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As- 3:

W ork E xperience of the j / f f
P opulation in 1981-82 industry and sconce
S p e c ia l L a b o r F o rc e R e p o rt

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
June 1984

%

Bulletin 2199




A

/.o.
O’

W mk ixpsridm©© © to©
if
Population in 1981-82
U.S. Department of Labor
Raymond J. Donovan, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
.June 1984
Bulletin 2199

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402




,

' //

■

■ ■- i;
';




.

Pir©fe©@

This bulletin on the work experience of the popula­
tion is part of the Special Labor Force Reports series.
It discusses the extent and duration of joblessness dur­
ing 1982, its effect on family income, and the incidence
of poverty. The article was initially published in the
Monthly Labor Review, February 1984, and is reprinted
with additional tabular material and an explanatory note.
The data were compiled from supplementary ques­
tions to the March 1982 and 1983 Current Population
Survey (CPS) conducted and tabulated by the Bureau




of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Date
on work experience of the population during a given
year are collected in March of the following year. The
information obtained refers to the civilian work ©aperience of all persons 16 years and over in the civilian
noninstitutional population as of the March date.
Material in this publication is in the public domain
and, with appropriate credit, may be reproduced without permission.




Contents

Page
Unemployment in 1982: the cost to workers and their fam ilies.......................................................................

1

Appendixes:
A. Explanatory n o t e ........................................................................................................................................

9

B.

Supplementary tables for 1982:

B- 1. Work experience o f the population in 1982 by extent o f employment, sex, and a g e .............
B- 2. Work experience o f the population in 1982 by race, Hispanic origin, age, and
extent o f em ploym ent.................................................................. ...................................................
B- 3. Work experience o f the population in 1982 by marital status, age, sex, and extent
o f em ploym ent..................................................................................................................................
B- 4. Persons with work experience in 1982 by industry and class o f worker o f the job
held the longest, sex, and extent o f em ploym ent.......................................................................
B- 5. Wage and salary workers with work experience in 1982 by industry of the job
held the longest, race, sex, and extent o f employment..............................................................
B- 6 . Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation o f the job held the longest,
sex, and extent o f em ploym ent......................................................................................................
B- 7. Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation o f the job held the longest,
race, sex, and extent o f em ploym ent............................................................................................
B- 8 . Part-year workers in 1982 by extent o f employment, sex, and reason for working
less than a full year............................................................................................................................
B- 9. Part-year workers in 1982 by race, age, sex, and reason for working less than a
full year...............................................................................................................................................
B-10. Extent o f unemployment in
1982 by sex, race,
Hispanic origin, and a g e .....
B-l 1. Extent o f unemployment in
1982 by sex, race,
and marital status..................
B-12. Extent o f unemployment o f wage and salary workers in 1982 by industry o f the
job held the lo n g e st...................................................................................
B -l3. Extent o f unemployment in 1982 by occupation o f the job held the longest
and sex .................................................................................................................................................
B-14. Extent o f unemployment in 1982 by occupation o f the job held the longest
and race...............................................................................................................................................
B -l5. Extent o f unemployment in 1982 for part-year workers by sex and spells o f
unem ploym ent.............................
B -l 6 . Persons with no work experience in 1982 by age, marital status, race, and s e x .....................
B -l7. Persons with no work experience in 1982 by sex, age, race, and reason
for not w o rk in g ................................................................................................................................
C.

Supplementary tables for 1981:
C- 1. Work experience of the population in 1981 by extent o f employment, sex,
and a g e ...............................................................................................................................................
C= 2. Work experience o f the population in 1981 by race, Hispanic origin, age, and
extent o f em ploym ent.......................................................
C- 3. Work experience of the population in 1981 by marital status, age, sex, and extent
o f em ploym ent..................................................................................................................................
C- 4. Persons with work experience in 1981 by industry and class o f worker o f the job
held the longest, sex, and extent o f em ploym ent.......................................................................




v

12
14
15
16
19

21
24
27
28
29
32

33
34
36

3g
39
40

41
43
44
45

C o n t e o t s — C o n tin u e d
Page
C 5. Wage and salary workers with work experience in 1981 by industry o f the job
held the longest, race, sex, and extent o f employment..............................................................
C- 6 . Persons with work experience in 1981 by occupation o f the job held the longest,
sex, and extent o f em ploym ent......................................................................................................
C- 7. Persons with work experience in 1981 by occupation o f the job held the longest,
race, sex, and extent o f em ploym ent............................................................................................
C- 8 . Part-year workers in 1981 by extent o f employment, sex, and reason for working
less than a full year...........................................................................................................................
C- 9. Part-year workers in 1981 by ra.ce, age, sex, and reason for working less than a

full year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _____ ____. . . . . . . . . . ________ ___. . . . . . ___ ________...

48
50
53

55

56

C-10. Extent o f unemployment in 1981 by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and a g e ................................ 57
C-l 1. Extent o f unemployment in 1981; by sex, race, and marital status.............. , ............ ..............
60
C-12. Extent o f unemployment o f wage and salary workers in 1981 by industry o f the
job held the lo n g e st....................................................... .................................................................
61
C -l3. Extent o f unemployment in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest
62
and sex............................................................................................................ ............ ..
C-14. Extent o f unemployment in 1981 by occupation o f the job held the longest
'■ V '
and race....................................................................
64
C -l5. Extent o f unemployment in 1981 for part-year workers by sex and spells of
unem ploym ent.........................................................
65

C-l6. Persons with no work experience in 1981 by age, marital status, race, and sex...................

66

C-17. Persons with no work experience in 1981 by sex, age, race, and reason for not
working...............................................................................................................................................

67




vi

Unemployment m 1982: the cost
to workers and their families
The March 1983 work experience survey
provides a close look at joblessness by
extent and duration and the effect on
family income and the incidence o f poverty
Paul O. Flaim
earnings of workers and the income of their families from
other sources. Because there are many persons who change
their labor force status during the course of a year, the
number with some employment or unemployment as esti
mated through the work experience survey is generally much
higher than the annual averages for employment and un­
employment based on data from the monthly surveys.
For 1982. the work experience survey shows that the
number of persons with a job for at least part of the year
was 116.3 million. This number was 17 percent higher than
the “ average” civilian employment level for the year. And
the number of persons with some unemployment, as mea
sured through the same retrospective survey, was 26.5 mi!
lion, about 2.5 times the “ average" number for the year.
Overall, 22.0 percent of all persons with any labor force
activity during 1982 (in terms of having either worked or
looked for work) were found to have experienced some
unemployment during the year. This percentage was more
than double the annual average employment rate for the
same year (9.7 percent).
In this article, we look at how the work experience num­
bers for 1982 changed vis-a-vis similar data for previous
years, particularly 1981. We then examine the earnings and
family income of the workers who encountered some job­
lessness. Finally, we look at workers who, because of un­
favorable economic conditions, had to work part time during
the year or who, because of their perception of the job
market, remained on the sidelines for at least part of the
year.

Joblessness reached a postwar high in 1982. On “ average.”
10.7 million persons were unemployed during the year. 9.7
percent of the labor force. By the end of the year, when the
economy finally ended its deep recessionary slide, unem­
ployment had risen even higher, with the number of jobless
persons (seasonally adjusted) reaching 11.9 million in De­
cember and with the rate of joblessness peaking at 10.7
percent.
What these numbers, based on data from the monthly
Current Population Survey (cps ) , 1 do not really tell us is
how many different persons among the entire population
encountered unemployment during the course of the year,
how long they were unemployed, how many weeks they
still managed to work, and how their earnings and family
income compared with those of workers who remained free
of unemployment. For this additional information on the
“ pervasiveness” of unemployment and for a glance at its
impact on the economic well-being of American workers,
we must turn to special data from the "work experience”
survey.
The work experience survey, conducted each March as
a special supplement to the cps , relates to the activities of
the entire civilian population over the previous calendar
year. It obtains a complete count of all the persons with
some employment or unemployment, as well as data on the

Paul O. Flaim is chief of the Division of Data Development- and Users'
Services, Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics. Bureau of
Labor Statistics.




1

82 period with the much larger average gains posted during
the 1970 decade when, except for the 1973-75 period, the
economy was on a more steady upward path:

The recessionary impact on jobs
For most of 1982, the American economy was in the
throes of a deep recession which had begun the previous
year and which had brought about a substantial decline in
the demand for goods and some services. For example, real
G N P (the gross national product measured in constant dol­
lars) declined by 3.0 percent from the third quarter of 1981
to the fourth quarter of 1982. Although the recession is
considered to have bottomed as of November 1982,2 it was
not until the following January that any significant improve­
ment was noticed in the monthly statistics on employment
and unemployment. All of 1982 was thus a poor year in
terms of the demand for workers, and the work experience
data for the year are a reflection of this situation.
Of course, even 1980 and 1981, affected by a previous
recession, were not banner years in terms of employment
growth. This is clearly shown in the following tabulation,
which contrasts the rather meager jobs gain over the 1979-

1969
Persons with some
employment dur­
ing the year
(millions) .............
Persons with yearround full-time
jobs (millions) ...

1979

1980

1981

1982

92.5

115.0

115.8

116.8

116.3

52.8

64.7

64.9

65.3

64.0

Over the 1969-79 period, the year-to-year gains in the
number of persons with some employment averaged 2.3
million. Of this average annual gain, a little more than half,
or 1.2 million, was in year-round full-time jobs. In sharp
contrast, over the 1979-82 period, which was plagued by
two back-to-back recessions, the number of persons with

Tab le 1. W ork experience of th e population during th e y ear by e xten t of em ploym ent, gender, race, and H ispanic origin, 1 @81-82
[Numbers in thousands]

Total

Extent of employment

1981

Men

Women

1982

1981

1982

1981

1982

173.656
120.235
69.2
116.277
67.0

81.231
65.950
81.2
64.769
79.7

82.260
66,160
80.4
64,365
78.2

90.436
53,708
59.4
52,025
57.5

91.395
54,074
59.2
51,912
56.8

TOTAL
Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................................................................
Total who worked or looked for work ....................................................................................
Percent of the population.....................................................................................................
Total who worked during the year ......................................................................................
Percent of the population............................

171.666
119.658
69.7
116.794
68.0 -

Full time1:
50 to 52 weeks ........................................................................................................
48 to 49 weeks ........................................................................................................
40 to 47 weeks ........................................................................................................
27 to 39 weeks ........................................................................................................
14 to 26 weeks ........................................................................................................
1 to 13 weeks ..........................................................................................................

65.292
2.446
5.888
6.102
6.138
4.804

63.973
2.317
5.772
6.017
6.263
5,233

41.806
1,567
3.436
3.335
3,286
2,379

40,129
1,381
3.377
3,575
3,654
2,800

23.486
880
2.452
2,767
2,852
2,425

23,844
936
2,395
2,441
2,609
2,433

Part time2:
50 to 52 weeks ........................................................................................................
48 to 49 weeks ........................................................................................................
40 to 47 weeks ........................................................................................................
27 to 39 weeks ........................................................................................................
14 to 26 weeks ........................................................................................................
1 to 13 weeks ..........................................................................................................

9.133
827
2,425
3.345
4.711
5.684

9,812
815
2,416
3.463
4,623
5,574

2,946
215
811
1,059
1,782
2,149

3,118
253
912
1,210
1,714
2,241

6,187
612
1.614
2,286
2,929
3,535

6,694
562
1,503
2,253
2,910
3,332
*

White
Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................................................................
Total who worked or looked for work ...................................................................................
Percent of the population.....................................................................................................
Total who worked during the year ......................................................................................
Percent of the population.....................................................................................................

149,136
104.668
70.2
102.825
68.9

150,427
104,942
69.8
102,192
67.9

71,018
58,378
82.2
57,615
81.1

71,808
58,560
81.6
57,273
79.8

78,118
46,290
59.3
45,210
57.9

78,618
46,381
59.0
44,918
57.1

18.480
12,153
65.8
11,211
60.7

18,823
12,276
65.2
11,168
59.3

8,236
6,030
73.2
5,653
68.6

8,398
5,994
71.4
5,521
65.7

10,244
6,123
59.8
5,558
54.3

10,425
6,282
60.3
5,647
54.2

9,227
6,293
68.2
6,125

9,384
6,331
67.5
6,078

4,393
3,678
83.7
3,605

4,406
3,646
82.7
3,544

4,834
2,615
54.1
2,520

4,978
2,685
53.9
2,534

Black
Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................................................................
Total who worked or looked for work ...................................................................................
Percent of the population.....................................................................................................
Total who worked during the year ......................................................................................
Percent of the population.....................................................................................................
Hispanic origin
Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................................................................
Total who worked or looked for work ...................................................................................
Percent of the population.....................................................................................................
Total who worked during the year .....................................................................................
'Usually worked 35 hours or more per week.
2Usualty worked 1 to 34 hours per week.

for the "other races" group are not presented and Hispanics are included in both the white
and black population groups.

Note: Detail for races and Hispanic-origin groups will not sum to totals because data




2

The number of blacks and Hispanics with jobs was not
significantly lower in 1982 than in 1981. However, the fact
that their employment level did not increase at all means
that there was a drop in their employment/population ratios
as their populations increased at a relatively rapid pace.

any type of job during the year posted an average annual
gain of only 0.4 million. And the proportion with yearround full-time jobs showed an actual decline for this period,
reflecting primarily the severity of the 1981-82 recession.
As indicated in greater detail in table 1, the number of
persons with some employment during the year was half a
million lower in 1982 than it had been in 1981. There was
an even bigger drop— of 1.3 million— in the number of
year-round full-time workers, that is, those working 35 or
more hours a week 50 to 52 weeks. The drop in their number
reflects the sharp cutbacks in the workweek as well as actual
layoffs of workers. The large increase— from 9.1 to 9.8
million— in the number of persons working mostly part time
the entire year was a further reflection of the cyclical cutback
in hours.
Table I also shows that it was men who accounted for
nearly all of the employment declines between 1981 and
1982, particularly among those with year-round, full-time
jobs. The number of women with some employment was
almost the same for 1982 as for 1981—about 52 million.
And there were actually more women with year-round full­
time employment in 1982 than a year earlier. The relative
stability in the employment of women reflects both their
growing attachment to the job market as well as the fact
that, in this as in other recessions, the sharpest rise in un­
employment occurred in goods-producing industries— such
as construction, autos, and steel— which are largely staffed
by men. Although women have been moving gradually even
into nontraditional fields, they are still concentrated in the
less cyclically sensitive service-producing industries. How­
ever, even these industries did not show much growth during
1982, and this caused at least a pause in the historical rise
in female employment.

TabS© 2.

The increase in joblessness
With employment showing a sizable decline for men and
a virtual stalemate for women, it is not surprising that there
was a sharp rise in 1982 in the number of persons with a
period of unemployment during the year. The total rose to
26.5 million from 23.4 million in 1981, with an increase
of 2.3 million among men and nearly 850,000 among women.
Taken as a proportion of the labor force, these numbers
represented 23.3 percent of all men and 20.4 percent of all
women with some job market activity in 1982. (See table
2.)
Not only were there more persons with some unemploy­
ment in 1982 than in 1981, they were also unemployed for
longer periods. As shown in table 2, of those with some
work during the year— and they were the great majority of
the unemployed— the proportion with relatively short un­
employment spells of 1 to 4 weeks shrank from 4.0 to 3.5
million. At the same time, the proportions unemployed 27
weeks or more (that is, in excess of 6 months) increased
from 3.6 to 5.0 million. Also of interest is the fact that the
number of persons with two or more spells of unemployment
during the year increased from 7.0 million to 7.6 million
during 1982. Taking into account all spells, the average
(median) duration of unemployment was 15.4 weeks in 1982
versus 13.3 weeks in 1981.
As a further reflection of the cyclical drop in the demand
for labor, there were nearly 4.0 million persons in 1982,

Extent of unem ploym ent during the year by gender, 1 0 8 1 -8 2

[Numbers in thousands]
Total

Extent si unemployment

Ellen

Kfoman

1981

1982

1981

1182

1981

1982

Total who worked or looked for work .........................................................................................
Percent with unemployment......................................................................................................

119,658
19.5

120,235
22.0

65,950
20.0

66,160
23.3

53,708
19.0

54,074
20.4

Total with unemployment ........................................................................................................
Did not work but looked for work ......................................................................................
1 to 14 weeks ..................................................................................................................
15 weeks or m o re .............................................................................................................
Worked during the y e a r........................................................................................................

23,382
2.863
1,499
1,364
20,518

26,493
3,958
1,730
2,228
22,535

13,175
1.181
430
751
11,994

15.441
1,795
508
1,286
13,646

10,207
1,682
1.069
613
8,525

11,052
2,163
1,221
942
8.889

Year-round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of unemployment...........................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment..........................................................................
1 to 4 weeks ................................................................................................................
5 to 10 w eeks................................................................................................................
11 to 14 w e e ks.............................................................................................................
15 to 26 w e e ks.............................................................................................................
27 weeks or more ......................................................................................................

1,170
19,348
3,991
4,040
2,815
4.940
3,562

1,155
21,380
3,483
4,184
2,808
5,863
5,041

733
11,260
1.985
2,296
1,667
3,057
2,256

747
12,900
1,736
2,372
1,721
3,911
3,159

437
8.088
2,006
1,744
1.148
1,884
1.308

408
8,481
1,747
1,813
1.087
1,952
1,882

With 2 or more spells of unemployment .......................................................................
2 s p e lls .....................................................................................................................
3 or more spells ......................................................................................................

6,986
3,750
3,237

7,573
3,854
3,719

4,478
2,329
2,149

4,913
2,421
2,492

2,508
1,421
1,087

2,660
1,433
1,227

13.3

15.4

14,2

16,9

12.0

13,5

Median weeks of unemployment .............................................................
'Worked 50 weeks or more.




2Worked less than 50 weeks

3

compared with about 2.9 million in 1981, who looked for
work but found none during the year. While many may have
been sporadic jobseekers, more than half reported that they
had looked for work for 15 or more weeks.
The already high incidence of unemployment among blacks
and Hispanics rose even higher in 1982. Among blacks,
33.4 percent of all those with some labor force activity
reported some unemployment, up from 30.5 percent in 1981.
Among Hispanics, the proportion with some unemployment
was 27.1 percent, up from 23.7 percent in 1981. (See table
3.)
An even greater difference between unemployed blacks
and other jobless workers was the proportion who, although

T a b le 3.

seeking work, failed to obtain any employment during the
year. For white and Hispanic jobseekers, the proportions
who never held a job in 1982 were very close, 13 and 15
percent. Among blacks, the proportion of jobseekers who
apparently never found any work was much higher— 27
percent.

H einnipD einjtt amid family mcome
Jim
oyinm
With unemployment generally longer in 1982 than in
1981, its effect on earnings and on family income became
obviously more burdensome. However, even in the unfa­
vorable labor market climate of 1982 there were many work­
ers for whom unemployment was a rather fleeting problem.

Entsmt of unem ploym ent during the year by race, H ispanic origin, and gender, 1 9 8 1 -8 2

[Numbers in thousands]
Men

Total

Women

1981

1982

1981

1982

1981

1982

Total who worked or looked for work .........................................................................................
Percent with unemployment......................................................................................................

104.668
18.3

104.942
20.7

58.378
18.8

58.560
22.0

46.290
.17.7

46,381
19.1

Total with unemployment .......................................................................... .........................
Did not work but looked for work ......................................................................................

19.140
1.843

21.730
2.750

10,963
763

12.883
1,287

8.177
1,080

8.847
1.463

Worked during the y e a r.......................................................................... .........................
Percent distribution ...................................................................................................................
Year-round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of unemployment...........................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment..........................................................................
1 to 4 weeks ................................................................................................................
5 to 14 w eeks......................................................................................................
15 weeks or more ...................................... ..................................................................

17,297
100.0
6.0
94.0
20.2
33.6
40.2

18,981
100.0
5.3
94.7
16.2
31.6
46.9

10,200
100.0
6.5
93.5
17.0
33:2
43.3

11,596
100.0
5.6
94.4
13.3
30.5
50.6

7,097
100.0
54
94.6
24.6
34.2
35.8

With 2 or more spells of unemployment............... ...................................
..........
Median weeks of unemployment ................................. ................. ......................................

33.8
13.0

33.3
14.9

37 2
14.0

35.7
16.4

Total who worked or looked for work .........................................................................................
Percent with unemployment......................................................................................................

12,153
30.5

12,276:
33.4

Total with unemployment ........................................................................................................
Did not work but looked for work ....................... ..........................................................

3,703
942-

4.096
1.108

Worked during the y e a r.........................................................................................................
Percent distribution ................................................................................................... ...............
Year-round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of unemployment...........................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment .............................. ......................................
1 to 4 weeks ................................................................................................................
5 to 14 w eeks................................................................................................................
..........
15 weeks or more . .
. . . . . . . . . , . , ; j. \

2,761
100.0
4.1
95.9
15.4
31.8
48.7

With 2 or more spells of unemployment ........................................
.......................
Median weeks of unemployment .............
............................

34.7
15.3.

WHITE

BUCK

J

HISPANIC ORIGIN

■
t

29.0
11.7

' ; ■

.

7.384
100.0
4.8
95.2
20.7
33.4
41.1
29.5
13.0

, h ;U r;:;

6.030
31.2
.

2.988
100.0
4.0
96.0
10.8
27.5 '
, ; 57.6

5,994
36.5

6.123
29.7

6,282
30.4

1,884
377

. 2,186
473

1,819
565

1,910
635

1,713
100.0
4.6
95.4
8.7
26.7
60.0

1,254
100.0
4.0
96.0
17.7
32.1
46.2

1,275
100.0
3.3
96.7
13.5
28.7
58.5

1.507
100.0
4.1
95.9
13.5 .
31.5
50.8

36.2
18.9

37.1
.17.3

38.3
19.8

31.9
14.4 ;

33.4
17,5

V'-iJ

Total who worked or looked for work ...................................... ................................ .................
Percent with unemployment . . ................................................................

6,293
23.7

6.331
27.1

3.678
24.2

3.646
28.5

2.615
22.9

2,685
25.3

Total with unemployment .................................................................................. .....................
Did not work but looked for work ......................................................................................

1,491
167

1,717
253

891
72

1,038
101

600
95

679
152

Worked during the y e a r........................................................................................................
Percent distribution ...........................................................................................
Year-round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of unemployment...........................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment .........................................................................
1 to 4 weeks ................................................................................................................
5 to 14 w eeks................................................................................................................
15 weeks or more ......................................................................................................

1,324
100.0
4.4
95.6
17.2
32.2
46.2

1,464
100.0
2.9
97.1
13.0
31.2
■ 53.0 ;

819
100.0
4.8
95.2
13.8
31.8
49.6

937
100.0
3.4
96.6
10.6
30.1
55.9

505
100.0
3.7
96.3
22.9
32.9
40.6

527
100.0
2.0
98.0
17.1
33.0
47.9

With 2 or more spells of unemployment .......................................................................
Median weeks of unemployment ....................................................................................

37.6
14.5

40.4
15.9

36.6
17.7

33.0
12.8

29.2
14.7

N
:
Detail for racial and Hispamc-origin groups will not sum to totals because data
for the "other races ] group are not presented and Hispanics are included in both the white
and black population groups.

’ Worked 50 weeks or more.

o te

2Worked less than 50 weeks.




33.9
16.8

4

Tabs© 4.

Earnings and fam ily incom e of w orkers by industry, unem ploym ent status, and incidence of poverty, 1982

[Numbers in thousands]
Workers with no
Median
Number annual
earnings

unemployment
Median Percent
family
in
income
poverty

Workers with some unemployment
Percent
Median
Median
Percent
Number
in
of all
annual
family
workers earnings income
poverty

Total ...............................................................................................................

93.742

$12,328

$27,930

56

22.535

19 4

$ 5.358

$19,503

16 6

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries ............................................................................
Mining ................................................................................................................
Construction .............................................................................................................

3.451
924
4.460

4.031
24.897
14.678

17.175
33.149
25.701

22.7
3.0
5.9

797
346
2.816

18 8
27.2
38.7

2.917
15.104
7.978

13.226
23.083
18.645

33 8
92
17 5

Manufacturing .............................................................................................................
Durable goods ...................................................................................................
Lumber, wood products, and furniture ........................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .......................................................................
Primary metal industries ...................................................................................
Fabricated metal products .................................................................................
Machinery, except electrical ..............................................................................
Electric machinery, eguipment, and supplies ..................................................
Automobiles ........................................................................................................
Aircraft and other transportation equipm ent...........................................
Professional and photographic equipment, and watches.................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries ..........................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ..................................................................................................

17.248
9.932
821
429
645
1.216
2.I69
1,753
704
1.143
600
452
7.316

17.243
18.658
12.004
17.739
22.999
16.776
20.485
17.174
23.177
23.149
17.934
12.183
14.915

29.010
30.156
22.568
29 534
30.467
28.784
31.343
30.202
33.299
34.645
33.446
26.313
27.368

28
2.1
6.5
23
1.6
24
1.0
2.5
2.0
9
4
2.9
3.7

5.914
3.718
475
203
404
409
771
565
411
221
104
156
2.196

25 5
27 2
36 7
32.1
38 5
25 2
26 2
24 4
36.8
16 2
14 7
25 6
23.1

8.563
10.184
6.841
12.469
13.064
9.659
11.210
9.039
16.672
10.204
8.094
5.812
6,528

21.210
22.369
18.671
20.863
24.644
21.986
23.657
22.175
27.560
23.090
22.722
16.219
18.539

10 5
77
18 3
6.0
45
92
39
73
3.5
48
10 5
16.5
15.1

Transportation, communications, and other public utilities ...................................
Wholesale trade ..........................................................................................................
Retail trade .................................................................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate.......................................................................
Business and repair services......................................................................................
Private households .....................................................................................................
Personal services, except private households ..........................................................
Entertainment and recreational services....................................................................
Professional and related services..............................................................................
Public administration . . . . : ......................................................................................

6.465
4.122
15.859
5.994
4.378
1.340
2.689
1.177
20.890
4.746

20.245
16.426
6.515
13.392
11.367
920
5.685
4.528
11.903
17.295

30.838
30.088
25.700
31.552
26.520
17.080
20,630
27.333
29.425
30.748

2.6
3.4
7.9
23
70
20 6
12 0
75
43
2.6

1.103
715
4.322
708
1,250
332
647
423
2.670
492

14.6
14 8
21.4
10 6
22 2
19.9
19.4
26 4
11.3
9.4

8.133
6.722
2.833
5.353
4.458
551
2.996
2.898
4.090
5.015

21.831
21.033
19.038
18.118
19.088
11.671
15.307
17.514
19.677
18.645

12.2
12.3
19.3
11.4
19.6
37 5
23 2
21.4
18.2
18.5

Industry

poverty thresholds. ' What is also interesting is the associ­
ation of the type of industry in which these jobless persons
had worked with their annual earnings, family income, and
the probability of falling into poverty. In general, the per­
sons whose principal jobs were in the various durable goods
manufacturing industries, in which average wages tend to
be much higher than in most other industries,4 had the lowest
probability of poverty. For example, of the workers who
lost jobs in the auto industry, only 3.5 percent wound up
with family income below the poverty line. In contrast,
about one-third of the jobless agricultural workers and onefifth of those who had been in the various service industries
had family income below the poverty line. Indeed, there
were some industries, notably agriculture, household ser­
vices, and personal services, in which the probability of
impoverishment was relatively high even for workers with
no unemployment whatsoever during the year. This is pri­
marily a reflection of the wide disparity in wages among
the various industries.
The number of wage earners in a family also affects the
likelihood of poverty among the unemployed. Altogether,
17.5 million families had one or more members out of work
in 1982. About 18 percent of such families reported total
income below the poverty line. (See table 5.) However, if
the family was headed by a married couple and had two
jobholders or more, the probability of poverty was only 6
percent. And about 10.5 million families, or well over half
of these with some unemployment, were working couples,

although of some economic consequence. For example, 1.2
million were year-round workers, meaning they were em­
ployed for at least 50 weeks and were without work no more
than a week or two. (See table 2.) An additional 3.5 million,
classified as part-year workers, were unemployed up to 4
weeks. Altogether, nearly 5 million persons, or almost onefifth of the unemployed in 1982, experienced relatively short
spells of joblessness. The effect of such spells on earnings
and total family income could not have been very large.
When spells of unemployment were much longer— and
it should be reemphasized that the overall median exceeded
15 weeks— the losses in earnings and family income were
obviously much larger. In such cases, the total income avail­
able for the year to the family of the affected worker de­
pended on three factors: (1) the type of job lost and its wage
level; (2) the amount of earnings that might accrue to the
family from the jobs of other members; and (3) the income
obtained from other sources, including unemployment in­
surance benefits and other transfer payments.
For workers with some unemployment in 1982, median
annual pay was not much over $5,000. Nevertheless, their
family income averaged nearly $20,000, reflecting the im­
portance of having more than one jobholder in the family—
which has become the rule rather than the exception— as
well as possible transfer payments.
Table 4 also shows that only 17 percent of the workers
with some unemployment in 1982 were in families whose
income for the year fell below the Federally designated




5

Percent with income below poverty

or if one spouse did not work, had a second earner in the
family, cushioning the effects of unemployment.
However, among the households maintained solely by a
woman, the incidence of poverty was very high when un­
employment struck. About 3.1 million such households ex­
perienced some unemployment, and 44 percent were in
poverty, largely because they seldom had more than one
earner. This highlights the financial vulnerability of families
with only one working member, particularly a woman. Be­
cause women who head their own families are even more
likely than women in general to be concentrated in relatively
low paying jobs,5 the incidence of poverty among the fam­
ilies which they head was comparatively high (17 percent)
even when these families escaped unemployment.
Workers living alone or with unrelated individuals also
faced a relatively high incidence of poverty when they be­
came unemployed. More than one-third reported annual in­
come for 1982 below the poverty line. Obviously, such
persons are also not likely to benefit from someone else's
earnings during periods of joblessness.
Race and ethnic origin makes a considerable difference
in terms of the incidence of unemployment-related poverty.
As indicated below, black and Hispanic families with un­
employment in 1982 were much more likely to be poor than
were comparable white families:

Table 5.

Type o f family

White

Black

Hispanic

All families .....................
Married-couple
families ...................
One earner .............
Two or more
earners ....................
Families maintained by
women .....................
Families maintained by
m e n ..........................
Persons not in families ..

14.0

3 8 .1

30.0

10.6
23.2

17.6
38: I

25.8
44.3

5.9

lO.l

16.7

33:4

64.6

50:8

18.6
32.7

33.9
49.9

21: i;
52.5

Not all of the differences in the rates of poverty among
these racial-ethnic groups can be ascribed to the degree of
severity of unemployment. The differences are also related
to wage levels, size of the family, and other factors, such
as the amount of transfer payments the families may have
drawn upon. It is important to note that, even when free of
unemployment, black and Hispanic families had much higher
rates of poverty than white families— 15 percent versus 5
percent.

lovoluntary part-time work
A total of 16.1 million workers reported that they had
been limited involuntarily to part-time work for varying

Incom e by family type, number of earners, unem ploym ent status, and incidence of poverty, 1982

[Numbers in thousands]

With a member in
the labor force
Family type and number ot earners

With no member
unemployed

Number

iVtcdian
family
income

All families ...........................................................................................

53.334

25.519

9.9

Married-couple families
..........................................................
No earners ...................................................................................
One earner ...................................................................................
Husband ...................................................................................
W ife ..........................................................................................
Other family m em ber............................................. .............
Two or more earners .................................................................
Husband and w ife ....................................................................
Husband and other family m em ber........................................
Husband is not an e a rn e r....................................................

43,732
262
13,636
11,236
1,832
568
29,834
25.922
3,241
672

27,917
7,160
21,411
22.435
16,191
21,518
31,209
31,031
34,144
25,449

6.6
61.4
11.2
10.8
12.9
13.0
4.0
3.5
6.8
8.9

Families maintained by wom en.......................................................
No earners ................................................................................
One earner ...................................................................................
Two or more earners .................................................................

7,772
558
4,488
2,725

13.618
3,755
11,514
20,974

27.9
92.0
30.3
10.9

4,635
2
3,197
1,436

Families maintained by m en ............................................................
No earners ...................................................................................
One earner ........................................ * .......................................
Two or more earners .................................................................

1,830
44
893
893

21,312
T)
17,414
26.705

11.8
(1)
16.7
3.9

1,138

Persons not living in families ............................................................
With earnings...................................................................................
Living alone ................................................................................
M e n ...................................................................................
Women .....................................................................................
Others with earnings ......................................................................
M e n ...........................................................................................
W om en.....................................................................................
Without earnings..............................................................................

18,019
17,617
10,668
5.468
5,199
6,949
4,209
2,740
402

13,162
13,436
14,941
17,160
13,340
11,285
12,585
9,583
1,502

15.1
13.6
9.9
9.9
10.0
19.3
16.7
23.4
80.4

Percent
in
poverty

'Data not shown where base is less than 75,000.




6

With at least one member
unemployed

Number

Median
family:
income

35,812

27,774

6.1

17,521

20,887

30,039
29,902
4
(1)
10,702 ■ 23.636
8,937 , 24.720
1.393
17,650
372
24,067
19,334
33,693
17,150
33,432.
1.852
37.639
; 333
29,614

4!4
C)
7.5
7:4
8.2
5.3
2.7
2.4
5.1
3-7

13,693
258
2,934
2.299
439
197
10,500
8,772
1,389
339

23,485
' 11 4
61.7
7,153
14.562
24.9
15,022
24.1
12,496
28.0
15,123
27.5
26,714
6.3
55
26.384
30,576
9.0
21.844 •
14,0

15,672 1
(1)
13,143
22,943

17 0
(1)
21.7
6.6

3 137
556
1,291
1,289

9 900
3 746
7.786
' 18.380

44 1
92.3
51.6
15.7

620
518

25,177
—
20,254
30,999

5.8
•--8.4
2.7

692
44
273
375

16,678
(’ )
10,151
? 21,395

21:7
(V
' 35.5
5.6

13,987
13,979
8,848
4,335
4,512
5,131
3,054
2,077
8

14,989
14,995
16,259
19,073
14,286
13,096
14,873
10,730
(1)

9.3
9.3
6.8
6.1
7.5
13.7
11.6
16.7
(1)

4,032 ’
7.190
8,039
3,638
1.820
> 9,135
■
1,133
10,503
687
7,848
1,818
7,074
1,155
8,007
662 •
5,850
394
1,459

35.3
30.3
• 25.2
24.7
26.1
35.3
-1 30.1
44.3
81.4

—

Percent
in
poverty

Number

Median ■
family
income

Percent
in
poverty
17,6

Part-year workers

periods during 1982. (See table 6.) About iwo-thirds cited
a reduction in their workweek due to "slack work or material
shortages” as the main cause. The other third attributed
their involuntary part-time work to the fact that they had
simply been unable to secure a full-time job in their initial
search and had reluctantly settled for part-time work. The
great majority of the workers who had suffered cutbacks in
their workweeks had been working either in construction or
durable goods manufacturing, and their problems were an
obvious consequence of the weak demand for housing and
other goods associated with the recession. Those who took
a part-time job involuntarily because they could not find
full-time work were employed for the most part in the var­
ious service-producing industries that were not hit so hard
by the recession.
About 7.4 million or nearly one-half of the persons with
involuntary part-time work had also suffered some unem­
ployment in 1982. Being beset with both of these labor
market problems, their earnings and family income were
obviously much lower than those of fully employed workers.
Almost one-fourth of them wound up with family income
below the poverty line.

Tabs©

As already noted, of the 116.3 million persons with some
employment in 1982, about 64 million worked all year in
full-time jobs. An additional 9.8 million also worked the
entire year but in jobs that were essentially of part-time
nature. Thus, the total employed the entire year was 73.8
million. This means that there were 42.5 million persons
with jobs for less than a full year or, more precisely, less
than 50 weeks. About three-fifths of these part-year workers
(25.6 million) had been in primarily full-time jobs, while
two-fifths (16.9 million) had been in jobs that were both of
a part-year or part-time nature.
Of the 42.5 million part-year workers, about two-fifths
had been constrained by unemployment from working all
year. The remainder cited a variety of reasons:

Reason fo r part-year work

Incem® and incidence of poverty of involuntary
w orkers fey industry, gender, rac®, and H ispanic
origin, 1912

Characteristic

Total

Percent
in
poverty

18.0
22.8

Total with involuntary parttime w o rk ............................
With unemployment also . . . .
With no unemployment..........

16,064
7,392
8,672

10,400
4,427
5,973

5,664
2,964
2,700

$18,400
16.456

Wien .........................................
Women ...................................

9,043
7,022

6,651
3,749

2,391
3,273

18,938
17,679

17.1
19.2

White ......................................
Black........................................
Hispanic origin .......................

13,555
2,180
1,060

8,927
1,253
724

4,628
927
336

19.299
12,997
14,389

15.8
31.9
30.1

784
181
2,057
3,528
1,787
1,741

549
169
1.762
3,143
1.588
1,555

235
12
294
385
199
186

13.225
24,256
17,621
19,984
21,524
18,173

34.4
8.2
18.5
10.2
7.9
12.7

826
436
3,512

607
332
1,498

219
105
2,014

21,109
21,672
18,369

14.8
14.0
20.2

403
930
358

241
623
75

163
307
283

22,485
16,507
10,166

8.7
21.4
38.0

683

418

265

14,690

25.9

291

139

152

16,380

22.5

1,789
287

717
129

1,072
158

20,010
17,294

17.1
21.5

Agriculture, forestry, and
fisheries ..............................
Mining......................................
Construction............................
Manufacturing.........................
Durable goods....................
Nondurable goods...............
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities . ..
Wholesale trade.......................
Retail trade..............................
Finance, insurance, and real
estate ....................................
Business and repair services .
Private households..................
Personal services, except
private household...............
Entertainment and recreational
services ..............................
Professional and related
services ..............................
Public administration .............

()

0

100.0
41.5
6.3
15.9
20.3
.3
4.1
11.6

Discouraged part-year workers.

An important subgroup
of part-year workers was identified for the first time in the
March 1983 survey. They are those who reported that their
main reason for working only part of 1982 was that there
was “ no work available.” Of the nearly 5 million part-year
workers in the catchall “ other reasons” category, about 2.2
million, or almost half, were found to have worded their
answers in such a way as to indicate that the unavailability
of jobs was their main reason for working only part of the
year. While these persons were not actually reported as
having "looked for work” during the year— and thus were
not classified as unemployed— it would appear from their
answers that they would have preferred to work all year and

'Not available.
Note: Detail tor racial and Hispanic-origin groups will not sum to totals because data
tor the "other races" group are not presented and Hispanics are included in both the
white and black population groups.




42.493
17.633
2.690
6.741
8.621
107
1.749
4.950

It should be noted that the number of persons citing unemployment as the main reason for working less than the
full year— 17.6 million-- i s considerably lower than the
number with both employment and unemployment— 22.5
million. There are two reasons for this. First, 1.2 million
of these persons managed to work at least 50 weeks and
were thus classified as employed the full year. Second, for
many of the part-year workers with some unemployment,
the principal reason for working less than the full year was
not necessarily the period of joblessness but the fact that
they left the labor force to go to school, to take care of their
families, or for other personal reasons. As shown, "school
attendance” and “ home responsibilities” figure very prom­
inently among the reasons for part-year work.

(Numbers in thousands)
Slack
Could Median
work or not find family
material full-time income
shortage
job

Percent
distribution

Total ....................................
Unemployment .............
illness or disability.......
Home responsibilities ..
School attendance.........
Military service .............
Retirement .....................
Other reasons .................

g.

Part-xear workers
(in thousands)

7

t a t they would have looked had it not been for their “ dis­
couragement” over job prospects.
Of course, discouragement has long been measured on a
current basis through a special set o f questions in the Current
Population Survey, with the data being published quarterly
and annually. During 1982, the numbes of “ discouraged
workers,” as measured monthly, averaged 1.6 million. The

March 1983 work experience survey was the first in which
an attempt was made to measure “ discouragement” ret­
roactively, at least for the part-year workers. These statis­
tics, although based on a different concept than those gathered
during the course of the year, add a new perspective to our
knowledge of the conditions of the labor market— and of
the perception of these conditions on the part of American
workers.
Hj

FOOTNOTES
'The Current Population Survey is a monthly household survey con­
ducted by the Bureau o f the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics for
the primary purpose o f determining the extent of employment and un­
employment among the American population. The sample of households
has been 60,000 in recent years.
2The National Bureau o f Economic Research designated the 1981-82
recession as starting in July 1981 and ending in November 1982.
’ The poverty thresholds, based primarily on a U.S. Department of Ag­
riculture study o f the consumption requirements of families by size, arc
updated each year to reflect changes in the Consumer Price Index. For
1982, the poverty threshold for a family of four was $9,862. It should be




noted, however, that in determining whether or not a family falls below
the poverty line, only cash income is taken into account. In-kind income,
while important to many families, is very difficult to measure and is not
yet included in the official measurements.
4The average (mean) weekly earnings for all production and nonsupervisory jobs in durable goods manufacturing was $356 in 1982. while the
mean for all private nonfarm production and nonsupervisory jobs was only
$267.
5 For 1982, the median usual weekly earnings for all women working
in full-time wage and salary jobs was $241: for men. the median was
$371. :
-

ru

v.i:

■ '■> T V -V ‘ V
J ■

T -T T V

ST

§

•'<. V .4 J

Appendix A. Explanatory Noli©

Extent o f employment represents the proportion o f the
population who worked and the total number o f weeks
worked during the preceding calendar year.
Full-time workers are those who worked 35 hours or
more per week in the majority o f the weeks worked
during the preceding calendar year. Part-time workers
are those who worked 1 to 34 hours per week in the
majority o f the weeks worked during the preceding
calendar year.
Year-roundfull-time workers are civilians who worked
primarily at full-time jobs for 50 or more weeks during
the preceding calendar year. Part-time workers are ci­
vilians who worked either full or part time for 1 to 49
weeks. These workers are further classified on the basis
o f their major activity during most o f the weeks in
which they did not work. These activities include un­
employment or layoff, illness or disability (excluding
paid sick leave), taking care o f home, going to school,
retirement, military service, etc.
Occupation, industry, and class o f worker apply to the
job held during the calendar year. Persons with two or
more jobs are classified in the job at which they worked
the greatest number o f weeks. The classifications o f oc­
cupations and industries used in work experience data
through 1981 are defined as in the 1970 census. Begin­
ning with 1982 data, they are defined as in the 1980
census. Information on the detailed categories included
in these groups is available upon request.
Longest job refers to the one held for the greatest
number o f weeks during the year. For most wage and
salary workers, a job is defined as all the time worked
for the same employer. The only exception is work for
private families (domestic service, child care, odd jobs,
etc.) which is counted as a single job regardless o f the
number of employers. Self-employment and unpaid
family work are also designated as jobs for purposes of
this survey.
Non workers are persons who did not work during the
year. These persons are also classified according to their
primary reason for not working such as illness or dis­
ability, home responsibilities, school attendance, inabil­
ity to find work, retirement, serving in the Armed
Forces, and other reasons. They are also classified as
to whether or not they looked for work.
Extent o f unemployment represents the number and
proportion o f the labor force that was unemployed at

Statistics on the labor force, employment, unemploy­
ment, and persons not in the labor force, classified by
a variety o f demographic, social, and economic char­
acteristics, are derived from the Current Population
Survey (cps), which is conducted by the Bureau of
the Census for the Bureau o f Labor Statistics. The in­
formation is collected by trained interviewers from a
sample o f about 60,O K households, representing 629
C)
areas in 1,148 counties and independent cities, with co v ­
erage in 50 States and the District o f Columbia.
The estimates in this bulletin are based on responses
to questions on work experience included in the March
1982 and 1983 CPS. These questions refer, retroactively,
to the work experience o f persons 16 years and over in
the civilian noninstitutional population during the pre­
ceding calendar year. Because many persons enter and
leave the labor force during the course of the year, the
number o f persons with employment and with un­
employment as determined through the work experi­
ence questions is much greater than the annual average
for the same year based on data from the monthly
surveys.
Persons who reached age 16 during January, Febru­
ary, or March o f 1982 or 1983 are included. However,
the work experience o f persons who were in the labor
force during 1981 or 1982 but not in the labor force as
o f the March survey dates is not included; similarly,
data on persons who died in 1982 or 1983, before the
March survey dates, are not reflected.
The concepts, definitions, and estimating methods
used in the survey, as well as indicators of the reliabil­
ity o f the data are briefly described below. A more de­
tailed description o f the survey appears in Concepts and
Methods Used in Labor Force Statistics Derived From the
Current Population Survey, bls Report 463, and in the
Explanatory Notes o f the bls monthly publication,
Employment and Earnings.

C®n©(tp£s and D e fin itio n s
Persons with work experience are all civilians who
worked at any time during the preceding calendar year
at full- or part-time jobs for pay or profit (including
paid vacation and sick leave) or worked without pay
on a farm or in a business that was family operated.




9

some time during the year. The number of weeks un­
employed is the total number of weeks accumulated
during the entire year.
A spell o f unemployment represents a continuous
period of unemployment of at least 1 week’s duration.
A spell is terminated by employment or withdrawal
from the labor force.
A ge is based on the age o f the respondent at his or her
last birthday.
White, black, and other are terms used to describe the
race o f workers. Included in the “other” group are
American Indians, Alaskan Natives, Asians, and Pa­
cific Islanders, and any other race except white and
black. All tables in this bulletin which contain racial
data present data for the black population group. Be­
cause o f their relatively small sample size, data for
“other” races are not published. In the enumeration
process, race is determined by the household
respondent.
Hispanic origin refers to persons who identified them­
selves in the enumeration process as Mexican, Puerto
Rican living on the mainland, Cuban, Central or South
American, or of other Hispanic origin or descent. Per­
sons o f Hispanic origin may be o f any race; thus, they
are included in both the white and black population
groups.
Single, never married; married, spouse present-, and other
marital status are terms used to define the marital status
o f individuals at the time of interview. Married, spouse
present, applies to husband and wife if both were re­
ported as members of the same household even though
one may be temporarily absent on business, vacation,
on a visit, in a hospital, etc. Other marital status applies
to persons who are married, spouse absent; widowed;
or divorced. Married, spouse absent, includes persons
who are separated because of marital discord, as well
as persons who are living apart because either the hus­
band or the wife was employed and living away from
home, serving in the Armed Forces, or had a different
place of residence for any reason.

E stim ating ile th o d s
The estimating procedure used in this survey inflates
weighted sample results to independent estimates of the
civilian noninstitutional population by age, sex, race,
and residence. These independent estimates are based
on data from the 1980 census and other statistics on
births, deaths, immigration, emigration, and the Armed
Forces.

Reliability off the estimates
Since the estimates are based on a sample, they may
differ somewhat from the figures that would have been
obtained if a complete census had been taken using the
same schedules and procedures. As in any survey, the
results are also subject to errors of response and report­
ing. These may be relatively large in the case o f per­
sons with irregular attachment to the labor force. Par­
ticular care should be exercised in the interpretation of
figures based on relatively small estimates as well as
small differences between estimates.
The standard error is primarily a measure o f sampling
variability, that is, o f the variations that might occur
by chance because a sample rather than the entire popu­
lation is surveyed. The standard error also partially
measures the effect o f response and enumeration errors
but does not measure any systematic biases in the data.
The chances are about 68 out o f 100 that an estimate
differs from a complete census by less than the stand­
ard error. The chances are about 95 out of 100 that the
difference would be less than twice the standard error.
Tables A -l and A-2 show approximations o f the stand­
ard errors o f estimated numbers and percentages at the
68-percent confidence level, and should be interpreted
as providing an indication of the order o f magnitude of
the standard error rather than a precise standard error
for any specific item. Standard errors for intermediate
values may be obtained by interpolation. The follow ­
ing examples illustrate the use of these tables.
Table B-10 o f the supplementary tables shows that
15.441.000 men 16 years and over were unemployed at
some time in 1982. Table A -l shows the standard error
on this estimate to be approximately 163,000. Thus, the
chances are about 68 out o f 100 that the difference be­
tween the sample estimate and a complete census count
would be less than 163,000. The chances are 95 out of
100 that the difference would be less than 326,000.
The 15,441,000 men represented 23.3 percent o f the
66.160.000 men 16 years and over in the labor force
(those who worked or looked for work at some time
in 1982). Table A-2 shows the standard error o f 23.3
T a b le A-1. S ta n d a rd errors fo r e s tim a te d levels
(In thousands)
S iz e o f e s tim a te
5 0 .................................................
1 0 0 ............................................
2 5 0 ....................................................
5 0 0 .......................................
1 ,0 0 0 ......................................................

R@ynding @ the estimates
ff
The sums of individual items may not always equal
the totals shown in the same tables because of inde­
pendent rounding of the totals and components to the
nearest thousand. Similarly, sums of percent distribu­



tions may not always equal 100 percent because of
rounding. Differences, however, are insignificant.

10

2 ,5 0 0 ......................................................................
5 ,0 0 0 .................................................................
1 0 ,0 0 0
.........................................
2 5 ,0 0 0 ............................................
5 0 ,0 0 0
.......................

S ta n d a rd e r r o r
10
15
23
33
46
73
104
139
205
246

A -2. S tan d ard errors fo r e s tim a te d p e rc e n ta g e s
E stim ated p e rc e n ta g e
(In thousands)
5 0 ........................................................................
1 0 0 ......................................................................
2 5 0 .....................................................................
5 0 0 .....................................................................
1 ,0 0 0 ...................................................................
2 ,5 0 0 ...................................................................
5 ,0 0 0 ...................................................................
2 5 ,0 0 0 ................................................................
5 0 ,0 0 0 ................................................................
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................................

1 o r 99
2.3
1.6
1.0
.7
.5
.3
.2
.1
.7
.5

2 o r 98
3.2
2.3
1.4
1.0
.7
.5
.3
.1
.1
.7

5 o r 95
5.0
3.5
2.2
1.6
1.1
.7
.5
.2
.2
.1

10 o r 90

'

6.9
4.9
3.1
2.2
1.5
1.0
.7
.3
.2
.2

percent with a base o f 66,160,000 to be about 0.5 per­
centage point. Consequently, the chances are 68 out of
100 that a complete census count would have disclosed
the figure to be between 23.0 and 23.6 percent, and 95
out o f 100 that the figure would have been between
22.7 and 23.9 percent.
The reliability of an estimated percentage, computed
using sample data for both numerator and denomina­
tor, depends upon both the size of the percentage and
the total upon which the percentage is based. Estimated
percentages are relatively more reliable than the corre­
sponding estimates o f the numerator o f the percentages;




11

15 o r 85
8.1
5.8
3.7
2.6
1.8
1.2
.8
.4
.3
.2

2 0 o r 80
9.1
6.5
4.1
2.9
2.0
1.3
.9
.4
.3
.2

25 o r 75
9.9
7.0
4.4
3.1
2.2
1.4
1.0
.4
.3
.2

35 o r 65
10.9
7.8
4.7
3.4
2.5
1.5
1.1
.5
.3
.2

50
11.4
8.1
5.1
3.6
2.6
1.6
1.2
.5
.4
.3

this is particularly true for percentages of 50 percent
or more. As a general rule, percentages are not pub­
lished when the monthly base of the measure is less
than 75,000. Because of the large standard errors in­
volved, there is little chance that summary measures
would reveal useful information when computed on a
smaller base. Estimated numbers are shown, however,
even though the relative standard errors of these num­
bers are larger than those for corresponding percent­
ages. These smaller estimates are provided primarily to
permit such combinations o f the categories as serve
each user’s needs.

Appsndre ! . Supplamdntary Tabl®g f®r 1S82
Table B-1. Work experience of tthe population in 1982 by extent of employment, sex, and age
(N u m b e rs in thousands)
T o tal

16 to 17
years

18 to 19
years

2 0 to 2 4
years

2 5 to 34
years

3 5 to 4 4
years

4 5 to 54
years

Civilian noninstitutional population ......................................................................
T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
P ercen t of th e population ..................................................................................

1 7 3 ,6 5 6
1 1 6 ,2 7 7
6 7 .0

7 ,4 6 9
3 ,2 9 8
4 4 .2

7 ,9 6 0
5 ,6 7 6
7 1 .3

2 0 ,8 3 2
1 6 ,9 6 0
8 1 .4

3 8 ,9 3 8
3 2 ,2 5 6
8 2 .8

2 8 ,5 5 9
2 3 ,6 8 8
8 2 .9

2 2 ,1 7 6
1 7 ,0 7 8
7 7 .0

T o tal w ho w orked during th e y e a r ..................................................................
Full tim e 1 ............................................................................................................. ;......
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
Part tim e2 ...................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
7 7 .0
5 5 .0
2 .0
5 .0
5 .2
5 .4
4 .5
2 3 .0
8.4
.7
2.1
3 .0
4 .0
4 .8

1 0 0 .0
16 .6
1.2
.1
.3
.4
3 .5
11 .0
8 3 .4
16 .9
1.4
4 .8
8 .6
2 0 .0
3 1 .8

1 0 0 .0
4 1 .0
12 .7
1.1
2.4
4 .9
7.7
12 .2
5 9 .0
15 .9
1.0
4 .0
9.5
12 .5
16.1

1 0 0 .0
7 1 .5
3 8 .7
2 .4
6 .0
7 .6
8 .4
8 .3
2 8 .5
9 .6
.9
2 .6
3 .8
5.1
6 .6

1 0 0 .0
8 4 .3
59 .9
2.4
6 .3
6.1
5 .9
3 .6
15 .7
5.7
.5
1.6
2 .2
3.0
2 .7

1 0 0.0
8 4 .2
6 6 .4
1.9
4 .7
4 .6
4 .0
2.6
15 .8
6 .9
.5
1.7
2.3
2.0
2 .3

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .6
6 9 .0
2.1
4 .8
4.1
3 .3
2 .3
14 .4
6 .9
.5
1.5
1.7
2.1
1.8

Civilian noninstitutional population ......................................................................
T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
P ercen t of th e population .................................................................................

8 2 ,2 6 0
6 4 ,3 6 5
7 8 .2

3 ,7 9 2
1 ,7 9 5
4 7 .3

3 ,9 4 0
2,961
7 5 .2

1 0 ,1 5 0
8 ,8 5 2
8 7 .2

1 9 ,0 3 4
1 7 ,6 5 2
9 2 .7

1 3 ,8 8 3
1 3 ,1 3 9
9 4 .6

1 0 ,6 9 2
9 ,7 1 4
9 0 .9

T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
Full tim e ’ .................................... ...............................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
Part tim e2 ...................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
6 2 .3
2.1
5.2
5 .6
5.7
4 .4
1 4 .7
4 .8
.4
1.4
1.9
2.7
3.5

1 0 0 .0
20.1
1.8
.1
.3
.5
5 .0
12.5
7 9 .9
15 .8
1.0
4 .8
8 .8
17 .5
3 1 .9

1 0 0 .0
4 6 .2
13 .6
1.0
2 .7
5.7
9.3
13 .9
5 3 .8
14 .0
.9
4 .2
7.8
1 1 .7
15.1

1 0 0.0
7 6 .5
3 9 .7
2.7
6.5
8.7
9 .6
9.3
2 3 .5
7.9
.7
2.3
3.2
3.8
5.7

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .4
6 7 .4
2 .6
6 .7
6 .8
6 .0
2.9
7 .6
2.7
.3
1.0
1.1
1.4
1.1

1 0 0 .0
95.1
7 7 .4
2.0
5.2
4 .5
4 .0
2 .0
4 .9
1.9
.1
.5
.9
.8
.7

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .0
7 8 .4
2.2
4 .8
4 .2
3 .4
2 .0
5 .0
1.8
.1
.7
.6
1.0
.7

Civilian noninstitutional p o p u la tio n ......................................................................
T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
P ercen t of th e population .................................................................................

9 1 ,3 9 5
5 1 ,9 1 2
5 6 .8

3 ,6 7 7
1 ,50 3
4 0 .9

4 ,0 2 0
2 ,7 1 5
6 7 .5

1 0 ,6 8 2
8 ,1 0 9
7 5 .9

1 9 ,9 0 3
1 4 ,6 0 4
7 3 .4

1 4 ,6 7 5
1 0 ,5 4 9
7 1 .9

1 1 ,4 8 4
7 ,3 6 3
64.1

T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
Full tim e 1 ....................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s ......................................................................................................
P art tim e2 ...................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w ee ks ......................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
6 6 .8
4 5 .9
1.8
4 .6
4 .7
5.0
4 .7
3 3 .2
12 .9
1.1
2 .9
4 .3
5.6
6.4

1 0 0 .0
12 .3
.6
.1
.2
.4
1.8
9.2
8 7 .7
18.3
1.8
4 .8
8.3
2 3 .0
3 1 .5

1 0 0.0
3 5 .2
11 .8
1.1
2 .0
4 .0
6.0
10 .4
6 4 .8
18 .0
1.0
3.9
11 .2
13.4
17.2

1 0 0 .0
6 6 .0
3 7 .7
2 .0
5.4
6 .5
7.2
7.2
3 4 .0
11 .4
1.2
2.8
4 .5
6 .4
7.7

1 0 0.0
7 4 .5
5 0 .8
2.1
5.9
5.3
5.9
4 .4
2 5 .5
9.4
.7
2.3
3.6
4 .9
4 .7

1 0 0 .0
7 0 .7
5 2 .6
1.8
4 .2
4 .6
4.1
3.4
2 9 .3
13.1
1.0
3.1
4 .2
3 .6
4.2

1 0 0 .0
7 3 .3
5 6 .7
2 .0
4 .7
3 .9
3.1
2.8
2 6 .7
1 3 .6
.9
2 .4
3.0
3 .4
3 .3

E xten t of em p lo ym en t and sex
TO TAL

M en

W om en

S e e fo o tn o tes at end of table.




12

T ab le 0 -1 . W o rk ©np©ri©inie© ©if (ft© p©pyia4o@ini in 1i® 2 by ®nft©p4 ©If smpDoymeimt, s®x5 and a g e — C ontinued
(N u m b e rs in th ousan ds)
6 0 to 6 4 years
E xtent of em p lo ym en t and sex

5 5 to 59
years

6 5 ye ars and over

Total

6 0 to 61
years

6 2 to 6 4
years

Total

6 5 to 6 9
years

7 0 years
and over

TO TAL
Civilian noninstitutional p o p u la tio n ......................................................................
T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
P ercen t of th e p o p u la tio n ............... .................................................................

11,391
7 ,6 9 5
6 7 .6

1 0 ,5 9 4
5 ,5 1 4
5 2 .0

4 ,4 3 2
2 ,6 0 4
5 8 .7

6 ,1 6 2
2 ,9 1 0
4 7 .2

2 5 ,7 3 8
4 ,1 1 2
16 .0

8 ,8 5 3
2 ,4 0 0
27.1

1 6 ,8 8 5
1 ,71 2
10.1

T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ......................................... ........................
Full tim e 1 .................................... ...............................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s ......................................................................................................
P art tim e2 ..................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ................................ ...................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................

1 0 0.0
8 3 .7
6 7 .2
2 .0
4.1
3 .7
4 .2
2 .5
16 .3
7 .9
.7
1.7
1.8
2.1
2.2

1 0 0 .0
8 0 .4
6 0 .9
1.6
4 .0
4 .7
5.6
3 .6
19 .6
8 .7
1.0
2 .0
2 .0
2 .7
3.3

1 0 0 .0
8 4 .0
6 5 .5
1.6
4.3
4 .8
5 .6
2.1
16 .0
6 .6
.9
2 .4
1.7
1.9
2 .5

1 0 0 .0
7 7 .2
56 .8
1.7
3.7
4 .6
5 .6
4 .8
2 2 .8
10 .5
1.1
1.7
2.3
3 .4
4 .0

1 0 0 .0
4 7 .3
3 1 .2
.7
2.5
3.0
5.3
4 .6
5 2 .7
2 3 .7
2 .4
4 .8
4 .8
7.3
9.8

1 0 0 .0
5 3 .6
3 5 .4
.8
2 .6
3 .5
6.5
4 .8
4 6 .4
21.1
2.3
4.1
4 .6
6.1
8.2

1 0 0 .0
3 8 .4
2 5 .2
.6
2 .3
2.3
3.7
4.3
6 1 .6
2 7 .3
2 .4
5.8
5.1
9.0
11 .9

Civilian noninstitutional p o p u la tio n ................ ...................................... ...............
T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ............................................................
P ercen t of th e p o p u la tio n .................................................................................

5 ,3 5 5
4 ,5 0 9
8 4 .2

4 ,8 9 8
3 ,2 2 5
6 5 .8

2 ,0 5 8
1 ,5 3 8
7 4 .7

2 ,8 4 0
1 ,68 7
5 9 .4

1 0 ,5 1 6
2 ,5 1 9
2 4 .0

3 ,9 3 9
1 ,44 3
3 6 .6

6 ,5 7 7
1 ,0 7 6
1 6 .4

T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ........................................ ....................
Full tim e 1 .............................. ............................. .......................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ................................................................... ................................
48 to 4 9 w e e k s ...................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ...... .............................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...... ............................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
Part tim e2 ...................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................... ............................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ........................................ ...........................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .......................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
93.1
7 5 .7
2.4
4 .2
3.9
4 .4
2 .5
6 .9
2 .8
1.0
.6
1.1
1.3

1 0 0 .0
8 8 .3
6 8 .0
1.5
4 .2
5.0
5.8
3.8
11.7
4 .7
.6
1.4
1.0
1.7
2 .2

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .8
7 3 .2
1.7
3 .7
5.3
5 .7
2 .2
8 .2
2 .6
.6
2.0
.6
1.2
1.3

1 0 0 .0
85.1
6 3 .3
1.4
4 .7
4 .8
5 .8
5:3
14 .9
6.7
.7
1.0
1.3
2.2
3.0

1 0 0 .0
5 3 .0
3 5 .5
.6
2 .6
3 .2
5 .8
5 .2
4 7 .0
2 1 .3
1.5
4 .0
4 .4
6 .9
8 .9

1 0 0 .0
60.1
4 0 .5
.7
2 .7
4 .0
7.1
5.1
3 9 .9
17 .5
1.7
3.5
4 .2
5 .6
7 .4

1 0 0,0
4 3 .5
2 8 .9
.5
2 .4
2 .2
4 .2
5.3
5 6 .5
2 6 .4
1.2
4 .8
4 .6
8 .6
10 .8

Civilian noninstitutional population .......................................
........................
T o tal w ho w orked during th e y e a r ..................................................................
P ercen t of th e population ....................
................................................

6 ,0 3 6
3 ,1 8 6
52 .8

5 ,6 9 6
2 ,2 8 8
4 0 .2

2 ,3 7 4
1 ,0 6 5
4 4 .9

3,321
1 ,22 3
3 6 .8

1 5 ,2 2 2
1 ,59 3
10 .5

4 ,9 1 4
957
19 .5

1 0 ,3 0 8
636
6 .2

T o tal w ho w orked during th e ye a r ..................................................................
Full tim e 1 ....................................................................................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ............................................................................................... .
. 2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...... ! ............................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...... ......... ...................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s ......................................................................................................
Part tim e2 .......................................................... .......................................................
5 0 to 5 2 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 8 to 4 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
4 0 to 4 7 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ....................................................................................................
1 to 13 w e e k s ......................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
7 0 .5
5 5 .2
1.4
4 .0
3.5
3.8
2 .6
2 9 .5
15.1
1.4
2:8
3 .4
3 .5
3.4

1 0 0.0
6 9 .3
5 0 .9
1.8
3 .6
4 .2
5.4
3 .2
3 0 .7
14.2
1.5
2.7
3.4
4 .0
4 .8

1 0 0 .0
7 2 .8
5 4 .4
1.5
5.1
4 .2
5.5
2.1
2 7 .2
12 .4
1.3
2.9
3.3
2.9
4.3

1 0 0.0
6 6 .2
4 7 .9
2.1
2 .4
4 .3
5.3
4 .2
3 3 .8
15 .7
1.6
2 .6
3.6
5.0
5.3

1 0 0 .0
3 8 .2
2 4 .2
.8
2 .3
2 .7
4 .5
3 .6
6 1 .8
2 7 .5
3.7
6 .0
5.5
8 .0
11 .2

1 0 0.0
4 3 .8
2 7 .7
.8
2 .5
2.9
5 .6
4 .3
5 6 .2
2 6 .6
3 .2
5.0
5.1
6 .9
9.5

1 0 0 .0
2 9 .8
19 .0
.8
2 .0
2 .6
2 .9
2 .6
7 0 .2
2 8 .8
4 .5
7.4
6.0
9.6
13 .9

Mem

.1

W om en

1 Usually w orked 3 5 hours or m ore p er w ee k.




2 Usually w orked 1 to 3 4 hours per w eek.

13

Tab le B-2. W o rk exp e rie n c e o f th e population in 1982 by race, H ispanic origin, age, and e x te n t of
em p lo ym en t
(N u m b e rs in thousands)
Civilian
noninstitutional
population
R ac e, H ispanic origin, and ag e

P ercen t distribution o f th o se
w ho w orked during th e ye ar

N u m b er

P ercen t
w ho w orked
during th e
ye ar

T o t a l .........................................................................................................

8 2 ,2 6 0

7 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
Hispanic o r ig in .............................................................................................

7 1 ,8 0 8
8 ,3 9 8
4 ,4 0 6

7 9 .8
6 5 .7
8 0 .4

16 to 19 years .........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k .................................................................................................................
Hispanic origin ............................................................................................

7 ,7 3 2
6 ,4 3 6
1 ,0 9 5
59 8

2 0 to 2 4 years .........................................................................................
W h it e .................................................................................................................
B l a c k ............................................•....................................................................
Hispanic origin ............................................................................................

Full tim e ’
Total

Part
tim e2

2 7 to 4 9
w ee ks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

6 2 .3

12 .9

1 0 .0

14 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 3 .2
54.1
5 7 .7

12 .8
1 4 .6
16.1

9 .6
1 4 .2
1 2 .7

14 .4
17 .0
13 .4

6 1 .5
6 6 .6
3 3 .9
52 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

9.1
9.4
6.1
13 .7

6 .3
6 .3
4 .9
6 .9

2 1 .0
2 0 .6
2 5 .0
2 7 .7

6 3 .6
6 3 .7
6 4 .0
5 1 .7

1 0 ,1 5 0
8 ,6 2 3
1 ,2 4 2
649

8 7 .2
9 0 .0
7 0 .5
8 6 .5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0 -

3 9 .7
4 1 .0
3 0 .7
4 1 .2

18 .0
18 .4
1 5 .6
2 2 .8

18 .8
18 .0
2 5 .3
1 6 .8

2 3 .5
2 2 .6
2 8 .4
19 .2

2 5 to 4 4 years .........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
Hispanic o r ig in ............................................................................................

3 2 ,9 1 8
2 8 ,6 5 5
3,361
2 ,0 2 8

9 3 .5
9 4 .9
8 2 .9
9 1 .7

1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

7 1 .7
7 2 .7
6 2 .9
6 5 .6

14 .2
1 3 .9
1 6 .7
1 6 .7

7 .7
7 .2
1 2 .0
1 0 .6

6 .4
6 .2
8 .4
7.1

4 5 to 6 4 years .........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
H ispanic origin ............................................................................................

2 0 ,9 4 5
1 8 ,6 1 3
1 ,8 5 5
885

8 3 .3
8 4 .4
7 2 .2
8 3 .5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

7 5 .8
7 6 .6
6 6 .5
7 0 .9

1 0 .9
10 .7
13 .4
14.1

6 .5
6 .3
9 .2
8 .4

6 .7
6 .4
1 0 .8
6 .7

6 5 years and o v e r .................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
H ispanic origin ............................................................................................

1 0 ,5 1 6
9 ,4 8 2
845
245

2 4 .0
2 4 .6
17 .4
2 7 .3

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 5 .5
35.1
36.1
ft

6 .5
6 .6
5 .4

ft

1 1 .0
1 1 .2
9.0
(3)

4 7 .0
47.1
4 9 .5
ft

T o t a l .........................................................................................................

9 1 ,3 9 5

5 6 .8

1 0 0.0

4 5 .9

11.1

9.7

3 3 .2

W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
...........................................................................................................

7 8 ,6 1 8
1 0 ,4 2 5
4 ,9 7 8

57.1
54 .2
5 0 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

4 5 .2
5 0 .5
4 5 .3

1 1 .0
1 2 .2
12 .9

9.4
11 .7
14 .9

3 4 .4
2 5 .6
2 6 .9

16 to 19 years .........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
Black ................................................................................................................
Hispanic origin ............................................................................................

7 ,6 9 7
6 ,3 3 6
1,14 7
552

5 4 .8
5 9 .7
3 0 .6
4 1 .7

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

7 .8
8 .0
6 .9
7.5

4 .8
5 .2
1.5
5 .9

14 .5
13 .9
2 0 .6
19.4

7 3 .0
7 3 .0
7 1 .0
6 7 .2

2 0 to 2 4 years ........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
H ispanic origin ............................................................................................

1 0 ,6 8 2
8 ,9 3 5
1 ,47 7
732

7 5 .9
79.1
5 9 .5
5 8 .6

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

3 7 .7
3 8 .7
3 0 .0
42.1

13 .9
14.1
12 .5
15 .5

14 .4
13 .8
19 .8
18 .2

3 4 .0
3 3 .5
3 7 .7
2 4 .2

2 5 to 4 4 years .........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
H ispanic o r ig in ............................................................................................

3 4 ,5 7 9
2 9 ,2 4 3
4,161
2 ,2 7 7

7 2 .7
73.1
71.1
5 8 .7

10 0.0
10 0.0
10 0.0
10 0.0

5 1 .6
5 0 .5
5 8 .3
4 9 .3

12 .2
12 .0
13.3
14.1

9.1
8 .7
11 .7
15 .0

27.1
2 8 .7
16 .8
2 1 .6

4 5 to 6 4 years .........................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
H ispanic origin ............................................................................................

2 3 ,2 1 6
2 0 ,3 5 3
2,361
1 ,0 6 6

5 5 .3
5 5 .2
56 .3
4 8 .0

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

5 5 .3
5 4 .4
61.1
5 5 .5

10 .0
9 .7
13.1
11 .4

6 .5
6 .7
4 .6
9 .5

28.1
2 9 .2
2 1 .3
2 3 .5

6 5 years and o v e r .................................................................................
W h it e ................................................................................................................
B l a c k ................................................................................................................
H ispanic origin ............................................................................................

1 5 ,2 2 2
1 3 ,7 5 2
1 ,27 9
351

10 .5
10 .5
10 .2
7.6

1 0 0.0
10 0.0
10 0.0
1 0 0.0

2 4 .2
2 4 .4
2 2 .6

5.9
5.9
5.4
O

8.1
8 .3
5 .8
f3)

6 1 .8
6 1 .3
6 6 .2

5 0 to 52
w ee ks
M en

W om en

H i s p a n i c o r ig in

1 Usually w orked 3 5 hours or m ore per w ee k.
2 Usually w orked 1 to 3 4 hours per w ee k.
3 D a ta not show n w h ere b as e is less than 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
N O T E : D etail fo r th e ab o ve race and Hispanic-origin groups will not




' 14

ft

ft

sum to to tals bec au se d a ta fo r th e “ o th er ra c e s ” group a re not
p resen ted and Hispanics a re included in both th e w h ite an d black
population groups.

Table B-3. Work experience of the population in 1S82 by marital status, age, sex, and extent of employment
(N u m b e rs in thousands)
Civilian noninstitutional
population
M arital status and age
N u m b er

P ercen t distribution o f th o se w ho w orked during th e year

P ercen t w ho
w orked
during th e
ye ar

Full tim e 1
Total

50 to 52
w ee ks

2 7 to 49
w ee ks

1 to 26
w ee ks

Part tim e2

M en
T o t a l .......................... ...........................................................

8 2 ,2 6 0

7 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

6 2 .3

12 .9

10 .0

14.7

S in g le .............................................................................................
16 to 19 years ......................................................................
20 to 2 4 y e a r s ......................................................................
2 5 to 4 4 years ......................................................................
4 5 to 6 4 years ......................................................................
6 5 years and o v e r ...............................................................

2 3 ,5 6 2
7 ,5 6 6
7 ,5 4 2
6 ,8 8 5
1 ,0 6 8
501

7 5 .6
6 0 .9
8 4 .8
8 6 .0
7 0 .3
2 7 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

3 7 .4
8 .4
3 2 .5
6 1 .5
6 7 .2
3 9 .9

13.0
5.9
15.8
15 .7
13 .9
5.6

17.3
2 1 .0
22 .3
10 .4
7.5
11.1

3 2 .2
6 4 .7
2 9 .3
12.4
11 .4
4 3 .4

M arried, spouse p resen t ....................................................
16 to 19 years ......................................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ......................................................................
2 5 to 4 4 years ......................................................................
4 5 to 6 4 years ......................................................................
6 5 years and o v e r ...............................................................

4 9 ,9 7 9
114
2 ,2 8 5
2 2 ,1 4 9
1 7 ,3 6 3
8 ,0 6 8

81.1
8 9 .8
9 4 .8
9 6 .6
85.1
2 5 .7

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

7 3 .5
3 7 .0
6 1 .2
7 6 .0
7 7 .4
3 5 .0

12 .4
2 2 .9
2 2 .5
13 .4
10 .4
6 .0

6.6
2 1 .5
8.7
6.2
6.2
11 .4

7.5
18 .5
7.6
4 .5
6.1
4 7 .6

O th e r m arital s t a t u s ..............................................................
16 to 19 years ..................................... ................................
2 0 to 2 4 years ......................................................................
2 5 to 4 4 years ......................................................................
4 5 to 64 y e a r s ......................................................................
6 5 years and o v e r ..............................................................

8 ,7 2 0
53
323
3 ,8 8 3
2 ,5 1 4
1 ,94 7

6 9 .3
(3)
8 8 .9
8 9 .7
7 6 .2
15.8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 1 .0
(3)
37 .2
6 2 .4
6 7 .0
3 7 .2

16.3
(3)
3 0 .6
17 .0
14.1
9.7

11 .2
(3)
16 .9
12.1
8.8
8.5

11 .5
(3)
15.2
8.5
10.1
4 4 .7

W om en
T o t a l ......................................................................................

9 1 ,3 9 5

5 6 .8

1 0 0.0

4 5 .9

11.1

9.7

33 .2

S in g le ............................................................................................
16 to 19 years ......................................................................
2 0 to 2 4 years ......................................................................
2 5 to 4 4 years ......................................................................
4 5 to 6 4 years ......................................................................
65 years and o v e r ...............................................................

1 9 ,6 1 7
7 ,0 8 8
5 ,9 3 3
4 ,7 3 8
1 ,02 9
82 9

6 7 .6
5 4 .6
7 9 .0
8 2 .3
6 6 .8
15.5

1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0

3 8 .5
7.1
3 6 .0
6 6 .4
74.1
4 3 .4

9.7
4.1
12 .2
12 .5
9.4
2 .6

11.3
13.8
14 .0
7.0
3.2
8.4

4 0 .5
75.1
3 7 .8
14 .0
13 .2
4 5 .7

M arried, spouse p r e s e n t.....................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s ......................................................................
2 0 to 2 4 years ......................................................................
2 5 to 4 4 years .......... ............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 ye ars .......................................................................
6 5 years and o v e r ...............................................................

5 0 ,6 5 9
51 0
3 ,9 4 9
2 3 ,8 4 2
1 6 ,4 7 2
5 ,8 8 7

57 .3
5 9 .4
7 2 .4
6 9 .7
5 2 .4
10 .7

10 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

4 5 .8
15 .4
3 9 .9
4 5 .5
5 1 .3
2 0 .6

11.3
11.7
15.8
11 .9
9.3
5.5

9.2
2 1 .6
14.9
9.3
6 .8
6.7

3 3 .6
5 1 .3
2 9 .4
3 3 .3
3 2 .6
6 7 .2

O th e r m arital s t a t u s ...............................................................
16 to 19 years ......................................................................
2 0 to 24 years ......................................................................
25 to 4 4 years ......................................................................
4 5 to 6 4 years ......................................................................
6 5 years and o v e r .............................. ................................

2 1 ,1 1 9
99
799
5 ,9 9 9
5 ,7 1 5
8 ,5 0 6

4 5 .5
4 8 .7
7 0 .2
77 .3
6 1 .7
9.8

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

5 6 .4
(3)
4 0 .9
6 0 .8
6 1 .3
2 4 .0

12 .4
(3)
17.8
13 .0
12 .0
6 .7

9.1
(3)
15 .6
10 .2
6.5
9.1

22.1
(3)
2 5 .7
16 .0
20 .2
6 0 .2

1 Usually w orked 3 5 hours or m ore per w ee k.
2 Usually w orked 1 to 3 4 hours per w eek.




3 D a ta not show n w h e re b a s e is less than 7 5 ,0 0 0 .

15

TabSe 1=4. Persons with work experience in 1982 by industry and class of worker of the job held the longest, sex, and
extent of employment
(Numbers in thousands)___________________ ________ __________________________________ _____ ______ _______________________________________________________
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
worked
during the
year

Industry, class of worker, and sex

Full tim e'
Total

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

1 to 26
weeks

Part time2

TOTAL
Total, 16 years and over ...................................................................................................................

116,277

100.0

55.0

12.1

9.9

23.0

A g riculture....................................................................................................................................................

4,011

100.0

47.8

9.7

15.7

26.9

Wage and salary w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................................
Self-employed w o rke rs...........................................................................................................................
Unpaid family w o rk e rs ............................................................................................................................

2,187
1,536
287

100.0
100.0
100.0

32.5
72.2
33.6

14.4
3.9
4.1

25.3
2.8
10.6

27.7
21.0
51.6

Nonagricultural industries .........................................................................................................................

112,266

100.0

55.3

12.2

9.7

22.8

Wage and salary w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................................

104,236

100.0

55.5

12.4

10.0

22.1

Mining .....................................................................................................................................................

1,226
5,985
22,777

100.0
100.0
100.0

63.3
45.2
64.1

19.1
23.5
17 3

13.3
19.5
11.6

4.2
11.7
7.0

Durable g o o d s ....................................................................................................................................
Lumber and wood products, except fu rn itu re ............................................................................
Furniture and fix tu re s .....................................................................................................................
Stone, clay, glass, and concrete p ro d u c ts .................................................................................
Primary metal industries ................................................................................................................
Fabricated metal p roducts.............................................................................................................
Machinery, except ele ctric a l.........................................................................................................
Electrical machinery, equipment, and supplies..........................................................................
Transportation equipm ent..............................................................................................................
Motor vehicles and equipm ent..................................................................................................
Other transportation e q u ip m e n t................................................................................................
Aircraft and parts ......................................................................................................................
Other transportation e q u ip m e n t.............................................................................................
Professional and photographic equipment, and watches .......................................................
Toys and amusement and sporting g o o d s .................................................................................
Misc. and n.e.c. manufacturing in d u s trie s ..................................................................................

13,405
710
488
620
1,046
1,607
2,897
2,305
2,466
1,113
1,353
649
704
698
177
391

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

65.4
46.6
55.0
62.8
55.0
66.8
68.7
67.9
69.3
61.2
75.9
75.1
76.7
75.8
52.8
61.0

18.1
23.7
21.4
22.5
22.0
17.4
17.1
18.5
16.4
23.5
10.5
10.9
10.3
11.4
20.9
17.1

12.0
20.2
14.8
10.3
15.8
11.1
10.7
10.9
11.5
13.8
9.6
9.5
9.7
7.7
18.0
13.1

4.5
9.5
8.8
4.4
7.3
4.6
3.5
2.8
2.9
1.6
3.9
4.5
3.4
5.1
8.4
8.8

Nondurable g o o d s .............................................................................................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts ...........................................................................................................
Tobacco manufactures ..................................................................................................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts .......................................................................................................................
Apparel and other finished textile p ro d u c ts ...............................................................................
Paper and allied products .............................................................................................................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....................................................................................
Chemicals and allied pro d u c ts .....................................................................................................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts .......................................................................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts ...........................................................................
Leather and leather products.......................................................................................................

9,372
1,946
87
850
1,332
704
1,796
1,307
239
784
327

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

62.3
61.1
77.6
57.8
47.0
71.3
60.5
78.3
78.0
65.0
47.6

16.1
16.3
1.9
22.5
26.0
14.8
10.7
9.7
11.5
18.1
19.7

11.1
14.4
16.4
8.7
16.6
8.0
7.6
8.4
7.8
10.3
13.3

10.5
8.2
4.2
11.0
10.4
5.8
21.2
3.6
2.6
6.6
19.4

Transportation and public utilities .....................................................................................................
Transportation....................................................................................................................................
Communications and other public utilitie s.....................................................................................
Communications .............................................................................................................................
Utilities and sanitary services.......................................................................................................

7,220
4,131
3,089
1,580
1,509

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

71.5
64.0
81.6
82.6
80.5

10.5
12.7
7.5
7.6
7.4

7.2
8.3
5.7
5.2
6.2

10.8
15.0
5.3
4.7
5.9

Wholesale and retail tra d e ..................................................................................................................
Wholesale tra d e .................................................................................................................................
Retail tra d e .........................................................................................................................................

22,819
4,500
18,319

100.0
100.0
100.0

43.8
69.6
37.4

9.8
10.4
9.7

9.6
8.9
9.8

36.8
11.1
43.1

Finance, insurance, and real estate .................................................................................................
Banking and other fin a n c e ...............................................................................................................
Insurance and real estate ................................................................................................................

6,223
2,952
3,271

100.0
100.0
100.0

69.5
71.4
67.8

9.1
9.2
9.1

6.9
6.5
7.2

14.5
12.9
15.9

S e rvice s..................................................................................................................................................
Private hou sehold..............................................................................................................................
Miscellaneous se rvice s.....................................................................................................................
Business and repair s e rv ic e s .......................................................................................................
Business services ........................................................................................................................
Repair services.............................................................................................................................
Personal services, except private household ...........................................................................
Entertainment and recreational s e rv ic e s ....................................................................................
Professional and related s e rv ic e s ...............................................................................................
Hospitals .......................................................................................................................................
Health services, except h o s p ita ls .............................................................................................
Educational se rvice s....................................................................................................................
Social services .............................................................................................................................
Other professional se rvice s.......................................................................................................
Forestry and fisheries ....................................................................................................................

32,748
1,662
31,086
4,575
3,272
1,302
2,497
1,417
22,405
4,667
3,675
9,153
1,547
3,363
192

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

49.7
10.8
51.8
50.8
48.9
55.6
37.9
27.0
55.2
64.8
51.6
52.0
41.1
60.7
50.6

10.5
4.4
10.8
13.4
12.2
16.4
12.1
9.4
10.2
8.1
9.9
11.7
10.9
9.2
10.0

9.0
11.1
8.9
13.1
13.1
13.2
13.5
20.1
6.7
5.6
9.1
5.6
8.8
7.2
27.3

30.8
73.6
28.5
22.7
25.9
14.7
36.5
43.5
28.0
21.5
29.5
30.7
39.1
22.8
12.1

Public adm inistration............................................................................................................................

5,238

100.0

75.9

6.3

7.0

10.8

7,548
482

100.0
100.0

54.3
27.6

10.4
5.4

5.5
6.2

29.8
60.7

Self-employed w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................
Unpaid family w o rk e rs ....................................................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




16

Tab!© B-4. Persons with work experience in 1982 by industry and class of worker of the job held the longest, sex, and
extent of employment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)

____________
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
Total who
worked
during the
year

Industry, class of worker, and sex

Full tim e'
Total

Part time2

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

1 to 26
weeks

10.0

14.7

Men
Total, 16 years and over ...................................................................................................................

64,365

100.0

62.3

12.9

A g riculture....................................................................................................................................................

3,112

100.0

53.1

10.5

14.6

21.8

Wage and salary w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................................
Self-employed w o rke rs...........................................................................................................................
Unpaid family w o rk e rs ............................................................................................................................

1,670
1,351
92

100.0
100.0
100.0

35.8
76.0
29.1

16.1
4.2
2.1

24.3
2.6
12.9

23.8
17.1
55.9

Nonagricultural industries .........................................................................................................................

61,253

100.0

62.8

13.1

9.8

14.3

Wage and salary w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................................

56,086

100.0

62.9

13.2

10.3

13.6

Mining .....................................................................................................................................................
C o nstruction..........................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing .......................................................................................................................................

1,058
5,425
15,191

100.0
100.0
100.0

62.3
45.5
68.5

20.8
24.8
16.3

13.4
19.4
10.6

3.5
10.2
4.7

Durable g o o d s....................................................................................................................................
Lumber and wood products, except fu rn itu re ...........................................................................
Furniture and fixtures .....................................................................................................................
Stone, clay, glass, and concrete pro d u c ts .................................................................................
Primary metal industries ...............................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products............................................................................................................
Machinery, except ele ctric a l.........................................................................................................
Electrical machinery, equipment, and supplies.........................................................................
Transportation equipm ent..............................................................................................................
Motor vehicles and equ ipm ent..................................................................................................
Other transportation equ ip m e n t................................................................................................
Aircraft and parts ......................................................................................................................
Other transportation equipment .............................................................................................
Professional and photographic equipment, and watches .......................................................
Toys and amusement and sporting g o o d s ................................................................................
Misc. and n.e.c. manufacturing in du s trie s.................................................................................

9,876
630
341
467
930
1,269
2,253
1,336
1,957
866
1,091
485
606
400
81
212

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

67.0
46.7
59.7
60.9
53.3
67.7
70.0
72.8
70.8
63.8
76.4
76.1
76.6
84.4
61.6
71.4

18.1
25.0
21.3
24.6
22.6
17.7
17.5
16.8
15.6
22.3
10.2
10.1
10.3
9.1
20.9
13.3

11.4
19.4
12.5
11.2
16.7
11.4
10.4
8.5
11.3
12.7
10.2
10.0
10.3
3.2
9.5
10.6

3.6
9.0
6.5
3.3
7.3
3.2
2.0
2.0
2.4
1.2
3.3
3.8
2.8
3.4
8.0
4.8

Nondurable g o o d s .............................................................................................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts ..........................................................................................................
Tobacco manufacture? ..................................................................................................................
Textile mill products .......................................................................................................................
Apparel and other finished textile p ro d u c ts ..............................................................................
Paper and allied products ............................................................................................................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....................................................................................
Chemicals and allied pro d u c ts .....................................................................................................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts .......................................................................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products ...........................................................................
Leather and leather p roducts.......................................................................................................

5,315
1,296
55
401
263
508
1,085
908
189
505
105

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

71.2
68.3
(3)
65.0
63.0
74.7
68.8
81.2
77.7
70.9
56.1

12.9
12.9
(3)
20.8
19.8
13.5
9.0
9.5
11.8
18.6
14.4

9.1
13.3
(3)
6.6
12.7
8.0
6.6
7.0
9.5
7.3
13.5

6.7
5.5
(3)
7.6
4.6
3.8
15.6
2.3
1.0
3.2
16.0

Transportation and public u tilitie s .....................................................................................................
Transportation....................................................................................................................................
Communications and other public utilities.....................................................................................
Communications .............................................................................................................................
Utilities and sanitary se rvice s.......................................................................................................

5,260
3,150
2,110
852
1,258

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

74.1
67.2
84.4
87.1
82.5

10.7
13.4
6.7
6.0
7.1

7.2
8.3
5.5
4.4
6.2

8.0
11.0
3.4
2.4
4.1

Wholesale and retail tra d e ..................................................................................................................
Wholesale tra d e .................................................................................................................................
Retail tra d e .........................................................................................................................................

11,562
3,188
8,374

100.0
100.0
100.0

54.4
74.2
46.9

10.2
10.1
10.3

9.5
8.3
9.9

25.9
7.3
32.9

Finance, insurance, and real estate .................................................................................................
Banking and other fin a n c e ..............................................................................................................
Insurance and real estate ...............................................................................................................

2,486
1,021
1,464

100.0
100.0
100.0

74.8
80.3
71.0

8.4
6.4
9.9

6.0
5.0
6.7

10.8
8.4
12.5

S e rvice s.................................................................................................................................................
Private hou sehold..............................................................................................................................
Miscellaneous se rvice s.......................................................................... ..........................................
Business and repair se rv ic e s .......................................................................................................
Business services ........................................................................................................................
Repair services.............................................................................................................................
Personal services, except private household ...........................................................................
Entertainment and recreational s e rv ic e s ...................................................................................
Professional and related services ...............................................................................................
Hospitals .......................................................................................................................................
Health services, except hos p ita ls .............................................................................................
Educational se rvice s...................................................................................................................
Social services .............................................................................................................................
Other professional se rvices.......................................................................................................
Forestry and fisheries ...................................................................................................................

12,039
293
11,746
2,785
1,684
1,101
905
773
7,125
1,117
668
3,305
306
1,727
158

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

59.8
7.7
61.1
57.6
57.8
57.3
48.3
32.6
67.3
73.5
76.9
62.7
53.1
70.8
54.8

10.4
2.6
10.6
13.6
11.8
16.3
13.7
11.7
9.0
7.9
7.8
9.4
11.9
8.9
7.1

9.3
6.9
9.3
12.2
11.6
13.0
15.6
17.7
6.1
7.0
5.9
5.5
10.3
6.1
28.5

20.6
82.8
19.0
16.7
18.8
13.4
22.4
38.0
17.6
11.7
9.4
22.4
24.8
14.3
9.6

Public adm inistration............................................................................................................................

3,065

100.0

80.8

5.9

6.9

6.4

5,110
57

100.0
100.0

62.8

11.2
(3)

4.7
(3)

21.4

Unpaid family w o rk e rs ...........................................................................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




17

(3)

(3)

Table B-4. Persons with work experience in 1982 by industry and class of worker of the job held the longest, sex, and
extent of employment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)

_______ ___________________ ________________________________
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
worked
during the
year

Industry, class of worker, and sex

Full time'
Total

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

45.9

11.1

1 to 26
weeks

Part time2

W om en
100.0

Total, 16 years and over ...................................................................................................................

51,912

9.7

33.2

A g riculture....................................................................................................................................................

898

100.0

29.6

Wage and salary w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................................
Unpaid family w o rk e rs ............................................................................................................................

517
186
195

100.0
100.0
100.0

21.7
44.8
35.8

6.7

19.4

44.3

9.1
1.8
5.1

28.6
4.3
9.5

40.6
49.2
49.6

Nonagricultural industries .........................................................................................................................

51,013

100.0

46.2

11.2

9.5

33.0

Wage and salary workers ......................................................................................................................

48,151

Mining .....................................................................................................................................................
M anufacturing.......................................................................................................................................

167
560
7,586

100.0

46.9

11.4

9.7

32.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

69.8
42.3
55.4

8.3
10.8
19.4

13.1
20.3
13.6

8.7
26.6
11.6

Durable g o o d s....................................................................................................................................
Lumber and wood products, except fu rn itu re ...........................................................................
Furniture and fix tu re s .....................................................................................................................
Stone, clay, glass, and concrete p ro d u c ts .................................................................................
Primary metal industries ................................................................................................................
Fabricated metal p roducts.............................................................................................................
Machinery, except ele ctrica l.........................................................................................................
Electrical machinery, equipment, and supp lie s.........................................................................
Transportation equipm ent..............................................................................................................
Motor vehicles and equipm ent...................................................................................................
Other transportation e qu ipm ent................................................................................................
Aircraft and parts ......................................................................................................................
Other transportation equipment .............................................................................................
Professional and photographic equipment, and watches .......................................................
Toys and amusement and sporting g o o d s .................................................................................
Misc. and n.e.c. manufacturing in d u strie s..................................................................................

3,529
79
148
154
117
338
644
969
509
247
262
164
97
298
95
178

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

60.9
46.3
44.1
68.5
68.4
63.5
64.0
61.1
63.5
52.2
74.1
72.1
77.5
64.3
45.2
48.7

18.3
13.9
21.7
16.1
16.8
16.5
15.4
20.8
19.5
27.5
12.0
13.2
9.8
14.6
20.9
21.8

13.5
26.2
20.1
7.6
8.1
10.1
11.9
14.3
12.2
17.4
7.2
8.0
5.8
13.8
25.2
16.0

7.3
13.6
14.1
7.8
6.7
9.9
8.7
3.8
4.8
2.8
6.7
6.7
6.8
7.3
8.7
13.5

Nondurable g o o d s .............................................................................................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts ...........................................................................................................
Tobacco manufactures ..................................................................................................................
Textile mill products .......................................................................................................................
Apparel and other finished textile p ro d u c ts ...............................................................................
Paper and allied products .............................................................................................................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....................................................................................
Chemicals and allied p roducts.....................................................................................................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u cts.......................................................................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products ............................................................................
Leather and leather p roducts.......................................................................................................

4,057
651
33
450
1,069
196
711
399
50
278
221

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

50.6
46.7
(3)
51.4
43.1
62.5
47.9
71.7
(3)
54.3
43.6

20.4
23.0
(3)
24.1
27.5
18.2
13.3
10.2
(3)
17.3
22.2

13.6
16.6
(3)
10.5
17.6
8.1
9.1
11.7
(3)
15.7
13.2

15.5
13.7
(3)
14.0
11.8
11.2
29.7
6.5
(3)
12.8
21.0

Transportation and public utilities .....................................................................................................
Transportation.....................................................................................................................................
Communications and other public utilities.....................................................................................
Communications .............................................................................................................................
Utilities and sanitary services.......................................................................................................

1,960
981
979
728
252

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

64.5
53.6
75.5
77.2
70.6

9.9
10.7
9.2
9.3
8.7

7.1
8.1
6.1
6.1
6.2

18.4
27.7
9.2
7.4
14.6

Wholesale and retail tra d e ..................................................................................................................
Wholesale tra d e .................................................................................................................................
Retail tra d e .........................................................................................................................................

11,257
1,312
9,945

100.0
100.0
100.0

32.9
58.5
29.5

9.3
11.1
9.1

9.7
10.3
9.6

48.1
20.1
51.8

Finance, insurance, and real estate .................................................................................................
Banking and other fin a n c e ..............................................................................................................
Insurance and real estate ...............................................................................................................

3,737
1,930
1,807

100.0
100.0
100.0

66.0
66.7
65.2

9.6
10.6
8.4

7.5
7.4
7.6

16.9
15.2
18.7

S e rvice s..................................................................................................................................................
Private hou sehold..............................................................................................................................
Miscellaneous se rvice s.....................................................................................................................
Business and repair se rvice s.......................................................................................................
Business services ........................................................................................................................
Repair services.............................................................................................................................
Personal services, except private household ...........................................................................
Entertainment and recreational se rvice s...................................................................................
Professional and related s e rv ic e s ...............................................................................................
Hospitals .......................................................................................................................................
Health services, except h o sp ita ls.............................................................................................
Educational se rvice s...................................................................................................................
Social services .............................................................................................................................
Other professional se rvice s.......................................................................................................
Forestry and fisheries ...................................................................................................................

20,709
1,369
19,340
1,789
1,588
201
1,592
644
15,280
3,550
3,007
5,847
1,241
1,636
34

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

43.9
11.5
46.2
40.2
39.3
46.7
32.0
20.2
49.5
62.1
45.9
45.9
38.2
50.2
(3)

10.5
4.8
10.9
13.1
12.6
17.0
11.1
6.7
10.8
8.2
10.3
13.0
10.7
9.6
(3)

8.9
12.1
8.6
14.6
14.6
14.7
12.3
22.9
6.9
5.2
9.8
5.7
8.4
8.5
(3)

36.7
71.6
34.3
32.1
33.4
21.6
44.6
50.2
32.8
24.5
33.9
35.4
42.7
31.7
(3)

Public adm inistration............................................................................................................................

2,173

100.0

68.8

6.9

7.1

17.1

Self-employed w o rk e rs ...........................................................................................................................
Unpaid family w o rk e rs ............................................................................................................................

2,438
425

100.0
100.0

36.5
27.1

8.7
4.2

7.3
5.9

47.5
62.8

1 Usually worked 35 hours or more per week.
2 Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week.
3 Data not shown where base is less than 75,000.




NOTE: Industry data shown in tables B-4, B-5, and B-12
are not strictly
comparable with those for earlier years because of revisions in industrial
classifications beginning in 1983.

18

Table S-5. Wage and salary workers with work experience in 1982 by industry of the Job held the Songest, race, sex, and
extent of employment
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )

In d u s try , ra c e , a n d s e x

T o ta l w h o
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

P a rt tim e 2

F u ll tim e 1
T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 49
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

W H IT E
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

9 2 ,8 2 8

1 0 0 .0

5 5.3

12.3

9.9

8.2

5.7

8.5

A g r ic u lt u r e ...........................................................................................

1,8 8 5
9 0 ,9 4 3
1,1 5 2
5,441
19,831
1 1 ,8 1 0
8 ,0 2 0
6 ,2 3 6
2 0 ,5 1 9
4 ,0 9 8
16,421
5 ,5 4 7
2 7 ,8 4 0
1,248
1 9 ,0 8 2
7 ,5 0 9
4 ,3 7 7

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 4.4
5 5.8
6 3 .7
4 6 .3
6 5.0
66.1
6 3 .4
7 1.9
4 4 .0
7 0.3
3 7.4
6 9 .5
4 9 .7
8.3
5 4.7
4 3.9
7 6.8

14.4
12.2
18.9
2 3 .2
16.8
17.8
15.5
10.5
9.8
10.0
9 .7
9 .0
10.3
4 .4
10.0
12.2
6.1

25.1
9.6
13.0
18.9
11.1
11.5
10.6
6.8
9.2
8 .4
9 .4
6 .4
8.7
12.5
6.2
14.5
6 .2

5.0
8.2
1.3
2 .9
2 .9
1.6
4.8
4 .9
13.7
5.0
15.9
7.1
11.1
18.4
11.3
9.3
3 .2

3.7
5.8
2.1
3 .8
1.9
1.4
2 .6
2.3
9 .0
2.1
10.8
3 .6
8 .5
12.1
8 .8
7.1
1.9

17.4
8.4
1.1
4 .7
2.3
1.6
3 .2
3.6
14.3
4 .2
16.8
4.3
11.6
4 4 .4
8.9

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

5 0 ,9 7 8

100 .0

6 3 .0

13.1

10.2

4 .4

3 .6

5.6

A g r ic u lt u r e ...........................................................................................
N o n a g ric u itu ra ! in d u s tr ie s .............................................................
M in in g ................................................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s .................. .........................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ...................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
W h o le s a le t r a d e ........ ...............................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ....................... ..........................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a i e s ta te ...................................
S e rv ic e s ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P ro fe s s io n a l s e rv ic e s ...................................................... .......
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............................................................................
Public a d m in is t r a tio n ....... ..........................................................

1,4 3 9
4 9 ,5 3 9
1,001
4 ,9 2 3
1 3 ,4 7 6
8 ,8 1 3

1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 7 .5
6 3 .7

15.7
13.1
2 0 .8
2 4 .5
15.8
17.7

24.1
9.8
13.3
18.9
10.1
10.8

3 .7
4 .4

16.1
5.3

12.3
10.6
10.3
9.5
10.7
8.0
10.2
2.2
8 .7
13.0
5.5

8 .6
6.8
9.0
7.8
9 .5
5.5
9.0
7.5
5.7
14.1
5 .8

5.8
1.6

2 .9
3 .6
1.7
3.8
1.4
1.3
1.6
1.7
6 .4
1.7
8.3
2 .4
5.5
8.0
5.7
5.1
1.0

1.2
4.4
1.4
1.1
2 .0
2 .7
10.4
3.1
13.3
2.8
8 .4
6 8 .4
5.4
9.5
3.4

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s tr ie s .............................................................
M in in g .................................................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ....................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
W h o le s a le t r a d e ........................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ..................................................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re al e s t a t e ...................................
S e r v ic e s ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P ro fe s s io n a l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ............. .....................................................

13.0
5.8

SVier)

4 ,6 8 3
4 ,5 7 4
1 0 ,3 3 0
2 ,8 9 8
7 ,4 3 3
2 ,2 5 2
1 0 ,3 4 3
238
6 ,1 2 2
3 ,9 8 3
2 ,6 4 0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

6 2 .3
4 6.8
6 9.5
6 8 .0
7 2 .4
7 5 .0
5 5.2
75.1
4 7.4
7 5.8
6 0 .6
5.8
6 8.0
5 2 .5
8 2 .6

.8
1.6
1.9
1.2
3.1
3 .2
8 .6
2 .9
10.8
5.5
6 .3
8.1
6 .5

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

4 1 ,8 4 9

1 00 .0

4 6 .0

11.2

9.6

12.8

8 .4

12.1

A g r ic u lt u r e ...........................................................................................
N o n a g ric u itu ra ! in d u s t r ie s ............................................................
M in in g .................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n ....................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu re d ................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................................................
N o n d u ra b le G o o d s ....................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
W h o le s a le t r a d e .........................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ..................................................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...................................

446
4 1 ,4 0 4
151
518
-6,355
2 ,9 9 8
3 ,3 5 7
1,6 6 2
1 0 ,1 8 8
1 ,2 0 0
■ 8 ,9 8 8
3 ,2 9 5

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
- 1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 4 .4
4 6 .2
72.8
4 1 ,8
55.4
6 0.7
5 0.8
6 3 .2
3 2.6
5 8 .8
29.1

10.3
11.2
6.7
11.2
19.0
18.1
19.9
10.2
9.2

2 1 .9
12.0
.2
7.8
4.1

1 7 ,4 9 6
1,010
1 2 ,9 6 0

100.0
100.0
1 00 .0
100.0
1 00 .0

9.3
12.8
4 .5
15.5
5.1
2.9
7.1
9.5
19.0
10.0
2 0 .2
8.2
13.9

6 .0
8 .4
4.8
4 .4
3.0
1.6
4 .2
3.9
11.7
3.3
12.8
4.4

S e r v ic e s .................................... .......................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................

2 8 .2
9.4
11.0
19.3
13.3
13.4
13.3
7.1
9.4
10.0
9.3
7.1
8 .6
13.7

W om en

P ro fe s s io n a l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................
O th e r s e rv ic e s .............................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ......................................... .........................

3 ,5 2 6
1 ,7 3 8

See footnotes at end of table.




19

6 5.2
4 3.3
8.9
48.4
34.2
6 8.0

11.1
8.9
9.7
10.4
4.9
10.6
11.3
7.0

6.5
14.9
6.7

'

2 0 .8
13.6
13.2
5.7

10.3
13.0
10.3
9.4
3.3

3 .3
4.8
6.2
18.2
6.8
19.7
5.3
13.5
3 8 .7
10.6
17.0
9.4

Tabi® IB-5. Wage and salary workers with work experience in 1982 by industry of the job held the longest, race, sex, and
extent ©f employment—Continued
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )

In d u s try , ra c e , a n d s e x

T o ta l w h o
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

F ull tim e '
T o ta l

P a rt tim e 2

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

5 2 .4

13.5

13.1

27 to 49
w eeks

5 0 to 52
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

BLACK
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................
A g r ic u lt u r e ..... .. ... ........V.................................... .
N o n a q ric u ltu ra ! in d u s tr ie s ............................................................
M in in g ............................................................. ..................................
C o n s tr u c t io n ...... ............................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s ................................................... .......................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ....................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u t i li t i e s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
W h o le s a le t r a d e ........................................................................

1 0 ,9 0 0

1 00 .0

265

- -1 0 0 .0

1 0 ,6 3 5
57
459
2 ,3 4 4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

"

1 5.1 ■
13.5

1 2.8

(3)
3 2 .0
5 7.9

(3)
2 6 .0
2 0 .5

-•••

2 6 .0

5 3 .2

— 2 0 .9

1,241

100 .0
1 0 0 .0

1,1 0 3

100 .0

862
1,7 0 3

1 0 0 .0
100 .0

5 6 .6
6 8 .4
4 1 .0

310
1,3 9 2
498

100 .0
100 .0

6 2.3
3 6 .3

100 .0

3 ,9 9 5
382
2 ,6 8 6
927
718

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 9.0

•

4 .8

9.S

...... 2 0

6 .2
3 .7

•

4 .9

32 3
9 .4

(3)
2 6 .4

(3)
2 .6

(3)
3.4

(3>
9.6

15.1
1 6.4

2 0 .4
2 0.7
10.2

6 .2

2.5
1.2
3 .9

1.9
1.2
2 .7

2 .2
1.9
£ .5

4 .3
11.1

2 .3
8.0

4 .9
1 5.6

1.S
13.2

2.1
9.4

5.2
17.9

3 .2
8.7
2 6 .6

1.0
7.2

4.1
13.0
2 5 ,6
9.5

.6

18.7
5.7
6 .9
1.9

13.6
10.0

-

9 .9
13.3

14.4
15.3

6 9 .8

9.1
9.8

14.2
12.1

4 9 .2
18.2
5 8 .0

11.5
4.8
12.0

10.3
6.2
8.9

1 0 0 .0
100 .0

3 6 .5
7 2 .2

12.9
7 .6

16.0
10.3

5 ,3 3 9

1 00 .0

54.1

14.9

14.5

4.1

3.4

9.0

A g ric u ltu re ..........................................................................................

203

5 5.3

19.7
14.7

2 3 .2
14.1

4 .9
4 .0

1.0
3.5

2 5 .3

5 ,1 3 6
46
424

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

2 6 .0

N o n a g ric u ltu ra i in d u s trie s .............................................................
M in in g .................................... ............................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ....... ...................................... .....................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

(3)
3 1 .4

(3)
2 7 .5

(3)
2 5 .3

(3)
2.8

(3)
3 .7

(3)
9.3

M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................. .............................
D u ra b le g o o d s ................................................................ ...........

1 ,3 7 0
825

1.8
1.2

2.1

545
600
914

15.5
17.7
12.3

1.5
1.2

N o n d u ra b le q c o d s ............. .....................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ................. ......................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il tra d e .............................................. ........

20.1
' 2 0 .9
18.9

224
690

11.0
14.5
15.8

2.7
2.3
7 .6

W h o le s a le tra d e ........................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ................. ................................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...................................

11.3
8 .7
15.6

1.9
4 .7
8 .6

2.9
9.1
.8
3 .9

1 4.6

0

(?)
10,5
17.0
6 .3

R e ta il t r a d e ..................................................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re al e s ta te ........... .......................
S e r v ic e s ......................... ............................ ....................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P ro fe s s io n a l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ..................................................................

5.9
9.4

1 8.2
7.5

M en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

S e r v ic e s ...........................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P ro fe s s io n a i s e rv ic e s ............................ .................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ....... ....................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n .......................... .......................................

1 75
1 ,2 5 7
50
734
473
349

1 0 0 .0

5 9.0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 7.2
6 1 .9
6 6 .5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

4 7 .4
6 4 .9
4 1 .7

1 00 .0

6 5 .8

6.5
13.9

14.0
11.9

(4)
11.3
3.3

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 3 .8

11.8

10.7

5.1

(3)
6 3 .0

(3)
11.1
13.8
8 .5

(3)
8 .5

(s)
3 .7

4 3 .9
7 0.4

14.8
1 2.4

‘

5.6
O

8.3

1.9
2.3
4 .2
13.3
.8
17.4
4 .3

3 .3
4 .9
2.3

•

W om en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

5,561

1 00 .0

5 0 .7

12.3

11.8

8 ,2

6.2

10.9

A g ric u ltu re ....................... .......... ........................................................
N o n a g ric u ltu ra i I n d u s tr ie s .............................................................
M in in g .................................................................................................

62
5 ,4 9 9

100 .0
1 0 0 .0

(3)
5 1 .2

(3)
12.4

f)
1 1.5

(3)
8.3

(3)
6 .2

(3) ' •
10.4

11
34

100 .0
1 0 0 .0

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

973
416

1 0 0 .0
100 .0

(3)
(3)
5 6 .2

(*>
21.1

(3)
14.4

(3)
3 .8

6 2 .6

19.4

1.1

(3>
2.4
1.9

558
262

1 0 0 .0

2 2 .4

1 00 .0

5 1 .4
7 2.9

13.8
14.8

f)
2 .0
1.2

5.9.
3 5

2.6
2 1

2 .8
6 3

W h o le s a le t r a d e ........................................................................

789
86

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

3 3.7
55.4

1 8.2
16.5

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

3 1.0
7 2 .0
47.1

C o n s t r u c t io n ..................................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .............................................................................. !
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................................ ...............
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ....................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u t i li t i e s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
R e ta il tra d e ..................................................................... .............

703

F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s t a t e ...................................

323

S e rv ic e s ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................

2 ,7 3 8

P ro fe s s io n a l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ..................................................................

1,9 5 2
454
369

332

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

14.3

14.1

8 .5

7 .2
11.7

13.9
14.3

6 .9
15.0

0
9.6

3.2

1.1

4 .0

10.4
2 7 .5

8 .8

12.3

21.0'
8 .6
9.0
1.4

'2 1 .3
9.1

.

11.4

12.2
10.1

100.0

56.1

4.S
12.3

6 .4
9.1

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

2 8.9
7 3.9

12.1
6.7

17.3
8.3

’ U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 6 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .




18.8

6.8
13.2
1.1

3 D a ta n o t s h o w n -w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
4 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

20

n

7 .6
11.2

7 .6

7 .6

•

18.4

1 9 .5
8 .7

Table B-6. Persons with work experience'in 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest, sex, and extent of
employment
(Numbers in thousands)
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
Total who
worked
during the
year

Occupation and sex

Full tim e1
Total

1 to 26
weeks

Part time2

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

55.0

12.1

9.9

23.0
14.2
7.9
8.4
7.8
8.1

TOTAL
116,277

Total, 16 years and o v e r ................................................................. ................................................

100.0

25,379
11,412
462
7,705
3,245

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

72.0
79.3
85.4
79.9
77.2

8.9
8.0
2.8
8.3
8.2

4.9
4.7
3.4
4.0
6.5

13,967
1,710
473
402
771
1,916.
685
3,951
682
3,378

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
10Q£
100.0
100.0

66.0
85.1
87.8
81.3
85.3
59.5
51.4
58.0
78.3
60.5

9.6
8.3
6.2
5.6
5.3
7.4
10.7
13.6
6.2
9.2

5.1
5.0
3.4
9.1
2.5
4.4
2.4
5.0
4.8
6.7

19.3
1.7
2.7
4.1
6.9
28.7
35.5
23.4
10.7
23.7

35,335
3,290
1,245
1,158
887

1Q0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

56.5
67.0
59.6
71.1
72.1

9.1
9.5
10.4
10.0
7.4

8.0
7.1
6.5
8.2
6.5

26.3
16.4
23.5
10.6
14.0

13,335
3,123 1,837
1,522
6,788
66

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

52.2
78.7
71.2
79.8
28.8
(3)

8.1
8.2
10.1
8.3
7.5
(3>

7.2
5.0
4.6
4.3
9.5
(3)

32.5
8.1
14.0
7.6
54.1
<
3)

Administrative support, including c le ric a l.................................. .........................................................
Supervisors ............................................................................. ........................ ......................... ,.........
Computer equipment o pe rators...................*............. .......................................................................
Secretaries, stenographers, and typists
.......................................................................................
Financial records processing.................................................. ........................................................
Mail and message distributing...........................................................................................................
Other administrative support, including clerical ................ ...:............. .:..... .......i........

18,710
681
647
5,502
2,885
896
8,100

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

57.8
90.4
64.7
59T3
57.1
63.4
53.0

9.8
4.6
12.9
9.9
9.1
5.9
10,7

8.8
2.1
9.5
8.9
7.1
9.8
9.7

23.6
2.9
13.0
21.8
26.7
‘20.9
26.5

Service occu p a tio n s...................................................................... , ............................................... ..........
Private household ...-............................... ......................................................................................... .......
Protective se rvice ....................................................................................................................................
Service, except private household and protective ................. ............................................. L...-.!..'..
Food service ..................................................................................................................................T.:L
Health s e rv ic e .................................................;........................ ...:,....................... ................... ..uvr.;...
Cleaning and building se rv ic e ...................... .... .............................................................................
Personal s e rv ic e ........................................................................ ..........................................................

17,217
1,286
1,846
14,085
6,464
2,060
3,347
2,214

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

33.7
11.5
63.3
31.8
22.7
44.8
42.2
30.6

9.5
4.7
9.1
10.0
9.8
12.7
8.6
10.1

10.6
10.8
11.2
10.6
9.3
11.0
12.1
11.3

46.2
73.0
16.4
47.6
58.1
31.4
37.1
48.1

Precision production, craft, and re p a ir...................................................................................................
Mechanics and repairers................................ .......................................................................................
Construction tra d e s.................................................................................................................................
Other precision production, craft, and re p a ir....... ................... .........................................................

14,021
4,587
5,001
4,433

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

60.4
71.8
44.0
67.3

18.3
13.2
25.2
15.9

11.6
8.4
16.3
9.5

9.6
6.6
14.5
7.3

Machine operators, assemblers, and in s p e c to rs ..............................................................................
Machine operators and tenders, except precision ..........................................................
Fabricators, assemblers, inspectors, and samplers ......................................................................

19,755
9,494
6,318
3,176

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

48.0
51.9
52.2
51.4

20.1
22.5
21.8
23.9

15.9
15.5
14.5
17.4

16.0
10.0
11.4
7.3

Transportation1and material moving occupations ..............................................................................
Motor vehicle operators .....................................................................................................................
Other transportation and material moving occup ations................................................................

4,943
3,481
1,462

100.0
100.0
100.0

52.9
53.3
51.9

20.6
18.5
25.6

'12.4
11.2
15.1

14.1
16.9
7.4

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and'laborers .....................................................................
Construction la borers................................................................. .........................................................
Freight, stock, and material ha n d le rs..................................... .........................................................
Other handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers and laborers ;.........................................................

5,318
781
1,842
2,695

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

36.3
30.5
31.7
41.2

15.4
20.3
11.1
16.9

19.9
33.6
14.8
19.5

28.4
15.6
42.4
22.5

4,571
1,431
2,907
233

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

43.3
76.1
27.9
32.8

9.5
4.0
11.3
21.2

17.6
2.9
24.1
27.1

Managerial and professional s p ecialty...................................................................................................
Executive, administrative, and m angerial.................................... .......................................................
Officials and administrators, public adm inistration....................................... ..................................
Other executive, administrative and m anage rial............................................................................
Management-related occup ations.....................................................................................................
Professional sp ecialty.............................................................................................................................
Engineers ...............................................................................................................................................
Natural scie ntists..................................................................................................................................
Health diagnosing occupations .........................................................................................................
Health assessment and treating occu p a tio n s..................................................,.............................
Teachers, college and university ......................................................................................................
Teachers, except college and unviersity..........................................................................................
Lawyers and ju d g e s ................................................................................................ ............................
Other professional specialty o ccup ations...................................................................................;....
Technical, sales, and administrative s u p p o rt........................................................................................
Technicians and related support .........................................................................................................
Health technologists and technicians...............................................................................................
Engineering and science techn ic ia n s ...............................................................................................
Technicians, except healthr, engineering, and science .................................................................
Sales occupations...................................................................................................................................
Supervisors and proprietors..................................... ..........................................................................
Sales representatives, finance, and business services ................................................................
Sales representatives, commodities, except retail ........................................................................
Sales workers, retail, and personal se rvice s..................................................................................
Sales-related occup ations........................................................................................................

Farming, forestry, and fish in g ..................................................................................................................
Farm operators and managers ............................................................................................................
Farm workers and related occupations .............................................................................................
Forestry and fis h in g .......................................................................................................................... .

See footnotes at end of table.




21

‘

'

•

•

29.6
16.9
36.7
■19.0 '

Table B-6. Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest, sex, and extent of
employment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
worked
during the
year

Occupation and sex

Total, 16 years and over

Full time’
Total

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

Part time2

1 to 26
weeks

64,365

100.0

62.3

12.9

10.0

14.7

Managerial and professional specialty.................................
Executive, administrative, and m angerial..........................
Officials and administrators, public adm inistration.......
Other executive, administrative and managerial ..........
Management-related occup ations...................................

14,727
7,618
292
5,405
1,921

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

81.1
84.1
89.6
84.7
81.6

7.4
6.9
2.8
7.6
5.6

4.1
4.1
3.2
3.3
6.5

7.3
4.9
4.3
4.4
6.3

Professional specialty...........................................................
Engineers ............................................................................
Mathematical and computer scie n tis ts...........................
Natural scie ntists................................................................
Health diagnosing occupations .......................................
Health assessment and treating occupations ..............
Teachers, college and university ....................................
Teachers, except college and unviersity........................
Lawyers and ju d g e s ...........................................................
Other professional specialty occu p a tio n s......................

7,108
1,603
332
326
655
282
433
1,099
573
1,805

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

77.9
85.8
89.9
89.0
88.2
79.3
58.3
73.2
80.0
69.7

8.0
7.5
4.6
2.9
5.3
7.3
11.1
12.4
6.5
8.3

4.2
5.0
3.1
5.4
1.3
2.4
3.3
2.9
4.4
5.6

9.9
1.6
2.3
2.7
5.2
11.0
27.3
11.4
9.2
16.4

Technical, sales, and administrative s u p p o rt......................
Technicians and related support .......................................
Health technologists and technicians.............................
Engineering and science techn ic ia n s.............................
Technicians, except health, engineering, and science

12,051
1,718
222
938
558

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

69.8
74.0
68.1
74.9
74.9

8.5
8.4
8.3
9.3
6.9

6.6
7.5
8.1
7.9
6.5

15.1
10.1
15.5
7.9
11.8

Sales occupations.................................................................
Supervisors and proprietors.............................................
Sales representatives, finance, and business services
Sales representatives, commodities, except retail ......
Sales workers, retail, and personal se rvice s.................
Sales-related occupations................................................

6,599
2,180
1,135
1,316
1,948
20

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

70.4
84.1
76.8
82.2
43.3
(3)

8.3
7.9
9.1
7.8
8.7
(3)

5.5
3.8
4.8
4.1
8.6
(3)

Administrative support, including c le ric a l...............
Supervisors ...............................................................
Computer equipment operators.............................
Secretaries, stenographers, and ty p is ts ..............
Financial records processing.................................
Mail and message distribu ting...............................
Other administrative support, including clerical ..

3,734
315
224
92
261
605
2,237

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

66.8
91.0
75.3
58.9
68.8
69.2
62.0

9.0
4.7
9.1
1.0
10.4
5.4
10.8

8.2
1.1
6.9
13.6
4.9
10.6
8.9

15.9
3.2
8.7
26.4
15.9
14.7
18.3

Service occupations ......................................................
Private household .......................................................
Protective service........................................................
Service, except private household and protective

6,612
41
1,580
4,991
2,308
242
1,962
479

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

44.7
(3)
67.9
37.6
26.5
58.9
47.5
39.5

9.8
(3)
9.0
10.0
10.1
12.5
9.4
10.7

10.5
(3)
9.6
10.8
9.2
3.1
13.2
12.7

35.0
(3)
13.5
41.6
54.2
25.5
29.9
37.1

Precision production, craft, and re p a ir.............
Mechanics and repairers..................................
Construction tra d e s ...........................................
Other precision production, craft, and repair

12,982
4,470
4,907
3,605

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

61.0
71.7
44.3
70.6

18.4
13:2
25.3
15.6

11.6
8.4
16.2
9.4

8.9
6.7
14.2
4.5

Operators, fabricators, and laborers ...............................
Machine operators, assemblers, and in spectors.......
Machine operators and tenders, except precision
Fabricators, assemblers, inspectors, and samplers

14,219
5,253
3,416
1,837

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

50.1
57.0
59.5
52.5

19.6
22.3
20.6
25.3

15.6
13.9
12.8
16.0

14.7
6.8
7.1
6.1

Transportation and material moving occupations.
Motor vehicle operators
Other transportation and material moving occupations .

4,536
3,157
1,379

100.0
100.0
100.0

55.2
56.5
52.3

21.1
18.9
26.1

12.3
11.0
15.3

11.4
13.6
6.4

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers
Construction la borers.....................................................
Freight, stock, and material handlers
Other handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers and laborers

•4,430
742
1,566
2,122

100.0
100:0
100.0
100.0

36.5
31.<8
31.8
41.6

15.0 •
20.9
10.8
16.0.

20.9
32.9
15.6
20.6.

27.6
14.4
41.8
21.8

3,776
1,288
2,264
224

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

47.0
78.9
30.2
33.2

10.1
4.3
12.3
21.1

16.6
2.8
23.4 26.9

26.4
14.1
34.1
18.7

F o o d

s e r v ic e

..........................................................................................................................

Health se rv ic e ...........................................................
Cleaning and building se rvice ................................
Personal s e rv ic e .......................................................

Farming, forestry, and fish in g ....................
Farm operators and managers .............
Farm workers and related occupations
Forestry and fis h in g .................................

See footnotes at end of table.




22

'

•

15.9
4.2
9.3
5.9
39.4
(3)

Table B-6. Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest, sex, and extent of
employment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
Total who
worked
during the
year

Occupation and sex

Full tim e1
Total

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

1 to 26
weeks

Part time2

Women
Total, 16 years and o v e r ..................................................................................................................

51,912

100.0

45.9

11.1

9.7

33.2

Managerial and professional specialty...................................................................................................
Executive, administrative, and m angerial............................................................................................
Officials and administrators, public adm inistration.........................................................................
Other executive, administrative and m anage rial............................................................................
Management-related occup ations.....................................................................................................

10,652
3,794
170
2,300
1,324

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

59.3
69.7
78.2
68.5
70.7

10.9
10.4
2.7
10.1
12.0

6.0
6.0
3.8
5.8
6.5

23.7
13.9
15.4
15.6
10.8

Professional specialty.............................................................................................................................
Engineers ..............................................................................................................................................
Mathematical and computer scie ntists.............................................................................................
Health diagnosing occupations .........................................................................................................
Health assessment and treating o ccup ations.................................................................................
Teachers, college and university ......................................................................................................
Teachers, except college and unviersity..........................................................................................
Lawyers and ju d g e s .............................................................................................................................
Other professional specialty occup ations........................................................................................

6,859
107
141
76
115
1,634
252
2,852
109
1,573

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

53.6
73.8
82.7
48.1
69.1
56.0
39.4
52.1
69.6
49.9

11.2
19.9
9.7
17.2
5.6
7.4
10.1
14.1
5.0
10.2

6.1
4.1
4.0
24.7
8.9
4.7
1.0
5.8
6.9
7.9

29.2
2.2
3.5
10.0
16.4
31.8
49.5
28.0
18.5
32.0

Technical, sales, and administrative s u p p o rt........................................................................................
Technicians and related support .........................................................................................................
Health technologists and technicians...............................................................................................
Engineering and science te chnicians...............................................................................................
Technicians, except health, engineering, and science .................................................................

23,284
1,572
1,023
220
329

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

49.7
59.3
57.7
54.9
67.3

9.4
10.6
10.9
12.9
8.3

8.8
6.8
6.2
9.7
6.7

32.1
23.3
25.2
22.4
17.7

Sales occupations...................................................................................................................................
Supervisors and proprietors................................................................................................................
Sales representatives, finance, and business services ................................................................
Sales representatives, commodities, except retail ........................................................................
Sales workers, retail, and personal se rv ic e s ...................................................................................
Sales-related occupations...................................................................................................................

6,736
942
702
205
4,841
46

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

34.4
66.2
62.3
64.3
23.0
(3)

7.8
8.8
11.8
11.1
7.0
(3)

8.9
7.9
4.4
5.8
9.9
(3)

48.8
17.1
21.6
18.8
60.1
(3)

Administrative support, including c le ric a l............................................................................................
Supervisors ............................................................................................................................................
Computer equipment ope rators.........................................................................................................
Secretaries, stenographers, and ty p is ts ...........................................................................................
Financial records processing..............................................................................................................
Mail and message distribu ting............................................................................................................
Other administrative support, including clerical .............................................................................

14,976
366
423
5,410
2,624
290
5,862

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

55.5
90.0
59.0
59.3
56.0
51.2
49.6

10.1
4.5
14.9
10.1
8.9
6.8
10.7

9.0
2.9
10.9
8.9
7.3
8.2
10.1

25.5
2.6
15.2
21.7
27.8
33.7
29.7

Service occupations ..................................................................................................................................
Protective se rvice ....................................................................................................................................
Service, except private household and protective ...........................................................................
Food service ..........................................................................................................................................
Health se rv ic e .......................................................................................................................................
Cleaning and building s e rvic e .............................................................................................................
Personal s e rv ic e ...................................................................................................................................

10,605
1,244
266
9,095
4,156
1,818
1,386
1,734

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

26.8
11.3
36.3
28.6
20.6
43.0
34.6
28.1

9.3
4.6
9.4
10.0
9.7
12.7
7.4
9.9

10.7
10 9
21.1
10.4
9.4
12.1
10.7
10.9

53.1
73.3
33.3
50.9
60.3
32.2
47.4
51.1

Precision production, craft, and re p a ir...................................................................................................
Mechanics and repairers........................................................................................................................
Construction tra d e s .................................................................................................................................
Other precision production, craft, and repair .....................................................................................

1,039
117
94
828

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

53.2
74.5
30.7
52.8

17.2
12.9
21.1
17.4

10.6
7.7
18.6
10.1

18.9
5.0
29.6
19.7

Operators, fabricators, and laborers ......................................................................................................
Machine operators, assemblers, and in sp e c to rs ..............................................................................
Machine operators and tenders, except precision ........................................................................
Fabricators, assemblers, inspectors, and samplers ......................................................................

5,536
4,241
2,902
1,340

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

- 42.7
45.7
43.7
49.8

21.5
22.9
23.3
22.0

16.7
17.4
16.6
19.2

19.2
14.0
16.4
8.9

Transportation and material moving occupations....................................... ......................................
Motor vehicle operators ......................................................................................................................
Other transportation and material moving occup ations................................................................

407
324
83

100.0
100.0
100.0

27.3
22.7
45.5

15.8
15.1
18.6

12.5
12.8
11.6

44.3
49.5
24.3

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers .....................................................................
Construction la borers...........................................................................................................................
Freight, stock, and material h a n d le rs...............................................................................................
Other handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers and la b o re rs.........................................................

888
39
276
573

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

35.4

17.3

(3)
31.3
39.4

(3)
12.8
20.1

15.1
(3)
10.1
15.3

32.2
(3)
45.8
25.2

Farming, forestry, and fish in g ...................................................................................................................
Farm operators and managers ............................................................................................................
Farm workers and related occupations ..............................................................................................
Forestry and fis h in g ................................................................................................................................

795
143
643
9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

25.6
51.2
20.0
(3)

6.6
1.5
7.6
(3)

22.5
4.2
26.5

45.2
43.1
46.0
(3)

' Usually worked 35 hours or more per week.
2 Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week.
3 Data not shown where base is less than 75,000.
NOTE: Occupational data shown in tables B-6, B-7, B-13, and B-14 are coded




(3)

i

and published according to the 1980 census classification system rather than the
1970 census system previously in use. Therefore, comparisons for earlier years are
not available.

23

Tab!© B-7. Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest, race, sex, and extent of
empSoyment
(N u m b e rs in thousands)
P ercen t distribution of th ose w ho w orked during th e year

Total
w ho
w orked
during
th e year

Total

50 to 52
w ee ks

2 7 to 4 9
w ee ks

T o tal, 16 years and o v e r .....................................................................................

1 0 2 ,1 9 2

10 0.0

5 5 .3

12.0

9.5

8.7

5.9

8 .6

M an a g erial and professional s p e c ia lty .................................................................
E xecutive, adm inistrative, and m anag erial ......................................................
Professional s p e c ia lty .................................................................................................

23 ,2 31
10,581
12,651

10 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

7 2 .0
79 .5
65 .7

8.9
8.1
9.5

4 .7
4 .5
4 .8

5.7
4 .2
6.9

4 .2
1.6
6.4

4.6
2.1
6 .6

T ec hnical, sales, and adm inistrative s u p p o rt....................................................
T ec h n ician s and re lated s u p p o r t..........................................................................
S a le s occupation s ...................* .................................................................................
A dm inistrative support, including c le r ic a l.........................................................

3 1 ,6 5 0
2 ,8 7 9
1 2 ,3 8 5
1 6 ,3 8 7

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

5 6 .5
6 6 .8
53.1
57 .3

9.0
9.5
8.0
9.7

7.7
6.7
6.8
8.5

11.7
8.2
13.3
11 .2

6.3
5.0
7.5
5.6

8.8
3.8
11.3
7.7

Service o c c u p a tio n s ........................................................................................................
P rivate h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................................!...............
Protective service .........................................................................................................
Service, e x cep t private household and p r o te c tiv e ......................................

1 3 ,9 6 3
96 2
1 ,56 6
1 1 ,4 3 5

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
10 0.0
1 0 0.0

31 .4
815
6 3 .8
2 8 .9

9.3
5.0
7.8
9.9

16.3
‘ 2 0 .5
4 .7
17.6

12.7
13 .5
4 .7
13 .7

19 .4
3 9 .8
7.9
19.3

Precision production, craft and r e p a ir ...................................................................
M ech an ics and r e p a ir e r s ..........................................................................................
C onstruction t r a d e s ...................................................................................................
O th e r precision production, craft, and r e p a ir .................................................

1 2 ,7 7 5
4 ,1 9 5
4 ,5 9 6
3 ,9 8 4

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

6 1 .0
7 2 .2
4 4 .8
68.1

18 .2
13 .5
2 4 .8
15 .6

11.1
7.8
15.9
9.0

2 .4
2.1
2.7
2.3

3 .2
1.9
5.4
2.0

4.1
2.5
6 .4
3.1

O perators, fabricators, and la b o r e r s ......................................................................
M ach in e operators, assem blers, and in s p e c to rs .........................................
Transpo rtation and m aterial m oving occupations .......................................
H andlers, equ ipm ent cleaners, helpers, and laborers ............................

1 6 ,4 9 7
7 ,8 5 7
4 ,2 5 5
4 ,3 8 4

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

4 7 .8
51 .9
52:5
35 .9

2 0 .3
2 2 .6
2 1 .0
15 .4

15.6
15.3
12 .6
19 .2

5.4
4.1
4.0
9.3

4 .4
2 .9
5.2
6.3

6.5
3.3
4.7
14 .0

Farm ing, forestry, and fis h in g ....................................................................................
Farm o p erators and m a n a g e r s .............................................................................
Farm w orkers and related o c c u p a tio n s ................................ ........................
Forestry and fis h in g ...................................... .....................................................

4 ,0 7 6
1 ,40 4
2 ,4 6 7
205

10 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

4 4 .9
76.1
28.1
3 4 .5

9.3
4.1
11.3
2 1 .9

17.0
3.0
2 4 .2
2 5 .4

8.7
10.9
7.7
5.3

3 .9
1.3
5.1
5.8

16 .2
4 .6
2 3 .5
7.1

Total, 16 years and o v e r .....................................................................................

5 7 ,2 7 3

10 0.0

6 3 .2

12.8

9.6

4.9

3.7

5.8

M an a g erial and professional specialty ................................................................
E xecutive, adm inistrative, and m anagerial ......................................................
P rofessional s p e c ia lty .................................................................... ............................

1 3 ,6 6 2
7,111
6 ,5 5 0

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
10 0.0

8 1 .4
8 4 .4
7 8 .0

7.4
6.9
7.9

3.8
3.8
3.9

3.3
2.7
4.0

2.0
.9
3.2

2.1
1.2
3 .0

Tec h n ical, sales, and adm inistrative s u p p o rt....................................................
T ec h n ician s and related s u p p o rt..........................................................................
S a le s occupations .......................................................................................................
A dm inistrative support, including c le r ic a l.........................................................

1 0 ,9 4 2
1 ,54 5
6 ,2 3 3
3 ,1 6 4

1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

7 0 .6
74 .6
71 .3
67 .2

8.4
8.4
8.4
8.5

6 .2
7.0
5.1
8.0

6.3
4.8
6.7
6.3

3.9
3.0
3.8
4.4

4 .7
2.2
4 .8
5.5

Service o c c u p a tio n s .................................................................... ..................... ..........
Private h o u s e h o ld ........................................................................................................
Protective service .........................................................................................................
Service, ex cep t private household and p r o te c tiv e .....................................

5 ,3 5 3
34
1 ,34 8
3,971

1 0 0.0
10 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

44.1
(3)
69 .0
3 6 .0

9.3
(3)
7.4
9 .9 .

10.9
(3)
9.8
11.3

10.9
(3)
4.8
12.9

9.2
(3)
3.2
11.2

15 .7
<3)
5.8
18 .7

Precision production, craft and r e p a ir.................................................................
M ech an ics and repairers ..........................................................................................
C onstruction t r a d e s ....................................................................................................
O th e r precision production, craft, and r e p a ir ....................
...................

1 1 ,9 0 0
4 ,0 9 7
4 ,5 1 2
3,291

10 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0

6 1 .7
72.1
45.1
71 .6

18.3
13.5
2 4 .9
15.2

11.1
7.8
15.8
8.8

2 .2
2.1
2.7
1.5

O p erato rs, fabricators, and la b o r e rs .....................................................................
M ach in e operators, assem blers, and in s p e c t o r ..................... ..................
Transpo rtation and m aterial m oving occupations .....................................
H andlers, equ ipm ent cleaners, helpers, and laborers .............................

1 2 ,0 5 3
4 ,5 1 0
3 ,9 1 4
3 ,6 2 9

1 0 0.0
10 0.0
1 0 0.0
10 0.0 •

50 .0
57 .2
54 .9
35 .8

1.9.9
2 2 .6
2 1 .4
14.8

15.2
13.2
12.5
2 0 .4

4 .8
2.7
' 3.4
9.1

4 .0
2.4
3.7
6.1

6 .2
1.9
4.1
13 .8

•Farm ing, forestry, and fishing ..................................................................................
Farm o perators and m a n a g e r s ............................................................................
Farm w orkers and related o c c u p a tio n s ..........................................................
Forestry and fis h in g .......................................................................................„ ..........

3 ,3 6 4
1 ,26 2
1,90 4
198

10 0.0
1 0 0.0
10 0.0
1 0 0.0

4 8 .7
7 8 .9
30 .0
34 .8

9.8
4.3
12 .2
2 1 .7

15.9
2.9
2 3 .6
2 5 .2

15.5
4.0
24.1
6.8

O ccupation, race, and sex

Part tim e2

Full tim e 1
1 to 2 6 : 5 0 to 52
w ee ks
w ee ks

2 7 to 49
w ee ks

1 to 26
w ee ks

W H IT E

'

10.9
12 .6
11.2
10.7

*

’

M en

S e e fo o tn o tes a t end of table.




24

3 .0 ;
1.8
5.4
1.2

6.8

3.3

8.8

1.1

5.6

4.5
6.0

5.5

3.7
2.5
6.1
1.7

Table B-7. Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest, race, sex, and extent of
employment—Continued
(Numbers In thousands)
P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f th o s e w h o w o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r

O c c u p a tio n , ra c e , a n d sex

w ho
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

P a rt tim e 2

F u ll tim e 1

T o ta l

5 0 to 52

2 7 to 4 9

1 to 2 6

w eeks

w eeks

w eeks

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

W H IT E — C o n tin u e d
W om en
4 4 ,9 1 8

1 0 0 .0

4 5 .2

11.0

9.4

13.5

8.7

12.2

M a n a g e ria l a n d p ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ...............................................................

9 ,5 7 0

11.0
10.5
11.2

7.3
3.0

8,1

6 9 .3
5 2 .5

5.9
6.1
5.8

9.0

3 ,4 6 9
6 ,1 0 0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

5 8 .6

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l ................................................ .
P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ...............................................................................................
T e c h n ic a l, s a le s , a n d a d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o r t ...................................................
T e c h n ic ia n s a n d re la te d s u p p o r t ................................................... ....................

2 0 ,7 0 8

1 0 0 .0

49.1

9.3

8.4

14.6

1 ,3 3 4

S a le s o c c u p a tio n s ....................................................................................................

5 7.8
3 4 .7

10.7
7.7

6.5
8.5

12.2
20.1

A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l........................................................

6,151
1 3 ,2 2 3

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 5 .0

10.0

8 .6

12.3

S e rv ic e o c c u p a t io n s ............................................... .....................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................................................

8 ,6 1 0
927

2 3 .6

19.6

219
7 ,4 6 4

9 .3
4 .8
10.0

10.9

P ro te c tiv e s e r v ic e ......................................................................................................
S e rv ic e , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld a n d p r o t e c t iv e ...... ..............................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

12.7
2 0 .0

9 .8

10.3

2 0 .5
3 .6
2 0 .0

P re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c r a ft a n d r e p a ir .................................................................

875
98
84

5 1 .6
7 5 .0
28.1

17.0
12.3
19.0

10.5
6.8
2 0 .9

5 1 .2

17.4

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ..................................................................................

M e c h a n ic s a n d re p a ire rs ........................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n t r a d e s ................... ........................................................................... ..
O th e r p re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a i r ...............................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

8.6
3 2.2
2 5 .2

7 .2
10.1

9.8

3.9
10.5

7 .6
7.3

11.0
5 .6

11.2
5.9

18.0
8.3

14.8
13.7

2 1 .8
3 9 .7

13.5
15.0

2 0 .6
19.6

5.6

9.7
2 .0
22.1

9.8

4 .3
8 .4

3.9
5.6
5.9

16.9
18.1

7.1
6 .0

5.5
3 .4

7.4
5.1

5.5
-

693

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

4 ,4 4 4

1 0 0 .0

4 1 .8

2 1 .3

3 ,3 4 8

1 0 0 .0

4 4 .8

2 2 .5

341
755

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 4 .9

15.5
1 8.6

13.1

11.4

2 2 .6

12.5

3 6 .2

13.2

10.1

6.8

15.2

F a rm o p e ra to rs a n d m a n a g e r s ...........................................................................
F a rm w o rk e rs a n d re la te d o c c u p a t io n s .....................................................

712
141
563

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

2 7 .3
5 0 .8
2 1 .4

7.1
1.5
8 .3

2 2 .0
4.3
2 6 .3

17.7
3 0 .2
14.8

6 .5
3 .2
7.4

10.0
2 1 .8

F o re s try a n d f is h in a ..................................................................................................

3

1 00 .0

0

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

T o ta l, 1 6 y e a rs a n d o v e r ..................................................................................

1 1 ,1 6 8

1 0 0 .0

5 2.3

13.4

13.0

M a n a g e ria l a n d p ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ...............................................................
E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l....................................................

1 ,4 1 0
537

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

7 1 .6
7 8.3

9.3
5.9

7.7
7.3

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lt y .................. ..................... ......................................................

874

1 00 .0

6 7 .5

11.4

T e c h n ic a l, s a le s , a n d a d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o r t ......................................,............
T e c h n ic ia n s a n d r e la te d s u p p o r t ................................................................ .......
S a le s o c c u p a tio n s ........................ ............... ............................................................
A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l........................................................

2 ,8 1 8
263
662
1 ,8 9 2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

5 6 .4
6 6 .7
3 6 .2
6 2 .0

S e rv ic e o c c u p a t io n s ....... ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e r v ic e .................................................................................................. .
S e rv ic e , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld a n d p ro te c tiv e .....................................

2 ,7 7 2
297
260
2 ,2 1 4

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

P re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c r a ft a n d r e p a ir ....... .........................................................
M e c h a n ic s a n d r e p a ir e r s ................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n t r a d e s .............................................................................................. .

956
290
325

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

O th e r p re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a i r ...............................................

341

1 00 .0

O p e ra to rs , fa b ric a to rs , a n d la b o r e r s ....................................................................
M a c h in e o p e ra to rs , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c to r s ........................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d m a te ria l m o v in g o c c u p a t io n s .....................................

2,801
1,3 2 9
633

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

50.1
5 3.9

H a n d le rs , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o r e r s .............................

8 39

100.0
1 00 .0

F a rm in g , fo re s try , a n d fis h in g .................................................................................
F a rm o p e ra to rs a n d m a n a g e r s ...........................................................................

411
20

F a rm w o rk e rs a n d re la te d o c c u p a t io n s ..................................................... :...

3 79
13

O p e ra to rs , fa b ric a to rs , a n d la b o r e r s ..... ............... ...............................................
M a c h in e o p e ra to rs , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c to rs ........................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d m a te ria l m o v in g o c c u p a tio n s ......................................
H a n d le rs , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o re rs ..............................
F a rm in g , fo re s try , a n d fis h in g .................................................................................

0

9.3

19.4

BLACK

F o re s try a n d f is h in g ...............................................................................................

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




25

4.9

10.1

3.2
4 .2

3 .5
2 .4

8 .0

2 .5

4.2

4 .7
1.9
6.4

1 0.4
12.3
9 .0
10.7

12.6
12.9
14.1
12.1

6 .2
5.2
15.6
3.1

4 .4
2 .7
8 .5
3 .2

9.9
.2
16.5
8.9

4 4 .0
2 0 .5
6 0 .2
4 5 .2

10.8
4 .2
16.8
11.0

9.5
3.7
11.8
10.0

11.1
2 8 .8

8 .4
2 0 .4
3 .0
7 .5

16.2
2 2 .4
8.2
16.3

5 3 .0
6 5 .6

2 0 .2
9.0

16.7
16.3

2.7
3 .9

1.9
1.0

5.5
4 .2

3 4.3

3 0 .2

19.4

3 .0

3 .6

9.5

6 0 .2

2 0 .2

14.4

1.4

1.0

2.7

0
10.0

18.9

16.8

4 .8

3.8

5.5

5 5.9
3 9 .8

22.1
17.1
15.2

15.0
11.2

2.6
6.0

3.1
4 .4

2 4 .0

3.4
5.4
6.7

4.0

10.3

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

27.1

11.9

2 1 .4

3 1 .7

(3)

(3)

(3)

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

2 5 .3

11.7

2 3 .2

(3)

(3)

(3)

5.3

2 .6

(3)

(3)

(3)

5.3

2.3

3 2 .2

(3)

(3)

(3)

Table B-7. Persons with work experience in 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest, race, sex, and extent ©?
employment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)
Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
O c c u p a tio n , ra c e , a n d sex

w ho
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

F ull tim e 1

Past tim e 2

T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

B L A C K — C o n tin u e d
H en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ..................................................................................

5,521

1 00 .0

54.1

14.6

14.2

4 .3

3.4

9.2

M a n a g e ria l a n d p ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ...............................................................
E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l ....................................................

619
316

9.2

8 .6
8.3
9 .0

.7

302

7 8 .5
8 0 .4
7 6 .6

7.3
5.5

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ..............................................................................................

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

.9
.5

2.3
2 .8
1.8

2.5
2.2
2 .8

T e c h n ic a l, sa le s , a n d a d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o r t ...................................................
T e c h n ic ia n s a n d re la te d s u p p o r t .......................................................................
S a le s o c c u p a tio n s ....................................................................................................
A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l.......................................................

791
101
226
464

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
100.0
1 00 .0

6 2.9
7 1.3
5 1.3
6 6 .7

9.9
11.7
6.5
11.3

11.5
15.9
1 2.0
10.2

4 .2
.6
1 1.6
1.4

3.8
(4)
6.8
3.1

7.7
.4
11.7
7.4

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s ...................................... .............................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................................................
P ro te c tiv e sesvice .....................................................................................................
S e rv ic e , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld a n d p r o t e c t iv e ....................................

1 ,0 3 0
5
217
808

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

4 7 .3

12.7

0
6 1 .3
4 4 .2

19.6
11.0

P re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c ra ft a n d r e p a ir .................................................................
M e c h a n ic s a n d re p a ire rs .......................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n tra d e s ..................................................................................................
O th e r p re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a i r ...............................................

842
276
316
251

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 1.7
6 5.3
3 4 .0
5 8.9

2 0.5
8.7
2 9 .8
2 1.7

1 7.6
16.3
2 0 .0
15.9

O p e ra to rs , fa b ric a to rs , a n d l a b o r e r s ....................................................................
M a c h in e o p e ra to rs , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c to r s ........................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d m a te ria l m o v in g o c c u p a t io n s ...................................
H a n d le rs , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d l a b o r e r s .............................

1 ,9 0 0
599
575
726

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

5 1.2
5 7.8
5 7.6
4 0 .6

17.5
19.3
17.5
16.1

17.6
16.9
11.2
2 3 .4

F a rm in g , fo re s try , a n d fis h in g .................................................................................
F a rm o p e ra to rs a n d m a n a g e rs ...........................................................................
F a rm w o rk e rs a n d re la te d o c c u p a tio i i s ..........................................................
F o re s try a n d f is h in g ....................... ..........................................................................

340
18
310

3 0 .6

14.0

19.5

f)
2 8.9

(3)
13.9

{1
2 1 .4

11

1 00 .0
100 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

(3
)

(3
)

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a nd o v e r ....................................................... ..........................

5 ,6 4 7

100.0

5 0.5

M a n a g e ria l a n d p ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ...............................................................
E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l ....................................................
P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty ......................................................................................... I...

792
220
571

1 00 .0
100 .0
100.0

T e c h n ic a l, s a le s , a n d a d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o r t ...................................................
T e c h n ic ia n s a nd re la te d s u p p o r t .......................................................................
S a le s o c c u p a tio n s ....................................................................................................
A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l .......................................................

2 ,0 2 7
1 62
436
1 ,4 2 9

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s ....................................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e rv ic e .....................................................................................................
S e rv ic e , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld a n d p r o t e c t iv e ....................................

( 3)

9 .0

7.8

5.5

17.1

(3)
8 .4

(3)
0
9.9

f)
2.2
6 .4

(3)
3 .4
19.4

2 .4
4.1
2.8
O

2.1
1.1
3.7
1.4

5.7
4 .5
3 .7
2 .2

4 .2
1.2
5,1
6.0

3 .5
2.2
4 .5
3 .8

5 .9
2 .6
4 .2
10.1
2 7 .9

9 .2

6 .4

1.7

(3
)

(3
)

6.5

1.2

(3)

(35

f)

12.2

11.7

8.3

6 .2

11.0

6 6 .2
75.3
6 2.7

10.8
6.5
12.5

7 .0
5.9
7.4

5.1
9.0
3 .6

4 .5
1.9
5 .5

6.4
1.5
8.3

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0 ’
100.0

53.9
5 3.8
28.5
6 0.5

10.6
12.7
10.4
10.5

13.1
11.0
15.2
12.7

7.0
8.1
17.6
3.7

4.7
4 .4
9.4

10.7

3.3

C)
19.0
9,4

1 ,7 4 2
292
44
1 ,4 0 6

100.0
100.0
100 .0
100 .0

4 1 .6
19.7

9.7
4.3

9.8
3.8

13.0
2 9.3

10.2
2 0 .7

15.6
2 2 .2

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

f)

(3
)

4 5.8

11.0

10.5

10.0

8.1

14.5

P re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c ra ft a n d r e p a ir .................................................................
M e c h a n ic s a n d re p a ire rs .......................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n tra d e s ..................................................................................................
O th e r p re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a i r ...............................................

114
15
9
91

100.0
1 00 .0
100.0
100.0

6 3.0

18.1

10.3

5.3

(3
)
(3
)

0
O

0
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
C
3
)

6 3.8

16.2

10.4

5.5

0
(3
)
(3
)
0

O p e ra to rs , fa b ric a to rs , a n d la b o r e r s ...................................................................
M a c h in e o p e ra to rs , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c tq r s ........................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d m a te ria l m o v in g o c c u p a t io n s .....................................
H a n d le rs , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o r e r s .............................

901
731
58

4 8.0
50.7

2 1 .7
2 4.3

15.0
13.4

6.1
5.2

4.4
2.9

4.7
3.5

113

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

F a rm in g , fo re s try , a n d fis h in g .................................................................................................
F a rm o p e ra to rs a n d m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................................
F a rm w o rk e rs a n d re la te d o c c u p a t io n s ..........................................................
F o re s try a n d f is h in g .....................................................................................................................

71

1 00 .0

1

100.0
100 .0
100 .0

(3)
2 8 .2
(3)

W om en

69
1

1 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .




4 .2

C
)

(3
)

(3
)

f)

(3
)

0

3 4.7

9.6

2 7.5

11.2

5.3

11 .8

(3
)
(3
)
( )

0
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

f)
(3
)
(3
)
f)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

C
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

3

(3
)

(3)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
4 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

26

3.3

(In thousands}
R e a s o n fo r w o rk in g le s s th a n a fu ll y e a r
E x te n t o f e m p lo y m e n t a n d s e x

i ora!
p a rt-y e a r
w o rk e rs '

Illn e s s
or
disability/2

U n e m p lo y m e n t

T a k in g
c a re
o f hom e

G o in g
to
school

R e tire m e n t

In A rm e d
F o rc e s

O th e r
re a s o n s 3

TO TAL
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................
W o rk e d a t fu ll-tim e jo b s 4 ...............................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
4 0 to 4 9 w e e k s ............................................... ...............
W o rk e d a t p a rt-tim e jo b s 5 .............................................
1 to 2 6 w e e k s .................................................................
2 7 to 4 9 w e e k s ............................................... ...............

4 2 ,4 9 2
2 5 ,6 0 2
5 ,2 3 3
6 ,2 6 3
6 ,0 1 7
8 ,0 8 9
1 6 ,8 9 0
1 0 ,1 9 7
6 ,6 9 3

1 7 ,6 3 3
1 3 ,4 5 7
1,814
3 ,2 7 9
3 ,5 7 8
4 ,7 8 5
4 ,1 7 7
2 ,1 5 9
2 ,0 1 7

2 ,6 9 0
1,8 6 7
293
343
381
849
824
380
444

6,741
2 ,9 1 6
803
841
621
651
3 ,8 2 5
2 ,3 8 2
1 ,4 4 3

8,621
3 ,3 4 5
1 ,6 5 9
930
570
1 87
5 ,2 7 6
3 ,8 9 7
1 ,3 7 9

1,7 4 9
899
261
355
1 87
95
850
607
243

1 07
87
30
26
12
19
20
19
1

4 ,8 5 0
3,031
373
488
668
1 ,5 0 2
1 ,9 1 9
754

2 1 ,1 1 8
1 4 ,7 8 8
2 ,8 0 0
3 ,6 5 4
3 ,5 7 5
4 ,7 5 8
6 ,3 3 0
3 ,9 5 5
2 ,3 7 5

1 1 ,3 8 5
9 ,2 4 5
1 ,1 8 9
2 ,3 3 4
2,491
3,231
2 ,1 4 0
1 ,1 2 4
1 ,0 1 6

1,2 8 8
1,0 1 0
1 50
207
215
438
278
1 69
1 09

1 45
96
8
19
21
47
49
20
29

4 ,6 2 8
2 ,0 4 0
1 ,0 2 5
570
345
101
2 ,5 8 8
1 ,9 2 3
665

1 ,2 2 2
641
204
231
1 40
67
581
420
161

98
82
29

2 ,3 5 2
1,6 7 4
1 95

26
10
17
16
16

267
352
859
678
283
396

2 1 ,3 7 4
1 0,8 14
2 ,4 3 3
2 ,6 0 9
2,441
3,331
1 0 ,5 6 0
6 ,2 4 2
4 ,3 1 8

6 ,2 4 8
4 ,2 1 2
625
946
1 ,0 8 7
1 ,5 5 4
2 ,0 3 6
1 ,0 3 5
1,001

1 ,4 0 2
856
143
137
165
412

6 ,5 9 6
2 ,8 2 0
794
822
599
605

546
211
335

3 ,7 7 6
2 ,3 6 2
1 ,4 1 5

3 ,9 9 3
1 ,3 0 5
634
360
225
86
2 ,6 8 8
1 ,9 7 4
714

527
258
58
124
48
29
269
1 87
82

1 ,1 6 5

Men
T o ta i, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................
W o rk e d a t fu ll-tim e jo b s 4 ...............................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
4 0 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
W o rk e d a t p a rt-tim e jo b s 5 .............................................
1 to 2 6 w e e k s .................................................................
2 7 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................

-

W om en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ........................ ..........
W o rk e d a t fu ll-tim e jo b s 4 ...............................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
4 0 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
W o rk e d a t p a rt-tim e jo b s 5 .............................................
1 to 2 6 w e e k s ..................................................................
2 7 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................

’ W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .
2 E x c lu d e s p a id s ic k le a v e fro m a jo b (w h ic h is c o u n te d a s tim e
w o rk e d ) a n d p e rio d s o f ilin e s s o r d is a b ility d u rin g w h ic h th e p e rs o n w o u ld
n o t h a v e w o rk e d o r w o u ld n o t h a v e b e e n in th e la b o r fo rc e e v e n if w e l l . .




3 in c lu d e s , a m o n g o th e rs , u n p a id v a c a tio n s ,
v a c a tio n s fo r s tu d e n ts .
4 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .
5 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .

27

9
5
1

2 ,5 9 8
1,3 5 8
178
221
3 15
643
1,241
471
7 69

-

2
2
4
2
1

s trik e s ,

and

sum m er

Table B-©. Part-year workers In 1982 by race, age, sex, and reason for working iess than a full year
(in thousands)

r~.......— -------- —

........ • —---------—“
——
R ea so n for working less th an a full ye ar

R a c e , a ge , a n d s e x

lo ta i
p a rt-y e a r
w o rk e rs '

------------------------------ 1

T a k in g

G o in g

c a re
of hom e

Illn e s s o r
d is a b ility 1
2

U n e m p lo y m e n t

to
school

R e tire m e n t

In
A rm e d
F o rc e s

O th e r
re a s o n s 3

W H IT E
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s ............................................................
4 5 to 8 4 y e a r s ............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

1 4 ,8 0 9
1 ,1 8 2
3 ,1 2 2
1,201
1,921
7 ,4 9 5
2 ,8 3 5
175

1 ,6 4 3
-

256
511
3 ,7 2 0
1 ,3 0 0
1 89

7 ,6 6 5
4 ,2 1 2
2 ,6 3 2
1 ,4 4 9
1 ,1 8 3
764
55
1

1 29

4 ,1 1 6

16
17
5
11
55
33
8

2 ,2 3 7
1 ,4 7 5
7 54
721
389
15

1,1 5 3
-

6,021
1 59

3 ,5 4 9
1 ,9 7 5

490
-

74
5 03
3 77
77

750
251
499
3 ,6 6 5
1 ,2 6 6
181

1 ,1 5 7
695
462
375
40
1

-

442
9
50
23
27
224

447
21
1 10
45
65
230

716
412
247

48

1

1 26
34

78
8

9
-

42
47

1 ,4 3 4
7S
349
120
229
749
252
11

194
-

10
-

366
215
115

58
—

2 ,3 2 3

9 53

2 47

437

293
530
2 36
2 94

52
1 95
64

9
26

21
1 10

8
18

157

140
56

7

18

6 ,7 6 5
1,703

2 ,1 8 5
67
247
83
164
943
766
161

6 ,1 5 0
1 75
767

9 ,6 7 8

3 6 ,7 9 7
5 ,9 9 5
7,491
3 ,2 6 6
4 ,2 2 5
1 4,8 42

1,0 6 9
34

13
729
901

91
9
56

4 ,2 5 4
349
667

20
37
25
-

2 57
410
1,881
1 ,0 8 0
277

-

M en
1 8,2 65
3 ,2 2 7
3 ,9 7 2
1,704
2 ,2 6 8
6 ,7 8 0
3 ,2 7 4
1 ,0 1 3

T o t a l ..........................................................................
18 to 19 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s ............................................... .............
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s ............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

761
1 ,9 8 9
775
1 ,2 1 4
4 ,9 8 6

121
31
90
440
3 90
84

1 ,8 2 9
1 14

4
507
641

-

88
7
56
20
36
25
-

2 ,0 3 2
1 72
316
1 19
1 96
880
499
1 66

-

W om en
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s ............................... ............... .............
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s ........................................................

18,531
2 ,7 6 9

2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s ............................................................

5 ,1 3 0
421
1,1 3 3
426
7 07

1,9 5 7
8 ,0 6 2
3 ,4 9 2
691

3 ,5 1 9
1,5 6 2

4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s .......................................... .................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r ....... .............................................

1 ,1 1 6
34
1 26
52

2 ,5 0 9
1 ,0 0 6
61

9
221
259

3
2
1
1
-

2 ,2 2 3
1 77
351
1 38
213
1,001
582
111

BLACK
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a rs ......... ................ ...................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s ............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s ............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

4 ,6 1 7
611
1,074
481
5 94
2 ,0 2 4 .
7 78
131

2 ,3 8 7
1 26
544
1 84
360
1,2 9 0
409
18

91
~
-

1 55
92

13
1
7
4
2
5
-

522
43
117
69
48
225
1 14
23

Steers
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s ............................................................
4 5 to 64 y e a r s ............................................................

6 5 y e a rs and o v e r .....................................................

.

2 ,2 9 4
318
5 44
2 45
300
9 60
409
63

_

24
14
9
84
70
16

.

9
-

24
34

-

223
29
53
41
12
85
56

-

-

350

33

4

300

197

-

1

14

45
65

1 32
89
43

-

2
-

222

18

1

65
28
36
141

77
6

2

18

-

13

-

65

-

49
30
6

7
1
2

-

fc
»

-

4
4
-

5

W om en
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s .............................. ..............................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s ............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r ................. ..............................

1,064
3 69
67

130
541

1 W o rke d less than 5 0 w ee ks.
2 Excludes paid sick leav e from a job (which is cou nted as tim e
w orked) and periods of illness or disability during which th e person w ould




-

2
1

58
23

not have w orked or w ould not bee n in th e labor fo rce ev en if well.
3 Includes, am ong others, unpaid vacation s, strikes, and su m m er
vacation s fo r students.

28

Table IB-10. Extent of unemployment ini 1982 by seu, race, IHispaoio origin, and ,age
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )
E x te n t o f u n e m p lo y m e n t, sex, ra c e , a n d H is p a n ic
o rig in

T o ta l

16 to 17
y e a rs

18 to 19
y e a rs

2 0 to 2 4
y e a rs

2 5 to 3 4
y e a rs

35 to 44
y e a rs

4 5 to 54
y e a rs

55 to 64
y e a rs

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ...............................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la t io n ...................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r .....................................................
P e r c e n t ................................................................................
Y e a r ro u n d w o rk e rs 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t....................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ....r...............;................ .<
..........................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...............................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........................................................

1 2 0 ,2 3 5
6 9 .2
2 6 ,4 9 3
2 2.0
3 ,9 5 8
2 2 ,5 3 5
1 00 .0

3 ,6 7 3
4 9 .2
1 ,0 8 2
2 9 .5
375
707
1 00 .0

6 ,0 7 8
7 6.4
2 ,1 8 2
3 5 .9
402
1,781
100.0

1 7 ,8 0 8
8 5 .5
5 ,8 5 8
3 2 .9
848
5 ,0 1 0
1 00 .0

3 3 ,3 6 5
8 5.7
8 ,1 1 3
2 4 .3
1,1 0 9
7 ,0 0 4
100 .0

2 4 ,2 2 9
8 4.8
4 ,4 4 9
18.4
542
3 ,9 0 7
1 00 .0

1 7 ,4 5 2
7 8.7
2 ,7 2 7
15.6
374
2 ,3 5 3
1 00 .0

1 3,4 58
6 1 .2
1 ,7 7 0
13.2
249
1 ,5 2 2
100.0

4 ,1 7 2
16.2
312
7.5
60
252
1 00 .0

5.1

.2

1.7

4 .0

4.9

6.3

7.4

9.8

3.4

15.5
18.6
12.5
2 6.0
2 2 .4

3 3 .5
2 1 .4
10.2
16.0
18.7

2 2 .2
20.1
12.5
2 1 .8
2 1.7

18.2

13.6

18.5
11.0
26.1
2 2.2

18.8
12.8
2 7 .7
22.1

12.9
18.8
12.7
26.1
2 3.2

11.9
17.7
14.1
2 7 .2
2 1 .7

11.1
15.3
13.1
2 5.8
2 4.9

14.1
17.8
13.4
2 5 .4
2 5 .9

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t..................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ................

17.1
16.5

2 0 .3
15.8

2 0 .4
15.3

19.0
14.9

16.6
16.1

16.6
18.6

14.1
18.9

14.1
16.3

13.7
18.5

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ...............................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la t io n .............................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ........ ............................................
P e r c e n t ..................................................... ..........................
Y e a r ro u n d w o r k e r s 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t........................................... ........................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...............................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ................................... ...........................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........................................................

6 6 ,1 6 0
8 0 .4
15,441
2 3 .3
1 ,7 9 5
1 3 ,6 4 6
1 00 .0

2 ,0 0 0
5 2 .7
594
2 9 .7
205
389
1 0 0 .0

3 ,1 6 9
8 0.4
1 ,2 1 8
3 8.4
208
1 ,0 1 0
1 00 .0

9 ,2 0 8
9 0.7
3 ,3 7 2
3 6 .6
356
3 ,0 1 6
100 .0

1 8 ,1 6 3
9 5 .4
4 ,8 6 5
2 6 .8
511
4 ,3 5 4
1 0 0 .0

1 3,3 19
95.9
2 ,4 9 7
18.7
181
2 ,3 1 6
100.0

9 ,8 8 5
9 2.5
1 ,6 3 4
16.5
171
1,463
1 00 .0

7 ,8 6 5
7 6 .7
1,078
13.7
131
947
100.0

2,551
2 4.3
1 84
7.2
32
152
1 00 .0

1.9

4 .3

5.6

6.9

7.8

8.0

3 .7

12.7
17.4
12.6
2 8.7
23.1

3 0 .4
19.8
9.7
18.5
2 1.7

15.4
19.0
14.4
2 6 .0
2 3 .2

15.7
17.2
11.1
28.1
2 3 .6

10.8
17.7
12.9
3 0 .6
.2 2 .4

10.3
17.7
12.4
2 9.0
2 3 .7

10.4
15.6
15.2
2 8:9
2 2 .2

11.7
16.1
11.7
2 7.3
2 5 .2

13.1
16.0
12.6
2 8.8
2 5 .7

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t..................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ................

17.7
18.3

2 0 .2
14.8

2 0.8
17.0

19.8
16.7

17.4
17.9

17.7
2 0 .2

14.2
21.1

15.0
18.1

11.2
19.9

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ...............................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r .....................................................
P e r c e n t ...............................................................................
Y e a r ro u n d w o rk e rs 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t...................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ..................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...............................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........................................................

5 4 ,0 7 4
5 9.2
1 1,0 52
2 0 .4
2 ,1 6 3
8 ,8 8 9
1 00 .0

1,6 7 3
4 5 .5
. 488
2 9 .2
1 70
3 18
100 .0

2 ,9 0 9
7 2 .4
964
33.1
1 94
771
100.0

8,601
8 0.5
2 ,4 8 6
2 8.9
492
1 ,9 9 4
1 00 .0

1 5 ,2 0 2
r 7 6 .4
3 ,2 4 7
2 1 .4
598
2 ,6 5 0
1 00 .0

1 0 ,9 1 0
7 4.3
1 ,9 5 2
17.9
361
1,591
100.0

7 ,5 6 7
6 5 .9
1,0 9 3
14.4
203
890
1 00 .0

5 ,5 9 2
4 7 .7
693
12.4
1 18
575
1 00 .0

4 .6

.4

1.5

3 .6

3.8

5.3

6.9

12.8

2 .9

19.7
2 0 .4
12.2
2 2 .0
2 1.2

3 7.3
2 3 .4
10.8
13.0
15.1

3 1.0
2 1.6
10.1
16.2
19.6

2 2 .0
2 0 .5
10.9
2 2 .9
2 0 .0

18.3
2 0.7
12.7
2 2 .9
2 1 .6

16.6
2 0 .4
13.2
2 2.0
2 2.5

14.4
2 1 .2
12.2
2 4 .4
2 0.9

10.2
14.0
15.3
2 3.3
2 4 .4

15.7
2 0 .4
14.5
2 0 .3
2 6 .2

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t..................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t................

16.1
13.8

2 0 .4
17.0

19.8
13.0

17.9
12.1

15.2
13.0

15.1
16.3

14.0
15.2

12.6
13.2

17.4
16.4

6 5 y e a rs
and over

TO TAL

EVSen

5.5

(3)

W om en

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




29

1,621
1 0.7 .,
129
7.9
28
101
100 .0

Table B-10. Extent of unemployment in 1982 by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)

Extent of unemployment, sex, race, and Hispanic origin

Total

16 to 19
years

20 to 24
years

25 to 44
years

45 to 54
years

55 to 64
years

65 years
and over

W H IT E
M en
Total who worked or looked for work .......................................
Percent of population ..........................................................
Total with une m plo ym e nt............................................................
Percent with unemployment .............................................
Did not work but looked for w o rk ..........................................
Worked during the year ............................................................
Percent .....................................................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of
unem ploym ent..........................................................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ........................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ......................................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ......................................................................
27 weeks or m o r e .................................................................

58,560
81.6
12,883
22.0
1,287
11,596
100.0

4,577
71.1
1,513
33.1
288
1,224
100.0

7,990
92.7
2,728
34.1
227
2,502
100.0

27,693
96.6
6,156
22.2
502
5,654
100.0

8,787
93.5
1,414
16.1
139
1,275
100.0

7,164
77.7
914
12.8
109
805
100.0

2,350
24.8
158
6.7
22
136
100.0

5.6

1.6

4.8

6.0

8.3

8.1

1.3

13.3
17.7
12.8
28.5
22.1

19.6
18.5
13.6
27.8
21.4

16.8
17.3
11.6
29.5
21.6

11.1
18.2
13.0
29.2
22.2

10.8
16.1
14.4
27.3
21.2

12.1
16.2
12.0
27.0
24.3

14.6
17.0
11.5
20.7
28.7

With 2 spells of unemployment ..........................................
With 3 or more spells of unemployment .........................

17.8
17.9

21.0
15.7

19.0
16.5

17.9
18.7

14.6
19.6

15.0
17.2

12.6
14.2

Total who worked or looked for work .......................................
Percent of population ..........................................................
Total with unemployment ............................................................
Percent with unemployment .............................................
Did not work but looked for w o rk ..........................................
Worked during the y e a r ............................................................
Percent .....................................................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of
unem ploym ent.........................................................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ........................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ......................................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ......................................................................
27 weeks or m o r e ................................................................

46,381
59.0
8,847
19.1
1,463
7,384
100.0

4,056
64.0
1,233
30.4
270
963
100.0

7,371
82.5
1,970
26.7
305
1,665
100.0

22,011
75.3
4,033
18.3
620
3,412
100.0

6,552
65.9
906
13.8
148
758
100.0

4,927
47.4
587
11.9
94
494
100.0

11,463
10.6
118
8.1
25
93
100.0

4.8

1.4

4.2

4.4

6.7

14.3

3.0

20.7
20.7
12.7
20.7
20.4

33.9
22.2
10.4
14.2
18.0

22.2
21.2
11.6
22.2
18.5

19.2
20.8
13.7
20.9
21.1

15.1
20.7
12.1
24.7
20.8

9.8
14.2
14.5
22.3
24.9

17.0
22.0
15.7
15.6
26.6

With 2 spells of unemployment ..........................................
With 3 or more spells of unemployment .........................

15.8
13.7

16.6
14.8

15.5
12.0

14.6
13.9

11.3
14.8

16.9
13.6

16.8
14.5

Total who worked or looked for work .......................................
Percent of population ..........................................................
Total with unemployment ............................................................
Percent with unemployment .............................................
Did not work but looked for w o rk ..........................................
Worked during the year ............................................................
Percent .....................................................................................
Year round workers' with 1 or 2 weeks of
unem ploym ent.........................................................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ........................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ......................................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ......................................................................
27 weeks or m o r e .................. ..............................................

5,994
71.4
2,186
36.5
473
1,713
100.0

492
44.9
271
55.1
120
151
100.0

994
80.0
562
56.5
118
444
100.0

2,965
88.2
1,017
34.3
179
838
100.0

820
82.0
175
21.3
30
145
100.0

567
66.2
142
25.0
17
125
100.0

156
18.5
19
12.5
9
11
100.0

2.2

6.5

4.0

6.5

8.7
15.4
11.3
30.7
29.3

18.6
26.8
10.2
11.1
33.3

8.1
15.1
8.9
31.3
34.4

7.6
14.1
11.3
35.1
25.4

7.3
13.0
19.3
25.9
30.4

9.2
14.9
9.7
25.9
33.8

With 2 spells of unemployment ..........................................
With 3 or more spells of unemployment .........................

16.8
21.5

17.6
25.0

23.7
18.0

15.0
19.1

10.7
34.9

11.8
24v8

•

W om en

•

BLACK
M en

4.6

(3)

See footnotes at end of table.




30

O
0

O
0
0

0
0
0

Table B-10. Extent of unemployment in 1982 by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age=-Contonued
(Num bers in thousands)

Extent of unemployment, sex, race, and Hispanic origin

16 to 19
years

Total

20 to 24
years

45 to 54
years

25 to 44
years

55 to 64
years

65 years
and over

B L A C K — C ontin ued
W om e n
1,052
71.3
469
44.6
174
296
100.0

3,265
78.5
999
30.6
308
692
100.0

839
66.7
164
19.5
51
112
100.0

.4

5.1

5.6

16.2
26.4
10.8
26.4
20.2

20.2
16.3
6.2
27.2
29.7

10.6
19.6
9.1
30.8
24.8

17.9
15.5

32.2
10.6

25.1
13.0

13.6
16.6

3,646
82.7
1,038
28.5
101
' 937
•100.0

339
56.6
123
36.3
22
101
100.0

575
88.5
212
36.8
13
198
100.0

1,908
94.1
544
28.5
47
497
100.0

2.4

4.0

6.7

Total who worked or looked for work .......................................
Percent of population ......f..................................................
Total with une m plo ym e nt............................................................
Percent with unemployment .............................................
Did not work but looked for w o rk ..................... ..... ..............
Worked during the year ............................................................
Percent ............................ *......................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of
unem ploym ent.................... :...................................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s ..........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ........................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ......................................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ......................................................................
27 weeks or m o r e ................................................................

13.5
19.3
9.4
29.3
25.1

With 2 spells of unemployment ..........................................
With 3 or more spells of une m plo ym e nt.........................

435
37.9
188
43.3
84
104
100.0

6,282
60.3
1,910
30.4
635
1,275
100.0
3.3

(3)

558
50.5
79
14.2
15
64
100.0

133
10.4
10
7.5
2
7
100.0

O

O

11.3
24.6
11.2
24.8
22.5

0
(4)
0
(4)
(4)

(4)
(4)
(4
)
(4
)
O

10.9
19.5

0
0

(4)
0

H IS P A N IC O R IG IN
Men
Total who worked or looked for work .................... *.................
Percent of population ........................................................
Total with une m plo ym e nt......,.....................................................
Percent with unemployment .......... » ................................
Did not work but looked for work ....!....................................
Worked during the year ............................................................
Percent .....................................................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of
unem ploym ent.........................................................................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ........................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ......:...............................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ......................................................................
27 weeks or m o r e ................................... .............................
With 2 spells of unemployment ..........................................
With 3 or more spells of unemployment .............. ...........

3.4

.

(3
)

'

497
89.9
too
20.1
8
92
100.0

258
77.5
51
19.8
8
43
100.0

69
28.3
9
(4
)
2
7
100.0

0

0

(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4)
(4)

(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4)
(4
)

0
0

(4
)
(4
)

10.6
15.8
14.3
33.3
22.6

15.1
22.2
14.2
24.8
23.7

15.9
17.5
12.2
33.6
18.4

9.1
14.8
15.9
31.6
24.7

4.4
12.2
13.8
' 45.6
17.3

17.5 '
19.1

26.4
11.5

15.4
18.6

16.8
20.4

17.6
16.8

259
46.9
96
36.9
29
67
100.0

458
62.6
143
31.2
30
113
100.0

1,412
62.0
342
24.2
76
266
100.0

359
57.2
65
18.0
12
53
100.0

1.2

1.8

C)

0

0

16.7
16.7
13.8
22.1
28.9

0
O
(4)

0
C)
4

O
(4)

0

O

0

(4
)
(4)

(4)

17.2
13.0

0
o .

0

(4)

W om en
Total who worked or looked for work ............. .........................
Percent of population .........................................................
Total with unemployment ............................................................
Percent with unemployment .............................................
Did not work but looked for w o rk ......... ................................
Worked during the year ............................................................
Percent .....................................................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of
unem ploym ent.............................................................. ...........
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .......................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s .........................................................<
...... .
15 to 26 w e e k s ................. :............................................ '......
27 weeks or m o r e ................................................................

2,685
53.9
679
25.3
152
527
100.0

17.1
18.5
14.5
23.6
24.3

C)
0
0

0
0

17.8
24.9.
16.1
24.0
16.0

With 2 spells of unemployment .........................................
With 3 or more spells of unemployment .........................

16.5
12.7

0
n

16.7
10.5

2.0

0

' Worked 50 weeks or more.
2. Worked less than 50 weeks.




.

(■)

169
38.6
29
17.2
5
24
100.0

(4
)

3 Less than 0.05 percent,
'' Data not shown where base is less than 75,000.

31-

28
7.9
5
(4
)
1
4
100.0

0
O

.

Table S-11. Extent off unemployment in 1982. by sex, race, and marital status
(Num bers in thousands)
White

T otal

Extent of unemployment and sex
Single

Married,
spouse
present

Other
marital
status

Black

Single
and
other
marital
status

Married,
spouse
present

Single
and
other
marital
status

Married,
spouse
present

M EN
Total who worked or looked for w o rk ....................................................................
Total with unem ploym ent........................................................................................
Percent with unemployment .......................................................................
Did not work but looked for w o r k .....................................................................
Worked during the y e a r ........................................................................................
Percent ...............................................................................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of une m plo ym e nt..................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ..................................................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ................................................................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ................................................................................................
27 weeks or m o r e ..........................................................................................

18,830
6,187
32.9
1,014
5,173
100.0
2.9

41,056
7,477
18.2
546
6,932
100.0
7.7

6,274
1,777
28.3
235
1,541
100.0
4.2

21,245
6,279
29.6
827
5,452
100.0
3.2

37,316
6,604
17.7
460
6,144
100.0
7.8

3,241
1,492
46.0
396
1,096
100.0
3.5

2,753
694
25.2
77
617
100.0
6.5

15.1
16.8
11.8
28.9
24.6

1.1.4
18.3
13.0
27.9
21.6

10.7
15.2
13.8
30.9
25.1

15.0
16.4
12.9
29.2
23.4

11.9
18.8
12.8
27.8
20.9

9.6
15.9
9.8
31.3
29.9

7.2
14.4
13.8
29.8
28.3

With 2 spells of unem ploym ent......................................................................
With 3 or more spells of unem ploym ent....................................................

19.4
17.0

16.7
18.3

16.9
22.5

18.9
17.7

16.9
18.0

18.0
21.5

14.7
21.5

Total who worked or looked for w o rk ....................................................................
Total with unem ploym ent........................................................................................
Percent with unemployment .......................................................................
Did not work but looked for w o r k .....................................................................
Worked during the y e a r ........................................................................................
Percent ...............................................................................................................
Year round workers1 with 1 or 2 weeks of unemployment ..................
Part-year workers2 with unemployment:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................................................
5 to 10 weeks ...................................................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ................................................................................................
15 to 26 w e e k s ................................................................................................
27 weeks or m o re ...........................................................................................

14,037
3,681
26.2
768
2,913
100.0
3.2

29,926
5,103
17.1
890
4,213
100.0
5.4

10,111
2,268
22.4
505
1;762
100.0
5.1

19,595
4,412
22.5
718
3,694
100.0
4.2

26,786
4,435
16.6
745
3,690
100.0
5.5

3,949
1,386
35.1
523
862
100.0
2.6

2,333
525
22.5
112
413
100.0
5.0

23.6
20.5
12.1
21.1
19.6

18.8
20.7
11.7
21.6
21.8

15.1
19.5
13.6
24.2
22.4

21.9
20.8
13.4
20.3
19.4

19.5
20.5
12.0
21.2
21.4

13.0
18.0
9.0
31.4
26.1

14.7
22.0
10.1
25.1
23.2

With 2 spells of unem ploym ent......................................................................
With 3 or more spells of unem ploym ent.....................................................

18.6
12.7

14.1
13.3

16.9
16.8

17.8
13.9

13.7
13.5

18.3
16.7

17.3
12.8

W OM EN

1 Worked 50 weeks or more.




2 Worked less than 50 weeks.

32

Tab!© 8-12. Extent of unemployment of wage and salary workers in 1982 by industry of tiie Job held the iongest
(Numbers in thousands)
Percent distribution of total
with unemployment

Total with
unemployment
■Total
wage
and
salary
workers

Industry

Total, 16 years and oyer ................................................

106,423

Number

21,544

Percent
of
total
wage
and
salary
workers

Total

20.2

Yearround
workers1
with 1
or 2
weeks of
unemploy­
ment

100.0

5.3

Percent of total
with unemployment

Part-year workers2 by
weeks of unemployment
With 2
spells of
unemploy­
ment

With 3
or more
spells of
unemploy­
ment

22.2

17.2

15.6

27
11 to 14 15 to 26 weeks
or
weeks
weeks
more

1 to 4
weeks

5 to 10
weeks

15.6

18.7

12.3

25.8

A griculture..................................................................................

2,187

667

30.5

100.0

1.5

10.8

13.5

11.4

35.0

27.8

25.3

25.2

Nonagricultural industries .......................................................
M in in g ......................................................................................
C onstruction...........................................................................
M anufacturing........................................................................

104,236
1,226
5,985
22,777

20,878
337
2,435
5,889

20.0
27.5
40.7
25.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.4
4.0
4.8
10.7

15.8
11.4
10.0
13.2

18.9
22.4
15.3
20.0

12.3
13.4
12.4
11.7

25.5
30.2
32.6
22.3

22.1
18.5
24.8
22.1

17.0
16.7
23.6
14.8

15.3
12.6
21.4
15.8

Durable goods ....................................................................
Lumber and wood products, except furn itu re ............
Furniture and fix tu re s ......................................................
Stone, clay, glass, and concrete products..................
Primary metal industries ................................................
Fabricated metal products ............................................
Machinery, except electrical .........................................
Electrical machinery, equipment, and supplies .........
Transportation equipment .............................................
Motor vehicles and equloment ..................................
Other transportation equ ipm ent.................................
Aircraft and p a rts ......................................................
Other transportation equipm ent.............................
Professional photographic equipment, and watches .
Toys and amusement and sporting goods ................
Misc. and n.e.c. manufacturing in dustries..................

13,405
710
488
620
1,046
1,609
2,897
2,305
2,466
1,113
1,353
649
704
698
177
391

3,698
297
165
201
404
407
768
565
632
411
221
112
109
104
58
97

27.6
41.8
33.7
32.5
38.6
25.4
26.5
24.5
25.6
36.9
16.3
17.2
15.5
14.9
33.0
24.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

10.7
4.8
14.6
17.1
8.2
9.1
11.2
14.2
11.2
12.9
8.1
8.5
7.8
5.6
(3)
8.9

12.7
12.4
11.3
6.4
10.6
11.5
11.0
18.0
13.2
13.1
13.2
11.1
15.4
18.4
(3)
15.6

19.8
18.1
19.7
22.9
18.3
17.5
19.8
17.2
21.3
24.8
14.9
19.0
10.7
26.4
(3)
24.9

11.6
7.8
12.1
12.1
13.7
11.9
11.8
11.1
11.5
11.3
11.9
6.3
17.7
18.9
(3)
9.2

22.9
29.1
20.8
22.2
22.2
27.4
24.7
21.0
21.3
17.0
29.2
33.5
24.8
13.0
(3)
13.1

22.4
27.7
21.5
19.3
27.1
22.6
21.4
18.5
21.5
20.9
22.6
21.5
23.7
17.7
(3)
28.3

14.7
18.3
11.5
14.6
13.9
13.6
12.5
13.7
18.2
19.0
16.5
12.9
20.2
17.0
(3)
11.7

16.0
25.8
14.6
16.3
25.3
12.9
14.5
10.4
17.4
20.5
11.7
11.7
11.7
6.4
(3)
14.2

Nondurable g o o d s ..............................................................
Food and kindred pro d u c ts............................. ..............
Tobacco m anufactures................................ ..................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts ........................................................
Apparel and other finished textile pro d u c ts ...............
Paper and allied products .............................................
Printing, publishing, and allied pro d u c ts ......................
Chemicals and allied products .....................................
Petroleum and coal p roducts........................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts............
Leather and leather products .......................................

9,372
1,946
87
850
1,332
704
1,796
1,307
239
784
■ 327

2,190
479
14
267
489
129
270
189
27
205
123

23.4
24.6
16.0
31.4
36.7
18.3
15.0
14.4
11.4
26.1
37.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

10.8
6.8
<
3)
19.3
10.5
7.2
5.6
10.3
(3)
15.6
20.3

14.1
12.5
<
3)
19.2
12.5
20.9
17.3
11.9
(3)
16.0
3.3

20.2
16.4
(3)
19.7
25.4
27.5
24.1
13.2
(3)
12.6
20.5

12.0
13.1
(3)
10.9
11.9
4.0
13.3
15.7
(3)
14.4
8.7

21.3
24.0
(3)
17.9
20.9
16.4
20.3
25.5
(3)
19.8
25.2

21.6
27.1
(3)
13.0
18.8
24.0
19.4
23.5
(3)
21.6
22.0

14.9
15.1
(3)
8.4
18.6
17.1
15.9
8.0
(3)
16.5
16.5

15.6
14.4
(3)
21.1
19.6
18.2
7.1
12.6
(3)
17.7
12.9

Transportation and public u tilitie s ......................................
Transportation............................................................. ........
Communications and other public utilities .....................
Communications ..............................................................
Utilities and sanitary services .......................................

7,220
4,131
3,089
1,580
1,509

1,040
790
250
115
135

14.4
19.1
8.1
7.3
9.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.3
5.0
6.3
7.3
5.5

14.1
12.2
20.4
26.3
15.4

18.4
19.1
16.2
16.7
15.8

13.2
13.9
11.3
13.7
9.2

26.9
28.2
22.7
16.9
27.7

22.0
21.7
23.1
19.2
26.4

16.9
15.6
21.0
20.2
21.7

16.4
18.5
9.7
9.0
10.3

Wholesale and reta k tra d e ...................................................
Wholesale trade ...... ............•..............................................
Retail trade .........................................................................

22,819
4,500
18,319

4,903
693
4,209

21.5
15.4
23.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

3.0
6.7
2.4

19.3
11.2
20.6

18.7
20.1
18.5

12.0
10.1
12.4

25.3
31.5
24.3

21.6
20.4
21.8

17.9
15.4
18.3

13.5
12.6
13.7

Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..................................
Banking a n ti other fin a n c e ...............................................
Insurance and real e s ta te ................................................

6,223
2,952
3,271

683
293
390

11.0
9.9
11.9

100.0
100.0
100.0

2.4
3.0
2.0

21.5
26.6
17.7

15.7
20.0
12.5

11.9
10.0
13.4

28.7
23.2
32.8

19.8
17.3
21.7

15.0
14.2
15.6

9.9
9.3
10.3

S e rvices............................... I....................... ..........................
Private household ....... t .....................................................
Miscellaneous services.......... :........... :................... ..........
Business and repair se rv ic e s ...............*........................
Business se rvice s ....... ...........................................
Repair services .............................................................
Personal services .............................................. .............
Entertainment and recreation se rvice s..................... .
Professional and related s e rv ic e s ..... ..........................
H o sp ita ls .............................;..........................................
Health services, except h o sp itals..............................
Educational services ...................................................
Social se rvice s.......................................... - .................
Other professional services ..........................................
Forestry and fis h e rie s ..........................;•.... ,...................

32,748
1,662
31,086
4,575
3,272
1,302 "
2,497
1,417
22,405
4,667
3,675
9,153
1,547
3,363
192

5,099
332
4,767
1,126
766
360
586
383
2,614
398
495
1,001
298
422
59'

15.6
20.0
15.3
24.6
23.4
27.6
23.5
27.0
11.7
8.5
13.5
10.9
19.3
12.5
30.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2.4
.4
2.5
2.6
2.6
2.6
1.6
1.9
2.8
5.0
1.3
1.7
1.6
5.8
(3)

18.2
15.0
18.4
16.4
17.6
13.9
18.5
15.7
19.8
23.6
18.2
17.6
16.1
26.0
(3)

20.1
17.1
20.3
17.6
16.4
20.2
19.1
19.4
21.9
19.6
23.0
21.8
21.3
23.4
(3)

12.6
13.6
12.5
10.7
10.9
10.5
13.2
10.3
13.5
10.5
10.2
17.6
13.2
10.5

25.2
20.1
25.5
29.7
29.2
30.6
24.8
26.2
23.8
28.5
24.5
23.5
24.6
18.8

21.6
33.8
20.7
22.9
23.3
22.2
22.7
26.4
18.2
12.8
22.7
17.8
23.2
15.4

(3)

(3)

<
3)

15.5
16.3
15.5
19.1
18.5
20.2
15.4
20.8
12.9
12.4
12.8
13.0
14.4
12.0
(3)

14.3
30.6
13.2
17.5
16.4
20.0
14:3
16.3
10.4
11.1
11.1
10.6
13.0
6.6
(3)

Public adm inistration.... ........................... ..........................

5,238

492

100.0 '

4.5

15.2

15.0

16.4

25.4

23.6

18.8

14.3

1 Worked 50 weeks or more.
2 Worked less than 50 weeks.




• .

9.4

.

3 Data not shown where base is less than 75,000.

33

Table B-13. Extent of unemployment in 1882 by occupation of the Job held the longest and sex
(Number in thousands)
Total with
unemployment

Occupation and sex

Total
with
work
exper­
ience

Number

Percent
of
total
with
work
exper­
ience

Percent distribution of total
with unemployment

Total

Yearround
work­
ers'
with
1 or 2
weeks
of unem­
ploy­
ment

Percent of total
with unemployment

Part-year workers2 by weeks
of unemployment

1 to 4
weeks

5 to 10
weeks

With 3
With 2
or more
spells
spells
of unem­
27
of unem­
11 to 14 15 to 26
ploy­
weeks or
ploy­
weeks
weeks
ment
ment
more

MEN
Total, 16 years and o v e r ..................................................

64,365

13,646

21.2

100.0

5.5

12.7

17.4

12.6

28.7

23.1

17.7

18.3

Managerial and professional specialty ..................................
Executive, administrative, and mangerial ...........................
Officials and administrators, public administration ........
Other executive, administrative and m anagerial............
Management-related occupations.....................................

14,727
7,618
292
5,405
1,921

1,167
605
9
438
158

7.9
7.9
3.0
8.1
8.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7.4
8.3
(3)
7.9
8.5

14.9
11.6
(3)
9.3
16.9

20.0
21.5
<
3)
23.0
18.1

15.5
15.4
(3)
18.7
6.0

23.3
24.0
(3)
22.9
27.1

19.0
19.3
(3)
18.2
23.5

12.6
13.0
(3)
14.7
9.0

13.3
12.6
(3)
13.7
8.8

Professional specialty.............................................................
E n qine ers...............................................................................
Mathematical and computer scie ntists.............................
Natural scie ntists..................................................................
Health diagnosing occu p a tio n s.........................................
Health assessment and treating o ccup ations.................
Teachers, college and unive rsity......................................
Teachers, except college and u n v ie rs ity.........................
Lawyers and ju d g e s .............................................................
Other professional specialty occup ations........................

7,108
1,603
332
326
655
282
433
1,099
573
1,805

563
135
18
20
9
10
40
95
16
219

7.9
8.4
5.5
6.2
1.4
3.5
9.3
8.6
2.8
12.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.5
12.6
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
2.1

18.5
18.8
<
3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3>
21.3
(3)
13.4

18.3
26.4
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
<
3)
10.0
(3)
17.4

15.5
7.7
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
21.3
(3)
15.3

22.6
21.3
(3)
(3>
(3)
(3)
(3>
25.6
<
3)
24.7

18.6
13.2
<
3)
<
3)
(3)
(3>
(3)
19.7
(3)
23.7

12.3
12.3
(3)
(3)
(3)
i 3)
(3)
4.3
(3)
14.2

14.2
10.9
(3)
(3)
(3)
<
3)
(3)
12.0
<
3)
23.1

Technical, sales, and administrative s u p p o rt........................
Technicians and related s u p p o rt..........................................
Health technoloaists and technicians ..............................
Engineering and science technicians...............................
Technicians, except health, engineering, and science ..

12,051
1,718
222
938
558

1,605
196
20
126
52

13.3
11.5
9.1
13.4
9.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4.6
5.1

(3)

17.1
19.8
(3)
19.2
(3)

21.1
26.2
(3)
19.3
(3)

11.0
16.8
(3)
18.3
(3)

28.9
20.5
(3)
24.7
(3)

17.2
11.6
(3)
13.7
(3)

14.6
9.6
(3)
10.2
(3)

12.3
11.6
(3)
9.3
(3)

Sales occupations ............................................................... ...
Supervisors and proprietors ....................................... .......
Sales representives, finance, and business services ....
Sales representatives, commodities, except r e ta il........
Sales workers, retail, and personal services...................
Sales-related occupations...................................................

6,599
2,180
1,135
1,316
1,948
20

8T3
192
104
120
391
6

12.3
8.8
9.1
9.1
20,1
(3)

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2.9
5.4
1.8
4.6
1.4
(3)

15.6
15.0
16.3
15.8 .
14.9
(3)

19.2
13.5
21.2
28.2
19.0
(3)

9.0
9.6
, 9.9
3.6
10.4
<
3)

34.0
39.6
32,4
37.4
31.1
(3)

19.2
16.8
18.3
10.4
23.1
(3)

14.7
16.1
14.5
13.0
14.8
(3)

11.9
8.1
6.3
5.2
17.4
<
3)

Administrative support, including c le ric a l............................
S upervisors......................................................................... .
Computer equipment operators ........................................
Secretaries, stenographers, and ty p is ts ...........................
Financial records processing.............................................
Mail and message distributing...........................................
Other administrative support, including c le ric a l.............

3,734
315
224
92
261
605
2,237

595
22
22
11
34
68
438

15.9
6.8
10.0
11.4
13.2
11.2
19.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.8

18.3
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
19.3

22.0

11.6

24.8

16.4

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
22.8

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
12.5

<
3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
22.3

<
3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
17.1

16.2
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
15.7

13.1

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
6.0

Service occup ations..................................................................
Private h o u sehold...................................................................
Protective service ...................................................................
Service, except private household and p ro te c tiv e ...........
Food s e rv ic e .........................................................................
Health service.......................................................................
Cleaning and building service ...........................................
Personal s e rvice ...................................................................

6,612
41
1,580
4,991
2,308
242
1,962
479

1,584
13
250
1,321
696
45
472
108

24.0
(3)
15.8
26.5
30.1
18.7
24.1
22.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.2
(3)
5.2
2.8
2.1
(3)
4.4
1.0

15.7
(3)
10.2
16.7
17.3
(3)
15.3
21.9

15.0
(3>
14.1
15.1
16.0
(3)
12.8
17.0

12.9
(3)
9.7
13.5
15.8
(3)
11.2
5.6

26.8
<
3)
36.7
25.2
24.0
(3)
24.2
30.7

26.4
(3)
• 24.1
26.8
24.9
(3)
32.0
23.8

19.5
(3)
18.9
19.8
21.9
(3)
16.4
19.1

16.0
(3)
11.0
16.7
16.1
<
3)
19.4
15.3

Precision production, craft, and re p a ir...................................
Mechanics and repairers .......................................................
Construction trades ................................................................
Other precision production, craft, and re p a ir.....................

12,982
4,470
4,907
3,605

3,671
849
2,029
792

28.3
19.0
41.4
22.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.4
8.5
4.0
5.7

12.2
13.7
11.2
13.1

16.3
15.2
15.9
18.3

13.8
11.5
15.9
10.7

30.0
30.3
30.5
28.6

22.3
20.9
22.5
23.6

18.4
16.3 '
20.4
15.5

22.0
13.2
29.0
13.4

Operators, fabricators, and la b o re rs......................................
Machine operators, assemblers, and in spectors..............
Machine operators and tenders, except p re c is io n ........
Fabricators, assemblers, inspectors, and sam p le rs......

14,219
5,253
3,416
1,837

4,817
1,859
1,108
752

33.9
35.4
32.4
40.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.8
9.8
10.2
9.2

10.7
12.5
11.7
13.6

17.7
19.7
22.0
16.2

11.4
10.6
10.9
10.1

28.8
24.9
24.2
26.0

24.6
22.5
20.9
24.9

18.0
15.3
16.2
14.0

' 18.0
16.8
16.5
17.3

Transportation and material moving occupations ............
Motor vehicle o p e ra to rs......................................................
Other transportation and material moving occupations .

4,536
3,157
1,379

1,380
853
527

30.4
27.0
38.2,

100.0
100.0
100.0

4.5
4.1
5.2

10.1
9.9
10.4

17.1
17.2
16.9

13.0
13.7
11.9

35.2
34.6
36.2

20.0
20.5
19.3

18.4
17.2
20.4

19.7
20.2
18.9

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and la b o re rs .....
Construction laborers ..........................................................
Freight, stock, and material handlers...............................
Other handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers and
la b o re rs.................................................................................

4,430
742
1,566

1,577
374
471

35.6
50.4
30.1

100.0
100.0
100.0

5.4
5.8
4.7

9.1
6.7
10.3

15.9
12.8
15.4

10.8
9.3
10.4

27.7

33.3

31.1
32.0
34.4

20.8
29.7
16.4

17.9
20.2
15.8

2,122

732

34.5

100.0

5.6

9.6

17.8

11.8

26.6

28.6

19.1

18.0

Farming, forestry, and fishing .................................................
Farm operators and m anage rs............................................
Farm workers and related o ccup ations..............................
Forestm and fis h in g .............................................................

3,776
1,288
2,264
224

802
40
672 .
90

21.3
3.1
29.7
40.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1.2
(3)
.8
2.9

9.3
(3)
9.6
7.6

14.0

13.5

32.6

29.3

23.4

26.4

(3)
15.1
12.2

(3)
14.4
9.9

(3)
31.6
36.1

(3)
28.5
31.4

(3)
24.2
18.2

(3)
25.2
35.5

See footnotes at end of table.




34

(3)
5.5

(3)
4.6

24.9

<
3)
<
3)
(3>
(3)
«
3)
15.6

Table B-13, Extent of unemployment In 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest and sex—Continued
Total with
unemployment

Occupation and sex

Total
with
work
exper­
ience

Number

Percent
of
total
with
work
exper­
ience

f :
of tote,
with unemployment

Force-it distribution ol ioiai
with unemployment

Total

Yearround
work­
ers’
with
1 or 2
weeks
of unem­
ploy­
ment

Part-year workers* by weeks
2
of unemployment

1 to 4
weeks

5 to 10
weeks

With 3
With 2
or more
speils
spells
of unem­
27
of unem­
11 to 14 15 to 26
ploy­
ploy­
weeks or
ment
weeks
weeks
ment
more

WOMEN
Total, 16 years and o v e r ..................................................

51,912

8,889

17.1

100.0

4.6

19.7

20.4

12.2

22.0

21.2

16.1

13.8

Managerial and professional specialty ..................................
Executive, administrative, and mangerial ...........................
Officials and administrators, public administration ........
Other executive, administrative and m anagerial............
Management-related occupations.....................................

10,652
3,794
170
2,300
1,324

1,021
376
13
206
158

9.6
9.9
7.5
8.9
11.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.1
6.6
(3)
7.7
4.8

20.8
19.5
<
3)
24.1
14.2

22.0
21.0

14.5
12.1
(3)
13.7
9.8

21.6
20.3
(3)
18.6
22.1

18.1
20.6
(3)
17.4
23.3

12.9
14.8
(3)
17.7
12.2

12.7
8.9

645
15
8
17
9
123
22
245
4
202

9.4
14.1
5.5
22.6
7.8
7.5
8.7
8.6
4.0
12.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1.0
(3)
(3)
<
3)
(3)
0
(3)

22.6

15.9
(3)
0
(3)
(3)
17.4

22.3

(3)
8.5

(3)
(3)
(3>
(3)
18.8
(3)
16.5
(3)
31.4

16.6
(3)
(3)
(3) <
3)
9.0
(3)
22.2
(3)
17.8

11.7
<
3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
14.4
(3)
10.8
(3)
9.8

14.9

(3)
2.9

21.6
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
29.6
(3)
16.9
(3>
17.2

Professional specialty.............................................................
E n gine ers..............................................................................
Mathematical and computer scientists........ ....................
Natural scientists..................................................................
Health diagnosing o ccup ations.........................................
Health assessment and treating occup ations................
Teachers, college and univ e rs ity......................................
Teachers, except college and u n v ie rs ity .........................
Lawyers and ju d g e s ............................................. .......,.......
Other professional specialty occupations........................

6,859
107
141 76
115
1,634
252
2,852
109
1,573

a

(3)
18.4
25.8

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
25.1
(3)
22.5
(3)
22.2

(3)
21.9

a

10.1
8.1

a
a
a
a
7.7
a
18.9
a

18.5

Technical, sales, and administrative s upp ort........................
Technicians and related s u p p o rt.........................................
Health technologists and technicians ..............................
Engineering and science technicians...............................
Technicians, except health, engineering, and science ..

23,284
1,572
1,023
220
329

3,430
197
116
55
26

14.7
12.5
11.3
25.1
8.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.5
7.1
5.6
(3)
(3>

22.5
21.6
20.8
(3)
(3)

19.0
21.7
22.0
(3)
(3)

12.6
11.6
10.0
(3)
(3)

23.4
25.0
30.2
(3)
(3)

19.1
13.0
11.5
(3)
(3)

15.1
12.2
17.7
(3)
(3)

12.1
9.7
6.4

Sales occupations ..................................................................
Supervisors and proprietors ...............................................
Sales representives, finance, and business services ....
Sales representatives, commodities, except r e ta il........
Sales workers, retail, and personal services...................
Sales-related occupations...................................................

6,736
942
702
205
4,841
46

1,183
95
62
24
995
7

17.6
10.1
8.8
11.5
20.6
(3)

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2.6
2.7
(3)
(3)
2.4
(3)

24.5
18.1
(3)
(3)
25.7
(3)

18,3
36.1
(3)
(3)
16.1
(3)

11.6
7.6
(3)
0
12.0
<
3>

23.3
19.2
(3)
<
3)
23.0
(3)

19.7
16.3
(3)
<
3)
20.8
<
3)

17.9
10.2
0
(3>
18.5
(3)

12.1
5.8

Administrative support, including c le ric a l............................
Supervisors ............................................................................
Computer equipment operators ..................................... „.
Secretaries, stenographers, and ty p is ts ...........................
Financial records processing..............................................
Mail and message distributing............................................
Other administrative support, including clerical .............

14,976
366
423
5,410
2,624
290
5,862

2,050
14
90
659
315
45
927

13.7
3.8
21.3
12.2
12.0
15.6
15.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100,0
100.0

3.7
0
7.6
2.5
2.5
(3)
4,1

21.5
(3)
16.7
22.1
17.7
(3)
23.4

19.1
(3)
20.1
21.4
20.8

23.2
(3)
32.8
21.6
24.1

(3)
17.2

13.2
(3)
13.5
13.7
12.7
(3>
13.1

19.3
(3)
9.3
18.6
22.2
0
19,1

13.8
(3)
18.5
13.4
12.0
(3)
13.3

Service o ccup ations............................................................. .
Private hou se h o ld ...................................................................
Protective service ...................................................................
Service, except private household and p ro te c tiv e ...........
Food s e rv ic e ..........................................................................
Health se rvice ........................................................................
Cleaning and building service ...........................................
Personal s e rvice ...................................................................

10,605
1,244
266
9,095
4,156
1,818
1,386
1,734

2,137
200
41
1,896
1,040
314
288
253

20.1
16.1
15.5
20.8
25.0
17.3
20.8
14.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1.3
.7
(3)
1.4
1.3
.7
2.1
1.9'

19.0
16.4
<
3)
19.5
22.3
15.6
14,1
18.7

22.0
15.1
0
22.4
22.7
19.1
22.1
25.1

12.1
12.6
(3)
11.7
11.5
9.8
10.2
16.4

22.6
23.5
0
22.8
22.8
28.8
22.0
1.5.9

23.0
31.7
(3)
22.3
19.3
26.0
29.5
22.1

17.8
14.7
(3)
18.1
18.8
14.5
15.2
22.8

Precision production, craft, and re p a ir...................................
Mechanics and repairers .......................................................
Construction trades ................................................................
Other precision production, craft, bnd re p a ir.....................

1,039
117
94
828.

224
. 19
33
172

21.6
16.7
35.1
20.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7.1
<
3>
■<3)
8.4

12.9
0
(3)
14.8

20.7
(3)
<
3)
17.3

20.6
<
3)
0
20.6

16.8

(3>
11.0

27.7
<
3)
<
3>
27.9

0
14.1

. 8.2

Operators, fabricators, and la b o re rs ......................................
Machine operators, assemblers, and in spectors..............
Machine operators and tenders, except p re c is io n ........
Fabricators, assemblers, inspectors, and s am ple rs......

5,536
4,241
2,902
1,340

1,920
1,529
1,047
482

34.7
36.1
36.1
36.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

11.0
11.9
11.4
12.8

15.3
14.8
14.8
14.7

20.2
20.4
20.0
21.3

11.1
11.3
10.9
12.2

18.6
17.8
19.2
14.7

23.7
23.9
23.7
24.3

16.8
15.5
15.3
16.2

1543
15.5
17.4
11.6

Transportation and material moving occupations ......... .
Motor vehicle o p e ra to rs ......................................................
Other transportation and material moving occupations .

407
324
83

116
84
32

28.5
26.0
38.1

100.0
100.0
100.0

6.3
4.5
(3)

12.0
11.9
(3)

21.8
21,8
(3>

13.3
18.3

25.0
23.7
(3)

21.6
19.8
0

17.7
13.6

17.6
17.6

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and la b o re rs.....
Construction laborers ..........................................................
Freight, stock, and material h a n dlers...............................
Other handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers and
la b o re rs...................:.............................................................

888
39
276

275
19
79

30.9
<
3)
28.6

100.0
100.0
100.0

8.4
(3)
7.9

19.8

18,7

20.5

23.5

23.4'

573

177

30,8

'100.0

Farming, forestry, and fishing ..................................................
Farm operators and m an a g e rs............................................
Farm workers and related occu p a tio n s........ .....................
Forestry and fis h in g ........ ....................................................

795
143
643
9

19.8

153
4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

' -Worked 50 weeks or more.
2 Worked less than 50 weeks.




158
-

11.1
(3 ,

'

.

<
3)
23.0

'

(3)

a

0

a
a
a

12.2

12.4

a

6.7
13.6
12.1

a

12.5
14.9
33.0

a

13.2
14.1
13.7
14.2
■7.5
10.9
0

■

a

<
$

-

23.8

•<
:
V

(3)

17.6

<
3)
17.1

9.2
<
3)
10.7

9.5

21.7

20.3

9.5

1.1
0.
.7

23.0
(3)
23.4

11.3
(3)
10,6

4.3
0
4.2

' <3-)

■

(3)

0

.

(3)

'

0

a

(3)

(3)
22.6

s

J a

15.2

a

24.1

26.1

15.1

18.0

23.1

21.0

14.4

28.1
<
3)
28.1
:

32.2

a

Data not shown whers base is less than .75,000.
■ .Less than 0.05 percent.
'

.

a

'

0

, 33.0
■

a.

26.3

24.8

26.2-

.a
25.5
a

a

.
'

0

Tab?® B-14. EitienS of unemployment ira 1982 by occupation of the job held the longest and race
(Num bers in thousands)

Total with
unemployment

Occupation and race

Total
with
work
exper­
ience

Percent
of
total
Number
with
work
exper­
ience

Percent of total
with
unemployment

Percent distribution of total
with unemployment

Total

Yearround
work­
ers1
with
1 or 2
weeks
of
unem­
ploy­
ment

Part-year workers2 by weeks
of unemployment

1 to 4
weeks

5 to 10
weeks

11 to
14
weeks

15 to
26
weeks

With 3
With 2
or more
spells
spells
of
of
27
unem­
unem­
weeks
ploy­
ploy­
or more ment
ment

W H IT E
Total, 16 years and o v e r ........... .............. ............

102,192

18,981

18.6

100.0

5.3

16.2

18.8

12.8

25.5

21.4

17.0

16.2

Manaaenal and professional specialty.....................
Executive, administrative, and m anagerial...........
Professioa! s pecialty....................................................
Technical, sales, and administrative s u o p o rt......
Technicians and related s u p p o rt..............................
Sales occup ations.................................. ......................
Administative support, including clerical ...............

23,231
10,581
12,651
31,650
• 2,879
12,385
16,387

1,950
881
1,063
4,304
321
1,760
2,223

8.4
8.3
8.4
13.6
11.1
14.2
13.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.7
8.2
3.6
4.0
7.5
2.7
4.5

18.2
14.5
21.2
21.6
20.3
21.3
22.0

21.4
22.2
20.8
19.9
23.5
18.8
20.2

15 7
14.7
16.5
11.8
15.0
10.7
12.2

21 5
21.9
21.1
24.8
20.9
27.6
23.2

17 5
18.4
16.8
17.9
12.8
19.0
17.8

12 5
13.5
11.7
14.7
12.1
15.5
14.4

12 7
10.6
14.4
12.0
11.0
11.9
12.2

S e rv ic e ......... ......................... ..............................................
Private household..........................................................
Protective service ................. .......................... .............
Service, except private household and
protective .......................................................................

13,963
962
1,566

2,923
165
211

20.9
17.1
13.5

100.0
100.0
100.0

1.9
.8
3.3

19.6
19.0
12.6

19.9
14.5
18.7

12.8
13.5
9.7

22.9
20.5
30.9

22.9
31.6
24.8

18.7
14.9
17.6

14.7
30.9
12.3

11,435

2,548

22.3

100.0

1.9

20.2

20.3

13.0

22.4

22.2

19.1

13.8

Precision production, craft and re p a ir......................
Mechanics and reoairers............................................
Construction tra d e s ......................................................
Other precision production, craft, and repair.......

12,775
4,195
4,596
3,984

3,467
776
1,854
836

27.1
18.5
40.3
21.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.8
9.0
4.1
6.6

12.7
14.1
12.0
12.8

16.9
15.1
16.3
19.9

13.8
11.3
15.7
11.6

30.0
32.3
30.1
27.3

20.9
18.1
21.7
21.8

18.5
16.8
20.6
15.5

21.5
14.0
28.8
12.4

Operators, fabricators, and laborers..........................
Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors
Transportation and material moving occupations
Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and
la b o re rs ............ ..............................................................

16,497
7,857
4,255

5,544
2,767
1,302

33.6
35.2
30.6

100.0
100.0
100.0

8.3
11.4
4.7

12.3
■ 13.5
9.9

18.5
19.4
17.9

11.9
11.5
13.1

25.3
21.1
34.0

23.8
23.0
20.4

17.6
15.8
18.9

17.0
15.9
19.5

4,384

1,476

33.7

100.0

5.6

12.0

17.2

11.7

25.3

28.2

20.0

17.1

Farming, forestry, and fishing.......................................
Farm operators and m an agers........ ........................
Farm workers and related occupations................
Forestry and fis h in g .....................................................

4,076
1,404
2,467
205

791
36
675
80

19.4
2.6
27.4
38.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1.1

12.6

13.9

12.6

29.8

29.9

24.3

25.1

(3)
13.4
7.2

(3
)
14.7
12.8

(3)
13.1
11.1

(3
)
28.2
38.4

(3
)
30.0
26.5

(3)
24.9
19.1

(3
)
24.5
34.0

See footnotes at end of table.




■36

(3)
.6
4.0

Talfeie B -14. Enters! off un em p lo ym en t in 1982 by ©eeupatiors off the Job held th e lo n g est and ra c e — C ontinued
(N u m b e rs in thousands)
Total with
unemployment

Occupation and race

Total
with
work
exper­
ience

Percent
of
total
with
Number
work
exper­
ience

Percent of total
with
unemployment

Percent distribution of total
with unemployment

Total

Yearround
work­
ers'
with
1 or 2
weeks
of
unem­
ploy­
ment

Part-year workers1 by weeks
2
of unemployment
With 3
With 2
or more
spells
spells
of
of
27
15 to
unem­
unem­
26
weeks
ploy­
ploy­
weeks or more ment
ment

1 to 4
weeks

5 to 10
weeks

11 to
14
weeks

10.5

30.1

27.5

17.3

18.9

8.0

BLACK
Total, 16 years and o v e r .......................................

11,168

2,988

26.8

100.0

4.0

10.8

17.0

Managerial and professional specialty.....................
Executive, administrative, and m anagerial...........
Professioal specialty....................................................
Technical, sales, and administrative s u p p o rt.........
Technicians and related suppo rt.............................
Sales occupations........................................................
Administative support, including clerical ...............

1,410
537
874
2,818
263
662
1,892

163
64
98
608
58
192
358

11.5
12.0
11.3
21.6
21.9
29.0
18.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1.4

9.4

15.5

S e rv ic e ........................................................... ................. .
Private household..........................................................
Protective s e rv ic e .........................................................
Service, except private household and
protective .......................................................................

2,772
297
260

693
46
74

25.0
15.3
28.5

100.0
100.0
100.0

(3)
(3)

2,214

573

25.9

100.0

2.3

Precision production, craft and re p a ir.......................
Mechanics and repairers............................................
Construction tra d e s ......................................................
Other precision production, craft, and repair.......

956
290
325
341

344
73
170
101

36.0
25.1
52.4
29.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2.5
(3)

(3)
5.5

Operators, fabricators, and laborers..........................
Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors
Transportation and material moving occupations
Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and
la b o re rs ...........................................................................

2,801
1,329
633

1,035
515
174

37.0
38.7
27.5

100.0
100.0
100.0

7.1
8.4
3.4

839

347

41.3

100.0

Farming, forestry, and fishing ......................................
Farm operators and m an agers.................................
Farm workers and related occupations.................
Forestry a n d fishing .................................. ...................

411
20
379
13

146

35.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4

136
6

(3)

35.9
0

1 W o rke d 5 0 w e e k s or m ore.
2 W o rke d less th an 5 0 w ee ks.




35.8

29.9

14.7

21.6

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

2.9

4.8
.15.5

19.6
18.5

9.3
13.0

39.5
27.6

26.8
22.5

14.2
16.6

0
19.5
14.8

(3)
3.5
3.1

0
15.4
14.3

(3)
20.9
15.4

(3)

(3)
27.6
27.7

(3)
22.0
24.3

(3)

(3)

10.6
15.2

24.4
14.4

14.1
15.7

8.9

(3)
(4)

2.8

16.1

11.8

30.1

30.3

17.6

18.8

(3)

0

0

(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

9.5

16.1

11.0

29.3

31.8

17.3

18.9

7.9

16.7

12.1

27.7

33.2

16.2

18.9

(3)

(3)

12.8
21.1

0
14.9
10.5

34.4
23.0

(3)
3 0 .4

14.0
14.4

17.8
22.8
13.2

8.0
7.3
13.9

29.5
25.4
35.7

2 2.2

7.0

5.3

12.8

6.2

0

6.0

12.4

(3)
(4)
(3)

(3)
5.5

(3)

(3)

11.6

10.6

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

2.0
3.4

10.8
11.1

9.8

(3)

19.5
13.4

27.9
12.4

19.5

17.8
14.2
14.6

19.3
18.9
18.7

32.5

36.2

24.7

20.1

44.9

26.9

20.6

31.6

(3)

(3)

44.9

27.4

(3)
2 2.2

28.7

(3)

(3)

(3)

31.3
26.4

3 D a ta not show n w h ere base is less th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
4 Less than 0 .0 5 percent.

37

( 3)

(3)

Table 8-15. Extent of unemployment in 1982 for part-year workers by sex and spells of unemployment
(In. thousands)

Part-year workers with unemployment'
Total workers

Extent of unemployment and sex
Total

Full-time workers1
2

With 3
With 1 With 2
or
spell spells more
of
of
spells
unem­ unem­
of
ploy­
ploy­ unem­
ment
ment
ploy­
ment

Total

Part-time workers3

With 3
With 1 With 2
or
spell spells more
of
of
spells
unem­ unem­
of
ploy­
ploy­ unem­
ment
ment
ploy­
ment

Total

With 3
With 1 With 2
or
spell spells more
of
of
spells
unem­ unem­
of
ploy­
ploy­ unem­
ment
ment
ploy­
ment

TOTAL
3,719
S06
670
545
1,207
989

15,435 10,221 2,811
2,385 1,850
317
3,175 2,166
546
2,058 1,350
332
4,302 2,696
852
3,514 2,158
764

2,403
218
462
376
755
592

5,945
1,098
1,010
750
1,560
1,526

3,586
887
615
474
830
781

1,043
123
186
107
278
348

1,315
88
208
169
453
397

7,987 2,421
1,347
223
1,550
415
1,054
273
2,278
768
1,757
742

2,492
166
406
395
865
660

10,122
1,326
1,973
1,364
3,094
2,366

1,748
141
311
291
580
424

2,777
410
399
358
818
793

1,530
336
235
205
383
370

503
49
68
49
150
187

744
25
95
103
285
236

5,820 1,433
217
1,390
1,231
317
770
167
1,248
362
1,182
370

1,227
140
265
151
342
330

5,313
1,059
1,202
695
1,209
1,149

656
77
152
85
175
168

3,168
688
611
392
743
733

2,057
551
380
268
447
411

540
74
118
58
128
161

571
83
113
66
168
162

Total with unemployment............................ 21,380 13,807 3,854
1 to 4 weeks...................................... ............ 3,483 2,737
440
5 to 10 weeks ................................................
4,184 2,781
733
439
11 to 14 weeks ........................ - ....................
2,808 1,824
15 to 26 weeks ..............................................
5,863 3,525 1,130
27 weeks or more........... ................................ 5,041. 2,939 1,112
Men

Total with unemployment............................ 12,900
1 to 4 weeks......................................-............. 1,736
2,372
5 to 10 weeks ................................................
11 to 14 weeks ............................................... 1,721
15 to 26 weeks ....................................... !...... 3,911
3,159
27 weeks or more...........................................

6,457 1,918
1,011
174
1,315
347
849
224
1,895
618
1,387
554

Women

Total with unemployment............................
1 to 4 weeks............................... ...................
5 to 10 weeks ................................................
11 to 14 weeks ...............................................
15 to 26 weeks ...............................................
27 weeks or more...........................................

8,481
1,747
1,813
1,087
1,952
1,882

1 Worked less than 50 weeks.
2 Usually worked 35 hours or more per week.




3,763
839
851
501
801
771

894
143
199
109
234
210

3 Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week.

38

Table 3-16. Persons with no work experience in 1982 by age, marital status, race, and sex
(Numbers in thousands)
Did not work but
looked for work

Percent distribution by number of
weeks unemployed

Age, marital status, and race
Number

Percent

Total

1 to 4
weeks

5 to 14
weeks

15 to 26
weeks

27 w eeks
or m ore

8.7

6 1 .3
1 5 .5
5 1 .4
7 7 .9

S.5

64.9

Men
AGE

Total...................................................................................
16 to 17 years .........................................................................
18 to 2 4 years .........................................................................
25 to 54 years .........................................................................
55 years and over....................................................................

1,795
205
564
863
163

100.0
11.4
31.4
48.1
9.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

11.7
35.2
12.6
5.4
12.2

16.6
36.1
22.8
8.0
16.4

10.4
13.2
13.2

1,014
546
235

56.5
30.4
13.1

100.0
100.0
100.0

16.1
7.0
3.5

21.2
10.6
11.0

11.9

50.8

7.7

7 4 .7

10.3

75.2

1,287
473

71.7
26.3

100.0
100.0

12.6
9.0

16.3
18.2

10.2

60.S
61.1

M A R IT A L S T A T U S

Single .....................................................................................
Married, spouse present............................................................
Other marital status...................................................................
RACE

White......................................................................................
Black ......................................................................................

11.7

■
*
W om en

AGE

Total...................................................................................
16 to 17 years .........................................................................
18 to 24 years .........................................................................
25 to 54 years .........................................................................
55 years and over....................................................................

2,163
170
686
1,162
146

100.0
7.8
31.7
53.7
6.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

27.9
48.3
26.5
26.3
23.0

28.6
31.1
35.0
25.5
19.9

14.9
8.8
16.2
15.3
11.9

2 2 .3
3 2 .8
4 5 .2

768
890
505

35.5
41.1
23.4

100.0
100.0
100.0

29.0
27.8
26.2

32.0
29.6
21.7

14.5
15.5
14.5

2 4 .5
2 7 .2
3 7 .6

1,463
635

67.6
29.4

100.0
100.0

29.2
23.6

28.9
27.8

15.1

2 6 .9
3 3 .7

2 8 .6

11.8

M A R IT A L S T A T U S

Single ......................................................................................
Married, spouse present............................................................
Other marital status...................................................................
RACE

White......................................................................................
Black ......................................................................................




•

39

14.9

Tabi© B-17. Persons wifb n® work experience in 1i82 by sex, ag®, rac®, and reason for not working
(In thousands)

Sex, age, and race

Total with
no work
experience

Reason for not working
Illness or
disability

Taking care
of home

Going to
school

Inability to
find v/ork

Retirement

MEN
Total .......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 21 years ............................................................
22 to 24 years ............................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 59 y e a rs ............................................................
60 to 64 y e a r s ............................................................
65 years and o v e r.........................................................

«
■

Other
reasons

•

17,895
2,976
1,298
590
708
3,105
2,518
845
1,673
7,997

3,623
40
98
33
65
1,304
1,081
461
620
1,101

146
5
14
9
5
72
14
8
6
40

3,475
2,528
628
310
318
307
7
3
5
4

2,015
343
427
182
245
1,061
149
82
67
35

8,172
136
1,233
277
956
6,803

99
8
59
14
45
29
2
2
-

39,484
3,478
2,573
1,031
1,542
13,546
6,257
2,850
3,407
13,628

4,627
36
98
33
59
1,167
1,128
538
589
2,199

21,770
289
1,388
400
983
10,742
4,044
1,992
2,052
5,307

3,906
2,885
635
389
247
377
9
8
1

1,831
232
392
181
211
1,041
133
68
64
33

6,896
1
76
854
208
646
5,965

19
15
5
10
4
-

2,877
724
366
152
215
784
306
123
183
697

658
11
17
3
14
295
185
87
98
150

28

786
594
135
69
67
54
2
2
-

629

29
22
4
17
8
-

118
23
23
15
8
59
11
1
10
2

4,778
796
598
254
345
1,674
561
281
280
1,149

975
10
26
5
21
316
225
109
116
397

1,742
67
237
84
153
904
235
137
98
299

852
645
157
98
59
50
-

12
-

-

41
3
10
6
5
14
7
1
6
7

3,958

138

405

515

2,813

26

25

36

_
-

1,403
1,017
358

15
13
1

16
14
2

26
18
7

11
11

9
1
8

10
8
2

WOMEN
Total .......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 21 y e a r s ............................................................
22 to 24 years ............................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 59 y e a rs ............................................................
60 to 64 years ............................................................
65 years and o v e r.........................................................

In Armed
Forces

365
51
72
42
31
195
32
13
19
14

*

-

-

434
35
44
17
27
141
90
36
54
125

BLACK
Men
Total .......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 21 y e a rs ............................................................
22 to 24 y e a rs ............................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 59 y e a rs ............................................................
60 to 64 y e a rs ............................................................
65 years and o v e r.........................................................

1
1
18
1
1
9-

-

629
96
168
60
108
334
23
14
9
8

16
84
18
65
529

Women
Total .......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs ...............................................................
20 to 21 years ............................................................
22 to 24 years ............................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs ...............................................................
55 to 59 years ............................................................
60 to 64 years ............................................................
65 years and o v e r.........................................................

-

650
71
158
59
99
384
23
1
1L
15

506
3
71
23
48
431

10
2
8
2
_
-

NONWORKERS WHO LOOKED FOR WORK
Total .......................................................................
M e n .................................................................................
W h ite ............................................................................
B la c k ............................................................................

1,795
1,287
473

66
41
22

"

270
183
82

Women ...........................................................................
W h ite ............................................................................
B la c k ............................................................................

2,163
1,463
635

72
49
21

405
310
78

246
189
46

1,410
894
480

Total .......................................................................

53,421

8,112

21,511

6,865

1,033

15,043

93

763

M e n .................................................................................
W h ite ............................................................................
B la c k ............................................................................

16,100
13,248
2,404

3,557
2,852
636

146
114
28

3,205
2,308
704

613
320
271

8,158
7,389
628

83
55
27

339
209
110

W o m e n ...........................................................................
W h ite ............................................................................
B la c k ............................................................................

37,321
32,237
4,143

4,555
3,538
954

21,366
19,162
1,664

3,660
2,666
806

421
232
170

6,885
6,276
506

10
6
4

424
357
39

-

NONWORKERS WHO DID NOT
LOOK FOR WORK




40

Appendix 0, Supplementary Tables for 1981
Table C-1. Work experience o f the popu lation irs 1981 by extent of employment, sex, and age
(Numbers in thousands)
Total

16 to 17
years

18 to 19
years

20 to 24
years

25 to 34
years

35 to 44
years

45 to 54
years

Civilian noninstitutiona! population ..............................................
Total who worked during the year ............................................
Percent of the population ......................................................

171,666
116,794
68.0

7,827
3,873
49.5

8,075
5,954
73.7

20,852
17,396
83.4

38,303
32.067
83.7

27,204
22,693
83.4

22,303
17,446
78.2

Total who worked during the year ............................................
Full time1 .............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................... ............................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks ...................................................................
Part time2 ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks....................................................................

100.0
77.6
55.9
2.1
5.0
5.2
5.3
4.1
22.4
7.8
.7
2.1
2.9
4.0
4.9

100.0
16.9
2.0
.2
2
1.2
3.0
10.3
83.1
15.7
1.3
4.8
9.3
19.6
32.4

100.0
45.9
13.9
1.0
2.9
5.8
9.8
12.4
54.1
14.5
1P
4.3
7.2
11.9
15.0

100.0
74.3
39.6
2.7
6.4
8.0
9.5
8.1
25.7
8.0
.7
2.6
3.4
5.1
5.8

100.0
85.0
61.9
2.6
6.0
6.0
5.5
3.0
15.0
5.3
.6
1.5
2.1
2.7
2.7

100.0
84.8
67.5
2.2
4.9
4.5
3.7
2.1
15.2
6.2
.5
1.6
2.1
2.3
2.4

100.0
85.1
69.9
1.8
4.8
4.0
2,8
1.8
14.9
7.0
.5
1.5
2.0
2.0
2.0

Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................
Total who worked during the year ............................................
Percent of the population ......................................................

81,231
64,769
79.7

3,968
2,132
53.7

3,976
3,127
78.7

10,137
9,084
89.6

18,690
. 17,681
94.6

13,209
12,573
95.2

10,743
9,821
91.4

Total who worked during the year ............................................
Full time1 .............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks................................... ..............................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................
Part time2 ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks...................................................... ...........
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks........ ........... ..............................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks....................................................................

100.0
86.2
64.5
2.4
5.3
5.1
5.1
3.7
13.8
4.5
.3
1.3
1.8
2.8
3.3

100.0
19.0
2.9
.2
.4
1.3
3.5
10.8
81.0
17.6
.9
'3.9
8.1
17.6
32.8

100.0
52.6
15.9
1.2
3.6
6.9
10.7
14.3
47.4
13.0
.8
3.9
5.7
10.2
13.8

100.0
79.3
41.9
3.1
7.1
8.8
9.5
8.8
20.7
6.7
.4
2.4
2.8
4.1
4.4

100.0
93.7
71.3
3.1
6.5
5.7
5.1
2.1
6.3
2.3
.3
.7
1.0
1.2
.9

100.0
96.5
80.5
2.6
5.0
4.1
3.2
1.1
3.5
1.3
.1
.3
.5
.7
.5

100.095.2
81.1
2.1
4.7
3.7
2.6
1.0
4,8
2.1
.1
q
.5
.8
.8

Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................
Total who worked during the year ............................................
Percent of the population ......................................................

90,436
52,025
57.5

3,859
1,741
45.1

4,099
2,826
68.9

10,716
8,312
77.6

19,613
14,386
73.3

13,996
10,121
72.3

11,561
7,625
66.0

Total who worked during the year ............................................
Full time1 .............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................
Part time2 ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks........ ...........................................................

100.0
67.0
45.1
1.7
4.7
5.3
5.5
4.7
33.0
11.9
1.2
3.1
4.4
5.6
6.8

100.0
14.3
1.0
.2
(3
)
1.0
2.4
9.7
85.7
13.3
1.7
5.9
10.7
22.0
32,0

100.0
38.4
11.6
.7
2.2
4.7
8.9
10.3
61.6
16.2
1.7
4.7
8.9
13.8
16.3

100.0
68.9
37.1
2.2
5.7
7.1
9.5
7.3
31.1
9.4
1.1
2.8
4.2
6.2
7.4

100.0
74.3
50.4
2.1
5.4
6.3
6.0
4.1
25.7
9.0
9
2.6
3.6
4.5
5.0

100.0
70.3
51.3
1.6
4.8
5.0
4.3
3.3
29.7
12.2
11
3.2
4.1
4.3
4.8

100.0
72.1
55.6
1.5
4.8
4.4
2.9
2.9
27.9
13.3
10
2.7
3.9
3.5
3.5

Extent of employment and sex
TOTAL

Men

Women

See footnotes at end of table.




41

Table G-1. Work experience of the population in 1981 by extent of employment, sex, and age-C ontinued
(Numbers in thousands)
60 to 64 years
Detent of employment and sex

55 to 59
years

65 years and over

Total

60 to 61
years

62 to 64
years

Total

65 to 69
years

70 years
and over

TOTAL
Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................
Total who worked during the year ...........................................
Percent of the population .....................................................

11,462
7,878
68.7

10,408
5,375
51.6

4,421
2,647
59.9

5,987
2,728
45.6

25,231
4,112
16.3

8,802
2,448
27.8

16,429
1,664
10.1

Total who worked during the year ............................................
Full time' ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................
Part time2 ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks........................................................... ........

100.0
85.1
69.5
1.8
5.1
3.8
3.0
1.8
14.9
7.0
.5
1.8
1.4
1.8
2.4

100.0
81.0
63.4
1.7
3.9
4.7
4.1
3.1
19.0
8.5
.7
2.0
2.1
2.7
3.1

100.0
84.1
67.6
2.0
3.8
4.8
3.4
2.5
15.9
6.9
.7
1.8
2.0
1.6
2.9

100.0
77.9
59.4
1.4
3.9
4.6
4.8
3.8
22.1
10.2
.7
2.1
2.2
3.6
3.2

100.0
47.2
30.3
.8
2.6
3.3
5.7
4.5
52.8
22.8
2.3
4.2
5.4
8.1
10.0

100.0
54.8
35.1
.7
3.5
3.8
7.0
4.6
45.2
22.0
1.5
3.6
3.7
6.3
8.0

100.0
36.0
23.3
.8
1.2
2.5
3.8
4.4
64.0
24.1
3.5
5.0
7.9
10.6
12.9

Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................
Total who worked during the year ...........................................
Percent of the population .....................................................

5,392
4,631
85.9

4,806
3,177
66.1

2,057
1,583
76.9

2,749
1,594
58.0

10,311
2,542
24.7

3,809
1,481
37.9

6,402
1,062
16.6

Total who worked during the year ............................................
Full time1 ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................
Part time2 ............................................................................
50 to 52 weeks.................................... .............................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................

100.0
93.9
78.5
1.5
5.2
3.7
3.2
1.8
6.1
2.5
.1
.9
.5
1.2
.9

100.0
89.4
70.8
2.3
4.1
5.1
4.4
2.7
10.6
4.6
.3
1.1
1.0
1.8
1.7

100.0
92.3
75.3
2.8
3.7
4.9
3.8
1.8
7.7
3.1
.3
.8
.9
1.2
1.4

100.0
86.5
66.3
1.8
4.4
5.3
5.0
3.7
13.5
6.1
.3
1.5
1.0
2.5
2.0

100.0
51.5
34.3
.8
2.6
2.9
6.3
4.6
48.5
20.4
1.6
3.9
4.5
8.5
9.5

100.0
60.0
39.0
.8
3.9
3.4
8.0
4.9
40.0
18.8
.9
3.0
2.9
6.2
8.2

100.0
39.7
27.8
.8
.9
2.1
4.0
4.1
60.3
22.6
2.6
5.2
6.7
11.7
11.4

Civilian noninstitutional population ..............................................
Total who worked during the year ...........................................
Percent of the oopulation .....................................................

6,070
3,247
53.5

5,602
2,198
39.2

2,364
1,064
45.0

3,238
1,134
35.0

14,921
1,569
10.5

4,893
967
19.8

10,028
602
6.0

Total who worked during the year ...........................................
Full time' ............................... .............................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................
Part time2 ...........................................................................
50 to 52 weeks..................................................................
48 to 49 weeks..................................................................
40 to 47 weeks..................................................................
27 to 39 weeks..................................................................
14 to 26 weeks..................................................................
1 to 13 weeks...................................................................

100.0
72.4
56.7
2.1
5.0
4.0
2.8
1.8
27.6
13.4
1.2
3.2
2.6
2.7
4.5

100.0
68.7
52.8
.8
3.6
4.2
3.6
3.7
31.3
14.3
1.2
3.1
3.7
3.8
5.1

100.0
71.9
56.1

100.0
65.8
49.7
.8
3.2
3.8
4.5
3.9
34.2
15.9
1.2
3.1
3.9
5.2
5.0

100.0
40.2
23.9
.7
2.6
3.9
4.6
4.5
59.8
26.7
3.4
4.6
6.8
7.3
10.9

100.0
46.9
29.1
.6
3.0
4.5
5.5
4.2
53.1
26.7
2.5
4.7
4.8
6.5
7.9

100.0
29.5
15.5
.9
1.8
3.1
3.3
4.9
70.5
26.6
4.9
4.5
10.0
8.6'
15.7

Men

Women

1 Usually worked 35 hours or more per week.
2 Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week.




.8

4.0
4.6
2.8
3.5
28.1
12.6
1.3
3.2
3.5
2.4
5.2

3 Less than 0.05 percent.

42

Tab!® 0-2. Work experience of the population in 1981 by race, H ispanic origin, age, and e x te n t o f
e m p lo ym en t

Civilian
noninstitutional
population

Percent distribution of those
who worked during the year
Full time'

Number

Percent
who
worked
during
the year

lotal

Total.....................................................................

81,231

79.7

100.0

64.5

12.9

8.7

13.8

White..........................................................................
Black ..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

71,018
8,236
4,393

81.1
68.6
82.1

100.0
100.0
100.0

65.2
58.8
61.4

12.7
14.5
14.9

8.4
11.8
11.3

13.7
15.0
12.4

16 to 19 years ...........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

7,944
6,632
1,102
617

66.2
71.3
39.8
54.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

10.6
11.1
5.8
13.8

7.7
7.6
8.4
10.4

20.7
20.0
27.5
27.6

61.0
61.3
58.2
48.2

20 to 24 years ..........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

10,137
8,654
1,215
707

89.6
92.4
73.5
88.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

41.9
42.5
39.3
47.3

19.0
19.2
16.1
18.7

18.4
18.0
22.2
18.5

20.7
20.3
22.3
15.5

25 to 44 years ..........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

31,898
27,798
3,226
' 1,960

94.8
96.0
86.6
94.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

75.1
75.8
70.4
69.8

13.8
13.7
14.9
17.2

6.0
5.6
9.0
7.1

5.1
4.9
5.7
5.9

45 to 64 years ..........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

20,941
18,654
1,849
856

84.2
85.2
73.9
84.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

78.5
79.4
68.2
76.6

10.6
10.3
14.9
9.0

4.7
4.5
5.8
8.3

6.2
5.8
11.1
6.2

65 years and over......................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

10,311
9,281
844
254

24.7
25.1
19.2
26.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

34.3
35.0
28.6
(3
)

6.3
5.9
11.3
(3
)

10.9
10.6
9.1
(3
)

48.5
48.5
50.9
(3
)

Total .....................................................................

90,436

57.5

100.0

45.1

11.7

10.1

33.0

White ...........................................................................
Black ...........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............. ...............................................

78,118
10,244
4,834

57.9
54.3
52.1

100.0
100.0
100.0

44.5
49.2
45.0

11.6
12.0
14.7

9.8
12.9
14.1

34.1
25.9
26.2

16 to 19 years ...........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin ........................................................ .....

7,958
6,596
1,161
591

57.4
62.5
31.1
42.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7.6
7.6
6.1
6.5

5.2
5.2
4.3
6.8

16.5
15.6
23.2
20.0

70.8
71.6
66.4
66.7

20 to 24 years ..........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black ..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

10,716
8,983
1,468
687

77.6
80.8
59.6
63.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

37.1
37.7
32.1
38.4

15.0
15.0
15.7
17.0

16.8
16.2
21.2
20.4

31.1
31.2
31.0
24.2

25 to 44 years ..........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black................................ .........................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

33,609
28,606
4,016
2,209

72.9
73.2
71.0
61.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

50.8
49.6
58.0
51.7

12.8
12.6
13.1
15.9

9.1
8.7
12.0
12.6

27.3
29.0
16.9
19.8

45 to 64 years ..........................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

23,232
20,424
2,341
1,033

56.3
56.1
57.0
44.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

55.4
55.2
57.0
53.2

10.4
10.5
9.7
13.8

5.8
5.7
6.4
9.2

28.4
28.7
26.9
23.8

65 years and over.....................................................
White..........................................................................
Black..........................................................................
Hispanic origin .............................................................

14,921
13,510
1,258
315

10.5
10.5
10.8
7.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

23.9
24.8
14.5

7.2
7.0
8.1

9.1

59.8
59.8
63.5

Race, Hispanic origin, and age

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

1 to 26
weeks

Part
time2

Men

Women

1 U s u a lly worked 35 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .
3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
N OTE:

(3)

(3)

(3)

s u m to to ta ls b e c a u s e d a ta fo r th e " o t h e r r a c e s " g ro u p a re n o t
p re s e n te d a n d H is p a n ic s a re in c lu d e d in b o th th e w h ite a n d b la c k
p o p u la tio n g ro u p s . •

D e ta il fo r th e a b o v e ra c e a n d H is p a n ic -o rig in g ro u p s w ill n o t




(3)

8.4
13.8

43

Table C-3. Work experience of the population in 1381 by marital status, age, sex, and extent of employment
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )

Civilian noninstitutional
population
Marital status and age
Number

Percent who
worked
during the
year

Percent distribution of those who worked during the year
Full time'
Total

50 to 52
weeks

27 to 49
weeks

Part time1
2

1 to 26
weeks

Men
Total.........................................................

81,231

79.7

100.0

64.5

12.9

8.7

13.8

Single.................... .............. .........................
16 to 19 years..............................................
20 to 24 years..............................................
25 to 44 years ...... ..................................... .
45 to 84 years..............................................
65 years and oyer.........................................

22,945
7,719
7,400
6,322
1,055
449

77.8
65.7
86.9
87.8
64.7
24.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

38.1
9.6
34.2
64.6
71.3
45.1

13.6
6.9
18.2
14.9
11.5
8.0

17.2
21.1
21.5
10.3
5.5
11.5

31.0
62.5
26.1
10.2
11.7
35.4

Married, spouse present..................................
16 to 19 years ..............................................
20 to 24 years..............................................
25 to 44 years ..............................................
45 to 64 years.....................;........................
65 years and over.........................................

49,631
152
2,434
21,765
17,275
8,004

82.2
88.7
97.3
97.4
86.8
26.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

76.2
45.4
62.0
79.2
80.3
34.3

12.1
30.1
20.3
13.0
10.1
6.4

5.0
10.8
10.4
4.4
4.2
11.1

6.7
13.7
7.3
3.5
5.3
48.2

Other marital status.........................................
16 to 19 years..............................................
20 to 24 years ..............................................
25 to 44 years ..............................................
45 to 64 years...................... i......................
65 years and over.........................................

8,655
72
302
3,811
2,611
1,858

70.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

64.0

15.9

0

93.1
91.8
75.0
18.2

(3)

49.3
67.1
67.4
31.2

(3)

8.8
(3)

-

11.3
(3)

25.9
17.0
14.0
5.0

13.8
9.1
7.6
9.5

11.0
6.8
11.0
54.4

Women
Total.........................................................

90,436

57.5

100.0

45.1

11.7

10.1

33.0

Single................ .......... .................................
1 6 to 19 years..............................................
20 to 24 years..............................................
25 to 4 4 years.................................... .........
45 to 84 years..............................................
65 years and over......... ................................

18,980
7,198
5,725
4,267
956
835

68.9
57.2
81.4
82.6
66.9
16.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

37.3
6.7
37.1
67.0
73.3
29.2

10.1

12.5
15.7
15.7
6.4
2.2
10.0

40.1
73.3
34.7
13.2
12.8
51.1

Married, spouse present..................................
16 to 19 years ..............................................
20 to 24 years ..............................................
25 to 4 4 years .......... ....................................
45 to 64 years..............................................
6 5 years and oyer.........................................

50,281
623
4,178
2339

100.0
100 0
100 0
100.0
100.0
100.0

45.0

12.4

17 2

5,743

57.6
61 1
73 3
69.8
53.0
10.0

9.2
21 ^
17 7
9.3
5.6
8.4

33.5
48 7
?7 n
33.5
33.2
61.0

Other marital status.........................................
16 to 1 9 years ..............................................
2 0 to 2 4 years ....... ..................................... .
25 to 4 4 years .... ..........................................
45 to 64 years........ .....................................
65 years and over.........................................

21,174
137
812
6,074
5,809
8,343

3.8

2 2 .2

51.6
72.8
78.2
63.8
10.3

1 6 ,4 6 8

47.1

1 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .




100.0
. 100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4 .4

12.5
13.4
11.7
9.7

37 1

1,9 R
1 8 .p

4 4 .4

12.8

51.4
23.3

9.8
7 .4

56.0

12.0

C)

37.5
60.4
61.8
23.5

(3)

17.1
12.5

(3)
2 1.2

10.3

11.7

6.8

6.7

9.5

3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .

44

(3)

24.2
16.8
19.6
60.3

Table C-4. Persons with work experience in 1981 by industry and class of worker of the job held the longest, sex, and
extent of employment
(N um bers in thousands)
P ercent distribution o f th o se w ho w o rke d during th e year
Industry, class o f w orker, and sex

i otai w no
w orked
during the
year

Full tim e 1
Total

50 to 52
w eeks

27 to 49
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

Part tim e 2

TOTAL
Total, 16 years and o v e r ......................................................................................

116,794

100.0

55.9

12.4

9.4

22.4

A g ric u ltu re ....................
...............................................................................................
W age and salary w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................
S elf-erriployed w o rk e rs ................................................................................................
Unpaid fa m ily w o rk e rs .................................................................................................

3 ,9 1 5

2,054
1,551
310

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

48.5
33.0
72.7
29.7

9.9
14.6
5.3
2.5

14.1
23.3
2.7
10.3

27.4
29.1
19.2
57.5

N onagricultural industries .............................................................................................
W age and salary w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................
M ining .............................................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n .................................................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ..............................................................................................................

112,880
104,902
1,206
6,107
23,788

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

56.2
56.4
62.9
46.3
66.8

12.4
12.6
21.1
24.7
16.3

9.2
9.5
11.9
.16.4
10.0

22.2
21.5
4.1
12.5
6.9

D urable go o ds .........................................................................................................
Lum ber and w ood p ro d u c ts ............................................................................
Furniture and fix tu re s .........................................................................................
S tone, clay, and glass p ro d u c ts ....................................................................
Prim ary m etal industries ...................................................................................
Fabricated m etal p ro d u c ts ...............................................................................
M achinery, e xce pt e le c tric a l............................................................................
E lectrical e q u ip m e n t...........................................................................................
Tran sp o rta tion e q u ip m e n t.................................................................................
A u to m o b ile s ........................................................................................................
O th e r tra n sp o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t.................................................................
O th e r durable g o o d s ..........................................................................................

14,081
740
542
657
1,158
1,704
3,011
2,618
2,228
1,079
1,149
1,423

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

69.2
48.3
58.8
65.1
70.3
69.4
73.4
73.6
68.2
61.7
74.4
69.4

17.1
26.2
19.2
17.0
17.9
16.4
14.3
14.5
22.4
28.7
16.4
14.0

9.1
16.0
12.2
11.9
7.8
10.8
7.5
8.4
7.1
8.2
6.1
10.2

4.6
9.5
9.9
6.0
4.1
3.4
4.7
3.4
2.3
1.4
3.1
6.5

N ondurable g o o d s ..................................................................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts .............................................................................
T E X Tile m ill p ro d u c ts .........................................................................................
A pparel and o th e r textile p ro d u c ts ...............................................................
P rinting and p u b lis h in g ......................................................................................
C hem icals and allied p ro d u c ts .......................................................................
O th e r nondurable g o o ds ...................................................................................

9,706
2,069
838
1,460
1,814
1,282
2,244

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

63.2
63.1
60.8
48.8
59.9
80.2
66.6

15.1
13.2
20.0
24.4
9.0
10.3
16.5

11.4
13.7
12.3
15.4
8.7
5.7
11.6

10.3
10.0
6.9
11.4
22.4
3.8
5.2

T ransportation and public u tilitie s .......................................................................
R ailroad and railw ay e x p re s s .............................................................................
O ther tra n s p o rta tio n ..............................................................................................
C o m m u n ic a tio n s .....................................................................................................
O ther public utilities ..............................................................................................

6,708
518
3,112
1,636
1,442

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

72.2
75.6
61.1
84.0
81.4

11.5
15.2
14.9
7.0
7.6

6.9
7.8
8.4
3.8
6.9

9.5
1.4
15.6
5.1
4.1

W holesale and retail tr a d e .....................................................................................
W h o le s a le ....................... ..........................................................................................
R e ta il............................................................................................................................

23,121
4,590
18,531

100.0
100.0
100.0

43.9
70.2
37.4

10.3
10.7
10.2

9.3
8.7
9.5

36.5
10.4
43.0

Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..................................................................

6,238

100.0

68.9

9.8

7.0

14.3

S e rv ic e s .........................................................................................................................
B usiness and r e p a ir ..............................................................................................
Private h o u s e h o ld ............................................. .....................................................
P ersonal s e rv ic e s ...................................................................................................
E ntertainm ent and recreation ............................................................................
M edical and o th er health ....................................................................................
W elfare and re lig io u s ............................................................................................
E d u c a tio n a l................................................................................................................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l..................................................................................................
Forestery and fis h e rie s ........................................................................................

31,823
4,110
1,701
2,254
1,330
8,377
1,815
9,277
2,774
186

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

50.3
52.7
13.9
41.7
28.0
58.4
50.3
50.3
62.3
50.8

10.6
12.4
5.8
11.0
10.4
9.1
9.6
12.5
9.5
16.2

9.4
12.3
9.8
13.8
. 19.0
7.8
7.6
7.1
9.4
21.6

29.7
22.6
70.4
33.5
42.6
24.6
32.4
30.2
18.9
11.5

P ublic a d m in is tra tio n .................................................................................................
P ostal ........................................................................................ .................................
F e d e ra l........................................................................................................................
S ta te ............................................................................................................................
Local ...........................................................................................................................
S elf-em ployed w o rk e rs ...............................................................................................
U npaid fam ily w o rk e rs ......... '......................................................................................

5,911
728
1,818
1,072
2,293
7,378
599

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

74.8
80.8
78.7
76.5
69.1
54.4
31.1

6.7
2.9
7.7
10.3
5.5
11.3
5.7

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




45

6.9
4.6
7.4
5.9
7.7
5.0 '
5.5

11.6
11.6
6.2
7.3
17.7
29.2
57.6

Table C-4. Persons with work experience in 1981 by industry and class of worker of the job held the longest, sex, and
extent of employment—Continued
(N um bers in thousands)
P ercent d istribution o f th o se w h o w o rke d during th e year
Industry, cla ss o f w orker, and sex

T o ta l w ho
w orked
during the
year

Full tim e 1
Total

50 to 52
w eeks

27 to 49
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

Part tim e 2

Men
tstyi& .... ....
t

. ............

.......... v........ ..................

84,769

100.0

64.5

12.9

8.7

13.8

A g ric u ltu re ............................................................................................................................
W age and salary w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................
S elf-em ployed w o rk e rs ................................................................................................
U npaid fam ily w o rk e rs .................................................................................................

3,070
1,590
1,373
107

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

55.2
37.2
77.4
35.7

10.7
15.7
5.7
.8

12.9
22.1
2.6
8.9

21.3
25.0
14.3
54.6

N onagricultural industries .............................................................................................
W age and salary w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................
M ining .............................................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n .................................................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ..............................................................................................................

61,698
56,619
1,023
5,543
15,787

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

65.0
65.1
62.0
46.9
72.4

13.0
13.1
22.6
25.7
14.9

8.5
8.9
12.3
16.6
8.0

13.5
12.9
3.1
10.8
4.8

D urable go o ds .........................................................................................................
Lum ber and w ood p ro d u c ts ............................................................................
Furniture and fix tu re s .........................................................................................
Stone, d a y, and glass p ro d u c ts ....................................................................
Prim ary m etal industries ...................................................................................
F abricated m etal p ro d u c ts ...............................................................................
M achinery, e xce pt e le c tric a l............................................................................
E lectrical e q u ip m e n t...........................................................................................
Tra n sp o rta tion e q u ip m e n t.................................................................................
A u to m o b ile s ........................................................................................................
O th e r tra nsportation e q u ip m e n t.................................................................
O th e r durable g o o d s ..........................................................................................

10,311
621
369
505
1,011
1,282
2,343
1,492
1,848
911
937
841

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

71.9
47.7
63.5
65.9
71.3
72.0
76.1
79.4
69.9
64.4
75.4
76.6

16.7
27.1
20.1
17.5
17.7
15.6
14.1
11.6
22.1
27.8
16.6
11.7

8.0
15.7
8.6
11.9
7.4
10.0
7.1
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.0
6.8

3.4
9.5
7.8
4.6
3.6
2.3
2.6
2.8
1.8
1.5
2.1
4.8

N ondurable g o o d s ..................................................................................................
F ood and kindred p ro d u c ts .............................................................................
TEXTile mill p ro d u c ts ........................................................................................
A pparel and o th er te xtile p ro d u c ts ...............................................................
Printinq and p u b lis h in g ......................................................................................
C nem icals and allied p ro d u c ts .......................................................................
O th e r nondurable g o o d s ...................................................................................

5,477
1,418
380
293
1,069
953
1,363

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

73.3
70.9
63.8
67.0
68.2
83.2
76.8

11.4
11.8
16.8
16.1
7.8
9.6
12.6

8.0
9.7
12.1
12.4
5.6
4.6
8.6

7.2
7.6
7.3
4.6
18.4
2.5
2.0

Tra n sp o rta tion and public u tilitie s .......................................................................
R ailroad and railw ay e x p re s s .............................................................................
O th e r tra n s p o rta tio n ..............................................................................................
C o m m u n ic a tio n s .....................................................................................................
O th e r public utilities ..............................................................................................

4,850
485
2,308
893
1,164

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

75.7
76.2
67.2
88.9
82.2

11.4
15.0
15.1
5.5
7.4

6.9
7.8
8.3
3.0
6.5

6.0
1.0
9.4
2.7
4.0

W h o lesa le and retail tr a d e .....................................................................................
W h o le s a le ...................................................................................... ...........................
R e ta il...........................................................................................................................

11,630
3,229
8,401

100.0
100.0
100.0

56.3
76.8
48.4

10.7
9.6
11.2

8.5
7.4
8.9

24.5
6.2
31.5

Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..................................................................

2,475

100.0

75.8

6.9

5.9

11.3

S e rv ic e s .........................................................................................................................
B usiness and r e p a ir ..............................................................................................
P rivate h o u s e h o ld ...................................................................................................
P ersonal s e rv ic e s ................................................................................ ..................
E nte rta in m e n t and recreation ............................................................................
M edical and o th er health ....................................................................................
W elfare and re lig io u s ............................................................................................
E d u c a tio n a l................................................................................................................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l..................................................................................................
Forestery and fis h e rie s ............................................................................... .........

11,713
2,563
279
822
752
1,778
691
3,263
1,410
155

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

61.1
60.4
11.2
55.4
33.0
73.5
60.3
63.6
70.4
52.4

10.3
12.7
2.7
11.9
13.9
6.9
9.8
9.9
9.7
15.2

9.1
11.4
5.7
14.3
18.5
6.8
8.2
5.8
7.2
20.8

19.5
15.5

Public a d m in is tra tio n ................................................................................................
P o s ta l..........................................................................................................................
F e d e ra l........................................................................................................................
S ta te ............................................................................................................................
Local ...........................................................................................................................
S eif-em ployed w o rk e rs ................................................................................................
U npaid fam ily w o rk e rs ................................../ . ...........................................................

3,597
531
1,054
595
1,418
5,007
72

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

82.6
90.1
83.5
82.1
79.3
64.1
(3)

5.7
2.8
6.9
8.4
4.7
12.2
(3)

5.5
2.8
6.4
3.6
6.8
4.5
(3)

S ee fo o tn o te s at end of table.




46

80.4
18.4
34.6
12.8
21.6
20.7
12.7
11.5
6.2
4.3

3.3
5.9
9.2
19.2
0

Table C-4. Persons with work experience in 1981 by industry and class of worker of the job held the longest, sex, and
extent of employment—Continued
(N um bers in thousands)
P ercent distrib u tion o f those w h o w o rke d during th e year
Industry, cla ss of w orker, and sex

i otai w no
w orked
during the
year

Full tim e '
Total

50 to 52
w eeks

27 to 49
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

Part tim e 2

W om en
Total, 16 years and o ver ......................................................................................

52,025

100.0

45.1

11.7

10.1

33.0

A g ric u ltu re ............................................................................................................................
W age and salary w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................
S elf-em ployed w o rk e rs ................................................................................................
Unpaid fam ily w o rk e rs .................................................................................................

844
464
177
203

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

24.3
18.6
36.5
26.5

7.1
10.6
2.1
3.4

18.7
27.6
4.2
11.0

49.9
43.1
57.3
59.0

N onagricultural industries .............................................................................................
W age and salary w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................
M ining .............................................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n .................................................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ..............................................................................................................

51,181
48,283
183
564
8,001

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

45.5
4 6 .2
68.1
41.2
55.7

11.8
12.0
12.6
15.0
19.0

10.0
10.2
9.9
14.6
14.1

32.7
31.6
9.4
29.3
11.2

D urable goods .........................................................................................................
Lum ber and w ood products ............................................................................
Furniture and fix tu re s ......... ...............................................................................
Stone, clay, and glass p ro d u c ts ...................................................................
Prim ary m etal industries ...................................................................................
Fabricated m etal p ro d u c ts ................................................................................
M achinery, exce pt e le c tric a l.................................................. .........................
E lectrical e q u ip m e n t...........................................................................................
Tra n sp o rta tion e q u ip m e n t.................................................................................
A u to m o b ile s ..................................... ..................................................................
O ther tra nsportation e q u ip m e n t.................................................................
O ther durable g o o d s ....................................... .............................................

3,771
119
173
152
147
423
669
1,126
381
169
212
582

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

61.9
51.4
48.6
62.3
62.9
61.4
63.9
66.0
60.0
47.3
70.1
58.9

18.1
21.4
17.3
15.1
19.5
18.8
15.1
18.4
23.5
33.2
15.7
17.2

12.3
17.4
19.7
12.1
10.3
13.4
8.9
11.4
11.7
18.2
6.6
14.9

N ondurable g o o d s ..................................................................................................
Food arid kindred p ro d u c ts .............................................................................
TE XTile mill p ro d u c ts ................................................................. ......................
A pparel and o th er te xtile p ro d u c ts .................................... ...........................
Printing and p u b lis h in g .......................................................................................
C hem icals and allied p ro d u c ts .......................................................................
O th e r nondurable g o o d s ...................................................................................

4,230
651
458
1,167
745
329
880

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

50.2
46.1
58.2
44.3
48.0
71.6
50.9

19.8
16.0
22.8
26 .4'
10.8
12.1
22.6

15.7
22.6
12.5
16:1
13.1
8.8
16.3

14.3
15.2
6.6
13.2
28.2
7.6
10.2

Tra n sp o rta tion and public u tilitie s .......................................................................
R ailroad and railw ay e x p re s s .............................................................................
O ther tra n s p o rta tio n ...............................................................................................
C o m m u n ic a tio n s .....................................................................................................
O th e r public utilities ...............................................................................................

1,857
33
804
743
278

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

63.0
(3)
43.5
78.2
78.1

11.5
(3)
14.5
8.9
8.8

7.0
(3)
9.5
4.9
8.3

18.5
(3)
33.4
7.9
4.8

W h olesale and retail tr a d e ...................................
.............. ........................
W h o le s a le ...................... ...........................................................................................
R e ta il...................................................................... .................... ...............................

11,492
1,361
10,130

100.0
100.0
100.0

31.3
54.7
28.2

9.9
13.2
9.4

10.1
11.8
9.9

48.7
20.4
52.5

Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ......... ........................................... .............

3,733

100.0

64.4

11.6

7.7

16.3

S e rv ic e s ................................................................................................. ........................
Business and repair ...............................................................................................
P rivate h o u s e h o ld ...................................................................................................
P ersonal services ...................................................................................................
E ntertainm ent and recreation ............................................................................
M edical and o ther health ....................................................................................
W e lfare and re lig io u s ............................................................................................
E d u c a tio n a l.................................................................................... ::.........................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l..................................................................................................
Forestery and fis h e rie s ................................................... .....................................

20,110
1,547
1,422
1,432
578
6,598
1,124
6,014
1,364
31

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

44.0
39.9
14.5
33.8
21.5
54.4
44.2
43.1
53.5
(3)

10.8
11.8
6.4
10.5
5.9
9.7
9.5
13.9
9.3
(3)

9.6
13.9
10.6
13.5
19.6
8.1
7.2
7.8
11.6
(3)

35.6
34.4
68.4
42.1
53.0
27.8
39.0
35.3
25.2
(3)

Public a d m in is tra tio n ........................................................................ ........................
P ostal ..........................................................................................................................
F e d e ra l........................................................................................................................
S tate .............................................................................................................................
Local ...........................................................................................................................
S elf-em ployed w orkers ................................................................................................
Unpaid fam ily w o rk e rs ................................................................................................

2,314
197
764
477
875
2,371
527

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

62.8
55.9
72.1
69.4
52.6
34.0
3 0 .S

8.3
3.2
8.8
12.6
6.7
9.5
6.0

9.0
9.6
8.8
8.8
9.2
6.1
5.7

19.9
31.3
10.3
9.2
31.4
50.4
57.5

' Usually w orked 35 hours o r m ore per week.
2 U sually w orked 1 to 34 hours per week.




;'

3 Data not show n w h e re base is less than 75,000.

47

.

7.7
9.8
14.4
10.5
7.3
6.5
12.2
4.2
4.8
1.3
7.6
8.9

Table 0 5 . Wage and salary workers with work experience in 1981 by industry of the job heid the longest, race, sex, and
extent of employment
(N u m bers in thousands)

In d u s try , ra c e , a n d s e x

F ull tim e 1

T o ta l w h o
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

P a rt tim e 2

2 7 to 49
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

W H IT E
T o ta l. 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

9 3 ,5 5 3

1 00 .0

5 6 .2

12.5

9.4

7.4

5.7

8 .9

A g r ic u lt u r e ...........................................................................................
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s tr ie s ............................................................
M in in g ................................................................................................
C o n s tr u c t io n ..................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ...................................................!...............
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re al e s ta te ...................................
S e r v ic e s ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P e r s o n a !........................................................................................
E d u c a t io n a l..................................................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s .............................................. ?............................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ..................................................................

1,728
9 1 ,8 2 5
1,161
5 ,5 5 0
2 0 ,8 4 9
1 2,4 53
8 ,3 9 6
5 ,8 0 2
2 0 ,8 7 4
5 ,6 2 5
2 7 ,0 7 9
1,251
1 ,8 2 9
8 ,0 8 9
1 5 ,9 1 0
4 ,8 8 6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0 .
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 3 .0
5 6.6
63.1
4 6 .9
6 7 .9
70.3
6 4 .2
7 2.4
4 3 .8
6 8 .8
5 0.0
12.4
4 0.4
5 0 .4
5 4.0
7 6 .2

14.1
12.4
2 0 .9
2 4 .9
15.7
16.3
14.9
11.7
10.1
. 9.7
•10.6
6 .4
11.3
12.4
10.0
6 .4

2 2 .4
9.2
12.2
15.9
9.7
8.9
10.8
6 .4
8.9
6 .6
.9.1
10.8
13.5
6.7
9.8
6.2

5.6
7.4
1.5
3.0
2.4
1.5
3.7
3.3
12.9
7.1
10.0
11.5
10.2
7.4
11.1
3 .3

4 .4
5.7
.5
3 .6
1.8
1.2
2 .6
3.2
9.0
3.0
8 .6
12.1
8.9
12.4
6 .3
2.3

2 0 .5
8 .6
1.9
5.7
2 .6
1.7
3.8
3 .0
15.2
4 .8
1 1.7
4 7 .0
15.7
10.9
8.8
5.6

T o ta i, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ........................ ..........................

5 1 ,4 3 6

1 0 0 .0

6 5.0

13.0

8.9

4.1

3.1

5.9

1 ,3 4 2
50,0.93
988.
. • 5 ,0 3 6
1 4 ,0 6 3
9 ,2 0 8
4 ,8 5 6
4 ,2 2 8
1 0,3 95
2 ,2 3 4
1 0 ,0 9 6
2 12
6 83
2 ,8 3 9
6,361
• 3 ,0 5 3

1 0 0 .0 '
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .6
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 6.9
6 5.8
6 2.2
4 7.5
7 3 .5
73.1
7 4.2
76.1
. 5 6.9
7 6.2
6 1 .5
8 .9 "
5 5.2

2 1 .8
8.6
12.5
16.0
7.7
7.7
•7.8
6 .4
8.0
5.9
8.9
6.4

3 .6
4.1
1.0
1.8
1.6
1.1
2.7
2.0
8.5
5 .4

8 4 .2 '

15.1
12.9
2 2 .3
2 5 .9
14.3
16.0
11.0
11.6
1 0.5
6.3
10.4
3.1
12.2
9.5
10.8
5.3

13.5
5.6
10.0
4.9

5.9
9.0
4.9
5.7
6 .0
1.6

4 .0
3.1
.5
3 .3
1.1
.9
1.6
1.8
5.5
2.3
4 .6
5.7
4.4
6.4
3 .8
1,1

1 8.6
5.5
1.6
5.4
1.8
1.2
2.7
2.1
10.6
4 .0
8 .6
6 6 .8
9.9
7 .8
6 .9
2 .9

1 0 0 .0 .

4 5.3

11.9

1 0 .0

11.4

8.8

1 2.5

•100.0 '
100.0.
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0 1 0 0 .0 .
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0 •
100 .0

19.4
4 5 .6
*6 8 .2
4 0 .8
5 6 .2
6 2 .6
5 0.4
6 2 .4
3 0 .9
6 3 .9
4 3 .2
13.0
3 1.6

10.8
11.9

2 4 .4
9.9
10.5
14,3
13.7
12.4
i4 . 9

12.4
11.4
4 .5
14.7
4.0
2.8
5.1
6.8

5.9
8.9
.7
5.9
3.1
2.1
4.1

27.1
12.4
3 .7
9.2
4 .2
3.0
5.4
5.5
1-9.9
5.4

A g r ic u lt u r e ...................................................... .•...................................
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s tr ie s ............................................................
M in in g ................................................................................................
C o n s tr u c t io n ...................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................... ................ ...........................
D u ra b le g o o d s ...........................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ............. ......................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a nd . p u b lic u tilitie s ........... ..........................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...................................
S e r v ic e s ................................................. ............... ..........................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld ....................................................................
P e r s o n a l...........'...........................................,..................... ..........
E d u c a t io n a l..................................................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ........................ :........................... ......................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n .................................. ...........................

•

W orn©?*
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ............................ ................ .
A g r ic u lt u r e ....................... ....................................... ...........................
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s tr ie s ................* ..........................................
M in in g ....................... .......... ......................................................... .
C o n s tr u c t io n ....................... ..........................:.......................... .
M a n u fa c tu re d ...... :.............................:........................................
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................. :................. ...........................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ................................................. ;................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s .....................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ............................... ..............:.......
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ........................ .........
S e rv ic e s ................................................................................... ........
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................

1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
'1 0 0 .0 .
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 4.9
6 2 .5

•
4 2 ,1 1 7

386
4 1 ,7 3 2
.172
.
. 514
6 ,7 8 5
3 ,2 4 5
»
3 ,5 4 0
: 1,5 7 4 v
“ 1 0,4 79
3,391
1 6 ,9 8 3
■
. 1,039
1,1 4 6
P e r s o n a l........................................................................................
5 ,2 4 9
.
E d u c a t io n a l.................................. ............................. .................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ...................................................................
■
9 ,5 4 9
.
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ..................................................... .......
1,832

See footnotes at end of table.




■

.

48

4 2 .5
4 8.3
6 2 .9

'

12.4
15.1
18.7
17.1
20.1
12,1 ■
9.7
12.0
10.8
7.0
10.7

.

13.9
9.5
8 .i

€a
•

9 .8
7.1
9.3
11.7
13.4
7.2
9.6
8 .4

17.2
8.2
12.4
11.9
1.3.4
8,2
.1 4 .5 '
6 .2
-

6.8
12.5
3.5
10.9
13.4
11.6
15.6
7.9
4 .3

.

13.5
4 2 .9
19.2
12.5
10.1
10.0

Table G-5. Wag© and salary workers with work experience In 1981 by industry of the Job held the longest, rae©, sex, and
©xfeni ©f employment—Continued
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )
F u ll tim e 1

T o ta l w h o
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

T o ta l

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................................

10,861

A g r ic u ltu r e ............................................................................................
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s t r ie s ............................................................
M in in g .............................................................................................. .
C o n s t r u c t io n ...................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................... ..........................
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................................................
N o n d u ra b le G o o d s ..................................................... ..............
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...................................
S e r v ic e s ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P e r s o n a l........................................................................................
E d u c a t io n a l..................................................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ..................................................................

In d u s try , ra c e , a n d s e x

P a rt tim e 2

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

5 0 to 5 2
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

100 .0

5 4 .2

13.4

12.5

6.0

4.4

9.5

255
1 0 ,6 0 6
25
476
2 ,3 5 2
1,2 8 0
1,0 7 2
786
1,7 0 2
475
3 ,9 2 4
423
340
9 90
2 ,1 7 0
867

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 7 .2
5 4 .6

14.5
13.4

2 5 .4
12.2

2 .7
5 .0

4.4
4 .4

15.8
9.4

f)
3 8 .5
5 9.2
5 9.9
5 8.5
7 0.9
4 2 .6
6 9 .8
5 0.8
16.6
4 5 .9
5 0.8
5 8.2
6 8 .4

(3)
2 4 .7
2 0 .0
2 3 .7
15.5
9.8
12.1
1 0.4
10.8
4 .2
9.8
14.0
10.7
8.1

f)
2 2 .9
13.4

(3)
1.7
2.3
1.5
3.2
3.7
6.5
.7
6.1
12.4
6.1
7.8
4 .0
2 .0

f)
11.1

1 1.3
15.9
3.9
12.6
1 0.6
11.3
7.4
16.3
10.5
11.6
9.9

0
1.0
2.4
1.6
3.3
2.4
8.4
3.5
9 .5
3 1 .2
13.3
5.0
6.8
3.0

1.9
3 .7
3.3
17.7
4 .9
11.5
28.1
8.8
1 1.8
8 .6
8 .6

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ................... ...............................

5 ,4 1 0

1 00 .0

5 9 .0

1 4.7

12.0

3 .0

3 .0

8.2

A g ric u ltu re ...........................................................................................

1 99
5,211
18
438
1,411

4 4 .0
5 9.6

18.1
14.6

19.3
1 1.8

3.5
3.0

3 .6
3.0

11.5
8.1

(*>
39.1
6 3 .8
6 2 .7
6 5 .5
7 2 .5
49.1
7 1 .8
5 6 .8

(3)
2 5 .4
1 9.6
2 2 .3
15.0
10.8
12.9
14.6
1 1.0

O
2 3.3
10.6
10.3
10.9
10,4
12.9
4 .8
1 1.0

(3)
1.1
1.9
1.8
2 .0
1.3
3 .5
3.7
5.4

(3)
1.0
1.5
.9
2.4
1.6
6.6

f)
10.2
2.8

882
529
549
915
1 87
1 ,2 5 0
61
1 08
329
752
442

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
100.0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

0
4.6

O
5 5 .3
5 8 .6
5 9 .6
7 4.2

0
10.1
13.9
10.7
6 .6

f)
2 0 .9
7.1
11.9
8 .9

f)
6.0
5.4
4 .8
2.3

(3)
2.2
5.9
3.9
1.0

\J

T o ta l, 1 6 y e a rs a n d o v e r ..................................... .■
............

5,451

100 .0

4 9 .5

12.0

13.0

8.9

5.7

10.8

A g ric u ltu re ...........................................................................................
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s tr ie s ............................................................
M in in g ........................................ ........................................................
C o n s tr u c t io n ........................................................................... .
M a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................... ..........................
D u ra b le g o o d s ...................... .......... ...........................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ............ .......................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................ ...............
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...................................
S e r v ic e s .............................. ................ ............................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld ....... .............................................................
P e r s o n a l............................... ................................................ ......
E d u c a t io n a l........................................................ ................. .......
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............ ........... ................... ..........................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ................................... ...............................

56
5 ,3 9 5
7
38
940
398
■ 5 42
2 37
7 87
288
2 ,6 7 4
362
232
661
1 ,4 1 9
424

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0
1 0 0 .0
100.0
100 .0
1 00 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
10G.0
100 .0
100 .0

(3)
4 9 .9

(3)
1 2.2

0
1 2.7

(3)
9.0

(3)
5.7

O
10.6

O
C
3)
5 2.5
5 3.5
5 1.7
6 7 .2
3 5 .0
6 8 .5
4 8 .0
17.2
4 1 .2
4 6 .9

(3)
(3)
2 0 .6
2 6 .9
16.0
7.7
1 1.3
7 .6
1 0.6
4 .6
9 .6
14.1
10.7
9.7

(3)
(3)
3.2
1.3
4 .5
5.0
14.1
3 .4
11.5

(3)
f)
3.4
2.8
3.9
8.6
6.5
1.2
6.8
12.7
7.8
3.8
4.1
3.0

(3)
(3)
2 .6
1.9
3.1
2 .8
2 0 .9
4 .7
11.7
2 2 .0
10.6
13.1
8.3
10.4

BLACK-

2.7

ItHen

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s t r ie s ............................................................
M in in g .................................................................................................
C o n s tr u c t io n ...................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ....................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ......................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...................................
S e r v ic e s ............................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .....................................................................
P e r s o n a l.......................................................................................
E d u c a t io n a l..................................................................................
O th e r s e r v ic e s ............................................................................
P u b lic a d m in is t r a tio n ..................................................................

'

1.9
4.2
3.6
15.0
5.1
1 1.2
4 .9
9.1
9.2
6 .9

W om en

1 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o i ss o r m o re p s f »vee^,
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e s k ,




5 7 .5
6 2 .4

(3)

0

.

17.7
.1 3 .5
2 0 .7
8 .8
1 2.2
14.4
11.4
8.1
14.1
12.2

3 4 .5
16.6
4.8

11.5
10.8

7.9
3 .6

3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
4 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t

Tabie C-S. Persons with work experience in 19B1 by occupation of the job held the longest, sex, and extent of
employment
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )
P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f th o s e w h o w o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r
T o ta l w h o
w o rk e d
d u rin g th e
year

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

F u ll tim e 1

T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

P a rt tim e 2

1 to 2 6
w eeks

TO TAL
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ..........................................................................................................

1 1 6 ,7 9 4

100 .0

5 5.9

12.4

9.4

2 2 .4

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s .............................................................................................
E n g in e e r s ...............................................................................................................................................
M e d ic a l a nd o th e r h e a lth w o r k e r s .............................................................................................
T e a c h e rs , e x c e p t c o lle g e ..............................................................................................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d s c ie n c e te c h n ic ia n s ......................................................................................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o rk e rs ............................................................................

1 8 ,2 9 3
1 ,6 8 0
3 ,3 1 2
3 ,7 6 2
1,207
8 ,3 3 2

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0

68.1
8 5 .8
6 5 .0
5 8 .0
76.1
69.1

9.7
6 .4
8.6
15.1
8 .8
8 .5

5.9
5 .4
4 .2
6 .7
7.8
6.1

18.3
2 .4
22.1
2 0 .3
7.3
16.3

M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t fa rm .............................................................................
S a la rie d w o r k e r s ................................................................................................................................
S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs in re ta il t r a d e ......................................................................................
S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs , e x c e p t re ta il t r a d e ...........................................................................

1 2 ,2 6 8
1 0 ,3 6 0
895
1 ,0 1 3

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 0 .2
8 1 .9
7 1 .2
70.1

7.8
7 .6
9.2
9.1

4.1
4 .0
5.5
4 .0

7 .9
6 .5
14.1
16.7

S a le s w o rk e rs .........................................................................................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ...........................................................................................................................................
O th e r s a le s w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................................

7 ,5 6 7
4 ,0 1 4
3 ,5 5 2

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 0 .2
3 2 .0
7 0 .7

8 .5
8 .4
8 .5

6.1
7.6
4.4

3 5 .3
5 2 .0
1 0.4

C le ric a l w o r k e r s .....................................................................................................................................
B o o k k e e p e rs ........................................................................................................................................
O ffic e m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ..............................................................................................................
S te n o g ra p h e rs , ty p is ts , a n d s e c re ta rie s ............. ...................................................................
O th e r c le ric a l w o r k e r s ................................... «•...............................................................................

2 1 ,4 8 8
2,241
1 ,2 1 6
5 ,5 5 8
1 2,4 72

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
100 .0

5 3 .6
5 2 .8
6 4 .6
5 7 .0
5 1.2

10.3
8.7
12.5
11.6
9.8

9.2
6 .9
10.1
9.7
9 .4

2 8 .8
3 1 .7
12.8
2 1 .7
2 9 .6

C ra ft w o r k e r s .................................. .........................................................................................................
C a r p e n t e r s ......................................................................................................... ...................................
C o n s tru c tio n c ra ft, e x c e p t c a r p e n te r s ......................................................................................
M e c h a n ic s a n d r e p a ir e r s ...............................................................................................................
M e ta l c ra ft, e x c p e t m e c h a n ic s ....................................................................................................
O th e r c ra ft a n d k in d re d w o rk e rs ...............................................................................................
B lu e -c o lla r w o rk e r s u p e rv is o rs , n o t e ls e w h e re c la s s ifie d ...............................................

1 4 ,3 2 6
1,479
3 ,0 1 0
3 ,7 1 5
1 ,4 3 5
2 ,8 3 2
1 ,8 5 6

1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0

6 4 .9
3 9 .3
5 0.0
7 4 .2
6 9 .4
6 6 .6
8 4 .6

17.3
2 8 .9
2 4 .8
12.8
19.9
1 3.6
8 .4

9 .4
16.9
13.2
7.2
7 .6
8 .4
4 .6

8 .5
■ 14.9
12.0
5 .9
3.2
1 1.4
2 .4

O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ............ ...............................................................................................
M in in g .......................................................................................................................... ...........................
D u ra b le g o o d s m a n u f a c t u r in g .....................................................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s m a u fa c tu rin g ...............................................................................................
O th e r in d u s tr ie s ..................................................................................................................................

1 2 ,2 1 9
3 95
5 ,0 7 3
4 ,0 4 0
2,711

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0

5 2.5
4 5 .7
5 9.5
5 0 .9
4 2 .8

2 1 .9
3 0 .4
24.1
2 2 .4
16.0

14.5
2 0 .4
12.1
16.6
14.9

11.1

T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a tiv e s ....................................................................................................
D e liv e ry a n d ro u te w o rk e rs ..........................................................................................................
O th e r tr a n s p o r t e a u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ....................................................................................

3 ,9 4 4
3 ,3 7 3
566

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 7 .9
5 6 .9
6 3 .3

18.2
18.0
19.5

8.7
9 .4
10.9

1 4.3
15.7

N o n fa rm la b o r e r s ..................................................................... ............................................................
C o n s tru c tio n ........................................................................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ......................................................................................................................................
O th e r in d u s tr ie s ..................................................................................................................................

6 ,0 4 0
1 ,1 0 6
1,184
3 ,7 4 9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 ,0
1 00 .0

3 6 .9
2 7 .5
5 0 .2
3 5 .4

16.3
2 4.9
2 4 .0
11.2

18.0
2 8 .9
16.9
15.1

2S.S

P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o r k e r s ...............................................................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ....... .....................................................................
C le a n in g s e rv ic e ........................................................... ....................................................................
F o o d s e r v ic e ..................................................................................................... i ................................
H e a lth s e r v ic e .....................................................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
100 .0
100.0
1 00 .0

13.4
3 5 .2
4 1 .8
2 1 .0
4 7 .5
2 9 .8
6 9 .0

6 .5
10.1
9.8
10.0
11.0
10.5
' 8 .9

11.0
10.7
11.8
10.3

P e rs o n a l s e rv ic e ................................................................................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e r v ic e ..........................................................................................................................■...

1 ,3 8 0
16,0 83
3 ,1 8 7
6 ,5 2 4
2 ,4 1 3
2 ,3 2 7
1,632-

F a rm e rs a n d fa r m 'm a n a g e r s .......................................... ...............................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a n d s u p e r v is o r s ......................................................................................................
P aid w o r k e r s ...... ....... ,......... ............................... t..............................................................................
U n p a id fa m ily w o r k e r s ................... ;................................................................. .............................

1 ,4 1 9
1 ,7 6 7
1 ,4 8 6
'281

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0
1 00 .0

7 7 .0
2 9.7
2 9.3
3 1 .8

4 .9
11.8
13.5
2,8

2.3
2 3 .S
2 6 .3

Sea footnotes at end of table.




50

.

•

3 .5

4.3
10.1
2 6 .3

6.3
18.7
8.9
38.2

11.5
12.1
7.5

11.1

•

‘

6 9 .2
4 3 .9
3 6 .6
5 8 .7
3 0 .0
4 7 .6
14.7
15.8
• 3 4 .6
3 0 .9
5 4.3

Table C-6. Persons with work experience in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest, sex, and extent of
employment—Continued
(N u m bers in thousands)
P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f th o s e w h o w o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r
T o ta l w h o
w o rk e d
d u rin g th e
year

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Full tim e 1

T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 49
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

P a rt tim e 2

M en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...........................................................................................................

6 4 ,7 6 9

1 00 .0

6 4 .5

12.9

8 .7

13.8

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s .............................................................................................
E n g in e e r s ...............................................................................................................................................
M e d ic a l a n d o th e r h e a lth w o r k e r s .............................................................................................
T e a c h e rs , e x c e p t c o lle g e ..............................................................................................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d s c ie n c e te c h n ic ia n s ......................................................................................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o rk e rs ............................................................................

9 ,9 1 7
1 ,5 7 7
1 ,1 1 9
1,0 9 8
1,001
5 ,1 2 2

1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

7 8.0
8 6 .9
8 1 .0
7 1.5
7 7.3
76.1

8.1
6.5
7.1
1 4.5
8.8
7.3

4.8
4.3
2 .7
4.1
8.2
4 .9

9.0
2.2
9.2
9.9
5.7
11.6

M a n a g e rs a nd a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t fa rm ..............................................................................
S a la rie d w o r k e r s .................................................................................................................................
S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs in re ta il t r a d e ......................................................................................
S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs , e x c e p t re ta il t r a d e ...........................................................................

8,761
7 ,3 4 2
574
845

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

8 5 .3
8 7.0
8 1 .3
7 3 .3

6.8
6.4
8.7
9.3

3.0
3.0
4.1
2.7

4 .8
3 .6
5.8
14.7

S a le s w o rk e rs .........................................................................................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ...........................................................................................................................................
O th e r s a le s w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................................

3 ,8 5 3
1,3 2 4
2 ,5 2 8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 9.7
53.1
78.3

8.4
11.8
6 .6

4.7
6.9
3 .6

17.2
2 8 .2
11.5

C le ric a l w o r k e r s .....................................................................................................................................
B o o k k e e p e rs ........................................................................................................................................
O ffic e m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ..............................................................................................................
S te n o g ra p h e rs , ty p is ts , a n d s e c r e t a r ie s .................................................................................
O th e r c le ric a l w o r k e r s ......................................................................................................................

4 ,0 4 4
201
304
56
3 ,4 8 3

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

6 4.8
5 2.4
7 1.8

8 .6
6.2
10.9

8 .6
9 .4
8 .6

18.0
3 2 .0
8 .6

(3)
65.1

(3)
8.5

(3)
8.3

(3)
18.1

C ra ft w o r k e r s ...........................................................................................................................................
C a r p e n te r s .............................................................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n c ra ft, e x c e p t c a r p e n te r s ......................................................................................
M e c h a n ic s a n d r e p a ir e r s ...............................................................................................................
M e ta l c ra ft, e x c p e t m e c h a n ic s .....................................................................................................
O th e r c ra ft a n d k in d re d w o rk e rs ................................................................................................
B lu e -c o lla r w o rk e r s u p e rv is o rs , n o t e ls e w h e re c la s s ifie d ...............................................

1 3 ,3 7 8
1,4 5 4
2 ,9 5 3
3 ,6 6 0
1 ,3 7 6
2 ,3 4 5
1,5 9 0

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

6 5 .7
3 9.3
5 0.3
7 4.3
7 0 .3
7 1.2
8 6.3

17.5
2 9 .2
2 4 .9
12.7
19.3
13.8
8.5

9.3
17.0
13.0
7.2
7.3

7.5
14.5
11.8
5.8
3.1

7.7
4.0

7.3
1.3

O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ............................................................................................................
M in in g ......................................................................................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s m a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s m a u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................................
O th e r in d u s tr ie s ...................................................................................................................................

7 ,0 0 4
383
3,251
1 ,5 2 9
1,841

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 7.7
4 6.5
6 2 .0
6 5 .5
4 5 .9

2 1 .3
2 9 .9
24.1
17.3
17.9

12.0
20.1
9.9
11.1
14.7

9.0
3 .5
4 .0
6.1
2 1 .6

T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a tiv e s .....................................................................................................
D e liv e ry a n d ro u te w o r k e r s ...........................................................................................................
O th e r tra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s .....................................................................................

3 ,5 7 7
3 ,0 5 3
524

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 0 .9
6 0 .4
6 3.3

18.6
1 8.6
18.9

9.8
9.6
11.5

10.7
11.4
6.3

N o n fa rm la b o r e r s ...................................................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n .........................................................................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ...................................................................................... ................................................
O th e r in d u s tr ie s ...................................................................................................................................

5 ,3 3 0
1 ,0 6 7
1 ,0 1 2
3 ,2 5 2

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 6.9
2 7 .6
4 9.8
3 5.9

16.8
2 4 .7
2 4 .2
11.8

18.1
2 8 .9
17.2
14.8

2 8.3
18.8
8 .7
3 7 .5

P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o r k e r s ................................................................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ..............................................................................
C le a n in g s e rv ic e .................................................................................................................................
F o o d s e r v ic e .........................................................................................................................................
H e a lth s e rv ic e .....................................................................................................................................
P e rs o n a l s e rv ic e .................................................................................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e rv ic e ..............................................................................................................................

40
6 ,3 1 5
1,921
2 ,1 6 0
251
5 32
1,4 5 2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
10.0

O
45.1
4 6 .9
2 4 .9
5 9.4
4 1.8
7 1.2

(3)
10.0
10.0
10.6
8.3
10.0
9.4

(3)
10.7
11.3
11.8
9.8
12.8
7.6

(3)
3 4 .3
3 1 .8
5 2 .6
2 2 .5
3 5 .4
11.8

F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ...........................................................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a n d s u p e r v is o r s .......................................................................................................

1,273
1,2 7 5

5.3
13.1
14.1

11.5
2 9 .8

1,171

8 1.0
3 4 .5
3 4 .3

2.2

P a id w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................................................
U n p a id fa m ily w o r k e r s ......................................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0
1 00 .0

3 6 .8

.8

See footnotes at end of table.




51

1 03

2 2 .6
2 3 .8
9.1

2 7 .8
5 3.2

r

Table 0 6 . Persons with work experience in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest, sex, and extent of
empSoyment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)
P ercen t distribution of th o se w ho w orked during th e year
i o ia i w n o
w o rk e d
d u rin g th e
year

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

F u ll tim e '

T o ta l

50 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 49
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

P a rt tim e 1
2

W om en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...........................................................................................................

5 2 ,0 2 5

1 00 .0

45.1

11.7

10.1

3 3 .0

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s .............................................................................................
E n g in e e r s ...............................................................................................................................................
M e d ic a l a n d o th e r h e a lth w o r k e r s .............................................................................................
T e a c h e rs , e x c e p t c o lle g e ..............................................................................................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d s c ie n c e te c h n ic ia n s ......................................................................................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o rk e rs ............................................................................

8 ,3 7 6
1 03
2 ,1 9 3
2 ,6 6 4
206
3 ,2 1 0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0

5 6 .4
6 9 .2
5 6 .9
5 2 .4
70.1
5 7.9

11.6
4 .0
9 .4
15.3
9.1
10.4

7.2
2 1 .3
5.0
7.7
5 .4
7.9

2 4.9
5.5
2 8 .7
2 4 .5
15.4
2 3 .7

M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t fa rm ..............................................................................
S a la rie d w o r k e r s .................................................................................................................................
S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs in re ta il t r a d e ......................................................................................
S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs , e x c e p t re ta il t r a d e ...........................................................................

3 ,5 0 7
3 ,0 1 8
321
1 67

1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

6 7 .3
6 9 .5
5 3.2
5 4.4

10.4
10.6
1 0.0

6 .8
6 .4
8.1

8.3

10.3

15.5
13.5
2 8 .7
2 7 .0

S a le s w o rk e rs .........................................................................................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ............................................................................................................................................
O th e r s a le s w o r k e r s ..........................................................................................................................

3 ,7 1 4
2 ,6 9 0
1,0 2 4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 9 .9
2 1 .6
5 1 .9

8 .6
6 .8
1 3.2

7 .5
7 .9
6 .5

5 4 .0
6 3 .8
2 8 .4

C le ric a l w o r k e r s ......................................................................................................................................
B o o k k e e p e rs ........................................................................................................................................
O ffic e m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ...............................................................................................................
S te n o g ra p h e rs , ty p is ts , a n d s e c r e t a r ie s .................................................................................
O th e r c le ric a l w o r k e r s ......................................................................................................................

1 7 ,4 4 3
2 ,0 3 9
912
5 ,5 0 3
8 ,9 8 9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

5 1 .0
5 2 .9
6 2 .2
57.1
4 5 .8

1 0.7
8 .9
13.0
1 1.6
10.3

9.4
6 .6
10.6
9.5
9 .8

2 8 .9
3 1 .6
14.2
2 1 .8
34.1

C ra ft w o r k e r s ............................................................................................................................................
C a r p e n t e r s ......................................................................................................................... ...................
C o n s tru c tio n c ra ft, e x c e p t c a r p e n t e r s ......................................................................................
M e c h a n ic s a n d r e p a ir e r s ................................................................................................................
M e ta l c ra ft, e x c p e t m e c h a n ic s .....................................................................................................
O th e r c r a ft a n d k in d re d w o rk e rs ................................................................................................
B lu e -c o lla r w o rk e r s u p e rv is o rs , n o t e ls e w h e re c la s s ifie d ................................................

948
25
57
54
59
487
266

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

5 3 .4

13.4

11.2

2 1 .9

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

O
(3)
(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

4 4 .6
7 4 .3

12.5
8 .2

11.9
8.3

3 1 .0
9.3

O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ............................................................................................................
M in in g .......................................................................................................................................................
D u ra b le g o o d s m a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s m a u fa c tu rin g ................................................................................................
O th e r in d u s tr ie s ...................................................................................................................................

5 ,2 1 4
12
1,821
2,511
871

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0

4 5 .5

2 2 .8

17.8

13.8

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

5 5.0
4 2 .0
3 6 .3

2 4 .0
2 5 .4
1 2.2

16.1
2 0 .0
15.1

4 .9
1 2.6
3 6 .4

T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a tiv e s .....................................................................................................
D e liv e ry a n d ro u te w o rk e rs ........................................ ..................................................................
O th e r tr a n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s .....................................................................................

368

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 8 .7
24.1

13.6

325
43

11.9

7.8
8.4

4 9 .9
5 5 .6

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

N o n fa rm la b o r e r s ...................................................................................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n .........................................................................................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .......................................................................................................................................
O th e r in d u s tr ie s ...................................................................................................................................

709
39
172
498

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 6 .9

12.5

17.1

3 3 .6

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

5 2 .2
3 2 .4

2 2 .9
7.5

15.1
16.9

9.7
4 3 .2

P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o r k e r s ........................................................................................ .......................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ..............................................................................
C le a n in g s e rv ic e ................................................................................................................................
F o o d s e r v ic e .........................................................................................................................................
H e a lth s e r v ic e .....................................................................................................................................

1 ,3 4 0
9 ,7 6 8
1,2 6 6
4 ,3 6 4
2 ,1 6 2
1,7 9 5
180

1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

13.1
2 8 .9
3 3 .9
19.1
46.1

6 .7
10.1
9 .6
9.7
11.4

2 6 .2
5 1 .0

10.7
5.2

10.9
10.8
12.5
9.5
11.7
11.9
6 .3

6 9 .3
5 0.2
4 4 .0
6 1 .7
3 0 .9
5 1 .2
3 7 .5

1 46

1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

4 2 .4

2.0
8 .5
11.2
3.9

2.8
2 7 .3
3 5 .8
12.2

5 2.9
4 7 .0
4 2 .5
5 4.9

P e rs o n a l s e rv ic e ................................................................................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e r v ic e ..............................................................................................................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ...........................................................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a n d s u p e r v is o r s .......................................................................................................
P a id w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................................................
U n p a id fa m ily w o r k e r s .....................................................................................................................

1 Usually w orked 3 5 hours or m ore per w e e k .
2 U sually w orked 1 to 3 4 hours per w ee k.




492
314
178

1 7.2
10.5
2 8 .9

3 D a ta not show n w h ere bas e is less th an 7 5 ,0 0 0 .

52

Tab!® C-7. Persons with work experience in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest, race, sex, and extent of
employment
(Numbers in thousands)
P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f th o s e w h o w o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r
w ho
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................................

1 0 2 ,8 2 5

1 0 0 .0

56.1

12.2

9 .0

8.0

5.8

8 .9

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............................................................
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m .............................................
S a le s w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ....................................................................................................
C ra ft w o r k e r s ..................................................... ...................................................
O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ..........................................................................
T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ..................................................................
N o n fa rm la b o r e r s .................................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .............................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ............................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a m d s u p e r v is o r s ....................................................................

1 6 ,6 0 3
1 1 ,5 4 3
7,181
1 8 ,8 4 5
1 3 ,0 9 7
1 0 ,1 8 9
3 ,3 3 2
5 ,0 0 5
994
1 3 ,1 7 8
1 ,3 7 4
1 ,4 8 4

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 7 .6
8 0 .4
5 0.8
5 2.9
6 5 .0
5 2.5
5 6.4
3 5 .7
11.5
3 3 .3
7 8 .0
3 0 .2

9.7
7.5
8.3
10.3
1 7.4
2 2 .0
18.9
16.7
7.1
9.8
4 .8
10.7

5.9
4.1
5.7
8.9
9.0
14.5
10.0
17.9
12.2
10.2
2.2
2 2 .5

5.9
4 .4
13.8
11.3
2.5
3 .2
4 .0
7.8
12.1
15.1
12.1
10.5

5.5
1.5
8.3
7.0
2.7
3.3
5.2
5.6
14.3
12.4
.5
4 .6

5.4
2.1
13.1
9.6
3.4
4.6
5.4
16.3
4 2 .8
19.2
2.5
2 1.5

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................................

5 7 ,6 1 5

100 .0

6 5 .2

12.7

8.4

4 .6

3.2

5.8

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............................................................
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to q s , e x c e p t fa r m .............................................
S a le s w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ....................................................................................................
C ra ft w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................
O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ..........................................................................
T ra n s p o rt e a u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ..................................................................
N o n fa rm l a b o r e r s .................................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .............................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ............................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a m d s u p e r v is o r s ....................................................................

9 ,0 9 9
8 ,2 4 5
3 ,6 8 5
3 ,4 1 9
1 2 ,2 5 0
6 ,0 1 6
3 ,0 1 9
4 ,3 9 4
27
5 ,1 6 9
1 ,2 3 0
1 ,0 6 2

100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100.0
100 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

7 8 .2
8 5.7
7 0 .5
6 4 .5
6 5 .9
5 7.5
5 9.8
3 5 .9

8 .2
6 .5
8.2
8 .2
17.6
2 1 .2
19.5
17.3

4.7
3 .0
4 .4
8 .4
8 .9
12.2
10.1
18.0

3.1 2. 3
2.7
7.7
7.1
2.2
2.7

.7
3.8
5.1
2.4

0
4 4 .3
8 2 .2
3 4 .8

(3)
9.5
5.1
11.8

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................................

4 5 ,2 1 0

1 00 .0

4 4 .5

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............................................................
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m .............................................
S a le s w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ....................................................................................................
C ra ft w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................
O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ..........................................................................

7 ,5 0 5
3 ,2 9 8
3 ,4 9 6
1 5 ,4 2 6
8 47
4 ,1 7 3
3 13
610
967
8 ,0 1 0
1 44
421

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0

5 4 .8
6 7 .0
3 0 .2
5 0 .4
5 2 .4
4 5 .2
2 4.3
3 4 .4
11.6
2 6 .2
4 2 .4
18.4

O c c u p a tio n , ra c e , a n d s e x

P a rt tim e 2

F u ll tim e '
1 to 2 6
w eeks

50 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 49
w eeks

1 to 26
w eeks

W H IT E

Men

3.1
7.2

2 .5
3.3
5.5

2.9
1.4
5.4
6.9
3.0
3.9
4.3
16.1

(3)
10.3
2.1
2 1 .7

0
11.5
8.2
7.7

(3)
7.7
.4
4 .3

(3)
16.7
2.1
19.6

1 1.6

9.8

12.3

9.1

12.7

11.5
10.3
8.3
10.7
14.4
23.1
13.7
12.3
7.3
9.9
2 .0
8.2

7.3
6.9
7.1
9.0
10.8
17.9
8 .6
17.1
12.1
10.1
2.8
2 4 .4

9.4
8.5
20.1
12.3
7 .6
3 .9
13.0
11.9
11.9
17.5
4 5 .7
17.5

8.6
3.4
13.0
7.4
6 .2
4 .4
2 3 .9
6.4
14.3
15.4
1.2
5.4

8 .4

Women

T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ..................................................................
N o n fa rm la b o re rs .................................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .............................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ............................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a m d s u p e r v is o r s ....................................................................

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




53

3.9
2 1 .3
10.2
8.5
5.6
16.4
18.0
4 2 .9
2 0 .9
5.9
26.1

Table C-7. P©rs@eis with work ©^persesnee in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest, race, sen, and extent of
employment—Continued
(Numbers in thousands)
P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f th o s e w h o w o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r
w ho
w o rk e d
d u rin g
th e y e a r

T o ta l

5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................................

11,211

1 00 .0

5 4.0

13.3

12.3

6.3

4 .5

9.7

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............................................................
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m .............................................

1,1 3 3
498
273
2 ,1 2 5
967
1,651
541
914
364
2 ,4 9 6
32
217

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
1 00 .0

7 2 .0
7 7 .9
3 3.5
5 8.8
8 4 .2
5 3.2
6 7 .4
4 3 .0
17.4
4 4 .5

11.1
13.5
13.8
10.3
15.7
21.1
13.3
13.9
4 .8
11.5

7.1
2 .8
15.0
11.5
14.1
14.4
8.2
17.9
7.8
1 3.0

4 .4
2.8
1 4.5
5 .0
2 .0
3 .9
2.1
4 .2
3 5 .7
8 .6

2 .0
1.7
5.5
4 .3
1.9
2 .9
3 .8
4 .8
11.9
7 .4

3 .5
1.2
17.7
10.1
2 .2
4 .5
5.3
16.2
2 2 .4
15.0

(3)
3 1.0

(3)
14.6

(3)
29.1

(3)
3 .2

(3)
2 .6

(3)
1 9.5

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................................

5 ,6 5 3

1 00 .0

5 8 .8

14.5

11.8

3 .5

3.1

8.3

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............................................................
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m .............................................
S a le s w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ....................................................................................................
C ra ft w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................
O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ..........................................................................
T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ..................................................................
N o n fa rm l a b o r e r s .................................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .............................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ...........................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a m d s u p e r v is o r s ....................................................................

474
357
117
491
895
825
499
829
11
958
32
165

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0
100 .0

7 4 .7
7 8.9
4 9 .2
69.1
6 3 .8
59.1
6 8.3
4 1 .4

9.5
12.9
12.7
10.6
16.4
2 1.0
13.2
14.3

6.9
2 .5
14.3
9.8
14.0
10.7
8 .9
17.9

4 .4
3.2
7.0
1.7
2.0
3.1
2.3
4.0

.9
.8
6 .6
1.9
1.6
1.9
2 .0
5 .3

3 .6
1.7
10.3
6 .9
2 .2
4 .3
5 .3
17.1

0
4 8 .4

(3)
12.9

(3)
11.7

(3)
4 .6

(3)
6 .8

(3)
15.6

(3)
3 7 .7

(3)
18.6

(3)
2 3 .3

(3)
4 .2

(3)
2.3

(3)
13.9

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................................

5 ,5 5 8

1 0 0 .0

4 9 .2

12.0

1 2.9

9.0

5.8

11.0

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............................................................
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m .............................................
S a le s w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ....................................................................................................
C ra ft w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................
O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ..........................................................................
T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ..................................................................
N o n fa rm la b o r e r s .............................. ..................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .............................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ...........................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a m d s u p e r v is o r s ....................................................................

659
141
1 56
1 ,6 3 4
72
826
42
85
352
1 ,5 3 8

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

70.1
7 5.5
2 1.7
5 5 .7

12.2
15.1
14.7
10.2

7.3
3 .6
15.6
12.0

4.3
2 .0
20.1
6.0

2 .7
3.8
4 .7
5.0

3 .4
2 3 .2
11.0

(3)
4 7.3

(3)
2 1.3

(3)
18.1

(3)
4.7

(3)
3.9

(3)
4 .7

(3)
5 8.0
16.4
42.1

(3)
10.8
4 .9
10.6

(3)
18.3
8.1
13.9

(3)
5.8
3 5 .9
11.0

(3)
O
12.3
7.8

(3)
7.1
2 2 .3
14.6

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)

O c c u p a tio n , ra c e , a n d s e x

F u ll tim e 1

P a rt tim e 2
5 0 to 52
w eeks

2 7 to 4 9
w eeks

1 to 2 6
w eeks

BLACK

S a le s w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ....................................................................................................
C ra ft w o r k e r s .........................................................................................................
O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ..........................................................................
T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ..................................................................
N o n fa rm la b o r e r s .................................................................................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .............................................................................
S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld ...........................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ..........................................................................
F a rm la b o re rs a m d s u p e r v is o r s ....................................................................

Wien

W om en

-

52

1 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .




3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
4 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

54

-

Table C-8. Part-year workers in 1981 by extent ©f employment, sex, and reason fo r working less than a full year
(In th o u s a n d s )
R e a s o n fo r w o rk in g le s s th a n a fu ll y e a r
E x te n t o f e m p lo y m e n t a n d s e x

T o ta l
p a rt-y e a r
w o rk e rs ’

U n e m p lo y m e n t

Illn e s s
or
d is a b ility 2

T a k in g
c a re
o f hom e

G o in g
to
school

R e tire m e n t

In A rm e d
F o rc e s

O th e r
re a s o n s 3

TO TAL
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................
W o rk e d a t fu ll-tim e jo b s 4 ...............................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
4 0 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
W o rk e d a t p a rt-tim e jo b s 5 .............................................
1 to 2 6 w e e k s .................................................................
2 7 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................

4 2 ,3 6 9
2 5 ,3 7 8
4 ,8 0 4
6 ,1 3 8
6 ,1 0 2
8 ,3 3 4
16,991
1 0 ,3 9 5
6 ,5 9 6

1 5 ,0 9 5
1 1 ,8 1 8
1 ,1 7 7
2 ,6 0 3
3 ,3 2 6
4 ,7 1 2
3 ,2 7 7
1 ,6 3 9
1,6 3 7

2 ,9 0 2
2 ,0 0 0
321
400
415
864
902
471
430

8 ,2 1 0
3 ,6 8 0
1 ,0 2 2
994
882
782
4 ,5 3 0
2 ,8 5 7
1 ,6 7 3

9 ,3 5 8
3 ,6 3 4
1,6 6 3
1,2 2 3
5 45
202
5 ,7 2 5
4 ,2 2 2
1,5 0 2

1 ,6 5 3
836
233
326
165
1 12
817
576
241

1 48
1 28
62
44
15
7
21
19
2

3 ,2 8 2
327
548
753
1 ,6 5 4
1 ,7 2 0
610
1 ,1 1 0

5 ,0 0 2

2 0 ,0 1 7
1 4 ,0 0 2
2 ,3 7 9
3 ,2 8 6
3 ,3 3 5
5 ,0 0 3
6 ,0 1 5
3 ,9 3 0
2 ,0 8 5

9 ,5 1 9
7 ,9 2 7
764
1 ,7 4 3
2 ,2 0 4
3 ,2 1 6
1,5 9 2
892
7 00

1 ,4 3 6
1 ,1 0 9
168
229
242
470
327
204
123

231
1 74
23
25
35
90
57
30
27

4 ,9 5 0
2 ,1 2 9
1,021
676
304
128
2,821
2,131
690

1 ,2 1 4
605
1 79
240
1 05
81
609
426
1 82

131
118
56
42
14
7
13
10
2

2 ,5 3 6
1 ,9 3 9
167
331
432
1 ,0 1 0
597
236
361

2 2 ,3 5 2
1 1 ,3 7 6
2 ,4 2 5
2 ,8 5 2
2 ,7 6 7
3 ,3 3 2
1 0 ,9 7 6
6 ,4 6 5
4 ,5 1 2

5 ,5 7 5
3,891
413
859
1 ,1 2 2
1 ,4 9 6
1 ,6 8 5
747
938

1 ,4 6 6
891
153
171
173
394
574
267
307

7 ,9 7 9
3 ,5 0 7
998
969
847
692
4 ,4 7 3
2 ,8 2 7
1 ,6 4 5

4 ,4 0 8
1 ,5 0 4
642
5 47
241
74
2 ,9 0 4
2,091
813

440
231
54
86
60
31
209
1 50
59

17
9
6
2
2

2 ,4 6 6
1 ,3 4 3
1 60
217
322
644
1,1 2 4
374
750

M en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................
W o rk e d a t fu ll-tim e jo b s 4 ...............................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
4 0 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
W o rk e d a t p a rt-tim e jo b s 5 .............................................
1 to 2 6 w e e k s .................................................................
2 7 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
W om en
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................................
W o rk e d a t fu ll-tim e jo b s 4 ...............................................
1 to 13 w e e k s .................................................................
14 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 to 3 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
4 0 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................
W o rk e d a t p a rt-tim e jo b s 5 .............................................
1 to 2 6 w e e k s .................................................................
2 7 to 4 9 w e e k s ...............................................................

' W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .
2 E x c lu d e s p a id s ic k le a v e fro m a jo b (w h ic h is c o u n te d a s tim e
w o rk e d ) a n d p e rio d s o f illn e s s o r d is a b ility d u rin g w h ic h th e p e rs o n w o u ld
n o t h a v e w o rk e d o r w o u ld n o t h a v e b e e n in th e la b o r fo rc e e v e n if w e ll.




3 In c lu d e s , a m o n g o th e rs , u n p a id v a c a tio n s ,
v a c a tio n s fo r s tu d e n ts ,
4 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k ,
5 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .

55

-

8
8
-

s trik e s ,

and

sum m er

T ab le 0 9 . P art-year w o rk e rs in 1981 by race, age, sex, and reason fo r w orking less than a full y e a r
(in th o u s a n d s )
R e a s o n fo r w o rk in g le s s th a n a fu ll y e a r
T o ta l
p a rt-y e a r
w o rk e rs '

R a c e , a g e , a n d se x

Illn e s s o r
d is a b ility 1
2

U n e m p lo y m e n t

In

T a k in g

G o in g

c a re
of hom e

to
school

R e tire m e n t

A rm e d
F o rc e s

O th e r
re a s o n s 3

W H IT E
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s .............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s .............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r ......................................................

1 2,6 56
1,1 0 6
2 ,9 8 5
1 ,1 8 2
1,8 0 3
6 ,2 0 6
2,221
1 36

7 ,4 4 8

8 ,3 3 0

95
294

216
1 ,0 1 9
339
680
4 ,3 2 7
1,6 2 7
259

4 ,8 0 0
2 ,7 4 0
1,5 0 2
1,2 3 8
7 38
47
5

1 ,2 5 6
43

1,9 4 6
765
1,181
4,011
1 ,3 7 6
87

6 ,4 7 3
1,740

2 ,4 4 7

8 ,0 6 7
647

36,911
6 ,6 3 6
7,861
3 ,4 7 3
4 ,3 8 8
1 4,2 00

103
1 92
940
909
208

1,5 6 3
13
598
952

1 27
23
72
26
46
27
4
-

4 ,3 4 0
395
751
321
430
1 ,9 4 9
1 ,0 6 6
1 80

M en
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s .............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s .............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

197

4 ,4 4 0

143
52
91
461
488
122

19
20
12
8
85
48
25

2,521
1 ,5 0 0
776
725
404
14

4 ,5 8 9
461
1 ,0 3 8
417

1,191
53
151
51

7,251
197
999
327

3 ,8 9 0
2 ,2 7 8
1 ,2 4 0

622

101
480

672

726
514

422
86

4 ,2 4 2
1 ,5 7 9
234

334
33
5

9
1 74
227

573
25
127
53
73

811
447
294

181
303

385
8
28
13
15

61
-

1,832
7 40
147

1,0 8 4
359
18

1 24
175
49

304
1 00
17

66
4

2 ,1 3 3
3 87
5 15
2 44
2 72
7 92
3 60

1 ,2 3 7
109
303
115
189
5 94
224
7

1 46
7
6
4
2
29
75
29

25
1
8
3
5
10
6

381
240
1 26
82
44
15
1

-

-

36

866
49

2 39

549

429

2
22
9

24
119
50

207
168
1 04

19
-

-

-

-

17,3 92
3 ,4 6 0
4 ,0 3 5
1,772
2 ,2 6 3
5 ,9 6 9
2 ,8 8 4
1,044

-

1,1 5 3
-

4
424
725

1 09
18
62
23
39
25
4
-

2,171
212
364
1 44
220
978
530
86

W om en
T o t a l ..........................................................................
1 6 to 19 y e a r s ............................................................

1 9,5 19
3 ,1 7 7

2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s .............................................................

3 ,8 2 6
1,701

4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s .............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

2 ,1 2 5
8,231
3 ,5 8 9
6 96

2 ,1 9 5
845
50

410
-

17

2 ,1 7 0

5
11

1 82
387
1 77

3
8

-

210

2

971
536
94

19
2
11

500
49
1 00
50
50

-

BLACK
T o t a l ..........................................................................
1 6 to 19 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s .............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s .............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

4 ,4 5 2
6 89

2 ,1 0 3
1 58
484

1,043
484
560

1 86
108

1
11

10
51

4
2
-

249
90
12

41

19

-

2
11
1

283
28
61
39
22
140
47

-

-

M en
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................
2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................
2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s ............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s ............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

78

-

6

11
4
2
-

6

W om en
T o t a l ..........................................................................
16 to 19 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s .............................................................
2 0 to 21 y e a r s .........................................................

2 ,3 1 9
301
5 28
2 40

181
67

2 2 to 2 4 y e a r s .........................................................

2 88

114

13

69

64

2 5 to 4 4 y e a r s .............................................................
4 5 to 6 4 y e a r s .............................................................
6 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .....................................................

1,040

490
135

96
100

294

51

11

19

1 W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .
2 E x c lu d e s p a id s ic k le a v e fro m

a jo b

3 80
70

(w h ic h

is

c o u n te d

as

3
-

4
15

“

217
20
39
11
28
109
43
6

n o t h a v e w o rk e d o r w o u ld n o t b e e n in th e la b o r fo rc e e v e n if w e ll
3 In c lu d e s , a m o n g o th e rs , u n p a id v a c a tio n s , s trik e s , a n d s u m m e r

tim e

w o rk e d ) a n d p e rio d s o f illn e s s o r d is a b ility d u rin g w h ic h th e p e rs o n w o u ld




95
17

_

v a c a tio n s fo r s tu d e n ts .

56

Table C-10. Extent of unemployment in 1981 by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )
2 0 to 2 4
y e a rs

2 5 to 3 4
y e a rs

3 5 to 4 4
y e a rs

4 5 to 54
y e a rs

5 5 to 6 4
y e a rs

6 ,2 7 9
7 7 .8
2 ,0 8 4
3 3 .2
326
1 ,7 5 8
1 00 .0

1 7 ,9 7 2
8 6 .2
5 ,6 0 4
3 1 .2
576
5 ,0 2 8
10.0.0

3 2 ,8 4 4
8 5 .7
7 ,0 5 4
2 1 .5
777
6 ,2 7 8
1 00 .0

2 3 ,0 6 5
8 4 .8
3,601
15.6
371
3 ,2 3 0
1 00 .0

1 7 ,7 0 6
7 9 .4
2,181
12.3
2 60
1,921
1 00 .0

1 3,4 37
6 1 .4
1,4 7 7
11.0
1 84
1 ,2 9 3
1 00 .0

4 ,1 6 9
16.5
268
6.4
57
211
100 .0

.5

2.5

4.1

5.9

7.7

8.1

10.1

7.0

19.5
19.7
13.7
24.1
17.4

3 5 .8
2 1 .2
6.7
16.6
19.2

2 7 .6
18.4
10.1
2 2.0
19.4

2 2 .4
19.8
13.4
2 3 .2
17.1

17.6
19.8
15.2
2 4 .7
16.8

16.1
2 0.0
13.3
2 6.5
16.4

13.9
19.1
16.4
2 5 .2
17.3

14.0
2 0 .9
13.2
24.1
17.8

10.7
13.0
16.9
2 3 .9
2 8 .5

18.3
15.8

19.3
14.9

22.1
15.9

2 1 .5
13.9

17.9
15.4

15.0
16.4

15.0
19.2

14.6
17.9

2 1.0
2 1.3

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ...............................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la t io n ...................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r .....................................................
P e r c e n t ................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t....................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ..................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...............................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........................................................

6 5 ,9 5 0
8 1 .2
1 3 ,1 7 5
2 0.0
1,181
1 1 ,9 9 4
100 .0

2 ,2 8 8
5 7 .6
576
2 5 .2
155
421
1 00 .0

3 ,2 7 9
8 2 .5
1 ,1 3 5
3 4 .6
151
984
1 0 0 .0

9 ,3 2 9
9 2.0
3 ,2 5 7
3 4 .9
245
3 ,0 1 2
1 00 .0

1 7 ,9 5 7
96.1
4 ,0 6 3
2 2 .6
276
3 ,7 8 7
1 0 0 .0

1 2,7 13
96.2
1,9 0 4
15.0
1 40
1,763
1 0 0 .0

9 ,9 3 2
9 2 .5
1 ,2 1 9
12.3
111
1 ,1 0 8
1 00 .0

7 ,8 7 5
7 7 .2
862
10.9
67
7 95
100 .0

2 ,5 7 7
2 5 .0
159
6.2
35
124
1 00 .0

2.3

4 .5

6.3

8.3

9.4

10.1

3.9

16.6
19.1
13.9
2 5.5
18.8

2 8.4
2 2 .4
6.4
18.9
2 4 .0

2 6 .3
18.0
10.2
2 2 .9
2 0 .4

18.1
18.6
14.3
2 6.0
18.4

14.8
19.0
15.6
2 5 .9
18.5

15.2
19.5
13.2
2 7.2
16.5

11.5
19.2
16.1
2 5 .5
18.3

11.7
2 1 .5
10.8
2 5 .0
2 0 .8

11.1
14.0
17.5
2 1 .4
32.1

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t..................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t................

19.4
17.9

16.9
18.4

2 3 .9
16.7

23.1
16.3

19.3
17.0

15.1
19.1

16.2
22.1

16.4
19.7

18.1
2 7 .2

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ...............................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ...................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r .....................................................
P e r c e n t ................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs 1, w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t....................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p io y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ..................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...............................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........................................................

5 3 ,7 0 8
5 9.4
1 0 ,2 0 7
19.0
1,6 8 2
8 ,5 2 5
1 00 .0

1 ,8 9 8
4 9 .2
535
2 8 .2
1 57
379
1 0 0 .0

3,001
7 3 .2
9 49
3 1 .6
174
774
100.0

8 ,6 4 3
8 0 .7
2 ,3 4 7
2 7 .2
331
2 ,0 1 6
100 .0

1 4 ,8 8 7
7 5 .9
2 ,9 9 2
20.1
501
2,491
100 .0

1 0 ,3 5 2
7 4 .0
1 ,6 9 8
16.4
231
1,4 6 7
100 .0

7 ,7 7 4
6 7 .2
962
12.4
1 49
813
1 0 0 .0

5 ,5 6 2
4 7 .7
615
11.1
1 17
498
1 00 .0

1,591
10.7
108
6.8
22
86
100 .0

5.1

1.2

2.7

3.4

5.2

7.0

6 .4

10.0

11.6

2 3.5
2 0.5
13.5
22.1
15.3

44.1
19.9
7.1
14.0
13.8

2 9.3
18.9
10.1
2 0 .9
18.0

2 8.7
2 1 .6
12.2
18.9
15.2

2 1.9
2 1 .0
14.7
2 3 .0
14.3

17.2
2 0 .6
13.4
2 5 .7
16.2

17.1
18.8
16.7
2 4 .8
16.1

17.6
19.8
17.0
2 2 .7
12.9

10.2
11.4
16.0
2 7 .5
2 3 .2

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t..................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t................

16.7
12.8

2 1 .9
11.0

19.9
14.8

19.1
10.4

15.8
12.9

14.8
13.1

13.4
15.1

11.6
15.1

25.1

E x te n t o f u n e m p lo y m e n t, s e x , ra c e , a n d H is p a n ic
o rig in

T o ta l

16 to 17
y e a rs

18 to 19
y e a rs

1 1 9 ,6 5 8
6 9 .7
2 3 ,3 8 2
19.5
2 ,8 6 3
2 0 ,5 1 8
1 00 .0

4 ,1 8 5
5 3 .5
1,1 1 2
2 6 .6
312
799
100 .0

5.7

6 5 y e a rs
and o ver

TO TAL
T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ...............................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ...... ...........................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.....................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r .....................................................
P e r c e n t ................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t....................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s .....................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ..................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...............................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...............................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........................................................
W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t..................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t................
M en

6.1

0

W om en

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




57

12.8

Table C-10. Extent of unemployment in 1981 by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age—Continued
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )

E x te n t o f u n e m p lo y m e n t, sex, ra c e, a n d H is p a n ic o rig in

T o ta l

16 to 19
y e a rs

2 0 to 2 4
y e a rs

2 5 to 4 4
y e a rs

4 5 to 5 4
y e a rs

5 5 to 6 4
y e a rs

6 5 y e a rs
and over

W H IT E
M en
T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ..............................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t................................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .............................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ................................................................
P e rc e n t ...........................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs ' w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t...............................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s ................................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ..............................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...........................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e .....................................................................

5 8 ,3 7 8
8 2 .2
1 0,9 63
18.8
763
1 0 ,2 0 0
100 .0

4 ,9 2 4
7 4.2
1,4 0 2
2 8.5
197
1 ,2 0 5
1 00 .0

8 ,1 4 0
94.1
2 ,7 2 0
3 3 .4
148
2,571
1 00 .0

2 6 ,9 3 8
9 6 .9
4 ,9 5 6
18.4
256
4,701
1 00 .0

8 ,8 1 9
93.1
1 ,0 2 2
11.6
79
942
1 0 0 .0

7 ,2 0 2
7 8 .4
728
10.1
56
672
1 0 0 .0

2 ,3 5 4
2 5 .4
1 35
5 .8
27
108
1 0 0 .0

6.5

1.8

5.2

7 .2

9.4

11.0

4 .0

17.0
19.4
13.8
2 5 .4
17.9

2 7 .5
19.9
9.0
2 0 .9
2 0 .9

18.4
19.3
14.3
2 5 .3
17.5

15.5
19.5
14.6
2 6 .5
16.7

1 2.0
18.4
15.4
2 6 .9
1 7.9

1 1.6
21.1
11.1
2 5 .2
2 0 .0

1 2.5
13.5
1 9.0
2 2 .7
2 8 .4

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t .............................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ..........................

19.8
17.5

22.1
17.8

2 3 .2
15.2

18.6
17.6

1 6.4
2 0 .4

16.5
18.2

1 2.8
2 9 .3

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ..............................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t................................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .............................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ................................................................
P e r c e n t ...........................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs ' w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t..............................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s ................................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .............................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...........................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e .....................................................................

4 6 ,2 9 0
5 9 .3
8 ,1 7 7
17.7
1 ,0 8 0
7 ,0 9 7
1 0 0 .0

4 ,3 3 3
6 5 .7
1 ,2 4 2
2 8.7
207
1,0 3 5
100 .0

7 ,4 3 7
8 2 .8
1,8 7 2
2 5 .2
176
1 ,6 9 6
1 0 0 .0

2 1 ,4 3 3
7 4 .9
3 ,6 7 9
17.2
480
3 ,1 9 9
100 .0

6 ,7 5 8
6 7 .2
780
11.5
1 16
664
1 0 0 .0

4 ,8 9 6
4 7 .2
514
1 0.5
85
429
1 0 0 .0

1 ,4 3 2
1 0 .6
89
6 .2
15
74
1 0 0 .0

5.4

2 .4

3 .7

6.3

5 .5

1 0.9

O

2 4 .6
2 0 .4
13.8
2 2 .2
13.6

3 5 .2
18.8
9.0
18.4
16.1

3 0 .5
2 1 .2
12.2
19.1
13.3

21.1
2 0 .8
14.7
2 4.3
12.9

1 6.9
19.1
17.7
2 5 .4
1 5.4

1 7.0
2 0 .9
18.1
2 2 .6
1 0.5

(4)
O
O
0
0

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t .............................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ..........................

16.4
12.5

19.9
13.5

19.6
10.0

14.8
12.8

13.7
14.7

10.1
1 3.8

(4)
(4)

6 ,0 3 0
7 3.2
1 ,8 8 4
3 1 .2
377
1,5 0 7
100.0

5 39
4 8 .9
274
5 0.9
101
173
1 00 .0

976
8 0 .3
468
4 7 .9
83
385
1 0 0 .0

2 ,9 3 9
91.1
839
2 8 .5
1 45
694
1 00 .0

863
8 6 .0
1 67
19.4
30
1 37
1 0 0 .0

544
6 4 .3
1 20
22.1
10
111
1 0 0 .0

4.1

.2

.9

5.6

10.7

4 .5

(4)

13.5
16.8
14.7
2 5.3

15.7
14.4
13.5
3 0 .7
2 4 .9

11.9
16.5
16.0
2 4 .6
2 5 .4

7 .6
2 2 .8
2 0 .8
16.0
2 2 .0

12.3
2 2 .9
10.4
2 3 .7
26.1

(4)
O
0
(4)
(4)

2 0 .9
2 3 .4

13.7
17.6

12.3
30.1

12.8
3 0.3

W om en

BLACK
M en
T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................
P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ..............................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t................................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .............................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ................................................................
P e rc e n t ...........................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs ’ w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t..............................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s ................................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .............................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s ...........................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e .....................................................................

2 5 .5

2 0 .8
15.1
10.1
2 6.0
2 7.8

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t .............................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ..........................

16.2
20.8

19.0
15.7

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




58

170
20.1
16
9 .5
8
8
1 0 0 .0

,

(4)
(4)

Table C-10. Extent of unemployment in 1981 by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age—Continued
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )

E x te n t o f u n e m p lo y m e n t, sex, ra c e , a n d H is p a n ic o rig in

T o ta l

16 to 19
y e a rs

2 0 to 2 4

2 5 to 4 4

4 5 to 54

5 5 to 6 4

y e a rs

y e a rs

y e a rs

y e a rs

6 5 y e a rs
and over

B L A C K — C o n tin u e d
W om en
T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................

6 ,1 2 3

479

1 ,0 2 0

3 ,0 8 9

846

548

140

P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ..............................................................

5 9 .8

4 1 .3

6 9 .5

7 6 .9

6 7 .2

5 0 .7

11.2

T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................................

1,8 1 9
2 9.7

222

435

906

154

85

17

4 6 .3

4 2 .6

2 9 .3

18.2

15.5

11.9

1 18
1 04

1 46
289

236

32

29

5

670

123

56

12

1 00 .0

1 00 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1.8

4.3

10.3

P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .............................................

565

W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ................................................................
P e rc e n t ...........................................................................................

1 ,2 5 4
1 00 .0

Y e a r-ro u n d w o r k e r s 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t...............................................................................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:

4 .0

(3)

(4)

O
(4)

1 to 4 w e e k s ................................................................................

17.7

2 7 .8

19.8

14.7

20.1

(4)

5 to 10 w e e k s ..............................................................................

2 0.3

2 3 .9

2 0.9

2 1 .0

17.6

(4)

(4)

11 to 14 w e e k s ...........................................................................

11.8

9.9

13.2

11.7

10.5
2 0 .9
2 0 .6

(4)
(4)

(4)
(4)

O

0

0

(4)

(4)

0

15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................................

2 1 .8

19.0

18.2

2 3 .2

2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e .....................................................................

2 4 .4

19.3

2 6.0

2 5 .0

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t .............................................

17.1

2 4 .5

14.9

18.1

9.3

W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ...........................

14.8

15.8

12.6

14.4

19.3

H IS P A N IC O R IG IN
M en
T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................

3 ,6 7 8

361

638

1 ,8 7 3

472

265

69

P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ..............................................................

8 3.7

5 8 .5

9 0.2

9 5 .6

9 2 .7

7 6 .5

27.1

T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................................

891

P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................

2 4 .2
72

1 42
3 9 .3

211
3 3 .0

419
2 2 .4

69
14.6

16.4

44

7
(4)

23

10

25

10

3

2

819

1 19

201

394

1 00 .0

100 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

59
1 0 0 .0

41
1 00 .0

5
100 .0

4 .8

1.6

5.3

4 .7

0

(4)

1 to 4 w e e k s ................................................................................

13.8

13.5
16.3

(4)

1 9.2

0
0

(4)

17.5

2 4 .3
17.2

11.8

5 to 10 w e e k s .............................................................................

(4)

(4)

D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .............................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ................................................................
P e r c e n t ...........................................................................................
Y e a r-ro u n d w o rk e rs 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f
u n e m p lo y m e n t...............................................................................

O

P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:

11 to 14 w e e k s ...........................................................................

14.3

6.8

14.8

17.0

O

(4)

O

15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................................

2 7 .6

2 4 .6

2 8 .4

2 8 .6

O

0

27 w e e k s o r m o r e .....................................................................

2 2.0

2 5 .6

2 1 .7

1 8.7

(4)

O
(4)

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t .............................................

2 0.4

2 9 .8

18.1

19.0

0

(4)

(4)

W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t...........................

2 0.0

13.8

23.1

18.5

(4)

(4)

(4)

0

W om en
T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o rk ..........................................

2 ,6 1 5

273

448

1 ,3 9 5

327

1 48

25

P e rc e n t o f p o p u la tio n ..............................................................

54.1
600

4 6 .2
89

6 5 .2

63.1

P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k .............................................

2 2 .9

3 2 .7

299
2 1 .4

3 2 .9
26

7 .8

1 23
2 7 .4

5 6 .0
61
18.5

17.5

95

W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ................................................................
P e rc e n t ...........................................................................................

5 05
100 .0

20
69

3
22

Y e a r-ro u n d w o r k e r s 1 w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s of
u n e m p lo y m e n t...............................................................................

3.7

T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ................................................................

15

48

8

108
1 00 .0

251
1 0 0 .0

53
1 0 0 .0

0

2.9

3 .2

0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

3
O
1
2
100 .0

O

(4)
(4)

P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s ................................................................................

2 2 .9

0

2 5 .7

17.5

O

(4)

5 to 10 w e e k s .............................................................................

18.8

n

14.8

2 1 .5

0

O

(4)

11 to 14 w e e k s ...........................................................................

14.1

0

10.1

15.4

0

(4)

(4)

15 to 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................................

2 2.9

0

2 2 .8

2 6 .4

(4)

(4)

(4)

2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ..........:............................................ ;............

17.7

0

2 3.6

16.0

(4)

0

(4)

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t .............................................

18.7

0

14.8

19.7

(4)

(4)

0

W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ...........................

14.3

(4)

16.9

15.2

(4)

O

(4)

1 W o rk e d 50 w e e k s o r m o re .

3 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

2 W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .

4 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .




59

Tabi® C-11. EKtenft of unemployment o 1981 by sex, race, and marital status
n
(Numbers in thousands)
W h ite

T o ta l

E x te n t o f u n e m p lo y m e n t a nd s e x
S in g le

M a rrie d ,
spouse
p re s e n t

O th e r
m a rita l
s ta tu s

B la c k

S in g le
and
o th e r
m a rita l
s ta tu s

M a rrie d ,
spouse
p re s e n t

S in g le
a nd
o th e r
m a rita l
s ta tu s

M a rrie d ,
spouse
p re s e n t

MEN
1 8 ,5 7 6
5 ,6 6 5
3 0 .5
731
4 ,9 3 4
1 0 0 .0
3.1

4 1 ,0 9 4
5 ,9 3 0
14.4
303
5 ,6 2 7
1 0 0 .0
8.7

6 ,2 8 0
1 ,5 8 0
2 5 .2
1 47
1 ,4 3 3
1 00 .0
6 .4

2 1 ,0 3 0
5 ,7 6 9
2 7 .4
523
5 ,2 4 6
1 00 .0
4.1

3 7 ,3 4 8
5 ,1 9 4
13.9
240
4 ,9 5 4
1 0 0 .0
9.0

3 ,2 0 7
1 ,3 1 2
4 0 .9
326
986
1 0 0 .0
2.7

2 ,8 2 3
572
2 0 .3
51
521
1 0 0 .0
6 .7

19.6
17.6
13.0
2 5.8
2 0 .9

14.5
21.1
14.3
2 5 .5
16.0

13.9
16.7
15.5
2 4 .6
2 2 .9

19.3
17.8
13.4
2 5 .2
2 0 .2

14.7
21.1
14.1
2 5 .7
15.4

13.2
15.5
14.2
2 6 .5
2 7 .9

14.1
1 9.4
1 5.7
23.1
2 1 .0

2 2 .7
16.5

16.9
18.9

18.2
18.9

2 2 .2
16.3

17.2
18.7

18.6
2 1 .2

11.7
2 0 .2

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k .........................................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m o lo y m e n t..............................................................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ............................................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................................................
W o rk e d d u fin g th e y e a r ..............................................................................................
P e r c e n t .......................................................................................................................
Y e a r ro u n d w o rk e rs ' w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f u n e m p lo y m e n t....................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s ............................................................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .........................................................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e .................................................................................................

1 3 ,7 0 2
3 ,3 9 7
2 4 .8
626
2,771
1 0 0 .0
3.9

2 9 ,6 3 5
4 ,6 8 5
15.8
662
4 ,0 2 2
1 0 0 .0
5.7

1 0 ,3 7 0
2 ,1 2 5
2 0 .5
394
.1,731
1 00 .0
5.9

1 9 ,7 8 7
4 ,1 4 7
2 1 .0
537
3 ,6 1 0
100 .0
4.9

2 6 ,5 0 3
4 ,0 3 0
15.2
543
3 ,4 8 7
1 0 0 .0
5.9

3 ,7 8 1 .
1 ,2 9 4
3 4 .2
468
826
1 0 0 .0
3.3

2 ,3 4 2
, 525
2 2 .4
98
428
1 00 .0
5.2

2 8 .9
2 0 .2
12.9
19.4
1 4 .7

2 1.7
2 0.3
14.5
2 3 .4
14.4

19.2
2 1 .2
12.0
2 3.3
18.4

2 6 .9
2 0 .7
12.9
2 0 .7
13.9

2 2 .3
2 0 .0
14.7
2 3 .6
13.4

18.2
19.7,
11.8
21.1
2 5 .8

16.7
2 1 .3
11.8
23.1
2 1 .7

W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t...................................................................... .
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t.........................................................

19.1
12.1

15.6
12.5

15.3
14.3

17.4
12.7

15.5
12.4

18.4
14.9

14.6
14.6

T o ta l w h o w o rk e d o r lo o k e d fo r w o r k ........................................................................
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t..............................................................................................
P e rc e n t w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t ............................................................................
D id n o t w o rk b u t lo o k e d fo r w o r k ..........................................................................
W o rk e d d u rin g th e y e a r ..............................................................................................
P e r c e n t .......................................................................................................................
Y e a r ro u n d w o rk e rs ' w ith 1 o r 2 w e e k s o f u n e m p lo y m e n t ...................
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t:
1 to 4 w e e k s ............................................................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .........................................................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s .......................................................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e .................................................................................................
W ith 2 s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t...........................................................................
W ith 3 o r m o re s p e lls o f u n e m p lo y m e n t.........................................................
WORSEN

1 W o rk e d 5 0 w e e k s o r m o re .




2 W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .

: '■

60

ri '

. : ;■ :

!• >• !

Tab!® C-12. Extent of unemployment @ wag® and salary workers in 1981 by industry of the Job bold the longest
1
?
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )
T o ta l w ith
u n e m p lo y m e n t

T o ta l
w age
In d u s try

and
s a la ry
w o rk e rs

P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f to ta l
w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t

P e rc e n t

N um ber

of
to ta l
w age
and
s a la ry

T o ta l

w o rk e rs

Y e a rro u n d
w o rk ­
e rs 1
w ith 1
or 2
w eeks of
unem ­

P e rc e n t o f to ta l
w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t

P a rt-y e a r w o r k e r s 2 by
w e e k s o f u n e m p lo y m e n t

1 to 4

5 to 10

w eeks

w eeks

11 to
14
w eeks

w eeks

15 to
26

p lo y ­
m ent

27

W ith 2
s p e lls o f
unem ­

w eeks
or

p lo y ­
m ent

m o re

W ith 3
o r m o re
s p e lls o f
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ................................

1 0 6 ,9 5 6

1 9,701

1 8.4

1 0 0 .0

5.9

1 9.7

19.8

1 3.6

2 3 .8

1 7.2

18.3

14.9

A g r ic u lt u r e .......................................................................

2 ,0 5 4

561

2 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1.2

1 5 .9

18.1

1 1.9

3 0 .3

2 2 .6

2 5 .3

2 4 .7

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s t r ie s .......................................
M i n i n g ...........................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................................

1 0 4 ,9 0 2
1 ,2 0 6

1 9 ,1 4 0

1 8.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 9.9
2 1 .5
1 7.8
2 2 .0

1 3.6
1 2.8
14.6
12.3

2 3 .6
2 4 .8
3 0 .3

17.1

19.3
3 7 .5
2 1 .9

6 .0
8 .7
4 .2
11.7

1 9 .8

233
2 ,2 8 8
5 ,2 1 5

18.1
1 5.6
2 0 .8
18.2

1 4.6
14.1
2 4 .0
1 4.6

D u ra b le g o o d s .......................................................

1 4,081
740
542
657
1 ,1 5 8
1 ,7 0 4

3 ,1 2 3
282
151

2 2 .2
3 8 .2
2 7 .8
2 6 .2
2 3 .9
2 0 .6
17.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 2.7
8 .4
1 1.6
12.3
16.1
9.9
1 3.2

2 2 .9
1 9.9
1 8.0

12.0
11.9
15.8
6 .3
12.1
1 2.4
9.4

1 3.5
2 1 .5
17.7
6.1
12.9
8.2
10.1

198
276

1 8.8
2 6 .9
3 7 .2
1 7 .2
1 9 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 6.4
13.0
1 6.7
5 .4
10.1

2 7 .3
2 2 .6
2 4 .3
2 2 .7
2 1 .5
25.1
2 3 .9
2 7 .4

18.4
2 1 .3
2 0 .6
2 4 .7
1 7 .2
1 9.9

1 0.2
1 6.4
18.1
1 2.8

2 2 .7

2 ,0 9 2
462

2 1 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0.2

2 0 .6

2 2 .3

1 0 0 .0

2 5 .3
3 3 .7
1 5.6
12.3
2 1 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 .5
1 5.7
1 2.6
7.8
7.3
1 1.3

1 3 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

4 .2
3 .4
5.1
1.8

1 0 0 .0

2 .9

1 7.4

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ........................
F u rn itu re a n d f i x t u r e s .....................................
S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s ...............
P rim a ry m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ...............................
F a b ric a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts ..........................
M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e le c t r ic a l........................

6 ,1 0 7
2 3 ,7 8 8

172
277
351
522
493
600
402

1 5.3
1 3.0
18.1
1 8.3
1 4 .0
1 6.3
2 6 .2
1 4 .4
2 0 .7

E le c tric a l e q u ip m e n t ...................... ..............
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t .............................
A u to m o b ile s ......................................................
O th e r tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t ............

3,0 1 1
2 ,6 1 8
2 ,2 2 8
1 ,0 7 9
1 ,1 4 9

O th e r d u ra b le g o o d s ......................................

1 ,4 2 3

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ...............................................

9 ,7 0 6

F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s .........................
T E X T ile m ill p r o d u c t s .....................................
A p p a re l a n d o th e r te x tile p r o d u c ts ..........
P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ...................................

2 ,0 6 9
838
1 ,4 6 0
1 ,8 1 4

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ...................
O th e r n o n d u ra b le g o o d s ................ ..............

1 ,2 8 2
2 ,2 4 4

487

T ra n s p o r ta tio n a n d p u b lic u t i li t i e s ...................

6 ,7 0 8
518

914
81

C o m m u n ic a t io n s ...................................................
O th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ............................................

3 ,1 1 2
1 ,6 3 6
1 ,4 4 2

578
1 15
1 40

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e .................................
W h o le s a le .................................................................
R e t a i l ...........................................................................

2 3 ,1 2 1
4 ,5 9 0
1 8,5 31

4 ,6 9 2
708
3 ,9 8 4

2 0 .3
1 5.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 .9
7 .4

2 3 .4
17.7

2 1 .5

1 0 0 .0

3 .3

2 4 .5

F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s t a t e ..............
S e r v ic e s ........................................................................
B u s in e s s a n d r e p a i r ............................................
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld .................................................
P e rs o n a l s e r v ic e s ................................................
E n te r ta in m e n t a n d r e c r e a t i o n ........................
M e d ic a l a n d o th e r h e a lth ................................
W e lfa re a n d r e lig io u s .........................................

651
4 ,5 5 8
924
297
486
286
846
234

10.4
1 4.3
2 2 .5
1 7.5
2 1 .6
2 1 .5
10.1
1 2.9
1 1.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5.1
3 .2
3 .7
3 .3
3 .5
1.9
4 .0
3 .8

E d u c a t io n a l..............................................................
O th e r p r o f e s s io n a l...............................................
F o re s try a n d f i s h e r i e s ........................................

6 ,2 3 8
3 1 ,8 2 3
4 ,1 1 0
1,701
2 ,2 5 4
1 ,3 3 0
8 ,3 7 7
1 ,8 1 5
9 ,2 7 7
2 ,7 7 4
186

1 0 0 .0

1.8

2 8 .0
2 1 .4
1 7.5
1 9 .6
2 1 .9
2 0 .8
2 5 .3
1 3.2
2 2 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5.5

45

12.1
2 4 .0

P u b lic a d m in is t r a t io n ..............................................

5,911

589

1 0.0

1 0 0 .0

R a ilro a d s a n d r a ilw a y e x p r e s s ......................
O th e r t r a n s p o r t a t io n ............................................

212
492
282
157

1 ,1 0 3
337

15.7
1 8 .6
7 .0
9 .7

1 W o rk e d 5 0 w e e k s o r m o re .

1 7.7
1 4.6
1 7.3
1 6.9
2 4 .0
1 3.7
1 9.2
.

16.1
19.8
14.3
2 1 .0

2 0 .8

13.3

2 6 .2
2 4 .5
1 9 .0
21.1
18.3
2 1 .6
1 6.7

1 9.6
13.8
8 .9
1 3.7
1 4.5
13.0

1 8.7
14.3

T4.3
9.1

61

1 5.4
1 5.5

10.1
2 1 .2
23.1

1 1.8

2 7 .5
2 7 .6

8 .6
10.1
1 5.3

2 0 .9
2 0 .9
2 0 .8
1 4.8

2 0 .6
23.1
2 2 .6
1 4.8

1 2.8
1 1.2
1 0.8
13.0
13.7

2 2 .6
2 3 .2
2 1 .2
2 3 .9
2 0 .3

16.1
2 3 .9
1 1.8
1 1.0
19.4

1 8.0
2 0 .8
1 0.8
1 4.7
17.7

2 5 .7
1 9.2

11.2
1 5.0

29.1
2 0 .6

1 3.0
14.7

2 2 .7
2 0 .3

1 9 .6
1 6.3
1 9 .8

16.3
1 5.8

2 7 . 9 .,
2 9 .3 ,
2 6 .8

1 5 .9
1 5.4
16.8

2 7 .3
3 2 .4

10.2
17.3

17.5
2 2 .8
1 6.2
13.3
2 2 .9

14.3

1 7.5
1 0.4
1 6.3
1 3.5
1 8.4
2 1 .2
1 1.0
1 3.8
1 7.0
14.1
8 .7

2 7 .3
14.1

1 7.2
12.3
15.8

1 9 .9
1 9.3
2 0 .0

14.0
15.4
1 3.7

2 1 .4
2 0 .7
2 1 .5

17.3
19.5
17.0

18.3
2 0 .8
17.9

1 1.9
8.3
12.5

1 5.3
1 9 .4
17.9
1 5.8
1 8.3

14.3
1 3.8
1 4.0
9.3
1 3.9

2 0 .8
2 1 .5
17.3
2 0 .4

7 .6
12.3
1 5.0
1 7.7

2 1 .8
2 3 .8
2 6 .0
2 0 .2
1 9.8
3 1 .4
2 0 .8
3 0 .9
2 4 .4

1 5.4
18.4
2 0 .9
3 1 .8
2 2 .5
1 7.6
16.1
19.8
13.1

8 .8
14.1
18.0
2 5 .7
1 3.5
2 0 .9
9.3
13.3

2 6 .2

19.7

1 3.0

1 9.9

1 5.7

14.3
17.3
18.1
1 9.9
16.6
17.9
14.9
19.5
1 6.7
18.4

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

3 .8

18.5

18.1

1 3.7

26.1

19.8

17.8

10.8

3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .

2 W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .




20.1
2 1 .0
1 7 .9
1 8.4
1 6.8
1 2 .4

2 1 .5

1 6.9
20.1
1 4 .4

16.3
7.1

11.3
8 .9

Table C-13. Extent of unemployment in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest and sex
(N u m b e r in th o u s a n d s )

T o ta l w ith
u n e m p lo y m e n t

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

T o ta l
w ith
w o rk
e x p e r­
ie n c e

P e rc e n t

N um ber

of
to ta l
w ith
w o rk
e x p e r­
ie n c e

P e rc e n t o f to ta l
w ith

P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f to ta l
w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t

T o ta l

Y e a rro u n d
w o rk ­
e rs 1
w ith
1 or 2
w eeks
of
unem ­

u n e m p lo y m e n t

P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs 2 b y w e e k s
o f u n e m p lo y m e n t

1 to 4
w eeks

5 to 10
w eeks

w eeks

15 to
26
w eeks

27
w eeks
o r m o re

11 to
14

W ith 2
s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

W ith 3
o r m o re
s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

p lo y ­
m ent
M EN
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...........................................

6 4 ,7 6 9

1 1 ,9 9 4

18.5

1 00 .0

6.1

16.6

19.1

13.9

2 5 .5

18.8

1 9.4

1 7.9

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s .............................
E n g in e e rs ..............................................................................
M e d ic a l a n d o th e r h e a lth w o rk e rs ............................
T e a c h e rs , e x c e p t c o ll e g e ...............................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d s c ie n c e t e c h n ic ia n s ......................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............

9 ,9 1 7
1 ,5 7 7
1 ,1 1 9
1 ,0 9 8
1,001
5 ,1 2 2

799
77
44
107
148
423

8.1
4.9
3.9
9.8
14.7
8.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 .7
5.7

19.1
2 0 .0

19.6
2 8 .6

17.9
15.7

2 2 .2
19.0

14.4
10.9

1 8.4
1 3.0

10.8
7.3

(3)
4 .7
18.1
3.7

(3)
2 2.5
2 0 .0
17.6

(3)
18.8
13.3
2 0 .9

(3)
2 1 .3
10.6
17.8

(3)
2 4 .0
2 2 .5
2 3 .2

(3)
8.7
1 5.6
16.9

(3)
12.0
14.0
2 2 .0

(3)
14.3
1 0.6
1 1.5

M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m ..............

8,761

580

6 .6

1 0 0 .0

6.0

10.9

25.1

1 4.6

2 6 .0

1 7.4

14.7

1 2.8

S a le s w o r k e r s .........................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ............................................................................
O th e r s a le s w o r k e r s .........................................................

3 ,8 5 3
1 ,3 2 4
2 ,5 2 8

439
220
219

11.4
16.6
8.7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

4 .2
1.2
7.3

2 3.8
2 2 .4
2 5.2

18.0
2 3 .0
13.0

13.3
13.2
13.4

2 7 .4
2 7 .7
27.1

13.2
12.6
13.9

15.1
12.1
1 8.2

1 0.7
1 2.8
8 .6

C le ric a l w o r k e r s ......................................................................

4 ,0 4 4

635

15.7

1 00 .0

5.2

17.2

1 9.2

12.8

2 6 .7

18.8

21.1

1 2.7

C ra ft w o r k e r s ..........................................................................
C a r p e n te r s .............................................................................
C o n s tru c tio n c ra ft, e x c e p t c a r p e n t e r s .....................
M e c h a n ic s a n d r e p a ir e r s ................................................
O th e r c r a ft w o r k e r s ...........................................................

1 3 ,3 7 8
1 ,4 5 4
2 ,9 5 3
3 ,6 6 0
5,311

3 ,0 8 3
622
1 ,0 1 6
583
882

2 3 .0
4 2 .8
3 4 .4
15.4
16.6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0

7.1
2.8
5.0
9.0
11.4

14.8
12.3
14.5
16.0
16.1

2 0 .0
2 0 .6
16.5

14.5
14.9
1 5.4
17.2
11.5

2 6 .2
2 8 .6
2 9 .6
21.1
2 3 .8

17.4

1 8.5

2 0 .8
18.9
1 7.7
13.2

2 0 .5
2 1 .3
13.5
17.2

2 2 .7
29.1
2 6 .6
1 4.6
1 8.9

O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ...........................................
D u ra b le g o o d s m a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s m a u fa c tu rin g ................................
O th e r in d u s t r ie s ..................................................................

7 ,0 0 4

2 ,0 6 9
1 ,0 3 6
379
654

2 9 .5
3 1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

11.2
15.1

16.5
18.2

17.1

2 4 .8
2 9 .4

100.C
1 0 0 .0

11.1
5.2

16.1
14.0

2 1 .9
18.7
2 1 .9
2 6 .7

19.0

2 2 .2
14.2
17.8

1 4.4
13.2
18.6
13.8

16.7

3,251
1 ,5 2 9
2 ,2 2 4

12.5
18.2
2 2 .5

18.0
18.8
2 0 .6

14.0
1 7.7
2 1 .8

T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e ra tiv e s ...................................
D e liv e ry a n d ro u te w o r k e r s ...........................................
O th e r tra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a tiv e s .....................

3 ,5 7 7
3 ,0 5 3
524

883
739
1 44

2 4 .7
2 4 .2
2 7 .6

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

5.4
4.1
12.4

15.3
14.1
2 1.3

22.1
2 1 .8
2 3 .8

14.0
1 5.2
7 .8

2 6 .4
2 8 .3
16.2

16.8
16.5
18.4

2 0 .4
2 0 .4
2 0 .2

15.9
16.8
1 1 .5

N o n fa rm la b o re rs ..................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .........................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g .....................................................................
O th e r in d u s t r ie s ..................................................................

5 ,3 3 0
1 ,0 6 7
1 ,0 1 2
3 ,2 5 2

1 ,7 5 5
523
378
853

3 2 .9
4 9 .0
3 7 .4
2 6 .2

1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

2 .4
1.6
4 .6
1.9

14.5
13.8
14.5
15.0

1 5.4
12.9
2 3 .3
13.4

1 2.0
12.0
11.0
12.5

3 0 .5
3 3 .8
2 4 .9
3 1 .0

25.1
2 5 .9
2 1 .7
2 6 .2

2 2 .6
2 2 .5
2 2 .6
2 2 .6

21.1
2 4 .5
18.4
2 0 .2

S e rv ic e w o rk e rs 4 ...................................................................
C le a n in g s e r v ic e .................................................................
F o o d s e r v ic e ........................................................................
H e a lth s e r v ic e .....................................................................

6 ,3 5 6
1,921
2 ,1 6 0
251
532

1 ,4 0 9
396
639
54
103

2 2 .6
19.8
2 6 .0

1 7.5
11.3
21.1

13.0
9.9
12.7

2 2 .2
2 3 .3
20.1

2 1 .5
3 2 .0
18.0

19.1
2 1 .2
19.0

14.4
1 3.4
14.3

(3)
5.3
4.1

(3)
2 5 .8
15.0

(3)
2 2 .0
13.3

(3)
1 1.2
18.9

(3)
2 0 .8

(3)
15.0

212

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
100 .0

3.1
3 .6
2.1

1 ,4 5 2

2 2 .2
2 0 .6
2 9 .6
2 1 .7
1 9.4
1 4.6

3 0 .4

18.3

(3)
9.1
17.2

(3)
18.4
13.1

24

1.9

319
313
6

2 5 .0
2 6 .7
5.5

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

O
2.2

(3)
14.4

(3)
19.1

(3)
10.7

(3)
2 8 .5

(3)
2 6 .4

(3)
2 7 .0

1 00 .0
1 00 .0

2.2

14.7

18.9

1 0.9

2 8 .5

(3)
25.1
2 4 .8

2 6 .9

2 6 .9

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

P e rs o n a l s e r v ic e .................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e r v ic e ..............................................................
F a rm e rs a n d fa rm m a n a g e r s ...........................................
F a rm la b o re rs a n d s u p e r v is o r s ......................................
P a id w o rk e rs ....................................................................
U n p a id fa m ily w o r k e r s .....................................................

1 ,2 7 3
1 ,2 7 5
1,171
1 03

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




62

19.0
2 4 .0
1 9.4

Table C-13. Extent of unemployment in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest and sex—Continued
(N u m b e r in th o u s a n d s )

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

T o ta l
w ith
w o rk
e x p e r­
ie n c e

P e rc e n t
of
N um ber

to ta l
w ith
w o rk
e x p e r­

P e rc e n t o f to ta l
w ith
u n e m p lo y m e n t

P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f to ta l
w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t

T o ta l w ith
u n e m p lo y m e n t

T o ta l

Y e a rro u n d
w o rk ­
e rs '
w ith
1 or 2
w eeks
of
unem ­

ie n c e

P a rt-y e a r w o r k e r s 2 b y w e e k s
o f u n e m p lo y m e n t
W ith 2

1 to 4
w eeks

5 to 10
w eeks

11 to
14

15 to
26

w eeks

w eeks

27
w eeks
o r m o re

s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

W ith 3
o r m o re
s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

p lo y ­
m ent

W OMEN
T o ta l, 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...........................................

5 2 ,0 2 5

8 ,5 2 5

1 6.4

1 0 0 .0

5.1

2 3 .5

2 0 .5

13.5

22.1

1 5.3

1 6 .7

1 2.8

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s .............................
M e d ic a l a n d o th e r h e a lth w o r k e r s ............................
T e a c h e rs , e x c e p t c o ll e g e ...............................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d s c ie n c e t e c h n ic ia n s ......................
O th e r p ro fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s ............
M a n a g e rs a n d a d m in is tra to rs , e x c e p t f a r m .............

8 ,3 7 6
2 ,1 9 3
2 ,6 6 4
206
3 ,3 1 4
3 ,5 0 7

797
1 40
232
34
391
354

9.5
6 .4
8 .7
16.3
1 1.8
10.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 .5
2 .5
2 .0

2 2 .7
3 3 .2
2 0 .2

19.1
1 8 .4
2 0 .5

1 6.9
1 1.3
2 1 .7

2 7 .2
2 5 .5
2 8 .2

1 0 .7
9 .2
7 .4

1 3 .5
1 0 .5
1 0 .3

8 .6
5 .4
9 .2

(3)
3 .6
5.7

(3)
2 0 .3
2 7 .5

(3)
1 8 .0
2 3 .3

(3)
1 6 .6
13.5

(3)
2 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

(3)
1 2.9
6 .6

(3)
1 7 .0
1 3 .6

(3)
9 .2
6 .9

S a le s w o r k e r s ..........................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ............................................................................
O th e r s a le s w o r k e r s ..........................................................
C le ric a l w o r k e r s ......................................................................
S te n o g ra p h e rs , ty p is ts , a n d s e c r e t a r ie s .................

3 ,7 1 4
2 ,6 9 0

581
432

1 5.7
1 6.0

2 2 .9
2 2 .8

1 0 .7

1 3 .2

1 8 .0

1 2 .8

3 0 .2
2 7 .2
30.1

2 3 .0
2 1 .6

4 .9

26.1

2 2 .4
2 1 .2

1 0.7
1 1 .6

1 3 .7
10.1
1 0 .9
1 2.3

1 0 0 .0

2 1 .3
2 0 .6
20.1
2 0 .8

1 5.3
7 .2
1 4 .8
1 3 .2
1 5.4

1 7 .6
1 9 .2
1 6 .0
1 7 .9

O th e r c le ric a l w o r k e r s ......................................................

1 4.6
1 4.2
1 2.7
14.9

9 .0
1 5.9
1 1.4

2 1 .0
2 1 .0

1 50
2 ,4 7 5
699
1 ,7 7 6

3 .6
4.1
2 .4
4 .4
3 .4

2 8 .5
2 7 .9

1 ,0 2 4
1 7 ,4 4 3
5 ,5 0 3
11,941

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 5 .3

1 0 .4

C ra ft w o r k e r s ...........................................................................

948

161

1 7.0

1 0 0 .0

3 .4

2 4 .9

1 9 .5

1 3 .7

25.1

1 3 .5

16.1

9 .9

O p e ra tiv e s , e x c e p t t r a n s p o r t ...........................................
D u ra b le g o o d s m a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s m a u f a c t u r in g ................................
O th e r in d u s t r ie s ..................................................................

5 ,2 1 4
1,821

3 2 .4
3 0 .4
3 6 .3
2 5 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0.6

2,511
882

1 ,6 8 9
554
913
223

1 2.0
1 1.4
4.1

1 7.5
1 8.5
1 7 .6
1 4.5

2 2 .4
2 4 .3
2 2 .9
1 5.2

1 2.8
1 2 .4
1 0.4
2 3 .7

2 1 .2
20.1
2 3 .0

1 5 .6
1 2.7
1 4 .8

18.1
1 8 .9
1 6.8

1 7 .2
1 3 .2
1 9.8

1 6 .3

2 6 .2

2 1 .6

1 6 .4

T ra n s p o rt e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t iv e s ....................................

368

69

1 8.8

1 0 0 .0

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

P riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs ...............................................

1 ,3 4 0

216

16.1

1 0 0 .0

4 .5

2 0 .8

1 7 .0

8 .7

2 0 .5

2 8 .4

2 2 .3

2 3 .9

S e rv ic e w o rk e rs , e x c e p t p riv a te h o u s e h o ld .............
C le a n in g s e r v ic e .................................................................

1 ,9 2 4
264
1 ,1 0 3
300

1 6.2
1 5.3

1 8 .3
32.1
1 4 .4
20.1
2 0 .4

1 6 .7
2 2 .7

1 2 .4
1 0 .9

1 6 .2

1 2 .8
1 2 .2

P e rs o n a l s e r v ic e .................................................................
P ro te c tiv e s e r v ic e ...............................................................

9 ,7 6 8
1 ,2 6 6
4 ,3 6 4
2 ,1 6 2
1 ,7 9 5
180

F a rm e rs , fa rm m a n a g e rs , a n d n o n fa rm la b o re rs ...

638

1 10

F o o d s e r v ic e ........................................................................
H e a lth s e r v ic e ......................................................................

234
23

1 9.7

1 0 0 .0

3.1

2 3 .9

2 0 .8
2 5 .3
13.9
13.0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

(5)
4.1

1 4 .0
2 7 .8
2 2 .3
1 9.6

1 7.4
1 4 .5
1 7 .6
1 8.3
1 8 .7

1 6.4
1 3 .4
1 7.2

2 1 .0
24.1
1 9.8
22.1
2 2 .3

13.0

1 0 0 .0

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

1 7.2

1 0 0 .0

(5)

1 5.6

1 7 .8

1 0 .4

3 8 .2

1 8 .2

2 6 .0

1 4 .3

1 W o rk e d 5 0 w e e k s o r m o re .
2 W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .
3 D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e rs b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .




2 3 .3

3 .8
1.7

4 In c lu d e s p riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .
5 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

63

1 2 .8
1 7 .9

1 2 .6

T a D C-14. Extent of unemployment in 1981 by occupation of the job held the longest and race
T lb ©

(N ber in thousands)
um
T o ta l w ith
u n e m p lo y m e n t

Percent of total
w
ith
unemployment

P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n o f to ta l
w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t

Y e a r-

Occupation and race

T o ta l
w ith
w o rk
e x p e r­
ie n c e

N um ber

P e rc e n t
of
to ta l
w ith
w o rk
e x p e r­
ie n c e

T o ta l

P a rt-y e a r w o r k e r s 2 b y w e e k s

ro u n d
w o rk ­
e rs '
w ith
1 or 2
w eeks
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

o f u n e m p lo y m e n t

1 to 4
w eeks

5 to 10
w eeks

11 to
14
w eeks

15 to
26
w eeks

W 2
ith
spells
of
27 unem­
weeks ploy­
or m
ore m
ent

W 3
ith
or m
ore
spells
of
unem­
ploy­
m
ent

W IT
H E
Total, 16 years and over.........................

1 0 2 ,8 2 5

1 7 ,2 9 7

16.8

1 0 0 .0

6 .0

2 0 .2

19.8

13.8

24.1

16.1

18.4

15.4

Professional and technical w o r k e r s .............................
M
anagers and adm
inistrators, except farm........
Sales workers...............................................
C
lerical workers............................................
C workers...............................................
raft
Operatives, except transport...........................
Transport equipm operatives......................
ent
N
onfarm laborers..........................................
Private household workers.............................
Service workers, except private household........
Farm and farm managers...........................
ers
Farm laborers am supervisors.......................
d

16,6 03
1 1,5 43
7,181
1 8,8 45
1 3,0 97
1 0,1 89
3 ,3 3 2
5 ,0 0 5
994
1 3 ,1 7 8
1,3 7 4
1,4 8 4

1 ,4 2 5
844
920
2 ,6 3 0
2 ,9 1 8
3,111
829
1 ,5 3 2
1 65
2 ,5 7 2
20
330

8 .6
7 .3
12.8
14.0
2 2 .3

5.4
5.8
4 .2
4 .9

2 1 .5

17.3
14.1
1 2.4
1 1.8
1 4.3
13.8
15.1
12.1
10.3
14.8

25.1
2 5 .3
2 4 .6
2 1 .2
2 6 .6

3 0 .6
1 6.6
1 9.5
1.5
2 2 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

11.4
13.4
12.4
14.0
16.2
15.1
15.0
24.5

16.2
14.8
17.1
17.4
18.5
19.0
20.3
22.9
23.9
17.3

9.8
9.5
11.4
11.0
21.7
17.3
15.8
19.6
23.4
12.4

11,211

2,761

2 4 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 ,1 3 3

136

12.0

498
273
2 ,1 2 5
967
1,651
541

69
83
411
259
546
1 09
336
53
684
2
74

1 3.9
3 0 .3
19.3
2 6 .8
33.1
2 0 .2
3 6 .7
14.6
2 7 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 0 .5
2 4 .9

7.0
11.7
5 .2
2 .7
3 .7
3.3

2 6 .5
15.8
16.6
15.9
15.6
18.6
2 5 .8

19.3
2 4 .5
19.3
2 1 .6
2 0 .2
2 0 .6
21.1
15.7
17.6
17.7

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

• 1.5

1 4.6

19.1

1 1.2

4.1

1 5.4

18.4

2.7

1 3.7

16.9
27.1

2 2 .2
2 7 .8
2 9 .4
2 1 .9
2 0 .4

2 7 .9

2 9 .4

17.9
(3
)
24.3

22.3

26.9

1 3.4

2 3 .7

25.0

16.6

18.1

1 8.8

19.3

2 2 .6

2 2 .9

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

3 1 .5
18.7
1 7.0
2 0 .5

8.8
1 0.2
1 6.4
1 3.2
1 2.2
1 3.8

1 6.6
2 2 .6
2 0 .8
1 7.2
2 2 .3
3 4 .0

(3
)
24.8

13.2
(3
)
9.9

6.9
(3
)
17.8
13.8
24.5
16.3
19.2
26.6
(3
1
17.1

(3)

(3)

BAK
LC
Total, 16 years and over.........................
Professional and technical workers...................
M
anagers and adm
inistrators, except farm........
Sales workers.....................................
C
lerical workers..................................
C workers................................
raft
Operatives, except transport...........................
Transport equipm operatives......................
ent
N
onfarm laborers...............................
Private household workers......................
Service w
orkers, except private household........
Farm and farm managers..........................
ers
Farm laborers am supervisors................
d
W
orked 50 weeks or m
ore.
W
orked jess than 50 weeks.




914
364
2 ,4 9 6
32
217

(3
)
3 4 .0

(3
)
0
3 .5
6 .8
7 .5
3 .6
1.2

(3
)
2 .6

(3
)
(3
)

(3 ‘
)
18.3
19.3
10.5
18.7
10.2
9.9

2 9 .2
1 4.5

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

14.1

1 6.6

1 4.4

2 6 .3

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

2 5 .8

28.5
22.9
22.3
26.6
(3
)
2 6 .0
f3)

(3
)

D a ta n o t s h o w n w h e re b a s e is le s s th a n 7 5 ,0 0 0 .
L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

1 4 .6
1 4.7

16.8
9.9
16.9
<)
3
19.4
/3
\
(3
)

0

Tabs© 0 1 5 . Extent of unemptoymeGiS o 1981 for part-year workers by sex and spells of unemployment
n
(N u m b e rs in th o u s a n d s )
P a rt-y e a r w o rk e rs w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t'
T o ta l w o rk e rs

W ith 1
s p e ll

P a rt-tim e w o rk e rs 3

F u ll-tim e w o rk e rs 1
2

W ith 3
or

W ith 1
s p e ll

W ith 2
s p e lls

of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

W ith 3
or
m o re
s p e lls
of
unem ­

W ith 1 . W ith 2
s p e ll
s p e lls
of
of
unem ­
unem ­
p lo y ­
p lo y ­
m ent
m ent

W ith 3
or
m o re
s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

W ith 2
s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

1 9 ,3 4 8
3,991
4 ,0 4 0
2 ,8 1 5
4 ,9 4 0
3 ,5 6 2

1 2 ,3 6 2
3 ,1 2 8
2 ,6 8 3
1 ,7 5 6
2 ,8 0 8
1 ,9 8 7

3 ,7 5 0
5 52
7 49
5 22
1,0 6 8
858

3 ,2 3 7
311
608
537
1 ,0 6 4
717

1 4 ,2 5 2
2,791
3 ,0 7 6
2 ,2 0 3
3 ,7 3 6
2 ,4 4 6

9 ,2 6 5
2,241
2 ,1 1 0
1 ,3 9 2
2 ,1 5 0
1,371

2 ,8 6 4
350
557
448
872
637

2 ,1 2 3
200
409
362
715
437

5 ,0 9 6
1 ,2 0 0
964
611
1 ,2 0 4
1 ,1 1 6

3 ,0 9 7
887
573
363
658
616

885
202
1 92
74
1 97
221

1 ,1 1 3
111
1 99
1 74
350
279

1 1 ,2 6 0
1 ,9 8 5
2 ,2 9 6
1 ,6 6 7
3 ,0 5 7
2 ,2 5 6

6 ,7 8 2
1,541
1 ,5 0 3
952
1 ,6 3 9
1 ,1 4 7

2 ,3 2 9
267
437

2 ,1 4 9
1 77
356
367
708
542

9 ,0 0 4
1 ,5 7 9
1 ,8 8 9
1 ,4 3 4

1 ,9 3 3
1 99
357

2 ,4 6 3
1 ,6 3 9

5 ,5 7 3
1 ,2 5 9
1 ,2 7 5
833
1 ,3 5 8
848

324
606
447

1 ,4 9 9
121
257
277
499
344

2 ,2 5 6
406
407
233
594

1 ,2 1 0
282
228
1 19
282
299

396
68
80
24
1 04
121

651
56
99
90
209
1 98

8 ,0 8 8
2 ,0 0 6
1 ,7 4 4
1 ,1 4 8
1 ,8 8 4
1 ,3 0 6

5 ,5 8 0
1,5 8 7

1,421
285
312
1 74
359
291

5 ,2 4 9
1 ,2 1 2
1 ,1 8 7
769
1 ,2 7 4
806

3 ,6 9 3
982
835
560
792
523

932
151
200
1 24
266
1 90

625
79
1 52
86
2 15
93

2 ,8 3 9
794
557
378
610
500

1 ,8 8 7
605
345
244

489
133
1 13
50
93
101

463
56
1 00
85
141
82

E x te n t o f u n e m p lo y m e n t a n d s e x
T o ta l

m o re
s p e lls
of
unem ­
p lo y ­
m ent

T o ta l

T o ta l

p lo y ­
m ent

TO TAL
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.........................................
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .......................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s .....................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s .....................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ................................................................
M en
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.........................................
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s ........................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s .......................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s .........1
..........................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ................................................................

348
709
567

617

W om en
T o ta l w ith u n e m p lo y m e n t.........................................
1 to 4 w e e k s ...........................................................................
5 to 10 w e e k s .......................................................................
11 to 14 w e e k s .....................................................................
15 to 2 6 w e e k s .....................................................................
2 7 w e e k s o r m o r e ................................................................
'r

1 ,1 8 0
804
1 ,1 6 9
840

1 ,0 8 7
134
252
170
356
175

1 W o rk e d le s s th a n 5 0 w e e k s .
2 U s u a lly w o rk e d 3 5 h o u rs o r m o re p e r w e e k .




3 U s u a lly w o rk e d 1 to 3 4 h o u rs p e r w e e k .

65

376
317

Tab le C -16. P erso ns w ith no w o rk e x p e rie n c e in 1981 by age, m arilal status, race, and sex
(N u m bers in th ousan ds)
Did not w ork but
looked fo r w ork

P ercen t distribution by num b er of
w e e k s unem ployed

A ge, m arital status, and race
N u m b er

P ercen t

Total

1 to 4
w eeks

5 to 14
w eeks

15 to 2 6
w eeks

27 w eeks
or m ore

M en
AGE

16
18
25
55

T o t a l ...............................................................................................................................
to 17 years ................................................................................................................
to 2 4 ye ars ................................................................................................................
to 5 4 ye ars ................................................................................................................
years and o v e r ........................................................................................................

1,181
15 5
397
527
10 2

1 0 0 .0
13 .2
3 3 .6
4 4 .6
8 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

15 .2
3 3 .5
17 .4
7.4
19 .0

2 1 .2
3 8 .3
26.1
12 .8
2 0 .0

1 3 .5
1 1 .9
1 7 .9
10 .8
1 2 .6

50.1
16 .3
3 8 .6
69.1
4 8 .4

731
303
147

6 1 .9
2 5 .7
12 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0

18 .5
10 .8
7.8

2 4 .3
15 .6
17 .3

15 .0
11 .7
9 .4

4 2 .2
6 1 .9
6 5 .4

76 3
377

6 4 .6
3 1 .9

1 0 0.0
1 0 0 .0

16 .7
1 1 .5

2 4 .7
13 .9

1 2 .0
1 6 .5

4 6 .6
58.1

M A R IT A L S T A T U S
Single ..................................................................................................................................
M arried, spouse p r e s e n t...........................................................................................
O th e r m arital s ta tu s ......................................................................................................
RACE
W h it e ....................................................................................................................................
B lack ...................................................................................................................................

W om en
AGE

16
18
25
55

T o t a l ..............................................................................................................................
to 17 years ...............................................................................................................
to 2 4 years ...............................................................................................................
to 5 4 years ...............................................................................................................
years and o v e r ........................................................................................................

1 ,6 8 2
15 7
505
881
13 9

1 0 0 .0
9.3
3 0 .0
5 2 .4
8.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 3 .0
4 2 .7
3 0 .8
3 2 .5
3 3 .8

3 0 .5
3 0 .4
3 3 .6
30.1
2 1 .8

14 .0
13 .5
12 .5
15 .2
12 .4

2 2 .4
1 3 .5
2 3 .2
22.1
3 1 .9

626
662
394

3 7 .2
3 9 .4
2 3 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 0 .8
3 3 .8
3 5 .3

3 1 .8
3 4 .0
2 2 .6

13.1
14 .2
15.3

2 4 .4
1 8 .0
2 6 .8

1 ,0 8 0
565

6 4 .2
3 3 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 3 .2
33.1

32.1
2 6 .6

14.1
1 4 .3

2 0 .6
2 6 .0

M A R IT A L S T A T U S
Single ..................................................................................................................................
M arried, spouse p r e s e n t...........................................................................................
O th e r m arital s ta tu s .....................................................................................................
RACE
W h it e ...................................................................................................................................
B l a c k ...................................................................................................................................




66

TffllbB® 0 1 7 . Fsfrsoinis w ith n© w o rk ©xp®ri@ne@ in 1981 by sex, ag@, rae®, and reason to r not w orking
(In thousands)

Sex, age, and race

Total with
no work
experience

Reason for not working
Illness or
disability

Taking care
of home

Going to
school

Inability to
find work

Retirement

In Armed
Forces

Other
reasons

321
60
64
32
32
153
28
13
14
16

MEM
16,462
2,684
1,053
510
542
2,567
2,390
761
1,629
7,768

3,807
57
102
35
67
1,331
1,083
462
620
1,234

138
1
6
6
60
22
8
14
49

3,164
2,323
570
318
251
264
7
4
4
-

1,177
232
252
97
155
568
74
31
43
52

7,743
2
2
148
1,176
242
934
6,418

112
11
57
28
29
44
-

38,410
3,391
2,403
954
1,450
13,037
6,227
2,823
3,403
13,351

4,915
51
107
46
61
1,262
1,115
518
597
2,379

21,951
356
1,422
433
989
10,576
4,127
2,004
2,123
5,469

3,664
2,671
582
380
202
394
14
14
3

1,242
237
224
77
147
624
117
74
44
41

6,191
2
2
47
780
184
596
5,362

15
2
10
2
8
4
-

2,582
664
323
156
166
602
312
136
176
682

770
12
38
15
22
313
199
103
96
208

25

733
550
143
81
62
40
-

405
77
114
42
73
190
12
6
6
12

562

21
2
11
7
4
8
-

4,686
800
593
248
345
1,608
562
282
280
1,123

1,092
11
29
14
15
354
244
131
113
454

1,772
85
265
79
186
916
212
112
100
295

835
586
171
116
55
75
1
1
2

498
107
114
35
79
242
22
18
13

77
19
59
360

To tal.......................................................................

2,863

190

432

452

1,701

M e n ................................................................................
W h ite ...........................................................................
B la c k ...........................................................................

1,181
763
377

82
54
26

6
2
2

254
172
69

Women ..........................................................................
W h ite ...........................................................................
B la c k ...........................................................................

1,682
1,080
565

109
58
48

427
330
84

T o ta l.......................................................................

52,009

8,531

M e n ................................................................................
W h ite ...........................................................................
B la c k ...........................................................................

15,281
12,640
2,206

Women ..........................................................................
W h ite ...........................................................................
B la c k ...........................................................................

36,728
31,828
4,121

T o ta l.......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 21 years ..........................................................
22 to 24 years ..........................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 59 years ..........................................................
60 to 64 years ..........................................................
65 years and o v e r.......................................................

-

WOMEN
T o ta l......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 21 years ..........................................................
22 to 24 years ..........................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 59 years ..........................................................
60 to 64 years ..........................................................
65 years and o v e r.......................................................

-

432
74
56
16
40
132
72
29
43
97

BLACK
Men
T o tal.......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 21 years ..........................................................
22 to 24 years ..........................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 59 years ..........................................................
60 to 64 years ..........................................................
65 years and o v e r.......................................................

-

67
22
15
11
4
25
1
1
4

6
2
2
2
1
2
-

44
9
11
2
9
18
5
1
4

-

-

33

17

38

783
491
269

24
21
2

13
8

5

20
15
4

198
138
58

918
528
370

8
6

3

4
4
-

18
16
2

21,656

6,376

719

13,902

110

715

3,725
2,912
744

132
107
23

2,910
2,043
664

395
247
137

7,719
7,040
560

98
80
15

301
211
63

4,806
3,701
1,044

21,524
19,374
1,688

3,466
2,529

324
191
128

6,183
5,673
436

11

414
356
42

1
1
19
1
1
3

-

8
99
27
72
455

Women
T o ta l.......................................................................
16 to 19 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 24 y e a rs .............................................................
20 to 21 y e a rs ..........................................................
22 to 24 y e a rs ..........................................................
25 to 54 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 64 y e a rs .............................................................
55 to 59 years ..........................................................
60 to 64 years ..........................................................
65 years and o v e r.......................................................

5

438
-

1

MOMWORKERS WHO LOOKED FOR WORK

MOMWORKERS WHO DID MOT
LOOK FOR WORK




67

777

5
6

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