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U N A F F IL IA T E D
IN T R A S T A T E a n d
S IN G L E -E M P L O Y E R
U N IO N S , S
1

6

7

Public

O a y to n & M o n tg o m .^
L ib rary
J A N S I9 7 Q

DOCUM C O L L E C T I O N
ENT

B ulletin No. 1640

~~W '
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R




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B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S




UIM A F F I L I A T E D
IN T R A S T A T E
S IN G L E -E M P L O Y E R
U N I O N S ,1 S 6 7
a

n

d

B ulletin No. 1640
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T
G e o rg e

O F

L A B O R

P. S h u ltz, S e c re ta ry

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
G e o ff r e y H . M o o r e , C o m m is s io n e r
Issued Novem ber 1969
F or s a le b y t h e S u p e r in t e n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U . S . G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O ff ic e , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . 2 0 4 0 2 . P rice 3 5 cents.







Preface
D esp ite d e term in ed co m p etitio n fro m n ation al u n ion s,
u n a ffilia ted in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r unions continue
to accoun t for a sm a ll, r e la tiv e ly sta b le p rop ortion of the
m em b ersh ip in o rg a n ized lab o r. H o w ev er, the A m erica n
labor m o v em en t today u su a lly is d efin ed to includ e the
AFL—
CIO and its a ffilia ted unions and the n ation al unions
o u tsid e the fed era tio n . The e x iste n c e of lo c a l u n a ffilia ted
un ion s, m o re often than not, is o v erlo o k ed e n tir e ly .
The e c lip s e of the sm a ll u n a ffilia ted lo c a l un ion s,
w hich once accou n ted for a r e la tiv e ly sig n ifica n t seg m en t
of o rg a n ized lab or in the U nited S ta tes, began w ith the
p a ssa g e of the N ation al L abor R ela tio n s (W agner) A ct in
1935, and w as h a sten ed by the e m erg en ce and grow th of
stron g n ation al unions during W orld W ar II.
The B ureau of L abor S ta tistic s b ien n ia l su rv ey s of
union m em b ersh ip , for the m o st part, have been confined
to n ation al and in tern a tio n a l unions; that is , th ose labor
o rg a n iza tio n s w hich b argain w ith m o re than one em p lo y er
in m o re than one S tate. To fill the gap in its m e m b e r ­
ship s ta tis tic s , the B ureau cond ucted its fir s t su rv ey of
lo c a l u n a ffilia ted unions in 1961. T h is, the B u rea u ’s secon d
su rv ey , p e rm its a look at tren d s and should p rovid e a
b a sis for fu rth er r e s e a r c h into the nature and a c tiv itie s
of th ese o rg a n iza tio n s.
T h is study w as p rep a red in the B u rea u ’s D iv isio n of In­
d u stria l R ela tio n s by W inston L. T ille r y and F red R. N agy.







Contents

In tr o d u c tio n -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Scope and m e th o d --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P e r io d of o r g a n iz a tio n -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S ize and co m p o sitio n of m e m b e r s h ip ___________________________________________________________
B a rg a in in g co v era g e ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W om en m e m b e r s ________________________________________________________________________________
W h ite-co lla r m em b ers _________________________________________________________________________
In d u stria l d is tr ib u tio n ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------State m em b ersh ip -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------N um ber of lo c a ls --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------C o lle c tiv e b a r g a in in g ______________________________________________________________________________
A s so c ia tio n s of in d ep en d e n ts-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------U n a ffilia ted unions term in a ted during the 1961—67 p e r io d ---------------------------------------------------L a rg e unions: 1961 and 1967 data c o m p a r e d ------------------------------------------------------------------------T a b les:
1. D u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip in in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r
unions by p eriod of o rg a n iza tion , 1967 --------------------------------------------------------------------2. D u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip of in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r
u n ion s, 1967 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3. A g reem en t co v era g e of in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r
u n ion s, 1967 ______________________________________________________________________________
4. P ro p o rtio n of w om en m e m b e r s in in tra sta te and s in g le ­
em p lo y er u n ion s, 1967 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5. P ro p o rtio n of w h ite -c o lla r m em b ers in in tra sta te and
sin g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, 1967 _________________________________________________________
6. D u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip and a g reem en t co v era g e of in tra sta te
and sin g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, by in d u stry, 1967 ____________________________________
7. D u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip and a g reem en t co v era g e of in tra sta te
and sin g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, by State, 1 9 6 7 _________________________________________
8. N um ber of lo c a ls a ffilia ted w ith in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r
u n ion s, 1967 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------9. N um ber of b a sic c o lle c tiv e b a rgain in g a g reem en ts n ego tia ted
by in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, 1967 ___________________________________
10. C hanges in d u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip in m ajor in tra sta te and
s in g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, by in d u stry , 1961—67 _____________________________________
11. C han ges in d u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip in m a jo r in tr a sta te and
sin g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, by State, 1961—67 -------------------------------------------------------------C harts:
1. D u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip in in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r
unions in 1967, by p erio d of o rg a n iza tio n and m em b ersh ip of unions ____________
2. D u es-p a y in g m em b ersh ip in in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r unions
in 1967, by p erio d of o rg a n iza tio n and in d u s tr y ___________________________________
3. P ro p o rtio n of w om en and w h ite -c o lla r m em b ersh ip in in tra sta te
and sin g le -e m p lo y e r unions in 1967, by p erio d of o r g a n iz a tio n ------------------------A ppendix.

Q u estio n n a ire -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




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Unaffiliated Intrastate and Single-Employer Unions, 1967
Introduction
U n a ffilia ted in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r unions (e x c lu siv e of govern m en t
un ion s) 1 co n stitu te a n u m erica lly sm a ll, r e la tiv e ly sta b le p rop ortion of the A m erica n
lab or m o v em en t. Two su rv ey s cond ucted by the BL S in 1961 2 and 1967 in d icate
that u n a ffilia ted union m em b ersh ip in both y e a r s w a s about 2 .6 p ercen t of the m e m ­
b e rsh ip in a ll unions in the U nited S ta tes, 3 as show n in the fo llo w in g tab u lation :
Union membership in the United States
1961

Union
T o t a l ------------------------------ ---AFL—
CIO a ffiliates (including
directly a ffiliated labor unions)--------N ational u n affiliated u n io n s --------- ---U naffiliated intrastate and
single-em ployer u n io n s ------------------

1967

Number
(in thousands)

Percent

Number
(in thousands)

Percent

17,456

100.0

18,301

100.0

14,103
2,901

8 0 .8
1 6.6

14, 975
2, 852

8 1 .8
1 5 .6

452

2 .6

475

2 .6

D esp ite a 1961—67 d eclin e from 1, 277 to 884 in the num ber of u sa b le sc h e d ­
u le s , o v e r a ll m em b ersh ip in c r e a se d about 23, 000. The to ta l num ber of w o rk e rs
co v ered by a g r e e m e n ts, h o w ev er, dropped by m o re than 1 3 ,0 0 0 .
A lrea d y high in co m p a riso n w ith n ation al u n ion s, the p rop o rtio n s of w om en
and w h ite -c o lla r w o rk ers in the u n a ffilia ted unions in c r e a se d during the 1961—67
p erio d — for w om en, fro m 29. 3 to 34. 1 p ercen t and for w h ite -c o lla r m e m b e r s, from
25 to 3 2 .6 p ercen t. In c r e a se s in th ese two c a te g o r ie s and in to ta l m em b ersh ip m ay
be a ttrib u ted a lm o st en tir e ly to the continued grow th of o ld er, la r g e r u n ion s. U naf­
filia te d unions new ly o rg a n ized sin ce the p rev io u s su rv ey accou n ted for only slig h tly
o v er 10, 000 m e m b e r s, a fig u re m o re than o ffse t by m em b ersh ip lo s s e s fro m unions
d is s o lv e d or a ffilia ted during the p erio d . R e la tiv e ly few w om en or w h ite -c o lla r
w o rk e rs w ere m em b ers of th ese new u n ion s.
C o m p a rison s of 1961 and 1967 data show ed d e c lin e s in the num ber of un af­
filia te d unions in n ea rly a ll in d u stries and g eo g ra p h ica l a r e a s . ^ H o w ev er, sig n ifica n t
m em b ersh ip in c r e a s e s w ere noted in s e r v ic e s , co m m u n ica tio n s, p rim a ry m e ta ls , and
s e v e r a l oth er in d u str ie s, and m em b ersh ip w as up 25 p e rcen t or m o re in 13 S ta tes.
W ith a drop of 30 p ercen t in the num ber of q u alifying o rg a n iza tio n s, the o v e r ­
a ll n u m b ers of lo c a l u n its and cu rren t a g reem en ts a lso fe ll, although the a v era g e
num ber of lo c a ls and of a g reem en ts per union r o se slig h tly .

1 Hereafter referred to in this bulletin as u naffiliated unions.
2 See U naffiliated Local and Single-Em ployer Unions in the United States, 1961, BLS Bulletin 1348 (1962).
3 Although the figures in the tabulation for national unions are actually for 1960 and 1966, the tim e difference
probably does not affect the comparison significantly. For d etails regarding these union figures and for the source of
statem ents on the characteristics of national unions m ade throughout this study, see Directory of National and Inter­
national Labor Unions in the United States, 1961 and 1967, BLS Bulletins 1320 (1962) and 1596 (1968).




1

2

Scope and M ethod
F o r both the 1961 and 1967 su r v e y s, the D ep artm en t of L a b o r's O ffice of
L a b or-M an agem en t and W e lfa r e -P e n sio n R ep orts (OLM W PR) p rovid ed the B u reau of
L abor S ta tistic s w ith union lis tin g s co m p iled from rep o rts r e c e iv e d under the L a b o rM anagem ent R ep ortin g and D isc lo s u r e A ct (LM RDA) of 1959. The B u reau , in turn,
ca n v a sse d by m a il q u estio n n a ire a ll unions w h ose rep o rts in d ica ted they w ere not
n ation al in sco p e (as d efin ed by the B u reau for d ir e c to r y p u r p o s e s ).4 T h ese unions
w ere a sk ed w h eth er th eir c o lle c tiv e b argain in g rela tio n sh ip s w ere con fin ed to a
sin g le em p lo y er or em p lo y er a sso c ia tio n , or if two or m o re e m p lo y ers or a s s o c ia ­
tio n s w ere under co n tra ct, to a sin g le State. An a ffirm a tiv e a n sw er to eith e r of
th e se sc r e e n in g q u estio n s p la ced the union w ith in the sco p e of the su rv ey . E ach
q u alifying union a lso w as a sk ed for its m em b ersh ip (dues paying or in good standing)
in the cu rren t p e r io d ,5 the num ber of w o rk e rs co v ered by its c o lle c tiv e bargain in g
a g r e e m e n ts, and the in d u stry and city w h ere the w o rk e rs w ere em p lo y ed . O ther
q u estio n s d ea lt w ith the p rop o rtio n s of w om en and w h ite -c o lla r w o r k e r s, the num ber
of lo c a ls and a g r e e m e n ts, m u ltiem p lo y er b a rgain in g, and a ffilia tio n w ith sim ila r
u n ion s. The 1967 su rv ey req u este d the union to sta te the y ea r it w a s o rg a n ized .
A s is cu sto m a ry in m o st BL S su r v e y s, resp on d en ts w ere a ssu r e d that in fo rm a tio n
su b m itted w ould be u sed for s ta tis tic a l p u rp o ses only.
Of 1, 527 q u estio n n a ires m a ile d out by the B u reau in 1967, 1, 176 w ere r e ­
tu rned , a resp o n se rate of 77 p ercen t, or a p p ro x im a tely 8 p ercen ta g e points low er
than in the e a r lie r su rv ey . 6 On ex a m in a tion , 884, or only 58 p ercen t of the m a ilin g ,
p roved u sa b le. Of the 292 retu rn s w h ich w ere ex clu d ed , 46 rep o rted that th ey w ere
n eith er in tra sta te nor sin g le -e m p lo y e r u n ion s, but w ere n ation al in s c o p e .7 A nother
135 rep o rted eith e r having a ffilia ted w ith or having been d efea ted by a n ation al union
in a N ation al L abor R ela tio n s B oard (NLRB) e le c t io n .8 E ig h teen rep o rted that the
union had been d is s o lv e d b e ca u se of a plant shutdow n, com pany m e r g e r , or r e o r g a n ­
iza tio n , and another 76 retu rn s in d ica ted that the unions w ere no lon g er in e x iste n c e
but gave no fu rth er d e ta ils. The other 17 rep o rts w ere retu rn ed b e ca u se th ey did
not rea ch the p rop er union o ffic ia l; probably m any of th e se unions w ere defunct.
O b viou sly, the BL S cannot cla im that the study has accoun ted fo r a ll unions
of th is type in the coun try. Som e m ay not have su b m itted rep o rts to the D ep a r t­
m en t of L abor as req u ired under the LM RDA; o th e r s, b e ca u se of inadequ ate in fo r ­
m a tion , m ay have e sca p e d id en tific a tio n . M ost of th ese o rg a n iza tio n s are sm a ll,
m any appear to be s h o r t-liv e d , and u n lik e n ation al u n ion s, th ey r a r e ly em p loy o ffice
sta ff or fu ll-tim e o ffic e r s .
On the other hand, the B u reau b e lie v e s that the su rv ey a ccou n ts fo r v irtu a lly
a ll lo c a l u n a ffilia ted unions w hich have n ego tia ted m a jo r c o lle c tiv e a g reem en ts (c o v ­
erin g 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk ers or m o re). ^ T hus, unions that m ay have b een o v erlo o k ed or

survey.

4 Because of the reporting requirements of the LMRDA, no unions of government employees were included in the

5 The question was modified in the 1967 survey to elicit information on dues-paying members or members in
good standing, but the change is not believed to have seriously affected comparative figures for the two studies.
6 Compared with the 1961 survey, the 1967 study suggests a possible deterioration in the position of the unaffil­
iated unions. Although the number of operating unions reporting declined from 1, 277 to 884, the number of unions re­
porting that they were no longer in existence increased from 197 to 229. A check of one-fifth of the 351 nonrespondents
against the files of OLMWPR indicated that at least one-half of them had filed terminal reports and gone out of existence.
7 Some of these unions misinterpreted the "scope" question. In any case, they will be surveyed for possible in­
clusion in the Bureau's next directory of national and international unions.
8 Included in this group were 94 unions which reported affiliation with AFL—CIO organizations and 41 with
national unaffiliated unions.
9 For many years, the Bureau has been striving to include all agreements covering 1,000 workers or more (ex­
clusive of the railroad and airline industries, for which agreements are filed with the National Mediation Board as required
by the Railway Labor Act) in its file of collective bargaining agreements, which has been set up under the provisions of
section 211 of the Labor-Management Relations Act of 1947.



3

that fa ile d to resp on d should have only a m in or effe c t on the m em b ersh ip and a g r e e ­
m en t co v era g e to ta ls p r esen te d in th is study.
Sin ce the q u estio n s a sk ed in the 1961 and 1967 su r v e y s w ere e s s e n tia lly
the sa m e, co m p a riso n s w ere m ade b etw een the two s e ts of data. D e ta ils of th ese
co m p a riso n s app ear, w h ere ap p ro p ria te, in the tex t. Such co m p a riso n s do not
n e c e s s a r ily in d ica te tren d s w ith in the sa m e group of unions b e ca u se the 1961 and
1967 u n a ffilia ted union pop ulation s w ere not id en tica l. A s p r ev io u sly noted, so m e
unions rep o rtin g in the 1961 su rv ey no lon ger e x iste d and a num ber w ere fo rm ed
a fter that date. In addition, so m e unions b e lie v e d to be op eratin g in both su rv ey
y e a r s fa iled to rep o rt in 1 y ea r o r anoth er.
In an effo rt to d eterm in e tren d s w ithin the la r g e r u n ion s, 1961 retu rn s w ere
m a tch ed , w h e rev er p o s s ib le , w ith retu rn s fro m unions rep o rtin g a 1967 m em b ersh ip
of 1 ,0 0 0 or m o r e .
P e r io d of O rgan ization
S e v e r a l thousand lo c a l and s in g le -e m p lo y e r unions a re e stim a te d to have e x iste d
in the U nited S tates at one tim e or another in the decade p rio r to the p a ssa g e of the
W agner A ct. Of th e se , only a few have su rv iv ed . In the 1967 su rv ey , 778 of the
884 unions resp on d ed to the q u estio n on date of o rg a n iza tio n , but of th e se , only 40,
w ith 50, 000 m e m b e r s, cla im ed to have been e sta b lish e d b efo re 1936. (See tab le 1. )
A lto g e th er, 317 u n ion s, having m em b ersh ip of n ea rly 320, 000 (tw o -th ird s of
the to ta l), su rv iv ed the m a s s iv e W orld W ar II o rg a n izin g d r iv e s conducted by n ation al
u n ion s. T hus, the bulk of the m em b ersh ip is in lo c a l u n a ffilia ted unions w hich have
d em o n stra ted co n sid e ra b le sta y in g pow er in the p a st and a re lik e ly to do so in the
fu tu re. M ore than h alf (461) the rep o rtin g unions w ere e sta b lish e d a fter 1945, but
th e se accoun t for only 128, 000 m e m b e r s.
U n a ffilia ted unions e sta b lish e d during the 1961—67 p erio d (56), rep o rted only
10, 000 m e m b e r s. 10 T h ese u n ion s w e r e g en e ra lly sm a ll; 35 cla im ed 100 m e m b ers
or fe w e r , and 17 b etw een 100 and 500 m e m b e r s. Only th ree of the n ew er unions
rep o rted a m em b ersh ip in e x c e s s of 1 ,0 0 0 , and two of th em appear to be the r e su lt
of m e r g e r s of unions o rg a n ized at an e a r lie r date.
Only about 11 p ercen t of the m e m b ers in the new u n a ffilia ted unions w e r e
w om en , a ratio below that in n ation al u n ion s. T hus, the su b stan tia l in c r e a s e in
w om en m em b ersh ip m u st be a ttrib u ted to in c r e a s e d w om en m em b ersh ip in the o ld er
u n ion s. S im ila r ly , only about 15 p ercen t of the new m e m b ers w ere w h ite -c o lla r
w o r k e r s, about the sa m e as that in n ation al u n ion s.
M ost new u n a ffilia ted unions (14) w ere o rg a n ized in r e ta il tra d e, but th ese
accou n ted for only 648 w o r k e r s. The p etro leu m in d u stry , w ith th ree new u n ion s,
added the g r e a te st num ber of w o rk e rs (3, 600). No un usu al tren d s w ere apparent
by S tates or r eg io n s; S tates that had the g r e a te r num ber of o ld er unions tended
to lea d in the esta b lish m e n t of new o n es. P en n sy lv a n ia added 10 new unions w ith
3 ,3 5 2 m e m b e r s, and N ew Y ork gained 12 w ith 1 ,6 3 3 .
10
By comparison, during the 1961—67 period, 229 unaffiliated unions, with membership of more than 30,000, are
known to have disbanded or affiliated with national unions. Because many returns from the dissolved unions were incom­
plete, exact membership or period of organization distributions could not be determined.



4
V irtu a lly a ll of the new u n a ffilia ted unions b a rg a in ed w ith a sin g le em p lo y er,
and n o rm a lly c o n siste d of a sin g le lo c a l w ith a sin g le cu rren t a g reem en t.
A stro n g rela tio n sh ip w as found b etw een u n a ffilia ted union age and 1967
m em b ersh ip s iz e . In g en e ra l, o ld er unions ten ded to be la r g e r . A bout 70 p ercen t
of the unions rep o rtin g m o re than 1, 000 m e m b e r s in 1967, but only 27 p ercen t of
th o se rep o rtin g 250 m e m b ers or fe w e r , c la im ed to have b een o rg a n ized b efo re 1946.
A s show n in ch art 1, the la r g e unions m ade up 85 p ercen t of to ta l 1967 m em b ersh ip
in the p r e-1 9 3 6 union group, but only 47 p ercen t of the m em b ersh ip in unions e s ­
ta b lish ed a fter I960. By co m p a riso n , the s m a lle s t unions accou n ted for only 3 p e r ­
cen t of to ta l m em b ersh ip in the o ld e st group of u n ion s, but n e a r ly 32 p ercen t of
m em b ersh ip in the n e w est group. T h is d istrib u tio n m ay be ex p la in ed , in part, by
the ten d en cy to o rg a n ize the la r g e r co m p a n ies and plants e a r lie r . It a lso m ay r e ­
fle c t a grow th and " su rv iv a l of the fittest" pattern; the unions (and co m p a n ies) b e ­
cam e m o re capab le of su rv iv a l as th ey grew la r g e r .
P r e c is e in fo rm a tio n is lack in g on the in d u stria l d istrib u tio n of u n a ffilia ted
union m em b ersh ip p rio r to the 1961 su rv ey . M em b ersh ip fig u r e s fo r 1967 a re
c la s s ifie d by in d u stry and date of a union*s founding, and r e fle c t to so m e exten t
the p erio d s during w hich u n a ffilia ted unions gain ed a foothold in p a rticu la r in d u s­
t r ie s . C hart 2 in d ica te s that 1967 u n a ffilia ted union m em b ersh ip in a num ber of
in d u str ie s w as co n cen trated h ea v ily in unions o rg a n ized m uch e a r lie r . M ore than
th r e e -q u a r te r s of union m e m b e r s in e le c tr ic a l and n o n e le c tr ic a l m a ch in ery , tr a n s ­
portation eq uipm en t, co m m u n ica tio n s, and u tilitie s w ere in unions e sta b lish e d during
the 1936—45 p erio d . F ew m e m b ers em p lo y ed in s e r v ic e s , on the other hand, w ere
in unions e sta b lish e d during th is p erio d , p erh ap s b e ca u se of the sh arp c u r ta il­
m en t of m any s e r v ic e s that a cco m p a n ied W orld W ar II. M ore than h alf the m e m b e r ­
ship in s e r v ic e s w ere in unions o rg a n ized b efo re 1936. A su b sta n tia l p rop ortion of
union m e m b ers in s e r v ic e s , as w e ll as in p rim a ry m e ta ls , w ere in unions o rg a n ized
during 1946—60. Only one in d u stry— p etro leu m p rod u cts— had as m uch as 10 p ercen t
of its m em b ersh ip in unions o rg a n ized during 1961—67.
No sig n ifica n t re la tio n sh ip s w ere found b etw een the p erio d s of o rg a n iza tio n of
the unions and th eir reg io n a l d istrib u tio n s. The m o re pop ulous, high ly in d u stria lized
N o rth e a ste rn , N orth C en tra l, and P a c ific S tates tended to have the g rea ter 1967
m em b ersh ip fo r unions of a ll a g es.
S ize and C o m p o sitio n of M em b ersh ip
In 1967, 884 u n a ffilia ted in tra sta te and sin g le -e m p lo y e r unions en ro lled 4 7 4 ,6 0 0
m e m b e r s. (See tab le 2 .) B y co m p a riso n , 1 ,2 77 unions rep o rted 4 5 2 ,5 0 0 m e m b ers
in 1961. A s in the p rev io u s su rv ey , m o st u n a ffilia ted u n ion s, p a rticu la r ly th ose
w h o se a c tiv itie s w ere confin ed to one em p lo y er, w ere s m a ll, and p resu m a b ly had
r e s o u r c e s co m m en su ra te w ith th eir s iz e . A lm o st half the un ion s (423) ea ch had
100 m e m b e r s or few er but accou n ted for only 3. 5 p ercen t of the to ta l m em b ersh ip
co v ered by the study.
D esp ite the sharp drop in the num ber of rep o rtin g o rg a n iza tio n s, o v e r a ll
m em b ersh ip in c r e a se d slig h tly . T his in c r e a se could be a ttrib u ted a lm o st en tir e ly
to the grow th of la r g e r u n a ffilia ted un ion s.
A lm o st a ll the d eclin e in the n u m b ers of u n a ffilia ted unions sin c e 1961 w as
am ong the sm a ll u n ion s, w h ile the num ber of un ion s having o v er 1 ,0 0 0 m em b ers
in c r e a s e d slig h tly , fro m 103 to 106. T otal m em b ersh ip in th e se la r g e unions in ­
c r e a s e d fro m 2 6 5 ,0 0 0 (59 p ercen t) in 1961 to 3 4 0 ,0 0 0 (73 p ercen t) in 1967. T h is
grow th o c c u r r e d a lm o st e n tir e ly in the o ld er u n ion s, sin ce only th ree new la r g e
unions w ere fo rm ed during th is p erio d . 11
11 Two of these large unions appear to have been formed through mergers of smaller unions.



PERCENT 100
C h a r t 1.

D U E S-PA Y IN G
M E M B E R S H IP IN
IN TRA STA TE A N D

75

SIN G LE-EM PLO Y ER
U N I O N S IN 1 9 6 7 ,
BY PER IO D O F
O R G A N IZ A T IO N
A N D M E M B E R S H I P 50
O F U N IO N S

M E M B E R S H IP

O F

2 5 0
I

M

85.4%

U N IO N S

O R

LESS

25

251— 5 0 0
5 0 1 -1 0 0 0
O V E R

1000

PERIOD OF ORGANIZATION




P R E -1 9 3 6

1 9 3 6 -4 5

1 9 4 6 -6 0

1 9 6 1 -6 7

Chart 2.

DUES-PAYING M BERSH IN INTRASTATE AND SINGLE-EM
EM
IP
PLOYER
UNIONS IN 1967, BY PERIOD OF ORGANIZATION AND INDUSTRY
PERIOD OF ORGANIZATION

INDUSTRY

PRE-1936

1 9 3 6 -4 5

[]l9 4 6 -6 0

1 9 6 1 -6 7

NO DATE

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY
2.7

12.4

80.9

.7 | 3.3

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT
87.8

8.1 .2| 3.9

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)

■ 14

80.0

11.0

1 .4 | 6 2

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS

■ 14

6 8 .0

2 2 .1

3 0 1

PRIMARY METALS INDUSTRIES

10




20

30

40

50
PERCENT

60

70

80

90

100

7

G row th was co n cen trated in unions th at had ov er 5,000 m e m b e rs; th ese
doubled in n u m bers fro m 8 to 16, and in c re a se d in m em b ersh ip fro m 76, 800 (17 p e r ­
cent) to 158,500 (33 p ercent) during 1961—
67. F o u r big unions in se rv ic e s (p a rtic u ­
la rly h o sp itals) and th re e in e le c tric a l m ach in ery accounted for about th re e -fo u rth s
of the m e m b e rsh ip in each of th ese in d u strie s. L arg e unions also w ere p rev alen t
in com m unications, tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent, u tilitie s, and p rim a ry m e ta ls. N early
a ll of the la rg e r unions w ere found in the n o rth e rn in d u stria l S tates.
B argaining C o v erag e. A lthough o v e ra ll m em b ersh ip in c re a se d slightly , the
1967 su rvey show ed a decline in the to tal num ber of w o rk e rs co v ered by collective
b argaining a g re e m e n ts, fro m 494,400 in 1961 to 480,800 in 1967. (See table 3.)
Indications a re th at m any of the surviving unions have been su ccessfu l in re c ru itin g
w o rk ers, for the p ro p o rtio n of unions re p o rtin g b argaining unit coverage in ex ce ss of
m em b ersh ip declined. 12 The p ro p o rtio n of unions rep o rtin g union shop conditions 13
in c re a se d fro m 77 to 88 p e rc e n t. C u riously, a g re a te r p ro p o rtio n of the la rg e r
unions re p o rte d coverage in ex c e ss of m em b ersh ip .
W om en M e m b e rs. The lab o r m ovem ent has been m ark ed in re c e n t y e a rs by
an in c re a s e in the p ro p o rtio n of w om en m e m b e rs; to som e extent th is in c re a se r e ­
fle c ts the grow th of w om en p a rtic ip a tio n in the lab or fo rc e. T his in c re a se has been
p a rtic u la rly evident in un affiliated unions. In 1961, the un affiliated union survey
counted 132,800 w om en m e m b e rs, o r 29 p e rcen t of to tal m em b ersh ip . By 1967,
w om en m e m b e rsh ip had ris e n to 162, 100, o r to 34 p e rc e n t of the to tal. (See table 4.)
A lthough o v e ra ll m em b ersh ip ro se about 5 p ercen t, w om en m em b ersh ip w as up 22
p e rc e n t. Since to ta l m e m b e rsh ip in un affiliated unions ro se by only 23, 000, w hile
w om en m e m b e rsh ip ro se by n e a rly 30,000, the fig u res re p re se n t a decline of m en
m e m b e rs in both absolute and re la tiv e te rm s .
By co m p ariso n , the p ro p o rtio n of w om en in natio nal and in tern atio n al unions
in c re a se d m o re slow ly, from 18. 3 p e rc e n t in I960 to 19. 3 p e rc e n t in 1966. Although
to tal m em b e rsh ip ro se about 5 p e rc e n t, w om en m e m b e rsh ip showed a gain of about
16 p ercen t.
The in c re a se in the num ber and p ro p o rtio n of w om en in un affiliated unions
could be a ttrib u te d alm o st e n tire ly to m e m b ersh ip grow th w ithin o ld er, la rg e r unions.
E ig h ty -th re e p e rc e n t of the w om en w ere in unions having o v er 1, 000 m e m b e rs.
C h art 3 shows th at in 1967, w om en accounted fo r 70 p e rc e n t of to tal m em b ersh ip in
unions e sta b lish e d before 1936, and 38 p e rc en t of the m em b ersh ip in those e s ta b ­
lish ed during 1936—39. By co m p ariso n , w om en co m p rised le ss than 11 p e rc e n t of
the m em b e rsh ip of unions org an ized during 1961—
67.
W h ite-C o llar M e m b e rs. As w ith w om en m em b ersh ip , w h ite -c o lla r w o rk ers
re p re se n te d a su b stan tial and in c re a sin g p ro p o rtio n of u n affiliated union m e m b e rsh ip .14
The 1967 su rv ey indicated w h ite -c o lla r m e m b ersh ip co n stitu ted 32. 6 p e rc e n t of the
to tal. (See tab le 5. ) T his p ro p o rtio n re p re se n te d an in c re a se fro m 25 p e rc e n t r e ­
p o rted in 1961, and an in c re m e n t of m o re than o n e -th ird in to ta l w h ite -c o lla r m e m ­
b e rsh ip . By co m p ariso n , the p ro p o rtio n of such m e m b e rs in natio nal and in te r ­
natio nal unions ro se m o re slow ly, fro m 12. 2 to 14. 3 p ercen t, w hich re p re se n te d a
o n e-fo u rth in c re a se in to tal m em b ersh ip .
*2 In 1961, 269 unions reported contract coverage in excess of dues-paying membership (in 123, by margins of
20 percent or more). By 1967, this number had fallen to 146 (70 by margins of 20 percent or more).
On the other hand, in 1961, 19 unions reported that membership exceeded coverage by over 16,000 workers, while
in 1967, 18 unions reported that membership exceeded coverage by 32,000 workers.
13 A union shop "condition" is defined as a condition where membership equals bargaining coverage, and does
not necessarily mean that a union shop exists.
14 Some relationship is to be expected, since the majority of women workers are in white-collar occupations.




PERCENT 8 0 r "
C h a r t 3.

PROPORTION OF
W O M E N AND
WHITE-COLLAR
MEMBERSHIP IN
INTRASTATE AND
SINGLE-EMPLOYER
UNIONS IN

1 9 6 7

,

BY PERIOD OF
ORGANIZATION

W OM EN
MEMBERSHIP
WHITE COLLAR
MEMBERSHIP

PERIOD OF ORGANIZATION



14.0%

P R E -1 9 3 6

1 9 3 6 -3 9

1 9 4 0 -4 5

1 9 4 6 -5 0

1 9 5 1 -6 0

14.7%

1 9 6 1 -6 7

The data, how ever, did not indicate any sig nifican t fo rm atio n of new w hitec o lla r unions; m e m b e rsh ip grow th o c c u rre d in the o ld er o rg an izatio n s. The w hitec o lla r group g en erally w as co n cen trated in the o ld er unions of m o re than 1,000
m e m b e rs, w hich contained 84 p e rc e n t of a ll w h ite -c o lla r m e m b e rs. As shown in
c h a rt 3, w h ite -c o lla r w o rk e rs m ade up a re la tiv e ly sm all p ro p o rtio n of the unions
o rg an ized since 1950. Only 314 of the 884 unions re p o rte d any w h ite -c o lla r m e m ­
b e rs , and in the m a jo rity of th ese b lu e -c o lla r w o rk ers form ed a m ajo rity . N early
th re e -fo u rth s of a ll w h ite -c o lla r w o rk e rs w ere in 138 unions w hich had few if any
m e m b e rs fro m b lu e -c o lla r occupations.
About th re e -fifth s of the w h ite -c o lla r m em b ers w ere in nonm anufacturing in ­
d u s trie s , p rim a rily se rv ic e s (hospitals) and com m unications (telephone). T hese two
in d u strie s alone accounted for about half of all w h ite -c o lla r m e m b e rs. M ost of the
rem ain in g w o rk e rs w ere in e le c tric a l m ach in ery , tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent, and the
u tilitie s .
U naffiliated unions included v a rie d groups such as tech no log ical re s e a rc h e rs ,
e n g in ee rs, new spaper re p o rte rs , in su ran ce agen ts, bank te lle rs , telev isio n and radio
an n o u n cers, chem ical re s e a rc h e rs , and m u sician s.
In d u stria l D istrib u tio n
Although unaffiliated in tra s ta te and sin g le-em p lo y er unions w ere found in all
in d u strie s, th e ir m ain stre n g th in both 1961 and 1967 w as co n cen trated in a few in ­
d u strie s th at g en erally a re co n sid ered th e ir tra d itio n a l stro n g h o ld s. Six m an u fac­
tu rin g in d u strie s continued to account for over half of all w o rk ers cov ered by c o lle c ­
tive a g re e m e n ts— e le c tric a l m ach in ery , tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent, p rim a ry m e ta ls,
ch em icals, m ach in ery (except e le c tric a l), and p etro leu m . (See table 6. ) T hese plus
th re e nonm anufacturing in d u strie s— se rv ic e s , com m unications (telephone and telegraph),
and e le c tric a l and gas u tilitie s — enco m p assed over 3 out of 4 w o rk ers re p re se n te d by
independent lo cal unions.
C om pared w ith the to ta l num ber of union m e m b ers in broad in d u stria l c a te ­
g o r ie s , the lo c a l ind epen dents m ade th eir b e st show ing in the p etro leu m —c h e m ic a lrubber grou p s, although they rep r e se n te d a sm a ll (and slig h tly d eclin in g) p rop ortion
of to ta l union stren g th (68, 900 m e m b ers as com p ared w ith 569, 000 in national unions
in 1966). In e le c tr ic a l and gas u tilitie s , s e r v ic e s , and co m m u n icatio n s (telep hone
and teleg ra p h ), the v a st m a jo rity of union m em b ers b elon ged to national o rg a n iza tio n s.

The num ber of rep o rtin g unions declined in n early all in d u strie s. Of the th ree
in d u strie s re p o rtin g in c re a s e s , the gain (20) w as sig nifican t only in re ta il tra d e .
M em b ership, how ever, in c re a se d in m o re than a dozen in d u strie s; se rv ic e s,
com m unications, p rim a ry m e ta ls, tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent, and e le c tric a l m ach in ery
show ed su b sta n tia l in c re a s e s . M em b ership declined 25 p e rc e n t o r m o re in se v e ra l
in d u strie s, and w as off sh arp ly in m ining, and w holesale and re ta il tra d e . Like the
natio nal unions, the independent lo cals showed a continuing lack of su ccess in o rg a n ­
izing w o rk e rs in a g ric u ltu re , finance, and in su ran ce.
State M em b ersh ip

The geo graph ical d istrib u tio n of un affiliated unions did not change significantly
in the 1961—67 p erio d . As in 1961, 10 o r few er unions w ere found in 3 out of 5
S tates; only th re e S tates— New Y ork, Ohio, and P en n sy lv an ia had m o re than 90. (See
table 7. ) The num ber of rep o rtin g unions declined in m o st S tates; a 25 p ercen t o r
g re a te r drop w as noted in m o re than half. F o rty -o n e few er unions re p o rte d from
Ohio than in 1961, follow ed by P en n sy lv an ia (36), New Y ork (32), and New J e rs e y
and Rhode Island (29 each). The num ber of unions in c re a se d in only two S tates—C olorado and L ouisiana.



10

U naffiliated in tra s ta te and sin g le-em p lo y er unions re se m b le natio nal unions in
m a jo r m e m b e rsh ip co n cen tratio n in highly in d u stria liz e d S tates— P enn sylv ania, New
Y ork, Ohio, New J e rs e y , C alifo rn ia, and Illin o is— although not in th is ranking o rd e r.
S outhern S tates, as w ell as o th e rs th at have rig h t-to -w o rk law s, have re s is te d o r ­
ganization by both natio nal and un affiliated unions.
N um ber of L ocals
The 884 un affiliated unions included in the 1967 su rv ey re p o rte d a to tal of
1,600 lo c a ls. (See table 8 .) T his num ber co m p ares w ith 1,277 unions and 2,056
lo cals in 1961. T ypically, the sin g le-em p lo y er or in tra s ta te union is still a "onelo cal" org an izatio n , but the co m p ariso n is in dicative of a slight upw ard tre n d . In
1967, 9. 4 p e rc e n t of the unions re p o rte d two lo cals o r m o re , co m p ared w ith 6. 5
p e rc e n t in 1961. The change m ay re fle c t the in c re a sin g dom ination of the u n affil­
iated union group by la rg e r unions.
The 83 unions re p o rtin g m o re than one lo cal had 799 a ffilia te s. About 26 p e r ­
cent of the in tra s ta te un affiliated unions w ere m u ltilo cal o rg an izatio n s— slightly le ss
than the p ro p o rtio n of such unions rep o rtin g in 1961, but fa r above the 1967 p ro p o r­
tion of sin g le-em p lo y er o r sin g le -e m p lo y er a sso ciatio n u n affiliated unions. In larg e
m e a su re , th is p ro p o rtio n re fle c te d the p re se n c e of num ero us lo cal ch a p te rs in s ta te ­
w ide a sso c iatio n s of n u rse s and h o sp ital p erso n n el. Among sin g le-em p lo y er unions,
m o st m u ltilo c a l o rg an izatio n s w ere found in p etro leu m refin in g and d istrib u tio n ,
com m unications, and public u tilitie s .
C ollective B argaining
As shown in tab le 9, 77 3 of the 884 un affiliated unions included in the 1967
survey had neg otiated a single a g reem en t. The to tal of 1,625 a g reem en ts rep o rted
in effect was 478 le s s than in 1961, w hile w o rk er cov erag e dropped by about 14,000.
One hundred and eleven unions w ere p arty to two a g reem en ts o r m o re , and to gether
accounted fo r 52 p e rc e n t of those in effect at the tim e of the study.
The incidence of se p a ra te a g reem en ts am ong unions negotiating w ith a single
em ployer o r a sso c ia tio n c o n tra sts w ith th at am ong in tra s ta te unions negotiating w ith
m o re than one em ployer o r a sso c ia tio n , and stem s fro m the d ifferen t o rg an izatio n al
s tru c tu re s of th ese two types of unions. When the re la tio n sh ip is confined to a
single em p lo y er, a single a g reem en t n o rm ally w ill re su lt; w hen a union b arg ain s
w ith s e v e ra l em p lo y ers o r a sso c ia tio n s, se p a ra te ag reem en ts a re m o re likely to be
concluded. A lm ost th re e -fo u rth s of the in tra s ta te unions rep o rtin g in 1967 had two
a g re e m e n ts o r m o re , co m p ared w ith 8 p ercen t of the sin g le-em p lo y er o r asso ciatio n
group. M ost of the m u ltia g re e m e n t unions in the la tte r categ o ry co v ered w o rk ers in
w idely s c a tte re d plants o r se rv ic e fa c ilitie s; ty pically , those w o rk e rs in the public
u tilitie s o r p etro leu m in d u strie s.
F o rty -th re e of the un affiliated unions, re p re se n tin g 38,700 w o rk e rs, rep o rted
th at they engaged in m u ltiem p lo y er (asso ciation ) b argaining. T w enty-four of the
unions b arg ain ed w ith only one em ployer a sso c ia tio n fo r 12, 000 em ployees, w hile
each of the rem ain in g unions b arg ain ed w ith two asso ciatio n s o r m o re . N early tw oth ird s of the w o rk e rs re p re se n te d in asso ciatio n bargaining w ere in nonm anufacturing
in d u s trie s , and of th e se , ov er o n e-h alf w ere in s e rv ic e s, p rim a rily h o sp itals.
A sso ciatio n s of Independents
The 1967 re sp o n se to the question on cou ncils, fed e ra tio n s, a sso c ia tio n s, and
o th er groups jo in ed by un affiliated unions p e rm its only a few g en eral o b serv atip n s. As



11

in the 1961 survey, it w as not alw ays c le a r w hether an o rg an izatio n liste d on the
q u estio n n aire w as indeed a fe d e ra tio n o r an asso ciatio n of autonom ous unions or a
p a re n t body of a m u ltilo c a l o rg an izatio n . Since rep o rtin g unions w ere asked to
fu rn ish only the o rg an izatio n ’s nam e, c la ssific a tio n of th ese o rg an izatio n s w as not
alw ays p o ssib le.
N o netheless, app aren tly few un affiliated in tra s ta te and sin g le-em p lo y er unions
m ain tain fo rm a l tie s w ith o th er such unions. Only 69 unions re p o rte d th ese a rra n g e ­
m en ts in 1967, or le ss than o n e-h alf of the num ber belonging to asso ciatio n s in
1961. 15 The sh a rp drop, p a rtic u la rly in the num ber rep o rtin g m e m b e rsh ip in a
com panyw ide a sso c ia tio n (from 80 to 23), su g g ests the p o ssib ility of consolidations
am ong asso c ia tio n s of th is type, but such sig nifican t changes could not be d eterm in ed
fro m the data. B ecause of the in clu sion of se v e ra l la rg e unions, the to tal m e m b e r­
ship in unions form ing asso c ia tio n s in c re a se d slightly, fro m 90,000 to about 100,000.
The N ational F e d e ra tio n of Independent U nions, w hich had 15 rep o rtin g unions,
accounted for a to ta l of 20,000 m e m b e rs. 16
A sso ciatio n s com posed of unions w hose m em b ersh ip c o m p rise s p a rtic u la r o ccu ­
pations (n u rse s, e n g in e e rs, guards) w ere p rev alen t am ong independent lo cal unions.
Nine se p a ra te o rg an izatio n s of th is type w ere id entified, based on re p o rts fro m 15
unions having a m e m b e rsh ip of n e a rly 43, 000.
E ight asso cia tio n s w ere com panyw ide and included 23 unions having a to tal
m em b e rsh ip of 23,000. T hese bodies co n sisted larg ely of unions in the ch em ical
and p etro leu m in d u strie s.
U naffiliated Unions T erm in a te d D uring the 1961— P e rio d
67
In addition to the 884 functioning unions retu rn in g usab le q u estio n n aires in
the 1967 survey , 229 re p o rte d th at they w ere no lo ng er in ex isten ce. Of th ese, 135
o r 59 p e rc e n t re p o rte d e ith e r having affiliated w ith o r having been defeated in an
NLRB electio n by a national union. 17 N inety-one had been succeeded by A FL —
CIO
affilia te s and 44 by national independent unions. In all, 35 d ifferen t A FL — unions
CIO
and 15 national independent unions w ere nam ed; 6 la rg e natio nal o rg an izatio n s a c ­
counted for n e a rly half the to tal— the S teelw o rk ers (17); O il, C h em ical and A tom ic
W o rk ers (12); T e a m s te rs (11); Auto W o rk ers (10); M ach in ists (7); and E le c tric a l
W o rk ers (IUE) (6).
The re tu rn s in dicated th at 18 o th er un affiliated unions had been te rm in a te d as
a re su lt of b u sin e ss fa ilu re , plant shutdow n o r m ovem ent, o r com pany m e rg e r or
reo rg an izatio n . The rem ain in g 76 re tu rn s in dicated te rm in a tio n only; no in fo rm ation
about the c irc u m sta n c e s w as given.
B ecause m any of the q u estio n n aires w ere in com plete, no ac c u ra te m em b ersh ip
o r o th er data could be com piled. In g en eral, the disbanded unions app ear to have
been sm all. B ased on the availab le data, how ever, m o re than 30,000 m e m b e rs, or
about th re e tim es the num ber in the new ly -o rg an ized unions, app ear to have been
re p re se n te d by the 229 te rm in a te d o rg an izatio n s. No sig nifican t in d u stry or geo­
g rap h ical d istrib u tio n w as found.
15 This number excludes multilocal unions shown in table 8, unless they were part of an association or federation.
16 The National Federation of Independent Unions (NFIU) was created in 1963 by a merger of the Confederated
Unions of America (CUA) and the National Independent Union Council (NIUC). In 1961, 9 unions having 12,000 mem­
bers reported affiliation with the CUA, and 12 unions, having 6,000 members, with the NIUC.
17 The figure is undoubtedly higher, since many of the remaining returns indicated only that the union no longer
existed and made no mention of a successor.



12

T he lim ite d data a v a ila b le in d ica te that during 1961—67, a m uch g r e a te r num ber
of u n a ffilia ted unions w ere term in a ted than w ere o rg a n ized , and that th e se accoun ted
for a m em b ersh ip lo s s that w as not o ffse t by gain s from the n ew ly fo rm ed u n ion s.
The app arent sta b ility of the m em b ersh ip in the u n a ffilia ted s e c to r of the lab or m o v e ­
m en t m ay be the r e su lt of m em b ersh ip lo s s e s in s m a ll unions o ffse t by m em b ersh ip
gain s in la rg e un ion s.
A m ong the la r g e u n a ffilia ted unions rep la ced by or a ffilia ted w ith n ation al or
in tern a tio n a l unions during the 1961—67 p erio d w ere the follow in g:
Independent M etal W ork ers U nion— 2, 200 w o rk ers (H ughes T ool
C o. , H ouston, T ex. ) rep la ce d by the
U nited S teelw o r k ers of A m e r ic a .
T e x tile M achine W orks E m p lo y ee s Independent U nion— 3, 400
w o rk e rs (T ex tile M achine W orks, R eadin g, P a .) rep la ce d by the
U nited S teelw o r k ers of A m e r ic a .
Independent P etro leu m W ork ers U nion of B ayw ay— 1, 400
w o rk e rs (H um ble O il and R efin in g C o., B ayw ay R efin ery ,
L inden, N. J .) rep la ce d by the
In tern ation al B roth erh ood of T e a m s te r s, C h au ffeu rs,
W areh ou sem en and H e lp ers of A m e r ic a . (IPWU
reta in ed c le r ic a l m e m b e r s .)
R o ch e ste r Independent W orkers L o ca l N o. 1— 3, 100 w o rk ers
(G en eral D y n a m ics C orp. , S tr o m b e r g -C a r lso n D iv isio n ,
R o c h e ste r , N. Y. ) rep la ce d by the
In tern ation al U nion of E le c tr ic a l, R adio and M achine
W ork ers of A m e r ic a . (RIW reta in ed E le c tr o n ic s
D iv isio n s w ork er s .)
O rgan ization of P la n t C le r ic a l and O ffice F o r c e s of N orth ern
C a lifo rn ia and N evada— 1 ,9 0 0 w o rk e rs (P a c ific T elep h on e
and T eleg ra p h C o .) rep la ce d by the
C om m u n ication s W ork ers of A m e r ic a .
H ou ston P a p er and P ulp M ill W ork er’s U nion----1, 150 w o rk ers
(C ham pion P a p e r s, I n c ., P a sa d en a , T e x .) rep la ce d by the
In tern ation al B roth erh ood of P ulp, Sulphite and P a p er
M ill W ork ers.
N atu ral G as W orkers U nion— 2, 800 w o rk ers (E a st Ohio G as
C o. , C lev ela n d , O hio) rep la ce d by the
S e r v ic e E m p lo y ee s In tern ation al Union.
Independent C on d en ser W ork ers U nion, L o ca l N o. 2— 2, 200
w o rk ers (Sprague E le c tr ic C o. , N orth A d am s, M a ss. )
rep la ce d by the
In tern ation al U nion of E le c tr ic a l, R adio and M achine
W ork ers of A m e r ic a .
L o ca l 433, Independent— 1 ,1 0 0 w o rk ers (W agner E le c tr ic C o.,
T u n g-S ol D iv isio n , N ew ark, N. J .) rep la ced by the
In tern ation al U nion of E le c tr ic a l, R adio and M achine
W orkers of A m e r ic a .



13
L arg e U nions: 1961 and 1967 D ata C om pared
The s ta tis tic s fo r the 1961 and 1967 stu d ies a re not e n tir e ly co m p a ra b le,
sin c e so m e unions w ere new ly fo rm ed or disban ded during the p erio d , and other
unions fa iled to rep o rt in one of the su r v e y s.
To obtain a se t of data u se fu l in d eterm in in g tren d s, the 1967 q u estio n n a ires
fo r un ion s rep o rtin g 1, 000 m e m b ers or m o re w ere m a tch ed as c lo s e ly as p o ssib le
w ith 1961 retu rn s. Out of 107 unions in th is group, 91 m a tch es w ere obtained.
The m atch ed retu rn s in d ica ted that m em b ersh ip in the 91 unions for 1967 w as
2 5 5 ,3 0 0 , or 54 p ercen t of a ll unions rep o rtin g . T h is co m p a red w ith a 1961 m e m ­
b e r sh ip of 220, 200, or 49 p ercen t of the m em b ersh ip for unions rep o rtin g that y ea r.
M em b ersh ip in c r e a se for the la r g e st unions w as n e a r ly 16 p ercen t, co m p a red
w ith an o v e r a ll in c r e a se of 5 p e rcen t. Of the unions rep o rtin g a 1967 m em b ersh ip
of 1 ,0 0 0 or m o r e , 59 had in c r e a se d , 30 d e c r e a se d , and 2 rem a in ed the sa m e. (See
tab le 10. ) The g r e a te st in c r e a s e s w ere noted am ong la r g e unions in the m a ch in ery
(ex cep t e le c tr ic a l), c h e m ic a ls , tra n sp o rta tio n eq uipm en t, and s e r v ic e in d u str ie s.
S iza b le d e c r e a s e s w ere noted in lea th er and lea th er p ro d u cts, and r e ta il tra d e.
B a rgain in g unit co v era g e in c r e a se d 10 p ercen t fo r the 91 u n ion s, fro m 2 3 8 ,6 0 0
in 1961 to 2 6 2 ,7 0 0 in 1967. In both y e a r s , co v era g e w as the sa m e as m em b ersh ip
in 52 u n ion s. C o v era g e that ex cee d ed m em b ersh ip d eclin ed fro m 34 to 31 u n ion s,
and co v era g e in e x c e s s of 10 p ercen t above m em b ersh ip dropped fro m 24 to 23
un ion s. M em b ersh ip that e x cee d ed co v era g e r o se fro m 5 to 8 u n ion s, and by a 10
p e rcen t m a rg in or m o re fro m 5 to 6 un ion s.
F ew sig n ifica n t m em b ersh ip ch an ges w ere noted by S tate. (See tab le 1 1 .)
The g r e a te s t net in c r e a se w as found in Illin o is (8, 789). O ther su b sta n tia l in c r e a s e s
o ccu rred in H aw aii (6 ,0 1 8 ), Indiana (3 ,8 8 2 ), and V irg in ia (3 ,8 6 6 ). In th ese S tates
and s e v e r a l o th e r s, the in c r e a s e s in the m atch ed la r g e u n ion s re p r e se n te d the en tire
in c r e a s e fo r u n a ffilia ted unions sin ce 1961. S m a ll net d e c lin e s (under 1 ,0 0 0 ) w ere
noted in M aine, M aryland, M a ssa c h u se tts, New H a m p sh ire, T e x a s, and W isco n sin .




14

T a b le 1. D u e s -P a y in g M e m b e rsh ip in In tra s ta te an d S in g le -E m p lo y e r
U n io n s by P e rio d o f O rg a n iz a tio n , 1967
D u es-p ay in g m e m b e rs
N um ber
T o ta l
(in
P e rc e n t
of
th o u s a n d s )
u n io n s

P e rio d of o rg a n iz a tio n

884

474. 6

U nion sp e c ify in g a d a te ---------------------------------------

778

4 4 7 .5

10
30
131
146
115
290
56

3 3 .7
1 6 .4
141. 9
127. 3
5 6 .2
6 1 .4
1 0.6
27. 1

5 .7

34. 2

154. 8

155. 9
30. 3
4. 8
53. 7
31. 8
1 7 .7
16. 5
1. 1
6 .2

7. 1
3. 5
29. 9
26. 8
11. 8
1 2 .9
2. 2

106

W h ite -c o lla r m e m b e rs
N um ber
P e rc e n t
(in
th o u sa n d s)

162. 1

100. 0
94. 3

P r e -1930 ------------------------------------------------------1 9 30-35 --------------------------------------------------------1 9 36-39 --------------------------------------------------------1940-45 --------------------------------------------------------1946-50 --------------------------------------------------------1 951-60 --------------------------------------------------------19 61 -6 7 ---------------------------------------------------------U nions n o t sp e c ify in g a d a te ------------------------------

W om en m e m b e rs
N u m b er
P e rc e n t
(in
th o u sa n d s)

34. 8
90. 0
28. 9
37. 8
25. 0
31. 5
26. 8
10. 7

145. 1
30. 5
2 .9
5 9 .2
25. 0
17. 3
8. 6
1.6

23. 0

9 .7

3 2 .6
3 2 .4
9 0. 5
17. 8
4 1 .7
1 9 .6
3 0 .7
14. 0
14. 7
36. 0

1 A ll m e m b e rs h ip s ta tis tic s in th is and su b se q u e n t ta b le s in clu d e b o th d u e s-p ay in g m e m b e rs an d m e m b e rs in good sta n d in g ,
N O T E : B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u al to ta ls . P e rc e n t fig u re s b a s e d on u n ro u n d e d n u m b e rs .

T ab le 2. D u e s-P a y in g M e m b e r sh ip 1 of In tra s ta te and S in g le -E m p lo y e r U n io n s, 1967

N u m b e r o f m e m b e rs

A ll u n io n s
S in g le -e m p lo y e r u n io n s
I n tra s ta te u n io n s
D u e s-p a y in g
D u e s-p a y in g
D u e s-p a y in g
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
N u m b e r P e rc e n t N u m b er
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b e r
N um ber P e rc e n t N um ber
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
th o u sa n d s)
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
884

2 0 -5 0 m e m b e rs
5 1 -1 00 m e m b e rs
101-150 m e m b e rs
151-200 m e m b e rs ----------------------------------------2 0 1 -2 5 0 m e m b e rs ----------------------------------------2 5 1 -3 0 0 m e m b e rs
30 1-40 0 m e m b e rs ----------------------------------------4 0 1 -5 0 0 m e m b e rs ----------------------------------------5 0 1 -1 , 000 m e m b e rs — ------- —
1 ,0 0 1 -2 , 500 m e m b e rs — —
— — 2, 5 0 1 -5 , 000 m e m b e rs --------------------------------O v e r 5, 000 m e m b e rs - ----- ----------------

100. 0

474. 6

100. 0

822

100. 0

390. 4

100. 0

62

294
129
76
57
36
33
45
41
67
69
21
16

33. 3
14. 5
8 .6
6 .4
4. 0
3. 7
5. 1
4. 6
7. 6
7. 8
2. 4
1 .8

7. 0
9 .7
9 .6
10. 1
8. 0
9. 1
16. 1
18. 7
45. 9
109. 0
7 2 .6
158. 5

1. 5
2. 0
2. 0
2. 1
1. 7
1. 9
3. 4
3. 9
9. 7
23. 0
15. 3
3 3 .4

286
118
73
52
35
32
41
36
61
58
19
11

34. 8
14. 4
8 .9
6. 3
4. 3
3. 9
5. 0
4. 4
7. 4
7. 1
2. 3
1. 3

6. 8
8. 9
9 .2
9 .2
7. 8
8. 8
14. 7
16. 4
4 1 .5
92. 6
6 4. 1
1 1 0.4

1 .7
2. 3
2. 4
2 .4
2. 0
2. 3
3. 8
4. 2
10. 6
23. 7
16. 4
28. 3

8
11
3
5
1
1
4
5
6
11
2
5

100. 0

84. 2

100. 0

1 2 .9
17. 7
4. 8
8. 1
1 .6
1. 6
6. 5
8. 1
9. 7
17. 7
3. 2
8. 1

0 .2
.9
.4
.9
.2
.3
1. 5
2. 3
4. 5
16. 4
8 .6
48. 1

0. 2
1. 0
.5
1. 0
.3
.4
1. 7
2. 7
5. 3
19.6
10. 2
57. 3

1 A ll m e m b e rs h ip s ta tis tic s in clu d e b o th d u e s-p a y in g m e m b e rs an d m e m b e rs in good sta n d in g .
N O T E : B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . P e r c e n t fig u re s a re b a s e d on u n ro u n d e d n u m b e rs .




15
T ab le 3. A g re e m e n t C o v e ra g e of In tra s ta te an d S in g le -E m p lo y e r U n io n s, 1967

N u m b e r o f w o rk e rs in b a rg a in in g u n it

1-50 w o r k e r s ________________________________
5 1 -1 0 0 w o rk e rs ---------------- -----------------1 01-150 w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------1 51-200 w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------2 0 1 -2 5 0 w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------2 5 1 -3 0 0 w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------3 0 1 -4 0 0 w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------4 0 1 -5 0 0 w o r k e r s ____________________________
501 - 1, 000 w o r k e r s _____ — --- --------------1 ,0 0 1 -2 , 500 w o r k e r s ------------------- ------ —
2 ,5 0 1 -5 , 000 w o r k e r s ---------------------------------O v e r 5, 000 w o rk e rs ----- ------ --- - - —

A ll u nions
S in g le -e m p lo y e r u nions
In tra s ta te u nions
W o rk e rs in
W o rk e rs in
W o rk e rs in
b a rg a in in g u n it
b a rg a in in g un it
b a rg a in in g u n it
N u m b e r P e rc e n t N u m b e r
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b e r
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b e r
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
884
316
120
73
58
32
34
40
32
69
72
21
17

100. 0

480. 8

3 5 .7
13.6
8. 3
6 .6
3 .6
3. 8
4. 5
3 .6
7. 8
8. 1
2. 4
1. 9

6 .6
9. 0
9. 3
10. 4
7. 1
9 .4
14. 3
14. 7
4 7. 5
115. 8
75. 5
161. 2

100. 0
1 .4
1. 9
1. 9
2. 2
1. 5
2. 0
3. 0
3. 1
9. 9
24. 1
15.7
33. 5

822
305
110
71
52
31
33
38
28
62
60
17
15

100. 0
37. 1
1 3 .4
8 .6
6. 3
3 .8
4. 0
4 .6
3. 4
7. 5
7. 3
2. 1
1 .8

416. 9
6. 5
8. 1
9 .0
9. 3
6. 9
9. 1
13. 6
12. 8
42. 5
97. 2
5 9 .4
1 4 2 .4

100. 0

62

1 .6
1. 9
2. 1
2. 2
1.7
2. 2
3. 3
3. 1
10. 2
23. 3
14. 2
34. 2

11
10
2
6
1
1
2
4
7
12
4
2

100. 0
17. 7
16. 1
3. 2
9 .6
1.6
1 .6
3 .2
6. 5
11. 2
19. 3
6 .5
3 .2

64. 0

100. 0

0. 2
.8
.3
1. 0
.2
.3
.7
1. 9
5. 0
18. 6
16. 1
18. 8

0. 3
1. 3
.5
1. 6
.3
.5
1. 2
3. 0
7. 8
2 9. 1
25. 1
29. 4

N O T E : B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u al to ta ls . P e rc e n t fig u re s a re b a s e d on u n ro u n d e d n u m b e rs .

T a b le 4. P ro p o rtio n of W om en M e m b e rs in I n tra s ta te an d S in g le -E m p lo y e r U n io n s, 1967
A ll u n io n s

P e r c e n t of w o m en m e m b e rs

S in g le -e m p lo y e r u nions
In tra s ta te u n ions
W om en
W om en
W om en
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
N u m b e r P e rc e n t N u m b er
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b e r
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b e r
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
(in
P e rc e n t
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
884
391
122
130
86
80
48
27

100. 0
44. 2
13. 8
14. 7
9. 7
9. 0
5. 4
3. 1

162. 1

100. 0

5. 3
17. 2
25. 8
22. 6
23. 3
67. 9

3. 3
10. 6
15. 9
13. 9
14. 4
4 1 .9

822
368
107
125
81
74
47
20

100. 0
44. 8
13. 0
15. 2
9. 9
9. 0
5. 7
2. 4

117. 2

100. 0

4. 9
15. 9
22. 4
20. 6
22. 4
31. 0

4. 2
13. 6
19. 1
17. 6
19. 1
26. 5

62
23
15
5
5
6
1
7

100. 0
37. 1
2 4. 2
8. 1
8. 1
9. 7
1. 6
11. 3

44. 9

100. 0

0. 4
1. 3
3. 4
2. 0
.9
36. 9

0. 9
2. 9
7. 6
4. 5
2. 0
82. 2

N O T E : B e c a u se o f ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . P e rc e n t fig u re s a re b a s e d on u n ro u n d e d n u m b e rs .

T ab le 5. P ro p o rtio n of W h ite -C o lla r M e m b e rs in In tra s ta te and S in g le -E m p lo y e r U n io n s, 1967
P e r c e n t of w h ite -c o lla r m e m b e rs

A ll u nions
S in g le -e m p lo y e r u nions
In tra s ta te u n io n s
W h ite -c o lla r
W h ite -c o lla r
W hite -c o lla r
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b er
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b e r
N u m b er P e rc e n t N u m b er
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
(in
P e rc e n t
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
th o u san ds)
884
570
68
66
24
9
9
138

100. 0
7. 7
7. 5
2. 7
1. 0
1. 0
1 5.6

154. 8

100. 0

2. 4
3. 7
8. 2 “ 5. 3
7. 7
5. 0
1 .2
1 .9
4. 4
2. 8
128. 8
83. 2

822

100. 0

539
61
65
24
7

7. 4
7. 9
2. 9
.9

117

14. 2

103. 7
3. 2
8. 2
1. 2
4. 4
78. 9

100. 0
3. 1
7. 9
7. 4
1 .2
4. 2
76. 0

62

51. 1

100. 0

3. 2

0. 5
(* i
.7

1. 0
(2 )
1 .4

33. 9

49. 9

9 7 .6

31
7

100. 0
50. 0
1 1 .3

2
21

1 L e s s th a n 100 m e m b e rs .
2 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
N O T E : B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u al to ta ls . P e rc e n t fig u re s a re b a se d on u n ro u n d e d n u m b e rs,




16
T ab le 6. D u e s-P a y in g M e m b e rs h ip 1 and A g re e m e n t C o v e ra g e of In tra s ta te and
S in g le -E m p lo y e r U n io n s, by In d u stry , 1967

In d u stry

A ll in d u s tr ie s -----------------------M a n u fac tu rin g ----------------------------O rd n a n c e and a c c e s s o r ie s _________
F o od an d k in d re d p r o d u c ts -----------T o b acco m a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts --------------------A p p a re l an d o th e r fin ish e d
p ro d u c ts . _
_
_______
L u m b e r and w ood p ro d u c ts ,
e x c e p t f u r n it u r e ---------------------------F u rn itu re an d fix tu r e s -------------------P a p e r an d a llie d p r o d u c ts ------------P rin tin g , p u b lish in g , and
a llie d in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c ts -----P e tro le u m re fin in g and
re la te d in d u s trie s - _ ------- — R u b b e r and m is c e lla n e o u s
p la s tic s p ro d u c ts --------------------------L e a th e r an d le a th e r p ro d u c ts -------S to n e, c la y , and g la s s p ro d u c ts —
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s tr i e s -------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts -----------M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e le c tr ic a l— —
E le c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, and s u p p lie s - — -----T r a n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t---------- In s tru m e n ts and re la te d
p ro d u c ts
- - ----- -------------M isc e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g
in d u s trie s
- —
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g -------------------M in in g , c ru d e p e tro le u m , and
n a tu r a l g as p ro d u c tio n -----------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n -------------------------------C o m m u n ic a tio n s-----------------------------U tilitie s : E le c tr ic and g a s ________
W h o le sale tr a d e ____________________
R e ta il tra d e — ———— — — — — _—
H o tels an d r e s ta u r a n ts ------------------S e r v ic e s — _ — — — - _ — —
C o n stru c tio n ------- — ------------------ M isc e lla n e o u s n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g —
U n c la ssifia b le e s ta b lis h m e n ts —

A ll u n io n s
W o rk e rs in
D u e s-p a y in g
b a rg a in in g
m e m b e rs
u n it
N um ­
b e r N u m b er P e r ­ N u m b er P e r ­
(in th o u ­ c e n t (in th o u ­ c e n t
sa n d s )
sa n d s )
884 4 7 4 .6
545 3 1 1 .7
3. 3
2
8. 7
48
1
(2 )
6. 4
25

100. 0
65. 7
0. 7
1. 8
(3 )
1. 3

480. 8

.3
1. 1
.6
6. 7
6. 7
38. 3

4

.8

.2

12
7
18

1. 1
.8
6. 0

34
57

5. 6
37. 0

.2
.2
1. 3
1 .2
8. 0

42
12
16
9
47
50
54

26. C

5. 5

5. 9
9 .6
1. 3
36. 1
8. 7
4 1 .6

54
34

54. 2
46. 2

1. 2
2. 0
.3
7 .6
1 .8
8. 8
1 1 .4
9. 7
1. 5

6 7. 0
13
5. 3
325 1 6 1.4
11
58
15
23
73
76
3
49
4
13
14

1. 3
13. 1
38. 3
24. 3
6. 7
15. 8
1.0
57. 0
.2
3 .7
1 .5

1. 1
34. 0
0. 3
2. 8
8. 1
5. 1
1. 4
3. 3
.2
12. 0

(3)
.8
.3

336. 9
3. 3
7. 8
(2 )
6. 3

100. 0
70. 1
0. 7
1. 6
(3 )
1. 3
.1
.2
.1
1. 4
1. 4
8. 0

S ingle e m p lo y e r u n io n s
In tra s ta te u n io n s
W o rk e rs in
W o rk e rs in
D u e s-p a y in g
D u e s-p a y in g
b a rg a in in g
b a rg a in in g
m e m b e rs
m e m b e rs
Num
u n it
Num u n it
b e r N u m b e r P e r ­ N u m b e r P e r ­ b e r N u m b e r P e r ­ N u m b er P e r ­
(in th o u ­ c e n t (in th o u ­ c e n t
[in th o u ­ c e n t [in th o u ­ c en t
sa n d s )
sa n d s )
sa n d s )
sa n d s )
822
516
2
45
1
24

3 9 0 .4
287. 5
3. 3
8 .6
(2 )
6. 1

5. 0
37. 0

1. 3
9. 5

6. 0
38. 2

1.4
9 .2

3
-

.6
-

.8

.6
-

1. 0
-

38
10
14
9
47
47
50

23. 2
4 .6
6. 3
1. 3
36. 1
8. 1
36. 7

27. 9
5. 0
6 .2
1. 3
38. 0
7. 8
3 7 .6

6. 7

4

2. 8

3. 4

3. 8

1 .2
1.5
.3
9. 1
1. 9
9. 0
14. 2
10. 1

2
2
3
4

1. 5
3 .9
.7
5. 8

1. 2
3. 3
.6
4 .9
.2
14. 8

5 .9
1 .9
5. 2
.9
7. 7

54. 1
39. 2
7. 0

5. 9
1. 2
1 .6
.3
9 .2
2. 1
9. 4
13. 8
10. 0

-

-

-

2. 8
30. 9

4. 4

7. 3 1 1.4
2. 9 4. 5
.8
1 .2
.1
.2
_
19. 7 30. 8

29. 7

293

0 .2
2. 7
9 .9
5. 2
1 .4
4. 1
.2
5. 1

11
54
15
19
69
73
3
33
3
13
13

1. 3
5. 7
3 8 .4
21. 3
6. 0
15. 7
1. 0
8. 4
.2
3. 7
1. 3

.3

6
11

1 .8

.6
26. 0
0. 3
1. 5
9. 8
5. 4
1.5
4. 0
.3
2. 1

(3)
.9
.3

3. 3
7. 7
(2 )
5. 9
.3

0. 8
1. 8
(3)
1. 4
.1

3
1
-

0. 1
.4
-

0. 2
.4
-

0. 1
.4
-

0. 2
.5
-

.9
.6
6. 7

.2
.1
1 .6

2
-

.2
-

.3
_
-

.2
_
-

.4
-

5 9 .2
42. 3
7. 0
2. 0
1 1 1.8

1. 0
5. 8
47. 7
22. 0
5. 8
19. 7
1. 0
5. 0
.2
3 .6
1. 1

1. 7

-

1. 2
3. 3
.6
4 .9
.2
7. 0
-

.5
26. 8

2

2. 8

32

59. 7

3. 3
70. 9

-

7. 3
2. 9
.8
.1
48. 6

8. 7
3. 5
.9
.2
_
57. 7

c2

.2

0. 2
1. 4
1 1 .4
5. 3
1 .4
4. 7
.2
1. 2

(3)

.9
.3

1

2

4
-

4

4
3
16

i

-

1

(3)

.2
8. 3

(3)

1 A ll m e m b e rs h ip s ta tis tic s in clu d e b o th d u e s-p a y in g m e m b e rs and m e m b e rs in good sta n d in g .
2 L e s s th a n 100 m e m b e rs o r w o rk e rs c o v e re d by a g re e m e n t.
3 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
N O T E : B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . P e rc e n t fig u re s a re b a s e d on u n ro u n d e d n u m b e rs




64. 0 100. 0
32. 9 5 1 .4

31
57

2. 5
101. 6

(3)
.7

100. 0
28. 8

.8

53
32

6.6

84. 2
24. 2

.8
.8
6. 0

11. 2
11. 9
1. 5
1 .0

19. 8
1. 0
24. 7
.2
3 .6
1 .3

29

4

59. 4
57. 2
7. 0

1. 0
13. 1
4 7. 7
24. 9

62

10
7
18

6 .6

4. 8
142. 7

416. 9 100. 0
304. 0 72. 9

0. 8
2. 2
(3 )
1. 6
.2
.2
.2
1. 5

31. 6
6. 2
9. 5
1. 3
38. 0
8 .4
42. 5

1. 3
2. 0
.3
7. 9
1.7
8. 8

100. 0
73. 6

.3
23. 2

48. 3

(2)

(3)

.2

.3

17

Table 7. D ues-Paying M em bership1 and A greem ent Coverage of Intrastate and Single-E m ployer Unions, by State, 1967

State

United S ta te s--------A labam a--------------------A laska ----------------------A rizo n a---------------------A rk a n sa s-------------------C alifo rn ia-----------------Colorado -------------------C onnecticut---------------D elaw are-------------------D istrict of Columbia —
F lo rid a ---------------------G e o rg ia ---------------------H a w a ii----------------------Idaho-------------------------Illin o is----------------------In d ia n a ---------------------Io w a --------------------------K a n sa s----------------------K entucky-------------------L o u isia n a -----------------M a in e -----------------------M aryland------------ ---M assach u setts----------M ich ig an ------------------M innesota-----------------M ississip p i---------------M is s o u ri------------------M ontan a--------------------N e b ra sk a ------------------N evada----------------------New H a m p sh ire --------New J e r s e y ---------------New M exico --------------New York -----------------N orth C a ro lin a ---------N orth D akota-------------Ohio -------------------------O klaho m a-----------------Oregon ----------------------P enn sylv an ia-------------Rhode I s la n d -------------South C a ro lin a ----------South D a k o ta -------------T ennessee ----------------Texas -----------------------U ta h -------------------------V erm o nt-------------------V irg in ia -------------------W ashington---------------W est V irg in ia-----------W isconsin-----------------W yom ing------------------Not classified by State

All unions
Single-em ployer
D ues-paying W orkers in
D ues-paying
bargaining
m em bers
>JumNum- m em bers
unit
ber Number P e r ­ Number P e r ­ ber Number P e r ­
(in thou­ cent [in thou- cent
(in thou­ cent
sands)
s and s)
sands)
884 474. 6 100.0
4
0.8
0. 2
1
(3)
(2)
1
.1
(3)
68 57. 5 12. 1
4
.2
(3)
12
6. 2 1. 3
3
4. 1
.9
6. 4 1. 3
3
4
1.5
.3
3
.3
.1
3
6. 7 1.4
1.2
1
.2
54 46. 5 9.8
2?
11. 3 2. 4
.3
10
1. 3
.4
6
1.8
12
4. 1
.9
18
3.0
.6
5
2. 7
.6
8. 1 1.7
17
52 15. 9 3. 4
24
7. 2 1.5
1.5
7
6.9
1
(2)
(3)
1.4
6.6
29
4
(3)
(2)
1
.1
(3)
2
.3
.1
3
2. 3
.5
67 31. 2 6. 6
1
(2)
(3>
105 48. 3 10. 2
1
.3
.1
1
.2
(3)
93
53. 8 11. 3
6
.3
1. 6
1.4
7
.3
124 45.0
9.5
12
.8
.2
.4
1
.1
3
3. 2
.7
24 11. 3 2. 4
4
.2
(3)
1
.6
.1
14 23.0
4. 8
8 12. 6 2.7
11.6
2. 4
11
20
1.2
5.9
1
(2)
(3)
7 20.0
4.0

480. 8
0. 8
(2)
.1
40. 7
.2
6. 2
4. 3
7. 4
1. 5
.3
1.4
1.4
48. 5
11.7
1.5
2. 7
4. 4
3. 2
2. 7
11. 1
15.9
7. 2
6. 0
(2>
5. 8
(2)
.1
.2
2. 5
32. 3
(2)
52. 6
.3
.2
56. 6
1.6
1.4
46. 6
.8
.4
2.7
12. 8
.2
.6
23. 2
18. 3
12. 1
6. 0
(2>
24. 0

100.0 822 390.4
0. 2
4
0. 8
1
(3)
(2)
1
.1
(3)
8. 5 54 26. 3
3
.2
(3)
6. 2
1. 3 12
3
4. 1
.9
3
6. 4
1. 5
.3
3
.8
3
.3
.1
.3
2
(2>
.3
1
1. 2
10. 1 51
37. 7
2.4
21
11.3
. 3 10
1. 3
1.8
.6
6
11
4.0
.9
. 7 17
2.9
.5
3
.6
2. 3 15
7. 2
3. 3 52 15.9
3. 6
1. 5 22
4
.8
1. 2
1
(3)
(2)
6.6
1. 2 29
4
(2)
1
.1
<>
2
.3
(3)
.5
3
2. 3
63 29. 5
6.7
1
(3)
(2)
95 44. 8
10.9
.3
.1
1
1
.2
(3)
11.8
53. 5
91
.3
5
.6
.3
6
1. 3
9.7 120 44. 5
.2
12
.8
.4
.1
1
.6
3
3. 2
2. 7 20
7. 8
4
.2
(3)
.6
.1
1
4. 8 13 22. 6
3. 8
6
2. 1
2. 5 11
11. 6
1.2
18
3. 8
1
(2)
(3)
5.0
7 20.0

100.0
0. 2
(3)
(3)
6. 7
(3)
1. 6
1.0
1. 6
.2
.1
(3>
.3
9.6
2.9
.3
.5
1.0
.7
.1
1. 8
4. 0
.9
.2
.1
1. 7
(3)
.1
.1
.6
7. 6
(3)
11. 5
.1
(3)
13. 7
.2
.3
11. 4
.2
.1
.8
2. 0
(3)
.1
5. 8
.5
3.0
1. 0
(3)
5. 1

unions
In trastate unions
W orkers in
W orkers in
Dues-paying
bargaining
bargaining
Num - m em bers
unit
unit
Number P e r ­ ber Number P e r ­ Number P e r ­
(in thou- cent
(in thou- cent (in thou- cent
s and s)
s and s)
s and s )
416. 9
0. 8
(2)
.1
29.9
.2
6. 2
4. 3
7. 4
.7
.3
(2)
1.4
39. 7
11.7
1. 5
2. 7
4. 2
3. 2
.5
10. 2
15.9
3.6
.8
(2)
5. 8
(2)
.1
.2
2. 5
30. 6
(2)
49. 6
.3
.2
56. 3
.6
1. 3
46. 1
.8
.4
2.7
8.4
.2
.6
22. 8
1.9
12. 1
3.9
(2)
24. 0

100.0
0. 2
(3)
(3)
7. 2
(3)
1. 5
1.0
1. 8
.2
.1
(3)
.3
9.5
2. 8
.4
.6
1.0
.8
.1
2. 4
3. 8
.9
.2
(3)
1.4
(3>
( >
(3)
.6
7. 3
(3)
11.9
.1
(3)
13. 5
.2
.3
11.0
.2

62

84. 2

100.0

14
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
2
3
-

31. 2
(2)
.8
6. 7
8. 8
.2
(2)
2. 2
1.0
3. 6
6. 1

37. 1
(3)
.9
7.9
10. 5
.2
(3)
2. 7
1. 1
4. 3
7. 4

-

-

4
10

1. 7
3. 5

2

1
1

4

3
1.0
(2)
.4

-

-

-

.

-

.1

1. 2
(3)
.5
-

3
1.0
(2)4
.
-

4
1. 5
(3)
.7
6.9

.

-

3. 5

4. 1

4.4

-

-

.

.

.1
5. 5
.5

2.9
.9
(3)
5. 7

1
2
2
-

4
10. 5
2. 1
.

-

4
12. 5
2. 5
-

-

2. 7
4. 7

4

_

17.0
(3)
1.2
2. 1
13.8
.3
(3)
3.5
1.5
5. 6
8. 4
-

1. 7
3.0

.6
2.0
(3)

_

-

-

-

1 All m em bership statistics include both dues-paying m em bers and m em bers in good standing.
2 L ess than 100 m em bers or w orkers covered by agreem ents.
3 L ess than 0.05 percent.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals. P ercen t figures are based on unrounded num bers,




2. 1
4. 1

10.9
(2)
.8
1.4
8. 8
.2
(2)
2. 2
1.0
3. 6
5. 3

.1

_

-

-

64. 0 100.0

_

4
16. 3
2. 1
-

.

_

-

.6
25. 5
3. 3
-

18
Table 8. Num ber of Locals A ffiliated With Intrastate and Single-E m ployer Unions, 1967

Num ber of locals
A ll unions ____________ ____ ___
1 lo c a l______________________________
2 locals ____________________________
3 locals ____________________________
4 locals _______________ _____________
5 locals ____________________________
6 locals ____________________________
7 locals ____________________________
8 locals ____________________________
9 locals ................................ „ ...............
10 and under 20 locals ............................
20 and under 30 lo c a ls ______________
30 locals and over __________________

All unions
Due s paying
Unions Locals m e m b e r 8
(in
thousands)
884
801
20
13
8
7
3
2
2
5
13
2
8

1,600
801
40
39
32
35
18
14
16
45
173
48
339

Single-em ployer unions
In trastate unions
Due s - W orkers
W orker s
Due 8- W orkers
in b a r­
paying in b a r ­
paying in b a r­
gaining Unions Locals m e m b e rs1 gaining Unions Locals m em b ers1 gaining
unit (in
(in
unit ^in
(in
unit (in
thousand^ thousands)
thousands)
thousands' thousands)

474. 6
321. 6
15.4
30. 0
4. 5
9. 1
1.6
1. 7
.9
5. 4
27. 9
16.8
39. 7

480. 8
339. 2
16. 8
35. 1
4. 5
4. 4
1. 2
2. 1
.9
7. 3
35. 2
19. 3
14. 8

822
755
15
9
8
6
2
2
2
4
12
2
5

1,344
755
30
27
32
30
12
14
16
36
163
48
181

390. 4
284. 5
9.8
27. 9
4. 5
2.4
1.0
1. 7
.9
5. 2
27. 2
16.8
8. 5

416.9
295. 7
11. 2
32. 2
4. 5
3. 0
.7
2. 1
.9
7. 1
34. 0
19. 3
6. 3

62
46
5
4
1
1
_
1
1
_
3

84. 2
37. 1
5.6
2. 2
_
6. 7
._6
.2
.7
_
31. 1

256
46
10
12
_
5
6
_
9
10
_
158

64.0
43. 5
5. 6
2.9
_
1.4
.6
_
_
.2
1.2
_
8.6

1 All m em bership statistics include both dues-paying m em bers and m em bers in good standing.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals. Percent figures are based on unrounded num bers.

Table 9. Num ber of Basic Collective Bargaining A greem ents Negotiated by In trastate and Single-E m ployer Unions,' 1967
Num ber of collective b a r­
gaining agreem ents

Num ber

A ll unions
1 ag ree m en t_____________________ ___ ________
2 a g re e m e n ts_________ _____________________
3 agreem ents ________________________________
4-6 agreem ents
7-9 a g re e m e n ts______________________________
10-20 agreem ents ____________________________
21-30 agreem ents
31-40 a g re e m e n ts_________________________ _
41-50 a g re e m e n ts____________________________
Over 50 a g re e m e n ts_______________________ _

884
773
52
22
16
7
3
6
2
1
2

All unions
C ollective
bargaining
agreem ents
W orkers
Number (in thou­
sands)
1,625
773
104
66
77
55
39
146
78
49
238

480.8
320. 3
72. 2
38. 9
15.8
7. 6
2. 6
12. 8
.5
4. 0
6. 1

Single -em ployer unions
Collective
bargaining
agreem ents
Num ber
W orkers
Num ber (in thou­
sands)
822
756
39
11
13
3
-

953
756
78
33
62
24
"

416.9
316.4
50.4
29. 2
14. 6
6. 3
-

In trastate unions
C ollective
bargaining
agreem ents
Number
W orkers
Num ber (in thou­
sands)
62
17
13
11
3
4
3
6
2
1
2

672
17
26
33
15
31
39
146
78
49
238

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal totals. P ercent figures a re based on unrounded num bers.




64. 0
3.9
21. 8
9.7
1. 2
1. 3
2. 6
12. 8
.5
4. 0
6. 1

19

Table 10. Changes in D ues-Paying M em bership 1 in M ajor Intrastate and Single-Em ployer
Unions, by Industry, 1961—
67
Industry

All in d u strie s-------------------------M anufacturing-----------------------------O rdnance and accesso ries --------------Food and kindred products
Tobacco m anufacturing
Textile m ill products
A pparel and other finished
p ro d u c ts----------------------------------------Lum ber and wood products,
except fu rn itu re ___________________
F u rnitu re and fixtures_______________
P aper and allied products ----------- Printing, publishing, and
allied industries— -----Chem icals and allied products---------Petroleum refining and
related industries
—Rubber and m iscellaneous
plastics products---------------------------L eather and leather products— — Stone, clay, and glass pro d u cts------P rim a ry m etal in d u strie s----------------F abricated m etal p rod ucts---------------M achinery, except e le c tr ic a l----------E lectrical m achinery, equipment,
and su p p lies----------------------------------T ransportation equipm ent—-------------Instrum ents and related pro d u cts----M iscellaneous m anufacturing
ind ustries
—
Nonm anufacturing------------------------M ining, crude petroleum , and
natu ral gas production-------------------T ransportation ------ - - -----------Com m unications-------------------------------U tilities: E lectric and gas---------------W holesale tra d e -------------------------------Retail trad e. .
—
— ----Hotels and re sta u ra n ts- — ------ _
Services - _ —
_
——Const rue ti on..—
^___ ,______
M iscellaneous nonm anufacturing------

D ecrease
Increase
Net iilerease
Same
25 percent
L ess than
L ess than
25 percent
or dt crease
or m ore
25 percent
25 percent
or m ore
Due s Dues Dues Dues D uesD uesUnions paying Unions paying Unions paying Unions paying Unions paying Unions paying
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
91
63
2
2
2
2
1
11
4
2
3
7
7
9
9
2

35. 378
24.020
1, 030
284
97
-476
275
3,285
-537
1,405
-2,52 7
1,924
8,868
5,998
3,584
810

5
4

5.939
3.223

25
15

8.853
7, 025

2
1

0
0

27
19

10,487
8, 826

1
2
1
-

11.358

1

1
1
2
1
3
1
1
4
1
10

16
165
476
396
1,287
677
250
1,482
2, 276
*
1.828

1
1

0
-

28

“
500
1,850
873
*
2.716

1
1
5
5
2
i
3
1
8

1
6
10
3
8
-

-247
2,730
936
-2,65 5
10,594
-

-

2, 716
-

1
3
4
2
-

247
381
619

-

1
4

-

-

-

-

0
-

-

1
-

581
-

1

1 All m em bership statistics include both dues-paying m em bers and m em bers in good standing.




0

-

1

2
-

262
275
1,231
1,834
2, 772
275
2, 027
150

32
24
2
1
4
1
1
1
5
3
5
1

39.683
25.442
1,030
300
2,950
750
1,405
340
6, 096
8, 078
3,833
660

*
1.661

8

14.241

138
225

2
2

2, 973
1, 330
9,938
_

-

61

1, 237
-

-

4
-

20
Table 11. Changes in D ues-Paying M em bership1 in M ajor Intrastate and Single-E m ployer Unions, by State, 1961—
67
State

United S ta te s--------------------C alifo rn ia------------------------------C onnecticut---------------------------D elaw are ------------------------------D istrict of C olum bia-------------Hawaii ----------------------------------Idaho ------------------------------------Illin o is----------------------------------Indiana----------------------------------K entucky-------------------------------M a in e -----------------------------------M aryland-------------------------------M assach u setts-----------------------M ichigan -------------------------------M innesota------------------------------M is s o u r i------------------------------New H a m p sh ire --------------------New J e r s e y ---------------------------New Y o rk ------------------------------O h io --------------------------------------P enn sylv an ia-------------------------Tennessee -----------------------------V irg in ia --------------------------------W ashington---------------------------W est V irg in ia------------------------W isconsin-------------------------------

D ecrease
Increase
Net increase
Same
25 percent
Le ss than
Le ss than
25 percent
or dec p s e
25 percent
25 percent
or m ore
or m ore
D uesDues D uesD uesDues D uesinions paying Unions paying Unions paying Unions paying Unions paying Unions paying
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
m em bers
91
7
2
1
2
1
1
11
4
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
9
8
9
12
1
3
4
2
1
1

35,378
1,475
1,760
956
68
6,018
340
8,739
3, 882
314
-677
-6 1 3
-3 6 5
987
913
275
-7 0 0
1,541
767
1,804
1,259
1,255
-5 2 4
3,866
1,789
304
-55

5
1
-

-

5,939
2,716
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
2
1

-

700
1,373
1,150
-

-

-

-

-

25
1

8,853
300

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

2
1
1
2
2
-

3
1
3
5
2
1
1

212
27
677
613
689
-

-

470
16
2,922
2,030
561
281
-

55

2
-

-

27
1
-

1

0

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

0

-

-

-

-

-

All m em bership statistics include both dues-paying m em bers and m em bers in good standing.




0

-

-

1

10,487
209
-

-

68
-

5
1

1,079
56

-

324
913
275
1,000
223
3,155
864
_
37
1,980
304

-

1
1
1
2
3
4
3
1
2
1

-

32
4
2
1
1
1
4
3
1
_
-

-

1

-

1
3
2
4
i
_
2
i
-

39,683
4, 282
1,760
956
6,018
340
7,872
3,909
258
-

-

987
-

_

2, 384
1,710
1,571
2,425
1,255
_
1,886
2,070
-

Appendix. Questionnaire
BLS2725

Budget Bureau No. 44-S67009.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

A “ ’ *1"
pP

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S

For Department of
Labor Use Only.

WASHINGTON,

D .C .

pi" *

D ' 196,‘
"

20212

M bership Survey of Single-Em
em
ployer an Intrastate U
d
nions in the U
nited States, 1967

For
office
use
only

I. Union Identification:
(Please change if shown incorrectly above)
1. Is your collective bargaining relationship
limited to only 1 employer or company
or to a single association of employers?

1 1 Yes, only 1 employer or
association of employers.

| 1 No, more than 1 company or
association of employers.

2. Are the plants or offices in which you repre1 1 Yes, only 1 State.
| 1 No, more than 1 State,
sent workers all within a single State?
If you answered "No” to both 1 and 2, enter your name below without answering the other questions, and return the
form in the enclosed envelope.
If you answered "Yes” to either 1 or 2, please enter the information requested below and teturn the form in the
enclosed envelope.
3. Number of set>arate locals or branches
locals or branches.
4. Is your union affiliated with (i.e., pays regular dues or per capita tax to)
any other union, council, association, or federation of unions?

| | Yes | 1 No

5. If "Y es,” please give name and address of organization with which affiliated:
Name
Address
6. Year union was organized:
II. Membership:
1. Number of members (dues-paying or in good standing) as of March or April 1967 (or another recent month). members
2. Approximate percentage of members who are women.
%
3. Approximate percentage of members who are in "white-collar” jobs (office, technical, professional, sales).
%
III. Collective Bargaining Coverage:
1. Number of agreements currently held by your union.

agreements

2. Total number of workers covered by these agreements (i.e., in bargaining unit) as of
employers
4. If more than one employer, do they negotiate as an association?

1 1 Yes

I I No

5. Industry or business of employer(s) under agreement.

6. In what citv or State are most of vour members eiiioloved?

Citv

Name of person reporting
Title
If you want to receive announcements of Bureau industrial relations studies, check | 1

State
Date

(Please use back of form for any comments regarding this survey you may wish to make.)




21
☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1969 0-366-542

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

e°s

REGION VIII
NEBR

pn'
R E G I O N

I
I

KANS
Kansas

City

OKLA

U.S.

BR.

V IR G IN IS L A N D S

.tianta
Dallas

REGION VI
H W II
A A

P U E R T O R IC O

Region II
Region I
341 Ninth Ave.
1603-B Federal Building
Government Center
New York, N. Y. 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region V
Region VI
219 South Dearborn St.
337 M ayflower Building
Chicago, HI. 60604
411 North Akard St.
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)
Dallas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut S t ., 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

*
**

Regions VII and VIII w ill be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.




U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W A S H IN G T O N ,

D.C. 20212

O FFICIAL BUSINESS




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

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