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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES 1
BUREAU OF LABOR STA TISTICS/ • • • •
SAFETY

CODE

liO .

*1

SERIES

TEXTILE SAFETY CODE
NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL, SPONSOR




AMERICAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
Approved September 18, 1929

DECEMBER, 1929

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON s 1930

DU5J

r-A A




PREFACE
Code was formulated
Safety
Code Committee.
is a
the American Stand­
THE Textile SafetyThis bodycommittee of by the Textiledevelop­
ards Association, a national
organized to promote the
ment of industrial standards and codes for adoption and enforce­
ment by States and for voluntary adoption by individual industrial
concerns.
The procedure for each project of this kind is to appoint one or
more organizations as sponsors to organize and supervise the work
on that project. These sponsors organize a committee, usually con­
sisting of 20 to 50 representatives of national organizations and
groups interested in or affected by the project, including manufac­
turers of equipment and machinery, users of equipment and machinery, operatives, insurance companies, State and governmental bodies,
and technical experts.
In this case, the American Standards Association appointed the
National Safety Council as sponsor for the Textile Safety Code.
The National Safety Council organized the Textile Safety Code
Committee, the personnel of which follows:
Name and title
Chairman, Chas. H. Eames,
president.
John A. Perkins, agent........

Affiliation
Lowell Textile Institute, Lowell,
Mass.
Harmony Mills, Cohoes, N. Y ____

Representing
Lowell Textile Institute.
National Association of Cotton
Manufacturers, 45 Milk Street,
Boston, Mass.
Alternate.

Russell T, Fisher, secretary.. National Association of Cotton
Manufacturers, 45 Milk Street,
Boston, Mass.
Kelsey G. Reed.....................j K. M. Gilmore & Co., Somerville, National Association of Finishers
I Mass.
of Cotton Fabrics, 320 Broadway,
New York City.
A. C. Marble........................ s Curtis & Marble Manufacturing Curtis & Marble Manufacturing
Co., Worcester, Mass.
Co.
W. A. Humphreys, secretary. National Association of Wool Manu­ National Association of Wool Manu­
facturers, 50 State Street, Boston,
facturers, 50 State Street, Boston,
Mass.
F. G. Cobb, secretary- Southern Textile Association, Lan­ Southern Textile Association.
caster, S. C.
treasurer.
Lockwood, Green & Co., 60 Federal Lockwood, Green & Co.
W, D. Barker___
Street, Boston, Mass.
H. W. Donald.
American Mutual Liability Insur­ American Society of Mechanical
Engineers, 29 West Thirty-ninth
ance Co., 142 Berkeley Street,
Street, New York City.
Boston, Mass.
Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Crompton & Knowles Loom Works.
H. L. Nickerson.
Worcester, Mass.
Pennsylvania Department of Labor Association of Governmental Offi­
Cyril Ainsworth.
and Industry, Harrisburg, Pa.
cials in Industry of the United
States and Canada, St. Paul,
Minn.
H. M. Stanley, chairman___ Industrial Commission, Atlanta, International Association of Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Com­
Ga.
missions, Washington, D. C.
Do.
John P. Meade, director....... Division of Industrial Safety, De­
partment of Labor and Indus­
tries, Boston, Mass.
2958 North Third Street, Philadel­ U. S. Department of Labor,
Arthur McDonnell..
Washington, D. C.
phia, Pa.
Do.
14 Merrill Street, Lowell, Mass.......
John Hanley----Do.
93 Englewood Avenue, Pawtucket,
William Doctor.
R .I.
Box 1707, Paterson, N. J..................
Do.
Junes Ratclifle.
m




PREFACE

IV

Name and title

Affiliation

Representing

C. E. Pettibone, vice presi­
dent and chief engineer.

American Mutual Liability Insur­
ance Co., 142 Berkeley Street,
Boston, Mass.

National Association of Mutual
Casualty Companies, 25 West
Forty-third Street, New York
City.
National Bureau of Casualty &
Surety Underwriters, 1 Park Ave­
nue, New York City.
National Safety Council, 108 East
Ohio Street, Chicago, 11 .
1
____do________________________

David Van Schaack, director. Bureau of Inspection and Accident
Prevention, Aetna Life Insurance
Co., Hartford, Conn.
Ignatius McNulty_________ American Woolen Co., 245 State
Street, Boston. Mass.
Harvey Saul _________ ___ United States Finishing Co., Provi­
dence, R. I.
C. W. Schoffstall, chief sec­ U. S. Bureau of Standards, Wash­
ington, D. C.
tion of textiles.
Dr. M. G. Lloyd ...............
0 . Warren Howe_____ ___ _ Saco-Lowell Shops, Lowell, Mass...
Emil Buhler__________ . __ Duplan Silk Corporation, Hazle­
ton, Pa.
John W. Lasell___ _______ _ Whitm Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass.
McRae Parker, chief engineer Cleveland Worsted Mills, 6114
Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio.
Secretary, W. Dean Keefer, National Safety Council______
chief engineer.




U. S. Bureau of Standards.
Alternate.
Saco-Lowell Shops.
The Silk Association of America.
Whitin Machine Works.
Cleveland Worsted Mills.
National Safety Council.

CONTENTS
Pag*

Introduction_______________________________________________________
1
Section 1. Scope and purpose_________ ______________________________
1
Rule 10. Scope________________________ ______ _________________
1
Rule 11. Purpose----------------------------- ------- --------------------------------1
Rule 12. Exceptions____________________________________________
1
Section 2. Definitions_______________________________________________
2
Rule 20. Definitions____________________________________________
2
Section 3. Reference to other codes__________________________________
2
Rule 30_______________________________________________________
2
Section 10. General requirements____________________________________
3
Rule 100. Working space and aisles______________________________
3
Rule 101. Means of disconnecting power_____________________ ____
3
3
Rule 102. Power-transmission guards____________________________
3
Rule 103. Electrical apparatus__________________________________
Rule 104. Housekeeping________________________________________
3
Rule 105. Inspection and maintenance___________________________
3
Section 11. Pickers_________________________________________________
3
Rule 110. Feeding_________________ _______ __________ _________ _
3
Rule 111. Cylinder guard_______________________________________
3
Rule 112. Interlock____________ ________________________________
3
Section 12. Cards--------------------------- ------- ----------------------------------------4
Rule 120. Inclosures for cotton cards____ _____ __________________
4
Section 13. Spinning mules__________________________________________
4
Rule 130. Clearance____________________________________________
4
Rule 131. Railing guard________________________________________
4
Rule 132. Fender____________________ _________ ________________
4
Section 14. Slashers________________________________________________
4
Rule 140. Steam-pipe covering------ ------------------------ -------------------4
Rule 141. Pressure-reducing valve_______________________________
4
Rule 142. Safety valve--------------- ----------------------- ----------------------4
Rule 143. Safety stop__________________________________________
4
Section 15. Looms_________________________________________________
4
Rule 150. Protection for loom fixer______________________________
4
Rule 151. Shuttle guard______________________________________ 4
Rule 152. Pin or stud guard____________________________________
5
5
Section 16. Cloth-folding machines__________________________________
Rule 160. Blade-guide rod______________________________________
5
Rule 161. Barrier guard________________________________________
5
Section 17. Sewing machines______________________ _________________
5
Rule 170. Needle guard............. ......... ..................................... ......... .
5
Rule 171. Power transmission___________________________________
5
Section 18. Washing and preparing machines_______________________ _
5
Rule 180. Splash guards------- ---------------------------------------------------5
Rule 181. Barrel not inclosed___________________________________
5
Rule 182. Inclosed barrel____________________ _____________ _____
5
Section 19. Kiers___________________________________________________
5
Rule 190. Pressure gauge. - ------- ------------------------------------------------5
Section 20. Mercerizing and tenter frames....... - ______ _______ _________
5
Rule 200. Oil cup......................... ......................................... ................
5
Rule 201. Stopping devices_____________________________________
6
Section 21. Dyeing jigs and padders------ -------------------------------------------6
Rule 210. Power control________________________________________
6
Rule 211. Splash shield___ _______ - - _________ __________________
6
Section 22. Calenders........................................... .........................................
6
Rule 220. Roll guard___________________________________________
6




▼

VI

CONTENTS




0000

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0 0 ( X ) 0 0 M ^ M ^ M ^ ^ * ^ M M < I M ^ O i O i O 5 O > O > © ® O J

Pag©

Section 23. Power-guillotine cutter___________________________________
Rule 230. Two-hand trip________ ________ _________________ _____
Section 24. Slitter_______________________________________ __________
Rule 240. Inclosure____________________________________________
Section 25. Centrifugal extractor____________________________________
Rule 250. Cover_______________________________________________
Rule 251. Interlock____________________________________________
Rule 252. Brake_______________________________________________
Section 26. Flat-work ironer_________________________________________
Rule 261. Feed rolls____ _____________ __________________________
Rule 262. Pressure rolls_________________________________________
Section 27. Drying cans____________________________________________
Rule 270. Pressure-reducing valve and pressure gauge_____________
Section 28. Exhaust systems________________________________________
Rule 280. Removal of dust and flying material___________________
Section 29. Color-mixing room______________________________________
Rule 290. Floors_______________________________________________
Section 30. Acid carboys____________________________ _______________
Rule 300. Emptying carboys____________________________________
Section 31. Caustic soda_________________ ___________________________
Rule 310. Handling caustic soda and caustic potash_______________
Section 32. First aid for acid and caustic burns____ __________________
Rule 320. Clean water__________________________________________
Rule 321. First-aid materials____________________________________
Section 33. Dye kettles and vats____________________________________
Rule 330. Pipes and drains_____________________________________
Section 34. Tanks and vats_________________________________________
Rule 340. Protection against falls________________________________
Rule 341. Shut-off valves_______________________________________
Section 35. Carpet shears___________________________________________
Rule 350. Knife guard__________________________________________
Section 36. Roll benches____________________________________________
Rule 360. Cleats_______________________________________________
Section 37. Drawing frames, slubbers, roving frames, ring spinning frames,
twisters_________________________________________________________
Rule 370...................................... —.................................................... —

BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
No. 509

WASHINGTON

De c e m

ber

, 1929

TEXTILE SAFETY CODE
INTRODUCTION
1. This code is one of a number of safety codes on various subjects
which have been or are being formulated under the general auspices
of the American Standards Association.
2. It is intended for voluntary adoption and use as a standard for
safeguarding textile machinery and equipment by concerns operating
such machinery and equipment and by the manufacturers of textile
machinery and equipment.
SECTION 1. SCOPE AND PURPOSE
Rule 10. Scope.
These requirements apply to all plants operating textile machinery
and equipment such as pickers, cards, combing machinery, drawing
frames, slubbers, roving frames, ring spinning frames, spinning
mules, spoolers, twisters, warpers, slashers, looms, inspection ma­
chines, folding machines, baling presses, sewing machines, cloth singei washing machines, kiers, mercerizing and tenter frames, mangles,
winders, dry cans, dyeing padders, jigs and vats, color mixers, print­
ing machines, soapers, aging boxes, pasters, dampeners, calenders,
hookers, doublers, extractors, bottles, and other machinery and equip­
ment used for similar purposes.
Rule 11. Purpose.
The purpose of this code is to provide reasonable safety for life,
limb, and health. In cases of practical difficulty or unnecessary hard­
ships, the enforcing officers or body may grant exceptions from the
literal requirements of this code or permit the use of other devices
or methods, but only when it is clearly evident that equivalent pro­
tection is thereby secured.
Buie 12. Exceptions.
After the date on which this code becomes effective all new con­
struction and installations shall conform to its provisions. Equip­
ment installed prior to that date shall be modified to conform to its




1

2

TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

provisions unless exception is allowed in accordance with rule 11 or
elsewhere in this code.
N o te . —To secure the uniform application of this code, enforcing officers are
urged before rendering decisions on disputed points to consult the committee
which formulated it—the Committee on Safety Code for Textiles, in care of
the American Standards Association, 29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York
City—or the National Safety Council, 108 East Ohio Street, Chicago.

SECTION 2. DEFINITIONS
Buie 20. Definitions.
(а) The word “ shall ” is to be understood as mandatory, and the
word “ should ” as advisory.
(б) “Approved” means approved by the authority having juris­
diction.
(c) “ Nip ” refers to the point of contact between two inrunning
rolls, as in “ The nip of inrunning rolls.”
(d) “ Exposed to contact ” means that the location of an object
is such that a person is liable to come into contact with it in his
normal course of employment.
(e) “ Combing machinery” is a general classification including
combers, sliver lap machines, and ribbon lap machines.
( /) “ Pickers” is a general classification including pickers, bale
breakers, openers, breaker lappers, intermediate lappers, and finisher
lappers.
(ff) “ Interlock” means a device which will prevent the operation
o,f the machine while the cover or door is open or unlocked and will
also hold the cover or door closed and locked while the machine is
in motion.
SECTION 3. REFERENCE TO OTHER CODES
Rule 30.
This code is supplemented by the following codes:
(a) Safety Code for the Construction, Care, and Use of Ladders.
N o t e .—Copies may be obtained from Superintendent of Documents, Govern­
ment Printing Office, Washington, D. C.

(&) Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission Apparatus.
N o te .—Copies

may be obtained from the Ajnerican Society of Mechanical
Engineers, 29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York City.

(c) National Electrical Safety Code.
N o t e .—Copies

may be obtained from Superintendent of Documents, Govern­
ment Printing Office, Washington, D. C.

(d) National Electrical (Fire) Code.
N o t e .—Copies

may be obtained from National Board of Fire Underwriters,
76 William Street, New York City.

(e) Safety Code for Walkway Surfaces.
N o t e .—This

code is now in preparation, but tentative draft may be ob­
tained from the American Standards Association, 29 West Thirty-ninth Street,
New York City.

( /) Code of Lighting Factories, Mills, and Other Work Places.
N o t e .—Copies

may be obtained from Superintendent of Documents, Govern­
ment Printing Office, Washington, D. C.




TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

3

(g ) Safety Code for the Protection of the Heads and Eyes of
Industrial Workers.
N o t e .—Copies may be obtained from Superintendent of Documents, Govern­
ment Printing Office, Washington, D. C.
N o te .—When the Textile Safety Code is adopted by a State or other author­
ity, it is expected that rule 30 will be changed so as to refer to other regulations
of such authority.

SECTION 10. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Buie 100. Working space and aisles.
Machinery shall be so located as to give sufficient clearance for
cleaning machinery and floors and for aisles that will permit the free
movement of employees bringing and removing material.
Buie 101. Means of disconnecting power.
Every textile machine shall be provided with means for disconnect­
ing all power from the machine and from the pulley on the machine.
(See Power-Transmission Code listed in rule 30.)
Buie 102. Power-transmission guards.
All moving parts of equipment exposed to contact used in the
mechanical transmission of power, including prime movers, inter­
mediate equipment, and driven machines, shall be guarded in accord­
ance with the Power-Transmission Code. (See rule 30.)
Buie 103. Electrical apparatus.
All switches and other electrical apparatus shall be guarded in
accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code. (See rule 30.)
Buie 104. Housekeeping.
Aisles and working spaces shall be kept in good order and free
from obstruction at all times.
Buie 105. Inspection and maintenance.
Regular inspection shall be made of all guards and other safety
devices and important mechanical equipment, such as starting ancl
stopping devices, to insure their being kept in good operating
condition.
SECTION 11. PICKERS
Buie 110. Feeding.
Hopper feed shall be provided or the feed rolls shall be provided
with a cover or guard to protect the operative’s fingers while feeding
material.
Buie 111. Cylinder guard.
The cylinder shall be covered.
Buie 112. Interlock.
An approved interlock shall be provided on the beater cover and on
the door to the dust bars.
81603°—30----- 2




4

TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

SECTION 12. CARDS
Rule 120. Inclosures for cotton cards.
{a) Cylinders, workers, strippers, lickerin, and doffers shall be
inclosed.
(&) The inclosures or covers shall be fastened securely so they
can not be lifted or opened while the machine is revolving.
SECTION 13. SPINNING MULES
Rule 130. Clearance.
On new installations there shall be a minimum clearance of 18
inches between the end of the carriage run and any wall, column,
machine, or other fixed structure. On existing installations this
clearance shall not be less than 12 inches.
Rule 131. Railing guard.
An approved railing (see specifications for guard rails in PowerTransmission Code mentioned in rule 30) shall be installed to guard
the end of the carriage run.
Rule 132. Fender.
A substantial fender of metal or hardwood shall be installed in
front of the carriage wheels, the fender to extend to within onefourth inch of the rail.
SECTION 14. SLASHERS
Rule 140. Steam-pipe covering.
Steam pipe exposed to contact within 6 feet of floor or working
platform shall be covered with heat-insulating material.
Rule 141. Pressure-reducing valve.
Where slashers are fed from steam lines carrying pressures in
excess of 15 pounds, a pressure-reducing valve and a pressure gauge
shall be installed in the steam line between the slasher and the
boiler.
Rule 142. Safety valve.
An approved safety valve shall be installed in the steam line be­
tween the slasher and the pressure-reducing valve.
Rule 143. Safety stop.
The control levers of the slasher shall be connected to a horizontal
bar or treadle located not more than 69 inches above the floor to
control the operation from any point.
SECTION 15. LOOMS
Rule 150> Protection for loom fixer.
Provision shall be made so that every loom fixer can make it im­
possible for a loom to be started while the fixer is at work on the loom.
Rule 151. Shuttle guard.
Each loom shall be equipped with a guard designed to prevent the
shuttle from flying out of the shed, and the guard shall be frequently
inspected and maintained in proper working order.




TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

5

Eule 152. Pin 6r stud guard.
Pins or studs in eccentric motion of looms in or along passageways
shall be guarded.
SECTION 16. CLOTH-FOLDING MACHINES
Eule 160. Blade-guide rod.
On machines where the blade-guide rod comes up the blade-guide
rod shall be completely inclosed with a suitable guard.
Eule 161. Barrier guard.
A barrier shall be erected at the side of each cloth-folding machine
to guard completely the arc described by the revolving crank.
SECTION 17. SEWING MACHINES
Eule 170. Needle guard.
A permanently attached needle guard shall be installed on each
sewing machine so the operator’s fingers can not pass under the
needle. It shall be of such form that the needle can be threaded
conveniently without removing the guard.
Eule 171. Power transmission.
Safety-type sewing tables with no exposed power-transmission
parts should be used; otherwise the shafting and pulleys shall be
guarded in accordance with the requirements specified in the Safety
Code for Mechanical-Power Transmission Apparatus. (See rule 30.)
SECTION 18. WASHING AND PREPARING MACHINES
Eule 180. Splash guards.
All washing and preparing machines shall have splash guards.
Eule 181. Barrel not inclosed.
I f barrel is not inclosed, the barrel shall be smooth or so guarded
as to prevent accidental contact with operatives.
Eule 182. Inclosed barrel.
An approved interlock shall be provided on the inclosure door.
N o t e .—This rule is mandatory for all new construction and installations;
it is advisory for existing installations.

SECTION 19. KIERS
Eule 190. Pressure gauge.
Every pressure kier shall be equipped with a pressure gauge, a
pressure-reducing valve, and a safety valve. Construction and
equipment shall comply with the requirements specified in the A. S.
M. E. Code for Unfired Pressure Vessels.
SECTION 20. MERCERIZING AND TENTER FRAMES
Eule 200. Oil cup.
Oil cup shall be conveniently and safely located to permit easy
access without reaching over the chain.




TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

6

Buie 201. Stopping devices.
A convenient means shall be provided along the entire length and
at each end of an open machine and at each end of an entirely closed
machine to enable each operative to shut off the power.
SECTION 21. DYEING JIGS AND PADDERS
Buie 210. Power control.
(a) Power-control devices shall be provided for each jig.
(&) Roll arms on jigs shall be built to allow for extra-large batches
and to prevent center bar being forced off, causing batch to fall.
(c)
Where the arms are short, a hinged latch on one side of each
arm and fastened on other side by a pin shall be provided.
Buie 211. Splash shield.
A splash shield shall be installed extending across the pad in front
Qf the nip to prevent splashing of hot liquid and to serve as a nip
guard.
SECTION 22. CALENDERS
Buie 220. Boll guard.
The nip at the inrunning side of the rolls shall be provided witk
a guard so arranged that cloth can be fed into the rolls without
permitting the fingers of the operative to be caught between the rolls
or between the guard and the rolls.
SECTION 23. POWER-GUILLOTINE CUTTER
Buie 230. Two-hand trip.
A device shall be provided which to operate the machine requires
the use of both bands sufficiently distant from the knife to eliminate
the possibility of an operative’s hands being caught under the
descending blade.
SECTION 24. SLITTER
Buie 240. Inclosure.
A guard inclosing the cutting disks shall be provided to protect
the operative’s fingers from the cutting edges while machine is in
operation.
SECTION 25. CENTRIFUGAL EXTRACTOR
Buie 250. Cover.
A cover shall be provided for the revolving drum or basket.
Buie 251. Interlock.
An approved interlock shall be provided on the cover for the
revolving drum or basket.
Buie 252. Brake.
A mechanically operated brake should be provided.




TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

7

SECTION 26. FLAT-WORK IRONER
Rule 261. Feed rolls.
The feed rolls shall be provided with a bar across the front so
arranged that the machine will stop if the operative’s hand strikes
the bar.
Rule 262. Pressure rolls.
Pressure rolls shall be covered or guarded so that the operative
can not reach into the rolls.
SECTION 27. DRYING CANS
Rule 270. Pressure-reducing valve and pressure gauge.
Where drying cans are fed from steam lines carrying pressure in
excess of 15 pounds, a pressure-reducing valve and a safety valve
shall be installed in the steam line between the drying can and the
boiler; the safety valve shall be installed between the reducing valve
and the drying can. Furthermore, a pressure gauge and a safety
valve shall be installed on each set.
SECTION 28. EXHAUST SYSTEMS
Rule 280. Removal of dust and flying material.
The following machines shall be covered and exhaust systems shall
be installed to remove dust or fly:
(a) Dusting and opening machines such as willows, burr pickers,
and mixing machines used in manufacturing woolen and worsted
yarns.
(&) Machines such as openers and pickers used in preparing cotton
iov carding cotton yarns.
(c) Machines such as willows, pickers, and openers used in manu­
facturing cotton yarns on cotton-waste cards.
(d) Machines such as willows, pickers, and cards used in spinning
asbestos yarns.
SECTION 29. COLOR-MIXING ROOM
Rule 290. Moors.
Floors in color-mixing rooms shall be arranged to drain easily.
SECTION 30. ACID CARBOYS
Rule 300. Emptying carboys.
Carboys shall be provided with inclinators, or the acid shall be
withdrawn from the carboys by means of pumping or hand-operated
siphons.
SECTION 31. CAUSTIC SODA
Rule 310. Handling caustic soda and caustic potash.
Means shall be provided for handling and emptying caustic-soda
and caustic-potash containers without operatives coming into con­
tact with the caustic.




8

TEXTILE SAFETY CODE

SECTION 32. FIRST AID FOR ACID AND CAUSTIC BURNS
Rule 320. Clean water.
Wherever acids or caustics are used, clean water shall be piped to
a near-by location convenient for emergency use by operatives.
Rule 321. First-aid materials.
Appropriate first-aid materials shall be provided for emergency
use in case of acid or caustic burns.
SECTION 33. DYE KETTLES AND VATS
Buie 330. Pipes and drains.
Dye kettles and vats which may at any time contain hot or cor­
rosive liquids shall not empty directly onto the floor but shall be
provided with pipes or drains of sufficient capacity to carry off the
contents safely.
SECTION 34. TANKS AND VATS
Rule 340. Protection against falls.
Tanks and vats containing hot or corrosive liquids shall be pro­
tected so that operatives can not accidentally fall into them.
N o t e .—Protection may be provided either by railings or other means or by

elevating the tank or vat to a height of 3 feet or more above the floor or working
platform.

Rule 341. Sliut-off valves.
Boiling tanks, caustic tanks, and hot-liquor containers shall have
shut-off valves controlled from a point not subject to splash.
N o t e .—In lieu of the above, an automatic sliut-off steam valve thermostati­
cally controlled may be provided.

SECTION 35. CARPET SHEARS
Buie 350. Knife guard.
Revolving knives shall be provided with a cover or guard so ar­
ranged that the operative’s fingers can not come in contact with the
knives while feeding material.
SECTION 36. ROLL BENCHES
Rule 360. Cleats.
Cleats shall be installed on the ends of roll benches.
SECTION 37. DRAWING FRAMES, SLUBBERS, ROVING
FRAMES, RING SPINNING FRAMES, TWISTERS
Buie 370.
It is recommended that on all new installations of drawing frames,
slubbers, roving frames, ring spinning frames, and twisters, inter*
locks should be provided on the gear-housing covers.




INDEX
Page

Page

Construction, care and use of ia<£
ders, reference to code (rule 30)_
Containers, caustic-soda and caustic-potash (rule 310)____________
Control levers, slasher, safety stop
(rule 1 4 3 )---------------------------------




8
6
8
7

6
7
7

>(*>03
to
C O
C S
C
i

00

5

00

3
8

0535

6

Dust bars, interlock on door to (rule
112) _____________________________
Dust, removal of (rule 280)________
Dye kettles and vats, pipes a n d
drains (rule 330)________________

-3 C
O

6

Definitions (rule 2 0 )______________ _
Devices:
Power control, for dyeing jigs
(rule 210) ___________________
Safety, inspection of (rule 1 0 5 ).
Stopping, mercerizing and tenter
frames (rule 201)___________
Disconnecting power, means of (rule
101) _____________________________
Doffers, inclosures for (rule 120)___
Drains, dye kettles and vats (rule
330)_____________________________
Drawing frames, interlocks on gearhousing covers (rule 370)________
Drum, revolving:
Cover for (rule 250)___________
Interlock for cover (rule 251)__
Drying cans, valves and gauges (rule

oo

5

Dyeing jigs and padders, power con­

8

Electrical apparatus, guards

8
7

Electrical (fire) code, national, ref­
erence to (rule 3 0 )______________
Electrical safety code, national, ref­
erence to (rules 30, 103)________
Emptying carboys (rule 300)______
Emptying caustic-soda containers
(rule 310)_______________________
Equipment:
Exposed to contact, guards
(rule 102) ___________________
Installed prior to date code ef­
fective (rule 12) ____________
Mechanical, inspection of (rule
1 0 5 )________________________
Exceptions allowed (rules 11, 12)__
Exhaust systems (rule 280)_______
Exposed to contact, defined (rule

8

6
3
8
3
4
8
2,3

7

2
2
7

4

a

trol and splash shield (rules 210,
211)_______________________ I
(rule

20 ) __________________________

Extractor, centrifugal (rules 250252)-------------------------------------------Eyes of industrial workers, protec­
tion of, reference to code (rule
30)______________________________
Falls into tanks or vats, protection
against (rule 340)_______________
Feed, hopper, pickers (rule 110)___
Fender, spinning mules (rule 132)__
First aid for burns (rules 320, 3 2 1 ).
9

rO

4

2,

-3®0

7

-3

Carboys, acid, emptying (rule 300) _
Cards:
Exhaust systems to be installed
(rule 280)____ ______________
Inclosures for (rule 120)_____
Carpet shears, knire guard (rule
350)________________ ! ___________
Caustic burns, first aid for (rules
320, 321)________________________
Caustic soda, handling (rule 310)__
Caustic tanks, shut-off valves (rule
341)______ ______________________
Centrifugal extractor, cover, inter­
lock, brake (rules 250-252)_____
Changes in Rule 30, on adoption, to
meet State regulations (note)____
Clean water, piped for emergency use
(rule 3 2 0 )______________________
Clearance:
Cleaning purposes (rule 100) —
Spinning mules, carriage run
and fixed structure (rule
130)________________________
Cleats to be installed on roll benches
(rule 360)— ------------------------------Cloth-folding machines.
(See Ma­
chines.)
Codes, reference to (rule 3 0)______
Color-mixing room, floors (rule 290) _
Combing machinery, defined (rule

5

6

C
O

Calenders, roll guard (rule 220)____
Cans, drying, valve and gauge (rule

5

8
6

1,
1,

10

Brake, centrifugal extractor (rule
252) _
---- —
■
— —— ------ — — _
Burns, first aid for (rules 320, 321)_
Burr pickers, exhaust systems to be
installed (rule 280)_____________

8

6

-ItOCO

Interlock on in closure door (rule
182)________________________
Barrier guard, cloth-folding machine
(rule 161)____________ - __________
Basket revolving:
Cover for (rule 250)___________
Interlock to t cover (rule 251)__
Beater cover, interlock for (rule
112) ____________________________
Benches, roll, cleats to be installed
(rule 360)_______ _______________
Blade - guide, rod, cloth - folding ma­
chine (rule 160)________________
Boiling tanks, shut-off valves (rule

3
2

4

tO

Barrel, washing and preparing ma­
chines :
Guarded if not inclosed (rule

3

C
i

Approved, defined (rule 2 0 )________
Automatic shut-off steam valve, tanks
or vats (note)___________________

7

Cotton cards, inclosure fo* (rule
^ 120)-------------------------------------------Covers:
Centrifugal extractor ( r u l e
250)________________________
Gear-housing interlocks recom­
mended on new installations
(rule 370)__________________
Cutter, power-guillotine, two- h a n d
trip (rule 230)---------------------------Cutting disks, slitter, guards (rule
240)_____________________________
Cylinders:
Guards, pickers (rule 111)
Inclosures for (rule 120) _

60

Acid carboys, emptying (rule 300)__
Aisles, working space and (rule 100)Apparatus, electrical, guards (rule

8

OOt^OOOO

Acid burns, first aid for (rules 320,

10

INDEX
Page

Flat-work ironer, guards (rules 261,
262)____________________________
Floors, color-mixing room (rule 290)
Flying material, removal of (rule
280)-------------------------------------------Frames:
Drawing, interlocks on gearhousing covers (rule 370)---Mercerizing and tenter (rules
200, 201)____________________
Ring spinning, interlocks on
gear-housing covers (rule 370)
Roving, interlocks on gearhousing covers (rule 370)—
Gauges, pressure:
Drying cans (rule 270)------------Kiers equipped with (rule 1 9 0 ).
Gear-housing covers, interlocks rec­
ommended, on new installations
(rule 370)_______________________
Guards:
Bar across feed rolls, flat-work
ironer (rule 261)---------------Barrier, cloth-folding machine
(rule 161)__________________
Blade-guide rods, cloth-folding
machine (rule 160)--------------Calenders (rule 220)--------------Cleats on roll benches (rule
3 6 0 )________________________
Cutting disks, slitter (rule 2 4 0 ).
Cylinder, pickers (rule 111)---Hopper feed (rule 110)----------Inspection of (rule 105)--------Knife, carpet shears (rule 350)_
Needle, sewing machine (rule
170 )
Pins or studs in eccentric mo­
tion of looms (rule 152)____
Power-transmission (rules 102,
171 )
Presser rolls, flat-work ironer
(rule 262)---------------------------Rails for carriage run, spinning
mules (rule 131)____________
Shuttle, for looms (rule 151)—
Splash, washing and preparing
machines (rule 180)------------Splash shield, dyeing jigs and
padders (rule 211) --------------Tanks and vats, to prevent falls
(rule 340)---------------------------Handling caustic - soda containers
(rule 310)_______________________
Heads and eyes of industrial work­
ers, protection of, reference to code
(rule 3 0 )------------------------------------Hopper feed, guard for (rule 110) _
Hot-liquor containers, shut-off valves
(rule 341)_______________________
Housekeeping (rule 104)---------------Inclinators, emptying acid carboys
(rule 300)_______________________
Inclosures, cotton cards (rule 1 2 0 ).
Inspection and maintenance (rule
105)_____________________________
Interlocks:
Barrel, washing and preparing
machines (rule 182)________
Beater cover and dust bars,
pickers (rule 112) ---------------Centrifugal extractor ( r u l e
251)________________________
Defined (rule 20) ______ ;______
Gear-housing covers, new instal­
lations (rule 370)---------------ironer, flat-work, guards (rules 261,
262)_____ ___________________
Jig, dyeing, power control and splash

shield (rules 210, 211)_________




7
7
7
8
5, 6
8
8
7

5
8

7

5
5

6
8
6
3
3
3
8

5
5
3,5
7
4
4

5
6
8
7
3
3
8
3
7
4

3
5
3
6
2
8
7

6

Pag*
Kettles, dye, pipes and drains (rule
330)-------------------------------------------Kiers, pressure gauge for (rule
190)_____________________________
Knife guard, carpet shears (rule
350)________________________ _
Ladders, construction, care and use
of, reference to code (rule 3 0 )___
Levers, control, safety stop (rule
143)_______________ 1____ ________
Lickerin, inclosures for (rule 120) _
Lighting factories, mills, and other
work places, reference to code
(rule 3 0 )__________________ _____
Loom s:
Guards for (rules 151, 152)____
Protection for loom fixer (rule
150)------------------------------------Machines:
Cloth-folding, guards (rules 160,
161)------------------------------------Exhaust systems for (rule 280) _
Mercerizing and tenter frames,
stopping devices for ( r u l e
201) ________________________
Sewing, guards (rules 170, 1 7 1 )Slitter, guard inclosure ( r u l e
240)_________________ ______
Washing and preparing, guards
for (rules 180-182)----------------Maintenance, inspection and ( r u l e
105),______________________ ______
Materials, first-aid (rule 321)______
Means of disconnecting power (rule
101) -------------------------------------------Mechanical equipment. (See Equip­
ment. )
Mechanical power-transmission appa­
ratus, reference to code (rules 30,
101, 102) ________________________
Mercerizing and tenter frames (rules
200, 201) ________________________
Mixing machines, exhaust systems
(rule 280)________________ ' ______
Mules, spinning, guards and clear­
ances (rules 130-132)____________

8
5
8
2
4
4
2
4 ,5
4

&
7
6
5
6
5
3
8
3

2,3
5,G
7
4

Needle guard on sewing machines
(rule 170)_______________________
Nip, defined (rule 2 0 )______________
Nip guard, dyeing jigs, and padders
(rule 211) _______________________

5
2

Oil cup, mercerizing and tenter
frames (rule 200) _______________
Openers, exhaust systems to be In­
stalled (rule 280)________________

5

Padders, dyeing jigs, power control
and splash shield (rules 210, 211) Pickers:
Defined (rule 2 0 )-------------------Exhaust systems to be installed
(rule 280)___________________
Feed and guards (rules 110112) ________________________
Pipes, dye kettles and vats (rule
330)_____________________________
Potash, caustic, handling containers
(rule 310)_______________________
Power control:
Dyeing jigs and padders (rule
210) ________________________
Means of disconnecting (rule
1 0 1 )________________________
Power-guillotine cutter, two-hand
trip (rule 230)_________________
Power-transmission:
Guards (rule 102) _____________
Sewing machines guarded (rule
1 7 1 )________________________
Pressure gauge. (See Gauge, pres­
sure.)

6

7
62
7
3
8
7
ft
3
6
3
5

11

IN D E X

Page
Soda, caustic, handling (rule 310)__
Space, working, and aisles (rule

Pressure - reducing
valves.
(See
Valves.)
Protection for loom fixer (rule 150) _
Protection of heads and eyes, indus­
trial workers, reference to code
(rule 3 0 )_______________________
Purpose of code (rule 11)_______ —

100) ______________________________




00
O
S
M

0C

Of

-4
00

Walkway surfaces, safety code for,
reference to (rule 3 0 )---- ----------Water, clean, piped for emergency
use (rule 320)---------------------------Willows, exhaust systems to he in­
stalled (rule 280)----------------------Workers, inclosures for (rule 120) —
Working space and aisles (rule 10 0 )-

00

2, 3

Valves:
Pressure-reducing, drying cans
(rule 270)---------------------------Pressure-reducing, kier equipped
with (rule 190)-------------------Pressure-reducing, slashers (rule
141)________________________
Safety, drying cans (rule 270) _
Safety, kiers equipped with (rule
190)________________________
Safety, slashers (rule 142)-----Shut-off, tanks and vats (rule
341)________________________
Vats, dye, pipes and drains (rule
330)_____________________________

00 * -*

Tanks and vats, protection against
falls (rule 340)--------------------------Tenter frames (rules 200, 201) __—
Twisters, interlocks on gear-housing
covers (rule 370)----------------------Two-hand trip, power-guillotine cut­
ter (rule 230)----------------------------

C500

Spinning frames, ring, interlocks on
gear-housing covers (rule 370)__
Spinning mules, guards and clear­
ance (rules 130-132)-------------------Splash shield, dyeing jigs and padders (rule 211) --------------------------Steam-pipe covering, slashers (rule
140)_____________________________
Stopping devices. (See Devices.)
Strippers, inclosures for (rule 120)Switches, electrical, guards for (rule
103)_____________________________

Railing guard:
Spinning mules (rule 131)_____
Tanks and vats (rule 340)____
Requirements, general (rules 1001 0 5 )_____________________________
Revolving knives, carpet shears,
guards (rule 350)_______________
Ring spinning frames, interlock on
gear-housing covers (rule 370)___
Rods, blade-guide, cloth-folding ma­
chine (rule 160)________________
Roll benches, cleats to be installed
(rule 360)_______________________
R olls:
Feed, flat-work ironer (rule
261)________________________
Pressure, flat-work ironer (rule
262)________________________
Roving frames, interlocks on gearhousing covers (rule 370)_______
Rule 30, changed to meet State regu­
lations, on adoption (note)______
Safety:
Codes, reference to (rule 3 0)__
Devices, inspection of (rule 105)Stop, control levers of slasher
rule 143)---------------------------Valves. (See Valves.)
Scope of code (rule 1 0 )-----------------Sewing machines, guards (rules 170,
171)_____________________________
Shall, defined (rule 2 0 )____________
Shears, carpet, knife guard (rule
350)_____________________________
Shut-off valves. (See Valves.)
Shuttle guard for looms (rule 151)_
Slashers, safety valves and stops
(rules 140-143)--------------------------Slitter, guard inclosure (rule 240) —
Slubbers, interlocks on gear-housing
covers (rule 370)------ -------------- -

Page
7




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor•
Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulletins
published since that date, will be furnished on application• Bulletins marked thus (*)
are out of print.
Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).

*No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York. [1913.]
•No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its inquiry into industrial
agreements. [1913.]
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City. [1014.]
No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of New York City.
[1914.]
♦No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry. [1916.]
♦No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc. [1921.J
No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
No. 468. Trade agreements, 1927.
No. 481. Joint industrial control in the book and job printing industry. [1928.]
Cooperation.

No. 313. Consumers* cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricultural).
Employment and Unemployment.

*No.
No.
♦No.
♦No.
No.

109.
172.
183.
195.
196.

•No. 202.
No. 206.
No. 227.
No. 235.
•No. 241.
No. 247.
No. 310.
No. 409.

Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the United States. [1913.1
Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries. [1915.]
Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis, Minn., Jan­
uary 19 and 20,1916.
Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association of Boston, Mass.
held May 10,1916.
The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3.
1917.
Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May 9-11,1918.
Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes. [1922.]
Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.

Foreign Labor Laws.

♦No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European countries. [1914.]
No. 494. Labor legislation of Uruguay.
Housing.

•No. 158.
No. 263.
No 295.
No. 469.
No. 500.

Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign countries. [1014.1
Housing by employers in the United States. [1920].
Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1921 to] 1927*
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States. (In press.)




ri]

'Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.

*No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories.
[1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade. [1913.1
*No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection. [1913.1
•No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. fl914.]
*No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
*No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
*No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead in the painting
of buildings. [1916.]
*No. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. [1916.]
*No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
*No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives. [1917.]
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
*No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts). [1918.
♦No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Munition Workers’
Committee. [1919.]
*No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates. [1921.]
No. 291. Carbon-monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust pht hisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and preventison of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910-1919.
No. 306. Occupational hazard and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be looked for in hasardous occupations* [1922.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and in the preparation of phosphorus.
[1926.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at Washington, D. O,
July 14-16, 1926.
No. 460. A new test for industrial lead poisoning. [1928.]
No. 466. Settlement for accidents to American seamen. [1928.]
No. 488. Deaths from lead poisoning, 1925-1927. (In press.)
No. 490. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States to the end of 1927.
No. 507. Causes of death by occupation. >1929.] (In press.)
Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.

No. 237.
No. 340.
No. 349.
No. 361.
No. 380.
No. 383.
No. 384.
No. 399.

Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
Chinese migrations, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
Labor relations in the Fairmont (W. Va.) bituminous-eoal field. [1924.]
Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920-1924.
Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States. [1925.]

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).

No. 211.
No. 229.
No. 285.
No. 321.
No. 322.
No. 343.
No. 370.
No. 408.
No. 444.
No. 486.

Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
Wage-payment legislation in the United States. [1917.]
Minimum-wage laws of the United States: Construction and operation. [1921.]
Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto. [1925.]
Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1926.
Labor legislation of 1928.




In]

Proceedings of Annual Conventions of the Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the United
States and Canada. (Name changed in 1S28 to Association of Governmental Officials in Industry of
the United States and Canada.)

*No. 266.
No. 307.
No. 323.
No. 352.
*No. 389.
*No. 411.
No. 429.
No. 455.
No. 480.
No. 508.

Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6,1921.
Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922.
Tenth, Richmond, Va., May 1-4, 1923.
Eleventh, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10,1926.
Fourteenth, Paterson, N. J., May 31 to June 3, 1927.
Fifteenth, New Orleans, La., May 21-24, 1928.
Sixteenth, Toronto, Canada, June 4-7, 1929. (In press.)

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards andi
Commissions*

No. 210.
No. 248.
No. 264.
•No. 273.
No. 281.
No. 304.
No. 333.
No. 359.
No. 385.
No. 395.
No. 406.
No. 432.
No. 456.
No. 485.

Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25,1917.
Fifth, Madison, Wis., September 24-27,1918.
Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
Eighth, Chicago, HI., September 19-23, 1921.
Ninth, Baltimore, Md., October 9-13, 1922.
Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26, 1923.
Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20,1925.
Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Fourteenth, Atlanta, Ga., September 27-29,1927.
Fifteenth, Paterson, N. J., September 11-14,1928.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Public Employment Services.

No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20,1913; second, Indianapolis, September 24 and 25, 1914;;
third, Detroit, July 1 and 2,1915.
No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21,1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y., September 7-9,1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, HI., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., September 15-17,1925.
No. 478. Fifteenth, Detroit, Mich., October 25-28,1927.
No. 501. Sixteenth, Cleveland, Ohio, September 18-21, 1928.
Productivity of Labor.

No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.J
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry..
[1926.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]
No. 474. Productivity of labor in merchant blast furnaces. [1928.]
No. 475. Productivity of labor in newspaper printing. [1928.]
Retail Prices and Cost of Living.

♦No. 121.
♦No. 130.
No. 164.
No. 170.
No. 357.
No. 369.
No. 464.

Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
Retail prices, 1890 to 1927.

Safety Codes.

♦No. 331. Code of lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
No. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
No. 350. Specifications of laboratory tests for approval of electric headlighting devices for motor
vehicles.
No. 351. Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
No. 375. Safety code for laundry machinery and operations.
No. 378. Safety code for woodworking plants.




[m ]

Safety Codes—Continued.
No. 382. Code for lighting school buildings.
No. 410. Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
No. 430. Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433i Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
No. 436. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
No. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
No. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
No. 463. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus—first revision.
Vocational Workers* Education.
♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment. [1915.]
*No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1917.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States. [1920.]
No. 459. Apprenticeship in building construction. [1928.]
Wages and Hours of Labor.
*No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in the dress and waist
industry of New York. [1914.]
*No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry. [1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
*No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907 to 1914.
No. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1915.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
No. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 10 pairs of shoes, 1923.
0
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor costs of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry. [1926.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and 1924.
No. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1925.
No. 454. Hours and earnings in bituminous-coal mining, 1922, 1924, and 1926.
No. 471. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1927.
No. 472. Wages and hours of labor in slaughtering and meat packing, 1927.
No. 476. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, 1927. [Supplement to Bui. 457.]
No. 482. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1928.
No. 484. Wages and hours of labor of common street laborers, 1928.
No. 487. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1928*
No. 492. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1928.
No. 497. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1928.
No. 498. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1910 to 1928.
No. 499. History of wages in the United States from colonial times to 1928.
No. 502. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1928. (In press.)
No. 503. Wages and hours of labor in the men's clothing industry, 1911 to 1928 (In press.)
No. 504. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1908 to 1928. (In press.)
Welfare Work.
*No. 123. Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munitions factories. [1917.]
*No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United States. [1919.]
No. 458. Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments, 1926.
Wholesale Prices.
No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign countries. 11921.]
No. 453. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
No. 493. Wholesale prices, 1913 to 1928.
Women and Children in Industry.
No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in selected industries
in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.1
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]




[IV]

Women and Children in Industry—Continued.
•No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries In Milwaukee. [1913.1
No: 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile establishments and
garment factories. [1914.] *
•No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries. [1915.]
•No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of women and child wage earners in the United States.
[1915.]
•No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determination in Oregon. [1915.]
•No. 180. Thl boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women. [1915.]
•No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of Boston, Mass. [1916.}
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.J
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
•No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of industrial employ­
ment of women and children. [1918.]
No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war. [1917.]
No. 253. Women in the lead industries.. [1919.]
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto)*
♦No. 101. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
•No. 102. British national insurance act, 1911.
No. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law in Switzerland. [1912.]
No. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
•No. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
No. 212. Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Washington, D. C., December 5-9,1916.
*No. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign countries, 1917 and
1918.
No. SO Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration. [1922.]
I.
No. 312. National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921.
No. 379. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of January 1, 1925.
No. 477. Public-service retirement systems, United States and Europe. [1928.]
No. 496. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada as of January, 1929.
(With text of legislation enacted in 1927 and 1928.)
Miscellaneous Series.
•No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to
May 1,1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington, D. C. [1921.]
No. 299. Personnel research agencies: A guide to organized research in employment management,
industrial relations, training, and working conditions. [1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization. [1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. [1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and problems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. Cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 439. Handbook of labor statistics, 1924 to 1926.
No. 461. Labor organizations in Chile. [1928.]
No. 462. Park recreation areas in the United States. [1928.]
No. 465. Beneficial activities of American trade-unions. [1928.]
No. 479. Activities and functions of a State department of labor. [1928.
No. 483. Conditions in the shoe industry in Haverhill, Mass., 1928.
No. 489. Care of aged persons in United States. (In press.)
No. 491. Handbook of labor statistics: 1929 edition.
No. 505. Directory of homes for the aged in the United States. [1929«]
No. 506. Handbook of American trade-unions: 1929 edition.




[V]