View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

•",,-;*',<;*&"'
,- n> . ;?>"'
<* '
, "' >1^
" , V*Vv:$&
•»:'&&
'•

..^m'

' ?'J'>r

;-; r-<r ";0IfK

UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

'

WASHINGTON

>

SURVEY OF
CURRENT BUSINESS

.- " '

'>*' y*';;^f$

;

^ " *v^ •

\ , -*

>;

FEBRUARY, 1927
No. 66
*•

"

'»

"" '* V i- '^"^'-^

{ .' ' '

'

^" I y

,;/-, '-

'^ffi(

'r

COMPILED BY

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
BUREAU OF STANDARDS
i

V
'':*:'* r.vi;-'^^

1

T"mrT\/^ ni* A TVTI* NOTICE
IMPORTANT "W/^T^T/^TJ

In addition to figures given from Government sources, there are also incorporated for completeness of
service figures from other sources generally accepted by the trades, the authority and responsibility
for which are noted in the "Sources of Data" on pages 135-138 of the present issue

\

\ \f
^ V

r

t

,;;..^^v^
;
;

,'i'^ f-^

,"
V

i^^v'il

>v

Subscription price of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS is $1.50 a year; single copies (monthly), 10 cents; semiannual
issues, 25 cents. Foreign subscriptions, $2.25; single copies (monthly issues), including postage, 14 c^nts; semiannual
issues, 36 cents. Subscription price of COMMERCE REPORTS is $4 a year; with the SURVEY, $5.50 a yeaj. Make
remittances only to Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C., by postal money order, express order* Or, New/
York draft. Currency at sender's risk. Postage stamps or foreign money not accepted v
.
«> ; ,




s

*^.
^ l*»i*' »
-.'-•;-• T•',- ' '--A&

WA8HINQTON : GOVERNMENT FRINTINQ OFFICE : 1027

• ' '-.••;:-•.->,•' ---^
'"

-

/

/

i . , i'>?./..A-1.V.-7C

INTRODUCTION
The SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS is designed to
present each month a picture of the business situation
by setting forth the principal facts regarding the various lines of trade ana industry. At semiannual intervals detailed tables are published giving, for each item,
monthly figures for the past two years and yearly
comparisons, where available, back to 1913; also blank
lines sufficient for six months have been left at the
bottom of each table enabling those who care to do
so to enter new figures as soon as they appear (see
Tames l-l 10). In the intervening months the more
important comparisons only are given 9 the table
in
entitled "Trend of business movements/
\

ADVANCE SHEETS

Realizing that current statistics are highly perishable and that to be of use they must reach the business
man at the earliest possible moment, the department
has arranged to distribute advance leaflets evefry week
to subscribers in the United States. The leaflets
aria usually mailed on Tuesdays and give such information as has been received during the preceding
week. The information contained in these leaflets
is also reprinted in "Commerce Reports/1 issued
weeH^ by the Btirfeau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The monthly bulletin is distributed as quickly
as it can be completed and printed.
BASIC DATA
The figures reported in the accompanying tables are
v^y i$rgely those already in existence. The chief
function of the department is to bring together these
data which, if available at all, are scattered in hundreds of different publications. A portion of these
<Ia^ ara collected by Government departments, other
figures are compiled by technical journals, and still
T others ipe repotted by trade associations.
RELATIVE NUMBERS
1 To facilitate comparison between different items and
render the trend of a movement more apparent, relative numbers (often called "index numbers," a term
referring more particularly to a special kind of number
described below) have been calculated. The relative
numbers enable the reader to see at a glance the
general upward or downward tendency of a movement which can not so easily be grasped from the
actual figures.
In computing these relative numbers the last prewar year, 1013, or in some instances a five-year average, 1909-1913, has been used as a base equal to 100
/ ipiereve* poejdme.
• fhe illative numbers are computed by allowing the
monthly average for the base year or period to equal
,100. If the movement for a current month is greater
, than the base, the relative number will be greater than
100, and vice versa. The difference between 100 and
the relative number will give at once the per cent
increase or decrease compared with the base period.
Thus a relative number of 115 means an increase of 15

per cent over the base period, while a relative number
of 80 means a decrease of 20 per cent from the base.
Relative numbers may also be used to calculate the
approximate percentage increase or decrease in a movement from one period to the next. Thus, if a relative
number at one month is 120 and for a later month it
is 144 there has been an increase of 20 per cent.
In many instances comparable figures for the prewar years are not available, and in such cases the year
1919 has usually been taken as the base. For some
industries 1919 can not be regarded as a proper base,
due to extraordinary conditions in the industry, and
some more representative period has been chosen.
In many cases relative numbers of less importance
have been temporarily omitted.
Most of the relative numbers appear, in a special
section of the semiannual issues, as in Tables 111 to
131 of the present number, thus allowing easy comparison on a pre-war base for all items for which
relatives could be computed.
INDEX NUMBERS
When two or more series of relative numbers are
combined by a system of weightings the resulting
series is denominated an index number. The index
number, by combining many relative numbers, is
designed to show the trend of an entire group of industries or for the country a6 a whole, instead of for
the single commodity or industry which the relative
number covers. Comparisons with the base year or
with other periods are made in the same manner as in
the case of relative numbers,
BATIO CHARTS
In many instances the charts used in the SURVEY
OB> CURRENT BUSINESS are of the type termed "Ratio
Charts" (logarithmic scale), notably the Business
Indicator charts on page 2. These charts show the
percentage increase and allow direct comparisons
between the slope of one curve and that of any other
curve regardless of its location on the diagram; that
is, a 10 per cent increase in an item is given the same
vertical movement whether its curve is near the bottom or near the top of the chart.
The difference between this and the ordinary form
of a chart can be made clear by an example. If a
certain item, having a relative number of 400 in one
month, increases 10 per cent in the following month,
its relative number will be 440, and on an ordinary
chart would be plotted 40 equidistant scale points
higher than the preceding month. Another movement with a relative number of, say, 50 also increases
10 per cent, making its relative number 55. On the
ordinary (arithmetic) s6ale this item would rise only 5
equidistant points, whereas the previous item rose 40
points, yet each showed the same percentage increase.
The ratio charts avoid this difficulty and give to each
of the two movements exactly the same vertical rise
and hence the slopes of the two lines are directly
comparable. The ratio charts compare percentage
changes, while the arithmetic charts compare absolute
changes.

This issue presents practically complete data for the month of December and also items covering the early weeks of
January received up to January 26. (See charts and table, pp. 4 and 5.) As most data covering a particular month's
business are not available until from 15 to 30 days after the close of the monthf a complete picture of that month's
operations can not be presented at an early date, but the advance leaflets give every week the latest data available.



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
WASHINGTON

SURVEY OF
CURRENT BUSINESS
COMPILED BY
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

:

: BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE

:

BUREAU OF STANDARDS

FEBRUARY

No. 66

1927

CONTENTS
SUMMARIES

Page

Preliminary summary for January
,
1
Course of business in December
11
Monthly business indicators (table and chart)
2, 3
Weekly business indicators (table and chart)
4, 5
Wholesale price comparisons (table and charts)
6, 7,13
Annual statistical summary of commerce and industry. 9, 10
Indexes of business:
Condensed summary
11
Text and chart
12
Detailed indexes of production
22
Basic steel and related products (charts)
8
NEW TEXT TABLES

Electric fans
Census of manufactures
Canadian inspected slaughter of livestock
Industrial pumps
Silver production and refinery stocks

14
20
23
24
25

INDEX BY SUBJECTS

Text
page
13
14
15

Table
page

Textiles
30
Metals and metal products.
38
Fuels.
37,53
Automobiles
46
Hides and leather
16
58
Rubber
56
Paper and printing
16
61
Building construction and housing
16
65
Lumber products
16
67
Stone, clay, and glass products
17
73
Chemicals and oils
17
76
Foodstuffs and tobacco
17 84,97
Transportation and public utilities
18 98, 104
Employment and wages
13
105
111
Distribution movement (trade, advertising, etc.). 18
122
Banking, finance, and insurance
18
20 121, 131
Foreign exchange and trade, gold and silver

PRELIMINARY SUMMARY FOR JANUARY
The dollar volume of trade during the early weeks
of January, as seen from check payments, was higher
than in the corresponding period of 1926. Distributions of goods, as seen from data on carloadings, was
also greater than in the corresponding weeks of the
preceding year. Wholesale prices in general averaged
lower than in the preceding month and a year ago.
Production of bituminous coal was larger than in
January of the preceding year, while the output of
beehive coke was smaller. The production of crude
petroleum showed little change from the preceding
month, but was substantially greater than a year ago.
26446°—27




1

The output of lumber was running lower than in
January, 1926.
The volume of new building contracts awarded was
lower than in the corresponding period of the previous
year. Loans and discounts of Federal reserve member
banks declined during the month, but were larger than
a year ago. Money rates, both on time loans and
call money, were generally lower than in either the
preceding month or January, 1926. Stock prices,
both industrial and railroad, continued to average
higher, as compared with both periods. Business
failures were more numerous during January than in
either the preceding month or January, 1926.

MONTHLY BUSINESS INDICATORS: 1920-1926
[Ratio charts—see explanations on inside front cover. The curve on bank debits has been adjusted for normal seasonal variations and that on manufacturing production
for the varying number of working days in the month]
RELATIVE TO 1913 AS 100

350
300

1920

1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926

RELATIVE TO 1919 AS 100

1920 1921 1922 1923 J924 1925 1926
BANK DEBITS, 141 CENTERS

200 tf




INTEREST RATES, COMMERCIAL PAPER

WHOLESALE TRADE, 6 LINES

DEPT, STORE TRADE <359 STORES)
WHOLESALE PRICES'CDEPT.OF LABOR )

MAIL-ORDER SALES
(4 HOUSES)

;

NET FREIGHT TON-MILES

MANUFACTURING PRODUCTION
-1
(64 COMMODITIES)—]

AUTOMOBILE PRODUCTION
( PASSENGER CARS AND TRUCKS;

FACTORY EMPLOYMENT

30 L

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 IS26

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926

200

3

MONTHLY BUSINESS INDICATORS
The following table gives comparative relative numbers for a selected list of important business movements. It is believed
that this table will prove useful, because it segregates from the large mass of material a comparatively small number of items which
are often regarded as indicative of business in general.
The table has been divided into two parts, the first containing those items for which relative numbers can be calculated, using
1913 as a base. The second part contains items for which comparable data back to 1913 are not available. This latter group of
relative numbers is calculated by letting the 1919 monthly average equal 100. Care should therefore be exercised in comparing the
absolute value of the two sets of data. In either group, however, the upward or downward trend of the relative numbers, compared
to previous months, does reflect the present tendency in each item and will give a basis for business judgment.
1026

1925

MONTHLY AVERAGE
ITEM
1920

1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 Oct. Nov. Dec.

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

1913 monthly average"* 100
Production:
Pig iron
120 54 87 130 101
Steel ingots
135 64 114 144 122
Copper
99 38 80 120 128
Cement (shipments).
108 107 131 153 164
Anthracite coal
98 99 58 104 99
Bituminous coal
119 87 85 118 101
Electric energy (gross revenue sales)
283 312 349 407 434
Crude petroleum _ ._ .
178 189 224 295 287
Cotton (consumption)
_
105 97 109 117 99
Beef
119 113 126 130 133
Pork
113 117 130 160 151
Unfilled orders:
United States Steel Corporation
170 90 96 102 63
Stocks:
Crude petroleum *
143 171 265 311 369
Cotton (total)
155 198 153 125 111
2
Price:
Wholesale index
226 147 149 154 150
Retail food. _
_
_
203 153 142 146 146
Retail coal, bituminous
_ _ 207 197 188 190 169
Farm products
205 11.6 124 135 134
Business finances:
Defaulted liabilities.
108 229 228 197 198
Price 25 industrial stocks
184 136 169 185 198
Price 25 railroad stocks
67 64 75 72 81
Banking:
Clearings, New York City.
257 205 230 226 264
Clearings, outside
_ . __ 275 212 230 276 284
Commercial paper interest rate.
134 118 80 90 71
Distribution :
Imports (value)
294 140 177 212 201
Exports (value) _>
331 181 154 168 185
Sales, mail-order
264 188 204 259 284
Transportation :
Freight, net ton-miles. __ .
137 105 115 139 131

118
146
136
177
68
109
470
304
115
138
128
73

123 130 126 121

309
120
144
127

118
154
138
207
1
133
495
311
117
173
122

118
155
131
137
2
127
535
297
117
137
127

127
158
135
94
3
132
558
294
124
152
162

130
164
138
77
2
135
578
288
125
139
168

114
151
132
79
27
117
559
264
121
120
127

134
178
147
129
115
116
545
293
137
136
136

135
163
143
175
108
101
637
290
124
137
120

136
156
143
243
106
98
506
302
111
139
119

126
149
139
259
117
105
499
298
111
160
136

126
145
140
254
111
109
489
313
99
136
129

125
169
140
251
108
116
491
321
108
140
118

156
141
245
111
123
511
315
123
164
100

162
146
237
114
137
548
333
122
166
101

336
126
155
119

348
130
150
151

64

70

78

85

83

78

74

65

61

59

61

60

61

62

64

67

127
156
141
182
93
121

148 138
146 140
153 87
98 99
150 145

290 269 284 283 278 278 274 274 273 271 268 265 264 265 264 264 265
129 177 185 216 237 227 213 192 167 143 119 98 85 137 217 260 267
159
145
167
147

151
160
172
136

158
162
170
143

158
167
179
144

156
166
179
143

156
164
179
143

155
162
179
143

152
160
170
140

151
162
168
140

152
161
161
139

152
160
160
139

151
157
160
130

149
156
162
133

151
159
170
134

150
160
T77
130

148
162
188
130

147
162
187
127

162 149 129 157 160 191 150 134 169 147 129 130 123 131 146 143 200
262 285 298 305 305 309 309 272 249 253 268 280 296 296 283 295 308
99 112 102 107 111 111 109 105 104 106 111 113 116 120 114 117 121
300 307 329 298 342 344 272 356 329 297 307 302 275 271 309 282 339
318 324 358 323 354 341 288 339 324 316 329 334 304 313 344 317 344
73 77 80 79 79 79 75 78 76 72 70 72 78 80 82 80 79
236 248 250 252 266 279 260 297 266 215 226 227 225 230 253 250 242
198 193 237 216 226 192 170 181 187 172 163 178 186 217 215 232 226
327 349 464 396 473 336 322 357 344 299 309 284 286 336 417 425 471
139

161 149 139 138 130 141 133 146 144 153 160 162 177 159

1919 monthly average3 100
Production:
Lumber 3
Building contracts.. _ _
Stocks:
Beef . .
Pork
Business finances:
Bond prices (40 issues)
Banking:
Debits outside New York City. . _
Federal ReserveBills discounted
Total reserves
Ratio

102
72

86 117 133 129 141 136 157 140 127 113 130 146 142 148 148 139 143 141 143 127 114
69 102 106 108 138 133 148 146 137 117 90 150 155 153 142 125 141 139 135 131 119
29
70

32
91

34
90

34
82

27
70

20
46

22
74

66
98

42
83

86

87 107 104 108 112 116 111 112 112 114 115 115 116 117 117 117 117 116 116 118 119

114

91

31
45

95 107 108 121 127 137 121

36
56

34
67

33
74

30
78

25
76

21
78

19
86

18
84

20
67

26
52

36
47

137 134 114 133 128 122 128 135 118 121 135 123

43
57

139

132 91 28 39 19 26 30 30 32 89 23 28 33 27 24 27 27 32 37 33 33 37
97 122 144 146 146 134 135 132 131 129 135 133 133 135 136 136 137 135 134 135 135 134
80 122 154 152 160 149 148 144 142 134 149 147 146 151 151 150 152 148 145 147 144 140

i Data since January, 1925, cover only stocks east of California, and hence are not directly comparable with figures for earlier periods.
» Wholesale and retail prices from Department of Labor averaged for the month; farm prices from Department of Agriculture.
• Based on the total computed production reported by 5 associations. Includes southern pine, Douglas flr, western pine, North Oarolina pine, and California white
pine. The total production of these associations in 1919 was equal to 11,401,000,000 board feet, compared with a total lumber production for the country of 34,552,000,000
board feet reported by the census.




WEEKLY BUSINESS INDICATORS
[See table on page 5]
WEEKLY AVERAGE. 1922 -1924 = 100.
BITUMINOUS COAL. PRODUCTION
. APR

MAY

JUNE JULY

AUG. SEPT

OGT

FISHER'S INDEX, WEEKLY AVER AGE 1923-1924=100 WHEAT RECEIPTS

FISHER'S WHOLESALE PRICE INDEX

NOV. DEC

j

<x

V\

\
\

I..
,.

s*

• -i

VW

.'

/'v
*

..x-

\

*•**•*

V

•v*

^A u

j

V^
111 1 1 1 1 11

MM

1 ! 1

1 1 1 MM

1 1 !

V
1 II 1

f\
I11 1 1P

COTTON PRICES MIDDLING NEW YORK
LUMBER PRODUCTION

BEEHIVE COKE PRODUCTION

WHEAT PRICE N0.2 RED WINTER

PETROLEUM PRODUCTIONCDAiLY AVERAGE)




LOANS AND DISCOUNTS F.'R.MEMBER BANKS
CATTLE RECEIPTS

DEBITS JO INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTS .

Receipts of cattle

Price of No. 2 wheat

Bank loans and discounts

Debits to individual
accounts

Call-money rates

116.9
115.5
116.3
101.5

175.8
141.5
147.2
104.3

95.8
86.5
104.5
104.7

323.8
288.5
289.8
285.1

136.7
124.4
119.0
88.7

85.0
87.5
97.6
79.0

103.3
103.4
103.6
104.2

79.2
78.9
78.5
80.8

93.6
94.3
94.5
94.6

136. 6
138.2
137.4
140.7

120.0
119.9
119.9
119.4

131.8
114.4
145.8
124.4

112.1
109.1
112.1
121.2

88.1
102.7
109.0
95.3

Dec

141.8
142.2
139.8
92.9

108.1
110.5
111.4
72.9

130.7
127.6
137.3
114.5

111.9
111.2
110.5
109. 8

112.2
110.9
106.4
77.1

181.4
142.1
142.3
110.2

117.3
116.3
104.1
74.4

293.6
283.0
242.6
206.8

123.6
125.1
119.3
66.3

110.0
110.2
102.8
70.6

105.1
103.6
102.7
102.9

78.5
74.3
73.2
74.7

95.3
95.2
95.2
95.2

143.9

119.8
120.2
120.4
120.8

124.7
123.9
141.4
133.6

121.2
124.2
124.2
142.4

105.0
107.5
112.7
83.1

Price of iron and
steel (composite)

Receipts of cotton

112.8
111.8
112.5
112.1

Price of cotton middling

Receipts of wheat

128.1
129.4
124.6
128.5

Wholesale prices

Petroleum production

114. 8
112.4
113.8
106.2

Receipts of hogs

Beehive coke production

134.1
134.0
138.8
127.8

Building contracts

Lumber production

NOT. 7
14
21
28

WEBK
ENDING »~

Gar loadings

Bituminous coal
production

WEEKLY BUSINESS INDICATORS1

1

i
•58
S3
«

1925

5
12
19
26

1926
Jan.

2
9
16
23
30

117.5
143.5
144.0
136.9
138.4

56.7
81.4
94.3
101.9
103.8

128.5
127.2
136.4
150.4
148.7

108.2
107.7
106.8
105.7
103.8

81.5
99.7
103.0
101.3
101.7

152.3
131.8
119.2
182.7
115.5

41.6
76.7
63.0
55.9
53.0

174.0
132.8
112.3
119.6
106.0

71.4
103.9
105.1
102.2
83.3

97.2
122.7
112.5
94.7
102.0

103.8
103.8
103.4
103.7
104.0

78.1
78.5
79.6
78.9
78.5

95.5
95.5
95.5
95.3
94.9

152.8
153. 7
152.8
152.8
148.8

121.8
121.3
120.2
120.0
119.3

109.8
153.2
129.8
135.2
124.0

145.5
97.0
109.1
97.0
109.1

93.0
137.3
142.5
127.6
128.4

Fob

6
13 .
20
27

134.0
132.3
126.8
120.0

108.1
110.5
108.1
107.1

161.0
158.8
154.8
140.4

104.5
104.3
104.3
105.6

100.6
100.8
102.4
100.3

93.2
77.0
102.8
146.7

51.9
48.9
60.8
40.6

101.3
97.9
87.7
71.1

87.8
85.5
78.8
82.3

94.4
93.7
79.0
80.9

104.0
103.3
102.0
101.3

78.5
78.5
78.5
75.1

94.9
94.9
94.7
94.7

156.1
148.8
145.5
147.2

119.6
119.8
119.4
119.2

132.4
123.3
121.7
107.7

112.1
118.2
115.1
127.3

128.9
94.8
118.9
104.0

Mar

115.2
6
13 . .. 117.8
113.1
20
106.0
27

109.5
111.4
114.8
118.1

115.8
115.4
115. 4
109.7

105.3
106.1
105.8
106.0

106.0
106.3
107.4
106.4

106.4
119.6
167.0
157.1

45.7
36.6
42.1
42.1

68.5
65.5
68.1
71.5

81.0
83.3
85.9
88.4

90.1
82.9
85.6
78.6

100.3
99.9
100.1
98.8

73.6
74.0
72.8
72.8

94.7
94.7
94.6
94.6

139.0
137.4
142.3
130.1

119.8
119.0
119.3
119.3

143.5
121.7
133.6
122.2

112.1
103.0
103.0
118.2

120.4
122.1
97.5
110.2

Apr

3
10
17
24

99.6
103.8
102.5
102.1

116.7
115.7
119.0
118.1

102.6
100.0
102.2
100.0

106.7
106.7
106.4
107.2

102.0
102.2
106.1
107.0

165.1
207.4
184.9
128.6

31.4
39.4
33.6
42.4

57.4
51.9
48.1
43.0

69.8
74.3
82.0
88.7

59.9
68.9
74.8
74.6

98.9
98.2
98.8
98.5

73.2
72.8
72.5
71.3

94.6
93.8
93.8
93.6

136.6
142.3

120.2
119.4
118.9
118.7

124.0
133. 1
126.2
129.6

115. 1 98.5
97.0 99.8
109.1 108.2
84.8 117.9

100.5
99.6
102.4
102.3
106.7

111.4
109.5
111.4
112.4
113.8

92.1
93.0
89.3
92.5
85.1

109.1
109.3
109.6
108.9
110.3

109.4
109.5
113.2
114.2
118.8

165.2
166.4
147.2
190.0
168.3

41.9
42.3
37.3
43.4
58.2

49.4
43.4
44.3
39.6
40.4

99.0
98.1
87.1
86.8
95.8

78.7
74.5
66.5
72.1
78.7

97.9
98.5
99.2
99.6
99.4

71.3
72.5
71.7
70.9
71.3

93.4
93.4
93.3
92.8
92.5

134.1
135. 8
137.4
134.1
135.0

119.3
119.8
119.4
118.9
118.7

117.3
134.2
119.7
125.6
118.8

93.9
93.9
90.9
97.0
97.0

122.6
100. 3
104.2
102.7
108.0

95.4
June 5
12 . . 106.0
104.7
19
108.5
26

105.2
112.4
114.8
109.5

85.5
86.0
80.7
82.0

110.1
110.4
110.3
110.8

104.0
116.5
114.7
116.8

124. 5
150.9
134.3
150.6

44.3
44.7
42.3
68.3

36.6
34.0
27.2
18.3

95.5
92.9
94.2
85.9

75.7
92.0
75.7
71.4

98.9
100.1
99.2
99.0

70.9
68.7
69.4
70.2

92.1
91.7
91.5
91.5

120.3
126.8
125.2
117.9

119.4
118.9
120.2
119.3

117.0
121.4
129.8
123.0

100.0
97.0
90.9
103.0

84.8
94.0
99.5
99. 5

104.5
91.5
111.4
111.8
116.1

105.2
84.8
107.1
103.8
109.5

71.5
77.2
79.8
74.6
77.2

111.7
111.5
112.6
113.5
116.0

117.9
99.0
119.1
119.3
121.2

125.6
158.2
162.8
134.1
138.7

106.0
166.1
171.6
232.0
309.6

20.4
14.5
22.1
22.1
28.1

96.5
90.0
104.2
94.9
94.2

72.1
70.7
67.1
70.9
68.2

97.9
98.2
97.9
97.1
96.4

69.1
72.1
70.2
71.3
72.5

91.8
91.8
91.7
91.7
91.5

109.8
120.3
117.1
118.7

129.9
120.3
119.8
119. 6
119.6

125.8
130.8
129.3
129.9
116.1

115.1
109.1
103.0
97.0
106.1

92.3
76.1
88.1
89.3
98.8

21
28

111.8
117.1
116.0
123.6

110.5
111.4
110.5
113.3

72.8
71.5
80.3
79.4

117.4
118.5
119.0
119.4

119.1
121.7
119.7
124.9

121.5
152.1
151.8
197.7

284.0
225.0
167.9
131.1

25.1
48,5
59.1
67.7

75.6
99.0
102.9
103.9

70.9
67.1
67.9
59.9

96.2
96.0
95.9
96.5

71.3
67.2
68.7
72.1

91.5
91.5
91.5
91.5

113 0
111.4
110.6
110.6

120 4
120.7
120.3
120.4

127. 2
116.8
122.8
113.0

109 1
109.1
109. 1
115.1

63.3
92.3
90.1
91.0

Sept. 4
11
18
25

121.3
113,0
128.1
129.1

109.5
99.5
109.5
111.4

80.7
79.8
86.0
86.4

120.4
119.7
119.1
119.0

126.6
113.3
130.5
130.0

145.0
193.4
162.1
180.2

155.1
146.6
141.2
117.1

112.8
128.0
216.2
275.7

124.1
121.9
134. 1
141.6

60.9
60.7
64.2
60.4

96.2
96.7
96.6
96.3

70.6
.69.8
64.5
57.4

91.5
9J.4
91.9
92.1

108 1
108.9
111.4
111.4

121 3
121.5
122.5
122.0

112 7
101.7
127.4
131.3

115 1
121.2
121 2
127 3

93 8
74.4
81 3
83.6

Oct. 2
9
16

132.3
136.2
136.4
140.0
148.6

108.1
111.4
110.5
108.1
110.5

80.7
91.2
88.2
87.7
86.0

120.3
120.8
122.5
125. 3
127.8

130.3
130.2
133.0
132.9
133.7

173.8
141. 4
186.4
159.9
168.8

110.9
104.9
87.9
104.6
112.9

355.7
398.7
397.4
391.1
363.0

131. 2
147.3
143.1
144.0
151.8

59.5
64.5
67.3
75.1
80.1

98.6
95.5
96.5
96.7
97.7

54.0
49.4
51.3
47.5
47.9

92.0
92.1
92.8
92.8
92.9

113.0
111.4
113.0
115 4
116.3

123.1
123,3
123.2
123 0
122.4

119.6
143.6
118.7
145.4
127.7

133.3 82.8
115. 1 97.3
124.2 93.3
103 0 107 2
109.1 107.0

Nov. 6
13

1*4.4
152.1
157.3
147.8

107.1
103.8
103.8
92.4

84.2
88.6
89.9
86.8

129.2
128.5
129.9
131.1

125.0
122.3
118.6
103.6

147.3
140.0
137. 4
188.1

99.6
92.4
73.9
70.6

354.0
340.4
337. 9
307.7

125.7
139.2
133.4
98.4

80.7
86.4
80.6
76.2

100.0
99.6
97.2
97 3

47.9
49.4
49.1
49.4

93.2
93.5
93.6
93 7

114 6
113.0
110 6
112 2

122 9
122.4
122 2
122 5

123 2
127.3
130 3
123 6

109 1 95 5
106 1 105 2
112 1 113 7
115 1 98 8

Dec. 4
11
18.
25

161.7
155.2
148.5
115.5

102.9
101.0
94.3
79.5

83.8
80.7
77.2
64.0

131.0
131.4
131.4
131.7

116.3
109.8
104.5
84.9

96.8
135.4
203.0
104.9

65.5
68.3
59.1
48.0

311.5
288.5
263.0
225.1

112.5
103.5
105.1
72.7

98.3
101.2
91.4
80.0

97.4
97.1
95.9
95.4

45.7
46.4
47.5
49.1

93.6
93.1
93 0
92.8

112 2
113.8
113 0

123 0
122.7
123 0
123 5

119 9
126.2
130 8
139.4

118 2
118.2
118 2
126 4

118.0
146.0
149.3

55.7
79.5
90.0

75.4
74.6
78.1

130.9
131.0
131.1
131.0

81.4
103.4
104.4

159.8
123.9
112.3
103.3

50.7
56.5
57.4

211.9
147.7
166.8
176.6

65.3
88.7
94.5

72.8
102.5
112.4

95.2
95 0
94.5
95 1

49.1
49 4
50.9
51 3

92.7
92 7
91.9
91 2

113 0
109 8

124
124
123
122

116 9
157 8
132 6
131 3

133 3 110 4
115 1 122 9
103 0 144 5
100 0 152 2

May 1.
8
16
22
29

July

3
10 ,
17
24
31

-

AUK. 7

ii:~:~"~~

23

30

20
27

115 2
115 9
105 2
122 1

1927
Jan.

1

8

15

22

. __

29.

112 2

6
8
3
2

i Sources of data are as follows: Bituminous coal and beehive coke production from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines; Lumber production, based on four
associations, from the National Lumber Manufacturers Association; Petroleum production (crude) from American Petroleum Institute; Loadings of freight cars from American
Railway Association; Building contracts from F. W Dodge Corporation; Receipts of wheat from J?radafre^'«; Receipts of cattle and hogs from U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Bureau of Agricultural Economics; Receipts of cotton from New Orleans Cotton Exchange; Wholesale prices (Fisher's index), based on 1923-24 as 100, from Professor Irving
Fisher; Price of cotton, middling, from New York Cotton Exchange; Price of iron and steel, composite, from Iron Trade Review; Price of wheat, No. 2, red, cash, from Chicago
Board of Trade through U. 8. Department of Agriculturer Bureau of Agricultural Economics; Loans and discounts of member banks and debits to individual accounts from
Federal Reserve Board; Call-money rate from Wall Street Journal; Business failures from JJ. Q. Dun & Company.
* The actual week for all items does not always end on same day.




WHOLESALE PRICES IN DECEMBER
[Bars denote percentages of increase or decrease in the wholesale prices of specified commodities as compared with the same month of 1925 and 1924]
COMPARISON WITH
PREVIOUS MONTH
COMMODITIES

COMPARISON WITH SAME" MONTH
1925

DECREASE INCREASE
20 10
0
|0 20 60

DECREASE
30 20 10

40

0

10

20

COMPARISON WITH SAME MONTH
1924

INCREASE
30 40 50 60

70 80 50

40

DECREASE
30 20
10

0

10

20

INCREASE
30 40 50 60

70

60

FARM PRODUCTS. AVERAGE PRICE TO PRODUCER
WHEAT

'

POTATOES

\

V//////////////////,
V///////////////^^^^

COTTONSEED
CATTLE. BEEF
HOGS

f

W//////////////^^

Y///////////////////S

.

,

. , vzzzT .

I.

.

L

mam

mmmmm

. , , ,

FARM PRODUCTS. MARKET P Rl CE

WHEAT. SPRING
WHEAT. WINTER
CORN NO. 2

1

'

w//////,

\/9^/Z^/^/^///^//

OATS
BARLEY

1

^S

1

RYE. NO . 2

v////////?////?/,
mm.

J%

ir
ir

TOBACCO. BURLEY
COTTON

V/W/W/#/MZW/Mfi
V////^/////7/////^

Y////////////////////S

mrn^

WOOL. r/4 GREASE (BOSTON)
CATTLE. STEERS

««

1

HOGS. HEAVY
SHEEP. EWES
SHEEP. LAMBS

I

y

FLOUR. SPRING
FLOUR. WINTER
SUGAR. RAW
SUGAR. GRANULATED
COTTONSEED OIL
BEEF. CARCASS

FOOD
'

W/////A

•i r

*

BEEF. STEER ROUNDS
HAMS. SMOKEDfCHICAGO}

•
1
f ""f

i

,

,

!

.

,

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

1

i

i

i

< ._.

CLOTHING

COTTON YARN
COTTON PRINT CLOTH

W///////////////,

COTTON SHEETING
WORSTED YARNS

E22

v%%>.

:r
ir

WOMEN'S DRESS GOODS
SUITINGS
SILK. RAW

tf%7/,
V/////M

1

Vffift.

HIDES. PACKER'S
HIDES. CALFSKINS

f%%%%

LEATHER, CHROME (BOSTON \
LEATHER. SOLE. OAK
BOOTS AND SHOES (BOSTON )
BOOTS AND SHOES <ST. LOUIS)

E^%^

W///W/////////^

E

COTTON

LAMBS

1

mam

CORN

ir
1r
i
r
i
k

(

COAL, BITUMINOUS.

I

m
ir
, ,d

*
1

vz%
1

FUEL

'

COAL. ANTHRACITE
COKE
PETROLEUM

I
g

^J^~
METALS

PIG IRON. FOUNDRY

1

'

PIG IRON, BASIC
STEEL BILLETS. BESSEMER
COPPER

£
;

i
I
I

LEAD

m

m£

TIN

V//////A
mim

ZINC

BUILDING MATERIAL AND MISC

LUMBER. PINE. SOUTHERN
LUMBER. DOUGLAS FIR

1

'

'

' V///
1

<

BRICK, COMMON (NEW YORK)
CEMENT
STEEL BEAMS
RUBBER CRUDE
SULPHURIC ACID




LLANEOUS

)~
20

10

DECREASE

Q

10

20

INCREASE

\
1

W////////.

5^68. 5^^^^^/%^%
1

50

,

40

L_

,

,

30

20

DECREASE

10

•

0

1

1

i

f

i

l

1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 6 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0
10
INCREASE
DECREASE

* NO CHANGE

* * NO QUOTATION

*

l

Q

I 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 6 0 6 0 7 0 8 C
INCREASE

WHOLESALE PRICE COMPARISONS
NOTB.—Prices to producer on farm products and market price of wool are from U. 8. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics; nonferroui metal
from the Engineering and Mining Journal-Press. All other prices are from U. 3. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. As far as possible all quotations represent prices to producer or at mill. See diagram on page 6
PER CENT
INCREASE (+) OB
DECREASE (-)

ACTUAL PRICE

(dollars)
Unit

COMMODITIES

Decem- DecemNovem- Decem- Decem- ber, 1926, ber, 1926,
from
from
ber, 1926 ber, 1926 ber, 1925 Novem- December, 1926 ber, 1925

RELATIVE PKICE

(1913average-100)

November,
1926

December,
1926

December,
1925

FARM PRODUCTS-AVERAGE PRICE TO PRODUCERS
Wheat . .
Corn...............
Potatoes *
Cotton
..
Cottonseed... .
Cattle, beef.
Hogs... .
Lambs . . . . . .
......

_.

.

Bushel
. . . . . . . . . . . . Bushel
............
Bushel
... ... Pound
. . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . . . Ton
....
Pound...
.
. _ Pound
. . . . ... .
...
. . . . . . . . . . Pound
........

..

. ...

1.228
.648
1.370
.100
18.05
.0642
.1097
.1092

1.537
.707
2.015
.174
27.87
.0618
.1051
.1267

06
-2.3
30
-9.1
-3.3
+1.6
42
-1.7

20 1
-8.8
32 0
42 5
-35.2
+3.9
+4.4
-13.8

156
107
237
92
86
107
153
182

155
104
229
83
83
109
146
179

194
114
338
145
128
105
140
208

21.00
.128
.45
9.39
12.09
5.77
12.70

1.44
1.40
.76
.50
.74
.97
21.00
.128
.44
9.72
11.77
5.64
12.04

1.77
1.80
.80
.42
.72
1.04
25.00
.202
.55
10.04
10.88
8.06
15.94

+3.6
+1.4
+7.0
+11.1
+4.2
+1.0
0.0
0.0
22
+3.5
25
23
-5.2

18 4
-22.2
50
+19.0
+2.8
-6.7
-16.0
36 6
20 0
-3.2
+8.2
30 0
-24.5

152
140
114
120
114
151
159
100
180
110
145
123
163

158
142
121
134
119
152
159
100
176
114
141
120
155

194
182
127
112
115
165
189
158
220
118
130
172
205

Barrel... .. 7.74
6.64
Barrel
Pound
.047
Pound.
.058
Pound
.08
.170
Pound
.145
Pound
Pound
.293

7.63
6.60
.051
.061
.08
.170
.141
.280

9.18
7.89
.041
.053
.11
.170
.131
.280

-1.4
06
+8.5
+5.2
0.0
0.0
28
44

-16.9
-16.3
+24.4
+15.1
27 3
0.0
+7.6
0.0

169
173
134
135
114
131
111
176

167
172
146
143
113
131
108
169

200
205
118
123
146
131
100
168

Pound
Yard
Yard
Pound
Yard
Yard.
Pound
Pound
Pound
Square foot
Pound
Pair.
Pair.. .

.321
.069
.085
1.40
.70
3.29
5.49
.153
.168
.45
.43
6.40
4.85

.311
.067
.080
1.40
.70
3.29
5.59
.151
.167
.45
.43
6.40
4.85

.402
.087
.103
1.55
.80
3.60
6.81
.156
.192
.46
.46
6.40
5.13

-3.1
-2.9
59
0.0
0.0
0.0
+1.8
13
-0.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

-22,6
-23.0
22 7
97
-12.5
-8.6
17 9
-3.2

130
130
138
180
222
213
151
83
89
167
96
206
153

126
126
130
180
222
213
154
82
89
167
96
206
153

162
165
167
200
254
233
187
85
102
171
103
206
162

Short ton.. 4.39
11.48
Long ton
1 Short ton.. 4.89
1.750
Barrel.

4.39
11.48
3.91
1.750

3.39

0.0
00
-20.0
0.0

+29.5

200
216
200
187

200
216
160
187

154

4.45
1.550

182
166

20.76
Long ton
Long ton... 18.50
Long ton... 35.00
.1358
Pound
.0801
Pound
.6867
Pound
.0720
Pound

20.51
18.50
35.00
.1330
.0786
.6664
.0702

22.26
20.00
35.00
.1387
.0931
.6195
.0857

-1.2
0.0
0.0
-2.1
19
-3.0
-2.5

79
-7.5
0.0
41
15 6
•+7.6

130
126
136
89
183
158
130

128
126
136
87
180
153
126

139
136
136
91
213
140
156

43.02
Mfeet
Mfeet
16.23
Thousand.. 12.25

41.31
16.89
15.50

49.83
15.50
14.75

-4.0
+4.1
+26.5

-17.1
+9.0
+5.1

187
176
175

179
183
236

216
168
225

0.0
0.0
-10.5
0.0

0.0
+2.6
-66.5
+7.1

163
132
35
75

163
132
32
75

163
129
95
70

.

1.236
.660
1.413
.110
18.66
.0632
.1145
.1111

FARM PRODUCTS-MARKET PRICE
Wheat, No. 1, northern spring (Chicago)
Wheat, No. 2 red, winter (Chicago)
Corn, contract grade No. 2, cash (Chicago) ...
Oats, contract grades, cash (Chicago)...,.........
. . . ..
...
.
Barley, fair to good, malting (Chicago)
..
.
Rye, No. 2, cash (Chicago)
Tobacco, burley, good leaf, dark red (Louisville)
Cotton, middling upland (New York)
Wool, H bloodcombing, Ohio and Pennsylvania fleeces (Boston)
Cattle, steers, good to choice, corn fed (Chicago)
Hogs, heavy (Chicago) . .
..
Sheep, ewes (Chicago).......
...... .. . ....
.....
.. ..
Sheep, lambs (Chicago)

Bushel..
Bushel..
Bushel..
Bushel..
Bushel..
Bushel..
Cwt...
Pound
Pound
Cwt..

.. 1.39
.. 1.38
.. .71
.. .45
.. .71
.. .96

Cwt
Cwt
Cwt

FOOD
Flour, standard patents (Minneapolis)
...
...
Flour, winter straights (Kansas City),....
.. . . ... . ... ... ...
..
Sugar, 96° centrifugal (New York)
Sugar, granulated, in barrels (New York)
Cottonseed oil, prime summer yellow (New York)..... ........ .
Beef, fresh carcass good native steers (Chicago)
Beef, fresh steer rounds No. 2 (Chicago) .... .
..
Pork, giriokgd hams (Chicago)
CLOTHING
Cotton yarns, carded, white, northern, mule spun, 22-1 cones (Boston)
Cotton-print cloth, 27 inches, 64 x 60-38H"-5.35—yards to pound
Cotton sheeting, brown 4/4 Trion (New York) . . . . . . . . . . .
.........
Worsted yarns, 2/32's crossbred stock, white, in skein (Boston)
Women's dress goods, French, 36-36 inches at mills, serge
Suitings, wool, dyed blue, 55-56 inches, 16-ounce Middlesex (N. Y.)
Silk, raw, Japanese, Kansai No. 1 (New York)
Hides, green salted, packer's heavy native steers (Chicago)...
Hides, calfskins, No. 1, country, 8 to 15 pounds (Chicago)
Leather, chrome calf, dull or bright "B "grades (Boston)
Leather, sole, oak, scoured backs, heavy (Boston)
. .
...
Boots and shoes, men's black calf, blucher (Massachusetts)
Boots and shoes, men's dress welt tan calf (St. Louis)
FUEL
Coal, bituminous, mine-run Kanawha (Cincinnati). .......
Coalj anthracite, chestnut (New York tidewater)..!
Coke, Connellsville (range of prompt and future) furnace—at ovens..
Petroleum, crude, Kansas-Oklahoma—at wells

-2.2
65

o.'o

-5.5

-12.1
+12.9

METALS
Pig iron, foundry No. 2, northern (Pittsburgh) .
Pig iron, basic, valley furnace
.
.....
.....
Steel billets, Bessemer (Pittsburgh)
Copper ingots, electrolytic, early delivery (New York)
Lead, pig, desilverized, for early delivery (New York)..
Tin, pig, for early delivery (New York)
Zinc, slab, western (St. Louis)
BUILDING MATERIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
Lumber, pine, southern, yellow flooring, 1 x 4, "B" and better (Hattiesburg district)
Lumber, Douglas flr, No. 1, common s 1 s, 1 x 8 10 (Washington)... . .
..
Brick, common red, domestic building (New York)
Cement, Portland, net without bags to trade, f. o. b., plant (Chicago
district)
Steel beams, mill (Pittsburgh)
Rubber, Para, Island, fine (New York)
Sulphuric acid 66° (New York)




Barrel.. .
Cwt
Pound
Cwt...

1.65
2.00
.286
.75

1.65
2.00
.256
.75

1.65
1.95
.764
.70

PRODUCTION OF PIG IRON AND UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION'S UNFILLED ORDERS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]
14,000

600

AUTOMOBILE PRODUCTION AND NEW BUILDING CONTRACTS AWARDED IN 27 NORTHEASTERN STATES
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]
800

BUILDING CONTRACTS AWARDED.
(27 STATES)

\

TOTAL AUTOMOBILE
PRODUCTION
40

LOCOMOTIVE SHIPMENTS AND UNFILLED ORDERS
[December, 1Q26, is latest month plotted]
4,000
2,000




STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY: 1922-1926
The following table contains a review of production
and distribution by principal industries and branches
of commerce for the year 1926, with comparisons
since 1921. On the following page is given a table of

commodity stocks, as well as of unfilled orders, as of
December 31, 1926, with similar data for earlier comparable periods.

VOLUME OF PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION IN 1926
1922

ITEM

1923

1924

1925

1926

BUILDING AND BUILDING

FOODSTUFFS

66, 794 66, 160 75, 345 70, 264 76, 095
Corn grindings (bu. —000 omitted)
Sugar meltings (long tons—000 omitted).. 5,148 4,149 4,547 5,113 5,303
195, 117 192 274 204 060 238, 811 263, 985
Fish catch (Ibs —000 omitted)
Meat production, inspected slaughter
(Ibs. —000, 000 omitted) :
5,480
4,969
5,711
5 129
5 328
Beef products
9,182
7,419
8,820
7,273
7,323
Pork products
501
418
456
467
446
Lamb and mutton products
Cottonseed oil production (Ibs.—000,000
1,951
1,512
935
974
1,155
omitted)
Wheat flour production (bbls.—000,000
1128
125
126
133
126
omitted)

1932

ITEM

continued

1923

1924

1925

1926

MATERIALS—

Brick production (000 omitted) :
8,296
8,671
8,661
7,988
7,089
Face brick (average per firm)
Cement (bbls. —000 omitted) :
Production.
_
_ .__ 113, 870 137,377 148, 859 161,202 164, 057
116, 563 135, 887 145, 747 156, 724 161, 781
Shipments
Sanitary enamel ware shipments (pieces —
000 omitted) :
1,326
1,085
1,148
1,195
898
Baths
1,326
1,528
1,365
1,323
1,098
Lavatories
1,445
1,551
1,364
1,144
1,370
Sinks
AUTOMOBILES AND TIRES

TEXTILES

Consumption (000 omitted) :
Wool (pounds)
Cotton (bales)
Silk (bales)
Production (000 omitted) :
Fine cotton goods (pieces)

- - - 654, 125 641 607 537, 760 526, 285 510, 033
6 088
368

6 521
358

5 522
366

6 433
501

6 687
502

4,629

5 265

4,246

5,053

4,836

METALS

59 047
40 039
43, 486
2 675
' 70

42, 624
31 088
36, 811
2 638
64

54, 081
36 401
44, 178
3 522
76

58, 532
39 068
47, 134
3,447
78

531 204 535 848 590 928 638, 533
738 768 793 377 842 117 872 318

1,997
1 077

2,403
954

2,690
923

2,526
990

3,378

1,554

1,216

1,750

RAILWAY EQUIPMENT

1,405

PRODUCTION OF FUEL AND POWER

Coal (short tons—000 omitted) :
Anthracite
54, 684 93, 336 87, 927 61, 817
Bituminous
- _ _ _ 422 268 564 565 483 687 520, 053
Coke (short tons—000 omitted) :
8 040 19 380 10 284 1 1, 355
Beehive
- - 28 500 37 596 33 984 39 912
By-product
Petroleum products (000,000 omitted) :
Crude petroleum (bbls. —42 gal.)
558
732
714
764
148
Gasoline (bbls. — 42 gal.)
180
213
260
55
Kerosene (bbls —42 gal.)
60
60
56
Lubricants (bbls. —42 gal.)
27
23
26
31
Electrical energy, central stations (kw.
hours— 000,000 omitted) :
Total
_ .
47 700 55 932 58 992 65 604
By water power
17 256 19' 620 20 016 22 320
Bv fuels
30 456 36 324 39 012 43 284

85,001
578, 290
11, 659
44 437
766
293
62
32

i December figure estimated.




3,702
393

3,263
378

3,836
500

3, 930
535

30, 698
787
38, 137

33,944
684
45, 087

38, 726
558
53, 028

45,633
620
61, 960

46, 102
480
57, 465

52 905
47 444

676
3,981

5,180
5 228
588
797
1,448
631
282
318
534
151
275
138

Production (000 omitted) :
Newsprint paper (short tons)
Sole leather (backs bends and sides)
Naval stores, receipts (barrels —000
omitted) •
Turpentine
Rosin

1,448
17, 735

1,489
18, 732

1,471
14,645

1,530
14,884

1,679
13,608

261
1,001

318
1,171

308
1,108

292
1,082

303
1,097

DISTRIB UTION

Sales (dollars —000 omitted) •
344, 339 433, 177 461, 045 517, 581 540, 181
4 mail-order houses
286, 500 338,064 378, 883 429, 131 469, 346
5 ten-cent chains
508, 848 632, 784 721, 428 888, 480 1,066,495
27 grocery chains
Advertising, agate lines (000,000 omitted) :
24
19
23
25
27
Magazine
1,169
1,094
1,158
1,223
1,262
Newspaper, 22 cities
316
274
301
344
367
Postal receipts (dollars—000,000 omitted) _
Foreign trade of United States (dollars—
000,000 omitted):
4,167
3,832
4,591
4,803
Exports
4,910
3,792
4,437
3,113
3,610
4,228
Imports
PRICE INDEX NUMBERS

(Monthly averages, relative to 1918)
Farm prices
Wholesale prices (404 commodities)
Retail food prices (22 commodities)

124
149
142

135
154
146

134
150
146

147
159
145

136
151
160

262
4,121

237
2,735

282
3,784

452
3,433

449
3,121

62.38
98.58
71.11

60.15
107. 78
71.72

67.18
115. 08
74.32

82.48
152. 65
77 04

93.27
165. 70
80 28

6,728

-

8,270

8,949

10, 757

11, 398

BANKING AND FINANCE

73 349

BUILDING AND BUILDING MATERIALS

Contracts awarded (36 States—000,000
omitted):
Total floor space (sq. ft.) _
Total value (dolls.)
Lumber production (board feet— 000,000
omitted) :
Southern pine _ _
Douglas fir
California redwood
California white pine .
Western pine
_ .
North Carolina pine
Northern hemlock.
Northern hardwoods
Northern pine lumber _
Northern pine lath
Oak flooring
Maple flooring...

2,385
254

MISCELLANEOUS

Production (000 omitted) :
42, 622
Iron ore shipments (tons) - - 26 880
Pig iron (long tons)
34, 568
Steel ingots (long tons)
__
2 290
Steel sheets (short tons)
Tin (consumption—long tons)
57
Production (short tons) :
373, 680
Zinc
493 848
Copper
Sales (short tons—000 omitted) :
2,113
Structural steel
933
Steel Castings
- Locomotive shipments (number)

Automobile production (000 omitted) :
Passenger cars. _
_
Trucks
Rubber tires production (000 omitted) :
Pneumatic tires
Solid tires
Inner tubes

706
4,486

899
5,822

843
6,103

5 402
6 105
639
1 223
1 751
579
313
449
618
159
361
141

5 441
5 866
578
1 153
1,651
580
245
400
516
130
418
103

5 680
6 528
520
1,399
1,812
650
254
362
559
145
518
106

5,374
6 322
508
1,485
1,735
694
210
360
488
126
533
120

Securities *
Sales (000 000 omitted) —
Stocks (shares)
Bonds, total (dolls.)
Prices, monthly average (dolls.)—
25 railroad stocks . _
25 industrials
40 bonds
Banking and insurance (dollars —000 000
omitted) :
Life insurance, new business
Debits to individual accounts—
Outside New York City
New York City
Bank clearings—
Outside New York City
New York City
Interest rates monthly average (per
cent) —
New York call loans
Commercial paper 60-90 days
Business failures:
Liabilities (dollars —000,000 omitted)
Firms (number) __

199 500 225 324 227 949 256 415 268 935
239 856 238 392 263 531 313 372 339 056
158 448 189 816 196 166 219 064 223 238
217, 896 213, 996 249, 870 283, 649 290, 354
4 42
4.43

4 87
4.99

3 17
3 91

4 31
4 02

4 24
4.58

624
23, 676

539
18, 714

543
20, 615

444
21, 214

409
21, 773

10
STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY: 1923-1926—Continued
STOCKS OF COMMODITIES HELD AT YEAR-END INVENTORY PERIODS
1923

Unit

COMMODITY

1925

192 6

November December
30
31

November December
30
31

1924

November December
30
31

November
30

December
31

62,839
140, 658
82, 269
7,900
3,254
19,858
51 508
55, 105
4,028
63, 274
63,458

105, 577
758, 209
2,493
56, 788
140, 981
84 030
7,100
9,683
21,350
30 299
49,566
1,927
93, 434
64,290

100, 239
463 233
3,326
32 172
106, 426
105 533
7,700
8,072
71, 997
100 832
58,705
3,102
87, 939
70, 406

142, 964
708 413
2, 949
49 393
105, 992
96 114
6 700
19, 693
76, 343
65 694
49 187
1,050
133 990
68,325

73, 564
418 737
1,549
92 709
111, 965
49 774
7,800
3,077
68,584
74 754
66 495
3,786
86 733
61, 849

84, 996
514 697
1,820
120 146
118 719
55 024
6,900
19, 095
66 762
52 785
58 457
1,683
111 501
58,048

85, 977
434 972
3,166
277 687
131 034
78 412
8 000
32, 219
50 063
64 381
63 881
3, 215
106 854
75, 034

101, 016
525 074
4,519
246 391
155 455
68 125

1,735

2,011

2,265

2,347

1,091

2,046

2,197

2,362

i 474, 748
5,214
35, 398

415, 681
5,140
40, 959

i 391, 248
5,852
55, 516

359, 612
5,937
61, 533

373, 010
6,664
46,813

346 678
7,305
49, 824

i 375 714
8,015
47, 130

8,245
52 478

42,836
30,904
1,072

38, 635
37, 578
1,652

40,728
26 912
2,089

36,360
21 208
2,844

41,686
6 922
1,904

36, 898
9 295
2,654

42, 761
14 481
2,304

38 426
21 887
1 909

M feet b. m ... 1, 115, 880
41 467
M feet b m
22, 159
M feet b. m
6 991
Thous of bbls
37, 342
Number
69, 412
Number.
67, 265
Number
39, 221
Barrels
316, 820
Barrels _ .

1, 110, 704
41 140
24, 239
10 900
43, 557
84,373
87, 147
50,323
346,200

1 026,246
41 795
22, 931
8 928
90 012
171, 999
228 438
51, 489
228, 673

1, 152, 743
43 204
25, 072
14 534
110, Oil
222, 032
228, 659
45,046
196, 939

1, 165, 620
44 715
28, 440
18 515
123,600
228,838
260, 981
51, 247
220, 479

1 065,538
60 145
33, 619
16 243
161, 391
225, 645
274, 422
63,650
184, 405

23, 669

25, 062

17, 418

16,238

13, 592

FOODSTUFFS

Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of Ibs
- Thous. of Ibs
Long tons
- - Thous. of Ibs
Thous of bus
Thous. of bbls
Thous. of bus
Thous. of bus
Thous of Ibs
Thous. of Ibs
.
Thous. of cases
Thous. of Ibs
- Thous. oJlbs
Thous of bags
Thous. of pockets

Beef products .
..
Pork products
Lamb and mutton
.. . . . . _ . .
Sugar (raw at refineries)
Cottonseed o i l
_ _ _ ._
Wheat (visible United States)
Wheat flour
Corn (visible, United States)
Oats (visible, United States)
Butter
Cheese
Eggs
.
Poultry
Fish
.
Coffee (visible United States)
TUce (domestic)

93, 166
612, 823
2,014

884

712

803

789

611

888

888

36, 412
46 341
34 355
54 495
1,111
144 230
69,585

978

CLOTHING MATERIALS

Wool, grease equivalent (mills and dealers)
C otton (mills and warehouses)
Silk (warehouses)
- -

Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of bales
Bales

1

METALS

Iron ore
Zinc
Tin

.

-

.

-

Thous. of long tons _
Short tons
Long tons -

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

Yellow pine
Oak flooring
Maple
flooring
Cement
Baths (enamel)
Lavatories (enamel)
Pinks (ftfifvmel)

Turpentine
Rosin

_ _

-

-.
_

.

...

_ . . . . . ....

1 041 774
43 823
25 992
14 123
104 301
196, 324
251, 448
61, 379
256, 482

1 164 232
67 079
35 483
20 555
177 331
265, 400
306 431
58,321
208 789

PAPER

Newsprint (at mills)

_

- Short tons

_

23, 346

23, 838

12 030

TOBACCO

Total
...
Chewing, smoking, and snuff
Cigar types.-

Thous. of Ibs
Thous of Ibs
_ Thous. of Ibs

.-

1 1, 562, 225
i 1, 086, 985
i 393, 489

1, 713, 670 i 1, 754, 596
1 266 083 1 1 289 447
i 389, 913
371, 043

1, 651, 930 i 1, 724, 767
1, 219, 694 i 1 239, 936
358, 256
* 407, 006

1, 818, 564 * 1, 768, 399
1 384 627 i 1 312 142
356, 119
* 389, 178

1, 841, 645
1 416 412
353, 973

i Quarter ending September 30.

UNFILLED ORDERS FOR SPECIFIED COMMODITIES
DECEMB ER 31—

JUNE 30—

COMMODITY

Unit
1923

Sheets, blue, black, and galvanized
Steel (U. S. Steel Corporation)
Locomotives.
Oak flooring
Maple flooring
Baths (enamel)
Small ware (e-tfaiDel)




503, 175
Short tons
6,386
Thous. of long tons .
Number
2,010
38, 530
M feet b. m
28,265
M feet b m
286,888
Number
1 038,045
Number

1924

1925

1926

1923

1924

1925

1926

246, 810
3,263

440, 687
3,710

422, 237
3,479

445, 167
4,445

663,460
4,817

677 907
5,033

529, 940
3,961

50,092
9 498
111, 797
252 991

41, 744
9 317
80 050
172 026

47,700
15 375
203, 329
712 620

53,295
12 735
89, 402
254 625

61, 103
9 076
83 831
189 157

35, 995
7 669
49 804
127 104

548

36, 093
9,596
181, 907
458, 182

411

667

409

439

708

398

Percentage
change
Dec. 31,
1926, from
June 30,
1926
+25 5
+13.9
—40.3
—13 8
—17 7
—37 8
—26 1

11
BUSINESS SUMMARY
[Index and relative numbers based on the 1919 monthly average as 100—except unfilled orders which are based on the 1920 average-tenable comparisons to be made of the
relative condition of the several phases of business. The use of index and relative numbers is more fully explained on the inside front cover, while further details of
this summary relating to production are given in the table entitled "Indexes of Production" on page 22]

IS 25

YEARLY AVERAGE

1923

PRODUCTION:
Manufacturing (64 commodities—adjusted) 1
Raw materials, total
Minerals
Animal products
Crops
_
Forest products
Electric power
Building (awards — floor space)
STOCKS (45 commodities; seasonal
ad j ustment)
UNFILLED ORDERS (relative to 1920) _ _
SALES (based on value) :
Mail-order houses (4 houses)
Ten-cent chains (5 chains)
Wholesale trade _.
Department stores (359 stores) _ _
PRICES (recomputed to 1919 base) :
Producers', farm products ._ _
Wholesale, all commodities
Retail food
Cost of living (including food)
CHECK PAYMENTS (141 cities—seasonal adjustment)
_ _ __ „_
FACTORY EMPLOYMENT (1919 base)...
TRANSPORTATION :
Net freight ton-mile operation
Car loadings (monthly total)
Net available car surplus (end
of month)

1924

1925

1926

113
119
126
117
118
119
152
108

126
117
133
113
111
126
169
138

128
121
142
114
117
119

119
74

135
52

144
56

99
165
83
124

105
185
82
125

65
75
78
94

119
114
136
117
102
121
144
106

PER CENT I NCREASE (+)
OR DECK EASE (— )

1926

Novem- Decem- October Novem- December
ber
ber
ber

December,
1926, from
November,
1926

December,
1926, from
December,
1925

119

— 6. 6
— 15. 2
—5 1
-fO. 8
-25. 1
—4 4
+ 5. 0
-9.2

+ 22 0
+24
— 9. 1
—8 5
+ 10 0
-13. 1

198
45

186
47

— 6. 1
+ 4.4

+ 21 6
-26. 6

150
257
94
158

153
247
87
157

166
466
77
234

+ 8.5
+ 88. 7
— 11. 5
+ 49.0

-1.2
+ 9. 1
-3. 7
+ 3. 5

68
76
89
99

62
73
86
97

62
72
87
98

61
71
87
98

— 1. 6
— 1. 4
0. 0
0.0

— 10. 3
— 6. 6
-2. 2
-1. 0

127
86

129
86

131
86

124
84

135
84

+ 8. 9
0.0

+ 4. 7
-2.3

127

123
117

115
106

146
172

131
123

108

-12. 2

+ 1.9

124

83

162

48

87

167

+ 92. 0

+ 3. 1

122
141
123
123
164
118
190
137

133
179
165
117
232
120
202
135

121
165
158
125
199
113
199
131

113
140
150
126
149
106
209

133

128
146
129
119
174
120
178
146

171
50

132
58

153
64

174
46

118
209
84
131

123
229
84
136

144
220
86
145

168
427
80
226

64
73
78
95

70
77
84
98

65
73
86
98

69
77
90
100

103
93

110
84

127
84

135
85

115
119

108
116

115
122

25

139
•

146

— 7. 4
— 0. 1

i See p. 28, January, 1925, issue (No. 1), for details of adjustment.

COURSE OF BUSINESS IN DECEMBER
GENERAL CONDITIONS
Manufacturing activity, after adjustment for differences in working time, was lower in December than
in either the preceding month or the corresponding
month of 1925. The output of raw materials showed
similar comparisons, despite an increase over a year
ago in the case of mineral production and in the marketings of animal products. Stocks of commodities,
after adjustment for seasonal variations, were generally
lower than in the previous month but higher than a
year ago. Unfilled orders of manufactured commodities, principally iron and steel and building materials,
were larger than at the end of the preceding month
but smaller than on December 31, 1925.
The volume of new building contracts awarded,
measured in floor space, was smaller than in either
the previous month or December, 1925, but, measured in value, December contracts were larger than
in either period. The dollar volume of trade, measured by check payments, was greater than in either
the previous month or December a year earlier, after
adjustment for seasonal changes. Retail trade was




greater than a year ago, as seen from reports from department stores and 10-cent chain stores. Sales by
mail-order houses, however, were smaller than in December, 1925. Wholesale trade was smaller than in
either the preceding month or December of the previous year.
Wholesale prices continued to decline in December,
while retail food prices, though showing no change
from the preceding month, were generally lower than
a year ago. Factory employment, though showing
no change from November, was smaller than in December, 1925. The distribution of goods, as seen
from data on carloadings, was larger than a year
earlier. Interest rates on commercial paper were generally lower than in November but showed no change
from December of the previous year. Prices of stocks,
both industrial and railroad, averaged higher than in
either the preceding month or December, 1925. Defaulted liabilities of failing business firms were larger
than in either the previous month or December of the
preceding year.

12
SUMMARY OP INDEXES OP BUSINESS
PRODUCTION
which declined. As compared with November, the
The output of raw materials was smaller in Decem- December output of foodstuffs, textiles, and chemicals
ber than in either the previous month or December, and oils was greater, all other classes, however, show1925, all classes of raw products showing declines ing a decline, while, as compared with December,
from November except the marketing of animal prod- 1925, all classes of goods were produced in smaller
ucts, which increased slightly. For the year as a quantities, except textiles, leather, chemicals, and
whole, the production of raw materials was greater stone and clay products, which increased.
than in 1925, all classes showing increased output
COMMODITY STOCKS
except forest products, which declined. As compared
The index of commodity stocks when adjusted for
with December a year ago, mineral output and the
seasonal trends was lower than on November 30, all
marketings of animal products were larger, while the
marketings of crops and production of forest products groups declining except manufactured commodities
other than foodstuffs. Compared with a year ago?
were smaller.
Manufacturing output, after adjustment for differ- all groups increased their stocks except manufactured
ences in working time, was substantially lower in foodstuffs, with raw foodstuffs making a particularly
December than in either the preceding month or large gain. Average stocks of manufactured comDecember of the previous year, but for the year as modities held during 1926 were about the same as in
a whole manufacturing production was greater than 1925, while raw material stocks were larger, especially
in 1925, all classes of goods showing increased pro- foodstuffs.
duction except nonferrous metals, lumber, and leather,
RELATIVE PRODUCTION, STOCKS, AND UNFILLED ORDERS FOR MANUFACTURED COMMODITIES
[1920 monthly average=100. Adjustment has been made for both stocks and production for their respective seasonal movements. Unfilled orders
are principally those of iron, steel, and building materials. December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

SALES

The index of unfilled orders for iron and steel and
building materials rose during December, both groups
showing increases, each group, however, being lower
than on December 31, 1926. Ketail trade, as seen
from reports from 10-cent chains and department
stores, was larger in December than a year ago.
Wholesale trade, however, showed lower sales volume
than in December, 1925.
PRICES

The wholesale price index again declined in December to the lowest point in over two years. All groups




declined except farm products, foods, and miscellaneous, which were unchanged, the fuel group
declining seven points. This group, however, was
the only one higher than a year ago, both for December and for the year as a whole.
The index of prices received by farmers also declined
in December, with dairy and poultry products alone
increasing over the previous month. Compared with
a year ago, all groups except meat animals were lower,
while for the year 1926 as a whole meat animals also
showed an increase in price level over 1925 together
with fruits and vegetables.

13
Retail prices for food and coal showed no change
from November but were lower than a year ago. In
both cases, however, the 1926 averages were higher
than the 1925 figures.
EMPLOYMENT

Fewer workers were carried on industrial pay rolls
in December than in either the previous month or

December, 1925, but for the year 1926 as a whole the
volume of employment was higher than in either of
the two previous years. Pay-roll payments were
higher than in November but lower than a year ago,
while the 1926 industrial pay rolls as a whole were
larger than in either 1924 or 1925.

COMPARISON OF WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FOOD PRICE INDEX NUMBERS
WITH INDEX OF ALL COMMODITIES AT WHOLESALE
[U. S. Department of Labor index numbers. Eelative prices, 1913=100. December, 1926, is latest month plotted]
250
240

90

REVIEW BY PRINCIPAL BRANCHES OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
TEXTILE INDUSTRIES

More wool was received at Boston in December
than a year ago, while for the calendar year 1926 the
same was true. Imports of wool were also larger than
a year ago in both comparisons. Consumption of
wool by textile mills was smaller than in November
but larger than in December, 1925, but for the calendar
year a decline was registered. Wool machinery was
generally less active in December than in November,
but more active than a year ago.
Consumption of cotton by textile mills in December
was larger than in the preceding month or the same
month of 1925, with the calendar year also showing
an increase over 1925. Exports of raw cotton showed
similar comparisons. The world visible supply of
cotton continued to increase and at the end of the
year was more than 20 per cent greater than a year

ago.


Fewer cotton spindles were active than in either
November or the same month of 1925, but the hourly
activity was greater than in either comparative
period. The production of cotton textiles was greater
than in either the previous month or December of the
previous year, while unfilled orders on the books at
the end of 1926 were substantially larger than at the
end of the preceding year. The production of cotton
goods in the New Bedford district was larger than in
either the previous month or in December, 1925.
Exports of cotton cloth were smaller than last year,
both in the monthly and annual comparisons.
Deliveries of silk to consuming establishments were
smaller in December than in either the preceding
month or in December, 1925. Silk stocks held at
manufacturing plants, although larger than at the
end of the preceding month, were substantially lower
than a year ago.

14
THE TEXTILE INDUSTRIES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925 taken as 100]

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

920

192!

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1927

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

CONSUMPTION

w&
M

120
100
80 M-

-J

1
-

-EXPORTS

COTTON
20

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

Wholesale prices for wool averaged lower in December than in either the preceding month or the same
month of 1925. Prices of cotton showed similar comparisons while the wholesale price of raw silk, although
higher than in November, averaged substantially
lower than in December, 1925. The wholesale price
index for cloths and clothing averaged lower than in
either the preceding month or December, 1925.
METAL INDUSTRIES

Consumption of iron ore in December was smaller
than in either the previous month or December of the
preceding year, but for the year as a whole consumption was substantially greater, with similar comparisons registered in the case of production of pig iron.
Stocks of iron ore at the end of the year were larger
than the holdings of the year previous.
The output of steel ingots declined from both the
previous month and December of the previous year,
but unfilled orders increased over the previous month,
despite a decline from a year ago. Steel-ingot production in the calendar year 1926 was well ahead of
the year 1925. The output of steel sheets by independent manufacturers was smaller than in either the
previous month or December, 1925, with a similar
comparison for the annual totals.
Bookings for structural steel were smaller than in the
same month of 1925, with a similar comparison for the




annual total. Bookings for fabricated steel plate, while
showing a decline from both the previous month and
December, 1925, were greater than in 1925 for the annual
total. Shipments of steel furniture were greater than in
November, with the calendar year showing an increase
over 1925 as well. Production of steel barrels in
December was larger than in either the preceding
month or in December, 1925, with the calendar year
total showing an increase also over the year 1925.
The production of copper, although larger than in
December, 1925, was smaller than in November, but
the calendar year, 1926, showed an increase over the
previous year. Exports of refined copper also showed
a decline from 1925 in the annual total. Shipments
of enameled sanitary ware declined generally from the
preceding month and December, 1925, with a similar
comparison in the annual total. Sales of tubular
plumbing goods showed similar comparisons.
NUMBER OF ELECTRIC FANS SOLD!
YEAR
1916

1917
1918
1919
1920
1921

_

Domestic
270, 604
386, 314
576, 934
583 964
704, 494
494 740

YEAR

Export
31, 860
44, 231
43, 749
48, 631
103, 757
36, 801

1922

2

19232
19242
2

1925
1926 2

1
Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers'
Section.
2 For "fan-year" ending Sept. 30 of year indicated.

Domestic
547, 454
657, 570
639, 617
881, 025
744, 053

Export
41 899
42 699
65, 698
37 676
46, 394

Association, Fan Motor

15
THE METAL INDUSTRIES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925 taken as 100]
160
EXPORTS.

PRODUCTION

COPPER
1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1920

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

(927

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1920

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

Deliveries of tin to consuming establishments were
larger than in either the previous month or December,
1925, while tin stocks in the United States were smaller
at the end of December than in either comparative
period. Production of zinc showed increases over
both prior months, with a substantial gain registered
in the annual total. Zinc stocks at refineries at the
end of the year were more than twice as large as a
year ago.
Wholesale prices of iron and steel products were
generally lower in December than in either the previous
month or December, 1925. Prices for copper and
zinc showed similar comparisons, while for tin December prices were lower only than those for the previous
month. The wholesale price index for metals and
metal products declined from both the preceding
month and December, 1925, with the iron and steel
group and nonferrous metals showing no change from
the general trend.

were higher than a year ago. Wholesale and retail
prices of bituminous averaged higher than in the
previous month or a year ago.
The production of anthracite coal was larger than
in November. Prices for anthracite, both wholesale
and retail, showed no change from the preceding
month. The production of coke, both beehive and
by-product, was smaller than in either the previous
month or the same month of last year. For the year
1926 as a whole, however, the output of both kinds of
coke was greater than in 1925. The wholesale price
of coke averaged lower than in either the previous
month or December a year ago.
PKODUCTION OF BITUMINOUS AND ANTHRACITE COAL
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

FUELS

The production of bituminous coal was smaller than
in November but larger than in December a year ago,
with the annual total also showing an increase over
1925. Exports of bituminous were more than three
times as large as last year, while the total for the
calendar year was twice as large. Prices of bituminous
at the mines averaged lower than in November but



1920

I

I92J

I

1922

j

1923

|

1924

|

1926

16
BEEHIVE AND BY-PRODUCT COKE PRODUCTION
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

HIDES AND LEATHER

Production of sole leather in December was larger
than in either the previous month or December, 1925,
but for the calendar year sole-leather output was
smaller than in 1925. Exports of sole leather, though
larger than in November, were less than half as great
as a year earlier, with the annual total also showing a
substantial decline from 1925. Production of boots
and shoes in December, although smaller than in the
previous month, were larger than last year. Little
change, however, was shown from 1925 in the annual
output of boots and shoes. Sales of leather belting
in December were smaller than in either the preceding
month or December, 1925, with the 1926 total also
showing a decline from the previous year.
Imports of hides and skins, although smaller than
in December, 1925, were larger than in November.
The total importation of hides and skins during 1926
was slightly larger than in 1925. Wholesale prices for
hides and skins averaged lower than in either the
previous month or December, 1925. Prices for boots
and shoes, although showing no change from the
preceding month, were lower than a year earlier.
PAPER AND PAPER PRODUCTS
Production of newsprint paper in December was
smaller than in either the previous month or December, 1925, but the total output during 1926 was considerably larger than in the previous year. Stocks of
newsprint at mills were smaller at the end of the year
than at any time since the beginning of 1920. Publishers7 stocks, however, continued to increase, being
larger than at any time in more than two years.
Exports of newsprint from Canada, principally to the
United States, were larger in December than in either
the previous month or December, 1925, while for the
calendar year Canadian exports were substantially
larger than in 1925. Imports of chemical wood pulp
were larger in December than in either the previous
month or a year ago, while mechanical pulp imports
were smaller than in either comparative period.




NEWSPRINT PAPER PRODUCTION AND MILL STOCKS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]
160r

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION
Indexes of construction costs showed little change
from the previous month, but, except for industrial
construction, were generally lower than in December,
1925.
New building contracts awarded in December
were larger in value than in either the previous month
or December, 1925. Measured in floor space, however, new contracts were smaller than in either comparative period. For the year 1926 the value of new
building contracts was greater than in the previous
year, despite a substantial decline in floor space.
NEW ORDERS FOR ENAMELED BATHS AND NEW CONTRACTS
AWARDED FOR RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION IN 27 NORTHEASTERN STATES
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

LUMBER

The production of the principal species of lumber
in December was smaller than a year ago, with the
1926 annual totals showing a similar comparison.
Stocks of the principal species of lumber held at the
end of the year were about the same as the year
previous. Exports of lumber, all species, during
December, although larger than in November, were
substantially smaller than a year ago, but the annual
total showed a slight increase over the year 1925.
Composite lumber prices for both hardwoods and softwoods showed practically no change from the preceding month but were lower than a year ago.
The production and shipments of flooring, both oak
and maple, were smaller than in November, and for
oak smaller also than a year ago. Unfilled orders
for flooring, both species, at the end of December were
smaller than a year ago, while stocks of flooring, both
oak and maple, were substantially larger than the
holdings a year earlier.

17
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS

Production and shipments of face brick averaged
lower than in either the preceding month or December, 1925. For the year 1926 face-brick production
was smaller than in 1925 while shipments were larger.
Face-brick stocks at the end of the year were greater
than a year earlier, while unfilled orders were smaller.
Bookings of architectural terra cotta, both in
quantity and value, were smaller than in either the
preceding month or December, 1925, each item showing a decline also in the annual total.
Production and shipments of Portland cement were
smaller than in November and for shipments smaller
also than a year ago. Cement stocks at the end of
the year were substantially larger than a year earlier.
New paving contracts awarded were larger than in
either the preceding month or December the previous
year with a similar comparison in the case of the annual
total.
CHEMICALS AND OILS

Imports of nitrate of soda in December were larger
than in either the preceding month or December,
1925. Exports of sulphuric acid showed similar comparison, while fertilizer exports declined from each
comparative period. Wholesale price indexes for
chemicals showed relatively little change from a year
ago, while drugs and essential oils declined and prices
for crude drugs averaged higher.
Exports of vegetable oils, although larger than in
November, were smaller than a year ago, while
imports of vegetable oils showed declines from both
periods. Production of cottonseed oil was greater
than a year ago, with a similar comparison in the case
of cottonseed-oil stocks. The price of cottonseed
oil was not changed from the previous month but
averaged substantially lower than a year ago.
WHOLESALE PKICES OF CHEMICALS, BY GROUPS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

sale prices for both turpentine and rosin averaged
lower than in eitner the previous month or December, 1925.
CEREALS

Visible stocks of wheat at the end of December were
larger than a year ago for the United States and
slightly smaller for Canada. Receipts and shipments
at terminal markets were lower than in December,
1925, while exports increased over a year ago for the
United States but declined for Canada. Flour exports
from the United States were larger than a year ago.
Wheat prices advanced over November, while flour
declined, both being considerably less in price than a
year ago.
Corn stocks were higher than a year ago, but
receipts, shipments, exports, and grindings declined.
The price of corn rose over November but declined
from a year ago. For oats, receipts, exports, and
stocks declined from a year ago and prices rose. Barley stocks declined from a year ago and exports and
prices rose. For rye, exports were much larger than
in December, 1925, while prices were lower.
Receipts of rice in December declined from a year
ago, and shipments and stocks increased. December
car-lot shipments of apples, citrus fruit, potatoes, and
onions were all larger than a year ago, as well as coldstorage holdings of apples. Hay receipts were less
than in December, 1925.
MEATS AND DAIRY PRODUCTS

Cattle and hog movement, both for December and
the year 1926 as a whole, was generally less than a year
ago, with sheep movement slightly larger. Livestock
prices were less than a year ago, except for hogs.
Storage holdings of the various classes of meats were
larger than on December 31, 1925, while exports
declined.
INSPECTED SLAUGHTER OP CATTLE, CALVES, SHEEP, AND HOGS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

Receipts of turpentine and rosin at the three principal ports were larger than in either the preceding
month or December, 1925. Stocks of turpentine both
at ports and stills were generally greater than a year
ago, while rosin stocks were generally smaller. Whole-


26446°—27


2

18
Butter receipts and storage holdings for December
were less than a year ago, and prices were higher.
Receipts of cheese increased over December, 1925,
while storage holdings and exports declined. Egg
receipts increased over a year ago and stocks declined.
Receipts and storage holdings of both poultry and
fish increased over a year ago. Exports of canned
salmon from Canada declined.
COFFEE AND TOBACCO

Although more coffee was held in the United States
on December 31 than a year previous, the world supply
declined. The price declined both from November
and a year ago.
Consumption of cigarettes in December was larger
than a year ago, but exports declined. Consumption
of both cigars and manufactured tobacco declined
from December, 1925. For the calendar year as a
whole, manufactured tobacco showed a slight decline
from 1925, while consumption of both cigars and
cigarettes increased.
TRANSPORTATION

Vessel clearances in foreign trade increased over a
year ago, both for December and the year as a whole.
More vessels were completed than in 1925, also, both
as respects December and the full year, while for the
world as a whole the tonnage of launchings decreased
and less tonnage was under construction than a year
earlier. Sault Ste. Marie Canal traffic, though less than
in December, 1925, showed an increase over 1925 for
the calendar year.

loadings over 1925, all groups except livestock and
forest products participating therein. Railroads held
fewer freight cars than a year ago, but with a larger
capacity. The percentage of bad-order cars was
reduced in December to the lowest rates in many years.
New orders, shipments, and unfilled orders of manufacturers of freight cars declined from a year ago, but
more cars were being built in railroad shops. Passenger-car orders declined from a year ago, but shipments
increased.
DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT

Mail-order business in December was about the
same as a year ago, but the year 1926 as a whole showed
a new peak for this class of business. Sales of 10-cent
chains in December exceeded those of any previous
month and total sales for 1926 also exceeded those of
any previous year, both as a whole and averaged per
store in operation. Postal receipts showed similar
comparisons. Newspaper advertising linage was less
than in December, 1925, but the year as a whole was
the largest on record in this respect. Magazine
advertising for 1926 was exceeded only by 1920, and
advertising appearing in January, 1927, issues was
larger than in January, 1926.
SALES BY MAIL-ORDER HOUSES AND TEN-CENT CHAIN STORES
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

SURPLUS, SHORTAGE, AND BAD-ORDER FREIGHT CARS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

BANKING AND FINANCE

Fewer locomotives were ordered in December than
a year ago, but more were shipped. Unfilled orders
of manufacturers were less than on December 31, 1925.
The surplus of idle freight cars was larger at the end of
1926 than a year earlier, and shortages were almost
eliminated. Loadings w^ere slightly larger than a year
ago in December, due principally to larger coal and
coke movement, as merchandise loadings showed the
only other increase. The year 1926 showed increased



New life insurance business in December was slightly
larger than a year ago, both in number of policies and
in amount of insurance, although group insurance
declined and fewer policies were represented in ordinary insurance. The calendar year total was the
highest recorded in amount of new insurance placed,
but fewer policies were represented than in the 1925
business, due to the smaller number of industrial
policies placed. December sales of ordinary insurance
exceeded those of a year ago for all sections of the
United States, except the western agricultural and
the southern. All sections showed increases for the
calendar year, as well as Canada.

19
SALES OF ORDINARY LIFE INSURANCE, BY GEOGRAPHICAL
DIVISIONS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]
1,000

deposits than in December, 1925. New York banks
had less loans outstanding to brokers than a year ago.
Government receipts for the calendar year increased
more than expenditures, customs receipts making a
new peak. The outstanding Government debt was
reduced by over $1,000,000,000 during the year. The
amount of money in circulation on December 31 was
slightly less than a year ago, but for the calendar year
it averaged higher than in 1925.
While call loan rates increased over November,
they were lower than a year ago. The Federal reserve
rediscount rate at New York was higher than a year
ago, the average intermediate credit banks' rate lower,
while the Federal land bank rate and the commercial
rate were the same as in December, 1925. All these
interest rates averaged higher in 1926 than in 1925,
except the Federal land banks, which remained
unchanged.
LOANS, DISCOUNTS, AND TOTAL INVESTMENTS OF FEDERAL
RESERVE MEMBER BANKS

I UNITED STATES TOTAL
EASTERN MANUFACTURING
3 WESTERN MANUFACTURING
WESTERN AGRICULTURAL
SOUTHERN
FAR WESTERN

[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]
TOTAL LOANS AND DISCOUNTS-

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

TOTAL INVESTMENTS

1921

BILLS DISCOUNTED AND TOTAL INVESTMENTS OF FEDERAL
RESERVE BANKS
[December, 1928, is latest month plotted]

Check payments, as shown by bank debits, increased
over a year ago, both for December and the year as a
whole. Federal reserve banks at the end of December had less discounts, investments, and deposits than
a year ago, but larger note circulation and reserves and
a higher reserve ratio. Member banks showed larger
loans and discounts and investments, with smaller




1922

1923

Stock prices in December averaged higher than the
month previous and as a rule were higher than a
year ago. The yearly averages for 1926 exceeded
the 1925 averages, except for the index of southern
cotton mills. All classes of bonds increased in price
over both November and a year ago, the yearly
average also exceeding 1925 in all groups. Municipal
bond yields declined slightly from November and for
the year as a whole were slightly higher than in 1925.
Both stock and bond sales were less in volume in
1926 than in 1925.
Although the volume of corporate securities issued
in December declined both from November and a
year ago, the year 1926 was the largest on record in
this respect, the increase over 1925 being chiefly in
the form of bonds. Railroads and real estate alone
had a smaller volume of bonds issued than in 1926.
Foreign government loans were less than in 1925.
Fewer municipal loans were made than in 1925, both
for December and the year as a whole. New incorporations were less than in December, 1925, but for the
calendar year were the largest since 1920.
Business failures were larger in December than a
year ago, both in number and liabilities, except for
liabilities of trade establishments, but 1926 showed the

20

lowest aggregate liabilities Involved in failures since
1920, though the number of firms continued to increase.
Bank failures for the last quarter of 1926 and for the
year were considerably higher than in the corresponding 1925 periods in both number and liabilities.
NUMBER OF BUSINESS FAILUEES AND DEFAULTED LIABILITIES
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

both the United States and C inada increased over the
previous December, product] m for the calendar year
declining from 1925 in the U dted States but increasing in Canada. Stocks of producers in the United
States were smaller on December 31 than a year
earlier while Canadian producers had larger stocks*
The prices of silver continued to decline.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND TRADE

Total dividend and interest payments made a new
high record in 1926. All groups of dividend payments
increased. Although the average payments on industrial stocks were less in the last quarter of 1926 than a
year previous, the 1926 average as a whole was higher
than in 1925.

Exchange rates on France, Italy, India, and Argentina increased over November, while Canada, Japan,
Brazil, and Chile showed decreases. Yearly averages
of foreign exchange in 1926 were higher than the 1925
averages for England, Japan, and the South American
countries, while for France, Italy, Belgium, and the
Netherlands, 1926 averages were lower.
December exports declined from November and
were about the same as a year ago. Total exports
for the year declined slightly from 1925. Imports
declined, both from November and a year ago, the
1926 total showing a gain ov< r 1925. The net export
balance was less in 1926 thar in the previous year.
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS o

MERCHANDISE

[December, 1926, is lates month plotted]

GOLD AND SILVER

Imports and exports of gold were about the same
as in November but larger than a year ago, especially
imports. For the year as a whole imports exceeded
exports as against a net export balance in 1925.
Domestic receipts of gold at the mint were less than a
year ago, both for December and the calendar year.
GOLD TRADE BALANCE, SHOWING EXCESS OF IMPORTS OR
EXPORTS
[December, 1926, is latest month plotted]

CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1925

The foreign trade in silver declined from December,
1926. Imports increased over 1925 for the calendar
year while exports declined. Silver production in




The Bureau of the Census announces preliminary
reports from additional manufacturing industries,
collected pursuant to the census of manufactures for
the year 1925. The following table summarizes some
important data made available since the publication
of the previous issue of the SURVEY, earlier figures
having been presented in each issue beginning with
July, 1926. Further compilations will appear in the
future issues as the data relating thereto are completed.
Statistics in greater detail for each industry may be
obtained from the bureau's preliminary statements on
the respective industries.

21
ADDITIONAL PRELIMINARY RETURNS, CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1925
VALUE OF PRODUCTS

INDUSTRY

1923

1935

Thousands of
dollars
Acids
Aluminum manufactures
Artificial flowers
Awnings, tents, and sails
Asbestos products, other
than steam packing, or
pipe and boiler covering. _ _
Beet sugar
Boot and shoe findings, not
made^ in boot and shoe
factories .
_ _
Brushes
Canning and preserving
fruits and vegetables, pickles, jellies, preserves, and
sauces
__
__
Cast-iron pipe and fittings...
Cement
Compressed and liquified
gases
Confectionery
Cooperage
Dental goods
Dyeing and cleaning establishments
Engraving and diesinking
Fur goods
Furniture
_ _ _
Gas and water meters and
acetylene and gasoline gas
generators
Glass
Hand stamps, stencils, and
brands
Leather belting _
Leather gloves and mittens ..
Leather, tanned, curried, and
finished
- Lime
_
Mirrors
Nitrogen and fixed nitrogen
compounds
Optical goods
Paper and wood pulp

Per cent minimum month
Per
is of maximum
cent inPer
month
cent in- crease
crease i over
19231
1925
1933

82, 613
125, 697
17, 824
48, 834

82, 027
106, 930
19, 650
45, 276

0.7
17.5
-9.3
7.9

-14.0
-8.3
4.9

93.5
72.3
55.4

77.9
77.4
57.0

36, 174
132, 339

36,820
118, 314

-1.8
11.9

0.8
17.2

84.8
14.3

77.2
8.7

52,064
45, 824

48, 013
50, 511

8.4
-9.3

9.4
-10.1

80.0
91.0

80.8
94.4

616, 068
100. 388
300, 895

515, 316
92, 674
264, 098

19.6
8.3
13.9

18.4
6.8
9.5

13.3
95.6
85.7

16.5
89.3
83.1

56, 405
380, 761
67, 735
38, 769

54, 402
366, 256
73, 134
32, 422

3.7
4.0
-7.4
19.6

0.2
-4.5
15.1

65.8
91.4
96.9

68.4
89.0
89.8

-3.2

84 8
86.9
65.0

102, 647
8,623
254, 266
868, 146

9,121

34, 292
295, 959

34, 250
309, 353

0.1
-4.3

-10.0
-5.4

95.7
90.3

86.5
88.8

15, 321
31,811
37, 164

11, 131
37, 724
38, 081

37.6
-15.7
-2.4

26.7
-16. 6
—16.3

92.8
92.4
89.9

92.6
SO. 8
85.1

-5.5

462, 014
50, 652
34, 679

488, 898
47, 244
33, 468

-5.5
7.2
3.5

31,410
33, 655
971,882

30, 436

3.2

907, 347

7.1

i A minus sign (—) denotes decrease.




PERSONS EMPLOYED

-11.2
-1.8
19.1

2.6

93.8
83.5
91.3
76.0
97.0 i

93.3

90.3
79.5
96.6

95.8

VALUE OF PRODUCTS

INDUSTP.Y

1925

1923

Thousands of
dollars
Petrnfeiim refmirig
2,373,178
Plated ware..
54, 330
Pocketbooks, purses, and
cardcases.- . _
43, 184
Potassium compounds
5,898
Professional and scientific
instruments -_
72, 387
1,332,679
Railroad repair shops
Safes^ vaults, and steel
23,044
burial vaults
34, 253
Salt
Scales and balances
27, 237
Sewing machines, cases, and
attachments
46, 298
Shipbuilding
177, 151
Silversmithing and silver32, 532
ware
Sodium compounds
110, 096
Statuary and art goods
9,330
(factory product)
Steam and other packing,
pipe and boiler covering
and gaskets
43, 860
Sulphuric, nitric, and mixed
acids
23, 307
Tanning materials, natural
dyestuffs, mordants and
assistants, and sizes
34,784
Tin cans and other tinware __ 260, 360
Tin and other foils, not including gold and silver,
collapsible tubes _ _
30, 060
Trunks, suit cases, and bags. 61, 098
Umbrellas, parasols, and
canes
27, 299
Wall plaster, wall board, and
floor composition
90,957
Washing machines, clothes
wringers, dryers, and ironing machines for domestic
use
_ _ _
69, 568
Window shades and fixtures _ 41, 658
Wood distillation and charcoal manufacture
25, 283

PERSONS EMPLOYED

Per cent minimum month
Per is of maximum
Per cent inmonth
cent in- crease
crease * over
19231
1925

1923

1,793,700
53, 899

32.3
0.8

-2.2
-6.8

91.9
* 80.9

91.5
90.4

32, 732
6,319

31.9
-6.7

23.9

80.2

80.1

63, 074
14.8
1,520,093 -12.3

-3.6
-12.5

86.3
95.3

90. Q
92.0

19, 101
36, 837
24, 157

20.6
-7.0
12.8

11.2
-7.4
1.1

93.0
90.7
91.0

90.7
90.1
93.1

45, 967
213, 232

0.7
-16.9

-9.8
-19.4

93.4
84.9

92.7
87.8

27, 207
111, 848

19.6
-1.6

12.4

88.9

85.2

23.6

12.5

82.6

84.9

7,550
32, 991

32.9

20.1

88.2

86.4

24, 405

-4.5

-6.8

94.7

92.7

35, 972
215, 971

-3.3
20.6

94.2
79.8

82.2
84.5

23, 465
63, 023

28.1
-3.1

8.9
-9.7

90.6
95.2

88.8
86.7

28, 395

-3.9

-1.2

-23.1
-2.0

83.7

87.1

73,801

23.2

18.2

87.6

82.6

50, 373
47,640

38.1
-12.6

15.2
-13.1

82.0
90.4

89.3
92.9

29, 695

-14.9

2.3

89.2

89.9

22
INDEXES OF PRODUCTION
The index numbers presented in this table are designed to show the trend in production, prices, trade,
etc., in various groups of industry and commerce. They consist in general of weighted combinations of series
of individual relative numbers; often the individual relative numbers making up the series are also given.
The function of index and relative numbers is explained on the inside front cover. A condensed form of this
table is given on page 9. The regular semiannual detailed table in this issue presents comparable data for
earlier years on page 26. On other pages the remaining indexes usually found in this table are given.
1925

PER CENT INCREASE (+)
OR DECREASE (— )

1926

Maximum
since
Jan. 1,
1920

Minimum
since
Jan. 1,
1920

October

180

73

158

146

141

179

165
220
154
122
273
150
191
142
131
145

62
105
41
0
0
17
78
38
57
80

140
206
137
1
178
140
188
124
130
98

129
196
131
2
108
133
174
134
104
104

123
195
136
3
0
138
184
138
96
104

138
253
143
177
153
245
390
185
190

80
19
58
64
54
30
21
45
94

115
33
136
91
141
60
139
122
138

119
41
111
103
76
36
314
87
133

246
242
254
405
346
170

49
43
58
50
12
19

196
106
234
274
310
114

136
137
164
267
149

61
59
51
20
24

Grand total (adjusted for working days) 135
Grand total (unadjusted)
137
129
Foodstuffs
130
Textiles
151
Iron and steel
166
Lumber _
115
Leather
127
Paper and printing
Chemicals, oils, etc
_ __ _ 206
174
Stone and clay products _
Metals, excepting iron and steel. _ 195
137
Tobacco
157
Miscellaneous

71
68
77
54
32
57
63
69
92
69
71
70
37

NoDevember cember

December,
1926, from
November,
1926

December,
1926, from
December,
1925

165

140

-15.2

-0.1

165
219
141
118
238
149
189
141
110
108

158
220
154
101
100
148
183
138
106
101

150
229
149
103
1
144
195
146
90
108

-5.1
+ 4. 1
-3.2
+ 1.9
-99. 0
-2.7
+ 6.6
+ 5.8
-15. 1
+ 6.9

+22.0
+ 17.4
+ 9.6

123
31
100
117
71
53
345
54
136

117
39
130
87
136
59
157
137
145

125
47
120
95
85
49
353
115
136

126
56
90
105
75
63
388
77
141

+ 0.8
+ 19. 1
-25. 0
+ 10. 5
-11.8
+ 28. 6
+ 9.9
-33.0
+ 3.7

+2.4
+ 80.6
-10.0
-10.3
+ 5. 6
+ 18.9
+ 12. 5
+ 43.0
+ 3.7

174
110
121
175
277
138

164
137
86
83
239
135

232
135
250
399
346
137

199
108
137
202
343
142

149
90
104
104
251
117

-25.1
-16.7
-24.8
— 48. 5
-26. 8
-17.6

-9.1
-34. 3
+ 20.9
+ 25.3
+ 5. 0
-13.3

136
137
119
178
94

120
120
124
131
104

118
116
120
151
109

120
119
89
209
97

113
110
108
184
105

106
102
97
209
142

-6.2
-7.3
-10.2
+ 13. 6
+ 35.2

-10.2
12 1
-19.2
+ 38.4
+ 30.3

132
137
113
108
130
166
96
118
188
158
193
132
148

128
123
98
105
131
144
77
114
181
133
159
116
129

122
122
107
110
134
142
76
119
186
112
167
104
119

133
133
108
112
139
148
96
125
206
162
178
137
129

122
122
101
113
127
137
84
123
205
144
154
128
105

113
113
105
116
119
128
83
118
210
115
148
104
91

-6.6
-6.6
+ 4.0
+ 2.7
-6. 3
-6.6
-2.4
-4. 1
+ 2.4
-20. 1
-3.9
-18.8
-13.3

-7.4
-7.4
-1.9
+ 5.5
-11. 2
-9.9
+ 9.2
-0.8
+ 12.9
+ 2.7
-11.4
0.0
-23.5

NoDevember cember

October

PRODUCTION
(Relative to 19 monthly average as 100)
RAW MATERIALS

Grand total

_

_ __

MINERALS

Total
Petroleum __
Bituminous coal
Anthracite coal
Iron ore* _ _ _ _
Copper
Lead
Zinc _ _
Gold
Silver

+ 4.3
+ 6. 0
+ 5.8
-6.3
+ 3.8

ANIMAL PRODUCTS (marketings)

Total
Wool*
Cattle and calves _
Hogs
Sheep _ _
_ _ _
Eggs*
Poultry*
Fish
_
Milk (New York)
CROPS (marketings)

Total
Grains*
Vegetables*
_ Fruits*
Cotton products*
Miscellaneous crops*

__ _ _ _

FOREST PRODUCTS

Total
_
Lumber
Pulp wood
Gum (rosin and turpentine) *
Distilled wood
MANUFACTURING

" Fluctuations between maximum and minimum due largely to seasonal conditions.




23

CANADIAN INSPECTED SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK1
[Number of animals]

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

32, 362
26,964
25,223
42, 329

26, 242
19, 217
25, 960
40, 189

29, 984
24,963
35, 863
40,958

31,694
31, 650
39,008
41, 017

42, 382
29, 301
34, 186
42, 265

42, 658
32, 726
42, 872
56, 732

47, 937
32, 235
43,964
68,238

47, 916
33, 103
56, 727
80, 059

51, 769
31, 272
50, 496
49, 038

44, 845
39, 568
64,149
78,841

49, 816
41, 556
60,943
71, 769

55, 463
47, 775
59, 161
85,634

60, 415
48, 624
73, 934
87, 197

64, 226
53, 402
83,706
90,630

44,347
39,905
43,026
40, 050

41, 685
39, 734
37,208
45,974

40,629
36,800
37, 520
42, 372

54,764
44,315
39, 221
53,367

49,864
41, 825
45, 639
68,729

64,772
48, 296
62, 524
82, 621

57, 672
46, 421
79, 405
98, 574

78, 136
68,352
54, 966
60,943

61, 250
60, 821
46, 959
65, 708

81,633
64,680
57, 665
72, 466

80, 761
55, 203
62,859
71, 598

91, 116
74, 749
69, 382
68, 675

86, 003
75, 959
73,801
77, 643

100,093
100, 021
87,244
92, 541

55, 139
84, 256
79, 467
. _. . 42, 056

49,961
52,896
74, 272
57, 806

49/261
64, 609
80, 127
47, 526

63,027
85, 522
97, 537
64,220

82, 721
115, 728
109, 305
64, 753

98, 385
119, 164
119, 968
111, 175

98,099
134, 106
139, 614
100, 750

87, 780
96,112
112, 867
53,740

67, 946
76,944
90, 498
62, 212

80, 544
96,239
90,095
60, 976

68, 586
96,061
95, 326
57, 564

76, 980
89,230
105, 191
76, 265

89, 973
118, 920
100, 644
82, 701

100,990
110, 746
124, 499
89, 320

545, 124
45, 427

511, 144
42, 595

530, 502
44,209

645, 342
53, 779

726, 698
60, 558

881, 893
73,491

947, 015
78, 918

831, 701
69, 308

715,313
59, 609

831, 701
69, 308

812, 142
67, 679

899, 621
74,968

975, 814 1,097.418
81,318
91, 452

January
February.
March
April .

145, 481
132, 535
126, 175
144, 610

196, 510
175, 169
166, 872
168, 671

336, 173
288,173
257, 114
201, 894

230, 094
190, 176
208, 422
183, 374

198, 471
155, 820
200,434
180, 726

215, 519
177, 761
204, 411
159, 380

253,477
211,084
194, 345
216, 352

184, 572
152, 896
161, 809
164, 802

151, 397
128, 337
120, 367
115, 479

168, 988
144, 398
159, 142
154, 691

225, 165
175, 831
168, 855
200, 364

259, 380
255, 347
255, 760
242, 225

335, 413
245, 440
240, 476
219, 884

232, 242
199, 978
216, 917
203, 892

May

158,890
141, 212
129,836
122, 978

161, 522
193, 912
187, 184
155, 953

214, 451
213, 745
183,097
135, 414

179, 436
177, 986
146, 592
166, 283

189, 795
170 550
140, 341
142 462

204, 663
142, 617
162, 544
134, 931

185, 606
190, 572
181, 855
144, 205

159, 340
160, 498
139, 387
93, 764

145, 036
122, 022
94, 695
107, 980

160, 920
152 146
120, 779
125 815

190, 757
131 492
157, 632
164 222

236,886
213, 123
176, 612
184, 709

210, 073
225, 372
168, 162
155 310

203, 458
182 057
164, 310
164 518

113, 578
133, 662
157, 029
158,664

157, 860
197, 428
226, 136
268, 212

136, 092
210, 345
206, 927
233, 036

172, 057
181, 780
257, 647
225, 631

106, 671
157, 382
212, 385
228, 479

112, 684
191, 911
280, 041
285, 177

153, 094
185, 360
215, 600
199, 826

97, 169
142, 686
189, 242
139, 070

100, 667
155, 897
204, 683
189, 829

130, 943
176, 597
230, 455
202, 338

150, 692
192, 194
243, 151
256, 039

185, 049
260, 743
291, 400
352, 409

173, 536
208, 502
224, 359
235,204

189, 275
216, 762
263, 527
254, 489

MONTH

1926

CATTLE
January
February
March
April _

_

May

June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Total
Monthly average..
SWINE

June
July
August
September
October.
November
December

_.

Total
1, 664, 650 2, 255, 429 2, 616, 461 2, 319, 478 2, 083, 516 2, 271, 639 2, 331, 876 1, 785, 235 1, 636, 389 1 927,212 2, 256, 394 2, 913, 643 2, 641, 731 2,491.425
194, 323
148, 770
218, 038
189, 303
Monthly average. . 138, 721
187, 952
193, 290
173, 626
188, 033
242,804
220, 144 207, 619
136, 366
160, 601
SHEEP
15,501
6,930
8,238
11, 326

May
June
July . ..
August
September
October. .
November .
December

_ __

Total
Monthly average..

17, 152
7,484
5,412
5,431

13, 885
5,014
4,704
2,089

16, 898
7,781
4,020
4,423

20, 495
5 607
3,796
2,858

16, 112
4,613
2,710
1,487

25, 484
11, 666
6,192
3,327

20, 537
5,907
3,562
1,982

24, 623
15, 450
9,850
4,645

20, 259
14 180
11, 366
7,150

29, 490
14 465
14, 420
9,209

29,062
14 820
12, 116
9,3Q8

19, 310
11 172
10, 847
13, 341

25 666
16 686
22 296
15,036

15, 399
* 24, 307
38, 498
46,106

January...
February
March
April

9,813
17,246
31, 415
39, 932

5,573
16, 793
29, 223
43, 640

8,831
16, 943
23,918
38, 277

3,889
6 764
14,587
31, 750

2,588
9,302
20,100
33, 895

2,962
8,185
31, 687
58, 737

4,601
21, 311
37, 216
63, 797

10, 693
28, 634
42, 263
78,541

16,088
32 184
44, 913
86,488

11, 037
19 171
31, 883
73, 056

11,909
19 697
34 565
45,035

10, 674
16 851
31, 272
43,830

11, 391
19 037
30 373
51, 052

77, 160
105, 712
100,648
50, 080

61, 167
100, 227
119, 844
38, 495

57, 689
91,843
96, 199
31, 399

55,005
92, 106
114, 872
32, 302

51, 991
80, 679
91, 982
28 962

49, 741
83, 307
98, 654
55,545

95, 849
161, 850
151, 054
56, 467

131, 413
161, 883
148, 359
62, 195

123, 924
151, 941
113, 486
42,900

112, 243
131, 537
81, 164
38 831

70, 272
108 463
84, 676
33 603

69,608
142 203
80, 112
41 806

72,690
129 283
89, 578
41 856

74, 702
113 389
119 940
46 201

499, 905
41, 659

453 618
37, 802

398, 051
33, 171

415, 376
34, 615

343 360
28,613

378 054
31, 505

613 460
51, 122

662, 763
55, 230

646 950
53, 913

596 403
49,700

499 745
41, 645

510 241
42,520

490 704
40, 892

545 769
45, 481

i Compiled by Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Internal Trade Branch, covering all slaughter under Canadian inspection.




24

INDUSTRIAL PUMPS (STEAM, POWER, AND CENTRIFUGAL)
[Thousands of dollars]
1919

MONTH

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

NEW ORDERS
1,203
1,031
1,216
1,280

3,771
3,740
3,116
2,675

1,168
858
1,166
1,262

956
939
1,192
1,199

1,789
2,203
2,469
2,400

1,191
1,164
1,409
1,526

1,228
1,164
1,649
1,471

1,331
1,280
1,656
1,669

May
June.
July.. .
August

1,441
1,509
2,031
2,291

2,380
2,479
2,631
2,480

1,005
1,031
1,109
964

1,311
1,611
1,500
1,279

1,722
1,848
1,598
1, 447

1,433
1,119
1,129
1,099

1,483
1,661
1,563
1,791

1,730
1,834
1,594
1,947

September
October
_ _ _ _ _
November
December . _

2,043
2,661
2,628
3,250

2,626
1,979
2,413
1,794

655
1,015
1,134
1,497

1,848
1,512
1,683
1,839

1,188
1,275
1,180
1,079

1,082
1,071
934
1,383

1,323
1,481
1,289
1,336

1,468
1,484
1,462
1,533

22, 584
1,882

32, 084
2,673

12, 864
1,072

16,869
1,406

20, 148
1,679

14, 540
1, 2;2

17, 419
1,452

18, 988
1,582

January.. _
February
March..
April

_. _

__

Total
Monthly average

SHIPMENTS
January
February..
March
April

:

September..
October
November
December

_

_

Total
Monthly average.. _ _ _

2,191
1,741
2,907
1,842

1,752
2,115
1,893
1,790

1,116
1,275
1,291
1,027

1,284
1,436
1,672
1,855

1,202
1,222
1,347
1,444

1.012
1,141
1,411
1,354

1, 193
1,275
1,408
1,460

2,319
2,874
2,663
2,476

1,414
1,620
1,452
1,131

1,001
1,121
1,403
1, 308

1,903
1,833
2,038
2,145

1,451
1,463
1,185
1,151

1,392
1,539
1,498
1,428

1,603
1,698
1,611
1,919

1,622
1,871
1,835
2,589

2,688
2,744
2,974
• 3,091

1,002
1,011
1,115
1,325

1,232
1,265
1,352
1,657

1,838
1,947
1,564
1,515

1,109
1,232
1,094
1,225

1,461
1,582
1,290
1,625

1,703
1,540
1,674
1,541

17, 549
1,462

._

May
June..
July
August

923
953
1,043
1,195

1,100
1,231
1,740
1,447

_ _

30, 510
2,543

17, 620
1,468

15, 048
1,254

21, 030
1,753

15, 125
1,260

16, 733
1,394

18, 625
1,552

UNFILLED ORDERS, END OF MONTH
January
February
March
April _

May_
June
July
August

_.
_.

September
October
November
December

. _
_

Monthly average

__

4,296
4,321
4,414
4,600

11, 556
13, 562
13, 265
14, 554

9,338
7,931
7,116
6,533

4,854
4,518
4,330
4,472

5,599
6,367
7,154
7,615

1,202
1,222
1,444
1,347

1,012
1,141
1,411
2,975

* 2,910
2,892
3,121
3,385

4,396
4,567
5,481
6,244

_

14, 535
13, 642
12, 897
12, 490

6,030
5,483
4,995
4,820

3,820
4,328
4,415
4,398

7,398
7,365
6,913
6, 251

1,451
1,463
1,185
1,051

3,031
3,150
3,212
3,530

3,546
3,619
3,586
3,606

6,418
8,593
9,697
9,889

12, 363
11, 486
11, 421
10, 060

4,808
4,794
4,797
5,044

4,784
4,999
5, 266
5,386

5,470
1,947
1,564
1,515

1,109
1,232
1,094
1,225

3,378
3,252
3,256
2,765

3,332
3,256
3,029
2,992

6,076

12, 653

5,974

4,631

5,430

1,252

2,676

3,273

1
Compiled from data furnished by the Hydraulic Society, the original figures being prorated to compare with reports from 23 identical firms beginning with April,
1925. The number of members reporting gradually increased from 14 in 1919, representing about two-thirds of the 1925 membership, until the full 23 companies reported.
These totals are believed to represent about two-thirds of the industry, and in 1923 these shipments represented about 23 per cent of the total production of all pumps and
pumping machinery according to the census of manufactures. Details are given on the association's reports as to single steam pumps, duplex steam pumps, power pumps,
centrifugal pumps, and reciprocating deep-well pumps. Data as originally reported are shown on page 44.




25

SILVER, PRODUCTION AND REFINERY STOCKS AT END OF MONTH
[Thousands of fine ounces]
1931

MONTH

1923

1922

1924

1925

1926

1921

PRODUCTION, MEXICO

1922

1923

1925

1924

1926

PRODUCTION, CANADA

•-

September
October
November
December
Total
Monthly average

7, 292
7,068
6,332
8,345

6,988
6,868
8,311
7,296

6,608
7,540
7,996
7,836

5,562
8.707
9,192
8,839

1,217
1,343
1,309
738

1,266
1,410
1,347
1,143

1,417
1,084
1,610
1,302

1,414
1,153
1,905
1,033

1,294
1.275
1,576
958

1,126
1,636
1,920
1,373

7,113
6,779
6,053
7,081

8,007
7,825
6,862
7,503

7,975
6,814
7.073
7,954

6,904
7,596
7,732
6,900

7,997
8,401
6,980
6,134

815
720
1,229
951

1,002
1,097
1,700
1,377

1,468
1,090
2,007
1,831

1,370
1,389
1,724
1,668

914
1,005
1,226
1,594

1,546
1,510
2,665
2,142

6,120
7,838
7,503
8,051

6,852
8,037
7,942
8,746

7,258
9,000
7,345
8, 556

7,607
8,418
8,027
9, 721

7,632
9,612

988
1,263
1,350
1,082

1,463
1,946
1,302
1,937

1,539
1.121
1, 209
1,339

1,524
1,276
1,285
1,201

1,692
1,570
1,286
1,538

1,926
2,030
1,742
2,047

64,466
5,372

.

May
June
July
August

6,115
6,050
6,730
5,643

3,904
5,075
5,208
5,226

_

7,006
5,661
3,815
4,847

5,260
6,138
5,533
6,793

January
February..
March
April

81,076
6,756

90, 811
7,568

91,438
7,620

92, 885
7,740

13. 005
1,084

16, 990
1,416

17, 017
1,418

16, 942
1,412

15, 928
1,327

21, 663
1,085

STOCKS, UNITED STATES

STOCKS, CANADA

2, 163
1,965
1,655
2,377

298
211
395
357

327
280
723
380

976
454
728
329

312
820
417
633

927
1,025
395
336

1,013
1,215
652
528

715
694
634
594

492
340
510
302

813
729
775
337

486
523
554
361

749
819
648
961

1,027
590
637
512

285
452
402
369

390
690
318
1,175

848
880
385
1,067

557
518
539
280

589
392
821
575

748
571
432
363

526
638
744
661

334
405
610
296

377
600
198
429

312
225
293
223

693
546
772
738

675
902
377
212

524
745
500
814

342
181
351
346

664
523
713
1,060

277
202
513
365

336
543
242
326

242
396
865
840

r559

_ _.

491
699
682

227
597
360
429

518
379
704
675

541
495
655
634

775
1,343
1,085
941

Monthly average

1,091

446

459

719

453

542

655

636

409

544

442

839

January
__
February.
March
April
May
June
July
August

-

.

September
October
November..
December

_ _

i Compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics, the Mexican statistics being reported by the Mexican Government and the other data directly by the producers.
The United States, Canada, and Mexico combined produced about 75 per cent of the world's silver output in 1923. Canadian production is incomplete as the silver contained in blister copper, lead bullion,and lead and zinc ores exported is omitted. Production for both the United States and Canada includes purchases of crude silver by
the mints in each country.




26

Table 1.—INDEXES OF PRODUCTION
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]
FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD
INDEXES

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE INDEXES

Raw materials2

Manufacturing
(64 commodities),1
by groups
YEAR AND MONTH
Unadjusted

Adjusted

Total

22 basic
Manu- comAgricul- Mining^ factur- modiCrop Animal
ture 3 (40 (8 com- ing 3
ties *
market- products Forestry com(correctMinerals
ings (26 (9 com- (13 com- modi- modi- (48 com- ed for
modi- seasonal
ties)
(9 commodities)
commodities)
ties)
modi- modities)
deties)
ties)
. ment)
Relative
to 19091913 av.

Kelative to 1919

Relative to 1919

100

100

100

100

100

1OO

100

100

99
103
108

100
116
93
98

100

98
79
101

114
133
98
107

100

98
79
101

94
112
113

95
98
106

102
86
110

91
105
110

117
92
95

102
80
104

105
80
98

119
113
126
128

119
113
126
128

114
119
116
121

147
138
145
167

136
126
133
142

102
118
111
117

117
117
113
114

121
119
126
119

108
117
111

132
122
127
137

124
115
128
133

120
108
116
120

114
121
110
112

114
116
114
,112

153
180
156
143

148
156
135
135

134
141
122
124

193
246
195
158

110
112
125
138

119
123
114
108

152
193
160
143

124
134
122
130

113
124
113
117

103
109
108
117

122
115
129
130

117
124
129
130

122
95
97
86

145
124
130
131

145
114
118
119

119
81
75
49

113
102
112
115

116
111
125
130

118
88
86
72

141
119
123
118

127
120
134
132

127
124
120
119

128
129
128
122

128
129
128
122

93
94
99
116

154
153
160
165

140
139
145
151

55
55
69
106

114
120
111
107

132
134
126
132

79
83
88
104

125
125
129
136

129
125
126
121

111
110
113
109

122
137
123
122

122
132
128
122

151
158
146
141

145
155
141
133

133
140
129
123

191
196
174
164

105
115
119
123

134
136
120
118

152
166
149
148

121
130
125
129

126
141
129
129

111
116
115
121

122
121
137
132

122
130
132
132

111
92
97
89

133
123
141
133

122
113
130
123

109
79
70
57

107
95
113
110

108
114
126
123

108
88
85
75

129
115
137
127

129
125
142
137

120
120
123
122

May
June
July
August

130
130
127
135

130
130
127
135

94
99
116
122

164
180
190
199

135
144
150
156

57
63
103
114

118
121
115
111

131
128
119
117

85
91
107
106

128
132
135
139

134
133
129
138

117
118
118
116

September
October
November
December a

135
133
122
113

135
133
122
113

148
179
165
140

196
206
181
161

156
165
158
150

172
232
199
149

111
117
125
126

120
120
113
106

144
190
165

142
153
157
152

138
139
130
120

121
122
124
121

1919
1920
1921
1922

monthly average
monthly average.
monthly average
monthly average

1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

_
_.

1924
September
_.
October
- .
November .
December
...
...
1935
January
February
March
April

. „_
...

May
June
July
August

_
._

September
October
November
December

1926
January
February
March
April

« .- _

_ . ...

1927
January
April

May

i Weighted average of 64 commodities (glass bottles having been dropped from the original 65 commodities), representing about 36 per cent of the entire manufacturing
industry, based on value added by manufacture, as compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census: For details see January, 1923, issue (No. 17) and
January, 1924, issue (No. 29) of SURVEY OP CURRENT BUSINESS. The adjusted index eliminates changes due to the varying number of working days in each month, thus
enabling comparison of productive activity to be made on a basis of 26 working days for each month. Details of the method employed appeared in January, 1925, issue
(No. 41), p. 28.
.
* Weighted averages, compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing 87 per cent of minerals, 94 per cent of crops, 99 per cent of
marketed livestock and its products, and 80 per cent of forest products: For details, see the following issues of SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS: Minerals, May, 1922 (No. 9)
and September, 1922 (No. 13); crops, July, 1922 (No. 11); animal products, June, 1922 (No. 10); forestry, August, 1922 (No. 12); total, September, 1922 (No. 13). The indexes
relative to 1919 are weighted in accordance with production in that census year, while the mineral index relative to the five-year pre-war average is weighted by the
average value of mineral production in the years 1909 to 1913.
'Weighted averages compiled by the Federal Reserve Board: For details see issues of the Federal Reserve Bulletin for March, 1922, and March, 1924.
* Weighted averages compiled by the Federal Reserve Board and corrected for seasonal variations: For details, see December, 1922, issue of the Federal Reserve Bulletin.
'Partly estimated.




27

Table 2.—INDEXES OF COMMODITY STOCKS AND UNFILLED ORDERS
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]
UNFILLED ORDERS >
(end of month)

STOCKS i
(held at end of month)

Unadjusted indexes

Adjusted for seasonal element
Other

YEAB AND MONTH

Total

Raw
foodstuffs

Raw Manu- manufacmatefactured
rial for tured
commanu- foodfacture stuffs modi-

Other

Total

Raw
foodstuffs

Raw Manu- manumatefacfacrial for tured tured
manu- foodcomfacture stuffs modi-

Total

Iron
and
steel

Building
materials

ties

ties

Relative to 1920

Relative to 1919

100

100

100

100

89
161
192

106
147
110

94
78
72

98
135
117

100

100
48
54

100

47
62

119
134
145
163

144
152
170
229

111
119
134
146

81
85
78
78

130
162
174
175

74
52
56
50

57
39
43
39

129
106
109
96

128
124
121
120

148
128
112
114

90
84
82
83

74
87
100
102

168
169
164
159

140
133
129
133

174
151
145
156

105
98
95
100

86
87
89
87

169
169
161
164

47
43
44
46

35
32
31
32

98
87
96
107

127
142
144
155

119
145
154
191

116
168
180
174

100
93
83
82

157
157
158
162

134
135
135
144

145
148
152
186

118
130
134
136

90
86
84
88

165
160
155
152

46
43
53
62

34
34
42
49

97
81
99
114

1925
January
February
March . . _
April

162
164
159
144

216
230
236
195

157
137
118
104

85
83
73
69

172
178
176
176

155
151
150
141

186
181
193
172

149
139
128
119

87
86
80
74

178
177
173
174

62
63
58
54

50
50
46
42

115
115
105
104

May
June
July
August

135
136
125
124

170
164
122
118

93
89
84
88

64
76
91
91

177
179
175
173

145
143
133
142

191
182
149
158

107
102
100
119

73
76
83
78

177
178
173
185

53
51
51
52

39
37
36
36

107
106
113
121

139
141
144
162

133
121
134
196

153
194
193
199

87
77
73
71

171
172
172
172

148
131
132
153

160
113
128
206

155
144
142
155

79
73
74
75

180
176
170
161

52
53
58
64

38
43
47
51

109
94
101
119

165
166
164
159

218
237
250
243

181
163
142
123

72
69
65
65

175
175
173
172

167
164
154
157

228
227
198
206

169
163
153
141

74
74
80
95

179
174
170
169

61
57
55
51

48
44
43
38

114
110
105
104

May
June
July .
August

149
157
151
146

215
237
203
191

114
109
98
90

65
79
97
100

170
171
173
170

162
162
167
184

235
240
256
310

134
132
120
127

85
81
89
88

170
169
172
177

48
48
48
49

36
36
37
36

100
98
94
99

September
October
November
December

150
171
189
189

188
222
270
273

123
191
217
203

94
86
76
69

172
175
183
192

172
174
198
186

256
263
346
303

130
143
160
158

88
84
76
72

183
180
180
182

49
46
45
47

38
38
38
39

92
82
74
78

1919
1920
1921
1922

100
monthly average. ..
monthly average. ..
96
monthly average . . . 132
monthly average
126

1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly average . . _
monthly average
monthly average . . .
monthly average. . .

1934
May
June.. - .
July
August

September
October
November _
December

- -.

September
October
November ._
December
1996
January .
February
March
April

--

.
...

41
95

1937
January
_
February
March
April
May
June

i Weighted index of stocks of commodities in hands of manufacturers or in other visible hands at the end of each month compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from data on 45 commodities. Details are given in the February, 1924, issue (No. 30) of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS, while seasonal
eliminations are given in the April, 1924, issue (No. 32).
»Weighted index of unfilled orders of manufacturers in the iron and steel and building industries at the end of each month compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce.
Bureau of the Census: For details see May, 1923, issue (No. 21).



28

Table 3.—INDEXES OF WHOLESALE PRICES

Metals Build- Chem- House
All
and
Farm Food, Cloths
fur- Mis- coming
and
prod- etc. cloth- Fuels metal mate- icals nish- cella- modiand
prod- rials drugs ing neous ties
ucts
ing

ucts

goods

Pro- Con- Raw
duc- sum- mateers'
ers*
goods goods rials

BRADSTREET'S 3
(1st of month)

COMPILED BY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 1

DUN'S 2
(1st of month)

[Base year in bold-faced type]

YEAR AND MONTH
Number of quotations
56

95

65

30

37

33

43

31

Commodities

35

404

117

199

88

300

96

Relative to 1913

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

103
104
123
190
218
231

102
105
121
167
188
207

98
98
127
175
228
253

93
88
126
169
170
181

85
99
162
231
187
162

92
94
120
157
172
201

101
134
181
202
215
169

100
100
106
125
153
184

95
95
121
148
156
175

98
101
127
177
194
206

92
97
143
184
181
179

101
102
119
163
191
211

99
101
126
187
205
218

100
101
105
123
199
190
191

10O
97
107
128
170
203
203

218
124
133
141
143
158
143

220
144
138
144
144
157
153

295
180
181
200
190
189
176

241
199
218
185
172
172
180

192
129
122
144
134
130
127

264
165
168
189
176
175
174

200
136
124
131
130
134
131

254
195
176
183
173
170
162

196
128
117
123
116
134
124

226
147
149
154
150
159
151

214
133
128
141
133
134
128

231
159
151
156
156
167
162

229
142
159
159
154
164
154

207
141
142
157
157
163
156

204
123
132
145
140
151
141

163
162
161
153

160
157
159
154

292
191
191
190

268
178
174
169

136
136
134
129

179
183
180
174

135
135
134
134

173
173
170
171

127
125
125
129

160
161
161
156

134
136
135
131

169
167
168
166

167
169
169
161

167
169
167
161

151
151
150
149

152
155
162
163

153
155
157
159

188
188
189
190

168
173
172
170

127
126
126
127

174
171
170
172

133
133
133
135

171
170
169
169

131
138
143
138

155
157
160
160

131
135
137
134

164
165
167
168

160
162
166
168

160
161
162
164

145
148
150
155

September...
October
November
December.. - - . . . -

160
155
154
152

160
158
160
157

189
190
188
187

169
172
175
175

127
128
130
130

174
174
176
177

136
135
135
135

168
168
166
166

135
138
142
138

160
158
158
156

131
133
135
134

169
166
168
166

166
162
160
159

162
161
163
164

153
154
155
156

1926
January. _.
February _ _ _ _ _ _ _
March
April

152
150
144
145

156
153
151
153

186
184
181
177

177
179
175
174

129
128
128
127

178
177
176
173

133
132
132
130

165
164
164
163

135
133
128
127

156
155
152
151

132
130
128
128

166
163
162
163

160
161
154
152

163
161
159
157

152
149
145
142

May
June
July
August

144
144
141
138

154
157
154
151

176
175
173
175

179
179
177
180

125
125
126
127

172
171
172
172

131
131
131
131

162
162
161
161

125
123
123
122

152
152
151
149

129
127
127
128

163
165
162
160

153
154
153
151

156
155
154
153

140
139
138
137

September
October

141
139
135
135

152
152
151
151

175
172
170
169

182
184
190
183

127
127
127
126

172
172
174
173

131
129
129
128

160
160
160
159

120
119
118
118

151
150
148
147

129
127
126
126

161
160
159
158

153
152
150
149

153
155
155
155

138
139
138
139

155

139

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average.
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
1935

January..
February
March
April

_ _

May
June
July
August

_

_

N"ovp/mb@ir

December .

1937

May
I
j

1

1 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, based on monthly averages of weekly quotations of 404 commodities, arranged in 9 groups and
3 major classes. In computing this index, the price of each commodity is weighted by multiplying it by the estimated quantity of that article marketed in the census year
1919. For comparable yearly data since 1890 and monthly data for period 1900 to 1923, see Bulletin 367 of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, p. 126. Prices of the principal individual commodities making up this index are presented in the SURVEY under their respective headings. The data on the 3 major classes were computed by the Federal
Reserve Board until August, 1926, and thereafter by the Department of Labor. Monthly data on these classes from 1920 appeared in the October, 1922, issue of the SURVEY
(No. 14), p. 45. The term "consumers' goods" in general applies to those commodities which because of their finished condition are ready for consumption; the term "producers' goods" applies to those products which are essentially still in the raw state or semifinished condition requiring additional manufacture.
2
Dun's and Bradstreet's index numbers are calculated as of the first of each month, and have been recomputed to a 1913 base from the actual figures as published in these
journals. Bradstreet's index is the sum of prices per pound of the commodities, while Dun's is weighted by the amount" annually consumed by each inhabitant.'' Monthly
data of Bradstreet's index from 1913 appeared in July, 1923, issue (No. 23), p. 45.




29

Table 4.—COST OF LIVING, FARM, AND RETAIL PRICE INDEXES

Fuel and light

YEAR AND MONTH

Food

Sundries

Shel- Clothter
ing

AH
items

Fruits Meat
and
Grain vegeta- animals
bles

Dairy Cotton
and
and UnAll
poul- cot- classitry
ton- fied groups
prod- seed
ucts

Number of quotations
Combined

Fuel

Light
6

9

5

4

2

5

31

Relative to 1909-1914 average (fiscal years)

Relative to July, 1914

RETAIL COAL PRICES *

FARM PRICES 3

COST OF LIVING 1

RETAIL FOOD PRICES 3

[Base year in bold-faced type]

Relative to 1913

100
92
100
83
123

100

100
100
101
99
106

100

108
112
104
120

97
85
78
119

100
94
95
95
100

100
100
102
100
117

100
102
101
114

100
100
99
104

100
100
102

100
103
120

10O
102
104

100
100
104

100

111

1909-14 monthly av_
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av

101
109

100
92
103
120
126

117
152
164
185
184

131
159
172
198
167

217
226
231
231
112

202
162
189
249
148

173
202
206
173
108

133
160
182
197
151

187
245
247
248
101

130
157
162
152
90

176
200
209
205
116

146
168
186
203
153

117
127
150
6190
192
6191

100
100

1917
1918
1919
1920
1921

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

146
173
186
205
156

105
118
129
154
169

143
185
205
261
166

126
138
144
168
183

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

142
146
146
157
160

166
173
184
180
176

155
170
175
174
174

179
172
161
161
163

197
182
181
186

123
121
121
120

173
173
174
175
174

157
161
164
168
168

105
114
129
156
129

152
136
125
160
189

113
106
109
139
146

135
147
137
143
141

156
216
211
177
122

94
109
100
92
88

124
135
134
147
136

142
146
146
157
160

194
193
* 191
6
194

1925
' September
October
November
December

159
162
167
166

178
178
178
177

176
176
176
177

161
162
167
166

181
183
190
188

121
121
122
122

174
174
175
176

168
170
172
171

148
135
138
140

142
152
194
194

143
141
136
136

141
154
162
163

178
171
144
139

90
90
95
92

144
143
144
143

159
162
167
166

195
198
(8)
(8)

1926
January
February
March
April

164
162
160
162

177
177
177
176

176
176
176
175

166
169
166
162

189
195
190
184

122
118
118
118

176
175
175
173

170
170
169
168

143
140
133
131

214
218
220
253

140
146
147
146

153
144
137
133

138
142
133
135

87
87
85
83

143
143
140
140

164
162
160
162

1
(8)
(«)
201
194

161
160
157
156

176
176
176
175

175
174
173
173

158
158
158
160

179
179
179
180

118
118
118
121

173
172
174
173

168
167
166
165

131
130
125
128

240
216
195
166

148
154
152
144

131
130
131
130

130
132
126
130

82
81
85
89

139
139
136
133

161
160
157
156

192
192
192
192

159
160
162
162

175
174
174
173

174
173
173
174

161
163
170
169

182
185
195
194

121
121
121
121

173
174
173
174

167
167
168
168

121
123
121
120

136
136
142
137

148
148
142
140

139
144
157
161

134
94
88
81

93
97
97
91

134
130
130
127

159
160
162
162

193
194
195
195

May
June
July
August

- -

- -

September
October
November
December.
1927
J-inuary February _ _
March.
April
Mav
June

ii

_-.
1

•"

i

"

1 Index numbers of the cqst-of-liying, compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board, represent, up to March, 1922, retail prices on the first day of the month
except food, which is the retail food index of the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the 15th of the preceding month. Beginning with March, 1922,
all prices shown are as of the 15th of the month indicated. The index is weighted according to the estimated consumption of average wage earners before the war, on the
following basis: Food, 43.1 per cent; shelter, 17.7 per cent; clothing, 13.2 per cent; fuel and light, 5.6 per cent; sundries, 20.4 per cent. Figures from 1914 to 1917 are based
on July quotations: 1918figuresare for 2 months: 1919 for 3 months and thereafter monthly. Owing to different trends, the fuel and the light data have been segregated
from 1923 forward and revised, the monthly data for 1923 to 1925 being shown in the June, 1926, issue of the SURVEY (No. 58), p. 24: segregation for previous years is not
available and the fuel and light data previous to 1923 are not quite comparable with the revised figures following, which are 8 points lower than the original figures for those
years on fuel and light. The cost-of-living indexes of the U. S. Department of Labor, now compiled only semi-annually, are omitted.
2
Compiled by the Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, as of the 15th of the month. These indexes are based upon prices received by farmers
throughout the country for their respective crops and animal products, as collected by the Department, and are weighted by the average annual marketings by farmers for
the period 1919-23. For the detailed explanation of this index see August, 1925, monthly supplement to " Crops and Markets " published by the Department of Agriculture.
8
The retail food price index compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, the prices of 22 articles of food being weighted according to their
consumption in working man's families as reported by retail dealers in 51 of the largest cities as of the 15th of the month. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in Bulletin 396
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, p. 12.
4
The retail coal price index compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, is based on an unweighted average of quotations on Pennsylvania
anthracite, white ash, chestnut, as of the 15th of each month in 51 cities. The annual figures from 1913 through 1920 are based on two quotations a year, on January 15 and
July 15; thereafter monthly averages are used.
6 Eight months' average, February, March, April, and May missing.
e Eleven months' average, August missing.
^ Ten months' average, no quotations being available for other months.
*No quotations.




30

Table 5.—WOOL

Total

Domestic

Foreign

CONSUMPTION
(in
In
grease
As im- grease equivaported equiva- lent) 3
lent

STOCKS 4
(in grease equivalent,
quarterly)

Total

MACHINERY ACTIVITY 5

Looms
Held by
manu- Held by
Carfacdealers
pet
turers
Wide Nar- and
row
rug

Thousands of pounds
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average. _ .
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average. . _
1919 monthly average

18, 761
27,906
35, 796
36, 683
42, 214
41, 957
39, 918

13, 483
15, 894
15, 142
17, 100
17, 511
15, 275
17, 825

5, 278
12, 012
20, 655
19, 583
24, 704
26, 682
22, 093

22, 839
28, 589
36, 147
34, 758
26,001
25, 501
29, 101

8,809
11,977
15, 909
12,095
'16,687
11,018
14, 105

14, 030
16, 613
20, 238
22, 664
9, 315
14,483
14,996

21, 635
26, 722
31, 390
32, 854
22, 349
28, 271
25, 814

26,890
34, 338
30, 753

44,125
54, 510
53, 467
44, 813
43, 857
42, 503

May
June
July
August

16, 206
26, 824
45, 922
34, 998

8,866
20, 490
38, 378
20, 559

7,340
6,334
7,544
14, 439

22, 387
20, 468
20, 802
34, 449

25, 647
23, 318
26, 632
42, 552

38,246
38, 176
40, 781
42, 149

September. _ _
October
November
December

20, 403
17, 406
16, 126
18, 754

7,453
5,885
7,309
5,501

12, 950
11, 521
8,817
13, 253

18, 948
23, 920
25, 170
23, 176

23, 670
29, 941
31,114
27, 910

44, 383
47, 327
43, 471
44, 762

1926
January
February
March
April

29, 883
31, 379
45, 060
38, 905

4,767
5,098
11, 634
8,857

25, 116
26, 281
33, 426
30,048

45, 102
35, 321
48, 002
32, 653

54, 130
41, 761
55, 618
37, 822

41, 446
40, 492
43, 932
40, 093

May
June
July
August

36, 368
30, 224
50, 675
28, 035

13, 729
22, 631
45, 162
23, 611

22, 639
7,593
5,513
4,424

24, 119
13, 395
12, 545
15, 305

27, 151
13,653
13, 958
19,200

36, 237
38,249
38, 236
40, 859

September
October
November
December

13, 018
13, 336
14, 834
17, 498

8,511
6,921
8,451
9,889

4,507
6,415
6,383
7,609

13, 997
19, 264
25, 063
25, 004

18, 998
24, 499
32, 127
30, 116

45, 770
49, 072
47, 808
47, 839

Wool- Woren sted

Per cent of active hours to total reported

12, 632
21, 557
34, 393
37, 432
35, 083
37,811
37, 158

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average. _ _
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

Spinning
spindles
Combs

YEAR AND MONTH

IMPORTS 2

Sets of cards

RECEIPTS AT
BOSTON i

75
74
73
86
87
85
71
6 529, 174 6 183, 917 6 345, 258
7 533, 473 7 247, 412 7 286, 061
s 506, 623 8291,318 8 215, 305
480, 867 247, 431 233, 437
383, 100 207, 803
175, 297
352, 061 179, 213 172, 848

73
78
73
91
88
84
72

68
65
72
80
74
60
57

79
77
84
90
94
91
84

77
78
78
90
90
86
83

77
75
85
90
93
90
83

74
78
74
90
85
81
79

64
69
68
83
69
69
63

70
64
65
76
62
64
61

67
51
77
82
66
72
63

70
71
89
98
88
86
77

75
89
91
98
80
77
79

68
72
87
92
85
84
73

74
82
79
92
66
67
69

66
65
61
63

59
59
52
57

73
70
65
68

86
82
80
82

58
64
65
77

85
83
79
79

64
53
54
65

69
72
74
70

61
67
68
64

65
64
69
67

85
81
83
81

79
88
90
86

82
82
81
76

70
80
75
71

67
63
62
59

63
62
61
62

68
70
70
63

77
76
78
75

85
85
79
73

72
70
73
72

71
75
70
62

57
57
53
56

57
57
53
55

57
58
55
60

73
75
68
71

68
68
68
74

70
71
66
67

57
59
56
66

64
71
73
72

57
68
67
67

62
65
67
65

80
89
84
80

84
90
88
84

76
86
81
77

74
79
80
78

1925
382, 596

179, 203

203, 394

373, 010

182, 506

190, 504

346, 678

175, 898

170, 780

331, 324

176, 520

154, 804

397, 446

165, 776

231, 670

375, 714

161, 943

213, 770

1927

January
February
~M. arch
April
May
June

1 Receipts of wool at Boston by railroads and steamships compiled by the Boston Chamber of Commerce through January, 1925, and since that date by the Boston Grain
and Flour Exchange. They comprise usually about two-thirds of all wool imported and about half of the domestic wool clip. All classes of wool are combined in these
figures, without reduction to grease equivalent.
2
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The left-hand column totals wool of all classes in the condition imported, while the right-hand column shows the reduction to grease equivalent. Scoured wool is multiplied by 2 to get its grease equivalent in the conversion.
3 Consumption of wool by textile mills from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, until April, 1922, when the compilation was transferred
to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. These data reported by almost 600 manufacturers represent nearly 80 per cent of the industry, the figures
from the American Woolen Company and from 10 to 20 other concerns not being included. The figures are reduced to grease equivalent by multiplying scoured wool by
2 and ptilled wool by 1^. Further details as to classes of wool and districts are given in press releases.
* Stocks of wool held by about 600 manufacturers and about 400 dealers from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, until April, 1922,
and thereafter by that bureau jointly with U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Figures have not been received from practically the same manufacturers
as fail to report on wool consumption while about 15 dealers do not report. Stocks in dealers' hands include U. S. Government stocks taken over during the war and finally
disposed of shortly after the end of 1921. Stocks include wool, tops, and noils and are reduced to grease equivalent in the same manner as in the consumption report; further
details as to classes of wool, etc., are given in press releases.
«Percentage of active wool machinery compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, beginning with June, 1919. Front October, 1918, through
May, 1919, these data had been collected by the 17. S. Department of Agriculture, while previous thereto they were compiled by the National Association of Wool Manufacturers. The 1913 figure is based on only one month (November figures as of December 1), while thereafter the averages are of quarterly data, until 1917 when monthly
figures were started in the middle of the year. The 1917 averages are therefore based on 9 months' figures. Up to 1921, the data represent the percentage of active machines
to total and beginning with 1921, the percentage of active hours to total hours of plant operation. Figures on the old basis of active machines are still published in the
press releases but are not much different from the more accurate active hour figures. Previous to October, 1922, these figures were originally given as of the first of the
following month, representing the previous month's operations, but these have now been changed to show the activity for the month to which properly credited; where
over
 activity ofThese100 per cent is shown, overtime was reported sufficient to offset all idle hours and leave an excess. Details as to number of spindles, etc., are given in press
releases.
data comprise practically all wool-consuming7mills.
e Average of the last two quarters of 1920.
Average of the first three quarters of 1921.
8 Average of the last three Quarters of 1999


31

Table 6.—CLOTHING AND BUTTONS
MEN'S AND BOYS'
GARMENTS CUT 1

YEAR
AND

MONTH

Suits

Separate Overtrou- coats
sers

Thousands of garments

1922 m. a.
1923 m. a
1924 m. a.
1925 m. a.
1926 in. a.

HOSIERY a

WORK CLOTHING »

Net Stocks,
ship- end of
ments montk

Cut

Produc- Net St'ks, New Untion ship- end orders filled
(all ments mo.
orders
classes)

Dozen garments

FRESHWATER
PEARL
BUTTONS*

KNIT UNDERWEAR'

Production

Thousands of dozen pairs

UnNet St'ks,
ship- end New filled
ments mo. orders orders

Per ct Thous.
of caof
pacity gross

Thousands of dozens

1,263
1,414

1,512
1,607

402
370

208, 314
250, 468

192, 492
217, 286

349, 916
326, 257

3,352
3,812

3,331
3,758

6,259
5,771

3,410
3,888

5,755
7,394

1,154

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

1,048
890
1,046
1,468

1,421
1,533
1,289
1,344

669
687
368
227

223, 904
245, 804
242, 504
212, 505

222, 911
227, 914
188, 578
168, 678

315, 812
321, 000
316, 884
344, 576

3,107
3,597
3,274
3,402

3,533
3,771
3,304
3,434

5,889
5,849
5,781
5,752

4,006
4,452
4,433
3,907

4,980
5,579
6,492
6,673

840
1, 017
902
1,035

1,058
1,082
958
961

1935
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

1,578
1,626
1,843
1,276

1,604
1,562
,574
,689

207
245
233
197

237, 808
252, 861
290, 448
266, 256

214, 095
213, 031
251, 365
227, 518

330, 893
325, 958
344, 714
345, 478

3,661
3,703
4,039
4,030

3,373
3,467
3,937
3,836

5,738
5,964
5,945
4,874

4,400
3,852
4,096
4,345

7,372
7,705
7,730
7,937

1,079
1,201
1,325
1,329

May
June
July
Aug

1,200
1,616
1,632
1,492

,473
,780
,579
1,575

290
403
475
520

237, 023
277, 021
212, 915
251, 737

202, 579
220, 624
207, 223
231, 703

324, 729
346, 039
335, 640
305, 448

3,921
3,865
3,697
3,702

3,623
4,050
3,753
3,864

6,235
6,039
6,114
5,734

3,961
4,179
3,332
3,267

8,034
8,302
7,645
6,796

Sept__ .Oct
Nov
Dec

1,083
1,041
1,086
1,491

1,547
1,731
1,536
1,631

565
657
440
211

256, 519
285, 304
248, 687
189, 033

241, 594
246, 209
194, 121
157, 364

302, 630
303, 001
318, 428
332, 123

3,756
4,051
3,803
3,510

4,135
4,067
3,607
3, 388

5, 565
5, 476
5,738
5,834

4,167
4,580
3,580
2,896

1926
Jan __ __
Feb
Mar
Apr

1,595
1,685
1,660
1, 282

1,764
1,674
1,847
1,711

223
239
267
215

240, 380
240, 223
285, 821
272, 273

222, 392
208, 998
255, 962
229, 772

343, 570
340, 384
346, 341
358, 142

3,672
3,592
3,937
3,535

3,339
3,383
3,920
3,473

6,156
6,410
6,483
6,503

May
June
July
Aug

1,220
1,513
1,409
1,429

1,524
1,416
1,435
1,479

321
454
486
576

251, 747
250, 683
229, 323
259, 963

235, 792
228, 585
205, 447
249, 271

328, 605
328, 918
298, 013
295, 607

3,215
3,424
3,060
3,359

3,266
3,812
3,078
3,767

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

1,170
1,108
1,019

1,591
1,518
1,343

577
676
279

286, 759
271, 984
241, 685

262, 264
226, 728
206, 383

301, 160
308, 731
324, 672

3,557
3,694
3,733

4,015
3,940
3,888

Pro- Stocks,
duc- end of
tion month

46.1
46.1
33.5
44.0
46.5

12, 562
13, 846
14,001
12, 489
11, 938

81,221

3,002

1,149
959
928
954

1,199
1,473
1,556
1,669

1,462
1,676
2,229
2,906

28.4
32.1
36.1
36.8

13, 782
13, 605
13,623
13,656

1,108
1,198
1,245
1,184

981
1,030
1,103
1,208

1,832
1,254
1,210
1,033

3,596
3, 559
3,541
3,275

33.9
41.6
43.6
45.5

13, 107
12, 836
12, 601
12, 527

1,223
1,151
1,033
1,010

1,090
1,093
(7)
1,128

1,252
1,279
(7)
1,182

1,112
939
(0
1,047

3,200
2,935
2,824
2.529

46.0
47.0
38.4
46.6

12, 497
12, 503
12, 321
12, 381

6,842
7,163
6,993
6,206

1,119
1,217
1,094
1,069

1,203
1,429
1,092
941

1,136
941
957
1,096

1,174
1,499
1,018
1,314

2,688
2,670
2,470
2,736

46.5
48.1
47.3
43.8

12, 224
12, 172
12, 286
12, 414

3,699
3,322
4,075
3,517

7,242
6,329
6,457
6, 384

1,060
1,094
1,244
1,174

1,081
1,057
1,207
971

993
1,446
1,154
1,258

1,373
1,048
1,037
774

3,002
2, 996
2,740
2,498

45.1
50.2
53.0
52.4

11, 471
11,371
12, 117
12, 101

6,128
6,397
7,616
7,378

3,252
3,848
2,966
3,477

6,213
6,229
6,170
5,786

1,043
1,062
821
927

838
853
843
1,109

1,379
1,484
1,507
1,386

720
966
616
974

2,354
2,391
2,114
1,910

49.6
45.0
38.6
44.4

12, 203
12, 331
12, 196
11, 754

6,953
6, 843
6,856

3,946
4,289
4,012

5,566
5,667
5,783

1,004
1,015
976

1,325
1,166
999

1,196
1,042
1,011

1,087
949
1,117

1,659
1,417
1,460

44.4
51.3
47.5
36.9

11, 759
12, 002
12, 049
11,. 898

61,156 61,106

±924:

1937
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

i

May
June
1
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 467 establishments of which 4 did not begin reporting until February, 1924.
Details by materials are given in press releases.
2
Compiled from reports to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from 158 identical establishments of which 2 are now out of business; further details
by materials used and sizes are given in press summaries. For January, 1924,4 firms did not report. The data represent outer work garments (overalls, unionalls, coveralls,
two-piece suits, work pants, etc.) and do not include data on work shirts.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, as reported by 261 identical establishments. Further details are given in press releases.
4
Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, compiled from reports of 150 establishments while stocks are from 70 to 83 establishments
only. Further details as to classes given in press releases. Data for the period, July, 1920, through May, 1924, representing about 30 per cent of production in 1921 and
compiled by the Associated Knit Underwear Manufacturers of America appeared in November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 42.
s Data on fresh-water pearl buttons from National Association of Button Manufacturers from reports of 17 firms representing 95.2 per cent of the machine capacity of
the association members, except prior to July, 1922, when 16 firms reported.
6 Eleven months' average.
7 No data available.




32

Table 7.—TEXTILE WHOLESALE PRICES1
COTTON YARN

COTTON

WOR-

WOOL
(Boston) 2

COTTON GOODS

STED
YARN

SUITINGS

SILK,
RAW

Print
SheetCarded, Carded,
M hlood
Woolcloth,
Japawhite,
ing, 4/4 Territory, combing
French
single
2/32's
Price to Middling northnese,
grease,
64 x 60,
Trion,
serge,
fine,
producer, upland. ern, mule warp, Fairchild 38H in., L L, 36",
Ohio and crossbred 35/36"
Kansal
index * 5.35 yds. 4 yds.
staple,
stock,
55/56"
all grades New York spun,22/l, 40/ls,
Pennaverage Middlesex No.l,
scoured sylvania Boston at mills
New
to lb.,
tolb.
cones,
New York New York
fleeces
f. o. b.niill New York
Boston Bedford

ffiS

YEAR AND
MONTH

Rel to
1911-1913

Per pound

$0.t)53
.046
.041
.061
.095
.159
.146

$0. 062
.056
,052
.072
.119
.195
.168

$0.57
.61
.71
.87
1.59
7 1.84
1.74

$0.25
.26
.36
.41
.66
7.76
.64

$0.78
.64
.79
1.05
1.56
2.11
61.63

$0. 448
.571
.648
.593
.558
.508

323
162
187
213
199
188
160

.182
.077
.086
.102
.092
.093
.076

,211
.087
.104
.123
.113
.104
.093

1.66
.85
1.25
1.41
1.42
1.40
1.15

.51
.26
.42
.51
.53
.55
.46

.437
.430
.430
.420

.547
.569
.589
.580

194
194
196
194

.092
.095
.096
.094

.108
.107
.108
.106

1.67
1.65
1.58
1.42

.234
.242
.248
.238

.399
.403
.415
.423 .

.558
.543
.544
.547

188
183
182
185

.092
.092
.095
.095

.102
.097
.096
.104

.225
.215
.181
.174

.236
.220
.208
.202

.423
.430
.407
.402

.563
.562
.546
.550

187
187
182
178

.095
.096
.089
.087

1926
January
February
March
April

.172
.177
.165
.166

.208
.206
.194
.192

.403
.399
.384
.374

.550
.545
.540
.528

176
175
170
166

May
June.
July
August

.160
.161
.154
.161

.189
.186
.187
.187

.357
.349
.344
.363

.513
.500
.500
.500

September
October
November
December

.168
.117
.110
.100

.170
.132
.128
.128

.367
.329
.321
.311

.506
.482
.470
.467

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av_-_
mo. av

$0. 120
.104
.091
.137
.220
.295
.299

$0. 128

.102
.145
.226
.312
.318

$0. 248
.218
.198
.297
.449
.662
.596

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.

av___
av
av
av__.
av
av__av___

.310
.125
.193
.270
.268
.222
.151

.339
.152
.213
.294
.287
.235
.176

.703
.331
.397
.486
.475
.418
.358

1935
January
February
March April

.227
.230
.245
.237

.240
.247
.256
.244

May
June
July
August. .

.230
.230
.234
.234

September
October
. .
November
December

6.119

Per pound

Per yard

Per pound

Per yard

«100
97
91
122
187
292
272

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

1927
January
February
March
April

DRESS
GOODS

$3.64

$0.32
.43
.72
.90
.90

$1.55
1.46
1.57
1.97
3.17
M.04
4.01

1.83
1.18
1.41
1.73
1.69
1.72
1.44

1.09
.73
.66
.76
.78
.80
.74

4.18
2.94
3.10
3.62
3.66
3.66
3.40

8.28
6.04
7.22
8.23
5.92
6.34
5.94

.69
.68
.63
.54

1.90
1.90
1.80
1.75

.78
.80
.80
.80

3.78
3.78
3.78
3.78

6.08
6.22
5.83
5.98

1.24
1.31
1.37
1.31

.45
.50
.52
.51

1.75
1.75
1.70
1.65

.80
.80
.80
.80

3.60
3.60
3.60
3.60

6.17
6.37
6.32
6.47

.106
.108
.108
.103

1.28'
1.32
1.32
1.30

.50
.51
.54
.55

1.65
1.65
1.60
1.55

.80
.80
.80
.80

3.60
3.60
3.60
3.60

6.62
6.66
6.57
6.81

.087
.086
.080
.077

.101
.101
.098
.098

1.28
1.26
1.21
1.15

.54
.53
.48
.44

1.55
1.55
1.50
1.45

.80
.80
.80
.73

3.60
3.60
3.51
3.51

6.71
6.66
6,03
5.49

161
157
155
157

.076
.073
.073
.076

.095
.093
.089
.092

1.13
1.10
1.14
1.11

.42
.42
.43
.44

1.40
1.40
1.40
1.40

.73
.73
.73
.73

3.51
3.29
3.29
3.29

5.73
5.88
5.78
5.98

159
154
148
143

.076
.068
.069
.067

.093
.090
.085
.080

1.11
1.12
1.12
1.08

.44
.45
.45
.44

1.40
1.40
1.40
1.40

.71
.70
.70
.70

3.29
3.29
3.29
3.29

6.13
5.78
5.49
5.59

3.69
3.32
4.87
5.51
6.27
8.88

_ .

May
June
1
Unless otherwise specified, all prices are averages of weekly quotations as compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly data for
1920 and 1921 on most items appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 47. That issue also contained monthly data on another print-cloth quotation, which has been superseded by the present data due to their more general use. Monthly data on cotton yarns, single warp, at New Bedford, from 1921 to 1925, appeared in December, 1925, issue
(No. 52), p. 10, while monthly print-cloth figures from 1913 appeared on p. 22 of that issue, and women's dress goods, French serge, from 1915 in the November, 1925, issue
(No. 51), p. 22.
2
Averages of weekly quotations on representative grades in the Boston market, as compiled by the 17". S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Monthly data from 1913 to 1925 appeared in May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 29.
3 Price of cotton to the producer, given at the end of each month until December, 1923, since which month it is given as of the 15th of the month, is a weighted average
of prices received by producers throughout the United States for all grades of cotton as compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
The 4market price in New York, on the other hand, is quoted on a specific grade and includes handling and transportation charges.
Fairchild cotton goods index, compiled by the Daily News Record, represents average weekly wholesale quotations of 36 standard8 cloths in the New York market.
8
6
7
Average for years 1911 to 1913, inclusive.
Average for 10 months.
Average for 6 months.
Average for 9 months.




33

Table 8.—COTTON
GINNINGS
EX(total
REPRODUCcrop
POETS CONCEIPTS
TION
IMINTO POBTS urn-hid- SUMP(crop 2 to end of
ing
month
TION
estimate)
SIGHT
indiSinters)
cated; 3

YEAB AND MONTH

STOCKS
(end of month)
Domestic
Total

Mills

World visible *
Warehouses

Total
cotton

American
cotton

Bales8
1909-13 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average

13, 033, 235
14, 156, 486
16, 134, 930
11, 191, 820
11, 449, 930
11, 302, 375
12, 040, 532

1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

11, 420, 763
13, 439, 603
7, 953, 641
9, 762, 069
10, 139, 671
13, 627, 936
16, 103, 679
15, 544, 840

1, 203, 092
1, 035, 730
1, 256, 604
1, 186, 402
959, 945
920, 106

17,313
18, 455
26,283
33, 798
32, 064
23, 103
18, 781

735, 226
746, 978
547, 068
727, 033
607, 546
412, 690
352, 953

465, 289
454, 064
500, 749
551, 701
567, 984
514, 712

3, 085, 132
3, 414, 853
4, 898, 345
4, 777, 800
4, 137, 287
4, 687, 250

1, 359, 417
1, 209, 177
1, 552, 989
1, 863, 668
1, 658, 513
1, 594, 578

1, 725, 715
2, 205, 675
3, 345, 356
2, 914, 132
2,478,774
3, 092, 672

4, 386, 925
4, 628, 711
5, 920, 149
4, 704, 844
3, 974, 733
4, 021, 720

3, 079, 529
3, 094, 377
4, 480, 679
3, 410, 678
2, 743, 733
2, 814, 722

11, 325, 532
13, 270, 970
7, 977, 778
9, 729, 306
10, 170, 694
13, 639, 399
16, 122, 516

1, 031, 256
896, 699
997, 307
972, 319
936, 705
1, 105, 315
1, 321, 206
1, 373, 366

29, 226
49, 999
23, 158
31, 030
31, 228
26,770
26, 113
30, 197

561,280
513, 261
539, 509
509, 484
439, 930
566, 243
710, 520
753, 949

493, 293
486, 933
450, 565
507, 294
543, 444
460, 139
536, 044
557, 266

4, 935, 973
4, 792, 190
6, 100, 426
4, 706, 031
3, 853, 119
3, 435, 371
3, 991, 285
5, 467, 567

1, 430, 976
1, 453, 054
1, 312, 862
1, 447, 196
1, 480, 319
1, 087, 880
1, 283, 913
1, 434, 093

3, 504, 998
3, 339, 136
4,787,564
3, 258, 836
2, 372, 800
2, 347, 490
2, 707, 372
4, 033, 474

5, 065, 485
5, 662, 420
6, 344, 953
4, 950, 925
3, 503, 179
3, 724, 552
4, 576, 477
5, 626, 734

3, 614, 068
3, 909, 420
4,410,286
3, 152, 091
2,352,179
2,417,302
3, 274, 060
4, 209, 484

13, 306, 813

monthly averege
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

13, 982, 811
15, 905, 840
11,068,173
11,363,915
11, 248, 242
11, 906, 480

1, 379, 161
864, 323
811, 452
495, 283

54, 822 1, 076, 075
59, 902 811, 838
33, 955 740, 076
22,409 472, 555

594, 010
550, 775
583, 407
596, 541

5, 302, 032
4, 615, 778
3, 662, 114
3, 177, 217

1, 441, 699
1, 542, 382
1, 633, 783
1, 511, 008

3, 860, 333
3, 073, 396
2, 028, 331
1, 666, 209

5, 830, 282
5, 644, 890
5, 322, 550
4, 545, 302

4, 722, 282
4, 327, 890
3, 789, 550
2, 942, 302

14, 219
19, 957
9,927
9,266

330, 987
217, 786
202, 468
315, 825

531, 668
494, 083
483, 926
451, 236

2, 482, 671
1, 885, 477
1, 379, 848
1, 719, 631

1, 343, 019
1, 126, 127
865, 842
678, 948

1, 139, 652
759, 350
514, 006
1, 040, 683

3, 848, 225
2, 969, 422
2, 342, 887
2, 232, 427

2, 253, 225
1, 583, 422
1, 112, 887
1, 099, 427

1935
January
February
March
April

13, 639, 399

May
Juno
July
August

14, 339, 000
13, 566, 000

161, 632
1,886,399

311, 313
128, 743
153, 881
780, 440

September. _
October
November
December

13, 740, 000
14, 759, 000
15, 386, 000
16, 103, 679

7, 126, 248
11, 207, 197
13, 870, 507
14, 831, 846

2, 332, 283
3, 149, 220
2, 942, 255
2, 506, 120

15, 121 752, 324
12, 402 1, 421, 482
27, 007 1, 206, 786
34, 374 984, 061

483, 032
544, 097
543, 488
576, 216

3, 984, 411
5, 717, 509
6, 664, 018
7, 304, 712

869,419
1, 216, 571
1, 457, 456
1, 720, 696

3, 114, 992
4, 500, 938
5, 206, 562
5, 584, 016

3, 883, 012
5, 193, 976
6, 048, 438
7, 056, 308

2, 805, 012
4, 114, 976
4, 903, 438
5, 634, 308

15, 499, 893

1, 154, 805
752, 290
701, 268
618, 488

62,061
38, 354
45, 726
33, 348

749, 967
556, 185
519, 732
516, 494

582, 315
565, 118
635, 896
577,678

6, 996, 220
6, 573, 105
5, 935, 959
5, 166, 412

1, 815, 232
1, 832, 655
1, 771, 897
1, 637, 062

5, 180, 988
4, 740, 450
4, 164, 062
3, 529, 350

6, 773, 664
6, 642, 807
5, 956, 734
5, 485, 607

5, 237, 664
4, 929, 807
4, 277, 734
3, 804, 607

13, 625
22, 137
12, 090
13, 280

419, 459
346, 533
366, 722
391, 329

516, 376
518, 607
461, 743
500, 652

4, 414, 216
3, 678, 968
3, 032, 560
2, 636, 537

1, 448, 739
1, 268, 707
1, 096, 647
920, 944

2, 965, 477
2, 410, 261
1, 935, 913
1, 715, 593

5, 070, 424
4, 314, 794
3, 686, 450
3, 182, 764

3, 459, 424
2, 762, 794
2, 284, 450
1, 988, 764

10, 007 794, 584
30, 449 1, 369, 820
41, 441 1, 486, 224
39, 851 1, 531, 297

571, 105
568, 532
583, 950
605, 217

4, 230, 346
6, 685, 682
8, 015, 409
8, 247, 390

937, 129
1, 215, 873
1, 497, 844
1, 766, 392

3, 293, 217
5, 469, 809
6,517,565
6, 478, 998

4, 283, 515
6, 148, 052
7, 456, 845
8, 519, 146

3, 115, 515
5, 056, 052
6, 367, 845
7, 229, 146

,.

1936
January
February
March
April

16, 122, 516

May
June
July
.
August..

15, 621, 000
15, 166, 000

September _
October
November
December

_

_ .

_ _ _ _

47, 749
694, 877

16, 627, 000
17, 918, 000
18, 618, 000
15, 544, 840

„

504, 174
221, 064
131, 103
536, 402

5, 639, 284
11, 259, 038
14, 644, 966
15, 542, 249

2, 125, 808
3, 482, 579
3, 592, 806
2, 659, 606

1937
16, 609, 517

January
February
March
April

_

May
June

1 Receipts into sight compiled by New Orleans Cotton Exchange; imports and exports from U. S, Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce;
consumption, ginnings, and domestic stocks from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Linters are not included in the statistics in this table, except in
the exports. Yearly figures represent averages for the calendar year except for ginnings and production, in which case totals for the crop year are shown (not an average),
and the 1913 and 1914 data on imports and exports, which are averages for the fiscal year ending June 30 of the year given. Monthly data, 1913-1921, on consumption and
stocks are given in December, 1922, issue (No. 16), the 1921 stocks being revised in the August, 1923, issue (No. 24), p. 55.
2
The yearly figures, from V. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, represent the latest revised estinmtes of total production of the cotton
crop3for the year (not a monthly average). The monthly figures show the current estimate of total production as reported each month.
Figures for September are to Sept. 25 only, prior to 1924. December figures cover ginnings through Dec. 13 only. January figures for all years cover ginnings through
Jan. 16, and February figures cover all ginnings of the crop. Yearly figures represent total ginnings for the cotton crop harvested in that year (not a monthly average).
Monthly data for prior years 1914-1922 are given in the April, 1923, issue (No. 20) of the SURVEY, page 51.
4
These figures, from the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, represent world visible supply on the Saturday nearest the end of the month, covering European ports,
United States ports and interior, Egypt, India, and quantities afioat.
a
All bales are running bales counting round as half bales, except for imports, which are given in equivalent 500-pound bales

26446°—27



3

Table 9.—COTTON MANUFACTURING
SPINDLE ACTIVITY 1

YEAE AND MONTH

Active
spindles

Per
Total spin- Ratio
spin- dle to ca- Billings Orders, Ship- Stocks,
gray
end of
dle
yardage ments month
in
hours place pacity

Thous. Millions Hours
of hours

Per
cent

FINE
COTCOTTON
TON CLOTH*
GOODS3

FINISHED COTTON GOODS 2

Thousands of
yards

Cases

Per
cent Days

monthly average..
monthly average. .
monthly average .
monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average. _

30, 559
30, 748
31, 136
32, 293
33, 400
33, 525
33, 878

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average. .
monthly average..

33, 807
33, 052 97,532
33,026 7,725
34, 681 8,292
31, 136 6,689
32, 642 7,883
32, 348 8,252

6206
209
222
177
208
215

31, 572
32, 520
32,913
32, 951

7,107
7,963
7,825
8,261

188
210
207
218

83.8
89.5
96.0
99.4

72, 257
85, 859
78, 239
83, 541

81, 079
85,907
75, 453
78, 448

42, 608
47, 556
39, 676
44, 754

40, 711
39, 917
40, 511
42, 315

58
67
61
62

32, 810
33,009
33, 245
32,891

8,356
8,121
9,169
8,345

221
214
242
221

98.6
103.2
102.2
98.2

78, 170
82, 370
98, 321
90,938

87, 188
85, 055
97, 436
79, 606

46, 679
46, 922
54, 452
49, 301

41, 111
41,006
41, 329
42, 350

32, 275
31, 756
31, 057
31,322

7,503
7,607
6,750
7,489

199
202
180
200

88.9
88.4
78.7
87.4

79,164
78,161
65, 714
69, 554

69, 348
65, 072
67, 272
75, 180

45, 715
45, 272
43,724.
44, 336

32, 135
32, 593
32, 587
32, 496

8,248
8,370
8,480
8,563

220
224
227
229

98.5
98.9
101.2
100.3

79, 223
88, 295
79, 480
87, 401

84, 438
79, 350
76, 483
77, 686

49, 312
51, 010
45, 941
46, 827

1936
January
February
March
April

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
J~)piCP'TTibf»r

_ _ _

Fall River «

New Bedford *

UnRatio
filled ProducRatio to
Ac- orto caption
Exports Total italiza- Total capitaltivity ders,
(New
ization
tion
end Bedford)
mo.

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

1935
September
October
November
December

MILL DIVIDENDS
(quarterly)

Pieces

Thous.
of
yards

Thous. Per
Thous. Per cent
cent per
of
of
per
dollars quarter dollars quarter

7 434, 188
383, 523

38,890
27, 207
43, 195
51, 688
63, 718
45, 348
56, 920

$519
311
284
512
1,054
1, 512
1,208

1.820
1.084
.974
1.734
3.338
4.594
3.651

$547
470
653
746
1,471
1,603
1,681

1.405
1.197
1.6451. 832'
3. 001
3.164
3.324

329, 571
354, 274
385, 772
438, 761
353, 851
421, 059
403, 020

68, 229
45, 959
48,958
38, 710
39, 818
45, 267
42, 606

2,521
780
762
882
705
419
305

7.486
2.031
1.997
2.061
1.609
.931
.722

2,238
1,365
1,500
1,258
942
981
703

4.390
2.299
2.429
1.741
1.285
1.325
1.024

6.7
6.5
6.8
5.5

371,500
452, 552
385, 841
448,625

42, 366
44, 887
43,084
46, 871

338

.759

1,231

1. 663'

299

.634

941

1.271

62
71
74
67

7.4
7.1
7.4
6.3

427,234
397, 463
452, 349
419, 510

41,017
37, 626
41, 344
52,308

299

.702

776

1.129

41,352
41,494
40,446
38, 449

61
55
50
59

5.5
4.2
5.2
5.7

422, 221
382, 371
339, 755
302, 571

43,420
41, 105
49,042
38, 227

294

.690

807

1.175

36, 868
36, 161
37, 113
38,398

66
70
63
66

6.7
6.2
6.0
5.0

413,
401,
406,
470,

45, 983
37, 556
43, 284
40, 361

321

.767

617

.899

305

.727

612

.891.

852,787 8 39, 431 s 25, 543 8 39, 920 838 86.7
•91.5 10 85, 386 10 90, 054 10 44, 935 1036,226 "65 109.4
93.5 11 94, 016 n 95, 509 11 49, 102 n 44, 937 "66 "9.9
95, 098 91,504 48, 116 46, 166
98.9
68
9.5
77, 650 76, 105 41,863 43, 139
78.5
58
5.9
76, 558 43, 691 39, 640
92.9
78, 756
60
5.8
81, 399 78, 676 47, 458 39, 673
95.4
64
6.1

762
636
896
469

1937

April
May
June

i Data irom U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing total cotton spindles active in textile mills during the month. The capacity percentage^
takes into account working-days, on a single-shift basis, exclusive of holidays. Details by States are given in press releases.
2
Compiled by the National Association of Finishers of Cotton Fabrics from reports from 31 out of 51 members, estimated to cover approximately the following percentages of the industry, based on work done outside of regular textile mills: White goods, 70 per cent; dyed goods, 55 per cent; printed goods, 25 per cent. In the statistics>
given above, white goods and dyed goods each comprise regularly about 40 per cent of billings and orders. Prior to November, 1923, an additional firm was included.
Details by Federal reserve districts and classes of goods are given in the association reports. Monthly data from 1920 by classes of goods are given in the December, 1923*
issue (No. 28), p. 55. The goods are billed as completed; hence billings approximate production. Data for December, 1921, and January, 1922, were not compiled and
averages for the years 1921 and 1922 are based on 11 months' figures.
a Data on fine cotton goods, from the Fine Cotton Goods Exchange, are reported by 24 identical mills in the New Bedford district, representing about 50 per cent of the
fine cotton goods industry in New England and from 20 to 30 per cent throughout the United States. Data on sales no longer published, as not strictly comparable with.
4
Exports of cotton cloth, from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, include duck and other cloth, bleached, unbleached, and;
colored. Beginning with January, 1921, the figures are reported in square yards instead of linear yards, as formerly, and are probably slightly smaller than in the corresponding linear-yard measurement.
« Dividends paid by cotton mills in Fall River in quarter ending in the month given, comprising about 38 mills, are compiled by G. M. Haffards & Co. Yearly figures
are quarterly averages. Quarterly data, 1911-1922, are given in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 48.
« Dividends paid by New Bedford cotton mills in quarter ending in the month given, compiled from records comprising about 26 mills, supplied by Sanford <& KeWsy*.
i Nine months' average, April to December.
Yearly figures are quarterly averages. Quarterly data from 1909 appeared in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 12.
8 Six months' average, July to December, inclusive; previous data not available.
»Average for five months, August to December, inclusive; previous data not available.
1° Eleven months' average, January to November, inclusive.
U Eleven months' average, February to December, inclusive.




35

Table 10.—COTTON TEXTILES

l

[Thousands of yards]
TOTAL, 9 GROUPS

SHEETINGS

PRINT CLOTH

PAJAMA CHECKS

YEAH AND MONTH

Production

Stocks

Unfilled
orders

1925 monthly av. 2 190, 259 2 218, 403 2 291, 697
217, 977
243, 266
1926 monthly av _ 200, 196

Production

Stocks

Unfilled
orders

2 46, 528 2 36, 250 2 53, 592
52, 120 31, 393 54, 378

DRILLS AND TWILLS
(40" and narrower)

Production

Stocks

Unfilled
orders

Production

2 63, 517 2 21, 018 291,913
65, 143 41, 104 60, 824

2 3, 328
6,886

2 2, 253
2,215

2 8, 443
21, 640

2 14, 769
11,141

Production

Stocks

Unfilled
orders

Stocks

Unfilled
orders

2 17, 856 * 18, 156
8,901
17, 288

1926
January February
March
April

229, 453
199, 153
197, 474
193, 119

220, 486
208, 154
211,352
234, 247

279, 025
239, 957
228, 503
201, 412

57, 015
46, 612
45, 254
46, 281

31, 105
22, 360
20,196
24, 561

64, 378
62, 689
53, 992
42, 378

80, 835
66, 952
65, 553
65, 747

29, 996
33, 569
32, 503
42, 841

86, 696
62, 111
56,757
47,411

4,796
4,404
4,839
5,624

921
914
1,212
1,360

7,080
10, 461
22, 352
26, 873

17, 136
14, 499
13, 295
12, 394

17, 072
16, 971
18, 394
20, 073

14, 811
11,517
8,446
4,757

May
June
July
August.

214,415
174, 740
167, 365
208, 658

246, 740
261, 574
247, 825
216, 253

182, 101
160, 582
211,515
270, 482

56, 877
44,740
43, 894
61,008

30, 950
32, 244
29, 398
27, 324

45, 176
40, 469
56, 303
65, 084

73, 534
54, 008
53, 142
73, 016

50, 705
61, 256
57, 720
53, 142

29, 333
19, 161
46, 756
59, 224

7,662
6,410
6,588
8,879

1,487
2,107
2,043
3,046

25, 494
26, 822
26, 080
24. 806

12, 133
8,676
7,735
9,843

21, 595
22, 691
21,056
. 16,510

4,478
4,137
7,65a
10,084

September
October
November
December

190, 556
230, 607
197, 231
199, 578

184, 036
181, 834
193, 099
210,122

302, 130
290, 917
277, 857
274, 715

52, 691
66, 205
53, 008
51, 853

26, 601
34, 365
45, 212
52, 399

60, 912
52, 968
56, 751
51, 438

59, 060
71, 818
58, 584
59, 472

37, 139
29, 505
28, 424
36, 448

66, 361
85, 032
88, 957
82, 088

7, 340
9,736
8,344
8,008

2,906
2,864
3,539
4,185

26, 393
25, 046
21, 778
16, 489

8,550
10, 361
9,229
9,842

14, 304
12, 907
12, 517
13, 368

10, 957
9,224
10, 618
10, 131

1937
January
February
Mi arch
April
May
June

«

_ __

YEAR AND MONTH

POCKETING TWILLS
AND JEANS

OSNABURGS

HEAVY WARP
SATEENS

DRILLS, TWILLS,
SHEETINGS, AND
SATEENS
(wider than 40")
2

COLORED GOODS

2

2

1925 monthly av_
1926monthlyav_

2 3, 808
2,682

2 5, 161
4,910

2 3, 788
2,384

26,019
7,993

2' 8, 001
4,565

2 6, 055
14, 347

21,219
1,161

* 1, 093
909

2 1,517
1,201

2 5, 904
5,644

2 2, 716
6,465

1926
January .
February.. -- ..
March
April

4,298
3,324
3,092
2,450

7,091
7,153
7,037
7,573

3,309
2,140
1,608
1,170

7,199
7,380
8,145
6,844

8,357
7,536
7,523
7,151

16, 429
18, 532
15, 427
11,643

1,587
1,326
981
902

1,219
1, 037
1,201
1, 376

1,384
984
906
418

6,851
7,367
7,061
6,144

1,586
1,798
3,250
5, 258

19, 052
15, 177
12, 435
10, 483

49, 736
47, 289
49, 254
46, 733

123, 139
116, 816
120, 036
124, 054

65,886
56, 346
56,580
56, 279

May
June
July
August

2,842
1,923
1,613
2,345

7, 145
6,378
5,223
3,875

1,214
1,004
1,744
2,817

8,592
7,498
7,694
9,567

4,061
2,320
1,900
2,131

16, 013
14, 078
13, 338
10, 236

885
775
548
991

1,67&
1,550
1,237
276

269
288
1,383
1,281

5,146
5,182
4,420
5,141

6,444
7,925
7,984
8,746

9,482
8, 563
8,827
8,994

46, 744
45, 528
41, 731
37, 868

122, 675
125, 103
121, 264
101, 203

50, 642
46, 060
49, 434
87, 956

1,985
2,812
2,428
3,068

3,108
1,645
1,564
1,122

3,607
2,901
3,962
3,131

8,039
9,825
7,200
7,936

3,736
4,734
2,786
2,549

11, 770
15, 198
14,756
14, 741

969
1,651
1,624
1,697

258
238
336
502

2,074
1,624
2,123
1,677

4,866
5,284
5,056
5,208

8,377
8,712
8,426
9,075

9,049
11, 240
10,544
10, 072

47, 056
52, 915
51, 758
52, 494

87, 607
86, 864
90,295
90, 474

111, 007
87,684
68, 368
84,948

September
October _
November
December

_._

18, 194
11, 160

45, 168
47, 426

124, 054 2 90, 039
109, 128 68, 433

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June
1
Compiled from weekly and semimonthly reports issued by The Association of Cotton Textile Merchants of New York, reported by about 22 commission houses regardingthe mills which they represent, which are located principally in the South and estimated to cover at least 50 per cent of the industry. Monthly totals on production represent the four 9r five weeks falling within the month, while figures on stocks and unfilled orders are as of the week ending nearest the end of the month, except colored goods
and drills, twills, sheetings, and sateens wider than 40 inches, which are compiled from semimonthly reports. Details by construction are given in the association's reports.
Colored goods include denims, ginghams, and chambrays, chevoits, and plaids.
2
Four months' average.




36

Table 11.—SILK AND OTHER TEXTILES AND FUK
SILK
Stocks, end of
month

Imports i

YEAR AND MONTH

Deliveries 2

1920 monthly average .
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

_

Machinery activity 4

Nar- SpinAt ware- At mfg, Broad row
ning
houses 2 plants 3 looms looms spindles

Thous.
oflbs.
1909-13 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average.__
1919 monthly average

OTHER TEXTILES

Per cent of active
hours to total

Shipments

Imports i

8 17, 830
26,94]
30, 635
29,868
30, 592
41, 779
41, 796

51, 312
21, 315
32, 350
33, 367
37, 464
44, 819
36, 814

15, 283
15, 176
18,484
20, 051
27, 732
24, 043

942.1
55.1
47.8
59.5

959.3
73.5
72.5
88.7

9

62. 6
72.5
69.5
97.9

Thous.
of yds.

Long
tons

Thous,
of Ibs.

14, 707

Bales

2,850
2,565
3,094
3,406
3,619
4,060
4,627
3,305
4,361
4,872
5,. 163
5,050
6,408
6,472

Elastie Fibers
web(unBurlap
bing 5 manfd.)

28, 613
32, 596
32, 960
32, 769
41, 070
33, 318
31, 886
27, 274
33, 817
20, 416
22, 815
26, 613
24, 691
25, 854
25, 047

47, 628
39, 595
43, 436
49, 873
47, 971
52, 151
49, 910

Pyroxylin-coated
textiles «
(artificial leather)
Sales by
dealers 7
Pyrox- Sliip- Unfilled
ylin
ment& orders,
end of
spread billed month

34, 052
38, 387
36, 519
34, 047
32, 147
40, 661
36, 366
36, 880

12,620
11, 593
13, 778
13, 041
10, 731
13, 478
10, 695

FUR

Thous.
oflbs.

Thous. of linear
yds.

9

9

2, 482
2,201
2,438
2,900

2, 050
1,63^
2,018
2, 256

9-2,46§
I, 577
1, 698
2,045

•

1925

Thous.
of dolls.

$12, 029
13, 624
1
i

8,408
7,240
6,814
8,063

41,684
46, 815
41, 848
42,484

42, 708
39, 423
46, 813
49,824

28, 169
30, 107
30, 602
30, 277

91.2
93.7*
96.4
95.2

60.8
61.3
59.1
58.7

104.0
112.9
107.0
104.5

12, 129
13, 637
11, 658
13, 137

20, 936
23, 621
26, 930
27, 014

43, 664
42, 621
39, 957
51, 363

2,804
2,987
2,537
2,728

2, 377
2, 380
1, 975
2,077

1,857
1,852
1,933
I r 677

11,986
11, 867
14, 372
6,150

6,821
6,919
5,054
_.. 6,003

46, 148
42, 476
39, 400
37, 276

47, 326
43, 418
35, 948
30, 122

32,054
31, 118
28, 515
25, 898

93.9
92.6
92.0
84.0

59.1
59.2
62.5
65. 8

101.7
103.4
101.1
82.9

10, 875
10, 892
11, 983
9,608

36, 715
27, 235
36, 701
34, 257

64, 493
47, 190
63, 653
68, 816

2,310
2,320
2,885
2,517

1,927
1,971
2,313
2,127

1,639
2,080
1,696
1,687

8,714
14, 146
15, 473
16, 292

4,614
4,857
6,313
6,207

September
October
November
December

34,099
37, 644
39, 425
45, 943

31, 143
29, 111
27, 528
28,006

25, 323
20, 323
18, 665
19, 274

80.2
77.2
78.7
78.9

65.0
61.7
59.5
61.8

75.0
78.8
81.7
82.0

8,331
9,497
10, 854
10, 695

18, 919
17, 170
19, 975
15, 070

38, 339
44, 206
55, 258
52, 990

2,775
3,604
3,093
3,423

2,096
2,663
2,301
2,510

2,058
2, 374
2,186
2,158

13, 198
15, 040
13, 230
17, 647

7,046
7,936
7,934
7,961

43, 962
47, 768
47, 634
39, 771

34, 459
35, 094
47, 130
52, 478

18, 491
22, 762
22, 821
23, 270

80.8

66.6

87.5

11,429
12, 001
12, 335
10, 634

16, 004
18, 836
25, 017
34, 666

32, 066
53, 696
36, 529
41, 683

3,470
2,954
2,421
3,026

2,407
2,374
2,046
2,337

2,067
1,625
2,443
2,523

16, 969
13,664
10, 176
8, 943

1926
January
February
March _
April

_

_

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
D ecember

__ _ . _

1937
January
j

March

May

.-

1
Imports of silk, of unmanufactured fibers and of burlap from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Silk imports are a total of
-unmanufactured silk, including raw silk, cocoons and waste. Unmanufactured fibers include flax, hemp, istle, jute, kapok, manila, New Zealand flax, sisal, etc.
2
Deliveries of raw silk from principal warehouses in New York City, indicating approximate consumption by mills, and stocks at these warehouses are from the Silk
Association of America. A bale of silk averages about 133 pounds, but varies considerably according to origin of the bale. Details by sources are given in the association's
•report The delivery figures are computed by the association from the data on stocks and trade figures on imports through New York and Pacific ports, allowing time for
Pacific imports to reach New York. Monthly data for 1920 and 1921 may be found in May, 1922, issue (No. 9) p. 43.
3 Computed from data reported by the Silk Association of America, covering from 35 to 60 per cent of the silk manufactures and throwsters, averaging1 about 45 per cent
for most of the year 1924. Owing to the varying number of mills reporting, the original figures have been prorated up to 100 per cent, by dividing the stocks reported by the
percentage of the trade which they are estimated to represent. The maximum reporting capacity (60 per cent in April and May, 1923), coming immediately after a month
•of minimum reporting capacity (35 per cent in March, 1923), indicates, in the close correspondence of these prorated totals, that the prorating shows the situation quite
.accurately.
* Compiled "by the Silk Association of America from manufacturers representing about 50 per cent of the industry. The figures represent the percentage of active hours
to the total hours normally worked, and are weighted averages of each section of the silk industry, for which details are given in the association's monthly reports, i. e.,
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New England, and all other.
6 Elastic webbing sales are reported by 8 manufacturers to the Webbing Manufacturers Exchange, comprising almost the entire industry.

varies slightly each month i
7 Compiled by the Amer
places in the United States and Canada.
8
Eleven months' average, February to December, inclusive.
9
Ten months' average, March to December, inclusive, except pyroxylin unfilled orders, which is a 10 months' average, January and October figures not being available.




37

Table 12.—COAL
ANTHRACITE

BITUMINOUS
Production
YEAR
AND

MONTH

United CanStates i ada 2

Stocks,
Prices
end of mo.
Stocks,
end of
ProWholeBy
ExBy coke plants mo.,
DisExducBy
held by Mine sale, Retail, tion 1 trib- Retail ports3
ports 3 ves- electric
aver- Kana- Chisels
conuting dealers
clear- power5 roads6 United Can- sumers* age wha, cago11
11
points 13
(spot) 10 f.o.b.
ing 4 plants
12
States i ada s
Cinci.
ports
Consumption

Prices

a

Whole- Retail,
sale,
chest- chestnut,
nut,
New
New
York i1
York "

Thous. of short Thous. of long
tons
tons
1909-13
1913 m. a_
1914 m. a.
1915 m. a_
1916 m. a_
1917 m. a.
1918 m. a_

35, 522
39, 870
35, 225
36, 886
41, 877
45, 983
48, 282

1919 m. a_
1920 m. a.
1921 m. a_
1922 m. a.
1923 m. a
1924 m. a_
1925 m. a_
1926 m. a.

38, 822
47, 389
34, 660
35, 189
47, 047
40, 307
43, 338
48, 191

Dollars per short ton

Thousands of short tons

1,114
1,499
1,150
1,397
1, 581
1,774
1,663

642
606
620
656
574
461

1,160
1,412
1,255
1, 263
1,416
1,136
1,095

1,497
2,866
1,721
924
1,596
1,272
1,299
2,626

604
780
629
343
379
332
362
575

2,925
3,104
2,631
2,850
3,241
3,132
3,336

9,451
7,644
8,006
9,123
8,161
8,123

1936
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

53, 662 1,230
46, 577 1,076
46, 137 1,069
40, 079
995

993
1,013
1,143
1,094

330
305
423
' 401

3,723
3,311
3,490
3,125

9,155
8,351
9,025
8,063

7,644
7,241
7,252
6,723

240
252
238
232

May
June
July
Aug

39, 059
41, 992
43, 472
46, 352

1,139
1,396
1,348
1,336

1,517
2,139
3,240
3,548

437
521
641
709

3,085
3,174
3,360
3,447

7,844
7,519
7,635
7,873

6,742
6,465
6,915
6,574

242
230
236
250

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

48, 976
54, 592
59 721
57, 671

1, 407
1,700

3,737
4,188
4,605
4,299

739
840
841
718

3,481 8,115
3,699 8,973
3,600

6,543
6,847
6,735
6,555

250
263
234

« 2, 764
4,463
6,849
5,340
6,196
6,853

187

7,198
7,627
7,569
7,416
7,298
8,301
8,236

$1.23
1.14
1.12
1.85
3.25
2.58

$2.20
2.20
2.20
2.68
4.58
3.88

$4.81
4.93
4.89
4.87
6.95
6.58

40, 400
29, 933
44, 250
38, 583
49, 000
49, 000
44, 400

2.59
5.64
2.55
3.69
2.77
2.08
2.06
2.21

4.11
5.85
4.56
5.20
4.31
3.43
3.40
3.62

6.86
H 9. 66
8.85
i« 9. 53
9.23
8.15
8.65
8.96

45,000

2.18
2.11
2.02
1.92

3.49
3.39
3.39
3.39

9.48
9.34
8.99
8.39

173
2,083
8,790
8,217

1.93
1.90
1.91
2.00

3.39
3.39
3.39
3.39

8.12
8.13
8.27
8.32

8,054
8,937
8,429
8,225

2.15
2.70
3.19
2.54

3.64
3.74
4.39
4.39

8.91
9.06
10. 15
10.34

8,444
8,675
7,446
7,528

57,900

J

Thous. Thous. Thous. Thous. Dolls,
Dolls,
of short of long of short of long per long per short
ton
ton
tons
tons
tons
tons

40, 000
36,000

39, 000
41,000

44,000

931

7,341
7,467
7,539
2,673
4,557
1,478
7,778
696
7,327
2,983
5, 151 183,954
7,083

1,370
454
649
1,308
1,137

637

1,047
1,181

1,245

288
346
319
295
347
447
370

$5.32
5.40
5.29
5.57
5.94
6.86

370
402
348
197
379
299
237
300

&27
9.50
10.53
17
10. 58
10.88
11.37
»11.19
21
11. 48

6
37
297
295

11.49
11.48
11.48

15.29
14.54

. 327 11.48
386
11.47
11.48
390
11.47
395

jJ4.50
14.50
14.50
14.50

11.48
11.48
11.48
11.48

14.54
14.50
14.50
14.50

363
459
350
294

(20)

$6. 97
7.00
7.18
7.34
8.46
9.19

10.81
13. 65
13.51
" 13. 50
14. 21
13.99
19
14. 90
22 14. 59
14

(20)
(20)

1937
Jan _.
Feb
Mar
Apr
1
1

Production figures, calculated from shipments from the mine and representing complete production except for small quantities used at the mines, compiled by T7. S.
Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines. Monthly data from 1911 given in November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 215. Periodic data on total stocks from 1916 given in
March, 1924, issue (No. 31), p. 13.
2
Compiled by Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, including bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite. Previous to 1919 these data
comprised sales, colliery consumption, and coal used by operators, and thereafter the tonnage representing output of all mines.
3
Compiled by the V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; bunker coal on vessels engaged in the foreign trade is not included.
* Coal loaded for consumption by outgoing vessels at principal ports compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly
data5 covering the period 1913-1923 appeared in October, 1923, issue of the SURVEY (No. 26), p. 61.
From U. S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, representing fuel consumption by all plants producing electric power, mainly central stations. Coal consumption in central stations alone shown in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), p. 29, and by street railways, manufacturing plants, and reclamation projects in March, 1925, issue
(No. 43), p. 28.
6
Compiled by Interstate Commerce Commission from reports of 174 Class I railroads. Consumption by switching and terminal engines is not included. It is stated
that about 3 per cent would be added to the figures by such inclusion. About 2 per cent of the coal consumed on railroads in 1923 was anthracite. Monthly data from
19207appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 23.
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, by applying to the coke production figures the average amount of coal used in making both byproduct and beehive coke. Monthly data from June, 1921, were given in March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 25.
8
Data from the Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, presenting complete figures for Canada.
9
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, representing stocks in the hands of commercial consumers and retail dealers at the end of each
month, but does not include coal for steamship fuel, on lake docks, in transit, and in householders' bins. The figures for 1918 were taken on three different dates, from actual
canvasses, while the later figures are based upon reports from a selected list of 5,000 consumers whose stocks in 19J.8 bore a known relation to the known total stocks. Data
for 1918 and 1919 are averages of one month, for 1920 and 1924 each 3 months, for 1921, 4 months, for 1922, 6 months, and for 1923,8 months. Details from 1919 were given
in the December, 1926, issue (No. 64), p. 14.
10
Average mine price of spot coal in 14 representative bituminous fields weighted by the production in each field, compiled by the Coal Age; about 20 per cent of the
total11output of bituminous coal is sold spot, while about 55 per cent is sold on future contracts, and 25 per cent of the output is not sold commercially.
Wholesale and retail prices are monthly averages from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wholesale price of bituminous coal is based on run
of mine, while the retail price is average consumer's price of lump, egg, nut, and mine run, averaged according to shipments.
w From Anthracite Bureau of Information, representing stocks at distribution points excluding Hudson Coal Co. tonnage.
13
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, from reports of 474 retail dealers. Averages for one month in the fall or early winter of each year
..„ ,
_
,
.,f
t available.
ifi Eleven months' average, August missing.
I?8 Eight months' average, May, June, July, and August missing.
*9 Seven months' average, January to July, inclusive; no data available for other months.
1 Eleven months' average, January to November, inclusive; no December quotations.
20
No data
 available.
21
Eleven months' average, January missing.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ average, January and February missing.
23 Tea months'

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

38

Table 13.—IRON ORE AND PIG IRON
IRON OMEi

MANGANESE
ORE

YEAR AND
MONTH

Slf
111

III
Sg«

PIG IKON
Stocks, end of month

Hecelpts

ConsumpShipIm- ments Lake
tion
ports - from Erie
by
mines ports Other furand ports naces Total
furnaces

Furnaces in Wast,
end of month 4

Production

1
United
Canada 7
On
States *
At fur- Lake
Fur» Capacnaces Erie
naces ity
Merdocks Total chant Total
iron 6

Num.- Tons per Per
cent
ber
day

Thousands of long tons

1909-1913 mo .av
1913 mo.av
1914 mo.av
1915 mo.av
1916 mo.av
1917 mo.av
1918rno.av
1919 mo.av

21
29
24
26
48
52
41
28

180
218
113
112
110
81
66
40

4,089
2,688
3,869
5,395
5,208
5,096
3,931

3,230
2,091
3, 127
4,282
4,033
3,978
3,074

826
565
732
1,082
1,128
1,089 » 5, 290 9 33, 455
816
3,903
31, 325

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

51
33
31
16
19
23
30

106
26
95
231
171
183
213

4,886
1,858
3, 552
4,921
3,552
4,507
4,878

3, 736
1,298
2,637
3,638
2,630
3,225
3,532

1,096
540
863
1,220
888'
1,238
1,373

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo.av
mo.av
mo.av

4,531
2,030
3, 355
5, 191
3,833
4, 584
4,863

29, 753
33, 330
33, 751
31, 036
31, 639
30, 422
29, 860

Per
cent
of
total

e 25, 523
23, 546

7,230
8,234
7, 779

2,262
2, 530
1, 921
2, 472
3, 254
3,182
3,209
2,549

676
753
560
647
922
929
863
650

21,211
24, 512
25, 642
24, 438
25, 076
24, 319
23, 863

8,542
8,818
8,109
6,621
6,563
6,102
5,998

3,035
1,379
2,240
3,338
2,591
3, 033
3,256

7, 530
7, 246
7, 244

Wholesale prices 3
Foundry,
No. 2,
northern
(Pittsburgh)

Basic Com(valley posite
furpig
nace) iron 5

Dollars per long ton

87
87
88
68

252
268
187
230
319
338
352
241

74, 507
84, 080
62, 390
83, 539
106, 775
106, 499
8
108, 950
81, 900

60.8
63.7
44.5
55.0
81.4
83.2
83.1
56.3

$15. 60
161. 01
13.90
14.87
21.07
41.45
34.44
30.28

$14. 71
12. 87
13.74
19.76
38.98
32. 50
27.68

$15. 21
15.42
13. 52
14. 15
20.31
39. 99
34.38
29.92

824
246
472
805
621
659
750

81
50
32
73
49
48
62

287
97, 561
105 8 41, 353
181
75, 164
277 109, 055
84, 795
203
99, 690
216
221 106, 586

66.5
25.1
43.2
66.2
50.1
55.1
59.4

44.88
25. 15
26.93
28.15
22. 50
21.66
20.63

42.25
21.74
24.20
25.81
20.24
19.58
18.55

43.80
24.06
25.09
27. 15
21. 87
21.32
21.06

[

1935
May
June
July..
August

26
17
26
34

150
183
174
171

8,314
7,958
8,531
8,533

5,376
5,975
6,217
6,228

2,328
2,139
2,276
2,143

4,357
3,863
3,842
4,020

21, 049
25,404
30, 332
34, 605

16, 527
20, 397
24, 720
28, 272

4,522
5, 007
5,612
6,333

2,931
2,673
2,664
2,704

624
560
627
580

63
46
21
27

196
189
190
192

89, 550
85, 250
86, 420
88, 250

49.4
47.7
48.5
48.1

20.89
20.06
20.28
20. 26

18.81
18.05
18.00
18.00

20.65
19. 78
19.72
19.78

SeptJffiaber
October
November
December

23*
23
33
37

93
204
246
240

7,355
7,004
4,258
7

5,646
5,147
3,198
48

1,864
2,088
1,517
5

4,011
4,609
4,554
4,965

38, 423
41, 198
41, 686
36, 899

31, 408
33, 542
33, 830
29, 818

7,015
7,656
7,856
7,081

2,726
3,023
3,023
3,250

617
653
679
722

35
74
69
55

200
206
220
234

94, 550
97, 950
103, 445
107, 560

52.4
53.9
57.6
61.9

20.56
20.89
22. 14
22.26

18.30
18.63
19.88
20.00

20.08
20.66
21. 83
22.28

1936
January
February
March
April

38
27
27
55

202
160
184
195

10

5,043
4,389
5,160
5,192

32, 035
27, 677
22, 611
17, 708

25, 412
21, 593
17, 120
13, 133

6,623
6,084
5,491
4,575

3,316
2,923
3,442
3,450

716
651
781
773

57
50
53
68

224
226
238
237

104, 065
104, 800
114,000
115, 150

59.3
60.3
63.3
63.5

22.26
22.26
22.26
20.76

20.00
20.00
20.00
18.63

22.29
22.31
22. 27
21.53

May
June
July
August

22
31
34
41

239
273
233
259

6,113
8,770
9,999
10, 709

3,338
6,472
7,300
7,655

1,477
3,217
2,609
2,651

5,194
4,834
4,787
4,796

17, 387
21, 512
26, 691
32, 174

13, 063 - 4,324
16, 939
4,573
21, 582
5,109
5,894
26, 280

3,481
3,235
3,223
3,200

794
770
762
776

73
71
67
59

228
220
216
213

110, 600
106, 140
103, 245
102, 085

61.5
59.6
58.5
57.7

20.64
19.71
19. 45
19.26

18.38
18.00
17. 63
17.50

21.15
20.62
20.23
20. 19

September
October
November
December

18
13
20
27

233
190
186
205

9,622
9,337
3,947
23

7,346
6,906
3,283
88

2,586
2,360
1,549
30

4,738
4,948
4,717
4,562

37, 335
42, 004
42, 761
38, 426

30, 438
34, 407
35, 098
31, 286

6,897
7,597
7,663
7,140

3,136
3,334
3,237
3,091

700
755
752
769

64
70
52
54

216
219
213
204

105, 480
108,760
105, 850
98, 860

58.4
58.9
57.1
55.0

19.39
20.26
20.76
20.51

17.50
18.00
18.50
18.50

20.18
20.39
20.83
20.77

1927
January ..
February
March
April

May
June.
1
Data on iron ore from the Lake Superior Iron Ore Association, except imports. Shipments represent movement of ore through the upper lake ports, including not only
tonnage passing through the Sault Ste. Marie canals but also that from ports on Lake Michigan, thus representing over 85 per cent of the total iron ore mined. Receipts
at ports other than on Lake Erie are mostly at Chicago and vicinity and Detroit, the details by ports being shown in the monthly reports of the association, which also
give by districts the consumption data. Monthly data on stocks and consumption from 1921 are givenin June, 1923, issue of the SURVEY (No. 22), p. 49. Furnaces reporting
vary2 in number from 319 to 341 and beginning with June, 1922, reports from 15 Canadian furnaces are included. Averages are based on the full twelve months of the year.
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports of manganese ores exclude ores imported from Cuba since September, 1922, which are shown only in the raw state, but included these ores prior to that date, when they were combined with the manganese content of imported ores.
a Wholesale prices, except composite average, are averages of weekly quotations taken from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly prices of
basic pig iron from 1920 in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 42.
* Pig-iron production and blast furnace data, in the United States, comprising practically the entire output, except that made with charcoal, from the Iron Age. Monthly
data6 from 1913 on all items appeared in February, 1925, issue of the SURVEY (No. 42), p. 44.
The composite pig-iron price, compiled by the American Metal Market, is the average of daily prices of 10 tons of iron distributed as follows: One ton each of Bessemer
Valley; No. 2 foundry valley; No. 2X foundry at Philadelphia and at Buffalo; No. 2 foundry at Cleveland and at Chicago; 2 tons each of basic valley and No. 2 Southern
foundry at Cincinnati.
6
Compiled from data reported by the Iron Age by subtracting the figures on pig iron produced by steel mills from the total pig-iron production figures, thus obtaining
data on the total output of merchant pig iron.
7

Data on Canadian pig-iron production compiled by Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
8
Eleven months' average, February to December, inclusive.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ *Nine months' average, April to December, inclusive.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

39

Table 14.—CRUDE STEEL AND COKE
STEEL INGOTS

IT. S. STEEL
COSP.3

COKE

STEEL, PRICES

Production

Production

United States 1

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

Katio

to

Canada 2

Unfilled
orders, Earnings
end of
month

Steel
Strucbillets,
tural
Bessesteel
mer
beams
(Pitts-4 (Pittsburgh) burgh)*

Iron

and

steel s

Composite
steel e

United States ^
ByBeehive product

capac.
Thous.
of long
tons
1909-13 monthly average.
1913 monthly average - 1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average. _
1917 monthly average _
1918 monthly average ..
1919 monthly aver age _ - 1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average.- _
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average. 1924 monthly average- 1925 monthly average- _ .
1926 monthly average

Thous. of long
tons

Thous.
of dolls.

Dolls,
per long
ton

pound

per

Dolls,
per long

106
130
140
77

4,795
5,907
4,115
5,189
9,722
10, 720
8,635
5, 995

$10, 370
11, 432
5,972
10, 866
27, 798
24, 608
16, 613
11, 966

$23. 93
25.79
20.08
22.44
43.95
70.78
47.30
40.54

$0. 0151
.0118
.0128
.0253
.0374
. 0300
.0252

$26. 32
22.92
24.76
40.50
70.10
56.68
50.32

92
56
41
74
54
63
65

10, 022
5,331
5,648
6,009
3,993
4, 324
3,922

14, 724
7,727
8,461
14, 971
12, 745
13, 766
16, 584

56.14
34.46
33.95
41.65
37.99
35.45
35.00

.0284
.0204
.0173
.0242
.0224
.0200
.0196

65.59
40.74
37.86
44.55
40.86
38.83
38.27

100
63
22
25

4,050
3,710
3,539
3,513

13, 803
13, 444
13, 909
14, 399

35.25
35.00
35.00
35.00

.0200
.0200
.0200
.0193

38.37
37.60
27.45
37.39

.0269
.0265
.0263

37
109
73
62

3,717
4,109
4,582
5,033

14, 093
14, 592
14, 211
13, 477

35.00
34.25
34.75
35.00

.0195
.0195
.0195
.0195

37.35
37.61
38.73
39.14

.0261
.0261

89
88
93
88

69
53
59
80

4,883
4,617
4,380
3,868

13, 810
14, 385
16, 866
15, 705

35.00
35.00
35.00
35.00

.0195
.0195
.0195
.0195

85
80
78
86

90
81
65
46

3,649
3,479
3,603
3,542

16, 160
15, 949
17, 799
17, 244

35.00
35..00
35.00
35.00

84
88
80
74

59
64
54
58

3,594
3,684
3,807
3,961

17, 584
18, 992
18, 145
16, 365

35.00
35.00
35.00
35.00

Per

cent

2 523
1, 902
2, 607
3, 450
3, 635

3,588
2,808
3,407
1,602
2 881

3,624
3,068
3,678
3,928

84

Dolls,

ton

Dolls,
per
pound

j

Can-8
ada

Thous. of short tons

Exports 9

Wholesale
price
Connelisville 10

Thous. Dolls,
of long per short
ton
tons

2,799
1,945
2,292
2. 955
2,764
2, 540
1,587

1,060
935
1, 173
1, 589
1,870
2,167
2,095

73
73
49
67
87
105
126
53

$2.09
2.30
1.79
1.89
3.81
8.15
6.00
4.75

1,709
462
714
1,615
857
946
972

2,570
1,646
2,379
3,133
2,832
3,326
3,703

68
23
38
92
49
71
73

10.79
3.65
7.42
5.55
3.53
4.09
4.14

710
632
561
641

3,280
3,151
3,167
3,159

130
110
89
95

59
50
64
64

3.11
2.90
2.91
3.19

.0263
.0265

794
1,066
1,286
1,385

3,178
3,395
3,550
3,753

103
161
156
152

84
71
87
131

3.70
6.53
6.88
4.45

39.18
38.95
38.90
38.60

.0265
.0263
, .0263
.0264

1,381
1,402
1, 158
981

3,804
3,500
3,777
3,602

156
166
152
149

82
68
87
55

7.31
7.84
3.28
3.13

.0195
.0185
.0195
.0195

38.25
37.68
37.69
37.61

.0261

.0262
.0264
.0264

884
811
963
752

3,722
3,610
3,756
3,749

159
152
158
166

80
76
81
75

2.94
2.84
2.94
3.14

.0200
.0200
.0200
.0200

37.70
38.02
38.43
38.26

.0264
.0265
.0265
.0265

820
867
860
780

3.654
3,814
3,743
3,706

166
174
154

64
84
67
61

3.49
4.00
4.89
3.91

$0 0171
.0172
. 0152
.0163

. 0280
. 0446
.0379
.0332
.0363
.0269
.0231

. 0295
.0284
.0268
.0264

123

1925
May
June _
July
August-

3 455

3,204
3,084
_

3,421

September
October
November
December.

3,490
3,889
3,903
3,971

1936
Januarv
February
March
April
_ _

4,150

3,802
4,488
4,124

May
June
July
August

September
October
NovemberDecember

3,945
3,751
3,651

.-

4,005
3,931

__

4,093
3,722
3,472

.0261

1937
January
February
March..
April
May
June
1 Yearly figures represent the monthly averages of total production of all companies as compiled annually by the American Iron and Steel Institute. The institute
reported up to 1923 monthly production figures for 30 companies which produced 84.4 per cent of the total output of the country in 1920,87.48 per cent in 1921, and 84.15
per cent i n 1922. In order to make the monthly figures comparable they have been calculated to a 100 per cent production each year on the basis o f the above percentages.
The figures since 1922 are calculated on the basis of reports from companies which produced 95.35 per cent of the total productionin 1922,94.84 per cent in 1923, and 94.43
per cent in 1924, the total computations to 100 per cent being made by the American Iron and Steel Institute. Data for 1925 and 1926 are prorated on the 1924 percentage.
Monthly data, beginning with inauguration of monthly figuresin 1917, are givenin April, 1924, issue (No. 24), p. 61.
2
Production of steel in Canada, representing complete figures, compiled by Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
3 Unfilled orders olsteel and earnings reported by United Sta es Steel Corporation. Monthly unfilled orders, 1913-1921, are givenin December, 1922, issue (No. 16), p. 47.
* Average of weekly prices from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly prices, 1920 and 1921, arein May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 49 and 83.
8
Average of weekly prices compiled by the Iron Trade Review, on the following 14 products: Pig iron, billets, slabs, sheet bars, wire rods, steel bars, plates, structural
shapes, black galvanized and blue annealed sheets, tin plates, wire nails, and black pipe. Pig iron average, in turn, is average of 13 different quotations. Monthly data,
1913-1922, givenin April, 1923, issue (No. 20), p. 48.
^F
&
e,
>
&
H
>
,
6
The figures for composite steel compiled by the American Metal Market represents the daily average price per pound of steel products weighted as follows :2H-pound
bars. 1^-pound plates, Impound pipe, Impound wire nails, 1-pound galvanized sheets, and H-pound tin plate.
1
Production figures, representing complete production, compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines.
8
Compiled by the Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, presenting complete figures for Canada.
9
Exports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

1° Compiled by U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing beehive furnace coke (range of prompt and future) at Cozmellsville ovens.



40

Table 15.—FABRICATED STEEL PRODUCTS
FABRICATED
STRUCTURAL STEEL 1
New orders
YEAR AND
MONTH

Computed
total

Shipments

FABRICATED
STEEL PLATE 2

IRON AND
STEEL 3

STEEL FURNITURE <

New orders

Total
RaHaRa- Stortioto Com- tio to
age
ca- puted ea- Quan- tio to tanks
tity
pac.
capac.

Business group
ImExports, ports,
total
total

Shipments

Per
cent

Short
tons

Per
cent

Short
tons

Per
cent

Short
tons

Unfilled
orders,
end of
mo.

Shipments

New
orders

1, 940, 874
1, 250, 244
1, 432, 294
1, 811, 201
1, 908, 965 « $1,255, 502 s $566, 648
2, 278, 907 1, 540, 813 556, 493
2,615,712 1, 693, 293 611, 283

Unfilled
orders,

$285, 119

New
orders

pac.

Short
tons

Shelving

Long tons

end of
mo.

Dollars

1913 monthly av_
1914 monthly av_
1915 monthly av_
1916 monthly av_
1917 monthly av_
19 18 monthly av_
1919 monthly av_

105, 000
105,500
149, 800
153, 180
138, 600
136, 640
133, 560

50
50
70
69
60
56
53

227, 187
128, 256
293, 088
506, 238
532, 170
444, 091
362, 920

26, 438
24,831
23, 572
26, 904
27,419
13, 972
26, 854

1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av_
1922 monthly av.
1923 monthly av.
1924 monthly av_
1925 monthly av.
1926 monthly av.

140, 400
92, 750
176, 080
166, 407
200, 217
224, 175
210, 525

54
35
62
64
68
74
67

200, 949
226, 971
236, 333

69
74
75

46, 650
27, 436
30, 593
39, 948

61
37
' 36
52

25, 285
10, 413
8,261
14,569

405, 644
182, 661
167, 515
167, 565
150, 580
146, 881
180, 587

34, 546
10, 075
64, 115
59, 961
38, 868 « $1,935, 736
70, 488
2, 235, 635
2, 618, 970
77, 268

1935
May
June
July .
August

207, 400
259, 250
247, 050
237, 900

68
85
81
78

228, 750
231, 800
247, 050
244, 000

75
76
81
80

31, 483
37, 017
32, 361
37, 420

28
45
39
45

9,679
17, 108
6,756
12, 621

150, 612
136, 847
139, 861
188, 465

62, 223
75, 602
50, 618
57, 099

2, 204, 103
2, 130, 316
2, 111, 358
1, 957, 385

2, 127, 440
2, 116, 034
2, 105, 133
1, 989, 476

1, 457, 502
1, 457, 432
1, 490, 784
1, 437, 507

549, 272
514, 117
482, 187
452, 716

523, 426
501, 182
510, 815
516, 694

September
October _
NovemberDecember. _

244, 000
268, 400
216, 550
225, 700

80
88
71
74

240, 950
265, 350
222,650
240, 950

79
87
73
79

28, 362
32, 772
31, 673
33,700

34
39
39
41

10, 095
8,802
7,676
7,884

136, 791
141, 817
171, 134
142, 209

61, 015
69, 280
70, 261
85, 652

2, 123, 733
2, 423, 474
2, 191, 680
2, 851, 652

2, 260, 194
2, 488, 353
2, 309, 159
2, 876, 761

1, 629, 357
1, 544, 013
1, 663, 526
1, 695, 927

542, 173
622, 471
574, 905
788, 461

624, 676
730, 911
686, 814
620, 947

511, 689
626, 933
739, 831
570, 941

182, 700
182, 700
207, 900
220, 500

58
58
66
70

204, 750
189, 000
242, 550
242, 550

65
60
77
77

27, 484
37, 541
39, 764
36, 345

34
49
52
48

8,316
10, 184
12, 693
6,390

174, 585
157, 187
169, 438
194, 449

71, 838
92, 681
83, 808
98, 442

2, 859, 393
2, 598, 713
2, 843, 869
2, 782, 167

3, 063, 833
2, 662, 095
2, 687, 268
2, 936, 884

1, 927, 777
1, 975, 884
1, 804, 059
1, 783, 734

578, 161
603, 501
726, 413
699, 370

582, 016
656, 367
583, 701
704, 432

584, 824
633, 935
604, 991
570, 693

May
June
July
August

233, 100
229, 950
217, 350
252, 000

74
73
69
80

236, 250
274, 050
261, 450
248, 850

75
87
83
79

49,971
41, 695
34, 213
48, 138

64
54
44
64

16, 243
11, 114
12, 827
21, 723

173, 418
159, 506
194, 717
171, 588

92, 201
107, 712
61, 795
75, 248

2, 575, 561
2, 605, 502
2, 149, 546
2, 342, 615

2, 464, 457
2, 556, 631
2, 283, 666
2, 298, 526

1, 588, 788
1, 535, 166
1, 668, 989
1, 637, 538

617, 260
601, 913
531, 361
545, 901

580, 995
606, 698
604, 271
610, 617

587, 310
553, 660
602, 134
662, 148

September
October
November ._
December

185, 850
201, 600
192, 150

59
64
61
70

252,000
249, 850
220, 500
214, 200

80
79
70
68

35, 589
41,969
59, 886
26, 992

47
56
74
38

17, 038
23, 070
25, 945
9,283

182, 071
172, 070
219, 830
198, 189

68, 334
64, 722
58, 472
51,964

2, 449, 906
2, 552, 997
2, 734, 540
2, 932, 834

2, 419, 554
2, 614, 780
2, 603, 152
2, 797, 698

1, 613, 823
1, 687, 319
1, 547, 128
1, 549, 309

588, 096
639, 780

707, 893
595, 906
574, 949
511, 116

790, 426
745, 364
730, 846
595, 254

1936
January
February
March
April. ...

_

220,500

$1, 335, 349

•583, 488
620, 151

122, 826
204, 983
i
364, 357
466, 638 8 $374, 017
482, 843
579, 185
614, 913
638, 465

372 296
360, 089

398,973
447, 255

1937

April

i Fabricated structural steel data compiled by the Bridge Builders and Structural Society up to April, 1922, and since then by V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of
the Census, including reports from the Structural Steel Society. Percentages of capacity calculated from reports of the Bridge Builders and Structural Society up to April, 1922,

and 1926, for comparison with previous
figures.
.
.
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 36 identical firms, including most of the larger fabricators. Data for other classifications included in the total covering refinery, tank cars, gasholders, blast furnaces, and miscellaneous, including stocks and ladles, but not separately shown, are given in
press releases issued by the Bureau of the Census.
.
.
3
Iron and steel exports and imports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The exports prior to 1922 are based on the
group of pig iron and rolled products as used in the Iron Trade Review, comparable each month back to 1913. Beginning with January, 1922, all commodities are given in
quantities in the export reports, and thus a grand total can be presented, which is not more than about 5 per cent larger, on the average, than the data for the comparable
items. Imports are identical throughout the period, with a few minor exceptions.
.
. .
.
4 These data, compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, including reports from the National Association of Steel Furniture Manufacturers,
are based on reports from 33 companies in the "business group" and 15 companies manufacturing shelving, comprising the entire^industry, with few exceptions. Monthly
data from 1919 are given in March, 1923, issue (No. 19), p. 45 and the later data in the November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 60. The "business group" includes sections, counters,6 office and vault verticals, safes and interiors, desks and tables, and small miscellaneous articles, exclusive of lockers.
Four months' average, September to December, inclusive; previous data not available.




41

Table 16.—STEEL SHEETS AND BARRELS
STEEL BARBELS 3

SHEETS— BLUE, BLACK, GALVANIZED, AND FULL FINISHED 1
Production

Stocks,
end of month

Prices2
Shipments

Ratio

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

to

capac-

Total

Unsold

New
orders

Unfilled
orders

Y'ngstown

ity <

dis-

Shipments

Stocks,

Unfilled
orders,

month

month

end of

end of

trict

ity

Short
tons

Ratio
Producto
tion
capac-

Per

Dols. per Number
100 Ibs. of barrels

Short tons

cent

1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average.,.
1921 monthly average. ..

171, 489
85,409

72.7
34.9

111, 906
106, 175

5,590
46, 989

172, 161
87, 702

140, 844
75, 329

689, 853
232, 551

1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average. ..
1925 monthly average. ._
1926 monthly average...

190,864
222, 660
219, 836
293, 499
287, 288

76.5
79.7
74.2
92.8
90.4

108, 709
129, 728
122, 955
137, 863
162, 234

28, 703
35, 336
42, 115
45, 702
50,085

182, 519
230, §23
209, 329
266, 156
282, 835

203, 869
213, 583
225, 024
273, 281
266. 361

346, 449
450, 750
368, 147
530, 869
530, 595

317, 424
283, 290
290, 308
280, 082

98.0
96.5
90.7
87.5

140, 823
159, 661
151, 788
137, 499

49, 460
53, 717
57, 714
51, 264

283, 645
255, 080
279, 437
263, 174

241, 040
235, 980
263, 666
193, 949

607, 190
565, 133
550, 422
463, 425

260, 470
266, 290
246, 404
270, 212

87.0
83.4
75.5
87.2

133, 513
132, 552
130, 940
114, 577

52, 051
51, 614
42, 081
38, 476

232, 372
231, 006
223, 454
243, 204

186, 538
286, 453
252, 871
239,492

399, 330
440, 687
475, 950
460, 530

September
October
November
December

295, 810
348, 714
336, 021
326, 960

92.7
106.4
107.8
100.7

120, 798
123, 444
143, 282
165, 481

36, 587
40, 200
36, 105
39, 155

262, 050
332, 211
294, 660
293, 579

286, 029
403, 491
370, 361
319, 504

497, 698
595, 583
636, 570
677, 907

1926
January
February
March
.__ .
April

328, 643
299, 553
319, 132
294, 811

104.4
100.9
94.2
91.0

165, 966
165, 445
173, 381
184, 289

55, 295
51, 648
61, 433
62, 604

333,485
290, 026
320, 623
288, 759

253, 323
181, 101
304, 233
249, 866

609, 203
523, 882
534, 641
472, 448

May
June
July
August.

264, 541
268, 448
239, 764
293, 703

84.3
84.0
77.3
92.0

178, 539
176, 428
153, 962
147, 862

58, 503
55, 140
46, 031
44, 988

267, 299
262, 231
264, 025
281, 602

201, 743
284, 319
352,414
283, 055

418, 582
422, 237
520, 281
521, 837

September
October
November
December

307, 459
314, 598
278, 455
238, 345

96.2
101.4
86.9
72.3

134,422
141,206
165, 114
160, 193

34, 511
40, 758
40, 929
49, 182

302, 198
301, 474
262, 797
219, 489

448, 147
212, 029
185, 235
240, 862

731, 977
581, 993
500,120
529, 940

$4.60
5 17
4 47
5.35
3.46
3.01
3.51
3.63
3.15

Per

cent

Number of barrels

18.1
33.9
640.7
393, 800
503, 888
549, 036

43.7
48.4

393, 535
504, 364
548, 904

49, 845
52, 614
47, 865

756, 963
1, 169, 765
1, 448, 140

420, 127
413, 823
505,429
594, 971

39.0
38.0
45.0
52.0

415, 040
407, 781
510, 928
605, 424

59, 277
64,402
57, 603
47,048

1, 374, 274
1, 336, 124
1, 264, 860
1, 137, 552

570, 962
514, 913
497, 152
498, 449

47.0
44.0
41.0
39.5

569, 670
508, 880
506, 894
495, 736

48, 340
54, 373
44, 631
48, 052

950, 353
852, 594
1, 109, 383
1, 114, 667

510, 869
553, 545
498, 929
467, 485

42.0
51.0
45.0
41.0

503, 221
555, 981
498, 070
474, 742

55, 184
52, 748
53, 607
46,100

1, 012, 576
890, 904
1, 248, 545
1, 745, 346

468, 722
522, 486
622, 949
602, 058

43.8
46.9
55.0
53.4

469, 432
518, 104
622, 312
608, 056

45, 390
49, 772
50, 409
44, 411

1, 765, 846
1, 697, 328
1, 645, 066
1, 279, 159

581, 962
626, 812
585, 734
523, 037

51.3
54.6
47.7
41.0

582, 352
624, 082
593, 611
511, 542

44, 021
46, 751
38, 874
50, 369

1,209,815
1, 300, 113
1, 293, 601
1, 170, 998

511, 118
493, 363
510, 489
539, 805

43.6
46.0
48.0
50.0

508, 548
497, 031
505, 383
546, 392

52, 939
49, 271
54, 377
47,790

1, 288, 431
1, 149, 325
1, 732, 007
1, 845, 987

1935
January
February
March
April

_ _

May
June
July
August

1937
January
February
March __
April
May
June.

-

_ _.

3.40
3.25

3.05
3.05

3.05
3.10

3.20
3.25

3.25
3.25

3.25

L_
_
!.

|

'

i___
_
1

ii

are based on these price reports.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the reports of 30 identical establishments, operating 35 plants, except for figures on percentage of capacity operated, which are compiled by the Steel Barrel Manufacturers' Institute from reports to it each month by from 14 to 23 members. Monthly data from
1921 appeared in March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 24. Data on shipments, unfilled orders, and new orders of the Steel Barrel Manufacturers Association for 1921 to 1923 appeared
in February, 1924, issue (No. 30), p. 77, while orders data for 1920 may be found in September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 54.
* Compiled by the Steel Barrel Manufacturers' Institute, through September, 1926, snowing the percentage to capacity used in the production of steel barrels each month,
as reported by from 14 to 23 members of the institute, no data being collected from November, 1923, to November, 1924, inclusive. Monthly data since January, 1921,
appeared m the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 24. Beginning with October, 1926, these data are compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census,
from the same firms as contribute the other steel barrel data.
5
Ten months' average.




42

Table 17.—IRON AND STEEL CASTINGS
MALLEABLE CASTINGS 1

STEEL CASTINGS 3

Production

Production
YEAR AND MONTH

Total
Short
tons

ShipRatio ments
to capacity

Per
cent

New
orders

Total

Ratio
to capacity

Railroad

Per
cent

Short tons

TRACK
WORK *

New orders
Miscellaneous

Total

Ratio
to capacity

Railroad

Per
cent

Short tons

Miscellaneous

Production

Short tons

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average

57, 341
43, 768
64,447
101, 379
88, 842
110, 182
44, 477

67
51
72
107
88
105
41

27,600
21, 142
29, 966
54,645
34, 529
48, 124
13, 692

29, 741
22, 626
34, 481
46, 734
54, 313
62, 058
30, 785

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average _
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

79, 263
29, 891
77, 732
89, 765
79,404
76, 954
82, 521

68
25
67
74
62
59
62

33,080
12, 210
38, 890
40, 318
40, 394
32, 102
31, 873

46, 183
17, 681
38, 842
49, 447
39,000
44, 852
50, 647

17, 639
12, 781
14, 283
14, 882

2 59, 052
49, 201
57,829
57, 074

258.2
46.0
54.7
55.4

2 57, 241
47, 951
54, 747
53, 405

2 41, 204
45, 795
51, 037
47, 543

62,829
56, 399
57, 304
59, 046

58.6
53.4
53.6
55.4

55, 672
57,042
58, 999
58, 610

58,047
46, 193
52, 962
54, 145

100, 014
77, 861
78, 035
78, 252

77
60
60
60

49, 976
35, 578
30, 870
32, 066

50, 038
42, 283
47, 165
46, 186

11, 096
14, 392
17, 965
16, 792

May
June
July
August

57, 289
55, 143
53, 450
53, 221

54.3
51.6
50.1
50.0

57, 260
54, 510
51, 384
49, 486

47, 247
44, 026
52, 916
45, 142

65,009
63, 839
69, 058
67, 933

50
49
53
52

22,989
23, 389
26, 462
25, 690

42, 020
40, 450
42, 596
42, 243

17, 075
17, 416
13, 858
12, 982

September
October
November
December

54, 943
64, 216
58, 315
61, 791

51.7
61.3
56.8
59.5

50, 621
55, 795
51, 866
55, 713

46, 530
61, 778
52, 053
51, 400

60, 547
76, 570
84, 938
101, 390

46
59
65
78

20, 992
27, 484
39, 077
50, 654

39, 555
49, 086
45, 861
50, 736

11, 373
12, 689
12, 281
13, 475

January
February
March
April ...

72, 417
62, 574
70,474
62, 812

69.2
59.7
67.6
60.3

52, 287
59, 845
65, 989
62, 333

61, 120
54, 118
55, 027
49, 599

93, 041
91, 884
110, 542
107, 666

70
69
83
81

37, 321
41, 208
47, 604
41, 961

55, 720
50, 676
62, 938
65, 705

108, 162
94, 917
108, 018
88, 453

82
72
81
67

51, 574
41, 816
46, 655
26, 715

56, 588
53,101
61, 363
61, 738

15, 247
16, 158
19, 756
16, 660

May
June
July
August..

55, 803
56, 659
51, 568
53, 796

54.3
54.5
50.4
52.0

54,908
57,641
50, 998
53,586

45, 376
42, 813
52, 716
45, 802

97, 405
94, 796
86,653
80, 928

73
71
65
61

42, 425
34, 421
30,694
26, 088

54, 980
60, 375
55, 959
54,840

80, 337
69, 308
75, 872
67, 615

61
52
57
51

31, 388
16, 018
29, 266
22, 998

48, 949
53, 290
46,606
44, 617

16, 228
16, 256
13, 853
13, 004

54,630
53, 963
43, 214
46, 977

53.2
52.7
42.7
48.2

50, 885
49, 738
41, 102
41, 545

43, 874
43, 322
39, 017
37, 737

79, 021
79, 331
86, 273
81,556

60
60
65
62

22,837
25, 737
24, 421
28, 699

56, 184
53, 594
61, 852
52, 857

66,889
74, 187
70, 803
85, 685

50
56
53
65

22, 031
27, 827
28, 079
38,111

44,858
46, 360
42, 724
47, 574

13, 308
14, 016
11, 093
13, 010

90, 758

68

33,618

57, 140

1925

January
February
March
April

_ __

1926

-

September _
October
November
December.

- _.

1927

January
February
March
April
May
June

* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing reports from 130 identical establishments, covering most of the industry. The
bookings, however, are furnished by only 122 firms.
2 Seven months' average.
3 Reported by the Steel Founders Society and principal nonmember firms to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Reports are by 118 identical
firms with a present capacity of 132,400 tons per month, of which 60,100 tons are usually devoted to railway specialties. This represents over 80 per cent of the steel castings
capacity of the United States devoted to commercial castings (as distinguished from castings used in further manufacture in the same plant). Prior to 1920 figures for
companies representing about 6 per cent of the miscellaneous castings are not available and the totals of this class have been prorated by that amount for these years in order
to afford comparison with later years. RaMway specialties include such items as bolsters, side arms, draft arms, couplers, and cast-steel car wheels, and are reported by
identical firms throughout. Monthly data on bookings from 1920 covering 107 firms appeared in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 27.
4
Compiled by the American Iron and Steel Institute and covers the production of T-rail track of 60 pounds per yard and heavier, including all special or fabricated T-rail
trackwork (switches, switch stands, frogs, crossings, guard rails, and appurtenances) of carbon steel, manganese steel, and other metals for both domestic and export use.
Monthly figures are available only from the beginning of 1925 and are collected only every 3 months.




43

Table 18.—IRON PRODUCTS

YEAR AND MONTH

Ratio
Actual to normal

Receipts of
iron

Meltings

Total stocks,
end of mo.

OHIO FOUNDRY IRON 1

Long
tons
» 1, 791
12, 183
20, 497
19, 014
18, 632
17, 660

320.7
51.8
73.8
67.6
77.8
81.9

93
89
85
91
91

37
58
52
66
71

1924
January
February
March
April

20,520
23, 137
23, 331
23, 470

74.4
74.1
79.9
74.6

85
78
84
87

18, 658
15, 403

75.0
72.0
62.5
54.2

82
87
85
87

54.5
64.5
62.8
63.0

83
85
98
76

16, 516
17, 605
21, 035
19, 954

70.7
71.4
74.9
74.0

94
106
94
92

May
June
July . .
August

20, 311
19, 940
17, 117
15, 353

77.8
73.0
85.3
76.8

September
October
November
December

19, 125
25, 002
15, 953
15, 678

1926
January
February
March
April

Ship- New Stocks, ProProShip- New Stocks, ProShip- New Stocks,
end
end
duction ments orders mo. duction ments orders mo. duction ments orders end mo.

41
52
60
57

1935
January
February
March
April

Radiators

44
51
49
42

14,721
15,407
16, 209
14, 471

Square Boilers

57
60
59
51

22, 586
20, 251

Round Boilers

Per cent of normal
meltings

1921 mo av
1922 mo av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo av
1926 mo. av

CAST-IRON BOILERS AND RADIATORS *

Thousands of square feet of heating
surface

Thousands of pounds

16, 848
18, 126
19, 526

16, 177
17, 339
18, 935

17, 652
18, 753
20, 903

16, 641
17, 354
20,480

12, 670
12, 623
13, 486

11, 939
12,304
13, 769

72
58
64
54

17, 612
18, 054
19, 649
20, 245

11, 887
12, 183
14, 064
18,073

20, 552
19, 973
20, 163
20, 560

13, 877
13, 514
14, 431
17, 657

13, 281
12, 349
11, 527
12, 625

10, 378
8,898
9,463
11, 565

108
84
84
79

59
61
70
61

18, 919
18, 305
19, 722
19, 142

18, 811
16, 513
20, 017
22, 785

18, 488
17,253
20, 691
21, 694

17, 711
16, 884
21, 350
26, 346

11, 781
10, 152
12, 663
13, 124

14, 372
11, 404
13, 858
17, 038

84,3
92.5
75.4
78.0

88
92
83
88

78
69
68
74

18, 830
24, 310
19, 810
19, 715

23, 674
28, 889
22, 920
17, 407

21,344
27, 889
20, 854
21, 378

29,062
31, 528
24, 571
18, 832

13, 426
18, 604
15, 788
16, 512

17, 121
19, 848
16, 455
14, 825

16, 797
16, 123
21, 162
16, 908

76.0
73.9
90.3
86.0

77
91
111
100

64
69
78
72

19, 087
21, 240
23,549
24, 380

13, 087
12, 928
14, 288
17, 340

13, 278
14, 150
19, 987
19, 974

74, 324
85, 332
94, 657
102, 248

20, 802
19, 471
20, 274
22,012

13, 846
12, 736
12, 266
15, 012

14, 617
14, 341
18, 033
18, 022

89,567
93, 198
102, 007
108, 944

15, 342
15, 360
15, 740
16, 366

10,004
9,770
8,810
10, 592

10, 576
12,202
17, 778
14, 210

32, 115
38,053
45, 059
50,897

May
June
July
August

17, 518
15, 025
18, 472
20, 846

76.2
80.3
76.8
87.6

95
88
79
84

69
74
56
71

20, 660
20, 982
17, 058
18, 174

18, 881
16, 883
20, 882
27, 393

20,056
18, 162
23,157
29, 858

104, 917
109, 243
107, 171
102, 913

20, 933
20, 655
18, 257
21,444

19, 181
16, 502
23, 991
30, 249

20,538
18, 214
27, 904
33, 187

110, 533
114, 515
111,713
105, 071

14, 113
13,834
14, 424
14, 308

14, 355
10, 824
14, 983
19, 845

16, 489
13, 486
16, 243
23,028

50,853
53,638
52, 915
46, 519

September
October
November..
December

15, 427
14, 365
21, 009
18, 270

85.8
81.3
86.0
82.4

101
87
82
99

85
58
82
72

22, 359
17, 676
15, 914

27,929
30, 978
26, 175

30, 820
24, 830
23, 966

101, 047
89, 849
81, 010

26, 191
22, 338
19, 229

31, 888
35,354
27, 777

37, 305
28, 170
28,255

99, 982
87, 437
77, 150

15, 551
15, 000
12, 356

18, 766
20, 173
19, 631

21,080
18, 257
20,236

44,534
39, 409
32, 375

May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December

1927
January
February..
March
April.

__

_•

|

___

May
June
1
Data on gray iron foundries in Ohio from Ohio State Foundrymen's Association, comprising reports from 40 to 70 firms each month. Owing to the varying capacity of
the firms reporting each month, from 20,000 to 31,000 tons, the data on stocks and receipts have been converted to a percentage basis for better comparison. Details as to
class of receipts and stocks are shown on the association's reports. Monthly data from 1922 on receipts and stocks and total normal melt of reporting firms appeared in March,
1926, issue (No. 55), p. 24.
2
Compiled by the National Boiler and Radiator Manufacturers' Association, from reports of 30 firms, 15 reporting on cast-iron radiators and 25 reporting on cast-iron
boilers (both round and square), both estimated to represent over 90 per cent of the industry. The data for 1923 and 1924 are not available by months.
3 Ten months' average, March to December, inclusive.



44

Table 19.—HOUSEHOLD MACHINERY AND PUMPS
PUMPS

VACUUM
CLEANERS i

WATER
SOFTENERS 3

WASHING
MACHINES 2

WATER
SYSTEMS *

Domestic 5

(atiy.)

Shipments

YEAR AND MONTH
Shipments

Total

New Shiporders ments

Electric

Pitcher, Power
St'ks, Ship- St'ks, hand
and
end of ments end of and hydromonth wind- pneumonth
matic
mill

Number of machines
1919 monthly average
' 1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
• 1926 monthly average

Steam, power, 6and
centrifugal

Shipments

46,207

213, 232

57, 305
66, 720
73, 739

Dollars

Number of units

7 51, 566

49,804
45, 021

58,845
692

678

696

6, 566

Shipments

Unfilled

orders

Thousands of dollars
$1, 044
1,945
1,176
1,031
1,532
1,136
1,375
1, 552 ,

522, 995
516, 966
545, 812
604, 393

1,148
1,088
1,542
1,471

946
1,067
1,319
1,354

1,463
1, 661
1,563
1,791

1,392
1,539
1,498
1,428

3,031
3,150
3,212

3,378
3,252
3,256
2,765

24,117
35, 244
46, 197
51, 005
61, 073
70, 307

New
orders

$1, 339
2, 045
859
1,157
1,464
1,099
1,430
1,582

47, 128

254, 075
225, 891
239, 463
266, 358

74, 071
34, 691
48, 203
59, 036
60, 741
73, 506
85, 754

Total

72,029 7 $455, 512
2,049
481, 371
2,235
469, 503
3,071
582, 347

6,214

$4, 306

9,679
4,785
3,807
5,192

2,438
3,001

3,273

1925
January
February
March
April

77,004
76,200

May
June
July
August

234, 821

192, 861

78,774

316, 936

September
October
November
December

77, 515
76, 267
78, 539
75, 577
73, 746
70, 683

59, 815
60, 030
58, 327
56, 268

2,213

53, 038
61, 108
62, 925
63, 380
64, 302
65, 495
64, 040

57, 665
60, 344
59, 360
63, 995

3,136
3,413
3,151

3,289

600, 766
627, 448
597, 720
636, 353

66, 601
63, 607
62, 276
59, 894

62, 944
68, 152
46, 173
53, 068

2,909
3,666
2,984
3,033

643, 338
662, 700
516, 356
513, 311'

1,323
1,481
1,289
1,336

1,461
1,582
1,290
1,625

50, 269
56, 255
51, 118
42, 984

3,167

2,609
3,009
3,226

506, 934
493, 381
540, 814
487,763.

1,331
1,280
1,656
1,669

1,193
1,275
1,408
1,460

38, 570
60, 707
51, 874
46, 000

3,330
4,085
3,653
3,225

475, 475
648, 045
581, 726
561, 064

1,730
1,834
1,594
1,947

1, 603
1,698
1,611
1,919

3,546
3,620
3,586
3,606

38, 578
39, 912
29, 208

3,173

473, 617
463, 522
448, 140

1,468
1,484
1,462
1,533

1,703
1,540
1,674
1,541

3,332
3,256
3,029
2,992

2,417

2,422
2,627
2,975

3,530

i

1936
January
February
March
April

68, 753
77, 161
92, 832
92? 582
89, 150
90, 758
85, 799
84, 912

72, 865
73, 258
69, 762
70, 592

93, 801
89 645
81, 394
! 82, 263
i

_ _ _ _ _ _
320, 110

i

723
637
911
715

415
643
733
915

5, 627
4, 510

677
798
704
663

674
693
785
652

824
783
711
681

662
669
574
506

76, 308
75, 459
69, 654
70, 340

270, 934

216, 148

759
637
941
716

54, 657
61, 509
74, 859
74, 522

258, 238

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2,539
2,964
3,550

632
634
583
500

599
804
620
620

5,144

5,856

5,660
6,092

5, 915

6, 254

7,004
8,318

6,142
5,110

7,830
7,578

4,320
4,267

7,534
7,463
6,310

4,847

5,581

7,802
9,172
9,019

3,333
3, 451

2,910

2,892
3,121

3,385

1927
Februarv
April

May
June

-

!
i
i
i

i!

1
Compiled by the Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturers' Association from companies representing about 90 per cent of the industry. Annual figures represent quarterly
averages. Quarterly data from 1923 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 12.
2
Compiled by the American Washing Machine Manufacturers' Association from reports of 48 members representing practically the entire industry in the United States
and Canada. Data for 7 small firms have been estimated to make the compilation complete. Monthly data from 1920, showing electric, gas, and power, water-power, and
hand machines, separately, are given in November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 97.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, horn reports of 11 manufacturers, covering domestic water systems. Values of orders and
shipments arc given on press releases.
4
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, .Bureau of the Census, from reports of 21 manufacturers. Details by classes are given on press releases.
5 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, covering 22 firms, until 1924, since when only 19 firms have reported; the total shipments include, besides the articles
shownin other two columns.the value of cylinders shipped separately. Details for each class, segregated as to foreign and domestic shipments, are shown separately in the
monthly summaries of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
• Datafromthe Hydraulic Society, covering about two-thirds of the industry, on which monthly data back to January, 1919, may be found in the September, 1923, issue
(No. 25), pp. 64-57. The association reports give data by classes, showing single steam, double steam, power, and centrifugal. The number of firms reporting has gradually increased from 14 in 1919 to 23 in 1925 and therefore the data are not strictly comparable for the entire period. Data prorated to a comparable basis are shown at the
end of the text-matter in this issue.
? Eleven months' average.




45

Table 20.—INDUSTRIAL AND FARM MACHINERY

Sales

Number

Dollars

Total
h.p.

Relative to av.
shipments, 1922-1924

!•

Number
3, 073

586, 583
469, 183
511, 148
518, 249

234
183
73
130
122
94
112
113

52, 732
65, 920
27, 262
60, 409
60, 871
42, 857
46, 111
45, 519

261
202
38
77
134
94
150
162

345,908

305, 581
277, 856
348, 590
325, 952

421, 918
446, 895
539, 540
539, 232

57
135
131
120

27, 871
46, 298
71, 099
47, 627

104
114
134
131

June
July
August

332, 175
334, 424
353, 561
580, 865

407, 340
318, 442
352, 603
388, 371

463, 431
460, 383
457, 925
598, 143

122
128
147
91

55, 588
44, 095
58, 719
29, 865

135
159
153
161

September
October
November
December

296, 438
424, 054
480, 328
416, 610

351, 121
400, 646
414, 148
472, 144

544,042
518, 795
593, 456
550, 016

119
114
76
108

38, 155
53, 451
33, 461
47, 104

149
208
189
162

165
132
161

279
297
293

3,725
3,777
4,726

414, 121
472, 814
483, 010
434, 626

445, 377
422, 004
525, 655
402, 494

501, 793
536, 978
504, 671
506, 214

72
83
132
145

36, 913
33, 141
52, 312
70, 055

145
146
183
134

166
163
195
162

319
300
282
247

3,138

425, 638
407, 940
378, 163
391, 935

415, 082
417, 632
448, 390
384, 924

524, 382
511, 290
411, 119
422, 148

129
175
125
104

48, 482
50, 494
38, 852

112
186
173
167

150
159
146
130

400, 464
396, 354
454, 536
652, 334

377, 798
447, 189
405, 345
542, 640

522, 273
524, 612
570, 608
682, 896

127
112
85
72

44, 211
40, 780
27, 606
34, 974

194
195
175
134

157
193
184
193

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
6 $97, 284 e $101, 843
256, 869
275, 955
379, 464
403, 443
306, 664
311, 892
363, 566
388, 775
436, 211
442, 661

1923 monthly averacre
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average

7

$369, 816

3,097
3,157
3,201

3,220
8153
167

Shipments

§

a
u)

Production

Shipments

Unfilled
New Ship- ororders ments ders,
end
mo.

AGRICULTURAL
MACHINERY AND
EQUIPMENT «

PATENTS
GRANTED *
Agricultural
implements
Internalcombustion
engines

New
orders

YEAR AND MONTH

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

MACHINE
TOOLS 3

Domestic

STOKERS 2

FOUNDRY
EQUIPMENT i

Relative to 1923-1925

68
65
57
49
49
52
61
53

65
73
65
49
59
58
63
51

54
45
77
71

91
91
118

93
90
117

82
95
123

101
89
110

50
60
83
62

82
109
138
140

78
112
145
144

97
95
113
122

97
101
104
106

79
69
57
50

92
90
48
56

128
138
140
131

133
145
141
127

107
108
137
147

109
108
107
110

68
63
48
48

57
59
53
43

125
102
84
102

116
101
78
86

159
110
110
166

115
116
121
126

3,564
3,506
4,639

63
55
72
46

34
54
69
55

122
148
168
140

107
143
169
142

170
175
162
131

137
133
137
133

214
255
277
308

3,625
4,495
3,334
4,254

53
68
49
39

40
42
37
78

153
179
154
150

157
190
157
135

142
125
126
199

141
140
137
129

363
350
340
278

3,115
3, 239

43
40
52
51

30
32
79
63

121
86
76

110
83
66

148
102
131

132
128
120

8290

3, 550
3,871

294

3,729

1925
304, 725
326, 887
469, 325

January
February
JVlarch
April

.

1926
January
February _ _ _ _ _ _
March
April

__

Mi ay

June
July
August
September
(October
November
December

-

------

_
1

__

68,408

3,057
3,320
4,146

3,933
3,773
4,724
3,477
3,513
4,281

4,330
3,512

1927

January
February
March
April

:

_

May

June
1

Data reported by 11 members of the Foundry Equipment Manufacturers' Association, said to represent 65 to 70 per cent of the foundry equipment industry. The princi-

when 4 establishments consolidated into 2). Monthly data from 1920 appeared in September, 1922, issue (No. 13), p. 48. Press releases show segregation as to installation
under fire-tube or water-tube boilers.
3
Compiled by the National Machine Tool Builders' Association, including quantity reports from between 50 and 60 firms, said to represent about one-third of the Indus*
try. This index, based on average monthly shipments for the years 1922 to 1924 as 100, covers gross new orders, shipments, and unfilled orders at the end of the month.
The association reports give detailed index numbers by sizes of firms but no numerical data. Detailed shipments data, since discontinued, appeared on p. 55 of the ApriL
1924, issue (No. 32).
4
Patents granted compiled from the official records on file in the U. S. Department of Commerce, U. 8. Patent Office, Division of Publications; inasmuch as patents are
granted on Tuesdays only, the number of patents shown for a given month represents the total of either four or five Tuesdays. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in ApriL
1923, issue (No. 20), p. 48, except for internal-combustion engines, which appeared in June, 1923, issue (No. 22), p. 52. Agricultural implements patents fall within the official
classification of "Agricultural implements; planters, harrows and diggers, plows, harvesters, scattering unloaders, and threshing implements." Annual averages from
19135to 1918 appeared in February, 1925, issue (No. 42), p. 64.
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago from reports of 113 companies on value of shipments, of which 72 report on foreign shipments, the reports being
estimated to cover about 80 per cent of the industry. Production figures are computed from employment figures of 109 concerns. Monthly data from 1923 appeared in.
the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 25.
6
Seven months' average, June to December, inclusive.
7 Eight months' average, May to December, inclusive.
8
Three months' average.




46

Table 21.—AUTOMOBILES
EXPORTS 2

PRODUCTION i
Passenger cars
YEAR AND
MONTH
Total

United
States

Canada

United States

Trucks

Total United CanStates ada

SALES* 11 GEMBBAIs MOTORS
CORP.*

Canada

FORiEIGK
:
ASComplete or chassis 'SMMComplete or chassis
Sales
Pas- Pro- ,
AccesBLIES senger porsories
tion
cars
Pasand
Pasand closed
To
T©
Total senger Tr'ks parts Total senger Tr'ks
motor- cars i dealers ; users
cars
cars
cycles sold

Thous.
ofdols.

Number of cars

Thous, , P..et, 1
of dols. total Number of cars

Number of cars

1913mo.av__
1914 mo. av _ _
1915 mo. av__
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av__
191 8 mo. av__
1919 mo. av__

38, 458
45, 307
68, 218
124, 468
145,066
77, 199
138, 138

1,958
2,115
6,167
7,500
10, 680
18, 938
26,364

2,241
2,147
5,330
6,737
6,687
3,937
6,894

2,157
1,861
3,489
5,160
5,480
3,078
5,595

84
286
1,841
1,577
1,207
859
1,299

$523
462
1,389
2,001
2,635
2,801 n,006
3,547 1,912

6780
1,633

6226
279

1920 mo. av__
1921moiav__
1922mo.av._
1923 mo. a v _ _
1924 mo. av._
1925 mo. a v _ _
1926 mo. av._

156, 930
127, 933
199, 819
309, 930
273,897
319, 650
327, 461

26, 837
12, 272
7,909 20, 956
10, 769 31, 524
9,814 31,509
11, 609 41, 706
13, 707 44, 584

20, 360
596
30,090 1,434
30, 052 1,457
39, 866 1,840
41, 198 3,386

14,304
3,202
6,546
12, 658
34, 843
25, 245
25,483

11, 876
2,579
5,591
10, 586
12, 589
20, 358
19, 866

2,428
623
955
2,072
2,255
4,886
5,617

7,183
3,255
3,191
4,915
5,086
7,016
7,560

1,918
893
3,164
5,827
4,721
6,182
6,194

1,506
775
2,950
4,790
3,657
4,834
4,469

412
118
214
1,037 8,851
1,064 11, 862
1,349 15, 322
1,725 14, 577

139, 340
85, 400
116, 420
177, 140
168, 540
186, 642
217, 351

1935
May
Juno
July
August

384, 548 366, 197
366, 510 352, 261
360, 124 348, 984
223, 517 216, 087

18, 351
14,249
11, 140
7,430

45, 719
38, 151
41, 870
37,850

43,831
36, 357
40, 025
36,364

1,888
1,794
1,845
1,486

29, 871
20, 408
20, 859
33, 240

24, 562 5,309 9,081
17, 310 3,098 7,329
16, 567 4,292 5,704
26, 516 6,724 6,021

5,753
6,081
4,284
4,431

4, 633
4,811
3,021
2,995

1,120
1,270
1,263
1,446

18, 537
17, 089
16, 694
16, 136

September.—
October
November
December

274, 227 263, 855
408, 017 394, 096
337,435 328, 694
286, 141 278, 643

10, 372
13, 921
8,741
7,498

60,482
46, 013
40,048
34,488

58,002 2,480
44, 323 1,690
37, 811 2,237
32, 757 1,731

22, 814
22, 562
28, 472
33, 520

18, 780 4,034 7,561
18,487 4,075 7,521
21, 158 7,314 6,346
24, 619 8,901 7,887

5,547
7,976
9,323
7,015

4,030
6,229
7,659
5,642

1,517
1,747
1,664
1,373

1936
January _.. _ 284, 703 272, 922
334, 524 319, 763
February
399, 105 381, 116
March
401, 836 383, 907
April

11, 781
14, 761
17, 989
17, 929

33,517
41,784
49, 386
54,135

29, 819
37, 707
45, 001
50, 562

3,698
4,077
4,385
3,573

26, 312
28, 232
27, 952
31, 189

21, 171 5,141 7,161 5,159
22, 355 5,877 8,380 8,408
22, 278 5,674 10, 617 10, 888
23, 152 8,037 9,608 4,101

3,760
5,936
8,033
2,661

191, 910
299, 161
262, 083
308, 041
313, 754

7$116,480

r

28
37
43
63

38,064
66,546
48, 945
69, 659
102, 904

37, 195
60, 940
54, 797
68, 921
101, 319

200, 560
230, 120
246, 660
203, 960

59
58
54
62

77, 223
71, 088
57, 358
76, 462

87,488
75, 864
65, 872
78, 638

11, 817
12, 713
14, 827
17, 251

236,000

66
71
73
77

89, 018
96, 364
73, 374
54,117

83,519
86, 281
60, 257
56,129

1,399
2,472
2,855
1,440

17, 234
17, 547
20, 287
19, 777

188,060

1,617
1,562
1,517
597

11, 391
15, 431
12, 299
11, 647

322, 051

May
June
July
August-

394, 569
358, 388
329, 956
393, 056

373, 140
339, 570
317, 003
380, 274

21,429
18, 818
12, 953
12; 782

51,568
47, 265
41, 873
47, 836

48,063
44, 332
39, 618
45, 333

3,505
2,933
2, 255
2,503

28, 482
19, 934
22, 486
20, 272

22, 120 6,362
15, 354 4,580
17, 077 5,409
16, 130 4,142

7,685
6,789
8,160
6,319

5,594
4,541
4,158
3,045

3,977
.2, 979
2,641
2,448

September. __
October
November
December

363, 547 350, 923
300, 160 289, 565
226, 278 219, 504
143, 413 137, 361

12, 624
10, 595
6,774
6,052

51, 257
46, 973
39, 410
30, 002

46, 386 4,871
42, 898 4,075
36, 356 3,054
28, 302 1,700

27, 001
20, 395
27, 873
25, 663

20, 038 6,963 6,925
16, 348 4,047 6,018
20, 562 7,311 7,016
21, 805 3,858 6,038

6,471
7,546
8,793
5,620

4,483 1,988 8,514
5,439 2,107 12, 919
6,435 2,358 14, 242
784 13, 641
4,836

101, 780
252, 280
187, 700

142, 700
202, 940

336,497
175, 755
242, 398
160, 767
237,
256,
171,
170,

931
631
915
567

84
82
78
76

76, 332 53, 698
91, 313 64,971
113, 341 106, 051
122, 742 136, 643

79
81
84
81

120, 979
111, 380
87, 643
134, 231

81
81

138, 360 118, 224
115, 849 99, 073
78, 550 101, 729
44,130 52, 729

141,651
117, 176
101, 576
122, 305

1937
February
March

May

J

tnercel

. on the basis ofsh~ip~ments and are given in detail in the July, 1923, issue (No. 23) of the SURVEY. ' Monthly data from 1922 appeared in May^ 1926, issue (NoT 57), p. 267
2 Automobile exports compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
a Cars assembled in foreign countries except Canada by the principal American automobile manufacturers compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of
Foreign and Domestic Commerce. These cars are not included in the production figures for the United States and Canada, nor in the exports of complete cars or chassis,
but they are represented in the value of parts exported.
4 Computed from tax collections by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, to represent actual sales values and not merely the taxes on those values;
the sales actually took place in the previous month. On passenger cars and motor cycles the tax rate was 5 per cent prior to Mar. 26,1926, at which time the rate was
changed to 3 per cent. Sales of accessories can no longer be computed owing to the elimination of tax under the act of 1926.
B
Data supplied by the General Motors Corporation to show proportion of closed cars sold by a representative manufacturer and the relation between sales by the company to retail dealers and by these dealers to users. Closed car percentage is based on sales of Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Oakland, Buick, and Cadillac cars, while
the other figures comprise, in addition to these cars, the Chevrolet commercial cars and trucks, and cars, trucks, and tractors not now manufactured, including through
April, 1925, the G. M. C. trucks, which were then transferred to another manufacturing unit. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 25.
• Nine months' average, April to December, inclusive.
f Six months' average, July to December, inclusive.




47

Table 22.—MOTOR VEHICLES
ELECTRIC
TRUCKS AND
TRACTORS 2

YEAE AND MONTH

Total

High- Second Third
est
price highest highest

Lowest
price

Miscellaneous

245, 315

7,113

47, 295

39, 586

147, 531

3,790

164, 769
158, 817
_.249, 971
350, 533

4,024
4,053
6,931
9,144

31, 193
30, 205
50, 176
68, 004

21, 426
22, 143
36, 594
50, 069

104, 512
98, 761
149, 839
214, 691

3,614
3, 655
6,431
8,625

May
June
July
August

339, 794
309, 512
319, 964
261, 307

8,340
8,011
8,290
8,144

64, 703
55, 033
54, 777
51, 872

49, 441
47, 269
54, 967
49, 056

208, 833
193, 147
199, 003
150, 457

8,477
6,052
2,927
1,778

September
October
November
December..

193, 169
247, 002
193, 922
155, 014

7,893
8,663
6,364
5,496

50, 468
47, 814
33, 297
30, 003

46, 417
43, 918
29, 866
23, 860

87, 073
145, 508
123, 612
94, 935

1936
January
February
March
April

192, 994
161, 975
273,260
388, 024

6,417
5,215
10, 426
15, 684

36, 971
29, 575
53, 026
78,488

32, 612
31, 377
57, 774
86, 021

396,
319,
327,
303,

504
788
713
757

16, 349
13, 216
11, 553
10, 600

76, 527
61, 366
56, 535
63, 703

258, 431
238, 328
161, 013

9,579
9,160
6,650

55, 224
49, 288
31, 632

1925
January
February
March. _.
April

May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December __
1937
January.February
March
__
April

_

.

FIRE EXTINGUISHING
EQUIPMENT *

Shipments

Shipments

Domestic

All
Tractors other

Exports

Number of vehicles

Number of cars
1925 monthly average..
1926 monthly average

AUTOMOBILE
ACCESSORIES 3

Shipments

NEW PASSENGER-CAR REGISTRATIONS
(by price groups) 1

16
16

93
94

11
8

Serv- MoOrigi- Reice
nal place- Actor
equip- ment cesso- equip- vehiries ment
ment parts
cles
Indexes relative to Jan., 1925

Hand
types

Number

156
139

120
124

153
131

124
156

127
124

51, 581
50, 292

100
101
138
183

100
86
95
107

100
121
159
193

100
122
162
149

106
88
110
138

54,188
45, 715
51, 482
55, 734

174
164
165
161

134
129
152
130

173
172
149
149

146
159
113
113

142
140
163
131

53,906
54, 856
55, 185
49, 997

545

5259

541

549

5280

550

1,318
1,099
783
720

557
17
12
12

»286

512

108
102
85

5
10
10

179
214
149
141

100
131
133
145

155
163
158
146

123
100
96
110

126
123
128
134

51, 343
51, 408
45,491
49,664

115, 643
94, 856
150, 921
206, 045

1,351
952
1,113
1,786

21
15
11
17

86
96
128
90

4
5
8
4

137
160
182
,160

103
114
146
141

127
139
167
176

115
138
205
208

82
86
110
119

43, 659
51, 478
59, 245
52, 874

88, 455
70, 524
71, 371
59, 355

213, 151
173, 312
186, 842
168, 920

2,022
1,370
1,412
1,179

12
21
15
14

87
104
95
81

9
19
1
2

145
140
135
157

177
135
117
120

183
140
127
131

175
184
142
166

110
148
142
153

61, 526
53, 751
54,234
50, 659

50, 818
48, 237
33, 621

141, 811
130, 650
88, 430

969
993
680

10
18
18
18

82
97
86
95

5
17
19
5

151
125
79
95

120
116
94
109

126
109
83
64

165
145
119
112

127
148
132
129

48, 517
44, 334
42, 953
40, 270

__

May
June
1
Compiled by R. L. Polk & Co., showing the number of new cars registered each month in all but three States, estimates being made for these States, which in the
aggregate have only 2 per cent of the country's automobile population. The complete reports show data by makes of car and by States and counties.
2
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing shipments of electric industrial trucks and tractors by 9 leading manufacturers, comprising the greater part of the industry.
3
Sales of automobile accessories and parts shipped to customers by 75 members of the Motor and Accessory Manufacturers' Association, the relative numbers being
based on value, with January, 1925, as 100.
4
Compiled by the U. S, Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 39 companies, representing practically the entire industry. Further details by
classes are given on press releases. Data compiled by the Fire Extinguisher Exchange from January, 1922, through September, 1923, appeared in the May, 1924, issue (No. 33).
p. 81.
6
Quarter ending in month indicated.




48

BATHS
YEAR AND
MONTH

Ship- Stocks,
New
ments end mo. orders

LAVATORIES

Unfilled
orders,
end mo.

SINKS

Ship- Stocks,
New
ments end mo. orders

Ship- Stocks,
New
ments end mo. orders

MISCELLANEOUS

Ship- Stocks,
ments end mo.

New
orders

TOTAL
SMALL
WAKE 2

Unfilled
orders,
end mo.

Number of pieces
47, 754
49, 527
55, 769
65, 230
44, 888
32, 697
45, 768

132, 369
139, 751

3 40, 816
137, 628
253, 957
168, 542
104, 126
71, 230

51, 438
58, 169
91, 512
110, 479
110, 283
127, 356
113, 773

90,195
78, 578
78, 297
110, 347

131, 904
79,444
64, 876
89, 402

105, 056
121, 490
122, 999
123, 269

121, 092
100, 926
110, 330
110, 690

112, 457
118, 448
134, 218
129, 629

119, 104
101, 925
95, 562
90, 441

September _
October
NovemberDecember. _

122, 564
127, 355
86, 615
93, 242

1926
January
February-March
April
May
June
July
August

1913 mo. av.
1914 mo. av.
1915 mo. av.
1916 mo. av.
1917 mo. av.
1918 mo. av.
1919 mo. av,

39, 831
42, 450
46, 977
51, 181
33, 172
19,495
34, 608

60, 530
42, 175

21, 514
69, 872

1920 mo. av.
1921 mo. av.
1922 mo. av.
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av_

51, 441
41, 510
74, 814
90, 396
95, 629
110, 460
99, 595

20, 951
75, 324
41, 768
35, 439
71, 193
106, 995
156, 620

36, 774
40, 911
93, 033
97, 316
98, 758
115, 841
103, 581

1924
September. 104, 622
93, 878
October
November. 75, 075
December. _ 73>724

68,373
88, 980
90, 012
104, 301

1925
January
February
March
April

93, 938
93, 380
105, 905
107, 766

May
June
July
August

HOUSEHOLD
WARE*

Table 23—ENAMELED WARE1

P.ct.

34, 322
73, 612

53, 428
57, 789
70, 626
74, 293
48, 419
33, 097
54, 584

145, 329
125, 814

43, 302
109, 318
79, 507
56, 408
143, 788
217, 056
236, 642

53, 438
56, 315
117, 222
121, 891
106, 353
131, 741
115, 065

60,231
66, 458
95, 327
114, 146
120, 381
129, 233
113,638

103, 002
105,497
85,790
83, 861

147, 318
161, 474
171, 999
196, 324

94, 243
91, 583
83, 685
127, 240

108, 572
115, 236
114, 759
109, 136

123, 533
123,085
121, 936
123,240

184, 765
203, 625
225, 497
228, 532

122, 785
129, 806
140, 692
129, 826

110, 318
111, 797
117, 461
113,328

122, 322
130,691
148, 428
140, 391

84, 933
85, 555
110,011
123, 600

121, 827
110,396
93, 685
98, 031

107, 316
79, 437
78, 325
83, 831

90, 503
82, 909
102, 284
103, 624

130, 056
144, 501
166, 756
177, 778

103, 500
87, 002
118, 076
110, 476

116, 740
121, 933
113, 427
114, 748

164, 614
158, 897
149, 829
139, 964

September . 102, 333
98, 237
October
80, 271
November.
December.. 68, 133

149, 555
158, 764
161, 391
177, 331

35, 089
88, 018

31, 555
34, 655
29, 367
40, 887
22, 201
23, 405
28, 383

77, 034
79, 869

25, 427
41, 900

66, 333
111, 764
93, 336
59, 188
154, 896
266, 823
283, 031

57, 502
64, 577
124, 179
127, 919
115, 485
133, 381
115, 666

31, 062
33, 640
45, 531
57, 913
70, 658
62, 289
50,003

47, 410
89, 394
68, 400
51, 260
111,138
171, 306
151, 371

27, 691
31, 803
60, 933
63, 290
65, 700
58, 535
52, 364

3 129,261
406, 291
913, 480
480, 920
250, 646
162, 217

110, 666
114, 710
91, 625
99, 857

197, 932
215, 939
228, 438
251, 448

94, 871
99, 688
93, 556
132, 658

75,312
71, 508
50, 716
46, 983

132, 121
158, 351
151, 675
187, 812

65, 201
58, 291
50, 175
65, 669

286, 783
206, 332
174, 127
254, 625

146, 677
124, 856
125, 847
123, 182

127, 289
121, 519
125, 667
135, 767

252, 258
276, 333
306, 220
306, 477

148, 857
123, 982
120, 513
130, 063

72, 316
65, 032
71, 203
75, 089

174, 290
188, 348
191, 104
196, 755

71, 685
59, 723
55, 595
52, 546

295, 400
299, 254
280, 734
265,885

232, 811
227, 018
225, 966
218, 728

129, 673
137, 887
144, 052
145, 848

130, 094
132, 243
135, 453
135, 211

286, 317
279, 287
273, 720
252, 703

138, 225
136, 027
140, 839
143, 275

75, 110
64, 232
60,837
58,747

180, 079
179, 127
176, 506
160, 085

60, 188
62, 723
65, 384
64, 019

251, 820
252, 991
251, 545
.260, 171

139, 858
140, 669
105, 523
108, 595

205, 012
201,847
222, 032
228, 838

145, 226
124, 362
117,750
115, 536

140, 046
145, 951
106, 028
115, 529

239, 654
239, 269
228, 659
260, 981

145, 236
130, 554
121, 985
121, 012

56,701
57,906
45, 910
44, 380

151, 433
142, 542
153, 960
161, 445

57, 629
54, 452
46, 778
51, 700

261, 737
192, 610
206, 451
189, 157

84
86
73

88, 38£
89, 611
94, 167
96, 048

114, 198
104, 982
121, 801
116, 205

232, 117
246, 544
245, 384
250, 143

125, 168
102, 910
128, 349
120, 139

115, 017
97, 797
121, 883
117, 212

253, 779
275, 530
301, 070
321, 073

123, 656
97, 108
130, 496
119, 236

51, 922
46, 210
55, 607
52,076

158, 717
160, 656
168, 298
158? 229

58, 729
47, 147
60, 226
51, 180

200, 619
198, 326
205, 003
198, 203

65
72
85
86

124, 479
119,554
112, 629
113,835

90, 427
80, 050
73, 640
61,991

125, 241
134, 542
117, 973
122, 523

249, 171
248, 959
238, 556
219, 086

129, 327
130, 904
118, 963
119, 924

127, 153
129, 509
117, 263
122, 294

307, 405
294, 587
284, 432
273, 590

126, 732
126, 728
117, 705
127, 758

55, 022
56, 144
48, 162
51, 559

160, 469
157, 030
151, 854
145, 143

59, 786
58, 538
49, 432
55, 657

182, 931
172, 026
160, 665
155, 423

81
80
71
77

97, 178
92,008
84, 209
80, 023

48, 278
43, 556
38, 801
49, 804

130, 131
117, 122
86, 552
74,005

210, 291
208, 406
225, 645
265, 400

115, 797
109, 582
86, 962
92, 759

125, 044
120, 262
91, 699
78, 524

257, 240
246, 816
274, 422
306, 431

115, 973
110, 784
94, 740
97,081

55,412
52, 018
40, 247
35, 659

137, 971
135, 600
137, 926
144, 564

51, 483
49, 027
42, 243
44,914

143, 670
105, 664
96, 966
127, 104

80
86

681

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June

1 Monthly production data beginning January, 1922, represent complete production, including total membership of the Enameled Sanitary Ware Manufacturers9
Association and reports to the Bureau of the Census from outside manufacturers, except that a few small firms were not able to furnish complete reports prior to January,
1924; data now include 21 manufacturers. Data prior to 1922 are totals of the association reports representing about 98 per cent of the industry, and may be found in the
May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 81.
2 Small ware includes lavatories, sinks, and miscellaneous,
a
4 Average of 8 months, May to December, inclusive.
Data compiled by the Enamelist Publishing Co. from trade reports on the wet-process vitreous enamel industry, covering stoves, kitchen ware, scales, refrigerator
linings, etc.; reports are from about 350 furnaces, representing about 90 per cent of the industry.
« Average for three months.




49

Table 24.—COPPER AND BRASS
COPPER

PLUMBING FIXTURES

Stocks, end mo.5 Price,
ingots,
electrolytic
(New
York) s

Production

YEAR AND MONTH
Mine'

World 2 Domes- Ex- (N.and S.America)
tic
produc- shipports, 4
tion,
Smel- Refined" blister ments,3 refined Refined Blister
(N.andS.
ter" America)
refined

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

51, 487
47, 851
62,003
83, 578
78,976
79, 584
50, 514

51, 020
47, 922
57,834
80, 327
78,588
79, 522
53, 601

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

51,023
19, 667
41, 154
61, 564
66, 115
70, 176
72, 693

50,378' 69, 615
23, 938
44, 766
47, 131
65, 736
69, 478
96, 990
74, 872 108, 361
112, 692
78, 944
82, Oil .120, 038

67, 720
71,042
67,400
69, 566

76, 571
82, 839
78, 643
79, 285

April

71,026
68, 131
75, 728
73,454

May
June
July
August _ .

September
October
November
December

38, 593
35, 003
28,362
31, 906
46, 194
30,398
21, 413

77,300

Wholesale
New
priced orders
6 pieces

New orders,
tubular 7

Dollars Number
perlb.

Short tons

Dollars

$0. 1527
» . 1360
.1703
.2720
.2718
.2481
.1869

297, 928

BRASS
FAUCETS 1

Shipments

Number of pieces

$67. 58

1936
January
February

- ._

- -

25,888 270, 151
26, 178 337, 989 206, 377
30,326 188,211 177, 928
33, 859
120, 427 244, 509
45, 692 » 128, 918 "241,659
44, 196 i« 82, 726 i« 248, 213
39, 231
73,390 266, 638

108, 426
121, 639
113, 474
119, 535

125, 206
138, 234
133, 007
131, 809

75, 670
76, 468
82, 779
71,358

34, 516
30, 872
30, 547
36, 069

69,007
72, 855
67, 838
73, 082

247, 398
247, 061
249, 064
248, 875

.1438
.1430
.1435
.1387

197, 703
323, 247
393, 556
379, 462

192, 638
314, 967
385, 128
383,828

111. 72
111. 77
110. 83
110. 13

368, 405
442, 427
547, 667
317, 210

338, 083
468, 330
366, 603
280, 398

78, 576
75, 630
80, 719
85, 951

113,974
110, 538
121, 798
116, 302

129, 518
126, 455
134, 727
136, 938

67, 829
70,406
88, 573
75,030

33, 648
30,506
39, 244
44, 926

81,686
86, 354
75, 206
72, 644

251, 096
251, 947
261, 916
264, 721

.1382
.1400
.1386
.1371

376, 875
239, 507
230, 262
192, 666

310, 120
234, 164
217, 435
187, 261

109. 79
109. 72
109. 87
109. 19

551,408
344, 264
257, 336
257, 082

455, 876
351, 174
298, 742
302, 841

73, 542
71, 317
72, 228
72, 014

85, 025
77, 166
76, 479
77, 613

113, 898
116, 743
119, 020
128, 925

136, 468
124, 100
124, 483
128, 568

73, 197
78, 206
76, 352
84, 034

36, 263
42, 422
35, 300
37, 741

69, 369
66, 096
64, 940
66, 658

274, 943
275, 338
277, 888
260, 186

.1360
. 1366
.1392
.1417

184, 501
154, 250
174, 145
176, 794

211,223
173, 223
188, 203
214, 370

108. 74
173. 13
106. 78
106. 23

219, 362
188, 979
225, 831
186, 751

263, 810
199, 475
237, 808
226,872

72, 627
75, 099
74, 947
72, 205

1925
September
October
November
December _ .

79, 554
113, 016
121, 624
128, 406
133, 365

52, 179
25, 605
45, 829
61, 293
62, 782
69, 264
75, 181

80, 320
87, 012
92, 768
86, 876

123, 390
123, 120
126, 322
126, 424

132, 013
136, 600
148, 321
142, 191

78, 459
73, 939
74, 207
61, 942

40, 753
36,563
46, 471
46, 932

70, 137
68, 233
73, 856
85, 501

263, 935
267, 866
277, 479
272, 342

.1406
.1386
.1358
.1330

201, 998
155, 069
172, 394
152, 616

204, 256
175, 454
171, 963
161, 629

106. 22
106. 19
106. 02
105.74

261, 055
253, 6»4
216, 117
137, 634

277, 647
311,883
246, 041
142, 661

.1746
.1250
.1338 13 220, 198 i3$208,006
.1442
215, 908 207, 849
.1303
265, 748 224, 054
,1404
242, 535 229, 695
.1380
200, 923 204, 108

126. 45
119. 84
112. 81
107.64

u 296, 090 K 280, 033
478, 768 519, 970
437, 252 381, 261
385, 891 421, 116
258, 285 276, 236

1937
January.
February
March
April
May
June
1
Data on brass faucets, representing the total of 22 different kinds of faucets, reported to the National Association of Brass Manufacturers by about 13 members each
month.
2 World production of blister copper as compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics, includes the smelter output of the United States, Mexico, Canada, Chile,
Peru, Japan, Australia, Europe, Belgian Congo, and Rhodesia. These countries produced about 95 per cent of the world's production in 1922 and about 96 per cent in 1923.
The 3figures are based on smelter production of blister copper without any attempt at segregation according to the country of origin.
Shipments figures represent the movement of refined copper from 12 refineries, located in both North and South America, as compiled by the American Bureau of
Metal Statistics.
4
Exports of refined copper compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, include refined copper in pigs, ingots, bars, old
and scrap, pipes, tubes, plates, sheets, and wire except insulated wire and cable; other manufactures of copper included since Jan. 1922.
& Stocks of blister copper, North and South America, including copper "in process," compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics.
0 Price of ingot copper, electrolytic, New York, based on averages of daily transactions, reported by the Engineering and Mining Journal-Press.
1 Tubular plumbing sales from Tubular Plumbing Goods Association, comprising cast, wrought, and miscellaneous traps, basin, bath, and tank supply pipes and connected wastes and overflows. Details by classes, sizes, and geographical distribution are given on the association's reports.
s Wholesale price, compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, is an average of 12 reports o f combined net selling prices to retailers, without
freight, on the following competitive fixtures: Bathtub, washstand, water-closet, sink, two-part cement laundry tub, and 30-gallon range boiler.
« Figures on mine production represent practically complete primary production of copper in the United States, as compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics,
since January, 1921. Mine production from 1913 through 1920 is given as reported annually by the U. S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey.
1° Smelter production data are based on the production of blister copper by smelters in the United States from both domestic and imported ores, also from some scrap
copper, as compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics. Yearly figures for the period 1913-1920 represent production as reported by the U. S. Department of the
Interior, Geological Survey.
11
Refined production represents the total output of refined copper by primary refiners in North and South America, as compiled by the American Bureau of Metal
Statistics.
12
Nine months' average.
13 Four months* average.
14
Seven months' average.
M Ten months' average, October and November missing.
16
Eight months' average, January, February, April, and May missing.

26446 °—27



4

50

LAMINATED
PHENOLIC
PRODUCTS 3

ELECTRICAL
PORCELAIN a

ELECTRIC.
GOODS
(qtly.)1

Shipments

YEAR AND
MONTH

ShipStand- Special High
ard
tension ments

New
orders
Thous.
of dolls.

ELECTRIC
MOTORS 4

POWER
SWITCH.
EQUIP.
8

1 to 200 HP.

New orders

Orders Billings

(qtly.)

vlndoor

Outdoor

Single-pole
units

Dollars

ELECTRIC
HOISTS 6

1922 mo. av. $133, 113
1923 ino. av_ 170, 015
1924 mo. av. 171, 346 !o$71, 607 o$217,346 ^$109,310
1925 mo. av. 181, 008 125, 446 153, 779 35, 091 $723, 692
1926 mo. av.
90, 371 151, 503 43, 497

New orders

OUTLET
BOXES
AND
COVERS?

VULCANIZED
FIBER 8

Shipments

Wo.

Value

No. of
hoists

Dollars

INDUSTRIAL
REFLECTORS e

Table 25.—ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS

Dom. sales
Con-

Shipments

Hol- sumpTotal low tion
ware
Thous. of Thous.
Ibs.
dollars

Number of
pieces

Sales
Units

311 $167, 929 $154,073
300 160, 016 165,089

"147, 498

!

1934
September. _ 146, 474
October _ _ _
November
December.. 183, 140

53,. 255
66, 751
108, 471
111, 025

141, 796
176, 541
162, 898
208, 454

96, 013
115, 119

1935
January
February
March
April

152, 840
131, 865
137, 259
151, 241

163, 127
185, 915
165, 953
148, 215

19, 065
27, 405
58, 267
37, 758

880, 318
558, 184
490, 169
366, 761

342
303
264
264

181, 618
158, 668
137, 030
137, 065

109, 017
122, 930
179, 609
155, 969

112, 563
104, 659
123, 126
111, 002

163, 395
152, 318
156, 694
121, 555

37, 996
35, 370
37, 208
30, 154

416, 741
481, 664
527, 052
883, 158

280
268
320
288

164, 636
136, 064
159, 652
150, 642

141, 910
151, 674
166, 417
149, 677

September- 180, 761
October
November
December __ 183, 363

100, 898
120, 041
166,366
93, 502

140, 375
158, 064
139, 883
149, 858

31, 354 1, 096, 531
37, 427 1, 318, 083
39, 653 984, 598
29, 436 681, 050

261
350
388
408

151,913
207, 761
213, 130
216, 966

118, 166
156, 508
179, 286
217, 715

1, 628, 546

1926
January
February
March__ . _ 203, 883
April

93,811
93, 540
98, 818
95, 259

134,
144,
172,
169,

726
031
506
213

44, 843
42, 749
51, 265
36, 627

567, 748 $815, 977 $934, 124
878, 028 807, 281
489, 884
603, 372 1, 167, 749 1, 027, 319 $10, 776
821, 947
540, 814
866, 869

305 152, 938
321 166, 243
385 234, 032
282 134, 109

169, 02&
210, 673
191, 188
128, 140

1, 466, 302 $977
946
1, 387, 165
1, 288, 116 1,052
964
1, 609, 255

85, 503
93, 437
75, 630
86, 986

141, 483
142, 098
154, 041
145, 616

43, 974
47, 992
43, 694
51, 872

556, 260
525, 690
613, 645
765, 810

253
332
293
273

147, 447
178, 426
171, 871
165, 773

185, 607
159, 124
130, 234
150, 419

1, 452, 768
1, 422, 186

97, 335
101, 984
90, 428
71, 715

146, 974
148, 970
176, 583
141, 789

43, 052 829, 355
41/038 1, 032, 042
44, 518 834, 884
30,335

326
233
290
312

153,632
128, 137
130, 257
157, 329

173, 958
169, 245
139, 231
174, 220

May
June
July
August

May
June
July

183, 568

176, 339

189, 642
|

\UgUSt

September
October
November
December

184, 107

175, 314

740,
904,
740,
792,

232
269
424
613

793, 832
928, 272
876, 257
876, 297

937, 913
801, 036
745, 629

745, 783
837, 214
897, 262

11, 436

15, 520

$7, 905

10, 191

14, 970

$42
34
65
61

2,630
2,822
3,266
3,182

878
855
889
902

61
48
43
42

3,234
3,272
3,020
2,711

913
932
790

47
61
48

2,682
2,175
2,643

12

460, 599

113, 716
133, 813
145, 161
178, 993
157, 713
137, 486

1927
January
February
March
April
May

June
I
1 Data compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from quarterly reports by 10 manufacturers of electrical goods.
2
Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association, from reports of 12 firms estimated to produce 50 to 60 per cent of all standard porcelain (8 firms) 15
to 20 per cent of special porcelain (12 firms), and 10 per cent of high-tension porcelain (3 firms).
3

Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association. This product is sold mostly in sheets, tubes, and cut panels and includes some material for noiseless
automobile gears.
* Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association, and comprise large power direct current electric motors of from 1 to 200 horsepower, inclusive, built
in general purpose motor, frames including control equipment sold with motors. The data are estimated to represent about 85 per cent of the output of these kinds of motors.
«Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association from reports of 10 firms estimated to represent about 90 per cent of the output of this product.
6
Compiled by the Electric Hoist Manufacturers' Association from the reports of nine firms.
? Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association from reports of six firms estimated to represent 75 per cent of the output of this product.
8 Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association. Domestic sales are exclusive of intercompany sales. Consumption represents total vulcanized
fiber paper, both sheet and tube.
9
Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association from reports of five companies estimated to represent 85 per cent of the output of the product.
Details by kind of reflector and wattage are given in the association's monthly reports. The reflectors shown here are only for industrial use, but most of them can be
used either indoors or outdoors.
1° Six months' average.
11
12 Nine months' average.
Quarter ending in month indicated.



51

Table 26.—TIN, ZINC, AND LEAD
LEADS

ZINC 2

TIN*

Retorts ProOre
ImOre
ports, Price, in oper- duction Stocks ship- stocks,
ation, (total at re- ments, Joplia
bars, (New
prifineries
Jopiin district
blocks, York) ^ end of
U.S.
month mary)
district
etc.

Stocks
YEAR AND
MONTH

Deliveries

World
visible

Dolls,
per Ib. Number

Long tons

1913 mo. av__
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av._
1916mo.av__
1917 mo. av
1918mo.av-.
1919 mo. av_-

3,658
3,475
4,063
4,685
4,823
4,862
2,692

12, 377
14, 907
15, 208
18, 586
18, 803
13, 894
12, 890

1,854
1,700
2,079
3,331
2,284
286
1,630

3,880 $0. 4359
3,536 5 . 3430
4,302 .3859
5,137 .4348
5,344 .6180
5, 302
3,337 .6333

1920mo.av__
1921 rno.av-.
1922mo.av_.
1923 mo. a v- .
1924 mo. av..
1925mo.av_.
1926mo.av__

4,260
2,156
4,788
5,846
5,344
6,371
6,504

19, 726
19, 697
24, 683
21, 740
21, 254
19, 538
15, 386

3,322
2,351
2,482
2,667
3,251
2,890
2,164

4, 689
2,017
5,016
5,745
5,422
6,386
6,424

1935
January _ __
February
March
April

7,155
7,205
7,100
6,655

22, 949
23, 591
19, 623
18, 105

4,394
3,949
5,184
2,309

May
June
July
August

4,910
6,175
6,475
6,520

20, 897
19, 797
19, 857
20, 000

SeptemberOctober
November___
December--_

6,360
6,070
5,670
6,160

1926
January
February
March
April

Price,
prime
west.,
(St.
Louis)
(4)

Production

Ore shipments
Jopiin
dist.

Dolls,
per Ib.

Short tons

Utah

Price,
Receipts Stocks, Pig»
of lead U.S. desilin
and
verized
U.S. Mexico (New
ore
York) *
Dolls,
per Ib.

Short tons

105, 684
94, 468
156, 568
204, 693
136, 639
123, 033
100, 830

28, 890
29, 420
40, 793
55, 621
55, 798
43, 160
38, 250

40, 659
20, 095
14, 253
17, 598
53, 721
41, 241
37, 485

22, 449
20, 139
23, 530
28, 996
33, 546
29, 362
33, 622

$0. 0550
.0506
.1306
.1264
. 0873
.0789
.0699

.4828
.2858
.3183
.4180
.4968
.5679
.6362

89, 737
36, 623
57, 007
84, 634
76, 748
87,062
87, 105

39, 981
17, 968
31, 140
44, 267
44,654
49, 244
53, 211

40, 443
79, 394
36, 385
20,042
39, 226
15, 720
20, 501

46, 461
26, 192
44, 426
58, 126
60, 965
67, 767
70, 072

68, 063
58, 649
42, 003
25, 521
23, 544

.0775
.0466
.0572
.0669
.0634
.0762
.0734

26,490
33, 291
37, 791
43, 877
47, 695
49, 903

7,800 6 38, 938
5,700 21, 181 25, 986
7,805 32, 152 30, 748
7,522 43, 349 37, 449
8,336 48, 459 41, 844
10, 774 67, 586 46, 069
10, 782 65, 532

8,714
6,117
8,037
4, 656

.5769
.5652
.5304
.5138

86, 081
87, 377
86, 529
86, 674

50,386
46, 811
51, 485
48, 851

18, 996
16, 703
17, 196
18, 337

67, 824
67, 482
62, 808
57, 427

30, 926
25, 919
26, 921
27, 595

.0774
.0748
.0732
.0699

47,091
42, 237
49, 635
46, 209

13, 429
10, 695
9,734
9,751

84, 569
73, 565
70, 172
64, 896

47, 254
45, 224
46, 081
45,005

100, 925
105, 812
104, 784
100, 963

.1017
.0943
.0891
.0801

1,404
2,054
2,414
3,644

3,847
6,985
6,735
7,747

.5368
.5489
.5668
.5665

86, 457
82, 358
82, 140
85, 576

49, 738
45, 921
47, 583
47, 849

21, 210
22, 906
20, 771
17, 032

71, 231
62, 641
56, 894
75, 125

30, 996
29, 025
23, 662
27, 682

.0695
.0699
.0721
.0758

47, 316
48, 775
46, 552
46, 223

9,607
10, 090
7,813
10, 772

79, 413
61,366
66, 139
55, 645

45, 426
45, 397
43, 108
42, 588

97, 462
96, 738
95, 731
91, 589

.0799
.0832
.0815
.0919

17, 642
15, 770
18, 199
18, 024

2,309
2,464
1,904
2,654

5,365
6,401
4,574
7,449

.5641
.6046
.6214
.6195

86, 556
89, 877
90, 085
95, 029

47, 384
50, 497
50, 629
53, 794

11, 796
7, 475
6,922
9,295

70, 083
81, 295
73, 915
66, 479

22, 810
24, 593
18, 638
17, 479

.0775
.0828
.0861
.0857

44, 334
52, 927
49, 230
51,816

10, 820
9,703
13, 693
13, 182

56, 810
75, 709
58,192
64, 554

46, 381
47, 412
48, 273
50, 682

96, 932
104, 999
106, 912
105, 629

.0951
.0951
.0974
.0931

7,340
6,250
6,835
7,105

16, 787
16, 239
14, 280
15, 516

2,104
3, 399
2,494
1,354

7,031
6, 501
6,699
5,912

.6142
.6265
.6347
.6196

96, 229
87, 651
89, 497
89, 333

56, 389
53, 237
54, 411
53, 334

14, 300
20, 341
20, 561
25, 990

76, 569
77, 093
71,811
64, 722

25, 201
21, 528
24, 107
22, 995

.0830
.0776
.0733
.0700

50, 796
47, 604
52, 331
46, 718

11, 976
12, 306
10, 212
8,435

71, 645 47, 663
58, 951 46,804
56, 902 49, 287
75, 563 47, 710

104, 663
105, 417
112, 637
117, 563

.0926
.0915
.0839
.0797

May ... ._ .
June—
__
July
August

5,685
6,900
7,630
5,870

18, 045
15, 831
13, 777
13, 352

1,739
2,409
3,014
1,829

6,160
7,230
7,941
5,132

.6017
. 5841
.6137
, 6388

86, 279
76, 912
83, 980
84, 584

53, 703
48, 226
48, 403
51, 761

29, 934
25, 760
22, 986
18, 164

68, 718
55, 732
73, 409
67, 736

29, 757
31, 885
20, 776
19, 250

. 0682*
.0711
.0741
.0738

49, 915
47, 524
47, 796
49, 017

10, 765
7,131
11, 566
10, 505

60, 051
62, 418
69, 965
59, 303

48, 112
44, 918
44, 944
47, 566

120, 817
123, 099
118, 697
111,429

.0775
.0803
.0850
.0891

September. __
October
November._.
December_._

5,835
5,955
6,140
6,505

14, 379
14, 841
15, 257
16, 326

1,854
1,554
2,304
1,909

6,092
5,126
6,882
6,384

.6654
.6823
.6867
.6664

87, 028
87, 028
88, 076
88, 668

52, 144
54,979
55, 062
56, 884

15, 699
15, 909
14, 481
21, 887

69, 547
75, 7S6
70, 045
69, 699

19, 103
26, 287
22, 482
19, 158

.0741
.0730
.0720
.0702

47,240
53, 389
51, 527
54, 981

11,879
14, 965
8,641
10, 997

62, 817
76, 317
61, 460
70, 989

47, 755 113, 109
48, 881 118, 311
47, 981 120, 871

.0879
.0840
.0801
.0786

3,936
3,464
3,734
4,496
5,264
5,561
5,683

,

v

102, 046
100, 706

$0. 0437
.0386
.0467
.0686
.0879
.0750
.0576
.0796
.0454
.0573
.0727
.0810
.0902
.0842

1937
January
February
March
April
May—
June

.

1 Deliveries and stocks of tin from New York Metal Exchange. Stocks in the United States are at port warehouses in New York at the end of the month, while deliveries
are from these warehouses and indicate approximate consumption. The world visible supply at the end of the month includes stocks in the United States, in Europe, and
afloat. Imports of tin in bars, blocks, etc., from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,
2
Production and stocks at refineries at end of month of total primary zinc and retorts in operation at end of month from American Zinc Institute. Ore shipments and
stocks at Jopiin district mines at end of month from the Jopiin Globe. The Jopiin or Tri-State district includes parts of Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, and produces
about 65 per cent of zinc ore mined in the United States. Shipments are recorded as loaded at mines by buyers for shipment to smelters.
3
Production of crude lead (amount extracted from Mexican ore deducted), receipts of lead in United States ore, shipments of lead ore from Utah, and total subscribers'
stocks in the United States and Mexico of ore, matte, base bullion, and refined lead, including antimonial, reported by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics. Shipments
of lead ore from mines of the Jopiin district from the Jopiin Globe. Utah shipments are from the Park City, Bingham, and Tintic districts and represent totals for 4 weeks,
with a fifth week added in certain months, this accounting for most of the larger fluctuations. Details by districts are given in the bureau's reports and monthly data from
August, 1920, were given in the November, 1926, issue of the Survey (No. 63), p. 14.
4
Price quotations, representing averages of daily prices are from the Engineering and Mining Journal-Press; prices on tin and lead are New York quotations and zinc
is from St. Louis.
* Eleven months' average, August missing.
0 Five months' average, August to December, inclusive.




52

Table 27.—MISCELLANEOUS METAL PRODUCTS
BABBITT METAL 1
Consumption

BAND INSTRUMENTS 3

ARSENIC 2
Crude

Refined

GALVANIZED SHEET METAL WARE *

Shipments

Other

Pails and tubs

!
YEAR AND
MONTH

Total
apparent

Direct Sale to
Pro- Stocks, Pro- Stocks,
by
pro- con- duc- end of duc- end of
duc- sum- tion mo. tion mo.
ers
ers
Short tons

Thousands of pounds

1923 mo. av
1924 mo av
1925 mo. av_. 5,201
1926 mo. av__ 4,977

1,177
1,282

4,023
3,695

Total

1,497
697

Cup
Saxomouth- phones Wood
wind
piece

Stocks, Shipend of ments
mo.

Production

Dozens of pieces

Dollars

' 742
1,072
2,924 1,519 3,268 s $588, 513
587, 589
921 7,034
3,575
544, 327

$206, 113 $365, 634
219, 151

201,623

Pro- Stocks, Shipduc- end of ments
tion
mo.

350, 817
319, 307

$17, 100
19, 287
23, 396

1

!

1934
May
June
July
August

1,746
1,761
1,726
1,502

2,448 1,487
2,866 1,486
3,049 1,622
3,222 1,674

2,056
2,164
2,685
3,755

374, 656
472, 292

149, 439
168, 622

212, 948
292, 672

12, 269
12, 998

September
October
November
December

1,323
1,129
1,280
1,240

3,448 1,385
3,475 1,224
3,730 1,467
4,151 1,141

4,708
5,181
6,245
6,676

498, 069
725, 505
639, 957
820, 598

191, 514
252, 978
216, 498
257, 628

297,366
450, 182
406, 058
534, 577

9,189
22, 345
17, 403
28, 393

4,276
4,651
4,394
3,881

1,269
1,218
1,301
1,210

6,997
7,204
7,055
6,913

488, 428
539, 866
563, 436
560, 007

166, 243
177, 758
187, 722
199, 812

308, 931
345, 443
380, 118
342, 129

13, 254
16, 665
15, 595

1935
January
February
JVIarch
April

5,683
5,165
5,644
5,126

1,062
1,061
1,248
1,198

4,621
4,103
4,396
3,928

978
1,224
946
684

M!ay
June
July
August

5,082
5,075
5,184
5,442

892
990
1,490
1,373

4,190
4,085
3,694
4,069

507
752
516
672

3,384
461
3,193 1,317
804
3,091
749
3,233

6,505
7,018
7,085
7,190

542, 816
493, 463
437, 378
483, 616

210, 410
199, 255
178, 036
194, 485

311, 755
277, 810
243, 883
273, 766

20, 651
16, 398
15, 459
15, 365

SeptemberOctober
November...December

4,621
5,550
4,955
4,879

1,041
1,380
1,421
969

3,580
4,170
3,534
3,910

511
517
492
563

3,003
3,143
3,346
3,305

866
728
491
636

7,493
7,476
6,997
6,469

613, 234
771, 239
677, 884
879, 698

228,543
274, 429
271, 624
341, 499

364, 565
468, 530
381, 886
510, 988

20, 126
28, 280

1936
January
February
March
April

5,153
5,140
5,861
5,229

1,444
1,272
1,008
1,412

3,708
3,868
4,853
3,817

386
357
539
418

3,433
3,540
3,534
3,7,18

258
536
746
377

5,950
5,675
5,976
5,462

464, 916
527, 727
622, 248
533, 732

157, 097
182, 183
214, 590
198, 628

289, 254
326, 791
385, 119
312, 130

18, 565
19, 361
22, 539
22, 974

148, 537
138, 159
120, 396
91, 707

115,087

]VTay
June_
July
August

4,797
4,964
5,015
4,987

1,157
1,330
.1, 339
1,354

3,640
3,634
3,677
3,633

973
327
374
166

3,712
3,167
2,954
2,947

140
390
271
495

4,768
4,414
3,523
3,002

445, 256
499, 554
482, 765
419, 071

179,318

247, 624
279, 474
286, 553
228, 488

18, 314
24, 213
19, 227
18, 457

95,929

195, 867
176, 985
172, 126

108, 672
104, 435
92, 340
86, 963

September—October
November—.
December —

5,337
4,868
4,358
4,013

1,482
1,339
1,147
1,096

3,855
3,529
3,211
2,917

488
419
514

2,959
2,538
2,576

560
697
885

2,648
2,382
2,188

514, 799
646, 065
634, 999
740, 786

238, 822
245, 328
234, 605
223, 626

247, 940
367, 628
371, 939
489, 356

28, 037
33, 109

18,066

24,374
27, 211

87, 205
108, 631
127, 366

135, 572

143,038
114,844

28,455

125, 002
125, 837
109, 858

150, 430
124, 955
116, 036
109, 228

38, 526
51, 658
60, 177
44, 434

61, 335
62, 507
66, 989
60, 731

43, 441
48, 620

103, 455

57, 568

61,047

96,437

54,937

119, 663
134, 323

38, 779
44, 700

64, 308
57, 820
56, 208

49, 926
48, 940
41, 652
44, 911

140, 491
140, 778
88, 520

42, 219
38, 847
32, 865

56,119
48, 182

43,060
41, 295
31, 321

27, 504

1927
February
Ivlarch

{

* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 27 firms, comprising a large part of the industry. Consumption is calculated
from sales by manufacturers and consumption by those firms (among them several important railroad systems) which consume their own production. These figures include
all white-base friction bearing metals.
.
.
, ., ,,
^ „
.
<.*.•
2
Compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics. Figures on crude arsenic cover this element in its primary state, while those on refined arsenic cover this
commodity as derived from the crude. Stocks are those in producers' hands at the end of each month. Monthly data on refined arsenic from 1923 appeared in the August,
1925 issue (No 48) D 48
» Data compiled by the Band Instrument Manufacturers' Association, comprising practically the entire industry, with wood-wind instruments about 75 per cent complete
4
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 12 firms, including data from the Sheet Metal Ware Association. Stock figures
were discontinued after August. The galvanized ware included here is the product resulting from dipping made-up shapes in molten zinc and not utensils of galvanized
sheets. It is classified as follows: (a) Pails and tubs include well buckets, cement pails, sap pails, stock pails, fire pails, water pails, and wash tubs, but not pails for shipping food or candy, food-container pails, etc. (6) Other galvanized ware includes steel baskets (but not wash boilers), ash and garbage cans, stable or street-cleaning cans,
coal hods (including japanned hods), feed measures, dry measures (including japanned), refrigerator pans, watering pots, oil and gasoline cans, chamber pails, and ash and.
garbage-can covers.
5
Six months' average, July to December, inclusive; previous data not available.




53

Table 28.—CRUDE PETROLEUM
STOCKS 2
(end of month)

PRODUCTION i

YEAH AND MONTH

Tank
farms
and pipe
lines

Grand
total

Refineries

CONSUMPTION *

Price,
Kans. Okla.,

on

Heavy *

Run to
stills

8

wells
completed 6

barrel

California
Light

IMPORTS
(3)

Number
of wells

at

wells

Per

Thousands of barrels

MEXICAN
FIELD r

Shipments

Storage,
Tampico
field

Thousands of
barrels

20,583
26, 261
27,169
30, 127

$0. 934
.798
.583
1.258
1.775
2.196
2.279

1,592
1,389
763
1,565
1,383
1,487
1,747

2, 159
1,766
2,743
3,318
4,608
5,319
7,280

• 48, 470
51, 708
71, 599
87, 329

9,054
10, 442
10, 609
6,835
6,481
5,152
5,028

36, 160
36, 947
41, 726
48,437
53, 643
61, 660
64, 977

3.408
1.704
1.806
1.439
1.446
1.675
1.883

2,024
1,218
1,445
1,357
1,212
1,380
1,580

12, 814
15,093
15, 611
12, 147
11, 251
8,487

44, 600
44, 058
43, 411
41, 566

65, 481
68, 337
72, 388
78, 507

6,484
5,153
4, 155
4,045

62, 379
64,913
67, 575
67, 016

1.800
1.800
1.800
1.730

1,675
1,709
1,791
1,581

10, 254
8,913
8,440
6,545

19, 189
18, 591
17, 616
18, 488

30,660
28, 033
27, 144
29,200

43,007
44, 059
44, 561
44,451

81, 476
83, 391
84, 373
84, 983

4,027
4,367
4,891
4,241

62, 115
63,970
60,310
62, 179

1.600
1.600
1.588
1.550

1,504
1,420
1,196
1,147

6,905
6,626
6,075
5,522

18, 029
18, 205
19, 872
22, 372

260, 619
257, 541
256, 080
252, 0!>8

w 30, 781
10
30, 434
31, 650
34, 180

44, 215
44, 877
43, 996
38, 634

86, 979
86, 761
87, 682
85, 656

4,688
3,689
7,216
5,906

61, 257
56, 291
62, 493
61, 289

1.550
1.800
1.800
1.800

1,164
1,130
1,304
1,417

6,808
6,900
8,971
7, 587

23,600
24, 152
22, 008

284, 009
281, 432
278, 184
277, 4&6

248, 550
244, 690
242, 149
240, 855

35, 459
36, 742
36, 035
36, 631

37, 179
35, 405
33, 583
32, 124

88, 180
87, 389
87, 761
87, 769

4,502
5,571
5, 185
5,332

65, 341
65, 030
67, 442
6.7, 693

1.900
2.050
2.050
2.050

1, 517
1,652
1,861
1,924

8,482
7,522

277, 771
277, 014
277, 099
278, 077

240, 123
240, 365
241, 420
242, 602

37,648
36, 649
35, 565
35, 475

30, 489
30, 4G7
30, 122
30, 876

87, 475
87, 461
87, 375
87, 454

4,350
3,860
5,043
4,988

65, 992
69, 034
68, 045
69, 820

2.050
2.050
1.750
1.750

1,745
1, 957
1,738
1,566

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average - _
1919 monthly average

20, 704
22, 147
23, 425
25, 064
27,943
29, 661
31, 531

104, 962
123, 709
145, 914
144, 556
133, 883
117,412
124, 961

104, 962
123, 709
145, 914
144, 556
128, 201
103, 886
110, 026

1920 monthly average . .
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

36, 911
39, 137
46,463
61, 034
59, 495
63, 645
63, 875

150,069
179, 888
278, 605
326, 682
386, 896
305, 273
282, 030

68, 850
67, 240
67, 763
67,580

11,364
13, 540
14, 935

1,484
1,437
1,512
1,714
2,514
3,144
4,401

133, 115
159, 237
245, 673
294, 659
347, 320
273, 878
247, 260

16, 954
20, 651
32,610
32,190
39, 575
31, 395
34, 771

» 31, 550
39, 132
43, 462
35, 997

311, 947
310, 694
308, 231
303, 291

279, 532
276, 812
273, 924
272, 576

32, 415
33, 882
34, 307
30, 715

65, 432
64, 842
61, 927
61, 547

301, 156
298, 193
296, 904
293, 852

270, 496
270, 160
269, 760
264, 652

59, 670
, 54, 564
60, G69
59, 988

291,400
287, 975
287, 710
286, 208

May
June
July
August

62, 556
61, 742
64, 893
66, 525

September
October
November- - - _
December

65,300
69, 043
69, 483
72, 061

8

21, 763
21,927
19, 160

1925
May
June.
July
August

_ - -

September
October
NovemberDecember

-

1926
January
Februarv
March.
April - -

.-

.

.

1927
January
February
March
| April

May
June
1

-

1

i

Production data, compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, represent output transported from field of production, excluding oil consumed at locality of production or not transported therefrom, which has comprised only 1 or 2 per cent of the total production since 1919. Details by States and fields are given in monthly
press releases. Monthly data from 1917 to 1920 given in December, 1922, issue (No. 16), p. 48, for 1921 and 1922 in August, 1923, issue (No. 24), p. 77.
2
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, consolidating work formerly carried on by the Bureau of Mines and the Geological Survey under the
Department of the Interior. Tank-farm stocks include total stocks at pipe lines and tank farms, producers' stocks in California and imported oil held outside refineries through
December, 1924; since then California stocks are not included. Refinery stocks since January, 1925, represent only the stocks at refineries east of California. Prior to January, 1923, the figures on tank-farm stocks included topped oil and imported oil at refineries, but the duplication between this item and the total stocks at refineries was
slight. This old method of securing figures showed totals about 2 per cent greater than those secured by the new method used in 1923. Adjustments have been made
in figures of some of the earlier years to represent approximate net stocks for comparison with later figures. Refineries' stocks include both imported and domestic oil. - The
number of days supply is calculated from the tank-farm and pipe-line stocks and from current consumption but because of the incompleteness of stocks data this item is
nolonger computed. Monthly data on stocks from 1917 to 1919 appeared in December, 1922, issue (No. 16), p. 48; for 1920 to 1922 in July, 1923, issue (No. 23), p. 50; on days'
supply from 1921 to August, 1923, issue (No. 24), p. 77.
3
Imports of crude petroleum are as compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines. Beginning with February, 1923, topped oil has been generally
excluded from the imports; on this basis imports for January, 1923, were 5,069,000 barrels instead of 6,199,000 barrels, as reported, and to which previous months' figures
are comparable.
4
Consumption by refiners, taken as amount of crude oil run to stills at refineries, compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines.
8 Wholesale price of Kansas-Oklahoma crude oil at wells is average for the month as compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6
Number of oil wells completed during the month compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, from reports by the American Petroleum Institute and
the Oil and Gas Journal.
7 Mexican petroleum shipments from the three ports, Tampico, Port Lobos, and Tuxpam, indicating Mexican oil production, from the Oil Trade Journal, the preliminary figure for the current month being taken from the Wall Street Journal. Storage of oil in the Tampico field in Mexico from the Wall Street Journal.
8
Including fuel oil.
9 Average of seven months, June to December, inclusive.
10
Revised to include crude petroleum in transit not previously included which approximated 3,200,000 barrels January 31 and 1,900,000 barrels February 28.




54

Table 29.—GASOLINE AND KEROSENE
GASOLINE
Production *

YEAR AND MONTH

KEROSENE OIL

Retail
Stocks at Price,
Con- Stocks at
refineries, motor. distribu- Produc- sump- refineries,
tion, 21
end of1 New
tion^
end of
tion i month 1
month York 3 States *

Con2
Natural Exports sumption*
Raw (at gas (at
refineries) plants)

Dollars
per gal.

Thousands of barrels

4,085

1909—13 monthly average
1913 ironthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average

48
85
130
205

270
373
416
559
706

Thous. of
gallons

Thousands of barrels

Price,
f . o. b,
refineries,
Pa.3

Retail
distribution, 13
States 6

Dollars
per gal.

Thous. of
gallons

$0. 168
.144
.138
.230

•

2,888
3,426
3,622
4,646
4,603
3,859

2,067
2,870
2,766
2,757
2,461

612,411
9,648
7,157
9,035
9,584

.080
.108
.115
.149
.084

$0 062
.058
.050

060

1917
1918
1919
1920
1921

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

5,656
7,084
7,853
9,688
10, 225

432
561
698
763
893

822
1,105
727
1,261
1,040

4,693
6,209
6,815
8,434
8,960

68,033
.9,196
11, 248
11,059
15, 018

.238
.242
.245
.293
.261

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

12,306
14, 992
17, 777
21, 633
24, 402

1,004
1,620
1,853
2,192
2,692

1,143
1,666
2,336
2,570
3,539

10, 659
13, 062
15, 417
18, 655
21, 246

18, 834
28,249
35, 319
38, 142
39, 702

.251
.207
.180
.191
.199

149, 593
185, 096
228, 751
271, 459

4,576
4,661
5,002
4,974
5,132

2,905
2,921
3,059
3,331
3,196

7,180
6,498
7,855
9,498
7,720

.085
.084
.080
.078
.104

29,107
30,268
31, 719
33, 343

2,274
2,377
2,830
2,487

14, 386
13, 210
14,890
19, 013

34, 569
38, 372
41, 512
40, 895

.170
.210
.205
.200

196, 339
192, 084
195, 723
261, 600

5,897
5,101
5,228
4,774

3,367
2,814
2,786
3,375

9,366
10,337
10,831
10, 316

.083
.084
.082
.078

30,229
30,388
29,535
36, 359

20,459
20, 724
22, 879
22, 323

40,474
39, 916
38,007
36, 236

.190
.215
.220
.202

279, 978
289, 010
299,889
303, 906

4,810
4,600
4,592
4,465

3,029
2,474
3,506
3,528

10, 747
11, 216
10,581
9,575

.075
.075
.072
.072

35, 655
31,186
30,903
38,654

1925

/

January
February
Miarch
April

20,043
19, 182
20, 631
20, 752

May
June
July
August

21,996
22, 488
23, 073
23,191

2,162
2,207

2,345
2,659
2,497
2,773

September
October
November
December

21, 573
22,488
21,946
22,238

2,217
2,431
2,448
2,562

2,095
2,438
2,960
3,107

20, 177
19, 826
18, 024
17,954

35, 572
35,910
37,363
38, 875

.170
.170
.170
.170

293, 519
335, 237
304, 551
305, 670

4,710
5,121
5,064
5,327

4,260
3,446
3,513
3,871

8,405
7,989
7,496
7,121

.074
.077
.080
.088

38,110
35,185
33,229
30, 687

22, 593
20, 560
23,084
23, 515

2,524
2,381
2,694
2,610

3,278
3,162
3,126
4,229

16,788
15, 112
18, 566
19, 796

41,643
44,254
46, 103
45, 874

.170
.175
.180
.190

243, 929
226, 663
252,034
289, 824

5,113
4,714
5,485
5,012

3,515
3,129
3,560
3,355

6,848
6,857
6,998
7,014

.090
.094
.099
.098

32,098
28,678
32, 435
36,046

24,509
24,238
24, 927
25, 416

2,626
2,548
2,628
2,663

4,495
3,516
3,593
3,430

23, 568
23, 073
24, 162
26,282

42, 907
40, 792
38, 315
34, 551

.202
.210
.210
.210

313, 765
325, 793
327, 076
331, 020

5,193
4,995
4,862
5,149

3,210
2,895
2,709
2,733

7,378
7,877
8,439
8,186

.125
.125
.099
.109

40, 679
29,370
30,528
35, 451

24,834
25, 762
25,885
27, 497

2,658
2,906
2,967
3,100

3,846
2,687
3,779
3,325

22, 449
23,488
20, 241
21,429

33, 341
33,706
35, 916
39, 023

.210
.210
.210
.210

314, 705
349, 660
327, 411

5,191
5,102
5,365
5,399

3,396
3,208
3,590
3,047

8,159
8,238
8,070
8,575

.116
.105
.093
.093

34, 021
31,486
27, 924

_ __

1926
January
February
March
April

May
June
July_ ..
August

_

-

September..
October
November

_

DpCemb^T

1927
January
February
March
April

'

M!ay
June
1 Production, consumption, and stocks held by refiners at end of month, from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines; stocks include marketers' stocks,
beginning with June, 1923, while consumption figures since that time take account of this change in stocks.
2 Exports of gasoline taken from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, include gasoline and all other naphtha, less exports to
the Philippine Islands, to agree with data used by the Bureau of Mines.
3
Prices compiled by U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Gasoline price represents price of motor gasoline delivered in drums to garages in New York
City, the 1913 price being $0.168 per gallon.
* Retail distribution of gasoline compiled by the American Petroleum Institute, from reports of gasoline-tax collection by the following States: Alabama, Arkansas,
Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Washington.^ Details by States for 1922 and |923,^with partial^reportsjor 1921^rnay be found on pp. 52 and 53TOf the June,
Beginning with July,
5
Retail distribution
_,
. . . . . .
,
,
.
_
.
.
_ ,
. .. ,
Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and South Dakota by the American Petroleum Institute. Due to an injunction against the operation of the law in Indiana, figures
for that State are not available since 1923; the totals for 1923, however, have been used for the corresponding months of 1924 and 1925, in order to permit a total for identical
States. Details by States for 1922 and 1923, with partial reports for 1921, appeared in the June, 1924, issue of the SURVEY (No. 34), p. 51, and data for 1924 and 1925 in the
May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 28.
« Six months' average, July-December, inclusive.




55

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average

9,254
12, 923
14, 527
15, 134

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average.
__
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average. .
1926 monthly average

Dolls,
per bbl.

Stocks Price,
Pro- Con- at re- parafduc- sump- fineries, fin,
tion i tion i end of1 903,
New
month York
Thousands of barrels

$0. 902
.663
.513
.871
fi 14, 806 1,525
1.885
13, 071
1.120
18, 533

6217
297
461
492
550
1,169

1,239
1,496
1,670
1,680

24,480
23,806

2.622
.687
.951
.929
.959
1.099
1.294

Dolls,
per gal.

&

Production

Price,
Okla.,
34-36
at refineries*

Thousands of barrels

YEAR AND MONTH

Stocks
at reBy
By electric By fineries,
end of1
ves- power rail- 5
sels 2 plants3 roads month

COKBi

Production

Consumption

Production!

ASPHALT
0)

LUBRICATING OIL

GAS AND FUEL, OILS

Stocks, refineries, end of
month

Table 30.—OTHER PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

*3 ^
fa d

t'A
Hi
fi

WAXi

Production

r

Thous. of short tons

Stocks,
refineries,
end of
month

Thous. of pounds

$0. 143
151

1,152
1,133

6 2, 917
3,425
3,825

.139
.201
.215
.341
.306

60
62
51
75

678
91
97

34
45
47
50

2,078
1,741
1,942
2,177
2,292
2,588
2,702

1,229
1,004
1,294
1,438
1,510
1,715
1,893

3,267
5,552
5,492
5,659
6,230
6,879
7,481

.435
.281
.230
.215
.204
.240
.240

108
101
158
194
212
223
244

74
113
134
129
123
145
195

1,263
1,620
1,618
1,880

6,678
6,818
7,136
6,906

.235
.248
.245
.240

162
119
174
209

1,654
1,497
1,931

6,955
6,633
6,852
6,728

.240
.249
.249
.237

7833

32, 182
611

40,100

108,402

17
37

42, 095
38, 936

172, 976
241, 895

48
51
59
56
64
83
83

23
62
58
24
60
191
254

45, 100
36, 240

181, 567
240, 072
223, 741

122
123
134
137

76
76
79
81

111
125
134
145

54, 310
47, 812
53, 642
48, 867

265
266
273
286

152
142
161
151

88
87
89
88

166
192
214
223

43, 348
46, 032
47, 456

2,192
2,256
2,641
3,137
3,611
3,569
3,888

1,094
1,001
1,099
1,224
1,393
854

2,831
3,107
3,928
4,165
4,117

29,453

3,508
3,248
3,371
3,735

1,376
994
834
699

4,410
3,780
3,996
3,758

18, 425
18, 949
19, 089
20, 493

1.331
1.325
1.140
1.631

2,467
2,401
2,831
2,559

30, 441
32, 519
34, 495
33, 502

3,995
3,720
3,740
3,355

675
792
853
759

3,788
3,703
3,891
4,008

22, 542
25, 763
27, 821
29, 863

.913
.935
.906
1.035

2,609
2,500
2,499
2,675

30, 579
31, 559

3,736
3,069
3,788
3,562

809
853
791
811

4,315
4,841
4,473
4,404

29, 915
28, 948
27, 266
24, 681

1.050
1.056
1.215
1. 250

2,565
2,608
2,630
2,711

1,987
1,785
1,753
1,511

6,760
6,827
6,999
7,253

.230
.230
.234
.239

265
284
218
156

143
152
162
159

84
87
82
74

250
247
248
238

46, 713
50, 182
49, 087
52, 859

108, 679
113, 649

1,026
732
715
638

4,301
3,728
4,040
3,882

23, 266
21, 445
20, 267
19, 773

1.250
1.181
1.210
1.381

2,649
2,426
2,623
2,670

1,633
1,273
2,156

28, 827

3,746
3,232
3,402
4,060

7,544
7,909
7,640
7,368

.240
.240
.240
.240

162
152
211
199

175
182
195
240

74
64
81
76

231
210
220
216

52, 630
49, 922
55, 329
54, 985

122, 773
123, 964
130, 341
136, 084

30, 321
29, 236
31, 351
31, 056

3,729
4,038
3,940
4,125

603
623
704
760

3,942
3,769
4,071
4,084

20,841

1.335
1.225
1.231
1.355

2,856
2,682
2,847
2,836

2,043
2,089
2,279

7,656
7,314
7,327
7,226

.240
.240
.240
.240

248
301
281
306

230
201
185
200

80
81
83
89

234
247
261
278

56, 050
50, 672

54,267
54,440

149, 396
155, 254
156, 704
165, 065

30, 620
32, 362
31, 686
33, 376

4,040
4,330
3,952
4,065

915
912
956

4,211
4,543
4,318

1.425
1.356
1.305
1.275

2,645
2,768
2,724
2,699

2,019
1,778
1,722
1,827

7,149
7,437
7,620
7,576

.240
.240
.240
.240

309
323
216
214

189
188
167
193

95
88
91
93

288
287
286
291

49, 228
56, Oil
54, 678
55, 950

159, 779
167, 925
177, 054
185, 331

17, 582
19, 174
21, 243

23,957
26, 706
30, 416
30, 405

16, 378
27, 736
31, 625
32, 610
37, 675

38,500
38, 887
43, 041
49, 215
53, 680

178,060
109, 465
106, 409
152, 473

1925
January
February
March
April

_.

_.

28,000
25, 355
28, 825

May
June
July
August .

_

September
October
...
November
December
_

29,306
. ._

30, 957

2,082

50,269

89,006
89, 326
95, 077
103, 310

109, 822
110, 384

112,942
117, 086

111,231
116, 391

1936
January
February
March
April.

29,319
27, 067

__ _ _

May
»
June
July
August

. __

September
October
November
December...

•
January
February
March
April

29,642

22, 554
25, 696

26,500
27,200
26, 376
26, 859
24, 898

2,032
1,864

1937

May
June
1
„
,
--„
0
Figures on asphalt, coke, and wax relate only to the by-products of petroleum.
2
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, covering loading of vessels for foreign trade at principal clearing ports.
Monthly data covering the period 1913-1923 appeared in the October, 1923, issue (No. 26), p. 61.
3 From U. S. Department of the Interior, U. S. Geological Survey, representing consumption by all plants producing electric power, but mainly central stations; consumption in central stations alone shown in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), p. 29, and by street railways, manufacturing plants, and reclamation projects in March, 1925, issue
(No. 43), p. 28.
4
Prices from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Lubricating oil is of 903 specific gravity.
5
Compiled by the Interstate Commerce Commission from reports of 174 steam railroads of Class I, not including switching and terminal companies, and excluding fuel
used6 in switching locomotives. Monthly data fro.m 1921 appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 23.
Six-months' average, July to December, inclusive.
7
Five-months' average, August to December, inclusive.




56

Table 31.—CRUDE AND SCRAP RUBBER
RECLAIMED
RUBBER
(quarterly) *

CRUDE RUBBER

Consumption *
(quarterly)
ImWorld
ship- ports 3
ments, (includplanta- ing
For
tion i latex) Total
tires

YEAB AND MONTH

Stocks, end of quarter l
Total

Manu- Dealfacers
turers

Stocks
in
United
King-dom,4
Afloat end of
month

SCRAP
RUBBER
(quarterly) 1

^T?«o
«• fl M

Stocks, fert-S
planta- |fl|g
tion,
afloat,! o> rt u.
end of
month Ill

Con-

Production

ers

Dolls,
per Ib.

Long tons

Stocks, Stocks sumption
end of at requar- claim- by reclaimter
ers

Long tons

24,663
31,800
34, 398
35, 101
43,006

15, 449
25, 090
25, 757
27,450
33, 103
34, 433

38, 572
63, 546
68, 739
75, 445
88,468

31, 280
51, 801
55,238
62, 916
74,247

83,994
85, 935
85, 450
59, 458
45, 960

65, 982
66,885
46, 829
37, 467

19, 953
18, 565
12, 629
8,493

29,671
39,523
33, 589
40, 026
48,811

76, 529
78,296
65, 345
52, 581
11,275

31, 038 $0. 182
42,284 .183
46, 973 .249
49, 654 .211
58,726 .568
382

17, 078
26,894
17, 384
19,018
30,906

8,217
8,662

37, 496
61, 963

23,018
34,422
22,002
26,415
39, 770

38, 960
34,290
36, 599
39, 823

26, 801
38, 997
33, 691
26, 407

75,432

64, 525

49,645

37, 725

11, 920

50, 760

37, 136

22,498

54, 831 44, 659

10, 172

44, 159

.227
.262
.286
.315

7,620

69, 894

53,700
50, 600
54,300
57, 670

16,678

83, 391

48, 058
40, 936
36, 666
32, 425

25,263

8,838

41,273

31, 344

January
February
March
April

33,021
35, 539
43, 977
38, 326

32, 898
24, 700
33, 072
32, 506

29, 982
25, 729
19, 977
14, 270

54, 030
48, 300
49, 590
53, 500

.318
.307
.346
.340

25, 353

9,238

40,045

32, 630

May
June
July
August

42, 522
43, 838
43,041
42, 990

36, 932
32, 154
32, 455
33, 413

6,660
5,824
4,740
5,107

57, 270
58, 940
56, 800
62,400

.420
.619
.825
.663

27,523

8,820

46, 152

35, 414

September...
October
November
December

44, 496
46, 830
50, 327
51, 169

26, 367
34, 651
37, 755
40, 329

6,206
5,855
4,620
6,328

63, 220
63, 570
67, 100
69, 990

.590
.773
.853
.764

31,909

7,762

74, 809

40, 780

38,840

8,827

86, 846

50, 256

49, 306
48, 057
55, 271
39, 946

42,404
32, 865
42, 152
34, 544

11, 111
10, 979
14, 452
20, 403

68, 500
69, 200
73, 600
64, 330

.605
.526
.448
.395

44, 092

13, 377

85, 593

52,437

50, 534
47,800
47, 310
53, 079

29, 759
24, 901
35, 821
27, 399

21, 865
25,399
29, 289
31, 756

63, 500
71,600
69, 700
72, 100

.383
.344
.335
.337

38, 841

14, 581

69, 914

53, 382

55, 363
58, 401
51, 925

37, 112
29, 334
39, 155
37, 754

36, 880
43,996

67, 400
71, 340
73, 100

.340
.333
.286
.256

40, 020

13, 758

66, 908

52, 068

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

1924
September
October
November
December

__

_.

1935
9,474

46, 254

87, 642

71, 343

54, 502 45, 028

95, 771

82,007

47, 770

37, 358

10,412

48, 708

91, 534

78, 552

33, 131 28, 185

4,946

50, 480

78,926

65,084

48, 436

39, 298

9,138

49, 800

1936
January
February
March
April
IVXa/y
June_
July
August

-

September
October
No vemb er

9,890

43,204

86, 757

73, 081

58, 191 48, 301

80, 140

68, 542

59, 254

50, 610

8,644

40, 713

86, 290

66, 908

58, 883 45, 121

13, 762

39, 815

1927

•

January
March
April

_

May
June
.

1 Data compiled by the Rubber Association of America, Inc., from reports of about 285 members and nonmembers representing the principal manufacturers, importers,
and reclaimers in this field. It should be noted that these consumption and production data represent quarterly, not monthly, totals, while stock figures are shown as of
the end of the quarterly period indicated, and annual averages in these columns are of quarterly, not monthly, data.
2
World shipments and floating stocks of plantation rubber from the World's Rubber Position, a British publication. Details of shipments by countries are given in the
publication, as well as amounts retained by the principal importing countries.
8
Imports of rubber, including latex, into the United States from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
* Stocks of crude rubber in the United Kingdom, from the Rubber Growers Association (British), represent aggregate stocks at wharves and warehouses in London and
in six recognized public warehouses at Liverpool. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), pp. 55 and 56.
« Wholesale prices are averages of weekly quotations of Para Island rubber in New York, compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.




57

Table 32.—RUBBER PRODUCTS
BUBBERPROOFED
FABRICS

AUTOMOBILE TIRES

Pneumatic tires
YEAR AND
MONTH

Inner tubes

Raw material
consumed

Solid tires

ShipShipShipPro- Stocks, ments, Pro- Stocks, ments, Pro- St'ks, m'ts,
end do- Fabrics Crude
end
end
ducdo- duc- of
ducdoof
rubber
of
tion month mes- tion month mes- tion mo. mestic
tic
tic
Thousands of
pounds

Thousands

RUBBER HEELS

Production

Shipments

ClothAuto ing
Total fabrics fabrics

Production

Thousands of pairs

Thousands of yards

1921 mo. av_.
1922 mo. av__
1923 mo. av_ _
1924 mo. av__
1925 mo. av_ _
1926 mo. av. .

1,818
2,558
2,829
3,227
3,803
3,842

4,213
4,867
5,621
5,395
5,904
8,144

1,906
2,435
2,749
3,047
3,603
3,600

2, 259
3,178
3,757
4,419
5,163
4,789

4,568
6,039
7,306
7,459
8,297
13, 097

2,292
3,055
3,630
4,173
4,963
4,411

35
66
57
47
52
40

231
193
246
161
130
153

44
57
56
44
51
36

6,696
9,257
9,861
11, 868
14, 025
13, 820

17, 922
27, 301
30, 604
37, 821
46, 033
43, 170

1,528
2,026
2,649
2,085
1,999
2,444

456
799
1,316
927
657
697

756
696
640
526
765
1,230

1934
May
._
June
July
August

3,039
2,630
2,552
3,235

6,331
6,156
5,138
4,477

2,679
2,663
3,484
3,688

3,744
3,493
3,857
5,016

8,762
8,166
6, 634
5,758

3,559
3,858
5,318
5,552

50
38
31
38

188
176
165
146

47
46
40
45

11,903
10, 067
9,789
12, 471

35, 474
31, 229
32, 625
40, 385

1,428
1,400
1,325
1,668

597
562
509
656

September
October
November
December

3,531
3,877
3,190
3,438

4,524
5,338
5,207
5,571

3,319
3,046
3,273
3,008

5,506
5,896
4,602
4,704

6,039
7,352
7,668
8,289

5,119
4,177
4,679
4,066

42
48
42
46

142
145
149
154

46
45
41
39

13, 171
13, 205
12, 191
12, 172

43, 921
46, 045
39, 812
38, 956

2,297
2,830
2,151
1,615

1925
January
February
March
April

3,555
3,681
3,957
4,005

5,962
6,696
7,132
6,816

2,994
2,835
3,392
4,014

4, 757
4,755
5,250
5,139

8,677
9,767
10, 677
10, 213

4,107
3,625
4,176
4,933

43
43
46
52

160
153
143
135

32
43
52
53

12, 311
13, 364
15, 041
14, 902

42, 171
41, 721
46, 366
48, 155

May
June
July
August

4,100
4,063
4,191
4,205

6,458
5,432
4,815
5,446

4,333
4,950
4,624
3,454

5,134
5,207
5,658
5,713

9,376
7,807
6,477
6,953

5,908
6,683
6,761
5,101

58
64
58
62

124
116
112
125

68
70
58
44

14, 985
15, 840
16, 014
15, 758

September
October _ ._
November
December

3,755
3,379
3,172
3,570

5,761
5,003
5,216
6,106

3,293
4,088
2,667
2,597

5,440
4,959
4,699
5,249

7,463
6,545
7, 119
8,485

4,851
5,764
3,982
3,665

56
45
42
51

136
127
119
114

39
55
47
55

1936
January
February
March . _
April

3,541
3,649
4,092
4,009

7,460
8,373
9,003
9, 346

2,142
2,500
3,335
3,642

5,107
5,119
5,272
4,916

10, 770
12, 818
14, 348
15, 505

2,728
2,750
3,672
3,727

52
53
50
41

135
163
180
177

May
June
July
August. ._

3,768
4,066
3,712
4,404

9,257
8,976
7,944
7,299

3,829
4,208
4,682
4,973

4,612
4,628
4,297
5,568

15, 855
15, 182
12,949
11,696

4,654
5,097
6,381
7,114

36
33
30
?8

September. _.
October
November- _ _
December

4,279
3,827
3,243
3,512

6,988
7,438
7,798
7,842

4,452
3,318
2,708
3,413

5,693
4,656
3,639
3,958

11, 484
11, 947
12, 453
12, 150

5,755
4,046
2,984
4,027

36
37
36
38

Stocks,
To
end of
shoe
To month
manu- repair
fac- trade
turers

15, 243
15, 523
17, 248

9,889
10, 412
10, 765

4,172
4,751
5,727

33, 962
33, 110
40, 569

303
337
339
543

13, 030
12, 243
10, 451
11, 476

8,364
7,018
9,262
10, 431

4,551
5,179
4,677
5,098

38, 024
36, 632
32, 144
28, 245

884
1,181
752
497

784
998
699
490

16, 666
22, 202
18, 121
18, 831

11, 594
14,060
9,813
10, 472

5,783
6,737
4,885
4,797

27, 722
28, 948
31, 486
33, 608

1,548
1, 815
1, 945
1,680

581
602
628
600

342
440
463
413

19, 170
17, 627
18, 329
14, 971

11, 180
10, 089
9,524
9,033

3,182
2,870
4,681
5, 555

37, 539
42, 303
44, 515
46, 733

47, 639
53, 367
53, 197
52, 171

1,560
1,595
1,587
2,326

518
566
595
646

452
529
693
1,206

14, 518
14, 002
13, 472
15, 469

8,006
10, 229
10, 166
11, 046

5,264
6,045
8,509
7,209

47, 076
46, 774
37, 740
34, 927

14, 025
12, 446
11, 349
12, 261

46, 745
42, 211
38, 876
39, 771

2,587
3,353
2,191
1,796

669
1, 303
571
600

1,452
1,506
959
726

19, 471
21, 853
17,233
20, 855

12, 251
12, 338
10, 282
15, 030

5,764
7,137
5,987
6,519

35, 512
38, 675
37, 611
37, 425

26
23
29
40

13, 198
13, 251
14, 198
13, 930

44,528
43, 161
45, 497
43, 802

1,395
1,459
2,102
1,579

426
351
449
400

596
719
983
656

16, 574
16, 709
17, 635
15, 097

10, 510
8,745
9,111
6,157

4,448
2,781
3,884
3,282

39, 133
44, 074
52, 179
56, 681

173
172
152
147

37
38
40
45

13, 279
14, 021
14, 050
16, 140

40, 953
42, 914
42, 189
49, 841

1,730
2,445
2,458
2,940

659
1,099
999
913

646
778
954
1, 533

11, 367
12, 769
11, 109
14, 490

6,818
7,541
8,651
9,607

4,002
5,902
6,370
7,911

58, 326
56, 701
51, 699
49, 593

137
129
128
138

44
44
33
29

15, 910
13, 973
12, 422
11, 593

48, 168
43, 137
36, 737
37, 117

3,964
3,538
2,910
1,813

804 2,652
962 2,987
772 1,440
814
533

16, 349
18, 513
16, 759

9,785
9,777
9,091

9,429
9,556
6,377

45, 483
44, 105
42, 199

1927
January
February
March-. _ _
April
May

1
Compiled by the Rubber Association of America. Figures on tires represent about 75 per cent of the industry. The number of firms reporting on tires has increased
from 36 in November, 1920, to a maximum of 66 in 1922, the number standing, at present, at about 45. It is stated by the Rubber Association that this variation in the
number of firms does not change the totals to any great degree, except for the omission of the Firestone Tire Co. beginning in September, 1921. Association reports show
details by sizes and classes. Figures on auto fabrics represent about 60 per cent and other classes of fabrics about 85 per cent of the total output of the respective products,
while figures on rubber heels represent approximately 70 per cent of the entire industry.




58

Table 33.—HIDES AND SKINS
IMPORTS i

Total
hides
and
skins

YEAR AND MONTH

Calfskins

Cattle
hides

WHOLESALE
PRICES 3

STOCKS, END OF MONTH 2

Goatskins

Sheepskins

Total
hides
and
skins

Calf
and
kip
skins

Cattle
hides

Sheep
and
lamb
skins

Thousands of pounds

Green,
Calfsalted,
packers' skins,
heavy country
native
No. 1
steers
(Chi(Chicago)
cago)
Dolls, per pound

1909-1913, 'monthly average _
1913 monthly average - - -_
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average.

42, 854
41, 490
46,350
53, 858
60, 526
52, 589
30, 158

4 6, 815
6,372
5,576
4,076
5,221
2,465
632

4 19, 160
18, 629
25, 671
34, 053
33, 683
30, 890
18, 421

8,199
7,473
6,321
6,607
8,686
7,409
5,197

5,289
5, 684
5, 495
6,257
8,461
6,999
4,372

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
- 1925 monthly average- -. _.
1926 monthly average

62, 070
42, 499
29, 003
45, 938
44, 315
29, 723
30, 173
30, 704

5,380
2,928
3,995
4,630
4,058
3,426
2,396
3,764

33, 940
22, 922
15, 015
27, 035
24, 315
15, 468
13, 889
12, 480

11, 138
6,684
5, 260
6, 745
7,152
4,353
6,807
7,293

7,086
6,896
3,822
5,136
6,353
4,843
5,127
4,942

« 435, 477
430, 897
355, 025
357,392
267, 533
270, 370

5 340, 339
339, 548
275, 293
288, 589
222, 046
220, 282

6 63, 139
58, 414
52, 281
46, 485
29, 878
33, 218

8 32, 916
32, 935
27, 452
22, 319
15, 601
16, 870

.393
.312
.139
.181
.166
.147
.160
.141

.685
.388
.149
.160
.157 ,
.184
.202
.174

1925
January
February
March
April
_ _._ _

34, 302
30,727
36, 135
41, 160

2,216
2,409
2,952
2,536

18, 636
15, 301
14, 216
20, 812

7,411
7,154
8,335
7,181

4,524
3,439
8,003
8,824

292, 311
292, 364
282, 733
275,028

251, 758
254, 751
242, 820
229, 370

27, 531
25, 690
25, 893
29,481

13, 022
11, 923
14,020
16, 177

.169
.163
.148
.142

.215
.215
.204
.184

26, 002
36, 338
28, 780
28, 624

2,236
3,411
2,624
3,921

9,989
16, 967
12,712
9,165

6,171
7,408
6,358
.7,040

5,556
6,568
4,755
6,442

264, 158
256, 800
259, 078
254, 801

215,471
202, 145
202, 014
197, 111

30, 625
35, 776
36, 749
37, 814

18, 032
18, 879
20, 315
19, 876

.143
.147
.166
.176

.183
.200
.218
.213

27, 055
20, 338
27, 716
24, 899

1,977
1,773
1,262
1,433

12, 872
8,957
16, 020
11, 023

6,095
5,248
6,181
7,104

4,002
3,268
2,885
3,260

251, 459
259, 369
273, 686
282, 653

192, 753
203, 246
220, 293
231, 656

38, 456
38, 343
36, 441
35, 816

20, 250
17, 780
16, 952
15, 181

.177
.174
.163
.156

.198
.200
.198
.192

30, 937
31, 747
34, 170
33, 608

2,544
2,823
3,293
3,702

12, 969
16, 125
13, 901
14, 591

7,465
6,493
9,144
8,022

5,839
3,758
4,554
5,148

296, 046
297, 193
276, 324
280, 782

245, 820
248, 673
230, 332
231, 719

34, 046
32, 547
31, 872
33, 121

16, 180
15, 973
14, 120
15, 942

.150
.130
.122
.114

.193
.183
.170
.165

31, 497
35, 623
33, 299
32, 359

2,883
4, 775
5,023
5,079

13,629
13, 057
11, 047
12, 345

8,742
8,597
8,455
6,917

3,867
6,383
6,677
6,472

281, 354
293, 615
288, 754
282, 933

232, 645
237, 937
228, 320
219, 193

33, 603
37,959
41, 767
43, 483

15, 106
17, 719
18, 667
20, 257

.129
.133
.142
.149

.168
.167
.172
.178

29, 797
29, 125
22, 929
23, 352

3,822
4,642
3,447
3,133

11, 537
12, 572
8,903
9,083

6,713
6, 028
5,324
5,617

5,634
3,980
3,475
3,522

284, 326
282, 936
281, 620

222, 234
222, 556
221, 880

41, 561
40, 735
40, 747

20, 531
19, 645
18, 993

.152
.161
.153
.151

.178
.178
.168
.167

May
June
July
August

__

_

September
October
November
December _.

__
__

$0. 184
.196
.242
.262
.327
.301

$0. 189
.210
.215
.338
. 406
.371

1936

January February
March
April
May
_ _
June
July
August

_

_

_

September
October
November
December
1937

January
February
March
April

_

^

May
June
1
3

Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from returns from packers, tanners, dealers, importers, and manufacturers, and represent
practically complete returns from the leather industry. As given in the detailed monthly reports, which can be obtained upon request from the Bureau of the Census, the
returns for hides and skins are expressed in numbers of hides and skins. For the above summary these have been reduced to pounds on the basis of the average weights
of each class. The detailed reports also show the various kinds of skins held and where located as between tanners, dealers, etc.
3
Data from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing average monthly prices.
4
Four-year monthly average, 1910-1913.
8
Four months' average, September to December, inclusive.




59

Table 34.—LEATHER

Sole
only 3
Backs,
bends, and
sides

1913
1914
1915
1916

mo
mo
mo.
mo.

151
FinTotal process ished

Exports 3

Exports 3

In
Finprocess ished

Sheep
Cattle,
Total calf, Patent and
iamb
goat

Dols.
per
Ib.

Thousands of pounds

av
av
av
av

Stocks, end of
month 2
Pro»
duetiona

1Q17THO R.V

1, 653, 073
1, 876, 285

1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922ino. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av

1, 535, 290 6 23, 742 6114,810 H61,573
1, 499, 225
25, 657 111, 217 193, 528
24, 557 100, 679 186, 434
1, 477, 886
1, 561, 015
27, 411 107, 144 171, 631
1, 220, 402
21, 665 88, 429 149, 508
1, 239, 887
22, 431 87, 081 126, 856
1, 134, 000

1,758
1,198
1,300
1,459
1,877
1, 616
1,127

.86
.55
.52
.51
.45
.48
.44

6 42, 344
57, 986
72, 963
78, 019
64, 118
63, 407

1935
May
June
July
Aug

1, 285, 590
1, 331, 142
1, 292, 580
1, 279, 365

23, 367
24,283
23, 707
23,617

92,650
93, 098
91, 125
88,487

128, 110
131, 286
134, 726
133, 679

1,615
1,374
1,206
1, 716

.49
.48
.46
.46

55, 982
56, 190
57, 718
61, 999

133, 129
130, 948
135, 871
144, 392

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

1, 107, 321
1, 318, 342
1, 074, 133
1, 066, 006

20, 701
23, 957
19, 983
20, 155

88, 202
81, 303
78, 176
77, 184

131, 377
127, 926
122, 429
117, 802

1,637
1,859
1,137
2,134

.46
.46
.47
.46

62, 645
68, 346
60, 289
69, 955

998, 305
1, 113, 393
1, 105, 923

20, 096
19, 568
21, 644
21,492

75, 779 115, 615
78, 106 110, 829
79, 022 106, 182
79, 585 103, 843

1,075
1,131
1,398
1,325

.46
.46
.46
.46

1, 059, 346
1, 179, 637
1, 114, 708
1, 182, 563

20, 229
22, 922
21, 440
22, 308

78, 971 102, 557
79, 337 99, 835
79, 601 95, 990
80, 313 90,660

1,102
1,486
1,320
1,152

1, 152, 356
1, 225, 524
1, 170, 058
1, 248, 836

21,978
23,681
22, 748

81, 721
82, 261
82,371

1,180
879
635
839

1936
_ _ _ _ 1, 057, 351

May
June
July
Aug..

.

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec _ -

85, 819
80,491
76, 397

8, 845
6,834
8,967
10, 623
6,175
3,908
17, 023

i

1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av

Jan
Feb
jVIar
Apr

Dols.
per
sq. ft.

Thousands of square feet

2,605 $0. 44
4,319
.47
.50
6,751
.64
7,540
3, 657
.83
.80
2,229
10, 222
.91
6142,136 0400,906
164, 216 423, 021
166, 770 428, 169
158, 852 387, 376
133, 758 358, 168
140, 367 305, 637

Price, chrome
calf, "B9S grade
(Boston) ^

YEAR AND
MONTH

Prices sole, oak,
scoured backs
(Boston) 4

Stocks, end of
month 2

Production 2

HARNESS
LEATHER i

UPPER LEATHER

SOLE AND BELTING LEATHER

SKIVERS*

Unfilled

ProStuffed orders, duction
end of
montii

Sides

$0 27
28
.29
.45
58
.60 « 203, 596
95, 244
,97

"

Dozens
i
|! -"

s 16, 039
15, 032

624
527
666
541
683

.99
.52
.44
.44
.45
.47
.45

96, 974
56, 266
104, 976
135, 621
104, 121
103, 650
100, 349

8 24, 942
120, 898
158, 479
141, 550
152, 017
163, 027

3,457
2,909
2,609
3,092

512
329
354
469

.46
.46
.46
.46

96, 159
89, 604
99,889
94,925

123,909
149, 891
229, 537
220 366

27, 691
30, 537
30,613
30, 662

7,991
7,986
7,855
10, 966

2,333
2,350
3,128
3,335

675
565
556
495

.46
.46
.46
.46

96,548
124, 900
111,404
120, 863

215, 929
182, 652
164, 783
137, 400

33,418
33, 910
28, 336
23, 207

11, 705
11,001
12, 791
13, 663

8,422
8,205
9,761
9,918

2,744
2,355
2,520
2,978

539
441
510
767

.46
.46
.46
.46

112, 352 114, 530
105, 814 96, 569
114, 678 76, 992
109,905 76, 224

24, 268
21, 750
25, 338
22,390

306, 664
300,834
295, 074
289, 218

11, 627
11,048
10,953
9,516

8,501
7,987
8,181
7,576

2,393
2,294
2,023
1,113

733
767
749
827

.45
.45
.45
.45

99,463
100, 097
93, 896
100, 217

103, 212
236,130
240, 002
232, 545

21, 781
20,329
18, 126
19,221

69, 090 151, 905 278, 719
71, 678 147, 457 274, 918
67, 979 149, 048 277, 072

11, 348
11, 262
11, 867
12, 504

8,666
8,787
7,941
9,143

1,975
2,767
3,091
2,754

707
708
835
607

.45
.45
.45
.45

98, 098
100,085
88,777
80,801

223, 165
207,921
188, 261
160, 767

23,488
24, 738
25,577

10, 416
9, 228
11, 264
11,392
11, 607

7, 304 i 1, 752
3, 559
1,643
6,744
3,048
6,187
2,514
6,982
3,616
7,769
3,082
8,591
2, 417

317, 542
319, 124
304,082
295, 988

10, 575
10, 368
10, 385
10, 272

6,606
7,130
7,422
6,711

145, 869
147, 329
149, 608
148, 687

296, 174
291, 891
290, 815
295, 173

10, 999
10,901
11, 539
14, 796

67, 425
65, 309
73, 903
68, 675

155, 660
159, 474
156, 956
155,454

298, 189
299, 413
303, 863
306, 572

.45
.43
.41
.41

62, 807
82, 022
64, 678
67, 313

153, 500
141, 693
151, 389
155, 178

.43
.43
.43
.43

13, 274
16, 653
24, 642
38, 462
33, 693
32,666

1927
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

___

May
June

i Prior to July, 1922, these figures were compiled by the Tanners1 Council. Since July, 1922, they have been compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau
of the Census, representing practically the entire industry, while skiver and harness production prior to that date covered a much smaller proportion of the industry.
Hence the figures from July, 1922, on are not directly comparable with those for preceding months. Beginning December, 1919, the harness leather statistics cover amount
of harness leather "stuffed," rather than that produced, but the variation between these items is small.
8
Based on figures compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. The data embrace returns from packers, tanners, dealers, importers, and
manufacturers. Data on leather have been converted to pounds or square feet on the basis of the average weights of each class from original detailed reports in skins,
sides, backs, butts, pounds, etc., which may be obtained from the Bureau of the Census on request. Stocks in process represent leather in process of tanning, which takes
several months to complete, while finished stocks are those completely tanned.
3 Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The exports under sole and belting cover sole leather only, while under upper
leather, the addition of patent and sheep and lamb leather in 1920 and 1922, respectively, enables total upper exports to be presented from the latter date. The column
covering cattle, calf, and goat upper leather continues figures previously presented in the SURVEY.
4
Data from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing average monthly prices.
* Includes estimated production of firms outside the Tanners' Council.
e Four months' average, September to December.
7
Eleven months' average, February to December, inclusive; previous data not available.
* Seven months' average^




60

Table 35.—LEATHER PRODUCTS
BOOTS AND SHOES

BELTING i

GLOVES 2

Wholesale prices «

YEAR AND MONTH

Shipments

Pounds
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average

Thous.
of dolls.

Produc- Ex- 4
tion 3 ports

Thous. of pairs

24, 389

WoMen's Men's men's
dress
black
black
welt
kid,
calf,
blucher tan
dress
calf
(Boswelt
(St.
ton)
lace
Louis) oxford
Dollars per pair

842
827
1,412
1,623
1,237
1,100
1,780

$3.11
3.17
3.25
3.71
4.75
5.63
7.60

Stocks (tanned),
end of month
Production

Dress and street
Total

In process Finished

ImDoported mestic
leather leather

Work
gloves

Dozen pairs

$3.17
3.28
3.35
4.01
5.68
5.65
7.77

$899
1,171
1,199
1,354
1,365

694, 899
300, 090
430, 614
449, 109
353, 832
364, 153
350, 777
•

1, 587
548
721
833
603
626
596

23, 898
26, 990
29, 260
26, 102
26,963

1,403
746
450
612
526
550
476

8.95
7.00
6.51
6.43
6.25
6.39
6.40

8.14
5.18
4.74
4.85
4.88
5.13
4.92

$4.13
4.07

345, 926
367, 583
345, 709
351, 707

602
643
588
595

25, 107
23,449
24, 758
28,486

696
559
488
458

6.40
6.40
6.40
6.40

5.15
5.15
5.15
5.15

September
October
November
December

361, 138
363, 709
310, 542
343,443

622
626
543
599

29,769
31, 055
24, 630
24,404

401
515
557
557

6.40
6.40
6.40
6.40

1936
January
February..
March___
April

370, 678
376,460
397, 207
359, 298

639
640
679
609

23,874
25, 698
29, 928
26,637

470
416
400
657

337, 042
346, 739
327, 855
396, 991

567
595
564
672

23,129
2i, 041
25, 052
29,646

371, 597
352,255

625
593
495
471

31, 673
31, 662
26, 768

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

Gloves cut

Number of skins

754, 274
846, 664
739, 628
767, 423
710, 214

27, 602

Glove leather 6

' 197, 593 7 37, 623 7 30, 847 1 129, 123
32, 067 29, 955 126, 832
188, 854
40, 828 30, 327 128, 973
200, 536

488, 258
531, 840

1, 509, 719
1, 291, 178

528, 775
363, 802

4.15
4.15
4.15
4.15

535, 431
494, 052
442, 059
456, 059

1, 286, 092
1, 269, 346
1, 205, 971
1, 167, 838

421, 251
419, 211
420, 949
382, 678

206, 354
210, 598
190,443
203, 336

43, 619
44, 970
39, 186
45, 037

30, 536
34, 578
31, 592
30, 807

5.15
5.15
5.15
5.13

4.15
4.15
4.15
4.15

482, 137
560, 730
576, 743
583,426

1, 127, 024
1, 287, 706
1, 353, 367
1, 335, 608

343, 559
328, 282
324, 050
395, 767

203, 946
219, 133
196, 957
177, 239

43, 521
47, 853
40, 739
30, 028

23,077 137, 348
28, 457 142, 823
27, 503 128, 715
26, 221 120, 990

6.40
6.40
6.40
6.40

5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00

4.15
4.15
4.15
4.15

663, 089
610, 014
650, 640
591, 328

1,476,157
1,453,338
1,470,313
1, 496, 396

448, 748
500, 161
537, 404
549, 436

200, 308
205, 764
218, 961
222, 713

40, 380
45, 640
51, 816
54, 595

26,482
30, 370
35,963
35, 544

133, 446
129, 754
131, 182
132, 574

533
464
533
357

6.40
6.40
6.40
6.40

5.00
4.98
4.85
4.85

4.15
4.13
4.00
4.00

582, 199
550, 559
499, 912
529, 823

1, 469, 279
1, 446, 430
1, 482, 470
1, 614, 077

569, 467
555, 112
510, 898
538, 066

206, 850
213, 069
183, 562
224, 583

50,003
50, 240
49, 327
56,224

34, 862
38, 579
30, 792
34, 590

121, 985
124, 239
103, 443
133, 769

426
407
- 546
498

6.40
6.40
6.40
6.40

4.85
4.85
4.85
4.85

4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00

585, 394
604, 271
576, 006

1, 600, 976
1, 602, 217
1, 625, 071

527, 476
519, 327
526, 488

218, 191
229, 798
196, 060

56,406
56, 087
51, 605

33, 905
34,837
31,046

127, 880
138, 87-4
113, 409

1935
May
June
July
August

May
_
June.. _
July
August _
September...
October
November..
December

.

_

287, 351
285, 847

132, 199
131, 050
119, 665
127, 492

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

1 Shipments of oak leather belting compiled by the Leather Belting Exchange from reports of from 32 to 39 members, estimated to represent about 60 per cent of the industry. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 67. Details by qualities are presented in the association's reports, while earlier reports also
present data by geographical districts.
2
Reported to U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, by 206 identical factories (including data in earlier months for 1 factory now out of business) representing 87 per cent of the leather-glove industry according to the census of manufactures, 1921.
3 Compiled by U. S. Department of C ommerce, Bureau of the Census, from over 1,000 firms each month, comprising almost; the entire industry- Figures for the years
1914, 1919,*and 1921 are those reported'by the census of manufactures for those years. Monthly data from November, 1921, appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 97.
Further details as to classes given in press releases, and details by States are given twice a year.
4
Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, include men's and boys', women's and children's boots and shoes but exclude
slippers, athletic shoes, sandals, and other leather footwear.
6 Data from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing average monthly prices. Monthly data from 1920 on the St. Louis quotations appeared
in the September, 1922, issue (No. 13), p. 47.
e Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Stocks of glove leather are those held by tanners.
1
Average for last 6 months of year.




61

Production

U.S.«

Canada «

Shipments
i

Canada e

IT. S.5

U. SJ

At mills

U.S.*

Canada 6

At
publishers

In
transit to
publishers

U.SJ

Imports

Exports

U.S.8

U.S.8

Canada e

I

1
61, 527
67, 284

110, 248
142, 091

113, 858
108, 049
114, 880

62, 386
67, 922

38, 998
31,713
24, 035
23, 929

13, 352
12, 597

124, 789
154, 952 41, 155
155, 185 40, 983

3,608
5,066
4,597
6,395
7,822
8,062
9,189

18, 320
26, 290
30, 701
39, 019
46, 593
49, 689
52,311

Total
activity

Thousands of
books

Rel.
to
1924

i

Dolls. Number of
100
editions
Ibs.

Short tons

3913 mo av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo av
1916 mo av
113, 251
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av_. 105, 024
1919 ino. av_. 114, 543

New Shiporders ments

Imported books

YEAR AND •
MONTH

American manufacture

Price roll, f. o. b. mill *

Stocks, end of month
Consumption
by publishers

SALES
BOOKS 2

BOOK
PUBLICATION i

NEWSPRINT PAPER

PRINTINGS

Table 36.—NEWSPRINT PAPER AND PRINTING

12, 233 $2. 25
24, 382 2.25
20, 384 2.05
38, 601 2.70
45, 026 3.35
50, 425 3.41
55, 203 3.88

814
763
616
733
728
695
648

206
238
195
136
110
75
67

10, 046

9,850

1920 mo. av..
1921 mo. av—
1922 mo. av_.
1923mo.av__
1924 mo. av__
1925mo.av_.
1926 mo. av_-

125, 997
102, 182
120, 641
123, 750
122, 548
127, 527
139, 889

72, 931
67, 339
90, 028
105, 519
112, 750
126, 851
156, 478

148, 760
147, 957
170, 738
151, 179
136, 829
148, 897
166, 780

125, 215 72, 563
102, 252 66, 930
121, 035 90,499
123, 111 104, 543
122, 505 112, 063
127, 862 127, 096
139, 933 156, 229

23, 324
29, 940
22, 837
22, 207
29, 357
26, 867
16, 660

10, 687
17, 045
10, 600
14, 948
19, 789
22, 454
13, 881

144, 712
188, 797
171, 121
175, 797
176, 855
152, 733
148, 043

52,006
28, 211
36, 657
40, 601
33, 941
32, 205
36, 194

60, 822
66,040
85, 772
109, 056
113, 065
120, 687
154, 278

3,824
1,401
2,147
1,363
1,429
1,895
1,610

59, 469
62, 969
79,960
94, 830
101, 615
116, 805
144, 332

6.00
5.00
3.69
3.89
3.83
3.70
3.50

621
581
604
626
611
667
681

81
113
116
113
144
131
137

9,592
7,665
10, 779
11, 344
10, 988
11, 991
11, 913

11, 118
8,264
10, 083
11, 488
11,200
11, 916
11, 967

1935
September. __
October
Nov©mber__December..-

121, 594 124, 889
135, 662 137, 670
130, 539 132, 332
136, 681 136, 983

145, 082
167, 515
174, 907
170, 122

128, 030
142, 641
133, 636
137, 718

124, 874
139, 051
132, 127
140, 165

27, 281
20, 446
17, 418
16, 238

22, 864
21, 423
21, 563
18, 414

159, 926
144, 333
131, 236
132, 156

31, 054
33, 261
34, 635
31, 458

110, 688
145, 088
124, 681
122, 085

1,869
1,784
2,947
1,943

116, 278
124, 529
122, 486
137, 140

3.70
3.70
3.70
3.70

695
977
668
489

117
157
126
95

12, 562
13,496
11, 691
10, 303

12, 973
12, 654
12, 172
12, 275

96
107
99
107

1936
J anuary
February
March
April

140, 026
129, 622
145, 910
145, 327

139, 688
135, 663
154, 093
151, 739

158, 419
147, 477
170, 228
172, 670

139, 012
128, 635
142, 666
144, 600

136, 498
135, 505
153, 157
154, 015

16, 338
14, 791
18, 352
19, 478

14, 602
13, 500
14, 800
12, 415

125, 872 34, 398 126, 428
127, 661 37, 771 133, 219
132, 416 34, 185 158, 400
128, 685 32, 505 168, 463

2,489
1,416
1,475
2,392

125, 999
128, 965
173, 171
112, 828

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

628
559
705
649

113
131
144
189

11, 789 11, 108
10, 555 11, 502
13, 284 13, 072
11, 471 11, 908

96
94
110
104

141, 032
_ 142, 166
_ 140, 516
139, 259

153, 969
158, 601
163, 037
162, 545

176, 893
161, 156
147, 584
151, 144

142, 294
141, 521
142, 690
136, 564

151, 990
161, 108
161, 824
160, 031

18, 207
18, 852
16, 524
19, 098

14, 331
11, 795
12, 963
15, 624

128, 253
115, 714
152, 295
165, 229

134, 870
162, 972
153, 865
161, 063

1,941
1,526
1,902
1,206

135, 251
141, 889
150, 778
149, 935

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

847
491
606
587

146
88
108
135

12, 250
12, 946
11, 638
13, 288

11, 537
12, 432
9,578
12, 625

96
97
91
94

161, 387
168, 500
164, 798
163, 717

163, 089
186, 860
183,368'
182, 469

137, 259
146, 411
141, 042
136, 501

162, 740
168, 821
167, 135
161, 922

18, 026
14, 633
13, 592
12, 030

14, 684
14, 942
12, 571
14, 345

170, 543 36, 863 139, 720
161, 917 43, 359 172, 603
180, 663 37, 399 169, 577
187, 272 41, 560 170, 159

1,413
1,403
1,256
902

143, 524
159, 509
153, 729
156, 408

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

805
920
737
634

135
187
174
96

12, 682
11, 719
11,091
10, 244

12, 096
12, 814
12, 386
12, 544

101
104
102

May
June.
July.
August

September...
October
November._.
December...

136, 167
143, 148
140, 427
135, 069

1937
January
February-March .
April

i
•

i
i

j

\
i

May
June...

i
II

1

35, 770
32, 391
31, 811
36, 316

101
100
100
100

i

i

Compiled by the Publishers' Weekly. Books imported are books of foreign manufacture, catalogued and marketed by American publishers. Between 10 and 15 per
cent of the books manufactured in America are new editions, the remainder being new books, while about 95 per cent of the books manufactured in this country are by
American authors.
2
Shipments and new orders of sales books by manufacturers from the Sales Hook Manufacturers Association, reported by 11 manufacturers representing about 90 per
cent of the industry east of the Rocky Mountains, the sales books included are those commonly known as duplicate and triplicate books used by retail stores in recording
their sales; all sizes and styles are included. Interchangeable covers and accessories are not included. Monthly data on new orders from 1911 appeared in the July, 1926,
issue (No. 59), p. 24.
3
Printing activity, from the United Typothetse of America, is based on productive hours reported by plants in 52 cities in 30 States, each department being weighted for
the combined index.
4
Newsprint prices are averages of wholesale weekly prices of roll newsprint f. o. b. mill from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
8
Data on production, shipments, and mill stocks of newsprint in the United States prior to May, 1923, from the Federal Trade Commission; since then from the
Newsprint Service Bureau, covering almost the entire industry.
6
Production, shipments, and mill stocks of newsprint, comprising practically the total production of Canada, furnished by the Newsprint Service Bureau; exports from
Department of Trade and Commerce. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 49.
7
Consumption, publishers' stocks, and stocks in transit, compiled by the Federal Trade Commission through May, 1923, have been compiled since then by the American
Newspaper Publishers' Association from reports of about 422 publishers who were included in the 600 reporting to the Federal Trade Commission and had on hand on May
31, 1923, a total of 133,312 tons of paper as against 176,347 tons held by those reporting to the Federal Trade Commission on that date. Monthly data on newsprint paper
from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), pp. 45-47.
8
Imports and exports from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Prior to Sept. 1, 1916, imports include only paper valued at
not above 2.5 cents per pound; from Sept. 1,1916, to Apr. 24,1920, not above 5 cents per pound; and from Apr. 24,1920, to date not above 8 cents per pound.




62

Table 37.—BOX BOARD AND PAPER BOXES
BOX BOARD i

PAPER-BOARD SHIPPING BOXES 2
Stocks of waste
paper, end of
month

New

orders

Unfilled
orders,

Con-

sumption,
month waste
paper

end of

Shipments

Stocks,

In

end of

month

At

mills

transit

shipped

pur-

chases
Thous.
of inch Perct.
hours capac.

1921 mo av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo av
1924 mo av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av

i

and un-

3
"o

Solid fiber

Production

Corrugated

Operation

YEAR AND
MONTH

Operating
time

Per cent of
normal

Short tons

Production

Corrugated

Total

Solid

fiber

Thousands of square feet

8,016
7,921
8,419

91.7
97.0
98.5

93, 528
147, 745
169, 384
178, 733
189, 665
207,066

June
July
August

8,253
6,693
7,175
7,973

83.7
84.1
86.0
100.2

173, 483
151,414
164, 762
183, 570

165, 868
167, 658
186, 259
202, 919

68, 676
85, 414
105, 009
122, 927

165, 479
148, 440
158, 734
181, 752

170, 821
150, 920
166, 664
184,941

51, 774
52, 268
50, 366
48, 935

142, 319
159, 767
165, 802
161, 793

38, 486
47,696
51, 809
51, 921

72
67
64
68

69
66
64
65

80
70
63
74

297,764
255, 561
269, 108
287, 937

225, 103
193, 800
205, 723
219, 141

72, 661
61, 761
63, 385
68, 796

September
October
November
December

»,G37
8,422
7,546
7,489

101.0
96.6
104.7
89.8

188, 669
196, 633
170, 550
170, 674

168, 299
180, 846
174, 184
180,284

103, 056
87, 563
94, 711
107, 584

182, 521
189, 187
162, 771
163, 878

191, 203
198, 352
169,018
168, 677

46, 401
44, 682
46,214
48, 211

172, 240
175, 946
164, 065
179,442

57, 085
42, 725
44, 946
45, 949

52
77
78
75

69
77
77
74

79
78
80
76

302, 181
331, 390
332, 824
321, 617

231,066
256,410
259, 390
248, 956

71, 115
74, 980
73,434
72, 661

January
February
March
April

8,389
7,551
7,570
7,654

105.4
99.3
90.5
91.6

199, 633
177, 292
179,067
185, 866

199, 649
162, 724
169, 924
169, 914

112, 911
100, 403
90,062
79, 127

193, 285
170, 023
170, 363
170, 487

195, 501
176, 101
180,418
179, 772

52, 466
53, 960
51, 835
57, 212

172, 382
172, 456
176, 035
186, 530

53, 820
43, 745
36, 147
32, 593

71
76
78
74

70
76
79
76

73
76
75
67

302, 291
333, 431
341, 769
330, 616

228, 084
263, 862
268, 335
256,409

74, 207
69, 569
73,434
74, 207

M^ay
June
July
August

7,112
7,983
8,272
8,070

89.1
95.5
94.6
101.1

163, 956
190, 310
196, 522
196, 527

175, 246
193, 564
216,013
211, 385

83,415
92,022
111,919
119, 248

159, 095
179, 953
184, 295
188, 301

168, 353
184, 928
190, 667
204, 766

53, 327
59, 452
64,600
55, 560

174, 726
166, 467
160,099
149, 984

38, 815
39, 118
46, 311
44, 359

74
74
76
79

75
73
75
80

69
76
77
74

325,426
321, 836
340, 608
361,424

250,406
242, 992
257, 879
286, 261

74, 980
78,844
82, 709
81,163

September
October
November
December .

8,152
8,439
7,923
7,936

102.2
100. 9
99.3
94.9

198, 749
204,492
193, 140
190,426

191, 840
207, 178
195, 142
191, 895

109, 191
101, 981
103, 304
105, 993

188, 720
190, 779
182, 176
178, 729

202, 599
213, 019
193, 847
189, 206

51, 699
46, 054
44, 541
48,468

155, 476
168, 505
166, 289
174, 155

49, 587
48, 911
46, 928
37,496

81
88
86
73

82
90
88
73

79
81
80
71

370, 315
422, 548
409, 411
345, 341

290, 698
341, 384
332, 112
275, 772

79, 617
81, 164
77, 299
69, 569

7,817
7,670
8,828
8,455

102.8
100.9
101.0
101.0

192, 436
191, 808
220, 495
207, 623

207, 658
178, 099
214, 724
200,154

118, 531
104, 578
102, 362
89, 622

182, 733
182, 298
208, 201
198, 161

192, 990
190, 901
216, 833
208, 789

47, 745
48, 468
52,041
51, 447

168, 479
162, 381
151, 176
145, 772

44,477
53, 985
42, 971
50, 803

76
81
85
81

75
81
87
82

78
81
79
77

359, 052
386, 051
410,011
379, 259

281, 753
304, 115
324, 983
299, 641

77, 299
81, 936
85, 028
79, 618

June
July
August

8,269
9,036
8,469
8,934

108.8
108.1
106.1
106.9

203, 937
218, 555
204, 848
222, 245

198, 154
238, 836
215, 790
207, 230

83, 293
109, 437
121, 970
109, 245

188, 691
208, 728
196, 250
216, 017

204, 617
212, 741
203, 257
220, 790

52, 060
57, 416
56,4*01
57, 303

136, 895
136,.380
142, 813
192, 635

44, 802
57,820
60,391
56, 685

79
77
77
82

79
77
78
83

78
78
75
79

382, 405
387, 650
403, 386
441, 593

298, 150
302, 622
316, 039
348, 835

84,255
85,028
87, 347
92,758

September
October
November
December

9,098
9,423
8,250
6,774

95.8
95.4
86,8
68.6

225, 103
222, 010
210, 746
164, 982

215, 102
220, 710
182, 750
185, 922

100, 765
92, 301
69, 086
85, 518

206, 593
211, 444
194, 431
156,481

223, 581
229, 175
205, 915
169, 527

59, 915
53, 150
57, 936
52, 931

116, 329
139,111
146, 287
161, 544

70, 311
58, 576
46, 175
34, 662

81
87
80
70

83
89
82
70

76
81
72
65

441,
476,
431,
314,

354, 798
386, 104
353, 307
242, 992

86, 574
90,439
78, 071
71, 888

178, 912
190, 373
205,427

96,768
100, 798
99, 726

170, 728
179, 684
195, 836

178, 434
189, 931
206, 593

31, 667
28, 967
45, 031
48, 667
53, 265
53,901

155, 697
168, 592
149, 984

46, 394
43, 153
51, 805

50
70
79
74
78
80

45
66
79
72
78
81

65
81
79
79
75
77

226, 622
291, 036
306, 743
350, 418
401, 132

149, 323
211, 654
231, 190
274, 516
317,778

77, 299
79,382
75, 553
76, 397
83, 353

1934
May

1925

1926
January
_
February
March April

May

. __

372
543
378
880

1927
January
February
March
April- _

. ._ _

May
June

]
1

Compiled by V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 89 identical manufacturers each month, including figures from the members of the
PaperboardIndustries Association, formerly included in the Box Board Association, prorated from weekly reports. These box board data included all paper board of more
thanO.009inch thickness, such as strawboard, chip board, news board, etc., used for making boxes. Similar paper board designed for making specialties, and board s of less
than0.009inch thickness are not classed as box board. Capacity data are determined by the number of working days in each month, Sundays and holidays excluded until
the end of May, 1924, with Saturdays also excluded since June 1, 1924, when the five-day week (with Saturday used for clean-up and repairs) was adopted by about 80 per
cent2 of the mills. The data almost completely cover the box board industry.
Data from the Paperboard Industries Association, comprising the former National Container Association, which in turn had merged the statistical activities of the Container Club and the National Association of Corrugated and Fiber Box Manufacturers, who formerly reported separately. Thirty identical companies report corrugated board
data and 11 report solid fiber data. Data for the former individual associations, extending back to 1919 for the Container Club, are given in the August, 1923, issue (No. 24)
but are not comparable with data shown here, as the former National Association of Corrugated and Fiber Box Manufacturers reported in their totals single face board (used
 principally for wrapping purposes), which is excluded from the tabulation above. Monthly data for 1921 and 1922 on the present basis, including relative prices of finished
board
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ and raw materials, appeared in the November, 1923, issue (No. 27), p. 89. The production of boxes is measured by the area of board passing through the box machines.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

63

Table 38.—PAPER
BOOK PAPER i
WRAPPING
PAPER 2

|
!
~d
00*

Total
IJnniled
orders,
end mo.

Production

Unnlled
orders,
end mo.

Orders

Shipments

Production

YEAR AND
MONTH

Orders

Uncoated

Coated

FINE PAPER 2

Produc- Stocks,
end of
tion
month

Production

Production

Stocks,
end of
month

Per cent of normal Days Per cent of normal Days
production
production

1917 mo.
1918 mo.
1919 mo.
1920 mo.
1921 mo.

ALL OTHER 2
GRADES

TOTAL PAPER2
(including newsprint and
boxboard)

Stocks, Produc- Stocks, Produc- Stocks,
end of
end of
end of
tion
tion
month
month
month

Short tons

74, 357
70, 763
76,232
92, 039
60, 499

av
av
av
av
av

1922 mo. a
1923 mo. a
1924 mo. a ___
1925 mo. a .__
• 1926 mo. a ...

92
86
89

91
86
90

96
82
86

10
9
8

95
96

95
93

96
92

14
12

36, 845
29, 622
31, 643
23, 719
36, 234

60,626
59, 500
57, 851
69, 324
54,300

53, 551
37, 664
54, 702
26, 013
55, 465

24,030
30, 668
28,647
32, 444
20, 207

32,500
29, 308
36,845
29,268
37, 377

70, 658
77, 757
76, 085
98, 627
70, 426

41, 093
29, 308
37, 500
36, 594
49, 044

493, 304 238, 113
504, 294 189, 240
515, 861 238, 999
533, 278 181, 910
401, 134 239, 697

81, 827
93, 466
102, 569
107, 038
112, 182

38, 221
46, 439
48, 851
58, 870
62, 354

69, 689
85, 320
84, 639
90, 615
89, 460

61, 228
67, 370
108, 635
99, 577
68, 697

30, 088
31, 341
30, 810
37, 410
38, 390

36, 630
43, 913
50, 278
50, 650
51, 633

102, 758
90, 630
92, 752
99, 737
102, 767

47, 488
53, 279
57, 811
62, 855
74, 312

552, 748 235, 371
593, 891 278, 239
612, 051 343, 599
651, 991 352, 083
689, 753 327, 556

0

1934
September. -.
October _ _
November. ..
December

91
98
98
85

89
94
91
84

87
83
88
82

10
7
7
7

92
101
105
96

95
101
102
93

96
96
97
94

13
12
12
12

100, 369
111, 410
104, 725
105, 772

47, 160
48, 103
49, 546
51, 528

89, 114
90, 130
84, 314
88, 109

111, 803
104, 867
109, 586
113, 614

28, 959
33, 125
29,944
30, 568

50, 685
50, 174
51, 523
52, 143

94, 157
109, 906
95, 723
101, 263

57/194
57, 602
57, 977
57, 782

618, 021
671, 056
603, 531
617, 439

341, 682
333, 657
339, 908
347, 116

95
101
100
100

94
96
101
99

91
100
102
91

10
11
13
11

102
106
107
102

98
106
103
99

108
108
98
92

15
15
15
12

108, 945
103, 498
113, 848
111, 571

56, 166
52, 234
51, 189
52, 213

91, 511
87, 863
94, 430
90, 596

108, 374
106, 525
108, 086
109, 060

37, 636
35, 986
39,440
38,656

52, 258
51, 448
52, 869
49, 290

106, 822
97, 478
103, 537
103, 063

57, 489
55, 760
58, 102
61, 820

673, 989
616, 385
658, 157
662, 850

353, 021
345, 815
348, 495
359, 041

_ .

95
88
76
70

93
86
77
73

79
74
73
75

8
8
8
7

95
90
87
91

89
87
80
88

83
83
81
90

11
11
10
11

107, 108
103, 895
101, 817
105, 890

55, 346
58, 667
61, 600
64, 064

86, 168
88, 630
87, 586
93, 002

108, 218
111, 349
105, 514
99, 284

36,658
36,715
35, 143
36,399

49, 131
51, 803
50, 001
51, 145

101, 348
93, 318
94, 629
99, 672

66, 060
67, 632
67, 594
65, 612

624, 701
641, 715
637, 247
652, 829

364, 119
380, 712
383, 388
370, 742

September ...
October _ __
November...
December

72
77
80
78

77
80
82
78

67
77
75
79

7
7
6
8

90
94
94
91

87
93
93
90

88
94
89
95

12
11
11
12

103, 772
111, 036
105, 484
107, 594

64, 064
64, 705
63, 411
62, 777

89, 076
99, 916
88, 356
90, 247

93, 481
86, 495
81, 037
77, 504

35,750
41, 235
37, 045
38, 256

49, 558
49, 923
50, 259
50, 113

102, 195
107, 891
96, 041
90, 846

63, 989
61, 551
61, 126
67, 525

651, 136
700, 232
650, 605
654, 050

350, 072
329, 174
317, 792
322, 627

1926
January
February
March
April

87
92
94
92

87
92
97
97

88
102
91
82

9
10
10
8

100
101
97
100

104
101
100
98

98
102
98
90

13
14
14
12

110,822
108, 606
122, 725
116, 589

60, 894
59, 067
56, 704
56, 137

91,811
83, 019
96, 289
89, 461

73, 751
68, 819
70, 979
69, 093

39, 435
39, 115
42, 408
40, 855

48, 663
49, 389
50, 038
49, 594

106, 334
99, 103
108, 462
101, 035

69, 080
70, 917
73, 666
75, 703

680, 864
651, 273
736, 289
700, 890

316,471
311,451
321, 780
321, 452

May
June.
July
August

89
88
83
87

87
88
84
81

79
83
81
89

6
6
6
9

99
92
88
94

92
88
87
91

90
86
91
92

12
12
13
13

109, 594
111, 786
100, 607
108, 656

62, 312
67, 920
64, 524
67, 750

82, 905
87, 391
84, 142
92, 546

70, 147
72, 019
67, 642
66, 211

39, 271
36, 780
36, 489
36, 488

51, 040
53, 675
52, 104
53, 528

104, 575
103, 594
98, 006
97, 525

80, 834
84, 146
81, 963
77, 675

681, 314
700, 272
664, 608
696, 719

334, 600
354, 028
339, 158
341, 565

September
October
November _
December

90
92
89
87

89
94
88
92

85
85
79
82

9
8
7
5

96
99
98

95
100
93

88
99
93

12
13
13

110, 829
113, 046
115, 307
117,613

67, 073
62, 378
61, 130
62, 353

90, 432
95, 384
92, 125
88, 012

64, 444
67, 914
67, 446
65, 894

36, 751
37, 756
38, 113
37, 213

53, 843
51, 609
52, 959
53, 151

103, 174
109, 903
105, 511
95, 986

75, 215
68,908
67, 746
65, 894

702, 456
721, 249
702, 229
638, 875

338, 516
318, 592
320, 809
312, 253

1935
January
February
March
April
May
June.
July
August

_

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June
1

""1

Compiled from weekly reports of the American Paper and Pulp Association from about 28 mills on coated paper and 10 mills on uncoated paper, representing a smaller
properties of the industry than the monthly reports on total book paper. Unnlled orders show average number of days which orders on hand will need to complete.
2
Data to May, 1923, from the Federal Trade Commission, representing practically complete production, beginning June, 1923, data compiled from reports of the American
Paper and Pulp Association and prorated to represent complete production on the following percentages calculated on the production in the last seven months of 1923, as
compared with the total for that period derived from the Federal Trade Commission reports and the census of manufactures: Wrapping paper, 57 per cent; fine paper, 80^
per cent; "all other grades," comprising bag, tissue, hanging, felts and building and other paper, 65 per cent. Book paper total production and stock figures are obtained
by link relatives, based on identical reports, from the previous month owing to changes in the number of reporting firms. Total paper figures are the aggregate of the fourprevious production or stock columns plus, up to May, 1923, the figures on newsprint and paper board as compiled by the Federal Trade Commission, and, after May, 1923,
the figures on newsprint as compiled by the Newsprint Service Bureau, and the figures on box board as compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of ihe Census,.
except that from June through October, 1923, when these latter figures were not compiled, the paper board figures of the American Paper and Pulp Association nave been used,,
prorated up to complete production by the percentages which they bore to the box board figures in 1924, or 60 per cent on production and 73 per cent in stocks. Stock
figures represent paper at mills only.




64

Table 39.—WOOD PULP AND PAPER PRODUCTS
WOOD PULP
LABELS i

Chemical

Mechanical

ABRASIVE
PAPER AND
CLOTH 2

ROPE
PAPER
SACKS
(»)

Price,
ConShipments
ConsulsumpsumpProduc- tion and Stocks, Imports5 Produc- tion and Stocks, Imports phite, j
end of 4
end of
untion *
tion 4
ship- month
ShipNew
ship- month 4
bleach- orders Domes- Foreign ments
tic
ments 4
ments 4
ed o
Per
Dolls,
Rel. to
Short tons
per 100 cent of
Beams
1921capac19227
Ibs.
ity |

YEAH AND MONTH

1909-1913 monthlv av
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av

125, 678

1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av

120, 589
108, 617
120, 817
131, 525
105, 668

1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av _•
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1925
January
February __ .
March
April

25, 855

25, 521
31, 130
38, 091
32, 861
35,100

$2.23
2.16
2.12
3.81

157, 797
158,930
160, 375
185, 536
127,467

44,799
33,671
53, 725
33, 720
53,411

33,230
32, 728
36, 147
56, 153
44,457

4.81
3.84
3.52
6.58
3.50

165, 198
185, 253
199, 140
205, 785
222, 769

166, 438
200, 642
200,793
206, 147
223, 395

52, 518
62, 472
58, 492
41, 335
42,062

86, 942
92,843
106, 399
111, 520
118, 809

2.56
2.97
2.58
2.68
2.87

22, 463
27, 560
18, 896
21, 740

221, 756
191, 142
220, 184
217, 590

224, 836
198, 720
217, 300
217, 484

47, 850
40, 198
37, 964
39, 186

142, 119
104, 262
120, 194
88,973

288, 978
294, 358
276, 347
246, 691

32, 620
30, 199
23, 369
29, 859

194, 260
195, 992
193, 158
198, 142

195, 522
196, 054
189, 822
196, 548

37,980
38, 012
40, 220
42, 350

135, 368
151, 469
148, 155
149, 631

212, 798
201, 212
194, 400
194, 062

24, 777
32,812
35, 105
32, 480

196, 690
221, 270
210, 724
208, 510

193, 748
224, 082
210, 544
209, 102

152, 957
133, 397
153,057
186, 918

150, 115
141, 695
160, 368
162, 083

196, 894
188, 472
181, 248
205, 935

25, 388
22, 894
24, 416
15, 866

217, 246
209, 458
235, 684
225, 664

May
June
July
August _ _ _ _ _ _ _

189, 580
165, 312
130, 197
123, 438

161,478
155, 229
147,005
149, 520

234, 037
241, 754
224, 948
198, 782

19, 127
26, 067
21,645
26, 759

September October
November
December

135, 003
167, 597
164,278
147, 288

147, 025
162, 812
156, 409
148, 165

186, 760
193, 040
200, 932
195, 926

31, 771
39, 123
26, 712
22, 556

129, 325

112, 145

16, 463
13, 991
18, 105
14, 504
21,877

117, 804
109, 817
120, 660
132, 308
106, 214

145, 567
131, 170
154, 251
120, 079
166, 889

23, 257
15, 456
16, 855
19, 375
16,000

159, 375
158,008
161, 247
185, 780
127, 786

123,495
131, 073
145, 727
142, 464
154,085

127, 802
131, 266
139, 796
143, 569
153, 159

136, 664
95,900
195,007
225, 804
204, 227

17, 965
24, 957
20,929
27, 657
25,194

126, 308
124, 909
177, 137
198, 583

149, 678
126, 537
147, 026
155, 878

159, 435
177, 175
207, 934
256, 255

179, 591
118, 571
99, 794

148, 240
145, 129
136, 391
129, 329

September...
October
November
December

101, 465
139, 417
141, 786
152, 066

1936
January
February
March
April

May
June July
August

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

106, 824

. -- 149, 942

160, 572

44.2

68, 150
78, 363
47, 957

9,171
11, 695
4,379

82.7
80.6
83.7
86.0
87.4

72, 394
86, 916
79,006
86, 891
84, 634

8,836
10, 943
10, 165
12, 435
13, 565

110
119
129
126

2.63
2.63
2.60
2.60

87.9
107.3
124.9
87.1

100, 565
94, 935
92,097
86,484

9,582
10, 764
12, 029
11, 485

101
127
142
126

101, 285
111, 539
107, 752
106, 879

2.60
2.66
2.68
2.68

66.4
84.4
91.8
100.9

82, 780
85, 503
78, 130
85, 194

13, 922
14, 182
11, 407
8,947

124
143
136
151

45, 252
42, 470
42, 660
41, 872

111, 163
117, 388
110, 328
116, 358

2.68
2.73
2.80
2.90

50.7
84.6
67.8
78.6

86, 448
102, 058
76, 877
71,623

10, 997
14, 034
14, 836
17, 037

133
138
101
92

215, 490
208, 948
236, 768
236, 364

40,542
41, 178
39, 790
39,078

125, 796
99,948
99, Oil
102, 344

2.95
2.95
2.95
2.95

83.8
99.8
102.8
98.2

84,825
83, 795
96,354
86, 14^

11, 461
10, 956
18, 907
15, 669

89
101
115
104

220, 142
225, 330
217, 150
221, 874

220, 118
223, 214
213, 550
223, 340

39, 274
42, 132
45, 710
45, 566

106,250
136, 577
129, 237
131, 769

2.95
2.95
2.95
2.75

113.4
98.1
101. 9
74.1

82, 181
93, 003
77, 756
94, 911

14, 962
13, 591
12, 277
10, 549

95
123
127
138

218, 466
235, 848
227, 186
219, 176

219, 788
237, 560
225, 202
220, 398

44,012
42, 130
43, 638
41, 688

104, 964
121, 806
123, 582
144, 425

2.75
2.75
2.75
2.75

65.4
68.9
97.1
45.1

93, 804
89, 802
72, 748
60, 291

10, 896
13, 123
15, 903
14,490

137
133
123

MOO

_

_

1
Compiled by the Labe I Manufacturers National Association, said to include about 75 per cent of the industry. Data on production, compiled from January, 1921,
through November, 1922, may be found in May, 1923, issue (No. 21), p. 85
2
Data compiled by the Abrasive Paper and Cloth Manufacturers' Exchange, estimated to represent 90 per cent of the industry. The totals given include the shipments of
garnet, emery, flint, and artificial (silicon, carbide, and aluminous oxide) paper, cloth, and combinations. Figures are stated in equivalent reams 9 by 11 inches in size.
The data submitted show that in 1919 the total shipments were made up of the following approximate percentages: Garnet 39, emery 8, flint 32, and artificial 20 per cent.
Details are given in the association's reports.
3
Rope paper sacks from Mope Paper Sack Manufacturers1 Association, comprising 14 manufacturers, said to represent approximately 95 per cent of the industry. Rope
paper sacks are bags or sacks made principally of old rope and used for flour, cement, lime, plaster, etc.
4
Data on production, consumption, and shipments by mills and stocks from the Federal Trade Commission to May, 1923, representing practically complete production
thereafter compiled from reports of the American Paper and Pulp Association prorated to represent complete production on the following percentages calculated on the
production in the last seven months of 1923 as compared with the total for that period derived from the Federal Trade Commission reports and the Census of Manufactures:
Mechanical pulp, 65 per cent; chemical pulp, 50 per cent.
6
Imports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
6
Price of sulphite domestic wood pulp is monthly average from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
7
Twelve months' average July,' 1921, to June, 1922. Numerical data not furnished by the association.




65

Table 40.—BUILDING COSTS AND HOUSING
BUILDING
MATERIAL
PRICES i
(1st of nio.)

INDEXES OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS

Frame Brick
house house
Relative to 1913

YEAR AND MONTH

Factory
buildIng
costs 3
^4°

Construc- Frame5 Brick, Brick,
wood
steel
tion
frame 6 frame 5
costs 4

Reinforced
concrete 5

HOUSING
RENTAL
ADVERTISEMENTS

REAL
ESTATE
CONVEYANCES 2

Portland,
Oreg.e

41 cities

Relative to 1913

100

10O
100

- -

I

j

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

United
States
and
Canada*

Great
Britain 9

Thous.
dolls.

Number

RELATIVE NUMBERS
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average

Minneapolis,
Minn. 7

FIRE LOSSES

Thous.
of£

NUMERICAL DATA

100
89
93
147
181
189
198

10JLOO
1097
1099
"109
10134
10164
10212

10100
10100
10103
10114
10 140
10171
"219

10100
1098
10101
"122
10155
10179
"209

10100
1098
10102
10120
10147
10171
10210

251
202
175
214
215
207
208

10 269
10196
10190
209
205
202
204

10284
10216
"196
219
218
210
213

10257
10201
10185
212
210
202
199

10264
10207
10188
210
206
200
201

$18 727
19 637
15, 236
19, 287
22, 273
26, 413
22, 414

64, 672
63, 094
56, 877
92, 567

808
968
1,094
1,232
1,284

" 1,319
1,886
3,082
3,673
4,788
5,098
5,161

104, 973
91, 642
109, 895
139, 089
140, 961
153, 973

27, 571
27, 721
34, 241
32, 433
31, 461
31, 125
32, 751

£707
614
514
904
620
628

395
647
654
810

182
207
201
196
196

192
194
195
193

194
194
194
194

202
205
206
206

200
201
204
204

210
210
212
213

199
199
199
199

200
201
201
201

1,510
1,429
1,336
1,187

8,497
7,079
5,136
3,042

149, 156
165, 375
149, 204
163, 670

25, 396
23, 991
30, 320
43, 275

195
196
197
197

195
195
195
199

207
207
208
207

204
205
205
205

212
213
213
213

199
199
200
200

201
201
201
202

1,278
1,141
1,365
1,357

2,802
2,593
3,856
6,209

147, 039
133, 724
166, 418
166, 224

41, 119
30, 964
42, 855
52, 408

197
195
197
196

197
196
197
196

199
199
199
198

207
205
208
208

203
203
203
203

213
213
213
213

200
200
197
198

202
201
200
200

1,379
1,277
1,143
1, 348

5,858
4,318
3,793
8,932

162, 565
166, 738
160, 732
151, 418

32, 764
28,676
31, 723
27, 833

194
192
192
189

194
192
192
190

197
197
197
197

208
210
211
211

203
204
204
204

213
213
213
213

197
198 .
198
198

200
201
200
200

1,421
1,456
1,172
1,070

8,169
7,273
4,738
3,385

146, 717
158, 217
144, 942

19, 309
14, 877
26, 724
43, 758

196

1935
September
October
November
December _
- -_

193
195
196
195

195
196
196
196

.

186
209
203
197
195

179
170
202
198
195
197

212

1936
January
February
March
April .

_

May
June
July
August

- -

-

September
October
November.-- _
December

_

- .

1927
January
February..
March
April __

_
I

!

| May. _ _ .! June
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

i
1

i!

1 Building material price indexes representing the relative cost of building materials entering into the construction of a six-room frame house and a six-room brick house
from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Standards, Division of Building and Housing, and Bureau of the Census, are based on prices paid for material by contractors in some 60 cities of the United States. The prices are weighted by the relative importance of each commodity in the construction of a six-room house.,
2
Real estate transfers and conveyances compiled from official records of 41 large cities by the National Association of Real Estate Boards.
3 This index number, furnished through the courtesy of the Aberthaw Construction Co., is designed to show the relative changes in the cost of constructing a standard
concrete fact9ry building. The company believes that the year 1914 gives a normal base and that July, 1920, with an index number of 265, represented the peak of costs.
Beginning with June, 1923, the Morton C. Tuttle Co. has also prepared an index on a similar basis, with practically identical results. These index numbers are given as
of the first day of the month.
* The construction cost index, computed by the Engineering News Record, is based upon the costs of steel (structural shapes, Pittsburgh base), cement (f. o. b. Chicago,
exclusive of bags), lumber (southern pine, New York base), and the rates paid common labor in the steel industry through 1920, after which common labor rates are averages reported from about 20 cities by correspondents of the Engineering News Record. The prices are weighted on the basis of the total production of steel, cement, and
lumber, and the total supply of common labor. Monthly data from 1914 appeared in June. 1923, issue (No. 22), page 52. These index numbers are given as of the first day
of the month.
s Compiled by the American Appraisal Company and represent construction costs for each month as based upon material and labor costs prevailing in the United States,
weighted in accordance with cost precentages determined from buildings of each type actually constructed. Details by districts and description of method of compilation
may6be found in the American Appraisal News for January, 1925, p. 9. Quarterly data, 1920 to 1923, inclusive, appeared in October, 1925, issue of the SURVEY (No. 50), p. 26.
Compiled by the Portland Association of Building Owners and Managers, showing the number of advertisements, computed from number of inches, carried in leading
newspapers of Portland, Oreg., each month of houses and apartments to rent.
7
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, showing number of advertisements in a Minneapolis newspaper each month of houses and apartments to rent
both furnished and unfurnished. No effort has been made to eliminate duplications of houses advertised from day to day, and thus the total does not represent actual
number of dwellings for rent, but it does indicate the trend.
8
Fire losses in the United States and Canada compiled by the New York Journal of Commerce include losses of $10,000 or over in the principal cities of the United States,
Canada, and Alaska, each month's figures including an item of 15 per cent to cover small and unreported losses. Individual losses are given in the original publication of
the 9figures. Monthly data from 1913 and seasonal index appeared in the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 53.
Fire losses in Great Britain compiled by the London Times; prior to January, 1923, these figures did not include fires involving losses of less than £1,000, and thus
are not comparable with later figures.
1° Four months' average, September to December.
11
Average of quarterly figures.


« 26446°—27


5

66

Table 41.—BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
CONTRACTS AWARDED
UNITED STATES
(36 States) 1

CANADA
(2)

YEAE AND MONTH
Commercial

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thous.
dolls.

Industrial
Thous.
sq. ft.

Residential

Thous.
dolls.

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thous.
dolls.

Public and
semipublic

Educational

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thous.
dolls.

Thous.
dolls.

Public
works
and
utilities

Grand total

Thous.
dolls.

Total

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thousands of dollars

1

1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
19L7 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly

av.
av_
av.
av_
avav_
av.

10, 897

1920 monthly av_
1921 monthly av_
1922 monthly av_
1923 monthly av.
1924 monthly av.
1925 monthly av.
1926 monthly av.

$38, 882

6,262
9,500
10, 669
17, 786
15, 065

$10, 435
17, 813
24, 208
47, 085
50, 051

20, 927
•20,006
13, 864
9,552
22, 218

$38, 121
44, 068
32, 348
27, 785
77, 465

2,399

$11, 722

2,864

$17, 450

$49, 977

53, 382

$245, 089

$32, 013
20, 163
6,993
8,276
7,070
8,320
15. 835

8,107
6,413
9,363
9,120
9,420
12, 589
11, 791

30, 639
31, 803
47, 545
42, 743
49, 695
69, 639
71, 845

12, 564
3,518
6,448
6,119
4,169
5,623
6,566

57, 459
16, 893
31, 674
36, 932
29, 606
88, 562
54, 259

12, 642
18, 812
28, 538
32, 562
35, 192
45, 043
41, 577

51, 669
80f 139
123, 014
144, 541
170, 841
222, 664
214, 944

2,745
4,239
5,701
4,641
4, 854
4,892
4,351

16,903
23, 918
29, 754
26, 719
30, 620
34, 434
30, 558

2,824
4,298
4,921
3,912
4,643
5, 817
5,512

20, 765
26, 268
31, 653
25, 386
32, 728
46, 077
48, 347

56, 374
45, 719
55, 960
55, 456
60, 326
73, 811
88,603

38, 275
36, 859
54, 552
56, 352
58, 869
74, 955
70, 245

240, 677
224, 070
318, 403
331, 776
373, 816
485, 187
508, 583

21, 300
20, Oil
27,653
26, 187
23,022
24, 831
31,079

1935
January
February
March
April

10, 919
7,467
11, 772
12, 261

67, 372
38, 825
54, 871
63, 969

4,335
3,308
4,836
6,496

19, 454
20, 767
53, 133
46, 568

26, 791
27, 850
45, 534
51, 453

127, 232
136, 023
220, 872
256, 414

2,371
3,809
5, 557
5,203

15, 339
20, 278
42, 193
33, 155

3,217
3,746
5,571
6,431

31, 614
30, 501
41,917
51, 433

35, 462
52, 865
67, 931
95, 432

48, 536
46, 861
73, 555
82, 565

296, 473
299, 260
480, 916
546, 971

8,935
11, 048
13, 393
24, 887

May
June
July
August

14, 183
13, 713
13, 153
17, 295

80, 280
92, 152
67, 166
105, 849

5,278
3,973
5,643
4,773

27, 562
25, 161
58, 148
22, 693

48, 101
42, 988
48, 081
52, 096

231, 182
208, 583
224, 713
263, 485

4,623
9,002
7,645
5,246

29, 313
64,585
57, 572
33, 667

6,106
6,597
7,251
8, 736

49, 928
57, 214
48, 658
67, 996

77, 759
92, 916
72, 743
96,000

78, 910
76,756
82, 210
88, 594

496, 024
540, 610
529,000
589, 690

34, 052
33, 230
22, 179
31, 207

September
October
November
December

13, 262
12, 228
11, 421
13, 389

80, 171
55, 912
61, 336
67, 770

8,643
7,231
7,758
5,204

43, 298
63, 316
53, 309
29,332

46, 790
52, 238
50,309
48, 280

250, 417
262, 726
240, 280
250, 044

4,744
3,937
3,157
3,407

35, 217
28, 192
22, 048
31, 646

8,270
5,418
4,070
4,390

59, 445
43, 376
30, 675
40, 164

79, 668
66,007
57, 035
91, 912

86, 167
82, 577
77, 871
74, 852

548, 217
519, 528
464, 683
510, 868

29, 746
29,648
46, 973
12, 675

1936
January
February
March..
April

11, 191
7,907
15, 431
14, 981

67, 514
47, 319
104, 113
87, 895

7,245
5,256
7,033
5,277

94,415
39, 087
47, 776
41,524

37, 694
31, 853
49, 139
51, 756

183, 279
171, 297
252, 425
257, 965

2,170
2,928
3,936
4,907

12, 736
19, 214
28, 576
37, 245

4,042
3,440
5,880
5,889

32, 669
32, 078
46, 627
50,685

52, 761
64,728
97, 283
76,940

62, 498
51, 660
81,800
83,454

443, 373
373, 723
576, 800
552, 253

12, 669
13, 478
19, 779
37, 292

May
June
July
August

12,045
12, 015
10,704
12, 438

63, 006
66,064
65, 347
78, 236

6,785
5,610
9,209
6,918

44, 560
53, 725
59, 703
64, 049

48, 783
44, 154
34, 999
39, 829

236,640
224, 771
177, 646
213, 624

6,194
5,635
5,876
5,196

37,188
38, 845
40, 874
40,906

6,012
5,938
4,901
7,207

46, 978
47, 798
48, 374
58,153

92, 335
91, 809
109, 436
119, 078

80,704
73,802
66,004
72,220

520, 707
523,011
501, 380
574, 046

57, 140
54, 186
33, 865
31, 696

September
October
November
December _ _ _

14, 171
11, 141
9,616
9,856

95, 352
61, 219
56, 403
69, 634

6,290
6,613
6, 613
5,941

48, 836
45, 740
64,552
47, 139

40, 183
41, 814
41, 691
37,033

219, 910
218, 982
223, 305
199, 483

4,588
3,404
4, 562.
2,812

32, 953
23, 076
33, 535
21, 912

6,303
5,768
5,181
5,587

66, 825
49,837
46, 782
63, 357

90,652
100, 512
49, 122
118, 583

71,897
69, 316
68,049
61, 531

544,528
499,366
473, 700
520, 107

20, 760
43, 384
34, 972
13, 725

1927
January. February
March
April. .
May
June

i

..
"""

1

1 Compiled by the F. W. Dodge Corporation from reports covering contracts awarded in small towns and rural districts as well as large cities. The data shown on this
page include figures from 36 States, all except Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Wyoming, Nevada, California, Arizona, New Mexico, and parts of Kansas and
Nebraska, comprising about seven-eighths of the total building contracts in the United States. Prior to 1923, figures for Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana,
Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia were not compiled, and the totals for those years for 27 States have been prorated to the figures shown above by applying to
the 1923 totals for 36 States the percentage changes from year to year for the 27 States. The original area figures for the years 1915 to 1918, inclusive, used in these calculations,
were estimates by the F. W. Dodge Corporation. Data giving monthly figures for 27 States (except that prior to May, 1921, North and South Carolina were not included,
which, however, made little change in the total) for 1920 and 1921 appeared in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 71 and 73, and for subsequent months in the August, 1924,
issue (No. 36), p. 109. The reports of the F. W. Dodge Corporation show totals by districts and also separate the public and semipublic building group into various classes,
shown separately in the August, 1923, issue (No. 24), pp. 94 to 97, and also present military and naval and miscellaneous classifications, which are here included only in the
grand total.
2
Canadian building contracts furnished by McLean Building Reports (Ltd.}; monthly data from 1920 appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 46.




67

Table 42.—YELLOW PINE AND DOUGLAS FIR LUMBER
NORTH
CAROLINA
PINE 2

SOUTHERN PINE 1
Production

YEAR AND MONTH

Shipments

New
orders

Stocks,
end of
month

Exports s
Lumber

Timber

av
av
av
av
av
av
av

423, 529 441, 903 446, 405
388, 307 399, 160 354, 287
380, 532 379, 701 376, 070

1920 rno. av
1921 mo av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av

Miy
June
July

Productions

Exports 6
ShipNew
ments 5 orders 5 Lum- Timber
ber

Thousands of feet, board measure

82, 270 34, 627 $23. 04
52, 325 24, 109 21.37
38, 353 13, 674 20. 29
40, 263 13, 933 22.64
1, 371, 652 27, 369 10, 069 31.54
1, 116, 259 24, 993 2,991 33.76
937, 748 36, 481 12,849
55.00

34, 230

32, 107

349, 510 . 322, 157
376, 882 364, 646
373, 263 355, 358

Wholesale price 7

No.l, Floorcoming
mon
Dolls. M ft. b. m.

56, 203
46, 848
23, 299
23, 240
23, 647
22, 700
25, 095

$9 21
7.92
7.88
10.38
15.88
18.25
25.42

46.95
47.24
51.57
45.33
42.18
38.93

330, 229
394, 812
430, 673
458, 971
459, 483
471, 843
452, 646

306, 559
399, 677
451, 395
451, 944
463, 763
474, 291
445, 749

1, 187, 587 53, 096
1, 211, 174 36, 061
1, 177, 627 39, 522
1, 086, 042 54, 368
1, 099, 374 55, 827
1, 162, 665 57, 678
1, 106, 661 48, 465

11, 245
7,228
12, 616
14, 237
14, 563
12, 866
1,668

74.53
35.98
45.46
47.70
41.89
46.49
45.11

33, 514
30, 164
52, 543
48, 257
49, 144
54, 188
49, 474

29, 791
29, 052
52, 496
48, 539
49, 337
51, 558
48, 901

380, 351
297, 738
435, 673
508, 789
488, 831
543, 966
526, 844

334, 915
37, 602
298, 506
37 936
409, 224 416, 088 51, 225
515, 951 510, 318 43, 165
497, 747 509, 871 51, 877
558, 067 562, 805 50, 659
529, 828 536, 468 57, 927

14, 371
31, 479
40, 427
28, 897
46, 314

29.92
11.83
15.25
19.42
17.25
17.25
16.48

481, 936
484, 840
423, 026
448, 825

491, 568
496, 022
469, 155
452, 165

501, 395
511, 706
494, 812
416, 635

1, 181, 906 43, 993
1, 199, 328 48, 932
1, 152, 743 60, 232
1, 165, 620 51, 627

10, 723
9,343
8,102
10, 024

46.42
47.41
48.27
49.83

63, 504 55, 979
62, 538 51, 352
58, 240 51, 100
44, 688 48, 076

568, 960
600, 295
584, 180
526, 434

575, 227 564, 484
600, 743 549, 264
526, 881 621, 782
568, 512 588, 657

49, 225
61, 457
38, 683
77,840

27, 078
34, 014
25, 678
49, 523

16.50
16.50
16.50
15.50

41.00
41.45
40.59
40.27

446, 454
434, 400
479, 370
454, 005

-_

-

437, 159 463, 977
456, 570 473, 852
469,737 475, 838
492, 779 474, 287

1, 182, 790 44, 359
1, 156, 211 44, 825
1, 178, 497 51, 362
1, 120, 803 56, 908

7,758
10, 950
126
183

49.43
49.84
47.96
46.88

38, 584 46, 550
51, 639 49, 700
48, 895 45, 388
54, 222 47, 348

461, 077
601, 191
612, 382
521, 062

522, 405
577, 465
629, 392
538, 072

55, 017 30, 081
61, 340 33, 571
78, 509 37, 909
61, 632 54,261

15.50
16.00
16.50
16.50

40.23
40.09
40.20
40.20

583, 732 562, 693 70, 816
577, 913 573, 884 65, 340
508, 975 532, 253 44, 531
526, 434 481, 221 53, 822

567, 169
590, 895
660, 280
514, 795

460, 346 479, 176 489, 003
449, 745 469, 108 435, 126
449, 794 471, 819 460, 685
446, 163 467, 317 499, 991

- -

AUSTUSt

September
October
November December

Shipments

358, 031
375, 438
431, 633
450, 165
453, 376
473, 336
447, 857

1925
September.
October
November _
December
1936
January
February
March
\pril

Production

Dolls.
• M ft.
i b. m.

Thousands of feet, board measure

1913 mo
1914 mo
1915 mo.
1916 mo.
1917 mo.
191 8 mo
1919 mo.

Price,
flooring4

DOUGLAS FIR

1, 102, 498
1, 086, 086
1, 070, 179
1, 055, 408

46, 905
48, 992
44, 790
46, 141

156
271
85
117

45.76
44.63
43.17
42.89

58, 898 63, 350
45, 136 43, 631
46, 347 49, 490
48, 888 47, 033

545, 682
560, 455
491, 965
515, 690

53, 437
65, 518
36, 065
58, 747

16.50
16.50
16.97
16.55

39.46
39.47
39.27
38.50

458, 749
457, 297
426, 171
345, 865

1, 052, 000
1, 045, 688
1, 065, 538
1, 164, 232

41, 951
49, 122
47, 531
58, 692

71
162
58
74

42.88
43.54
43.02
41.31

48, 524 47, 670
53, 711 54, 019
50, 050 47, 271
48, 797 45, 367

525, 091 512, 556 528, 224 67, 380 50, 983
564, 036 517, 928 511, 661 25, 137 32, 708
503, 603 457, 943 512, 556 63, 801 56, 042
419, 893 405, 121 401, 987 47, 794 46, 442

16.49
17.16
16.23
16.89

38.23
37.91
37.41
36.24

_ 448, 293
441, 419
427, 430
_ 436, 869

445, 502
431, 254
362, 275
337, 200

1937
January
Februay
March
April
| May
June
1

11

1 The figures for southern yellow pine, except exports and prices, are computed data furnished by the Southern Pine Association. The method of computing is first to
find the percentage relation between the actual production, shipments, and orders of the mills reporting and the normal production of these same mills This per cent is
then applied to the normal production of the 192 mills. The average production in the first four months of 1916,484,065,392 feet, is taken as normal production. There are no
separate normals for orders and shipments since these two items must be governed by production. Assuming that the mills reporting are a good sample of the industrv
the resulting figures are equivalent to the actual production, shipments, and orders of the 192 identical mills, and hence a fair sample of the industry The same procedure
is followed for stocks except that normal in this case is 1,262,450,326 feet, the average stocks during 16 months ending April, 1916. The figures are based on actual renorts
from about 180 mills on production, shipments, and stocks and from about 145 mills on orders. Monthly data for 1921 amd 1922vv
appeared on Dace 59 of the Ootohpr i QOQ
v
issue (No. 26). Monthly data 1917 to 1920 appeared in April, 1923, issue (No. 20), p. 49.
*
voiouer, iy^,,
2 Data computed from reports on actual production and shipments as furnished by the North Carolina Pine Association, Inc., for mills varying in number from 31 to 56
The computed figures given are obtained by first determining for a given month the per cent which the actual production is of the normal production of the identical mills
reporting. This per cent is then applied to an arbitrary figure of 70,000,000 board feet, which represents the approximate monthly average normal production of the mills
which reported in 1919. A similar per cent of actual shipments to normal production is applied to the same figure to obtain the computed shipment figures The resulting
figures represent a computed production as of identical mills for each month. The figures are of the same order of magnitude as the actual reported'production and
shipments, but avoid the rather wide variations due to different mills reporting in different months.
3
Exports of southern yellow pine lumber and timber from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1921 on
lumber only are given in the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), page 56. Lumber exports comprise boards, blanks, and scantlings, rough and dressed and exclude short-leaf
pine4 and>all other not long-leaf or pitch pine. Timber exports include both treated and untreated, sawed, and exclude logs and round timber.
From U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent average weekly prices for yellow pine flooring, grading B and better at Hattiesburg Miss
5 The figures of production, shipments, and orders of Douglas fir were obtained by applying the percentage figures of actual production, shipments, and orders to normal
production of reporting mills as supplied by the West Coast Lumbermen's Association to the actual production of 124 mills for May, 1920. The production in that month
was 447,647,540 board feet and has averaged about 75 per cent of the total production of Douglas fir lumber in the United States. Monthly production data for the npriod
1917-1921 appeared in the December, 1922, issue (No. 16), page 49.
i^nuu
6
Export figures are from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1921 for both lumber and timber appeared in
the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 56. Lumber exports comprise boards, planks, and scantlings, rough and dressed, while timber exports include treated and untreated
sawed, excluding logs and round timber.
»
7
Data from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent averages of weekly prices. No. 1 common is given for the State of Washington while
flooring price is an average for Pacific coast mills, covering 1 by 4, B and better grade, vertical grain. Monthly data on flooring extending back to 1921 appeared'in the
November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 16.




68
Table 43.—MISCELLANEOUS SOFTWOODS
CALIFORNIA
WHITE PINE 2

WESTERN PINEi

Shg
doc"- I ments
p;
Ton

Stocks,
end of
month

Production

Ship- Stocks,
end of
ments month

Production

Ship- New Proments orders duction

Thousands of feet, board measure
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av....

109, 357 110, 423
113, 424 97, 784
113, 794 109, 032
881, 924
134, 467 110, 697
74, 437 76, 840 1, 063, 658

1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av.—
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly a v.._

120, 689
145, 916
137, 661
150, 988
144, 553

857, 812
128, 606
914, 376
129, 140
135, 251 1, 033, 833
983, 967
138, 820
148, 542 1, 138, 394

1935
January
February
March
April

77, 994
96, 184
145, 951
164, 584

133, 718
120, 398
129, 019
136, 212

31,900
37, 284
36, 037
29, 114

265, 113
287, 645
267, 276
370, 303

66, 387
101, 876
96, 061
116, 576

45, 784
61, 972
76,765
106,570

382, 216
494, 177
568, 840
567, 021

44, 512
51, 460
42, 959
46, 599
40, 687

48, 357
46, 346
44, 621
45, 204
45, 163

658
676
684
535

34, 979
32, 614
64, 884
98, 551

84,316
76, 820
88, 417
84, 377

550, 925
495, 533
467, 330
458, 791

33, 414
33, 905
41, 512
59, 332

177, 055
180, 919
179, 468
179, 044

927, 799
145, 562
964, 260
149, 624
996, 619
154, 981
160, 097 1, 006, 021

133, 818
165, 516
166, 656
173,701

107, 745
107, 911
115, 795
125, 582

493, 023
545, 982
584, 721
619, 829

173, 285
September
175, 843
October
November _ _ _ _ _ 146, 362
115, 165
December

151, 440 1, 037, 717
140, 480 1, 071, 835
114,009 1, 102, 368
130, 294 1, 148, 436

167, 244
164, 357
118, 200
78, 393

129, 970
145, 665
111, 359
100, 883

1936
January
February
March
April

82, 765
95, 217
151, 165
164, 256

120, 095 1, 120, 036
125, 251 1, 099, 644
152, 165 1, 094, 268
144, 836 1, 081, 820

47, 839
53, 978
96, 129
148, 662

179, ill
180, 746
175, 363
175, 005

144, 653
154, 785
172, 648
186, 740

1, 145, 787
1, 170, 478
1, 180, 321
1, 165, 752

_ _ 157, 977
- - 153, 716
125, 685
93, 632

175, 618
162, 282
130, 469
112, 962

1, 154, 950
1, 150, 089
1, 142, 636
1, 154, 850

• __

May
June
July •
August _

May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December

.

899,
867,
881,
903,

Shipments

Thousands

52, 561
48, 263
58, 368
39, 110

CALIFORNIA
REDWOOD «

Lath

Lumber
YEAE AND MONTH

NORTHERN
HEMLOCK *

NORTHERN PINE 3

Production

Shipments

Production

Ship- New
ments orders

Thousands of feet, board measure
35, 327
33, 643
30, 056
27, 290
16, 986

33, 169
37, 974
37, 051
19, 431
18, 435

37, 460
36, 404
44, 243
39, 618

28, 547
32, 759
35, 337
28, 441

28, 745
39, 934
30, 576
29, 472

9,581
8,669

6,357
9,881

49, 033
41, 018
44, 406
41, 127
41, 110

12, 574
13, 290
10, 825
12, 110
10,52?

11, 097
12, 292
11, 796
9,550
10, 735

23, 483
26, 059
20, 416
21, 166

26, 083
25, 351
18, 920
18, 082

49, 035
53, 240
48, 136
43, 294
42, 326

44, 010
49, 268
37, 583
38, 785
39, 165

47, 805
46, 861
38, 129
38, 391
42, 371

44, 457
39, 466
37, 389
41, 929

40, 527
35, 650
32, 486
39, 856

8,943
9,301
10, 781
13, 526

6,566
7,333
9,357
8,538

18, 664
14, 095
16, 674
10, 156

17, 455
13, 648
14, 049
15, 819

43, 385
41, 822
51, 409
39, 584

36, 246
40, 085
40, 904
34, 770

40, 618
35, 194
40, 990
36, 825

61, 906
66, 200
64, 313
63, 407

44, 368
46, 265
49, 534
53, 065

38, 636
38, 622
48, 928
53, 152

16, 237
17, 978
18, 397
15, 356

12, 403
11, 989
14, 576
11, 144

12, 338
18, 313
24, 298
33, 923

21, 323
18, 417
20, 154
20, 890

41, 933.
49, 544
37, 416
47, 182

39, 992
41, 754
32, 025
47, 941

34, 176
42, 978
29, 414
46, 571

641, 152
659,855
644, 318
642, 798

45, 825
38, 491
15, 286
35, 591

50, 465
55, 485
43, 908
36, 119

42, 994
49, 856
36, 018
36, 798

12, 144 11, 194
9,284 9,881
4,118 6,735
9,254 4,884

29, 207
28, 500
21, 198
26,628

19, 265
21, 622
18, 070
16, 276

39, 451
44, 089
36, 897
46, 810

38, 620
36, 641
38, 216
38, 225

33, 657
38, 328
37, 1'03
44, 837

111, 987
91, 759
115, 576
123, 666

573, 264
540, 585
485, 007
521, 153

35, 825
31, 546
36, 742
45, 493

40, 933 41, 399
39,043 I 36, 128
43, 260 42, 000
46, 732 41, 874

9,246 8,690
8,282 8,148
8,791 13, 599
10, 076 9,570

16, 301
16, 633
17, 727
16, 291

14, 152
15, 445
14, 629
20, 326

41, 846
40, 965
57, 078
42, 413

33, 489
33, 709
41, 616
41, 370

44, 832
39, 648
53,913
39, 390

161, 382
169, 420
154, 409
171, 168

117, 601
133, 923
123, 414
127, 671

521, 237
605, 169
606, 335
659, 098

43, 493
51, 571
51, 549
45, 528

47, 351
51, 972
56, 490
49, 890

46, 170
50, 690
46, 783
50, 389

9,950 11, 444
15, 728 18, 348
15,944 13, 422
13, 127 16, 942

17, 712
16, 229
19,905
21, 582

21, 892
25, 107
21, 738
23, 027

50, 023
40, 404
30, 762
47, 448

47, 687
40, 448
37, 702
49, 418

46, 352
42, 530
34, 135
45, 978

160, 740
138, 768
100, 885

126, 708
109, 915
91, 472

679, 154
659, 171
674, 249

40, 859
52, 296
25, 649
27, 693

48, 323
50, 396
39, 452
28, 115

46, 204
41, 460
24, 677
25, 550

10, 029
13, 050
5,729
6,372

23, 219
15,024
15, 504

22, 109
19, 500
17, 797

35, 749
40, 463
49, 906
30, 852

33, 639
39, 742
47, 116
24, 043

33, 516
49, 886
46, 259
32, 014

40, 273 50, 139
34, 204 27, 768

9,846
9,796
4,342
4,668

1937
January
February
March
April

IVIay
June

ii

1

1 Compiled by the Western Pine Manufacturers' Association, the actual data being computed to comparative bases through percentages of normal production for the
mills reporting in each period. The normal monthly production covers 54 mills with output of 148,000,000 board feet in the earlier years, gradually reduced to 42 mills
with normal output of 136,800,000 feet in 1925, and is estimated to represent 70 per cent of the output of the western pine territory throughout most of the period owing
to the decrease of the total number of mills in business. Monthly data covering the period 1917-1921 appeared in the April, 1923, issue (No. 20), p. 49.
2
Actual figures reported by about 20 mills each month to the California White and Sugar Pine Association; the number of mills varies from 13 to 26.
3 From the Northern Pine Manufacturers' Association, and includes reports from some 24 mills, both member and nonmember, located chiefly in Minnesota. The
number of mills has gradually declined and from 15 to 17 reported in 1925. Monthly data on production and shipments from 1920 appeared in September, 1922, issue (No.
' 4 Compiled by the Northern Hemlock and Hardwood Manufacturers' Association, representing chiefly Wisconsin and upper Michigan mills, from actual reports of from
60 to 75 mills each month. Yearly averages covering the period 1913-1916 were shown in the August, 1924, issue (No. 36). The 1913 monthly averages on which the relative numbers were based are 37,664,000 and 36,442,000 board feet, respectively, for production and shipments.
5 The California Redwood Association has furnished to the Bureau of the Census the figures on the actual production, shipments, and orders received by 7 identical
mills for each month of 1918, 1919, and 1920. These 7 mills represent 40 per cent of the capacity of all listed mills for these years. For the first 4 months of 1921 reports
were furnished from 10 mills representing 56H per cent of the capacity of all listed mills. For the remaining months of 1921 reports are available from 11 mills representing
71 per cent of tlie total listed capacity, and for 1922 to 1924 from 14 mills representing 73 per cent, and beginning with 1925 from 15 mills representing 79 per cent of the total
listed capacity- The actual average monthly production of the 7 reporting mills for 1918 was 14,984.000 feet. On the basis of 40 per cent capacity, the 1918 average monthly
production of all mills is computed as 37,460,000 feet. Regarding this as normal production, there has been computed the probable production of the total redwood capacity
based on the proportion which capacity of the reporting mills bears to the total of all mills. The columns on shipments and orders received represent a similar relationship between the"actual reported figures and the total capacity of all mills.




69

Table 44.—HARDWOODS
WALNUT 3

ALL HAHDWOOBS
Unsold stocks 1

Total stocks i
YEAR AND
MONTH

Total
hardwoods

Gn in

Oak

Total
hardwoods

Gum

Unfilled orders 1
Total
hardwoods

Oak

Gum

Oak

Lumber
Pro- Ship- New
duc- ments* orders 2
tion 2
Stocks Pur(com- (com- (comSMP- on
puted) puted) puted) du°c- meDts hand chases
tton

M feet, log measure

Thousands of feet, board measure

•II
1922 nao. av_
1923mo.av_ 4 492,159 * 145,024 4 173,012 * 392,818 4 111,097 * 143,854 * 134,608 4 47,020 4 39,530
1924 mo. av_ 6 555,276 » 174,425 5 191,628 5434,137 6 134,413 s 150,528 8 139,712 s 48,029 5 45,952
1925 mo. av_ 763,235 234,025 245,086 616,003 182,308 197,030 170,177 57,645 54,063 s 72,000 5 87,000 3 94,000
1928mo.av_ 831,563 227,226 264,850 645,836 186,265 210,536 216,651 71,522 69,372 88,000 89,000 91,000
1934
May
June __-,_424, 175 134,
July
August
477, 002 151,

Logs
Made
into
lum- St'ks
on
ber
and hand
veneer

1,807 1,927 10, 214
2,538 2,391 8,153
3, 529 3, 144 11, 463
3, 830 3,477 19, 282

1,460
2,410
2,641
2, 958

1,327 2, 037
2,114 3, 282
2,727 3,106
3,011 4,158

2,428
2, 647
2,409
2,742

10, 168
12, 885
13, 813

3,339
2, 443
2,256
2,061

2,880
2,573
2,521
2, 544

3, 801
3,694
2,910
2, 419

261
218

152, 555
163, 697

325, 652
355, 698

102, 204
114, 594

121, 337
117, 002

118, 285
137, 563

41, 044
44, 138

34, 144
51, 143

3,647
3,375
3,736
3,660

9,355

September
October
November .
December...

546, 242
563, 759
653, 653
666, 825

169, 421
174, 274
202, 489
214, 889

188, 942
193, 997
222, 837
227, 743

428, 003
455, 080
516, 247
524, 142

128, 518
138, 168
157, 123
165, 871

151, 052
159, 771
173, 532
180, 474

132, 838
123, 485
158, 179
167, 924

46, 633
41, 546
54, 135
60, 677

42, 753
39, 738
54, 927
53, 004

3,648
3,990
3,990
4,256

3,255
3,889
3,352
3,818

13, 605
14, 556
15, 176
15, 614

2,543
3,345
3,243
2,902

2,746
2,997
3,731
3, 017

2,348
2, 695
2,931
2,686

1335
January-- _
February __
March
April

665, 144
689, 384
733, 351
775, 221

214, 750
219, 501
228, 110
289, 563

225, 734
227, 670
247, 669
258, 294

529, 515
554, 280
598, 267
646, 255

169, 712
176, 546
185, 891
199, 413

180, 321
182, 678
200, 116
215, 122

159, 337
153, 680
150, 027
148, OG8

54, 927
49, 569
47, 836
49, 740

50, 743
49, 851
51, 497
48, 102

4,650
4,056
4,336
4,017

4,182
3,825
3,654
3,341

16, 709
17, 085
17, 476
18, 232

3,205
3,472
3,679
3,862

3,073
3,208
3,441
3,465

3,356
4,002
4,281
4,678

May
June
July _ _
August

775, 695
796, 324
802, 349
781, 610

241, 714
241, 912
242, 377
231, 784

251, 129
253, 228
252, 198
242, 544

638, 391
658, 998
653, 174
635, 618

194, 168
197, 199
196, 281
184, 064

206, 650
210, 831
201, 981
194, 514

157, 975
156, 356
169, 152
171, 277

56, 749
53, 542
52, 736
58, 245

49, 957
47, 226
57, 236
56, 862

4,132
3,589
3,873
3, 491

3,029 19, 332 3, 552
3,119 19, 515 2,921
2,940 20, 736 2,880
3,237 20, 898 2,637

September.
October. ...
November .
December..

761, 818
783, 401
788, 180
806, 346

222, 577
226, 808
225, 087
224, 112

228, 742
243, 417
249, 340
261, 070

608, 554
619, 997
613, 814
635, 176

171, 838
170, 786
168, 829
172, 966

178, 850
193, 980
195, 297
204, 024

176, 217
188, 400
207, 561
204, 077

60, 712
67, 143
72, 354
68, 188

56, 688
55, 712
61, 572

74, 000
72, 000

73, 000
86, 000

63,312

78, 000
73, 000
65, 000
68, 000

83, 000 98, 000
93, 000 98, COO
96, 000 107, 000
92, 000 90, 000

3, 363 3,287
3,243 3,066
2,979 3,813
4, 229 3,870

83, 000
91, 000

2,897
1,842
2,121
2,430

20, 688
20, 858
20, 024
19, 831

3,496 4,734
3, 261 4,374
2,656 4,599
2,637 4, 599
2,879
2,378
2,361
3, 281

4,770
3,930
4,000
2,569

]

1928
January
February- March
April
__

765, 431
783, 215
769, 992
790, 558

212, 922
226, 818
221, 397
224, 164

244, 137
246, 619
247, 154
252, 375

592, 772
607, 117
593, 423
626, 807

161, 851
174, 314
168, 507
175, 405

188, 963
186, 202
184, 817
192, 072

204, 771
216, 186
208, 965
193, 150

68, 190
74, 488
68, 952
61, 955

60, 433
66, 670
68, 884
67, 863

81, 000
85, 000
82, 000
80, 000

85, 000 87, 000
92, 000 100, 000
86, 000 90, 000
85, 000 81, 000

3,143
3,156
2,874
3, 077

May
Junp<
July _
August

807, 583
820, 714
819, 196
824, 661

229, 017
235, 525
232, 729
223, 865

258, 404
259, 965
269, 228
273, 426

636,
640,
641,
642,

253
937
713
551

175, 453
175, 188
168, 894
165, Oil

198, 839
199, 732
210, 390
215, 312

202, 383
210, 850
206, 584
207, 768

69, 200
73, 617
73, 191
70, 279

67, 212
68, 836
67, 198
63, 942

85, 000
95, 000
94, 000
94, 000

82, 000
84, 000
91, 000
97, 000

2,787 2,778
3, 043 3,074
2,134 3, 057
2,610 3,022

September.
October
November _
December..

893, 104
884, 608
897, 818
921, 875

222, 502
224, 008
231, 160
242, 602

301, 830
301, 135
308, 099
315, 826

685, 439
673, 856
690, 785
718, 393

163, 108
164, 309
168, 703
176, 443

230, 752
227, 982

233, 189
242, 254
239, 059
234, 651

69, 822
73, 184
76, 790
78, 594

76, 661
82, 185
79, 739
67, 841

94,000

1927
January
February
March ...
April..- _ _ _
May
June

235,911
255, 457

..:.:: i:::::::::::~::~::~::"

87, 000
92, 000
92, 000
93, 000

3,624 19, 071 2,076 2,073 1,208
3,627 18, 010 2,559 2, 393 1,485
4,011 17, 473 2,781 2,821 1,388
3, 143 17, 368 2, 597 2,472 1,513
3,380
3,417
2, 399
15,046 2,361

16, 974
16, 992
15, 463

2,630
2,803
2,168
2,439

2,151
2,961
3,193
3,093

2,640 2,806 13, 930 1, 991 2,619 2,237
2,320 3,688 12, 503 1,833 2,143 1,941
2,378 3,310 11,591 2,273 2,335 1,754

93, 000 105, 000
93, 000 101, 000 100, 000
90, 000 91, 000 92, 000
82, 000 79, 000 74, 000

I

1
i

200 units reported. A single band-mill is considered one unit of production.
2
Data on production, shipments, and new orders are reported by from 100 to 135 units each week to the Hardwood Manufacturers* Institute, the monthly data being
computed by applying the percentages of normal production calculated by the association for every four or five weeks' period to an average normal output of these mills
of about 100,000,000 feet per month. These figures thus represent only about two-thirds as many units as the data on stocks and unfilled orders.
s Compiled by American Walnut Manufacturers' Association from reports of identical firms representing from 50 to 60 per cent of the walnut lumber industry.
* Seven months' average, May through November, inclusive.
« Six months' average, July to December, inclusive.




70

Table 45.—TOTAL LUMBER AND FLOORING
LUMBER— ALL SPECIES

YEAR AND
MONTH

MAPLE FLOORING i

OAK FLOORING 2

Retail yards, 9th Composite
Unfilled
Unfilled
prices 6
Fed. Res. Dist.«
Produc4
Ship- Stocks, New orders, ProProShip- Stocks, New orders,
end of
•end of
tion 3 Exports
Hard- Soft- duction ments month orders end of duction ments month orders end of
Sales Stocks woods woods
month
month
Thousands of feet, board measure

1909-13 m.a.
1913mo.av_- 2, 197, 334
1914 mo. av-_ 2, 102, 537
1915mo.av._ 2, .086, 531
1916mo.av__ 2, 262, 175
1917mo.av_. 2, 141, 144
1918 mo. av_. 1, 874, 419
2, 069, 522
2, 059, 875
1, 762, 264
2, 270, 967
2, 495, 261
2, 418, 838
2, 625, 942
2, 462, 996

109, 268 7 $30, 995 7 215, 564
129, 280
16, 786
203, 175
100, 401
13, 838
153, 155
127, 743
15, 496
126, 744
146, 071
14, 651
127, 719
161, 500
13, 403
111, 606
161, 687
17, 187
111, 258
161, 714
15, 149
106, 768

1935
May
June
July
August

2, 682, 113
2, 745, 777
2, 563, 211
2, 800, 999

160, 258
183, 170
158, 369
132, 089

20, 904
24,656
23, 321
22,245

September _ _
October
November.December...

2, 824, 212
2,835,311
2, 476, 262
2, 403, 748

138, 044
170, 376
148, 858
201, 369

1926
January
February —
March
April

2,254,461
2,470,531
2, 737, 616
2, 591, 512

May
June.
July
August

September _.
October
November. .
December. .-

Thousands of feet, board measure

178, 398
216, 037
149, 146
93, 947
91, 208
84, 971
85, 314

1919mo.av_.
1920mo.av__
1921 mo. av_.
1922mo.av__
1923mo.av_.
1924mo.av_1925mo.av_.
1926 mo. av__

Dollars per
thousand feet,
board measure

4,572
6,675
7,464
9,205
11, 563
11, 120
4,858

4,572
6,009
6,877
8,894
11, 470
10, 446
5,537

12, 171
10, 544
15, 877
17, 158
22, 489
25, 652
25, 680

4,719
6,104
7,419
9,525
11, 429
8,956
4,781

6,290
7,285
7,578
7,547
16, 124
20,074
7,270

$40. 33
46.72
43.11
41.80
46.56

$48. 98
27.42
30.79
33.86
30.95
30.71
30. 67

10, 039
10, 383
8,378
11, 479
11, 734
8,603
8,828
9,986

11, 848
8,259
8,121
11,934
11, 805
7,865
8,428
8,849

15, 448
15, 963
30, 749
28, 040
21, 268
23, 880
26, 979
31, 277

14, 163
5,106
8,991
12, 194
11, 085
8,085
8,360
8,370

38, 289
26, 723
10, 176
20, 311
26, 804
12,347
10, 117
9,419

10, 101
10, 745
12, 411
22, 877
30, 103
34, 843
43, 167
44, 421

11, 070
7,800
13, 595
23,945
28, 878
35, 306
42, 825
41, 923

14, 431
25, 859
32, 875
23, 006
33, 609
43, 773
47, 104
57, 443

11, 782
6,343
14, 058
23, 723
28, 313
35, 900
42, 435
40, 194

15, 035
11, 324
12, 003
33, 052
44, 258
46, 562
52, 031
41, 728

112,407
110, 387
114, 887
115, 794

41.43
40.04
40.22
40.16

30.84
29.93
29.85
30.15

7,687
7,600
7,962
8,325

7,399
8,353
10, 167
10, 567

29, 165
28, 504
26, 399
24, 115

7,413
9,244
12, 172
11,534

8, 752
9,498
11, 012
11, 136

41, 329
41, 692
44, 026
46, 282

42, 104
43, 699
48, 029
48, 948

51,254
53, 494
45, 155
41, 082

43, 372
46,003
49,904
54,372

50, 862
50, 092
53, 740
59,844

30,799
21.859
17,751
9,870

111, 953
104, 849
98, 345
100, 273

40.58
40.54
41.67
41.69

30.35
30.35
30.59
30.34

9,292
10, 720
9,084
9,984

10, 704
9,439
7,445
6,855

22, 750
23,728
25, 072
28,440

9,766
7,916
6,340
8,749

9,980
8, 219
7,829
9,076

45,922
49, 498
41, 947
42,206

45,630
49, 686
39, 276
41, 816

38,372
39, 921
43,204
44, 715

39,968
40, 094
41, 594
47,300

52,729
44, 793
50, 565
61, 103

155, 726
156, 720
188, 249
173, 675

8,597
7,524
10, 716
14, 554

110,436
114,046
115, 780
117,447

42.60
43.79
43.00
41.96

30.79
31.32
31.44
31.48

8,922
7,845
9,624
9,339

7,143
6,526
9,221
9,099

29, 314
30,447
31, 197
30, 733

8,264
7,083
9,224
8,281

10, 401
10, 762
11, 761
9, 919

45, 171
44,540
47,686
48,642

41, 498
37, 708
43,543
43,007

48,244
54,362
57,291
62,656

34,446
33, 411
42,267
40,223

54,161
49, 599
45, 231
42,491

2,677,098
2, 582, 349
2, 443, 684
2, 413, 655

173,466
178, 197
142, 895
156, 875

19, 021
22,543
20,611
20, 268

114, 779
112, 412
109,909
109, 822

41.70
41.61
39.95
39.95

31.46
30.22
30.21
29.93

8,283
8,624
8,329
11,316

8,074
9,334
10, 414
13,911

31, 689
30, 290
28, 557
31,546

7,443
9,949
8,963
11, 155

8,920
9,317
8,755
9,987

41,998
44, 056
44, 789
46, 396

42, 139
46, 035
46, 259
47, 756

60, 282
59, 737
56, 450
54,325

41, 415
45, 302
47,545
49, 756

41, 513
41,744
39,260
43,329

2, 491, 837
2,468,949
2, 279, 825
2, 144, 917

163,301
121, 116
164,263
166, 080

16,483
20, 664
14, 697
6,105

102, 183
94, 830
88, 276
91, 298

40.96
40.93
41.15
41.15

29.90
30.28
29.98
29.78

12, 034
11,616
12, 152
11, 750

13, 194
11, 961
9,765
9,541

31, 131
31, 314
33, 619
35, 483

9,720
7,115
6,171
7,071

9,606
8,580
7,350
7,669

47,201
45, 056
40,029
37,489

47,270
42, 859
34, 501
30, 504

53, 469
55, 273
60, 145
67, 079

41, 777
37, 767
33,827
34, 595

39,237
35, 578
32,603
35, 995

1927
January
February _ _
March
April
Mav
June

1 Data on maple flooring (including also birch and beech) are compiled by the Maple Flooring Manufacturers' Association, said to represent about 70 per cent of the industry. The data for the period 1919-1922 include reports from 20 identical mills; in 1923 an additional mill was included, while 3 mills ceased reporting at the beginning of 1924.
In July, 1925, one other member was added, making a total of 19 reporting. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 43.
2
Compiled by the Oak Flooring Manufacturers' Association from reports of 25 identical mills, said to represent about 90 per cent of the total oak-flooring industry.
Monthly data from 1912 appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 36.
3
Figures in this column represent the total cut of 10 species of lumber—yellow pine, Douglas fir, hemlock, western pine, redwood, maple, birch, beech, white fir, and
sugar pine—representing over 70 per cent of the total cut of lumber in the United States. Annual figures for 1913 and 1914 are from actual reports to the U. S. Department
of Agriculture, Forest Service, and from 1915 through 1920 are computed on the basis of actual reports to the Forest Service. Monthly figures for 1920 are obtained by prorating the cut of each species as reported by the associations whose figures are carried on these columns to the Forest Service total. For subsequent months prorating is done
on an approximate average for the years 1917 to 1920.
* Exports consisting of boards, planks, and scantlings are from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
* Data compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Stocks represent the inventories of 19 companies retailing lumber through 588 yards in the Ninth Federal
Reserve District; sales represent the total retail business reported by 21 companies operating 625 yards. Data for 1919 were estimated for a few companies on the basis of the
correlation of reporting companies of 1919 and 1920. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in October, 1923, issue (No. 26), p. 59.
t
6
Composite lumber prices compiled from weekly data published in the Lumber Manufacturer and Dealer, representing combined weighted averages for the respective
series of lumber, based on quotations on various grades for each species. The species are weighted according to annual production of the previous year, the weights changing about May of each year, when the new production figures are available. The softwood index is based upon 7 species: Yellow pine, Douglas fir, North Carolina pine,
white pine, hemlock, spruce, and cypress. The hardwood index is based upon 13 species: Maple, birch, beech, basswood, elm, oak, gum, ash, cottonwood, chestnut, poplar,
hickory, and walnut. Figures formerly published covered only first week of the month.
? Seven months' average, June to December, inclusive.




71

Table 46.—FURNITURE, ROOFING, AND NORTHERN HARDWOODS

1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 Tncynthly av

$40, 266 $128,088
23, 949 28, 812
29, 833 45, 005
37,882 56, 317
36, 950 46, 287
45, 742 53,305

1925
January
February
March
April
. .

34,775
35,302
42,907
37, 154

47, 976
45, 037
36, 990

May
June . > . ...
July
August

34, 135
41, 637

31, 432
33, 916

44,700
53,940

63, 030

September
October
November
December _

62, 301
60, 852
55, 681
45, 518

69, 157
73, 625

53, 161
42, 207

79,602

57,364
48,486

58,484
49, 344

42,941

50,130

41, 695
40, 331

48, 025

1936
January - February
March
April
May
June _ _ .
July
August

September
October .
November
December

- _

55,813

53,420

73,449
55,809

72, 763

54,218

68,891
74,240

63,266

78,590

63, 560

72, 215

. . 58, 183

67,016

$13, 281 $17, 225 $12, 424
11,317 13, 160 11, 357 812,465
7,125
6,227 10, 149
4,433
9,231 13, 689
9,773
6,960
13, 767 11, 709 13, 719 16, 540
5,034 11, 743 13, 969
11, 658
12, 288
4,308 12, 318 15, 229

924
27
28
30

825
25
27
27

858
57
57
53

26, 500
37, 397
33, 352
34, 404

Plant
operations

11.3
11.2
13.5

897.3
96.8
97.5
100.0

100
100
98.5
96

47,411

96
93.5
95
96

41, 443

815

Thous.
of sqs.?

St'ks,
end of
mo.

Net tons

33, 328
27, 509
19, 067
34, 204
38, 852
28, 533
29, 202

2,079
2,360
2,182 89,016
2,541 s 12, 055
2,542
16, 078 2,427
2,714
17, 406 2,296
2,731
20,297 3,588
23,030 4,043
2,670

29, 117
23, 913
25, 481
22, 176

2,370
2,170
2,373
2,773

20, 076
15, 658
18, 652
19, 788

3,503

20, 884
26, 282
28,909
35, 640

2,452
2,962
3,021
3,003

20, 656
20, 946
22, 360
22,794

3,378
3,075
3,751
3,951

29,508
39,979
35, 261
33, 269

3,176
3,473
2,607
2,386

23, 272
23,946
19,043
16, 373

2,556
3,488
4,234

32, 696
33, 866
33, 301
30,249

1,699
2,053
2,752
2,700

18, 195
17, 829
25, 061
21, 545

4,641

57
22
22
14

26
28
29
33

60
60
55
60

4
4.5
11
20

9,079

11, 307
11, 689
10, 638
11, 863

47
56
63
64

18
27
34
30

18
17
25
25

51
51
56
60

20
10
8
7

17, 789
20,963
19,474
20,885

68
68
68
56

34
32
34
15

29
33
32
26

64
59
55
51

5.5
9
10.5
25

94
100
101
99.5

35, 842
25, 175
15, 735

10, 158
13, 186
13, 222
11, 140

82
78
68
55

53
23
25
20

27
28
30
24

51
54
52
50

4.5
9
13.5
23

100
98
100
100

48, 395
51, 856

57
60
72
68

29
28
42
27

22
22
26
29

47
47
46
55

25
11
5
7

100
100
97
100

41,499
27, 470
17, 169
15, 875

25,863
26,867
26, 468
29,674

2,958
3,012
2,597
2,768

24,520
26,218
25, 003
23, 547

4,269
3,054

9,017

11,690
11, 153
9,979
11, 875

12,061
14,716
15,533

16,600
18,709
20, 474

65
62
60
42

34
33
34
15

31
31
31
28

60
61
61
56

7.5
13.5
12.0
31.0

100
102
102
100

15, 653
13, 034
11, 394

15, 399
29, 247
26,153

3,450
3,495
2,441
2,115

26, 938
27, 636
22,013
17, 857

3,236
3,426
3,246

•3, 513
3,214

16, 489
18,003
15,944
13, 621

6,637
7,042

13, 592
11,086
10, 811
8,784

3,892
3,353

10,997

3,154
3,149

10,916
8,782

9,256
8,332
8,231
10, 101

2,592
1,897
2,511

9,443
9,878
7,604

3,408

15,524
16,891
13, 557

6,651

8,649
6,663

32, 732

»63
58
62
64

Ship- Ship- Proments ments duction

M ft. b. m.

34,206
27,838

DRY
ROOFING
FELT 6

80
72
54
43

9,722
9,296
9,219
10, 793

6,851
2,541

Pro'duetion

PREPARED
ROOF.
ING 6

13, 327
13, 548
15, 810
12, 457

3,921

3,324
4,047

No. Perct. Per ct.
days' new
full
sales orders time

NORTHERN
HARDWOODS
(4)

10, 913
11, 163
12, 518
10, 081

11, 562
11, 635
11, 506
9,668

4,378
3,324
2,903

Number days'
production

Cancellations

Number
of pieces

Shipments

Quantity

Value, average per firm, dollars

YEAR AND MONTH

Outstanding
accounts, end
of mo.

Shipments

Unfilled
Unfilled
Ship- orders, New orders,
end
ments of mo. orders end of
month Value

FURNITURE— GRAND RAPIDS
DISTRICT 3

New orders

PIANO BENCHES AND
STOOLS 2

Unfilled orders,
end of mo.

HOUSEHOLD
FURNITURE
AND CASE
GOODS i

9,519

9,077
10, 052
13, 892
17, 559
16, 121

17,839

10, 757

44, 894
47, 186

44,732
41,299
26, 223
20, 811

22,098

54,622
47, 226

3,713
3,813

4,362

3,231

4,279
5,943
5,186

4,051

3,636

3, 545

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June

1 Combined figures representing average shipments and unfilled orders per firm from reports of 50 identical firms of the National Association of Chair Manufacturers.
from 42 to 58 firms of the Southern Furniture Manufacturers' Association, and about 100 firms of the National Alliance of Case Goods Association. Data from the National
Association of Chair Manufacturers were discontinued after May, 1925, while those of the National Alliance of Case Goods Associations were not collected from June through
September but on an average per firm basis, the data are still quite comparable.
2
Compiled by the National Association of Piano Bench and Stool Manufacturers from concerns estimated to cover about 80 per cent of this industry. Reports are from
14 firms m July, 1917, gradually decreasing until 1923 since which time only 8 firms have reported. The figures are strictly comparable, however, as the 6 firms which
ceased reporting went out of this line of business. It should be noted that the items, new orders, unfilled orders, and shipments (values) are averages per firm while shipments (quantities) are totals for the reporting firms. Monthly data from 1917 to April, 1924, showing aggregates for all items appeared in the June, 1924, issue (No. 34)
p. 57.
3
Compiled by Seidman & Seidman from reports of representative manufacturers of furniture in the Grand Rapids district. Owing to variation in the number of firms
reporting each month, the figures have been shown in number of days' production or sales, based on current ratios, or as percentages. The original data are based on value.
Monthly data from June 1923 appeared in the June, 1926, issue (No. 58), p. 24,
4
Data from Northern Hemlock and Hardwood Manufacturers' Association, representing chiefly Wisconsin and upper Michigan mills. These figures represent actual
reports from 60 to 75 mills each month. The hardwoods cut are mostly maple, birch, and beeclu Annual averages from 1913 through 1918 appeared in the February. 1926.
issue (No. 54), p. 65.
B Compiled by the Prepared Roofing Manufacturers' Association until 1926 and prorated to 100 per cent of the industry from reports received from 60 to 90 per cent of
the total machine activity, comprising all types of asphalt-saturated roll roofing whether surfaced or not and all types of asphalt shingles. Monthly data back to 1919
appeared m the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 55. Beginning with 1926 the name of the association was changed to the Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Association and
data6 are prorated to 100 per cent of the industry.
Compiled by the Felt Manufacturers' Association, including reports from 16 identical mills, until 1925, when 17 firms reported. The felt is made from waste rags and
the data are said to represent about 50 per cent of the industry. Data as to receipts of rags and paper and stocks of all kinds appeared hi November, 1924, issue (No 39)
p. 104. Average prices are also included in the reports of the association.
*
8 A roof square is equivalent to 100 square feet of covering as measured on the roof.
Six months average, July to December, inclusive.
8
Seven months' average, June to December, inclusive.



72

Table 47.—LUMBER PRODUCTS AND SAND-LIME BRICK
BOTABYCUT
VENEER 2

UnBook- Ship- filled
ings ments orders

YEAR AND MONTH

Thousands of sq. ft.
surface

3

3,938
4,341
4,721
4,189

3,763
4,232
3,401
3,301

Production
(rough)6

192

6294,768 8711,687
707, 426 738, 341

222
146
214
126

„

5,972
6,130
5, 349
4,278

205, 738 591, 912
358, 733 632, 542
451, 868 596, 824
332, 551 492, 072

6

473, 988
675, 812

6

1,235, 610 6 2,402, 466
1, 662, 681 2, 459, 913

1, 023, 457
970, 130
987, 222
1, 237, 374

675, 166
699, 165
847, 249
653, 905

1, 446, 864 2, 074, 030
1, 853, 831 2, 676, 208
1, 832, 283 2, 578, 671
1, 711, 747 3, 070, 079

251
184
214
151

220 1,403,392 895, 528 1,293,273 2, 184, 084
111 862, 800 965, 924 1,159,314 2, 753, 279
231 752, 557 697, 679 534, 616 2, 577, 303
82 724, 085 860, 875 630, 909 1, 374, 498

581, 809
813, 932
814, 754
916, 242

Ship- St'ks, Unfilled
ments end of orders,
end of
by
truck mo. month

20, 626

i

8,456

12, 319

16, 101 4, 984
17, 940 9,465
20, 819 5,649
17, 435 7,690

12, 151
8,302
10, 996
9,870

15, 626
18, 178
16, 923
10, 597

9,094 9,877
12, 344 8,613
10, 240 8,953
6, 286 10, 838

1, 475, 275
1, 794, 937
1, 853, 125
1, 411, 589

371, 689
431, 569
308, 803
504, 087

138 395, 583
344 790, 622
227 997, 792
248 1,213,395

i

Pro- Shipduc- ments
by
tion
rail

Thousands of brick

182
208
172
172

4,672
4,807
4,548

SAND-LIME BRICK «

Sets

3, 893
3,786
3,625

4 121
8, 882
_ '3, 791

_

Unfilled
Stocks
orders, on hand,
ShipSales
ments (finish- end of
end of 7
month
(finished sets) ed sets) (finished month
(rough)
sets)

3, 678 3,824
3, 936 3,443
3,406 4,437
3, 456 4, 708

2,609
3, 605
3.. 696
_ _ _ 3, 824

_ _

CIRCLED HEADINGS FOR WOODEN
BARRELS 3

Number of
carloads

•192

1926
January..
Februarv
*
March
ApriL.._ . .

September
October
November
December

5

54,888 ^5?217 57,188

1325 month! v average
1P2Q monthly average

May
June „
July
August

Purchases

PLYWOOD i

3, 545, 455
2, 993, 355
3, 069, 088
2, 977, 129

6,663
4,890
6,363
3, 695

7,311 20, 695
6,855 23, 446
7,613 18, 526
8,770 24, 200
18, 651
19, 325
18, 150
7,701

i

1

Compiled by the Plywood Manufacturers' Association from reports of 20 members (only 18 members in April), of which 2 or 3 report on shipments only. These data
represent the business of building up veneers into plywood of from 3 to 8 thicknesses. Details as to kinds of wood and nature of cores are shown in the association's report.
2
Compiled by prorating the weekly reports of the Wirebound Box Manufacturer's Association from 11 members, estimated to represent about 80 per cent of the industry
concerning their purchases and receipts of rotary-cut veneer for the manufacture of wire-bound boxes. Details by sizes and sources are given in the association reports.
8
Compiled from reports of the Tight Barrel Circled Heading Manufacturers' Association, the association's weekly reports being prorated to 100 per cent of the industry
and combined into monthly figures. The original data are reported by from 7 to 11 firms each week, estimated to cover from 63 to 91 per cent of the industry. Data on
stocks and unfilled orders are as of the Saturday nearest the end of the month. Details by kinds of sets are presented in the association's weekly reports. From the rough
headings are produced the finished sets. Stocks include both sold and unsold goods.
4
Compiled by -Rock Products from reports of 14 firms from May through August, believed to represent about one-half of the production of sand-lime brick in the
United States and Canada. In September and November 17 firms reported, October 20 firms, and December 23 firms. The 1926 averages are based on total figures for
the 5
year by 23 firms.
Four months' average, September to December, inclusive.
6
Three months' average, October to December, inclusive.
7
Eight months' average, May to December, inclusive.

Table 48.—NATIONAL ADVERTISING IN NEWSPAPERS1

YEAR AND
MONTH

Auto- Auto- Cigars,
cigamobile mobile rettes,
adver- accesand
tising sories tobacco

Total

Financial

Food,
grocer- Hotels House- Men's Musihold cloth- cal
and
ies,
bever- resorts furaiing instruture
ments
ages

Radio
and
electrical

Ballroads
and
steamships

Shoes

Toilet
articles WoMisand
cellamedical mens* neous
wear
preparations

Thousands of lines

1925 mo. av.2
1926 mo. av

24, 730
29,034

4,624
5,912

1,259
1,526

1,435
2,354

932
867

6,563
3,682

530
429

592
589

331
323

154
207

1,294
1,448

1,748
1,991

217
175

4,289
5,358

158
154

3,409
3,936

1928
January
February March
April

24,543
27, 339
32, 766
32, 609

6,063
6,327
6,827
6,193

760
507
845
1,275

1,621
2,084
2,003
2,850

1,153
823
1,154
925

2,610
2,557
4,409
4,920

413
262
279
383

150
251
681
1,261

30
81
369
492

86
223
244
124

1,310
1,316
1,242
872

1,401
1,221
1,239
2,119

56
56
240
287

5,905
7,137
8,504
6,005

26
63
293
336

2,959
3,431
4,437
4,567

«

34, 219
31, 664
26, 383
26, 426

6,654
5,438
5, 904
8,200

2,489
2,510
2,086
1, 857

2, 715
2,786
2,447
2,552

708
918
895
505

5,016
4,859
3,730
2,999

658
965
724
385

1,010
555
281
284

617
596
189
57

134
96
83
68

915
1, 024
685
835

2,948
3,174
2,442
2,065

285
157
53
32

5, 084
4,294
3, 758
3, 369

204
83
33
44

4,782
4,209
3,073
3,174

September
October
November
December

28, 875
32, 098
29, 977
29, 513

6,411
6,098
4,338
2,486

1, 867
1,396
1,352
1,372

2,442
2,124
2,875
1,748

741
784
865
927

3,229
3,983
3,591
2,281

188
219
281
395

799
1,089
463
247

353
458
377
261

191
321
416
501

1,698
2, 367
2,480
2,628

1,584
1,665
2,060
1,972

218
228
223
269

4,197
6,345
6,464
3,231

186
317
171
97

4,771
4,704
4,021
3,098

May
June

July..
August

1

„...„

1

Compiled by Printers' Ink Monthly, showing the amount of national advertising of various classes appearing in newspapers of 44 identical cities, National advertising
is believed to represent from 15 to 20 per cent of the total advertising appearing in newspapers.
2
Seven months' average, June to December, inclusive*




73

Table 49.—GLASS AND CHINA PLUMBING FIXTURES
POLISHED
PLATE
GLASS
(2)

ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE 1

Unfilled
New Ship- or- St'ks,
Ratio orders ments ders, end
Total to caend mo.
pacity
mo.
No. of
turns

1920 mo
1921 mo
1922 mo.
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.

Production

Production

YEAR AND
MONTH

av
av
av
av
av
av
av

Per cent of capacity

VITREOUS CHINA PLUMBING
FIXTURES *

GLASS CONTAINERS 3

Production

UnNet
Net Ship- filled St'ks, orders
Ratio orders ments orders, end
Total to camo. received
end
pacity
mo.

Thous. Thous.
gross
so., ft.

No. of weeks'
supply

4,465
6,390
7, 422
7,630
9,769
10, 738

P.ct.

Thous. of gross

4,021
3,112
3, 385

50.1
41,6
44.5

50.7
42.1
44.7

50.5
40.0
44.2

3.2
2.8
2.3

6.7
8.4
7.0

1924
September
October
November. .
December

2,742
3,494
4, 574
2,492

37.7
45.7
51.0
43.6

48.7
45.8
43.5
42.2

44.3
48.3
45.5
39.5

3.0
2.4
2.9
2.8

8.2
6.6
8.4
8.5

3,200
3,913
4,330
2,901

38.7
52.0
55.5
38.7

38.9
50.0
51.0
43.0

39.4
45.1
48.7
41.9

2.8
3.2
2.0
2.0

8.5
8.9
7.0
6.8

8,674
8,588
9, 774
9,848

May
June
July
August

3,050
3,556
2,298
2,637

40.4
48.4
30.4
34.7

45.1
49.2
35.6
41.8

43.6
46.8
34.4
38.7

2.2
2.3
2.2
2.3

6.6
6.7
6.4
6. 3

9,812
9,885
9,928
10, 328

September
3,707
October __ _ . 4,841
2,571
November
3,612
December

50.1
51.0
46.1
48.2

45.9
50.6
47.3
37.6

47.8
51.9
47.3
44.4

2.3
2.1
2.1
1.9

6.5
6.5
6.5
6.7

10, 297
10, 714
9,889
9,506

1,940
2, 206
2,012
2,055

73.8
77.6
79.7
75.1

2,373
2,510
2,543
2,105

2,078
1,982
1,648
1,532

7,090
7,301
8,378
8,794

1936
January
February
March
April

2,975
2,998
3,517
3,575

38.0
41.8
43.9
47.1

40.8
45.9
45.3
42.4

38.3
42.2
42.9
43.9

1.4
1.1
1.1
1.0

6.3
6.3
6.4
6.3

10, 729
10, 544
11, 617
10, 726

2,005
1,834
1,977
2, 051

73.3
72.6
68.3
74.2

2,804
2,166
2,290
1,663

1,704
1,744
2,056
2,179

May
June
July
August

3, 123
3,171
1,494
2,050

42.8
41.7
25.0
29.8

45.9
47.9
36.3
42.8

41.3
45.6
34.5
36.9

1.3
2.5
1.8
1.9

6.0
4.7
3.8
3.5

11,029
12, 525
10, 748
11, 274

2,130
1,988
2,016
2,038

76.5
70.0
71.0
71.7

1,754
1,862
1,935
1,642

September
October
November
December

3,193

47.0

43.7

46.3

1.4

3.4

11,431
11, 186
9,705
7,344

2,009
2,321
2,143
2, 045

72.2
79.7
72.3
69.0

2,237
2, 421
2, 553
2,414

Number of pieces

6,948
8, 154
7,821
7, 878

1935 '
January
February
March . __ _
April
..__

Ship- Unfilled Stocks,
orders,
ments end mo. end mo.

1937
January
February
March
April

82,053
2,046

«76.6
72.6

52,383
2,145

51,805
1,987

67,891 64,911
8,751 5,607

6223,783
258, 104

6238, 280 6439,986 0343,201
250, 295 513, 298 492, 186

196, 727
204, 117

259, 877
272, 828

509, 763 281, 106
441, 052 285, 684

4,295
4,669
5,064
5,614

181, 544
212, 829
288, 986
258, 495

236, 187
240, 318
190,066
230, 404

386, 409 300, 906
358, 920 350, 926
457, 840 405, 716
485, 931 434, 865

9,654
10,017
10, 116
9,522

5,906
5,982
5,915
5,781

271, 957
230, 639
243, 499
188, 227

230, 507
227, 924
268, 792
219, 843

527, 381 444, 664
530, 096 443, 043
504, 803 472, 199
473, 187 507, 807

2,381
2,288
2,117
2,022

8,918
8,116
7,232
7,640

5,543
5,276
5,138
5, 145

235, 768
331, 163
259, 576
376,060

255,018
304, 140
266, 959
270, 876

453, 937 559, 082
480, 960 517, 308
473, 577 504, 452
578, 761 498, 687

2,- 088
1,980
1,693
1,592

7,672
7, 958
8,714
9,453

5,054
5,408
5,822
6,315

234, 898
151, 403
406, 305
167, 752

288, 195
257, 637
207, 452
206, 199

524, 079
417, 845
616, 698
578, 251

469, 706
495, 900
523, 338
470, 009

..

May
June

_„_„

i
II

1 Data from biweekly reports of from 9 to 11 firms to the Illuminating Glassware Guild, estimated to represent from 70 to 75 per cent of the capacity of the industry,
with capacity ranging from 4,500 to 7,000 turns per month. A turn is a four-hour working period for one shop. Production data originally reported by firms with a biweekly capacity off rom 2,256 to 3,463 turns, have first been prorated to the equivalent production of a capacity of 3,500 turns per biweekly period; these figures have in turn
been reduced to monthly data by combining and prorating the overlapping periods. Data given in percentages of capacity are averages of either two or three biweekly
periods from the association reports. Stocks and unfilled orders have been reported by capacities ranging from 1,891 to 3,098 turns biweekly, but as they are expressed in
weeks' supply, they are comparable without prorating. Data from 1923 on actual production, stocks, and unfilled orders appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59) p. 25.
The 2association reports give details by classes of shades, reflectors, bowls, and globes in number of turns.
Compiled by Plate Glass Manufacturers of America, comprising practically the entire industry. Monthly data from 1923 appeared in January. 1926, issue (No. 53),
p. 23.
3
Data from the Glass Container Association, covering 41 manufacturers of glass containers with an annual productive capacity of 32,000,000 gross, or about 83 per cent of
theindustry. Details by classes are shown in the association's report.
4
Compiled by 17. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 33 manufacturers, covering most of the firms making vitreous chinaware which in
regular practice is connected with a drainage system. The figures represent regular selection (formerly grade A). Details by classes are given on press releases, showing
also culls, the classification including siphon j ets, washdowns, reverse traps, lowdown tanks, lavatories, and miscellaneous. Net orders received comprise total new
orders less cancellations, while stocks show amount of finished glost fixtures on hand at the end of the month.
8
Four months' average, September to December, inclusive.

6 Six months' average, July to December, inclusive.



74

Table 50.—BUILDING BRICK, TILE AND TERRA COTTA

UnBurned burned

Number

1919 monthly average _ 1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average _ _
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average _ .

Shipments

Unfilled Whole- Prosale
orders, price, ducend of red,
month N. Y.« tion
Dolls,
per
thous.

Thousands of brick

Thous. Thous.
of dolls. of sq.ft.

$15. 96
21.85
57
23
20
20
17

251, 949
187, 856 6 46, 687
224, 962
64, 918
275, 946
57, 340
68, 597
279, 504

22
18
24
48

272, 172
312, 061
319, 585
354, 477

31
26
16
6

129, 024
158, 524

129, 573
231, 063
344, 580
281, 735
281, 751

15.25
17.36
19.81
17.04
14.70
16.19

61, 150
44, 543
49, 596
51, 162

111, 846
135, 806
126, 945
118, 759

226, 529
186, 977
179, 225
202, 906

279, 862
305, 831
287,800
281, 858

23, 951
34, 891
43, 446
71, 266

94, 185
110, 790
170, 697
206, 551

9
5
12
7

239, 389
225,451
227, 306
265, 897

67, 480
82, 987
92, 267
89, 608

12
18
21
43

338, 857
306, 588
279, 188
316, 023

32
30
17
6

1934
September
October
November
December
-

Thous. of
sq. ft.

Short
tons

FACE BRICK *

Thous.
of dolls.

Shipments

YEAR AND MONTH

Stocks, end of
month

ARCHITECTURAL
TERRACOTTA
Shipments
Stocks, BOOKINGS 3
end
of
Quan- Value month Quan- Value
tity
tity

FLOOR AND WALL TILE 2

Production

Plants closed
down

COMMON BRICK 1

UnSt'ks, filled
end orders,
of
mo. end of
mo.

Thousands of brick

5, 252
5,629
5,930
10, 524
10, 556
11, 937
13, 965
13, 306

$652
895
743
1,163
1,348
1,288
1,683
1,605

591
691
666
723
722

511
616
616
660
667

1,544
1,740
1,576
1,736
2,178

859
1,244
956
966
1,007

4,235
4,490

3,678
4,476

$1,246
1,613

7,659
7,843

14.00
14.00
13.50
13.50

4,090
4,404
3,882
3.859

3,770
4,047
3,289
3,042

1,308
1,462
1,170
1,134

7,533
7,821
7,910
8,964

11,471
9,526
10, 374
9,861

1,184
954
1,106
1,022

692
745
664
639

722
692
555
366

1,457
1,475
1,433
1,803

808
781
716
644

201, 479
247, 176
329, 673
339, 629

14.50
14.50
13.50
13.50

3,606
3,708
4,014
3,859

3,031
3,270
3,891
4,260

1,085
1,162
1,357
1,503

9,090
9,358
9,506
9,076

12, 809
11,429
14,849
17, 875

1,434
1,306
1,675
2,073

548
508
670
777

283
436
732
902

1,801
2,068
2,034
1,769

728
949
1,091
1,140

180, 851
173, 215
180, 407
159, 309

333,967
326, 226
292, 775
301, 913

15.00
15.50
15.50
15.37

4,162
4,408
4,508
4,809

4,315
4,526
4,839
4,867

1,544
1,625
1,725
1,788

8,308
7,389
7,194
6,624

10,376
14,964
10, 774
15,450

1,287
1,806
1,392
2,002

833
817
837
812

890
875
822
733

1,688
1,589
1,503
1,477

1,200
1,153
1,007
892

104, 066
86, 164
64,090
62, 947

171, 830
172, 542
144, 127
137, 788

252,511
262, 534
239, 636
253, 490

14.75
14.75
14.75
14.75

5,092
5,313
5,139
5,259

5,178
5,470
5,013
5,050

1,892
2,029
1,761
1,886

6,677
6,606
6,703
7,569

18, 555
12, 341
13,864
14,297

2,156
1,607
1,696
1,763

723
823
683
640

681
651
504
409

1,522
1,693
1,713
1,978

929
903
835
770

324, 203
355, 139
339, 392
265,093

58, 339
60, 014
69, 597
61, 934

108, 688
110, 866
150, 485
146, 431

259, 158
262, 481
280, 612
277, 412

16.00
17.00
17.00
17.00

4,957
4,829
5,524
5,242

4,289
4,165
4,867
5,084

1,620
1,564
1,817
1,832

7,529
7,592
8,359
8,246

13, 342
10, 742
15,617
18,924

1,645
1,402
2,046
2,322

584
476
648
752

351
373
628
798

2,310
2,322
2,443
2,337

912
1,031
1,032
1,334

4
2
5
4

250, 849
193, 246
218, 348
249, 271

77, 178
46, 310
58, 652
59, 103

192, 065
149, 170
140, 623
135, 090

265, 435
220, 078
234, 164
211, 141

17.00
17.00
17.00
17.00

5,374
5,646
5,716
5,708

4,964
5,406
5,401
5,885

1,847
2,015
2,048
2,196

8,518
8,276
8,725
8,473

12,338
10, 581
17, 613
12, 734

1,609
1,378
2,165
1,491

780
836
859
855

896
895
823
780

2,082
2,028
2,040
2,011

1,257
1,130
1,147
985

18
16
21

284, 021
286, 952
451, 563

67, 658
68, 388
182, 716

118, 537
135, 824
217, 740

216, 289
213, 092
274, 850

16.00
15.50
12.25
15.50

5,304
5,817
5,457

5,625
5,242
4,970

2,069
1,987
1,895

8,258
8,386
8,460

11,520
15, 151
10, 690
10, 414

1,247
1,579
1,221
1,155

792
753
716
610

722
861
542
338

2,132
2,084
2,104
2,241

979
863
741
673

1985

January
February
March
April

- -

May
June
July
August

- -

September
October
November
December

- -

- __ _ -

1936

January
February
March
April

...

"Misiy

_

June
July
August
September
October
November
December
1937

February
March
April
May.
June

* Data, except prices, compiled by the Common Brick Manufacturers' Association of America from reports of about 100 concerns representing about 30 per cent of the
total output of common brick. It should be noticed that the number of plants shut down increases considerably in the winter, owing to seasonal shutdowns in the more
northern localities. Details by districts are given in the association's reports. Monthly data from 1921 appeared in May, 1925, issue (No. 45), p. 27.
2
Compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from data reported by 37 concerns which produced about 80 per cent of the total production
of floor and wall tile in 1923, including the entire membership of the Associated Tile Manufacturers. Details by grades and kinds are issued each month in mimeograph form.
a Bookings of architectural terra cotta are compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the reports of 27 manufacturers who produced
over 95 per cent of the total architectural terra cotta made in 1922. Values exclude freight, cartage, duty, and setting charges. Monthly data from 1919 are given in the
October, 1924 issue (No. 38), p. 52. Details by districts are given in the press releases.
4
Data compiled by American Face Brick Association, representing averages per plant in order to allow for the variation in number of firms reporting. About 70 firms
usually report. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 22.
* Wholesale prices are monthly averages from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, yearly price averages from 1913 to 1918 appeared in the November,
fl

' Eleven month's' average, February to December, inclusive.




75

Table 51.—CEMENT, HIGHWAYS, AND PAVING BRICK
CONCRETE
PAVEMENTS

PORTLAND CEMENT 1

Wholesale
New orders 2
price, net,
Pro- Ship- Stocks, without bags
YEAR AND MONTH duc- ments end of
tion
month Chi- Lehigh
cago Valley Total Roads
dist. mills
Thousands of barrels

Per barrel

av
av
av
av
av
av
av

7,675
7,353
7,146
7,589
7,721
5,891
6,700

7,391
7,203
7,219
7,852
7,542
5,894
7,167

11, 220
12, 773
11, 312
11,054
11, 080
9,386
9,809

$1.01
.89
.95
1.19
1.53
1.67
1.66

$0.89
.89
.79
1.03
1.40
1.75
1.74

mo av
mo av
mo av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av.

8,306
8,191
9,489
11,448
12,405
13, 434
13, 671

7,999
7,921
9,714
11, 324
12, 146
13,060
13,482

7,278
10, 161
9,572
9,258
13, 178
16, 055
18, 792

1.80
1.54
1.61
1.72
1.74
1.73
1.65

2.05
1.85
1.73
1.88
1.75
1.75
1.72

1935
5,162
8,856
January
February. ._ __ 8,255 6,015
11, 034 10, 279
March
13, 807 14, 394
April

17, 656
19, 689
20,469
19,877

1.74
1.75
1.75
1.75

1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75

1913 mo
1914 mo
1915 mo
1916 mo
1917 mo.
1918 mo
1919 mo
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

FEDERAL AID
HIGHWAYS 3
Under
construction

Completed

Cost

Thous.ofsq.yds. Thous.of
dollars

PAVING BRICK *

Pep
cent

Production

Distance

Can- Unfilled of caShip- Stocks, New
orders, pacity
end of
ments month orders cella- end of
tions month

Thousands of brick, No. 1 quality

(No.l
and
No. 2
brick)

631,495 a 27, 123 7 78, 929 « 24, 699 82,207 7 86, 763
24, 620 20, 957 99,588 21,485
957 71, 115
27, 793 21, 279 116, 391 22,616 1,258 63,627
22, 593 21, 866 99, 594 22,866
842 63.807

«80
70
74
58

Miles

4,455 «3,435
3,264
4,686
6,595
6,580
7,679
8,681
8,942

2,454
3,662
4,863
4,245
4,842
5,328
5,095

$15,472
10, 799
17,084
18,410
17, 876

937
606
853
862
787

14, 458
14, 529
14,637
12, 187
10,890

4,513 3,474
5,047 3,787
8,502 5,772
17, 363 12, 463

30,665 1,160
.11, 206
616
254
4, 159
15, 383
686

12, 759
12, 345
12, 388
12, 231

25,266
20,841
27,404
28,444

4,198
5,613
12, 271
18, 738

111,666
117, 776
135, 435
139, 223

5,751
6,932
23, 188
21, 921

40
21
712
1,627

51, 572
49, 692
64, 091
68, 636

62
62
78
81

May
June
July
August

15, 503
15, 387
15, 641
16,419

16, 735
17, 501
18, 131
18,383

18,440
16,409
13, 896
11, 952

1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75

1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75

12, 286
10, 222
12,044
9,594

7,724
5,981
6,362
6,368

14, 332
767
27,520 1,335
11,038
581
19, 584
956

12, 583
12, 536
12, 276
11, 839

32, 177
30, 731
30, 635
34,098

25,690
31, 973
34, 317
35, 638

131, 689
126, 038
117, 543
116, 123

41, 391
31, 125
29,270
33,209

1,969
1,014
1,855
1,132

82, 101
82, 239
75, 389
77, 662

86
82
79
81

September
October
November
December

15, 939
15,992
13, 656
10, 713

17, 711
15, 309
10, 187
6,917

10, 247
10, 979
14,534
18, 515

1.75
1.70
1.65
1.65

1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75

9,730
6,135
3,488
5,244

4,087
3,711
1,718
2,491

22, 395 1,177 12, 186
12, 255
535 12, 187
31, 822 1,188 11, 935
20, 561 1,094 10, 978

30, 072
28, 935
23, 611
21, 302

29, 773 104,286
28,482 99,567
17, 869 101, 915
10, 788 95,427

31,925
19, 021
17, 746
9,916

2,362
3,262
364
738

63, 702
51, 161
50, 669
46, 608

78
74
60
64

1936
January
February
March
April

7,887
7,731
. 10, 390
12,440

5,674
5,820
9,539
12, 965

20, 582
22, 385
23,236
22, 710

1.65
1.65
1.65
1.65

1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75

3,629
5,012
7,938
13, 563

2,161
2,727
4,663
8,758

12, 110
11, 837
8,535
9,981

10,838
10, 803
10, 690
10, 851

19, 329
20, 170
22,642
22,496

10, 237
9,896
10, 996
16, 491

111,431
115, 977
123, 997
128, 137

11,454
12, 984
21, 805
18, 358

344
151
18
749

48, 722
51, 573
63, 364
64,081

50
52
57
57

May
Jun0_
July
August

16, 510
16, 866
17, 134
16,995

17, 973
19,134
18, 812
18,583

21, 255
19,000
17, 301
15, 718

1.65
1.65
1.65
1.65

1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75

14,008
10, 750
10,856
13,249

8,911
6,948
5,663
6,594

23, 311
968 10, 843
22, 709 1,341 10, 961
605 11, 100
13,520
19, 275
890 11, 147

21, 103
26, 342
27, 611
30, 481

22,645 123,808
30, 312 115, 971
37, 443 101, 243
34,803 92,479

30,296
35, 451
41, 761
34, 266

302
3,396
392
1,261

71, 430
75, 283
78, 947
77, 149

49
63
71
78

September
October
November
December

16, 571
16, 596
14, 193
10, 744

18, 087
17, 486
11, 276
6,432

14, 188
13, 334
16,243
20, 555

1.65
1.65
1.65
1.65

1.65
1.65
1.65
1.65

8,378
7,528
5,595
6,797

3,736
4,224
3,231
3,518

15, 222
668 11, 309
21, 948 1,090 11, 607
29,768 1,128 10, 478
951 10, 047
26, 298

25, 385
23,224
18, 516
13, 815

31, 330
26, 852
20, 711
10, 681

24,663
20, 712
12, 874
10, 003

128
255
2,999
109

70, 350
62, 474
51, 606
50, 701

66
61
53
36

386
492
430
495

82, 220
70, 857
63,207
65,800

1927
January
„.._
February _ . »
March
April _ _
May
June
1
Data on Portland cement, representing complete reports of manufacturers, are from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, except prices, which are averages
of weekly prices reported by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. The cement industry is highly seasonal and its figures should be compared with
corresponding months of previous years rather than with other months of the current year. Detailed data by months back to 1915, with an 8-year average for each month
which can be used for seasonal comparisons, will be found in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 47. Monthly price data from 1913 appeared in December, 1923, issue
(No. 28), p..54.
J
Concrete pavements contracted for throughout the United States are from the Portland Cement Association, Highway Bureau. The total contracts include streets and
alleys besides roads.
a Data on amount of Federal aid highways completed during each month and under construction at the end of month specified are compiled by the V. S. Department
of Agriculture, Bureau of Public Roads, and include all kinds of improved roads built with Federal aid. Federal-aid roads represented about 45 per cent of the total mileage of roads unproved by the States in 1925, while Federal-aid grants amounted to about 20 per cent of the costs of the Federal-aid roads shown above. The
data on roads completed represent all roads reported as such to the Bureau of Public Roads, whether paid for or not. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the July, 1926,
issue (No. 59), p. 24.
4
Compiled from reports of the Paving Brick Manufacturers' Association, covering from 24 to 29 companies each month, stated to represent from 66 to 71 per cent of the
industry; further details as to size, quality, and geographical distribution may be obtained from the regular reports of the association.
c
Of the numerical 1919 monthly average, 3,221,000 yards was actually reported. The remainder is the prorated portion of a total of 3,338,309 yards for the last year of
pavement less than 6 inches thick not allocated by class of pavement. This has been prorated to roads on the basis of the roads' share of allocated contracts.
6
Nine months' average April to December, inclusive.
7
months' average, March to December, inclusive.
Ten



76

Table 52.—WOOD DISTILLATION1
ACETATE OF LIME

YEAS AND MONTH

METHANOL (CRUDE)

Ship- Stocks, Ex- i«%
0-3 5
s
ments end of ports 2
mo.

Production

e»
^ i

Production

Shipments

Dolls,
per
cwt.

Thousands of pounds

Stocks,
end of
mo.

652, 021
324, 504
567, 409
716, 144
574, 799
638, 145

635, 563
666, 718
591, 531
671, 280

2, 749, 407
8,494,877
2, 110, 722
1, 693, 459

23, 402
27, 623
32, 370
30,535

326
1, 119
1,622
1,421

4.00
4.00
3.88
3.38

705, 747
690, 403
741, 505
698, 126

642, 812
681, 057
617, 949
626, 837

2, 632, 633
2, 738, 308
2, 749, 818
2, 656, 211

8,561
9,261
7,058
11, 101

33, 986
32, 291
23, 757
19, 764

3,249
3,184
3,196
728

3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00

623, 107
492, 902
408, 132
444, 612

659, 564
472, 285
448, 022
525, 756

8, 449
9,803
10, 327
10, 317

10, 025
12,047
11, 698
9,026

18, 070
15, 259
11, 890
13, 499

2,462
1,367
3,512
980

3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00

464, 702
539, 333
562, 828
526, 192

1935
January
February
March
__ _ _
April

13, 081
11, 906
12, 827
13,033

10, 248
10, 126
11, 415
9, 443

21, 233
23, 072
25, 149
28, 823

1,995
999
1,098
1,639

3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00

May
__
June
July
August .

12, 802
11, 262
11, 803
12, 422

13, 335
15, 362
12, 182
11, 722

28, 337
24, 092
23, 737
22, 988

1,815
1,498
2,457
1,231

September
October
November.
December

12, 117
12, 588
13, 324
14, 369

13, 707
14, 048
12, 926
17, 711

20, 882
18, 979
19, 406
15, 711

1930
January
February
March
April

14, 072
12, 599
13, 960
13, 901

11, 240
10, 358
9,887
11, 349

May*
June
July
August

13, 151
10, 937
10, 690
11, 845
11, 406
13, 575
13, 829

1 DAILY CAPACITY

Stocks,
end of
mo.

Dolls,
per
gal.

Total

829, 227
826, 847
942, 884
794, 744
715, 690
6-46, 454

73, 768
120, 489
26, 231
32, 188

.88
.88
.88
.88

78,892
73, 541
78, 661
74, 596

2, 615, 144
2, 368, 760
1,873,932
1, 797, 729

60, 651
51, 125
50, 462
77? 547

.75
.74
.65
.68

578, 381
621, 412
627, 586
596, 706

1, 656, 499
1, 551, 678
1, 372, 786
1, 315, 166

19, 747
50, 901
42, 218
35, 310

648, 709
615, 306
663, 665
671, 878

654, 369
594, 281
582, 665
595, 988

1, 459, 231
1, 520, 489
1, 870, 472
1, 821, 024

2.88
2.75
2. 75
2.75

656, 751
587, 271
622, 863
600, 188

624, 215
596, 291
621, 134
673, 081

1, 340
426
4,571
2,970

2.75
2.75
3.00
3.13

577, 930
613, 886
676, 987
722, 331

18, 625
20, 881
24;870
27, 629

1,286
615
2,251
503

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

13, 162
11, 999
14, 252
13, 979

27, 789
25, 573
22, 068
19, 857

1,893
2,235
1,909
2,902

11, 025
15, 628
15, 298

23, 043
17, 505
16, 218

1, 392
1,125
1,797
675

____

13,420
13, 173
14, 107
12, 650

9,022
8,548
9,028
12, 460

11, 539
9,398
7,714
8,112

13, 683
.13, 424
9,819
12, 686

35, 836
14, 269
23, 537
22, 701

!

Re- Shutport- down
ing

Cords
78, 580
34, 177
64, 286
80,787
61, 577
68, 303

12, 421
4,885
10, 445
13, 700
10,751
12, 628

5,629
5,448
5,391
5,339
4,687
4, 719

4,083 626
4, 585 2, 771
5,217 1,890
5,171 1,183
4,038 681
4, 425 759

786, 174
814, 896
815, 824
849, 991

4,633
4,833
4,633
4,633

4, 513
4,495
4,513
4,378

67, 841
53, 594
48, 536
47, 198

866, 518
821, 242
623, 940
683,715

4,609
4, 609
4,609
4,609

4,339 698
4,156 1,199
3,580 928
3,544 969

.68
.69
.68
.68

49, 850
57, 624
55, Oil
55, 585

645, 956
633, 428
538, 798
527, 802

4,819
4,819
4,819
4,819

3,724
3,784
3,712
3,712

926
709
581
275

56, 760
39, 625
63, 343
34, 321

.68
.68
.68
.68

71, 130
62, 880
68, 848
71, 057

636, 379
633, 006
677, 725
685, 430

4,747
4,747
4,747
4,827

4,280
4,280
4,4884,568

339
363
381
591

1, 871, 609
1, 866, 632
2, 056, 207
1, 829, 218

39, 342
17, 853
28, 447
9,881

.58
.58
.58
.58

68, 935
63, 040
66, 023
65, 811

695, 460
675, 707
584, 782
644, 882

4,827
4,827
4, 659
4,659

4,568
4,568
4,436
4,388

849
987
935
921

670, 318
845, 975
783, 541
813, 504

1, 727, 270
1, 500, 328
1, 422, 961
1, 373, 068

15, 320
19, 558
10, 643
73, 092

.58
.58
.58
.58

65, 485
66, 336
72, 988
77, 101

620, 944
603, 632
575, 987
723, 511

4,659
4,659
4,635
4,635

4,388 969
4,388 1,095
4,388 841
4,388 841

724, 649
655, 938
709, 653
735, 182

675, 698
842, 609
643, 670
592, 199

1, 472, 508
1, 278, 448
1, 370, 680
1, 559, 769

70, 254
39, 270
62, 139
26, 794

.58
.58
.57
.55

75, 463
69, 922
76, 478
78, 083

517, 714
508, 355
504, 501
485, 417

4,524
4,464
4,464
4,464

4,301
4,241
4,241
4,241

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

646, 024
540, 076
527, 842
564, 037

620, 572
786, 250
779, 613
755, 252

1, 528, 433
1, 289, 362
1, 009, 393
735, 557

16, 001
37, 811
19, 317
43, 350

.55
.55
.56
.70

71, 324
61, 115
59, 437
64, 487

488, 722
465, 361
481, 836
480, 878

4,464
4,424
4,424
4,328

4,277 462
4,237 664
4,237 1, 187
4,141 691

3.25
3.25
3.38

584, 225
684, 575
695, 865

685, 560
672, 521
891, 186

592, 217
534, 067
555, 290

38, 779
24, 977
29, 869
8,704

.78
.74
. 75

63, 923
71, 781
72, 431

470, 729
465, 964
461, 642

4,252
4,252
4,252

4,065
4,065
4,113

!

1934
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August -_

._

.

__

._..... .

September
October. _. .
November
December
1937
January
Februarv__
_._
March
„
April
„
„
May
June

g"B,

Carbonised

58,589 $2.56
34, 343
.80
105, 860 1.64
100, 585 1.06
53, 386
.76
.61
34, 015
34, 047

average
average.
average _
average.
average.
average.
average.

September
October
November
December

Ex1
ports 3 1 1

Gallons

1, 942 $2.78
1,520 1.87
2, 300 2,26
1,829 3.84
1,926 3.27
1,837 2.90
1,549

1920 monthly
1921 monthly
1922 monthly
1923 monthly
1924 monthly
1925 monthly
1926 monthly

WOOD

630
408 |
382 1
488

694
634
422
426

556
464
390

1

..

1 Except for prices and exports, data are compiled by the If. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, including through June, 1924, the reports of the National
Wood Chemical Association, the total reports from all sources comprising about 95 per cent of the industry during most of this period. Beginning with July, 1924, all data
have been collected directly by the Bureau of the Census, The decline in capacity in January, 1924, is due to dropping from the capacity records of firms with a daily
capacity of 723 cords which had been idle for a long time. Monthly data on production and on consumption and stocks of wood for 1920 appeared in the September, 1923,
issue (No. 25), p. 46, the 1921 data being revised in the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 51. Press releases of the Bureau of the Census also give Canadian figures, beginning
with 1925.
2
Exports from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
s Wholesale prices representing monthly averages from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.




77

Table 53.—METHANOL, ETHYL ALCOHOL, AND STEAM NAVAL STORES
METHANOL '

STEAM NAVAL STORES 1
Wood

Wood rosin

Wood turpentine

AND

MONTH

Consumption
Tons

Pro- Stocks Pro- Stocks Producat duc- at
duction plants tion plants tion
Bbls. oi50Glbs.

Crude for refining

Pine oil

YEAR

j ETHYL ALCOHOL 3

Consumed
Stocks
at
plants 1 United CanStates ada

Eenned

Stocks, refineries,
end of month

Canada

United
States

Bbls. of 50
gals.

Production

Stocks, end of
month

Produced
United CanStates ada

United CanStates ada

Gallons

\ Thousands of gallons
4

1913m. a
19 14m. a
1915m. a
1916m. a
1917m. a
1918m. a
1919m. a

6, 581
6, 573
4
6, 758
4
15,232
4
17,632
4
12?532
4
8, 180
4

I

1
f

1j

1920m. a
1921m. a
j 1922m. a
1923m. a
1924m. a
1925m. a
1926m. a

23, 885
27, 213

35, 449
22, 746

4,883
5,219

8,144
3,156

161, 550
195, 166

654, 06S
407, 587

1935
Jan
Feb .
Mar
Apr

20, 789
20, 630
24, 030
24, 676

45, 349
42, 633
43, 433
46, 255

4,396
4,775
5,263
5,516

12, 390
12, 262
12, 460
11, 098

150, 769
152, 793
162, 400
165, 744

560, 225
553, 417
569, 909
581, 169

581, 181 37, 928 1, 786, 150 65, 643

474, 701

May
June
July
Aug____

25, 895
25, 202
25, 101
24, 305

42,017
45, 707
45, 387
40, 676

4, 852 8, 400
4, 898 9, 454
5,008 8 ? 354
5,004 7, 118

164, 351
153,356
156,017
170,458

664, 355
661, 410
693, 845
7G8, 813

589, 223 26, 465
480, 057 17, 493
646, 490 21, 641
622, 570 None.

1, 869, 677
1, 461, 989
1, 544, 175
1, 468, 549

58, 648
55, 475
42, 944
42, 077

Sept
Oct .
Nov
Dec

23, 249
21 446
23, 959
24, 095

27, 039 4,355 4,454 180, 372
16, 306 4,498 3,118 174, 890
15, 269 4,787 3,506 165, 347
15, 319 5, 240 5,113 142, 107

697, 988
713, 673
719, 726
724, 292

619, 782
907, 452
810, 607
771, 827

22, 188
12, 200
40, 895
47, 391

1, 365, 088 19, 889
1, 084, 365 36, 606
858, 301 33, 186
792, 357 15, 300

1926
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

20, 470
18, 945
24, 145
22, 920

16, 431
21, 699
39, 329
27, 963

135, 135 674,097
125, 247 645, 441
173, 465 598, 459
158, 149 565, 416

731, 466
691, 730
756, 346
633, 731

32, 574
39, 570
30, 561
28, 072

656, 565 40, 096
685, 995 29, 478
750, 480 33, 089
850, 999 22, 451

596, 997
483, 059
559, 505
525, 008

May
June
July
Aug

21,912
23, 495
29, 710
32, 800

24, 824 4,570
19, 079 4,633
24, 382 5,356
17, 424 5,483

2,310 148, 592
2,218 212, 021
2,998 215, 706
2,765 222,002

503, 780
302, 853
319, 588
278, 487

802, 337 28, 537
963, 093 13, 379
337
880, 196
714, 658 None.

876, 428
600, 780
279, 202
351, 409

23, 827
20,664
33, 827
33, 651

477, 559 27, 460
652, 692 12, 670
685, 201 None.
560, 806 None.

Sept.... 42, 439
Oct
46, 566
46, 686
Nov
Dec_- -

31, 768
34, 161
33, 373
32, 864

13, 555 5,604
17, 702 6,046
22, 831 6,612
27, 736 6,499

3,837 228, 833
3,426 263, 696
3,773 238, 322
4,911 220, 827

249, 974
259, 670
239, 017
254, 259

820, 504
776, 430
725, 852

164, 363
151, 326
144, 136

31, 853
30, 293
18, 947

663, 251
585, 122
577, 718

_ __

4,362 3,468
3, 930 2,670
4,934 2,706
4,595 2,785

7

669,910

7

25,133

27, 685
30, 222
38, 884

7

1,356,739

7

With- Waredrawn house
for
dena- stocks,
end of
turi- month
zatlon

41,085

_
7

515,262

7

24,202

7

1, 413 5 3, 014
1, 484 5 2, 495
4
2, 118 5 2, 500
4
7, 044 5 2, 602
4
7, 814 5 3, 657
4
7, 554 5 14,719
4
5, 033 5 6, 403
4

6

ii

_ 1

4

593,589 |7 47,019

9, 485 6 4, 398
6,119 3,864
8,137
6,876
9,527
11,234
12, 201 10, 965
16, 190 14, 801
16, 221 14, 995

6

4, 466
7,040
5,074
4,754
3,980
6,463
7,929

68, 477

16, 323
13, 120
12, 592
12, 096

13, 690
9,722
9,682
10, 168

1,932
4,037
5,010
5,983

417, 727 25, 800
375, 040 17, 200
395, 607 20, 700
526, 383 None.

717, 400 50, 344
672, 061 51, 551
556, 561 52, 459
577, 292 32, 007

12, 718
13, 457
13, 143
18, 550

9,971
11, 526
16, 240
16, 823

7, 831
9,038
6,968
7,831

509, 795 21, 185
673, 308 11, 500
656, 641 39, 200
608, 152 45, 555

527, 176
516, 437
496, 792
559, 112

19, 859 18, 021
21, 541 21, 624
21, 235 20, 680
19, 640 19, 463

8,913
7, 411
6,636
5,967

16, 350
12, 765
13, 153
12, 756

17, 712
9,407
9,501
10, 298

3,871
5,801
7,282
8,804

567, 444 81, 259
512, 606 76, 108
585, 301 58, 465
385, 765 42, 994

13, 468
17, 391
17, 225
16, 977

12, 563
18, 847
14, 267
14, 390

8,327
5,734
7,335
8,914

344, 629 44, 303
279, 781 40, 631
235, 516 43, 964

20, 776
20, 530
17, 640
15, 622

17, 338
18,809
18, 696
18, 108

10, 863
11,436
9,913
6,868

36, 680

719, 468

40, 129
32, 443
40, 846
54, 915

31, 545 637, 300 60, 704
38, 070 636, 699 69, 371
29, 140 557,711 72, 629
26, 995 623, 538 75, 276

26, 700
29, 200
37, 500

1937
Jan
Feb
Mar....
Apr _
May
June
1 Compiled by the Hercules Powder Company from reports of 8 firms representing almost the entire output of steam naval stores, from distillation of softwood lumber.

2 Compiled from individual reports of all methanol-refining plants in the United States and Canada by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, the
following grades of methanol being included: 95 per cent refined, 97 per cent refined, pure, C. P. and denaturing grade methanol. The amounts of crude methanol purchased by refiners are less than consumption of crude in refineries because many refiners have their own crude plants and thus do not have to purchase crude methanol.
Canadian refineries all have their own supplies of crude and so no purchase column is shown for Canada.
3
Statistics of ethyl alcohol, compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, comprise all 160° proof alcohol produced in the United States.
Withdrawals for denaturing represent approximate production of denatured alcohol. The large increase in the proportion of the total production used for denaturing,
beginning with 1922, is stated to be due to the use of denatured alcohol, which pays no tax, for certain medical purposes in place of pure alcohol which was formerly used
and is taxable.
*
£ Fiscal year beginning July 1 of year indicated.
6 Stocks on June 30 of year indicated.
7 Eight months' average, May to December, inclusive.
Nine months' average, April to December, inclusive.



78

Table 54.—NAVAL STORES, EXPLOSIVES, AND DYES
TURPENTINE

Net
YEAH AND MONTH receipts
(Sports)
(')

ROSIN

Stocks, end of month
3 ports a Sports

At
stillss

3

Net
Whole- receipts
sale
price 4 (3 ports)
(2)
Dolls,
per gal.

Barrels

Stocks, end of month
3 ports -

5 ports 3

DYES AND
DYESTUFFS

EXPLOSIVES i

Wholesale
At stills 3 price 4

Production

Ship- New Stocks,
end of
ments orders month

Dolls,
per bbl.

Barrels

$0.43
4.47
.46
.49
.49
.59
1.20

58, 914
92, 260
98, 905
79, 787
53, 138
54, 092

275, 273
322, 029
323, 461
292, 126
223, 926

1.74
.68
1.15
1.17
.91
1.01
.93

69, 912
65, 939
83,439
97, 575
92, 295
90, 195
91, 426

157, 943
316, 585
308,498
266, 932
250, 478 « 303, 908 6 212, 410
192, 908
104, 733
226, 367
68, 548
145, 074
164, 721

15.29
5.79
5.77
6.01
6.17
10.94
12.41

49, 556
37, 606
22, 831
20, 373

55, 368
43, 138
26, 936
34, 041

10, 014
6,903
6,628
7,596

.93
.94
.92
.96

51, 279
49, 322
50, 137
57, 080

222, 857
199, 896
171, 197
154, 244

261, 801
232, 902
199, 077
178, 794

140, 056
97, 879
66, 589
77, 450

34, 379
42, 146
42, 704
36, 945

26, 761
35,402
44, 957
58, 437

40, 828
39, 517
51, 793
68, 173

8,486
13, 196
11, 936
10, 635

1.06
.99
.97
1.01

106, 424
126, 622
134, 609
122, 022

161,970
210, 059
211,452
202, 247

271, 770
238, 467
238, 522
225, 690

34, 013
26, 367
18, 001
20, 114

48, 149
48, 404
45, 046
51, 247

54, 636
58, 749
57, 650
62,041

15, 992
14, 637
21, 765
12, 969

1.12
1.13
1.12
1.02

115, 023
100, 264
77, 491
92, 070

181, 940
181, 613
196, 939
220, 479

6,512
4,681
3,499
11, 291

44, 907
37, 647
26, 866
24, 619

54, 304
46, 719
30, 470
27, 414

7,303
4,807
6,064
4,821

1.07
1.00
1.00
.97

36, 466
31, 082
20, 196
40, 643

28, 945
42, 503
43, 122
40, 632

26, 719
36, 532
44, 762
58,929

35, 709
40, 751
49, 798
64, 171

5,984
6,546
9,126
11, 471

.86
.87
.88
.95

34, 918
32, 216
25, 885
29, 143

57, 601
57, 370
63, 650
58, 321

62, 281
63, 736
70, 788
63,835

12, 180
13,069
12, 685
13. 228

.92
.90
.89
.86

Coal
tar

Vegetable

Thousands of pounds

$4.82
4.02
3.77
5.80
6.39
10.56
15.16

27, 764
47,707
26, 762
28, 610
38, 567 « 57, 237 6 20, 527
40, 731
48, 573
11, 730
44, 827
50, 831
8,940

Exports s

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

monthly av_
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av.

26, 494
22, 807
25, 819
23,006
13, 349
15, 481

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

monthly av
monthly av_
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av.
monthly av_

21, 131
22, 110
21, 765
26, 515
25,067
24, 319
25, 279

January _.
February
March
April

8,391
6,167
5,907
16, 695

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

59, 721
71, 562
96, 818
122, 792
55, 481

30, 756
36, 762
33, 740
34, 057

31, 080
36,542
34, 340
34, 241

28, 926
35, 174
32, 726
32, 737

16, 316
18, 758
17, 067
17, 346

437
354
264
310
216

696
1,494
1,310
2, 150
2,151

8.24
8.28
8.09
7.95

33, 479
36, 527
34, 211
32, 504

35, 296
34, 074
33, 354
33, 727

34,541
31, 675
31, 269
33, 451

16, 480
18, 976
20, 358
19, 501

201
216
430
287

2, 007
2,067
1,990
2,172

83, 466
98, 246
105, 709
115, 376

8.91
8.91
9.98
10.89

32, 718
33, 894
35, 621
37, 436

33, 769
35, 492
35, 545
37, 429

32, 165
34, 860
33, 869
36, 402

18, 272
16,540
16, 187
16,585

322
291
421
431

2,077
2,128
2,081
2,205

197, 015
202, 425
221, 273
248, 667

119, 679
112, 915
121, 659
117, 769

14.19
15.88
15.94
14.07

35, 844
33, 049
31, 638
31, 765

35, 454
33, 414
33, 127
30, 214

33, 020
32, 594
31, 181
27, 817

17, 335
16, 309
14, 958
18, 649

236
334
306
248

2,512
1,718
1,840
3, 005

199, 121
169, 140
117, 182
94, 035

218, 726
196, 157
137, 263
107, 961

93, 318
78, 704
58, 846
40, 813

14.34
13.33
11.10
8.91

28, 789
33, 886
36, 238
34, 186

30, 075
32, 370
36, 469
34, 284

29, 717
29, 335
34, 266
33, 528

16, 414
16, 777
17, 349
17, 331

215
126
228
165

1,552
1,611
2,925
1,666

85,965
137, 584
143,415
138, 124

85, 026
112, 514
132, 649
131, 636

146, 930
124, 114
144, 325
143, 500

48, 570
51, 585
61, 997
61, 892

8.43
11.19
13.35
14.61

34, 355
37, 492
34, 663
38, 023

35, 378
37, 875
34, 973
37, 174

33, 506
35, 568
34, 909
37, 021

16, 809
16, 458
16, 070
16, 894

135
269
217
558

2, 326
1,661
2, 743
2,449

118, 868
114, 120
107, 801
122, 847

148, 177
158, 210
184, 405
208, 789

158, 039
166, 703
203, 744
229, 189

69, 387
74, 445
90,163
92, 860

14.43
13.86
13.08
12.24

40, 741
40, 670
39, 628

41, 098
40, 951
41, 475

38,348
39, 311
37, 913

16,488
16, 854
15, 126

136
162
209
177

1,883
2,220
2,672
2,104

1925

1926
January
February
March .
| April

May
June
July
August...

-.

September _
October.
November
December

:
'
1

'

1987
January
February
March
April
May
June .

I

_.
I
i

1

Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, from reports from 24 companies. Data comprise black powder, permissibles, and other high explosives, and do not include reports of manufacturers of ammunition and fireworks, nor production of nitroglycerin, except in so far as nitroglycerin is used in the manufactureaof other explosives. Detailed data by classes from 1922 appeared in November, 1924, issue (No. 30), p. 107.
Represent the receipts and stocks at Jacksonville, Savannah, and Pensacola, as reported by the Naval Stores Review, earlier data being supplied by the Savannah
Board of Trade, Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, and Pensacola Chamber of Commerce. Monthly averages for 1914 and 1915 are based on the season beginning Apr. lof
the 3
year indicated and thereafter on the calendar year.1 Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 40.
Compiled by the Turpentine and Rosin Producers Association. Stocks at stills cover all such stocks in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, 95 per cent of those in Alabama, and a few of the larger places in Georgia and Florida, the producers in these two States generally shipping to the ports as fast as produced. Port stocks include Savannah,4 Jacksonville, Pensacola, New Orleans, and Mobile.
Data from the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent average prices in the New York market. Quotations for rosin cover grades common
to good. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in November, 1925, issue (No. 51), p. 22.
5
Average of four months, July, September, November, and December.
6
Data compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Export figures for "vegetable" dyes include logwood extract (about
50 per cent) and other dye extracts; coal-tar exports comprise coal-tar colors, dyes, and stains.




Table 55.—CHEMICALS
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]

Index numbers relative to Aug., 1914

SULPHURIC
ACID

Oils and fats 4

4

Chemicals

Crude drugs 3

YEAR AND
MONTH

Essential oils 3

Drugs and
Pharmaceuticals 3

WHOLESALE PRICE
INDEXES

Relative to
1913-14 ^

19}g_13 ypo av

1913 mo av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo av
1916 mo av
1917 mo av
1918 mo. av
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

10O

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av

10O

100

201
196
129
120
142
155
157
156

213
265
158
131
135
140
174
170

185
202
134
174
220
208
198
205

1935
May.
June
July
August .

155
156
158
158

151
161
175
171

September
October _
November
December

158
158
157
157

1926
January
February
March
April,
May__
June _
July
.
August

September
October
November
December

100

100

NITRATE OF SODA 1

POTASH i

Production in
Chile
WholeExports 4 sale 5
price

Units Imports

reQuantity port-

Im-

ports

FERTILIZER

ACID PHOSPHATE '

Stocks,

Production

end of

month

Exports 4

sumption

Consumption in
Southern
States 6

Long
tons

Con-

Short
tons

ing

Pounds

Dollars
per 100
pounds

614, 940
807, 417
1, 098, 015
6, 486, 619
5, 538, 625
5, 293, 578
6, 691, 220

1.00
1.00
1.30
2.00
1.70
1.60

1. 774, 625
2, 415, 612
1, 067, 862
1, 039, 199
686, 981
939, 306
628, 067
768, 701

Metric
tons

No. of
plants

Long tons

43, 177
52, 155
45, 143
64, 349
101, 535
128, 601
153, 766

Short tons

21, 124
22, 291
17, 611
6,305
978
802
1,564

103, 391
119, 938
85, 639
30, 647
32, 747
28, 733
18, 713

238, 712

116

1.00
1.12
.91
.76
.73
.71
.70
.73

139, 921
210, 386
109, 629
89, 317
158, 809
200, 266
209, 982

67
99
54
38
69
89
90

33, 955
110, 160
30, 767
45, 039
74, 084
82, 053
92, 901
75, 416

5,230
14, 880
8,739
20, 103
19, 205
19, 088
21, 751
25,304

275, 722
283, 805

1, 177, 544
1, 316, 277

288, 350
274, 400

54, 509
117, 994
74, 620
77, 912
91, 641
89, 216
65, 532
91, 342

411, 678
232, 193
292, 224
360, 412
390, 477
423, 022
424, 422

i
i

142
139
155

192
191
187
190

113
112
111
112

153
154
153
158

669, 293
660, 490
354, 548
440, 954

.70
.70
.70
.70

191,443
192,924
215, 393
224, 587

86
90
92
93

135, 169
59, 016
68, 791
92,082

7,757
13, 803
25, 954
21, 041

231, 470
239, 301
247, 092
212, 687

527, 259
716, 709
937, 662
881,339

119, 825
56, 319
26,568
86, 727

123, 813
94. 805
120, 171
94, 089

120, 942
37, 231
13,973
60, 272

179
191
215
225

196
195
191
192

113
113
113
113

156
158
156
156

478, 168
382, 780
408,050
581,442

.70
.70
.70
.70

206, 745
227, 240
234, 319
240, 000

92
88
91
91

56, 764
48, 587
73, 892
43, 018

29, 451
17, 455
19, 646
26, 894

241, 390
271, 486
257, 956
344, 591

1, 070, 406
1,147,900
1,317,618
1, 609, 639

250, 034
182, 524
113, 143
156, 188

110, 558
87, 568
65, 260
125, 423

133, 247
117, 572
56, 248
110, 640

156
156
156
156

218
202
192
179

193
200
205
204

114
112
112
113

155
149
152
149

996, 662
667, 579
1, 324, 657
1,029,287

.70
.70
.70
.70

235,000
220, 000
228,000
216, 362

89
88
79
75

103, 627
156, 354
171, 929
124, 370

28, 365
25, 632
38, 856
24, 827

438, 213
336, 150
346, 182
298, 227

2, 394, 242
2,140,710
1, 544, 347
1,081,293

192, 059
559, 345
952, 797
664,036

60, 121
651, 205
93, 365 1, 291, 757
106, 850 1, 740, 293
110, 588
673, 440

156
155
155
155

_,_

125
114
113

175
168
167
163

203
206
206
206

112
114
114
113

154
170
165
157

1,126,993
453, 315
1, 154, 118
598, 156

.73
.75
.75
.75

196, 700
170, 000
159, 466
142, 589

65
60
49
47

58, 082
12, 225
23, 367
55, 325

11, 696
6,013
25,287
27, 522

227,269
257, 131
232, 394
240, 185

840, 543
1, 018, 246
1, 147, 998
1, 280, 187

175,740
68, 792
85, 115
104, 645

116, 228
90, 998
88, 622
113, 785

154, 515
55, 572
22, 978
45, 479

155
156
156
156

155
148
143
135

209
215
211
203

114
114
114

154
136
134

384, 061
260, 291
590, 680
638, 607

.75
.75
.75
.75

120, 890
127, 082
111,283

43
40
36

37, 096
47, 503
51, 448
63,660

23, 355
28,341
34,411
29, 347

227, 112
267, 475
272, 571
262, 746

1, 233, 428
1, 352, 440
1, 635, 805
1, 761, 892

276, 584
145, 333
86, 703
126, 981

97, 701
73,384
73, 993
70, 466

155, 921
119, 165
79, 693
103, 048

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June

i

1
Data compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Potash includes potash imported as chemicals and also the
murate and sulphate used in fertilizers. " Total fertilizer " exports are made up largely of phosphate rock.
a
Data compiled by the National Fertilizer Association from reports of acidulators representing about 80 percent of the industry; figures in greater detail divided into northern and southern sections are obtainable from the association's reports. Consumption figures have been computed by adding production to stocks at the beginning of
month and subtracting from this total the stocks at the end of the month, hence indicating disappearance or shipments from plants and not actually fertilizer
used. Details by sections for 1925 appeared in the January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 16.
* Compiled by the Oil, Paint, and, Drug Reporter from weekly wholesale quotations of 40 crude botanical drugs, 20 essential oils, and 35 drugs and pharmaceutical
chemicals, respectively.
* The chemical price indexes from Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering include quotations on 25 chemicals and 15 oils and fats selected on the basis of their
importance as representing both qualitatively and quantitatively the principal branches of the chemical industry. These prices are weighted on the basis of total
production plus total imports in the year 1923. The figures are averages of weekly prices. A similar index including 25 of the principal chemicals, oils, and fats used
in the new indexes, with yearly data from 1917 to 1923, and monthly data for 1923 and 1924, may be found in the November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 105.
6 Wholesale average monthly price of 66° sulphuric acid at New York from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
* Compiled by the National Fertilizer Association from tag sales reports of Commissioners of Agriculture of 12 Southern States (Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Missouri, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas). Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57) p. 17.
7 Relative to 12 months' average, July, 1913, to June, 1914.
s Tons of 16 per cent available phosphoric acid, which is equivalent to 320 pounds per ton.




80

Table 56.—COTTONSEED PRODUCTS
COTTONSEED OIL

YEAR AND MONTH

Con- Stocks
Receipts sump- at mills,
at
tion
end of
mills (crush) month

Production

Stocks,
end of
month

Short tons
1913 mo. av_
1914 ino. av_
1915 mo. av_
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av

Production i

8

Thous. of IDS.
41, 878
42, 062
60, 786
51, 330
16, 890
486
26, 172

7 12, 102
7 12, 002
? 12, 151
? 12, 709
23, 937
29, 217
30, 733

11, 861
11, 798
11, 787
12, 404
19, 044
26, 877
29,081

8 116, 385
238, 965
231, 106
189, 530

$0 07
.07
07
.11
.15
.20
.24

271, 659
253, 101
188, 105
156, 684
152, 824
225, 114
209, 124

.15
.08
.10
.11
.11
.11
.11

137, 015
149, 183
114, 794
122, 901
147, 394
197, 303
225, 892

198;187
143, 476
133, 357
127, 702
122, 743
139, 910
226, 406

14, 168
24, 399
18, 707
14, 349
25, 907
33, 290

29, 957
17, 840
15, 396
18, 965
19, 294
19, 568

30, 014
17, 518
14, 969
18, 872
19, 156
19, 359
20, 226

8 93, 175 8 148, 815
176, 746 180, 400
175, 239
86, 007
182, 653 109, 522

303, 789
349, 357
372, 379
382, 151

.11
.11
.11
.11

318, 957
237, 880
174, 925
113, 451

195, 900
211, 173
182, 737
142, 498

64, 953
38, 279
39, 921
8, 750

19, 177
17, 288
19, 729
18, 941

19, 109
15, 846
20, 125
17, 090

1,808
1,636
1,794
1,652

345, 413
265, 726
173, 549
92, 977

.11
.11
.11
.11

66, 108
35, 515
15, 245
52, 467

100, 085
65, 121
18, 976
23, 612

13, 832
16, 294
19, 757
16, 813

17, 599
15,312
15, 809
17, 191

18, 542
14, 623
14, 704
17, 068

1,893
2,641
2,320
2,689

57, 309
78, 166
111, 654
168, 898

.11
.10
.10

229, 277
372, 104
380, 946
370, 758

89, 383
168, 101
222, 271
259, 061

15, 974
50, 547
53, 810
60, 548

19, 328
25, 947
24, 275
24, 217

20, 057
25, 612
24, 974
24, 553

2,407
2,705
2, 347
1,898

204, 397
260, 452
301, 333
294, 544

.11
.11
.11
.12

366, 294
310, 119
248, 098
151, 709

317, 342
357, 495
344, 618
306, 754

68, 907
25, 046
16, 362
11,415

22, 585
20, 721
22, 413
19, 793

21, 501
21, 481
21, 268
20, 445

1,700

259, 203
192, 004
145, 671
89, 412

.12
.15
.15
.13

68, 343
31, 587
16, 013
33, 266

285, 307
229, 855
142, 844
90, 488

6,689
12, 382
17, 354
27, 124

17, 719
17, 922
16, 445
15, 635

16, 646
17, 901
15, 906
17, 294

64, 568
132, 578
232, 983
332, 344

.11
.09
.08
.08

210, 833
419, 784
438, 410
416, 246

127, 064
172, 566
176, 006
166, 535

21, 749
74, 114
47, 547

20, 232
21, 766
23, 428

20, 172
21, 766
23, 800
24, 530

104, 564
93, 865
48, 503
61, 544
72, 957
72, 816
75, 744

1925
January
February
March .
April

370, 307
208, 792
104, 457
53, 556

700, 352
508, 541
378, 672
232, 569

900, 899
598, 021
323, 806
144, 235

210, 439
158, 014
116, 572
77, 717

122, 352
127, 423
88, 015
70, 314

175, 755
137, 323
141, 213
101, 491

43, 780
49, 921
31, 365
269, 252

132, 958
76, 723
27, 312
112, 936

54, 688
27, 885
32, 276
188, 592

44, 366
23, 953
10, 238
33, 781

44, 339
22, 363
4,847
17, 330

60, 566
40, 558
28, 738
19, 573

September _ _ _ _ 1, 079, 416
October
1, 303, 412
November
910, 581
849, 396
December
1926
January_ 472, 760
February
308, 026
March
183, 225
April
63, 319

488, 578
779, 430
809, 861 1, 272, 981
815, 838 1, 367, 395
798, 408 1, 416, 473

141, 974
234, 556
235, 252
224, 980

53, 814
92, 315
111,965
118, 719

103, 682
167, 344
185, 450
183, 768

790, 679 1, 098, 364
662, 141
744, 246
410, 875
516, 596
152, 525
314, 967

226, 231
191, 818
152, 475
97, 313

129, 743
121, 579
88, 272
57, 000

180, 038
160, 652
156, 463
92, 415

May
June
July
August

141, 169
67, 450
39, 620
70, 657

56, 650
40, 357
23,249
70, 667

45, 562
20, 973
12, 099
19, 641

29, 437
15, 142
8,281
10,045

62, 584
34, 460
16, 780
17, 748

577, 981
487, 708
938, 476 1, 146, 792
980, 321 1, 387, 387
932, 726 1, 291, 912

136, 470
284, 229
296, 197
275, 127

58, 158
104, 778
131, 035
155, 455

75, 440
213, 255
237, 599
229, 142

Mav
June

Consumption

2,230
1,783
2,040
1,860

95, 223
106, 442
77, 886
81, 146
96, 286
125, 987
146, 511

September
975, 028
October __ _
1, 508, 357
November
1, 222, 493
December
834, 925
1927
January
February
March
„__
April

Short tons

Production

169, 226
223, 758 8 1, 456
183, 517
1,239
168, 811
1,705
194, 965
1,693
290, 279
2,029

259, 179
364, 744
315, 672
327, 424
435, 341
592, 223
583/417

45, 294
51, 157
22, 512
117, 748

Dolls,
per Ib.

Stocks
at mills, Exend of ports 3
month i

81, 645
99, 659
68, 933
75, 878
88, 056
112, 122
123, 048

308, 006
335, 846
253, 578
269, 745
321, 649
423, 562
493, 543

,

Production i

8 98, 545

304, 727
359, 686
268, 135
262, 946
363, 132
439, 520
483, 737

August___

In
Total
(qtrly)s Oleo. 6

Stocks,
end of
month i

OLEOMARGARINE2

170, 890
99, 087
101, 457
97, 483

1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av..
1924njo. av_.
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av

Julv

Factory consumption

Pho jsands of pounds

8 768, 756 s 463, 114
320, 871 357, 084
358, 344 354, 433
351, 443 392, 739 8 457, 924

May
June.-

COTTONSEED CAKE
AND MEAL

Refined

Crude 1

Price, summer yellow
prime 4

COTTONSEED 1

225, 152

1

257, 229

241, 687

292, 222

370, 125

318, 670

248, 364

1,581
1,373
1,405

311, 756

1,775
2,091
2,158

.11

|

_
"

1
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, covering the entire industry. Receipts of cottonseed at mills include seed later destroyed at mills
but not seed reshipped. Stocks of crude oil include holdings of crude mills and of refiners and oil in transit to refiners and consumers, while stocks of refined oil include
holdings of refiners, brokers, agents, and warehousemen, and oil in transit to manufacturers of lard substitutes, oleomargarine, soap, etc. Yearly figures for all these items
are now based on the calendar year. Monthly data from 1920 on cottonseed stocks appeared in the August, 1922, issue (No. 12), p. 94, and on crude cottonseed oil production
and 2stocks in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 87.
Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue. Production data represent total output, while consumption figures represent tax-paid withdrawals of both colored and uncolored oleomargarine, consisting of all withdrawals for domestic use except for the Government.
3
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
4
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly quotations at New York. Monthly data from 1920 appeared
in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing practically complete consumption of refined cottonseed oil by factories in further
manufacture of such articles as lard substitutes, oleomargarine, soap, etc. Yearly figures are quarterly averages. Quarterly data for 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue
(No. 30), p. 119.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, showing total consumption in the manufacture of oleomargarine, as ascertained from tax
reports. Monthly data from July. 1921, together with figures for other ingredients consumed in the manufacture of oleomargarine, are given in the March, 1926, issue (No.
55), 7 25.
p.
Average for fiscal years beginning July 1 of year stated.
8
Five months' average, August to December, inclusive.
8
Six months' average, July to December, inclusive,
1




81

Table 57.—FLAXSEED AND LINSEED PRODUCTS
FLAXSEED

Minneapolis and
Duluth 2
YEAR AND
MONTH

Imports i

Oil mills 3
(quarterly)

Argentina

Re- Ship- Stocks, Con- Stocks, Ex- Stocks,
ceipts ments end of sump- end of ports 6 end of
mo.7
mo.
qtr.
tion

548
771
1,225
1,092
783
1,081
1,170

1,979
1,104
999
1,337
843
870
757

1, 255
585
460
710
475
421
280

2,984
2,288
1,038
1,490
1,040
260
179

1920 monthly av...
1921 monthly av.__
1922 monthly av.__
1923 monthly av...
1924 monthly av...
1925 monthly av...
1926 monthly av.._

2,053
1,027
1,243
2,028
1,382
1,376
1,880

964
831
729
1,468
2,294
1,944
1,438

329
568
388
561
1, 522
997
668

984
2,087
299
568
799
1,365
1,715

678
1,689
834
2,122

1,481
859
780
489

497
425
391
253

1,322
1,036
767
635

2, 153
1,329
936
1,082

725
819
758
1,412

333
200
364
602

502
617
581
291

729
1,278
1,759
1,921

5,593
5, 515
3,522
1,378

1,965
2,593
3,554
781

2,453
3,302
2, 488
2,391

1926
January .
Februarv
March
April

1,301
1?7SO
2, 813
1, 297

513
379
533
474

320
422
292
308

2,026
1,719
1,370
1,167

May
June
July
August

1, 988
2,470
1,371
1,264

642
666
478
1,029

187
130
362
370

1,221
1,305
976
579

1,556
2,952
2,568
1,190

2,189
6,144
2,811
1,402

907
1,644
1,671
1,405

846
3,102
3,569
2,694

1925
January
February
M?rch

-.

May
June
July
August

,

September
October
November
December

,

..

September
October.
November
December

._

6,176

1,066

6,407
6,507
6,085
8,543
9 ? 522
10, 263

2,668
2,050
1,501
2,760
3,331
3,997

3,446
4, 463
3,038
3,779
4,830
3,430

1,457
2,867
1,768
2, 168
3, 433
3,517
4,667

2,519
2.520
1,947
2, 561

2,800
3,000
3,200
4,400

4,034
3,637
3, 781
4,268

4,600
5,000
5,200
4,400

3,576
5, 135
4,212
2,974

4,000
1,800
1, 800
2,000

6,214
6,887
7,404
6,636

4,000
4,600
5,200
6,000

7,267
7,179
3,781
4, 279

5,200
4,600
4,000
3,600

3,574

5,200
4,600
4, 600
4,400

4,015

9,128

Dolls,
per Ib.

Thousands of pounds
3,336
2,761
3,219
2,099
464
1,284
2,087

12, 303

Whole- Shipments
sale
from
price,
MinneNew
York 5 apolis 4

Ship- Factory Stocks
Produc- ments
contions
sump- at facfrom
tories s
Minne- tions
(qtly.)
(Qtty.)
apolis 4
(qfly.)

Thousands of bushels
1913 monthly av._.
19 14 monthly av...
1915 monthly av._.
1916 monthly av___
191 7 monthly av__ _
IQlSmonthlyav...
1919 monthly av...

LINSEED CAKE
AND MEAL

LINSEED OIL

2, 257
_„

7,822

2,834

11, 798

6,882

10, 651

3,472

7,783

2,611

9,507

2,511

728
1,415
2, 374
515
1,520
2,617

126, 856

121,318
120, 703
114, 361
163, 391
176, 397
189, 962

132, 897
120, 550
93, 863
113, 232

225, 568
.

169, 980

146, 306

217, 992

194, 607

145, 329

174, 057

15, 210
11, 868
9,862
10, 662
11, 158
9,271
10, 026

47, 286

14, 720
14, 468
14, 810
14, 043

109, 271

12, 401
10, 545
11, 141
11, 061

98, 905

107, 281

14, 153
11, 669
8,725
8,756

12, 332
15, 637
14, 624
24, 490

51, 232
43, 097
42, 668
48, 242

24, 916
33, 958
35, 190
32, 563

48, 024
40, 406
45, 673
60, 922

26, 581
20, 330
10, 464
8,902

71, 496
61, 571
46, 749
49, 518

8,075
6,079
9,210
12, 632

31, 991
41, 907
55, 084
37, 477

.112
.108
.108
.107

107, 213

66, 023
66, 131
80, 526
57, 746

.108
.112
.119
.119

128, 557

106, 144

10, 182
11, 870
10, 282
11, 904

190, 421

31, 226
29, 847
20, 933
15, 680

.117
.113
.107
.108

155, 642

19, 635
48, 856
36, 739
47, 058
54, 463
54, 224
49, 150

.137
.132
.128
.126

86, 437

94, 122

13, 840
17 769
14, 676
11, 848

12, 069
15, 068
10, 790
17, 062
17, 370
24, 283
16, 741

.140
.141
.130
.136

128, 888

98, 448

13,331
12, 681
9,380
10, 881

72, 478
42, 451
50, 532
55, 637
25, 992
7,163
29, 479

.155
.155
.148
.139

151, 136

30, 166
20, 684
17, 188
18, 706
18, 428
15, 998
18, 473

.194
.093
.113
.133
.131
.139
.112

78, 457
99, 611
100, 718
85, 549
81, 482
130, 026

109, 898

Thous. of Ibs.

$0. 062
.067
.077
. 103
.151
.212
.236

65, 425

53, 551
59, 706
85, 754.
95, 169
96, 127
102, 935

7,856
8, 157
8,156
10, 763
10, 958
13, 537
11, 057

Exports 1

21, 799
30, 436
23, 808
22, 581

48, 257
55, 950
40, 916
48, 868

*

1927
January..
February
March
April
May
June... _

i

I
!

1 Compiled by the 17. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
2
Compiled by the Northwestern Miller. Receipts and shipments are totals of weekly figures, with first and last weeks of each month prorated, while stocks are taken
on the Saturday nearest the end of the month. Monthly data for 1920 appeared in the August, 1922, issue (No. 12), page 94, the data for each city being given separately
through the February, 1925, issue (No. 42), p. 89.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, covering practically the entire production, factory stocks, and factory consumption, of fats and
oils and their raw materials. Quarterly data from 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue (No. 30), pp. 115 and 119. Data on flaxseed have been reduced to bushels from
original data in tons. Annual figures are quarterly averages. Data prior to 1919 collected by the U. S. Food Administration, and published in detail in the supplement to
Bulletin 769 of the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
4
Compiled by the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce.
c
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices at New York. Previous to October, 1925, prices were
quoted per gallon and have been reduced to pounds at 71A pounds to the gallon. Monthly data from 1909 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 26.
0
Compiled by the Argentine Ministry of Agriculture, and converted to bushels from original data in metric tons. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in October, 1923,
issue (No. 26), p. 50.
" Compiled by the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, representing stocks on the Saturday nearest to the end of the month.

26446°—27




6

82

Table 58.—TOTAL VEGETABLE OILS AND COPRA
TOTAL VEGETABLE OILS

COPRA

COCONUT OR COPRA OIL

Stocks, end of
Production 1 Factory consumption Stocks, end of
quarter 1
quarter 1
Factory
Fac- Stocks,
ProconExIm- 3 Im- tory end of ImRefined
YEAE AND MONTH duc- sumpports 2 ports ports 3 sump- quar- ports a
tioni
tion,1
Re- Crude1
In
Retion i ter i
Crude fined
crude Crude Refined
oleo- Crude fined
Total 1 margarine *
Short tons

Thousands of pounds
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

monthly av
monthly av monthly av_.
monthly av._
monthly av
monthly av._
monthly av.. 578,478 635, 803 506, 533 283, 591

1920 monthly av—
1921 monthly av~
1922 monthly av._
1923 monthly av_.
1924 monthly av_.
1925 monthly av..
1926 monthly av.-

1935
January
February
March
.April

511, 121
504, 034
459, 447
519, 273
576, 568
681, 077

378, 498
332, 003
324, 227
308, 159
276, 696
343, 732

352, 768
263, 529
223, 992
197, 604
194, 496
241, 777

802, 192

401, 039

531, 093

292, 822

295, 618

460, 574

275, 656

82, 187

1,020 627 919, 558

1926
January
February
March
April

377, 415

417, 715

September
October
November
December

813, 013

402, 370

May
June
July
August

429, 034

188, 263

876, 906

910, 626

484, 717

330, 915

416, 509

M!ay
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

474, 776
504, 318
434, 658
505, 647
554, 950
660, 727

596, 830

319, 415

289, 331

.. _. 445, 151 481,005 341, 633 200, 694

Thousands of pounds

29, 042
17, 758
31, 641
16, 977
11,788
10, 437
17, 599

21, 387
26, 441
20, 636
30, 133
36,850
65, 295
67, 495

1,265
2,503
4,512
6,615
15, 279
17, 944
10,788

42, 153

22, 184

16, 863
21,964
6,978
4,744
4,117
5,729
3,643

71, 390
28, 499
53, 298
52, 295
67, 641
55, 368
55, 815

8,966
7,888
11,206
13, 874
12,128
15, 170

25, 276
21, 525
35, 881
46, 245
37,066
40, 177

10, 665
5,869
10, 705
6,615
8,224
3,641

9,454
4,880
5, 392
2,702

59, 445
52, 617
79, 213
58, 556

19, 526
8,314
17, 568
10,329

3,269
5,657
2, 525
3,486

49, 629
58, 950
44, 941
47, 316

2,877
11,206
8,815
10, 577

3,923
8,183
9,635
9,640

32, 057
52, 179
59, 534
69, 975

19, 058
8,680
27,100
19, 988

7,470
7,073
4,631
4,659

57, 657
57, 747
45,890
58, 934

15,080
12,020
19,564
19, 038

1,887
868
904
541

41, 365
58,054
74, 001
55, 971

19, 096
17, 364
25, 391
18, 337

801
2,688
5,336
6,862

55, 095
50, 449
67, 086
47,633

21,288
19, 813

37, 947

7,566

36, 847

13, 822

35, 584

9,473

50, 328

12, 832

48, 520

6,225

49, 771

15,278

48, 912

30, 185

6,016
4,834
5,264
5,362
13, 591
29, 674
23,422

53, 886

18,027 32, 805
15, 810 28,299
18, 943 46, 381
15, 157 58,980
18, 730 47, 839
19, 431 51, 901
18, 986

26, 922
19, 734
31,312
24, 743

8,283
25, 915
10, 755
10,300
8,603
15, 430
22,047
29,130
21, 377
21,644
11, 703
20, 484
12, 299
17, 676
22, 538
20,950
16, 127
21, 219
21, 793
20, 016

69, 273 105 564

53,054

155, 220

34, 958

46, 486
30,669
33, 811
43, 095
43, 430
49, 280

59, 025
93, 277
36, 851 n 5, 316 73, 550
41, 270
4,480 115, 996
52, 985
6,326 72, 692
52, 725
6,938 48, 846
51, 444
7,576 51, 322

28,664
19, 051
23, 522
25, 527
14, 895
13, 616

73, 525
60, 274
75, 721
90, 377
99, 943
96,364

49, 531

42, 576

95, 375

47, 374

47, 521

43, 617

81,806

48,104

46, 135

52, 850 100, 660

52, 523

64,418

58,076 107, 614

57, 776

63,089

47, 407

87, 039

45, 877

64,407

64, 745 105, 152

57, 750

62, 981

60, 491 117,050

52,245

7,642
6,698
7,301
7,099
6,408
5,187
5,484
6,462
7,804
10,206
10, 612
10, 008
9,337
8,132
8,925
7,996
6,713
6,736
6,138
6,190
8,127
8,895
9,850

61, 139

12, 507

61, 543

14, 735

36, 270

15, 751

46, 338

11, 469

62, 692

12, 698

65, 797

12, 372

66, 973

11,881

1937
January
February
March _ _ « _ . .
April
May
June
i Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, covering practically the entire production, factory stocks and factory consumption of fats and
oils and their raw materials. Quarterly data from 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue (No. 30). pp. 115 and 119. Annual figures are quarterly averages. Data prior
to 1919 collected by the U. S. Food Administration, and published in detail in the supplement to Bulletin 769 of the Z7. S. Department of Agriculture. Data on production
and consumption of total vegetable oils represent those in the crude state.
' Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, including cottonseed, corn, and linseed oils.
8
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports of total vegetable oils include the following oils: Chinese nut,
cocoa butter, coconut, cottonseed, olive (both edible and inedible), palm, palm kernel, peanut, rapeseed, soya bean and linseed. The figures for Chinese nut, inedible olive
and 4rapeseed oils, which are reported in gallons, have been converted into pounds, allowing 7^ pounds per gallon.
Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, showing total consumption of coconut oil in the manufacture of oleomargarine, as ascertained from tax reports. Monthly data from July, 1921, together with figures for other ingredients consumed in the manufacture of oleomargarine are given in the March,
1926, issue (No. 55), page 25.




83

Table 59.—ANIMAL FATS AND OILS
ANIMAL FATS

YEAR AND
MONTH

Production

Factory
consumption

Stocks'
end of
quarter

LAUD COMPOUNDS AND
SUBSTITUTES

GREASES

Production

Factory
consumption

ANIMAL GLUES

FISH OILS

Stocks'
Stocks'
Pro- end of Proend of
quar- duction quar- duction
ter
ter

Fac- Stocks'
tory
con- end of
sump- quarter
tion

Production

Stocks'
end of Shipquar- ments
a
ter

EDIBLE
GELATIN

Production

Stocks'
end of
quarter

Thousands of pounds
1919 qtly. av_. 367, 518
1920 qtly. av_. 410, 677
1921 qtly, a v- 473, 266
1922 qtly. av._ 511, 451
612, 912
1923 qtly. av
1924 qtly. av._ 613, 290
1925 qtly. av_. 497, 864
1936 qtly. av__

144, 308
149, 275
141, 324
139, 043
140, 991
151, 862
141, 084

138, 071
185, 283
226, 631
175, 481
144, 576
162, 018
142, 382

69,647
86, 384
85, 222
94, 430
102, 285
99, 111
89, 849

51, 566
49, 023
44, 325
61, 548
66, 911
61,498
59, 710

67, 429
69, 741
95, 592
53, 127
57, 045
48, 097
41, 927

3 156, 770
196, 045
187, 631
207, 609
288, 155

s 9, 517
15, 671
11, 756
16, 182
18, 674

8,230
16, 507
13, 916
19,754
21, 326
17, 271
25, 291

9,791
12, 046
19, 990
27, 513
29, 675
29,067
38, 581

44, 609
45, 238
54, 009
47, 425
43, 228
46, 105
56, 225

23, 660
25,015
24,924
24,272

52, 442
50,370

3,305 4 9, 891
3,541 * 10, 454
3,134
9,084

10, 454

1934
Jan. 1-Mar. 31
Apr. l~June 30
July 1-Sept. 30
Oct. 1-Dec. 31.

719, 139
635, 577
525, 495
572, 950

149, 720
147, 008
156, 470
154, 246

158, 706
211, 383
148, 948
129, 032

104, 178
103, 409
92, 331
96,524

68, 599
61, 838
56, 838
58, 718

50,227
51, 035
49, 191
41, 933

178, 146
181, 022
192, 377
278, 890

17, Oil
14, 811
13, 390
19, 517

5,444
8,071
31, 797
23, 772

24,642
27, 522
31, 467
32, 635

43, 748
44,400
48, 720
47, 551

28, 701
24, 451
20, 178
26, 365

48, 888
51,696
53, 211
55,974

1925
Jan. 1-Mar. 31
Apr.l-June30
Julyl-Sept.30
Oct. 1-Dec. 31.

593, 673
486, 311
405, 433
506, 038

155, 838
121, 989
141, 319
125, 187

183, 015
182, 100
101, 724
102, 691

98, 793
90, 282
82, 108
88, 211

56, 341
53, 851
64, 440
64, 208

37, 499
46, 217
42, 457
41, 535

257, 695
252, 818
305, 910
336, 197

18, 197
17, 581
16, 061
22, 857

16, 613
9,217
49, 091
26, 242

41, 807
35, 564
34, 768
42, 189

37, 925
55, 087
73, 575
58, 311

25, 403
23,837
20,603
27, 246

53,944
51, 849
48, 927
46, 761

1936
January
February
March
April

_.

578, 253

1937
January
February
March
April

153, 481

198, 181

498, 716

September
October
November
December

186, 505

542, 465

May.
June _
July
August

126, 987

160, 268

180, 575

65, 977

41, 783

288, 785

16, 660

7,377

32, 474

35, 456

27, 609

44, 854

89, 954

58, 551

45, 540

270, 660

15, 533

8,150

36, 460

61, 649

24, 289

42, 842

91, 512

62, 668

48, 663

242, 372

18, 128

3,977

41, 010

86, 639

20, 364

36, 675

88, 801

II

4,258
2,829
5 1, 440
4,009

7,270
7,012
6,943
7,525
6,013
6,226
6,073
6,222
6,447
7,130

11, 271
8,931
« 7, 146
8,990

4,637

10, 104

3,894

8,882

2,401

7,191

""

__

May
June
1
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, except for shipments of animal glues, and representing practically complete production, factory
consumption, and factory stocks. Quarterly data from 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue (No. 36), p. 115, except on animal glues and edible gelatin, for which quarterly
figures were not begun until 1924 and 1925, respectively. Further details are given in the quarterly press releases.
2
Compiled by the National Association of Glue Manufacturers from reports of 15 companies estimated to represent 70 per cent of the output of the industry. Sales
between members are excluded to avoid duplication. Further details are given in the association's reports.
3
Average of last two quarters of the year.
4 Stocks on Dec. 31.
* Certain reports missing which would make totals slightly larger.




84

Table 60.—CROP PRODUCTION1
[Base year in bold-faced type]
WHEAT
CORN
Winter

Spring

BARLEY

OATS

Total

RYE

TOTAL
BREAD
GRAINS

RICE

POTA- APPLES HAY,
TOES (total) TAME

TOTAL
VALUE
OF
CROPS 2

YEAR AND MONTH
A — RELATIVE NUMBERS
Relative to 5-year average, 1909-1913
1909-1913 average
1914 final estimate
1915 final estimate
1916 final estimate
1917 final estimate
1918 final estimate
1919 final estimate
1920 final estimate
1921 final estimate
1922 final estimate
1923 final estimate
1924 final estimate
1925 final estimate ..—.
1926 final estimate

100
155
153
109
94
128
172
138

100

100

84
144
64
91
145
85
91

119
149
93
93
134
141
121

10O
99
111
95
113
92
104
118

100
101
137
111
141
136
105
132

100
107
126
100
116
141
81
104

100
123
155
140
180
261
216
173

100
104
123
99
117
112
110
122

100
99
121
171
145
161
175
218

10O
115
101
80
124
115
91
113

100
143
130
110
94
96
81
127

100
106
130
138
126
116
131
133

100
107
121
159
236
251
270
191

136
133
130
134

88
115
92
111
112
84

119
126
116
126
99
121

113
107
113
85
108
98

95
107
115
133
132
111

85
100
109
100
119
105

177
296
181
185
133
115

109
111
114
104
113
105

157
173
141
135
139
171

101
127
117
118
91
100

56
115
115
97
98
140

125
145
135
148
130
132

99
137
153
163
154
137

91
142

B.— NUMERICAL DATA

YEAR AND MONTH

Thous.
of tons

Thousands of bushels

Millions
of dollars

1909-1913 average _ ._
1914 final estimate
1915 final estimate
1916 final estimate
1917 final estimate
1918 final estimate
1919 final estimate
1920 final estimate

441, 603
684,990
673,947
480,553
412, 901
565, 099
760, 677
610, 597

686, 697
345, 059
891, 017
206, 027
351, 854 1, 025, 801
636, 318
155, 765
636, 655
223, 754
921, 438
356, 339
968, 279
207, 602
833, 027
222, 430

2,708,33-1
2, 672, 804
2,994,763
2, 566, 927
3,085,233
2, 502, 665
2, 816, 318
3, 208, 584

1, 131, 175
1,141,060
1,549,030
1, 251, 837
1, 592, 740
1, 538, 124
1, 184, 030
1, 496, 281

181, 886
194,953
228, 851
182, 309
211, 759
256, 225
147, 608
189, 332

U, 916
42, 779
54, 050
48, 862
62, 933
91, 041
75, 542
60, 490

4, 743, 068
4, 942, 613
5, 852, 525
4, 686, 253
5, 569, 320
5,309,493
5, 191, 777
5, 787, 714

S3, 926
23, 649
28, 947
40,861
34, 739
38, 606
41, 985
52,066

356, 627
409, 921
359, 721
286,953
442, 108
411, 860
322, 867
403, 296

176, 483
252, 200
230, Oil
193, 905
166, 749
169, 625
142,086
223, 677

65, 987
70, 071
85, 920
91, 192
83, 308
76, 660
86, 359
87,855

$5, 702
6,112
6,907
9,054
13, 479
14, 331
15, 423
10, 909

1921 final estimate
1922 final estimate
1923 final estimate
1924 final estimate
1925 final estimate
1926 final estimate

600, 316
586, 878
571, 959
592, 259
401, 734
626, 929

214, 589
280, 720
225, 422
272, 169
274, 695
205, 376

814, 905
867, 598
797, 381
864, 428
676, 427
832, 305

3, 068, 569
2, 906, 020
3, 053, 557
2, 309, 444
2, 916, 961
2, 645, 031

1, 078, 341
1, 215, 803
1, 305, 883
1, 502, 529
1, 487, 550
1, 253, 739

154, 946
182, 068
197, 691
181, 575
216, 554
191, 182

61,675
103, 362
63, 077
65, 466
46, 456
40, 024

5, 178, 436
5, 274, 851
5, 417, 589
4, 923, 412
5, 343, 950
4, 962, 281

37, 612
41, 405
33, 717
32, 498
33, 309
41, 006

361, 659
453, 396
416, 105
421, 585
323, 465
357, 800

99, 002
202, 702
202, 842
171, 725
172, 389
246,460

82, 379
95, 882
89, 250
97, 622
85, 717
86, 378

5,630
7,816
8,727
9,291
8,790
7,803

i

1925

July estimate
August estimate
September estimate
October estimate
November estimate

407, 156
403, 851
415, 697
415, 697
415, 697
415, 697

253, 729
275, 739
262, 749
283, 872
281, 575
281, 575

660, 855
679, 590
678, 446
699, 569
6975 272
697, 272

3, 095, 176
2,950,340
2,885,108
2, 917, 836
3,013,390

1,295,456
1, 292, 101
1, 387, 349
1,461,945
1,470,384
1, 470, 384

204, 687
208, 475
213, 596
221, 713
226, 786
226, 786

53,317
54,104
51, 768
51, 768
51, 768
51, 968

5, 309, 521
5, 329, 446
5, 281, 699
5, 320, 103
5, 364, 046
4, 762, 528

38, 100
36, 200
35, 284
35, 810
35,810

349, 566
353, 266
344, 391
344, 227
346, 503

156, 942
161, 148
162, 198
164, 042
171, 264

82, 500
78, 400
77, 700
81, 200
85, 700
85, 700

1926
June estimate
July estimate
August estimate
September estimate
October estimate
November estimate —

543, 300
567,762
626, 482
626, 000
626, 000
626, 000

199, 595
212, 719
212, 109
213, 336
213, 336

767, 357
839, 201
838, 109
839, 336
839, 336

2, 661, 000
2, 660, 780
2, 576, 936
2, 697, 872
2, 679, 988
2, 693, 963

1, 334, 260
1, 311, 159
1, 263, 619
1, 282, 414
1, 282, 414

190, 959
191, 088
195, 204
196, 762
196, 762

41, 131
39, 666
41, 900
41, 900
41, 900
41,870

3 2, 702, 131
4, 225, 665
4, 960, 254
4, 198, 595
4, 201, 064
4, 215, 009

39, 633
40,543
39, 267
39, 436
40, 809

333, 540
345, 569
351, 558
350, 821
360, 727

208, 412
218, 920
242, 114
234, 252
246, 262

77, 800
77, 900
78, 900
83, 200
83, 200

1927
June estimate

1
Yearly figures represent the latest revised estimates of total production for the year as reported by the V. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. Monthly figures are estimates of the current year's crop as made during the first week of that month. The estimates made in December of each year are subject
to revision in the final estimate made in December of the following year.
2 Estimated total value of all crops based on prices at the farm on Dec. 1« Prior to 1924, 23 crops were included, thereafter 55 crops, but the additional crops are
minor and have little effect on the grand totals.
3
June figures for total bread grains include corn as estimated on July 1.




85

Table 61.—WHEAT FLOUR
GKINDINGS OF
WHEAT

United
States 2
( Census)

YEAB, AND
MONTH

United States

Canada 3

Canada3

Actual 2 Prorated4
( Census) (Russell)

Thous. of bushels

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

CON
FLOUR SUMPMILLS TION

PRODUCTION

Capacity
operated 2

Grain
offal 2

Thousands of barrels

STOCKS (end
of month)
All positions
(computed)

Computed *

Held
mills a
(qtty.)

"

.
"

1920 monthly av__
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av_
1925 monthly av__
1926 monthly av__

9. 703
9,338
9, 919
9,815
9,317
11,091

8,156

1, 422
1,559
1,661
1,547

8 762, 180
734, 824
702, 318

856
54
52

8,943
7,148
7,228
7,701
7,344
7,046

7 42, 872
41, 277
39, 836

6, 386
6, 886
7,418
8,940

7 9, 288
8,943
8,649

1925
January
February _
March
April

45, 010
37, 720
33, 548
31, 066

7,692
7,037
7,552
5,585

9, 853
8,248
7,347
6,781

11, 705
10, 189
9,297
8,185

1,698
1,557
1,668
1,244

762, 489
648, 197
576, 955
536, 263

58
53
43
40

10, 017
9,801
8,360
7,431

May
_
Juno
July
August

31, 874
35, 526
40, 651
42, 818

4,562
5,611
5,960
4,663

6,942
7,745
8,840
9,292

8,153
8,927
10, 377
11, 049

1,015
1,239
1,340
1,029

553, 750
621, 141
708, 349
754, 446

43
46
52
56

7,963
7,907
7,801
10, 485

5,700
5,900
7,700
7,400

45, 952
49, 799
42, 416
41, 656

7,143
10, 181
9,499
7,794

9,938
10, 728
9,128
8,948

12, 501
13, 165
10, 864
10, 783

1,601
2,308
2,127
1,738

833, 270
907, 390
769, 373
756. 198

62
61
56
53

10, 701
12, 655
10, 101
10, 676

8,400
7,900
7,800
6,900

40, 358
34, 573
38, 027
35, 234

6,347
6,461
7,249
6,367

8,679
7, 429
8,289
7, 589

10, 287
8,811
9,901
8,817

1,422
1,440
1,609
1,416

728, 335
625, 503
685, 314
633, 082

54
50
47
45

9,513
8,635
9,707
7,584

7,000
6,600
6,100
6,500

May
June
July
August

34, 657
37, 251
43, 942
47, 654

6,661
7,386
5,523
4,694

7,418
8,005
9,570
10, 447

8, 633
9,631
11, 189
12, 338

1,491
1,646
1,228
1,044

626, 138
668, 392
768, 231
820, 795

44
48
57
62

8, 055
8,864
9, 237
10, 257

6,400
6,500
7,660
8,300

September _
October
November
December

49, 317
48, 727
43, 782

7,323
10, 029
9, 495

10, 843
10, 678
9,583

12, 681
13, 029
11,312

' 1, 634
2,231
2,089

844, 773
834, 908
747, 280

67
63
59

10, 921
11, 444
10, 668

8,500
8,700
8,000

1926
Januarv. _ _ _
February
March
April

_

1927
January
February
March_,__
April

Standard
Winter
pat- straights
ents Kansas
MinneCity
apolis
Dollars per barrel

9 3, 965

3,347

4,584

3,888

3,122

4,217

408
389
464
660
731
839
839

$4.58
5.10
6.66
7.26
11.39
(7)
12.00

$3.85
4.13
5.61
6.09
10.55
10.30
10.70

1, 654
1,400
1,252
1,359
1,333
927
994

394
606
790
928
956
892
871

12.68
8.34
7.30
6.38
7.18
8.83
8.44

11.58
7.05
6.14
5.36
5.98
7.67
7.29

988
939
1,387
955

7,400
6,850
6, 400
6,200

_

United CanStates 5 ada &

1,023
1,064
1,305
1, 198
1,161
1,809
2,204

9,433

8,237
8,569
9,291
9,223
9,719
9,492

9, 148
10, 102
10, 466
10, 480
11, 047
10, 433

September
October
November
December __

WHOLESALE
PRICES i

Thousands of barrels

Per cent

1

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av
monthly av

EXPORTS

875
834
1,385
710

9.69
9.85
9.04
8.25

8.81
8.67
7.97
7.04

690
820
775
874

482
596
815
685

8.87
8.53
8.65
8.83

7.22
7.51
6.95
7.57

800
1,012
872
1,009

661
1,022
1,210
1,042

8.31
8.26
8.54
9.18

7.43
7.41
7.61
7.89

676
647
695
834

717
842
1,302
682

9.41
9.14
8.81
8.76

8.34
8.00
7.88
7.51

679
667
793
1,442

726
1,029
978
459

8.49
8.68
8.98
7.95

7.40
7.34
6.81
6.74

1,560
1,385
1,344
1,208

612
963
1,262
885

7.73
7.94
7.74
7.63

6.68
6.94
6.64
6.60

1
1

._

i

May
June
i

!

1

1 Wholesale prices from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, represent averages of weekly quotations. Monthly figures from 1920 appeared in May,
1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.
2
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of over 1,000 mills each month, which produced about 88 per cent of the flour manufactured in 1923, according to the Census of Manufactures. Stocks include flour owned by millers whether in mills, elevators, or in transit.
3
Compiled by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Internal Trade Branch, covering merchant mills having a capacity of about 120,000 barrels per month, and also custom
mills. The detailed reports of Canadian milling statistics also contain data on other grains as well as a division into eastern and western territory. Monthly data through
1922 appeared in May, 1925, issue (No. 45) , p. 27.
4
Reported by U. 8. Grain Corporation prior to July, 1920, covering practically the entire industry; beginning with July, 1920, from Russell's Commercial News, the
production and stock figures being prorated to 100 per cent from representative current data bearing a known relation to the total figures. Stocks represent flour in all
po
positions. Consumption is calculated from production, stocks, exports, and imports. Monthly production figures from January, 1914, are given in the October, 1922, issue
(N 14), p. 47.
No.
5 Exports of flour from IT. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
6
Exports of flour from Canada from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statist
7
No quotations.
8
Average
 for last six months of year. and December
fi Average for two periods only, June



86

Table 62.—WHEAT AND CORN
WHEAT

YEAR
AND

Canada <
ShipReVisible supply 2 ceipts a ments 3 United States »
by
IncludIncludmills
ing Wheat ing
Wheat
(quaronly wheat only wheat
terly) • United Canada
States
flour
flour
Held

14, 198
16, 353
19, 919

12, 897
19, 277
23, 034
18, 230
14, 072
17, 405
22, 259

8,378
10, 540
5,993
13, 145
15, 804
12, 533
3,484

10, 214
12, 291
8,081
16, 115
19, 094
16,309
7,260

$0.91
1.04
1.34
1.24
2.32
2.42
2.56

$0.99
1.01
1.31
1.35
2.28
2.21
2.34

11, 117
11, 486
16, 210
12, 736
6,122
10, 266
4,101

21, 158
17, 4*47
24, 774
14, 995

27, 038
36, 369
35,009
32, 363
40, 878
29, 993
32, 519

23, 252
24,318
23, 107
18, 038
29, 891
21, 267
17, 805

18, 191
23, 338
13, 724
8,211
13, 859
7,700
11, 503

25, 636
29, 639
19, 359
14, 327
19, 861
11, 306
15, 973

6,498
10, 776
11, 374
17, 923
21, 406
18, 529
20,836

8,271
13, 503
14, 929
22,099
25, 708
22, 397
25,091

2.60
1.47
1.28
1.16
1.31
1.67
1.56

2.52
1.44
1.24
1.17
1.28
1.77
1.55

6,254
20, 686
25, 137
11, 660
12, 870
16, 981
31, 757

79, 341
76, 187
75, 048
58, 212

24, 734
19, 923
17, 260
10, 422

19, 864
16, 168
18, 367
14, 226

8,484
7,387
9,961
8,304

12, 930
11, 613
16, 203
12, 722

6,103
4,146
4,423
4,953

10,041
7,899
10, 656
8,148

1.91
1.84
1.69
1.55

2.01
1.98
1.77
1.70

36, 911
30, 420
33, 248
38, 167

48, 744
40, 087
22, 513
7,583

17, 659
21, 866
41, 783
43, 342

21, 067
17, 719
22, 693
27, 652

9,870
7,070
9,288
9,901

12, 975
10, 760
8,777
11, 832

14, 883
9,784
13, 097
15, 336

17, 052
12, 466
16, 765
18, 419

1.68
1.62
1.59
1.64

54,543
49, 651
49, 774
55, 024

58, 366
76, 239
103, 584
119, 077

57, 862
36, 045
34, 127
34, 897

28, 151
24, 508
22, 324
22, 448

9,391
4,354
4,696
3,695

12, 092
8,910
8,621
8,235

15, 876
41, 896
34,840
57, 008

18, 851
46, 495
40,285
61, 697

49, 473
44, 686
37, 385
30, 780

111, 121
106, 748
100, 446
94, 500

21, 640
16, 188
15, 101
14, Oil

12, 358
9,874
11, 465
10, 290

2,411
1,700
3, 773
2, 533

5,452
4,613
6,900
6,285

13, 199
14,002
14, 710
5,526

20, 125
13, 273
31, 959
66, 739

66, 521
53, 173
30, 474
19, 437

15, 663
21, 058
76, 960
71, 583

19, 605
15, 748
29, 013
34, 458

9,368
8,074
16, 083
28, 995

12, 423
11, 076
19,652
35, 485

81, 780
77, 714
78,412
68, 125

44,754
83, 719
119, 790
117, 796

48, 731
37, 137
29, 754
22, 405

24, 625
24, 427
23,422
17, 376

23, 700
17, 589
14, 280
9,536

30, 719
23, 821
20, 277
14, 793

50, 802
57, 379
38,155
65, 974
30, 393
51, 051
78, 231

32, 665
32, 604
32, 173
61, 055
47, 831
25, 871
32, 750

18,861
21, 619
32, 517
31,493

1920 m. a.
1921 rn.a1922 m. a_
1923 m.a.
1924 m.a.
1925 m.a. 8 67, 712
1926 m.a_

41, 987
36, 795
37, 131
57, 601
70, 407
51,241
50, 038

24,583
36, 516
56, 510
63, 693
70, 359
63, 749
79,040

81, 796
74, 167
63, 327
47,864

Sep
Oct
Nov_
Dec

1936
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr. _
MayJune
July
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov_
Dec

32, 314

103, 109

64, 639

35, 834

124, 773

Dolls,
per bu.

Thousands of bushels

8,292
14, 432
17, 161
12, 838
8,850
9,265
12, 341

1913 m. a.
1914 m.a.
1915m. a.
1916 m.a.
1917 m.a.
1918 m. a_
1919 m. a.

May
June
July
Aug

Visible
No. 1
supply, ReShip- Grind- Corn, Cash,
connorth- No. 3 end of 2 ceipts 3 ments 3 ings 4
inred month
tract,
ern winter,
clud- grades
spring Chiing
Chicorn No. 3,
Chicago cago
meal cago

Dolls, per bu.

Thousands of bushels

1935
Jan
Feb
Mar_
Apr

Ex- Wholesale
ports 6 prices *

Wholesale
prices 1

Exports

Stocks (end of month)

MONTH

CORN

10, 233
13, 525
8,845

4,195
3,817
4,664
5,276
4,952
6,142
5,411

3,910
1,418
4,185
4,603
4,751
3,922
1,334

$0.63
.70
.73
.83
1.64
1.61
1.60

17, 985
28,409
32, 814
22,642
23,179
18,886
19, 583

9,653
18, 949
21, 552
14, 211
14, 033
11, 261
10, 149

5,055 1,769
4,875 11, 015
5,566 13,844
5,513 3,724
6,279 1,681
5,855 1,122
6,341 2,101

1.41
.58
.62
.82
.97
1.04
.76

28, 812
34, 199
36, 526
25, 253

37, 038
21, 274
24, 916
10,224

14,290
12, 270
13, 692
14,243

6,751
6,198
5,672
5,240

896
704
89
1,109

1.27
1.24
1.17
1.08

1.89
1.82
1.59
1.68

18, 676
16, 040
6,832
7,135

11, 566
17, 860
9,891
17, 774

10, 058
13, 676
10,697
9,373

4,983
5,498
4,430
5,567

843
964
844
849

1.14
1.10
1.07
1.05

1.56
1.55
1.61
1.77

1.67
1.64
1.71
1.80

5,912
2,209
3,077
19, 095

12, 583
12, 881
18, 456
32, 180

8,318
8,693
7,692
12, 131

5,902
7,037
6,497
6,489

1,240
1,292
1,210
3,428

.92
.83
.84
.80

16,426
17, 791
20, 569
8,595

1.84
1.77
1.63
1.67

1.87
1.85
1.68
1.69

29, 519
35, 688
59, 650
34, 937

30, 851
25,596
19,994
13, 166

10, 268
9,906
9,566
9,927

7, 191
6,709
7,431
5,611

4,823
2,918
2,270
2,210

.80
.77
.74
.73

18, 979
27, 792
16, 306
9,541

22,246
32, 423
20, 707
11, 607

1.64
1.53
1.53
1.42

1.66
1.48
1.44
1.37

27, 469
32, 279
26, 821
22, 455

11, 731
24,306
13, 748
11, 482

12, 497
11,124
10, 724
8,288

5,490
6,314
6,222
6,735

1,865
1,831
1,358
1,158

.72
.72
.80
.81

10, 575
30, 573
43, 947
44, 879

13, 329
34,907
49, 626
52, 862

1.39
1.44
1 39
1.44

1.36
1.40
1.38
1.40

18, 999
24,637
32, 219
36, 412

13, 524
28,393
22, 847
22, 339

7,267
11,001
12, 563
8,652

6,311
7,057
5,924
5,100

1,052
1,494
2,208
2,030

.80
.78
.71
.76

1937
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
June. __
1 From U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, averages of weekly quotations. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.
2 Data from Bradstreet's representing stocks carried on Saturday nearest end of month at terminals, elevators, warehouses, docks, etc.
3 At principal primary markets, as compiled by the Chicago Board of Trade and reported by the Price Current Grain Reporter.
* Grindings of corn by the wet process in the manufacture of cornstarch, glucose, etc., compiled by the Associated Corn Products Manufacturers from reports of 11 firms,
comprising practically the entire industry. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
5 Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly figures from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 88. Wheat
flour has been converted to wheat equivalent at 4J4 bushels to the barrel, while corn meal has been converted at 4 bushels to the barrel.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of over 1,000 flour mills representing 88 per cent of the industry. Stocks include
wheat owned by millers, whether at mills, in elevators or in transit. Details by class of elevator are given in press releases.
? Exports from Canada from Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
8 Average of two quarters, June and December.




87

Table 63.—OTHER GRAINS
BARLEY

YEAR AND
MONTH

RYE

WholeCanada *
sale
ExReReExports, prices, ceipts
Exports, Whole- Receipts
ports, Wholeceipts
sale
Visible includ- prices,
at
Visible includ- by samVisible includ- sale
at
at
Producing
prin- supply,
ing
prin- supply, ing ple, fair prinsupply,
prices,
tion,
No. 2
cash, Grind- oatmeal
end of
flour
cipal
end of 2 oatcipal end of flour to good, cipal
cash, interior month
uteri or month 2
malt- interior month 6
Chi-4
as
as
meal
Chi- 4 markets1
ings
and
grain 3 cago
grain 3 ing,
marcago
as
marrolled
Chigrain 3
kets i
kets i
oats
cago *
Thousands of bushels

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

mo. av
mo av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo av
mo. av
mo. av . _
mo. av «,
mo. av
mo av
mo. av

1924
September..
October
November
December. __.
1925
January
February
March
April .
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
1936
January
February
March
April
May
June..
July
August
September _. .
October
November
December

TOTAL
GRAINS

OATS

Per
bushel

Thousands of
bushels

9,058
7,435
8,385
9,438
6,907
6,118
7,746

5,021
5,24]
4,071
5,040
4,818
4,483
8,708

1,461
554
2,211
1,874
1,488
1,897
3,369

$0.63
.62
.70
.87
1.32
1.31
1.22

3,815
3,321
3,367
3,904
5,207
5,517

3,438
2,913
2,002
2,352
2,498
3,988
4,656

1,489
2,153
1,536
984
1,477
2,381
1,131

1.26
.64
.63
.66
.82
.85
.70

1,294
1,648
1,809
1,936
1,912
2,777
3,988
3,712
2,573
5,353
3,683
5,414
2,489
1,130

13, 965
12,296
7,258
5,405

4,700
5,209
5,481
5,484

1,955
5,315
2,710
1,744

.87
.91
.86
.94

4,940
4,210
3,359
2,038

3,939
3,850
3,834
2,773

1,522
881
864
934

.97
1.00
.92
.88

2,662
3,382
3,086
11, 929

1,809
1,657
1,099
3,367

1,608
667
1,940
4,564

.88
.89
.88
.81

14, 993
6,445
4,791
4,364

6,036
5,642
6,705
7,257

9,103
3,043
2,493
958

.75
.74
.72
.72

3,034
2,588
2,958
2,528

6,971
7,919
5,322
4,431

783
311
436
734

.72
.70
.66
.69

3,058
3,104
1,466
5,150

3,293
2, 835
2,299
3,581

996
1,352
1,386
1,523

.69
.68
.72
.65

6,953
4,445
3,668

5,008
4,823
4,902
4,492

2,663
939
1,080
1,363

.67
.71
.71
.74

Per
bushel

Thousands of bushels

13, 018

155
189
1,138
1,320
1,224
1,359
3,375

7,323
2,785
5,516
14, 017
16, 288
10, 340
10, 493

4,938
2,512
3,985
2,667
3,082
2,408
1,003

$0.64
.77
1.09
1.11
1.87
1.94
1.53
1.87
1.21
.89
.75
.92
1.13
.96

14, 291
17, 708
8,932
3,802

12, 311
14, 174
17, 965
18, 532

11, 579
10, 927
1,323
856

1.02
1.28
1.31
1.40

55, 710
39, 149
18, 620
19, 738

50, 690
71, 157
71, 997
76, 343

662
2,735
1,366
1,171

2,134
2,823
833
1,506
4,554
889
403
1,939
6,639
3,304
2,598
2,243

13, 122
19, 499
18, 168
11,411

1,208
944
2,408
10,749

23,474
14, 110
12, 851
11, 679

77, 579
76, 519
67, 509
50, 995

934
843
1,006
917

8,507
7,181
3,357
3,688

5,795
1,627
3,794
1,036

11, 845
17, 363
16, 591
48, 399

37, 520
37, 530
28,020
54, 715

3,908
2,398
4,292
7,073

7,382
9,290
10, 533
11, 945

1,054
127
62
95

1.59
1.58
1.35
1.12
1.19
1.09
.98
1.07
.88
.84
.86
1.04

29, 243
18, 918
14,094
15, 582

69, 960
69, 216
68, 584
66, 762

6,279
4,744
2,443
2,466

1,520
1,082
1,032
1,301
1,364
1,202
802
2,007
3,900
2,688
2,254

6,236
5,871
13, 079
13, 271

197
186
369
1,424

14, 948
11, 128
11, 622
13, 762

66, 284
61, 896
56, 217
48,704

1,447
873
810
3,043

9,984
10, 748
8,659
9,325

3,219
1,085
2,195
318

12, 378
13, 400
9,241
23, 078

39, 995
38, 768
34, 489
42, 529

3,255
2,429
1,468
1,028

11, 052
12, 594
12, 751
12, 343

2,130
137
162
613

1.05
.97
.84
.89
.84
.91
1.04
1.01
.97
1.01
.96
.97

16, 783
14, 333
11, 309
10, 188

50, 194
49, 732
50, 063
46, 341

1,762
860
951
808

Per
bushel

20, 694
22, 200
22, 651
27, 299
24, 844
28, 335
19, 264

22, 907
24, 390
20, 481
30, 336
23,493
22, 703
22, 898

3,018
223
8,993
8,791
9,370
10, 815
5,551

17,800
17, 880
19, 063
19, 974
22, 046
19, 512
13, 514

17, 609
50, 863
49, 317
19, 637
30, 675
58, 742
49, 184

1,357
698
2,979
966
694
3,109
1,561

$0.38
.42
.50
.46
.64
.78
.70
.80
.39
.40
.44
.51
.47
.43

Thous.
of bus.

Thous.
of Ibs.

Exports,
including
flour
and
meal as
grains 3
Thous.
of bus.
20,764
13, 973
39, 560
34, 817
30,903
35, 406
35, 878
35, 191
46,002
41, 672
22, 668
26, 817
20,796
21, 769

821
821
1,053
855

9,610
10, 322
15, 362
11, 098

.50
.52
.52
.60

1,010
1,097
1,218
1,134

15, 157
15, 945
16, 199
14,467

54,242
73, 243
41, 433
28,668

.60
.57
.49
.45
.48
.51
.48
.42
.40
.40
.40
.42

879
659
689
672
594
667
667
727
1,062
1,197
1,257
1, 192

11, 159
7,133
7,469
7,358

17, 538
14, 984
21, 376
26, 310
25, 130
16, 416
23,647
25,354
30, 668
18, 116
14, 829
15, 182

.43
.41
.41
.42
.42
.41
.42
.40
.43
.47
.45
.50

996
894
904
764
589
652
800
841
1,099
1,036
1,215

13,994
11, 898
11, 205
9,523

6, 898
8,449
8,581
9,347
15, 043
17, 782
17, 704
16,252

6,990
9,137
11,224
11, 309
14, 893
14, 068
15, 026

12, 702
8,901
10, 785
13, 696
21, 758
17, 773
26, 059
39, 512
38, 326
27, 251
24, 678
19, 787

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June
i Receipts of oats compiled by Chicago Board of Trade and reported by Price Current Grain Reporter, while receipts of barley and rye are compiled by the Federal Reserve
Board from receipts at 17 interior centers. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
a
Data from Bradstreet's, representing stocks carried on Saturday nearest end of month at terminals, elevators, warehouses, docks, etc. Monthly data from 1913 appeared
in November, 1925, issue of the SURVEY (No. 51), p. 23.
3 Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 88. Barley
flour converted at 5.5 bushels to the barrel, oatmeal at 5.21 bushels to 100 pounds, and rye flour at 6 bushels to the barrel.
« From U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, averages of weekly quotations. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.
« Compiled by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Internal Trade Branch, covering merchant mills having a capacity of about 120,000 barrels per month, and also custom
mills. The detailed reports of Canadian milling statistics also contain data on other grains as well as a division into eastern and western territory. Monthly data from
1922 6separating oatmeal and rolled oats appeared in May, 1925, issue (No. 45), p. 27.
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, representing stocks held in elevators and warehouses at 11 interior centers and 8 seaports.
Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the May, 1926, issue of the SURVEY (No. 57), p. 29.




88

Table 64.—RICE, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND HAY
RICE*
Paddy at
California
warehouses
YEAR AND
MONTH
Shipments

Stocks,
end of
month

Southern
paddy

Receipts
at mills

1
Total
movement
to mills

Shipments

Total
from
mills

Barrels or sacks of 162 pounds

1913 mo. av._
1914 mo av
1915 mo. av 1
1916 mo. av
1917mo.av__
1918 mo. av__
1919 mo av

639, 610
796, 277
837, 657
659, 645
707, 425
494, 586
630, 670

1925
January.
February
March
April

3 994, 249
896, 093
560, 607

Domestic at
mills
and
dealers

Imports

169, 718
203, 340
196, 238
258, 484
275, 513
278, 785
254, 825

554, 723
957, 589
797, 973
687, 198
691, 376
536, 989
635, 703

Coldstor.
holdings,'
end
mo.

Car-lot shipments

Thous.
ofbbls.

Exports

Pockets of 100 pounds

479, 349
652, 912
642, 918
699, 754
611, 661

468, 036
640, 627
591, 159
633, 910
609, 477

1920 mo av
1921 mo. av _
1922 mo av
1923 mo. av_. * 337, 223 * 1, 172, 184
386, 862
1924 mo. av__ 188, 668
254, 002
66, 022
1925 mo. av._
1926 mo av

New
Orleans

CITWHITE
RUS POTA- ONFRUIT TOES IONS

APPLES

Stocks,
end of
month

Number of carloads

757, 281
1, 021, 642
872, 667
682, 788
811, 658

191, 510
193, 597
212, 140
179, 760
222, 059
446, 741
136, 090

23, 004
41, 904
56, 327
109, 114
172, 990
139, 944
314, 063

1,800
1,752
1,865
1,940

6,950
4,754
5,737
6,796

222, 175
318, 147
275, 358
223, 472
156, 446
133, 944
152, 703

1, 287, 057
1, 291, 023
1, 253, 992
1, 343, 655
1, 142, 799
896, 837
1, 574, 650

109, 706
63, 532
52, 946
40, 105
31, 728
56, 272
97, 415

327, 177
4.88, 412
342, 952
283, 636
128, 945
54, 556
97, 910

2,383
2, 344
2,570
3,391
3,484
3,320
3, 859

HAY

Receipts

2

Tons

3,417
5,398

11, 397
12, 055
14, 105
15, 005

1,304
1,596
1,835
1,740

124, 870
120, 675

8,580
8,042
7,734
10, 268
9,009
9,202
10, 380

5,975
7,500
5,882
8,261
8,562
7,299
8; 095

14, 627
18, 206
19, 930
18, 956
20, 178
19, 585
18, 903

2,163
1,932
2,163
2,132
2,502
2, 453
2,635

119, 102 j
69, 948
76, 873
76, 493
80, 006
72, 343
66, 371

101, 595
69, 869
74,305 i
45,985 i

j

583, 136
532, 886
375, 675
257, 570

448, 306
197, 214
43, 129
34, 465

476, 373
216,286,
135, 431
155, 942

981, 194
543, 246
496, 485
389, 915

219, 817
128, 858
118, 163
95, 082

1, 867, 227
1, 559, 679
1, 059, 649
674, 106

41, 497
78, 493
98, 554
60, 728

108,979
114, 109
79,085
63,246

5,233
3,761
2,288
1,143

4,980
3,802
3,244
2,216

12, 036
10, 402
11, 309
10,417

21, 159
19, 886
20, 862
19, 532

2,713
1,984
1,533
2,900

97, 766
29, 183
None.
None.

May
June
July
August

28,067
19, 072
92, 302
121, 477

40, 000
2,700
2,700

11, 000
45, 218
8, 252
566, 268

108, 766
74, 401
8,252
566, 268

337, 221
192, 507
140, 316
315, 239

117, 128
38, 849
89, 607
101, 054

363, 747
223, 542
95, 427
398, 186

55, 333
34, 351
63, 238
109, 753

52, 574
43, 854
13, 946
25, 865

399
104
42
64

1,525
889
2,667
3,956

8,332
5,464
3,587
2,442

19, 397
19, 976
17, 467
14, 326

1,932
590
1,725
2,391

54, 349
48, 022
71, 783
79, 611

^ 856, 840
1, 061, 489
1, 348, 875
1, 718, 366

619, 078
842, 366
834, 604
751, 701

135, 778
186, 218
172, 564
204, 210

632, 444
751, 680
1, 090, 571
2, 045, 781

24, 409
18, 568
23, 586
66, 751

13, 293
28, 248
41, 666
69, 803

1,422
7,489
9,398
8,502

19, 103
41, 324
19, 478
7,244

2,379
2,639
9,229
9,350

22, 763
32, 545
15, 980
11, 125

3,994
5,157
2,968
1,554

79, 516
76, 687
84, 068
82, 329

September -3,510
136, 235
October
November _ _ 218, 009
December— . 46, 641

1, 253, 359

853, 330
925, 254
1, 130, 866
1, 671, 725

1926
January
February
March „ _
April

214, 777
107, 495
116, 952
238, 209

1, 120, 715
1, 005, 396
920, 259
651, 901

1, 019, 566
477, 583
210, 515
194, 321

1, 234, 343
585, 078
327, 467
432, 530

911, 578
608, 600
498, 419
471, 143

72, 805
131, 393
176, 229
122, 908

2, 168, 554
2, 052, 144
1, 824, 807
1, 556, 393

108, 464
194, 576
190, 036
156, 964

55, 739
48, 248
65, 490
35, 926

7,051
5,300
3,314
1,691

6,078
6,622
6, 084
3,990

9,703
8,399
11, 559
10, 894

15, 817
14, 553
19, 577
13, 718

2,524
2, 248
1,806
1,924

98, 998
72, 139
73,286 j
66,037 [

May
June
July
August

213, 437
177, 376
153, 198
70, 820

368, 037
224, 018
70, 820
None.

118, 885
105, 923
74, 634
259, 953

332, 322
283, 299
227, 832
330, 773

473, 963
351, 292
278, 871
310, 412

113,558
129, 725
34, 528
142, 589

1, 179, 488
975, 043
767, 627
715, 632

114, 174
111,455
88, 159
68, 739

38, 140
37, 618
40, 464
50, 504

630
112
61
87

2,480
1,204
3,665
3,131

9,250
6,248
5,982
4,533

16, 488
23, 370
19, 914
14, 775

4,071
1,237
1,569
2,596

53, 217
60, 457
57, 014
49, 157

717, 070
1, 034, 736
1, 077, 146
895, 206

132, 495
359, 205
307, 692
209, 306

1, 217, 603
1, 879, 502
2, 196, 817
2, 362, 088

43, 002
25, 957
30, 372
37, 076

64, 290
101, 707
241, 678
395, 119

1,204
7,107
10, 468
9,382

19, 272
41, 745
22, 200
8,090

3,614
4,521
9,855
12, 581

21, 846
34, 920
18, 510
13, 252

3,640
5,265
2,850
2,491

58,240
70, 100
69, 539
68, 273

September
October
November
December

1, 147, 507
1, 681, 130
1, 252, 887
1, 025, 131

1927
January
February
March
April

May
June

_ __-

1
Southern receipts, shipments, and stocks at mills from Eke Millers' Association, comprising movement of the whole rice crop except California rice. Data on paddy
at all California warehouses from Rice Growers' Association of California. The column ''Total movement to mills" is a total of the shipments from California warehouses
and receipts at Southern mills, thus giving a view of the total movement of domestic rice to the mills. Shipments of rice through New Orleans compiled by New Orleans
Board of Trade. Imports and exports from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, data for rough rice being reduced to the equivalent
clean rice at 162 pounds of rough to 100 pounds of clean, as barrels or sacks of 162 pounds are equivalent to clean rice pockets of 100 pounds each,
2
Data on cold-storage holdings of apples and on car-lot shipments of fruits and vegetables compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Citrus fruit shipments consist of oranges, lemons, and grapefruit.
3
Receipts of hay at 11 principal markets, compiled by prorating weekly reports to the (Hay Trade Journal,
4
Average for 10 months, March through December.
* Stocks on hand are negligible, as the crop is not warehoused until the month of December.




89

Table 65.—LIVESTOCK MOVEMENT1
CATTLE AND CALVES

SHEEP AND LAMBS

HOGS

Price
Shipments
steers,
good to
Local choice,
Total
Total
slaugh- corn
receipts Stoekreceipts Stoekter
er and Total
erand Total
fed,
Chifeeder
feeder
cago 2
Shipments

YEAR AND
MONTH

Dolls, p.
100 Ibs.

Thousands of animals

1,106
1,239
1,136

3,170
3, 739
3,706

64
81
75

1,048
1,198
1,197

819
717
889
838
808
786
784

1, 016
923
1,036
1,086
1,154
1,205
1,196

14.49
8.76
9.46
9.96
9.68
10.65
9.51

3,510
3,425
3,672
4,611
4,618
3,661
3, 314

61
42
49
68
41
44
78

2,566
2,737
2,363
2,083

580 . 1, 166
763 " 1, 339
549
1,095
309
816

1,312
1,432
1, 267
1,265

9.02
9.50
9.16
9.55

3,216
3,990
4,904
6,604

1,869
1,530
1, 860
1, 827

207
176
230
271

708
555
645
664

1,150
967
1,179
1, 163

9.31
9.47
10.20
9.99

,_.

1,737
1,746
1, 970
2, 245

216
154
243
360

602
534
706
886

1,123
1,190
1, 252
1, 281

September. ..
October
November
December

2,157
2,789
2,282
2, 056

427
717
489
333

938
1,348
1,017
833

1936
January
February
March _ .
April

1,840
1, 551
1,811
1,711

225
172
184
206

675
532

May
June
July
August

1,894
1,871
1,821
1,997
2,397
2, 674
2,461
1,846

Local
Total
slaughreceipts StoekEwes,
ter
er and Total
Chifeeder
cago

Dolls, p.
100 Ibs.

Thousands of animals

$8.51
7.04
8.70
9.58
12.81
16.42
17.50

1913 mo.
1914 mo
1915 mo
1916 mo
1917 mo.
1918 mo.
1919 mo.

2,120
2,537
2,501

1,685
1, 874
2,271

371
434
580

917
1,017
1,215

1,275
1,226
1,278
1,595
1, 684
1,355
1,264

2,230
2, 195
2,395
3, 014
2,932
2,305
2,048

14.19
8.45
9.39
7.70
8.48
12.22
12. 35

1, 961
2,014
19864
1,835
1,850
1,842
1,989

432
258
347
373
390
361
384

35
51
40
38

1,252
1,469
1,760
2,271

1,959
2,525
3,132
4,335

9.86
10.78
9.58
9.96

3,027
3,295
1, 879
1,605

6,105
4, 558
3,528
3,246

38
35
52
41

2,176
1,580
1,239
1, 199

3,910
3,010
2,285
2, 039

10.80
11.15
13.48
12.58

9.66
10.50
11.56
12.08

3,283
3,507
2,798
2, 549

36
49
35
30

1,346
1,222
995
952

1,931
2, 298
1, 804
1, 586

1,227
1,450
1,232
1,248

12.44
11.91
10.58
10. 04

2,741
3,390
3,844
4,380

33
45
61
77

1,092
1,323
1,524
1,618

572
603

1,144
1,013
1,221
1,113

9.38
9.69
9.69
9.13

4,304
3,372
3,579
3,135

65
58
56
54

218
169
198
252

668
658
658
776

1,194
1,217
1,168
1,171

9.06
9.59
9.42
8.98

3,037
3,143
2,854
2,804

521
693
570
301

1,100
1,310
1,112
739

1,290
1,356
1,326
1,136

10.19
9.89
9.39
9.72

2,819
3,261
3,554
3,910

1,922
2,108
2, 052

321
400
418
440

789
859
896

1920 mo. av__
1921 mo. av_1922 mo. av__
1923 mo. av_1924 mo. av__
1925 mo. av_ ..
1926 mo. a v _ _

1,850
1, 649
1,935
1,934
1,975
2,000
1, 990

342
292
405
379
331
319
308

September. ._
October
„.
November. .December

1925
January
February
March
April

Lambs,
Chicago

Dollars per 100
pounds

Thousands of animals

$8.37
8.36
7.13
9.62
15.71
17.60
18.24

av
av
av
av
av_av__
av_ _

Price 2

Shipments
Price,
Local
slaugh- heavy,
Chiter
cago 2

762
855
1,053

$4.69
5.04
5.93
7.17
10.33
11.29
9.35

$7.79
8.12
9.23
10.02
16.09
17.33
16.13

1,047
944
973
977
983
976
1,376

915
1,071
889
856
867
867
949

8.74
3.41
5.81
6.09
6.91
7.21
6.39

15.90
9.99
13.22
13.46
14.29
15.22
13.73

973
1, 436
676
206

1,876
2,267
1,154
750

1,097
1,020
775
854

5.41
5.81
6.33
7. 58

13.18
13.44
13.34
15.98

1,467
1,388
1,504
1,541

138
119
94
109

688
675
670
704

786
711
836
833

8.69
8.44
9.18
7.92

17.63
17.27
16.05
14.16

12.18
12.70
13.79
13.13

1,689
1,603
1,699
2, 064

178
137
193
421

877
693
763
1, 037

830
908
939
998

6.53
5.63
6.31
6.40

12.28
14.87
14.66
14.60

1, 645
2,081
2,300
2,776

12.88
11.69
11. 32
10.88

2,627
3,198
1,712
1, 608

857
1,392
475
220

1,619
2, 287
927
771

981
945
793
840

6.19
6.41
6.79
8.06

15.09
14.81
15.25
15.94

1,581
1, 345
1,428
1,264

2,721
2,035
2,144
1,871

11.63
12.05
11.49
11.74

1,548
1,486
1,695
1,502

155
107
83
124

694
615
695
698

856
863
1,001
801

7.89
7.89
7.70
8.53

14.84
13.28
12.73
13.53

68
72
49
51

1,164
1,048
989
1,084

1,872
2,087
1, 873
1,711

13.29
13.96
12.98
11.85

1,717
1,913
1,739
2,277

130
238
260
567

838
916
828
1,176

885
998
912
1,058

7.05
5.31
5.88
5.87

14.20
16.13
14. 26
13.95

84
129
126
105

1,142
1,334
1,314
1,476

1,673
1,933
2, 222
2,441

12.38
12.97
12.09
11.77

3,279
3,090
1,917
1,708

1,081
1, 150
493
223

2,124
2,099
988
780

1,147
999
932
934

5.77
5.81
5.77
5.64

13. 78
13.28
12.70
12.04

1924:

May
June
July
A.ugnst

_-

September
October
November
December

19^7
Januarv
February
March...
April
May
June

-

""

II"

i These figures, except prices, represent the movement at between 60 and 70 markets; data procured from the U. S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in November, 1922, issue (No. 15), p. 115.
2 From U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, averages of weekly quotations. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.




90

Table 66.—PORK PRODUCTS
PRODUCTION i
(inspected slaughter)
YEAH AND MONTH

Total pork
products

Lard

Total

Lard

APPARENT
CONSUMPTION *

COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS 3

EXPORTS «

(end of month)

Other
products

Total

Lard

Lard,
Fresh and Total pork Smoked prime
hams,
cured
products Chicago contract,
New York

Thousand of pounds
1913 monthly average .
1914 monthly average. ..
1815 monthly average. ..
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average...
1919 monthly average—

477, 117
450, 851
524, 294
565, 691
449, 570
583, 154
588, 977

1920 monthly average...
1921 monthly average...
1922 monthly average.. .
1923 monthly average...
1924 monthly average...
1925 monthly average...
1926 monthly average...

Dollars per pound

87,986

82,058
76, 826
113, 205
120,941
108,142
187, 558
219, 803

35, 555
31,060
45, 735
63, 409

85, 377
77, 149
141, 819
156,394

644, 543
669, 283
875, 406
920,922

85,741
74, 117
90, 959
92, 212

558, 802
595, 166
784, 364
828, 747

539, 452
560, 212
618, 276
765, 178
734,963
610, 226
606,044

104, 622
119, 216
130, 652
159, 686
160, 849
122, 537
122,247

128, 052
135,887
123, 912
165,645
139,483
102, 268
93,321

51, 021
72, 412
63, 913
86,282
78, 668
57, 234
58, 248

76, 983
65, 896
60, Oil
79,338
62, 621
44,838
35,073

898,845
761,914
647, 594
837, 352
827, 581
753, 480
646, 715

120, 413
119, 705
86, 573
77, 358
89, 855
108, 020
94,843

492,898
560, 043
723, 213
1,027,375

103, 645
106, 781
130, 184
192, 596

114,656
111,952
91,730
120, 607

65, 810
60, 813
49, 120
76, 803

48, 842
71, 873
42,610
43,804

649, 371
439,437
463, 233
708, 413

950,738
723,465
547, 772
519, 331

194, 189
161, 697
115, 016
113, 277

144,221
114, 706
123,423
83,215

78,440
60, 363
63,281
44,447

65,781
54,343
60,000
38, 768

555, 823
650, 452
512, 095
457, 345

109, 183
124,507
118, 969
90,421

109, 173
104, 146
89,975
83,226

71, 135
59, 779
49,414
45,740

September
October
November
D ecember

461, 253
563,747
606,706
773,984

84,972
104,288
106,206
147,716

102, 152
81, 321
76, 418
115,241

1936
January
February
- ....
...
March
April
-—

802,879
604, 958
649, 871
572,037

162, 314
126, 905
138, 567
126, 385

568,585
646, 770
616,289
563, 719
475,867
479, 917
568, 835
722, 806

1934
September
October
November
December
1935
January
February
March
...
April
May
June
July
August

-

._- .

- .--

—.

May
JUly

September
October
November
December

..
..

WHOLESALE
PRICES 5

431, 847
343, 486
378, 420
383, 581

$0. 166
.167
.153
.185
.252
.318
.343

$0. 110
.104
.094
.135
.219
.261
.290

785,932
642, 209
561, 021
760, 019
737, 726
645, 460
551, 872

417, 203
435, 295
481, 376
588, 051
600, 103
524, 712
512, 630

.334
.268
.265
.212
.202
.271
.307

.200
.111
.115
.123
.133
.168
.150

84,198
31,706
35,713
61,049

565, 173
407, 731
427, 520
647,364

565, 365
660, 248
608, 165
662, 169

.223
.216
.205
.207

.144
.165
.153
.169

891, 496
1, 017, 282
979, 739
965,688

112, 704
151,927
150, 182
151,499

778,792
865, 355
829, 557
814, 189

623,912
483,364
462,563
450, 801

.219
.231
.269
.282

.166
.161
.171
.161

38, 038
44,347
40, 563
37, 291

886,713
884,574
815, 460
698, 513

138, 295
145, 919
145, 924
114, 724

748, 418
738, 655
669, 536
583, 789

526, 195
549, 338
492, 017
492, 088

.256
.263
.293
.298

.163
.176
.181
.179

60, 646
44, 745
39, 979
68,840

39,506
36, 576
36, 439
46,401

539,004,
429, 861
418, 737
514,697

71,626
37,256
33, 710
42,478

467, 378
392, 605
385, 027
472,219

519, 282
592, 235
541, 736
563,011

.292
.283
.282
.280

.178
.164
.162
.150

130,829
109,764
104,678
100,619

76,670
65, 356
64,259
63, 160

54,159
44, 408
40,420
37,459

620,229
685, 992
719, 702
702, 163

64,187
76, 145
93, 108
98, 365

556, 042
609, 847
626, 594
603, 798

566, 918
429, 713
511, 952
489, 416

.278
.288
.295
.301

.157
.152
.150
.145

117, 241
122, 885
133,702
114, 803

93, 366
85,094
72, 557
87,944

58,154
56, 482
45, 879
54,273

35, 212
28, 612
26, 678
33, 671

681, 296
722, 703
796, 245
774, 319

106,824
120,527
153, 572
151, 233

574, 472
602,176
642, 673
623,086

496,451
521, 083
470, 705
498,315

.310
.340
.351
.329

.159
.170
.165
.156

97,466
92,967
106,061
130, 398

93, 835
76,906
72, 914
91,347

61, 577
46,988
43,488
62,690

32, 258
29, 918
29,426
28, 657

619,909
477, 978
434, 972
525, 074

105, 558
72, 355
46,744
49, 498

514, 351
405, 623
388,228
475, 576

537, 320
546,837
540, 331
542,448

.320
.303
.293
.280

.150
.142
.128
.128

•

1937
January
February
March
April

May

i Production of pork products, including lard, from animals slaughtered under Federal inspection reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal
Industry, given as total dressed weight, excluding meat from condemned animals. Slaughter of hogs under Federal inspection according to 1919 census figures amounted
to 68 per cent of total slaughter. Monthly data from 1920, slightly revised since, given in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 95, including data on exports, storage holdings, and
apparent consumption also. Monthly data on lard from 1916 appeared in March, 1924, issue (No. 31), p. 54.
J
Exports reported by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The total includes bacon, ham, shoulders, lard, neutral lard, and
canned, fresh, and pickled pork. In the division between lard and other products, neutral lard is included with " Other products."
3
Cold-storage holdings, reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, are distinctly seasonal. No allowance for this has been
made in computing index numbers.
4
Apparent consumption including only meat produced under Federal inspection, has been computed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics from the inspected slaughter, less condemned animals, plus net imports less exports and reexports and the change in cold-storage holdings.
a Wholesale prices are averages of weekly quotations as compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly data on ham prices froin 1919
appeared in September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 55.




91

Table 67.—OTHER MEATS
BEEF

YEAR AND MONTH

Production (inspected
slaughter)!

MISC.
MEATS

LAMB

Wholesale
prices 5

Coldstorage Apparent
Ex- 2 - holdings? consump- Good Steer
ports
end of
native
month 3 tion * steers, rounds.
No. 2,

Chicago Chicago

Cold
Cold
Produc- Cold- Appartion (in- storage ent con- storage Produc- storage Apparent
holdholdtion
spected
ln
sump[(inspected holdings, consumpslaugh- end of tion 4
tion *
end of
Fv
tajPv
end of slaughter)! month 3
ter)! month 3
month 6

Thousands of pounds

Dolls, per pound

Thousands of pounds

354, 440
420, 946
467, 135
431, 602

$0. 130
.136
.129
.138
.167
.221
.233

$0. 131
.133
.124
.130
.162
.221
.224

45, 661
44,623
38,445
37, 564
28, 287
31, 831
38, 539

3,722
4,531
6,026
8,291

38, 439
29, 141
31,299
39, 166

156, 117
99, 623
68, 521
75, 689
79, 712
80, 156
64, 370

400, 648
375, 060
411, 561
427, 455
440, 131
460, 585
478, 728

.230
.163
.150
.158
.171
.181
.164

.213
.145
.145
.153
.152
.158
.157

34, 399
41,096
34,820
37,188
38, 030
38,943
41, 731

20, 174
22,090
3,294
3,742
2,495
1,731
2,619

1,960
2,152
2,853
2,043

140, 705
130, 809
116, 318
96, 223

481, 583
387, 219
438, 123
450, 644

.183
.183
.183
.183

.133
.135
.148
.153

39, 655
34,910
40,572
40,610

435,890
418,082
478,231
444,474

2,198
2,202
2,369
2,382

74,618
61, 554
49,674
45,214

457, 054
430, 103
489, 204
447, 509

.178
.175
.178
.185

.162
.173
.192
.188

466, 438
569,094
451, 396
499, 739

2,353
2,273
1,749
1,928

40, 719
47,481
73,564
84,996

469, 695
563, 086
424,809
487, 985

.185
.185
.178
.170

458, 376
395, 362
450, 058
450, 142

1,754
2,083
1,913
2,180

80,538
77,690
70, 781
59,978

462,650
397, 616
456, 197
460, 438

May
June
July
August

457, 575
495, 925
447, 515
461, 661

1,502
2,292
2,501
2,168

52, 579
48,688
46,048
41, 697

September
October
November
December..

540,945
645,988
512, 357
494,665

2,805
1,984
2,190
1,697

46,250
61, 198
85,977
101, 016

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

monthly average. .
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average . _
monthly average. .
monthly average. _
monthly average. .

329, 811
314, 784
331, 971
383, 268
457, 910
522, 309
448, 074

3,016
7,161
31, 297
22, 724
29, 142
58, 334
22, 592

127, 200
192, 343
256, 523
237, 123

1920 monthly average. .
1921 monthly average. .
1922 monthly average. .
1923 monthly average. .
1924 monthly average. .
1925 monthly average..
1926 monthly average. .

395, 093
371, 108
414, 045
427, 407
444,005
456, 643
475, 881

11, 599
3,417
2, 921
2,447
2,253
2,205
2,089

480, 692
378, 932
425, 739
431,009

1935
January
February
March
May
June
July
August

-

September
October
November
December

1936
January
February..
March
April

_

._

TOTAL MEATS

7 48, 182
86,774
103,078

852, 589
810, 258
894, 710
986, 523
935, 767
1, 137, 294
1, 075, 590

813, 465
1, 133, 687
1, 177, 201

824, 727
793, 573
876, 854
854, 349

37, 703
43, 003
35, 830
37, 615
38,047
39, 140
41, 694

82,474
79, 137
53,641
67,540
72,060
73,021
54, 674

968, 944
972, 417
1,067,141
1,229,773
1,216,998
1, 105, 812
1,124,073

1,037,197
843,059
686,477
907, 388
891,992
800,368
673, 535

855, 554
853, 358
928, 766
1, 053, 121
1,078,281
1,024,436
1, 033, 052

2,336
2,294
2,090
1,998

40, 275
34, 953
40,710
40,680

98, 162
101, 163
94,128
87,090

1, 471, 085
1, 137, 307
1, 014, 083
990, 950

1, 019, 995 1, 145, 770
1,099,621
905,536
1, 042, 093
941,396
999,500 , 942, 125

40,698
36,417
39,374
38,870

1,913
1,535
1,349
1,339

40, 761
36, 537
39, 361
38, 698

80,070
76, 586
69,866
64,573

1,032,411
1, 104, 951
1, 029, 700
940,689

905,019
878, 330
790,425
694, 915

1, 024, 010
1,015,978
1, 020, 582
978, 295

.173
.160
.143
.131

40,994
41, 701
34,049
39, 468

1,112
1,435
1,549
1,820

41, 505
42,287
34, 524
39,383

52,550
44,954
50,415
56,696

968,685
1, 174, 542
1, 092, 151
1, 313, 191

561, 759
486, 475
510, 555
615,731

1, 030, 482
1, 197, 608
1, 001, 069
1,090,379

.170
.163
.160
.160

.147
.150
.150
.152

42,684
40,946
47, 611
40,318

2,354
3,346
3,289
2,393

42,526
40, 016
47, 676
41,247

57,168
54,825
52, 399
48, 174

1, 303, 939
1, 041, 266
1, 147, 540
1, 062, 497

696, 102
745, 708
753,063
714, 343

1, 072, 094
867, 345
1, 015, 825
1, 000, 101

465, 155
498,764
495,007
465,917

.160
.160
.162
.160

.159
.162
.170
.170

36,728
39, 818
87,935
40,260

1,697
1,871
1,813
1,929

37, 362
39, 676
37,786
40, 134

48, 033
52, 985
57, 053
58,557

1,062,888
1, 182, 513
1, 101, 739
1, 065, 640

676, 781
705, 720
747, 587
725,269

998, 968
1, 059, 800
1, 003, 518
1,004,433

536, 285
531,354
486, 723
479, 341

.163
.170
.170
.170

.170
.162
.145
.141

45, 485
43, 892
39, 737
45,354

2,234
2,814
3,166
4,519

45,470
43,825
39, 762
44,725

56,135
52,590
53,960
64,210

1,062,297
1,069,797
1, 120, 929
1, 262, 825

618,970
522, 225
531,331
645, 321

1, 119, 198
1,122,016
1,066,817
1, 066, 514

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

! Production from animals slaughtered under Federal inspection reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, given as total dressed
weight, excluding meat from condemned animals. The slaughter under Federal inspection, according to census figures for 1919, amounted to 82 per cent of the total number
of animals slaughtered in the United States in the case of beef and 91 per cent for lamb. Monthly data from 1920, including also exports, storage holdings, apparent consumption, and prices, appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 95. Veal is included in the beef figures and mutton in the lamb figures.
3
Exports, as reported by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, include fresh, canned, pickled, and cured beef.
3
Cold-storage holdings, reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, are distinctly seasonal. No allowance for this had been
made in calculating index numbers. Figures represent storage holdings on the last day of each month. Beef holdings include frozen, cured, and in process of cure, while
lamb holdings embrace frozen lamb and mutton.
4
Apparent consumption, including only meat produced under Federal inspection, has been computed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, from the inspected slaughter, less condemned animals, plus net imports less exports and reexports and the change in cold-storage holdings. Monthly data on total
meats from 1916 appeared in the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 23.
* Wholesale prices are averages for the month -from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6
Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture and include all stocks of beef, pork, and mutton trimmings and edibles offal that have been frozen, cured, or otherwise
prepared for food. Data do not include trimmings that have not been frozen, cured, nor processed, nor sausage or canned-meat products. Data are given for the end of
each7 month. Monthly data from August, 1917, appeared in the April, 1926, issue of the SURVEY (No. 56), p. 20.
Average for five months, August to December, inclusive.




92

Table 68.—CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK

Evaporated

Condensed

i
Case
Case Bulk
goods goods goods

Evaporated
Total

Total

Bulk
goods

Evap«
orated

Condensed

Case
Case Bulk
goods goods goods

Case Bulk
Case
goods goods goods

131,501
122, 014
119, 279
147, 907
141, 712
148, 488

29, 008
16, 987
19, 531
16, 567
15, 777
15, 797

8,979 82, 117
7,365 85, 798
8, 862 79, 457
12, 258 104, 963
12, 001 100, 109
13, 246 100, 704

235, 138
173, 926
137, 225
166, 022
186, 925
161, 388

11, 398
11, 864
11, 430
14, 119
13, 825
16, 626

56, 515 19, 701
31, 375 17, 999
21, 166 9,875
20, 181 18, 505
19, 236 16, 727
29, 792 7,790

EXPORTS £

Case
goods

•e

Total

a

! 5. |

Dolls, per
case

Thousands of pounds
1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av

i

WHOLESALE
PKICES 2

158, 214
123, 661
105, 872
127, 089
150, 693
123, 538

123, 436
116,560
87, 342
104, 558
132, 998
113, 852

29,083
23,346
14, 833
13, 429
14, 119
20,843

81, 890
79, 207
64, 711
79, 750
109, 751
88, 189

11, 846
13, 142
7,504
11, 142
8,870
4,092

9.50
7.06
5.25
6.24
6.99
5.91
5.86

Thous. of pounds

6.01
5.10
4.14
4.71
4.15
4.33
4.42

34, 256 23, 094
24,144 7,825
15, 625 4, 734
16, 180 4,781
17,185 5, 331
12, 314 3,559
9,640 3,226

14, 040
17, 616
13, 325
11, 876

11, 078
9,363
8,688
9,849

12, 793
11, 223
8, 772
8, 285

202, 977
180, 054
159, 593
123, 428

22, 616
18, 070
14, 604
11, 830
'

15, 476
13, 974
11,802
9,161

164, 538
147, 596
133, 093
102, 337

141, 633
132, 579
117, 590
46, 445

16, 766
13, 282
10, 650
2,149

7, 744
6,330
6, 212
4,168

116, 808
112, 553
100, 639
40, 032

1925
January. _.
February .
March
April
__

110, 002
108, 448
136, 887
163, 017

12, 801
12, 508
16, 442
19, 978

9,900 77, 871 9,430
9,036 76, 386 10, 407
12, 337 94, 663 13, 178
13, 690 112, 573 16, 776

91, 205
90, 869
110, 565
140, 713

12, 208
12, 321
13, 554
17, 585

7,066
5,956
5, 537
5,683

71, 857
72S 460
91, 309
117, 321

35, 318
47, 323
69, 330
1G3, 895

2,209
2,628
1, 702
8,273

3,113
2,407
2, 557
2,504

May
June
July
August

213, 162
218, 100
191, 238
155, 436

26, 561 23, 137
22, 022 21, 050
20, 469 14, 979
12, 481 12, 129

141, 552
144, 933
130, 866
109, 591

21, 912
30, 095
24, 924
21, 235

193, 307
187, 636
194, 865
212, 903

31, 035
43, 243
48, 244
46, 757

10, 363
13, 988
11, 795
10, 098

151, 120
129, 947
134, 328
155, 654

154, 681
102, 803
138, 956
163, 453

22, 711
31, 622
38, 621
39, 425

September
October...
November
December.

126, 552
127, 661
97, 057
110, 298

9,815
12, 922
11, 428
12, 137

8,897
12, 073
9,523
12, 205

89, 989
90,286
65, 152
74, 588

17, 851
12, 380
10, 954
11, 368

207, 263
185, 624
165, 682
158, 272

42, 208
34, 792
29, 685
25, 876

7,340 157, 381
6,370 144, 324
4,619 131, 251
4,660 125, 501

159, 310
140, 022
130,317
119,821

1926
January. -_
February _
March
April

120, 475
112, 238
139, 381
160, 154

13, 710
10, 613
12, 459
14, 705

15, 248
14, 634
16, 345
17, 272

82,954
78, 059
97,081
113, 891

8,368
8, 215
10, 732
14, 286

136, 015
118, 346
115,417
128, 496

22, 889
19, 142
17,008
19, 082

5,718
6,081
9,028
10, 829

107, 304
92, 974
89, 225
98, 414

202, 091
228, 070

18, 197
17, 450

25,002
28, 971

138, 982
159, 523

19, 910
22, 126

153, 710
228, 158
242, 102
241, 547

26, 068 15, 701
36, 734 21, 392
37, 285 23, 310
40, 821 23, 136

207, 422
174, 909
137, 491

34, 106
27, 945
23, 935

21, 478
18, 438
13, 714

May
June
July
August

88, 140
83, 125
62, 578
67, 202

September
October
November
December -

11, 162
16, 319
10, 891
11,407
11, 854
8,755
6, 220

I

I

1924
September 128, 051
October___ 121, 329
November 92, 363
December. 97, 212

Evaporated

Condensed
YEAR AND
MONTH
Total

UNSOLD STOCKS i
(end of month)

Condensed

TOTAL STOCKS i
(end of month)

PRODUCTION i

5.81 3.92
5.85 3.89
5.85 3.92
5.87 3.99

20, 084
22, 600
15, 123
10, 862

4,192
6,265
4,306
3,096

15, 892
16, 335
11, 029
7,768

29, 929
42, 187
64, 936
93, 000

5.88
5.88
5.88
5.88

4.16
4.18
4.16
4.08

10, 653
9,661
9, 091
13, 247

4, 701
2,961
2, 674.
3,757

5,952
6,700
6,417
9,490

6,632
8, 157
7,586
3,735

125, 092
62, 568
92, 255
119, 899

5.88
5.88
5.86
5.85

4.09
4.33
4.46
4.51

14, 251
18, 213
15, 771
13, 120

3,519
3, 560
3,962
3,153

10, 732
14, 653
11, 809
9,967

33, 888
28, 489
24, 181
21, 363

3,346
3,210
2, 308
3, 548

121, 745
108, 185
103, 700
94, 775

5.88
5.98
6.03
6.04

4.49
4.50
4.49
4.54

15, 687
10, 323
7,970
9,775

2, 348 13, 339
4,552 5,771
3,316 . 4,654
4, 203 5,572

103, 799
89, 045
82, 613
95, 807

17, 592
14, 909
11, 723
14, 424

3,217
3,822
7,070
4,768

82, 897
70, 187
63, 730
76, 465

6.00
5.95
5.95
5.92

4.72
4.44
4.38
4.36

9,695
8,478
11, 500
12, 946

3,733
3,777
3, 642
3,685

5,962
4,701
7,858
9,261

111, 659
169, 533
181, 287
177, 323

107, 291
167, 693
179, 708
174, 441

20, 439
30, 943
31,931
32, 545

7,073
10, 083
9,138
9,148

79, 518
126, 383
138,475
132, 531

5.86
5.86
5.87
5.75

4.34
4.33
4.33
4.36

9,776
10, 825
9,160
7,992

2,813
3,472
3,537
2,139

6,963
7,353
5,623
5,657

151, 687
123, 346
99, 681

150, 738
133.412
100, 723

26, 711
23, 010
18, 628

8,203
7,869
4,995

115, 700
104, 385
74, 965

5.76 4.45
5.85 4.41
5.85 4.42
5.68 4.48

8,481
7,349
9,268
10, 213

3,001
2,521
2,939
3,454

5,191
4,657
6,115
6,499

1927
January
February .
March
April

i
1

May
June

i
"

!
1

ii

i
j

1 Data on production and stocks from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing practically the entire industry. Production
figures are reported only every three months, while stocks are available currently. Stocks, both total and unsold, are given as of the end of each month, stocks of evaporated bulk goods being included in each total, but omitted in detail on account of the small quantities usually held. Condensed milk is sweetened by the addition of sugar
while evaporated milk is simply milk reduced in volume. The bulk goods are generally destined fflr bakeries, etc., while case goods are for the retail trade.
2
Wholesale prices compiled by U. 8. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, are averages of weekly prices at New York. A case of condensed milk contains
4814-ounce tins while a case of evaporated milk has 48 16-ounce tins. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in December, 1925, issue (No. 52), p, 22.
3 ExDorts are from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.




93

Table 69.—FLUID AND POWDERED MILK AND ICE CREAM
ICE
CREAM

FLUID MILK
Receipts
YEAR AND MONTH

Greater
New
Yorki

Boston
(includ. Philacream) 2 delphia 3
Thousands of quarts

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average.
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average

Production 7

Thousands of
pounds

Baltimore 4

ConProduction,
sumpMinne- tion in
apolis, oleomarSt. Paul « garine 6

POWDERED MILK

Thous. of
gallons

59, 840
60, 520

Production 7

Net
orders 9

Stocks,
Ex- 10
end of
month s ports

Thousands of pounds

1,749

63,600
64, 520
66, 080
70, 520
74, .920

11, 727
12, 193
13, 059

81, 440
85, 760
89, 280
98, 440
99, 640
103, 617

13, 865
14, 116
14, 878
15, 391
15, 930
16, 511

21, 107
21,354
23,461
24,253
24, 003

May
June
July
August

107, 040
110, 440
106, 920

17, 472
19, 388
18,104
17, 227

September
October.
November
December

105, 880
103, 480
99, 840
101, 840

100, 880

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

10,470
11, 098

5,715
7,145

1,549
2,147
2,530
3,634
11, 645
11, 775
7,314
6,395
12, 881
7,092

264
787
516
203
461
304
222

5,026
7,060
5,125
4,528

8,173
8,100
8,280
9,777

286
286
352
291

5,771
5,608
4,643
5,068

4,005
4,523
3,870
3,715

8,634
7,396
6,371
5,954

392
201
376
336

8,080
7,973
10, 481
13, 678

5,874
5,780
8,111
9,549

4,363
4,448
4,893
5,115

5,726
5,774
5,278
7,286

203
190
285
285

23, 115
25, 840

11, 550
13, 036

6,142
6,806
5,837
5,363

9,861
12, 884
14, 599
14, 941

181
178
209
196

5, 031
5,249
4,426
4,366

14, 146
12, 299
10, 292

289
171
213
259

5,944
6,203

7,786
12, 141
13, 224
17, 895
21,005
23, 286

11 4, 876
4,386
5,426
5,564
5,740

12, 357
12, 193
13, 108
15, 284
15, 130
17, 865

4,436
3,566
3,901
5,734
6, 426
6,854

25, 027
27, 635
25, 195
23, 465

7,254
6,867
6,297
6,649

28,212
28,854
26, 413
21, 730

5,189
4,407
4,761
5,318

22, 380
34,647
33, 179
29, 785

11,241
10, 931
8,761
7, 165 •

16, 305
16, 277
15, 649
15, 899

23, 621
23,583
22,905
21, 836

5,981
5,929
5,545
6,051

18, 322
19, 417
20, 255
23, 875

5,708
7,483
7,077
7,133

23, 081
10, 407
8,586
7,761

105, 560
105, 160

16, 010
14, 876
17, 128
16, 800

20, 441
19, 157
22, 032
23, 240

6,465
6,060
6,813
6,720

27, 188
26, 126
29, 153
27,685

6,616
5,972
6,522
5,690

111, 120
111, 040
114, 040
110, 920

18, 231
19, 279
19, 868
18, 027

23, 422
23, 107
24, 213
22, 752

7,824
8,029
6,969
6,761

30, 499
29, 191
25, 229
21, 771

5,134
5,250
4,690
4,651

107, 240
108, 480
101, 880

17, 570
17,758
16, 772

20, 134

6,722
6,538
6,201

19, 070

5,991
6,504
6,891

3,948
4,347
5,170

1935
116,080

_ __ _

1936
January.
February
_
March
April .
May
June..
July..
August

__

92,800

_

September
October
November
December

__
_
.

._

1927
January..
February
March...
April...
May
June
1

""T

Receipts of milk, excluding cream, in the metropolitan area around New York City, including many large cities in New Jersey, from the Milk Reporter. Monthly
data from 1920 appeared in the July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 46. These data have been computed from original figures in 40-quart cans, previously shown in the survey.
2
Receipts of milk at Boston by rail, including cream, from the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the July, 1922, issue
(No. 11), p. 46.
3 Receipts at Philadelphia, including cream and condensed milk, from the Philadelphia Milk Exchange, with current figures given by the Interstate Milk Producers'
Association. Monthly data from 1920 were given in the September, 1922, issue (No. 13), p. 50, and later data in the August, 1924, issue (No. 36), p. 155.
4
Receipts at Baltimore from Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, estimated to represent more than 90 per cent of the total milk receipts in that city.
5
Production of whole milk by members of the Twin City Milk Association, including most of the area within a 40-inile radius of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Monthly
data6 from 1920 appeared in the July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 46.
Data from U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, showing consumption of milk in the manufacture of oleomargarine. Monthly data from July, 1921
appeared in the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 25.
7 Data from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing practically complete production, but reported only every three months,
Monthly data from 1920 on production of powdered milk appeared in the October, 1925, issue (No. 50), p. 26.
8
Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Stocks comprise powdered milk derived from whole milk, skim milk and unskimmed
milk as of the end of the month and include both case and bulk goods, the former being comparatively small. Monthly data from 1920, divided as between case and bulk
goods, are given in the November, 1925, issue (No. 51), p. 23.
8
Compiled by the American Dry Milk Institute from 31 identical firms which in 1924 produced 61 per cent of the totals as compiled by the Department of Agriculture
Monthly data from 1924 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 19. Data on stocks held by 21 institute members appeared in October, 1925, issue (No. 50), p. 26.
The 10
association reports also include production and unit prices of members.
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,
11
Six months' period, July to December, inclusive.




94

Table 70.—BUTTER, CHEESE, AND EGGS
BUTTER

CHEESE
® 3

YEAR AND
MONTH

Production
(factory) i

Apparent
consumption 2

ColdReceipts storage
holdat 5
ings,
markets s creamery 4

mo. av
mo. av_.
mo. av__
mo. av__
mo. av__
mo. av__
mo. av__

129, 466
143, 811
149, 671
155, 584
161, 175
163, 875

33, 563
39, 012
43, 893
45, 448
48, 956
47, 666
47, 745

59, 754
52, 623
50, 959
47, 074
73, 665
61, 665
67, 693

.586
.429
.403
.464
.418
.459
.439

32, 693
31, 930
33, 531
35, 852
39, 024
41, 917

31, 304
31, 709
33, 992
35, 733
38, 956

145, 478
164, 253
158, 920
136, 738

200, 764
189, 342
182, 636
177, 029

56, 838
74, 171
69, 970
55, 064

13, 036
63, 687
109, 075
128, 403

.420
.429
.434
.448

55, 562

108, 325
104, 520
85, 492
91, 136

171, 882
167, 629
142, 082
150, 393

45, 005
43, 463
35, 455
36, 199

114, 172
94, 916
74, 754
52, 785

.488
.554
.511
.489

94,436
90,839

138, 165
131, 461
142, 617
147, 225

39, 424
39, 507
46, 077
45, 501

39, 381
26, 313
17, 392
17, 527

184, 452
185, 795
178, 825
181, 506

54, 464
75, 931
68, 393

173, 808
167, 692
158, 407

September ..
October
November..
December...

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

1

38, 336

1925
Mav
June
July..
August

1936
January
February
March
April

80, 539
54, 572
49, 737
67, 229 $0. 593

71, 965
87, 912
96, 126
104, 268
113, 007
113, 460

108, 410
115, 060
147, 758
168, 525

Dolls,
perlb.

Thousands of pounds

51,588
138, 109
123, 796
126, 844

ColdRe- storceipts age
Exports
Coldat 5 holdProduc- storage Whole mar- ings
sale
tion* bold- price 9 kets a (case4
6
Can4
U.S.
ings
eggs)
ada 7

ColdAppar- ReProduc- entcon- ceipts storage Im- 6
tion i sump- 5 mar- hold- ports
3
tion* kets
ings 4

per Ib.

1

63, 293
66, 107
70, 833

1920 mo. av..
1921 mo. av..
1922 mo. av_.
1923 mo. av..
1924 mo. av..
1925 mo. av__
1926 mo av

ogg
PA

American 8

Total, all varieties

Dolls,

Thousands of pounds

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

-s
«s
®u»

EGGS

4,632
221
4,623
316
3,235 5,246
2,376 4,508
528 4,448
630 4,034
944 1,180

12, 942
12, 076
11, 442
16, 081
16, 492
14, 573

10, 533
11, 135
11, 104

16, 189

83, 887
41, 599
53, 805

14, 055
16, 695
16, 655
18, 254
17, 921
18, 488
17, 324

52, 917
43, 939
41, 637
52, 431
66, 536
6S, 489
72, 673

1,333
2,239
3,881
5,368
4,931
5,200

1,358
981
417
694
358
766
325

12, 562
11, 221

49, 366
44, 334
36, 616
39, 026

18, 530
24, 020
25, 825
22, 472

42, 888
61, 992
83, 568
95, 472

4, 333

388
482
351
319

8,721
25, 660
23, 508

43, 726
41, 275
31, 557
29, 289

42,450

20, 520

49, 980
40, 143
38, 409

21,029
17, 059
14, 012

97, 777
90, 866
84, 561
76, 649

279
353
345
381

.447
.449
.408
.392

27, 667
27, 888
34, 729
37, 681

39, 057
37, 214
43, 778
42, 198

14, 854
13, 568
15, 056
15, 531

67, 531
58, 175
51, 285
47, 452

4,788

.404
.409
.403
.422

47, 686
55, 328

44, 059
45, 385
36, 060
36, 542

14, 973
21, 777
21, 972

52, 167
68, 771
90, 053
98, 473

5,165

50,476

30, 561
86, 897
131, 152
138, 151

44, 761
38, 166
34, 180
36, 054

125, 342
100, 871
64, 377
34, 355

.446
.462
.493
.528

43, 705

18,231

45,423

19, 252

95, 385
89, 785
81, 084
71, 920

7,449
9,722

64,180
58, 661
51, 292

40,636

20,735

15,954

42, 774

15, 984

12,684

9,546
9,732

3,372

0

22, 079
20, 607
23, 486
21, 224
21, 811
23, 567
25, 676
27, 058
28, 937

Thousands of
cases 10

28, 995
26, 125
47, 590
34, 646
41, 442 $0. 310

1,224

3,069
3,504
3,367
4,156

37, 559
30, 066
30, 675
39, 579
49, 483
52, 056
56, 956

.280
.216
.211
.241
.203
.234
.227

1,079
1,251
1,335
1, 391
1,284
1,290
1,300

3,261
4,171
5,137
5, 355
4,597
5,309
4,943

29,550

.214
.226
.230
.241

2,193
1,315
1,042

7,712
9,482
10,024
9,873

930
709
433
625

8,612
6,322
3,786
1,683

6,312

3,131
4, 6-11
4, 872

5,908
5,087
6,520

11, 102

43,706

66,634

37, 659

76, 512

22, 646
25, 748
17, 469
12, 461

31, 548
28, 253
20, 349
18, 619

78, 582
66, 495
58, 457

.241
.252
.254
.246

2,668
2,580
2,548

50, 339
42, 587
38, 041
35, 597

.245
.243
.222
.200

906
1,070
1,741

1,303

17, 668
18, 237
22, 784
24, 656

2,087

578
77
872
3,735

3,280
6,667

32, 393
39, 133

39, 346
54, 069

20, 681
19, 903

81, 297

.199
.209
.212
.218

2,251
2,115
1,385
1,083

7,236
9,133
9,845
9,573

323
252
341
356

6,848

46, 468

351
261
309
254

5,424
6,819

38, 012
45, 782

340
335
432
348

5,963
4,459
4,046

19, 343
23, 449
18, 601
13, 635

77, 646
72, 491
63, 881
54, 495

.231
.246
.245
.249

932
699
581
751

8,048
5, 888
3, 215
1,111

71,913

73,681

2,025

1927
February
April

May
June

!

1

1

i

1 Data from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing practically complete factory production, but reported only every three
months. Total production figures covering cheese, which include cottage, pot and bakers' cheese, are shown monthly from 1920, and American cheese production from 1917
in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 23.
2
Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing the disappearance of butter or cheese into trade. These data are computed from production (comprising actual factory data plus allowance for production on farms), imports, and the difference in cold-storage holdings. Monthly data on
butter from 1917 appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 23, and on cheese from 1920, in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 29.
3
Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, covering Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco, and representing total of weekly figures with first and last weeks of month prorated.
4 Cold-storage holdings at end of month reported by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing about 98 per cent of stocks held
in public and private cold-storage warehouses. Monthly data on total cheese hoMin?s from 1917 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 23.
s Average pf weekly prices of creamery butter, 92 score at Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco, as compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
6
Imports and exports for the United States from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign ana Domestic Commerce, representing all classes of cheese. Monthly
data from 1909 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 23.
? Exports from Canada from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Yearly figures through 1925 represent monthly averages for the Canadian
fiscal year ended March 31 of the year indicated.
8
American cheese figures are for whole milk cheese only and do not include cheese made from part skim milk, these latter usually totaling from 1 to 2 per cent of the
American whole milk output.
» Average of weekly prices of American cheese, No. 1 fresh twins, at Boston, New York, Wisconsin, Chicago, and San Francisco, as compiled by the U. S. Department
of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
10
One case of eggs equals 30 dozen, or about 45 pounds net.
11
Five months' average, August to December, inclusive.




95

Table 71.—SUGAR
WHOLESALE
EXPRICE 2
PORTS i

RAW CANE SUGAR
Imports *

YEAR AND MONTH

Receipts,
Louisi8
From
From ana crop Meltings
Hawaii foreign at New 4
and
Orleans
P. R. countries

RETAIL
PRICE 2

CUBAN MOVEMENTS

(raw)

Stocks Refined, Raw, Gran96°
at recen- ulated, Gran- Index, Receipts, Exports
Cuban
fineries, includ- trifu- in ulated, 51
ing
bbls., N. Y. cities
end of
ports
gal,
month 6 maple N. Y. N. ¥.

Long tons

Dollars per pound

Eel. to
1913

Stocks,
end of
month

Long tons

2,953
1,926
14, 524
35, 838
58, 812
37, 602
15, 152

$0. 035
.038
.047
.058
.063
.064

$0. 043
.047
.056
.069
.077
.078

$0. 049
.053
.059
.075
.088
.094

100
108
120
146
169
176

134, 225
125, 726
210, 908
246, 245
201, 760
272, 066

129, 447
120, 972
209, 971
237, 004
204, 422
265, 707

115, 706
106, 017
158, 830
191, 101
175, 770
184, 473
202, 648
323, 541

54, 891
34, 371
34, 739
68, 341
16, 520
16, 381
28, 228
7,957

.075
.130
.048
.047
.070
.060
.043
.043

.089
.126
.062
.059
.084
.075
.055
.055

.104
.182
.077
.066
.094
.084
.064
.061

205
353
146
132
184
167
131
125

328, 360
288, 281
291, 342
357, 892
290, 609
332, 554
420, 238
384, 321

323, 441
647, 341
274, 811
410, 287
233, 140 1, 047, 721
428, 302
617, 799
290, 065
395, 339
332, 035
455, 115
411, 793
713, 576
388, 866
816, 549

460, 822
478, 833
482, 824
438,767

325, 906
376, 868
323, 649
235, 725

32, 258
34, 699
49, 457
67, 327

.043
.044
.043
.044

.055
.055
.053
.054

.062
.062
.061
.062

131
131
129
127

615, 616
309, 213
201, 791
179, 225

447, 557
487, 380
336, 775
333, 938

1, 290, 663
1, 121, 345
970, 025
822, 799

None.
835
25, 248
27,583

459, 875
385, 647
262, 894
349, 139

187, 739
94, 511
92, 709
120, 146

40, 624
21, 614
19, 131
10, 728

.043
.039
.040
.041

.054
.050
.051
.053

.062
.059
.058
.058

127
124
120
122

158, 009
125, 012
88,119
181, 448

371, 200
281, 210
262, 855
327, 298

594, 378
460, 709
292, 119
132, 148

233, 821
434, 095
453,128
460, 240

28, 386
1,980
258
136

367, 439
444, 259
497, 912
464, 740

89, 144
178, 803
290, 061
461, 857

6,553
9,645
16, 141
11, 195

.042
.042
.040
.041

.051
.052
.049
.052

.058
.060
.059
.058

122
122
122
120

611, 099
769, 537
920, 480
757, 373

379, 723
445, 215
454, 631
465, 263

364, 430
684, 263
1,107,066
1. 452, 146

172, 569
May
June
.....
. . . . . ... 151, 174
July
83, 537
58,206
August
......
.....

364,473
385, 027
284,411
313, 841

362
378
854
564

452, 681
491, 389
465, 144
453, 226

519, 595
541, 467
425, 902
341, 803

6,671
8,793
11, 692
7,095

.042
.041
.042
.042

.055
.054
.056
.055

.060
.061
.061
.062

122
126
126
127

354, 890
254, 748
163, 014
164, 744

360, 464
357, 859
300, 955
445,900

1, 442, 231
1, 327, 592 ;
1, 195, 658
935, 416

September
October

326, 105
299, 863
352, 569
221, 927'

228
157
17, 722
11, 148

448,043
471, 192
347, 156

287, 655
222, 129
277, 687
246, 391

5,464
4,213
2,417
5,604

.044
.046
.047
.051

.056
.057
.058
.061

.062
.064
.064
.065

127
129
129
133

186, 580
197, 350
169, 202
62,829

473, 190
434, 253
342, 124
206, 816

603, 469
390, 989
225, 592
69, 741

1909-1913 monthly av
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average

63, 336
66, 890
67, 984
69, 756
75, 683
80, 581
65, 951

175, 664
201, 437
196, 569
205, 716
183, 802
192, 219

16, 184
10, 109
8,501
14, 050
9,545
7,286

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

69, 322
70, 803
74, 572
68, 436
63, 575
79, 142
100, 257
96,486

261, 149
298, 686
222, 005
362, 040
286, 806
307, 724
332, 711
344, 125

8,154
4,704
8,812
9,236
14, 102
6,601
4,952
5,181

326, 547
334, 981
296,130
429, 002
345, 730
378, 937
426, 075

144, 962
144, 345
118, 844
103, 961

406, 475
386, 492
324, 997
287, 018

102
623
557
124

98, 530
70, 940
21, 307
17, 939

320, 562
240, 030
220, 123
226, 953

1926
January
. . . . . . 58, 309
.....
144, 273
February
....
...
150,677
March . . . . .
.....
183,482
April
. ..

r

242, 583
280, 333
364, 179
436, 913
308, 662
592, 065

1925
May
June
July
August

_

-_--. _

....
....

September - ....._
October
November
....
...
T}£C<vmbeT

m

mm

....
....

"NYwp.mhfir

December

56, 798
61, 505
26, 827
20, 475

1927
January
February
March
April
May

June
1
Imports of raw cane sugar and exports of refined from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports from foreign countries are
mostly from Cuba and Central America while sugar from the Philippine Islands is also included in the imports from foreign countries, not in the data from noncontiguous
territories, including Hawaii and Porto Bico. The original data in pounds have been converted into long tons for comparison with the other data.
2
Wholesale price of raw sugar, duty paid, wholesale and retail prices of granulated sugar in New York, and retail price index for 51 cities from U. S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices, except retail prices which are as of the 15th of the month.
3
Statistics of receipts at Cuban ports, exports from Cuba, and stocks at Cuban ports from Statistical Sugar Trade Journal. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the
June, 1922, issue of the SURVEY (No. 10), p. 49.
4
Receipts of the Louisiana cane crop at New Orleans from the Statistical Sugar Trade Journal. These receipts total about half of the total domestic cane sugar production.
6
Meltings of raw sugar by refiners compiled by the Statistical Sugar Trade Journal represent operations at the eight ports of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Savannah, New Orleans, Galveston, and San Francisco, the Baltimore figures being added in 1921 upon completion of refinery in that city. The figures from the*
four North Atlantic ports are actual monthly totals; those for San Francisco, Savannah, and Galveston are prorated from weekly totals; while the New Orleans figures are
prorated from partly estimated figures. Stocks represent the amount of raw sugar in the hands of refiners and of certain importers (the bulk of stocks being in refiners'
hands) at the end of each month for the four North Atlantic ports and on the Saturday nearest to the end of each month for the other ports, the total being considered as
of the last day of the month. Details of meltings and stocks, by ports, are given in the Statistical Sugar Trade Journal: also classification as between importers' and refiners"
stocks.




96

Table 72.—COFFEE, TEA, POULTRY, AND FISH
COFFEE i

YEAR AND MONTH

Receipts
in
World United Brazil
total States

Clearances
from Brazil
To
Total U.S.

11,819
11, 371
9,468
9,280

U.S.2

Thous. Dolls,
oflbs. per Ib.

Thousands of bags

1909-1913 mo av
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av
1919 monthly av

Imports
into

1,835
1,577
1,727
2,017
2,611
1,851
1,213

955
1,151
1,072
1,249
1,009
1,261
762

990
1,207
1,103
1,261
1,014
813
831

393
491
474
544
610
536
359

75, 659 0.113
71, 044 .107
84, 256 .080
102, 438 .075
97, 241 .094
107, 209 .091
91, 788 .098
111, 130 .178

Imports
into
U.S.2

Stocks
in
United
Kingdom *

Thous. of Ibs.

8,241
7,418
8,151
8,842
8,814
10, 566
11, 044
6,747

107, 127
96, 338
107, 053
110, 784
67, 040
90, 408
153, 759

POULTRY
Price, Formosa
fine, New York 3

Visible supply,
end of month

TEA

Price, Rio No. 7,
Brazil grades.
N. Y.3

1

FISH

Canned salmon
Cold
Total
Cold
Receipts storage catch, storage
hold- prin- holdat 5
ings
ings
cipal
marof Ship- Exports
kets « (end of fishing 7 U5th 6 ments Canada •
mo.)6 ports
mo.)
U.S.s

Dolls,
per Ib.

Thousands of pounds

0.242
.249
.248
.240
.240
.318
.358
.353

10 13, 518
10 13, 549
10 14, 300
16, 936
15, 999
44, 032
18, 549
64, 798
17, 358

62, 501
61, 764

36, 604
106, 083
60, 167
85, 313
83, 875
76, 000
82, 833

106, 813
53, 396
75,729
55, 896
93, 875
134, 938
116, 476

Cases

1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly a v
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av

7,941
8,913
8,730
5,863
4,857
5,145
4,619

1,695
1,686
1,087
903
726
736
779

558
1,064
894
916
1,186
984
1,043

891
1,003
1,036
1,175
1,157
1,105
1,156

637
513
499
625
582
590
625

108, 118
111, 956
103, 837
117, 321
118, 047
106, 915
124, 443

.120
.072
.103
.115
.168
.203
.182

7,567
6,374
8,093
8,927
7,701
8,437
7,994

213, 843
211, 666
187, 796
151, 357
159, 665
192, 428

.337
.240
.303
.310
.316
.350
.355

18, 239
21, 355
23, 559
28, 397
30, 265
26, 733
30, 178

46, 146
50, 278
54, 276
68, 045
64, 990
82,046
70, 373

15, 675
13, 608
16, 260
16, 023
17, 005
19, 901
21, 999

45, 296
44, 355
35, 311
36, 210
45, 041
44, 084
46, 026

1935
May
June
July
August

5,123
5,009
5,126
5,118

537
713
804
859

498
716
1,094
1,173

618
1,242
1,235
1,487

292
676
701
794

79, 548
87, 967
118, 493
97, 696

.186
.216
.197
.207

4,183
4,819
9,536
10, 144

188, 964
178, 900
162, 286
165, 129

.350
.350
.350
.350

16, 354
17, 918
17, 932
14, 466

68, 126
58, 562
53, 558
47, 946

17, 167
25, 261
24, 539
26, 839

23, 749
31, 980
40, 458
47, 474

September
October
November
December .

5,087
5,082
5,035
5,080

716
583
789
888

1,494
1,262
1,144
1, 187

1, 434
1,536
1,269
1,195

705
680
758
731

133, 463
111, 920
115, 225
128, 371

.212
.195
.185
.171

11, 993
13, 088
11, 067
10,468

180, 327
181, 676
188, 859
203, 654

.350
.350
.350
.353

18, 804
27, 507
62, 272
68, 385

44, 345
53, 787
86, 733
111, 501

28, 184
21, 186
15, 174
9,401

55, 447 1, 205, 930
58,358 1, 100, 958
61, 849
503, 149
58, 048 659, 033

212, 619
216, 615
201, 648
196, 333

1936
January
. _. _
February
March
April
„_ _».. .

4,753
4,761
4,747
4,464

685
798
743
694

1,157
939
1,056
761

1,007
1,236
1,071
1,235

572
610
649
353

143, 268
122, 965
146, 048
129, 064

.185
.191
.182
.183

7,546
7,080
5,776
4,891

209, 655
202, 300
195, 388
179, 891

.355
.355
.355
.355

26, 765
19, 181
17, 638
13, 992

108, 512
95, 397
73, 124
52, 783

13,644
14, 756
23, 751
18, 539

48, 181
37, 378
24, 894
16, 154

325, 612
282, 987
368, 154
152, 126

115, 042
81, 854
94, 083
40, 313

May
June
July
August

4,387
4,491
4,560
4,738

583
647
691
832

748
901
1,072
1,117

893
889
1,217
1,289

554
511
653
684

85, 424
104, 720
116, 702
122, 922

.198
.201
.198
.192

3,149
4,907
9,025
10, 056

163, 408
155, 595
148, 207
156, 850

.355
.355
.355
.355

16, 519
21, 311
20, 974
23, 164

42, 808
36, 730
35, 793
38, 634

22, 220
27, 929
29, 564
32, 043

21, 540 . 177, 464
31,345 368, 619
45, 606 581, 072
57, 627 840, 065

27, 146
19, 208
22, 708
100, 321

September
October.
November
December

4,663
4,601
4,564
4,701

912
899
888
978

1,053
1,108
1,215
1,389

1,240
1,363
1,269
1,159

694
780
721
716

105, 163
159, 567
120, 518
136, 955

.177
.161
.163
.153

12, 148
11, 057
10, 737
9,559

175, 012
186, 861
196, 626

.355
.355
.355
.350

24,579
31, 105
69, 991
76, 919

44, 771
64,842
106, 854
144, 230

24, 414
23, 762
19, 924
13, 439

64, 657 1, 237, 767
70, 309
836, 374
75, 034 543, 333
69, 585

130, 796
245, 660
245, 883
121, 965

467, 086
471, 438
541, 804
513, 446

132, 926
279, 022
604, 231
757, 479

42, 063
20, 813
51, 915
135,306 1

1937
January
February
March _
April
May
June _ _

1 Data on coffee, except imports and prices, from the New York Coffee and Sugar Exchange, Inc. Receipts in Brazil cover the ports of Rio and Santos, while clearances
are from Rio, Santos, and Victoria, and in the case of the United States, from Bahia also. A bag of coffee averages 132 pounds. Monthly data for 1920 and 1921 appeared
in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 102, and for 1922 in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 156.
2
Imports of coffee and tea from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices in the New York wholesale markets, except that prior
tp 1918, the prices are averages of quotations on the first day of the month.
* Compiled by the British Board of Trade, representing the quantity of tea remaining in bonded warehouses in the United Kingdom or entered to be warehoused on
the last day of the month. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 26.
fi Receipts at the markets of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Foreign and
Domestic Commerce, are totals of weekly figures with overlapping weeks prorated. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
6
Cold-storage holdings at principal warehouses compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Poultry holdings are given as of the
end 7of the month, with fish holdings as of the 15th of the month. Monthly data from 1920 on poultry appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
Fish catch, representing landings of fresh fish from vessels at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., Portland, Me., and Seattle, Wash., compiled by II. S, Department of
Commerce, Bureau of Fisheries. Details by ports are given in monthly statements. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 97 and 98.
8
Shipments of canned salmon from Puget Sound, Astoria, Portland, Oreg, (except small rail shipments), San Francisco, and in bond through Prince Rupert, B. C.,
representing practically complete pack of the United States, including Alaska, reported by Pacific Canned Fish Brokers' Association, in cases of 48 one-pound*cans to the
case.
9
Canadian exports of canned salmon from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Yearly figures represent monthly averages for the Cana dian fiscal year ending March 31 of the year indicated.
10 Excluding Portland and Seattle.



97

Table 73.—TOBACCO
UNMANUFACTURED

MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS
Wholesale
price s

Stocks 4
(quarterly)
Sales,
Production loose-leaf Exports,
Chewing,
(crop l
waresmoking,
estimate) houses 2 leafs
snuff, and
export
types

YEAR AND MONTH

Cigar
types

Burley, ManuTotal,
good factured
including
leaf,
imported dark red, tobacco
and
types
Louissnuff
ville
Dolls, per
100 Ibs.

Thousands of pounds

1Q18 monthly avftra,gft

996, 176
953, 734
1, 034, 679
1, 062, 237
1, 153, 278
1,249,276
1, 439, 071

1919 monthly average __ .
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
_.
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average _ _

1, 465, 481
1, 582, 225
1, 069, 693
1, 246, 837
1, 515, 110
1, 251, 343
1, 376, 628
1, 323, 388

1909-1913 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average _ _
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average

Consumption 6
(tax-paid withdrawals)

Large
cigars

Thous.
of Ibs.

31, 417
36, 754
28, 827
35, 877
39, 784
21, 186
33,656

810, 469
835, 462
915, 452
821, 564
923, 240
975, 427

369, 802
344, 971
361, 114
286, 007
275, 770
291, 214

1, 234, 014
1, 224, 524
1, 343, 396
1, 165, 332
1, 250, 801
1, 337, 747

$13. 20
14. 65
13.79
15.23
22.30
36.57

36, 990
36, 745
36, 863

6 82, 149
65, 280
74, 254
41, 601
42, 028
40, 344
52, 398

63, 828
38, 946
42, 946
35, 907
41, 434
48, 005
39, 200
39, 897

1, 030, 642
1, 026, 109
1, 227, 487
1, 121, 075
1, 207, 714
1, 329, 960
1, 383, 519
1, 408, 152

303, 343
327, 185
344, 617
386, 091
404, 584
410, 435
398, 243
400, 272

1, 402, 525
1, 440, 507
1,650,022
1, 587, 422
1, 689, 639
1, 814, 686
1, 864, 016
1, 879, 602

93, 551
51, 833
14, 556
4, 307

36, 150
24, 127
32, 475
30, 850

1, 282, 916
1, 234, 096

1,156
239
69
39, 144

22, 415
27, 460
39, 037
34, 890

1,247,011
1, 228, 972
1, 264, 226
1, 376, 628

91, 682
98, 657
112, 615
120, 972

50, 694
52, 784
51, 141
68, 375

111, 199
83, 462
25, 210
15, 078

46, 891
47, 147
36, 167
43, 388

4,189
7,660
582
34, 772

27, 431
30, 762
29, 760
26, 263

102, 691
131, 891
141, 000

38, 319
53, 129
49, 136
50, 375

Exports a

Small
cigarettes Cigarettes

Thousands

38, 847
40, 248
41, 423

630, 959
597, 849
549, 932
586, 844
629, 991
587, 796

1, 296, 308
1, 404, 636
1, 497, 029
2, 107, 525
2, 944, 272
3, 888, 075

193, 234
200, 602
173, 015
354, 889
584, 977
1, 012, 128

32.35
34.18
29.28
27.50
27.78
26.03
24.79
22.42

35, 339
33, 324
32, 208
35, 019
34, 342
34, 415
34, 186
34, 173

589, 363
661, 418
563, 218
574, 383
583, 241
554, 867
541, 729
549, 077

4, 426, 649
3, 720, 072
4, 240, 181
4, 463, 752
5, 370, 890
5, 917, 368
6, 663, 134
7, 453, 926

1, 350, 981
1, 319, 489
711, 973
956, 334
1, 027, 303
882, 616
678, 803
791, 278

24.50
24.50
24.50
24.50

35, 457
33, 172
34, 346
34, 159

474, 803
451, 562
504, 304
493, 775

6, 652, 475
5, 681, 227
6, 270, 421
6, 048, 354

707, 071
734,952
720, 837
969, 566

24.50
25.00
25.00
25.00

34, 338
34, 630
35, 653
35, 358

514, 509
569, 743
575, 823
557, 432

6, 465, 490
7, 434, 013
7, 612, 281
6,983,027

1, 004, 479
709, 665
316, 902
714, 978

25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00

36, 054
38, 061
30, 342
28, 657

575, 764
711, 222
598, 478
473,336

7, 119, 055
6, 925, 427
6, 516, 922
6, 248, 920

336, 145
488, 130
499, 756
943, 158

25.00
25.00
25. 00
25. 00

34, 411
34,054
37, 428
33, 891

433, 673
451, 204
564, 245
509, 133

6, 943, 815
6, 240, 142
7, 633, 201
6, 972, 836

851, 531
513, 193
906, 029
946, 711

22.60
21.00
21.00
21.00

34, 380
36,, 327
33,648
35, 809

507, 253
576, 562
568, 553
594, 242

7, 257, 751
8, 486, 335
7, 961, 032
8, 068, 005

866, 705
1, 061, 448
726, 669
819, 569

21.00
21.00
21.00
21.00

36, 224
34, 731
30, 955
28, 218

600, 016
664, 497
654, 975
646, 574

8, 086, 274
8, 060, 677
7, 345, 202
6, 391, 844

762, 387
654, 013
611, 998
775, 081

1925

January
February
March _
April

_

May
June
July
August

-.-

September
October
November
December

1, 522, 217

422, 966

2, 035, 678

1, 337, 784

423, 975

1, 847, 225

1,289", 447

389, 913

1, 754, 596

1, 384, 627

356, 119

1, 818, 564

1926

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

1, 139, 251
1, 202, 884

September
October
November
December

1, 306, 494
1, 293, 918
1, 304, 494
1, 323, 388

_

1, 531, 617

433, 479

2, 040, 067

1, 372, 438

424, 460

1, 868, 296

1, 312, 142

389, 178

1, 768, 399

1, 416, 412

353, 973

1, 841, 645

1927

January
February
March
April
May
June

___

_

1 Estimate of production of the tobacco crop from the 17. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The annual figures represent the latest revised
estimates of the year's total crop, not monthly averages, while the monthly figures represent the current estimate of the total crop for the year made the first week of each
month. Revisions of the December estimate for each year are made in December of the following year.
2 Sales of tobacco from k>9se-leaf warehouses compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics from reports of State authorities of Kentucky,
North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, which States grow about 75 per cent of the total tobacco crop. Sales from Kentucky were not available for the first six
months of 1919, so that the year's figure is partly estimated by estimating the Kentucky figures for the first half year as equal to the sum of the sales in the other reporting
States, which is approximately the normal proportion of Kentucky sales to the total.
a Exports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
* Stocks of leaf tobacco held by manufacturers and dealers compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. During the years 1913, 1914,1915,
and 1916 the data were collected semiannually in March and September, the quarterly collection commencing with December, 1916, Therefore the averages for the years
19136through 1915 are semiannual, while for 1916 three quarters are averaged, and thereafter four quarters.
Wholesale price of burley, good leaf, dark red tobacco at Louisville is average for the month compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6
Figures of consumption of tobacco products from U, S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, represent withdrawals from bonded warehouses upon payment of tax for domestic consumption. The figures for manufactured tobacco and snuff comprise plug, twist, fine-cut, and smoking tobacco and snuff. Figures for cigars
are those for large cigars, weighing over 3 pounds per thousand, while for cigarettes, small cigarettes are taken, weighing 3 pounds per thousand or less; in both cases the
series taken represent over 90 per cent of the totals for each class.
 2(^46°—27
T


98

SHIP
CLEARANCES i

VESSEL
LOSSES 2
(quarterly)

Completed
during
month s

Vessels in foreign
trade
YEAR AND
MONTH

Lost
Amer- Forican
eign

SHIP CONSTRUCTION

Abandoned
Total

Total

Under
construction

World (quarterly) 4

FREIGHT
BATES

Table 74.—OCEAN TRANSPORTATION
IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION

United States
citizens 5

Aliens «

Passports
CharUnder con- ter
issued 6
Steel Merrates Immi- Emi- Arrivals Deparsea- chant Launched struction
end of
tures
world grants grants
going vessels
month
routes
(7)

Thousands8 of net
tons

Thous. No. of Thous. No. of Thous. Rel. to
of gross ships of gross ships of gross 1911-13
tons 8
tons8
av.
tons 8

Gross tons 8

1913 mo. av.
1914 mo. av_
191 5 mo av
1916mo.av_
1917 mo. av.
1918 mo. av.
1919 mo. av_

1,250
1,000
1,340
1,537
1,666
1,563
2,083

3,333
3,017
2,826
2,895
2,467
2,184
2,189

4,483
4,017
4,166
4,433
4,133
3,748
4,271

31, 075
38, 378
44, 398
32, 960
66, 781
101, 420
42, 411

10, 895
13, 495
19, 772
13, 512
11,452
9,596
6,910

1920 mo. av.
1921 mo. av.
1922 mo. av.
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av.

2,836
2,507
2,639
2,329
2,503
2,329
2,378

2,816
2,704
2,756
3,228
3,232
3,525
4,209

5,653
5,211
5,395
5,556
5,735
5,854
6,587

62, 090
48, 291
28, 842
31, 216
31, 772
21, 527

8,556
15, 272
34, 173
171, 683
168, 445
35,845

2,439
2,481

5,957
6,378
6,833
6,917

15, 101

37, 149

2,578
2,586

3,518
3,897
4,255
4,331

September,
October
November .
December..

2,450
2,991
2,451
2,003

3,789
3,581
3,220
3,328

6,239
6,572
5,671
5,331

12, 349

3,477

36, 595

5,048

1926
January
February. _
March
4.pril

1,600
1,590
1,721
1,838

3,016
2,929
3,313
3,383

4,616
4,519
5,034
5,221

June
July

2,536
2, 640
3,149
2,567

3,529
4,445
5,275
5,325

6,065
7,086
8, 424
7,892

September.
October
November.
December..

2,554
2,908
3,063
2,366

5,103
5,033
4,638
4,522

7,657
7,940
7,701
6,888

28, 846
26, 354
9,548
27, 094
50, 895
155, 110
294,849
\

1,236

238, 394
115, 569
28, 246
24, 099
17, 507
17, 595
19,006

208, 557
102, 157
13, 239
9,774
10, 854
11,068
13, 573

1,188
546
231
197
173
186
260

31, 826
18, 687
30, 101
8,415

16,200
9,767
21, 951
1,631

177
186
157
155

21, 758
17, 516
9,844
13, 096

17, 191
12, 210
3,283
9,339

162
170
186
232

8,629
7,578
33, 016
22, 874

4,517
312
28,850
18, 096

268
251
228
229

16, 377
22, 819
14, 009
19, 423

7,179
13, 724
8,389
13, 384

223
199
254
275

11,317
12, 414
23, 237
36, 376

6,244
9,648
20, 934
31, 605

281
273
317
314

18, 836
46, 225
86, 192
226, 773
354, 845

438
330
186
241
278
467
621
440
344
213
163
218
203

1,466
1,085
617
410
505
542'
419

212

100

833
713
300
422
735
1,362
1,786

Number of people

384

115, 610
57,375
21, 557
29, 647
12, 747
9,660
20, 613

22,859
24,470
13, 387
5,810
5,638
6,718
21, 810

24, 600
23, 238
10, 161
11, 208
8,187
6,564
10, 839

30,069
24, 580
8,954
10, 321
14, 161
27,909
12, 247

1,954
1,693
1,093
1,927
3,135
4,735
8,163

272
160
114
108
106
99

59, 047
46, 992
31, 764
62, 587
29, 564
24,227

21, 810
20, 498
9,664
5,884
7,510
6,807

17,038
19, 272
24, 296
23, 020
26,839
30, 550

21, 102
23, 340
24, 209
21, 728
25, 137
28, 569

13, 374
11,474
11,463
10, 521
12, 198
14, 342
14, 669

26,045
25, 304
18, 590
22, 421

8,403
5,747
8,784
7,539

22, 540
27, 347
26, 326
49, 922

20, 262
39, 289
66, 136
37, 185

31,985
26, 359
13, 830
9,370

26, 721
28, 685
26, 642
21, 089

7,200
7,674
6,555
8,840

68,500
35, 413
23, 118
18, 027

24,369
24, 227
18,039
19, 270

8,795
8,012
7,776
8,172

19, 072
20, 041
29, 504
33, 400

5,286
3,232
3,457
4,989

19, 695
23, 687
29, 987
28, 931

25, 987
29, 108
25, 215
26, 312

9,054
8,411
16, 502
27, 239

33, 533
24,790
22, 283
29, 286

5,861
7,575
7,052
7,376

22, 719
24,432
25, 981
52, 683

28, 913
47, 715
60, 223
42, 248

31, 460
25, 916
14, 007
9,936

35, 297
34,528
30, 756

6,634
5,377
6,859

71, 263
34, 176
27, 844

26, 268
18, 150
17, 992

8,747
7,896
8,434
8,431

757
745
626

2,556
2,546
2,261
1,939

593

674

2,370

96

207

476

609

2,207

98

191

489

539

2,070

99

1925

]ytay
June
July

25, 845

73, 945

14, 960

82, 014

21, 107

64, 778

134

461

524

2,010

94

156

376

512

1,971

89

138

387

477

1,851

101

452

1,923

1937
March
April

1 Tonnage of vessels cleared in foreign trade from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
2
Vessels lost and abandoned, representing all classes of American vessels, from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Navigation, given for quarter ending in month
stated, yearly figures representing quarterly averages. Scrapped vessels are included under abandoned vessels.
3
From the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Navigation, The total completed includes ocean-going, lake, and river vessels built and officially numbered, including vessels of the U. S. Shipping Board and private American owners, but not vessels built for foreign owners. The column on merchant vessels under construction
includes all kinds of ships except Government vessels building or under construction at the end of the month. Monthly data from 1915 given in the January, 1924, issue
of the SUEVEY (No. 29), p. 49.
4
Quarterly data on world ship construction compiled by Lloyds', covering all vessels of 100 tons and over, except that from 1914 to 1921 figures for Germany are not
fi
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Immigration. Aliens admitted and departed include complete legal immigration and emigration but not nonimmigrants.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Department of State, Division of Passport Control and excludes passports issued to Government officials.
7
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, covering six tramp-ship commodities over 12 world-wide trade routes.
8
Net ton represents 100 cubic feet internal carrying capacity after prescribed allowance for crew and engine space, w^hile gross ton represents in units of 100 cubic feet
the entire cubical capacity of the vessel, including crew and engine space.




99

Table 75.—RIVER AND CANAL CARGO TRAFFIC
RIVERS

CANALS
Panama i
YEAR AND MONTH

Total

Long tons

Cape
Cod*

Suez «

Thousands of
short tons

In
In
American British
vessels
vessels

Sault New
Ste. York
Marie 2 State

Short
tons

St.
Lawrence 6

Thous.
of met.
tons

372
297
265
232
185
166
177

134, 107
99, 411
153, 140
216, 402

Weiland 6

Mississippi
(Governmentowiiecl
barges)7

Ohio
(Pittsburgh Mononto
gahela «
Wheeling^

Allegheny •

Short tons

1,164

407, 371
257, 843
588, 214
627, 669
576, 385

183, 376
130, 888
282, 813
217, 973
156, 412

781, 208
961, 601
907, 078
1, 630, 409
2, 157, 679
1, 891, 773
2, 298, 838

378, 928
431, 613
412, 543
912, 857
1, 256, 468
1, 056, 498
1, 237, 947

235, 856
310, 161
277, 488
410, 762
529, 380
498, 002
552, 690

9,910
6,032
8,259
11, 203
0, 042
10, 234
10, 985

203
208
262
312
290
335

158,600
114, 406
103, 226
115, 788
70, 242
50, 733

1,421
1,459
1,780
1,898
2,122
2,215

370, 105
422, 208
464, 809
531, 260
682, 534
765, 858
744, 931

388, 429
518, 795
597, 653
641, 944
759, 067
851, 407
889, 100

13, 392
36, 939
49, 841
59, 203
70, 792
75, 896
86, 978

298, 766
538, 380
523, 497
588, 130
776, 813

1, 144, 652
1, 787, 388
1, 733, 135
1, 840, 193
2, 039, 110

247, 189
270, 053
252, 667
292, 871
209, 100

942, 264
1,037,308
1, 221, 325
1, 113, 668

516, 974
428, 091
509, 583
451, 991

None. None.
None. None.
None. None.
3,604
65

38, 499
42, 192
43, 360
43, 856

2,305
2,209
2,724
2,548

None.
None.
None.
209, 829

None,
None.
None.
150, 574

81, 087
95, 907
91, 787
98, 417

365, 970
345, 183
401, 371
572, 528

1,945,426
1, 662, 112
1, 784, 392
1, 877, 194

75, 700
56, 295
159, 070
309, 047

1, 823, 042
1, 920, 323
1, 960, 654
1, 912, 217

986, 830
1,029,044
1, 063, 361
1, 013, 480

443, 586
502, 069
475, 744
482, 277

11,210
10, 942
11, 668
11, 663

300
316
386
280

44, 444
59, 530
65, 510
74, 857

2,316
1,974
2,050
2,030

719, 765
651, 135
831, 814
877, 506

794, 803
797, 566
938, 126
989, 128

97, 349
75, 283
79, 361
64, 913

633, 605
565, 228
609, 727
716, 142

1, 691, 539
1, 772, 053
1, 739, 425
1, 938, 145

357, 115
414, 410
381, 512
405, 495

1, 891, 988
2, 009, 171
2, 023, 398
2, 358, 170

983, 470
967, 587
1, 025, 914
1, 293, 725

476, 082
626, 160
522, 228
541, 243

391
10, 904
289
11, 637
316
8, 409
1,838 None.

64, 274
51, 243
42, 497
38, 536

2, 087
2, 135
1,970
2,230

765, 032
849, 457
661, 935
69, 455

823, 315
933, 423
693, 497
86, 556

46, 070
67, 627
47, 361
65, 593

668, 392
739, 635
603, 125
836, 650

2, 016, 646
1, 966, 248
1, 863, 566
1, 825, 568

394, 970
346, 431
375, 958
238, 447

2, 346, 643
2, 139, 207
2, 607, 046
2, 237, 567

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average _ _ _
1925 monthly average
_
1926 monthly average

182, 325
70,738
122, 977
174, 856
229, 907

9,965
6,921
8,911
11, 486
11, 227
10, 710
8,529

1, 907, 469
1, 839, 619
2, 104, 324
1, 950, 902

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average ..

1, 152, 416
1, 092, 241
1, 402, 726
1, 156, 986

625, 336
522, 631
701, 497
626, 064

None.
None.
None.
2,000

None.
None.
None.
None.

37, 755
40, 889
58, 023
71, 208

2, 245
2,061
2,471
2,255

None.
None.
None.
None.

None.
None.
None.
None.

57, 996
49, 975
74, 688
72, 682

155, 339
273, 207
571, 193
761, 947

1, 487, 357
1, 638, 476
1, 831, 204
1, 919, 679

24, 330
81,315
159, 660
202, 090

2, 416, 701
2, 134, 686
2, 185, 527
2, 321, 697

1, 369, 156
1, 189, 894
1, 165, 195
1, 317, 489

289, 337
562, 242
565, 424 ,
516, 505

10, 157
12, 910
13, 608
13, 776

229
399
316
336

70, 615
75, 247
65, 027
62, 004

1,964
1,939
2,033
2, 080

653, 025 744, 510
948, 840 1, 060, 598
787, 478 968, 976
630, 169
798, 845

95, 605 852, 732
90, 495 1, 045, 889
88, 846 1, 159, 138
114, 352 1, 078, 041

1, 972, 767
2, 067, 772
2, 334, 195
2, 289, 324

222, 395
245, 741
273, 641
295, 823

2, 239, 547
2,374,711
2, 272, 449
2, 310, 270

1, 254, 467
1, 326, 609
1, 195, 006
1, 232, 583

573, 140
555, 927
542, 779
551, 403

12, 789
12, 879
8, 170
1,387

416
348

58, 831
83, 218
79, 040

1,845
2,153
2,059

717, 548
833, 591
579, 881
63, 982

110, 690
103, 960
104, 450
80, 000

927, 851
975, 225
881, 490
639, 709

2, 317, 562
2, 303, 595
2, 192, 169
2, 115, 215

291, 111
274, 931
246, 446
191, 719

8,731

1925
January
February
March
April._

_'

May
June
July .
August..

__

September
October
November .
December

1936
JanuaryFebruary
March
April

.

Mav
June__
July
August ___

_

September _
October
Novpimbfir
December _

_.

..

.__ .. _

872, 597
923, 051
682, 848
72, 276

1937
January
February
March
April—.

May
June

._
;

.
i

|

!

. _ ._ (i

1
Panama Canal traffic, reported by the Panama Canal, represents tonnage of cargo carried by commercial vessels. Yearly figures prior to 1922 refer to fiscal years
ending June 30.
2 Traffic through the Sault Ste. Marie canals, including both the American and Canadian canals, reported by U. S. War Department, Engineer Corps. Monthly averages for each year are for eight months during which the canals are usually open—that is, the yearly totals are divided by eight in order to present a figure fairly comparable with current monthly movements. Monthly data distributed by classes of commodities, covering the years 1913-1922, appeared in the March, 1923, issue (No. 19)
pp. 48 and 49.
3 Traffic through New York State canals from New York State Superintendent of Public Works. About two-thirds of this traffic goes through the Erie Canal and one
third through the Champlain Canal. Monthly averages for each year are for the seven months during which the canals are usually open.
4
Cape Cod Canal traffic from the Boston, Cape Cod & New York Canal Co. The average for 1916 is an average of nine months of operation. Data previously shown
in this column represented ship tonnage, but have been replaced by figures on cargo tonnage. Monthly data from 1920 on ship tonnage (not comparable with present
figures) appeared in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), pp. 55 and 56.
6
Suez Canal traffic from Le Canal de Suez.
6
Data from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce. Monthly averages for each year are for seven months during the equivalent 7of which period the canals are usually open—that is, totals for the years are divided by 7 in order to present a figure fairly comparable with current monthly movements.
Cargo tonnage on Government-owned barge line on Mississippi River between St. Louis and New Orleans from U. S. War Department, Mississippi- Warrior Service.
Receipts and shipments of cargo by river at St. Louis, now discontinued, appeared in August, 1925. issue (No. 48). Monthly data from 1920, including Government barge
line 8
traffic, appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 45.
Data on Ohio River commerce from the U. S. War Department, Engineer Corps, represent total cargo traffic between Pittsburgh and Lock and Dam 11, located between Wellsburg and Wheeling, W. Va. The total of 3,585,188 short tons shown for the months of 1922, from which the average is computed, does not include the annual
total of 1,327,199 short tons not shown separately by months, the total movement for 1922 being 4,912,387. Data are available from 1910 to 1914 for traffic between Pittsburgh and Lock No. 6 (near Beaver, Pa.), and from 1915 to 1921 between Pittsburgh and Lock No. 10 (near Steubenville, Ohio). Traffic between Pittsburgh and Lock
10 amounted to 4,733,620 short tons in 1920 and 2,840,978 in 1921.
9
Compiled by the U. S. War Department, Engineer Corps, representing total cargo traffic on the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers above Pittsburgh. This traffic
consists mostly of coal. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 26.




100

Canada 3
YEAR, AND Total
MONTH operat- Freight Passen- Total
operatger
ing
ing
United States *

3*® ,i
£l5*tt
gSSTJ

United States

NET OPERATING
REVENUES

REVENUES

NET OPERATING INCOME2

Table 76.—RAILWAY, PULLMAN, AND EXPRESS OPERATIONS

Canada

Thousands of dollars
$176, 916
165, 943
178, 804
214, 784
236, 177
288, 183
296, 410

$57, 548
54, 230
53, 798
58, 980
68, 935
86, 056
98, 334

$181, 732
173, 916
171, 926
198, 031
238, 184
334, 767
368, 287

$59, 900
53, 451
70,002
87, 265
81, 232
57, 759
43, 034

$6,224
5,342
4,343
6,915
7,323
4,689
2,651

1920 m. a_ 518, 785
1921 m. a_ 464, 429
1922 m. a_ 468, 291
1923 m. a. 529, 118
1924 m. a. 498, 963
1925 m. a_ 515, 553
1926 m. a_

360, 304
327, 328
334, 076
385, 465
362, 412
379, 424

107, 285
96, 172
89, 686
95, 636
89, 724
87, 994

485, 861
383, 651
371, 397
412, 081
379, 970
381, 946

4,846
51, 329
64, 748
81, 911
82, 229
94, 987

485, 019
455, 185
486, 668
473, 692

350, 766
336, 946
360, 779
347, 166

88, 739
77, 599
79, 588
78, 410

30, 361
30,093
33, 037
31, 844

383, 962
355, 686
377, 401
370, 777

488, 962
507, 021
522, 484
555, 494

359, 367
366, 143
377, 522
403, 356

82,043
92, 628
97, 967
104, 034

32, 373
33, 679
37, 829
38, 455

Sept
Oct_
Nov
Dec

565, 568
591, 533
532, 985
524, 007

419, 737
450, 629
402, 544
379, 505

95, 710
86, 528
81,112
91, 997

1936
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

480, 995
460, 204
530, 453
499, 662

347, 568
340, 276
401, 197
370, 024

May
June
July_
Aug

517, 423
539, 865
556, 515
578, 823

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

589, 961
609, 045
561, 034

1935
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May__June
July
AUg

,.

PULLMAN
CO.*

Freight carried RePas1 mile
Total Pasceipts senper
reve- sengers
gers
ton- carried nue carried
United Canada 3 mile Imile
States
Millions of tons

$255, 139
241,608
256, 630
302, 104
337, 539
410, 549
432, 005

1913 m. a,
1914 m. a.
1915 m. a_
1916m. a.
1917 m. a.
1918 m. a.
1919 m. a_

OPERATION RESULTS *

8

Millions

Cents

Thous. Thouof dolls. sands

8

8

8

8

VISITORS TO
EXPRESS
NAT. PARKS e EARNINGS 7

Persons

Total OperAuto- operat- ating
moing
inreve- come
biles
nue

Number

No. of
cars

Thousands of
dollars

27, 338
26, 163
25, 232
31, 126
34, 943
36, 410
33, 034

1,919
1,839
1,472
2,350
2,599
2,586
2,246

0.719
.723
.722
.707
.715
.849
.973

420
3,034
3,896
4,138
5,829
5,280
7,351

37, 412
28, 730
31,316
38, 134
35, 802
35, 520

2,605
2,199
2,202
2,602
2,862
2,454
2,715

1.052
1.275
1.182
1.115
1.115
1.097

3,904
3,111
2,877
3,167
3,010
2,996

6,012
5,370
5,465
6,048
6,063
6,683

3,271
2,600
2,646
2,854
2,841
2,961

68, 887
74, 966
81, 812
113, 062
132, 874
138, 910
147, 851

7,230
9,548
10, 025
12, 452
16,002
16, 766
26, 030

16, 306
15, 640
13,006
13, 441
12, 909
12, 829

3,615
260
116
105
91
101

66, 060
65, 151
73, 375
66, 465

1,524
2,335
4,417
3,120

37, 026
33, 570
35, 332
33, 571

2,120
2,138
2,408
1,976

1.057
1.100
1.128
1.141

2,890
2,549
2,620
2,596

6,320
5,652
6,270
6,008

2,800
2,503
2,651
2,701

38, 292
45, 700
58, 082
66, 476

852
1,267
3,171
2,888

12, 432
12, 357
12, 875
13, 041

80
80
111
22

375, 999
376, 064
382, 925
388, 898

76, 154
92, 149
99, 669
124, 944

1,805
?,137
6,418
8,137

37, 126
35, 853
37, 944
41, 709

1,864
1,827
2,073
1,866

1. 081
1.115
1.093
1.070

2,798
3,282
3,543
3,758

6,367
7,291
7,562
7,768

2,777
3,150
3,276
3,633

124, 205 11, 059
252, 589 22, 576
411, 376 77, 723
384, 501 56, 195

12, 791
12,804
12, 753
12, 567

101
99
102
115

43, 870
48, 723
45, 806
44, 448

388, 110
410, 447
384, 550
389, 650

134, 522
138, 033
107, 016
94, 667

11, 538
16, 706
13, 871
11, 560

41, 305
44, 054
40, 775
37, 869

3,339
4,019
4,051
4,148

1.103
1.114
1.079
1.085

3,335
2,908
2,699
2,985

7,409
6,818
6,052
6,680

3,385
3,039
2,742
2,869

184,279 17, 361
36, 524 2,462
37, 083 3,865
27, 807 1,767

13, 152
13, 465
13, 102
12, 608

154
210
137
*5

89, 505
78, 595
80, 779
80, 641

33, 138
32, 044
37, 570
35, 350

378, 649
360, 590
396, 473
384, 833

65, 725
63, 289
94, 523
76, 282

1,062
3,914
7,948
5,563

37, 678
35, 414
38, 672
36, 317

2,590
2,379
2,487
2,109

1.032
1.066
1.133
1.121

2,913
2,579
2,644
2,661

7,107
6,032
6,387
6,326

2,991
2,608
2,718
2,810

36, 238
38, 713
54, 955
58, 192

2,411
2,265
4,081
4,374

12, 378
12, 324
12, 952
12, 769

86
102
119
96

385, 073
396, 687
408, 645
428, 628

82, 783
92, 381
97, 787
98, 913

39,487
39, 833
41, 366
41, 225

388, 763
390, 190
395, 294
399, 330

88, 105
107, 336
116, 895
133, 008

6,229
5,635
7,646
8, 917,

39, 833
39, 237
41, 705
43, 724

2,630
2,383
2,213
2,047

1.077
1.108
1.076
1.082

2,017
3,252
3,502
3,535

6,470
7,604
7,376
7,653

2,817
3,282
3,336
3,542

128, 629
235, 698
455, 204
434, 603

18, 505
44, 361
86, 779
77,004

12, 840
12, 845
12, 547
12, 636

75
91
85
89

444, 142
471, 478
432, 666

92, 648
82, 082
77, 299

44, 830
50, 782

397, 860
414, 902
402, 673

145, 492
146, 125
114, 734

12, 499
17, 397

44, 328
48, 273
43, 342

3,144
4,275

1.091
1.072

3,247
2,795

7,646
6,778
6,018

3,399
2,997
2,684

212, 387 50, 383
55,543 15, 620
33, 088 3,658
30, 957 2,958

13, 187

126

$37, 199
39, 844
35, 967
38, 315

8

2, 823 $3,445
2, 881 3,284
8
3, 649 3,483
3,684
2,882
4,311
3,290
4,164
3,556
5,756
3,863

8

2, 072
2, 182
2, 021
2,326
2,691
2,397
3,112

$12, 613 $2, 092

1937
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
June
* Deficit.

1 Data from the Interstate Commerce Commission, covering Class I railroads, those having annual operating revenues in excess of $1,000,000, which comprise 193 railroads
with about 98 per cent of the total operating revenues of all railroads.
2
Net railway operating income, from the Interstate Commerce Commission reports on Class I railroads, includes net operating revenue (equal to the difference between
total operating revenue and total operating expenses), from which there have been deducted railway tax accruals, uncollectible railway revenues, equipment, and joint
facility rents.
a Annual figures, from Department of Trade and Commerce, cover all railroads in Canada, averaged for the fiscal year ending March 31 of the year indicated; monthly
reports cover all railroads with annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over, which includes 98 per cent of the total revenues of all roads. Monthly data from 1920 on net
operating revenue and on freight carried appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 45.
4
Data on the United States from the Bureau of Railway Economics, except tons per mile for 1915 and 1916, from Interstate Commerce Commission. Monthly data on tonmile5 operations from 1916 appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 52.
Pullman passenger traffic furnished by The Pullman Company; revenues from its reports to the Interstate Commerce Commission.
6
Visitors to national parks from U. S. Department of Interior as reported by superintendents of the following 15 parks: Grand Canyon and Casa Grande, Ariz, (the latter
a monument rather than a park); Hot Springs, Ark.; General Grant, Sequoia, and Yosemite, Calif.; Rocky Mountain, Colo.; Glacier, Mont.; Platt, Okla,; Crater Lake,
Oreg.; Wind Cave, S. Dak.; Zion, Utah; Mount Rainier, Wash.; Yellowstone, Wyo.; and Mount McKinley, Alaska. Vehicles are not reported by Platt, Hot Springs,
Wind Cave, and Mount McKinley. By far the largest attendance of visitors is shown at Platt Park. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28),
p. 56.
7
Reports to the Interstate Commerce Commission of the American Railway Express Co., to which are added reports of the Southeastern Express Co. from the time of its
organization in May, 1921, thus presenting practically complete reports of the express business on railroads, Operating income includes net operating revenue (equal to
the difference between total operating revenues and operating expenses) from which have been deducted uncollectible revenue from transportation and express taxes.

s Fiscal year ending June 30 of year indicated.



101

Total owned

Number

In bad order

Tractive
power
(mills, Number
oflbs.)

1913 monthly av_
19 14 monthly av .
1915 monthly av .
1916 monthly av .
1917 monthly av.
1918 monthly av.
1919 monthly av_

SHIPMENTS BY
MANUFACTURERS 3

UNFILLED ORDERS
(end of month)
Reported by
manufacturers 3

Domestic
Total

Domestic

Steam Electric

Per
ct.of
total
in use

Reported by
railroads 1

Total

In
In
R.R. mfg.
Steam Elec- shops plants
tric

EXPORTS *

ORDERED F R O M
MFRS. 2

YEAR AND
MONTH

RETIRED *

ON RAILROAD LINES *
(end of month)

INSTALLED 1

Table 77.—LOCOMOTIVES

S

625.3
23.9
26.4
19.0
17.4
16.9
14.9

7265
187
144
200

7230
179
250
298

166
20
217
165
118
83
100

224
130
117
281
129
101
146

110
69
88
248
109
63
113

26
18
11
17
8
12
14

1,447
367
892
1,636
499
467
583

894
206
787
1,488
386
335
461

122
57
40
85
61
46
38

813

2,573
2,584
2,602

5,559
17, 026
12, 204
11, 195
10, 736
9,320

40
59
77

8846
351
236
432

143
84
31
22
27
30
23

64, 824
64, 779
64, 747
64, 509

2,591
2,592
2, 593
2,587

11, 315
11,407
11, 613
11, 101

17.6
17.7
18.1
17.3

167
125
138
171

213
169
170
409

27
49
106
84

98
88
117
101

41
69
88
78

12
7
13
14

414
414
461
490

322
318
324
343

44
51
51
41

81
77
83
82

199
216
232
258

39
13
27
19

64, 484
64, 435
64, 420
64,357

2,590
2,591
2,594
2,596

10, 902
10,917
10, 659
10, 551

17.0
17.1
16.7
16.5

147
179
139
147

172
224
170
210

51
16
39
26

101
114
76
118

65
58
56
91

9
8
12
6

478
411
386
334

324
274
259
199

48
47
39
48

80
66
59
45

249
213
191
148

45
43
12
11

September .
October
November
December

64,257
64, 142
63, 869
63, 619

2,596
2,595
2,589
2,585

10,643
10, 230
10, 725
9,769

16.5
16.1
16.9
15.4

129
150
112
129

229
266
394
379

86
199
101
216

100
93
106
104

42
47
52
68

16
21
8
18

390
530
585
708

278
386
435
557

41
40
46
54

37
33
32
35

200
185
307
436

22
56
38
38

1926
January
February
March
April

63, 593
63, 548
63, 548
63, 440

2,588
2,592
2,596
2,597

10, 087
10, 076
10, 191
9,836

16.0
16.0
16.2
15.6

191
175
204
189

206
222
205
295

60
13
204
251

121
163
162
151

96
101
146
122

11
22
11
12

.653
572
780
713

506
442
635
580

53
60
50
44

38
40
103
95

455
401
635
559

58
38
20
9

May...
June _
July....
August

63, 352
63, 266
63, 202
63, 107

2,598
2,601
2,603
2,605

9,266
9,228
8,718
9,031

14.7
14.7
13.9
14.4

174
184
171
152

262
270
237
247

50
191
14
84

140
159
132
124

105
133
82
78

14
11
20
16

726
667
555
525

585
522
445
455

46
53
36
26

92
84
123
67

520
562
394
486

15
15
20
44

September _
October
November
December

63, 040
62, 829
62, 672
62, 428

2,611
2,610
2,611
2,608

8,889
8,654
9,320
8,549

14.2
13.9
15.0
13.8

224
175
354
208

278
390
512
450

31
30
215
52

134
151
128
185

109
124
109
152

13
15
15
17

498
390
517
398

386
286
391
297

24
20
27
14

100
72
57
53

343
262
287
276

12
18
5
17

1925
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

___

L

Industrial

41
22
52
69
148
89
80

18

monthly avmonthly av.
monthly av_
monthly av. 7 64, 757
monthly av_
64, 962
monthly av.
64, 370
monthly av. 63, 169

Mining

Number of locomotives

23.8

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

SHIPMENTS,
ELECTRIC
LOCOMOTIVES 5
(quarterly)

8318
8 142
«172

922
»14

151

7

120

19

187

13

228

16

165

19

176

9

204

16

615

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

l
1

* Locomotives in bad order, both passenger and freight on Class I railroads, and number owned, retired, and building from American Eailw ay Association, Car Service
Division. Data for 1919 on bad-order locomotives from U. S. Railroad Administration.
2
Data from the Railway Age covering the principal transactions, each month's figures being totals of those given in the weekly issues of the publication appearing
during the month, and prorated up to the annual totals made from special inquiries. The percentage used in prorating the 1924 data was 91 per cent.
3
Reported direct to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, by principal locomotive manufacturing companies, exclusive of railroads making locomotives in their own shops. Both steam and electric railroad locomotives are included in these data, the totals including foreign as well as domestic business. Monthly
data from 1920 showing both shipments and unfilled orders for domestic and foreign business classified between steam and electric, appeared in the May, 1926, issue, No. 57,
p. 25.
4
Data from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), pp. 27
and 28.
* Compiled from quarterly reports to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from nine manufacturers comprising practically the entire industry.
Press releases furnish details as to type, i. e., trolley or storage battery. Data for 1923 not available by quarters, but annual figures are reduced to quarterly averages.
6
Ten months' average, March to December, inclusive.
7 Eight months' average, May to December, inclusive.
8
Four months' average,
 averages. September to December, inclusive.
9
Quarterly



102

Table 78.—FREIGHT-CAR MOVEMENT
SURPLUS^

YEABAND
MONTH

Box

cars

Coal
cars

LOADINGS 2

SHORTAGE 1

Total
cars 3

Box
cars

Coal
cars

Total
cars3

Grain
and
grain
products

Livestock

Coal
and
coke

Forest
products

Ore

Merchandise and
1. c. 1.

Miscellaneous

Total

Number of cars

75, 605
1,981
154, 499

23, 592
68, 680
189, 396
24, 194
339, 026

65, 901
28, 964
18, 991
43, 148
1,146

112, 934
52, 360
4,200 24, 174
25, 868 82, 056
1,896
444

169, 256
153, 585
191, 065

142, 874
129, 452
124, 744

747, 394
894, 180
691, 016

247, 322
254, 861
207, 314

161, 868
200, 853
75, 592

751,043
917, 508

1, 375, 951
1, 069, 692

3, 716, 007
3, 486, 409
3, 759, 873
3, 276, 930

47, 675
33, 635
88, 482
103, 747
104, 770

90, 897
23, 367
110, 572
96, 843
61, 656

164, 500
69, 659
229, 908
241, 289
205, 915

26, 653
10, 566
384
90
96

15, 852
13, 527
487
112
196

51, 579
27,873
1,046
440
331

204, 397
189, 642
214, 223
192, 144
200, 593

135, 508
147,375
146, 087
136, 301
133, 610

655, 962
851,753
754, 650
794, 060
885, 023

243, 001
312,074
305, 594
311, 402
304, 536

132, 524
195, 143
139, 881
167, 637
182, 074

985, 495
1, 013, 754
1, 043, 344
1, 099, 383
1, 121, 487

1, 243, 743
1, 441, 270
1, 440, 757
1, 567, 753
1, 615, 230

3,600,630
4, 151, 009
4, 044, 536
4, 268, 679
4, 442, 470

133, 216
153, 550
138, 734
69,244

168, 913
162, 343
146, 840
97, 089

338, 526
356, 389
322, 530
194, 306

43
64
94
212

17
3
13
19

151
'98
150
248

196, 116
151, 625
230, 703
247, 692

153, 973
120, 162
144,416
125, 772

703, 275
596, 938
729, 382
654, 288

365, 541
274, 499
306,788
275, 875

255, 606
237, 446
275,740
200, 241

1, 210, 017
963, 748
1, 157, 783
972, 758

1, 589, 201
1, 280, 764
1, 626, 710
1, 422, 758

4, 473, 729
3, 625, 182
4, 470, 522
3, 898, 384

September ._ . 36, 768
October.
30,486
November
73, 547
December
117, 434

58, 375
49, 058
82, 819
108, 189

116, 689
99, 190
183, 914
266, 252

270
784
166
27

274
785
133
30

670
1,656
354
101

269, 073
338, 613
219, 098
187, 308

750, 324
146, 760
205, 762 1, 003, 986
159, 217
771, 887
752, 227
147, 652

269, 408
353, 498
276, 220
252, 849

188, 326
212, 601
71, 598
39, 366

987, 214
1, 290, 075
981, 134
928, 291

1, 536, 780
2, 050, 896
1, 423, 018
1, 167, 194

4, 147, 885
5, 455, 431
3, 902, 172
3, 474, 887

1935
January
February
March
April

103, 209
103, 177
. 113, 615
131, 212

69, 736
138, 425
185,724
160, 913

213,921
285, 015
344, 959
337, 181

61
100

5
None.

4
10
25
15

406
167
60
15

245, 173
168, 932
150, 674
131, 429

180, 125 1, 071, 509
734, 105
123,076
110, 463
647, 853
601, 815
110, 638

339, 527
319, 563
324, 535
312, 402

48, 519
45, 030
47, 311
90, 802

1, 132, 774
977, 692
1, 039, 535
1, 038, 117

1, 439, 322
1, 254, 649
1, 382, 042
1, 441, 627

4, 456, 949
3, 623, 047
3, 702, 413
3, 726, 830

140, 676
149, 405
139, 428
85, 732

133, 559
109,404
80, 661
40, 427

323,624
307, 495
263, 876
162, 397

4
9
4
272

None.
None.
None.
354

7
18
4
636

183,205
145, 801
216, 214
220, 676

136, 129
106, 076
133, 207
121, 227

813, 119
665, 901
876, 362
833, 768

377, 138
294, 052
330, 712
285, 548

309, 822
252, 076
314, 110
250,447

1, 268, 532
1, 030, 366
1, 242, 669
1, 042, 763

1,765,434
1, 471, 600
1, 831, 817
1, 566, 998

4, 853, 379
3, 965, 872
4, 945, 091
4, 321, 427

September
October
NovemberDecember

58, 203
49, 502
58, 463
112, 345

61, 370
42, 949
43, 658
95, 295

140, 842
111, 619
136, 796
267, 739

364
153
104
5

153
495
200
8/

558
2,957
357
97

210, 565
232, 248
195, 152
205, 662

131, 300
211, 729
140, 404
131, 236

731, 738
996, 948
798, 770
756, 827

278, 590
351, 937
265, 373
257, 447

229, 220
246, 882
130, 900
46, 521

1, 051, 989
1, 355, 132
1, 036, 784
976, 238

1, 664, 534
2, 142, 283
1,526,332
1, 326, 403

4, 297, 936
5, 537, 159
4, 093, 715
3, 700, 334

1926
January __
February
March
April

113, 860
87, 389
95, 478
118,419

92,040
74, 151
104, 280
115, 205"

250, 935
207, 683
246, 549
276, 573

10
83
None.
None.

170
15
None.
8

218
197
13
12

226, 246
171, 099
159, 357
149, 751

162, 578
113, 199
113, 727
104,004

998, 070
770, 077
783, 448
705, 198

312, 254
298, 663
306, 959
299, 991

48, 978
41, 934
43, 566
55, 072

1, 171, 960
989, 717
1, 062, 947
1,057,406.

1, 511, 924
1, 291, 760
1, 407, 135
1, 424, 415

4, 432, 010
3, 676, 449
3, 877, 139
3, 795, 837

May
June _
July
August

135, 233
140,421
104, 796
88,967

75, 253
69,869
56, 785
38, 967

257, 956
254, 807
199, 073
161, 478

None.
None.
172
None.

None.
48
114
None.

None.
68
404
None.

197, 997
160, 917
279, 527
227, 930

142, 765
107, 501
134, 363
117, 097

898, 076
734, 393
938, 537
809, 785

383,403
295, 942
334, 843
282, 376

243, 183
271, 446
364, 950
310, 424

1, 330, 505
1, 026, 471
1, 273, 732
1,061,346

1, 946, 950
1, 515, 480
1, 919, 315
1, 608, 822

5, 142, 879
4, 112, 150
5, 245, 267
4,417,780

September
October
November
December

62, 202
45, 148
98, 794
166, 532

27, 519
12, 106
12, 521
61, 181

114, 730
81, Oil
144, 921
375, 260

403
460
25
None.

100
1,360
516
18

542
1,945
579
28

202, 312
266, 240
180, 596
184, 139

147,
200,
138,
121,

847, 513
232
666 1, 196, 637
988, 281
443
947, 265
747

281, 723
360, 775
263, 351
234, 152

300, 627
338, 619
127, 302
38, 792

1, 065, 424
1, 384, 234
1, 046, 406
987, 699

1, 707, 547
2, 258, 853
1, 524, 321
1, 266, 237

4, 552, 378
6, 006, 024
4, 271, 700
3, 780, 031

1917 mo.
1918 mo.
1919 mo.
1920 mo.
1921 mo.

av
av
av
av
av

6,437
29 251
82, 135
15, 985
127, 982

1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 ino. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av

1924
May
June
July.
August

May
June
July
August

_. .

1927
January
February
March
April.
May
June

%

1 Data from the American Railway Association. Daily average for the last period (7 or 8 days) of the month, exclusive of Canadian roads. The association reports the
number of freight cars which are idle (surplus) and also the number of requests for cars which can not be filled (shortage). The difference between these two figures
represents the net freight-car situation for the country as a whole. The car shortages can not ordinarily be filled from the idle cars because of the uneven geographical
distribution of the latter.
2
From reports of the American Railway Association, Car Service Division. These figures are now put on a monthly basis from weekly reports, consisting of exactly four
weeks for each month prior to 1923, except'in March, June, September, and December, which cover five weeks each year. Beginning with 1923, the five-week months are
January, May, August, and October.
3 Includes other classes than groups listed.



103

Table 79.—RAILWAY CAR SUPPLY
PASSENGER CABS

FREIGHT CABS

In railroad hands,
end of month 1
YEAR AND
MONTH

In bad order

Total
Number

Capacity
(millions
oflbs.)

Ordered
from
mfrs.2

Shipments by
mfrs.3

DoTotal mestic

Total

Perct.

Number of total

In
railroad
hands,
end of
To
In R. B. quarter1
mfrs.
shops

5.9
7.0
7.3
13.9
13.3

1,838
7,017
1,945
15, 013

7,961
11, 917
5,116
3,528
4,866

4,392
6,904
3,899
3, 109
4,749

4 53, 673
54, 157

1923 monthly av 1924 monthly av1925 monthly av1026 monthly av.

2, 323, 472
2, 349, 752
2, 345, 525

204, 369
209, 082
211, 255

185, 343
188, 012
183, 725
155, 006

8.0
8.2
7.9
6.7

7,873
11, 899
6,527
4,691

12, 233
6,850
6,447
6,675

12, 069
6,718
6,124
6,138

48, 033
34, 757
30, 055

44,548
27, 924
22, 810

3,482
6,833
7,245

1934
May .
June
July
August... .

2,312,237
2, 314, 798
2, 322, 968
2, 329, 582

202, 606
203, 139
204, 777
205, 690

189, 219
194, 869
202, 864
210, 109

8.3
8.5
8.9
9.2

463
412
567
5,054

6,253
6,854
9,584
9,411

6,158
6,813
9,580
9,350

57, 266
57, 735
51, 156
40, 961

54,799
55, 466
46, 554
37, 343

2,467
2,269
4,602
3,618

September
October.. . _
November.. ._.
December

2, 336, 147
2, 342, 149
2, 342, 479
2, 337, 229

206, 540
207, 366
207, 535
207, 172

206, 044
190, 543
189, 140
190, 979

8.9
8.2
8.2
8.3

23, 597
12, 610
13, 870
10, 240

9,467
8,839
6,382
5,661

9,440
8,449
5,938
5,365

47, 553
38, 403
42, 765
54, 202

44, 508
34, 829
37, 606
47, 724

3,045
3,574
5,159
6,478

1935
January... _ _ _
February
March
April.

2, 341, 109
2, 346, 687
2, 350, 697
2, 353, 956

207, 626
208, 339
208, 908
209, 368

186, 539
185, 047
186, 417
189, 514

8.1
8.0
8.1
8.2

10, 312
5,388
4,677
5,525

8,365
10, 335
10, 718
9,352

7,031
9,881
10, 503
9,212

58, 910
50, 603
45, 419
42, 602

53, 625
45, 725
39, 847
34, 530

5,285
4,878
5,572
8,072

May
June.
July
August

2, 356, 641
2, 359, 040
2, 301, 551
2, 363, 849

209, 804
210, 256
210, 701
211, 102

195, 986
198, 468
. 197,281
197, 178

8.4
8.5
8.4
8.4

8,944
777
843
2,816

7,059
7,639
5,040
3,617

7,030
35, 823
7,623 • 27,458
4,880
26, 087
3,412
20,151

26, 781
18, 825
17, 898
13, 711

9,042
8,633
8,189
6,440

September
October. November
December. -

2, 363, 637
2, 359, 124
2, 353, 454
2, 347, 275

211,201
210, 922
200, 590
210, 171

179, 571
165, 481
165, 818
157, 405

7.7
7.1
7.2
6.8

6,113
5,556
13, 598
13, 776

5,405
2,849
3,365
3,618

5,319
2,492
2,649
3,451

19, 548
23, 333
27, 136
40, 015

13, 302
16, 144
20, 013
34, 692

6,246
7,189
7,123
5,323

1936
January...
February
March
April
_

2, 344, 016
2, 345, 508
2, 346, 242
2, 348, 148

210, 009
210, 362
210, 569
210, 966

158, 160
161, 959
162, 470
159, 845

6.8
7.0
7.0
6.9

11, 531
11, 353
7,640
5,622

3, 299
6,904
8,811
9,257

2,968
6,412
8,668
9,207

49, 831
45, 344
44, 183
43, 582

39, 751
34, 626
35, 810
34, 839

10, 080
10, 718
8,373
8,743

2, 345, 091
2, 346, 908
2, 348, 508
2, 349, 100

211,049
211, 316
211, 642
211, 875

168, 498
165, 588
165, 756
161, 396

7.3
7.2
7.2
7.0

435
4,270
1,256
164

8,170
10, 009
9,287
8, 357

8,130
10, 003
9,185
8,308

40, 003
34, 874
27, 995
19, 819

31, 437
27, 222
21, 762
13, 816

8,566
7,652
6,233
6,003

2, 348, 912
2, 345, 392
2, 342, 000
2, 336, 470

212, 082
211, 988
211, 768
211, 436

149, 078
139, 484
137, 420
130, 146

6.5
6. 1
6.0
5.7

2,564
2,891
2, 732
5,831

5,606
5, 31.1
2,433
2,656

5,560
4,388
2,376
2,450

13, 468
11, 484
11, 591
18, 481

8,118
7,046
6,975
12, 313

5,350
4,438
4,616
6, 168

_

May.
June
July
August

.-._

September
October
November
December

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

Or- Shipments Un3
filled
dered by mfrs.
from2
orders,
end of
mfrs.
DoTotal mes- quarter*
tic

Number of cars

in use

142, 790
168, 973
166, 779
318, 880
302, 456

1918 monthly av.
1919 monthly av.
1920monthlyav.
1921 monthly av 1922 monthly av.

Unfilled orders,
end of month *

54, 326
54, 577
54, 592

54, 522

54,659
54, 877

54,575

54, 612

54,634
54,552

54,034

54,167

53, 938

24
148
20
198

70
19
34
75
59

63
11
23
71
46

184
213
135
118

138
93
76
186

135
88
73
176

131
40
194
213

76
102
63
94

67
102
63
94

325
244
279
235

88
96
99
79

87
90
98
79

78
90
111
104

68
62
45
56

68
62
45
50

22
34
362
9

77
81
82
130

77
81
75
110

37
134
87
547

67
66
56
126

58
66
56
126

217
152
107
230

176
165
115
225

157
165
102
225

30
124
68
1

208
224
222
187

196
218- 1,298
222
187

131
32
124
105

178
197
145
191

163
197
114
191

*218
1,121
1,270
815
830

847

791

651

773

498

901

1,146

1,206

766

; •{
..

1 Compiled by the American Railway Association, Car Service Division, covering Class I railroads and some others, including about 99 per cent of total railroad operations. Cars in railroad hands include those owned or leased by railroads but not private-owned cars on their lines. Passenger coaches in railroad hands include coaches,
combination, baggage, express, and all other coaches. Monthly averages for bad-order cars for the years 1913-1917; also monthly data for 1920 and 1921, appeared in the
October, 1923, issue (No. 26), pp. 59 and 60.
2
Data from the Railway Age covering the principal transactions, each month's figures being totals of those given in the weekly issues of the publication appearing during the month, and prorated up to the annual totals made from special inquiries. The percentage used in prorating the 1924 data was 94 per cent. Data for the years 1913
to 1918 from the Iron Trade Review appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 77; though not comparable month by month on account of different methods of compilation,
they indicate the trend from year to year comparable to the above figures.
8
The data on shipments of manufacturers for railway equipment were obtained from the Interstate Commerce Commission. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in July,
Digitized for1924,issue (No. 35), p. 55.
FRASER
* Average of two periods, June 30 and September 30 (no report made for December 31).
•



104

Table 80.—PUBLIC UTILITIES
TELEPHONE
COMPANIES i

TELEGRAPH
COMPANIES i

GAS AND
ELECTRIC
COMPANIES 2

Energy produced <

Tele-

Total
operating
revenues

YEAR AND
MONTH

Net
operating
income

Com- graph
Opermerand
cable ating
cial
tele- operat- ingraph ing come
tolls reve-

Gross
earnings

Net
earnings

Gross
revenue
sales 3

Passengers

Total

nues

Thousands of dollars
1913 monthly av1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av_.
1916 monthly av._
1917 monthly av_.
1918 monthly av__
1919 monthly av. _

$13, 132
13, 722
14, 527
16, 452
18, 700
20, 225
24, 635

$3, 710
3,709
4,139
4,785
4,700
4,649
5,104

1920 monthly av__
30, 320
5,415
1921 monthly av
' 36, 265 7,573
8,882
1922 monthly av._
40, 204
1923 monthly av_.
44, 106 10, 015
48, 412
10, 555
1924 monthly av__
54, 313 12, 988
1925 monthly av__
1926 monthly av

ELECTRIC
RAILWAYS

ELECTRIC POWER STATIONS

By
water
power

By
fuels

In
carried"
In
mfg.
central plants,
sta- street
tions rys., 212 companies
etc.
Thousands
of persons

Millions of kilowatt hours

$5,898
6,287
7,596

$35, 874 $14, 128
37, 581 14, 817
38, 629
15, 057
42, 275 16, 367
16,001
$7, 674 $1,711 i 46, 534
8,477
1, 282
51, 564 15, 250
10, 095 1,636
58, 981 16, 159

$26, 017
28,067
30, 100
35, 458
44,925
55, 442
60, 083

3,243

1,217

2,026

9,113
8,043
8,435
9,027
9,085
10, 245

11, 698
10, 371
10, 608
11, 153
11, 210
12, 598

1,438
1,265
1,697
1,583
1,548
1,796

71,095
73, 859
77, 587
84, 188
88, 485
95, 372

17, 762
20, 571
22, 951
25,351
26, 866
31, 045

73, 575
81, 066
90, 825
105, 796
112, 969
122, 365

3,630
3,439
3,975
4,661
4,916
5,471

1,346
1,245
1,438
1,635
1,668
1,861

2,284
2,194
2,538
3,027
3,251
3,610

3,331
3,106
3,634
4,283
4,537
5,079

336
333
342
379
383
393

ji

!

i
!

784,893
784, 896
792, 790

1935
May _
June.
July
August

53, 119
53, 946
53, 815
54,623

12, 187
12, 613
11,815
12, 461

9,652
10, 452
10, 448
10, 780

11, 966
12, 808
12, 868
13, 186

1,646
1,967
1,755
1,907

92, 648
90, 213
89, 220
89, 343

29, 830
29, 229
26, 274
25, 965

111, 576
109, 400
108, 900 .
111, 500

5,189
5,203
5,346
5,463

2,025
1,845
1,870
1,768

3,164
3,358
3,476
3,695

4,812
4,829
4,967
5,086

377
374
379
377

797,044 j
769, 618
753, 359
752, 417

September
October
November
December

54, 955
57, 925
56, 826
58, 923

13,373
15, 034
14, 327
13, 686

11, 306
11, 678
10, 395
10, 510

13, 784
14, 408
12, 810
12, 957

2,211
2,342
1,660
1,652

91,855
100, 029
101, 154
106, 065

28,977
33, 053
35, 152
38, 007

117, 200
128, 800
139, 300
145, 300

5,490
5,948
5,787
6,153

1,607
1,801
1,946
1,977

3,883
4,147
3,841
4,176

5,125
5,550
5,392
5,720

365
398
395
438

750, 209
811,236 !
779, 691
841, 943 ]

1936
January
February
March
April

58, 189
56, 509
59, 581
59, 521

14, 115
13, 748
14, 056
14,669

10, 430
9,837
11, 276
10, 564

12, 767
12,073
13, 836
12, 980

1,450
1,226
2,092
1,611

106, 975
99, 953
102,442
100, 831

37, 588
33, 737
35, 102
33, 822

150, 500
145, 400
141, 800
139, 800

6,121
5,602
6,149
5,773

1,956
1,909
2,264
2,312

4,165
3,693
3,886
3, 462

5,683
5,191
5,727
5,390

438
411
422
383

820,072
753, 791
831, 238
802,890

May
June
.
July
..
August

59, 699
60, 302
60, 119
60, 097

13, 785
14, 404
13, 261
13, 713

10, 615
11, 085
10, 822
11,109

13, 177
13, 644
13, 386
13, 663

1, 659
1,945
1,662
2,351

98, 459
97,823
95, 007
93, 873

32, 133
32, 260
27, 729
25, 909

131, 600
129, 700
127, 200
127,800

5,809
5,878
5,914
6,145

2,309
2,231
2,001
2,088

3,500
3,648
3,916
4,057

5,437
5,509
5,559
5,777

372
369
355
368

810, 275
783, 702
764, 509
749, 592

62,009
62, 641
62, 363

14, 848
15, 920
15, 941

11, 654
12, 205
10, 321

14, 338
13, 998
12, 879

2,255
1,678
1,626

97, 752
104, 400

32, 675
34, 939

133, 000
142, 500

6,180
6,554
6,446

2,058
2,159
2,241

4,122
4,394
4,204

5,826
6,174
6,049

354
380
397

742, 932
807, 261
791, 386
855, 835

September
October .
November
December

.

.

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

1 Telephone earnings are the combined reports of 12 largest telephone companies, reduced from 13 companies, due to a consolidation comprising about 83 per cent of the
total operating revenues of telephone companies with annual operating revenues over $250,000,, and telegraph earnings are the combined reports of the Western Union and
Postal Telegraph Cos., as reported to the Interstate Commerce Commission.
2 Gas and electric earnings are the combined reports to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, of 78 companies or systems operating gas, electric light,
heat, power, and traction services and comprising most of the large companies in the United States. Gross earnings are in general the gross operating revenues, while net
earnings in general represent the gross, less operating expenses and taxes; but owing to alack of uniformity in the accounts of individual companies, it has not been possible
to secure these actual items for each company, and in such cases the nearest comparable figures have been taken. Also in some cases the figures for prior years do not cover
exactly the same subsidiaries owing to acquisitions, consolidations, etc., but these differences are not believed to be great in the aggregate.
3
Gross revenue received from the sale of electrical energy as reported by the Electrical World represents the total receipts from the sale of electricity by companies with
about 83 per cent of the installed generator rating of the country, computed to 100 per cent of the industry on the basis of the percentage which the reporting companies
bear to the installed central-station rating of the country. Companies reporting sales are not identical with those reporting energy produced. These figures cover light and
power companies only, excluding electric railways which do not sell their current. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in the July, 1923, issue of the SURVEY (No. 23), p. 45.
4
Production of electric power by central stations from U. S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey. Production in central stations up to January, 1925, was segregated by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the original records of reporting firms on file with the Geological Survey, from that produced in
connection with street railways, manufacurting plants, and reclamation projects. Details, by months, since 1920 for central stations appeared in the April, 1925, issue of
the SURVEY (No. 44), p. 29, while for the other items details appeared in the March, 1925, issue (No. 43), p. 28. Beginning with January, 1925, this segregation has been
carried on by the Geological Survey. Monthly data from 1913 on total production appeared in the July, 1923, issue (No. 23), p. 49.
4
Data compiled by the American Electric Railway Association from reports, of 212 companies operating 24,187 miles of revenue single track and 3,090 miles of bus
routes and carrying about 68 per cent of the total revenue passengers carried by electric railways.




105

Table 81.—EMPLOYMENT—INDUSTRIAL, RAILWAY, MINING, AND FEDERAL
RAILWAYS 2

INDUSTRIAL 1

Total
YEAR AND
12
MONTH groups

Iron Lum- LeathChemFood Texber
and
and
tiles
steel and er and Paper icals
its fin- and and
kinand
and
its
ished print- other
dred their
prodprod- prod- their man- prod- ing
ucts
ucts prod- ufac- ucts
ucts
ucts ture

Stone, Nonclay, ferand
glass rous
prod- metucts als 8

ufac- trans- industure porta- tries Thoution
sands

INDEX NUMBERS RELATIVE TO 1923
1914m. a
1915 m.a_1916 m. a..
1917 m. a1918m. a. .
1919 m. a_.
1920 m. a..

Dollars

Number employed

NUMERICAL DATA

794.9
97.0
110.4
115.0
114.0
108.2
109.9

85.1
1921m. a
1922 m. a. . 88.4
1923 m. a.. 100.0
1924 m. a. _ 90.3
1925 m. a.. 91.2
1926m. a.. 91.9

U.S.

GOVT.,
ANEm- Aver- THRA- WASHINGVehiCITE
ploy- age
Tocles Miscel- ees on hour- MINES 3 TON
(civilbacco for lanepay
ly
ian) *
man- land ous
roll wage

1,647 $0. 276
1,733 .313
1,842 .463
1,913 .557
2,013 .667
(13)
u 106. 2 12 83. 7 !2 89. 8
» 91. 5 1295.4 12 84. 7 12 96. 1 12 98. 4 12 95. 1 12 92. 6 12 96. 3
100.0 100.0 1OO.O 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
88.2
100.2
94.8
86.7
92.7
95.6
90.6
91.6
94.0
88.6
87.8
86.3
94.2
90.9
89.3
97.6
87.3
93.1
92.5 100.8
96.7
92.0
91.0
91.6
89.8
99.7
86.1
90.8
98.4
97.5
91.2
96.8
90.3 103.6
85.6
92.0

OHIO CONSTRUCTION •

[Index numbers for base year In bold-faced type]

EmPloy.

Rel.
to 1923

8 99, 970
92, 237

1,661
1,645
1,880
1,777
1,769

.665 9 156, 008
.618 10 152, 874
.615
153, 873
.628
153, 383
11
.637
152, 419
K 153, 621

80, 838
71, 061
66, 214
64,755
63, 703

64, 611
63, 756
63, 837
63, 055

99
110
112
108

62, 519
62, 039
61, 753
61, 509

114
118
102
100

82
100
93
97
89

1925
May
June
July
Aug. _ _

90.9
90.1
89.3
89.9

86.6
89.3
89.4
89.9

88.9
87.8
86.0
86.8

87.3
86.6
85.3
85.3

93.3
93.7
92.8
93.0

89.6
85.9
88.5
92.9

99.7
99.4
99.4
99.1

89.0
87.1
88.9
91.4

100.4
100.7
96.5
98.8

95.9
95.9
95.4
95.5

91.9
90.6
90.7
89.9

92.3
90.3
89.9
90.7

93.0
90.9
90.9
90.2

1,767
1,782
1,796
1,800

.620
.628
.668
.633

Sept. .
Oct
Nov
Dec

90.9
92.3
92.5
92.6

92.3
94.8
93.7
92.5

86.9
89.5
89.8
89.6

86.4
87.8
88.7
90.1

94.2
94.3
93.2
91.6

94.8
94.6
91.9
89.2

100.2
101.9
103.0
103.6

97.3
98.0
97.6
98.0

99.8
100.5
99.7
98.3

96.3
98.3
100.2
101.5

92.0
95.1
94.6
95.0

92.1
94.6
93.7
92.7

90.1
89.2
91.0
94.2

1,804
1,817
1,789
1,753

.638
.632
.647
.643

1936
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

93.3
94.3
93.7
92.8

90.3
89.4
88.3
85.6

89.8
90.1
90.0
87.9

90.3
92.4
93.0
93.2

89.2
89.5
89.7
91.7

91.0
92.6
91.4
87.1

103.2
102.4
103.1
102.5

98.0
100.5
105.2
103.4

93.5
94.3
96.3
99.2

100.2
101.8
102.9
101.0

85.0
89.0
88.2
84.4

92.7
94.3
96.1
95.3

97.0
98.4
98.3
96.6

1,730
1,733
1,745
1,783

.648
.656
.637
.634

142, 162
153, 856
155, 236

61, 296
61, 199
61, 274
61, 211

76
74
64
71

91.7
91.3
89.8
90.7

86.8
88.7
89.2
89.8

85.7
84.0
80.2
81.5

92.4
92.6
91.4
91.8

91.9
92.1
91.6
92.4

85.7
85.3
88.5
92.4

102.6
102.5
102.1
102.3

95.3
93.7
93.2
94.7

102.3
104.0
100.8
102.9

98.5
96.3
94.3
94.5

94.0
86.7
83.7
81.2

93.5
92.1
90.8
91.4

95.5
94.8
93.4
94.6

1,809
1,834
1,857
1,853

.635
.630
.631
.633

155, 798
154, 716
156, 274
157, 308

61, 036
60, 811
60, 435
60, 270

82
100
108
108

92.2
92.5
91.4
90.9

92.4
94.3
92.4
90.4

84.2
86.4
86.1
87.7

92.6
92.2
90.5
89.8

91.8
91.5
90.2
88.2

93.9
93.5
92.0
90.2

104.0
105.4
106.6
106.1

100.3
100.2
99.2
97.0

103.6
102.4
100.9
96.4

95.7
96.0
95.4
93.6

85.1
87.3
86.8
86.3

91.3
89.0
85.1
82.6

96.4
97.5
98.6
101.0

1,855
1,866

.642
.639

59, 849
59, 618
59, 489

113
100
92
84

May
June
July
Aug

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

_

_

153, 282
151, 807
152, 469
152, 314

1937
Jan
Feb
Mar
April
,.
1 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent weighted indexes based upon the number of wage earners in the respective
industries in 1919. The original data are taken from the pay roll nearest to the middle of the month as reported by more than 9,000 firms, employing almost 3,000,000 workers.
Details of this table, together with the method of construction, may be found in the April, 1924, Monthly Labor Review, pp. 129-132, while current details are given monthly
in Employment in Selected Industries as issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2
Compiled from reports of Class I carriers and 15 switching and terminal companies to the Interstate Commerce Commission. The computation of average wages exclude
the officials included in total on pay roll. Monthly data from 1920 given in January, 1923, issue (No. 17), page 51.
a Compiled by the Anthracite Bureau of Information, and includes miners, miners' laborers, inside and outside company men, and all other employees at collieries. These
classes are shown separately in the association's report.
4 Compiled by the U. S. Civil Service Commission, giving number of civilian employees carried on rolls at end of each month. Details by departments, with data on
additions and separations, are given in the monthly reports.
* Compiled by the Ohio State University, Bureau of Business Research, based on reports from firms engaged in general contracting throughout Ohio, 73 being included
in 1922, 81 from 1923 to 1925, and an increasing number in 1926, approximating 120; allowance for the changing number of firms is made through link relatives each
month. The 88 firms used in the base year, employed on the average, 4,064 wage earners employed by the entire construction industry in Ohio. Employment in the general
contracting industry in Ohio follows very closely the trend in the entire construction industry in the State. Wage earners in this report include mechanics, artisans, laborers,
and 6foremen, and part-time workers are reduced to a full-time basis for the week including the 15th of each month, which is used as the monthly index.
Includes stamped and enameled ware and brass, bronze, and copper products.
7
Average for last 7 months of yean earlier data not available.
8
Nine months' average, April to December, inclusive.
9
Average of last 3 months of the year.
1° Average of 6 months; data for the 6-month period, March to September, not available on account of strike.
" Average for first 7 months of year; later data not available on account of shut down of mines.
" Average of last six months of the year.
is Data for this group not available in 1922.
" Average of seven months, February to August, inclusive; data for other months not available.




106

Table 82.—FACTORY EMPLOYMENT, BY STATES AND CITIES
[Base year in bold-faced type]
CANADIAN
EMPLOYMENT i

EMPLOYEES ON PAY BOLL

YEAR AND
MONTH

MasNew New Penn- Dela- Illisachu- York s Jer- syl- 4 ware 4 nois J
setts 2
sey 4 vania
Relative to
1914

Wisconsin e

Detroit •

EmNew Penn4
ploy, Trade New Jer- syl- Delaindex unions York 3 sey 4 vania4 ware

Rel. to Rel. to Rel. to Rel. to Em- Rel. to
Jan., ployed 1914
19158
1920
1922
1920

Relative to 1923

RELATIVE NUMBERS

1914 mo.
1915 mo.
1916 mo.
1917 mo
1918 mo.
1919 mo.

av
100.0
av
98.3
av__
112.5
av__
116.8
118.5
av__
av
117.6

1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
19?2mo. av__
1923 mo. av__
1924 mo. av__
1925 mo. av__
1926 mo av

100
103
121
126
128
120

P. ct.

8105

993.1

128
136
140
136

"98.1
"98.1
98.5
96.6

EMPLOYEES TOTAL
PAY
ON PAY ROLL ROLL

TOTAL PAY ROLLS

Wisconsin 6
Rel. to
19158

Relative to 1923

RELATIVE NUMBERS

100
107
141
166
210

Detroit 1

New York
State s

Number Thou- Thous.of
sands dollars
NUMERICAL DATA
478
494
579
604
614
573

$5,943
6,377
8,366
9,892
12,481
13, 490

177,533
97, 845
161, 269
218, 713
203, 666
230, 251
228, 625

594
464
500
553
504
501
502

16, 711
11, 943
12, 524
15, 074
13, 967
14,159
14, 564

«113

227

160
198
258
284

100 "100.0
55
87.0
91
88.6
124
94.8
114
91.9
130
93.0

95.4
87.5
93.0
95.1
93.0
93.0

281
201
211
254
235
238
245

100
89
90
101

100

100

86
87
90

83
84
89

342
191
210
270
262
285
282

133
135
137
137

94.5
96.8
96.3
96.6

93.0
93.9
94.8
95.' 6

234
231
229
231

90
87
84
88

88
85
81
84

86
84
79
77

289.4
284.8
286.2
295.3

236, 686
240, 406
242, 515
244, 002

495
491
486
487

13, 891
13, 717
13, 589
13, 722

123.9
123.3
122.6
123.7

145
150
149
73

98.3
97.1
95.3
89.6

94.3
94.9
94.3
92.1

238
245
247
252

89
95
96
100

83
90
88
92

78
82
84
89

286.7
297.6
288.1
291.3

257, 894
266, 947
264, 221
129, 104

500
510
513
516

14, 150
14, 559
14, 700
14, 983

98.8
101.4
101.8
101.5

123.2
125.3
124.8
123.4

147
152
152
142

90.7
91.5
91.4
94.3

91.9
91.9
92.7
92.7

251
248
252
247

98
97
98
96

88
92
92
90

90
93
93
93

282.3
302.3
302.9
298.7

261,602
270, 395
269, 959
251, 078

513
515
517
509

14,905
14, 720
14, 996
14, 691

82
80
80
81

101.1
101.0
101.1
100.7

121.7
121.2
125. 8
125.9

138
127
131
135

101.0
103.7
104.2
104.9

95.1
95.9
97.7
97.5

241
242
236
237

95
96
96
98

89
89
84
87

88
88
84
85

285.3
280.7
270.6
282.0

245, 440
224, 837
232, 757
239, 099

498
496
486
489

14,299
14,390
13, 995
14, 103

81
77
76
78

102.9
102.4
101.1
99.7

123.9
121.0
119.2
116.4

132
124
116

105.2
102.8
101.1

96.7
97.4

247
250
245
245

106
110
109
111

89
94
91
92

87
86
87
91

278.0
285.5
262.1
253.7

234,000
220, 367
206, 123
87, 842

500
506
500
495

14,664
14, 853
14, 564
14, 584

114.7
95.4
101.0
106.6
90.3
91.1

124
97
105
116
106
105
105

100
90
88
93

100
89
91
93

100

1925
May
June
July__ --.
August

90.3
87.7
86.5
88.3

104
103
102
102

86
85
84
86

90
90
90
89

82
82
80
76

96.9
96.5
95.3
95.5

121.1
122.3
128.3
124.1

September
October
November...
December

89.9
92.2
93.1
92.7

105
107
107
108

91
92
93
95

90
92
92
93

79
78
78
82

97.8
98.6
99.3
99.8

1936
January
February
March . .
April

92.9
94.1
95.0
92.6

107
108
108
106

94
94
93
91

92
94
93
93

83
86
86
85

May .. _ _
June
July
August

90.2
87.4
82.2
85.8

104
104
102
102

89
88
89
90

92
92
92
93

September...
October
November
December

89.0
89.8
89.6

105
106
105
104

97
97
97
96

95
96
95
93

100
79
81
81

110
101
98

135
94
107
124
117
122
123

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

i

-| -

1
Percentage of trade-union membership employed and applications and job vacancies reported to Canadian employment service, latter being prorated from weekly
reports, from Dominion Department of Labor, Employment Service of Canada;employment index number taken as of the first day of the month following that indicated,
showing conditions reported by an average of about 5,800 firms employing about 775,000 workers in 1923, in manufacturing construction, mining, logging, and services from
Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Trade-union employment figures from 1915 through 1918 are averages of quarterly data.
2
Data from Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries, Division of Statistics. Yearly figures through 1922 are based on identical plants as secured by a yearly
census. Data for 1923, 1924, and 1925 are connected to the series by the chain relative method, representing at least 40 per cent of the firms included in the yearly figures.
These will later be revised by a complete census and subsequent data will be added by the chain relative method.
3
Figures represent reports from 1,648 firms in New York State employing more than one-third of the factory workers of the State, as reported by the New York
State Department of Labor. The 1914 average upon which the index numbers are calculated is an average of the 7 months, June to December, 1914, inclusive. As originally
published by the New York Department of Labor, the index numbers are based on June, 1914, and have been recalculated to the 7-month average.
4
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia from reports of about 1,000 plants each month in the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Since
August, 1926, figures for New Jersey are from the New Jersey Department of Labor.
6
Data on Illinois represent reports by about 1,400 manufacturing establishments, employing about 400,000 people, to the Illinois Department of Labor. Figures on •
employees are based upon the number on the pay roll nearest the fifteenth of the month.
6
Data compiled by Industrial Commission of Wisconsin. Prior to June, 1923, this index was based on identical manufacturing establishments employing about 80,000
people; thereafter on link relatives from reports of manufacturing, logging, and agricultural firms.
7
Data on Detroit employment from the Employers' Association of Detroit, covering about two-thirds of the working population of that city. Figures for the last week
of the month are given here.
s Relative to afirst quarter of 1915.
10
n
December only.
Average of four quarters, March, June, September, and December.
January, 192G.




107

U.S.
average

Central
States

EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES •
Eastern
States

ik

U.S. *&•§
aver- « flg SS-M
age fcw.2 S3

Pacific

YEAR AND
MONTH

South
Atlantic
East
South
Central
West
South
Central
East
North
Central
West
North
Central
Mountain

WAGES OF COMMON LABOR
by geographic divisions*

U. S. STEEL
CORP. WAGE
RATES 2
YOUNGSTOWN
DISTRICT
(wages of 3
steel workers)
FARM
WAGES
(without
board) *

Table 83.—WAGES AND EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES

i

<n Workers
registered

S«3 tSfl£
s

1

> 3Q
!|M

i Perct. Dollars Number of applicants per 100 jobs
base scale per mo.

Cents per hour
1913 monthly av_
1914 monthly av.
1915 monthly av_
1916 monthly av.
1917 monthly av.
1918 monthly av.
1919 monthly av.

20
23
28
36
41

20
25
31
39
41

20
24
30
38
41

14
16
21
27
32

12
13
17
23
28

16
17
21
28
36

21
24
29
39
43

25
28
34
45
53

26
29
36
44
47

1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av.
1922 monthly av.
1923 monthly av.
1924 monthly av.
1925 monthly av.
1926 monthly av.

49
36
32
38
38
38
39

49
38
39
51
50
46
50

50
35
36
45
45
45
46

37
26
21
25
28
27
30

32
25
20
22
24
25
25

40
28
24
25
27
27
27

53
35
31
39
40
37
38

62
45
31
34
36
38
36

1925
May
June
July
August

38
38
38
38

46
46
47
47

42
42
43
42

28
29
28
28

26
26
25
25

24
25
26
25

37
38
36
38

September
October _. _
November
December

38
38
38
38

46
46
46
48

44
46
45
48

30
25
27
27

25
25
25
25

26
28
29
25

1936
January _
February
March
April

37
38
39
39

45
57
56
54

46
42
46
46

27
28
30
27

28
26
24
24

May
June
July
August

38
38
39
39

50
46
48
48

44
45
47
47-

29
28
27
33

September
October
November
December

39
39
39
38

49
49
49
54

47
47
49
50

39
27
31
36

26
28
36
45
52

20
20
20
23
30
37
42

160 0
191.8
174.0

55
46
37
42
41
44
43

60
50
48
54
52
52
50

44
39
33
42
50
50
50

192.0
151.0
123.3
138.5
145.8
131.8
132.0

38
38
35
38

45
47
48
44

52
53
52
52

50
50
50
50

133.0
133.0
127.0
127.0

38
36
36
37

38
37
37
38

45
46
46
43

53
53
52
51

50
50
50
50

127.0
127.0
127.0
127.0

25
27
27
28

36
39
38
40

36
35
36
37

42
41
44
45

51
51
53
52

50
50
50
50

128.5
128.5
131.5
131.5

25
25
25
24

27
27
26
28

37
38
37
37

36
36
37
36

44
45
46
42

53
53
52
52

50
50
50
50

133.0
133.0
133.0
133.0

25
25
25
24

26
29
28
27

37
39
40
40

36
36
37
36

44
42
43
40

52
52
52
52

50
50
50
50

133.0
133.0
133.0
133.0

CANADIAN EMPLOYMENT a
Jobs
registered

Number

$30. 21
29.72
29.97
32.58
40.19
49.13
56.77

65.05
43.58
42.09
46.74
47.22
47.88

7

41,533
44, 240
45, 690
49, 098
43, 281
44, 514

40, 165
35, 002
39, 157
45, 082
34, 339
38, 384

59
59
71
65

39, 953
38, 107
39, 502
83,777

30, 650
29, 335
31, 509
81, 886

89
93
119
120

59
59
66
70

77,436
50, 212
27, 215
22,802

75, 312
42, 230
40, 766
21, 797

237
222
185
157

139
120
114
137

75
75
64
62

35,988
29,414
37, 664
42,029

20, 699
19, 823
27, 802
36, 166

113
123
128
118

138
174
139
128

103
109
107
81

56
54
78
62

43,209
42, 191
42,763
78, 519

36, 966
36, 103
37, 851
77, 501

105
112
122
135

118
122
139
157

85
72
102
125

58
65
68
78

60, 692
50,838

64,106
44, 120

7

50.10

122
122
136
127

87
113
119
126

137
144
149
190

138
108
117
114

100
104
120
135

49.89

162
180
177
167

115
130
120
106

48.40

124
118
132
123

174
158
137
126

46.26

7235
146
131
180
175
159

105
144
127
146

48.99

7131
106
100
127
122
119

129
155
140
131

48.55

173
127
105
143
140
127

164
125
109
130
122
108

7

95

70
60
69
64
66

1927
January
February
March
April
May_.
June
I

1 Compiled by the V. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Public Roads. The current data beginning January, 1922, are compiled directly from Federal aid project
reports. Earlier data included reports on farm labor or other forms of common labor closely correlated as reported to the Department of Agriculture and the Department
of Labor.
2
Average rates in the Pittsburgh district reported by the United States Steel Corporation; rates apply to 10-hour day except for the period Oct. 1,1918, to July 16,1921,
during which period the rates applied to a basic 8-hour day with time and a half for overtime, and beginning Aug. 16,1923, when they applied to an 8-hour day, the 10hour3 workers amounting to only 30 per cent of the total.
Compiled from data furnished by the Western Sheet and Tin Plate Manufacturers' Association and the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel and Tin Workers. The
wage scales are based on the price of steel sheets in the previous two-month period as ascertained by actual prices received by mills. Monthly data from 1917 together with
price of steel sheets for the same period appeared in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57) of THE SURVEY, p. 13.
4
Average rates paid to farmlabor as reported by crop reporters to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Data by sections of the country
are shown in the detailed reports published in Crops and Markets.
6
Compiled from weekly reports to the U. S. Department of Labor, Employment Service, showing the number of workers and jobs registered at State and municipal employment agencies. Eastern States included in the report are Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island (Delaware
Maryland, and Pennsylvania, now reporting, are excluded to show true comparison). Central States are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Southern States include Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas,
and Virginia. Western States include Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington; Montana is included beginning with March, 1922, its figures being
so small as not to affect the total.
6
Percentage of trade-union membership employed and applications and job vacancies reported to Canadian employment service, latter being prorated from weekly
reports, from Dominion Department of Labor, Employment Service of Canada', employment index number taken as of the first day of the month following that indicated
showing conditions reported by an average of about 5,800 firms employing about 775,000 workers in 1923, in manufacturing construction, mining, logging, and services from
Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Trade-union employment figures from 1915 through 1918 are averages of quarterly data.
7
Six months' average June to December, inclusive.




108

Table 84.—WEEKLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY LABOR
[Base year in bold-faced type]
BY STATES

U. S. TOTALS, 23 INDUSTRIES 1

1

Men

YEAR AND
MONTH

MasWo- sachu- New New 1Penn- Dela-4 IlliGrand
Jer- syltotal
Un- men setts 2 Forks sey 4 ivania4 ware nois «
Total Skilled skilled
Relative to 1914

Relative to July, 1914

Relative to 1923

Wisconsin 6

U. S. TOTALS, 23 INDUSTRIES 1

Men
Grand
total

Rel. to Rel. to |
1915
1922

NUMERICAL DATA

100

7100

7100

100.0

100

103.2
116.6
134.7
167.8
190.8

7100

Women

Dollars

RELATIVE NUMBERS
1914mo.av__ 7100
1915 mo av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo av
19 19 mo. av

UnTotal Skilled skilled

NEW
YORK
STATE
(3)

103
116
131
188
188

s 106
125
146
186209

226
206
201
218
222
227
233

100

100

100

100
101
107

98
99
103

102
101
104

7 $12. 54

7 $13. 30 7 $14. 16 7 $10. 71

254
202
196
218
223
233
233

o 29. 51
23.57
!0 24. 06
26.25
26.27
26.94

« 31. 72
25.05
W 25. 69
28.27
28.31
29.26

7 $7. 84

$12.48
12.85
14.43
16.37
23.50
23.50

9 33. 31 9 27. 11 9 18. 27
26.55
20.48
16.07
W 27. 42 » 20. 53 to 15. 99
30.12
22.61
17.46
30.04
16.89
22.86
30.90
23.62
17.27

28.15
25.72
25.04
27.23
27.68
28.29
29.01

9235
188
U192
209
209
215

«238
188
W193
213
213
220

9235
188
*0194
213
212
218

9253
191
to 192
211
213
221

9233
205
204
223
215
220

227.6

1935
May
June -July
August ---.

215
211
210
210

222
218
215
216

220
216
214
214

221
217
214
217

223
216
213
215

185.4
182.9
187.3
187.9

225
224
224
228

104
102
101
103

100
97
94
97

102
100
97
99

113.0
113.8
110.9
112.9

238.4
232.4
222.6
237.3

27.02
26.49
26.31
26.37

29.50
28.98
28.61
28.73

31.19
30.65
30.26
30.30

23.66
23.19
22.92
23.23

17.50
16.95
16.70
16.87

28.07
27.94
27.98
28.46

September-.
October
November-December—

215
216
216
219

221
222
221
225

218
220
219
223

219
221
222
225

217
218
219
222

186.5
189.9
187.8
187.8

227
229
230
233

98
103
103
105

95
101
99
103

96
102
104
104

107.6
115.3
115.2
116.4

231.1
241.0
234.7
235.2

26.94
27.12
27.13
27.48

29.27
29.51
29.43
29.86

30.89
31.20
31. 08
31.54

23.48
23.66
23.79
24.10

17.00
17.13
17.15
17.43

28.32
28.57
28.67
29.05

1936
January
February
March
April

216
219
219
217

222
226
227
225

220
225
225
222

222
224
226
224

218
221
221'
222

188.8
189.3
184.8
180.3

233
229
233
231

104
104
105
105

100
103
104
103

104
104
103
104

114.3
118.4
116.4
116.9

228.6
240.5
241.9
241.2

27.07
27.49
27.49
27.26

29.47
30.04
30.13
29.87

31.16
31.79
31.82
31.50

23.76
24.04
24.21
24.01

17.07
17.31
17.30
17. 38

29.05
28.58
29.03
28.85

May
June -_
July
August

216
216
214
213

223
224
220
221

220
222
217
218

223
225
221
222

218
218
221
216

179.9
178.7
178.5
180.9

230
232
231
231

106
108
106
107

103
104
99
101

103
105
99
99

117. 1
117.5
113.2
115.9

240.9
236. 6
219.8
228.8

27.13
27.06
26.78
26.76

29.61
29.78
29.21
29.39

31.21
31.38
30.76
30.91

23.91
24.14
23.67
23.81

17.09
17.07
17.29
16.91

28.69
28.99
28.81
28.86

September..
October
November..
December. __

218
219
216

224
224
219

222
221
216

224
227
222

221
225
222

181.0
180.1
181.7

235
235
234
236

107
110
109
112

101
106
103
106

101
105
107
108

113.2
117.5
115.7
113.0

229.3
241.2
225.0
223.0

27.38
27.43
27.14

29.83
29.79
29.13

31.39
31.26
30.57

24.03
24.28
23.80

17.34
17.64
17.39

29.31
29.35
29.15
29.47

1920 mo. av..
1921mo.av__
1922mo.av_,
1923mo.av__
1924 mo. av..
1925mo.av_.
1928 mo av

196.8
196.6

223.8
210.8
187.3

10100
110
112
113

1937
January
February. _
March
April
May
June

1 Compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board from reports from 1,678 manufacturing plants employing 506,315 people in January, 1921, and representing 23
industries. The nominal hours per week represent the weighted number of hours the plants are supposed normally to operate, while the actual hours represent the average man-hours worked each week. The grand total weekly earnings are cpmpiled by weighting the average earnings in each industry by the number of wage earners employed as reported by the census of manufacturers of 1919, but as it was impossible to obtain the necessary weighting factors for the classes of labor, the latter averages
are unweighted; hence, the relative number for the grand total sometimes is lower than the relative number of any class, owing to the different methods of computation.
2
Data from Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries, Division of Statisics. Yearly figures through 1922 are based on identical plants as secured by a yearly
census. Data for 1923, 1924, and 1925 are connected to the series by the chain relative method, representing at least 40 per cent of the firms included in the yearly figures.
These will later be revised by a complete census and subsequent data will be added by the chain relative method.
3
Figures represent reports from 1,648 firms in New York State employing more than one-third of the factory workers of the State, as reported by the New Yorl State
Department of Labor. The 1914 average upon which the index numbers are calculated is an average of the 7 months, June to December, 1914, inclusive. As originally
published by the New York Department of Labor, the index numbers are based on June, 1914, and have been recalculated to the 7-month average.
4
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia from reports of about 1,000 plants each month in the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Since
August, 1926, figures for New Jersey are from New Jersey State Department of Labor.
6
Compiled by Illinois Department of Labor from reports of about 1,400 manufacturing establishments, employing about 400,000 people, taken from the pay roll nearest
the 6
15th of the month. The index on earnings is relative to the last six months of 1922.
Data compiled by Industrial Commission of Wisconsin. Prior to June, 1923, this index was based on identical manufacturing establishments employing about 80,000
people; thereafter on link relatives from reports of manufacturing, logging, and agricultural firms.
7
July, 1914.
s Relative to first quarter of 1915.
9 Average of last seven months of the year.
10

Average of last six months of the year
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ 11 Relative to last six months of 1922.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

109

Table 85.—PAY ROLL AND HOURS IN FACTORIES
PAT-BOLL. INDEXES^
Food
Total
13
groups

YEAR AND MONTH

and
kin-

dred
products

Textiles
and

their
products

Lumber
and
its
their manuprodfacIron

and
and

Leather

ucts

ucts

and Paper
its fin- and
ished printproding

steel

ture

AVERAGE
WEEKLY
HOURS 2

Chem- Stone,
icals
day,

and

other
products

VehiTocles MiscelNonbacco
for
laneand ferrous
land
ous
glass metals 3 manu- trans- indus- Nomi- Actual
facprodnal
ture porta- tries
ucts
tion
NUMERICAL
DATA

INDEX NUMBERS RELATIVE TO 1923
1914, July
._1920 monthly average...
1921 monthly average. ._
1922 monthly average...
1923 monthly average...
1924 monthly average...
1925 monthly average...
1926 monthly average

125.9
80.0
79.9
100.0
90.6
93.6
95.8

584.1
100.0
97.9
93.7
93.8

889.3
100.0
86.8
89.5
85.9

« 75. 5
109.0
86.6
90.6
97.2

588.5
100.0
97.3
98.1
97.7

595.2
100.0
88.3
89.4
87.8

592.3
100.0
102.2
102.9
111.5

589.6
100.0
82.7
95.9
101.8

885.8
100.0
101.3
103.5
106.4

(fl)
100.0

92.4
87.0
80.8
83.5

95.5
97.7
98.0
95.9

83.1.
78.9
72.0
78.4

91.2
82.1
72.5
75.6

101.0
98.9
91.9
93.1

83.0
79.1
77.6
86.8

102.7
101.0
96.7
97.1

94.3
88.6
85.5
87.1

99.6
97.4
97.2
100.1

83.5
87.1
83.0
90.3

77.1
81.5
81.9
88.5

95.6
97.6
95.8
96.7

91.2
91.9
84.8
88.3

101.2
103.3
103.4
106.1

55.0
450.0
49.7
»50.0
49.9
49.7
49.9

51.5
*48. 7
45.5
549.2
49.2
46.8
48.2

91.6
89.8
98.5

5 107. 9
100.0
95.6
92.7
87.7

«78.1
100.0
87.5
93.5
92.8

«81.9
100.0
90.6
94.6
101.9

108.2
106.0
94.1
98.1

94.8
86.7
78.2
80.0

92.3
95.4
92.9
92.7

91.0
84.4
77.8
81.0

95.0
86.1
83.5
82.2

49.9
49.9
49.6
49.5

46.6
45.4
44.8
45.2

89.0
90.0
92.2
91.9

97.6
101.2
98.8
100.3

83.6
86. 6~
89.8
95.5

96.6
87.9
100.3
102.5

81.6
86.8
83.8
86.1

84.5
83.8
87.4
90.4

49.6
49.6
49.7
49.8

46.4
47.1
47.1
47.1

1934
May
June
July
August

- .

September
October - _
November
DeCP.mfaPT

86.0 '
88.5
87.6
91.7

1925
January
February
March
April

90.0
95.1
96.6
94.2

96.0
94.6
92.6
87.6

91.8
96.1
97.0
91.1

89.7
93.1
94.0
91.2

90.1
96.4
97.9
97.3

91.5
95.8
96.0
87.9

104.7
104.4
106.0
104.2

90.9
94.0
100.3
98.7

92.0
98.0
101. 9
104.9

95.0
98.1
99.9
94.9

95.8
89.3
90.4
76.1

78.9
92.3
95.6
96.8

91.9
96.1
98.1
97.0

49.8
49.9
49.9
49.9

48.5
48.6
48.6
48.2

May
June
July
August

94.4
91.7
89.6
91.4

90.4
93.3
92.8
92.8

87.8
84.8
84.9
87.2

91.7
88.7
84.5
86.8

98.4
100.2
96.6
97.1

87.0
82.3
85.2
94.2

103.7
102.6
101.4
101.6

93.9
91.0
91.6
93.9

106.9
106.0
99.1
105.4

97.9
97.0
94.1
98.3

92.8
92.3
90.2
91.9

96.8
92.6
90.2
89.9

99.1
92.8
91.2
93.1

50.1
49.8
49.8
50.1

48. 1
47.4
47.5
47.5

September
October
November ._ _ .. _. _ _
"December

90.4
96.2
96.2
97.3

93.0
97.5
97.1
96.7

83.2
90.3
89.6
90.0

85.4
92.4
92.9
96.9

99.7
102.4
100.9
99.8

90.6
92.0
85.4
84.3

102.5
108.0
110.4
112.5

95.6
99.8
100. 5
100.6

103.4
109.1
108.8
106.3

92.6
99.2
102.3
105.7

91.9
99.0
100.6
101.2

90.9
99.5
101.0
96.9

90.6
93.2
93.0
98.9

50.0
50.0
49.7
49.9

48.3
48.3
48.5
49. 1

1926
January
February
March _ _
April

94.9
98.9
99.1
97 2

94.1
92.9
91.9
88.6

90.8
93.0
93.0
87.2

94.7
98.6
100.6
99.6

90.9
95.7
96.3
97.1

86.9
91.1
90.2
82.2

110.0
109.7
111. 7
111.0

100.2
100.8
105.8
104.8

97.7
100.8
103.8
105. 0

101.3
104.0
106.9
103.6

87.7
85.9
90.1
83.9

86.0
97.6
100.2
99.4

100.4
102.0
102.9
102.9

49.9
49.8
50.1
50.4

48.5
48.9
49.0
48.5

May
June
July
August

95.6
95 5
91.2
94.6

91.8
93.9
-93.5
93.5

83.1
81.4
76.2
80.6

98.0
98.2
2.8
94.8

98.3
100.0
95.4
99.6

70.4
82.7
86.8
93.7

111.0
110.8
108.5
109.2

100.0
100.0
96.9
98.9

110.1
112.4
104.0
110.5

99.9
97.5
91.9
94.0

83.3
88.6
85.2
84.4

96.8
94.7
88.3
94.7

100. 2
100.3
97.0
99.5

49.9
50.0
49.6
49.6

48.1
47.9
47.6
47.5

September
October
November.. _ _
December

95.1
98.6
95.4
95.6

96.3
97.9
95.8
90.4

82.9
88.1
84.8
89.2

96.0
99.4
96.0
96.3

100.2
102.0
100.0
96.4

93.6
93.6
87.4
86.0

110.8
114.2
115.0
116. 3

102. 5
104.6
103.6
103. 5

108. 1
111.2
108.9
104.8

93.6
98.0
95.7
95.6

89. 1
92.9
91.9
89.8

91.3
94.2
87.9
82.3

99.3
105.3
102.9
109.7

49.6
49.8
49.6

48.4
48.6
47.9

- -

_ -_ _ -

1937
January
February
. .
March
April

.

!__
i
-J

1
j

May
June
1 Compiled by the U. S.^ Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent weighted indexes of the amount of the pay roll at the date nearest the middle
of each month, for 52 industries combined into 12 groups as above. The groups are weighted in accordance with the aggregate earnings of the respective industries in 1919.
The 2 actual data are obtained from a varying number of reporting firms each month, the months of 1925 covering over 9,000 firms, employing almost 3,000,000 people.
Compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board from reports from 1,678 manufacturing plants employing 506,315 people in January, 1921, and representing 23
industries. The nominal hours per week represent the weighted number of hours the plants are supposed normally to operate, while the actual hours represent the average
man3 hours worked each week.
Includes enameled ware and brass, bronze, and copper products.
4
Average of last seven months of the year.
5 Average of last six months of the year.
6
 this group not available in 1922.
Data for



110

Table 86.—FACTORY TIME OPERATIONS
Total,
12
groups1

YEAR AND MONTH

Food
and
kindred
products

Textiles

and

their
products

Iron

and
and

steel

VehiLum- Leather Paper Chem- Stone,
Tocles Miscel- Ratio
and
icals
clay,
ber its fin- and
Non- hacco
actual
for
laneand
and
and its ished print- other glass ferrous manu- land
ous time to
manu- prodtrans- indus- capacing
prod- prod- metals ^ fac-

their
prod- jfacture
ucts

ucts

ucts

ture

ucts

portation

tries

AVERAGE PER CENT OF FULL TIME OPERATED

Per cent

1924 monthly average 3
1925 monthly average 1926 monthly average

91
93
95

87
88
93

88
93
94

89
93
96

94
95
97

90
91
93

95
95
97

90
95
97

92
91
94

90
96
96

91
92
95

93
96
97

92
94
96

72
77
82

1936
January
February __ _ .
March__
April

93
94
94
93

91
87
87
86

94
95
95
93

94
95
95
95

95
96
96
96

90
92
94
90

97
97
97
96

96
95
97
97

88
89
89
92

94
95
98
96

90
92
96
92

96
96
96
91

93
94
95
94

79
82
82
81

93
92
96
97

88
88
95
96

91
88
92
94

94
93
97
97

95
95
97
98

90
90
93
98

96
96
97
97

95
96
98
99

93
93
98
97

96
95
96
97

93
94
96
98

97
96
98
98

96
94
97
97

80

98
98
97
97

98
99
98
98

96
98
97
97

97
97
96
97

99
99
99
98

96
96
92
92

99
99
99
99

100
99
99
98

98
97
98
97

97
98
96
97

97
97
97
97

98
98
98
98

98
98
97
97

86
86
84
84

May
June
July
August

„_

_. __
_

September
October
November
December- .

•

78
83
84

1937
February
M[arch
April

May
June
AVERAGE PER CENT OF FULL CAPACITY OPERATED
79
83
87

1924 monthly average '
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

78
82
88

78
85
87

70
76
82

87
89
89

73
82
87

89
92
94

76
78
80

84
85
88

69
80
84

77
83
87

82
86
89

73
78
84

85
87
87
87

85
86
84
85

87
89
88
86

79
80
82
82

89
88
88
88

82
87
88
86

94
94
95
94

83
86
89
85

85
87
86
89

86
86
87
86

85
86
89
88

88
89
88
95

82
83
83
83

86
85
86
87

86
80
90
89

86
84
83
85

81
81
81
82

88
88
91
90

84
82
84
88

94
92
93
93

74
72
72
80

91
91
91
90

84
82
82
82

88
84
85
87

89
87
89
88

86
80
85
84

88
88
87
87

91
92
89
87

87
89
89
88

82
82
82
86

89
89
88
88

91
91
90
88

94
95
95
95

83
82
78
75

88
87
86
81

82
82
82
84

86
90
88
86

88
88
88
88

86
87
86
85

1936
January
February
March
April

- _ _-

May
June
July
August

- --

September
October
November
December

_-

1937
March
April

May
I

1
1 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, from reports of over 9,000 firms, employing almost 3,000,000 people showing, in the lower part of
table, the percentage of their capacity force employed each month and, in the upper part of the table, the percentage of full time worked by the force actually employed.
Details for individual industries of each group and percentage of firms operated at full capacity and at full time are given in "Employment in Selected Industries/' issued
each month by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2 These data, compiled by multiplying the percentage of capacity operated, as shown in the first column of the lower half of this table, by the percentage of time
operated, as shown in the first column of the upper half, indicate the approximate actual employment time relative to capacity.
3
4 Average of last 10 months of year.
Includes enameled ware, brass, bronze, and copper products.




Ill
Table 87.—DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT
MAIL-ORDER HOUSE SALES 1
Total

YEAR AND
MONTH

%
4
houses houses

4
3
houses houses

POSTAL RECEIPTS

Sears, MontRoe- gomery
buck Ward
& Co. &Co.

INDEXES

Eel. to Eel. to
1919
1913
1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly

av
av
av
av
av. .
av._av...

100

10O
105
120
154
186
203
264

monthly av...
monthly av._.
monthly av-monthly av...
monthly av...
monthly av...
monthly av._.

103
72
79
99
105
118
123

264
188
204
259
284
327
349

1925
September
October
November _
December

114
170
144
168

1926
January
February
March
April

Domestic4 (50 principal cities)

Total 2
50 selected
cities

POSTAL MONET ORDERS

Thousands

Thousands of dollars
$2, 525
2,598
2,684
2,898
2,860
3,367
5,051

Thous. Thouof dolls. sands

61, 440
62, 671
61, 067
83, 859

25, 017
23,351
24, 544
28,005
29, 831
31, 094

2,390
1,877
2,282
3,531
4,306
4,669

2,305
1,480
1,573
1,953
2,034
2,094
2,272

95, 832
86, 661
91, 131
97, 402
96, 469
101, 916
105, 138

2,801
3,154
3,065
3,546

29, 456
33,041
32, 016
35, 252

4,036
4,463
5,657
9,019

1,979
2,421
2,506
2,251

99, 472
120, 910
117, 365
110, 833

78, 898
74, 312
94, 968
87, 948

3,088
2,990
3,539
3,218

31, 189
30, 481
35,411
32, 687

4,223
4,408
5,424
4,620

1,778
2,145
2,372
2,620

92, 797
91, 497
113, 772
114, 878

10, 634
11, 276
9,868
9,417

83, 359
87, 257
79, 733
77, 674

3,109
3,214
2,970
2,892

32, 650
33, 289
32, 154
31, 517

4,571
5,294
5,361
5,601

2,571
2,419
1,833
1,689

117, 035
105, 948
88, 052
91, 763

9,972
11, 447
11, 677

83, 963
97, 263
97,417

2,895
3,208
3,320

31, 712
34, 551
35, 216

5,297
5,462

2,138
2,626
2,703
2,373

104, 106
123, 300
111, 157
107, 351

37, 693
26, 190
28, 695
36, 098
38, 421
43,173
45, 015

30, 233
21, 970
22, 969
29, 182
32, 074
36, 870
39, 330

21, 217
14, 834
15, 180
17, 962
18, 515
21, 529
22, 725

9,192
6,330
7,706
11, 220
13, 560
15, 341
16, 605

20, 688
20, 759 s $2, 157
22, 901 2,333
25, 085 2,593
26, 335 2,809
28, 831 3,068
30,605 3,274

5, 914
4,898
6,851
7,233
7,386
7,664

8,098
8,211
9,409
10, 391
10, 797
11, 161

72, 432
64, 827
68, 462
78, 913
84, 515
81, 287

2,059
2,107
2,340
2,684
2,981
3,105

309
464
396
473

41, 523
62, 216
52, 786
61, 299

34, 836
52, 340
44,618
53, 311

19, 359
30, 375
25, 824
30, 522

15, 477
21, 965
18, 794
22,789

28, 551
32, 489
29, 962
38, 656

3,002
3,352
2,964
4,126

7,063

9,716
12, 008
10, 916
13, 221

79, 336
99, 240
88,548
101, 440

116
111
130
121

336
322
357
344

42, 315
40, 489
47, 369
44, 064

37, 858
36, 268
40, 262
38, 841

22, 591
21, 423
21, 996
22, 998

15, 267
14, 845
18, 266
15, 843

29, 116
28, 088
33, 454
30, 851

3,193
3,172
3,525
3,234

10, 607
9,905
12, 543
11,411

May
June
._
July
August.. __!_

105
113
98
98

299
309
284
286

38, 408
41, 296
35, 670
35, 763

33, 724
34, 887
31, 995
32, 272

19, 339
18, 275
20, Oil
19, 605

14, 385
16, 612
11, 984
12, 667

28, 547
28, 719
26, 783
26, 714

2,985
2,952
3,073
3,003

September
October
November
December.

120
150
153
166

336
417
425
471

43, 742
54, 743
55, 802
60, 521

37, 907
46, 995
47, 869
53, 086

21, 648
26, 840
27, 991
29, 983

16, 259
20, 155
19, 878
23, 103

29, 976
32, 860
31, 868
40, 282

3,169
3,421
3,223
4,340

1937
January
February
March
April

8,219

8,533

8,171

7,634

Thousands of
agate lines
1,224
1,161
1,147
1,415
1,490
1,344
1,890

$3, 310
3,420
4,113
5,178
6,592
6,664
8,838

$13, 543
14, 611
17, 066
18, 380

Thousands of
dollars

Maga- News7
zine0 paper

$8, 526
6,781
$11, 467 4,464
12, 702 3,667
14, 657 3,230
17, 837 3,151
21, 713 3,030

$7, 965
8,427
9,389
12, 237
14, 856
16, 544
21, 494

._ _

For-

eign «
Second
Paid
Issued
50 in- class a
dus- (quartrial terly) Num- Value NumValue
ber
ber
cities

$11, 275
11, 847
13,498
17, 407
20, 982
22, 891
$36, 569 29, 772

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

ADVERTISING

6,313 $34, 812
7,248 40, 592
7,149 44, 863
6,784 50, 587
7,773 65, 356

1,315
1,470
1,610
1,711
1,895

1 821

May
June

1 Sales of four principal mail-order houses compiled by Federal Reserve Board and include Sears, Roebuck & Co., Montgomery Ward & Co., National Cloak & Suit Co.,
Larkin & Co. Data on two chief houses, extending back to 1913, total the sales of Sears, Roebuck & Co. and Montgomery Ward & Co.
2
Data from U. S. Post Office Department, comprising receipts for transporting all classes of mail. The 50 selected cities cover the largest cities in the country, the industrial cities comprising the 50 next largest. The war revenue act of Oct. 3, 1917, provided for an increase in the rate for first-class letter mail from 2 cents per ounce or
fraction thereof prior to Nov. 1, 1917, to 3 cents per ounce or fraction thereof, from Nov. 1, 1917, to July 1,1919, and an increase of the rate on postal and post cards from 1
cent to 2 cents each during the same period. Since July 1, 1919, the old rates on first-class mail have been restored. Under this act a stamp tax of 1 cent for each 25 cents
postage charge or fraction thereof is collectible on parcel-post matter. Effective April 15,1925, the new postal rates applicable almost entirely to matter other than first class
have operated to increase the magnitude of these data, thereby affecting their comparability from this point forward.
3 Note that these data from U. S. Post Office Department represent quarters ending in the months specified and the annual figures represent quarterly averages for each
year, not monthly averages. Second-class mail comprises regular mailings of periodicals. The war revenue act of Oct. 3,1917, provided for a series of graduated annual rate
increases 1on second-class mail as follows, compared with a flat rate of 1 cent per pound previous to July 1,1918. From July 1,1918, to June 30, 1919,1M cents, and since July
1,1919, 1 A cents per pound, these changes applying regardless of zone or distance, to portions of publications devoted to reading matter. For the advertised portions the
country was divided into eight zones, each with a graduated rate and its corresponding annual increase, beginning with July 1,1918, and reaching the maximum on July
1,1921, making, for the first time, a differentiation between the rates on reading and advertising matter.
4
Total of 50 cities transacting two-thirds of the total money-order business of the country, from the U. S. Post Office Department. Money orders paid include, in addition to those both issued and payable in the 50 cities, those presented for payment but issued at any of the other offices in the United States and the 22 foreign countries,
mostly in North America and West Indies, to which domestic postage rates apply.
6
Money orders issued to 67 principal foreign countries, representing practically the total international money orders issued by U. S. Post Office Department.
« These figures represent the number of lines of advertising carried by the 60 leading magazines dated for the month noted, as compiled by Printer's Ink, classified as
follows: 20 general, 15 womens', 16 class, and 9 weeklies.
7 Compiled by the New York Evening Post from 22 identical cities: New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis, Boston, Baltimore, Los Angeles,
Buffalo, San Francisco, Milwaukee, Washington, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Columbus, Louisville, St. Paul, Birmingham, and Houston. For
the years 1916 to 1918 no reports were available for Boston, Louisville, Houston, and Columbus. The totals for those years were computed from the actual reports of the
18 other cities, allowing 13.85 per cent of the total to the four missing cities, the average ratio of those cities to the total in the subsequent years.
8
Six months' average, July to December, inclusive.




112

Table 88.—CHAIN-STORE SALES
[Relative numbers for base year in bold-faced type; numerical data on opposite page]
GROCERIES
(27 chains) 3

DRUG
(9 chains)

CIGAR
(3 chains)

SHOE
(6 chains)

MUSIC
(4 chains)

CANDY
(5 chains)

With
Actual seasonal
corrections

YEAB AND MONTH

FIVE AND
TEN
(5 chains)
With
Actual seasonal
correction 2

With
Actual seasonal
correction 2

With
Actual seasonal
correction a

With
Actual seasonal
correction 2

With
Actual seasonal
correction 2

With
Actual seasonal
correction 2

Relative to 1919

100

133
132
128

120
113
114

100
109
86
101

10O
138
142
147

188
214
264
309

1934
. . . ._

May
June
July
August _ . .

100
121
123
127

165
185
209
229

144
150
169
196

135
138
142
154

123
133
139
148

113
101
122
128

176
190
199
215

100

1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average .

January ..
February
March
April

10O
120
124
140

100

146
130
151

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average

205
201
200
210

141
143
149
145

146
150
147
149

119
124
136
130

137
140
140
136

99
93
118
178

130
132
118
153

84
97
99
88

102
112
110
103

154
167
184
205

184
190
182
205

214
203
214
211

174
162
163
172

183
177
179
181

150
143
148
152

153
146
147
151

143
131
128
138

141
134
129
141

150
140
113
108

130
132
123
138

82
75
72
91

99
94
97
102

186
169
177
180

193
181
181
179

210
240
232
253

221
234
230
242

169
203
199
366

183
188
191
198

145
159
145
187

147
156
164
153

137
144
138
192

137
137
139
142

124
138
146
186

129
122
134
142

110
124
111
184

110
102
87
98

189
199
186
282

192
194
195
188

250
233
252
258

249
243
233
255

151
156
177
195

207
209
185
208

155
146
160
159

161
161
159
164

122
119
131
134

141
140
135
139

107
100
127
177

141
149
127
152

92
99
105
107

112
120
116
126

162
175
188
210

193
207
186
210

254
257
269
255

191
187
183
195

201
203
201
205

163
167
166
171

166
170
164
171

143
134
136
142

140
137
137
145

149
152
122
120

129
142
134
153

96
99
104
128

116
125
140
143

195
184
181
202

202
197
185
202

245
318
272
332

258
309
270
318

191
237
220
427

206
219
211
231

169
179
167
225

172
175
177
185

142
151
136
212

142
145
138
157

129
164
136
188

135
145
126
143

136
141
139
214

136
117
111
114

202
215
195
280

204
209
205
191

286
287
302
329

284
299
279
324

166
170
199
202

228
227
207
216

178
172
194
191

185
189
192
196

127
127
143
150

146
151
147
156

108
97
143
166

142
145
143
143

101
103
112
111

122
126
124
130

167
173
206
226

199
205
204
226

322
309
316
295

_ _

173
179
170
190

254
254
259
243

September
October
November _ . .
December

126
140
163
178

214
200
206
201

. . . >_

204
200
184
208

321
314
329
310

214
204
206
204

225
222
227
215

188
184
195
193

191
187
194
192

160
152
155
148

157
156
157
151

174
153
145
122

151
144
159
155

109
118
108
121

131
149
145
136

220
204
210
194

228
218
214
193

307
334
347
372

323
325
344
356

211
257
247
466

227
237
236
252

192
206
198
261

195
202
210
215

153
162
150
222

152
155
151
164

142
158
150
215

148
140
138
164

139
151
146
223

137
125
117
118

218
227
232
303

221
221
244
208

1935

January _
February
March
April .
May
June
July
August...

__.
.

_

September
October .
November
December
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

_
..
1936
_

_

September
October
November.
December

_

. . __
_ ._ _

1937

January
February
March
April
May
June




See footnotes on opposite page

I
j

113

Table 89.—CHAIN-STORE SALES 1
[Base year in bold-faced type; relative numbers on opposite page
GROCERIES
(37 chains)
YEAR AND MONTH

Thousands of
dollars

Number of
stores

$28, 046
40, 794
36, 351
42,404

1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av

FIVE AND TEN
(5 chains)
Thousands of
dollars

Number of
stores

DRUG
(9 chains)
Thousands of
dollars

Number of
stores

$3,917
4,737
4,826
4,985

$17, 100
20, 491
21, 160
23, 875

CIGAR
(3 chains)
Thousands of
dollars

Number of
stores

$5, 525
7,852
7,800
7,538

SHOE
(6 chains)
Thousands of
dollars

CANDY
(5 chains) 3

MUSIC
(4 chains)

Number of
stores

Thousands of
dollars

Number of
stores

Number of

stores

$949
1,308
1,348
1,391

$905
989
775
914

$2,337
2,804
2,651
2,663

Thousands of
dollars

1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av _ _ _

52, 732
60,119
74, 094
88,875

15, 362
18, 351
22, 244
25,423

28, 172
31,574
35, 761
39, 112

1,819
1,958
2,084
2,268

5,655
5,899
6,620
7,345

492
525
553
644

8,025
8,197
8,404
9,126

2,737
2,776
3,015
3,328

2,880
3,103
3,254
3,452

343
407
488
551

1,026
917
1,101
1,161

59
55
56
60

2,133
2,307
2,333
2,611

1924
January
February
March
April

57,625
56,233
56,032
59, 028

17, 161
17,294
17, 456
17, 703

21,531
23,881
27,922
30, 398

1,893
1,894
1,920
1,933

5,506
5,583
5,831
5,683

520
521
524
524

7,052
7,335
8,042
7,713

2,770
2,699
2,721
2,741

2,308
2,166
2,754
4,170

365
371
383
398

761
876
894
795

59
57
57
55

1,876
2,031
2,230
2,494

May
June
July
August

60,071
56,002
57, 887
56, 356

17, 973
18,297
18, 526
18,717

29, 822
27, 736
27,861
29,361

1,930
1,952
1,969
1,975

5,888
5,615
5,798
5,948

525
526
529
529

8,499
7,748
7,612
8,180

2,754
2,772
2,760
2,797

3,516
3,279
2,642
2,529

405
406
405
407

741
677
652
821

55
55
55
55

2,264
2,053
2,150
2,181

September
_ _
October
November..
December

58, 816
67,404
65, 031
70, 947

18,896
19,090
19, 395
19, 707

28, 965
34, 751
34, 021
62, 634

1,986
1,996
2,010
2,033

5,677
6,229
5,669
7,314

533
524
526
527

8,131
8,520
8,168
11, 362

2,814
2,815
2,829
2,841

2,902
3,218
3,400
4,358

415
425
447
452

994
1,118
1,002
1,668

55
54
54
54

2,298
2,420
2,253
3,430

186
179

1925
January
February _
March.
April

70, 161
65, 368
70,792
72, 412

20, 033
20,385
20,835
21, 297

25, 746
26,623
30,201
33, 357

2,028
2,036
2,048
2,059

6,066
5,730
6,285
6,243

528
528
531
532

7,255
7,026
7,786
7,919

2,817
2,809
2,884
2,908

2,499
2,334
2,968
4,138

451
456
462
471

831
893
946
970

54
55
54
55

1,966
2,123
2,283
2,545

178
195
196
212

May
June
July
August

71, 315
71, 105
72, 649
68, 189

21, 751
21, 920
22, 640
23,017

32, 615
31, 973
31, 219
33, 331

2,069
2,078
2,081
2,101

6,390
6,546
6,490
6,711

541
548
550
551

8,468
7,928
8,040
8,417

2,930
2,966
3,008
3,088

3,480
3,546
2,855
2,810

480
491
492
498

870
896
944
1,156

54
58
55
57

2,367
2,234
2,196
2,455

220
225
232
239

September
October
November
December

68, 631
89, 210
76, 230
93, 064

23,309
23, 655
23, 897
24, 190

32, 710
40, 582
37, 676
73, 098

2,108
2,126
2,135
2,136

6,630
7,015
6,522
8,809

560
568
589
615

8,429
8,969
8,072
12, 536

3,118
3,165
3,224
3,259

3,015
3,823
3,186
4,398

504
508
516
521

1,234
1,272
1,257
1,939

57
57
58
60

2,449
2,606
2,372
2,396

240
222
231
234

80, 137
80, 460
84, 676
92, 205

24, 327
24, 540
24,743
24, 889

28, 334
29, 012
33, 963
34, 529

2,149
2,156
2,166
2,176

6,978
6,735
7,586
7,474

612
622
619
625

7,545
7,544
8,442
8,886

3,265
3,266
3,270
3,288

2,524
2,274
3,340
3, 880

522
522
529
538

911
932
1,013
1,000

60
61
59
-59

2,028
2,101
2,504
2,745

232
229
236
249

90, 215
86, 769
88, 856
82, 976

25, 101
25, 371
'25, 607
25, 793

36, 561
34, 876
35, 282
34, 877

2,194
2,208
2,222
2,234

7,370
7,226
7,656
7,548

606
613
631
645

9,489
8,979
9,210
8,770

3,282
3,310
3,321
3,335

4,063
3,586
3,382
2,842

547
556
561
553

982
1,071
976
1,095

59
59
60
60

2,670
2,476
2,550
2,353

251
2(59
276
275

85, 082
93, 639
97, 274
104, 206

25, 923
26, 114
26, 315
26, 357

36, 073
43, 960
42, 233
79, 646

2,252
2,272
2,885
2,301

7,531
8,078
7, 739
10, 223

652
660
704
733

9,037
9,607
8,862
13, 138

3,354
3,389
3,424
3,434

3,313
3,684
3,501
5,029

566
566
569
576

1,244
1,366
1, 318
2,018

61
62
62
61

2,649
2,754
2,818
3,684

274
263
254
259

1936
January
February
March
April

_ _

-

May
June
July __
August
September
October. .. .
November.
December

3120
» 134
219
256

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June
i Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics. Monthly data from 1919 on grocery and candy chains (but not comparable with present
data) appeared in January, 19'24, issue (No. 29) p. 49. The music chains operate locally in the West, but otherwise the data cover the larger chain-store organizations operating
nationally.
> Based on variati9ns in the 4-year period 1919 to 1922. For details of computation see Federal Reserve Bulletin for January, 1924. Correction of the actual data, to
eliminate seasonal variation, may be accomplished by dividing the index for each month by the seasonal index for the corresponding month given in the table on p. 154 of
the February, 1924, issue (No. 30) of the SURVEY.
 chains prior to January, 1923. The average number of stores for 1923 and 1924 is also for 4 chains only. The index numbers, however, are strictly comparable for
3 Four
thft fin tire Deriod,
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ as allowance has been made for the extra chain in the base beginning with 1923.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

114

Table 90.—TEN-CENT CHAIN STORES
TOTAL 2
(4 chains)
YEAR AND
MONTH

Sales
Thous.
of dolls.

1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av
1934
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
NovemberDecember
1925
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September .
October
November
December. __

F. W. WOOLWORTH CO.

Average
per store Stores

Sales

Stores

S.S.KRESGE McCRORY
STORES
CO.
CORP.

S. H. KRESS
CO.

METROPOLITAN

Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores

Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
Dollars Number of dolls. Number of dolls. Num- of dolls. Num- of dolls. Num- of dolls. Num- of dolls. Num- of dolls. Number
ber
ber
ber
ber
ber

$7, 972
8,544
9,582
11, 278
12,806
14, 520
16, 575

$7, 909
7,839
8,086
8,398
8,820
9,680
10, 728

1,008
1,090
1,185
1,343
1,452
1,500
1, 545

$5, 519
5,801
6,333
7,257
8,174
8,931
9,958

684
737
805
920
,000
,039
,081

$1, 105
1,341
1,745
2,200
2,508
3,026
3, 556

100
118
140
161
165
169
171

$450
411
468
566
655
800
957

110
116
117
132
143
147
148

$898
991
1,036
1, 255
1,469
1,763
2,104

114
119
123
130
144
145
145

19, 575
20, 561
23, 344
27, 555
30, 922
35, 038
38, 158

12, 234
12, 560
13, 780
15, 199
15, 809
16, 968
17,188

1,600
1,637
1,694
1,813
1,956
2,065
2,220

11, 741
12, 302
13, 934
16, 120
17, 956
19, 912
21, 136

,111
,137
,176
,261
1,364
1,420
1,484

4,270
4,655
5,433
6,820
7,508
8,831
9,902

188
199
212
233
256
298
368

1,198
1,195
1,423
1,781
2,103
2,465
2,797

156
159
161
167
176
181
199

2,415
2,409
2,554
2,834
3,355
3,830
4,323

145
142
145
152
160
166
169

21, 096
23, 406
27, 344
29, 725

11, 617
12, 811
14, 839
16, 016

1,816
1,827
1,843
1,856

12, 134
13,431
15, 903
17, 257

1,263
1,271
1,285
1,293

5,457
6,019
6,875
7,370

234
236
235
240

1,352
1,612
1,835
2,085

167
168
168
169

2,153
2,344
2,731
3,013

152
152
155
154

29, 212
27, 210
27, 329
28, 789

15, 672
14, 435
14, 369
15,089

1,864
1,885
1,902
1,908

17, 075
15, 485
15, 950
16, 927

1,299
1,316
1,328
1,334

7,157
6,478
6,371
6,802

242
242
245
245

1,963
1,877
1,909
2,060

169
170
171
171

3,017
3,370
3,099
3,000

154
157
258
158

28, 405
34, 054
33, 292
61, 209

14, 802
17, 654
17, 134
31, 293

1,919
1,929
1,943
1,956

16, 528
20, 400
19, 369
35, 025

1,345
1,351
1,364
1,364

6,851
7,873
8,252
14, 592

245
247
247
256

1,903
2,102
2,244
4,290

171
172
174
176

3,123
3,679
3,427
7,302

158
159
158
160

25, 376
26, 130
29, 684
32, 722

12, 932
13,271
14, 977
16, 427

1,957
1,969
1,982
1,992

14, 205
14, 853
16, 917
18, 895

1,366
1,371
1,381
1,389

6,672
6,644
7,453
8,150

259
262
267
267

1,703
1,783
2,021
2,265

176
176
174
176

2,796
2,850
3,293
3,412

160
160
160
160

32,008
31, 258
30, 621
32, 669

15, 980
15, 582
15,200
16, 061

2,003
2,012
2,015
2,034

18, 510
17, 827
17, 829
18, 781

1,397
1,403
1,405
1,411

7,838
7,898
7,510
8,178

273
275
275
285

2,115
2,190
2,144
2,329

173
173
173
175

3,545
3,343
3,138
3,381

160
161
162
163

32, 079
39, 739
36, 886
71, 285

15, 717
19, 319
17,854
34, 508

2,041
2,057
2,066
2,065

18, 129
22, 976
20, 677
39, 345

1,415
1,420
1,425
1,420

8,222
9,992
9,425
17, 984

287
293
293
298

2,288
2,725
2,673
5,348

175
179
182
181

3,440
4,046
4,111
8,608

164
165
166
166

13, 362
13, 641
15, 893
16, 049

2,078
2,084
2,094
2,104

15, 168
15, 478
18, 309
18, 967

1,423
1,423
1, 431
1,435

7,451
7,496
8,472
8,591

305
312
316
322

2,102
2,174
2,654
2,446

183
182
180
180

3,046
3,280
3,844
3,764

167
167
167
167

16, 882
15, 987
16, 077
15, 819

2,114
2,128
2,142
2,154

20, 263
19, 021
19, 395
19, 015

1,442
1,451
1,460
1,465

8,993
8,834
8,886
8,713

325
329
332
338

2,486
2,358
2,459
2,493

180
181
183
184

3,947
3,807
3,696
3,854

167
167
167
167

16, 207
19, 400
18, 704
34, 909

2,172
2,191
2,204
2,220

19, 339
24, 801
22, 533
41, 347

1,471
1,482
1,484
1,484

9,439
10, 535
10, 957
20, 451

345
354
362
368

2,543
2,910
2,912
6,031

189
187
189
199

3,881
4,260
4,822
9,669

167
168
169
169

1926
January
27,?67
February. _ _ 28, 428
March
33, 279
April
33, 768
35,689
May
June _
34, 020
July .
34, 436
August
_. 34, 075
September
35, 202
October
42, 506
November
41, 224
December
77, 498

W. T. GRANT
CO.

F. & W.
GRAND

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June

19
19
19
22
23
28
37
41

435
475
577
673
610
527
532
571
562
704
726
1,429

68
68
68

378
399
511
553
463
474
460
472
469
634
593
1,171

23
23
24
24
24
24
24
25
25
27
27
28

1,342
1,474
1,734
1,910
1,940
1,796
1,498
1,553
1,698
2,561
2,710
4,630

60
60
60
62
62
62
63
64
64
67
70
70

509
507
518
640
627
623
592
664
636
829
794
1,840.

66
66
66
66
66
67
67
68
63
69
70
72

415
471
537
635
556
636
572
622
646
849
838
1,757

29
29
29
30
32
33
33
34
33
34
36
37

1,816
1,796
2,011
2,330
2,293
2,357
1,806
2,006
2,176
3,317
2,922
5,334

70
70
70
71
73
73
73
74
74
77
77
77

567
583
684
748
867
856
831
801
872
1,048
1,010
2,141

72
72
72
74
80
80
80
80
81
81
81
81

641
632
763
785
801
779
790
703
799
1,025
954
1,821

37
37
38
38
38
40
40
40
40
41
41
41

2,065
1,951
2,307
2,553
2,851
2,640
2,417
2,371
2,772
3,799
3,726
6,455

77
78
80
81
83
88
89
92
95
101
104
106

$478
868
538
520
615
652
732
917

U

1

68
72
81

$661
735
305
360
452
548
711
874

$253
301
370
495
644
845
1,051
1,257
1,695
2,070
2,514
2,992

22
25
30
32
33
38
45
50
58
70
77
106

I

!

This table is submitted in response to a demand for publication of the figures of sales of the large individual ten-cent chains, as compiled from published reports in
itly
financial papers or as reported direc> by the companies. Sales data represent the retail sales in dollar values of the ten-cent chains shown, while the annual figures of stores
Monthly data on sales from 1920 appeared in May,
operated rep
10 cents, some selling articles valued as high as
1922,'issue C
' 2'lncludes~F7w7



>., McCrory Stores Corp., and S. H. Kress Co.

115
Table 91.—RESTAURANT AND OTHER CHAIN STORES

Total, 3 chains
Childs
Co.
YEAR AND MONTH

Sales

Average Stores
per
store

Thous.
Numof dolls. Dollars ber

1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av

Thous. of dollars

$3, 681 $13, 891
3,617 13,011
3,798 12,660
4,020 12, 642
4,072 12, 568
4,181 12, 443
4,485

1935
May
June _
July
August

Penney United Cigar
Isaac Silver Hartmann J. C.Co.
Corp.
& Bros.
Stores Co.
(furnishings) (clothing)

A. Schulte,
Inc.
(cigars)

Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores

Sales

$710
718
756
898
1,141
1,228
1,384

1920 mo av
1921 mo. av__
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av__

OTHER CHAIN STORES

J.R.
Thompson
Co.

Waldorf
System, Inc.

RESTAURANT CHAINS

Sales Stores Sales Stores

Owl Drug
Co.

Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Numof dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber
45 $2, 465
67 2,492
80 2,587
117 2,885
165 3,576
192 4,336
197 5,172

$1, 091

8

$220
297
402
701
1,240
1,778
2,398

8
10
12
14
19

1,294
965
1,173
1,503
1,638
1,468
1,571

8
9
10
16
16
17
15

3,569
3,887
4,086
5,183
6,188
7,539
9,640

312
313
371
475
569
671
747

6,637
6,339
6,079
6,272
6,232
6,266
6,687

$375
448
571
696
746
937

265
278
300
318
324
336

1,828
1,774
1,864
1, 933
1,945
2,028
2,165

$790
820
964
1,103
1,086
1,069
1,122

1,063
1,023
970
984
1,041
1,083
1,199

2 $170
202
233
266
329
408

26

18
20
22
25
26
29
32

$672

224

$325
360
364
381
443
566
798

2,439
2,572
2,980
3,134

1,084
1,230
1,370
1,666
1,892
2,079
2,396

224
224
224
250
255
268
292

1,030
1,138
1,190
1,446
1,452
1,404
1,411

36
40
43
80
84
88
95

4,081
3,851
4,022
4,222

12, 674
11, 886
12, 414
12, 872

322
324
324
328

1,919
1,810
1,943
2,109

1,074
1,001
1,024
1,042

1,088
1,040
1,056
1,071

258
274
336
248

13
13
1.3
13

1,966
1,199
1,071
1,199

17
17
16
16

7,154
7,037
5,883
6,582

590
591
593
618

6,378
5,965
6,020
6,303

2,656
2,690
2,731
2,810

2,041
1,913
1,965
2,057

263
265
266
267

1,306
1,455
1,418
1,453

85
85
85
85

4,289
4,543
4,278
4,657

12, 997
13, 732
12, 847
13, 863

330
331
333
336

2,151
2,246
2,107
2, 275

1,076
1,157
1,077
1,170

1,062
1,140
1,094
1,212

248
392
355
731

14
14
14
14

1,422
1, 526
1,248
1,434

16
16
16
17

8,317
12, 147
9,853
12, 612

645
644
668
671

6,326
6,661
5,992
9,187

2,840
2,888
2,946
2,980

2,050
2,257
2,034
3,234

267
266
267
268

1,330
1,451
1,252
1,886

87
87
87
88

1936
January
February
March
April

4,440
4,088
4,519
4,486

13, 214
12, 167
13, 409
13, 312

336
336
337
337

2,120
1,926
2,141
2,171

1,126
1,045
1,150
1,113

1,194
1,117
1,228
1,202

218
239
373
407

14
14
14
15

925
1,187
1,338
2,338

16
16
16
16

4,970
5,478
7,975
8,762

671
671
687
692

5,608
5,610
6, 267
6, 504

2,985
2,984
2,986
2, 995

1,895
1,894
2,133
2,341

269
271
273
282

1,261
1,194
1,367
1,291

88
88
88
88

May.
June
July
August

4,533
4,412
4,297
4,426

13, 491
13, 131
12, 751
13, 056

336
336
337
339

2,165
2,113
2,050
2,189

1,131
1,089
1,076
1,084

1,237
1,210
1,171
1,153

326
306
399
314

15
15
16
16

2,012
1,630
1,242
1,643

16
16
15
15

9,797
9,093
8,327
8,083

694
697
697
721

6,945
6,623
6,783
6,472

2,993
3,017
3,027
3,039

2,502
2,314
2,388
2,260

278
282
285
287

1,253
1,408
1,441
1,403

88
88
91
91

September
October
November
December

4,622
4,748
4,491
4,759

13, 515
13, 843
13, 132

342
343
342

2,289
2,310
2,181
2,321

1,162
1,194
1,117
1,176

1,171
1,244
1,193
1,262

373
511
480
951

17
17
18
19

2,054
1,596
1,393
1,496

15 10, 622
15 13, 247
15 13, 334
15 15, 986

735
743
743
747

6,560
6,878
6,517
9,478

3,059
3,091
3,125
3,134

2,442
2,693
2,312
3,574

286
. 289
291
292

1,423
1,597
1,347
1,949

94
95
94
95

September
October
November
December __ _ _

1927
January.
February
March
April
May
June

i

.'

i
1 Data compiled from published reports in financial papers or reported directly by the company to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. These
sales data represent money values. Data for Jones Brothers Tea Co. from 1920 appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 56, Month.y data since 1920 for the Childs
Co. and Waldorf System are shown in the October, 1923, issue (No. 26), pp. 58 and 59. Monthly data for Schulte Cigar Stores from 1921 appeared in June, 1923, issue (No.
22), p. 49, while, for Penney, United Cigar and Owl Drug, monthly sales from 1920 were given in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 111. Yearly data represent number of stores
in operation at end of the year indicated.
2
Seven months' average, June to December, inclusive.




116

Table 92.—DEPARTMENT-STORE SALES 1
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]
VALUE OF SALES, BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS
YEAR AND MONTH

RichClevePhilaSan
Boston New York delphia
Atlanta Chicago MinneDallas
mond
land
apolis
(24 stores) (63 stores) (22 stores) (54 stores) (23 stores) (35 stores) (63 stores) 23 stores).2 (21 stores) 2 Francisco
(31 stores)

Total
(359
stores)

10O
119
114
116

100
118
112
114

100
128
114
114

100
113
106
101

10O
119
101
94

10O
123
110
114

100
112
102
99

100
120
99
92

100
121
116
121

100

116
114
119
127
126
128
134

127
132
138
143

127
126
129
133

130
128
131
133

111
117
124
129

104
101
106
110

132
133
142
153

105
104
107
99

98
102
109
113

139
143
149
158

124
125
131
136

120
101
113
137

120
103
118
137

110
111
120
136

109
112
120
145

94
87
109
128

85
83
94
107

112
112
123
145

88
77
94
115

85
82
94
101

132
121
134
139

110
102
115
133

May
June
__ . _ _ _ . . . .
July
August, _

132
131
89
86

132
127
93
83

124
123
82
85

133
126
94
101

116
118
85
78

104
95
73
72

134
125
99
108

109
99
81
89

105
95
71
70

146
125
116
136

127
12,0
91
93

September
October .
November
December

115
137
140
215

127
161
153
226

109
144
153
213

117
134
139
207

106
137
137
213

94
120
113
173

132
135
154
217

102
116
111
162

114
126
115
171

130
157
144
238

119
141
141
210

January
February
March.
April

110
94
110
136

120
107
124
140

105
101
125
134

107
106
125
142

93
89
119
132

83
84
99
109

112
107
127
149

92
81
97
116

92
90
107
110

128
113
142
146

108
101
121
136

May June - July
August

128
134
92
88

132
132
94
90

121
127
85
86

132
128
98
103

117
123
91
87

104
98
78
78

139
139
105
113

107
103
81
92

108
98
72
76

148
134
123
140

128
126
95
98

September
October _ _
November. _
December

118
156
143
225

128
186
158
243

111
167
167
222

115
160
134
218

105
160
146
230

89
139
122
190

145
173
154
244

104
135
105
167

112
141
115
183

139
168
158
253

121
165
145
226

131
93
119
133

124
108
131
138

112
103
138
128

108
106
127
133

103
91
130
126

88
92
108
114

119
119
145
147

85
76
94
107

96
93
111
108

129
117
158
150

114
104
130
133

134
134
94
97

139
137
99
99

137
129
87
89

137
126
100
108

129
123
96
93

114
104
80
82

159
146
114
122

102
93
81
84

115
107
79
91

152
142
124
151

137
130
99
105

122
154
157
235

136
177
170
254

116
160
166
228

123
152
147
223

110
154
156
235

92
125
129
189

164
171
178
251

103
109
102
157

114
134
126
185

158
169
168
278

131
158
157
234

1919
1920
1921
1922
1924
1924
1925
1926

100

monthly average .
monthly average
monthly average - monthly average ..'... .
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

January
February
March
April

1934
_
_

120
110
111

1935

January
February
March
April

1936
-

May
j June
July
August
September
October
November
December

_

,

1

1937
February
April

May

i Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics. Index numbers are based upon dollar values and are given by Federal reserve districts.
3
In calculating bases, estimates are made for sales of stores in the Minneapolis and Dallas districts for the months of 1919 for which there are no reports.




117

Table 93.—DEPARTMENT-STORE STOCKS

1

[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]
VALUE OF STOCKS AT END OF MONTH, BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS
YEAR AND MCNTH

San
Total
RichClevePhilaMinne- Dallas
Boston New York delphia
(314
mond Atlanta Chicago apolis
land
(24 stores) (63 stores) (13 stores) (52 stores) (19 stores) (22 stores) (51 stores) (22 stores) (14 stores) Francisco stores) 3
(29 stores)

100

100

100

134
105
109

100
152
124
123

100

119
118
131

100
134
114
112

100

136
115
116

100
139
117
110

100

126
108
115

119
96
97

143
116
109

100
132
116
118

100
136
115
116

122
123
122
121

125
130
133
137

150
154
181
189

125
131
131
130

121
126
126
127

119
116
112
116

147
152
152
155

110
109
112
101

116
107
121
119

130
137
134
138

' 129
132
135
137

111
115
128
128

117
119
130
136

132
152
162
162

110
126
137
141

104
121
140
134

109
123
125
124

128
145
163
162

97
106
114
112

107
118
126
125

125
131
143
148

116
127
139
141

May
June
July
August

126
119
118
113

131
122
115
120

152
146
141
144

138
128
120
123

130
122
113
116

121
113
109
109

154
145
142
149

113
106
102
106

120
114
110
122

141
134
132
131

136
127
123
126

September
October
November
December

125
135
141
120

133
146
147
125

160
171
172
151

136
146
145
120

128
143
145
117

118
126
123
96

158
170
168
141

115
121
122
99

129
133
132
105

140
147
148
124

137
147
148
124

112
115
126
127

118
123
135
139

147
167
185
186

112
125
137
140

109
118
131
132

99
107
113
114

137
145
156
157

99
106
117
116

103
113
125
126

123
126
136
140

119
127
139
141

125
112
113
114

134
128
120
124

179
174
164
179

136
129
120
126

124
123
119
118

114
108
103
113

153
143
140
149

115
109
107
111

123
114
111
123

134
128
129
133

136
129
124
131

125
132
140
119

140
148
153
131

195
210
211
176

137
141
145
123

135
138
147
120

121
124
126
102

158
168
175
148

120
122
124
101

134
135
135
111

140
147
148
124

143
149
154
129

110
113
124
125

125
128
142
142

167
183
201
201

111
125
137
134

113
120
128
131

111
112
122
125

143
151
160
159

96
101
110
110

109
118
128
130

127
132
141
145

125
131
142
143

123
116
111
111

138
131
124
128

184
177
171
175

133
126
118
122

132
126
119
118

116
110
108
109

153
147
137
152

108
101
94
97

125
114
110
117

140
132
129
134

138
131
125
130

125
136
141
121

142
152
157
131

180
221
216
187

137
146
151
124

135
146
149
119

122
128
127
102

162
174
177
142

103
105
105
85

126
129
126
97

143
152
156
128

142
153
156
128

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly
1924 monthly
1925 monthly
1926 monthly

average
average
average . _
average

1924
January
February . . _
March .
..
April

.

_.

1925
January
February .
._ _
March . __
April
May
June - ._.._
July
August

_ .

__

September .
October
November
December

_.

1936

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December

.«

-

.

. _

1937

January
February
March
April
May
June
1
2

_

Data compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, and are based upon values.
Weighted index based upon number of employees in retail stores as shown by latest available census data, '.For details, see Federal Reserve Bulletin for February, 1923.




118

Table 94.—WHOLESALE TRADE BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]

Cleveland

Richmond

Chicago

Kansas City

100

100

10O

100

100

69
71

89
93

96
106

112
112

87
89

86
90

99
92

92
86

112
115

99
110
109
106

79
83
85
86

101
97
97
97

111
113
114
118

118
126
118
129

126
119
124
132

100
103
106
106

100
97
102
101

98
96
103
98

94
104
104
106

132
144
147
153

80
90
90
91

104
117
106
117

77
75
76
86

93
101
96
97

110
105
110
107

125
120
121
112

116
111
117
116

98
92
98
99

97
92
91
93

92
87
96
95

97
91
99
101

135
131
148
144

84
91
79
73

95
99
89
76

123
138
127
106

99
95
82
79

103
108
98
85

117
128
109
109

130
146
113
120

116
125
113
118

107
107
103
100

102
108
94
91

98
115
101
98

112
124
108
106

154
171
139
134

95
85
90
82

68
64
72
67

75
73
79
76

99
87
97
96

85
81
82
75

96
82
98
88

116
109
121
115

129
126
135
117

124
115
127
126

110
101
108
105

95
89
106
104

101
91
102
102

118
102
103
104

145
130
156
151

86
85
88
85

80
80
83
89

70
73
77
75

80
89
92
98

100
116
112
109

74
75
84
92

91
97
96
95

106
110
111
108

108
113
112
96

114
120
123
124

100
99
104
103

96
101
99
104

99
99
105
100

94
95
96
99

136
139
145
140

89
95
83
81

94
99
94
95

99
105
91
96

81
86
75
69

95
97
91
80

127
141
125
100

106
96
85
82

103
116
108
88

120
133
110
111

113
151
110
107

134
136
119
130

116
116
105
103

111
116
99
100

109
120
103
105

114
119
99
102

162
170
149
143

77
74
82
80

69
67
75
73

73
70
77
75

101
92
104
93

61
60
70
72

75
71
81
82

93
84
97
100

86
83
84
84

94
85
97
100

111
110
133
123

107
125
153
142

126
117
146
139

118
105
116
104

95
91
113
106

91
90
107
96

106
102
110
98

155
137
166
155

73
77
76
71

87
97
97
94

72
80
74
76

74
77
75
73

86
85
80
87

74
81
79
78

84
100
95
101

101
109
114
104

80
86
84
90

96
104
100
97

111
116
114
115

121
131
125
127

126
128
129
127

99
96
98
101

97
101
96
96

96
97
95
95

97
97
100
120

139
141
146
146

79
88
84
77

109
107
110
101

89
87
82
76

84
81
76
69

95
89
83
84

85
82
77
70

98
90
88
77

126
120
117
112

108
93
84
75

106
104
97
88

124
133
117
110

135
156
113
115

137
137
133
135

113
111
106
93

105
108
106
93

105
104
104
93

121
113
107
97

155
188
161
143

Chicago

100

Atlanta

100

112
97
100

Richmond

100

Cleveland

New York

San Francisco

DRUGS

Weighted index
7 districts

San Francisco

Kansas City

Minneapolis

Philadelphia

'

10O

New York

Boston

YEAR AND
MONTH

Weighted index
11 districts

GROCERIES

|

3

1

INDEX NUMBERS RELATIVE TO 1919
100

100

100

100

100

100

10O

10O

100

1919 mo.
1920 mo.
1921 mo.
1922 mo.

av
av
av
av

100
113
77
76

75

74
76

80
76

75
71

74
73

79
77

72
69

79
79

94
91

1923
1924
1925
1926

av
av
av
av

83
84
83
83

83
82
81
77

80
78
78
76

88
87
86
93

79
81
79
77

83
84
89
75

85
90
90
90

74
77
72
74

85
85
86
87

1934
May
June
July
August

81
83
83
83

83
86
90
82

73
71
74
72

85
86
85
84

79
76
81
77

84
79
77
83

82
76
84
89

75
81
78
76

September
October
November
December

93
100
89
83

94
93
83
83

84
94
88
80

94
103
93
91

89
99
83
80

92
100
88
87

98
108
92
98

1925
January
February
March
April

80
73
79
75

79
68
73
75

75
66
69
68

82
78
81
80

75
68
75
72

86
80
86
84

May
June
July
August

79
84
85
83

81
93
87
81

74
77
79
70

81
86
87
85

75
78
78
78

September
October
N o vember
December

92
99
91
83

84
88
82
81

83
97
92
82

90
96
92
88

1926
January
February _ .
March
April

77
71
81
79

70
63
76
74

77
66
77
71

May . . ._
June
July
August

80
86
84
82

76
85
84
76

September
October _
November
December

92
91
87
80

80
82
83
78

mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.

1927
January
February
March
April

100

1
'
!

May
June
1
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, representing combined indexes of dollar sales reported for the various Federal reserve
districts, weighted by the number of persons employed in wholesale trade in each district in 1919. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in April, 1923, issue (No. 20) of the
SUEVEY, p. 50. For details and methods of computation, see Federal Reserve Bulletin for April. 1923.




119

Table 95.—WHOLESALE TRADE BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]

>>

Atlanta

Chicago

Minneapolis

100

100

100

100

100

80
81

86
97

86
89

62
54

75
66

66
66

60
58

67
64

62
66

78
76

81
77
83
79

101
102
110
120

113
104
106
106

68
58
58
63

101
83
91
93

58
56
58
59

65
58
58
63

71
58
62
70

61
51
52
55

59
47
37
43

69
56
70
57

80
66
70
91

141
143
150
144

75
75
71
74

102
90
93
98

111
103
94
97

56
52
44
56

77
69
68
83

50
52
46
54

70
67
43
43

62
42
37
67

45
37
34
53

42
42
37
46

51
47
39
56

74
66
54
69

106
109
93
93

166
152
151
144

87
96
88
93

108
109
98
116

105
107
90
91

69
67
57
56

105
97
82
100

64
63
49
54

61
66
59
61

70
69
55
44

64
68
55
44

59
53
48
47

74
78
68
64

70
69
63
50

92
81
89
85

80
83
110
115

115
133
144
167

73
76
86
86

104
102
110
108

93
98
110
110

43
46
63
65

79
68
94
91

43
45
65
67

39
45
63
76

40
58
71
63

40
46
59
49

26
30
42
49

49
48
61
72

51
56
70
61

80
79
78
89

78
80
78
94

107
110
104
98

148
155
163
161

78
82
77
76

105
101
100
108

110
109
105
108

54
54
47
65

78
79
78
100

54
55
51
61

58
59
38
51

52
45
47
87

54
38
41
55

35
34
29
40

63
70
48
95

66
72
61
84

108
125
101
92

94
100
87
79

108
132
120
118

105
118
94
91

171
169
157
142

86
102
82
86

119
136
111
110

112
114
98
100

72
77
59
54

113
118
91
98

65
67
55
62

65
80
59
58

88
89
63
43

61
80
60
43

47
49
34
25

96
95
77
70

93
91
76
55

95
87
116
118

86
95
113
102

91
78
90
87

115
102
101
89

75
76
103
102

119
118
153
152

61
71
84
74

99
109
118
106

103
99
115
114

43
50
73
59

59
77
100
82

43
43
70
55

46
47
70
61

49
64
93
68

47
50
73
56

26
35
55
40

33
48
69
58

62
67
77
79

103
102
90
87

126
122
107
104

108
109
105
99

86
81
85
92

86
85
79
86

116
108
101
99

150
152
156
145

78
84
76
75

124
115
106
123

113
112
100
103

60
59
52
73

85
75
75
103

56
61
' 52
65

64
66
49
63

69
56
51
96

53
47
41
57

46
41
36
49

53
52
50
75

78
87
81
118

101
109
99
108

114
128
119
132

115
118
113
98

107
109
102
85

96
106
98
31

111
112
95
87

164
157
145
122

90
93
82
84

149
135
133
117

110
108
97
94

84
76
67
60

114
111
99
132

74
62
59
66

83
78
67
63

103
80
72
42

66
70
63
41

58
54
46
30

82
76
56
34

136
125
104
81

3

1

&

Boston

100

Minneapolis

100

88
68
65

Chicago

100

Atlanta

Richmond

s
1

100

Richmond

fs

£

i
I
,*

Cleveland

*l
!l
£•0

YEAR AND
MONTH

Philadelphia

8

Weighted index
8 districts

SHOES
San Francisco

HARDWARE

•s
£

«

1

i

INDEX NUMBERS RELATIVE TO 1919
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av

100

100

100

100

10O

100

10O

10O
116
82
86

100
78
84

97
100

92
94

82
78

66
69

86
91

78
78

74
76

104
99
103
102

100
96
98
96

113
115
115
114

111
102
104
105

100
94
88
91

84
79
96
94

103
100
101
99

148
143
152
144

104
96
93
93

105
92
88
83

123
115
111
111

107
97
98
95

91
78
83
93

73
69
64
76

108
102
99
93

TDp.cfvmhw

106
110
98
99

95
107
95
97

115
134
114
123

111
114
98
93

108
95
88
85

89
101
88
96

1935
January
February.
March
April

89
90
107
107

83
85
103
102

99
95
122
122

93
100
111
104

98
83
97
86

May
June
July
August.

101
105
99
98

97
105
92
87

120
121
108
104

104
111
102
93

September
October...
NovemberDecember

109
122
103
101

104
117
102
102

111
131
115
126

1936
January
February.
March
April

86
87
106
103

75
77
96
103

May
June
^..
July
August. .

108
105
98
98

September
October
November
December

111
114
104
99

1923
1924
1925
1926

mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.

av
av
av
av

1934
May
June
. -.
July
August

September
October
November

1937
January
February
March
April

_

_

May
June-.




100

10O

120

Table 96.—WHOLESALE TRADE AND CREDIT CONDITIONS

,

San Francisco

Kansas City

Chicago

Atlanta

Richmond

Cleveland

New York

YEAR AND
MONTH

Weighted index
8 districts

MEATS i

DRY GOODS i

INDEX OF WHOLESALE TRADE i

[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]

average
average
average
average

100

-

100

100

100

85
83

84
84

75
72

70
70

80
84

90
91

86
85

95
91
91
87

98
95
105
98

99
80
77
74

87
76
69
67

79
76
80
82

94
89
87
79

99
107
120
120

82
88
96
85

94
110
121
100

66
75
81
73

70
70
73
59

63
71
89
73

80
77
85
83

77
82
85
106

92
100
98
105

65
69
61
80

51
58
60
91

61
55
67
99

82
87
72
72

112
118
92
75

117
117
103
101

93
107
78
79

93
97
68
43

79
85
93
77

94
104
109
86

60
72
77
67

81
82
77
81

_ ._

100

78
76
78
102

87
84
92
105

86
85
76
71

September
October
November..
December

100

75
79
79
79

--

100

79
75
75
76

May
June
July
August

100

71
69
73
68

- ..
.

100

115
83
83

65
67
76
79

1925
_

January
February
March
April

100

55
56

1923 monthly average.
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

Textile trade 2

Electrical trade 3

Prompt
Orders Indebt- payedness ments

Delinquent
Accounts

Percentage of total
recorded transactions

INDEX NUMBERS RELATIVE TO 1919

1919 monthly
1920 monthly
1921 monthly
1922 monthly

CREDIT CONDITIONS

114
102
91
71

119
103
95
93

Dollars

No. of
firms

* 225, 106
202, 557

1, 518
1,625

90
98

10O
112
73
74

28.3
23.0
24.6
26.9

34.1
36.2
36.6
43.3

60.7
59.4
53.4
47.6

98
102
90
86

109
101
93
90

83
82
84
84

28.8
28.9
25.5

42.6
42.6
41.2

55.3
55.0
53.9

201, 689
186, 770
196, 747
179, 921

1,497
1,518
1,547
1,498

113
111
114
111

81
101
88
73

83
77
91
85

79
76
83
79

25.5
32.0
33.5
28.0

39.1
38.8
42.5
46.3

51.4
52.0
53.9
58.0

198, 223
223, 649
231, 911
216, 950

1,336
1,456
1,806
1,953

74
86
80
99

103
105
138
147

64
63
76
143

83
83
93
118

79
83
83
87

27.5
27.0
25.5
32.0

41.9
40.6
37.4
34.2

56.2
51.6
53.9
52.3

228, 726
209, 780
195, 345
153, 424

1,774
1,678
1,490
1,425

111
127
84
62

110
118
83
66

141
147
120
88

124
129
93
45

114
114
99
70

94
101
86
80

None.
31.5
24.5
19.0

38.7
44.4
46.7
43.7

51.8
57.7
55.6
52.7

166, 073
184, 055
168, 732
184, 098

1,400
1,597
1,142
1,503

67
71
68
58

74
80
91
78

66
70
83
70

117
116
124
101

71
97
79
69

79
75
99
87

78
76
85
80

24.0
29.9
30.8
24.6

39.1
39.1
41.4
45.0

56.0
51.9
43.3
43.2

159, 038
137, 517
222, 768
249, 618

1,339
1,552
1,897
1,881

68
66
53
76

56
50
53
87

72
63
.62
94

75
72
72
86

106
114
120
146

68
76
75
143

82
85
90
116

82
84
82
87

24.4
22.8
23.5
26.7

45.0
46.5
42.9
38,7

42.6
63.9
52.7
53.3

207, 018
192, 591
167, 635
165, 213

1,702
1,538
1,388
1,367

91
94
86
73

94
84
75
44

118
113
84
53

111
98
86
63

144
132
131
88

129
94
89
45

109
101
89
71

97
94
87
77

29.1
29.3
26.3

40.1
47.8
47.8

55.1
68.1
57.1

186, 892
144, 458
144, 985
-181,318

1,419
1,211
1,241
1,438

1926
January
February
March
April

May
June
July
August

_ _ __
_-

- -

September
October
November
December

1927
February
March
April

May
June

- _
_..

_

- „

..

1 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, representing a combined index of dollar sales reported for the various Federal reserve districts, weighted by the number of persons employed in wholesale trade in each district in 1919. For details and methods of computation see Federal Reserve Bulletin for
April, 1923. The combined index of wholesale trade is a weighted average based upon the total volume of wholesale trade in lines separately shown on this and the preceding pages, proportional to the total production of each line of goods in 1919. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in April, 1923, issue (No. 20) of the SURVEY, p. 50.
2
Orders, indebtedness, and prompt payments compiled by the Credit Clearing House from reports to it by manufacturers and wholesalers on items of credit from their
ledgers concerning merchants or jobbers to whom they sell. The commodities covered are largely textiles, and the individual orders are stated to average from $250 to $600,
depending on trade conditions. As one transaction may cover both an order and an indebtedness or payment, the sum of the percentages of orders, indebtedness, and
payments will usually exceed 100 per cent. Monthly data by geographic divisions for 1920 and 1921 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 131-133, and for 1922 in May,
1923, issue (No. 21), pp. 171-3.
3 Delinquent accounts, electrical trade, are compiled by the National Electrical Credit Association, from reports to its constituent regional associations by electrical manufacturers and j obbers. Monthly data from 1921 appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 206.
4
Eleven months' average, February to December, inclusive.




121
Table 97.—GOLD AND SILVER
SILVER

GOLD

Domestic
Imports Exports i receipts
at mint 2
1

YEAR AND MONTH

Thousands of
dollars

Stocks, end of
month 4

Production 4

Band
output 3

Fine ounces

Imports1

Exports1

United
States

Thousands of
dollars

Canada Mexico United Canada
States

Price
in
New
York 3
Dolls,
per fine
ounce

Thousands of fine ounces

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average. ._ _

$5, 309
4,782
37, 663
57, 166
46, 038
5,170
6,378

$7, 650
18, 551
2,619
12,999
30, 990
3,422
30, 682

148, 050
155, 083
157,830
133, 597
112, 495
86, 472
71, 093

732, 779
698, 275
757, 823
772, 128
751, 855
701, 722
694, 174

$2,989
2,163
2,874
2,689
4,445
5,948
7,451

$5, 231
4,300
1,467
5,883
7,011
21, 071
19, 918

5,567
6,038
6,247
6,201
5,978
5,651
4,723

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

35, 729
57,604
22, 931
26, 893
26, 643
10, 690
17, 785

26,841
1,991
3,073
2,387
5,137
21,887
9,642

62, 377
80, 183
86, 314
84, 044
90, 234
87, 693
85, 390

679, 801
676, 216
585, 009
761, 088
799, 803
799, 975

7,338
5,270
5,901
6,204
6,162
5,383
5,766

9,468
4,298
5,234
6,039
9,158
8,261
7,688

4,714
4,477
4,623
5,514
5,352
5,115
5,031

1,084
1,416
1,418
1,412
1,327
1,805

5,372
6,756
7,568
7,620
7,740

1,091
446
459
719
453
542

655
636
409
544
442
839

1.010
.621
.675
.647
.668
.691
.621

11, 393
4,426
10, 204
4,862

13, 390
6,712
4,416
2,136

70, 438
71, 652
92, 830
87, 490

813, 249
780, 251
18, 202
808, 218

3,390
4,919
5,238
7,273

6,536
8,522
8,349
8,285

5,225
5,481
5,365
4,934

914
1,005
1,226
1,594

6,904
7,596
7,732
6,900

557
518
539
280

312
225
293
223

.676
.691
.694
.702

4,128
50, 741
10, 456
7,216

6,784
28, 039
24,360
5,968

78, 329
128, 030
102, 641
94, 504

797, 247
812, 832
787, 633
791, 455

4,504
5,602
4,049
5,747

7,487
8,783
8,118
7, 589

4,845
4,644
4,898
4, 931

1,692
1,570
1,286
1,538

7,607
8,418
8,027
9,721

277
202
513
365

541
495
655
634

.716
.711
.692
.689

January
February
March _
April

19, 351
25,416
43,413
13, 116

3,087
3,851
4,225
17,884

86, 054
74, 044
58, 229
75,336

796, 270
753, 924
834, 340
803, 303

5,763
8,863
5,539
6,322

9,763
7,752
8,333
7,612

5,162
5,043
5,171
4,954

1,126
1,636
1,920
1,373

5,562
8,707
9,192
8,839

927
1,025
395
336

749
819
648
961

.678
.668
.659
.644

May
JuneJuly
August

2,935
18, 890
19, 820
11, 979

9,343
3,346
5,069
29,743

69, 699
68, 261
82, 696
97,426

849, 214
852, 145
860, 134
843, 854

4,872
5,628
5,949
5,988

7,391
7,978
7,921
8,041

5,066
5,211
4,673
5,270

1,546
1,510
2,665
2,142

7,997
8,401
6,980
6,134

589
392
821
575

693
546
772
738

.651
.655
.648
.624

15, 933
8,857
16, 738
16, 972

23,081
1,156
7,727
7,196

111, 657
108, 741
104, 230
88,307

839, 939
853, 296
840, 276

7,204
5,083
3,914
4,063

7,238
7,279
6,794
5,610

4,860
5,114
4,757
5,091

1,926
2,030
1,742
2,047

7,632
9,612

336
543
242
326

775
1,343
1,085
941

.606
.545
.541
.535

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

$0. 598
.548
.497
.657
.814
.964
1.111

1925
May
June
July
August.
September
October
November
December

,_.

1926

September .
October. _
November
December

1927
January _ _ _.
February..
March
April

__

__ _

May
June
1

Imports and exports of gold and silver from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
2 Domestic receipts of unrefined gold at U. S. mint from U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of the Mint.

of?'
United States and Canada includes purchases of crude silver by the mints in each country. Canadian production is incomplete as the silver contained in blister copper,
lead bullion, and lead and zinc ores exported is omitted. Mexican production is reported to the bureau by the Mexican Government and covers refined silver received at
the mint for coinage, refined silver exported and silver content of base bullion, blister copper, ore concentrates, etc., exported. Detailed data are contained in the bureau's
monthly reports.




122

Table 98.—LIFE INSURANCE—NEW BUSINESS AND PREMIUMS1
(Association of Life Insurance Presidents)
PREMIUM COLLECTIONS
(new and renewal)

NEW BUSINESS

YEAR AND MONTH

Ordinary

Industrial

Group

Number Number
Thou- Num- Number Thouof
sands of ber of certifi- sands of of policies of policies
conand
dollars tracts cates 2 dollars contracts and certificates

Number Thouof
sands of
policies dollars

Number
of
policies
379, 819
410, 189
428, 559
414, 605
414, 443
433, 226
465, 248

$51,909
55, 217
58, 128
58, 645
61, 484
66, 099
77, 901

5
6
11
32
81
70
164

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average

110, 448
111, 640
180, 261

$141, 450
138, 225
146, 792
181, 418
210, 087
219, 300
382, 644

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average

205, 276
163, 313
166, 781
195, 841
196, 841
214, 168
218, 382

464, 189
381, 688
419, 585
502, 495
532, 347
616, 551
648, 524

499, 938
550, 065
582, 102
662, 259
703, 769
804, 380
782, 137

93, 044
104, 813
118, 233
143, 338
163, 630
196, 598
213, 777

190
58
96
158
132
165
196

1924
September
October
_ _
November
. _
December

157, 705
214, 569
217, 519

424, 701
491, 219
514, 706
637, 727

614, 848
830, 831
641, 128
903, 065

145, 052

180,091

176, 993
184, 724
217, 859
214, 244

523, 654
548, 529
654, 771
638, 206

238, 253
218, 157
213, 216
208, 631

698, 706
638, 195
638, 833
607, 621

September
October
November. . . .
Deravmhfir

79, 514
78, 779
83, 909

2,500
4,090
6,542

Indus- Group
trial

Ordinary

Total
Thousands of
dollars

Thousands of dollars

$195, 095
$38, 953 $10, 778
40, 506
11, 580
197, 231
42, 262
12, 421
208, 847
246, 623 ' 45, 721 13, 280
14, 440
50, 485
286, 433
54, 579
305, 953
15, 807
64, 348
496, 010
18, 088

459, 338
488, 974
512, 479
510, 948
524, 972
544, 936
645, 674

461, 833
493, 059
519, Oil
522, 655
550, 650
571, 133
685, 229

705, 404
713, 437
748, 979
858, 257

743, 705
723, 678
770, 229
892, 946
930, 525
1, 064, 080
1, 063, 208

592, 711
495, 758
560, 703
689, 170
745, 790
896, 381
949, 851

150, 718
225, 892

75 13,896 19,354
87 70, 769 131, 101
131 25, 770 38,623
473 109,429 184, 198

772, 628
786,449
1, Oil, 009 1,081,691
855, 828
881, 467
1, 121, 057 1, 230, 013

589, 107
820, 781
704, 047
1, 047, 817

109, 188
103, 731
141, 633

618, 425
732, 120
809, 517
803, 384

147, 441
177, 666
193, 604
196, 895

178
114
129
143

47, 462
22, 764
26, 991

37,244

40, 797
66, 415

795, 596
916, 958
1, 027, 505
1, 017, 771

842, 880
939, 608
1, 054, 367
1, 054, 872

740, 052
762, 891
889, 172
901, 516

882, 325
788, 352
734, 531
717, 402

217, 735
198, 113
182, 991
181, 048

143
160
121
118

23, 174
32, 202
27, 762
68, 887

39, 041
47, 565
54, 947
126, 885

1, 120, 721
1, 006, 669
947, 868
926, 151

1, 143, 752
1, 038, 711
975, 509
994, 920

186, 175
222, 764
218, 240
270, 754

525, 532
691, 227
616, 725 ,1, 199, 183
586, 877
851, 209
720,965 824, 881

175, 114
256, 704
207, 980
223, 883

107 20, 033 37, 788
114 38, 109 54, 433
172 26, 476 111, 066
485 175, 287 314, 194

1926
January
February
March
April

184, 846
192, 677
239, 720
227, 169

560, 289
597, 429
724, 454
675, 296

817, 246
653, 943
844, 659
787, 138

227, 158
174, 782
230, 203
215, 504

200
152
190
163

40, 794
52, 250
44, 257
60, 919

May
June
July...
August

236, 209
237, 020
221, 697
198, 686

702, 309
704, 852
658, 562
595, 929

859, 630
743, 137
916, 607
719, 203

235, 207
202, 315
194, 315
199, 076

195
167
149
157

39, 815
43, 710
53, 057
40, 882

September
October
November. .
December

184, 843
219, 049
221, 457

523, 915
618, 041
629, 860
791, 351

714,041
822, 459
870, 324
837, 252

197, 277
226, 523
235, 691
227, 273

1935
Januarv
February
March
April
May
June
July
August.

_

-

96,311

257,207

198,461

11, 739
25, 760
26, 266
39, 720

$1, 736

3,790
3,927
6,560
14, 861
20, 555
35, 465

Total

$36
52
97
143
308
536
991

$49, 767
52, 138
54, 780
59, 144
65, 233
70, 922
83, 427

75, 462
81, 424
89, 242
99, 631
110, 287
125, 119

20, 342
22, 587
25, 751
30, 057
34, 178
39, 119

1,498
1,545
1,621
2,092
2,618
4,625

97, 302
105, 556
116, 614
131, 779
147, 083
168, 863

95,049

33,811
33,405
32,190
59, 616

2,148
3,025
2,593
4,186

131, 008
145, 617'
138, 515
205, 434

116, 835
116, 975
128, 544
128, 710

36, 550
32, 901
37, 022
33, 829

4,171
3,125
9,173
5,124

157, 556
153, 000
174, 738
167, 663

955, 482
883, 873
876, 771
915, 554

127, 080
121, 806
125, 554
109, 737

36, 573
37, 977
36, 665
37, 808

3,586
3,263
3,375
3,682

167, 240
163, 046
165, 593
151, 227

877, 509
1, 422, 061
1, 069, 621
1, 096, 120

897, 435

738, 434
927, 862
905,923
1, 095, 925
1, 270, 922 1,259,042

107/367

37, 057

1,460,056

130, 045
130, 920
157, 858

38,951

3,124
4,841
4,940
7,100

147, 548
173, 837
174, 934
229, 976

56, 280
83, 088
72, 368
80, 663

1, 002, 292
846, 772
1, 084, 569
1, 014, 470

1, 042, 886
898, 870
1, 128, 636
1, 075, 226

843, 727
855, 299
1,027,025
971, 463

124, 695

41, 247
37, 801

170, 949
169, 364
190, 301
183, 126

56, 458
69, 282
78, 125
55, 632

1, 096, 034
980, 324
938, 453
918, 046

1, 135, 654
1, 023, 867
991, 361
958, 771

157 47, 743 73, 456
183 44, 213 62, 353
182 70, 363 100, 448
456 214, 277 262, 452

899, 041
1, 041, 691
1, 091, 963
1, 094, 915

946, 627
1, 085, 721
1, 162, 144
1, 308, 736

38, 491
10, 299
21, 345
34, 847

29,916
45, 533
62, 690

35,478
9,257
22, 885
43, 337
49, 814

83,232
87, 550

68, 957

36,696

900,741
1, 018, 713
1, 000, 714

39, 074
65, 018

142, 143
139, 123

43,344
40, 763

5,007
8,107
4,814
3,240

993, 974
976, 449
931, 002
850, 637

131, 553

40, 299
43, 747
42, 639
43, 419

4,251
4,206
4,457
4,102

176, 103
180, 221
180, 851
165, 372

794, 648
906, 917
965, 999
1, 281, 076

118, 023
125, 689
127, 489

40, 827
43, 988

3,783
4,735
4,327

162, 633
174, 412
177, 097

123,456

132,268
133, 755
117, 851

45,281

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June
1
Compiled by the Association of Life Insurance Presidents. The data on new business represents only new business that has been paid for, exclusive of revivals, increases
and dividend additions. Premium collections show the amount of money actually invested in life insurance each month, and include total premium collections, new and
renewal, and considerations for annuities and for supplementary contracts involving and not involving life contingencies. The 45 companies whose figures are included
in this table had in force 81 per cent of the total legal reserve life insurance outstanding in the United States as of Dec. 31,1923. Complete monthly data from 1922 were
given in September, 1924, issue (No. 37), p. 37. Data given in previous issues cover a smaller number of companies.
2
This column, by adding together the number of policies issued for ordinary and industrial insurance and the number of certificates issued under group insurance contracts, indicates the trend in number of persons covered by new .insurance, but does not show the exact number of persons covered, since one person may have several policies
of ordinary insurance and in addition hold a certificate under a group contract.




123

Table 99.—LIFE INSURANCE—ASSETS AND SALES BY DISTRICTS
SALES, ORDINARY INSURANCE (81 compan es) '
(Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau)

ADMITTED ASSETS (41 companies) 1
(Association of Life Insurance Presidents)

Mortgage loans Bonds and stocks (book values) Policy
YEAR AND
MONTH

Grand
total

Total

Farm

Total

Government

Railroad

loans
and
Public preutili- mium
notes
ties

United
States,
total

Eastern
manufacturing

mo. av__.
mo. av
mo. av...
mo. av.__
mo. av._.
mo. av...

SouthFar
ern western

Thousands of dollars

Millions of dollars

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

Western Western
manufactur- agricultural
ing

CANADIAN
SALES,
ORDINARY a

$425, 092
459, 292
549, 296
584, 871
672, 286
700, 730

$154, 321
174, 242
208, 526
233, 584
267, 430
279, 875

$90, 152
98, 380
121, 194
127, 321
144, 071
152, 474

$81, 074
78, 899
90, 912
91, 008
107, 277
110, 174

$57, 145
61, 645
72, 403
72, 954
85, 312
88, 133

$42, 400
46, 126
56, 261
60,088
67, 946
70,075

$30, 847
28, 421
30, 487
32, 597
35, 406
39, 304

$7, 409
8,091
8,944

$2, 694
3,138
3,607

$1,261
1,405
1,496

$3, 327
3,428
3,653

$1, 219
1,119
1,053

$1, 750
1,849
1,975

$281
365
521

$928
995
1,070

1924
September
October
November
December

8, 231
8,297
8,359
8,476

3,227
3,263
3,298
3,338

1,433
1,439
1,444
1,452

3,453
3,469
3,496
3,534

1,092
1,085
1,085
1,086

1,883
1,899
1,909
1,915

381
388
405
430

1,012
1,017
1,018
1,020

487, 944
572, 184
545, 152
744, 111

180, 485
224, 325
218, 834
281, 134

106, 181
124, 841
115, 577
165, 469

84, 217
93, 489
88, 871
120, 784

62, 616
69, 226
65, 490
98, 928

54,445
60,303
56, 380
77, 796

30, 029
32, 438
34, 357
37, 120

1935
January
February
March—
April

8,549
8,606
8,673
8,755

3,377
3,410
3,449
3,496

1, 456
1,460
1,474
1,483

3,547
3,561
3,583
3,595

1,082
1,078
1,067
1,061

1,922
,927
,939
,946

441
454
474
486

1,027
1,032
1,039
1,048

559, 916
611, 480
702, 994
716, 078

238, 217
259, 837
284,997
293, 452

120, 740
131, 410
152, 821
149, 330

81, 576
92, 432
111, 129
116, 079

62, 662
72, 367
85, Oil
88,054

56, 721
55, 435
66, 036
69, 163

30,838
28, 698
35, 001
35, 872

May
June
July
August

8,825
8,892
8,974
9,039

3,542
3,586
3,633
3,671

1,492
1, 500
1,507
1,510

3,624
3,647
3,666
3,680

1,055
1,048
1,038
1,040

,960
,974
1,983
1,989

506
521
538
545

1,057
1,066
1,075
1,083

737, 515
694, 577
692, 492
651, 110

298, 032
268, 911
288, 312
250, 691

154, 941
148, 939
144, 296
140, 368

117, 751
116, 109
107, 665
105, 099

94, 436
90, 515
82, 901
83,514

72, 355
70, 093
69,318
71,438

34, 377
42, 307
37, 671
31, 724

September
October
November
December

9,121
9,209
9,292
9,394

3,707
3,750
3,796
3,864

1,513
1,515
1,518
1,523

3,694
3,713
3,751
3,779

1,041
1,035
1,048
1,045

2,001
2,005
2,015
2,034

547
567
580
588

1,092
1,099
1,103
1,113

590, 771
668, 794
637, 023
804, 684

219, 426
258, 615
252, 514
296, 151

127,
148,
136,
173,

582
401
517
510

98, 954
107, 380
99, 155
133, 997

80, 030
86, 527
81, 492
116, 231

64, 779
67, 871
67, 345
84, 795

33, 543
36, 259
36, 760
41, 822

1926
January
February
March
April

9,481
9,546
9,630
9,717

3,913
3,961
4,016
4,073

1,527
1,533
1,543
1,552

3,807
3,811
3,825
3,846

'l, 043
1,026
1,007
996

2,046
2,057
2,074
2,091

607
620
636
650

1, 122
1, 129
1,141
1,152

572, 639
640, 775
790, 669
743, 635

241, 508
266, 359
314, 969
301,053

121, 408
140, 076
177, 861
156, 590

85,239
96,704
121, 290
119, 914

68,874
78, 835
97, 904
94, 449

55, 610
58,801
78, 645
71, 629

33, 907
34, 744
40, 483
37,346

May
June
July
August

9,800
9,882
9,969
10, 050

4,121
4,181
4,238
4,290

1,560
1,568
1,572
1,577

3,865
3,888
3,899
3,907

979
962
951
948

2,104
2,128
2,132
2,137

672
688
705
710

1,163
1,174
1,184
1,194

735, 724
749, 567
702, 129
649, 023

299, 463
289, 847
279, 650
241, 270

152, 382
162, 750
153, 663
145, 015

116, 090
124, 381
110, 372
107, 354

93, 816
96, 540
86, 758
84, 572

73, 973
76, 049
71, 686
70, 812

37, 703
44, 634
40, 101
36, 010

September
October
November
December

10, 141
10, 237
10, 333

4,335
4,405
4,463

1,579
1,581
1,585

3,924
3,941
3,957

948
937
936

2,148
2,156
2,161

715
729
740

1,202
1,210
1,219

597, 667
656, 362
691, 520
879, 049

222, 265
262, 334
283, 297
356, 488

132, 004
145, 635
153, 194
189, 106

104, 268
100, 446
102, 894
133, 132

76,904
81, 621
84, 462
112, 856

62, 226
66, 326
67, 673
87, 467

34, 878
40, 226
44, 251
47, 366

1927
January
February
March
April

_.

Mav
June.
1
Compiled by the Association of Life Insurance Presidents from special reports of 41 companies having 82 per cent of the total admitted life insurance assets of United
States legal reserve companies; the data are given as 9f the end of each month and are designed to show the fluctuations in the character of investments of life insurance
companies. Admitted assets embrace all assets permitted by statute to be included for testing the solvency of the companies; in addition to the items separately listed,
the total also includes real estate, collateral loans, cash, bills receivable, interest due and accrued, deferred and unpaid premiums, etc. Of the bonds and stocks, approximately 98^ per cent are bonds and 1^ per cent are stocks. A compilation of the mortgages owned by 57 life insurance companies, by States, as of Dec. 31, 1925,
appeared in the September, 1926, issue (No. 61), p. 26.
2
Represents data on ordinary life insurance only (thus excluding industrial and group insurance) compiled by the Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau from 81 insurance companies who held on Jan. 1, 1923, 88 per cent of the total ordinary legal life reserve in force in the United States. Monthly data for 1921 were given in the April,
1924, issue (No. 32), p. 66. The Eastern Manufacturing district includes Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New
Jersey, and Pennsylvania; Western Manufacturing district—Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin; Western Agricultural district—Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri.
North Dakota, and Texas; Southern district—Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi; Far Western district—Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, and California,
a Compiled by the Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau from reports of companies which had on Jan. 1,1923,83 per cent of the legal reserve ordinary business in force
in Canada. Details by Provinces are given in the bureau's monthly reports.




124
Table 100.—BANKING
DEBITS TO
INDIVIDUAL
ACCOUNTS i
In New Outside
New
York
York
City
City

YEAR AND
MONTH

BANK CLEARINGS a

In New
York
City

CONDITION OF
CONDITION OF FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS 3 REPORTING MEMBER
BANKS 3

Bills Notes Total Total
Outside
New
Canadis- in cirreYork dian < count- cula- invest- serves
ments
tion
ed
City
Millions of dollars

1913 mo
1914 mo.
1915 mo.
1916 mo.
1917 mo.
1918 mo.
1919 mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av
av

Total
deposits

Reserve
ratio

Per cent

'

$5, 749
5,508
5,879
7,713
9,734
11, 801
13, 944

$775
659
637
859
1,021
1,115
1,351

$29
24
224
1,158
1,936

$89
185
606
1,911
2,618

$144
231
466
592

$384
586
1,261
1,991
2,190

$1, 154
1,738
1,937

Total
Total
loans
and dis- investments
counts

Net
demand
deposits

Millions of dollars

94.6
83.5
75.6
57.0
50.2

$20, 343

$17, 598

$7, 886
6,918
9,184
13, 298
14, 784
14, 878
19, 650

1920 ino. av . .
1921 mo, av _._ .
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av _
1926 mo. av

20,119
17, 258
19, 988
19, 866
21, 961
26, 114
28, 255

20, 133
15, 995
16, 626
18, 777
19, 013
21, 368
22, 411

20, 261
16, 194
18, 158
17, 833
20, 823
23, 637
24, 196

15, 801
12, 212
13, 204
15, 847
16, 347
18, 255
18, 653

1,632
1,401
1,304
1,392
1,367
1,346
1,414

2,557
1,755
550
751
362
500
581

3,154
2,664
2,215
2,239
1,866
1,689
1,707

685
338
618
399
583
646
627

2,126
2,672
3,149
3,192
3,196
2,869
2,955

1,922
1,744
1,851
1,941
2,111
2,247
2,286

43.5
61.4
77.5
76.4
80.4
74.8
74.1

$11, 927
10, 953
11,788
12, 343
13, 450
14, 141

$3, 364
4,230
4,617
4,968
5,464
5,579

11, 302
10, 178
10, 855
11, 143
12, 065
12, 892
12, 976

1925
January
February
March
April

27, 682
22,924
26, 382
23, 945

22, 277
18, 571
21, 219
20,592

26, 721
21,057
23, 349
22, 879

18, 589
15, 738
17, 855
17, 821

1,364
1,069
1,151
1,229

274
434
378
400

1,684
1,729
1,709
1,684

715
696
663
628

3,083
3,030
3,008
2,993

2,265
2,270
2,184
2,187

78.0
75.8
77.3
77.3

13, 051
13, 143
13, 140
13, 232

5,488
5,396
5, 478
5,484

13, 014
12, 932
12, 588
12, 814

May
June
July
August

26, 179
26, 930
25, 458
23, 265

20, 397
21, 681
21, 559
19, 847

23, 847
24, 019
23, 396
20, 219

17, 212
18, 361
18, 714
17, 053

1,290
1,186
1,273
1,195

414
455
468
580

1,671
1,634
1,598
1,616

640
579
553
547

2,982
2,059
2,937
2,888

2,202
2,210
2,201
2,237

77.0
77.0
77.3
75.0

13, 108
13,205
13,217
13, 375

5,485
5,505
5,506
5,471

12,645
12, 725
12, 815
12, 755

24, 369
28, 916
27,009
30, 313

20, 872
24, 008
21, 334
24, 058

21, 774
25, 952
23, 477
26,959

18, 190
20, 554
18, 598
20, 379

1,278
1,647
1, 613
1,835

633
590
625
750

1,685
1,695
1,732
1,835

624
660
701
751

2,866
2,893
2,861
2,822
\

2,268
2,297
2,291
2,357

72.5
72.5
71.1
67.3

13, 832
13, 901
13, 959
14, 235

5,440
5,443
5,405
5,462

13,046
13, 082
13,025
13, 261

30, 538
24, 813
33,006
29, 300

23,581
20,016
23, 432
22, 512

27, 101
21, 453
28, 092
25, 964

19, 631
16,583
19, 502
18, 649

1,300
1,193
1,293
1,417

449
540
632
514

1,667
1,679
1,656
1,662

670
645
593
601

2,953
2,917
2,920
2,954

2,272
2,262
2,323
2,242

75.0
74.0
73.4
75.7

13, 949
13, 930
14,052
13,949

5,478
5,492
5,495
5,576

13, 034
12, 935
12, 901
12, 829

May
June
July
August

26, 571
28,196
27, 659
26, 233

21, 426
22, 442
23, 674
20, 755

23, 386
24, 195
23, 827
21, 676

18, 170
18, 934
19, 184
17, 472

1,403
1,411
1, 376
1,345

474
515
621
620

1,673
1,697
1,671
1,703

645
643
585
576

2,975
2,980
2,999
2,966

2,243
2,260
2; 261
2,282

76.0
75.3
76.3
74.4

13, 874
14, 135
13, 976
14, 179

5,705
5,681
5,652
5,599

12, 917
13, 252
12, 846
12, 961

September
October..
November
December

25, 618
28, 755
25, 790
32, 577

21, 311
23, 754
21, 568
24, 464

21, 360
24, 333
22, 252
26, 715

17, 966
19, 754
18, 236
19, 757

1,320
1, 579
1,669
1,664

717
632
645
711

1,716
1,731
1,772
1,857

581
610
677
699

2,937
2,954
2,956
2,944

2,330
2,281
2,324
2,346

72.6
73.6
72.2
70.1

14, 395
14, 314
14, 375
14, 569

5,634
5,578
5,521
5,541

13,003
12, 918
13, 033
13, 082

September
October. _
November
December

1926
January
February
March
April

_ .

_..

$9,260
10, 576

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June

1 Debits to individual accounts are collected by the Federal Reserve Board from about 150 of the larger clearing-house centers. These data represent check transactions
more fully than clearings inasmuch as all checks debited to individual accounts are included and not merely those passing through the clearing house. The figures given
are combined from weekly totals, the first and last weeks of the month being prorated. Data for individual cities were presented in the October, 1923, issue (No. 26),
pp. 51 to 55, and in the October, 1926, issue (No. 62), pp. 22 to 24.
2 Figures on bank clearings, showing volume of check transactions passing through the clearing houses, compiled by Bradstreets. Clearings outside New York City
represent 117 cities each year, estimates for some of the smaller cities being necessary in earlier years to complete the data.
3 Condition reports, showing respectively the combined condition of the 12 Federal reserve banks and the condition of over 800 member banks of the Federal reserve
system, are compiled by the Federal Reserve Board. The condition is given as of the last Wednesday of the month, but prior to April, 1921, figures are of the last Friday of
the month. The reserve ratio represents the percentage which total reserves (mostly gold) form of the combined deposit and Federal reserve note liabilities. Prior to
March, 1921, net deposits were used instead of total deposits in calculating reserve ratios. Monthly data from 1920 on condition of Federal reserve banks may be found in the
May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 123, except for investments, which are given in the September, 1922, issue (No. 13), p. 47.
4
Covering 16 cities.




125

Table 101.—PUBLIC FINANCE, INTEREST RATES, AND SAVINGS
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT FINANCES i
YEAR AND
MONTH

MONEY
IN CIRCULATION a

BROKERS' LOANS
(end of month)

To New
OrdiGross
York
Total
CusPer
nary
debt,
Stock
toms
end of receipts ordinary expendi- Total capita Exchange
receipts
month
tures
members8

Millions
of dolls.

Thousands of dollars

Millions of Dollars
dolls.

By New
York
banks 4

N.Y. Coml. Fed.
call
land
banks
loans
III OS.5
(8)
(6)

Thousands of dollars

11 $696, 452
1, 156, 891

976, 888
774, 005
1, 319, 184
1, 391, 229
1, 564, 708
2, 336, 188
2, 704, 238

8.58
5.99
4.42
4.87
3.17
4.31
4.58

7.38
6.54
4.43
4.99
3.91
4.02
4.24

2, 466, 628
2, 629, 243
2, 691, 297
2, 908, 060

4.56
4.90
4.75
5.45

3, 513, 174
3, 535, 590
3, 000, 096
2, 835, 719

3, 098, 192
3, 109, 331
2, 573, 051
2, 463, 697

42.21
41.85
42.01
42.02

2, 767, 401
2, 926, 298
2, 997, 760
3, 142, 148

42.34
42. 53
42.62
43.03

3, 218, 937
3, 111, 177
3, 129, 162
3, 292, 860

1920 mo. av.
1921 mo. av.
1922 mo. av_
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av_

24, 298
23, 976
22, 964
22, 350
21, 251
20, 516
19, 643

26, 909
25, 714
29,704
46, 827
45, 470
45, 630
48, 286

557, 880
468, 744
342, 425
333, 928
334, 337
315, 012
330, 813

540, 174
461, 517
316, 275
308, 123
292, 223
294, 137
298, 749

5,332
4,843
4,374
4,729
4,755
4,736
4,835

50.11
44.80
39.86
42.50
42.20
41.51
41.85

20, 418
20, 407
20, 401
20, 248

51,017
52, 835
48, 276
46, 223

512, 072
202, 245
184, 931
602, 575

330, 851
323, 432
236, 034
433, 968

4,827
4,901
4,972
5,008

42.17
42.77
43.35
43.62

20,283
20, 276
20, 083
20,069

46, 399
47, 615
54, 891
47, 936

186, 283
179, 296
657, 621
194, 713

232, 847
151, 877
466, 240
336, 867

4,740
4,814
4,806
4,854

41.24
41.84
41.73
42.11

May
June.. _
July
August

20, 063
19, 643
19, 613
19, 534

42, 707
47, 261
49, 352
51, 815

183, 520
651, 639
236, 020
192, 954

250, 869
362, 203
222, 095
254, 802

4,871
4,835
4,858
4, 864

September
October
November
December __

19, 473
19, 420
19, 389
19, 075

55, 596
60, 969
52, 655
48, 431

576, 528
192, 919
176, 002
657, 096

290, 465
367, 595
364, 250
414, 032

4,906
4,933
4,949
5,001

Redis. New York United
N.Y.
States
State
Fed.
postal
savings8
Res.
savings °
banks
Bk.?
Thousands of dollars

5.52
4 80
3.46
3.45
4.73 10 5. 50
5.83
5.88
5.67
5.43

$26, 512
24, 344
17, 439
17, 636
18, 832
15,000
15, 371

1925
September..
October
NovemberDecember..
1926
January
February
March
April

rev

3.29
3.68
1.90
2.74
3.37
5.08
7.07

$1, 193
1,188
1,191
1,225
2,976
12, 244
25, 482

$60, 315
$60, 474
61, 195
61, 282
57, 972
63, 353
65,003
61, 250
94, 037
165, 025
305, 382 1, 058, 153
429, 355 1, 543, 575

Interin ed.
credit
banks
(6)

Per cent

$3, 364 $34. 56
3,402 34.35
3,261 32.38
3,591 35.06
3,849 36.96
4,336 40.96
4,795 45.18

1913 mo. av.
1914 mo. av_
1915 mo. av.
1916 mo. av.
1917 mo. av.
1918 mo. av.
1919 mo. av.

SAVING DEPOSITS
(end of month)

INTEREST RATES

$3, 289, 194

5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00

$1, 724, 607
1, 772, 357
1, 805, 366
1, 918, 453
1, 989, 013
2, 016, 866
2, 223, 216

$39, 750
59, 145
74, 349
112, 159
143, 193
167, 653
161, 373

5.50
5.83
5.67
5.63 12 5. 50
5.75
5.17
5.25
4.58
,5.25
4.71

6.50
5.88
4.20
4.46
3.67
3.46
3.83

2, 465, 491
2, 635, 572
2, 800, 118
3, 090, 659
3, 258, 920
3, 491, 492
3, 717, 807

163, 434
154, 124
138, 168
132, 190
133, 025
132, 824

4.19
4.40
4.38
4.38

5.25
4.50
5.25
4.50
5.25 is 5. 00
5.25
5.00

3.50
3.50
3. 50
3.50

3, 487, 629
3, 529, 169
3, 533, 841
3, 602, 675

132, 159
132, 398
132, 711
133, 235

. 4. 50
4.94
4.59
4.38

4.38
4.13
4.28
4.20

5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25

5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00

4.00
4.00
4.00
3.50

3, 593, 530
3, 625, 038
3, 671, 730
3, 668, 819

134, 091
134, 997
134, 926
134, 850

2, 431, 505
2, 565, 177
2, 602, 042
2, 758, 274

3.97
4.19
4.43
4.59

4.00
3.88
3.95
4.31

5.25
5.00
5.25 !3 4. 50
5.25
4.50
5.25
4.50

3.50
3.50
3.50
4.00

3, 667, 580
3, 726, 826
3, 721, 746
3, 729, 404

2, 812, 971
2, 602, 196
2, 646, 653
2, 787, 761

4.90
4.75
4.59
5.15

4.43
4.50
4.44
4.38

5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25

4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00

3, 776, 911
3, 778, 155
3, 791, 144
3, 862, 801

4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50

1927
January
February
March
April
1
Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department. Yearly figures under this heading represent averages for the fiscal year ending June 30 of the year indicated, except the
debt figures, which represent the condition on June 30. Debt figures up to thelast two months are on a warrant basis, the current months being on a cash basis, as shown in
the preliminary debt statement, where further details may be obtained. Monthly data extending back to 1921 appeared in the March, 1924, issue of the Survey (No. 31),
p. 56. Receipts and expenditures are shown in detail currently in the daily statement of the U. S. Treasury. The large total receipts every three months are due to payment of income-tax installments. Expenditures represent those chargeable against ordinary receipts.
2 Represents money held outside the Treasury and Federal reserve system. Prior to July 1,1922, these data were compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, and thereafter by the U. S. Treasury Department. Yearly figures are as of June 30.
3 Compiled by the New York Stock Exchange from reports of all its members as to their net borrowings on collateral outstanding at the end of each month from banks
or agencies in New York City. These data include borrowings for out-of-town branch and correspondent offices. These security loans are used to carry securities not only
for customers but also for investment distribution. Details as between banks and other agencies and between demand and time loans are given in the Exchange's
monthly reports.
4 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board from reports, beginning with 1926, of 61 identical reporting member banks in New York City on their collateral loans to brokers
and dealers on thelast Wednesday in each month (not confined to members 9f the New York Stock Exchange). Details as to the account for which loans were made (for
out-of-town banks, or others), differentiating in each case between call and time money, are given in the board's weekly press releases. Prior to 1926, the figures are based
on daily reports of 43 banks, a few of them nonmembers of the Federal reserve system, and did not include for some banks the loans to dealers in securities. However, the
figures are fairly comparable. Prior to April, 1921, the data represent thelast Friday in each month, instead of the last Wednesday. Complete weekly data in detail from
1917 were published in the November, 1926, issue of the Federal Reserve Bulletin, pp. 779-786.
* Interest rates are averages of weekly ranges in the New York market as published by the Commercial and Financial Chronicle. During the earlier years quotations
on commercial paper are based on prime commercial paper maturing in 60 to 90 days, but lately the quotations have been changed to from 4 to 6 months' paper which now
constitutes the bulk of this business and the rates for which have been practically identical with the shorter maturities. Call loan rates are based on mixed collateral.
Detailed data by months from 1913 are given in the June, 1924, issue (No. 34), p. 56.
6
Compiled by the Federal^ Farm Loan Board, representing average interest rates charged by the Federal farm loan banks and intermediate credit banks, respectively.
These rates are based on the interest rates on farm loan bonds issued by the respective banks, being limited bylaw to a rate not exceeding 1 per cent higher than the
rate of the bond issue. The law limits interest rates to a 6 per cent maximum. The rates given here for intermediate credit banks are those for direct loans only. For
descriptions of these banks and the type of their loans, see Table 103. The land bank rates since the beginning of 1925 range from 5 to 5K per cent, the figure of 5^ being
merely an average of these rates and not the actual rate.
7
From the Federal Reserve Board. Monthly averages for years prior to 1922 cover only 61-90 day commercial, agricultural and livestock paper; since then rates shown are
applicable to all classes and maturities of eligible paper.
s Compiled from data furnished by the Savings Bank Association oftJie State of New York, comprising all savings banks in New York State at semiannual periods, totaling
about 150 banks. For the intervening months, for which figures were compiled beginning in 1924, a few banks, representing about 1 per cent of the total deposits do not
report and their deposited balance at the last semiannual period is added to the figures of the reporting banks to secure complete data. Yearly figures from 1914 to 1920,
inclusive, and for 1923, are averages of deposits on June 30 and December 31 of each year; 1913 figures are for December 31; 1921 data are averages of four quarterly figures,
and for 1922 the first three quarters are averaged.
s Compiled by the U. S. Post Office Department, showing depositors' balance in all postal savings accounts throughout the country at the end of the month. Details
for principal cities are given in the department's? monthly statement of postal savings business.
12
10 Average of 8 months, May to December, inclusive.
Average of 10 months, March to December, inclusive.
13
" Average of 3. months, October to December, inclusive.
Rate change occurred during this month, but not usually on the first day of the month.




126
Table 102.—STOCKS AND BONDS
STOCK PRICES
YEAR
AND

MONTH

BOND
YIELDS NEW YORK STOCK2 EXCHANGE
SALES

BOND PRICE INDEXES

0)

ComCom10
10
Com10
10
Libbined
25 South- bined high- sec- public indus- bined 5erty
25
ern
index indus- rail- cotton index est
ond utility trial index and
trials roads mills
(103
(40 grade grade
(66
stocks)
bonds) rails rails bonds bonds bonds) Treasury

Dollars per share

16
for-

eign

Munici- Stocks
pal

bonds

Liberty

Miscellaneous
bonds

and
ury

Treas-

Total
bonds

bonds

Per cent of par value

cent

Per

Thous.
of shares

4.45
4 16
4.23
4.06
4.31
4.58
4.50

Per cent of par value of 4 per cent bond

6,924
3,992
14, 448
19,404
15, 378
11, 948
26, 073

$41, 499
56, 959
79,623
94,199
61, 866 8 $40, 492
47, 544
117, 059
71, 322
236, 814

$41, 499
56, 959
79, 623
94, 199
85,690
164, 603
308, 136
323, 969
288, 816
343, 390
227, 903
315, 323
286, 124
260, 045

Thousands of dollars
par value

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.

$58. 19
58.08
75.35
99.14
85.44
80.98
105. 77

$82. 97
77.57
73.16
80.05
69.12
61.34
62.06

76.76
80.49
75.88
69.84
69.07

89.79
92.45
87.43
80.02
77.89

75.55
78.00
72.42
66.12
66.33

73.73
77.59
72.36
63.89
61.77

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

m.a.
m.a. $84.57
m.a. 97.08
m.a. 82.13
m.a. 88.74
m.a. 110. 63
m.a. 113.56

107. 21
79.38
98.58
107. 78
115. 08
152. 65
165. 70

55.94
53.21
62.38
60.15
67.18
82.48
93.27

$138. 45
124. 68
116. 99
114. 25

59.70
60.15
74.11
71.72
74.32
77.04
80.28

71.33
74.39
85.50
82.86
85.11
86.96
89.48

58.54
61.43
71.76
67.71
71.96
76.69
81.21

51.99
60.12
53.92
55.28
67.50 8 74. 00
72.27
66.26
73.21
68.93
70.81
75.45
74.40
77.86

85.38
94.93
93.46
95.68
97.52
99.23

93.20
99.54
98.77
101. 44
102. 62
102.73

92.42
101. 22
100. 22
101. 71
103. 04
103.31

5.04
5.02
4.21
4.27
4.21
4.13
4.14

18, 728
14, 334
21, 852
19, 773
23, 503
37, 684
37, 425

88, 563
115, 686
206, 948
161, 521
243, 145
256, 621
238,734

235,406
173, 130
136, 442
66,549
72, 178
29,503
21, 311

70.51
75.89
71.35
69.36
70.76

1925
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

105. 06
105.64
99.78
101. 90

135.
138.
136.
135.

38
48
96
40

79.97
80.90
79.07
76.28

120. 91
119. 97
119. 08
117. 74

76.07
76.82
76.38
76.51

85.82
86.37
86.98
87.66

75.12
76.00
75.50
75.90

70.63
71.26
70.03
69.59

74.61
75.16
74.90
75.05

96.94
97.23
96/76
97.39

102. 21
102. 11
102. 03
102. 62

103. 24
103. 14
102. 32
102. 80

4.16
4.11
4.10
4.07

41, 431
32, 750
38, 568
24,836

303, 825
280, 237
281, 732
247,768

48, 638
26, 691
33, 316
30, 283

352, 463
306,928
315,048 .
278, 051

May
June
July
Aug

104.68
108. 05
110. 75
112. 71

142. 34
144. 42
149. 25
158. 16

79.50
79.57
80.23
83.63

115. 95
114. 84
113. 66
114. 24

77.97
78.46
77.56
76.34

88.91
88.77
87.28
86.00

77.49
77.79
76.78
75.99

71.36
72.06
71.05
70.66

76.15
77.01
76.85
74.27

98.15
98.18
97.47
97.71

102. 65
102. 97
102. 14
102. 46

103. 84
103. 50
103. 40
103. 81

3.99
4.00
4.07
4.15

36, 463
30, 860
32, 273
32, 865

313, 612
243, 516
237, 909
219, 278

25, 186
33, 074
32, 192
22,143

338, 798
276, 590
270, 101
241, 421

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

115.
121.
120.
121.

71
39
05
84

162. 83
173. 56
177. 26
177. 74

84.73
84.92
88.56
92.45

114. 42
115. 89
118. 27
118. 88

76.92
76.73
77.12
77.56

86.54
86.06
86.22
86.90

76.91
76.78
77.73
78.28

70.95
70.52
70.65
70.92

74.92
75.17
75.46
75.81

97.55
97.46
97.53
97.81

101. 40
106. 92
102. 02
101. 95

104. 00
102. 75
101. 41
102. 26

4.21
4.26
4.22
4.23

36, 886
53, 423
48, 981
42, 876

242, 657
258, 979
218, 999
230, 939

21, 066
21, 528
23, Oil
36, 911

263, 723
280, 507
242, 010
267,- 850

1936
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

120. 42
119. 92
106. 63
108. 94

179.90
179. 55
158. 05
144. 70

92.40
90.83
87.35
86.33

120. 49
120. 89
119.49
117. 79

78.59
78.69
79.32
80.16

87.99
88.77
88.71
89.83

79.22
80.09
79.74
81.23

71. 99
73.65
73.22
73.69

76.80
77.73
77.13
77.60

98.77
98.81
98.38
99.38

102. 35
102. 63
102. 61
102. 87

103. 26
103. 14
101. 80
102. 92

4. 17
4.15
4.14
4.12

39, 088
35, 462
52, 040
30, 224

262, 897
218, 297
247, 061
269, 232

29, 680
17, 938
27,106
28, 948

292, 577
236, 235
274, 176
298, 180

115. 04
113.84
110. 58
110. 33

80.68
80.82
80.56
80.48

89.99
89.59
89.11
89.23

81.97
82.20
81.53
81.20

74.24
74.89
75.14
74. 78

78. 15
78.08
77.79
78.09

99.43
99.42
99.15
99.08

102. 78
102. 95
102. 74
102. 56

102. 83
103. 31
103. 40
103. 61

4.12
4.10
4.11
4.12

23, 188
37, 990
36, 732
44, 189

226, 854
250, 875
221, 926
203, 543

20, 857
26,452
20, 052
11, 906

247, 711
277, 327
241, 978
215, 449

110.
110.
110.
110.

80.42
80.31
81.36
81.95

89. 36
89.52
90.42
91.19

81.23
81.33
82.27
82. 51

74.67
74.29
75.60
76. 59

77.82
77.59
78.60
78.89

99.01
99.41
99.74
100.14

102. 27
102. 62
102. 88
103. 50

103. 64
103. 80
103. 92
104. 04

4.16
4.16
4.14
4.13

36, 904
40, 213
31, 183
41, 891

175, 594
217, 302
272, 138
299, 088

14, 060
15, 870
17, 457
25, 403

189, 654
233, 172
289, 595
324, 491

May
June
Julv
Aug

108. 13
111. 50
112. 75
' 115. 64

146.
155.
163.
172.

95
81
01
22

88.04
92.37
93.77
96.14

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

114. 48
111. 61
115. 32
117.43

172.
164.
171.
179.

26
63
95
36

99.43
94.93
97.43
100. 35

68
67
79
46

1927
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

!

I

May
June

|
II

i

1 Average market yield of bonds of 20 large cities at the end of each month compiled by The Bond Buyer. Averages for 1913 to 1916, inclusive, taken from Bond Buyer's
Index of the Municipal Bond Market, based on period Jan. 1 to Dec. 1; subsequent yearly data are averages for the period Jan. 31 to Dec. 31.
2 Bond sales from Dow, Jones & Co.; stock sales from the Annalist. These data include only sales on the New York Stock Exchange and not those in the "over-thecounter" market or on other exchanges. Monthly data from 1920 are given for most items in this table in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 125 and 129.
3 This index, compiled as of the last day of the month by the New York Trust Co., includes 25 railroad, 10 iron and steel, 5 railroad equipment, 9 motor (including accessories), 5 rubber tire, 5 shipping, 5 sugar, 5 leather and shoe, 5 tobacco, 10 copper, 10 oil, and 9 New York bank and trust companies.
* Prices are averages of daily closing prices for these stocks on New York Stock Exchange, taken from the Annalist. Monthly data from 1913 are given in the December,
1922, issue (No. 16), p. 47.
[ from weekly quotations of 25 southern cotton-mill stocks as furnished by E. S. Dlckson & Co. Monthly data from 1923 may be found on page 24 of the
8 Compiled f
March, 1926, issue (No. 55).
8
These indexes are compiled by Dow, Jones & Co. from the yields of the average prices of the bonds for each day of the month, the average yields for the 10 bonds of
each class being capitalized at 4 per cent to give the combined index.
7 This index, compiled as of the last day of the month by the New York Trust Co., includes 6 Liberty and Victory bonds (the 2 issues of Victory bonds being replaced
at their redemption by the Treasury bonds, thus making only 5 issues), 16 foreign government and city, 20 railroad, 10 public utility, and 5 telegraph and telephone issues.
8
Seven months' average, June to December, inclusive.
8
Five substitutions in this series in January, 1922, account for the violent change in the index.



127
Table 103.—NEW SECURITY ISSUES AND AGRICULTURAL FINANCING
CORPORATE SECURITIES 1

YEAR AND MONTH
Total

ReBonds New
Stocks and capital funding
notes

MUNICIPAL
SECURITIES'

CANADIAN
BOND ISSUES 3

$157, 935 $225, 825 $21, 357
117, 963 151, 828 49, 407
203, 899 194, 615 61, 460
206, 291 214, 782 44,037
247, 691 276, 858 43,023
285, 595 341, 727 53,115
331, 815 363, 084 78, 546

247, 188
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av.-- 201, 234
1922 monthly a v - - . 255, 868
1923 monthly av_ _ _ 267, 704
1924 monthly av_- _ 319, 890
1925 monthly av._. 394, 843
1926 monthly av.__ 441, 629

$89, 253
23,271
51, 969
61, 413
72, 199
109, 248
109, 814

1935
September
October
November
December.

74,634
120, 932
149, 938
161, 919

236, 053
250, 373
226, 302
356, 441

294, 309
300, 994
365, 565
474, 903

16, 379
70, 310
10, 675
43, 458

442, 807
288, 039
299, 109
410, 853

545,843
381, 093
443, 232
331, 516

68, 707
33, 095
37, 168
111, 070

310, 687
371, 305
__ _ 376, 240
518, 360

1926
January
February
_ __
March... . . _ _ .
April

614, 549
414, 189
480, 400
442, 586

171, 742
126, 150
181, 291
31, 733

May _ .
June
July
August
_ --_

453, 868
472, 402
474, 384
243, 450

196, 423 257, 445
57, 196 415, 206
101, 036 373, 348
46, 507 196, 943

441, 631 12, 237
379, 039 93, 363
414, 635 59, 748
176, 155 67, 295

September
October
November
December

._ 328, 706
350, 483
595, 237
429, 304

48, 327 280, 379
58, 490 291, 993
203, 909 391, 328
94, 969 334, 335

283, 231
276, 706
330, 694
353, 228

1937
January ._
February
March
April
May
June

_

45, 474
73, 776
264, 543
76, 076

(end of month)

Mil. of
dolls.

$34, 040 $40, 268
37,200 24,332
41, 049 12, 894
41, 450 24, 367
37, 078 32,704
21,902 39, 428
63, 528 37,508

av_-_ $137, 145
av-_- 119, 710
av_-_ 119, 613
av-._ 182, 208
av___ 127, 498
112, 068
av
a v~ 251, 764

AGRICULTURAL, LOANS
OUTSTANDING

NEW
INCORPORAPerma- Tem- Govt.
FedTotal TIONS «
Joint
nent porary and Mu- Coreral
outstock
loans loans pro- nici- pora- stdg.,
farm
tion* end of
and
(long (short
pal bonds
loan
term) term) vincial
banks 6 banks °
mo.

Thousands of dollars
1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly

TAXEX.
SECURITIES *

$4, 422
7,118
17, 901
17, 385
56, 198
58,000
64,429

$9, 647
7,032
5,542
4,158
2,365
4,917
2,583

$6, 171
3,644
1,888
3,540
2,708
628
5,121

64, 742
115, 281
106, 629
94, 597
120, 557
117, 059
113, 352

9,749
13, 395
27, 125
25, 107
25, 748
22, 189
14, 897

4,466
7,052
7,290
7,227
7,270
3,849
5,242

3,846
5,121
6,729
10, 880
15, 284
12, 996
22, 146

121, 428 76, 118 155, 100 2,496
84,775 93, 465
150 3,385
71, 523 39, 827
2,275 4,909
166, 273 141, 732 21,000 1,665

7,550
8,328
14, 425
10, 236

55, 341
63,503
32, 965
42, 846
81, 590
72, 172
51, 757

75, 050 79, 824
5,200 12, 615 8,725
146, 457 23, 866 105, 000 1,861 2,310
118, 982 122, 301
5,000 1,888 16,540
117, 553 72, 748 None. 5,735 50, 575

Fed- War
eral
Fiin ter- nance
med, Corporacredit
banks7 tion s

Thousands of dollars

$5,554

$172, 301
120, 306
164, 915
276, 925
373, 198
183, 275
9,506
1, 056, 519

13, 652
14, 036
16, 268
16, 870

1, 249, 920
663,260
700, 013
780, 896
596, 227
823, 434
912, 278

$110, 498
237, 478 $34, 257

338, 234 76, 951
373, 381 79, 124
$174, 051
546, 519 143, 410
732, 365 9131,837
103, 646
879, 929 421, 394 $50, 883 60, 438
973, 934 502, 133 64, 333 28, 191
11,116

64,318
73, 097
77, 300
80, 052

24, 688
22, 275
19, 843
15, 565

17, 472 1, 040, 096 1, Oil, 088 555, 756 79, 935
17, 612 2, 675, 185 1, 019, 486 567, 544 81, 574
748, 505 1, 027, 361 579, 458 83, 991
17, 719
17, 816 1, Oil, 931 1, 033, 045 587, 169 81, 574

14, 637
13, 861
13, 089
12, 564

1, 038, 385
1, 043, 955
1, 048, 275
1, 053, 336

572, 751
989, 960 519, 237
17, 144
17, 221
585, 422
995, 207 526, 042
999,415 534, 134
17, 266 1, 241, 594
17, 392 1, 020, 548 1, 005, 685 545, 559

35, 533
58, 335
51, 831
38, 055

25, 000
21, 943
5,250
None.

6,643 2,100
3,342 34, 005
4,950 48, 005
1,051 11, 949

17, 934
18, 060
18, 117
18, 172

867, 366
757, 355
454, 865
505, 770

594, 028 78,554
600, 150 76, 450
605, 718 71, 139
610, 794 78, 083

11, 870
11, 188
10, 803
10, 504

135, 093 54, 613
105, 210 42, 075
71, 826 11, 882
143, 691 30,024

None.
6,000
2,540
2,827

3,771 51, 713
3,374 33, 960
415
12, 967
4,712
5,460

18, 282
18, 368
18, 422

580, 387 1, 057, 217 614, 639 78, 490
901, 303 1, 063, 056 619, 217 84, 665
552, 787 1, 068, 596 624, 230 87, 977
851 660

9,629
9,154
8,421
7,671

141, 006
145, 616
90, 884
68, 853

__

i Compiled by the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, except for data previous to 1920, which are from the New York Journal of Commerce. The columns " New capital"
and" Refunding" include all types of financing to be used for the purpose designated. Distribution of bond issues by classes, from 1920 through September, 1924, appeared
in June, 1923, issue (No. 22), page 42, and in November, 1924, issue (No. 39), page 137. Further details are given in the Commercial and Financial Chronicle.
3
Sales of new securities by States and municipalities compiled by The Bond Buyer. The short-term loans are of a temporary character, usually replaced later by permanent3 loans.
Issues of Canadian bonds from The Financial Post, Canada.
4
Estimated gross amount of wholly tax-exempt securities outstanding compiled by U. S. Treasury Department. The yearly figures represent data as of Dec. 31 of each
year, except for 1913, when the figures are for Dec. 31,1912. In 1912,1918, and 1922 the data were based on census reports. Details as to amount held in sinking funds and
divisions by classes are shown in the monthly statements issued by the Treasury.
* New incorporations represent the value of the authorized capital of new enterprises, exclusive of those under $100,000, incorporated in the principal Eastern States as
compiled by the New York Journal of Commerce. Monthly averages from 1913 appeared in November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 187.
6
These data, from the Federal Farm Loan Board, represent loans made for agricultural development secured by mortgages on land and buildings, the Federal farm
loan banks being established by the Government in 12 districts, while the joint-stock land banks, of which 70 are now in existence, are private organizations. The banks
were closed during the greater part of 1920, pending litigation in the Supreme Court involving the constitutionality of the Federal farm loan act, and in 1921 many loan
requests could not be granted because the cessation of bond selling had depleted the resources. Monthly figures on loans closed from 1920 appeared in June, 1923, issue
(No. 22), page 47.
7 The Federal intermediate credit banks under the supervision of the Federal Farm Loan Board are located in the same cities as the 12 Federal land banks, as follows:
Springfield, Mass.; Baltimore, Md.; Columbia, S. C.; Louisville, Ky.; New Orleans, La.; St. Louis, Mo.; St. Paul, Minn.; Omaha, Nebr.; Wichita, Kans.; Houston,
Tex.; Berkeley, Calif.; and Spokane, Wash. These banks lend money on staple agricultural products and make rediscounts for agricultural credit corporations andlivestock
loan8 companies.
Data from the War Finance Corporation comprise advances for "agricultural and livestock purposes" under the agricultural credits acts on Aug. 24,1621, to banks,
livestock associations, and cooperative marketing associations. Figures on advancements and repayments from 1922 to September, 1924, appeared in November, 1924, issue
(No. 39), page 189; since that date new advances have practically ceased.
0 six months' average, March, June, September, October, November, and December.




128
Table 104.—NEW SECURITY ISSUES BY CLASSES
CORPORATE ISSUES

LONG-TERM REAL ESTATE BONDS

Purpose of issue
Foreign
government

YEAR AND
MONTH

Total
corporate

Rail- Public In du sroads utilities .trials

Oils

ShipLand, ping Grand
To
build- and
Real
ing, etc. miscel- total finance estate
con- mortlaneous
struc- gages
tion

Kind of structure

Acquisitions
and
improvements

InterOffice
est
and
other Hotels Apart- rates
comments
mercial
Per ct.

Thousands of dollars

1919 mo.
1920 mo.
1921 mo.
1922 mo.

av
av
av
av

$36, 640
24, 250
31, 606
35, 942

$228, 304
247, 192
199, 242
256, 107

1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.

av
av
av
av

20, 237
69, 000
53, 782
42, 844

269, 403
319, 881
394, 843
441, 630

1924
May
June
July
August

9,250
15, 700
10, 000
48, 065

September
October.
November
December

42, 000
214, 000
_. _ 102, 000
91, 000

$17, 343 $38, 523
31, 490 41, 402
54, 607 55, 924
54, 294 80, 007

$73, 455 $54, 310
88, 595 38, 222
43, 881 27, 671
52, 818 25, 192

$5, 565 $25, 908
7,700 30, 970
4,542 13, 450
14, 875 28, 920

$13, 338

6.91

$8, 452 $1,066 $2, 209

$6, 171 $2, 676 $2,404

3,696
1,057
7,233
6,861

9,723
12, 214
21, 892
21, 806

4,354
4,964
9,761
8,637

3,499
5,567
8,155
7,261

6.58
6.50
6.29
6.18

3,800
2,300
1,168
3,425

3,665
4,560
11, 730
4,100

6.48
6.62
6.52
6.45

94, 866
127, 470
143, 753
164, 538

68, 248
51, 512
76, 887
88, 938

18, 822
15, 627
23, 545
41, 643

21, 013
27, 958
62, 722
61, 347

23, 268
18, 956
39, 623
46, 348

19, 940
26, 604
57, 963
53, 701

13, 014
19, 001
33, 322
29, 480

2,157
4,328
12, 613
10, 643

495, 953
316, 075
279, 178
287, 849

113, 391 278, 639
119,342 145, 507
66, 029 124, 365
116, 340 74, 131

55, 363
14, 219
22, 933
24, 160

10, 319
None.
18, 145
21, 844

27, 692
16, 375
28, 868
19, 068

10, 555
20, 632
18, 439
32, 305

24, 342
15, 945
26, 658
18, 568

19, 112
11, 455
24, 233
15, 258

5,005
4,165
1,615
2,935

175
375

13, 787
8, 515
11,880
10, 110

312, 425
418, 447
243, 368
373, 170

130, 813
107, 118
52, 714
14, 890

91, 468
133, 280
82, 018
132, 907

28, 842
56,565
44, 247
148, 618

11, 850
32, 950
19, 625
None.

41, 803
32, 484
39, 417
47, 657

7,650
56, 050
5,347
290, 098

39, 818
30, 549
38, 257
46, 557

30, 038
20, 614
24, 622
27, 265

4,400
4,200
10, 735
1,301

2,300
4,590
1,000
2,510

15, 880
20, 570
17, 320
19, 905

2,795
3,215
11, 115
4,290

8,358
3,124
5,537
10, 085

6.41
6.46
6.33
6.29

8,000
62,500
28,000
8,000

508, 598
503, 553
352,606
482,575

22, 992 237, 725
112, 045 205, 324
38, 833 171, 557
87, 614 82,400

85, 773
63,899
51, 962
195, 904

76, 400
18, 435
6,900
32, 731

53, 893
39, 283
60, 972
60, 561

31, 815
33, 817
22, 382
21, 365

48, 373 ^
31, 258
53, 387
51, 861

23, 338
18, 178
39, 355
35, 113

8,998
9,210
7,350
10, 708

14, 680
530
5,400
950

21, 693
7,220
25, 138
28, 685

10, 275
6,320
8,115
3,763

11, 268
4,058
7,602
7,888

6.40
6.48
6.27
6.28

May
June
July
August

5,943
140, 188
144, 500
8,700

295,872
379, 269
398,059
240,987

48, 497
36, 527
65, 000
19, 245

122, 935
141, 419
107, 853
111, 539

49,794
23, 610
92, 445
39, 178

12, 288
16, 359
40, 722
14, 547

40, 453
116, 262
63, 269
36, 994

21, 906
45, 093
26, 769
18, 684

39, 853
108, 195
60, 099
36, 428

30, 855
59, 244
37,004
21, 180

4,553
27, 091
9,420
11, 515

1,550
10, 405
8,145
650

23, 462
37, 745
13, 756
10, 175

2,000
23, 365
16, 655
5,705

9,801
7,855
6,630
6,970

6.29
6.25
6.26
6.39

September.
October
November
December

61, 800
39, 650
138, 100
None.

310,688
371,305
376,240
518, 359

13, 684
28, 952
6,320
35, 000

131, 081
109, 590
121, 446
182, 164

43, 062
99, 918
82, 759
94, 335

20, 400
2,500
20, 757
20, 500

54, 960
96, 629
67, 297
62, 086

47,500
29,714
67, 426
109, 010

51, 808
90, 839
65, 647
57, 808

16, 350
39, 880
45, 240
34, 130

13, 330
31, 753
9,620
7,803

13, 068
11,640
10, 375
9,405

11, 270
37, 515
27, 090
18, 953

8,755
8,393
12, 795
10, 995

7,025
5,130
10, 165
13, 470

6.16
6.25
6.14
6.31

1926
January ._
February
March. _ _
April

24, 972
3,800
21, 500
83, 100

614, 549
414,188
480, 400
442,586

46, 670
23, Oil
31, 930
61, 924

206, 246
149, 658
137, 426
216, 932

151, 052
162, 237
95, 366
51, 100

43, 857
6,930
104, 750
9,450

58, 331
42, 313
55, 505
53, 533

81, 229
30, 040
48, 923
48, 498

53, 927
41, 153
50, 370
42, 398

38, 767
32, 858
24, 950
20, 603

8,663
250
9,640
13, 110

4,522
2,750
5,230
5,085

27, 342
29, 550
16, 525
11, 378

9,490
1, 650
8,925
6, 235

11,318
3,258
6,075
6,440

6.24
6.26
6.24
6.23

May
June
July
August

42, 000
27, 600
12, 520
34, 000

453, 868
472, 402
474, 383
243, 450

17, 925 274, 824
40, 376 215, 876
40, 775 211, 829
15, 085 69, 434

51, 178
76, 744
91, 801
66, 035

3,500
2,050
6,500
10, 500

50, 481
94, 744
82, 893
52, 628

55, 710
42, 362
40, 585
29, 618

49,754
82, 985
69, 408
48, 220

18, 239
40, 945
43, 660
18, 845

12, 615
7, 425
18, 125
18, 760

15, 480
13, 180
3,138
8,000

29, 191
34, 295
22, 640
8,915

4,833
16, 505
29, 345
8,960

7,875
7,035
8,850
7,070

6.22
6.15
6.23
6.15

74,900
118, 000
24, 240
47, 492

328, 705
350, 482
595, 237
429, 304

61, 706
12, 190
27, 821
43, 170

45, 930
147,311
162, 328
136, 656

114, 938
55, 117
73, 058
78, 624

None.
31, 212
230, 968
50, 000

48, 537
80, 142
51, 068
65, 993

57, 595
17, 260
49, 494
54, 861

42, 606
67, 545
40, 330
55, 715

27, 700
24, 015
30, 375
32, 805

7,021
19, 160
4,845
8,100

2,385
14, 300
4,110
4,150

21, 350
14, 105
23, 910
22, 475

1,630
5,175
6,235
4,660

4,270
11, 320
5,945
7,670

6.10
6.08
6.14
6.16

1935
January
February _ _ _
March
_
April

September
October
November
December

1927
January
February,
March
April

43, 187
78, 358
42, 892
35, 215

_

__

May
June

i From the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, showing new financing in the United States. Corporate financing includes both stock and bond finances, and foreign
as well as American corporations. The industrial group comprises the following classifications given in the detailed statements: Iron, steel, coal, copper, etc.; equipment
manufacturers; motors and accessories; rubber and miscellaneous industrials. The data on long-term real estate bonds which represent only those put out by mortgage
bonding houses, have been segregated from detailed figures of individual issues in the land and building group as given in the Chronicle, eliminating data on stocks and
short-term bonds. These latter items, however, were shown in the September, 1925, issue (No. 49) of the SURVEY, p. 25, together with interest rates on the short-term
bonds and the data shown here on long term bonds extending back to January, 1922. In the classifications shown above by purpose of issue and by kind of structure, the
miscellaneous group, making the difference between the totals of the three classes shown and the grand total, has been omitted. The interest rates shown are the average
coupon rates on the long-term real estate bonds issued during the month.



129

Table 105.—BUSINESS PROFITS AND LOSSES
DIVIDEND AND INTEREST
PAYMENTS

BUSINESS FAILURES •!

1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av

Thous.
Thous.
of dolls. No. of dolls. No.

Canadian 2
Liabilities

Firms

&

Banks
(quarterly)
Liabilities

I

Firms

03

Liabilities

1,336 $10, 366
1, 523 11,312
9,335
1,846
6,083
1,415
1,154
6,628
6,121
832
4,301
538

Trade estab- Agents and
brokers
lishments
Liabilities

$22, 818
29, 821
25, 106
16, 354
15, 203
13, 590
9,442

Firms

No.

Liabilities

Thous.
of dolls.

YEAR AND MONTH

Firms

Manufacturing
establish,
ments

Liabilities

Total
commercial

JB

Dividend payments
Total
dividend
Indusand intrial Steam Street
terest
and
Total
rail- railpay- 3
miscel- roads ways
ments
laneous

£

Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
of
of dolls. No. of dolls. No. dolls. No.

353
385
426
349
308
230
155

$9, 583
13, 805
12, 436
7,616
5,843
4,825
3,139

929
1,071
1,336
994
786
541
334

$2, 869
4,704
3,335
2,655
2,732
2,644
2,002

54
67
84
73
61
60
48

«$7,887
14, 001
9,306
1,598
4,614
1,284
4,131

12, 675
30
43, 254 " 102
19, 434
69
144
50, 934
50, 731 153
41, 175 116
53, 019
152

24, 593
740
52, 361 1,638
51, 989 1,973
44, 885 1,560
45, 269 1,718
_ _ 36, 979 1,768
34, 104 1,814

10, 666
19, 488
17, 910
23, 379
23, 847
13, 974
13, 170

220
375
473
414
434
424
450

7,380
21, 232
22, 615
17, 495
16, 933
17, 948
16, 779

461
1,166
1,410
1,089
1,197
1,263
1,272

6,547
11,641
11, 465
4,012
4,439
5,058
4,155

59
96
89
57
85
80
93

«30 $1, 388
54 2,562
33 2,698
12 1,312
12 1,138
6 1,035
12
843

$24, 733
24, 549
23, 613
26, 095
26, 038
24, 135
23,705

$4,906
5,368
5,149
6,020
6,493
6,318
5,977

54, 354
40, 123
34, 005
37, 189

2,317
1,793
1,859
1,939

11, 909
15, 334
13, 375
13, 097

480
409
429
430

24, 655
21, 067
17, 595
21, 536

1,757
1,285
1,345
1,427

17, 790
3,722
3,035
2,556

80
99
85
82

May
June
July
August

37, 027
36, 701
34, 505
37, 159

1,767
1,745
1,685
1,513

18, 184
16, 159
10, 932
22, 339

400
431
418
365

15, 820
17, 213
15, 961
13, 460

1,286
1,229
1,184
1,069

3,023
3,329
7,612
1,360

81
85
83
79

September
October
November
December

30, 687
29, 544
35, 922
36, 528

1,465
1,581
1,672
1,878

8,167
11, 264
13, 994
12, 931

388
408
442
490

14, 990
13, 530
18, 907
20, 635

1,015
1,111
1,146
1,307

7,530
4,750
3,022
2,962

62
62
84
81

1936
January
February
March
April

43, 661
34, 176
30, 623
38, 487

2,296
1,801
1,984
1,957

16, 094
10, 822
9,862
16, 734

510
447
469
494

21, 512
20, 317
18, 623
19, 094

1,696
1,282
1,424
1,378

6, 056
3,037
2,138
2,660

90
72
91
85

May
June
July
August

33, 543
29, 408
29, 680
28, 130

1,730
1,708
1,605
1,593

16, 157
10, 092
11, 167
12, 516

437
435
396
449

15, 710
15, 525
14, 614
14, 096

1,216
1,160
1,122
1,071

1,676
3,791
3,898
1,519

77
113
87
73

September
October
November
December

29, 990
33, 231
32, 694
45, 620

1,437
1,763
1,830
2,069

10, 093
11, 650
16, 097
16, 758

374
450
440
494

11, 243
15, 874
14, 158
20, 579

958
1,205
1,285
1,469

8,654
5,707
2,439
8,282

105
108
105
106

1927
January
February
March
April

43, 926

144

42, 859

111

11, 613

46

66, 301

163

25, 894

94

30,309

115

73, 651

169

82, 221

230

1,845
4,221
4,771
4, 285'
3,378
2, 990
2,369

82
199
271
243
192
176
176

284, 573
278, 484
283, 310
298, 768
320, 049
340, 492
361, 326

80,248
76, 965
77, 554
80, 271
84, 391
89, 246
93, 366

50, 140
45,200
43, 723
45, 120
47, 181
49, 671
51,641

23, 832
23, 668
23, 508
24, 093
25, 100
26, 251
27, 528

6,074
5,970
5,902
6,313
7,008
7,778
8,496

4,923
2,659
3,392
2,054

285
189
199
145

458, 625 158, 125
202, 200 80, 400
333, 380 87, 980
405, 250 95, 000

64, 600
44, 150
51, 900
60,500

27, 150
29, 100
31,200
25, 025

16, 800
7,150
4,800
9,475

6,116
2,204
2,627
967

176
151
155
111

328, 225 59, 725
323, 400 68, 900
438, 785 115,385
215, 800 83,900

29, 600
40, 950
59, 075
46, 500

24, 075
23, 450
30, 510
32, 275

6,050
4,500
10, 900
5,125

1,895
3,533
2,352
3,156

141
183
167
212

320, 170 68, 920
427, 225 102, 925
300, 500 73, 700
323, 348 75, 995

45, 300
66, 375
32, 500
54,600

17, 250
25, 900
33, 900
15, 180

5,375
10, 650
7,300
5,215

2,677
2,653
3,653
3,202

249
188
172
153

511, 725 166, 775
218, 715 83,215
332, 222 90, 972
426, 075 99, 575

68, 200
45, 575
53, 325
63, 075

28, 775
30, 215
32, 575
26, 175

18, 100
7,425
5,070
10, 325

1,770
72
3,328
1,494

158
150
171
141

338, 650 62, 950
341, 350 71, 250
491, 915 121, 415
234, 635 87, 135

31, 300
41, 550
62, 215
47, 950

24,900
24, 575
31, 900
33,500

6,750
5,125
11, 600
5,685

1,298
2,486
2,691
3,108

142
188
188
208

321, 542 72,800
447, 500 106, 650
330, 900 78, 600
340, 681 79, 050

47, 050
68, 300
34, 700
56, 450

18, 500
27, 050
35, 750
16, 425

6,260
11, 300
8,150
6,175

579, 850 178, 900

1925
January
February
March
April

StOCkS:

(<ltly.)*
Dolls.!
per :
share •

Thousands of dollars

152 $148, 103 $69, 838 $38, 527
241 148, 948 68, 481 36, 530
219 155, 426 66, 019 36, 374
148 177, 919 77, 176 44, 986
93 199, 095 89, 856 56,542
68 227, 061 85, 184 53,788
52 265, 764 79, 745 48,264

Av.
pay- ;
ments
on
industrial ,

73,000

30, 900

$5. 23
6.36
3.45
6.09
6.68
6.19
6.85

1
i
f
:
:
:
;

19,200

6.59 i
4.94 r

4.40 i
5.46
5.55
7.09
7.68

6.52

6.55

6.95

8.32

7.15

7.65

7.62

7.90

May
June
1
Compiled by Dun's Review; for annual data in greater detail, see April, 1924, issue of the SURVEY (No. 32), pp. 57-59. Monthly data on total commercial failures froni
19132appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 53; monthly data on all classes from 1921 appeared in June, 1924, issue (No. 34), p. 55.
:
Canadian business failures from Bradstreet's.
3
Data compiled by New York Journal of Commerce. "Total dividends" include bank dividends not separately shown for those months where such payments are re-,
ported. The total interest payments may be obtained by subtracting total dividends from total interest and dividend payments. Monthly data for total dividend and
interest payments covering the period 1913 to 1921 appeared in the September, 1922, issue (No. 13) of the SURVEY, p. 51 (figure for July, 1917, should be $333,011 instead of
$633,011); and for dividends, classified, covering the same period, in the October, 1922, issue (No. 14), p. 46.
4
Average dollar dividends paid on industrial stocks compiled by the Cleveland Trust Co. for the industrial stocks included in the Dow-Jones index of stock prices, comprising 12 stocks from 1900 through 1914 and 20 stocks from 1915 through 1924. The figures are unweighted averages of the amount of dividends paid per share for these,
stocks in each quarter, reduced to an annual basis. Quarterly figures extending back to 1900 appeared in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), p. 29.
5
Yearly data are quarterly averages.


26446°—27


9

130
Table 106.—CORPORATION PROFITS AND STOCKHOLDERS
NET PROFITS i

OQ

O

1

Miscellaneous

1

Machinery

6D

Metals and
mining

•a
a

U. S. Steel Corp.
(common stock)

Pennsylvania
R. R. Co.

Industrial
Motors and
accessories

II

Telephone

YEAR AND QUABTEB

Railroads

Railroad
and
telephone

§

"3

STOCKHOLDERS*

Domestic

Foreign

Domestic

Foreign

Per ct.
of total

Number

Millions of dollars

Shares
held
by
brokers

i

American Tefeph*
& Telego Co.

Domestic

Foreign

Number

1913 quarterly av.._
1914 quarterly av
1915 quarterly av
1916 quarterly av
1917 quarterly av
19i8 quarterly av
1919 quarterly av

72, 714
78, 682
81, 603
85, 343
93, 331
102, 798
111,316

11, 258
11,839
11,816
6,884
2, 235
1,773
1,727

41, 436
47, 777
3 42, 020
39, 365
44, 531
64, 314
73, 510

1,529
1,697
3 1, 980
939
1,191
1,484
1,475

51.48
46.73
45. 87
55.08
51.88
43. 22
40.65

53, 205
56, 932
62, 279
67, 504
78, 597
96, 035
115,482

1,041
1,175
1,270
1,187
999
1,143
1,239

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

126, 424
138, 450
136, 181
138, 846
142, 718
144, 380
140, 954

1,500
1,743
2,869
2,847
2,925
2,968
2,911

88, 085
104, 621
97, 580
94, 489
96, 081
91, 043
87, 467

1,300
1,341
1,380
1,431
1,557
1,511
1,587

30.35
22.45
24. 36
22.76
22.97
26.31
28.01

131, 643
163, 703
217, 599
265, 638
322, 693
353, 217
377, 563

1,267
2,013
2,298
2,644
3,086
3,796
4,753

1930
March
June
September
December

121, 326
124, 943
127, 768
131, 659

1,595
1,525
1,472
1,409

82, 246
85, 909
89, 665
94, 520

1,337
1,320
1,287
1,256

33.46
32.09
30.69
25.17

122, 999
131, 558
134, 112
137, 901

1,173
1,173
1,174
1,547

1931
March
June
September
December

137, 007
139, 702
138,243
138, 847

1, 386
1,373
1,362
2,852

103, 093
103, 976
105, 355
106, 061

1,283
1,334
1,368
1,379

24.27
22.61
21.49
21.44

144, 716
153, 649
172, 770
183, 676

1,774
1,953
2,146
2,180

1933
March
June
- September
December

138, 895
136, 940
134, 279
134, 609

2,915
2,888
2,851
2,820

105, 261
97, 989
94, 789
92, 281

1,399
1,370
1,384
1,365

22.02
24.09
25.05
26.28

195, 608
201, 303
228, 592
246, 494

2,217
2,233
2,309
2,431

quarterly av. _ _
quarterly av
quarterly av
quarterly av_ _ _ $400
quarterly av_ __
388
quarterly av_ __
480
quterarly av

1933
March
June
September _ _
December
1934
March
June
September
1935
March
June
September
December
1936
March
June
September
December

$246
246
283

$34
38
47

$120
104
150

$35
27
56

$41
29
34

$15
17
21

$12
13
14

$6
5
8

$4
4
5

$8
10
13

339
453
422
386

185
262
276
261

36
36
30
35

118
155
116
90

39
50
29
20

27
46
43
46

17
21
14
6

12
13
13
9

7
8
7
3

4
5
4
3

12
12
6
3

136, 247
137, 156
138, 581
141, 348

2,814
2,843
2,852
2,880

92, 711
91, 593
95, 462
98, 189

1,355
1,351
1,481
1,536

26.24
23.34
20.83
20.62

255, 421
260, 446
269, 762
269, 923

2,524
2,603
2,719
2,729

374
328
412
439

203
189
286
307

35
37
37
43

136
102
89
89

37
23
22
25

45
30
18
22

24
18
16
8

12
13
15
12

6
5
4
6

4
4
4
4

8
9
10
12

142, 339
142, 965
143, 307
142, 261

2,987
2,901
2,903
2,913

97, 135
97, 577
94, 904
94, 708

1,542
1,549
1,558
1,577

22.39
20.45
22.82
26.21

296, 738
314, 227
338, 183
341, 625

2,760
2, 875
3,199
3,508

_
377
. . . 446
563
533

205
234
359
334

44
46
45
51

128
166
159
148

41
66
63
54

33
34
33
35

18
25
22
18

12
15
16
13

9
7
7
9

5
5
5
5

10
14
13
14

143, 224
146, 988
145, 583
141, 725

2,939
2,966
2,981
2,986

92, 552
91, 910
90, 651
89, 057

1,490
, 525
,526
,504

26.81
25.45
25.39
27.60

345, 451
354, 279
355, 895
357, 242

3,740
3,994
4,102
4,347

439
527
656

224
271
393

51
52
51

164
204
212

58
82
76

41
43
46

19
30
37

17
20
21

10
9
10

6
5
5

13
15
17

141, 097
141, 365
140, 153
141, 202

2,931
2,909
2,892
2,913

89, 102
92, 031
84,287
84, 447

,575
,618
,572
,582

29.92
24.10
29.01
28.99

362, 093
368, 410
385, 907
393, 843

4,432
4,557
4,937
5,084

1937
March
June
1
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York from quarterly reports of net profits of 355 companies, consisting of 185 Class I railroads, 71 telephone, 18 motor
'and 8accessories, 14 oil, 12 steel, 13 food, 10 metal and mining, 10 machine manufacturing, and 22 miscellaneous companies.
These data showing the growth of stockholders in three prominent companies—a railroad, a public utility, and an industrial—have been furnished direct by the
respective companies and represent the number of holders of common stock at the end of each quarter, i. e., December figures are for December 31 or January 1.
8
December 31 figures; other quarters of 1915 not available.




131
Table 107.—FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND CANADIAN TRADE
EUROPE

YEAR AND MONTH

England

France

Italy

Belgium

ASIA

Nether- Sweden Switzerland
lands

Japan

CANADIAN
FOREIGN TRADE 2

THE AMERICAS

India 3 Canada Argentina

Brazil

Chile

Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per ilate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per elate per Elate per Rate per
paper
pound
gold
guilder krone
yen
dollar
franc
lire
franc
rupee
milreis
sterling franc
peso
peso
f
Par value (or 1913
mo. av.)
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av__ _
1916 monthly a v _ _ _
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av__
1919 monthly av.__

$4.87
4.93
4.78
4.76
4.76
4.76
4.43

$0. 193
.199
.182
.170
.174
.178
.137

$0. 193
.195
.169
.155
.137
.134
.114

$0. 193

.128

.394

3.66
3.85
4.43
4.57
4.42
4.83
4.86

.070
.075
.082
.061
.052
.048
.032

.050
.043
.048
.046
.044
.040
.039

.074
.074
.077
.052
.046
.048
.033

1934
September
October
November
December . __

4.46
4.49
4.61
4.70

.053
.052
.053
.054

.044
.044
.043
.043

1925
January
February ___
March
April

4.78
4.77
4.78
4.80

.054
.053
.052
.052

May
June
July
August

4.85
4.86
4.86
4.86

September
October
November. _ __ _
December

.226

.225
.131
.129
.102
.109
.122
.144

.185
.121
.122
.122
.105
.116
.121

88, 711
103, 347
62, 317
66, 882
74, 428
66, 412
77, 278

107, 222
100, 869
62, 827
78, 858
88, 230
90,113
110, 711

.800
.836
.855
.883

.101
.112
.155
.115

.104
.111
.113
.113

63, 901
68, 184
66, 229
60, 946

82, 456
104, 316
119, 876
125, 462

.997
.999
.999
.999

.911
.903
.897
.869

.117
.113
.110
.106

.114
.108
.111
.112

58, 376
61, 430
84, 638
59, 105

75, 999
71, 164
95,888
60,709

.362
.365
.366
.366

1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000

.902
.913
.918
.917

.103
.109
.114
.121

.114
.113
.117
.119

75, 895
75, 518
81, 492
82,074

97, 475
94, 319
103, 280
112, 414

.408
.410
. 423
.432

.366
.366
.366
.366

1.000
1.001
1.001
1.000

.917
.934
.944
.942

.135
.148
.146
.142

.120
.121
.122
.122

78, 663
80, 800
75, 286
76, 918

109, 574
144, 520
141, 359
176, 399

.193
.193
.193
.193

.442
.454
.454
.466

.367
.368
.366
.362

.998
.997
.996
1.000

.941
.933
.903
.908

.148
.148
.145
.140

.120
.121
.121
.121

69, 736
70, 909
100, 934
67, 801

85, 716
88,809
113, 966
60, 915

.268
.268
.268
.268

.194
.194
.194
.193

.470
.469
.471
.478

.363
.363
.363
.364

1.001
1.001
1.001
1.001

.913
.917
.921
.920

.147
.155
.156
.154

.120
.120
.121
.121

86, 052
91, 513
88, 605
89,670

93,095
119, 399
111, 595
91, 663

.268
.267
.267
.267

.193
.193
.193
.193

.484
.487
.491
.489

.363
.362
.360
.361

1.001
1.001
1.001
.999

.922
.928
.924
.933

.152
.140
.130
.119

.121
.121
.121
.120

85, 563
88, 127
87, 657
81, 775

93, 327
131, 489
154, 009
139, 808

$0. 324

4 $0.195

.403

.956

.941
.964
.997
.999
.990

.234
.236
.249
.253
.267

.504
.482
.478
.486
.412
.410
.471

.389
.262
.287
.311
.318
.363
.363

.893
.896
.985
.980
.987
1.000
1.000

.907
.730
.818
.786
.781
.914
.921

.189
.192
.193
.194

.406
.388
.385
.384

.325
.337
.344
.353

.999
1.000
1.000
.997

.270
.269
.270
.269

.193
.193
.193
.193

.385
.391
.410
.418

.357
.357
.357
.356

.402
.401
.401
.402

.268
.268
.269
.269

.194
.194
.194
.194

.419
.408
.411
.410

.044
.045
.045
.045

.402
.402
.402
.402

.268
.268
.268
.268

.193
.193
.193
.193

.040
.040
.040
.040

.045
.045
.042
.037

.402
.401
.401
.402

.268
.268
.268
.268

.032
.029
.025
.028

.039
.037
.034
.033

.031
.030
.024
.028

.402
.402
.402
.401

.029
.029
.034
.040

.037
.041
.042
.044

.027
.028
M39
.139

.401
.400
.400
.400

$0. 487

.255

$0. 499
.491
.495
.507
.513
.533
.512

.344
.336
.385
.391
.382
.402
.401

.205
.225
.262
.266
.265
.268
.268

.169
.174
.191
.181
.182
.193
.193

.049
.048
.048
.050

.385
.391
.401
.404

.266
.266
.268
.270

.042
.041
.041
.041

.051
.051
.051
.051

.404
.402
.399
.400

.052
.048
.047
.047

.041
.038
.037
.037

.050
.047
.046
.045

4.85
4.84
4.85
4.85

.047
.044
.040
.037

.041
.040
.040
.040

1926
January
February
March
April

4.86
4.86
4.86
4.86

.038
.037
.036
.034

May
June
July
August

4.86
4.87
4.86
4.86

September
October
November
December

4.85
4.85
4.85
4.85

monthly av. _ .
monthly av___
monthly av_ . _
monthly av _ _ _
monthly av__.
monthly av. _ .
monthly av _ _ .

Thousands of dollars

$31, 422
37, 953
39, 287
64, 858
98, 268
132, 181
105, 730

$0. 965

$0. 268

$0. 193
.194
.187
.191
.211
.229
.190

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

Exports

$55, 934
51,600
37, 996
42, 350
70, 538
80, 294
76, 643

$1. 000

$0. 402

Imports

1937
January
February. __
March
April
May
June

..

1 Daily averages of noon rates for cable transfers reported to the Treasury daily by the New Pbrfe Federal Reserve Bank. Average figures for the years 1914 to 1918,
inclusive, where given, are weekly averages of commercial quotations from the Annalist. Monthly figures on all items back to 1920 may be found in the Mav. 1922. issue
(No. 9), p. 135.
2 Foreign trade statistics from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Yearly figures represent monthly averages for the Canadian fiscal
year3 ending March 31 of the year indicated.
Parity established October, 1920. Prior to that, par value of the rupee was 32.44 cents.
< Average value of the paper peso in 1913. Beginning with January, 1926, the par value of the peso was established at 12.17 cents.
* Bate for the "belga," the new unit equivalent to 5 paper francs, with a par value of 13.9 cents.




132
Table 108.—IMPORTS BY GRAND DIVISIONS
FROM NORTH
AMERICA

FROM EUROPE

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

France

Germany

Italy

United
Kingdom

Total

Canada

FROM SOUTH
AMERICA

Total

Argentina

FROM ASIA
AND OCEANIA

FROM
AFRICA
GRAND
TOTAL

Total

Japan

Total

Thousands of dollars
average. .
average. .
average. .
average. average. .
average. .
average. .

$72, 056
65, 293
45, 529
52, 776
45, 929
26, 510
62, 544

$11, 578
8,685
6,493
9, 074
8,220
4,959
10, 318

$15, 351
12, 449
3,746
485
13
26
884

$4, 610
4,601
4,297
5,020
3,040
2,028
4,922

$22, 663
23,949
21, 525
25, 457
23, 340
12, 385
25, 766

$32, 485
36, 783
42, 455
54, 870
72, 665
81, 218
6,481

$11, 844
13, 669
14, 800
19, 771
34, 473
37, 641
41, 225

$16, 522
19, 127
26, 857
35, 634
49, 902
50, 911
57, 294

$2, 131
4,690
7,890
9,691
14, 855
19, 032
16, 597

$26, 344
26, 265
30, 489
50, 865
71, 455
86, 837
99,696

$8, 245
8,808
9,026
15, 174
21, 139
25, 162
34, 154

$1, 978
1,638
2,887
5,158
6,089
7,126
9,349

$149, 383
149, 106
148, 216
199, 303
246, 039
252, 601
325, 364

1920 monthly average. .
1921 monthly average. .
1922 monthly average. .
1923 monthly average. .
1924 monthly average. .
1925 monthly average. .
1926 monthly average

102, 320
63, 745
82, 600
96, 421
91, 341
103, 153

13, 805
11, 824
11, 901
12, 468
12, 303
13, 119

7,403
6,690
9,791
13, 433
11, 605
13, 688

6,280
5,191
5,328
7,689
6,251
8,517

42, 821
19, 900
29, 739
33, 673
30, 539
34, 360

138, 555
62, 904
68, 538
83, 460
82, 930
81, 787

50, 989
27, 953
30, 337
34, 667
33, 262
37, 897

63, 417
24, 635
29, 897
38, 952
38, 840
43, 249

17, 315
4,994
7,140
9,606
6,275
6,681

123, 058
54,447
72, 955
89, 918
81, 638
111, 465

34, 548
20, 939
29,525
28, 912
28, 338
32,009

12, 524
3,365
5/410
7,255
6,083
7,679

439, 873
209, 096
259, 396
316, 006
300, 247
352, 333

98, 849
106, 477
97, 911
110, 654

12, 620
14, 123
13, 729
14, 437

13, 157
13, 701
11, 909
12, 794

5,766
9,019
7,989
9,073

32, 700
36, 530
35, 675
39, 338

73, 953
75, 124
71, 177
69, 217

31, 297
33, 729
35, 059
36, 570

30,632
42, 103
41, 925
44,127

5,442
4,700
4,582
6,294

80, 667
82, 920
80, 979
97, 365

35, 601
29, 308
28, 364
39, 626

3,043
4,128
4,156
11, 829

287,144
310, 752
296, 148
333, 192

1925
January
February
March
_
April

102, 809
100, 916
112, 025
97, 931

13, 924
14, 878
14, 150
11,816

11, 402
12, 068
13, 074
11, 503

8,463
8,262
9,504
9,999

35, 178
33, 894
40, 159
31, 288

77, 531
83, 214
91, 290
93, 352

32, 963
33, 620
34, 419
33, 119

42,«254
43, 981
58, 451
46, 440

6,523
10, 212
8,584
11, 363

112, 920
92, 232
113, 368
98, 264

33, 286
23,159
28, 294
21, 570

10, 651
13, 044
10, 245
10, 105

346, 165
333, 387
385, 379
346, 091

May
June
July
August...

92, 210
88, 759
93, 071
100, 529

10, 406
10, 053
9,852
14, 295

9,522
11, 247
13, 809
13, 770

8,514
9,206
7,036
6,046

31, 676
26, 674
33, 196
32, 286

89, 122
85, 228
76, 103
71, 913

37, 560
37, 321
38, 824
36, 550

32, 848
37, 022
41, 487
41, 962

3,823
5,799
5,249
5,152

108, 585
107, 514
111, 724
119, 114

22, 570
24, 215
31, 866
35, 729

4,753
6,694
3,263
6,567

327, 519
325, 216
325, 648
340, 086

100, 605
115,692
118, 005
115, 642

12, 843
15, 469
14, 491
15, 257

15, 067
15, 703
15, 701
21, 287

6,722
9, 678
9,323
9,452

31, 536
37, 733
42, 348
36, 746

76, 160
81, 950
75, 847
79, 338

37, 356
47, 121
43, 217
42, 676

44, 241
38, 985
43, 319
47, 929

5,603
4,003
6,714
7,146

123, 410
133, 941
131, 472
145, 047

47, 970
39, 079
37, 243
39, 177

5,538
3,506
7,788
9,989

349, 954
374, 074
376, 431
397, 945

111, 210
105, 318
117, 119
104, 808

12, 826
12, 080
14, 456
11, 648

16, 006
16, 548
18, 383
17, 101

8,555
6,774
8,957
7,639

34, 620
37, 282
37, 126
33, 271

73, 559
87, 047
97, 536
90, 929

35, 576
37, 646
40, 382
38, 434

53, 518
51, 955
63, 613
51, 247

7,678
9,412
12, 677
8,027

162, 083
132, 612
153, 235
139, 864

40, 407
33, 177
22, 901
32, 309

16, 397
11, 571
11, 595
11,115

416, 766
388, 503
443, 098
397, 964

89,461
104, 597
95, 238
105, 993

8,771
10, 074
10, 193
12, 069

14, 413
15, 100
15, 416
18, 311

7,420
7,924
6,735
7,084

24, 401
31, 591
27, 344
27, 346

79, 048
88, 134
' 78, 894
79, 798

35, 144
41, 607
39, 880
38, 902

37, 542
40, 390
41, 056
44, 858

6,933
7,365
5,092
4,835

110, 238
96, 527
117, 324
101, 089

24, 810
21, 137
35, 532
37, 387

4,740
7,332
6,721
4,867

321, 029
336, 980
339, 233
336, 605

108, 930
118, 907
114, 759

14, 444
17, 343
15,004

17, 299
17, 750
16, 075

8,451
10, 286
12, 155

29, 791
33, 637
34,504

77, 967
92, 800
88, 564

40, 432
45, 787
44, 607

42, 139
50, 381
44, 587

5,722
7,765
7,237

110, 322
112, 720
119, 241

37, 839
39, 912
37, 008

4,120
3,542
6,890

343, 479
378, 350
374, 042
2361,000

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

1934
September
October
November
December

September
October
November
December

_

_

_ _

_ _

1936
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December

'

__

1937
January
February
March

May

1
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, and represent imports of merchandise only. Up to and including May,
1921, import values represented " actual market value or wholesale price at the time of exportation to the United States, in the principal markets of the C9untry from whence
exported, including the value of all containers and coverings, whether holding liquids or solids, and all other costs, charges, and expenses incident to placing the merchandise
• •* "Lited
in condition, packed ready for shipment• to the United States." (Tariff act of 1913.) Beginning with June, 1921, the import values are either the actual foreign market
„
, _.„__..„.
1
value, as denned above, or "the export value, including any export tax imposed by the country of exportation, whichever is higher. (Emergency tariff act of May 27,1921.)
2 Preliminary.




133
Table 109.—EXPORTS BY GRAND DIVISIONS
TO NORTH
AMERICA

TO EUROPE

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

France

Germany

Italy

United
Kingdom

Total

Canada

TO SOUTH
AMERICA

Total

TO ASIA AND
OCEANIA

TO
AFRICA
GRAND
TOTAL

Argentina

Total

Japan

Total

Thousands of dollars

monthly average.. $124, 964
monthly average. _ 111, 608
monthly average.. 214, 451
monthly average.. 317, 773
monthly average. _ 338, 538
monthly average. . 321, 558
monthly average.. 432, 306

$12, 827
14, 175
41, 733
71, 735
78, 399
77, 600
74, 447

$29, 328
13, 191
981
188
2
()
2
()
7,730

$6, 556
8,161
22, 477
25, 294
34, 920
41, 015
36, 890

$49, 228
49, 984
99, 870
157, 282
167, 450
171, 774
189/880

$50, 098
40, 132
46, 567
77, 046
105, 081
110, 457
107, 983

$33, 599
25, 885
28, 754
50, 409
69, 077
73, 906
61, 187

$12, 210
7,584
12, Oil
18, 356
25, 991
25, 226
36, 812

$4, 582
2, 261
4,403
6,406
8,925
8,759
12, 992

$17, 319
14, 700
20, 009
39, 211
45, 567
50, 250
74, 775

$5, 208
3,479
3,811
9,096
15, 528
22, 815
30, 530

$2, 411
2,110
3,095
4,501
4,282
4,933
8,160

$207, 002
176, 135
296, 223
456, 887
519, 459
512, 424
660, 035

1920 monthly average. . 372, 174
1921 monthly average. _, 196, 992
1922 monthly average.. 173, 613
1923 monthly average. . 174, 451
1924 monthly average.. 203, 775
1925 monthly average. . 216, 874
1926 monthly average

56, 349
18, 745
22, 247
22, 678
23, 472
23, 358

25, 953
31, 027
26, 343
26, 403
36, 702
39, 195

30, 980
17, 955
12, 575
13, 961
15, 595
17, 096

161, 319
78, 510
71, 319
73, 527
81, 912
85, 990

160, 764
94, 132
76, 305
90, 514
90, 837
95, 029

80, 988
49, 473
48, 057
54, 327
52,003
54, 230

51, 993
22, 777
18, 840
22, 443
26, 188
33,550

17, 811
9,236
7,962
9,398
9, -758
12, 397

86, 932
53, 782
45, 910
54, 827
55,925
56, 243

31, 495
19, 620
18, 200
22,019
20, 859
18, 976

13, 806
6,071
4,648
5,056
5,858
7,420

685, 668
373, 753
319, 315
347, 291
382, 582
409, 116

162, 178
141, 975
125, 948
156, 103

22, 073
21, 321
13, 179
20, 524

28, 271
18, 027
12, 836
19, 279

11, 213
12, 045
8,042
13, 220

62, 409
51, 795
56, 596
65, 687

88, 471
84, 929
83, 358
94, 563

48, 063
48, 274
45, 167
50, 385

24, 764
25, 860
23, 362
30, 538

8,841
8,987
8,778
12, 399

54,038
48, 897
39,025
44, 333

15, 937
9,563
8,423
9,635

5,638
5,328
4,956
6,123

335, 089
306, 989
276, 649
330, 660

235, 729
290, 615
305, 456
274, 251

28, 217
26, 787
36, 765
27, 862

44, 381
49, 655
58, 312
50,673

12, 793
21, 955
22, 863
23, 914

96, 663
125, 432
125, 835
116, 792

112, 150
133, 314
93, 094
77, 263

70, 455
86, 270
53, 110
38, 988

24, 224
32, 820
27, 087
28, 845

9,628
12, 764
10, 108
10, 702

49, 405
64, 190
63, 149
58, 362

15, 765
28, 928
31, 348
26, 451

5,952
6,232
4,787
7,027

427, 460
527, 172
493, 573
445, 748

1935
January
February
March
_ __ ..
April
.

269, 401
222, 266
252, 714
207, 470

29, 210
22, 855
25, 689
22, 070

49, 599
43, 785
51, 385
32, 993

22, 669
23, 061
26, 154
19, 171

113, 137
85, 760
85, 720
73, 148

77, 831
75, 052
99, 618
92, 694

36, 931
39, 043
51, 213
49, 285

31, 745
25, 463
33, 545
35, 899

12, 893
9,939
12, 213
12, 242

60, 884
42, 565
58, 970
54, 513

28, 094
15, 819
21, 602
12, 979

6,582
5,330
8,805
7,679

446,
370,
453,
398,

May
June
July
August

175, 322
144, 437
155, 090
180, 856

20, 266
15, 205
14, 456
18, 225

28, 727
22, 365
23, 588
34, 116

14, 022
11, 763
12, 268
11, 601

62, 806
57, 197
57, 744
63, 084

107, 466
96, 177
101, 514
101, 362

66, 815
59, 877
62, 969
60, 770

35, 689
31, 192
32, 285
38, 125

12, 263
10,936
11, 977
14, 392

45, 106
45, 110
44, 895
50, 790

8,165
9,764
11,352
13, 272

7,362
6,433
5,876
8,690

370, 945
323, 348
339, 660
379, 823

September
October
November __ _
December

229, 704
282, 669
237, 642
246, 160

20, 495
34, 051
29, 560
28, 218

52, 202
56, 481
39, 120
35,983

.12, 803
17, 392
16, 766
17, 479

91, 687
121, 393
107, 247
114, 234

101, 586
9&, 484
93, 159
96, 162

62, 100
55, 798
53, 065
51, 649

28, 993
31, 132
34, 991
43, 545

9,661
12, 144
13,230
16, 871

53, 076
73, 421
73, 443
72, 929

18, 029
33, 442
30, 027
26, 801

7,009
6,861
8,566
9,849

420,
490,
447,
468,

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

1934
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

_ ..

1936
January
February
' March
April ,

443
676
653
255

368
567
804
645

199, 794
171, 968
164, 373
175, 732

29, 731
21, 724
24, 000
21, 924

25, 537
22, 166
21, 116
21, 345

14, 382
12, 823
12,260
14, 811

82, 159
75, 834
67, 941
70, 614

84, 780
82, 588
100, 567
99, 272

47, 437
45, 976
62, 446
56, 746

37, 775
35, 265
35, 413
37, 181

14, 938
10, 885
11, 878
10, 878

66, 545
56, 063
65, 826
66, 460

23, 425
18, 934
22, 323
21, 000

8,302
7,032
8,242
9,226

397, 196
352, 917
374, 421
387, 871

_

145, 477
144, 393
166, 123
186, 961

19, 084
14, 802
12, 769
14, 898

21,202
20, 170
20, 395
28, 844

11, 801
10, 661
12, 201
10, 817

55, 500
62, 647
77, 446
73, 496

110, 873
98, 642
101, 912
101, 640

75, 735
64, 989
66, 101
69, 118

35, 342
30, 126
37, 299
34, 290

10, 643
9,770
11, 464
11, 725

57, 483
57, 490
54, 400
53, 654

18, 753
16, 895
17, 805
14, 256

7,447
6,768
8,625
9,076

356, 621
338, 419
368, 359
385, 621

September.
October
November
December

224, 186
235, 578
247, 084

19, 006
29,214
28, 852

44, 437
47, 004
42, 098

11,311
14, 945
14, 195

93, 642
97, 631
110, 843

102, 389
102, 855
100, 735

65, 033
68, 377
61, 816

41, 562
32, 957
43, 301

13, 247
11, 060
13, 289

71, 160
75, 417
79, 227

21, 754
27, 724
30, 159

9,427
9,148
9,967

448, 724
445, 955
480, 314
3467,000

May
June
July
August

1937
January
February
March
April

__

May
June

_
__

1
Compiled by the Z7. $. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, and represent exports, including reexports, of merchandise only. Value
.are those at time of exportation in the ports of the United States whence exported, except reexports from bonded warehouses, which are expressed in their import value
2 Total for year 1917 is $3,275. No figures for 1918.
3
Preliminary.




134
Table 110.—IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY CLASSES OF COMMODITIES
IMPORTS

YEAR AND
MONTH

Total

Crude
materials

EXPORTS

FoodFinstuffs, Manu- Semifacished
crude, tured rn a 11 u- manuand
facfoodfacfood
tures
tures
animals stuffs

Total

Crude
materials

Foodstuffs, Manu- Semifaccrude, tured iiiauuand
facfoodfood
tures
animals stuffs

Finished
manufactures

Thousands of dollars
1913 monthly av__
1914 monthly av__
1915 monthly av__
1916 monthly av__
1917 monthly av__
1918 monthly av__
1919 monthly av_.

149, 383
149, 106
148, 216
199, 303
246, 039
252, 601
325, 364

50, 462
49, 790
57, 991
84, 132
105, 682
101, 760
139, 521

18, 413
19, 561
20, 242
21, 678
32, 144
28, 795
45, 441

16, 518
21, 378
22, 770
28, 226
29, 287
33, 114
46, 308

28,355
23, 006
21, 748
34, 822
45, 124
54, 080
50, 860

34, 401
33, 936
24, 335
28, 798
32, 327
33, 742
41, 028

204, 024
172, 675
291, 104
451, 887
513, 934
503, 990
645, 818

64, 017
40, 938
47, 280
60, 118
65, 061
79, 432
134, 178

14, 121
22, 939
38, 470
35, 107
42,406
45, 620
56, 530

27,023
25, 727
45, 880
54,003
67, 228
117, 152
163, 551

33, 066
27,949
39, 641
76, 022
109, 835
87, 773
76, 854

65, 120
53, 243
109, 584
218, 780
225, 066
172, 437
213, 625

1920 monthly av__
1921 monthly av__
1922 monthly av_.
1923 monthly av__
1924 monthly av_.
1925 monthly av__
1926 monthly av

439, 873
209, 096
259, 396
316, 006
300, 247
352, 333

146, 073
71, 090
96, 381
115, 737
103, 008
143, 435

48, 136
25, 331
27, 660
30, 234
35, 406
41, 233

103, 179
30, 737
32, 290
44, 134
43, 467
36, 133

66, 835
28, 669
45, 793
59, 976
54, 657
62,951

73, 094
51, 577
55, 642
64, 212
62, 446
66, 362

673, 402
364, 911
313, 776
340, 893
374, 804
401, 523

155, 902
81, 997
81, 800
100, 170
110, 528
117, 829

76,498
57, 687
38, 212
21, 457
32, 724
26, 491

93, 080
55, 805
48, 965
48,608
47, 791
47, 813

79,909
33, 270
36, 484
46, 977
50, 889
55,144

267, 032
135, 497
107, 720
123, 147
132, 338
153, 570

302,988
274, 000
278, 594
254, 542

104, 164
88, 682
89, 180
83, 288

37, 484
34, 189
39, 130
31,471

50, 581
41, 774
42, 495
30, 396

48,652
48, 366
44, 909
47, 140

61, 677
60, 575
62, 144
60, 466

325 839
299, 160
270, 598
325, 027

77, 047
62, 387
55, 863
63, 044

10, 638
15, 014
12, 821
31, 728

37, 452
34, 035
37, 220
44, 378

53, 103
50, 461
46, 251
47, 166

147, 348
136, 936
118, 123
138, 234

September __
October
November
December

287, 144
310, 752
296, 148
333, 192

96, 242
100, 726
106, 807
130, 665

29, 152
42, 462
38, 076
40, 053

38, 243
38, 414
28, 936
27, 395

52, 384
56, 651
58,917
60, 260

66,456
68, 979
61, 464
69, 133

419, 064
518, 265
486, 453
438, 587

127, 974
162, 432
196, 372
168, 335

66, 064
101, 820
58, 940
39, 619

48, 834
58, 711
54, 461
54, 287

49, 556
53, 428
50, 896
53, 801

126, 198
141, 107
124, 897
122, 017

1925
January
February
March
April

346, 165
333, 387
385,379
346, 091

149, 850
130, 588
144, 597
139, 312

38, 062
36, 778
50, 184
36, 533

32, 332
39, 774
46, 840
48, 423

63, 108
63, 649
75, 890
59, 611

62, 813
62, 590
67, 868
62, 212

440, 578
364, 831
445, 834
390, 956

169, 196
129, 333
122,845
83, 766

25, 885
25, 488
31, 101
36, 192

54,031
46, 347
55, 585
39, 365

58, 597
47, 781
64, 666
60, 935

133, 869
117, 882
171, 637
170, 698

May __ _
June
July
August

327, 519
325, 216
325, 648
340, 086

136, 241
130, 226
125, 483
142, 306

34, 168
35, 733
42, 368
36, 948

39, 900
37, 704
34, 095
29, 783

56, 320
59, 085
58, 791
65, 304

60, 890
62,468
64, 911
65, 665

362, 285
315, 676
331, 674
372, 457

65, 973
52, 578
56, 854
71, 830

33, 625
21, 879
22, 546
28, 562

41, 161
43, 346
43, 339
47, 516

58, 818
54,382
57, 782
52, 145

162, 708
143, 760
151, 146
172, 404

September.. _ __
October
November
December

349, 954
374, 074
376, 431
397, 945

148, 243
153, 702
168, 084
175, 727

45, 167
44, 277
46, 412
48, 161

33, 278
33, 193
29,341
28, 937

58, 129
65, 669
62, 093
67, 595

65, 137
77, 233
70, 500
74, 089

412, 728
482, 881
439, 657
459, 506

132, 329
210, 314
173, 723
152, 490

34, 632
19, 312
19, 485
21, 187

52, 206
51, 473
46, 972
52, 675

50, 143
50, 737
49, 871
55,705

143, 418
151, 045
149, 606
176, 619

1926
January
February.. _
March..
April .

416, 766
388, 503
443, 098
397, 963

201, 092
174, 020
198, 351
164,800

48, 632
42, 110
51, 102
47, 122

28,826
35, 998
40, 153
39, 249

71, 140
72, 844
74, 697
70, 610

67,076
63, 531
78, 795
76, 182

388, 119
345, 819
364, 940
379, 198

113,925
89, 317
83, 031
80, 506

15, 845
12, 172
15, 596
14, 595

47, 788
41, 837
40, 526
38, 170

51, 853
47, 917
53, 520
57, 910

158, 708
154, 576
172, 267
188, 017

May
June
July
August

321, 029
336, 980
339, 232
336, 605

128, 109
122, 537
131, 215
124, 399

35, 908
43, 040
42, 209
42, 081

32, 931
36, 025
29, 312
30, 550

61, 059
64, 332
65, 775
63,987

63, 022
71, 046
70, 721
70, 588

348, 079
328, 728
360, 494
379, 496

67,383
63, 245
72, 093
76, 677

25, 155
21, 088
33, 908
49, 932

34, 053
34, 237
35, 418
42, 936

50, 707
54, 986
53, 145
53, 207

170, 781
155, 172
165, 930
156, 744

September .
October _
November _ __
December

343, 479
378, 350
374, 042

135, 131
134, 783
141, 138

39, 108
50, 420
49, 611

32, 588
40, 659
39, 620

62, 779
64, 726
65, 897

73, 873
87, 762
77, 776

440, 865
448, 883
473, 509

120, 607
167, 167
168, 602

46, 484
35, 658
37, 440

47, 839
47, 527
45, 001

55, 450
53, 544
61, 618

170, 485
144, 987
160, 848

1934
May
June
-July -.
August

__

1927
January
February
March

May
June
1
Data from U, S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. For changes in valuations, see footnote on preceding page.



135
SOURCES OF DATA
[Only sources presenting current material are given here: Sources of data used to fill gaps in early figures are noted in their respective detailed tables, thus making this table
a complete record of current source material for the SURVEY]
CURRENT PUBLICATION

l

DATE OF PUBLICATION

I.-REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN
ARGENTINE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE..
BRITISH BOARD OF TRADE
_
CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.
FEDERAL FARM LOAN BOARD
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CHICAGO..
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF MINNEAPOLIS..
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF NEW YORK—
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF PHILADELPHIA.
FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD__
...

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION-

Flaxseed exports from Argentina
Tea stocks in United Kingdom
Employment in Canadian trade-unions.
Operations of Canadian employment service
Foreign trade of Canada
Canadian railroad operationsCanadian iron, steel, coal, flour production, etc. _
Agricultural loans by land and credit banks
Agricultural machinery
Domestic pumps
Retail sales of lumber by rural yards..
Housing rental advertisements
Foreign exchange rates
Corporation profits.
Employment in Pennsylvania and Delaware
Debits to individual accounts
Condition of Federal reserve banks
Condition of reporting member banks
_
Department store trade
Index numbers of department store, mail order,
and chain store trade.
Barley and rye receipts and rye stocks
Sales of loose-leaf tobacco
Index numbers of production
Wholesale trade index
Employment in Illinois
Railway revenues and expenses
Telephone operating revenue and income
Telegraph operations and income
Express operations and income
Fuel consumption by railroads
Railway employment
Massachusetts employment.,
Milk receipts at Boston...
New Jersey factory employment
New York factory employment and earnings.._
New York State canal traffic..
Panama Canal traffic
Government employment

MASSACHUSETTS DEPT. LABOR AND INDUSTRY..
MASSACHUSETTS DEPT. PUBLIC UTILITIES
NEW JERSEY DEPT. LABOR
NEW YORK STATE DEPT. LABOR
NEW YORK STATE DEPT. PUBLIC WORKS
PANAMA CANAL. _
_
U. S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE:
BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY
Beef, pork, and lamb production
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS.._ Prices of farm products to producers.
Wool stocks in dealers' hands and wool prices
Crop production.

BUREAU OF PUBLIC ROADS.
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE:
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. _

Cold-storage holdings
Movement of cattle, hogs, and sheep
Receipts of butter, cheese, eggs, and poultry
Production of dairy products
Car-lot shipments of fruits and vegetables
Farm labor, wages, supply, etc
Consumption of butter, cheese and meats
Index of agricultural exports
Federal-aid highways
Wages of common labor, by geog. divs__

Estadistica Agro-Pecuaria. _.
Board of Trade Bulletin
Labour Gazette (Canadian) _
Labour Gazette (Canadian)..
Foreign trade of Canada
Operating Revenues, etc., of Railways*. __
Press releases*
Not published currentlyBusiness Conditions
Business Conditions
Business Conditions.
Business Conditions.
Fed. Res. Bull, and daily statement*
Monthly Review
Business and Financial Conditions
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*..
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*..
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*.Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin __
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin..
The Employment Bulletin
Preliminary statement Class I roads
Operations of large telephone companies...
Not published
Not published
Fuel for Road Locomotives
Not published
Monthly statement*
Not published
Fed. Res. Bank of Philadelphia
Labor Market Bulletin and press releases*.
Annual report
^___
The Panama Canal Record
Not published
Crops and
Crops and
Crops and
Crops and

Markets
Markets
Markets
Markets and press releases*

Crops and Markets
Crops and Markets
Crops and Markets
Crops and Markets
Crops and Markets
Crops and Markets
Crops and Markets._ Crops and Markets.
Public Roads. _
Not published __

Monthly.
Semimonthly.
Semimonthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Daily and monthly.
Quarterly.
Monthly.
Sun. papers and monthly.
Fri. morn, papers and mo.
Fri. aftnoon papers and mo;
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.

Monthly.
Yearly.
Last weekly issue of month.

Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
Releases about 1st mo. (cotton) ; 10th (other crops).
._ Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
Weekly.
Quarterly.
Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
Monthly.
_ _ . Monthly.
Monthly.

Cotton ginned
_.
Preliminary report on ginnings*.
Semimo. during season.
Cotton consumed and on hand
Preliminary report on cotton consumed. __ 15th of month.
Active textile machinery.
Wool machinery and cotton spindles*
20th of month.
Leather, hides, shoes, gloves, production, etc
Census of hides, skins, and leather*
First week of month.
Leather gloves and mittens
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Cottonseed and cottonseed oil
Preliminary report on cottonseed*
18th of month.
Hosiery production, stocks, etc
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Knit underwear production, etc
Press release* __
30th of month.
Men's and boys' and work clothing
Press release* __
30th of month.
Malleable castings
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Wheat flour production from May, 1923
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Wheat and wheat flour stocks
_
__ Press release*
One month after end of qtr.
Pyroxylin coated textiles •__.
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Stokers, sales from January, 1923
Press release*. _.
20th of month.
Stocks of tobacco
Statement on stocks of leaf tobacco
One month after end of qtr.
Wool consumption and stocks
Press release"
30th of month.
3
Steel barrels __
Press release5
30th of month.
Fabricated steel plate bookings
Press release1
20th of month.
Box board
Press release
30th of month.
Electrical goods, bookings
Press release*
One month after end of qtr.
Electric locomotives, mining and industrial
Press release*
One month after end of qtr.
Electric industrial trucks and tractors
Pressrelease*
25th of month.
Floor and wall tile
Press release* __
30th of month.
Fire extinguishers
Press release*
20th of month.
Galvanized sheet metal ware
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Babbitt metal consumption,
Pressrelease*
_
__ 30th of month.
Floor and wall tile
Press release*
30th of month,
Enameled sanitary ware
Pressrelease*
20th of month.
Vitreous china plumbing fixtures
Press release'
25th of month.
Fats and oils, production, consumption, stocks __ Statistics of fats and oils*__.
_
One month after end of qtr«
Glues and gelatin, production and stocks
Pressrelease*
_
___ 30 days after end of qtr,
Fabricated struc. steel sales from Apr., 1922
Pressrelease*.
_
20th of month.
Automobile production from July, 1921
Pressrelease*
_
20th of month.
Wood chemical operations, crude and refined
Pressrelease*
30th of month.
Steel castings bookings and production. _.
Pressrelease*
__
__ 20th of month.
Steel furniture shipments
_
Pressrelease*
"_" 25th of month.
Locomotive shipments and unfilled orders.
Press release*
_ 10th of month.
Earnings of public utilities..
] Survey of Current Business
"_"_ Monthly.
i This is not necessarily the source of the figures published in the SURVEY, as many of them are obtained direct from the compilers prior to publication in the respective
journals. This column and the right-hand column have been added to assist readers in obtaining current statistics between publication dates of the SURVEY.
*Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets




136
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued
CURRENT PUBLICATION

DATE OF PUBLICATION

I.—REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN—Continued
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Contd.
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS (continued)

DIVISION OF NATIONAL PARKS..
; S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR:
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE

30th of month.
20th of month.
Last week of month.

Report on Portland cement output*
Commerce Reports
Not published.
Not published.
Production of electric power*..
Production of electric power*..
Not published

End of month,
End of month.
Monthly.

Employment agency operations.

- BUREAU OF STANDARDS
U. S. PATENT OFFICE
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR:
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Press release*
Monthly statement
Monthly Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. I)1.
Not published
Monthly Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. II)
Commerce Reports
Petroleum statistics*
Explosive statistics*
Weekly report on production of coal*.

Electric power production
Consumption of fuel by public utility plants
Visitors to National Parks

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION..

10th of month.
30th of month.
30th of month.
15th of month.

Building material price indexes..
Patents granted

BUREAU OF MINES..

Press release*
Press release*
Press release*
Press release*

Portland cement, production, etc..
Vessel construction and losses

BUREAU OF FISHERIES..
_
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
COMMERCE.

Plumbing goods price index
Domestic pumps and water systems
Water softeners
Architectural terra cotta
Index numbers of production, stocks, and unfilled orders.
Fish catch at principal fishing ports
All imports and exports
Fuel loaded for consumption by vessels
Vessels cleared
Ship charter rates index
Petroleum, crude and refined, production, etc
Explosives, production, shipments, etc
Coal and coke production
_

Report of Activities of State and Municipal Employment Agencies.
Not published
Wholesale Prices of Commodities

Every 4 or 5 weeks.

Immigration and emigration statistics.__
Wholesale prices of commodities, including
farm products, food, clothing, metals, etc.
Wholesale price index.
Retail price indexes
Factory employment, pay roll, etc
United States postal savings
Postal receipts
Money orders
___
Passports issued
Government debt, receipts, and disbursements..
Money in circulation from July 1, 1922
Domestic receipts of gold at mint
Oleomargarine production and consumption of
ingredients.
Consumption of manufactured tobacco, snuff,
cigars, cigarettes, and oleomargarine.
Internal Revenue taxes on automobiles
Ethyl alcohol production, stocks, etc

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

U. S. POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT..
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE..
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT.
BUREAU OF THE MINT
..
BUREAU OF INTERNAL EEVENUE .

U. S,. WAR DEPARTMENT:
ENGINEER CORPS

Monthly Labor Review
Monthly Lab9r Review
Employment in Selected Industries..
Postal Savings News BulletinStatement of Postal Receipts*
Not published.
Not published
Daily Statement of the U. S. Treasury
Circulation of. money
_
Not published
Not published
Statement of Tax-paid Products*

15th of month.
Monthly,,
Monthly.
. Monthly.
12th of month.
7th of month,
10th of month.
Last day of month.
Monthly.
First week of month.

Classified collections of Internal Revenue. 25th of month,
Not published

Sault Ste. Marie Canal traffic
Monthly statistical report..
Ohio, Monongahela, and Allegheny Rivers cargo N6t published
traffic.
Barge traffic on Mississippi River
Not published
Agricultural loans
Not published in form used
Bulletin on Wisconsin labor market*
Wisconsin factory earnings and employment

MISSISSIPPI-WARRIOR SERVICE _..
WAR FINANCE CORPORATION
WISCONSIN INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.

Middle of next month.
30th of month.
Monthly.
Second or third weekly
issue of month.
20th of month.
First weekly issue of
month (Mondays).

Monthly during season.

15th of month.

IL—REPORTS FROM COMMERCIAL AND TRADE ASSOCIATIONS
ABRASIVE PAPER AND CLOTH MANUFACTURERS' EXCHANGE.
AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF IRON, STSEL,
AND TIN WORKERS.
AMERICAN BUREAU OF METAL STATISTICS
AMERICAN DRY MILK INSTITUTE
AMERICAN ELECTRIC RAILWAY ASSOCIATION. _.
AMERICAN FACE BRICK ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN FUR MERCHANTS ASSOCN
AMERICAN NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS' ASSOCN..
AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE

Shipments of abrasive paper and cloth
Wages, steel workers, Youngstown district.

Copper, silver, lead, arsenic—production, etc
Powdered milk sales
Passengers carried, electric railways
Face brick production, stocks, etc
Fur sales
Stocks of newsprint paper
Steel ingot production
Trackwork production
Paper and wood pulp production, etc
AMERICAN PAPER AND PULP ASSOCIATION
Gasoline and kerosene consumption
AMERICAN PETROLEUM INSTITUTE
AMERICAN RAILWAY ASSOCIATION (Car Serv- Freight car surplus and shortage
Car loadings and bad-order cars and locomotives
ice Division).
Walnut lumber and logs
AMERICAN WALNUT MFRS. ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN WASHING MACHINE MANUFAC- Washing machine shipments
TURERS' ASSOCIATION.
Production and stocks zinc, retorts operating
AMERICAN ZINC INSTITUTE
Anthracite shipments, etc., and mine employANTHRACITE BUREAU OF INFORMATION
ment.
ASPHALT SHINGLE AND ROOFING MFRS. ASSOCN Prepared roofing shipments. _ .
Corn ground into starch, glucose, etc
Assoc. CORN PRODUCTS MANUFACTURERS
ASSOCIATION OF COTTON TEXTILE MERCHANTS- Cotton textiles, production, stocks, etc
ASSOCIATION OF LIFE INSURANCE PRESIDENTS New life insurance business
Premium collections..
Distribution of assets
BAND INSTRUMENT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCN. Band instrument shipments
Receipts of wool at Boston
BOSTON GRAIN AND FLOUR EXCHANGE
Average receipts per ton-mile
BUREAU OF RAILWAY ECONOMICS
Passengers and tonnage carried 1 mile
Redwood lumber production, etc
CALIFORNIA RED.WOOD ASSOCIATION
CALIFORNIA WHITE AND SXJGAR PINE ASSOCN. Sugar pine lumber production, etc
Fabricated structural steel
OENTRAL FABRICATORS ASSOCIATION
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Wheat, corn, and pats, receipts, etc
COMMON BRICK MANFRS. ASSOCN. OF AMERICA Common brick shipments, stocks, etc
Credit conditions
CREDIT CLEARING HOUSE
Electiic hoists, orders and shipments
ELECTRIC HOIST MANUFACTURERS ASSOCN
Detroit factory employment
EMPLOYERS' ASSOCIATION OF DETROIT
ENAMELED SANITARY WARE MFRS. ASSOCN. Enameled sanitary ware, orders, etc.
Roofing felt production, stocks, etc
FELT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
Fine cotton goods production
FINE COTTON GOODS EXCHANGE

* Imports and exports of gold and silver in Part II.



Not published.
Trade papers...

Bimonthly.

Not published...
Monthly report*.
Aera.
Trends in the Face Brick Industry.
Not published _
Monthly report
Press release to trade papers*..
Trade papers
Monthly report*
Bulletin
_,
Car Surpluses and Shortages*.
Information Bulletins*
Not published
Not published

Monthly.
7th of month.
Quarterly.

Press release to trade papers *
Statement of anthracite shipments*.

13th of month.
15th of month.

Monthly.
Monthly.

Weekly.
Weekly.

Not published.
Not published .
Not published-.
Not published
Not published...
_
Not published
Not published
Trade papers...
Daily.
Not published
Summary of operating statistics.
Monthly,
Not published
Not published
Not published
Daily.
Trade papers
Monthly report
Weekly.
Credit
Not published .......
Weekly press release.
Not published
Not published
Trade papers
*Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.

137
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued
CURRENT PUBLICATION

DATE OF PUBLICATION

II.-REPORTS FROM COMMERCIAL AND TRADE ASSOCIATIONS—Continued
FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT MFRS. ASSOCIATION
GLASS CONTAINER ASSOCIATION.
HARDWOOD MANUFACTURERS INSTITUTE
HYDRAULIC SOCIETY
_.
ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE GUILD
INTERSTATE MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION. _.
LABEL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
LAKE SUPERIOR IRON ORE ASSOCIATION.
LEATHER BELTING EXCHANGE
LIFE INSURANCE SALES RESEARCH BUREAU...
MAPLE FLOORING MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
MINNEAPOLIS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
MOTOR AND ACCESSORY MFRS. ASSOCIATION._.
NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF CASE GOODS ASSOCN.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BRASS MFRS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BUTTON MFRS
.NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FINISHERS OF COTTON FABRICS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF GLUE MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PIANO BENCH AND
STOOL MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE
BOARDS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STEEL FURNITURE
MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SHEET AND TIN
PLATE MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
NATIONAL BOILER AND RADIATOR ASSN.
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CREDIT ASSOCIATION..
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MFRS. ASSOCN
NATIONAL FERTILIZER ASSOCIATION

Foundry equipment production
Glass container production, etc
Hardwood lumber, stocks, etc
Steam, power, and centrifugal pumps
Illuminating glassware production, orders, etc..
Milk receipts at Philadelphia
Label orders
Consumption, stocks, and shipments, iron ore -.
Shipments of leather belting.
Life insurance sales, ordinary
Maple flooring production, etc
Linseed oil and oil-cake shipments
Shipments of accessories and parts
Unfilled orders and shipments of furniture
Brass faucets, orders and shipments
Button stocks, activity, etc.
Finished cotton goods, billings, orders, shipments, and stocks.
Shipments of animal glues




Monthly.

18th of month.
Monthly.
Weekly.

Not published

Production, shipments, and unfilled orders of
piano benches and stools.
Real estate conveyances

Not published...

Steel furniture shipments, orders, etc

Not published

Steel sheets, production, stocks, etc

Not published

Production and shipments of passenger cars
and trucks.
Cast iron boilers and radiators
Credit conditions
Electrical products, shipments, orders, etc
Acid phosphate production, etc., and fertilizer
consumption in southern states.
NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL CONFERENCE BOARD... Cost of living, wages and hours of labor
NATIONAL MACHINE TOOL BUILDERS' ASSOCN. Machine-tool orders, shipments, etc
.NATIONAL PAVING BRICK MANUFACTURERS' Paving-brick production, etc
ASSOCIATION.
NEW ORLEANS BOARD OF TRADE
... Rice distribution through New Orleans
NEW ORLEANS COTTON EXCHANGE
.... Cotton receipts into sight
.NEWS PRINT SERVICE BUREAU
Canadian newsprint production, etc
United States newsprint data since June, 1923..
NEW YORK COFFEE AND SUGAR EXCHANGE.._ Coffee receipts, stocks, etc
NEW YORK METAL EXCHANGE...
Tin stocks and deliveries
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
Loans to brokers
NORTH CAROLINA PINE ASSOCIATION
North Carolina pine, production, etc
NORTHERN HEMLOCK AND HARDWOOD MANU- Hemlock and hardwood lumber production,
FACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
etc.
NORTHERN PINE MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
Northern pine lumber and lath
OAK FLOORING MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
Oak flooring, production, etc
OHIO STATE FOUNDRYMENS' ASSOCIATION
Ohio foundry iron production, etc
PACIFIC CANNED FISH BROKERS' ASSOCIATION. Shipments of canned salmon
PAPERBOARD INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION
Paperboard shipping boxes and boxboard production, etc.
PHILADELPHIA MILK EXCHANGE
Milk receipts at Philadelphia
PLATE GLASS MFRS. OF AMERICA
Plate glass production
PLYWOOD MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
Plywood, orders, etc
PORTLAND ASSOCIATION OF BLDG. OWNERS Rental advertisements, Portland, Oreg
AND MANAGERS.
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
Cement paving contracts
RICE GROWERS' ASSOCIATION OF CALIFORNIA _. Receipts, stocks, and shipments (Calif, mills).
HICE MILLERS' ASSOCIATION
Rice receipts, stocks, etc
ROPE PAPER SACK MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
Shipments of rope paper sacks
RUBBER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
Rubber tires, heels, fabrics, crude stocks, etc
RUBBER GROWERS' ASSOCIATION
Rubber stocks in England
SALES BOOK MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION. _ Shipments and orders of sales books
SAVINGS BANK ASSOCIATION OF STATE OF Savings banks deposits in New York State
NEW YORK.
SHEET METAL WARE ASSOCIATION
Galvanized sheet rnetal ware
SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
Raw silk consumption, machinery activity, etc..
SOUTHERN FURNITURE MFRS. ASSOCIATION
Furniture shipments and unfilled orders
_.
.SOUTHERN PINE ASSOCIATION
Yellow pine production and stocks
.STEEL BARREL MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION Steel barrel capacity operations
_.
STEEL FOUNDERS' SOCIETY
Steel castings, bookings and production
TIGHT BARREL CIRCLED HEADING MFRS. ASSN_ Circled headings for wooden barrels
TUBULAR PLUMBING GOODS ASSOCIATION
Tubular plumbing sales
TURPENTINE AND ROSIN PRODUCERS ASSN
St9cks of turpentine and rosin
__
TWIN CITY MILK PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION. __ Milk production, Minnesota
UNITED TYPOTHETAE OF AMERICA
Printing activity
VACUUM CLEANER MANUFACTURERS ASSN
Vacuum cleaner shipments
WEST COAST LUMBERMEN'S ASSOCIATION
Douglas fir lumber production, etc
WEBBING MANUFACTURERS' EXCHANGE
Sales of elastic webbing
_
WESTERN PINE MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION Western pine lumber production, etc
WESTERN SHEET AND TIN PLATE MANUFAC- Prices of steelsheets, Youngstowndistrict
_.
TURERS ASSOCIATION.
WlREBOUND BOX MANUFACTURERS ASSN---__ Rotary cut veneer receipts and purchases
' Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.

Report on monthly volume of business..
Monthly report*
_
Monthly report
Not published. _
_
_
Not published
Monthly
Not published
Monthly report*
Monthly report (not published)
Monthly release
Not published
Monthly statement
Business Bulletin
Not published in form used
Not published
Weekly report
._
Not published

Bulletin.

Traffic bulletin* (production figures not
published).
Not published...
Not published __
Not published__
Not published. _

Second week of month.

Monthly press releaseNot published
Monthly report

21st of month

Monthly report
Monthly report
Monthly bulletin...
Monthly bulletin. __
Monthly statement.
Trade papers
Financial papers
Not published
Not published

First week of month.
First week of month.

Not published
Not published
Monthly report* (not published)..
Not published
Not published. _

First week of month.
First week of month.
5th of month.

Monthly.

Not published..
Not published.
Not published.
Not published.
Concrete Highway Magazine
Monthly.
Not published
Monthly report
Not published.
Monthly reports (not published)
Bulletin of Rubber Growers' Association. Monthly.
Not published
Not published in form used
Not published
Monthly press release to trade papers*
Not published in form used
Not published in form used
Monthly reports * (not published)
Not published
Not published
Semiweekly reports
Not published
Not published.
Typothetae Bulletin.
Trade papers
Not published
Not published
Not published
Trade papers
Weekly report..

5th of month.

Monthly.

Bimonthly.

138
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued
DATE OF PUBLICATION

m.-REPORTS FROM TECHNICAL PERIODICALS
Composite pig iron and steel prices
__
First or second week of month (daily).
Stock sales __ _
_
First weekly issue of month (Fridays).
Stock prices
Weekly (Fridays).
State and municipal bond issues
THE BOND BUYER
.First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Municipal bond yields
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Visible supply of grains (except rye)
__
Weekly (Saturdays) .
BRADSTREET'S
- - - ------- Bank clearings, United States and Canada
_
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Wholesale price index
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Business failures, Canada
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
Chemical price index
Weekly (Wednesdays).
COAL AGE
_
Mine price of bituminous coal
__
_ _ __
Weekly (Thursdays) .
Cotton, visible supply
COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL CHRONICLE
Weekly (Saturdays').
Interest rates on call loans and commercial paper
Weekly (Saturdays) .
New corporate securities
_
Last weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Fairchild cotton goods index
DAILY NEWS RECORD
Dow, JONES & Co. (WALL STREET JOURNAL).
New York bond sales and prices
_
_. _. First week of month (daily) .
Mexican petroleum shipments
20th of month (daily).
DUN'S REVIEW
__
-. Business failures and wholesale price index
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Sales of electrical energy, central stations
ELECTRICAL WORLD
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Household enameled ware
Monthly.
ENAMELIST
Rand gold production; tin, lead, zinc, copper, and silver Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL-PRESS
prices.
Construction cost index
ENGINEERING NEWS RECORD
First weekly issue of montn.
Canadian bond issues
_
_ _ _
Weekly (Thursdays).
FINANCIAL POST
- - - - - - - Hay receipts
HAY TRADE JOURNAL
Weekly (Fridays).
IRON AGE
_
Pig-iron production, furnaces in blast, etc
_ __
First weekly issue of month (Thursdays).
Iron and steel prices
Weekly (Thursdays) .
IRON TRADE REVIEW
Shipments, etc., zinc and lead ore, Joplin district
JOPLIN GLOBE
- Fire losses in Great Britain
LONDON TIMES
Price indexes of lumber
LUMBER MANUFACTURER AND DEALER
First weekly issue of month (Fridays).
Milk receipts a t Greater N e w York
___
MILK REPORTER
_
Weekly.
Turpentine and rosin, receipts and stocks, 3 ports
Weekly (Saturdays).
NAVAL STORES REVIEW
Dividend and interest payments
„-_. _ _ _
NEW YORK JOURNAL OF COMMERCE - - - First week of month (daily) .
New incorporations
First week of month (daily).
Fire losses
10th of month (daily) .
Newspaper advertising
NEW YORK EVENING POST
Not published.
NORTHWESTERN MILLER
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Flaxseed, receipts, etc
Weekly (Wednesdays).
OIL, PAINT, AND DRUG REPORTER
_ Price indexes of drugs, oil, etc
_ __
Weekly (Mondays).
Argentine visible supply of flaxseed
Weekly (Mondays).
OIL TRADE JOURNAL.
:
Mexican petroleum shipments
_
10th of month (monthly) .
PRINTERS' INK
- _ _ __
Magazine advertising
Second week of month.
PRINTERS' INK MONTHLY
_
_ _ _
Monthly.
National advertising in newspapers
Book production
PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY
. .
Third week of month.
Equipment orders
RAILWAY AGE
.
__
Sand liine brick production, etc
ROCK PRODUCTS
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Monthly;
Wheat flour production, from July, 1920
RUSSELL'S COMMERCIAL NEWS
- _ _ __
Fourth week of month (Wednesdays).
r
Sugar stocks receipts meltings, and Cuban statistics
Weekly (Fridays).
ST4 TisTi AL SUGAR TRADE JOURNAL
World shipments and stocks, plantation rubber
WORLD RUBBER POSITION (BRITISH)
AMERICAN METAL MARKET
THE ANNALIST
- -

-

SOURCE

DATA

CURRENT PUBLICATION

DATE OF PUBLICATION

IV.—REPORTS FROM PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS
(Excluding individual firms reporting data to be combined with other firms or trade associations;
ABERTHAW CONSTRUCTION Co_
_
AMERICAN APPRAISAL Co
AMERICAN TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH Co
BOSTON, CAPE COD & NEW YORK CANAL Co.
CHILDS Co
_
CLEVELAND TRUST Co
COMPAGNIE UNIVERSELLE DU CANAL MARITIME DE SUEZ.
DICKSON, R. S., & Co
DODGE, F. W., CORPORATION..
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION
GRAND, F. & W., 5-10-25CENT STORES___
GRANT, W. T., Co
HAFFARDS, G. M., & Co
HARTMAN CORPORATION.
___
HERCULES POWDER Co
LLOYD'S
KING, CLYDE L
KRESGE, S. S., Co
.
KRESS, S. H., & Co
MCLEAN BUILDING REPORTS, LTD.__
MCCRORY STORES CORPORATION
METROPOLITAN FIVE AND TEN CENT STORES. _
METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE Co
NEW YOEK TRUST Co
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, BUREAU OF BUSINESS
RESEARCH.
OWL DRUG Co__
PENNEY, J. C., Co___
_
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD Co
POLK, R. L., & Co.
_
PULLMAN Co
_
SANFORD & KELLEY
SCHULTE, A., INC
___
SEARS, ROEBUCK & Co.
SEIDMAN & SEIDMAN
SILVER, ISAAC, & BROS
_
THOMPSON, J. R., Co
_
__
UNITED CIGAR STORES Co
UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION
WALDORF SYSTEM, INC
 WARD, MONTGOMERY, & Co.
WOOLWORTH, F. W., & CO.__


Building costs
Construction costs
Stockholders in the company..
Cape Cod Canal traffic
Restaurant sales _
Dividends paid on industrial stocks..
Suez Canal traffic

Construction trade papers..
American Appraisal News.
Financial papers
Not published
Monthly report
Bulletin
Le Canalde Suez.

Southern cotton mill stocks index
Building contracts
Sales of closed cars, sales to dealers and to users...
Chain-store sales
Chain-store sales
Fall River cotton mill dividends
Chain-store sales..
Steam naval stores, production and stocks
World ship construction
Milk receipts of Baltimore.
Chain-store sales
Chain-store sales
Canadian building contracts
Chain-store sales
Chain-store sales
_
Factory Labor Turnover
Indexes of stock and bond prices
Employment, construction industries, Ohio

Financial papers
Statement on Building Statistics..
Financial papers
Financial papers
Financial papers
Bradstreet's
.
Financial papers
Naval Stores Review
New York Journal of Commerce..
Not published
Financial papers
_.
Financial papers
Canadian Building Review
Financial papers
Financial papers...
Not published
The Index
Bulletin

Chain-store sales
Chain-store sales
Stockholders in the company
New passenger-car registrations
Pullman passenger traffic and operations
New Bedford cotton mill dividends
Chain-store sales
Mail-order sales
Sales of furniture in Grand Rapids district
Chain-store sales
Restaurant sales
_
Chain-store sales
Unfilled orders
Earnings.
_
_
Stockholders
_
_
Wages of common labor
_
Restaurant sales
Mail-order sales
_
Chain-store sales
__

Financial papers
__
Financial papers
Financial papers
National New Car Reporting Service*.
Not published
Bradstreet's
Finanical papers
.
Financial papers
Not published
Financial papers
Monthly press release*
Financial papers
Pressrelease*
Press release*
Financial papers
Special reports*
Monthly press release*
_
Financial papers
.
Financial papers
__

Monthly.
Third week of month.
Monthly.
Quarterly.
5th, 15th, and 25th of
month.
Weekly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Quarterly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
First week of month.
First week of month.
Monthly.
First week of month.
Monthly.
Monthly.
First week of month.
Quarterly.
Monthly.
Quarterly.
First week of month.

10th of month.
Quarterly.
Quarterly.
Occasionally«
First week of month.
First week of month.

GENERAL INDEX
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 26-134) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents," page 1.
Abrasives, paper and cloth
64
Accessories, automobile
46, 47
Acetate of lime, production, shipments, etc
76
Acid phosphate, production, stocks,
etc
79
Acid, sulphuric, price and exports
79
Active textile machinery
30, 34, 36
Advertising:
Magazine and newspaper
72, 111
Rentals, Minneapolis, and Portland, Oreg
65
Agencies, employment
107
Agents and brokers, failures
129
Agriculture:
Price indexes
28, 29
Production, index numbers
26
Wages
107
Agricultural implements
45, 47
Agricultural loans and mortgages __ 123,
127
Alcohol, ethyl, and wood (methanol)
76, 77
Allegheny River, cargo traffic
99
American Telephone & Telegraph
Co., stockholders
130
Animal fats and glues, production,
stocks, etc
83
Animal products:
Price index
29
Production, index numbers
26
Apartments, bond issues
128
Apples:
Production (crop estimate)
84
Stocks and shipments
88
Architectural terra cotta
74
Argentina:
Flaxseed, exports, and visible
supply
81
Foreign-exchange rates
131
Foreign trade with
132, 133
Arsenic, crude and refined
52
Asphalt, production, stocks
55
Assets, life-insurance companies..
123
Automobiles:
Accessories, registrations, etc__ 47
Advertising, national, in newspapers
72
Earnings, manufacturers
130
Production, exports, sales, etc__ 46
Tires and tubes
57
Babbitt metal, consumption
52
Bad-order cars
103
Bad-order locomotives
101
Baltimore, milk receipts
93
Band-instruments, shipments
52
Banks:
Clearings, conditions, interest
rates, etc
124,125
Failures
129
Farm loans
127
Barley:
Exports, prices, receipts and
stocks
87
Production (crop estimate)
84
Barrels:
Steel
41
Wooden headings
72
Basic commodities, production, index numbers
L
26
Baths, enamel, orders, etc
48
Beef, consumption, exports, proDigitized for duction, prices, etc
FRASER
91


Page
Belgium, foreign-exchange rates
131
Belting, leather, sales
60
Benches, piano
71
Boilers, cast-iron, production, shipments, etc
43
Bonds:
Government, outstanding
125
Held by life-insurance companies
123
New issues
127,128
Prices, sales, and yields
126, 128
Tax-exempt, outstanding
127
Book paper, production, etc
63
Boojts, publication
61
Boots and shoes. (See Shoes.)
Boston:
Milk receipts
93
Wool receipts
30
Box board, production, receipts, etc.. 62
Boxes, paper, production, etc
62
Bradstreet's, price index
28
Brass faucets, orders and shipments._ 49
Brazil:
Coffee, receipts and clearances, _ 96
Foreign-exchange rates
131
Brick:
Housing costs
65
Production, stocks, prices, etc__ 72,
74,75
British India, foreign-exchange rates. 181
Brokers:
Failures
. _ _ _ 129
Loans to
125
Buildings:
Contracts awarded
66
Cost indexes, losses, etc
65
Employment in Ohio
105
Security issues
128
Building materials:
Price indexes
28, 65
Unfilled-order index
27
Burlap, imports
36
Butter, production, receipts, etc
94
Buttons, pearl, production and stocks. 31
Cake and meal:
Cottonseed, production, etc
80
Linseed, shipments, etc
81
California:
Petroleum stocks
53
Redwood and white-pine lumber,
production, shipments, etc
68
Rice stocks
88
Canada:
Automobiles, production and exports
.
46
Bank clearings
124
Bond issues
127
Building, contracts awarded
66
Canals, traffic
99
Cheese, exports
94
Coal, production and consumption
37
Employment
106, 107
Failures
129
Foreign-exchange rates and
trade
131,132,133
Iron and steel, production
38, 39
Life-insurance, sales
123
Methanol, refining
77
Newsprint paper, production,

61

etc

Oats and oatmeal
87
Railroads, operation
100
Silver, production and stocks. __ 121

(139)

Canada—Continued.
Wheat flour, production
85
Wheat, grindings, stocks and
exports
85,86
Canals, traffic
99
Candy, sales, chain stores
112, 113
Canned goods:
Milk, condensed, evaporated,
and powdered
92, 93
Salmon
96
Cape Cod Canal, traffic
99
Capital issues. (See Securites.)
Cars, railroad
102, 103
Castings, malleable, steel and track
work
42
Cast iron, boilers and radiators
43
Cattle, receipts, shipments, prices
and slaughter
89
Cement, production, stocks, shipments and prices
75
Cereals. (See Grains.)
Chain stores, sales
112, 113, 114, 115
Check payments
124
Cheese, production, receipts, etc
94
Chemicals:
Employment index
105
Exports, imports, production and
prices
79
Pay-roll index
109
Price indexes
28, 79
Time operations, factory, index
number
110
Wood distillation and alcohol. 76, 77
Childs Co., restaurant sales
115
Chile:
Foreign-exchange rates
131
Nitrate production
79
China, vitreous, plumbing fixtures 73
Cigars and cigarettes:
Consumption and exports
97
Sales, chain stores
112, 113, 115
Circulation, money and notes
124, 125
Citrus fruits, car-lot shipments
88
Clay and glass products:
Employment index
105
Pay-roll index
109
Production, prices, etc
73, 74, 75
Time operations
110
Cleaners, vacuum
44
Clearings, bank
124
Clothing: "
Advertising, national, in newspapers
72
Cost indexes
28, 29
Production, stocks, etc
31
Rubber-proofed
57
Coal:
Employment, anthracite mines._ 105
Loadings, freight cars
102
Prices, production, stocks, exports, etc
37
Retail-price index
29
Coconut oil (or copra), consumption,
stocks, etc
82
Coffee, imports, stocks and Brazilian
movements
96
Coke:
Production, exports and prices. 39,55
Coal consumption
37
Cold-storage holdings:
Apples
88
Butter, cheese, and eggs
94
Poultry and
fish
96
Meats
90,91
Concrete, paving contracts
75

140
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 26-134) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents," page 1.
Page

Condition, banks
124
Construction, building:
Contracts awarded
66
Cost and volume indexes
65
Employment in Ohio
105
Security issues
128
Construction, highways
75
Construction, ships
98
Consumption:
Chemicals and oils
79,80,81,82
Coal
37
Cotton and fabrics
33,57
Iron ore
38
Meats and dairy products
90,
91, 93, 94
Petroleum products
53, 54, 55
Pulp and paper products
61,
62, 63, 64
Rubber
56,57
Tobacco
97
Wheat
flour
. _ _ _ 85
Wool
30
Containers:
Glass, production, etc
73
Paper, production, etc.^
62
Conveyances, real estate
65
Copper, exports, prices, production,
etc
....
49
Copra oil (or coconut) production,
consumption, and stocks
82
Corn:
Production (crop estimate)
84
Receipts, grindings, exports, etc_ 86
Corporations:
Dividend payments and failures- 129
New security issues and incorporations
127, 128
Profits and stockholders
130
Stock and bond prices
125, 126
Costs, living, indexes
29
Costs, building construction
65
Cotton:
Consumption, receipts, exports,
etc
33
Prices
29, 32
'Cotton fabrics:
Cloth, exports
34
Consumption by tire manufacturers
57
Fine goods, production
34
Prices, wholesale
32
Production, stocks, and unfilled
orders
35
Cotton finishing, billings, shipments,
etc
34
Cotton mills:
Dividends and spindle activity- _ 34
Stock prices, southern mills
126
'Cotton yarns, wholesale prices
32
Cottonseed and products
80
Credit:
Bank
124
Conditions by trades
120
Farm
..
127
Crops:
Cotton, production
33
Food, production and value
84
Marketings, index numbers
26
Price indexes
28
Tobacco, production
97
Cuba, sugar movement
95
Customs, receipts
125
Dairy products:
Butter and cheese
94
Milk
92, 93
Price indexes
29
Debits to individual accounts
124
125
 Debt, United States Government
Delaware, employment and earnings. 106


Faucets, brass, orders and shipments. 49
Delinquent accounts, electrical trade,
75
etc
120 Federal-aid highways completed
Federal farm-loan and intermediate
Department stores, sales and stocks,
credit banks, loans
127
indexes
116, 117
Deposits, bank and savings
124, 125 Federal reserve banks and member
banks, condition
124
Detroit, employment
106
Dividends, payments
34, 129 Federal reserve districts:
Chain-store sales
112, 113
Douglas fir lumber, production, shipDepartment-store trade index
ments, orders, etc
67
numbers
116, 117
Drugs:
Wholesale trade index numPrice indexes
28, 79
bers
118,119
Sales, chain stores
112, 113, 115
Wholesale trade
118 Felt, roofing, production and stocks. 71
Fertilizer, exports, consumption,
Dry goods:
etc
79
Prices, wholesale
32
Wholesale trade
120 Fiber, vulcanized, sales and consumption
50
Dun's, price index
28
36
Dyes and dyestuffs, exports
78 Fibers, imports
Finance:
Advertising, national, in newsEarnings:
papers
72
Corporations, classified
130
Banking
124,125
Labor
108,110
Government
125
Public utilities
104
Securities
126, 127, 128
Railroads and express companies. 100
63
United States Steel Corporation. 39 Fine paper
Finishing, cotton
.34
Eggs, receipts and cold-storage holdings
94 Fire-extinguishing equipment, shipments
47
Elastic webbing, sales
36
65
Electric locomotives, shipments-. 47, 101 Fire losses
Fish, catch and cold-storage holdings. 96
Electric power:
Fuel consumption
37, 55, Fish oil, production, consumption
and stocks
83
Production and sales
104
Flaxseed, receipts, shipments, stocks,
Electric washing machines, shipetc
81
ments
44
Flooring:
Electric trucks and tractors, shipProduction, shipments, etc
70
ments
47
Price, southern pine and DougElectrical products (motors, porlas
fir
67
celain, etc.)
50
Electrical trade, delinquent accounts. 120 Floor and wall tile, production, shipments, etc
74
Emigration
98
Flour, wheat, production, consumpEmployment:
tion, stocks, etc
85
Agencies, State and municipal. _ 107
Factory, mines, railroads, etc. 105, 106 Food:
Advertising, national, in newsTime
109,110
papers
72
Enameled ware
48
Earnings, manufacturers
130
Engines, internal-combustion, patExports and imports
134
ents granted
45
Factory employment, index
105
England. (See United Kingdom.)
Pay-roll index, factories
109
Equipment:
Prices indexes
28, 29
Agricultural, shipments
45
Fire-extinguishing, shipments__ 47
Stock indexes
27
Time operations, factories
110
Foundry, orders, shipments,
etc
45 Foreign bonds, prices and issues. 126, 128
Foreign-exchange rates
131
Railway, orders, shipments,
130
etc
_ - 101,103 Foreign stockholders
Essential oils, wholesale-price index. 79 Foreign trade:
Canadian exports and imports
131
Ethyl alcohol
77
United States exports
133, 134
Expenditures, United States GovUnited States imports
132, 134
ernment
125
Vessels in United States ports
98
Exports. (See Foreign trade and InForest products:
dividual commodities.)
Car loadings
102
Explosives, production, shipments,
Production, index numbers
26
stocks and sales
78
Express, earnings
100 Foundry equipment, orders, sales,
and shipments
45
Fabricated steel
40 Foundry iron, meltings, prices, etc. 38, 43
Fabrics, rubber-proofed
57 France:
Foreign-exchange rates
131
Face brick, production, shipments,
Foreign trade with
132,133
etc
74
Freight cars
102, 103
Factories. (See Manufactures and
Freight rates, ocean
98
Industrial corporations.)
Failures, business
129 Fruits:
Farm prices
29
Fall River, textile-mill dividends
34
Shipments, car-lot
88
Farm implements
45,47
Farm loans and mortgages
123, 127 Fuel:
Consumption, production, etc _ _ 39,
Farm products:
53, 54, 55, 104
Price indexes
28, 29
Cost of, index numbers
28,29
Production indexes
28
36
Farm wages
107 Fur, sales
28
Fats, animal, grease and derivatives. 83 Furnishings, house, price index

141
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 26-134) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups which should make.
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents," page 1.
Page
Leather—Continued.
Illuminating glassware, production,
Furniture:
Pay-roll index
109
Household
71
shipments, stocks, etc
73
Products (shoes, gloves, and
Steel, office
40 Immigration
98
belting)
60
Imports. (See Foreign trade and InLeather, artificial, shipments, etc
36
Galvanized metal ware
52
dividual commodities.)
122, 123
Gas and electric companies, earnings
Incorporations, new
127 Life insurance
29
(see also Public utilities)
104 Indebtedness, wholesale trade
120 Light, cost of, index number
Linseed oil and cake
81
Gas and fuel oils, consumption, proIndia. (See British India.)
Livestock:
duction, stocks and prices
55 Industrials. (See Manufactures and
Loadings
102
Gasoline, consumption, exports, price,
Corporations.)
Marketings, indexes
26
production, stocks, etc^
54 Instruments, musical:
Price to farmers, indexes
29
Gelatin, edible, production and stocks 83
Advertising, national, in newsGeneral Motors Corporation, sales __ 46
Receipts, shipments, prices, and
papers
72
Germany, foreign trade with
132, 133
slaughter
•_ 89
Band, shipments
52
Ginnings, cotton
33 Insurance, life
29
122, 123 Living, cost of
Glass, production, etc
73 Interest, rates and payments
102
125, Loadings, freight cars
Gloves and glove leather
60 Investments:
126,128,129 Loans:
Glues, animal, production and stocks. 83
Agricultural
123, 127
Banks
127
Gold, receipts, exports, imports and
Bank
124
Life-insurance companies
123
Rand output
121
Brokers
125
Iron and steel:
Government, Canadian, bond issues- 127
Life-insurance policies
Barrels and drums
41 Locomotives, exports, shipments, 123
Government, United States:
Boilers and radiators, cast-iron_ _ 43
Bonds, prices, holdings, etc
123,
etc
47, 101
Castings, malleable, steel and
126, 127
69
track-work
42 Logs, walnut
Employment in Washington
105
Earnings, manufacturers'
39, 130 Losses:
Finances, debt, etc
125
Business
129
Employment index
105
Postal business
111, 125
Fire
65
Enameled sanitary ware
48
Grains:
Ships
Exports and imports
40 Lubricating oil, production, stocks, 98
Exports, receipts, prices, etc__ 86, 87
Fabricated steel products
40
Farm-price indexes
29
consumption, and price
55
Foundry iron, meltings, prices,
Loadings
102
etc
38,43 Lumber:
Production (crop estimates)
84
Employment index
i
105
Ingots, steel, production, prices,
Grand, F. & W., sales
114
Factory time operations, index_ _ 110
etc
39
Grant, W. T., & Co., sales
114
Pay-roll index
109
Ore shipments, stocks, etc
38
Grease, production, consumption, and
Production, a x p o r t s , stocks,
Pay-roll index
109
stocks
83
prices, etc
67, 68, 69, 70, 71
Pig-iron production, prices, etc_ _ 38
Great Britain. (See United KingRailway equipment
101,103,104 McCrory Stores Corporation, sales. _ 114
dom.)
Sheets, steel
41 Machine tools, new orders
Groceries:
45
Time operations, factory, index
Sales, chain stores
112
number
110 Machinery, sales, profits, etc_ 44, 45, 130
Wholesale trade
118
Unfilled orders
27, 39 Machinery activity:
Gum lumber, stocks
69
Boxboard and box mills
62
Vessels, construction
98
Textile mills
30, 34, 36
Wages
107
Ham, smoked, prices
90
advertising
111
127, 128 Magazines, houses, sales
Hardware, wholesale trade
119 Issues, new capital
Mail-order
111
Italy:
Hardwood
lumber,
production,
Foreign-exchange rates
131 Malleable castings, production, shipstocks, and shipments
69, 71
ments, and orders
42
Foreign trade with
132, 133
Harness leather
59
Manufactures:
Hartman Corporation, sales
115 Japan:
Earnings and stockholders
130
Hay:
Foreign-exchange rates
131
Employment index
105, 106
Production (crop estimate)
84
Foreign trade with
132, 133
Exports and imports
134
Receipts
88 Joint-stock land banks, loans
127
Failures and dividend payments _ 129
Headings, barrel
72 Joplin district, lead and zinc shipPay-roll payments
106, 109
Heels, rubber, production, shipments,
ments
51
Production, index numbers
26
etc
57
Securities issued, prices, etc
125,
Kerosene oil, production, consumpHemlock, northern, lumber
68
126, 128
tion, stocks, etc
54
Hides and skins, imports, prices,
Stocks on hand, index numbers_ _ 27
Knit underwear, production, shipstocks
58
Time operations
109, 110
ments, etc
31
Highways, construction
75
Kresge, S. S., Co., sales
114 Maple flooring, production, shipHogs, prices, receipts, shipments, and
ments, stocks, etc
70
114
slaughter
89 Kress, S. H., & Co., sales
Massachusetts, e m p l o y m e n t and
Hoists, electric
50 Labels, paper, orders
64
earnings
106, 108
Hosiery, production, stocks, etc
31 Labor:
Meats:
Hotels:
Earnings
107, 108
Farm prices
29
Advertising
72
Employment
106
Production, cold-storage holdBond issues
128
Time worked
109,110
ings, etc
90, 91
Hours, factory operations
30, Lamb, production, stocks, etc
91
Wholesale trade
120
34, 36, 109, 110 Lambs, shipments and slaughter
89 Merchandise, car loadings
102
Household:
Lard compounds and substitutes
83 Metals and minerals (see also InEnameled ware, activity
48 Lard, production, exports, etc
90
dividual commodities):
Furnishings, price indexes
28 Lath, northern pine
68
Earnings, corporations
130
Furniture, advertising, shipLavatories, enamel, shipments, orEmployment index
105
ments; etc _ _ ,
71, 72
ders, etc
48
Pay-roll index
109
Housing:
Lead, production, prices, etc
51
Price indexes
28
Construction
66 Leather:
Production indexes
26
Cost of, index numbers
29, 65
Employment index
105
Time operations, factory, index
Rental advertisements
65
Factory time operations, innumber
110
dex
105,110 Methanol, production, shipments, exIce cream, production
93
Glove, production and stocks__ 60
ports, stocks, price
76, 77
Illinois, employment and earnings
106,
Sole, upper, harness and skivers,
Metropolitan Stores Corporation,

production, etc
59
108
sales
114


142
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 26-134) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents," page 1.
Page
Page
Mexico:
Oil wells completed
53 Poultry:
Receipts and cold-storage holdPetroleum, shipments and stocks. 53 Oleomargarine:
Silver, production
121
Production and consumption
80
ings
96
Price index (with dairy prodMilk, receipts, production, exports,
Consumption of chief ingrediucts) _ _ _ _
29
etc
92, 93
ents
80,82,93
88 Power, electric:
Minerals,production, index numbers. 26 Onions, car-lot shipments
Fuel consumption
37, 55
Minneapolis:
Orders, new. (See Individual comProduction
104
Linseed oil and cake, shipments. 81
modities.)
Switching equipment
50
Milk, production
93 Orders, unfilled, index (see also In122
Rental advertisements
65
dividual commodities)
27 Premiums, life insurance
Prices:
Mississippi River, cargo traffic
99 Ore:
Brick and cement
74, 75
Money in circulation
125
Iron, shipments
38
Coal and coke
37,39
Money orders, postal
111
Lead and zinc, shipments
51
Coffee and tea
96
Monongahela River, cargo traffic
99
Total, car loadings
102
Dairy products
29, 92, 94
Mortgages:
Outlet boxes, electrical
50
Drugs, chemicals, and oils. 76, 80, 81
Held by farm banks, etc
127 Owl Drug Co., sales
115
Grains and
flour
29, 85, 86, 87
Held by life-insurance comHides and leather
58, 59, 60
panies
123 Panama Canal, traffic
99
Iron and steel
38, 39,41
Issued for real estate, bonds
128 Paper:
Lumber
67,70
Motors, electric
50
Book, fine, wrapping, etc
63
Meats and livestock... 29, 89, 90, 91
Municipal bonds, new issues and
Boxboard and boxes
62
Naval stores
78
yields
126, 127
Employment index
105
Nonferrous metals
49, 51
Music, sales, chain stores
112, 113
Newsprint, production, etc
61
Petroleum products
53, 54, 55
Naval stores, receipts and stocks. _ 77, 78
Pay-roll index
109
Plumbing
fixtures
49
Netherlands, foreign exchange rates. 131
Pulp and paper products
64
. Rubber
56
New Bedford, textile-mill dividends. 34
Time operations, index numSilver
121
New Jersey, employment and earnber
105,110
Sugar
95
ings
106, 108
Waste, consumption, and stocks. 62
Textiles
28, 32
New Orleans:
Parks, national, visitors
100
Tobacco
97
Rice shipments
88 Passengers, railroad and Pullman
100 Price indexes (see also Prices):
Sugar receipts, domestic crop
95 Passenger automobiles, production,
Building and construction costs. 65
Newspapers, advertising
72, 111
exports, etc
46, 47
Farm
1
29
Newsprint paper, exports, prices,
Passenger cars, railroad, orders, shipRetail
29
production, etc
61
ments, etc
103
Stocks and bonds
125,126
New York City:
Passports, issued
98
Wholesale, classified
28
Bank clearings and debits
124 Patents, granted
45 Printing:
\
Loans to brokers and discount
Pavements, concrete, c o n t r a c t s
Activity
61
rates
125
awarded
75
Employment
105
Milk receipts
93 Paving brick, production, shipments,
Pay-roll index
109
New York State:
stocks, etc
75 Profits. (See Earnings.)
Canal traffic
99 Payments, check
124 Production, index (see also Individual
Employment and earnings. _ 106, 108 Payments, dividend and interest
129
commodities)
26
Savings banks, deposits
125 Pay roll, factories
106, 109 Public
finance
125
New York Stock Exchange:
Pennsylvania, employment and earnPublic utilities:
Loans to members of
125
ings
106, 108
Bonds, prices, issues, holdings,
Security sales
126 Pennsylvania Railroad Co., stocketc
123,126,128
Nitrate of soda, imports and producholders
130
Contracts awarded
66
tion
79 Penney, J. C. & Co., sales
115
Dividends, earnings, etc
104,
Nonferrous metals:
129, 130
Employment index
105 Petroleum:
61
Capital issues
128 Publishing, book, newspaper, etc
Production, prices, etc
49, 51
Crude, products, etc
53 Pullman, passengers carried and operPay-roll index
109
ations
100
Earnings
130
Time operations, index
110
64
Refined products
54, 55 Pulp wood
North Carolina pine lumber, produc44
laminated
50 Pumps, shipments, etc
tion and shipments
67 Phenolic products, receipts
36
Philadelphia, milk
93 Pyroxylin-coated textiles
Northern hardwoods, production and
production, conshipments
71 Phosphate, acid, stocks
sumption, and
79 Radiators, cast-iron, production,
Northern hemlock and pine lumber,
shipments, etc
43
Piano, benches, and stools
71
production, shipments, etc
68 Pig-iron prices, production, etc
38 Railroads:
Advertising in newspapers
72
Oak:
Pine lumber, production, etc
67, 68
Dividend payments
129
Flooring, production, shipments,
Pine oil, production and stocks
77
Employment
105
stocks, etc
70 Plate glass, production
73
Equipment
101, 103
Lumber, stocks and unfilled
Plumbing fixtures:
Financial operations
100,130
orders
69
Enameled sanitary ware
48
Freight-car
movement
and
Oats:
Price index and sales, tubular. _ 49
traffic
100,102
Exports, price, receipts, etc
87
Vitreous china, shipments, etc.. 73
Fuel consumption
37, 55
Production (crop estimate)
84 Plywood, bookings, shipments, etc__ 72
Securities
123,
130
Ocean transportation
98 Policies, life insurance
123 Railways, electric and street 126, 128, 129
104,
Offal, grain, production
85 Porcelain, electric, shipments
50 Rand, gold output
121
Ohio:
Pork products, production exports,
materials:
Foundry, iron, stocks, receipts,
consumption, holdings, etc
90 Raw Exports and imports.
134
etc
43
Price indexes
28
Employment in construction
105 Portland, Oreg., rental advertisements
65
Production indexes
26
Ohio River, cargo traffic
99
Postal receipts and money orders__ 111
Stock indexes
27
Oil:
125 Real estate:
Essential, wholesale price index._ 79 Postal savings
Potash, imports
79
Conveyances
65
Petroleum and products
53,
Bond issues
128
54, 55, 128, 130 Potatoes:
Car-lot shipments
88 Receipts, United States GovernPine
77

Production (crop estimate)
84
ment
111, 125
Vegetable and fish 80, 81, 82, 83


143
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 26-134) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also "Table of Contents," page 1.
Page
Page
Page
Tin, deliveries, imports, prices, and
Refining:
Shoes—Continued.
stocks
51
Sales, chain stores
112, 113
Methanol
77
Petroleum
54, 55
Wholesale trade
119 Tires, production, stocks, and shipSugar
95 Silk, raw:
ments
57
Vegetable oils
80, 82
Tobacco:
Consumption, imports, stocks,
Advertising, national, in newsReflectors, sales
50
etc
36
papers
72
Registrations, automobiles
47
Prices
32
Employment index
105
Rent:
Silver, exports, imports, production,
Pay-roll index
109
Advertisements
65
and prices
121
Production, exports,
prices,
Cost of
29 Silver, Isaac & Bros., sales
115
Reserves, bank
124 Sinks, enameled
stocks, etc
97
48
Time operations, factories
110
Restaurants, sales
115 Skivers, production
59
Toilet articles, advertising in newsRetail prices:
Soda, nitrate of, production and
papers
72
Coal.
37
imports
79
Tools, machine, new orders
45
Food and coal indexes
29 Southern pine lumber, production,
Sugar
95
42
shipments, etc
67 Trackwork, steel
47
Retail trade:
Steam naval stores
77 Tractors, electric industrial
Chain stores
112, 113, 114, 115 Steel (see also Iron and Steel).
Trade:
Business failures
129
Department stores
116
Barrels and drums
41
Canadian foreign
131
Gasoline and kerosene
54
Castings
42
Foreign, United States. 132, 133, 134
Lumber
70
Earnings
39,130
Mail-order
111
Retail
111,
Exports and imports
40
112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117
Rice:
Fabricated products
40
Exports, imports, receipts, shipWholesale
. _ _ - 118, 119, 120
Ingots, prices, etc
39 Trucks:
ments, and stocks
88
Sheets, production, shipments _ _ 41
Automobile, production
46
Production (crop estimate)
84
Unfilled orders
27,39
Rivers, cargo traffic
99
Electric industrial, shipments
47
Wages
107 Tubular plumbing, sales
Roads, construction
75
49
130 Turpentine, receipts, prices, and
Roofing, production and stocks
71 Stockholders, corporations
Rope paper sacks, shipments
64 Stocks, commodity, index numbers
stocks
77, 78
(see also Individual commodities) _ 27
Rosin, receipts, stocks, etc
77, 78
Stocks, corporation:
Underwear, knit, production, etc
31
Rubber, consumption, imports, prices,
New issues
127, 128 Unfilled orders, index (see also Indietc
56
Prices and sales
125,126
Rubber products, production, etc
57
vidual commodities)
27
Stokers, mechanical, sales
45 Unions, trade, employment in CanRye:
Exports, price, receipts and
ada
106
Stone, clay, and glass products:
stocks
87
115
Employment index
105 United Cigar Stores Co., sales
Production (crop estimate)
84
Pay-roll index
109 United Kingdom:
Fire losses
65
Production, etc
73, 74, 75
Foreign-exchange rates
131
St. Lawrence Canal, traffic
99
Time operations, factory, index
Sacks, rope paper, shipments
64
Foreign trade with
132, 133
number
110
Sales:
Tea stocks
96
Stools, piano
71
Chain stores
112, 113, 114, 115 Stores, retail, sales
112, United States Government. (See
Department stores
116
Government, United States.)
113, 114, 115, 116, 117
Factory. (See Individual comStructural steel, fabricated
40 United States Steel Corporation:
modities.)
Earnings and unfilled orders
39
99
Mail-order houses
111 Suez Canal, traffic
Stockholders
130
stocks, receipts,
Wholesale, by districts. 118,119,120 Sugar, meltings,price and exports etc. 95
Wage rates
107
79
Sales books, shipments and orders
61 Sulphuric acid, exchange rates
51.
Sweden, foreign
131 Utah, lead shipments
Salmon, canned, shipments and
Utilities, public. (See Public UtiliCanadian exports
96 Switzerland, foreign exchange rates. _ 131
ties.)
Sanitary ware, orders, shipments,
127
and stocks
46 Tax-exempt securitiesprices
44
Tea, imports, stocks,
96 Vacuum cleaners, sales
Vegetables, car-lot shipments
88
Sault Ste. Marie Canal, cargo
telephone companies:
traffic
99 Telegraph andand earnings
Pi^evenue
104, 130 Vegetable oils, production, stocks,
Savings deposits
125
etc
80, 81, 82
Stockholders, American TeleSchulte, A. (Inc.), sales
115
phone &
130 Vehicles (see also Automobiles, ShipSears, Roebuck & Co., sales
111 Ten-cent stores, Telegraph Co112, 113, 114
ping, and Railroads):
sales
Securities:
Employment, index number
105
74
Held by life-insurance companies. 123 Terra cotta, bookings
Pay-roll, index number
109
Newissues___
127,128 Textiles:
Time operations, factory, index
Burlap and
fibers
.
36
Prices and sales
125, 126
number
110
Clothing
28, 29, 31 Veneer, rotary-cut
Tax-exempt, outstanding...
127
72
Cotton
32 Vessels. (See Shipping.)
Sheep, receipts, shipments, prices,
Cotton manufactures
34, 35 Vitreous china, plumbing
and slaughter
89
fixtures
73
Employment index
105 Vulcanized fiber, sales and consumpSheet-metal ware, galvanized
52
Hosiery and knit underwaer
31
Sheets, steel
41
tion
50
Machinery activity
30, 34, 36
Shelter, prices of, index numbers
29
Mill dividends and
stock
Shelving, steel, shipments, etc
40
Wages, factory, etc
107, 108
prices
34,126 Waldorf System, restaurant sales
Shipments. (See Individual com115
Pay-roll index
109 Walnut, lumber and logs
modities.)
69
Prices, wholesale
32 War Finance Corporation, loans
Shipping:
127
Silk
32, 36 Ward, Montgomery, & Co
Fuel consumption
37, 55
111
Time operations, factories
110 Washington, D. C., Government emOcean and construction
98
Webbing, elastic
36
River and canal cargo traffic
99
ployment in
105
Wholesalers, credit conditions __ 120 Washing machines, electric, sales
Security issues
128
44
Wool
30,32 Water power, electric energy proShoes:
Advertising in newspapers
72 Thompson, J. R. Co., restaurant
duced
104
115 Water softeners and systems, orders,
Production, prices, exports, etc.- 60
Rubber heels, production, shipTile, production, stocks, prices, and
shipments, and stocks
44
ments,
57
shipments
74 Wax, production, stocks
55
 etc


144
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 26-134) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups which should make;
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also "Table of Contents/' page 1.
Page
Page
Page
vj^jva,
consumption and stocks
Worsted yarn, wholesale price
32
Webbing, elastic, sales
36 Wood, v^vjiiC! u.ii-i|_» tiiv^-L-i aiii^j. Dt'W^rusj
63
chemical plants
76, 77 Wrapping paper
Welland Canal, traffic
99
Wells, oil, completed
53 Wood furniture
71
Western pine lumber, production,
Wood pulp
64 Yarns, cotton and worsted, wholeshipments, and stocks
68
sale prices
._
32
Wheat and wheat
flour
84, 85, 86 Wool:
Prices, wholesale
32 Yields, bonds
126, 128
Wholesale price indexes
28,29
Receipts, imports, consumpYoungstown District, steel workers'
Wholesale trade:
tion, stocks, etc
30
wages
107
Credit conditions
120
114
Price indexes
28 Woolworth, F. W., & Co., sales
Zinc, prices, production, stocks, etc__ 51
Sales
118, 119, 128 Work clothing, cut, shipments, returned stocks
31
Wisconsin, employment and earn107
ings
106, 100 Workers, registered




OF TfljE DE!»AETMENT OF COMMERCE
'*-* *$\JB&cetf& pubM^ationg 'oi the^6epartnienti of Commerce having the most direct interest to Dreaders of the SUEVEY of CTIBRENT
;ll£T|8i#B$&^efe
may be obtained by addressing the Division of Publie&^ns^ Department of Com*
1
ineorce^tWai^iington.A *Copiespf ifoe^pubft cations m^y be purdhasedtrom the Superintendent of Documents, t^overnment Printing t
• r 'I '/-\jsc-i MrtT— _/u!;.:.LJb^r*» ^A.a.i~v ~—i jriLf-,'/i--,ji'~ J' " TJP; ~^ ^_:^1 i~ «^^«,-t-r^*»^^» x*i— «i..i_i;^.I.j.«
.
no. price is mentioned, the publications are _ii..x_^»'tl_il_ JT fjr
distributed'free. '.. i
V'v..,- . • : * - ^. --^!^SW^^^A^ .r""'V ~l
t^'?^'^^
^ecMve, December 81,' 1926.
l-y-A'^ .,-;_fcAA£i'.. «_fi.-i: ^-xt^^.^^^^^p^^^
trli^F^S ,6$g€birr -fftese ^© ^ie regulations promulgated by( the
t]fre^turementf in'operai^lon,
of Alaska.
s

Itatber; Opp^unities for Use
Constructing Small Houses and

v_ *, jr'_ _l'"_a.__'JOLS^l- f j—.ii.'-^—i^L^iJ. __ ^«

p^

'

bf wttoni world's_i?proid^ibtion, eont- . - \,
«r -* '» - 4
' .£•««.%' - */h ," .'•"*•. .
l

&fl7tUBft'-Jitf-1ttK
*»f*-iy* f^'r"..»t ~&t. f<ei^.£**

>

t Delates ^:|^TOer$(t%i''pen
.
N
-' ^fto.ws 4$&i&& ^Mitiolng , in the
'

,- Beview of LiCeratitte Delating to .Criacal Constants;. of
Various jGases, by S. F. Pickering. - Bcientific Paper No. 5^1.
(I'rom Scientife Papers^ vol. 21, pp. ^07-629.)' Price, 15$.
/ / High Silicon Sfcuctttrai Steel, by H. W.,ainett. Technqlogic
"Po'-r^oiV *tW"A
'S'Q'I ^ '-/TJWvrri ^cjinc^pgie Pabers, vol. 21, pp.,
Paper Jf6lf ^3lV 'J<From " T £krt>«-»-./ il^/»4/* "0o-*-\£vt«s '. -wWl Ol »>*^
121-1,43, 10 illustrations.) In fljis papei;'are described tnevtests
ma'<ie at; thelbuVeaii with steel made % a new {German proee'ss^
x
-Price lS^.*- v J " "" "v / > ' *
" ^ ?> -^
^ '/ * ' ;
ssioti of Sound TK^ottkli Voi<ie /Tubes, by E. 4.
.
, V.;L. OhriBlerj P.. P.. QiXaylejr M, J. Evans, with,, note
. .
jr , .
,
on Absorption ^f Bound in plgid Pipes^ b^y Edgar BueMngh$ra.
'Tjechpologie, Paper No, ^S3. (Fronn T^dhnqlogip Papers, vol^
illt^trations,
21, j>p. 163-193,^14 illttrations, l^plate.) >^i^ ,,pdp«r \^ye$
>p."
pie restilts of investigations c^-the'tran^mlssion( of sound through
r
voice tub^ofvthe kin^l used qn board sMps, .^ Price, 150. ;
Uilited St^te^ Goreriimerit Master ; Spec?ficadons.— -The$e >
, sp^cMcations for tiie; piircliase bf .material for tke ttae of Government departments ate issued as circulars of the: Bureau of
Standards., Those' listed ijel6w( by ^circular number may <b,e
'
" ' - " ' "''"- ' ~ -* ' ' ' •r 1

s

v

\f ecimical ^[ews Bulletin, to^auy, ^?19^7; f S pages.
monthly pufelieation <K>ntains item$, d^s4cM{>j[ng the laboratory \
.activities of the biirjs^u and a>Mst of publications issued during
^ie preceding mqnjih. Annual ^
,. ..ir_rr
^_^^._ftfte%^4^&^
; >'
on .mineral resoui?ces ^re!Issued in iiolormc b|«e^arate bulletins,
of, wjifoh thefollowfhg have\beeii r(eleased%inc,e^,the:. January^ ^
s^uneement and may be obtained s&t^6^«eaphr,,!
, /
"' ,(Pt 1
Oold^"S&^r, ^Copper,~Lje&i, aiid Ztod io ,Ne^ S^xiei,atod* l5exas in 1921 J

of 'oilier, agencies for
^^ ____

, ,1 fcaa
au^j^ and f&rm= , prQpt|fctyt
^

Mineral ge^our^es of the United Sia4^, ;1925. The follow- ^
mg reports have been release^(since the1 January announcement.
and may. be obtained yat the pride indicated;",
, '
~ ~ tterlials ki'1,925. (Pt.*'H* pt>.4TJfi79.) Price, 5«i.1
.
- - - - - 726. v (Pt, II, p||i I09fll60v ^Price, 6^. ,
, ^y. i^/~14X.y Price, 6#. ,' v
,
,
r in 8outh D^:ot& ai^df Wyoming in 1925. (Ft. I,
, Q^ld, Silver,
f
"

k 165-170.)^ Price, ^

,
>/
.,

'

,
and Salts in 1925; ) (Ft;4ppa4^156.)

irts,bi
itr%^ 1925, ,wi^n the
~]P^tgr X a^d JQL Pari^ '! ^contains
and* i£*ports ,by

Mica in 1§2^., <Pf»

, 181-193.) .Pricfe. 5^.'

(Pt, II,
S^lfc, Bromifte,4 and jG^Jdnni Chlgri
Talc and Soapstone ina«. (Pt/II, pp. ^

^ .IP^rf. il Jsdistaito ^ums^aries, of
, J[a^?a^"a^d IPor^o Bicq.

IB India 7a

for
s^fyiiig ^Ipmentg
lj^^, s, /
6e!oin
J. W,

^ Organic Consent of Lake Waier^ by ISdward A; Bir^o and ;
Qhince^ Juday. Document No, 1010., (From Bulletin of
tfre> Bureau of ^ Fisheries, vol. iii, 19^6, pp. ,185-20^!) A
bibliography is ijicluxied.' Price, 10^. ' s;," " ,.
^
* * s of Tw® TSew Species of JFislres front Key We^t, i
,j*la.» with nptes-on nine othor species collected in samojlocality, ^ «
by Saniuel F- Hildebrand and, .Isaac Ginsbufg.'. Document
Ko. H>13. (From .Bulletin of the Bureau,of ^heries, vo}.
xh% X920} pp; ^67-215, 1 illustration, 2 plates.) Price, 10f
,

BUK6ATJ OF N^VIOATION
d tbe «iare ol
^,
^\-^>ttw*^ •r^^.w .1.—.rf»y» -•
Farmltr^
, ^.r^
^7
«• •
>

>




American- Boeomeftted Seagofng %^I^| of 1^0 Crro^sfons ,
and Ovfer, Jajiitsiry^'lO^,, ii+6S p^ges£ Published monthly.
Bingl^ copies, 10$; annual subscription,; 7S^.- ' , ,
T
Radio Service Btaietin, December*;i'92S»l SGjtfages, Published monthly in the^interest ofvradio; ^rvice.tf Contain^, lista^ ^
of radio' Stations, a; chronology o| imp6rtaint fevents lns 'Yadi^
J
--^-1 -^—--^^ andta fist of preferences tov<?uirenjb radio Htemifcmr0.

s^RVicje
f
L* I -, *
•{
' ' ^J - ' \ * < ' - ' ' ' " ' '
^^^•^^^^(W^v

r

io N
to navigatioti
United Slate^ W fy& Mfssisajf)pi Jti|rei;
of ^he Missouri Bivcar and oil the Red Biver.




WECKLY
ADVANCE
REPRINTS