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Wage Chronology: International
Paper Co., Multiple Mill Group, and
the Paperworkers and the Electrical
Workers (IBEW), 1937-79
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1979

Wage Chronology: International
Paper Co., Multiple Mill Group, and
the Paperworkers and the Electrical
Workers (IBEW) 1937-79
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
September 1979

Bulletin 2023

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402
Stock No. 029-001-02393-6

Preface

This wage chronology prepared by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics is one of a series that traces changes in
wage rates and related benefits negotiated by in­
dividual employers or combinations of employers with
a union or group of unions. Benefits unilaterally in­
troduced by an employer generally are included. The
information is obtained largely from collective bargain-'
ing agreements and related documents voluntarily filed
with the Bureau. Descriptions of the course of collec­
tive bargaining are derived from the news media and
confirmed and supplemented by the parties to the
agreement. Wage chronologies deal only with selected
features of collective bargaining or wage determina­
tion. They are intended primarily as a tool for research,
analysis, and wage administration. References to job
security, grievance procedures, methods of piece-rate
adjustment, and similar matters are omitted.
This wage chronology summarizes changes in wage
rates and related benefits negotiated by the Interna­
tional Paper Co., Multiple Mill Group, with the United
Paperworkers International Union (UPIU) and the In­
ternational Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)
from June 1937 to May 1979. This bulletin replaces
Wage Chronology: International Paper Co., Southern
Kraft Division, December 1937-May 1973, BLS
Bulletin 1788, and incorporates the supplement cover­
ing the June 1973-May 1977 period. Materials pre­

viously published have been supplemented in this
bulletin by data on contract changes negotiated for the
1977-79 period. If still in print, copies of Bulletin 1788,
are for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402,
or by the regional offices of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics listed on the inside back cover. All chronology
publications may be available for reference in leading
public, college, and university libraries and in the
Bureau’s regional offices.
The Bureau has introduced new job titles to elimi­
nate those that denote sex stereotypes. For purposes of
this chronology, however, old titles have been retained
where they refer specifically to contractual definitions.
Titles used in the generic sense and not to describe a
contract term have been changed to eliminate the sex
stereotype.
Material in this publication is in the public domain
and may be reproduced without permission of the
Federal Government. Please credit the Bureau of
Labor Statistics and cite Wage Chronology: Interna­
tional Paper Company, Multiple Mill Group, and the
Paperworkers (UPIU) and the Electrical Workers
(IBEW) 1937-79, BLS Bulletin 2023.
The analysis for the 1973-79 period was prepared in
the Division of Trends in Employee Compensation by
Milfred W. Ellis.

iii

Contents

Page
Introduction.........................................................................................................................................................

1

Summary of contract negotiations:
December 1937-May 1965 ..........................................................................................................................
June 1965-May1967 .....................................................................................................................................
June 1967-May1970 .....................................................................................................................................
June 1970-May1973 .....................................................................................................................................
June 1973-May1977 .....................................................................................................................................
June 1977-May1979 .....................................................................................................................................

4
4
5
6
6
7

Tables:
1. General wage changes...........................................................................................................................
2a. Beginners’ hourly wage rates,1937-65 ..................................................................................................
2b. Beginners’ hourly wage rates,1966-78 ..................................................................................................
3. Supplementary compensationpractices..................................................................................................
Shift premium pay..................................................................................................................................
Premium pay for Sunday work.............................................................................................................
Overtime p a y ..........................................................................................................................................
Holiday p a y ............................................................................................................................................
Paid vacations........................................................................................................................................
Call-in p a y ..............................................................................................................................................
Reporting pay..........................................................................................................................................
Paid rest periods....................................................................................................................................
Paid sick leave........................................................................................................................................
Jury duty p a y ..........................................................................................................................................
Severance p a y ........................................................................................................................................
Funeral leave..........................................................................................................................................
Mealtime p a y ..........................................................................................................................................
Wire and clothing time pay..................................................................................................................
Insurance p la n s......................................................................................................................................
Retirement plan......................................................................................................................................

9
12
12
13
13
13
13
14
15
16
16
17
17
17
17
17
18
18
19
22

Wage chronologies available.............................................................................................................................

29

v

Introduction

The International Paper Co. and its subsidiaries
make up the world’s largest papermaking organization.
In addition to its papermaking operations in the United
States and Canada, International Paper owns or leases
over 23 million acres of woodlands. The Multiple Mill
Group (the Southern Kraft Division until 1976) is the
firm’s largest.1
International Paper Co. was first incorporated in
New York in 1898. It was formed through a merger of
18 papermaking companies located in northern New
York, V erm ont, New H am pshire, M aine, and
Massachusetts. In 1928, the International Paper and
Power Co., which subsequently divested itself of its
utility properties, acquired the company. The present
organization was incorporated in New York on June
23, 1941 and on September 29, 1941 acquired the
assets of the International Paper and Power Co., in­
cluding over 99 percent of the stock of the latter’s subridiary, the old International Paper Co.
Operations in the South and in kraft paper were
started when the Bastrop Mill in Louisiana was
purchased in 1925. Subsequently, mills in the South
were built or bought in Camden, Ark. (1926), Bastrop,
La. (Louisiana Mill-1927), Moss Point, Miss. (1928),
Mobile, Ala. (1929), Panama City Fla. (1931),
Georgetown, S.C. (1937), Springhill, La. (1938),
Natchez, Miss. (1951), and Pine Bluff, Ark. (1958).2
As the number of mills in the Southern Kraft Divi­
sion increased to 10, production expanded from
unbleached linerboard into practically every grade of
paper and board. Today, in addition to bleached and
unbleached kraft paper and board, products include
newsprint, various groundwood printing grades, dis­
solving pulps, chemfibre, shipping containers, and gro­
cery and specialty bags.
Hourly rated employees of the International Paper
Co., Multiple Mill Group papermills are represented
by four international unions. Two—the United Papermakers International Union (UPIU) and the Interna­
tional Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)—
represent the vast majority of workers (about 93 per­
cent). They negotiate jointly with the company and are
the two unions summarized in this wage chronology.

Other hourly employees are represented by the Inter­
national Association of Machinists and Aerospace
Workers (I AM) and the United Association of Journey­
men and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting
Industry of the United States and Canada (PPF).3
The current UPIU resulted from the merger of the
former United Papermakers and Paperworkers (UPP)
and the former International Brotherhood of Pulp,
Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers (PSPMW) on August
9, 1972. Antecedents of the UPP can be traced to 1884,
when a group of Holyoke, Mass., papermachine ten­
ders organized a “social club.” This and other groups
that followed were located in the northeastern states,
then the center of the paper industry. A charter cover­
ing paper-machine tenders and beater engineers, the
aristocrats of the trade, was issued by the American
Federation of Labor in 1893 in the name of the United
B rotherhood of P aperm akers. Other paperm ill
workers’ dissatisfaction with the lack of representation
in matters that directly affected their livelihood caused
the AFL to issue a new charter in 1897. This charter
expanded the organization’s jurisdiction to all branches
of the paper-making industry.
A dual movement, founded by skilled papermachine tenders who were not in accord with the ex­
pansion in membership, amalgamated with the United
Brotherhood in 1902 to form the International Brother­
hood of Paper Makers. One year later, a group of
Laborers Protective Unions, affiliated directly with the
Federation and representing workers employed outside
the machine rooms, were transferred without their con­
sent to the International Brotherhood. This merger did
not adequately represent unskilled and semiskilled
workers, and, in 1906, these workers organized the
PSPMW outside of the Federation.
Intense rivalry hurt both unions, and in 1909 they
divided the jurisdiction of the paper industry.
Newsprint, bag, and hanging mill workers were ceded
to the Pulp Workers, as were all workers not connected
with any other international union. To eliminate possi­
ble conflicts, a joint conference board was established
to discuss mutual problems at regular intervals. The
new jurisdictions were confirmed when the Pulp

1 In 1976, International Paper Co. was reorganized into various
Business Groups. The former Southern Kraft Division became the
Multiple Mill Group.
2Other International Paper Co. primary mills are not covered by
this chronology.

3
Other groups of employees and operations not included in this
chronology are also represented by international unions. The Office
and Professional Employees International Union, for example, is the
collective bargaining agent for specified groups of salaried office
and clerical employees.

1

pleted in 1967 when the first of the 3-year agreements
was negotiated. From 1937 to 1965, all general wage
changes that were negotiated were increases except
one—a 5-percent wage decrease was instituted in Sep­
tember 1938 but rescinded in February 1939. General
wage increases went into effect in each of the years of
the contractual relationship except two— 1943 and
1949. Southern Kraft employees’ wage rates were in­
creased twice a year in 2 years, during World War II
and the Korean emergency.
In 1938, black laborers received 4 cents an hour
below the base rate for whites. On application of the
company and the union, the National War Labor
Board in 1943 removed the differential, which had in­
creased to 4'/2 cents an hour. Women’s minimum rates
were 8 cents an hour below those paid men when the
Board was considering the parties’ request. This
differential was maintained until 1948, however, when
it was reduced to 6 cents an hour. No further decreases
were negotiated until 1962 when another 2-cent reduc­
tion was made. The following year the differential was
reduced to 2 cents and in 1964 was eliminated.
Basic hourly rates of pay in kraft pulp and papermills are among the highest in the South. The industry
started in the South in 1910 and developed rapidly
during the 1920’s. Papermaking requires a relatively
large proportion of skilled labor to perform intricate
operations with expensive machinery. Because few
workers in the region were experienced, southern
employers imported and paid the rates necessary to at­
tract skilled workers from the North. As a result,
“.. .wage rates for skilled workers in 1939 were con­
siderably higher in some of the Southern States than in
Maine and New Hampshire. Common labor, on the
other hand, was paid a uniformly lower rate in the
South.”6 By 1946, however, the director of the southern
region of the Paper Makers was able to report that the
regular rate in Southern Kraft Division plants was ..
the same as the base (rate) in the Book and Bond Divi­
sion of the International Paper Company.”7 Book and
Bond Division plants of the company were all located
in northern states.
Wages paid in the South are greater than those paid
in the Northeast, although still below those in the
Pacific Northwest.8 Wage rates in the Northwest, which
also is a major production center for pulp and paper
products, traditionally have been the highest in the in-

Workers were admitted to the Federation. In March
1957, the Paper Makers adopted the name United
Papermakers and Paperworkers after amalgamating
with a former affiliate of the CIO—the United Paperworkers of America.4
The accord of 1909 established a basis for a joint
and harmonious association between the UPP and the
PSPMW that lasted until their recent merger, and
resulted in relatively uniform policies among the mills
within each of the major producing regions. Bargaining
goals in the South, as in other regions, were influenced
strongly by the two internationals through joint wage
conferences. Generally, a union vice president and
sometimes international representatives supervised
negotiations with key companies. The terms agreed to
then became the pattern for negotiations in other plants
in the region, subject to some changes because of
differing conditions among firms. In the South, expres­
sion of local opinion, provided through the Southern
Association of Pulp and Paper Industry Unions, was in­
formal but effective. The association, organized in
1943, continues to meet several times a year and before
negotiations to discuss problems in the South.
At the Southern Kraft Division, the practice has
been for a single contract to be negotiated and signed
with the two paper unions (now the combined UPIU)
and the IBEW.5 It frequently was the first to be negoti­
ated in the South and provided the pattern for a major
segment of the southern paper and pulp industry.
The initial collective bargaining agreement in the
Southern Kraft Division was negotiated with the UPP,
PSPMW, and IBEW at the Mobile plant in 1937. Addi­
tional contracts were reached in 1938 for mills located
in Panama City, Georgetown, Bastrop (2 mills), and
Camden, and the first multiplant contract covering all
eight mills then in the Southern Kraft Division was
negotiated with the 3 unions in 1939. The Machinists
negotiated their initial contract in 1938 for employees
of the Panama City mill, and the Plumbers’ first agree­
ment, at the Springhill mill, was reached 3 years later.
From 1941 through 1949, a master agreement
negotiated by the five unions for all eight mills covered
all employees. The Machinists and Plumbers returned
to separate contracts for their members in 1950; this
practice continues at the present time. The IBEW and
the former UPP and PSPMW still negotiate jointly.
One-year contracts were traditional until 1956,
when the parties negotiated a 2-year agreement. Of the
next six negotiations, half produced 2-year agreements
and the trend toward multi-year contracts was com-

6Rupert W. Maclaurin, “Wages and Profits in the Paper Indus­
try, 1929-39,” The Quarterly Journal o f Economics, February
1944, Vol. LVIII, No. 2, p. 217.
7 Letter dated May 23, 1946, from Regional Director, Southern
Regional Offices, International Brotherhood of Papermakers to the
Research and Educational Director, International Brotherhood of
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers.
8 See Industry Wage Survey: Pulp, Paper and Paperboard Mills,
Summer-Fall 1977, Bulletin 2008 (Bureau of Labor Statistics,
1979).

4 The United Paperworkers received its charter from CIO on Jan.
1, 1944; the union did not represent workers in the Southern Kraft
Division of the International Paper Co.
5Separate contracts (not included in this chronology) were
negotiated by the PSPMW for each of the five regions in which the
company had woodland operations. The first agreement for these
employees was signed in Georgetown, S.C. in 1947.
2

dustry. However, the percentage differential between
rates in the Northwest and those in the Southern Kraft
Division has been narrowed significantly over the last
30 years due to a greater rate of increase in pay in
southern mills.9
The predominant method of pay has always been a
flat rate, but a small percentage of the workers—those

who operate paper machines—were paid according to
an incentive formula during the period June 1958
through May 1973; in the 1973 bargaining, the com­
pany and the union agreed to discontinue the paper
machine incentive formula. Provisions of the contracts
dealing with the day-to-day administration of the paper
machine formula are not included in the tables of this
chronology. Changes in related practices that are
reported, however, applied to those employees during
this period as well as those paid time rates.

“Harold M. Levinson, Determining Forces in Collective Wage
Bargaining (New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1966), pp.
130-131.

3

Summary of Contract Negotiations

ble sections, and was supplemented by a 6-page safety
manual and a 52-page schedule of occupational rates.

December 1937-May 1965

The first collective bargaining agreement negotiated
by the company in the South,1 at the Mobile plant, was
0
initiated jointly by the UPP, PSPMW, and IBEW in
1937, and signed in January 1938, during the period of
rapid union expansion encouraged by enactment of
favorable Federal legislation.1
1
The contract was comparatively free of detail. It was
a two-page typewritten document with six sections, an
addendum of 15 mill rules and 25 safety rules, and a
three-page wage schedule. Its economic provisions,
other than those directly related to rates of pay, were
limited to premium pay for overtime, shift differentials,
work on recognized holidays, and pay for workers
called to work outside their regular schedule. At the
time of the first agreement, the company also improved
the jointly financed insurance benefits which had been
available to its workers companywide since 1923, two
years before it started operations in the South. (Provi­
sions reported in table 3 as being in effect in 1937 do
not necessarily indicate changes from prior conditions
of employment.)
Numerous improvements and additions to work
practice provisions and benefits were negotiated over
the next 27 years. By 1965, the contract had grown to
56 printed pages, including 16 articles and innumera­

June 1965-May 1967

The course of negotiations scheduled to open in May
1965 appeared to have been forecast by the tenor of
statements presented by union officials at the 22d An­
nual Convention of the Southern Association of Pulp
and Paper Industry Unions. Delegates to the April con­
vention received an inclusive bargaining proposal
“Design for Progress ’65,” that explained the goals of
the PSPMW. Similar goals were adopted by the UPP.
As in the past, the goals covered many issues. Pro­
posals to raise earnings included increases in wage
rates and premium pay for overtime as well as higher
shift differentials. Recommendations for additional
paid holidays, longer regular vacations with pay, and
extended vacations would have maintained earnings
levels while providing more leisure. Although the AFLCIO position on a shorter workweek was supported to
provide additional jobs, the paper unions’ proposals
made no reference to the maintenance of earnings.
During periods of unemployment resulting from
mergers and technological changes, supplemental
unemployment benefits and severance pay plans were
advocated. Finally, there were proposals to improve
pension and health and welfare plans. Since most of the
union contracts provided for paid jury duty and funeral
leave, only brief reference was made to them. Almost
as many goals dealt with nonmonetary issues as with
monetary demands.
The bargaining objectives developed by the Associa­
tion and the demands of the union locals were largely a
reflection of the International Unions’ program.
Negotiations opened on May 6 and continued beyond
May 31, the scheduled expiration date of the contract,
without either party serving the required 10-day notice
of intent to terminate. By June 3, the union negotiators
had decided that the areas of disagreement warranted
a 10-day strike notice. On June 11, 1965, employees
left their jobs for the first time since the initial agree­
ment was signed in January 1938.1 Reflecting the un­
2
derstanding that had developed during the long rela­
tionship, negotiations continued and shutdown opera­
tions proceeded in an orderly fashion.

1 The UPP and PSPMW had contracts with the company’s north­
0
ern mills during and before World War I. In 1921, the unions struck
in the northern mills against a reduction in pay. The strike against
the company lasted 5 years. From the start of the strike until 1937
the company operated an open shop. In 1935, however, John P.
Burke, President of the PSPMW, reported at the union’s annual con­
vention that “the company was not discriminating against the union
a n d ... I have also had several meetings with the head officials o f the
International Paper Company during the past 2 years.”
1 Robert M. Macdonald stated in Unionism and the Wage Struc­
1
ture in the United States Pulp and Paper Industry, Institute of In­
dustrial Relations, University of California, Los Angeles, 1956, that
the ebb in union membership in the late 1920’s and early 30’s was
“brought to an abrupt halt with the enactment of the National In­
dustrial Recovery Act and the National Labor Relations Act. As a
result of this legislation new locals sprang up rapidly not only in the
older papermaking regions of the Northeast and Lake States but also
in the newer regions of the Pacific Coast and South.”
James A. Gross, in “The Making and Shaping of Unionism in the
Pulp Industry,” Labor History, Spring 1964, p. 198, agreed with
Macdonald and in addition suggested that: “Many formerly hostile
employers, surveying the scene, decided that it would be prudent to
settle with the more mature conservatism of the Pulp and Sulphite
Workers and the Paper Makers before the new and more ‘radical’
labor unions made inroads among their employees. . .”

1 Short wildcat strikes had occurred at two plants before the
2
division-wide walkout.

4

At this point, the company had offered a 32.5-centsan-hour package in a 2-year agreement. Under the
offer, wage rates would have been increased 10 cents
an hour the first year and 3.5 percent (averaging ap­
proximately 9.6 cents an hour) the second year. Shift
differentials would have been increased. An additional
holiday was offered, and vacation benefits would have
been increased to 5 weeks after 25 years’ service. Ex­
tensive revisions of the pension plan were proposed.
Eligibility requirements for normal retirement would
have been reduced to age 63 with 30 years’ service, and
annuities would have been increased by 15 percent for
past service credits and by 16.66 percent for all service
starting in 1965. Fifteen years’ service would have been
required for disability benefits. The plan was to be ex­
panded by the addition of benefits for survivors of ac­
tive employees who died at or after age 63 with 30
years of service or more. The proposal would also have
required the company, over a 4-year period, to assume
the employee’s pension contribution on the first $3,000
earned during a year.
Although the company and union were in agreement
on many issues, there were wide areas of difference on
a number of major items—the most important was
reported to be eligibility for early retirement with
unreduced pension benefits. Under the unions’ pro­
posals, any employee would be eligible for a “full nor­
mal annuity,” based on years of service, at age 62.
There was also a wide gap between the two general
wage increase proposals; the union wanted a 12-centan-hour raise the first year, and 4.5 percent (about 12.5
cents) the second year. Also, the union requested a 4week paid vacation after 15 years of service, 5 weeks
after 20 years, and 6 weeks after 30 years.
The unions struck at 2 p.m. on June 11, 1965.
Negotiations were recessed on June 14, and were not
resumed for 10 days. A week after talks resumed, the
company had sufficiently narrowed the difference in
the parties’ position to warrant, in the opinion of the
union negotiators, a vote by members of the locals. The
agreement was ratified by the locals on July 2 and the
strike ended on the same day. All 10 Southern Kraft
Division plants observed the July 4, no-work holiday
and resumed operations after that date.
In the first year of the 2-year contract wage rates
were increased 10.5 cents an hour, paid vacations were
increased to 4 weeks for employees with 15 years of
service or more, and extensive improvements were
made in the pension plan. Normal benefits for
employees retiring after the effective date of the con­
tract were to be raised by increasing the dollar amount
due for past service and the percentage used to com­
pute benefits earned after January 1, 1965. The ac­
tuarial reduction was eliminated for employees who
retired at age 62 with at least 20 years’ service, and
years of service required for a disability benefit were

reduced. A benefit was added for surviving spouses of
employees who died before retirement. The treatment
accorded employees who had participated in the plan
and rejoined was liberalized and employees’ contribu­
tions on the first $3,000 *of annual earnings were
reduced.
The contract provided for a 3.5 percent general
wage increase in 1966, as well as further improvements
in vacation benefits. On or after June 1, 1966,
employees with 25 but less than 30 years’ service were
to receive 5 weeks’ paid vacation; those who completed
30 years or more, 6 weeks’. Another decrease in
employee pension plan contributions went into effect
on June 1, 1966. Although the contract could be
renegotiated or terminated after May 31, 1967,
employees’ contributions on the first $3,000 of earnings
were again to be reduced on June 1, 1967, and com­
pletely eliminated the following year.
June 1967-May 1970

v A 3-year contract was signed on June 28, 1967, by
the International Paper Co., Southern Kraft Division,
and the Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers; the
United Papermakers and Paperworkers; and the Inter­
national Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Approx­
imately 11,500 workers at 10 plants in six Southern
States were covered by the agreement, which had been
ratified by union members in mid-June.
Negotiations for a new contract to replace the one
expiring May 31, 1967, began May 1, 1967. Union de­
mands included: A 1-year contract; a 40-cent-an-hour
general wage increase; three additional paid “no work”
holidays; 10 weeks of paid vacation every fifth year, in
addition to the existing vacation provisions; improved
overtime, call-in, and severance pay; improved shift
differentials and insurance provisions, including illness
and accident benefits, and company assumption of the
cost of the dependent insurance program and also of
life insurance for retirees regardless of age or cause of
retirement; a cost-of-living escalator clause; and a
$ 1,000 bonus, instead of a $ 1,000 life insurance policy,
to employees after 25 years of service with the com­
pany.
The agreement provided for general wage increases
of 16 cents an hour, retroactive to June 1, 1967, 5 per­
cent (calculated to the nearest '/•> cent) and averaging
15.6 cents an hour effective June 1, 1968; and 17 cents
an hour on June 1, 1969. Additional adjustments for
approximately 5,700 workers, ranging from x to 18
k
cents an hour, also were effective June 1, 1967. Pre­
mium pay for second and third shifts was increased 1
cent an hour, effective June 1, 1967, and the third-shift
premium was increased 2 cents more the following
June.
July 3 was designated as an eighth paid holiday (but
plant closing was to be optional); 4 hours’ pay at time
5

and one-half, in addition to regular holiday pay, was
guaranteed for work on scheduled no-work holidays.
Eligibility requirements for 3 weeks of paid vacation
were reduced. The agreement also increased severance
pay, to 2 from 1 percent of total earnings during the last
period of unbroken employment. Improvements in the
insurance plan included an increase in company con­
tributions toward dependent hospital insurance, effec­
tive June 1, 1969. The parties agreed to the following
changes in the 4-year pension agreement which was
scheduled to expire June 1, 1969: To extend the ex­
piration date to June 1, 1970, the expiration of the
labor agreement; that any pension changes negotiated
in 1970 were to apply to employees retiring during the
third contract year (June 1, 1969, through May 31,
1970); that the company would assume the full cost of
group life insurance for early retirees, effective June 1,
1967; and that elimination of the employee’s contribu­
tion to the pension plan on the first $3,000 annual earn­
ings would be advanced to June 1, 1967, from June 1,
1968, as originally negotiated in 1965.
•
The agreement was to remain in effect through May
31, 1970, with provision for a 1969 reopening on wage
rates of new or revised jobs. Under this provision,
negotiations in May and June of 1969 resulted in wage
adjustments of from 2 to 38 cents an hour on new or
changed jobs. These adjustments, effective June 1,
1969, affected approximately 500 employees and were
in addition to the 17-cent-an-hour general wage in­
crease, effective the same day, negotiated in 1967.

to $3,085, $3.28, and $3,485 an hour effective June 1,
1970, 1971 and 1972, respectively. Shift differentials
were raised to 8 cents for the second shift in 1971 and
13 cents for the third shift in 1972.
Fringe benefit changes were highlighted by company
assumption of the full cost of pensions, effective June 1,
1970. Previously, employees had contributed 4.5 per­
cent of annual earnings over $3,000 into the retirement
fund. Also, effective June 1, 1970 for those who retired
on or after June 1, 1969, the normal benefit was raised
by 20 percent of the allowance accrued to January 1,
1970, and the minimum benefit for retirement at age
65, or at age 62 with 20 years of service, was raised to
$5 a month for each year of creditable service. The
early retirement benefit was raised 5 to 22 percent, de­
pending on the employee’s age at retirement. The con­
tract also provided that an employee with a minimum
of 15 years’ service became vested for reduced pension
benefits at age 65 as long as he did not withdraw his
contributions from the plan.
The company’s contribution towards the cost of de­
pendent health and welfare coverage was increased to
$5 and $6 a month in 1971 and 1972, respectively.
Health and welfare benefit changes included an in­
crease in the surgical schedule maximum to $455 in
1970, and increases in sickness and accident benefits to
bring the range of payments to $50 to $92 a week in
1971 and $50 to $114 in 1972. Other changes included
a nonduplication of benefits clause, improved pay­
ments for in-hospital diagnostic examinations by non­
attending physicians, and a broader definition of those
who qualified as dependents due to disability.
A paid holiday was added—the employee’s birth­
day—bringing the total to 9. Also, provisions for call-in
pay and jury-duty pay were liberalized and wire and
clothing pay provisions were instituted as a separate
clause in the agreement.
The 3-year agreement, covering 11,500 workers in
10 pulp and paper mills in 6 Southern States, was to re­
main in effect through May 31, 1973; there were no
reopening provisions.

June 1970-May 1973

The 1970 negotiations between the International
Paper Co., Southern Kraft Div., and the Pulp, Sulphite,
and Paper Mill Workers; the United Papermakers and
Paperworkers; and the International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers, began on May 12. The unions pro­
posed an 11 -point general program which provided for
2 additional paid holidays, wage increases of 75 cents
an hour over 3 years, plus changes in pension, vacation,
insurance, overtime, and shift differential provisions.
The company countered with an offer of a 3-year
package of wages and benefits it estimated to be worth
74.41 cents an hour.
Contract talks were concluded June 29, with the
negotiation of a 3-year agreement estimated by the par­
ties to include a total of 98.68 cents in wage and benefit
improvements. The company was notified on July 3
that a majority of the three International Unions’ locals
had ratified the contract.
An initial 25-cent-an-hour wage increase was to go
into effect on June 1, 1970, and additional 6.25-per­
cent increases were scheduled for June 1, 1971 and
June 1, 1972. These increases, averaged over all the
units, amounted to approximately 23.83 and 25.32
cents an hour, respectively. Minimum rates were raised

June 1973-May 1977

Representatives of International Paper Co.’s
Southern Kraft Division and the United Paperworkers
International Union (UPIU) and the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) met on
May 8, 1973, in Jackson, Miss., to begin formal con­
tract negotiations. The existing agreement was to ex­
pire on May 31. The unions’ economic demands in­
cluded a 50-cents-an-hour general wage increase; an
increase in shift premiums; establishment of a cost-ofliving escalator clause; 2 additional paid holidays; and
improved vacation, insurance, and pension benefits.
The company initially offered a 3-year agreement
reportedly valued at 79 cents an hour.
6

Negotiations were concluded the 1st week in July
when the parties agreed on a 3-year contract. The pact
covered approximately 11,000 workers at 10 facilities
in South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi,
Arkansas, and Louisiana. The company valued the
contract package at about $1.34 an hour.
The agreement provided for a general wage increase
of 30 cents an hour effective June 1, 1973, a 6.5-per­
cent increase, estimated to average about 30 cents an
hour, effective June 1, 1974, and 6.25-percent increase
also estimated to average about 30 cents, effective June
1, 1975. Some classification adjustments were made
and the minimum hourly rate was raised to $3,785 on
June 1, 1973, and to $4.03 and $4.28, effective June 1,
1974, and June 1, 1975, respectively.
Benefit changes included improvements in the
health insurance and pension programs, and a larger
company contribution toward dependent hospital in­
surance. Employees who had reached age 62 and met
all retirement obligations, could, on written request,
receive vacation time accrued during the last full year
prior to retirement. Liberalized wire and clothing time
pay was also provided.
The 3-year agreement, set to expire May 31, 1976,
did not provide for a reopener. However, in mid-March
1974, officials of a number of UPIU locals urged the
president of the union to seek contract reopeners with
the International Paper Co. to negotiate additional
wage increases to help offset the effects of inflation.
The union’s first request for a reopener was rejected by
the company in April 1974. In August 1974, the com­
pany agreed to a second request to consider a wage ad­
justment, with an extension of the labor agreement.
Representatives of the International Paper Co.,
UPIU, IBEW, and the International Brotherhood of
Firemen and Oilers (which represented some workers
in the Company’s Northern Division) then met on Sep­
tember 17 in Washington, D.C., and discussed the
possibility of a cost-of-living wage increase.
On September 24, the company proposed an addi­
tional 3'^-percent wage increase retroactive to Septem­
ber 1, 1974, and a June 1, 1975, wage increase of 10
percent, instead of the scheduled 6% percent. The com­
pany also proposed an additional 10-percent increase
on June 1, 1976, and a 1-year extension of the existing
agreements to May 31, 1977. The proposal was offered
to locals representing employees in the Northern Divi­
sion, the Southern Kraft Division, and various convert­
ing plants. A few locals were excluded due to special
circumstances.
The proposal was accepted in October 1974 by
employees of the Northern Division and the Woodlands
Division of the South, but rejected by Southern Kraft
employees. However, they reconsidered the proposal
and accepted it in December 1974. The initial wage in­
crease for Southern Kraft employees was retroactive to

November 1, 1974, rather than September 1, because
they had not accepted within the time limit specified in
the company proposal.
The contract was scheduled to expire May 31, 1977.
June 1977-May 1979

Representatives of the International Paper Com­
pany, Multiple Mill Group1 and the United Paper3
workers International Union and the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers commenced formal
contract negotiations on May 3, 1977 in Jackson,
Mississippi. The existing contract was scheduled to ex­
pire May 31. The unions’ initial demands, presented on
May 3, 1977, included general wage increases of $1.50
an hour in the first year and 15 percent in the second
year; establishment of a cost-of-living escalator clause;
four additional paid holidays; improved vacation, in­
surance and pension benefits; job rate adjustments, and
many contract language changes. The company pro­
posal, presented on June 9, 1977, included general
wage increase offers of 10 percent and 9.75 percent in
the first and second years, respectively, plus benefit im­
provements, job rate adjustments, and contract
language changes.
The existing contract was automatically extended
when negotiators were unable to reach an agreement
before termination date. Both parties had agreed to ex­
tend talks until a settlement was reached, or until either
party gave a 10-day notice of intent to terminate the ex­
tended agreement. On June 9, the union rejected the
company’s proposal, and negotiations were recessed.
On June 20, talks were resumed, and the unions
served a 10-day contract termination notice on the
company that same date. The parties continued discus­
sions that resulted in a revised offer on June 25, which
was accepted by the unions. The 2-year pact, which
was ratified on June 29, covered approximately 9,500
workers at 10 plants in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida,
Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The
unions valued the two-year wage and benefit package
at about $1.71 an hour, excluding the multiplying
effect on existing benefit plans, and indicated that the
settlement was expected to set a pattern for settlements
with other paper companies.
The contract provided for a general wage increase of
10.5 percent effective June 1, 1977, averaging about
65.10 cents per hour, and a 10-percent wage increase
on June 1,1978, averaging 68.97 cents per hour. It also
provided for adjustments ranging from 1 cent to 18.5
cents per hour for certain job classifications.

1 In 1976, International Paper was reorganized into various
3
Business Groups, and the term Southern Kraft Division was drop­
ped. The Labor Agreement now applies to the International Paper
Co., Multiple Mill Group.

7

These adjustments were effective immediately before
the 1977 general wage increase. Some other adjust­
ments, ranging from 3 cents to 25 cents per hour were
retroactive to various dates, some as early as March 3,
1975. Minimum wage rates were increased to $5.57 per
hour on June 1, 1977, and to $6,125 per hour on June
1, 1978. Shift premiums for second and third shifts
were increased in 1977 and 1978. The new contract
also provided for improvements in paid vacations, paid
holidays, call-in-pay, meal allowances, and funeral
leave.
Substantial improvements were provided in health
and welfare benefits. These improvements included an
increase in the non-occupational sickness and accident
benefits to a maximum of $142 per week in 1977, and
to $150 per week in 1978. Life insurance coverage was
increased to a maximum of $13,000. Outpatient diag­
nostic X-ray and medical benefits were increased to a
maximum of $200 per year (combined). The number of

days of covered in-hospital maternity care increased to
a maximum of 120 days. Coverage for dependents was
comparably expanded under the hospitalization and
surgical plan. A major medical benefit plan was also
established.
Pension improvements included a 15-percent in­
crease in normal benefits for future retirees and in­
crease in the minimum monthly benefit rate, to $9 a
month for each year of credited service; an lowered
eligibility requirements for early and disability retire­
ments. The company also agreed to refund contribu­
tions employees had made to the fund prior to 1970,
when the pension plan became noncontributory. The
unions estimated that under the new contract approx­
imately 8,000 employees received an average of
$3,000, in three installments.
The following tables bring this wage chronology up
to date through the May 31, 1979, contract termination
date.

8

Table 1.

General wage changes1

Effective date
June 1, 1937 (PSPMW-UPPIBEW agreement dated
Jan. 19, 1938)2
Sept. 1, 1938 (agreement
dated June 1, 1938)
Feb. 19, 1939 (agreement
dated March 31, 1939)
June 1, 1940 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1941 (agreement of
same date)
Nov. 16, 1941 (agreement
dated Dec. 9, 1941)
June 1, 1942 (agreement of
same date)
Apr. 16, 19433.......................
Aug. 15, 1943 (approved by
National
War Labor
Board, Aug. 27, 1943)

July 18, 1944 (approved by
NWLB Feb. 15, 1945)

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increase
10-percent.

5-percent decrease.
Pre-Sept. 1, 1938, wage levels restored.

5 percent restored.
3 cents an hour.
7 cents an hour.
7-percent, averaging 4.8 cents an hour.
4 cents an hour.

1.5 cents an hour.

June 3, 19453......................................................................................................................................
Dec. 16, 19453 .....................
2 .5 cents an hour in lieu of shift differential plus 13-percent,
averaging 10.6 cents an hour.

June 1, 19463

6 to 10 cents an hour, averaging 8.1 cents.

June 1, 19473 .......................

Hourly
Hourly rate
increase
75 cents and under...........................................
10 cents
76 and under 82 cents.....................................
9 cents
82 and under 87 cents.....................................
8 cents
87 and under 91 cents.....................................
7 cents
91 cents and o v e r.............................................
6 cents
In addition, 1 to 14 cents an hour adjustments in wage rates
for selected classifications approved by Wage Stabiliza­
tion Board, Aug. 7, 1946, for more than 800 employees.
In addition, adjustments in wage rates for more than 2,100
employees.
Increases varied as follows:

15 cents an hour.

June 1, 1948 (agreement of
same date)

Hours increased to 48 per week.
Increase of 1.4 percent (0.9 cents an hour when averaged
over all employees in the bargaining unit) resulting from
equalization of white-black common labor rates. In addi­
tion, adjustments made in wage rates of selected
classifications.
In addition retroactive wage adjustments designed to
eliminate intraplant inequities. Adjustments ranged from 2
cents to 8 cents an hour for more than 600 workers.
Adjustments in wage rates of selected classifications.
2.5 cents in lieu of shift differential which was removed ad­
ded to rates and then 13 percent applied. Reduction in
workweek from 48 to 42 hours. In addition, adjustments
in wage rates for approximately 1,350 employees.
Increases varied as follows:

5 to 13 cents an hour, averaging 9.4 cents.

Hourly rate
$1.00....................................................................
$1.01....................................................................
$1.02....................................................................
$1.03....................................................................
$1.04....................................................................
$1.05....................................................................
$1.06....................................................................
$1.07-$ 1.32..........................................................
$1.33 and o v e r...................................................
Rates for women below $1 increased 7 percent.
See footnotes at end of table.

9

Hourly
increase
5 cents
6 cents
7 cents
8 cents
9 cents
10 cents
11 cents
12 cents
13 cents

Table 1.

Continued— General wage changes1

Effective date
June 1, 1949 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1950 (agreement of
same date)

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increase

Adjustments ranging from 1 to 12 cents an hour in wage
rates for approximately 1,250 employees.
Increases varied as follows:

7 to 10 cents an hour, averaging 8.02 cents.

$1.24
$1.25
$1.42
$1.59

and
and
and
and

Hourly rate
under................................................
under $ 1 .4 2 .....................................
under $ 1 .5 9 .....................................
o v e r..................................................

Hourly
increase
7 cents
8 cents
9 cents
10 cents

In addition, 2 to 5 cents an hour adjustments in wage rates
for nearly 1,600 employees.
Oct. 15, 1950 (agreement
dated June 1, 1950)
June 1, 1951 (approved by
Wage Stabilization Board,
Jan. 25, 1952)

4 percent, minimum 5 cents, averaging 5.65 cents an hour,
8 centsanhour.

June 1, 1952 (approved by
WSB, Nov. 26, 1952)

5 cents an hour.

Dec. 1, 1952 (approved by
WSB November 1952)
June 1, 1953 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1954 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1955 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1956 (agreement of
same date)

Consisted of retroactive increases of (1) 3 cents cost-of-liv­
ing adjustment allowable under General Wage Regula­
tion No. 83 and (2) 5 cents under General Wage Regula­
4
tion No. 6.5 In addition, 2 to 16 cents an hour adjustments
in wage rates for nearly 2,100 employees.
Designated by parties as 2-cent-an-hour general wage
change, 2-cent cost-of-living increase, and 1-cent in lieu
of company proposed hospitalization plan. In addition, 1
to 10 cents an hour adjustments in wage rates for ap­
proximately 1,575 employees.

2 cents an hour.

June 1, 1957 (agreement
dated June 1, 1956)
June 1, 1958 (agreement of
same date)

3 percent, minimum 5 cents, averaging 5.35 cents an hour.
7 cents an hour.
5 percent, averaging 8.9 cents an hour.
13 cents an hour.

In addition, 2 to 8 cents an hour adjustments in wage rates
for approximately 850 employees.
In addition, 2 to 17 cents an hour adjustments in wage rates
for approximately 300 employees.
In addition, adjustments in wage rates of 2 to 5 cents an hour
for approximately 650 employees.
In addition, adjustments in wage rates of 1 to 8 cents an hour
for approximately 4,900 employees. Deferred increase
effective June 1,1957.

5 percent, minimum 9 cents, averaging 10.1 cents an hour,

Deferred increase.

4 to 8 cents an hour, averaging 5.05 cents an hour,

Increases varied as follows:

$1.85
$1.86
$2.25
$2.72
$3.14

June 1, 1959 (agreement of
same date)

3 percent, minimum 7 cents, averaging 7.3 cents an hour.

June 1, 1960 (agreement
dated June 1, 1959).
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1962 (agreement of
same date)

4 percent, minimum 8 cents, averaging 9.4 cents an hour.
3.5 cents an hour increase.

and
and
and
and
and

Hourly rate
under....................
less than $2.25 ..
less than $2.72 ..
less than $3.14 ..
o v e r.....................

Hourly
increase
4 cents
5 cents
6 cents
7 cents
8 cents

In addition, adjustments in wage rates of 1 to 10 cents an
hour for approximately 5,700 employees.
In addition, adjustments in wage rates of 1 to 10 cents an
hour for approximately 1,500 employees.
Deferred increase, effective June 1,1960.
Deferred increase.
In addition, adjustments in wage rates of 2 to 15 cents an
hour for selected classifications.
In addition, women’s minimum job rate increased an addi­
tional 2 cents an hour. Adjustments in wage rates of 2 to
17 cents an hour for selected classifications.

3 percent, averaging 7.4 cents an hour.

See footnotes at end of table.

10

Table 1.

Continued— General wage changes1

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increase

June 1, 1963 (agreement of
same date)

7 cents an hour.

June 1, 1964 (agreement
dated June 1,1963)

3 percent, minimum 7 cents, averaging 7.9 cents an hour.

June 1, 1965 (agreement of
same date)

10.5 cents an hour.

June 1, 1966 (agreement
dated June 1,1965)
June 1, 1967 (agreement of
same date)

3.5 percent, averaging 9.6 cents an hour.
16 cents an hour.

In addition, women’s minimum job rates increased 2 cents
an hour. Adjustments in wage rates of 2 to 11.5 cents an
hour for approximately 1,175 employees.
Deferred increase, effective June 1,1964.
Deferred increase: Women’s minimum rates increased 2
cents an hour, thereby eliminating the differential for
somewhat over 300 employees.
In addition, adjustments in wage rates of 2 to 20 cents an
hour for approximately 1,900 employees.
Deferred increase, effective June 1,1966.
Deferred increase.
In addition, special adjustments of 4 cents an hour for all
base rated jobs and from 'k to 3 cents an hour for all
other lower rated jobs, affecting approximately 2,350
employees, and other adjustments in wage rates of 2 to
18 cents an hour for approximately 3,350 additional
employees. Deferred increases, effective both June 1,
1968, and June 1 1969, and a limited wage reopening,
effective June 1,1969.
Deferred increase.

,

June 1, 1968
dated June
June 1, 1969
dated June

(agreement
1,1967)
(agreement
1,1967)

5 percent (calculated to nearest
cents an hour.
17centsan hour.

June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

cent), averaging 15.6

25 cents an hour.

June 1, 1971 (agreement
dated June 1,1970)
June 1, 1972 (agreement
dated June 1,1970)
June 1, 1973 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1974 (agreement
dated June 1,1973)
Nov. 1, 1974 (agreement
dated Jan. 20,1975)

'ft

6'/4 percent (calculated to nearest

'ft cent), averaging 23.83
cents an hour.
6 ‘/ percent (calculated to nearest 1 cent), averaging 25.32
4
ft
cents an hour.
30 cents an hour.

6 'h percent (calculated to nearest

1cent), averaging about
ft

30.7 an hour.
3'/i percent (calculated to nearest 'ft cent), averaging about
16.1 cents an hour.

Deferred increase.
Agreement also provided a 6 V percent wage increase June
2
1 1974, and 6 'Upercent June 1 1975.
Deferred increase.

,

,

'/;

Negotiated under an unscheduled wage reopener of the
1973 agreement. Also provided was an increase in the
scheduled June 1 1975, deferred wage increase to 10 per­
cent (from 6 %), an additional 10 percent increase on June 1
1976, and a 1 -year extension of the contract, to May 31 1977.
Increase consisted of a 6 %percent deferred increase negotiated in 1973 and an additional 3¥4 percent increase
negotiated under the 1974 reopener.
Deferred increase.

'ft

The 10'/4 percent increase was applied following classification adjustments effective June 1, 1977, which ranged
from 1 to 18.5 cents an hour. In addition some classifica­
tions adjustments ranging from 3 to 25 cents were made
retroactive to various dates, some as early as March 3,
1975. The classification adjustment affected about 4,400
workers and averaged 5 cents when spread over all
workers under the agreement. Agreement also provided
for a deferred increase on June 1 1978.
Deferred increase.

10 percent (calculated to nearest 'h cent), averaging about

June 1, 1975 (agreement
dated June 1, 1973, and
Jan. 20,1975)
June 1, 1976 (agreement
dated Jan. 20,1975)
June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

cent), averaging about
55.8 cents an hour.
10 Vi percent (calculated to the nearest 'k cent), averaging
65.10 cents an hour.

June 1, 1978 (agreement
o f June 1,1977)

10 percent (calculated to nearest
cents an hour.

50.8 cents an hour.

10 percent (calculated to nearest

Deferred increase. In addition, adjustments in wage rates of
2 to 38 cents an hour on new or changed jobs, affecting
approximately 500 employees, were negotiated under a
limited wage reopener in May and June 1969.
In addition, special adjustments ranging from 3 to 27 cents
an hour and affecting approximately 4,400 workers, and
deferred general increases of 6 % percent (computed to
the nearest ‘,4 cent) effective both June 1,1971 and June
1,1972.
Deferred increase.

,

,

,

,

cent), averaging 68.97

’ General wage changes are general increases or decreases as well as
adjustments for individual job classifications that change basic hourly
rates of pay and affect a substantial number of workers. Not included are
adjustments in individual rates (promotions, merit increases, etc.) and
minor interim adjustments in the wage structure (such as changes in the
wage rates during the contractual year for individual occupations) that do
not have an immediate and noticeable effect on the average wage level.
The changes listed in this table were major adjustments in the wage
level made during the period covered. The sum of general changes listed
will not necessarily coincide with the changes in straight-time average
hourly earnings over the period of this chronology because of fluctuations
in earnings, changes in products, production methods, and employment
practices, the omission of nongeneral changes in rates, changes in the
composition of the labor force, and other factors.
2Since the United Paperworkers International Union is a result of a
merger between the International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper
Mill Workers, and the United Papermakers and Paperworkers (once the In­

ternational Brotherhood of Papermakers) which have negotiated agree­
ments jointly along with the International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers during the entire period covered by this chronology, the usual
union designations are omitted from this and subsequent tables after the
first entry.
3 Date of agreement not available.
* In collective bargaining situations where there was no cost-of-living
escalator clause in effect, General Wage Regulation No. 8, Section 4, per­
mitted parties who found that the real value of wages and salaries had
declined since Jan. 25,1951, to put into effect, no more frequently than ev­
ery 6 months, in creases that would restore the real value of those rates from
Jan. 25, 1951, to date of the increase.
'General Wage Regulation No. 6 provided that, if general wage in­
creases since Jan. 15,1950, had been less than 10 percent, future increases
"maybe permitted in amounts up to but not in excess of the difference bet­
ween such past increases, if any, and the permissible 10 percent.”

11

Table 2a.

Beginners’ hourly wage rates, 1937-65
Men'

Women’

Effective date
Hiring rate2
June 1, 1937.................................................................................
Sept. 1, 1938.................................................................................
Feb. 19, 1939 ...............................................................................
June 1, 1940.................................................................................
June 1, 1941.................................................................................
Nov. 16, 1941...............................................................................
June 1, 1942.................................................................................
June 18, 1944...............................................................................
Dec. 16, 1945 ...............................................................................
June 1, 1946.................................................................................
June 1, 1947.................................................................................
June 1, 1948.................................................................................
June 1, 1950.................................................................................
Oct. 15, 1950 ...............................................................................
June 1, 1951.................................................................................
June 1, 1952.................................................................................
Dec. 1, 1952 .................................................................................
June 1, 1953.................................................................................
June 1, 1954.................................................................................
June 1, 1955.................................................................................
June 1, 1956.................................................................................
June 1, 1957.................................................................................
June 1, 1958.................................................................................
June 1, 1959.................................................................................
June 1, 1960.................................................................................
June 1, 1961.................................................................................
June 1, 1962.................................................................................
June 1, 1963.................................................................................
June 1, 1964.................................................................................
June 1, 1965.................................................................................

Minimum rate2

Hiring rate2

(3)
'( 3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
$0.54 and $0.58
(3)
.70
.80
.95
1.00
1.07
1.12
1.20
1.25
1.27
1.32
1.39
1.46
1.59
1.68
1.72
1.79
1.87
1.905
1.960
2.030
2.100
2.205

$0.40 and $0.44
.38 and
.42
.40 and
.44
.43 and
.47
.50 and
.54
.535 and .58
.575 and .62
(3)
.75
.85
1.00
1.05
1.12
1.17
1.25
1.30
1.32
1.37
1.44
1.51
1.64
1.73
1.77
1.84
1.92
1.955
2.015
2.085
2.155
2.260

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
$0.44
(3)
.54
.64
.79
.86
.93
.98
1.06
1.12
1.14
1.18
1.25
1.31
1.44
1.53
1.57
1.64
1.72
1.755
1.810
1.880
1.950
2.055

Minimum rate2
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
$0.54
(3)
.67
.77
.92
.99
1.06
1.11
1.19
1.24
1.26
1.31
1.38
1.45
1.58
1.67
1.71
1.78
1.86
1.895
1.975
2.065
2.155
2.260^

1
Blacks were paid lower rates than whites until Sept. 14,1943. On peti­
2 From the date of the first contract to May 31, 1951, employees
tion of the company and the unions, the Fifth Regional War Labor Board ap­
progressed from the hiring to the minimum rate in 90 days in one step; from
proved a single hiring and minimum rate for men, effective Sept. 15,1943. A
June 1, 1951, the period was 30 days.
single rate for women previously had been in effect.
3Not available.

Table 2b.

Beginners’ hourly wage rates, 1966-781
Effective date

Hiring rate
$2,280
2.480
2.605
2.775
3.025
3.215
3.415
3.715
3.955
4.085
4.495
4.945
5.465
6.010

June 1, 1966
June 1, 1967
June 1,1968
June 1, 1969
June 1,1970
June 1, 1971
June 1, 1972
June 1, 1973
June 1, 1974
Nov. 1,1974.
June 1, 1975
June 1, 1976
June 1,1977
June 1, 1978
1 Beginning June 1, 1966, men and women were paid the same rates.

12

Minimum rate
$2,340
2.540
2.665
2.835
3.085
3.280
3.485
3.785
4.030
4.165
4.580
5.040
5.570
6.125

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Effective date
Shift premium pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 3, 1944’ .......................
Dec. 16, 1 9 4 5 '.....................

No provision.
Established: 4 cents an hour premium for work on 2d shift, 6
cents for 3d shift.
Discontinued: All shift premiums.

Dec. 1, 1952 (agreement
dated June 1, 1953)
June 1, 1953 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1956 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1963 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1964 (agreement of
June 1, 1963)
June 1, 1965 (agreement of
same date)

Reestablished shift premiums: 2 cents an hour premium for
work on 2d or 3d shifts.
Increased to: 3 cents for 2d shift, 5 cents for 3d shift.

June 1, 1967 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1968 (agreement
dated June 1, 1967)
June 1, 1971 (agreement
dated June 1, 1970)
June 1, 1972 (agreement
dated June 1, 1970)
June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1978 (agreement
dated June 1, 1977)

Basic wage rates of all workers increased 2.5 cents an hour
in lieu of shift differential. (See table 1.)
Shift differential included in computing overtime.

Increased to: 7 cents for second shift, 10 cents for third shift.

Increased to: 5 cents for 2d shift, 8 cents for 3d shift.
Increased to: 9 cents for 3d shift.
Increased to: 6 cents for 2d shift.

0

Added: Shift differential paid dayworkers for all work after
scheduled shift if 2 or more non-scheduled hours were
worked.

Increased to: 12 cents for third shift.
Increased to: 8 cents for second shift.
Increased to: 13 cents for third shift.
Increased to: 10 cents for second shift and 15 cents for third
shift.
Increased to: 12 cents for second shift and 18 cents for third
shift.
Premium pay for Sunday work

June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 1, 1951 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1956 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: Time and one-half for work on Sunday.

Approved by Wage Stabilization Board.
Hours worked on Sunday to be included in computing
weekly overtime.

Overtime pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)

Time and one-half for work in excess of 8 hours a day.

June 1, 1939 (agreement of
same date)

Added: Overtime rate paid for all hours worked in excess of
16 until employee had 8 hours’ rest.

June 1, 1941 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1948 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1951 (agreement of
same date)

Added: Overtime rate paid for all hours when employee
worked 24 consecutive hours or more.
Added: Time and one-half for work in excess of 40 hours a
week.
Changed: Overtime rate paid for all hours worked in excess
of 16 in a 24-hour period until employee had 8 hours’
rest.

June 1, 1952 (agreement of
same date)
June 1953 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: Overtime rate paid for all hours when employee
worked more than 16 consecutive hours until 8 hours’
rest was provided.

June 1, 1956 (agreement of
same date)

Not applicable to shift employee who worked (1) double
shifts or extra hours because worker assigned to next
shift did not report, or (2) extra hours when shifts were
changed.
Changed: Overtime not payable to (a) employee on con­
tinuous operations (tour worker) who worked (1) double
shift, of (2) extra hours because employee assigned to
next shift did not report; (b) any employee (1) when extra
hours were required for shift changes or (2) for starting
or shutting down operation.
Eliminated: Provisions withholding overtime pay for starting
or shutting down operation.
Added to contract at this time although the provisions of the
Fair Labor Standards Act were applied since 1938.
Changed: Employee working 16 hours or more paid at ap­
plicable rate for meal periods taken in other than first 8
hours. Next scheduled shift of employee working 16
hours not to be changed to avoid payment of overtime.
Changed: Overtime rate paid employee working 24 con­
secutive hours for all meal periods taken.
Meal period in first 8 hours not considered time worked.

Added: Sunday work included in total hours worked for pur­
poses of computing weekly overtime.

See footnotes at end of table.

13

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Overtime pay— Continued

June 1, 1958 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: Time and one-half paid for work in excess of 8 in a
24-hour period until employee had 8 hours’ rest.
Added: First 8 hours worked and paid for at overtime rate
under 16 hours provision, and hours paid for but not
worked on a holiday, included in total hours worked for
purposes of computing weekly overtime.
Added: For hours worked on a no-work holiday (excluding
birthday holiday), the holiday pay allowance for 8 hours
to be included as time worked for purpose of computing
weekly overtime.

June 1, 1973 (agreement of
same date)

Holiday pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)

Time and one-half for work on 4 specified holidays. No pay­
ment for holidays not worked.

June 1, 1938 (agreement of
same date)
Aug. 5, 19451 .......................

Added: 1 holiday (total 5).

June 1, 1946'

Added: 1 paid holiday, Easter Sunday (total 4).

Changed: 3 of 5 unpaid holidays to become paid holidays.
Employees with 90 days’ service or more and not re­
quired to work to receive 8 hours’ straight-time pay on
Christmas Day, Fourth of July, and Labor Day.

June 1, 19491

June 1, 1952 (agreement
dated May 31, 1952)

June 1, 1954 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1958 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1959 (agreement
dated June 18,1959)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1967 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

Added: Christmas Eve, and Thanksgiving Day changed to
paid holiday (total 6). Time and one-half plusholiday pay
(double time and one-half) for work on Christmas,
Fourth of July, Labor Day, and Easter Sunday, and
straight time plus holiday pay (double time) for work on
Christmas Eve and Thanksgiving Day.
Changed: Time and one-half plus holiday pay (double time
and one-half) for work on all 6 recognized holidays.

Easter Sunday, Fourth of July, Labor Day, and Christmas
Day. Only employees necessary to protect life and pro­
perty (steam plant, electrical power plant employees,
watchmen, etc.) were required to work.
Thanksgiving Day.
Employees required to work on these paid holidays to
receive straight-time pay and another day off with pay
later in the week. To be eligible for holiday pay,
employee must have worked 2 scheduled workdays pre­
ceding and 2 scheduled workdays following holiday.
Pay not provided employee scheduled to work holiday
who failed to report for personal reasons. Employee
on vacation during holiday to receive holiday pay in ad­
dition to vacation allowance.
Plants to close on Labor Day, Fourth of July, and Christmas
except for those employees necessary to protect life and
property. Plants to operate on Easter Sunday.
Added: Pay for 1 holiday in layoff period of 90 days or less
provided employee on return to work.
Added: Maximum hours of work on day preceding holiday
limited to 12.
Eliminated: Day off with pay given to employees required to
work on paid holiday.

Changed: Plants to close on all holidays except Thanksgiv­
ing Day, which was optional. Pay for all holidays in
layoff period of 90 days or less provided employee on
return to work.
December 26. Plants to be closed on this holiday.

Added: 1 paid holiday (total 7).

Added: 1 paid holiday (total 8).
Added: Guaranteed 4 hours’ pay at time and one-half, in ad­
dition to regular holiday pay (straight-time for 8 hours)
for work on scheduled no-work holidays.
Added: 1 paid holiday (total 9).
Changed: Sunday before Labor Day substituted for Easter
Sunday as a paid no-work holiday.
Changed: Eligibility requirement for paid holidays reduced
to 45 days of company service.

Hours paid but not worked on a holiday included in hours
worked for overtime purposes.
July 3. Plant closing on this holiday was to be optional.

Employee’s birthday, which was to be a no-work holiday. If
employee's birthday fell on another paid holiday, he
could take either the day before or day after as his birth­
day holiday.
Changed: Employee’s birthday holiday could be taken on
any day during the same workweek that employee's
birthday fell, provided that day selected was a scheduled
work day for that employee, and that employee had ap­
proval of supervisor.

June 1, 1973 (agreement of
same date)

See footnotes at end of table.

14

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Holiday pay— Continued

June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: July 4 holiday to an option-to-work holiday.
In effect and continued: Maximum hours of work by day
workers on day preceding holiday— limited to 8.
Added: Maximum hours of work on day following holiday
limited to 12.
Holiday was July 5, which was an option-to-work holiday.
Changed: Sunday before Labor Day and Labor Day to op­
tion-to-work holiday. July 4th and 5th to no-work holi­
day.
1
Holiday was December 23, which was a no-work holiday.
Added: For work on a holiday which fell on a Sunday,
employee paid regular holiday pay (straight-time for 8
hours) plus double time for all hours worked.

Added: 1 paid holiday (total 10).
June 1, 1978 (agreement
dated June 1,1977)
Added: 1 paid holiday (total 11).

Paid vacations
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19,1938)
June 1, 1939 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1941 (agreement
dated May 31, 1942)

June 1, 1942 (agreement of
same date)
June 16, 1944 (approved by
N a tio n a l W ar Labo r
Board, Sept. 29,1944)
June 1, 1949 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1950 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.

Established: 1 week’s vacation with pay at 2 percent pre­
vious year’s earnings provided employee with 2 years’
continuous service or more and 1,400 hours of work in
previous year. Pay in lieu of vacation, at company op­
tion.
Changed: Eligibility requirement reduced to 1 year. Pay in
lieu of vacation to equal 3 percent of earnings.
Added: 2 weeks' vacation with 4 percent of previous year’s
earnings provided employee with 5 years’ service or
more; 6 percent when required to work during the 2
weeks.

Vacation pay provided employee when employment rela­
tionship was terminated.
Added: 3 weeks’ vacation with 6 percent of previous year’s
earnings provided employee with 15 years’ service or
more; 9 percent when required to work during the 3
weeks.

June 1, 1951 (agreement of
same date)
Dec. 1, 1952 (agreement
dated Nov. 29,1952)
June 1, 1953 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1956 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1957 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1959 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1963 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1964 (agreement
dated June 1,1963)
June 1, 1965 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1966 (agreement
dated June 1, 1965)

June 1 1967 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

Employee permitted to take up to 2 weeks’ unpaid vacation a
year, on 30 days' written notice.
Continuous employment broken only by discharge for
cause or voluntary separation.

Added: Vacation pay at appropriate rate, but not vacation,
provided employee unable to work 1,400 hours in pre­
vious year because of occupational injury.
Changed to: 2 weeks’ vacation after 3 years’ continuous
service.
Added: Employee permitted to charge against vacation: ab­
sences due to his own illness or death in family.
Reduced: Minimum hours worked in previous year—to
1,040.
Added: 4 weeks’ vacation with 8 percent of previous year’s
earnings provided employee with 25 years’ service or
more; 12 percent is required to work the 4 weeks.
Changed to: 3 weeks’ vacation after 10 years’ continuous
service.
Changed to: 4 weeks’ vacation after 23 years' continuous
service.
Changed to: 4 weeks’ vacation after 20 years’ continuous
service.
Added: 5 weeks' vacation with 10 percent of previous year’s
earnings provided employee with 30 years’ service or
more; 15 percent when required to work the 5 weeks.
Changed: 4 weeks' vacation after 15 years’ continuous
service.
Changed: 5 weeks’ vacation after 25 years’ continuous ser­
vice, 6 weeks with 12 percent of previous year’s earnings
after 30 years, 18 percent when required to work the 6
weeks.
Changed: 3 weeks' vacation after 8 years of continuous
service.

Pro

rata vacation provided employee with 3 years’
service or more when terminated.

Added: Pro rata vacation pay provided employee with 3
years’ service or more but less than 1,040 hours of work
in previous year.

Changed: For employee working less than 1,040 hours in
previous year, service requirement for pro rata vacation
pay (with no scheduled time off) reduced to 1 year.

See footnotes at end of table

15

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Effective date

Paid vacations—Continued
June 1, 1974 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: 5 weeks’ vacation after 20 years of continuous
service.

Added: Employee committed to retire at age 62 or later on
written request was permitted to waive vacation earned
and due to be taken in the last full year of employment
prior to retirement and receive vacation pay in lieu. Such
employee also, on request, permitted to defer until the
date of retirement any vacation and vacation pay earned
during the last full year of employment prior to retire­
ment.
Changed: If an employee lost a partial work week due to
temporary curtailed plant operations, an election could
be made to accumulate each short period of less than a
full week up to 5 work days, and such time could then be
charged to vacation time with regular vacation pay.
Added: Occupational injury—regularly scheduled work
hours lost credited as hours worked in computing vaca­
tion pay in vacation year in which injury occurred and
the following vacation year.

Call-in pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 1, 1939 (agreement of
same date)

Minimum of 3 hours’ pay guaranteed employee called to
perform repair or maintenance work; 4 hours’ guaran­
teed employee called to change paper machine wires.
Changed: 4-hour guarantee extended to repair and mainte­
nance work and changing Fourdrinier wires, welt felts,
and dryer felts.

June 1, 1951 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1952 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1956 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1959 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1962 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

Not applicable to employees on extra board who were re­
quired to report for work regularly until assigned to
regular job.
Added: When regular plus extra hours worked exceeded 8,
employee to be paid greater of sum due under call-in or
overtime provisions.
Not applicable to employee held over at end of shift.
Changed: Guarantee made applicable to employee on extra
board.
Added: Not applicable to employee in mill yard or called-in
for planned, anticipated, or predetermined work.
Added: Guarantee made applicable to employee required to
work beyond regular shift to change paper machine
wires and employee called-in at other than designated
starting time to perform emergency work.
Added: Guarantee extended to any work on paper machine
proper.
Added: Guarantee extended to any work of 2 hours and 40
minutes or less that was not a continuation of a regular
shift.
Changed: Guarantee extended to planned, anticipated, and
predetermined work.
Added: Guarantee extended to day workers called back
to work after shift was completed.
Changed Guarantee extended to employee in mill yard when
called-in to work.
Added: Employee who had not had an 8-hour rest period,
and was required to work 2 hours and 40 minutes or less
which was not a continuation of a regular shift, was paid
according to overtime or call-in provisions, whichever
resulted in higher net pay.

Reporting pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19,1938)
June 1, 1941 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: Minimum of 2 hours’ work guaranteed
employee called to work or not properly notified of lack
of work.

June 1, 1951 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1958 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)

Added: Minimum 4 hours’ pay guaranteed employee put to
work.
Changed: Minimum of 2 hours’ pay guaranteed employee
not put to work.

See footnotes at end of table.

16

Not applicable when lack of work was caused by conditions
beyond control of company or to extra men assigned to
roster containing larger work force than was required.
Extra board employee required to report at specific times or
for specific shifts to be eligible for minimum guarantee
after accumulating 30 days' service.

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
j

Reporting pay— Continued

June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: Employee who started a scheduled shift and then
was rescheduled to a later period within the 24 hour
period after start of the scheduled shift because of
emergency, to receive 4 hours straight time pay for the
rescheduled period plus not less than 4 hours pay for
working the rescheduled period.

Paid rest periods
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 1, 1951 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established for women employees in Mobile bag factory and
all continuous finishing room operations—two 10minute paid rest periods.
Paid sick leave

June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 1, 1955 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1963 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: 40 hours' paid sick leave at regular hourly rate
provided employee with 6 months’ service or more in­
capacitated 2 weeks or more by sicknessor nonoccupational injury.
Eliminated: Sick leave pay.

Employee required to provide medical evidence of inability
to perform duties. Leave limited to 1 illness in contract
year.
See “Insurance plan.”

Jury duty pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 1, 1959 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: Difference between straight-time hourly rate
times regular scheduled hours (8-hour period) and
statutory fee paid employee while serving on jury.

Jury duty not included in hours worked for overtime pur­
poses.
Added: Employee scheduled to work the 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.
shift immediately before serving the first day of jury duty
was not required to work but was paid for that shift at his
scheduled straight-time rate.

June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

Severance pay
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19,1938)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.

June 1, 1967 (agreement of
same date)

Increased to: Maximum of 2 percent of total earnings during
last period of unbroken employment.

Established: Plan providing employee with 1 year’s service
or more, laid-off because of lack of work, with maximum
of 1 percent of total earnings during last period of
unbroken employment. Half benefit paid after 6 weeks’
layoff, remainder after 3 months.

Unpaid benefits (1) not paid to employee recalled and who
returned to work before payment was due, (2) canceled
for employee recalled before receipt of benefit if he did
not return to work.
New earnings credits to be accumulated on return to work.
Employee recalled before 3-month period to retain credit
for unpaid balance of severance benefits.

Funeral leave
June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 19, 1938)
June 1, 1959 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: Up to 3 paid days of absence at regular
straight-time rate allowed because of death in immedi­
ate family.

June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)

See footnotes at end of table.

17

Immediate family defined as spouse, mother, father,
brothers, sisters, sons, and daughters.
Paid leave limited to day before, day of, and day after
funeral, and to 8 hours a day for absences that fell on
scheduled days of work.
No pay provided employee who did not attend funeral.
Not included in hours worked for overtime purposes.
Added: To definition of immediate family— mother-in-law
and father-in-law

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

i Funeral leave—Continued
June 1, 1973 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: Paid funeral leave absence could be for any 3
consecutive days, one of which to be the day of funeral
(previously, the day before, the defy of the funeral, and
the day after were specified as the 3 days to be taken).
Added: Definition of family to include step parents where
employee lived in same household with step parents or
where legal adoption occurred.
Added: Funeral leave to cover grandmothers and grand­
fathers.

June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Mealtime pay
June 1,
dated
June 1,
dated

1937 (agreement
Jan. 16, 1938)
1951 (agreement
Oct. 12,1951)

Dec. 2, 1952 (agreement
dated Nov. 29, 1952)
June 1, 1953 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: Paid meal period, but not meals provided
employee after 3 hours’ work beyond assigned shift and
at 5-hour intervals thereafter.

Changed: Meal periods provided (1) day-workers after 2
hours on extended shift, and (2) shift workers at approx­
imately regular meal intervals during extended shift.
Changed: Paid meal period provided before start of over­
time and each 5 hours thereafter to employee required to
work overtime after assigned 12-hour shift

June 1, 1958 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1961 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: Paid meal periods provided shift workers on dou­
ble shifts.

June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Meal periods limited to 30 to 40 minutes. Not applicable to
employee who exchanged shifts at own request.
One-half hour’s pay at overtime rates in lieu of meal period
provided employee required to work up to 1 hour beyond
regular schedule.
Women in Mobile bag factory and all continuous finishing
room operations provided 20-minute paid lunch period.

Added: Company to send and pay for meal of employee una­
ble to leave job at designated meal periods. Employee
required to work part of lunch period could elect full
lunch period later in shift.
Meal periods to be provided at approximately regular
mealtimes during additional shift.
Changed: Women in Mobile bag factory and all continuous
finishing room operations—20 minute paid lunch period
in mills with 2 shifts limited to 2d shift. Previous practice
continued in mills with 3 shifts.

Added: $2 meal allowance provided: (1) day workers after
working 2 hours beyond assigned shift and at 5 hour in­
tervals thereafter; (2) dayworkers after an assigned 12
hour shift,and at5hour intervals thereafter; (3) fo r“tour
workers held over (including a holdover for wire and/or
clothing change)”, and (4) employees called in who
work more than 5 hours on the call in.
Wire and clothing time pay

June 1, 1937 (agreement
dated Jan. 16, 1938)
June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

No provision.
Established: Minimum 6 hours’ pay guaranteed employee
who worked other than on his regular shift in putting in
paper machine wires ancVor paper machine clothing
and/or who worked on the paper machine proper bet­
ween the fan pump and the winder inclusive, during wire
and/or clothing changes.

See footnotes at end of table.

18

This time previously considered as call-in time and paid as
such.
Employee to do any other work required during the wire
and/or clothing changes or incidental to the start-up of
the machine after such changes.
Employee engaged in both wire and clothing changes dur­
ing the same work period to be paid on the basis of the
wire time provision.
The6-hour minimum for wire and/or clothing changes not to
apply during a scheduled repair shutdown provided
notice was posted at least 16 hours before the shutdown.
Employee was not eligible for both call time and wire and/or
clothing time for work on wire and clothing changes.

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increase

Effective date

Wire and clothing time pay— Continued
June 1, 1973 (agreement of
same date)

Added: Employee who was called in for wire and clothing
time after having worked 16 consecutive hours, but
before having 8 hours rest period, engaged at time other
than the period of employee’s regular shift in putting on
paper machine wires anchor paper machine clothing
and/or who worked on the paper machine proper bet­
ween the fan pump and the winder inclusive during wire
and/or clothing changes wod Id receive no less than (1)6
hours' pay at employee’s straight-time rate or the over­
time rate for hours worked, whichever was greater; or (2)
time and one-half for all hours worked until employee
was given 8-hour rest period whichever would net
employee the most compensation.
Insurance plans

June 1, 1937.

Sept. 1,1938

Oct. 1, 1947

June 1, 1950.

Dec. 1,1952.
June 1, 1954
June 1, 1955.

Contributory plan available to employees with 6 months’
service or more, providing:
Life insurance—$1,000 to $3,000 depending on annual earn­
ings.2

Accidental death or dismemberment— Death—double face
value of life insurance.
Dismemberment—one-half to full face value of life insurance depending on extent of loss.
Total and permanent disability benefits—$51.04 to $54 a
month for 20 to 40 months.2
Sickness and accident benefits— $10 to $20 a week for maximum of 26 weeks2 for each nonoccupational disability;
payable from 8th day of disability.
Visiting nurse service—provided in home, as necessary.
Added: For retired employees:
Life and accidental death or dismemberment—face value of
insurance at time of retirement made available to
employee with 15 years' service or more and eligible
under the pension plan, at cost of 60 cents per $1,0003

Added: For retired employees:
Life and accidental death or dismemberment—face value of
insurance at time of retirement provided without cost to
employee, with 15 years’ service or more and eligible
under pension plan.
Changed to: Sickness and accident benefits—$10 to $26 a
week.4
Increased: Sickness and accident benefits—maximum to
$28.5
Added:
Noncontributory hospital-surgical-medical plan for em­
ployees with 6 months’ service or more, providing:6
Hospitalization:
Room and board— up to $12 a day, maximum $840.
Special services—up to $150.
Maternity obstetrical— $150 for normal delivery, $75 to
$225 for other procedures.
Medical care:
Doctor's services—$4 for each hospital visit, maximum
$250.
Surgical benefits:
Surgical schedule—up to $250.

See footnotes at end of table.

19

Plans established in 1923, not covered by collective
bargaining agreement. Employee weekly contributions
were 25 cents of annual earnings under $1,500,50 cents
if $1500 but under $2,500, and 75 cents if $2,500 or over.
Life and accidental death and dismemberment insurance in­
creased $100 for each year’s service up to 5. Employee
with annual earnings of $2,500 but less than $5,000 per­
mitted to subscribe to additional $2,000 coverage (at
cost of 35 cents a week); employee earning $5,000 or
more could subscribe for the $2,000 (at the stated rate)
plus $5,000 additional coverage (at cost of 83 cents a
week).
In addition to total and permanent disability benefits.

Paid in lieu of death benefits.

All insurance: Coverage levels maintained for disabled
employee required to accept job with lower than pre­
disability wage rate; company to pay difference between
contribution required at former and new earnings.
Company assumed entire contributons of employee dis­
abled 8 days or more.
Insurance extended 6 months for employee temporarily laid
off or on approved leave of absence; employee to con­
tinue contributions.
Employee who retired in good health before age 65 required
to contribute to that age.3 Insurance continued without
cost during period retiree received sickness and acci­
dent benefits or workmen's compensation, up to 26
weeks.

Coverage extended up to 2 months during periods of tem­
porary layoff; to termination of scheduled services for
hospitalization and pregnancy, in effect on date employ­
ment relationship ceased, or surgery performed prior to
that date. Retired employees’ benefits provided for 1 dis­
ability in each 12-month period.

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Insurance plans— Continued

June 1,1956.........................
June 1,1958.........................

Increased to:
Sickness and accident benefits—$15 to $40 a week.
Added:
For retired employment:
Life and accidental death or dismemberment insurance—
reduced coverage at company expense provided
employee retired at age 65 with 10 but less than 15 years’
service.1

June 1, 1959,

June 1, 1961,

Added: Company to contribute $2 a month towards cost of
d e p en d e n ts’ h o s p ita l-s u rg ic a l-m e d ic a l benefits.
Benefits identical to those provided employee.
Changed: Company assumed full cost of life, accidental
death and dismemberment, and sickness and accident
insurance for active employees.
Added: All group insurance extended up to 8 weeks, at com­
pany expense, for employee temporarily laid off through
no fault of his own; could be extended additional 4
months by payment of contribution by employee.
Eliminated: Opportunity to elect additional insurance.

Increased: Life insurance— maximum to $10,000.9

Total and permanent disability benefits— maximum, to $180
a month for 66 months.
Sickness and accident benefits— $20 to $50 a week.* Maternity benefits up to 6 weeks added.
Ch anged: fo r emp toyees an d dependents, h ospita l-su rg icalmedical program— from indemnity to service (Blue
Cross-Blue Shield) benefit plan providing:

V
Hospitalization: Room and board—up to 70 days per admission; in member hospital, full semiprivate room charge;
in non member hospital, actual charges up to $10 a day.
Special services—for charges other than room and board, in
member hospitals fu II coverage up to 70 days an admis­
sion for the following services: Use of operating, recov­
ery and treatment rooms and equipment, drugs and
medicines for use in hospital; dressings, ordinary splints
and plaster casts, and when provided and billed as a
regular hospital service, laboratory and X-ray examina­
tions, electrocardiograms, intravenous injections and
solutions, physical therapy, oxygen and its administra­
tion, administration of blood and blood plasma, and
anesthetics and their administration.
In nonmember hospitals, 75 percent of actual charges for
services and supplies listed for member hospitals.
Emergency care— in member and non-member hospitals,
charges for emergency surgical or medical care and
treatment within 24 hours of accident.

Maternity benefits—full coverage for hospital charges for
maximum of 10 days.
Surgical benefits—surgical schedule up to $300.
Anesthesia—greater of $15 or 20 percent of scheduled
surgical fee for administration of anesthesia by doctor
not in charge of case.
Obstetrical benefits—up to $90 for normal delivery, $60 to
$250 for other procedures.
Medical benefits— doctor's services up to $4 for each of
maximum of 70 hospital visits.

Diagnostic X-ray exam inations—$5 to $35, maximum
$50 in 12 consecutive months.

Laboratory services—$10 to $25, maximum $50 in 12 con­
secutive months.
See footnotes at end of table.

20

Company to continue paying full cost of employee
coverage; contribution for dependents increased to $3 a
month.
Dependent defined as a spouse and children (1) under 19
years of age, (2) if full time student, to age 23, or (3) dur­
ing period of permanent incapacity.
Employee using private room in member hospital to pay
difference between that charge and hospital’s average
charge for semiprivate accommodations, up to $10 a
day.
Benefits limited to 30 days in 12 consecutive months for
treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis or mental or ner­
vous disorders.
Supplies and services available only to bed patients and
limited to drugs and medicines listed in official formul­
aries.
Hospitalization benefits not available for: Services of doc­
tors and technicians not employed by hospital or special
nurses; occupational disabilities or those for which
treatment was provided by statute; chronic alcoholism
or drug addiction after diagnosis; diagnostic studies or
tests or physical therapy; plastic surgery or cosmetic
treatment unless necessary to correct traumatic injury;
personal comfort services; X-ray and radium therapy and
radium isotopes; blood or blood plasma; convalescent
care; dental care by other than licensed doctor of
medicine unless necessitated by accident, special
braces, appliances or equipment.
Up to 70 days’ hospitalization provided for ectopic pregnan­
cies.
Surgical and medical exclusions almost identical to
hospitalization exclusions.

Limited to 1 treatment a day. Not available for patient
who had received surgical or obstetrical care. Available
for pulmonary tuberculosis or mental disorders up to 30
days in 12 consecutive months.
Not available for: Pregnancy, care of teeth, research studies,
screening, routine physical or premarital examinations,
routine hospital admission procedures, fluoroscopy
without films, or examinations not necessary to a diag­
nosis.

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Insurance plans— Continued

June 3, 1963.

Increased to: Sickness and accident benefits—$50 to $70 a
week payable from first day of hospitalization or acci­
dent and 4th day of sickness.1
0
Increased: Total and permanent disability benefits—
minimum to $90 a month.1
0

June 1, 1967 (agreement of
same date)
June 1, 1969 (agreement
dated June 1, 1967)
Sept. 1, 1970 (agreement of
June 1, 1970)

June 1, 1971 (agreement
June 1,1970)
June 1, 1972 (agreement
June 1,1970)
June 1, 1973 (agreement
same date)
Sept. 1, 1973 (agreement
June 1, 1973)

of
of

Added: Company assumed full cost of group life insurance
for early retirees (retired at age 62 or older with 20 years
or more of continuous employment).
Increased: Company contributon to dependent hospital in­
surance—to $4 a month.
Increased: Surgical benefits— surgical schedule maximum
to $455, unless fixed fee surgical schedule provided
greater allowance.
Changed: Anesthesia—to 20 percent of surgical schedule
allowance (was greater of $15 or 20 percent).

Increased: Sickness and accident benefits—to range from
$50 to $92 a week.1
1
Increased: Sickness and accident benefits—to range from
$50 to $114 a week.1
1

of
of

June 1, 1975 (agreement of
June 1, 1973)
June 1, 1976 (agreement of
June 1, 1973)
June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Discontinued: 1 week’s paid sick leave a year at 40 times
hourly rate.

Added: Benefits available under Blue Cross/Blue Shield
Health Program to be coordinated with those payable
under other plans to prevent duplication of benefits.
Changed: Plan to provide payment to physician other than
attending physician for interpretation or performance of
radiological procedures and surgical and clinical
pathological procedures, or examinations rendered
hospital bed patients, on basis of physician's claim after
service. Payment not made if service was covered as
hospital benefit.
Changed: Dependent definition for permanently disabled
children to include only those so disabled before reach­
ing age 19.
Company contribution for dependent health coverage in­
creased to $5 a month.
Company contribution for dependent health coverage in­
creased to $6 a month.
Company contribution for dependent health coverage in­
creased to $7 a month.

Increased: Surgical benefits—surgical schedule to maxi­
mum $600, unless fixed fee surgical schedule provided
greater allowance.
Changed: Diagnostic X-ray examinations—to range of $5
to $40, maximum $50 for each eligible patient during a
period of 12 consecutive months.
Increased: Hospitalization—room and board up to a max­
imum of 120 days per admission.
Changed: Dependent definition— an employee’s unmarried
child between 19 and 23 years of age who was a full-time
student in a recognized course of study or training but
could not be employed on a regular full-time basis and
had to be chiefly dependent upon the employee for sup­
port. The term child also was to include any blood des­
cendant of the first degree who was supported by the
employee, but did not permanently reside in the
employee’s household.
Added: Surviving spouse coverage— If employee with a
minimum of 15 years of service or a retiree while receiv­
ing pension died, surviving spouse could continue
coverage for self and eligible dependents, provided they
were covered at time of death of employee or retiree.
Surviving spouse and eligible dependents would lose
insurance coverage if:
(1) Employed and eligible for group health in­
surance;
(2) Failed to pay the full premium for coverage;
(3) Remarried; or
(4) Died
Increased: Company contribution for dependent health
coverage to $10 a month.
Increased: Company contribution for dependent health
coverage to $20 a month.
Increased: Sickness and accident benefits maximum
to $142 a week.12.
Increase: Life insurance— maximum to $13,000.1
3

See footnotes at end of table.

21

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Insurance plan— Continued
Sept. 1, 1977 (agreement of
June 1, 1977)

June 1, 1978 (agreement of
June 1, 1977)
Sept. 1, 1978 (agreement of
June 1, 1977)

Increased: Surgical benefits— surgical schedule maximum
to $900, unless fixed fee surgical schedule provided
greater allowance.
Changed: $200 maximum per covered member during a
calendar year for outpatient diagnostic x-ray examina­
tion and pathological examination on an out-patient
basis which were necessary for the diagnosis of an ill­
ness or injury.
Added: Provision to pay physician for treatment of any acci­
dental injury, which included physician’s services for xray or any service required to treat the specific injury
derived from an accident.
Improved: Emergency care— limitation for surgical or medi­
cal care for outpatient—emergency treatment to 72
hours (was 24).
Established: Major medical expense plan, which paid 80
percent of first $5,000 of usual, customary and reasona­
ble charges in excess of basic plan benefits and $100
deductible and 100 percent of charges over $5,000, up to
maximum of $250,000 per individual per lifetime (also an­
nual maximum). Mental and nervous disorder paid for at
50 percent of charges.

Increased: Maternity benefits—full coverage for hospital
charges to 120 days (was 10).

Once two members of a family met the calendar year deduc­
tible for a particular year, no other member was subject
to the requirement.
Major medical covered major medical expenses, with cer­
tain limitations: Semi-private hospital room and board,
$5 a day toward charges for private accommodations
(when medically necessary); doctors service for medical
and surgical care; registered or licensed practical nurs­
ing care; laboratory and x-ray examination and treat­
ment; prescription drugs and medicine and blood; ox­
ygen, casts, splints and dressing, prosthetic appliances
and braces, rental of iron lung, wheelchair, hospital bed
or other medically necessary mechanical appliances,
ambulance service; treatment for accidental injury to
natural teeth or jaw.

Increased: Sickness and accident benefits— maximum
to $150 a week.1
2
Increased: Surgical benefits—surgical schedule maximum
to $1,000, unless fixed fee surgical schedule provided
greater allowance.

Retirement plan
Jan. 1, 1937
Feb. 1, 1946

No provision.
Established: Contributory plan requiring employee con­
tributions and company payments and providing
benefits (in addition to Federal old-age, survivors’ and
disability insurance) as follows:
Contributions: Employee—2'/< percent of first $3,000 annual
earnings and 4V4 percent of remainder up to $15,000;
company—actuarially determined amounts sufficient to
fund prior service credits and, with employee contribu­
tions, to provide benefits based on service after plan was
established.
Normal retirement annuity—employee aged 65 or older to
receive: (1) For service after plan was established, basic
annual benefits equal to the sum of 0.75 percent of first
$3,000 earned plus 1.5 percent of earnings above $3,000
but not in excess of $15,000 times credited years in plan,
plus (2) for 6th and subsequent years of company serv­
ice before plan was established and after reaching age
30, basic annual benefits of 0.5 percent of first $3,000
and 1 percent of earnings above $3,000, but not in ex­
cess of $15,000 times credited years of service.
Early retirement annuity—employee aged 55 but under 65
with 20 years’ service or more retired with consent or at
request of company cou Id elect (1) immediate actuarially
reduced annuity, or (2) deferred normal benefit payable
at age 65.

See footnotes at end of table.

22

Plan was established Jan. 1, 1945; benefits were first paid
and employee contributions were collected on effective
date shown.
To be eligible to participate, employee must have (1) been
30 years of age or over, (2) been regularly employed full
time, and (3) had 5 years’ service since last break in ser­
vice of more than 12 months.
Benefits of employee whose plan coverage was discon­
tinued for any reason, except military or other approved
leave, to be based on earnings in last period of service
after rejoining plan.
Annual earnings for period before plan was established
based on, 2,496 hours at basic hourly rate in effect im­
mediately prior to establishment of plan.

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Effective date

Retirement plan— Continued
Feb. 1, 1946— Continued

Joint and survivorship option— providing actuarially
reduced annuities to employee and beneficiary.

June 1, 1950.

Increased: Contributions— maximum income on which contributions were paid—to $30,000.
Normal retirement annuity— maximum earnings used to
compute annuity, to $30,000.
Added: Vesting—employee age 50 or over with 25 years cre­
dited service or more terminated for any reason could
elect (1) deferred normal annuity at age 65 based on
compensation and service at termination, or (2) to with­
draw own contribution plus interest.
Added: Disability retirement annuity— immediate actuarially
reduced annuity provided employee totally and perma­
nently disabled.
Added: Disability retirement annuity— immediate normal annuity, based on earnings and service, provided totally
and permanently disabled employee with 25 years’
service or more.
Added: Minimum monthly annuity—$50 for employee with
15 years’ service or more at age 65, reduced propor­
tionately for less than 15 years' service.
Reduced: Vesting— age, to 45; years of credited service to

Dec. 1, 1952.

June 1, 1955.

June 1, 1958.

Employee could elect amount payable to beneficiary upon
death after his retirement equal to or one-half basic
benefit or any other proportion acceptable to retirement
board.
Contributions plus interest paid beneficiary of employee
who died before retiring; balance of contribution paid
beneficiary of retiree who died, without electing optional
benefits, before benefits equaled contributions.

Reduced: Service required to participate in plan since last
break in service in excess of 12 months, to 3 years.

Applicable to employee retiring after May 31,1958.
Added: For employee retired before June 1, 1958, supple­
mental allowance provided by company continued.

20 .
June 1, 1961.

July 1, 1963

O ct 1, 1963 .
June 1, 1965.

June 1, 1966.
June 1, 1967 (agreement of
same date)

Increased: Normal retirement annuity—by one-third for cre­
dited service before Jan. 1, 1961.
Changed: Minimum monthly annuity—$50 for employee
with 15 but less than 20 years* service, $55for20but less
than 25 years, and $60 for 25 years or more; employee
with less than 15 years to receive, annually, $40 times
years of service.
Changed: Disability retirement annuity— immediate annuity
based on earnings and service at time of disability for
employee with (1) less than 20 years' service—normal
annuity actuarially reduced for years below 65, (2) 20
years' service or more— normal annuity.
Removed: $30,000 limit on earnings.
Reduced:Contributionsof employee on first $3,000 annual
earnings, by 25 percent.

D isa b ility retirem ent an nu ity— service required for
unreduced benefits, to 15 years.
Increased: Normal retirement annuity— all benefits earned
before Jan. 1,1965, by 15 percent; for service after Dec.
31, 1964— by 0.875 percent of first $3,000 earned.
Added: Early retirement annuity—employee aged 62 but
under65 with 20 years' serviceorm oreto receive full an­
nuity based on years of service and earnings.
Joint and survivorship option— spouse of employee aged 63
or over with 30 years1 service or more who died before
receiving annuity, could elect to receive a benefit under
a 50-percent survivorship option.
Reduced: Contributions—by additional 25 percent of
original contribution.
Eliminated: Contributions—of employees on first $3,000 an­
nual earnings (advanced from June 1,1968 date negoti­
ated in 1965).

June 1, 1969 (agreement
dated June 1, 1967)

Changed: Employee who was a contributory member of plan
on June 1, 1965, or joined plan within 90 days, and who
(1) had discontinued contributions after a prior period of
membership, (2) had been employed continuously, and
(3) had not withdrawn contributions, to have benefits
based on all earnings while a member of plan.

Employee must have designated, 60 days or more before
death, widow as beneficiary with rights to receive ac­
cumulated contributions. Spouse to receive one-half
benefit employee would have received had he retired.

Added: Any benefit changes negotiated in 1970 were to ap­
ply to employees retired during third year of labor con­
tract (June 1 , 1969-May 31,1970).

See footnotes at end of table.

23

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Effective date

Retirement plan— Continued
June 1, 1970 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1973 (agreement of
same date)

June 1, 1974 (agreement
dated June 1, 1973

Eliminated: Employee contributions to plan.
Increased: Normal retirement annuity— by 20 percent of
allowance accrued before Jan. 1, 1970. This included
allowance based on prior service (before 1945) and
allowance based on membership service (1945 to 1970).
Minimum monthly annuity— eligible member retiring age 65
to receive $5 a month a year of credited service during
which he worked 1,000 hoursor more. Minimum annuity
extended to eligible members who retired at age 62 with
20 years of service or more.
Increased: Monthly annuity of previously retired employees
by 1.5 percent for each year between effective date of
retirement and June 1, 1969.
Changed: Vesting—employee with 15 years of service and
terminated for any cause, except death or retirement
under plan, entitled to deferred pension provided he did
not withdraw accumulated contributions to the plan and
applied for pension at or after age 65.
Increased: Early retirement annuity—employee under age
62 and with 20 years or more of service to receive 50 to
92 percent (was 45 to 70 percent) of normal pension, de­
pending on age at retirement.1
4
Increased: Normal retirement annuity— by 10 percent of
allowance accrued to Jan. 1,1973. Applied to prior ser­
vice (before Jan. 1, 1945) and to membership service
(Jan. 1, 1945 to Jan. 1, 1973).
Increased: Monthly annuity of retirees who retired before
June 1,1973 by 2 percent per year for each full or partial
year of retirement between retirement date and Dec. 31,
1974.
Liberalized: Benefits for former members of the pension
plan.

Added: $7.50 month benefit for each year of service
(maximum 3) prior to initial membership in retirement
plan, in addition to other benefits for which retiree was
eligible under the plan.
Increased: Minimum monthly annuity for eligible members
retiring at age 65—to $6 a month times years of credited
service which member worked 1,000 hours or
more. Increase also extended to eligible members who
retired at age 62 with 20 years of service or more.
Increased: Normal retirement .annuity—by 7 'h percent of
allowance accrued to Jan. 1,1973. Applied to prior ser­
vice (before Jan. 1, 1945) and to membership service
(Jan. 1, 1945 to Jan. 1,1973).
Increased: Minimum monthly annuity for eligible members
retiring at age 65 and those retiring at age 62 with 20
years of service or more—to $6.50 a month times years of
credited service during which member worked 1,000
hours or more.
Changed: Surviving spouse’s benefits— spouse of a mem­
ber of the plan, age 60 or over with 30 years of service or
more who died before commencing to receive a pension,
cou Id elect to receive same allowance as if member had
retired just before death and had designated the spouse
as beneficiary under the 50 percent option.
Changed: Vesting eligibility reduced to 12 years of service.
Changed: Disability retirement annuity—service required
for unreduced benefits— to 12 years.

See footnotes at end of table.

24

Applicable to those who retired on or after June 1,1969.

Applicable to employees who retired before June 1, 1969,
and who received retirement allowance.
Increased: Interest on members’ account to 4.5 percent per
year compounded annually (was 3.5 percent).

Applicable for retirement between June 1,1973, and May 31,
1974.

For those retiring on or after June 1, 1973—employee who,
during last period of continuous employment, had (1)
been a contributing member of the pension plan for a
prior period, (2) stopped contributing although working
continuously for the company, (3) left the contributions
in the plan and (4) subsequently rejoined the plan,
would receive credit toward pension calculation for all
periods of service for which employee made required
contributions to the plan.
A p p lica b le for retirem ent betw een
and May 31,1974.

June 1, 1973,

Applicable for retirement between June 1,1973, and May 31,
1974.

Applicable for retirement between June 1,1974, and May 31,
1975.

Applicable for retirement between June 1,1974, and May 31,
1975.

Employee must have designated spouse as beneficiary 60
days or more before death, for spouse to receive choice
of refund of member accumulated contributions or onehalf benefit employee would have received had
employee retired.
Age requirement continued to be 65.

Table 3.

Continued— Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increase
Retirement plan— Continued

Dec. 31, 1974 (agreement
dated June 1, 1973)

Changed: Vesting eligibility reduced to 10 years of service.

June 1, 1975 (agreement
dated June 1, 1973)

Increased: Normal retirement annuity— by 5 percent of
allowance accrued to Jan. 1, 1973. Applied to prior
service (before Jan. 1,1945) and to membership service
(Jan. 1,1945 to Jan. 1,1973).
Changed: $7.50 month benefit for each year of service (max­
imum ii) prior to initial membership in retirement plan, in
addition to other benefits for which retiree was eligible
under the plan.
Increased: Minimum monthly annuity for eligible members
retiring at age 65 and to those retiring at age 62 with 20
years of service or more to $7.50 a month times years of
credited service during which member worked 1,000
hours or more.
Employee who retired on or after Jan. 1, 1975 to receive
retirement benefits computed under old formula or an
alternate formula, whichever resulted in larger pension:
Old formula— V
*of 1 percent of first $3,000earnings for years
of membership service prior to Jan. 1,1965; plus %of 1
percent of first $3,000 earnings for years of membership
service after Jan. 1, 1965; plus 1 'A percent of earnings
over $3,000 for each year of membership service (based
on career average earnings); plus all applicable in­
creases to accrued benefits and applicable waiting
period benefits.
Alternate formula: %of 1 percent of first $6,600; plus 1'/«percent of balance multiplied by all years of service to
December 31, 1973 for all workers who joined the plan
when first eligible (based on 1973 earnings rather than
career average earnings); plus, for 1974 service, 7 of 1
A
percent of the first $3,000 and 1 'A percent of balance ap­
plied to 1974 earnings; plus for future service that began
January 1,1975,1 percent of first $3,000 and 1 'A percent
of balance up to Social Security wage base, plus 2 per­
cent of balance over wage base applied to annual earn­
ings.
Increased: Normal retirement annuity—by 15 percent of
allowance accrued to Jan. 1, 1977.

June 1, 1977 (agreement of
same date)

Changed: Early retirement at age 55 with a minimum of 15
years of service.
Changed: Pre-retirement survivor benefit— annual reduc­
tion charge reduced to .60 percent (was .75 percent)
where eligible employee elected pre-retirement survivor
option.
Reduced: Disability retirement annuity—service require­
ment for unreduced benefits to 10 years.
Established: Employee retiring at age 60 or above permitted
to convert half of post-retirement group life insurance to
cash equivalent.

Changed: Eligibility for participation in retirement plan
reduced from 3 years to date of employment.
Applicable for retirement on or after June 1,1975.

Applicable for retirement on or after June 1, 1973.

Applicable for retirement on or after June 1, 1975.

Applied to members with prior service (before Jan. 1,1945)
and membership service (Jan. 1, 1945 to Jan. 1, 1977)
under Part I formula and to prior service (before Jan. 1,
1974) and membership service (Jan. 1, 1974 to Jan. 1,
1977) under Part II of formula. Also applied to retiree
who retired on or after June 1, 1977.
Applicable to retirement on or after June 1,1977. Reduction
factors for such retirements also were reduced.1
5

Applicable to retirement on or after June 1,1977.
If employee elected to take early retirement before age 60,
such option could be exercised provided employee
made application within 90 days before 60th birthday.
Added: Deceased retiree’s monthly pension check due the
retiree for the month in which death occurred, to be paid
to surviving spouse or designated beneficiary.

Increased: Benefit allowance for existing required 3-year or
5-year waiting period to $9 per month for each year of
service during waiting period prior to initial eligibility.
Changed: Employee contributions deducted before June 1,
1970 from earnings of members of the plan who were in
active service as of June 1,1977 to be returned without
interest and without reduction in accrued benefits in 3
installments as follows: (1) 50 percent within 60 days of
government approval of such return of contribution, (2)
one-half of the remainder within 12 months of the first
payment, and (3) remainder within 12 months of the
second year.

See footnotes at end of table.

25

Footnotes to Table 3
1 Date of agreement not available.
2 Benefit levels were determined by an employee’s computed earnings as'follows:
Disability
Monthly
payment

$1,000
2,000
3,000

Under $1,500 ................................................
$1300 and under $ 2 , 5 0 0 , . , ..................
$2,500 and over.............................................

Number of
months

Weekly sickness
and accident

Weekly
contributions

$51.04
52.50
54.00

Life
insurance

Annual earnings

20
40
60

$10
15
20

$0.25
.50
.75

1 Weekly contributions ranged from $0.60 to $1.80 depending on earnings prior to retirement.
* Earnings classes and.sickness and,accident benefits were changed as follows:
Weekly sickness
and accident
benefits

Annual earnings

Weekly sickness
and accident
benefits

Annual earnings
$1,872 and
$1,976 and
$2,080 and
$2,184 and
$2388 and
$2,392 and
$2,496 and
$2,500 and
$2,600 and

Under $1,040.........................................................................
$10
$1,040 and under $1,144......................................................
11
$1,144 and under $1,248...................................................... "
12
$1,248 and under $1,352......................................................
13
$1352 and under $1,456......................................................
14
$1,456 and under $1,560......................................................
15
$1360 and under $1,664......................................................
16
$1,664 and under $1,768......................................................
17
$1,768 and under $1,872......................................................
18
5 Earnings classes and benefits were extended as follows:

under $1,976.......................................................
under $2,080 ......................................................
under $2,184......................................................
under $2,288.......................................................
under $2,392......................................................
under $2,496.......................................................
under $2,500......................................................
under $2,600.......................................................
o v e r ....................................................................

$19
20
21
22
23
24
25
25
26

Weekly sickness
and accident
benefits

Annual earnings
$2,600 and under $2,704.....................................................
$2,704 and under $2,808 .....................................................
$2,808 and o v e r...................................................................

$26
27
28

• At their own expense, employees could provide this coverage for their dependents, and retirees could subscribe for themselves as their dependents.
7 Earnings classes and sickness and accident benefits were changed as follows:
Weekly sickness
and accident
benefits

Annual earnings
Under $1,560.........................................................................
$1,560 and under $1,820......................................................
$1,820 and under $2,080......................................................
$2,080 and under$2,340.....................................................
$2,340 and under $2,600.....................................................

Weekly sickness
and accident
benefits

Annual earnings

$2,600 and under $2,860............................................................
$2,860and under$3,120.............................................................
$3,120 and under $3,380.............................................................
$3,380 and under $3,640.............................................................
$3,640 and under $3,900.............................................................
$3,900 and over............................................................................

$15.00
17.50
20.00
22.50
25.00

$27.50
30.00
32.50
35.00
37.50
40.00

8 Face value of insurance was as follows:
Years of senrice
10
11
12
13
14

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

11 years
12 years
13 years
14 years
15 years

Insurance
$ 550

1,100
1,650
2,750
4,125

9 Benefits levels were determined by an employee’s earnings as follows:
Accidental death and
dismemberment

Annual earnings
Under
$1,500
$2,500
$3,000
$3,500
$4,000
$4,500
$5,000

$ 1 300...........................................
and under $2,500.......................
and under $3,000.......................
and under $3,500.......................
and under $4,000.......................
and under $4,500.......................
and under $5,000.......................
and o v e r .....................................

Life
insurance
$1,000
2,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
10,000

Disability

Dismemberment

$1,000
2,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000

26

Number of
months

$500-$ 1,000
1,000- 2,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000

Death

Monthly
payment
$51.04
52.50
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
180.00

20
40
60
60
60
60
60
60

Weekly
sickness
and accident
$20
25
30
35
40
45
50
50

Footnotes to Table 3 —Continued
,0 The schedule of benefit levels was revised to reflect higher minimum benefits and earnings levels as follows:
Accidental death
and dismemberment
Life
insurance

Annual earnings
Less than $4,500 ...................................
$4,500 but less than $5,000.................
$5,000 but less than $5,500.................
$5,500 but less than $6,000..................
$6,000- but less than $6,500 ..............
$6,500 and o v e r.....................................

$5,000
5000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000

Disability

Dismemberment

$3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000

Monthly
payment

Number of
months

$1,500-$3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000
1,500- 3,000

Death

$90
90
180
180
180
180

60
60
60
60
60
60

Earnings classes and benefits were extended as follows:
Weekly sickness and
accident benefits
e ffe c tiv e -

Annual earnings

June 1,1971
$50
54
58
63
66
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92

Less than $4,500 ...................
$4,500 but less than $5,000..
$5,000 but less than $5,500..
$5,500 but less than $6,000..
$6,000 but less than $6,500..
$6,500 but less than $7,000..
$7,000 but less than $7,500..
$7,500 but less than $8,000..
$8,000 but less than $8,500..
$8,500 but less than $9,000..
$9,000 but less than $9,500..
$9,500 but less than $10,000.
$10,000 but less than $10,500
$10,500 but less than $11,000
$11,000 but less than $11,500
$11,500 but less than $12,000
$12,000 and o v e r...................

June 1, 1972
$50
54
58
63
66
70
74
78
82
86
90
94
98
102
106
110
114

,2 Earnings classes and benefits were extended as follows:
Weekly sickness and
accident benefits
effective—

Annual earnings

June 1, 1977
$12,000
$12,500
$13,000
$13,500
$14,000
$14,500
$15,000
$15,500
$16,000
$16,500

but less than $12,500............
but less than $13,000............
but less than $13,500............
but less than $14,000...........
but less than $14,500............
but less than $15,000............
but less than $15 50 0............
but less than $16,000...........
but less than $16,500............
and above...............................

$114
118
122
126
130
134
138
142
—
—

* Schedule for earnings below amounts shown remained unchanged.
u Life insurance benefits based on annual earnings:
Annual earnings
Less than $10,000.....................................................................................
$10,000 but less than $11,500 ................................................................
$11,500 but less than $13,000 ................................................................
$13,000 or o v e r.........................................................................................

Life
insurance
$10,000
11,000
12,000
13,000

27

June 1, 1978
$114
118
122
126
130
134
138
142
146
150

Weekly
sickness
and accident
$50
54
58
63
66
70

Footnotes to Table 3 —Continued
1 Early .etirement annuity was to be computed as follows:
4

Age

Percent of
normal pension
allowable

Percent
allowable before
June 1,1970

61..........................................................................
60 ....................................................................
59 ..........................................................................
5 8 . . . ..................................................................
57 ..........................................................................
56 ....................................................................
55 ..........................................................................

92
84
76
68
60
55
50

70
65
60
56
52
48
45

1
5

Early retirement annuity was to be computed as follows:

Age

61 .....................................................................
60 .....................................................................
59 ..........................................................................
58 ..........................................................................
57 .....................................................................
56 .....................................................................
55.............

Percent
allowable for
those retired
before
June 1, 1977

Percent
allowable for
those retired
on or after
June 1, 1977

92
84
76
68
60
55
50

92
85
81
77
73
69
65

28

Wage Chronologies Available

The following wage chronologies are available from
the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from the
regional offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics listed
on the inside back cover. Some publications are out of
print and not available from the Superintendent of
Documents but may be obtained, as long as supplies
are available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D.C. 20212, or from the Bureaus’ regional
offices. Out-of-print items also may be available for
reference in leading public, college, or university libr­
aries.
Before July 1965, basic wage chronologies and their
supplements were published in the Monthly Labor
Review and released as Bureau reports. Wage
chronologies published later are available only as
bulletins (and their supplements). Summaries of
general wage changes and new or changed working
practices are added to bulletins as new contracts are
negotiated.

Bethlehem Steel Corp. (Shipbuilding Department) and
the IUMSW—
June 1941—August 1975, BLS Bulletin 1866.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1866.
Bituminous Coal Mine Operators and United Mine
Workers of America—
October 1933—November 1974, BLS Bulletin
1799.
1974—77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1799.
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants) and the Interna­
tional Association of Machinists—
June 1936—September 1977, BLS Bulletin 1895.
1977—80, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1895.
Commonwealth Edison Co. and the Electrical Workers
(IBEW)—
October 1945—March 1974, BLS Bulletin 1808.
1974— 79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1808.
Dan River Inc. and the Textile Workers (UTWA)—
1943—76, BLS Bulletin 1934.
FMC Corp., Chemical Group—Fiber Division and the
TWUA—
1945—77, BLS Bulletin 1924.
1977—79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1924.
Federal Employees under the General Schedule Pay
System—
July 1924—October 1974, BLS Bulletin 1870.
1975—
77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1870.
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and B.F. Goodrich Co.
(Akron Plants) and the Rubber Workers—
1937—79, BLS Bulletin 2011.
Ford Motor Co., and the Auto Workers—
Volume I, June 1941—September 1973, BLS
Bulletin 1787.
Volume II, 1973—79, BLS Bulletin 1994.
International Harvester Co. and the Auto Workers—
February 1946—September 1976, BLS Bulletin
1887.
1976—
79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1887.
International Paper Co., Multiple Mill Group, and the
Paperworkers and the Electrical Workers (IBEW)—
1 9 3 7 — 7 9 , BLS Bulletin 2023.
International Shoe Co. (a division of Interco, Inc.)—
1945—74, BLS Bulletin 1718.
October 1974—September 1976, Supplement to
BLS Bulletin 1718.

Aluminum Company of America with United Steel­
workers of America and Aluminum Workers Inter­
national Union—
November 1939—January 1974, BLS Bulletin
1815.
February 1974—May 1977, Supplement to BLS
Bulletin 1815.
The Anaconda Co. (Montana Mining Division) and the
Steelworkers—
1941—77, BLS Bulletin 1953.
1977—80, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1953.
Armour and Company—
1941—72, BLS Bulletin 1682.
1973—79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1682.
A.T.&T.—Long Lines Department and Communica­
tions Workers of America (AFL-CIO)—
October 1940—July 1974, BLS Bulletin 1812.
July 1974—August 1977, Supplement to BLS
Bulletin 1812.
Atlantic Richfield and the Oil Workers (Former
Sinclair Oil Facilities)—
1941—77, BLS Bulletin 1915.
1977—7 9 , Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1915.
Berkshire Hathaway Inc. and the Textile Workers—
June 1943—April 1975, BLS Bulletin 1849.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1849.
29

L ockheed—C alifornia Company (a division of
Lockheed Aircraft Corp.) and Machinists’ Union—
March 1937—October 1977, BLS Bulletin 1904.
1977—80, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1904.
Martin Marietta Aerospace and the Auto Workers—
March 1944—November 1975, BLS Bulletin
1884.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1884.
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturers and the Shoe
Workers—
1945—79, BLS Bulletin 1993.
New York City Laundries and the Clothing Workers—
November 1945—November 1975, BLS Bulletin
1845.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1845.
North Atlantic Longshoremen—
1934—71, BLS Bulletin 1736.
1971—
77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1736.
Pacific Coast Shipbuilders and Various Unions—
1941—77, BLS Bulletin 1982.
Pacific Gas and Electric Co.—
1943—72, BLS Bulletin 1761.
1972— 76, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1761.

Pacific Maritime Association and the ILWU—
1934_78, BLS Bulletin 1960.
Railroads—Nonoperating Employees—
1920—62, BLS Report 208.1
Rockwell International (Electronics, North American
Aircraft/Space Operations) and the Auto Workers—
May 1941—September 1977, BLS Bulletin 1893.
United States Steel Corporation—
March 1937—April 1974, BLS Bulletin 1814.
May 1974—July 1977, Supplement to BLS
Bulletin 1814.
Western Greyhound Lines—
1945—67, BLS Bulletin 1595.1
1968—77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1595.
Western Union Telegraph Co. and the Telegraph
Workers and the Communications Workers—
1943—76, BLS Bulletin 1927.
1976—79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1927.
1Out of print. See Directory o f Wage Chronologies, 1948—June
1977 for Monthly Labor Review issue in which reports and supple­
ments published before July 1965 appeared.

i f

30

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1979

0 - 2 8 1 - 4 1 2 (1 4 7 )

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

Region I

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston. Mass 02203
Phone: (617)223-6761

Region IV

1371 Peachtree Street. NE
Atlanta. Ga 30309
Phone: (404)881-4418
Region V

Region II

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York. N Y 10036
Phone:(212)399-5405
Region III

3535 Market Street
P O Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154

9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S Dearborn Street
Chicago. Ill 60604
Phone: (312)353-1880

Regions VII and V III*

911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481
Regions IX and X**

450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678

Region VI

Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas. Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 767-6971

Regions VII and VIII are serviced
by Kansas City
“ Regtons IX and X are serviced
by San Francisco