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U N IT E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
Frances Perkins, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Isador Lubin, Commissioner (on leave)
A . F. Hinrichs, Acting Commissioner

Vacation and Holiday Provisions
in U nion Agreements
January 1943

B ulletin 7S[o. 743
{Reprinted from the M o n th ly Labor R ev iew , M ay 1943,
w ith additional data]

UNITED STATES
GOVERNM ENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1943

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U. S. Governm ent Printing O ffice
Washington, D . C. - Price 5 cents




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

U nited States D epartment of L abor ,
B ureau of L abor Statistics ,

,

Washington, Z>. (7., M ay 25 1943.
The S ecretary of L abor :
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on vacation and
holiday provisions in union agreements. This report is based on an
analysis of approximately 12,000 agreements on file in the Bureau
o f Labor Statistics which were current during all or part of 1942.
This bulletin, a portion of which appeared in the M ay 1943 issue
o f the M onthly Labor Review, was prepared under the general super­
vision of Florence Peterson, chief of the Industrial Relations Division.
Constance Williams was in immediate charge of the agreement anal­
ysis and writing of the report.
A. F. H inrichs ,
Acting Commissioner.
Hon. F rances P erkins ,
Secretary oj Labor.

CONTENTS
Vacation provisions:
Extent of paid vacations-------- -----------------------------------------------------------Length of vacation and service requirements__________________________
Bonus in lieu of vacation_____________________________________________
Vacation p ay-------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------Conditional vacation rights___________________________________________
Vacation rights when leaving jo b -------------------------------------------------------Timing of vacation period ------------------------------------------------------------------

Pa^
e
1
2
4
4
5
5
6

Holiday provisions:
Pay for holidays not worked--------------------------------------------------------------Pay for work on holidays_____________________________________________
Holidays specified____________________________________________________
Make-up for holidays________________________________________________
Holidays during war emergency---------------------------------------------------------Sample vacation clauses in union agreements----- ---------------------------------------Sample holiday clauses in union agreements-------------------------------------ii




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7
7
7
7
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10

B ulletin 7\[o. 743 o f the
U nited States B ureau o f Labor Statistics
[Reprinted from the M onthly L aboe R eview , M a y 1943, wi^h additional data]

VACATION AND HOLIDAY PROVISIONS IN UNION
AGREEMENTS IN EFFECT JANUARY 1943
Vacation Provisions
EXTENT OF PAID VACATIONS

During the last few years there has been a great increase in the
number of union agreements providing vacations with pay. At
present almost eight million workers, representing about 60 percent of
all workers under agreement, are covered by agreements which pro­
vide vacation allowances. In 1940 two million workers, or about 25
percent of all workers under union agreement at that time, were en­
titled to paid vacations if they met certain eligibility requirements.
(These estimates do not include vacation plans not included under
terms of collective bargaining. Some unorganized wage earners and
many salaried workers customarily have been granted paid vacations.)
Vacations with pay are least often found in industries marked by
seasonal lay-offs and intermittent work, and where workers are em­
ployed by a number of different employers during the course of the
year. Building-trades workers, actors, and musicians, for example,
are almost entirely without paid vacations, primarily because of their
frequent shifting in employment.1 The small proportion of workers
entitled to paid vacations in most of the clothing trades reflects the
seasonal character of these industries.
Outstanding among the industries where vacations with pay have
been obtained during the past few years are coal mining, railroad
transportation, and shipbuilding. Vacations and vacation bonuses
were provided for the first time in the 1941 anthracite and bituminouscoal agreements. The arbitration award which settled the railroad
dispute in December 1941 extended paid vacations to the non­
operating railroad employees.
Vacation allowances in the shipbuilding industry became extensive
after the inclusion of a paid-vacation provision in the Pacific Coast
master shipbuilding agreement. Other industries where there has
been a considerable increase in the proportion of agreements providing
paid vacations are newspaper printing and publishing, electrical equip­
ment, trucking, flat glass, hosiery, and leather tanning.
1 That diversity of place of employment does not present insurmountable barriers is evidenced b y a few
plans providing for the pooling of the various employers’ contributions and the administration of the vacar
tion program through a central office. Such plans exist, for example, in some branches of the women’s
clothing industry and for ship clerks in San Francisco.
631485°— 43




1

2

UNION AGREEMENT PROVISIONS

Proportion o f W orkers Under Agreements in Effect January 1943, W ho W ere Covered
b y Vacations W ith P a y or Vacation Allowances
M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U ST R IE S

Almost all

Large proportion

About half

Moderate propor­
tion

Aircraft
Alum inum
Automobiles
Blast furnaces, steel
works, rolling mills
Cement
Chemicals, industrial
Cigarettes
Electrical machinery,
including radio and
appliances
Flour and other grain
products
Glass, flat
Hosiery
M eat packing
Nonferrous metals,
smelting and alloy­
ing
Paints and varnishes
Petroleum and coal
products
Rayon yam
Sugar refining, beet
and cane

Breweries
Canning and pre­
serving
Clocks and watches
Concrete, gypsum,
and plaster prod­
ucts
Dyeing and finish­
ing textiles
Iron and steel prod­
u cts, exclu ding
machinery
Leather tanning and
finishing
Machinery, exclud­
ing electrical
Newspaper printing
and publishing
Pulp
and
paper
products
Rubber products
Shipbuilding
Soap
Woolen and worsted
textiles

Baking
B o o k an d jo b
p r in tin g and
publishing
C o n fe c tio n e r y
products
Cotton textiles
Glass containers
Lumber—saw and
planing mills
Railroad
equip­
ment

Cigars
Clothing, men’s,
including
fur­
nishings
Clothing, women’s
Furniture—wood,
u p h o ls te r e d ,
metal
G lo v e s— leather,
cloth, knit
Leather products,
excluding shoes
and gloves
Silk and rayon
textiles

Very few

Furs and fur gar­
ments
Glassware
Millinery and hats
Pottery, including
chinaware
Shoes, including
cut stock and
findings

N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U ST R IE S
Airline pilots and
mechanics
Bus and streetcar,
intercity and local
Coal mining
Crude oil and natural
gas
Newspaper offices
N o n ferro u s-m e t a 1
mining
Office, technical, and

Building service
Hotels and restau­
rants
Ron mining
Light and power
T rad e, w holesale
and retail
Trucking, local and
intercity

Maritime, licensed
and unlicensed
personnel

Taxicabs

Barber shops
Construction
Fishing
Longshoring
Musicians
Railroads, operat­
ing employees
Theaters,
profes­
sional and main­
tenance

Railroads, nonoper­
ating em ployees
(shopmen, clerical,
etc.)
T elegraph service
and maintenance
Telep hon e service
ana maintenance

Paid vacations have been common practice for some years in the
rubber, petroleum, steel, aluminum, meat-packing, and other industries,
as well as among professional and clerical groups. In some of these
cases, paid vacations antedated the establishment of collective­
bargaining relations, and recent efforts of the unions have been di­
rected toward liberalizing and extending vacation benefits.
LENGTH OF VACATION AND SERVICE REQUIREMENTS

Minimum vacation allowances.— In a majority of industries the
most recurrent type of vacation clause is that which grants 1 week’s
vacation with pay after 1 year of service. Two weeks’ vacation after
1 year of service is provided in varying numbers of agreements in
many industries and is frequently provided in agreements covering
maritime workers, telegraph and radio operators, office, technical.




VACATIONS AND HOLIDAYS

3

professional, and utility employees. Both the anthracite and bitu­
minous-coal agreements provide a vacation of 10 days (including the
Fourth of July).
Longer than 1 year’s service for a week’s vacation is required in
some agreements. Several of the large rubber companies require 2
years’ service before a week’s vacation with pay is granted. Three
years’ service for 1 week’s vacation and 15 years’ service for 2 weeks’
vacation is specified in practically all of the agreements in the basic
iron and steel industry.
M ost agreements require at least a year’s seniority before a week’s
vacation is allowed, although some specify 6 months. M any agree­
ments specify that eligibility for vacations is contingent upon the
employee’s having worked a given number of hom*s, days, or months
during the year. In the hosiery industry 9 months’ actual employ­
ment is sufficient to earn a week’s vacation. The work requirement
most often established in the canning industry calls for between 1,600
and 1,800 hours within the year, in the lumber industry 1,400 hours,
while many of the shipbuilding agreements require 1,200 hours of
work. The major flat-glass agreements specify a minimum of 500
hours for employees with 1 year’s service, provided the employee has
worked during the preceding busy season. Agreements of the
Anaconda Copper Mining Co. state that employees with less than 10
years’ service must have worked 230 days within the year in order to
be eligible for a vacation; employees with 10 years’ service must have
worked 215 days, and employees with 20 years’ service must have
worked 200 days. M any agreements in the basic steel industry pro­
vide that employees must have received earnings in at least 60 percent
of the pay periods within the year.
A number of agreements make some special provision for new em­
ployees who have not yet accumulated the required service for a full
week’s vacation. Thus, an employee with 3 months’ and less than 1
year’s continuous service may be given a vacation of 3 days. Similar
arrangements for shortened vacations are sometimes made for parttime or extra workers, as for example, a 3-day paid vacation after 800
hours of work.
Maximum vacation allowances— In many instances 1 week’s vaca­
tion after a year’s service is a minimum allowance, with 2 or more
weeks provided for those employees having longer service records.
Although it is not known how many workers actually benefit from
vacations of more than a week, it is estimated that well over two
million are entitled, under the terms of their union agreements, to
longer vacations (usually 2 weeks) after having attained a specified
length of service beyond the minimum required for a 1-week vacation.
The service requirements for 2 weeks’ vacation vary, the most
common range being from 2 to 5 years. A considerable number
of agreements in the electrical-equipment, aluminum, rubber, ship­
building, and aircraft industries provide 2 weeks’ paid vacation after
2 or 3 or, in some cases, 5 years’ service. Railroad clerks’ agreements
provide 9 days’ vacation after 2 years’ service and 12 days after 3
years’ service. M ost of the steel agreements, as already indicated,
require 15 years’ service for a 2-week vacation.




4

UNION AGREEMENT PROVISIONS
B O N U S IN L IE U O F V A C A T IO N

In normal times unions generally oppose the granting of a bonus in
lieu of time off for vacation. However, a number of agreements
negotiated during the past 2 years specify that bonuses shall be paid
as a substitute for vacations or that vacations may be waived in the
interest of war production.2 In all cases the waiving of the vacation
period is compensated for by the payment of a bonus, usually equal
to the vacation pay. Such clauses have become widespread in a few
key war industries, but remain uncommon in industry in general.
M ost of the agreements in the basic iron and steel, automobile, and
aircraft industries now grant bonuses in lieu of vacation or provide
that this substitution isxallowable. The 1942 shipbuilding stabili­
zation agreement provides that employees may waive their vacations
if their services are needed by their employers. Over half of the
workers under machine-tool agreements are covered by waiver
clauses. Bonuses in lieu of vacations also are allowable in a number
of the agreements in the electrical-equipment, copper, aluminum,
rubber, and steel-products industries.
There is no consistent practice in most of these clauses in the matter
of implementing the permissive waiver. Some agreements specify
that the substitution of bonuses for vacations shall be made by mutual
agreement of the employer and union. A large number of the agree­
ments permit the employer to decide whether or not the vacation
shall be waived in favor of the bonus. A small proportion of the
agreements leave the matter to the individual employees, and a few
agreements specify that vacations may be waived at “ Government
request.”
V A C A T IO N P A Y

In agreements covering time workers, the vacation pay provided is
usually based on the “ regular rate of pay,” “ base rate,” or “ current
rate.” Since workers paid by the hour sometimes work at different
rates during the same week because of job transfers, some agreements
specify that vacation pay shall be based on the “ highest” or “ pre­
dominating” rate; others specify the average wages over a given
period, exclusive of overtime. M ost agreements covering workers
paid at piece rates or under other incentive methods state that
vacation pay shall equal the average earnings during a specified
period, or an established percent of annual earnings, excluding over­
time, although some specify that vacation pay shall equal the “ base”
or guaranteed rate. For salaried workers vacation pay is generally
based on the employee’s weekly or monthly rate in effect when the
vacation takes place.
2 T h e Government has not been inclined to discourage the practice of annual vacations. W hen the ques­
tion has been raised before the National W ar Labor Board, the Board has almost always granted vacation
allowances. The Chairman of the W a r Production Board in April 1942 stated: “ Experience here and
abroad is indicating that the worker, even when stimulated b y the urgency of the Allied war situation,
cannot work long hours and maintain peak output indefinitely. W e know that he benefits in peacetime
from an annual vacation. After the extensive overtime and the added emotional strain of the war effort,
we can be sure some rest period this year is going to prove doubly effective in the restoration of his energy
and determination . . .”
In July 1942 eight Government agencies (W ar, N avy, Commerce, and Labor Departments, W ar M a n ­
power Commission, W a r Production Board, M aritim e Commission, Public Health Service) issued a joint
statement of labor policy for the purpose of safeguarding the health and improving the efficiency of workers.
The fourth point stated: “ Vacations are conducive to sustained production.” T o avoid interference with
maximum plant production, they recommended that vacations be staggered over the largest possible
period.




VACATIONS AND HOLIDAYS

5

The period used for computing average earnings is commonly the
month preceding the vacation, although many agreements refer to a
period of 3 months preceding the vacation. Some agreements which
provide certain perquisites, such as meals or lodging, in addition to
cash wages, require that the cash value of such items be included in
the base pay for vacation purposes. Agreements which base vaca­
tion pay on annual earnings most frequently provide for 2 percent o f
the annual earnings, exclusive of overtime; a number, however, specify
2% percent. The annual earnings method of computing vacation
pay would, of course, reflect absences from work during the year.
In only a few agreements does the vacation pay differ from the
employee's regular pay or its computed equivalent. In a limited
number of agreements, such as those in coal mining, a flat amount is
given to each employee regardless of salary level. This amount
may be more or less than the regular rate of pay for those receiving it.
M ost agreements provide for the payment of the vacation allowance
prior to vacations, usually on the pay day preceding. In some in­
stances this is optional with the employer. When payment is made
after the vacation, it is usually stipulated that payment must be made
on the first day of the employee's return to work.
CONDITIONAL VACATION RIGHTS

In a small number of agreements, the granting of vacation rights is
made dependent on some condition other than length of service.
The most common of these conditions, usually in cases of small
firms, is the financial status of the company. In such cases, vacations
are granted provided the company's profits or sales volume, or some
other financial criteria, reach a specified level. Another conditional
provision sometimes found provides for granting of vacations only
if similar vacation privileges are granted by the com pany's competi­
tors in the industry or locality. Other agreements grant vacations
but provide that certain conditions may allow the employer to reopen
the question through collective bargaining.
VACATION RIGHTS WHEN LEAVING JOB

M any agreements do not refer to vacation privileges in case o f
resignations or discharges. Those which do, most frequently specify
that termination of employment through voluntary leaving or dis­
charge will result in loss of vacation rights. A few provide that
the departing employee shall be given a proportional share of his
vacation based on the months already worked. M en leaving for
military service who have not received their vacations during the
year usually are granted vacation pay upon induction.
A considerable number of agreements specifically provide that
short-time lay-offs or absences due to sickness shall not result in a
loss of vacation rights. (This situation also exists in many companies
where it is not mentioned in the agreements.) The period most
frequently mentioned is 30 or 60 days, although some agreements
mention 90 days, or even longer periods. Extended lay-offs or leaves
of absence usually result either m reduced vacation benefits or com­
plete disqualification. Very rarely does an agreement provide that




6

UNION* AGREEMENT PROVISIONS

an employee who has been absent a major portion of the year shall
receive a vacation with pay or its equivalent in a bonus.
TIMING OF VACATION PERIOD

A large number of the agreements specify the general time during
which vacations may be taken. In the major portion of these, the
summer months are fixed as the vacation period. Generally the
employees are given the choice, on the basis of seniority, of vacation
time during the specified months, providing such time “ does not
interfere with the efficient operation of the plant.” Some agreements
require that a schedule of vacations be posted at the beginning of
each season, and a few specify the amount of advance notice which
must be given to each employee regarding the date of his vacation.
In industries where business is normally slack during a certain
time each year, many companies shut their plants down for a vacation
eriod. In some instances, agreements provide for joint negotiations
etween the union and the employer regarding the exact time of
the shut-down. A frequent requirement for such plant shut-downs
is that notice be given to all employees sufficiently in advance to
enable them to complete their vacation plans.
The splitting up of vacation time is prohibited in many agreements,
insuring a continuous period for rest and relaxation. Split vacations
are generally permitted only in agreements providing for vacations
o f more than 1 week.
M any agreements prohibit the postponing of vacations from year
to year in order to accumulate longer periods, by stipulating that
vacations are not cumulative and must be taken within the year of
the vacation period provided; otherwise, vacation rights are forfeited.

E

Holiday Provisions
PAY FOR HOLIDAYS NOT WORKED

Although an increasing number of union agreements make provision
for paying wage earners for some or all of the major holidays, the
m ajority of agreements in manufacturing, construction, and mining
merely provide time off on holidays, without pay. As in the past,
holidays with pay are customarily granted to salaried workers as
distinct from wage earners.
Among the industries in which agreements commonly provide
paid holidays are wom ens clothing, bakery, wholesale ana retail
trade, trucking, and office, technical, and professional work. Some
agreements in the leather-tanning industry provide two or three
holidays with pay a year. In the remaining industries a varying
number of agreements provide for paid holidays, but these agreements
cover only a negligible proportion of the total workers.
In a number of agreements which grant holiday pay, such pay is
allowed only to employees who have worked all or part of the preceding
week. In a few agreements part-time workers are given prorated
holiday pay. Some agreements specify that absence on the day
preceding or immediately following a holiday results in the loss of
holiday pay. This, of course, is intended to prevent a pronounced
drop in production during the holiday week.




VACATIONS AND HOLIDAYS

7

Holiday pay for hourly workers is usually calculated by applying the
employee’s regular rate to the usual number of daily working hours.
For piece workers, holiday pay is frequently determined by averaging
the employee’s daily earnings for a specified period.
P A Y FO R W O R K O N H O L ID A Y S

Whether or not provision is made for payment of regular wages
on holidays not worked, if unusual circumstances make work neces­
sary, special penalty rates are usually provided. However, the
amount of the rate of pay for work on holidays tends to be higher
under agreements providing pay for holidays not worked than those
which do not provide for paid holidays.
Of the agreements which provide pay for holidays not worked, 70
percent establish holiday penalty rates of double time, and an addi­
tional 20 percent provide penalty rates of either 2}i or 3 times the
regular rate. M ost of the remainder provide time and a half for work
performed on holidays.
Of the agreements which do not provide for paid holidays, approxi­
mately 50 percent specify that double the regular rate shall be paid for
work performed on holidays, and most of the remainder provide
holiday rates of time and a half. Only a very few specify higher than
double time for holiday work.
H O L ID A Y S S P E C IF IE D

The number of holidays specified in union agreements varies con­
siderably, some providing as few as 2 or 3 while a few specify as many
as 12 or 13. Both the agreements which provide paid hohdays and
the agreements which provide holidays without pay most commonly
specify 6 holidays— New Year’s Day, Memorial D ay, Fourth of July,
Labor Day, Thanksgiving D ay, and Christmas Day. Some additional
holidays frequently observed are Armistice Day, Election Day,
Columbus Day, Washington’s Birthday, and sometimes Lincoln’s
Birthday. Special local patriotic and labor holidays, as well as religious
holidays, are also included in some agreements.
M A K E -U P F O R H O L ID A Y S

When the observance of holidays seriously curtails production,
employers may require the time so lost to be made up by the em­
ployees. Some agreements, however, specifically prohibit making up
time lost because of holidays. A few agreements which provide
unpaid holidays give employees the option of making up holidays in
order to avoid a decrease in normal weekly earnings. Make-up time,
if permitted, is frequently worked on Saturday, if this is a regular
day off. In some cases lost time is made up by working extra hours a
few days preceding or following the holiday.
H O L ID A Y S D U R IN G W A R E M E R G E N C Y

Regardless of the holiday provisions in existing union agreements,
on all work relating to the prosecution of the war the number of
holidays to be observed, and the rate of pay for work performed on




8

UNION AGREEMENT PROVISIONS

such holidays, are now covered by Government regulation. Executive
Order No. 9240, effective October 1, 1942, states:
No premium wage or extra compensation shall be paid for work on customary
holidays except that time and one-half wage compensation shall be paid for work
performed on any of the following holidays only: New Year’s Day, Fourth of
July, Labor Day, Thanskgiving Day, Christmas Day, and either Memorial Day
or one other such holiday of greater local importance.

Sample Vacation Clauses in Union Agreements
2 -W E E K

M A X IM U M

C lause A.—The employer agrees that all employees shall receive 2

weeks7 vacation with pay after 2 years7 service with the com pany;
1 week’s vacation with pay after 1 year’s service; and one day for each
2 months of service, when less than 1 year.
Vacation pay for each employee will be based on a 40-hour week
at his or her average hourly earnings, not including overtime, for
the 2 months preceding the vacation.
C lause B.— All employees who have worked 2 months or more dur­
ing 1943, and who have more than 1 year’s seniority rating, will be
eligible for vacation.
Employees who have 1 to 3 years’ seniority will receive 1 week’s
vacation.
All employees having seniority o f more than 3 years will receive
2 weeks’ vacation.
The vacation may be divided into not more than two periods.
In case of sickness, vacation time may be applied, but not more
than twice during the year. If vacation time is so applied against
time off for sickness, no further vacation will be allowed.
Seniority for vacation will be figured as of M ay 1, each year, and
vacations must be taken between May 1 and December 31.
Each employee shall be granted full pay at his regular rate during
his vacation. If an employee has worked at two or more rates during
the 6 months preceding his vacation, he shall be paid according to
whichever rate is higher.
The full amount of vacation pay to which each employee is entitled
shall be paid the employee before he starts on his vacation.
Bonus in Lieu o f Vacation Allowed at Option o f Management

C lause C.— Each employee in the continuous employ of the
company for 1 year or more shall receive 1 week’s vacation with pay.
Each employee in the continuous employ of the company for 5 years
or more shall receive 2 weeks’ vacation with pay. Vacations will be
paid on the following basis: 2% percent of annual earnings, said 2%
percent to be computed between the period of July 1 and June 30.
Vacations shall be given during the so called vacation period from
June 1 to September 30 of the year. So far as practicable, employees
may choose vacations on the basis of seniority. Vacation pay shall
be paid in advance.
If, in the opinion of management, this vacation program would
interfere with the attainment of maximum war production, at the
option of the corporation any eligible employee may be required to
continue work and receive vacation pay as above provided, in lieu of




VACATIONS AND HOLIDAYS

9

actual vacation from work. However, it is the intent that to the
greatest degree possible, in management’s judgment, eligible em­
ployees shall receive the benefit of vacation from work.
1 -W E E K

M A X IM U M

Bonus in Lieu o f Vacation at Option o f Em ployee

C lause D .—Employees on the pay roll for 1 year or more as of
July 1, shall receive 1 week’s vacation for which they will be paid at
their regular rates based on a 40-hour week. Employees on the pay
roll more than 26 weeks but less than 1 year as of July 1, shall receive
one-half week’s vacation for which they will be paid at their regular
rate based on a 40-hour week.
Employees eligible for vacations who prefer to work rather than
take time off, will be permitted to take the amount of money they
would have received for their vacation period in a lump-sum pay­
ment. All employees exercising this right, will receive their vacation
pay on any pay day after July 1, that they designate on the cards
provided the employees for this purpose.
Bonus in Lieu o f Vacation Disallowed

C lause E.— Employees who complete 1 contract year o f service
shall have 1 week’s vacation at their regular rate of pay, based on
a 40-hour week. If, after completing the year, the employee either
resigns or is discharged, he shall have 1 week’s vacation pay in lieu
of his vacation. Absence of less than 60 days in the aggregate due
to lack of business or illness shall not be construed §,s interrupting
the yearly service of such employee.
Vacations are to be scheduled any time from June 1 to December 31
of each year. Employees are to select their vacation period in order
of their seniority. No employee shall accept pay in lieu of vacations
under penalty of being suspended from the union.
M IN IM U M

V A C A T IO N

P A Y A L L O W A N C E W H E N D IS C H A R G E D O R F U R L O U G H E D

C lause F. — Employees who have been in the service of the employer
for a period of 1 year or longer shall receive 1 week’s vacation with
pay in each calendar year. Employees who take their vacation
during a week in which a holiday falls shall be given an extra day or
the equivalent in pay at the discretion of the employer. Employees
are entitled to a second week of vacation, without pay, in each cal­
endar year.
The vacation pay o f each employee will be based on a 40-hour week
at his or her average hourly earnings, not including overtime, for
the preceding 6 weeks but not less than $25 for any employee.
Employees furloughed or discharged after April 1 in any year
and prior to their previously assigned vacation period, shall receive
vacation pay as herein specified. Employees discharged or volun­
tarily terminating their employment prior to April 1 in any year shall
not be entitled to vacation pay.
Each employee will be asked to designate his choice for vacation
time, and such choices will be allowed insofar as possible. In cases
where the employee’s choice cannot be allowed, preference will be




10

UNION AGREEMENT PROVISIONS

given to the employees according to seniority. A schedule of vacation
time will be posted not later than [specify date] of each year.
S P E C IF IE D B O N U S IN S T E A D O F V A C A T IO N

C lause G.— The company agrees to pay to each employee subject

to this agreement, in lieu of vacation, a bonus equal to 3 percent of
his total wages earned between October 1, 1941, and October 1, 1942:
Provided, however, That in no case shall the bonus of one who has
been in the employ of the company between 3 and 6 months be less
than $20, nor shall the bonus of one who has been in the employ of
the company between 6 months and 1 year be less than $25, nor shall
the bonus of one who has been in the employ of the company for more
than 1 year be less than $30. The bonus herein provided shall be
paid between December 1 and December 15, 1942.
P O O L E D V A C A T IO N F U N D FO R IN T E R M IT T E N T W O R K E R S

C lause H . —Every employee shall be credited on the first pay day

after January 1, and weekly thereafter, with 3 percent of all weekly
earnings on account of pay for the said week’s vacation: Provided,
however, That the employer shall not be obligated to so credit and
pay such 3 percent on more than 40 weeks’ full minimum pay of the
craft classi fication of such workers as set forth in the schedule hereto
attached. The amount of accumulated vacation credits for all
workers in the shop shall be paid to the union weekly. The moneys
due for said vacation shall be enforced in the same manner as if they
were unpaid wages.

Sample Holiday Clauses in Union Agreements
h o l id a y s

w it h

p a y

All workers shall be paid for the following legal holidays: New
Year’s Day, Decoration Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanks­
giving Day, and Christmas Day.
Piece workers shall be paid for the afore-mentioned holidays on the
basis of their average earnings for the month preceding the week in
which the particular holiday falls. Week workers and hourly workers
shall be paid for each of those holidays irrespective of whether or
not they perform work during the week in which the particular holi­
day occurs.
There shall be no work on the above-mentioned holidays except in
special cases of emergency when double time shall be paid.
M O D IF IE D P A Y P L A N S

Any regular full-time employee who is ill in any workweek in which
a holiday falls, but who has worked at least 1 day during that workweek,
shall be entitled to pay, in cash, for said holiaay, or at the option of
the employer shall receive corresponding time off.
During the week in which a legal holiday occurs, employees working
less than a full week shall be paid for the holiday pro rata for the
hours worked. No workers shall be discharged in a week preceding
a holiday.




VACATIONS AND HOLIDAYS

11

Any employee failing to work the day preceding or the day follow­
ing holidays without a reasonable excuse, shall not receive pay for
the holiday.
Any employee working 3 days in any workweek Monday to Friday
shall be paid for legal holidays occurring during said workweek.
P A R T IA L O P E R A T IO N S

No more than the force absolutely necessary will be kept on duty
All other employ­
on the following h olid a ys:_____________________
ees will be excused without loss of pay for time not worked. Em­
ployees will be excused on holidays in rotation.
An employee whose regular shift falls on a holiday will receive a
full day’s pay for 4 hours’ work. Any work required beyond this
amount will be paid for at the holiday overtime rate.
An employee whose regular shift falls on a holiday will not be re­
quired to work more than absolutely necessary, but will receive a full
day’s pay in any case.
H O L ID A Y S W IT H O U T

PAY

No employee will be required to work on the following holidays:
New Year’s Day, Washington’s Birthday, Decoration Day, Fourth
o f July, Labor Day, Armistice Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christ­
mas Day. If any holiday herein named shall fall upon any employee’s
regular day off he shall be granted an additional day off.
No production work shall be done on these holidays except in the
case of emergencies beyond the control of the company. Time and
one-half shall be paid for work done an any of the above-mentioned
holidays except watchmen and firemen who shall receive their regular
rate.
H O L I D A Y S I N C O N T I N U O U S -P R O C E S S W O R K

New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas D ay are regarded as holidays
and, except for watchmen and powerhouse employees, workers on
continuous processes, and for such repairs as are essential to factory
operation, work will be avoided. Overtime will not be paid for these
holidays for work required in the continuous processes or for repairs
of emergency nature essential to factory operation, except for Christ­
mas Day and Fourth of July. If, however, emergencies arise where
work on Sundays or any of the holidays stated is required to fill emer­
gency orders or to avoid the hiring of temporary employees during
any rush season, it is agreed that holiday work may be carried on
provided overtime is paid for this emergency work.
M A K IN G U P H O L ID A Y S A T P E N A L T Y R A T E S

Holidays listed above shall be considered as days worked. Any
work done on Saturdays to make up holidays shall be compensated
at the rate of time and a half.




12

UNION AGREEMENT PROVISIONS
M A K IN G U P H O L ID A Y S A T R E G U L A R R A T E S

Paid holidays.— If a holiday intervenes during any given week,
and the employees receive payment for that holiday, the employer
shall have the right to make up the time so lost without having to
pay overtime rates.
Unpaid holidays.—No work shall be done on legal holidays and
no time made up because of legal holidays unless agreed to between
the company and union. Holiday make-up work so agreed upon
shall be paid at regular rates.




FQSyiCTORY




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