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Wages and Related Benefits
2 L B RM R ET
0 AO A K S
1 9 5 8 -5 9

Earnings Trends
Intercity Com parisons
Occupational Earnings
Supplem entary Practices
B u lle tin N o . 1 2 4 0 - 2 2

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR ST T IC
A IST S
Ewan Clague, Com issioner
m




W a g e s and R elated B e n efits
20




LABOR

M ARKETS

1 9 5 8 -5 9

#

E a r n in g s T re n d s

#

In te rc ity C o m p a r is o n s

#

O c c u p a t io n a l E a r n in g s

#

S u p p le m e n t a r y P ra c tice s

Bulletin No.

1240-22
Novem
ber 1959

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STA ISTIC
T
S
Ewan Clague, Com issioner
m

☆ For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.G.

Price 50 cents




Contents

Preface

Page

The Community Wage Survey Program
The Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly conducts area­
wide wage surveys in a number of important industrial centers.
The studies, made from late fall to early spring, provide data
on occupational earnings and related supplementary benefits. A
preliminary report is available on completion of the study in
each area, usually in the month following the payroll period
studied.
The preliminary report is supplied free of charge.
This is followed within 2 months by an area summary bulletin
(for sale) that provides additional data not included in the ear­
lier report.
These include:

Introduction--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industrial composition of the 20 a r e a s ----------------------------------Comparability of area data---------------------------------------------------------

2

Trends of occupational earnings, 1953-59 ____________________—
7
Movement of wages, all industries, 1958-59 -----------------------7
7
Movement of wages, all industries, 1953-59 ________________
Movement of wages, manufacturing_________________________
8
Coverage and method of computing the indexes______________
8
Limitations of the d a ta _______________________________________
8
Wage differences among labor markets _________________________
17
Method of computing area relatives _________________________
17
Interarea comparisons _______________________________________
17
Job groups ----------------------------------------------------------------------------17
Industry groups --------------------------------------------------------------------18
Occupational earnings ___________________________________________
20
Office occupations_____________________________________________
20
Professional and technical occupations _____________________
20
Plant occupations -------------------------------------------------------------------20
Pay variations in occupational earnings _____________________
20
Differences in pay rates for men and women ___________________
37
Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions ---------------------------------------------------------------------------46
Introduction_____________________________________________________
46
Minimum entrance rates for women office workers_________
46
Trend of scheduled workweeks_______________________________
46
Trend of late-shift pay differentials
46
(manufacturing)-------------Trend of paid holidays _______________________________________
49
49
Trend of vacation p a y ________________________________________ More pay for comparable service ________________________
49
Higher maximums ___________________________________________
49
Trend of health, insurance, and pension p la n s ----------------------52

For each occupation—
areawide and selected
industry-group average earnings and employ­
ment and distributions of workers by earnings
intervals.
For each related "fringe” benefit and sup­
plementary wage practice— selective distribu­
tions of frequency of the practice and service
requirements (where pertinent) by areawide and
industry-group proportions of office and plant
workers to whom applicable.
A scope table— showing the number of e s ­
tablishments in scope, the number studied,
and corresponding office and plant worker em ­
ployment, in the area and industry groups,
as defined.
This consolidated bulletin summarizes and analyzes the
results of the individual area bulletins for the surveys made
during late 1958 and early 1959. A list of the bulletins for the
areas surveyed appears on the last page.




I
1

Charts:
1.
2.

iii

Relative employment in 6 industry divisions,
20 labor m ark ets_______________________________________
Relative employment in selected manufacturing
industry divisions, 20 labor m a r k e ts________________

3
4

Contents — Continued

Contents—- Continued

Page

Page
Tables:— Continued

Tables:
1.

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
A:

B:

Occupational earnings
Average weekly earnings for selected office occupations—
A - 1.
All industries ________________________________
A -2 .
Manufacturing ________________________________
A -3 .
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________
A -4 .
Public utilities _______________________________
A - 5.
Wholesale trade _____________________________
A - 6.
Retail trade __________________________________
A - 7.
Finance ---------------------------------------------------------A -8 .
Services _____________________________________




iv

69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
81

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of su rvey_______________________________
B. Occupational descriptions _________________________________

53
54

61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68

Health, insurance, and pension plans—
B -2 6. All industries ______________________________________
B -2 7. Manufacturing _____________________________________
B -2 8. Public utilities _____________________________________
B -2 9. Wholesale trade ____________________________________
B -3 0 . Retail trade ________________________________________
B -31.
Finance __________ «
._________________________________
B -3 2. Services ____________________________________________

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
36

45

59
60

Paid vacations—
B - 19• All industries----------------------------------------------------------B -2 0. Manufacturing _____________________________________
B -2 1. Public utilities -------------------------------------------------------B -2 2. Wholesale trade ____________________________________
B -2 3 . Retail trade ________________________________________
B -24. Finance _____________________________________________
B -2 5. Services ------------------------------------------------------------------

13
19
19
39
43

55
55
56
56
57
57
58

Paid holidays—
B - 12. All industries ______________________________________
B - 12a. Paid holiday time— all industries _________________
B - 13. Manufacturing______________________________________
B - 14. Public utilities _____________________________________
3 -1 5 . Wholesale trade ____________________________________
B - 16. Retail trade _________________________________________
B - 17. Finance _____________________________________________
B - 1 8 . Services ____________________________________________

9

weekly hours—
All industries ---------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing ______________________________________
Public utilities _____________________________________
Wholesale trade ____________________________________
Retail trade ________________________________________
Finance _____________________________________________
Services ____________________________________________

Shift differentials, manufacturing—
B -10. Provisions __________________________________________
B - l l . Practices ___________________________________________

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions
Minimum entrance rates for women office workers—
B - 1.
All industries ________________________________
B -2 .
Manufacturing ________________________________

Scheduled
B -3 .
B -4 .
B -5 .
B - 6.
B -7 .
B -8 .
B -9 .

45
47
47
48
48
50
51

Average hourly earnings for selected plant occupations—
A -9 .
All industries ________________________________
A - 10. Manufacturing ________________________________
A - 11. Nonmanufacturing ___________________________
A - 12. Public utilities _______________________________
A - 13. Wholesale tra d e______________________________
A - 14. Retail trade __________________________________
A - 15. Finance ______________________________________
A - 16. Services ______________________________________

2.

Wage indexes, office and plant— all industries
and manufacturing ______________________________________
Percent increases, office and plant— all
industries and manufacturing---------------------------------------Interarea pay comparisons, office workers -----------------Interarea pay comparisons, plant workers _____________
Pay comparisons by sex, office workers _______________
Pay comparisons by sex, plant workers __._____________
Establishment differences in earnings of men
and women office workers _____________________________
Establishment differences in earnings of men
and women plant workers ______________________________
Median entrance rates ___________________________________
Trend of scheduled weekly hours _______________________
Trend of shift differentials (manufacturing) ____________
Trend of paid holidays ___________________________________
Trend of vacation p a y ____________________________________
Trend of health, insurance, and pension plans ________

82
87

W a g e s and Related Benefits, 20 Labor Markets, 1958-59 1

Introduction

The Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted surveys of occupa­
tional earnings and related practices in 20 important labor market
areas during late 1958 and early 1959. 2 These studies were part of
a continuing program designed to meet a variety of governmental and
nongovernmental needs for information on occupational earnings, e s ­
tablishment practices, and related wage provisions.
Occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing indus­
tries are studied on a communitywide basis in selected areas. The
area surveys provide earnings data for the following types of occu­
pations: (a) Office clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) main­
tenance and powerplant; and (d) custodial and material movement.
Data are also collected and summarized on shift operations and dif­
ferentials, weekly work schedules, and supplementary wage benefits
such as paid vacations and paid holidays.
These data, presented
in detail in the individual area bulletins, are summarized and analyzed
in this bulletin.4
Each of the detailed area bulletins presents areawide infor­
mation combining data for six major industry groupings.5 Separate
data for each industry group are provided where feasible, depending
largely on the relative size and importance of the industry group within

1 Prepared by Otto Hollberg and Alexander N. Jarrell of the
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Area studies were supervised by the Bureau's Regional
Wage and Industrial Relations Analysts.
2 Since 1948, the Bureau has conducted 1 or more areawide
surveys in 51 labor markets.
The earliest surveys covered office
workers only. Surveys covering both office and plant workers were
conducted in 40 areas in late 1951 and early 1952; in 20 areas in
1952-53; in 17 areas in each of the following 4 years; and in 19 areas
in 1957-58. Special surveys were also conducted in Lawrence, M ass.,
in February 1956 and May 1959. A listing of area reports issued pre­
viously, including items covered, is available in Directory of Com­
munity Wage Surveys; copies are available upon request from the U .S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington 25, D .C .,
or from any of its five regional offices.
3 Beginning with surveys conducted in the winter of 1956-57,
data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions in
some areas are collected only biennially. See footnote 18, p. 46.
4 See listing of occupational wage survey bulletins on last page.
5 See note at bottom of table in appendix A relating to the
adoption of the revised Standard Industrial Classification system.




a given area.
Thus, the sampling techniques permitted computation
of separate data for manufacturing and public utilities in each of the
20 areas; retail trade in 15; finance in 13; wholesale trade in 12; and
services in 6.
The establishments within the scope of the surveys in the
20 areas provided employment to an estimated 73 million workers.
/4

Industrial Composition of the 20 Areas
The 20 areas covered by this report had a combined popu­
lation of about 39 million in 1950 more than a fourth of the Nation's
total. Eighteen States were represented, permitting some examina­
tion of interregional as well as intraregional variations in pay levels
and associated practices.
At the time of the latest study, the largest area labor force
(New York City proper) was more than 20 times the size of that in the
smallest area (Memphis), and from 10 to 14 times as large as that
in either Atlanta, Dallas, Denver, New Orleans, Portland (O reg.), or
Seattle. The 4 largest areas studied— Chicago, Detroit, Los AngelesLong Beach, and New York City— accounted for more than half of
both the manufacturing and the nonmanufacturing employment in the
20 areas combined.
The individual industry divisions had about the same relative
importance in the 20 areas as a group as in the Nation as a whole
(chart 1). Among the 20 areas, the industrial composition of the in­
dividual areas varied substantially.
In each of the areas, Detroit, Buffalo, Milwaukee, and Newark Jersey City, more workers were employed in manufacturing industries
than in all nonmanufacturing industry groups combined. (See chart 1 .)
More than 40 percent of the labor force in five other areas was em­
ployed in manufacturing. On the other hand, manufacturing industries
employed fewer than a third of the workers in Memphis, Portland
(O reg.), Dallas, San Francisco-Oakland, Denver, and New Orleans;
and in these areas, the proportion of the labor force engaged in trade
was greater than that engaged in manufacturing.
Similar employment variations were evident among the com­
ponents of the broad industry divisions.
Thus, marked differences
among the areas are shown in relative employment in the various

2
industry groups within the manufacturing division (chart 2). The group
of related industries with the largest segment of the manufacturing
labor force in 11 of the 20 areas was made up of metals and metal­
working firm s. The strongest concentrations of employment in these
manufacturing industries, ranging from 50 to 82 percent, were found
in Detroit, Seattle, Milwaukee, Buffalo, Los Angeles-Long Beach,
Baltimore, Chicago, and Dallas.
Those areas showing the weakest
concentration in the metal industries (less than 30 percent) were Den­
ver, New Orleans, Memphis, and New York City.
The latter area
showed a larger proportion of employment in the textiles and apparel
industries than in the metal and metal products industries.




Comparability of Area Data
Areawide (all industries) estimates of wage levels and related
practices were affected to some extent by the industrial composition
of the area.
The proportion of employment accounted for, both by
the respective broad industry divisions and their subgroups, varied
considerably among areas. The estimates must, therefore, be viewed
in terms of these interarea differences. In a few areas, additional
limitations on area-to-area comparisons arose from incomplete cov­
erage of certain industries; these are indicated in the footnotes to the
table in appendix A on pages 84 and 85.

3
C hart

1.

RELATIVE EMPLOYMENT IN 6 INDUSTRY DIVISIONS
2 0 LABOR M ARKETS
PERCEN T

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

UNITED STATES
2 0 AREAS COMBINED
Detroit
B u ffalo
M ilwaukee
N ew a rk -J e rse y City
St. Louis
C h icago
Philadelphia
Baltimore
Los A n g eles-L on g Beach
Boston
M inneapolis-St. Paul
Seattle
N ew York City
Atlanta
Memphis
Portland (O reg .)
Dallas
San F rancisco-O akland
Denver
N ew O rleans
M anu factu rin g

UN ITED

STATES D E P A R T M E N T O F

BU
REAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




LA BO R

C o n s t ru c ti o n , F in a n c e , P ub lic U t il it ie s , a n d S e r v i c e s

S ource: C o u n t y

B u s in e s s

Patterns.

w m
1957;

Trade

U .S . D e p a r t m e n t o f C o m m e r c e .

4
Chart

2.

RELATIVE EMPLOYMENT IN SELECTED MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY DIVISIONS
2 0

LABOR M ARKETS
PERCEN T

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

UNITED STATES
2 0 AREAS COMBINED
D etroit
Seattle
M ilw aukee
B uffalo
Los A n geles-L on g Beach
Baltimore
C h icago
Dallas
St. Louis
N ew a rk -J ersey City
Atlanta
M inneapolis-St. Paul
San F rancisco-O akland
Boston
Philadelphia
Portland (O r e g .)
Denver
N ew O rleans
Memphis
N ew York City
■ ■ ■ H

M e ta ls a n d
M e t a l Products

U N IT E D STATES D E P A R T M E N T

B RE U OF LABOR STA
U A
TISTIC
S




OF

LA BO R

IBRJQOQj M a n u f a c t u r i n g O t h e r T h a n M e t a l s ,
M e ta l P ro d u c ts, Textile s, a n d A p p a r e l
S ource: C o u n t y

B u s in e s s

Patterns,

T extiles a n d
Apparel

1 9 5 7 ; U .S . D e p a r t m e n t o f C o m m e r c e .

90

100

5

As in earlier years, improvements in occupational wage rates
and wage supplements were reflected in the studies conducted in
20 major labor markets by the Bureau during the winter of 1958-59.
Of the 20 areas, 18 also were surveyed a year earlier and
provide earnings comparisons for 4 selected skill-occupational group­
ings. Median area increases in earnings during the year ranged from
3. 5 percent for women office workers to 4. 7 percent for unskilled
men plant workers. Earnings of women industrial nurses and skilled
maintenance men increased 4 .2 and 4. 5 percent, respectively. During
the 6-year period, 1953 to 1959, median area average annual increases
were as follows: Women office workers, 4 .4 percent; women indus­
trial nurses, 5.1 percent; skilled maintenance men, 4 .7 percent; and
unskilled men plant workers, 4. 8 percent.
Workers in the larger West Coast and North Central areas
were generally the highest paid among the 20 areas. Earnings of
office and plant workers tended to be higher in manufacturing than in
nonmanufacturing industries. Men earned more than women in similar
jobs but a recent analysis of available data shows that differences
between their earnings were greatly reduced when comparisons were
limited to establishments employing both sexes in the jobs studied.
Wage differences between the highest and lowest pay areas
were greater for unskilled plant workers than for skilled maintenance
and office workers.
The wage differences were greater for office
workers in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturingj whereas the dif­
fe r e n c e s fo r

s k ille d

m a in te n a n c e

and c u s to d ia l

w orkers

w ere

g r e a te r

in nonmanufacturing. Differentials for the material movement group
were about the same in the two broad industry divisions.
Data were collected on establishment practices and supple­
mentary wage provisions in only 11 of the 20 areas studied in the
winter of 1958-59. 6 Most establishments visited in these areas re­
ported formally established salaries for hiring inexperienced women
for office clerical work. Median establishment rates for hiring inex­
perienced typists ranged from $45 a week in Boston to $59 in Los
Angeles-Long Beach. Established rates were not only more common
in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing, but most such hiring sala­
ries were higher in manufacturing offices than in the combined non­
manufacturing industries.
Virtually all office workers in the 11 areas had workweeks of
40 hours or less. Weekly schedules of less than 40 hours were most
common in areas in the Northeast, where they applied to two-thirds

or more of the office workers in most areas. Higher proportions of
office workers at fewer than 40 hours were found in finance than in
any of the other five major industry groups.
More than 90 percent
of the plant workers in most areas had weekly schedules of 40 or
fewer hours. Workweeks of more than 40 hours were generally more
prevalent in retail trade than in other industries.
Three-fourths or more of the manufacturing plant workers in
all areas, other than Dallas and New York City, were employed in
firms that had premium pay provisions for late-shift work.
Centsper-hour premiums over first-shift rates were more common than
percentage premiums for both second- and third-shift work in most
of the areas. The proportion of manufacturing plant workers actually
working on late shifts at the time of the study ranged from 12 percent
in Boston to 31 percent in Seattle.
Six or more paid holidays (including half-day holidays) were
provided to virtually all office workers in each area except Dallas,
and to 90 percent or more of the plant workers in these areas. Up­
ward of 96 percent of the plant workers in all areas except two re­
ceived one or more paid holidays.
In manufacturing eight or more
paid holidays (or the equivalent) were given to about three out of every
five factory workers in Boston, New York City, San Francisco-Oakland,
and Seattle; seven or more were received by at least four out of
every five in all but two areas— Dallas and Chicago (table B-13).
One week's vacation pay was provided to virtually all office
and plant workers in the 11 areas on completion of a service quali­
fying period of 6 months for most office workers and 1 year for most
plant workers.
The great majority of office workers could become
eligible for as much as 2 weeks' vacation pay after working 2 years
with the same employer, and most plant workers could qualify for
such pay after 3 to 5 years.
In most of the 11 areas, paid vacations of 2 or more weeks
were available to virtually all office workers; 3 or more weeks' pay
was available to about 90 percent, with qualifying length-of-service
requirements that ranged from a year in some establishments to as
many as 25 years in others. Four or more weeks' pay was available
to about 30 to 45 percent of office workers, but the proportion was
20 percent in Detroit and the three western areas. These respective
pay amounts, particularly 4 weeks' pay or more, were available to
generally smaller proportions of the plant workers. Moreover, fewer
years of service were required of office workers than plant workers
to qualify for the same pay, in virtually all areas.

6
Comments in the remaining sections of this summary are
Two weeks' pay was the maximum available for 5 to 10 per­
based on these 11 areas. Analysis of changes in supplementary wage
cent of the office and for 10 to 20 percent of the plant workers in
provisions since 1953, based on a constant list of 18 areas, appears
the 11 areas. Three weeks' pay was the maximum attainable vaca­
in the section beginning on p. 46.
tion pay of most of the workers in most areas. However, 4 weeks'




6
pay could be achieved by about 20 to 40 percent of the office and 15 to
30 percent of the plant workers, for most of whom the service re­
quirement was 25 years.
Part or all of the cost of one or more types of employee
health, insurance, or pension plans was paid by employers of virtually
all office and plant workers. On this basis in the 11 areas studied
in the winter of 1958-59, life insurance was available to proportions
of office workers ranging from 92 percent (Boston) to 98 percent (Los
Angeles-Long Beach); 95 percent—the median-area percentage of office
workers covered was found in Buffalo, Chicago, and San Francisco Oakland. The corresponding median-area proportion of plant workers
covered by life insurance was 92 percent (Buffalo and Chicago).




Median-area proportions of workers to whom other types of
health and insurance plans were available were somewhat lower than
for life insurance. For office and plant workers, respectively, these
were as follows: Hospitalization, 83 and 88 percent; surgical, 82 and
87 percent; sickness pay, 81 and 88 percent; medical, 56 and 58 per­
cent; catastrophe, 35 and 8 percent; and retirement pension, 82 and
70 percent.
Provisions for employee illness, either in the form of
paid sick leave or insurance benefits, applied to 81 percent of the
office workers, and to 88 percent of the plant workers in their re­
spective median areas.
The office and plant workers' coverage in
their respective median areas was: Sickness and accident insurance,
3 6 and 74 percent; paid sick leave with full pay and no waiting period,
61 and 12 percent; and paid sick leave with partial pay or a waiting
period, 7 and 11 percent.

7

Trends of Occupational Earnings, 1953-59

Movement of Wages, All Industries,

1958-59

Average pay levels of women industrial nurses, skilled men
maintenance workers, and unskilled men plant workers increased
4 .2 , 4 .5 , and 4 .7 percent, respectively, between the 1958 and 1959
studies.7 Weekly salaries of women office workers increased 3. 5 per cent during this period (table 2).
Increases for each of the four job groups were less than those
granted between the 1957 and 1958 studies. In 11 areas® which were
studied in all 3 years, median area increases for the four groups in
these 11 areas were as follows:
Percent increase—
1957-58
Women office w orkers------------------Women industrial n u r s e s -------------Men skilled maintenance
workers --------------------------------------Men unskilled plant
workers ---------------------------------------

1958-59

4 .3
5 .1

3 .4
3 .7

5 .3

4 .6

5 .2

4 .9

In the 18 areas studied in both 1958 and 1959, increases
in earnings ranged as follows: Women office workers, from 2 .7 per­
cent in New Orleans to 5.3 percent in Boston; women industrial nurses,
from 1 .9 percent in Denver to 6. 3 percent in Portland; skilled main­
tenance men, from 2 .3 percent in Memphis to 6.1 percent in Dallas;
and unskilled men plant workers, from 0 .9 percent in Memphis to
7. 1 percent in Boston.
Movement of Wages, All Industries,

1953-59

Over the 6-year period between 1953 and 1959, median in­
creases in all-industry average earnings for workers in the 4 occu­
pational groups considered, ranged from 29.3 percent for women
7 Percentage increases are median area increases in 18 of the
20 areas studied in 1959* Buffalo and Detroit were not surveyed in
1958. Years shown refer to fiscal years ending June 30, during which
studies were conducted. Studies are not conducted during the same
month in all areas. For example, the 1959 study includes areas with
payroll periods varying from August 1958 to May 1959. However, the
interim between studies is usually 12 months in each of the areas.
The time interval between surveys in each area is shown in table 2.
8 These areas include Boston, New York City, Philadelphia,
Atlanta, Dallas, Memphis, Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Los AngelesLong Beach, Portland, and San Francisco-Oakland.




office workers to 33.9 percent for industrial nurses in the 17 areas
which were studied in both 1953 and 1959.9 Earnings of skilled main­
tenance and unskilled plant groups increased 32.5 and 32.4 percent,
respectively (table 1).
Percentage increases in earnings levels during the 6-year
period varied substantially among areas. Increases for women office
workers, for example^ ranged from 25 percent in Memphis to 34.2
percent in Baltimore. The greatest interarea variation in increases
for the same job group was for unskilled plant workers, 28.2 percent
in Boston to 45. 1 percent in Denver. As pointed out in footnote 9, the
length of the "6-year period" varied among areas.
This variation
can be corrected by computing the average annual (12-month) rate
of increase for each of the four groups.
Annual average increases
in the salaries of women office workers ranged from 3. 8 percent in
Memphis to 5.3 percent in Detroit. Earnings of women industrial nurses
and skilled maintenance men increased at the rate of 6. 9 percent a
year in New Orleans compared with a low of 4 percent for nurses in
Dallas and 4. 1 percent for skilled maintenance men in New York City.
Increases for men unskilled plant workers ranged from an annual
average of 4.1 percent in Portland to 6.4 percent in Baltimore. Me­
dian-area average increases per year for the four groups were as
follows: Women office workers, 4 .4 percent; women industrial nurses,
5. 1 percent; skilled maintenance men, 4 . 7 percent; and unskilled men
plant workers, 4. c percent.
Philadelphia registered the least variation in increases granted
among the four groups within a single labor market.
The average
annual increase for nurses in Philadelphia was 5 percent— 0 .2 per­
cent higher than that for skilled maintenance men in that area. New
Orleans had the greatest variation in annual increases between groups.
In this area, earnings of industrial nurses and skilled maintenance
men increased 6. 9 percent a year compared with an increase of
4 .7 percenc for women office workers.
The highest percentage increases in earnings were not nec­
essarily the highest increases in terms of cents per hour. For ex­
ample, from 1953 to 1959, earnings of unskilled plant workers rose
37.1 percent in Atlanta and 33.4 percent in San Francisco-Oakland.
These percentage increases were equivalent to about 3 9 cents in
Atlanta and 54 cents in San Francisco-Oakland.
Thus, even though
the percentage differential in earnings for unskilled workers in these
areas narrowed during this period, the cents-per-hcur differential
increased.

9
The "6-year period" covered 65 months in Buffalo, 67 in
Boston, 79 in Portland, and 70, 72, 73, or 74 months in the other
14 areas. See table 1 for the time intervals in each area.

8

Among the 17 areas which were studied in both 1953 and 1959,
percentage differences between earnings of the skilled maintenance
men and unskilled men plant worker groups varied from an increase
of nearly 4 percent in Portland, to a decrease of 8 percent in Atlanta.
Differentials between the skilled and unskilled groups narrowed in
nine areas and increased in eight areas. Cents-per-hour differences,
however, increased in all areas over this period.
Movement of Wages, Manufacturing
On the whole, differences between the increases for manu­
facturing and those for all industries combined were relatively slight.
In a majority of cases, where comparisons were possible the differ­
ence in the amount of increase over the 6 years between manufacturing
and all industries was less than 2 percentage points.
Part of this
similarity in wage movement was due to the importance of manufac­
turing in the all industries classification. For example, most of the
industrial nurses and nearly all of the skilled maintenance workers
except automotive mechanics were employed in manufacturing indus­
tries. The greatest difference between the increase in manufacturing
and the increase for all industries was for industrial nurses in New
York City.
Their earnings increased 31 percent in all industries,
compared with 4 0 .6 percent in manufacturing. New York City was the
only area in which more than half of the industrial nurses were em ­
ployed in nonmanufacturing industries.
Coverage and Method of Computing the Indexes
The indexes for office clerical workers and industrial nurses
relate to average weekly salaries for normal hours of work; that is,
the standard work schedule for which straight-time salaries are paid.
For plant worker groups, they measure changes in straight-time
hourly earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
The indexes are based on data
for selected key occupations and include most of the numerically im ­
portant jobs within each group.
The office clerical data are based
on women in the following 18 jobs: Billers, machine (billing machine);
bookkeeping-machine operators, class A and B; Comptometer opera­
tors; clerks, file, class A and B; clerks, order; clerks, payroll;
key-punch operators; office girls; secretaries; stenographers, general;
switchboard operators; switchboard operator-receptionists; tabulating machine operators; transcribing-machine operators, general; and
typists, class A and B. The industrial nurse data are based on women
industrial nurses.
Men in the following 10 skilled maintenance jobs
and 3 unskilled jobs were included in the plant worker data: Skilled—
carpenters, electricians, machinists, mechanics, automotive me­
chanics, millwrights, painters, pipefitters, sheet-metal workers, and
tool and die makers; unskilled— janitors, porters, and cleaners; ma­
terial handling laborers; and watchmen.
Nearly a third of the office employees in all industries within
the scope of the surveys were employed in the 18 occupations used in
constructing the office workers' index. Less than a tenth of all plant
workers, the majority of whom were unskilled, were employed in the




13 occupations used in computing the indexes for skilled and unskilled
workers. These jobs were not necessarily representative of produc­
tion workers more directly connected with the actual manufacturing,
processing, or of servicing jobs which vary widely among plants and
industries.
A large majority of the skilled maintenance workers
covered by the index was employed in manufacturing establishments,
whereas the unskilled workers were about evenly divided between
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing. A large proportion of the office
workers were employed in nonmanufacturing industries.
Average weekly salaries or average hourly earnings were
computed for each of the selected occupations. The average salaries
or hourly earnings were multiplied by the average employment in
1953 and 1954 in each job in each area.
These weighted earnings
for individual occupations were totaled to obtain an aggregate for each
occupational group. Finally, the ratio of these group aggregates for
a given year to the aggregate for the base period (survey month,
winter 1952-53) was computed and the result multiplied by the base
year index (100) to get the index for the given year.
Adjustments have been made where necessary to maintain
comparability.
For example, in 1959, the new (1957) edition of the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual was adopted in these surveys
introducing certain changes in the classification of establishments by
industry, e. g., the transfer of milk dealers from trade to manufac­
turing. Two aggregates were computed for 1959— one included milk
dealers in manufacturing and the other excluded them.
The latter
aggregate was comparable to the 1958 figures and was used in com­
puting the index for 1959*
The other aggregate will be employed in
making comparisons with I960 figures.
Limitations of the Data
The indexes measure, principally, the effects of (1) general
salary and wage changes; (2) merit or other increases in pay received
by individual workers while in the same job; and (3) changes in the
labor force such as labor turnover, force expansions, force reduc­
tions, and changes in the proportion of workers employed by estab­
lishments with different pay levels. Changes in the labor force can
effect increases or decreases in the occupational averages without
actual wage changes. For example, a force expansion might increase
the proportion of lower paid workers in a specific occupation and re­
sult in a drop in the average, whereas a reduction in the proportion
of lower paid workers would have the opposite effect. The movement
of a high paying establishment out of an area could cause the average
earnings to drop, even though no change in rates occurred in other
area establishments.
The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effects
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the data. Nor are the indexes affected by changes in stand­
ard work schedules or in premium pay for overtime, since they are
based on pay for straight-time hours.

9
Table 1.

W a g e indexes , office and p la n t-a ll industries and manufacturing

(indexes o f average w eekly earnings or average hourly earnings

for s elected occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry divisions in 17 labor m arkets, 2 1954-593)
(1953 = 100)
N ortheast

B o s to n

N ew ark J e r s e y C ity

B u ffa lo

O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

W o m e n o f f ic e w o r k e r s :
— 1954 _
___ ' „ _

1955
_ ___ ___ _____________
1956 __________________________
_________________________
1957
1958
_________________________
1 9 5 9 -----------------------------------------

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

17
41

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

105. 3
115.2

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

106.3
116.7

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s )

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

P h ila d e lp h ia

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s )

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

132.3

13
25
37
61
73

105. 7
109.8
114.0
125.0
129.3

105.9
109.8
113.9
126.2
132.0

12
25
38
50
62
74

104.3
108.0
114.3
120.3
124.5
128.2

105.2
110.2
116.0
122.8
126.4
130.9

12
25
37
49
60
73

107. 1
110.8
114.6
122.0
129.0
134. 1

106.6
111.6
114.6
120.4
127.9
133.3

107.9
117. 1
(4)
131.4

107.8
117.7
( 4)
131.9

13
25
37
61
73

105.2
109.7
111.2
126.1
132. 1

105.2
109.7
111.2
126. 1
132.1

12
25
38
50
62
74

104.2
109.9
115.5
121.1
126.8
131.0

108.0
115.9
121.7
127. 5
134. 1
140.6

12
25
37
49
60
73

107. 1
110.3
115.1
122.2
130.2
134.9

107.9
111.0
116.5
123.6
130. 7
133.9

17
41
( 4)
65

106.7
119.5
( 4)
131.3

106.7
119.5
( 4)
131.0

13
25
37
_
61
73

105.6
109.5
115.4
127.4
132.3

105.5
109.4
115.7
127.6
132.2

12
25
38
50
62
74

104. 5
109.7
113.4
117.7
122.7
128. 1

105.2
109.6
113.2
119.4
124. 1
130.0

12
25
37
49
60
73

107.2
111.9
116.4
122.5
128.8
132.9

107.2
111.4
115.7
122.0
128.2
132.3

17
41
( 4)
65

107.6
118.2
( 4)
132.4

107.8
118.9
(4)
132.7

13
25
37
61
73

107. 1
111.5
118.2
128.4
134.9

107.8
112.3
120. 1
132.2
139.6

12
25
38
50
62
74

105.4
108. 1
113. 5
119.6
125. 1
130.4

106.3
110.3
114. 5
123. 1
129.8
134.8

12
25
37
49
60
73

104.5
109.0
115.5
120.9
128. 1
134.5

103. 3
107.9
113.9
119.0
125.9
132. 1

12
25
42
54
67

105.2
108.3
117.0
123.8
130.3

104.4
106.8
114.6
121.6
127.4

(4)

( 4)

65

128.6

12
25
42
54
67

106.5
108.1
117.7
123.4
130.6

107.2
108.0
117.6
122.4
130.4

17
41
( 4)
65

12
25
42
54
67

105.3
107.2
116.4
122.5
129.1

105.6
107.6
117.1
123.5
130.1

12
25
42
54
67

105. 1
107.6
114.4
119.7
128.2

105.5
108.8
114.2
119.4
128.8

In d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (women):

— rcsi —
. __
___
1955 ______________
_ . _
1956 ______ _____ _ _ _ _
1957
_ _
__ 1958 __________________________
1959 __
___________________

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

N ew Y o r k
C ity

(4)

S k ille d m a in te n a n c e tr a d e s (m e n ):

1 $4
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

______________________ ___
__
_
___ ___ ____
___________________________
____
_
_ _____
_ __
_
_
___
-----------------------------------------

U n s k ille d plant w o r k e r s (m e n ):

— TT54—
___
1955
__
____
__ _
1956
1957 __________________________
__________
1958 ___
_ _

See footnotes at end o f table.




10

Table 1.

W a g e indexes, office and p lan t-all industries and m anufacturing-Continued

(indexes o f average w eekly earnings or average hourly earnings 1 for s e le cte d occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry divisions in 17 labor m arkets, 2 1954-59 3)
(1953 = 100)
South
A t la n ta

B a ltifn o r e

D a lla s

M e m p h is

O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s )

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

M anufa c tu r in g

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s )

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

W o m e n o f f ic e w o r k e r s :

1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

______________ _____________
___________________________
..................................................
___________________________
.................... .. ...........................
............................................

12
24
37
49
62
74

103.0
105.2
111.8
115.6
122. 1
126.9

103.8
105.8
110. 5
116.0
123.9
127.0

30
58
70

112.9
129.7
134.2

114.2
132. 1
139.2

13
25
38
50
62
74

105.6
110.9
115.3
122.0
127. 3
131.6

103. 3
108.4
112.7
118.9
124.4
127.5

12
25
37
49
60
72

104. 1
106.2
113.2
118.0
120.8
125.0

102.3
106.2
110. 7
117.0
122.3
124.4

12
24
37
49
62
74

105.3
109.9
119.8
124.4
131.3
137.4

(5)
108.9
118.5
124.4
131.9
138.5

30
58
70

117.2
132.8
139. 1

116.9
133.8
140.8

13
25
38
50
62
74

9 9 .2
106.8
109.8
117.4
122.7
127.3

9 7 .0
106.7
108. 1
116. 3
122.2
125.9

12
25
37
49
60
72

106. 7
114. 3
121.0
126. 1
130.3
134.5

( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
( 5)

12
24
37
49
62
74

105. 3
108. 3
114. 1
119. 1
126.4
131.5

104.9
108.2
113.6
118.0
126.0
130. 3

30

115.7

116.7

13
25
38
50
62
74

105.9
109.9
115.0
119.4
124.2
131.8

107.0
110.7
114.6
119.3
124. 5
129.5

12
25
37
49
60
72

103. 5
106.5
115.2
121.4
129.0
131.9

101.6
103.9
113.2
118.5
124.8
127. 3

12
24
37
49
62
74

105.9
107.9
122.6
128.6
135.7
137. 1

104.9
106.7
118.9
126.7
136.0
138.8

13
25
38
50
62
74

103.6
107. 1
112. 1
116.6
123.5
130.6

109.5
113.8
115.0
121.5
126.9
130.5

12
25
37
49
60
72

105.2
108.8
117.2
125.6
131.2
132.4

103.4
107.7
111.6
119.7
126.7
128.0

I n d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (w o m e n ):

-----1954
_ __ . ____ _________
1955 _
........................
’1956 ..................................................
1957 _____________________
_ __
1958 ___
_ ___ ___
_____
1959
...............................................
S k ille d m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s (m e n ):
— pres— :
~~
____ __

1955 ______________ _________
1956 ___________________________
1957 ___________________________
1958
- - - - - - - - - - - - -----1959

------------------------------------------

U n s k ille d p lant w o r k e r s (men):
— 1754—
“
____ —
____

1955
1956
1957

_ _____
___________________________
.
_ ~ ”
~
_ ”

1959

............................................

1 58
0

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

58
70

-

30
-

58
70

-

134. 5
141.6

-

115.2
-

140.0
143.6

-

136. 3
143. 7

-

117. 1
-

140.9
145.8

Table 1.

11

W a g e indexes, office and p la n t-a ll industries ancf m anufacturing-Continued

(indexes o f average w eekly earnings or average hourly e a r n in g s 1 for s elected occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry divisions in 17 labor m ark ets, 2 1954-59 3)
(1953 = 100)_____________________
North Central
C h ic a g o

M i n n e a p o li s S t. P a u l

M ilw a u k e e

O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

19 55
IQ 56

1957
19 58
1959

_

_________ _
.... . _______

.......... ...............................

I n d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (w o m e n ):
------ 1 9 5 4 " ~
' T " ________

19 55
1956
19 57
195R
1959

__

___

__

___________
______
................................ —

S k ille d m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s (m e n ):
------ T O ---------------------------------------------------T

1955
1956
19 57
19 58
1959

____
_
_ ___

...................................................

U n s k ille d p la n t w o r k e r s (m e n ):
------ 1T5TZ— K
--------------------------------------

1955
19 57
19 58

1959 . .

. . . . . . . . .

..........................

See footnotes at end o f table




A ll
in d u s t r ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

12
25
37
49
61
73

105.8
109.5
114. 3
120. 5
126. 1
129.9

106.2
109.8
114.4
120.6
127.3
131.0

12

104. 5

105.5

31
( 4)
61
72

110. 1
( 4)
125. 1
128.7

112.6
( 4)
127.2
132.0

12
25
37
49
61
73

105.9
110. 3
116.9
122.8
130.9
135.3

105.9
110. 3
116.9
122.8
130.9
135. 3

12
_
31
( 4)
61
72

105.5
115.0
( 4)
131.5
137.0

105.5

12
25
37
49
61
73

106.3
109.8
115.5
121.3
127.6
133.6

105.8
109.0
115.4
121.7
128.2
134.0

12
_
31

105.9

12
25
37
49
61
73

105.7
109.4
114.4
119.0
124.8
130.6

104.8
107.6
113.0
118.5
124.6
129.3

(4)

61
72

-

113.0
( 4)
128.2
133.2

12

104.6

31

111.1
( 4)
126. 3
131.2

_

(4)

61
72

-

-

115.0
( 4)
131.5
137.0

106.3
113.6
( 4)

128.9
134.2

105.8
-

113.6
(4)

127.5
131.6

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s)

S t.

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

12
24
37
52
62
74

106.3
109.9
114. 1
121.3
125.0
129.2

105.8
109.6
113.3
119.3
122.9
126.7

12
24
37
52
62
74

109.4
114.2
118. 1
124.4
129. 1
133.9

12
24
37
52
62
74

12
24
37
52
62
74

T im e
in te r v a l
(m o n th s )

L o u is

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anu­
fa c tu r in g

13
26
38
(4)
59
70

10$. 7
110. 1
114.7
( 4)
124.0
128.9

105.5
108.8
113.9
(4)
124.3
129.7

109.4
114.8
117.2
123.4
128.9
133.6

13
26
38
(4)
59
70

106.4
109.6
116.8

105.6
109.6
116.8

128.8
136.0

128.8
136.0

106.6
110.2
115.5
121.7
126.7
132.6

106.7
108. 1
113.9
119.7
125. 1
130.2

13
26
38

107. 1
110.5
117.3

107.0
110.0

106.4
111.6
117. 1
124.6
130.9
137.4

105.8
110.9
115.5
121.7
126.7
133.7

(4)

(4 )

l4)

(4)

116.8
(4)

59
70

129.0
134.4

128.5
133.8

13
26
38

108.5
111.7
116.6

107.4
110.2
115.2
(4)
126.7
132.0

(4)

59
70

(4)

127.5
131.5

12

Table 1.

W a g e indexes, office and plant—all industries and m anufacturing—Continued

(In d e x e s o f a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s or a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 f o r s e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n a l g r o u p s stu d ie d in 6 b r o a d in d u s tr y d iv i s io n s in 17 l a b o r m a r k e t s , 2 1 9 5 4 - 5 9 3 )
(1 9 5 3 s 1 0 0 )
W est

L os A n geles Long Beach

Denver
O ccupational group
Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

W om en o ffic e w ork e rs:
—
____
1955 _________________ „________
1956 ___ _____ ______
. .. _
1957 ... ___ ____ _ .
.... _
1958 _ ___
_ _
___
_
1959 ..................... ...................

13
25
37
_
61
73

105.7
108.8
113.3
125.8
130.4

105.8
109.8
116.5
129.7
136. 3

Industrial n urses (wom en):
— 1954
~
"
______________
1955 ____________
____
_
1956
_ _ __
_ _ _
.......................... ...............
1957
1958 ___________________________
1959 .........................
.

Z

13
25
37
61
73

108.0
108.0
115.2
129.6
132.0

(!)
!)
( 5)
<’ )
( s)

Skilled m aintenance trades (men):
— re s ?— : ----------— —
1955 _____________
_________ ______
1956
_
____
1957 __ ________
1958
1959
..............................................

13
25
37
61
73

108. 1
113.0
120.9
135.2
140.6

109.2
112.5
120.0
137.4
142.8

13
25
37
49

U nskilled plant w o rk e rs (men):
— 1953—
: : ___________ ____
1955 _________ _________ _______
1956
_
_
_
_
___
1957
1958 __________________________
1959 ' .1 I.
„
' . -I ” 1

13
25
37
61
73

108.0
114.2
123.8
137.3
145. 1

112.4
118.9
124. 1
141.5
149.3

13
25
37
49

tim e

13
25
37
49

6
1
73

13
25
37
49

6
1
73

6
1
73

6
1
73

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

4
5

I n s u ffic ie n t da ta to m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

NOTE:

D ash es




in d ic a te n ot s u r v e y e d th is

p e rio d .

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

104.6
108.4
113.5
120.5
124.4
130.2

105.2
109.0
113.7
120.2
125.5
131. 1

12
31
43
55
67
79

104.7
110.3
116.0
120.2
126.3
130.3

104. 3
110.0
114.6
120.7
125.3
129. 1

12
24
36
48
60
72

104.4
107.6
112.7
118.3
123.3
129.2

104.5
107.0
112.8
118. 1
123.0
129.3

105.4
108. 1
112.8
119.5
125.5
130.2

106.8
109.5
114.2
120.3
127.0
132.4

12
31
43
55
67
79

101.6
108.5
113.2
115.5
124.0
131.8

100.8
108.6
114. 1
114.8
123.4
131.3

12
24
36
48
60
72

104.3
110.9
113.8
121.0
129.0
136.2

105. 1
111.6
114.5
122.5
130.4
137.7

105.5
108.7
114.8
119.4
125.7
132.5

105.8
108.9
115.2
119.8
126.4
132.7

12
31
43
55
67
79

105.5
109.6
115.0
121.2
128.3
134.0

104.6
109. 6
115. 1
122.3
129.9
135.4

12
24
36
48
60
72

104.0
106.5
110.4
118.6
125.6
132.2

104.0
106.3
110.7
120.1
127.8
134.4

106.0
109.8
113.6
119.6
125.9
132.3

104.9
108.6
112.9
117.9
124.3
129.5

12
31
43
55
67
79

104.9
110.6
113.9
119. 1
125.3
130. 1

105.5
112.5
116.0
121.3
127.7
130.4

12
24
36
48
60
72

106. 1
109.3
113.2
119.4
125.9
133.4

104.2
108. 5
111.6
118.4
124.8
133.5

1 A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s r e l a t e to sta n d a r d s a l a r i e s th at a r e p aid fo r s ta n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s .
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s a r e
an d fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o li d a y s , an d la te s h if t s .
2 D e t r o it , N ew O r le a n s , an d S e a t t le , in c lu d e d in th e c u r r e n t s t u d ie s , w e r e n ot s u r v e y e d in 1 9 5 3 (th e b a s e y e a r o f the in d e x e s ).
3 F i s c a l y e a r s e n d in g June 3 0 .
L im it e d s u r v e y s . D ata w e r e c o l le c t e d o n ly fo r s e le c t e d plant w o r k e r s in m a n u fa c tu r in g in d u s tr ie s in M ilw a u k e e an d f o r plant w o r k e r s

St. L ou is.

San F r a n cis c o Oakland

Portland

s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,

in

m a n u fa c tu r in g

and

p u b lic

e x c lu d in g

u tilit ie s

p r e m iu m

in d u s tr ie s

p ay fo r

in

over­

B u ffa lo

and

Table 2.

13

Percent increases, office and plant—all industries and m anufacturing

(P ercent in crea ses in average weekly earnings or average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry divisions in 20 labor m a rk ets, 1 9 54 -59 2 )
Northeast

Boston

N ewarkJ e rs e y City

Buffalo

O ccupational group
Tim e
interval
(months)

W om en o ffice w ork e rs:
1954 ____________________________
19 55
1956

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

5. 3

6. 3

9 .4
( 3)
11.6

9 .8
( 3)
13.4

12
13

5.2
2 .9

4 .4
2. 3

17

1958 ____________________________
1959 _

17
12
13

8 .0
5 .7
5 .3

7 .3
6. 1
4 .6

24
( 3)
24

Industrial n urses (wom en):
----- TT53________ ___ __________________
19 55

12
13

6 .5
1.5

7 .2
.7

_

_

17

7 .9

7.8

17
12
13

9 .0
4 .8
5.9

8 .9
4. 1
6 .5

24
( 3)
24

8 .6
( 3)
12.2

9 .2
( 3)
12.0

12
13

5.3
1.9

5.6
1.9

_

_

17

6 .7

6 .7

1957 ____________________________
1958 ____________________________
1959 -------------------------------------------

17
12
13

8 .5
5.2
5 .4

8 .9
5 .4
5.3

24
( 3)
24

12.0
( 3)
9 .8

11.9
( 3)
9 .6

U nskilled plant w o rk e rs (men):
----- T9 S3 "
------ ------ --------_
1955
__ _____
1956
_______
1957

12
13

5. 1
2 .4

5 .5
3. 1

_

_

17

7 .6

7.8

17
12
13

6 .3
4 .7
7. 1

5 .0
4 .6
7.9

24
( 3)
24

9 .9
( 3)
12.0

10.4
( 3)
11.6

19 57
19 58

Skilled m aintenance trades frnen):
----- TTO---------------------------------------1955

19 59

See footnotes at end of table,




_

_

_

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

New Y ork
City
Manu­
facturing

13
12
12

5.7
3.9
3.8

5.9
3 .7
3.8

24
12

9 .6
3. 5

10.8
4. 6

13
12
12
_
24
12

5.2
4. 3
1.4

5.2
4. 3
1.4

13.4
4 .7

13
12
12
24
12

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Philadelphia
Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

12
13
13
12
12
12

4. 3
3. 5
5.9
5.2
3. 5
3.0

5.2
4 .7
5.3
5.9
2 .9
3.6

12
13
12
12
11
13

7. 1
3 .4
3 .4
6 .5
5. 7
4 .0

6 .6
4 .6
2 .8
5.1
6.2
4 .2

13.4
4 .7

12
13
13
12
12
12

4 .2
5 .4
5. 1
4 .9
4. 7
3.3

8 .0
7 .4
5.0
4 .8
5. 1
4 .9

12
13
12
12
11
13

7. 1
3.0
4 .3
6 .2
6. 5
3.7

7.9
2 .9
5.0
6. 1
5.7
2 .4

5.6
3 .7
5 .4
10.4
3.9

5. 5
3.7
5.8
10. 3
3.6

12
13
13
12
12
12

4. 5
5.0
3 .4
3.8
4 .3
4 .4

5.2
4 .2
3.2
5 .5
3.9
4 .7

12
13
12
12
11
13

7 .2
4 .4
4 .0
5.2
5.2
3.2

7 .2
3.9
3.8
5 .4
5. 1
3.2

13
12
12

7. 1
4 .2
6 .0

7.8
4. 1
6 .9

24
12

8 .6
5.0

10. 1
5.6

12
13
13
12
12
12

5 .4
2 .6
5.0 •
5. 3
4 .6
4 .2

6 .3
3.8
3.8
7. 5
5. 5
3.9

12
13
12
12
11
13

4. 5
4. 3
6 .0
4 .7
6 .0
5.0

3 .3
4 .5
5 .5
4. 5
5.8
4 .9

_

_

14
Table 2.

Percent increases, office and p la n t-a ll industries and m anufacturing-C ontinued

(P ercen t in cre a se s in average w eekly earnings or average hourly earnings 1 for s e le cte d occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry divisions in 20 labor m arkets, 1954-59 2)
South
Atlanta

B a ltim ore

D allas

New
O rleans

M em phis

Occupational group
Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Tim e
interval
(months)

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

W om en o ffice w ork ers:
r m ---------. . .
_
_
1955 __ _________________ _____
1956
_ ___________
__
1957 ___.
... _ ____________
1958 _____________________
1959 ------------------------------------------

12
12
13
12
13
12

3 .0
2 .2
6 .3
3 .4
5.6
3.9

3.8
1.9
4 .4
5.0
6 .8
2 .5

30
28
12

_
12.9
14.9
3. 5

14.2
15.7
5 .4

13
12
13
12
12
12

5.6
5.0
4 .0
5.8
4 .3
3 .4

3. 3
5.0
3.9
5 .5
4 .6
2 .5

12
13
12
12
11
12

4. 1
2. 1
6 .5
4 .3
2 .4
3 .4

2 .3
3.9
4 .7
5.6
4 .6
1.8

24
_
27
12

10.2
_
8 .0
_
13.4
2 .7

11.4
_
8. 1
_
12.4
1. 1

Industrial nurses (women):
— 1 $ 5 _________ — r ____
.
1955
....................................
1956 ___________________________
1957 _________________________ __
1958 ___ ”
_____ "_ —
...............................................
1959

12
12
13
12
13
12

5 .3
4 .3
9 .0
3.8
5 .5
4 .7

( 4)
( 4)
8 .8
5.0
6 .0
5.1

30
28
12

17.2
13. 3
4 .7

16.9
_
14.5
5.2

13
12
13
12
12
12

( 4)
7. *
2 .8
6 .9
4 .5
3.7

(4)
9 .9
1.4
7 .5
5. 1
3.0

12
13
12
12
11
12

6 .7
7. 1
5.9
4 .2
3 .3
3.2

l 4)
l 4)
( 4)
(4)
l 4)
( 4)

23
_
24
_
27
12

2 3 .8
_
8 .5
13.5
5.6

2 5 .7
_
8 .3
16.1
4 .8

Skilled maintenance trades (mei^):
1^4
........... | _
1955 .
. . . I ____
__ _ _
1956 _________
1957
_
_ _ _ _ _
1958
...................
1959 .........................

12
12
13
12
13
12

5.3
2 .9
5 .4
4 .3
6 .2
4 .0

4 .9
3. 1
5.0
3.9
6 :8
3 .4

30

-

13
12
13
12
12
12

5.9
3.8
4 .6
3 .4
4 .4
6. 1

7 .0
3 .5
3.5
4 .2
4 .4
4 .0

12
13
12
12
11
12

3 .5
3.0
8. 1
5 .4
6 .3
2 .3

1.6
2 .3
8 .9
4 .8
5 .4
1.9

24

27
12

2 1.8
9 .0
15.2
5.2

22.2

28
12

16.7
16.8
5 .4

23

15. 7
16. 3
5. 3

U nskilled plant w o rk e rs (men):
— rm — _
----------------.
1955 ______ _ _ _ _ _ _
1956
_
_ ___ ____
1957
___ _
_ __ _______ __
1958 ___________________________
1959

12
12
13
12
13
12

5.9
1. 8
13.6
4 .9
5.6
1.0

4 .9
1. 7
11.4
6 .6
7. 3
2. 1

30
-

15.2
-

17. 1
-

13
12
13
12
12
12

3.6
3. 3
4 .7
4 .0
5.9
5.7

9 .5
4 .0
1. 1
5 .7
4 .4
2 .8

12
13
12
12
11
12

5.2
3 .5
7 .7
7.2
4. 5
.9

3 .4
4 .2
3.6
7 .3
5.8
1.0

23
_
24

10.7
6 .0

4 .7
8 .7

27
12

18. 1
4 .2

—

See footnotes at end o f table,




-

-

28
12

-

2 1 .6
2. 5

-

2 0 .3
3 .5

23

_

_
_

_

-

-

7.6
16.4
6 .6

-

15.2
4 .8

Table 2.

15

Percent increases, office and plant-all industries ancj manufacturing-Continued

(P ercen t in cre a se s in average w eekly earnings or average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry divisions in 20 labor markets^ 1954-59 i )
North Central

Chicago

Detroit

Minneapolis
S Paul
t.

Milwaukee

Occupational group
Time
All
interval
(months) industries

W o m e n office workers:
1954 ...
1955 ___ ___ ____
1956
_
1957 ___ __
1958
_ _______ 1959
__
____

Manu­
facturing

Time
interval
(months)

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Time
interval
(months)

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Time
interval
(months)

All
industries

St. Louis
Manu­
facturing

Time
interval
(months)

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

12
13
12
i2
12
12

5.8
3.6
4 .3
5 .4
4 .7
3.0

6 .2
3 .4
4 .2
5 .4
5 .5
3.0

22
_
24
39

11.8
_
7 .5
_
19.8

12.0
7. 1
23. 3

12
_
19
( 3)
30
11

4 .5
_
5.3
( 3)
13.6
2.9

5 .5
6 .7
( 3)
13.0
3.8

12
12
13
15
10
12

6 .3
3.3
3.8
6 .3
3.0
3 .4

5.8
3.6
3 .4
5 .3
3 .0
3. 1

13
13
12
( 3)
21
11

5.7
4 .2
4 .2
( 3)
8 .1
4 .0

9 .1
4 .3

12
13
12
12
12
12

5.9
4 .2
6 .0
5.0
6 .6
3.4

5.9
4 .2
6 .0
5.0
6 .6
3 .4

22
_
24
_
39

10.2
_
7.9
20.2

10. 1
_
7.9
20.7

12
_
19
( 3)
30
11

5 .5
_
9 .0
( 3)
14.4
4 .2

5 .5
9 .0
( 3)
14.4
4.2

12
12
13
15
10
12

9 .4
4 .3
3 .4
5.3
3.8
3 .7

9 .4
5.0
2 .0
5 .3
4 .4
3.6

13
13
12
( 3)
21
11

6 .4
3.0
6 .6
( 3)
10.3
5.6

5.6
3.8
6 .6
( 3)
10.3
5.6

12
13
12
12
12
12

6 .3
3. 3
5. 1
5.0
5.3
4 .7

5.8
3. 1
5 .8
5.5
5 .3
4 .6

22
24
39

11.0
8 .3
17.0

11.1
8 .1
17.2

12
19
( 3)
30
11

5.9
6 .7
( 3)
13.5
3.9

6 .3
6 .9
( 3)
13.4
4 .2

12
12
13
15
10
12

6 .6
3.3
4 .9
5 .3
4. 1
4 .6

6 .7
1.4
5 .4
5.1
4 .4
4. 1

13
13
12
( 3)
21
11

7.1
3.2
6 .1
( 3)
10.0
4 .2

7.0
2 .9
6 .2
l 3)
10.0
4 .1

12
13
12
12
12
12

5.7
3.5
4 .6
4 .0
4 .9
4 .6

4 .8
2 .7
5.0
4 .9
5. 1
3.8

22
24
39

10.0
6 .2
15.8

8 .0
6 .4
17.6

12
19
( 3)
30

4 .6
6 .2
( 3)
13.7
3.8

5.8
7 .4
( 3)
12.3
3.2

12
12
13
15
10
12

6 .4
4 .9
4 .9
6 .4
5.2
4 .9

5 .8
4 .8
4 .2
5 .4
4. 1
5 .5

13
13
12
( 3)
21

8 .5
3.0
4 .4
( 3)
9 .4
3.2

7 .4
2 .6
4 .6
l 3)
10.0
4 .2

5 .5
3. 1
4 .8

l3)

Industrial nurses (women):
-----FT54-------------------- T — T __ . _
1955
_ ________
1956 ____________
_
_____
1957 __________________________
1958
_ ’
___
.......................
1959 -

Skilled maintenance trades (men):

— 1335---------------~
1955 . ____________ _ _ ____
1956 _
____ _________ _
1957 . _______________________
1958
.............................
1959
.
_
. .

Unskilled plant workers (men):
— T954—
I -------------------.
1955 ____ ______ __________ ____
19 56 _____ _______ _
1957 ___
1958 ______________ ____________
1959
.......................... ..

See footnotes at end o f table,




11

11

16

Table 2

Percent increases, office and plant-al| industries and manufacturing-Continued

(P ercen t in cre a s e s in average w eekly earnings or average hourly earnings

for selected occupational groups studied in 6 broad industry division s in 20 labor m ark ets, 1954-59 2)
W est

Los AngelesLong Beach

Denver
Occupational group
Time
interval
(months)

Manu­
All
industries facturing

San FranciscoOakland

Portland

Time
interval
(months)

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Time
interval
(months)

All
Manu­
industries ; facturing

Time
All
interval
(months) ! industries

Seattle

Time
Manu­
interval
facturing (months)

W o m e n office workers:
-----fT O
' ____
____
_ ________ _ _
_
1955
1956 _________________ _
_
1957 ______________________
1958
1959
............ ........

13
12
12
24
12

5.7
2.9
4.2
11.0
3.6

5.8
3.8
6.1
11.3
5. 1

13
12
12
12
12
12

4.6
3.6
4.7
6.2
3.3
4.6

5.2
3.6
4.3
5.8
4.4
4.5

12
19
12
12
12
12

4.7
5.4
5.2
3.6
5.1
3.2

4. 3
5.6
4.0
5.3
3.8
3. 1

12
12
12
12
12
12

4.4
3.0
4.8
5.0
4.2
4.8

4.5
2.4
5.4
4.7
4.2
5. 1

_
_
_
59
12
12

Industrial nurses (women):
___ ___ ______ ______
1955 ___________
___
1956 ___________ _ _ __
_
1957 _______
_
_ ..
..
1958 ......................
1959
..................

13
12
12
_
24

8.0
0
6.7
12.5

(4)
( 4)
( 4)

5.4
2.5
4. 3
6.0
5. 1

6.8
2.5
4.3
5.3
5.6

12
19
12
12
12

1.6
6.9
4.3
2. 1
7.4

.8
7.8
5.0
.7
7.5

12
12
12
12
12

4.3
6.3
2.6
6.4
6.6

5 1
.
6.2
2.6
7.0
6.5

_
_
59
12

12

1.9

(4)
( 4)

13
12
12
12
12
12

3.7

4. 3

12

6 .3

6. 3

12

5.6

5.6

13
12
12

8. 1
4 .5
7 .0

9 .2
3.1
6 .6

13
12
12
12
12
12

5.5
3.0
5.6
4 .0
5 .3
5.3

5.8
2 .9
5.8
4 .0
5 .5
5.0

12
19
12
12
12
12

5 .5
3.9
4 .9
5 .5
5.8
4 .4

4 .6
4 .7
5. 1
6 .2
6 .2
4 .2

12
12
12
12
12
12

4 .0
2 .4
3 .7
7 .5
5.9
5.3

4 .0
2 .2
4. 1
8 .5
6 .4
5. 1

13
12
12
12
12
12

6 .0
3.6
3 .4
5 .3
5.2
5. 1

4 .9
3 .5
3.9
4 .4
5 .4
4 .2

12
19
12
12
12
12

4 .9
5 .4
3.0
4 .6
5.2
3.8

5. 5
6 .7
3. 1
4 .6
5. 3
2. 1

12
12
12
12
12
12

6. 1
3.0
4 .4
5 .5
5 .4
5.9

4 .2
4 .2
4. 3
6 .0
5 .5
6 .9

— 1954

Skilled maintenance trades (men):
:~i
—
__
...............................................
1955
1956 ___________
__ _
1957 _______
__ __
1958
..............................................
1959
.....................

— 1954

U nskilled plant w ork e rs (men):
1954 ___ _
....................
..
19 55 ______________________
1956
___
_ _ __
_
19 57 __
1958
. . .
.......................
1959 ..................................................

_

-

24
12

11.8
4 .0

14.5
4 .0

13
12
12

8 .0
5.7
8 .4

12.4
5.8
4 .3

_

-

24
12

10.9
5 .7

-

14.0
5.5

All
industries

_
_
_
23.6
5.0
4.9

Manu­
facturing

_
_
_
22.2
3.9
5.3

_
_
_

_
_
_

12

( 4)
l 4)
( 4)

(4)
( 4)
( 4)

-

_
_

_
_
_

59
12
12

21 .0
4 .7
5.2

20 .8
4.0
5.9

-

_

_
_

59
12
12

2 3.0
4 .9
5 .7

15.2
5 .3
5 .5

1 A verage w eekly earnings rela te to standard sala rie s that are paid for standard w ork schedules.
A verage hourly earnings are straigh t-tim e hourly earnings, excluding prem ium pay for o v e r ­
tim e and for w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
a F is c a l years ending June 30.
3 L im ited survey.
Data w ere co lle c te d only for s e le cte d plant w o rk e rs in m anufacturing industries in Milwaukee and for plant w ork ers in manufacturing and public utilities industries in Buffalo
and St. L ou is.
Insufficient data to m eet publication c r ite r ia .

4

NOTE:

Dashes indicate not surveyed this period.




17
Wage Differences Among Labor Markets

The m agnitude o f w age d iffe r e n c e s betw een any two o f the
a r e a s stu d ied v a r ie d som ew h a t am ong o c c u p a tio n s , and, in so m e c a s e s ,
b etw een m en and w om en in the sa m e o c cu p a tio n .
A v e ra g e pay fo r
m en p a y r o ll c le r k s in P h ila d elp h ia , fo r e x a m p le , e x c e e d e d that in
New Y o rk C ity b y i}>7 a w eek , w h erea s w om en p a y r o ll c le r k s in New
Y o rk C ity a v e r a g e d $ 8 .5 0 a w eek m o r e than th e ir c o u n te rp a rts in
P h ila d e lp h ia .
S im ila r ly , su ch s k ille d m a in ten an ce w o r k e r s as a u to ­
m otiv e m e c h a n ic s , c a r p e n t e r s , and p a in ters had h igh er a v e ra g e pay
in C h ica g o than in D e tr o it although the r e v e r s e r e la tio n s h ip w as n oted
fo r e le c t r ic ia n s , m a c h in is ts , and m e c h a n ics r e p a ir in g n on au tom otive
equ ip m en t. T h e r e fo r e , to get a m o r e r e p re s e n ta tiv e in d ic a to r o f in t e r ­
a r e a w age d iffe r e n c e s , a r e a e s tim a te s w ere c o n s tr u c te d fo r g rou p s o f
w o r k e r s in o f f ic e , s k ille d m a in ten a n ce, c u s to d ia l, and m a te r ia l m o v e ­
m en t j o b s . 10 In te ra re a wage d iffe r e n c e s fo r th ese grou p s o f w o rk e r s
w ill not n e c e s s a r ily a g r e e with m e a s u r e s b a s e d o n a v e r a g e s f o r b r o a d e r
g rou p s o f w o r k e r s o r occu p a tio n a l a v e r a g e s fo r a s p e c ific in d u stry .
The u se o f data fo r the sa m e jo b s in ea ch la b o r m a rk e t, t o ­
g eth er w ith the assu m p tion o f a con sta n t em p lo y m e n t re la tio n s h ip
b etw een jo b s in a ll m a rk e ts elim in a te s in te r a r e a d iffe r e n c e s in o c c u ­
pation al c o m p o s itio n as a fa c to r in exam in in g pay le v e ls . In d u stria l
c o m p o s itio n , h o w e v e r , v a r ie s su b sta n tia lly am ong la b o r m a r k e ts , p a r ­
t ic u la r ly in m a n u fa ctu rin g . T h is type o f v a r ia tio n is n e c e s s a r ily r e ­
fle c t e d in the a r e a e s t im a te s .
M ethod o f C om putin g A r e a R e la tiv e s
The fo llo w in g m eth od w as u sed in com pu tin g the data u se d in
the c o m p a r is o n s .
A g g r e g a te s fo r a ll in d u str ie s c o m b in e d and fo r
m a n u factu rin g and n on m an u fa ctu rin g s e p a r a te ly fo r e a ch a r e a w ere
com p u ted b y m u ltip ly in g the a v e ra g e stan dard w eek ly s a la ry fo r ea ch
o f 18 o ffic e jo b s and the a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly ea rn in g s (e x ­
clu d in g p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and n igh tw ork) f o r ea ch o f 17 plant
jo b s by e stim a te d total e m p lo y m e n t in the jo b in all in d u str ie s and
a r e a s co m b in e d .

F o r p u rp o s e s o f this c o m p a r is o n , a g g re g a te s f o r e a ch o c c u ­
pation al and in d u stry grou p a re e x p r e s s e d as p e r ce n ta g e s o f lik e
g rou p s in New Y o rk C ity , a d ju sted f o r d iffe r e n c e s in s u r v e y tim in g .
W age data f o r New Y o r k C ity re la te to A p r il 1959, as do th ose fo r
C h ic a g o , M ilw au k ee, and P o r tla n d .
The oth er 16 a r e a s w e re s u r ­
v e y e d during the fo llo w in g m on th s:
1958

August:
Baltimore
Seattle
September:
Buffalo
October:
Boston
Dallas
St. Louis
November:
Philadelphia
December:
Denver
Newark-Jersey City

1959

January:
Detroit
Memphis
MinneapolisSt. Paul
San FranciscoOakland
February:
New Orleans
March:
Los AngelesLong Beach
May:
Atlanta

The ad ju stm en t f o r tim in g d iffe r e n c e s a s su m e d that N ew Y o rk C ity
w ages in c r e a s e d u n ifo r m ly o v e r the 12 m onths betw een annual stu d ies
and that an in te rm e d ia te le v e l fo r any in terv en in g m onth c o u ld be o b ­
tain ed by adding the e stim a te d w age in c r e m e n t to A p r il 1958 pay le v e ls .
The c o m p a r is o n s in the p r e se n t study a re c o m p a r a b le w ith a n a ly ses
m ade in the 19 5 6 -5 7 and 1 9 5 7 -5 8 stu d ies but n ot w ith the u nadju sted
com p u ta tion s p u blish ed fo r e a r lie r y e a r s .
In te r a r e a C o m p a r is o n s

J ob G r o u p s . — O ffice c l e r i c a l pay in D e tr o it w as 113 p e r ce n t
o f the New Y o rk C ity le v e l (table 3); L.os A n g e le s -L o n g B e a ch , San
10
The o ffic e o c cu p a tio n s c o v e r e d 5 m e n 's and 13 w o m e n 's r a n c is c o -O a k la n d , and C h ica g o w e re 108, 107, and 106 p e r c e n t, r e ­
F
jo b s :
M en— c le r k s , a cco u n tin g , c la s s A and B; o r d e r c le r k s ; o ffic e
s p e c t iv e ly , o f the New Y ork C ity l e v e l . 11 In B u ffa lo , M ilw au k ee,
b o y s ; ta b u la tin g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ; w om en — b i l l e r s , m a ch in e (b illin g
N e w a r k -J e r s e y C ity , P o r tla n d , and S eattle it did not d iffe r s ig n ifi­
m a ch in e); b o o k k e e p in g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s , c la s s B; C o m p to m e te r o p ­
ca n tly fr o m that in New Y o rk C ity . P a y r e la t iv e s in eig h t oth er a r e a s
e r a t o r s ; c le r k s , a ccou n tin g , c la s s A and B; c le r k s , f i l e , c la s s B ;
w ere c lu s t e r e d at 9 1 -9 5 p e r ce n t o f N ew Y o rk C ity pay, and b e lo w
c le r k s , p a y r o ll; k e y -p u n ch o p e r a t o r s ; s e c r e t a r ie s ; ste n o g r a p h e rs , g en ­
90 p e r ce n t in M em p h is and New O r le a n s .
e r a l; sw itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r s ; ty p is ts , c la s s A and B . The plant jo b s
in clu d ed 6 m ain ten an ce tr a d e s , 4 c u s to d ia l and 7 m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t
jo b s :
M ain ten an ce— a u tom otive m e c h a n ic s , c a r p e n t e r s , e le c t r ic ia n s ,
11
If c o m p a r is o n s w e re b a s e d o n a v e ra g e h o u rly ea rn in g s in stea d
m a c h in is ts , m e c h a n ic s , and p a in te rs ; c u s to d ia l— g u a rd s, ja n it o r s ,
o f a v e ra g e w eek ly s a la r ie s , New Y o rk C ity w ould rank s e c o n d am ong
ja n it r e s s e s , and w atch m en ; m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t— fo r k lift o p e r a t o r s ;
th ese a r e a s . G e n e r a l ste n o g r a p h e r s , f o r e x a m p le , a v e r a g e d a 3 6-h ou r
m a te r ia l handling la b o r e r s ; o r d e r f i l l e r s ; p a c k e r s , sh ipping; shipping
w eek in New Y o rk C ity ; they a v e r a g e d fr o m 38. 5 to 39* 5 h ou rs in
and r e c e iv in g c le r k s ; and t r u c k d r iv e r s , m ed iu m and heavy t r a ile r ty pe.
the 4 a r e a s with the h ig h e st sa la ry le v e ls .




18

S k illed m a in ten an ce w o r k e r s w e re a ls o h ig h est paid in D e tr o it
(115 p erp en t o f New Y o r k C ity ) with r e la t iv e s o f 109 o r h ig h e r a lso
r e c o r d e d in th ree W est C o a s t a r e a s and in C h ic a g o . The pay r e l a ­
tive f o r St. L o u is w as 108 c o m p a r e d w ith 107 in B u ffa lo , M ilw au k ee,
and S e a ttle , and 105 in M in n e a p o lis -S t. P au l and N e w a r k -J e r s e y C ity .
B a ltim o r e , D e n v e r, and P h ila d e lp h ia w e re g rou p ed at 101. A m on g the
fiv e a r e a s in w h ich s k ille d m a in ten an ce w o r k e r s a v e r a g e d le s s than the
N ew Y o r k C ity le v e l, B o s to n and N ew O rle a n s w e re at the 9 5 -p e r c e n t
poin t and A tlan ta , D a lla s , and M em p h is at the 8 9 -9 1 le v e l.
C u stod ia l w o r k e r s ' and m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t w o r k e r s ' pay r e ­
la tiv e s com p u ted on an a ll-in d u s tr y b a s is d iffe r e d fr o m th ose fo r
s k ille d m a in ten an ce w o r k e r s both in ranking o f a r e a s and in the m a g ­
nitude o f the w age d iffe r e n tia l b etw een the h ig h e st and lo w e s t w age
a r e a s . W h erea s C h ic a g o , f o r e x a m p le , ran ked th ird h ig h est in sk ille d
m a in ten an ce w o r k e r pay, th is a r e a ran k ed eighth and tenth in pay
le v e ls fo r c u s to d ia l and m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t w o r k e r s , r e s p e c t iv e ly .
B y way o f c o n t r a s t w ith the 29 p e r c e n t d iffe r e n c e in pay f o r the m a in ­
ten an ce g rou p betw een the h ig h est and lo w e s t w age a r e a s , the m a x i­
m u m w age s p re a d f o r c u s to d ia l w o r k e r s am oun ted to 92 p e r c e n t and
f o r m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t w o r k e r s to 58 p e r c e n t. E x clu d in g the 5 a r e a s
in the South, the m a x im u m w age d iffe r e n c e s am ong the 15 o th e r a re a s
ra n g ed on ly fr o m 21 p e r ce n t f o r the m a in ten an ce g rou p to 25 p e r ce n t
f o r the c u s to d ia l g ro u p .
In du stry G r o u p s . — P a y re la tio n s h ip s a re show n s e p a r a te ly fo r
m a n u factu rin g and n on m an u fa ctu rin g in ta b les 3 and 4 .
F o r a few
a r e a s , unusual v a r ia tio n w as n oted in the pay r e la tiv e v a lu es and rank
p o s itio n am on g jo b g rou p s in the m an u factu rin g and n on m an u fa ctu rin g
d iv is io n s . O ffic e w o r k e r s in m an u factu rin g in D e tr o it h eld a d is tin c t
s a la r y advantage o v e r th eir c o u n te r p a r ts in oth er c it ie s ; in nonm anu­
fa c tu r in g , h o w e v e r, D e tr o it o ffic e pay w as e x c e e d e d by C h ic a g o , L os
A n g e le s -L o n g B e a ch , and San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d . E v en m o r e strik in g
is the v a r ia tio n in the r e la tiv e pay p o s itio n o f cu s to d ia l w o r k e r s in
D e tr o it; in m a n u fa ctu rin g , th ey ran ked se c o n d to San F r a n cis c o -O a k la n d ;




w h erea s in n on m an u fa ctu rin g D e tr o it c u s to d ia l w o r k e r s a v e r a g e d on ly
91 p e r c e n t o f N ew Y o rk C ity pay and ran ked ninth am ong the 20 a r e a s .
S im ila r ly , m a in ten an ce w o r k e r s in C h ica g o ran ked f i r s t in nonm anu­
fa ctu rin g but 6 p e rce n ta g e poin ts b e lo w D e tr o it and San F r a n c is c o O akland in the m a tter o f m a n u fa ctu rin g pay.
The m a x im u m w age d iffe r e n c e (as m e a s u r e d in p erce n ta g e
t e r m s ) am ong the a r e a s stu d ied w as g r e a te r f o r o ffic e w o r k e r s in
m a n u factu rin g than in n on m an u fa ctu rin g.
F o r s k ille d m a in ten an ce
and c u s to d ia l w o r k e r s , the m a x im u m d iffe r e n tia ls w e re su bsta n tially
g r e a te r in n on m an u fa ctu rin g; m a xim u m d iffe r e n tia ls fo r the m a te r ia l
m o v e m e n t g rou p w e re about the sam e in the two b r o a d in d u stry
d iv is io n s .
B a s e d on data fo r the y e a r s 1954 and 1959, the pay r e la tiv e s
and rank fo r so m e a r e a s and jo b g rou p s have ch a n g ed su ffic ie n tly to
w a rra n t m en tion h e r e . 12 A lthough New Y o rk C ity o ffic e pay w as tied
f o r fifth p o s itio n in 1954 and 1959, pay r e la tiv e s in 11 o f the 18 oth er
a r e a s w e re fr o m 1 to 3 points h igh er in the c u r r e n t p e r io d than
in 1954. S k ille d m ain ten an ce w o r k e r pay r e la t iv e s had a ls o in c r e a s e d
in m o s t a r e a s with the g r e a te s t r is e (6 p oin ts) n oted in B u ffa lo , D en ­
v e r , and B a ltim o r e , and a 5 -p o in t r is e r e c o r d e d in St. L o u is and
N ew O r le a n s . E a ch o f th ese 5 a r e a s a d va n ced 2 o r 3 p o s itio n s in the
ranking o f the 19 a r e a s .
St. L o u is , fo r e x a m p le , ran ked ninth in
1954 and sixth in 1959 in the pay le v e l fo r m a in ten an ce w o r k e r s . C u s ­
to d ia l w o r k e r pay r e la t iv e s sh ow ed le s s change b etw een the 1954 and
1959 s tu d ie s .
O f the 10 a r e a s in w h ich pay d e c lin e d r e la tiv e to the
New Y o rk C ity le v e l, P o r tla n d sh ow ed the g r e a te s t sh ift— fr o m a tie
f o r th ird in 1954 to eighth p la ce in 1959.

12
F o r ex a m in a tion o f tr e n d s , pay r e la t iv e s w e re a d ju sted fo r
tim in g d iffe r e n c e s ; data fo r 17 a r e a s re la te to 1954 and fo r B a ltim o r e
and B u ffa lo to 1955.
S ea ttle w as n ot stu d ied in eith er y e a r .

Table 3.

19

Interarea pay comparisons, office workers

(R elative pay le v e ls for o ffice w o rk e rs in 20 labor m arkets by industry d ivision and sex, w inter 1958-59)
r

v/ixy ~ iv u ;

A ll industries
L abor m arket

Northeast:
B oston

98
115
106
100
101

90
98
98
100
93

90
103
98
100
94

98
117
106
100
98

89
101
97
100
93

98
105
100
97
93

91
92
92
83
87

94
99
96
85
88

98
104
105
96
93

113
123
111
103
104

105
112
96
90
94

103
117
98
89
95

94
108
99
107
102

------

Los Angeles-Long Beach
Portland _ ______ _ _ _
_
_
San Francisco-Oakland _
S eattle_________________

Men
and
wom en

106
113
98
91
95

__________
Chicago "
Detroit _________________

Milwaukee ---------Minneapolis-St. P a u l _
_
St. Louis ______________
West:

W om en

92
93
93
84
87

_________________

Baltimore
D a lla s _________________
M e m p h is _____ __ ______
New O r le a n s ___________
North Central:

Denver

Nonmanufacturing

Men

91
100
99
100
94

___

Buffalo ___________ , ____.
_
Newark-Jersey City
New York City _________
Philadelphia ___________
South:
Atlanta

Manufac tur ing

Men
and
w om en

98
113
114
114
113

94
107
97
106
101

96
108
97
110
105

Table 4.

Men

M en
and
w om en

W om en

91
90
97

97
103
104

91

98

94
98
95
84
88

92
89
91
83

98

112
126
no
99
106

102
116
96
88
93

105
103
93
92
93

98
112
106
118
117

96
107
95
109
104

100

90
89
96

100

100
90
91
87
90
81
87

102
97
96
92

111
116
106

104

102

104

92
90
92

98
113
119

93
105

102

93

106
100

100

110
112

105

99

104
98

Interarea pay comparisons, plant workers

(R elative pay le v e ls fo r plant w o rk e rs in 20 labor m arkets by industry d ivision and w ork c a te g ory , w inter 1958 - 59)
(New Y ork = 100)
Manufa c tur ing

A ll industries
M aintenance,
custodial,
and
M aintenance'
m aterial
m ovem ent

Labor m arket

Northeast:
--------frnatnn
Buffalo
1M»war1r-.Tf>rflf>y f.ity
New Y ork City
TShilarinlpfcia
South:
Atlanta
B altim ore
D allas
M em phis
New O rleans
North Central:
C hicago
D etroit
Milwaukee
M in neapolis-St. Paul
St. Louis
W est:
Denver
L os A n g eles-L o n g B each
P ortland
Seattle




----

__

Custodial

M aterial
m ovem ent

M aintenance,
custodial,
M aintenance
and
m ater ial
m ovem ent

Nonmanufac tur ing

Custodial

M aterial
m ovem ent

M aintenance,
cu stodial,
M aintenance
and
m aterial
m ovem ent

Custodial

M aterial
m ovem ent

94
108
108
100
99

_

_

_ _

95
107
105
100
101

95
111
105
100
95

93
107
no
100
99

94
108
109
100
98

93
104
102
100
98

102
118
no
100
104

90
105
111
100
96

93
101
107
100
98

96
106
115
100
105

88
89
96
100
85

95
104
109
100
102

82
94
80
77
75

91
101
90
89
95

75
87
76
72
62

81
94
78
73
73

81
95
83
78
80

87
99
87
85
93

87
101
89
83
88

75
91
78
72
70

81
87
78
72
74

93
95
87
81
94

66
72
67
63
57

83
92
79
74
75

106
113
106
105
102

112
115
107
105
108

104
114
105
102
96

104
112
107
106
103

103
115
105
103
103

105
111
103
100
104

108
126
111
108
107

100
111
102
100
100

109
105
104
107
99

119
113
no
113
no

100
91
87
95
77

109
no
111
no
106

98
109
106
116
108

101
109
109
114
107

95
109
103
119
no

98
109
106
115
107

98
107
103
116
107

98
104
104
111
102

106
116
108
127
115

95
104
100
113
105

98
no
108

105
113
114
114
111

85
102
98
114
104

101
114
111
118
109

116

108

20

Occupational Earnings

O ccu p a tion a l pay d iffe r e d w id e ly am on g and w ithin a r e a s . In
v e r y few jo b s and a r e a s w e re e a rn in g s o f in div idu al w o r k e r s in the
jo b c o n c e n tra te d arou n d the a v e r a g e ; th ese e x ce p tio n s w e re n oted in
a few o f the s k ille d m a in ten an ce tra d e s in a r e a s with la r g e n u m b ers
o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y c o lle c t iv e ba rg a in in g a g r e e m e n ts .
The w ide
d is p e r s io n o f in div idu al ra te s ty p ic a l in c o m p o s ite d is trib u tio n s o f
m a rk etw id e o c cu p a tio n a l pay r a te s should be kept in m in d in view in g
the e stim a te s in the fo llo w in g tex t and ta b les A - l to A - 16, in c lu s iv e .
O ffic e O ccu p a tion s
In the 1 9 5 8 -5 9 s u r v e y s , pay le v e ls in 23 w o m e n 's o ffic e o c c u ­
pations and 6 m e n 's o c cu p a tio n s w e re stu d ied . A m ong th e se , s e c r e t a ­
r ie s and g e n e r a l ste n o g r a p h e rs w e re n u m e r ic a lly am ong the m o s t
im p orta n t w o m e n 's o ffic e jo b s .
A m on g the la tte r , s e c r e t a r ie s had
the h ig h est a v e ra g e w eek ly s a la r ie s in 18 o f the 20 a r e a s ; th eir a v ­
e r a g e s a la r ie s ra n ged fr o m $ 6 8 .5 0 in M em ph is to $ 9 4 .5 0 in D e tr o it
(table A - l ) . N e a rly tw o -fifth s o f the s e c r e t a r ie s in the 20 a r e a s c o m ­
b in ed w e re earn in g $90 o r m o r e a w eek . The p r o p o r tio n w ith s a la r ie s
o f $90 o r m o r e ra n ged fr o m a tenth in M em p h is to m o r e than th ree fifth s in D e tr o it.
W om en a ccou n tin g c le r k s (c la s s A ) had a v e ra g e
s a la r ie s that w e re fr o m 50 cen ts to $ 8 .5 0 lo w e r than th ose o f s e c ­
r e t a r ie s in all a r e a s e x c e p t M em p h is w h ere a ccou n tin g c le r k s a v e r a g e d
50 cen ts a w eek m o r e ($ 6 9 ).
D iffe r e n c e s b etw een the s a la r ie s o f
s e c r e t a r ie s and g e n e r a l s te n o g r a p h e rs ran ged fr o m $ 8 .5 0 in M em ph is
to $1 7 in M ilw au kee and New Y o rk C ity . S a la rie s o f ste n o g ra p h e rs
ran ged fr o m $60 in M em ph is to $85 in D e tr o it. A bout tw o -fifth s o f
the s te n o g r a p h e rs in the 20 a r e a s c o m b in e d w e re ea rn in g $75 o r m o r e
a w eek .
A m on g the lo w e r paid w om en o ffic e jo b s , a v era g e s a la r ie s
o f o ffic e g ir ls ra n ged fr o m $ 4 0 .5 0 in New O rlea n s to $ 6 1 .5 0 in
D e tr o it.
T h ey a v e r a g e d o v e r $50 a w eek in 11 o f the 20 a r e a s
(table A - l ) .
A m on g 6 o ffic e jo b s in w h ich m en a ls o w e re stu d ied , c la s s
A accou n tin g c le r k s had the h ig h e st w eek ly s a la r ie s in 15 o f the
20 a r e a s , a v era g in g fr o m $88 in B o s to n to $ 1 1 2 .5 0 in D e tr o it.
In
14 o f the 20 a r e a s , they a v e r a g e d $94 o r m o r e a w eek .
A v e ra g e
s a la r ie s f o r this jo b w e re e x c e e d e d by the a v e r a g e s f o r p a y r o ll c le r k s
in B u ffa lo , B a ltim o r e , and in the L o s A n g e le s -L o n g B ea ch a r e a .
T a b u la tin g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s in P o rtla n d a v e r a g e d 50 cen ts m o r e a
w eek and in San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d m en o r d e r c le r k s had a v era g e
s a la r ie s equ al to th ose o f the c la s s A a ccou n tin g c le r k s .
P r o fe s s io n a l and T e c h n ic a l O ccu p a tion s

The

h ig h e s t

te c h n ic a l c a t e g o r ie s




area

averages

am ong

s tu d ie d in 1 9 5 8 -5 9 w e r e

th e

fiv e

p r o fe s s io n a l

fo r d r a fts m e n

le a d e r s

and
and

r a n g e d fr o m $ 1 2 0 .5 0 in D a lla s to $ 1 6 6 .5 0 in N ew Y o rk C ity . S a la ­
r ie s o f d r a fts m e n le a d e r s e x c e e d e d th ose o f s e n io r d ra fts m e n by about
$ 2 9 , on the a v e r a g e ; the d iffe r e n c e b etw een s a la r ie s o f ju n io r and
s e n io r d r a fts m e n a ls o a v e r a g e d about $ 2 9 .
W eek ly pay o f in d u stria l n u r s e s — the on ly p r o fe s s io n in w hich
w o m e n 's ea rn in g s w e r e stu d ied— ra n ged fr o m $80 in M em p h is to $98
in D e tr o it. T h e ir s a la r ie s e x c e e d e d s a la r ie s o f s e c r e t a r ie s — the h ig h ­
e s t paid w o m e n 's n o n p r o fe s s io n a l occu p a tio n — in a ll a r e a s by am ounts
ran gin g fr o m $1 to $ 1 1 .5 0 .
P la n t O ccu p a tion s
T o o l and die m a k e r s , the h ig h e st paid s k ille d w o r k e r s stud ied
in 1 9 5 8 -5 9 , had a v e ra g e h o u r ly ea rn in g s ran gin g fr o m $ 2 .7 2 in D a lla s
to $ 3 .3 8 in San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d .
A v e r a g e s fo r th is jo b w e re
g rou p ed at $ 3 . 1 6 - $ 3 . 1 7 in C h ic a g o , D e tr o it, and M ilw au k ee, and a lso
e x c e e d e d $3 in St. L ou is and S e a ttle . A v e r a g e pay r a te s fo r m a in ­
ten an ce e le c t r ic ia n s ra n ged fr o m $ 2 .3 2 an h ou r in D a lla s to $ 3 .0 7 in
D e tr o it and e x c e e d e d $ 2 .8 0 in a ll a r e a s on the P a c ific C o a s t and in
the N orth C e n tra l r e g io n and in B u ffa lo and N e w a r k -J e r s e y C ity .
E l e c t r ic ia n s ' pay w as h igh er than m a in ten an ce m a c h in is t s 'in 13 o f
the 20 a r e a s ; the d iffe r e n c e in th eir pay w as 5 ce n ts o r l e s s .
(See
table A - 9. )
T r u c k d r iv e r s , m a te r ia l handling la b o r e r s , and ja n ito r s w e re
n u m e r ic a lly the m o s t im p orta n t am ong the c u s to d ia l and m a te r ia l
m o v e m e n t jo b s stu d ied .
E a rn in g s o f t r u c k d r iv e r s ra n ged fr o m $ 1 .6 8
in New O rlea n s to $ 2 .6 7 in N e w a r k -J e r s e y C ity . W ithin the t r u c k d r iv e r c la s s ific a t io n , d r iv e r s o f lig h t tru ck s in M em p h is a v e r a g e d
$ 1 . 17 an h ou r as c o n tr a s te d w ith $ 2 .9 5 an h ou r f o r d r iv e r s o f heavy
(oth er than t r a ile r ty pe) tru ck s in New Y o rk C ity .
T h e re w e re about 1 1 8 ,0 0 0 m a te r ia l handling la b o r e r s in the
20 a r e a s and th e ir a v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s ran ged fr o m $ 1 .4 0 in
M em ph is to $ 2 .3 2 in San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d .
A v e ra g e h o u r ly e a r n ­
in gs o f ja n ito r s ran ged fr o m $ 1 .0 5 in New O rle a n s to $ 2 .0 2 in San
F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d .
J a n ito r s ' e a rn in g s w e re h ig h er than th ose o f
ja n it r e s s e s b y am ounts v a ry in g fr o m 8 ce n ts in D en v er to 52 cen ts
in D e tr o it and M ilw a u k e e .13
P a y V a ria tio n s in O ccu p a tion a l E a rn in g s
Individu al ea rn in g s v a r ie d c o n s id e r a b ly not on ly am ong o c c u ­
pations and la b o r m a rk e ts but a ls o w ithin the sam e o c cu p a tio n s and
la b o r m a r k e ts .
E a rn in g s p r e se n te d in the a cco m p a n y in g ta b le* are
13
See p. 37 f o r an a n a ly s is o f d iffe r e n c e s betw een ea rn in g s o f
m en and w om en in s im ila r o c cu p a tio n s .

21

a v e r a g e s , and do not in d ica te eith e r the b r o a d ran ge o f ea rn in g s that
m a y o c c u r w ithin a given o ccu p a tio n o r the o v e rla p p in g o f pay ra tes
am ong o c c u p a tio n s , in d u stry d iv is io n s , and la b o r m a rk e ts w ith w id ely
d iv e r g e n t a v e r a g e s . The a v e r a g e s m a y a p p rox im a te the actu al e a r n ­
in gs o f on ly a few o f the w o r k e r s . F o r e x a m p le , although m ain ten an ce
m a ch in is ts in N ew O rlea n s m a n u factu rin g plants a v e r a g e d $ 2 .6 7 an
h o u r, none o f th ese w o r k e r s ea rn ed fr o m $ 2 .6 0 to $ 2 .7 0 an hour
(table A -1 0 ). A bout a th ird had e a rn in g s o f fr o m $ 2 .3 0 to $ 2 .4 0 and
a lm o s t as m any w o r k e r s had ea rn in g s in the $3 to $ 3 .1 0 b r a c k e t.
In S ea ttle, on the o th e r hand, to o l and die m a k e rs a v e r a g e d $ 3 .0 3 ;
e a rn in g s o f 88 p e r c e n t o f the w o r k e r s w e re c o n c e n tra te d in the e a r n ­
in gs in te rv a l o f $3 to $ 3 .1 0 , and ea rn in g s o f a ll to o l and die m a k e rs
in Seattle fe ll in the n a r ro w ran ge fr o m $3 to $ 3 .3 0 .
In o r d e r to
b e tte r u n derstan d and u se the a v e r a g e , it is n e c e s s a r y to ex a m in e the
in dividu al e a rn in g s w hich a re co m b in e d to c o m p ile the a v e r a g e .14

w h o le sa le tra d e , fo r e x a m p le , are c h a r a c t e r iz e d by pay le v e ls that
fre q u e n tly equ al o r e x c e e d m a n u factu rin g a v e r a g e s f o r c o m p a ra b le
w o rk in the sa m e a r e a .
Job rate v a ria tio n is a ls o ty p ic a l am ong e sta b lis h m e n ts w ithin
the sam e in d u stry and ev en am ong w o r k e r s in the sam e e sta b lis h m e n t.
F o r e x a m p le , s a la r ie s o f s e c r e t a r ie s in a la rg e fo o d p r o c e s s in g fir m
in 1 9 5 8 -5 9 ra n ged fr o m $7 7 to $151 a w eek w ith an esta b lis h m e n t
a v e ra g e fo r s e c r e t a r ie s o f $ 1 0 4 .5 0 .
In the sa m e a r e a , s a la r ie s o f
s e c r e t a r ie s in an e le c t r o n ic com p on en ts fir m fe ll w ithin the above
ran ge fr o m $81 to $ 1 3 2 .5 0 but the esta b lis h m e n t a v era g e fo r s e c ­
r e ta r ie s w as $ 1 1 8 .5 0 .
In an oth er m a n u factu rin g f ir m , s e c r e t a r i e s '
s a la r ie s ran ged fr o m $55 to $91 w ith an e sta b lis h m e n t a v e ra g e o f
$ 6 9 .5 0 . A s p re a d in ea rn in g s is found in esta b lis h m e n ts with a f o r ­
m a l ran ge o f r a te s fo r each jo b and a ls o in e sta b lis h m e n ts w hich
d eterm in e ra te s on an in dividu al b a s is .

B e ca u se o f the s p re a d o r v a r ia tio n in in dividu al e a r n in g s , it
is c o m m o n p la ce to fin d som e w o r k e r s in jo b s r e q u irin g l e s s e r s k ill
o r tra in in g r e c e iv in g h igh er s a la r ie s o r a v e ra g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s than
th ose in jo b s re q u irin g h ig h er s k ills .
A s an e x a m p le , in D e tr o it,
g e n e r a l ste n o g r a p h e rs a v e r a g e d $ 8 9 .5 0 a w eek in m an u factu rin g in
1 9 5 8 -5 9 c o m p a r e d with an a v era g e o f $ 6 7 .5 0 fo r w om en file c le r k s
(rou tin e) in this in d u stry g rou p (table A - 2 ) . T w e n ty -e ig h t p e r c e n t o f
the routine file c le r k s a v e r a g e d at le a s t $75 a w eek , w h erea s n e a r ly
14
The d is trib u tio n o f w o r k e r s b y a v e ra g e h o u rly o r w eek ly p e r ce n t o f the g e n e ra l ste n o g ra p h e rs w e re earn in g le s s than that
10
ea rn in g s is p r e se n te d in the in dividu al a r e a b u lle tin s. See la s t page
am ount. T h is o v e r la p in e a rn in g s is a ls o c o m m o n b etw een a r e a s and
f o r lis tin g o f th ese b u lle tin s .
in d u stry g rou p s with w id e ly d iv e rg e n t a v e r a g e s .
S om e sp re a d in the ra te s paid to w o r k e r s in the sa m e jo b
and a r e a is a ccou n ted fo r by in te rin d u s try d iffe r e n c e s in pay.
In
g e n e r a l, a v e ra g e ea rn in g s o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s tended to be
h ig h e r in m a n u factu rin g than in n on m an u factu rin g in d u s tr ie s . E a ch o f
th ese g rou p s in clu d es a w ide v a r ie ty o f in d u str ie s that d iffe r in le v e l
o f ra te s paid. Such n onm an ufacturin g in d u str ie s as pu blic u tilitie s and




A: Occupational Earnings
Table A -l.

O ffice occu patbn s-all industries

(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r selected occupations studied in 6 broad industry d iv isio n s, w inter 1958-59)
South

N ortheast
Sex, occupation, and grade
Boston*

N ewarkBuffalo Je rse y
City2

New
Y ork
City1

Ph ila­
Atlanta
delphia1

B alti­
m o re

Dallas

North Central
M em ­
phis1

W est

LOS
M inne­
New
M ilwau­
C h icago1 D etroit1
a p o lis - St. L ou is1 D enver A n geles Orleans
kee
Long
St. Paul
B each1

P ort­
land

San
F ra n Seattle1
c is c o Oakland2

Office clerical
Men
C lerk s:
A ccounting, cla ss A

.....

P a y r o l l -------------------------------------O ffice b o y s ------------------------------------Tabulating-m achine operators — —

$ 8 8 .0 0 $100.50
6 5.00
90. 50
86.50
9 7 .5 0
84.50
107. 50
5 0.50
55.50
75.50
9 4 .0 0

$94.00
82.50
89.50
8 8.50
5 6.50
79.00

$ 9 4 .0 0
70.50
80.50
82.00
53.50
77.50

$ 9 4 .0 0
70. 50
82.50
89.00
50.50
78. 50

$9 3 .5 0
73.50
74. 50
81.00
51.50
79.50

$96. 50
84.50
81.50
107.50
4 9 .5 0
84. 50

$ 9 6 .0 0
77.00
74.50
80.50
4 9 .0 0
76.50

$ 9 1 .0 0
-

70.00
_

4 5 .5 0
84. 50

$ 8 9 .5 0 $101.00 $112.50 $103.50
85.50
80.00
68.0 0
79.00
69.50
9 9 .5 0
106.50
88.00
88.00
9 6 .5 0
108.50
6 2.00
4 5 .5 0
59.00
59. 50
78.00
88.50
9 5 .0 0
89.50

$ 9 4 .5 0
73. 50
9 0 .0 0
81.50
50.50
79.00

$ 9 3 .5 0
75. 50
84.50
88.00
5 3.00
88. 50

$ 9 1 .0 0 $100.00 $102.00
76.50
81.00
9 4 .0 0
9 6 .5 0
75.00
80.0 0 103.50
4 9 .0 0
62.50
56.00
9 2 .5 0
102.50
81.00

$ 9 9 .5 0
85.00
9 9 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
60.0 0
89.50

$ 9 9 .0 0
-

9 3 .0 0
95 .5 0
58.50
88.50

Women
B illers, m achine:
B illing m achine --------—....... >---Bookkeeping m a c h i n e -------------Bookkeeping-m ach ine op e ra to rs:
C lass A ------------------------------------C lass B ------------------------------------C lerk s;
A ccounting, cla ss A ----------------F ile , cla sa A ^ - -------------------------F ile , cla ss B ---------------------------O rder ----------------------------------------P a y r o l l -------------------------------------Com ptom eter o p e r a t o r s ---------------D uplicating-m achine op erators
(M im eograph o r D i t t o ) ---------------K ey-punch op erators ------------- ;------O ffice g i r l s -----------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s ------------------------------ -----S tenographers:
G eneral ------------------------------------T e c h n ic a l----------------------------------Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s -----------------Sw itchboard o p e r a to r Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s -----T ra n scribin g-m ach in e op e ra to rs,
general ----------------------------------------T ypists:
C lass A ------------------------------------C lass B -------------------------------------

6 4.00
54.50

71.00
56.00

6 4.50
5 9.00

6 8.50
72.00

62.50
60.00

61.00
57.50

60. 50
54.50

61.50
55.00

56.50
50.50

55.50
4 8 .0 0

70. 50
68.5 0

71.00
62.50

59.00
61.50

59.00
61.00

63.5 0
68.0 0

6 3.00
5 4.50

72.00
74.00

66.50
59.00

85. 50
70.00

64.00
64.00

64.5 0
57.50

71.00
53.00

74.50
60.0 0

76.50
66. 00

69. 50
57. 50

65.50
60.5 0

67. 50
53.00

68.50
57. 00

70.50
54.0 0

6 1.50
53. 50

82.00
70.00

82.50
67.00

74.00
6 1.50

71.00
58. 50

66.50
58.00

75.00
58. 00

8 5.50
6 4.00

80.00
61.5 0

85.00
64. 50

72.50
61.00

72.00
59. 50
62.00
4 9 .0 0
61.00
6 6.00
59.50

80.0 0
63.50
66.00
54.50
65.00
71.50
66.50

81.50
64.00
67.50
52. 50
6 5.50
75.00
71.00

84.00
66.50
68.00
55.00
68.00
77. 50
70. 50

77.00
60.00
65.50
4 9 .5 0
61.00
69.00
64.00

79.50
60. 50
61.50
49.5 0
59.50
69.00
65. 50

73.00
62.00
65.00
4 8.00
54.00
67.00
65.50

75.00
59.50
58.50
4 8.50
59.50
67.50
64.50

69.00
56.50
55.50
49. 50
58. 50
61.00
57.00

75.50
58.00
59.00
4 7 .0 0
58.00
62.00
60.00

87.0 0
70.00
70.50
57.50
70.50
79.00
74.00

93 .0 0
70.50
82.50
57.00
71.50
82.00
78.50

8 3.00
6 4.50
6 6.00
56.00
64.50
70.00
63.00

74.50
6 0.00
61.50
50.00
61.50
68.00
64.50

80.50
6 0.50
65.00
5 3.00
6 0.00
68.00
66.00

75.50
6 1.50
61.5 0
55.00
60.5 0
72.00
6 3.00

8 6.50
71.50
71.50
58.00
81.00
82.50
80. 50

81.00
70.00
67.00
50.50
65.50
73.00
70.00

84.50
69.50
75.50
56.00
80.00
84. 00
76.00

76.50
68.00
73.00
58.50
70.00
75.50
68.50

56.00
60.00
4 9 .5 0
76.00

6 1.00
67. 50
54.00
82.50

65.50
65.50
55.00
85.50

61.50
65. 50
52.00
88.00

57.00
62.00
4 8 .0 0
81.50

59.00
62. 50
50.50
80.00

61.50
62.00
4 8 .0 0
78.50

59.50
61.00
48.5 0
79.00

56.00
57. 50
4 6 .5 0
68.50

61.00
4 0 .5 0
78.50

65.50
72.00
59.00
89.50

70.00
77.50
61.50
9 4 .5 0

64.00
65. 50
51.0 0
85.5 0

55.00
58.00
4 7 .0 0
76.50

61.50
64. 50
5 3.00
81.00

65.00
5 9.50
4 9 .5 0
81.50

69.00
77.50
59.50
9 0 .5 0

61.50
70. 50
49.0 0
83.00

6 9.50
71.50
5 9.50
8 9.00

58.50
70. 50
5 2.50
85.00

6 5.50
68.00
61.50

72.00
78.50
65.00

70.00
73.00
68.00

71.00
85.00
70.00

66.00
70. 50
62.00

67.50
58.50

66.00
58.00

69.00
88.00
56.00

60.00
44.0 0

63.00
4 7 .0 0

75.50
85.00
70.50

85.00
9 4 .0 0
74.50

68.50
63.00

64.00
66.50
62.00

6 6.50
71.50
62.00

67.50
79.00
62.00

78.50
89.00
73.50

71.50
62.00

78.00
77.00
71.50

74.00
72.00
6 6.50

6 1.50
63.50

62. 50
81.00

66.00
71.00

69.50
75.00

61.00
69.00

60.50
68. 50

59. 50
67.00

63.00
68.0 0

57.50
-

58.50
73.50

72.00
77. 50

71.50
87. 50

62.00
73.50

59.50
67.00

6 1.50
77.00

61.50
71.50

73.50
88.50

6 5.00
82.50

70.50
83.50

66.00
75.50

60.50

62.00

63.50

70.00

58.50

59.50

62.00

56.00

55.0 0

62.5 0

73.00

74.00

64.00

60.00

62.5 0

6 0.00

69.00

64.00

71.50

66.00

68.00
52.50

61.50
52.50

61.00
4 8 .5 0

59.00
51.50

72.50
63.50

84.50
65.50

69. 50
58.50

61.00
54.00

6 5.00
56.00

6 3.50
54.50

74.00
6 2.50

65.50
58.00

73.00
62.00

67.50
5 7.00

-

61.50
54.50

69.50
5 8.50

66. 50
57.50

67. 50
60.00

65.50
55.0 0

62.00
52.00

149.00
113.00
84.5 0
62.0 0

153.50
119.00
87.00
-

132.50
114.50
86.00
-

166.50
127.50
87.50
-

149.00
109.00
81.50
-

151.00
110.50
82.50
-

138.50
112.00
77.00
-

120.50
9 7 .0 0
76.00
-

108.00
72.50
-

111.50
81.00
-

145.00
127.00
9 3 .5 0
72.50

136.50
9 6 .0 0
85.00

147.00
113.00
89.50
73.50

108.00
84.50
-

146.50
115.50
89.00
74.50

150.50
128.50
82.50
-

142.00
112.50
9 0 .0 0
"

107.50
9 1 .5 0
“

132.50
112.50
9 0 .0 0
“

121.50
100.00
83.00
-

81.00

9 2 .0 0

88.50

9 3 .0 0

85.00

9 0 .0 0

89.00

84.00

80.00

84.50

9 2 .0 0

9 8 .0 0

87.00

85.00

85.00

82.50

9 7 .0 0

85.00

9 4 .0 0

9 4 .5 0

Professional and technical
Men
D raftsm en:
Senior
......... ....... ................. .
J u n i o r ----------------------------------------T r a c e r s ------------------------------------------W om en
N u rses, industrial (re g is te re d ) —

1 Earnings rela te to standard sa la rie s that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules.
2 Exceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footnotes 4 a n d /o r 5 to the table in appendix A .
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




2a
Table A-2.

O ffice occupations-m anufacturing

(Average weekly earnings 1 for selected occupations studied in manufacturing, winter 1958-59)
1

South

N ortheast

Sex, occupation, and grade
B oston

N ew arkBuffalo J e r s e y
City

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

$96. 50
79.50
9 3 .5 0
8 8.00
57.00
87.50

$ 9 5 .5 0
78.00
82.5 0
8 2.50
53.50
81.50

$96. 50
71.50

M em ­
phis

New
M ilwau­
C hicago D etroit
O rleans
kee

$ 9 4 .5 0 $100.00 $108.50
80.50
75.00
82.50
.
76.00
77.00 110.00
82.50
53.00
50.00
51.00
9 4 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
88.00

$ 9 2 .5 0
66.00
-

$91 .0 0 $103.50 $114.00 $105.50
7 1.00
8 6 .5 0
9 4 .0 0
83.5 0
9 8 .0 0
9 0 .0 0
73.50
114.50
9 6 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
114.00
4 6 .0 0
61.50
59.50
67.50
92 .0 0
100.00
9 2 .5 0
-

Atlanta

B a lti­
m o re

D allas

W est

North, C entral
Los
Minne*
A n geles a p o lis - St. Louis D enver
Long
St. Paul
Beach

P o r t­
land

San
F ran c is c o - Seattle
Oakland

Office clerical
Men
C lerk s:
Accounting, cla ss B ---------------O rder
--------- ----------P a y r o l l ------------------- ... ------ -- —»
O ffice b o y s -----------------------------------Tabulating-m achine operators ——-

$9 6 .0 0 $105.50
67.50
9 5 .5 0
80.00
102.00
110.50
50.50
58.50
79.00
9 7 .0 0

-

89.00
51.50
84.00

-

9 1 .0 0

$ 9 1 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
-

4 9 .5 0
8 0.50

$ 9 5 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
88.50
88 .0 0
56.00
88 .0 0

$ 9 4 .0 0 $102.00
7 9.00
80 .0 0
9 4 .5 0
8 1.50
81 .5 0 102.50
65.50
9 4 .0 0
8 2 .5 0

$ 9 7 .0 0 $103.00 $101.50
9 0 .0 0
102.00 112.00
108.50
50.50
63.50
61.00
9 4 .0 0
-

W om en
B ille r s , m achine:
Bookkeeping m achine —
B ook keeping-m ach ine op e ra to rs:
C lass A ------------------------------------C lass B ------------------------------------C lerk s:
Accounting, cla ss A ---------------A ccounting, cla ss B ---------------O rd er --------------------------------------P a y r o l l ------------------------------------C om ptom eter operators ---------------D uplicating-m achine op erators
(M im eograph o r D itto) ■ — - ■ .
■
■
K ey-punch o p e r a t o r s --------------------O ffice g i r l s -----------------------------------S ecreta ries — ----- -----------------------Stenographer s :
T e c h n ic a l---------------------------------Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s ----------------Sw itchboard o p e ra to rreception ists ---- -------------------------Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s -----T ran scribin g-m ach in e op e ra to rs,
■
■■
general --------- — ----- ---- ■
Typists:
C lass A - ------------- ----------- ----- - ....
C lass B -------------------------------------

62.00
-

73.00
-

63.50
61.50

71.00
71.00

64.50
-

61.50
-

61.50
-

67.5 0
-

57.00
-

60.00
-

70.50
-

74.00
-

63.5 0
-

-

63.5 0
-

-

68.00
77.50

72.00
-

-

-

71.50
6 3.00

81.00
64.50

79.50
68.00

78.00
72.00

72.50
64.50

75.00
63.00

70.00
64.00

72.00
61.50

62.50

67.00
64.00

81.0 0
74.00

88.00
79.00

79.00
65.50

64.00

74.50
6 5.50

6 6.00

87. 00
80.00

80 .5 0
67.00

86. 50
78.00

69.00

72.50
63.00
63.50
53.50
6 1.00
65.00
61.0 0

82.50
69.50
75.50
67.50
67.00
73.00
71.00

82.50
66.00
70.00
61.50
69.50
76.00
73.00

86.50
69.00
73.00
59.00
67.50
78.00
76.50

8 5.00
62.50
70.00
56.00
6 6.00
70.50
67.50

83.00
64.50
75.00
64.00
60.00
70.00
76.50

81.00
71.00
54.00
55.50
68.00
70.50

80.00
69.00
63.50
64.00
68.00
70.00

75.50
58.50
4 9 .5 0
62.00
64.00
65.50

74.50
59.50
6 6 .5 0
62.00
62.00

89.00
73.00
71.50
61.0 0
75.00
79.00
80.00

104.50
83.00
. 67.50
80.00
88.00
84.50

85.00
6 9.00
69.50
64.50
68.00
70.50
67.50

77.00
6 3.00
59.00
5 1.50
65.50
67.50
71.50

8 4.50
6 3.00
6 5.50
5 5.50
6 1.50
6 5.00
6 8.50

8 4.00
6 8 .0 0
72.50
69.50

87.50
75.00
81.00
6 8.00
80.00
8 3.50
83.50

8 3.00
71.50
5 7 .5 0
74.00
72.50

9 2 .5 0
78.0 0
8 0.50
6 9 .0 0
82.5 0
8 5 .0 0
79.50

78.00
6 9.50
68.00
78.50
73.50

55.50
62.50
54.50
78.00

73.00
56.50
85.00

72.00
5 5.50
87.00

68.50
52.5 0
9 2 .5 0

60.50
65.00
4 9 .5 0
85.50

77.50
83.00

69.00
85.00

68.50
58.50
81.50

66.50
47 .5 0
71.00

8 0.50

6 4.00
74.00
61.50
9 1 .0 0

77.50
84.50
70.50
101.50

68.50
68.50
57.50
8 9.00

60.00
4 6 .0 0
78.00

59.50
64.50
52.50
84.50

70.50
85.0 0

74.00
79.50
62.50
9 1 .5 0

6 5.50
8 1 .0 0

71.00
75.00
64.50
9 3 .0 0

72.50
64.00
9 0 .0 0

68.00
68.00
70.00

77.00
73. 50
77.50

73.50
72.00
74.00

75.00
9 1 .5 0
75.50

67. 50
73.50
71.00

68.50
78.00

76.00
72.50

75.50
- •
69.00

64.50
-

6 6.50
-

77.00
77.00

89.50
8 6.50

71.00
•
78.00

64.50
66.50

68.50
73.00
72.00

72.50
72.50

8 2.00
9 4 .0 0
62.00

73.50
-

82 .5 0
81 .5 0

76.50
75.50

63.00
71.00

66.50
86.50

66.00
76.00

69.50
78.00

63.00
80.00

58.00
-

59.50
-

62.00
-

58.50
-

57.00
-

73.50
-

75.50
9 5 .5 0

65.50
78.50

61.50
-

6 2.50
78.50

6 1.00
-

73.50
89.50

6 6.50
-

70.50
85.50

68.5 0
-

-

64.00

6 3.50

68.00

73.50

60.00

58.50

69.50

60.00

52.00

-

75.00

86.50

6 5.00

6 1.50

6 3.00

6 5.50

6 8.50

69.50

75.50

-

6 1.00
58.00

75.50
64. o a

68.00
61.50

73.00
64.50

69.50
57. 50

74.50
56.50

73.00
6 3.50

64.00
60.50

63.00
51.0 0

67.5 0
52.50

73.00
65.00

87.00
73.00

73.50
61.00

6 0.00
55.00

68.00
60.00

6 7.50
57. 50

78.50
6 9.00

74.50
6 2.50

8 2.50
68 .5 0

73.00
6 3.00

141.50
111.50
8 6 .5 0

156.00
120.00
8 7.00

132.00
113.50
86.50

162.50
114.50
82.00

149.50
108.50
83.5 0

148.50
109.50
86.50

141.00
115.00
82.00

106.50
9 3 .0 0
73.00

111.00
74.00

111.50
81.5 0

140.00
119.50
89.0 0

.
135.50
9 7 .5 0

146.00
113.00
89.00

106.00
8 5.00

147.00
116.00
8 6 .5 0

104.50
8 0 .0 0

139.50
111.00
9 0 .0 0

108.50
9 4 .0 0

133.00
114.00
90. 50

120.50
97. 50
78.50

81.50

9 3 .0 0

88.50

9 7 .0 0

85.00

9 3 .5 0

9 1 .5 0

85.00

“

87.0 0

9 2 .0 0

9 9 .0 0

8 7.00

8 5.50

8 5.00

"

9 8 .0 0

8 4 .0 0

9 5 .0 0

9 6 .0 0

Professional and technical
Men
D raftsm en:

W om en
N u rses, industrial (re g is te re d ) —

1 Earnings rela te to standard sa la rie s that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




24
Table A-3.

Office occupafions-nonm anufacturing

(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r selected occupations studied in nonm anufacturing, winter 1958-59)
Mortheast
Sex, occupation, and grade

NewarkB oston2 Buffalo Je rse y
C ity2

South

North Central

New
P h ila­
York
Atlanta
delphia2
C ity2

B a lti­
m ore

M em ­
D allas >
phis2

West

L os
New
M ilwau­ M inneC h icago2 D etroit2
a p o lis - St. L o u is 2 Denver A n g e le s O rleans
kee
Long
St. Paul
B ea ch 2

P o r t­
land

San
F ra n Seattle2
c is c o Oakland2

Office clerical
Men
C lerk s:
A ccounting, cla ss A ____________
Accounting, c la s s B ____________
O r d e r ____ _________________
P a y ro ll __________________________
O ffice boys _________________________
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____

$85 .50
64. 00
88. 00
79. 00
50. 00
7 1 .5 0

$ 89 .00
51. 00
-

$90 .00
85. 00
86. 50
55.5 0
7 4 .5 0

$93 .50
6 9 .0 0
80. 00
82. 00
53.5 0
7 6 .5 0

$88.00
69. 00
85. 00
89. 00
4 9 .5 0
72. 00

$93 .50
7 3 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
85. 00
5 1.50
7 5 .5 0

$91 .50
87.0 0
8 2 .5 0
4 7 .5 0
78. 00

$92.00
74.0 0
7 4 .5 0
79. 00
48. 00
7 1 .5 0

$88 .50
7 1 .5 0
44. 00
80. 00

$89 .00
67. 00
6 9 .0 0
8 5 .5 0
45. 00
7 6 .0 0

66. 00
5 2 .5 0

56. 00

66. 50
57. 00

6 7 .5 0
72.5 0

6 1.50
5 7 .5 0

60. 50
56.5 0

51. 00

59. 00
5 3 .5 0

5 6.00
5 0 .5 0

53 .5 0
4 8 .0 0

7 0 .5 0
65 .5 0

62. 00
56. 00

64. 00
50. 00

67.5 0
5 6 .5 0

76. 00
65. 50

6 4 .5 0
56. 00

63. 50
60. 50

6 4 .5 0
5 1 .5 0

6 7.50
5 5.50

7 1 .5 0
5 1 .5 0

58 .0 0
5 2 .5 0

7 1 .5 0
5 8 .5 0
61. 00
48. 00
60.5 0
6 6 .5 0
5 8 .0 0

77. 00
57 .5 0
4 5 .5 0
66. 50
60. 00

81. 00
62. 00
66. 00
5 0 .0 0
6 3 .0 0
7 2 .0 0
69. 00

83.5 0
6 5 .5 0
6 6 .5 0
5 4 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
77. 50
6 9 .5 0

72. 00
58 .5 0
6 2.00
48. 00
58. 00
6 5.50
6 1.50

79. 00
6 0.00
5 9 .5 0
4 8 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
68. 00
6 4 .5 0

7 0 .5 0
60. 00
60. 00
4 6 .5 0
5 3 .5 0
66. 00
6 3 .0 0

73. 00
5 7.50
58. 00
4 7 .5 0
5 6.50
67. 00
6 1 .5 0

67. 00
56. 00
5 6 .5 0
4 9 .5 0
56. 00
58. 50
5 4.00

5 7 .0 0
58. 50
4 8 .5 0
7 4 .5 0

5 9 .5 0
77.50

61. 50
55. 00
84. 00

60. 00
6 4 .5 0
52. 00
86.5 0

53.
59.
47.
78.

00
00
00
00

60. 00
49. 50
79. 00

5 9 .0 0
4 6 .5 0
74. 00

5 8.50
4 5 .5 0
78. 50

64. 00
6 7 .5 0
5 9.50

62. 00
5 6 .5 0

67. 00
73. 50
64. 50

6 9 .5 0
8 0.00
6 9 .0 0

6 3 .5 0
69. 00
5 9 .5 0

67. 00
54.5 0

58. 50
5 2 .5 0

6 0 .5 0
6 1 .5 0

57. 00
-

66. 00
6 7 .5 0

6 9 .5 0
7 5 .0 0

5 9 .5 0
6 3 .5 0

61. 00
6 5 .5 0

59. 50
6 3 .0 0

$99 .00 $106.50
7 6 .0 0
77 .5 0
100.00
102.50
9 7 .5 0
91 .0 0
5 8.00
57. 00
8 6.50
87 .5 0

$99 .00
85. 00
59 .5 0
82 .5 0

$96 .50
7 5 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
51. 00
7 8 .5 0

$ 92 .00
6 8 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
4 9 .5 0
8 9 .5 0

$90 .00
7 5 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
49. 50
80.5 0

68. 00
-

56 .5 0
6 1 .5 0

5 8 .5 0
59 .5 0

63. 00
-

6 3 .5 0
5 4 .5 0

73. 00
7 0 .0 0

83. 00
69. 00

7 8 .0 0
6 3 .0 0

60. 00

6 9 .5 0
5 6 .5 0

6 3 .5 0
54 .5 0

74. 00
5 7 .5 0

7 5 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
4 6 .5 0
56. 00
6 1 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

86. 00
6 8 .5 0
69. 50
5 7 .0 0
68. 00
79. 00
7 1 .0 0

8 4 .0 0
66. 00
6 8 .5 0
54.5 0
6 7 .5 0
72. 00
6 7 .5 0

80. 00,
62. 00
4 9 .5 0
59.5 0
6 8 .5 0
6 0 .5 0

7 4 .0 0
5 9 .5 0
65. 00
5 0 .0 0
59. 50
68. 00
6 1 .5 0

7 6 .5 0
58.5 0
64. 00
5 1 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
73. 50
6 2 .5 0

5 3 .5 0
4 6 .5 0
67. 00

59.0 0
4 0 .0 0
78. 00

68. 00
71. 00
5 7 .5 0
8 8.50

6 2 .5 0
68. 00
5 3 .5 0
8 5.50

6 1 .5 0
4 8 .0 0
81. 00

57. 00
4 7 .5 0
7 5 .5 0

65. 00
78. 00
53. 00

5 6 .5 0
41. 00

6 2 .5 0
4 6 .5 0

7 4 .5 0
8 3.50
6 8 .0 0

73. 00
6 5 .5 0

64. 00
5 7 .5 0

6 3 .5 0
6 6 .0 0

5 7 .0 0
-

60. 00
-

71. 00
7 7 .5 0

6 7 .5 0
7 5 .5 0

5 7 .5 0
7 0 .5 0

$97 .50 $104.00
8 5 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
9 3 .5 0
105.00
6 0 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
104.50

$95 .00
81. 00
95. 00
9 0 .5 0
5 8 .5 0
8 7.50

$97 .50
90.5 0
_
56. 00
92. 00

6 4 .5 0
5 6 .5 0

8 4 .0 0
6 9 .0 0

6 3 .0 0
63. 00

8 4 .5 0
6 2 .0 0

6 0 .5 0

83 .5 0
63. 00

7 2 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

7 3 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
61. 00
5 0 .0 0
5 9 .5 0
72. 00
6 1 .5 0

8 5.50
6 9 .0 0
6 7 .5 0
54. 50
82. 00
81 .0 0
78. 00

7 9 .5 0
69. 50
6 7 .0 0
49. 00
67. 00
7 2 .0 0
69. 00

81. 00
6 7 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
79. 00
82 .5 0
7 4 .5 0

76. 00
6 6.00
66. 50
5 3.50
7 0 .0 0
7 2 .5 0
6 7 .0 0

65. 00
54. 00
77. 00

5 7 .5 0
49. 00
80. 50

6 4 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
57. 50
90. 00

7 3 .5 0
48. 00
84. 00

6 7 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
56. 00
8 6 .5 0

58.50
68. 00
4 9 .5 0
8 0.50

6 3 .5 0
67. 00
6 0 .5 0

64. 00
56 .5 0

66. 00
5 9 .5 0

75. 50
8 4 .5 0
6 9 .5 0

71. 00
6 1 .5 0

75. 00
6 8 .5 0

70. 00
64 .5 0

58. 00
65. 00

6 0 .5 0
7 5 .5 0

6 2 .0 0
6 8 .5 0

7 3 .5 0
8 8 .0 0

6 4 .5 0
-

70. 50
8 2 .5 0

65. 00
7 0 .5 0

Women
B ille r s , m achine:
B illing m achine
Bookkeeping m achine
Bookkeeping-m ach ine o p era tors:
C la ss A ______________ ____
C la ss B ______________________
C lerk s:
Accounting, c la s s A ___________ _
Accounting, cla s s B ____________
F ile , cla s s A ___________________
F ile , c la s s B
_________________
O rd er ___________________________
P a y ro ll --------------------------------------C om ptom eter op erators _ _
D uplicating-m achine o p erators
(M im eograph o r D itto) ___________
K ey-punch op erators ______________
O ffice g i r l s ------------- __ ___________
S e c r e t a r ie s _____ __ __ ___________
Stenographers;
G e n e r a l__________________________
T echn ical _________________ ____
Sw itchboard op erators ____________
Sw itchboard o p era to rrecep tion ists ________ ___________
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____
T ra n scribin g-m ach in e op e ra to rs,
general ___________________________
Typi sts:
C la ss A ________ ________ _____
C la ss B __________________________

5 8 .5 0

5 9 .5 0

61. 00

69. 00

58. 00

5 9 .5 0

59. 00

56. 00

56. 00

62. 00

7 1 .5 0

68. 00

6 3 .5 0

59. 00

6 2 .0 0

58. 00

6 9 .5 0

62 .5 0

71. 00

66. 50

6 2 .5 0
53. 00

57. 00
5 1 .5 0

64. 50
56. 00

6 6 .5 0
5 9.50

6 1 .5 0
53. 00

6 0 .0 0
52. 00

59-50
4 9 .5 0

61. 00
5 0 .5 0

5 9 .5 0
4 7 .5 0

5 7 .5 0
51 .5 0

72. 00
6 2 .5 0

72. 00
61. 00

60. 00
5 5 .5 0

6 1 .5 0
54. 00

62. 00
52. 00

61. 00
54. 00

7 0 .0 0
59 .5 0

6 2 .5 0
56. 50

6 9.50
6 1 .0 0

62. 00
55. 50

114.50
81. 00

111.50
-

118.50
8 4.50

133.50
9 0.50

111.50
7 7 .5 0

113.00
7 4 .5 0

104.50
7 3 .0 0

109.50
79 .0 0

-

111.00
80. 00

136.50
102.00

138. 50
92.5 0

-

114.00
8 2 .5 0

110.50
97. 00

8 6 .5 0

126.50
-

104.50
"

108.50
"

114.00
9 3 .0 0

80. 50

"

90.5 0

8 3 .5 0

-

"

-

-

9 2 .0 0

“

-

-

-

9 3.00

-

Professional and technical
Men
D raftsm en:
S e n i o r ____ __
__ ___________
J u n io r ________ _________________
W omen
N u rses, industrial (r e g is t e r e d )___

1 Earnings relate to standard s a la rie s that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules.
2 E xceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footnotes 4 a n d /o r 5 to the table in appendix A .
NOTE:

D ashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c r it e r ia ..




25
Table A-4.

O ffice occupations-public utilities*

(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r selected occupations studied in transportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Sex, occupation, and grade

NewarkBoston2 Buffalo Je rse y
City

South
New
Y ork
C ity2

P h ila­
delphia

Atlanta

B a lti­
m ore

D allas

North C entral
M em ­
p h is2

West

L os
M inneNew
A ngelesC h ica g o 2 D etroit* M ilwau­ a p o lis - St. Louis D enver
O rleans
Long
kee
St. Paul
Beach*

P o r t­
land

San
F ra n Seattle2
c is c o Oakland2

Office clerical
Men
C lerk s:
Accounting, cla s s A _____
_
A ccounting, c la s s B
____ ____
O ffice boys ________________________ _
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____

$98 .00
5 8 .0 0
4 7 .0 0

$98.00
-

-

-

77 .5 0
66. 00
50 .5 0
6 9 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
90. 00
6 8 .0 0
7 2.50

88.0 0
7 3 .0 0
7 0 .5 0

87.0 0
6 7 .5 0
88. 50
6 6 .5 0
75. 00

9 2 .5 0
7 7 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
6 6 .5 0
5 0 .5 0
9 4.00
7 3 .5 0
7 4 .0 0

8 5 .0 0
7 0 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
5 8.00
6 2 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
6 1 .5 0
9 3 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
72 .0 0

6 1 .0 0
-

-

67. 00
-

87. 50

5 2.00

5 9.00

6 2 .5 0

-

-

-

$89 .50 $100.00
8 2.50
5 7 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
92 .5 0
-

-

$90. 00
7 5 .5 0
5 0 .0 0
7 6.50

-

-

$97 .50 $107.00
7 3 .5 0
81 .5 0
4 5 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
-

$85 .00 $105.00 $106.50 $106.50 $10 8.50
6 8 .0 0
7 6 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
4 6 .0 0
6 3 .0 0
6 0 .0 0
9 4.00
98.0 0
"

$87 .00
-

$88 .50
-

-

6 2 .5 0

$97.00 $103.00 $104.50
9 0 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
9 2.00
9 4 .5 0
-

$92 .00
-

W omen
B ille r s , m achine (billing
m achine)
__ ________ __ ________
C lerk s:
Accounting, c la s s A ____________
Accounting, c la s s B ____________
F ile , c la s s A ___________________
______________ __
F ile , c la s s B
P a y ro ll ___________________ ____
C om ptom eter op era to rs ___________
K ey-punch op era to rs ________ ____
O ffice g i r l s _____________________ —
S e c r e t a r ie s _____ ____ ___________
Stenographers, general ____________
Sw itchboard op era to rs ____________
Sw itchboard o p era to rrecep tion ists _____________________
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____
T yp ists:
C la ss A _________________________
C la ss B _________________________

-

-

8 9 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
7 4 .5 0
71 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
97 .5 0
7 3 .0 0
-

$ 72 .00
6 1 .5 0
4 9 .5 0
8 9.50
6 4 .5 0

72. 00
56. 00
7 2 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
4 9 .5 0
83. 00
6 6 .0 0
6 2 .5 0

$74 .50
-

7 8 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
8 2 .5 0
61. 00
60. 00

6 6 .5 0
66. 00

7 6 .5 0
-

-

72. 00
7 7 .0 0

-

7 0.50
64. 50

59. 00
5 8.00

6 3 .5 0

5 9.50
56 .5 0

63.5 0
52. 00

-

134.00
86. 00

-

111.50
-

-

9 7.50
6 3 .0 0

-

9 1.00

7 0 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

91 .5 0
7 2 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
7 7 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
8 0 .5 0
82. 00

9 7.00
7 4 .0 0
5 7.00
7 0 .5 0
70. 00
6 8 .5 0
6 4 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
7 7 .5 0
8 3 .5 0

70. 50
5 5 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
64. 00
9 5 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
-

7 7 .5 0
6 4 .5 0
5 2 .0 0
71. 00
6 1 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
77. 00
6 9 .0 0
7 4 .5 0

90. 00
6 6 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
77. 00
7 0 .5 0
8 8.50
7 2 .5 0
-

6 1 .5 0
-

74. 50
-

68. 00
-

-

5 8 .5 0
-

-

5 8 .5 0
5 8 .5 0

77. 00
65. 50

81. 00
67. 00

6 3 .0 0
5 5 .5 0

-

-

125.50
-

124.00
9 1.50

-

-

7 7 .0 0

-

-

-

66. 00

80. 00
6 4 .5 0
5 4 .0 0
7 6 .5 0
6 1 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
-

8 8 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
91. 00
77. 00
7 4 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
82. 00
8 0 .0 0

8 1 .5 0
80. 00
72. 00
9 2 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
74. 00

90.5 0
7 3 .5 0
8 5 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
8 6.00
8 2.50
7 8 .0 0
91.5 0
80. 00
8 3 .0 0

80.0 0
68. 00
6 2 .0 0
7 1 .5 0
8 5 .5 0
69 .5 0
-

6 8 .0 0
87.0 0

66. 50
66.5 0

89. 50
-

-

86. 00
88. 00

6 7.50
-

6 9 .5 0
-

6 2 .5 0

6 7 .5 0

7 1 .5 0

6 5 .5 0
65. 00

7 6 .5 0
67. 00

64. 00
58.50

-

"

-

8 8 .0 0

124.50
-

-

-

"

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

5 9 .5 0

Professional and technical
Men
Draftsm en:
S e n i o r ____
____ ________ ..
J u n io r ________ __ ______________
W omen
N u rses, industrial ( r e g is t e r e d ) ___

-

'

_________
1 Earnings relate to standard sa laries that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules.
2 1 or m ore utilities are m unicipally operated, and, th e re fo re , excluded fro m the scope o f the studies.
* Tran sportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), com m unication, and other public u tilities.
NOTE:

D ashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




See footnote 4 to the table in appendix A.

26
Table A-5.

O ffice occupations-w holesale trade

(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r se le cte d occupations studied in w holesale trade, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Sex, occupation, and grade

South

B oston

N ewarkJ e rse y
City

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

$ 9 5 .0 0
7 0 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
8 4 .0 0

$ 8 7 .5 0
-

$95. 50
7 8 .0 0
80. 00
5 6 .5 0
8 2.50

$ 6 9 . 00
83 .5 0
5 4 .5 0
8 0 .5 0

Atlanta

North C entral
B a lti­
m ore

C h icago

D etroit

M innea p o lis St. Paul

$ 8 6 .5 0
“

$ 101.50
7 6 .0 0
101.00
5 8 .5 0
91 .0 0

$ 112.50
8 0 .5 0
102.50
88 .0 0

$ 8 7 .0 0
7 5 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
5 5 .0 0
-

West
St. L ou is

L os
A n geles Long
Beach

---------5SH--------F ra n c is c o Oakland

Office clerical
Men
C lerk s:
Accounting, c la s s A ____________
Accounting, c la s s B _____
O rd er __ __ — __
____
O ffice b o y s _________________________
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____

$ 9 3 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
7 4 .0 0
5 4 .0 0
81 .5 0

$ 9 5 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
5 4 .0 0

$ 9 8 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
6 2 .0 0
9 1 .0 0

$ 9 8 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
9 7 .5 0

W omen
B ille r s , m achine (billing
m achine) __ . . „
------- ------B ook keeping-m ach ine op e ra to rs:
C la ss A __________________________
C la ss B ___— — __ -------------------C lerk s:
A ccounting, c la s s A __ __
__
A ccounting, cla s s B ____________
F ile , c la s s A ___________________
F ile , c la s s B _____ ____ _ ___
O rd er
P a y ro ll
„ __ __ „ ____ __
C om ptom eter op era to rs
________
K ey-pu nch op era to rs
____ __ __
O ffice g i r l s _________________________
S e c r e t a r ie s _________________________
Stenographers, g e n e r a l__ __ __ __
Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s _____________
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rrecep tion ists ______________________
T ran scrib in g-m a ch in e o p e ra to rs,
gen eral
____ __
____ __
T yp ists:
C la s s A ..................................
C la ss B - .......................................

7 2 .5 0

-

7 3 .0 0

-

7 0 .5 0

-

7 1 .5 0

-

6 2 .5 0

-

8 0 .0 0

-

6 3 .0 0
6 4 .0 0

6 1 .0 0

76. 00
7 3 .5 0

6 7 .0 0

7 0 .5 0
6 4 .5 0

-

“

8 3 .5 0
6 8 .5 0

8 9 .5 0
7 8 .0 0

7 6 .5 0
60. 00

6 2 .0 0

89 .0 0
7 5 .0 0

85 .5 0
7 1 .5 0

7 8 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
5 1 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
7 7 .0 0
7 3 .5 0
6 5 .5 0

6 8 .5 0
4 9 .5 0
67. 00
7 5 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
81 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
-

8 7 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
70. 00
5 8 .0 0
6 9 .5 0
8 3 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
6 6 .5 0
87 .5 0
74. 00
7 2 .5 0

8 3 .0 0
6 7 .5 0
5 1 .5 0
61. 00
6 7 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
4 5 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
6 7 .5 0
7 1 .0 0

8 0 .0 0
6 6 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
5 6 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
6 5 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
5 1 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
7 0 .0 0
-

69. 00
5 4 .0 0
6 8 .5 0
7 9 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
-

9 0 .0 0
7 2 .5 0
7 4 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
5 9 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
7 5 .5 0
7 5 .5 0

8 5 .0 0
6 7 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
77. 00
8 7 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
7 7 .0 0

7 6 .5 0
6 1 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
5 1 .5 0
8 0 .5 0
6 6 .5 0
-

7 9 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
5 4 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
6 3 .5 0
72. 00
7 7 .0 0
64. 00
-

8 2 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
6 0 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
7 9 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
60. 00
9 0 .5 0
78. 00
7 7 .0 0

8 2 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
57.0 0
9 5.00
89.5 0
7 5 .5 0
7 6 .0 0
91.5 0
8 0.00
7 4 .5 0
7 1 .0 0

6 5 .0 0

69. 00

7 0 .5 0

58 .0 0

6 3 .5 0

6 0 .0 0

6 9 .0 0

7 5 .5 0

6 1 .5 0

5 9 .5 0

7 5 .5 0

6 5 .5 0

-

6 9 .5 0

6 5 .0 0

6 6 .0 0

-

74. 00

7 7 .5 0

6 1 .0 0

6 7 .0 0

7 3 .0 0

7 2 .0 0

7 7 .0 0
5 8 .5 0

-

7 1 .0 0
6 5 .0 0

5 6 .0 0

6 3 .0 0
5 4 .5 0

5 6 .5 0

7 7 .5 0
6 5 .0 0

8 0 .5 0
67. 00

6 4 .5 0
5 5 .5 0

5 4 .5 0

7 3 .5 0
6 5 .5 0

7 1 .5 0
6 2 .5 0

6 2 .0 0

1 Earnings rela te to standard sa la ries that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules.
NOTE:

D ashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication cr it e r ia .




27
Table A -6 .

O ffice occupations-retail trade

(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r selected occupations studied in retail trade, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Sex, occupation, and grade
B oston

NewarkJe rse y
C ity2

South

New
Y ork
C it y 2

P h ila­
delphia2

$ 9 0 .5 0

-

Atlanta

B a lti­
m ore

North Central
D allas

New
O rleans

Chicago

D etroit3

West
M innea p o lis St. Paul

D enver

P ort­
land

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Seattle

Office clerical
Men
C le rk s , accounting, c la s s A ____ _

$ 7 5 .5 0

-

$ 8 7 .5 0

-

$ 9 2 .5 0

$ 8 0 . 00

$10 2.50

$ 9 4 .5 0

-

-

-

-

W omen
B ille r s , m achine (bookkeeping
m achine)
______ ___
____
B ookkeeping-m achine op e ra to rs,
cla s s B ___________________________
C lerk s:
A ccounting, cla ss A ____________
A ccounting, c la s s B ____________
F ile , c la s s B
_» __ ____ ___
O rder __ __ __ ------- „
------P a y ro ll
__ __ _ ____ __ __
Com ptom eter op era to rs ___________
K ey-punch o p e r a t o r s ______________
O ffice g i r l s -------- ----------------- __ —
S e c r e t a r ie s _____ __ __ ________ __
Stenographers, g e n e r a l____________
Sw itchboard op era to rs _____________
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rrecep tion ists ______________________
T yp ists:
C la ss A .........................................
C la ss B __________________________

50.5 0

-

6 8 .5 0

$ 5 6 .5 0

$ 5 0 .5 0

5 1 .0 0

4 7 .5 0

-

5 4.00

-

6 7.50

5 9 .0 0

59. 00

5 1 .0 0

58 .0 0

4 8 .5 0

66.5 0

$ 6 0 . 00

5 7.50

5 7.50

$ 6 4 .5 0

73.0 0

63. 00

79.00
6 1.50
53.0 0
6 4 .5 0
70.5 0
67. 00
62. 00
85. 00
6 8 .5 0
6 4 .5 0

7 1 .5 0
57. 00
4 4 .5 0
51.5 0
6 1 .0 0
5 9 .0 0
59. 00
7 6 .0 0
6 2.50
52.5 0

7 5 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
4 6 .5 0
5 2 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
6 1 .0 0
5 1 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
60 .5 0
5 2.50

6 0 .0 0
53.5 0
4 2 .5 0
49. 00
62 .5 0
62 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
60. 50
4 9 .0 0

7 0 .0 0
5 7.00
4 1 .5 0
53 .0 0
64. 00
6 0 .0 0
7 4 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
4 9 .5 0

73. 00
55 .0 0
4 4 .5 0
5 3 .5 0
5 6 .5 0
5 4 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
5 5 .0 0
4 5 .0 0

84. 00
66.5 0
55.50
58.50
72. 00
68 .5 0
69. 00
56. 00
85.50
7 2 .0 0
64. 00

81. 00
59. 00
52.50
63 .5 0
64. 00
59.50
83.50
64.5 0
62.50

7 2 .0 0
54.50
4 9 .5 0
52. 00
6 0 .5 0
57.50
46. 50
75. 00
62.5 0
55.00

67.50
58. 00
50.50
69. 00
56.0 0
7 1 .0 0
60.0 0
54. 00

73.00
65.50
65.0 0
6 4 .0 0
74. 00
53.00

80. 00
67.50
5 9.50
6 5.50
7 4 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
7 1 .5 0
82. 00
7 3 .5 0
7 0 .0 0

70. 00
64.00
55. 00
63. 00
7 3.50
63. 50
75. 00
68.5 0
64. 50

6 6.50
53. 00
4 4 .5 0
5 0.50
6 1 .5 0
55. 00
5 5 .5 0
44. 00
72.5 0
58. 00
55.5 0

$ 6 2 .0 0
-

66. 00
61. 00
7 5.50
57.00

-

$ 5 4 .5 0

-

$ 7 0 .5 0

$ 6 2 .5 0

-

6 9.50

59.0 0

5 4.00

-

5 9 .5 0

-

72 .5 0

-

54.50

56. 00

-

-

6 8.00

50.50

54. 00

65. 00
59.0 0

5 3 .5 0

5 0.50

51 .0 0

58. 00
5 0 .5 0

4 9 .0 0
4 9 .5 0

62.00

56. 50

53.0 0

58. 00
53. 00

-

63. 00

61.00

D ashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c rite ria .




-

-

5 4.50

1 Earnings rela te to standard s a la rie s that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules.
2 Excludes data fo r lim ite d -p ric e variety sto r e s.
3 E xcludes data fo r 2 large departm ent s to re s.
NOTE:

-

28
Table A -7.

Office occupations-finance f

(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r se le cte d occupations studied in finance, insurance, and real estate, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Sex, occupation, and grade
B oston

South

NewarkJ e rse y
City

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

Atlanta

$ 7 8 .5 0

$89 . 00
6 1 .5 0
5 3 .0 0
7 4 .0 0

$ 8 3 .5 0
61. 00
50. 00
67. 00

$ 8 5 . 00
69. 00
4 7 .5 0
7 1 .5 0

7 5 .5 0
6 3 .5 0

65.00
53. 00

5 6 .0 0

67. 00
52.50
60.50
47. 00
63.5 0
-

-

57. 00
4 5 .5 0
74. 00
60. 00
59.00

5 5 .0 0
49. 00
7 2 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
6 1 .5 0

62.5 0
63.00

55. 00
66. 00

B a lti­
m ore

North Central
M innea p o lis St. Paul

West
L os
A n g elesLong
B each

San
F ran c is c o Oakland

$8 7 . 00

$ 8 6 .5 0

D allas

C h icago

$ 8 8 . 00
6 6 .5 0
47. 00
6 9 .5 0

$ 9 4 .5 0

-

-

-

4 7 .5 0
69.50

57.50
81.50

$ 5 3 .5 0
77. 00

$4 7 . 00
76.5 0

4 5 .5 0
■

56.50
85. 50

5 9.50
8 1 .0 0

50. 00

6 9 .5 0
5 2 .5 0

69. 00

7 2 .5 0
5 9.50

5 2.50

5 6 .5 0
5 1 .5 0

59.50

6 0 .5 0

69. 00
54.5 0
57. 00
4 4 .5 0
65. 00

82.50
66 .5 0
68. 00
5 5.00
85. 00
6 7.50
6 8 .5 0
5 7.50
87. 00
71. 50
7 3 .5 0

78 .5 0
65 .5 0
65. 00
5 3.50

7 0 .5 0
58.50

7 0 .5 0
52.5 0
6 0 .0 0
4 8 .5 0

78. 50
6 2.50
62.50
51.50
7 5.50

7 5 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
5 3.00
8 2.00

55 .5 0
4 3 .5 0
72. 00
54 .5 0
55. 00

6 4 .5 0
5 0 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
4 5 .5 0
6 5 .5 0
58. 00
5 3 .5 0
4 4 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

-

61. 00
5 8 .0 0

7 1 .5 0
7 9 .0 0

D etroit

St. Louis

Office clerical
Men
C lerk s:
Accounting, c la s s A __ ___________
A ccounting, c la s s B _ _
O ffice b oys ______________________________
T abulating - m achine o p e r a t o r s ________

$ 7 7 .0 0
59. 00
5 0 .5 0
6 5 .5 0

-

55.0 0
"

$ 8 3 . 00
-

-

-

-

$ 8 6 .5 0

W omen
Bookkeeping-m ach ine op e ra to rs:
C la s s A ______________________________
C la ss B __________________ — --------C lerk s:
Accounting, c la s s A ____________ ___
Accounting, cla s s B _____ _________
F ile , c la s s A
— ________________________
F ile , c la s s B ______________________________
P a y ro ll
„
------------------ ----------- ---------------------C om ptom eter op era to rs __________________
K ey-punch op era to rs ________________________
O ffice g i r l s ________ „ ____ __ ______
Stenographers, g e n e r a l_____ __
____ __
Sw itchboard op era to rs
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rrecep tion ists __________________
T abulating-m achine o p e ra to rs __
T ran scrib in g-m a ch in e op e ra to rs,

-

55.50
7 3.00
59.0 0
6 2.50
4 8 .5 0

______
______

6 9 .5 0
5 6 .0 0
5 8 .0 0
48. 00
6 5 .5 0
5 2 .5 0
5 7 .0 0
4 9 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
6 0 .5 0

6 0 .5 0
53. 00
81. 00
62. 50
61. 00

7 8 .5 0
6 2 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
5 3 .0 0
7 9 .5 0
6 9 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
5 2 .5 0
86. 00
6 6 .0 0
6 9 .5 0

_____
— __

5 9 .0 0
6 5 .0 0

-

6 6 .5 0
7 4 .5 0

-

7 0 .0 0
5 3 .5 0
5 8 .5 0
46. 00

-

-

4 8 .5 0

-

-

61 .5 0
66. 00
50.50
83.50
70. 00
63. 50

63.50
55. 00
4 5 .0 0
7 5 .5 0
58 .5 0
61. 00

-

-

5 8 .5 0
49. 00
6 9 .5 0
5 8 .5 0
5 8 .5 0

66. 00
54. 00
85. 00
72. 00
6 7 .5 0

6 5 .5 0
5 3 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
72. 00
6 6 .5 0

64. 50

60. 00
6 1.50

-

66. 00
85.50

66. 00
7 8 .5 0

-

-

.

5 7 .0 0

60. 00

68. 00

5 3.50

57. 00

56. 00

5 4 .5 0

6 9 .5 0

6 4 .5 0

57. 00

60. 00

6 4 .5 0

7 0 .5 0

60. 00
53. 00

62. 00
53.0 0

6 3 .5 0
5 7.00

59.00
51. 00

5 7 .5 0
5 0 .5 0

58.50
4 8 .0 0

6 0 .5 0
49. 00

70. 00
60.5 0

66. 00
58. 00

5 6 .5 0
5 2.50

5 8 .5 0
4 8 .5 0

68. 00
57. 00

6 7 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

__

1 Earnings rela te to standard s a la rie s that are paid fo r standard w ork schedules,
■ F inance, in surance, and re a l estate.
f
NOTE:

-

__ __ _____________________
......................................................

g e n e ra l

T yp ists:
C la s s A
C la s s B

6 1 .5 0
5 2 .5 0

D ashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c rite ria .




Table A-8. Office occupations-services
(A verage w eekly earnings 1 fo r selected occupations studied in s e rv ice s , winter 1 9 5 8 -5 9 )
N o rth e a s t
Sex, o c c u p a tio n , and g ra d e

New
Y ork
C ity

N orth C e n tr a l

W est
Los
A n g e le s L on g
B ea ch 2

P h ila ­
de lp h ia

C h ic a g o

D e tr o it

$ 5 1 . 00

-

$ 57.50

$ 5 5 . 50

-

-

72. 50

-

74.50

74.50

-

73.00
64. 50
4 9. 00
69. 00
71.50
62.50
51.50

83.50
66. 50
58. 00
75. 00
69. 50
67. 00
84. 00
71. 50
66. 00

84. 00
68. 50
56. 00
80. 00
71. 50
87. 50
78. 00
59.50

86.50
66.50
54. 00
75. 00
68. 50
86. 00
72. 00
58. 50

B o s to n

Office clerical

M en
O ffic e b o y s ___________________________

$ 4 6 . 00

W om en

B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B _____________________________
C le r k s :
A c c o u n tin g , c la s s A
A c c o u n tin g , c la s s B
F i l e , c la s s B
P a y r o l l _____________________________
C om p tom eter o p e ra to rs
K e y -p u n c h o p e r a t o r s _______________
S e c r e t a r ie s ___________________________
S te n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l _____________
S w itc h b o a rd o p e r a t o r s ______________
S w itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r r e c e p t io n is t s _
T y p is t s :
C la s s A ____________________________
C la s s B
_________________________ _

$ 6 1 .5 0
51. 00
62. 00
73. 00
63. 00
50.50

$82 .50
72.50
54. 00
75. 00
64. 00
73.50
88. 50
70.50
58.50

59. 00

68. 00

-

74. 00

-

66. 00

64. 00
53. 00

69- 00
63.50

62. 00
53.50

74. 00
64. 50

60. 50

73.50
61. 00

1 1 4 .5 0
8 1 .5 0

1 3 4 .0 0
9 1 -0 0

-

-

Professional and technical

M en
D ra fts m e n :
S e n io r -------------------------------------------J u n io r --------------------------------------------

1 4 1 .5 0
9 2 .5 0

1 E a rn in g s r e la te to sta n d a rd s a la r ie s that a re paid f o r sta n d a rd w o rk s c h e d u le s .
2 E x c lu d e s m o t io n -p ic t u r e p r o d u c tio n and a llie d s e r v i c e s ; data f o r th e se in d u s tr ie s are in c lu d e d ,
d u s t r i e s " and "n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ."




NOTE:

D a sh e s in d ica te no data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

-

h ow ever,

in " a ll in ­

30
Table A-9. Plant occupations-all industries
(Average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupations studied in 6 broad industry divisions, winter 1958-59)
South

N ortheast
O ccupation 2

N ewarkB oston3 Buffalo J e rs e y
C ity3

New
Y ork
C ity3

P h ila ­
delphia3 Atlanta

B a lti­
m ore

D allas

N orth Central
M em ­
phis3

W est

L os
Minne­
New
M ilwau­ a p o lis A n gelesSt. L ou is3D enver
O rleans C h icago3 D etroit3
kee
Long
St. Paul
Beach3

P ort­
land

San
F ra n Seattle3
c is c o Oakland3

Maintenance and powerplant
C a rp enters
__ _ ______
E lectricia n s __ _
_ ___
E n gin eers, stationary _
F irem en , stationary b o i l e r _______
H elpers, trades _
_
M ach in e-tool op era tors,
toolroom
_. .
M a c h in is t s _________________________
M e c h a n ic s __________________________
M erhanirs, autom otive
. .. M illw rights ________________________
O ilers - . . _
P ainters
P i p e f it t e r s _________________________
P lum bers
................ _
Sheet-m etal w o r k e r s ______________
T ool and die m akers
_ _ __

$2. 51
2. 58
2. 51
2. 12
2.01
2 .4 8
2. 60
2.3 3
2. 25
2. 44
1.97
2. 22
2. 55
2. 50
2. 56
2. 74

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

70
86
59
33
38

$2. 72
2. 87
2 .9 2
2.41
2. 13

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

57
63
80
20
11

$2. 65
2. 69
2 .3 4
2. 15
2. 21

2. 70
2 . r>
2. 77
2. 51
2. 77
2. 38
2. 57
2. 69
2. 76
2 .9 8

2. 79
2. 82
2. 76
2. 48
2. 79
2. 32
2. 59
2. 87
2.95
2. 77
2. 86

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

66
85
65
52
72
16
33
65
34
66
87

2. 63
2. 70
2. 55
2. 55
2. 65
1.98
2. 40
2. 73
2. 42
2. 65
2. 87

1. 56

1. 74

$2.
2.
2.
1.
1.

27
71
17
62
80

1. 56

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

52
62
38
13
13

$2. 37
2. 32
2.07
1. 68

$2.
2.
2.
1.
1.

11
53
19
27
63

$2. 26
2. 69
1.97
1. 56
1. 82

$3. 01
3.05
2 .9 6
2. 39
2.41

$2.90
3. 07
2 .9 8
2. 51
2. 40

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

70
89
68
36
11

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

81
89
60
39
27

$2. 74
2.91
2. 74
2. 53
2. 43

$2. 65
2. 67
2. 54
2. 01
1.96

$2. 80
2 .97
2. 93
2. 53
2.30

$2. 87
2.9 6
2. 74
2. 32
2. 23

$2. 97
3. 04
2. 88
2. 57
2.45

2. 83
2.99
2. 72
2. 65
2. 71
2. 42
2. 78
2. 82
2. 89
3. 16

2. 44
2. 82
2. 53
2. 58
2. 72
2. 26
2. 83
2. 86
2 .9 5

2. 72
2.93
2. 63
2. 59
2. 86
2. 40
2. 70
2. 84
2. 88
3. 03

2. 62
2. 60
2. 50
2. 13
2. 56
2. 71
2. 79

2. 82
2. 94
2. 75
2. 76
2.91
2. 27
2. 71
2. 93
2. 84
2.9 5
3.0 0

2. 78
2.91
2. 85
2. 65
2. 85
2. 32
2. 94
2. 86
2. 87
-

2. 98
3. 02
2. 92
2. 90
3. 17
2. 43
2. 86
2. 97
2.91
3. 38

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

62
81
56
25
18

2. 35
2. 32
2. 23
1.94
2. 18
2. 38
2. 72

2. 49
2. 24
2. 28
2. 58
1.95
1.99
2. 76
2. 83

2. 66
2. 57
2. 27
1.96
2. 16
2. 44
-

2. 82
3. 03
2. 74
2. 83
2. 90
2. 36
3.01
3. 02
3. 17
3.01
3. 16

3 .0 6
3. 06
3. 04
2. 80
3. 01
2 .4 7
2. 80
3. 00
2. 82
2. 96
3. 17

1. 00

2. 50
2. 18
2. 29
1. 70
2. 22
2. 80
-

2. 67
2 .90
2. 67
2. 34
2. 61
2. 15
2. 21
2. 61
2. 79
2 .9 4

1. 02

. 66

. 83

2 .0 8

1. 83

1. 53

1. 26

1. 21
2. 45

1. 13
2. 08

1.41
2. 06

1. 22
2. 10

1. 12
2. 00

1.49
2. 25

1. 34
-

1. 90
1.93

1. 52
2. 10

2. 78
2. 71
2. 61
2. 61
2. 25
2. 68
2. 62
3. 03

Custodial and material movement
E levator op era tors, passenger
(men) . . . . . .
____
E levator o p era tors , passenger
_ _ _ _ _
__
(w o m e n )____
Guards __
______
_____
Jan itors, p o rte rs , and
clea n ers (m e n ) ______ L____________
Jan itors, p o rte rs , and
clea n ers (w o m e n )___
_ __ _
L a b o r e rs , m aterial h a n d lin g _____
O rder fille r s
. . .
P a ck e rs , shipping (m e n )_
P a ck e rs , shipping ( w o m e n )_______
R eceivin g cle r k s ____ _ _
Shipping r l e r k s
Shipping and receiv in g c l e r k s ____
T r u c k d r iv e r s 4 _
_
_ _
Light (under 1 V2 t o n s ) _________
M edium ( 1 V2 to and including
4 tons) _ _ _
_
__ _
Heavy (ov er 4 tons, tra ile r
type) __
.........................
Heavy (over 4 tons, other than
tr a ile r type) _ _ _ _ __ __
T ru ck ers , pow er ( f o r k l i f t ) ________
T ru ck ers , pow er (other than
fo r k lift )

W atchmen _

__ __ _ _ _ _ _

1. 28
1. 18
1.91

1. 22
2. 31

1. 33
2.09

1. 61
1. 89

1. 59

1.91

1. 81

1. 31
1. 81
1. 82
1. 72
1. 45
1. 83
1.99
1.97
2. 19
1. 86

1.41
2. 09
2. 24
2. 19
1. 81
2. 16
2. 34
2. 20
2. 40
2. 20

1. 43
2. 21
2. 13
1.92
1. 53
2. 10
2. 27
2. 18
2. 67
2. 08

2. 08

2. 24

2. 73

2. 65

2. 40

2. 37

2.55

2. 77

2. 59

2. 52

2. 26
2. 07

2 .48
2. 31

2. 49
2. 28

2.95
2. 44

2. 44
2. 10

.
1. 87

2. 03
1.57

2. 30
1. 71

2. 02
1. 68

2. 34
1. 75

2. 01
1. 60

.
1. 30

1. 74

. 85
1. 84

. 67
1. 95

. 67
1.41

1. 31
2.0 7

1. 22

1. 46

1. 25

1. 19

1. 05

1. 83

1.99

1. 88

1. 72

1. 62

1. 54

1. 82

1. 75

2. 02

1. 78

. 88
1. 53
1. 55
1. 51
1. 40
1. 72
1. 86
2. 03
2. 04
1. 44

1. 06
1. 85
1. 69
1. 75
1. 25
1. 81
2. 01
1.94
2. 12
2 .0 4

.9 5
1. 54
1. 55
1. 42
_
1. 83
1. 81
1. 89
1. 85
1. 50

. 91
1. 40
1.46
1. 52
1. 22
1.49
1. 74
1. 77
1. 78
1. 17

. 75
1.47
1. 42
1. 35
.9 8
1. 60
1. 69
1. 84
1. 68
1.42

1. 61
2. 06
2.09
1.96
1. 70
2. 21
2. 30
2. 18
2. 63
2. 58

1. 47
2. 24
2. 24
2. 25
2. 16
2. 34
2 .4 6
2. 39
2. 57
2. 30

1. 36
2. 18
2. 14
2. 13
1. 71
2. 22
2. 25
2. 33
2. 51
2.41

1.
2.
2.
2.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

1.
1.
2.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

1.46
2. 02
1.90
1.69
1. 58
1. 84
1.93
2. 07
2. 16
1.92

1. 58
2. 21
2. 22
2. 11
1. 89
2. 33
2. 32
2 .3 8
2. 54
2. 30

1. 50
2. 18
2. 16
2. 13
2. 26
2. 36
2 .2 5
2. 40
2. 18

1. 90
2. 32
2. 33
2. 24
2. 41
2. 45
2. 54
2. 63
2. 54

1. 66
2. 12
2. 12
2. 10
1. 79
2. 06
2. 22
2. 19
2.4 2
2. 30

2. 10

1.96

1.91

1. 66

1. 61

2. 58

2. 55

2. 34

2. 42

2. 48

2. 18

2. 48

2. 38

2. 62

2. 34

2. 39

2. 30

1. 78

1. 90

1. 63

2. 70

2. 62

2. 64

2. 47

2. 51

2. 36

2. 60

2.47

2. 70

2.49

2. 11
2. 30

1. 73

.
1. 53

2. 08
1. 82

2. 68
2. 30

2. 64
2. 36

2. 51
2. 33

2. 38
2. 30

.
2. 19

2. 07
2. 10

2. 58
2. 37

2. 40
2. 26

2. 64
2. 41

2. 49
2. 21

2. 31
1. 36

2.03
1. 25

1. 82
1. 10

1. 70
1. 14

2. 33
1. 42

2. 47
1. 75

2. 29
1. 63

2. 22
1. 70

2. 10
1. 45

1. 57

2. 32
1. 86

2. 35
1. 87

2. 01

. 59
2. 19

1. 70

1. 66

1.49
1.95
1.97
1. 72
1. 63
2. 00
2. 16
2. 11
2 .6 6
2. 27

1. 29
1.93
2. 03
1. 78
1. 50
1.97
2. 12
2. 20
2. 42
2. 07

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Data lim ited to m en w ork ers except w here otherw ise indicated.
3 Exceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footnotes 4 and/or 5 to the table in appendix A.

4 Includes all drivers, regardless of size and type of truck operated.
NOTE: D ashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication cr ite r ia .




1. 48

.9 9
2. 02

1. 29
1. 65

41
14
07
10
56
19
31
26
42
37

28
98
06
98
61
15
21
16
48
29

.

.

2. 20
1. 89

31
Table A-10. Plant occupatfons-manufacturing
(Average hourly earnings1 for selected occupations studied in manufacturing, winter 1958-59)

O ccupation *
Boston

N ewarkBuffalo J e rse y
City

North Central

South

N ortheast

W est

Minne­
apolis - St. Louis
St. Paul

Los
A n g elesD enver
Long
B each

$ 2 .6 9
2 .8 7
2. 76
2 .3 8
2 .0 8

$2. 71
2 .8 2
2 .6 3
2 .4 3
2 .2 4

$2. 74
2 .8 9
2 .8 4
2 .5 2
2 .4 4

$ 2 .6 4
2 .6 7
2 .6 6
2 .2 5
1.91

$ 2 .7 4
2 .9 4
2 .9 7
2 .6 7
2. 30

$2.81
2 .9 4
2. 74
2 .2 6
2.21

$ 2 .9 2
3 .0 7
3 .02
2 .6 5
2. 52

$2. 57
2. 73
2 .5 6
2 .2 8
2. 18

3 .0 6
3 .0 7
3 .0 4
2 .8 4
3.01
2 .4 8
2. 86
2 .9 9
2 .9 8
2 .9 7
3 .1 7

2 .8 3
3.01
2. 71
2 .7 2
2. 71
2 .4 2
2. 77
2. 83
2.91
3 .16

2 .4 4
2.81
2 .5 2
2. 58
2. 72
2 .2 5
2. 76
2. 83
2 .9 5

2. 73
2 .9 3
2 .6 4
2 .6 6
2. 86
2 .4 2
2. 70
2. 84
2 .8 8
3.03

2. 62
2. 58
2 .6 3
2. 14
2 .6 9
2. 71
2. 79

2. 82
2 .9 3
2. 75
2 .8 0
2.91
2 .2 7
2. 70
2 .9 3
2 .8 0
2 .9 3
2 .9 9

2. 78
2 .9 2
2 .8 5
2. 58
2 .8 5
2 .3 2
2 .9 0
2 .8 6
“

2 .9 8
3.03
2 .9 3
2 .9 6
3 .1 7
2 .4 3
2 .9 2
2 .9 7
2.91
3 .3 8

2. 78
2. 72
2 .5 7
2. 61
2 .2 5
2 .6 3
2. 61
3 .03

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

Atlanta

B alti­
m o re

D allas

M em ­
phis

New
Chicago
Orleans

D etroit

M ilw au­
kee

$ 2 .2 0
2. 74
2. 50
1 .6 4
1.98

$ 2 .5 8
2 .6 6
2 .4 6
2 .1 5
2 .1 6

$ 2 .3 6
2 .4 2
2 .2 6
1. 76

$ 2 .0 3
2.6 3
2 .4 0
1.25
1.46

$ 2 .3 4
2. 76
1.95
1 .65
1 .86

$ 2 .7 7
2 .9 9
2 .9 3
2 .3 5
2 .41

$ 2 .9 4
3 .0 7
3 .0 8
2.61
2 .4 2

2 .6 7
2.91
2. 69
2 .2 9
2. 61
2. 15
2 .4 0
2. 60
2.81
2 .9 5

2 .4 7
2 .3 0
2. 05
1.98
2. 30
2. 72

2 .49
2 .2 7
1.97
2. 58
2 .0 8
2. 76
2. 83

2 .6 7
2 .5 7
2 .1 5
2 .0 0
2 .4 5
2 .4 2
-

2 .8 2
3.02
2. 73
2 .8 0
2.91
2 .3 3
2. 77
2 .9 9
3.0 2
3. 16

P o r t­
land

San
F ra n Seattle
c is c o Oakland

Maintenance and powerplant
C arpenters ----- --------- -..... ------------E lectricia n s ........ ................ -.... ..
■
E n gin eers, stationary —---------------F irem en , stationary b o ile r —
■
H elp ers, trades --------- —---- ---------- M ach in e-tool o p era to rs,
toolroom ------- - - ----- ------—
M a c h in is t s ------------- — r-----------------M e c h a n ic s -------------------------------------M echanics, a u to m o tiv e -----------------

$2.61
2 .8 3
2 .9 8
2 .4 2
2 .0 6

$ 2 .6 3
2. 81
3. 13
2. 58
2 .0 3

$2. 62
2. 70
2 .4 5
2 .2 0
2 .2 5

2 .4 8
2 .6 0
2 .3 0
2 .4 2
2 .4 4
1 .9 7
2 .3 9
2. 55
2. 56
2. 75

2. 70
2 .8 2
2. 77
2 .6 2
2. 77
2 .4 0
2 .6 0
2 .6 9
2. 77
2 .9 8

2. 79
2. 81
2. 76
2. 73
2. 77
2. 30
2 .5 5
2 .8 3
2 .9 5
2. 75
2 .8 4

2 .6 6
2. 84
2. 70
2 .6 3
2. 75
2 .2 2
2. 73
2 .6 6
2. 60
2 .6 6
2 .8 7

2 .6 3
2. 68
2. 55
2 .5 3
2. 65
1.98
2. 54
2. 72
2 .6 5
2 .8 7

2 .3 2

2. 15

2 .0 5

2 .0 6

2. 32

2. 17

2 .0 2

2.01

2 .0 9

2. 16

2 .4 8

2 .1 0

2. 14

2. 19

2 .2 3

2 .2 6

2.31

2. 12

1.7 6

2. 04

1.91

1.69

1.79

1.52

1.78

1.50

1.42

1.49

1.89

2. 19

1.99

1.88

1.81

1. 81

1.99

1.90

2 .2 0

1.92

1.53
1.79
1.90
1.6 8
1.48
1.91
2 .1 0
2 .0 8
2 .2 5
2.11

1.75
2. 13
2. 17
2 .2 2
1.90
2 .2 5
2 .3 8
2 .2 8
2 .3 9
2 .2 5

1.70
2 .2 7
2 .0 5
1.92
1.62
2 .0 9
2 .1 8
2 .2 2
2 .9 7
2 .2 3

1.6 7
2 .0 9
1.70
1 .68
2. 13
2. 18
2 .0 5
2. 89
2 .2 4

1.51
1.94
1.92
1.80
2. 10
2. 14
1.99
2 .4 2

1 .20
1.53
1.48
1.59
1 .80
1.93
2. 18
1.56
1 .56

1.32
1.88
1 .5 7
1.85
1.21
2. 07
2 .2 2
1.92
2. 19
2 .2 6

1.29
1.52
1.81
1.53
2. 04
2. 00
1.93
1.81
1.56

1.23
1.41
1.62
1.67
1.25
1 .75
1 .8 4
1.68
1.56

1.2 6
1.4 5
1.30
1.35
1.89
1.73
1.92
1 .5 6
1.40

1.69
1.99
2 .0 6
2 .0 0
1 .7 8
2 .2 7
2 .3 9
2 .1 8
2. 63
2. 68

1.95
2 .3 0
2 .3 7
2 .2 8
2 .2 2
2 .3 9
2 .4 9
2 .4 3
2. 54
2 .4 5

1.66
2. 17
1.99
2 .1 4
1.79
2 .2 2
2 .2 9
2 .3 4
2 .3 0
2. 16

1.65
2 .0 7
2. 05
2. 03
2 .2 3
2 .2 8
2 .2 9
2 .4 3
2. 54

1.5 6
1.9 7
2 .0 3
1.96
1.62
2 .1 9
2 .2 6
2 .1 5
2. 56
2. 34

1.6 8
1.99
1.9 8
1 .7 4
1.51
2. 12
2 .0 5
1 .97
2.11
1.91

1.85
2. 15
2 .0 9
2. 07
1.93
2 .32
2 .2 2
2 .3 6
2. 52
2 .2 3

1 .68
2.11
2 .2 3
2 .3 9
2 .4 9
2.31
2 .4 0
2. 12

2. 04
2 .3 0
2 .4 2
2 .2 8
2 .4 8
2 .4 2
2 .5 3
2. 71
2. 69

2. 11
2 .1 6
2.12
1.90
2 .03
2 .3 4
2 .2 7
2 .5 5
-

2 .2 3

T ool and die m a k e r s ---------------------

$2. 72
2 .8 7
2. 64
2 .3 4
2 .4 0

1.9 5

O ilers --------------------------------------------P a i n t e r s ........... ........ ........... . - ..... - ■
P i p e f it t e r s ------------------------------------P l u m b e r s ------- ------------ ---------- —

$2 .4 2
2. 62
2.61
2 .1 9
2 .0 2

2 .2 5

3 .1 5

2 .9 2

2 .4 5

1.40

2 .0 3

1.76

1.61

1.60

2. 53

2 .5 9

2 .3 4

2 .3 7

2 .6 3

2 .2 0

2. 55

2. 38

2. 75

2 .4 9

2 .2 5

-

3 .0 0

2. 70

2 .4 2

2 .1 3

1.95

-

1.63

2. 69

2. 53

2. 50

-

2. 62

-

2 .6 7

2 .4 4

2. 74

2. 54

-

2 .4 7
2.11
2. 11
1.70
2. 69
2 .8 0
-

-

Custodial and material movement

Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
clea ners ( m e n ) ------------ —
-----------Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
clea n ers ( w o m e n ) ---------------------L a b o r e rs , m aterial h a n d lin g ------O rder f i l l e r s ------------------------ —— —
P a ck e rs , shipping (men) -----------—
P a ck e rs , shipping (w o m e n ) --------R eceivin g c l e r k s --------------------------Shipping c l e r k s -----------------------------Shipping and receivin g c l e r k s -----T ru ckd rivers 3 ------------------------------Light (under l 1 t o n s ) ------------/*
Medium (lVa to and including
Heavy (over 4 tons, tra ile r
t y p e ) --------------------------------------Heavy (over 4 tons, other than
tra iler t y p e ) --------------------------T ru ck ers, pow er ( f o r k l i f t ) ----------T ru ck ers, pow er (other than
f o r k l i f t ) --------------------------------------W a tc h m e n -------- ------------------------------

-

-

2 .2 4
2 .0 3

2. 51
2 .3 0

2 .4 5
2 .2 6

3. 15
2 .4 2

2 .4 2
2 .0 7

2. 00

2. 32
2. 32

1.79

1 .66

1 .9 4

2 .3 0

2 .5 2
2. 36

2 .3 2

2. 18

2 .1 8

2. 05

2 .5 3
2. 30

2 .4 2
2 .2 5

2. 64
2 .4 2

2 .4 5
2. 18

2 .0 3
1.68

2. 30
1.82

2 .0 2
1.73

1 .6 7

2. 00
1 .7 4

1.25

2. 31
1 .47

2 .2 2
1.38

2 .0 4
1.20

1 .4 4

2. 33
1.8 0

2 .0 5

2 .2 8
1.89

2 .2 3
1.79

2 .0 9
1 .8 4

1 .56

2.22
1.96

2 .3 5
1.90

2. 10

2 .2 0
1.89

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
1 Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3 Includes all drivers, regardless of size and type of truck operated.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




-

-

32

Table A-11. Plant occupations-nonmanufacturing
(Average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupations studied in nonmanufacturing, winter 1958-59)
N ortheast
O ccupation*

South

N ewarkB oston3 B uffalo J e rse y
C ity3

New
Y ork
C ity3

$ 2.61

$ 2 .5 4
2 .4 8
2 .6 2
1.95
2. 14
2 .9 3
2 .5 4
2 .5 0
2 .2 4
2 .2 9

P h ila­
Atlanta
delphia3

B alti­
m o re

Dallas

North Central
M em ­
phis3

W est

Los
M inne­
New
C h icago3 D etroit3 M ilwau­ a p o lis - St. L ou is3 D enver A n g elesOrleans
kee
Long
St. Paul
Beach3

P o r t­
land

San
F ran­
Seattle3
cis c o Oakland3

Maintenance and powerplant
C a r p e n t e r s ------— — ... - — ..— —
....—
E lectricia n s — -------------------------------E n gin eers, sta tion a ry --------------------F irem en , stationary b o i l e r -----------H elp ers, t r a d e s ------------------------- --M a c h in is t s ------- — -----——----------------M e c h a n ic s ----------------------------- —------M ech an ics, a u to m o tiv e -----------------P ainters — —— —— ——---- ——— —

$ 2 .6 9
2 .4 0
2 .2 9
2 .0 0
2.01
2 .5 3
2 .4 6
2 .2 0
1.98
“

-

2 .3 6
2 .0 9
2 .6 3
2 .4 5
“

$ 3 .0 8
3.21
2. 75
2 .3 7
2 .32
3. 18
2 .7 6
2 .3 8
2. 68
"

$2. 73
2 .6 3
2 .1 2
1.89
2 .0 4
2 .8 7
2 .6 5
2 .5 5
2 .1 9
2.3 2

$ 2 .3 3
2 .5 8
1 .7 6

-

-

1.64
2 .3 7
2 .3 3
1.92
”

$ 2 .1 7

1.92
2 .5 0
2 .3 7
1.91
“

$ 2 .3 8
2. 14
1.94
1.45
2 .3 8
2 .2 6
2 .02
*

$ 2 .2 2
2 .3 0
2 .1 0
-

-

1.90
1 .87
1.83
2 .3 7
1.93
“

$ 2 .1 9
2 .49
1.99
1.05
1.68
2. 52
2.31
1.96
-

$ 3 .3 4
3.21
2 .9 9
2. 51
2 .4 0
3.12
2. 77
2 .8 5
3 .2 6
3.31

$ 2 .7 7
3. 03
2 .6 9
2 .0 8
2 .3 0
2 .9 7
2 .7 6
2 .6 5
"

$2. 74
-

2 .4 4
-

-

2 .6 2
2 .8 0
-

$ 2 .9 2
3. 10
2. 56
2 .32
2 .5 6
2. 58
2 .8 7
”

$2.28
2 .5 6
2 .5 7
_
"

_
_
$ 2 .2 6
_
2 .0 6
.
2 .5 0
“

$ 2 .9 8
3 .0 8
2 .82
2 .3 3
3. 13
2. 66
2 .7 5
2. 74

-

1 .4 6

$ 2 .9 7
_
2. 71
-

_
2 .6 8
“

$ 3 .0 5
_
2. 66
-

2 .8 5
2.82
2 .8 8
2. 79
"

$ 2 .7 3
3. 10
2 .5 9
_
_
2 .6 3
2. 73
“

Custodial and material movement
E levator o p e ra to rs , p assen ger

L a b o r e rs , m a teria l h a n d lin g -------P a ck e rs , shipping ( m e n ) -------------R eceivin g c l e r k s ---------------------------Shipping c l e r k s ------------------------------Shipping and receivin g c le r k s -------Truckd riv e rs 4 ................. ..................
Light (under l 1 t o n s ) --------------/*
M edium (lVa to and including

-

1.49

1.73

1.53

.9 8

.91

.62

.82

2 .0 8

1.32

1. 17
1.8 4

1.21
-

1.31
1 .9 4

1.61
1.85

1.25
1.28

.59
1.71

.9 9
1 .7 6

.85
1.43

.6 7
-

. 67
1.24

1.30
1.9 4

1.21
1.99

1 .44

1 .44

1.62

1.70

1.50

1.04

1.12

1.10

1.02

.9 4

1 .76

1 .35
2 .11
2. 18
1.93
2. 12
2. 61
2. 12
2 .4 7
-

1.48
1.83
2 .0 5
1 .76
1.59
1 .9 4
2 .1 4
2 .1 5
2. 54
2 .2 8

1.23
1.90
2. 10
1.72
1.40
1.83
2. 05
2 .2 9
2 .4 3
1 .94

. 82
1.53
1.57
1.4 4
1.33
1.65
1.71
1.91
2 .1 4
1.42

.9 5
1 .7 4
1.71
1.56
1.44
1.62
1.81
1.9 7
2 .0 9
1.32

.9 0
1.57
1.41
1.31
1 .5 4
1.59
1.85
1.86
1.49

. 80
1.39
1.41
1.45
1.31
1 .57
1.88
1.83
1. 14

. 73
1.49
1.43
1.35
.9 4
1 .4 7
1.6 6
1.82
1.70
1.42

1.6 0
2 .1 3
2 .1 0
1.90
1.48
2 .1 6
2 .1 8
2 .1 7
2 .6 3
2 .5 2

1.2 7
E levator o p e ra to rs , passen ger
(w o m e n )----------------------------------------Guards —------------ -----------------------------Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
clea ners ( m e n ) -------— ......— ---------Jan itors, p o r te r s , and

1.28
1.82
1. 79
1. 78
1.38
1.7 7
1.91
1.85
2. 16
1.63

1 .2 6
1.9 7
2 .2 9
1 .5 4
2 .0 7
2.11
2.4 1
-

-

1.53

1. 15

1.13
-

1.41
1.85

1.1 7
1.48

1.52

1 .5 7

1.59

1.29

1 .36

1.69

1.29
2 .0 8
2 .1 9
2 .0 6
2.21
2 .3 4
2 .2 9
2 .5 9
2 .0 6

1.23
2.21
2 .2 2
2 .0 5
1.48
2 .2 2
2 .1 8
2 .5 6
-

1.35
2 .1 8
2 .0 7
2. 14
1.39
2 .1 4
2 .3 4
2 .2 0
2 .4 2
-

1.17
2 .0 0
2 .0 9
2 .0 3
2 .1 0
2. 12
2. 19
2 .4 4
2. 13

•1.43
2 .0 3
1.87
1.65

1.53
2 .2 4
2 .2 4
2 . 14
2 .3 4
2 .4 2
2 .4 2
2 .5 4
2 .3 9

1.11
1 .4 7

-

1 .77
1.90
2. 15
2 .1 7
1.92

1 .4 7
2 .2 2

1 .3 4
-

1.72

-

1 .87
1.81

1.52
1.91

1.6 4

1.92

1.66

1 .47
2 .2 4
2. 15
2 .1 7
2. 17
2 .2 6
2 .2 2
2.41
2 .2 4

1.88
2 .3 4
2 .3 0
2 .2 0
2 .3 5
2 .4 6
2 .5 5
2. 61
2 .4 8

1.58
2 .1 2
2.11
2 .0 7
1.67
2 .1 2
2 .1 9
2 .0 6
2 .3 9
2 .2 3

1.9 7
Heavy (over 4 tons, tra ile r
t y p e ) ------------------:----------------------H eavy (over 4 tons, other than
W a t c h m e n ------------—

— ..... . ...

2 .2 3

2 .3 6

2 .4 7

2 .3 6

2 .2 7

1.93

1.93

1.69

1.62

2 .5 9

2 .4 9

2 .3 5

2.4 2

2 .3 9

2. 17

2 .4 5

2 .3 7

2 .5 9

2 .3 2

2 .4 0

2 .5 5

2 .7 0

2 .5 6

2. 53

2 .4 2

2 .3 4

1.69

1.92

1.63

2. 70

2 .6 5

2 .6 5

2 .4 6

2 .4 9

2 .3 6

2 .5 6

2 .4 9

2. 70

2 .4 8

2 .2 6
2. 16
1.42

2 .4 6
2. 34
1.40

2. 51
2. 36
1.59

2. 81
2 .4 8
1.79

2 .4 4
2 .2 0
1.44

1.60
1.37

1.63
1.13

1 .2 8
.9 8

2 .0 9
1.65
1.08

2 .6 9
2 .3 2
1.32

2 .6 8
2 .3 6
1 .47

2 .5 3
2 .4 0

2.41
2 .3 9
1 .6 6

2.22

2 .0 6
2 .1 9
1.59

2 .6 0
2 .5 5
1.65

2 .3 9
2 .2 8
1 .7 7

2 .6 4
2 .4 0
1 .87

2 .5 0
2 .2 6

-

-

2. 06
1.21

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
* Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3 Exceptions to the standard industry limitations are shown in footnotes 4 and/or 5 to the table in appendix A.
4
Includes all drivers, regardless of size and type of truck operated.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




-

1.18

33

Table A-12. Plant occupations-public utilities*
(Average hourly earnings1 for selected occupations studied in transportation, communication, and other public utilities, winter 1958-59)
Northeast
Occupation*

NewarkBoston3 Buffalo Jersey
City

South
New
York
City3

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

Balti­
more

Dallas

North Central

West
Los
San
New
Fran­ Seattle3
Milwau­ Minne­ St. Louis Denver Angeles- Port­
Mem­
Chicago3 Detroit3 kee
apolis land
cis coLong
phis3 Orleans
St. Paul
Beach3
Oakland3

Maintenance and powerplant
C a r p e n te rs --------------------------------Electricians ......... —
—
.—
Engineers, stationary —— — ——
Firemen, stationary b o ile r ---------Mechanics — ........ ............■ ------ —
—
Mechanics, automotive - ........ .......
Painters --------------------------------------

$2.56
2. 15
2.52
2.21
2.41

_
$2. 11
2.44
"

$2.82
2. 72
2.39
2. 17
2. 78
2.68

$2.81
2.64
2.70
2.26
2.19
2.62
2.50
2. 61

$2.53
2.72
2.31
2.14
2. 53
2.61

.
$1.75
2.37
■

_
$2.02
2.36

.
$2.01
-

2.31
”

.
-

$2.22
2.56
“

$2.29
-

_
-

-

-

2.65
2.36
“

$2.89
~

.
$2.41
2.81
"

.
-

-

$2.65
_

_
$2.60

$2.34
2. 73
2.58
"

$2.52
*
*

$3.00
2.75
2.85

$2.68
“

$2.75
2.87
2.73

-

-

$2.62
”

Custodial and material movement
Guards
..... .......—----------- ----- -■
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners ( m e n ) ------------------------Janitors, porters, and
Laborers, material handling —
Medium (lVa to and including
4 tons) ---------------------------------Heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
t y p e ) -----------------------------------Heavy (over 4 tons, other than
Truckers, power (fo r k lift )--------------- ---------W atchm en---------------—

_

_

1.75

1.79

2. 10
2.27

2.26
2.43

2.30
2.57

2.23

2.42

2.27

2.47

2.28
1.93

2.53
2.36
1.57

-

2.05

_

_

1.69

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

-

_

-

-

1.81

1.87

1.39

1.56

1.43

1.22

1.32

1.96

1.96

-

1. 79

1.85

1. 68

1.96

1.84

1.89

1.86

2.20
2.54

1.58
2. 18
2.37

1.33
2.00
2. 50

2.06
2. 18

1.25
1.94
2.32

1.15
1.88
2.36

1.34
1.72
2.16

1.67
2.42
2.64

1.77
2.53
2.69

2.45
2.45

1.51
2.12
2.45

2.29
2.32

2.36
2.50

1.63
2.37
2.38

2.45
2.55

2.28
2.32

2.46

2.51

2.37

2. 51

2. 06

2.30

2. 17

2. 11

2.54

-

2.63

2.46

-

2.29

2.48

2.38

2.52

2.30

2.68

2.62

2.43

2. 56

-

1.66

2.69

2.72

2.68

2.47

2.47

2.39

2.51

2.39

2.66

2.39

•
2.35
1.75

2.46
2.57
1.82

1.71

1. 71

2.26
1.61

1.65
1.18

2.05

2. 70
2. 50
2.20

-

2.47
1.90

1. 76

2.38

2.50
2.54

2.36
2.28

2. 60
2.42

-

1.93
-

-

1.65

1.04

1.34
2.47
2.66

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
* Data limited to m e n workers except where otherwise indicated.
3 1 or more utilities are municipally operated, and, therefore, excluded from the scope of the studies. See footnote 4 to the table in appendix A.
4 Includes all d r iv e r s , r e g a rd le ss o f s ize and type of truck operated.

* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




-

34

Table A-13. Plant occMpations-wholesale trade
(Average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupations studied in wholesale trade, winter 1958-59)

South

Northeast
Occupation*
Boston

NewarkJersey
City

$ 2 .1 7

$ 2 .6 6

1.75
1.89
1.75
1.95
1.88
2 .0 1
2 .0 5
2 .2 4
1.69

1.83
2 .1 0
2.0 1
1 .9 8
2 .01

2 .0 4

New
York
City

North Central

Phila­
delphia

Atlanta

Balti­
m ore

$ 2 .6 3

$ 1 .9 7

1.62
1.86
2 .1 3

$1.43
1.73
1.62

West

Minne­
apolis St. Paul

St. Louis

Los
AngelesLong
Beach

San
Fran­
cis co Oakland

Chicago

Detroit

$ 2 .7 4

$ 2 .6 0

2 .11

1.74
2.01
2 .0 9
1.92
2.21
2.21
2 .2 9
2 .6 5

1 .9 4
2 .0 7
2 .1 8
2 .2 0
2 .5 7
2 .4 9
2 .2 2
2 .5 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2.04
2 .2 3
2.31
2 .2 4
2.31
2 .4 6
2 .6 5
2 .5 9
2 .5 8

1.98

2 .6 7

2 .4 1

2 .3 3

2 .4 4

2 .4 4

2 .5 3

2 .4 4

2 .5 3

2 .5 4

2 .6 8

-

2 .6 6
2 .5 4

2 .6 1
2 .3 6

Maintenance and powerplant

-

-

$ 2 .7 5

-

-

Custodial and material movement

Janitors, porters, and
Laborers, material handling -------Order fillers ■■ — ...........—- ........- ■
Shipping c l e r k s ----------- --- <.. ■ Shipping and receiving clerks -----Light (under l 1 tons) ------------/*
Medium (lVa to and including
4 to n s )----------------------------------Heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
type) -------------------------------------Heavy (over 4 tons, other than
Truckers, power (forklift) -----------

$1.6 6
1.83
2 .0 5
1 .74
2 .1 7
2 .1 9
2 .0 9
2 .5 4

2 .5 4

-

-

1.50
1.31
1.53
1.46
1.73
1.81
1.88
1.67
1.38

2 .2 6

2 .5 0

2 .3 9

1.63

2 .5 9

2 .7 5

-

2.6 1

-

2 .4 8

2 .7 9

2 .5 4

2 .1 8
2 .0 9

2 .5 2

-

2 .5 7

-

-

-

-

-

2 .1 5
2 .4 7

-

-

1 .66

1
3

*

-

2 .0 3
-

-

-

1 .87

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Includes all drivers, regardless of size and type of truck operated.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




1.50

-

2 .3 2
1.26

2 .3 3

$1.7 6
2 .2 0
2 .21
2 .1 7
2 .2 4
2 .3 1

2 .3 7

2 .3 0

$ 1 .6 4
1.93
2 .1 0
2 .0 8
2 .0 2
2 .1 5
2 .2 2
2 .4 9

2 .2 4

1.92
2 .3 4
2 .2 3
2 .1 5
2 .3 0
2 .3 9
2 .5 3
2 .5 8

35
Table A-14. Plant occupations-retail trade
(Average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupations studied in retail trade, winter 1958-59)
Northeast
Occupation*
Boston

NewarkJersey
City*

South

New
York
City3

Phila­
delphia3

Atlanta

$3.43
2.92

$2.50

Balti­
m ore

North Central

West
Minne­
apolis St. Paul

P ort­
land

San
Fran­
cis co Oakland

-

_
-

$3.28

-

-

-

2.80
"

-

-

$1.49

I Chicago

$2.63

Dallas

New
Orleans

$2.98

_

-

2.34
1.93

$3.01
3.15
2.98
-

-

“

-

-

Detroit*

Denver

Seattle

Maintenance and powsrplant
$2.97

.

-

-

-

“

$2.68
2. 70
2. 76
-

2.60

2.07
2.19

.
-

-

-

$1.87
-

_

-

-

Custodial and material movement
Elevator operators, passenger
(women) ---- -------------------------------Janitors, porters, and

-

1.08

$1.16

1.32

.71

$0.92

.89

.71

1.24

1.00

$1.27

$1.18

$1.27

1.36

1.42

1.38

1.37

.95

1.08

1.01

.82

1.50

1.29

1.52

1.15

1.63

1.79

1.65

1.07
1.61
1.87
1.38
1.32
1.71
1.74
2.03

1.78
2.34
1.89
-

1.42
1.70
1.97
1.69
1.56
1. 73
3.00
2.63

1.14
1.82
2.02
1.53
1.43
1.73
2.39
2.39

.86
1.29
1.69
1.26
1.29
1. 54
1. 74
1.50

.81
1.65
1.80
1.30
1.52
1.74
2.03

.79
1.30
1.48
1.25
1.68
1.70
1.41

.64
1.19
1.44
1.39
1.64
1.78
1.43

1.38
2.00
2.13
1.82
2.12
2.08
1.94
2.60

1.16
1.72
2.18
1.96
2.55

1.22
1.75
1.81
1.37
2.08
2.37

1.26
1.78
1.73
1.38
1.64
2.07

1.83
2.13
2.09
2.32
2.40

2.38
2.27
2. 13
2.39
2.30
2.81

1.50
1.99
1.73
2.07
2.03
2.50

1.90
2.22
1.34

2.31
2.39

2.15
1.58

2.25
1.42

1.45
1.84
1.33

1.74
2.01
1. 12

1.30
1.11

1.51
1.57
1.01

.
2.34
1.52

2.55
2.31
1.40

2.33
2.32

1.97
-

2.35
-

2. 78
2.45

2.24

Janitors, porters, and
Laborers, material handling ——
Packers, shipping (men) ......
Packers, shipping (w om en )---- —Shipping and receiving cle rk s ------Medium (lVa to and including

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes data for limited-price variety stores.
Excludes data for 2 large department stores.
Includes all drivers, regardless of siae and type of truck operated.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria,




36
Table A-15. Plant occupations-financef
(A verage hourly earnings 1 fo r s e le cte d occupations studied in finance, insurance, and re a l estate, w inter 1958-59)
South

N ortheast
O ccup ation2
B oston

New
Y ork
City

N ew arkJ ersey
C ity

P h ila­
delphia

Atlanta

North Central

B alti­
m o re

D allas

C hicago

D etroit

West

M inne­
a p o lis St. Paul

St. Louis

Los
A n gelesLong
Beach

San
F ran ­
cis c o Oakland

Maintenance and powerplant
C arpenters

— —--------...------ -— —.....
-

.
-

_
-

$2. 56
2 .6 9
2 .4 4

_
$2 .0 9
1.93

_
-

_
-

$ 1 .3 5

-

1.79

1.58

-

-

$1. 75

1.99

1.51
1. 54

-

.
$ 2 .0 4
-

$ 3 .6 4
3 .0 6
-

-

2 .1 5

_
“

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

$ 2 .5 3
2 .6 9

_

$ 1 .2 0

$ 1 .5 5

$ 1 .9 2

1. 18
1 .48

1.55
1. 77

1.83
1.96

-

Custodial and material movement
E levator o p era tors, p assenger
(men) —------- ------ .. ■ ....................
■
E levator o p era tors , passen ger
(women) ------------ ■ ..........................
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
cleaners (men) ------------------------:----Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
clea n ers (wom en) ------- ----------------W a t c h m e n ---------------------— ------------

1.26
1.77

$ 1 .0 3
-

.9 8
1.52

1.95

$ 1 .8 5

1.26
1 .88

1.42

1.61

1.81

1 .54

$ 0 .9 3

1. 10

1.03

2. 12

1.50

1 .6 7

1.15

1 .55

1.31
1.4 5

1.3 7
1 .54

1.49
1.99

1 .24
1.46

-

.9 6
1.09

.7 6
1.06

1.63
"

1.29
1.59

1.3 8
“

1 .16
”

1 .47
1 .54

“

1 Excludes prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
2 Data lim ited to m en w ork ers except w here otherw ise indicated,
t F inance, in surance, and re a l estate.
NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




Table A-16. Plant occupations-services
(A verage hourly earnings 1 fo r se le cte d occupations studied in s e r v ic e s , w inter 1958-59)

B oston

New
Y ork
City

W est

North Central

N ortheast
O ccup ation2

P h ila­
delphia

Los
A n geles Long
B ea ch 3

Chicago

D etroit

$ 3 .0 3
2 .9 2
“

_

_

$2. 02
-

$ 2 .6 9
1.91
"

$ 2 .6 9
-

-

-

Maintenance and powerplant
$ 1 .6 0

$2. 17
2 .4 2
1.82
1.98

1.04

1 .54

E le c t r ic ia n s ------------------------------------P a i n t e r s -----------------------------------------

-

Custodial and material movement
E levator o p e ra to rs , passen ger
E levator o p e ra to rs , passen ger
(wom en) — ---------------------------- -----Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
clea n ers ( m e n ) --------------------------- —
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and
T ru ck d rivers 4 —— -------------- ---------W a t c h m e n -------- -— — .............. ......

-

1.61

1.00

1. 19

1.69

1.15

1.50
1.48

1.48
2. 15
1.4 7

1. 10
1.85
1.87
1. 14

"

-

1.22

1.49

1.45

1.65

1.61
1.26

1.30
1.30

1. 54
-

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holid ays, and late shifts.
2 Data lim ited to m en w ork ers except w here otherw ise indicated.
3 Excludes data fo r m o tio n -p ictu re production and allied s e r v ic e s ; data fo r these industries are included, h ow ever, in "a ll
and "nonm anufacturing. "
4 Includes all d r iv e r s , re g a rd le ss of s ize and type of truck operated.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .

1.36

1.20

-

in d u stries"

-

-

”

37
Differences in Pay Rates for Men and Women

The Bureau's community wage surveys provide data for both
knen and women in six of the office jobs and three of the plant (non­
office) jobs studied. With few exceptions, areawide averages for men
exceeded the averages for women in the same job categories and
areas.
The average amounts by which m en's average weekly sala­
ries exceeded those of women office workers were as follows: Order
clerks, $22; payroll clerks, $19; accounting clerks (class A), I 17. 50;
p
accounting clerks (class B), $14; tabulating-machine operators, $10.50;
and office boys and girls, $2. In the three plant jobs, m en's aver­
age hourly earnings exceeded those of women as follows: Janitors,
porters, and cleaners, 30 cents; shipping packers, 29 cents; and pas­
senger elevator operators, 17 cents.
These are averages of pay
differences within the 20 areas; they do not represent a comparison
of earnings in identical establishments.
Of the factors that may influence the pay position of men and
women in the same job categories, one is difference in length of serv­
ice or experience. This information is not collected in the surveys;
it seems likely, however, that women generally have less service
than men in a particular job. To the extent that individual pay rates
were adjusted on the basis of length of service or merit review, longer
average service would result in higher average pay for men when both
sexes are employed within the same wage range. Pay data in these
studies relate to salaries (or hourly rates) paid to each individual
worker at the time of study. Differences in length of service would be
more of a factor in office than in plant jobs since rate ranges are
more common in the office jobs.
Differences in duties of men and women in the same job
categories may also influence these pay positions. Job descriptions
used in classifying employees in these wage surveys are usually more
generalized than those used in individual establishments because allow­
ance must be made for minor differences among establishments in
specific duties performed.15 In janitorial work andin packing products
or materials for shipment or storage, it can be assumed that, on the
average, jobs in which men were employed involved the heavier tasks.
Similarly, office occupations could differ sufficiently among establish­
ments with respect to scope of duties and responsibilities to explain
in part the variation in rates found within the categories and areas
studied.
A measurable factor contributing to differences in earnings
of men and women in the same job classification is the variation in
the establishments and type of industry in which men and women are
15
This is essential to permit grouping of occupational
rates representing comparable job content. The job descriptions used
are in appendix B, p. $7.




employed. For each of the 20 areas, separate tabulations were pre­
pared of earnings in establishments employing (a) both men and women
in the same job, (b) only men in the job, and (c) only women in the job.
Among the nine jobs compared, the proportion of workers in
establishments employing both men and women in a job varied from
17 percent of the payroll clerks to 66 percent of the janitors. Nearly
three-fourths of the payroll clerks worked in establishments employing
only women payroll clerks whereas only about 1 percent of the jani­
tors worked in establishments employing only women. The nine jobs
also differed by the type of establishment in which they were located.
About 6 percent of the elevator operators as compared with over
60 percent of the shipping packers were employed in manufacturing
establishments.
As shown in the estimates for the nine jobs combined below,
men were found in manufacturing establishments more often than
women.
P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s found in —
Men
A ll e sta b lis h m e n ts -------------------------E sta b lish m en t group em p loyin g
men on ly in j o b -----------------------------E sta b lish m en t group em p loyin g
both s e x e s in j o b --------------------------

M anufacturing

N onm anufacturine

42

21

47

53

37

63

2£

70

37

63

23

77

Women
A ll e s t a b l is h m e n t s --------------- ---------E sta b lish m e n t group em p loyin g
w om en o n ly in j o b ------------------------E sta b lish m e n t group em p loyin g
both s e x e s in jo b -------------------------

Tables 5 and 6 present, separately for manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing, comparisons of m en's and women's earnings by
job and area in (a) all establishments, (b) establishments employing
both men and women in the same job, and (c) establishments employ­
ing only men or women in the job.
Averages for women in all in­
dustries in each area and job, were used as a basis for comparison,
i. e., the earnings for men and women in the above groups of estab­
wage
lishments were divided by the average for women in all industries in
the same job and area to establish the pay relatives presented in
tables 5 and 6.

38
In the great majority of cases, the difference between m en's
and women's earnings was greatly reduced when the comparison was
limited to their earnings in identical establishments, i. e .,' those
which employed both men and women in the same job. The greatest
differences were between earnings in establishments employing only
men and those employing only women. Average earnings for men and
women in identical establishments may, however, differ even when
their earnings are the same in individual establishments. Such a
difference might occur because of differences in the proportion of
men or women employed by establishments with different pay levels.
In order to summarize the data presented in tables 5 and 6,
a simple average of the pay relatives for each establishment group­
ing16 was computed for each of the 9 jobs in the 20 areas.
Com­
parisons of the averages of pay relatives were then possible for each
of the 9 jobs in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing (18 comparisons).
Among the nine jobs and establishment groupings, m en's earnings in
establishments employing only men in the job were generally highest.
Their pay relatives or earnings were highest for four of the nine jobs
in manufacturing and for six of the nine in nonmanufacturing. Lowest
relatives or earnings were for women in establishments employing
only women; their earnings were the lowest among the establishment
groupings in eight of the nine jobs in both manufacturing and nonmanu­
facturing establishments. Earnings by establishment groupings gen­
erally ranked as follows; (1) Highest earnings were m en's in estab­
lishments employing only men in the job; (2) m en's earnings in all
establishments; (3) m en's earnings in establishments employing men
and women; (4) women's earnings in establishments employing men
and women; (5) women's earnings in all establishments; and (6) low­
est earnings were women's in establishments employing only women.
From this ranking, it is evident that the greatest differences in earn­
ings were between earnings in groups 1 and 6 and smallest differences
were between groups 3 and 4.
For all nine jobs combined, the average difference between
m en's and women's earnings was 16 percent in manufacturing and
19 percent in nonmanufacturing establishments.
In establishments
employing men and women in the same job, these differences were
reduced to 9 percent in manufacturing and 12 percent in nonmanufac­
turing. The difference was greatest between earnings of men in plants
employing men only and earnings of women in establishments employ­
ing women only— percent in both manufacturing and nonmanufacturing.
23
In the establishments studied which employed both sexes in
the same job, the proportion of establishments in which the average
for women was at least $1 a week higher than the m en's average for
the same job ranged from 21 to 37 percent among the six office jobs

16 The groups of establishments include (a) all establishments,
(b) establishments employing men and women in the same job, and
(c) establishments employing only one sex in a job.




(table 7). The difference was less than $ 1 a week in from 9 to 29 per­
cent of the establishments. The proportion of establishments in which
m en's averages were at least $ 1 more than women's for the same
job ranged from 41 percent for office boys to 71 percent for order
clerks. It should be noted that these differences are limited to dif­
ferences in establishment job averages and relate only to rates ac­
tually paid.
Data on formal rate ranges were not collected and it
is probable that some of the establishments tabulated as having higher
rates for one sex, in reality employed both sexes within the same
rate range. Among plant jobs, the proportion of establishments with
women's averages at least 3 cents an hour higher than m en's averages
(in the same job and establishment) ranged from 5 percent for janitors
to 13 percent for passenger elevator operators (table 8).
The pro­
portion of establishments in which the difference was less than 3 cents
ranged from 21 percent of the establishments for shipping packers
to 55 percent for passenger elevator operators; m en's averages ex­
ceeded women's by 3 cents or more for elevator operators in 32 per­
cent of the establishments and for janitors in 72 percent. It can be
noted that differences between establishment averages for men and
women were smallest for office boys and girls and for elevator op­
erators. Differences in duties according to sex can be ruled out as
a pay factor in these jobs.

The following example is cited to illustrate further how in­
dividual earnings affect the averages presented.
Men operators of
passenger elevators in Chicago averaged $ 2 .0 8 an hour, 77 cents
more than women in this occupation. Earnings of men and women,
however, were nearly the same in establishments which employed both
men and women elevator operators.
In these establishments, men
averaged $ 1 .3 5 and women $ 1 .3 3 . Only about 7 percent of the men
elevator operators in Chicago were employed in such establishments,
however, compared with 43 percent of the women. Establishments
employing only men elevator operators provided an average wage of
$ 2 .1 4 an hour, 84 cents more than women averaged in the establish­
ments employing only women. In these establishments employing only
one sex in the job, 80 percent of the men were employed in office
buildings. Labor-management agreements covering elevator opera­
tors were in effect in a majority of the office buildings in Chicago.
About 85 percent of the men elevator operators in establishments
employing only men in the job earned $ 2 .1 5 , the union hourly scale
for elevator operators in building service. Seventy percent of the
women elevator operators, on the other hand, were employed in retail
trade establishments and nearly 30 percent were employed in hotels.

The accompanying tables show that the differences between
m en's and women's earnings are greatly reduced when comparisons
are limited to identical establishments. Indications are that the re­
maining differentials in identical establishments are at least partially
accounted for by differences in workers' positions within rate ranges,
differences in length of service, and differences in actual duties within
the limits of the job descriptions.

39

Table 5. Pay comparisons by sex, office workers
(R elative pay le v e ls in o ffic e s em ploying m en and w om en, m en only, and w om en only in se le cte d o ffic e jo b s by industry d ivision and labor m arket, w inter 1958-59)

M anufacturing

Nonmanufacturing

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W omen
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

130.6
116.0
127.0

105.6
110.9
100.0

W om en
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

Boston:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
_
rlerlm
,---- .. .
P a y ro ll c le r k s
O ffire hoy a or girla _ . . T_ ,.._T _
T abulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s _____________

100.7
105.9
100.0
no. i
111.8

133.3
113.4
131. 1

136. 1
111.8
132.0

102.0
124.4

9 7 .0
125.2

114. 1
122.8

Buffalo:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder rlerk e . ...
P a yroll cle rk s
O ffice boys or g ir ls
Tabulating-m achine o p erators

103.1
109.4
103.1
102.1
104.6
106.8

131.9
150.4
156.9
154.5
108.3
119.8

136.9
156.7
140.8
139.2
108.3
121.0

101.2
103.1
106.1
101.3
100.9
107.0

118.4
124.2
142.7
117.3
103.6
123.2

New Y ork City:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder cle r k s
__
_____
P a y roll c le r k s
_
__
O ffice boys or g ir ls
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____________

103.0
103.8
9 9 .3
100.6
101.0
104.0

Philadelphia:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B __
O rder cle r k s
P a y roll cle r k s _ __
O ffice boys or g ir ls —
T abulating-m achine o p e ra to rs

110.4
104.2
102.2
103. 1
115.9

Labor m arket and
occupation

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

W om en
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

117.2
114.2

100.0
104.2
100.0
105. 1
107.9

9 9 .3
9 8 .3
9 9 .2
100.8
9 8 .0
9 6 .9

118.7
107.6
144.3
119.7
101.0
112.6

125.0
149.6
170.8
162.2
109.3
119.8

112.5
125.2
139.2
137. 1
118.5
112.3

9 8 .8
103.9
9 4 .6
9 5 .8
103.7
103.7

9 6 .3

111.3

122.7
126.6
141.2
114.7
100.0
130.3

115.3
121.1
148.1
121.3
116.4
118.3

102.5
107.0
105.3
114.7
112.7
109.2

100.0
102.3
106. 1
9 8 .7
9 5 .5
102. 1

9 9 .4
9 6 .9
9 6 .2

113.7
117. 3
121.3
106.5
102.9
108.7

111.9
118.0
130.1
102.6
9 9 .0
110.7

115.5
116.5
111.0
112.3
111.5
103.3

105.4
111.3
9 2 .6
9 7 .4
104.8
108.0

125.3
119.2
129.0
107.3
121.7

118.2
125.8

127.9
118.3

115.6
110.0

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

124.3
126.9
141.8
119.7
103.0
118.9

114.6
104.2
150.8
119.7
9 8 .0
110.2

101.4
101.7
107.4
109.8
101.0
105.5

9 7 .9
9 5 .8
9 5 .9
100.0
9 3 .9
8 9 .8

108.8

113.1

101.3

9 3.1
_
_
-

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

W omen
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

Northeast

N ew ark -Jersey City:
Accounting cle r k s , cla s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder cle rk s
_
_
_ ---- ------ P a yroll cle r k s . . .
..
O ffice hoys or g ir ls
Tabulating-m achine op e ra to rs

__
.

_

_

—
----

-

NOTE: Dashes indicate data that do not m eet publication c r it e r ia .




-

-

126. 1
108.3
123.9

-

-

132.6
9 5 .8
117.4

-

-

117.4
9 6 .9
121.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

_
"

100.0
95. 1

110.4
132.8
132.1
100.9
104.9

114.7
101.6
134.4
_
9 8 .2
113.4

107.4
137.5
117.6
.
106.4
102.8

9 6 .9
9 7 .7
120.6
_
100.9
103.5

100.6
9 6 .9
93 .9
_
9 6 .4
9 0.8

9 9 .4
9 8 .5
103.7
101.3
8 9 .4
100.7

9 9 .4
9 8 .5
100.7
100.0
100.0
100.0

111.3
103.8
117.6
105.8
102.9
102.0

117.9
112.8
120.6
106.5
103.8
102.7

106.5
100.8
114.7
105.2
9 8.1
101.3

9 8 .2
9 9 .2
100.7
101.9
9 9 .0
9 8 .7

101.8
9 7 .7
100.7
9 9 .4
102.9
104.0

103.9
101.7
101.4
105.2
108.0

9 3 .5
9 6 .7
9 5 .1
9 4 .9
9 7 .9
9 2 .0

114.3
115.0
139.3
129.0
103. 1
104.3

112.3
115.0
138.5
124.6
102. 1
115.9

115.6
115.0
140.2
144.2
106.2
9 2 .8

98.1
100.0
100.8
139.9
9 4 .8
9 2 .0

90 .9
9 4 .2
9 4 .3
9 2 .8
100.0
9 2 .0

-

40
Table 5. Pay comparisons by sex, office workers-Continued
(R elative pay le v e ls in o ffic e s em ploying m en and w om en, m en only, and w om en only in se le cte d o ffic e jo b s by industry division and labor m ark et, w inter 1958-59)
(A verage fo r w om en in all industries in each jo b and a rea ■ 100)
Manufactur ing
Labor m arket and
occupation

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

Nonmanufacturing

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W omen
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W omen
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

Women
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

105.0
109.1
9 8 .3
100.0
“

9 9 .4
9 9 .2
100.0
9 8 .6
9 8 .0
9 5 .6

117.6
120.7
124.4
123.2
102.0
110.2

117.6
130.6
126.9
121.7
103.0
116.8

117.6
119.8
105.9
124.6
100.0
103.6

100.6
108.3
100.8
113.8
9 6 .0
9 7 .8

9 8.1
9 4.2
9 9 .2
97 .1
9 9 .0
8 9.8

104.8
122.6
117.9
"

118.5
108.9
9 9 .3
"

9 6 .6
9 6 .8
9 9.1
9 6 .9
9 4 .0

125.3
140.3
152.8
.
9 9 .0
116.4

130.1
108.1
143.5

113.7
147.6
163.0

9 6 .6
102.4
125.0

9 6 .6
9 6 .0
9 7.2

9 7 .9
117.9

100.0
103.7

100.0
88. 1

9 4 .8
9 6 .3

152.0
138.7
131.1
122.7
■

111.3
114.3
143.7
121.6
"

103. 3
116.8
9 6 .3
120.6
■

9 7 .3
9 6 .6
9 5 .0
9 9 .3
9 3 .8
9 7 .1

122.7
124.4
125.2
117.0
9 9 .0
105. 1

124.0
137.0
126.1
108.1
9 9 .0
105. 1

121.3
120.2
123.5
125.9
100.0
104.4

112.7
101.7
101.7
111. 1
9 2 .8
9 2 .6

8 8 .7
94 .1
9 0 .8
97 .8
9 6.9
105.9

126.8
138.5
-

142.0
100.9
“

122.5
103.4
-

9 0 .6
106.8
“

9 7.1
9 5 .7
100.0
-

128.3
122.2
9 4 .6
"

119.6
121.4
9 4 .6
"

144.9
169.2
“

112.3
162.4
“

9 5 .7
_
9 1 .5
100.0
“

119.9
110.3
126.7
136.3
-

123.8
131.9
179.8
-

100.0
119.8
190.3
-

9 7 .4
9 6 .6
114.7
9 8 .4
-

100.0
9 9.1
9 6 .6
9 9 .2
9 8 .8

117.9
115.5
119.0
137.9
111. 1

116.6
120.7
113.8
133.1
112.3

118.5
106.9
128.4
161.3
109.9

102.6
9 8 .3
99 .1
126.6
107.4

9 7 .4
9 9.1
9 5 .7
9 6 .0
9 3 .8

W om en
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

104.4
106.6
100.8
101.4
-

118.9
124.0
127.7
111.6
"

117.0
135.5
125.2
110.1
■

124.5
120.7
142.9
114.5
“

102.5
104.1
107.6
115.9
"

B a ltim ore:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A —______ _____
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B --- -------- T
------O rder c le r k s _ .
.
---- .
P a y roll c le r k s
_ .......
O ffice boys or g ir ls _
_
Tahulating-m achine o p e ra to rs
_

111.0
114.5
101.5
“

137.0
133.1
164.2
“

143.2
138.7
170.9
“

124.0
129.8
144.8
“

D allas:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A _
Accounting c le r k s , cla s s R
O rder c le r k s
P a y ro ll c le r k s
. __
O ffice boys or g ir ls _
T abulating-m achine o p e ra to rs
_

106.7
116.0
100.7
120.6
~

144.7
135.3
122.2
109.3

125.3
124.4
114.8
102. 1
■

M em phis:
A ccounting c le r k s , cla s s A --------------- ----Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder cle r k s
_ ...
P a y roll cle r k s
... ---O ffice boys or g ir ls
_
__
Tabulating-m achine o p erators

109.4
106.0
-

134. 1
112.8
-

New O rleans:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s R
O rder cle r k s _
__
P a y roll c le r k s
...........
.. _
O ffice boys or g ir ls
. .........
Tabula tin g-m achine o p e ra to rs

9 8 .7
102.6
114.7
100.0
-

120.5
122.4
126.7
146.8
-

Women
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

South
Atlanta:
A ccounting c le r k s , c la s s A _
_____ __
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B ______________
O rder c le r k s _____________
P a yroll rlerka
O ffice hoy* or g ir ls _____ . . .
Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs -----------------

~

'
NOTE:

D ashes indicate data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




_

_

41
Table 5.

Pay com parisons |by sex, office w orkers-C o n tin u ed

(R elative pay le v e ls in o ffic e s em ploying m en and w om en, m en only, and w om en only in se le cte d o ffic e jo b s by industry d ivision and labor m arket, w inter 1958-59)
(A verage for w om en in all industries in each jo b and a rea ■ 100)
Manufa c tur ing
Labor m arket and
occupation

W omen
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

.

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

Nonmanufacturing

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

W omen
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

Women
in o ffice s
em ploying
only w om en

North Central
Chicago:
Accounting c le r k s , cla s s A ________ _
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B ___ .
___
O rder cle rk s ____ _________ _________________
P a yroll c le r k s ^
O ffice boys or g i r l s _____ _____________ _______
Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs
__
-

102.3
104.3
106.4
100.0
104.2
"

119.0
123.6
139.0
121.5
104.2
"

118.4
124.3
137.6
124. 1
102.5
■

119.0
122.9
140.4
118.4
108.5
■

104.6
110.7
131.9
105.7
112.7

100.6
102.9
100.7
9 8 .7
100.8
“

9 8 .9
97.1
9 6 .5
100.0
9 7 .5
100.0

113.8
108.6
141.8
123.4
9 8 .3
111.6

117.8
111.4
144.7
134.2
9 8 .3
112.3

112. 1
107.1
137.6
112.0
100.8
110.3

100.0
9 9 .3
100.7
9 7 .5
9 6 .6
102.6

D etroit:
Accounting c le r k s , cla s s A ______________________
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B .
O rder c le r k s
____ ,
P a y ro ll cle r k s _
O ffice boys or g ir ls _______ . . . .
____
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____________

112.4
117.7
111.9
107.3
114.6
109.1

122.6
133.3
160.1
139.0
109.8
114.3

121.5
137.6
157.3
111.6
100.8
122.3

123. 1
128.4
173.4
139.6
123.6
112.0

114.0
126.2
124.5
117.7
123.6
110.3

107.5
112.1
102.8
103.0
103.3
101. 1

9 0 .3
9 3 .6
9 4 .4
8 7 .8
8 7 .0
8 6 .3

114.5
109.9
143.4
111.0
9 2 .7
100.0

121.0
105.7
143.4
111.0
91. 1
103.4

103.2
112.8
142.7
110.4
9 5 .9
9 2 .0

9 4.1
102.8
110.5
8 6 .6
9 6 .7
8 3 .4

8 9.2
9 2.2
76.9
8 7 .8
82.1
89. 1

Milwaukee:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
_
___
Accounting c le r k s , cla s s B
O rder c le r k s _______ ___... -------------------P a yroll cle r k s
_
O ffice boys or g ir ls
___
_ __
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s _________________

127.1

128.3

122.9

107.2

105.4
112.7
106.8

139.5

100.0
103. 1
108.8
104.8

9 6 .4
96 .1
9 2 .2
9 4.1
9 5 .9

119.3
129.5
131.8

116.9
148. 1
131.0

124.7
9 3 .0
157.4

101.2
9 6 .1
120.2

9 4 .6
9 5 .3
8 3 .7

116.7
125.9

144.2
115.7
122.4

116.7
112.2

125.5
126.5

9 4.1
105.4

8 6 .3
9 5 .2

95.1
95.9

103.4
105.0
106.5

122.8
113. 3
156. 1

125.5
123. 3
156.9

9 9 .3
9 9 .2
9 6 .7

129.5
125.8
143.9

125.5
125.0
139.0

132.9
125.8
156.1

111.4
109.2
115.4

9 4 .6
9 6 .7
9 0 .2

,_M
M
m

M in neapolis-St. Paul:
Accounting clerics, c la s s A ...
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
...
.............
O rder cle rk s
P a y ro ll c le r k s
_ _
_
_
O ffice boys or g i r l s _______________ _________________
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s _________________
St. Louis:
Accounting c le r k s , cla s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B _ .
O rder cle rk s
_
__
P a y roll c le r k s
_
_
_
O ffice boys or g i r l s ____ _______ _____ ________ ____
Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs _
_ __

NOTE:

102.4
-

-

-

126.5
129.3

106.0
9 5 .0
117.9
9 5 .7
■

102.0
108.3
105. 7
9 7 .9
”

101.1
9 7 .0

108.5
117.2

107.4
116.4

110.6
117.9

102.1
9 6 .3

100.0
100.7

108.7
122.3
102.5
107.4
100.9
102.6

103. 1
101.7
101.7
9 4 .9
9 4 .3
100.6

9 5 .0
9 6 .7
9 9 .2
108. 1
101.9
9 8.1

114.3
113.2
135.8
125.0
9 3 .4
116.2

114.9
121.5
136.7
117.6
9 3 .4
113.0

113.7
105.0
135.8
130.9
98. 1
120. 1

9 6 .3
9 2 .6
112.5
136.8
105.7
125.3

9 5 .0
9 8 .3
9 1 .7
104.4
100.9
83. 1

-

9 7 .9
”

105.3

104.3
“

105.0
104.1
102.5
9 5 .6
9 9.1
101.9

118.0
150.4
147.5
129.4
105.7
114.3

113.7
153.7
153.3
138.2
108.5
120. 1

123.0
147. 1
113.3
112.5
101.9
110.4

-

-

-

-

110. 1
115.7
108.2

134.9

119.5
105.0
142.3
106 .4
"

Dashes indicate data that do not m eet publication cr ite r ia ,




-

97.1
9 7.1
9 3 .6
100.6
9 7 .5
9 6.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

42

Table 5.

Pay com parisons by sex, office w orke rs-C o n tin u e d

tR elative pay le v e ls in o ffic e s em ploying m en and w om en, m en only, and w om en only in s e le cte d o ffic e jo b s by industry division and labor m arket, w inter 1958-59)
(A verage for w om en in all industries in each job and area = 100)
M anufacturing
Labor m arket and
occupation

W omen
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

Nonmanufacturing
W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W om en
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

W om en
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in all
o ffic e s

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only m en

129.1
133.3
123.1

Men
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
women

Women
in o ffic e s
em ploying
m en and
w om en

115.9
104. 1
102.5
_
9 7 .0
100.0

100.0
8 9 .5

Women
in o ffic e s
em ploying
only w om en

West
D enver:
Accounting clerics, c la s s A ______ ____ __
Accounting c le r k s , cla s s B __
O rder c le r k s
P a yroll c le r k s
, ....... .. ..... .
__
O ffice boys or g ir ls ------------ —
..........^-------Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s ____________

111.3
110.6
100.7
“

124.5
130. 1
113.2
"

126.5
147.2
111.8
"

110.6
122.8
125.0
“

111.9
108.1
79 .9
"

111.3
112.2
100.7
-

9 6 .7
9 8 .4
9 8 .3
9 9 .0
9 5 .8

119.2
122.8
121.5
100.0
112.6

100.0
115.4

114.6
120.3
119.0
_
101.0
105.6

L os A n geles:
Accounting cle rk s , c la s s A _ _
...........
A ccounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder c le r k s ......... _ ---_ _ _____ _
P a yroll cle r k s
........ .
. ..................... __
O ffice boys or g ir ls
Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs ____________

101.2
104.9
9 8 .8
101.2
105.0
101.1

117.9
110.5
116.7
124.2
110. 1
106.2

126.0
101.4
122.2
126.7
109.2
105.6

108.1
111.2
101.9
117.6
111.8
106.2

104.0
111.9
9 0 .7
107.9
116.8
101.1

9 8 .8
102. 1
101.9
100.6
101.7
101.1

9 8 .8
9 6 .5
101.2
9 8 .2
9 6 .6
9 9 .4

112.7
118.9
115.4
127.3
101.7
103.4

109.2
107.7
116.0
132. 1
104.2
108.5

115.6
119.6
113.6
120.6
9 5 .8
9 8 .3

97 .1
102.8
9 8 .8
106.1
9 1 .6
98 .9

9 9 .4
9 5 .8
102.5
9 7.6
9 8 .3
9 9 .4

Portland:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder c le r k s
....................
P a y roll c le r k s .... ........ .
........ ..................
O ffice boys or g ir ls
Tahnlating-m achine o p erators

102.5
“

119.8
"

122.2
“

115.4
“

101.9
~

103.1
“

9 8 .1
102.3
“

128.4
142.7
“

127.8
142.7
■

130.2
142.0
_
-

118.5
_
113.7

9 3 .8

109.5
112.2
103. 1
101.2
108.4
102.4

121.9
129.5
140.0
129.2
106.7
112.6

120.7
133.8
127.5
131.5
103.4
116.8

123. 1
127.3
174.4
126.2
110.9
104.2

111.8
125.2
116.3
113.1
110.1
100.6

105.9
109.4
100.0
9 9 .4
105.9
103.6

9 5 .9
9 7 .1
9 8 .8
9 8 .2
9 4 .1
9 8 .8

112.4
116.5
118.8
107.7
9 8 .3
104.8

117.2
121.6
120.0
103.0
9 5 .8
109.0

110. 1
114.4
114.4
114.3
105.0
101.8

104.7
100.7
121.9
105.4
100.0
101.2

8 9.9
9 5 .7
8 3 .8
9 7 .0
89.1
9 2 .8

121.9

116.2

120.0

116.2

123.8

116.2

9 9 .3
100.0
9 4 .3
9 3 .4

127.5
129.3
106.7
121.9

127.5
130.7
106.7
124.5

126.8
119.3
108.6
111.9

9 5 .4
9 1 .4
.
9 6 .2
102.6

100.0
100.7
9 3 .3
9 0 .7

San F ran cisco-O aklan d :
A ccounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
P a y ro ll cle r k s ------------------------------------ ------O ffice hoys or g ir ls
_ _
T abulating-m achine o p e ra to rs
Seattle:
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s A
Accounting c le r k s , c la s s B
O rder c le r k s
P a y ro ll c le r k s .....- ------------------ ------—■__ __
Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs

NOTE:

D ashes indicate data that do not m eet publication c r it e r ia .




_

_
_

9 1 .4
9 6 .7
9 7 .5

_

9 4 .7
_

-

43
Table 6.

Pay com parisons by sex, plant w orkers

(Relative pay levels in establishments employing m e n and women, m e n only, and women only in selected plant jobs by industry division and labor market, winter 1958-59)

J^Averag^Jorjwomen^ii^allj^
Manufacturing
Labor m arket and
occupation

W omen
in all
plants

Men
in all
plants

Men
in plants
em ploying
only men

N onmanufa c tur ing

M en
in plants
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W omen
in plants
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W omen
in plants
em ploying
only w om en

W omen
in all
plants

Men
in all
plants

Men
in plants
em ploying
only m en

Men
in plant 8
em ploying
m en and
w om en

W omen
in plants
em ploying
m en and
w om en

Women
in plants
em ploying
only w om en

Northeast
Boston:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s ___
P a rk e rs , shipping „r
„ _ .... _ _ _
_
Elevator o p e r a to r s , passenger
Buffalo:
J a n itors , p o r te r s , and r.leaners
P a c k e r s , shipping _
__
E levator o p e r a to r s , passenger

116.8
102. 1

New Y ork City:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs
P a ck e rs , shipping
Elevator o p e r a to r s , passenger
Philadelphia:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs _
P a ck e rs , shipping
. . .
Elevator o p e r a to r s , passenger

__

139.7
118.6
-

120.6
113.1
-

9 5 .4
9 3 .8
-

9 7 .7
9 5 .2
9 9 .2

109.9
122.8
107.6

113.7
125. 5
103.4

108.4
100.7
115.3

9 6 .9
9 5 .9
107.6

104.6
94. 1

144.7
122.7
-

143. 3
121.0
-

146. 1
124. 3

127.0
112.2
-

105.0
8 6 .7
-

8 9 .4

102.1

100.7

103. 5

9 5 .7
-

80. 1
-

118.9
105.9

133.6
125. 5
-

132.2
127.5
-

135.7
118. 3
-

122.4
104.6
-

8 3 .2
107.8
-

9 4 .4
9 8 .5

112.0

113.3
113.5

101.4
9 1 .7

9 4 .4
_
88. 7

95 .1
_
103.0

112.1
"

N ew ark -Jersey City:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and r.leaners ________
P a ck e rs , shipping __________________ ____
E levator op e r a to r s , passenger

128.2
115.9
-

124. 1
105.0
-

„

134.4
115.9
~

113.4

107.4
“

129.5

113.4

8 5.9

9 9 .3
9 7 .5
100.0

114. 1
108.0
107.5

104.0
106.7
106.8

118. 1
112.9
111.8

100.0
9 3 .3
102.5

8 8 .6
104.9
9 3 .8

117. 1

138.8

140.3

138.8

111.6
"

9 5 .3
9 3 .3
9 6 .9

116.3
114.7
118.6

110.1
119.3
119.4

119.4
103. 3
115.5

9 5 .3
9 4 .7
103. 1

89. 1
8 9 .3
92.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

117. 1

-

-

“

"

-

■

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

113. 3
-

-

South
Atlanta:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s _______
P a ck e rs , shipping
E levator o p era to rs, passenger __ ______

D allas:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s _______
Elevator op era to rs, passenger _
M em phis:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs
P a ck e rs , shipping _
E levator op era to rs, p assenger
New O rleans:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs
P a ck e rs , shipping
E levator op era to rs, passenger

...... ...

172.7
-

179.5
-

160.2
-

137. 5
“

113.6
-

9 3 .2
9 5 .0

118.2
102.9

122.7
104. 3
“

115.9
9 4 .3
-

9 3 .2
94. 3
-

98 .9
9 6 .4

124.5
9 6 .8
-

B altim ore:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs
P a ck e rs , shipping
_ _
E levator op era to rs, passenger

136.4
-

167.9
148.0
■

163.2
152.8
-

175.5
110.4
-

132. 1
9 4 .4

105.7
9 7 .6
~

8 9 .6
115.2
100.0

105. 7
124.8
9 9 .0

107.5
125.6
8 8 .9

101.9
120.8
151.5

8 9 .6
124.0
162.6

9 2 .5
113.6
9 8 .0

135.8
-

157.9
“

157.9
-

157.9
-

135.8
-

9 4 .7
100.0

115.8
107. 1

112.6
127. 1

117.9
94. 1

9 4 .7

135.2
102.5

156.0
136.9
“

147. 3
144.3

175.8
103.3
■

140.7
109.8
“

125. 3
9 4 .3
“

8 7 .9

112. 1

112. 1

198.7

200 .0

196.0

188.0
-

145.3
-

__

______

168.0
-

-

NOTE: Dashes indicate data that do not meet publication criteria.




-

-

.
-

-

-

-

112. 1
-

-

6 9 .4
9 1 .2
-

8 8 .4
-

117.6
68.1
-

100.0

9 2 .5

8 9 .6

123.9

128.4

9 4 .0

9 7 .3
9 5 .9
100.0

125.3
137.8
122.4

121.3
141.8
122.4

128.0
110.2
109.0

9 6 .0
9 4 .9
137.3

117.3
105.1
9 7 .0

44
Table 6. Pay com parisons, by sex, plant w o rk e rs-C o n tin u e d
(R elative pay le v e ls in establishm ents em ploying m en and w om en, m en only, and w om en only in se le cte d plant jobs by industry d ivision and labor m arket, w inter 1958-59)
(A verage for w om en in all industries in each job and area = 100)
Manufacturing
Labor m arket and
occupation

W om en
in all
plants

Men
in plants
em ploying
only m en

Men
in all
plants

Nonmanufacturing

Men
in plants
em ploying
m en and
w om en

Women
in plants
em ploying
m en and
wom en

W omen
in plants
em ploying
only w om en

W omen
in all
plants

Men
in all
plants

Men
in plants
em ploying
only m en

Men
in plants
em ploying
m en and
w om en

Women
in plants
em ploying
m en and
w om en

9 9 .4
8 6 .5
9 9.2

W omen
in plants
em ploying
only w om en

North Central
Chicago:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s _______
P a ck e rs , shipping _____________________

105.0
104.7

117.4
117.6

116. 1
116.5

118.6
120.0
-

106.2
105. 3
_

8 1 .4
103. 5
_

9 9 .4
87. 1
9 9 .2

109.3
111.8
158.8

9 6 .9
114.7
163.4

117.4
9 7 .6
100.8

132.7
102.8

149.0
105.6

150.3
105.6

147.6
107.4

134.0
105.6

8 6 .4
102.8
“

8 7 .8

103.4

103.4

104. 1

8 7 .8

87. 1

100.0

109. 1

105.8

113.2

100.0

100.0

9 1.9
109.4
99 .2

D etroit:
Elevator op era tors, passenger ________
Milwaukee:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s _______
P a ck e rs , shipping _____________________
Elevator o p e r a to r s , passenger ________

122. 1
115.2
-

120.6
9 8 .8
"

9 0 .4
8 6 .5

115.4
119.9
-

110. 3
113. 5

121.3
146.2
-

8 9 .7
102.9
-

91.9
6 8 .4
-

134.0

119.9

8 5 .8

9 5 .7
89. 1
100.0

112.8
137.2
108.5

107. 1
139. 1
107.8

117.0
110.9
118.4

9 5 .7
8 4 .0
105.0

9 1 .5
94 .9
9 9 .3

139.8
123.0
140.2

143.0
113.7

121.9
108.7

9 6 .9
132.8

9 1 .4
9 7 .5
9 5 .9

100.8
126. 1
94. 3

101.6
129.2
9 3 .4

99.2
109.3
95. 1

9 1 .4
109.3
94. 3

9 7 .7
65.8
9 7 .5

124.0
110. 1

118.5
110.8

129.5
103.2

115. 1
8 8 .6

9 6 .2

9 7 .9
-

9 3 .2
-

8 7 .0
-

100.0
-

97.9
-

125.9
109.5

126.6
111.6

125. 3
102. 1
-

117. 1
102.6
*

132.3
9 8 .9

9 6 .8
9 8 .7

107.0

no. i

105. 1

9 8 .0

8 8 .6

106. 7

104.7

9 3 .3

9 8 .0
-

109.3
’

107.3
-

110.7
-

9 8 .7
-

94 .0
-

9 8 .9
9 7 .9
9 8 .4

101.1
117.6
9 0 .5

9 5 .3
120.3
8 3.2

102.6
101.1
103.7

9 8.9
9 3 .0
103.2

115. 5
86. 3

9 5.2
9 3 .3

100.0
115.6

105.4
115.6

9 9 .4
115. 1

9 5.2
9 2.2

9 4 .4

122.1
104.7
-

146. 3
125. 1
“

143.4
126.3
*

148.5
113.5
-

117.0

133.3

132.6

121.9
100.6
132.8

141.4
121.7
140.2

115. 1
9 5 .6

117. 1
102. 1

M inneapolis-St. Paul:
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s
P a c k e r s , shipping
E levator opera tors, p assen ger

_

St. Louis:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s _______
P a ck e rs , shipping _____________________
E lev ator op e ra to rs,

passenger

.... .

_

_

_
_

_
-

West
Denver:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c l e a n e r s _______
P a ck e rs , s h ip p in g ______ _______________
E levator op e ra to rs,

passenger

Los A n geles:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs
Packers,

skipping

....

______

__

Elevator op e r a to r s , passenger

______

Portland:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs ______
P a ck e rs , shipping _____ ________________
Elevator op e ra to rs , passenger ________
San F ran cisco-O aklan d :
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs
Packers,

skipping

_

.

_____
___

112.0
-

126.7
-

126.0
-

130.0
-

112.0
-

107.4
100.0

115.8
121.9

117.4
121.9

112. 1
122.5

107.4
122.5

106.1

118.4

Elevator o p era to rs , passenger ________
Seattle:
Jan itors, p o r te r s , and c le a n e rs _______
P a ck e rs , shipping _____________________
Elevator op e ra to rs , passenger ________

-

-

•

101. 1

-

121.8

106. 1

■

9 8 .4
-

122.3
'

NOTE:

Dashes indicate data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




_

_

_

9 6 .8
_

-

_
_

-

45
Table 7.
Establishment differences in earnings
of men and women office w orkers

Table 8. Establishment differences in earn ings
of men and wom en plant w orkers

(D istribution o f establishm ents studied by relationship between
establishm ent average w eekly earnings for m en and w om en
in s e le cte d o ffice occupations, 20 labor m arkets com bined,
w inter 1958-59)

(D istribution of establishm ents studied by relationship between
establishm ent average hourly earnings for m en and w om en
in s elected plant occupations, 20 labor m arkets com bined,
w inter 1958-59)

R elationship o f w om en 's
earnings to m en's

Total number of es ta b lis h m e n ts___
E stablishm ents with w om en 's
average higher than m e n 's 1______
$20 or m ore __
_____ __ ____
$18 but le s s than $ 2 0 __________
$16 but le s s than $18
$14 but le s s than $ 1 6 __________
$12 but le s s than $14
$10 but le s s than $12 ____
$8 but le s s than $10
$6 but le s s than $8 ____________
$4 but le s s than $6
_ __
$2 but le s s than $4 __ _ _____
$1 but le s s than $2
__________
E stablishm ents in w hich d iffe r ­
ence was le s s than $1 _ __
_ _

Establishm ents with m e n 's
average higher than
w om en *s1_______________________ _
$1 but le s s than $2
____
$2 but le s s than $4
$4 but le s s than $6 ___________
$6 but le s s than $8 __
_
$8 but le s s than $10 _________
$10 but le s s than $ 1 2 _________
$12 but le s s than $14
_ _
$14 but le s s than $ 1 6 _________
$16 but le s s than $18
$18 but le s s than $ 2 0 _________
$20 or m ore _
____ __

Accounting Accounting
c le r k s ,
c le r k s ,
c la s s A
cla s s B

748

603

O rder
c le rk s

Payr oil
c le rk s

207

472

Total number o f establishm ents __

2
4
3
9
4
10
8

112
3
1
2
2
6
6
5
17
25
26
19

176
5
2
5
3
5
17
13
24
30
48
24

18

30

108

43

Establishm ents in which d iffe r ­
ence was le s s than 3 c e n t s ______

43
2
1

91

81

-

146
4
10
15
7
8
11
13
11
8
9
50

1 Lim ited to establishm ents in which the d ifferen ce is $ 1 o r m o r e .




Relationship of w om en 's
earnings to m en's

1
4
5
6
5
10
9
15
19
10

182
6
2
4
4
6
10
8
16
35
60
31

340
24
61
57
37
44
32
23
15
13
8
26

376

" M m " -----latingm achine
op erators

Establishm ents with w om en 's
average higher than m e n 's 1______
25 cents or m ore ______________
23 but le s s than 25 cents __ __
21 but le s s than 23 c e n t s _______
19 but le s s than 21 cents __ ____
17 but le s s than 19 c e n t s _______
15 but le s s than 17 cents _______
13 but le s s than 15 c e n t s _______
11 but le s s than 13 cents _______
9 but le s s than 11 c e n t s ________
7 but le s s than 9 c e n t s _________
5 but le s s than 7 cents ________
3 but le s s than 5 cents

170
6
2
2
6
9
14
12
23
35
40
22

487
56
58
51
63
52
44
35
26
24
22
76

317

O ffice
boys or
g irls

91

1

196
l4
19
18
14
21
13
14
19
10
7
47

156
27
46
24
14
13
14
7
6
-

4
1

253
20
41
33
26
26
21
20
11
12
13
30

Jan itors,
p orters,
and
clea n ers

P a ck e rs ,
shipping

Elevator
op era tors,
passenger

1,232

185

110

58
1
5
2
2
6
2
2
4
13
18

16
2
1
2
2
3
3
3

14
-

284

39

61

130
9
10
8
14
14
6
6
2
6
6
6
43

35
3
7
6
6

3

Establishm ents with m en 's
average higher than
890
w o m e n 's 1____
__
__ __ _ _
3 but le s s than 5 c e n t s __ ___ __ --------------- 52------64
5 but le s s than 7 cents _________
63
7 but le s s than 9 c e n t s _________
63
9 but le s s than 11 c e n t s ____ ____
63
11 but le s s than 13 cents __ ___
56
13 but le s s than 15 c e n t s ________
45
15 but le s s than 17 c e n t s ________
52
17 but le s s than 19 cents __ __
47
19 but le s s than 21 c e n t s ________
38
21 but le s s than 23 cents ________
28
23 but le s s than 25 c e n t s ________
25 cents or m ore ____ __ __
319

Lim ited to establishm ents in which the d ifferen ce is 3 cents o r m o re.

-

3
-

1
1
2
7

-

2
5
-

1
2
3

46
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions

Introduction
Data pertaining to the nature and prevalence of selected e s­
tablishment practices and supplementary wage provisions for office
and plant workers in 11 areas*7 appear in the B tables. The scope
of the data is described in footnotes to the tables and under Scope and
Method of Survey beginning on page 82.
Where the estimates relate to the availability of certain bene­
fits to the overall groups of office or plant workers, data are limited
to plans under which the employer contributes at least part of the
cost. The provisions have been treated statistically on the basis that
they are applicable to all plant or office workers if a majority of such
workers are eligible or may eventually qualify for the benefits. For
each benefit, aside from the factor of cost allocation, there is a wide
(but unmeasured) range in the dollars-and-cents value to the worker
of the benefits specified.
Varying length-of-service (seniority) re­
quirements are an obvious factor in evaluating the extent to which in­
dividual workers participate or benefit by a particular supplementary
benefit. Thus, length of service is a limiting factor, both as to the
number of workers who receive the benefit in any given period and
the amount of the benefit. Relatively long seniority requirements, as
in the case of retirement programs, limit the number of workers who
ultimately qualify, or, as in the case of paid vacations, limit the num­
ber who receive payment for 3 or 4 weeks at any given time.
Minimum Entrance Rates for Women Office Workers
More than half of the firms sampled in the 11 areas had a
formally established minimum salary for hiring inexperienced women
typists or other inexperienced women office clerical workers.
The
proportion of firms with formal salary rates for these hiring situa­
tions ranged from 41 percent of the firms sampled in Dallas, to
65 percent of those in Detroit.
The salaries were formally prede­
termined in proportionately more of the nonmanufacturing than of the
manufacturing firm s.
Distributions of establishments in each area, by the formally
established salaries at which they hire inexperienced typists and other
inexperienced office clerical workers are presented in tables B -l
and B -2 .

The median establishment rates for hiring inexperienced
typists ranged from $45 in Boston and $46. 50 in Baltimore to $57. 50
in San Francisco-Oakland and $59 in Los Angeles-Long Beach (table 9).
In a majority of the 11 areas, the median weekly entrance rate for
typists was $1 or $ 1.50 above the median of the lowest hiring salary
for inexperienced workers in any of the other office jobs.
(Rates
applicable to messengers, office girls, or similar subclerical jobs
were not considered.)
In seven areas permitting comparison with the Bureau's sur­
veys conducted 3 years ago, the median minimum entrance salary in
1959 for typists was from $6 to $7 a week higher than recorded in
the earlier surveys.
Trend of Scheduled Workweeks 18
In the winter of 1958-59, slightly more than half of the office
workers in all industries in the combined 18 areas selected for trend
purposes had a 40-hour weekly work schedule. Almost all other office
workers were on schedules of fewer than 40 hours. In manufacturing
industries in these areas, 40-hour schedules applied to more than twothirds of the office workers (table 10). The number of office workers
in manufacturing and in all industries who worked fewer than 40 hours
a week increased 4 and 3 percent, respectively, between the winters
of 1952-53 and 1958-59.
About 7 percent of the plant workers in the 18 areas had
work schedules of more than 40 hours a week in 1958-59 compared
with 20 percent in 1952-53. During this 6-year period, the proportion
of plant workers with 40-hour schedules increased from 74 to 83 per­
cent; those with less than 40-hour schedules increased from 6 percent
in 1952-53 to 10 percent in 1958-59Trend of Late-Shift Pay Differentials (Manufacturing)
Except for a tendency toward combination-type differentials
the proportions of workers in establishments having formed, provi­
sions for shift operation, and the proportions covered by the sepa­
rate types of differentials for late-shift work (cents, percentage, or
other) changed only slightly from 6 years earlier (table 11).

18
In order to present the best possible measure of changes in
supplementary wage provisions, this and later analyses in this bulletin
are based on data for a constant list of 18 areas. The larger labor
markets have generally been surveyed each year whereas others have
17
In 9 of the 20 areas— Atlanta, Denver, Memphis, Milwaukee,
been covered biennially or less often. Since some of the 18 areas
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Newark-Jersey City, New Orleans, Portland,
were not surveyed in the years of reference (winters of 1952-53,
and St. Louis—-data collection was limited to occupational earnings.
1955-56, 1957-58, and 1958-59) it was necessary to include data from
For these areas, the latest information on supplementary wage pro­
the previous or following year. Areas for which current iijformation
visions is contained in Wages and Related Benefits, 19 Labor M ar­
was available, accounted for 80 percent or more of the employment
kets, 1957-58 (BLS Bull. 1224-20).
covered in 1953, 1956, and 1958; and more than 70 percent in 1959-




Table 9.

47

M e d ia n entrance rates

(M ed ia n m in im u m en tra n ce s a l a r i e s 1 fo r in e x p e rie n c e d w om en ty p ists and oth e r in e x p e rie n c e d
w om en c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s , 2 re p o rte d in a ll in d u s t r ie s , m an u factu rin g and nonm anu facturing
e s t a b lis h m e n t s , 11 m a jo r la b o r m a r k e t s , w inter 1 9 5 8 -5 9 )
In ex p erien c ed ty p ists
A rea

O th er in e x p e rie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s

A ll
in d u s trie s

M an u ­
factu rin g

N onm an u­
factu rin g

A ll
in d u s trie s

M an u ­
fa ctu rin g

N onm an u­
fa ctu rin g

$ 4 5 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
4 7 .5 0

$ 4 6 .5 0
5 5 .0 0
5 4 .0 0
5 0 .0 0

$ 4 5 .0 0
4 7 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
4 5 .0 0

$ 4 5 .0 0
5 0 .0 0
5 0 .0 0
4 6 .0 0

$ 4 5 .0 0
5 2 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
5 0 .0 0

$ 4 5 .0 0
4 7 .0 0
5 0 .0 0
4 5 .0 0

South:
B a lt im o r e
----- _
D a l l a s ----------------------------------------------------

4 6 .5 0
4 7 .0 0

5 2 .0 0
5 0 .0 0

4 5 .0 0
4 6 .0 0

4 5 .5 0
4 5 .0 0

5 0 .0 0
5 0 .0 0

4 2 .5 0
4 3 .5 0

N orth C e n tra l:
C h ica g o _
_
D e t r o i t ---------------------------------------------------

5 5 .5 0
5 4 .5 0

5 8 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

5 5 .0 0
5 1 .5 0

5 4 .0 0
5 3 .0 0

5 5 .0 0
5 9 . b0

5 2 .5 0
5 0 .0 0

W est:
Lios A n g e le s -L o n g B e a c h ---------------San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d
S e a ttle

5 9 .0 0
5 7 .5 0
5 2 .0 0

6 1 .5 0
6 1 .0 0
5 2 .0 0

5 7 .5 0
5 4 .0 0
5 0 .0 0

5 7 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
5 2 .0 0

6 0 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
5 2 .0 0

5 6 .0 0
5 3 .5 0
5 0 .0 0

N o r th e a s t:
B o sto n
B u f f a l o _____ _______ _____ ___ __________
N ew Y o r k C ity
P h ila d elp h ia

1 R ounded to n e a r e s t 50 c e n t s .
2 S a la r ie s ap p lic a b le to m e s s e n g e r s , o ffic e g i r l s , o r s i m il a r s u b c le r ic a l jo b s a re not c o n s id e r e d .

Table 10.

Trend of scheduled weekly hours

(P e r c e n t o f o ffic e and plant w o r k e r s w ith s e le c t e d sch ed u led h o u rs o f w ork p e r w eek ,
a ll in d u s trie s and m a n u fa ctu rin g , 18 a r e a s co m b in e d , w in te rs of
1 9 5 2 -5 3 , 1 9 5 5 -5 6 , 1 9 5 7 -5 8 , and 1 9 5 8 -5 9 )
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o rk e rs
S u rv e y p e rio d

L e s s than
4 0 ho u rs

40 h o u rs

O ver
40 h o u rs

L e s s than
40 h o u rs

40 h o u rs

O ver
40 h o u rs

74
80
82
83

20
13
8
7

78
82
84
85

16
9
4
4

A l l in d u s trie s
W in te r
W in te r
W in te r
W in te r

1 9 5 2 -5 3
_____
1 9 5 5 -5 6
......................
1 9 5 7 -5 8 __________________________
1 9 5 8 -5 9 -------

l44

l 53

146
48
47

1 53
52
53

13
'1
1
1

6
8
10
10

M anu fac turing
W in te r
W in te r
W in te r
W in te r




1 9 5 2 -5 3
1 9 5 5 -5 6
1 9 5 7 -5 8
1 9 5 8 -5 9

----------------------------------------.............................
----------------------------------------

1 27
1 32
32
31

D ata r e f e r to w om en w o r k e r s o n ly .
L e s s than 0 . 5 p e r c e n t.

1 70
1 67
68
69

13
11
(? )
(* )

6
8
12
11

48

Table 1 . Trend of shift differentials (manufacturing)
1
(P ercen t of plant w ork ers in establishm ents having fo rm a l pro visio n s fo r late-shift
operation, 18 areas com bined, w inters of 1952-53 and 1958-59)
Second shift

P rovision s fo r shift operation and
shift pay differential

1953

Third shift
1953

1959

100

1959
100

88
86
50
10
12
15
6
2
2
2

76
75
36
6
11
11
4
1
2
1

80
80
38
2
5
12
7
1
6
5

31
16
15
1

30
14
13
3

28
6
18
3

3

U niform p e r c e n t a g e --------------------------------Under 10 percen t — ---------------------------10 p e r c e n t ------------------ ------------------------Over 10 p e r c e n t -------- --------------------------O ther-type differential (ch iefly
co m b in a tio n -ty p e )---- —
—-------------- ----------

100

34
17
16
1

In firm s with p rovision s fo r:
Shift o p e r a t i o n ------------------------------------------- -—
Shift d iffe r e n t ia l-------------------------------------------U niform cents per h o u r ---------------------------Under 7 c e n t s ----------------------- ---------------7 and under 10 c e n t s --------------------------10 cents -----------------------------------------------Over 10 and under 13 cents ---------------13 and under 15 c e n t s ------------------------15 c e n t s ---------------------- --------- -------------—
O ver 15 c e n t s ------- -— —------------------------

100

87
84
46
22
13
8
1
1
1
C)

A ll plant w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------- —

5

9

15

1 L e ss than 0. 5 percent.

Table 12. Trend of paid holidays
(P e rce n t o f o ffice and plant w o rk e rs by number o f holidays provided annually, all industries and m anufacturing,
18 a reas com bined, Winters o f 1952-53, 1955-56, 1957-58, and 1958-59)
O ffice w o rk e rs
Item

A ll industries

Plant w ork ers
M anufacturing

A ll industries

Manufacturing

1953
W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays _ _
_
_
Paid holiday t im e :1
Under 6 days
_ .
6 days
6 V? days ___
7 days _ ___
_
_ .
7
d a y s _______________ *_____________________
8 days ________________________________________
8 V days _ .
*
.
_
_
_ __
_
9 d a y s ___ ___________________________________
9
days _____________________________________
10 days ^ _ ____________________________ ^_____
_
lO 1 days _
^
......
...
.. __
11 days ____
I I V 2 days ___________________________________
12 or m ore days ____________________________

l
lz

1
!z

Cumulative sum m ary:
6 or m ore days
7 c r m ore days
_ _______
8 o r m ore days _____________________________
9 o r m ore days
.........
_ ___
10 or m ore days _
11 o r m ore days
......
12 o r m ore days

1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

92

96

97

96

94

98

99

98

2
37

2
25
1
24
2
10
1
6
1
4
1
14
2
6

2
19
2
26
2
13
2
6
1
4
1
12
2
7

2
15
2
28
3
14
2
7
1
4
1
12
2
7

1
64

6
55
( 2)
16
1
8
2
( 2)
1

5
22
1
40
1
14
1
3
( 2)

4
36
2
40
1
10

3
16
1
53
2
13
2
4
( 2)
2

( 2)

4

1
4
1
4

5
26
1
40
1
12
1
3
( 2)
2

4
64
1
14
1
8

5

6
36
1
34
1
10
(* )
2
( 2)
2

( 2)

1
2i
2
44
2
13
1
4
1
4
1
4

1
14
2
49
3
14
2

2
( 2)
3

1
34
2
37
1
10
1
4
1
4

( 2)
3

( 2)
3

( 2)
3

( 2)

3

-

( 2)

( 2)

( 2)

-

( 2)

1

1

1

(*)
( 2)

( 2)

98
71
45

98
77
49
34
27
21
7

98
81
50
35
27
21
7

99
63
25
14
10
5
1

99
75
30
15
10
5
1

99
84
32
16
11
6
1

( 2)

15
1
9
1
4
1
5
1
18
1
7

98
60
45
35
31
25
7

33

26
21
6

( 2)

15
1
10

( 2)

2

( 2)

99
35
19
8
5
3
( 2)

( 2)

( 2)

86
31
14
6
4
3
( 2)

1

1958"

1959

-

( 2)

3

2
( 2)
1

2
( 2)
2

4
21
1
51
1
11
1
3
( 2)
2

1

( 2)

( 2)

( 2)

2

1

-

( 2)
( 2)

(?)
( 2)

( 2)

95
57
16
6

95
72
20
8

1

1

( 2)

1

1

91
53
18
9
6

23

10
7

91
68
26
11
7

4

4

4

4

4

2
1

95
79
25
10
5

2

2

3

( 2)

1

1

( 2)

( 2)

( 2)

1

91
64

91
26
12
3

1 A ll com binations o f full and half days that add to the same amount are com bined; fo r exam ple, the proportion o f w o rk e rs receivin g a total of 7 days includes those with 7 full days and no half days, 6 full
days and 2 half days, 5 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
2 L ess than 0. 5 percen t.




49
The level of the cents differential provided was generally
higher, in the latter period, for workers on both shifts. For example,
the proportion of workers in firms with a second-shift differential of
less than 7 cents decreased from 22 to 10 percent, and with differen­
tials of 7 and under 10 cents, from 13 to 12 percent; whereas the
proportions of workers with differentials of 10 cents or more but
mainly under 13 cents, increased from 11 to 27 percent of the plant
workers in the combined 18 areas.
A similar, but less extensive
shift to 10 cents or higher differentials, chiefly to 15 cents or higher,
was noted in the provisions for third-shift operation.
The proportions of third-shift workers who were provided a
differential of less than 10 percent of the day rate decreased from
14 to 6 percent; an increase from 13 to 18 percent was recorded in
the proportions who were provided a differential of 10 percent.
Trend of Paid Holidays
Virtually all office workers in the 18 areas to which trend
data relate received the equivalent of 6 or more paid holidays in the
winter of 1952-53; among plant workers, on the other hand, 6 per­
cent received fewer than 6, and another 8 percent received no paid
holidays.
The 1958-59 survey indicated little change in the above
proportions other than a decline to 4 percent in the proportion of plant
workers who received no paid holidays. During the 6-year period, the
proportion of office workers receiving 8 or more holidays increased
from 45 to 50 percent and that of plant workers from 14 to 2 6 percent
(table 12).
In 1953, 6 paid holidays was the most common number re­
ceived by both office and plant workers. For office workers the next
most common number was 11 paid holidays, and for plant workers, 7.
In 1956, 6 and 7 days ranked about equally; and in the latest surveys,
those receiving 6 paid holidays were outnumbered about 2 to 1 by
those receiving 7 or the equivalent of 7 in full and half days.
Trend of Vacation Pay
For the great majority of workers in 1959 as in 1953, vaca­
tion pay was expressed in terms of regular or average earnings,
graduated on a sliding scale from as little as 1 day's pay after a
short period of employment to as much as 4 weeks' pay after long
service. Some plans of this type also provided 1 day's pay for each
year of service, thus providing progression for intermediate years.
Another type of graduated plan expressed vacation pay as a percent­
age of the worker's annual earnings. This latter type applied to about
8 percent of the plant workers, chiefly in manufacturing industries,
but to relatively few office workers. Other types of payment, includ­
ing flat-sum payments were unusual. Office workers continued to have
the more liberal vacation pay scales compared with plant workers
in regard to amount of pay and length of service required.




Both the maximum amount of vacation pay available and the
amount of vacation pay for comparable service were considerably
higher in 1959 than in 1953 for many of the office and plant workers
in the combined 18 areas. The limit on maximum pay was raised for
about three out of every eight of the office and plant workers, chiefly
to 3 weeks' pay and to a lesser extent, 4 weeks. For about one out
of every five workers, 3 weeks' pay may now be had after 10 years'
service, compared with longer service required in 1953.
More Pay for Comparable Service. — A larger amount of va­
cation pay was available in 1959 than in 1953, for many workers in
the 18 areas. In both 1953 and 1959, at least a week's vacation pay
was available to the bulk of the office workers after 6 months and to
four-fifths of the plant workers after a year's service with the em ­
ployer (table 13). Likewise, at least 2 weeks' vacation pay was availa­
ble to four out of five office workers after a year's service, although
5 years' service was required for the same proportion of plant work­
ers. Nevertheless, in 1959, at least 2 weeks' pay was available to
half of the plant workers after 2 years of service, compared with twofifths of the plant workers in 1953.
The chief improvements in pay-for-service scales in the
6-year period, however, were found in the area of 3- and 4-week paid
vacations.
Vacations with at least 3 weeks' pay were available in
1959 to about a tenth of the office and plant workers after as little
as 5 years' service— about twice the 1953 proportion. Three weeks'
pay or more after 10 years was available to 45 percent of the office
workers, compared with 22 percent in 1953; the proportions for plant
workers were 31 and 12 percent, respectively.
Liberalization of service requirements for 4-week or longer
paid vacations is reflected in the increased proportions of both plant
and office workers to whom this amount is available for 20 years'
service.
Higher Maxi mums. — In 1953, vacation pay of 2 weeks was the
maximum amount available under establishment vacation-pay sched­
ules covering 28 percent of the office workers in the 18 combined
areas; a maximum of 3 weeks' pay applied to 52 percent, and 4 weeks
or more to 19 percent (table 13). 9 By 1959, the proportion of office
workers with a 2-week maximum had decreased to 11 percent, and
the proportion with a maximum of 4 weeks' or more pay had more
than doubled (41 percent).
Correspondingly, the proportion of plant workers with vaca­
tion pay scales that provided a maximum of 2 weeks' paid vacation
decreased from 37 percent in 1953 to 18 percent in 1959, those with
a maximum of 3 weeks' pay increased from 51 to 58 percent, and
those with 4 weeks increased from 7 to 23 percent.
Two-thirds of
the increase in the proportion of plant workers to whom maximum
3-week paid vacations were made available during the last 6 years
19
In this sense, "2 w eeks'" and "3 weeks' " pay include amounts
up to, but less than, 3 and 4 weeks, respectively.

50
Table 13.

Trend o f vacation p a y

(Percent of office and plant workers, by amount of vacation pay for selected years of service, all industries and manufacturing,
18 areas combined, winters of 1952-53, 1955-56, 1957-58, and 1958-59)
Plant w ork ers

O ffice w ork ers
A ll
industries

V acation p o licy
1953
Total with p rovision s fo r paid
vacations

1956

A ll
industries

Manufacturing

1958

1959

1953

1956

M anufacturing

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

99

l 1)
19
80
l 1)

l 1)
17
82
1

(* )
17
82
1

(* )
17
82
1

(l)
18
81
l 1)

(* )
15
84
2

l 1)
15
84
2

(M
15
84
1

1
77
20
1

(M
75
23
2

(M
75
22
2

l 1)
74
23
2

1
85
13
1

(M
81
16
2

(M
81
16
3

( x)
80
17
3

l 1)
5
94
1

.
4
94
2

_
4
94
2

_
4
94
2

(M
8
91
1

_
5
92
2

_
5
92
3

.
5
92
2

1
58
40
-

( *)
53
44
-

l 1)
51
46
2

(M
49
48
3

73
25
-

(l)
68
29
-

(l)
66
30
3

(M
63
33
3

3
95
2

2
95
3

2
95
3

2
95
3

5
92
2

3
92
4

3
92
5

3
92
5

42
55
1

33
64
2

30
66
3

29
67
3

56
41
2

47
50
3

43
52
4

42
54
4

1
87
5
7
l 1)

( J)
84
6
9
(M

(M
82
7
11
(* )

(M
81
7
12
l 1)

1
91
3
5
( 1)

ll)
87
4
9
-

l 1)
86
5
9
(* )

(* )
85
5
9
l 1)

5
86
4
4
l 1)

3
86
4
6
l 1)

2
85
4
8
(‘ )

3
84
4
9
l 1)

5
87
4
2
-

3
87
4
6
-

2
85
5
6
l 1)

3
85
5
7
l 1)

1
72
5
21
1

l 1)
60
6
32
1

(M
50
8
41
1

(* )
47
8
43
1

1
79
3
16
1

I 1)
62
4
33
2

t 1)
52
7
40
2

(* )
48
7
43
2

4
79
5
11
1

2
63
15
19
1

2
53
17
26
1

2
50
16
30
1

4
80
6
9
(* )

2
59
21
17
l 1)

2
50
25
22
1

2
49
23
25
1

1
36
62
2

l 1)
19
78
2

l 1)
15
82
3

l 1)
13
83
3

1
37
60
2

(M
14
83
3

(* )

(* )

85
4

85
4

4
42
52
1

2
25
70
2

2
20
75
2

2
19
76
2

4
38
58
l 1)

2
21
76
1

2
20
76
1

2
20
76
2

1
30
63
6

(* )
16
75
9

(M
13
73
14

l 1)
12
73
15

1
33
64
2

( J)
13
82
5

l 1)
11
78
11

(M
10
76
14

4
38
55
2

2
25
68
4

2
19
70
8

2
18
70
9

4
34
62
1

2
20
75
3

2
15
77
5

2
14
77
7

1
28
52
19

l 1)
14
58
27

(* )
12
53
35

l 1)
11
51
38

1
32
60
6

i 1)
13
73
14

l 1)
11
65
24

t 1)
10
61
29

4
37
51
7

2
24
60
13

2
19
60
19

2
18
58
22

4
32
59
4

2
20
68
10

2
15
68
15

2
14
65
19

Amount of vacation pay
A fter 1 year o f s e r v ic e
L es s than 1 w eek
1 w eek *
.... ---2 w eeks 3
---3 w eeks
A fter 2 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
L ess than 1 w eek
1 w eek2 .
_ _ _ _ _ _
2 w eeks 3 ___________________________
3 w eeks

l

A fter 3 y ears o f s e r v ic e
1 week*
_ __ _______
___ ___
2 w e e k s 3 __ _
__
_ ____
3 w e e k s 4 ----------------------------------------A fter 5 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek*
2 w eeks ... _ _
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks
3 w eeks 4
.... _
4 w eeks
_
__

__ .
_ _

A fter 10 y e a r 8 o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek * _ _
_ _
2 w eeks ________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ____ _____
3 w eeks 4
_
4 w eeks
A fter 15 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek *
2 w eeks3
3 w eeks 4
4 w eeks

__
_ _
------------ .

_

A fter 20 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek *
2 w eeks 3
3 w eeks 4 _
4 w eeks

__

_ _ __
_ _ _ _ _ _
_

A fter 25 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
1
2
3
4

w eek *
____
__ __
__
w eeks 3
. ---. ------w eeks 4 _
w eeks and o v e r ________ ____ ____

See footnotes at end of table.




NOTE:

In the tabulations of vacation allowances by years of service, payments other than "length of time,"
such as percentage of annual earnings or flat-sum payments, were converted to an equivalent time
basis; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week's pay.
Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Table 13.

51

Trend of vacation p a y -C o n tin u e d

(P ercen t o f o ffice and plant w o rk e rs , by amount o f vacation pay fo r s e le cte d ye a rs o f s e r v ic e , all industries and m anufacturing,
18 areas com bin ed, w in ters o f 1952-53, 1955-56, 1957-58. and 1958-59)
O ffice

Plant

A ll
indust rie s

V acation po licy
1953

1956

A ll
industries

Manufa ctur ing

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

Manufacturing

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

Amount of vacation pay
and service period
1 week or m ore
................
... _ .
6 months ---------- ---------- -----------1 year -----------------------------------------

99
63
99

99
69
99

99
70
99

99
70
99

99
58
99

99
65
99

99
67
99

99
68
99

99
18
98

99
20
99

99
20
99

99
20
99

99
13
98

99
13
99

99
13
99

99
14
99

2 w eeks or m o re
6 months
1 year
_
2 yea rs
...
3 y ea rs ...........
5 years ..
..

.
____ _ __
_ _
_ _
. _
. .
_ _

99
6
81
94
97
99

99
8
83
96
98
99

99
8
83
96
98
99

99
9
83
96
98
99

99
3
81
92
94
99

99
4
85
94
97
99

99
3
85
95
97
99

99
3
85
95
97
99

95
1
21
41
57
94

97
1
24
46
66
97

97
1
24
49
69
97

97
1
25
51
71
97

96
1
14
26
43
94

97
1
18
32
53
97

98
(l)
18
34
56
97

98
(M
19
36
58
97

3 w eeks or m ore
_ _ __ __
3 y ears
_
--------_ _
5 yea rs
. _ --_
10 yea rs
....
15 yea rs
..._
_____ _
20 yea rs
...........
25 y ears

71
2
7
22
63
69
71

85
3
9
33
80
84
85

88
3
11
42
85
87
88

89
3
12
45
86
88
89

67
3
5
17
62
66
67

87
4
9
34
86
87
87

89
5
9
42
89
89
89

90
5
10
45
89
89
90

58
1
4
12
53
57
58

73
2
6
19
71
72
73

79
3
8
27
77
78
79

80
3
9
31
78
79
80

63
2
2
9
58
62
63

78
3
6
18
77
77
78

83
4
7
23
78
83
83

84
4
7
26
78
84
84

4 w eeks or m ore _
10 yea rs
_
__ ____
15 yea rs _
_ __
20 y ea rs ________________________
25 y ea rs _
____ ________ „

19
1
2
6
19

27
1
2
9
27

38
1
3
14
35

41
1
3
15
38

6
1
2
2
6

14
2
3
5
14

25
2
4
11
24

29
2
4
14
29

7
1
1
2
7

13
1
2
4
13

20
1
2
8
19

23
1
2
9
22

4

10
(* )
1
3
10

16
(M
1
5
15

19
1
2
7
19

1
*
J
4

L ess than
Includes
Includes
Includes

(l)
1
4

0 .5 p ercent.
proportion s (notexceeding 2 percent) at o v e r 1 and under 2 w eeks.
proportion s (notexceeding 3 percent) at o v e r 2 and under 3 w eeks.
proportion s (notexceeding 3 percent) at o v e r 3 and under 4 w eeks.

Table 14.

Trend of health, insurance, an d pension plans

(P ercen t of o ffic e and plant w ork ers provided health, insurance, and pension plans, all industries and m anufacturing,
18 areas com bined, w inters of 1952-53, 1955-56, 1957-58, and 1958-59)
Plant w ork ers

O ffice w ork ers
Type of plan
1953
L i f e -----------------------------------------------A cciden tal death and d is ­
m em berm en t --— -------------- --------Sickness and a c c id e n t -------------------H o s p ita liz a tio n ------------------------------Surgical ------------— ---------------------- —
M6(3iC2ll — ■
-■ --------- ■n
-rs------ 1t
i
-------------Catastrophe —— ------------- — — -------R etirem ent p e n s io n ---------------------L ess than 0. 5 percent,




Manufacturing

A ll industries
1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

Manufacturing

A ll industries
1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

1953

1956

1958

1959

87

93

94

95

91

95

96

96

85

91

92

92

89

94

95

95

35
43
66
58
38
0)
66

44
44
77
75
53
16
75

46
41
80
79
58
29
79

48
41
81
80
59
35
80

43
62
76
71
50
(*)
63

58
65
88
87
65
17
74

59
62
89
89
69
27
80

59
61
90
90
69
31
81

36
60
73
66
44
(l )
52

51
67
84
82
58
6
63

54
68
86
84
60
10
68

54
66
66
85
61
13
69

41
69
81
75
52
(‘ )
57

57
79
91
90
64
7
67

59
79
93
92
66
11
72

59
78
94
93
67
13
72

52
occurred in the period 1953-56. A lm o st all of the gain in office w o rk ­
ers also occurred then.
In contrast, 4-w eek (o r longer) paid vaca­
tions as m axim um s became available to proportionately m ore of the
office and plant w orkers during 1956-59 than in the e a rlie r 3 -ye a r
period.
Tre n d of Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
In 1959, life insurance was available to m ore than 90 percent
of both office w orkers and plant w orkers in the 18 areas combined.
Hospitalization insurance, as w ell as surg ical insurance, was availa­
ble to m ore than 80 percent. R etirem ent pension plans covered 80 p e r­
cent of the office w orkers and about 70 percent of the plant w o rk e rs;
and m edical insurance plans covered about 60 percent of each group.
Accidental death and dism em berm ent benefits, sickness and accident
insurance, and catastrophe insurance were available to sm alle r propor­
tions of w orkers.




Although many w orkers have acquired coverage for these
benefits during the past 6 ye a rs, the rate of growth of the prevalence
of these benefits has slowed in the past 3 ye a rs, except for catastrophe
insurance (table 14).
D urin g the period 1953 to 1956, hospitalization,
surgical, and m edical benefits were provided, on the average, to an
additional 4 to 6 percent of both office and plant w orkers each year,
but to only an added 1 to 2 percent a year between 195 6 and 1959.
Accidental death and dism em berm ent insurance coverage was received
in the firs t 3 -ye a r period by an added 3 percent of the office and
5 percent of the plant w orkers each ye a r, compared with 1 percent
each year since 1956.
The rate of added pension coverage provided
to both office and plant w orkers decreased from 3 percent a year
during the e a rlie r 3 -ye a r period to 2 percent a year after 1956. C a ­
tastrophe insurance coverage of office w orkers increased at the rate
of 5 percent a year in the e a rlie r 3 -ye a r period, and averaged 6 p e r­
cent a year in the past 3 years; in contrast, this benefit was received,
on the average, by an added 2 percent of the plant w orkers annually,
over the entire 6 -ye a r period.

B :

E s ta b lis h m e n t

P r a c tic e s

and

S u p p le m e n t a r y

W age

53

P r o v is io n s

Table B-1: Minimum entrance rates1 for women office w orkers-all industries
(D istribution o f establishm ents studied by m inim um hiring rate fo r se le cte d occupations, w inter 1958-59)

E stablishm ents s tu d ie d ____________________ ____

B oston 2

252

Buffalo

204

North Central

South

N ortheast
M inim vim rate
(weekly straigh t-tim e salary)

New
York
C ity2
558

P h ila ­
delphia2
311

B a lti­
m ore
181

Dallas

D etroit2

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland2

438

266

317

253

138

C h icago2

181

W est
Los
A n g elesLong
Beach*

Seattle2

Inexperienced typists
Establishm ents having a s p e cifie d
m inim um 3__— _____________________________ .
Under $ 3 7 .5 0 _______________________________
$ 3 7 .5 0 and under $ 4 0 .0 0 ................................
$ 4 0 .0 0 and under $ 4 2 .5 0 _____ ____ _______
$4 2 .5 0 and under $ 4 5 .0 0 _________________
$ 4 5 .0 0 and under $ 4 7 .5 0 ___ ____________
$47. 50 and under $ 5 0 .0 0 ________
____ _
$ 5 0 .0 0 and under $ 5 2 .5 0 _________________
$5 2 .5 0 and under $ 5 5 .0 0 _________________
$ 5 5 .0 0 and under $ 5 7 .5 0
_ ___
___ _
$5 7 .5 0 and under $ 6 0 .0 0 _____________ __
$ 60 .00 and under $ 6 2 .5 0 __ _________
__
$62. 50 and under $65. 00 __ ___
$ 65 .00 and under $ 6 7 .5 0 _________________
$67. 50 and under $ 7 0 .0 0 _________________
$7 0 .0 0 and under $ 7 2 .5 0 _________________
$7 2 .5 0 and under $ 7 5 .0 0 _________________
* 7 5 .0 0 and under $77. 50 _ _ _ _ _
_
__ _
$77. 50 and under $ 8 0 .0 0 ___
$ 8 0 .0 0 and o v e r __ ____
_ _ ____ _
Establishm ents having no sp e cifie d
m in im u m ___ ______ _____ __ __ ____________
Establishm ents which did not em ploy
w ork ers in this ca te go ry ___ ________________
Inform ation not available _____________________

131
1
6
14
16
43
14
18
4
4
3
1
2
1
4
_
_
_
_
_

97
_
3
11
5
12
6
18
4
8
8
9
5
2
2
1
1
_
_
2

259
_
_
5
4
23
17
70
33
57
16
21
3
3
2
_
3
_
1
1

69

35

121

52
-

71
1

178
-

88
1
_
12
14
19
5
12
7
4
1
_
4
3
2
1
2
1
_
_

69
1
1
15
10
8
9
8
3
3
3
2
3
1
2

230
2
_
6
_
6
13
40
27
38
21
24
12
15
10
2
2
2
6
4

155
2
2
6
4
16
10
26
11
16
12
18
5
7
6
2
3
2
4
3

162
_
_
2
1
4
6
16
15
15
31
16
7
1
7
11
8
6
3
13

120
_
_
_
1
1
4
25
15
6
21
12
3
9
3
4
4
2
6
4

64
_
2
2
5
9
5
16
4
5
3
2
2
6
1
1
1
_
_
_

72

19

35

106

45

60

71

24

75
1

74
-

77

102
-

66
-

95
-

62
-

49
1

174
3
3
11
10
22
10
26
13
16
15
15
6
4
3
2
5
4
2
4

166
_
_
2
7
4
12
16
17
20
21
14
7
2
10
9
6
5
7
.7

133
_
_
_
2
7
8
25
15
7
18
14
6
6
5
5
5
2
5
3

63
_
2
3
4
11
4
16
9
2
2
1
1
6
_
_
1
_
1
_

163
1
2
22
20
34
13
28
10
6
8
8
4
3
2
1
1
_
_
_

-

Other inexperienced clerical workers4
Establishm ents having a s p e cifie d
m inim um
_
___
___
__
Under $37. 50 _
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _______
$37 . 50 and under $ 4 0 .0 0 _ _ _ _ _
__ _
$4 0 .0 0 and under $42. 50
_______ _____
$ 4 2 .5 0 and under $ 4 5 .0 0 __
$45 .0 0 and under $ 4 7 .5 0 ................................
$4 7 .5 0 and under $ 5 0 .0 0 ___ __ _ _
$ 5 0 .0 0 and under $ 52. 50 ................................
$52 .5 0 and under $ 5 5 .0 0 _________________
$ 5 5 .0 0 and under $57 . 50 _________________
$ 57. 50 and under $ 6 0 .0 0 __
$60 .0 0 and under $ 6 2 .5 0 _
_ _
$6 2 .5 0 and under $ 6 5 .0 0 __ _____________
$6 5 .0 0 and under $ 6 7 .5 0 __ ___ ________
$6 7 .5 0 and under $ 7 0 .0 0 _________________
$ 7 0 .0 0 and under $ 7 2 .5 0 _____ ________ _
$ 7 2 .5 0 and under $ 7 5 .0 0
$75. 00 and under $77. 50
_______
$ 77 .50 and under $ 8 0 .0 0 _________________
$ 8 0 .0 0 and o v e r __
___
______
__ _
E stablishm ents having no sp e cifie d
m in im u m _. __
_________
______ ____
E stablishm ents which did not em ploy
w ork ers in this c a te g o ry
__ __ ___ _____
Inform ation not available __
__ _
1
2
3
4

136
2
8
18
19
42
15
13
5
4
3
_
2
_
3
2
_
_
_
_

106
_
6
16
5
13
9
19
5
4
6
11
4
2
2
1
1
_
2
_

288
_
1
14
13
50
21
81
29
37
10
18
2
6
2
_
3
_
1
_

75

40

41

57
1

“

169
2
5
40
17
28
14
26
10
3
6
8
4
3
2
_
1
_
_
_

96
4
1
29
9
13
8
11
3
4
2
2
3
3
2
_
1
1
_
_

75
3
2
21
12
9
5
7
3
1
3
3
3
3
_
_
_
_
_
_

251
2
_
7
4
18
15
56
35
30
14
26
6
13
8
2
2
3
7
3

130

92

26

37

114

46

63

70

25

140
“

49
1

59
-

69
-

73
-

46
-

88
“

50
“

49
1

L ow est fo rm a lly establish ed sa la ry rate.
E xceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footn otes 4 a n d /o r 5 to the table in appendix A.
Regular straigh t-tim e salary corresp on d in g to e m p lo y e e 's standard w orkw eek.
Data are presented fo r all w orkweeks com bin ed.
Rates applicable to m e s s e n g e r s , o ffic e g ir ls , o r s im ila r s u b c le r ic a l jo b s are not co n sid e re d .




54
Table B-2: Minimum entrance rates1 for women office workers-manufacturing
(D istribution o f establishm ents studied by m inim um hiring rate fo r se le cte d occupations, w inter 1958-59)
South

N ortheast
M inim um rate
(weekly straigh t-tim e salary)

E stablishm ents studied ______________ ,_________

Boston

Buffalo

86

112

New
Y ork
City

P h ila ­
delphia

180

134

B a lti­
m ore

North Central
D allas

71

Chicago

57

W est

D etroit

L os
A n g e le s Long
Beach

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Seattle

173

100

113

86

48

19
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
1
_
.
-

103
.
.
_
3
2
15
11
15
8
13
9
6
7
2
2
6
4

60
_
1
1
2
9
3
5
6
10
2
5
6
2
2
1
3
2

66
.
_
_
1
1
3
3
7
14
9
4
1
6
7
4
4
2

43
.
_
.
.
.
1
_
3
1
12
6
1
6
2
.
2
2
3
4

18
_
_
_
_
_
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
.
.
_
_

Inexperienced typists
E stablishm ents having a s p e cifie d
m inim um 2 _____________________________________
Under $ 3 7 .5 0 .
______________ ___________
$ 3 7 .5 0 and under $ 4 0 .0 0 _____ __
____
$4 0 .0 0 and under $ 4 2 .5 0 _____ __
$ 4 2 .5 0 and under $ 4 5 .0 0 ___________________
$ 4 5 .0 0 and under $ 4 7 .5 0 _ _
_ _
$ 4 7 .5 0 and under $ 5 0 .0 0 __________________
$ 5 0 .0 0 and under $ 5 2 .5 0 _ _________ ___
$5 2 .5 0 and under $ 5 5 .0 0 __ „ ____ ____
$5 5 .0 0 and under $ 5 7 .5 0 _____ _____________
$ 5 7 .5 0 and under $ 6 0 .0 0 __ ____ ____ __
$6 0 .0 0 and under $ 6 2 .5 0 _
_ _
$ 62.50 and under $ 6 5 .0 0 __ ___
______
$6 5 .0 0 and under $ 6 7 .5 0 ___________ _______
$ 6 7 .5 0 and under $ 7 0 .0 0 ________ ________
$7 0 .0 0 and under $ 7 2 .5 0
„
$7 2 .5 0 and under $ 7 5 .0 0 __________________
„
__
$ 7 5 .0 0 and under $77 . 50 _______
$ 7 7 .5 0 and under $ 8 0 .0 0 _ __ _ _ __
$ 8 0 .0 0 and o v e r ____________________________
E stablishm ents having no sp e cifie d
m inim um ______________________________________
E stablishm ents which did not em ploy
w ork ers in this c a t e g o r y ________ ___
___
Inform ation not available
—_______ _______

37
_
.
3
2
5
2
8
3
2
1
_
4
2
1
1
2
1
-

50
.
1
7
6
14
6
8
1
_
1
1
2
_
3
_
_
_
.
_

62
_
_
4
2
7
6
8
4
6
6
9
4
1
2
_
1
_
_
2

83
_
_
2
1
8
6
19
9
17
4
8
1
2
1
_
3
_
1
1

79
_
_
9
5
12
8
15
5
4
5
7
3
2
2
1
1
.
-

30

24

36

26

9

10

46

22

18

22

9

6
-

25
1

61
-

29
-

25
-

28
-

24

18
“

29
-

21
-

21
-

64
_
.
2
3
2
8
6
5
9
8

65
_
2
1
3
7
9
10
7
4
1
9
6
3

47
_
.
_
1
1
6
2
10
8

16
_
_
_
_
.
1
8
2
_
1

.
1

3
3

Other inexperienced clerical workers 3
E stablishm ents having a s p e cifie d
m in im u m 2__
______________ ___ ______
Under $37 . 50 _______________________________
$ 3 7 .5 0 and under $ 4 0 .0 0 __________________
$ 4 0 .0 0 and under $4 2 .5 0 __________________
$ 4 2 .5 0 and under $ 4 5 .0 0 __________________
$ 4 5 .0 0 and under $ 4 7 .5 0 __________________
$ 4 7 .5 0 and under $ 5 0 .0 0 __________________
$ 5 0 .0 0 and under $ 5 2 .5 0 ____________ ____
$ 5 2 .5 0 and under $ 5 5 .0 0 __________________
$ 5 5 .0 0 and under $ 5 7 .5 0 __________________
$ 5 7 .5 0 and under $ 6 0 .0 0 ________ ____ __
$ 6 0 .0 0 and under $ 62. 50 __________________
$ 6 2 .5 0 and under $ 6 5 .0 0 __________________
$ 6 5 .0 0 and under $ 6 7 .5 0 ________ _ ____
$ 6 7 .5 0 and under $ 7 0 .0 0 __________________
$ 7 0 .0 0 and under $ 7 2 .5 0 __________________
$ 7 2 .5 0 and under $ 7 5 .0 0 __________________
$ 7 5 .0 0 and under $77 . 50 ___ ______________
$77 . 50 and under $ 8 0 .0 0 _____ __
$ 8 0 .0 0 and o v e r ____________________________
E stablishm ents having no sp e cifie d
m inim um T __„
,
_____ E stablishm ents which did not em ploy
w ork ers in this c a t e g o r y ________________ __ ___
Inform ation not available
____________ ______

_
2
1
.
.
_
.

91
_
_
4
3
17
4
21
10
12
5
6
_
3

30

26

38

33

14

8
”

24

51
"

21
"

21
"

2

1

2
_
3
.
1
.

80
.
1
12
7
11
6
17
6
2
4
6
3

36
_
_
4
3
6
3
7
1
1
2
_
3
3
1
.
1
1
.

61
_
_
5
3
8
5
11
4
2
5
9
3
1
2
.
1
.
_
2

48
_
1
8
6
14
7
6
.
_
1
_

2
2
1
.
.
.

18
_
3
2
2
3
2
1
1

2
1
1
.
.
.
.

2

2
2

1

2

3
7
3

4
3
1
4
3
1
3

11

44

23

18

21

10

28
"

24
"

13
■

30
“

18
“

22
-

1 L ow est fo rm a lly established salary rate.
2 Regular straigh t-tim e sa la ry corresp on d in g to e m p lo y e e 's standard w orkw eek.
Data are presented fo r all w orkweeks com bin ed.
3 Rates applicable to m e s s e n g e rs , o ffice g ir ls , o r s im ila r su b c le r ic a l jo b s are not co n sid e re d .




105
.
7
1
21
16
11
6
13
4
6
5
.

2

2

3
1
3

2

.
.
.
.
1
_

55
Table B-3: Scheduled weekly hours-a II industries
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in all establishm ents by scheduled hours o f w ork per w eek, w inter 1958-59)
Plant w ork ers 2

O ffice w ork er s 1
Under 40 hours

A re a
35
N ortheast:
B oston ^
Buffalo
Naw Y ork C it y 4 __
P h iladelph ia4

36 y*

37 V 2

383
/4

T o t a l3

Over
40
hours

40
hours

Over 40 hours

Under 40 hours
Under
37 Va

3 y2
7

T o ta l3

40
hours

T o ta l3

42

45

44

Over
48

48

12
3
54
10

7
(* )
11
5

26
29
16
27

6
3
1
11

65
37
89
61

35
62
11
39

(* )
( )
(«>
( 5)

3
1
13
2

7
8
6
10

13
10
20
13

79
85
75
84

8
5
5
3

( 5)
1
2

1
2
1
l 5)

_
1
2
( 5)

4
1
1
( 5)

( 5)
1
.
( 5)

9
4

2
-

10
3

4
4

30
14

69
80

1
7

3
1

2
1

7
2

82
64

11
34

( 5)

2
6

2
8

3
7

2
6

----_
____

5
1

5
1

17
6

8
3

38
15

61
85

1
1

5
2

3
2

8
4

84
90

8
6

( 9)
2

1

2
( S)

3
2

1
( 5)

W est:
Eos A n geles-L o n g B e a c h 4
San F ra n cis co-O a k la n d 4
_
S e a t t l e * ---------------------------------------------------------

1
2
-

1
1
-

7
16
9

4
12
4

15
36
12

85
64
88

(* )
( 5)

1
6
3

1
7
"

3
13
3

94
87
97

4
(* )
<5)

1
( 5)

( 5)
_
“

1
( 5)

1
.
"

-

’

M
_
I
__ _________________
_
.

South:
D allas _

. . .

N orth Central:
C hicago 4
D e tr o it4 _

_____

____

1 ■

Data rela te to all o ffic e w o rk e rs and a re com parable only with studies made in the w inter o f 1957-58.
Data for finance and insurance are excluded.
Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented separately.
E xceptions to the standard industry lim itations a re shown in footn otes 4 a n d /o r 7 to the table in appendix A.
L ess than 0 .5 p ercent.

Table B-4: Scheduled weekly hours-manufacturing
(P e rce n t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in m anufacturing establishm ents by scheduled hours o f w ork per w eek, w inter 1958-59)
Plant w ork ers

O ffice w o rk e rs 1
Under 40 hours

A rea
35
N ortheast:
B oston
Buffalo
New Y ork C ity
Philadelphia
South:
B a ltim ore
D allas

. . __

_

North Central:
Chicago
D etroit
W est:
Eos A n geles-L o n g B e a c h ___________________
San F ra n cisco-O a k la n d .
Seattle

3 y4
6

40
hours

3 y2
7

383
/4

16
11
13
23

6
5
1
17

36
18
92
50

Over
40
hour 8

63
82
8
50

T o t a l2

37Va

Total 2

40
hours

T o t a l2

44

42

45

Over
48

48

7
5
32
15

87
92
65
85

5
3
3
l 3)

.
-

1
2
( 3)
-

_
1
( 3)

2
1
2
-

.
( 3)

(* )

5
3
4
12

82
89

1
7

4
2

3
-

7
2

87
77

6
21

-

( 3)
4

2
5

3
4

1
1

38
3

62
97

( 3)
-

7
2

4
2

11
4

86
92

3
4

*

1

1
( 3)

1
2

( 3)
-

1
30
1

98
70
99

( 3)
“

2
10
4

1
3
”

3
13
4

94
87
95

3
( 3)

2
( 3)

"

1
“

“

“

2
( 3)
8
2

3
1

1
-

7
3

4
-

17
4

5

2

16
2

12
1

( 3)
2
"

1
“

1
6
1

-

Data rela te to all o ffic e w o rk e rs and are com parable only with studies m ade in the w inter o f 1957-58
Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented separately.
L ess than 0 .5 percen t.




Under
3 y2
7

2
2
28
3

12
1
69
5

16
( 3)

Over 40 hours

Under 40 hours

1
( 3)

_

-

56

Table B-5: Scheduled weekly hours-public utilities*
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in public utilities establishm ents by scheduled hours o f w ork per w eek, w inter 1958-59)
O ffice w o rk e rs 1

Plant w ork ers

Under 40 hours

A rea
35
N ortheast:
B o s to n 3 ___ _ ___ ___
_______
_ __ _
Buffalo ___ __ _ __
____ _ __ __
___
__ _______
New Y ork C ity 3____
P h ila d e lp h ia _________________________________

36V4

37 y2

383
/4

T o t a l2

3
1
57
13

4
6

1
3

_
-

30
1

2
-

37
4

63
90

North Central:
C h i c a g o __ __ __ _ _____ __ ____ _________
___ ____
D e tr o it3 ___ _ _______ __ „

3
-

-

-

5
39

1
1

9
66

W est:
'
Los A n geles-L on g B e a ch 3___ __
__ __
San F ran cis c o-O a k la n d 3 ____ __
___ __
S eattle3 ------------------------------------------------------------

7
2
-

“

1
7
~

1
8
"

8
17
"

South:
B a ltim ore _
D allas ___

1
2
3
4
*

. _ -

58
60
8
43

( 4)

40
hours

61

60
69
62

Over
40
hours

Under
37 y2

37V2

O ver 40 hours

Total 2

( 4)
1

_
3
-

( 4)
6

1
"

_

91
34

-

-

-

-

-

( 4)

( 4)

92
83
100

-

“

3

3
"

39
39
31
38

_
( 4)

Under 40 hours

-

.
_
3
1
1
-

-

40
hours

97
98
94
99
97
64

Total 2

42

44

_

48

Over
48

_

_
_
_
-

2
2
_

_
_
_

-

-

_

3
2
3
-

_

2
4

3

2
36

-

100
98

-

-

-

1

-

-

100
96
100

1
”

“

*
*

-

-

_
-

-

-

“

Data rela te to all o ffic e w o rk e rs and are com parable only with studies made in the w inter o f 1957-58.
Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented separately.
1 or m ore utilities are m unicipally operated, and, th erefore excluded fro m the sco p e o f the studies. See footnote 4 to the table in appendix A.
L ess than 0 .5 percent.
Tran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), com m u nication, and other public u tilities.

Table B-6: Scheduled weekly hours-wholesale trade
(P ercen t o f o ffice and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in w h olesale trade establishm ents by scheduled hours of w ork per w eek, w inter 1958-59)
O ffice w o rk e rs 1
A rea

N ortheast:
B oston _
— _ .
New Y ork C i t y ______________________________
__ _ „
__ _
_ _
Philadelphia _ _____
----------------------------------------------------

North Central:
C hicago __ _ __ _
D e t r o i t __________

____
_ _

____
___

_

_ _

W est:
L os A n geles-L on g B e a c h __________________
San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d _____________________

40
hours

36 y4

37 Va

3 83/4

_
51
2

7
10
-

30
27
27

4
3
20

47
91
51

52
9
49

-

2

6

9

18

3
2

3
-

20
6

2
12

-

1
4

8
8

8
7

35

South:
B altim ore

Plant w ork ers

Under 40 hours

“

T o t a l2

Under
37 V2

1

-

-

-

5
7

82

-

28
20

69
80

2
-

-

16
19

84
81

"

“

-

-

O ver 40 hours

40
T o t a l2 ; hours

37V2

3
13

Total 2

42

44

_

Over
48

48

5
19
9

71
81
87

25

2

85

13

1
“

1
“

84
95

15
5

-

-

-

-

3
6

5
6

91
94

5
”

-

3
"

2

Data rela te to all o ffic e w o rk e rs and are com parable only with studies made in the w inter of 1957-58.
Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented separately.




Over
40
hours

Under 40 hours

-

-

1
_

5

3

-

7
_
-

2

_

-

3
3

4

-

-

"

“

57
Table B-7: Scheduled weekly hours-retail trade
(Percent of office and plant w ork ers em ployed in reta il trade establishm ents by scheduled hours of work per w eek, winter 1 9 58 -59 )
O ffice w ork ers 1
A rea
35

36 V4

Northeast:
_____ __ __ __________________________
Boston
New York C ity 4
_
_
P hiladelphia4 ___________________________________

11
15
10

5
16

13
35
15

South:
B altim ore __________________ __________________
D allas -----------------------------------------------------------------

4
-

383
/4

37Vz

North C entral:
Chicago
D e tr o it5 _ _

_

W est:
San F ran cisco-O akland
Seattle
-----

1
2
3
4
5

Plant w orkers

Under 40 hours

-

6
3
7

T o t a l2

Under 40 hours

Over
40
hours

40
hours

Under
3 7 l/a

37 Va

Over 40 hours

T o t a l2

40
hours

Total 2

44

38
26
14

50
63
75

12
10
11

2
1
9

_
4
-

7
( 3)
2

-

-

-

-

3

9
3

63
42

29
55

2

9
18

4
6

7
15

8
3

-

23
20
65

( 3)
1
l 3)

4
8
1

5
4

92
78

3
18

_

1
4

-

"

(3)
-

6
3

5
"

12
6

87
87

1
7

2

-

-

"

2

2
2

76
75

22
23

3
13

2
3

(3 )

_ _ _ _ _ _ _
_________

_

6
"

10

16
“

84
100

_

1
"

9
“

10
-

88
100

2
“

_

-

"

■

-

_ __

"

Table B-8: Scheduled weekly hours-finance f
(P ercent of office w ork ers em ployed in finance establishm ents by scheduled hours o f w ork per w eek, winter 1 9 5 8 -5 9 )
O ffic e w o r k e r s 1

Under 40 hours

A rea
35

361
/4

37 Va

383
/4

Total 2

40
hours

Over
40
hour 8

N ortheast:
Boston
__ _
_ .
New Y ork C i t y ______________________________
P h ila d e lp h ia -------------------------------------------------

16
53
20

14
16
11

31
10
27

8
1
3

93
93
86

7
7
14

South:
B a ltim ore
D allas __

27
8

5
-

14
-

5
10

53
29

47
71

( 3)

N orth Central:
C h icago __________ ___ — . ___ ____ ,__ __ —_
_
D e tr o it -----------------------------------------------------------

7
( 3)

15
7

26
6

10
9

67
26

33
74

-

W est:
Eos A n geles-L on g Beach _________________
San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d __________ __________

( 3)
( 3)

3
~

18
29

11
13

38
53

62
47

“

__ . __

_ _

_

__

Over
48

48

19
15
10

77
79
35

Data relate to a ll office w ork ers and are com parable only with studies made in the winter of 1 9 5 7 -5 8 .
Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented separately..
D ess than 0. 5 percent.
E xcludes lim ite d -p r ic e variety sto r e s.
E xcludes 2 large departm ent sto r e s.




42

1 Data relate to a ll office w ork ers and are com parable only with studies made in the winter of 1 9 5 7 -5 8 .
2 Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented sep arately.
3 L e ss than 0 .5 percent.
t Finance, in suran ce, and r e a l estate.

_

-

1
_

"

_

_

"

“




Table B-9: Scheduled w eekly hours-services
(P ercen t o f o ffice and plant w ork ers em ployed in s e rv ice s establishm ents by scheduled hours o f w ork per w eek, winter 1958-59)
O ffice w o rk e rs 1
Under 40 hours

A rea
35

Over
40
hours

40
hours

36>/4

37‘/a

383
/4

15
57
2

7
4
12

16
25
50

56
94
81

44

16

18

1

10
16

3

17
12

4
8

48
39

51
57

1
4

5

4

24

34

65

1

T otal 2

Northeast:
B o s to n
N ew Y o r k f.ity

_ ..

__ _ _ _
P h ila d e lp h ia _________________ ___________ __

6

North C entral:
Chi ra g n
D e tr o it

__

..

W est:
Eos A n geles-L on g B e a c h 3 _________________

Plant w ork ers
Under 40 hours
Under
37Va
N ortheast:
B oston __
New Y ork C ity
. . .
P h ila d e lp h ia _______________________________
North C entral:
C hicago _
D etroit _
W est:
Eos A n geles-L on g B e a c h 3
1
2
3
4

_

37Va

Over 40 hours

Total 2

40
hours

Total 2

6
( 4)
3

2
1
4

7
2
8

78
91
74

14
7
18

6
8

1
-

9
8

67
82

23
10

“

2

2

91

7

42

44

45

Over
48

48

10

_

-

6

4
2

5
( 4)
1

7

-

8
( 4)

.
"

10
4

5
6

“

“

1

6

-

-

3
-

_

Data relate to all o ffice w ork ers and a re com p arable only with studies m ade in the winter o f 1957-58.
Includes w eekly schedules other than those presented separately.
E xcludes m otion -p ictu re production and a llie d s e r v ic e s ; data for these industries a re included, h ow ever, in "a ll industries*
L ess than 0 .5 percen t.

59

Table B-10: Shift differential provisions-manufactoring
(Total plant w ork ers in establishm ents having fo rm a l provision s fo r late-shift operation s, winter 1958-59)
P e rce n t o f m anufacturing plant w ork ers

Boston

Total plant workers in manufacturing
establishments
„ _

Buffalo

North Central

South

Northeast

Shift operation and shiftpay differential

New
York
City

Phila­
delphia

Balti­
more

Dallas

Chicago

West

Detroit

Los
AngelesLong
Beach

Sah
FranciscoOakland

Seattle

_ .

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Second shift
. _____
_ _
_
With shift-pay differential __ __
Uniform cents (per h o u r ) ___ ___
Under 5 cents _ __
_
_
5 and under 6 cents
_ _ _
_ _
6 and under 7 cents _____________
7 and under 8 cents .
______ .
8 and under 9 cents _____________9 and under 10 cents___ _________
10 and under 11 cents
11 and under 12 cents
______ _
12 and under 13 cents
_ ______ _
_
13 and under 14 cents __________ —
14 and under 15 cents _
_ __
_
15 and under 16 cents
_ __ ___ _
16 cents and over
__
_____
Uniform percentage ____ ___ _ __
Under 5 percent
____ ___ ___
5 percent______________________
___
Over 5 and under 10 percent _10 percent__ ___________________
12, 12%, or 15 percent _____
_
Other1 ___
__ „
No shift-pay differential ___ __________

81.4
80.5
36.2
_
7.3
1.5
5.4
3.4
1.4
8.3
_
.7
1.2
_
2.9
4. 1
41.3
2. 6
4. 6
33. 1
.9
3. 1
.9

90.0
90.0
57.3
1.1
4.8
3.4
2.2
19.5
4. 7
10.5
.3
4.5
.1
_
4. 6
1 6
.
25.0
.4
14. 7
1 1
.
8.8
7.7
-

60.4
59.0
34. 6
.2
4.3
2. 1
3. 7
1.0
_
10.0
_
.9
5.8
_
5. 6
1.0
22.2
_
2. 1
3. 6
11.0
5. 5
2.2
1.4

85.3
79.7
37.3
_
8. 1
•9
7.8
8.4
.3
6 5
.
1.8
.6
2.2

74.8
73.3
68.8
.
4. 7
1.0
10.9
4.0
.
16.1

94.5
94.5
71.0
.3
5.9
3.8
.7
2.8
.3
22. 7
_
26.1
3.4
.2
1.7
3.0
13. 7
_
4. 7
3.2
5 8
.
_
9.8
-

9 2.0

29.5
_
1.8
_
.8
4. 5
1.2
2. 6
.7
_
1.5

90.4
89.3
47.6
.5
4.2
.8
2.6
7.9
_
24.0
_
1.2
.7
.4
1 7
.
3.5
35.9
6.8
.5
27.0
1 5
.
5.8
1 1
.

99.2
99.2
33. 5
_
3.3
.9
4.9
10.4
.6
7.5
.7
2.4
_

.7
40.8
6.6
9.0
25.3
_
1.6
5. 6

89. 8
87. 3
51. 7
4.8
4. 1
7.8
_
26.8
_
6.9
.
_
1.2
_
.
_
25.8
3.3
8.9
13. 6
9.8
2.5

96.7
96.7
81. 5
.7
4.3
2. 6
_
4. 5
4. 6
_
62.6
_
2.2
_
_
1.0
.2
_
.8
_
14.2
-

Third shift
__ _
_
With shift-pay differential
Uniform cents (per hour)____________
Under 5 cents
__
_ ___
5 and under 6 cents____________
6 and unde r 7 cents _ __ ___
7 and under 8 cents , ___
8 and under 9 cents _ __
9 and under 10 cents —
_
10 and under 11 cents _ _ __ _ _
_
_
11 and under 12 cents _
_
__
12 and under 12% cents________
12% and under 13 cents
13 and under 14 cents
___
14 and under 15 cents ___________
15 and under 16 cents
_
_
_
16 and under 17 cents ___________
17 and under 20 cents _____ _____
20 cents and o v e r __ ___ ____ ____
Uniform percentage
— _ ___ ___ _
_
Under 7 percent ___________ ___ _
7 and under 8 percent .
.
_ .
8 and under 10 percent
10 percent _
_
_
____
___
12, 12%, or 13 percent___
15 percent ___ __________________
Other * ___ _
,
_ _ ____ _____
No shift-pay differential_____ ________

72.5
72.5
29.5
_
.7
_
6.8
.9
.6
8.8
_
3. 6
.5
_
_
3.4
.8
1.2
2.2
41. 5
1.2
4. 6

87.5
87.4
52. 6
_
.4
_
1.1
1 9
.
7. 6
11.9
_
20.2
2.3
_
.1
4.0
.5
1.6
1.0
23. 7

50. 6
49.6
23.2
_
_
1.2
.7
_
.8
10.0
_
.6
1.8
_
1.0
2. 7
.4
2.9
1 1
.
17. 8
.
3. 6

82.1
79. 9
33. 3
_
1.9
_
3.5
1 9
.
.3
12.8
.4
3.4
_
.7
_
2.3
4.0
2. 1
_
39.0
1.1
8. 7

79-0
78.8
37.2
.4
.8
.2
1.2
_
_
12.4
.1
6.3
2.9
.7
1.3
9.2
.
.7
1.0
32. 1
.8
.8

96.9
96.9
32.2
_
.5
_
1 6
.
3. 6
1.3
8.0
.4
7 5
.
•9
_

1.2
25.3
.
7 7
.

67.3
65.8
33.9
_
_
_
1.0
1 6
.
_
11.2
_
4.4
_
_
_
12.4
.6
.8
1.8
3.3
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

8.3
_
5.9
8. 6
1.0

26.0
.5
2. 7
7 6
.
2.2

15.9
_
1.7
9.8
1.7

3.3
_
_
28. 6
1.5

25. 1
1 6
.
3.8
9.5
.2

-

20. 7
.7
14.3
1.5

-

4. 6
.6
18.0
.5
_
11. 1
.1

84. 5
82.8
47. 7
.4
2. 7
_
_
.3
8.2
4.9
.9
25. 1
2.4
_
_
.8
.8

2.7
_
64.0
.2
60.5
.4
2.9
_
1 7
.
-

2.9
3.4
_
2.2
62.2
-

21.2
-

41.0
_

83.8
83.8
30. 5
_
.1
1 8
.
1.2
_
2.3
10. 1
_
2.0
_
.3
_
7.0
1 6
.
1 1
.
2. 9
7.0
1.4
_
-

5. 7
-

-

-

2.5

46.3

92.0
49-6
1.0
3.0
1.5
1.0
16.9
.
11.9
.8
.5
4.0
3.4
2. 6
2.9
5.9
.5
2.5
.
3.0
_
36.5
90.4
90.4
38.2
_
1.9
1.0
1.0
_
1.5
1.6
.8
4. 0
.5
5.8
_
7.4
7.0
_
5 5
.
4. 6
_
_
2.5
_
2.1
47.6
'

1 Pay at regular rate fo r m ore hours than w orked, a paid lunch period not given f ir s t -s h ift w o rk e rs, a flat sum per shift,
lishm ents which provided 1 such pro visio n in com bination with a cents o r percentage d ifferential fo r hours actually w orked.




and other p ro v is io n s .

93.4
93.4
13. 5
_
.5
2.2
2.3
1.0
1 1
.
3 7
.
_
1 7
.
.6
_
_
.4
_
_
.
1.0
_
-

.2
.
.8
78. 9
'

M ost "o th e r " w ork ers, how ever, w ere in esta b ­

60

Table B-ll:Shift differential practices-manufactoring
(Workers employed on late shifts at time of survey, winter 1958-59)
Percent of manufacturing plant workers
South

Northeast

Shift operation and shiftpay differential
Boston

Buffalo

New
York
City

Phila­
delphia

Balti­
more

North Central
Dallas

Chicago

Detroit

Los
AngelesLong
Beach

West
San
Fran­
ciscoOakland

Seattle

Total plant workers in manufacturing
establishments__
__ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ ___
_

100.0

100.0

100.0

.100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Second shift ___________________________
With shift-pay differential
Uniform cents (per hour)
____
Under 5 cents_ _________ ____
5 and under 6 cents _ __ ______
6 and under 7 cents _____________
7 and under 8 cents _____________
8 and voider 9 cents _____________
9 and under 10 cents ____________
10 and under 11 cents _
_
11 and under 12 cents ___________
12 and under 13 cents___________
13 and under 14 cents ___________
14 and under 15 cents___________
15 and under 16 cents
- 16 cents and over _
____
___
Uniform percentage________________
Under 5 percent „
_ _
_
_ _
_
5 percent__ _____
Over 5 and under 10 percent______
10 percent _______________ ____ _
12, 12%, or 15 percent _____ ____
__ _
_
Other2 _ _
_
. _
No shift-pay differential _____ _
__
_

10.0
9.8
5.3
_
.7
.3
.1
.3
.1
1.8
_
_
.6
_
.5
.8
4. 5
.2
.5
3.7
.1
.1
.1

19.2
19.2
11.2
.3
.7
.4
.4
4. 5
.8
1.0
_
1.3
(M

11.8
11.6
8.8
.1
1.0
.5
.6
.2
_
1.7
_
.2
3.4
_
1.2
(M

15. 1
13. 5
5.9
_
1 1
.
.1
1.1
1.5
(M
.7
.8
.1
.5
_
.1
7 1
.
1.0
1.8
4.2
.5
1 6
.

17. 7
17.2
11.6
1 1
.
.6
2.2
6 7
.
.
•9
_
_
.1
_
_
3.2
.1
1.2
1.9
2.4
.5

10. 7
10.5
10.4
.8
.2
1.0
.3
.
1.5
.
6.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
(M
-

17.0
16.6
9.2
.1
.7
.2
.7
2.2
.
3. 6
.3
.2
.1
.3
.9
5.9
1.5
.1
4. 1
.2
1.5
.4

22.7
22.7
6.6
_
.7
.2
1.0
2. 1
.1
1.4
.1
.4
_
_
.7
.
15.4
.1
14. 9
.1
.3
.7
-

20. 3
20.3
15. 5
.1
.7
1.0
.1
.5
.l
3.9
_
6.8
.9
.1
.6
.7
2. 8
.8
1.4
.7
2.0
"

16.3
16.3
10. 1
.2
.7
.5
.3
3.2
_
2. 1
.3
.1
1.4
.3
.8
.1
.3
.1
.2
5.9
-

26.6
26. 6
25.4
_
.5
.3
_
.7
_
.6
_
22.6
_
.8
_
_
.1
.1

Third shift____________________________
With shift-pay differential
Uniform cents (per hour) ____
Under 5 cents __________________
5 and under 6 cents
6 and under 7 cents
_ ___ ___
_
7 and under 8 cents _____________
8 and under 9 cents _____________
9 and under 10 cents _
_ _ ___ _
_
10 and under 11 cents ___________
11 and under 12 cents ______
12 and under I2 V2 cents ________ _
12Vs and under 13 cents____ _____
13 and under 14 cents ___________
14 and under 15 cents ____ __ _
15 and under 16 cents ___________
16 and under 17 cents ___________
17 and under 20 cents__ _________
20 cents and over _______________
Uniform percentage
Under 7 percent
7 and under 8 percent___________
8 and under 10 percent___________
10 percent ________ ____________
12, 12y2, or 13 percent ________ _
15 percent _ ___ __ ________ _
Other * _ _ _____________ ___ _
_ _
No shift-pay differential _ __
_ _

2.3
2.3
1.3
_
_
_
.2
(M
(M

6.9
6.9
4. 8
_
(M

5.9
5 9
.
2. 6
_
(M

8.6
8. 5
6 7
.
(M
.3

3.2
3.0

5.6
5 5
.
3.3
()
*
_
_
.2
_
_
.5
_
1.3
.4
_
.3
.4
.1
.1
1.4
_
.1
_
.9
.1
.4
.8
(M

6 6
.
6 6
.
2.9
_
.1
.4
(M
.6
_
1.0
.1
_
.2
.2
_
.2
3.5
1 5
.
2.0
_
.1

3.8
3.8
1 9
.
_
_
.3
.1
.4
.3
_
.2
_
(M

5.2
5.2
4. 6
_
.2
.2
.2
_
.5
(M

4. 6
4. 6
1.0
_
_
_
_
.1
.2
.4
_
.2
(M

.4

_
.2

(M
_
.2
.1
.2

(M
1.0

(M
(M
_
.5
(M
.4

_
'

Less than 0.05 percent.
See footnote 1 table B-10
,




1.7

.1
6. 7
.1
5.0
.2
1.4
1.3
-

.1
.2

.6
.5
3. 0
_
_
(»)
.2
.1
.1
(M
.9

_
.3

(M
.6
_
_
1.2
(M

2.5

.5
.8
1.0
.3
.3
.1
3.2
3.2
2.0
_
_
_
_
_
.1
.7
_
.1
.1
_
.1
.1
(M
.6
_
.3

2.2

-

P)

.2
.1

_
(M

(M

1.1
.5
.1
4.1
.1

1.1

_
.4

_
(M
.1
.5
.1
_

_
_
.1
.1
_
.2
1.7

_

.1
_
.3
_
(M

1.9

1.4

(M
_

.9

1.0

(M

(M

.1
.1
.1

.3

.2

_

.2

1 8
.
_
_
_
.1
(M
_
.4

_
.2

_
_
.5

_
.1
.5

_
.
_
1.2
.2

(
:)
.2
.1
.2
.3

.
_
.3

_
1 6
.

.5
.1
1.0
_
.3
1.0
_
.7
.1
.
_
.1
(M
.5

-

1 1
.
-

_
(M
_
_
(M
.
_
_
(
‘)
_
_
3. 6
'

61
Table B
-12: Paid holidays-all industries
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in all establishm ents that provide paid holidays by number o f paid holidays provided annually, w inter 1958-59)

South

Northeast
Number of paid holidays
Boston x

Buffalo

New
York
City1

Phila­
delphia 1

Balti­
more

North Central
Dallas

Chicago 1

West

Detroit 1

Los
AngelesLong
Beach 1

San
FranciscoOakland 1

Seattle 1

O f workers
f ice
Workers in establishments providing
.
paid holidays _
_______
______
Under 5 holidays _
_
_ _ _ _ _
_ _
5 holidays
....
_
5 holidays plus 1 half day
__
5 holidays plus 2 or more half days
6 holidays __ _
_ _
_ _ _ ___
_ __
6 holidays plus 1 half da y _____________
6 holidays plus 2 or more half days______
7 holidays
__
_
_ _ ____
_
7 holidays plus 1 half day _ _ __ __ __
_
7 holidays plus 2 or more half days_
____________
8 holidays ______________ 8 holidays plus 1 half day ___
8 holidays plus 2 or more half days _____
9 holidays ____ _ __ _ _ _ ______
_
9 holidays plus 1 half day _____________
9 holidays plus 2 or more half days _____
10 holidays _ _ _
_ _
_
_ ___
10 holidays plus 1 half day _ ___ __ __
_
10 holidays plus 2 or more half days____
11 holidays _____ ____ ______________
11 holidays plus 1 half day___ _
_ __ _
_
11 holidays plus 2 or more half days____
Over 11 holidays ______
________ _
Workers in establishments providing
no paid holidays _ ____ _ ______
_

100
1
1
(2)
2
(2)
4
2
5
1
7
2
(2)
16
6
(2)
44
8
1
1
“

99
(2)
(2)
23
2
8
21
1
8
8
3
3
3
1
16
1
(2)

99
(2)
1
(2)
11
1
1
8
2
2
9
1
1
6
2
2
31
5
3
13
(2)

100
(!)
(2)
15
2
2
15
6
2
18
2
1
6
1
5
1
(2)
1
(2)

99
5
23
8
1
32
1
3
20
(2)
5
1
(2)
-

99
32
3
8
22
4
1
11
1
1
4
(!)
(2)
2
(2)
7
1
1
-

99
(2)
20
2
51
12
1
1
2
(2)
8
1
(2)
~
(2)

99
(*)
I2)
14
1
2
43
10
1
21
1
1
3
1
1
1
-

22

99
(2)
1
(!)
(2)
13
2
2
35
1
11
(2)
3
8
2
22
1
(2)

“

(2)

(2)

(2)

( )

( )

97
3
1
“
37
2
1
1
31
1

97

94
2
1
~

2
55
(2)

89
17
21
1
19
1
2
25
1

-

-

( 2)

9
1

3

9

“
2

“

2

(2)
1
-

100
(*)
(2)
1
(2)
24
1
4
50
1
1
11
2
2
1
(2)
“
2

100
(2)
1
(2)
48
1
46
(2)
2
(2)
—
1
-

"

Flant workers

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays _____________ ______ _ _
_
Under 5 holidays ________ ___
___
5 holidays _ _ _ _ ______ _ ___
_
5 holidays plus 1 half da y ______________
5 holidays plus 2 or more half d a y s _____
6 holidays ----------- ------------6 holidays plus 1 half day _ _ —
_
— _
6 holidays plus 2 or more half days _____
7 holidays _ _
------ _
_ _ - --7 holidays plus 1 half day _________ __
7 holidays plus 2 or more half days ---8 holidays
__ ___ _ _ _
_
_ ---_
8 holidays plus 1 half da y ______
8 holidays plus 2 or more half days ___ _
9 holidays _ ______________ ____
9 holidays plus 1 half da y ------------- __
9 holidays plus 2 or more half days _ _ _
_ _
10 holidays ______
______ —
- - —
_ _
_
10 holidays plus 1 half day _ __
10 holidays plus 2 or more half days---______
____ —
11 holidays___
11 holidays plus 1 half day --- _ — _ _
_
_
11 holidays plus 2 or more half days____
Over 1 holidays -- - - ----- ----1
Workers in establishments providing
no paid holidays ------ -------- - - —

97
4
1
1
(2)
7
-

1
19
(2)
7
6

8
1
7
1
( 2)

20
5
-

8
1
(!)
( 2)
3

97
(2)
1
-

25
(2)
11
29
2
9
14
( 2)

1
1
-

1
2
3

98
4
1
10
(!)
(2)
28
3

2
12
1
2
7
( 2)

1
7
2
( 2)

99
1

98
2

jr\

3

“
22
1
2
30
1
3
24
3

(!)
( )
17

( 2)

( 2)

5

( 2)
“
2

1
-

3

1

"
3
~
~

16
1

1

1

( 2)
2

-

“
“
~

2

1
1

2

1 Exceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footnotes 4 a n d /o r 5 to the table in appendix A .
2 L ess than 0.5 p ercen t.




( )
~
“
"
~
“
~
11

2

(2)
“
22
1
55
16
1
1
1

18
1
3

42
3

1
21
1 2V

2

“
“
"

( )
~
“

/ 2\
( )

l 2\

97
3
4
“
~
4
”
1
34
1
7
40

( )

/ 2\
( )
“
“
"
3

1

1

97
6
1
1
"
3

(2)
43
1
“

43
"
”

l Z)
K \

( )
“
“

1
“
”

“
”
“
“

“
“

~
“

"

6

3

3

“
3

62

Table B-12a: Paid holiday time-all industries
(Percent of office and plant workers employed in all establishments that provide paid holidays by sum of full-day and half-day holidays provided annually, 1 cumulative, winter 1958-59)
Northeast
Total paid holiday time
Boston

Buffalo

South
New
York
City

Phila­
delphia

Balti­
more

North Central
Dallas

Chicago

West

Detroit

Los
AngelesLong
Beach

San
FranciscoOakland

Seattle

O f workers
f ice
13 or more days
. ..
..
.. _
.
_
I2 V2 or more days _______________
12 or more days
. .
. .
llVa or more days ..
..
11 or more days _
_
10Va or more days
. . ..
10 or more days
9Va or more days
9 or more days .
__
81? or more days
/
8 or more days .
_ ...
7V? or more days , „_
r ... .
..
7 or more days
6Va or more days
6 or more days
_,
.
5V2 or more days _ _
_
. _
5 or more days --

..
.
__

.. .
..

Total receiving paid holidays_____________

j
2
2
10
54
60
76
78
85
90
96
97
99
99
99
99
99

100

_
_
1
1
17
17
19
19
25
28
44
45
75
76

!
3
17
22
54
56
64
66
76
78
87
88
99

99
99
99

99
99
99
99

99

99

_
2
9
9
12
12
18
20
31
35
65
68

(2)
1
10
10
13
14
78
80

_
_
_
2
3
4
5
8
9
31
41
85
86

99
99
99

_
1
1
7
7
30
31
63
71
94

99
99
99

99
99
99

100

99

99

99

99

(2)
(2)
3
4
31
32
51
52
72
73
85

_
J!)
(2)
2!
(2)

_
(!)

3
3
12
12
55
57
94
94
95
95
95

89

97

17
17
22
22
23
24
29
30
37
39
59
66
83
85

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
1
1
23
25
35
36
47
48
84
86

99
99
99

_
(2)
(2>

_
_
_
2
3
5
7
19
20
74
75

_
_
_
_
1
1
3
4
50
51

99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99

100
100
100

99

100

100

(2)
(2)
2
3
73
74
95
95
95
95
97

(2)
1
1
1
23
26
72
73
91
91
92
92
92

_
1
1
2
2
50
51
86
86
90
90
94
94
94

_
43
43
87
87
90
91
91
91
92

97

94

97

97

O
(\)

99
99

Plant workers
12 or more days
.
.
.
_ _.
II1. pr more days
/
11 or more days
_ _
_ _
IOV2 or more days
10 or more days _ _ _
9Va or more days
__
9 or more days ..
.
-- .
8 Va or more days
._ _
8 or more days _
7x2 or more days _
/
7 or more days
6Vz or more days
6 or more days
.. ..
.. .
.
5V2 or more days
_ _
5 or more days
_
_ _
4V. or more days
a
4 or more days
_
_ _ _ _

1
2
10
14
34
36
43
51
64
64
84
84
92
92
93
93
95

2
2
3
3
5
5
28
30
71
71
96
96
96
96
96

3
3
19
21
28
29
37
38
52
55
83
83
93
93
95
95
95

1
1
2
3
5
5
11
13
40
41
74
74
96
96
97
97
98

_
1
1
3
3
5
5
14
14
72
74
92
92
96
96
97

Total receiving paid holidays

97

97

98

99

98

\\)

1 All combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving a total of 7 days includes those with 7 full days and no half days, 6 f ll
u
days and 2 half days, 5 full days and 4 half days, and so on. Proportions were then cumulated.
2 Less than 0.5 percent.




63

Table B-13: Paid holidays-manufacturing
(P e rce n t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in m anufacturing establishm ents that provide paid holidays by number of paid holidays provided annually, w inter 1958-59)

Northeast
Number of paid holidays
Boston

Buffalo

South
New
York
City

Phila­
delphia

Balti­
more

North Central
Dallas

Chicago

West

Detroit

Los
AngelesLong
Beach

3IH
FranciscoOakland

Seattle

Office workers
Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays
_ _
_
_
Under 5 holidays _ _
_
_ _
_
5 holidays _
_
_
5 holidays plus 1 half day __
_
_
_ _
_
5 holidays plus 2 or more half days _ _ _
_
_
6 holidays
_
_
_
__ _
6 holidays plus 1 half da y ___
6 holidays plus 2 or more half d a y s _ _ _
_
7 holidays _
_
_ __
_ _
7 holidays plus 1 half day _ __
7 holidays plus 2 or more half d a y s ______
8 holidays ___
_ _
_
8 holidays plus 1 half day ______________
8 holidays plus 2 or more half days______
9 holidays__ _____ _________ ___ ,
,
___
9 holidays plus 1 half day ______________
9 holidays plus 2 or more half d a y s ______
10 holidays
10 holidays plus 1 half d a y _____________
10 holidays plus 2 or more half days_____
_ _
_
11 holidays _ _ _ _ _ ___
11 holidays plus 1 half d a y _____________
11 holidays plus 2 or more half days_____
Over 11 holidays _ _ _ _ _ _ ___
_ ____
Workers in establishments providing no
paid holidays _ _ ______ _____ _
_ _

100
1
1
5
1
2
16
3
12
1
25
5
27
1
1

100
(M
14
2
14
34
2
14
13
6
(M
-

“

~

100
(X)
14
3
(M
15
3
1
15
2
1
18
3
4
15
2
1
4

100
1
19
1
5
21
8
6
25
3
1
5
(1)
4
1

99
(M
1
(*)
9
2
2
73
8
1
(X)
2
(1)
(M
-

“

"

(M

100
4
9
24
1
5
44
1
11
1
-

99
30
3
14
34
5
(*>
11
1
2
-

100
7
(M
82
9
1
1
-

3
64
3
1
15
(1)
1
(1)
-

(*)

■

~

~

*
*

91
5
14
23
1
5
37
1
4
1
-

99
1
l
23
3
17
42
1
( 1)
9
1
(1)
-

99
2
8
(M
72
15
1
1
1
-

98
(M
1
16
1
5
56
5
1
11
1
1
-

96
4
2
30
2
14
40
1
1
2
-

97
r1)
2
4
23
68
-

9

1

1

2

4

3

i 1)

100
(M
n
i

100
(M
1
32
(M
15
45
2
l1)
1
(X)
1
-

100
1
(M
n
87
1
(M
-

Plant workers
Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays ____
__
_
___
Under 5 holidays _
_
_ _
_
5 holidays _ _ ___ ___ _
___
5 holidays plus 1 half da y ______________
5 holidays plus 2 or more half days ______
__
_
_
_ _
_
6 holidays
_ _
_
6 holidays plus 1 half day _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___
6 holidays plus 2 or more days__________
7 holidays
.
_
_
_ _
_
_ _
7 holidays plus 1 half day _ _
_
_
7 holidays plus 2 or more days _
8 holidays _ ___ _ _
_
_ _ _
_
8 holidays plus 1 half day _
_
8 holidays plus 2 or more half d a y s ______
9 holidays _ _
_
_ _
9 holidays plus 1 half d a y ______________
9 holidays plus 2 or more half days ______
10 holidays-------------------------—
_ _
10 holidays plus 1 half day _ _
_
10 holidays plus 2 or more half days_____
11 holidays _
_
__
_____
11 holidays plus 1 half d a y __ _
_
...
11 holidays plus 2 or more half days_____
Over 11 holidays _
_ _ _ ___
Workers in establishments providing
no paid holidays _ _
_
__

L ess than 0 .5 p ercent.




100
3
2
6
2
28
8
14
2
9
2
15
2
5
2
1

98
(M
1
10
15
38
2
12
17
2
1
2

100
6
3
3
(X)
1
22
4
18
1
3
12
1
9
2
1
8
1
4

100
1
16
1
2
38
2
4
25
3
1
4
1
1
1
-

99
1
1
11
3
3
69
8
1
1
<’>
1
-

64

Table B-14: Paid holidays-public utilities #
(P e rce n t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in public utilities establishm ents that provide paid holidays by num ber o f paid holidays provided annually, w inter 1958-59)

B oston 1

Buffalo

North Central

South

N ortheast
Number o f paid holidays

New
Y ork
C it y 1

P h ila­
delphia

B a lti­
m ore

D allas

Chicago 1

W est

D e tr o it 1

Los
A n g elesLong
Beach 1

San
F ran c is c o Oakland1

Seattle 1

Office workers
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays
Under 5 holidays _ _ _
__ ____
5 holidays ___________ __ _ ______ ___________
_
5 holidays plus 1 half day __ _
_ _
5 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
6 holidays
__ _
__ __
6 holidays plus 1 half day _________________
6 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _______
7 holidays
__
_ __
7 holidays plus 1 half day __________ _______
7 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half days
_____
8 holidays
__
_ _ _ _ _
_
8 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
8 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half days ________
9 holidays _
_
_
._
. __
9 holidays plus 1 half d a y ___________ __ _
9 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half days
10 holidays ------------ -----10 holidays plus 1 h alf day _
- - 10 holidays plus 2 or m o re h alf d a y s ____ _
11 holidays __
___
11 holidays plus 1 half day ___ _____ _
11 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _ _ _ _ _
O ver 1 1 holidays
_ _ _
W ork ers in establishm ents providing no
paid holidays
.
. ............... - . _ -

100
1
1
2
4
( 2)
7
53
31
"

100
1
17
2
2
31
2
45
“

100
18
8
4
2
( 2)
2
1
57
2
3
1

100
1
1
7
4
41
( 2)
6
6
26
5
3

100
( 2)
7
6
30
57
( 2)

“

“

100
1
15
3
38
40
3
-

“

100
10
7
20
3
36
22
2
-

100
1
17
3
( 2)
79
-

100
3
5
91
-

100
20
78
1
-

100
2
2
88
8
-

“

”

“

"

”

100
2
22
1
74
-

96
2
4
13
78
*
*
-

100
7
26
67
“

99
1
3
3
88
5
•
-

Plant workers
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays _
_
Under 5 holidays __
_
5 holidays _
_
____
5 holid ays plus 1 half day .

__
_
_____

6 holidays __
______
_
_
_
6 holidays plus 1 h alf day _ _____
_
6 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half days
__
7 holidays
^
7 holidays plus 1 half day _
7 holidays plus 2 or m o r e h alf days
8 holidays .
. _ _
8 holidays plus 1 half day ---------------------- ----8 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _
9 holidays .------ -------- ------------------------------------9 holidays plus 1 h alf d a y __ _
9 holidays plus 2 o r m o re h alf days _
10 holidays _
_
______
10 holidays plus 1 half d a y __
_
10 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ___
11 holidays __
11 holidays plus 1 half day
11 holidays plus 2 or m o re h alf days .
O ver 11 holidays __
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays _
_

99
2
5
9
8
•
2
7
43
22
1

100
1
20
(* )
19
14
15
3
28
-

98
1
( 2)
4
16
14
1
1
60
( 2)
( 2)

100
2
28
37
3
1
14
7
8

2

1 1 or m ore utilities are m unicipally op erated, and, th e re fo re excluded fro m the s co p e o f the studies.
2 L ess than 0 .5 percen t.
* Tran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), com m u nication, and other public u tilities.




99
( 2)
1
26
33
38
-

97
10
14
3
27
43
-

98
34
10
32
23
-

1

3

2

See footnote 4 to the table in appendix A.

4

1

Table B-15: Paid holidays-wholesale trade
(P e rce n t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in w holesale trade establishm ents that provide paid holidays
by number o f paid holidays provided annually, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Number o f paid holidays
Boston

New
York
C ity

North Central

South
P h ila­
delphia

B a lti­
m o re

Chicago

West

D etroit

Los
A n g elesLong
B each

San
F ran c is c o Oakland

Office workers
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays ______
_ — ___
___
Under 5 holidays _
_
__ __
_ _
5 holidays
5 holidays plus 1 half day _ _ _
5 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _ __
6 holidays __
_ __
6 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
6 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
7 holidays
7 holidays plus 1 half day __ ___ _
7 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
__
_
_
___
8 holidays
8 holidays plus 1 half day ^
.... .
8 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _______
9 h o l i d a y s .................. ......—
________ _____ _
9 holidays plus 1 half day __ ___
.. _
9 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days ___ _
10 holidays __ _ ______
__ __ ____ __
10 holidays plus 1 half d a y _________________
10 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _____
11 holidays _
__
__ __ __
________
11 holidays plus 1 half day _________________
11 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ______
Over 11 h o l i d a y s ____ __
_________ __ __
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays _ _ ______
____
___

100
1
7
41
4
41
3
4
-

100
.
1
12
2
4
7
4
7
14
2
2
9
8
4
12
1
5
5

100
20
10
1
16
7
27
6
8
5
-

100
.
13
11
5
30
5
11
6
20
-

“

"

“

~

100
48
1
10
17
(l)
21
(l)
2
-

100
.
49
4
13
6
3
23
3
-

100
23
6
1
25
4
2
33
2
2
1
-

100
4
25
2
66
2
-

“

“

“

“

100
61
15
10
3
9
2
-

100
15
3
2
32
4
3
36
2
1
3
-

Plant workers
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays _
__ __________ __ __ __
Under 5 holidays
_
. . .
5 h o l i d a y s __
__
_
_
5 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
5 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _______
6 holidays _______ __ ______ _ ______________
_
6 holidays plus 1 half day _ _ ______ __ __
_____
6 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days
7 holidays ___ _
__ _ __ __ ____ ____
7 holidays plus 1 half d a y ____
______
7 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
8 h o l i d a y s __
____ __
8 holidays plus 1 half day
_ _ _ __
8 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _______
9 holidays __ ___ __ _____ __
____
9 holidays plus 1 half day ___
9 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days ______
10 h o l i d a y s _____ _r_______________ ________
10 holidays plus 1 half day _ __ ____
10 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ______
11 holidays __ _
___
_____ _ __ __
11 holidays plus 1 half d a y _________ ________
11 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ______
O ver 11 holidays __
_
_
___
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays _ __ ______
_ _
__




L ess than 0 .5 percen t.

100
2
4
1
5
10
50
26
2
-

100
2
18
(M
2
12
1
( ')
13
1
1
7
3
( 1)
27
3
5
7

91
8
6
4
8
1
37
7
14
6
-

98
4
12
16
4
3
33
3
13
9
-

98
58
1
7
18
1
9
2
1
-

9

2

2

100
(M
8
2
90
*
•




Table B-16: Paid holidays-retail trade
(P ercen t o f o ffice and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in retail trade establishm ents that provide paid holidays
by number o f paid holidays provided annually, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Number o f paid holidays
Boston

New
York
C it y 1

South
P h ila­
delphia

1

B a lti­
m ore

North Central
Dallas

Chicago

Weat

D etroit 2

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Seattle

Gffice workers
W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays _ __ _ __
__
___
__ .
Under 5 holidays _______________________ ____
5 h o l i d a y s _______________________________ ___
5 holidays plus 1 half day ____ _ _____ __
5 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days ________
6 holidays ____ ___________
__ __ „
6 holidays plus 1 half day __ ____ „ _ ____
6 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days ________
____ _____
__ _
7 holidays _____ _
7 holidays plus 1 half day __ _
__ ____
7 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
8 holidays _______ ________ _________ _______
8 holidays plus 1 half day __________________
8 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days ________
9 holidays
__
_____ _____ ____
____
9 holidays plus 1 half day „ __ __ _
------9 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
10 h o lid a y s

_

__

__

10 holidays plus 1 half d a y _________________
10 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _______
11 h o lid a y s

11 holidays plus 1 half day ___
11 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days
O ver 11 holidays __
„ _
__ . .
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
no paid h o l i d a y s -----------------------------------------------

100
8
3
( 3)
61
1
( 3)
1
1
20
( 3)
6
-

99
1
( 3)
56
1
1
1
2
6
2
5
8
7
6
2

“

( 3)

100
1
38
1
2
37
8
6
1
6
"

100
67
2
25
5
-

97
37
38
22
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

"

"

"

95
4

94
5

100
16

-

10

76

83

1
-

98
15
-

-

-

"

99
64
2
( 3)
32
( 3)
I3)

-

100
84
11
4
1
-

100
( 3)
2
77
6
12
3
-

100
l 3)
99
( 3)
-

Float workers

W ork ers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays
_
__
_ __
Under 5 holidays
_ _
5 holidays __
__
5 holidays plus 1 half day
_____
5 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half d a y s ________
6 h o lid a y s
.
6 holidays plus 1 half day
. .
.
6 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days __
7 holidays
__ _
7 holidays plus 1 half day
7 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _____ _
8 h o l i d a y s _____ ______________________________
8 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
8 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s ________
9 h o l i d a y s ___________________________________
9 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
9 h o lid a y s p in s 2 o r m o r e h a lf d a y s

...

10 holidays _
_
__
10 holidays plus 1 half d a y _________________
10 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half days _
__
11 h o l i d a y s __________________________________
11 holidays plus 1 half d a y ___
.
„ _
11 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _____ _
O ver 11 h o l i d a y s ________ ___________________
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
no paid h o l i d a y s _______________ __________ ___ ;

E xcludes lim ite d -p r ic e v ariety stores,
E xcludes 2 la rge departm ent s to r e s.
L e ss than 0 .5 percent.

96
11
2
2
5

97
5

99
8

-

-

4

43

-

-

-

-

59
5
8

32
2
-

2
1
37

-

1
2
2
( 3)
-

3
12
1
20
10
-

6

93
4
5
-

55
1

86
48
29

-

-

-

27
1
-

-

13
1
( 3)
-

-

5

6

( 3)

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

7

14

-

( 3)

4

4

-

( 3)

4

3

-

1
3
-

2
-

-

-

62
1
20
-

83
-

-

-

-

2

Table B-17: Paid holidays-finance f
(Percent of office workers employed in finance establishments that provide paid holidays
by number of paid holidays provided annually, winter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Number o f paid holidays
Boston

South

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

B a lti­
m o re

North Central
D allas

W est

Chicago

D etroit

100
10

2
11
23
9
50
2
1

100
(M
26
19
4
41
4
3
2
-

100
21
4
4
3
3
1
3
2
54

"

“

“

Los
A n g elesLong
Beach

San

F ran c is c o Oakland

Cffict workers
W ork ers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays
Under 5 holidays
---------------------------------------5 holidays
— .... — ---------- ----5 holidays plus 1 half day
5 h o lid a y s p lu s 2 o r m o r e h a lf d a y s

6
6
6
7

holidays
_ „
_
.
_
holidays plus 1 half day - - ----------------------holidays plus 2 or m ore half days _
holidays

7 h o lid a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y

_

7 holidays plus 2 or m ore half days _
8 h o lid a y s
...
.... ._
. ...
8 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
8 holidays plus 2 o r m o re half days _
9 holidays _
_
9 holidays plus 1 half day --------- ---------- 9 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days
10 holidays
__________________
. __ .. ....
10 holidays plus 1 half day _
_
10 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days
11 holidays
__
11 holidays plus 1 half day ----- ------ -------------11 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days
O v e r 11 h o lid a y s
_ ... _
... .
W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays




1 L ess than 0 .5 p ercent,
t Finan ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate.

100
1
3
3
6
67
18
2
"

100
(* )
1
3
1
(* )
7
(M
2
(* )
45
10
5
25
"

100
(M
(* )
2
1
1
2
8
t 1)
3
1
3
1
78
“

100
2
-

(l)

5

3
4
7
2
4
4
5

4
2
1
8
(* )
32
5
3
-

5

1
*
*

100
.
4
( x)
34
28
4
4
2
9
3
4
7
1
2
“

100
5

49
2
1
26
6
4
3
4
"

68

Table B-18: Paid holidays-services
(P e rce n t o f o ffic e and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in s e r v ic e s establishm ents that provide paid holidays by number o f paid holidays provided annually, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Number o f paid holidays
Boston

New
Y ork
City

North Central
P h ila­
delphia

Chicago

W est

D etroit

N ortheast

Los
A n g e le sLong
B each 1

New
Y ork
City

Boston

100
2
2
2
1
5
-

2
14
-

7
-

57
-

8

100
7
( 2)
11
5
10
16
6
3
6
2
1
4
2
16
5
7

100
3
31
9
( 2)
15
30
7
5
( 2)
-

99
67
1
1
14
1
6
6
3
-

98
86
13
-

99
3
41
(!)
( 2)
26
1
18
9
-

70
6
29
15
8
2
3
7
-

94
40
( 2)
20
1
1
7
( 2)
5
1
13
5
( 2)

( )

( 2)

2

( 2)

30

E xcludes m o tion -p ictu re production and a llie d s e r v ic e s ; data fo r these industries a r e included, h ow ever, in " a ll in d u s tr ie s ."
L ess than 0 .5 p ercent.




P h ila­
delphia

Chicago

West

D etroit

Los
An geles Long
B each 1

Plant workers

Office workers
W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays ____
_____
_______ ____
Under 5 holidays ___________________________
5 holidays _ .... ........
___ - _______ _____
5 holidays plus 1 half d a y _____ ____
5 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _______
6 holidays . . _,,______ ___
_ __ ___ _ _
__
6 holidays plus 1 half day _
6 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _______
7 holidays __
__
__
_ __ _______
7 holidays plus 1 half day
_ _ __
7 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days
_ __
_ ____
8 holidays _ _ _ _ _ __ ____ ___
8 holidays plus 1 half d a y __________________
8 holidays plus 2 or m o re half days _______
9 h o l i d a y s ____ ___ _ ____
__ ___
9 holidays plus 1 half day _________________
9 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _______
10 holidays
10 holidays plus 1 half d a y ______
____
10 holidays plus 2 or m o re half d a y s _____
11 holidays _____, n
____ ^______________________
11 holidays plus 1 half day __________________
11 holidays plus 2 or m ore half d a y s _____
O ver 11 holidays _______ __
--------W ork ers in establishm ents providing
no paid h o l i d a y s _____
___
. — __ —

North Central

l )

85
2
3
72
4
1
3
-

87
30
55
( 2)
1
(!)
( 2)
( 2)
-

65
5
60
( 2)
-

62
3
2
36
3
15
( 2)
2
-

6

15

13

35

38

69

Table B-19: Paid vacations- all industries
(P ercen t o£ o ffic e and plant w ork ers em ployed in all establishm ents providing paid vacations by amount o f vacation pay provided after sp ecified le n g th -o f-s e r v ic e period s, winter 1958-59)
South

N ortheast
Amount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e p eriod

B oston2

Buffalo

New
York
C ity2

P h ila­
delphia2

B alti­
m ore

North Central
Dallas

C h icago2

W est

D etroit 2

LOS
A n g elesLong
B e a ch 2

San
F ranc is c o Oakland2

Seattle 2

Office workers
99
87
99

99
69
99

99
64
99

99
60
99

99
65
99

99
80
99

100
51
99

100
66
100

99
37
99

99
(3 )
80
90
97
99

99
16
93
99
99
99

99
10
80
93
96
99

99
4
71
83
86
99

97
2
73
91
95
97

99
5
80
97
99
99

99
3
88
97
99
99

99
6
78
96
99
99

100
8
81
99
100
100

99
_
86
97
99
99

92
7
28
49
86
88
92

93
2
7
46
91
92
93

91
6
22
62
90
90
91

89
1
10
41
86
88
89

88
4
5
23
82
84
88

64
2
11
59
64
64

89
4
7
42
87
88
89

92
1
5
76
92
92
92

88
4
10
33
86
88
88

94
4
15
42
89
94
94

47
1
2
15
43
47
47

41
5
5
15
38
41

42

60
2
6
22
58
60

48
(3 )
1
12
46
48

31
(3 )
5
30
31

31

46
2
3
15
41
46

19
1
2
9
19
19

30
1
2
14
22
30

30
(3 )
(3 )
10
25
30

20
6
19
20

99
15
99

99
7
99

99
18
99

99

1 week o r m ore - --------- -----------— —
6 months —---- — ---------------------- — ___
1 yea r _ „
----------------------------------- _

100
85
100

2 weeks o r m ore ----------------------------------------------6 months — ---------------__ ___________ _
1 y e a r ------ — —
— —
----------2 years _
— — — ---— —
— — _
3 years __ __ ____
______________ ___
5 yea rs _
— ______
— — — — „ _

99
29
96
99
99
99

3 weeks o r m ore _________________ ___ _______
3 y ears __ — __ ------- -----------------------5 years ------------- -------------— — ------- _
10 yea rs — — _________ ___________ ___
15 yea rs — ---- — ------- — — ________ _
20 yea rs ______ ______ - ________ — — _
25 yea rs ________ — ------------ ------------ — _
4 weeks o r m ore ------------- — ----------------10 yea rs ------- ------- ------------------------------- _
15 y ears — __ ___________ ____
____ _
20 y ears ____________________________________
25 years ...........................................— ...................
30 o r m ore y ears __________________________

100
71
100

-

1
9
40
42

-

(3 )
5
30
31
plant workers

100
36
100

99
15
99

99
39
99

99
19
99

99
15
99

97
18
97

_
_
_
_
_

99
4
40
52
72
99

99
_
17
36
62
99

95
3
47
71
89
95

96
(3 )
22
35
60
96

94
(3 )
15
32
45
94

98
(3)
33
76
93
98

_

21
55
77
98

99
l
9
24
37
99

_

21
62
79
87

30
85
92
99

50
73
86
98

3 weeks o r m ore __________________ __________
3 years _ -------------- --------------------------- -----5 yftarfl
.......... .
...... ..................
10 years ____________ ___ ________ _ ____
15 years — ________ ___________ ____ ____
20 years ----------------- ---- ---------------------------25 yea rs ------- ------------ --------------------------- _

82
2
15
39
81
81
82

89
3
8
37
88
88
89

69
8
17
43
67
68
69

79
1
6
38
76
76
79

76
1
2
16
75
76
76

48
1
8
44
46
48

85
4
8
36
83
85
85

90
2
5
24
89
89
90

81
4
15
32
81
81
81

95
6
23
54
95
95
95

76
1
2
49
76
76
76

4 weeks o r m ore _ — ---------------------------------- _
10 yea rs
___ _____________________ _______
15 yea rs __ ______ ___________________ ____
20 y ears --------------------------- -------------------------25 y ears ------- ----------------------------- --------- _
30 o r m ore yea rs __________________________

24
9
9
12
23
24

32

27
2
5
11
22
27

25

32
(*)
(3 )
13
29
32

15
1
2
7
15
15

15
1
3
10
14
15

21
(3 )
1
10
19
21

1 week o r m ore _ ______
____ — ------------ _
6 months ____ _________________ ___ _____
1 year ------- ----------------------------- ------------ .
2 weeks o r m ore --------------------------------- ---6 months ___________________________ ____
1 year ----------------------------------------- -----------2 years ------ -------------------------------------- —
3 years ------------------------------ -------------- __
5 yea rs —
___________ — —
____

.

2
9
31
32

87
-

-

15

24

-

_

-

(3 )
6
24
25

(3 )
2
15
15

-

2
22
24

_

100
28
100
99

99
47
99
98

7
_
-

2
7
7

________________
1 Includes pe rce n ta ge - o r fla t-s u m type payments con verted to equivalent w eek s' pay.
P e rio d s o f s e r v ic e w ere arb itra rily chosen and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fle c t the individual provision s fo r p r o ­
g r e s s io n s.
F o r exam ple, the changes in proportion s indicated at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e include changes in p rovisions o c c u r rin g betw een 5 and 10 y e a r s .
E stim ates are cum ulative.
Thus, the proportion
receivin g 3 w eek s' pay o r m ore after 5 years include those who r e c e iv e 3 w eeks' pay o r m ore after few er years o f s e r v ic e .
2 E xceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footnotes 4 a n d /o r 5 to the table in appendix A.
3 L ess than 0 .5 p ercent.




70
Table B-20:Paid vacations-manu factoring
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w ork ers em ployed in m anufacturing establishm ents providing paid vacations by amount o f vacation pay provided after s p ecified le n g t h -o f-s e r v ic e p eriod s, w inter 1958-59)
South

N ortheast
Amount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e p eriod

Boston

Buffalo

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

B a lti­
m ore

North Central
Dallas

W est

Chicago

D etroit

L os
A n g elesLong
Beach

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Seattle

Office workers
1 week o r m ore
_______ ____ ______ ____ _
6 months ___
________ __ ____ __ ___
1 y ea r -----------------------------------------------------------

100
82
100

100
71
100

99
84
99

100
72
100

100
51
100

99
50
99

100
67
100

100
93
100

100
38
100

100
65
100

100
8
100

___ ____ ____ __ _
__ ____
__ ____ _
— — —
„ .
__ __ __ ------- __
__ ____
_ „
__ __ ___
______

99
13
96
99
99
99

99
(2)
84
91
95
99

99
3
93
99
99
99

99
4
86
92
95
99

99
2
61
67
70
99

97
1
68
91
96
97

100
7
83
97
99
100

99
4
97
99
99
99

99
.
83
96
99
99

100
_
96
100
100
100

100
_
94
98
99
100

3 weeks o r m ore _____ ________ —
__ _
3 yea rs _____________________________________
5 yea rs -------- ---------------- . . _
10 yea rs
— __ ----------------- ---- ------------15 yea rs „
__ ________ ____ ____ _
20 yea rs ____________________________________
25 y ears __ __ __ ____ ____ ____ __________

90
3
12
24
86
88
90

95
5
45
94
95
95

87
11
24
67
87
87
87

89
3
14
47
88
88
89

90
4
5
19
88
90
90

68
4
23
68
68
68

90
7
9
46
88
90
90

94
1
1
80
94
94
94

92
7
10
32
92
92
92

95
7
14
56
95
95
95

14
2
3
7
14
14
14

4 weeks o r m ore _
________ ___
__
_____
10 y e a r s „ ------------ ------------ ---------- _
15 yea rs __ __ „ __ __ ____ ______ ___ _
20 yea rs
__ ____ ____ __ _______
25 yea rs __ __ . . __ _____________ ______ _
30 o r m ore yea rs __ ____ ___ ______ __ _

21
3
3
7
20
21

40
2
8
39
40

47
5
17
28
47
47

41
_
1
13
41
41

17
5
17
17

51
1
10
51
51

41
4
4
15
40
41

5
(a)
1
2
5
5

21
_
1
18
21
21

35
(a)
18
33
35

1
_
.
(a)
1
1

2 w eeks o r m o r e __
6 months _ — _ „
1 y e a r -------—
2 yea rs __
__
3 yea rs _ —
5 y ears
_ -------

Plant workers
100
7
100

99
27
99

100
20
100

99
9
99

96
7
96

100
12
100

99
5
99

100
13
100

100
31
100

99
64
99

99
(a)
21
27
59
99

99
_
12
28
50
99

90
1
44
59
76
90

97
1
24
24
54
96

99
1
9
20
32
99

91
.
14
60
81
91

99
15
42
68
98

100
2
5
12
21
100

99
_
38
70
91
99

99
_
27
75
85
99

98
_
65
71
79
98

3 w eeks o r m ore _______ ______ ________ ____
3 y ears — — — — ------- __
___ „ __ _
5 yea rs ____ ___
— __ . . „ „ ____ _
10 yea rs
___
______ „ „
. .. .
15 yea rs
— ___
— --------- ------__ _
20 yea rs
—
..... ......................... .
25 years
___ _________ __
__ __ __ _

82
2
7
22
80
80
82

93
1
2
30
92
92
93

65
15
18
44
62
65
65

81
2
7
30
79
79
81

81
1
2
10
79
81
81

53
2
11
53
53
53

90
7
9
36
89
90
90

92
2
3
15
92
92
92

85
6
10
26
85
85
85

96
8
15
42
96
96
96

89
2
3
70
88
89
89

4 weeks or m o r e __ ______ ___
____ ____
10 years ______________ ______
___
15 years __
„ — __ __ ______
__
20 years ________________________ ____ _______
25 y e a r s __________ ____________
__
30 or more years __ -------------------------------- -

17
1
1
4
17
17

35
.
3
11
34
35

13
3
5
8
13
13

23
.
<
a)
8
23
23

11
.
2
11
11

33

26
.
(a)
7
24
26

7
( a)
1
3
7
7

14
_
2
10
14
14

25
_
2
13
23
25

3
_
„
1
3
3

1 week o r m ore _______________________________
---__
__
__ _
6 months ------ ---1 y ear ----------- -------- ----------------------- ------- _
2 weeks o r m ore ------ -------------- ----------------6 months _ __
_________
__
„ __
1 y e a r _ ___________ ______ _____________
2 y ears
__
____ ____ ___
„ __
______ __ „ — „ __ __
3 yea rs _____
5 years __ — __ „
___ ___ ______ „

_
_
_
_
_

100
22
100

1 Includes p e rce n ta g e - o r fla t-s u m type payments con verted to equivalent w eek s' pay.
a L ess than 0 .5 percen t.




See footnote 1, table B -1 9 .

.
1
33
33

-

71

Table B-21: Paid vacations-public utilities*
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w ork ers em ployed in public utilities establishm ents providing paid vacations by amount o f vacation pay provided after s p ecified le n g th -o f-s e r v ic e p eriod s, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Am ount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e p eriod

North Central

South

W est
LOS
A n g elesLong
B ea ch 2

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland2

Buffalo

New
Y ork
C ity2

P h ila­
delphia

B a lti­
m ore

100
90
100

100
72
100

100
88
100

100
58
100

100
95
100

100
71
100

100
49
100

100
27
100

100
51
100

100
63
100

100
63
100

2 weeks o r m ore — ___
6 m o n t h s _____________________________ ___ .
1 y e a r ....................... - — ....................................
2 yea rs _
_ _
_ _ _ _ _
3 yea rs _
__
--------------__ _
5 years _
__ ____ ________ ________ __ _

98
54
98
98
98
98

100
_
71
93
99
100

100
18
99
100
100
100

100
_
57
97
97
100

100
_
92
96
99
100

96
49
87
95
96

100
_
88
96
100
100

100
(3 )
54
97
100
100

100
_
15
92
99
100

100
_
34
95
100
100

100
_
87
90
99
100

3 weeks o r m o r e __ — ____ ____ — __
3 years — ---- ---------------------------------- -----5 years --- -------------------------------------------10 years ----------------------------------------------- -----15 years
------------------------------------------ -----20 yea rs ____________________________________
25 yea rs --------------------------------------------------------

98
1
3
40
98
98
98

91
6
26
91
91
91

96
4
21
36
96
96
96

96
10
24
96
96
96

95
(3 )
2
95
95
95

89
1
2
74
89
89

97
1
16
97
97
97

94
2
53
94
94
94

99
6
34
99
99
99

95
5
17
39
95
95
95

74
3
3
12
74
74
74

4 w eeks o r m ore _ ________________ „ _______
10 yea rs _____________________ ___________ _
15 years __ ------------ ------------ __ ____ __ _
20 y ears __ ______________________________ _
25 yea rs __ ------------------------------------- ----------30 o r m ore yea rs __________________________

31
_
_
1
30
31

41
_
_
6
41
41

59
5
5
12
35
59

35
_
2
2
34
35

59
_
(3 )
57
59

9
6
6
9

69
1
25
31
69

52
21
52
52

39
28
39

30
1
1
2
28
30

5
5
5
5

B oston 2

Dallas

C h icago2

D etroit2

Seattle 2

Office workers
1 week o r m ore
6 months - __
1 year -

_ __

_____ __ __
-------- -------- ----- __

Plant workers
1 week o r m ore
— _____________________ __
6 months ----------- ----------------- ------- _.
1 year _ -------------------------------------------------------

100
78
100

100
51
100

100
86
100

100
36
100

99
73
99

98
58
98

100
6
100

100
18
100

100
45
100

100
65
100

100
55
100

2 weeks o r m ore _ __________________________ _
6 months ____________________ __ __ ___
1 year
______ ___^ __ _____________ ___ _
2 years _ ----------------------------------------------------3 years ----------------------------------------------------- _
5 years ______________________ ___________ _

100
44
92
92
92
100

100
_
48
53
98
100

100
22
86
94
100
100

100
_
28
66
67
100

99
_
73
88
98
99

96
_
37
69
85
96

100
_
35
72
100
100

100
_
47
84
99
100

100
3
16
74
98
100

100
_
47
96
100
100

100
61
61
96
100

3 weeks o r m ore _______________ ____ _______
3 years _____________________________________
5 years --------------------------------------------------------10 years ____ ______________________________
15 years -------------------------------------------------------20 years ___________________________ _______
25 y ears ____________________________________

100
6
6
40
100
100
100

99

94
8
15
29
94
94
94

100
5
6
55
100
100
100

99
(?)
(?)
(3 )
99
99
99

89
_
(3 )
2
80
89
89

100
_
1
7
100
100
100

100
1
2
48
100
100
100

96
3
3
24
96
96
96

98
15
17
36
98
98
98

64
(3 )
(3)
15
64
64
64

4 weeks o r m ore _______________________________
10 y ears ____________________________________
15 y ears ________ _________ _______________
20 y ears __ ____ __________________________
25 y ears __ _________________________________
30 o r m ore yea rs __________________________

31
1
1
1
26
31

67
6
6
15
34
67

29

53

16

-

30
3
3
3
19
30

24
3
3
7
21
24

9

-

1
2
3
*

_

4
40
97
99
99
46
-

_
2
46
46

(3 )
24
29

_
53
53

92

60

-

-

12
12
16

2
56
57
92

-

Includes p e rce n ta g e - o r fla t-s u m type payments con verted to equivalent w eeks' pay.
See footnote 1, table B -1 9 .
1 or m ore utilities are m unicipally operated, and, th e re fo re , excluded fro m the scope of the studies.
See footnote 4 to the table in appendix A.
L e s s than 0 .5 percent.
Tran sportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), com m u nication, and other public u tilities.




25
57
60

-

6
6
9




Table B-22: Paid vacations-w holesale trade
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w ork ers em ployed in w holesale trade establishm ents providing paid vacations
by amount of vacation pay provided after sp ecified le n g th -o f-s e r v ic e p eriod s, w inter 1958-59)
N ortheast
Amount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e p eriod

Boston

New
Y ork
City

North Central

South
P h ila ­
delphia

B a lti­
m ore

Chicago

W est

D etroit

Los
An geles Long
B each

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Office workers
1 week o r m o re _ ________ __ ___________
6 months ___________________________________
1 year --------------------------------------------------- ------

100
71
100

100
82
100

100
53
100

100
43
100

100
59
100

100
49
100

100
46
100

100
40
100

2 w eeks o r m ore ______________________________
6 months ________ _____________ ____ __ _
1 year _____ __
____ ___ _________ __ _
2 yea rs _____________________________________
3 y ears — --------------------------- ------- ------- _
5 years _
____
______ __ _____________

98
9
95
98
98
98

100
12
97
100
100
100

100
5
83
88
91
100

95
5
82
88
91
95

100
_
79
93
98
100

100
_
80
91
100
100

100
_
70
97
100
100

100
_
76
100
100
100

3 weeks o r m ore ------------ — --------------------3 years — — ____ ________ ________
_
5 years _____________________________________
10 y ears ____ __ ____ ____________________
15 y ears __ ___ ___ ___ ______________ __
20 ye a rs __ _________________________________
25 y ears ____________________________________

78
34
75
75
78

84
2
11
54
83
83
83

76
13
47
76
76
76

70
53
63
63
70

76
6
32
75
76
76

91
7
69
91
91
91

80
2
14
52
79
80
80

87
1
33
87
87
87

4 w eeks o r m ore ____________________________ _
10 y ears
____ ________________ ________ _
15 years _____
___
______ ______ __ _
20 yea rs __ __ __ __ ________ ___ ______ _
25 ye a rs
__
____________ ________ ____
30 o r m o re ye a rs
— ___ ______ __ ------

17
13
17
17

38
1
1
15
38
38

27
18
27
27

38
4
35
38
38

38
4
4
18
36
38

40
3
3
25
40
40

26
1
10
26
26

29
.
8
29
29

Plant workers
1 w eek o r m o r e ____ __ __ __ ________ _ ___
6 months _ ________
__ __ ________ __
1 ye a r - — — ~ ---------------------- _ _ _ _ _ _

100
47
100

100
68
100

81
20
81

100
19
100

100
30
100

100
10
100

100
20
100

100
12
100

100
1
81
96
98
100

89

_

95
7
71
84
89
95

33
37
56
89

81
1
37
40
48
81

100
37
71
89
100

100
_
25
56
75
100

100
_
33
92
100
100

100
_
22
99
99
100

---------- ----------3 weeks o r m ore
3 years --- -------------- - __ ___
____ __ _
5 years ____________________________________ _
10 y e a r s __________________ ___________ ______
15 ye a rs
_ _ __ _ __ __ __ __
20 ye a rs
------- ------- __ ____ __
25 yea rs
__ ---- — _
- — -------

80
7
7
24
75
75
80

82
9
29
55
81
81
81

51
36
51
51
51

60
24
58
58
60

78
3
31
74
78
78

87
20
46
87
87
87

86
5
17
50
84
86
86

100
6
52
100
100
100

4 weeks o r m o r e __
—
— ________ — _
10 y ears
__ — _________
__ __
__ —
15 ye a rs
_____ _______ _____ __ ____ _
20 ye a rs
— — ___
________ ________ _
25 ye a rs — ----------------_ _
30 o r m o re ye a rs
_ __ _ ____ ____

17
7
7
16
17
17

25
4
9
25
25

19
-

16
-

34
1

45
1

16

15
33
34

38
45
45

15
3
8
15
15

17
10
17
17

2 w eeks o r m ore ___
6 months _ ---1 ye a r
__
2 years ------_
3 yea rs —
5 y ears
____

__ — ____
------ ------__ __ _ — __ __
------- __ —
__
---- — _ —
__ __ ___ ____

____
__ —
__ __
__ __
---____

_
_
_

1
1
19
19

1
13
1
6

1

Includes p e rce n ta g e - o r fla t-s u m type payments con verted to equivalent w e e k s' pay. S ee footnote 1, table B-19<

1
1

Table B-23: Paid vacations-retail trad e
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w ork ers em ployed in retail trade establishm ents providing paid vacations
by amount o f vacation pay provided after sp e cifie d le n g th -o f-s e r v ic e p e rio d s, w inter 1958-59)

B oston

New
Y ork
C ity4

North Central

South

N ortheast
Amount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e period

P h ila­
delphia4

B alti­
m ore

Dallas

Chicago

W est

D etroit3

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Seattle

Office workers
1 week o r m o r e __________
__ __
___
6 months __
__ __ __ __ __ ____ __ __
1 ye a r _ — ____ __ __ ____ ___ __
„ _

100
77
100

100
54
100

100
21
100

100
12
100

98
14
98

100
27
100

100
23
100

100
16
100

99
10
99

2 w eeks o r m o r e __
— ______ ________ ____
6 months ____________ ___________________ _
1 year _ ___ _________ __
__ ____ __ _
2 years _
____
___
________ ______ _
3 y ears ------------ ------- ------------------- __
5 years ___ ___ ____ ___
____
_____

100
_
79
100
100
100

99
53
99
99
99

100
_
22
84
99
100

99
_
12
89
98
99

91
„
20
78
88
91

99
.
31
99
99
99

100
_
29
92
100
100

100
_
31
100
100
100

99
18
99
99
99

3 weeks o r m ore _____ __ _______ ____ „
___ ___
___ __
3 years
5 yea rs — __ __
___ ___ ______ „ __ _
_______ __ ______ __
10 y ears ____ ___
15 ye a rs
------------------------------------20 years ____________________ ________________
25 ye a rs — — ___ __ ____ ____ _ __ _

99
.
57
93
99
99
99

88
4
33
75
88
88
88

88
8
85
86
86
87

75
2
45
75
75
75

47
1
19
38
47
47

94
3
62
92
94
94

75
3
30
64
75
75
75

96
61
86
95
95
95

83
(4 )
38
83
83
83

4 weeks o r m o r e __ __ ____ __ __
_____
10 years — ____ __ — _________________ _
15 ye a rs — ---------- __
__ ____ __ _
20 y ears __ -------------------------- --__ „ _
25 yea rs ________________ ___________________
30 o r m ore years ______ ___

66
47
47
53
66
66

58
1
4
17
58
58

61
_
7
61
61

38
2
38
38

36
_
30
36

78
.
13
78
78

48
7
7
16
48
48

20
2
20
20

44
_
_
(4 )
44
44

100
29
100

100
18
100

100
7
100

98
7
98

98
_
90
93
98

100
_
17
66
100
100

100
_
29
96
100

98
_
7
90
98
98

Plant workers
1 w eek o r m ore _______ _____________________ _
6 months ___________________________________
1 year -----------------------------------------------------------

100
59
100

99
41
99

100
9
100

100
15
100

97
19
97

2 weeks o r m ore _
--------------------------- ---6 months _______________________ — _______
1 year _____________ _______________________
2 years _____________________________________
3 y ears --------------------------------------------------------5 years -------- ----------------------------------------------

98
_
71
96
98
98

98
_
46
98
98
98

95
_
15
57
95
95

87
_
7
61
84
87

85
20
76
81
85

3 weeks o r m ore ------------------------------ ------------3 years ____________________________ _______

92
47
90
92
92
92

80
25
69
80
80
80

85
5
73
78
78
85

70
-

5 years ------ --------------------------------------- -----10 years ________________________ _ _
_________________________________
15 years
20 years
__ ------------------- ------------ __
25 yea rs ____ ________________________ — _

56
70
70
70

32
2
8
17
32
32

83
10
54
80
83
83

86
2
19
69
86
86
86

96
_
56
91
96
96
96

68
2
14
68
68
68

4 weeks o r m ore _________________ ____________

44

20

18

44

41

-

-

_
13
18

4
4

15
_
_
6
15
15

24
_
2
24
24

10
15
20
25
30




yea rs —
__ ________ _________________
yea rs — ____ _________________ _______
years ________ ___________ __
________
years _____________________ ________ ____
o r m ore yea rs ________ ________ __ __ _

1
2
3
4

36
36
43
44
44

4

46
2
6
20
46
46

41
_
-

4

5

4

41
41

20
20

Includes p ercen tage- o r fla t-s u m type payments converted to equivalent w eek s' pay.
Excludes lim ite d -p ric e variety s to r e s .
E xcludes 2 large departm ent s to r e s .
L e ss than 0 .5 p ercen t.

See footnote 1, table B -1 9 .

33

20
44
44

17
41
41

99

74




Table B-24: Paid vacations-finance t
(P ercen t o f o ffic e w ork ers em ployed in finance establishm ents providing paid vacations by amount of
vacation pay provided after sp e cifie d le n g th -o f-s e r v ic e p e rio d s , w inter 1958-59)
\

N ortheast
Amount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e p eriod

North Central

South

W est

C hicago

D etroit

Los
A ngeles Long
B each

100
73
100

99
91
99

100
87
100

100
78
100

100
87
100

100
9
95
100
100
100

100
4
100
100
100
100

99
7
97
99
99
99

100
3
98
100
100
100

100
20
99
100
100
100

100
21
100
100
100
100

95
1
18
85
91
95

95
2
20
76
82
95

59
3
7
53
59
59

94
(a)
3
38
91
91
94

94
9
82
94
94
94

90
7
25
85
90
90

95
4
4
23
82
94
95

69
13
63
69

40
3
39
40

34
3
34
34

43
3
10
38
43

40
4
20
38
40

49
1
14
21
49

30
10
21
30

Boston

New
Y ork
City

P h ila ­
delphia

1 week o r m ore _ __ — — __
— __
6 months __________________ _____ ___________
„
------- „ __
1 y ear — ____

100
91
100

99
96
99

99
93
99

100
92
100

2 w eeks o r m ore _ ___ ___
__
____
6 months ----------- — — —
1 y ear - — ------- ---__
__
2 y ears — ------- — ~ ~
---3 y e a r 8 — ------- ------- ------5 years _
—
__ „
_________

100
48
100
100
100
100

99
27
98
99
99
99

99
27
99
99
99
99

3 w eeks o r m o r e _______________________________
3 years __
__ ____
— _
5 ye a rs . . . ___
10 ye a rs
—
_
15 ye a rs —
— —
—
---20 ye a rs
.. ..
25 ye a rs
— — — —
__

97
10
45
64
85
91
97

97
4
21
66
95
96
97

4 w eeks o r m ore _
10 y ears
_
_____
15 ye a rs
—
20 ye a rs
—
25 ye a rs
__
_
30 o r m ore y e a rs —

66
19
60
66

81
2
24
80
81

B a lti­
m ore

Dallas

San
F ra n c is c o Oakland

Office workers

_

__

_

__

___
_
_
— —

— —

— __

1 Includes p e rce n ta g e - o r fla t-su m type paym ents con verted to equivalent w e e k s' pay.
2 L e s s than 0. 5 percen t.
t Finan ce, insurance, and re a l estate.

See footnote 1, table B -1 9 .

75
Table B-25: Paid vacafiont-tervicet
(P ercen t o f o ffic e and plant w ork ers em ployed in s e r v ic e s establishm ents providing paid vacations by amount o f vacation pay provided after s p ecified le n g th -o f-s e r v ic e p eriod s, w inter 1958-59)
North Central

N ortheast
Amount o f vacation p a y 1
and s e r v ic e period

N ortheast

Los
A n g e le sLong
B each 2

Boston

New
Y ork
City

P h ila­
delphia

100
3
100

Los
A n g elesLong
B each 2

100
7
99

92
6
92

86
15
82

90
_
5
32
38
90

99
_
11
56
91
99

86
_
6
16
32
86

83
2
28
55
79
83

39
(3 )
3
13
32
34
39

18

22
(3 )
(3 )
10
13
17
22

37
1
9
30
30
37

24
2
2
18
24
24
24

3
(3 )
1
1

2

1 w eek o r m ore
__ — — ------6 months _
— — __ —
____ — ~ _
1 y ear -----------------------------------------------------------

100
87
100

100
82
100

100
66
100

100
60
100

99
63
99

100
52
99

100
13
100

99
17
99

2 weeks o r m ore - ------------- — — — 6 months _
— — „ __ ________ — „
1 year _ — — —
----------------- _ — —
2 years
— ___ — ---- — —
3 years ------------- __ --------------------------- „
5 years _ ---- — ____ —
____ ____

100
22
89
96
97
100

100
6
88
94
99
100

99
19
74
87
88
99

100
(3 )
76
99
100
100

99
11
70
84
85
99

99
13
74
86
99
99

100
1
18
54
61
100

97
(3)
18
39
95
97

71
24
34
58
71
71
71

76
9
35
63
75
76
76

74
(3)
36
51
72
73
74

69
21
27
52
66
67
69

74
15
62
69
69
74

60
13
19
43
60
60
60

31
(3 )
8
18
31
31
31

9
8
8
8
9
9

34
3
11
21
34
34

22
6
6
6
21
22

16
3
9
9
14
16

17
3
7
17
17
17

34
13
13
13
34
34

6

Chicago

D etroit

3 weeks o r m ore
_ __
3 yea rs _ -------- „
—
5 years —
— __ ------10 years
— ___ _________
15 years
---- —
------20 years
__
__ __
25 years
— -----------------

_

—
---—

—
— -

— —
__ -----__ __ „ „
---— ----

4 weeks o r m ore ____________
______
10 years — __ __ __
„ ------- „
---- ---- — --------- —
15 yea rs
20 yea rs
— —
___ ____
25 years
— ___ — ------30 o r m ore years
___ __ __
__

__
— —
____
—
— „

_
_

-

1 Includes pe rce n ta ge - o r fla t-s u m type payments con verted to equivalent w eek s' pay. See footnote 1, table B -1 9 2 E xcludes m otion -p ictu re production and allied s e r v ic e s ; data fo r these industries are included, how ever, in "a ll industries.
3 L ess than 0 .5 percent.




Chicago

Plant workers

Office workers

_
_
_
_
_

W est

D etroit

Boston

P h ila­
delphia

North Central

W est

New
Y ork
City

-

6
6

-

1
13
16
18
-

3

-

3

2

1
-

1
1

1
(3 )
1
1
1
1

4
2
2
2
4
4

76
Table B-26: Health, insurance, and pension plans-all industries
(P ercen t o f o ffice and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in all establishm ents with fo rm a l p ro v isio n s other than le ga lly required by type of plan, w inter 1958-59)
Insurance plans
A rea
Life

A ccidental
death and
d ism e m ­
berm ent.

H ospitali­
zation

Surgical

Sickness and accid en t insurance a n d /o r sick leave
M edical

Catastrophe

T otal 1

Sickness
and accident
insurance

Sick leave
(full pay and
no waiting
period)

Sick leave
(partial pay
o r waiting
p eriod)

Retirem ent
pension
plan

No health,
insurance,
o r pension
plan

Office workers
N ortheast:
B o s to n 2 — — — „ —........................... ....... .
B u ff a lo _______________________________________
New Y ork C i t y * ____ __________________ ___
P h ila d elp h ia 2 ______________ _____________

92
95
94
97

53
45
43
34

82
85
78
68

81
82
77
64

56
61
55
39

38
16
38
25

73
91
92
81

41
50
31
39

61
73
84
66

3
4
2
4

79
81
82
84

1
1
( 3)
1

South:
B a ltim ore _ „ ____ ___________ __________
D a ll a s -------------------------------------------------------------

96
93

40
44

68
84

68
82

30
52

35
19

83
60

36
30

44
39

23
9

88
69

1
2

North C entral:
C h ic a g o 2 __ __ ______________________________
D e tr o it 2 __ ____ ________________________

95
97

44
57

83
90

83
90

56
80

37
30

80
88

48
67

42
61

15
17

76
83

1
1

W est:
L os A n g eles-L o n g B e a c h 2 ________________
San F ran cisco-O ak lan d 2 ___________________
S ea ttle2 _____ __ __ __ ____________________

98
95
96

65
48
82

90
83
48

89
83
48

74
72
43

50
43
14

79
81
92

33
36
29

68
58
71

4
11
7

83
82
81

( 3)
( 3)
1

Plant workers
Northeast:
B o s t o n 2 --- ------- ------------------------------------- _
B uffalo ____________ _________ __________ ___
New Y ork C ity 2 _____________________________
P h ila d elp h ia 2
__ __ __ __ __ _______

90
92
94
91

59
43
46
38

79
88
87
84

76
87
85
77

49
51
60
48

7
7
5
8

94
83
85
88

78
69
66
78

16
14
26
12

11
8
11
9

66
77
82
65

1
3
1
3

South:
B altim ore _ __ ____ __ __ ____ __ ____ _
........................................................ ..........
D allas

90
87

35
45

75
80

75
78

19
40

10
12

91
59

74
44

5
11

21
11

80
63

5
4

North Central:
C h ic a g o 2 _ __ __ __ ________
__ — __ _
D e tr o it 2 __ __ __ ____ _________________ _

92
96

49
63

89
92

88
92

58
79

15
3

90
93

78
85

5
11

14
4

60
79

2
1

W est:
L os A n g eles -L o n g Beach 2 ________
San F r a n cis c o -O a k la n d 2 __ _____
S e a ttle 2 __ __ __ ___________ ____

94
94
93

76
57
85

92
90
93

92
90
93

80
87
89

31
32
5

64
65
94

31
25
87

32
18
4

14
34
5

70
70
68

1
( 3)
2

__ ___
___
__

1 Unduplicated total o f w o rk e rs re ce iv in g sick leave o r sick n ess and accident insurance shown separately. S ick -lea ve plans are lim ited to those w hich defin itely establish at least the m inim um number of
days* pay that can be expected by each em p lo ye e . Inform al sick -le a v e allow an ces determ ined on an individual b a sis are excluded.
* E xceptions to the standard industry lim itations are shown in footnotes 4 and/ or 5 to the table in appendix A .
3
L es s than 0.5 p ercen t.




77
Table B-27: Health, insurance, and pension plans-m anufacturing
(P ercen t o f o ffice and plant w o rk e rs em ployed in m anufacturing establishm ents with fo rm a l p ro v isio n s other than le g a lly required by type o f plan, w inter 1958-59)
Insurance plans
A rea
Life

A cciden tal
death and
d ism e m ­
berm ent

H ospitali­
zation

Sickness and accid ent insurance a n d /o r sick leave

Surgical

M edical

Catastrophe

T otal 1

Sickness
and accident
insurance

Sick leave
(full pay and
no waiting
p eriod )

Sick leave
(partial pay
or waiting
p eriod )

R etirem ent
pension
plan

No health,
insurance,
o r pension
plan

Office workers
Northeast:
B oston _ __ __ „ „ . . __ ______________ _
B u ffa lo ......................................................................
New Y ork C i t y __ „ ____ _________________
P h ila d elp h ia ____ __ ______________ _____

91
98
91
98

58
55
43
36

91
94
84
79

89
92
85
78

71
64
66
51

16
15
32
20

90
93
90
92

61
67
34
59

74
66
80
75

3
6
4
( 2)

76
81
77
82

1
1
( 2)
( 2)

South:
B a lt im o r e ___________________________________
D a ll a s ................. ...................................................

97
97

60
48

83
95

85
96

32
43

36
10

94
82

58
66

46
58

29
2

90
81

2
( 2)

North Central:
C h icago __
___________ ____ ___________
D e t r o i t ___ __ „ ________ ___________ ____

99
99

54
60

87
98

87
99

63
95

28
28

88
96

68
93

44
60

9
26

75
90

( 2)
( 2)

W est:
L os A n g eles-L o n g B e a c h _________________
San F ran cisco-O ak lan d _____ _____________
Seattle _ ________________________ ________

99
92
97

87
62
93

96
95
15

96
94
15

77
88
15

67
34
2

87
78
95

43
38
9

73
58
88

2
1
( 2)

83
83
90

( 2)
( 2)
1

Plant workers
Northeast:
Boston _ _____________________ ___________ .
Buffalo __ ________ _______________________
New Y ork C i t y ______________________________
P h ila d e lp h ia _________________________________

91
96
96
88

61
48
40
34

92
96
96
92

92
95
95
87

62
53
67
53

8
5
3
10

95
87
81
92

90
82
73
87

7
7
15
6

7
8
5
6

72
81
85
68

1
1
( 2)
3

South:
B a lt im o r e ____ ______________________________
D a ll a s ------------------------------------------------------------

95
91

39
47

87
92

88
90

19
42

11
8

96
63

90
59

1
4

17
5

87
66

3
1

North Central:
C h icago __ ____ __________________________
D etroit . __ _________________ _____________

98
98

57
66

93
99

93
99

61
89

13
2

97
96

89
96

1
4

10
( 2)

65
89

1

W est:
L os A n g eles-L o n g B e a c h ___________________
San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d ______ _____ __ __ _
Seattle ___ __ ____ _______________________

97
97
92

86
68
85

99
98
96

99
98
96

85
93
94

43
30
2

66
45
94

38
28
94

35
12

7
11

66
66
75

3

1 Unduplicated total o f w o rk e rs re ceivin g sick leave o r sick n ess and accident insurance shown separately. S ick -lea ve plans are lim ited to those w hich definitely establish at least the m inim um number of
days1 pay that can be expected by each em ployee. Inform al s ick -le a v e allow ances determ ined on an individual ba sis are excluded.
* L ess than 0 .5 percent.




78
Table B-28: Health, insurance, and pension plans-public utilities*
(Percent of office and plant workers employed in public utilities establishments with formal provisions other than legally required by type of plan, winter 1958-59)
In su r a n c e p la n s
A rea
L ife

A c c id en ta l
d e a th and
d is m e m ­
berm en t

H o s p i t a l i­
za tio n

S ic k n e s s an d a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e a n d /o r s ic k le a v e

S u r g ic a l

M e d ic a l

C a ta s t r o p h e

T o ta l 1

S ic k le a v e
S ic k n e s s
( fu ll p a y and
an d a c c i d e n t 1
no w a itin g
in s u r a n c e
p e rio d )

S ic k le a v e
( p a r tia l p ay
o r w a itin g
p e r io d )

R e tire m en t
p e n s io n
p la n

N o h e a lth ,
in s u r a n c e ,
o r p e n s io n
p la n

Office workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o s t o n 2 ___
„ __ __ „
__
_
B u f f a l o ________ _______
N e w Y o r k C i t y 2 _ _____________
P h ila d e lp h ia
Sou th :
B a l t im o r e _ __ _____
D a l la s _
_ ____
.
N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h ic a g o a
D e t r o i t 2 ___

_____
_____

„

__

__

__

__

__

_
_
_

_________________
__
_____________

______
_
_ _ ___
__ __ _________ _____ __

__

_

W e st:
L o s A n g e le s -L o n g B e a ch 2
____ _
_
___
S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k la n d 2 ______________________
S e a ttle 2 _
_ __
__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

98
98
93
99

90
61
63
55

43
53
61
24

43
52
63
20

20
46
42
16

6
19
20

1 00
98

3
41

9
56

9
56

96
100

30
50

55
64

99
97
99

58
61
83

47
54
45

1
1

_

1

96
94
95
95

20
7
33
38

86
92
86
85

7

92
89
92
91

3
44

21

96
69

3
18

37
27

57
33

93
85

54
64

37
52

35
4

92
97

36
15

41
94

43
1

86
91

( 3)

47
54
45

45
54
42

33
37
5

93
96
92

18
32
33

79
51
20

11
42
48

98
87
78

1
-

-

5

(3)

2

“

Plant workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o s t o n 2 _ ____
_
__ _____ __ __ _____ __
B u f f a l o .............................................................................
N e w Y o r k C it y 2 ___________________________________
P h ila d e lp h ia __ __ __ „
__ __ __

99

80
63
67
39

Sou th :
B a l t im o r e _ __
_____________ __ __ ___
D a l la s
....................................................................

1 00
96

13
45

29
49

29
49

16
29

N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h i c a g o 2 __
__ __ _____ __ __ __
___
D e tr o it 2 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

98
1 00

37
52

61
63

61
63

38
57

23

98
94
94

68

47
59
57

47
59
57

44

21
46

82
89

73

11

100

W e st:
L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h 2 _____________________
S an F r a n c i s c o -O a k la n d 2 _______________________

95
98
93

66

48
71
53
58

48
71
45
39

22
48
34
21

7
33
10
5

99
93
96
98

30
30
39
68

34
38
40
29

46
29
42
20

90
89
98
95

-

84
83

13
40

33
25

38
33

99

-

16

85

4

97
98

54
21

30
44

36
36

94

-

97

"

18
36
49

64
45
28

96
95
93

-

42
35

59
47

(3)

11

-

(3)

-

1 Unduplicated total o f w o rk e rs re ce iv in g sick leave o r sick n ess and accid ent insurance shown separately. S ick -le a ve plans are lim ited to those w hich defin itely establish at lea st the m inim um num ber of
d a y s' pay that can be expected by each em p loyee. Inform al s ick -le a v e allow ances determ ined on an individual b a sis are excluded.
* 1 o r m ore utilities are m unicipally operated, and, th e re fo re , excluded fro m the scope o f the studies. See footnote 4 to the table in appendix A.
s L ess than 0 .5 percen t.
* Tran sportation (excluding railroads]^ com m unication, and other public utilitie*s.




79
Table B-29: Health, insurance, and pension plans-w holesale trade
(Percent of office and plant workers employed in wholesale trade establishments with formal provisions other than legally required by type of plan, winter 1958-59)
In su r a n c e p la n s
A rea
L ife

A c c id en ta l
d e a th and
d is m e m ­
berm en t

H o s p i t a li­
za tio n

S u r g ic a l

S ic k n e s s an d a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e a n d /o r s ic k l e a v e

M e d ic a l

C a ta s t r o p h e

T o ta l 1

S ic k n e s s
and a c c id e n t
in s u r a n c e

S ic k le a v e
(fu ll p a y and
no w a itin g
p e r io d )

S ic k le a v e
(p a r tia l p ay
o r w a itin g
p e r io d )

R e tire m en t
p e n s io n
p la n

N o h e a lth ,
in s u r a n c e ,
o r p e n s io n
p la n

Office workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o sto n _
N e w Y o r k C it y
13hi1ari»lpVi4a

-

95
93
88

41
50
31

86
72
67

90
69
55

57
51
39

24
33
21

67
93
75

40
38
44

64
84
71

2
1

68
82
71

2
1
3

South:
B a l t i m o r e ___________________________________________

95

42

86

84

40

6

84

27

55

11

78

-

N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h ic a g o
__
D e tr o it

85
89

50
59

84
82

82
79

59
59

34
30

78
88

43
68

53
67

2
5

72
58

1
8

95
97

58
51

92
83

86
81

67
72

37
31

74
79

35
32

56
68

5
9

62
65

( 2)

__

_____

„

„

__ „

_________________

__ _
_

_________

_

W e st:
L o s A n g e le s -L o n g B e a c h
_
_
__ _
_
San F r a n c i s c o -O a k la n d _________________________

1

Plant workers

N o r th e a s t :
B o sto n
__ _
_
New Y o rk C i t y _
_
P h ila d e lp h ia „
__

____
___________ _____ ________
_____ _________ _________ .

91
96
89

39
68
40

78
78
74

85
76
62

54
43
36

15
12
12

71
89
81

44
57
63

46
52
20

8
9
3

58
84
52

6
1
7

Sou th :
B a l t im o r e _

__

_
_

69

34

74

65

24

4

58

33

20

9

42

19

N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h ic a g o
„
D e tr o it _

„
__ __

89
95

49
62

78
87

77
87

48
47

14

70
91

53
80

22
37

3

4

59
50

4

7

89

61

88

88

77

66

86

81

79

19
26

71
89

40
19

35
18

26
71

57
89

-

100

__

_

_____

_____________
_____ _____

__

____________

_____
_____

__
~

____

W e st:
L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h _ _____ ____________
San F r a n c i s c o - O a k la n d ______ ______________

3

1 Unduplicated total o f w o rk e rs re ce ivin g sick leave o r sick n ess and accid ent insurance shown separately. S ick -leave plans are lim ited to those w hich definitely establish at least the m inim um number of
days* pay that can be expected by each em ployee. Inform al s ick -le a v e allow ances determ ined on an individual b a sis are excluded.
* L ess than 0 .5 p ercent.




80
Table B-30: Health, insurance, and pension plans-retail trade
( P e r c e n t o f o ffic e an d p la n t w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d in r e t a il tr a d e e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith f o r m a l p r o v is io n s o th e r th an le g a l l y r e q u ir e d b y ty p e o f p la n , w in te r 1 9 5 8 - 5 9 )
In su r a n c e p la n s
A rea
L ife

A c c id en ta l
d e a th and
d is m e m be r m e n t

H o s p i t a li­
za tio n

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e a n d /o r s ic k le a v e

S u r g ic a l

M e d ic a l

C a ta s t r o p h e

T o ta l 1

S ic k n e s s
and a c c id e n t
in s u r a n c e

S ic k le a v e
(fu ll p a y and
no w a itin g
p e r io d )

S ic k le a v e
(p a r tia l pay
o r w a itin g
____ p e r io d )

R e tire m en t
p e n s io n
p la n

N o h e a lth ,
in s u r a n c e ,
o r p e n s io n
p la n

Office workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o s to n ________ ____________________________________
N e w Y o r k C i t y 3 ___________________________________
P h ila d e lp h ia 3 ______________________________________

'
91
87
97

54
27
26

59
88
86

55
85
82

32
67
32

17
16
32

90
91
87

66
56
42

44
42
28

26
11
38

61
67
85

( 2)
1
2

S outh:
B a l t im o r e _ ________________________________________
D a l la s
____________________________________________

83
91

45
86

63
76

62
71

34
47

35
35

93
60

57
18

4
17

36
31

81
63

2

N o r th C e n t r a l:
_________ ________________________________
C h ic a g o
D e t r o i t 4____ ________________________________________

92
82

38
61

95
58

90
58

24
39

58
23

91
52

35
30

8
33

57
10

77
42

1
15

W e st:
S an F r a n c i s c o -O a k la n d ______ ________________
S e a t t l e ______________________________________________

80
97

30
65

90
96

90
96

88
63

61
37

77
93

15
63

20
11

51
30

36
79

2

-

-

Plant workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o s t o n ___
N e w Y o r k C i t y 3 ____________ ____________________
P h ila d e lp h ia 3 ______________________________________

89
91
94

50
35
43

55
96
75

51
94
73

32
69
41

3
4
6

91
86
82

70
69
64

26
29
21

9
4
17

57
74
61

3
2
5

S outh:
B a l t im o r e ___________________________________________
D a l l a s _____ ________________________________________

75
76

32
44

49
68

47
62

22
34

9
22

87
43

48
18

6
13

40
17

72
53

2
7

N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h i c a g o ______________________________________________
D e t r o i t 3 ______ ____________________________________

81
92

32
61

90
66

85
66

46
36

22
15

79
78

57
57

4
37

29
11

45
42

3
5

W e st:
S an F r a n c i s c o -O a k la n d _________________________
S e a ttle ________________ ____________________________

87
100

24
89

95
97

95
97

94
89

43
13

88
92

19
84

13

68
8

52
52

-

1
U n d u p lic a te d to t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g s ic k l e a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e l y . S i c k -l e a v e p la n s a r e l im it e d to th o s e w h ic h d e fin ite ly e s t a b l is h a t l e a s t the m in im u m n u m b e r o f
d a y s* p a y th a t ca n b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e . I n fo r m a l s i c k -l e a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te r m in e d on an in d iv id u a l b a s i s a r e e x c lu d e d .
* L e s s th an 0 . 5 p e r c e n t.
3 E x c lu d e s l i m i t e d -p r i c e v a r ie t y s t o r e s .
4 E x c lu d e s 2 la r g e d e p a r tm e n t s t o r e s .




81
Table B-31: Health, insurance, and pension plans-finance^
(Percent of office workers employed in finance establishments with formal provisions other than legally required by type of plan, winter 1958-59)
Insurance plans
A rea
Life

A cciden tal
death and
d ism e m be rment

H ospitali­
zation

Sickness and accid ent insurance a n d /o r sick leave

Surgical

M edical

Catastrophe

Total 1

Sickness
and accident
insurance

S ick -leave
(full pay and
no waiting
p eriod )

Sick leave
(partial pay
o r waiting
p eriod )

Retirem ent
pension
plan

No health,
insurance,
or pension
plan

Office workers
Northeast:
B oston
__ __ __ ________ ______________ _
New Y ork C i t y __ __ ____ __ __ ____ ___
P h ila d elp h ia ________________ _________________

96
97
99

48
39
26

91
83
62

91
81
59

58
53
34

71
52
40

53
93
63

25
24
7

49
91
60

-

South:
B a lt im o r e ____ ____ ________________________
D a ll a s ________ ___________
______________

99
91

25
29

65
89

62
82

36
63

48
17

57
39

5
5

53
34

-

North Central:
C h icago
D etroit

_
__
_
_________________ ______________

99
95

38
47

83
87

86
87

70
62

50
59

65
70

32
10

W est:
L os A n g eles-L o n g B e a c h ___ _________________
San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d __ __ ______________

97
100

30
43

93
85

93
85

84
65

37
53

66
81

22
44

1 U n d u p lic a te d to t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g
d a y s* p a y th a t can b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e .
* L e s s th an 0 . 5 p e r c e n t ,
t F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .

1

89
88
94

-

-

92
55

(* )
3

54
61

2
2

84
87

(?)
( 2)

63
63

1

90
96

-

3

-

-

s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e l y . S i c k -l e a v e p la n s a r e l im it e d to th o s e w h ic h d e fin ite ly e s t a b l is h a t l e a s t th e m in im u m n u m b e r o f
In fo r m a l s i c k -l e a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te r m in e d on an in d iv id u a l b a s i s a r e e x c lu d e d .

Table B-32: Health, insurance, and pension plans-services
(P e r c e n t o f o ffic e and p lan t w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d in s e r v i c e s e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith f o r m a l p r o v is io n s o th e r th an le g a l l y r e q u ir e d b y ty p e o f p la n , w in te r 1 9 5 8 - 5 9 )
S ic k n e s s an d a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e a n d /o f s ic k le a v e

In su r a n c e p la n s
A rea

L ife

A c c id e n ta l
d e a th and
d is m e m ­
berm ent

H o s p i t a l i­
z a tio n

S u r g ic a l

M e d ic a l

C a ta s tr o p h e

T o ta l 1

S ick n e s s
and a c c id e n t
in s u r a n c e

S ic k le a v e
(fu ll p a y and
no w a itin g
p e r io d )

S ic k le a v e
( p a r tia l pay
o r w a itin g
p e r io d )

R e tire m en t
p e n s io n
p lan

N o h e a lth ,
in s u r a n c e ,
o r p e n s io n
p la n

Office workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o s t o n ____ _____ ________________________________
N ew Y o r k C i t y _____________________________________
P h ila d e lp h ia _ . . __ „
__ ____________________

64
94
99

27
39
41

47
62
61

45
59
37

42
49
26

26
35
24

74
93
59

34
27
42

50
84
45

( 2)
-

59
62
50

( 2)
1

N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h ic a g o
____________________________________________
D e t r o i t _______________________________________________

69
96

23
49

69
81

69
81

43
58

23
21

49
66

23
39

29
44

5
-

41
40

11
4

W e st:
L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h 3 _____________________

95

67

92

92

76

51

55

25

54

70

2

3
4
2

90
83
62

76
68
57

11
24
7

7
3
4

23
79
7

5
4

74

70
70

13
6

1
“

17
9

12
10

4

7

5

38

20

-

1

Plant workers
N o r th e a s t :
B o s to n _______________________________________________
N ew Y o r k C i t y _____________________________________
P h i l a d e l p h i a ________________________________________

85
92
97

77
57
84

81
84
75

51
83
59

33
64
68

N o r th C e n t r a l:
C h ic a g o
„ — _____ ____________________________
D e t r o i t _______________________________________________

79
72

33
46

87
80

85
80

78
70

8
-

7
1

W e st:
L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h 3 ---------------------------------

78

51

80

80

77

9

12

"

1 U n d u p lic a te d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e l y . S i c k -l e a v e p la n s a r e lim it e d to th o s e w h ic h d e fin ite ly e s t a b l is h a t l e a s t th e m in im u m n u m b e r o f
d a y 8* p a y th a t can b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e . In fo r m a l s i c k -l e a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te r m in e d on an in d iv id u a l b a s i s a r e e x c lu d e d .
* L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .
3 E x c lu d e s m o tio n -p ic t u r e p r o d u c tio n an d a l li e d s e r v i c e s ; d ata fo r th e s e in d u s tr ie s a r e in c lu d e d , h o w e v e r , in " a l l i n d u s t r i e s ."




82

A p p e n d ix A :

Scope and Method of Surve y2
0

Industry and Establishment Limitations

Occupational Earnings

The area survey data were obtained by personal visits of
Bureau field agents21 to representative establishments within six broad
industry divisions: (l) Manufacturing; (2) transportation (excluding
railroads), communication, and other public utilities; (3) wholesale
trade; (4) retail trade; (5) finance, insurance, aid real estate; and
( l) selected services. Excluded from the scope of the studies, besides
railroads, were government institutions22 and the construction and ex­
tractive industries.

Workers were classified by occupation on the basis of uni­
form job descriptions designed to take account of minor interestab­
lishment variation in duties within the same job; these job descriptions
are listed in appendix B.

The scope of the studies was furtner limited within each of
the six major industry groupings to establishments which employed
more than a specified minimum number of workers, as indicated in
the following table. Smaller establishments were omitted because they
furnished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
More than 4, 700 establishments were included in the Bureau*s
sample of more than 24, 000 establishments within the scope of the
studies in the 20 areas.
To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum
cost, a greater proportion of large than of small establishments was
studied; however, all establishments were given their appropriate
weight. Estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to all estab­
lishments in the industry grouping and area, but not to those below
the minimum size studied; an exception, however, is the tabulation
of minimum entrance rates, which relates solely to provisions in the
establishments actually visited.

20 A more technical description of the methodology of community
and other types of earnings studies is included in Studies of Occu­
pational Wages and Supplementary Benefits, Monthly Labor Review,
March 1954 (p. 292).
21 In partial resurveys of Atlanta,Denver, Memphis, Milwaukee,
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Newark-Jersey City, New Orleans, Portland,
and St. Louis, the data were obtained chiefly by mail questionnaire,
from the establishments visited by field agents in the regular fullscale survey made in the winter of 1957-58.
Personal visits were
made to nonrespondents and to those respondents reporting unusual
changes since the previous survey. Full-scale employment and earn­
ings information (A tables) were obtained in each of the industry divi­
sions, for occupation reported in the earlier study, but no data were
requested for current establishment practices or supplementary wage
provisions.
In re surveying the 11 other areas, data were also obtained
by mail from some of the smaller establishments for which visits by
Bureau field agents in the last previous survey indicated employment
in relatively few of the occupations studied. Unusual changes reported
by mail were verified with employers.
22 See footnote 4 to the table, p. 84, for areas in which public
utilities were municipally operated and have been excluded.




Average earnings are presented in the A tables, beginning on
page 22.
Data are shown for full-time workers; i. e. , those hired
to work a full-time schedule for the given occupational classification.
Earnings data exclude premium pay for overtime and nightwork, and
for work on weekends and holidays. Nonproduction bonuses are ex­
cluded also, but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings are
included. Average weekly earnings for office clerical, professional,
and technical occupations relate to the standard salaries that were
paid for standard work schedules; i. e. , to the straight-time salary
corresponding to the workers’ normal weekly work schedule excluding
all overtime hours.
Weekly earnings were rounded to the nearest
half dollar.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Information is presented (in the B tables) on selected estab­
lishment practices and supplementary benefits as they relate to office
and plant workers in 11 areas.
The term "office workers," as used
in these studies, includes working supervisors and nonsupervisory
workers performing clerical functions and excludes administrative,
executive, and professional personnel. "Plant workers" include work­
ing foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including leadmen and
trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administrative, executive,
and professional employees, and force-account construction employees
who are utilized as a separate work force were excluded. Cafeteria
workers and routemen were excluded in manufacturing industries but
were included as plant workers in nonmanufacturing industries.
Minimum Entrance Rates. — Tables B -l and B-2 relate only
to the establishments in each area sample. They are presented on an
establishment rather than on an employment basis. The detailed tables
in the individual area bulletins also present data for nonmanufacturing
industries as a group, the entrance rates are also presented in terms
of the most common workweeks for which they were recorded.
Shift-Differential Data. — Tables B -10 and B - l l are limited to
manufacturing industries. This information is presented both in terms
of (a) establishment policy, 23 presented in terms of total plant worker
employment, and (b) effective practice presented on the basis of work­
ers actually employed on the specified shift at the time of the survey.

23
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met
either of the following conditions: (l) Operated late shifts at the time
of the survey, or (?) had formal provisions covering late shifts.

83
In establishments having varied differentials, the amount ap­
plying to a majority was used or, if no amount applied to a majority,
the classification "other" was used. In establishments in which some
late-shift hours are paid at normal rates, a differential was recorded
only if it applied to a majority of the shift hours.
Paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pen­
sion plans are treated statistically on the basis that these are appli­
cable to all plant or office workers if a majority of such workers are
eligible or may eventually qualify for the practices listed. Scheduled
hours are treated. statistically on the basis that these are applicable
to all plant or office workers if a majority are covered. 24 Because
of rounding, sums of individual items in these tabulations may not
equal totals.
The paid holidays tables present the number of whole and
half holidays actually provided.
Table B -lZ a (all industries) com­
bines whole and half holidays to show total holiday time.
The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal arrange­
ments, excluding informal plans whereby time off with pay was granted
at the discretion of the employer.
In the tabulations of vacation
allowances by weeks of pay and years of service, payments not on a
time basis were converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent of
annual earnings was considered as the equivalent of 1 week’s pay. The
pay amounts and service periods for which data are presented are
typical but do not necessarily reflect the individual provisions for
progressions. For example, the changes in proportions indicated at
10 years' service include changes in provisions occurring between
5 and 10 years. Furthermore, estimates are cumulative. Thus, the
proportion receiving 3 or more weeks' pay after 5 years includes
those who receive 3 or more weeks' pay after fewer years of service.
Data for intermediate service periods were not tabulated. Data on em­
ployer practice in computing vacation payments, such as time pay­
ments, percent of annual earnings, or flat-sum amounts, are available
in the individual area bulletins.

Data are presented for all health, insurance, and pension
plans for which at least a part of the cost was borne by the employer,
excepting only legal requirements such as workmen's compensation and
social security (tables B-26 to B-32). Such plans included those under­
written by a commercial insurance company and those provided through
a union fund or paid directly by the employer out of current operating
funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose. Death benefits were
included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance data are limited to that type
of insurance under which predetermined cash payments were made
directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or
accident disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to
which the employer contributes. However, in New York and New
Jersey, which have enacted temporary disability insurance laws which
require employer contributions,25 plans were included only if the em­
ployer (l) contributed more than was legally required, or (2) provided
the employee with benefits which exceed the requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick-leave plans are limited to formal plans which
provided full pay or a proportion of the worker's pay during absence
from work because of illness. Separate tabulations are provided ac­
cording to (1) plans which proviaed full pay and no waiting period,
and (2) plans providing either partial pay or a waiting period. Sickleave plans include only those which definitely established at least
the minimum number of days' pay that could be expected by each em­
ployee.
Informal sick-leave allowances determined on an individual
basis were excluded. In addition to the presentation of the proportions
of workers who are provided sickness and accident insurance or paid
sick leave, an unduplicated total is shown of workers who received
either or both types of benefit.

Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended
medical insurance, includes those plans which were designed to pro­
tect employees in case of sickness and injury involving expenses
beyond the normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical
plans. Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or
partial payment of doctors' fees.
Such plans might be underwritten
by commercial insurance companies or nonprofit organizations or they
might be self-insured. Tabulations of retirement plans are limited to
those plans that provided monthly payments for the remainder of the
24
Prior to the surveys made in the winter of 1957-58, sched­
worker's life.
uled weekly hours for office workers (first section of tables B-3 to
B -9) were presented in terms of the proportion of women office
workers employed in offices with the indicated weekly hours
for
25
The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island
women workers.
did not require employer contributions.




84
M i n i m u m -s i z e e s ta b lis h m e n t and e s t im a t e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y
(in th o u sa n d s)

Number of w orkers in establishm ents within scope of studies 2
M inim um -

L abor m a r k e t1

P a y ro ll
p eriod

size
establish ­
ment

A ll industries
Total

Off ic e

]Manufacturing
Plant

Total

Off ic e

Northeast:
Boston __ ______ _______ __ _ ------- __ --------------------Buffalo
__ ___________ „ ------- — — — ------- —
N ew ark -Jersey C i t y 10 _ _____ _____ _ ____ ___ __
New Y ork C ity __ _____________ __ _____ __ _________
Philadelphia _ ___________ . _________ ________

O ctober 1958
Septem ber 1958
D ecem ber 1958
A p ril 1959
N ovem ber 1958

( 8)
51
(!)
( !)
(8)

406. 2
224. 1
360.4
1, 349.3
536. 7

88. 4
29. 0
406.9
9 5.7

244. 4
157. 5
609. 5
342. 0

206. 8
154. 8
228. 9
405 .9
312 .4

28. 7
16. 5
84.9
38. 1

South:
_ ------------ --------------------------—
Atlanta 10 _ ____
B altim ore
......
- r .-_,,
D a ll a s _______ _ _______________ __ . -----------------______ __ __
___ _ _ ____ ______ __
M em p h is10
New O rleans 10
_ _ _ _ _ _________ __ ___
__ __ —

May 1959
August 1958
O ctober 1958
January 1959
F ebru ary 1959

51
( 8)
51
51
51

156.4
258. 3
163. 5
76. 8
120. 3

40. 7
36. 0
-

171. 1
96. 5
-

68.9
163. 0
73. 5
35. 5
38.9

-

North Central:
___
C h ic a g o __ ____ ______________ ____
D etroit __ __ ____ ____ ________
—
----------------M ilwaukee 10 _________________ __ ------- --------_ _
M inneapolis-St. P a u l10 ______________________________
St. Louis 10 __ ________ ____ ______________ _

A p ril 1959
January 1959
A p ril 1959
January 1959
O ctober 1958

(!)
( 8)
51
51

2
0
1
7
1

223.9
121. 0

624. 1
378. 8
-

576.
426.
168.
115.
207.

107. 4
934 .0
96. 1
346.3
164. 7

195. 8
91. 1
33. 6

Nonmanufacturing 3
Plant

Total

145. 8
113.9
234. 8
220. 4

O ffice

Plant

199.4
69. 3
131. 5
943. 4
224. 3

59. 7
12. 5
,322. 0
57. 6

98. 6
43. 6
374. 7
121. 6

87. 5
95. 3
90. 0
41. 3
8 1 .4

23. 8
26. 8
-

51. 7
46. 1
-

456. 1
179.9
71. 6
118.9
9 9 .4

134.9
47. 3
-

221. 5
93. 6
-

67. 5
390. 7
47. 0
209. 9
66.9

108. 0
67. 0
16.9

.

( 8)

1,032.
606.
240.
234.
307.

-

-

-

-

16.9
9. 2
-

119. 4
5 0 .4
-

1
1
5
8
7

89. 0
73. 7
-

402. 6
285. 2
-

39.9
543. 3
49. 1
136. 4
97. 8

87. 8
24. 1
16. 7

-

-

-

-

W e st:

-----D enver 1 0 ..................................................................................
L os A n g eles -L o n g B each __
____
__ ____ _
P o r tla n d 10
_____
____
_ ____ _ _ ________ _
San F ran cisco-O ak lan d __ _ _ _ __ __ __ __
__ _ __ __
__ _ ____ _ __
_____
Seattle

D ecem ber 1958
M arch 1959
A p ril 1959
January 1959
August 1958

51
(8)

51
( 8)

51

535. 9
179. 8
99. 1

338. 6
87. 5
62. 2

197. 3
92. 3
36.9

1 S ta n d a rd m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , w ith the fo llo w in g e x c e p t io n s : N e w a r k -J e r s e y C it y A r e a ( E s s e x , H u d so n , and U n ion C o u n t ie s ); N e w Y o r k C it y A r e a
(B r o n x , N e w Y o r k , K i n g s , Q u e e n s , and R ic h m o n d
C o u n t ie s ) ; P h ila d e lp h ia A r e a (P h ila d e lp h ia and D e la w a r e C o u n t ie s , P a . ; and C a m d e n C o u n t y , N . J . ) ; an d C h ic a g o A r e a (C o o k C o u n ty ).
2 T o t a ls in clu d e e x e c u t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and o th e r w o r k e r s e x c lu d e d f r o m th e s e p a r a t e o ffic e and p lan t c a t e g o r i e s .
T h e e s t im a t e s sh o w n in th is ta b le p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t io n o f
the s iz e and c o m p o s itio n o f the labor- f o r c e in c lu d e d in the s u r v e y s .
T h e y a r e n ot in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w ith o th e r a r e a e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s to m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t tr e n d s
o r l e v e l s s in c e ( l ) plan n in g o f w age s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s the u se o f e s t a b lis h m e n t d ata c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in a d v a n ce o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d s tu d ie d , and (2) s m a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m the s c o p e
o f the stu d y .
3 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r 5 b r o a d n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g in d u s tr y g ro u p s sh ow n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 T r a n s p o r ta t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t il it ie s .
T a x ic a b s and s e r v i c e s in c id e n ta l to w a te r tr a n s p o r t a tio n a r e a l s o e x c lu d e d , a s a r e m u n ic ip a lly o p e r a t e d e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s . A l l o r m a jo r l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a t io n s in B o s to n , C h ic a g o , D e t r o it , L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h , N e w Y o r k C it y , S an F r a n c i s c o -O a k la n d , and S e a ttle w e r e m u n ic ip a lly o p e r a t e d a s w e r e e le c t r ic u tility
o p e r a t io n s in L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h and S e a t t le , and e le c t r i c and g a s o p e r a t io n s in M e m p h i s .
5 E s t im a t e s f o r N e w a r k -J e r s e y C i t y , N e w Y o r k C i t y , and P h ila d e lp h ia e x c lu d e l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r ie t y s t o r e s ; th o se f o r L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h , d e p a r tm e n t s t o r e s ; fo r D e t r o it , 2 l a r g e d e p a r tm e n t
s t o r e s ; and f o r S t. L o u is , d e p a r t m e n t and l i m i t e d -p r i c e v a r ie t y s t o r e s .
In e a c h in s t a n c e , h o w e v e r , the r e m a in d e r o f r e t a il tr a d e is a p p r o p r ia te ly r e p r e s e n t e d in the A - and B - t a b le e s t im a t e s f o r a l l in ­
d u s t r ie s
c o m b in e d , and w h e r e p r e s e n t e d , n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .




85
by industry division fo r 20 labor m arkets studied by the Bureau of Labor S tatistics, winter 1958-59
(in thousands)
Number of w ork ers in establishm ents within scope o f studies 2
Public utilities 4
O ffice

Total

6. 5
2 .7

W holesale trade
Plant

7
6
0
b
3

22. 4
21. 8
21. 6
7. 7
26. 4

83.
42.
17.
26.
31.

18.
88.
13.
62.
17.

4
1
3
5
8

42. 5
9. 3

19. 8
11. 4
84. 9
33. 1

4. 4
5. 7

12. 3
11. 0

-

-

'

32.
17.
34.
197.
53.

44. 2
20. 0

-

-

-

-

-

“

15. 8
10. 2
13. 6
9 .0
11.5

7. 3
(9)

Plant

Total

O ffice

18. 6

49. 5

-

-

11. 9
2. 9

27. 7
8. 3

Finance 6
Plant

49. 5
10. 0

8. 5
(9)
34. 2
14. 4

64.1
29. 1
26. 5
186. 2
67.9

6. 3
(9)
25. 2
9. 2

135. 9
52. 5

2. 2
(9)
(!)
(9)

4. 7
(9)
(!)
(9)

26. 3
33.9
27. 3
15. 1
26. 5

4. 1
3. 3
(9)

26. 0
21. 1
(9)

-

52. 8
(9)

Total

S erv ices 7

O ffice

Total

O ffice

L a bor m a r k e t1
Plant

Northeast:
Boston
Buffalo
N ew ark -Jersey C ity 10
New Y ork City
Philadelphia

49. 7
8. 3
30. 8
249. 5
42.9

33.9
(9)
165. 5
25. 4

31.
7.
25.
183.
27.

1
1
2
9
4

5. 7
(!)
(9)
39. 3
3. 7

15.1
(9)
(9)
99. 3
18. 8

13.7
17. 8
18. 2
3. 5
7. 5

11. 6
12. 6
(9)
(9)

9.
11.
9.
6.
7.

3
6
3
0
5

(!)
(9)
(9)
(:>
(9)

(9)
(9)
(9)
( !)
(9)

76.
27.
9.
12.
13.

0
9
3
0
5

14. 3
6.9
(9)
( )
(9)

39. 2
14. 8
(9)
9)
(9)

North Central:
Chicago
D etroit
Milwaukee 10
M inneapolis-St. P a u l1 0
St. Louis 10

6. 5
1 59.9
1
3. 8
24. 6
7. 6

(9)
11. 9
<:>
n
(9)

(9)
31. 0
( !)
!>
(9)

W est:
D enver 10
Los A n geles-L on g Beach
Portland 10
San F ran cisco-O aklan d
Seattle

South:
Atlanta 10
B altim ore
D allas
M emphis 10
New O rleans 10

“

79. 8
24. 7
8.0
19. 6
18. 5

25. 9
o. 4
(9)

32. 5
10. £
(9)

10.9
60. 6
7. 5
31. 2
9. 1

-

-

'

'

5

1
7
5
0

22. 4
7. 2
15.0
126. 2
32. 8

Off ic e

‘

19. 9
10. 0

Total

R etail trade 5

(9)
24. 3
(9)
13. 3
(9)

3
3
3
1
1

"

(9)
17. 3
(9)
9. 7
(9)

137.
56.
27.
41.
18.

23. 6
90. 7
15. 4
47. 2
23. 2

25. 5
5. 2
(9)

9 7 .4
45. 4
(9)

-

-

(9)

(9)

(9 )
_

(9j

5.9
2. 7

35. 8
17. 7

-

79. 6
28.9
9. 7
19.7
17. 5

49. 3
18. 8
(9)

8.
72.
6.
44.
10.

(9)
49 .9
(9)
35. 0
(9)

0
4
6
4
0

-

6 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Data for nonoffice (plant) workers in finance and insurance establishment's are excluded from the total, as well as from the B -ta b le estim ates for all indus­
trie s combined, and nonmanufacturing.
Data for plant w orkers in real estate, not presented sep arately, how ever, are included.
7 H otels; personal s e r v ic e s; business se r v ic e s; auto repair shops; motion p ictures; nonprofit m em bership organizations; and engineering and architectural se r v ic e s.
8 M in im u m -size establishm ent (in term s of employment) was 51 w orkers in-the w holesale trade, finance, and servic es industry groups; and 101 in the manufacturing, public utilities, and retail trade groups.
9 Tnis industry division is represented in estim ates for " a l l in d u stries" and "nonrr anufacturing" although coverage was insufficient to ju stify separate presentation of data.
10 Survey lim ited to occupational earnings; separate office and plant em ployment totals w ere not com piled.
D ashes indicate, however, that coverage was sufficient to ju stify separate presentation
of data in the S eries A tables.
11 Excludes data for m otion-picture production and allied se r v ic e s; data for these industries are included, however, in " a l l in du stries" and "n onm anu facturin g."

NO TE: The 1957 revised edition of the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual was used in c lassifyin g establishm ents by industry division. M ajor
changes from the ea rlier edition used in previous
surveys are the transfer of m ilk pasteurization plants and ready mixed concrete establishm ents from trade (wnolesale or retail) to manufacturing, and the transfer of radio and television broadcasting from
servic es to the transportation, com m unication, and other public utilities division.







87

Appendix B:

Occupational Descriptions

The p r im a r y p u rp o s e o f p r e p a r in g jo b d e s c r ip tio n s f o r the B u r e a u 's w age s u r v e y s is to
a s s i s t its fie ld sta ff in c la s s ify in g into a p p r o p r ia te o c cu p a tio n s w o r k e r s w h o a r e e m p lo y e d u nder
a v a r ie ty o f p a y r o ll title s and d iffe r e n t w o rk a r r a n g e m e n ts fr o m e sta b lis h m e n t to e sta b lis h m e n t
and fr o m a r e a to a r e a .
T h is is e s s e n tia l in o r d e r to p e r m it the g rou p in g o f o c cu p a tio n a l w age
ra te s r e p r e s e n tin g c o m p a r a b le jo b con ten t.
B e c a u s e o f this e m p h a sis on in ter e sta b lis h m e n t and
in te r a r e a c o m p a r a b ility o f o c cu p a tio n a l con ten t, the B u r e a u 's jo b d e s c r ip tio n s m a y d iffe r s ig n ifi­
ca n tly fr o m th ose in u se in in div idu al e s ta b lis h m e n ts o r th o se p r e p a r e d f o r o th e r p u r p o s e s .
In
ap p lyin g th ese jo b d e s c r ip t io n s , the B u r e a u 's fie ld r e p r e s e n t a t iv e s a r e in s tru cte d to e x clu d e w o r k ­
ing s u p e r v is o r s , a p p r e n tic e s , le a r n e r s , b e g in n e r s , t r a in e e s , h an d icap p ed w o r k e r s , p a r t -t im e ,
te m p o r a r y , and p r o b a tio n a r y w o r k e r s .

Office
B IL L E R ,

M ACHIN E

P r e p a r e s sta te m e n ts, b i lls , and in v o ic e s on a m a ch in e oth er
than an o r d in a r y o r e le c t r o m a t ic ty p e w r ite r . M ay a ls o k eep r e c o r d s
as to b illin g s o r sh ipp ing c h a r g e s o r p e r fo r m oth er c l e r i c a l w o r k in ­
cid e n ta l to b illin g o p e r a t io n s .
F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , b i l l e r s ,
m a ch in e , a r e c la s s ifie d b y type o f m a ch in e , as fo llo w s :
B ille r , m a ch in e (b illin g m a ch in e )——U ses a s p e c ia l b illin g
m a ch in e (M oon H opkin s, fcliio tt F is h e r , B u r ro u g h s , e t c . , w h ich
a r e com b in a tion typing and adding m a c h in e s ) to p r e p a r e b ills and
in v o ic e s fr o m c u s t o m e r s ' p u rc h a se o r d e r s , in te r n a lly p r e p a r e d
o r d e r s , sh ipp in g m e m o ra n d a , e tc .
U su a lly in v o lv e s a p p lic a tio n
o f p r e d e te r m in e d d is co u n ts and sh ipping c h a r g e s and en try o f
n e c e s s a r y e x te n s io n s , w h ich m a y o r m a y not be com p u te d on the
b illin g m a ch in e , and tota ls w h ich a r e a u to m a tic a lly a c c u m u la te d
b y m a ch in e .
The o p e r a tio n u su a lly in v o lv e s a la r g e n u m b er o f
c a r b o n c o p ie s o f the b ill bein g p r e p a r e d and is often done on a
fa n fo ld m a ch in e .
B i lle r , m a ch in e (book k eep in g m a c h in e )----- U ses a book k eep in g
m a ch in e (&undstrand, E llio tt F is n e r , R em in gton R and, e tc . , w h ich
m a y o r m a y not have ty p e w r ite r k e y b o a r d ) to p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s '
b ills as p a rt o f the a cco u n ts r e c e iv a b le o p e r a tio n .
G e n e r a lly
in v o lv e s the sim u lta n eou s en try o f fig u r e s on c u s t o m e r s ' le d g e r
record .
The m a ch in e a u to m a tica lly a c c u m u la te s fig u r e s on a
n u m ber o f v e r t ic a l colu m n s and co m p u te s and u su a lly p r in ts a u to ­
m a tic a lly the d eb it o r c r e d it b a la n ce s . D oes not in v o lv e a k n o w l­
edge o f b ook k eep in g . W ork s fr o m u n ifo r m and stan dard ty p es o f
s a le s and c r e d it s lip s .
B O O K K E E PIN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O p era tes a book k eep in g m a ch in e (R em in gton R and, E llio tt
F is h e r , S undstrand, B u rro u g h s, N ation al C ash R e g is t e r , w ith o r w ith ­
out a ty p e w rite r k e y b o a r d ) to k eep a r e c o r d o f b u s in e s s tr a n s a c t io n s .




B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ----- C on tinu ed
C la s s A-— K eep s a s e t o f r e c o r d s r e q u irin g a k n ow led ge o f
and e x p e r ie n c e in b a s ic b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s and fa m ilia r it y w ith
the s t r u c tu r e o f the p a r t ic u la r a cco u n tin g s y s te m u s e d .
D e te r­
m in e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s and d is tr ib u tio n o f d eb it and c r e d it item s
to be u se d in ea ch p h a se o f the w o r k . M ay p r e p a r e c o n s o lid a te d
r e p o r t s , b a la n c e s h e e ts , and o th e r r e c o r d s b y hand.
C la s s B — -K eep s a r e c o r d o f on e o r m o r e p h a s e s o r s e c tio n s
o f a s e t o f r e c o r d s u s u a lly r e q u ir in g little kn ow led ge o f b a s ic b o o k ­
k ee p in g .
P h a s e s o r s e c tio n s in clu d e a c c o u n ts p a y a b le , p a y r o ll,
c u s t o m e r s ' a c c o u n ts (not in clu d in g a s im p le type o f b illin g d e s c r ib e d
u n der b i l l e r , m a c h in e ), c o s t d is tr ib u tio n , ex p e n s e d is tr ib u tio n , in ­
v e n to r y c o n t r o l, e t c . M ay c h e c k o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r a tio n o f t r ia l
b a la n c e s and p r e p a r e c o n t r o l sh e e ts f o r the a cco u n tin g d ep a rtm en t.
CLERK,

AC C O U N TIN G

C la s s A ——U nder g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n o f a b o o k k e e p e r o r a c c o u n t­
ant, has r e s p o n s ib ilit y f o r k eep in g on e o r m o r e s e c tio n s o f a com-*
p le te s e t o f b ook s o r r e c o r d s r e la tin g to on e p h a se o f an e s t a b lis h ­
m e n t's b u s in e s s tr a n s a c t io n s . W o rk in v o lv e s p o s tin g and ba la n cin g
s u b s id ia r y le d g e r o r le d g e r s su ch as a c c o u n ts r e c e iv a b le o r a c ­
cou n ts p a y a b le ; ex a m in in g and c o d in g in v o ic e s o r v o u c h e r s w ith
p r o p e r a c c o u n tin g d is tr ib u tio n ; r e q u ir e s ju d g m en t and e x p e r ie n c e
in m a k in g p r o p e r a s s ig n a tio n s and a llo c a t io n s .
M ay a s s i s t in
p r e p a r in g , a d ju stin g , and c lo s in g jo u r n a l e n tr ie s ; m a y d ir e c t c la s s B
a ccou n tin g c le r k s .
C la s s B ——U nder s u p e r v is io n , p e r fo r m s one o r m o r e rou tin e
a c c o u n tin g o p e r a tio n s su ch a s p o s tin g s im p le jo u r n a l v o u c h e r s ,
a c c o u n ts p a y a b le v o u c h e r s , e n te rin g v o u c h e r s in v o u c h e r r e g is t e r s ;
r e c o n c ilin g bank a c c o u n ts ; p o s tin g s u b s id ia r y le d g e r s c o n t r o lle d
b y g e n e r a l le d g e r s .
T h is jo b d o e s not r e q u ir e a kn ow led ge o f
a c c o u n tin g and b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s but is found in o ffic e s in
w h ich the m o r e rou tin e a c c o u n tin g w o r k is su b d iv id ed on a fu n c ­
tio n a l b a s is a m on g s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .

88

CLERK,

F IL E

C la s s A ——R e s p o n s ib le fo r m a in tain in g an e s ta b lis h e d filin g
s y s t e m . C la s s ifie s and in d e x e s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e o r oth er m a te r ia l;
m a y a ls o file th is m a t e r ia l. M ay k eep r e c o r d s o f v a r io u s ty p es
in c o n ju n ctio n w ith file s o r s u p e r v is e o th e r s in filin g and lo c a tin g
m a te r ia l in the f i l e s .
M ay p e r fo r m in cid e n ta l c l e r i c a l d u tie s .
C la s s B -----P e r f o r m s ro u tin e filin g , u su a lly o f m a te r ia l that
has a lr e a d y been c la s s if i e d , o r lo c a t e s o r a s s i s t s in lo c a tin g m a ­
te r ia l in the f i l e s .
M ay p e r fo r m in cid e n ta l c l e r i c a l d u tie s .
CLERK,

ORDER

R e c e iv e s cu s to m e r s * o r d e r s fo r m a te r ia l o r m e r c h a n d is e by
m a il, phone, o r p e r s o n a lly .
D uties in v o lv e any c o m b in a tio n o f the
fo llo w in g : Q uoting p r ic e s to c u s t o m e r s ; m akin g out an o r d e r sh eet
lis tin g the ite m s to m a k e up the o r d e r ; ch e ck in g p r ic e s and q u a n tities
o f ite m s on o r d e r sh eet; d is trib u tin g o r d e r sh e e ts to r e s p e c t iv e d e ­
p a rtm en ts to be fill e d .
M ay c h e c k w ith c r e d it d ep a rtm en t to d e t e r ­
m in e c r e d it ra tin g o f c u s t o m e r , a ck n o w le d g e r e c e ip t o f o r d e r s fr o m
c u s t o m e r s , fo llo w up o r d e r s to s e e that they h ave b e e n fille d , keep
file o f o r d e r s r e c e iv e d , and c h e c k sh ipping in v o ic e s w ith o r ig in a l
ord ers.
CLERK,

K E Y -P U N C H O P E R A T O R
Under g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n and w ith no s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i­
b i lit ie s , r e c o r d s a cco u n tin g and s t a t is t ic a l data on tabulating c a r d s
by punching a s e r ie s o f h o le s in the c a r d s in a s p e c ifie d se q u e n c e ,
using an a lp h a b e tica l o r a n u m e r ic a l k e y -p u n ch m a ch in e , fo llo w in g
w ritte n in fo r m a tio n on r e c o r d s .
M ay d u p lica te c a r d s by using the
d u p lica tin g d e v ic e a tta ch ed to m a ch in e .
K eep s file s o f punch c a r d s .
M ay v e r ify ow n w o rk o r w o rk o f o t h e r s .
O F F IC E BOY O R G IR L
P e r f o r m s v a r io u s rou tin e d u ties su ch a s running e r r a n d s ,
o p e r a tin g m in o r o f f ic e m a ch in e s su ch a s s e a le r s o r m a ile r s , opening
and d is trib u tin g m a il, and oth er m in o r c l e r i c a l w o rk .
SE CRE TARY
P e r f o r m s s e c r e t a r ia l and c l e r i c a l d u ties fo r a s u p e r io r in an
a d m in is tr a tiv e o r e x e c u tiv e p o s it io n . D u ties in clu d e m aking a p p oin t­
m en ts fo r s u p e r io r ; r e c e iv in g p eop le c o m in g in to o f f ic e ; a n sw erin g
and m akin g phone c a lls ; han dlin g p e r s o n a l and im p o rta n t o r c o n fi­
d en tia l m a il, and w ritin g rou tin e c o r r e s p o n d e n c e on ow n in itia tiv e ;
taking d ic ta tio n (w h e re tr a n s c r ib in g m a ch in e is n ot u sed ) e ith er in
sh orth an d o r by Stenotype o r s im ila r m a ch in e , and tr a n s c r ib in g d ic ta ­
tion o r the r e c o r d e d in fo r m a tio n r e p r o d u c e d on a tr a n s c r ib in g m a ch in e .
M ay p r e p a r e s p e c ia l r e p o r t s o r m e m o ra n d a fo r in fo r m a tio n o f s u p e r io r .

PAYROLL
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

C om p u tes w a g e s o f com p a n y e m p lo y e e s and e n te r s the n e c e s ­
s a r y data on the p a y r o ll s h e e ts . D u ties in v o lv e : C a lcu la tin g w o rk e r s*
e a rn in g s b a s e d on tim e o r p ro d u c tio n r e c o r d s ; p ostin g c a lc u la te d data
on p a y r o ll sh eet, sh ow in g in fo r m a tio n su ch a s w o rk e r * s n a m e , w ork in g
d a y s , tim e , r a te , d ed u ction s fo r in s u r a n c e , and tota l w a g es d u e. M ay
m ake out p a y c h e c k s and a s s i s t p a y m a s te r in m akin g up and d i s ­
trib u tin g pay e n v e lo p e s .
M ay u se a c a lc u la tin g m a ch in e .

P r im a r y duty is to take d ic ta tio n fr o m one o r m o r e p e r s o n s ,
e ith e r in sh orth an d o r by Stenotype o r s im ila r m a ch in e , in v olv in g a
n o r m a l r ou tin e v o c a b u la r y , and to tr a n s c r ib e th is d icta tio n on a ty p e ­
w r it e r . M ay a ls o type fr o m w ritte n c o p y . M ay a ls o set up and keep
file s in o r d e r , k eep s im p le r e c o r d s , e t c .
D o e s not in clu d e tr a n ­
s c r ib in g -m a c h in e w o r k (s e e t r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r ).

COM PTOM ETER OPERATOR

ST E N O G R A P H E R ,

P r im a r y duty is to o p e r a te a C o m p to m e te r to p e r fo r m m a th e ­
m a tic a l co m p u ta tio n s.
T h is jo b is not to be c o n fu s e d w ith that o f
s t a t is t ic a l o r oth er type o f c le r k , w h ich m a y in v o lv e fre q u e n t u se o f
a C o m p to m e te r but, in w h ich , u se o f th is m a ch in e is in cid e n ta l to
p e r fo r m a n c e o f oth er d u tie s .

P r im a r y duty is to take d icta tio n fr o m one o r m o r e p e r s o n s ,
e ith e r in sh orth an d o r by Stenotype o r s im ila r m a ch in e , in v olv in g a
v a r ie d te c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u la r y su ch a s in le g a l b r ie fs o r
r e p o r t s on s c ie n t ific r e s e a r c h and to t r a n s c r ib e th is d icta tio n on a
t y p e w r ite r .
M ay a ls o type fr o m w ritten c o p y . M ay a ls o set up and
k eep f ile s in o r d e r , k eep s im p le r e c o r d s , e t c .
D oes not in clu d e
tr a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e w o r k .

T E C H N IC A L

D U P L IC A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R (M IM E O G R A P H OR D IT T O )
SW ITC H B O A R D O P E R A T O R
U nder g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n and w ith no s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n ­
s ib ilit ie s , r e p r o d u c e s m u ltip le c o p ie s o f ty p ew ritten o r h an dw ritten
m a tte r, using a M im e o g ra p h o r D itto m a ch in e . M ak es n e c e s s a r y a d ­
ju stm en t su ch as fo r ink and paper fe e d cou n ter and c y lin d e r sp e e d .
Is not r e q u ir e d to p r e p a r e s te n c il o r D itto m a s t e r . M ay k eep file o f
u sed s t e n c ils o r D itto m a s t e r s .
M ay s o r t, c o lla t e , and staple c o m ­
pleted m a te r ia l.




O p e ra te s a s in g le - o r m u lt ip le -p o s it io n telep h on e sw itch b o a rd .
D uties in v o lv e handling in c o m in g , ou tg oin g , and in trap lan t o r o ffic e
c a lls .
M ay r e c o r d to ll c a lls and take m e s s a g e s .
M ay g iv e in fo r ­
m a tion to p e r s o n s who c a ll in, o r o c c a s io n a lly take telep h on e o r d e r s .
F o r w o r k e r s who a ls o a c t as r e c e p t io n is t s se e s w itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r r e c e p t io n is t .

89
SW ITCH BO AR D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
tion
type
T h is
tim e

T R A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ,

In ad d ition to p e r fo r m in g du ties o f o p e r a t o r , on a sin g le p o s i ­
o r m o n it o r -t y p e sw itch b o a rd , a c ts a s r e c e p t io n is t and m a y a ls o
o r p e r fo r m rou tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k as p a rt o f r e g u la r d u tie s .
typing o r c l e r i c a l w o rk m a y take the m a jo r p a rt o f th is w o rk e r * s
w h ile at s w itch b o a rd .

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O p e ra te s m a ch in e that a u to m a tica lly a n a ly z e s and tr a n s la te s
in fo rm a tio n punch ed in g ro u p s o f tabu latin g c a r d s and p rin ts tr a n s ­
la te d data on f o r m s o r a cco u n tin g r e c o r d s ; sets o r a d ju sts m a ch in e ;
d o e s s im p le w irin g o f p lu g b o a rd s a c c o r d in g to e s ta b lis h e d p r a c t ic e
o r d ia g r a m s ; p la c e s c a r d s to be ta bu la ted in fe e d m a g a zin e and s ta r ts
m a ch in e . M ay file c a r d s a fte r they a r e ta b u la ted . M ay, in a d d itio n ,
o p e r a te a u x ilia r y m a c h in e s .
T R A N SC R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ,

in clu d e d . A w o r k e r w ho ta k es d icta tio n in sh orth an d o r by Stenotype
o r s im ila r m a ch in e is c la s s if i e d a s a ste n o g r a p h e r, g e n e r a l.
T Y P IS T
U ses a ty p e w rite r to m ake c o p ie s o f v a r io u s m a te r ia l o r to
m ake out b ills a fte r c a lc u la tio n s have b een m a de by an oth er p e r s o n .
M ay do c l e r i c a l w o rk in v olv in g lit tle s p e c ia l tra in in g , su ch a s k e e p ­
ing s im p le r e c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s o r s o rtin g and d is ­
trib u tin g in co m in g m a il.
C la s s A ----- P e r f o r m s one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g :
T yping
m a t e r ia l in fin a l fo r m fr o m v e r y rou g h and in v o lv e d d ra ft; c o p y ­
ing fr o m plain o r c o r r e c t e d co p y in w h ich th e r e is a freq u en t
and v a r ie d u se o f te c h n ic a l and unusual w o r d s o r fr o m fo r e ig n la n g u a ge c o p y ; co m b in in g m a te r ia l fr o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s , o r
planning la you t o f c o m p lic a te d s t a t is t ic a l ta b le s to m ain tain uni­
fo r m it y and b a la n ce in sp a cin g ; typing ta b le s fr o m rou g h d ra ft in
fin a l fo r m .
M ay type rou tin e fo r m le t t e r s , v a ry in g d e ta ils to
suit c ir c u m s t a n c e s .

GENERAL

P r im a r y duty is to tr a n s c r ib e d ic ta tio n in v o lv in g a n o r m a l
rou tin e v o c a b u la r y fr o m tr a n s c r ib in g m a ch in e r e c o r d s .
M ay a ls o
type fr o m w ritte n c o p y and do s im p le c l e r i c a l w o r k . W o r k e r s tr a n ­
s c r ib in g d icta tio n in v olv in g a v a r ie d te c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u ­
la r y su ch a s le g a l b r ie fs o r r e p o r t s on s c ie n t ific r e s e a r c h a r e not

Professional

DRAFTSM AN,

JUNIOR

(A s sis ta n t d ra fts m a n )
D ra w s to s c a le units o r p a rts o f d ra w in g s p r e p a r e d by d r a ft s ­
m an o r o th e r s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , o r m a n u fa ctu rin g p u r­
poses.
U ses v a r io u s ty p es o f d ra ftin g t o o ls as r e q u ir e d . M ay p r e ­
pa re d raw in gs fr o m sim p le plans o r s k e tc h e s , o r p e r fo r m oth er d u ties
under d ir e c tio n o f a d r a fts m a n .
DRAFTSM AN,

LEADER

P la n s and d ir e c t s a c t iv it ie s o f on e o r m o r e d r a fts m e n in
p rep a ra tion o f w ork in g plans and d eta il d ra w in g s fr o m rou g h o r p r e ­
lim in a r y sk e tch e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , o r m a n u fa ctu rin g
p u r p o s e s . D uties in v o lv e a co m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g : In terp retin g
b lu e p rin ts , sk e tch e s , and w ritten o r v e r b a l o r d e r s ; d e te rm in in g w o rk
p r o c e d u r e s ; a s sig n in g d u ties to su b o rd in a te s and in s p e c tin g th eir w o rk ;
p e r fo r m in g m o r e d iffic u lt p r o b le m s . M ay a s s i s t su b o r d in a te s during




G E N E R A L -----Continued

C la s s B ---- P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g :
T yping
fr o m r e la t iv e ly c le a r o r ty p ed d r a fts ; rou tin e typing o f fo r m s ,
in s u r a n c e p o lic ie s , e t c . , settin g up s im p le stan dard ta b u la tion s, o r
c o p y in g m o r e c o m p le x ta b le s a lr e a d y set up and sp a c e d p r o p e r ly .

and

Technical

DRAFTSM AN,

L E A D E R ------C on tinu ed

e m e r g e n c ie s o r as a r e g u la r a s sig n m e n t, o r p e r fo r m r e la t e d duties
o f a s u p e r v is o r y o r a d m in is tra tiv e n a tu re.
DRAFTSM AN,

SENIOR

P r e p a r e s w ork in g plans and d e ta il d ra w in gs fr o m n o te s,
rou g h o r d e ta ile d sk e tch e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , o r m anu­
fa ctu rin g p u r p o s e s .
D uties in v o lv e a c o m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g :
P r e p a r in g w ork in g p la n s, d e ta il d ra w in g s , m a p s, c r o s s - s e c t i o n s , e t c . ,
to s c a le by use o f draftin g in s tru m e n ts ; m akin g en g in eerin g com p u ta ­
tio n s su ch a s th o se in v o lv e d in stren g th o f m a t e r ia ls , b e a m s and
t r u s s e s ; v e r ify in g c o m p le t e d w o rk , ch eck in g d im e n s io n s , m a te r ia ls
to be u s e d , and q u a n tities; w ritin g s p e c ific a t io n s ; m aking a d ju stm en ts
o r ch a n g e s in d ra w in g s o r s p e c ific a t io n s . M ay ink in lin e s and le t te r s
on p e n c il d ra w in g s , p r e p a r e d e ta il units o f c o m p le te d ra w in g s , o r
tr a c e d r a w in g s .
W ork is fr e q u e n tly in a s p e c ia liz e d fie ld su ch as
a r c h it e c t u r a l, e l e c t r ic a l, m e c h a n ic a l, or s tru c tu ra l d ra ftin g .

90
NURSE,

N U RSE,

IN D U STR IA L (R E G IS T E R E D )

A r e g is t e r e d n u r s e w ho g iv e s n u rsin g s e r v ic e to i l l o r ' in ju re d
e m p lo y e e s o r oth er p e r s o n s who b e c o m e i l l o r s u ffe r an a c c id e n t on
the p r e m is e s o f a fa c t o r y o r o th e r e s ta b lis h m e n t.
D u ties in v o lv e a
c o m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g : G iving f ir s t aid to the ill o r in ju re d ;
attending to su bsequ en t d r e s s in g o f e m p lo y e e s * in ju r ie s ; k eep in g r e c o r d s
o f patien ts tr e a te d ; p r e p a r in g a c c id e n t r e p o r t s fo r c o m p e n s a tio n o r
oth er p u r p o s e s ; con d u ctin g p h y s ic a l ex a m in a tion s and h ealth e v a lu a tion s
o f a p p lica n ts and e m p lo y e e s ; and planning and c a r r y in g out p r o g r a m s
in v olv in g health ed u ca tion , a c c id e n t p r e v e n tio n , e v a lu a tion o f plant

Maintenance

CARPENTER,

M A IN TE N A N C E

P e r fo r m s the c a r p e n tr y d u ties n e c e s s a r y to c o n s tr u c t and
m a in tain in g o o d r e p a ir b u ildin g w o o d w o r k and equ ip m en t su ch as bin s,
c r ib s , c o u n te r s , b e n c h e s , p a rtitio n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a ir s , c a s in g s ,
and t r im m a d e o f w ood in an e s ta b lis h m e n t. W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f
the fo llo w in g : P lann in g and la y in g out o f w o r k fr o m b lu e p r in ts , d ra w in g s , m o d e ls , o r v e r b a l in s t r u c t io n s ; u sin g a v a r ie ty o f c a r p e n te r* s
h a n d tools, p o rta b le p ow er t o o ls , and sta n d a rd m e a s u rin g in stru m e n ts ;
m akin g stan dard sh op co m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g to d im e n s io n s o f w o rk ;
s e le c tin g m a te r ia ls n e c e s s a r y fo r the w o r k . In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f
the m a in ten a n ce c a r p e n te r r e q u ir e s rou n d ed train in g and e x p e r ie n c e
u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p re n tice s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tr a in ­
ing and e x p e r ie n c e .

E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s a v a r ie ty o f e le c t r ic a l tra d e fu n ctio n s su ch a s the
in sta lla tio n , m a in ten a n ce, o r r e p a ir o f equ ip m en t fo r the g en e ra tin g ,
d is tr ib u tio n , o r u tiliz a tio n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an e s ta b lis h m e n t.
W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : In sta llin g o r r e p a ir in g any o f
a v a r ie ty o f e le c t r ic a l eq u ipm en t su ch a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s fo r m e r s ,
s w itch b o a rd s , c o n t r o ll e r s , c ir c u it b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h eatin g units,
con d u it s y s t e m s , o r oth er tr a n s m is s io n equ ipm en t; w ork in g fr o m b lu e ­
p r in ts, d ra w in g s, la y ou t, o r oth er s p e c ific a t io n s ; lo c a tin g and d ia g ­
n osin g tr o u b le in the e le c t r ic a l s y s t e m o r equ ip m en t; w ork in g stan dard
com p u ta tion s r e la tin g to lo a d r e q u ir e m e n ts o f w irin g o r e le c t r ic a l
equ ipm en t; usin g a v a r ie t y o f e le c tr ic ia n * s h a n d tools and m e a su rin g
and testin g in s tr u m e n ts .
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f the m a in ten an ce
e le c t r ic ia n r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c ­
q u ir e d th rough a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and
e x p e r ie n c e .




IN D U STR IA L (R E G IS T E R E D )----- C ontinued

e n v ir o n m e n t, o r oth er a c tiv it ie s
sa fe ty o f a ll p e r s o n n e l.

a ffe c tin g

the h ealth,

w e lfa r e ,

and

TRACER
C o p ie s plans and d ra w in gs p r e p a r e d by o th e r s , by pla cin g
tr a c in g c lo th o r paper o v e r draw in g and tr a c in g w ith pen or p e n cil.
U s e s T - s q u a r e , c o m p a s s , and oth er d ra ftin g t o o l s .
M ay p r e p a r e
s im p le d ra w in g s and do s im p le le t te r in g .

and

Powerplant

E N G IN E E R ,

S T A T IO N A R Y

O p e ra te s and m ain tain s and m a y a ls o s u p e r v is e the o p e r a tio n
o f s ta tio n a ry e n g in es and eq u ipm en t (m e c h a n ica l o r e le c t r ic a l) to su p ­
ply the e s ta b lis h m e n t in w h ich e m p lo y e d w ith p o w e r, h eat, r e f r i g e r a ­
tion , o r a ir -c o n d it io n in g .
W ork in v o lv e s : O pera tin g and m ain taining
eq u ip m en t su ch a s ste a m e n g in e s, a ir c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o ­
t o r s , tu r b in e s , v en tila tin g and r e fr ig e r a t in g equ ipm en t, stea m b o ile r s
and b o i l e r - f e d w a ter pu m ps; m aking eq u ipm en t r e p a ir s ; keepin g a
r e c o r d o f o p e r a tio n o f m a c h in e r y , te m p e ra tu re , and fu el c o n s u m p ­
tion . M ay a ls o s u p e r v is e th ese o p e r a t io n s . H ead o r c h ie f e n g in e e r s
in e s ta b lis h m e n ts em p loy in g m o r e than one en g in eer a r e e x c lu d e d .
F IR E M A N ,

S T A T IO N A R Y B O IL E R

F ir e s sta tio n a ry b o ile r s to fu rn ish the e s ta b lis h m e n t in w hich
e m p lo y e d w ith heat, p o w e r, o r s te a m .
F e e d s fu e ls to f ir e by hand
o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n ic a l s to k e r , g a s , o r o il b u r n e r ; c h e c k s w ater
and s a fe ty v a lv e s .
M ay cle a n , o il, o r a s s is t in r e p a ir in g b o i le r r o o m eq u ip m en t.
H ELPER,

TR A D E S,

M A IN TE N A N C E

A s s is t s one o r m o r e w o r k e r s in the s k ille d m a in ten an ce
tr a d e s , b y p e r fo r m in g s p e c ific o r g e n e r a l du ties o f le s s e r s k ill, such
as k eep in g a w o r k e r su p p lied w ith m a te r ia ls and to o ls ; clea n in g w o r k ­
ing a r e a , m a ch in e , and equ ipm en t; a s s is tin g w o rk e r by h oldin g m a ­
t e r ia ls o r t o o ls ; p e r fo r m in g oth er u n s k ille d ta sk s as d ir e c te d by jo u r ­
n eym a n . The kind o f w o rk the h e lp e r is p e r m itte d to p e r fo r m v a r ie s
fr o m tr a d e to tra d e :
In s o m e tr a d e s the h e lp e r is co n fin e d to su p ­
p ly in g , lift in g , and h oldin g m a te r ia ls and to o ls and clea n in g w ork in g
a r e a s ; an d in o th e r s he is p e r m itte d to p e r fo r m s p e c ia liz e d m a ch in e
o p e r a t io n s , o r p a rts o f a trad e that a r e a ls o p e r fo r m e d by w o r k e r s
on a fu ll- t i m e b a s i s .

91
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R ,

TO O LR O O M

S p e c ia liz e s in the o p e r a tio n o f one o r m o r e ty p es o f m a ch in e
to o ls , su ch as jig b o r e r s , c y lin d r ic a l o r s u r fa c e g r in d e r s , en gin e
la th es, o r m illin g m a ch in e s in the c o n s tr u c tio n o f m a c h in e -s h o p to o ls ,
g a u ges, ji g s , fix tu r e s , o r d ie s . W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g :
Plann in g and p e r fo r m in g d iffic u lt m a ch in in g o p e r a t io n s ; p r o c e s s in g
ite m s r e q u irin g c o m p lic a te d setup s o r a high d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ;
using a v a r ie ty o f p r e c is io n m e a su rin g in stru m e n ts ; s e le c t in g fe e d s ,
sp e e d s , to o lin g and o p e r a tio n se q u e n ce ; m akin g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t­
m en ts du ring o p e r a tio n to a c h ie v e r e q u is ite t o le r a n c e s o r d im e n s io n s .
M ay be r e q u ir e d to r e c o g n iz e w hen to o ls n eed d r e s s in g , to d r e s s to o ls ,
and to s e le c t p r o p e r c o o la n ts and cutting and lu b r ic a tin g o i l s .
F or
c r o s s -in d u s t r y w age study p u r p o s e s , m a c h in e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o lr o o m ,
in to o l and die job b in g sh op s a r e e x clu d e d fr o m th is c la s s ific a t io n .

M ACHIN IST,

M E C H A N IC ,

M A IN TE N A N C E

R e p a ir s m a c h in e r y o r m e c h a n ic a l eq u ipm en t o f an e s t a b lis h ­
m e n t.
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : E xam in ing m a ch in e s
an d m e c h a n ic a l equ ip m en t to d ia g n o se s o u r c e o f tr o u b le ; d ism a n tlin g
o r p a rtly d ism a n tlin g m a ch in e s and p e r fo r m in g r e p a ir s that m a in ly
in v o lv e the u se o f h a n d tools in s c r a p in g and fittin g p a rts ; r e p la c in g
b r o k e n o r d e fe c tiv e p a rts w ith it e m s ob ta in ed fr o m s to ck ; o r d e r in g the
p r o d u c tio n o f a r e p la c e m e n t p a rt by a m a ch in e shop o r sending o f
the m a ch in e to a m a ch in e sh op fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s ; p r e p a r in g w ritten
s p e c ific a t io n s fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s o r fo r the p r o d u c tio n o f p a rts o r d e r e d
f r o m m a ch in e sh op ; r e a s s e m b lin g m a c h in e s ; and m akin g a ll n e c e s s a r y
a d ju stm e n ts fo r o p e r a tio n .
In g e n e r a l, the w o rk o f a m a in ten a n ce
m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d
th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p re n tice s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
E x clu d e d fr o m th is c la s s ific a t io n a r e w o r k e r s w h ose p r im a r y d u ties
in v o lv e settin g up o r ad ju stin g m a c h in e s .

M A IN TE N A N C E
M IL L W R IG H T

P r o d u c e s r e p la c e m e n t p a rts and new p a rts in m akin g r e p a ir s
o f m eta l p a rts o f m e c h a n ica l eq u ipm en t o p e r a te d in an e s ta b lis h m e n t.
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : In terp retin g w ritte n in s t r u c ­
tion s and s p e c ific a t io n s ; planning and la y in g out o f w o rk ; using a v a ­
r ie ty o f m a c h in is t s h a n d tools and p r e c is io n m e a s u rin g in stru m e n ts ;
settin g up and o p e ra tin g stan d ard m a ch in e t o o ls ; shaping o f m e ta l
p a rts to c lo s e t o le r a n c e s ; m akin g stan dard shop co m p u ta tio n s r e la t ­
ing to d im e n s io n s o f w ork , to o lin g , fe e d s and s p e e d s o f m a ch in in g ;
kn ow led ge o f the w ork in g p r o p e r t ie s o f the c o m m o n m e t a ls ; s e le c tin g
stan dard m a t e r ia ls , p a rts, and equ ipm en t r e q u ir e d fo r h is w o rk ; fittin g
and a s s e m b lin g p a rts into m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m en t.
In g e n e r a l, the
m a c h in is t s w o rk n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s a rou n d ed tra in in g in m a c h in e shop p r a c tic e u su ally a c q u ir e d th rough a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r
equ ivalen t train in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

In sta lls new m a ch in e s o r h ea v y equ ip m en t and d is m a n tle s and
in s t a lls m a ch in e s o r h eav y equ ip m en t w hen ch a n g es in the plant la y ­
ou t a r e r e q u ir e d . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : P lan n in g and
la y in g out o f the w o rk ; in te r p r e tin g b lu e p r in ts o r o th e r s p e c ific a t io n s ;
u sin g a v a r ie ty o f h a n d tools and r ig g in g ; m akin g sta n d a rd shop c o m ­
p u ta tion s r e la tin g to s t r e s s e s , stren g th o f m a t e r ia ls , and c e n t e r s o f
g r a v it y ; alin in g and b a la n cin g o f equ ip m en t; s e le c tin g stan dard t o o ls ,
eq u ip m en t, and p a rts to be u sed ; in sta llin g and m a in tain in g in g o o d
o r d e r p ow er t r a n s m is s io n equ ip m en t su ch a s d r iv e s and sp e e d r e ­
d u c e r s . In g e n e r a l, the m illw r ig h t’ s w o rk n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s a rou n ded
tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e in the tra d e a c q u ir e d th rough a fo r m a l a p p re n ­
tic e s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
O IL E R

M ECH ANIC,

A U T O M O T IV E (M A IN T E N A N C E )

R e p a ir s a u to m o b ile s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , and t r a c t o r s o f
an e s ta b lis h m e n t.
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : E xam in in g
a u tom otiv e eq u ipm en t to d ia g n o se s o u r c e o f tr o u b le ; d is a s s e m b lin g
equ ipm en t and p e r fo r m in g r e p a ir s that in v o lv e the u se o f su ch h an dto o ls as w r e n c h e s , g a u g es, d r ills , o r s p e c ia liz e d eq u ipm en t in d i s ­
a s s e m b lin g o r fittin g p a rts; r e p la c in g b r o k e n o r d e fe c tiv e p a rts fr o m
sto ck ; g rin d in g and a d ju stin g v a lv e s ; r e a s s e m b lin g and in sta llin g the
v a r io u s a s s e m b lie s in the v e h ic le and m akin g n e c e s s a r y a d ju stm e n ts;
alin in g w h e e ls , ad ju stin g b r a k e s and lig h ts , o r tigh ten in g b od y b o lt s .
In g e n e r a l, the w o rk o f the a u tom otiv e m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s rou n d ed
train in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su ally a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e ­
ship o r eq u iv a len t train in g and e x p e r ie n c e .




L u b r ic a te s , w ith o il o r g r e a s e , the m ov in g p a rts o r w ea rin g
s u r fa c e s o f m e c h a n ic a l equ ip m en t o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t.
P A IN T E R ,

M A IN TE N A N C E

P a in ts and r e d e c o r a t e s w a lls , w o o d w o rk , and fix tu r e s o f an
e s t a b lis h m e n t.
W ork in v o lv e s the fo llo w in g : K n ow ledge o f s u r fa c e
p e c u lia r it ie s and ty p es o f paint r e q u ir e d lo r d iffe r e n t a p p lic a tio n s ;
p r e p a r in g s u r fa c e fo r painting by r e m o v in g o ld fin is h o r by pla cin g
putty o r f ill e r in n a il h o le s and in t e r s t ic e s ; ap plyin g paint w ith sp ra y
gun o r b r u s h .
M ay m ix c o l o r s , o ils , w hite le a d , and oth er paint
in g r e d ie n ts to ob ta in p r o p e r c o lo r
o r c o n s is t e n c y .
In g e n e r a l, the
w o r k o f the m a in ten a n ce p a in ter r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x ­
p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p re n tice s h ip o r e q u iv a ­
le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

92
P IP E F IT T E R ,

S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

M A IN TE N A N C E

In sta lls o r r e p a ir s w a te r , stea m , g a s , o r oth er ty p es o f pipe
and p ip e fittin g s in an e s ta b lis h m e n t. W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the f o l ­
lo w in g : L ay in g out o f w o rk and m e a s u rin g to lo c a t e p o s itio n o f pipe
f r o m d ra w in g s o r oth er w ritte n s p e c ific a t io n s ; cuttin g v a r io u s s iz e s
o f pipe to c o r r e c t len gth s w ith c h is e l and h a m m e r o r o x y a ce ty le n e
t o r c h o r p ip e -c u ttin g m a ch in e ; th read in g pipe w ith s to c k s and d ie s ;
bending pipe by h a n d -d riv e n o r p o w e r -d r iv e n m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b lin g
pipe w ith co u p lin g s and fasten in g pipe to h a n g e r s; m akin g stan dard
sh op com p u ta tion s re la tin g to p r e s s u r e s , flo w , and s iz e o f pipe r e ­
q u ir e d ; m akin g stan dard te s ts to d e te rm in e w h eth er fin is h e d p ip es m e e t
s p e c ific a t io n s .
In g e n e r a l, the w o rk o f the m a in ten a n ce p ip e fitte r
r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a
fo r m a l a p p re n tice s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e . W o r k e r s
p r im a r ily en ga ged in in sta llin g and r e p a ir in g bu ildin g sa n ita tion or
heating s y s te m s a r e e x c lu d e d .
PLUM BER,

M A IN TE N A N C E

K eep s the plum bing s y s te m o f an e sta b lis h m e n t in g o o d o r d e r .
W ork in v o lv e s : K n ow ledge o f sa n ita ry c o d e s r e g a r d in g in sta lla tio n o f
ven ts and tra p s in plu m bin g s y s te m ; in sta llin g o r r e p a ir in g p ip es and
fix tu r e s ; open in g c lo g g e d d ra in s w ith a p lu n ger o r p lu m b er*s sn ak e.
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f the m a in ten a n ce p lu m b er r e q u ir e s rou n ded
tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e ­
ship o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

M A IN TE N A N C E

F a b r ic a t e s , in s t a lls , and m a in tain s in g o o d r e p a ir the s h e e tm e ta l equ ipm en t and fix tu r e s (su ch a s m a ch in e g u a rd s , g r e a s e pans,
s h e lv e s , l o c k e r s , tanks, v e n t ila t o r s , ch u te s , d u cts, m e ta l r o o fin g )
o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t. W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : P lann in g

Custodial

ELEVATOR OPERATOR,

and

T r a n s p o r ts p a s s e n g e r s b etw een f l o o r s o f an o f f ic e b u ild in g ,
ap a rtm en t h o u s e , d ep a rtm en t s t o r e , h o te l o r s im ila r e s ta b lis h m e n t.
W o r k e r s w ho o p e r a te e le v a t o r s in c o n ju n ctio n w ith oth er d u ties su ch
as th o se o f s t a r te r s and ja n ito r s a r e e x c lu d e d .
G UARD
P e r f o r m s rou tin e p o lic e d u ties, e ith e r at fix e d p o s t o r on
tou r, m a in tain in g o r d e r , using a r m s o r f o r c e w h e re n e c e s s a r y . In e lu d e s g a tem en w ho a r e sta tion ed at gate and c h e c k on id en tity o f
e m p lo y e e s and oth er p e r s o n s e n te r in g .




and la yin g out a ll ty p es o f s h e e t-m e ta l m a in ten a n ce w o r k fr o m b lu e ­
p r in ts , m o d e ls , o r oth er s p e c ific a t io n s ; settin g up and o p e ra tin g a ll
a v a ila b le ty p es o f s h e e t-m e ta l-w o r k in g m a c h in e s ; using a v a r ie ty o f
h a n d to o ls in cu ttin g, ben d in g , fo r m in g , sh aping, fittin g , and a s s e m ­
b lin g ; in sta llin g s h e e t-m e ta l a r t i c le s as r e q u ir e d .
In g e n e r a l, the
w o r k o f the m a in ten a n ce s h e e t-m e ta l w o r k e r r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g
an d e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p re n tice s h ip o r
eq u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e
T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R
(D ie m a k e r; jig

m a k e r ; to o l m a k e r ;

fix tu r e

m a k e r ; gau ge

m a k e r)

C o n s tru c ts and r e p a ir s m a c h in e -s h o p t o o ls , g a u g e s , ji g s , f i x ­
tu r e s o r d ie s fo r fo r g in g s , punching and oth er m e t a l-fo r m in g w o r k .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : P la n n in g and la yin g out o f w o rk
f r o m m o d e ls , b lu e p r in ts , d r a w in g s , o r o th e r o r a l and w ritte n s p e c i f i ­
c a tio n s ; u sing a v a r ie ty o f t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's h a n d tools and p r e c is io n
m e a s u r in g in s tru m e n ts , u n d erstan din g o f the w ork in g p r o p e r t ie s o f
c o m m o n m e ta ls and a llo y s ; settin g up and o p e r a tin g o f m a ch in e to o ls
and r e la t e d equ ip m en t; m akin g n e c e s s a r y sh op com p u ta tion s re la tin g
to d im e n s io n s o f w o rk , s p e e d s , fe e d s , and to o lin g o f m a c h in e s ; h e a ttr e a tin g o f m e ta l p a rts du rin g fa b r ic a tio n a s w e ll a s o f fin is h e d to o ls
an d d ie s to a c h ie v e r e q u ir e d q u a litie s ; w ork in g to c l o s e t o le r a n c e s ;
fittin g and a s s e m b lin g o f p a rts to p r e s c r i b e d t o le r a n c e s and a llo w ­
a n c e s ; s e le c tin g a p p r o p r ia te m a t e r ia ls , t o o ls , and p r o c e s s e s .
In
g e n e r a l, the to o l and d ie m a k e r 's w o r k r e q u ir e s a rou n d ed train in g
in m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o lr o o m p r a c t ic e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a
fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - in d u s t r y w age study p u r p o s e s , to o l and d ie m a k e r s
in to o l and d ie jo b b in g sh op s a r e e x c lu d e d fr o m th is c la s s ifi c a t io n .

Material

PASSE N G E R

M A IN T E N A N C E -----C on tinu ed

Movement

J A N IT O R ,

PORTER,

OR C L E A N E R

(S w e e p e r; ch a rw om a n ; ja n it r e s s )
C lea n s and k e e p s in an o r d e r l y co n d itio n fa c t o r y w ork in g
a r e a s and w a s h r o o m s , o r p r e m is e s o f an o f f ic e , a p a rtm en t h ou se,
o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o th e r e s ta b lis h m e n t. D u ties in v o lv e a co m b in a tio n
o f the fo llo w in g : S w eepin g, m op p in g o r sc r u b b in g , and p olish in g f l o o r s ;
r e m o v in g c h ip s , tr a s h , and oth er r e fu s e ; du sting equ ip m en t, fu rn itu re ,
o r fix tu r e s ; p o lish in g m e ta l fix tu r e s o r tr im m in g s ; p ro v id in g su p p lie s
an d m in o r m a in ten a n ce s e r v ic e s ; cle a n in g la v a t o r ie s , s h o w e r s , and
r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w ho s p e c ia liz e in w in dow w ashin g a r e e x clu d e d .

93
LABORER,

M A T E R IA L HANDLING

(L o a d e r and u n loa d er; h an dler and s t a c k e r ; s h e lv e r ; tr u c k e r ;
stock m a n o r s to c k h e lp e r ; w a reh ou sem a n o r w a re h o u se h e lp e r )

SH IPPIN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K -----C on tinu ed
o th e r r e c o r d s ; ch eck in g fo r sh o r ta g e s and r e je c t in g da m ag ed g o o d s ;
rou tin g m e r c h a n d is e o r m a te r ia ls to p r o p e r d e p a rtm e n ts; m ain taining
n e c e s s a r y r e c o r d s and f i l e s .

A w o rk e r e m p lo y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u factu rin g plant,
s t o r e , o r oth er e sta b lis h m e n t w h ose du ties in v o lv e one or m o r e o f
the fo llo w in g : L oad ing and unloading v a r io u s m a te r ia ls and m e r c h a n ­
d is e on or fr o m fr e ig h t c a r s , tr u ck s , o r oth er tr a n sp o rtin g d e v ic e s ;
unpacking, sh elv in g, o r p la cin g m a te r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e in p r o p e r
s to ra g e lo c a tio n ; tra n sp o rtin g m a te r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e by h an dtruck,
c a r , or w h e e lb a r r o w . L o n g s h o r e m e n , who lo a d and u nload sh ip s a r e
e x clu d e d .

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c la s s if i e d a s fo llo w s :
R e c e iv in g c le r k
Shipping c le r k
Shipping and r e c e iv in g c le r k
T R U C K D R IV E R

O RD ER F IL L E R
(O rd er p ic k e r ; s to ck s e le c t o r ; w a re h o u se stock m a n )
F ills shipping o r tr a n s fe r o r d e r s fo r fin is h e d g o o d s fr o m
s to r e d m e r c h a n d is e in a c c o r d a n c e with s p e c ific a tio n s on s a le s s lip s ,
c u s t o m e r s 1 o r d e r s , o r oth er in s t r u c t io n s . M ay, in a d d ition to fillin g
o r d e r s and in d ica tin g ite m s fille d o r o m itte d , k eep r e c o r d s o f ou t­
goin g o r d e r s , r e q u is itio n a d d ition a l sto ck , o r r e p o r t sh ort su p p lies
to s u p e r v is o r , and p e r fo r m oth er r e la te d d u tie s .
PACKER,

D r iv e s a tr u ck w ith in a c ity o r in d u str ia l a r e a to tr a n s p o rt
m a t e r ia ls , m e r c h a n d is e , equ ip m en t, o r m en b etw een v a r io u s ty p es o f
e s ta b lis h m e n ts su ch a s : M an u factu rin g pla n ts, fr e ig h t d e p o ts, w a r e ­
h o u s e s , w h o le s a le and r e ta il e s ta b lis h m e n ts , o r b etw een r e t a il e s t a b ­
lis h m e n ts and c u s t o m e r s ’ h o u s e s o r p la c e s o f b u s in e s s .
M ay a ls o
lo a d o r u n loa d tr u ck w ith o r w ithout h e lp e r s , m ake m in o r m e c h a n ica l
r e p a ir s , and keep tr u ck in g o o d w ork in g o r d e r . D r iv e r -s a l e s m e n and
o v e r - t h e - r o a d d r iv e r s a r e e x c lu d e d .
F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , t r u c k d r iv e r s a r e c la s s if i e d by s iz e
and type o f equ ipm en t, as fo llo w s :
( T r a c t o r -t r a i l e r sh ou ld be ra te d
on the b a s is o f t r a ile r c a p a c it y .)

SHIPPING

P r e p a r e s fin ish e d p ro d u cts fo r sh ipm en t o r s to ra g e by p la cin g
th em in shipping c o n ta in e r s , the s p e c ific o p e r a tio n s p e r fo r m e d being
dependent upon the type, s iz e , and n u m ber o f units to be pa ck ed , the
type o f co n ta in e r e m p lo y e d , and m eth od o f sh ip m en t. W ork r e q u ir e s
the p la cin g o f ite m s in shipping c o n ta in e rs and m a y in v o lv e one or
m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : K now ledge o f v a r io u s ite m s o f s to c k in o r d e r
to v e r ify con ten t; s e le c t io n o f a p p ro p r ia te type and s iz e o f c o n ta in e r;
in se r tin g e n c lo s u r e s in c o n ta in e r; using e x c e ls io r o r oth er m a te r ia l to
p reven t b rea k a g e o r d a m ag e; c lo s in g and sea lin g c o n ta in e r; applying
la b e ls o r en terin g id en tifyin g data on c o n ta in e r.
P a c k e r s w ho a ls o
m ake w ood en b o x e s o r c r a te s a r e e x clu d e d .

T r u c k d r iv e r (co m b in a tio n o f s iz e s lis te d s e p a r a te ly )
T r u c k d r iv e r , ligh t (under IV 2 ton¥)
T r u c k d r iv e r , m ed iu m ( 1 V2 to and in clu d in g 4 ton s)
T r u c k d r iv e r , h eav y (o v e r 4 ton s, t r a ile r type^)

Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRUCKER,

O p e ra te s a m a n u ally c o n t r o lle d g a s o lin e - o r e le c t r ic - p o w e r e d
tru ck o r tr a c to r to tr a n s p o r t g o o d s and m a te r ia ls o f a ll kinds about
a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa ctu rin g plant, o r oth er e s ta b lis h m e n t.

SHIPPING AN D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K
tru ck ,
P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d is e fo r sh ipm en t, o r r e c e iv e s and is r e ­
s p o n s ib le fo r in co m in g sh ipm ents o f m e r c h a n d is e o r oth er m a t e r ia ls .
Shipping w o rk in v o lv e s ; A kn ow led ge o f shipping p r o c e d u r e s , p r a c ­
t ic e s , r o u te s , a v a ila b le m ea n s o f tr a n sp o rta tio n and r a t e s ; and p r e ­
pa rin g r e c o r d s o f the g o o d s sh ipped, m akin g up b ills o f la din g, p o s t ­
ing w eigh t and shipping c h a r g e s , and keepin g a file o f shipping r e c o r d s .
M ay d ir e c t o r a s s is t in p rep a rin g the m e r c h a n d is e fo r sh ip m en t.
R e c e iv in g w o rk in v o lv e s : V e r ify in g o r d ir e c tin g others in v e r ify in g
the c o r r e c t n e s s o f sh ipm en ts ag a in st bills* o f la d in g, in v o ic e s , or




PO W E R

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c la s s ifi e d by type o f
a s fo llo w s :
T ru ck er,
T ru ck er,

pow er (fo r k lift)
p ow er (oth er than fo r k lift)

W ATCHMAN
M akes rou n d s o f p r e m is e s p e r io d ic a lly in p r o te c tin g p r o p e r ty
a g a in st f i r e , th eft, and ille g a l e n tr y .

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1959 0 -532503




Occupational Wage Survey
la s t o f th is

c a te g o r ie s :

m a in te n a n c e

and

in fo r m a tio n

O ffic e

p o w e r p la n t ,

on

c le r ic a l,
and

s tu d ie s

1 9 5 8 -5 9 .
about

The

60

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by

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and

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fin a n c e , tra d e ,

A ls o p re se n te d

averages

and

d is tr ib u tio n s

in fo r m a tio n

and

s c h e d u le d
m um

S t. L o u is ,

w e e k ly

h ou rs;

in c lu d in g

are

d a ta

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ra tes

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fo r a l l a r e a s e x c e p t A t la n t a , D e n v e r , M e m p h is ,

T he
are

p r o v id e d

s e r v ic e s .

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P o r tla n d ,

is

o f w ork ­

fo r p a id
in s u r a n c e ,

o ffic e

su rvey

C ity , N e w

h o lid a y s ;
and

p a id

p e n s io n

O rle a n s ,

v a c a tio n s ;

p la n s ; m in i­

w ork ers; and

s h ift d iffe r e n t ia ls .

d a te , b u lle tin

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by

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Z o n e _______________S t a t e

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p r o v id e

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S tr e e t, N E ., A tla n ta

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w ere

P e a ch tre e

in d iv id u a l

and

1371

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10, M ass.

con d u cted

21

Y ork

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A v en u e, N ew

th e

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r e le a s e d

341

has

s u r v e y s fo r m a jo r la b o r m a r k e t s . T h e

B oston

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—
(D

C e n ts

A tla n ta

-------------------------------------------------

A p r il 1 9 5 9

1 2 4 0 -1 9

B a l t i m o r e --------------------------------------------

A u gu st

1 2 4 0 -2

25

B oston

O ctob er

T3
G
O
S

20

1958
1958

B u f f a l o -------------------------------------------------

S ep tem b er

C h ic a g o

______________________________

1958

1 2 4 0 -6

25

-Q
6
G
G

25

1 2 4 0 -3

A p r il 1 9 5 9

1 2 4 0 -1 8

25

D a lla s

-------------------------------------------------

O ctob er

1 2 4 0 -5

25

D enver

-----------------------------

D ecem ber 1958

1 2 4 0 -7

20

D e tr o it

-------------------------------------------------

or

-------------------------------------------------

B ea ch —

1959

25

1 2 4 0 -2 1

25

1 2 4 0 -1 5

25

1 2 4 0 -1 0

20

M e m p h i s ----------------------------------------------

Jan u ary

M ilw a u k e e

A p r il 1 9 5 9

1 2 4 0 -1 6

20

Jan u ary

1 2 4 0 -1 1

20

1 2 4 0 -9

20

1 2 4 0 -1 4

20

-----------------------------------------

M in n e a p o lis -S t .
N e w a rk -J e rs e y

P a u l ---------------C ity

--------------

N ew

O r l e a n s -------------------------------------

N ew

Y ork

C i t y -------------------------------

1959

1959

D ecem ber
F eb ru a ry

1958
1959

A p r il 1 9 5 9

1 2 4 0 -1 7

25

1 2 4 0 -8

30

A p r il 1 9 5 9

1 2 4 0 -2 0

20

Jan u ary

1 2 4 0 -1 3

25

P h i l a d e l p h i a ------------------------------------

N ovem ber

P o r tla n d
San

(O r e g .)

---------------------------

F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d -----------

S t. L o u is
S e a ttle

-----------------------------------------

----------------------------- -------------------




O ctob er
A u gu st

1958

1959
1958
1958

1 2 4 0 -4

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