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Subject Index of Volumes 52—
71
Monthly Labor Review
January 1941 to December 1 9 5 0




Bulletin No. 1080
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague. Commissioner




Subject Index of Volumes 52—
71
Monthly Labor Review
January 1941 to December 1950

Bulletin No. 1080
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 25, D. C.




Price $1.00




L e t t e r of T r a n s mi t t a l

U nited States D epartment
B ureau

of

of

L abor,

L abor Statistics ,

W ashington , D. C., January 21,1953.

T he Secretary

of

L abor :

I have the honor to transmit herewith the Subject Index o f Volumes 52
to 71, Monthly Labor Review, January 1941 to December 1950. This
volume is based on the 6-months indexes which were prepared in large
part by Jeannette M. Watson and Mary G. Macomber o f the Office of
Publications. Elizabeth L. Black, assistant editor o f the Monthly Labor
Review, had final responsibility for the content and form of this 10-year
index.
Previous bulletins in this series are No. 695 for volumes 1-11 (July
1915 to December 1920) and No. 696 for volumes 12-51 (January 1921
to December 1940).
E w an Cl ague, Com m issioner.

Hon. M artin P. D u rk in ,




Secretary o f Labor.




Subject Index of Volumes 52—
71
Monthly Labor Review
January 1941 to December 1950

Absenteeism, United States:
Airframe, engine, and propeller plants, January
1943 to August 1944, by month. 19 U — Sept. 480,
U
Nov. 926-927.
Clay construction products industry, days lost due
to industrial injuries, 1948 (table). 1950— Mar.
272.
Control. Methods suggested, based on experience
in airframe plants (B LS study, 1943). 19 U —
S
July 9-16.
Guaranteed employment and wage plans in collec­
tive bargaining agreements, effect upon. 1950—
Jan. 29.
Long working hours, contributing factor to. 19U —
U
June 1131-1144, Oct. 739; 19U7— July 7-8, 10.
Manufacturing. Absences per 1,000 workers and
distribution of explained absence, by reason for,
by sex of absentee, and by quarter, 1947. 19U —
S
Mar. 266-267, Sept. 236-237.
-------Average days per worker and distribution of
explained absenteeism by reason, by sex of ab­
sentee, and by quarter, 1947. 19U — Mar. 267,
S
Sept. 237-238.
------- Distribution of absences ascribed to nonin­
dustrial illness or accident, by length of absence,
by sex of absentee, and by quarter, 1947. 19U —
S
Mar. 267, Sept. 238-239.
-------Extent and causes, under peacetime operating
conditions, year 1947. Joint survey by Social
Security Administration, U. S. Public Health
Service, and BLS. 19U — Mar. 265-267, Sept.
S
235-239.
-------Older workers. Rates, by age groups and sex.
19 U — July 16-17.
S
Metalworking companies (3 ). Study by Harvard
School of Business Administration reviewed.
19UU— Feb. 312-314.
Older workers. BLS study of rates, 17,800 workers
in 109 manufacturing plants, showing compari­
sons with younger workers. 19U — July 16-19.
S
Shipbuilding. Unannounced quits, effect upon in­
dustry, January 1943. 19U — June 1047-1048.
S
Shipyards, commercial. 1942. Extent, causes, and
methods of reducing. 19US— Feb. 211-222.
------- 1918. Percentage of, by district, and kind of
construction. 19U — Feb. 213-214.
S
Shipyards, private. Rates by month, April 1942 to
January 1944; by region and month, JanuaryDecember 1943; annual rates by size of yard,
1943. 19U — May 956, June 1186-1187.
U
W ar production. Characteristics of absenteeism,
extent, causes, and methods of control. 19U —
S
Jan. 1-9.
Absenteeism, foreign countries:
Australia. Measures to reduce, including regula­
tion (1942) forbidding, except for specified
causes. 19U — Jan. 31.
S




------- Proportion of time lost and average length
of absence, by sex, in 26 factories, 1942; distri­
bution of cases by cause. 19U — Apr. 740-742.
U
Canada. W ar industries. Survey by Canadian De­
partment of Munitions and supply, findings.
19US— Apr. 683-686.
Chile. Rates in manufacturing, commerce, and
agriculture, 1943, with causes. 19UU— Aug. 294295.
France. Postwar high level and reasons for. 19U —
S
July 44-45.
Great Britain. Coal-mining industry. Extent of
and probable causes; methods of dealing with.
19U1— Nov. 1164; 19U2— Nov. 944-945.
------- ------- Percentage over-all, 1936-49. 1950—
Jan. 22.
--------------- Rates, 1948, all workers and workers at
coal face. 19U9— Mar. 282.
------- Engineering factories (13 light or medium).
Absenteeism and neurosis among, 1942-44, and
reasons for. Study of over 30,000 workers, by
Industrial Health Research Board. 19US— April
403-404.
------- Extent, causes and prevention, and relation
to long hours and fatigue. 19U — July 26-27.
S
------- Factories. Study by Industrial Health Re­
search Board. Summary of findings (1943 re­
port). 19U — July 85-86.
U
------- Munitions industry. Methods of dealing with.
19 Ul— Nov. 1164.
------- Ordnance plants (2 ), women workers. Find­
ings of study by Industrial Health Research
Board, 1942. 19U — Dec. 1179.
S
-------Women workers, second half of 1942, absences
due to sickness. 19U — Sept. 481-482.
S
New Zealand. Industrial Manpower Emergency
Regulations effective Feb. 14, 1944. Provisions
concerning. 19UU— June 1202-1203.
------- Inquiry, 1942, into extent and apparent
causes. Summary of findings. 19U — June 1195.
U
------- Reasons given for certain cases (year ended
Mar. 31, 1943). 19U
S— Oct. 722.
Accident and health insurance:
Scientists, industrial research, 1949. 1950— Apr. 372.
See also Health (or sickness) insurance.
Accident and sickness benefits. United States Steel
Corp., by agreements, 1949. 1950— Oct. 474.
Accident benefits (nonoccupational), Canada. Manufac­
turing-plants employees. Plans providing for. Sum­
mary. 19 U5— June 1244.
Accident compensation or insurance. See Workmen’s
compensation.
Accident prevention, general, United States ( see also
S a fety ):
Efficacy of, in avoiding disproportionate increase
in injuries when long hours are worked. 19U —
U
Oct. 739.

l

2

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Accident prevention, general, U. S.— Continued
Hazards, industrial. By size of plant, 1941 (Kossoris). 1943— Apr. 647-651.
------- Fact-finding activities of Bureau of Labor
Statistics concerning. 1945— May 944-945.
Hazardous occupations Prohibition of employment
of young workers in (Fair Labor Standards Act
of 1938). 1941— Aug. 396-397.
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions, proceedings of annual
meeting, 1941. 1941— Dec. 1456.
Safety and health unit in Department of Labor
recommended by 1941 convention of Interna­
tional Association of Governmental Labor Offi­
cials. 1941— Dec. 1454-1455.
Accident prevention, by industry, United States:
Brewing industry. Unsafe working conditions and
unsafe acts summarized, with description of
preventive measures needed. 1945— July 72-81.
Foundry industry. 1942 injuries. Causes and unsafe
conditions analyzed. 1944— Dec. 1173-1179.
Longshore industry. Unsafe conditions and actions
causing injuries (1942 BLS survey). 1944— Jan.
1-7.
Lumber industry. Woodworking hazards and pre­
ventive methods. 1942— Nov. 962-965.
Lumber mills and logging. Causes and prevention
of accidents in 1940 (Kossoris and McElroy).
1941— Dec. 1465-1485.
Lumber products. Causes of injuries, 1940, and
preventive measures which should have been
used. 1941— Oct. 957-959.
------- Finished. Measures which could have pre­
vented injuries sustained in 1941. 1942— Nov.
973-977.
Metalworking plant. Conditions in 1942 and 1943
studied. 1944— June 1138.
Pulp wood logging. Unsafe conditions and acts;
effect on accident rates. 1947— Aug. 176-180.
Shipyards. Basic factors of hazards and program
for overcoming. 1944— July 13-23.
-------Cranes, injuries in use of. Causes and preven­
tive methods that could have been used. 1944—
Mar. 531-533.
------- Disabling injuries, 1943, by causes and nature
of injury. 1944— May 1007-1008.
------- Eyes, injuries to. Causes and suggested pre­
ventive methods. 1943— Dec. 1151-1154.
------- ------- Protective measures described. 1944—
Jan. 93.
------- Falls, first 4 months of 1943. Unsafe condi­
tions and practices causing. 1943— Oct. 766-772.
-------Faulty handling of materials and equipment,
measures recommended to avoid injuries from ;
description of unsafe acts. 1944— Sept. 533-536.
------- Navy and Maritime Commission, safety pro­
gram, 1943. Experience first quarter of year and
causes of injuries. 1943— July 5-8.
-------Unsafe conditions in connection with injuries
in 1941. 1942— Oct. 692-696.
Slaughtering and meat-packing industry. Injuries
in 1943, summary of causes. 1945— Dec. 11531168.
Accident prevention, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Factories. Proneness to accidents as
characteristic of certain workers. 1942— Dec.
1199-1202.
Uruguay. Spinning mills, regulations established
by decree of Jan. 9, 1942. 1942— Apr. 993-994.
Accident statistics, general, United States:
Analysis of industrial injuries, basic needs for.
Severity and frequency rates, accident-cause
analysis, and development of data. 1950— Mar.
267-270.




BLS Program for reporting, fiscal year 1947—
48.
1947— Oct. 413.
Compilation, BLS. Categories, standardization of
methods, and definition and measurements of
work injuries. 1950— Mar. 303-304.
------- Limitations of series, sources and methods
of surveys, and computation procedures. 1950—
Mar. 304-307.
Disabling injuries.
Estimates,
1943-49
(pre­
liminary, by industry group); summary. 1944—
Feb. 242-243; 1946— Mar. 411-412; 1948— Mar.
301-302; 1949—-Mar. 289-290; 1950— Mar. 265267.
------- Frequency rates, by type and severity, and
distribution by industry groups, 1940-50. 1941—
Aug. 327-354; 1942— Sept. 501-527; 1943— Nov.
865-868; 1944— Nov. 905-908; 1945— Mar. 549551; 1947— Mar. 469-471; 1948— Oct. 361-363;
1949— Oct. 385-390; 1950— Oct. 478-484.
------- Minors, frequency distribution, compared to
that of adults. 1948— Dec. 595.
-------Severity (estimated), 1940-46. 1947— Oct. 442.
Employment and hours worked. 1941. Increases in,
as related to increases in number of disabling
injuries. 1941— Aug. 340-342; 1942— Sept. 512516.
Forstmann Woolen Co., Passaic, N. J. (under
union-management cooperation). Accident-fre­
quency rate, 1943-47. 1946— Apr. 430.
Frequency rate, by size of plant, 1941. 1943— Apr.
657-661.
Industrial injuries. See Disabling injuries, this

section.
Injury incidence rate, effect of long hours on.
1947— July 8.
New York State. Minors. Compensated injuries to,
by age group, sex, and kind of disability, 1942.
1943— Nov. 943-944.
Nonmanufacturing, 1948-49. 1950— Oct. 478, 480484.
Peak hours, California industrial injuries. JulyAugust 1948. 1949— Aug. 136-137.
Older workers. Injury-frequency rates, disabling
and nondisabling injuries, by age group; average
days disability, average number redressings per
injury. 1948— July 17-18.
Safety, greater emphasis on, shown by 1948 workinjury record. 1949— Feb. 178.
Women workers. Findings of inquiry by BLS, in­
cluding comparison with record of men workers.
1945— Feb. 311-315.
-------Michigan. Number of closed cases, by occupa­
tion, first half of 1944. 1944— Dec. 1235-1236.
------- Shipyards, summary 1943-44. 1945— Mar.
551-560.
Accident statistics, by industry, United States:
Brewery industry. Frequency rates in 1944; com­
parisons by department, by region, and by size of
plant. 1945— Aug. 264-272.
Coal mining. See Mining, coal, this section.
Clay construction products industry. Work in­
juries, estimate of costs and comparisons by kind
of product, by regional and State differences, by
size of plant, and by department, 1948. 1950—
Mar. 270-275.
Construction. Injury rates (16,321 companies)
1948, by occupation and extent of disability.
1950— Apr. 387-389.
Crewman on inland waterways and harbor waters.
Injury rates, by occupation, and by type of
vessel, 1946. 1950— Dec. 676-680.
Fertilizer industry. Injury-frequency rates, com­
pared with all chemical manufacturing and all
manufacturing, prewar years 1938 and 1939, and
year 1946. 1948— Dec. 606.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Work injuries; time, wage, and other losses,
causes of accidents; 1946. 1948— Dec. 606-611.
Foundry industry. Frequency rates, by year, 193943, compared with those of all manufacturing;
results of detailed study concerning injuries in
1942. 1944— Dec. 1170-1173.
Gas industry. 1944 experience, summary (Dunston). 19^6— Jan. 82-84.
Iron and steel industry. Frequency and severity
rates, by department; relation of employment,
exposure, and injury occurrence; disability dis­
tribution by departments, 1939 and 1940. 1941—
Sept. 681-689; 1942— Dec. 1192-1199.
------- 1940 and 1941 surveys, BLS. Summary; scope
and method. 1941— Sept. 679-681; 1942— Dec.
1191-1192.
------- Select group of plants having positive safety
programs, frequency rates, specified years 1913
to 1930, 1935-40. 1941— Sept. 689-690.
------- Shift hour of occurrence, 1,273 injuries, by
departments, 1940. 1941— Sept. 691-692.
Longshore industry. 1942 record, summary (BLS
survey). 1944— Jan. 1-7.
Lumber manufacture. Logging, sawmills, and plan­
ing mills. Injury rates, by type of accident, and
experience, by geographic area, 1940. 1942—
Dec. 1467-1485.
Lumber products. By type of injury, branch of
industry, causes, and severity, 1940 and 1941.
1941— Oct. 945-956; 1942— Nov. 960-973.
Manufacturing. Disabling injuries. See Accident
statistics, general— Disabling injuries.
------- Injury-frequency rates. Industries showing
principal changes in, first and second quarters,
1950, and first 6 months of 1949 and 1950; per­
cent change in, 1943-50. 1950— Nov. 567-568.
------- Injury-frequency rates, by industry. By
month, January 1943-September 1944. 1948—
June 1161-1163, July 114-116, Aug. 287-289,
Sept. 521-523, Oct. 773-774, Nov. 938-940, Dec.
1154-1156; 1944— 3 an. 94-96, Feb. 323-325, Mar.
533-535, Apr. 763-765, June 1204-1206, July 9 5 97, Aug. 306-308, Sept. 537-539, Nov. 978-981,
Dec. 1180-1182; 1945-^ Jan. 96-98, Feb. 315-317.
---------------- By quarter and by month, last quarter
1944-second quarter 1950; cumulative and an­
nual rates, 1943-50. 1945— Apr. 805-808, July
87-90, Oct. 744-747; 1946— Feb. 237-240, Apr.
597; 1946 — Feb. 237-240, Apr. 597, July
68-71, Sept. 393-396; 1947— 3 an. 74-77, May 830833, July 67-70, Nov. 559-561; 1948— March 302304, May 509-512, Aug. 135-137, Nov. 505-508;
1949— Feb. 200-203, May 526-528, Aug. 133-135,
Nov. 510-513; 1950— Feb. 142-145, May 514517, Aug. 203-206, Nov. 567-571.
---------------- Lowest levels in December, years 194347. 1948— May 509.
---------------- Relation to numbers employed, 1936-41,
by industry and year. 1948— May 949-954.
------- W ar production, January 1943, frequency
rates compared with 1943 rates. 1948— May 846848.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing. Estimates,
by severity and industry group; frequency
rates, in specified industries; 1945-47. 1946—
Sept. 390-393; 1947— Oct. 442-446; 1948— Oct.
361-365.
------- See also Accident statistics, general— Dis­
abling injuries.
Manufacturing, nonmanufacturing, and mining.
Injury-frequency and severity rates and injuries,
by extent of disability, 1949 (table). 1950— Oct.
483.
Maritime, 1938. 1946— June 851.




Metalworking plant. Disabling injuries, October
1943. 1944— June 1138.
Mineral industries. Preliminary reports, 1940, sum­
marized. 1941— Oct. 960.
Mining, coal. Injury-frequency rates, by fatality
and industry branch, 1933-49 (table). 1950—
Sept. 347.
------- 1943 and earlier years, as reported by United
Mine Workers (1944 convention). 1944— Dec.
1196.
Mining industries. Injury frequency and severity,
1948-49. 1950— Oct. 481-484.
Molding occupations. Injury frequency, in foun­
dries and in iron and steel industries, 1942.
1946— Apr. 584.
Paper and pulp industry. Industrial injury rates
for 534 mills, classified by product and extent of
disability and by department and extent of dis­
ability, 1949 (tables). 1950— Sept. 340-341.
Plastics products industry. Disabling injuries,
1946, compared with rate for all manufacturing;
nature of hazards. 1947— Sept. 296-297.
Prisons, Federal. Injuries during employment, 1943
record summarized. 1944— Oct. 764-765.
Pulpwood logging, northeastern, Great Lakes, and
southern areas. Frequency rates, 1944, compared
with rates for general logging and manufactur­
ing. 1947— Aug. 175-176.
Shipyards. Cranes, injuries through use of, first
7 months of 1943, and distribution by causes.
1944— Mar. 531-533.
------- Disabling injuries, 1943, by types, by unsafe
conditions and acts causing, and by agencies
causing. 1944— July 16-23.
------- Eye injuries. Nature and sources, first 5
months of 1943. 1948— Dec. 1151-1154.
-------Falls, causes and prevention of injuries from,
first 4 months of 1943. 1948— Oct. 766—
772.
------- Fatal injuries, 1943 and 1944, by occupation
of worker, kind of accident, and cause. 1945—
July 75-87.
-------Faulty handling of materials and equipment,
injuries involving, number by unsafe act or
agency, nature, and part of body affected. 1944—
Sept. 533-537.
-------Frequency, kinds, and causes of injuries, 1941
(McElroy and McCormick). 1942— Oct. 680-696.
------- Frequency rates, first quarter 1943, and
causes. 1948— 3 uly 6-8.
------- Frequency rates, 1943, by type of vessel con­
struction, type of contract, and area, and by
month; disabling injuries, 1943, by kind; sum­
mary of causes. 1944— May 1004—
1008; 1945—
May 1018-1022.
------- Minor injuries, East Coast, Oct. 1, 1942, to
Sept. 30, 1943. Summary, including data on time
lost, departmental differences, nature of injuries,
duration of temporary total disabilities, seasonal
variations, repeat injuries, and infections. 1944—
Aug. 251-263.
------- Women workers. Frequency rates as related
to work department, cause, accident type, nature
of injury, body parts injured, shift differences,
1943-44. 1945— Mar. 551-560.
Slaughtering and meat-packing industry, 1943, by
region, department of industry, size and type of
plant, nature of injury, and causes. 1945— Nov.
955-971, Dec. 1153-1168.
Textile dyeing and finishing. Injury-frequency
rates, 1945; estimated losses; accident causes;
“ unsafe act” defined. 1948— July 20-25.
Work injuries and accident causes, 1946; time,
wage, and other losses. 1948— Nov. 505-506.

4

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Accident statistics, foreign countries:
Canada. Fatal industrial injuries, 1939 and 1940,
by industry. 1941— Aug. 444.
Chile. Officially registered injuries, extent of dis­
ability, 1932-44. 1946— June 914.
Great Britain. Civilians’ injuries, due to war. Com­
pensation for. Sex discrimination eliminated by
Government, April 1943. 1946— May 908-910.
------- Factories. Fatal and nonfatal injuries, 1938
and 1939. 1941— May 1212-1213.
---------------- Increase in 1940, and conditions as to
ventilation, air raid shelters, hours, and health.
1942— Jan. 134-139.
----------------1941 and 1942, by sex, summary. 1946—
Jan. 76-77; 1944— Jan. 97.
------- Fatal and nonfatal, 1946, with major causes.
1948—-May 532-533.
------- Industrial experience, 1943, and fatal and
nonfatal accidents, 1938-43. 1946— Sept. 478-479.
------- Proneness to accidents, as characteristic of
some workers. Research in British factories.
1942— Dec. 1199-1202.
------- Women workers. Frequency increase resulting
from excessive overtime. 1941— June 1346.
Accounting. Last-In-First-Out (L IF O ) method; retail
price indexes used in, designed by BLS in coopera­
tion with Bureau of Internal Revenue and American
Retail Federation. 1948— Jan. 58.
Aeronautics. See Air transport.
Affiliated Schools for Workers. Name changed in 1940
to American Labor Education Service. 1945— Aug.
314.
A ge certificates. See Child Labor— Minors, 14-17 years
of age.
Age classification of employees. See Age distribution.
Age problems in employment. See Older workers.
Age distribution:
Cotton-textile workers, New England. By age as of
June 1945 and age of entrance into labor market.
1946— July 8—
10.
Federal employees, as of Dec. 31, 1938. 1941—
Jan. 70-72.
Population of United States, 1940 census, by
sex, race, and urbanization, and comparison with
1930 figures. 1942— Aug. 264-267.
Puerto Rico. Members of wage-earner families,
1941. 1946— Feb. 225.
Wartime, extra workers added, by sex and class
of population. 1944— Aug. 270-278.
Aged persons, assistance to. See Old-age assistance.
Agreements. See Collective agreements.
Agricultural-machinery industry:
Characteristics; and plan of BLS survey, February-March 1942. 1942— May 1177-1180.
Union agreements. Provisions summarized, 1943.
1944—Jan. 77-91.
Agriculture, United States:
Apprenticeship training for, under Michigan State
Plan. 1942— Jan. 70-72.
Changes, 1900-50. 1950— July 6, 13.
Child labor. State employment or age certificates
for minors, 1950. Issuance and purpose. 1950—
Aug. 241.
------- State legislation, 1947, changing provisions
concerning, Connecticut, New York, and Hawaii.
1947— Sept. 278.
Cooperative societies. See Cooperatives.
Cooperatives; resolution on, passed by Congress of
Industrial Cooperative Alliance (Prague). 1948—
Dec. 600.
Costs of farm operation, 1910-14, 1939, and 1943,
indexes. 1944— Jan. 19-20.
Employment. Statistics, 1948, compared with 1945
and 1940. Movement of population into urban
centers. 1949— Feb. 172.




------- Trends, 1910-47. 1947— Dec. 649-653.
Fair Labor Standards Act, Exemptions from labor
provisions for “ area of production” of agri­
cultural, horticultural, and dairy commodities
broadened. 1941— May 1253-1254.
Farm employment. Changes in number and in kind
of workers during World W ar II. 1945— Sept.
442-451.
Farm labor. Alien workers from other American
nations, to be admitted (when qualified) under
terms of joint resolution of Apr. 29, 1943. 1946—
July 124-125.
------- Employment status, January 1946; wages
earned (cash and perquisites), 1945. 1947— Feb.
225-231.
------- Hired. Value of and kind of perquisite fur­
nished to, by region, 1945. 1947— Aug. 193.
------- Major source of industrial labor supply, 1950.
1950—-July 15.
------- Statistics. New types of survey inaugurated
1945 by Bureau of Agricultural Economics to
include time worked, making wage data com­
parisons possible. 1947— Feb. 231-233.
------- Trends in, wartime and postwar. 1947— Aug.
139-147.
-------World W ar II period. Changes in composition
of labor force and number of workers; public
policies concerning. 1944— Jan. 21-24.
Farm operators, nonwhite. By States and by status
of ownership or tenancy, 1940. 194t — Aug. 399401.
Farm prices, increases from August 1939 to Sep­
tember 1941. 1941— Nov. 1081-1085.
Farmer’s cooperatives. See Cooperatives.
Income. See Wages and income, this section .
Labor unionism in. Summary of conditions (Jamie­
son). 1946— Jan. 25-36.
Manpower and wages, in wartime (Bowden).
1942— Dec. 1111-1124.
Mechanization. See Mechanizations— Agriculture.
Migratory workers. Arizona and California. Asso­
ciation for medical care established by F S A and
California State agencies; statistics of operation
July 1939 to June 1940. 1942— Nov. 957-959.
-------California, 1935-40. Sections of origin, routes,
and State borders crossed (Janow and Gilmartin). 1941— July 18-34.
-------Child labor, New York. Recommendations by
conferences of consumers’ league and other State
agencies. 1945— Aug. 237.
------- Labor contractor system (Calif, and other
States), methods and results. 1941— Feb. 34 5 348.
-------New Jersey program, under new statutes for
betterment of conditions. 1945— Aug. 236-237.
Negro families. Aid to, under rehabilitation pro­
gram of Farm Security Administration. 1941—
Feb. 348-349.
Northwest region. Value of crops and livestock
sold, traded, and consumed on farm, 1939. 1947—
Apr. 640.
Perquisites. Kind and value of, by region, fur­
nished to hired farm workers, 1945. 1947— Aug.
193.
Perquisites as component of wages. Declining rela­
tive importance of. 1946— July 38, 43-44.
Potato and strawberry crops (Atlantic coast).
Migration of workers. 1941— Aug. 406-408.
Potato workers, migrant (N . J.). Characteristics
and economic conditions, labor-contract system,
and proposals for improvement. 1941— Aug. 410413.
Prices of products brought under control by amend­
ment Oct. 2, 1942, to Emergency Price Control
Act. I P ^ - M a y 882.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Prisoners of war. Regulations concerning hours of
work in contract employment. 1945-—
July 46.
Production. See Production, U. S.— Agriculture.
Productivity of labor. See Productivity, U. S.—
Agriculture.
Prosperity of, as related to full industrial employ­
ment (summary from annual report of Secretary
of Agriculture, 1944). 1945— May 1000-1003.
Puerto Rico. Sugarcane. Employment, wages, work­
ing conditions, labor and other legislation, and
importance of industry in Island’s economy.
1941— Jan. 105-109.
Regional differences in, 1929-49. 1950— Oct. 434.
Veterans. Return to farm work from V E -d ay to
March 1946. 1946— July 93.
------- Wishing to enter. Government aid, including
land-purchase loans and preference in acquiring
new machinery. 1945— Aug. 262.
Wages and income. Postwar period, problems in.
1946— Aug. 203-204.
------- See also Wages and hours— Agriculture.
Wartime income, manpower, and wages. Changes
1939-43, summary. 1944— Jan. 15-24.
Wartime wages, income, and wage regulation—
Pt. 1, Farm wages and labor cost; Pt. 2, Com­
parative wages and wage regulation. 1946— July
36-44, Aug. 195-204.
Women workers needed for 1944, and plans for
recruiting by various agencies. 1944— June 1248.
Workers, placement of, policies and requirements
concerning, W ar Manpower Commission, state­
ment, June 5, 1944. 1944— July 88-89.
Agriculture, foreign countries:
Argentina (Santa Fe Province). Harvesting and
threshing, minimum rates fixed by legislature,
1941- 42. 1942— Mar. 772-773.
Belgium. Control by Germans, following 1940 in­
vasion. 1944— Feb. 297-298.
Canada. Farm-labor shortage, alleviation of by
various measures, 1943. 1944— Jan. 59-61.
------- Ontario. Women farm-service volunteer work­
ers, 1941, summary of program. 1942— July 8 0 81.
Chile. Development measures authorized by Eco­
nomic Powers Act of Dec. 23, 1943. 1944— Apr.
795.
China. Farm products, production and consump­
tion, and Government measures and plans for
improvement. 1943—-June 1184-1187.
------- Measures to improve conditions, necessity for.
1943— Sept. 493-495.
------- Wartime conditions and governmental policies.
1942— Dec. 1162-1163.
French Indo China. Conditions summarized to
period of World W ar II. 1944— July 47-49, 53.
Germany. Youth policies adopted to retain on the
land. 1942—-Aug. 237.
Great Britain. Scotland. Minimum wages estab­
lished for temporary workers, effective May 12,
1941. 1941— Aug. 480-481.
Greece. Conditions reviewed, to 1928. 1943— Aug.
215-217.
Italy. Tenant’s share in crop and tenure of lease.
Decrees of 1944 and 1945 regulating. Disputes in
summer of 1945. 1945— Nov. 923-924.
Peru. Tenant farmers. Labor contract with high­
land farm proprietor. Provisions. 1945— Aug. 273.
Poland. Situation prior to World W ar II and
changes under German control. 1944— July 6 4 -

.

66

South Africa. Farming reconstruction and affores­
tation plan. Summary of features. 1945— June
1218-1219.
Turkey. Land for distribution to farmers. Law of
June 11, 1945, provisions. 1945— Oct. 759-761.




5

World. Output, mid-1948, compared with previous
levels; outlook for crop year 1948-49. 1948—
Nov. 468, 469.
A ir transport, United States:
Airlines. Characteristics of operation and scope
of BLS employment study. 1945— Apr. 739-743.
------- Employment before and during World W ar
II and probable in postwar period. 1945— Apr.
739-755.
Aircraft industry. Absenteeism. Methods to control,
based on BLS study of experience in 34 major
plants. 1943— July 9-16.
------- California. Nature and scope of, November
1942 BLS survey. 1943— Apr. 758-760.
-------Characteristics; scope and method of, Novem­
ber 1942 BLS survey; and characteristics of
labor force. 1943— June 1054-1058.
-------Contracts, U. S. Government. Minimum-wage
determination effective Nov. 18, 1941. 1942—
Jan. 217.
------- Downgrading, collective agreement covering.
1945— July 51.
------- Downgrading (6 companies, southern Cali­
fornia), voluntary agreement approved (effec­
tive Apr. 11, 1943) by National W ar Labor
Board. Provisions. 1945— July 51.
-------Engine-manufacturing plants. Characteristics
of industry and scope of BLS survey, May 1942
and 1943. 1942— Dec. 1230-1231; 1944— Mar.
579-581.
------- Expansion to meet war demands. Govern­
ment aid, location, floor-space extension, labor
requirements, potential additions to program,
jobs, and labor needs. 1941— Feb. 327-331.
------- Labor requirements, estimates of, for 1941.
1941— May 1135.
------- Los Angeles, employees hired during June
1942. Distribution by occupation, industries for­
merly employing, age, race, and marital status.
1942— Nov. 926-931.
------- Overtime provisions in collective agreements.
1941— Apr. 842.
------- Pacific Coast. Collective bargaining, history
of. 1947— Apr. 667-669.
------- Separate classifications (“ Standard B LS”
and “ Total industry” ) explained. 1945— May
1106-1108.
------- Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and
renewal of contract. Summary of provisions in
collective agreements. 1941— Mar. 548-550.
------- Wartime development of. Employment vol­
ume and distribution, labor turn-over, absentee­
ism, hours, earnings, production, and productiv­
ity. 1944— Nov. 909-931.
Aircraft-propeller industry.
Development and
scope of survey by BLS in 1942. 1943— Apr.
748-751.
Aircraft workers, wartime, southern California.
Employment status in postwar period, and char­
acter of activities entered. 1946— Nov. 706-711.
Airframe industry. California. Nature; history of
wage-rate standardization and discussion of
problems involved (Solomon and Tolies). 1942—
Mar. 559-572.
----------------Wartime expansion. Numbers employed
compared with total in other States, January
1940 to August 1945. 1945— Oct. 721-727.
------- Collective bargaining in. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 340-356.
------- Eastern States. Characteristics and scope of
BLS report 1941-42 (Solomon and Tolies).
1942— July 15-18.
------- Michigan and Buffalo area. Characteristics
and scope of BLS May 1942 study (Solomon
and Tolies). 1942— Aug. 289-291.

6

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

A ir transport, U. S.— Continued
Airframe industry. Midcontinent. Characteristics
of industry and scope of BLS wage study, June
1942 (Solomon and Tolies). 1942— Oct. 772-774.
------- Productivity of labor. Wartime changes, in­
dexes, January 1942 to May 1945; factors
affecting; and outlook for industry. 1945— Aug.
215-225.
------- Skilled workers, percent of total workers in
two skill classes. 1941— Feb. 331.
------- Wage rates and related wage practices, M ayJune 1949. 1950— Jan. 30-33.
Postwar employment outlook in aviation occupa­
tions. 1945— Apr. 739-755, June 1186-1204.
Railway Labor Act provisions made effective,
1936. 1938— Mar. 702.
Working conditions, report of Federal Coordinator
of Transportation. 1936— Sept. 678-684.
Workmen's compensation not applicable to em­
ployees in actual flying (decision of Wash. State
Sup. Ct.). 1939— Nov. 1140.
A ir transport, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Aircraft industry. Problems. Select
Committee on National Expenditure, findings of
study by, recommendations. 1941— Oct. 900-902.
Hawaii. Growth of and effects on economy of
Island. 1948— May 489.
Aircraft industry. See Air transport.
Airframe industry. See Air transport.
Air-raid protection. Company policies as to compen­
sation for employees' time lost. 1942— Sept. 476-477.
Alcoholic beverages:
Expenditures for, by net income group and race,
1947, Washington, D. C., Richmond, Va., and
Manchester, N. H. 1949—June 622-627.
Chile. Prohibition of manufacture, transportation,
sale, or consumption, in certain mining areas,
collective agreement signed May 1941. 1941—
July 221-222.
Aliens, United States (see also Foreign workers):
Admissions and departures. See Immigration and
emigration.
Age distribution, by country of citizenship, as of
Mar. 1, 1944. 1 9 4 4 - Ju ly 34-35.
Characteristics of such population and employ­
ment and other problems. 1942— Jan. 73-75.
Deportations from United States, by cause and by
year, 1935-40. 1941— Mar. 665.
Employment. Difficulties facing aliens. Summary
of address by associate commissioner of United
States Immigration and Naturalization Service.
1942 Jan. 73—
75.
------- Discrimination in. Policies, summary of, and
President's statement of Jan. 2, 1942. 1942—
Mar. 632-633.
---------------- Prevention of. President's statement of
July 13, 1942 (text). 1942— Sept. 465-466.
------- Plants having confidential Army and Navy
contracts. Routine concerning permits simplified.
1944— July 89.
------- Policies concerning. Dry-goods stores. 1941—
Mar. 586-587.
------- Restrictions against in United States, by
industry; and proportionate employment by
States (15). 1941— July 69-72.
Japanese and United States citizens having Japa­
nese ancestry in relocation centers. Employment
policy concerning. 1944— May 993-994.
Occupational status of, in 1940, by sex, kind of
work, and period of immigration. 1945— Sept.
452-454.
Registration under Alien Registration Act of 1940
to Jan. 10, 1941, by State. 1941— Mar. 667.




Aliens, foreign countries:
Brazil. Enemy-alien employees. Suspension of
ordered by decree law of Sept. 1, 1942. 1942—
Dec. 1155-1156.
Canada. Japanese labor moved from coast areas
to alleviate agricultural needs, 1943. 1944—
J an. 60.
Great Britain. Employment through International
labor branch of Ministry of Labor and National
Service. 1941— Dec. 1399.
Netherlands. Employment. Regulation under law
of May 16, 1934. 1944— Jan. 36.
Paraguay. Legal restrictions on employment of.
1942— Sept. 477.
Allied Control Council. See Employment conditions,
foreign countries— Germany.
Aluminum Co. of America. North-South wage differ­
entials; and shift differential New Kensington (Pa.)
plant; National W ar Labor Board decisions. 1942—
June 1345.
Aluminum-fabrication industry. Union agreements,
summary of provisions in effect in 20 contracts,
1943. 1943— Dec. 1131-1150.
Aluminum industry:
Overtime provisions, collective agreements. 1941—
Apr. 843-844.
Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and re­
newal of contract. Summary of provisions in
collective agreements. 1941— Mar. 550-551.
Aluminum-products
industry.
Employment
trend,
1919-43; scope and geographic distribution; con­
sumption distribution by type of use, 1939 and 1943;
production and consumption, by year, 1913-43;
hours and earnings, specified years, 1935-43; work­
ing conditions; postwar outlook. 1944— Feb. 299-306.
American Brass Co.:
Connecticut plants. Employees granted wage in­
crease by National W ar Labor Board decision.
June 25, 1942. 1942— Sept. 486.
Union-security issue. National W ar Labor Board
order. 1942— Sept. 494.
American Federation of Labor. See Conventions,
meetings, etc.; also Labor organizations.
American Labor Education Service. Activities as of
1945 and description of work during past period.
1945— Aug. 314-316.
American Woolen Co. W age chronology. See Wage
chronologies.
Ammunition loading. Characteristics of industry, war­
time development, labor force, scope and method of
1944 BLS survey. 1945— Apr. 837-843.
Anglo-American Caribbean Commission. Establish­
ment, March 1942, composition and functions. 1942—
Apr. 915-916.
Anglo-American Production Council. See Productivity,
foreign countries— Great Britain.
Annual earnings. See Wages and hours.
Annual leave. See Vacations with pay.
Annual wage, stabilization plans. See Employment,
stabilization of.
Anthracite industry. Pennsylvania area. Report of
Federal Anthracite Commission summarized. 1942—
May 1101-1106.
Apparel industries (see also Clothing industry): ^
Employment in, as affected by war conditions.
1942— Sept. 449-458.
Men's and boys'. Trends, postwar, in style and
construction. 1948— July 37-38.
Minimum-wage order effective Dec. 15, 1941;
coverage of industry. 1942— Jan. 216.
Quality, wartime restrictions, and changes follow­
ing removal. See Clothing— Quality.
Women's and children's. Trends, postwar, in style
and construction. 1948— July 38.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Apprenticeship, United States:
Agricultural (Michigan). Course organized under
State vocational-training plan. 1942— Jan. 70-72.
Building trades. Postwar conditions, summary of.
1947— Jan. 65-66.
Construction. Programs registered and appren­
tices employed, 1948 compared with 1947. 1949—
Feb. 181.
Defense-goods contracts. Inclusion of provision
for training recommended by 1941 convention
of International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials. 1941— Dec. 1455.
Eastern
Seaboard Apprenticeship Conference.
Magnolia, Mass., June 15-17, 1949; resolutions
of conference; section meetings. 1949— Aug.
130-132.
------- Poland Spring, Maine, June 1950. Theme of
conference,
representation, and
discussions.
Summary. 1950— Aug. 213-214.
Manufacturing. Apprentices registered, December
1948, by occupation group. 1949— Aug. 130.
National program. Operations, and recent devel­
opments under, 1937-48. 1949— Aug. 126-130.
Nonmanufacturing. Apprentices registered, De­
cember 1948, by occupation group. 1949— Aug.
130.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Provisions
for training of, in collective agreements, 1946.
1947— Aug. 163.
Programs, increase in, 1948, and apprentices
registered; number of registered programs.
1949— Feb. 176.
Registered apprentices for the United States, by
occupation group, Dec. 31, 1948 (table). 1949—
Aug. 130.
Servicemen and women, in postwar period. Char­
acter of trainees. 1944— Nov. 973.
State legislation. See Legislation, United States,
Federal and general; and by States, fo r specified
State .
Voluntary. Program under State agreements set
up by Utah Act, 1949. 1950— Jan. 46.
West Coast (Calif., Oreg., Wash.) Status of pro­
grams under State laws, end of 1946. 1947—
Apr. 681, 684, 687.
Apprenticeship, foreign countries:
Argentina. Employment of minors permitted
under certain circumstances, under decrees of
Aug. 24 and Sept. 13, 1943. 1944— Mar. 576.
Canada. Construction industry. National Joint
Conference Board recommendations. 1941— Apr.
839-840.
Great Britain. Postwar resumption of positions
and Government wage allowances, under plan
effective Apr. 12, 1945. 1945— Sept. 517-518.
Haiti. Central Agricultural School training center
for basketry, ironwork, butchering, cabinet
work, and gardening. 1941— Feb. 387—
388.
Soviet Union. Industrial training for youth;
decrees providing for, summary. 1947— Nov.
569-571.
Arbitration awards. See under specific industry; also
Conciliation and arbitration.
Arbitrator’s decision:
Summaries. 1944— Nov. 1026.
Supervisor’s retention by company regardless of
union’s complaint, held not arbitrable. 1944—
Apr. 791.
Veterans’ rights. 1946— Jan. 88.
Armed services, United States ( see also Labor force) :
Army. Age distribution of officers and enlisted
personnel, by sex, as of Dec. 31, 1943. 1944—
July 29-30.
Army Nurse Corps. Full military status accorded




7

by law of June 22, 1944; growth of corps since
December 1941. 1944— Dec. 1169.
Demobilization, postwar period. Estimated number
of personnel demobilized by State. 1944— Sept.
489.
------- Severity of, by States, estimated. 1945—*
July 1-4.
Intake from civilian manpower, estimated, in first
half of 1945. 1945— Feb. 288-289.
Manpower requirements for, estimates for 1943—
44. 1948— Aug. 204-211.
Members of. Commissioner of Internal Revenue
ruling as to payments by employers and reem­
ployment in former status. 1945— May 1016.
Navy officers (2,300) reaching retirement age
during World W ar II, retained in active duty.
1944— July 29.
Pay, total (mustering-out pay and family allow­
ances shown separately), specified periods to
April 1946. 1946— Mar. 504, 507, June 986-987.
Personnel. Growth and distribution (estimated),
September 1944 to March 1945, with relation to
labor force. Summary. 1944— Dec. 1160-1161.
------- Increases in numbers compared with in­
creases in civilian employment, April 1940 to
April 1944. 1944— Aug. 267.
Release from. Credit points allowed for stated
qualifications; procedure of discharge. 1945—
June 1208-1209.
Standards for military induction modified. A n­
nouncement of Feb. 15, 1946. 1946— Apr. 591.
W A C S and W A V E S . Qualifications; types of
work; and remuneration, by rank. 1948— Sept.
577-579.
Women members entitled to reemployment rights
after honorable discharge. 1945— Sept. 465.
Women’s Army Corps substituted for Women’s
Auxiliary Army Corps, July 1, 1943 [footnote].
1948— Sept. 577.
Women’s branches. Quota set, recruiting rate,
and number of members (Army, Navy, Marine
Corps, and Coast Guard), April 1944. 1944—
June 1247.
------- Recruiting policy adopted by officials con­
cerned (summary of W M C field instruction of
Mar. 7, 1944). 1944— Apr. 749-750.
Armed services, foreign countries:
Canada. Women in various branches, as of March
1943. 1948— Sept. 503-504.
Great Britain. Leave according to length of for­
eign service. Plan to provide equality in priv­
ilege between branches. 1944— Nov. 975.
------- Release method to be followed for personnel
according to classes. 1945— Jan. 44-45.
India. Gratuities, war-service, to be paid to serv­
ice men and women and to veterans. Provisions
of plan. 1945— Dec. 1151.
Soviet Union. Demobilization provisions of decree
of Sept. 25, 1945. Summary. 1945— Dec. 1152.
Armour & Co., U. S. Wage chronology, 1949. 1950—
Oct. 474-476.
Armour Leather Co. Employees’ wage-increase re­
quest. National W ar Labor Board decision, June 10,
1942. 1942— Sept. 485.
Armstrong Brothers Tool Co. Union-security issue.
National W ar Labor Board decision. 1942— Sept. 490.
Artificial-flower industry. New York. Home work pro­
hibited, 1938, and effects upon workers and employ­
ers. Summary. 1942— Mar. 642-646.
Assignment. See Promotion and assignment.
Atomic energy:
Economic and technological effects of development
on electric light and power industry. 1948— Nov.
498-499.

8

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Atomic energy— Continued
Labor-management disputes. See Labor-manage­
ment disputes.
Program, reconciliation with collective bargaining.
Background to 1946; policy adopted and expe­
rience under policy, 1946-50. Summary. 1950—
Nov. 587-588.
Austrian Trade Union Federation. See Labor organ­
izations, foreign countries.
Automobile manufacturing industry. See Motor-vehicle
industry.
Automobile repair shops ( see also Wages and hours,
United States):
Holidays, paid, vacations with pay. Extent of
provisions for July 1948. 1949— Jan. 38.
Workweek, length of, July 1948. 1949— Jan. 38.
Automobiles. Purchase of, by workers’ families, 1940.
1941— July 62.
Aviation. Hours of work and earnings, flight personnel
and fixed base operations (including Civil Aero­
nautics Administration). 1946— Aug. 186-194.
Aviation. See Air transport.
Awards. See under specific industry , firm , or labor
union .
Bakery industry:
Annual wage and hour surveys by BLS, 1940 and
1945. Method and scope. 1941— Jan. 200-201;
1946— Mar. 451-452.
Union scales. See Wages and hours, United States.
Banks, labor. See Cooperatives.
Banks, foreign countries:
Argentina. Working conditions of employees. Law
of Sept. 10, 1940, provisions. 1941— Jan. 143145.
Austria. Labor banks. Financial status, end of
1947. 1948— Sept. 248.
Basing point system, cement industry. Supreme Court
decision. 1949— Feb. 166.
Bay-oil, bay-rum, and aromatic-alcohol industries.
Puerto Rico. Minimum wage rates set, effective May
19, 1941. 1941— Oct. 990-991.
Beauty-service industry. New York. Minimum-wage
law. Wage increases since date effective. 1941— Feb.
359-360.
Beauty shops ( see also Court decisions, U. S., and
Legislation, U. S., by S ta te ):
Minimum weekly wage for all working 4 days or
more in week (provision in several State orders).
1941— Sept. 573.
Ohio. Students working in shops where customers
pay fees must receive minimum wage under
State order. 1941— Sept. 573-574.
Benefits and benefit funds (see also under specific type
o f benefit) :
Ford Motor Co. and United Automobile Workers
(C IO ). Provisions for, 1948 collective agree­
ment. 1949— Feb. 146.
Tobacco Workers International Union (A F L )
plans, types and amounts of specified benefits,
April 1949. 1949— Oct. 371-376.
United Mine Workers of America. Welfare and
Retirement Fund. Resumption of benefits under,
September 1949; types of benefits and status of
fund. 1950— Dec. 706-709.
Welfare programs, Federal grants-in-aid for,
1900-50. 1950— July 33.
Benefit plans. Canada. Factory workers, employers’
schemes, types and provisions. Summary. 1945—
June 1242-1245.
Beveridge Plan. Great Britain. Provisions proposed,
including benefits; summary. 1948— Feb. 272-276.
Bibliographies. Taft-Hartley Act, legal aspects. Se­
lected list of articles. 1948— Apr. 409-410.




Bituminous-coal industry. See Mining— Coal (bitu­
minous).
Black markets, foreign countries. See Prices, foreign
countries, specified country.
Blind workers:
Number estimated available for industry in 1944.
1944— Oct. 679.
Use of, by aircraft corporation in sorting rivets.
1944— Oct. 683.
Boards of inquiry. See Labor-management disputes.
Bomber plant employees. Prospects for future employ­
ment. Summary. 1945— Dec. 1088-1090.
Bonus, United States (see also Bonus, nonproduction):
Cost of living. Clauses providing for, in collective
agreements, types. 1946— Nov. 742-743.
W ar risk. Paid to seamen. Developments since
World W ar I and rates effective Mar. 15, 1943.
1944— Jan. 8-14.
Bonus, foreign countries:
Canada. Cost of living. Wartime provision for.
1942— Sept. 466, 470-472.
Great Britain. Building and civil engineering.
Legal provision for, in certain cases, 1941 order.
1942— Aug. 362-363.
Netherlands. W ar risk, paid to seamen. Instituted
by collective agreement, Sept. 12, 1939. 1944—
Jan. 43.
Bonus, nonproduction. United States:
Automobile repair shops, general. Extent of use,
July 1946. 1947— May 828.
Candy and other confectionery. Extent of use,
January 1947. 1948— Apr. 397.
Chemical industry. Extent of use, January 1946.
1946— Nov. 749.
Cotton-garment industry. Extent of use, Septem­
ber 1947. 1948— June 629.
Cotton-textile manufacturing. Extent of use,
spring of 1946. 1947— Mar. 461.
Dyeing and finishing, textiles. Extent of use, July
1946. 1947— June 1039.
Electric and gas utilities. Extent of use, MarchApril 1948. 1948— Oct. 380.
Electric light and power industry. Extent of use,
July 1945. 1946— Sept. 379.
Extent of use, 1945-46, selected manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries. 1947— Oct.
451-452.
Foundry industry, ferrous and nonferrous. Extent
of use, 1945 and 1946. 1946— July 65 -6 6 ; 1947—
Aug. 183.
Gas utilities. Extent of use, January 1947. 1948—
Jan. 58.
Glassware industry. Extent of use, January 1947.
1947— Nov. 551.
Life insurance, home offices; extent of use of,
January 1947. 1948— Jan. 13.
Machine-tool industry. Extent of use by companies,
1945. 1946— June 943.
Machinery industries. Extent of use, October 1946.
1947— Sept. 320.
Metal furniture industry. Extent of use, January
1947. 1947— Oct. 449.
Office workers. Atlanta, Memphis, and Oklahoma
City, January-February 1950. 1950— June 632.
------- Boston, January 1950. 1950— July 119.
------- Chicago, Indianapolis, and Milwaukee, Janu­
ary-February 1950. 1950— July 117.
------- Detroit, Mich., April 1950. 1950— Sept. 350.
------- Large cities, 11, January-June 1950. 1950—
Nov. 580.
------- New York City. Extent of use, JanuaryFebruary 1948 and February 1950. 1948— July
29; 1950— Aug. 238.
-------Philadelphia and Los Angeles, January 1949.
1949—June 646, 649.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Percentage distribution of establishments paying
to plant and office workers, selected manufactur­
ing and nonmanufacturing industries, by type
of bonus, 1945-46. 1947— Oct. 452.
Petroleum industry. Refining. Provisions for, 1948.
191*9— July 25.
Rayon and silk industry. Extent of use, JuneJuly 1946. 191*7— May 828.
Sawmills in South. Extent of use, SeptemberOctober 1946. 191*7— , une 1033.
J
Scientists, industrial research, late 1949. 1950—
Apr. 372.
Structural clay products industry. Extent of use,
October 1945. 1946— Aug. 216.
Tobacco (cigar) industry. Extent of use, January
1946. 191*7— Jan. 52.
Wholesale drugs and allied products; extent of
use, January 1947. 191*7— Nov. 554.
Women office workers, January-May 1949. 191*9—
Nov. 528.
Women’s blouse and waist industry. Extent of use,
January 1947. 191*7— Sept. 316.
Woolen and worsted industry. Extent of use, April
1946. 191*7— Mar. 468.
Bookkeepers, stenographers, and typists. Technological
advance, 1900-50. 1950— July 6.
Boot and shoe industry ( see also Footwear manufactur­
ing). Minimum-wage order, Federal, effective Nov.
3, 1941. m i — Nov. 1292.
“ Borrowing” workers. Agreement between Regional
W ar Manpower Commission and Regional W ar
Labor Board (New York area). 191*4— Dec. 1168.
Boycotts. Unfair labor practice under Labor Manage­
ment Relations Act, 1947; administrative procedures
for prevention of. 1947— July 59-62.
Boycotts, secondary (see also Legislation, U. S., by
States, fo r specified S ta te ):
State legislation prohibiting, enacted in 1947. Sum­
mary. 1947— Sept. 277-280.
Upheld by California Supreme Court. 1941— Jan.
141.
Brass, bronze, and copper products. See Copper and
copper-alloys industry.
Brewing industry:
Accident-prevention measures needed to combat
specified hazards. Summary. 1946— July 72-81.
Injuries, industrial, 1944. Summary. 1945— Aug.
264-272.
Budget, national. Full employment as related to (Pier­
son) ; economic budget, selected years, 1939-47
(chart). 1945— Aug. 210-214. 1947— Sept. 324.
Budgets, cost-of-living, United States ( see also Cost of
livin g):
BLS study, city worker’s, family; authorized by
Congress in 1945. Origin and purpose, methods
followed in developing; findings. 1948— Feb.
133-170.
City worker’s family, 4-person. Annual quantities
required, by item; food, rent, fuel, utilities,
housefurnishings, household operation, clothing,
medical care, transportation, recreation, person­
al care, and miscellaneous. 1948— Feb. 161-170.
------- Birmingham, Ala., percentage distribution,
cost of items, March 1946 and June 1947 (ta­
ble). 1948— Feb. 155.
------- Compared with estimated costs for families
of different sizes. 1948— Feb. 157, 179-181.
-------Cost of, 34 large cities, March 1946 and June
1947; intercity differences, food, clothing, hous­
ing, transportation, medical care, other goods
and services. 1948— Feb. 152-160.
------- Distribution of husband-wife families and
single persons in relation to, by 1947 total
money income and family size, Washington,
D. C. 1948— Dec. 623.




------- Methods of pricing, by item. 1948— Feb. 147152.
------- Quantities of items included in, spring 1946.
1948— Feb. 161-170.
------- Sample in relation to all cities in United
States of 50,000 or more population, by region
and population group, and intercity differences
, in total cost of goods and services, June 1947.
1948— Feb. 154.
------- Technical Advisory Committee, appointed by
Labor and Federal Security Subcommittee, Com­
mittee on Appropriations, House of Represen­
tatives, to assist in developing standards and
methods used in determining city workers’ fam­
ily budget. Report (text). 1948— Feb. 136-139.
Factory workers. Relative levels, estimated hourly
earnings, October 1946, compared with total
cost, city worker’s family budget, March 1946,
22 large cities. 1948— June 603-604.
Family budgets. Development o f; methods previ­
ously used, and general outline of those used in
BLS study authorized by Congress in 1945
(Hinrichs). 1948— Feb. 131-132.
------- Historical survey of, from Gregory King,
17th century England, to BLS present budget
study; bibliography. 1948— Feb. 171-175.
------- Income in relation to, Washington, D. C.,
June 1947. 1948— Dec. 622-623.
------- Indexes showing relationship between size
of family and cost of budget (income for 4-person family = 1 0 0 ) . 1948— Feb. 180-181.
------- See also City worker’s family, 4-person, this

section.
Index of intercity living costs, selection of items
and method of computing. 1949— Mar. 315-320.
Intercity indexes. Total cost of goods and services.
Comparison of city formula index with city
worker’s family budget, March 1946 and June
1947. 1949— Mar. 315-320.
------- See also City worker’s family, this section.
Level of living, city worker’s family, large cities,
United States. Details. 1948— Feb. 134-136.
Prices. See Prices— Consumers’ price index.
Standards of living. Method of determining and
pricing of goods and services. 1948— Feb. 133152.
Textile Workers Union of America. Study by.
1944— Oct. 859-861.
Women workers. Annual cost, minimum adequate
budget for self-supporting woman without de­
pendents, selected States, various dates, 1946
and 1947. 1948— Feb. 182-184.
------- Cost-of-living figures, seven States, speci­
fied period 1947, or first half of 1948, necessary
for self-supporting woman to maintain herself
in health. 1948— Sept. 278.
------- Living as family members, annual cost for
adequate maintenance and protection of health,
New York State and by community, September
1947. 1949— Jan. 55-56.
------- Minimum adequate living standard, annual
and weekly costs, 1947 (8 States). 1947— June
1044-1045.
------- Without dependents, selected States. Mini­
mum adequacy standard, factors influencing
allowances, annual costs and uses, 1950. 1950—
Dec. 698-701.
Budgets, cost-of-living, Great Britain and Northern
Ireland. Industrial workers’ households, 1937-38,
food and other items. Summary. 1941— Apr. 940942.
Building and loan associations, United States (see also
Cooperatives— Savings and loan associations):
Federal- and State-chartered. Number, member­
ship, and assets, 1938 and 1939. 1941— Jan. 127.

10

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Building and loan associations, U. S.— Continued
Number, membership, and assets. By States, end
of 1939, including mortgage loans, surplus and
undivided profits. 191*1--J a n . 126-127.
------- United States, by year, 1930-39, summary.
10.41— Jan. 127.
Building and loan associations, Great Britain. Changes
in assets, 1939 to 1942; liquidity of funds, earnings
and dividends, and mortgage-lending policies, 1942.
1 91*3— June 1155-1157.
Building construction ( see also Construction; and
H ousing):
Activity in year 1940, including comparison with
1939 and trends since 1921. 10-41--Ju n e 15731584.
Continental United States. Estimated activity
1939-42, by character of structures and quar­
terly period. 191*2— Sept. 601-605.
------- New activities, public and private, 1942 and
1943, by type and estimated valuation. 10 11
**—
Mar. 666-667.
Defense units, publicly and privately financed, by
region, specified periods, January 1940 to
August 1942. 191*2— Dec. 1203-1212.
Materials. Shortages of supplies as of May 1946,
and effect upon labor supply. 191*6— Sept. 354.
Principal cities. Number and kind of buildings,
permit valuation, and families provided for,
November 1940 to October 1942. 191*1— Jan. 219223, Feb. 460-464, Mar. 729-732, Apr. 10021005, May 1279-1283, June 1584-1587, July
228-231, Aug. 508-511, Sept. 764-767, Oct.
1037-1040, Nov. 1302-1305, Dec. 1586-1588;
191*2— Jan. 231-233, Feb. 508-510, Mar. 779780, Apr. 1027-1029, May 1211-1213, June
1414-1416, July 162-163, Aug. 373-374, Sept.
612-613, Oct. 845-847, Nov. 1065-1067, Dec.
1293-1295.
Private. Nonresidential— commercial, industrial,
and nonprofit. Probable demand for in postwar
period. 191*5— Mar. 488-494.
Public buildings, Federal and State, principal
cities. Value of contracts awarded November
1940 to January 1943. 191*1— Jan. 223, Feb.
463-464, Mar. 732, Apr. 1005, May 1282, June
1587, July 231, Aug. 511, Sept. 767, Oct. 1040,
Nov. 1305-1306, Dec. 1588; 191*2— Jan. 234, Feb.
511, Mar. 781, Apr. 1030, May 1213, June 1417,
July 164, Aug. 375, Sept. 614, Oct. 847-848, Nov.
1067-1068, Dec. 1295-1296; 191*8— Jan. 165, Feb.
369-370, Mar. 599.
Residential. Construction and demolition, 1936-38,
summary (Schneider). 191*1— Mar. 721-729.
------- Defense areas, selected, new units in years
1940 and 1941, summary. 191*2— May 1149-1153.
------- Nonfarm units, by type, size of city, and
source of funds. First half, years 1941, 1943,
and 1944. 191*1— < uly 223-228. Oct. 1031-1036;
J
191*1*— Oct. 812-817.
------- ------- First 9 months, years 1940 and 1941.
191*1— Jan. 214-219; 191*2— Jan. 225-231.
---------------- Years, 1940-41 and 1943-44, estimated
valuation, by geographic division. 191*1— Apr.
1006-1014; 191*2— May 1139-1148; 191*5— May
1053-1061.
------- Time required to complete, estimated actual
cost, units started last 4 months 1945 and March
1946. 191*6— Sept. 346-354.
Residential and nonresidential. Financed from
Federal funds, 1939-43. Summary. 191*1*— June
1309-1313.
Urban areas. Expenditure on, selected periods. (See
p. VI, each issue, January to December 1945.)
-------Federally financed and other. Number, kind,




and valuation of structures started, May 1943
to October 1946; coverage and method, compari­
son with previous year. 191*8— Jan. 162—
165,
Feb. 367-370, Mar. 598-599, Apr. 799-800, May
994-996, June 1211-1212, July 152-154, Aug.
359-362, Sept. 607-609, Oct. 828-830, Nov. 10131015, Dec. 1248-1251; 191*1*— Jan. 207-209, Feb.
433-435, Mar. 668-670, Apr. 882-884, May 10961101, June 1313-1316, July 203-205, Aug. 430432, Sept. 633-635, Oct. 872-874, Nov. 1085-1087,
Dec. 1294-1296; 191*5—Jan. 192-195, Feb. 429431, Mar. 666-668, Apr. 886-888, May 11031105, June 1313-1315, July 156-158, Aug. 366369, Sept. 576-579, Oct. 805-807, Nov. 1019-1022,
Dec. 1244-1247; 191*6—Jan. 139-142, Feb. 323326, Mar. 499-501, Apr. 667-670, May 809-811,
June 977-980, July 124-127, Aug. 273-276, Sept.
440-443, Oct. 613-616, Nov. 798-803, Dec. 10151017.
Wage stabilization for duration of war provided
for by collective agreements as of July 1, 1942;
and Wage Adjustment Board established by
Secretary of Labor. 191*2— July 86-88.
Building construction, Great Britain:
Guaranteed weekly wage provided by amendment
to working rules of National Joint Council for
Building industry. 191*5— July 71-72.
------- Productivity changes in, 1947-50. 1950— Dec.
706.
Building materials:
Controls over. Extent of removal, effective in sec­
ond quarter, 1947. 191*7— Sept. 310.
Prices. See Prices, United States— Building ma­
terials.
Building trades:
Bargaining plan in southern California. Descrip­
tion of agreement; grievances and jurisdictional
disputes; basis of plan’s success. 1950— Jan.
14-18.
Collective bargaining, level of and its effect on
pattern of rates; comparison of union rates by
region and city. 191*8— Jan. 52-53.
Earnings, weekly and hourly (gross), private
building construction workers, wartime and post­
war; rise in, compared with rise in consumers’
prices. 191*9— Jan. 39-40.
Southern California. Hourly wage rates, 6 basic
trades and 13 subtrades, 1941-49. 1950— Jan. 14.
Union scales. See Wages and hours— Building
trades.
Workweek. Length of, selected periods, 1940-48.
191*9— Jan. 40.
------- Standard, 1948-49. 191*9— Dec. 663.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U. S. Government) :
Consumers’ price index. See Prices— Consumers’
price index.
Fact-finding activities of, summary. 191*5— May
927-953.
Program. Change in character from original credo
to wider scope and newer methods of recent
years. 1950— July 75-78.
----- - Fiscal year 1947-48; basic statistical ser­
vices to continue, certain new programs added;
summary. 191*7— Oct. 409-414.
Realignment of functions to meet requirements of
Labor Management Relations Act. 191*7— Oct. 436.
Bureau of Manpower Utilization (U . S. Government).
War Manpower Commission action establishing, early
in 1943. 191*3— Mar. 473.
Business. High activity and industrial output, June
1950. 1950— July 104.
Camps, labor. Child workers, on farms in Erie County,
N. Y . Conditions. 1941— Apr. 864-865.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Candy and other confectionery manufacturing ( see also
Wages and hours):
Bonus (nonproduction), group insurance, lunch
periods (paid), pensions, shift differentials, sick
leave and vacations with pay. Extent of provi­
sion for, January 1947. 1948— Apr. 397.
Wage incentives, use of, January 1947, and com­
parison with time workers. 1948— Apr. 397.
Workweek, length of, January 1947. 1948— Apr.
397.
Canneries:
Fruit and vegetable. Characteristics of industry
and method of 1943 wage survey. 1945— Jan.
134-136.
------- Collective agreements (32). Provisions sum­
marized. 1944— Dec. 1220-1221.
Migrant workers. Delaware, living conditions, re­
muneration, and family characteristics. 1941—
Aug. 408-410.
------- New Jersey, living conditions. 1941— Aug.
411-413.
Puerto Rico. Minimum-wage order effective Mar.
22, 1941, under FL SA . 1941— May 1255.
Canning and preserving industry:
Description and sections in which located. 1941—
Feb. 435-437.
Earnings, hourly. Plant workers, (except seafood
establishments), 11 States, 1948 peak season.
1949— July 20-22.
------- Seafood processing, plant workers, selected
States, 1948 peak season. 1949— July 22.
Canteens, United States. Manufacturing plants (in war
work). Cafeterias, lunch counters or stands, station­
ary or mobile canteens. Extent to which supplied by
employers. 1944— Oct. 746.
Canteens, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Factories. Extension of service in
1942, with statistics. 1944— Jan. 99-100.
--------------- Order by Minister of Labor and National
Service, Nov. 11, 1940. Provisions. 1941— Apr.
927.
------- ------- Progress in provision of, 1941. 1948—
Jan. 79.
------- Industrial and staff. Wages board to be
established, by order Mar. 13, 1944, of Minister
of Labor and National Service. 1944— June 12771278.
------- Industrial, provision to April 1943, with
detailed statistics on colliery canteens. 1948—
June 1108-1109.
------- Status in December 1943. Summary. 1945—
Sept. 480—
481.
New Zealand. Situation, year ended Mar. 31, 1943.
1948— Oct. 721.
Capital and labor, United States. Factors in industrial
productivity. 1950— July 9.
Capitalism, United States. Role in labor organizations.
1900-50. 1950— July 41.
Carbon-products manufacturing. Use in electrical in­
dustry, characteristics, and scope and method of BLS
survey, 1942. 1948— Feb. 329-331.
Carpet and rug industry. Minimum-wage order effec­
tive Mar. 17, 1941. 1941— Apr. 967.
Cartels, international. Provisions for supervision of,
in Charter for International Trade Organization.
1948— Nov. 479, 481-482.
Case-goods-furniture industry.
Characteristics and
method and scope of BLS survey, March-April 1942.
1942— July 124-125.
Catering industry, Great Britain. Wages and working
conditions. Law of Apr. 20, 1943, provisions. 1948—
July 42-44.
Cement industry:
Man-hour requirements for production (52 plants
surveyed, 1945-46). Summary. 1946— Sept. 355363.




11

Portland. Productivity of labor, factors affecting;
characteristics of industry; employment outlook.
1941— Oct. 862-874.
Census, Sixteenth (1940). Population by States and
comparison of total with totals of former censuses
from 1790. 1941— Jan. 133-135.
Census, industrial, Mexico. Extractive, electric power,
and manufacturing industries, 1940 (preliminary).
1942— Mar. 636-639.
Ceramic engineers, earnings. See Wages and hours,
United States.
Chamber of labor, foreign countries. See Labor organi­
zations, foreign countries— Austria, Italy.
Check-off provisions:
“ Basic Steel” decision, National W ar Labor Board.
Continuation or incorporation of agreement
clauses ordered. 1945— Jan. 43.
Collective-bargaining agreements. Types and prev­
alence of, by industry group, union affiliation,
and region, 1949-50. 1950— Aug. 225-227.
Limits on, under section 302 (c) (4) of Labor
Management Relations A ct; opinion given by
Assistant Solicitor General, May 13, 1948. 1948—
July 42.
Prevalence of, in industry, and 1944 increase in
proportion of workers under. 1945— Apr. 816822.
State legislation. Restricting use of, 1947. 1947—
Sept. 282-283.
------- See Legislation, U. S., by States, fo r specified
S tate; see also Court decisions.
Union dues. Extent of practice in 1946, by indus­
try, and changes, by year, from 1941. 1947—
May 768-769.
Chemical industries, United States:
Collective bargaining, status of, May 1942, and
provisions of 84 agreements (summary). 1942—
July 64-85.
Industrial. Products included. 1946— Nov. 744.
Minimum-wage determination effective Apr. 28,
1942 (chemical and related products). 1942—
May 1189.
Productivity and technological changes, 1929-40
(BLS study). 1942— July 53-57.
Wage rates and hourly earnings. See Wages and
hours— Chemical industries.
Chemical industries, Dominican Republic. Courses pro­
vided in University of Santo Domingo to prepare
skilled technicians. 1944— Dec. 1238.
Chemists and chemical engineers:
Earnings, 1941 and 1943, and factors affecting.
1946—3 xme 879-894.
Employment outlook, chemists, 1950. 1950— May
510.
Salary rates, Chemical Society members, trend
1926-41, and earnings in relation to experience
and service. 1948— April 776-780.
Child-care centers. Wartime care of working mothers’
children, Minneapolis program. 1948— July 107-108.
Child endowment, See Family allowances.
Child labor, United States ( see also Y o u th ):
Accident statistics. See Injuries to minors, this

section.
Agriculture, industrialized. Age minimum recom­
mended by Southern Interstate Conference on
Migratory Labor. 1941— Feb. 345.
-------Farms (New York, Erie Co.). Berry and bean
pickers. Hours and conditions (summary of State
Industrial Commissioner’s report). 1941— Apr.
864-865.
California. Wartime relaxation of protective laws.
Applications for and policy followed as to per­
mits. 1944— July 121-122.

12

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Child labor, U. S.— Continued
Court decisions. See Court decisions, United States.
Employment certificates. See Minors, 14-17 years
of age, this section .
Fair Labor Standards Act. Control of employment
in interstate industries, and extent of illegal
employment, 1948, and during first 10 years’
operation under act. 1948— Dec. 589, 595.
------- Coverage, 1949 amendments. 1949— Dec. 667.
------- Provisions governing, enforcement; Adminis­
trator’s recommendations for extension of cover­
age. 1948— Sept. 271-274.
Farms. See Agriculture, this section .
Hazardous occupations. 18-year minimum provided
(under Fair Labor Standards Act) by Chief of
Children’s Bureau, orders of July 1939, January
and September 1940, and June 1941. 1941— Aug.
396-397.
------- Order No. 4 extended to include pulpwood,
logging, etc. 1948— Apr. 410.
------- Orders issued by authority of Fair Labor
Standards Act, with effective dates. 1948— Apr.
410.
Illegal employment. Extent of, 1940-44, and 1948.
1945— Apr. 757; 1948— Dec. 595.
------- Workmen’s compensation, double, employer
deposit of security required, New York. 194.8—
Sept. 281.
Illinois. Wartime problems, summary of conditions,
1943. 19U — Nov. 1034-1035.
Injuries to minors, frequency distribution, com­
pared to that of adults. 1948— Dec. 595.
International Association of Governmental Labor
Officials, resolution by 1941 convention. 1941—
Dec. 1453-1456.
Legislation. Federal and general, controlling child
labor, summary of provisions. 1947— Dec. 672;
1950— July 15-16, Dec. 701-704.
------- State. See Legislation, U. S., by State, fo r

specified State.
Michigan. Wartime problems, summary of condi­
tions, 1942-43. 1944— Nov. 1035.
Minimum-age laws for employment of minors,
1916-50. Summary. 1950— Dec. 701-704.
Mining. Coal (bituminous). Employment of minors
under 17 prohibited in Appalachian agreement of
May 1941. 1941— Aug. 376.
Minors, 14-17 years of age. A t work, March 1940
and April 1945 (chart). 1948— Dec. 590.
------- Employed in agriculture and nonagriculture,
July 1945-September 1948 (chart). 1948— Dec.
593.
------- Employment certificates, regular. Number is­
sued, ages 14-15 and 16-17, 1940 and 1943-47,
by State and city; percent change, 1940-47.
1948— Dec. 590-593.
---------------- Number issued, ages 14-15 and 16-17,
1939-44, by State and city; percent change, 193941 and 1940-43. 1948— Mar. 454-458; 1945—
Apr. 763-770.
-------Full- or part-time work. Employment and age
certificates for, 1940 and 1943-47; percent
change, 1940-47. 1948— Dec. 594.
------- ------- Workers under 18, increase 1940-44.
1948— Nov. 942-943; 1944— Nov. 1034.
National Conference on Labor Legislation, 1949,
recommendations. 1950— Jan. 41-42.
New York. Agricultural workers, 1948, legal and
illegal employment, wages and hours. 1950— June
650.
-------Truck farms, migrants serving. Proportion of
workers under age. 1941— Feb. 391-392.
------- Wartime conditions, summary of conditions,
1944. 1944— Nov. 1035.




Part-time school and work programs. Statement by
W ar Manpower Commission, Children’s Bureau,
and Office of Education, outlining policies and
standards. 1948— Nov. 941-942.
Part-time work. High-school students (3 cities).
Effect on scholastic standing. 1944— July 134135.
------- See also Minors, 14-17 years of age, this section .
Professional (stage and radio entertainers, etc.).
Recommendations by National Child Labor Com­
mittee. 1941— Apr. 869.
Source of labor supply, changes in 1900-50. 1950—
July 15-16.
Southern States. Legislative provisions, standards,
and accomplishments. Summary. 1945— Oct. 552554.
State legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal
and general; and by States, fo r specified State.
Students leaving school for work before graduation
(Chicago). Subsequent employment records sum­
marized. 1944— July 135-136.
Telegraph messengers. Company held subject to
provisions of Fair Labor Standards Act by deci­
sion of Federal Court. 1948— Dec. 1194-1195.
Theaters, entertainers in. Minimum ages, working
conditions, social effects, and problems of legis­
lation. 1941— Apr. 864-869.
Tobacco plantations (Conn.). Survey by State de­
partment of labor, 1942. 1948— Feb. 267-268.
Trends in. Youth under 18, 1939-47, summaries of
studies. 1948— Mar. 450-467; 1945— Apr. 756775; 1948— Dec. 589-595.
Wartime effect upon, 1939-42, 1940-44, with em­
ployment-certificate by States, extent of illegal
employment. 1948— Mar. 450-467; 1945— Apr.
756-775.
Wartime exemption permitting employment of girls
under 18 revoked as to public contracts (under
W alsh-Healy Act) awarded after Sept. 4, 1945.
1946— Jan. 69.
Wartime problems. Summary of conditions, general,
and in three States (111., Mich., and N. Y .).
1944— Nov. 1034-1035.
Working conditions, youth under 18 years of age.
Types of jobs, hours, hazards, fiscal year ended
June 1947; comparisons with years 1946 and
1945. 1947— Dec. 673.
Child labor, foreign countries:
Argentina. Decrees of Aug. 24 and Sept. 13, 1943.
Provisions 1944— Mar. 576.
Brazil. Law of Sept. 13, 1941, amending previous
legislation, provisions. 1942— Jan. 72.
British Malaya. Conditions prior to World W ar II
including legislative provisions. 1944— Aug. 290.
Germany. Elementary-school children employed in
agricultural work. 1948— Sept. 497.
Great Britain. Law enforcement relaxed to permit
employment in defense emergency. 1941— Dec.
1399.
------- London Regional Advisory Council for Ju­
venile Employment. Memorandum (1942) sum­
marized. 1948— Jan. 56-58.
Japan. Night work forbidden in mines (1928) and
in factories (1929). 1945— Oct. 659.
------- Restrictions, increase of, 1949-50. 1950— Oct.
449.
------- 12-year minimum age adopted for labor con­
scription, November 1944. 1945— Jan. 46.
Netherlands Indies. Laws of 1926 and 1930 (mining
ordinance). Provisions. 1944— May 987.
Panama. Labor code of 1941, provisions concern­
ing miners. 1942— May 1162-1163.
South Africa. Minimum age raised from 14 to 15
years by Factories Act of 1941. 1941— Dec. 14631464.

INDEX — JA N U A R Y 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Child labor, international. International Labor Organi­
zation conventions and recommendations adopted by
1946 Conference (Montreal). Summary of coverage.
1946— Dec. 938.
Child welfare, United States:
Berry and bean pickers on farms in Erie County,
N. Y . (State Industrial Commissioner’s report).
1941— Apr. 864-865.
Homemaker service as aid to war effort. 1943— May
913-914.
Preschool programs adopted by tenants of public
housing projects. 194%— Jan. 100-101.
School attendance. Strawberry pickers, migrant
(Arkansas and Kentucky). 1940— 5 \me 1416-1417.
Child welfare, foreign countries:
Great Britain. School-meals service extended in
October 1941. 194%— Apr. 917-918.
Soviet Union. Nursery schools for children of work­
ing mothers. Management and functions. 1945—
Sept. 476-477.
Turkey. Provisions for under republican govern­
ment, summary. 194%— Aug. 246.
Chronologies:
Labor events. 1900 to June 1950. 1950— July 79-86.
-------October 1942-November 1950. 1943— Feb. 411418, May 1025-1036, Aug. 399-410, Nov. 10341043; 1944— Feb. 455-467, June 1336-1345, Sept.
659-666, Dec. 1316-1322; 1945— Apr. 909-916,
June 1336-1342; 1946— May 833-940, Aug. 316323, Nov. 830-838; 1947— Feb. 345-356, May 946955, Aug. 211-214, Nov. 577-580; 1948— Jan. 7 0 72, Feb. 190-192, Mar. 313-315, Apr. 422-424,
May 542-545, June 653-655, July 60-62, Aug.
172-173, Sept. 305-307, Oct. 411-412, Nov. 524525, Dec. 645-646; 1949— Jan. 76-77, Feb. 213214, Mar. 328-329, Apr. 443-444, May 560-561,
June 677-678, July 56-57, Aug. 175-177, Sept.
303-305, Oct. 428-429, Nov. 558-560, Dec. 684686; 1950— Jan. 70-72, Feb. 193-194, Mar. 315316, Apr. 432, May 547, June 662-663, July 139140, Aug. 250-251, Sept. 374, Oct. 498-499, Nov.
600-601, Dec. 720-721. •
Wage. See Wage chronologies.
Chrysler Motor Corp. employees. Collective bargaining
with employer and provisions of major settlements.
1950— Aug. 218-223.
Cigar and cigarette industry. See Tobacco industry.
Civil defense. Great Britain. National Service Act of
April 1941. Provisions. 1941— June 1393-1394.
Civil liberties, protected and extended by labor unions.
1949— Mar. 285-288.
Civil Service, Federal. Employment under. See Legis­
lation, U. S., Federal and general— Federal em­
ployees.
Civil Service, France. Law of Sept. 14, 1941, regu­
lating employment in. 194%— Jan. 130-133.
Civil Service Commission (U. S. Government):
Examinations. Maximum age limits for, in 1940
and 1941. 194%— Jan. 65-69.
-------Wartime. Elimination of maximum age limits
and list of opportunities for positions, 1944.
1944— July 27-28.
Laws concerning. See Legislation. U. S., Federal
and general— Federal employees.
Civilian Conservation Corps (U. S. Government). Oper­
ations, 1933-41, summarized; eligibility and enroll­
ment regulations, remuneration, educational and
training opportunities, camp life, and administration.
1941— June 1405-1413.
Civilian defense workers. Payment by employers for
time lost, policies concerning. 194%— Sept. 476.
Clay-products industry:
Minimum-wage rate set (except for workers in
refractories, pottery, and ceramic whiteware),
effective Sept. 1, 1941. 1941— Oct. 990.




13

Structural. Characteristics, labor force, and wage
structure, October 1945. 1946— Aug. 210-216.
------- Contracts (U . S. Government). Minimumwage determination Dec. 27, 1940. 1941— Feb.
424.
------- Wage determination effective Jan. 10, 1941,
amended effective Oct. 27, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1296.
Clerical and professional workers. Unionization of.
Estimated number organized, by industry group and
in Government work. 1944— June 1229.
Closed shop:
Collective agreements. Status of practice at end
of 1941. Summary. 194%— May 1069-1070.
Definition of, with other types of union recogni­
tion; prevalence of practice in 1946. 1947— May
768.
Growth. Amalgamated Clothing Workers of Ameri­
ca, 1919-48. 1949— May 543.
Legislation to ban, rejected by voters in Maine,
Massachusetts, and New Mexico. 1948— Nov. III.
Prohibition of, Labor Management Relations Act,
1947. 1947— July 58, 60.
State “ right-to-work” laws. See Legislation, U. S.
by States, fo r specified State.
Clothing:
Cost of, changes (percentage) from Sept. 15 to
Mar. 15, 1944. 1944— July 161-178.
Men’s, dress shirts. Man-hour requirements per
dozen to produce, by price line, plant size, and
type of labor and department, and 1939-47, show­
ing decline per unit. 1948— Sept. 254-256.
Quality. Postwar changes following removal of
wartime restrictions. 1948— July 34-39.
------- Rising costs and their effects. 1941— Feb.
286-291.
------- Wartime regulations affecting. 1944— July
175-178.
Wool, cotton, and rayon; and leather shoes. W ar­
time changes in quality and price. 1943— Sept.
421-434.
Clothing, Great Britain. Postwar increases in supplies,
efforts of Government to aid low-income families;
relative supplies, including footwear, compared with
prewar, beginning 1947. 1948— Aug. 122.
Clothing allowance, Belgium. Low-wage workers. Pay­
roll tax on employers to provide fund, prescribed by
decree. 1946— Mar. 475-476.
Clothing industry:
Change in, 1900 compared with 1950. 1950— July 6.
Cotton garments. Characteristics, background, and
method of BLS study of minimum-wage results.
194%— Feb. 318-323.
-------Minimum-wage rates set in 1939 and 1940, re­
sults of. 194%— Feb. 318-337.
Men’s. Cotton garments. Characteristics of industry
and scope of BLS survey, March 1941. 194%—
Aug. 335-339.
-------Suits and coats. Earnings, hourly, selected oc­
cupations, 10 cities, paid holidays and vacations,
retirement benefits, group insurance, and medical
care, August-September 1948. 1949— Feb. 189192.
------- Shirts, single pants, and allied garments.
Minimum wage effective Sept. 29, 1941. 1941—
Oct. 989.
Quality. See Clothing— Quality.
Women’s and children’s garments. Minimum-wage
order effective Sept. 29, 1941. 1941— Oct. 989.
Women’s and misses’ dresses. BLS study of occu­
pational earnings in 14 cities, August 1947. Sum­
mary. 1948— May 518-520.
----- - Holidays, paid; medical care, hospitalization;
sick leave; vacations with pay. Extent and
method of provision for, August 1947. 1948—
May 520.

14

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Clothing industry— Continued
Women’s and misses’ dresses. Hourly earnings,
selected occupations, August 1947. 1948— May
518-520.
Women’s apparel. Minimum-wage order effective
Sept. 29, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1292.
Women’s dresses. Collective-agreement provisions
covering, management efficiency and sales; hours
and overtime; setting of piece rates; and media­
tion. 1941— May 1164-1167.
------- Earnings, hourly, selected occupations, paid
holidays and vacations, and length of workweek,
August 1948. 1949— Feb. 187-189.
Coal. Production and distribution in World W ar II.
1943— May 1000-1001.
Coal industry, United States. See Mining, U. S.
Coal industry, foreign countries. See Mining, f. c.
Coconut industry, Puerto Rico. Wage order under Fair
Labor Standards Act, effective May 12, 1941. 1941—
June 1487-1488.
“ Cold war,” Marshall Plan as instrument in. 1949—
Feb. 139.
Collective agreements, United States ( see also Collective
bargaining) :
Agricultural-machinery industry. Larger plants
concerned and unions bargained with; coverage
and duration; 1943. 1944— Jan. 77-79.
------- Night-work and shift differentials, as of
January 1943. 1943— July 136-137.
-------Status in 1943, including list of larger plants
under agreement and unions concerned; provi­
sions summarized. 1944— Jan. 77-91.
-------Union status; wages; overtime, week-end, and
holiday pay; paid vacations; leave of absence;
seniority; discharge; military service and war
jobs; safety and sanitation; adjustment of dis­
putes; strikes and lock-outs. Summary of provi­
sions as of 1943. 1944—Jan. 80-91.
Aircraft industry. Down grading of employees (6
companies), voluntary union-management agree­
ments approved (effective Apr. 11, 1945), by
National W ar Labor Board. 1945— July 51.
Airframe industry. Coverage and duration, union
status, check-off, wages (incentive plans, mini­
mum and hiring rates, interim adjustments, mini­
mum call pay and recall for overtime, shift dif­
ferentials, overtime, and week-end work), holi­
days, paid vacations, sick leave, military service,
leave of absence, seniority, safety and sanitation,
lay-off and rehiring, promotions, discharges, con­
ciliation and arbitration, strikes and lock-outs.
Summary of provisions (26 agreements in effect
June 1944). 1944— Aug. 340-356.
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. and U A W (CIO) 5-year
contract. Terms. 1950— Aug. 244.
Aluminum-fabrication industry. Union status;
wages; overtime, week-end, and holiday payments;
vacations; seniority; lay-offs and rehiring; pro­
motions; military service; leaves of absence;
health, safety, and welfare; apprenticeships;
grievances; strikes and lock-outs; 1943. Summary
of provisions (20 contracts). 1943— Dec. 11311150.
American Woolen Co. and Textile Workers Union
of America (C IO ). See Wage chronology.
Analysis of. Statistical card developed for use in,
by International Association of Machinists.
1947— July 75-77.
Anthracite, mining. See Mining, this section .
Arbitration. Provisions, analysis of 1,482 agree­
ments, 1949, by industry group. 1950— Feb. 160165.




-------Provisions, by industries (14). Features sum­
marized. 1944— Nov. 1001-1013.
------- Type of machinery established, by industry
group, 1949 (table). 1950— Feb. 163.
Armour & Co. and employers sign contracts giving
pay raises and other benefits, August 1950.
1950— Sept. IV, 366-367.
Automobile industry. Ford, Chrysler, and General
Motors, 1949-50. Background and major provi­
sions. 1950— Aug. 218-224.
-------General Motors Corp. and United Automobile
Workers (CIO) agreement based on changes in
BLS consumers’ price index and containing “ an­
nual improvement factor.” Analysis, wage clause
(text). 1948— July 1-7.
------- Seniority provisions. Findings in BLS study
(completed March 1944), summary. 1944— Sept.
463-474.
-------United Automobile Workers (C IO ). Ford
Motor Co. and Nash-Kelvinator Corp., pension
agreements, March 1950. 1950— Apr. I ll , 411.
---------------- Ford Motor Co., June 20, 1941. Provi­
sions. 1941— Aug. 383-390.
----------------General Motors, 5-year agreement, May
1950, provisions. 1950— June III, 655-656.
Benefit plans included in; character, growth, de­
velopment, and administration, 1948; funds, regu­
lation of. 1948— Sept. 229-234.
Bituminous coal. See Mining, this section.
Building contractors and 23 A F L unions (Houston,
Tex.) sign treaty effective June 30, 1951, re­
quiring approval by three-fourths of unions be­
fore any signatory may take strike action. March
1950. 1950— Apr. 411.
Building trades (A F L ) and agencies of U. S. Gov­
ernment. Wartime construction— work stabiliza­
tion plan, May 22, 1942. 1942— Dec. 1263.
Bureau of Labor Statistics program for maintain­
ing files of, under Labor Management Relations
Act, fiscal year 1947-48. 1947— Oct. 412-413.
Canning (fruit and vegetable). Coverage and du­
ration; union status; wages; hours and over­
time ; week-end and holiday pay; vacation; leave;
seniority; lay-off; promotions; transfers; mili­
tary service, health and safety; disputes; arbitra­
tion, discharge, strikes, and lock-outs. Provisions
(32 agreements) summarized. 1944— Dec. 12031216.
Changes in, 1948, to comply with new legislation
( Taft-Hartley A ct), court decisions, administra­
tive rulings, and interpretations. 1949— Feb. 139,
143-147.
Chemical industry. Duration and renewal; union
status; wages; hours, shifts, and overtime; holi­
days; vacation and leave; seniority, lay-off and
promotion; working foremen; apprenticeship;
military service; health, safety, and welfare; ad­
justment of disputes; strikes and lock-outs. Pro­
visions (84 contracts) as of May 1942, summar­
ized. 1942— July 64-85.
Chrysler Corp., 1939-48. Wage chronology. 1949—
Apr. 411-413.
Closed shop. Status of practice at end of 1941.
Provisions, 1949-50, by type. 1942— May 10691070; 1950— Aug. 224-226.
Clothing (dress) industry. Management efficiency,
sales promotion, hours and overtime, piece rates,
and mediation. Provisions. 1941— May 1164-1167.
Clothing, men’s and boys. Amalgamated Clothing
Workers of America (C IO ). Collective agree­

ment with men’s and boys’ clothing manufac­

15

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
turers; standard contract, welfare clause (ex­
cerpts). 1947— Feb. 199-200.
Coal mining. See Mining, this section.
Contract, signed, may be required by National La­
bor Relations Board if collective-bargaining
agreement has been reached (U . S. Sup. Ct. deci­
sion). 1941— Feb. 398-399.
Cotton-textile association, Northern, and Textile
Workers Union of America (C IO ), 1943-48.
1949- —Jan. 30-35.
Cotton-textile industry. Coverage and duration;
union status; wages; hours, shifts, and overtime;
paid vacations; leave of absence; seniority, veter­
ans’ privileges; safety and health; adjustment
of disputes; strikes and lock-outs. Provisions (45
contracts) in effect, 1945, summarized. 1946—
Mar. 413-423.
Coverage. Percent of workers, 67 industries and
services. 1947— Mar. 399.
------- Proportion of wage earners, manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries, beginning of
1942 (Peterson). 1942— May 1068.
Dismissal compensation. Provisions covering, sum­
mary, December 1944 and 1 949 . 1945— Jan. 47-57;
1950— Apr. 384-387.
Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers, Interna­
tional Union (CIO) and Sperry Gyroscope Co.
sign 3-year no-strike agreement, July 1950.
1950— Aug. IV.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of
(A F L ), and National Electrical Contractors A s­
sociation. Employer contribution to benefit fund,
provision. 1946— June 867-869.
Employer unit in, Bureau of Labor Statistics class­
ification, and distribution of agreements and
workers covered, by type of bargaining unit,
1950. 1950— Dec. 695-697.
Escalator clause (automatic). Wage changes under,
early 1949, General Motors Corp., International
Shoe Co., and others. 1949— Mar. IV.
Escalator clause (cost-of-living). General Motors
and United Automobile Workers 2-year agree­
ment containing, based on BLS consumers’ price
index. 1948— June 644.
------- Use of, following First World W a r; effect of
wartime stabilization program on; samples.
1948— July 5-7.
------- Wage-agreement provisions between private
employers and employees, suspended by W ar
Labor Board, December 1942. 1945— Nov. 892.
------- See also Wage-adjustment, this section.
“ Escape period” provision in maintenance of mem­
bership clause. Effects summarized. 1944— Dec.
1137-1140.
Filing of, with Bureau of Labor Statistics, provi­
sion, Labor Management Relations Act. 1947—
July 61.
Ford Motor Co. and United Automobile Workers of
America (C IO ). Agreements on pensions, March
1950. 1950— Apr. I ll, 411.
------- Agreement of June 20, 1941, provisions.
1941— Aug. 383-390.
---------Contract signed immediately prior to passage
of Labor Management Relations A ct; provisions.
1947— Oct. 440-441.
-------Health and welfare provisions, 1948, methods
of financing. 1949— Feb. 146.
Full-Fashioned Hosiery Manufacturers of America,
Inc. and American Federation of Hosiery
Workers (Ind.), 1941-48, wage rates and re­
lated wage practices. 1949-Aug. 139-143.
Furniture Workers of America, United (CIO). Col­
lective agreement with Atlantic Cotton Felt Co.,
Newark, N. J .; welfare clause. 1947— Feb. 200.
General Motors. Automobile and electrical equip­




ment plants, 1948. Provisions and effects on fu­
ture wage developments. 1949— Feb. 160-161.
General Motors and United Automobile Workers of
America (C IO ). Details and effect of agreement
on current wage negotiations. 1948— June III,
644.
------- Five-year agreement signed May 23, 1950.
Provisions. 1950— June III, 655-656.
Guaranteed employment and wage plans. Definition,
history, limitations, and provisions. 1950—^Jan.
26-30.
------- Eligibility requirements, effect of absences,
and provisions for holidays, vacations, and trans­
fers. 1950— Jan. 29-30.
------- Provisions covering 42,500 workers summar­
ized. 1945— Apr. 707-727.
Health programs. See Welfare, this section; also

Health— Plans, health and welfare; and Min­
ing—-Coal (anthracite and bituminous).
Impartial agencies used in selection of arbitrator;
cost of arbitration. 1950— Feb. 164-165.
International Harvester Co. employees and the
U A W (CIO) agreement, May 1950, provisions.
1950— June 657.
Kaiser-Frazer Corp. and United Automobile
Workers (C IO ), 1948. Health and welfare pro­
visions, methods of financing, administration.
1949— Feb. 146.
Leather-tanning industry. Union status; wages;
overtime, week-end and holiday rates; hours;

vacations; seniority; and adjustment of disputes.
Provisions

(40

contracts),

1943,

summarized.

1944— June 1219-1223.
Longshoremen. Atlantic and Pacific Coasts, and
employers, October 1949, pension, welfare, and
social insurance benefits. 1949— Nov. IV.
------- Pacific. Wage changes, hourly rates for gen­
eral and penalty cargo, overtime rates, and rela­
ted wage practices, 1934-50. 1950— May 521-526.
Machinery industries. Prevalence of union con­
tracts, January 1945. 1946— Feb. 269.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Proportion of wage earners covered, January
1944 and 1945, by industry. Union-status pro­
visions, summary. 1944— Apr. 697-705; 1945—
Apr. 816-822.
Masters, Mates and Pilots (A F L ) and East and
Gulf Coast ship operators extend agreement
until April 1950. 1950— Jan. 54.
Membership-maintenance clause revised by National
W ar Labor Board, effective Dec. 1, 1943. 1944—
Jan. 67.
Military-service men. Provisions concerning reem­
ployment, seniority, insurance and benefit plans,
and provision for dependent survivors. 1942—
Dec. 1147-1155.
Mining. Anthracite. 1941 contract. Basis and pro­

visions. 1943— Aug. 291. Correction. 1943— Sept.
537.
---------------- Wage provisions, agreement of Mar. 8,
1944 (approved by National W ar Labor Board,
Apr. 8, 1944) between operators and United Mine
Workers. 1944— June 1197.
-------Bituminous coal. National wage agreement of
Apr. 11, 1945. Provisions summarized. 1946—

Apr. 551-552.
--------------- 1941 agreement, provisions of, with sum­
mary of previous contracts. 1943— Aug. 291.
---------------- United Mine Workers and Coal Mines
Administrator. May 29, 1946, summary of terms
and issues in negotiations. Welfare clause.
1946— Aug. 165-172; 1947— Feb. 197-199.
------- ------- United Mine Workers and operators.
Signed July 7, prior to passage of Labor Manage­
ment Relations A ct; provisions. 1947— Oct. 440.

16

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Collective agreements, U. S.— Continued
Mining. Bituminous coal. U M W A and employers’
associations, 1933-48. 1949— Mar. 303-307.
---------------- Wage provisions, contract approved in
April 1945. 1945— June 1209-1210.
----------------Wages and hours and related practices,
1933-48. 1949— Mar. 303-307.
------- Coal. Appalachian agreement, provisions of.
1941— Aug. 374-382.
------- Nation-wide agreements. 1947— Mar. 401-402.
---------------- Progressive Mine Workers of America
and Coal Producers Association of Illinois, Dec.
3, 1943. Provisions. 1944— Jan. 65.
----------------Welfare funds, provision for, 1948 collec­
tive agreements. 1949— Feb. 146.
Municipalities, with unions. Organizations involved,
character and provisions of contracts. 1943—
June 1165-1170.
Musicians, American Federation of (A F L ) and
employers. Welfare fund established by 1948
agreement, administration; recording ban lifted.
1949— Jan. 59, Feb. 146-147.
Nash-Kelvinator Corp. and U A W (C IO ), agree­
ment on pensions, March 1950. 1950— Apr. I ll,
411.
Night work, pay differentials for, all manufactur­
ing and selected industries, as of January 1943.
1943— July 133-144.
No-strike provision (text). Murray Body Corp.,
signed Aug. 19, prior to passage of Labor Man­
agement Relations Act. 1947— Oct. 440-441.
Offices, unionized, personnel practices; provisions.
Analysis of 50 agreements from American Man­
agement Association survey. 1948— Dec. 623-626.
Overtime, holidays, and shift differentials, 1948-49.
Study of 464 selected union agreements. 1949—
July 1-7.
Overtime provisions in specified defense industries.
1941— Apr. 841-851.
Paid-vacation provisions, as of November 1944.
Summary. 1945— Feb. 299-309.
Paper and allied-products industry. Union status;
wages; hours, overtime, and shift provisions;
vacations; seniority, lay-off, and promotion;
military service; health and safety; duration and
renewal of contracts; industrial disputes and
conciliation. Summary of provisions. 1942— Apr.
928-943.
Personnel practices, unionized offices; provisions.
Analysis, 50 agreements from American Manage­
ment Association survey. 1948— Dec. 623-626.
Petroleum-refining industry agreements (21), ne­
gotiated by Oil Workers International Union
(C IO ). Provisions summarized. 1945— June 12491253.
Philippine Islands. Extent of use, to time of Japa­
nese invasion. 1945— Apr. 783.
Power laundries. Discharge and quits, miscellane­
ous causes for, specified in agreements. 1946.
1947— Aug. 165.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Provisions
in 33 agreements, covering 65 percent of produc­
tion workers under union contracts, 1946; anal­
ysis of. 1947— Aug. 158-166.
Premium-pay provisions, as of latter half of 1946,
BLS study. 1947— Oct. 419-425.
Promotion and assignment. Provisions for, selected
clauses (text). 1948— Nov. 490-493.
Railroad dispute settled Dec. 17, 1948; retroactive
pay increase for employees and 40-hour week.
1949— Apr. III.
Railroads and nonoperating unions. Terms, Mar.
20, 1949. 1949— Apr. 433.




Rehiring and seniority provisions. Workers released
from war jobs. 1942— Dec. 1154-1155.
Rights and obligations of parties. Clauses. 1949—
Mar. 294-299.
Rubber industry. “ Big Four” agreement of Mar.
2, 1946. 1947— Mar. 404-405.
Safety provisions. Prevalence of, by industry
group, 1950 (table). 1950— Sept. 343.
Seaboard Airline Railroad and Federated Shop
Crafts (System Federation No. 39, Railway
Employee’s Department, A F L ) ; minimum-force
agreement, plan summarized. 1947— Aug. 167171.
Seniority provisions. Automobile industry. 1944—
Sept. 463-474.
------- Petroleum-refining industry. Provisions, 21
agreements, summary. 1945—June 1252-1253.
------- Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Rules
for, 1946. 1947— Aug. 163.
-------Servicemen, returned. Legal provisions and
agreement clauses. 1942— Dec. 1150-1151.
------- Types of, analyzed; selected clauses (text).
1941— May 1167-1177; 1948— Nov. 490-493.
------- Workers released, from war jobs; rehiring
provisions. 1942— Dec. 1154-1155.
Shipbuilding industry. Overtime provisions. 1941—
Apr. 850-856.
------- Pacific Coast. Amendment Jan. 13, 1942, to
provide continuous operation for war period.
1942— Feb. 384.
---------------- Zone standards of working conditions,
background and text of agreement. 1941— May
1162-1164.
------- Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and
renewal of contract. Summary of provisions.
1941— Mar. 562-563.
-------Stabilization. Duration of emergency, Atlantic
Coast, Great Lakes, and Gulf Coast. Provisions
for. 1941— Oct. 880-881.
------- ------- Program, contracts signed in 1941.
1943— A u g . 319-320.
---------------- Wage provisions effective for Atlantic,
Pacific, Great Lakes, and Gulf areas, under 1942
amendments as result of National Shipbuilding
Conference. 1942— July 85-86.
Shipowners and unions. War-risk bonus. Summary
of provisions. May 1917 to December 1941 (super­
seded by decisions of Maritime W ar Emergency
Board). 1944— Jan. 9-10.
Sick-leave provisions (350 union contracts) sum­
marized. 1945— May 1023-1029.
Sickness and accident benefits in, 1949. Prevalence
and costs; amount of weekly benefits; length of
benefit period; other provisions. 1950— June 636639.
Singer Manufacturing Co., Elizabeth, N. J. and
United Electrical Workers, October 1949. Non­
wage benefits and pay raises. 1949— Nov. III.
Steel companies and employees. Contracts, October
and December 1949. 1950— Jan. 53; Nov. III.
Steel industry. U. S. Steel Corp. and United Steel­
workers of America (CIO) 1937-48 and 1949.
1949— Feb. 194-200; 1950— Oct. 473-474.
------- U. S. Steel subsidiaries and United Steel­
workers of America, Apr. 22, 1947; background
of negotiations and summary of provisions.
1947— June 967-982.
Swift and Co. and three unions of employees,
October 1949. Non wage benefits and small wage
increase. 1949— Nov. III.
Swift and Co. and United Packinghouse Workers
(C IO ), regarding wage increases. 1950— Sept.
367.
Telephone employees, Bell System long lines, repre-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
sented by Division 10, Communications Workers
of America (C IO ), sign contract, June 1950.
Terms. 1950— Aug. 244.
Termination and reopening dates, 84 selected con­
tracts, July-December 1950; companies and
unions involved, by industries. 1950— June 650658.
Textile Workers Union (CIO) and 3 rug companies
employing 12,000 workers. Agreement on welfare
plans, March 1950. 1950— Apr. 411.
Tobacco industry (cigar manufacturing; cigarette,
smoking, and chewing tobacco; and snuff manu­
facturing). Provisions of contracts in effect
January 1945 summarized. 1945— Sept. 483-490.
Transfers. Provisions for; selected contract clauses
(text). 1948— Nov. 490-493.
Union liability and no-strike clauses; effects of
damage suit provisions for breach of contract in
Labor Management Relations Act, 1948. 1949—
Feb. 145.
Union recognition, provisions in January 1945.
Summary. 1946— Apr. 567-570.
Union security. Provisions, 1949-50. 1950— Aug.
224-227.
------- State legislation affecting, enacted in 1947.
1947— Sept. 279-280.
Union status. Features (including check-off) cov­
ered, provisions as of January 1944 and 1945
summarized. 1944— Apr. 697-705; 1945— Apr.
818-822.
Upholstered International Union of North Amer­
ica (A F L ) and Philadelphia Bedding Manufac­
turers' Association; welfare clause. 1947— Feb.
197.
Vacations with pay. Provisions summarized. Agree­
ments in effect, January 1943, and late 1948 or
early 1949. 1948— May 924-931; 1945— Feb. 299309; 1949— Feb. 146, Nov. 518-522.
Wage-adjustment clauses. Prevalence of and types
(general and cost-of-living, permissive and auto­
matic). 1945-46 and 1950. 1946— Nov. 733-743;
1950— Dec. 694-695.
Wage-adjustment or escalator clauses, based on
cost-of-living changes, 1950. Summary. 1950—
Nov. 557-559. See also Escalator clause, this

section.
Wage-incentive
provisions
summarized,
1941.
1941— Nov. 1126-1139.
Welfare plans. Conclusion of agreements on, March
1950; rubber workers, truck drivers, rug com­
panies, and public-utility workers. 1950— Apr.
411.
------- See also Collective bargaining— Health pro­
grams; Health— Plans, health and welfare; and
Mining— Coal (anthracite and bituminous).
Collective agreements, foreign countries:
Austria. Act of, February 1947 affecting. 1948—
Sept. 246.
Belgium. 1936 general strike, agreement reached,
summary of provisions. 1944— Feb. 291-292.
------- Extent of, and methods of enforcing, as of
1946, summarized. 1947— June 1021, 1026-1027.
Brazil. Petroleum industry. Provisions, effective for
4 years from June 1, 1939. Summary. 1941—
May 1177-1179.
British West Indies. Antigua. Leeward Islands.
Trades and Labor Union contract with Sugar
Planters Association. Provisions. 1945— June
1247-1248.
------- Jamaica. Bustamente Industrial TradeUnion contracts, January 1945, with Sugar
Manufacturers' Association. Provisions. 1945—
June 1246-1247.




17

------- St. Christopher. St. Kitt’s Nevix Trades and
Labor Union contract with St. Christopher Sugar
Producers' Association, January 1945. Provisions.
1945— June 1248.
Canada. Iron and steel industry. Union status.
Provisions effective in 1945. 1946— Mar. 424.
------- Maintenance-of-membership, union-shop, or
check-off clauses, increasing emphasis (1944) on
demands for. 1945— May 1044.
------- Provisions concerning, in labor relations code
of Feb. 17, 1944. 1944— Apr. 753-754.
------- Saskatchewan. Provincial Government, with
Saskatchewan Civil Servants' Association, Aug.
2, 1945. Provisions. 1945— Nov. 972-973.
Colombia. Petroleum industry. Contract signed Apr.
19, 1944. Provisions. 1945— July 91-92.
Denmark. Extent of, as of 1946, summarized.
1947— June 1020, 1022, 1024-1025, 1028.
Escalator clauses (cost-of-living). Use of in Great
Britain, Scandinavia, Finland, Switzerland, and
Italy. 1948— July 7.
Europe (Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain,
Netherlands, Norway, Sweden). Extent of, 1946.
1947— June 1019-1028.
France. Conditions prior to World W ar II, sum­
mary. 1944— Oct. 721-722.
------- Extent of, 1946, summarized. 1947— June
1020- 1027.
------- 1936 legislation, making compulsory inclusion
of minimum rates in. 1947— Aug. 154.
Germany (U . S. Zone). Number signed up to Octo­
ber 1947 and limitations imposed on by Control
Council. 1948— Apr. 384-385.
Great Britain. Coal mining. Contract, national,
signed Apr. 20, 1944, to be effective 4 years.
1944—July 112-115.
------- Cost-of-living scales regulating wage rates;
total workers covered by, year 1939 and April
1947; list of industries affected. 1947— Sept.
286-287.
------- Equal-pay provisions, wartime (World W ar
II). 1947— Sept. 289.
------- Holidays (paid), number providing for, 1947.
1948— Aug. 119.
-------Extent of, as of 1946, summarized. 1947— June
1019-1023, 1025-1027.
Greece. Laws enacted in 1935, 1936, and 1938,
provisions. 1943— Aug. 226.
Iceland. Provisions summarized, as of early months
of 1945. 1945— Sept. 490-491.
Italy. Nature of, under pre-Fascist and Fascist
governments. 1943— Nov. 912-913.
Japan. 1936-46; number of agreements and workers
covered. 1947— Feb. 245-247.
------- 1928 to 1936; progress. 1945— Oct. 662.
Mexico. Summary of dates made compulsory and
wage provisions in following industries: Counter­
pane; rubber; fine china and porcelain; starch
and glucose; wool; cotton; silk and rayon; knit­
wear; hard fibers; mattress and filling; sugar,
alcohol, etc.; Summary of laws covering collec­
tive agreements. 1944— Feb. 354-358.
Netherlands. Extent of, as of 1946. 1947— June
1021- 1023, 1025-1027.
------- Status, prior to World W ar II and effect of
German occupation. Summary. 1944— 3 an. 48-49.
Netherlands Indies. Provisions for, in Civil Code of
1847 and amendment of 1926. 1944— May 989990.
Norway. Early development and extent o f; methods
of enforcement; as of 1946. 1947— June 10191020, 1022, 1024-1028, Sept. 340-343.

18

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Collective agreements, f. c.— Continued
Peru. Indian tenants and highland farm proprietor,
contract between. Provisions summarized. 1945—
Aug. 273.
Rumania. Number concluded and workers covered,
by year, 1929-38. 1943— Dec. 1108-1109.
Sweden. Federation of Labor and Swedish Em­
ployers’ Association, contract Jan. 9, 1941, pro­
viding for wage increase. 1941— Apr. 1001.
------- Master wage agreement for 1942 and 1944,
between Federation of Swedish Employers and
Swedish Confederation of Labor. Provisions.
1943— Apr. 792; 1944— Apr. 857.
------- Status in 1943, 1944, and 1946 (postwar
years), summarized. 1944— Jan. 6 3-64; 1945—
Feb. 292-294; 1947— June 1019-1020, 1022, 1024,
1028.
------- Use of, to achieve wage stabilization during
war period. 1947— Oct. 431, 434.
Switzerland. Industries covered and provisions in­
cluded in 663 contracts, end of 1944. 1945— Dec.
1175-1177.
Venezuela. Application of and decline in, 1949.
1950— Oct. 451.
Workers covered by and trade-union membership,
selected countries, 1925, 1939, 1945. 1947— June

1020.

Yugoslavia. Law of 1922 and order of 1937, pro­
visions. 1943— Nov. 905.
Collective bargaining. United States:
Agreements under. See Collective agreements.
Area coverage, national, regional or municipal, bjr
industry. 1947— Mar. 399.
Atomic energy program. Background to 1946;
policy adopted and experience under policy,
1946- 50. Summary. 1950— Nov. 587-588.
Benefit plans under; character, growth, develop­
ment, and administration, 1948; funds, regulation
of. 1948— Sept. 229-234.
Building trades. Level of and its effect on pattern
of rates; comparison of union rates by region
and city. 1948— Jan. 52-53.
------- Southern California. Agreement on basic
standards, 1941-49. 1950— Jan. 14-18.
Chemical industry. Status summarized as of July1942. 1942— July 64-85.
City-wide. Needle trades and other industries and
trades. Special problems and methods of nego­
tiating. 1947— Mar. 408-410.
Coal industry. See Collective agreements, U. S.—
Mining, coal.
Corporation-wide in mass-production industries.
1947— Mar. 398.
Definition of, under Labor Management Relations
Act, 1947; procedure in selection of representa­
tives. 1947—July 59-60.
Developments during July 1946. Summary. 1946—
Aug. 219-220.
Emphasis on in recent labor briefs. 1950— July
73-74.
Employer associations or groups. Across industry
lines, examples of. 1947— Mar. 410.
------- Worker coverage under agreements with.
1947— Mar. 399.
Extent of. Elimination of unfair labor practices
through National Labor Relations Board action,
effect on. 1944— June 1207-1219.
------- Union status and worker coverage. 1942—
May 1066-1070; 1944— Apr. 697-705; 1946— Apr.
567-572; 1947— May 765-766.
Federal agencies (Government Printing Office and
Tennessee Valley Authority). Procedures fol­
lowed. 1944— Nov. 1069.
Forces affecting, 1948. Labor Management Rela­




tions (Taft-Hartley) Act, court decisions, admin­
istrative rulings and interpretations; changes in
collective agreements. 1949— Feb. 139, 143-147.
Foremen. Union policies as to inclusion under.
1943— *
June 1049-1053.
Geographic-area coverage. Industries in which used
and methods of negotiating. 1947— Mar. 405-408.
Glassware industries. Collective-bargaining history
since 1888. 1947— Mar. 397, 402-403.
Grievance procedures under. Summary (from study
of 101 plants). 1946— Aug. 175-185.
Hawaii. Postwar organization of labor. 1948—
May 491-492, June 609-610.
Health and welfare programs established by.
See Health— Plans, health and welfare; also
Mining— Coal (anthracite and bituminous).
Incentive-wage systems, controls established. 1942—
July 8-14.
Industry-wide. Case studies; social costs and gains.
1949— June 659-661.
------- Economic effects o f; meeting, May 14, 1948,
under auspices of Labor Relations Council,
Wharton School of Finance and Commerce,
University of Pennsylvania, discussion. 1948—
July 40-42.
------- Methods of negotiation by type of industry.
1947— Mar. 400-405.
Job tenure practices and worker security, influence
upon. 1950— July 20.
Jobs for handicapped to be provided by; advocated
by A F L . 1947— Aug. 205.
Labor organizations. Development of bargaining in,
1900 to 1950. 1950—July 41-47.
Legislation affecting, 1900-1950. 1950— July 4 8 50.
Legislation, need for, to provide governmental
assistance (President’s message to Congress,
January 1947). 1947— Feb. 255-256.
Maritime shipping industry. Organization for,
1880-1938; changing status of seamen, 18871945; conditions since World W ar II. 1950—
Sept. 332-337.
Merchant marine, U. S. offshore. Extent in Febru­
ary 1946, summary. 1947— Feb. 257-261.
Milk-supply industry. Chicago area. Milk Drivers
Union with dealer associations. 1942— June 12871305.
Nation-wide. Coal industry and railroad systems.
Methods of negotiating. 1947— Mar. 401-402.
Needle trades. Methods of negotiation. 1947— Mar.
408-409.
New York State. Gains in, 1949. 1950— Aug. 2 29230.
Obligations and rights of management and unions
under, sample agreement clauses. 1949— Mar.
294-299.
Pacific Coast. Multiple-employer bargaining in San
Francisco. Characteristics described. 1947— Apr.
672-674.
------- Status, early in 1947; history of development
in longshoring, maritime, transportation, fishing,
lumber, pulp and paper, motion-picture produc­
tion, aircraft, and teamster industries. 1947—
Apr. 650-672.
------- Wage negotiations, VJ-day to February 1947,
history of, by industry. 1947— Apr. 619-626.
Pension and retirement plans. Employers’ obliga­
tion to bargain collectively on; NLRB rulings in
Inland Steel Co. case. 1948— May I II-IV , Sept.
234.
------- Supreme Court decision on bargaining, April
1949. 1949— May IV.
Pension and social-insurance plans as result of,
1949-50. 1950— Dec. 664-665.
Philippine Islands. Operative, by 1926, in same

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
industries and occupations; 214 agreements
reported in 1939 and 1940. 191*5— Apr. 780, 783.
Pottery industry. Collective-bargaining history
since 1922. 191*7— Mar. 397, 402-403.
Price developments, importance as factor in. 191*8—
Jan. 1, Mar. III-IV .
Profit-sharing case studies. 191*9— Apr. 425-426.
Promotion, transfer, and assignment, analysis of,
and selected contract clauses (text). 19 If8—
Nov. 490-493.
Railroads. Methods of negotiating. Nation-wide
and individual railroad systems. 19A7— Mar. 402.
Representation determined by NLRB elections;
resume of year June 30, 1948-49. 1950— Apr.
402-403.
Rights protected by State labor relations acts.
1950— Aug. 214-217.
Rubber industry. Degree of uniformity in agree­
ments. 191f7— Mar. 404-405.
St. Louis area. Types of union recognition in
agreements negotiated by locals of Central
Trades and Labor Union (A F L ), year ending
Aug. 17, 1947. 191*8— Apr. 411.
Steel industry. Degree of uniformity in agreements
and reasons therefor. 191*7— Mar. 405.
------- Report of President's Steel Industry Board,
Sept. 10, 1949. Observations and recommenda­
tions of Board. 191f9— Nov. 507-510.
Union-management cooperation; analysis of, and
selected contract clauses (text). 19If8— Nov. 487490.
Wage developments, January-June 1949. 191f9—
Sept. 238—
239.
W ar bonuses to crew members sailing in the Far
East negotiated by the Seafarers International
Union (A F L ) and the National Maritime Union
(C IO ), July 1950. 1950— Aug. IV.
Collective bargaining, foreign countries:
Austria. Act on collective agreements, February
1947, affecting. 191*8— Sept. 246, 248.
------- Lag in, since liberation, and reasons. 191*8—
Sept. 248.
Canada. Establishment of, provided by Wartime
Labor Relations Regulations of Feb. 17, 1944.
191*5— May 1044.
------- Government-owned-company employees. Right
established by law Dec. 1, 1942. 191*8— Mar. 474475.
------- Ontario. Law of Apr. 14, 1943, provisions.
191*8— July 58-59.
France. Efforts of organized labor to obtain collec­
tive agreements in 1949. 191*9— July 13.
Germany. U. S. Government occupation policy per­
mitting; directives of April 1945 and July 1947;
works councils, establishment of. 191*7— Oct. 460.
-------U. S. Zone. Importance of, since beginning of
occupation, limitations imposed on, by Control
Council. 191*8— Apr. 384—
385.
------- Western. Provisions, labor legislation during
Occupation, 1945-50. 1950— Dec. 668-670.
Great Britain. Coal industry. Union membership,
1948; consultation between the National Coal
Board and unions. 1950— Jan. 20-21.
------- Trade-union demands in postwar period, suc­
cess o f; Government's effort to reconcile social
reforms with need for exports. 191*7— Sept. 285.
Ireland. Status of under 1946 Industrial Relations
Act. 191*7— May 866.
Japan. In labor-management relations, 1949-50.
1950— Oct. 448.
Netherlands. Laws of Apr. 7, 1933, and May 25,
1937, and order issued by German occupational
forces on Nov. 28, 1940. 191*1*— Jan. 48-49.
Norway. Status prior to World W ar II and changes
under German occupation. 191*1*— Sept. 508-509.




19

Rumania. Recognition by law, 1929. 191*8— Dec.
1105.
College graduates. Employment outlook for 1950. Sum­
mary. 1950— May 509-511.
College-trained workers. Wartime need for; proportion
in total working force in December 1941 and in
ordnance plants in April 1942. 191*2— July 60-63.
Colleges and universities. Enrollment in, as affected
by the war. Findings of BLS inquiry, academic year
1941-42. 191*2— Aug. 250-254.
Colonization. Colombia. Land purchase by tenants.
Decree of Oct. 4, 1944, provisions. 191*1*— Dec. 1169.
Committee for European Economic Cooperation:
Manpower report of technical subcommittee. 191*7—
Nov. 567-568.
Production goals, 16 Western European Nations,
and requirements from outside sources for period
1948-51; report to Department of State, Sept.
22, 1947, outlining agreement on; summary.
191*8— Jan. 40—
42.
Committee on Fair Employment Practices (U . S. Gov­
ernment) :
Created by Executive order June 25, 1941, to
prevent racial discrimination. 191*1— Aug. 398.
Established in Office for Emergency Management,
by Executive order 9346 of May 27, 1943. 191*8—
July 32—
33.
Expenses (with limitations) provided for carrying
out “ lawfully" vested functions, amendment to
War Agencies Appropriation Act. 191*5— Jan.
119-120.
Termination of, June 1946; summary of accomplish­
ments. 191*7— June 1068-1069.
Committees, joint production. See Joint production com­
mittees.
Common labor. See Wages and hours.
Communications industries, United States:
Ocean cable carriers, principal. Distribution of
employees by hourly earnings and selected oc­
cupations, October 1948 and 1947 (table). 191*9—
Oct. 395.
Radiotelegraph carriers, principal. Distribution of
employees by hourly earnings and selected oc­
cupations, October 1948 and 1947 (table). 191*9—
Oct. 395.
Technological changes, 1900-50. 1950— July 6.
Telephone carriers, class A interstate. Distribution
of employees by hourly earnings and selected
occupations, October 1948 and 1947 (table).
191*9— Oct. 393.
Union membership stipulations in wire and radio
communications and postal service. 1950— Mar.
278.
Western Union Telegraph Co. Distribution of wiretelegraph employees by hourly earnings and
selected occupations, October 1948 and 1947
(table). 191*9— Oct. 394.
Communism:
Hawaii. Importance of issue in labor movement.
191*8— May 489, 492, June 612.
Support of, among foreign labor organizations.
191*9— Feb. 181-183.
Trade-union attitudes and action. See Labor organi­
zations, under name o f organization .
Community welfare, U. S. workers, 1900-50. 1950—
July 28-30.
Company benefit plans for employees. See Benefits and
benefit funds, or under specific type o f benefit.
Company stores, Bolivia. Mining industry. Regulation
of and relation of prices to wages. 191*1— Oct. 991.
Comptroller General (United States). Decision concern­
ing inclusion of military-severance pay in labor costs
to Government contractor. 191*1*— May 1024-1025.

20

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Compulsory labor, foreign countries:
Belgium. German measures after invasion in 1940
to add to Germany’s labor forces. 1944— Feb.
284-285.
Bulgaria. Laws of 1920 and 1922, provisions.
1943— Oct. 681-682.
Ecuador. Road work required of men between age
21 and age 50, by Executive decree of June 15,
1944, and Road Conscription law effective Aug.
1, 1944. 1944— Nov. 962-963.
France. Law of Sept. 4, 1942, provisions. 1943—
Jan. 33.
French Indo-China. Conditions under which im­
posed and restrictive legislation. 1944— July 5 3 54.
Germany. Foreign workers from occupied countries,
methods of recruiting and control. 1942— June
1310-1319.
-------Introduced in 1938; later wartime application
to foreigners. 1945— Mar. 502-503.
Italy. Decree of February 1942, provisions. 1943—
Nov. 918-919.
-------Men 18 to 55 years, under decree of February
1942. 1942— May 1091.
Japan. 12-year minimum age limit adopted, Novem­
ber 1944. 1945— Jan. 46.
Netherlands Indies. Work performed for payment
of taxes; summary of status prior to Japanese
invasion. 1944— May 977-978.
Norway. Decreed by German occupational author­
ity, Apr. 15, 1941. 1941— Oct. 902.
------- Training of leaders planned to begin Decem­
ber 1940 and labor camps to open May 1, 1941.
1941— Mar. 595-596.
Poland. Jewish workers. Oppressive measures taken
by Nazi authorities after German conquest.
1944— July 69.
Rumania. System of premilitary training intro­
duced in 1937 and wartime measure of 1941.
1943— Dec. 1107-1108.
Soviet Union. Boys 14 to 17 or 18 to be trained for
State Labor Reserve under decrees of Oct. 3,
1940. 1941— Feb. 393-394.
Switzerland. Decree of Sept. 18, 1942. Provisions.
1942— Dec. 1166.
Thailand. Abolition of, by successive measures
taken between 1870 and 1905. 1944— June 1173.
Compulsory school attendance, United States. Laws,
1900-50, effect upon child labor. 1950— July 16.
Conciliation and arbitration, United States:
Coal mines (captive), strike. Decision of National
Defense Mediation Board, Dec. 7, 1941. 1942—
Jan. 96-97.
Collective agreements (11 industries). Provisions
for. 1941— Mar. 546-564.
Compulsory arbitration in labor disputes, legisla­
tion affecting, 1920-50. 1950— July 49-50.
Defense Mediation Board, National, discontinued,
and W ar Labor Board, National, established, by
Executive order of Jan. 12, 1942. 1942— Feb.
427-430.
Department of Labor, Conciliation Service (U. S.
Government). Activities, fiscal years 1941-45
and year following VJ-day. 1941— Sept. 707-709;
1942— Oct. 747-749; 1943— Sept. 540-542; 1944—
Sept. 575-577; 1945— Sept. 498; 1946— Dec. 891892.
------- History of operations, ended Aug. 21, 1947.
1947— Aug. 172-174.
-------Replaced by separate and independent agency,
under Labor Management Relations Act, 1947;
part of Department for 32 years. 1947— Oct. 436.
------- Labor Management Advisory Committee rec­
ommendations, December 1946 (first public ac­
tion). 1947— Jan. 81—
83.




-------Work o f; statistics, by industry and by State,.
November 1940 to April 1947. See Activities o f
U. S. Conciliation Service, each issue , January
1941-June 1947.
Disputes concerning overtime pay for work in
prosecution of war. Settlement procedure out­
lined by Secretary of Labor, Nov. 24, 1943*
1944— 3 an. 66-67.
Fact-finding boards appointed, Nov. 27, 1945, to
Jan. 17, 1946, and activities. 1946— Apr. 540-549.
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. Di­
rector appointed by President. 1947— Oct. 439.
-------Organization under Labor Management Rela­
tions Act, 1947; functions and facilities. 1947—
July 6 0-61; 1948— July 42-43.
-------Policies o f; statement of Director concerning.
1947— Nov. 564-565.
-------Report, 1948 (first); operations and FederalState cooperation. 1949— Mar. 312-313.
-------Report, 1949; outcome of disputes investigated,
degree of participation, and issues involved;
general policy considerations. 1950— Aug. 2 2 8 229.
Mediation Board, National Defense. Activities,
April to November 1941. 1941— May 1139, June
1477-1478, July 158-159, Aug. 471-472, Oct. 9 8 2 983, Dec. 1425-1426.
National W ar Labor Board. See National W ar
Labor Board.
New York State Commission Against Discrimina­
tion. Success of method in processing complaints
received. 1947— Jan. 24-25, 27.
Panel of special conciliators appointed to act in­
dividually in major industrial disputes, supple­
menting work of regular Conciliation staff. Mem­
bership. 1947— Feb. 265-267.
Provisions for, in Labor Management Relations
Act, 1947. 1947— July 57, 60-61.
Railroads. National Mediation Board. Activities,
1939-40, 1942-43, and 1943-44. 1941— Mar. 598600; 1944— Mar. 524-525; 1945— May 1039-1040.
------- Nonoperating employees. Special Emergency
Board appointed to reconsider claims; recommen­
dation of Nov. 4, 1943. 1943— Dec. 1128.
------- Union shop and hourly increase requested
(Sept. 25, 1942); Emergency Board’s report of
May 24, 1943, summary of. 1943— July 46-57.
Railway Labor Panel, National. Establishment by
Executive order, 1942, and members appointed
(text of order). 1942— July 92-93.
State legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal
and general; by States, fo r specified State.
Union agreements. Arbitration provision of col­
lective agreements in 14 important industries,
summary. 1944— Nov. 1001-1013.
Conciliation and arbitration, foreign countries:
Australia. Court of Conciliation and Arbitration.
Powers extended by wartime regulations. 1941—
Apr. 827-829.
Belgium. Provisions for, prior to German invasion
(1940). 1944— Feb. 292-293.
Brazil. National and regional labor councils and
local boards of conciliation and judgment. Sum­
mary of 1943 operation. 1944— Oct. 808-809.
Cuba. Compulsory procedure established by decree
of Dec. 10, 1941. 1942— Feb. 430-431.
France. Conditions prior to World W a r II, sum­
mary. 1944— Oct. 723-724.
Germany, U. S. Zone. Provisions for. Requests small
in number. 1948— Apr. 385.
Great Britain. Coal-mining industry. System put
into effect May 1, 1943 (Greene Tribunal
Scheme). 1943—June 1170-1174.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Greece. Laws enacted 1935 and 1936, provisions.
1948— Aug. 227.
Ireland. Trade-Union Tribunal provided for by
law of Sept. 22, 1941. 1942— May 1159-1161.
Italy. Methods of, under Fascist government. 1943—
Nov. 913-914.
Japan. Government measures to provide. Summary.
1945— Oct. 663.
Netherlands. Laws of 1923 and 1933, provisions.
1944~~~5an. 49—
50.
------- Merchant marine, wartime scheme, under 1943
regulations. Summary. 1944— Jan. 50.
------- Netherlands Indies. Laws of 1937, 1939, and
1940. Provisions. 1944— May 990-991.
New Zealand. Amendments to Industrial Concilia­
tion and Arbitration Act, 1939 and 1943, to
strengthen protection of workers active in unions
against loss of jobs. 1942— Apr. 903; 1943— Dec.

1202.

Norway. Laws of 1915, 1927, and 1944, provisions.
1944— Sept. 508-509; 1946— Aug. 234-235.
Rumania. Law of 1920, summary of provisions.
1943— Dec. 1109.
South Africa, Union of. Legislative measures, 1937
and 1942, provisions. 1943— Sept. 476, 482-483.
Yugoslavia. Law of 1937, provisions. 1948— Nov.
905-906.
Concrete industry. Labor requirements (man-hours per
1,000 masonry blocks or per ton of pipe) to produce
and transport, 1946. 1946— Nov. 681-691.
Confectionery industry. New York. Minimum-wage
orders, gains in women's earnings, 1937 to 1939-40.
1941— Feb. 361, Sept. 624.
Congress of Industrial Organizations. See under Con­
ventions, meetings, etc., U. S.; also Labor organiza­
tions, U. S.
Congresses. See Conventions, meetings, etc.
Conservation. Industrial, in First World War. Govern­
ment agencies formed, list of industries restricted,
1918, and operation of curtailment program. 1942—
Jan. 16-33.
Construction industry, United States (see also H ousing):
Activity and employment in 1948. Summary. 1949—
Feb. 178-181.
Activities and expenditures, 1939-47; future pros­
pects. 1947— Nov. 539-543.
Activities, October 1946 to May 1947. Summaries.
1947— Jan. 118-125, Feb. 296-304, Mar. 514-521,
Apr. 720-726, May 895-902, June 1108-1116.
Apprentices registered, by occupation group, De­
cember 1948. 1949— Aug. 130.
Apprenticeship programs registered, and appren­
tices employed, 1948 compared with 1947. 1949—
Feb. 181.
Boom, spring of 1950. 1950— July 104-105.
BLS program for statistical reporting, fiscal year
1947-48. 1947— Oct. 413.
Building and nonbuilding. Summaries August to
November 1946. 1946— Nov. 798-803, Dec. 10121018.
Building trades, union wage scales. See Wages and
hours— Building trades.
Contract work. Professional and scientific personnel
employed. July 1942. 1942— Nov. 932-935.
Controls over building materials. Extent of re­
moval, effective in second quarter 1947. 1947—
Sept. 310.
Disputes. See Labor-management disputes— Con­
struction industry.
Dwelling units. New nonfarm, by urban or rural
location. Number started and cost, selected years
1925-47, and monthly (January 1947-September
1948), by source of funds. See Current labor sta­




21

tistics, table F -5 , each issue May 1948-December
1950.
------- New urban and rural nonfarm. Number
started, and cost, selected years 1925-49, and
monthly (April 1946-March 1948), by source of
funds. See Current labor statistics, table F -8 ,
each issue July 1947-January 1948; table F -7 ,
February-March 1948; table F -6 , April 1948.
-------Nonfarm. Estimated changes in supply, April
1940- December 1948. 1949— July 47.
--------------- New permanent, number started, by type
of structure, 1920-48 (chart). 1949— Feb. 179.
---------------- New units, number and cost, by urban
or rural location and by source of funds, selected
years, 1925-49, quarterly and monthly, 1947September 1950. See Current labor statistics,
table F -5 , each issue May 1948-December 1950.
------- Privately financed, started October 1946March 1947, percentage distribution by type and
size of project. 1948—J wciq 636.
------- Privately financed (30 leading industrial
areas); number started, average cost, monthly
January 1946-September 1947. See Current labor
statistics, table F -7 , each issue July 1947-Janu­
ary 1948. (Table discontinued.)
-------With kitchen facilities, structural and facility
characteristics of, St. Louis and Minneapolis-St.
Paul areas, December 1949 (table). 1950— Sept.
365.
------- See also Family dwellings, this section .
Earnings and hours. See Wages and hours— Con­
struction.
Employment. See Employment statistics— Con­
struction.
Expenditures. Estimating, statistical methods o f;
coverage of BLS studies and classifications de­
fined; sources of data; and adjustment pro­
cedures. 1950— Feb. 177-185.
-------New building, by quarters, 1946 and 1947, and
by years, 1939-46. 1947— Nov. 540.
------- 1925-49 (table). 1950— July 111.
-------Private, commercial, and industrial, 1948 com­
pared with 1947. 1949— Feb. 179-180.
------- Total new, by type, 1915-48. 1949— Feb. 178180.
-------Total value, by type, private and public; 1939
and 1946-49; monthly, June 1946-November 1950.
See Current labor statistics, table F - l , each is­
sue July 1947-December 1950.
Family dwellings. New units scheduled, urban
areas, 1942, 1946, and 1947; monthly, April
1946-January 1948, by type and by source of
funds, private and public. See Current labor
statistics, table F -4 , each issue July 1947April 1948.
-------Private, 1-fam ily, started October 1946-March
1947, as percent of total projects. 1948— June 636.
-------Units started, new permanent, January 1946September 1947. 1947— Nov. 540-541.
------- See also Dwelling units, this section.
Federally financed. Contracts awarded and forceaccount work started. Value of, selected periods,
1936-49, and monthly, May 1946-October 1950,
by type of project. See Current labor statistics,
table F -2 , each issue July 1947-December 1950.
-------Value of contracts awarded and force-account
work started, April 1941 to April 1947. See sec­
tion on Building operation, each issue January
1941- October 1946, and Construction, each issue
November 1946-June 1947.
Fresno, Calif.; survey of current and anticipated
private construction volume, December 1946;
techniques used, designed by B LS; tests and
conclusions. 1947— July 73-75.

22

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Construction industry, U. S.— Continued
Homebuilding industry. BLS surveys, 1946 and
1947, showing predominence of small- over largeunit projects. 1948— June 636.
Houses. Cost, definition of. 1949— Jan. 44.
Houses, new, one-family. Labor requirements and
costs, 18 areas, by construction cost class, exterior
wall material, and region, 1946-47. 1949— May
518.
------- Man-hours required to build, 18 industrial
areas, 1946-47. Summary of BLS survey. 1948—
Dec. 611-614.
------- Multiple-unit projects, percentage distribu­
tion of man-hours by weeks of operation, 194647.-- 1949— May 524.
------- Occupational distribution of man-hours
worked on, by type of exterior wall material; by
construction cost classification; by size of opera­
tion; by selected area. 1948— Dec. 612-614.
------- Single-unit projects, percentage distribution
of man-hours worked, by cost, time, and type of
exterior wall material, and by weeks of opera­
tion, 1946-47. 1949— May 523, 525.
-------Started. January-March 1947, selected areas;
characteristics. 1949— Jan. 46-47.
---------------- October 1946-September 1947, selected
areas; cost. 1949— Jan. 44-45.
Industrial relations activities, June 1950. 1950—
Aug. 243.
Injury rates, 16,321 companies, 1948, by occupa­
tion and extent of disability. 1950— Apr. 387389.
List of projects included under. 1947— Aug. 202.
New. Labor requirements, by type of construction,
1946-48; and by quarters, 1947-48. 1948— Apr.
413-414; 1949— Feb. 203-204.
------- Nonresidential.
See
Nonresidential,
this
section .
-------One-family and multifamily houses. Labor re­
quirements and costs, 18 areas, by type of struc­
ture and size of project, 1946-47. 1949— May 519.
------- Public and private. Labor requirements for,
1948 and 1949. 1948— July 47-48, Oct. 393-394;
1949— May 545-546.
New, estimated. 5—
year period following World
W ar II. Value of type of project and source of
funds; site employment, by type of worker and
year. 1945— July 1-13.
—
Postwar period, with basic conditions govern­
ing extent; volume in past period 1 9 2 0 -4 3 . 1945—
Feb. 261-275.
------- Private and public, 1939-42, by type and
estimated valuation. 1942— Sept. 601-605, Dec.
1297-1298; 1943— Aug. 357-359, Dec. 1246-1248;
1944— Mar. 666-667.
Nonessential projects prohibited Apr. 9, 1942, by
order Conservation L -41 of U. S. W ar Produc­
tion Board. 1942— June 1355-1356.
Nonfarm areas. See Dwelling units, also Family
dwellings, this section.
Nonresidential. Permit valuation, new units sched­
uled, urban areas; 1946-49; monthly, April 1946September 1950; by general type. See Current
labor statistics, table F -5 , each issue July 1947April 1948; table F -4 , each issue , May 1948December 1950.
Postwar demand, production capacity, material
supply, machinery and equipment status, labor
supply, and possible measures to facilitate. Sum­
mary. 1944— May 913-926.
Postwar. Probable volume. General forecast and
controlling background; demand for private con­
struction; demand for public construction. 1945—
Feb. 261-275, Mar. 479-497, Apr. 728-738.




Private. Building and other. Demand for (probable)
in postwar period. 1945— Mar. 479-497.
-------Demand for, year 1939; and estimated demand
in 1950. 1947— Feb. 184.
Public. Demand (probable) for various types of, in
postwar period. 1945— Apr. 728-738.
Public utilities. Railroads, communication lines,
pipe lines, light and power, and gas projects.
Probable demand for in postwar period. 1945—
Mar. 494-497.
Public works and employment, 1930-50. 1950—
July 109-112.
Rental housing, percentage distribution, structures
containing 2 or more units, 1948, compared with
1947 and with 1925-29 period. 1949— Feb. 180.
Residential building, nonfarm. Statistics, 1946 and
1947. BLS program to develop better measures
of activity; sampling methods and survey tech­
niques used. 1948— Aug. 161-164.
State funds (financed from). Public buildings and
roads (highways). November 1940 to January
1943. 1941— Jan. 223, Feb. 464, Mar. 733, Apr.
1006, May 1283, June 1588, July 232, Aug. 512,
Sept. 768, Oct. 1041, Nov. 1306; 1942— Jan. 234,
Feb. 510, Mar. 780, Apr. 1030, May 1213, June
1416, July 164, Aug. 375, Sept. 614, Oct. 847,
Nov. 1067, Dec. 1295; 1943— Jan. 164, Feb. 369,
Mar. 599.
Urban building authorized. Valuation, total, se­
lected years 1942-49, monthly, April 1946-Sep­
tember 1950, by class of construction, type of
building, and source of funds. See Current labor
statistics, table F -3 , each issue July 1947-December 1950. (Number of dwelling units, be­
ginning with May 1948 issue.)
Wage Adjustment Board for Building Construction
Industry reconstituted, October 13, 1943; func­
tions and composition. 1943— Dec. 1127-1128.
Wages. Working rules, 6 basic trades and 13 sub­
trades, southern California, 1941-49. 1950— Jan.
14-18.
------- See also Wages and hours— Construction.
Work stoppages. See Labor-management disputes—
Construction industry.
Workweek, length of, 1947 and 1948, compared with
1944. 1949— Feb. 180.
Construction industry, foreign countries:
Canada. Joint control by employee and employer
representatives, for speedier war production.
1941— Apr. 837-840.
Great Britain. Housing program, by region, end
of 1946, estimated for 1947; under construction,
or approved but not started, by type, end of 1946,
estimated for 1947. 1947— Aug. 196-197.
Construction-machinery industry:
Characteristics, and scope of BLS survey February-April 1942. 1942—
-July 117-119.
------- Man-hours expended per unit, 1939-45, and
1947-48, by kind of product. 1947— July 4 1-47;
1949— Jan. 24 -3 0 ; 1950— June 645-648.
Consumer goods:
Consumption of, expansion in purchases, 1940, and
factors affecting. 1941— Mar. 532-533.
-------Production methods and technological changes.
1947— July 46-47; 1949— Jan. 28; 1950—June
647.
------- Wartime changes in American markets
(W ebb). 1942— Nov. 891-902.
Consumer goods industries. Readjustments in, 1946December 1948; declines in employment, man-hours
and workweek, rise in lay-off rates, selected indus­
tries. 1949— Mar. 273-277.
Consumer income and expenditures:
Fact-finding activities of BLS concerning. 1945—
May 950-951.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
See also Cost of living; Expenditures— Consumer;
Income — Consumer; and Prices — Consumers’
price index.
Consumers’ cooperative societies. See Cooperatives.
Consumers’ price index. See Prices.
Contract labor, foreign countries:
Japan. Labor-boss system, history, industries in­
volved, and legislation designed to eliminate.
1949— Jan. 47—
49.
Netherlands Indies. Measures adopted since 1880.
Provisions summarized. 1944— May 976-977.
Contractors. Licensing and examination of. State laws,
summary of. 1941— Feb. 395-398.
Contracts, U. S. Government:
Compliance with Federal and State laws, National
Defense Advisory Commission statement, Sept.
1, 1940, concerning. Discussion of. 1941— Mar.
535-536.
Davis-Bacon Act. See Legislation* U. S., Federal
and general— Contracts, U. S. Government.
Girls under 18 employed in certain industries. Safe­
guards required under exemption Apr. 21, 1942,
from provisions of section 1, Public Contracts
Act. 1942— June 1328-1329.
------- Wartime provision revoked by Secretary of
Labor, autumn of 1945. 1946— Jan. 69.
Military-severance pay provided for in collective
agreement and approved by W ar Labor Board,
to be included in contractor’s costs (Dec. of
Compt. Gen.). 1944— May 1025.
Minimum wage. Adjustment to 75-cent minimum.
1950— Mar. 283.
------- Determinations. See under specific industry.
Walsh-Healey Act governing. See Legislation,
U. S., Federal and general— Walsh-Healey Act.
Wartime. Termination of, after close of war. Rec­
ommendations in “ Baruch report,” Feb. 15, 1944,
summary. 1944— Apr. 758-759.
Conventions, meetings, etc., United States:
Aging, FSA Conference on. August 1950. Repre­
sentation, proposals, and reports. Summary.
1950— July 104-105, Oct. 489-490.
American Federation of Labor. Annual conven­
tions, 1941-50, proceedings summarized. 1941—
Nov. 1215-1219; 1 ^ - N o v . 1000-1006; 1943—
Dec. 1180-1186; 1945— Feb. 318-324; 1946— Nov.
777; 1947— Nov. 527-531; 1948— Dec. I I I -I V ;
1949— Jan. 1-6, 12-13, Nov. IV, 494-498; 1950—
Oct. IV, Nov. 553-556.
------- Attack on Communism, decision to reunion
“in politics.” 1948— Dec. III-IV .
------- Price and wage controls, report stating
attitude toward. 1946— Nov. 777.
American Public Welfare Association. Annual con­
ference, December 1949, discussions summarized.
1950— Jan. 51-52.
Apprenticeship Conference, Eastern Seaboard,
1949 and 1950. Discussions and resolutions
summarized. 1949— Aug. 130-132; 1950— Aug.
213-214.
Automobile Workers (C IO ). Annual convention,
Oct. 4-10, 1943, review of report. 1943— Nov.
954-957.
Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural Implement
Workers of America, United (U A W -C IO ) twelfth
convention, July 1949; resolutions and reports.
1949— Sept. 243-246.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders and Helpers,
International. Kansas City, Mo., January-February 1944. Proceedings, summary of. 1944—
Apr. 771-781.
Bretton Woods— United Nations Monetary and
Financial Conference, July 1944. Description




23

of fund proposed by. 1945— May 975-976.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers
(A F L ), St. Louis. September 1944. Proceedings.
1945— Jan. 99-101.
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated (14th
biennial, Chicago, May 1944). Summary of pro­
ceedings. 1944— Aug. 332-336.
Committee on Employ the Handicapped Week,
sixth annual meeting, August 1950. Purpose of
meeting and summary of addresses. 1950— Oct.
490-491.
Congress of Industrial Organizations. Annual con­
ventions,
1941-50,
proceedings
summarized.
1941— Dec. 1452-1453; 1942— Dec. 1219-1222;
1944— Jan. 113-119; 1945— Feb. 324-327; 1947—
Nov. 531-534; 1948— Dec. I I I -I V ; 1949-^ Jan. 1,
7-12, 14, Dec. 640-645; 1950— Dec. IV.
------- Resolutions: Attack on Communism, decision
to remain “in politics.” 1948— Dec. I II-IV .
Cooperative League of U. S. Biennial Congresses,
1942 and 1944, action and resolutions. 1943—
Jan. 88-91; 1945— Mar. 566-567.
Dumbarton Oaks Conference, Washington, D. C.,
Aug. 14-Oct. 7, 1944. Proposals submitted by,
summary of. 1945— Apr. 702-706.
Education Assembly, International. Meeting at
Frederick, Md., June 1944. 1944— July 107.
Electrical Radio and Machine Workers (CIO)
International Union, founding convention, Phila­
delphia, November 1949. 1949— Dec. III.
Employment of Disabled Veterans, conference on,
May 1950. Summary. 1950— July 126-127.
Employment of women in wartime, conference on,
March 1943. Resolutions adopted. 1943— June
1120- 1121 .
Employment problems of the Negro, Michigan State
Conference on; Detroit, October 1940. Findings,
committee report summarized. 1941— Feb. 350354.
Foreman’s Association of America, annual meet­
ing, December 1945. Roster of officers reelected.
1946— Feb. 244.
Garment Workers’ Union, Ladies’ International,
May-June 1944. Proceedings and reports, sum­
mary of. 1944— Sept. 560-569.
Governmental Labor Officials, International Asso­
ciation of, 1941 and 1947. Proceedings, sum­
marized. 1941— Dec. 1453-1456; 1947— Nov. 565566.
Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers, International
Union, United, May 1944. Summary of proceed­
ings. 1944— Sept. 555-560.
Hosiery Workers, American Federation of (C IO ),
September 1944. Proceedings, summary of. 1944—
Dec. 1190-1194.
Hot Springs Conference, June 1943. Food and
Agriculture Organization recommended; declara­
tion of food problem. 1945— June 1184.
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, In­
ternational Association of. 1941 annual meeting.
1941— T)ec. 1456.
Labor legislation, National Conference on. 1940-41
and 1944-49, summaries of recommendations and
proceedings. 1941— Jan. 136-137, Dec. 1450-1451;
1945— Feb. 330-332; 1946— Feb. 254-257; 1947—
Feb. 268-271; 1948— Jan. 28-31, Dec. IV ; 1949—
Jan. 15-19; 1950— Jan. 39-42.
Labor-Management Conference. 1945. Composition,
procedure, and texts of reports. Wage-issue
resolution. 1946— Jan. 37-43, Dec. 875-876.
------- 1948. Management functions classified by
spokesmen for management, opposition of labor
members. 1949— Mar. 294-295.

24

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Conventions, meetings, etc., U. S.— Continued
Labor Relations Council, Wharton School of
Finance and Commerce, University of Pennsyl­
vania, auspices of, May 1948; significance of
national collective bargaining. 1948— July 40-42.
Machinists, International Association of. OctoberNovember 1945. Problems discussed, recommen­
dations. 1946— Jan. 55-60.
Marine Cooks and Stewards of Pacific Coast. July
1945. Organizational changes; programs out­
lined. 1945— Oct. 752-754.
Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America,
Industrial Union of (C IO ), 1944 convention,
proceedings. 1945— Jan. 102-106.
Migratory Labor, Interstate Conference on (South­
ern), Atlanta, December 1940. Recommendations
summarized. 1941— Feb. 343-345.
Mine Workers, United. 1942, summary of proceed­
ings. 1944— Dec. 1195-1202.
Oil Workers’ International Union. Annual conven­
tion, Fort Worth, Tex., December 1945. Summary
of proceedings. 1946— Apr. 606-608.
Rubber Workers of America, United. Annual meet­
ing, Grand Rapids, December 1945. Summary of
proceedings. 1946— Apr. 604-606.
Safety, President’s Conference on. 1948. First
national conference on industrial safety; subjects
covered, committees appointed and scope of
activities; provision for final recommendations.
1948— Nov. 508-511 (correction p. 510); 1949—
Jan. 59.
------- 1949 and 1950. Summary of discussions and
recommendations. 1949— May 529-532; 1950—
Aug. 207-209.
Shipbuilding Conference, National, 1942, composi­
tion of personnel (footnote) and results of pro­
ceedings. 1942— July 85-86.
Sleeping Car Porters, Brotherhood of. September
1944. 1944— Nov. 998.
Steelworkers of America, United, 1942 convention
and provisions of constitution. 1942— Sept. 4 97500.
Telephone Workers, National Federation of. June
1944. Summary of proceedings. 1944— Sept. 569571.
Textile Workers of America, United (A F L ). Bien­
nial, 1944. Proceedings summarized. 1944— June
1225-1228.
Typographical Union, International. August 1944.
Summary of proceedings. 1944— Oct. 782-787.
Union conventions. May 1950. Summary. 1950—
June IV.
------- 106 scheduled, April 1950. Dates, unions, and
places of meetings. 1950— June 654-655.
Women’s Bureau, U. S. Department of Labor,
conference commemorating Seneca Falls Conven­
tion of 1848, beginning of women’s rights move­
ment. 1948— Apr. 408-409.
Workmen’s Compensation and Rehabilitation, Na­
tional Conference on. March 1950. Needs for
improved services and recommendations, sum­
mary. 1950— May 511-513.
Conventions, meetings, etc., foreign countries:
British Trades-Union Congress. See Great Britain,
this section .
Canadian Conference on Reconstruction, Dominion
and Provinces, August 1945. 1946— Jan. 67-68.
Canadian Congress of Labor. 1942-44, review of
proceedings. 1942— Dec. 1222-1223; 1948— Dec.
1188; 1945— Jan. 107-108.
Canadian National Joint Conference of Employers
and Employees in Building Industry, Ottawa,
February 1941. Proceedings summarized. 1941—
Apr. 837-840.
Canadian Trades and Labor Congress, 1941 to 1944.




Discussions and resolutions summarized. 1942—
Jan. 123-124, Oct. 725-726; 1943— Dec. 11861188; 1945— Jan. 108-110.
Great Britain. British Trades Union Congress,
annual meetings, 1940-45 and 1948-49; proceed­
ings summarized. 1941— Jan. 154-155, Dec. 1457—
1459; 1942— Dec. 1223-1225; 1943— Dec. 11891190; 1945— Jan. 112-114, Dec. 1179-1181;
1948— Nov. 511-513; 1949— Dec. 675-676.
India. Policy Committee of Resettlement and Re­
employment (New Delhi, Feb. 29, 1944). 1944—
July 132-133.
Italian General Confederation of Labor, First Offi­
cial convention, Naples, January-February 1945.
1945— May 1012.
------- Recommendations of April 1945 meeting.
1945— Aug. 282-283.
Italy. World Federation of Trade Unions (W F T U ),
Rome, May 5-10, 1948. Successful efforts of
western trade-unionists to reduce powers of gen­
eral secretary; other details. 1948— Aug. 147151.
Soviet Union. Tenth congress of Soviet tradeunions, April 1949, Moscow; report of All-Union
Council of Trade-Unions; new constitution; elec­
tion of officers. 1949— Aug. 164-166.
Stockholm Conference attended by representatives
of Refugee Committee and of United States,
Swedish, and German trade-unions, February,
1944. Summary of plans discussed. 1944— Aug.
337-339; 1945— Mar. 515.
West Indian Conference (under auspices of A n gloAmerican Caribbean Commission), Barbados,
March 1944. Objectives. 1944— July 110-111.
Conventions, meetings, etc., international:
Anti-Communist Inter-American Confederation of
Workers (C IT) convention, Havana, September
1949. Membership representations and action
taken at convention. 1949— Dec. 674-675.
Christian International Trade-Union Congress,
Lyons, France, May-^June 1949. Background and
program of CISC; conference action; member­
ship and relations with other unions. 1949—
Dec. 670-674.
Cooperative Alliance, International, 17th Congress,
Prague, Czechoslovakia, 1948. Summary of pro­
ceedings. 1948— Dec. 600-602.
Free trade-unions, international conference of,
London, November 1949. 1949— Dec. III-IV .
Inter-American Committee on Social Security,
Santiago de Chile, Sept. 10-16, 1942; agenda for.
1942— Aug. 238-239.
Inter-American Confederation of Workers (C IT ).
Peru, January 1948. Organizations represented,
resolutions approved and program of action.
1948—-May 299-502.
Inter-American Development Commission, May
1944. List of individual commissions included in
central agency. 1944— July 107-109.
International Labor Conference. 1941, 1944-46,
and 1948-50, proceedings summarized. 1941—
Dec. 1448-1450; 1944—July 1 -1 2 ; 1946— Jan.
44-47, Dec. 935-940; 1948— Sept. 261-266; 1949—
Sept. 272-276; 1950— Aug. 210-213.
------- Summary of background and proposed work
for 1941 meeting, New York. 1941— Sept. 616617.
International Labor Organization. Coal Mines
Committee, third session, Pittsburgh, 1949. Coun­
tries represented, discussions, and resolutions
adopted. 1949— June 631-632.
------- London meeting, April 1942 (Goodrich).
1942—June 1320-1322.
------- Regional Conference of American States,
Montevideo, Uruguay, 1949. Countries repre-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
sented,

discussions,

and

resolutions

adopted.

19^9— June 632-634.
Labor Conference of American Countries, Regional,
Mexico City, April 1946. Summary of resolutions
adopted. 1946— June 907-911.
Latin-American Confederation of Labor (C T A L ).
Mexico City, March 1948. Organizations repre­
sented, resolutions approved. 1948— May 499,
502-503.
Latin-American Workers, Confederation of. Second
regular meeting, Colombia, December 1944.
1945— June 1254.
Manpower Conference, January 26 to February 9,
countries participating in European Recovery
Program. Requirements through 1948, by coun­
try (preliminary and revised estimates). Sugges­
tions for solution of technical manpower problems.
1948— Apr. 404-405.
Metalworkers Federation, International. Confer­
ence of central committee, Washington, D. C.,
1949. History of federation, action, and dis­
cussion. 1949— June 634-635.
Miners7 International Federation, meeting of ex­
ecutive committee, Washington, D. C., 1949.
Agenda, history of federation, and reports on
mining industry conditions. 1940— June 636-637.
Trade
Secretariats, International. Conference,
England, 1949. Coordinating committee estab­
lished to deal with problems of member organiza­
tions. 1949— June 637.
United Nations Conference, San Francisco, A p rilJune 1945. For International Organization. Out­
line by U. S. State Department of work proposed
for. 1945— Apr. 701-706.
------- Provision for international agencies to be
brought into relationship by negotiation with
Economic and Social Council. 1945— Sept. 436.
United Nations Monetary and Financial Congress,
Bretton Woods, July 1944. Description of fund
proposed by. 1945— May 975-976.
World Federation of International Groupments.
First conference, New York City, December
1942. 1943— Jan. 90.
World Trades-Union Conference. London, February
1945. Declaration (of committee) concerning
social security, including family allowances.
1945— Nov. 948-949.
---------------- Scope of representation, and objectives
stated. 1945— May 1030-1032.
-------Second, Paris, Sept. 25-Oct. 8, 1945. Creation
of World Federation of Trade-Unions. 1946—
Jan. 47-54.
“ Coolie” labor, China. Estimated number so classed,
and nature of work. 1945— Jan. 21.
Cooperatives, United States:
Alabama. Status of cooperative movement. Sum­
mary. 1946— Oct. 584.
Alaska. Indian community on Annette Islands.
Summary of activities. 1943— Mar. 648.
Apartment buildings. See Housing, this section .
Arkansas. Status of cooperative movement. Sum­
mary. 1946— Oct. 584.
Banks, labor. Capital, surplus, and undivided
profits; deposits; and total resources; by indi­
vidual bank, fiscal years 1941-46; and for 4
banks combined, by year, 1934-49. 1941— Sept.
656; 1942— Nov. 999; 1944— Jan. 106, Dec. 12201221; 1945— Oct. 738; 1947— May 834; 1949—
Jan. 55; 1950— July 125.
California. Status of associations in 1946, with
background. 1947— Apr. 689-691.
Clothing Workers, Amalgamated, of America.
Apartment-building projects. 1941— Sept. 646.
Cold-storage. Farmers7 lockers in central plants.
Extent of service, 1941. 1942— Jan. 116-117.




25

Communal colonies, California and Washington.
Short-lived associations in early period. 1947—
Apr. 688.
Community Cooperative Hospital, Elk City, Okla.
Favorable decision by State district court,
February 1941. 1942— Mar. 685.
Consumers7 associations. Activities summarized,
years 1940-49 (education and recreation; ex­
pansion of services; labor relations; legislation;
structural and functional changes; etc.). 1941—
Mar. 638-648; 1942— Mar. 683-692; 1943— Mar.
499-515; 1944— Mar. 553-565; 1945— Mar. 566574; 1946— Mar. 403-410; 1947— Mar. 472-482;
1948— Mar. 261-264; 1949— Apr. 407-410; 1950—
Mar. 284-286.
------- Distributive businesses and services handled,
as shown by BLS Directory, 1943 (Bull. No.
750), summary. 1944-Jan. 102-106.
-------Income, taxable, factors affecting computation
of. 1942— Apr. 985-988.
------- Operations, years 1940-49 (membership and
business, by type; activities summarized by type;
business done by service federations and whole­
sales; production by central cooperatives). 1941—
Sept. 648-655; 1942— Nov. 980-999; 1943— Oct.
756-761; 1944— Oct. 777-778; 1945— Sept. 467474; 1946— Nov. 750-753; 1947— Oct. 456-459;
1948— Nov. 499-502; 1949— Oct. 399-402; 1950—
Sept. 355-358.
------- Position and future possibilities of associa­
tions as aid to consumers (summary of TNEC
statement). 1942— Jan. 114-116.
------- Production by federations. Objectives stated
by Cooperative League of the U.S.A. 1944—
Sept. 548.
------- Production by local consumers7 associations
(137 reporting). Summary of activities. 1944—
Jan. 106.
-------Productive plants operated by central federa­
tions, June 1944, summary; value of goods pro­
duced, by product and section, 1943; geographical
location of plants, by State. 1944— Sept. 548-554.
------- Retail store and petroleum. Trend of opera­
tions, changes in net earnings, 1942-49. 1948—
Nov. 501-502; 1949— Oct. 402; 1950— Sept. 357358.
------- Upper Lake Region of Michigan, Minnesota,
and Wisconsin. Place in the community, charac­
teristics, and evaluation of Finnish-initiated
movement. 1941— Oct. 933-938.
------- Wholesale associations. Membership, business
operations, earnings, and patronage refunds,
1939 and 1940. 1941— Sept. 650-655.
----------------Services added during 1941 summarized.
1942— Mar. 689.
------- ------- Status under Guffy Act, according to
Bituminous Coal Commission ruling, 1941. 1942—
Mar. 684.
Cooperative League of U.S.A. Biennial congresses.
Resolutions and recommendations, 1942, 1944,
and 1948, summarized. 1943— Jan. 88-91; 1945—
Mar. 566-567; 1949— Apr. 407-408.
Credit unions. Development, trend of, 1931-47
(chart). 1948— Oct. 385.
------- Legislation proposed to enable payment of
patronage refunds to borrowers. 1941— Mar. 639.
-------Operations, funds, earnings and dividends, by
States, 1939-47; number, by State and type of
charter, end of year 1940-49. 1941— Aug. 429436; 1942— Sept. 540-547; 1943— Oct. 762-765;
1944— Oct. 778-781; 1945— Oct. 732-737; 1946—
Dec. 962-966; 1947— Nov. 555-557; 1948— Oct.
385-387; 1949— Sept. 276-278; 1950— Sept. 360362.

26

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperatives, U. S.— Continued
Credit unions. State and Federal, relative develop­
ment of, 1925-47. 191*7— Nov. 558; 191*8— Oct.
388; 191*9— Sept. 279; 1950— Sept. 362.
------- Status in 1942, summary of. 191*8— Mar. 508509.
Distributive associations. See Consumers' associa­
tions, this section.
Educational work in 1940, summary. 191*1— Mar.
646-647.
Electricity associations. Aided by Rural Electrifica­
tion Administration, by State, and operations to
end of 1942. 191*1*— Feb. 326-330.
------- Federation's purchase of private power com­
pany. Public service commission (Mo.) ruling on
protest by 14 other companies. 191*1*— Mar. 557.
------- R E A activities, years 1935-36 to 1939-40,
summarized; income and payroll, year ending
June 30, 1940. 191*1— Apr. 896-900.
-------REiV promotion of. Summary for first 5 years,
statistics as of Dec. 31, 1941. 191*3— Jan. 91-93.
-------Service to villages. Public Utilities Commission
(Ark.) ruling. 191*1*— Mar. 557.
Farmers' cooperatives. Marketing and purchasing.
Number organized and number discontinued,
1863 to 1939, and longevity, by type; number
active in 1939, specified States. 191*2— Mar. 692695.
------- Purchasing. Associations operating, 1939-40,
and 1943-44, estimated membership and business;
development since 1913. 191*1— June 1436-1437;
191*6— Jan. 78; 191*7— Oct. 459.
Farmers' market, consumer-sponsored; develop­
ment of. 191*9—Jan. 44.
Farmers' Union, National. Relations with coopera­
tives summarized, 1942. 191*8— Mar. 510.
Farmers' use of. Extent, by State. 1929 and
1939. f P ^ - J a n . 117-119.
Federations, developments among. See Consumers'
associations, this section.
Florida. Status of movement. Summary. 191*6—
Oct. 584.
Functions and central structure, change in, 1947.
191*8— Mar. 264.
Georgia. Status of movement, summary. 191*6—
Oct. 584.
Health Federation of America, Cooperative. First
annual meeting. Existing prepayment groups
and, 1948 State legislation. 191*9— Apr. 409-410.
Housing. Activities in 1941 and 1949 summarized.
191*2— Mar. 687-688; 1950— Mar. 285-286.
------- Apartment buildings constructed by Amalga­
mated Clothing Workers of America. Cooperative
management of buildings, and related coopera­
tive enterprises. 191*1— Sept. 646.
------- Home-building projects. Penn Craft, Pa.;
Iona, Idaho; Chapel Hill, N. C.; Madison, W is.;
Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn.; and Greenbelt,
Md. Summary of developments and community
activities. 191*1— Feb. 292-321.
------- Mutual plan for purchase by residents, of
Government-financed emergency and “ Greenbelt" projects. Summary. 191*6— Mar. 406-407.
------- Projects developed in 1947. 191*8— Mar. 262263.
------- Projects, features of, in comparison with
other plans (excerpts from report by Coopera­
tive Project, New York). 191*3— Jan. 93-96.
------- Public. Buying clubs, cooperatives, and credit
unions organized by tenants. 191*2— Jan. 101.
------- Resolutions on, Congress of International
Cooperative Alliance (Prague). 191*8— Dec. 600.
-------Units built or under construction, 1948, num­
ber. 191*9— Apr. 410.




------- Wisconsin Cooperative Housing Association;
Crestwood Community. Home-building plan be­
gun in 1936. Summary and status, October 1940.
191*1— Feb. 306-312.
Indiana. Handicraft cooperative in operation
(Black River Falls, W is.). 191*6— Mar. 409.
Insurance associations. Developments, 1941 to 1943
summarized. 191*2— Mar. 688; 191*8— Mar. 507;
19U — Mar. 560-561.
Kentucky. Status of movement. Summary. 191*6—
Oct. 584-585.
Labor relations, summary, 1942. 191*8— Mar. 509.
Laws and decisions affecting cooperatives, 1943;
summary. 191*1*— Mar. 554-557.
Laws, State. See Legislation, U. S., by State.
Louisiana. Status of movement. Summary. 191*6—
Oct. 585.
Mail-order firms ordered by Federal Trade Com­
mission to cease unwarranted use of word “ co­
operative” in names. 191*1— Mar. 639.
Medical and hospital care. Development in coopera­
tive provision for, 1945. 191*6— Mar. 407-408.
------- Expansion in 1941 summarized. 1942— Mar.

688.
Medical-care associations. Developments in 1942,
1943, 1946, 1947, and 1949. 191*8— Mar. 506507; 191*4— Mar. 559-560; 191*7— Mar. 477-480;
191*8— Mar. 263-264; 1950— Mar. 285.
Mississippi. Status of movement. Summary. 191*6—
Oct. 585.
Negroes. Conditions in various associations, 1945.
191*6— Mar. 408-409.
North Carolina. Status of movement. Summary.
191*6— Oct. 585.
North Dakota. Operations 1941-42 and 1942-43,
summarized. 191*8— June 1147-1148; 191*4— Feb.
330.
Oil associations. Minnesota. Growth, 1921 to 1940;
status, 1939. 1941— Oct. 938-940.
------- Nebraska. Status, 1938. 1941— Oct. 940.
Oil-producing association. Kansas. Promotion of
and results achieved. 1941— Mar. 644.
Oklahoma. Status of movement. Summary. 191*6—
Oct. 585.
Oregon. Status of associations in 1946, with back­
ground. 1947— Apr. 692-693.
Pacific States. Grange. (Patrons of Husbandry).
Importance of, in development of movement.
1947— Apr. 688, 692-695.
Philippine Islands. Summary of development,
1916-41; policies under Japanese occupation.
1945— Apr. 784-785, 789.
Postwar problems, summary of, and program of
Cooperative League. 1943— Jan. 86-91.
Production. See Consumers' associations, this sec­

tion.
Radio presentation. Opposition encountered and
plan for series of broadcasts early in 1943.
1943— Mar. 504-505.
Religious groups. Relations with, summarized,
1942. 1943— Mar. 510.
Rural-urban cooperation in movement and meth­
ods used. 1949— Jan. 43-44.
Savings and loan associations. Home financing,
mortgage-lending activity, by class of associa­
tion and by State, 1941-42, and trends, 192342 (Torrance). 1943— May 932-940.
------- New mortgage loans made, by purpose of
borrower, and financial statements, 1943 and
1944. 1946— Jan. 77.
Self-help. Utah. Development, 1935-41, legislation,
1941, and status of associations in May 1941.
1941— Aug. 438-443.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Washington, D. C. Exchange. Activities to
1940. 1941— July 35-49.
Shares, sale of. Appeal to State (Mass.) Public
Utilities Commission for exemption from restric­
tion in “ blue sky” law. 1944— Mar. 554.
South Carolina. Status of movement. Summary.
1946— Oct. 585.
Southern States (A la., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ky., La.,
Miss., N. C., Okla., S. C., Tenn., Tex., V a.).
Development of movement and summary of
status in mid-1940’s. 1946— Oct. 583-586.
Students’ associations. Membership, types, dis­
tribution by States, finances, and administration,
1941. 1943— Apr. 702-720.
------- Organizations and congresses in 1940. 1941—
Mar. 646.
Taxation of consumers’ associations. Taxes paid,
and kind, comparison with private business,
and legal status as to taxation, 1940 (BLS
study). 1942— Apr. 968-988.
Tennessee. Status of movement. Summary. 1946—
Oct. 585.
Texas. Status of movement. Summary. 1946— Oct.
585-586.
Training of employees. Summary, 1942. 1943—
Mar. 503-504.
Union participation, extent of. BLS study of 600
associations, various types. 1948— Oct. 388-392.
------- See also Labor organizations, U. S.— Co­
operatives, consumers’.
Virginia. Status of movement. Summary. 1946—
Oct. 586.
W ar, effects of, and wartime problems, 1942.
1943— Mar. 510-515.
Washington. Status of movement, 1946, with back­
ground. 1947— Apr. 693-695.
Wholesale associations. See Consumers’ associa­
tions, this section.
Cooperatives, foreign countries:
Argentina. Development, 1930-39, and status,
1938-39. 1941— Apr. 810-812.
Austria. Status, to time of German invasion
(1938). Summary. 1944— Aug. 309-330.
Belgium. Extent of movement summarized. 1941—
Apr. 903.
------- Status, to May 1950 invasion, and to World
W ar II. Summary. 1944— Feb. 293-294, Aug.
309-329.
------- Wartime and postwar developments, sum­
mary. 1948— Jan. 3-7.
Brazil. Membership and number of associations,
by type, 1935; legislation, 1938, and total asso­
ciations and members in 1940. 1941— Apr. 812.
Bulgaria. Extent of movement, legislation relative
to and effect of war, summary. 1943— Oct. 683684.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 310-330.
Canada. Consumers’ associations. Number and
type of associations, members, and amount of
business, 1948. 1950— Jan. 52-53.
------- Credit unions. Development and status, by
Provinces, 1938, 1939, and 1940. 1941— Sept.
656-657.
------- Number and types of associations, member­
ship, and amount of business, 1948. 1950—Jan.
52-4S3.
-------Situation, 1940, and service in production war.
1942— Sept. 555-556.
Ceylon. Progress of movement, 1939-40. 1942—
Sept. 556.
Chile. Summary of status, 1938. 1941— Apr. 812813.




27

China. Development and growth, 1937-40, and
importance of production for war. 1942— Sept.
557-558.
------- Growth of movement from 1919 to Japanese
invasion; wartime development. 1945— Jan. 3 8 40.
------- Industrial. Role in war economy. Location,
basis, organization, membership, accomplish­
ments, and types, May 1940, summarized. 1941—
May 1117-1122.
------- Rural, banks and other. Statistics, December
1941. 1942— Dec. 1163.
Colombia. Development, 1933-39, and status, 1939.
1941— Apr. 813.
Czechoslovakia. Consumers’. Trends, membership,
and business, 1937-47. 1948— May 506.
------- German occupation, effects of. 1941— Apr.
903-904.
------- Housing, Government supervised (prior to
German occupation). 1943— Jan. 97.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 310-331.
Denmark. Housing. Characteristic features of
associations. 1943— Jan. 94, 96-97.
------- Status prior to World W ar II, summary.
1944— Aug. 309-329, Nov. 956.
------- W ar conditions, effects of, and extent of
movement. 1941— Apr. 904-905.
------- Wholesale and its affiliates. Membership,
trend of, and business of, 1939-45. 1948— Apr.
387.
Ecuador. Legislative status of movement, act of
Nov. 19, 1937. 1941— Apr. 814.
Egypt. Superior council provided for by law of
Aug. 24, 1944. 1945— July 64.
El Salvador. Rural credit unions organized by
Mortgage Bank. 1943— Aug. 234.
Estonia. Extent of movement prior to occupation
by aggressor. 1942— Sept. 561.
-------Influence of, on national economy, up to time
of Soviet occupation. 1941— Apr. 905.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 310-329.
Europe. Consumers’. Developments, wartime and
postwar, by country: Austria, Czechoslovakia,
Germany, and Italy. Summary. 1948— May 504508.
—------------- Number and membership as compared
with prewar, by country. 1948— June 616.
------- ------- Percent of national trade, by country,
1948. 1949— May 544.
------- Prewar, wartime, and postwar developments,
early 1930’s to 1947: Albania, Bulgaria, Estonia,
Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland,
Rumania, Soviet Union, and Yugoslavia. Sum­
mary. 1948— June 613-616.
------- Status to World W ar II, situation during
W ar, and possibilities for use in postwar recon­
struction: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czecho­
slovakia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France,
Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Ice­
land, Irish Free State, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania,
Luxemburg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Ru­
mania, Soviet Union, Spain, Sweden, Switzer­
land, and Yugoslavia. General summary. 1944—
Aug. 309-331.
------- Summary of conditions, by country. 1941—
Apr. 901-915.
------- Wartime and postwar developments: Great
Britain, Belgium, France, the Netherlands,
and Switzerland. Summary. 1948— Jan. 3-9.
Finland. Connection with cooperatives of other
countries severed by war. 1942— Sept. 560-561.

28

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperatives, f. c.— Continued
Finland. Consumers’. Membership, trend of, and
business of, 1937-46. Indexes of prices, retail
(food) and wholesale. 1948— Apr. 388.
------- History summarized, including status in
1940. 1941— Apr. 905-907.
------- Status to World W ar I I; wartime and post­
war developments; summary. 1944— Aug. 313331; 1948— Apr. 388-389.
France. Extent of movement and conditions re­
sulting from German occupation. 1941— Apr.
907-908; 1942— Sept. 563.
-------Reconstruction cooperatives after World W ar
I. Membership, functions, legal organization,
finances, central federations, and accomplish­
ments. 1948— Aug. 278-283.
------- Status of movement prior to and since begin­
ning of World W ar I I; wartime and postwar
developments; summary. 19 4U— Aug. 311-330,
Oct. 727; 1948— Jan. 3—
4.
------- Wholesale, trend of operations, 1938-46,
indexes. 1948— Jan. 7.
Germany. Consumers’. Decree of Feb. 28, 1941,
and statement of Labor Front leader, concerning
liquidation. 1941— Aug. 436-437.
---------------- Trends, membership, business, 1931-47;
“ supply ring” facilities, by occupation zone,
1945. 1948— May 507-508.
------- Development of movement; housing, credit
and agricultural, and distributive associations;
conditions before and under Nazi regime. 1948—
June 1131-1147.
-------Extent of movement prior to 1933 and status
in 1933; opposition by National Socialist Party.
1941— Apr. 908-909; 1945— Mar. 523-524.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 309-330.
------- Suppression of movement, 1933-41. 1942—
Sept. 559-560.
Great Britain. Development, 1900 to 1940, and
effect of Second World W ar. Summary. 1942—
Sept. 549-555.
------- Housing. Types followed, and outstanding
societies. 1948— Jan. 96.
------- Retail and wholesale, development trends,
1939-46, indexes. 1948— Jan. 4-5.
------- Status to World W ar I I ; wartime and post­
war developments. Summary. 1944— Aug. 310328; 1948— Jan. 3-5.
-------W ar conditions and their effect, 1940. 1941—
Apr. 909-910.
Greece. Housing associations; fishing associations.
1944— Aug. 313-314, 317.
------- Legal authorization in 1914 and development
to 1939. 1948— Aug. 228-229.
Honduras. Legislative status of movement, decree
of Feb. 28, 1936. 1941— Apr. 814.
Hungary. Characteristics and importance of move­
ment prior to World W ar II, with statistics.
1948—June 1083-1084.
-------Increase in activities as result of war. 1941—
Apr. 910-911.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 310-331.
Iceland. Status, 1935, 1936, 1942. 1944— Aug. 323327.
India. Impetus given to movement as result of
World W ar II. 1942— Sept. 556.
Irish Agricultural Wholesale. Statistics, 1942 and
1937. 1944— Aug. 324.
Irish Free State. Statistics, 1941, 1936, and 1935.
1944— Aug. 323.
Italy. Consumers’. Membership and business, free
and Fascist Italy, 1921-46. 1948— May 508.




------- Pre-Fascist and Fascist conditions, summary.
1948— Nov. 930-931.
------- Status to World W ar II, summary; postwar
status and activities of certain groups. 1944—
Aug. 310-330; 1945— May 1014.
Japan. Summary of development of movement,
1900 to 1940. 1945— Oct. 663-665.
Latin America. Summary of movement in 11
countries. 1941— Apr. 810-816.
Latvia. Effect of change in 1934 to totalitarian
form of government. 1941— Apr. 905.
Lithuania. Secondary importance of consumers’
movement because country is agricultural.
1941— Apr. 905.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 310-329.
------- Subversion of movement to purposes of army
of occupation. 1942— Sept. 561.
Luxemburg. General Federation. Statistics, 1937,
and proportion of cooperators to population.
1944— Aug. 324-325.
Malay States, Federated, and Straits Settlements.
Credit-type movements. Probable effects of Jap­
anese occupation. 1942— Sept. 556.
Manchuria. Destructive effect of Japanese-enacted
Cooperative Promotion Law of 1940. 1942—
Sept. 556.
Mexico. Associations authorized and established,
with membership and capital, by year, 1934 to
August 1940; by State, 1936-39; by type 193840. 1941— Sept. 659.
------- Development of various types, legal status,
and Government activities, 1940, summary.
1941— Sept. 657-661.
------- Status of movement and provisions of law of
Jan. 11, 1938. 1941— Apr. 814-815.
Netherlands. Development prior to 1940 and con­
ditions under German occupation. 1942— Sept.
562-563; 1944— Jan. 52-53.
------- Extent of movement and activities to begin­
ning of 1940 summarized. 1941— Apr. 911-912.
------- Wartime and postwar developments, sum­
mary. 1948— Jan. 3-4 , 8.
Netherlands Indies. Status, summary of, to 1939.
1944— May 991.
Newfoundland. Development of associations on
east, west, and south coasts, and status in 1940.
1941— June 1438-1441.
New Zealand. Cooperative contract system for
loading and discharging vessels extended as
result of war, 1940. 1942— Sept. 556.
Nicaragua. Decree of Jan. 31, 1935, provisions.
1941— Apr. 815-816.
Norway. Effects of German occupation of country.
1942— Sept. 562.
------- Extent o f movement and status in 1940
summarized. 1941— Apr. 912-913.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 1944—
Aug. 313-330.
------- Wholesale and its affiliates. Membership,
trend of, and business of, 1939-46. 1948— Apr.
390.
Peru. Institute of Cooperation, established 1940.
Activities. 1941— Apr. 816.
Poland. Extent of movement to 1939 and effect of
war. 1941— Apr. 913.
------- History and status prior to World W ar I I ;
situation after German invasion. 1944— July
80-81, Aug. 311-328.
------- Subversion of movement to purposes of army
of occupation. 1942— Sept. 561-562.
Rumania. Character of movement since 1903.
1941— Apr. 913-914.
------- Membership and number of associations, by

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
class, 1938, and Government measures, 1940-42.
19 US— Dec. 1110-1111.
------- Status to World W ar II. Summary. 19U —
U
Aug. 315-325.
Scandinavia. Wartime and postwar developments,
by country, summary. 19U — Apr. 387-391.
S
South Africa, Union of. Agricultural and con­
sumers’ associations. Number, membership, and
legal status. 19U2— Jan. 119-122.
------- Consumers’ association. Work on military
contracts. 19U2— Sept. 556.
------- Natives. Associations formed for benefit of.
19 U2— Jan. 122.
Soviet Union. Status to World W ar II. Summary.
19U — Aug. 309-330.
U
Spain. Status prior to World W ar II. 19U — Aug.
U
315, 323, 325.
Sweden. Consumers’. Membership, trend of, and
business of, 1939-46. 19US— Apr. 390.
------- Activities since onset of war in regulating
prices; membership and business statistics, 1939.
19U1— Apr. 914.
------- Housing. Activities summarized. 19U — Jan.
S
97-99.
------- Production of selected consumer goods, per­
cent of total national output, 1944 and 1947.
19U9— May 544.
------- Status in 1940 and to World W ar I I; effects
of war conditions. Summary. 19U2— Sept. 564565; 19UU— Aug. 310-330.
Switzerland. Consumers’ cooperatives, trend of
membership and business, 1939-46, indexes,
19U — Jan. 9.
S
------- Housing. Progress, and characteristics of
project. 19U — Jan. 97.
S
------- Restrictions imposed, 1940 and 1941, and
effects upon movement. 19U2— Sept. 565-566.
------- Status, end of 1939 and to World W ar II.
Summary. 19U1— Apr. 914-915; 19U — Aug. 310U
328.
------- Wartime and postwar developments, sum­
mary. 19U — Jan. 8-9.
S
Thailand.
Government-sponsored
associations.
Growth from 1916-17 to 1936-37. 19U — June
U
1176.
Uruguay. Membership reported, 1939, and activi­
ties of national league. 19U1— Apr. 816.
Venezuela. Legislative provisions, decree of July
22, 1939. . W l — Apr. 816.
Yugoslavia. History of movement, including effect
of German invasion and control. 19U — Nov.
S
906-907.
------- Importance of movement prior to war, and
effects of German occupation of country. 19U2—
Sept. 563-564.
------- Statistics, 1938, and activities— cultural,
economic, and health. 19U1— Apr. 915.
------- Status to World W ar II. General summary.
19UU— Aug. 310-329.
Cooperatives, international:
Cooperative Reconstruction, International Com­
mittee for Formation announced by Cooperative
League of the U .S.A., March 1942. 19U — Jan.
S
90.
International agencies. Structure and activities
summarized. 19UU—June 1159-1168.
International Cooperative Alliance (Prague), 17th
Congress. Summary of proceedings. 19U — Dec.
S
600-602.
International Cooperative Women’s Guild, history
and functions. 19U — June 1166-1168.
U
Movement throughout world as affected by Second
World War. 19U2— Sept. 547-566.




29

Promotion o f; resolution passed by Congress of
International Cooperative Alliance (Prague),
1948. 19US— Dec. 600-601.
World Federation of International Groupments.
Plans for postwar reconstruction. 19U — Jan. 90.
S
Copper and copper-alloys industry. Connecticut Val­
ley. Characteristics and scope of BLS survey, April
1943. 19UU— Oct. 836-837.
Copper Labor Advisory Committee. Recommendations
by, early 1945, to War Production Board. 19U —
S
July 45.
Copper-mining industry. Wartime expansion; proc­
esses, productivity trend, indexes 1935-42; outlook
for future. 19U — Aug. 258-264.
S
Cordage and twine industry. Description and method
and scope of BLS study. 19U1— Oct. 995-999.
Cost of living, United States ( see also Prices— Con­
sumers’ price index):
Bonus. Collective-agreement clauses providing for,
types. 19U
S— Nov. 742-743.
Brokerage employees. Purchasing power of Decem­
ber 1944 take-home weekly pay in terms of
January 1941 prices. 19U — Mar. 378.
S
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Criticism of index
investigated. Summary, May 1943 to June 1944
(President’s Committee report with MeanyThomas report, Mills Committee and Mitchell
Committee reports, and statement by Acting
Commissioner of Labor Statistics). 19U5— Jan.
168-174.
------- Fact-finding activities, summary. 19U — May
S
945-948.
------- Program for reporting, fiscal year 1947-48.
19U7— Oct. 410-411.
Changes in, from March 1942 (beginning of retailprice control) to May 1943, review of. 19U —
S
July 66-81.
City families. Expenditures for housing and fuel,
1941 and 1944. 19U7— May 868-877.
------- Savings and expenditures, 1944. 19U — Jan.
S
1-5.
Cities (large). Changes and indexes, various items,
by month. See Prices— Consumers’ price index,
large cities.
Cost and price data records required by all per­
sons in trade or business, May 24 to June 24,
1950 (base period for determining wage and
price ceilings when necessary) by President’s
Executive Order No. 10160, Sept. 9, 1950. 1950—
Oct. 457.
Defense areas. (Bridgeport, Conn.; Corpus Christi, Tex.; Gadsden, A la.; San Diego, Calif.;
South Bend, Ind.) Food, clothing, housing, fur­
nishings, fuel, light, ice, miscellaneous items,
changes October 1939 to October 1940. 19U1—
Mar. 565-570.
Domestic workers, Washington, D. C. Rent, food,
and clothing. 19U2— Feb. 353-354.
Factory employees. Purchasing power of Decem­
ber 1944 weekly take-home pay in terms of
January 1941 prices. 19U — Mar. 378.
S
------- Spendable earnings, comparison with trend
in cost of living, 1941-43. 19U — Mar. 477-489.
U
Family expenditures. See Expenditures— Families
of 2 or more.
Federal employees. Purchasing power of takehome pay. See Wages, real— Federal employees.
Fluorspar-mining area of Illinois and Kentucky,
compared with St. Louis, Apr. 15, 1943; percent
of change, each area, since 1941. 19U — Dec.
S
1231-1235.
Food. Expenditure average, by city families, 1
week in 1944 and in 1942, by kind of food and
income level. 19U — June 1143-1157.
S

30

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cost of living, U. S.— Continued
Food. Percent of change Aug. 15, 1939, to Dec. 15,
1941. 1942—-Apr. 834-836.
------- Prices, decline and increase in various other
items, first quarter of 1944. 1944— June 1298.
-------Retail prices combined by BLS into averages
and index numbers. Revision of methods (com­
pleted in June 1946); effects. 1947— Jan. 90-100.
------- Weekly cost, per capita, by income class,
February 1945 and fall of 1944; food purchases
by city families, February 1945, by size of
family and income class. 1946— Feb. 297-301.
Fuel, light, and refrigeration. Percent of change,
September 1939 to December 1941. 1942— Apr.
839.
Goods and services. Price-controlled and other.
Indexes showing cost trends Aug. 15, 1939, to
Oct. 15, 1942. 1943— Jan. 104-107.
Hawaii. Prices, consumers' goods compared with
Mainland prices; reasons for continuing differ­
ential. Other comparisons. 1948— June 611.
Hawaii (Honolulu). Family budgets, and net
money income, wartime. 1944— Apr. 713-716.
Housefurnishings. Percent of change, Sept. 15,
1939, to Dec. 15, 1941. 1942— Apr. 836-837.
Increases, August 1939 to December 1941. 1942—
Apr. 833-842.
Index, BLS. Adjustment for wartime changes in
goods available, and relative importance of var­
ious groups of goods and services. 1942— Apr.
840-842.
------- Effect of changes in character of consumer
goods. 1943— Sept. 434.
------- Investigation by committee of American
Statistical Association and findings issued in
October 1943. 1943— Nov. 994-1002.
------- Price differences, between stores, effect of.
1944— Feb. 239-241.
------- Wartime. Weights given costs of clothing,
housefurnishings,
and
miscellaneous
items,
changes, January 1942 to March 1943; food
costs, computation of weights from March 1943;
population weights used for individual cities;
relative importance of groups and items priced,
Mar. 15, 1943, and average, 1935-39. 1943—
July 82-95.
------- What it measures, items covered, frequency
of issue, relative importance of items, sources
of information, cities covered, how to read it,
etc. 1942— Aug. 268-277.
------- See also Prices— Consumers’ price index.
Installment buying by- city consumers in 1941.
Summary of analysis, including distribution by
income groups. 1944— June 1289-1291.
Intercity differences. Manual worker’s family at
maintenance level. Dec. 15, 1942, and Mar. 15,
1943. 1943— Apr. 745-747, Oct. 803-805.
------- 33 large cities. Estimated amounts and in­
dexes, by item, for worker’s family. Mar. 15,
1941, and June 15, 1942. 1941— May 1227-1231;
1942— Sept. 570-573.
Measuring, 1900 to 1950. 1950— July 72-73.
Milwaukee. Percentage changes in, by item, from
Mar. 15, 1939, to specified dates. 1941— Mar.
670-672.
Miscellaneous goods and services. Percent of
change, by item, Sept. 15, 1939, to Dec. 15, 1941.
1942— Apr. 839.
Percentage changes. August 1939 to December
1941, by cities (34). 1942— Apr. 834.
------- By month, and by city. See Prices— Con­
sumers’ price index.
------- Large cities, by item from May 1942 (begin­
ning of price control) and earlier specified




dates to August 1942. 1942— Oct. 760-771.
Philippine Islands. Increase in, during Japanese
occupation. 1945— Apr. 788-789.
Price increases, indirect, as result of advancing
costs and material shortages in wartime (U l­
mer). 1942— Nov. 903-912.
Prices paid by consumers, index of. See Prices.
Puerto Rico. Expenditures per family, by item,
averages weekly and yearly, 1940-41. 1943—
Feb. 228-232.
------- Incomes and expenditures, wage earners’
families. W P A survey begun in January 1941;
objections and sponsoring agencies. 1941— Apr.
808-809.
------- Indexes, by item, 6 municipalities, specified
months, March 1941 to July 1943; summary of
conditions. 1943— Oct. 806-816.
------- Recommended budgets, retail prices, family
expenditures, estimated yearly consumption of
food, and economic characteristics of laborers’
families (Hansen). 1941— Apr. 793-804.
Purchasing power, December 1944 take-home
weekly pay, in terms of January 1941 prices
(as
affecting
brokerage,
factory,
Federal,
street-railway and bus, and telephone employ­
ees). 1946— Mar. 378.
Rent. Defense areas, cities covered by surveys
and regular reports, changes, specified periods,
1939-41. I P ^ - M a r . 577-580.
------- 33 large cities, changes, to December 1940
from specified periods. 1941— Mar. 580-582.
------- Indexes showing changes for lower and
higher brackets, description of. 1941— Mar. 582583.
------- Percentage changes. By cities (34), Septem­
ber 1939 to December 1941. 1942— Apr. 838.
---------------- By quarter, September 1940 to March
1941. 1941— Feb. 404-405, May 1227.
------- See also Rent.
Southern cities and selected other cities. Com­
parisons in costs of equivalent rents, goods, and
services. 1946— Oct. 532-534.
Spending and saving of workers in large cities,
1934-36, and estimated situation in 1940. 1941—
July 50-65.
Stabilization of, through wage and price control.
1942— Nov. 917-924.
State and municipal employees. Wage adjustment
to, under stabilization program. 1943— Nov.
885-894.
Steelworkers’ families. Average weekly expendi­
tures, September to November 1943. 1944— July
188-192.
Street-railway and bus employees. Purchasing
power of December 1944 take-home weekly pay,
in terms of January 1941 prices. 1946— Mar.
378.
Subsistence level for family of 4. Summary of
study by Textile Workers Union of America.
1944— Oct. 859-861.
Telephone workers. Purchasing power of Decem­
ber 1944 take-home weekly pay, in terms of
January 1941 prices. 1946— Mar. 378.
Transportation. Percentage distribution of various
items, December 1941 and January 1942 (before
and after index adjustment). 1942— Apr. 841.
Trends. Dec. 15, 1939, to Dec. 15, 1940. Resume.
1941— Mar. 531-532.
------- First and Second World Wars, and relation
to wages. (Bowden.) 1941— Nov. 1103-1125.
------- Prices affecting, in 1943. 1944— Feb. 244-268.
Wage adjustments in relation to. Collectiveagreement provisions, permissive and automatic.
1941—-Nov. 1136-1139; 1946— Nov. 736-743.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Wartime. City families. Expenditure, by item and
income group, 1941 and first quarter of 1942.
1942— Sept. 419-434.
------- Conditions, effect of, and changes, August
1939 to September 1941. f ^ f - N o v . 1076-1078.
------- Farm and nonfarm families. Expenditures,
by item, 1935-36, 1941, and 1942; general dif­
ferences between the two classes. 1942— Oct.
700-713.
------- Measures to control through reduction of
consumer spending. 1943— May 877-882.
Wholesale prices, slight rise (August 1939 to
November 1940) in relation to, discussion of.
1941— Jan. 64-65.
Women workers. Budgets for minimum adequate
standard, annual and weekly, 1946, in 8 States
(Calif., Conn., D. C., Ky., Mass., N. J., N. Y .,
Utah). 1947—-June 1044-1045.
------- New York State. Maintenance budget as
family member, 1942, 1944, and 1947, by item
and size of city. 1943— July 100; 1945— July
103-104; 1949— Jan. 55-56.
Workers in certain industry groups, early 1942.
1942— June 1363-1366.
Cost of living, foreign countries (see also Prices) :
Argentina. Indexes, during First and Second
World Wars, comparison of. 1942— Mar. 710.
------- 1940 costs compared with those of 1939.
W l — May 1125.
Australia. Rents and mortgages, moratorium on,
for mobilized men. 1941— Jan. 93-94.
Brazil. (Federal District). “ Middle class” family.
By item of expense, for years 1933 to 1942, and
for months January to June 1943. 1944— Dec.
1282.
Canada. Expenditure, annual, by w o rk ed fam­
ilies, and proportions principal items form of
total, year ending Sept. 30, 1938. 1941— Jan.
151.
------- Index, new, based on year ending Sept. 30,
1938, methods of construction; index numbers,
by item, specified years 1913 to 1939; year 1939
and to September 1940, by month. 1941— Jan.
149-153.
------- Rents, maximum rates set, effective Dec. 1,
1941. 1942— Feb. 461.
Chile. Conditions, 1937-44, summarized; worker’s
family of 4 (Santiago), indexes 1939-44. 1945—
Apr. 787-794.
------- Indexes, by item, monthly averages Decem­
ber 1941 to December 1942, annual averages,
1937-42. 1943— Oct. 716-719.
China. Food situation and need of increased pro­
duction. 1943— June 1184-1187.
Colombia. Indexes, by year, 1938-44, and com­
parison with wage trend. 1945— July 116-117.
------- Worker’s family of five, Bogota. Money cost
and indexes, specified months, in five main
categories, February 1939 to July 1944. 1944—
Nov. 1072-1073.
Costa Rica, San Jose. Families (258), selected
types of expenditures, by item, September 1949,
and weekly earnings. 1950— Oct. 443-445.
Denmark. Family expenditures, year 1935, April
1940, and April 1941, amount and indexes.
1941— Aug. 367.
------- Indexes. Major expenditure groups, quar­
terly, 1949, and January 1950. 1950— Apr. 392.
------- 1935 and 1939, and year of minimum in
1930’s; 1939-47. 1946— Feb. 188; 1948— Mar.
293-294.
------- Nonfarm families, 1948 and 1942 surveys
revalued at 1948 prices (table). 1950— Apr. 391.




31

------- Sampling methods and coverage, expendi­
tures and consumption patterns, and revised
retail price index, 1948. 1950— Apr. 389-392.
------- Wage adjustments according to index
changes, since 1939. 1944— Nov. 951.
Finland. Indexes, 1935 and 1939, and year of
minimum in 1930’s. 1946— Feb. 188.
------- Wages to be adjusted to, under Government
regulations. 1942— Nov. 1014.
France (Lyons). Situation of a typical worker,
summer of 1945. 1945— Oct. 624-625.
French Indo-China. Rise from 1925 to 1930 to
correspond to increase in wages. 1944— July 57.
Great Britain. Food. Stabilization by subsidy plan;
methods used; and results. 1943— Oct. 816-817.
------- Foods, canned, rationing of, effective Dec. 1,
1941. 1 9 4 2 — Feb. 461.
------- Index. Changes since 1938 and recommenda­
tion, spring of 1947, to substitute new index.
1 9 4 7 — Sept. 285-291.
------- Indexes (July 1914 = 1 00), by months, 1920,
1933, 1939-41; by group, years 1939-44. 1941—
Apr. 831-832; 1942— Apr. 1003-1004; 1945—
Apr. 976.
------- Indexes, as related to automatic changes in
wage rates (under collective agreement). 1944—
Sept. 602-603.
Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Agricul­
tural workers’ households. Weekly expenditures
summarized, and by principal items, 1937-38.
1941— June 1458-1461.
-------Indexes by item, Sept. 1, 1939, and by month,
Jan. 1, 1942, to Jan. 1, 1943. 1943— Apr. 687-

688.
------- Industrial workers’ household, 1937-38. Min­
istry of Labor inquiry, summary of findings.
1941— Apr. 937-942.
----------------Weekly expenditures, by principal items.
1941— June 1461.
------- 1943, slight variation in index. 1944— Apr.
743-744.
Greece. Daily expenditures by principal items,
selected worker families and selected areas, February-May 1949. 1949— Nov. 536-537.
------- Indexes, by item, 1931-40. 1943— Aug. 220.
Iceland (Reykjavik). Increases in 1940, and to
December 1942, from January-March 1939.
1941— Mar. 672; 1943— Apr. 747.
------- Total, and food alone, indexes by months,
January 1941 to July 1942. 1942— Nov. 1014.
India. Expenditures, percent of, for various items,
1926: Ahmedabad, Bombay, Calcutta, Cawnpore,
Madras. 1 9 4 3 — Oct. 695.
------- Food expenditures by workers’ families,
estimated; plan for payment of allowances.
1 9 4 4 — June 1191-1192.
------- Wartime price rise and measures taken to
meet situation. 1943— Oct. 697-698.
Italy. Conditions in May 1945, with comparison
between northern and southern sections. 1945—
Sept. 459.
-------Rise from November 1940 to November 1944;
bonuses granted, latter date. 1945— May 1013.
-------Rome. Cost of fixed food budget, indexes 194045. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 337-338.
---------------- Wartime increase, 1940-44. 1 9 4 5 — June
1284.
------- Sliding wage scale, General Confederation
of Labor request (December 1944 and April
1945) for. 1945— Aug. 282.
Japan. Indexes, 1937-42. 1945— Oct. 656.
Korea. Family income and expenditures, 1948.
1949— Apr. 403-405.

32

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cost of living, f. c.— Continued
Latin America. Indexes (Argentina, Bolivia, Bra­
zil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Para­
guay, Peru, Uruguay), August 1939 to Febru­
ary 1946. 19 U
S— May 778-779.
Mexico. Indexes, by item and by year, 1934-42;
by month, August 1942 to April 1943. 19U —
S
Aug. 244.
Netherlands (Amsterdam). Indexes, yearly, 192940. 19U — Jan. 41—
U
42.
Netherlands Indies. Trend, 1929-42, indexes.
19U — May 983-984.
U
Newfoundland. Indexes, specified dates September
1942 to March 1943, and effect of decline in
employment. 19U — Sept. 499-501.
S
Paraguay (Asuncion). Increase from Oct. 1, 1943,
to end of 1944. 19U — June 1287.
S
South Africa, Union of. Relation of cost-of-living
allowances to maintenance of purchasing power
at high level. 19U2— June 1340-1341.
------- Wartime rise. Indexes, 1939-43, and wage
adjustments under war measure of May 1942.
19U Sept. 478-479.
S—
Spain. Increase since 1936 and factors influencing.
19Ul— Apr. 942-943.
Sweden. Index. Status of, to govern wage levels,
under agreement of Jan. 9, 1941. 19Ul— Apr.

1001.

------- Social Board’s statistics, and their relation
to wage increases and collective agreements.
19U5— Feb. 292-294.
Switzerland. Indexes, selected periods, 1939-47.
19U Mar. 297.
S—
------- Trend, 1939-45, and relation to nominal and
real wages. 19U — Sept. 533-534.
S
Trinidad and Tobago. Rise in index, by year,
1939-42. 19U — Apr. 746-747.
U
Uruguay. Indexes, certain months, 1939, 1940, and
1941. 19U%— Aug. 366.
------- Montevideo. Increase from 1937 to August
1944; indexes, by year and by item. 19U5—
June 1299-1301.
Venezuela (Caracas and Maracaibo regions).
Petroleum workers, 3 large companies, indexes
July to September 1944. 19U — July 137.
S
Costs, United States ( see also specific type o f ) :
Bituminous-coal production. Basis for computation;
in 1940, and as affected by 1941 wage changes;
factors affecting; and minimum price related to.
(Bowden.) 19Ul— Aug. 304-313.
Glove industry. Wage and salary, in relation to
sales, by kind of product, years ending June 30,
1940, and 1941. 19U2— Mar. 735-736.
Labor, unit. Changes, 1939-45, summary; indexes,
selected industries, by year, 1940-45. 19U — Dec.
S
914-916.
------- Indexes, selected manufacturing industries,
1935, 1937, and 1939-41. 19U2— May 1071-1072.
------- Man-hour output, increased costs in relation
to, August 1939 to August 1941. 19Ul— Dec.
1388-1391.
Overtime pay in relation to costs and profits.
19Ul— July 9-17.
Costs, Great Britain. Wartime production, labor and
material, factors in. 19Ul— May 1158-1159.
Cotton garments and allied industries. Minimum-wage
determination extended to cover additional textile
items on bids solicited on or after Mar. 6, 1941.
19U1— Apr. 968.
Cotton-garment industry:
Bonus, nonproduction, group insurance, pensions,
vacations with pay. Extent of provision for,
September 1947. 19U — Jan. 629.
S
Wages. See Wages and hours, United States.




Workweek, length of, September 1947. 19U — June
S
629.
Cotton-textile manufacturing, United States:
Collective agreements (45), effective in 1947. Sum­
mary of provisions. 19U — Mar. 413-423.
S
Characteristics, definition and method of BLS sur­
vey of September 1940. 19U1— Dec. 1490-1499.
Earnings. See Wages and hours, United States.
Holidays, paid, shift differentials, vacations with
pay, April 1948. 19U — Sept. 268.
S
Minimum wage increased and differentials provided
for by National W ar Labor Board order of Feb.
21, 1945. 19U — Apr. 856-857.
S
Northern associations. Wage chronology. 19U9—
Jan. 30-35.
Production workers. Employment, weekly hours,
and labor turn-over, January 1948 compared
with January 1949, and monthly, August-December 1948. 19U9— Mar. 274-277.
Productivity indexes, by quarter 1938-42, and
factors influencing (BLS study). 19U — July
%
47-53.
Work and wage experience (New England) during
and following World War II. 19U July 8-15.
S—
Workweek, length of, April 1948. 19U — Sept. 268.
S
Cotton-textile manufacturing, Great Britain:
Wages, cotton-spinning, recommendations of spe­
cial commission, late 1945. 19U — Mar. 476.
S
Wartime production and employment policies.
19 Ul— May 1088-1089.
Weavers. Guaranteed weekly wage provided by
collective agreement, effective October 1941.
19 Ul— Dec. 1579-1580.
Council of Economic Advisers (U. S. Government):
Annual reports, first to fourth (1 94 6 -4 9 ); sum­
maries. 19U7— Jan. 43 -4 4 ; 19U — Mar. 279-280;
S
19U9— Mar. 291-292; 1950— Feb. 140-142.
Economic adjustment, course and problems of,
report to the President, July 1949. 19U9— Aug.
151-153.
Inflationary factors in economy, quarterly report
to the President, Apr. 9, 1948. 19U — June 640S
641.
Production report, index, selected industries, 1948.
19U9— Feb. 140-141.
Court decisions. United States:
Age misrepresentation by employee held to be no
defense under Employers’ Liability Act (N.C.
Sup. Ct.). 19Ul— Sept. 663.
All-union contract issue, Colorado. 19U9— Mar. 326327.
Alien Registration Act of Pennsylvania held in­
valid (U. S. Sup. Ct.). 19Ul— Mar. 659.
Airport night watchman not covered by Fair Labor
Standards Act. Louisiana. 19U — Feb. 257.
S
American Medical Association and D. of C. Medi­
cal Association held guilty of conspiracy against
Group Health Association (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
19U — Mar. 555.
U
Anti-closed shop. Arizona law, constitutional.
19US— Apr. 420-421.
------- Florida amendment. Court jurisdiction ruled
upon by U.S. Supreme Court. 19U — May 759.
S
------- Nebraska legislation. Constitutionality of.
19U7— Sept. 349; 19US— May 540-541.
------- North Carolina law, validity of. 19U — Mar.
S
311.
------- Tennessee legislation. Constitutionality of.
19U?— Dec. 689; 19U8— May 540-541.
Anti-injunction laws. New Jersey. Employer’s re­
fusal to negotiate with union while strikers were
picketing not cause for injunction. 1950— Jan. 69.
---------------- Partially invalid. 19U — June 923-924.
S
------- New York. Effect of existing collective-bar-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
gaining agreement. 1947— Mar. 492.
------- Norris-La Guardia Act. See Norris-La Guardia
Act, this section.
Anti-kick-back Act. Cases involving application and
coverage. 1943— May 946-947; 1944— Feb. 361362.
Anti-migrant law, California, held unconstitutional
(U .S. Sup. Ct.). 1942— Jan. 127.
Anti-Monopoly Act, New York. Independent laun­
dry trade drivers as “ workingmen” under. 1946—
July 102-103.
Anti-noise ordinance, constitutional. New Jersey.
1947— Mar. 492.
Antipicketing law held to violate right of free
speech (Oreg. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Jan. 141-142.
Antiracketeering, Federal Act, held not applicable
to trade-unions (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1942— Apr. 995996.
Antitrust laws, State and Federal. 1949— June 671;
1950— Dec. 717-718.
Antitrust (Sherman) Act. See Sherman Antitrust
Act, this section.
Arbitration. Agreement, enforceability of. Ohio.
1948— Apr. 421.
------- Arbitrator removed by court in employerunion dispute. New York. 1946— Aug. 255.
-------Award broader in scope than issue framed in
agreement to arbitrate, upheld (Appellate Div.
N .Y . Sup. Ct.). 1943— July 129-130.
-------Award, New Jersey Bell Telephone Co. opera­
tors, April 1950, “ just and reasonable;” State’s
public utilities antistrike law upheld (N.J. Su­
perior Court). 1950— Sept. 367.
------- Compulsory. And right to strike. Wisconsin.
1948— May 541.
---------------- Constitutionality of acts. Michigan and
New Jersey. 1948— Nov. 522-523.
------- ------- j n public utility disputes, Wisconsin.
1949— Mar. 327.
------- Contract with union, bus company employer
must abide by, Wisconsin. 1950— Apr. 431.
------- New York Civil Practice Act, procedure con­
cerning reinstatement of employee under Inter­
state Commerce. 1943— May 948.
Back wages, no interest allowed on recovery of.
1945— Sept. 502.
Bankruptcy Act— pension payments. 1950— Nov.
598.
Barber-shop proprietors, union membership require­
ment of, to display union-shop cards, legal (Ga.
Sup. Ct.). 1950— Dec. 718.
Basing-point price practices in cement industry
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1949— Feb. 166.
Beauty shops. Illinois, operators not professional
class; subject to State Minimum Fair Wages
Act (111. Appellate Court and Sup. Ct.). 1941—
Aug. 446-447; 1942— June 1358.
Check-off. Agreement clause, validity of, Rhode
Island; State wage-payment law prohibiting
check-off not in conflict with LM RA. 1949— Nov.
557; 1950— Oct. 497.
-------Assignment by one union to another of right
to receive dues from employer held valid, Ken­
tucky. 1950— May 545-546.
------- Valid under collective-bargaining agreement,
Connecticut. 1947— Oct. 467.
Child labor. Case involving violation of State
(Mass.) law. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1944— Apr. 786.
------- School-cafeteria worker. Damage claim, ac­
count injury, sustained (N .Y . State). 1943—
Oct. 787.
------- Telegraph messengers. Fair Labor Standards
Act provisions concerning, Telegraph Co. held
subject to (U.S. Dist. Ct. for So. Dist. of N .Y .).
1943— Dec. 1194-1195.




33

Closed shop. Alabama. Check-off; striking and
picketing to obtain. 1947— July 81.
-------California. Picketing for, by noncomplying
union. 1948— June 651.
------- Company assistance to union through shut­
down renders subsequent agreement unlawful
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1942— May 1157.
-------Florida. State public policy (Cir. Ct. of Duval
Co.). 1943— Apr. 730-731.
------- Massachusetts. Strike for, unlawful. 1948—
June 651-652.
------- State laws prohibiting (or other union mem­
bership requirements for employment) constitu­
tional, U.S. Supreme Court. 1949— Jan. I ll, Mar.
322-323.
------- Virginia. 1948— Aug. 171.
------- See also Labor Management Relations Act,
this section.
Closed unions. Burden of proof on individual work­
ers, California. 1950— Jan. 68-69.
------- Discrimination. Case in California Supreme
Court. Summary. 1945— Feb. 337-338, 339-340.
------- Right to work. New York. 1948— Nov. 523.
Collective bargaining for State government em­
ployees. California and Florida. 1946— Sept. 407.
Colorado Labor Peace Act invalid in part. 1946—
June 925.
Concerted employee action not a “ strike.” Florida.
1945— Dec. 1191.
Conciliator, appointment not reviewable, Wiscon­
sin. 1949— Feb. 212.
Contempt decree against strikers after injunction
prohibiting unlawful picketing, Iowa. 1949—
May 559.
Contempt of injunction against picketing, convic­
tion of certain workers for, upheld (Ark. Sup.
Ct.). 1950— Dec. 717.
Contempt of court, union official’s refusal to an­
swer, on cross-examination, whether he was a
Communist. 1950— June 661.
Continuous employment of individual for life of
collective agreement not guaranteed by fact that
agreement exists (Kans. Sup. Ct.). 1942— Jan.
127-128.
Contracts, U. S. Government (Davis-Bacon A ct).
Claim involving application. 1944— Apr. 791.
Controversy between 2 unions held labor dispute
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Jan. 140.
“ Co-op” as trade-mark held property right of Na­
tional Cooperatives (U.S. Dist. Ct. of N .Y . City).
1942— Mar. 684.
Cooperatives. Electricity, ruled not subject to regu­
lation as public utilities (Utah Sup. Ct.). 1941—
Mar. 639.
------- Held subject to Fair Labor Standards Act,
when controlled by manager rather than work­
ing members (circuit court decision; U.S. Sup.
Ct. refused to review). 1942— June 1357.
Discharge. Because of union membership. State
statute holding act a felony unconstitutional
(Ariz. Sup. Ct.). 1941— June 1452.
------- During life of union contract, employees not
entitled to recover damages for breach of such
contract, Florida. 1 9 5 0 — Sept. 372.
------- Employee given opportunity to amend com­
plaint to show valid reasons why discharge
wrongful in suit for violation of collective-bar­
gaining agreement. 1950— Sept. 371.
------- Not violation of collective bargaining con­
tract. 1950— Jan. 68.
------- Unlawful when caused by union which had
expelled employees from membership without fol­
lowing procedures under union constitution and
bylaws, Rhode Island. 1950— July 138.

34

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Court decisions, U. S.— Continued
Discharge. Without fair hearing, New Jersey.
1949— July 55.
Discrimination. Because of political affiliation up­
held, statute penalizing. Puerto Rico. 1946—
June 924-925.
------- In union membership; discharge of Negro
shipyard workers. California. 1946— Apr. 619620.
8-Hour Law. Civil action by employee. 1949— June
670.
------- Federal, 1940, held to supersede Fair Labor
Standards Act of 1938 (Fed. Dist. Ct.). 1942—
June 1359.
------- U. S. bases in foreign countries. 1949— May
552-553.
Employees held to have no absolute right to remain
unorganized, and coercion by fellow workers up­
held (Calif. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Jan. 141.
Employer’s current compliance with National La­
bor Relations Board order to bargain with union
no ground for refusal to enforce Board’s order
(U.S. Sup. C t.). 1950— Aug. 246.
Employer’s duty to bargain. Ohio. 1948— Sept. 303304.
Employers’ liability law. Occupational disease re­
sulting from employer’s negligence held com­
pensable (Appellate Ct. of Ind.). 1941— Aug. 447.
Employer’s petition for election, not supported by
employees, accepted (Cir. Ct. of Appeals, Pa.).
1946—
-Jan. 89.
Employment agencies. Nebraska. Private, feelimitation statute held unconstitutional (Neb.
Sup. Ct.). Fee-fixing provisions upheld (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1941— Feb. 400, June 1451-1452, Sept.
532.
Employment Peace Act (Wisconsin). Coercion by
union unlawful; conflict with National Labor
Relations Board. 1941— July 138-139; 1948—
Jan. 8 4-85; 1947— Aug. 210.
------- Indirectly upheld by U.S. Supreme Court’s re­
fusal to review decision of Wisconsin Supreme
Court. 1942— June 1359.
------- Upheld as to regulation of picketing (U.S.
Sup. Ct.) 1 9 4 2 — May 1157.
Enticement statute. Tennessee. 1947— Aug. 210.
Equal Pay Act. New York. 1 9 4 8 — Feb. 189.
Fair Labor Standards Act. Administrative ruling
as Portal Act defense for not operating under
FL SA . 1948— Apr. 415-416.
------- Agriculture. Exemptions. 1 9 4 7 — Mar. 486,
July 78-79; 1 9 5 0 — July 133-134.
---------------- Fermentation of tobacco not exempt.
1 9 4 9 — Feb. 208.
---------------- Mutual Irrigation Co. workers not em­
ployed in (U.S. Sup. C t.). 1949— Aug. 168.
------- Airport night watchmen not covered by act.
1946— Feb. 257.
------- Applicability depends on work of employee
and not on that of employer. 1945— Dec. 1189.
-------Arbitration law, local, not controlling in con­
sent election. 1945— June 1263.
------- “ Area of production.” Validity of Adminis­
trator’s definition of. 1944— Aug. 378.
------- Atomic bomb not an article of commerce.
1948— Mar. 306-307; 1949— Aug. 168-169.
------- Back pay. Injunction suit by administrator.
1949— Oct. 422.

---------------No interest allowed on recovery.

1945—

Sept. 502.
----------------No reduction from for refusal to accept
employer-proffered job. 1946— Jan. 89.
------- Baker employed by timber company. 1948—
Mar. 491-492.




------- Bank messenger, employee engaged in inter­
state commerce. 1945— Dec. 1190.
------- Barge captains employed by common carrier.
1946— Apr. 617.
------- Belo case. U.S. Supreme Court decisions.
1 9 4 8 — Jan. 84; 1 9 4 7 — June 1059-1060, Aug. 207;
1 9 5 0 — July 133.
-------Bona fide settlements not binding. 1946— June
918-919.
-------Bonus. Attendance, as part of regular rate of
pay. 1946— July 102.
---------------- Discretionary; included in regular rate
of pay. 1945— Apr. 833; 1949— Feb. 208.
----------------Incentive bonus not part of regular rate.
1945— Mar. 594.
--------------- Building service and maintenance employ­
ees. Applicability of act to. 194b— Sept. 582-583,
Dec. 1224; 1945— Mar. 595, Aug. 290; 1949—
Nov. 553.
-------Burglar alarm systems, installation of. 1946—
July 102.
------- Chain grocery, central office and warehouse,
not exempt as retail establishment. 1945— May
1047-1048.
------- Chain-store warehouse employees, application
of act to. 1944— Sept. 582.
------- Channel and drydock, original construction of,
not covered by act. 1946— Mar. 436.
------- Cheese, manufacture of, held “ first process­
ing” of milk. 1945— Aug. 290.
------- Child labor. Clause inapplicable to western
Union. 1945— Feb. 336-337.
---------------- Illegal. 1 9 4 5 — Apr. 830; 1950— Dec. 714.
------- Civil rights statute. Rights under Wage-Hour
law not protected by. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 550.
------- Class action open for other workers. 1945—
Apr. 832-833.
-------Constitutionality upheld, Feb. 3, 1941, by U.S.
Supreme Court. 1941— Feb. 423.
------- Construction work replacing old bridge with
new. 1948— June 646.
------- Contracts, written or nonwritten, between
employer and employee. 1947— Oct. 464-465.

------ Cook employed by (1) timber company and
(2) contractor with railroad company. 1948—
Apr. 727, July 126-127.
-------Coverage, miscellaneous occupations or opera­
tions. 1941— Dec. 1460-1461; I ^ - N o v . 10261027; 1945— Apr. 831, Aug. 291; 1946— Mar.
436-437, May 760-761, Aug. 251-252; 1947— May
860; 1950— July 133.
------- Deductions from wages. 1948— June 11241125.
------- Defense plant construction not production of
goods for commerce. 1949— Sept. 296.
------- Discharged employees. Reinstatement; back
pay; discrimination. 1944— Feb. 359; 1945— Mar.
594-595; 1950— Jan. 64.
------- Distributors. Automobile supplies; coal; cov­
erage of employees. 1945— Apr. 831-832; 1947—
July 78.
------- Dredgemen. Inapplicability of “ seamen” ex­
emption to. 1 9 4 4 % Aug. 380; 1 9 4 5 — Sept. 503.
—
------- Drydock, original construction of, not cov­
ered. 1945— July 101.
------- Electrical installation and repair classed as
production of goods. 1945— May 1948-1049.
------- Employee suit in State court not removable
to Federal District Court. 1948— Aug. 308-309.
------- Employment agreement, reformation of de­
nied. 1946— Aug. 252.
------- Enforcement, injunction (Oreg.) and inspec­

tion of records.

1 9 4 9 — July

51, Nov. 554-555.

------- “ Executive” and “ administrative” employees.
Exemptions. 1946— Aug. 250-251; 1947— Feb.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
272-273, Nov. 574; 1948— Dec. 638-639; 1949—
Apr. 437-438.
--------------- Requirements of act, distinguishing from
employees. 1945— Sept. 502; 1946— May 761.
---------------- Supervisory capacity of foreman meets
requirements. 1945— July 101.
------- Exemptions. Applicability of various. 1 9 4 7 —
May 860-861.
--------------- Burden of proof on employer. 1945— Nov.
"5 .
----------------Employment on salary basis as a requis­
ite for. 1 9 4 4 — Nov. 1027.
------- ------- Interstate Commerce Act. 1947— Mar.
486, Aug. 208.
----------------Nature of employees’ work alone not de­
cisive of issue. 1946— Apr. 617.
--------------- Various types of employment. 1947— July
78; 1948— Aug. 165-166; 1949— Jan. 69-70, Feb.
208-209, Apr. 437, June 669, Sept. 296.
------- Factory store employees necessary to pro­
duction. 1948— Dec. 638.
------- Falsification of records. Defense of estoppel
operative against employee-plaintiff. 1948— Aug.
308.
------- Federal 8-hour law and FL SA , employees en­
titled to benefits of both. 1948— June 1126.
------- Free meals, cost included in wages. 1 9 4 8 —
Feb. 186.
-------Free speech, right of, does not include picket­
ing employers’ customers. 1945— Nov. 995.
------- Gold production for noncompetitive market
covered by act. 1948— July 126.

------

Good

faith

defense.

1 9 4 7 — Dec.

686-687;

19 4 8 — Jan. 65, May 534-535, Aug. 166, Oct.
406-407, Nov. 519-520.
------- Government war contracts, employees cov­
ered by the act. 1950— July 133.
------- Guards. Agency supplying, held to be in in­
terstate commerce. 1945— Oct. 758-759.
------- ------- Plant manufacturing ordnance under
cost-plus-fixed-fee contracts. 1947— Mar. 485.
---------------- Plants operating on Government ac­
count, coverage of. 1 9 4 8 — April 726.
-------Guaranteed wage contracts and fictitious reg­
ular rates. 1948— Mar. 306.
-------Guaranteed wage plan valid. 1949— Aug. 169.
------- Highway repair employees, engaged in com­
merce. 1949— Apr. 437.
------- Home work. Administrator’s power to pro­
hibit. 1 9 4 4 — Aug. 379-380.
---------------- Certificates, power of Wage and Hour
Administrator to require. 1945— Oct. 758-759.
----------------Embroidery industry. 1942— June 1358;
1945—
Apr. 830.
------- Home workers. 1942— June 1358; 1945— Dec.
1189; 1946— Sept. 404; 1947— Feb. 273; 1949—
Oct. 422-423; 1950— Apr. 426.
------- “ Hours worked” under act clarified. 1946—
Aug. 249-250.
-------Injunctions. Employer held to be in contempt,
Federal District Court of Puerto Rico. 1950—
Oct. 494.
----------------Issuance of and limitation cf right to.
1948 — Apr. 727, July 127-128.
------- ------- Restitution of wages ordered for con­
tempt in proceedings. 1950— May 541.
------- Insurance company, liability. Claim adjustor
covered by act. 1945— Sept. 502-503.
------- Interstate commerce goods, storing, with in­
trastate does not change interstate character.
1946— Nov. 765-766.
------- Interstate shipments, regularity of, not vol­
ume, determines coverage. 1946— Apr. 617.
-------Intrastate distribution by wholesalers. 1948—
Mar. 493-494.




35

------- Intrastate power company employees. 1947—
Feb. 273.
------- Irrigation. 1944— Sept. 581-582; 1948— July
55.
-------Jurisdiction not extended to foreign countries.
1 9 4 6 — Apr. 616.
------- Liquidated damages. 1945— Oct. 759; 1946—
July 100-101; 1947— Sept. 348.
------- Livestock commission company. Clerical em­
ployees covered. 1946— Sept. 404-405.
------- Log cutters held to be employees. 1 9 5 0 — Jan.
64.
------- Lunch periods. Work during; when compen­
sable. 1946— Jan. 89; 1948— Oct. 407, Nov. 520;
1950— Sept. 368.
------- Maintenance and service employees. Loft
building used for manufacture of goods for in­
terstate commerce; act applicable. (U.S. Sup.
Ct.— K irschbaum v, W alling c a s e .) 1 9 4 2 — July
102-103, Sept. 531-532; 1948— Jan. 84.
------- ------- Office buildings. 1948— Mar. 493, Dec.
1195-1196.
--------------Production of milk products for interstate
commerce. 1944— Oct. 808.
------- Maintenance, repair, and expansion of plant
facilities and roads. 1946— Nov. 764-765.
-------Maintenance, repair, and reconstruction of
public highways; coverage of employees engaged
in. 1948— July 127.
------- Make-ready activities included as working
time (U. S. Sup. C t.). 1947— Mar. 483-484.
------- Military camp, construction of, not “ in com­
merce.” 1945— Sept. 502.
------- Minimum pay. Contract rate equal to, held
valid. 1945— Sept. 503.
------- Minimum wage. Act upheld by U.S. Supreme
Court (Feb. 3, 1941). 1 9 4 1 — Feb. 423.
------- Motor Carrier Act exemption, employees in
intrastate transportation. 1948— Jan. 64.
------- Motor carriers. Application of exemptions
from coverage. 1946— Mar. 437, Dec. 971.
--------------- Exemption broadened. 1947— June 10611062.
------- Mines, iron-ore, working time in. 1948— May
944-945.
-------Newspaper rackmen not engaged in interstate
commerce. 1948— Nov. 963.
------- Newspapers. Subpena power of Wage-Hour
Administrator as applied to. 1945— April 831.
------- Newspapers, local. Employees held to be en­
gaged in commerce. 1950— May 541.
----------------Exemption. 1947— Dec. 687.
------- Night watchman. Law applicable to. 1944—
Feb. 360.
-------No closed shop for closed union. 1 9 4 5 — Aug.
291.
------- Nonproductive hours, compensation for. 1946
— Jan. 88-89.
--------------- Basis for computing, agreed-upon hourly
rate in excess of legal minimum, upheld (by U.S.
Sup. Ct.— Bello case). 1942— July 103-105, 106,
Sept. 532.
------- Overtime. Basis for c o m p u tin g , a c tu a l
straight-time rate, in absence of contract (U.S.
Sup. Ct.— Missel case). 1942— Sept. 532.
------- ------- Belo case. Doctrine of, in computing
rates; validity reaffirmed by U.S. Supreme Court.
1 , 47 — June 1059-1060, Aug. 207.
9
---------------- Civil action to recover, 8-hour law.
1 9 4 8 — May 535.
---------------- Compromise of claim under Portal-toPortal Act. 1948— Feb. 186.
------- Overtime compensation. Arbitration of con­
troversy involving, employer may not compel.
1948— June 1126.

36

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Court decisions, U. S.— Continued
FL SA . Overtime compensation. Disapproval of
plan to avoid. 1945— Jan. 121-122.
--------------Government contracts. 1948— July 54.
------- ------- Liquidated damages. Weight accorded
ruling of Wage and Hour local office. 1948—
Jan. 65.
---------------- Longshoremen, New York. 1948— July
IV.
------- ------- Partner-employers guilty of criminal
contempt of injunction forbidding noncompliance
with act. 1950— Aug. 245.
----------------Payment of IY2 times regular rate after
40 hours, and not minimum wage, required, when
no overtime provision in contract (U.S. Sup. Ct.
— Motor Transp. Co. case). 1942— July 102, 105106.
----------------Settlements, judicial approval of. 1946—
Apr. 617.
------- ------- Unpaid. Agent of employer liable for.
1948— Sept. 551.
---------------- Workers entitled to. 1 9 4 3 — Jan. 84;
1 9 5 0 — Feb. 187, Mar. 308.
------- Overtime pay due. Agreement in settlement
of, held invalid. 1945— Nov. 994-995.
----------------Balancing weekly overpayments against,
procedure rejected by court. 1947— Nov. 575. ^
------- Piece workers; coverage; rates and incentive
earnings, interpretation regarding. 1945— Mar.
593, Aug. 290-291.
------- Political subdivision, employment by. 1943—
May 945.
------- Portal-to-portal claim of Mt. Clemens Pottery
f
workers denied. 1947— Mar. 483.
1
------- “ Portal-to-Portal” pay to miners. 1944— Feb.
1021-1023.
------- Power-plant employees. 1945— Jan.
122;
1946—
Apr. 618.
------- Production. Distribution as well as manufac­
ture included. 1945— Aug. 291.
---------------- Goods for interstate commerce. 1943—
Nov. 963; 1945— July 100-101; 1947— Oct. 464;
1948— Apr. 415; 1949— May 553.
---------------- Transport of goods as. 1945— Jan. 122.
------ Railroad employees, persons making rail­
road car doors. 1948— Jan. 64-65.
------- Railroad “ trainess” not employees. 1945—
July 101; 1946— July 101; 1947— May 859-860.
------- Railroad wage contract modified. 1 9 4 4 — Dec.
1224.
------- Record-keeping and overtime pay provisions,
violation of, contempt. 1949— Apr. 436, Dec. 678.
-------Record-keeping by employer, essential. 1 9 4 5 —
May 1048.
------- Records for Wage Administrator. Subpenas
to compel production of. 1945— July 100; 1949—
Mar. 322.
------- Refrigeration-truck mechanic covered. 1945—
Apr. 832.
------- Regular and overtime rates, computation of.
Night and day differentials, wage premium plan.
1947— Mar. 486, 487.
------- Regular rate of pay. 1948— June 646, Aug.
165; 1949— July 50.
------- Renting stores and collecting rents is not
“ commerce.” 1946— May 761-762.
------- Representation election. Employer officious­
ness held unfair. 1945— June 1262-1263.
------- Retail or service establishments. Exemptions.
1946— Dec. 971-972; 1947— Nov. 574; 1948—
Aug. 166, Nov. 519.
------- Roll call and inspection time called hours
worked. 1945— May 1048.
-------Sawyers and woodcutters held to be employees.
1 9 5 0 — May 541.




------- Seamen. Application of exemptions from cov­
erage. 1946— Dec. 972.
------- Seasonal fruit, first processing of. 1945— July
54-55.
------- Service establishments. Exemptions. 1946—
Dec. 971; 1947— Sept. 347.
------- Slaughterhouse meat boner employees. 1947—
Aug. 206-207.
------- “ Split day” wage plan. 1 9 4 5 — Dec. 1190;
1 9 4 7 — Jan. 84.
------- State’s curtailment of time for employee suit
considered by courts. 1945— Mar. 593-594.
------- Statutory wages, acceptance of, as waiver of
suit for liquidated damages. 1943— May 945.
------- Subpena case. Predetermination of coverage.
1946— Apr. 616.
-------Subpena powers, Wage and Hour Administra­
tor, scope of. 1948— July 125-126, Dec. 1196.
------- Switchboard operator, office, within the act.
1946— Nov. 766-767.
-------Telegraph company. Agency offices of, not in­
dependent contractors. 1948— Feb. 186-187.
----------------Subject to child-labor provisions. 1943—
Dec. 1194-1195.
------- Timber operations conducted for agricultural
purposes not within act. 1945— Dec. 1190.
------- Timekeeper, local housing project. 1947—
Mar. 485.
------- Time limitation, new, not applicable to em­
ployee suits. 1945— Apr. 833-834
------- Time records, changing without employee’s
knowledge held illegal. 1945— Nov. 995.
------- Time spent in oiling machines held working
time. 1945— Dec. 1189.
------- Time spent waiting to punch time clock as
“hours worked.” 1946— July 101-102.
------- Time studies as evidence of violation. 1945—
Sept. 503.
------- Time worked, theater editor of newspaper,
held as compensable working time. 1949— May
553-554.
------- Toll road and drawbridge. Employees main­
taining and operating. 1943— Mar. 492-493.
------- Travel time. Between portal and face of coal
mine. Miners in open pit mines. 1 9 4 5 — July 9 9 100, Aug. 290.
-------Truck drivers engaged in interstate and/or in­
trastate commerce covered. 1946— Feb. 257, Mar.
437.
------- Trucks in interstate commerce, employees of
copartnerships serving, covered. 1945— July 102.
------- Union activity. Company rules limiting, held
unfair labor practice. 1945— June 1262.
------- Union as “ employer” under Wage-Hour Act,
suability of. 1943— Aug. 307-308.
-------Victory tax. Application of, to wage and sal­
ary payments received after Jan. 1, 1943. 1948—
Aug. 309.
-------Violations. Alleged, Wage and Hour Adminis­
trator entitled to refuse to answer questions on
source of information. 1950— Apr. 426.
----------------Share in, no defense to employee action.
1945— Mar. 595-596.
------- Volunteer worker, applicability of act to.
1947— Jan. 84-85, Sept. 348.
-------Wage claim under statute held arbitrable dis­
pute. 1943— Oct. 781-782.
------- Wage-order coverage. 1944— Feb. 360-361.
-------Wage-rate manipulation. 1947— Aug. 207-208.
-------Wage (weekly) plan without guaranty or stip­
ulated hourly rate rejected. 1947— June 10601061.
------- Wages, restitution of, included in consent de­
cree. 1943— Oct. 781; 1944— Feb. 359-360.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
-------Waiting time as working time. 1945— Feb. 337.
------- Warehouse employees; wholesalers operating
wholesale and retail establishments; retail and
mail-order business. 19U — Apr. 724-725; 1947—
S
Mar. 485.
------- Watchmen’s services furnished by employees
of detective agency. 1943— Mar. 492.
------- Wholesale produce dealer. Coverage of dis­
tributors’ employees. 1947— July 78.
Federal Communications Act. Amendment of 1946
declared unconstitutional. 1947— Feb. 276.
Federal Employers’ Liability Act. Cases relating
to. 1945— Jan. 126-127.
Free speech. Interference with employment, pro­
hibited by Arkansas law, not an unconstitu­
tional abridgment of the right of (U.S. Sup Ct.).
1950— Feb. 187-188.
Georgia law penalizing failure of employee to repay
in work or in money, funds advanced by em­
ployer, held invalid. 1942— Mar. 700.
Government employees residing in Washington re­
quired to pay District of Columbia income tax
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1942— M slt. 701-702.
Government war contracts coverage. New trials
ordered in suits for overtime compensation.
1950— Sept. 368.
Group Health Association (D.C.) American Med­
ical Association and District Medical Society
found guilty of conspiracy against, Apr. 4, 1941,
by jury. 1942— Mar. 685.
Hearings, due process of law, U.S. Supreme Court.
1949— Aug. 171-172.
Hiring halls of the National Maritime Union
(CIO) on the Great Lakes illegal; union’s in­
sistence on continuation of violation of TaftHartley Act. 1950— Mar. IV.
Home-work certificates, injunction for failure to
supply. New York. 1945— Sept. 503.
Home workers. See Fair Labor Standards Act, this

section.
Hospitals, charitable. Massachusetts Labor Rela­
tions Act not applicable to. 1947— Mar. 491.
------- Nonprofit, held subject to State labor-rela­
tions act (Minn. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Feb. 399.
------- Partially supported by State appropriation,
held not subject to State labor-relations act (Pa.
Sup. Ct.). 1941— Apr. 929-930.
“ Hot Cargo” Act. California. Constitutionality of.
1946— July 102, Dec. 976; 1947— Dec. 688-689.
Hourly pay rate, stipulated in “ Belo” contract,
bonafide only when some reasonable relation
between guaranteed wage and wage paid without
a contract. 1950— July 133.
Hours of work. Puerto Rico Act, 1935. Employee’s
claim for overtime under provisions of, not up­
held (U .S. Dist. Ct.). 1943— 5 une 1128-1129.
Income tax paid on back wages for year in which
payment was received. Claim for refund not up­
held (U .S. Dist. Ct.). 1944— Apr. 790.
Individual rights under union contract void after
nullification of agreement by NLRB, as terms
were not incorporated into employee’s individ­
ual contract of employment. 1950— Apr. 429.
Injunction. Against picketing. Duration of decree,
New York. 1949— Aug. 174.
------- ------- Employer by outside union; “ inside”
union not entitled to. (Calif. Sup. Ct.). 1941—
Jan. 141.
------- Against
union.
Coercion.
Pennsylvania.
1948— Oct. 410.
---------------- Malicious
interference.
New
York.
1948— June 652.
------- Court jurisdiction to entertain petitions not




37

given in section 301 of LMRA. 1 9 5 0 —-Feb. 191.
------- Enforcing union shop, California. 1949—
June 675.
------- Industrial-dispute cases involving use of.
1943— Mar. 496-497, Apr. 729-730, May 947-948.
-------Peaceful picketing, Arkansas. 1949— Apr. 442.
------- Prohibiting abusive language by pickets.
Georgia. 1948— Dec. 644.
------- Temporary. Dissolution of and refusal to
grant permanent injunction against interference
with access to employer’s plant during strike,
Connecticut. 1950— Mar. 313-314.
------- Union affiliation changes, injunction against
denied, New York State. 1950— Feb. 191-192.
Interstate commerce. See Fair Labor Standards
Act, this section.
Jurisdictional controversy held labor dispute (U.S.
Ct. of App. for D .C.). 1941— May 1218-1219.
Jurisdictional strikes. California. 1948— July 59;
1950— May 545.
“ Kickback” Act not applicable to union officials.
1946— May 759-760.
Labor dispute. Award under public-utility compul­
sory-arbitration law invalid, New Jersey Su­
preme Court. 1950— Dec. 719.
------- Free speech, Pennsylvania. 1949— Feb. 212.
------- Meaning, Oregon. 1949— Oct. 427.
Labor Management Relations Act, 1947. Agricul­
tural workers, coverage. 1949— Feb. 211.
-------Appropriate unit for collective bargaining, de­
ciding factor in ascertaining might be wishes of
employees themselves. 1950— Mar. 312.
------- Breach of contract in collective-bargaining
agreement. 1949— Dec. 679-680.
------- Closed shop. Contracts executed prior to
enactment of amended N LR A not an unfair labor
practice. 1949— Dec. 680.
----------------Order prohibiting strike upheld. 1949—
Sept. 297.
---------------- See also Closed shop, this section.
------- Concerted activity. 1949— Oct. 424.
------- Constitutionality of. 1947— Nov. 572-573;
1948—
Mar. I V ; 1950— June IV , July 135-136.
-------Damage suits between employers and labor or­
ganizations for breach of contract affecting in­
terstate commerce under Federal courts’ juris­
diction. 1950— Aug. 248.
------- Damages for violation of no-strike agreement
denied. 1950— Sept. 370-371 .
------- Discharge for cause. 1949— Aug. 171.
------- Duty to bargain, group health plan. 1949—
July 51.
------- Economic strikers, discrimination against.
1949— Mar. 324.
-------Expenditures by labor organization for news­
paper advertisement and broadcast over a com­
mercial radio station, not violation. 1949— Apr.
439-440.
------- Free speech. Citizens’ committee’s activities
not violation. 1950— Aug. 247.
------- Grievances, presentation by union represent­
ing minority. 1949— May 557-558.
------- Injunctions under. 1947— Oct. 465; 1948—
Apr. 421, Sept. 302-303; 1949—-Nov. 554.
-------Interference, refusal of use of company audi­
torium. 1949— Apr. 439.
-------Jurisdiction of Federal courts. 1950— May 544.
— - NLRB, exclusive jurisdiction over the ques­
tion of certification of bargaining representative.
1949— Mar. 323-324.
------- Non-Communist affidavit requirements held
constitutional and applicable to parent federa­
tions such as A F L and CIO. 1950— July 135-136.

38

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Court decisions, U. S.— Continued
LM RA, 1947. Non-Communist oath requirement
upheld by Supreme Court, May 8, 1950. 1 9 5 0 —
June IV.
------- Picketing and circulation of blacklist to en­
force secondary boycott not protected by “ free
speech” clause. 1950— Oct. 494.
------- Refusal of John L. Lewis and United Mine
Workers to comply with restraining order sus­
pending existing strike, contempt. 1949— Aug.
171.
------- Refusal to bargain. 1947— Aug. 247; 1949—
Dec. 681; 1950— Apr. 428, May 543, Sept. 368369, Nov. 597.
---------------- Employer, U.S. Supreme Court. 1949—
Aug. 169-170.
------- Review of NLRB decisions, judicial scope
of. 1950— Mar. 312-313, May 544.
------- Secondary boycotts. 1949— Jan. 71, June 673674; 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 67, May 541-542, Sept. 370, Oct.
494, Nov. 596.
-------State court jurisdiction to enforce, California.
1949— Jan. 75.
-------Strikes, State and Federal jurisdiction. 1949—
Apr. 438-439; 1950— July 135.
------- Supervisors, definition of “ authority.” 1 9 4 9 —
Oct. 423.
------- Unfair labor practices. Employer. 1 9 4 9 — Feb.
209-210, May 556-557; 1950— Feb. 131, 188, Apr.
427-428, Oct. 495.
------- ------- Union, injunction prohibiting. 1 9 4 9 —
Jan. 71-72.
------- Union of guards and nonguards. 1947— Dec.
685-686. '
------- Union shop, State versus Federal jurisdiction.
1949— May 554-555.
-------Welfare funds. Collection from Arkansas coal
operators unenforceable. 1949— Nov. 555.
Labor organizers, laws licensing. Constitutionality
of. 1944— Oct. 808.
Labor Peace Act, Colorado. 1947— Aug. 210.
Labor relations. Significant decisions, 1900-50; ef­
fects on labor-management relations. 1950— July
51-57.
------- State acts held applicable in absence of Fed­
eral jurisdiction (W is. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Apr.
929.
Labor-union regulation. Federal and State courts.
Summaries. 1949— Feb. 332-336, June 1267.
Lea Act, constitutionality of. 1947— Aug. 206.
Legality of property right in secession by local,
Rhode Island. 1950— Sept. 372.
Libel against union. New York. 1948— Sept. 303.
Libel by unions. Illinois, New York, Washington.
1948— June 651, July 59; 1950— Sept. 373.
“ Liquidated damages” held to accrue automati­
cally with finding of unpaid overtime (Minn.
Sup. C t.). 1941— Dec. 1460.
Maritime employment. Shipowner held liable for
wages, maintenance, and care to seaman injured
during authorized shore leave (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1943— June 1126-1127.
Migration, interstate. “ Anti-Oakie” law (Calif.)
ruled unconstitutional (U .S. Sup. Ct.). 1942—
Sept. 538.
Military camp, construction of, not “ in commerce.”
New York. 1945— Sept. 502.
Miners’ hours. Wage and Hour Administrator’s
“ portal to portal” ruling to govern, to avoid con­
flict of State and Federal hour laws (Mont. Sup.
Ct.). 1942— Feb. 452-453.
Mine Workers, United. Contempt cases. (U .S. Dist.
Ct. and U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1947— Feb. 271-272, May
855-857; 1949— Aug. 171.




-------Not guilty of either civil or criminal contempt
for refusal to comply with restraining order sus­
pending existing strike. 1950— May 544-545.
Minimum wage. Beauty-shop operators subject to
law (Appellate Ct. of 111.). 1941— Aug. 446-447.
------- Cases involving tipping practice (Calif) and
State orders. 1942— Mar. 587-588; 1943— Jan.
85, Mar. 494.
------- Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 upheld by
U. S. Supreme Court (Feb. 3, 1941). 1941— Feb.
423.
Minor illegally unemployed, compensation for.
1945— July 98-99.
Motortruck drivers and helpers. New York City,
indicted for threats of violence and coercion,
held not liable under Federal Antiracketeering
Act (U .S. Sup. Ct.). 1942— Apr. 995-996.
National Labor Relations Act. Antistrike law, valid­
ity challenged. 1943— Oct. 782.
------- Business subject to, though no longer in in­
terstate commerce. 1945— May 1046.
------- “ Cease and desist order.” Persons who may
be included. 1945— Apr. 828.
------- Closed shop and dual unionism. 1947— Feb.
274-275.
-------“ Company union” properly excluded from bal­
lot. 1945— Apr. 827.
-------Constitutional
privilege
against
self-in­
crimination, applicability of to union records.
1944— Aug. 373.
------- Free speech and coercive statements. 1946—
Dec. 973; 1947— Mar. 489-490.
-------Freedom of speech, employer’s, and the W ag­
ner Act. 1943— Dec. 1196; 1944— July 125-126,
Aug. 374-375, Sept. 578.
-------Hearings, NLRB. 1945— Feb. 344; 1946— Jan,
89-90.
------- Picketing an exercise of freedom of speech
guaranteed by the Constitution, principle reaf­
firmed. 1944— Feb. 364-365. See also Picketing,
this section .
------- Reemployment rights under Selective Service
Act. 1944— Apr. 789. See also Selective service.
------- Right of concerted activity for mutual aid
guaranteed. 1945— Mar. 597.
------- Rights of employees under Pennsylvania Labor
Relations Act. 1944— Sept. 581.
-------Seizure of Montgomery Ward & Co. unlawful.
1945— Mar. 592-593.
------- State regulation of labor unions. 1944— Sept.
581.
------- Status of individual contracts under Wagner
Act. 1944— Apr. 788.
-------Status of informal committees. 1947— Feb. 275.
------- Unilateral act of employer to aid employees,
violation. 1946— Feb. 258-259.
National Labor Relations Board. Automobile dis­
tributors engaging in interstate commerce ruled
subject to jurisdiction (Circuit Court of A p­
peals, Boston; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Mar. 659660.
------- Back-pay orders. Authority of Board to issue
limited (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Jan. 137-138.
---------------- Pay for picketing, etc., not deductible.
(New York.) 1946— Mar. 435.
-------Bargaining-agent designation by, for 6 plants
of Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., upheld (U .S. Sup.
Ct.). 1941— June 1449-1450.
------- Bargaining, individual, permissible area of
(U .S. Sup. Ct.). 1947— Mar. 490-491.
------- Bargaining rights in unfair-labor-practice
case, rulings on held final (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1942—
Mar. 701.
-------Blanket orders held to be improper (U .S. Sup.
Ct.). 1941— Apr. 928-929.

39

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Decisions and orders. 19 U — Aug. 311-312,
S
Sept. 553-554, Oct. 783-784, Nov. 964-965. See
also National Labor Relations Board.
------- Certification of union on ground company re­
sponsible for small number employees voting in
election, upheld (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 19U1— Jan. 139.
-------Closed shop. Invalidation of contract with na­
tionally affiliated union which employer assisted
in organizing, upheld (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 19U1—
Jan. 138-139.
------- Contract with union, signed; order requiring
employer to enter after collective-bargaining
agreement reached, upheld. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
19U1— Feb. 398-399.
------- Decisions. See National Labor Relations
Board.
-------Discharge for union activity. Order requiring
company to reinstate workers (with back pay)
upheld, despite company’s liquidation (U.S. Cir.
Ct. of App. and U.S. Sup. Ct.). 19 U2— Mar. 700701.
------- Discrimination against union men in hiring
hall held unfair labor practice making employer
subject to Board’s order requiring hiring and
reimbursement (U .S. Sup. Ct.). 19 Ul—June
1448-1449.
------- Disestablishment of employee-representation
systems, aided by employer (10 steel plants) up­
held by D.C. Ct. of Appeals. 19Ul— July 140-141.
-------Disestablishment of independent union account
bulletin and speeches by company officials, order
directing company remanded to Board for rede­
termination of issues (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 19 U2— Feb.
452.
-------Enjoining employer against disobeying NLRB
order not in power of State court (Tex. Ct. Civ.
App.). 19U1— Oct. 943.
------- Foremen, rights to self-organization (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 19U7— May 857-858.
-------Independent union held not entitled to injunc­
tion to prevent employer from dealing with other
unions (a Federal district court decision). 19Ul—
Oct. 941-942.
-------Jurisdictional disputes, hearings required only
when there is reasonable basis for complaint and
when an actual dispute exists. 1950— Apr. 4 2 9 430.
------- Lumber company having 1 percent of sales
and $150,000 of purchases interstate, held sub­
ject to Board’s jurisdiction by U.S. Circuit of
Appeals (Philadelphia); review by U.S. Supreme
Court refused. 19 U2— Feb. 453.
------- Orders, only specific violations of National
Labor Relations Act to be subject of. (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 19U1— Apr. 928-929.
------- Public and employers, relationship between
held not province of Board (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
19 Ul— Jan. 138.
------- Refusal to entertain post-election challengers
upheld by U.S. Supreme Court. 19U7— Feb. 274.
-------Unfair labor practice which also violated con­
tract, held subject to Board by U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals (Philadelphia); review by U.S. Su­
preme Court refused. 19 U2— Feb. 453.
Night work law constitutional. Connecticut. 19U7—
Oct. 467.
Non-Communist affidavit and strike. Pennsylvania.
19U — Jan. 69.
S
Noncomplying union, injunction against. Indiana.
19U — May 540.
S
Nonstriking butchers refusing to go through groc­
ery clerks picket line not entitled to wages (D.C.
Municipal Ct., Sm. Claims and Cone. B r.). 19Ul—
Sept. 662.




Nonunion employees. Check-off agreement valid.
New York. 19U6— Sept. 406-407.
Nonunion goods. Refusal to handle. New York.
19U7—Jan. 89.
Norris-LaGuardia Act. Antitrust cases, act appli­
cable when labor disputes involved (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 19 Ul— Jan. 139-140.
------- Conditions precedent to relief under. Indiana.
19U — June 924.
S
------- Federal district court not prevented from
restraining union under Railway Labor Act from
discriminatory representation. 1950— Jan. 64—
65.
------ Injunction by private party. 19U 9 — Jan. 72.
------- Intra-union dispute held a “ labor dispute”

within meaning of act.

1 9 5 0 — Feb.

191.

------- Limitation of jurisdiction in issuance of in­
junctions. 19U7— July 80-81, Sept. 347, Oct. 465,
Dec. 686.
-------Refusal (company) to submit dispute to arbi­
tration held to bar use of injunction (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). i P ^ - A p r . 786-787.
No-strike clause, breach of. Alabama and New
York. 19U — June 650-651, Aug. 171.
S
No-strike contract defeats State Board’s orders.
New York. 19U5— Oct. 759.
Overtime compensation. See Fair Labor Standards
Act, and Portal-to-Portal Act, this section .
“ Overtime-on-Overtime Act of 1949,” Public Law
177 (81st Cong.), constitutional. 1950— Feb. 187.
Parent labor organization held authorized to de­
termine jurisdiction of affiliates (U.S. Ct. of App.
for D.C.). 19Ul— May 1219-1220.
Pennsylvania labor-relations act of 1937 held con­
stitutional (Pa. Sup. Ct.). 19U1— Apr. 930-931.
Pensions held subject to collective bargaining, 1949,
U.S. Sup. Ct. 1950— Dec. 664.
Peonage. Federal-court decision. 19U5— Apr. 836.
Picketing. Act prohibiting, by nonemployees, held
unconstitutional. Pennsylvania. 19U — Dec. 644.
S
------- Against closed shop with independent union,
by A F L union upheld; employer held not en­
titled to injunction (Superior Ct. of Los Angeles,
Calif.). 19 Ul— Nov. 1222.
----- - And boycotting. Employer, because of juris­
dictional disputes between unions, held allowable
under Clayton Act and not liable to prosecution
under Sherman Antitrust Act (U .S. Sup. Ct.).
i ^ l - M a r . 658-659.
----------;----- Two hotels by 4 labor unions. Injunction
against, by Wisconsin Employment Relations
Board, upheld (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 19U2— Apr. 997.
------- And free speech. Texas, Massachusetts, and
Tennessee. 19U — Jan. 69, Mar. 310-311, Aug.
S
171.
------- Business having no employees. Michigan and
Minnesota. 19U5— July 102; 19U6— Aug. 255.
------- By minority union. Tennessee and Washing­
ton. 19U7— May 863-864, June 1964.
-------Cases concerning use of. 19UU— Feb. 364-365;

19U6— June 923-925.
------- Customer of disputing employer. New York.
19 U7— June 1064.
------- Defense project. Held not prohibited by Cali­
fornia Sabotage Prevention Act (State Superior
Ct. for Los Angeles Co.). 19Ul— Oct. 941.
-------Enjoinable, when signs misleading, New York
State. 1950— Apr. 431.
-------Freedom to. California. 19U — May 540.
S
-------For closed shop. Maine, Nevada, and Florida.

19U7— Feb. 276-277;
1950— May 545.

19 U9— Sept.

300-301;

------- Held protected free speech, Arkansas. 1950—
May 545.

40

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Court decisions, U. S.— Continued
Picketing. Held to be protected free speech. (U. S.
Sup. C t.). 191+2— May 1158.
-------Home of employer with whom union is having
a labor dispute legal, California. 1950— Apr.
430-431.
------- Injunction against. Illegal (U .S. Sup. Ct.),
account employer’s refusing to renew expired
union contract, discharging union employee, and
entering into agreement with rival union. 191+1—
May 1219.
------- Injunction restraining mass tactics but per­
mitting limited number of pickets, upheld (Wash.
Sup. Ct.). 1942— Mar. 702.
-------Injunction when not directly related to labor
dispute. Texas courts upheld in issuance of. (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1942— May 1158.
------- Injunctions,
Tennessee and Washington.
1948— Dec. 644; 1949— Sept. 301-302.
-------Injury to picketers by manager of store, held
to be responsibility of store owner (Ga. Ct. of
App.). 1941— Feb. 399-400.
-------Jurisdictional dispute. California. 1947— Feb.
277.
------- Labor disputes, Texas. 1949— May 675-676;
1950— Apr. 431.
------- Law restricting use in support of strike not
voted by majority in collective bargaining unit
upheld (W is. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Jan. 142.
------- Lawful under Federal Constitution. 1941—
Mar. 661; 1944— Feb. 364-365.
----- Legality of objective. 1947— Nov. 576; 1948—
Sept. 304; 1950—July 138, Sept. 372.
------- Limitations on. Michigan. 1948— Aug. 170.
------- Mass picketing. Limitations on, and legality of.
1946— Feb. 260, May 762-763; 1947— Feb. 277;
1948— Jan. 68-69, July 59; 1949— May 559.
------- Not enjoinable as “ untruthful” when “ un­
truth” expressed is merely matter of opinion,
California. 1950— Apr. 431.
-------Pay for. Not deductible under back-pay award.
New York. 1946— Mar. 435.
-------Peaceful. And boycotting to obtain closed shop
upheld by California Supreme Court. 1941— Jan.
140-141.
---------------- Held lawful (2 cases) by New Jersey
Court of Errors and Appeals. 1941— July 139140.
----------------Protected by the first amendment to the
Constitution which guarantees free speech.
1950— July 134-135.
---------------- Permissible, when associated with vio­
lence. (111. Sup. Ct., upheld by U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1941— June 1450-1451.
------- Plants bargaining with another union, per­
mitted, Washington. 1946— Mar. 435-436.
------- Prohibition of, as unfair labor practice, up­
held (U .S. Sup. Ct.). 1942— May 1157.
------- Refusal to cross picket line. California.
1948— Oct. 410.
-------Residence, not protected as free speech. Ohio.
1948— Jan. 69.
-------Secondary boycott. Ohio. 1947— Aug. 210.
------- Stranger picketing. 1947— Mar. 491-492, Sept.
349, Dec. 689; 1948— Mar. 311-312.
------- Temporary restraining order against striking
and picketing of hospital. New York. 1946—
Feb. 260.
------- To compel employer to join union. 1949— Feb.
211-212; 1950— Feb. 192.
------- To compel selective hiring illegal, California.
1949— Jan. 74—
75.
------- To compel union shop illegal but picketing for
lawful objectives by union representing minority
of employees legal, Texas. 1950— Mar. 314.




-------To compel unionization. Injunction against by
State (111.) court held invalid (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1 9 4 1 — June 1451.
------- To induce breach of contract lawful, Cali­
fornia. 1950— Nov. 598-599.
-------Union liable for unfair practices of its mem­
bers. Wisconsin. 1946— Nov. 772.
Plumbers’ permits. Municipality held authorized
to issue (Mich. Sup. C t.). 1 9 4 1 — Sept. 662-663.
Political activities, union. Contributions, and as­
sessments for.
California. 1 9 4 5 — Jan. 128;
1948—
Feb. 189.
Political expenditures, by unions, restriction on
held unconstitutional (Fed. Dist. Ct.). 1 9 4 8 —
Apr. III.
Portal-to-Portal
Act.
Compensable
activities.
1949—
Jan. 69, June 669-670, Oct. 422; 1950—
Nov. 596.
-------Constitutionality of. 1947— Oct. 464-465, Dec.
686-687; 1948— Sept. 299-300. Oct. 406; 1949—
Feb. 152.
------- Contract or custom. De minimis rule on over­
time compensation. 1949— Apr. 436-437, July 5 0 51; 1950— Jan. 64, Feb. 186.
----------------Guards employed by a Government con­
tractor in a war munitions plant, while within
the coverage of the FL SA , not eligible for over­
time compensation for work not compensable
under the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947. 1950—
Aug. 245.
------- Good faith defense. 1948— Jan. 65, May 534,
Aug. 166, Oct. 406-407, Nov. 519-520; 1949—
Feb. 153, Nov. 553-554; 1950— Oct. 494.
------- Lunch-time activities. When compensable.
1948— Oct. 407, Nov. 520.
------- Minimum wages and overtime compensation,
employer engaged in production and sale of gas
(Puerto Rico) not relieved of liability by “ good
faith” defense. 1950— June 658.
------- Overtime compensation claims. 1949— May
553; 1950— Mar. 308, Aug. 245-246, Sept. 368.
------- Statute of limitations. 1949— June 670.
------- Sufficiency of allegations; de minimis rule;
contract or custom. 1 9 4 9 — Dec. 678-679.
Prevailing rates on public works, cases concerning.
1 9 4 3 — Mar. 494.
Price-fixing provision in collective agreement held
to invalidate contract (N .Y . Sup. Ct.). 1941—
Oct. 942.
Production, union rules limiting, unlawful. Massa­
chusetts. 1947— Nov. 576.
Public Contracts (Walsh-Healey) Act. Applicabil­
ity. 1950— July 133.
------- Child-labor violations. 1950— Feb. 187, June
658, Dec. 714.
------- Effect upon union’s responsibility for unlaw­
ful conspiracy (U .S. Sup. Ct.). 1947— May 862863.
------- Production of goods for commerce, war con­
tracts. 1949— June 670-671.
-------Statute of limitations, overtime compensation.
1949— May 554.
------- Surety on a Government contract liable for
wages due to employees from a bankrupt con­
tractor. 1950— Aug. 245.
Public utilities. Statutes requiring compulsory arbi­
tration of disputes. 1949— Aug. 173-174, Sept.
302.
Public utility strike law constitution, Wisconsin.
1950— Aug. 249.
Pullman conductor on every train carrying sleep­
ing car. Legality of order of Texas Railroad Com­
mission to be decided by State courts (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1 9 4 1 — May 1218.
Railroads. Abandonment of lines. Employees ad-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Tersely affected by change, Interstate Commerce
Commission empowered to make provision for
(U .S. Sup. Ct.). 191*2— Apr. 997-998.
------- Board’s order blocked by minority employees,
action on. Mississippi. 191*5— July 101.
------- Claim for wrongful discharge, employee not
precluded by Railway Labor Act from suit
against company (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 191*1— May
1217-1218.
------- Nebraska Full-Train-Crew Act. Penal pro­
visions held to be enforceable by State official
(U .S. Sup. Ct.). 191*1— Mar. 660-661.
Railway Labor Act. Arbitration. 191*1*— Oct. 805.
------- Award of Board incontestable by employer
for 2 years. 191*8— Aug. 312.
------- Grievances, presentation of, not limited to
unions alone. 191*3— Nov. 965-966.
------- National Mediation Board. Authority to in­
vestigate railway disputes and designate bar­
gaining agent for employees involved. 191*3— Oct.
784-785.
----------------Decisions held not reviewable (3 cases).

191*1*— Feb. 362-363.
-------Racial discrimination in promotion, collectiveagreement provision unlawful (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
191*7— Jan. 85.
------- Racial discrimination in union representation
forbidden. 191*7— Nov. 573.
------- Railroad Adjustment Board. Court’s right to
review ruling. 191*3— Dec. 1198-1199.
---------------- Exclusive jurisdiction over controversy
between two unions both claiming right to assign
certain railroad jobs. 1950— June 659.
------- Work assignments, court authorized to deal
with agreement on (U . S. Dist. Ct.). 191*5— July

102

.

Relief-work remuneration held to be return for
commensurate service (U . S. Sup. Ct.). 191*1—
Jan. 138.
Representation, majority status, New York State.
1950— Apr. 431.
Representation of members by union, Arkansas.
191*9— May 558-559.
Restricting sales, monopoly, California. 191*9—
July 54-55.
Right of State to compel election of bargaining
agent denied, Kentucky. 1950— May 545.
Right to vote without pay deduction. New York.
191*6— Sept. 406.
“ Right to work” (Florida and Virginia). 191*5—
Aug. 292-293; 191*9— Sept. 299, Nov. 557.
River-dike work held not to be interstate commerce
nor production of goods for (Fed. Dist. C t.).
191*2— June 1359.
Safety appliance acts, Federal, held applicable to
employee injured in intrastate transportation (U.
S. Sup. Ct.). 191*1— May 1218-1219.
Sale of commodities, dispute involving fishermen’s
union. Anti-injunction law held not applicable
since employer-employee relationship not in­
volved. (U . S. Sup. Ct.). 191*2— Mar. 702-703.
Secondary boycotts. California, New York, Idaho,
and Massachusetts. 191*1— Jan. 141; 191*7— May
864; 191*9— July 55, Dec. 683. See also LaborManagement Relations Act, this section.
Secondary picketing within jurisdiction of National
Labor Relations Board. (Minn. Supreme Court.)
1950— Dec. 718.
Selective Training and Service Act. Veterans’
rights under; summaries. 191*7— July 79-80, Aug.
208-210, Sept. 348-349, Oct. 466-467, Nov. 575576, Dec. 687-688; 191*8— Jan. 67-68, Feb. 188189, Mar. 309-310, Apr. 419-420, May 539-540,




41

June 649-650, July 58-59, Aug. 168-170, Oct.
409-410, Nov. 522, Dec. 643-644; 191*9— Aug.
172-173.
Seniority rights. Cases involving. 191*5— Jan. 123124.
Service letter statute, Missouri. Employer’s refusal
to issue. 191*1— Dec. 1461-1462; 191*7— July 81.
Severance pay plan, Virginia. 191*9— Sept. 301.
Sherman Antitrust Act. Agreement held in viola­
tion, because of noncompetitive price lists. 191*1*—
Nov. 1023-1025.
-------Agreement restricting use of spray equipment
for painting held not a violation (U . S. Dist. Ct.
for No. Dist. of Calif.). 191*3— June 1127-1128.
-------Union activities in jurisdictional disputes, act
held not applicable (U . S. Sup. Ct.). 191*1— Mar.
658-659.
------- Union held not immune from triple damage
suit for violation, or from injunction, when union
employers fix prices (Fed. Dist. Ct., Hawaii).
191*7— Oct. 465-466.
Sit-down strike by seamen aboard ship in port held
mutiny (U . S. Sup. Ct.). 191*2— May 1156.
Social Security Act. Applicable to employer of
dancers for California dance hall under contract
(Dist. Ct. and Cir. Ct. of A pp.). 191*3— June
1129-1130.
------- Coverage, members of orchestra in which
leader personally plays instrument. 191*1*— Aug.
382.
------- Old-age and unemployment-insurance pro­
grams held constitutional, U. S. Supreme Court,
1937. 1950— July 33.
Social-security laws. Cases in regard to. 191*3— July
130-132, Aug. 312-313, Sept. 554, Oct. 785-786,
Dec. 1199-1200.
Sound trucks and other devices emitting “ loud and
raucous” noises. City ordinances prohibiting use
upon public streets, constitutionality (U. S. Sup.
Ct.). 191*9— Apr. 439.
“ Split workweek” rule, Wage and Hour Division.
Lumber company’s payment of lower wage for
portion of week spent in retail branch held un­
lawful (Fed. Dist. Ct. for So. Dist. of Ga.).
191*2— Feb. 454.
State laws. See under specific subject , this section.
Strikes. Compliance with State strike-vote law and
not violation of no-strike clause in agreement,
Minnesota. 1950— June 661.
------- For closed shop, law prohibiting upheld,
Minnesota. 191*9— Sept. 300.
-------Majority approval of required, Michigan and
Florida. 191*9— Sept. 299-300, Oct. 426.
-------Not voted by majority. Picketing or boycotting
in support of, declared unfair labor practice in
legal provision, upheld (W is. Sup. Ct.). 191*1—
Jan. 142.
------- Picketing to obtain maintenance of member­
ship unlawful. Massachusetts. 191*7— Sept. 349.
------- Sufficient notice before calling, requirement
of, Alabama. 191*7— Jan. 89.
------- Vote, peaceful picketing,
Utah. 191*9—
May 559.
Supreme Court, United States. Basing point sys­
tem of pricing. 191*8— Aug. III.
-------Labor questions, important decisions on. 191*2—
Sept. 530-539; 191*5— Aug. 288-289.
------- Labor relations, rulings and decisions affect­
ing, January-June 1949. 191*9— Sept. 239.
------- Refusal to review certain cases; summary of
decisions. 191*3— Jan. 84.
------- See also under specific subject , this section.
Taft-Hartley Act. See Labor Management Rela­
tions Act, this section.

42

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Court decisions, U. S.— Continued
Time studies as evidence of violations. New York.
19 U5— Sept. 503.
Tips. Inclusion as part of wages, held prohibited
by minimum-wage law (Calif. Sup. C t.). 19U —
S
Sept. 555-556.
------- Redcaps; may be treated as wages under
Fair Labor Standards Act (U . S. Sup. Ct.).
19U2— Apr. 996-997.
Trade secret of employer, New York County
Supreme Court. 75^5-—Jan. 129.
Unemployment compensation. Not payable for
cessation of work caused by labor dispute (Sup.
Ct. of Ala. decision; U. S. Sup. Ct. refused to
review). 19U1— Aug. 446.
------- Refusal to cross picket lines disqualifies for
(Calif. Sup. Ct.). 19 Ul— May 1220.
-------State court cases concerning. 19U — Apr. 731S
732, May 948; 19 U — Apr. 791-792, Sept. 583,
U
Dec. 1223-1224; 19 U
S— Dec. 1190-1191; 19U8—
Jan. 68.
------- State laws. Application and coverage of.
19U Julv 130-132, Sept. 554, Oct. 785-786,
S—
Dec. 1199-1200; 19 U5— Mar. 598-599.
----------------Georgia Supreme Court decision holding
certain provisions unconstitutional upheld (U . S.
Sup. Ct.). 19 Ul— Jan. 143.
--------------- Virginia, industrial life insurance agents
held to be covered (Sup. Ct. of App. of V a.).
19 Ul— Nov. 1222-1223.
Unfair labor practice. Carrying over union-shop
agreement. New York. 19U — Sept. 303. See also
S
Labor Management Relations Act, this section.
Union and self-operated business, dispute between,
not “ labor dispute.” New York. 19U — Nov. 772S
773.
Union constitution, provisions concerning affiliated
locals, New York State. 19U9— Nov. 556-557.
Union control laws. Kansas, Florida, and Massa­
chusetts. 19U5— May 1051-1052, July 98; 19U —
S
Dec. 975-976.
Union, expulsion from, hearing before. Wisconsin.
19U7— Nov. 576.
Union funds, limitations on use or transfer of.
19U — May 1052; 19U9— Jan. 75.
S
Union liability. 19U — Feb. 259-260; 19U9— Mar.
S
327.
Union membership. Compulsory. State laws out­
lawing held constitutional (U. S. Sup. Ct.).
1950— Feb. 131.
------- Denial of, New York. 19U — Sept. 303.
S
Union not liable for discharge, Pennsylvania.
19U9— Apr. 442.
Union property, transfer of held void, not consis­
tent with local and national constitution. 1950—
Jan. 67.
Union recognition and reinstatement of discharged
employees held lawful strike objectives, Texas.
1950— May 546.
Union responsibility for unlawful acts of officers,
members, or agents; effect of anti-injunction
and anti-trust laws upon (U . S. Sup. Ct.).
19U7— May 862-863.
Union right to sue illegal, Indiana. 19U9— Dec. 683.
Union security. New Hampshire. 19U — Aug. 170S
171.
Union shop. California and New York. 19U — Feb.
S
189; 19U9— Oct. 426-427.
Union solicitation of members and fees. Town
ordinance forbidding upheld by circuit judge,
but action reversed by Florida Supreme Court.
19U — May 945-946.
S
Union, suspension of local, constitutionality, Wash­
ington. 19U9— June 676.
Unions. Expulsion of Communist members valid,




New York. 1950— Aug. 249.
------- Expulsion from, hearing before, Wisconsin.
19U7— Nov. 576.
------- International. Jurisdiction of court to enjoin,
unlawful expulsion of local because of property
rights. 1950— Apr. 430.
---------------- Power to take over local union limited.
Washington. 19 U7— June 1064.
-------Not exempt from provisions of Sherman Anti­
trust Act (Dec. of U. S. Dist. Ct. for No. Dist.
of Ohio). 19U1— Nov. 1221-1222.
------ - Penalties on members working for employer
without going through procedures required by
union’s bylaws not enjoinable (Kans. Sup. Ct.).
1950— Oct. 496.
-------Refusal to supply laborers to an employer not
violation of anti-monopoly law, New York Court
of Appeals. 1950— Oct. 496-497.
------- Withdrawal of local from parent union,
validity of, Connecticut. 1950— Aug. 248-249.
United States Supreme Court. See Supreme Court,

this section.
Vacation time, unless contract specifies, fixed by
employer; employee taking vacation at different
time fixed by union not entitled to vacation pay.
1950— Jan. 69.
Veteran’s benefit (U . S. Dist. Ct. for Eastern Dist.
of K y.). 19U — May 1025-1026.
U
Veterans’ reemployment rights. 19U — Oct. 802,
U
Nov. 1019-1020; 19U5— May 1049; 19U6— Feb.
259, Mar. 437, Apr. 618-619, May 760, June
919-920, July 98, Aug. 252-253, Sept. 405-406,
Nov. 769-771, Dec. 973; 19U7— Jan. 86-87, Feb.
275-276, Mar. 487-489, May 861-862, June 10631064; 19U9— Jan. 73-74, Feb. 211, Mar. 325-326,
May 558, June 674-675, Oct. 425-426, Dec. 682683; 1950— Jan. 68, Mar. 313, Apr. 430, June
660, July 137-138.
Veterans’ seniority. New collective-bargaining terms
could take precedence over seniority granted
under GX bill of rights (U. S. Sup. Ct.). 1950—
Feb. 131.
Voter must be employed at time of election if vote
is to count. 19U — Feb. 258.
S
Voting time. Compulsory payment for, unlawful.
Kentucky. 19 U8— Jan. 68.
Wage adjustments based on findings of State or
Federal agencies having legal authority to make
determinations. Summary of cases concerning
authenticity of (cited in connection with wage
adjustments to cost of living). 19US— Nov. 892894.
Wage assignment. Law restricting, future wages,
upheld (N . C. Sup. Ct.). 19U2— Jan. 128.
Wage payment at specified times, with exclusion
of banks and mercantile houses. State law held
constitutional (Utah Sup. Ct.). 19Ul— Nov. 1221.
Wage stabilization. Cases concerning, summary.
19U Nov. 964-965.
S—
Walk-outs to attend union meetings. Wisconsin.
19U7—J slti. 88-89.
Walsh-Healey Act. See Public Contracts Act, this

section.
W ar Labor Disputes Act. Cases involving decisions
under. 19U — Oct. 782-784.
S
------- Federal-court decision in Montgomery-Ward
seizure case. 19U5— Mar. 592-593.
Wisconsin Employment Relations (Employment
Peace) Act. Board order forbidding use of picket­
ing to compel closed shop not voted for by threefourths of employees, upheld (W is. Sup. Ct.;
U. S. Sup. Ct. refused to review). 19Ul— Apr.
929; 19U2— June 1359.
------- Board order (under Employment Peace Act)
to union to refrain from mass picketing and ob-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
struction of factory entrances, upheld (W is. Sup.
Ct.). 19U1— Apr. 929.
------- Held applicable in absence of Federal juris­
diction (W is. Sup. Ct.). 19 U1— Apr. 929.
Workmen’s compensation. Alien beneficiaries, non­
resident. Benefits not due to, under State statute
(W . Va. Sup. Ct. of App.) 19 U1— May 1221.
------- Award to dependents of weekly payment
larger than deceased had contributed, upheld
(Superior Ct. of Pa.). 19 U1— Oct. 943-944.
-------Award claimed sufficient reason for employee’s
dismissal as physically unfit. Arbitrator’s ruling
requiring continuance in employment but in light­
er work, upheld (Appellate Div. N. Y . Sup. Ct.).
19 U — July 129-130.
S
------- Cases relating to. 19U — Mar. 497-498.
S
------- Death of labor organizer from shot at night
held result of work and compensable (Minn.
Sup. Ct.). 19U1— June 1452-1453.
------- Employer assault upon employee not com­
pensable; employee’s remedy through suit for
assault and battery (Common Pleas Ct. Union
Co., N. J.). 19U1— Aug. 448.
------- Lead poisoning from spray gun held acci­
dental injury and compensable (Sup. Ct. of
Okla.). 19U2— Jan. 129.
------- Loss of front teeth held compensable (Sup.
Ct. of Idaho). 19U1— Aug. 448.
------- Not recoverable from both Louisiana and
Texas for same injury (U . S. Sup. Ct.). 19U —
U
Feb. 363-364.
------- Silicosis. Ohio act containing special sched­
ule for compensation upheld (Ohio Sup. Ct.).
19 U2— Jan. 128-129.
------- Safety shoe, injury to employee wearing held
compensable (Sup. Ct. of App. of V a.). 19U1—
Dec. 1462.
------- Unpaid portion held payable to covered em­
ployee’s heirs, if vested right exists due to
specific injury or failure of insurer to make
payments due before employee’s death (Ct. of
Civ. App. of Tex.). 19U1— July 141.
Court decisions, foreign countries:
Australia. Basic-wage level of 1937 upheld by
Commonwealth Arbitration Court. 19U1— May
1255-1256.
-------W ar bonus award refused by Commonwealth
Arbitration Court, June 27, 1941. 19U1— Dec.
1578-1579.
------- Women workers, metal trades, rate of pay.
Judge’s opinion (Aug. 17, 1942) summarized.
19U Jan. 53-55.
S—
Brazil. National Labor Council, cases handled in
1943. Summary. 19U — Oct. 808-809.
U
Chile. Labor courts, cases decided in 1943. Sum­
mary. 19U — Oct. 809-810.
U
Great Britain. Collective bargaining with union in
wartime required of employer (Ct. of inquiry
appointed under Industrial Courts Act of 1919).
19U1— Nov. 1165-1166.
New Zealand. W age-rate increases awarded in
1940 and 1942, by Court of Arbitration. 19U —
%
Sept. 590-593.
Courts, United States. Role in labor-management rela­
tions, 1900-30. 1950— July 51-53.
Credit controls, United States:
Consumer. Provisions for in Defense Production
Act of Sept. 8, 1950, and changes in following
act. 1950— Oct. 455-456.
Real estate construction. Provisions for in Defense
Production Act of Sept. 8, 1950. 1950— Oct. 455.
Credit unions. See Cooperatives.
Current labor statistics. See Statistics; also under
specific subject .




43

Cut-backs:
Production adjustment as related to employment,
period following end of European war. 19U5—
June 1211-1212.
War contracts, in 1943 and 1944. Effects on em­
ployment, 80 selected establishments (25 locali­
ties). Summary. 19U — Mar. 463-478.
S
------ Turn-over rates and employment reduction
resulting from, selected plants. 19U — June 1175S
1181.
W ar industries. Summaries of effects on workers.
19U — Sept. 585-588, Nov. 1030-1033,
U
Cutlery industry. See Pocket-cutlery industry.
Day of rest, United States. Southern region, summary
of State legislative provisions. 19U — Oct. 538.
S
Day of rest, Great Britain. 7-day workweek found to
result in economic loss. 19U1— June 1345.
Deaf workers. Industrial positions to which adaptable.
19UU— Oct. 680-681, 683.
Death benefits. Women’s coats and suits manufacture,
September 1949. 1950— Feb. 155.
Debt. Forced labor in payment of, held violation of
13th Amendment and Act of 1867 (decision of U. S.
Sup. Ct.). 19U2— Mar. 700.
Decisions. See Arbitrator’s decision; Court decisions;
Comptroller General; Manpower— W ar Manpower
Commission; National Labor Relations Board; Na­
tional W ar Labor Board; Regional War Labor Boards.
Defense activities:
Employment, man-hour. Changes in, by industry,
January 1940 to January 1941. 19U1— May 11801181.
Shift operations for further utilization of plant
facilities, summary, June 1941. 19U1— Nov. 11401147.
Shipbuilding program. Construction facilities and
labor requirements. 19U1— Mar. 571-576.
Defense, Department of (U. S. Government). Construc­
tion employment policy on use of civilian and military
personnel. 1950— Dec. 687-688.
Defense Homes Corporation. See Housing.
Defense Manpower, Office of (U. S. Department of
Labor):
Establishment of, September 1950, by Secretary
of Labor Tobin pursuant to President’s Execu­
tive order. Duties. 1950— Oct. IV.
Organizational set-up, advisory committees, and
functions of Labor Department Bureaus, October
1950. 1950— Nov. IV, 575-576.
Defense materials and facilities, United States:
Priorities, allocations, and requisitions. Delegated
to various agencies by the President in Execu­
tive Order No. 10161, Sept. 9, 1950. 1950— Oct.
457.
------- Provision for in Defense Production Act of
Sept. 8, 1950. 1950— Oct. 455.
Defense policies, United States:
Aircraft industry. Expansion to meet war demands
(Croston). 19U1— Feb. 327-331.
Civil Service positions. Maximum age for examina­
tion eligibility. 19 U1— June 1385-1386.
Construction of leased air bases, 8-hour day sus­
pended. 19U1— Feb. 327.
Employment shifts to key industries, status to
October 1941. 19 U — Jan. 1-15.
%
Employment trends, labor requirements, and fac­
tors in meeting demand (Hinricks). 19U1— May
1126-1137.
Housing projects initiated by U.S. agencies, sum­
mary of (Veenstra). 19U1— May 1061-1078.
National Defense Advisory Commission. Appoint­

ment, 1940; activities, first 6 months. 19Ul— Jan.
86-89.

44

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Defense policies, U. S.— Continued
Negro workers. Summary of training and employ­
ment opportunities. 194-1— June 1388-1390.
Rent control. Measures suggested by U.S. Office of
Price Administration. 1941— Dec. 1488-1489.
Vacations with pay. Practices and plans of 246
companies summarized. 1941— July 66-69.
Vocational training. Appropriations for, program,
and operation, June 1941. 1941— Nov. 1148-1153.
Women workers in defense industries. Findings of
U.S. Women’s Bureau survey, fall of 1941.
m i — May 1147-1151.
Defense Production Act (Public Law 774). Passed
Sept. 8, 1950, by Congress. Legislative provisions
and administrative action following. 1950— Oct. 453457.
Deflation. Forces at work, end of 1948, outlook. 1949—
Feb. 139-140, 142-143.
Demand, postwar world. Investment and expenditures
as factors in; inflationary effects. 1948— Nov. 469-471.
Demobilization, United States:
Armed Forces. Partial, after European victory.
Order to be followed according to plans of W ar
Department and W ar Manpower Commission.
1944— Nov. 971-972.
Armed services and war industries. Severity,
estimated, by States. 1948— July 1-4.
Industrial, probable extent of, and factors involved.
1944— Feb. 271-272.
Military and industrial (hypothetical) in relation
to prewar employment. 1944— Sept. 488-495.
Military, probable volume, including distribution
of Armed Forces by States of origin, Sept. 15,
1943. 1 9 4 4 — Feb. 270-271.
1918-19, after World W ar I. Plans followed; early

phases.

1944—

Mar. 500-513, Apr. 717-729.

Reconversion activities, release from Armed Forces
of limited number of key men and women for.
Announcement of Feb. 14, 1946. 1946— Apr. 591.
Demobilization, foreign countries:
Canada. Special Cabinet Committee to plan for,
provided by P.C. order of December 1939. 1944—
July 98.
Great Britain. Armed Forces. Partial, after Eu­
ropean victory. Priority classes and distinction
in treatment. Summary. 1944— Nov. 973-975.
------- Effecting, after World W ar II. Policies pro­
posed, summary. 1944— July 99-101.
------- 1918-19, after World W ar I. Plans followed,
summary. 1944— Mar. 501, 508-509.
Dentists. Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May 510.
Department and clothing stores. Characteristics of
establishments and scope and method of wage survey,
spring and summer, 1943. 1944— Nov. 1036-1047.
Department and women’s ready-to-wear stores:
Discounts, paid holidays, vacations with pay, 16
cities, April 1948. 1948— Nov. 486.
Wage survey, 16 cities, April 1948, summary.
1948— Nov. 483-486.
Workweek, length of, April 1948. 1948— Nov. 486.
Department stores. Price indexes, inventory, by depart­
ment groups, 1941-47. 1948— Jan. 58.
Dependent territories. Economic and social condition
of inhabitants. Recommendation of ILO Paris Con­
ference (1945) concerning improvement. 1946—
Jan. 46.
Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Co. Seamen granted
wage increase by National W ar Labor Board deci­
sions, July 3, 1942. 1942— Sept. 487.
Die-casting-manufacturing industry. Minimum-wage
order effective on bids let on or after April 5, 1941.
1941— Apr. 967-968.
Diesel-engine mechanics. Characteristics of occupation;
apnraisal of postwar opportunities. 1945— Feb. 276285.




Dietitians. Annual salaries and weekly hours (by
period) and related wage practices, 1949; opinions
of dietitians on their economic status and working
conditions; and characteristics of inactive dietitians.
1950—-Feb. 149-153.
Directories. Labor and welfare offices, Latin America,
by country. 1942— May 1246-1248.
Disability compensation. See Legislation, U.S., by State,
fo r specified S ta te ; also under Workmen’s compensa­
tion.
Disability insurance. Payments under public programs,
1948. 1950—Jan. 49.
Discharge or dismissal of workers. See Court decisions.
Discounts. Departments and women’s ready-to-wear
stores, 16 cities, April 1948. 1948— Nov. 486.
Discrimination:
A F L president’s statement concerning, July 1945.
1945— Aug. 279.
Antidiscrimination legislation and agencies. See
Fair employment practice.
Employment, legislation. See Legislation, United
States, Federal and general; by State, fo r spe­

cific State.

New York. Commission appointed, 1944, to study
practices, and make recommendations to elimi­
nate. 1944— Aug. 360-361.
------- Operations under law, first 6 months. E x­
perience summarized. 1946— Apr. 593-594.
Racial. Barred in new union (sleeping-car porters)
organized by American Federation of Labor.
1944— Nov. 998.
------- Committee on Fair Employment Practices.
See Committee on, etc.
State legislation. See Legislation, U.S., by States,
fo r specified States .
Diseases, industrial. See Workmen’s compensation—
Occupational diseases.
Dismissal compensation, United States:
Armour & Co. employees, by agreements, 1949.
1950— Oct. 476.
Collective agreements. Provisions covering, Decem­
ber 1944. 1945— Jan. 47-57.
National Industrial Conference Board study, 1939,
comparison Wharton School investigation for
Philadelphia, 1941. 1941— Aug. 418-420.
Philadelphia firms (29). Characteristics of plans.
1941— Aug. 418-420.
Plans, provisions in union agreements. Conditions
and amounts of dismissal pay and computation
of service and pay. 1950— Apr. 384-387.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. New York
City, collective-agreement provisions, 1946. 1947—
Aug. 160—
161.
Swift & Co. employees, by agreements, 1949.
1950— Oct. 477.
Dismissal compensation, foreign countries:
Germany, Western. During occupation, 1945-50,
protection established by labor legislation. 1950—
Dec. 671.
Japan. Employment separation allowances pro­
vided for by act of Jan. 1, 1937. 1945— Oct. 668.
Peru. Not required from employers having profitsharing plan (legislation of 1924, 1928, 1929,
and 1943). 1943— July 64-65.
------- Provisions under law summarized. 1945—
July 55.
Uruguay. Commercial firms’ employees. Require­
ments of law of June 6, 1944. 1944— Nov. 963964.
Displaced persons. See under Manpower, foreign
countries.
Disputes, between labor and management. See Labormanagement disputes.
Docks and harbors, United States. See Longshoring
industry.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Domestic service, United States:
Employment, decline in, 1940 to 1948 and reasons.
191+9— Feb. 176.
Full-time and part-time. Wages and hours, New
York State, 1948. 191+9— Oct. 405-407.
Housekeeper service maintained by child welfare
services in Colorado. 191+1— Apr. 869-871.
New York State. Wartime changes in, and postwar
outlook. 191+6— June 930-931.
Washington, D. C. Characteristics of employers
and employees, and working conditions, earnings,
medical care, insurance, and cost of living, 1940
(F ox). 191+2— Feb. 338-359.
------- Job opportunities, autumn of 1944, including
qualifications specified, wages, and working con­
ditions offered. 191+5— Mar. 575-584.
Domestic service, foreign countries:
Costa Rica. Medical examination, compulsory, pro­
vided for by decree of May 7, 1941. 191+1— Aug.
444-445.
Great Britain. Hospitals and other institutions,
and private households in exceptional cases.
Special arrangements by Ministry of Labor for
recruitment. 191+1+ June 1248-1249.
—
------- Training. Establishment of corporation for
recommended by Minister of Labor and National
Service. 191+5— Sept. 509-510.
Douglas fir operators. Puget Sound area. Employees
granted wage increase and paid vacations by Na­
tional War Labor Board decision, June 16, 1942.
191+2— Sept. 486.
Draft for armed services. See Selective Service.
Dress manufacturing. See Clothing industry— Women’s
and misses’ dresses and Women’s dress.
Drug, medicine, and toilet-preparations industry:
Contracts, U. S. Government. Wage determination
effective Sept. 19, 1941. 191+1— Nov. 1295.
Minimum wage order under Fair Labor Standards
Act, effective July 7, 1941. 191+1— Aug. 480.
Dwelling unit surveys. See Construction industry.
Dyeing and finishing, textiles. Characteristics; defini­
tion and description of industry and labor force;
scope and method of BLS study; 1940 and 1946.
191+1— Sept. 723-728; 191+7— June 1034-1039.
Earnings. See Wages and hours.
Economic and Social Council. See United Nations.
Economic conditions, general, United States:
Consumer appraisals of, 1946 and 1947; intentions
to buy, by income group; expectations concern­
ing incomes and prices; attitudes toward selected
purchases. 191+7— Sept. 329-330.
Consumer finance surveys. See Finances, consumer.
Control measures sought, July-August 1950. 1950—
Aug. III-IV .
Council of Economic Advisers, reports. See Coun­
cil of Economic Advisers.
Defense program, influence upon, September 1950.
1950— Oct. III-IV .
Determining factor in occupational choice in job
selection, 1900-50. 1950— July 13.
Employment. Council of Economic Advisers, first
annual report, Summary. 191+7— Jan. 43-44.
Employment and unemployment, trend of. Report
of Subcommittee on Unemployment of the Joint
Committee on the Economic Report, July 1949.
191+9— Aug. 151-152.
Family. Changing role, 1900-50. 1950— July 26-28.
Farm prosperity as related to full industrial em­
ployment. 191+5— May 1000-1003.
Foreign trade. Effect upon employment. Summary
of opinions concerning. 191+5— Nov. 858-862.
Future prospects; international problems. 1950—
July 12.




45

Half century of economic growth, 1900-50 (chart).
1 9 5 0 — July 38-39.
Hawaii. See Labor and industrial relations.
Inflationary factors in economy, as outlined in
quarterly report of Council of Economic Advisers
to President on Apr. 9, 1948. 191+8— June 640.
Inflation threat, late 1946, and conditions in
foreign countries affecting. 191+7— Jan. 28-42.
Labor force. See Labor force.
Labor in transition to a war economy in 1941
(Bowden). 191+2— Apr. 843-868.
Northwest region. Natural resources and indus­
tries, impact of war, and outlook for future
(Engle). 191+7— Apr. 636-649.
Political factors in industrial progress, 1900-50;
free enterprise; capital and labor. 1950— July
8-9.
President’s economic reports to Congress. 1947 to
1950. Summaries. 191+7— Feb. 234-238, Sept. 321325; 191+8— Mar. 278-279; 191+9— Mar. 292-294,
Aug. 151-152; 1950— Sept. 364.
Prices. Inflation and factors underlying; postwar
demand; changes in prices and price relation­
ships; 1939 and 1948. 191+8— Nov. 467-475.
------- Various countries, postwar period, 1939-46.
Summary, with regard to inflationary tendencies.
191+7— Jan. 28-36.
Problems involved in fixing economic policy, as
outlined in third annual report of Council of
Economic Advisers, December 1948. 191+9— Mar.
291-292.
Puerto Rico. Manufacturing industries, rank of,
showing employment, material costs, and value
of products, 1939. 191+1— Dec. 1574.
------- Workers’ families, general summary (Han­
son). 191+1— Apr. 788-809.
Reflected in BLS data, 1900-50. 1950— July 75-78.
Savings by various groups, 1946; holdings of
nonliquid assets, early 1947; survey for Federal
Reserve Board. 1947— Nov. 558-559.
Virgin Islands. Summary of Governor’s annual
report, fiscal year ended June 30, 1940. 191+1—
Apr. 853-857.
Wage-earner
security
sought through
labor
unions and Government, 1900-50. 1950— July
31-34.
Women workers. Wartime adjustments to produc­
tion demands, postwar changes in comparison
with; future outlook. 191+7— Dec. 666-671.
Year 1948 in review. Resume of economic and
labor developments. 191+9— Feb. 139-186.
Economic conditions, general, foreign countries:
Austria. Currency reform of December 1947, de­
tails and results; effects on labor. 191+8—July
45-46.
------- Wages and price trends, 1938-47, summary.
191+8— Jan. 20-27.
Canada. Inflation problems, 1939-46. 191+7— Jan.
29-30.
-------Labor and industrial statistics, 1939 and 1940.
191+1— Jan. 94-95.
------- Machine-tool, ship, and aircraft production,
1939 and 1940; plant construction and extension,
Jan. 2, 1941, by type. 191+1— Mar. 590-592.
------- Wartime economic developments in 1940.
191+1— Apr. 835-837.
China. Inflation problems in the postwar era.
191+7— Jan. 32-33.
Denmark. Planned system, and efficiency of opera­
tion. 191+ — Nov. 945-946.
1+
Europe. Trade-unions and wage-price relation­
ships. 1948. 191+9— Feb. 181-186.
------- Western. Prewar and postwar conditions, ef­
forts required for reconstruction; report of 16

46

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Economic conditions, general, f. c.— Continued
nations participating in European Recovery
Program. 1948—-Jan. 40-42.
France. Inflation problems in the postwar era.
1947— Jan. 31-32.
------- Prior to World W ar II, summary; including
review of events in August and September, 1944.
1944— Oct. 705-727.
French Indo-China. Summary of status previous
to World War II and under Japanese control.
1944— July 47-61.
Germany. Development during 70 years preceding
World W ar II. 194.5— Mar. 499.
------- Food situation, summer of 1941, and outlook
for future supply. 1941— Aug. 283-292.
------- Inflation problems in the postwar era. In­
crease in use of barter system described. 1947—
Jan. 33.
-------Postwar. Summary, autumn 1945. 1946— Jan.
72-76.
Great Britain. Coal-mine labor shortage threat­
ened under war conditions and measures to
avert. 1942— Nov. 941-951.
------- Inflation problems, 1939-46, England. 1947—
Jan. 30.
------- Labor, postwar position o f; income levels,
national, 1938 and 1947; workers’ gains in
earnings and working conditions. 1948— Aug.
117-122.
------- Trade-unions and wage-price relationships,
1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
Haiti. Effects of land ownership on peasants.
1944— Oct. 748.
Hungary. Inflation problems in the postwar era.
1947— Jan. 32.
Japan. Economic crisis; eight-point program de­
signed to cope with, July 11, 1947; wage-price
features. 1947— Sept. 337-340.
------- Trade-unions and wage-price relationships,
1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
Latin America. Inflation problems in the postwar
era. 1947— Jan. 33-34.
------- Trade-unions and wage-price relationships,
1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
Poland. Summary of status previous to World
W ar II and under Nazi control. 1944— July
62-66.
Postwar relief, rehabilitation, reconstruction, and
trade. U.S. State Department outline concern­
ing. 1945— May 974-977.
Prices. Inflation and factors underlying; postwar
demand; changes in prices and price relation­
ships; 1939 and 1948. 1948— Nov. 467-475.
------- Various countries, postwar period, 1939-46.
Summary, with regard to inflationary tendencies.
1947— Jan. 28-36.
Sweden. Employment, wages and collective agree­
ments, summary. 1945— Feb. 292-294.
-------Inflation problems in the postwar era. 1947—
Jan. 30-31.
------- Postwar Economic Planning Commission
established February 1944. Reports summarized.
1944— Sept, 530—
532.
Trade-unions and wage-price relationships, 1948,
various countries. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
Economic Cooperation Administration:
Created to administer Foreign Assistance Act of
1948. 1948— June 640.
Second report to Congress recommending strength­
ened trade-unions in Western Europe, 1949.
1949— June 664-665.
Economic development. Provisions for Charter for
International Trade Organization. 1948—Nov. 477,
480-481.




Economic Stabilization Agency (U.S. Government):
Creation of by Executive Order No. 10161, Sept.
9, 1950. Duties. 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 457.
Wage Stabilization Board, completion of, Novem­
ber 1950; appointment of Director of Price
Stabilization and summary of other activities,
December 1950. 1950— Dec. III-IV .
Economic Warfare, Board of (U . S. Government).
Supplanted (Exec, order, July 15, 1943) by Office
of Economic Warfare. 1943— Sept. 470.
Economic policies, foreign countries:
France. Loans for small businesses, to ex-prison­
ers of war, deported persons, and refugees
(French nationality), provided for by ordinance
of Oct. 5, 1945. Provisions. 1946— Mar. 401.
Japan. Final report of Advisory Committee on
Labor in Japan. Proposals for labor programs
outlined; need for education in labor matters.
1947— Feb. 239-254.
Economy housing campaign. Sponsorship and purpose;
homes for lower-income groups. 1949— Feb. 207.
Education, United States:
Chemists and chemical engineers. Degree of col­
lege work completed by, distribution, 1943.
1 9 4 6 — June 882.
College registrations. Effect of Selective Service
draft on, fall semester, 1940. 1941— May 1146-

1147.
------- Fall term 1948; number of graduates, 1948.
1949— Feb. 176.
Colleges and universities. Adaptation of courses of
study to war effort. 1942— Aug. 250-254.
High School Victory Corps. Organization of, under
plan of National Policy Committee (U . S. Gov­
ernment). 1943— Jan. 74-75.
Labor Education and the University. Address by
Dr. Edwin E. Witte, excerpts from. 1947— July
36-40.
Labor. New Jersey’s Institute of Management and
Labor Relations, Rutgers University, July 1947December 1948; courses and research program.
1949— June 663.
Negro history. Teaching of, in Chicago public
schools. 1943— Apr. 721-722.
Negroes, adult. Teacher-training, and vocational
courses, experiment in Shreveport and Caddo
Parish, Louisiana. 1941— June 1445-1447.
Peacetime needs, of labor interest, listed in Na­
tional Education Association Journal (Septem­
ber 1945). 1946— Jan. 79.
Prison inmates. Activities, 1941. 1942— Mar. 705.
Professional, as related to wartime manpower
needs. Findings of 1942 survey summarized.
1942— Aug. 247-250.
School attendance, percentages, 1900-50. 1950—
July 28.
United Nations organization to promote needed
educational facilities (State Department out­
line). 1945— June 1185.
Virgin Islands. Resume of activities to June 30,
1940. 1941— Apr. 856-857.
Vocational, negro high schools, Texas, 1945-46.
1949— May 544-545.
Workers. See Apprenticeship; Training; Workers’
education.
Education, foreign countries:
Colombia. Schools, primary, to be maintained by
certain companies for workers’ children. Law
effective March 1945, provisions. 1945— Aug. 297.
Great Britain. British Education Act, Aug. 3,
1944. Provisions. 1944— Dec. 1238-1239.
-------Trade-union studies. See Workers’ education.
Japan. School attendance for 6 years required up
to 1937. 1945— Oct. 654.

47

INDEX — JA N U A R Y 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Peru. Mining, copper, industry. Schools and books
provided by employers. 1945—
-July 55.
South Africa, Union of. Planning Council recom­
mendation concerning. 19 £5— June 1218.
Soviet Union. Nursery schools. Management and
functions. 191*5— Sept. 476-477.
Efficiency. Effects of long hours on output; study of.
191*7—July 5-14.
Elections, representation. See National Labor Rela­
tions Board.
Electric and gas utilities ( s e e a lso Electric light and
power industry):
Bonus (nonproduction), group insurance or pen­
sion plans, holidays, paid sick leave, vacations
with pay. Extent of provision for, March-April
1948. 191*8— Oct. 380.
Hourly earnings, selected occupations, by region,
March-April 1948. 191*8— Oct. 378-379.
Price changes in bills. See Prices— Fuels.
Wage structure, 1948, occupational difference,
regional variations, supplementary wage prac­
tices. 191*8— Oct. 377-380.
Electric-energy generation. Hydro-electric and fuel
plants. Productivity of labor, increase 1937-42, and
factors affecting. 191*1*— Jan. 25-31.

Electric light and power industry

( s e e a lso

Electric and

gas utilities):
Atomic energy. Economic and technological effects
of development on. 191*8— Nov. 498-499.
Capacity and production, 1902-47. 191*8— Nov. 497.
Characteristics, labor force, and wage structure,
July 1946. 191*6— Sept. 369-379.
Employment outlook; job characteristics; prospec­
tive levels of production and capacity. 191*8—
Nov. 493-499.
Electrical-appliance manufacturing. Characteristics of
industrv and scope of BLS survev, summer of 1942.
191*3— Mar. 526-529.
Electrical-equipment industry:
Overtime provisions in collective agreements. 191*1—

Apr. 845-846.
Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and re­
newal of contract. Summary of provisions in
collective agreements. 191*1— Mar. 551-553.
Electricity. Amount used in production by United
States compared with world consumption, 1937.
1 9 5 0 — July 7. S e e a lso Electric and gas utilities.
Electroplating and polishing industry. Characteristics,
and scope of 1945 BLS survey. 191*6— May 767-770.
Embroideries industry. Minimum wage. Rate set, effec­
tive Jan. 27, 1941. 1941— Jan. 173.
Emigration:
United States. Departures of aliens, by fiscal years,
1938-39 to 1946-49. 191*3— Dec. 1203; 191*1*—

Dec. 1240;

191*6 — Apr.

644-648;

191*8 — Apr.

405;

Feb. 165-166.
Western Europe. Manpower needs for participation
in ERP proposals for solution of technical prob­
lems involved. 191*8— Apr. 404-405.
1950—

Employer unit, United States. Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics classification, in collective agreements, and dis­
tribution of agreements and workers covered, by type
of bargaining unit, 1950. 1950— Dec. 695-697.
Employers, United States. Government’s attitude in
legislation, 1950. 1950— July 58.
Employers’ associations, United States:
Bituminous Coal Operators Association organized,

Northern

Commercial

1 9 5 0 — Aug.

fields,

1950.

Purpose.

244, Oct. 493.
Milk-supply industry, Chicago area. 191*2— June
1290-1293.
Employers’ associations, foreign countries:
Belgium. Central Industrial Committee and indi­
vidual associations; dissolution in 1942. 191*1*—
Feb. 291.




British Malaya. United Planters’ Association, in­
fluence during depression. 191*1*— Aug. 290.
Bulgaria. Supervision of, by Government. 191*8—
Oct. 680-681.
France. Status prior to World W ar II; dissolution
by Vichy. 191*1*— Oct. 720-721.
France (unoccupied). General employers’ associa­
tion (Confederation Generate du Patronat), dis­
solved by decree of Nov. 9, 1940. 1941— Jan. 98.
------- Steel and coal industries. Associations dis­
solved by decree of Nov. 9, 1940. 191*1— Jan. 98.
Germany. Activities under Weimar Republic, under
Nazis, and under Military Government in U. S.
Zone of occupation. 191*8— Apr. 383-384.
------- Federation of German Employers’ Associa­

tions,

employers
884.

and

employees

represented.

191*8 — Apr.

Hungary. Legislation of 1868, 1884, and 1932, con­
cerning employer organization. 191*3— June 10801081.
Ireland. Number of, combined with similar statis­
tics for labor organizations, by year, 1938-44;
membership to 1943. 191*5— Aug. 281.
Japan. Extent of, combined with centralization of
industry. 191*5— Oct. 661.
Netherlands. Labor Foundation (including workers
and employers) incorporated May 17, 1942. Ob­
jectives, member organizations, and program.
191*5— Dec. 1171-1173.
------- Prewar conditions, and developments after
German occupation. 191*1*— Jan. 46-48.
Venezuela. Requirements of law of May 4, 1945
(amending 1936 law). 191*6— Feb. 260, 262.

Employment:
Guaranteed. See Employment stabilization.
Industrial. Measurement. Limitations of data, sur­
vey sources and methods, and calculation pro­
cedures. 1950— Jan. 55-58.
Maintenance and development of, by members of
projected International Trade Organization. Pro­
visions of Charter regarding; role of ILO in
helping to achieve. 191*8— Nov. 477-479.
Older workers, problems. See Older workers.
Employment, international. Full employment report by
U. N. experts; domestic and international measures
recommended, Dec. 22, 1949. 1950— Apr. 379-381.

Employment agencies, United States:
Colleges and universities. Services maintained to
assist students and graduates, Barnard College
service 1939-40 given as example. 191*2— Mar.
681- 682 .
Employment Service (U.S. Government). Probable
postwar load upon. 1941*— Feb. 279.
Fees, State regulation of. See Court decisions, U. S.
— Employment agencies.
Kentucky. Employment service commission estab­
lished, 1946. 1946— Nov. 758.
Labor needs, current information on. Use of by
public offices recommended, to avoid wasteful
migration. 1941— Feb. 343.
Man-marketing clinics. Status of movement in 1945
and character of service performed. 1946— Mar.
391.
Michigan State Employment Service. Junior-place­
ment program, methods, and activities January
to August 1940. 1941— Feb. 389-391.
Older workers. Forty Plus clubs and other agencies
for placement. Summary of activities. 1946—

Mar. 389-392.

S e e a lso

Older workers.

Placements (nonfarm) made by public employ­
ment offices. By industry division, 1940-46; by
class, 1945 and 1946. 1947— June 1065-1068.
Private. California. Fees charged by, summary.
1941— June 1401-1404.

48

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment agencies, U. S.— Continued
Private. State legislation. See Legislation, U. S.,
by States.
Public employment offices, Federal and State. All
officers placed under Federal operation Jan. 1,
1942; summary of plan. 191*2— Feb. 451.
Public employment services, Federal and State.
Placement activities, October 1940 to January
1942. 1941— Jtm. 110-114, Feb. 369-373, Mar. 617622, Apr. 877-881, May 1202-1206, June 14191423, July 103-107, Aug. 420-424, Sept. 634-637,
Oct. 921-924, Nov. 1209-1212, Dec. 1443-1447;
1942— Jan. 109-113, Feb. 446-450, Mar. 675-680,
Apr. 958-960.
Public, State. Placements of Negroes, industrial.
Increase January to May 1941. 1 9 4 1 — Oct. 925926.
Reemployment Division, Selective Service System,
and Veterans’ Employment Service, W ar Man­
power Commission. Functions. 1944— Apr. 751.
United States Employment Service. History,
functions, and responsibilities; activities of local
offices; “ six-point program.” Summary. 1948—
June 605-608.
------- Labor-supply activities for defense work.
1941— Nov. 1151-1152.
------- Nonagricultural placements, by year, 193943, and by occupational group, race, and sex,
1943. 1945— Feb. 291-292.
------- Placement activities, 1941, 1942, and 1945.
1942— -Sept. 482-483; 1948— June 1118-1119;
1946— May 755-757 .
------- Procedures concerning veterans. 1945— July
65-66.
------- State employment offices transferred to;
summary of plan. 1942— Feb. 451.
“ Women Associated” for placement of older women,
Los Angeles. Summary of activities. 1941— Aug.
393-394; 1946— Mar. 390.
Employment agencies, foreign countries:
Argentina. National Employment Registry pro­
vided for by law of July 21, 1943. Functions.
1943— Nov. 946-949.
Australia. Commonwealth Employment Service
(proposed). Attitudes of employer and tradeunion representatives concerning establishment.
1946— Feb. 229.
------- Women’s Employment Board of Australia.
Senate action affecting in March 1943, and court
decision of Aug. 13, 1943. 1944— Jan. 69.
Belgium. Public and private. Summary of status in
1945. 1945— Nov. 951-952.
------- Postwar reorganization, employment services,
hiring and discharge of workers. 1947— Dec. 684.
------- Structure and powers of system prior to and
after German invasion, 1940. 1944— Feb. 285-286.
Bulgaria. Established by law of 1925. 1943— Oct.
676.
Denmark. Public offices established by act of 1921;
status in 1939. 1944— Nov. 949-950.
Egypt. Registry office established in Department
of Labor, March 1945. 1945— July 62.
France. Postwar reorganization of employment
services, hiring and discharge of workers.
1947— Dec. 684.
------- Status prior to and during World W ar II.
1944— Oct. 711-712.
Germany. Status, under Republic and under Nazi
Government. 1945— Mar. 504-505.
India. Government exchanges, location and func­
tions. 1944— June 1193-1194.
Italy. Free exchanges created by law, 1928; char­
acteristics. 1943— Nov. 921.
Japan. Public. Status in 1946 and need for
strengthening organization. 1947— Feb. 253.




------- Public and private exchanges, operation, by
year 1933-38; wartime control adopted, March
1938. 1945— Oct. 654-655.
Netherlands. Central employment office created by
German authorities, September 1940. 1944— Jan.
51.
------- Postwar reorganization of employment serv­
ices, hiring and discharge of workers. 1947—
Dec. 684.
New Zealand. Employment Act of 1945, provisions.
1946— June 928.
Norway. System and functions prior to World W ar
I I; use of by Nazi authorities after German oc­
cupation. 1944— Sept. 500-501.
Poland. Government offices maintained by Labor
Fund. Status in 1937. 1944— July 68.
Rumania. Free Government offices established and
charging of fees prohibited, 1921. 1943— Dec.
1104.
Spain. Private offices abolished, and Nation-wide
State service established, law of Feb. 10, 1943.
1943— July 45.
------- System established by law of 1931; made
available to employers for public works in 1935;
placement statistics, February 1944. 1944— Dec.
1165-1166.
Yugoslavia. System established by law, 1922, and
changes made in 1927, 1928, and 1932. 1943—
Nov. 898-899.
Employment certificates. See Child labor— Minors,
14-17 years of age.
Employment conditions, United States:
Aircraft workers. Southern California. Postwar
adjustment, summary. 1946— Nov. 706-711.
Attributable to U.S. exports. See Employment sta­
tistics— Exports.
California (San Francisco Bay area). Wartime
workers, migrant and other, characteristics;
working conditions. 1945— Oct. 708-720.
Changes. By month, June 1947-November 1950.
See section The Labor Month in Review, each
issue July 1947-December 1950.
------- 1948-50. 1950— June 620-621.
Child labor. Wartime, in Illinois, Michigan, and
New York. Summary. 1944— Nov. 1034-1035.
Cotton-textile industry, New England. Skilled
workers. Job tenure, wage-income and age dis­
tribution, June 1945. 1946— July 8-15.
Council of Economic Advisers. Annual reports. See
Council of Economic Advisers.
Cut-backs in war contracts, 1943 and 1944, effects
of. 1945— Mar. 463-478, June 1175-1181.
Cut-backs in war industries. Buffalo area. Sum­
mary. 1944— Dec. 1133-1135.
-------Effects on employees in four areas (St. Louis,
St. Louis County, and Weldon Springs, Mo.;
Jamestown and Dunkirk, N. Y., and Meadville
and Butler, P a .; Wilkes-Barre, Williamsport, and
Berwick, P a.; Memphis, Nashville, and Chatta­
nooga, Tenn., and Radford and Dublin, V a.).
1944— Sept. 585-588.
-------Women workers released in seven areas (E l­
mira, N. Y .; Minneapolis-St. Paul; Evansville,
Ind.; Rockford, 111.; Eau Claire, W is.; Los A n­
geles; Des Moines), and in Portland, Oreg.,
and San Francisco. 1944— Nov. 1030-1033.
Economic shifts in, prewar, wartime, and postwar.
1947— Dec. 645-649.
Employment Act of 1946. See Legislation, U. S.,
Federal and general.
Factory employment, Southern States. Trends in,
by industry group, prewar, wartime, and post­
war. 1947— Feb. 305-317.
Foreign trade, effects of. Summary of opinions;
factors involved. 1945— Nov. 858-862.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Full employment. In 1950. Levels of demand and
output necessary to provide; implications of re­
sults. 1 9 4 7 — Mar. 420-432.
------- ------- Patterns for, assumptions regarding;
analysis and summary. 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 163-190.
------- Policies required for program, as related to
national budget (Pierson). 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 210-214.
Hawaii. Factors influencing, present and prospec­
tive. 1 9 4 8 — May 491, June 612.
Manpower requirements and supply, current de­
velopments in. 1 9 4 4 — Dec. 1158-1161.
Migration to war-industry areas. Need for plan­
ning to prevent unemployment after war. 1 9 4 2 —
July 58-60.
Manufacturing. Changes, 1899-1949. 1 9 5 0 — July
106-108.
------- Decrease in employment, reduction in hours
of work, and rise in unemployment, 1949. 1 9 5 0 —
Feb. 125-127.
------- New England. Reconversion period, through
March 1946. Summary. 1 9 4 6 — July 1-7.
------- Regional differences in activity and factory
jobs, 1929-49. 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 433-434.
Massachusetts. Changes during defense period (to
December 1941) and in World W ar II (estimated
to December 1943). 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 740-745.
Negro workers, war and anticipated postwar
trends. 1 9 4 5 — Jan. 1-5.
Nonferrous-metal miners. Status of a specified
group (404) by age, June 1946. 1 9 4 7 — May 777.
Nurses, registered. Hours, earnings, living arrange­
ments, and opinions regarding conditions of
work. Survey, 1947, by National Nursing Coun­
cil, Women’s Bureau, and BLS. Summary. 1 9 4 7 —
July 20-27.
President’s economic reports to Congress. 1947
and 1948. Summary. 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 234-238, Sept.
321-325; 1 9 4 8 — Mar. 278-279.
Postwar demobilization, military and industrial,
severity of, by States, estimated. 1 9 4 3 — July
1-4.
Propeller plant workers, St. Paul, Minn. Personal
and family characteristics, industrial and occu­
pational background, migration, unionization,
earnings, and postwar plans. 1 9 4 6 — Jan. 93-103.
Reconversion period, first phase. Summary. 1 9 4 6 —
May 709-713.
Report of Subcommittee on Unemployment of the
Joint Committee on the Joint Committee on the
Economic Report, July 1949; trend of employ­
ment and unemployment. 1 9 4 9 — Aug. 151-152.
Sawmills, southern. Effect of 75-cent minimum
wage upon, 1950. 1 9 5 0 — Sept. 317.
Small-arms workers, Connecticut. Wartime and
postwar work experiences of. 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 215223
Trends. 1929 to 1949. 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 196-201.
------- Prewar, wartime, and postwar; outlook for
future. 1 9 4 7 — Dec. 637-678.
Unemployment, frictional. Nature and extent of,
various periods. 1 9 4 7 — Jan. 1-10.
Veterans. March 1946, findings from sample num­
ber interviewed. Summary. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 712-720.
------- VJ-day to August 1946, summary. 1 9 4 6 —
Nov. 673-674.
Young persons. Estimated population and civilian
labor force in the United States, by age, speci­
fied months, 1940 and 1947-49. 1 9 4 9 — Dec. 646647.
Employment conditions, foreign countries:
Asia. Trend of employment (China, Korea, Man­
churia, French Indo-China, Thailand), 1945;
statistics, various years, 1930-39. 1 9 4 6 — Feb.
206-208.




49

Australia.
White
Paper
issued
May
1945,
recommendations summarized. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 257-

260.

------- World W ar II and reconversion periods.
1 9 4 6 — Jan. 6-24.
Belgium. General, in 1945, compared with 1937.
1 9 4 6 — July 27-29.
------- Government measures after liberation (in
September 1944), and decrease in unemploy­
ment in 1945. 1 9 4 6 — Feb. 197-198.
-------Status in spring of 1945. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 238-239.
British Malaya. Prior to World W ar II, including
occupational distribution. 1 9 4 4 — Aug. 282-284.
Canada. World W ar II and reconversion periods.
1 9 4 6 — Jan. 6—
23.
China. Wartime controls and long-term planning,
1945. 1 9 4 6 — Feb. 207-208.
Denmark. Status in June 1945, summary. 1 9 4 5 —
Aug. 240.
Europe. Manpower programs, postwar period; pro­
duction incentives; recruitment and training.
France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and Nor­
way. 1 9 4 7 — Dec. 682-683.
-------Prewar employment; manpower controls,
1942- 44; wartime disposition of labor force; and
postwar problems and plans. (Austria, Belgium,
Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, France, Ger­
many, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Po­
land, and Yugoslavia.) 1 9 4 6 — Feb. 187-206.
-------World W ar II and reconversion period. Sum­
mary for specified countries on continent and in
British Empire. 1 9 4 6 — Jan. 6-24.
Finland. Postwar period, outlook favorable. 1 9 4 5 —
Oct. 728-729.
France. Status prior to and during World W ar II.
Summary. 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 708-712.
Germany. Industrial. Future levels, estimated, and
possible effect of Allied Control Council de­
cisions. 1 9 4 6 — June 895-903.
Great Britain. Boys and girls, bill to improve in­
troduced, March 1948. 1 9 4 8 — Aug. 120.
-------Controls over, postwar; union attitude toward.
1 9 4 8 — Oct. 370.
------- Distribution of Industry Act, June 15, 1945.
Objectives summarized. 1 9 4 5 — Dec. 1148-1149.
------- Increase in number employed, 1931 to 1943.
1 9 4 3 — July 17.
------- Legislation. See Legislation, foreign coun­
tries— Great Britain, employment control.
------- World W ar II and reconversion periods.
1 9 4 6 — Jan. 6-23.
Italy. Efforts to create jobs. Measures taken in 1947
and earlier years summarized. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 336-337.
-------Effects of war, and general situation, 1944-45.
1 9 4 5 — Sept. 455-464.
Japan. Controls, 1937-45, and situation in 1945.
Summary. 1 9 4 6 — Feb. 208-210.
------- Surplus of workers and resultant low index
of productivity. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 338-339.
Latin America. Situation, World W ar II and in
1945 (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colum­
bia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay,
Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela). 1946— May
741-752.
New Zealand. World W ar II and reconversion pe­
riods. 1 9 4 6 — Jan. 6-24.
Norway. Control of in certain industries, under de­
cree issued Mar. 27, 1941. 1 9 4 1 — July 81-82.
------- Period World W ar I to World W ar I I; sum­
mary; employment indexes, 1935 to 1941. 1944—
Sept. 499-500.
------- Reemployment rights of workers who lost
positions during war. Provisional decree of May
4, 1945. 1 9 4 6 — Jan. 71.

50

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment conditions, f. c.— Continued
Soviet Union. World W ar II and reconversion pe­
riods. 1946— Jan. 6-23.
Sweden. World W ar II and reconversion periods.
1946— Jan* 6—
23.
------- Summary by kind of work, 1943. 1944— Jan.
62-63.
Switzerland. World W ar II and reconversion pe­
riods. 1946— Jan. 6-24.
Venezuela. Legal minimum standards, 1949. 1 9 5 0 —
Oct. 451.
Employment contract, foreign countries:
Dominican Republic. Law of June 16, 1944. Pro­
visions concerning obligations, termination, dis­
missal compensation, suspension of agreement,
minors, maternity leave, apprenticeship, arbitra­
tion. 1944— Nov. 1013-1016.
Surinam (Dutch Guiana). Law of Mar. 4, 1943,
provisions. 1944— Mar. 577-578.
Employment control, foreign countries:
China. Technicians and skilled workers. Wartime
regulations of July 9, 1943. Provisions. 1944—
Apr. 757.
------- Wartime, free and occupied regions. 1 9 4 6 —
Feb. 207-208.
Japan. Conditions 1937-45 and situation in 1945.
Summary. 1946— Feb. 208-210.
Norway. Certain industries, under decree issued
Mar. 27, 1941. 1941— July 81-82.
Employment, full. See Employment conditions— Full
employment.
Employment outlook, United States:
Airframe industry. Factors, probable, affecting
labor demand. 1945— Aug. 225.
Air-line operation. Postwar job prospects, by oc­
cupation. 1945— Apr. 739-755.
Air transportation (nonscheduled) and related
services. Job prospects, postwar, by type of serv­
ice and by occupations. 1945— June 1187-1196.
Aluminum industry. Probable postwar effects of
changes in consumption. 1944— Feb. 305-306.
Bomber plant employees. Prospects for future em­
ployment. Summary. 1945— Dec. 1088-1090.
Bureau of Labor Statistics program for reporting
on occupational outlook, fiscal year 1947-48.
1947—

Oct. 414.

Cement (Portland) industry. Probable changes un­
der wartime conditions. 1941— Oct. 862-874.
College graduates, 1950. Summary of principal
professions. 1950— May 509-511.
College students. Demand for, due to wartime con­
ditions. 1942— Aug. 253-254.
Construction, new, in 5-year period following
World W ar II. Site employment. Total man-hours
and man-years, and total numbers employed, by
type of work, estimated. 1 9 4 5 — July 1-13.
Diesel-engine mechanics. Extent of probable de­
mand in postwar period, and factors limiting.
1945—

Feb. 276-285.

Dietitian’s profession. Training courses and place­
ment prospects for Negro women. 1943— July
104-105.
Engineers. 1949— July 14-19.
Federal Civil Service. Peacetime requirements for.
1946— Apr. 588-591.
Foundry occupations. Products and processes; eco­
nomic characteristics; production, employment,
and technological trends; summary. 1945— Dec.
1112-1131.
Hosiery (full-fashioned) industry. Status as of
Sept. 1, 1941 (Clem). 1941— Oct. 821-848.
Industrial-research laboratories. Estimated per­
sonnel by July 1942 and increase from April
1941. 1941— Oct. 876.
Lawyers, women. Openings. Governmental and




others, resulting from war. 1 9 4 3 — Sept. 502-503.
Louisville, Ky., youth, out-of-school. BLS survey,
spring 1947, summary. 1 9 4 7 — Dec. 673-674.
Mass production and rationalization of labor proc­
esses, changes in occupational composition re­
sulting. 1 9 5 0 — July 13.
Mechanics, automobile. Probable increase in de­
mand for, in postwar years. 1 9 4 6 — Feb. 216-221.
Mobilization program, effect of on selected occupa­
tion, 1950-51. 1 9 5 0 — Dec. 680-681.
Petroleum industry, production and refining, 1950.
1 9 5 0 — Apr. 374-378.
Physicians. Postwar prospective demand for serv­
ices of, summary. 1 9 4 5 — Dec. 1094-1111.
Plastics products industry. Characteristics of; pro­
duction and employment trends and prospects.
1 9 4 7 — Sept. 293-301.
Recommendations of National Conferences on
Labor Legislation, 1949. 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 40-41.
Retail stores (Boston), for youth, last half of 1941.
1 9 4 1 — Aug. 314-326 .
Synthetic-rubber industry. Estimate of labor re­
quirements in 1944. 1 9 4 3 — May 837-845.
Teachers, elementary and high-school, 1949. 1 9 5 0 —
Feb. 146-149.
United States civilians in foreign countries, in post­
war period. Summary of agencies concerned and
nature of jobs. 1 9 4 5 — Sept. 451-452.
Welders. Postwar conditions, summary. 1 9 4 5 —
Sept. 423-429.
Women workers. Hosiery industry. Postwar con­
tinuation of wartime jobs, prospects for. 1 9 4 5 —
May 978-989.
------- Occupational therapy, need for. Training
courses and qualifications required. 1 9 4 4 — Apr.
768-769.
------- Postwar plans of employers concerning (sur­
vey by New York State agency). 1 9 4 5 — June 1269.
Working-life tables, application of, 1940 to 1950.
1 9 5 0 — Nov. 560-563.
Employment outlook, foreign countries:
Canada. Program proposed for maintaining high
and stable level. 1 9 4 5 — July 56-60.
Great Britain. Bill to improve, for boys and girls,
introduced March 1948. Provisions. 1 9 4 8 — Aug.

120.

Employment policies, United States:
Borrowing workers (New York area). Agreement
between Regional W ar Manpower Commission
and Regional W ar Labor Board. 1 9 4 4 — Dec. 1168.
Discrimination. New York law against. Provisions
and success in first year of operation. 1 9 4 7 —
J an. 24-27.
------- W ar industries. Forbidden, account race,
creed, color, or national origin, by Executive
order, May 27, 1943. 1 9 4 3 — July 32-33.
“ Engineering service” companies supplying skilled
labor. Program announced by Government agen­
cies for preventing abuses. 1 9 4 4 — June 11891190.
Foreign workers. Discontinuance of use after close
of war. 1 9 4 5 — Nov. 910.
-------Jamaicans. Wartime use of, summary of plan
and experience. Release for return home after
end of war period. 1 9 4 5 — Nov. 848-857, 910.
Japanese aliens and U. S. Citizens of Japanese an­
cestry in relocation centers. Recruitment for sea­
sonal and permanent employment. 1 9 4 4 — Mav
993-994.
Older workers. Hiring of urged by President, for
National Employment Week, April 1941. 1 9 4 1 —
May 1151-1152.
Persons excluded from military areas. Placement
procedure of W ar Relocation Authority. 1944—
May 994.

INDEX — JA N U A R Y 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Philippine Islands. Japanese measures during in­
vasion, summary. 194,5 — Apr. 787-788.
Physically impaired workers, factory employment
of. Summary of results of survey by Federal
agencies. 1944— Oct. 677-683.
Veterans’ placement. Provisions made by Veterans*
Placement Service Board, Aug. 15, 1945. 1945—
Nov. 909.
Wartime. Retired workers. Reemployment in War
and Navy Departments (sec. 6, National Defense
Act, approved June 28, 1940). 1 9 4 2 — Jan. 69.
Employment policies, foreign countries:
Australia. Commonwealth Employment Service
(proposed). Attitudes of employer and tradeunion representatives toward establishment of.
1946— Feb. 229.
Canada. Dominion proposals to Provinces at Au­
gust 1945 conference. Summary. 1946— Jan. 67-68.
-------Employment-service and trade-union facilities
recommended by Joint Conference Board of build­
ing and construction industry. 1941— Apr. 838.
------- Wartime controls (13) removed Aug. 16,
1945. Summary. 1945— Oct. 693-694.
Germany. Manpower controls, and wartime distri­
bution of labor, 1939-44, and proportion of for­
eign workers employed in October 1942 and Jan­
uary 1944. 1946— Feb. 189-196.
Great Britain. Controls, need for continuing during
reconversion period, White Paper, 1944. 1949—
Mar. 278-279.
------- Curtailment, Dec. 20, 1945, of number of
workers subject to wartime Control of Engage­
ment Order. 1946— Mar. 402.
------- Full employment, need for in postwar period,
with discussion of measures to attain. 1944—
Feb. 332-340.
------- Manpower problem, mid-1945; employment
levels and policies, 1945-47 and 1947-48; possi­
bilities for expanded production. 1949— Mar.
278-283.
------- Postwar period. Plans outlined. 1944— Aug.
296-302.
------- Wartime control policies, August 1939 to
March 1941, summarized. 1941— May 1079-1089.
Japan. Measures proposed for protection of labor
and for lessening unemployment, 1946. 1947—
Feb. 252-253.
Netherlands.
Postwar employment regulations
(Netherlands Government), 1945; control of
wages and working conditions for maintaining
stable wage-price relationship. 1949— Aug. 163164.
Employment-separation allowances, Japan. Law effec­
tive Jan. 1, 1937, summary of provisions. 1945—
Oct. 668.
Employment Service, United States. See Employment
agencies, United States.
Employment stabilization, United States:
Annual-wage and guaranteed-employment provi­
sions in collective agreements, summary. 1 9 4 5 —
Apr. 707-727.
Guaranteed employment plans. Collective bargain­
ing agreements. Definition, history, limitations,
and provisions. 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 26-30.
Industrial research scientists, written contracts and
dismissal pay, 1949. 1950— Apr. 373.
Wartime policy. W M C instructions of Feb. 15,
1944, summary. 1944— Apr. 748-749.
Wisconsin unemployment-compensation law. Ob­
jectives and results obtained, resume. 1941—
Apr. 890-895.
Employment stabilization, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Cotton weavers. Guaranteed weekly
wage provided by collective agreement effective
October 1941. 1941— Dec. 1579-1580.




51

Uruguay. Packing-house workers in 100-day season
following wool-clip guaranteed minimum working
month, by decree of Dec. 26, 1941. 1 9 4 2 — May
1192.
Employment statistics, United States ( s e e a lso Labor
force) :
Agricultural and nonagricultural. Averages, by
year, 1929-46. 1 9 4 7 — Dec. 638.
Agriculture. Employment changes, wartime and
early postwar, United States and major geo­
graphic divisions. 1 9 4 5 — Sept. 442-451; 1 9 4 7 —
Dec. 650.
------- Hired and other workers. Totals, by geo­
graphic division, October of 1939 and 1943, and
changes over period (in percent). 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 2 1 -

22.

------- Indexes showing trend, 1909-42. 1 9 4 4 — Mar.
514-520.
------- Labor force in 1945-46, by age, sex, and
duration of employment. 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 225-231.
------- Wage data. New types of surveys by Bureau
of Agricultural Economics to make comparisons
possible. 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 231-233.
Aircraft industry. Los Angeles. Workers hired dur­
ing June 1942. Previous employment, age, color,
and marital status. 1 9 4 2 — Nov. 926-931.
------- Monthly, by type of contractor, January 1942
to August 1944; by type of plant, January 1940
to August 1944; women workers, January 1942
to August 1944. 1 9 4 4 — Nov. 911-916.
------- Wartime workers, southern California. Dis­
tribution by employment status and sex, winter
and June 1946. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 706-708.
Aircraft-parts industry (engines separately), es­
timated number of workers by month and year,
January 1939 to December 1944. 1 9 4 5 — May
1108-1111.
Airframe industry. California. By month, Jan­
uary 1940 to August 1945, compared with other
State totals. 1 9 4 5 — Oct. 721-727.
------- Engine, and propeller plants, November 1943
to June 1944, by district and by type of plant.
1944— Sept. 475-480.
------- Number of workers, selected plant occupa­
tions, by region, May-June 1949. 1 9 5 0 — Jan.
30-31.
Air-line operation. Trends, by year, 1936-43; by
occupation, 1940-43. 1 9 4 5 — Apr. 743-746.
Aluminum industry. Trend 1919-43, in relation to
other conditions. 1 9 4 4 — Feb. 209-304.
Annual averages. See Manufacturing and nonman­
ufacturing industries, this section.
BLS collection and analysis of data, summary of
fact-finding functions. 1 9 4 5 — May 928-936.
BLS program for reporting, fiscal year 1947-48.
1 9 4 7 — Oct. 410.
Bomber plant (Willow Run, Ypsilanti, Mich.),
Decrease from July 1943 to July 1945. 1 9 4 5 —
Dec. 1076-1077.
California. Trends, 1940-46, by industry; wartime
changes and readjustments after YJ-day. 1 9 4 7 —
Apr. 576-588.
-------Women workers, by industry and by locality,
1943 and 1942. 1 9 4 S — July 105-106.
Cement, Portland. Estimated average number and
indexes, by year, 1919-40. 1 9 4 1 — Oct. 864-865.
Census data, preliminary, summary, March 1940.
1 9 4 1 — Jan. 102-103.
Changes in, employment and unemployment, and
factors influencing. 1 9 4 8 — Jan. 2, Feb. II, Mar.
I ll, Apr. IV, June IV.
Chemical (industrial) plants. January 1946, by
region, occupation, grade, and sex. 1946— Nov.
746.

52

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment statistics, U. S.— Continued
Chemists and chemical engineers. Percent employed,
1943, by classification. 191*6 — June 885.
Child labor. Minors, 14-17 years of age. Agricul­
ture and nonagriculture, July 1945-September
1948 (chart). 191*8 — Dec. 593.
------- Minors, 14 through 17 years of age. Employ­
ment and age certificates for full-or part-time
work, 1940 and 1943-47; percent change, 194047. 191*8— Dec. 590-594.
Civilian labor force. See Labor force.
Clay products (structural) industry. Approximate
labor force, October 1945. 191*6— Aug. 211.
Connecticut. Small-arms workers. Percentage dis­
tribution by age and sex and previous industrial
groupings; craftsmen and manual workers, by
skill. 191*7— Feb. 215-221.
Construction. Average employment, estimated. By
type of product; yearly averages 1941-47, quar­
terly averages, 1946 and 1947. 191*7 — Aug. 202,
Nov. 562; 191*8 — Jan. 58-59.
------- By month and type of project, October 1946
to May 1947. 191*7— Jan. 121-122, Feb. 297-299,
Mar. 515-516, Apr. 722, May 897, June 1111.
------- Contract. Monthly average, 1943; selected
months 1945; monthly (March 1946-June 1947)
by State. See Current labor statistics, table A - l l ,
July-September 1947 issues.
--------------- Professional and technical personnel, July
1942. 191*2 — Nov. 932-935.
---------------- Site employees, proportion skilled, 1948
and 1942 compared. 191*9 — Feb. 181.
---------------- Trend in average monthly employment,
1939-48. 191*9— Feb. 180-181.
---------------- Trends, long-term, 1929-47. 191*7— Dec.
645-649; 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 199-200.
--------------- Wage and salary workers, estimated num­
ber; annual average 1939, 1943, and 1948;
monthly, August 1946 to October 1950. See
Current labor statistics, Table A -2 , each issue
October 1947-December 1950.
------- Defense Department property; employment
policy on. 1 9 5 0 — Dec. 687-688.
------- Definition of and explanation of BLS tech­
niques for estimating employment on. 191*7 —
Aug. 202-203.
------- Federal and non-Federal projects. By month.
May 1944 to August 1946 (including payrolls).
191*1*— July 209, Aug. 436, Sept. 638-639, Oct.
878, Nov. 1091-1092, Dec. 1299-1300; 191*5— Jan.
199-200, Feb. 435-436, Mar. 672-673, Apr. 892893, May 1114-1115, June 1319-1321, July 163164, Aug. 373-375, Sept. 585-586, Oct. 813-814,
Nov. 1033-1034, Dec. 1252-1253; 1 9 1 * 6 - ^ s ,n . 147149, Feb. 331-332, Mar. 507-508, Apr. 677678, May 815-816, June 987-988, July 133-134,
Aug. 283-284, Sept. 450-452, Oct. 623-624, Nov.
800, Dec. 1013-1014.
------- Fresno, Calif. Comparative estimates, by oc­
cupation, January 1947. 191*7— July 74.
------- New projects. By type, average monthly and
yearly, 1939-42. 191*2 — Oct. 737-741.
------- ------- Labor requirements, (estimated total
number workers involved), quarterly, 1946-48, by
type of construction, public and private. 191*8 —
Apr. 413-414, Oct. 394.
------- Total employment, January 1945, August
1946; and estimates, September 1947. 191*7 —
Nov. 541.
Consumer goods. Postwar high; changes in over­
all employment, fall of 1947 to January 1949; in­
dustries involved. 191*9 — Mar. 273-274.
------- Selected industries, monthly, August 1948January 1949. 191*9 — Mar. 277.
Defense industries. Man-hour employment, changes




in, by industry, January 1940 to January 1941.
May 1180-1181.
Defense program. Effect upon, by industries (15)
and by regions, October 1941. 191*2— Jan. 1-15.
Engineers. Trends in employment, 1890-1948; num­
ber employed compared with number of workers
in specified industry groups, 1890-1949. 191*9—
July 14-15.
Estimating employment and unemployment; BLS
methods, revision of. 191*8— July 51-53.
Exports. Effects of, on employment levels, first half
of 1947; basic steps used in preparing estimates.
191*7— Dec. 675-678.
------- Employment attributable to, by industry
group, 1939, January-June 1947, and 1949.
July 37-38; 191*7— Dec. 676-677; 1 9 5 0 —
Aug. 202-203.
Factory wage earners, by sex, industry group, and
geographical region, April 1941 and April 1942.
191*2— Nov. 913-916.
Farm, 1948. Estimating methods; comparison of
Bureau of Agricultural Economics (B A E ) and
Census data; BAE interview surveys on farm
labor since 1945. 191*9— Nov. 549-550, 552. S e e
also Agriculture, this section.
Farm workers, hired. Specified months. See p. V,
each issue July 1944-July 1947.
Federal service. By branch; and Government cor­
porations; November 1940 to April 1947. See
Public employment, section on Trends of Employ­
ment and Labor Turn-Over, each issue January
1941-June 1947.
------- Civilian. Total located in each State, speci­
fied periods 1936-41; factors affecting distribu­
tion; and principal agencies in each State. 191*2—
Apr. 919-926.
------- Civilian and military. By major functional
group, June 1940 and June 1941, with payrolls;
postwar implications. 191*1— Dec. 1361-1367;
191*5— Feb. 243-248, 259-260.
------- Distribution. By major Government function,
by month, January 1939-July 1942, and by State,
July 1942. 191*2 — Nov. 935-940.
----------------By type of service, number and percent,
1938, 1942, and 1944. 191*6— Mar. 384.
-------Executive branch. And principal war agencies.
Increase in employment, June 1940 to May 1942,
by month and area. 1942— Aug. 217-222.
--------------- Employment and average annual salaries,
by pay-fixing authority, July 1946 and July 1947.
191*8— July 12.
----------------Inside and outside District of Columbia,
by agency and by month, December 1940 to De­
cember 1942. 191*8— Mar. 478-483.
----------------Percentage distribution, by basis of sal­
ary payment, July 1947. 191*8—-July 15.
---------------- State distribution, June 1941 and Octo­
ber 1943, and June 1944, by agency. 191*4— Apr.
730-739, Oct. 728-736.
------- Military branch. Personnel and total pay;
yearly, 1939 and 1943; monthly (May 1946October 1950). See Current labor statistics, table
A -15, July, September 1947 and January-September 1949 issues; table A -14, October 1947December 1948 issues; and table A -8 , October
1949-August 1950 issues . (Discontinued.)
--------------- Personnel, by sex, and total pay, specified
periods to April 1947. 1946— Mar. 504, 506-507,
June 984, 986-987, Sept. 449-450, Dec. 1025;
1947— Mar. 527, 529, June 1120, 1122.
------- Occupation and salaries, Dec. 31, 1938. 1941—
Jan. 66—
85.
------- Percentage distribution by pay-fixing autority and basic annual salary group, 1946-47.
1948— July 14.
191*1 —

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Personnel, December 1939 and 1940, by types
of work performed. 191+1— June 1360-1374.
------- W ar and other agencies, August 1939-46,
estimated. 191+6— Nov. 671.
------- Washington, D.C. Personnel and total pay,
yearly 1939, 1943, and 1948-49, monthly, April
1 9 4 6 -0 ctober 1950, by branch and agency group.
See Current labor statistics, Table A -1 4 , each
issue July-September 1947 and J anuary-September 1949; table A -1 3 , October 1947-December
1949; table A -7 , October 1949-December 1950.
----- Yearly, 1939 and 1943. Monthly (May 1946October 1950), by branch and agency group. See
Current labor statistics, table A -1 2 , each issue
July-September 1947 and January-September
1949; table A - l l , October 1947-December 1948;
and table A -5 , October 1949-December 1950.
Federal, State, and local governments. By govern­
mental unit, including percentage distribution.
191+1— Nov. 1171.
------- By month, January 1939 to July 1942; by
State, July 1942. 191+2— Nov. 935-940.
------- California. Wartime increase in number and
postwar trends. 191+7— Apr. 578-580, 585-586.
------- Monthly, August 1948-October 1950; annual
averages, 1947-49. See Current labor statistics,
table A -2 , each issue October 1949-December
1950.
------- 1948. 191+9— Feb. 173, 175.
-------Trend 1929-39, with payrolls, by year, and for
1939 by State; and postwar implications. 191+5—
Feb. 243-260.
Finance establishments. Annual averages, 194749, monthly, August 1948-October 1950, by in­
dustry group and industry. See Current labor
statistics, table A -2 , each issue October 1949December 1950.
------- Employment trends, 1929-49. 1950— Aug. 201.
Food processing. Southern States. Trend, 193946. Importance of industry in area’s manufactur­
ing economy. 191+7— Feb. 308-312, 315.
Foreign workers. Numbers used during World W ar
II. 191+5— Nov. 910.
Foundries, ferrous and nonferrous. Occupational
make-up of labor force, January 1945. 191+6—
July 66-67.
Furniture and finished lumber products. Southern
States. Trends, 1939-46. Importance of industry
in area’s manufacturing economy. 191+7— Feb.
308-311, 316.
Government. Trends, 1929-37, and 1929-49. 191+7—
Dec. 645-649; 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 200. S e e a lso Federal
Service, this section.
Government and private industry, March 1942 and
potential labor supply (Univ. of Minnesota
study). 191+2— Aug. 203-205.
Government-owned, privately operated war plants,
September 1943, by industry group and State.
191+ — July 46.
1+
Hawaii. By industries (those which employ women),
sex, and class of occupation, 1939. 191+1— Feb.
364-365.
Hosiery (full fashioned). Trend 1940-42, with
labor turn-over rates. 191+S— Mar. 430-434.
Illinois. Trends, during World W ar II. 191+5— Oct.
695-707.
----- Women workers in July 1944 and March 1940.
19 + — Dec. 1234.
1 1+
Indexes. By industry division, selected years, 192947. 191+7— Dec. 647.
------- Key defense industries, by month, January
1939 to September 1941: Blast furnaces, steel
works, and rolling mills; foundry and machineshop products; electrical machinery, apparatus,




53

and supplies; smelting and refining— copper,
lead, and zinc; brass, bronze, and copper prod­
ucts ; aluminum manufactures; ^machine tools;
machine-tool accessories; abrasives; screw-ma­
chine products; aircraft; aero engines; ship­
building; optical goods; instruments. 191+2— Jan.
6-7.
Industrial and business. Monthly, by industry, Oc­
tober 1940 to April 1947. See section , Trends of
Employment etc., each issue January 1941June 1947.
------- See also Manufacturing and Nonmanufactur­
ing, this section .
Industrial distribution. Census (1939), compared
with census data from Latin American coun­
tries. 191+6— May 747-748.
Industrial work force, prewar, wartime, and post­
war; trends. 191+7— Dec. 645-649.
Insured unemployment under State unemployment
insurance programs, by geographic division and
State, monthly, April-September 1948, April
1949-September 1950. See Current labor statis­
tics, table A - l l , each issue July-December 1950.
Iowa. Trends, during World W ar II. 191+5— Oct.
695-707.
------- Women, and total workers, by industry, May
of each year 1940 to 1944. 191+1+— Dec. 1234—
1235.
Iron and steel industry. 1940-42, and employment
outlook. 191+S— Feb. 258-267.
------- Southern States. Trends 1939-46. Importance
of industry in area’s manufacturing economy.
191+7— Feb. 308-312, 316.
Jamaicans employed on war work, by industry and
occupation (BLS survey of March 1945). 191+5—
Nov. 848-857.
Knitted-outerwear industry (Philadelphia), 1944
and 1945. 191+6— Aug. 205-206.
Lead and zinc mining. Indexes, 1939-42. 191+S— Dec.
1119.
Lumber and timber basic products. Southern States.
Trend, 1939-46. Importance of industry in area’s
manufacturing economy. 191+7— Feb. 308-311,
314-315.
Lumber industry. Douglas fir. 1927 to June 1941.
191+1— Oct. 851-854.
------- Far West. Estimated total, by region and
branch of industry, August 1944. 191+5— July 23.
Machine-tool-accessories industry. By months,193943, and comparison by year, 1939-43, with ma­
—
chine-tools and durable-goods industries. 191+1+
Feb. 307-309.
Machine-tool industry. Decline, 1942-49; prospects,
1950; hours and earnings, 1947-50. 1 9 5 0 — June
645.
-------Trend by months, January 1939 to April 1943;
indexes showing increase by region, specified
months, 1939-43. 191+S— Sept. 484-486.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Annual averages and indexes (including pay­
rolls) by industry, 1944 to 1946. 191+6— Aug.
294-297; 191+7— May 917-920.
Manufacturing industries. Annual 1939 and 1943;
monthly (May 1946-July 1949). By major in­
dustry group. See Current labor statistics, table
A -3 , each issue July 1947-September 1949.
------- Employees, by industry group and industry,
annual averages, 1947-49, monthly, August 194&October 1950. See Current labor statistics, table
A -2 , each issue October 1949-December 1950.
-------New England. Durable and nondurable goods.
By State and by industry, selected months, Sep­
tember 1939 to March 1946. 191+6— July 6-7.
------- 1936-41, as related to accident frequency.
191+S— M a y 949-954.

54

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment statistics, U. S.— Continued
Manufacturing industries. Percent distribution,
by industry division, 1939-47. 191*7— Dec. 648.
------- Population and employment changes, 18991949. 1950— July 106-108.
------- Production workers. Annual averages, 1939
and 1943; monthly (May 1946-October 1950) by
industry group and industry. See Current labor
statistics, table A -5 , each issue. July 1947-September 1949; table A -3 , each issue October 1949December 1950.
----------------Indexes; annual average, 1943; monthly
(May 1946-July 1949) by industry group and in­
dustry. See Current labor statistics, table A -6 ,
each isstie July 1947-December 1948, table A -7 ,
each issue January-September 1949. N ote —
Series discontinued after September 1949 issue.
--------------- Indexes, employment and weekly payroll,
annual averages, 1939-49 monthly, August 1948October 1950. See Current labor statistics, table
A -4 , each issue October 1949-December 1950.
-------Revised estimates and indexes (including pay­
rolls) by month and by industry group, January
1944 to December 1946. 191*6— Aug. 297-301;
191*7— May 926-930.
------- Southern States. Durable and nondurable
goods. By State and by industry, selected periods,
prewar (1939) first 8 months of 1946. 191*7— Feb.
305-317.
-------State averages. Annual 1943 and 1947, monthly
July 1948-September 1950. See Current labor
statistics, table A -1 0 , July-October and Decem­
ber 1949 issues; February, May, August, and No­
vember 1950 issues.
---------------- Annual 1943; monthly April 1946-June
1949. See Current labor statistics, table A -4 , each
issue , July 1947-December 1948, table A -5 , each
issue January-October 1949.
-------Trends, 1929-47 and 1929-49. 191*7— Dec. 645649; 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 200-201.
-------Wage and salary workers, by major industry
group, annual averages, 1939, 1943, monthly,
November 1947-July 1949. See Current labor
statistics, table A -3 , each issue January-Sep­
tember 1949.
------- Women production workers, estimates of, by
major industry branch and by selected industry*
1939 and 1943-47. 191*7— Dec. 666-667.
------- See also Nonagricultural establishments, this

section.
Massachusetts. Changes in situation during defense
period (to December 1941) and in war period
(to December 1943). 191*1*— Oct. 740-745.
Mechanics, automobile. Distribution, in 1940, by
State. 191*6— Feb. 214.
Metalworking employees shifted to ordnance pro­
duction. Number, April 1943, by industry trans­
ferred from and by type of new work; trend of
changes, June 1940 to April 1943. 191*3— Dec.
1084-1093.
Millinery industry. New York and remainder of
country. Increases, 1935-39. 191*1— Feb. 355-359.
------- ------- Indexes by year, 1935-41. 191*3— Jan.
23-24.
------- Trends, 1919-40. 191*1— July 93-94.
Mining. Employees, by industry group and indus­
try, annual averages 1947-49 and monthly Au­
gust 1948-October 1950. See Current labor sta­
tistics, table A -2 , each issue October 1949-De­
cember 1950.
------- Production workers, by industry group
and industry, annual averages, 1947-49, monthly,
August 1948-October 1950. See Current labor
statistics, table A -3 , each issue October 1949December 1950.




------- Trends, 1929-47, and 1929-49. 191*7— Dec.
645-649; 1 9 5 0 — A.xig. 200.
Mining, coal. Anthracite. Average number em­
ployed, 1942 and 1943. 19U — Nov. 962.
------- Bituminous. Average number, 1929, 1937,
1938, and 1939, and effect of “ share-the-work”
plans on totals shown. 191*1 — Jan. 103-104.
-------Bituminous and lignite. 1943 and earlier years,
as reported by United Mine Workers (1944 con­
vention). 191*1*— Dec. 1195.
Minneapolis. Women workers, number, January
1943. 191*3 — July 108.
Minnesota. Trends during World W ar II. 191*5—
Oct. 695-707.
Minors aged 14 through 17 years, 1940-43. 191*6 —
Apr. 756-775.
Municipal, in large cities, with payroll data, 192938. 191*3 — June 1097-1108.
Nebraska. Trends during World W ar II. 191*5 —
Oct. 695-707.
Negro workers. By occupation and by sex, 1940.
191*1*— Apr. 739.
------- New York. Occupational distribution, 194047. 191*9— Jan. 57.
------- Occupational and industrial distribution, by
sex, April 1940, 1944, and 1947. 191*7 — Dec. 664665.
------- San Francisco Bay area, 1940-48. 1 9 5 0 — June
614-617.
------- Trends, probable, based on 1940 and 1944 oc­
cupational and industrial distribution. Summary.
191*5 — Jan. 5.
Nonagricultural. Annual averages, 1939, 1943, and
1947- 49; monthly (May 1946-October 1950). By
industry division. S e e Current labor statistics,
table A -2 , each issue July 1947-September 1949;
by industry division and group, each issue Oc­
tober 1949-December 1950.
------- By industries and Government branches. Es­
timated numbers in 1939, 1943, 1945, and 1946.
191*6 — Nov. 671.
------- Changes, 1948-50, by industry, first quarter
1948 to first quarter 1950 (charts). 1 9 5 0 — June
622-623.
------- Employment attributable directly and indi­
rectly to exports from Continental United States,
January-June 1947 and annual 1949 (table).
1 9 5 0 — Aug. 202.
------- Estimates, by industry, for 1950, and com­
parisons with 1945, 1944, 1941, and 1939. 191*7 —
Mar. 428-429.
-------Indexes, and percentage distribution, specified
years, 1929-49. 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 200.
-------Revised. By industry group, years and months,
1939-43, and months, January 1939 to Decem­
ber 1946. 191*1*— July 222-224; 191*7 — May 9 21925.
------- Percentage distribution, by industry division,
selected years, 1929-48. 191*9— Feb. 173-174.
------- State averages. Annual, 1947, monthly, July
1948- September 1950. See Current labor statis­
tics, table A -4 , January-September 1949 issues ,
and table A -9 , October-December 1949, Febru­
ary, May, August, November 1950 issues.
------- Summaries. By industry groups and by
year, 1929-43 and 1919-49. 191*1*— Sept. 654-657;
191*8— Oct. 404, 405; 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 199.
----------------October 1945 to April 1947. 191*6 — Jan.
149, Feb. 333, Mar. 510, Apr. 680, May 818, June
983, July 128-130, Aug. 277-279, Sept. 445-447,
Oct. 617-620, Nov. 804-806, Dec. 1020-1022;
191*7— Jan. 128-129, Feb. 319-320, Mar. 5 23524, Apr. 728-729, May 905, June 1119.
Nonfarm. Total, December 1948. 191*9 — Mar. 273.
Nonmanufacturing. Annual average, 1939 and

55

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
1943; monthly (April 1946-M ay 1949), by se­
lected industry group and industry. See Current
labor statistics, table A -8 , each issue, July 1947December 1948; table A -9 , January-September 1949 issues; table A -2 , October 1949-December 1950 issues.
------- Indexes. Annual average, 1939 and 1943;
monthly (April 1946-October 1948) by selected
industry group and industry. See Current labor
statistics, table A -9 , July 1947-December 1948
issues; table A -10, January-September 1949.
N ote — Series discontinued after September 1949

issue.
North Central States (7 ), Trend, 1939-45, by
States. 191+5— Oct. 695-707.
North Dakota. Trends, during World War II.
191+5— Oct. 695-707.
Northwest region (Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Wash­
ington). Employed workers, by industry group,
1940 (percentage distribution). 191+7— Apr. 639.
Occupational groups, major. Workers classified, by
sex, April 1940, 1945, and 1947. 191*7— Aug. 140,
146.
-------Principal classifications (8 ), according to 1940
Census. 191+1+— May 1035.
Older workers. Estimated number employed, Octo­
ber 1942 and 1943, by age group and sex. 191+1+
—
July 25.
Ordnance plants. By State and sex, 1918, and sum­
mary figures for 1943. 191+3— Dec. 1074-1075.
Pacific Northwest (Oreg., and W ash.). By major
industry divisions, September 1939 and specified
periods, 1943-46; compared with U. S. 191+7—
Apr. 589-598.
Petroleum, crude, and natural gas production,
1939-50 (chart). 1950— Apr. 377.
Philippine Islands. Bv occupation, industry, and
sex, 1939. 191+5— Apr. 777-778.
Plastics products industry. Estimates, by year,
1937 to 1946 (December). 191+7— Sept. 297.
Population, white and nonwhite. Number in labor
force, proportions regularly employed, employed
on public emergency work, and seeking work,
by States (2 6), Mar. 24-30, 1940. 191+1— May
1181-1184.
Postwar. Excess over “ normal.” April 1945, by sex
and age group, and factors affecting. 191+5—
Nov. 841-847.
Production workers. See Manufacturing, Nonagricultural, and Nonmanufacturing, this section.
Public housekeeping (California). By occupation,
1940. 191+3— May 914-915.
Public utilities. Trends, 1929-47. 191+7— Dec. 645649.
Radio artists, percentages employed and unem­
ployed, 1948. 191+9— May 514-516.
Railroads. By year, 1939 to 1945, and by States,
July 1940 and September 1945. 191+6— May 753754.
----- Pennsylvania lines. Negro workers, by occupa­
tion, Sept. 28, 1942. 191+3— Mar. 484-485.
------- Section men. Average number, by year, 192944. 191+5— May 1070.
-------Women workers and all workers. By occupa­
tional group, January 1943 and 1944, April 1945,
and January 1946. 191+ — Sept. 590-591; 191+6—
1+
July 90-91.
Research laboratories, industrial. Professional per­
sonnel, April 1941. 191+1— Oct. 876.
Road (highway) construction from State funds. No­
vember 1940 to July 1941. 191+1— Jan. 246, Feb.
493, Mar. 756, Apr. 1033, May 1309, June 1555,
July 251, Aug. 531, Sept. 789.
Sawmills and logging camps. Douglas fir and west­
ern pine areas, 1941-42. 191+2— Dec. 1127-1129.




Seaboard Airline Railroad. Minimum force employ­
ment, annual payroll; 6 mechanical trades, 192346. 191+7— Aug. 170.
Seamen. Merchant marine, U. S. offshore. Total
jobs on War Shipping Administration vessels and
number controlled by unions. 191+7— Feb. 257-261.
Service. Trends, 1929-47. 191+7— Dec. 645-649.
Service establishments. Employees, by industry
group and industry, annual averages, 1947-49,
monthly, August 1948-October 1950. See Cur­
rent labor statistics, table A -2 , each issue Octo­
ber 1949-December 1950.
Shipbuilding and repair. November 1944 and De­
cember 1945 (including payrolls). 191+5— Jan.
199, Feb. 434-435, Mar. 671-672, Apr. 891-892,
May 1114, June 1319, July 162-163, Aug. 372373, Sept. 584, Oct. 812-813, Nov. 1032-1033,
Dec. 1251-1252; 191+6— Jan. 146-147, Feb. 330331.
Shipbuilding industry, 1935 to February 1941, and
estimated to December 1942. 191+1— June 1377.
-------West Coast. Workers hired during June 1942.
Previous employment, age, color, and marital sta­
tus. 191+2— Nov. 926-931.
Shipyards, private. By region and month, January
to December 1943; percent of women employed,
December 1942 and 1943. 191+1+— June 1178-1182.
------- Total. Wage earners (387 yards) by region,
June 1943. 191+ — Aug. 387.
1+
Slaughtering and meat packing. Trend by years,.
1939-45, and by month first quarter 1946; by
region and type of establishment, March 1946.
191+6— July 46, 53.
South Dakota. Trends during World War II. 191+5—

Oct. 695-707.
Southern States. Manufacturing, by State and by
industry, selected periods, prewar (1939) to first
8 months 1946. 191+7— Feb. 305-317.
State and local governments. August 1939-46, es­
timated. 1946— Nov. 671.
State and local governments, personnel. By type of
governmental unit and by function, January
1941; indexes, by quarter, 1940, and January
1941. 191+1— Nov. 1168-1171.
Stores, retail. Boston, by sex and age group. 191+1—
Aug. 314.
Students, high-school, in 9 New York up-State
cities, May 1944. Proportion of total, by sex and
age, and conditions of work. 191+5— Nov. 996-997.
Textile industries. Cotton-duck manufacturing,
wartime. General trend, 1939-45, and trend, by
area, January 1942 to December 1944. 191+5—
Aug. 226-234.
------- Mill products and apparel, by month, 194042. 191+2— Sept. 446-458.
------- Southern States. Mill products, trend, 193946. Importance of industry in area’s manufac­
turing economy. 191+7— Feb. 308-311, 314.
Tire-cord manufacture. Trends, January 1942 to
December 1944. 191+5— Mar. 527-533.
Tobacco plantations (Conn.), summer 1942. 191+3—

Feb. 267-268.
Trade establishments. Employees, by industry
group and industry, annual averages, 1947-49,
monthly, August 1948-October 1950. See Cur­
rent labor statistics, table A -2 , each issue Oc­

tober 1949-December 1950.
Trade, wholesale and retail. Trends, 1929 to 1947
and 1949. 191+7— Dec. 645-649; 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 201.
Transportation and public utilities. Employees, by
industry group, annual
averages, 1947-49,
monthly, August 1948-October 1950. See Current
labor statistics, table A -2 , each issue October
1949-December 1950.

------ Trends, 1929-49.

1 9 5 0 — Aug.

201.

56

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment statistics, U. S.— Continued
Transportation equipment (except automobiles).
Southern States. Trends, 1939-46. Importance
of industry in area’s manufacturing economy.
1947— Feb. 308-312, 316-317.
Trends. Consumer goods industries, August 1948January 1949. 1949— Mar. 274-277.
------- Major occupational groups, April 1940, 1945,
and 1947, by sex. 1947— Aug. 140, 146.
------- 1940, various classes of industries. 19£1—
Mar. 533-534.
------- 1948, agricultural and nonagricultural, man­
ufacturing and nonmanufacturing. Comparisons
with previous years. 1941— Feb. 171-178.
Unemployment under State unemployment insurance
programs, by geographic division and State,
monthly, January-March 1948, January 1949September 1950. See Current labor statistics,
table A - l l , each issue April-December 1950.
Veterans. Factory employment. Percentage dis­
tribution in major industry groups, proportion
of all employees and of all accessions, and turn­
over rates, December 1945 to July 1946. 1946—
Dec. 924-934.
-------Percentage distribution of those employed, by
status, age, occupational group, and race, March
and November 1946. 1947— July 63-65.
Wage and salary workers. Industry divisions,
1938-48 (charts). 1949— Feb. 173, 175.
-------Number in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division, 1929-47. 1947— Dec. 647.
W ar plants, Government-owned, privately operated,
September 1943. 1944— July 39-46.
Wartime labor. Excess over normal, by age group
and sex. 1945— Jan. 7.
White-collar workers. Clerical, sales, and profes­
sional classifications, by industry group, 1940.
1944— May 1035.
Wisconsin. Trends during World W ar II. 1945—
Oct. 695-707.
Women workers. Airframe, engine, and propeller
plants, by months, November 1943 to June 1944.
1 W — Sept. 477-478.
------- Change in percent, September 1939 to Octo­
ber 1940, in identical establishments. 1941— Nov.
1179.
------- Changes in wartime, by characteristics and
major occupation groups. 1944— Nov. 1029-1030.
-------Factory wage earners, April 1941-April 1942,
by industry group, and comparison with men
employed. 1942— Nov. 913-916.
------- Manufacturing. January and June 1943 and
trend since October 1939. 1943— Oct. 723-728.
----------------Percent of total employment, September
1949. 1950— Feb. 159.
--------------- Production workers, distribution in speci­
fied periods, 1939-46. 1947— Mar. 413.
---------------- Production workers, estimates of, 1939
and 1943-47, by major branch. 1947— Dec. 666667.
---------------- Wartime, estimated total, April 1942, and
by specified industries, May 1942. 1942— Sept.
441-445.
------ - New York. Factories, October 1942 compared
with January 1942; increase, year ending Jan­
uary 1943. 1943— Feb. 282-283, May 921-923.
----------------Up-State. Retail-trade and service estab­
lishments, 1944 and 1945. 1946— June 931-932.
------- Number and percent of total employment, by
industry group, September 1949. 1950— Feb. 159.
------- Production. Percentage of total workers, by
occupation and major industry branch, Octo­
ber 1939 and April 1940, 1945, and 1947. 1947—
Dec. 669.




-------Wartime trends. See Women workers, U. S.—
Wartime employment.
W P A projects, by month, July 1935 to December
1940. 1941— Mar. 601-603.
Youth. Number in labor market, 14 through 19
years of age, by age group, October 1946, April
1947. 1947— Dec. 672-673.
------- School-age groups, first year following VJday. Summary. 1946— Nov. 678-679.
------- Teen-age workers, wartime. Sex, school-at­
tendance status, industry employed in, and hours
worked, April 1944. 1945— Jan. 6-17.
Employment statistics, foreign countries:
Australia. August 1939 and summer 1941. 1942—
Mar. 627-628.
------- Factory workers. Indexes, specified periods,
1935-45 (1926 = 100). 1946— Jan. 9.
Belgium. By industrial groups and status, and by
sex, 1930; summary of trend prior to German
invasion. 1944— Feb. 282-283.
-------Mining, coal, by year or shorter period, 193846. 1946— July 28.
Bolivia (LaPaz). Salaried employees and wage
earners, by industry and citizenship, status, with
total payrolls, 1942. 1944— Mar. 629-630.
Brazil. Distribution of industrial population, 1940,
1941, and 1944, by industry group. 1943— Apr.
683; 1945— July 113.
------ - Sao Paulo. Specified industries in city and
State, 1943. 1943— Sept. 581-582.
British Malaya. Gainful workers, by region and
occupational group, 1931; employment trend for
a restricted group of estate, mine, and factory
workers, 1930-38. 1944— Aug. 283-284.
Bulgaria. Personnel classified by branch of activity
and by sex, 1934. 1943— Oct. 675.
Canada. Indexes, by industries, Oct. 1, 1940 and
1941. 1942— Mar. 635-636.
------- Industrial distribution, from Census (1942),
compared with census data from United States
and Latin America. 1946— May 747.
-------Industrial. Indexes, specified periods in years
1935-45 (1 926= 100). 1946— Jan. 9.
Chile. Cooper industry. Total salaried and wage­
earning workers, by year, 1937-43. 1945— Apr.
792.
------- Mining and other industries, by year, 193743. 1945— Apr. 790-792.
------- Nitrate industry. Total salaried and wage­
earning workers and dependents, by Province and
character of establishment, Dec. 31, 1943. 1945—
Apr. 791.
China. Shanghai. By type of factory, sex, and cate­
gory of worker. 1945— Jan. 23.
Colombia. Department of Atlantico. By industry
and sex, July 1938. 1941— Nov. 1173-1176.
-------Manufacturing, by industries, Dec. 31 of 1939
and 1940. 1942— Apr. 927.
Cuba. Gainfully occupied population. June 1943, by
industrial group. 1945— Sept. 454-455.
Denmark. Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of min­
imum in 1930’s. 1946— Feb. 188.
------- Industrial distribution of workers, 1930; dis­
tribution in manufacturing and mechanical
trades, 1935; yearly indexes, 1 9 3 1 -3 9 . 1944— Nov.
946-948.
------- Workers, number, by industry group, 1939
and 1943, and indexes of production. 1946— Feb.
196.
Egypt. Allied armies’ labor force, 1945; total work­
ers, by industry group, 1937. 1945—July 62.
El Salvador. Working population, distribution of,
by occupation. 1944— Oct. 746-747.
Finland. A t beginning and at end of World War

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
II, by industry. 1945— Oct. 728-729; 1946— Feb.
197.
------- Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of minimum in
1930,s. 1946— Feb. 188.
France. Indexes, 1938-47. 1948— July 44.
------- Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of minimum in
1930's. 1946— Feb. 188.
------- Occupational distribution, 1931, by industrial
group, class of worker, and sex. 1944— Oct. 708.
French Indo-China. Distribution of gainfully oc­
cupied persons by kind of activity (estimate),
1936. 1946— Feb. 207.
Germany. Distribution, by industry group and type
of worker, 1933; trend 1929-39. 1945— Mar. 500501.
-------Foreign and native workers employed in 1942
and 1944, by industry group. 1946— Feb. 195.
-------Foreign workers, by country of origin. October
1940 to January 1944; years, 1942 and 1944.
1945— Mar. 504; 1946— Feb. 196.
-------Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of minimum in
1930's. 1946— Feb. 188.
------- Wage and salaried workers, by economic
groups and branches of industry, U. S. Zone and
total Germany, end September 1947. 1948— Apr.
379-380.
------- Women workers, youth, and foreigners,
drafted for war industry. 1948— Sept. 495-498.
Great Britain. By industries and services and by
sex, June of 1939, 1942, and 1944. 1945— Jan.
74-75.
------- Coal mining. Totals, 1943, 1942, and 1938
compared. 1943— July 18.
--------------- Wage earners. Number on colliery books,
1936-49. 1950— Jan. 22.
------- Labor force, distribution of, selected periods
June 1939 to May 1945, sex and age groups and
by industry and service groups. 1945— Dec. 11491150.
------- Summary, September 1943. 1944— Jan. 71-76.
------- Total, by industry, mid-1933, mid-1945, m id1947, and October 1948; percentage change, 193948.
1949— Mar. 279.
Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Number in­
sured against unemployment in 1938, by industry.
1943— July 18.
Greece. Industrial, agricultural, service, and pro­
fessional, by branch of activity and sex, 1928.
1943— Aug. 217.
Guatemala. Distribution by industry and sex,
census of 1940. 1945— Jan. 76.
Haiti. Distribution by types of employment, 1943.
1944— Oct. 747-748.
Hungary. By industrial group, 1930. 1943— June
1069-1072.
India. Agricultural and industrial, by sex and
Province, specified periods. 1943— Sept. 452-456.
------- Factories, selected, by industry, 1939 and
1943. 1945— Aug. 335.
------- Plants subject to Factories Act, by industry
and by year, 1938-41. 1944— Apr. 745.
Ireland. Salaried workers and wage earners, by
industry and sex, mid-October 1943. 1945— Apr.
853-855.
Italy. By class, industry group, and region, 1936;
indexes showing trend, 1929-39; wartime con­
ditions. 1943— Nov. 915-919.
------- Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of minimum in
1930,s. 1946— Feb. 188.
Japan. Distribution of labor force, by kind of
activity, 1930, 1937, 1941, and 1944. 1946— Feb.
209.
------- Number and classes of employees, 1930, by
industry and sex. 1945— Oct. 652-654.




5Y

Korea. Distribution of gainfully occupied persons,
by kind of activity, 1930. 1946— Feb. 207.
------- North and South. Manufacturing. Labor
force and number of firms by industry group,
1944. 1949— Apr. 402.
Latin America (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexi­
co, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela). In­
dustrial distribution. 1946— May 746-747.
Manchuria. Distribution of gainfully occupied per­
sons, by kind of activity, 1936 (official estimates);
workers in factories and mines, by year, 1935-39.
1946— Feb. 207.
Mexico. Extractive, electric power, and manufac­
turing industries, 1940 census (preliminary).
1942— Mar. 636-639.
------- Industrial enterprises, by sex, Dec. 31, 1943.
1944— Dec. 1163-1164.
Netherlands. Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of
minimum in 1930's. 1946— Feb. 188.
------- 1930 (by industry group, status, and sex, by
occupation, and proportions employed in indus­
try, trade, agriculture, and professions); 1929
to 1940 (trend in mining, industry, transport,
and commerce, indexes). 1944—Jan. 33-35.
------- Number employed and unemployed, and per­
cent of population, 1938 and 1948. 1949— Aug.
161-162.
Netherlands Indies. By nationality and occupation
group, 1930. 1944— May 978-979.
New Zealand. Factories and stores, year ended
Mar. 31, 1942, and previous year. 1943— Jan. 37.
-------Labor-force distribution, by sex and industry
group. February 1944. 1945— Sept. 464.
------- Women workers, year ended Mar. 31, 1943.
1943— Oct. 721.
Newfoundland. Conditions, 1943, resulting from
wartime factors (including defense-base construc­
tion). 1943— Sept. 499-501.
Nicaragua. Commerce and industry, by type of
establishment, October 1943. 1944— Feb. 404-405.
Norway. Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of minimum
in 1930's. 1946— Feb. 188.
-------Numbers employed, specified periods, 1940-45
(unemployment insurance records). 1946— Jan. 10.
Panama. Entire republic, by occupational group
and sex; cities of Panama and Colon, by occupa­
tional group and nationality status; census of
1940. 1944— June 1195-1196.
Paraguay. Distribution between industry, com­
merce, and agriculture. 1945— June 1287.
Peru. Total number gainfully occupied, census of
1940, compared with total population. 1944—
Jan. 61.
------- Working population, by industry and sex,
1940; agriculture, by crop and sex, 1939-40 to
1941-42; and minerals; by product, 1940-42.
1945— Jan. 76-79.
Poland. Indexes, 1935, 1939, and year of minimum
in 1930's. 1946— Feb. 188.
------- Industrial distribution, by class of workers
and by sex, 1931. 1944— July 66-67.
Rumania. Trend (indexes), by year, 1929-38;
gainfully occupied persons, by industry group
and sex, 1930. 1943— Dec. 1104.
South Africa, Union of. Mining, industry and
commerce combined, indexes by year, 1929-42.
1943— Sept. 474.
Soviet Union. Wage and salary earners, 1950.
Summary. 1950— May 534.
Sweden. Norwegian workers, numbers employed in
various fields, 1943. 1944— Jan. 64.
Thailand. Distribution, by industry and sex, 1937.
1944— June 1171.

58

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment statistics, f. c.— Continued
Thailand. Distribution of gainfully occupied per­
sons, 1937, by kind of activity. 19 U6— Feb. 207.
Yugoslavia. Distribution by industry, class of
workers, and sex, 1931; indexes, 1929-40. 19U —
S
Nov. 897-898.
Enameled-utensil industry:
Definition and characteristics of, and scope of BLS
wage survey. August 1940. 19U1— Mar. 694-698.
Wage order, under wage and hour law, effective
Apr. 21, 1941. 19U1— May 1253.
Energy, United States:
Consumption by United States compared with
world consumption, 1937. 1950— July 6-7.
Petroleum as a source of, 1899-1948 (chart).
1950—3 uly 6.
Engineers:
Electrical. Trend in earnings, 1929-46. 19U —
S
July 19.
Employment outlook. 1950. 1950— May 510.
------- Trends, and estimated supply and demand,
1949-65. 19 U
S— July 14-18.
Occupational mobility, 1939-46. 19U9— July 18-19.
Engineering, Great Britain:
Cadetship training in, under Ministry of Labor
and National Service. 19U — Apr. 722-723.
S
Differential between time and piecework rate.
Increase recommended by Amalgamated En­
gineering Union, 1945. 19U6— Mar. 474.
Engineering, Science, and Management W ar Training
program. Summary. 1940-44. 19UU— Oct. 818-820.
Engineering-service companies. Labor brokerage by.
W ar Manpower Commission instructions concerning,
to regional directors, May 19, 1944. 19U — July 94.
U
Engines, internal-combustion. Characteristics of in­
dustry, and scope and method of BLS survey (spring
of 1942). 19U2— Nov. 1042-1044.
Equal pay, United States. See Legislation, United
States, by State, fo r specified S ta te; also Women
workers— Equal pay.
Equal pay. Canada and Great Britain. See Women
workers, foreign countries.
Escalator clauses. See Collective agreements, U. S.
ERP. See European Recovery Program.
“ Escape period.” Provision in maintenance-of-mem­
bership clauses in union agreements. Effects of.
Summary for first year. 19U — Dec. 1137-1140.
U
Eskimos. Alaska. Economic conditions and vocational
and welfare work among, June 30, 1941. 19U2— Mar.
647-649.
European Economic Cooperation, Committee for. See
Committee for, etc.
European Recovery Program:
Development, from June 5, 1947, date outlined by
Secretary of State, George Marshall, to Presi­
dent’s message to Congress, Nov. 17, 1947, mak­
ing specific recommendations; Krug, Nourse,
and Harriman reports summarized. 19U8— Jan.
40-45.
Effects of, and of other foreign grants and credits,
upon world economy. 19U — Nov. 471.
S
Foreign Assistance Act of 1948, authorizing ERP.
Economic Cooperation Administration to admin­
ister program; labor’s interest. 19U8— June 640641.
Harriman report on “limits within which the
United States may safely and wisely plan to
extend economic aid to Europe.” 19 U8— Jan.

43-44.
Krug report, appraising resources of United
States in relation to domestic needs and needs
of European countries. 19U8— Jan. 42.
Labor force in countries participating in; analy­
sis and summary. 19U7— Dec. 678-684. See also
Manpower— foreign countries.




Manpower report of CEEC technical subcommit­
tee. 19 U7— Nov. 567-568.
Marshall Plan as an instrument in “ cold war.”
19 U Feb. 139.
S—
Military purchases under, effects upon certain
markets. 19 U9— Feb. 166.
Nourse report, outlining effect upon domestic pro­
duction, consumption, and prices of a substan­
tial program of foreign aid. 19U8— Jan. 42-43.
Opposition and support by various international
trade-union organizations, 1948; resultant ac­
S
tions. 19 U — Feb. 181-182.
President’s message
to
Congress,
Nov.
17,
1947, recommending interim and long-term aid
to Western Europe and inflation controls at
home; summary. 19U8— Jan. 44-45.
Western European Nations (C E E C ) report to De­
partment of State, Sept. 22, 1947, outlining
agreement to production goals and requirements
from outside sources for period 1948-51; sum­
mary. 19U8— Jan. 40-42.
Evacuations. Great Britain. Unemployed workers re­
quired to register, order effective Sept. 18, 1940.
19U1— Jan. 101.
Evaporated-milk industry. Wage determination effec­
tive Nov. 3, 1941. 19U1— Nov. 1294.
Executive orders. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general; also under specific su b ject.
Expenditures, United States:
Construction. See Construction industry.
Consumer. By goods and services. (9 groups),
totals by year, 1939-43. 19U — July 152-153.
U
---------------- (12 groups), specified years 1929, 1933,
and 1937-43; percentage distribution. 19 U —
U
Oct. 857-859.
------- Changes in, 1945-49. 19U — Dec. 619-628.
S
------- Relationship to income, year 1948 compared
with 1939. 19U
S— Feb. 141-142.
------- See also Finances, consumer.
Consumer and Government, as percentage of gross
national product, 9 countries, 1938 and 1947.
ISU8— Nov. 470.
Durable goods expenditures, 1946-48; and buying
plans for 1947-49. (surveys of consumer fi­
nances). 19U7— Sept. 329-330; 19U8— Sept. 286;
19U9— Aug. 154-155.
Family. Surveys, 1947, procedures used. IS U —
S
Apr. 434-435.
Family spending. Comparisons, 1900-50. 1S50—
July 24.
Families of 2 or more. Birmingham, Ala. Average
money income, expenditures and savings, by in­
come class, 1945. Comparison with mid-1930’s.
19U8— June 622-626. Correction (p. 624). 1SU8—
Nov. 518.
------- By income class and by item, 1944. 1SU6—
Jan. 1—
4.
-------Denver, Colo. Average money income, expendi­
tures, and savings, 1948, by net income class.
19U — Dec. 634-635.
S
------- Detroit, Mich. Average money income, ex­
penditures, and savings, 1948, by net income
class. 19U
S— Bee. 632-633.
------- Houston, Tex. Average money income, ex­
penditures, and savings, 1948, by net income
class. 19U — Dec. 636-637.
S
-------Indianapolis, Ind. Average money income, ex­
penditures, and savings, 1945, by income class.
Comparison with mid-1930’s. 19U8—June 622626.
------- Los Alamos, N. Mex. Income, expenditures
by major category, and savings, 1948, by se­
lected net income class. 19U9— Sept. 247-250.
------- Manchester, N. H. Average money income,
savings, actual and percentage distribution of

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
expenditures; clothing per person and per fam­
ily, by sex-age groups; foods and alcoholic bev­
erages; and housing and household operations;
1947; by net income class. 191+9— Apr. 396, June
625, 628, Aug. 117-121, 124, Oct. 383.
---------------- Surpluses and deficits in relation to in­
come and expenditures, average amount and per­
centage reporting, 1947. 191+9— July 34-36.
------- Portland, Oreg. Average money income, ex­
penditures, and savings, 1945, by income class.
Comparison with mid-1930,s. 191+8—June 622626.
------- Richmond, Va. Clothing expenditures per
person and per family, 1947, by net income
class and sex-age groups. 191+9— Aug. 117-121,
123.
---------------- Food and alcoholic beverages; housing
and household operation; 1947; by net income
class. 191+9— June 624, 626-629, Oct. 382.
------- ------- Surpluses and deficits in relation to
income and expenditures, average amount and
percentage reporting, 1947. 191+9—July 34-36.
------- ------- White and Negro, average money in­
come, savings, actual and percentage distribu­
tion of expenditures, 1947, by net income class.
Apr. 394-395.
------- Washington, D. C. Clothing per person and
per family, 1947, by net income class. 191+9—
Aug. 117-121, 122.
---------------- Food and alcoholic beverages; housing
and household operation; 1947; by net income
class. 191+9— June 623, 626-629, Oct. 380-381.
------- ------- Surpluses and deficits in relation to
income and expenditures, average amount and
percentage reporting, 1947. 191+9— July 34-36.
---------------- White and Negro, average money in­
come, savings, actual and percentage distribu­
tion of expenditures, 1947, by net income class.
191+9— Apr. 389-393.
Food. See Cost of living, U. S.— Food.
Footwear. Children, 2-16 years of age, selected
family-income levels, 1947. 191+9— Aug. 125.
Government. Cash payments to public, 1948 com­
pared with 1947; defense expenditures, 1948;
outlook for 1949. 191+9— Feb. 142.
-------Federal, State and local. Actual revenues and
expenditures for specified years; estimate for
1950. 191+7— Feb. 173-175.
Home ownership, nonfarm families, relation to
income; expenditures for repairs and additions
and other items, 1947. 191+8— Nov. 516.
Housing. Renter and owner families. Costs as
percent of total family spending, selected in­
come levels, 1947; Washington, D. C., Richmond,
Va., and Manchester, N. H. 191+9— Oct. 377-384.
------- ------- Expenditures, including fuel, by city
families, 1941 and 1944, by family size and
income class. 191+7— May 868-877.
------- Rents, nonfarm dwellings, 1944 and 1946.
191+8— Dec. 633.
Living expenses. See Cost of living; also Prices—
Consum ed price index.
Nurses, private duty and institutional; amounts
reported and items covered. 191+7— Nov. 548.
Personal consumption, quarterly and annually, by
type, and in relation to disposable income, 1945

to 1949 (Denartmexit of Commerce estimates).
622-624.

191+9— Dec.

Portland, Maine. Average, by item, selected fam­
ilies, 1934-36. 191+8— Dec. 632.
Savings, use of in purchase of consumer durable
goods and housing, 1946, estimated. 191+6— Aug.
256-258.




59

Single consumers. Birmingham, Ala., Indianapolis,
and Portland, Oreg. Average money income,
expenditures, and savings, 1945, by net income
class. Comparison, mid-1930’s. 191+8— June 623.
------- By income class and by item, 1944. 191+6—
Jan. 1-2, 4-5.
------- Denver, Colo., Detroit, Mich., and Houston,
Tex. Average money income, expenditures, and
savings, 1948, by net income class. 191+9— Dec.
639.
------- Los Alamos, N. Mex. Income, expenditures,
and savings, 1948. 191+9— Sept. 250-251.
-------Washington, D. C., Richmond, Va., and Man­
chester, N. H. Average money income, savings,
actual and percentage distribution of expendi­
tures, 1947. 191+9— Apr. 397.
War. By year, 1939-43; by quarter, 1942 and
1943; and relation to gross national product.
19 + + July 152.
11—
Expenditures. Great Britain. Percent of gross na­
tional product, 1944, 1945, and 1947, compared with
1938. 191+8— Aug, 118.
Explosives industry. Manufacture of TN T, D N T, black
powder, smokeless powder, and dynamite. Descrip­
tion of products, characteristics and development of
industry, working conditions, earnings and hours,
and scope of 1944 BLS survey. 191+6— Mar. 603-617.
Export-Import Bank of Washington (United States
Government). Transferred to Office of Economic
Welfare by Executive order of July 15, 1943. 191+8—
Sept. 470.
Exports:
Dollar volume in 1939; estimate for 1950. 191+7—
Feb. 184-187.
Effects of on employment levels, first 6 months
1947; basic steps used in preparing estimates.
191+7— Dec. 675-678.
Employment resulting from, by industry group,
1939. 191+8— July 37-38.
Total, year 1948; surplus 1948 and 1947, reasons
for decline. 191+9— Feb. 142.
“ Extra” workers. Postwar labor force. Excess over
“ normal” by sex and age group, April 1945. 191+5—
Nov. 841-847.
Fabricated structural steel industry. See Iron and steel
industry.
Fabrics. Cotton, nylon, rayon, silk, and wool. Postwar
improvement in quality, following removal of war­
time restrictions. 191+8— July 34-37.
Fact-finding activities of Bureau of Labor Statistics.
191+5— May 927-953.
Fact-finding boards. See Labor-management disputes.
Factory workers. See Wages and hours, United States.
Fair employment practice:
Connecticut. State antidiscrimination law, 1947.
Provisions; role of Interracial Commission in
administration. 191+7— Aug. 198, Sept. 278.
Federal committee. See Committee on Fair Em­
ployment Practices.
New York City. Local Council of State Commis­
sion Against Discrimination. Organization plans,
Apr. 10, 1947. 191+7— June 1069-1070.
New York State. Antidiscrimination law, 1945.
Methods used in administration and success
of conciliation work, first year of operation.
191+7— Jan. 24-27.
------- Commission Against Discrimination. Local
agencies formed. 191+7— June 1069-1070.
Oregon. State antidiscrimination law, 1947. Pro­
visions; role of State Department of Education
in administration. 191+7— Aug. 198-199, Sept.
278.

60

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Fair Labor Standards A ct:
Agricultural, horticultural, and dairy products.
Area-of-production regulations amended, effec­
tive Apr. 1, 1941. 194,1— May 1253.
Amendments. 1940, to allow lowering of minimum
rate in Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands below
rates in effect in U. S. 1941— Mar. 654, Sept.
717.
------- 1941, increasing hours limit to 2,080 during
year. 1942— Mar. 698.
------- 1949; 75-cent minimum effective Jan. 25,
1950; summary of provisions. 1949— Nov. IV,
Dec. 666-667; 1950— Feb. 128.
Child labor. Control of, in interstate industries.
Percent illegally employed, year ended June 30,
1948; total number illegally employed and per­
cent by age group, during first 10 years’ opera­
tion of act. 1948— Dec. 589-595.
------- National standard for employment estab­
lished by; provisions. 1947— Dec. 672.
Decisions concerning. See Court decisions.
Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act. 1948— Sept. 274.
Hazardous Occupations Orders, with effective
dates. Order No. 4 extended to most jobs in
pulpwood logging, effective Feb. 2, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 410.
Minimum-wage orders. See Minimum wage, spe­

cific industry affected.
Operations under. 1940, 1941, and first 10 years;
summaries. 1941— Apr. 969-970; 1942— May
1190-1192; 1948— Sept. 271-274.
Proposals to amend, and estimates furnished by
BLS of rates paid factory workers summer of
1945. 1945— Sept. 529-530.
Recognition of collective bargaining; use of tri­
partite industry committees. 1947— May 852.
State statutes of limitations for suits under.
Changes in 1947. 1947— Sept. 277, 283-284.
Wage claims. State statutes of limitations. See
Legislation, U. S., Federal and general; and by
States, fo r specified State.
Wage orders. Employees affected by statutory
rate effective Oct. 24, 1939, by industry, July
1, 1941. 1941— Aug. 478-479.
Working conditions for women bettered under.
1948— Apr. 409.
Families:
Composition of, in relation to income, in cities.
1946— Feb. 175-180.
Size. Decline from 1930 to 1940, preliminary fig­
ures, Sixteenth Census. 1941— Apr. 932-934.
Family allowances, United States:
Extent of movement to provide, including certain
bills introduced in 79th Congress. Summary.
1945— Nov. 946-948.
Military. Enlisted men in Armed Forces. Act
approved June 23, 1942, provisions. 1 9 4 2 — Aug.
226-228.
------- Provisions of system in comparison with
systems in Great Britain and Canada. 1946—
July 94-97.
------- Servicemen’s dependents. Liberalization of
provisions by act of Oct. 26, 1943, and compar­
ison of new and former rates. 1944—Jan . 67-69.
------- Total amount of Government’s share, speci­
fied months to April 1946. 1 9 4 6 — Mar. 507,
June 986-987.
Public-school systems. Extent of use of allow­
ances, or married men’s differentials; teachers’
attitudes
concerning.
1 9 4 5 — Nov.
946-947;
1946—
Aug. 243-246.
Salvation Army officers. 1948— Aug. 270-271.




Family allowances, foreign countries:
General. Endorsement of, in recommendation of
International Labor Conference, April 1944.
1944— Nov. 995.
------- Summaries of developments, 1942-45, by
country. 1948— Aug. 265-276; 1944— Nov. 982995; 1945— Nov. 930-946.
------- World Trade-Union Conference (London,
February 1945). Committee declaration, includ­
ing social-security program. 1945— Nov. 948949.
------- See also Legislation, foreign countries.
Argentina (Buenos Aires). Bank employees, law
of 1940, provisions; private companies having
systems, 1942. 1948— Aug. 270.
-------Municipal employees (permanent). System ef­
fective in September 1943. 1944— Nov. 983.
------- National Administration employees. Decrees
of July 1943 and November 1943, provisions.
1944— Nov. 983.
Australia. Child-Endowment Act assented to Apr.
7, 1941. Provisions; and features of system.
1941— Sept. 718-719; 1948— Aug. 275-276.
------- Operation of system for first 3 years, sta­
tistics. 1944— Nov. 983; 1945— Nov. 932-934.
------- Victoria. Endowment plan proposed to State
Parliament, 1940. 1941— May 1211.
Belgium. Features of system summarized. 1948—
Aug. 266-275.
------- Part-time workers with dependents, assigned
to work under 75 percent of normal time; rates.
1941— Oct. 899-900.
------- Social security legislation, 1944, provisions.
1945— Nov. 938.
------- Systems in effect from 1915, and legislation
provided in 1928 and 1938. 1944— Feb. 288.
Brazil. Constitutional provisions concerning. 1948—
Aug. 276.
------- Children’s allowances, increase in number,
1944. 1945— Nov. 945.
------- Decrees of November 1943, summary of pro­
visions. 1944— Nov. 983-984.
Bulgaria. Mobilized men. Regulations under law
of May 1940. 1941— Jan. 92.
------- System, general established August 1942,
features; system for workers in State services
prior to 1930. 1948— Aug. 268-274, Oct. 679-680.
Canada. Armed forces. Increases in amounts, in­
cluding additional grants for large families.
1943— June 1114-1116.
------- Army, Air Force, and Navy personnel. Sum­
mary of provisions. 1941— Nov. 1156-1158.
-------Law of August 1944. Summary of provisions.
1944— Nov. 996-997; 1945—-Nov. 934-936.
------- Military. Provisions of system in comparison
with systems in United States and Great Bri­
tain. 1946— July 94-97.
Chile. Classes covered by Government and private
schemes. Summary. 1944— Nov. 984.
------- Coverage under system operated under laws
of 1937 and 1941. 1943— Aug. 270.
------- Dependents’ allowance fixed by 1944 decree.
1945—
Nov. 945.
Czechoslovakia. Act of Dec. 13, 1945, provisions.
1946—
Aug. 247.
Denmark. Cost-of-living allowances, 1 9 44 -4 5. 1945—
Nov. 938-939.
Eire. Children’s Allowance Act, 1944. Provisions
summarized. 1944— Nov. 985.
Finland. Legislation of 1943 and 1946, provisions
summarized. 1944— Nov. 985; 1946— Aug. 247248.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Plan suggested in report of Committee on
Population appointed by Government. 1941—
Sept. 719.
France. Features of system summarized. 1943—
Aug. 266-274.
------- Increase in rates, effective 6 months begin­
ning Sept. 1, 1944, granted by ordinance of Oct.
17, 1944; and postwar increases. 1945— May
1077; 1947— Aug. 149, 152, 154-157.
------- Seine department (Paris included). Amounts
provided, 1939-47. 1947— Aug. 152.
------- Status during World W ar II summarized.
1944— Nov. 985-987; 1945— Nov. 939-941.
Germany. Features of system. 1948— Aug. 269,
275-276.
------- Military. Laws of August 1938, and July
1939. Provisions. 1948— Dec. 1129-1130.
------- Provisions in effect during World W ar, con­
cerning transferred Belgian workers, French
workers, and shifted German workers. 1944—
Nov. 987-988.
------- System modified by ordinance effective Jan.
1, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1289-1290.
Great Britain. Act of June and regulations issued
January 1946; Provisions summarized. 1945—
Nov. 931-932; 1946— Aug. 248.
-------Attitude toward establishment o f; systems of
private companies and certain groups. 1943—
Aug. 267-272.
------- “ Beveridge Plan,” 1942, recommendations in,
and Government program, 1944, summarized.
1944— -Nov. 988-989.
-------Labor Party proposal for scheme summarized.
1941— Sept. 720-722.
-------Military. Increases, 1940 and 1941, in soldiers’
grants. 1941— Jan. 90, Sept. 720; 1942— Feb.
388-389.
----------------Provision of system in comparison with
systems in United States and Canada. 1946—
July 94-97.
------- Payments of, beginning August 1946; under
June 1945 law. 1947— Sept. 287.
-------“ White paper” issued June 1942 estimating
cost of plan. Summary. 1942— Aug. 243-244.
Hungary. Features of system. 1943— Aug. 268-275.
------- System provided for by law effective Jan. 1,
1939. 1943— June 1076.
Italy. Expenditures, 1922-42, October 1942 report.
I W — Nov. 989.
------- Legislation affecting, 1934 to 1941; provi­
sions summarized. 1943— Nov. 922-923.
------- Scale established November 1944, by decree;
amounts payable, March 1945. 1945— May 1013,
Nov. 941-942.
------- System established by 1936 and 1937 laws,
and changes made by August 1940 law. 1942—
Jan. 213-215; 1943— Aug. 268-275.
Japan. Plan decided upon in 1940, summary of.
1945— Oct. 667.
------- Textile industries’ use of plan; Government
scheme proposed in 1940. 1943— Aug. 271-273.
Latvia. Agriculture. Laws of May and December
1939, provisions. 1943— Aug. 270-272.
Luxemburg. Plan included in proposed social-in­
surance reorganization. 1944— Nov. 989.
Monaco, Principality of. Existence of system
in private industry prior to World W ar II.
1943— Aug. 271.
Netherlands. Law of December 1939 establishing
system; coverage. 1943— Aug. 268-274; 1944—
Jan. 43.
New Zealand. Laws of 1939, 1941, 1943, and 1944,
provisions summarized. 1943— Aug. 267, 276;
1944— Nov. 989; 1945— Nov. 936-937.




61

Norway. Decree of January 1944, by Quisling
Minister of Social Affairs; provisions. 1944—
Nov. 990.
------- Necessity for establishment of, after German
occupation. 1944— Sept. 504.
------- Wage supplement, 1945 resolution. 1945—
Nov. 942.
Paraguay. System in effect in 1943, provisions.
1944— Nov. 990.
Portugal. Legislation of 1942, 1943, and 1944;
provisions summarized. 1943— Aug. 268-275;
1944— Nov. 990-991.
Rumania. Soldiers not higher than sergeant, law
of 1940; workers in paper, cellulose, and card­
board factories, system effective Apr. 1, 1943.
1943— Dec. 1107.
Soviet Union. Aid to mothers. Provisions sum­
marized. 1944— Nov. 991-992.
South Africa, Union of. Scheme proposed, Feb­
ruary 1944, by Social Security Committee ap­
pointed in January 1943. Provisions summarized.
i P ^ _ N o v . 993; 1945— Nov. 937.
------- Soldiers’ dependents. State and employers’
contributions and Governor General’s National
W ar Fund. 1941— Oct. 889-892.
Spain. Coverage and expenditure, 1942 and 1944.
1945— Nov. 943.
-------Increases under decree, February 1941 . 1941—
Nov. 1291.
------- Legislation of 1938-40 and 1942-43; provi­
sions summarized. 1943— Aug. 268-275; 1944—
Nov. 992.
Sweden. Attitude toward family and child prob­
lems. 1944— Nov. 993.
-------Children’s allowance, scheme proposed. 1945—
Nov. 943.
------- Effective Jan. 1, 1948. 1947— Oct. 432.
------- Soldiers’ grants. Needs covered and adminis­
trative provisions. 1941— Jan. 91-92.
Switzerland. Men in military service, under orders
issued Dec. 28, 1940. 1941— Nov. 1166-1167.
------- Metal and engineering industries. Status in
1943. 1944— Nov. 993.
------- Vaud law, coverage and provisions, 1944.
1945— Nov. 944.
Turkey. Provided for needy large families by
Government. 1942— Aug. 246.
------- Public Health Act, provisions concerning.
1943— Aug. 276.
Uruguay. Law of Nov. 12, 1943. Provisions sum­
marized; progress under, to end of summer 1944.
1944— Feb. 346, Nov. 964, 994-995.
Yugoslavia. Croatia. Changes in provisions, 1943.
1943— Nov. 904.
------- Provisions for (including soldiers’ allow­
ances), 1923-43. Summary. 1943— Nov. 903-904.
Family budgets. See Budgets, cost of living.
Family expenditures. See Expenditures— Families.
Farm labor. See Agriculture.
Farm Security Administration (U. S. Government):
Activities for betterment of low-income and migra­
tory families, 1933-41. 1941— Dec. 1368-1387.
Housing work of 6 years summarized and regular
and defense activities in 1941 outlined. 1941—
Oct. 927-930.
Management of projects, problems discussed. 1941—
Oct. 930.
Farmers’ marketing associations. See Cooperatives.
Fatigue:
Great Britain. Factories. Preventive measures dis­
cussed in report of Industrial Health Research
Board, 1943. 1944— July 85-86.
United States. Motortruck drivers, interstate.
Tests made by Public Health Service, May 1938,
results of. 1941— Sept. 667-669.

62

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Federal employees, United States. See Government
employees.
Federal Housing Administration (U . S. Government).
Mortgages insured and property improvement loans,
August 1934 to December 1940. 1942— Oct. 752-755.
Federal Interagency Committee on Migrant Labor.
Summary of report; recommendations. 1947— July
70-71.
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (U. S.
Government). See Conciliation and arbitration.
Federal policy in the South. Effect of policy set forth
in report prepared for the President’s Council of
Economic Advisers; summary of economic develop­
ment, agricultural expansion, industrialization, natu­
ral resources, fiscal policy, and foreign trade;
author’s recommendations. 1949— Nov. 533-536.
Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (U. S. Government):
Production, by industry, year ended June 30, 1945.
1946— Aug. 217-218.
Training and employment program, report on,
June 30, 1949. 1950— Aug. 241-242.
Work in fiscal year 1940 summarized. 1941— June
1454-1455.
Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. Union-security
provision. National W ar Labor Board decision.
1942— June 1350-1351.
Federal troops, use of, in strikes. Summary of in­
stances, 1877 to 1941. 1941— Sept. 561-571.
Fellowships. U. S. Department of Commerce offer of,
to qualified citizens of other American countries.
Summary of plan. 1944— Oct. 822.
Ferrous foundries. See Foundries— Ferrous.
Fertilizer industry (see also Wages and hours):
Characteristics, degree of unionization, and nature
and scope of BLS survey, January 1943. 1943—
Aug. 337-340.
Man-hours expended to produce, per ton, mixed
fertilizer and superphosphate, 1939-46; trends,
by type of labor, product, and plant size. 1948—
Sept. 258-260.
Shift differentials, extent of use; workweek, length
of, 1948. 1948— Nov. 505.
Work injuries. Frequency rates; major agencies
involved in accidents; unsafe working conditions,
unsafe acts; 1946. 1948— Dec. 606-611.
Finance establishments, employment and earnings. See
Employment statistics, and Wages and hours.
Finances, consumer ( see also Expenditures and
Income):
Spending units. Distribution by income groups,
1945-48 (Federal Reserve estimates). 1949—
Dec. 626-627.
------- Savers and dissavers, 1946 and 1947; per­
centage, by income group; nonliquid assets,
holdings of. 1947— Nov. 538-539; 1948— Nov.
515.
Surveys (Board of Governors, Federal Reserve
System). Intentions to buy and actual purchases
compared with results two previous surveys;
price expectations and expenditures; July 1947.
1948— Feb. 185.
------- 1947 to 1950. Summaries of findings. 1947—
Sept. 329-331; 1948— Sept. 286-287; 1949— Aug.
154-155; 1950— Aug. 239-240.
Ownership of liquid assets, and consumer income,
1948 (1949 survey). 1949— Oct. 402-404.
Financial reports by unions. Compulsory filing. State
laws requiring. Summary, early i947. 1947— June
1052-1056.
Fingerprinting. Dispensations for (New York State)
granted employers under law of January 1942.
1943— Jan. 39.
Fire-department employees. Working conditions sum­
marized, July 1, 1938. 1941— July 185-186.
Firemen’s salaries. See Wages and hours.




Fishing industry:
Alaska. Rights of Indians established by legisla­
tion and self-sustaining colony on Annette
Islands. 1942— Mar. 648.
Newfoundland. Cooperatives, development and sta­
tus, 1940. 1941— June 1438-1441.
Pacific Coast. Collective bargaining, history of.
1947— Apr. 657-660.
Puerto Rico. Methods used, difficulties faced, prob­
lems caused by war, and earnings of fishermen.
Summary. 1943— July 145-146.
Fixed income groups. Economic situation of. Investiga­
tion by Senate Subcommittee. Summary of report
(1944). 1944— July 83-84.
Fluorspar mining and milling. Characteristics of in­
dustry and scope and method of BLS wage survey.
1944— Mar. 588-590.
Food Administration (U . S. Government). Established
August 1917. Objectives, and activities 1917-18.
1941— Feb. 281-282.
Food and Agriculture Organization (of United N a­
tions). See United Nations Organizations.
Food, United States (see also Cost of Living; Prices) :
Consumption. Estimated average annual amount,
selected foods and all foods, 1901, 1909, and
1948 (table). 1950— July 25.
Preparation and types of consumption, 1900-50.
1950— July 24-25.
Supplies in independent retail stores, by month,
March to October 1945. 1945— May 954r-956,
June 1298-1299, July 128-129, Aug. 352-353,
Sept. 562-563, Oct. 790-791, Nov. 1011-1102,
Dec. 1232-1233.
Food, foreign countries (s ee also Cost of living) :
China. Production and consumption of farm prod­
ucts, Government measures and plans for post­
war period. 1943— June 1184-1187.
Germany, Italy, and Axis-occupied countries.
Average weekly rations, 1943, by country, item,
and class of consumer. 1943— 3 uly 37-39.
Germany. Supply and requirements. Conditions in
fall of 1945. 1946— Jan. 72-73.
Netherlands. Farmers forced (after German oc­
cupation) to join board organized in October
1941. 1944— Jan. 48.
South Africa, Union of. Control measures. Ex­
perience summarized. 1945— June 1217-1218.
World production, crop year 1947-48, outlook for
year 1948-49. 1948— Nov. 469.
Food canning and preserving industry. See Canning
and preserving industry.
Food-products machinery. Characteristics, and scope
of BLS survey, 1942. 1942— Dec. 1241-1243.
Footwear manufacturing (see also Wages and hours) :
Employment, production workers. Man-hours and
labor turn-over, February 1948-January 1949.
1949— Mar. 275-277.
Holidays, paid; vacations with pay; use of, Sep­
tember 1947. 1948— July 33-34.
Man-hours expended to produce, per pair, selected
types of shoes, by class of shoe and factory
price line, 1945; trends, by area and plant size.
1948— Sept. 256-258.
Postwar improvement in quality, following removal
of wartime restrictions. 1948— July 37.
Supplementary wage practices, October 1948
W 0 — Mar. 309.
Workweek, length of, September 1947. 1948—
July 33.
Forced labor. See Compulsory labor.
Ford Motor Co. (see also Collective agreements). Col­
lective bargaining between employer and employees;
major provisions of settlements, 1949-50. 1950—
Aug. 218-223.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Foreign aid program. Grants and credits of U. S. Gov­
ernment, foreign, 1947 and 1948; effects on World
economy. 191*8— Nov. 471.
Foreign Economic Administration (U. S. Government):
Establishment Sept. 25, 1943, by Executive order.
Powers and functions. 191*3— Nov. 936-937.
Surplus war property disposition (outside United
States) to be assigned to. 191*1*— Apr. 759.
Foreign labor conditions. S ee Working conditions,
foreign countries.
Foreign trade. Effect upon employment. Summary of
opinions concerning. 191*5— Nov. 858-862.
Foreign workers:
Aliens from North, Central, and South America.
Admission for wartime agricultural work; plans
for release. 191*3— July 124-125.
Farm employment of, during World W ar II, sum­
mary 1943. 191*3— July 124-125; 191*5— Sept. 450.
Jamaicans. Wartime use of, plan and experience;
release at end of period. 191*5— Nov. 848-857,
910.
Mexican track workers admitted for railroads, under
War Manpower Commission regulation of June
17, 1943; plans for return at end of war. 191*3—
Aug. 240-241; 191*5— Nov. 910.
Mexicans employed in Detroit. Characteristics,
and types of work done (Humphrey). 191*5—
Nov. 913-923.
Use of, during World W ar II, and discontinuance
after close of war. 191*5— Nov. 910.
Wartime recruits from Mexico, Barbados, Jamaica,
and British Honduras. Industries in which em­
ployed; plans for release to return to homes.
191*5— Nov. 848-857, 910.
Foreigners. See Aliens; Foreign workers; and Immi­
gration and emigration.
Foreman’s Association of America. See Labor organiza­
tions.
Foundries (see also Wages and hours):
Employment outlook. Products and operations,
economic characteristics; trends affecting. 191*5—
Dec. 1112-1131.
Ferrous. Holidays, paid; vacations with pay;
extent of provision for, November 1947. 191*8—
Mar. 288.
-------Workweek, length of, November 1947. 191*8—
Mar. 287.
Ferrous and nonferrous. Bonus, nonproduction;
vacation with pay; wage incentives; extent of,
October 1946. 191*7— Aug. 182-183.
Injuries and accident causes, 1942. 191*1*— Dec.
1170-1179.
Free enterprise, United States. Place in industrial
development of the United States. 1950— July 9.
Freedom. Principles endorsed by Allied and United
Nations, 1942 to 1945; record of progress in past;
proposals for advancement in future (State Depart­
ment outline). 191*5— July 39-43.
Frictional unemployment. See Unemployment.
Fuel Administration (U . S. Government). Established
autumn of 1917. Objectives and activities 1917-18.
191*1 — Feb. 282-284.
Fuel control. Australia. (New South W ales). Lay-offs,
temporary, prescribed to relieve shortage. Regula­
tions concerning employees’ rights. 191*5— Jan. 45-46.
Full employment. See Employment conditions.
Fur farms. Alaska (Aleutian Islands). Fox ranches
operated by Indians under Government protection.
191*2— Mar. 649.
Furniture industry (see also Wages and hours) :
Characteristics and method of 1941 BLS survey of
hourly earnings; correction in 2 details. 191*1—
Sept. 741-745; 191*2— Jan. 211.




63

Employment, production workers. Weekly hours
and labor turn-over, 1946-January 1949. 191*9—
Mar. 276-277.
Metal. Wage determination, effective July 28, 1941,
extended to additional metal articles, effective
May 13, 1939. 191*1— Nov. 1295.
Wood and upholstered. Holidays, paid, vacations
with pay, extent of provision for; workweek,
length o f; September 1947. 191*8— Apr. 400-401.
Wood. Minimum wage order, effective Nov. 3,
1941. 191*1— Nov. 1293.
Gardens, “ V ictory.” City fam ilies’, to aid food supply.
191*5— Oct. 644-650.
Gas and electricity. See Electric and gas utilities.
Gas industry. Accident experience in 1944. 191*6— Jan.
82-84.
Gas utilities:
Bonus (nonproduction), group insurance, pensions,
shift differentials, sick leave, vacation with pay.
Provision for, January 1947. 191*8— Jan. 57-58.
Price changes. See Prices— Fuels.
Wage incentives. Extent of use of, January 1947.
191*8— Jan. 57.
Gages, pressure and vacuum, manufacturing. Survey
by BLS, August 1942, scope and purpose of. 191*2—
Nov. 1021.
General Motors Corp., United States:
Collective bargaining with employer and provisions
of major settlements, 1949-50. 1950— Aug. 218224.
Dispute with United Automobile Workers of Amer­
ica (C IO ). Refusal of National W ar Labor
Board to act before other procedures exhausted,
i 91*2— June 1344.
Wage changes and related wage practices. 193949. 191*9— Sept. 259-264.
George-Barden Act of 1946, providing funds for voca­
tional guidance. 191*8— Dec. 599.
Glassmaking industry, United States. Progress, techni­
cal, of twentieth century compared with former
years. 1950— July 6, 13-14.
Glassware industry (see also Wages and hours) :
Bonus, nonproduction; group insurance; paid
lunch periods; pensions; shift differentials; sick
leave; and vacations, with pay. Extent of pro­
vision for, January 1947. 194.7— Nov. 551.
Characteristics, findings based on BLS study of
earnings in January 1947. 191*7— Nov. 549-550.
Glove industry. Definition, growth, composition of force,
home work, and method of BLS survey. 1941. 1942—
Mar. 711-721.
Glove (woven and knitted, and leather) industry.
Puerto Rico. Minimum-wage order effective Feb. 19,
1941. 1941— Apr. 970.
Glycerin manufacturing. See Soap manufacturing.
Gompers’ centennial. Tribute by President Truman,
labor and government officials, to memory of Samuel
Gompers, labor leader, on centennial anniversary of
his birth, Jan. 27, 1950. 1950— Feb. IV.
Government, United States:
Labor-management relations, role in, 1900-50.
1950— July 51-61.
Labor role in, 1940-50. 1950— July 66-67.
Government employees, United States:
Employment trends, government and industrial,
1929-47. 1947— Dec. 645-649.
Federal. Classified positions, salaries. See Wages
and hours— Federal employees.
------- Employment. See Employment statistics.
------- Executive Service. Employment and average
annual salaries, by pay-fixing authority, July
1946 and July 1947. 1948— July 12.

64

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Government employees, U. S.— Continued
Federal. Classified positions, salaries. Percentage
distribution, by basis of salary payment, July
1947. 1948— July 15.
-------Improvements in status under amendments to
Civil Service Retirement Act, 1948. 1948-M ay 531.
------- Mechanical and labor positions. Methods of
determining rates paid. Summary. 1944— Nov.
1063-1069.
------- Military branch. Basic annual compensation
prior to and beginning Oct. 1, 1949 (table).
1950— Mar. 297.
---------------- Personnel and total pay. See Employ­
ment statistics— Federal service.
------- Occupations, salaries, and numbers employed,
summary, Dec. 31, 1938 (Smith and W right).
1941— Jan. 66-85.
------- Pay scales, civilian and military. Effects of
Public Laws 429, 428, and 351, Eighty-first
Congress, October 1949; summary. 1950— Mar.
295-298.
------- Percentage distribution of pay-fixing author­
ity and basic annual salary group, 1946-47.
1948— July 14.
-------Personnel and payrolls, by detailed functional
classification, December 1939 and 1940 (Murphy
and Gordon). 1941— June 1360-1374.
-------Postal service. Annual salary rates of perma­
nent employees, selected positions, prior to and
after Nov. 1, 1949 (table). 1950— Mar. 296.
------- Real wages. Average annual salaries in
current and 1939 dollars, July 1946 and July
1947; comparison with gains in manufacturing
industries. 1948— July 12-13.
------- Strikes. Prohibition from participation, and
penalties imposed, under section 305 of Labor
Management Relations A ct; clarification of, by
Civil Service Commission. 1947— July 62, Oct. 440.
Federal, State, and local. Number employed. See
Employment statistics.
State legislation. See Legislation, U. S., by States,

for specified State.
Strikes. State legislation, 1947, prohibiting. 1947—
Sept. 281.
Government employees. Colombia. Benefits for. Law
effective March 1945, provisions. 1945— Aug. 296.
Government enterprise. Canada (Saskatchewan). Nat­
ural Resources Department Act amended, 1944. Pro­
visions. 1945— Jan. 131.
Government regulations. See Legislation.
Government seizure of plants, instances of. 1943— Aug.
290-294; 1945— May 1035-1036; 1946— July 84-86,
Aug. 172; 1948— June 644-645.
Government workers. See Government employees.
Gradualism, United States: Role in labor organizations,
1900-50. 1950— July 40-41.
Grain-milling industry. Shift differentials; wage in­
centives, use of; workweek, length o f; January 1948.
1948— July 32.
Grain-mill products industries. Characteristics, union­
ization, and scope and method of BLS survey. 1942—
Apr. 1006-1013, 1016.
Great Lakes Shipping companies. Employees granted
increase by National W ar Labor Board decision,
June 16, 1942. 1942— Sept. 486.
Greenbelt communities:
Area, housing facilities, and cost, F S A program.
1941— Dec. 1374-1376.
Cooperative homebuilding plan inaugurated July
1940. 1941— Feb. 319-321.
Greenbelt Homeowners Cooperative, Inc. Nonprofit
housing plan, summary. 1941— Feb. 320-321.
Groceries, wholesale. Holidays, paid: vacations with
pay; extent of provision for. Workweek, length of.
July 1947. 1948— Mar. 288.




Group insurance ( see also specific type of) :
Automobile repair shops, general. Life- and healthinsurance programs; extent of provisions, July
1946. 1 9 4 7 — May 828.
Candy and other confectionery. Extent of provi­
sion, January 1947. 1948— Apr. 397.
Chemical (industrial) industry. Extent of provi­
sion and benefits offered, January 1946. 1946—
Nov. 749.
Clothing workers. Amalgamated Insurance Fund
financed by employers, providing life, accident,
and health protection. 1944— Aug. 335.
------- Coats and suits, men’s. Extent and methods
of provision, August-September 1948. 1949—
Feb. 192.
Collective agreements. January-June 1949; unions
having or advocating benefit plans. 1949— Sept.
239-240.
------- 1948 agreements; provisions, methods of
financing, workers covered. 1949— Feb. 146.
Cost sharing. Plans, 1949. 1950— Mar. 298-299.
------- Distribution of 191 plans by type of selected
benefits and by financial participation (table).
1950— Mar. 299.
Cotton garment industry. Extent of provision,
September 1947. 1948—June 629.
Cotton-textile manufacturing. Extent of provision,
spring 1946. 1947— Mar. 461.
Dyeing and finishing, textiles. Life, accident or
health insurance; extent of provisions for, July
1946. 1947— June 1039.
Electric and gas utilities. Extent of use, M archApril 1948. 1948— Oct. 380.
Electric light and power industry. Extent of use,
and benefit offered, July 1945. 1946— Sept. 379.
Electroplating and polishing industry. Extent of
provision and benefits offered. 1946— May 774775.
E m ployed obligation to bargain collectively on;
NLRB ruling in W . W . Cross and Co. case.
1948— Sept. 234.
Financial participation. See Cost sharing, this

section.
Foundries. Life-insurance provisions most common
in plans. 1946— July 66.
------- Ferrous and nonferrous. Life or health in­
surance; extent of provision for, 1946. 1947—
Aug. 183.
Furniture plants, September 1949. 1950— Mar. 292.
Gas utilities. Extent of provision, January 1947.
1948— Jan. 58.
Glassware industry. Extent of provision, January
1947. 1947— Nov. 551.
Life insurance, home offices. Extent of provision,
January 1947. 1948— Jan. 13.
Machinery industries. Extent of provision and
benefits offered, January 1945 and October 1946.
1946— Feb. 276; 1947— Sept. 320.
Machine-tool accessories industry. Extent of pro­
vision and benefits offered, January 1945. 1946—
Mar. 450.
Machine-tool industry. Extent of provision and
benefits offered. 1946— June 944.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Extent of percentage distribution of establish­
ments, by type of plan and region, 1945-46.
1947—
July 53-57.
Meat products industries. Extent of use, January
1947. 1948— Mar. 286.
Metal furniture industry. Extent of provision,
January 1947. 1947— Oct. 449.
Metalworking industries. Office workers. Extent
of provision and benefits offered. 1946— July 60.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Mining, coal (bituminous). Extent of provision
and benefits offered. 1946— Apr. 556.
Nurses. General staff; extent of provision, October
1946. 1947— Nov. 548.
------- Public health. Extent of provision, October
1946. 1947— Sept. 303.
Office workers. Atlanta, Memphis, and Oklahoma
City, January-February 1950. 1950— June 632.
------- New York City. Extent of provision, JanuaryFebruary 1948. 1948— July 29.
------- Women, January-May 1949. 1949— Nov. 528.
Petroleum industry, refining. Provisions for, 1948.
1949— July 25.
Railroad workers. Sickness and maternity benefits
for, July 1947. 1947— Aug. 194-195.
Rayon and silk industry. Life- and health-insur­
ance programs; extent of provisions, June-July
1946. 1947— May 823.
Sawmills in the South. Life- or health-insurance
programs; extent of provisions, October 1946.
1947—
June 1083.
Servicemen’s rights to participate in employer’s
plans equally with employees on leave-of-absence
status. 1942— Dec. 1153-1154.
Steel, fabricated structural, industry. Extent of
provision and benefits offered. 1946— Apr. 630.
Structural clay products industry. Extent of pro­
vision and character of benefits offered. 1946—
Aug. 216.
Tobacco industry. Cigars. Extent of use and bene­
fits offered, January 1946. 1947— Jan. 52.
------- Plans, 1949, A F L Tobacco workers. 1949—
Oct. 371-376.
Wholesale drugs and allied products; extent of
provision, January 1947. 1947— Nov. 554.
Women’s blouse and waist industry. Extent of use,
January 1947. 1947— Sept. 316.
Woolen and worsted industry. Extent of use, and
character of benefits offered. 1947— Mar. 468.
Guaranteed employment or wage. See Employment
stabilization.
Guaranteed wages:
Collective bargaining agreements. Plans, definition,
history, limitations, and provisions. 1950— Jan.
26-30.
Connecticut. Order establishing, for beauty cul­
ture. 1948— Sept. 276.
District of Columbia. Orders establishing, for
retail trade and beauty culture. 1948— Sept. 276.
Iron and Steel Committee, International Labor
Organization, Geneva, November 1949. Resolu­
tion on definition, purpose, method of applying,
and cost of plan. 1950— Mar. 281-282.
Minnesota. Order establishing, for retail trade.
1948— Sept. 276.
New York. Orders establishing, for laundry, beauty
culture, and cleaning and dyeing industries.
1 9 4 8 — Sept. 276.
North Dakota. Orders establishing, for laundry and
cleaning and dyeing industries. 1948— Sept. 276.
Orders establishing and industries covered 194748; summary. 1948— Sept. 276-277.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Provisions
for weekly guaranty in collective agreements,
1946. 1947— Aug. 160.
Seaboard Airline Railroad. Origin, terms, adminis­
tration, operation, and evaluation of plan;
summary. 1 9 4 7 — Aug. 167-171.
Utah. Order establishing, for retail trade. 1948—
Sept. 276.
W ar Mobilization and Reconversion, Office of.
Study by Advisory Board, recommendations con­
cerning, in report to President, issued by White
House, Apr. 27, 1947. 1 9 4 7 — July 40.




65

Guaranteed wage, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Building construction operatives.
Amendment to working rules of British Na­
tional Joint Council for Building Industry,
Mar. 27, 1945. Provisions. 1945— July 71-72.
------- Wages Council Act, March 1945; trade
boards’ powers, enlargement of, to permit paid
holidays and fix guaranteed wage. 1947— Sept.
291.
------- Wages Councils given power to establish.
1946— July 121.
Guaranteed workweek. Great Britain. Details of plan;
estimated number of workers covered by in 1947.
1947— Sept. 286.
Gypsum products:
Characteristics of industry; findings based on BLS
study, late in 1946, of 18 plants or 40 percent
of year’s production. 1947— Oct. 453-456.
Man-hour requirements, per unit of product, by
major operation, 1946. 1947— Oct. 453-454.
Hair-net industry. Puerto Rico. Minimum-wage rate
set, effective May 19, 1941. 1941— Oct. 990.
Handicapped workers, United States:
Civilian disabled. Rehabilitation and placement
under Vocational Rehabilitation Act amendments
of 1943. 1946— June 1231-1235.
Continuance in employment but at lighter work,
after injury and award of workmen’s compensa­
tion, required by arbitrator and upheld by court.
1948— July 129-130.
Employment in war industries. Reserve available;
placements 1940-43; methods of meeting prob­
lems involved; social aspects. 1948— Sept. 435443.
Fact-finding activities of Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics concerning. 1946— May 944-945.
Factory positions. Efficiency, absenteeism, injuryfrequency, and labor turn-over records, and
placement experience. Results of 1944 survey by
Federal agencies summarized. 1944— Oct. 677683.
Jewelry industry. Home work permitted through
exception, in minimum-wage order effective Nov.
1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 715.
Jobs for, through collective bargaining; advocated
by A F L . 1947— Aug. 205.
Placements. By U. S. Employment Service, year
1944, summary. 1946— May 1008-1009.
------- Total, by type of disability, June 1948, and
October 1942-June 1948. 1948— Sept. 284.
Rehabilitation and placement o f; Federal agencies
and private groups, work of. 1948— Sept. 2 82285.
Second-injury funds; new permanent impairments
handled under, in certain States; degree of
compensation. 1948— Jan. 33.
Subminimum rates provided under Fair Labor
Standards Act made effective also by amend­
ments to Public Contracts Act determinations,
September 1942. 1942— Oct. 843-844.
Utilization of, postwar period, Western Europe.
1947— Dec. 682-683.
Veterans; training and placement. See Veterans.
W ar industry, employment in. Experimental clinic
of Connecticut Department of Education. 1942—
June 1327-1328.
------- Extent of practice, 1940-43, and methods
used. 1948— Sept. 435-443.
Work performance, absenteeism, and injury ex­
perience; medical examinations, exclusion rules,
and placement practices. BLS survey, prelimi­
nary and final findings. 1946— Dec. 918-923;
1947— Feb. 233 (correction); 1948— Jan. 31-33.

66

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Handicapped workers, New Zealand. Veterans, dis­
abled. Provisions for, under 1941 Rehabilitation Act.
1945— Jan. 68-69.
Handicrafts. French Indo-China. Summary of condi­
tions prior to World W ar II. 1944— July 51-52.
Hanna, Hugh S. Deceased, January 9, 1948. Retired
editor, Monthly Labor Review. 194.8— Jan. II.
Hardwood flooring. Man-hour requirements by opera­
tion process and plant department, 1945 and 1946.
Characteristics of industry and method of laborrequirements survey, 1947. 1947— July 49-50.
Harriman report. See European Recovery Program.
H at (straw) industry. Puerto Rico. Wage order under
Fair Labor Standards Act, effective May 12, 1941.
1941— June 1487-1488.
Havana Charter. See International Trade Organiza­
tion— Charter.
Hazards, industrial or occupational. See Accident
prevention— Hazards, and Occupations— Hazardous.
Health, United States:
Aging as an industrial problem and factors in
maintenance of health. 1941— Sept. 672-674.
Arizona. Migratory workers. Agricultural Workers
Health and Medical Association. 1942— Nov. 957959.
Benefit plans through collective bargaining. See
Plans, health and welfare, this section.
California. Migratory workers. Agricultural Work­
ers Health and Medical Association. 1942— Nov.
957-959.
Clothing workers, New York City. Plans of Amal­
gamated Clothing Workers (CIO) and New York
Clothing Manufacturers Exchange; provisions,
total workers covered. 1949— Feb. 146.
Collective agreements. See Plans, health and wel­
fare, this section.
Collective bargaining and employer policy, 190050. 1950— July 22.
Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc. Details
of plan, sponsorship, benefits. Summary. 1948—
May 493-498.
Cooperative associations and prepayment medical
plans, 1948. 1949— Apr. 409-410.
Defense measures. Community Facilities Bill
passed June 30, 1941, provisions. 1942— Apr. 854.
Disability frequency of male industrial employees,
specified periods 1936-41 (From U. S. Public
Health Reports, Apr. 17, 1942). 1942— Aug.
262-263.
Factory health services. Results o f; factors and
cost of programs; survey by National Associa­
tion of Manufacturers. 1941— Sept. 669-671.
Food consumption in relation to. Wage earners'
families. 1941— July 2-5.
Ford Motor Co. and United Automobile Workers
(CIO). Provisions in 1948 collective agreement,
methods of financing. 1949— Feb. 146.
F S A work, including sanitation, to end of 1940.
1941— Dec. 1385.
Furniture plants, Plans. September 1949. 1950—
Mar. 292.
Housing projects, public. Programs adopted by
tenants. 1 9 4 2 — Jan. 101.
Industrial diseases and poisons, compensation for.
See Workmen's compensation.
Industrial policyholders (Metropolitan Life Insur­
ance Co.). Records for 1940-42 summarized.
1941— Apr. 920-922; 1942— Apr. 991-993; 1943—
Apr. 734-735.
Industrial. National Conference on Labor Legisla­
tion, Washington, 1949. Recommendations. 1 9 5 0 —
Jan. 40.
Kaiser-Frazer Corp. and United Automobile Work­
ers (C IO ). Provisions in 1948 collective agree­
ment. 1949— Feb. 146.




Lead and carbon disulfide poisoning. Need of
shielding young workers from exposure to
(Children's Bureau advisory standards). 1943—
Apr. 694-697.
Lead poisoning. Fatal cases, by States, 1941, 1942,
and 1943; by year 1901-42, including rates per
million of population; by occupational class and
year 1939-42. 1944— Nov. 976-978.
Medical and hospital care. See Medical and hospital
care.
Migratory labor. Arizona and California. Agricul­
tural Workers Health and Medical Association.
1942— Nov. 957-959.
------- Southern Interstate Conference on. Recom­
mendation. 1941— Feb. 344.
Miners. Payments to May 1, 1949, from United
Mine Workers of America Welfare and Retire­
ment Fund for medical, health, and hospital
care. 1949— July 40-41.
Mining. Coal (bituminous). Summary of results of
medical survey made for United States Depart­
ment of the Interior. 1947— June 997-1002.
-------Nonferrous metal, Utah. See Utah, this section .
Motor-truck drivers, interstate. Fatigue among,
causes and effects of. 1941— Sept. 667-669.
Negro youth. N Y A programs to promote. 1941—
June 1445.
New York. Airplane factories. Hazards. Ventila­
tion of spray booths, degreasing operations,
and electroplating tanks advised by State in­
spectors. 1941— Sept. 677.
--------------- X-ray workers, hazards to. State inspec­
tion, and safeguards provided. 1941— Sept. 678.
------- Labor Department (State) public-health ac­
tivities. Summary of functions and measures
adopted. 1941— Sept. 674-678.
------- Silicosis prevention. State rock-drilling code,
effectiveness of. 1941— Sept. 677.
Older workers. Welfare medical visits to plant
clinics, by age and sex of worker. 1948---July
18-19.
Physicians. Number in proportion to population,
by States. Prospective demand for, in postwar
period. 1945— Dec. 1094-1111.
Plans, health and welfare. Employer's liability
to bargain. 1948— July iv, Sept. 234.
-------Established under collective bargaining, bene­
fits, administration, financing, etc., 1945, early
1947, and 1948. 1945— Aug. 191-209; 1947— Feb.
191-201; 1948— Sept. 229-233; 1949— Feb. 146.
------- Funds, regulation of. 1948— Sept. 233-234.
------- Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, Interna­
tional (A F L ). See Labor organizations, U. S.—
Garment Workers' Union, etc.
------- Mining, coal. Features of, collective agree­
ments of May and June 1946. 1946— Dec. 880;
1947— Feb. 193-194.
---------------- See also Labor organizations, U. S.—
Mine Workers, United.
-------Tobacco workers (A F L ), 1 949 . 1949— Oct. 3 7 1 376.
------ Union Health Center, Philadelphia, and Labor
Health Institute, St. Louis; summary of pro­
visions and details of operation. 1948— Jan. 34-39.
------- Unions having or advocating, January-^June
1949. 1949— Sept. 239-240.
------ W elfare clauses in collective agreements.
Samples; selected list of references. 1947— Feb.
197-201.
------ Women’s blouse and waist industry, extent of
use, January 1947. 1947— Sept. 316.
------- See also Collective agreements— W elfare.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Health and
welfare provisions in collective agreements,
1946. 1947— Aug. 164.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Programs in collective-bargaining agreements.
See Plans, health and welfare, this section .
Puerto Rico. Conditions summarized. 1941— Apr.
805-807.
Radium dial-painting hazard. Renewal of indus­
try in 1941, and safety precautions. 1941— Sept.
676.
Rhode Island. Industrial code commission estab­
lished, 1946. 191*6— Nov. 759.
Safety and health unit in Department of Labor
recommended by 1941 convention of Interna­
tional Association of Governmental Labor Of­
ficials. 191*1— Dec. 1454-1455.
Shipyards. Chemical poisoning. Disabling cases
reported during first 9 months of 1943, by causal
condition. 191*1*— Apr. 761-763.
------- Medical care, industrial accidents, and occupa­
tional diseases. Summary of conditions and
problems. 191*1*— Jan. 92-94.
Southern States. Summary of legislation affecting.
191*6— Oct. 542-543.
State legislation, 1949. 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
Tobacco workers (A F L )
health and welfare
plans, 1949. 191*9— Oct. 371-376.
Utah. Dust hazards in nonferrous-metal mines.
Incidence, silicosis and other diseases; recom­
mendations, U. S. Public Health Service. 191*2—
Aug. 259-262.
-------Lead poisoning, nonferrous metal mining. Inci­
dence and symptoms. 191*2— Aug. 261-262.
Virginia. Occupational diseases (schedule) com­
pensable under workmen’s compensation law,
February 1944 amendment. 191*1*— May 1020-

1021.
Virgin Islands. Conditions as of June 30, 1940,
summarized. 191*1— Apr. 857.
Welding,
in ship construction.
Occupationaldisease hazards and preventive measures. 191*1*—
Jan. 93-94.
Welfare. See Plans, health and welfare, this section .
Wisconsin. Diseases and poisons, industrial. State
Industrial Commission data for period 1937-42.
191*8— July 117-118.
Women’s blouse and waist industry, health and
welfare plans; extent of use, January 1947.
191*7— Sept. 316.
Youth. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. data con­
cerning. 191*1— Aug. 395-396.
Health, foreign countries:
Belgium. Program planned under decree of Feb.
11, 1946. 191*6— July 31-32.
Canada. Industrial poisons. TN T (trinitrotoluene).
Method of measuring amount in air developed
by Division of Industrial Hygiene. Literature
concerning, furnished to employers and work­
ers. 191*1— Feb. 336-337.
------- Saskatchewan. Provincial-Government plan.
Provisions by legislature, 1944, for establishment
of. 191*1*— Jan. 131.
Chile. Preventive-medicine activities of Compul­
sory Insurance Fund, 1938-41. 191*1*— May 1009101°.
------- Preventive-medicine services by social-insur­
ance institutions. Legal provisions, administra­
tion, and sources of funds. 191*1— Feb. 381-384.
China. Rural conditions and problems, summary.
191*8— Sept. 494-495.
Great Britain. Conditions, 1942-43, summarized.
191*3— Dec. 1157-1159.
------- Disease incidence and health maintenance,
year ending Mar. 31, 1942, summary. 191*3—
Jan. 79-84.
-------Effect of long working hours. Report by Brit­
ish Association for Labor Legislation sum­
marized. 191*3— June 1163-1164.




67

------- England and Wales. Causes of death during
first 2 years of war. 191*2— May 1154-1155.
------- Excessive overtime, effects of, in war indus­
tries. 191*1— June 1345-1346.
------- Factories. Conditions early in war. 1941—
May 1213-1214.
---------------- Neurosis (wartime), reasons fo r; and
absenteeism among workers. Study of 30,000
workers in 13 light or medium engineering fac­
tories bv Industrial Health Research Board,
1942-44. 191*8— Apr. 403-404.
------- Industrial experience in 1942 and 1943. Sum­
mary. 191*3— Jan. 78-79; 191*5 — Sept. 480.
------- Industrial Health Advisory Committee, ap­
pointment Mar. 11, 1943, and functions. 191*3 —
July 118-119.
------- London. Health services during 1941, sum­
mary. 191*3 — Jan. 82-83.
------- Medical officers and nurses in industry.
191*4 — Jan. 98.
------- National health service proposed, summary
of plan. Provisions of 1946 act. 1 9 4 4 — Sept. 540543; 1 9 4 8 — Aug. 119.
------- Occupational diseases (factories). Cases and
deaths, by cause, specified years, 1910 to 1939;
summary of cases and deaths, 1941-42. 1941—
May 1214-1215; 1943— Jan. 79; 1944— Jan. 98.
---------------- Cotton-mill asthma. Law of November
1940, requiring compensation. 1941— Mar. 629630.
---------------- Dermatitis. Increase of, in year 1940.
1 9 4 2 — Jan. 139.
---------------- Hazards, increase on account of war.
1 9 4 2 — Jan. 138-139.
---------------- Lung diseases from dust inhalation
brought under workmen’s compensation law by
February 1943 amendment. 1943— May 908.
----------------TN T (trinitrotoluene) poisoning re­
ported for year 1940. 1942— Jan. 138-139.
------- Tuberculosis. Treatment and prevention
measures, Government plan announced Apr. 29,
1943; review of conditions since 1939. 1943—
Sept. 509-511.
------- Wartime policies 1914-18 and since 1939
compared. Resume of activities to promote health
and welfare of workers. 1941— Apr. 924-927.
------- Workweek, length of, in relation to health
and efficiency of workers (Review of Industrial
Health Research Board report). 1942— June
1400-1403.
Peru. Mines. Protective measures prescribed under
resolutions of August 1943. 1944— Jan. 100-101.
South Africa, Union of. Plan recommended by
commission appointed August 1942, and sub­
sequent preliminary measures taken by Govern­
ment. 1 9 4 5 — June 1216.
Turkey. Development of services under republican
government, summary. 1942— Aug. 244-246.
Uruguay. Spinning mills. Safety and health regu­
lations, January 1942 decree. 1942— Apr. 993-994.
Health (or sickness) insurance, United States:
Cotton-, rayon-, nylon-, and silk-textile industries,
selected occupations and areas, April 1950.
1 9 5 0 — Oct. 470.
Dress-shirt, and work-clothing establishments,
plans. August 1949. 1950— Mar. 295.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Percentage distribution of establishments hav­
ing, by region, 1945-46. 1947— July 54-55.
Motor-vehicle industry, United States and selected
regions, February 1950. 1950— Sept. 355.
Office workers. Boston, January 1950. 1 9 5 0 —
July 119.
Programs in 1949; compared with 1939. 1950—
June 642, 643.

68

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Health (or sickness) insurance, U. S.— Continued
Railroad workers. Sickness and maternity benefits
for, July 1947. 1947— Aug. 194-195.
------- Sickness benefits. Analysis of first 6 months’
operation of new Federal sickness compensation
program under Railroad Unemployment Insur­
ance Act. 1948— Apr. 402.
Rhode Island. Compulsory system. Law enacted,
1942, provisions. 1942— 5\x\y 101-102.
Sickness costs. Percent met by voluntary insur­
ance; extent of commercial and nonprofit in­
surance benefit payments, by type of plan,
1948. 1950— June 643-644.
United States Steel Corp. employees, by agree­
ments, 1949. 1950— Oct. 474.
Voluntary. Commercial and cooperative plans de­
scribed, and summary of operations. 1941—
June 1414-1419.
Health (or sickness) insurance, foreign countries:
Brazil. Longshoremen. System established in 1940,
coverage, sources of funds, benefits, general
provisions. 19 41— June 1428-1431.
Germany. Social-insurance pensioners, coverage
provided for by November 1941 law. 1942— Feb.
445.
Japan. Voluntary plan created July 1, 1938, sum­
mary. 1945— Oct. 666-667.
Programs in 1949; compared with 1939. 1950—
June 642, 643.
Health-service workers. Employment outlook, 1950.
1950— May 510.
High School Victory Corps. Plan for organization,
by National Policy Committee (U . S. Government),
to prepare for war work. 1948— Jan. 74-75.
Hiring halls. See Longshoring industry.
Histadrut (Labor Federation of Israel). Activities,
over-all; background, historical; structure and mem­
bership, 1921-50; recent policy actions; international
affiliations. 1950— Aug. 230-233.
Holidays, paid, United States:
Aluminum Co. of America, 1939-50. 1950— Dec.
691.
Automobile repair shops. Extent of provision July
1948. 1949— Jan. 38.
Bakery workers. Union provisions concerning
number per year, July 1, 1944. 1945— Feb. 368.
Clothing industry. Coats and suits, men’s. Extent
of provision, August-September 1948. 1949—
Feb. 191.
------- Women’s and misses’ dresses. Extent of pro­
vision for, August 1947 and 1948. 1948— May
520; 1949— Feb. 188.
------- Women’s coats and suits manufacture, Sep­
tember 1949. 1950— Feb. 155.
Collective agreements, provisions for, rules of
eligibility. 1949— Feb. 146.
Company practices in 1948. 1949— Apr. 426-427.
Cotton-, rayon-, nylon-, and silk-textile industries,
selected areas, April 1950. 1950— Oct. 469.
Department and women’s ready-to-wear stores.
Extent of provision, April 1948, 16 cities. 1948—
Nov. 486.
Electric and gas utilities. Extent of use, MarchApril 1948. 1948— Oct. 380.
Footwear manufacturing. Extent of provision,
September 1947. 1948— July 34.
Foundries, ferrous. Extent of provision, 1947,
1949, and 1950. W S — Mar. 288; 1949— Nov.
533; 1950— Dec. 694.
Furniture plants, September 1949. 1950— Mar.
292.
Glassware and glass container manufacturing,
January 1949. 1949— Aug. 151.
Groceries, wholesale. Extent of provision, July
1947. 1948— Mar. 288.




Guaranteed employment and wage plans, pro­
visions for. 1950— Jan. 29.
Hotels, year-round. Extent of provision, July 1948.
1949— Jan. 37.
Industrial chemical industry. Extent of provision,
January 1948. 1948— Aug. 143.
Machinery industries. Extent of provision, No­
vember 1947 and November 1949. 1948— Apr.
399; 1950— May 529.
Motor-vehicle industry, United States and selected
regions, February 1950. 1950— Sept. 352, 355.
Office-building service workers, 1949. 1949— Dec.
665.
Office workers. Atlanta, Memphis, and Oklahoma
City, January-February 1950. 1950— June 632.
------- Boston, January 1950. 1950— July 119.
------- Chicago, Indianapolis, and Milwaukee, Janu­
ary-February 1950. 1 9 5 0 — July 117.
------- Detroit, Mich., April 1950. 1950— Sept. 350.
------- Large cities, 11, January-June 1950. 1950—
Nov. 579.
------- New York City. Extent of provision,
January-February 1948 and February 1950.
1948— July 29; 1950— Aug. 238.
-------Philadelphia and Los Angeles, January 1949.
1949— June 646, 649.
------- Women, January-May 1949. 1949— Nov. 528.
Paint and varnish manufacturing. Extent of pro­
vision, August 1947 and April 1950. 1948— Apr.
402; 1 9 5 0 — Sept. 363.
Petroleum-refining industry. Collective-agreement
provisions. 1945— June 1251; 1949— July 25.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Collectiveagreement provisions, 1946 and 1949. 1947—
Aug. 162-163; 1949— Dec. 666.
Salaried and hourly workers, holiday practices,
1948. 1949— Apr. 426-427.
Saturday holiday. See Saturday, Sunday, and
holiday work.
Scientists, industrial research, late 1949. 1950—
Apr. 370.
Streetcar and bus operators. New York, pro­
visions for four per year. 1945— Feb. 373.
Textile industries. Collective-agreement provisions
summarized. 1941— Aug. 415; 1949— Sept. 267.
Union agreements. Provisions concerning, January
1943 and 1948-49. 1 9 4 3 — May 929-931; 1949—
July 5-6.
Wood and upholstered furniture. Extent of pro­
vision, September 1947. 1948— Apr. 401.
Woolen and worsted textile workers, May 1949
and May 1950. 1949— Oct. 399; 1950— Oct. 466.
Holidays, paid, foreign countries:
New Zealand. Wartime conditions and legislative
provisions. 1942— Apr. 902-903.
South Africa. Factories Act of 1941. Provisions.
1941— Dec. 1463.
Home conditions. See Living conditions.
Home loans, veterans’. Regulations (Oct. 19, 1944)
covering guaranty of. 1945— Jan. 63.
Home ownership:
Housing and fuel expenditures, 1941 and 1944,
city families, by family size and income class.
1947—
May 868-877.
Nonfarm families. Total number, early 1948; re­
lation to income; expenditures, for repairs and
additions during 1947; other expenditures.
1948—
Nov. 516.
Spending units owning homes, 1948-49; status of
mortgages. 1949— Aug. 154.
Wartime increase in, and effect upon supply of
rental units. 1946— Apr. 560-565.
Homesteads, United States:
Federal Security Administration projects. Selec­
tion of families, facilities, construction cost and

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
methods, rentals and purchase tenure, sources
of income, food produced for home use, com­
munity organization, and activities, advance in
living standards, difficulties encountered, and
accomplishments. 1942— Feb. 360-383.
Settlements for stranded groups, subsistence
projects, farming colonies, and individual scat­
tered farms, status 1941. 1941— Dec. 13761379.
Subsistence. Summary of Government program
since beginning in 1933, postwar possibilities
and recommendations by investigators (U . S.
Bureau of Agricultural Economics). 1944— Mar.
544-552.
Yakima Valley (Washington) Irrigated farm-land
tracts opened to veterans. 1947— Apr. 609.
Homesteads. Colombia. Land purchase by workers.
Provisions of October 1944 decree. 1944— Dec. 1169.
Home work, United States:
Artificial flower industry.
Order prohibiting
(1938), effect of upon workers and employers,
summary. 1942— Mar. 642-646.
Glove industry. Conditions and locations, July
1941. 1942— Mar. 718-720.
Industrial. Historical background; prohibiting
legislation, including Fair Labor Standards
A ct; relation to public assistance; local-handi­
crafts promotion, disadvantages of. 1944— June
1145-1158.
------- International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials, resolution by 1941 convention.
1941— T>ec. 1454.
Jewelry-manufacturing industry. Prohibition of,
except for handicapped workers. 1941— Sept.
715.
Lamp-shade industry, New York area, 1940.
1941— 1
Ian. 182-183.
Legislation, State. See Legislation, U. S., by
States, fo r specified State.
New York (State). Conditions in 1942, under
control measures, summarized. 1943— July 42.
------- Wartime increase in certificates granted, and
summary of conditions. 1945— May 1010-1011.
Home work, foreign countries:
Cuba. Women workers. May 1945 regulations,
provisions. 1945— July 119-120.
Netherlands. 1934 act, provisions. 1944— Jan. 44.
South Africa. Prohibition of, in 1941 Factories
Act. 1941— Dec. 1464.
Hosiery industry (see also Wages and hours) :
Full-fashioned. Characteristics, rehabilitation pro­
gram, and union-management cooperation, sum­
mary and status, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1180-1185.
------- Chronology of union agreements, 1941-48,
wage rates and related practices. 1949— Aug.
139-143.
------- Development and geographical distribution,
1919-39. 1941— Oct. 821-829.
-------Displaced workers, transferability to other
industries discussed. 1941— Oct. 847-848.
------- Employment outlook, Sept. 1, 1947 (Clem).
1941— Oct. 821-848.
-------Nylon introduction as raw material and pos­
sible labor displacement resulting from use.
1941— Oct. 837-839.
------- Production and employment statistics, 1941
and 1942, northern and southern areas; occu­
pational distribution, by sex, 1938; and con­
centration points, with employment, 1939. 1943—
Mar. 429-441.
------- Puerto Rico. Minimum wage rate set, ef­
fective May 19, 1941. 1941— Oct. 990.
------- Raw material crisis in 1941 and effect upon
employment outlook. 1941— Oct. 840-847.




69

------- Technological changes (recent), and reduced
labor requirements. 1941— Oct. 829-837.
Seamless. Definition, characteristics, labor force,
unionization, and regional distribution, 1940.
1941— June 1514-1520.
------- Minimum wage determinations, effective Sept.
15, 1941, and Mar. 30, 1942. 1941— Sept. 715;
1942— May 1189-1190.
Vacations with pay. Extent of provision for, Sep­
tember 1947. 1948— May 517-518.
Women workers. Postwar continuance of wartime
employment, prospects for. 1945— May 978-989.
Hospital service. See Medical and hospital care.
Hotels, year-round (see also Wages and hours) :
Holidays, paid, vacations with pay. Extent of
provision for, July 1948. 1949— Jan. 37.
Workweek, length of, July 1948. 1949— Jan. 36-37.
Hours of work, United States (see also Legislation;
Wages and hours) :
Automobile repair shops. Workweek, length of,
July 1948. 1949— Jan. 38.
Baking industry. Workweek, length of, July 1,
1947-49. 1948— May 522-523; 1949— Feb. 192,
194; 1950— J an. 33, 36.
Building trades. Workweek, length of, selected
periods, 1940-48. 1949— Jan. 40.
Candy and other confectionery. Workweek, length
of, January 1947. 1948— Apr. 397.
Child labor. Legislation. See Legislation, U. S.
Federal and general, and by States, fo r specified

State.
Clothing industry. Women’s and misses’ dresses.
Workweek, length of, August 1947. 1948—
May 520.
------- Women’s blouses and waists. Workweek,
length of, January 1947. 1947— Sept. 316.
------- Women’s dresses.
Workweek, length of,
August 1948. 1949— Feb. 188.
Construction. Workweek, length of, average, 1947
and 1948, compared with 1944. 1949— Feb. 180.
Consumer goods industries, selected, workweek,
length of. Monthly, August 1948-January 1949.
1949— Mar. 277.
Cotton-garment industry. Workweek, length of,
September 1947. 1948— June 629.
Cotton-textile industry.
Workweek, length of,
April 1948. 1948— Sept. 268.
Department and women’s ready-to-wear stores.
Workweek, length of, April 1948. 1948— Nov.
486.
Dietitians, hospital. Percentage distribution, by
scheduled weekly hours and by region, 1949.
1950— Feb. 151.
Durable and nondurable goods. Workweek of,
wartime, postwar period, and year 1948. 1949—
Feb. 174.
8-hour day, suspension of. See Legislation, U. S,,
Federal and general, also by States, fo r speci­

fied States.
8 per day and 48 per week considered optimum by
industrial executives (Princeton University sur­
vey). 1942— May 1099-1100.
Fact-finding activities of Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics summarized. 1945— May 943-944.
Federal agencies’ recommendations concerning and
effect of Fair Labor Standards and Public Con­
tracts Acts. 1946— Oct. 536-537.
Fertilizer industry. Workweek, length of, March
1948. 1948— Nov. 505.
Footwear manufacture.
Workweek, length of,
September 1947. 1948— July 33.
48-hour week. After war production cut-backs,
W ar Manpower Commission instructions con­
cerning. 1945— July 44-45.

70

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Hours of work, U. S.— Continued

48-hour week. Minimum established by Executive
order (No. 9801) Feb. 9, 1943. 19U Mar. 471S—
473.
-------W ar Manpower Commission regulation issued
Feb. 28, 1943, and general orders designating
32 local labor-shortage areas and specifying
national application to lumber and nonferrousmetal mining. 191*3— Apr. 666-668.
Foundries. Ferrous. Workweek, length of, No­
vember 1947; selected occupations, 1950 (22
cities). 191*8— Mar. 287; 1950— Dec. 693-694.
------- Ferrous and nonferrous. Workweek, October
1946. length of, in contrast with January 1945.
191*7— Aug. 183.
Furniture industry, wood and upholstered. Work­
week, length of, September 1947. 1948— Apr.
400.
Glassware industry. Workweek, length of, Janu­
ary 1947. 191*7— Nov. 551.
Grain-milling industry. Workweek, length of,
January 1948. 191*8— July 32.
Groceries, wholesale. Workweek, length of, July
1947. 191*8— Mar. 288.
Hosiery industry. Workweek, length of, Septem­
ber 1947. 191*8— May 517-518.
Hotels, year-round. Workweek, length of, July
1948. 191*9— Jan. 36—
37.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general, and by States.
Life insurance, home offices; workweek, length of,
January 1947. 191*8— Jan. 12.
Long hours. Effects of, results of 12 plant sur­
veys summarized. 191*1*— Oct. 737-740.
------- Effects on absenteeism, efficiency, spoilage,
and output. Results of BLS study summarized.
191*4— June 1131-1144.
Machinery industries. Workweek, length of, Oc­
tober 1946 in contrast with January 1945; No­
vember 1947. 1947— Sept. 320; 1948— Apr. 399.
Machine-tool-accessories industry. Average weekly,
by month, 1939-43. 1944— Feb. 309.
-------Workweek, length of, December 1947, com­
pared with January 1945. 1948— May 516.
Machine-tool industry. Average by months, Janu­
ary 1939 to January 1943. 1943— Sept. 485-486.
------- Weekly hours and use of shifts, June 1941.
1941— Oct. 876-879.
Manufacturing industries. By group, and by year,
1932-43; and trend, by year, 1914-43; war and
civilian goods industries, by group, 1941-43.
1944— Apr. 838-855.
------- By group, October-November 1940. 1941—
Apr. 981-987.
------- Durable and nondurable goods. Workweek,
comparison of, January 1949 with December
1948. 1949— Mar. IV.
------- Specified, and railroad transportation, coal
mining, building, and printing industries, by
year, 1914-23 and 1939-44. 1945— Oct. 621623, Nov. 875-880.
Meat-products industries. Workweek, length of,
January 1947. 1948— Mar. 286.
Metal-furniture industry. Workweek, length of,
January 1947. 1947— Oct. 449.
Metal-mining industry. Length of workday under
Fair Labor Standards Act established, effective
May 1, 1941. 1941— May 1254-1255.
Mining, coal (bituminous). Fall of 1945. 1946—
Apr. 551, 554-555.
------- Portal-to-portal travel time. Data reported
by President’s committee Feb. 3, 1944. 1944—
Mar. 628-629.
Motortruck drivers. Related to fatigue and physi­
cal fitness. Tests by U. S. Public Health Service.
1941— Sept. 667-669.




Motor-vehicle operators. Regulations and orders
by Interstate Commerce Commission, 1938-40,
resume. 1941— July 165-167.
New York. Women workers, factories, under dis­
pensations granted war industries by January
1942 law. 1943— Jan. 40-41.
Office workers, New York City. Average weekly
scheduled hours of work, selected occupations
in selected industry groups, January-February
1948. 1948— July 28-29.
Optimum (8 per day, 48 per week) recommended
for maximum production in war plants. 1942—
Sept. 459-460.
Paint and varnish manufacture, April 1950.
1950— Sept. 363.
Petroleum-refining industry. Provisions in 21 col­
lective agreements, summary. 1945— June 1251.
Printing trades (book and job and newspapers).
Weekly hours by trade and occupation, 1944;
indexes, 1907-44. 1945— Mar. 632-633.
Prisoners of war. Regulations issued early in
1945, provisions. 1945— July 46.
Public Contracts (Walsh-Healey) Act, provisions.
See Legislation, U. S., Federal and general—
Walsh-Healey Act.
Rayon and silk industry. Workweek, length of,
April 1948. 1948— Sept. 270.
Sawmills, southern. Effect of 75-cent minimum
wage upon, 1950. 1950— Sept. 317.
Seven-day week. Study of desirability of. 1947—
July 13-14.
Southern region.
Legislative provisions sum­
marized, by States. 1946— Oct. 537-538.
State legislation. See Legislation, U. S., by States.
Status 1940, general survey of. 1941— Mar. 534535.
Transit industry, local. Workweek, length of, Oct.
1, 1947. 1948— May 524.
Truck driving. Indexes, weekly hours, union driv­
ers, 1936-47. 1948— Apr. 394.
W ar industries. Workweek length, overtime, and
shift and Sunday operations (14 industries)
summarized (BLS survey, February 1942).
1942— May 1061-1065.
Weekly. Percentage distribution by size of com­
munity and number of hours worked, April
1940 and April 1941. 1941— Oct. 899.
------- Specified industries (19). Years 1939 and
1940 compared. 1941— July 17.
Wholesale drugs and allied products. Workweek,
length of, January 1947. 1947— Nov. 554.
Women workers (N . Y . State). War-plant em­
ployers’ experience as to length of work period.
1945— Sept. 507-508.
Woolen and worsted textile industry. Workweek,
length of, April 1948. 1948— Sept. 271.
Workweek, length of. Manufacturing, wartime,
reconversion period, 1946, 1947, and mid-October
1948; effects on factory worker’s gross earn­
ings. 1949— Feb. 164.
------- 1939-43 period. Lengthening of, and effect of
Executive order issued Feb. 9, 1943. 1943— Nov.
873-874.
------- Optimum length, opinions of executives rep­
resenting 140 companies (Princeton University
study summarized). 1942— May 1099-1100.
------- Prewar, wartime, and postwar periods. Study
of effects of changes in, on output and other
factors. 1947— July 5-14.
------- See also specified industry , this section.
Hours of work, foreign countries ( see also Legislation) :
Australia. 5-day week, or 5 % -day week. Relative
merits of the respective plans for 44-hour
weekly period. 1945— July 118-119.
------- Optimum weekly hours recommended by

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Government, for specified kinds of work. 19 U —
S
Oct. 792-793.
------- Restriction, to reduce absenteeism and raise
output. 19U —Jan. 31.
S
Belgium. Prior to invasion (1940), summary;
measures under German occupation. 19 U —
U
Feb. 289-291.
Canada. 40-hour week (without decrease in earn­
ings) adopted by Toronto plant as results of
increased efficiency. 19U — Apr. 853.
S
------- Quebec. Plants executing war contracts.
Restrictions eliminated, effective Feb. 7, 1941,
for 2 months. 19U1— Mar. 593.
Chile. Continuous working day provided for in
certain cities, by law of May 16, 1942. Unsat­
isfactory results of practice. 19U — Oct. 718.
S
Denmark. Status prior to World W ar II, sum­
mary. 19U — Nov. 952-953.
U
France. Indexes and number of hours per week,
1938-47. 19U — July 44.
S
------- Situation prior to World W ar I I; wartime
measures; changes under German occupation.
19UU— Oo.t. 718-720.
------- Weekly hours in occupied and unoccupied
zones. 19U2— Jan. 212—
213.
Germany. Status in 1938 and effect of war upon.
19U Mar. 508, 512-513.
S—
Great Britain. Average, 1945 and 1947, compared
with prewar; changes between July 1945 and
May 1, 1948. 19U8— Aug. 118-119.
----- - Effect upon health. Report by British Asso­
ciation for
Labor
Legislation summarized.
19US— June 1163-1164.
------- England and Wales. Agriculture. Schedules
made effective June 20, 1943. 19U — Sept. 583S
584.
------- 52-hour week ruled minimum for industrial
labor, by Ministry of Labor, May 20, 1942.
19U2— July 42.
------- Length of workweek. Relation to lost time
and labor wastage. 19 U2— June 1400-1403.
------- ------- Trends, mid-1945-April 1948. 1949—
Mar. 282.
------- Metal trades. Average workweek July 1941
and 1942, by occupation. 19U — June 1201-1202.
S
------- Overtime work, results in strain, efficiency
loss, and (for women workers) increased acci­
dent frequency. 19 U1— June 1337-1346.
-------Policies followed by representative factories in
1943 and 1944. Summary. 19U — Sept. 479-480.
S
------- Reduction, in 1942, effect upon productivity
of labor, selected factories. 19U — Oct. 765-767.
U
-------Weekly, by industry and sex, under trade
boards, 1944. 19U — Oct. 848-850.
U
------- Women and young persons, in factories.
Control under law re-established, by beginning
of 1941, and effect. 19U — Jan. 77-78.
S
Japan. Conditions, various classes of workers,
specified years from 1929 to 1944. 19U — Oct.
S
658-659.
New Zealand. Wartime conditions and legislative
provisions. 19 U2— Apr. 901-902.
Norway. Law of 1936, provisions; and changes
made by German occupational authorities.
19U — Sept. 505.
U
Panama. Civil-service and bank employees. Con­
tinuous working-day period 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
instituted Dec. 3, 1940; “ Siesta” period aban­
doned. 19U1— Feb. 459.
Switzerland. Workweek, length of, factories, se­
lected periods, 1939-47. 19U — Mar. 297.
S
Household equipment, United States. Owned by fami­
lies of varying income classes and in different types
of communities, December 1941. 19U — Dec. 1219S

1221.




71

Household equipment. Canada. Homes supplied with.
Summary of survey by manufacturing company,
1945. 19U — Feb. 233-234.
S
Household goods, Great Britain. Postwar increases
in supplies, efforts of Government to aid low-income
families. Relative supplies, compared with prewar,
beginning 1947. 19U — Aug. 122.
S
Housing and Rent Acts. See Legislation, U. S., Fed­
eral and general.
Housing, United States ( see also Building construc­
tion— Residential; Homesteads):
Activities 1930-40 and since World W ar I. Resi­
dential construction, extent of and types, 193040, and adequacy in relation to population in­
crease (Naigles). 19U2— Apr. 869-880.
Bridgeport, Conn. Occupancy of new and old
homes by workers in war industries. 19 U2—
Aug. 206-216.
Characteristics, one-family houses started January-March 1947, selected areas. 19U9—Jan. 4 6 47.
Clothing Workers, Amalgamated, of America.
Apartment buildings constructed by Amalga­
mated Housing Corporation and cooperatively
operated. 19U1— Sept. 646.
Commercial, Government, limited-dividend, and
cooperative projects. Characteristics compared.
19U Jan. 93-96.
S—
Conditions in 1940, and changes to 1945; probable
postwar demand. 19 US— Mar. 479-488.
Construction. Activities since January and to
November 1946. 19U — Nov. 798-802, Dec. 1012S
1017.
------- Definition. 19U9— Jan. 44.
------- Living-accommodation structures started and
completed, January 1946 to April 1947. 19U7—
Jan. 118-119, Feb. 296-297, Mar. 514-515, Apr.
720-721, May 895-896, June 1108-1110.
------- Nonessential, forbidden by order of U. S.
W ar Production Board. 19U2— June 1355-1356.
------- One-family houses started, selected areas,
October 1946-September 1947. 19.1,9— Jan. 44-45.
Cooperative. See Cooperatives— Housing.
Defense. Bridgeport area. Purpose and scope of
BLS study, extent of program in 1940 and
1941, effect on community, homes vacated and
change of tenure, costs, and size and income of
households concerned. 19U2— May 1073-1083.
Defense areas (1 1). Privately financed residential
units, 1940 and 1941, summary. 19US— Apr.
801-807.
Defense areas (138). Publicly and privately fi­
nanced units, by region, specified periods, Janu­
ary 1940 to August 1942. 19U2— Dec. 1203-1212.
Defense areas (selected). New units provided, by
quarter, 1940 and 1941, permit valuation dis­
tribution by period and by geographic distribu­
tion, 1940 and 1941. 19U2— May 1149-1153.
Defense Homes Corporation. Review of operation,
ending July 30, 1948; financial statement. 19U —
S
Nov. 516-517.
Defense program. Agencies and appropriations
for and 1940 and 1941 legislation. 19U1— May
1061-1066.
------- Contracts for, types and provisions under
legislation of 1940. 19U1— May 1071.
------- Rent control legislation suggested by Na­
tional Defense Advisory Commission, and rent
policy announced by Federal Works Adminisn
trator. 19 U1— May 1066, 1074.
------- Standards and policies followed in projects.
19U1— May 1071-1075.
------- Status of projects, Apr. 19, 1941, by authori­
zation, construction agency, and purpose. 19U1—
May 1075-1078.

72

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Housing, U. S.— Continued
Defense program. Steps included, and research sur­
veys required, coordination organization of ac­
tivities, and planning. 1 9 4 1 — May 1062-1063,
1066-1071.
Demountable construction. Use of in connection
with prefabrication for war workers’ housing.
1942— June 1267-1268.
District of Columbia. Alley Dwelling Authority.
Review of annual report year ending June 30,
1941. 1942— June 1356.
Economy housing campaign.
Sponsorship and
purpose; homes for lower-income groups. 1949—
Feb. 207.
Expenditures. See
Construction— Expenditures;
also Expenditures— Housing.
Farm Security Administration. Active projects,
by State and type, June 30, 1941. 1941— Dec.
1372-1373.
-------Displaced families, provision fo r; and perma­
nent and temporary units in defense areas.
1941— Oct. 927-929.
Federal employees, Washington area, 1941. Home
ownership, rent, and boarding conditions. 1941—
Nov. 1224-1237.
Federal Housing Administration. Net volume,
financed by, 1934 through 1940; analysis of 1940
activities. 1942— Oct. 752-755.
Federal housing policy developments, 1932-50.
Summary. 1950— Dec. 682-683.
$500 houses constructed in 1943. Characteristics;
and scope of BLS survey. 1948— Dec. 1058-1059.
Greenbelt communities. See Greenbelt communi­
ties.
Home builders, urban. Operations in 1938 by size
of city. 1941— May 1283-1285.
Home financing. New homes, 9 large city areas,
July-December 1949.
Summary.
1950— Dec.
673-675.
-------Through savings and loan associations, 192342. 1948— May 932-940.
Home ownership, nonfarm families. Total number,
early 1948; relation to income; expenditures for
repairs and additions during 1947; other ex­
penditures. 1948— Nov. 516.
Housing Expediter; actions of, on local advisory
board recommendations, July 1-Nov. 28, 1947.
1948— Jan. 17-18.
Labor requirements, future, in anticipated build­
ing programs; development of technique for use
in determining; tests and conclusions. 1947—
July 73-75.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general.
Migrant workers. Defense. Congressional com­
mittee’s recommendation as to Federal construc­
tion. 1942— Jan. 50-51.
------- Provision for by use of surplus war housing
recommended in suggested protection program.
1946— Feb. 228.
------- Southern Interstate Conference on. Recom­
mendation. 1941— Feb. 344.
Mining, coal (bituminous). Summary of findings
of survey, with recommendations for improve­
ment. 1947— June 997-1000.
Mutual (cooperative) plan for purchase by resi­
dents of Government-financed emergency and
“ Greenbelt” projects.
Summary. 1946— Mar.
406-407.
National Resources Planning Board report, 1940.
Summary of findings and conclusions. 1941—
Apr. 916-919.
Navy yard employees, Washington, D. C. Rent
levels, percent of home ownership, and incomes.
1941— Nov. 1236-1237.




Need in seven cities where rents had been de­
controlled from 1 to 5 months, 1949. 1950—
Mar. 255.
Negro employees, North Carolina University.
F H A plan, summary of features. 1941— Oct.
930-932.
Negro workers. Defense areas, projects planned
and under way, June 1941. 1941— Sept. 647.
New York City Authority projects. Activities,
1941, including costs and revenues, new and
planned construction and demolition activities.
1942— Apr. 961-963.
Nonfarm areas. Estimated changes in supply,
April 1940-December 1948. 1949— July 47.
------- New dwelling units, 1940 to 1944, by type,
size of city, geographic division, source of funds,
and permit valuation, 1942— Jan. 225-231, May
1139-1148, July 94-100, Sept. 606-612, Dec.
1212-1218; 1948— Apr. 652-660, June 1149-1154,
Oct. 749-755, 812-817, Dec. 1160-1165; 1944—
Mar. 536-544, June 1237-1242; 1945— May 10531061.
------- New units started, each year 1910-45 (from
1920, by area and type of structure). 1947—
Jan. 12.
-------Permanent 2-family and multifamily dwellings
authorized within housing-market areas, 34 large
cities, number, by source of funds, selected
periods, 1940-49. 1949— July 46-47.
------- Permanent; units started, new, by type of
structure, 1920-48. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 179.
------- Privately financed dwelling units (all, and
number in war-work areas). Trend by month,
January 1940 to June 1943. 1948— Sept. 513-517.
------- Publicly financed projects, by Government
agency and by year, 1935-39. 1942— Apr. 8 7 8 880.
------- Wartime needs, and trend of construction
1940-43. 1948— Sept. 513-520.
Prefabricated units. Factory-made units used in
lowering existing costs. 1947— Aug. 205.
------- W ar projects. Man-hour requirements for
construction and site work, compared with those
for conventional type. 1946— Nov. 721-732.
------- ------- Materials and processes described.
1 9 4 6 — Nov. 724-732.
------- W ar workers’ housing, use of. 1942— June
1267-1268.
Public projects. Community activities of tenants.
Summary. 1942— Jan. 100-103.
------- W ar workers’ units. Interior space arrange­
ments, convenience of. 1942— June 1269-1270.
Puerto Rico. Summary of conditions and Govern­
ment projects under way. 1941— Apr. 804-805.
Rents. Los Alamos, N. Mex., 1948, and operating
costs. 1 9 4 9 — Sept. 248.
------- New housing. Percentage distribution, struc­
tures containing two or more units, 1948 com­
pared with 1947 and with 1925-29 period. 1949—
Feb. 180.
------- See also Rents, United States
Slum clearance. Authorization under Housing Act
of 1949, summary of provisions of law. 1949—
Aug. 155-156.
Slums (New York; Jacksonville, F la.; and Denver).
Findings of studies summarized. 1941— Dec.
1428-1431.
Statistics. Annually, 1910-38, monthly 1939-49.
Limitations, methods and sources, calculation
procedures, tests of reliability. 1949— Oct. 4 1 0 416.
-------1946 and 1947. BLS program to develop better
measures of activity (nonfarm ); sampling
methods and survey techniques used. 1948— Aug.
161-164.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
State programs, major and other. New permanent
dwelling units started in projects financed by
State and local governments, January 1946July 1949, by State and size of place. 1949— Nov.
499-502.
Structural and facility characteristics of dwelling
units with kitchen facilities, St. Louis and
Minneapolis-St. Paul areas, December 1949
(table). 1950— Sept. 365.
Structural characteristics, new housing, 15 large
metropolitan areas, July-December 1949, re­
vealed by BLS surveys. 1950— Oct. 429-432.
Subsistence homesteads. See Homesteads, United
States.
Tenure of dwellings in nonfarm areas, trend 18901944. 1946— Apr. 561.
Time required to complete and estimated actual
cost of units covered by permits issued Septem­
ber to December 1945 and March 1946. Sum­
mary. 1946— Sept. 346-354.
Urban areas. Federally and privately financed.
Number of units, type, and valuation, November
1943 to October 1944. 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 207-208, Feb.
433-435, Mar. 668-669, Apr. 882-883, May 10991100, June 1313-1315, July 203-204, Aug. 4 30431, Sept. 633-634, Oct. 872-873, Nov. 1085-1087,
Dec. 1294-1296.
Vacancies, habitable and available for rent, urban
areas; Bureau of Census survey, April 1947;
comparison with report of November 1945. 1948—
Jan. 18.
Veterans’ Emergency Act of May 22, 1946. Sum­
mary of provisions. 191*6— July 92-93.
Veterans’ Emergency Program. Announced Feb. 8,
1946, and background. 191*7— Jan. 14-15.
------- Number of units started and completed,
January to November 1946, by month. 191*6—
Nov. 798-799, Dec. 1012-1013.
Virgin Islands. Homestead policy, summary. 191* 1—
Apr. 854-855.
W ar and postwar trends. New units started, by
type and by source of funds, specified periods,
and regional distribution. 191*7—5 sm. 11-23.
W ar industries. Program adopted and services es­
tablished, 1941. 191*2 — Apr. 853-854.
W ar program. Extent; public and private partici­
pation; costs of accommodations to workers;
and occupancy status (Murphy). 191*2— June
1257-1277.
Wartime shortages. Effect on home ownership.
191*6— Apr. 560-566.
War-work areas (495). Publicly and privately
financed dwelling units constructed, by region,
January 1940 to August 1942. 191*3— Sept. 520.
War-work centers. Expenditure upon residential
units, first 9 months 1943. 191*3— Dec. 1247.
Willow Run (Bomber plant, Ypsilanti, Mich.)
project. Description; status in autumn of 1945.
191*5— Dec. 1074—
1075.
Housing, foreign countries ( see also Legislation):
Argentina. Low-cost projects: Social services pro­
vided for residents, 1942. 191*3— Sept. 508-509.
Australia. Rents and mortgages, moratorium on
for mobilized men. 191*1— Jan. 93-94.
Canada. Advisory Committee on Reconstruction.
Subcommittee’s report published March 1944.
Summary. 191*5— Mar. 586-587.
------- Home-improvement loans discontinued Oct.
31, 1940. 191*1— Jan. 98.
------- Overcrowded condition, and need of facilities
and equipment. Summary of (1945 survey, man­
ufacturing company). 191*6— Feb. 233-234.
------- Problems due to war. Plan proposed by
Federation of Mayors and Municipalities. 191*1—
May 1154.




73

China. Tungsten miners. Project of Bureau of
Tungsten and Antimony Control, 1940. 191*3—
Nov. 950.
Colombia. Low-cost Government projects. Financ­
ing, selection of tenants and purchasers, terms,
and rural housing. Status, 1941. 191*2— Apr. 964967.
Costa Rica. San Jose. Facilities, 258 families, by
item and weekly earnings, September 1949.
1950— Oct. 444.
El Salvador. Government activities since enact­
ment of 1926 legislation, and program of Social
Development Corporation under decrees of De­
cember 1942. 191*3— Aug. 235-236.
France. Postwar conditions, and temporary meas­
ures to meet immediate needs. Summary. 191*6—
Feb. 234-236.
Great Britain. Construction, by region, end of
1946, estimated for 1947; under construction, or
approved but not started, by type, end of 1946,
estimated for 1947. 191*7— Aug. 196-197.
------- Postwar. Construction program, including
measures to secure material and labor. 191*5—
Oct. 739-743.
--------------- Long-term programs, summary of plans;
units completed Apr. 1, 1945-Apr. 30, 1948,
by category; types of assistance provided by
Central Government. 191*1*—
-July 104-106; 191*8—
Aug. 120-121.
----------------Statement of Minister of Reconstruction
concerning. 191*1*— Mar. 567.
------- Units destroyed or rendered uninhabitable,
damaged, out of total of 13 million dwellings,
during Second World W ar. Number needed to
replace. 191*3— Aug. 120.
India. Bombay. Summary of conditions. 191*3—
Oct. 696-697.
------- Summary of conditions and legislation con­
cerning land acquisition for housing projects.
191*3— Oct. 696-697.
Netherlands. Postwar conditions, rent control,
and plans for relief of shortages. 191*6— June 70.
South Africa, Union of. Government program,
summary. 191*6— June 1219.
Switzerland. Multiple dwellings, one-family houses,
and apartments constructed, by year, 1926-40.
191*1— Dec. 1431-1433.
------- Subsidies for construction of dwellings. Pro­
visions governing, under October 1945 ordinance.
191*6— Feb. 236.
Venezuela (Maracaibo). Oil companies’ provision
of, at specified rentals, for foreign employees.
191*5— Aug. 339.
Housing Expediter. See Housing.
Houston ordnance plant. Wartime labor force. Personal
and family characteristics, prewar background, oc­
cupations, wages and hours, postwar prospects.
Summary. 191*6— Mar. 458-472.
Im m igration and em igration, United S tates:
Aliens. Admission and departures, June 30, 193949, by class. 1941— Mar. 662-665; 191*3— Dec.
1203-1204; 191*4— Dec. 1240-1241; 1946— Apr.
645-646; 1948— Apr. 405; 1949— Sept. 278;
1950— Feb. 165-166.
------- Occupational distribution of those admitted,
specified years ended June 30, 1939-49. 1941—
Mar. 662-665; 1946— Apr. 645-646; 1948— Apr.
405-406; 1949— Sept. 280; 1950— Feb. 166.
Aliens and U. S. citizens. By principal ports, year
ended June 30, 1940. 1941— Mar. 662.
Chinese-exclusion acts repealed, December 1943.
1944— Feb. 367-368.
Decrease in, 1900-50. 1950— July 15.

74

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Immigration and emigrants:
British Malaya. Summary of conditions prior to
World War II. 1944— Aug. 282.
Canada. By sex, occupational class, and destina­
tion. 191+1— June 1404.
Impaired workers. See Handicapped workers.
Imports:
Dollar volume in 1939 and estimated amount under
full employment conditions in 1950. 191+7— Feb.
184-186.
Total, year 1948. 1949— Feb. 142.
Incentive pay Gr wage plans. See Wage-incentive
systems.
Income, United States:
Agricultural. Farm operators. 1939 and 1943,
indexes (1 9 1 0 -1 4 = 1 0 0 ). 191+4— Jan. 20.
------- Farm workers (family and hired), by size of
enterprise. 1944— Oct. 843-846.
-------Total and by region, specified years, 1929-40,
and yearly 1941-45. 1946— Oct. 509.
Birmingham, Indianapolis, and Portland (Oreg.).
Average money income, expenditures, and sav­
ings, families and single persons, by income
class, 1945. Comparison with mid-thirties. 1945—
June 622-626.
------- Percent spent, major groups of goods and
services, by families with same average income,
1945 and 1935-36. 1948— June 625.
Ceramic engineers. Median annual income, by
years of experience, specified years, 1939-47.
1948— Oct, 381.
Consumer. Analysis of broad movements 1945-49,
personal income, expenditures, and saving. 1949—
Dec. 619-628.
------- Disposable. Median, all spending units, before
and after taxes; proportion allocated to saving,
selected durable goods, other consumer expendi­
tures, by spending units within various income
groups, 1947. 1948— Nov. 515-516.
------- Distribution, by occupation group, 1947;
spending units showing increases and decreases;
liquid and nonliquid assets, ownership and use.
1948— Sept. 286-287.
------- Median, all spending units, year 1947 com­
pared with 1946. 1948— Feb. 185.
------- Money and liquid assets; median amounts of
spending units, by income group, 1946. 1947—
Sept. 330-331.
------- Relationship to expenditures. Total, 1948,
compared with 1947. 1949— Feb. 141-142.
------- Share received by each tenth of Nation’s
spending units, ranked by size of income, 1946
and 1945. 1947— Sept. 330.
------- Spending units. Money income received;
money and liquid assets; median amounts, and
percentage distribution, by income groups, 1946
and 1945. 1947— Sept. 331.
---------------- Savings and intended purchases, 1945
and 1946, distribution of liquid assets; correc­
tion (pp. 256-257). 1946— Aug. 256-258, Oct. 612.
Dentists. Average net, 1929-48 (chart); source;
trends; regional and State differentials; size of
community influence; age relationship. 1950—
Apr. 397-400.
Families and single persons. Cities. Income as
related to expenditures and savings, 1944. 1946—
Jan. 1-5.
------- Detroit, Mich., Denver, Colo., and Houston,
Tex. Average money income, expenditures, and
savings, by net income class, 1948. 1949— Dec.
630-639.
------- Washington, D. C., Richmond, Va., and
Manchester, N. H. Average money income,
savings, and actual and percentage distribution
of expenditures, 1947. 1949— Apr. 389-397.




Family. Cities. Composition in relation to income.
1946— Feb. 175-180.
------- Cost of family budgets (Indianapolis, Xnd.).
1948— Feb. 176-178.
------- Indexes showing relationship between size of
family and cost of budget; incomes providing
same level of well-being for different-size fam ­
ilies relative to incomes of four-person families.
1948— Feb. 179-181.
------- Percent spent for major groups of goods and
services by families with same average income
in 1945 and 1933-34, Birmingham, and 1935-36,
Indianapolis and Portland (Oreg.). 1948— June
625.
-------Relation to BLS family budget, Washington,
D. C., June 1947. 1948— Dec. 622-623.
Family and personal. Estimated increases, 190050. 1950— July 23.
Federal workers. Percent of old and new residents
(Washington area) in specified groups. 1941—
Nov. 1226-1227.
Fishermen, Boston Fish Pier Fleet, 1948. 1949—
Nov. 503-506.
Home owners (Federal employees). Percentages
receiving various monthly amounts. 1941— Nov.
1228.
Indianapolis, Ind. Percentage distribution, families,
by 1945 income and size, in relation to the city
worker’s family budget for March 1946. 1948—
Feb. 177.
Lawyers. Average net income, 1929-48; source of
income; size of firm influence; regional and
State differentials; and relationship of age and
years in practice. 1950— Apr. 396-398.
Manchester (N . H .) families of two or more.
Average money income, savings, and actual and
percentage distribution of expenditures, by net
income class, 1947. 1949— Apr. 396.
------- Surpluses and deficits in relation to income
and expenditures, average amount and per­
centages reporting, 1947. 1949— July 34-36.
Military payments in Southern States, total, 1940
and 1945. 1946— Oct. 510.
National. Analysis, including average salary-wage
of employees, by industrial divisions, specified
periods 1929 to 1940. 1941— July 112-119.
------- By distributive shares; second quarter 1943,
1939 and 1941 compared; 1929 and 1939-43;
1946 (revised) and 1929-47. 1943— Oct. 788790; 1944— July 150-151; 1947— Sept. 325-327.
------- Distribution, 1941, 1945; assumptions for
1950. 1947— Feb. 171-173.
------- Income payments, by item, and by years,
1929, 1932, and 1937-39. 1941— Apr. 980.
------- Payments by type, by month and year, 1929
to 1940; by State, specified years, 1929-39.
1941— Jan. 128-133, Apr. 974-977.
------- Salaries and wages by main types of enter­
prise, 1929-40. 1941— Apr. 978.
------- Wage and salary (exclusive of military
pay). Estimated 1939-44, by year and source;
and alternative estimates for postwar period
(Myers and Tolies). 1945— Sept. 401-413.
Navy Yard employees (Washington, D. C .), fam­
ilies of, in comparison with incomes of other
Federal workers’ families. 1941— Nov. 1236-1237.
Negroes, San Francisco Bay area, 1941-48. 1950—
June 617.
Pacific Coast (Calif., Oreg., Wash.) and entire
country. Per capita payments, specified years to
1945; composition of total amounts and per­
centage distribution. 1947— Apr. 599-609.
Per capita. By States and regions, 1939 and 1943,
and percent of increase, 1929-49. 1944— Nov.
1049-1053; 1950— Oct. 435-437.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Wage-earner families, 1939, by age, sex, and
marital status of head and by size of family.
1 9 U -~ Dec. 1254.
Personal. By source, 1929-47. 1947— Sept. 328.
------- Disposition, seasonally adjusted quarterly
totals at annual rates, 1945-49, Department of
Commerce estimates. 1949— Dec. 620-621.
Puerto Rico. Agriculture. Small farmers, earnings
and incomes, by type of farm, and use and
sources of credit. 1942— Dec. 1280-1283.
------- Family of wage earners, average. In money
and in kind, 1940-41. 1943— Feb. 223-227.
Richmond, Va., families of 2 or more. Surpluses
and deficits in relation to income and expendi­
tures, average amount and percentage reporting,
1947. 1949— July 34-36.
------- White and Negro. Average money income,
savings, and actual and percentage distribution
of expenditures, by net income class, 1947.
1949— Apr. 394-395.
Savings, by various groups, 1946. 1947— Nov. 558559.
Single persons. See Families and single persons,
a lso specific city , this section .
Southern States (compared with all States). Wage
and salary earnings, annual, by workers under
unemployment compensation laws, in major in­
dustry groups, 1939-44. 1946— Oct. 499-500.
Southern States (compared with other regions).
Per capita; average annual wages; aggregate
income payments; trends since 1929 and during
war. 1946— Oct. 495-510.
Spending units and total money income, distribu­
tion by income groups, 1945-48, Securities and
Exchange Commission estimates. 1949— Dec. 626.
Steelworkers. Weekly, September to November
1943, and debt, expenditure, taxes, and savings.
1944— July 188-192.
Teachers. Family allowances or married men’s
differentials. Extent of use of by public school
systems; teachers’ attitudes concerning. 1946—
Aug. 243-246.
Total money. Distribution by income group,
194548. Proportion accounted for by each tenth
of the Nation’s spending units when ranked by
size of income, 1941 and 1945-48, Federal Re­
serve estimates. 1949— Dec. 626-628.
Wage-earner families, per capita, by sex, age, and
marital status of head of family, 1939. 1944—
Dec. 1254.
Wages and salaries. Annual, 1939, summarized
from 1940 Census. 1942— July 149-151.
------- Income from (exclusive of military pay),
1939-44, and estimates of payments in postwar
period (Myers and Tolies). 1945— Sept. 401-413.
------- Total. Distribution, by region, between manu­
facturing, agricultural, Federal, and other
workers, 1940 and 1945. 1946— Oct. 508.
Washington, D. C. Families of 2 or more. Surpluses
and deficits in relation to income and expendi­
tures, average amount and percentage report­
ing, 1947. 1949— July 34-36.
------- ------- White and Negro. Average money in­
come, savings, and actual and percentage dis­
tribution of expenditures, by net income class,
1947. 1947— Apr. 392-393.
------- Total money, 1947, husband-wife families
and single persons; distribution, by family size,
in relation to city worker’s family budget. 1948—
Dec. 623.
Workers’ families. Estimated, for 1940, and in­
crease since 1934—
36 period. 1941— July 56-57.
Wartime. City families, 1941 and first quarter of
1942. 1942— Sept. 419-434.
------- Farm and nonfarm families, 1935-36, 1941,
and 1942. 1942— Oct. 700-704.




75

Income, foreign countries:
Canada. National. Estimates by year 1926-40.
1 9 4 1 — July 119.
Costa Rica. San Jose. Family income, 1949. 1950—
Oct. 443-444.
Great Britain. National. By year, 1938-40, 1941,
and Government expenditures and taxes. 1942—
July 31-32.
------- Personal income. Average before and after
taxes, 1938 and 1947; purchasing power, 193848; wage changes, 1914-47; salaries and profits.
1950— May 530-534.

------ Real income, national and per capita, postwar
period compared with 1938. 1948— Aug. 117-118.
Haiti. Distribution of workers by income group,
1943. 1944— Oct. 748.
Italy (Rome). Worker’s family, specified periods,
November 1940 to May 1945. 1945— Aug. 337-

338.
Poland, National. Percentage of, to be used for
investment, 1946-49. 1948— Nov. 470.
Switzerland. Percentage increase war and postwar
periods, wage earners and salaried workers,
industry, commerce, and transportation. 1948—
Mar. 297.
Uruguay. Packing house and chemical workers.
Average monthly, April 1940. 1942— Aug. 366.
Yugoslavia. National, percentage of, to be used for
investment, 1947-51. 1948— Nov. 470.
Indexes. See specific subject .
Indians:
Alaska. Economic condition and vocational and
welfare work among, June 30, 1941. 1942— Mar.
647-649.
Arts and Crafts Board (U . S. Government). Pro­
duction and sales under, progress of. 1941— Apr.
874-876.
Employment and rehabilitation activities of U. S.
Government. 1941— Apr. 872-874.
Industrial chemical industry. Shift differentials, holi­
days, paid, vacations with pay, January 1948. 1948—
Aug. 142-143.
Industrial conditions. See Labor and industrial condi­
tions.
Industrial diseases and poisons. See Workmen’s com­
pensation— Occupational diseases.
Industrial disputes, United States. See Labor-manage­
ment disputes.
Industrial-equipment industry. Unit man-hours, 194748. Number required, factors influencing; indexes
and trends, by type of product and type of labor.
1950— June 645-648.
Industrial hygiene. Bolivia, Peru, and Chile, summary
of problems and recommendations. 1949— Nov. 538539.
Industrial mobilization, foreign countries:
Belgium. Law of Mar. 20, 1945, and decrees of
April 1945, provisions. 1945— Aug. 239.
Great Britain. Wartime measures for, summary
of, to April 1942. 1942— July 25-41.
Industrial Organisation and Development Act of 1947.
Work authorized under. 1948— Oct. 370.
Industrial relations. See Labor and industrial relations;
Labor-management relations; also Legislation, U. S.
Federal and general.
Industrial research:
Laboratories. Professional-personnel requirements.
Findings of BLS survey for A rm y-N avy Muni­
tions Board summarized. 1941— Oct. 875-876.
Scientists. Employment and opportunities for ad­
vancement, work schedules and related wage
practices, late 1949. 1950— Apr. 369-373.
Industrialization, United States. New industrial devel­
opment in South; assets— good markets, available
materials and labor supply. 1949— Aug. 159-161.

76

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Industrialization, foreign countries:
China. Scheme proposed for 7 regions, with data
as to area, population, and natural resources.
1944— Feb. 341-342.
India. Plans for postwar period summarized.
19U — Feb. 343.
Korea. Nature of labor force and extent of manu­
facturing industry, 1944-48. 1949— Apr. 401-403.
South Africa, Union of. Postwar expansion urged
by Planning Council. 1945— June 1220-1221.
Industries, United States. Regional shifts in, 18991949. 1950— July 106-108.
Industries and services. Classification designations,
exact, in United States and Great Britain, compared.
1944— July 160.
Inflation, United States:
Factors creating pressures to produce. Quarterly
report of Council of Economic Advisers to
President on Apr. 9, 1948. 1948—June 640.
Forces at work, end of 1948, outlook. 1949— Feb.
139-140, 142-143.
Measures for halting. President’s Economic Report,
January 1948. 1948— Mar. 279.
Problems at home and abroad. Conditions at end
of 1946 summarized. 1947— Jan. 28-42.
World, wartime and postwar. Factors underlying
and effect on prices. 1948— Nov. 467-475.
Inflation, Great Britain. Union attitudes toward gov­
ernment efforts to control. 1948— Oct. 368.
Injunctions (see also Court decisions).
Provisions for granting, under Labor Management
Relations Act, 1947; Norris-LaGuardia Act to be
disregarded. 1947— July 61.
Injuries, industrial. See Accident prevention; Accident
statistics; Workmen’s compensation.
Injury-frequency rates. See Accident statistics.
Inspection. See Labor inspection, foreign countries.
Instruments industries. Scientific industrial and lab­
oratory; surgical (and apparatus) ; dental goods
(and equipment); wage determinations effective
Sept. 23, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1294.
Insurance (see also specific types o f ) :
Domestic workers’, carried by employers, inade­
quacy of (Washington, D. C.) 1942— Feb. 352.
Industrial-research scientists, late 1949. 1 9 5 0 —
Apr. 372.
Plans, collective-bargaining negotiations, mid-1949.
1949— Sept. 239-240.
Intensity of work. Increase in, 1900-50. 1950— July 22.
Inter-agency Committee on Occupational Deferment
(U . S. Government). List of, critical activities and
programs submitted by, to Selective Service System,
May 24, 1944. 1944— July 90-92.
Inter-American cooperation:
Caribbean region. West Indian Conference, Barba­
dos, March 1944 (representatives from Bahamas,
Barbados, British Guiana, British Honduras,
Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Puerto Rico, Trini­
dad, Virgin Islands, and Windward Islands).
Objectives discussed. 1944— July 110-111.
Fellowship offered to qualified citizens of other
American countries, by U. S. Department of
Commerce. Summary of plan. 1944— Oct. 822.
Latin-America. Participation in meeting to formu­
late postwar policies; membership and activities
of postwar planning bodies, by country. 1944—
July 107-109.
Inter-American Development Commission. Meeting,
New York City, May 1944. Membership and activities
of postwar planning bodies, by country. 1944— July
107-109.
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions. Annual meeting 1941, notice of
and officers for coming year. 1941— Dec. 1456.




“ International Bill of Rights.” Adoption of such bill by
United Nations proposed. 1945—July 43.
International communications. Methods of and facili­
ties for (State Department outline). 1945— July 41.
International Labor Conference. S e e International
Labor Organization— Conferences.
International Labor Organization:
Conferences. 1941. Announcement, with summary
account of past meetings. Proceedings, and pro­
gram of future action outlined. 1941— Sept.
616-617; 1942— Feb. 305-317.
------- 1942. London meeting, representatives present
and summary of problems discussed (Goodrich).
1942— June 1320-1322.
------- 1944. Called by Governing Body. December
1943. Agenda, summary of items. 1944— Mar.
490-499.
----- ;--------- Declaration of Aims and Purposes; resolu­
tions; and recommendations; summary (Good­
rich and Gambs). 1944— July 1-12.
------- 1945. Preparation for outlined. Agenda and
summary of action taken. 1945— Sept. 433-436;
1946— Jan. 44-47.
------- 1946. Summary of accomplishments. 1946—
Dec. 935-940.
------- 1948. San Francisco. Proceedings; conventions
(agreements), recommendations and resolutions
adopted. 1948— Sept. 261-266.
------- 1950. Representation, action taken, and dis­
cussions. Summary. 1950— Aug. 210-213.
Constitutional amendments proposed since initia­
tion of movement in 1944. Summary of provi­
sions. 1946— Dec. 936-938.
Declaration of Aims and Purposes adopted by 1944
Conference (Philadelphia). 1944— July 2-3.
Extraordinary or special session, Columbia Uni­
versity, New York, October-November 1941,
summary of proceedings. 1941— Dec. 1448-1450.
Future work. Program outlined at 1941 Confer­
ence. 1942— Feb. 313-317.
Goals worked for (as summarized in State Depart­
ment outline). 1945— June 1184-1185.
Governing Body. Meeting (London, December
1943). Plans for 1944 ILO Conference. 1944—
Mar. 492-493.
------- 1944 elections of members. 1944— July 12.
United Nations. Affiliation with Social and Eco­
nomic Council. 1946— Dec. 935-936.
------- Relationship to. 1946— Dec. 935-936, 940.
Value of and relation to objectives of Dumbarton
Oaks Conference (Perkins). 1945— Apr. 701.
Vocational guidance, tentative recommendations
concerning. 1948— Dec. 597-598.
International relations. Labor’s role in. Remarks at
A F L and CIO 1948 annual conventions. 1949—
Jan. 12-14.
International Trade Organization:
Charter for. Origin of proposal and international
sessions leading to completion of document.
1948— Nov. 476.
------- Provisions summarized, with emphasis on
Chapters II and III on employment and economic
development. 1948— Nov. 476-482.
S e e a lso Trade, international.
Investments:
Consumer and business. Totals, 1948 compared
with 1947. 1949— Feb. 141.
Domestic (gross) and foreign (net) as percentage
of gross national product, 9 countries, 1938 and
1947. 1948— Nov. 470.
Iona Self-Help Cooperatives. Home-building plan be­
gun in 1934. Summary and status October 1940.
1941— Feb. 302-306.
Iron and steel industry, United States:
Allocations, steel, voluntary, under Public Law No.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
395. 19U9— Feb. 169.
“ Basic Steel” decision, National W ar Labor Board,
Nov. 25, 1944, provisions summarized. 19 U5—
Jan. 41-43.
Composition of the industry and production and
employment trends, 1950. 1950— July 120-122.
Employment conditions, as affected by war, and
employment outlook. 19U — Feb. 258-267.
S
Fabricated structural steel. Characteristics and
scope of survey of wage structure in January
1945. 19U6— Apr. 621-624.
Injury experience. See Accident statistics, U. S.,
by industry.
Overtime provisions in collective agreements. 19 U1—
Apr. 846-847.
Rationalization program, United States Steel.
19U7— June 967-982.
Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and re­
newal of contract. Summary of provisions in
collective agreements. 19U1— Mar. 553-554.
Strikes. See Labor-management disputes— Steel in­
dustry.
Iron and steel industry, Canada. Union status in col­
lective agreements, 1945. 19 U — Mar. 424.
S
Iron foundries. Hawaii. Small industry represented by.
19U1— Jan. 40.
Iron (gray) jobbing-foundry industry. Minimum-wage
order effective Nov. 3, 1941. 19U1— Nov. 1293.
Jamaicans. Wartime utilization of, in U. S. industrial
plants. Plan and experience summarized. 19 U — Nov.
S
848-857.
Jewelry industry:
Description of industry and scope and method of
wage and hour survey, February 1940. 19U1—
Jan. 184-186.
Minimum wage order effective Nov. 1, 1941. 19U1—
Sept. 715.
Jewish Labor, General Federation of. See Labor
organizations, foreign countries— Israel.
Job evaluation:
Steel industry. Methods of classification, produc­
tion and maintenance jobs; factors involved
with their maximum weights. 19U7— June 977980.
Western Union Telegraph Co. Plan adopted, in­
cluding job classification, descriptions, and wage
schedules as of Apr. 1, 1948. 19U — Aug. 134.
S
Job selection. Occupational choice, based on industrial
economy, determining factor in. 1950— ^ uly 13.
J
Job tenure. Employer-employee relationship regarding.
Value of continued experience with the employer.
1950— July 18-19.
Joint production committees, United States. History
of, wartime, and number functioning in 1948, activi­
ties. 19 U — Aug. 123-126.
S
Joint production committees, Great Britain :
Character, functions, problems, and results of
activities (Summary of ILO study). 19U — May
S
900-903.
Functions, widespread use of in factories, and
effectiveness. 19U — July 28-29.
S
Results obtained by use of, as reported by Amal­
gamated Engineering Union. 19U — June 1110S

1112.
Journalists. Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May 510.
Jurisdictional disputes. See Legislation, U. S., Federal
and general.
Knit-goods industry, Cuba. Minimum-wage order by
National Minimum Wage Commission, March 15,
1941. 19U1— June 1488-1489.
Knitted and men’s woven underwear, and commercial
knitting industries. Minimum-wage order, effective
Nov. 24, 1941; amended, effective Mar. 3, 1942.




77

19Ul— T)ec. 1577; 19U2— Mar. 772.
Knitted-outerwear industry:
Minimum-wage order effective Apr. 20, 1942.
19U°2— May 1189.
Philadelphia. Characteristics, 1943. 19U — May
S
1062-1063.
Krug report. S e e European Recovery Program.
Labor adm inistration, Japan:
Measures adopted 1922 to 1944, summary. 19U —
S
Oct. 659-660.
Ministry of Labor and its operational agencies,
maturity and effectiveness of, 1949-50. 1950—
Oct. 449.
Labor agencies. Denmark. Administrative. Status prior
to World War II, summary. 19 U — Nov. 953-954.
U
Labor and industrial conditions, United States ( s e e also
Economic conditions) :
Child labor. State employment or age certificates
for minors, 1950. Issuance and purpose. 1950—
Aug. 241.
Developments in 1948. Resume. 19 U9— Feb. 139-186.
Hawaii. Factors affecting, postwar; basic indus­
tries, sugar, pineapple and service; employment
position, present and prospective; postwar
unionization of labor. Summary. 19U — May 488S
492.
------- Outlook for labor (1940), general. 19U1—
Jan. 46-48.
------- Sugar, pineapple, printing and publishing,
construction, miscellaneous manufacturing, trade
and service industries, longshore work, and
public utilities. Women workers, tailoring, dress­
making, and barbering. Working conditions sum­
marized. 19U1— Jan. 24-25.
------- White-collar workers, problems concerning,
and monthly and annual earnings. 1941—-Jan.
45-46.
Pre-Korean and Korean periods, 1950. Relation of
Labor-management negotiations to economic and
international conditions. 1950— Dec. 663-664.
South, 1949. Markets and materials greater attrac­
tion for plants moving South than labor needs.
19U9— Aug. 159-161.
Technical and economic progress, 1900-50; politi­
cal influences; effect on worker and home.
1950— July 5-12.
Labor and industrial conditions, foreign countries ( see
a lso Economic conditions):
General. FacUfinding activities of U. S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics concerning. Summary. 19U5—
May 953.
Albania. Summary, World W ar II period. 19U —
S
Dec. 1114-1115.
Argentina. Unemployment, industrial disputes,
and cost of living, 1940. 19U1— May 1123-1125.
Austria. Trade-union developments, prior to and
since liberation. Austrian Trade Union Federa­
tion granted legal status, summer 1946; charac­
ter and organization, activities and accomplish­
ments. 19U8— Sept. 244-248.
Belgium. Employment regulations under order of
June 21, 1941. 19U2— Jan. 218-219.
------- Prior to invasion (1940), and under subse­
quent German occupation; 1945 and early 1946.
19UU— Feb. 280-298; 19U6— July 26-35.
British Malaya. Summary, including economic and
political background, prior to World W ar II
and since Japanese invasion. 19U — Aug. 279U
294.
Bulgaria.
Summary, including historical back­
ground, to 1941. 19US— Oct. 672-688.
Canada. Statistics, 1939 and 1940. 19U1— Jan.
94-95.
Chile. Summary for 1942. 19US— Oct. 716-719.

78

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor and industrial conditions, f. c.— Continued
China. Effects of war and of industrialization;
labor and welfare problems; and proposed policy
(Tso). 1941— Feb. 322-326.
------- Employment; wages, hours, and working
conditions;
industrial
relations;
cooperative
movement; social insurance. Prewar status and
wartime changes. 1945— Jan. 18-40.
------- Factories using power-driven machinery and
employing more than 30 workers. Industries
covered and production indexes, 1941 and 1942.
19U Oct. 719-720.
S—
------- Labor Policy, 1942, outline and wartime
amendments to ; postwar reconstruction plans.
19U — Feb. 340-342.
U
Costa Rica. Maximum hours, minimum wage,
paid vacations, collective bargaining, and con­
ciliation machinery, provided for by constitu­
tional amendment July 7, 1943. 19U — Dec.
S
1175-1176.
Denmark. Summary, period preceding World W ar
II, with some later data. 1944— Nov. 945-961.
El Salvador. Small industries. Credit provided
for by Mortgage Bank (Government). 19U —
S
Aug. 234.
Europe. Trade-unions and wage-price relation­
ships, 1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
France. Prior to and after German invasion in
1940; spring of 1945; summary. 1944— Oct. 705727; 1945— Aug. 240-242.
French Africa (excepting Northern A frica). Con­
tracts, working conditions, social insurance,
labor inspection and arbitration.
Provisions
of decree of June 18, 1945, summarized. 1946—
Jan. 90-92.
French Indochina. Summaries for period preced­
ing World W ar II and period of Japanese con­
trol. 1944— July 47-61.
French North Africa. General summary, with
background. 19US— May 858-875.
Germany. Autumn 1945, summary. 1946— Jan.
72-76.
------- Economic background, industrial distribution
of population, employment conditions, employ­
ment agencies, wages and earnings, labor or­
ganizations, labor relations, social insurance,
cooperative movement. Summary. 1945— Mar.
498-524.
------- Labor Front (creation by Nazis, character,
and activities). 1944— Nov. 932-944.
Great Britain. Armament production. Report of
Select Committee on National Expenditure for
session 1940-41, summary. 1941— May 11551159.
------- Position of labor, 1939-41. Manpower situa­
tion, legislation and regulation, dilution, train­
ing, and transfer of workers, economic situa­
tion, hours, union membership, labor disputes
and restrictions on strikes. 1942— Mar. 594615.
------- Trade-unions and wage-price relationships,
1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
Great Britain (and Northern Ireland). 1943, sum­
mary for year. 1944— Apr. 742-745.
Greece. Summary to 1941, including historical
background. 19U — Aug. 215-232.
S
India. Measures to improve, to 1944, summary.
1944— June 1190-1194.
Iran. Conditions prior to decree of May 1946,
and provisions of pending new labor law. Sum­
mary. 1946— Sept. 364-368.
Italy. Allied Military Government and measures
in German-controlled sections, 1944. 1944— Dec.
1162-1163.




------- Labor shortage; provisions of act of July
16, 1940, lifting legal restrictions; increased
working hours. 1941— May 1159-1160.
------- 1929 to June 1943; summary, including re­
view of prewar factors. 19US— Nov. 911-931.
-------Postwar. Trade-union confederations, organi­
zation, functions, and activities. 1949— Jan. 4 9 53.
Japan. Employment, wages, hours, working con­
ditions, labor administration and legislation,
labor and employer organizations, industrial re­
lations, the cooperative movement, and social
insurance. Summary. 1945— Oct. 651-668.
------- Labor policies and programs under the occu­
pation. 1947— Feb. 239-254.
------- Trade-unions and wage-price relationships,
1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
------- Labor-boss system; history, industries in­
volved, conditions, and legislation designed to
eliminate. 1949— Jan. 47-49.
------- Labor's role in the economy, 1949-50; tradeunion movement. 1950— Oct. 446-449.
Latin America. Trade-unions and wage-price rela­
tionships, 1948. 1949— Feb. 181-186.
Netherlands. Period preceding World W ar II, with
some more recent data, summary. 1944— Jan.
32-57.
Netherland Indies. 1920's to early 1940's; sum­
mary, including historical background. 1944—
May 972-992; 1945— Feb. 294 (correction).
New Zealand. Manpower shortage, overtime, can­
teens, women workers, workshop committees,
absenteeism. Summary. 19U — Oct. 720-722.
S
Norway. Period prior to German occupation, in­
cluding historical background. Summary. 1944—
Sept. 496-515.
Philippine Islands. Employment conditions, wages
and hours, vacations with pay, labor relations,
cooperatives, social insurance up to Japanese in­
vasion; effect of invasion on employment, wages
and hours, cost of living, labor control, and co­
operatives. Summary. 1945— Apr. 776-789.
Poland. Status prior to World W ar II (including
historical background), and changes under Ger­
man control. Summary. 1944— July 62-81.
Rumania. Prior to World W ar II, with historical
background. 19 4S— Dec. 1102-1114.
South Africa, Union of. Population, labor force,
and summary of legislation since formulation of
Dominion in 1909. 19U — Sept. 473-483.
S
South Korea. Industrial rehabilitation, 1945-48.
Increased population, reduced industrial re­
sources, and labor force data. 1949— Apr. 4 0 1 403.
Switzerland. Control of prices and wages in war­
time. Summary of status. 1944— Dec. 1282.
Thailand. Summary, to January 1942. 1944—June
1169-1177.
Trinidad and Tobago. Summary, 1942. 1944— Apr.
746-747.
Yugoslavia. Summary to 1940, including historical
background of country. 194S— Nov. 895-910.
Labor and industrial relations, United States ( see also
Labor-management relations):
Absenteeism. See Absenteeism.
Agreements. See Collective agreements.
Agriculture. Summary of conditions (Jamieson).
1946— Jan. 25-36.
Cooperation between labor unions and management.
See Labor-Management cooperation.
Court decisions concerning. See Court decisions.
“ Cut-back" on war contracts. Labor force adjust­
ments and most common grievances reported.
1945— Mar. 471-476.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Disputes and conciliation measures, 1941, discus­
sion of (Bowden). 194%— Apr. 866-868.
Fact-finding activities of Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics summarized. 1 9 4 5 — May 942-943.
Federal wage and hour regulations, effect upon.
1941—
Apr. 969-970.
Grievance procedures under collective bargaining.
Summary (from study of 101 plants). 1946—
Aug. 175-185.
Hawaii. Regulations by military government, De­
cember 1941, and January, February, and April
1942. 194% — June 1323-1324.
Labor-Management Conference, November 5-30,
1945. Composition, procedure, and text of re­
ports unanimously adopted. 1946—-Jan. 37-43.
Labor-relations department created in Los Angeles
superior court. 1 9 4 1 — July 137-138.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general— Labor relations.
Munition plants, Government-owned, privately op­
erated. Statement by W ar and Navy Depart­
ments, July 18, 1942. 1 9 4 2 — Sept. 462-465.
National Labor Relations Board, activities. See Na­
tional Labor Relations Board.
National W ar Labor Board, decisions. See National
War Labor Board.
Navy Department. Announcement of policy Aug.
8, 1942, summarized. 1 9 4 2 — Oct. 719-720.
Philippine Islands. Customary contract and Pakiao
systems; extent of collective bargaining; State
requirements concerning wage payments; dis­
putes; conciliation. 1 9 4 5 — Apr. 779-784.
Railroads. S e e Conciliation and arbitration— Rail­
roads ; a lso Railroads.
Supreme Court (U . S.) decisions concerning, Oc­
tober 1940 to June 1942. Summary. 1 9 4 2 — Sept.
532-538.
Union-management cooperation. See Labor-man­
agement cooperation.
Union recognition. Types of in effect, January 1943.
1 9 4 3 — Feb. 284-290 .
Labor and industrial relations, foreign countries ( s e e
also Legislation):
Belgium. Joint councils, revived under decree law
of June 9, 1945. Organization, powers, and en­
forcement of decisions. Provisions summarized.
1 9 4 5 — Dec. 1169-1170.
------- Prior to German invasion (1940). 1 9 4 4 —
Feb. 291-293.
------- Trade-unions. Status in April 1945 sum­
marized. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 279-281.
Bolivia. Tin industry. Provisions of United States.
Bolivia contract, effective until June 30, 1945.
1 9 4 5 — Oct. 728.
Brazil. Decisions in 1943 by National Labor Coun­
cil, summary. 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 808.
British West Indies (Jamaica, Antigua, Leeward
Islands, and St. Christopher). Summary of con­
ditions. 1 9 4 5 — June 1246-1248.
Bulgaria. Collective agreements, strikes and lock­
outs, and arbitration machinery. Summary of
legal provisions covering. 1 9 4 3 — Oct. 682-683.
Canada. National W ar Labor Board reorganized,
Feb. 12, 1943; statement, new chairman. 1 9 4 3 —
May 911-912.
------- Saskatchewan. Agreement signed Aug. 2,
1945, between Provincial Government and Sas­
katchewan Civil Servants Association. 1 9 4 5 —
Nov. 972-973,
------- Wartime code (P.C. 1003) promulgated Feb.
17, 1944. Provisions. 1 9 4 4 — Apr. 751-756.
Chile. Economic Powers Act of Dec. 23, 1943. Pro­
visions. 1 9 4 4 — Apr. 793-794.
China. Control under Aug. 21, 1941, and Apr. 9,
1942, regulations and May 5, 1942, law. 1 9 4 3 —
July 35-36.




79

-------Status prior to World W ar II and provisions
of law of 1929, amended 1943. 1945— Jan. 36-38.
Denmark. Status prior to World W ar II, summary.
1944— Nov. 955-956.
Finland. Declaration of policy by Minister of So­
cial Affairs, Feb. 20, 1941. 1941— June 13951396.
France. Collective agreements, industrial disputes,
conciliation and arbitration, summary of status
prior to World W ar I I ; provisions of German
order of November 1941. 1944— Oct. 721-724.
------- Labor-management committees provided for
by act of Feb. 2, 1945. 1945— July 92-93.
French Indochina. Labor administration, situation
as to organization of unions, limits on right to
strike, conciliation and arbitration, prior to
World W ar I I; measures, since 1940 under domi­
nation of Japan. Summary. 1944—-July 58-61.
Germany. Contract workers from Rumania and
Spain, provisions concerning. 1943— Jan. 43-45.
------- Machinery for maintaining industrial peace
before and after rise of Nazism. 1945— Mar. 516518.
------- U. S. Zone. Unions, works councils, and em­
ployer organizations, development o f: United
States and Allied policies concerning. Summary.
1948— Apr. 378-385.
Great Britain. Catering Wages Commission pro­
vided for by law of Apr. 20, 1943. 1943— July
42-44.
--------- Coal-mining industry. Mine Workers’ Fed­
eration request (May 1942) for general increase,
and decision of Greene Tribunal. 1942— Nov.
942-943.
---------------- National Wages Board reestablished,
1942. 1 9 4 2 — Nov. 943, 950.
----- Colonial dependencies. Supervision agencies
provided and legislation enacted to 1942. 1943—
Oct. 713-716.
------- Fair Wages Resolution, proposed, for sub­
mission at close of war. Discussion and text.
1942— Dec. 1285-1287.
-------Government committees on which labor is rep­
resented, March 1942. 1942— July 40-41.
-------Possessions with American naval bases. Sum­
mary of legislative provisions concerning labor.
1942— Apr. 907-916.
------- Restoration of Prewar Trade Practices Act.
Provisions. 1942— June 1329-1331.
Hungary. Organization, collective agreements, in­
dustrial disputes, and conciliation machinery.
General summary, with statistics, specified years,
period immediately preceding World W ar II.
1942— June 1069-1088.
India. Conciliation machinery to be established as
stated in Department of Labor memo of Apr. 9,
1945. 1945— Nov. 973-974.
----- - Employment, working conditions, unions, con­
ciliation and arbitration, legislation, training,
health and safety, social insurance. (Das.)
1943— Sept. 452-469.
Italy. Labor-management committees. Development,
1900 to 1946. 1946— June 912-913.
-------Metalworkers recruited for work in Germany,
through agreements in February 1941. 1943—
Jan. 42.
Japan. Change from feudalism to modern indus­
trialism, close of nineteenth and beginning of
twentieth century. 1945— Oct. 661.
------- Factors in, 1949-50. 1950— Oct. 448.
Netherlands. Labor Foundation. Establishment di­
rectly after liberation, constitutional provisions,
member organizations, and program. 1945— Dec.
1171-1173.
-------Prior to World W ar I I; summary, with some
more recent data. 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 46-51.

80

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor and industrial relations, f. c.— Continued
Norway. Indirect conscription of labor by Ger­
mans. 1942— Nov. 951-952.
Palestine. Labor, Department of. Establishment by
ordinance of Feb. 15, 1943. 1943— May 912.
Peru. Contract between highland farm proprietor
and Indian tenants. Provisions. 1945— Aug. 273.
Poland. Status prior to World W ar II and changes
after German occupation. 1944— July 67-81.
Rumania. Labor organizations, status in summer
of 1945. 1945— Oct. 754-755.
------- Workers recruited for Germany under nego­
tiations of December 1941. 1943— Jan. 43.
Spain. Workers recruited for Germany under
agreement in August 1941. Contract provisions.
1943— Jan. 43—
45.
Switzerland. Collective agreements in force, end
of 1944; industrial disputes, by year, 1935-44.
1945— Dec. 1176-1177.
Labor and welfare offices. Latin America. Names, ad­
dresses, and directing officials, 1941. 1942— May 1246—
1248.
“ Labor book” (or passport) system. Soviet Union. New
requirements, decree of May 28, 1940. 1941— Mar.
610.
Labor banks. See Cooperatives— Banks, labor.
Labor bosses, Japan. See Labor and industrial rela­
tions, foreign countries.
Labor briefs, United States. Economic. Value of, 190050. 1950—July 73-74.
Labor brokers:
Engineering-service companies. Supply of skilled
labor program announced by Government agen­
cies for preventing abuses. 1944— June 11891190.
------- W ar Manpower Commission instructions con­
cerning, to regional directors, May 19, 1944.
1944— -July 94.
Labor camps. Child workers on farms in Erie County,
N. Y . Conditions. 1941— Apr. 864-865.
Labor-contractor system. Migrant workers, California
and other States. Methods and results (summarized
from hearings held by Tolan Committee). 1941—
Feb. 345-348.
Labor costs, United States:
Manufacturing industries. Output per man-hour
and unit labor cost, by industry, 1939 to 1942.
1943— May, 885-887.
Study of, authorized by Congress, 1940. 1941—
Mar. 658.
Labor costs, Canada. Wages as percent of value added
to products by manufacturing processes, by year,
1929-38. 1941— Oct. 1026.
Labor courts, foreign countries:
Brazil. Activities, end of 1948. 1949— Feb. 186.
Colombia. Law effective March 1945, provisions.
1945— Aug. 295.
Germany, U. S. Zone. Establishment of and juris­
diction. Types and number of cases filed, dis­
position. 1948— Apr. 385.
Norway. Collective agreements. Scope of authority
in enforcement of. 1947— Sept. 340-341.
------- Establishment on basis of 1915 law, supple­
mented by laws of 1927, 1931, and 1933. 1944—
Sept. 509.
Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, Sweden). Collec­
tive agreements. Scope of authority in enforce­
ment of. 1947— June 1027-1028.
Labor, Department of (U. S. Government) :
Annual report of Secretary. Fiscal years 1942, 1944,
and 1945. Summaries, including recommenda­
tions. 1943— Mar. 476-478; 1945— Mar. 525527, Sept. 440-442.
------- Fiscal years 1942-43 and 1947. Recommenda­
tions for postwar reconstruction, and for legis­




lation. 1944— Feb. 331-332; 1948— Mar. 280281.
Bureau of Employment Security transferred to the
Department of Labor under Presidents Reorgan­
ization Plan No. 2, August 1949. 1 9 4 9 — Sept. III.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. See Bureau of Labor
Statistics, U. S. Government.
Conciliation Service. Functions and personnel,
transfer of, to Federal Mediation and Concilia­
tion, under Labor Management Relations Act,
Title II. Historical summary. 1 9 4 7 — July 60-61,
Aug. 172-174.
------- See also Conciliation and arbitration— Depart­
ment of Labor.
Division of Labor Standards. Union Registration
Branch established; function. 1 9 4 7 — Oct. 436.
Legislative program, 15-point, for fiscal year 1948.
1949—
421-422.
Office of Defense Manpower in. Establishment,
September 1950, by Secretary of Labor Tobin
pursuant to President’s Executive order. Duties,
1950—
Oct. IV.
------- Organizational set-up, advisory committees,
and functions of Labor Department Bureaus, Oc­
tober 1950. 1 9 5 0 — Nov. IV, 575-576.
Origin and work of. Laws establishing; historical
background; changes in bureaus and divisions;
subsequent
developments.
1 9 4 7 — May
845;
1 ^ - M a r . 249-254; 1 9 5 0 — July 65.
Secretary of Labor, role of, in meeting defense
and essential civilian labor needs pursuant to
President’s Executive order, September 1950.
1 9 5 0 — Oct. 457.
Tobin, Maurice J., appointed Secretary, Aug. 7,
to fill vacancy created by death of predecessor.
1 9 4 8 — Sept. III.
Women’s Bureau. Conference commemorating Sen­
eca Falls Convention of 1848, beginning women’s
rights movement. 1 9 4 8 — Apr. 408-409.
------- Wartime work of, including survey of em­
ployment possibilities, and working conditions
and counseling of employers. 1942— Dec. 11701184.
Labor departments (State), United States:
California. Department of Industrial Relations and
divisions; background in earlier State Bureau of
Labor Statistics. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 676-677.
Oregon. Bureau of Labor and other agencies ad­
ministering specific laws. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 681-682.
Southern States have all established, except Mis­
sissippi (as of 1946). 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 536.
Washington Department of Labor and Industries.
Activities. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 684-685.
Labor department, Turkey. Ministry of Labor created,
June 8, 1945; scope and functions defined in law of
June 22, 1945. 1 9 4 5 — Sept. 505.
Labor dilution. Great Britain. Graded system needed
to attain maximum. 1 9 4 1 — May 1158.
Labor displacement. Tobacco industry (cigars). Mech­
anization resulting in and conditions in 1940. 1941—
July 95-98.
Labor distribution. Norway. Regulations governing, ef­
fective Oct. 14, 1940. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 596-597.
Labor disputes. See Labor-Management disputes.
Labor education. See Workers’ education.
Labor events:
Chronology of recent. See Chronologies.
Monthly review. See section , The Labor Month in
Review, each issue July 1947-December 1950.
Labor force, United States:
Adequacy of, fiscal year 1949, for expanded de­
fense program. 1 9 4 8 — Oct. 373-376.
Armed forces. Estimates, BLS methods of obtain­
ing. 1 9 4 8 — July 51.
----- Net strength, authorized by Selective Service

81

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Act of 1948. Recruits from labor force. 191*9—
Feb. 172.
Armed services and civilians, by employment
status, specified periods, April 1940 to August
1946. 191*6— Nov. 670.
Changes in. By class of activity, December 1943December 1944. 191*5— Feb. 289-290.
------- Prewar, wartime, and postwar; outlook for
future growth. 191*7— Dec. 637-678.
Civilian. July, years 1940-43, by employment sta­
tus and sex. 191*3— Nov. 871.
------- Specified periods, by sex and industry group.
See p. V, each issu e, July 1944-June 1947.
Compared with population, 1940, 1945, and 1950
(estimate), by sex and age group. 191*1— Nov.
1172-1173.
Composition of. 1948, employment and unemploy­
ment totals. 191*9— Feb. 140.
------- 1950 (August), and needs for defense pro­
gram and for all-out mobilization. Summary.
1950— Nov. 564-567.
Deviation of, from normal, April 1945, 1946, 1947,
by age and sex. 191*7— Dec. 641.
Distribution, by year and industry group, 194043, and estimate for 1944. 191*3— Dec. 1094-1098.
Employment and unemployment. Averages, selected
years, 1929-44; by year, 1945-47, 191*7— Dec. 640.
-------January 1948-April 1950 (table). 1950— June
620.
------- See also Employment statistics; Unemploy­
ment.
Engineers, 1890-1948. 191*9— July 15.
Estimating; BLS methods, revision of. 191*8— July
50-51, 53.
Growth. 1940-50, by State (estimated) and 194850; factors affecting. 191*6— Dec. 851-871; 1950—
June 621-622.
------- September 1940 to September 1944, and dis­
tribution of labor force. 191*1*— Dec. 1158-1161.
-------Since 1940, and estimated excess in April 1945
over normal, by age and sex. 191*5— Aug. 234236.
Hawaii. Composition, by race and income group.
191*8— June 612.
Labor reserve, growth of, 1900-50, and new needs
for new workers. 1950— July 16-18.
Men, 1940. Working-life pattern, (table, by year of
age). 1950— Sept. 323-331.
Number of persons and percent of population in,
by age group, week ended Mar. 30, 1940. 191*7—
Dec. 638-639.
Occupational characteristics, employer-employee
relationships, and physical conditions of work,
1900-50. 1950— July 13-22.
Older workers. Wartime contribution; postwar
problems. 191*7— Dec. 661-663.
Peacetime. First year after VJ-day. Summary.
191*6— Nov. 669-680.
Percent of population in, prewar and postwar, and
changes by sex, including data for West Euro­
pean countries participating in ERP. 191*7—
Dec. 679-680.
Postwar. Effects (expected) of demobilization
and change from wartime to civilian industries.
191*1*— Feb. 269-279.
San Francisco Bay area, durable goods manufac­
ture, wartime. Characteristics. 191*5— Oct. 708720.
Skilled workers. Professionally trained manpower
to become available in 1942 or by January 1943,
findings of survey. 191*2— Aug. 247-250.
Sources of labor supply, 1900-50. 1950— July 15-16.
------- S ee also Labor supply.
Southern States. By State, sex and color, 1940;




growth in South, 1920-40, compared with growth
in North and West. 191*6— Oct. 490-491.
Status. April 1943, and excess over normal, by age
group and sex. 191*3— Aug. 212-214.
-------August 1950, sources of manpower for defense
program and for all-out mobilization. 1950— Nov.
564-567.

Total. Civilian and Armed Forces, by year Septem­
ber 1940-44, and by employment status and by
year 1929-46. 191*1*— Dec. 1161; 191*7— Dec. 638.
-------

Classified by employment status,

191*8— July 51-52.
------ Estimated, April

1940

to

1929-47.

January

1943.

Monthly, by sex and age group. 191*2— July 191,
Aug. 406-407, Sept. 646-647, Oct. 879-880, Nov.
1100-1101, Dec. 1317-1319; 191*3— Jan. 196-197,
Feb. 409-410, Mar. 634-635.
-------February 1943 to April 1947. Monthly, by sex
and class of employment. See Labor Force, sec­
tion on Trends of Employment, etc., each issue
April 1943-June 1947.
------- May 1947 to October 1950. Monthly by em­
ployment status, hours worked, and sex. See
Current labor statistics, Table A - l , each issue
July 1947-December 1950.
------ Monthly (January 1948-April 1950). 1950—
Jan. 620.
Trends in 1948 (including employment and labor
turn-over). 191*9— Feb. 171-178.
Unemployment. See Unemployment.
Veterans. Factor in 1948. 191*9— Feb. 172.
-------Postwar participation of. 191*7— Dec. 642, 644.
Women. Movement into, 1948; unemployment rates,
1948, compared with 1946. 191*9— Feb. 172-173,
176.
------- Participation in, prewar, wartime, and pros­
pective trends; estimated deviations, 1945-49, by
sex. 191*7— Dec. 638-644.
-------Prewar, wartime, and postwar periods (194047), industrial and by occupational shifts; age
and marital status. 191*7— Dec. 666-671.
------- Postwar decline in total participating in;
postwar occupational shifts. 191*7— Aug. 144145.
------- Southern States, by State. Factors affecting
work of women. 191*6— Oct. 490, 493-494.
------- Wartime contributions; withdrawal, April
1945-April 1947; proportion of older women re­
maining, April 1947. 191*7— Dec. 661-663.
------- See also Employment statistics.

Labor force, foreign countries:
European Recovery Program. Countries participat­
ing in. Percent of population in, prewar and post­
war changes; character of components; analysis
and summary. (United States figures included.)
191*7— Dec. 678-684.
Great Britain. Displaced persons. European Volun­
teer Workers (E V W ’s), postwar use, totals by
country of origin and occupations to which as­
signed; rights and duties. 191*9— Mar. 282.
------- Total number and percentage, distribution,
mid-1939, mid-1945, end-1947, October 1948.
191*9— Mar. 278-281.
Italy. Workers included and number belonging to
labor organizations. 191*9— Jan. 49.
Netherlands. Manpower and population, labor-force
distribution and percentage change, 1938 to
1948. 191*9— Aug. 161-162.
Soviet Union. Estimated 1926 and 1940-49. 1950—
May 534.
Labor Front, Germany:
Dissolution in 1945, summary. 191*6— Jan. 76.
Structure, relation to Nazi Party, position in Third
Reich, prewar and wartime activities. 191*1*— Nov.
932-944.

82

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor, Governmental administrative agencies for. Nor­
way, prior to and subsequent to German occupation.
1 9 4 4 — Sept. 506.
Labor Health Institute, St. Louis. History of. 1 9 4 8 —
Jan. 34-39.
Labor inspection, foreign countries:
Chile. General Labor Office, Inspection Division.
Summary of activities, 1943 compared with pre­
vious years. 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 809-810.
Venezuela. Extent of, 1949. 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 452.
Labor legislation. See Legislation.
Labor Management Advisory Committee. Conciliation
Service Department of Labor (U.S. Government).
Recommendations made in December 1946 (first pub­
lic action). 1 9 4 7 — Jan. 81-83.
Labor-management committees. See Joint production
committees; a lso Labor-management cooperation.
Labor-Management Conference. See Conventions, meet­
ings, etc.
Labor-management cooperation, United States:
Clothing industries. Methods and results. 1941—
June 1358-1359.
Coal mining. Rocky Mountain Fuel Co. and United
Mine Workers. Results of the 1928 agreement.
1 9 4 1 — June 1357.
Die-casting industry. Plan established in company
plant to promote efficiency. 1 9 4 1 — June 1355.
Electrical manufacturing. Waste and defective
workmanship reduced through plan originated
in 1937. 1 9 4 1 — June 1354-1355.
Experiments and accomplishments, 1920 to 1940.
Historical review. 1 9 4 1 — June 1351-1359.
Health-benefit and welfare plans. See Health—
Plans, health and welfare.
Hosiery
(full-fashioned)
industry. Agreement,
1938, to facilitate adjustment of piece rates and
job standards and installation of new equipment.
1 9 4 1 — June 1356.
------- Background, rehabilitation program, and
status in 1941. 1941— Nov. 1180-1185.
Millinery Stabilization Commission, objective of.
1 9 4 1 — June 1357—
1358.
Printing pressmen. Special engineering service
technical training. 1 9 4 1 — Nov. 1356.
Railroad (B&O). Waste elimination, through shop
committees, originated in 1923. 1 9 4 1 — June 1354.
Steel industry. Through Steel Workers Organizing
Committee plan, 1937-40. 1 9 4 1 — June 13561357.
Textiles. Naumkeag Steam Cotton Co. plan and
factors preventing its success. 1 9 4 1 — June 1355.
Labor-management cooperation, foreign countries:
Austria. Works councils. Development under 1919
law and since World W ar II, summary. 1 9 4 6 —
Nov. 702-703.
Czechoslovakia. Works councils, prior to and since
World W ar II, summary. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 701-702.
Finland. Production committees established under
law of June 21, 1946. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 700-701.
France. Work committees and similar bodies. Legal
status achieved after liberation. 1 9 4 6 — Nov.

697-699.
Germany. Conditions prior to and since World War
II. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 703-705.
-------U. S. Zone. Works councils reestablished after
Nazi suppression; number and membership,
1947; general pattern adopted. 1 9 4 8 — Apr. 382383.
------- Western Germany. Works councils, during oc­
cupation, 1945-50. Functions established by labor
legislation. 1 9 5 0 — Dec. 671.
Great Britain. Conditions prior to and during World
W ar II and in first postwar year. 1 9 4 6 — Nov.

693-696.




-------Joint production committees. Character, func­
tions, and results obtained through use. 1943—
May 900-903, July 28-29.
Hungary. Works councils. Established after World
W ar II. Summary. 1946— Nov. 701-702.
Italy. “ Internal commission.” Development, from
1900 through World W ar II. 1946— June 912913.
------- Works committees. Precedents for, between
1906 and rise of fascism; growth of movement
during W ar II and to July 1946. 1946— Nov. 700.
Norway. Agreement of December 1945 between
Employers’ Association and National Federation
of Trade Unions. Summary. 1946— Nov. 696-697.
Poland. Works councils established after World
W ar II. Summary. 1946— Nov. 701-702.
Sweden. Joint production committees introduced in
armament enterprises, May 1945; agreement,
June 1946, between Swedish Confederation of
Labor and Employers’ Association. Summaries.
1946— Nov. 696.
Labor-management disputes, United States:
Agricultural workers and Central Arizona Vege­
table Growers Association. Strike in November
1947 settled about Feb. 21, 1948 (Arvin, Calif.).
1 ^ 5 - M a r . 305.
Aircraft industry, November 1950. 1950— Dec. 712.
Airline pilots. Strike beginning Oct. 21, 1946. Sum­
mary of background. 1946— Nov. 779.
American Newspaper Publishers Association and
International
Typographical
Union
(A F L ).
Union charged with encouraging strikes; tem­
porary injunction issued Mar. 27, 1948, terms.
1948— Apr. 413.
American Overseas Airlines, Inc., and Interna­
tional Airline Pilot’s Association (A F L ). Pilot’s
and co-pilot’s strike, Sept. 30 to Oct. 18, 1947;
contract negotiations, stand-by status of pilots
during time off between flights; details of settle­
ment. 1947— Nov. 566.
American Telephone and Telegraph Co. and Amer­
ican Union of Telegraph Workers (C IO ). Strike
threatened, Board of Inquiry appointed by Pres­
ident to inquire into issues; formal hearings to
start June 8, 1948— June IV, 645.
Anthracite industry. Strike of May 31, 1946, and
agreement of June 7. Summaries. 1946— July 86,
Dec. 880.
Atomic energy. Carbide and Carbon Chemical Corp.
and Atomic Trades and Labor Council (A F L ).
Injunction issued Mar. 19 restricting workers
from striking; other prohibitions. 1948— Apr.
I ll, 411-412.
------- Labor Relations Panel, 1949; 4 recommenda­
tions of President’s Commission on Labor Rela­
tions in Atomic Energy Installations. 1949—
June 661-662.
------- Los Alamos (N . Mex.). A F L building-trades
unions (3,300 members), in protest against hir­
ing out-of-State labor. Agreement reached Aug.
24. 1948— Sept. 288-289 .
-------Oak Ridge, Tenn. Contract signed June 14 by
Atomic Trades and Labor Council (A F L ) and
Carbide and Carbon Chemical Corp.; details of
settlement. 1948— July 49.
---------------- Plant construction projects delayed by
workers’ refusal to cross picket lines of Painters
Union (A F L ), August 1950. 1950— Sept. 367.
------- Program. Policy adopted in, 1946, and ex­
perience under policy, 1940-50. 1950— Nov. 587588.
Automobile industry. General Motors controversy,
November 1945 to March 1946. 1946— Dec. 876877, 878.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- May-November 1950. Summaries. 1950— July
128, Aug. 243-244, Sept. 366-367, Oct. 491-492,
Dec. 713.
------- See also name of company , this section.
Aviation. California (Inglewood). Strike, 1941, and
use of Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 571.
Bell Telephone Co. and workers. Developments De­
cember 1949-May 1950, 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 54, Feb. I ll —
IV , 167, Mar. IV, 302, Apr. I ll, 411, May IV, 536,

June 656-657.
Bendix Aviation Corp., South Bend, Ind., A prilMay 1949. 1949— May 546-547, June 664, Aug.
166.

Bituminous coal.
th is

See

Mining— Bituminous coal,

s e c tio n .

Boards of inquiry. Summaries of seven investiga­
tions, 1948, according to Labor Management Re­
lations Act. 1949— May 532-534.
Boeing Airplane Co. plants, Seattle, Wash., and
International Association of Machinists (Ind.).
Strike beginning Apr. 22. Efforts of Federal Con­
ciliation and Mediation Service to effect settle­
ment; unfair labor practice charges filed with
NLRB by union; report of trial examiner; stop­
page called off Sept. 10 by Aeronautical Me­
chanics Union. 1948— Aug. 152, Oct. 396.

Brewery workers, New York City, April 1949.
1949— May 546.
Briggs Manufacturing Co. Walk-out of 170 plant
guards, members of United Plant Guard Workers
of America (Ind.) on Sept. 8; refusal of 25,000
CIO United Auto Workers to cross picket lines;
closing of plants. Settlement, Sept. 23; terms.
1 9 4 8 — Oct. 395.
Building-service employees. New York City apart­
ment houses, 4-day stoppage over increased
wages and a 40-hour week terminated May 1,
1950. Dispute submitted to fact-finding board.
1950— June 657.
Building-trades workers. Buffalo, N. Y ., May 1,
1950. Stoppage over wage increases. Agreements
reached May 21; terms. 1 9 5 0 — June 657.
------- California, southern. Jurisdiction and griev­
ance arbitration, 1941-49. 1950— Jan. 16-17.
------- Minneapolis and St. Paul, June-July 1949.
1949— Aug. 166.
Campbell, Wyant and Cannon Foundry Co., sub­
sidiary National Motor Castings Co., and United
Auto Workers (CIO) Local No. 439. 1948— Sept.
288.
Carborundum Co. (Niagara Falls, N. Y .) and
United Gas, Coke, and Chemical Workers (CIO),
beginning Jan. 9, 1948, ending Feb. 16. 1948—
Mar. 305.
Chemical industry, August-September 1950. Sum­
maries. 1950— Sept. 367, Oct. 493.
Chrysler Corp. and United Automobile Workers
(C IO ). Strike beginning May 12, issues, dis­
orders at Highland Park and Dodge Truck
plants, terms of settlement. 1 9 4 8 — June III, 644.
-------Strike, 90,000 employees, Jan. 25-M ay 4, 1950.
Developments and provisions of settlement (pen­
sions and social insurance). 1 9 5 0 — Feb. I ll, 167,
Mar. IV, 302, Apr. I ll, 410-411, May III-IV ,
535, June III, 655-656.
Clothing industry, September-November 1950. Sum­
maries. 1950— Oct. 493, Dec. 710-711.
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated, New
Orleans. Wage increase demand, March 1942.
1942— May 1132.
Coal mining. See Mining— Anthracite and Bitum­
inous coal, th is s e c t io n .
Construction industry. Iron workers, 2,500, north­
ern New Jersey. 1948— Mar. 305.




83

------- June-August 1950. Summaries. 1950— July
127, Aug. 243, Sept. 367.
------- Washington (D.C.) projects, stoppage June
1949 involving 8,000 workers. 1949—July 42-43.
------- Work stoppages, workers involved, and mandays idle, first half 1948 compared with first
half 1947. 1949— Feb. 181.
Continental Baking Co. and Bakery and Confec­
tionery Workers (A F L ). Dispute submitted to
NLRB May 9, 1950. 1950— May IV, June 657.
Continental Paper Co., Ridgefield Park, N. J., and
United Paper Workers (C IO ), 8-month work
stoppage settled March 1950. 1950— Apr. 411.
Court decisions concerning. See Court decisions.
Discrimination, illegal, against employees, first de­
cision of NLRB making union, as well as em­
ployer, liable for back pay in certain cases, Au­
gust 1949. 1 9 4 9 — Sept. IV.
Electrical products industry, September-October
1950. Summaries. 1 9 5 0 — Sept. IV, Oct. 492, Dec.

711.
Electrical workers. Strike early in 1946. Summary.
1946— Dec. 879.

Electric-power employees
(Pittsburgh). Back­
ground of dispute and developments during Sep­
tember 1946. 1946— Oct. 593-594.
Fact-finding boards. Appointed Nov. 27, 1945, to
Jan. 17, 1946. Background; parties to disputes;
union demands and company proposition; and
recommendations of boards. 1946— Apr. 537549.

------ Usefulness of procedure as an alternative to
strife and importance of flexibility of technique.

1946— Nov. 774-776.
Farm equipment production, August-September
1950. Summaries. 1950— Sept. 367, Oct. 493.
Federal trooos, use o f Summary o f instances, 1877
to 1941. 1941— Sept. 561-571.
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and United Rubber
Workers (CIO) covering 20,000 workers. Agree­
ment on welfare plans March 1950. 1950— Apr.
411.

Fisherman’s Union, Atlantic. Demand for insurance
on account of submarine hazard, February 1942.
1 9 4 2 — May 1131-1132.
Flint Glass W orkers’ Union and Hazel-Atlas Glass
Co., Clarksburg, W . Va. Seniority clause, February-March 1942. 1942— May 1132.
Ford Motor Co. and United Automobile Workers
(C IO ). Dearborn and Detroit, Mich., May 1949.

Minor stoppages, other parts o f country.
June 663-664.

1949—

------- “ Financial penalty extension clause” ; agree­

ment reached Aug. 21,1947, strike averted.

1947—

Sept. 345.
------- Strike authorized and negotiations continued,
July-August 1949. 1949— Aug. 167, Sept. 281.
------- Wage settlement, July 22, terms o f; strike
averted. 1948— Aug. 152.
Gas, Coke, and Chemical Workers, United, and
Milwaukee Gas Light Co. Fact-finding board’s
statement as to value of procedure. 1946— Nov.
774-776.
General Motors Corp. and the United Automobile
Workers (C IO ). Agreement May 24, 1950. Pro­
visions. 1950—June 655-656.
------ Union shop. NLRB elections, 8 to 1 vote au­
thorizing United Auto Workers to bargain for.
1 9 5 0 — Mar.

IV.

----- Restraining order obtained by National Labor

Relations Board against company for failure to
bargain with union over insurance program.
1 9 4 8 — Feb. II, 192.

84

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor-management disputes, U. S.— Continued
Glass, Ceramic, and Silica Sand Workers (CIO) and
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. and Libbey-OwensFord Co., January 1950. 1950— Feb. 168.
Glass workers, October 1950. 1950— Dec. 712.
Goodrich Co., B. F., and United Rubber Workers
(C IO ). Strike, August, and settlement, October
1949, provisions. 1949— Sept. 281, Nov. 540.
Government seizures in railroad strike. 1948— June
644-645.
Government seizure of plants under W ar Labor
Disputes Act. 1948— Aug. 290-294; 1945— May
1035-1036; 1946— July 84-86, Aug. 172.
Government Services Inc. and United Public Work­
ers of America (C IO ). Strike of cafeteria work­
ers, Washington, D. C., January 1948. Union’s
legal position with respect to non-Communist
affidavits involved. Details of negotiations; terms
of settlement. 1948— Feb. 192, Mar. 305, May
543.
Hawaii. Longshoremen’s strike. Settlement terms;
strike effects. 1949— Dec. 653—
656.
-------Sugar industry, 1946, lasting 79 days; issues
involved and terms of settlement. 1948— May 492,
June 610-611.
Historical summary o f; Federal legislation con­
cerning. 1947— May 839-855.

Hosiery industry, September 1950.

1 9 5 0 — Dec.

712.

Intrastate. Principles regarding, adopted by Na­
tional W ar Labor Board. Summary. 1944— Sept.
520-521.
International Harvester Co. Illinois, Indiana, Ohio,
Tennessee, and International Union, United Au­
tomobile, A ircraft and Agricultural Workers of

America (C IO ), starting Aug. 17, 1948; issues
and date of settlement. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 287-288.
------ Louisville, Ky. Strike, Sept. 18 to Oct. 27,
1947, over wage and wage differential issues.

1947— Nov. 566.
------- Rock Island and East Moline, 111., and Farm

Equipment Workers Union (C IO ). Mid-October
strike protesting discharge of union workers;
grievances submitted to arbitration. 1947— Nov.

566.
Ladies’ Garment Workers, International, and New
England Clothing and Rainwear Manufacturing
Association, February 1942. Wage increase to off­
set rising living costs. 1942— May 1131.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general.
Longshoremen’s Association, International, A F L ,
and New York Shipping Association. Preferen­

tial hiring clause retained in new agreement
signed Aug. 21, 1947, prior to effective date of
Labor Management Relations A ct; 6-day strike
of 2 New York locals. 1947— Sept. 345.
Lumber industry. Strike beginning Sept. 24, 1945,
and continuing throughout winter. 1946— Dec.
875.
------- Washington and Oregon, July 1950. 1950—

Aug. IV.
Mackay Radio and Telegraph Co., Western Union
Telegraph Co. (Cable Division), Commercial
Cables Co., and All American Cables and Radios,
Inc., and American Communications Association
(CIO) or All American Cables Employers Asso­
ciation (Ind.), in New York City and San Fran­
cisco; issues and terms of settlement. 1948—
Mar. 305, May 544.
Macy, R. H. & Co. (New York). Settlement after
10-day strike. 1946— Aug. 221.
Maintenance of membership. “ Escape” period in­
cluded in “ standard” clause in N W L B decisions.
1943— Jan. 65^




Maritime. Atlantic and Gulf Coast operators.
Agreement, Aug. 13, Seafarers International
Union ( A F L ) ; agreement, Aug. 18, National
Maritime Union (C IO ); wage settlements, hiring
hall provisions. 1948— Sept. 289.
--------------- Arbitration of wage demands, agreement
to accept. 1948— Jan. 1.
---------------- Negotiations with Masters, Mates and
Pilots Union (A F L ) continued; contract signed
on Apr. 21, 1950. Provisions. 1 9 4 9 — Dec. 677;
1 9 5 0 — May IV, 536.
------- Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf Coasts; restrain­
ing orders, temporary, issued by New York,
Cleveland, and San Francisco Federal courts;
strike averted. 1948— July 49.
------- East Coast, dock workers. Board of inquiry
appointed by President, Aug. 17, 1948, to investi­
gate dispute; overtime on overtime issue; strike
Nov. 12-25; settlement ratified Nov. 27-28, terms.
1948— Sept. 289, Dec. 630.
------- West Coast. Waterfront Employers Associa­
tion and International Longshoremen’s and
Warehousemen’s Union (C IO ); strike Sept. 2;
issues, details of negotiations, employers’ insis­
tence upon non-Communist affidavits; settlement,
Nov. 25, terms; status of controversies with
other unions. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 289, Oct. 394-395,
Nov. 517, Dec. 629.
Maritime workers. Committee for Maritime Unity
and ship operators. Strike scheduled for June
averted. Summaries of background and terms of
settlement. 1946— July 82-85, Aug. 220-221, Dec.
882.
------- Hiring practices, declared in violation of the
Taft-Hartley Act. Unions signed mutual-aid pact
to continue fight to retain, March 1950. 1950—
Apr. III.
------- June, September, and October 1950. Sum­
maries. 1950— July 104-105, Oct. 493, Dec. 711.
------- Licensed personnel. Strike beginning Oct. 1.
Developments during October; Nov. 17 and 18
settlement. 1946— Nov. 777-779, Dec. 968-969.
------- Unlicensed personnel. Strike beginning Sept.
5; developments to Oct. 2, 1946. 1946— Oct. 591593.
------- Work stoppage following expiration of con­
tracts on June 15, 1947; summary. 1947— July
72.
Mediation Board, National Defense. See National
Defense Mediation Board.
Milk-supply industry, Chicago area, 1932-41, and
terms of settlement. 1 9 4 2 — June 1291-1293.
Mining. Anthracite. Agreement, Mar. 8, 1944, be­
tween operators and United Mine Workers, (ap­
proved by National W ar Labor Board Apr. 8,
1944). 1944—June 1197.
------- Anthracite and bituminous coal. Background
1933-43; strikes, negotiations, W ar Labor Board
decisions and orders, and Government measures,
1943. 1943— Aug. 290-294, Sept. 537 (correc­
tion).
-------Arizona (Morenci). Strike June 1903 and use
of Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 566-567.
------- Bituminous coal. Appalachian district. June
1941 agreement between United Mine Workers
and operators, provisions. 1941— Aug. 374-382.
---------------- Captive mines, steel companies refusal
to accept union-shop provisions in contract; un­
fair labor practice charges filed against union
( U M W A ) ; NLRB intervention; final settle­
ment. 1948— Aug. 151-152.
------- ------- Captive mines, strike and settlement,
1941, summary. 1942— Jan. 94-97.
---------------- Commercial operators and United Mine
Workers of America (Ind.) sign new contract on

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
June 24, steel companies operating captive mines
refraining. Details of negotiation and terms of
contract. 1948— July 48-49.
----------------Foremen and other supervisory employ­
ees, collective-bargaining rights for and recog­
nition, demanded by District 50 of U M W .
1946— Dec. 874-875.
----------------Memorial holiday taken by United Mine
Workers, March 1949. 1949— Apr. IXI-IV, 432433.
----------------New contract negotiations discontinued;
companies' efforts to force union to resume bar­
gaining. 1948— J une 645.
------- ------- 1919 strike, developments; West Vir­
ginia, United Mine Workers' organization at­
tempts, 1920-21, violence following; and use of
Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 570-571.
----- ------- 1946 strike (A pril-M ay), summary of
developments. 1946— Dec. 880.
---------------- 1 9 4 6 strike (November-December), de­
velopments summarized. Contempt charge case,
United Mine Workers, U. S. District Court (No­
vember and December 1946) and Supreme Court
(March 1947). 1946— Dec. 967-968; 1947— Feb.
271-272, May 790, 855-857.
---------------- 1949 strike (September-December), de­
velopments in situation; provisions of settle­
ment. 1949— Oct. I ll, 407-408, Nov. I ll, 539, Dec.
I ll, 676-677; 1950— Jan. I ll, 54, Feb. I ll, 166167, Mar. I ll, 301-302; Apr. I ll, 410, May 501502.
--------------- U M W A president's notice to Government
of desire to reopen Krug-Lewis agreement of
May 29, 1946. 1946— Nov. 777.
------- ------- Portal-to-portal travel time. Data re­
ported by President's committee Feb. 3, 1944.
1944— Mar. 628-629.
----------------Taft-Hartley Act invoked in work stop­
page, January-February 1950. 1950— Feb. I ll,
166-167.
----------------Unauthorized walk-outs, June 1947. Ala­
bama and Pennsylvania, preceding official 1 0 day vacation period; return of mines to private
control, June 30, 1947; new contract provisions.
1 9 4 ? — July 71-72, Aug. 203.
---------------- Welfare fund, deadlock over; resultant
work stoppage; court action. Terms of settlement.
1948— Apr. I ll, 412-413, May 532.
------- Coal. Colorado, strike 1913-14, and use of
Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 570-571.
--------------- June 1949, over 400,000 workers involved,
1 week. 1949— June 42-43.
------- ------- Work stoppage, June 1947, in protest
against Taft-Hartley Act. 1947— June 71-72.
------- Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Strikes 1892 and 1899,
and use of Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 564-565.
------- Copper. Arizona and Montana. Strikes, 1917
to 1920. Summary, and use of Federal troops.
1941— Sept. 568-569.
------- Goldfield, Nev. Strike 1907, and use of Fed­
eral troops. 1 9 4 1 — Sept. 567.
------- Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co., August
1950. 1950— Sept. 367.
Municipal workers (Rochester, N. Y .). Organiza­
tion agreed to May 29, 1946, after general 1-day
strike. 1946—July 87.
Murray Corp. of America. Strike (28 days) begin­
ning late July 1947, involving “ fundamental
principles" under new Management Relations
Act, viz: responsibility for damages for unau­
thorized work stoppages; details of settlement.
1947— Aug. 203-204, Sept. 344-345.
“ National emergency" disputes. Industries and
issues involved, 1948; powers invoked by Pres­




85

ident in connection therewith. 1949— Feb. 149150.
------- 1949, general features of strikes and disputes.
1 9 5 0 — May 497-499.
National Labor Relations Board cases handled, etc.
See National Labor Relations Board.
National W ar Labor Board, decisions, functions,
etc. See National W ar Labor Board.
New Jersey Public Service Electric & Gas Co. facil­
ities seized May 15, 1950, under State's public
utility antistrike law following 5-day work stop­
page over increased wages. 1950— June 657.
Newspapers (Chicago) and International Typo­
graphical Union. Union held in contempt of court
for violation of Mar. 27 injunction prohibiting
imposition of closed shop and other conditions
of employment; ordered to report compliance by
Oct. 26. Stay of execution of decision, pending ap­
peal, granted by United States Court of Ap­
peals on Oct. 18. 1948— Nov. 518.
Oakland (C alif.). General strike, December 1946.
Background and settlement summarized. 1947—
Jan. 78-79.
Oil industry. Controversy Sept. 17, 1945, to Febru­
ary 1946. Summary of developments. 1946— Dec.
874, 877, 878-879.
Oil workers, California. Major oil companies and
Oil Workers International Union (C IO ), joined
by Independent Union of Petroleum Workers
(employees of Standard Oil Co. of California).
Federal and State intervention; partial settle­
ment, terms. 1948— Oct. 395, Nov. 517-518, Dec.
629.
Packinghouse strike, Mar. 16, 1948, despite prior
appointment of presidential board of inquiry.
Swift, Armour, Wilson, Cudahy, Morrell, and
United Packinghouse Workers of America. Ter­
minated May 21 at Swift, Armour, and Cudahy
plants; terms of settlement. 1948— Apr. 412, May
531-532, June IV , 644.
Panel of special conciliators appointed to act in­
dividually in major industrial disputes, supple­
menting work of regular Conciliation staff.
Membership. 1947— Feb. 265-267.
Petroleum-refining industry. Adjustment provis­

ions, 21 collective agreements, summary.
June 1253.

1945—

Philco Corp., Philadelphia, Pa., May 1949. 1949—
June 663—
664.
Pipe Machinery Co. Rights of striking employers in
collective bargaining relations; procedures for
determining voting eligibility; NLRB's decision.
1948— Mar. IV.
Pottery industry, October 1950. 1950— Dec. 712.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Provisions
for adjustment of, in collective agreements, 1946.
1947— Aug. 166.
President's message to Congress, 1946 and Jan­
uary 1947. Program to reduce industrial strife
urged. Summary of provisions. 1946— Apr. 592;
1 9 4 7 — Feb. 255-261.
Press Wireless, Inc. August 1946 stoppage and
summary of negotiations. 1946— Sept. 401.

Pressmen, Washington, D. C. Newspapers, April
1949. 1949— May 547.
*
Printers. Chicago. International Typographical
Union and Franklin Association. Terms of settle­
ment. 1948— Aug. 145.
----------------Strike, settled Sept. 18, 1949; provisions
of new contract. 1949— Oct. 408-409.
Public utilities, Consolidated Edison Co., New
York City area, October 1950. 1950— Dec. 712.
Pullman strike, 1894. Summary of developments
and use of Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 565-566.

86

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor-management disputes, U. S.— Continued
Railroads. Brotherhoods o f Locomotive Engineers
(Ind.) and Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen
(Ind.), and Switchmen’s Union o f North Amer­
ica (A F L ). Efforts to settle; seizure o f roads

on May 10, 1948; emergency fact-finding board
recommendations rejected; settlement terms;
return to private operation, July 10. 1948— Apr.
IV, May III, June IV, 644-645, Aug. 152.
------- Controversy, early 1946, Government inter­
vention, and settlement May 25, 1946. Sum­

maries. 1 9 4 6 — July 84-86, Sept. 339-840, Dec.
881-882.
------- Engineers, January 1949. 1949— Feb. 205.
------- Grievance cases. Backlog June 30, 1949, and
agreements arrived at to help reduce backlog,
summary. 1950— Apr. 403-404.
------- Hudson and Manhattan, December 1948January 1949. 1949— Feb. 205.
------- Missouri Pacific employees and operators;
strike effective Sept. 9, 1949; settlement, Oct.
23, 1949. 191,9— Oct. 407-408, Nov. 540.
------- Nonoperating employees demanding a shorter
workweek, October 1948-March 1949. 191,9— Jan.
58, Apr. 433.
------- Operating employees, December 1949 to No­
vember 1950. 1950—Jan. 54, Feb. 167, Mar. 302,
April III, 411, May III, 536, June III -IV , 655656, July 104, Aug. IV , 242-243, Sept. IV, 366,
Oct. 491, Dec. 710.
------- Southern Pacific. Brief strike, July 21 and
22, 1947. 191,7— Aug. 204.
---------------December 1948, strike postponed. 191,9—
Jan. 58.
------- Strikes of 1877, use of Federal troops, and
States to which sent. 191,1— Sept. 564.
------- Wabash Railroad, March 1949. 191,9— Apr.
433.
------- Wage controversy, 1941. Background; find­
ings of Emergency Board appointed Sept. 10,
and compromise settlement arranged Dec. 1.
191,1— Dec. 1421-1425.
------- Wage disputes, 1942 and 1943, summary of.
19U — Mar. 611-627.
Railroads and air lines. National Mediation Board
cases, 1942-43, review of. 191,1,— Mar. 524-525.
Railway Express, New York City and northern
New Jersey, March-April 1949. 191,9— Apr. 433,
May 547.
Reconversion period. Summaries of developments in
principal controversies, September 1945 to June
1946. 191,6— Dec. 874-882.
Remington Rand Corp. Strike, May 26-July 31,
1947. involving 7 cities in New York and Michi­
gan; details of settlement. 191,7— Aug. 204-205.
Remington Rand, Inc., and United Electrical, Radio
and Machine Workers (C IO ). Bargaining rela­
tionships terminated by company; failure of
union to comply with registration and non-Communist affidavit requirements of Labor Manage­
ment Relations Act. Results undetermined. 1948—
Jan. 1.
Rochester (N . Y .). General strike, May 1946, in
sympathy with municipal employees. Summary
. 191,6— July 87.
Rubber industry. October-November 1950. 1950—
Dec. 712. See also Goodrich, B. F., this section.
Sailors. Wage demands of West Coast, December
1948. 191,9— Jan. 59.
Sawmill and timber workers, Pennsylvania-Maryland-West Virginia Tri-State area and Tri-State
Lumbermen’s Association, January 1948. Details.
1948— Mar. 304-305.
Seattle (W ash .). General strike, 1919. Summary of
developments and use of Federal troops. 1941—
Sept. 569.




Settlement of, provisions for in Defense Produc­
tion Act, September 1950. 1950— Oct. 454-455.
Shipbuilding. Bethlehem Steel Co., Todd Shipyards
Corp., Higgins Industries and other yards, June
1942. Background of controversy; spread of
strike, workers involved; partial settlement.
1947—
72, Aug. 203-204, Sept. 344, Oct.
462, Nov. 566.
Shipping strike (Great Lakes), August 1946. Agree­

ments of workers with 4 of 11 companies sum­
marized. 191,6 — Sept. 400-401.
Singer Manufacturing Co., Elizabeth, N. J., M ayOctober 1949; settlement provisions. 1949— June
663, Nov. 539.
Smelting and refining workers’ 5-month strike ter­
minated by agreement June 11, 1946. Summary
of developments. 1946— July 86-87.
Soda-ash production, October 1950. 1950— Dec. 713.
Southern States. Strikes under union leadership or
in connection with attempts to organize labor,
various periods since 1880’s. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 556-575.
Statistics. Analysis, 1940 and 1941; summary by
year 1881 to 1941. 1941— May 1090-1116; 1942—
May 1107-1129.
------- First 6 months of 1945, summary, with sta­
tistics for same period of each year, 1939 to 1944.
1945— Aug. 277-278.

------ Monthly. January 1939 to October 1950. See
section Industrial Disputes, each issue January
1940-February 1946; section Labor-Management
Disputes, each issue March 1946-June 1947;
Table E -l, Current labor statistics, each issue
July 1947-December 1950.
------- 1943, January compared with December 1942
and year by averages 1935-39; first 3 months
compared with first quarters 1942 and 1941; first
4 months. 1943— Mar. 518-519, May 978-979,
June 1175.
------- 1943, 1944, and 1945. Preliminary estimates
and summaries. 1944— Feb. 349, May 927-947;
1945— Feb. 328, May 957-973; 1946— Feb. 245247, May 718-735.
------- 1916 to 1945; by month, 1941 and 1942; by

industries, States, and cities, 1942.
959-978; 1 9 4 6 - U a y 720.

1 9 4 3 — May

Steel industry. 1919 strike, developments, and use of
Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 569.

------ 1946 strike, January-February.
877-878.

1 9 4 6 — Dec.

------- 1949 strike, August-December. Contract ne­
gotiations, truce terms, settlement. President’s
Steel Industry Board report (recommendations
on wage increase, insurance, pensions, collective
bargaining, and role of fact-finding boards).
Termination of strike. 1943— Aug. 166-167, Sept.
280-281, Oct. I ll, 407-408, Nov. 507-510, Dec.
676; 1950— Jan. 53, May 502.

------ 1950, September-October. Summaries.

1950—

Oct. 492, Dec. 710.
Streetcar workers. Denver, Colo., 1920 strike, and
use of Federal troops. 1941— Sept. 570.
Strike restrictions in union agreements, following
industries: Aircraft and parts; aluminum; elec­
trical equipment; iron and steel; longshore;
machine-tool; marine transport; metal mining,
smelting, and refining; rubber; shipbuilding; and
trucking. 1941— Mar. 546-564.
Strikes and lock-outs. Beginning of war, Dec. 8,
1941, to Mar. 31, 1942, summary. 1 9 4 2 — May

1129-1132.
-------Clipping service to Bureau of Labor Statistics
discontinued, July 1, 1943. 1943— Sept. 537.
------- Defense industries, during 1940. 1941— Apr.

945-949.
------- Developments to prevent, following passage

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
of Labor Management Relations A ct; summary.

1947— Oct. 440-441.
-------During World W ar II, by year (or shorter
period). 1946— May 723.
-------National W ar Labor Board activities concern­
ing, in 1944. 1945— May 971-973.
------- 1940, latter part, summarized. 1941— Mar.
675-676.
------- 1945, summaries. April (bituminous-coal min­
ing; rubber workers, (A kron); Packard Motor
Car Co.; Kelsey-Hayes Wheel Co.; Railway E x­
press Agency). 1945— June 1258-1261.
----------------August (aeronautical, steel, electric, and
other industries). 1945— Oct. 748-751.
------- ------- February (automobile workers; ship­
building workers; textile workers). 1945— Apr.
823-824.
------- ------- July (rubber, aircraft, shipbuilding,
newspaper and publishing, and other indus­
tries). 1945— Sept. 492-497.
---------------- June (stoppages protesting food short­
ages; jurisdictional dispute as to reconversion
work; Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. employees,
Akron, glass workers; Tennessee Coal, Iron and
Railroad Co. employees). 1945— Aug. 274-277.
----------------March (Briggs Manufacturing Co.; mo­
tion picture studios; Continental Motors; General
Motors, A. C. Spark Plug Division; Hudson Mo­
tor Car Co.). 1945— May 1041-1043.
----------------May (miners, anthracite and bituminous
coal; truck drivers, Chicago; and others). 1945—
July 94-96.
---------------- November (General Motors automotive
parts and assembly plants, textile workers, truck
drivers, Montgomery Ward employees). 1946—
Jan. 85-86.
------- ------- October (longshoremen, glass workers,
and machinists). 1945— Dec. 1182-1183.
------- ------- September (bituminous-coal mines, oil,
electric, textile dyeing and printing, lumber,
rubber, and other industries, and elevator opera­
tors, New York). 1945— Nov. 975-977.
------- 1944, summary. November (Packard Motor
Car Co. workers; Wright Aeronautical Corp.
supervising workers; telephone workers, Dayton
and other cities; truck drivers, Greater Boston).
1945— Jan. 115-117.
------- 1946, summaries. January-April (bituminouscoal mines, steel, electrical, automobile, meat­
packing, and oil industries). 1946— Mar. 425429, May 764-765, June 915-917.
------- State legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Fed­
eral and general.
------- Statistics. See Statistics, this section.
------- Unfair labor practice under Labor Manage­
ment Relations Act, 1947; administrative proce­
dures for prevention o f; President authorized to
appoint board of inquiry to investigate; provision
for injunctive relief. 1947— July 59-61.
-------Wage and hour, 1940 compared with preceding
years, and factors affecting. 1941— Mar. 529-531.

------ S ee also Work stoppages, this s ectio n .
Studebaker Corp., South Bend, Ind. Work stoppage
of 16,000 workers, January 1949. 1949— Feb. 204.
Taxi drivers. New York City, April 1949. 1949—
May 546.
Teachers (1,100), Minneapolis, Minn. 1948— Mar.
305.
Teachers, public school (St. Paul, Minn.), Nov.
25 to Dec. 27, 1946. Background and settlement
summarized. 1947— Jan. 79-80.
Teamsters. International Brotherhood and Railway
Express Agency (New York City). Strike, September-October 1947, resultant lay-offs; agree­




87

ment to submit demands to Presidents fact­
finding board. 1 9 4 7 — Oct. 463, Nov. 566.
------ International Brotherhood and trucking com­
panies (N ew Y ork ), strike September 1948, wage
and other issues; strike in Essex and Union
Counties, New Jersey, settlement. 1 9 4 8 — Oct.
395-396.
------ Southern Conference and Central States
Drivers Council (A F L ) covering 30,000 truck
drivers in 18 States. Agreement on welfare plans,
March 1950. 1 9 5 0 — Apr. 411.
Telephone industry. June, October, and November
1950. Summaries o f developments. 1 9 5 0 — July
104, 128, Dec. 711-712.
------ Southwestern Bell Telephone Co., December
1948. 1 9 4 9 — Jan. 58-59. ^
Textile industries. Fall River, Mass., strikes in
January and March to April 1942. Jurisdictional
matters. 1 9 4 % May 1130-1131.
—
------ September-October 1950. Summaries. 1 9 5 0 —
Oct. 492-493, Dec. 712.
Timber workers. Pennsylvania-Maryland-West V ir­
ginia Tri-State area, June-July 1949. 1949—
Aug. 166.
Transit workers. Cleveland strike, December 1949.
1 9 5 0 — Jan. 54, May 503.
------ New York City. June 1950. 1 9 5 0 — July 127-

128 .

------ ------ New York Omnibus Corp. and Fifth
Avenue Coach Co., July 1949. 1 9 4 9 — Aug. 166.
------ ------ Transport W orkers’ Union and New
York City’s Board o f Transportation, January
1950. 1 9 5 0 — Feb. 167-168, Mar. 302.
Transportation. Philadelphia strike over wages,
February 1949, city transit system and taxi
drivers. 1 9 4 9 — Mar. 314.
Truck drivers. Boston and vicinity. Issues involved;
settlement reached Feb. 4. 1 9 4 8 ^
—Mar. 305.
Trucking industry. New York City. June 1950.
1 9 5 0 — July 128.
-------------- Strike, Sept. 1, background and develop­
ments in first month; terms o f agreement, Nov.
2. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 594-595, Dec. 969.
Tugboat crews. New York Citv Harbor, December
1948-January 1949. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 204-205.
Unfair labor practices. Decline of, as cause. 1946—
Aug. 223.
------ See also Court decisions— Labor Management
Relations A ct; and National Labor Relations
Board.
Union Railroad Co. Walk-out, September 1947, re­
sultant lay-offs at Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corp.;
issues involved and basis of settlement. 1947
Oct. 462-463.
Union representation. See National Labor Rela­
tions Board.
Union-security provisions.^ National W ar Labor
Board opinion concerning. 194% — June 13471351.
United Auto Workers. See Automobile industry;
also under name o f com pany, this section.
United Construction Workers and Tri-State Lum­
bermen’s Association. Terms of settlement, end
of January. 1 9 4 8 — Mar. 304-305.
Univis Lens Co. and United Electrical, Radio and
Machine "Workers Union (C IO ). Union decerti­
fied, 9 officials found guilty contempt of court.
1 9 4 8 — Sept. 288.
Upholsterers’ Union, International, and E -Z Mills
(Bennington, V t.). Wage increase and union
shop demands, November 1941 to February 1942.
194% — May 1132.
W ar Labor Disputes Act. See Legislation, U. S.,
Federal and general.

88

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor-management disputes, U. S.— Continued
Wartime disputes in wage stabilization, etc. Role
of National War Labor Board in settlement of.
19 U9— Jan. 20-23.
W ar work, strikes and lock-outs affecting and total.
Trend, by months, January-December 1942.
19AS—-Jan. 68, Feb. 292.
Waterfront Employers’ Association of Southern
California. Port tie-up Oct. 1, 1947; dispute be­
tween Luckenbach Steamship Co. and Interna­
tional Longshoremen’s and Warehousemen’s
Union (C I O ); demand of dock foremen to recog­
nize union as bargaining agent; arbitration
committee appointed; vote by union, Oct. 14, to
return to work. 19 U7— Nov. 567.
Welders’ strike, West Coast, 1941, and factors in
situation. 19 U2— Mar. 662-664.
Western Union. Strike averted Dec. 21, 1947,
through efforts of Federal Mediation and Con­
ciliation Service, issues involved and settlement
proposals. 19U — Jan. I, 61.
S
Wholesale warehouse employees, Northern Cali­
fornia
Distributors’ Association, settlement,
Oct. 1, 1949, provisions. 19U9— Nov. 539-540.
Work stoppages. Developments to prevent, follow­
ing passage of Labor Management Relations
A ct; summary. 19U7— Oct. 440-441.
------- Involving 10,000 or more workers, by num­
ber and percent of stoppages, workers involved,
and man-days idle, selected periods, 1935-48.
19U9— May 507.
------- January 1947, compared with January 1946,
showing decrease in idleness due to work stop­
pages; steps taken by labor, management, and
public officials to preserve industrial peace.
19U7— Feb. 262-263.
-------Man-days idle, April-September 1947; month­
ly trends, 1939-49. 19U7— Oct. 462; 1950— May
499-500.
------- Statistics. By industry group, January to
June 1947; comparisons with prewar years
(1935-39) and 1946. 19U8— Jan. 59-60.
---------------- By major issues involved and industry
group, first quarter, 1947. 19U7— Sept. 335-336.
---------------- By month. See section Industrial Dis­
putes, each issue January 1940-February 1946;
section Labor-Management Disputes, each issue ,
March 1946-June 1947; table E - l , Current
labor statistics each issue , July 1947-December
1950.
---------------- Collection and compilation. Limitations,
survey methods and sources, calculation. 19U9—
Sept. 291-295.
------- ------- First 6 months, 1946-49, summaries.
19U6— Aug. 221-222; 19US— Jan. 60-61; 19U9—
Sept. 241-242.
---------- ;----- Year following VJ-day (including sum­
maries for 1935-39 and World W ar II periods).
19U6— Dec. 883-890.
--------------- Years 1946-49. Background and charac­
teristics of stoppages reviewed; monthly trends.
19U7— Feb. 263-264, May 780-800; 19U Jan.
S—
62, May 479-487; 19U9— Feb. 139, 143-150, May
507-513; 1950— Feb. 129-130, May 503-505.
------- Strike activity, spring pattern, 1948. 19U —
S
June III-IV .
------- Trends in 1950. 1950— Dec. 665-666.
------- See also Strikes and lock-outs, this section .
Year following VJ-day. General summary of prin­
cipal developments. 19U — Dec. 872-882.
S
Labor-management disputes, foreign countries:
Argentina. Strike statistics, year 1940. 19U1—
May 1125.
Australia. Compulsory peacetime arbitration since
1904; conditions (including statistics) 1934-38




and 1939-43; summary of postwar situation.
Aug. 228-230.
------ New South Wales. Coal-mine strikes, un­
authorized, prohibited by regulations, July 25,
1942. 19U 2 — Nov. 925.
---------------Coal strike. 1 9 U9— Feb. 186.
------ Queensland. Railroad strikes, early 1948.
1 9 U9— Feb. 186.
------ Time lost and workers involved, by year,
1935-43, and by stated period, 1944 and 1945.
19U S— Apr. 610-613.
Belgium. Coal industry, May 1945, time loss result­
ing. 19U 5 — Aug. 239.
------ Conditions. 1945 and 1946 summarized; sta­
tistics 1938 and 1945. 1 9 US— July 33.
------ ------ 1935-38 summarized; right to strike
abrogated under German occupation. 1 9 UU—
Feb. 292.
Canada. Decrease during year 1944. Summary o f
1944 conditions. 1 9 U5— May 1044.
------ Munitions plant taken over by Government
after conciliation failed (A pril 1941). 19U 1 —
July 80-81.
------ Provisions concerning, in labor relations
code o f Feb. 17, 1944. 1 9 UU— Apr. 754-755.
------ Statistics, 1934-38 and 1939-45; prewar con­
trols, wartime regulation, and postwar situa­
tion. 7 W -—Aug. 232-233.
------ Strikes and lock-outs. By year, 1934-43;
Government agencies dealing with and legisla­
tion affecting. 1 9 UU— Mar. 525—
528, June 1236.
------ ------ Coal mining, and all other industries
combined, by year, 1914-40. 1 9U 1 — May 12461247.
------ Time lost and workers involved, by year, 193543, and by stated period, 1944-45. 1 9 US— Apr.
611, 613-614.
------ Wartime measure amended Sept. 16, 1941.
19U 1— Nov. 1155-1156.
------ Wartime Wages Control Order o f 1943.
Amendment o f March 13, 1944, provisions.
19UU — May 998-1000.
------ World W ar 1914-18. Mining, coal. Govern­
ment measures taken after stoppages o f work,
resume of. 1 9 U1— July 80—
81.
Chile. Summary for 1942. 1 9 US— Oct. 718.
China. See Legislation, foreign countries.
Colombia. See Legislation, foreign countries.
Denmark. Conciliation. Laws of 1934, 1940, and
1945. Provisions. 1 9 UU— Nov. 955; 19U S— Aug.
234.
France. Coal, called by Communist-led General
Confederation of Labor (C G T ), 1948. 1 9 U9—
Feb. 184-185.
------------Strike movement of 1936. Summary. 1 9 UU—
Oct. 722-723.
------ Work stoppages, number of workers involved,
and man-days idle, 1937 and 1946— 1 9 U9— July
49.
9-10.
Germany. Machinery fo r settlement provided by
Military Government (U. S. Zone), and statistics
of cases handled June 1 to Aug. 25, 1945. 1 9 US—
Jan. 75-76.
xT .
------ Strikes and lock-outs. Forbidden by Nazi re­
gime under heavy penalties. 1 9 US— Mar. 518.
-------------- U. S. Zone. Military Government regula­
tions concerning. Number of work stoppages and
principal reasons for. 1 9 US— Apr. 380-385.
------ Western, during occupation, 1945-50. A djust­
ment of, provisions in labor legislation. 1 9 5 0 —
Dec. 670-671.
Great Britain. Coal mining. Conciliation machinery
put into effect May 1, 1943 (Green Tribunal
scheme). 19U S — June 1170-1174.
_________ Extent of, 1940 and 1941. 1 9U 2 — Nov. 945.
1 9 US—

INDEX— JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
---------------Man-days lost— number and percent o f
lost time, all industries— 1936-49. 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 22.
-------------- Strikes affecting output, spring of 1944.
1SUU— July 114.
------ Stoppages May 1944 to November 1945. Sum­
mary of background, duration, and methods of
settlement. I S US— Mar. 430-434.
------ Strikes, unauthorized, war and postwar pe­
riods; union disciplinary action against strikers.
Extension of wartime compulsory arbitration.
W ork stoppages and man-days lost, 1945-48,
compared with 1918-21. 1 9 US— Oct. 372.
------ Time lost. Favorable record, 1939-42, as com­
pared with 1914-18. 1 9 US— July 27-28.
-------------- Workers involved, by year, 1935-44, and
by stated period, 1944 and 1945. 1 9 U5— Apr. 796;
1 9 US— Apr. 610-612.
Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Strike activ­
ity, by year, 1928 to 1943; by industry, 1941 to
1943.
1 9 U 1 - Apr. 832-833; 1 9U 2— Mar. 614-615;
19US— Apr. 688-689; 1 9 UU— Apr. 744-745.
Ireland. Work stoppages. Statistics, by year, 194144. 1 9 U5— Sept. 498-499.
Italy. Statistics, by year, 1911-34. 1 9 US— Nov. 914.
Japan. “ Production control” method used by unions,
1946. 19U 7 — Feb. 247-248.
------ Summary, from 1883 to 1942. 1 9 US— Oct. 662663.
------ Widespread but few work stoppages, 1949.
1 9 5 0 — Oct. 448.
Netherlands. Conditions prior to World W ar II
summarized; strikes resulting from German oc­
cupation and penalties exacted. 1 9 UU— Jan. 49.
Netherlands Indies. See Legislation, foreign coun­
tries.
New Zealand. Compulsory peacetime arbitration
since 1894; conditions (including statistics),
1935-38 and 1939-43; summary o f postwar situa­
tion. 1 9U 6 — Aug. 230-232.
------ Laws concerning. See Legislation, foreign
countries.
------ Time lost and workers involved, by year, 193543, and by stated period, 1944-45. 1 9U 6 — Apr.
611, 615.
Norway. See Legislation, foreign countries.
Panama. Labor code of 1941, provisions of. 1 9 U2—
May 1164-1165.
Rumania. Statistics, by year, 1929-38. 1 9 US— Dec.
1110.
Sweden. Mediation, law of 1920, provisions. 1 9 US—
Aug. 233-235.
------ Workers involved, time lost, causes, and re­
sults, by year or specified period, 1903-08 to
1939. 19U 1— Dec. 1426-1427.
Switzerland. Strikes and lock-outs, and disputes
before conciliation officers, by year, 1935-44.
19U 5— Dec. 1177.
Yugoslavia. Statistics, by year, 1929-38. 1 9 US—
Nov. 906.
Labor-management relations. United States (see also
Labor and industrial relation s):
Activities in, during period from passage of Labor
Management Relations Act, June 23 to Aug. 22,
1947, full effective date; summary. 1 9 U7— Oct.
436, 440-441.
Agreements. See Collective agreements.
Arizona. Law of 1948 (referendum) regulating.
1 9 US— Nov. 514.
Bases for mutual understanding. Labor relations
report of the Labor Committee of the Twentieth
Century Fund, 1949. 1 9 US— May 539-541.
BLS program for reporting on, fiscal year 1947-48.
19U 7— Oct. 412-413.
Collective bargaining. See Collective bargaining.
Conciliation and arbitration. See Conciliation and
arbitration.




89

Courts, role in, 1900-50. 1 9 5 0 — July 51-53.
Elections, representation. See National Labor Re­
lations Board.
Government action to avert strikes in railroad,
maritime, and bituminous-coal mining industries.
Details. 1 9 US— July III.
Government’s role in, 1900-50, and Federal labor
policy, 1930-40. 1 9 5 0 — July 51-61.
Hawaii. Need for stability, as Territory faces eco­
nomic readjustments. 1 9 US— June 612.
------- Postwar changes and reasons for. 1 9 US— June
610.
Industrial peace, causes of. Case studies by National
Planning Association on relations between LibbyOwens-Ford Glass Co. and Federation of Glass,
Ceramic and Silica Sand Workers of America
(C IO ), and Crown Zellerbach Corp. and Inter­
national Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and
Paper Mill Workers and the International Broth­
erhood of Paper Makers. 1 9 US— Dec. 626-629.
-------Case study by National Planning Association
on relations between Amalgamated Clothing
Workers of America (CIO) and Hickey Free­
man Co. of Rochester, N. Y ., 1915-48. 1 9 US—
May 542-544.
Joint Congressional Committee to study. Provi­
sion for establishment of. 1 9 U7— July 62.
-------Report to Congress (Mar. 15, 1948) on first 6
months operation of Labor Management Rela­
tions Act. Majority and minority reports sum­
marized. I S US— May 528-530.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general; also by States.
Minimum force agreement between Seaboard Air­
line Railroad and Federated Shop Crafts (Sys­
tem Federation No. 39, Railway Employees’ De­
partment, A F L ) ; summary of plan. 1 9 U7— Aug.
167-171.
New Jersey. Institute of Management and Labor
Relations, Rutgers University. Review of activ­
ities, July 1, 1947-Mar. 31, 1949. 19U S — June 663.
President’s message to Congress, January 1947.
Program urged to reduce industrial strife. Sum­
mary of provisions. 19U 7 — Feb. 255-256.
Profit-sharing plans. See Profit sharing.
Public reactions to and future recommendations
for, 1950. 1 9 5 0 — July 58-59.
State legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal
and general; also by States.
Taft-Hartley Act. See Labor Management Rela­
tions Act.
Tennessee Valley Authority established in 1933.
Labor-management relations, resume. 1 9 U9— July
41-42.
Union-shop referendums. Petitions led with Na­
tional Labor Relations Board, elections held,
January 1947. 1 9 US— Mar. IV.
Wartime, and Government controls. See National
W ar Labor Board.
Labor-management relations, foreign countries ( see
also Legislation, foreign countries):
Japan. Program outlined by Advisory Committee
on Labor in Japan, 1946. 1 9 U7— Feb. 239-254.
Norway. Stabilization of, in post-liberation area.
19U 7 — Sept. 343.
Labor Management Relations A ct:
A F L and CIO attacks on; programs of action for
repeal of. 1 9U 7 — Nov. 529, 532.
Boards of Inquiry. Chronological summary of seven
disputes in 1948. 1 9 US— May 532-534.
Check-off, limits on, under section 3 0 2 (c )(4 );
opinion given by Assistant Solicitor General, May
13, 1948. 1SU8— July 42.
Constitutionality, section 1 0 (j) ; upheld in case in­
volving
International
Typographic
Union.
I S US— Mar. IV.

90

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor Management Relations Act— Continued
Court decisions. See Court decisions.
Damage-suit provisions for breach of contract;
effects on clauses (no-strike) in collective agree­
ments in 1948. 1949— Feb. 145.
Elections, representation; NLRB decisions. See
National Labor Relations Board.
Hearings, Joint Congressional Committee, on op­
eration; recommendations, 194.8 — July IXI-IV.
Importance of, in labor-management disputes, 1947.
1948— Jan. 62.
Legal aspects. Selected list of articles. 1948— Apr.
409-410.
Operations under. First 6 months; Joint Committee
on Labor-Management Relations, report to Con­
gress, Mar. 15, 1948. Majority and minority re­
ports summarized. 1948— May 528-580.
------- First 2 months. 1947— Oct. 436-441.
Pension and retirement plans. Employers required
to bargain with employees, NLRB ruling in In­
land Steel case. 1948— May III-IV .
Provisions summarized. 1947— July 57-62.
Registration forms required under provisions of
section 9 (f) and ( g ) ; samples. 1947— Oct. 436-439.
Scope and developments following. 1 9 5 0 — July 5 7 59.
Union-security provisions; effects on collective
bargaining. 1948— Sept. I V ; 1949— Feb. 139,
143-145.
Labor markets. See Manpower.
Labor mobilization, foreign countries:
Belgium. Law of Mar. 20, 1945, and decrees of
April 1945, provisions. 1945— Aug. 239.
Canada. Wartime methods as described by Prime
Minister, Mar. 24, 1942. 1942— July 42-45.
Great Britain. Wartime measures for, summary of,
to April 1942. 1942— July 25-41.
Labor Month in Review; summary of mamr events
currently affecting labor. See each issu e, July 1947December 1950.
Labor movement, United States:
Civic recognition; public interest in, 1930’s; par­
ticipation in Government and community activ­
ities; political action; period 1900-50 summa­
rized. 1 9 5 0 — July 62-69.
Unity in. See Labor organizations— Labor unity.
Labor movement, foreign countries (see also Labor or­
ganizations) :
France. Background and role of trade-unions, 194449. 1949— July 8-13.
Great Britain. Background and present dual role
of trade-unions. 1948— Oct. 392-393.
Italy. Postwar. Trade-union confederations, or­
ganization and functions; membership. 1949—
Jan. 49-53.
Labor offices. Governmental. State labor departments.
Reorganization, 1945, by certain States. Summary.
1946— Feb. 250-251.
Labor organizations, United States ( see also Conven­
tions, meetings, etc.):
Affiliation changes and organizing activities of
unions, 1948 and January-June 1949. 1949—
Feb. 147-148, Sept. 240-241.
Agriculture. Extent of unionism and factors affect­
ing. Summary (Jamieson). 1946— Jan. 25-36.
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (C IO ).
History and proceedings of 1944 convention.
1944— Aug. 332-336.
American Federation of Labor. Conventions. See
Conventions, meetings, etc.
------- Development in South since 1890’s. 1946—
Oct. 557-582.
------- Discrimination, President’s statement of July
1945 concerning. 1945— Aug. 279.
-------Workers’ education activities, summary, 1945.
1945— Aug. 301-308.




Anti-Communist movement, in 1948, summary.
1 9 4 9 — Feb. 148-149.
Automobile Workers, United (C IO ). Resolution
condemning communism, July 1949 convention.
1 9 4 9 — Sept. 245.
Benefit programs o f early trade-unions; purpose fo r
seeking Government programs benefiting work­
ers. 1 9 5 0 — July 32.
Boilermakers,
International
Brotherhood
of.
Women admitted to membership after referen­
dum. 1 9 4 2 — Nov. 1006.
Building trades. Residential construction, degree o f
participation in. 1947— Jan. 66.
Civil liberties, unions as champions of. 1949— Mar.
285-286.
Clerical and professional workers. Estimated num­
ber unionized, in Government work and by indus­
try group. 1944— June 1229.
Coal mining industry. See Mine Workers, United,
this section.
Collective bargaining with employer groups. Meth­
ods used. Summary. 1947— Mar. 397-410.
Communications Workers of America (C IO ), struc­
tural changes in the organization restricting pol­
icy making to local and international union levels
approved, October 1950. 1950— Dec. 713.
Congress o f Industrial Organizations. Anti-Com­
munist activities, September 1949. 1949— Oct. IV .
------ Conventions. See Conventions, meetings, etc.
------ Development in South since 1935. 1946— Oct.
576-582.
------ Expulsion o f affiliated unions on charges of
Communist domination, 1950. 1 9 5 0 — July 105,
Sept. IV, Dec. 666.
------ Organization, problems, and activities, 193550. 1 9 5 0 — July 43-47.
------ W orkers’ education activities, summary, 1945.
1945— Aug. 308-314.
Cooperatives, consumers. A F L and CIO sponsor­
ship; development, 1949. 1950— Mar. 286.
------ Movement to provide food, housing, and med­
ical care, 1947. 1948— Mar. 261-264.
------ Nonfarm, participation of unions and mem­
bership in organization and support of. 1948—
Oct. 388-392.
Development, 1900-50; services to workers; State
and Federal legislation benefiting. 1950—July
11- 12.
Distributive, Processing and Office Workers of
America (Ind.) organized, October 1950. 1950—
Dec. 713.
Domestic Workers Local Industrial Union, W ash­
ington, D. C., established, 1942. Standards and
activities summarized. 1945— Mar. 583-584.
Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers (C IO ), In­
ternational Union of, founding convention, Phil­
adelphia, November 1949. 1949— Dec. III.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of
(A F L ). Agreement with National Electrical
Contractors’ Association concerning employer
contribution to benefits fund. 1946— June 867869.
Employer opposition, price of, 1900-50. 1950—
July 43.
Fight against communism, 1949 activity. 1950—
Feb. 130.
Financial statements of operation required by 1943
legislation in Idaho and South Dakota. 1943—
May 942.
Foreman’s Association o f America. Conditions lead­
ing to formation (in 1941) ; history and growth;
structure, and status in December 1945. 1946—
Feb. 241-244.
Foremen as members of, and provisions o f collec­
tive agreements concerning. 1948— June 10491053.

I N D E X J A N U A R Y 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Garment Workers’ Union, International Ladies’
(A F L ). Health and welfare activities (includ­
ing work of Union Health Center and New York
Dress Joint Board). 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 204-212.
-------Health centers. Growth and work of, 1913-50.
1 9 5 0 — Dec. 709-710.
---------------- Philadelphia, history of. 194-8 — Jan. 3 4 39.
------- New York Health Center, services of, as re­
ported by ILGW U 1944 convention. 1 9 4 4 — Sept.
565.
Government’s role in union advance to 1950. 1 9 5 0 —
July 58.
Growth since middle of nineteenth century, and
from 1900 to 1950. 1 9 4 9 — Mar. 286; 1 9 5 0 — July
40-47.
Hosiery Workers, American Federation of. Activ­
ities in South since 1925. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 566-567.
International Federation of Trade-Unions. Mem­
bership, by country and by year, 1941-43. 1 944—
Aug. 336-337.
International relations, role in, according to re­
marks before A F L and CIO 1948 annual conven­
tions. 1 9 4 9 — Jan. 12-14.
Knights of Labor. See Noble Order of Labor, this

section.
Labor unity. Activities toward, 1949-50. 1 9 5 0 —
Feb. IV, Apr. III-IV , Dec. 666-667.
------- CIO and A F L committees set up to explore
possibility of, June 1950. 1 9 5 0 — July 105.
Labor’s League for Political Education (A F L ).
Activities in 1948; plans for future. 1 9 4 9 — Feb.
139, 147.
Legislation affecting, 1900-50, historical resume.
1 9 5 0 — July 48-50.
------- See also Legislation, U. S., Federal and gen­
eral.
Lumber industry (Far W est). Unionization status,
August 1944. 1 9 4 5 — July 21-22.
Machinists (Ind.). International Association of.
Recommendation of executive council for reaffil­
iation with the A F L , October 1950. 1 9 5 0 — Dec.
713.
Maintenance of membership awards by National
W ar Labor Board. Summary of results. 1 9 4 8 —
Sept. 524-533.
Membership. International unions, by size of and
number of locals, 1949 (chart). 1 9 5 0 — July 114.
------- Trend in, 1900-50 (chart). 1 9 5 0 — July 113.
Merchant Marine, U. S. offshore. Summary of jobs
covered by 11 principal unions, February 1946.
1 9 4 7 — Feb. 257-261.
Milk Wagon Drivers’ Union (local 753) Chicago
area. Jurisdiction and problems. 1 9 4 2 — June
1291-1293, 1303-1309.
Mine Workers, United. Developments in South
from 1890’s to 1930’s. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 558-559, 564565, 572-573.
------- Disaffiliation from American Federation of
Labor, reasons. 1 9 4 8 — Jan. 1.
------- Welfare and retirement fund. Operational
statistics up to May 1, 1949. 1 9 4 9 — July 40-41.
--------------- Resumption of benefits, September 1949;
types of benefits and status of fund. 1 9 5 0 — Dec.
706-709.
Municipal governments. Union affiliation (7 cities).
Summary. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 332-333.
Noble Order of the Knights of Labor. Character­
istics; developments. South, 1879 to late 1880’s;
and subsequent decline. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 555-556.
No-raid agreement between U A W (CIO) and In­
ternational Association of Machinists, January
1950. 1 9 5 0 — Mar. 278-279.
Obstacles to union activity, 1900-30. 1 9 5 0 — July
51-53.




91

Opposition to Taft-Hartley A ct; 1949 activity.
1 9 5 0 — Feb. 130.
Philippine Islands. Summary of status, Dec. 81,
1938; repressive measures taken by Japanese.
1945—
A y r . 782-783, 789.
Political action. 1900-50; community service activ­
ities. 1 9 5 0 — July 46-47, 67-69.
------- 1948. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 147.
Price and wage control termination. Attitudes of
leaders toward, and statements as to future pol­
icy. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 777.
Price control. Recommendations of A F L and CIO
concerning, July 1946. 1 9 4 6 — Aug. 219-220.
Propeller plant (St. Paul) workers. Unionization,
degree of. Summary. 1 9 4 6 — Jan. 99-100.
Recognition, fight for; written trade agreement
following union recognition. 1 9 5 0 — July 33.
Records, trade-union. Practical uses by unions and
by others. 1 9 4 9 — Mar. 300-301.
Registration and financial reports, State laws re­
quiring. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and gen­
eral.
Research work. Development, services, cooperation
with B L S; roster of union research departments
(Bortz). 1 9 4 8 — Feb. 296-307.
Right to organize protected by State labor relations
acts. 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 214-217.
Rubber, Cork, Linoleum, and Plastic Workers of
America, United (new name adopted December
1945, by United Rubber Workers of America).
1 9 4 6 — Apr. 605.
Rubber Workers of America, United. Growth, 193545 and account* of 1945 convention. 1 9 4 6 — Apr.
601-606.
Safety program, cooperation on, joint union, 194448, a case study. 1 9 4 9 — Apr. 430-432.
Safety provisions in union agreements, 1950. Types
of safety clauses; prevalence of joint committees;
jurisdiction and pay of committee members and
meeting schedule. 1 9 5 0 — Sept. 342-346.
Southern States. Development from 1879 to 1946.
Summary. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 555-582.
State legislation affecting. See Legislation, U. S.,
Federal and general; also by State, fo r specified

State.
Steelworkers of America, United. First constitu­
tional convention, May 1942, and provisions of
constitution adopted. 1 9 4 2 — Sept. 497-500.
Steel Workers’ Organizing Committee. Name
changed to “ United Steelworkers of America.”
1 9 4 2 — Sept. 497.
Telephone Workers, National Federation of. Na­
tional assembly, 1944, proceedings; history and
scope of federation. 1 9 4 4 — Sept. 569-571.
Textile Workers, United. Growth in South during
and after World W ar I ; dispute of 1929. 1 9 4 6 —
Oct. 562-564, 568-570.
Tobacco Workers’ Union, International. Growth
in South during and after World W ar I. 1 9 4 6 —
Oct. 561-562, 573.
Training for leaders. Course given at Industrial
Relations Center of University of Chicago, 1946.
1 9 4 6 — June 906.
Transportation and communications industries.
Labor unions, by industry branch, affiliation, and
persons to whom membership is open; age of
unions. 1 9 5 0 — Mar. 275-278.
Use of BLS data in recent years. 1 9 5 0 — July 77-78.
Welders. Jurisdictional claims by various A F L
unions and strike of 1941. 1 9 4 2 — Mar. 662-664.
Welfare programs. Individual unions. Development
of movement, features of plans, problems in­
volved. Summary (Minkoff). 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 201-214.
------- See also Health— Plans, health and welfare.

92

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor organizations, U. S.— Continued
Women members. Wartime increase in number.
1945—
June 1269-1270.
Labor organizations, foreign countries ^( see also Con­
ventions, meetings, etc.; and Legislation):
Australia. Action against communism, 1949-50.
1 9 5 0 — Nov. 580-581.
------- Membership statistics, 1939, and 1927 and
1939 legislation. 1 9 4 2 — Mar. 628-629.
Australia. New South Wales. Number and mem­
bership, by industry group, 1942, and total mem­
bership by year, 1932-42. 1 9 4 4 — June 1231-1232.
Austria. Chambers of labor, organization and func­
tion. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 244-245.
------- Trade-Union Federation. Affiliation, World
Federation of Trade Unions; London Trade
Union Conference, March 1948. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 248.
--------------- Granted legal status, summer 1946; char­
acter and organization activities and accomplish­
ments. Membership, 1945-47. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 244248.
---------------- Wage and price policies following cur­
rency reform of December 1947. 1 9 4 8 — July 4 5 47.
------- Trade-unions, legal status under provisions
of Association Act of 1867; provisions. 1 9 4 8 —
Sept, 245-246.
------- Works councils, organization and functions.
1 9 4 8 — Sept. 244-245.
Belgium. Characteristics, prior to German inva­
sion; dissolution of free unions in 1942. 1 9 4 4 —
Feb. 291.
------- General Federation of Labor formed, April
1945, by fusion of four confederations; objectives,
structure and program of new body. 1 9 4 5 — Aug.
279-281.
------- Membership, development, and policies, 1945.
1946—
July 33-35.
Brazil. Confederation of Brazilian Workers (C T B ).
Establishment, growth, and list of resolutions.
1947—
Mar. 439-442.
------- Constitution of September 1946, articles af­
fecting (text). 1 9 4 7 — Mar. 443.
------- Restrictions on activities during Vorgas and
Dutra regimes. 1 9 4 7 — Mar. 434-437, 438-439.
------- Workers’ Unification Movement (W U T ). Es­
tablishment and operation. 1 9 4 7 — Mar. 437-440.
British Malaya. Status prior to World W ar II, sum­
mary. 1 9 4 4 — Aug. 290-291.
Bulgaria. Membership, May 1945, and increase
since 1939. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 281.
Canada. Membership. By industry group, and bene­
fits paid, by type. 1939 and 1940. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 673674; 1 9 4 2 — Feb. 409-410.
----------------By industry group, 1940 and 1941, num­
ber of locals and members, by years, 1911-41;
history of movement. 1 9 4 8 — May 955-958.
--------------- Specified years, 1914-44; by organization,
1944 and 1948; by industrial group, 1943, 1944,
and 1948. 1 9 4 4 — Nov. 998; 1 9 4 5 — Dec. 11781179; 1 9 4 9 — Nov. 537.
------- Saskatchewan Civil Servants’ Association.
Agreement signed Aug. 2, 1945, with Provincial
Government. 1 9 4 5 — Nov. 972-973.
Chile. Industrial and craft membership, 1937-40.
1 9 4 2 — Feb. 411.
------- Union membership, end of 1943, by industry
and type. 1 9 4 5 — Jan. 110-111.
China. Chinese Federation of Labor. Formation,
April 1948, following passage of law revising
basis for membership in Government-dominated
unions. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 183.
------- Chinese Labor Association (C A L ). Back­
ground, membership (January 1943), affiliates,
and activities. 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 533-534.




Colombia. Membership, by industry group, region,
and sex, end of 1942, and by sex, 1938-42. 1 9 4 4 —
June 1230-1231.
Cuba. Trade-union federations and confederations
granted juridical personality by law of Apr. 9,
1943. 1 9 4 8 — Dec. 1188-1189.
Czechoslovakia. Political action by workers; unions
become arm of Communist Government. 1 9 4 9 —
Feb. 183.
Denmark. Status prior to World W ar II, summary.
1944—
Nov. 954-955.
Egypt. Number and membership, by industry, Feb­
ruary 1945. 1 9 4 5 — June 1255.
------- Position of labor strengthened by organiza­
tion of unions. 1 9 4 5 — July 63.
European Recovery Program. Opposition to and
support of, by various international trade-union
organizations, 1948; resultant actions. 1 9 4 9 —
Feb. 181-182.
-------Trade-Union Advisory Committee. Formation,
early in 1948, and reasons for; activities. 1 9 4 9 —
Feb. 182.
France. French Confederation of Christian Work­
ers (C F T C ). Closer cooperation with other
unions without giving up right to strike. 1 9 4 9 —
July 9.
-------General Confederation of Labor (C G T ). Com­
munist dominated since its reconstitution follow­
ing the liberation of France; history, 1906-49.
1 9 4 9 — July 9-11.
------- General Confederation of Labor— W o r k e d
Force (C G T -F O ). Organization, end of 1947,
membership, industries represented. 1 9 4 9 — Feb.
182.
----------------Trade-union independence from political
party influence. Philosophy parallel to that of
Socialist Party. 1 9 4 9 — July 9.
------- Inter-confederation relations, international
activities, and postwar industrial relations.
1 9 4 9 — July 11-13.
------- Reconstitution and expansion after libera­
tion of Republic; and international relations.
1945—
May 1032-1034.
-------Status prior to World W ar II; measures taken
by Vichy Government; and first meeting of CGT,
after liberation of Paris. 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 720-721.
------- Union membership, 1949. 1 9 4 9 — July 8-9.
France (unoccupied). General Confederation of
Labor dissolved by decree of Nov. 9, 1940. 1 9 4 1 —
Jan. 98.
Germany.
American Labor Adviser to Allied
Control Commission appointed, February 1945.
1 9 4 5 — Mar. 515.
-------Before rise of Nazism and during World W ar
I I; plan for reconstruction. 1 9 4 5 — Mar. 513-515.
------- Membership, U. S. Zone, January 1946-October 1947; by economic group, sex and age, end
of October 1947; for Germany as a whole, June
30, 1947. 1 9 4 8 — Apr. 382-384.
------- Plan for postwar reconstruction, summary.
1 9 4 4 — Aug. 337-339.
-------Postwar formation. Summary of status in fall
of 1945. 1 9 4 6 — Jan. 74-75.
------- Postwar reconstruction. Plan proposed at
Stockholm Conference, February 1944. 1 9 4 5 —
Mar. 515.
-------U. S. Government directive of July 1947, per­
mitting organization and functioning of. 1 9 4 7 —
Oct. 459-460.
Germany, Western Bizonal Trade Union Council,
formation, late 1947, accomplishments, industries
involved in mergers. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 183.
------- Independent Trade-Union Organization of
Greater Berlin (U G O ). Formation, August 1948,
objections from Soviet Zone. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 183.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Trizonal Trade-Union Federation established,
October 1949. Membership and dues, structure
and distribution of functions, and statement of
policies. 1 9 5 0 — Mar. 279-281.
Great Britain. Amalgamated Engineering Union.
Women admitted to membership by vote of home,
Australian, and South African branches. 1 9 4 2 —
Nov. 1007.
------- British Labor Party; British labor under labor
government; trade-unionists sitting in Parlia­
ment and holding important posts. 1 9 4 8 — Aug.
117-122, Oct. 366-372.
------- Foremen as members of trade-unions, sum­
mary of situation. 1 9 4 3 — June 1053.
------- Membership. 1937-43, all unions, and Trades
Union Congress affiliates;
1939-47, unions
showing greatest gains. 1 9 4 5 — June 1255-1256;
1948—
Oct. 366-367.
------- Position and role of, under the Labor Gov­
ernment. 1 9 4 8 — Oct. 366-372.
------- Trades Union Congress (T U C ). Relationship
with government; political contributions; support
of wage-price policies; attitudes toward workers’
control of industry, joint consultative machinery,
i.e., councils, works committees, etc. 1948— Oct.
368-369.
------- Workers’ education activities summarized,
particularly trade-union studies set up in 1945
by London School of Economics. 1 9 4 6 — Sept. 397398.
Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Membership
statistics, 1927-42. 1 9 4 1 — Jan. 156-157; 1 9 4 2 —
Mar. 613-614; 1 9 4 3 — Apr. 736-737; 1 9 4 4 — Apr.
781-782.
Greece. Conditions under laws enacted by various
governments in control, 1914-42. 1 9 4 3 — Aug.
225-226.
Iceland. Unions of four federations and wage and
hour provisions of collective agreements. 1 9 4 5 —
Sept. 490-491.
India. Indian Labor Congress. Formation, March
1948, upon withdrawal from All-India TradeUnion Congress (A IT U C ) ; other defections.
1949—
Feb. 183.
------- Indian National Trade Union Congress (IN T U C ), formation 1947; delegates sent to 1948
ILO Conference. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 183.
------- Membership, selected fiscal years, 1932-33 to
1941-42. 1 9 4 4 — Apr. 782, Nov. 999.
Iran. Development from 1941 to 1946, summary.
1 9 4 6 — Sept. 366-367.
Ireland. National unions; trade-union federations;
membership, 1938-49; domestic and interna­
tional programs; relations with political parties;
and unification efforts. 1 9 5 0 — Apr. 392-396.
------- Number of, 1938-44; membership in 1943
(similar statistics for employer organizations).
1 9 4 5 — Aug. 281.
Israel. Histadrut: Labor Federation of Israel.
Activities,
over-all;
background,
historical;
structure and membership; recent policy ac­
tions; international affiliations. 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 230233.
------- General
Federation
of
Jewish
Labor,
growth of, 1925-40. 1 9 4 1 — Oct. 965.
Italy. Chambers of labor, membership, functions,
total number, and extent of Communist con­
trol. 1 9 4 9 — Jan. 50-51.
------- Free Italian General Confederation of Work­
ers (LCGIL). Organization, October 1948, po­
litical background, estimated membership. 1 9 4 9 —
Jan. 49, 51, Feb. 182-183.
------- General Confederation of Labor. Composi­
tion; first official convention, 1945; number of
workers registered, Dec. 31, 1944, by industry




93

or occupation. 1 9 4 5 — May 1011-1012, June 12561257.
----------------Policy o f; resolutions of executive com­
mittee, April 1945. Summary. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 282283.
------- Italian General Confederation of Workers
(C G IL). Organization, membership, operation;
Communist control of policies; 1948 split within
ranks. 1 9 4 9 — Jan. 49-52, Feb. 182-183.
------- Pre-Fascist and Fascist unions, characteris­
tics of. 1 9 4 3 — Nov. 912-913.
Japan. Development, 1920-37 and 1946-50, sum­
maries. 1 9 4 5 — Oct. 660-661; 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 446448.
------- National Congress of Industrial Unions.
Proposal to dissolve anti-Communist Democra­
tization League; League’s counter proposal.
1 9 4 9 — F e b . 183.
------- Postwar developments and strength o f; na­
tional federations, their policies and programs;
outlook for future. 1 9 4 7 — Feb. 243-245.
Korea. Role of labor unions and membership, 1946
and 1948. 1 9 4 9 — Apr. 406.
Mexico. Increase in number and membership,
1933 to 1941; types of unions and federations.
I W —-Sept. 535-536.
------- Membership, unions under Federal jurisdic­
tion, by industry, June 30, 1944. 1 9 4 4 — Nov.
999-1000.
------- Pact of national worker unity, June 4, 1942.
1 9 4 3 — Sept. 536.
Netherlands. Labor Foundation (including work­
ers and employers) incorporated May 17, 1942.
Objectives, member organizations, and program.
1945—
Dec. 1171-1173.
------- Membership, by federations, 1937, 1940,
194647, and 1948-49; prewar conditions and
developments after German occupation; member­
ship distribution by industry, 1948-49. 1 9 4 4 —
Jan. 46-48; 1947— Oct. 462; 194& — Dec. 674.
Netherlands Indies. Development, 1908-40; and
membership, 1924, 1931, 1939, and 1940. 1 9 4 4 —
May 988-989.
New Zealand. Action, 1949-50, against commu­
nism. 1 9 5 0 — Nov. 580-581.
------- Federation of Labor. Acceptance of Govern­
ment stabilization policy. 1 9 4 3 — Aug. 254.
------- Membership provisions of Industrial Man­
power Emergency Regulations effective Feb. 14,
1944. 1 9 4 4 — June 1203.
Norway. Conditions under German occupation of
country. 1 9 4 2 — Nov. 951.
-------Development, 1870 to 1939, membership, speci­
fied years, and changes under German occupa­
tion. 1 9 4 4 — Sept. 506-508.
------- Underground activity during World W ar II,
and plans for postwar action. 1 9 4 5 — Nov. 979981.
Palestine. See Israel, this section.
Paraguay. Membership and number of unions at
beginning of 1945. 1 9 4 5 — June 1287.
Peru. Mining industry. Unionism, status of, in
1945. 1 9 4 5 — July 55.
Rumania. General Confederation of Labor mem­
bership, by year, 1932-39; effect of war upon
activities of unions. 1 9 4 3 — Dec. 1108.
-------Revival in summer of 1944; status, July 1945,
summary. 1 9 4 5 — Oct. 754-755.
South Africa, Union of. Trades and Labor Coun­
cil. Affiliation with, by trade-unions. Status,
July 1945. 1 9 4 5 — Oct. 755.
----------------Membership in 1943. 1 9 4 4 — Aug. 339.
Soviet Union. Rest homes and sanatoriums pro­
vided by. Restoration after close of World War
II. 1 9 4 5 — Oct. 729.

94

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Labor organizations, f. c.— Continued
Switzerland. Federation of State Railway Em­
ployees and Federation of Swiss Trade Unions.
Positions concerning stabilization policies of
Government, 3945. 1 9 4 5 — Sept. 535.
------- Trade-union growth during World W ar II
and statements on international policy. 1 9 4 5 —
Nov. 981-983.
------- Trade-Unions, Affiliated Swiss, membership,
1939 and 1940. 1 9 4 1 — Oct. 966.
Trade-union movements, clashes within, 1948;
changes in structure. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 181-183.
Trinidad and Tobago. Status, 1942, and function
of Trade Union Council. 1 9 4 4 — Apr. 746.
Turkey. Legislation concerning, i947. 1 9 4 7 —
Aug. 197-3 98.
Venezuela.^ Trade-unions and working conditions,
International Labor Office Mission’s report; sub­
sequent Government action; recommendations of
Mission. 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 449-452.
Yugoslavia. Classes; membership for specified
years, 1931-40; Government measures affecting.
1948—
Nov. 904-905.
Labor organizations, international:
American Countries, Third Regional Labor Con­
ference, April 1946. Policies endorsed. 1946—
June 907-911.
Christian International Trade-Union Congress,
Lyons, France, May 31-June 2, 1949. Back­
ground and program of CISC; conference action;
membership and relations with other unions.
1949—
Dec. 670-674.
Developments, 1913-50. 1 9 5 0 — July 44-45.
Inter-American Confederation of Workers (C IL ).
Origin at meeting in Lima, Peru, January 1948.
Organizations represented at conference, reso­
lutions approved, and program of action. Con­
stitution, excerpts from (translation). 1 9 4 8 —
May 499-502.
International Labor Organization. S e e
Inter­
national Labor Organization.
Iron and Steel Committee, ILO, recommendations
on guaranteed wage plans. 1 9 5 0 — Mar. 281-282.
Latin America. Confederation of Latin American
Workers. Second regular meeting, December
1944; changes in structure and points included
in program. 1 9 4 5 — June 1254.
Latin-Ameriean Confederation of Labor (C T A L ).
Meeting, Mexico City, March 1948. Organiza­
tions represented at conference, resolutions ap­
proved. 1 9 4 S — May 499, 502-503.
New non-Communist world labor organization
(supported by A F L and C IO). Background of
joint action, 1909-49; program agreed upon;
June 1949. 1 9 4 9 — July 39-40, Sept. 238.
World Federation of Trade Unions. Machinery for,
adopted by second World Trade Union Con­
ference, Paris, Sept. 25 to Oct. 8, 1945. 1 9 4 6 —
Jan. 47-54.
------- Organization, control of policies, attitude
toward European Recovery Program; meeting
in Rome, May 5-10, 1948. 1 9 4 8 — Aug. 147-151.
World Trade-Union Conference. London, Feb. 6 17, 1945. Scope of representation and objectives
stated. 1 9 4 5 — May 1030-1032.
------- Second (Paris, Sept. 25 to Oct. 8, 1945). Ac­
tion summarized; list of trade-unions repre­
sented (with reported membership), by country.
1 9 4 6 — Jan. 47-54.
Labor participation in management. S e e Labor man­
agement cooperation.
Labor policies, U. S. Zone, Germany:
Directive of July 1947, outlining; summary. 1 9 4 7 —
Oct. 459-460.
Military
Government regulations establishing.
1948 — Apr. 380.




Labor
for,
Labor
Labor

protection. Netherlands. Government agencies
prior to German occupation. 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 51.
recruiting. See Recruitment of labor.
relations. See Labor and industrial relations;
also Labor-management relations.
Labor requirements, United States ( see also Produc­
tivity) :
Aircraft industry. Estimates, factors affecting.
1 9 4 1 — Feb. 329-330.
Air transport, by occupations. 1 9 4 5 — June 11981204.
Concrete blocks and pipe. Man-hours in produc­
tion and transportation of raw material and in
manufacturing and transportation of product,
1946; including (in pipe production) variations
by geographic division. 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 681-691.
Construction machinery (selected). Man-hour re­
quirements per unit, 1939-45; indexes by type
of product and of labor; factors affecting pro­
duction. 1 9 4 7 — July 41-47.
Construction, new. 1947-48; 1948 and first quar­
ter, 1949. 1 9 4 8 — Apr. 413-414; 1 9 4 9 — May 545546.
------- Public and private. 1948, second quarter and
year. 1 9 4 8 — July 47-48, Oct. 393-394.
------- Workers required, by type of construction,
years 1946, 1947, and 1948, and by quarter,
1947 and 1948. 1 9 4 9 — Feb. 203-204.
Electric light and power industry. Effects of tech­
nological changes on. 1 9 4 8 — Nov. 498.
Leather manufacturing. Man-hours required per
pound or square foot, selected types of leather,
3946; comparison with 1939. Indexes, direct, in­
direct, and total factory man-hours, 1939-46,
all types combined. 1 9 4 8 — Oct. 383-385.
Ready-mixed concrete. Man-hours required to
batch, mix, and deliver 100 cubic yards, by
major operation and plant size, 1946-47. 1948—
June 634-635.
Rubber (synthetic) industry. Estimated, 1944, by
branch of industry and occupational category.
1 9 4 5 — May 990-999.
Labor requirements. Canada. Sources of demand; poli­
cies of Interdepartmental Committee on Labor Co­
ordination. 1 9 4 1 — Feb. 334-336.
Labor standards, United States:
Defense program, policies under, 1940. 1 9 4 1 — Mar.
536-538.
Defense workers. Resolution of 1941 convention
of International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials. 1 9 4 1 — Dec. 1455.
Fair. Maintenance of, by members of projected In­
ternational Trade Organization. Provisions of
Charter regarding. 1 9 4 8 — Nov. 478.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general.
New York. Dispensations from, to achieve maxi­
mum war-industry production, December 1941
to December 1942; January 1942 law granting,
and extent of use. 1 9 4 3 — Jan. 38-42, Nov. 9 61962.
Nonmetropolitan territories. Work of ILO con­
ference to provide for establishment of agree­
ment on. 1 9 4 6 — Dec. 939.
State laws. Blanket suspension of not favored by
Federal agencies. Text of statement issued.
1 9 4 8 — Feb. 256.
Labor supply, United States:
Aviation occupations, in postwar period. 1 9 4 5 —
June 1198-1204.
California. Wartime factors affecting; estimated
numbers of workers, 1940 and 1945, and assump­
tions for 1950. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 563-575.
Estimated numbers, 1940 and 1945, and assump­
tions for 1950, United States and major geo­
graphic divisions. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 571.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Foreign workers employed during World War II.
See Foreign workers.
Pacific Coast. Wartime factors affecting; estimated
numbers 1940 and 1945 and assumptions for
1950 (including data for other divisions). 191*7—
Apr. 563-575.
Potential. March 1942. Results of W P A survey
summarized. 191*2— June 1450.
------- W ar work, St. Paul, Minn., March 1942
(Univ. of Minn, study). 191*2 — Aug. 203-205.
Prospective growth in labor force, 1940 to 1950,
factors affecting and State and regional vari­
ations. 191*6— Dec. 851-871.
Southern States. Local supply and contribution to
other regions. 191*6— Oct. 484-489.
VJ-day to August 1946. Conditions summarized.
191*6— Nov. 673-680.
Wartime. Sources and excess over normal, by age
group and sex. 191*3 — Aug. 212-214.
------- Trends from beginning of Defense Program
(mid-1940) to April 1944. Summary. 191*1*— Aug.
264-278.
Labor supply, foreign countries:
Canada. Unskilled workers. Number expected to
be adequate for 1941 needs. 191*1 — Mar. 590.
Great Britain. Housing program, plans for secur­
ing workers. 191*5— Oct. 741-743.
Labor turn-over:
Aircraft industry. Airframe, engine, and propeller
plants, by year and month, January 1941 to
August 1944. 191*1*— Nov. 920-926.
Airframe, engine, and propeller plants, November
1943 to June 1944. 191*1*— Sept. 479-480.
BLS statistical series, limitations of, survey meth­
ods and sources, calculation. 191*8 — Oct. 418-421.
Consumer goods industries, selected. Accessions
and lay-offs, August 1948 to January 1949.
191*9— Mar. 277.
Cordage and twine plants, October 1942. 191*3 —
Feb. 355-356.
Cut-back contracts. Effects in selected plants.
191*5 — June 1175-1181.
Machine-tool-accessories industry. Rates by year,
1939-42; by month, January to October 1943.
191*1*— Feb. 311.
Machine-tool industry. Annual averages 1939-42;
separation and quit rates, January 1939 to April
1943. 191*3 — Sept. 487.
Manufacturing. Annual and monthly rates, 193041. 191*2— May 1193-1205.
------- Monthly rates. By class of turn-over, Janu­
ary 1939 to March 1947. See Labor Turn-Over,
each issue , January 1940-May 1946; see Trend
of Employment and Labor Turn-Over, each
issue , June 1946-June 1947.
---------------- By class of turn-over, April 1947-September 1950. See Current labor statistics, table
B -2, each issue , July 1947-December 1950.
----------------By class of turn-over, 1939 and January
1943-September 1950. See Current labor sta­
tistics, table B— each issue , July 1947-Decem­
1,
ber 1950.
---------------- Men and women, March-July 1947, by
selected industry group. See Current labor sta­
tistics, table B -3, each issue , July-November
1947. (Discontinued.)
------- Separation and accession rates, total and by
type of separation, 1939-1948 (charts). 191*9 —
Feb. 176-178.
Manufacturing,
mining,
and public utilities.
Monthly rates, specified industries, October 1940
to March 1947. S e e s e c t io n s Labor Turn-Over,
ea c h i s s u e January 1940-M ay 1946; Trend of
Employment and Labor Turn-Over, each issue
June 1946-June 1947.




95

Measurement in Bureau of Labor Statistics month­
ly series. Definitions of accessories, quits, dis­
charges, lay-offs, and miscellaneous separations.
191*9 — Oct. 417.
Munitions and nonmunitions industries. Monthly
rates, January 1943 to December 1944; by sex,
1944. 191*5— .July 143-151.
Ordnance workers. Rate in 1918, by housing situ­
ation and by wage group. 191*3 — Dec. 1079-1081.
Postwar. Certain groups. Probabilities concerning
and factors affecting. 191*1*— Feb. 271-279.
Problem of and importance of vocational counsel­
ing in reducing. 191*8— Dec. 596-597.
Rates. Computation, coverage, origin, and uses.
191*9— Oct. 417-418.
Retail stores, Boston. General discussion of. 191*1—
Aug. 325-326.
Rubber industry. Annual rates, 1939 and 1940, by
branch of industry and size of plant. 191*1— Apr.
956-966.
Sawmills and logging camps, western region, 1941
and 1942. 191*2— Dec. 1129-1131.
Series, shown in tables B -l and B -2 of Current
Labor Statistics section of the Monthly Labor
Review, revision of coding and weighting, 1950.
Summary. 1 9 5 0 — May 535.
Shipbuilding industry. Effect upon labor require­
ments; year 1940, compared with 1939. 191*1—
Mar. 575, June 1379.
Shipyards, private. Monthly rates. January 1940
to January 1944. 191*1*— May 954-955, June 11841185.
-------Separations. Monthly rates, 1942, also by re­
gion, 1943. 191*1*— June 1182-1185.
Titles used in schedules of rates, changes in. 191*3—
June 1210.
Veterans. Manufacturing industries. Summary of
hires, separations, quits, discharges, December
1945 to July 1946; and turn-over rates by in­
dustry, July 1946. 191*6— Dec. 927-934.
Women workers, factory. Involuntary separation
rates, quit rates, hiring rates by month, Novem­
ber 1945 to November 1946. 191*7— Mar. 411419.
------- War-contract plants cut back, December 1943
to May 1944. 191*5— June 1180-1181.
Labor unions. See Labor organizations.
Labor unity. See Labor organizations, United States.
Labor’s League for Political Education (A F L ). Activ­
ities in 1948; plans for future. 191*9 — Feb. 139, 147.
Lamp, portable, and lamp-shade industries:
Definitions and wage order of July 1, 1941. 191*1—
June 1487.
Description of industries and coverage of wage
and hour survey, February and March 1940.
191*1 — Jan. 175-176.
Land ownership. French Indo-China. Village-commu­
nity custom. Conditions prior to World W ar II.
191*1*— July 51.
Land utilization, postwar. Great Britain. Reports on
planning, 1942 (Scott and Uthwatt committees).
191*3 — Jan. 46-52.
Latin America. Labor and welfare national offices,
list of, with addresses. 191*2— May 1246-1248.
Laundries, power. See Power laundries.
Laundry equipment industry, domestic:
Characteristics of industry and scope of BLS sur­
vey, summer of 1942. 191*3 — Mar. 534-537.
Employment, production workers. Weekly hours
and labor turn-over, February 1948-January
1949. 191*9— Mar. 276-277.
Laundry industry:
New York. Minimum-wage law, and order of 1938;
gains in earnings since. 191*1 — Feb. 362-363,
Sept. 622-623.

96

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Laundry industry— Continued
Production workers. Weekly earnings, gross, in
current and 1939 dollars, annual averages, 194749, monthly, October 1948-September 1950. See
Current labor statistics, table C -2, each issue
January-Deeember 1950.
Lawyers. Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May 510.
Lay-off. Australia. New South Wales. Industrial Com­
mission rulings authorizing (as fuel-conservation
measures) ; provisions as to employees’ rights. 1945—
Jan. 45-46.
Lead and zinc mines and mills. Tri-State area. Charac­
teristics of industry and scope and method of BLS
study, June 1943. 19U — Sept. 558-560.
S
Learners. See Apprenticeship.
Leather, leather-trimmed, and sheep-lined garments in­
dustry. Wage determination effective May 13, 1938,
for jackets, extended to cover all leather, leathertrimmed, and sheep-lined garments, effective Sept.
19, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1295-1296.
Leather manufacturing:
Man-hour requirements for manufacturing a pound
or square foot, selected types of leather, 1946.
Comparison with 1939 figures. Indexes of man­
hours, 1939-46, by kind of labor and type of
leather, all reported types combined. 19U — Oct.
S
383-385.
Minimum-wage determination effective Dec. 17,
1941. 1942— Jan. 217.
Leather-tanning industry. Union agreements. Sum­
mary of provisions in effect in 40 contracts, 1943.
19 U — June 1219-1223.
U
Leave. See specific types of leave.
Legal aid, United States. Statistics, by city, 1939 and
1941 (report of National Association of Legal Aid
Organizations). 19U1— May 1199-1201; 19US— June
1158-1160.
Legislation, U. S., Federal and general:
Agricultural commodities, production and harvest­
ing. W ar Food Administrator granted appropria­
tion, 1944, for obtaining and caring for workers.
1945— Jan. 120.
Alaskan fishing and reindeer industries. Rights of
Indians and Eskimos. General provisions. 1942—
Mar. 648-649.
Alien employment. 1940 measures prohibiting, sum­
mary. 19U1— Mar. 652-653.
Aliens. Farm laborers from American countries.
Joint resolution of Apr. 29, 1943, to permit entry
of. 19 U — July 124-125.
S
------- Measure authorizing President to control
movements to and from United States, and pro­
visions barring from certain employment. 1942—
Mar. 697-698.
Anti-injunction (Norris-La Guardia) Act, 1932.
Provisions. 19U7— May 848.
Apprenticeship. State legislation establishing coun­
cils, 1947. 19U7— Sept. 277.
Barden-La Follette Act. See Vocational Rehabilita­
tion Act, this section.
Bituminous Coal Act of 1937 (Guffey A ct). Eco­
nomic background, objectives, provision! and ad­
ministration. 19U1— Aug. 297-304.
-------Extended in 1941 to Apr. 26, 1943. 19U2—
Mar. 699.
------- Ruling under, 1941, concerning consumers’
cooperative wholesale associations. 19U2— Mar.
684.
Boulder Dam. Wages and settlement of disputes,
provisions in 1940 law. 19U1— Mar. 654.
Boycotts, secondary. State legislation prohibiting,
1947. 19U7— Sept 280.
Canal Zone. Prevailing-wage provision in appro­
priation acts, 1940. 19U1— Mar. 654.
Check-off.
State legislation restricting use of,
1947. 19U7— Sept. 282-283.




Child labor. Federal and State legislation control­
ling, summary of provisions. 1 9 U7— Dec. 672;
1 9 5 0 — ,July 15-16, 48-50, Dec. 702-704.
-------State legislation regulating, 1945 to 1947, and
1948 to 1950; summaries. 1 9 US— Feb. 252, Nov.
757-758; 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 277-278; 1 9 4 8 — Nov. 513;
1 9 5 0 - ^ Jan. 42-43, Feb. 131, Dec. 701-702.
------- See also Legislation, U. S., by States, fo r

specific State.
Children in theaters. Problems connected with
State legislation. 1 9 U1— Apr. 865, 868-869.
Chinese-exclusion acts repealed Dec. 17, 1943.
19UU— Feb. 367-368.
Civil liberties, protection of, guaranteed by United
States Constitution. 1 9 4 9 — Mar. 287.
Civil Relief Act, Soldiers and Sailors, 1940. Pro­
visions summarized. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 651.
Civil service. See Federal employees, this section.
Civil Service Retirement Act. See Retirement,

this section.
Classification Act of 1949 and related laws. See
Federal employees, this section.
Clayton Act, 1914. Provisions. 1 9 4 7 — May 846847.
Closed shop. State “ right-to-work” legislation pro­
hibiting, 1947. 1 9 4 7 — June 1056-1059, Sept. 27 9 280.
Coal mining. Government control established by
Executive orders of Apr. 19 and May 1, 1943.
1 9 4 S — June 1093-1095.
------- Inspection. Federal act, 1941 (Pub. No. 4 9 ),
provisions. 1 9 4 1 — May 1216-1217.
Community Facilities Bill passed June 30, 1941.
Provisions summarized. 1 9 4 2 — Apr. 854.
Company-dominated unions, contracts with. Na­
tional Labor Relations Board given discretion
to challenge validity of (1944 Appropriations
A ct). 1 9 4 5 — Jan. 119.
Conciliation and arbitration. Executive order Jan.
12, 1942, establishing National W ar Labor
Board. 1 9 4 2 — Feb. 428.
------- State legislation relating to, 1947; provisions.
1 9 4 7 — Sept. 282.
Contractors. State laws requiring licenses, general
summary of provisions. 1 9 4 1 — Feb. 395-398.
Contracts, U. S. Government. Alaska and Hawaii
brought under coverage, 1940, of 1931 law
(Davis-Bacon A c t), prevailing wage determina­
tions. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 654.
-------Negotiation of, act of 1940. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 651.
------- Walsh-Healey (Public Contracts) Act. See
Walsh-Healey Act, this section.
Cooperatives. Housing. 1948 amendment to Fed­
eral Housing Act covering cooperatively owned
projects. 1 9 4 9 — Apr. 410.
-------Laws and decisions affecting, 1943, summary.
1 9 4 4 — Mar. 554-557.
Davis-Bacon Act. See Contracts, U. S. Govern­
ment, also Prevailing wage, this section.
Defense legislation, 1940, resume of, including the
draft, civil relief for servicemen, negotiation of
contracts, hours, overtime pay, alien-employ­
ment restrictions, housing. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 650-654.
Defense Mediation Board, National.
Creation
by Executive order, March 1941, abolishment
by Executive order, 1942. 1 9 4 2 — Mar. 696.
Defense Production Act (Public Law 774) of
Sept. 8, 1950. Provisions and administrative
action set in motion by the act. 1 9 5 0 — Sept.
I ll, Oct. 453-457.
Disability compensation. State legislation pro­
viding for. 1 9 US— Jan. 62 -6 3 ; 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 45,
Feb. 131.
Discrimination in employment. Laws of Con­
necticut and Oregon. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 278.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Racial or other, State laws, 1945 and 1949,
summary of provisions. 194-5— Nov. 984-991;
1946— Feb. 253; 1947— Aug. 198-199; 1950—
Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
Domestic workers. State laws affecting, summary.
1946— June 931.
Draft law. See Selective Service.
Economic stabilization through wage and price
control. Act of Oct. 2 and Executive order of
Oct. 3, 1942. 1942— Oct. 679, Nov. 917-924.
Eight-hour workday laws. See Hours of work,

this section.
Employment Act of 1946.
Summary of pro­
visions; official policy of U. S. Government.
1946— Apr. 586-588; 1947— Dec. 642.
Employment offices, public. Funds granted (Pub­
lic Act No. 668) to aid in recruiting defense
workers. 1941— Mar. 657.
------- See also Wagner-Peyser Act, this section .
Equal pay laws. See Legislation, U. S., by States.
Fair Employment Practice Committee. Expenses
(with limitations) provided for carrying out of
“lawfully” vested functions by amendment to
W ar Agencies Appropriation Act. 1945— Jan.
119-120.
Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. See Fair Labor
Standards Act.
Family allowances. Enlisted men in Armed
Forces. Act approved June 23, 1942, provisions.
1942— Aug. 226-228.
------- Servicemen’s dependents. Act of Oct. 26,
1943, provisions. 1944— Jan. 67-69.
Federal employees. Civil Service Act. Amend­
ment prohibiting discrimination in Federal
service against physically handicapped persons.
1948— Sept. 284.
------- Civil-service employment, wartime and post­
war, Executive orders concerning, provisions
summarized. 1946— Apr. 588-591.
------- Classification Act of 1949 (Pub. Law 429,
81st Cong.) classifying and grading positions
in Federal service and setting forth salary
scales; summary. 1950— Mar. 295-296.
------- Compensation Act liberalized, 1949. 1949—
Nov. 514, 518.
------- Overtime pay. 10-percent increase to those
not earning overtime. Joint resolution of Dec.
15, 1942 (temporary measure). 1948— Feb. 359361.
---------------- Wartime. Act of May 7, 1943; pro­
visions compared with those of Dec. 24, 1942.
1948— June 1203-1204.
------- Postal Rate Revision and Federal Employees
Salary Act of 1948. Pay raises for postal and
classified civil-service workers. 1948— July III.
------- Salaries. 1945 Pay Act, and laws and Ex­
ecutive orders 1923-44. Summary. 1946— Mar.
374-380.
------- ------- 1949 Federal legislation increasing.
1950— Feb. 129.
------- Vacations, certain services. Executive order
authorizing pay in lieu of. 1941— Aug. 415-416.
“ Fiancees” Act of July 29, 1946. Applicability of
and number of fiances and fiancees admitted to
the United States under. 1948— Apr. 405-406.
Foreign Assistance Act of 1948, signed Apr. 3,
authorizing European Recovery Program. Eco­
nomic Cooperation Administration to adminis­
ter program; labor’s interest. 1948— June 640641.
Foreign economic affairs. Unification of Federal
agencies concerned with, by Executive order of
July 15, 1943. 1943— Sept. 470.
George-Barden Act of 1946, providing funds for
vocational guidance. 1948— Dec. 599.




97

Government employees. Strikes by. State laws
prohibiting, 1947. Summary. 1947— Sept. 281.
Guffey Act. See Bituminous Coal Act, this section .
Home work. Laws of 1884, 1913, 1933, and 1938
(Fair Labor Standards A ct), provisions. 1944—
June 1147-1150.
Hours of work. Employees working in construc­
tion of leased air bases, 8-hour law suspended
by Executive order, Dec. 31, 1940. 1941— Feb.
327.
-------Federal measures to suspend provisions in
defense work, 1940, summary. 1941— Mar. 651652.
------- History of legislation affecting, 1900-50.
1950— July 48-50.
------- Laborers and mechanics. Agriculture De­
partment, public work within United States,
8-hour law suspended by Executive order Dec.
7, 1943. 1944— Feb. 322.
------- ------- Civil Aeronautics Authority on con­
struction projects, 8-hour law suspended Oct. 3,
1942. 1942— Nov. 924.
----------------Interior Department, public works with­
in United States, 8-hour law suspended by Ex­
ecutive order, July 7, 1943. 1948— Sept. 471.
---------------- Veterans Administration, public works
within United States, 8-hour law suspended by
Executive order, May 11, 1944. 1944— July 92.
----------------W ar Department in Canal Zone, Puerto
Rico, Alaska, Hawaii, 8-hour law suspended by
Executive orders of June 18 and Aug. 20, 1941.
1941— Aug. 479, Oct. 880.
---------------- W ar Department, public works, within
United States, 8-hour law suspended Aug. 8,
1941, and Dec. 28, 1942. 1941— Oct. 880; 1943—
Feb. 257.
Housing. Administration-sponsored bill before
Congress, January 1949, provisions. 1949— Feb.
207.
------- War. National Housing Act amended, March,
1941. 1942— June 1261.
Housing Act, Federal, amended, 1948, regarding
nonprofit cooperative housing projects. 1949—
Apr. 410.
Housing Act of 1949. Slum clearance and com­
munity development; low-rent public housing;
farm housing; housing research; miscellaneous
provisions. 1949— Aug. 155-159.
------- Enlisted men and defense workers, 1940,
summary of. 1941— Mar. 653-654.
-------Negro workers, defense areas. Public Law
No. 849 (76th Cong.) as amended by Public
Law No. 42 (77th Cong.). Allocations under.
1941— Sept. 647.
Housing and Rent Act of 1947. Provisions sum­
marized. 1947— Sept. 309-310; 1948— Jan. 1 415.
Housing and Rent Act of 1949, effective Apr. 1,
1949. Summary of provisions and extent of
decontrol. 1950— Mar. 255-256.
Housing, defense program. Acts of 1940 and
1941, providing for. 1941— May 1064-1066.
------- “ Lanham Act,” approved Oct. 14, 1940, and
amendment of Apr. 3, 1941. Provisions. 1941—
May 1064-1065, 1071-1072, 1076-1077.
------- Mortgage insurance. Amendment (Title V I)
to National Housing Act approved Mar. 28,
1941. Provisions. 1941— May 1065.
------- “ Navy Speed-up” law approved June 28,
1940. Provisions. 1941— May 1064, 1071, 10761077.
------- Second Supplemental National Defense A p­
propriation Act approved Sept. 9, 1940. Pro­
visions. 1941— May 1065, 1071, 1076-1077.

98

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., Federal and general— Continued
Housing, defense program. Urgent Deficiency A p­
propriation Act, approved Mar. 1, 1941. Pro­
visions. 1941— May 1065-1066.
Immigration.
Chinese-exclusion laws repealed
Dec. 17, 1943. 1944— Feb. 367-368.
-------Farm laborers from other American nations.
Joint resolution to permit, Apr. 29, 1943. Pro­
visions. 194-3— July 124-125.
Indian Arts and Crafts Board. 1936 act creating.
Activities under. 1941— Apr. 874-876.
Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. Effect upon
employment conditions. 1941— Apr. 872-874.
Industrial disputes. Federal troops used in con­
nection with.
Constitutional and statutory
authority summarized. 1941— Sept. 561-562.
-------National W ar Labor Board directives re­
ported to Director of Economic Stabilization.
Compliance to be effectuated by specified
methods (Exec, order No. 9370 of Aug. 16,
1943). 1943— Oct. 712.
-------Threatening strike. Authority granted Na­
tional W ar Labor Board to take jurisdiction
by Executive orders 9017 (Jan. 12, 1942) and
9250 (Oct. 3, 1942) based upon Inflation Con­
trol Act of Oct. 2, 1942. 1943— May 882-883.
Industrial relations.
National Labor Relations
Board. Power to challenge agreements entered
into with company-dominated unions, rider to
1944 Appropriations Act. 1945— Jan. 119.
------- ------- Provision in 1944 appropriation act
restricting investigation of collective agree­
ments; interpretation by General Counsel of
Board, July 16, 1943. 1943— Sept. 471-472.
------- National W ar Labor Board rulings. See
National W ar Labor Board.
------- State legislation. 1949. 1950— Jan. 44-45,
Feb. 131. S e e also Legislation, U. S., by States,

fo r specific State.
Inflation, controls and measures to guard against,
summary 1942 and first 4 months of 1943.
1943— May 877-882.
Jurisdictional disputes. State legislation regulat­
ing or prohibiting, 1947. 1947— Sept. 280-281.
------- Unfair labor practice under Labor Manage­
ment Relations A ct; administrative procedures
for prevention of. 1947— July 59-60, 62.
Labor. Federal acts, 1940, reviewed. 1941— Mar.
649-658.
Labor
legislation.
National
conferences
on.
Recommendations of. 1946— Oct. 535, 536.
---------------- 1940-41 and 1944-49. Proceedings and
recommendations summarized. 1941— Jan. 136137, Dec. 1450-1451; 1945— Feb. 330-332; 1946
— Feb. 254-257; 1947— Feb. 268-271; 1948— Jan.
28-31; 1949— Jan. 15-19; 1950— Jan. 39-42.
------- President's recommendations, State of the
Union message, January 1947. 1947— Feb. 255256.
------- State laws, adopted 1937 to 1947, but prior
to effective date of Taft-Hartley Act. Summary,
1948— June 637-638.
Labor-management disputes. Historical summary
to 1943; 1900-50. 1947— May 839-855; 1950—
July 48-50.
-------President's request, May 1946, for emergency
legislation; congressional action. 1946— Dec.
881-882.
Labor Management Relations Act, 1947. S e e Labor
Management Relations Act.
Labor-management relations.
State legislation.
Adopted 1937-47, prior to effective date of TaftHartley Act. Summary. 1948— June 637-638.
------- ------- 1947 and 1948. Summaries. 1947—
Sept. 278-283; 1948— Nov. 514.




Labor organization in Southern States. Effect of
National Industrial Recovery Act and National
Labor Relations Act. 1 9 4 6 — Oct. 573-575, 582.
Labor organizations. Registration and financial
reports, State laws requiring, 1943 and early
1947, summarized. 1943— May 942; 1947— June
1052-1056.
------- State legislation affecting, 1937-47, adopted
prior to effective date of Taft-Hartley A ct; sum­
mary. 1948— June 637-638.
------- State regulation of. New laws and amend­
ments of previous laws, 1943. Summary. 1943—
Oct. 778-780.
------- Suits by and against and responsibility for
actions of authorized representatives.
State
laws, 1947, summary. 1947— Sept. 282.
Labor relations. Legislation affecting, 1900-50,
review of. 1950— July 48-50.
------- Southern States, summary of provisions.
1946— Oct. 548-551.
------- State laws, 1941-43, 1945-47 and 1950. Sum­
mary of provisions. 1942— Jan. 7 6-81; 1943—
May 941-944; 1945— Nov. 984-991; 1946— Feb.
253, Nov. 755-757; 1947— Sept. 281-282; 1950—
Aug. 214-217.
Labor standards. 1950 amendments. 1950— Nov.
571-574.
------- Protective legislation, 1900-50, developments
in. 1950— July 48-50, 65.
Life Insurance Act, National Service. Amend­
ment liberalizing provisions. 1942— Sept. 473.
Longshoremen's and Harbor Workers' Compensa­
tion Act. Coverage extended, 1941; 1948 amend­
ments increasing benefits.
1942— Mar. 699;
1948— Sept. 279.
Manpower. W ar Commission established by Ex­
ecutive order of Apr. 18, 1942. 1 9 4 2 — June 1325.
Manpower mobilization and utilization. Executive
order of Dec. 5, 1942 (No. 9279). Provisions.
1943— Jan. 26-28.
Maritime employment. Acts of 1940, summary of.
1 9 4 1 — Mar. 656.
Meal or rest periods provided for in Arkansas,
Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina. 1946—
Oct. 538.
Merchant Marine Act amended, 1941, to repeal
mediatory function of Maritime Labor Board
and provide for Board's abolition on June 23,
1942. 1942— Mar. 699.
Merchant-marine personnel. Reemployment rights.
Law of June 23, 1943. 1943— Aug. 307.
Mercury, use of in fur-felt hat industry. State
laws prohibiting. Summary made at convention
of United Hatters, Cap, and Millinery Workers.
1944— Sept. 555.
Migratory labor. House resolution, 1940, resulting
in work of select committee. 1941— Mar. 657.
Military personnel. Minimum and maximum rates
of basic annual compensation. (Pub. Law 351,
81st Cong.); summary. 1950— Mar. 296-298.
Minimum wage. Fair Labor Standards Act of
1938. Lowering of minimum rate in Puerto Rico
and Virgin Islands below rates in effect in U. S.
allowed, 1940. 1941— Mar. 654, Sept. 717.
---------------- See also Fair Labor Standards Act.
------- Legislation affecting, 1900-50, review of.
1950— July 48-50.
-------Men workers, provisions, applicable to, 1945
(Conn., R. I., and N. Y .). 1946— Feb. 251.
------- Raised to 75 cents; and overtime provisions
of Fair Labor Standards Amendments of 1949.
1949—
Sept. III -IV , Dec. 667; 1950— Feb. 128,
Mar. 283.
------- State laws and orders. Summary of pro­
visions, 1940-49 .1941 — Mar. 684-691, Sept. 5 7 2 -

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
577; 1942— Mar. 585-593; 1943— Mar. 422-449;
1946— May 736-740, Oct. 538; 1947— June 10401051; 1948— Sept. 275-278; 1949— Aug. 137-139;
1950— Oct. 460-464.
------- Teachers. State provisions and proposals
for new State laws, summarized. 1943— Apr.
793-794.
Mining,
coal.
Inspections and investigations
authorized by 1941 law. 1942— Mar. 698-699.
National Industrial Recovery Act, June 13, 1933.
Provisions. 1947— May 848-851.
National Labor Relations Act. Amended by Labor
Management Relations Act of 1947, Title I.
1947— July 58-60.
-------Efforts to amend, 1940. 1941— Mar. 649.
------- Enacted July 5, 1935. Provisions. 1947—
May 851-852.
--------- Scope and developments following. 1950—
July 53-55.
National Labor Relations Board. See National
Labor Relations Board.
National War Labor Board. See National W ar
Labor Board.
Negro workers. Executive order 8802, June 1941,
forbidding discrimination against by Govern­
ment or defense industries. 1943— May 889.
Norris-La Guardia (anti-injunction) Act, 1932.
Provisions. 1947— May 848.
Nurses of Army Corps given full military status.
Law of June 22, 1944. 1944— Dec. 1169.
Office of W ar Mobilization and Reconversion es­
tablished by law of Oct. 3, 1944. 1945— Jan.
120- 121.
Overtime.
Federal provisions for payment in
cases of suspended hours-of-work laws, 1940,
summary. 1941— Mar. 651-652.
------- State laws establishing, 1947-48. Provisions.
1948— Sept. 277-278.
------- Walsh-Healey (Public Contracts) Act pro­
vision amended, 1942. 1942— July 101.
Pacific Coast States. Summary of labor laws.
1947— Apr. 675-687.
Portal-to-Portal Act. Effect on Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act. 1948— Sept. 274.
------- Provisions, May 14, 1947. 1947— Aug. 199-

202 .
Postal Rate Revision and Federal Employees
Salary Act of 1948. Pay raises for postal and
classified civil service workers. 1948— July III.
Postal workers. Field service employees. Addi­
tional compensation and other benefits provided
(Pub. Law 428, 81st Cong.); summary. 1950—
Mar. 296.
------- Rural mail carriers, annual and sick leave
provisions; 1947 amendment to law of 1945,
bettering. Postmasters, fourth-class; compen­
sation to persons substituting for, 1947 law.
1947— Sept. 344.
Post-defense problems. Study by BLS authorized
by Congress, 1941. 1942— Mar. 699.
Premium-pay provisions for Saturday, Sunday,
and holiday work altered by Executive order
9240; provisions. 1947— Oct. 419.
Prevailing wage (Davis-Bacon) Act. U. S. con­
tracts over $2,000 for construction, alteration or
repair of public buildings or public works.
Labor provisions. 1941— July 122-137.
Price control. Farm products made subject to by
amendment Oct. 2, 1942, to Emergency Price
Control Act. 1943— May 882.
------- General Maximum Price Regulation of Apr.
28, 1942. Wartime operation under. 1942—
Oct. 659-679; 1945— Oct. 675-693.
------- Hold-the-line order of April 1943. 1945—
Oct. 675, 677, 685-687.




99

------- Stabilization Act of October 1942 and Stabi­
lization Extension Act of June 1944. Operation
under. 1945— Oct. 675-693.
------- Wartime. Emergency Act of 1942 (January
30), provisions; operation under to September
1942; amendment of Oct. 2 and Executive order
of Oct. 3, 1942, to provide for economic stabiliza­
tion. 1942— Mar. 794-799, Oct. 659-679, Nov.
917-924.
------- World W ar (1917-18) period. Legal sanc­
tions summarized. 1941— Feb. 273-274.
Price-wage control. Executive order of Apr. 8,
1943. Provisions. 1943— May 876.
Prison labor. Legislation, 1929 to 1941, to prevent
competition of products with those of free labor.
Summary. 1941— Sept. 578.
Prison-made goods. Act of 1940 barring from
interstate commerce, provisions; study author­
ized, Public Resolution No. 85. 1941— Mar. 657658.
Productivity and labor costs. Studies authorized
by Congress in 1940; continuation provided for
by 1941 act. i ^ l - M a r . 658; 1942— Mar. 699.
Property-requisitioning
law,
1941,
provisions.
1942— Mar. 696-697.
Proposed; Secretary of Labor, annual report to
the Congress for fiscal year 1949, legislative
objectives outlined. 1950— May 519-520.
Protecting and fostering labor unions and personal
liberties. 1949— Mar. 287.
Protective labor legislation, 1900-50, developments
in. 1950— July 48-50, 65.
Public contracts. See Walsh-Healey (Public Con­
tracts) Act, this section.
Public utilities. State legislation providing for
regulation of disputes in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
Public works, 1931 and 1933. 1950— July 109.
Railroads. Federal measures to 1942, summary.
1947— May 839-844.
------- Protective labor legislation affecting, 18881950. 1950—Ju ly 48-50.
------- Retirement benefits. Military service prior
to 1937 to be credited toward employee’s an­
nuity; Retirement Board authorized to complete
annuity-record files (Public Act 801 of 1940).
1941— Mar. 655.
------- Transportation Act of 1940, provisions.
1941— Mar. 655.
------- Unemployment Insurance Act. 1940 amend­
ments, provisions. 1941— Mar. 654—
655.
---------------- 1946 amendments, creating sickness
compensation program.
Analysis of first 6
months’ operation. 1948— Apr. 402.
------- Wage disputes subject to Railway Labor Act
to be settled under that act (1944 amendment to
Stabilization A ct). 1945— Jan. 119.
Railway Labor Act of May 20, 1926, amended
June 21, 1934; provisions. 1947— May 843-844.
Railway Labor Act, proposed. Unanimous recom­
mendation of Senate Committee on Labor and
Public Welfare, for amendment (S. 3295), to
permit carriers and unions to negotiate union
shop and check-off arrangements, August 1950.
1950— Sept. 367.
Railway Labor Panel, National. Created by E x­
ecutive order, 1942 (text). 1942— July 92-93.
Reconversion. Office of W ar Mobilization and Re­
conversion provided for by law (of Oct. 3,
1944). 1945— Jan. 120-121.
------- Postwar. Executive order of Aug. 18, 1945
(No. 9599). 1945— Oct. 669-675.
Rent control. Coverage. Effect of Executive order
of Oct. 3, 1942, under anti-inflation law amend­
ing Emergency Price Control Act, 1942. 1942—
Nov. 918.

100

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., Federal and general— Continued
Rent Control. District of Columbia. Law enacted
by Congress, effective Jan. 1, 1942. Provisions.
1942— Jan. 145-148.
------- Extension of, 1950. 1950— Aug. 218.
------- Housing and Rent Act of 1947 extending
control to Mar. 1, 1948 (except on certain
categories of housing). 1947— Sept. 809-310.
------- Provisions of 1949 act. 1949— Apr. III-IV .
Reorganization of Government. Act approved Apr.
3, 1939; plans I and II, summaries of provisions
to take effect July 1, 1939. 1945— Aug. 378-382.
------- Bureau of Employment Security transferred
to the Labor Department under President’s Re­
organization Plan No. 2, August 1949. 1949—
Sept. III.
Retired persons, reemployment of, in W ar and
Navy Departments. (Section 6 of National De­
fense Act approved June 28, 1940.) 1942—
Jan. 69.
Retirement Act, Federal Civil Service. Amend­
ments. 1948— May 531.
------- Summary of provisions. 1942— Mar. 673-674.
Retraining and Reemployment Administration,
established in Office of W ar Mobilization and
Reconversion, law of Oct. 3, 1944. 1945— Jan.

121.

Sabotage prevention. Dies Committee’s investiga­
tion of un-American activities extended for 15
months; naval establishments, special force,
authorized to investigate existing or threatened
activities. 1942— Mar. 697.
Safety. Industrial legislation, 1900-50, affecting.
1950— July 48-50.
------- State legislation, 1949. 1950— Jan. 43, Feb.
131.
------- Statutes and regulations in Southern States.
Summary. 1946— Oct. 542-543.
Safety and health of workers. State legislation
establishing agencies responsible for, 1947.
1947— Sept. 283.
Saturday half holiday suspended for Coast Guard
and W ar Department civil employees with the
United States and in Canal Zone, Puerto Rico,
Alaska, and Hawaii, by Executive orders of
July 5 and Aug. 20, 1941. 1941— Aug. 365,
Oct. 881-882.
Saturday, Sunday, or holiday war work. Premium
pay prohibited by Executive order (Sept. 9,
1942). Summary of law in relation to wage
stabilization (Feinberg and Dadian). 1944—
Aug. 364-373.
---------------- Text of order and summary of amend­
ment of Sept. 17, 1942. 1942— Oct. 717-719.
School attendance. Compulsory, 1900-50. 1950—
July 16.
------- State legislation, 1949. 1950— Jan. 42-43.
Seamen. Employers’ liability. Merchant Marine
Act of 1920 (Jones A ct). Provisions. 1946—
June 853.
Seamen’s Act of 1915 (La Follette A ct). Pro­
visions and adverse decision by Supreme Court.
1946— June 852-853.
Selective Service Act of 1948. See Selective Service.
Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (G. I.
Bill of Rights). See Veterans, this section .
Social Security Act. Benefits for aged. 1947—
Dec. 661.
------- Benefits, OASI, increases in, extension of
coverage, liberalization of eligibility and other
requirements, and permanent and total dis­
ability payments provided (H.R. 6000), 1950.
1950— Jan. 8, Sept. IV.
------- Coverage and benefits. Changes, August 1950
amendment, Federal Government share in pay­




ments, and tax rates. 1950— Oct. 457-460.
------- ------- Increased by Senate bill passed in
June 1950. 1950—July 104-105.
Southern States (13). Principal labor provisions
in effect, 1946. 1946— Oct. 535-554.
Stabilization Act. See Wage control, U. S.—
Stabilization Act of Oct. 2, 1942.
State labor laws. Blanket suspension of, not fa ­
vored by Federal agencies. Text of statement is­
sued. 1948— Feb. 256.
------- 1941 to 1949. Summaries. 1942— Jan. 76-81,
Nov. 978-979; 1944— Aug. 359-364; 1946— Feb.
248-253, Nov. 754-762; m ? ’— Sept. 277-284;
1948— Nov. 513-515; 1950— Jan. 42-46.
------- 1900-50, review of. 1950— July 48-50.
------- See also Legislation, U. S., by States, for

specific State and subject.
States’ emergency war powers. Summary of pro­
visions. 1942— Apr. 905-907, May 1084-1087.
Steel, voluntary allocations of (Public Law No.
395). 1949— Feb. 169.
Strike breaking. Act prohibiting, June 24, 1936,
and amendment, June 29, 1938. Provisions.
1947— May 852.
Strikes. State legislation restricting, 1947, sum­
mary. 1947— Sept. 280-281.
Sugar Act of 1937. Determinations of minimum
wage issued under, for sugarcane and sugarbeet workers. 1941— July 167-169.
-------Extended to Dec. 31, 1946, including labor
provisions. 1945— Jan. 120.
-------Wage rates set under, for sugar-beet workers,
1939-46. Summary. 1946— Aug. 197-200.
Sugar industry. Jones-Costigan and Sugar (1937)
Acts. Effects upon Puerto Rican industry.
1941— Jan. 108-109.
Taft-Hartley Act. See Labor Management Rela­
tions Act.
Telegraph Merger Act of 1943. Functions assigned
by, to National Labor Relations Board. 1945—
May 1037, 1038-1039.
Transportation Act of 1940, summary of pro­
visions. 1941— Mar. 655.
Unemployment compensation, 1900—
50, and em­
ployment laws. 1950— July 11-12, 48-50.
------- State provisions, Aug. 1, 1941, by State;
January 1950, significant provisions. 1941—
Sept. 625-633; 1950— Jan. 46-48.
Unemployment Tax Act, Federal, formerly title
IX of the Social Security Act, and title III
of the Social Security Act, unemployment in­
surance provisions. 1950— Mar. 257.
Union activities, Federal laws restricting, 18901930. 1950— July 51.
Union membership, maintenance of, State legisla­
tion, 1947, prohibiting. 1947— Sept. 279.
Union registration and financial reports. Pro­
visions of 1947 State laws requiring. 1947—
Sept. 282.
------- States laws enacted up to early 1947. Pro­
visions. 1947— June 1052-1055.
Union shop, State legislation, 1947, prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 279.
Vacations, certain Federal services. Executive
order authorizing pay in lieu of. 1941— Aug.
415-416.
Veterans. Benefits, summary of provision for.
1945— Nov. 900-909.
------- Reinstatement in former employment at rate
exceeding minimum. National W ar Labor Board
general order No. 31. 1944— Oct. 759.
------- Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (G. I.
Bill of Rights). Provisions summarized; Jan.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
18, 1945, regulations; Dec. 28, 1945, amend­
ment.
19 A — Aug. 383-384; 1945— Jan. 120,
Ii.
June 1222-1223; 1946— Apr. 595-596.
---------------- Regulations concerning loans announced
Oct. 19, 1944. Summary. 1945—
-Jan. 63.
----------------Training and loan provisions liberalized;
procurement of artificial and other appliances
provided for, Dec. 28, 1945, amendment. 1946—
Apr. 595-596.
Veterans’ Emergency Housing Act, 1946. Pro­
visions concerning preference, subsidy, and in­
surance of mortgages summarized. 1946— July
92-93.
Veterans’ Preference Act of 1944. Civil Service
preference provisions. 1946— Apr. 590.
Vocational education, legislation affecting, 190050. 1950— July 48-50.
Vocational guidance. George-Barden Act, 1946,
providing funds for. 1948— Dec. 599.
Vocational Rehabilitation Act. Amendments of
1943 (Barden-La Follette A ct). Summary of ex­
perience first fiscal year of program. 1945—
June 1231-1235.
-------States allowed to rehabilitate certain citizens.
1948— Sept. 282-283.
Wage adjustment, wartime, to cost of living,
State and municipal employees. Summary.
1943— Nov. 885-894.
Wage and salary control. Executive order of Oct.
3, 1942, under anti-inflation law amending
Emergency Price Control Act of 1942. Pro­
visions summarized; regulations issued under.
1942— Nov. 917-924, Dec. 1142-1144.
------- Wartime Executive order Nov. 9, 1946, pro­
viding for termination. 1946— Dec. 977-978.
--------- See also Wage control, U. S.— Stabilization
Act of Oct. 2, 1942.
Wage claims. State legislation covering; changes
in 1947. 1947— Sept. 277, 283-284.
Wage payment and collection. Model law, drafted
in 1936, by State labor commissioners; State
laws, summary of provisions (Acee). 1944—
May 1015-1020.
Wages. Premium pay for sixth-day, seventh-day,
or holiday war work prohibited by Executive
order of Sept. 9, 1942. Summary of law in
relation to wage stabilization (Feinberg and
Dadian). 1944— Aug. 364-373.
----------------Text of order and summary of amend­
ment of Sept. 17, 1942. 1942— Oct. 717-719.
------- State, 1949; summaries. 1950— Jan. 43-44,
Feb. 131.
-------Prevailing rates; equal pay; minimum rates;
payment and collection; statute of limitations.
Summary of 1945 State laws. 1946— Feb. 248253.
------- Recommendations, National Conference on
Labor Legislation, 1949. 1950— Jan. 39-42.
Wage stabilization. See Wage controls— Stabiliza­
tion.
Wagner-Peyser Act, establishing Federal-State
Employment Service system, 1933. Objectives.
1948— June 605-608.
Walsh-Healey (Public Contracts) Act. Labor pro­
visions compared with those of Davis-Bacon Act.
U. S. contracts over $10,000, for manufacture
or furnishing of materials, supplies, articles
and equipment. 1941— July 122-137.
------- Overtime provision amended, 1942. 1942—
July 101.
------- Provisions; merging of Division administer­
ing with W age and Hour Division (U . S. Dept,
of Labor), 1942; enforcement. 1948— Sept. 272273.




101

War housing. National Housing Act amended,
Mar. 28, 1941. 1942— June 1261.
------- See also Housing, defense program, this
section.
War Labor Board, National. See National W ar
Labor Board.
W ar Labor Disputes (Smith-Connally) Act of
June 25, 1943. National W ar Labor Board
authority under, in interstate cases referred by
U. S. Conciliation Service. 1944— Sept. 520-521.
------- Powers given to National W ar Labor Board
and National Labor Relations Board. 1945—
May 1035, 1038.
------- Powers given President, President’s directive
to Secretary of Labor, Aug. 10, 1943. 1943—
Oct. 775.
------- Provisions summarized. 1943— Aug. 305-307;
1947— May 854-855.
------- Statutory basis given National W ar Labor
Board. 1949— Jan. 20.
W ar Manpower Commission established by Ex­
ecutive order (Apr. 18, 1942). 1942— June 13251327.
W ar Mobilization. Executive order (May 28, 1943)
creating Office of. Text. 1943— June 1089-1090.
W ar Mobilization and Reconversion Act of 1944.
Provisions. 1945— Jan. 120-121.
W ar Production Board order (Conservation L-41f
Apr. 9, 1942), prohibiting nonessential con­
struction. 1942— June 1355-1356.
W ar Revenue Act of Oct. 21, 1942. Certain pro­
visions including Victory tax. 1943— May 878.
Wartime policies. World W ar (1917-18). Price
control, legal sanctions for. Summary. 19LI—
Feb. 273-274.
Women physicians and surgeons to be appointed
in U. S. Arm y and Navy, law of Apr. 6, 1943.
1943— July 33.
Women workers. Equality with men in minimum
wage rates provided for in Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act and Public Contracts Act. 1946—
Sept. 385.
------- Protective legislation, 1947 changes in State
laws. 1947— Sept. 277-278.
------- State provisions. Equal pay for equal work.
See Legislation, U. S., by States.
------- Work standards, States passing laws for
improvement, 1948, by type of law. 1948— Apr.
409.
Workmen’s compensation.
Federal
employees.
Legislation increasing benefits, 1949; schedule
of injuries. 1949— Nov. 518.
------- Federal Longshoremen’s and Harbor Work­
ers’ Act. Benefits, 1948 amendment providing
increases. 1948— Sept. 279.
---------------- Coverage extended to persons employed
outside continental United States and at mili­
tary, air, and naval bases acquired by United
States. 1942— Mar. 699, Apr. 907.
-------Occupational diseases. State legislation, 1947.
1947— Sept. 277, 284, Oct. 415-416.
------- Second-injury funds. State provisions sum­
marized. 1945— Aug. 284-288; 1947— Sept. 277,
284, Oct. 415.
------- State laws enacted, 1943 and 1945-50. Pro­
visions summarized. 1943— Sept. 543-550, Oct..
729-748; 1946— Jan. 61-64, Feb. 248-249, Nov.
760-762; 1947— Sept. 277, 284, Oct. 415-418;
1948— Sept. 278-281; 1949— Aug. 137-139, Nov.
514-518; 1950— Feb. 131, Oct. 484-487.
Work relief. Wage and hour provisions in 1940
and 1941 emergency relief appropriation laws.
1941— Mar. 656-657.

102

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., Federal and general— Continued
World W ar I (1917-18). National Defense Act
(June 3, 1916), Naval Appropriation Act (Mar.
4, 1917), Deficiency Appropriations Act (June
15, 1917), Declaration of W ar, (Apr. 6, 1917),
Army Appropriation A ct of 1916, Interstate
Commerce Act amendment (May 29, 1917), Food
Control Act (Aug. 10, 1917), Preferential Ship­
ments Act (Aug. 10, 1917). Summary. 1941—
Feb. 273-274.
Legislation, U. S., by States:
Alabama.
Child labor.
Provisions concerning.
19^6— Oct. 552-553.
------- Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to work”
law, 1943. 1947—
-June 1057.
------- Industrial relations, 1949. 1950— Jan. 44.
------- Labor relations. Provision concerning media­
tion and arbitration, rights of employees to
organize and bargain collectively or to refrain
from such activities; prohibition of blacklisting
of employees; regulation of union organization
and of unions during strikes. 1946— Oct. 548550.
------- Labor-union regulation. Law enacted, 1943,
provisions. 1943— Oct. US-119.
------- Safety and health. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
542-543.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; degree of ex­
emption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979
------- Unemployment compensation.
Provisions,
1941; comparison with other Southern States.
1941— Sept. 631; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements of 1943 law. 1947— June 10521055.
------- Wage collection. 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
-------Wage payment law applying to public-service
transportation companies employing over 50.
1946— Oct. 540.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Funeral-allowance
increased by law of 1945. 1946— Jan. 64.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Alaska. Child labor, 1949; 16-year age minimum,
1950. 1950— Jan. 42, Feb. 131, Dec. 702.
------- Contracts (U . S. Government) brought under
coverage of 1931 law (Davis-Bacon A ct), pre­
vailing wage determination. 1941— Mar. 654.
------- Labor Code strengthened as to administra­
tion of department, 1945. 1946— Feb. 250.
------- Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45-46.
------- Minimum wage. Flat-rate law, coverage and
rates, Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 577.
------- Recruiting labor from outside Territory, em­
ployers required to pay return transportation
upon termination of employment, 1949. 1950—
Jan. 46.
------Unemployment compensation, provisions,
Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Wages and hours, 1949. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb.
131.
------- Workmen’s compensation.
Provisions in
effect September 1943; law reenacted. 1946.
1943— Oct. 729-748; 1946—-Nov. 754, 760, 762.
Arizona. Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to
work” law, 1947; constitutional amendment.
1947— June 1056-1058, Sept. 279.
------- Industrial relations. Law of 1948 (referen­
dum) regulating. 1948— Nov. 514.
------- Labor organizations. Suits by and against,
legality of, 1947. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.

280.




------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------Unemployment compensation, provisions,
Aug. 1, 1941. 1 9 4 1 — Sept. 631.
------Workmen’s
compensation.
Occupationaldisease coverage provided, 1943. 1943— Sept.
543-544.
---------------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1 9 4 3 — Oct. 729-748.
---------------- Second injury law, 1945, provisions;
second-injury fund provision. 1 9 4 5 — Aug. 285;
1946—
Jan. 61.
Arkansas. Anti-Picketing (“ Anti-Violence” ) Act
of 1943. Provisions. 1943— May 941.
------- Check-off. 1947 law restricting use. 1 9 4 7 —
Sept. 283.
------- Child labor. Provisions concerning. 1946—
Oct. 553.
------- Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to work”
law, 1947; constitutional amendment. 1947—
June 1056, 1958, Sept. 279, 283.
-------Day of rest. Permit required for work on
seventh day. 1946— Oct. 538.
------- Employment agents who hire workers in
Arkansas for work outside State, 1949 regula­
tion. 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 46.
------- Fees or assessments to unions as condition
of employment prohibited, law of 1947. 1947—
Sept. 283.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 1946— Oct. 537.
------- Labor relations. Conciliation and arbitra­
tion; blacklisting of employees forbidden; con­
stitutional amendment authorizing “ right to
work” legislation; regulation of unions during
strike. 1946— Oct. 548-550.
------- Land Policy Act of 1939, citation in relation
to interstate-migration problems. 1941— June
1349.
------- Minimum wage. Law of 1915; flat-rate law,
coverage and rates, 1941; provisions. 1941—
Sept. 577; 1946— Oct. 539.
-------Safety and health of workers. Provisions for.
Division of industrial hygiene established in
State board of health, 1947. 1946— Oct. 542543; 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation.
Provisions.
1941— Sept. 631; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Compulsory law.
Provisions. 1946— Oct. 544-548.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
California. Apprenticeship Labor Standards Act,
effective 1939. Status of programs at end of
1946. 1947— Apr. 681.
------- Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Child labor laws. Minors’ Emergency W ar
Employment Act repealed, 1946. 1946— Nov. 758.
---------------- Requests for wartime relaxation and
State policy toward. 1 9 4 4 — July 121-122.
---------------- Summary of provisions, 1946; 15-year
age minimum, 1950. 1947— Apr. 679; 1950—
Dec. 702.
—
Disability compensation. 1947 amendment
increasing benefits; operation of private sys­
tems permitted; provisions. 1949 amendments.
1948— Jan. 62-63; 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 45.
------- Discrimination in employment, 1949. 1950—
Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
------- Employment agencies, private. 1923 law re­
quiring filing of fee schedules. Provisions sum-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
marized, 1946. 1941— June 1401-1404; 1947—
Apr. 680.
------- Home work. Industrial Homework Act of
1939, summary of provisions. 1947— Apr. 679.
------- Hours of work. Provisions effective, 1946.
Summary. 1947— Apr. 678-679.
------- ------- Women workers. Law relaxing 8-hour
day repealed, 1947; permits canceled. 1947—
Sept. 278.
------- Housing of workers. Provisions of State
Housing Act, and Labor Camp Act of 1913.
19£7— Apr. 680.
------- Industrial relations. Department reorganized
by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 250.
------- ---------- Provisions summarized, 1946; 1949.
1947— Apr. 681; 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Los Angeles Superior Court. Labor-relations
department established; explanatory statement
concerning. 1941— July 137-138.
-------Minimum-wage orders.
1947 amendment,
clarifying method of revising; change in com­
pensation of wage-board members. 1948— Sept.
275.
------- ------- Overtime rates, effective in 1947-48.
Laundry and dry cleaning, hotel and restaurant,
retail trade, beauty culture. 1948— Sept. 27 6 277.
------- ------- Revisions, 1947-48.
Manufacturing;
professional, technical, clerical, and similar oc­
cupations;
transportation;
amusement
and
recreation; after-harvest industries; canning
and preserving. 1948— Sept. 276.
------- ------- Summary of adoptions or revisions,
1942, 1943, 1946, and 1949-50. 1943— Mar. 446;
1946— May 739; 1947— Apr. 678; 1950— Oct. 462.
------- Safety and health. Provisions summarized,
1946; 1949. 1947— Apr. 677; 1950— Jan. 43.
------- Sickness insurance. Disability benefits pro­
vided by 1946 amendment of Unemployment
Insurance Act. 1946— Aug. 236-242, Sept. 408,
Nov. 754.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------Unemployment compensation, provisions,
Aug. 1, 1941, and end of 1946. 1941— Sept. 631;
1947— Apr. 681.
------- Unemployment Insurance Act. Amendment,
1946, to provide for sickness insurance. 1946—
Aug. 236-242.
------- Wage payment and collection, provisions
summarized, 1946; statute of limitations for
claims, change in 1947. 1947— Apr. 679-680,
Sept. 283.
------- Wages and hours, 1949. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb.
131.
------- Women and children, employment of. W ar­
time relaxation of requirements, State policy
toward. Permits granted in 1943. 1944— July
121- 122.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death benefits;
changes in, 1947. 1947— Oct. 417.
---------------- Disability benefits, provisions in 1945;
increases in, 1947. 1946— Jan. 61; 1947— Oct.
416-417.
------- ------- Domestic servants working over 52
hours a week included. 1946— June 931.
---------------- Permanent disability benefits increased,
law effective until specified time. 1946— Nov.
761.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943,
and end of 1946. 1943— Sept. 546-548, Oct. 729748; 1947— Apr. 677.




-------

-------

103

Second-injury provisions, 1945 law.
Aug. 285; 1946— Jan. 61.
Colorado. Closed shop, restriction on. Provision
in Colorado Peace Act. 1947—June 1059.
------- Hours. Women workers. Permission to ex­
ceed 8-hour day in emergency; permit and
overtime requirements; 1947 law. 1947— Sept.
278.
------- Labor relations. 1943 law, provisions sum­
marized. 1943— May 943-944.
------- Minimum-wage orders adopted in 1940; re­
vision, laundries, 1941 provisions. 1941— Mar.
686; 1942— Mar. 589.
------- Safety and health of workers. State board
of public health authorized, 1947, to enforce
sanitary standards. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements of 1943 law. 1947— June 10521053.
------- Wage claims. One-year statute of limitations
established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death benefits;
changes in, 1947. 1947— Oct. 417.
------- ------- Disability benefits; increases in, 1947.
1947— Oct. 417.
---------------- Occupational-disease and second-injuryfund provisions enacted in 1945. 1945— Aug.
285-286; 1946— Jan. 61.
------- ------- Provisions in effectSeptember 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Connecticut. Arbitration. 1945 amendment, pro­
visions. 1945— Nov. 988.
----------------State Board
of Mediation and,enlarge­
ment of and duties. 1947— Sept. 282; 1950—
Jan. 44-45.
------- Child labor. Agricultural employment stand­
ards set; hourly limitations extended to boys
of 16 and 17 in restaurants, barber shops, and
certain other establishments; 1947 law, pro­
visions for administration. 1947— Sept. 278.
----- - Discrimination. 1947 law prohibiting; pro­
visions, and role of Interracial Commission in
administration. 1947— Aug. 198, Sept. 278.
------- Equal pay for equal work, 1949, men and
women. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
------- Factory inspection. Department of Labor
and, changed to Department of Labor, effective
January 1951. 1950— Nov. 572.
----------------Provisions of 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 250.
------- Labor Relations Act, 1945, provisions; pat­
terned after 1945 Wagner Act. 1945— Nov. 985;
1946— Feb. 253.
------- Mercury, use of in fur-felt hat industry,
prohibited by 1941 law. 1944— Sept. 555.
-------Minimum-wage orders. Adoptions, 1940, 1942,
and 1946, provisions. 1941— Mar. 686; 1943—
Mar. 446; 1947— June 1040-1043, 1047.
------- ------- Beauty shops, Mar. 3, 1941, revision*
1942— Mar. 589.
------- ——
Overtime rates.
Laundry and dry
cleaning, beauty culture (guaranteed wage),,
effective 1947-48. 1948— Sept. 276-277.
------- Picketing.
1947 law restricting.
1947—
Sept. 280.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Wage claims. Statute of limitations for.
Change in, 1947. 1947— Sept. 283.

1945—

104

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., by States— Continued
Connecticut. Wartime emergency powers given to
Governor by 1917 and 1941 acts. 19J 2 May
>—
1085-1086.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death benefits;
changes in, 1947. 19 U7— Oct. 416-417.
---------------- Disability benefits; increases in, 1947.
19U7— Oct. 417.
---------------- Provisions enacted in 1943; provisions
in effect in 1943. 19U — Sept. 546-548, Oct.
S
729-748.
---------------- Second-injury fund. 1945 law, pro­
visions. 19U5— Aug. 286; 19U6— Jan. 61.
Delaware. Boycotts, secondary. 19 U7 law pro­
hibiting, and 1949 restrictions. 19U7— Sept. 280;
1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
-------Check-off. 1947 law restricting use of. 19U7—
Sept. 283.
------- Closed shop. Restriction against. “ Right-towork” law, 1947; employer’s refusal to grant,
not unfair labor practice. 19U7— June 10561058, Sept. 279.
------- Labor organizations. Suits by and against,
legality of, 1947. 19U7— Sept. 282.
------- Labor Relations Act, 1947; provisions. 19U7—
Sept. 281-282.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 19U7— Sept.
280.
------- Strikes. Barred by 1947 law unless approved
by majority vote; secondary boycotts and other
union activities restricted, 1 949 . 19U7— Sept. 280;
1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds. 19U2— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 19U1— Sept. 631.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements of 1947 law. 19U7— June 1052,
1054, Sept. 282.
-------Workmen’s compensation. Choice of doctor
and increased burial benefit; increase in cover­
age; 1943 provisions. 19U — Sept. 547.
S
------- ------- Disability and death-benefit increases,
provisions of 1945 law; increases in, 1947.
19U6— Jan. 61-63; 19U7— Oct. 416.
------- ------- Provisions in effect, September 1943.
19U Oct. 729-748.
S—
------- ------- Second injury. 1945 law, provisions.
19 U — Aug. 286; 19U6— Jan. 61.
S
District of Columbia. Child labor. 14-year age
minimum, 1950. 1950— Dec. 702.
------- Minimum wage. Summary and provisions
of orders made effective in 1946 and 1947-48.
19U7— June 1040-1043, 1047; 19U
S— Sept. 276277.
------- Overtime rates. Retail trade, beauty culture.
Orders made effective in 1947-48, establishing
guaranteed wages. 19U — Sept. 276-277.
S
------- Rent-control law effective Jan. 1, 1942. Pro­
visions. 19U2— Jan. 145-148.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. m i — Sept. 631.
------- Workmen’s compensation.
Provisions in
effect, September 1943. 19U — Oct. 729-748.
S
Florida. Apprenticeship council established 1947.
19U7— Sept. 277.
------- Child labor. Provisions concerning. 19U —
S
Oct. 552-553.
------- Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to work”
constitutional amendment. 19 U7— June 1056,
1058.
------- Employment agencies, private, 1949 amend­
ment. 1950— Jan. 46.
------- Hours of work. Overtime provision for hours
over 10 a day, in absence of written contract.
19U6— Oct. 537.




------- Labor relations. Right of organization and
collective bargaining; prohibition of blacklist­
ing of employees; regulation of union organiza­
tion; “ right to work” constitutional amendment;
regulation of unions during strikes, picketing,
or organizational activity. 19U — Oct. 548-550.
S
------- Labor-union regulation. Law of 1943, pro­
visions. 19U — Oct. 778-779.
S
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating dis­
putes in. 19U7— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Safety and health. Provisions. 19U — Oct.
S
542-543.
-------Taxes (corporation), kinds. 19U — Apr. 979.
%
------- Unemployment compensation.
Provisions,
1941 and 1946, summarized. 19U1— Sept. 631;
19U6— Oct. 551.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements of 1943 law. 19U7— June 10521055.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Changes in ad­
ministration of, 1947. 19U7— Oct. 418.
----------------Death benefits; changes in, 1947. 19U7—
Oct. 417.
------- ------- Disability benefits; increases in, 1947.
19U7— Oct. 416-417.
------- ------- Occupational-disease law, enacted in
1945 (to cover all types). 19U Jan. 61.
S—
---------------- Provisions summarized; in effect Sep­
tember 1943, and in 1946. 19U — Sept. 546-547,
S
Oct. 729-748; 19U6— Oct. 544-548.
Georgia. Child labor. Provisions concerning. New
law enacted, 1946. 19U6— Oct. 552-553, Nov.
757-758.
-------Closed shop. “ Right-to-work” law prohibiting,
1947. 19U7— June 1056-1058, Sept. 279, 283.
-------Fees or assessments to unions as condition of
employment prohibited, law of 1947. 19U7—
Sept. 283.
------- Hours of work. Cotton and woolen manufac­
turing establishments. Provisions. 19U — Oct. 537.
S
-------Labor relations. Conciliation and arbitration;
regulation of unions during strike. 19U6— Oct.
548, 550.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 19U7— Sept.
280.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 19U2— Apr. 979.
-------Unemployment compensation. Provisions, 1941
and 1946. 19U1— Sept. 631; 19US— Oct. 551.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 19U — Oct.
S
541.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Accident and oc­
cupational-disease prevention transferred from
workmen’s compensation board to commissioner
of labor. 19US— Feb. 250.
---------------- Coverage, 1950 amendment. 1950— Oct.
484, 487.
---------------- Occupational diseases, law amended in
1946. 19U6— Nov. 762.
----------------Provisions in effect September 1943 and
in 1946 summarized. 19U — Sept. 548, Oct. 729S
748; 19U
S— Oct. 544-548.
Hawaii, Territory of. Child labor. Age certificate
requirement changed, minimum age raised, 1947.
16-year age minimum for minors legally required
to attend school. 19U7— Sept. 278; 1950— Dec.
702.
----------------Agriculture. Law clarified and strength­
ened, 1945. 19U6— Feb. 253.
------- Contracts, U. S. Government, brought under
coverage of Federal law of 1931 (Davis-Bacon
A ct), prevailing wage determination. 19U1—
Mar. 654.
------- Employment Relations Act (Little Wagner
A ct), 1945, providing machinery for obtaining
recognition for employees not covered by Na­

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
tional Labor Relations Act. 1945— Nov. 986987, 989; 1948—5 uuq 609.
------- Labor Relations law, 1945 (patterned largely
after Wis. Peace A ct). 191*6— Feb. 253.
------- Martial law declared, Governor’s proclama­
tion Dec. 7, 1941; all powers of civil governor
delegated to U. S. A rm y; regulations issued by
Military Governor. 1942—June 1323-1324.
-------Minimum wage. Law of 1941, effective Apr. 1,
1942, provisions. 191*2— Mar. 585.
---------------- Rates increased, 1943 and 1945. 1946—
Feb. 251, May 736-737.
------- Safety and health of workers. Division of
industrial safety, function of, 1947 law. 1947—
Sept. 283.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Wage and hour law, 1941, provisions. 1942—
Jan. 125-126.
------- Wage claims. One-year statute of limitations
established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Provisions in effect
September 1943. 1942— Oct. 729-748.
Idaho. Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Department of Labor established, 1949.
Duties. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
------- Labor Relations. Act of 1947. Labor dispute
defined. 1947— Sept. 282.
----------------Farm-labor unionization, 1943 act re­
stricting. 1943— May 942.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
-------Portal-to-portal claims restricted by 1947 law;
methods of determining “ hours worked” set-up.
1947— Sept. 283.
------- School attendance, compulsory, 1949. 1950—
Jan. 43.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements of 1943 law. 1947— June 1052-1053.
------- Wage claims. Statute of limitations for, 1947
changes. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability-benefit
increase, 1945, provision. 1946— Jan. 62.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943;
coverage extended, 1950. 1943— Oct. 729-748;
1950— Oct. 484, 487.
Illinois. Child labor law reenacted, 1945. Provi­
sions. 1946— Feb. 252-253.
------- Equal pay for equal work, men and women,
1944 law. 1944— June 1247; 1946— Sept. 386.
-------Minimum-wage revision, beauty culture, Mar.
24, 1941, provisions. 1942— Mar. 590.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability- and
death-benefit increases. Provisions enacted in
1945 and 1947. 1946— Jan. 62-63; 1947— Oct. 417.
Occupational disease, provision of 1943.
1943— Sept. 544.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Indiana. Child labor, 1949, certain standards
lowered. 1950— Feb. 131.
------- Department of Labor established to replace
division of labor, 1945. 1946— Feb. 250.
-------Discrimination in employment, prevention of.
Act of Mar. 9, 1945. 1945— May 1003, Nov. 991;
1946— Feb. 253.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.




105

------- Taxes (corporation), kinds. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 631.
------- Wage rates, prevailing, to govern in privatecontract road work, 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability- and
death-benefit increases, and medical service, 1945
and 1947. Provisions. 1946— Jan. 62-64; 1947—
Oct. 416, 418.
----------------Occupational disease, waiver of right to
compensation for second injury, and other provi­
sions, 1943. 1943— Sept. 544-547.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
---------------- Second injury. 1945 amendment, provi­
sions. 1945— Aug. 288.
Iowa. Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Check-off. 1947 law restricting use of. 1947—
Sept. 283.
-------Child labor. Workmen’s compensation benefits
extended to illegally employed minors, 1945.
1946— Feb. 253.
-------Closed shop. “ Right-to-work” law prohibiting,
1947. 1947— June 1056, 1058, Sept. 279, 283.
------- Cooperatives providing funeral service. 1943
amendment to State law regulating licensing
and practice of embalming. 1944— Mar. 555-556.
-------Fees or assessments to unions as condition of
employment prohibited, 1947 law. 1947— Sept.
283.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
-------Unemployment compensation, provisions as of
Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Wage claims. 2-year statute of limitations
established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability-benefit
increase; waiting period; second-injury fund.
1945 law. 1951— Aug. 286; 1946— Jan. 61-62.
---------------- Medical aid; changes in provisions for,
1947. 1947— Oct. 418.
---------------- Occupational-disease law, 1947. 1947—
Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Kansas. Closed-shop contracts. Regulation of un­
der Union Regulatory Act. 1947— June 1059.
-------Cooperatives providing funeral service. Effect
of embalmers’ and funeral directors’ law (1941
amendment). 1944— Mar. 556.
------- Discrimination in employment, 1949, com­
mittee to study. 1950— Feb. 131.
------- Labor relations law of 1943, including unionregistration provision. Summary. 1943— May
942-943.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements of 1943 law. 1947— June 1052-1053.
-------Workmen’s compensation. Provisions in effect
September 1943. 1943— Sept. 550, Oct. 729-748.
----------------Second injury; second-injury fund; 1945
law. 1945— Aug. 286; 1946— Jan. 61.
Kentucky. Child labor. Provisions concerning;
1948 law. 1946— Oct. 552-553; 1948— Nov. 513.
------- ------- Standards lowered in public bowling
alleys; employer’s requirement that employee
or applicant for employment pay cost of medical
examination as condition of employment made
unlawful, 1950. 1950— Nov. 572, 574.
--------------- Work (on Saturdays) more than 8 hours
and after 6 p.m., permitted, 1944 law. 1944—
Aug. 359.

106

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., by States— Continued
Kentucky. Emergency powers given labor com­
missioners during war, 1942 act. 191*2 — May

1084-1085.
------- Employment service law of 1946. Provisions.
191*6— Nov. 758.
------- Holiday-observance-suspension law, 1943; re­
peal for all but 3 holidays, 1944. 191*1*— Aug. 360.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 191*6— Oct. 537.
------- Labor relations. Provisions as to conciliation
in disputes, rights of collective bargaining and
union organization. 191*6— Oct. 548.
------- Minimum-wage law, and orders. Provisions.
1946— Oct. 539.
------- Minimum-wage orders. Adoptions, coverage
and rates, 1941 and 1942. 191*1— Sept. 576;
191*2— Mar. 590; 191*3— Mar. 447.
---------------- Overtime rates. 1947-48 revisions, gen­
eral coverage. 191*8— Sept. 276-277.
------- Safety and health. Provisions. 191*6— Oct.
542-543, Nov. 759.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 191*2— Apr. 979.
------- Unemployment
compensation.
Provisions,
1941 and 1946. 191*1— Sept. 632; 191*6— Oct. 551.
------- Wage deductions, itemized statements re­
quired from employers by 1944 law. 191*1*— Aug.
360.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 191*6— Oct.
541.
------- Wartime emergency powers given to labor
commissioners by 1942 act. 191*2— May 10841085.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Amendments 1948
and 1950; provisions for increased benefits, etc.
1948— Sept. 279-280; 1950— Oct. 484-485.
-----------------Death and disability benefits; changed
in 1947. 191*7— Oct. 417.
---------------- Medical aid; changes in provisions for,
1947. 191*7— Oct. 418.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943;
compulsory law, 1946, provisions (hazardous
employments only). 191*3— Oct. 729-748; 1946—
Oct. 544-548, Nov. 754, 760-761.
------- -------- Silicosis provisions of law extended,
1944. 1944— Aug. 361.
Louisiana. Child labor. Law relaxing standards
amended, 1944. 1944— Aug. 359.
---------------- Law strengthened, 1942.1942 — Nov. 978.
------------------ Provisions concerning. 1946— Oct. 552553.
------------------ Standards lowered in processing of
sugar cane, sorghum, and strawberries, 1950.
1950— Nov. 572.
----------------- Workmen’s compensation coverage, 1948,
for certain minors in street trades. 1948— Sept.
281.
------- Conciliation of labor disputes, voluntary,
authority to promote restored to State’s Com­
missioner of Labor, 1950. 1950— Nov. 573.
------- Day rest; hours of work; provisions. 1946—
Oct. 537-538.
------- Industrial relations. 1948 law establishing
board of mediation in Department of Labor;
functions. 1946 law repealed, effects upon labor
union activities. 1948— Nov. 514.
------- Labor relations. Conciliation and arbitration;
anti-injunction; “ yellow dog” contracts out­
lawed; regulation of strike. 1946— Oct. 548-550,
Nov. 756.
------- Minimum-wage law enacted in 1938, but no
wage orders issued to make effective. 1946—
Oct. 539.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.




-------Unemployment compensation, provisions, 1941
and 1946. 1941— Sept. 632; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Wage-payment law, provisions. 1 9 4 6 — Oct.
541.
------- W ar emergency exemption from labor laws
that interfere with war industry. 1942. 1942—
Nov. 978.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Medical, hospital,
and burial benefits, 1944 law increasing. 1944—
Aug. 361.
---------------- 1948 and 1950 amendments; provisions
for increased benefits; coverage for certain
minors engaged in street trades. 1 9 4 8 — Sept.
280-281; 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 484, 487.
----------------Provisions, in effect September 1943 and
1946, summarized. 1943— Oct. 729-748; 1946—
Oct. 544-548.
Maine. Arbitration. 1945 amendment to law, pro­
vision. 1945— Nov. 988.
------- Child labor. Employment standards estab­
lished, 1947. 1947— Sept. 278.
---------------- Minimum age raised; night work pro­
hibition; 1945 and 1950 amendments. 1946—
Feb. 253; 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 42-43, Feb. 131.
-------Closed shop. “ Right-to-work” law prohibiting,
1947; union-shop contracts permitted. 1947—
June 1056, 1058, Sept. 279.
------- Employment, cost of medical examination
required for, 1949. 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Industrial home work. 1949 law. 1950—
Jan. 46.
------- Industrial relations. Law of 1948 (referen­
dum) regulating. 1948— Nov. 514.
------- Minimum-wage order adopted in 1940, provi­
sions. 1941— Mar. 686.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as of
Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
-------Wartime emergency powers granted to Gover­
nor by 1942 law. 1 9 4 2 — Apr. 906-907, May
1085-1086.
-------Women workers, hours of work and equal pay
for equal work. 1950— Jan. 43-44, Feb. 131.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Occupational-dis­
ease law enacted in 1945. 1946— Jan. 61.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1 9 4 3 — Oct. 729-748.
----------------- Second-injury fund established and
other provisions, 1943. 1943— Sept. 544-547.
Maryland. Child-labor law revisions, 1950. 1950—
Nov. 572.
------- Enforcement of labor law transferred to
department of labor and industry, 1945. 1946—
Feb. 250.
------- Prevailing wage rates within State, 1950.
Creation of commission to fix and determine.
1950— Nov. 574.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degrees of
exemption for cooperatives. 1 9 4 2 — Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Wage claims. Three-year statute of limita­
tions established by 1945 law. 1 9 4 6 — Feb. 252.
------- Wartime emergency powers granted to Gov­
ernor by 1939 law. 1942— May 1086.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death and dis­
ability benefits, 1945; changes in 1947. 1946—
Jan. 62-63; 1 9 4 7 — Oct. 416-417.
----------------Medical aid; 1947 changes in provisions.
1 9 4 7 — O c t. 418.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Sept. 546-549, Oct. 729-748.
---------------- Second-injury fund established in 1945.
1946— Jan. 61.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Massachusetts. Boycotts. Conditions under which
unlawful, according to law of 1947. 1947— Sept.
280.
------- Child labor. Employment standards; changes
in 1947 and 1949. 1947— Sept. 278; 1 9 5 0 — Jan.

43.
---------------- Minors on farms. 1946 law, provisions.
194-6— Nov. 758.
------- Closed shop. Restrictions on, by 1947 amend­
ment to Labor Relations Act. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Department of Labor and industries. Powers
of investigation strengthened, by 1945 law.
1946— Feb. 250.
------- Employment, cost of medical examination
required for, 1949. 1950— Jan. 45.
-------Equal pay regardless of sex, 1945 law. 1946—
Feb. 251.
------- Fair employment practices. 1946 act. Provi­
sions. 1946— July 20, Nov. 757.
---------------- Name changed to Commission Against
Discrimination, 1950; age discrimination made
an unlawful employment practice. 1950— Nov.
573.
------- Hours. Women and minors over 18 permitted
by 1947 law to work until 11 p.m. in manufactur­
ing and mechanical establishments. 1 9 4 7 — Sept.

278.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1947 law regulating.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Labor dispute, limitation on temporary in­
junction in, and redefinition of “labor dispute,”
1950. 1950— Nov. 573.
------- Labor relations. Amendment, 1947, to act;
provisions. 1947— Sept. 282.
---------------- Decisions of arbitration tribunals, status.
1950— Jan. 45.
------- Minimum wage. 1946, 1948, and 1950 amend­
ments, including men and extending coverage;
statutory minima, etc. 1946— Nov. 759; 1948—
Sept. 275; 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131, Oct. 461-462.
------- Minimum-wage orders. Adopted, 1942, 1946,
and 1950. 1943— Mar. 447; 1947— June 10401043, 1047; 1950— Oct. 462-464.
------- ------- Office workers, 1941; restaurants and
hotel restaurants, 1941; hotels and restaurants,
1947-48. 1942— Mar. 591; 1948— Sept. 276.
------- ------- Revisions, laundry and dry cleaning,
bread and bakery, and mercantile industries.
1944. 1946— May 740.
------- Night work. Women and minors permitted,
under 1947 law, to work until 11 p.m. in estab­
lishments formerly barring such work. 1947—
Sept. 278.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Savings-bank life insurance law of 1907,
purposes of. 1942— Feb. 433.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
-------Unemployment compensation, provisions, Aug.
1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Unions, labor. 1943 law regulating provi­
sions. 1943— Oct. 778-779.
-----------------Registration and financial reporting,
requirements of 1946 law; 1949 amendments.
1947— June 1052, 1054-1055; 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Wage claims. Statute of limitations, 1947
change. 1947— Sept. 283.
-------Wartime emergency powers granted to Gov­
ernor by 1942 law. 1942— Apr. 907, May 10851086.
------- Women and minors. Employment in emergency
or under hardship conditions, authority extended
to July 1, 1951, for Commissioner of Labor and




107

Industries to suspend application of any provi­
sion regulating. 1950— Nov. 572.
------- Women workers. Employment standards,
night work; changes in, 1947. 1947— Sept. 278.
--------------- Pay equal to pay of men provided for by
Aug. 9, 1945, law. 1946— Sept. 386.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Coverage, 1943
and 1945; disability- and death-benefit increases,
1945; insurance of liability, 1943. Provisions.
1943— Sept. 548; 1946— 3 an. 62-64.
------- ------- Law amended, 1947, 1948, and 1950;
increases in benefits; other provisions. 1947—
Oct. 416; 1 9 4 8 — Sept. 280; 1 9 5 0 — Oct. 485.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
------- Young people, board for promotion of oppor­
tunities for, established Oct. 10, 1941, by law.
1942— Jan. 70.
Michigan. Arbitration, provisions in 1949 for
voluntary, and for special fact-finding commis­
sion. 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
------- Child labor. Employment standards, 1947
law. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 278.
------- Employment, cost of medicalexamination
required for, 1949. 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Equal pay for equal work, men and women.
Law upheld by State courts. 1944— June 1247.
------- Government employees, strikes by. 1947 law
prohibiting. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 281.
------- Health measures, 1949, first aid and ventila­
tion. 1 9 5 0 — Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1947 law regulating.
1 9 4 7 — Sept. 280.
------- Labor-union regulation. Provisions of 1943
law. 1 9 4 3 — Oct. 778-780.
------- Mediation and arbitration. Law amended,
1947; provisions. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 282.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1 9 4 7 — Sept.
280.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law (amendment) regu­
lating disputes in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- School attendance, compulsory, 1949. 1950—
Jan. 43.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
-------Women workers in manufacturing. Pay equal
to pay of men provided by June 16, 1931, law.
1946— Sept. 386.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Commission to ad­
minister established 1947; committee to study
law established, 1950. 1947— Oct. 418; 1950—
Oct. 484, 487.
------ - ------- Coverage made elective for employers
with fewer than 8 workers; artificial appliances
to be furnished by employer. Provisions enacted
in 1945. 1946— 3 an. 64.
---------------- Occupational-disease provisions revised,
second-injury fund established, and other provi­
sions, 1943. 1943— Sept. 544-550, Oct. 729-748.
Minnesota. Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibit­
ing. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Child labor. Age certificate requirements,
1947. 1947— Sept. 278.
------- ------- Workmen’s compensation benefits ex­
tended to illegally employed minors, 1945. 1946—
Feb. 253.
------- Hospitals, charitable. Strikes and lock-outs
forbidden by 1947 law. 1947— Sept. 281.
------- Labor organizations. Suits by and against,
legality of, 1947. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Labor Relations Act. 1945 amendment; col­
lective agreements, responsibility of employer
in, 1947. 1945— Nov. 986; 1947— Sept. 282.

108

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., by States— Continued
Minnesota. Labor-union regulation. Provisions of
1943 laws. 1 9 4 3 — Oct. 779-780.
------- Minimum wage orders. Coverage and rates
as of Aug. 1, 1941. 19h i — Sept. 576.
---------------- Retail trade (guaranteed wage), effec­
tive 1947-48. Overtime rates. 1948— Sept. 276277.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Wage claims. 2-year statute of limitations
established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability and
death benefits, and funeral allowances. Changes
in 1945 and 1947. 1946— Jan. 62-64; 1947—
Oct. 416-417.
----------------Occupational-disease law amended, 1947,
benefit changes; silicosis cases. 1947— Oct. 415.
------- ------- Occupational diseases. Amendments,
1943
and 1947, benefits, silicosis, and other
provisions. 1948— Sept. 544, 550; 1947— Oct. 415.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— ' ct. 729-748.
O
---------------- Second injury. 1945 amendment, provi­
sions. 1945— Aug. 287.
Mississippi. Child labor. Provisions concerning.
1946— Oct. 552-553.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 1946— Oct. 537.
------- Industrial relations law, 1942, prohibiting
certain activities. 1942— Nov. 979.
------- Safety and health. Rule-making authority
vested in State Board of Health. 1946— Oct. 543.
------- Strikes, provisions regulating unions during.
1946— Oct. 550.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
-------Unemployment compensation. Provisions, 1941
and 1946. 1941— Sept. 632; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Workmen’s
compensation.
Law
enacted
in 1948, effective Jan. 1, 1949. Provisions.
1948—June 639-640, Sept. 278, Nov. 513.
------- ------- 1950 amendments increasing benefits
and expanding medical aid. 1950— Oct. 486.
Missouri. Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibit­
ing. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Government employees, strikes by. 1947 law
prohibiting. 1947— Sept. 281.
------- Industrial relations. Department established
by 1946 law, functions. 1946— Nov. 758.
----------------Restrictions on union activities, strikes,
etc., 1949 amendments. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1947 law regulating.
1947— Sept. 280-281.
------- Picketing, 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Strikes. Barred by 1947 law unless approved
by majority vote. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemplovment compensation. Provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Amendment, 1948,
providing increased benefits. 1948— Sept. 280-281.
----------------Second-injury fund, and other provisions
in effect September 1943. 1943— Sept. 544-545,
Oct. 729-748.
Montana. Equal pay for equal work, men and
women. Law passed during World W ar II.
1944— June 1247.
------- Separate agency to enforce labor laws, 1949.
1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.




------- Taxes (corporation), kinds; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Women workers in public or private employ­
ment to receive pay equal to that of men (law
of 1919). 1946— Sept. 386.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death and dis­
ability benefits; 1947 changes. 1947— Oct. 417.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Nebraska. Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to
work” constitutional amendment; 1947 law.
1947— June 1056-1058, Sept. 279.
------- Cooperatives. Cold-storage-plants licensing
and regulation law, 1943, possible effects. 1944—
Mar. 555.
------- Discrimination in employment, 1949, com­
mittee to study. 1950— Feb. 131.
------- Labor organizations. Suits by and against,
legality of, 1947. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Mass picketing, 1949 law prohibiting. 1950—
Jan. 45.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes.
1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Taxes (corporations), kinds. 1942- Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability- and
death-benefit increases, provisions, 1945. 1946—
Jan. 62-63.
---------------- Occupational-disease coverage extended,
1943. Provisions. 1943— Sept. 544.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Nevada. Child labor— 14-year age minimum, 1950.
1950— Dec. 702.
------- Minimum wage. Flat-rate law, coverage and
rates, 1941 and 1945 amendment. 1941— Sept.
577; 1946— Feb. 251, May 737.
---------------- Rest periods, 1947 amendment provid­
ing. 1948— Sept. 275.
-------Taxes (corporation), kind. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Wage payment. 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death and dis­
ability benefits; 1947 changes. 1947— Oct. 417.
---------------- Occupational diseases; 1947 law listing
certain compensable diseases. 1947— Sept. 284,
Oct. 415.
----------------Provisions in effect in 1943. 1943— Sept.
546-547, 549, Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Second-injury fund; 1947 revision.
1947— Oct. 415.
New Hampshire. Apprenticeship council estab­
lished and voluntary system provided for. 1947—
Sept. 277.
------- Arbitration. 1945 amendment, provision.
1945— Nov. 988.
— — Closed shop. “ Right-to-work” law prohibit­
ing, 1947; employers of 5 or less only. 1947—
Sept. 279.
------- Equal-pay law. Discrimination in wages be­
cause of sex prohibited, 1947. 1947— Sept. 283.
—
Industrial hygiene division given powers to
investigate conditions in certain industries by
1945 law. 1946— Feb. 250.
------- Industrial relations, 1949 amendment on
union security agreements. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb.
131.
------- Labor Department reorganization, 1950.
Summary. 1950— Nov. 571-572.
------- Minimum-wage orders adopted, 1940, 1942,
1946, and 1949-50; provisions. 1941— Mar. 686;

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
19AS— Mar. 447; 1947— June 1040-1043, 1950—
Oct. 461-462.
------- Minimum wages, 1949 act fixing, exceptions.
1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
-------Union registration and financial reports. 1947
law requiring. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Wartime emergency powers granted to Gov­
ernor by law of 1917. 1942— May 1085-1086.
------- Women workers to receive pay equal to pay
of men, 1947 law. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Administration of,
1947 changes. 194-7— Oct. 418.
------- ------- Death and disability benefits; 1947
changes. 1947— Oct. 416-417.
------- ------- Medical service provision enacted in
1945. 1946— Jan. 64.
------- ------- Occupational-disease law, 1947. 1947—
Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Second-injury-rights waiver by work­
man provided for, and other measures, 1943;
second-injury fund established, 1947. 1943—
Sept. 546-547; 1947— Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
New Jersey. Child labor. Workmen’s compensa­
tion, double, provided for certain illegally em­
ployed minors 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 253.
------- Department of Labor and Industry; law
creating, effective Jan. 1, 1949; functions. 1948—
Nov. 515.
------- Discrimination in employment. Law effective
Apr. 16, 1945; creating division to prevent.
1945— May 1003, Nov. 990-991; 1946— Feb. 253.
-------Emergency powers given labor commissioners,
during war, 1942 act. 1942— May 1084-1086.
------- Fair Employment Practice Act, 1949 amend­
ment. 1950— Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
------- Labor relations of public utilities. 1946 law,
provisions. 1946— Nov. 755.
------- Mediation. 1945 law. 1945— Nov. 988.
------- Mercury, use of in fur-felt hat industry,
prohibited in 1942. 1944— Sept. 555-560.
-------Migrant Labor Act. Program of improvements
to be instituted under. 1945— Aug. 236-237.
-------Migrant workers, agricultural. Law of 1945,
provisions. 1946— Feb. 251.
------- Minimum-wage orders. 1942 and January
1943. 1943— Mar. 448.
------- ------- Provisions of 1946 orders. 1947— June
1040-1043, 1048.
---------------- Restaurants and beauty-culture in­
dustries effective 1943. 1946— May 740.
------- Public utilities. 1947 and 1949 amendments
to law regulating disputes. 1947— Sept. 279, 281;
1950— Jan. 44.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment
compensation,
provisions,
Aug. 1, 1941. m i — Sept. 632.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability act of
1948, provisions; 1950 amendments increasing
benefits; hernia cases. 1948— Nov. 513-514;
1950— Oct. 486.
---------------- Disability- and death-benefit increases,
1945. 1946— ,Ian. 62-63.
-----------------Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
---------------- Second-injury fund maximum limitation
increased by 1945 amendment. 1945— Aug. 287;
1946— Feb. 249.
-------------------Silicosis and asbestosis coverage, 1944
law. 1944— Aug. 361.




109

New Mexico. Child labor— 14-year age minimum,
1950. 1950— Dec. 702.
------- Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to work”
constitutional amendment proposed. 1947— June
1057.
------- Discrimination in employment, 1949. 1950—
Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind, 1940. 1942— Apr.
980.
------- Unemployment
compensation,
provisions,
Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Wage claims. Statue of limitations for. 1947
change. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Wage collection. 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Changes in admin­
istration, 1947. 1947— Oct. 418.
------- ------- Death and disability benefits; 1947
changes. 1947— Oct. 417.
------- ------- Funeral-expense allowance increase;
occupational disease. 1945 provisions. 1946—
Jan. 61, 64.
----------------Medical aid; 1947 changes in provisions.
1947— Oct. 418.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
New York. Antidiscrimination law, 1945. First
year of operation reviewed. 1947— Jan. 24-27.
------- Buildings owned by charitable, educational,
and religious associations and operated for pri­
vate profit. Employees operating brought under
State labor relations act coverage, 1946. 1946—
Nov. 756.
------- Child labor. 1944 laws reviewed. 1944— Aug.
359-360.
------- ------- Street-trades regulation made State­
wide, 1949. 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- ------- Wartime farm permit requirements
made permanent. 1947— Sept. 278.
---------------- Working hours outside school of stu­
dents under 17 restricted by 1945 law. 1946—
Feb. 253.
---------------- Workmen’s compensation, illegally em­
ployed minors, employer liability under 1948
law. 1948— Sept. 281.
------- Disability compensation, nonoccupational,
1949, weekly benefits. 1950— Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
------- Discrimination, racial and other, in employ­
ment. 1945 law prohibiting, provisions; opera­
tion of law for 6 months summarized. 1945—
May 1003, Nov. 990; 1946— Feb. 253; 1946—
Apr. 593-594.
------- Discriminatory employment practices by em­
ployers holding war-production contracts. In­
dustrial Commission given power to enforce.
Civil rights law prohibiting. 1942— Nov. 978.
------- Equal pay for equal work, men and women,
1944
law. 1944— June 1247.
-------Fair Employment Practice Act, 1950 supple­
ments to. 1950— Nov. 572-573.
------- Government employees, strikes by. 1947 law
prohibiting. 1947— Sept. 281.
------- Home-work prohibition order of 1938, pro­
visions. 1942— Mar. 642.
------- Hours of work. W ar Emergency Dispensa­
tion Act, 1942; provisions. 1942— Apr. 905-906.
------- Industrial Commissioner, powers and duties
changed, 1949. 1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
------- Labor Relations Act. 1946 amendments to.
1946— Nov. 756.
------- Labor standards. Dispensations from, to
achieve maximum war-industry production, 1942
law. 1943— Jan. 38-42.
------- Migratory labor. 1946 laws, provisions of.
1946— Nov. 759.

L10

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., by States— Continued
New York Minimum-wage law. Amendments, 1944,
1947, 1948, and 1950. Orders made mandatory
instead of directory; adult males covered; wage
boards and other provisions. 1944— Aug. 360;
1947— Sept. 283; 1948— Sept. 275; 1950— Oct.
462.
------- Minimum-wage orders. Adopted in 1940, pro­
visions. 194.1— Mar. 687-689.
‘ ------- ------- Laundry, dry cleaning and dyeing
(guaranteed wage), hotel and restaurant;
beauty culture (guaranteed wage), effective in
1947- 48; confectionery order revised. Overtime
rates. 1948— Sept. 276-277.
---------------- Retail trade, 1945. 1946— May 740------- Night work. Statute permitting longer hours
for women, provisions. 1949— Jan. 56-57.
------- Nonoccupational sickness insurance. Pro­
visions of 1949 disability-benefit law. 1949—
July 37-38.
-------Savings-bank insurance law of 1938, amended
1940. Points of difference from Massachusetts
law. 1942— Feb. 440.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degrees of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
------Unemployment compensation, provisions,
Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 632.
------- Veterans’ unemployment benefits, during
work stoppages. Provision for payment by State.
1946— May 758.
------- W ar emergency exemption from labor laws
interfering with war industry. 1942— Nov. 978.
------- Women workers. Private employment (limi­
ted exceptions), to receive pay equal to that of
men, 1944 law. 1946— Sept. 387.
---------------- Sex discrimination in rates of pay pro­
hibited (with certain exceptions), 1944 law.
1944— Aug. 360.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Changes in admin­
istration of, 1947. 1947— Oct. 418.
------- ------- Coverage extended, 1946 and 1950, to
cover domestic workers (including chauffeurs)
and certain firemen. 1946— June 931; 1950— Oct.
487.
---------------- Domestic workers, provisions regarding
in 1946 law. 1946— Nov. 760.
------- ------- 1948 amendments increasing benefits.
1948— Sept. 281.
------- ------- Occupational-disease law amended,
1947; silicosis benefits, changes in. 1947— Oct.
415-416.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943;
1944 laws reviewed. 1948— Oct. 729-748; 1944—
Aug. 359, 361-363.
----------------Second injury. 1945 amendment. 1945—
Aug. 287.
North Carolina. Arbitration service established by
1945 law. 1945— Nov. 988.
------- Child labor. Provisions concerning. 1946—
Oct. 552-553.
------- Closed shop. “ Right-to-work” law, 1947, pro­
hibiting. 1947— June 1056-1058, Sept. 279.
------- Day of rest. Provision. 1946— Oct. 538.
------- Fees or assessments to unions as condition
of employment prohibited, 1947 law. 1947— Sept.
283.
------- Hours of work, provisions; 1947 amendment
exempting male workers from daily and weekly
hours provisions. 1946— Oct. 537; 1947— Sept.
278.
------- Labor relations. Conciliation and arbitration
provided for disputes; blacklisting of employees
prohibited. 1946— Oct. 548-549.
------- Safety and health. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
542-543.




------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 980.
------- Unemployment compensation. Provisions,
1941 and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Wage claims. Three-year statute of limita­
tions established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
-------Wage-payment law. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
541.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Coverage increased,
1945. 1946—Jan. 64.
------- ------- Death and disability benefits; 1947
changes. 1947— Oct. 416-417.
------- ------- Provisions summarized; in effect Sep­
tember 1943 and in 1946. 1943— Sept. 546-548,
Oct. 729-748; 1946— Oct. 544-548.
------- ----- Second injury. 1945 amendment, pro­
visions. 1945— Aug. 287.
North Dakota. Arbitration panels. 1947 law re­
ducing size. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Closed shop. “ Right-to-work” law, 1947, pro­
hibiting. 1947— June 1056-1058, Sept. 279.
-------“ Cooperative.” Appropriation of name by
organization not incorporated under cooperative
law made misdemeanor, 1941 amendment. 1942—
Mar. 684.
------- Cooperatives, study of in teachers’ colleges.
Elective courses provided by 1943 law. 1944—
Mar. 554.
------- Emergency powers during strikes or lock­
outs involving danger, granted to Governor by
1941 law. 1942----- May 1087.
------- Industrial relations. Laws of 1948 (refer­
enda) regulating, provisions. 1948— Nov. 514.
-------Labor organizations. Suits by and against,
legality of, 1947. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Labor Relations Act, 1947; approval at 1948
general election required. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Minimum wage orders made effective in 1946
and 1947-48; provisions. 1947— June 1040-1043,
1048; 1948— Sept. 276.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
------- Safety and health of workers. State safety
engineer provided for by 1947 law. 1947— Sept.
283.
------- Strikes. Barred by 1947 law unless approved
by majority vote. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of ex­
emption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
------- Union registration and financial reporting.
Requirements of 1947 law. 1947-^ June 1052,
1054, Sept. 282.
------- Wage claims. One-year statute of limitations
established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation.
Disability- and
death-benefit, and funeral-allowance increases.
Provisions enacted in 1945. 1946— Jan. 62-64.
---------------- 1943 enactments and provisions in effect
in September 1943. 1943— Sept. 546, 548-549,
Oct. 729-748.
Ohio. Child labor, 1949, employment outside school
hours. 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- Cooperative marketing act amended, 1943.
Provisions. 1944— Mar. 554.
------- Government employees, strikes by. 1947 law
prohibiting. 1947— Sept. 281.
------- Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Minimum wage order adopted in 1940, pro­
visions. 1941— Mar. 689.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Taxes (corporation), kind, 1940. 1942— Apr.

981.
------- Unemployment compensation. Provisions, as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability and
death benefits. 1945 and 1947 changes. 1946—
Jan. 62-63; 1 9 4 7 — Oct. 417.
------- ------- Occupational disease, 1943 amendment.
1943— Sept. 544.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1 9 4 3 — Oct. 729-748.
Oklahoma. Child labor. Provisions concerning.
1946— Oct. 552-553.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 1946— Oct. 537.
------- Labor relations. Conciliation and arbitration;
restriction on courts in labor disputes; black­
listing of employees prohibited. 1946— Oct. 548549.
------ Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Minimum-wage law inoperative because of
injunction. 1946— Oct. 539.
------- Safety and health. Provisions, 1946 and 1949.
1946— Oct. 542-543; 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- School attendance, compulsory, 1949. 1950—
Jan. 43.
----- Sunday-work prohibition suspended with re­
gard to war materials. 1944. 1 9 4 4 — Aug. 360.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of ex­
emption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation. Provisions,
1941 and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
541.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Compulsory law.
Provisions
(hazardous
employments
only).
1946— Oct. 544-548.
------- ------- Death benefits; 1947 changes. 1947—
Oct. 418.
---------------- Disability-benefits increase, 1945 pro­
vision. 1946— Jan. 62-63.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Second-injury fund established, 1943;
1945 amendment, provisions. 1943— Sept. 544545; 1945— Aug. 288.
Oregon. Antidiscrimination Law, 1947. Provisions;
role of State Department of Education in Ad­
ministration. 1947— Aug. 198-199.
-------Apprenticeship. 1935 law amended. Status of
programs to end of 1946. 1947— Apr. 684.
------- Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Child labor. 1946, provisions summarized.
1947— Apr. 683.
------- Discrimination in employment. 1947 law ex­
pressing policy of opposition to; 1949 act. 1947—
Aug. 198-199, Sept. 278; 1950— , an. 45, Feb.
J
131.
------- Elections, collective-bargaining;
Commis­
sioner of Labor authorized to hold, by 1947 law.
1947— Sept. 282.
------- Employment agencies, private. 1946, pro­
visions summarized. 1947— Apr. 684.
------- Health and hygiene. Board of Health sur­
veys of working conditions in industrial estab­
lishments, directed by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 250;
1947— Apr. 682.
-------Home work. Manufacture of specified articles
prohibited by order of Wage and Hour Com­
mission. 1947— Apr. 683.
------- Hours of work. 1946, provisions summarized.
1947— Apr. 683.
------- Industrial relations. 1946. provisions sum­
marized. 1947— Apr. 684.




111

-------Minimum wage. Women and minors. 1946,
provisions summarized. 1947— Apr. 682-683.
------- Minimum-wage orders. Adopted, 1941 (all
occupations except agriculture), 1942, and 1946.
1942— Mar. 591-592; 1943— Mar. 448; 1947—
June 1040-1043, 1049.
------- ------- Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing; mer­
cantile industry; and public housekeeping. 1944
revisions. 1946— May 739-740.
----------------Overtime rates. Laundry and dry clean­
ing, hotel and restaurant, retail trade. Effective
in 1947-48. 1948— Sept. 276-277.
------- Safety and health. Industrial Accident Com­
mission, powers given to; State board of health,
functions, 1947 law. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 682, Sept. 283.
------- Strikes. Barred by 1947 law unless approved
by majority vote. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of ex­
emption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions, A u­
gust 1941 and end of 1946. 1941— Sept. 633;
1 9 4 7 — Apr. 684.
------- Wage payment and collection. 1946, pro­
visions summarized. 1947— Apr. 683-684.
-------Workmen’s compensation. Disability and
death benefits, second-injury funds. 1945 pro­
visions and 1947 changes. 1946— Jan. 61-62;
1947— Oct. 416-417.
--------------- 1913 law, summary of provisions. 1947—
Apr. 682.
----------------Occupational-disease coverage and safe­
ty requirements. 1943, provisions. 1943— Sept.
543, 549.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Second-injury provisions, 1945 law.
1945— Aug. 286.
Pennsylvania. Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law pro­
hibiting. 1947— Sept. 280.
------- Equal-pay law. Discrimination in wages be­
cause of sex prohibited, 1947. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Government employees, strike by. 1947 law
prohibiting. 1 9 4 7 — Sept. 281.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1947 law regulating.
1947— Sept. 280.
-------Labor Relations Act. Extended 1943, to cover
firms also covered by Wagner Act. 1943— Oct.
780.
---------------- 1945 and 1947 amendments; provisions.
1945— Nov. 986; 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Minimum-wage order adopted, 1940 and 1943
(restaurant industry), provisions. 1941— Mar.
689; 1946— May 740.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of ex­
emption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
------- Women workers. Pay equal to pay of men,
1947 law providing. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- ------- Workday and workweek, maximum
length increased by 1947 amendment. 1947—
Sept. 278.
------- Workmen’s compensation.
Disability- and
death-benefit; medical services; second-injury
fund. 1945 provisions. 1946— Jan. 61-64.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Second-injury provisions. 1945 law.
1945— Aug. 286-287; 1946— Jan. 61-64.
Philippine Islands. 8-hour workday. 1943 laws,
provisions. 1945— Apr. 779.

112

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., by States— Continued
Philippine Islands. Labor organizations. 1936 law,
provisions. 1945— Apr. 783, 784.
------- Labor relations. Court of Industrial Rela­
tions, act of 1936; conciliation between employ­
ers and workers, act of 1938; provisions. 1945—
Apr. 783-784.
------- Landlords and tenants. Conciliation between,
by Government mediators. Law of 1938, pro­
visions. 19If5— Apr. 783-784.
-------Retirement pensions, certain public employees.
Provisions summarized. 191f5— Apr. 786.
------- Workmen's compensation. Summary of pro­
visions. 191f5— Apr. 786.
Puerto Rico. Accounting service for labor organ­
izations, law of 1946. 191f6— Nov. 756.
------- Child labor. Law strengthened, 1942. 191f2—
Nov. 978.
---------------- 16-year age minimum, 1950. 1950— Dec.
702.
------- Discrimination against employee if affiliated
with any political party, 1950, employer liable
for. 1950— Nov. 573.
------- Labor laws, general summary of. 19Ifl— Jan.
107-108.
-------Labor-organization funds made exempt from
attachment. 19Jf6— Nov. 756.
------- Labor Relations Act of 1945, provisions of;
1946 amendment. 1945— Feb. 253, Nov. 987-989;
191f6— Nov. 755-756.
------- Minimum wage. Flat-rate law, coverage and
rates, 1941; 1945 amendment. 19Ifl— Sept. 577;
191f2— Mar. 585; 191f6— May 737.
----------------Summary and provisions of order made
effective in 1946. 1947—
-June 1040, 1049.
------- Workmen's compensation.
Disability- and
death-benefit increases and waiting-period de­
crease, 1945 provisions. 1946— Jan. 62-63.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
Rhode Island. Age discrimination, law affecting
industrial safety and health, and amendments
to wage laws, 1950; resolution creating legisla­
tive committee to investigate. 1950— Nov. 573574.
------- Cash Sickness Compensation Act of 1942.
Provisions, and operations to 1942. Summary of
1946 and 1949 amendments. 1942— July 101-102,
Nov. 979; 1945— Feb. 225-242; 1946—July 21,
2 3-25; 1948— > an. a6 2-63; 1950— Jan. 45.
J
------- Check-off. 1947 law restricting use. 1947—
Sept. 283.
------- Child labor. Night work prohibited for mi­
nors of 16 and 17, by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 253.
------- Discrimination in employment, 1949 act, pro­
visions. 1950— Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
------- Emergency powers, wartime, conferred upon
Governor. 1942— Nov. 978.
------- Equal pay for equal work. 1946 law. 1946—
Nov. 759.
-------Homework, industrial; 1948 amendment; pro­
visions. 1948— Nov. 513—
514.
-------Minimum wage. Law amended, 1945, broaden­
ing coverage to include men. 1946— Feb. 251,
May 737.
------- ------- Orders adopted, 1942, 1946, 1947-48
(hotel and restaurant), and 1950. 1943— Mar.
448; 1947— June 1040-1043, 1049; 1948— Sept.
276; 1950— Oct. 462.
------- Safety. Industrial code commission estab­
lished, 1946. Provisions of law. 1946— Nov. 759.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind in effect. 1942—
Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.




------- Veterans' seniority rights extended by 1945
law. 1945— Nov. 989.
------- Women workers (except domestic or in speci­
fied nonprofit organizations) to receive pay equal
of men (law of April 1946). 1946— Sept. 387.
------- Workmen's compensation. Administration,
and disability benefits, 1947 changes. 1947—
Oct. 417-418.
----------------- Law liberalized and strengthened, 1942;
provisions in effect in September 1943; amend­
ments, 1950, coverage, benefits, etc. 1942— Nov.
979; 1943— Oct. 729-748; 1950— Oct. 486-487.
---------------- Second-injury fund established. 1943—
Sept. 544-545.
South Carolina. Child labor. Provisions concern­
ing. 1946— Oct. 552-553.
------- Days of work limited to 5 in textile mills.
1946— Oct. 538.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 1946— Oct. 537538.
------- Labor relations. Conciliation and arbitration
of disputes provided for. 1946— Oct. 548.
------- Safety and health. Rule-making authority
vested in State Board of Health; functions of
board, 1947 law. 1946— Oct. 543; 1947— Sept.
283.
------- Safety, 1949, emergency exits. 1950— Jan. 43.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degrees of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation. Provisions,
1941 and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1946— Oct. 551.
-------Wage claims. One-year statute of limitations
established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
541.
-------Workmen's compensation. Committee to study
insurance rates continued, 1950. 1950— Oct. 484,
487.
------- ------- Provisions— in effect September 1943,
of 1944 law, and in 1946— summarized. 1943—
Oct. 729-748; 1944— Aug. 363-364; 1946— Oct.
544-548.
South Dakota. Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right
to work" laws 1946 and 1947; constitutional
amendment. 1947— June 1056-1058, Sept. 279.
------- Division of Labor created in 1949; duties.
1950— Jan. 44, Feb. 131.
--------- Labor organizations. Financial reporting
and registration, 1943 law. 1943— May 942;
1947— June 1052-1055.
---------------- Legality of suits by and against, 1947.
1947— Sept. 282.
------- Labor relations. Closed shop, union shop,
and maintenance-of-membership contracts out­
lawed by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 253.
----------------Farm-labor unionization, act restricting,
1943; and antiracketeering clause. Provisions.
1943— May 942.
------- Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45.
-------Minimum wage. Flat-rate law, 1941, coverage
and rates. 1941— Sept. 577.
---------------- Women. Wartime provision (1943) con­
tinued indefinitely by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 251,
May 736-737.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
-------Right-to-work law of 1945. Provisions. 1945—
Nov. 989.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
------- Wage claims. Statute of limitations for. 1947
changes. 1947— Sept. 283-284.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Workmen’s compensation. Coverage increase,
1943; provisions in effect, September 1943.
1943— Sept. 548, Oct. 729-748.
---------------- Disability benefits; increases in, 1947.
1947— Oct. 416-417.
---------------- Funeral allowance and medical-service
duration, provisions increasing, 1945. 1946—
Jan. 64.
------- ------- Occupational-disease law, 1947, and
second-injury fund established. 1947— Sept. 284,
Oct. 415.
Tennessee. Child labor. Provisions concerning.
1946— Oct. 552-553; 1950— Jan. 42-43, Feb. 131.
------- Closed shop, prohibition of “ Right to work”
law, 1947. 1947— June 1056, 1058, Sept. 279.
-------Fees or assessments to unions as condition of
employment prohibited. 1947 law. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Health and hygiene. Authority given indus­
trial hygiene department by 1945 law. 1946—
Feb. 250.
------- Health matters transferred to department of
public health. 1946— Oct. 542-543.
------- Home work, industrial. Provisions summa­
rized. 1946— Oct. 539-540.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 1946— Oct. 538.
------- Safety. Rules issued by Division of Factory
Inspection. 1946— Oct. 543.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions,
1941 and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Wage claims. Three-year statute of limita­
tions established by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 252.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
54!.
-------Women workers, factories, reduction in work­
week. 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Changes in ad­
ministration of, 1947. 1947— Oct. 418.
---------------- Death and disability benefits; 1947
changes. 1947— Oct. 417.
------- ------- Occupational-disease law, 1947. 1947—
Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
---------------- Provisions in effect, September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
---------------- Second-injury fund. 1945 provision for.
1946— Jan. 61.
Texas. Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Check-off. 1947 law restricting use of. 1947—
Sept. 283.
------- Child labor. 15-year age minimum, 1950.
1950— Dec. 702.
---------------- Provisions concerning. 1946— Oct. 552553.
------- Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to work”
law, 1947. 1947— June 1056, 1058, Sept. 279.
------- Employment agencies, private. 1949 amend­
ment to act. 1950— Jan. 46.
------- Government employees, strikes by. 1947 law
prohibiting. 1947— Sept. 281.
------- Health and hygiene. Authority given depart­
ment of health by 1945 law. 1946— Feb. 250.
------- Home work, industrial. Provisions summa­
rized. 1946— Oct. 540.
------- Hours of work. Provisions. 1946— Oct. 538.
-------Industrial relations. Law of 1941 prohibiting
certain activities. 1942— Jan. 81, Nov. 979.
------- Labor organizations. Registration and finan­
cial reporting. Requirements of 1943 law. 1943—
May 942; 1947— June 1052, 1054-1055.
---------------- Suits by and against, legality of, 1947.
1947— Sept. 282.
------- Labor relations. Arbitration provision; black­
listing of employees prohibited; regulation of




113

unions in organization and during strike. 1946—
Oct. 548-550.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation. Provisions,
1941 and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
541.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death and dis­
ability benefits; 1947 changes. 1947— Oct. 417.
---------------- Occupational-disease law, 1947. 1947—
Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
----------------Provisions in effect September 1943 and
in 1946. 1943— Oct. 729-748; 1946— Oct. 544548.
------- ------- Second-injury fund established, 1947.
1947— Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
Utah. Apprenticeship, voluntary. Program under
State agreements, 1949. 1950— Jan. 46.
------- Boycotts, secondary. 1947 law prohibiting.
1947— Sept. 280.
------- Labor Relations Act. 1947 amendment; pro­
visions. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45.
-------Minimum wage. Overtime rates. Laundry and
dry cleaning, hotel and restaurant, retail trade
(guaranteed wage), effective in 1947-48. 1948—
Sept. 276-277.
-------Minimum-wage orders. 1940 (retail industry),
1941 (laundry and public housekeeping), and
1946. 1941— Mar. 690; 1942— Mar. 592-593;
1947— June 1040-1043, 1049-1051.
------- Picketing. 1947 law restricting. 1947— Sept.
280.
-------Self-help cooperatives. Provision of 1941 acts.
1941— Aug. 439-440.
------- Strikes. Barred by 1947 law unless approved
by majority vote. 1947— Sept. 380.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Coverage increase,
1943 law; provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Sept. 548, Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Disability- and death-benefit changes
and funeral-allowance increase, artificial limb
or eye granted specific amount. Provisions en­
acted in 1945. 1946— Jan. 62-64.
Vermont. Apprenticeship law amended. Council
brought within department of industrial rela­
tions; division established, 1947. 1947— Sept. 277.
------- Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Safety and health of workers. Control of
occupational diseases and health hazards, 1949
act. 1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
---------------- State board of health, powers of, 1947
law. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
-------Wages and hours, investigation of, authorized,
1947, in intrastate industries, to determine need
for minimum-wage law. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Coverage (employ­
ers) increased, 1943; provisions in effect Sep­
tember 1943. 1943— Sept. 548, Oct. 729-748.
------- ------- Death benefits; 1947 changes. 1947—
Oct. 417.

114

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, U. S., by States— Continued
Vermont. Workmen’s compensation. Disabilitybenefit increases. 1945 provision. 1946— Jan. 63.
------- ------- Second-injury fund established, 1947.
194,7— Sept. 284, Oct. 415.
Virginia. Anti-monopoly law, 1950 amendments.
1950— Nov. 573-574.
------- Child labor. Provisions concerning as of
1946; law of 1948. 1946— Oct. 552-553; 1948—
Nov. 513.
-------Closed shop, prohibition of. “ Right to work”
law, 1947. 1947— June 1056,1058-1059, Sept. 279.
-------Pees or assessments to unions as condition of
employment prohibited, 1947 law. 1947— Sept. 283.
------- Fuel Commission to manage coal properties
seized by Governor, 1950. 1950— Nov. 573.
------- Hours of work. 1942 act; provisions in war­
time and 1946. 1942— Apr. 906; 1946— Oct. 538.
------- ------- W ar emergency exemption from laws
interfering with war industry, 1942. 1942—
Nov. 978.
------- ------- Women employees. Provisions of 1944
law summarized. 1944— Aug. 360.
------- Labor commissioner’s term of office changed
by 1946 law. 1946— Nov. 758.
------- Labor relations. Blacklisting of employees
prohibited; regulation of unions during strikes.
1946— Oct. 549-551, Nov. 756-757.
------- Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 1947— Sept. 279, 281.
------- Safety and health, industrial, 1950 law.
1950— Nov. 573.
------- State residents to be given preference in
contracts and employment, under 1944 law.
1944— Aug. 360-361.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 1942— Apr. 981.
-------Unemployment compensation, provisions, 1941
and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1946— Oct. 551.
------- Wage-payment law. Provisions. 1946— Oct.
541.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Coverage of act
extended, 1942. 1942— Nov. 979.
---------------- Disability benefits; increases in, 1947.
1947— Oct. 416.
---------------- 1946, 1948, and 1950 amendments, pro­
visions. 1946— Nov. 762; 1948— Sept. 281; 1950—
Oct. 484, 487.
---------------- Occupational-disease hazards included,
1944. Provisions. 1944— May 1020-1021.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943;
1944 law; compulsory law. 1948— Oct. 729-748;
1944— Aug. 364; 1946— Oct. 544-548.
Washington. Arbitration law amended, 1947.
1947— Sept. 282.
-------Child labor. Standards amended by Minimum
Wage and Welfare Order, effective July 10,
1950. Provisions of order. 1950— Nov. 572.
------- ------- Summary of provisions, 1946; 1949
amendment. 1947— Apr. 686; 1950— Jan. 43,
Feb. 131.
------- Discrimination in employment, 1949 act.
1950— Jan. 45, Feb. 131.
------- Domestic service. Law restricting hours of
work. 1946— June 931.
------- Employment agencies, private. Law concern­
ing misrepresentation by agent or broker. 1947—
Apr. 687.
-------Hours of work. Summary of provisions as of
1946. 1947— Apr. 686.
------- Industrial relations. Legal provisions, 1946.
1947— Apr. 687.
------- Minimum-wage orders adopted in 1940, 1942
(office work), 1946; summary of provisions.




1 9 4 1 — Mar. 691; 12/^— Mar. 593; 1 9 4 8 — Mar.
448-449; 1947— Apr. 685-686.
------ Pay of men and women equal for equal work.
Law passed during World W ar II. 1944— June

1247; 1040— Sept. 387.
------- Safety and health. Laws of 1903 and 1919,
provisions. 1947— Apr. 685.
------- Sickness insurance, nonoccupational. Provi­
sions of disability-benefit law, approved Mar.
21, 1949; operation suspended pending 1950
referendum. 1949— July 38—
39; 1950—Jan. 45,
Feb. 131.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind in effect. 1942—
Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment
compensation,
provisions,
1941 and 1946. 1941— Sept. 633; 1947— Apr. 687.

------ Wage payment and collection. Provisions,
1946, summarized. 1 9 4 7 — Apr. 686.
------- Wage rates, prevailing hourly, to govern on
public works, and contract specifications to in­
clude statement of minimum rate. 1945 law.
1946— Feb. 252.
------- Women workers, private employment, to
receive pay equal to pay of men (law of 1943).
1944— June 1247; 1946— Sept. 387.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Death and dis­
ability benefits; 1947 changes. 1947— Oct. 417.
---------------- Provisions summarized, 1943 and 1946.
1943— Oct. 729-748; 1947— Apr. 685.
------- ------- Second-injury fund, and other provi­
sions, 1943 and 1945. 1943— Sept. 544-546;
548-549; 1945— Aug. 287; 1946— Jan. 61.
West Virginia. Health and safety, 1949 act to
control occupational diseases and health hazards.
1950— Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind. 1942— Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation, provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 1941— Sept. 633.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability benefit
and medical services. Increase in duration of.
1946— Jan. 63-64.
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
1943— Oct. 729-748.
----------------Second-injury fund law amended, 1947;
special reserve fund established. 1947— Sept.
284, Oct. 415.
Wisconsin. Child labor, 1949 amendments. 1950—
Jan. 43, Feb. 131.
------- Closed-shop contracts. Regulation of, under
Employment Peace Act (1939). 1947— June 1059.
------- Cooperatives providing funeral service. Re­
strictions imposed by 1943 law. 1944— Mar. 556.
-------Discrimination. 1945 law providing for study
and recommendations. 1946— Feb. 253.
---------------- Racial or other; in employment. 1945
law prohibiting, provisions. 1945— Nov. 991.
-------Domestic service. Minimum-wage order, 1932,
for full- and part-time workers. 1946— June 931.
------- Employment Peace Act, Closed-shop provi­
sions, modified, 1943. 1943— Oct. 780.
------- Health and safety, 1949, provision of lunch­
rooms. 1950— Jan. 43.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1947 law regulating.
1947— Sept. 280.
-------Labor relations. Employment Peace Act, 1945

amendment.

1945— Nov. 985.

------- ------- Run-off elections authorized, 1947
amendment to act. 1947— Sept. 282.
------- Medical examination required for employ­
ment, 1949, cost of. 1950— Jan. 45.
------- Minimum-wage orders. Canning or first
processing of fruits and vegetables, 1942. 1943—
Mar. 449.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- ------- Coverage and rates, 1941; overtime
rates, 1947-48 revision. 19 U1— Sept. 576; 19 U —
S
Sept. 276-277.

------ Public utilities. 1947 law regulating disputes
in. 19 U7— Sept. 279, 281.
------- ------- Rural electrification cooperatives cov­
ered by labor disputes law. 1950— Jan. 44.
------- School attendance, compulsory 1949. 1950—
Jan. 43.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind; and degree of
exemption for cooperatives. 19 U — Apr. 981.
S
------Unemployment compensation. Provisions,
basic theory, and connection with employment
stabilization. 19 U1— Apr. 890-895, Sept. 633.
------- Wage deductions. Explanation required to be
furnished, 1945 law. 19 U — Feb. 252.
S
------- Workmen’s compensation.
Disability and
death benefits and funeral allowances. 1945 and
1947 changes. 19 U Jan. 63-64; 19U7— Oct. 417.
S—
------- ------- Provisions in effect September 1943.
19U Oct. 729-748.
S—
------------------ Temporary disability benefit increased,
1943. 19U
S— Sept. 546.
Wyoming. Health and hygiene. Industrial hygiene
service to be created by board of health. 1945
law. 19U6— Feb. 251.
------- Rest periods, women workers, 1949 act.
1950— Jan. 43-44, Feb. 131.
------- Safety and health of workers. State depart­
ment of public health, functions of, 1947 law.
19U7— Sept. 283.
------- Taxes (corporation), kind in effect. 19 U —
S
Apr. 981.
------- Unemployment compensation. Provisions as
of Aug. 1, 1941. 19U1— Sept. 633.
----- Wage payment, prompt, to employee leaving
service, 1945 law. 19U6— Feb. 252.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Disability and
death benefits, 1945 provisions and 1947 changes;
medical service and second-injury fund, 1945
provisions. 19 U — Jan. 61-64; 19U7— Oct. 4 1 7 S
418.
----------------Provisions enacted in 1943, and in effect
September 1943. 19U — Sept. 548, Oct. 729-748.
S
Legislation, foreign countries:
Antigua. Labor relations, minimum wage, employ­
ment of women and children, recruitment of
workers, and workmen’s compensations. Sum­
mary of provisions. 19U2— Apr. 909-915.
Argentina. Bank employees. Act of Sept. 10, 1940,
salary scales, working conditions, dismissal
causes, and administration. 19U1— Jan. 143-145.
------- Buenos Aires. Family allowances. Order of
Dec. 23, 1937, covering employees of munici­
pality. 19U — Aug. 276
S
------- Cooperatives. Provision of Land Settlement
Act, August 1940. 19U1— Apr. 812.
------- Employment agencies. ILO convention ratifi­
cation Sept. 28, 1933, and laws of 1934 and 1943.
Provisions. 19US— Nov. 946-949.
------- Family allowances. Banks. 1940 law, provi­
sions. 19U — Aug. 270, 273.
S
------- ------- Decree of July 3, 1943. Provisions.
19U — Nov. 983.
U
------ ------ Railway men. Decree of July 3, 1944,
provisions. 19U — Nov. 945.
S
------- Minimum wage. See Minimum wage, foreign
countries.
------- Minors, employment of. Decrees of Aug. 24,
1943, and Sept. 13, 1943. Provisions. 19U —
U
Mar. 576.
------- Santa Fe Province. Minimum-wage rates
for 1941-42, agriculture. 19U — Mar. 772-773.
S
-------Social services. Resolutions of National LowCost Housing Commission, Oct. 31, 1942, pro­




115

viding certain benefits for residents. 1 9 US—
Sept. 508-509.
-------Textile-trade schools. Creation of authorized
by 1942 law. 1 9 UU— Jan. 111-112.
-------Vacations with pay. Laws of 1934, 1940, 1944,
and 1945. Provisions. 1 9 U5— Dec. 1185-1186.
Australia. Absenteeism. Regulation covering, and
amendment, 1942. 1 9 US—-Jan. 31.
------- Employment controls during World W ar II
and in postwar period. Summary. 1 9 US— Jan.
13, 20.
------- Family allowances. Child-Endowment Act,
assented to, Apr. 7, 1941, and effective July 1,
1941; amended June 30, 1942; act of June 1945;
provisions. 19U 1 — Sept. 718-719; 19U S — Aug.
267; 1 9 U5— Nov. 932-934.
-------Invalidity and Old Age Pensions Act of 1945,
provisions. 1 9 US— Jan. 66.
------- Labor organization. Laws of 1927 and 1939,
provisions. 1 9 US— Mar. 628-629.
-------National Security Act of 1939-40, provisions;
regulations Dec. 16, 1940, covering arbitration
of industrial disputes. 1 9 U1— Apr. 827-829;
1 9 US— Mar. 617-618.
------- National Security (Employment of Women)
Regulations. Reference to by judge in wage
decision, Aug. 17, 1942. 1 9 U — Jan. 53-55.
S
------- National Security (Employment) Regula­
tions, effective Dec. 13, 1940, provisions. 1 9U 1 —
Sept. 609, 610.
------- New South Wales. Strikes by coal miners
prohibited by July 25, 1942, regulation. 1 9 US—
Nov. 925.
------- ------- Vacations with pay. Annual Holidays
Act of 1944, provisions. 1 9 U5— June 1267-1268.
------- Rent-control regulations effective July 1945,
summary of provisions. 1 9 U5— Nov. 912.
------- Servicemen. Regulations providing for mora­
torium on rents and mortgages for mobilized
men. 1 9U 1 — Jan. 93-94.
------- Social insurance (unemployment, sickness,
invalidity, old age). Provisions enacted in 1945.
19U 6 — Jan. 65-66.
------- Unemployment and Sickness Benefits Act of
1944. Contributions and benefit rates, 1945 pro­
vision. 1 9 US— Jan. 65-66.
------- Veterans. Amendment Apr. 1, 1943, to Sol­
diers Repatriation Act of 1920. Provisions.
1 9 UU— Oct. 760, 762.
------- ------- Benefits, summary of provisions, by
kind. 1 9U 5 — Nov. 900-909.
------- ------- National Security (Reinstatement in
Civil Employment) Regulations (Statutory Rules
1939), amendment to. Provisions. 1 9 UU— Oct.
762-763.
-------Wage adjustments. National Security (Eco­
nomic Organization) Regulations amended, 1945.
Provisions. 1 9 U5— May 1016-1017.
------- Wage-pegging regulations, summary of pro­
visions and amendments. 1 9 US— June 1204-1205.
------- Wages and hours. 1942 rules and regulations
providing for control of. 1 9 US— Jan. 28-31.
------- Women workers. Act of 1942 to encourage
and regulate employment. 1 9 US— Apr. 671-673.
---------------- Wartime. Laws of March, October, and
December 1942, and March 1943. Provisions.
1 9 UU— Jan. 69.
Austria. Associations Act of 1867, provisions.
1 9 U8— Sept. 245-246.
------- Collective agreements, February 1947 act;
provisions. 1 9 US— Sept. 246.
------- Nationalization law, issued July 1946; de­
lays in application and reasons; industries desig­
nated for. 19US— Sept. 248.

116

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. c.— Continued
Austria. Wages and prices during German occupa­
tion and after liberation, summary of measures,
agreements, and laws affecting control. 1948—
Jan. 24-27.
------- Works councils. Laws of 1919 and July 1946,
and 1947 act, provisions. 1946— Nov. 702-703;
1948— Sept. 244, 246.
Bahama Islands. Labor relations, labor contracts,
cash payment, minimum wage, employment of
children, labor recruitment. Summary of provi­
sions. 1942— Apr. 909-913.
Belgium. Employers’ organizations. Dissolution
1942, by order of German occupational forces.
1944— Feb. 291.
------- Employment agencies. Status 1918-40, and
orders under German occupational forces. 1944—
Feb. 285-286.
------- Employment-regulation order of June 21,
1941. Provisions. 1942— Jan. 218-219.
------- Employment services, postwar reorganiza­
tion. 1947— Dec. 684.
------- Family allowances. Laws of 1928, 1930, 1937,
and 1944. Provisions. 1943— Aug. 268; 1944—
Feb. 288; 1945— Nov. 938.
------- Hours of work and holidays. Laws of 1921,
1935, and 1936; regulations, 1942, by German
occupational forces; and decree of April 1945.
Provisions. 1944— Feb. 280, 289-291; 1945—
Aug. 238-239.
------- Hygiene and safety. Decree of Feb. 11, 1946,
provisions. 1946— July 31-32.
------- Industrial disputes. Conciliation and arbitra­
tion law of 1926; right to strike abrogated and
penalties imposed, 1942, by German occupational
authorities. 1944— Feb. 292.
------- Joint industrial councils authorized and
placed under national law, by June 9, 1945
decree. 1945— Dec. 1169-1170; 1946— July 32.
------- Labor control, emergency. Mobilization law
passed June 16, 1937. 1946— Feb. 191.
------- Labor organizations. Legalized in 1921; dis­
solution, 1942, by German occupational forces.
1944— Feb. 291.
------- Low-wage workers. Fund for financing of
clothing and household equipment, to be created
by payroll tax on employers. 1946— Mar. 475476.
------- Manpower. Measures taken by German oc­
cupational forces, 1940-42. 1944— Feb. 284-286.
---------------- Mobilization, labor and industrial. 1945
law and decrees, provisions. 1945— Aug. 239.
-------Maritime service. Decree-law of May 12, 1945,
creating pool of seamen and officers. 1946—
July 27.
------- Mines, National Mixed Commission on. Law
of 1920 creating; laws of 1936, 1938, and 1945
extending powers. 1945— Aug. 239.
-------Minimum wage. Home work. 1934 law. 1944—
Feb. 289.
------- Mining (coal). Welfare. Social-security pro­
visions of September 1944. 1946— June 862-863.
------- Overtime. 1921 law and October 1942 order
by German occupational forces; provisions.
1944— Feb. 290.
------- Price-fixing program established by Jan. 22,
1915, decree. 1946— July 30.
------- Public works. Decree of Aug. 31, 1945, provi­
sions for national and local investments. 1946—
Feb. 204.
-------Social insurance. General, merchant seamen’s,
and miners’ systems. 1944 and 1945 laws. 1945—
July 67-71.
------- ------- Old-age, death, sickness, invalidity,
maternity, seamen’s, widows’ and orphans’,




unemployment, workmen’s compensation. Laws
passed 1884-1943. 1944— Feb. 289, 294-297.
------- Social security. Benefits increased by decrees
of Jan. 30 and Feb. 5, 1945; postwar reequip­
ment of workers and their households provided
by Nov. 15, 1945, decree. 1946— July 31.
------- Supervision of industry and agriculture.
Measures by German occupational forces to
secure control, 1940-42. 1944— Feb. 297-298.
------- Unemployment compensation (including re­
taining plan). Decree-law of May 26, 1945.
Provisions. 1945— Nov. 949-952.
------- Vacations with pay. 1936 law and 1938
amendments. 1944— Feb. 288-289.
------- Wages. Increases prescribed by Sept. 14*
1945, decree. Provisions summarized. 1946— Mar.
475-476.
--------------- Orders, 1940-42, by German occupational
forces. 1944— Feb. 290-291.
------- ------- Regulation of May 29, 1941, order.
1942— Jan. 218.
------- ------- Stabilization agreement of May 1940
and law of April 1945, provisions. 1945— Aug.
238.
------- Workmen’s compensation. 1903 law and 1931
amendments. Provisions. 1944— Feb. 297.
-------Work spreading. Decree issued jointly May 7,
1941, by Ministries of Labor, Interior, Economic
Affairs, and Finance. 1941— Oct. 899-900.
Bermuda. Labor regulations issued under Emer­
gency Powers Defense Acts of Great Britain.
1942— Apr. 908.
Bolivia. Family allowances for bank employees.
Decree providing for. 1945— Nov. 945.
-------Labor code raised to status of law, 1942, with
temporary amendments in re dismissal, work­
men’s compensation, and strike prohibition.
1943— Apr. 732-733.
------- Mining industry. Wages increased to com­
pensate for rise in prices in company stores.
June 20, 1940, decree. 1941— Oct. 991.
------- Retirement (salaried employees) under labor
code, made compulsory at 65 by Nov. 23, 1943,
amendment. 1944— May 1027.
Brazil. Child labor. Law of Sept. 13, 1941, amend­
ing previous legislation, provisions. 1 9 4 2 — Jan.
72.
------- Cooperatives. Restrictions imposed by 1932
act counteracted by 1938 decree; 1939 decree
establishing special government section. 1941—
Apr. 812.
------- Enemy-alien employees. Decree-law of Sept.
1, 1942, ordering suspension. 1942— Dec. 11551156.
------- Family allowances. Decrees of Nov. 10 and
23, 1943. Provisions. 1944— Nov. 983-984.
------- Health (or sickness) insurance. Decree o f
June 19, 1939, and orders of Aug. 30, 1940, and
Feb. 6, 1941. 1941— June 1428-1431.
------- Hours. 10-hour working day (with overtime
payment for time in excess of 8 hours) author­
ized by decree-law Aug. 31, 1942. 1942— Dec.
1283.
------- Minimum-wage rates. Order of Jan. 8, 1943,
increasing rates established by May 1, 1940,
decree-law. 1943— Mar. 592.
------- Planning Commission, National Economic.
Installed Oct. 3, 1944, under decree of May 8,
1944. Functions and organization. 1945— A ug.
260-261.
------- Price control. Order of Jan. 8, 1943. Provi­
sions. 1943— Mar. 610-611.
------- Social insurance. Membership, continuation
after leaving company under which protection

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
began, decree-law of Feb. 7, 1940. 1941— Jan.
123-124.
------- Social security. Organic law of May 7, 1945.
Provisions. 1945— Sept. 475-476.
------- Textile industry. Decree-law of July 13,
1944, provisions. 1944— Oct. 752-753.
------- Trade schools in factories. Decree-law of
May 2, 1939, subsequent regulations, and decree
providing for. 1941— Feb. 388.
------- Wage increases to be considered allowances,
under decree-law of Nov. 10, 1941. 1942— Jan.
219.
------- Wartime and postwar controls. Law of Nov.
10, 1943, providing for establishment of Na­
tional Council of Industrial and Commercial
Policy. 1944— Mar. 566.
British Empire. See various countries composing.
British Guiana. Labor relations, hours of work,
safety and health, and workmen’s compensation.
Summary of provisions. 1942— Apr. 909-915.
British India. Mining (coal). Welfare. Ordinances
of Jan. 31, 1944. Provisions. 1946— June 864.
British Malaya. Collective-bargaining right estab­
lished, and other provisions of 1940 trade-union
law. 1944— Aug. 291.
------- Industrial-dispute, industrial-courts, and
arbitration laws enacted in 1940 and 1941.
1944— Aug. 279, 291.
------- Labor code, 1923, provisions on hours, night
work, women, and children. 1944— Aug. 289-290.
------- Mui-tsai registration ordinance of 1932.
1944— Aug. 290.
------- Wage ordinance issued by Japanese Occupa­
tion authorities, August 1943, 1944— Aug. 294.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Provisions of law
passed in early 1930’s. 1944— Aug. 292.
Bulgaria, Alien workers. Employment restricted,
Aug. 27, 1936, law. 1943— Oct. 676.
------- Arbitration courts provided for by Apr. 12,
1925, law. 1943— Oct. 682-683.
-------Civil Mobilization Act of May 4, 1940, provi­
sions. 1941— Jan. 92.
------- Collective agreements. Control established by
Sept. 5, 1936, law. 1943— Oct. 682.
------- Cooperatives. Measures of 1934, provisions.
1943— Oct. 683-684.
------- Employment agencies. 1925 law providing
for establishment and control. 1943— Oct. 676.
-------Family allowances. Act effective Aug. 4, 1942,
provisions. 1943— Aug. 268-274, Oct. 679-680.
------- Hours of work. Legal provisions of 1919,
1933, 1935, 1939, and 1940. 1943— Oct. 680.
------- Labor control. Compulsory labor-service laws
of 1920 and 1922; civilian registration for work,
1940. 1943— Oct. 681-682; 1946— Feb. 190.
------- Labor organizations. Laws of 1934, 1935, and
1941, Government supervision under, provisions.
1943— Oct. 680-681.
-------Social insurance. Compulsory, salaried and
professional workers. Law of Jan. 17, 1941,
provisions. 1941— Nov. 1206-1207.
------- ------- General system; old-age, disability,
death, and unemployment, compulsory system.
Provisions of various laws (1924-41) summa­
rized. 1943— Oct. 684—
§88.
------- Strikes and lock-outs prohibited by decree of
Sept. 22, 1936. 1943— Oct. 682.
-------Unemployment. Laws of 1935, and 1936,
provisions. 1943— Oct. 675-676.
------- Wage regulation, wartime, laws of 1940 and
1941, provisions. 1943— Oct. 679.
Canada. Accident compensation. Government Em­
ployees’ Compensation Act extended to trainees.
Provisions. 1941— Oct. 960-961.




117

-------Butter rationing, order effective Dec. 21, 1942,
provisions. 1943— Feb. 257.
------- Child care, daytime, to aid wartime working
mothers. Order in council, July 20, 1942. 1943—
Sept. 505.
------- Coal mining. Wartime measure to obtain
needed workers, May 17, 1943. 1943— July 34-35.
------- Coal operations, World W ar I period. Direc­
tor given control by 1917 order. Provisions.
1941— -July 80-81.
-------Collective-bargaining rights. Crown-company
employees, Dec. 1, 1942, order giving. 1943—
Mar. 474-475.
----------------Restored for certain working conditions,
Feb. 15, 1946. 1946— Mar. 401.
------- Conciliation and strike restriction. Laws and
orders covering, 1906-43, review of. 1944— Mar.
525-528.
------- Credit unions. Enabling legislation, 1932 and
1937, by Provinces. 1941— Sept. 656-657.
------- Demobilization problems. Special Cabinet
committee provided for, by December 1939 order.
1944— July 98.
------- Employment control through public offices.
1942 and January 1943 orders. Provisions.
1943— May 896-900.
------- Employment controls. Wartime. Orders effec­
tive Mar. 23, 1942, summary of provisions;
removal of, by order in council Dec. 21, 1945.
1942— May 1087; 1946— Mar. 400.
---------------- World W ar II and in postwar periods.
1946— Jan. 13, 20.
------- Employment transfer orders, compulsory.
Provisions put in effect August and September
1943. 1943— Dec. 1128-1129.
------- Enticement of skilled labor from war indus­
tries prohibited by Nov. 7, 1940, order-in-council.
1941— Jan. 97.
------- “ Essential services.” Nov. 13, 1940, order
giving new definition. 1941— Jan. 96.
------- Essential work. Employment in, compulsory,
instead of military service, provided by Apr. 12,
1943, order. 1943— June 1095-1096.
---------------- Transfer of workers to, orders of May
4, May 15, and June 17, 1943, provisions. 1943—
Aug. 241-243.
------- Family Allowances A ct of August 1944,
effective July 1, 1945; provisions. 1944— Nov.
996-997; 1945— Nov. 934-936.
------- “ Freezing” of workers on jobs. Order effec­
tive Sept. 20, 1943. Provisions. 1944— Jan. 70.
-------Hiring. Orders of June 20, 1940, and June 12,
1942 (through public employment exchanges).
Provisions. 1941— Apr. 838; 1942— Aug. 228229.
------- Home Improvement Loans Guaranty Act of
1936. Operations up to discontinuance of plan
on Oct. 31, 1940, summary. 1941— Jan. 98.
------- Hours limitations. Exemption from provided
by order-in-council. 1941—-Jan. 97.
------- Housing (Dominion) A ct of 1935 and Na­
tional Housing Acts of 1938 and 1944. Provi­
sions summarized. 1945— Mar. 585-589.
-------Industrial Disputes Investigating Act. Amend­
ments. Summary of provisions. 1941— Aug. 472,
Nov. 1155-1156.
---------------- Extended (Nov. 7, 1939) to apply to
all war production industries; principles of
wartime wage policy established under. 1940—
Jan. 44; 1941— Feb. 332-333, June 1391, Aug.
472, Nov. 1155-1156.
------- Industrial relations. National Emergency
Transitional Powers Act continuing wartime
regulations enacted December 1945. 1945— Mar.
401.

118

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. e.— Continued
Canada Interdepartmental Committee on Labor Co­
ordination. Oct. 25, 1940, order-in-council estab­
lishing. 1941— Jan. 95-96.
-------Labor Exit Permit Order, Oct. 16, 1942. Pro­
visions. 19U — May 898-899.
S
------- Labor relations. Amendment to provide for
appeal to National W ar Labor Board. 1942—
Feb. 392.
------- ------- Wartime. Regulations, Feb. 17, 1944.
Provisions, and effect upon prior laws. 1944—
Apr. 751-756; 1945— May 1044.
------- Minimum-wage rates. Government contracts
May 30, 1941, order-in-council increasing. 1941—
Aug. 366.
---------------- Made applicable to all persons em­
ployed by Government contractors, Oct. 15, 1941,
order. 1942— Jan. 54.
------- Munitions plant (Hamilton), controller ap­
pointed. Provisions of order. 1941— July 80.
------- Nonessential work. Employment of certain
groups or classes prohibited, Apr. 12, 1943,
order. 1943— June 1095-1096.
------- Ontario. Collective-bargaining law of Apr.
14, 1943, provisions. 1943— July 58-59.
------- Postwar period. National Emergency Transi­
tional Powers Act, December 1945. Provisions.
1945— Mar. 399-400.
-------Price and wage controls. Wartime. Orders in
council, January and February 1946, relaxing
restrictions. Summary of provisions. 1945— Mar.
400.
---------------- Wartime and postwar. Legislation pro­
viding. 1947— Oct. 426, 429-430.
------- See also Wages Control Order, this section.
------- Price control. Price-regulation order ef­
fective Nov. 17, 1941, provisions. 1941— Dec.
1394-1396.
---------------- W ar Measures Act of 1914, and orders
in council of 1939, 1940, 1941, and 1943. Pro­
visions. 1945— Aug. 243-254.
---------------- Wartime Prices and Trade Board pow­
ers extended by Aug. 29, 1941, orders. 1941—
Nov. 1154-1155.
------- Rationing orders covering tea, coffee, sugar
(May 19 and June 16, 1942), and gasoline (Feb.
19, 1941); provisions. 1942— Aug. 283-284.
------- Rehabilitation of discharged and demobilized
soldiers. Cabinet committee constituted. 1941—
Jan. 96.
------- Restricted-occupations order, 1942.
Pro­
vision. 1943— May 896.
------- Salary control. Amendment of Dec. 21, 1944,
easing restrictions to permit correction of
“ gross inequities.” 1945— Apr. 798-799.
------- Salary stabilization and cost-of-living bonus
extended to officials above rank of foreman,
Nov. 27, 1941, order. 1942— Jan. 52-53.
------- Saskatchewan. Departments of Labor, Co­
operation and Cooperative Development, Social
Welfare, and Reconstruction and Rehabilitation
established, by special session of legislature,
1944. 1945— Jan. 131.
---------------- Farm Security Act of 1944. Objectives.
1945— Jan. 131.
------- ------- Government enterprise. Natural Re­
sources Department Act, 1944 amendment. Pro­
visions. 1945— Jan. 131.
---------------- Health plan provisions of 1944. 1945—
Jan. 131.
---------------- Minimum-wage provision of 1944 (for
eight principal cities). 1945— Jan. 129.
------- ------- Trade-Union Act of 1944. Provisions.
1945— Jan. 129, 130.




---------------- Vacations with pay. Provision of 1944.
1945— Jan. 130-131.
------- Selective Service Civilian Regulations issued
Jan. 19, 1943, provisions. 1943— Apr. 673-677,

May 896-897, 900.
------- Selective Service Regulations, National, ef­
fective Sept. 1, 1942; P. C. 7595 issued Sept. 1,
1942. 1942— Oct. 722-725; 1943— May 896, 899.
------- Stabilization of Employment in Agriculture
Regulation, 1942 (P.C. 2251). 1943— May 896,
899.
------- Unemployment insurance. Law of August
1940, effective July 1, 1941; temporary exten­
sion, order of Jan. 7, 1942. Provisions. 1941—
Sept. 641-643; 1942— July 45-46.
------- Veterans’. Affairs. Government department
established by June 30, 1944, act; reemployment
and reinstatement, Aug. 1, 1942, act and Sept.
7, 1939, order; Post-Discharge Reestablishment
Order of 1941; Veterans’ Land Act of 1942.
Summary. 1944— Sept. 544-547.
------- ------- Benefits, provisions, summarized by
kind. 1945— Nov. 900-909.
------- Wage rates. Order in council restricting.
1941— Dec. 1392-1394.
------- Wage stabilization.
Cost-of-living bonus
made part of basic wage (effective Feb. 15,
1944) under December 1943 order; previous
wartime measures cited. 1944— Jan. 69-70.
------- W ar Labor Board, National. Reorganization,
February 1943, and objectives. 1 9 4 3 — May
911-912.
------- Wage policy, wartime, set forth in Dec. 16,
1940, order. 1 9 4 1 — June 1391-1393.
-------Wages and cos1>-of-living bonus order, war­
time, extended to smaller employers by Dec. 5,
1941, order. 1942— Feb. 391-392.
------- Wages Control Order, wartime, July 1942.
Equal pay for equal work, ruled under pro­
visions of. 1942— Dec. 1160-1161.
------- ------- 1943, amended Mar. 13, 1944. Pro­
visions. 1944— May 998-1000.
---------------- Wage and cost-of-living bonus pro­
visions summarized. 1 9 4 2 — Sept. 466-472.
Chile. Conciliation and arbitration. High Labor
Council reestablished by Oct. 2, 1942, decree.
1943— Oct. 718.
------- Working day, continuous, provided for by
law effective June 1, 1942, certain cities. 1943—
Oct. 718.
------- Cooperatives. Act of Oct. 17, 1925, develop­
ment under. 1941— Apr. 812-813.
------- Economic Powers Act of Dec. 23, 1943. Pro­
visions. 1944— Apr. 792-795.
------- Family allowances. Acts of Feb. 5, 1937,
and Sept. 12, 1941, and decree of June 24, 1944.
Provisions. 1943— Aug. 270, 273; 1945— Nov.
945.
---------------- Railway men. Order of Dec. 10, 1943,
effective Jan. 1, 1944. Provisions. 1944— Nov.
984.
------- Insurance Fund, compulsory. Laws of 1924
and 1938.
Provisions, and operation under,
1938-41. 1 9 4 4 — May 1009-1010.
------- Preventive-medicine services.
Laws and
decrees of 1938 and 1939, provisions. 1941—
Feb. 381-384.
------- Right of assembly in camps or towns of
mining companies. Decree of Oct. 21, 1942.
1943— Oct. 719.
------- Salary increases automatic. Sept. 11, 1942,
modifying and extending previous law. 1943—
Oct. 718.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Social security. 1942 measures summarized.
1942— Oct. 719.
------- Unemployment benefits. Decree of Jan. 12,

1943,

provisions. 1943— Dec. 1174.

China. Factory law of 1929, provisions. 1945—
Jan. 32-33.
------- Labor control, wartime, instituted by law
(Free China). 191*6— Feb. 208.
------- Labor Disputes Act. Amendments of Mar.
31, 1943, summary of provisions. 1944— Feb.
353-354.
------- Labor laws since 1926, general summary.
191*1— Feb. 322.
------- Labor-union law of 1929, provisions. 191*5—
Jan. 33.
------- Land act of 1930, and need of additional
measures. 191*3— Sept. 494-495.
------- Manpower control and prohibition of strikes
and lock-outs by National General Mobilization
Act, effective May 5, 1942. 191*3— July 35-36.
------- National General Mobilization Act, pro­
visions. 191*5— Jan. 34-35.
------- Technicians and skilled workers, control of
employment. July 9, 1943, regulations. 191*4—
Apr. 757.
Colombia. Arbitration, compulsory, of industrial
disputes, decree of July 28, 1944, requiring.
1944— Oct. 796.
-------Cooperatives. Provisions concerning. 191*1—
Apr. 813.
------- Family responsibilities listed as base for
difference in wage, 1945 labor law. 191*5— Nov.
945.
------- Labor law of 1945. Provisions covering em­
ployment contracts, hours, weekly rest, wages,
workers’ organizations, industrial disputes, labor
courts, welfare in private industry (temporary
provisions), education, public employees’ bene­
fits. 191*5— Aug. 293-297.
------- Land purchase by tenants. Decree of Oct.
4, 1944, provisions. 191*4— Dec. 1169.
------- Price and other economic controls provided

for, Mar. 2, 1943, law. 1943—July 40-41.
-------Wage differentials, approved bases for, Labor
Law of 1945. 1945— Nov. 945.
Costa Rica.
Medical examinations made com­
pulsory for domestic workers, by May 7, 1941,
decree. 1941— Aug. 444-445.
------- Minimum-wage rates, by Province, industry
and occupation, set by Aug. 7, 1944, decree.
1945— Apr. 857-859.
------- Social guaranties provided by constitutional
amendment, July 7, 1943; fair labor standards
and social insurance features. 1943— Dec. 1175-

1176.
------- Social insurance. Compulsory and voluntary.
November 1941 law, provisions. 1942— Aug.
239-240.
Cuba. Home work by women. Regulations of May
3, 1945. Provisions. 1945— July 119-120.
------- Industrial disputes. Arbitration, compulsory,
established by Dec. 10, 1941, decree. 1942— Feb.

430-431.
------- Minimum wage. Construction workers. Order,
Aug. 11 1944, by National Minimum Wage
Commission. 1944— Oct. 848.
---------------- Decrees of Nov. 7, 1941, and Apr. 21,
1942, and later measures. 1942— June 14071408; 1945— Jan. 163-164.

------ Port work, Havana. Rotation provided by
decree of May 5, 1942, and earlier legislation
affecting. 1942— Aug. 229-230.

------ Sugar workers’ retirement fund.
1941,

Mar. 21,

law and Nov. 16, 1943, regulations.
visions. 1944— Mar. 569.




Pro­

119

------- Trade-union federations and confederations,
juridical personality for. Apr. 9, 1943, decree.
1943— Dec. 1188-1189.
------- Wage increases. General, Aug. 19, 1944,
decree. 1945— Jan. 163-164.
------- ------- Government employees and national
police, Jan. 30, 1942, decree. 1942— Apr. 1019-

1020.
----------------Workers subject to social-welfare laws,
1941 decrees. 1942— Mar. 769.
Czechoslovakia. Family Allowance Act of Dec.
13, 1945. Provisions. 1946— Aug. 247.
------- Labor controls, German, during World W ar
II. Summary. 1946— Feb. 190.
------- Labor participation in management. Status
in 1946. 1946— Nov. 701-702.
------- Labor service, compulsory, introduced by
September and October 1945 decrees. 1946—
Feb. 200-201.
------- Works councils. 1920 and 1921 laws and
October 1945 decree, provisions. 1 9 4 6 — Nov.
701-702.
Denmark.
Conciliation and arbitration.
1934,
1940, and 1945 laws. Provisions. 1944— Nov.
955; 1946— Aug. 234.
------- Employment agencies, public. 1921 act es­
tablishing. 1944— Nov. 949.
------- Overtime restriction, 1937 act. Provisions.
1944— Nov. 952-953.
------- Public works. May 1940 and April 1941
laws, provisions. 1944— Nov. 948-949.
-------Social insurance (sickness, invalidity, oldage, unemployment, industrial injuries). Peo­
ples’ Insurance Act, effective Oct. 1, 1933, pro­
visions. 1944— Nov. 957-961.
------- Unemployment. Emergency act of 1933, pro­
vision. 1944— Nov. 949.
------- Vacations with pay. 1938 law, provisions.
1944— Nov. 953.
------- Work sharing. Provisions of May 1940 law.
1944— Nov. 948; 1946— Feb. 191.
------- Workmen’s compensation. May 1933 act,
provisions. 1944— Nov. 960-961.
Dominican Republic. Employment contracts. June
16, 1944, law regulating. 1944— Nov. 10131016.
------- Vacations, paid. Mar. 17, 1941, law, pro­
visions. 1941— June 1434-1435; 1942— Feb. 462.
Ecuador. Cooperatives. Nov. 19, 1937, act, pro­
visions. 1941— Apr. 814.
------- Road work compulsory for men between
ages 21 and 50 under Executive decree (June
15) and Road Conscription law effective Aug.
1, 1944. 1944— Nov. 962-963.
------- Wage increases, decrees effective Oct. 1,
1943, provisions; minimum-wage orders issued
1939-42. 1944— Feb. 400-401.
Egypt. Labor contracts. May 10, 1944, law ef­
fective Aug. 15, 1944. Provisions. 1 9 4 4 — Oct.
810-811.
— r- Trade-unions. Sept. 6, 1942, law authorizing
organizations. Provisions. 1943— Sept. 534-535.
------- Workmen’s compensation law effective Dec.
10, 1942. Provisions summarized. 1943— Apr.
692.
Eire. Children’s Allowance Act, 1944. Summary
of provisions. 1944— Nov. 985.
------- See also Ireland, this section.
El Salvador. 8-hour law of 1927 (commercial
employees) strengthened by Aug. 7, 1941, law.
1941— Oct. 992.
Europe.
Collective
agreements.
Enforcement
measures in France, Netherlands, and Scan­
dinavian
countries.
Summary.
1947— June
1026-1028.

120

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. c.— Continued
Europe. Labor participation in management. Laws
since World W ar II and earlier, in Austria,
Czechoslovakia,
Finland,
France,
Germany,
Hungary, Italy, Poland. Summary. 1946— Nov.
697-705.
Finland. Family allowances. 1943 law and Jan.
I, 1946, amendment, provisions. 1944— Nov.
985; 1946— Aug. 247-248.
------- Labor control. 1939 and 1942 laws, pro­
visions. 1946— Feb. 190.
-------Production committees provided for by June
21, 1946, law. 1946—-Nov. 700-701.
------- Wage-control measures of October 1942 and
July 1943, provisions. 1944— June 1199-1200.
France. Civil Service and State establishments,
Sept. 14, 1941, law regulating employment in.
194^— Jan. 130—
133.
------- Collective agreements. 1919 laws amended
by 1936 Popular Front law. Provisions. 1944—
Oct. 721-722.
------- Compulsory labor service, Sept. 4, 1942, law.
1945— Jan. 33.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. 1919 and 1936
laws. 1944— Oct. 706, 723-724.
------- Employer organizations. See Labor and em­
ployer organizations, this section.
-------Employment agencies. 1904, 1925, 1939, 1940,
and 1943 laws. Summary of provisions. 1944—
Oct. 711-712.
------- Employment services, postwar reorganiza­
tion. 1947— Dec. 684.
------- Family allowances. Laws of 1932, 1937-38,
1940-43; family code of July 29, 1939; Labor
Charter of Oct. 4, 1941; orders issued in 1944
and 1945. Provisions summarized. 1943— Aug.
268-274; 1944— Nov. 985-987; 1945— Nov. 939940.
---------------- Rate increased by Oct. 17, 1944, ordi­
nance. 1945— May 1077.
------- Hours of work. Law of 1936 (Popular
Front), and later laws prior to and during
World War II. 1944— Oct. 705, 712, 718-720.
---------------- Mines and quarries. July 18, 1941, de­
crees increasing. 1941— Nov. 1287.
------- Housing. Reconstruction of buildings de­
stroyed in war, and slum clearance (in Paris).
Oct. 11, 1940, laws. 1941— May 1186.
------- ------- Temporary controls provided by Oct.
I I, 1945, law. 1946— Feb. 235-236.
------- ------- W ar damage compensation to owners
provided for, 1940-44. 1946— Feb. 234.
------- Industry committees with labor representa­
tion authorized, Nov. 30, 1945, decree. 1946—
Nov. 699.
----- - ^ Labor and employer organizations. Pro­
visions of Labor Charter, made effective by
Oct. 4, 1941, decree. 1944— Oct. 721.
---------------- Unoccupied France. Aug. 16, 1940, de­
cree authorizing dissolution by decree; and
Nov. 9, 1940, decrees dissolving certain employer
organizations and the Confederation Generale
du Travail. 1941— Jan. 98-100.
-------Labor Charter made effective by Oct. 4, 1941,
decree— general regulations, classification of in­
dustries, syndicates, unions, and federations,
industrial and professional social committees,
wage provisions, jurisdiction, and transitory
provisions. 1942— Feb. 397-403.
------- Labor controls instituted. Provisional Gov­
ernment measures in 1944 and 1945 summarized.
1946— Feb. 199.
------- ------- Vichy Government measures in 1941,
1942, and 1943; removal of certain measures,
Provisional Government ordinances in July and
September 1944. 1946— Feb. 191, 193, 199.




------- Labor-management committees provided for
by Feb. 2, 1945, act. 1945— 5 uly 92-93.
------- Labor representatives included in councils
under nationalization laws covering credit (Dec.
2, 1945), gas and electricity (Apr. 8, 1946),
and insurance (Apr. 25, 1946). 1 9 4 6 — Nov. 699.
------- Labor requisitioning, July and November
1938 measures. 1946—-Feb. 191.
-------Loans for small businesses, to ex-prisoners of
war, deported persons, and refugees of French
nationality, provisions of Oct. 5, 1945, ordinance.
1946— Mar. 401.
------- Marriage bonus to women workers resigning
at marriage, Oct. 11, 1940, law. 1941— May
1186.
------- Military census requiring report upon em­
ployment and occupational qualifications. Jan.
10, 1945, decree. 1946— Feb. 204.
------- Minimum wages. Measures from 1915 to
1943 summarized. 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 717-718.
Vichy Government decree Feb. 16, 1944,
establishing; Provisional Government (Algiers)
enabling ordinance, Aug. 24, 1944; a fterLiberation ordinance (Sept. 14, 1944) granting
increases. 1945— May 1076-1077.
-------Multiple employment and overtime prohibited,
Oct. 11, 1940, act. 1941— May 1185.
------- Nationalization.
Automobile industry, by
January 1945 order. 1946— Nov. 697.
--------------- Coal fields of northern region, December
1944 order; and “ combustible mineral” mines,
May 18, 1946, law. Provisions. 1946— Nov.
697, 699.
------- ------- Credit. Dec. 2, 1945, measure. Pro­
visions. 1946— Nov. 699.
------- Reconstruction of wrecked buildings and
other war damage. Laws enacted during war
and after liberation. 1945— Nov. 925-929.
------- Reemployment of ex-servicemen, prisoners,
deportees, and other war victims. May 1, 1945,
decree, provisions. 1945— Oct. 730-731.
------- Retraining, occupational, of ex-servicemen,
repatriated prisoners, deported or displaced, and
similar, persons. May 1, 1945, decree, summary
of provisions. 1946— Jan. 80-81.
------- Social insurance, compulsory. Law of 1930
and changes in 1936, 1938, and 1942. Provisions.
1942— Sept. 479-481; 1944— Oct. 706.
------- ------- State-controlled economy, Aug. 16,
1940, decree, provisions. 1941— Jan. 9S-100.
------- Veterans’ demobilization benefits. Ministerial
decision June 22, 1945, provisions. 1945— Dec.
1151.
------- Vichy Government. Laws announced void
Sept. 10, 1944, and Third Republic laws re­
stored Sept. 12, 1944. 1944— Oct. 706-707.
------- ------- Laws concerning employment, employ­
ment offices, minimum wage, vacation with pay,
labor charter, hours of work, industrial rela­
tions, social insurance, provisions summarized.
1944— Oct. 709-726.
---------------- See also Labor controls, this section.
------- Wage allowances, supplementary. May 23,
1941, decree provisions. 1941— Oct. 1027-1028.
------- Wage and price stabilization program 194647; legislation establishing and problems of
enforcement. 1 9 4 7 — Aug. 156-157.
------- Wage policies, wartime decrees affecting;
wage-increase laws of July 29, 1946, and Mar.
31, 1947. 1 9 4 7 — Aug. 154-157.
------- Wage stabilization, Nov. 10, 1939, and May
31, 1940, decrees. 1941— Oct. 1027.
------- Women workers, married. Employment re­
strictions against; pensions on retirement. Oct.
11, 1940, law. 1941— May 1185-1186.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Works committees. Feb. 22, 1945, ordinance
making creation mandatory. Provisions. 1946—
Nov. 697-699.
French Africa (except North A frica). Labor code
established by June 18, 1945, decree; provisions.
19^6— Jan. 90-92.
French Indo-China. Administrative posts. A p­
pointment of natives authorized in November
1943 decree. 1944— July 61.
------- Community-corporation system. December
1935 order strengthening. 1944— July 50-51.
------- Compulsory labor. February 1932 and May
1933 decrees restricting or prohibiting practice.
Provisions. 1944— July 53.
------- Employment of natives and of women and
children. Decree of January 1933 promulgated
August 1936. 1944— July 58.
------- Hiring of labor. Summary of measures to
control, prior to World W ar II. 1944—-July 5 4 56.
------- Hours of work. October 1936 law reducing,
and September 1939 decrees lengthening. Pro­
visions. 1944— July 57.
-------Industrial disputes. Conciliation and arbitra­
tion. Decrees of April 1930 and April 1932.
1944— July 59.
------- Minimum wage. December 1936 decree, pro­
visions. 1944— July 57.
------- Overtime. October 1939 decree prohibiting
payment of increased wage for. 1944— July 57.
------- Vacations with pay. October 1936 decree.
1944— July 58.
------- Women and children. Employment regulated
and night work prohibited, August and October
1936 laws. 1944-—July 58.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Sept. 9, 1934, and
Dec. 30, 1936, decrees. Provisions. 1944—
-July
59-60.
French North Africa. Labor, general summary
of laws affecting. 1948— May 861-864, 866-875.
Germany. Compulsory labor. Children in agri­
culture, Government regulation, 1941. 1941—
Sept. 612.
----------------Feb. 13, 1939, decree, provisions. 1946—
Feb. 190.
------- Cooperative associations, February 1941 de­
crees requiring transfer, and handing over of
assets and properties, to Labor Front. 1941—
Aug. 436-437; 1942— Sept. 559-560.
------- Family allowances. Child endowment. Law
and decree of Dec. 9, 1940, provisions. 1948—
Aug. 276; 1945— Mar. 510.
-----------------Laws of 1938, 1939, 1942, and 1943.
Summary of provisions. 1948— Dec. 1129-1130;
1944— Nov. 987-988.
---------------- System modified by ordinance effective
Jan. 1, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1289-1290.
------- Health (or sickness) insurance for socialinsurance pensioners. 1942— Feb. 445.
------- Hours of Labor Code of 1938, sanctioning
daily hours over 10, and results. 1945— Mar. 508.
------- Labor-mobilization measures. Decree of Jan.
13, 1943; conscription, 1943-45.
Provisions.
1948— Apr.
681-682;
1944— Nov.
968-970;
1945— Mar. 502-503.
------- Labor organizations. 1934 and 1935 laws
and decrees resulting in Labor Front. 1945—
Mar. 514-515.
-------Labor relations. Berlin, U. S. Zone, laws and
directives of Allied Control Council establishing
policy. 1948— Apr. 379-380, 382.
----------------Works Council Act of 1920 and Federal
labor courts law of 1926, provisions. 1945—
Mar. 516-517.




121

------- Manpower control. Decree of Nov. 7, 1936,
provisions and operations under to March 1942.
1 9 4 2 — Oct. 727-728.
---------------- Measures during period 1934-39 sum­
marized (Bloch). 1948— Jan. 10-15.
------- Sickness insurance for widows and orphans
of soldiers, Apr. 20, 1939, decree. 1945— Mar.
519.
------- Social insurance, summary, to World W ar II
period. 1 9 4 5 — Mar. 518-522.
------- W age deductions simplified by July 1, 1941,
order. 1 9 4 1 — Nov. 1288-1289.
------- Western Germany Four-Power, Land, bi­
zonal (1948-49), and Federal, legislation during
occupation,
1945-50,
summary
and
scope.
1 9 5 0 — Dec. 668-672.
------- Works councils. Background and provisions
of law No. 22 (Apr. 10, 1946) provisions of.
1 9 4 6 — Nov. 703-704.
Great Britain. Agricultural Wages Regulation
Act. 1944 increases granted under, in Scotland
and Northern Ireland. 1 9 4 5 — Apr. 795.
------- Canteens, factory. Order by Minister of
Labor and National Service, Nov. 11, 1940, pro­
viding for. 1 9 4 1 — Apr. 927.
------- Catering Wages Act of Apr. 20, 1943, pro­
visions and objective. 1 9 4 8 — July 42-44; 1 9 4 4 —
July 102.
------- Coal mining. Absenteeism. Coal-production
committees made responsible for dealing with,
Sept. 4, 1941, by order. 1 9 4 2 — Jan. 56-57.
----------------Essential Work Order of May 15, 1941,
provisions. 1 9 4 1 — Aug. 369-371.
------- ------- Levy placed on each ton of coal sold
for partial compensation of mines suffering loss
of markets, 1940 order. 1 9 4 1 — Mar. 593-594.
----------------Royalties, nationalization of, under 1938
law, effective July 1942. 1 9 4 2 — Nov. 941, 947948.
------- ------- Wartime labor conditions, measures
affecting, summarized. 1 9 4 2 — Nov. 941-950.
------- Colonial dependencies. Legal provisions re­
lating to trade-unions, minimum wages, cost
of living, industrial disputes, workmen’s com­
pensation, factories and shops, and wartime
measures, to 1942. 1 9 4 8 — Oct. 714-716.
------- Conditions of Employment and Arbitration
Order, July 25, 1940, creating tribunal for
wage-dispute settlements; employers to observe
terms and conditions of employment. 1 9 4 7 —
Sept. 290.
------- Control of Engagement Order, Oct. 6, 1947;
provisions; methods used in placing workers,
results. 1 9 4 7 — Nov. 568-569, Dec. 683-684.
------- Cooperatives. Various war measures affect­
ing. 1 9 4 2 — Sept. 551-555.
------- Defense Regulations, 1939. Essential work
order under, for building and civil-engineering,
June 9, 1941, provisions. 1 9 4 1 — Sept. 613-615.
---------------- Extended to colonies in 1939 and 1940.
1 9 4 4 — Aug. 284.
---------------- Powers given Minister of Agriculture;
price control measures under. 1 9 4 2 — Oct. 730,
733.
---------------- Statutory Rules and Orders, 1940,
amending; terms. 1941— May 1080.
------- Distribution of Industry Act, 1945, pro­
visions. 1 9 4 5 — Dec. 1148-1149; 1 9 4 9 — Mar. 279.
------- Dock Labor
(Compulsory Registration)
Order, June 18, 1940, provisions. 1 9 4 1 — May
1081.
------- Education Act of Aug. 3, 1944. Provisions;
school-leaving age raised under. 1 9 4 4 — Dec.
1238-1239; 1 9 4 8 — Aug. 120.

122

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. c.— Continued
Great Britain. Emergency Powers (Defense) Acts,
September 1939 and May 1940, provisions and
regulations under; influence upon effectiveness
of earlier emergency legislation. 1 9 4 1 — May
1079-1080; 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 74.
------- Employment control. A ct of 1939, provisions
and orders under; measures adopted 1939-41.
1939— Dec. 1374-1376; 1 9 4 1 — M a y 1079-1080;
1942— Mar. 596-604.
------- ------- Control of Employment (Directed
Persons) Order, effective May 8, 1943. 1 9 4 3 —
July 23-24.
---------------- Control of Engagement Order, effective
June 4, 1945. Provisions. 1945— Sept. 437-439.
---------------- Control of Engagement Order, October
1947.
Net increase in employment under, Oc­
tober 1947-October 1948, other results. 1 9 4 9 —
Mar. 280.
---------------- Period between completion of military
operations in Atlantic and Pacific areas. Sum­
mary of laws to be applied. 1 9 4 5 — Jan. 45.
------- ------- Registration for Employment Order,
December 1947. Success of, obstacles to en­
forcement. 1949— Mar. 280.
---------------- Wartime acts 1941-43, provisions sum­
marized. 1943— July 20-24.
---------------- Wartime controls curtailed by measure
of Dec. 20, 1945. Provisions. 1946— Mar. 402.
---------------- Women. Various acts 1941-43, applica­
tion, and provisions summarized. 1 9 4 2 — Feb.
387-388, Apr. 916-917; 1943— July 21-25;
1944— Jan. 74-75.
------- ------- World W ar II and postwar periods.
Summary. 1946— Jan. 11-13.
------- Engineering and certain other classes of
works, General Emergency Order, June 1940.
1942— Jan. 137.
------- Essential Work Orders, 1941. Building and
Civil Engineering.
Provision for production
bonus. 1942— Aug. 362-363.
------- ------- General Provisions. Provisions and
amendment summarized. 1 9 4 1 — May 1085-1086,
Nov. 1160-1164.
---------------- Merchant Navy and Coal Mining. Pro­
visions. 1 9 4 1 — Aug. 368-371.
------- Evacuated Persons Registration Order, 1940,
effective Sept. 18, 1940, covering unemployed
evacuated workers; provisions. 1 9 4 1 — Jan. 101.
------- Factories Act. Wartime adherence to re­
quirements, importance of. 1 9 4 3 — Jan. 76-79.
------- Factories Order, 1940. Medical and Welfare
Services. Expansion of, 1942, under. 1 9 4 4 —
Jan. 98.
------- Factories Regulations, Standards of light­
ing. Effective Feb. 1, 1941. 1 9 4 3 — Jan. 77.
------- Family Allowances Act, June 1945. Effective
August 1946; amounts payable after August
1946; Jan. 25, 1946, regulations, provisions
summarized. 1945— Nov. 931-932; 1946— Aug.
248; 1947— Sept. 287; 1948— Aug. 119.
------- Food control. Essential Commodities Re­
serves Act, 1938, and Acquisition of Food
(Excessive Quantities) Order, 1939. 1942— Oct.
729-730.
------- Health. See National Health Insurance, this

section.
------- Holidays with Pay Act of July 29, 1938.
1938— Oct. 769-770; 1944— Oct. 850.
-------Hours of Day Work in Factories (Women
and
Young Persons) Order of Jan. 23, 1942.
Provisions. 1942—June 1331-1332.
------- Hours of work. Measures enacted and ef­
fective in 1942. 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 99.




------- Housing. Laws enacted, August and Oc­
tober 1944 and June 1945. Provisions. 1 9 4 5 —
Oct. 740-741.
------- Industrial Injuries Act, effective July 1948.
Provisions. 1948— Aug. 119.
------- Industrial Organization and Development
Act of 1947, work authorized under. 1948— Oct.
370.
------- Industrial relations.
Laws applicable to
situation in dockers’ strike, 1945, and plan
adopted for settlement. 1946— Mar. 433.
------- Lighting in work places. Regulations issued
Jan. 14, 1941, fixing minimum standards. 1941—
Apr. 925-926.
------- Local authorities. Retention of employees,
provision in Sept. 9, 1941, order. 1941— Dec.
1405.
------- Manpower and womanpower. Conscription
of, National Service (No. 2) A ct of 1941; op­
eration of various acts covering. Provisions.
1942— F e b. 385-386, Dec. 1134-1141.
------- Medical service in factories. Ministry of
Labor and National Service order of July 16,
1940, provisions. 1941— Apr. 922-924.
------- Merchant Navy. Essential Work Order ef­
fective May 26, 1941. Provisions. 1941— Aug.
368-369.
------- Mining Industry (W elfare Fund) Act of
1943, provisions; Proposed Coal Nationalization
Bill, status May 20, 1946. 1944— Apr. 765766; 1946— June 864.
------- National Assistance Act, effective July 1948.
Provisions. 1948— Aug. 119-120.
------- National Health Insurance, Contributory
Pensions, and Workmen’s Compensation Act,
1941. Provisions. 1941— Oct. 910-912.
------- National Health Services Act, 1946. Pro­
visions. 1948— Aug. 120.
------- National Insurance Act, effective July 1948.
Provisions. 1948— Aug. 119.
------- National Service Acts, 1939, 1941 (compul­
sory recruitment for civil-defense work), and
1942; provisions. 1941— June 1393-1394; 1944—
Jan. 73-74.
-------Northern Ireland. Agricultural Wages (Reg­
ulation) Act of 1939, effective Oct. 7, 1940.
Provisions. 1941— Mar. 718-719.
------- Old-Age and Widows’ Pensions Act. Regula­
tions adopted July 29, 1942, increasing rates
under. 1942— Oct. 744.
------- Personal Injuries (Emergency Provisions)
Act, 1939. Sex discrimination feature eliminated
by Government, April 1943. 1943— May 908910.
-------Possessions of, with American naval bases.
Labor provisions summarized. 1942— Apr. 907916.
------- Price Control Act of July 22, 1941; pro­
visions. 1941— Nov. 1159-1160.
------- Railways. Essential work order promulgated,
effective Oct. 9, 1941. 1942— Jan. 55.
------- Registration for Employment Order, 1941.
Application and provisions; employment of
women. 1942— Feb. 387-388; 1944—Jan. 75.
------- Registration of workers. Various acts 193943, provisions summarized. 1 9 4 3 — July 20-21,
23.
------- Registration orders, 1941: civil defense, ship­
building, and fire-prevention workers; and em­
ployment. 1941— May 1083-1085.
------- Restriction on Engagement order of June
1940. Application in mobilization management.
1944— Jan. 74-75.
------- Scotland. Agriculture declared “ essential

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
work” by Oct. 2, 1941, order. 1941— Dec. 1405.
------- Sick leave. Civil-defense full-time (paid)
volunteers granted pay for, by regulation ef­
fective June 1, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1208.
------- Strikes and lock-outs. Defense (General)
Regulation IA A adopted Apr. 17, 1944. 1944—
June 1200.
------- Trade practices. Restoration of prewar act,
1942. Provisions. 1942— June 1829-1331.
------- Unemployment assistance. Allowance rates.
Increased by regulations July 29, 1942, under
1934 and 1939 acts. 1942— Oct. 744-745.
--------------- Means test, decree, Mar. 26, 1941, chang­
ing. 1941— June 1431-1433.
------- Unemployment insurance. Extended to tem­
porary officers in Armed Forces (and certain
others) by Dec. 15, 1942, regulations. Provisions
summarized. 1948— Apr. 693.
----------------Increase of Benefit Act of Oct. 26, 1944.
Provisions. 1945— Apr. 809-810.
------- Union registration and financial reports.
Requirements regarding. 1947— June 1056.
------- Vacations with pay. Trade Boards orders
providing for. 1945— Feb. 310.
------- Veterans’ benefits, provisions summarized
by kind. 1945— Nov. 900-909.
------- Wage laws in effect prior to World W ar II.
Summary. 1947— Sept. 290.
------- Wage regulation. Trade Boards Acts, pro­
visions, 1944, and industries covered. 1944—
Oct. 848-850.
-------Wages Councils Act, March 1945. Replacing
prewar Trade Board A cts; paid vacations in
substandard industries. Provisions. 1945— July
120-123; 1947— Sept. 291; 1948— Aug. 119.
------- W ar Damage Act of 1941. Compensation
for air-raid or other losses due to enemy action.
Provisions. 1941— Aug. 371-373.
------- Welfare provisions of Factories Order of
1940. 1945— Sept. 480.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Cotton-mill asth­
ma (byssinosis) victims, Nov. 20, 1940, act.
1941— Mar. 629-630.
------- ------- Lung diseases from dust inhalation
(including silica-dust or asbestos-dust fibrosis,
or any form of pneumocomiosis) covered by Feb.
4, 1943, amendment. 1948— May 908.
------- ------- Payments under 1925 act increased
temporarily; Royal assent, Nov. 11, 1943. Sum­
mary of provisions. 1 9 4 4 — Feb. 345-346.
---------------- Rates and list of diseases compensable
under August 1940 law as amended. 1941—
Sept. 543-645.
Greece. Collective agreements. Legislation en­
acted 1914-38, provisions. 1948— Aug. 226.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. Law of Nov.
16, 1935, provisions. 1948— Aug. 227.
------- Cooperatives. Laws enacted 1914^39, sum­
mary. 1948— Aug. 228-229.
------- 8-hour day. Laws enacted, 1920-37, pro­
visions. 1948— Aug. 223-224.
------- Labor organizations. Laws enacted, 1914-42,
provisions. 1948— Aug. 225-226.
------- Seamen. Social insurance for (including war
risk). Various laws, 1926-42, provisions. 1948—
Aug. 230-231.
------- Social insurance. Laws of 1934 and 1939,
provisions. 1948— Aug. 229-230.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Law of Dec. 31,
1914, provisions. 1948— Aug. 232.
Guatemala.
Minimum wage, factory workers.
Decree of July 27, 1943, provisions. 1948—
Nov. 970.




123

Haiti. Minimum-wage law of May 4, 1942. Pro­
visions. 1943— Mar. 593.
------- Social Security. Bureau of, established by
May 15, 1943, decree. 1948— Aug. 277.
Honduras. Cooperatives. Decree of Feb. 28, 1936,
provisions. 1941— Apr. 814.
Hungary. Agriculture. Wage rates, legal pro­
visions 1921-41. 1948— June 1077.
------- Employer organization. Laws of 1868, 1884,
and June 10, 1932. Provisions. 1948— June
1080-1081.
------- Family allowances. Law of 1938, effective
Jan. 1, 1939. Provisions. 1948— June 1076, Aug.
268-269.
------- Labor control. Decrees of May 1944. 1944—
Aug. 304-305.
------- Labor organization, right of. 1919 law.
1948— June 1079.
------- Labor regulations. Conditions of Employ­
ment Act, 1937, provisions. 1948—June 1082.
------- Land reform. Measures of 1920 and 1936,
summary of provisions. 1948— June 1070.
------- Seamen’s Code, 1934. Provisions. 1948—
June 1085, 1088.
------- Social insurance. Legal provisions concern­
ing, 1891 to 1942, summarized. 1948— June
1084-1088.
------- Unemployment. Measures to remedy con­
ditions following 1929 economic depression.
1948— June 1073.
------- Wages (minimum) and hours. Summary of
measures, 1921-41. 1948— June 1077-1079.
------- Works councils. Decree of February 1945,
provisions. 1946— Nov. 701-702.
Iceland. Compulsory paid vacations. Feb. 26,
1943, law. 1945— Jan. 95.
India. Coal Mines Labor Welfare Ordinance of
1944. Provisions. 1944— June 1193.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. Laws enacted
in 1929, 1934, 1938, and 1942, summary of pro­
visions. 1948— Sept. 459, 461.
------- Housing.
Land Acquisition Act of 1894
amended, objectives. 1948— Oct. 697.
------Maternity-benefit measures enacted by
various Provinces, since 1929. 1948— Sept. 4 68469.
------- Mines Act, 1923. Exemption, wartime, of
coal mines in Central Provinces from provisions
prohibiting employment of women. i94U— Jan.
61.
------- Plantation law of 1863, factories law of
1881, and subsequent labor laws, to 1942. Sum­
mary of provisions. 1948— Sept 456-459.
------- Rent Control Order of 1939, amended Jan.
24, 1944, provisions. 1944— June 1192.
------- Safety. Factories Act of 1881 and later
measures; 1923 Mines A ct; provisions. 1948—
Sept. 467-468.
------- Trade Disputes Act of 1929. Probability (as
of April 1945) of amendment of law. 1945—
Nov. 973-974.
------- W ar Injuries (Compensation Insurance) Act,
effective Nov. 16, 1943. Provisions. 194U— June
1194.
------- Wartime labor measures. Technical Per­
sonnel and Essential Services (Maintenance)
ordinances, and Defense of India rules. Pro­
visions summarized. 1948— Sept. 458-459.
Iran. Labor law of 1946. Provisions; decree of
May 1946, putting into effect, pending sub­
mission of Parliament. 1946— Sept. 367-368.
Ireland. Industrial Relations Act, September 1946.
Provisions. 1947— May 864-867.

124

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. c.— Continued
Ireland. Profits and wages. Emergency order (No.
83) of May 1941, restricting. 1941— Oct. 992994.
------- Trade-Union Act of 1941, summary of pro­
visions. 1942— May 1159-1161.
------- Unemployment, intermittent, building indus­
try, insurance against provided for by 1942 act.
1942— Dec. 1167.
------- See also Eire, this section .
Italy. Agricultural land distributed to workers.
Decree of Oct. 19, 1944, provisions. 1947— Sept.
336-337.
------- Agriculture. Tenant's share in crop, and
tenure of lease. October 1944 and April 1945
decrees. 1945— Nov. 923-924.
------- Child labor. Laws of April 1934 and July
16, 1940, provisions. 1948— Nov. 919.
------- Compulsory labor. Decree of February 1942,
provisions. 1942— May 1091.
------- Cost-of-living bonuses. Measure of Novem­
ber 1944, to provide. 1945— May 1013.
-------Dismissal of workers banned by August 1945
decree. Operations under to 1947. 1947— Sept.
336.
------- Employers exempted from certain labor re­
strictions by July 16, 1940, act. 1941— May
1159-1161.
------- Employment agencies. Decrees of Mar. 29,
and Dec. 6, 1928, provisions. 1948— Nov. 921.
------- Family allowances. Laws of 1936, 1937, 1940,
and 1941; decrees of 1944 and 1945; provisions.
1943— Aug. 268, 269-275, Nov. 922-923; 1945—
May 1013, Nov. 941-942.
------- German-controlled section. Nationalization
of industry, Feb. 12, 1944, decree. 1944— Dec.
1162-1163.
------- Hours of work. Laws of 1923 and later
years, summary of provisions. 1943— Nov. 924926.
------- Labor mobilization. Wartime standards set
by act of May 24, 1940; controls issued in 1941
and 1942. 1946— Feb. 190.
------- Land allocation, from uncultivated private
and confiscated Fascist properties. Oct. 6, 1944,
decree. 1945— May 1012.
------- Land settlement and migration. Apr. 9,
1931, law. 1943— Nov. 920.
------- Recreation. Decree of 1925 creating “ Dopolavoro.” 1943— Nov. 929-930.
------- Social insurance. Decree of Oct. 4, 1935,
and amendments to August 1941; provisions.
1943— Nov. 927-928.
------- Social-security measure, postwar period.
Provisions summarized. 1946—June 925-927.
------- Veterans. Employment of. February 1946,
decree, to promote. 1947— Sept. 337.
------- Wages. Laws of 1936, 1940, and 1941 affect­
ing, summary of provisions; November 1944,
decree increasing. 1943— Nov. 922-923; 1945—
May 1013.
------- Woman workers. Laws of 1934, 1936, and
1940; provisions. 1943— Nov. 919-920.
------- Workmen's compensation. Decree of Aug.
17, 1935, and amendments; provisions. 1943—
Nov. 928-929.
------- Works committees provided for by Fascist
decree of Feb. 12, 1944. 1946— Nov. 700.
Jamaica. Labor contracts, hours of work, wage
claims, minimum wage, employment of women
and children, recruitment of workers, safety and
health, and workmen's compensation. 1942—
Apr. 910-915.
Japan. Constitution of May 3, 1947, article 22;
provisions. 1949— Jan. 47.




-------Cooperative law of 1900 and subsequent laws.
1945— Oct. 663-665.
------- Education. Children required by law, up
to 1937, to attend school 6 years. 1945— Oct.
654.
------- Employment agencies. Brought under State
control by March 1938 law. 1945— Oct. 655.
---------------- Public system based on ILO standards;
Employment Security Law; articles 44 and
45, effective Mar. 1, 1948, providing; results.
1949— Jan. 47—
48.
------- Employment-separation allowances, law ef­
fective Jan. 1, 1937. Provisions. 1945— Oct. 668.
------- Factory Act. 1911 provisions; limits on
working time not provided except for women
and children. 1945— Oct. 660; 1947— Feb. 250.
------- Family allowances. Orders and regulations
of 1939 and 1940. 1943— Aug. 271, 273.
------- Health Insurance Act of 1938, providing for
health cooperatives. 1945— Oct. 665-666.
------- Industrial centralization. Major Industries
Association Ordinance of 1941.
Provisions.
1945— Oct. 661.
------- Industrial disputes. Public Peace Police Act,
at opening of twentieth century; Labor Dis­
putes Conciliation Act of 1926; provisions.
Public Corporation Labor Relations Adjustment
law, 1949-50. 1945— Oct. 652, 662-663; 1950—
Oct. 448.
------- Labor Mobilization Ordinance, effective Mar.
10, 1945. Summary of provisions. 1945— June
1212-1213.
------- Labor registration, required by Government
orders, 1939, and later labor-control measures.
1945— Oct. 659-660.
------- Labor Relations Adjustment Act, placing
responsibility for settling disputes, act and en­
forcement ordinance. 1949-50 revisions. 1947—
Feb. 242-243; 1950— Oct. 448.
------- Labor standards, 1949-50 revisions in legis­
lation and administration. 1950— Oct. 448-449.
------- Life insurance. Post-office system, 1916 law.
Provisions. 1945— Oct. 667.
------- Mining Act of 1905, and Regulations for
Employment and Relief of Miners, 1916. 1945—
Oct. 660.
------- Mobilization Act of 1938, National General,
and subsequent wartime measures summarized.
1946— Feb. 208-209.
------- Protective laws for labor, need of. 1947—
Feb. 250-252.
------- Rest days (two per month) compulsory for
women and children under early factory law;
extended to men by 1939 law. 1945— Oct. 659.
------- Sickness insurance. Laws of 1934, 1935, and
1939. Provisions. 1945— Oct. 666.
------- Tenancy Disputes Conciliation Act of 1924.
1945— Oct. 663.
------- Trade-Union Act, establishing right of or­
ganization and collective bargaining. Enacted
1945, in effect, Mar. 1, 1946. Revisions, 1949-50.
1947— Feb. 242, 244; 1950— Oct. 448.
------- Unemployment compensation extended, 194950 to casual workers. 1950— Oct. 448.
------- Wage-control measures, 1939 and 1941. Pro­
visions. 1945— Oct. 658.
------- W ar Measures Act, Extraordinary, of June
23, 1945. Provisions. 1945— Aug. 254-255.
------- Workmen's compensation.
Laws enacted
from 1905 to 1937, provisions. 1945- Oct. 667.
Korea, South. Labor legislation and standards,
1945. 1949— Apr. 405.
Latvia. Family allowances. May and December
1939 laws. 1948— Aug. 270, 272.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Luxemburg.
Minimum-wage
rates
fixed
by
grand-ducal decree of Dec. 30, 1944. 1945—
June 1285.
Manchuria. “ Cooperative promotion law” of 1940
passed by Japanese, and destructive effect of.
1942— Sept. 556-557.
Mexico. Collective agreements. Provisions in 1917
Constitution, regulations, and amendments; and
in 1931 Federal Labor Law. 1944— Feb. 356358.
------- Cooperatives. Law of Jan. 11, 1938, pro­
visions. 1941— Apr. 814-875.
------- Industrial development in Federal District,
provisions of decree to encourage. 1945— Jan. 73.
------- Labor-contract law, effective June 6, 1945.
Provisions. 1945— Sept. 536.
------- Minimum wage. Rates established by Sept.
23, 1943, decree. 1945— Dec. 1221-1223.
------- Price control. Decrees, 1941, 1942, and 1943,
provisions. 1943— Aug. 247-248.
------- Rent control. Decree of July 10, 1942, pro­
visions. 1943— Aug. 249.
------- Strike-control law of 1941, provisions. 1941—
June 1480-1481.
Netherlands. Agricultural Crisis Act of Aug.
13, 1933. Provisions. 1944— Jan. 39.
------- Agriculture. Subsidies to growers or ex­
porters of farm commodities, special laws early
in 1930,s. 1944— Jan. 38.
------- Aliens, regulation of employment. 1934 law
and 1935 amendment. 1944— Jan. 36.
------- Collective agreements. Laws affecting, 1927
to 1939, including acts concerning agriculture.
1944— Jan. 48-49.
----------------Wage and salary stipulations suspended
and prohibited by Nov. 28, 1940, ordinance
under May 18, 1940, decree during German
occupation. 1941— Mar. 595.
------- Compulsory labor and labor conscription.
German orders, 1941 and 1943; wartime decree,
1939. 1944— Jan. 39-40, 44.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. Laws of 1923
and 1933. Seamen, 1943 regulations by Government-in-exile.
Provisions. 1944— Jan. 49-50.
------- Cooperatives. Law of 1876, authorizing.
1944— Jan. 51.
------- Economic regulation. Constitution amended,
1938, to permit creation of regulatory bodies for
certain
professions,
trades,
or industries.
1944— Jan. 39.
------- Employment, distribution of. Law of May
28, 1937. 1944— Jan. 37.
------- Employment services, postwar reorganiza­
tion. 1947— Dec. 684.
------- Family Allowances Act of Dec. 23, 1939,
and order of Feb. 22, 1940. Provisions. 1943—
Aug. 268, 270, 272-273; 1944— Jan. 43.
------- German decrees and orders, following in­
vasion and occupation in 1940. 1944— Jan. 40,
44-45, 47-49, 53-54.
------- Home workers. Act of Nov. 17, 1933 (ef­
fective 1936) providing for wage regulations.
1944— Jan. 44.
------- Hours of work. 1919 act and 1922 amend­
ment. 1944— Jan. 45.
------- Industrial disputes. Laws of 1872, 1903, and
1923, provisions. 1944— Jan. 49-50.
------- Industrial Establishments Act, governmental
powers under. 1944— Jan. 39.
------- Labor and social conditions. Postwar decrees
issued in London, summary of. 1945— June
1214-1215.
------- Labor-control measures of December 1939,
June 1940, and October 1945. 1946— Feb. 191,

200.




., ; •

125

-------Labor service and labor front, Nazi-inspired.
Government-in-exile measures of 1944, provid­
ing for abolition. 1946— Feb. 199.
------- Mining (coal). Social-security provisions,
summary. 1946— June 865.
------- Monetary regulations promulgated in Sep­
tember 1936, resulting in currency devaluation.
1944— Jan. 41.
------- Overtime. Labor act of 1919, provisions.
1944— Feb. 45-46.
------- Rent control. Laws enacted, 1938 to 1941,
and wartime and postwar controls. 1946— Jan.
70.
------- Seamen. Compulsory service. Order affect­
ing, Mar. 11, 1942, by Government-in-exile.
1944— Jan. 39, 44.
------- ------- Vacations with pay. Provisions ef­
fective in 1937 (act of June 14, 1930). 1944—
Jan. 43.
---------------- “ Waiting pay” and allowances payable
to officers and ratings. Decree of Governmentin-exile, effective Jan. 1, 1943. 1944— Jan. 44.
------- Social insurance: sickness, invalidity, oldage, death, unemployment, industrial accident.
Laws covering, provisions summarized. 1944—
Jan. 53-57.
------- Trade-unions. 1855 and other laws, pro­
visions. German decree of May 1, 1942, impos­
ing the “ Labor Front.” 1944— Jan. 46-48.
------- Wages frozen May 17, 1940, by order of
German commissioner. 1944— Jan. 44-45.
------- Women and young persons, employment of.
Labor act of 1919, provisions. 1944— Jan. 46.
------- Workmen’s compensation. Provisions of laws
covering industry, 1901; agriculture, 1922; and
seamen, 1919 and 1930. 1944— Jan. 57.
Netherlands Indies. Child labor. Laws of 1926,
and 1930 (mining ordinance). 1944— May 987.
------- Collective agreements. Civil Code of 1847
and 1926 amendment. Provisions. 1944— May
989-990.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. Laws of 1937,
1939, and 1940. Provisions. 1944— May 989990.
------- Contract labor and forced labor, early pro­
visions and later measures to better conditions;
summary, years 1880 to 1941. 1944— May 976978.
----- Cooperatives. Measures of 1915 and 1925.
I P M -M a y 991.
— Unemployment, depression period. Measures
of 1932, 1935, and 1937, provisions. 1944—
May 981-982.
Wartime control measures, 1939, 1940, and
1941. Provisions. 1944— May 982-983.
------- Women’s work at night. 1926 law restricting.
1944— May 987.
------- Working conditions. Industrial Cooperation
Act of 1940, provisions. 1944— May 987.
------- Workmen’s compensation.
Ordinances of
May 1939 and September 1940 (seamen). Pro­
visions. 1944— May 991-992.
Newfoundland. Defense Regulations, adopted Oct.
23, 1941. Provisions. 1942— Mar. 633-634.
------- Regulations issued under Emergency Powers
Defense Acts of Great Britain; summary of
provisions covering labor relations, hours of
work, wage payment, safety and health, and
workmen’s compensation. 1942— Apr. 908-915.
New Zealand. Absenteeism. Penalties provided
for by Industrial Manpower Emergency Regu­
lations of 1942, not effective. 1944— June 1195.
------- Agricultural Workers Act of 1936. Pro*•. visions. 1945— Sept. 536-537.

126

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. c.— Continued
New Zealand. Conciliation and Arbitration Act of
1925, industrial, amended 1939, and 1943 to
strengthen protection of workers active in
unions against loss of jobs. 1942— Apr. 903;
Dec. 1202.
------- Economic Stabilization Emergency Regula­
tion of 1942. Amendments 1944 and 1945;
order effective Feb. 13, 1945; provisions. 1944—
Nov. 970; 191*5— Aug. 255-256.
------- Emergency Regulations. National Service,
June 1940; Order-in-council June 18, 1940,
under 1939 act; provisions. 191*1— Sept. 609,
611.
-------Employment Act of October 1945; provisions.
191*6— June 928.
------- Employment controls, during World W ar II
and in postwar period. 191*6— Jan. 13-14, 20-21.
------- Family allowances.
Social Security Act
(1938) effective Apr. 1, 1939; provisions liber­
alized in 1941, 1942, 1943, and 1944. 191*3—
Aug. 267, 276; 191*1*— Nov. 989-990; 191*5— Nov.
936-937.
------- ------- See also Social Security, this section.
------- Hours of work. Factories Act and Shops
and Offices Act amended Dec. 7, 1945. 191*6—
June 928.
------- Industrial Disputes Emergency Regulations
of 1942. Machinery established under. 1942—
Dec. 1189-1190.
------- Industrial Efficiency Act of 1936. Provisions.
191*2— Apr. 895-896.
------- Manpower controls. Orders issued in No­
vember 1942; Industrial Manpower Emergency
Regulations effective Feb. 14, 1944; provisions
summarized.
191*3— Jan. 33-37; 191*1*— June.
1200-1203.
------- Minimum-Wage Act (Dec. 7, 1945), pro­
visions. 191*6— June 927-929.
------- Minimum-wage increase provided by Feb. 2,
1944, amendment to New Zealand Economic
Stabilization Emergency Regulations of 1942.
19U — Apr. 860.
------- Mining. Coal Mines Act of 1925. Provisions.
191*6 — June 865-866.
------- Price, rent, and wage stabilization. Regula­
tions issued Dec. 15, 1942, amended Mar. 17 and
30, 1943, provisions. 191*3— Aug. 250-253.
-------Railways Act amended Apr. 4, 1944 (effective
Jan. 1, 1945) to provide Government Railways
Industrial Tribunal. 191*4— Aug. 356.
------- Rehabilitation Act of 1944, provisions.
1945— Jan. 64-69.
------- Social Security Act of 1938; 1940, 1941, and
1945 amendments, provisions. 1941— Dec. 14411442; 1946— June 928-929.
------- Vacations with pay provided for by 1944
law. 1944— Aug. 302.
------- Veterans. Benefits, provisions summarized
by kind. 1945— Nov. 900-909.
----------------Servicemen’s Settlement and Land Sales
Act, 1943, provisions. 1945— Jan. 67-68.
------- Wartime.
Compulsory service, manpower
control, training, hours of work, overtime and
holiday rates, arbitration. Laws enacted to
January 1942, provisions. 1942— Apr. 896-903.
Nicaragua. Cooperatives. Decree of Jan. 31, 1935,
provisions. 1941— Apr. 815-816.
Norway. Collective bargaining, wage agreements,
and provision for settling labor disputes. 1944
and 1945 measures summarized. 1945— Dec.
1173-1175.
------- Compulsory labor. Decree, Apr. 15, 1941,
introducing system similar to German system.
Provisions. 1941— Oct. 902.
, ** ••• **:




------- Conciliation and arbitration. Labor Dis­
putes Act, 1927; and 1944 Provisional Act.
Provisions. 1944— Sept. 508; 1946— Aug. 233235.
------- Control of engagements, 1947 law to insti­
tute; provisions and plans to administer. 1947—
Dec. 684.
------- Employment control. Closing enterprise on
quitting work without authorization, prohibited
by provisional edict in 1945, following liberation.
1946— Feb. 187, 200.
------- Employment exchanges. Designated to draft
labor under National Labor Contribution Law,
February 1943 (German occupational authori­
ties). 1944— Sept. 501.
------- ------- Order of October 1940 by German
occupational authorities. 1944— Sept. 506.
------- Employment of foreigners restricted by 1927
and 1932 acts. 1944— Sept. 500.
------- Family allowances. Decree of Jan. 26, 1944
(Quisling Government) ; Royal resolution of
July 20, 1945; provisions. 1944— Nov. 990;
1945— Nov. 942.
------- Fishermen’s accident compensation.
1920
law, provisions. 1944— Sept. 513.
------- Hours of work. Provisions of 1936 law.
1944— Sept. 505.
------- Industrial disputes. 1915 Labor Disputes
Act, 1927 amendment, and 1944 provisional act.
Provisions. 1945— Dec. 1174-1175; 1947— Sept.
340-343.
------- Labor-control measures of 1940 and 1942,
German. 1946— Feb. 191, 193.
------- Labor court established on basis of pro­
visions of 1915, 1927, 1931, and 1933 laws.
1944— Sept. 509.
------- Labor distribution. Regulations, Oct. 14,
1940, governing. 1941— Mar. 596-597.
------- Leaving jobs and discharge of workers,
without Government permission, prohibited (19
industries). Provisions of Mar. 27, 1941, decree.
1941— July 81—
82.
------- National Wage Board, established by 1944
provisional act.
Procedure outlined. 1945—
Dec. 1174-1175.
------- Old-Age Insurance Act of 1936. Provisions.
1944— Sept. 511.
------- Pensions Fund Acts. 1921 (State) and 1923
(State Railways). Provisions. 1944— Sept. 512.
------- Reemployment rights. Provisional act, 1944,
and provisional decree, 1945. Features sum­
marized. 1946— Jan. 71.
------- Seamen’s Accident Insurance Act of 1931,
provisions. 1944— Sept. 513-514.
------- Sickness insurance. 1930 compulsory act,
provisions. 1944— Sept. 510.
------- ------- Seamen’s. Provisions effective Jan.
1, 1942, formulated by Government-in-exile.
1944— Sept. 514.
------- Strikes prohibited by order of German occu­
pational authorities. 1944— Sept. 509.
------- Trade-unions. Organization and membership
information required under 1927 Labor Dis­
putes Act. 1944— Sept. 507.
------- Unemployment Insurance Act of 1938. De­
cree of Nov. 15, 1940, superseding law. Pro­
visions. 1941— Mar. 630-634; 1944— Sept. 512.
------- Unemployment reduction through public
projects. Dec. 2, 1940, decree. 1941— May 11871188.
------- Vacations with pay. 1936 law, provisions.
1944— Sept. 505.
------- Workmen’s compensation. 1931 act and 1942
temporary law, provisions. 1944— Sept. 512-514.
rPalestine. Labor, Department of. Established by

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Feb. 15, 1943, ordinance. 1943— May 912.
------- Manpower control. Defense (W ar Service
Occupations)
Regulations, 1942.
19£2— Dec.
1165.
Panama. Labor code, 1941, provisions. 1942—
May 1161-1169.
------- Social insurance (compulsory) for public
employees and certain private employees. 1941
law revised 1943, provisions. 1945— Apr. 811814.
Paraguay. Aliens, employment of. Restricted by
June 26, 1942, decree. 1942— Sept. 477; 1944—
Apr. 797.
------- Cooperatives. Provision concerning, in June
24, 1936, law. 1944— Apr. 799.
------- Employment agencies. Provisions concern­
ing, 1936 and 1937 laws. 1944— Apr. 799, 801802.
------- Factory inspection. Provisions concerning,
1936 and 1937 laws. 1944— Apr. 799, 801.
------- Family allowances. Dec. 24, 1937, decree
amending Dec. 9, 1927, decree. 1944— Nov. 990.
------- Health certificates. Sept. 22, 1938, decree.
1944— Apr. 797.
------- Health conditions in workshops. Provisions
of 1936 and 1937 laws. 1944— Apr. 799, 801,
------- Holidays with pay. Provision of June 24,
1936, law. 1944— Apr. 799.
------- Home ownership. Provision of June 24,
1936, decree. 1944— Apr. 799.
-------Hours of work. Laws of 1937 (effective Jan.
6, 1938) and Sept. 4, 1943. 1944— Apr. 797.
------- Housing. National Council created by June
23, 1941, decree. 1944— Apr. 797.
------- Industrial disputes. 1936 and 1937, laws,
provisions. 1944— Apr. 799-802.
------- Maternity leave for women workers. Pro­
vision of Dec. 9, 1937, decree. 1944— Apr. 797.
------- Miners. Pay and working conditions. Aug.
24, 1914, law. 1944— Apr. 797.
------- Minimum wage. Decree-law of Oct. 2, 1943,
provisions. Rates resulting from, 1944. 1943—
Dec. 1223-1224; 1944— Apr. 797; 1945— June
1285-1287.
------- National Labor Bureau Formulation, es­
tablishment, and functions, under 1936 and
1937 decree-laws. 1944— Apr. 797, 799-803.
------- Night work. June 24, 1936, decree. 1944—
Apr. 799.
------- Pay increases, employees in industry and
commerce. 1943-- Jan. 155-156.
------- Pensions and retirement. Railway workers.
Aug. 23, 1926, law. 1944— Apr. 797.
------- Public morality and good habits. Prevention
of conditions leading to decline. June 24, 1936,
decree. 1944— Apr. 799.
------- Rural workers, contracts. 1931 law. 1944—
Apr. 797.
------- Social Welfare Institute. Feb. 18, Oct. 25,
and Nov. 26, 1943, decrees. 1944— Apr. 797.
------- Training.
1931 laws and 1936 decrees.
1944— Apr. 797.
------- Unemployment. Provision of June 24, 1936,
decree. 1944— Apr. 799.
------- Weekly rest. June 7, 1917, law. 1944— Apr.
797.
------- Working conditions. 1914 law, 1928, 1936,
and 1937 decrees. Provisions. 1944— Apr. 796802.
-------Workmen’s compensation. 1927 law, and
1932 and 1943 decrees. 1944— Apr. 797-799.
Peru. Bonus, sliding scale, on salaries in effect
since Jan. 1, 1942. Decree of Oct. 14, 1944.
1945— Jan. 167.




127

------- Compulsory social-insurance system. Feb.
18, 1941, decree amending regulations. 1941—
Oct. 912.
------- Cotton-textile workers granted wage in­
creases (as from Aug. 1, 1940) by Nov. 6, 1940,
decree. 1941— Feb. 459.
-------Dismissal compensation. 1924 and 1943 laws;
1928 and 1929 resolutions. 1943— July 64-65.
------- Employees’ compensation. 1924 law and
1928, 1929, and 1943 amendments. 1943— July
64-65.
------- Minimum salary rates to meet rising cost
of living, 1944 decrees. 1945— Jan. 167.
------- Mines, safety and health requirement. Aug.
31, 1943, resolutions. 1944— Jan. 100-101.
-------Profit sharing. 1928 resolution and 1943 law.
1943— July 64-65.
------- Social insurance. Oct. 28, 1942, decrees ex­
tending coverage. Provisions in effect, 1945,
summarized. 1943— Sept. 512; 1945— July 55.
------- Working conditions. Provisions in effect
summarized, 1945. 1945— July 55.
Poland. Arbitration. Presidential decree of Oct.
27, 1933. Provisions. 1944— July 75-76.
------- Child labor. Provisions, 1924 and 1931 laws.
1944— July 70.
------- Collective agreements. German order of Oct.
31, 1939, concerning. 1944— July 75.
-------Hours and working conditions, 1918 to 1931
laws, provisions. 1944— July 69-71.
-------Labor control. Registration ordered by Octo­
ber 1945 decree. 1946— Feb. 201.
------- Labor inspection, under 1927 Presidential
decree. 1944— July 70—
71.
------- Labor organizations. Guaranties of freedom
to form given in 1921 and 1935 constitutions.
1944— July 73.
------- Labor recruitment. German decrees to com­
pel registration and labor service. 1944— July
69.
-------Labor relations, welfare, and social-insur­
ance laws, prior to World War II. Summary.
1944— July 62, 64, 68-78.
------- Paid vacation. Legal provision for, abol­
ished by German occupational authorities.
1944— July 70.
------- Social Insurance Act, 1933, adjusted by de­
cree, 1934. Provisions. 1944— July 76-77.
------- Works councils. Provisions of February 1945
decree. 1946— Nov. 701-702.
Portugal. Family allowances. Decrees of Aug.
13, 1942, February 1943 (amended January
1944), and April 1943. Provisions. 1943— Aug.
270-275; 1944— Nov. 990-991.
------- Hours of work. 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936
decree-laws. 1943— Apr. 790-791.
Rumania. Collective bargaining recognized, 1929.
1943— Dec. 1105.
------- Compulsory labor. 1941 law, provisions.
1943— Dec. 1108.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. 1920 act, pro­
visions. 1943— Dec. 1109.
------- Cooperatives. 1940, 1941, and 1942 laws, pro­
visions. 1943— Dec. 1111.
------- Family allowances. Office of Price Admin­
istration decision granting, effective July 1,
1944. Provisions. 1945— Nov. 942.
----------------Soldiers. Provisions of 1940 law. 1943—
Dec. 1107.
------- Social insurance. 1912, 1933, and 1938 laws.
Provisions. 1943— Dec. 1111-1114.
------- Vacations with pay. 1929 law, provisions.
1943— Dec. 1107.
------- “ Work and Joy Service,” 1940 act regulariz­
ing. 1943— Dec. 1108.

128

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Legislation, f. c.— Continued
Rumania. Work cards. 1941 decree ordering all
persons to carry. 19U6— Feb. 190.
St. Lucia. Minimum wage, employment of women
and children, workmen’s compensation. Sum­
mary of provisions. 19 U — Apr. 911-915.
%
South Africa, Union of. Cost of living. War
Measures of 1941 and 1942. Provisions. 19U —
S
Sept. 478-479.
------- Defense regulations, February 1941, pro­
visions. 19U1— Sept. 609-610.
------- Discharge of workers, provision restricting.
Factories Act of 1941. 19U1— Dec. 1464.
------- Factories Act of 1941, provisions. 19 Ul—
Dec. 1462-1464.
------- Hours of work. 1918 and 1941 laws. Pro­
visions. 19U1— Dec. 1463; 19U — Sept. 479.
S
------- Industrial Conciliation Act of 1937. Agree­
ment under, not revocable by Controller under
1941 regulations. 19U1— Sept. 610.
------- ------- 1942 supplementary war measure.
19U Sept. 476, 482-483.
S—
------- Price control. W ar measures of 1941 and
1942.
Provisions. 19U — Sept. 476-478.
S
------- Rent control. W ar Measure of August 1942.
19U — Sept. 477.
S
------- Self-governing Dominion constituted, British
laws of 1909 and 1910. Summary. 19U — Sept.
S
473.
------- Veterans’ benefits, provisions, summarized
by kind. 19U — Nov. 900-909.
S
Soviet Union. Changing jobs, prohibition of. De­
cree of June 26, 1940. 19U1— Mar. 608.
------- Demobilization. Decree of Sept. 25, 1945,
provisions. 19 U — Dec. 1152.
S
------- Employment controls during World W ar II
and in postwar period. 19U — Jan. 14, 21.
S
------- Family allowances. Edict liberalizing aid to
mothers. Decree of July 8, 1944. Summary of
provisions. 19U — Nov. 991-992; 19U — Nov. 943.
U
S
-------Foreman’s power in machine shops increased.
Decree of June 27, 1940. 19U1— Mar. 608-609.
------- Passports “ labor books,” additional require­
ments for. Decree of May 28, 1940. 19U1—
Mar. 610.
------- Rationing and return to single-price system
in elimination of, distribution of consumer
goods, Council of Ministers, decree, Sept. 16,
1946, (translation, text). 19U7— July 28.
------- Training. Boys of State labor reserve. De­
cree, Oct. 3, 1940. 19 Ul— Feb. 393-394; 19 U —
U
Jan. 112.
----------------Industrial, for youth; decrees providing
for, summary. 19 U7— Nov. 569-571.
------- Veterans. Law of June 23, 1945, covering
benefits and rights. Provisions. 19U — Sept.
S
465-466.
------- Wage reduction in sugar refineries failing
to meet quotas, Oct. 25, 1940, order prescribing.
19U1— Jan. 109.
Spain. Employment exchanges. Laws of 1931
and 1935, provisions. 19U — Dec. 1165.
U
------- Employment services. Private offices abol­
ished and State service established, by February
1943 law. 19U — July 45.
S
------- Family allowances. Increases and marriage
loans provided, by decree of Feb. 22, 1941.
19U1— Nov. 1291.
------- ------- Laws, decrees, and regulations of
1938-39 and 1940-43. Provisions. 19U — Aug.
S
270, 273, 275; 19UU— Nov. 992.
------- Rest day, weekly, law requiring payment
for. 19U1— Apr. 943.
------- Salary increase. Commercial employees, Dec.




26, 1940, order; certain other groups, manda­
tory increases. 19U1— Mar. 720, Apr. 942-943.
------- Social welfare funds, coal-mining regions.
Ministry of Labor order of February 1946. Pro­
visions. 19US— June 866-867.
Surinam (Dutch Guiana). Employment-contract
law, provisions. 19U — Mar. 577-578.
U
Sweden. Employment controls during World W ar
II and in postwar period. Summary. 19U —
S
Jan. 12, 14, 18.
------- Family allowances. Order of Apr. 17, 1940,
provisions. 19U1— Jan. 91-92.
------- Mediation. Law of 1920, provisions. 19U —
S
Aug. 233-235.
------- Price control, legislation to provide for,
1939; Price Control Act, 1941; provisions.
19U7— Oct. 434-435.
Switzerland. Compulsory labor. Decree of Sept.
18, 1942. Provisions. 19U2— Dec. 1166.
------- Employment controls during World W ar II
and in postwar period. 19U — Jan. 14-15, 21.
S
------- Family allowances for men in military serv­
ice. Dec. 28, 1940, orders. 19Ul— Nov. 11661167.
------- Housing. Federal subsidies provided for by
Oct. 5, 1945, ordinance. 19U — Feb. 236.
S
------- Unemployment. Subsidies to housing, for
creation of work, provided by Oct. 5, 1945,
ordinance. 19U — Feb. 236.
S
-------Vand, Geneva, and Fribourg Cantons. Family
allowance laws, provisions. 19U — Nov. 944-945.
S
Thailand. Aliens excluded from professions and
trades, June 10, 1942, decree. 19U — June 1177.
U
------- Social insurance. Civil Service and Pensions
Act, provisions. 19U — June 1177.
U
Trinidad. Labor relations, labor contracts, hours
of work, wage payment, minimum wage,
women’s work, recruitment of workers, safety
and health, and workmen’s compensation. Sum­
mary of provisions. 19 U — Apr. 910-915.
%
Turkey. Compulsory labor. Mines and public
works, established in Eregli Coal Basin, law
of 1940; transportation and lumbering, decree
of Sept. 27, 1941. 19U2— Feb. 403-404.
------- Family allowances. Public Health Act. Pro­
visions for assistance to large families. 19U —
S
Aug. 276.
------- Labor, Ministry of. Law of June 22, 1945,
defining scope and functions. 19U5— Sept. 505.
------- Land for distribution to farmers. Law of
June 11, 1945, provisions. 19U5— Oct. 759-761.
------- Workers’ and employers’ associations, Feb.
22, 1947, law; outline of purposes; interpreta­
tions of Minister of Labor. 19U7— Aug. 197198.
Union of South Africa. See South Africa, Union
of, this section.
Uruguay. Banks and similar institutions. Wage
increases and dismissal compensation, June 6
and Aug. 11, 1944, laws. 19U — Nov. 963-964.
U
------- Dismissal compensation. Law of June 6,
1944; provisions. 19U — Nov. 963-964.
U
------- Family allowances. Law of Nov. 12, 1943;
regulations issued May 17, 1944. Provisions.
19U — Feb. 346, Nov. 964, 994-995; 19U5— Nov.
U
946.
------- Minimum-wage boards. Law of Nov. 12,
1943. Provisions. 19U — Feb. 406-407, Nov. 963.
U
------- Packing-house industry. Minimum-working
month guaranteed for 100-day season following
wool clip, Dec. 26, 1941, decree. 19U2— May
1192.
------- Retirement benefits, domestic servants. July
22, 1942, decree-law. 19U — June 1116-1117.
S

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Rice-field laborers. Working and living
conditions established by Dec. 12, 1940, decree.
1941— Mar. 610-611.
------- Safety and health regulations, spinning mills.
Jan. 9, 1942, decree. 19£2— Apr. 993-994.
------- Unemployment compensation. Meat-packing
workers. Law of Dec. 12, 1944, provisions.
1945— July 72-74.
------- Wage increases, commercial firms. June 6
and 16, 1944, laws. 1944— Nov. 963-964.
Venezuela.
Baking and bus-transportation in­
dustries. Weekly hours fixed to combat unem­
ployment, June and July 1942, resolutions.
1942— Oct. 742.
------- Cooperatives. July 22, 1939, decree. 1941—
Apr. 816.
------- Labor conditions. Power to regulate given
by June 13, 1942, decree. 1942— Oct. 741-742.
------- Labor contracts, profit sharing, employers’
and workers’ organizations, and labor courts.
1936 labor law amended May 4, 1945. 1946—
Feb. 260-264.
------- Profit-sharing scheme, compulsory. Dec. 15,
1941, decree amending. 1942— Apr. 1021.
------- Social insurance (sickness and maternity;
workmen’s compensation). Compulsory system.
Act of July 24, 1940, provisions. 1941— Mar.
635-637.
Yugoslavia. Collective bargaining. Provisions of
1922, 1931, 1936, and 1937. 1943— Nov. 899,
905.
------- Conciliation and arbitration. Act of 1937,
provisions. 1943— Nov. 905-906.
------- Employment agencies.
Law establishing,
1922 and changes made, 1927-28 and 1932.
1943— Nov. 898-899.
------- Labor organizations. Freedom of, decree by
German occupation forces, May 9, 1941, abolish­
ing. 1943— Nov. 904-905.
------- Social insurance. Workers’ Insurance Act
of 1922; Mines Act of 1933; decree covering
railroad and shipping-lines workers, June 24,
1939. 1943— Nov. 908-910.
Legislative bodies. State and Federal. Dates of con­
vening, 1942-47, and prescribed length of sessions.
1941— Nov. 1220; l ^ - N o v . 979; 1944— Dec. 12221223; 1945— Nov. 991-992; 1946— Nov. 763-764.
Leisure time, United States. Increase in, due to rise
in real earnings of workers, 1900 -5 0. 1950— July
23-24.
Level of living. See Budgets, cost-of-living.
Library service. Public housing projects (University
Homes, A tlanta). Extent, in 1939. 1942— Jan. 102.
Library employees, salaries. See Wages and hours.
Life insurance:
Collective-agreement plans, 1948; methods of
financing. 1948— Sept. 232.
Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc., em­
ployee-benefit plan.
Provisions.
1948— May
497.
Dietitians, 1949, plans with employer contribu­
tion. 1950— Feb. 152.
Dress-shirt and work-clothing establishments,
August 1949. 1950— Mar. 295.
Ford Motor Co. and United Automobile Workers
(C IO ). Provisions for, in 1948 collective agree­
ment. 1949— Feb. 146.
Group. Cotton-, rayon-, nylon-, and silk-textile
industries, April 1950, selected areas. 1 9 5 0 — Oct.
469-470.
------- Motor vehicle industry, February 1950,
United States and selected regions. 1950—
Sept. 355.
------- Office workers. Boston, January 1950. 1950—
July 119.




129

------- ------- Chicago, Indianapolis, and Milwaukee,
January-February 1950. 1950— July 117.
------- ------- Detroit, Mich., April 1950. 1950—
Sept. 350.
------- ------- Large cities, 11, January-June 1950.
1950— Nov. 580.
----------------New York City, February 1950. 1950—
Aug. 238.
------- United States Steel Corp. employees, 1949,
by agreements. 1950— Oct. 474.
------- Woolen and worsted textile industry, May
1950, specified areas. 1950— Oct. 466.
Home offices. Bonus (nonproduction), group in­
surance, pensions, sick leave, vacations with
pay. Provision for, as of January 1947. 1948—
Jan. 12-13.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Percentage distribution of establishments hav­
ing, 1945-46, by region. 1947— July 54-55.
Occupational mortality. Metropolitan Life Insur­
ance Co. industrial policyholders. Analysis of,
1937-39 (Dublin and Vane). 1947— June 10031018.
Savings bank. Massachusetts. Origin, purposes,
growth; administration; financial operations;
comparison with company insurance in selling
methods, policy terms and maintenance, costs
to policyholder; criticisms of system. 1942—
Feb. 432-440.
------- New York. Development and growth since
enactment of 1938 law providing for. 1942—
Feb. 440-441.
Scientists, industrial research, 1949, coverage.
1950— Apr. 372.
Wage structure. See Wages and hours— Insur­
ance.
Life insurance, foreign countries:
Bulgaria. System established by Jan. 17, 1941,
law. 1943— Oct. 685-686.
Canada. Manufacturing plants employees. Plans
providing for. Summary. 1945— June 1244.
Japan. Post-office system, summary of plan es­
tablished by 1916 law. 1945— Oct. 667.
Lighting.
Great Britain.
Workplaces.
Minimum
standards, regulations issued Jan. 14, 1941. 1941—
Apr. 925-926.
Liquid assets. See Income— Consumer.
“ Little Steel” decision, National W ar Labor Board,
July 16, 1942:
Formula and effect on wartime wage stabilization
policy; opposition of labor members. 1949—
Jan. 21-22.
Issues decided by and principle adopted. 1942—
Sept. 487-489, 495-496.
Living conditions, United States:
Family. Widening range of interests; manner
versus quality of living. 1950— July 28-30.
Industrial mechanization, effect upon. 1950— July
7, 9-11.
Technological changes in and increase in real in­
come, 1900-50, effect of. 1950— July 23-30.
Living standards, United States (see also Cost of Liv­
ing) :
Definition, search for, 1900-50. 1950— July 7 1 72.
Families owning specified items of household
equipment, by income class and type of com­
munity, December 1941. 1945— Dec. 1219-1221.
Hawaii (Honolulu). Wartime rise, as result of
higher earnings. 1944— Apr. 706-716.
Incomes of city families of varying composition.
1946— Feb. 175-180.
Per capita income in wage-earner families, 1939.
1944— Dec. 1254.

130

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Living standards, foreign countries ( see also Cost of
L ivin g):
Denmark. Lowered under German occupation.
Production, cost-of-living, and wholesale-price
indexes covering period. 191*1— Aug. 366-368.
El Salvador. Government measures for improve­
ment of, to December 1942. 191*3— Aug. 233235.
India. Conditions in various cities summarized.
191*3— Oct. 694-697.
Uruguay. Rice-field workers. Requirements of
Dec. 12, 1940, decree-law. 191*1— Mar. 610-611.
Lock-outs. See Labor-management disputes— Strikes
and lock-outs.
Longshoring industry ( see also Collective agreements;
Wages and hours):
Hiring halls. NLRB decision re National Mari­
time Union and four Great Lakes oil tankers;
union in violation of Labor Management Re­
lations Act. 191*8— Sept. IV.
Pacific Coast. Collective bargaining, history of.
191*7— Apr. 651-654.
Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration, and re­
newal of contract. Summary of provisions in col­
lective agreements. 191*1— Mar. 554-556.
Los Angeles Railway Corporation and Los Angeles
Motor Coach Co. Jurisdictional dispute of employees,
National W ar Labor Board decision. 191*2— June
1351-1352.
Low-income families, United States. Characteristics,
1948 (chart), and effect on national economy. 1950—
Jan. 50-51.
Luggage and leather industry. Minimum-wage rate
set, Jan. 6, 1941. 191*1— Jan. 173.
Lumber and timber products industry. Description,
labor force, and scope of BLS study, 1939-40. 191*1—
July 188-194.
Lumber industry (see also Wages and hours):
Basic. Characteristics, and scope and method of
BLS survey in fall of 1944. 191*5— Oct. 762-765.
Douglas fir. Production, employment, wages, and
prices. Findings of 1941 study. 191*1— Oct. 849861.
Far West. Characteristics, production techniques,
labor force, unionization, and scope and method
of BLS survey of August 1944 . 191*5— July 14-23.
Injuries. See Accident prevention, and Accident
statistics.
Logging camps (and sawmills), western, labor
situation, 1941 and 1942. 191*2— Dec. 1125-1133.
Manpower. U. S. W ar Commission’s stabilization
plan, summary of. 191*2— Oct. 714-717.
Minimum-wage order effective Nov. 3, 1941.
191*1— Nov. 1293.
Pacific Coast. Collective bargaining, history of.
191*7— Apr. 660-662.
Sawmilling in South. See Wages and hours.
Sawmills (and logging camps), western, labor sit­
uation, 1941 and 1942. 191*2— Dec. 1125-1133.
Southern pine. Characteristics of industry and
labor requirements, 1946 (including 1935 data).
191*6— Dec. 941-953.
Lunch periods, paid:
Candy and other confectionery. Extent of provi­
sion for, January 1947. 191*8— Apr. 397.
Chemicals (industrial). Extent of practice, Janu­
ary 1946. 191*6— Nov. 749.
Collective agreements providing for, in latter half
of 1946. 191*7— Oct, 425.
Dyeing and finishing, textiles. Extent of provi­
sions for, July 1946. 191*7— June 1039.
Glassware industry. Extent of provision for, Jan­
uary 1947. 191*7— Nov. 551.
Tobacco (cigar) industry. Policy reported in 2
establishments, January 1946. 191*7— Jan. 52.




Machinery industries (see also Wages and hours):
Background and characteristics, based on BLS
wage studies, January 1945 and October 1946.
191*6— Feb. 265-269; 191*7— Sept. 317-320.
Bonus (nonproductive). Extent of use, January
1945 and October 1946. 191*6— Feb. 275; 191*7—
Sept. 320.
Group insurance. Extent of use, January 1945 and
October 1946. 191*6— Feb. 276; 191*7— Sept. 320.
Miscellaneous industrial. Characteristics of in­
dustry and scope and method of 1942 survey.
191*2— Aug. 306-313.
Pensions. Extent of provision for, January 1945
and October 1946. 191*6— Feb. 275; 191*7— Sept.
320.
San Francisco Bay area. Conditions in industry,
March 1943. 1 W —-Sept. 564-565.
Shift differentials. Extent of use of, January 1945
and October 1946. 191*6— Feb. 275; 191*7— Sept.
320.
Sick leave. Extent of provision for, January 1945
and October 1946. 191*6— Feb. 276; 191*7— Sept.
320.
Vacation with pay. Extent of provisions for, Jan­
uary 1945, October 1946, and November 1947.
191*6— Feb. 275; 191*7— Sept. 319-320; 191*8—
Apr. 399.
Wage incentives. Effects of, on interplant wage dif­
ferences; analysis. 191*7— Sept. 319.
Workweek, length of, November 1947 and 1949.
191*8— Apr. 399; 1950— May 529.
Machines, office; in use, 1950; results. 1950— July 6, 14.
Machine-tool accessories industry (see also Wages and
h ou rs):
Characteristics, labor force, and scope of BLS sur­
veys. 191*3— Feb. 336-339; 191*6— Mar. 438-442.
Shift differentials, vacations with pay. Extent of
provision for, December 1947. 191*8— May 516.
Wartime expansion and employment trends. 191*1*—
Feb. 307-311.
Workweek, length of, December 1947, compared
with January 1945. 191*8— May 515-516.
Machine-tool industry (see also Wages and hours):
Characteristics. Importance, location of plants, and
Government assistance since June 1940. 191*1—
May 1140-1142.
-------Labor force, and scope of BLS surveys, spring
of 1942 and January 1945. 191*2— Oct. 802-804;
191*6— June 933-937.
Employment, 1942-49; prospects, 1950; hours and
earnings, 1947-50. 1950— June 645.
Grinding machines, selected. Percent change in
unit man-hours, by type of labor. 191*8— Dec.
617.
Labor requirements, by occupation, and labor
turn-over. 191*1— May 1140-1141.
Overtime provisions in collective agreements.
191*1— Apr. 847-848.
Productivity study, selected types, 1939-47 and
1947-48; indexes of man-hours (direct and in­
direct labor) ; plant trends and influences caus­
ing; factors affecting efficiency. 191*7— Aug. ISO192; 191*8— Dec. 615-617; 1950— June 645-648.
Schedules of operation according to shifts worked,
June 1941. 191*1— Oct. 876-879.
Shift operations, status March 1941, including ex­
tent of overtime and week-end shut-downs; com­
parison with December 1940 status. 191*1--^June
1380-1385.
Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and re­
newal of contract. Summary of provisions in
collective agreements. 191*1— Mar. 556-557.
Subcontracting. Increase of practice under defense
program. 191*1— May 1141.
Unit man-hour trends, 1939-47 and 1947-48, by

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
type of machine tool, type of labor, and size of
plant.
19£.7— Aug. 186-192; 1948— Dec. 616617; 1950— June 645-648.
Wartime expansion. Trend in employment, hours
per week, and labor turn-over, with geographical
distribution, 1939-43. 1943— Sept. 484-487.
Maintenance of membership:
“ Basic Steel” decision of National W ar Labor
Board. Continuation of incorporation of clause
ordered. 1945— Jan. 43.
Definition of, with other types of union recogni­
tion; prevalence of practice in 1946. 1947— May
768.
Labor organizations. National W ar Labor Board
order to provide escape periods in agreements.
Effects in first year summarized. 1944— Dec.
1137-1140.
National War Labor Board. Awards, degree of
stability resulting from (in 31 plants covered by
BLS survey). 1943— Sept. 524-533.
------- Changes effective Dec. 1, 1943, in clause for
collective agreements. 1944— Jan. 67.
------- Decisions, May 1 to July 31, 1942. 1942—
Sept. 489-496.
State legislation, 1947, prohibiting. 1947— Sept.
279.
Malt-liquor industry. Development and characteristics;
and scope and method of BLS survey, 1943. 1944—
Sept. 592-595.
Management-labor policy committee. W ar Manpower
Commission Chairman empowered to appoint. 1943—
Jan. 26-28.
Man-hour requirements. See Productivity.
Manpower, United States:
Agriculture. Placement of workers, WMC policies
and requirements concerning, statement of June
5, 1944. 1944— July 88-89,.
-------Trends, 1910-47. 1947— Dec. 649-653.
------- Wartime supply of farm labor, and farm
wages. 1942— Dec. 1111, 1124.
Armed Forces and munitions industries, require­
ments for, and sources of supply, 1944, sum­
mary. 1944— Dec. 1094-1098.
Ceiling program. Classes of workers given pre­
ferred treatment under regulations of W ar Man­
power Commission (Field instruction Aug. 5,
1944). 1944— Sept. 519-520.
------- Employment, priorities, and procedure for
appeals from determinations. W ar Manpower
Commission instructions, August 1944, summary.
1944— Oct. 749-752.
------- W ar Manpower Commission, summary of;
and relation to reemplo3mient rights. 1945—
Mar. 535-536.
Controls. Established Aug. 4, 1944, by Director
of W ar Mobilization. 1944— Sept. 516-517.
------- To prevent “ pirating,” statement July 1942
by W M C Chairman. 1942— Sept. 460-462.
-------Wartime, centralization of. Measures and ob­
jectives summarized. 1943— Jan. 26-28.
Critical areas, workers for. Program revised by
War Manpower Commission, Jan. 13, 1945.
Summary. 1945— Mar. 535.
Defense. Needs for fiscal year 1949, under ex­
panded program. 1948— Oct. 373-376. See also
Defense Manpower, Office of, and Defense
policies.
Deferments. See Selective Service— Deferments.
Economic shifts in, prewar, wartime, and postwar.
1947— Dec. 637-678.
Employment, rules for labor-shortage areas.
1943— Mar. 470-471.
Employment-stabilization program. War Man­
power Commission instructions issued Feb. 15,
1944, summary. 1944— Apr. 748-749.




131

------- See also Ceiling program, this section.
“ Essential activities” list as revised by W ar Man­
power Commission Apr. 17, 1943. 1943— June
1092-1093.
Fathers, draft of. Effect (probable) upon petro­
leum industry (BLS survey). 1943— Dec. 10531057.
------- Provided for under Selective Service after
Oct. 1, 1943 (W ar Manpower Commission’s an­
nouncement of Aug. 3, 1943). 1943— Sept. 472.
------- Replacement schedules to include (W ar Man­
power Commission instructions issued June 15,
1943). 1943— Aug. 238-239.
Hiring controls and practices, for labor-shortage
areas. W ar Manpower Commission order of Feb.
1, 1943. 1943— Mar. 470-471.
Hiring for essential war work. National W ar
Labor Board order governing individual wage
adjustments amended to permit certain excep­
tions. 1945— Mar. 538-539.
Hours, weekly, lengthening of by Executive Order
9301 of Feb. 9, 1943; statement by Chairman of
W ar Manpower Commission. 1943— Mar. 471473.
Industrial, prewar, wartime and postwar; trends.
1947— Dec. 645-649.
Industry requirements, effects on proposed with­
drawal of young men for militarv service. 1948—
Apr. IY.
Interregional Recruitment Program of WMC. Re­
ferrals and placements under, in 1944. 1945—
Feb. 290-291.
Jobs vacant because of labor dispute. W ar Man­
power Commission’s statement of policy on.
1943— Dec. 1124.
Labor force. See Labor force.
Labor markets. Child-labor trends in an expanding
labor market. Summary. 1948— Dec. 589-595.
------- Factors affecting manpower resources as of
May 1948. 1948— May IV.
------- Major areas, number, with substantial labor
surpluses, by geographic division, selected
months, 1948-50 (table). 1950— June 628.
Labor recruiting through scattering of circulars
from aeroplane. 1944— July 89.
“ Locally needed” activities. Designation of by
area manpower director, provided for, Sept. 10,
1943. 1943— Nov. 932.
------- Restricted to 15 trades and services, by W ar
Manpower Commission instructions, May 12,
1944. 1944— July 88.
Management-Labor Policy committee of W M C.
Acceleration of schedule to speed solution of
production problems, and 10-point program
adopted. 1945— Feb. 296-297.
Manning-table plan terminated by W ar Manpower
Commission, Aug. 3, 1944, announcement. 1944—
Sept. 518-519.
Meat-packing industry. Investigation of condi­
tions by W ar Manpower Commission, fall of
1943. 1943— Dec. 1124.
Merchant marine. Required personnel, by occupa­
tion, and potential labor supply. 1942— Sept.
435-440.
Newspaper advertising for workers. Policy of W ar
Manpower Commission summarized. 1943— Dec.
1125.
Occupations. Nondeferable, listed by Selective
Service, Bureau of W ar Manpower Commission,
Feb. 3, 1943, effective Apr. 1, 1943. 1943— Mar.
468-469.
------- Seasonal, important to war production, W ar
Manpower Commission instructions concerning
necessary men for. 1943— Dec. 1124-1125.

132

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Manpower, U. S.— Continued
Occupations. See also Selective Service— Defer­
ments.
Outlook. See Requirements, this section .
Petroleum industry. Effect, probable, of draft of
fathers and men under 26. 1943— Dec. 10531057; 19U — May 967-971.
Policies after V E -day. Controls, production shifts,
wages in converted plants, discharge from Armed
Forces. 1945— June 1205-1209.
Potential supply in an urban area (Univ. of Minn,
study). 1942— Aug. 203-205.
Priorities committees. Instructions for establish­
ment given by W ar Manpower Commission, Sept.
14, 1943. 1943— Nov. 932-933.
Priority referrals. Categories of employer orders,
introduced by W ar Manpower Commission Nov.
27, 1944. 1945— Feb. 295-296.
------- System established by W ar Manpower Com­
mission, June 21, effective July 1, 1944; stand­
ards governing; operation; additional directors.
1944— July 87-88, Aug. 303, Sept. 515-517, Oct.
749-752.
Prisoners of war. Hiring out of labor through W ar
Manpower Commission under conditions speci­
fied by 1929 Geneva Convention. 1944— Jan. 5 8 59.
Professionally trained. Future supply estimated
(Amer. Council on Education survey). 1942—
Aug. 247-250.
Railroads. Mexican track workers admitted under
W ar Manpower Commission regulation of June
17, 1943. 1943— Aug. 240-241.
Reconversion. Release from Armed Forces of
limited number of key men and women; for de­
cisions announced in February 1946. 1946—
Apr. 591.
------- W M C program, following end of war with
Japan. 1945— Oct. 670, 672-673.
Recruitment program of W ar Manpower Commis­
sion, interregional. Statement issued Mar. 9,
1944. Summary. 1944— May 996-997.
Requirements. Developments during year ended
September 1944. 1944— Dec. 1158-1161.
----- - 1943-44, estimated for Armed Forces and
civilian labor; sources of supply; and changes
in problems. 1943— Aug. 204-211.
------- 1945, first half, estimated changes in, and
outlook. 1945— Feb. 286-290.
Selective Service. See Selective Service.
Shipbuilding employees, Portland, Vancouver, and
Seattle areas, June 1942. Industries formerly
worked for. 1942— Oct. 735-736.
Shortages.^ W ar Manpower Commission and War
Production Board Instructions issued in Sep­
tember 1943, to correct effects of, upon war ef­
fort. 1943— Nov. 932-935.
Situation, August and November 1950. Summary.
1950— Nov. 564-567, Dec. III.
Utilization, Bureau of. W ar Manpower Commission
action establishing, early in 1943. 1943— Mar.
473.
Wage increases. W ar Manpower Commission
policy toward, as stated to regional directors on
Oct. 12, 1943. 1943— Dec. 1126.
W ar Manpower Commission. Decisions in individu­
al employees’ cases. 1945— Jan. 123.
-------Established by Executive order Apr. 18, 1942;
powers, personnel, and functions. 1942— June
1325-1327.
------- Labor directives (8) issued June 22, 1942,
summary of. 1942— Aug. 223-226.
------- Labor migration from areas of shortage,
program to reduce. 1944— Dec. 1167-1168.
-------Nonferrous metals and lumber industries, plan
announced for, summary. 1942— Oct. 714-717.




------- Older workers. Policy concerning, summary.
1944— July 35-36.
------- “ Pirating,” announcement in July 1942, on
prevention of. 1942— Sept. 460-462.
-------Reorganization, Dec. 5, 1942, establishing five
bureaus. 1945— Feb. 255.
------- Veterans’ placement policies. Labor-market
information sent by W ar Manpower Commission
to regional directors. 1944— May 992.
------- Women with young children, policies regard­
ing employment. 1942— Dec. 1184-1185.
------- Women’s Advisory Committee, recommenda­
tions, Mar. 21, 1945, concerning dismissal poli­
cies. 1945— Sept. 506.
------- Women’s Policy Committee, appointment and
roster of members. 1942— Nov. 924-925.
W ar Mobilization, Office of. Executive order, May
28, 1943, creating. Text. 1943— June 1089-1090.
W ar Production Board. Labor Advisory Commit­
tee, Office of, created June 1944, and committees
included. 1944— Aug. 303-304.
-------Placing and revising war procurements, man­
power factor to be observed in, Sept. 18, 1943,
statement. 1943— Nov. 933.
------- Priorities, withdrawal of, authorized Dec. 23,
1944, in event of manpower violations. 1945—
Feb. 297.
Wartime need for college-trained personnel (BLS
survey, 1941). 1942— July 60-63.
Wartime programs summarized (W est Coast and
other sections) to November 1943. 1944— Feb.
317-319.
West Coast. Program approved by W ar Mobiliza­
tion Committee, effective Sept. 15, 1943. Sum­
mary. 1943— Nov. 933-935.
Workweek. Wartime minimum (48 hours) to be
applied to all labor-shortage areas by W ar Man­
power Commission instruction of Oct. 13, 1943.
1943— Dec. 1125-1126.
Youth, employment. See Youth— Employment.
Manpower, foreign countries:
Austria. Requirement. By category; measures
adopted. 1947— Nov. 567-568.
---------------- For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
Belgium. Requirements. By category; measures
adopted. 1947— Nov. 567-568.
----------------For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
------- Utilization of labor, programs to improve,
postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
Canada. Changes after end of war in Europe sum­
marized. 1945— July 46-48.
------- Compulsory transfer in wartime utilization
and employment of men found unfit for military
service. Summary of provisions concerning.
1943— June 1095-1096.
------- Control. Administration of policy and meas­
ures for. 1942— Oct. 720-725.
------- ------- “ Freezing” of workers on jobs under
order effective Sept. 20, 1943. 1944— Jan. 70.
------- ------- Public employment offices’ activities,
March 1942 to January 1943, special problems
and provisions, and appeals under regulations.
1943— May 896-900.
--------------- Wartime, 13 specific controls removed by
Minister of Labor, Aug. 16, 1945. 1945— Oct.
693-694.
-------Utilization of manpower, described by Prime
Minister, Mar. 24, 1942. 1942— July 42-45.
Denmark. Utilization of labor, programs to im­
prove, postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
Displaced persons. Numbers of, employable but not
resettled, fall of 1947; plans for utilization of.
1947— Dec. 680-683.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
European Economic Cooperation, Committee of.
Requirements and resources, report. 1947— Nov.
567-568.
European Recovery Program. Conference, Jan. 26
to Feb. 9, 1948, of countries participating. Re­
quirements through 1948, by country (prelim­
inary and revised estimates). Suggestions for
solution of technical manpower problems. 1948—
Apr. 404-405.
------- See also European Recovery Program.
France. Requirements. By category; transfers
completed; measures adopted. 1947— Nov. 567568.
----------------For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
------- Utilization of labor, programs to improve,
postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
Germany. Contract workers from Rumania and
Spain, provisions concerning. 1948— Jan. 43-45.
------- Control measures, 1936 to 1942 summarized.
Results. 1942— Oct. 727-728; 1948— Jan. 10-21.
------- Foreign workers, draft of, and objectives.
1948— Sept. 495-498.
------- Metalworkers, Italian, recruited under agree­
ments signed in February 1941. 704#— Jan. 42.
------- Wartime economy as affected by, and ad­
ministrative changes in control.
194U— Feb.
314-316.
Great Britain. Allocation program provided, Con­
trol of Engagement Order (S.R. & O. No. 579,
effective June 4, 1945). 1945— Sept. 437-439.
------- Conditions and status summarized by Min­
istry of Labor, Sept. 23, 1943. 1944— Jan. 71-72.
------- Conscription (general) of man- and womanpower, 1941 National Service (No. 2) Act.
1942— Feb. 385-386.
------- Control policies since outbreak of war, sum­
mary. 1942— Dec. 1134-1141.
-------Displaced persons. European Volunteer Work­
ers (E V W ’s), postwar use to supplement labor
force; totals, by country of origin and occupa­
tions to which assigned; rights and duties.
1949— Mar. 282.
------- Distribution, selected periods, June 1939 to
May 1945, by industry, service groups. 1945—
Jan. 74-75, Dec. 1149-1150.
------- Engineers. Technical officers pool provided
for military services, throug;h compulsory regis­
tration. 1948— June 1096.
------- Production and manpower, specified indus­
tries, end-1947 and end-1948. 1949— Mar. 281.
------- Reallocation of persons in civil employment
after close of European phase of war. Govern­
ment plans. 1945— Jan. 43-44.
------- Requirements. By category; transfers com­
pleted; measures adopted. 1947— Nov. 567-568.
----------------For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
------- Utilization of labor, programs to improve,
postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
-------Wartime conditions, 1943, summarized. 1948—
July 17-30.
Hungary. Shortage, and legislative measures re­
lating to, May 1944. 1944— Aug. 304-305.
Italy. Emigration. Surplus available for participa­
tion in E R P ; proposals for handling problems.
1948— Apr. 404-405.
---------------- Workers available for. 1947— Nov. 567.
Luxembourg. Requirements. By category; meas­
ures adopted. 1947— Nov. 567-568.
---------------- For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
Netherlands. Requirements. By category; trans­
fers completed; measures adopted. 1947— Nov.
567-568.




133

---------------- For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
------- Utilization of labor, program to improve,
postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
New Zealand. Controls and wartime policies. S et
Wartime policies, foreign countries— New Zea­
land.
Norway. Utilization of labor, program to improve,
postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
Palestine. Control regulations issued Aug. 12, 1942.
1942— Dec. 1165.
Prisoners of W ar (P W 's), German. Numbers in
Soviet Union, France, and Great Britain, fall
of 1947, and plans for employment of. 1947—
Dec. 680.
South Africa, Union of. Controller of Industrial
Manpower appointed February 1941; objectives.
1942— 5 une 1340.
------- Wartime control extended by law over mer­
chant seamen (1940 and 1941), engineering
(1941 and 1942), building (1941 and 1942),
stevedores (1941 and 1942), and boot and shoe
industries (1941). 1948— Sept. 479-482.
Sweden. Requirements. By category; transfers
completed; measures adopted. 1947— Nov. 567568.
---------------- For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
------- Utilization of labor, program to improve,
postwar period. 1947— Dec. 682-684.
Switzerland. Requirements. By category; transfers
completed; measures adopted. 1947— Nov. 567568.
----------------For participation in ERP, 1948. 1948—
Apr. 404.
Manufacturing industries. See under specific subject ,

or specific industry.
Margarine industry. Germany. Difficulty in fixing
prices for. 1941— Jan. 232-233.
Marine transport industry. Strike restrictions, arbitra­
tion, duration and renewal of contracts. Summary
of provisions in collective contracts. 1941— Mar.
557-558.
Maritime shipping industry; collective bargaining.
Organization for, 1880-1938; changing status of
seamen, 1887-1945; conditions since World War II.
1950— Sept. 332-337.
Maritime transportation. Pacific Coast. Collective
bargaining, history of. 1947— Apr. 654-657.
Maritime W ar Emergency Board (U . S. Government):
Appointed by President, December 1941; composi­
tion, functions, and decisions and rulings to 1943.
1944— Jan. 8, 10-14.
Marriage bonus. France. Law of Oct. 11, 1940, provid­
ing, for women who resign from work at marriage.
1941— May 1186.
Marriage loans. Spain. Decree of Feb. 22, 1941, pro­
viding for. 1941— Nov. 1291.
Marriages. Decrease in, as affected by war casualties.
1946— F eh. 184-185.
Marshall Field and Co. Union-security provision. Na­
tional W ar Labor Board decision. 1942— June 1347.
Marshall Plan. See European Recovery Program.
Maternity and infant welfare, foreign countries :
Great Britain. Conditions summarized, 1941-42.
1948— Jan. 81-82.
Turkey. Services provided under republican gov­
ernment, summary. 1942— Aug. 246.
Mattress, quilt, and pillow industries. Puerto Rico.
Minimum-wage rate set, effective May 19, 1941.
1941— Oct. 990.
Mead Corporation. Employees granted increase by Na­
tional W ar Labor Board decision, June 10, 1942.
1942— Sept. 486.

134

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Meany-Thomas report. Cost-of-living index criticism,
and findings with regard to (first half of 1944).
1945— San. 168-174.
Meat-packing industry. Uruguay. Unemployment com­
pensation law of Dec. 12, 1944. Provisions. 1945—
July 72-74.
Meat products industries:
Group insurance, pensions, shift differentials, sick
leave, vacations with pay. Extent of provision
for, January 1947. 1948— Mar. 286.
Wage structure, plant workers (other than “ Big
Four” ) January 1947. 1948— Mar. 283-285.
Mechanics, automobile. Number employed in 1940, by
State. Employment conditions during war, and post­
war prospects. 1946— Feb. 211-227.
Mechanization, United States ( see also Productivity) :
Agriculture. Increase of, in tillage and harvesting
operations, since First World W ar. 1 9 4 4 — Mar.
517-519.
------- Increased productivity and availability of
farmers
for
industrial
employment. 1950—
July 15.
Mining (coal, bituminous). Increase in mechanical
methods in 1939 and 1940. 1 9 4 1 — Jan. 104-105.
Sawmills, southern. Effect of 75-cent minimum
wage upon. 1950. 1950— Sept. 317.
Mechanization, foreign countries:
Germany. Ammunition manufacture. Standardiza­
tion in and effects on productivity and costs.
1945— Mar. 540-541.
Great Britain. Need for, in cotton and coal indus­
tries, and policy of organized labor. 1945— Mar.
541-545.
Mediation and Conciliation Service, Federal. See Con­
ciliation and arbitration.
Medical and hospital care, United States:
Clothing industry. Men’s coats and suits. Extent
and methods of provision for, August-September
1948. 1949— Feb. 192.
------- Women’s and misses’ dresses. Hospitalization.
Method of provision for, August 1947. 1948—
May 520.
-------Women’s coats and suits. Medical and hospital
service, September 1949. 1950— Feb. 155,
Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc. Details
of plan, sponsorship, benefits. Summary. 1948—
May 493-498.
Cooperative projects. See Cooperatives.
Dietitians. Medical and hospital service, 1949.
1950— Feb. 152.
Domestic service (Washington, D. C.). Extent to
which furnished. 1942— Feb. 352.
Farm workers, migrant, Arizona and California.
Agricultural Workers’ Health and Medical Asso­
ciation, plan of, and statistics of operation, July
1939 to June 1940. 1942— Nov. 957-959.
F S A program (including dental service) summa­
rized as of June 30, 1941. 1941— Dec. 1385-1387.
Hospitalization. Cooperatives providing for. See
Cooperatives— Medical and hospital care.
------- Insurance, motor-vehicle industry, February
1950. 1950— Sept. 355.
------- Proportionate expense of, 1939-40, in Agri­
cultural Workers’ Health and Medical Associa­
tion (Ariz. and Calif.). 1942— Nov. 957-959.
Industrial research scientists, late 1949. 1950—
Apr. 373.
Labor Health Institute, St. Louis; summary of
plan, provisions, and details of operation. 1948—
Jan. 34—
39.
Mining, coal (bituminous). Findings of survey
made for U. S. Department of the Interior.
Summary. 1947— June 997-998, 1000-1002.
Philippine Islands. Embroidery industries. Fur­
nished by 13 establishments out of 30 reporting.




1941—
Feb. 455.
Plans established through collective bargaining.
1945— Aug. 191-209; 1947— Feb. 191-201.
------- See also Union Health Center, and Labor
Health Institute, this section.
Prepayment plans— industrial, medical-society, pri­
vate-group, consumer-sponsored, and Govern­
ment. Summary. 1945— Jan. 57-62.
Shipyards, West Coast. Conditions summarized.
1944—
5 an. 92-93.
Union Health Center. New York City. History and
extent of service given. 1947— Feb. 204-206.
------- Philadelphia. Summary of plan, provisions
and details of operation. 1948— Jan. 34-39.
Wisconsin. State Industrial Commission data for
1937-42 period. 1948— July 117.
Medical and hospital care, foreign countries:
Canada. Manufacturing plants’ employees. Plans
providing for. Summary. 1945— June 1244-1245.
Chile. Preventive. Social-insurance institutions re­
quired to furnish. Legal provisions, administra­
tion, and sources of funds. 1941— Feb. 381-384.
Great Britain. Factories. Provision for service,
order by Ministry of Labor and National Service,
November 1940. 1941— Apr. 922-924.
------- Industrial Health Advisory Committee ap­
pointed Mar. 11, 1943, and functions. 1948—
July 118-119.
-------National Health Service (to include hospitali­
zation) proposed, summary. 1944— Sept. 540-543.
Peru. Mining, copper, industry. Facilities fur­
nished by companies. 1945— July 55.
------- Workers’ hospitals, plan for 12, and opening
of first unit at Lima, Dec. 8, 1940. 1941— Oct.
919-920.
Venezuela (Maracaibo). Oil companies’ provision
for foreign employees, May 1945. 1945— Aug.
339.
Medical examination of employees. Cost. State legisla­
tion, 1949. 1950— Jan. 45-46.
Meetings. See Conventions, meetings, etc.
Membership maintenance. See Maintenance of mem­
bership.
Merchant marine. See Seamen.
Metal-furniture industry. Bonus
(nonproductive);
group insurance; pensions; shift differentials; sick
leave; and vacations with pay. Extent of provision
for, January 1947. 1947— Oct. 449.
Metal mining. See Mining.
Metals, nonferrous. See Nonferrous metals.
Metalworking. Germany. Italian laborers recruited for,
by agreements in February 1941. 1948— Jan. 42.
Metalworking industries. Conversion to war produc­
tion, 1939-43, summary. 1948— Dec. 1082-1093.
Metalworking machinery. Miscellaneous. Characteris­
tics of industry and scope of BLS survey, A p rilJune 1942. 1942— Dec. 1236-1238.
Mexican workers:
Employment patterns, in Detroit, 1920-38, sum­
mary. 1945— Nov. 913-923.
Farm employment of, during World W ar II.
1945— Sept. 450.
Railroad track workers admitted under W ar Man­
power regulation of June 17, 1943; plans for
release by employers at end of war. 1948— Aug.
240-241; 1945— Nov. 910.
Migration, United States:
Agricultural. Atlantic Coast workers in potato and
strawberry crops. 1941— Aug. 406-408.
Agricultural Workers’ Health and Medical Associ­
ation, established for migratory workers by F S A
and California authorities, operation for year
ended June 1940. 1942— Nov. 957-959.
Aircraft workers, wartime (California, southern).
Proportion leaving after end of war, and reasons

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
given. 1946— Nov. 710-711.
California. Agricultural and labor migrants to,
1935-40. Sections of origin, routes, and State
borders crossed. 1941— July 18-34.
Cannery workers (Del.). Living conditions, remu­
neration and family characteristics. 1941— Aug.
408-410.
Families displaced by defense projects. Camps,
permanent and mobile, and housing provided by
Farm Security Administration, 1941. 1941— Oct.
927-930.
F S A assistance to farm labor, summary of, and
status, 1941. 1941— Dec. 1382-1385.
Interregional and interstate. December 1941 to
March 1945; and (in South) net, by region,
State, and sex, 1935-40, by region and State
1940- 45. 1946— Oct. 485.
Interstate. Conference on Migratory Labor, South­
ern, 1940. Labor recruitment, health and hous­
ing, assistance, and child welfare problems. Rec­
ommendations concerning. 1 9 4 1 — Feb. 343-345.
------- Destitute citizens. Reports of Congressional
(H. R.) Select Committee to investigate. Sum­
mary, including recommendations. 1941— Feb.
338-342, June 1347-1350.
Labor. From labor-shortage areas. W ar Manpower
Commission program to reduce. Summary (from
field instruction Sept. 30, 1944.) 1944— Dec.
1167-1168.
Migrant labor. Problems of. Report and recommen­
dations, Federal Interagency Committee on Mi­
grant Labor; summary. 1947— July 70-71.
------- Recommendations, National Conference on
Labor Legislation, November 1949. 1950— Jan. 41.
Public assistance plans. Expansion recommended
by Southern Interstate Conference on Migratory
Labor. 1941— Feb. 344.
New Jersey Migrant Labor Act. Protection and
improvement of working conditions, provisions
for. 1945— Aug. 236-237; 1946— Feb. 251.
------- Potato workers; vegetable, fruit, and berry
pickers. Characteristics and working conditions.
1941— Aug. 410—
413.
New York. Camps. Suggestions by conference of
State agencies for improvement. 1945— Aug. 237.
------- Health and welfare. 1946 laws, provisions.
1946— Nov. 759.
------- Truck farms. Child and adult workers, and
conditions. 1941— Feb. 391-392.
Northwest (Puget Sound and Portland, Vancouver
areas). Sources of in-migration during World
W ar II period. 1947— Apr. 644-645.
Pacific Coast. In-migrants. Wartime and earlier
periods; age and sex distribution, 1935-40.
1947— Apr. 566-569, 572-573.
------- San Francisco Bay area. Wartime workers,
characteristics and working conditions. 1945—
Oct. 708-720.
Population shifts, 1947. Unemployment and eco­
nomic factors affecting, April 1948. 1950— May
495-496.
Postwar. Grants-in-aid, defense workers, recom­
mendation by Congressional committee’s report.
194%— Jan. 52.
------- W ar workers, proportions who moved in
winter of 1945-46. 1946— May 716-717.
Propeller plant (St. Paul) workers. Characteris­
tics, localities of origin, expenses incurred, plans
for further (postwar) moves. Summary. 1946—
Jan. 98-99, 103.
Protection of migrant workers, by public, endorsed
with specific recommendations as to methods.
1946— Feb. 228-229.
Shipyard workers, Wilmington (Del.) plants, in




135

World W ar II. 1946— June 872-873, 878.
Southern States. Conditions affecting, since 1920,
and likely postwar trends. Summary. 1946—
Oct. 484-489.
Trends and net migration, by region, 1930-49.
1 9 5 0 — Oct. 434-435.
Veterans. Direction of, by race, November 1946.
1947— July 66.
Wartime migration. Between areas. W ar Man­
power Commission’s instructions. Apr. 19, 1944,
to regional directors. 1 9 4 4 — June 1198-1199.
-------Bomber plant (Willow Run, Ypsilanti, Mich.)
Characteristics, conditions of work, postwar
prospects, summary. 1945— Dec. 1079-1081.
------- Defense work, report of Congressional Com­
mittee, summary of. 1942— Jan. 49-52.
------- Effect of, upon housing situation. 1942—
June 1258-1259.
-------Interstate, extent of, and effect upon postwar
employment problems; State variations and
population changes, 1940-43, compared with pre­
war changes. 1 9 4 4 — Sept. 481-495.
------- Sections affected by, extent of, and results.
1942— July 58-60.
Yakima Valley, Wash., and settlement. Economic
condition and future prospects of families, 1939*
1942— Feb. 405-406.
Migration, foreign countries:
Denmark. Workers, to Germany and Norway, fol­
lowing invasion by Germany. 1944— Nov. 949.
Great Britain. Emigration to Dominions, total,
1946-48. 1 9 4 9 — Mar. 282.
Italy. Emigration of workers from, in 1946 and
1947. Summary. 1947— Sept. 337.
-------Extent and effects of, to World W ar II period.
Summary. 1945— Nov. 920-921.
Military service, United States:
Career pay. Recommendations of Advisory Com­
mission on Service Pay (Hook Commission) in
report to Secretary of Defense, December 1948.
1949— June 656-659.
Collective-agreement provisions concerning reem­
ployment, seniority, separation payments, partic­
ipation in insurance plans, allowances to de­
pendent survivors. Employees of various com­
panies. 1942— Dec. 1147-1155.
Manufacturing, finance, and service industries.
Employees in, policies as to compensation, pen­
sion and group-insurance continuance, and re­
instatement. 1941— Mar. 583-586.
Paper industry. Employees in, summary of policies
concerning. 1941— June 1386-1388.
Retail dry-goods stores. Employees in, policies as
to supplementary wage and employee benefits.
1 9 4 1 — Mar. 586-588.
Temporary workers’ reinstatement after release
from armed services, National Labor Relations
Board decisions concerning. 1943— July 31.
Military service, Canada. Aid for ex-servicemen, in­
cluding various benefits and attention to placement.
Mar. 592-593.
Military-severance pay. Contractors (Government con­
tracts) entitled to reimbursement for, as items of
cost (decisions of Compt. Gen.). 1944— May 1025.
Milk-supply industry. Chicago area.
Distribution
methods, factors affecting and resulting displacement
of drivers; prices; growth of vendor system; and
labor problems in delivery. 1942— June 1283-1303*
Millinery industry, New York. Stabilization Commis­
sion, operations under, 1936-41, summarized. 1941—
Feb. 355-359; 1943— Jan. 22-25.
Milling industry. Characteristics; trends in labor
productivity and factors affecting; and employment
prospects. 1941— July 83-94.

136

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Mine Workers, United. See Labor organizations— Mine
Workers, United.
Mineral industries, injury statistics. See Accident
statistics, by industry.
Minimum wage, United States:
Agriculture. Sugar-beet farming. Rates estab­
lished 1939-46 under Sugar Act of 1937. Sum­
mary. 19 U — Aug. 197-200.
S
Aircraft industry. Contracts of U. S. Government.
Determination effective Nov. 18, 1941. 19U2—
Jan. 217.
Airframe industry (California). National W ar
Labor Board decision, Mar. 3, 1943. 19U —
S
June 1188.
Beauty shops. Full week’s pay for women working
4 days or more, (provision of several State
orders). 19Ul— Sept. 573.
------- Ohio State order providing for payment to
students working in establishments where cus­
tomers pay fees. 19Ul— Sept. 573-574.
Button and buckle industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Oct. 19, 1942.
19 U2— Dec. 1285.
Candy and related products manufacture. Order
under Fair Labor Standards Act effective Mar.
29, 1943. 19US— Mar. 590.
Carpet and rug industry. Order effective Mar. 17,
1941. 19U1— Apr. 967.
Chemical and related products industry. Contracts
of U. S. Government. Determination effective
Apr. 28, 1942. 19U2— May 1189.
Cigars and cigarettes. See Tobacco industry, this
section .
Clay products industry. Rate set under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Sept. 1, 1941. 19 Ul—
Oct. 990.
Clothing (women’s apparel) industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective Sept. 29,
1941. 19 Ul— Nov. 1292.
Contracts, U. S. Government. See specific industry ,
this section; also Contracts, U. S. Government.
Cooking and heating appliances manufacturing.
Order under Fair Labor Standards Act effective
Apr. 12, 1943. 19US— May 989.
Cost-of-living studies preliminary to recommenda­
tions. Progress in 1946. 19 U7— June 1044-1045.
Cotton-garment and allied industries. Determina­
tion extended to cover additional textile items on
bids solicited on or after Mar. 6, 1941. 19Ul—
Apr. 968.
------- Determination under Public Contracts Act
effective July 20, 1942. 19 U2— Aug. 367.
Cotton-garment industry. Effects upon workers of
orders promulgated in 1939 and 1940. 19 U2— Feb.
318-337.
Cottonseed and peanut-crushing industry. Order
under Fair Labor Standards Act effective Aug.
16, 1943. 19US— Sept. 583.
Cotton-textile industry (New England, N. Y ., and
Pa., and Southern States). Minimum rate raised
and differentials established, by National W ar
Labor Board. Provisions of order (February
1945) summarized. 19U5— Apr. 856-857.
Die-cutting-manufacturing industry. Order effec­
tive on bids let on or after Apr. 5, 1941.
19Ul— Apr. 967-968.
Drug and medicine industry. Contracts of U. S.
Government. Rate fixed by determination of 1939
raised and extended to toilet preparations in­
dustry effective July 7, 1941. 19Ul— Nov. 1295.
Drug, medicine, and toilet preparations industry.
Order under Fair Labor Standards A ct effective
July 7, 1941. 19U1— Aug. 480.
Embroideries industry. Rate set, order effective




Jan. 27, 1941. 19U1— Jan. 173.
------- Order under Fair Labor Standards Act ef­
fective Nov. 15, 1943. 19U — Oct. 791.
S
Enamel-utensil industry, (frder under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Apr. 21, 1941. 19Ul—
May 1253.
Evaporated milk industry. Contracts of U. S. Gov­
ernment. Determination effective Nov. 3, 1941.
19 Ul— Nov. 1294.
Fair Labor Standards Act. Orders under. See
specific industry affected , this section.
------------See a lso Court decisions; and Fair Labor
Standards Act.
Furniture industry. Metal. Contracts of U. S.
Government. Determination effective May 13,
1939, extended to additional metal articles, effec­
tive July 28, 1941. 19Ul— Nov. 1295.
------- Wood. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective Nov. 3, 1941. 19Ul— Nov. 1293.
-------Wood, and public seating branches. Determi­
nation under Public Contracts Act effective Aug.
15, 1942. 19U2— Sept. 595.
Garment industries. Shirts, single pants, and
allied. Rate set under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective Sept. 29, 1941. 19Ul— Oct. 989-990.
------- Women’s and children’s. Rate set under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Sept. 29, 1941.
19U1— Oct. 989.
Glove and mitten industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Sept. 21, 1942. 19 U2—
Oct. 844.
Glove and mitten workers. Determination under
Public Contracts Act effective Jan. 16, 1943.
19U Feb. 359.
S—
Grain-products industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Mar. 1, 1943. 19U —
S
Mar. 590.
Hair-net industry. Order under Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act effective May 19, 1941. 19Ul— Oct. 990991.
Handicapped or superannuated workers given
same rates as provided under Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act. (Amendments to all determinations
under Public Contracts Act effective Sept. 15,
1942.) 19U2— Oct. 843-844.
Handkerchief industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Feb. 15, 1943. 19US—
Mar. 590.
Hat and cap industry, women’s. Determination
under Public Contracts Act effective July 11,
1942. 19U2— Aug. 367.
Hat (straw), coconut, and vegetable-packing in­
dustries, order effective May 12, 1941. 19Ul—
June 1487-1488.
Hosiery, full-fashioned. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective May 19, 1941. 19Ul—
Oct. 990-991.
Hosiery (seamless) industry. Contracts, U. S.
Government. Determination effective Mar. 30,
1942. 19U2— May 1189-1190.
------- Orders under Fair Labor Standards Act
effective Sept. 15, 1941 (superseding earlier
order), and Feb. 15, 1943. 19Ul— Sept. 715;
19U — Mar. 590-591.
S
Hospitals (San Francisco Bay area). Public­
housekeeping occupations, monthly rates, 1942.
19US— May 917-918.
Industries with rates established under Fair Labor
Standards Act, and those with such rates pend­
ing. Tabulations, Nov. 10, 1943. 19U — Dec.
S
1220- 1221 .
Instruments industries (scientific, industrial, and
laboratory, surgical instruments and apparatus,
and dental goods and equipment). Contracts of

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
U. S. Government. Determination effective Sept.
23, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1294.
Iron (gray) jobbing-foundries industry. Order
under Fair Labor Standards Act effective Nov.
3, 1941. 19U1— Nov. 1293.
Jewelry manufacturing industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective Nov. 1, 1941.
1941— Sept. 715.
Knitted and woven men’s underwear and commer­
cial knitting. Contracts, U. S. Government.
Determination amended effective Mar. 3, 1942,
to conform with wage order under Fair Labor
Standards Act. 1942— Mar. 772.
------- Order under Fair Labor Standards Act
effective Nov. 24, 1941, superseding previous
order. 1941— Dec. 1577.
Knitted outerwear industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Apr. 20, 1942.
1942— May 1189.
Knitting, knitwear, and woven underwear industry.
Order under Public Contracts Act effective Apr.
20, 1943. 1943— M ay 989.
Lamp (portable) and shade industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective July 1, 1941.
1941— June 1487.
Leather and sheep-lined jackets. Contracts, U. S.
Government. Determination effective May 13,
1938, extended to include all leather, leather
trimmed, and sheep-lined garments effective
Sept. 19, 1941. m i — Nov. 1295-1296.
Leather industry. Contracts, U. S. Government.
Determination effective Dec. 17, 1941; regional
differentials. 1942— Jan. 217.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S.— Federal and
general, and by States.
Luggage and leather industry. Rate set by order
under Fair Labor Standards Act effective Jan. 6,
1941; coverage of industry. 1941— Jan. 173.
Luggage, leather goods, and women’s handbag
industry. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective July 27, 1942, 1942— Sept. 594.
Luggage, leather goods, belts, and women’s hand­
bag industry. Order under Public Contracts Act
effective Apr. 20, 1943. 1943— May 989-990.
Lumber industry. Order under Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act effective Nov. 3, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1293.
Mattress, quilt, and pillow industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective May 19,
1941. 1941— Oct. 990-991.
Miscellaneous apparel industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Dec. 15, 1941.
1942— Jan. 216.
Motor-carrier industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Jan. 5, 1942. 1942—
Jan. 216.
New York. Beauty-service, confectionery, and
laundry industries. Increases in wages paid
women since State laws became effective. 1941—
Feb. 359-363.
------- Confectionery and laundry industries. Orders
issued in 1938, gains in earnings since. 1941—
Sept. 622-624.
------- Confectionery industry. Earnings of women
workers, increase under State law to November
1942. 1943— July 144-145.
------- Laundry workers. Effect upon earnings and
working time, 1937-38 to 1939-40. 1942— June
1404-1407.
------- See also Legislation, U. S., by States.
Paint and varnish industry. Contracts of U. S.
Government. Determination effective Nov. 6,
1941. 1941— Nov. 1294-1295.
Paper products (converted) industry. Orders under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective June 30,
1941, and Feb. 15, 1943. 1941— July 170; 1943—




137

Mar. 591.
Printing and publishing industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective June 14,
1943. 1943— July 147.
Property motor carrier industry. Rate under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Mar. 16, 1942.
1942— May 1189.
Puerto Rico. Banking, insurance, and finance.
Order under Fair Labor Standards Act, May 7,
1945. 1945— May 1075.
------- Bay oil, bay rum, and aromatic alcohol
industry. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective May 19, 1941. 1941— Oct 990-991.
------- Canning industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Mar. 22, 1941. 1941—
May 1255.
------- Cement industry. Orders under Fair Labor
Standards Act, May 7, 1945. 1945— May 1075.
------- Chemical, petroleum, and related products
industries. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective Oct. 24, 1945. 1945— Dec. 1202.
------- Cigar and cigarette industries. Orders under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective May 19,
1941, and July 16, 1945. 1941— Oct. 990-991;
1945— July 118.
------- Coconut, manufactured. Orders under Fair
Labor Standards Act, May 7, 1941, and May 7,
1945. 1941— June 1487-1488; 1945— May 1075.
------- Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
transportation industries. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Oct. 24, 1945.
1945— Dec. 1202.
------- Construction, business-service, motion-pic­
ture, and miscellaneous industries. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective Oct. 24,
1945. 1945— Dec. 1202.
------- Construction industry. Order made effective
in 1946. Provisions. 1947— June 1049.
------- Foods, beverages, and related products in­
dustries. Order under Fair Labor Standards Act
effective Oct. 24, 1945. 1945— Dec. 1202.
-------Glove (woven and knitted fabric, and leather)
industry. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective Feb. 19, 1941. 1941— Apr. 970.
------- Hair-net industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act, May 7, 1945. 1945— May 1075.
-------Handicraft art-novelty industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective Oct. 30,
1944. 1945— Jan. 162.
------- Hat (straw) industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective May 12, 1941.
1941— June 1487-1488.
------- Leather goods industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Oct. 30, 1944.
1945— , an. 162-163.
J
------- Leather, textile, rubber, straw and related
products industries. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Oct. 24, 1945. 1945—
Dec. 1202.
------- Lumber and wood products industries. Order
under Fair Labor Standards Act effective Oct.
24, 1945. 1945— Dec. 1203.
-------Metal, plastics, machinery, instrument, trans­
portation-equipment, and allied industries. Order
under Fair Labor Standards Act effective Oct.
24, 1945. 1945— Dec. 1203.
------- Needlework. Fixing of piece rates effective
Oct. 12, 1941, superseding those originally
established Nov. 25, 1940. 1941— Sept. 717.
------- ------- Miscellaneous handiwork. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective Jan. 5, 1942.
1941— Dec. 1577-1578.
--------------- Orders under Fair Labor Standards Act
effective Jan. 1 and Oct. 24, 1945; schedule.
1945— Jan. 162-163, Dec. 1203.

138

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Minimum wage, U. S.— Continued
Puerto Rico. Paper-box manufacturing. Order un­
der Fair Labor Standards Act, May 7, 1945.
1945— May 1075.
------- Paper, paper products, printing, publishing,
and related industries. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Oct. 24, 1945. 194.5—
Dec. 1203.
------- Raffea hand bag industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective May 19, 1941.
1941— Oct. 990-991.
-------Railroads and property carriers. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act effective Apr. 7, 1942.
1942— May 1190.
-------Rum and industrial alcohol. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act, May 7, 1945. 1945— May
1075.
------- Shipping. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act, May 7, 1945. 1945— May 1075.
------- Stone, glass, and related products industries.
Order effective Oct. 24, 1945. 1945— Dec. 1203.
-------Sugar industry. Order of Jan. 15, 1945, under
Fair Labor Standards Act. 1945— Apr. 857.
------- Tobacco (leaf) industry. Orders under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Jan. 5, 1942, and
Apr. 1, 1945. 1941— Dec. 1577-1578; 1945—
May 1075.
-------Vegetable-packing industry. Order under
Fair Labor Standards Act, May 7, 1941. 1941—
June 1487-1488.
-------Wholesaling, warehousing, and other distribu­
tion industries. Order under Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act effective Oct. 24, 1945. 1945— Dec. 1203.
Railroad-carrier industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective Aug. 31, 1942. 1942—
Oct. 844.
Railroad workers (track workers, redcaps, dining
car waiters, office, and other employees). Rates
set under Fair Labor Standards Act effective
Mar. 1, 1941. 1941—Jan. 173-174.
Raincoats (men’s industry). Determination ex­
tended to cover all types of rain wear not
previously covered, on bids solicited on or after
Mar. 6, 1941. 1941— Apr. 968.
Retail stores (Boston). Massachusetts Commission,
mandatory order, provisions. 1941— Aug. 323324.
Rubber-products industry. Order under Fair Labor
Standards Act effective July 28, 1941. 1941—
Aug. 479-480.
Shoe industry. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act effective Nov. 3, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1292.
Shoe manufacturing and allied industries. Appli­
cation of 40-cent rate to all, by determination
under Public Contracts Act effective July 11,
1942. 1942— Aug. 367.
Southern region. Legislative provisions summar­
ized, by State. 1946— Oct. 538-539.
Standard draft bills of U. S. Department of Labor
for State laws, revised 1946. 1947— June 1046.
State law needed to protect workers in intrastate
employments (comment of Va. commissioner of
labor and industry). 1946— Oct. 538-539.
State legislation, including wage orders. See Legis­
lation, U. S., by States.
Structural-clay-products industry. Contracts of
U. S. Government. Determination effective Jan.
10, 1941, amended effective Oct. 27, 1941. 1941—
Nov. 1296.
Sugar-beet and sugarcane labor. Rates determined
under Federal Sugar Act of 1937. 1941— July
167-169.
Sugar industry. Order under Fair Labor Standards
Act, effective June 21, 1943. 1948— July 147.




Tag industry. Contracts of U. S. Government. Rate
under determination effective Oct. 31, 1938,
raised effective Sept. 23, 1941. 1941— Nov. 1296.
Teachers. State legal provisions, 1942, and pro­
posals for new State laws, summarized. 1943—
Apr. 793-794.
Textile industry. Contracts, U. S. Government.
Determinations, effective Dec. 17, 1941, and June
24, 1942. 1942— Jan. 216-217, Aug. 367.
------- Order under Fair Labor Standards Act,
effective Apr. 20, 1942. 1942— May 1190.
------- Rate increased, under Fair Labor Standards
Act, to 37.5 cents, effective June 30, 1941.
1941— July 170-171.
Tobacco industry. Cigarettes, snuff, chewing and
smoking tobacco. Determination under Public
Contracts Act effective Dec. 4, 1942. 1942— Sept.
594-595.
----------------Order under Fair Labor Standards Act,
effective Aug. 10, 1942. 1942— Sept. 594-595.
------- Cigar makers and cigar leaf-tobacco han­
dlers. Order under Fair Labor Standards Act
effective Aug. 10, 1942. 1942— Sept. 594.
Uniform and clothing industry. Contracts of U. S.
Government. Determination of rates effective
Jan. 25, 1941. 1941— Mar. 692-693.
Vegetable fats and oils industry. Order under Fair
Labor Standards Act effective Aug. 16, 1943.
1948— Sept. 583.
Vermont. Legislative action, 1947, authorizing in­
vestigation to determine need for, in intrastate
industries. 1948— Sept. 275.
Virgin Islands. Fair Labor Standards Act, order
effective Aug. 1, 1945, establishing rates for bay
oil, bay rum, and miscellaneous manufacturing;
communications; electric power; liquor; meat
packing; property motor carrier; shipping;
wholesaling; and other industries. 1945— Aug.
340.
------- Sugarcane workers. Determination by U. S.
Department of Agriculture, July 21, 1942. 1942—
Sept. 595.
Wage board activities, specified States, 1947-48,
to prepare or revise wage orders. 1948— Sept.
278.
Woolen industry. Order under Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act effective Nov. 24, 1941. 1941— Dec.
1577.
Minimum wage, foreign countries:
Argentina. Agricultural workers (certain areas).
Decree of Nov. 20, 1943, provisions. 1944—
Apr. 858-859.
-------Printing, Government contracts, under decree
of Nov. 12, 1942. 1942— Aug. 361.
------- Santa Fe Province. Agriculture. Harvesting
and threshing. Rates fixed for year 1941-42.
1942— M ar. 772-773.
Australia. Basic-rates awards, summary of plan
of Conciliation and Arbitration Court. 1942—
Mar. 625-628.
Belgium. Home work, 1934 law. 1944— Feb. 289.
------- Rates fixed by order of May 29, 1941. 1942—
Jan. 218.
Bolivia. Mining industry. Increase to be given to
compensate for rise in prices in company stores,
by decree of June 20, 1940. 1941— Oct. 991.
Brazil. Increases ordered Jan. 8, 1943, retroactive
to Jan. 1, 1943. 1943— Mar. 592.
------- Industrial workers, monthly rates. Additions
granted, law of May 11, 1943, by State and
locality. 1943— Aug. 349-350.
------- Petroleum industry, under collective agree­
ment effective for 4 years beginning June 1,
1939. 1941— May 1177-1179.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Bulgaria. Wartime provisions concerning, laws of
1940 and 1941. 19*3— Oct. 679.
Canada. Saskatchewan. Rate established by law,
1944, for 8 principal cities. 194.5— Jan. 129.
-------Workers on Government contracts, increase
in rates under order in council May 30, 1941.
1941— Aug. 366.
Costa Rica. Rates set by decree of Aug. 7, 1944,
by Province, industry, and occupation. 1945—
Apr. 857-859.
Cuba. Construction workers. Rates set Aug. 11,
1944, masons, carpenters, and helpers. 1944—
Oct. 848.
------- Established by decrees of Nov. 7, 1941, and
Apr. 21, 1942, and later measures. 1942— June
1407-1408; 1945— Jan. 163-164.
-------Knit-goods industry. Order of National Mini­
mum Wage Commission, Mar. 15, 1941. 1941—
June 1488-1489.
Ecuador. Orders issued to July 6, 1942, under
labor code of Aug. 5, 1938. 1944— Feb. 401.
France. Measures to provide, 1915-43. Summary.
1944— Oct. 717-718.
------- National survey planned, 1944, to obtain
data needed for adjustments. 1945— May 1077.
------- Paris region. Increase to maximum of 50
percent by decree of Sept. 14, 1944; summary
of application. 1945— May 1076.
French Indo-China. Decree of December 1936,
provisions. 1944— July 57.
Great Britain. Cotton weavers. Guaranteed weekly
wage provided by collective agreement effective
October 1941. 1941— Dec. 1579-1580.
------- England and Wales. Agricultural labor,
male. Weekly rate established late 1941. 1942—
Feb. 501-502.
----------------Agriculture. Guaranteed-minimum prin­
ciple extended to women workers June 20, 1943.
1943— Sept. 583-584.
------- ------- Central Agricultural Wages Board to
establish farm rates (Government decision of
Nov. 12, 1942). 1943— Mar. 592.
------- Fair Wages Resolution, proposed, for sub­
mission at close of war. Discussion and text.
1942—
D e c . 1285-1287.
------- Mining, coal. Rates established under na­
tional agreement signed Apr. 20, 1944. 1944—
July 112-114.
------- Northern Ireland. Agriculture. Rates estab­
lished under law effective Oct. 7, 1940, by dis­
trict and by age of worker. 1941— Mar. 718—
719.
------- Rates under Trade Board Acts, in effect in
1944, by industry and sex. 1944— Oct. 848-850.
------- Scotland. Agriculture. Temporary workers
(students, women, and holiday-period workers)
rates established May 12, 1941. 1941— Aug.
480-481.
Guatemala. Factory workers. Decree of July 27,
1943. Provisions. 1943— Nov. 970.
Haiti. Law of May 4, 1942. Provisions. 1943—
Mar. 593.
India. Consideration by Government committees
and plans for studies concerning. 1944— June
1191-1194.
Italy (northern). Rates, daily, established by
agreement, early summer 1945— by skill, dis­
trict, and industry. 1945— Sept. 458.
Luxembourg. Rates fixed by Grand-ducal decree
of Dec. 30, 1944. 1945— June 1285.
Mexico. Agricultural and nonagricultural workers
(excepting petroleum industry). Rates estab­
lished by decree of Sept. 23, 1943, amended
Oct. 15, 1943. 1943— Dec. 1221-1223.
------- Federal and State employees. Rates estab­




139

lished by decree of Sept. 27, 1943. 1943— Dec.
1221, 1223.
------- Lowest and highest rates, 1938-39, 1940-41,
1942- 43, and 1944-45; by governmental and
geographical
divisions. 1941— Apr.
971-973;
1943— Jan. 153-155; 1945— Jan. 164-167.
-------Petroleum workers. Recommendation that
arbitral Dec. 18, 1937, decision govern. 1943—
Dec. 1221-1222.
New Zealand. Increases provided for by amend­
ment of February 1944 to Economic Stabiliza­
tion Emergency Regulations. 1944— Apr. 860.
------- Law of Dec. 7, 1945, provisions. 1946— June
927-929.
------- Rates in effect Mar. 31, 1944, by industry
or occupation, and by sex. 1945— Apr. 859-861.
------- Weekly rates, dairy workers, specified dates
1937-44; agricultural workers (tobacco workers,
hourly rates), 1944; farm and station hands
(weekly) 1945. 1945— Sept. 536-537.
Paraguay. Daily rates set in 1944, by zone, in­
dustry, and sex. 1945— June 1285-1287.
------- Decree of Oct. 2, 1943, authorizing fixing
of. Provisions summarized. 1943— Dec. 12231224.
Peru, (specified Provinces). Salaried employees.
Rates established by decrees of July 20 and
Oct. 14, 1944. 1945— Jan. 167.
Portugal. Daily minimum and maximum rates,
1933, by industry and sex. 1943— Apr. 787.
Spain. Agricultural labor. Order of May 27, 1941,
fixing rates for Provinces of Toledo and Ciudad
Real. 1941— Aug. 506-507.
Thailand. Monthly base established for Govern­
ment employees. 1944— June 1175.
Uruguay. Boards established under law of Nov.
12, 1943. Composition and powers; wage-board
awards under law. 1944— Feb. 406-407, Nov.
963.
Venezuela. Baking industry. Daily rates estab­
lished Nov. 10, 1944, by resolution. 1945— Sept.
538.
Mining, United States:
Accidents. See Accident statistics, by industry.
Coal. Change, 1899 compared with 1950. 1950—
July 5.
------- Federal inspection act, 1941. Purpose and
provisions. 1941— May 1216-1217.
------- Government control by Secretary of Interior.
Established May 1, 1943; resumed (after termi­
nation in October 1943) Nov. 1, 1943; regula­
tions issued. 1943— June 1093, Aug. 237-238,
290-294, Dec. 1115.
------- Labor productivity, anthracite production,
and degree of mechanization, by year 1936-40;
“bootleg” problem, 1941. 1941— Sept. 618.
------- Output, per man-shift, year 1938, May 1947;
percent change, 1938 to 1947; data for United
Kingdom, Netherlands, Germany (British and
French zones), France and Belgium included.
1947— Dec. 681.
------- Production and distribution in World Wars
I and II. Summary of problems. 1943— May
1000- 1001.
Coal (anthracite). “ Bootleg” operations, extent of
in recent years, and 1941 program to combat,
m i — Sept. 618-619.
------- Pennsylvania area. Economic and unemploy­
ment situations, resume. 1942— May 1101-1106.
-------Productivity of labor. Production, and degree
of mechanization, by year, 1936-40. 1941— Sept.
618.
---------------- Production, employment, and industrial
disputes, 1941-43. 1943— Sept. 506-507; 1944—
Nov. 962.

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

140

Mining, U. S.— Continued
Coal (anthracite). Working conditions. 1943—
Feb. 270-271.
Coal (anthracite and bituminous). Collective bar­
gaining history since 1898. 1947— Mar. 401-402.
------- Health and welfare funds provided for by
agreements in May and June 1946. Features
of plans. 1946— Dec. 880; 1947— Feb. 193-194.
------- U M W A Welfare and Retirement Fund.
Operational statistics up to May 1, 1949. 1949—
July 40-41.
------- Work stoppages. See Labor-management
disputes— Mining.
Coal (bituminous). “ Captive” miners. Definition
of term. Factors affecting operation, and per­
centage production formed (in 1938 and 1940)
of total bituminous coal mined. 1941— Aug. 298299.
------Changing
status
of
miners,
1937-46
(Bowden), and addendum to p. 165 of article.
1946— Aug. 165-174; 1947— Feb. 224.
------- Check weighman. Provisions in Appalachian
agreement of June 19, 1941. 1941— Aug. 375376.
------- Collective agreements. See Collective agree­
ments— Mining.
------- Employment. Productivity, and effect of
mechanization, 1929 and 1937-39. 1941— Jan.
103-105.
---------------- See also Employment statistics.
------- Labor turn-over statistics. See Current labor
statistics, table B -2, each issue , July 1947December 1950.
------- Medical housing, sanitary, and other welfare
conditions. Findings of survey made for U. S.
Department of the Interior. 1947— June 997-

1002.
------- Portal-to-portal travel time. Reports of
President’s committee, Feb. 3 and May 24, 1944.
1944— Mar. 628-629, July 81-83.
------- Preparation and cleaning. “ Reject clauses”
to be eliminated under Appalachian agreement
of June 19, 1941. 1941— Aug. 378.
------- Wage and price structure and effect of 1941
Appalachian agreement (Bowden). 1941— Aug.
293-313.
------- Wage negotiations, 1941, and district and
price factors affecting differentials. 1941— Aug.
293-297.
------- Wage structure in fall of 1945. 1946— Apr.
550-559.
------- Wages. See Wages and hours.
------- Work stoppages. See Labor-management dis­
putes— Mining.
Coal (bituminous and lignite). Production, em­
ployment, and productivity, 1943 and previous
years, as reported by United Mine Workers,
1944 convention. 1944— Dec. 1195.
Copper. Productivity changes, 1935-42 (indexes),
and factors affecting. 1943— Aug. 258-264.
Iron. Characteristics of industry, and scope and
method of BLS wage survey, October 1943.
1944— June 1250-1255.
Labor turn-over rates. See sections Labor TurnOver, each issue January 1940-M ay 1946; Trend
of Employment and Labor Turn-Over, each
issue June 1946-June 1947; Current labor sta­
tistics, table B-2, each issue July 1947-December
1950.
Lead and zinc. Productivity of labor, changes in,
and factors affecting, 1929-42; annual indexes,
1935-42, of production, output, and labor cost.
1943— Dec. 1116-1122.
Metal. Determination of length of workday under




Fair Labor Standards Act effective May 1,
1941.
1941— May 1254-1255.
------- Overtime provisions in collective agreements.
1941— Apr. 848-849.
Metals, nonferrous. Wartime and postwar ex­
periences of miners. 1947— May 770-779.
Nonferrous metal. (U tah). Occupational diseases,
incidence of, hazards, and recommendations by
U. S. Public Health Service. 1942— Aug. 259262.
Strikes, 1892 to 1941, in connection with which
Federal troops were used, summary of. 1941—
Sept. 564-565, 566-569, 570-571.
Mining, foreign countries:
Belgium. Coal. Employment and production 193846; postwar conditions. 1946— July 27-28.
------- ------- Output per man-shift, 1938 and 1947,
and percent change. 1947— Dec. 681.
------- ------- Welfare, social-security provisions in
September 1944 law. 1946— June 862-863.
Bolivia. Company stores and wages to be regu­
lated by June 20, 1940, decree. 1941— Oct. 991.
------- Workmen’s-compensation statistics, 1937—
42.
1945— June 1239-1242.
British India. Coal Mines Labor Welfare Fund,
summary of plan; tax on coal produced. 1946—
June 864; 1947— Feb. 194.
Canada. Minerals output increase in 1940, and
use made of products. 1941— Apr. 837.
Europe, Western. Coal production (and certain
other industries); postwar efforts to improve.
1947— Dec. 682-683.
France. Coal. Output per man-shift, 1938 and
1947, and percent change. 1947— Dec. 681.
Germany (British and French Zones). Coal. Out­
put per man-shift, 1938 and 1947, and percent
change. 1947— Dec. 681.
Great Britain. Coal. Conciliation machinery put
into effect May 1, 1943 (Greene Tribunal
Scheme). 1943— June 1170-1174.
---------------- Decline, 1938 to 1943, in productivity,
employment, and production. 1944— Oct. 767768.
------- ------- Effect of nationalization upon unions,
collective bargaining, productivity, and wages;
prospects of industry and miners. 1950—Jan.
19-25.
---------------- Manpower position, compared with pre­
war. 1943— Oct. 371.
------- ------- Mechanization, need of, to increase
production. 1945— Mar. 545.
------- ------- Nationalization, Jan. 1, 1947; back­
ground. 1950— Jan. 19, 21.
------- ------- Output, annual, average weekly, and
average per man-shift, 1938, 1944-48. 1948—
Oct. 371.
------- ------- Output, manpower, productivity, and
time lost in deep-mined coal industry, 1936-49
(table). 1950— Jan. 22.
---------------- Output per man-shift, 1938 and 1948,
and percent change. 1947— Dec. 681.
----------------Tax on coal produced, for welfare fund,
in effect since 1920. 1947— Feb. 194.
----------------Wage agreement (4-year period) signed
Apr. 20, 1944, provisions. 1944— July 112-114.
----------------Wartime conditions and policies adopted
to avert shortage. 1942— Nov. 941-951.
------- ------- See also Wartime policies, f.c.— Great
Britain.
------- Miners Welfare Fund, activities since 1920
summarized; law of 1943, provisions. 1944—
Apr. 765-766; 1946— June 863-864.
India. Coal industry. Regulation of, measures sug­
gested for. 1944— Feb. 343.
---------------- Work conditions and provisions of 1944

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
welfare legislation. 1944— June 1192-1193.
Netherlands. Coal. Output per man-shift, 1938
and 1947, and percent change. 1947— Dec. 681.
----------------Tax on coal produced, for welfare fund,
in effect since 1936. 1947— Feb. 194.
------- ------- Welfare and social-security benefits,
summary. 1946— June 865.
New Zealand. Coal. Tax on coal produced, for
welfare fund, in effect since 1925. 1947— Feb.
194.
---------------- Welfare benefits provided by 1925 law.
1946— June 865-866.
Peru. Copper. Labor and industrial conditions,
1939 and 1944. 1945— July 52-55.
Spain. Coal. Tax on coal produced, for welfare
fund. 1947— Feb. 194.
-------Welfare. Ministry of Labor order of Feb­
ruary 1946. Provisions summarized. 1946— June
866-867.
Mining machinery and equipment industry. Charac­
teristics, and plan of BLS wage survey of March
1942. 1942— June 1367-1370.
Minneapolis Cooperative Housing Association. Home­
building plan begun February 1940. Summary of
plan and status, October 1940. 1941— Feb. 317319.
Minors, employment of. See Child labor.
Mobilization:
Labor-supply aspects, United States, summary of
by Secretary of Labor, September 1950. 1950—
Nov. 564-567.
Wartime measures. See Manpower; also Wartime
policies.
Molders. Employment outlook, description of work,
qualifications and training, earnings, and working
conditions. 1946— Apr. 573-585.
Montgomery Ward & Co.:
Jurisdiction of case taken by National W ar Labor
Board. 1942— Sept. 497.
Seizure unlawful. 1945— Mar. 592-593.
Monthly Labor Review:
Change in format. Organization of, explained.
1947— July II.
History of, purposes, and activities since 1915.
1947— July 15-19.
Motion-picture industry:
Expansion, 1900 to 1950, of movie industry. 1950—
July 7.
Production. Pacific Coast. Collective bargaining,
history of. 1947— Apr. 665-667.
Motor-carrier industry. Minimum-wage order effective
Jan. 5, 1942. 1942— Jan. 216.
Motor-carrier (property) industry. Minimum wage
order effective Mar. 16, 1942. 1942— May 1189.
Motortruck drivers and helpers, union scales. See
Wages and hours.
Motor-vehicle industry:
Automobile industry. Change in. 1900 compared
with 1950. 1950— July 5.
Effect of automobile industry upon other indus­
tries, 1900-50. 1950— July 13.
Employment and payrolls, indexes showing trend,
by year 1923-40, by month January 1935 to
November 1941. 1942— Feb. 289-290.
Labor relations activities, June-JTuly 1950. Auto­
mobile and automotive parts manufacturing.
1950— Aug. 243-244.
Overtime provisions in collective agreements.
1941—-Apr. 844-845.
Seniority provisions in collective agreements (sum­
mary of BLS study). 1944— Sept. 463-474.
Wages. See Wages and hours.
Motor-vehicle operators. Hours-of-work regulations
by Interstate Commerce Commission, 1938-40, sum­
mary of. 1941— July 165-167.




141

Moving and travel expenses. Scientists, industrial
research, late 1949. 1950— Apr. 373.
Municipal governments. Wage practices. Purpose,
scope, and method of BLS survey, 1944. 1945— Aug.
319-323.
Murray Industry Council Plan. CIO plan to increase
efficiency in defense program, outline of. 1941— Dec.
1453.
National Coal Board. Great Britain. Efforts to increase
output; attitudes, union and management toward.
1948— Oct. 371.
National Defense Advisory Commission (U . S. Govern­
ment). Appointment May 28, 1940, and activities
during first 6 months. 1941—-Jan. 86-89.
National Defense Mediation Board (U. S. Government) :
Creation in 1941; functions; replaced by National
War Labor Board in 1942. 1942— Apr. 867;
1947— May 853.
Establishment, Mar. 19, 1941. Organization, per­
sonnel, procedure, and functions; status of
cases, April 1941; activities in May 1941. 1941—
May 1137-1139, June 1477-1478.
National Industrial Recovery Act, June 13, 1933. Pro­
visions. 1947— May 848-851.
National Labor Relations Act. See Court decisions,
U. S.; also Legislation, U. S., Federal and general.
National Labor Relations Board (U. S. Government):
Actions eliminating unfair labor practices. Effect
upon extent of collective bargaining. 1944—
June 1207-1219.
Activities, 1939-40, 1941-43, and 1949, sum­
marized. 1941— Apr. 851-852; 1948— Mar. 516517; 1944— June 1223-1224; 1945— May 10361039; 1950— Apr. 402-403.
Assignment of work, disputes over, not under
jurisdiction of NLRB. 1950— Feb. 190.
Court decisions concerning. See Court decisions.
Creation, 1934, and continuation under National
Labor Relations Act, 1935. 1947— May 850-852.
Decisions. Agreement as bar where no unusual cir­
cumstances exist. 1946— July 100.
-------Agricultural workers. 1949— Feb. 211; 1950—
Jan. I ll, Mar. 310, Sept. 371-372.
-------Back pay awarded employees discriminatorily
transferred. 1948— Aug. 311.
------- Back pay, employees right to court review
of order. 1948— Mar. 495.
------- Bargaining; elections and representation.
1943— July 129, Aug. 311, Oct. 782-783, Nov.
966-967, 968; 1944—July 124, 126-127, 128,
Aug. 375, 378, Sept. 580, Oct. 800, 801, Nov.
1020, 1021, Dec. 1226, 1227; 1945— Feb. 344,
Mar. 597, Apr. 827, May 1046; 1946— July 9 9 100, Dec. 973-974; 1947— Feb. 274, Mar. 490,
May 858-859; 1948— Mar. I V ; 1949— Jan. 72,
Feb. 210-211, June 672, July 53-54, Sept. 298299, Oct. 423, Nov. 555, 556, Dec. 680-681;
1950— Jan. IV , 67, Feb. IV, Apr. III. 426-427,
May 543-544, June 659-660, Sept. 371, Nov.
598.
------- “ Captive audience” doctrine. 1947— Jan. 87.
------- Check-off. 1943— Mar. 494-495, July 128;
1947— June 1062; 1950— May 542, Dec. 715716.
------- Closed shop. 1946— Mar. 435, Dec. 974;
1947— Jan. 87; 1949— May 555-556; 1950— Aug.
248, Oct. 494.
------- Discharges, discriminatory and other. 1944—
Sept. 580; 1946— Mar. 436; 1947— May 858;
1949— July 51, Sept. 298; 1950— Feb. 188-189,
May IV, July 136-137, Aug. 247-248, Dec. 714715.

142

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

NLRB (U . S. Government)— Continued

Decisions. Discrimination. 1945— Feb. 343; 194.9—
July 51-52, Oct. 424; 1950— Mar. 311, Apr. 428,
Sept. 371.
------- Disestablishment of labor-management com­
mittee as employer-dominated. 1943— Dec. 1197.
------- Economic strikers. 1949— Jan. 73, May 325.
------- Employees within meaning of National Labor
Relations Act. 1943— June 1128, Aug. 309, 310311; 1944— July 123-124, Aug. 382, Dec. 1226.
------- Free speech, coercive statements, and unfair
labor practices. 1944— Dec. 1227; 1946— Dec.
973; 1947— Mar. 489-490.
------- Free speech, effect of W ar Labor Board
award. 1944— Apr. 789.
------- Government^seized plant, effect of NLRB
order on. 1944— Apr. 788-789.

------ Grievances
and nrocedures. 1943— Sept.
551-552, Nov. 966; 1944— Sept. 581, Oct. 800;
1945— Apr. 826-827; 1947— Mar. 490.
-------Hiring halls. 1948— Sept. IV.
------ Interference. 1944— Sept. 579-580; 1949—
Mar. 324, Dec. 681-682; 1950— Mar. 311, June
659, Sept. 370, Oct. 495.
------- Jurisdiction of NLRB. 1944— Oct. 801, Nov.
1020; 1949— June 674, July 52-53; 1950— Apr.
427, Aug. 246, Dec. 717.
------- Jurisdictional disputes. 1943— Nov. 964;
1944— Nov. 1022; 1949— May 555, June 672673, July 52; 1950— May 542-543, Oct. 496.
------- Labor-management committee functions lim­
ited. 1943— Dec. 1197.
------- Miscellaneous. 1943— Mar. 495; 1945— Jan.
125-126, Apr. 829-830, June 1266, Nov. 993,
Dec. 1188; 1946— June 920-923, July 98-100,
Sept. 403-404, Nov. 771-772; 1948— Apr. I ll,
Sept. I V ; 1949— Mar. 324-325, July 53, 54, Oct,
424; 1950— May IV, Oct. 495-496.
—— No unions for plant-protection employees
in wartime. 1945— Feb. 344.
------- Non-Communist affidavits. 1949— Mar. 325,
Apr. 440, Sept. 298; 1950— Jan. I ll , Feb. 190191.
------- Picketing permitted when plants are bar­
gaining with another union. 1946— Mar. 435436.
------- “ Premature extension” doctrine. 1947— Jan.
87-88.
------- Racial discrimination by railway labor union
enjoined. 1945— Feb. 339-341.
------- Recognition of and bargaining with inde­
pendent foremen’s unions. 1947— May 857-858.
------- Refusal to bargain. 1947— May 858, June
1062-1063;
1949— Nov. 555-556; 1950— Mar.
310-311, Apr. 428, May 543, June 659, July 137,
Aug. 247, Sept. 369-370, Nov. 597, Dec. 716717.
------- Reimbursement of employees for check-off
of dues to company-dominated union. 1943—
July 128.
------- Reinstatement. A fter discriminatory dis­
charge; after economic strike. 194b— Oct. 801,
Nov. 1021.
------- ------- After release from armed services,
temporary employee, order for. 1943— July 31.
----------------Cost of moving and increased rental in­
cluded in order. 1943— Sept. 553.
------- Restraint or coercion. 1949— Jan. 70, Apr.
440-441, Sept. 297-298.
------- Roadhouse entertainers held in peonage.
1945— Apr. 836.
------- Secondary boycotts. 1949— Apr. 441, May
557, June 673, Aug. 172, Oct. 424-425, Nov.
556; 1950— Feb. 189-190, Mar. 308-310, Aug.
246-247, Nov. 596-597.




------- Sidestepping union in proposing wage in­
crease, violation. 1945— Mar. 597.
------- Strike (protest). Advocates of defeated union
may lawfully stage. 1945— May 1047.
------- Strike to obtain agreement on wage increases
not unlawful. 1944— Nov. 1020.
------- Strikebreaker, employer may penalize em­
ployee refusing to act as. 1943— Sept. 552-553.
------- Unfair labor practices. 1943— Nov. 967, Dec.
1198; 1944— Aug. 375, Oct. 801, Dec. 1225, 1226;
1945— Feb. 338-339, June 1262; 1949— Feb.
209-210; 1950— Jan. 65-67, May 542, June 660,
Aug. 247, Nov. 597.
------- Union recognition obtained by strike not
conclusive with NLRB. 1944— Dec. 1227.
------- Union security. 1949— Jan. 70-71, Sept. 299;
1 9 5 0 — Feb. 130-131, Nov. 598, Dec. 716.
------- Union shop, construction industry. 1950—
Jan. I ll, July 105.
------- See also Labor Management Relations A ct;

specific issue involved.
Economic Research Division of, abolished by Con­
gressional mandate, 1940. 1941— Mar. 650.
Functions; activities in year ending June 30, 1944.
Summary. 1945— May 1036-1039.
General Counsel. Disagreement re powers and
duties; change in appointment. 1950— Mar. IV,
Oct. IV.
Government reorganization order affecting, sent
to Congress, March 1950, summary. 1950— Apr.
IV.
Interpretation. Legal restriction (1944 Appropria­
tion Act) upon investigation of collective agree­
ments (Gen. Couns. of Bd., July 16, 1943).
1943— Sept. 471-472.
Jurisdiction. Standards for exercise of, issued
by Board, October 1950. 1950— Nov. 574.
Labor relations. Legislative bans and decisions
affecting, January-June 1949. 1949— Sept. 239.
New personnel authorized by Labor Management
Relations Act, appointment o f; operating func­
tions outlined. 1947— Oct. 439-440.
Non-Communist affidavit; ruling on, reversing
interpretation of General Counsel. 1947— Nov.
565.
Orders of, court decisions on enforcement. See
Court decisions.
Representation election, Westinghouse Electric
Corp. employees, May 1950. 1950— May IV.
Structure and internal operation, changes in under
Labor Management Relations Act, 1947. 1947—
July 58.
Unfair labor practices, cases handled, 1939-40.
1941— Apr. 851-852. See also Decisions, this

section.
Union

representation,

cases

handled,

1939-40.

1941— Apr. 852.
Union-shop referendum. Petitions filed, elections
held, January 1947. 1948— Mar. IV.
National Mediation Board (U . S. Government). See
Conciliation and arbitration, U. S.— Railroads.
National Railway Labor panel (U . S. Government).
Creation of under Executive Order 9172 of May
22, 1942; jurisdiction affirmed by Executive Order
9299 of Feb. 4, 1943. 1943— July 46.
National Wage Stabilization Board (U. S. Government):
Created in Department of Labor, Jan. 1, 1946,
after liquidation of National W ar Labor Board,
to administer new wage policy. 1949— Jan. 23.
Statement of June 17, 1946, concerning probable
effect on wage control of price-control relaxa­
tion. 1946— July 104-105.
National W ar Labor Board (U . S. Government):
Activities, first 3 years ending January 1945,

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
with resume of establishment and functions.
191*5— May 1035-1036.
Adjustments for W ar Department civilian em­
ployees delegated by Board to that Department.
191*3— Jan. 148-149.
A r b itr a to r awards. Statement of Sept. 10, 1943,
regarding review of. 191*3— Nov. 935-936.
“ Basic Steel" decision of Nov. 25, 1944. Provisions
summarized. 191*5— Jan. 41-43.
Breeze Corporations, Inc., employees' wage-in­
crease request, decision, May 22, 1942. 191*2—
Sept. 485.
Cases received and cases closed, Jan. 13 to Nov.
30, 1942, summary. 191*3— Feb. 291.
Cases closed, dispute and voluntary, and workers
covered, Feb. 12, 1942, to Aug. 18, 1945. 191*9—
Jan. 22-23.
Coal miners and operators' (Illinois) agreement
of Dec. 3, 1943, approved. 191*1*— Jan. 65.
Commissions, payment methods not required to
conform with “ Little Steel5 formula. Nov. 16,
'
1943, decision. 191*1*— Jan. 65-66.
Decentralization of authority to make wage and
salary adjustments. 191*3— Jan. 148—
149.
Decisions. Labor relations. 191*1*— Apr. 789-790,
May 1023, 1025.
------- Miners' (coal) wage agreed upon (between
Secretary of Interior and United Mine Workers)
for extra hour, approved Nov. 5, 1943. Pro­
visions of agreement. 191*3— Dec. 1115.
-------Miscellaneous. 191*2— June 1344-1352, Sept.
484-497; 191*3— Jan. 59-67; 191*5— Jan. 124125, Feb. 341-343, Mar. 592-593, Apr. 828830, May 1049-1051, June 1266, Sept. 504, Oct.
757-758, Nov. 992-993, Dec. 1188-1189.
------- ------- (Including some regional board de­
cisions). 191*!*— July 127-128, Aug. 381-382,
Sept. 583-584, Oct. 805-807, Nov. 1025-1026,
Dec. 1230-1232.
------- Premium pay computations for sixth and
seventh days; types of absences excusable under
Sept. 8, 1944, ruling. 19U — Oct. 847.
-------Premium pay in relation to sixth and seventh
days, holidays, Saturday and Sunday, in cases
affected by wartime order (Exec. Order 9240, of
Sept.
9,
1942).
Summary
(Feinberg
and
Dadian). 191*1*— Aug. 364—
373.
------- Regional boards. See Regional W ar Labor
Boards.
------- Wage differentials based on racial discrimi­
nation to be abolished (ruling of June 7, 1943).
191*3— July 31-32.
Directives not complied with, reported to Director
of Economic Stabilization. Methods of enforcing
specified in Executive order of Aug. 16, 1943.
191*3— Oct. 712.
Establishment under Executive order (No. 9017)
of Jan. 12, 1942, character and procedures,
functions, and members appointed. 191*2— Feb.
427-430, Mar. 696, Apr. 867-868.
Jurisdiction. Intrastate cases; resolution sum­
marized. 191*1*— Sept. 520-521.
------- NLRB, refusal to interfere with. 191*3— Nov.
964.
------- Threatened strike cases, declaration of Mar.
29, 1943. 191*3— May 882-883.
“ Little Steel" formula. Resolution of July 25,
1944, outlining procedure in claims of inequi­
ties. 191*1*— Sept. 518.
Maintenance of union membership, awards con­
cerning, summary of results. 191*3— Sept. 524533.
------- Browne & Sharpe Manufacturing Co., clause
in agreement ordered. 191*2— Sept. 491-492.
Minimum rates established in cotton-textile in­




143

dustry, February 1945 order. 191*5— Apr. 856857.
State and municipal employees' wage adjustment
to cost of living. Policy, and action taken.
191*3 — Nov. 885-894.
Subsidiary agencies' decisions. Review of state­
ment concerning, on Apr. 1, 1943. 191*3— June
1203.
“ Substandard" wages, policies concerning, October
1944 to April 1945 period. 191*5— Sept. 519, 522.
Termination of, Dec. 31, 1945. 191*6— Apr. 539.
Termination Report, Volume I, summary. 191*9—
Jan. 20-23.
Veteran's right to increases granted during ab­
sence on position to which he has reinstatement
rights. Ruling under Selective Service Act.
191*5 — May 1049.
Wage adjustments, individual. General Order 31
amended to permit exceptions in hiring for es­
sential war work. 191*5— Mar. 538-539.
Wage and salary adjustments, individual. Regu­
lations (General Order No. 31) of Aug. 18, 1943.
191*3— Oct. 711-712.
Wage and union-security issues, International
Harvester Co., decision. 191*2— June 1346, 13491350.
Wage disputes during wartime, role in settlement
of; tripartite composition of Board. 191*9— Jan.
20-23.
Wage-incentive plans. Policies regarding stated,
Oct. 2, 1943. 191*3— Nov. 936.
Wage and salary rate increases not totaling over
40 cents an hour, allowed without approval
(Aug. 23, 1943, amendment to Gen. Order 30).
191*3— Oct. 712.
Wage-stabilization policy, statement o f; made
public Apr. 2, 1944; summary. 191*2— Dec. 1144r1147; 191*1*— May 995-996.
World W ar I and World W ar II Boards. Sum­
maries of activities. 191*7— May 847, 853-854.
National Youth Administration (U . S. Government).
See Youth Administration, National.
Nationalization:
Great Britain. Coal mines. Effect upon unions,
collective bargaining, productivity, and wages.
1 9 5 0 — Jan. 19-25.
Industrial; resolution passed by Congress of In­
ternational Cooperative Alliance (Prague); ob­
jections to proposal, specified countries. 191*8—
Dec. 601.
Naturalization. Total persons receiving, by country
of origin or nationality, 1923-40. 191*1— Mar. 666.
Navy (U. S. Government). Labor-relations policy an­
nounced Aug. 8, 1942. 191*2— Oct. 719-720.
Needlework industry, Puerto Rico:
Development, 1940-43, and summary of working
conditions. 191*5 — Oct. 778-779.
Miscellaneous handwork. Minimum-wage order
effective Jan. 5, 1942. 191*1— Dec. 1577-1578.
Piece rates fixed for home workers, effective Oct.
12, 1941. 191*1— Sept. 717.
Negro Americans in National Defense Industries, Com­
mittee on. Statement by, May 7, 1941. 191*1— June
1390.
Negroes (see also Negro workers) :
Education. Carpentry, educational research, and
domestic work, training courses in Tuskegee and
Hampton Institutes and in Yazoo City, Miss.
191*1— Sept. 620-621.
------- Louisiana (Shreveport and Caddo Parish)
experiment, including adult education and teach­
er training. 191*1— June 1445-1447.
------- Vocational, Texas high schools, 1945-46.
191*9— May 544-545.

144

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Negroes— Continued
Employed. Occupational and industrial distribu­
tion of, by sex, April 1940, 1944, and 1947, and
proportion of, to total employment in each major
occupational group. 1947— Dec. 664-665.
Housing projects (two, in Atlanta). Residents,
annual earnings, 1937-44, by size of family,
number of dependents, and occupation. 1945—
Dec. 1061-1073.
Labor force. Wartime and postwar shifts. 1947—
Dec. 663-665.
Louisville, Ky. Representation in city government;
equalization of teachers’ salaries; recreational,
housing, and hospital facilities planned. 1945—
Oct. 727-728.
New York. Occupational distribution, 1940-47.
1949— Jan. 57.
Northwest region (Puget Sound and PortlandVancouver areas). Increase in number, 1940-44.
1947— Apr. 644.
Problems of the Negro and Negro youth, Second
National Conference on, January 1939, pro­
ceedings summarized. 1939— Mar. 576-577.
Racial history. Teaching of, in Chicago public
schools. 1943— Apr. 721-722.
Richmond, Va. (families of 2 or more). Average
money income, savings, and actual and per­
centage distribution of expenditures in 1947.
1949— Apr. 394-395.
------- Expenditures for food and alcoholic bev­
erages, by net income class, 1947. 1949— June
623-624.
------- Renters and home owners, housing costs.
1949— Oct. 379.
------- Surpluses and deficits in relation to income
and expenditures, average amount and per­
centage reporting, 1947. 1949— July 34-36.
San Francisco Bay area. Income, household,
sources of, 1948; distribution of households, by
total income received, 1947 (tables). 1950— June
617.
------- Occupational distribution of workers, by
group; industrial distribution of principal wage
earners, by migration status; selected periods,
1940-48. 1 9 5 0 — June 614-616.
------- Status of workers, 1940-48; selected age
comparisons, 1947; educational distribution, per­
sons aged 25 and over, by group, 1948. 1950—
June 612-613.
Washington, D. C. (families of 2 or more).
Average money income, savings, and actual and
percentage distribution of expenditures, 1947.
1949— Apr. 392-393.
------- Expenditures for food and alcoholic bever­
ages, by net income class, 1947. 1949— June
623-624.
------- Surpluses and deficits in relation to income
and expenditures, average amount and per­
centage reporting, 1947. 1949— July 34-36.
Youth. N Y A aid to, 1935-40. 1941— June 14421445.
------- N Y A student-work program 1939-40, par­
ticipation in. 1941— May 1198.
------- Participation in CCC. 1941— June 1412-1413.
Negro workers ( see also N egroes):
Agricultural. Aid given under rehabilitation pro­
gram of Farm Security Administration. 1941—
Feb. 348-349.
Airframe plants. Proportions employed in midwestern, western, central, and eastern districts,
early 1943. 1943— May 888-889.
American Federation of Labor program in behalf
of, presented at convention of Brotherhood of




Sleeping Car Porters, September 1944. 1944—
Nov. 998.
Automobile industry. Wartime increase in em­
ployment; promotion and seniority policies.
1944—
Sept. 473-474.
Aviation. Employment opportunities summarized.
1 9 4 1 — June 1389-1390.
Buffalo area, war work. Status in 1944 and prob­
abilities of postwar employment. 1944— Dec.
1132.
Canneries (Delaware). Migrants. Living condi­
tions, remuneration, and family characteristics.
1941— Aug. 408-410.
Committee on Fair Employment Practices. See
Committee on Fair Employment Practices.
Defense program. Participation in, training pro­
gram, and construction work. 1941— June 13881390.
Discrimination in employment. New York State
law, operation under, first 6 months. Summary.
1946— Apr. 593-594.
------- Nondiscrimination clause in Government con­
tracts. Interpretation requested, and President’s
letter Nov. 5, 1943, stating it to be mandatory.
1 9 4 3 — Dec. 1123.
------- State legislation. See Legislation, U. S.,
Federal and general, and by States, fo r specific

State.
Employment trends, war and (anticipated) post­
war. 1945— Jan. 1-5.
Equal pay for equal work ordered by National
W ar Labor Board (decision of June 7, 1943).
1943— July 31—
32.
Fair employment practices. Summary of progress
toward, including legislative measures, to spring
of 1945. 1945— May 1003-1008.
Farm operators. By States and by ownership or
tenant status, 1940. 1941— Aug. 399-401.
Federal Government. Increase in employment fol­
lowing Executive order 8802, June 1941, for­
bidding discrimination. 1943— May 889-891.
------- Wartime increase in number employed, and
distribution by type of work, Mar. 31, 1944.
1945— May 1007-1008.
Firemen (Louisville, Ky.) New station to be
manned entirely by Negroes. 1945— Oct. 727.
Housing. Defense areas, projects planned and
under way, June 1941. 1 9 4 1 — Sept. 647.
-------Projects (2) in Atlanta, Ga. Annual earnings
of residents, by size of family, number of de­
pendents, and occupation, 1937-44. 1945— Dec.
1061-1073.
Indiana. Placement. Bi-racial committee’s organi­
zation in 1941 to promote, and activities to April
1942, summary. 1942— Aug. 231-234.
Michigan. Employment problems as summarized in
findings, committee report to State conference,
Oct. 8, 1940. 1941— Feb. 350-354.
Occupational distribution, by sex, 1940. 1944—
Apr. 739.
Old-age insurance. Characteristics under system.
1941— Aug. 402-405.
Placements, industrial. Increase, January to May
1941, by State. 1941— Oct. 925-926.
Potato and strawberry crops (Atlantic Coast).
1941— Aug. 406-408.
Railroad (Pennsylvania) employees, by occupa­
tion, Sept. 28, 1942. 1943— Mar. 484-485.
Rubber industry (Akron area). Seniority prac­
tices concerning. 1 9 4 4 — Oct. 795-796.
Teachers (Norfolk, V a.) granted pay equal to pay
of white teachers (Decisions of Cir. Ct. of
App. and U. S. Sup. Ct.). 1941— Feb. 350.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Unemployment among nonwhites as indicated by
1940 census. 191*1— May 1181-1184.
Veterans. Employment conditions, March 1946.
191*6— Nov. 714-720.
Vocational training for skilled war work. Various
courses furnished. 191*3— Nov. 952-953.
Women. Dietitian courses available, and prospects
for employment. 191*3— Juty 104-105.
Neurosis.
See
Health,
foreign
countries— Great
Britain.
New York Dress Joint Board. International Ladies’
Garment Workers’ Union. Collective agreement with
New York dress industry; summary of provisions.
191*7— Feb. 206-212.
New York State Labor Relations Board:
Change in policy as to back pay in discriminatory
discharge cases. 191*1*— Oct. 804-805.
Decision concerning collective bargaining by su­
pervisory employees. 191*5—Jan. 128.
Night work, United States:
Differentials in pay provided by union agreement.
191*3— July 133-144.
Pay differentials under union agreements, by in­
dustries (manufacturing), January 1943. 191*3—
July 133-144.
Women, (New York State). Relaxation of statute
permitting; attitudes toward, and reasons given
by those preferring. 191*9— Jan. 56-57.
------- War-plant employers, experience concerning.
191*5— Sept. 507, 509.
Night work, foreign countries:
Japan. Women and young persons. Forbidden in
mines, 1928, and in factories, 1929. 191*5— Oct.
659.
Venezuela. Baking industry. Resolution of Nov.
10, 1944. Provisions. 191*5 — Sept. 538.
Nonagricultural establishments. See Employment sta­
tistics.
Nonferrous metal mining and milling. Characteristics
of industry, and scope and method of BLS survey in
summer of 1941. 191*2— June 1374-1382.
Nonferrous metals:
Manpower. U. S. W ar Commission’s stabilization
plan, summary of. 191*2— Oct. 714-717.
Miners. Wartime and postwar experiences. 191*7—
May 770-779.
Mining and milling. Characteristics of industry,
wartime, scope and method of BLS survey.
191*3— Nov. 971-976.
Mining of (U tah). Occupational diseases (study
by U. S. Public Health Service). 191*2— Aug.
259-262.
Mining, smelting, and refining. Strike restrictions,
arbitration, duration, and renewal of collective
agreements. Summary of provisions. 191*1— Mar.
558-560.
Primary fabrication. Description and characteris­
tics of industry and scope of BLS survey,
August 1941. 191*2— Aug. 314-321.
Smelting and refining of. Characteristics of indus­
tries and scope of BLS surveys. August 1941
and June 1943. 191*2— July 129-135; 191*3— Dec.
1206-1208, 1215-1216.
Nonmanufacturing industries. See under specific sub­
ject , or specific industry.
No-raid agreements. United Automobile Workers and
the International Association of Machinists, Janu­
ary 1950. 1950— Mar. 278-279.
Norris-La Guardia Act of 1932. Scope and develop­
ments following. 1950— July 54-55. See also Court
decisions.
Nourse report. See European Recovery Program.
Nursery schools. Soviet Union. Care of children of
working mothers, description of schools provided
for. 191*5— Sept. 476-477.




145

N urses:
Army Nurse Corps. Growth, during World W ar
II; full military status given by law of June
22 , 1944. 191*1*— Dec. 1169.
Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May 510.
Practical. Employment prospects, postwar. 191*5—
Aug. 298-299.
Private duty and staff. 1947 survey of earnings,
hours, and working conditions, October 1946;
opinions of nurses regarding their work, by
subject. 191*7— Nov. 544-548.
Private duty. Percentage distribution of, by hourly
rates of pay, October 1946. 191*7— Nov. 546.
Public health. Hours, earnings, professional ex­
penses, conditions of work. Survey, 1947, by
National Nursing Council, Women’s Bureau, and
BLS. Summary. 191*7— Sept. 302-303.
Registered. Hours, earnings, living arrangements,
and opinions regarding conditions of work. Sur­
vey made in 1947 by National Nursing Council,
Women’s Bureau, and BLS. Summary. 191*7—
July 20-27.
Staff, general; duties of, and percentage of time
allocated to each. 191*7— Nov. 548.
Nutrition, United States:
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations (recommended by Hot Springs Confer­
ence, June 1943). Status of plan in March 1945.
191*5— June 1184.
National policy on, in relation to wage earners
(Perkins). 191*1— July 1-8.
War workers provided facilities for “food on job”
(summary of survey by W ar Food Administra­
tion). 191*1*— Oct. 746.
Nutrition, foreign countries:
Germany. Food consumption by workers’ families
compared with American families’ consumption.
191*1— Aug. 286-291.
------- Food rations in shop canteens increased,
Aug. 14, 1940. 191*1— Jan. 100.
Great Britain. Food consumption, per capita, pre­
war, 1945, and 1948. 191*8— Aug. 121-122.
------- Milk furnished free or at reduced prices,
community feeding centers and factory canteens.
191*1— Apr. 833-835.
------- School-meals service for children extended
in October 1941. 191*2— Apr. 917-918.
------- Wartime diet, quality deterioration; postwar
supply difficulties; lowered consumption, first
half 1948; special rations. 191*8— Aug. 121-122.
South Africa, Union of. Plan for improvement,
including food subsidy. 191*5— June 1217-1218.
Nylon-textile industry. Earnings, hourly, selected oc­
cupations and areas, April 1950, and related wage
practices. 1950— Oct. 466-470.
Oakwood Community, Chapel Hill, N. C. Cooperative
housing plan begun in March 1940. Summary, and
status November 1940. 191*1— Feb. 299-302.
Obituary. Hugh S. Hanna, Jan. 9, 1948. Retired edi­
tor, Monthly Labor Review. 191*8— Jan. II.
Occupational diseases. See Health; also Workmen’s
compensation.
Occupational distribution. S ee Employment statistics.
Occupational outlook. See Employment outlook.
Occupations:
Clerical. Trends, 1940-47, and future outlook;
Civil W ar ratio. 191*7— Dec. 658-659.
Crafts (skilled workers), operatives (semiskilled
workers), laborers; employment, 1948, compared
with other specified years. 191*9— Feb. 176.
Engineers. Growth of profession; change in num­
ber, 1890-1949; future outlook. 191*9— July 1 418; 1950— May 510.

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

146

Occupations— Continued
Farm, domestic, and unskilled. Trends, 1940-47
and future outlook. 1947— Dec. 659.
Hazardous. Molding. Summary, with injury fre­
quency rates, 1942. 1946— Apr. 584-585.
------- Pulp wood logging. Most jobs included, ef­
fective Feb. 2, 1948, under Hazardous Occupa­
tions Order No. 4, by authority of Fair Labor
Standards Act. Other orders, with effective
dates. 1948— Apr. 410.
------- Regulations for, set forth by Secretary of
Labor, Jan. 12, 1950; summary. 1950— Mar.
290.
------- Welding. Conditions involving and preventive
methods. Summary. 1945— Sept. 432.
Jobs. Entered by 5,000 young people (Maine),
1940 and 1941. Various types of. 1948— June
1122-1123.
------- Major trends, 1900-50, rise and decline of
specific jobs. 1950— July 13-14.
Physical aspects, changes in, 1900-50. 1950— July

22 .

Professional and semiprofessional. Trends, 194047, and future outlook. 1947— Dec. 655-656.
Sales. Trends, 1940-47, and future outlook. 1947—
Dec. 658.
Semiskilled. Growth in, and changing concept of
skill, 1900-50. 1950— July 14-15.
------- Trends, 1940-47, and future outlook. 1947—
Dec. 658.
Shifts in, wartime and postwar, by field, and future
potentialities; summary. 1947— Dec. 654-659.
Skilled. Trends, 1940-47, and future outlook.
1947— Dec. 657-658.
Wartime and postwar trends, comparison o f; shifts
in; prospects of growth, by category. 1947—
Aug. 139-147.
White-collar workers. Employment, expansion,
1948. 1949— Feb. 176.
Office-building service. See Wages and hours.
Office employees. Paid-vacation provisions, manufac­
turing and other industries, by type of plan, April
1943 to April 1944. 1945— Jan. 94-95. See also Wages
and hours.
Office of Defense Health and Welfare Services (U . S.
Government). Establishment, Sept. 3, 1941, and func­
tions. 1942— Apr. 854.
Office of Economic Stabilization (U . S. Government) :
Creation of, by Executive order of Oct. 3, 1942,
and appointment of Director. 1942— Oct. 679,
Nov. 917-924.
Role in clarification of wartime wage stabilization
policy. 1949— Jan. 22.
Office of Economic Warfare (U. S. Government):
Transferred, Sept. 25, 1943, to Foreign Economic
Administration. 1948— Nov. 936.
United States Commercial Co., Rubber Develop­
ment Corporation, Petroleum Reserve Corpora­
tion, Export-Import Bank of Washington, and
certain functions of Reconstruction Finance
Corporation and Secretary of Commerce, trans­
ferred to, by Executive order of July 15, 1943.
1948— Sept. 470.
Office of Foreign Economic Coordination (U . S. Govern­
ment). Transferred, Sept. 25, 1943, to Foreign
Economic Administration. 1948— Nov. 936.
Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations
(U . S. Government). Transferred, Sept. 25, 1943, to
Foreign Economic Administration. 1948— Nov. 936.
Office of Labor Advisory Committees (U . S. Govern­
ment). Created in W ar Production Board, June 1944,
functions; committees included. 1944— Aug. 303-304.
Office of Lend-Lease Administration (U. S. Govern­
ment). Transferred Sept. 25, 1943, to Foreign Eco­
nomic Administration. 1948— Nov. 936.




Office of W ar Mobilization (U. S. Government):
Established by Executive order of May 28, 1943
(text). 1948— June 1089-1090.
Unification and coordination of activities concern­
ing foreign economic affairs. Authority granted
by Executive order of July 15, 1943. 1948—
Sept. 470.
Office of W ar Mobilization and Reconversion, Advisory
Board. Report to President on work accomplished;
issued by White House, Apr. 27, 1947; recommenda­
tions on guaranteed wage. 1947— July 40.
Offices of Lend-Lease Administration, Foreign Relief
and Rehabilitation Operations, Economic Warfare,
and Foreign Economic Coordination (U . S. Govern­
ment). Transferred to Foreign Economic Adminis­
tration, Sept. 25, 1943. 1943— Nov. 936.
Office workers ( see also Wages and hours) :
Atlanta. Working conditions, December 1947, as
shown by BLS survey. 1948— May 512, 514.
New York City. Bonus, nonproduction; group
insurance; holidays, paid; pensions, retirement
plans; sick leave; and vacations with pay; use
of, January-February 1948. 1948— July 29.
Supplementary wage practices, selected cities,
December 1947-February 1948. 1948— Sept. 2 4 2 243;
Unionized offices, personnel practices; provisions.
Analysis of 50 collective-bargaining agreements
from American Management Association survey.
Dec. 623-626.
Oil. World resources; resolution on, passed by Congress
of International Cooperative Alliance (Prague).
1948— Dec. 600.
Oil-field machinery manufacturing. Characteristics of
industry and scope and method of BLS survey,
F.ebruary-March 1942. 1942— Sept. 578-581.
Old-age and survivors insurance:
Applicants. Age, sex, racial characteristics, and
occupational background, January-March 194043. 1948— Sept. 488-493.
Benefits. Average in force, Oct. 31, 1944, by class
of fam ily; and total payments in year 1944.
1945— June 1236.
------- Monthly, increase in, 1940-49. 1950— Jan. 6.
Coverage, extent of, in terms of workers, wages
and salaries, and firms, 1937-48 (table). 1950—
Jan. 5.
Earnings. Annual, nature of data, by industry.
Summary. 1950— June 608-609.
------- Statistics and their uses. Aggregate wage
statistics, wage size distributions, sources of
annual data, and development of statistics for
additional uses. 1950— Apr. 421-425.
Eligible persons, Jan. 1, 1946, and number post­
poning claims; total beneficiaries, October 1945.
1946— Mar. 388.
Federal program. Historical developments; provi­
sions and experience under present program;
relation to other programs; adequacy of present
program; legislative developments. 1950— Jan.

1- 8.

Older workers’ status, 1948. 1949— Dec. 668-670.
Payments, 1948. 1950— Jan. 49.
Recommended changes (22), report of Advisory
Council on Social Security to Senate Committee
on Finance, 1948. 1948— June 641-643.
Wage credits. Detailed tabulations, 1937-47, by sex
and age. Summary and conclusions. 1949— Dec.
668-670.
-------Percent distribution of living persons having,
by insurance status, January 1 of each year,
1940-49 (chart). 1950— July 36.
Workers covered. Number and percentage distribu­
tion, estimated, by number of quarters employed

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
and by prior activity and sex, 1947. 1950—
June 607.
------- Purchasing power of median annual wages
of, 1939-48. 1950— June 608.
Old-age assistance:
Average payment, recipient rate, and expenditure
per inhabitant, June 1949, by State. 1950— Feb.
133-140.
Program established by the Social Security Act of
1935 constitutional, U. S. Supreme Court, 1937.
1950— July 33.
Recipients. Decline in number during World W ar
II and increase in autumn of 1945. 1946— Mar.
388.
Old-age Counseling Center. San Francisco. Activities,
May 1943 to May 1945, summarized. 1946— Mar. 391.
Old-age insurance. Negro workers under system. Char­
acteristics. 1941— Aug. 402-405.
Old-age insurance. Norway. Laws of 1936, and 1921,
provisions. 1944— Sept. 511-512.
Old-age pensions and retirement, United States:
Aluminum Co. of America, 1939-50. 1950— Dec.
692.
Cotton-, rayon-, nylon-, and silk-textile industries,
April 1950. 1950— Oct. 470.
Males, retirement years of, 1940. 1950— Sept. 324331.
Motor-vehicle industry, United States and selected
regions, February 1950. 1950— Sept. 354-355.
Office workers. Boston, January 1950. 1950— July
119.
------- Chicago, Indianapolis, and Milwaukee, January-February 1950. 1950— July 117.
------- Detroit, Mich., April 1950. 1950— Sept. 350.
------- Large cities (11), January-June 1950. 1950—
Nov. 580.
------- New York City, February 1950. 1950— Aug.
238.
Plans, increase in, 1949-50. Summary. 1950— Dec.
684-665.
United Automobile Workers (CIO) area-wide pen­
sion agreement, 70 shops of Automotive Tool and
Die Manufacturers Association, Detroit, May
1950. 1950— July 128.
United States Steel Corp. employees. Pension plan
in 1949 collective agreement. 1950— Oct. 473-474.
Woolen and worsted textile industry, May 1950.
1950— Oct. 466.
Older workers:
Absenteeism. Rates. BLS study (17,800 workers in
109 manufacturing plants) showing comparisons
with younger workers. 1948— July 16-19.
Aging as an industrial health problem and factors
in job placement. 1941— Sept. 672-674.
Aging process and its relation to efficiency. Views
of various scientists and doctors summarized.
1944— July 36-37.
Civil Service examinations. Eligibility under de­
fense program, maximum age, by department
and occupation. 1941— June 1385-1386.
-------Maximum-age limits, by occupation, 1940 and
1941. 1942— Jan. 65-69.
Cotton-textile industry. (New England.) Skilled
work, long job tenure and comparative stability
in. 1946— 5 uly 8-14.
Economic value of work of, changes in, 1900-50.
1950— July 32.
Employment problems. Wartime, peacetime; future
outlook; summary. 1947— Dec. 660-663.
Employment status. Analysis of situation, summer
of 1941. 1942— Jan. 59-69.
-------Prospects after close of World W ar II. Sum­
mary (W aggam an). 1946— Mar. 386-396.
Federal employees. Age in relation to salary
received, Dec. 31, 1938. 1941— Jan. 77-85.




147

“ Forty-Plus” clubs. Purposes and activities; de­
crease in number of organizations, 1939 to 1944.
1 9 4 4 — July 30-31.
------- Los Angeles, for women, summary of activi­
ties. 1941— Aug. 393-394.
Labor force activity o f; prewar trend, wartimt
participation. 1947— Dec. 638-639, 641, 643-644.
Life expectancy, financial security, gainful employ­
ment, and handicaps of aging. 1950— May 506509.
National Conference on Aging to be held in Wash­
ington, D. C., Aug. 13-15, 1950, called by Oscar
Ewing, Federal Security Administrator, in June.
1950— July 104-105.
Old-age counseling centers. Purposes and activities
of, summary. 1944— July 34.
Percentage increases of, in labor force, April 1945.
1947— Dec. 661.
President’s appeal for hiring of, Apr. 3, 1941
(text). 1941— May 1151-1152.
Superannuated workers. Subminimum rates pro­
vided under Fair Labor Standards Act made ef­
fective also under Public Contracts Act by Sept.
15, 1942, amendment. 1942— Oct. 843-844.
Utilization of, from training and medical view­
points, and experience in war industries. 1948—
July 109-111.
War and Navy Departments, U. S. Government.
Age limits, civilian employees, extended, and
provision for reemployment of retired em­
ployees. 1942— Jan. 69.
Wartime. Age and sex distribution, and character­
istics. 1944— Aug. 270-278.
------- Employment increase (census estimates and
U. S. Employment Service records); reentry
into work by old-age-insurance beneficiaries and
Federal Civil Service annuitants; elimination
of age limits for Civil Service examinations;
older groups in armed services, WMC policy;
opportunities for training; postwar outlook.
1944— July 24-38.
Ordnance plants. Workers. Distribution by sex and
State, hours, rates, shifts, unionization, and labor
turn-over, 1918; comparison with 1943 summary
figures. 1948— Dec. 1074-1081.
Output:
France. Output per man-hour, indexes, 1938-47;
indexes, by industry, 1938-47; Monnet Plan to
increase. 1948— July 44-45.
Great Britain. Coal. Annual, average weekly, and
average per man-shift, 1938 to 1948. 1 9 4 8 —
Oct. 371.
United States. Electric light and power industry,
privately owned. Employment and output per
man-hour, 1922-47; effects of technological
changes on. 1948— Nov. 496, 498.
------- Union cooperation in promoting selected con­
tract clauses (text). 1948— Nov. 487-488.
World. Agriculture. Mid-1948 compared with pre­
war levels and outlook for 1948-49 crop year.
1948— Nov. 468-469.
------- Fuel and energy, by area, 1938 and 1947.
1948— Nov. 469.
-------Industrial. Indexes, 1947 and first half of
1948 (1 9 3 8 = 1 0 0 ), specified countries; second
quarter 1948 (1 9 3 7 = 1 0 0 ), specified products.
1948— Nov. 468-469.
Output per man-hour. See Productivity.
Overtime, and pay for, United States:
Aluminum Co. of America, 1939-50. 1950— Dec.
690.
Armour & Co. employees, compensation, by agree­
ments, 1949. 1950— Oct. 475.
Baking industry. Rates in effect in 1945, including
provisions for Sunday work. 1946— Mar. 457.

148

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Overtime, and pay for, U. S.— Continued
Baking workers. Provisions of union agreements
July 1, 1944. Summary. 1945— Feb. 367.
Court decisions. See under Court decisions— Fair
Labor Standards Act and Portal-to-Portal Act.
Defense industries. Extent of, March and June
1941; midweek December 1940 (11 industries).
19^,1— Mar. 544-545, Aug. 362-363, 365, Nov.
1146-1147.
------- Union-agreement provisions summarized.
1941— Apr. 841-851.
Fair Labor Standards Act. Enforcement provisions
governing, persons receiving protection under.
1948— Sept. 271-274.
------- 1949 amendments, provisions of. 1949—
Dec. 667.
Federal employees. Provisions of temporary meas­
ure of Dec. 24, 1942, and act of May 7, 1943.
1943— Feb. 359-361, June 1203-1204.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S.f Federal and
general.
Longshoremen, New York, pay under Fair Labor
Standards Act. U. S. Supreme Court ruling on
contract provisions. 1948— July IV.
Machine-tool industry. Extent of practice in March
1941, and comparison with December 1940.
1941— June 1383-1385.
Office workers, Philadelphia, January 1949. 1949—
June 645.
Pay for, in relation to costs and profits. Analysis.
1941— -July 9—
17.
Petroleum-refining industry. Collective-agreement
provisions concerning. 1945— June 1251.
Power laundries cleaning and dyeing. Collectiveagreement provisions, including week-end work.
1947— Aug. 162.
Premium payments for. Adjustment factors to
eliminate from gross average hourly earnings.
1942— Nov. 1053-1056; 1950— May 540.
Public Contracts (W alsh-Healey) Act amended,
1942, relative to employees under agreement
with certified union. 1942— July 101.
Pyramiding overtime pay prohibited, 1948-49, in
two-fifths of 464 selected union agreements.
1949— July 4.
Salaried employees' compensation. Statement, July
1, 1943, by Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
1948— Aug. 239-240.
Scientists, industrial research, late 1949. 1950—
Apr. 369-370.
Seventh-day double time under “ Premium Pay
Order.” Ruling, Jan. 26, 1943, by Secretary of
Labor. 1948— Mar. 591.
Shipbuilding industry. Prevalence of, in December
1940. 1941— June 1378-1379.
State legislation, establishing rates, 1947-48. Pro­
visions. 1 P^S-^-Sept. 277-278.
Streetcar and bus operators. Provisions effective
July 1, 1944, summary. 1945— Feb. 373.
Sunday, Saturday, and holiday war work. Double
pay prohibited by Executive order Sept. 9, 1942;
certain exceptions authorized by supplemental
order of Sept. 17, 1942. 1942— Oct. 717-719.
------- Executive order 9240, effect on compensation
for (Feinberg and Dadian). 1944— Aug. 364373.
Supreme Court's decision in longshore cases (Bay
Ridge Operating Co. v. Aaron). Summary.
1949— Feb. 143, 151.
Transit, local, operating employees, Oct. 1, 1949.
1950— Mar. 289.
Wage stabilization, Executive order 9240 in rela­
tion to, (Feinberg and Dadian). 1944— Aug.
364-373.




War industries (14). BLS survey findings sum­
marized. 1942— May 1062-1063.
Work on Saturday and Sunday and on sixth and
seventh day of scheduled workweek, union agree­
ments (464 selected), by industry, work require­
ment, and rate, 1948-49. 1949— July 1-4.
Work relating to prosecution of war. Disputes
concerning pay, procedure suggested by Secre­
tary of Labor for settlement. 1944— Jan. 66-67.
Overtime, foreign countries:
Denmark. Status prior to World W ar II, summary.
1944— Nov. 953.
Great Britain. Agreements to work, selected in­
dustries; objections. 1948— Aug. 119.
1------ Collective agreements, postwar adjustments
in, to provide for. 1948— Aug. 118.
------- W ar conditions, 1914-18 and present, and
relation of labor dilution, training, and costs to
problem. 1941— May 1156-1157.
Netherlands. Law of 1919, provisions. 1944— Jan.
45-46.
New Zealand. Extent of, in year ended Mar. 31,
1943. 1948— Oct. 720-721.
-------Wartime conditions and legislative provisions.
1942— Apr. 902-903.
------- Wartime use, to bolster production. 1948—
Jan. 37.
Norway. Law of 1936, provisions; and change
made by German occupational authorities. 1944—
Sept. 505.
Panama. Labor code of 1941, provisions. 1942—
May 1161-1162.
South Africa. Factories Act of 1941, provisions.
1941— Dec. 1463.
Oyster industry. New Jersey (Cumberland Co.). Mi­
grant workers. 1941— Aug. 411.
Pacific Northwest and California. Labor Conditions.
Section of 11 articles, with introduction. 1947— Apr.
561-695.
Paid lunch periods. See Lunch periods, paid.
Paint and varnish industry ( see also Wages and hours):
Holidays (paid), vacations with pay. Extent of
provision for, August 1947. 1948— Apr. 402.
Wage determination, effective Nov. 6, 1941. 1941—
Nov. 1294-1295.
Paper and allied-products industry. Collective agree­
ments. Provisions summarized. 1942— Apr. 928-943.
Paper and pulp industry, United States:
Collective bargaining, Pacific Coast, history of.
1947— Apr. 662-665.
Work injuries. Estimate of 1948 costs; compari­
sons within the industry; and with injuries in
all manufacturing. 1950— Sept. 338-342.
Paper and pulp industry. Canada. Training program
for technical wartime force, summary. 1941— July
76-78.
Paper industry. Military absences of employees. Sum­
mary of policies concerning. 1941— June 1386-1388.
Paper-products, converted, industry:
Definition and description; method and scope o f
BLS January 1940 survey of wages and hours.
1941— May 1257-1267.
Minimum wage rates, effective June 30, 1941, under
Fair Labor Standards Act. 1941— July 170.
Part-time workers, foreign countries:
Canada. Recruitment of women for, in specified
cities, 1943. 1944— Apr. 769-770.
Great Britain. Women workers. Use of plan as
wartime policy. 1948— July 19-20.
Payment of wages. See Wage payment.
Payrolls, United States:
BLS program for reporting, fiscal year 1947-48.
1947— Oct. 410.
Federal Executive Service. Employment and aver-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
age annual salaries by pay-fixing authority,
July 1946 and July 1947. 1948— July 12.
Federal. Military branch, yearly 1939, 1943, 1948,
and 1949; monthly, May 1946--June 1950; by
branch of service and type of pay. See Current
labor statistics, table A -1 5 , each issue JulySeptember 1947 and January-September 1949;
table A -14, October 1947-December 1948; and
table A -8 , October 1949-August 1950.
------- Washington, D. C .; yearly, 1939, 1943, and
1948-49; monthly, July 1946-October 1950; by
branch and agency group. See Current labor
statistics, table A -1 4 , each issue September
1947 and January-September 1949; table A -1 3 ,
October 1947-December 1949; and table A -7 ,
October 1949-December 1950.
------- Yearly, 1939, 1944, and 1948-49; monthly,
May 1946-October 1950; by branch and agency
group. See Current labor statistics, table A -1 3 ,
each issue July-September 1947 and JanuarySeptember 1949; table A -1 2 , October 1947December 1948; and table A -1 6 , October 1949December 1950.
Federal service (civilian and military), by major
functional group, June 1940 and June 1941.
1941— Dec. 1361-1367.
Federal, State, and local governments, by type of
unit, January 1941. 1941— Nov. 1171.
Government-owned, privately operated, war plants,
by industry and State. 1 week in September
1943. 1944— July 46.
Indexes. By industries, manufacturing and non­
manufacturing, 1945 and 1946. 1947— May 917920.
------- Production workers, manufacturing; annual
average, 1943; monthly (May 1946-October
1950), by industry group and industry. See
Current labor statistics, table A -7 , each issue
July 1947-December 1948, table A -8 , each issue
January-September 1949. N ote .— Series discon­
tinued after September 1949 issue.
------- With wage-earner employment, manufactur­
ing and nonmanufacturing. See section Trend of
Employment, etc., each issue January 1941June 1947.
Military. Totals, specified periods, to April 1947.
1947— Mar. 529, June 1122.
Municipal. Large cities, with employment statis­
tics, 1929-38. 194S— June 1097-1108.
Nonmanufacturing. Indexes;
annual average:
monthly; by selected industry group and indus­
try. See section Trends of Employment, etc.,
each issue January 1941-June 1947; also Cur­
rent labor statistics, table A -1 0 , each issue July
1947-December 1948, and table A - l l , each issue
January-September 1949. N ote .— Series discon­
tinued after September 1949.
Shipbuilding and repair. May to October 1945.
1945— July 162-163, Aug. 373, Sept. 584, Oct.
813, Nov. 1032-1033, Dec., 1252.
State and local governments, by type of govern­
mental unit, January 1941; indexes, by type of
governmental unit, quarterly, January 1940 to
January 1941. 1941— Nov. 1169, 1171.
Peace, industrial, Causes o f: summary of case studies
by National Planning Association on relations be­
tween Libby-Owens-Ford Glass Co. and Federation
of Glass, Ceramic and Silica Sand Workers of Amer­
ica (CIO) ; and Crown Zellerback Corp. and Inter­
national Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper
Mill Workers and the International Brotherhood of
Paper Workers. 1948— Dec. 626-629.
Peace:
Peace plan. Building the peace (Perkins); and




149

summary, by State Department, of Dumbarton
Oaks Plan. 1945— Apr. 701-706.
------- Prosperity— How can we promote it? State
Department outline concerning postwar relief,
rehabilitation, reconstruction and trade. 1945—
May 974-977.
Resolution passed by Congress of International Co­
operative Alliance (Prague). 1948— Dec. 600.
Penn-Craft Community, Pa. Cooperative housing proj­
ect begun in 1937. Status of, October 1940. 1941—
Feb. 296-299.
Pensions, United States (see also specific types o f ) :
Automobile repair shops, general. Extent of pro­
visions, July 1946. 1947— May 828.
Candy and other confectionery. Extent of provi­
sion, January 1947. 1948— Apr. 397.
Cap and hat manufacturers and United Hatters,
Cap and Millinery Workers International Union
(A F L ). Plans in 1948 collective agreements and
methods of financing. 1949— Feb. 147.
Collective-agreement plans. January-June 1949;
unions having or advocating benefit plans. 1949—
Sept. 239-240.
------- 1948; methods of financing, total workers
covered. 1949— Feb. 146.
Company plans, contributory and noncontributory,
by type of funding and company size, 1949
(table). 1950— Mar. 298.
Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc., em­
ployee-benefit plan. Provisions. 1948— May 497498.
Cotton-garment industry. Extent of provision for,
September 1947. 1948— June 629.
Developments, November and December 1949.
1949— Dec. I l l ; 1950— ,Jan. IV.
Dietitians, 1949. 1950— Feb. 152.
Dress-shirt and work-clothing establishments, Au­
gust 1949. 1950— Mar. 295.
Dyeing and finishing, textiles. Extent of provi­
sions for, July 1946. 1947— June 1039.
Employers’ obligation to bargain collectively on
plans for; NLRB ruling in Inland Steel case;
Supreme Court decision. 1948— May III-IV ,
Sept. 234; 1949— May IV.
Ford Motor Co. and United Automobile Workers
of America (U A W -C IO ) agreement for pension
plan. Terms of plan; health-security program;
comparison with other pension plans. 1949— Dec.
649-653.

Foundry industry, ferrous and nonferrous; extent
of provision for, October 1946. 1947— Aug. 183.
Gas utilities. Extent of provision for, January
1947. 1948— Jan. 58.
Glassware industry. Extent of provision for, Janu­
ary 1947. 1947— Nov. 551.
Life insurance, home offices; extent of provision
for, January 1947. 1948— Jan. 13.
Machinery industries. Extent of provision for,
October 1946. 1947— Sept. 320.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Percentage distribution of establishments having
plans. 1945-46, by region. 1947— July 54-55.
Meat products industry. Extent of provision for,
January 1947. 1948— Mar. 286.
Metal furniture industry. Extent of provision for,
January 1947. 1947— Oct. 499.
Nurses. General staff; provisions for, October 1946.
1947— Nov. 548.
------- Public health. Extent of provisions for, Octo­
ber 1946. 1947— Sept. 303.
Office workers. Atlanta, Memphis, and Oklahoma
City, January-February 1950. 1950— June 632.
------- New York City. Extent of provision for,
January-February 1948. 1948— July 29.

150

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Pensions, U. S.— Continued
Office workers. Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Jan­
uary 1949. 194.9— June 646, 649.
Petroleum industry. Refining. Provisions for, 1948.
1949— July 25.
Public utilities. Electric and gas utilities. Extent
of use of, March-April 1948. 1948— Oct. 380.
Railroad employees, private plans for, 1949.
Eligibility requirements and benefits; financing;
vested rights of employees. 1950— June 639-641.
Rayon and silk industry. Extent of provisions for,
June-July 1946. 1947— May 823.
Sawmills in South. Extent of provisions for, Oc­
tober 1946. 1947— June 1033.
Scientists, industrial research, late 1949. 1950—
Apr. 372-373.
Sponsorship, Government versus private. Discus­
sion, September 1949. 1949— Oct. I ll, IV.
Steel companies, December 1949. 1950—Jan. 53.
Steel workers and Atlantic Coast longshoremen,
October 1949. 1949— Nov. III-IV .
Tobacco workers, A F L . 1949— Oct. 371-376.
Veterans’. Payments under public programs, 1948.
1950— Jan. 49.
Wholesale drugs and allied products; extent of
provision for, January 1947. 1947— Nov. 554.
Women office workers, January-May 1949. 1949—
Nov. 528.
Pensions, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Old age and Widows’ Act, regula­
tions July 29, 1942, increasing rates under.
1942— Oct. 744.
------- Supplementary, regulations approved De­
cember 1943, provisions. 194U— May 1028-1029.
Perquisites ( see also Wages and hours). Hawaii. Use
of, in sugar industry, prior to 79-day strike of 1946;
problems involved in eliminating system. 1948—
May 492, June 610-611.
Personnel practices in unionized office; provisions.
Analysis of 50 collective-bargaining agreements
from American Management Association survey.
1948— Dec. 623-626.
Personnel workers. Employment outlook, 1950. 1950—
May 510.
Petroleum industry, United States:
Consumption trend, 1919-50 (chart). 1950— Apr.
375.
Crude-oil production. Characteristics of industry,
scope and method of BLS 1943 study. 1944—
Feb. 369-374.
Drilling and production. Southwest. Character­
istics, scope and method of survey, and degree
of unionization. 1945— Feb. 345-350.
Employment in crude petroleum and natural gas
production, 1939-50 (chart). 1950— Apr. 377.
Personnel. Draft of “fathers” and probable ef­
fect of (BLS survey). 1948— Dec. 1053-1057.
Production, growth of, and reserves, 1903-50
(chart). 1950— Apr. 376.
Refining. Capacity and output, 1920-50 (chart).
1950— Apr. 378.
------- Characteristics of industry, with scope and
method of 1943 BLS survey. 194U— Jan. 124130.
------- Employment outlook, factors affecting, and
job prospects, 1950. 1950— Apr. 374-378.
------- Union agreements (21) negotiated by Oil
Workers’ International Union. Provisions sum­
marized. 1945— June 1249-1253.
------- Women workers. Wartime employment of,
summary. 1948— Aug. 197-203.
Petroleum industry, foreign countries:
Brazil. Collective-agreement provisions covering
minimum wage, overtime, rest time, cleaning




of storage tanks, housing, remuneration, em­
ployment, sick leave, chauffeurs’ regulations,
effective for 4 years from June 1, 1939. 1941—
May 1177-1179.
Colombia. Collective agreement signed Apr. 19,
1944. Provisions. 1945— July 91-92.
Petroleum Reserve Corporation (U . S. Government).
Transferred to Office of Economic Warfare by Ex­
ecutive order of July 15, 1943. 1948— Sept. 470.
Pharmacists. Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May
510.
Phelps Dodge Corporation. Wage increase recom­
mended for Arizona plants, by National W ar Labor
Board decision, June 26, 1942. 1942— Sept. 486-487.
Physical examination. Domestic workers (Washington,
D. C .). Extent of requirement by employers. 1942—
Feb. 351-352.
Physical examination, Great Britain. New employees.
Requirement for in order by Minister of Labor and
National Service, November 1940. 1941— Apr. 923924.
Physically impaired workers. See Handicapped work­
ers.
Physicians:
Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May 510.
Postwar prospective demand for, with background
of prewar trends and wartime developments.
Summary. 1945— Dec. 1094-1111.
Picketing. State legislation. See Legislation, U. S.,
by States.
Pineapple industry, Hawaii:
Canning industry, unionization of. 1948— June 610.
Development, structural organization, labor, sea­
sonality, conditions in canneries, and market
conditions. 1941— Jan. 30-37.
Importance of, in Island economy and other in­
dustries dependent upon; unionization of. 1 9 4 8 —
May 489-491, June 610.
“ Pirating” of workers. Manpower control to prevent.
Statement issued July 1942 by W ar Manpower Com­
mission. 1942— Sept. 460-462.
Placements:
Jobs filled by W ar Manpower Commission, 194245. 1945— July 49-50.
Nonagrieultural.
See
Employment
agencies—
U. S. Employment Service.
Nonfarm. Public employment offices. By industry
division, 1940-46; and by class, 1945 and 1946.
1947— June 1065-1068.
Veterans. Connecticut program for reemployment
and readjustment. Summary of results, 1946—
July 16-19.
Plastic products, molded. Nature of industry (Chicago
area), July 1944. 1945— Jan. 132-133.
Plastics products industry. Characteristics o f; proc­
esses; working conditions; trends in production and
employment; prospective technological changes; em­
ployment outlook. 1947— Sept. 293-301.
Plywood (softwood). Characteristics of industry and
method and scope of labor-requirements survey in
1946. 1947— Jan. 67-68.
Pocket-cutlery industry:
Characteristics, and scope and method of BLS sur­
vey, July 1942. 1942— Nov. 1015-1017.
Steel-flatware. Nature of industry, and scope and
method of BLS survey (January 1945). 1945—
June 1273-1281.
Poisons, industrial. S e e Health.
Police departments. Salaries. See Wages and hours.
Political action. Resolution concerning, adopted at
U A W -C IO convention, July 1949. 1949— Sept. 2 4 4 245.
Political Action Committee (C IO ). Activities in 1948;
plans for future. 1949— Feb. 139, 147.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Political contributions, United States. Legislation pro­
hibiting, by corporations and labor organizations.
19U7— July 62.
Political contributions, Great Britain. Dependence of
Labor Party on trade-unions for. 19 U8— Oct. 367.
Population, United States:
Censuses, 1790-1940, with percent of increase,
each decade; censuses 1930, 1940, percent of
increase or decrease, by States and geographic
divisions. 19U1— Jan. 133-135.
Children under 18, number of, 1940, urban and
rural families, and by region. 19U — Dec. 1166S
1167.
Civilian. Shifts during World W ar II, by county
and metropolitan area, April 1940 to November
1943. 19UU-*Tune 1187-1189.
Estimates, years 1940 to 2000, by age group.
19U7— Dec. 644.
Family size. Decline since 1930 indicated by 1940
census. 19U1— Apr. 932-934.
Increase, 1930-40, as related to housing facilities
(Naigles). 19U2— Apr. 869-880.
Regional. By color and type of residence location.
19U6— Oct. 491.
Shifts in, 1899-1949. 1950— July 106-108.
Southern States. Distribution, geographical and by
color, 1940; growth and characteristics. 19U6—
Oct. 490-494.
States. Changes, wartime (1940-43), and prewar
(43 months of 1930-40 decade). 19U — Sept.
U
486-488.
Total. Estimated, years 1940, 1945, and 1950;
number and percent in labor force, by sex and
age group. 19U1— Nov. 1172-1173.
------- Percent change in, prewar and postwar;
data for countries participating in European
Recovery Program included. 19U7— Dec. 679680.
Population, foreign countries:
British Malaya. Statistics, and racial character­
istics, period preceding World W ar II. 19U —
U
Aug. 280-282.
Colombia, and Department of Atlantico. 1938 cen­
sus. 19U1— Nov. 1173, 1175-1176.
El Salvador. Distribution by employability status.
19U — Oct. 746-747.
U
Europe. Displacement of peoples during World
W ar II. 19U8— Dec. 1167-1173.
-------Western. Total; percent change in, prewar
and postwar, in countries participating in E R P ;
United States data included. 19U7— Dec. 679680.
Finland. Summary of report (Government com­
mittee) suggesting family allowances. 19U1—
Sept. 719-720.
France. Conditions in spring of 1945, and im­
portance of family allowances. 19U5— Nov. 941.
Germany. Occupation zones and Berlin, area and
population, Oct. 29, 1946. Population change,
1939 to 1946. 19U8— Apr. 378.
------- Total, 1939; industrial, by industry group
and class of workers, 1933. 19U5— Mar. 499-500.
Great Britain. Total, by sex, mid-1939, mid-1948;
percent in labor force. 19 U9— Mar. 281.
Guatemala. Distribution, by industry, occupation.
and sex, 1940 census. 19U — Jan. 75-76.
S
Netherlands. Density, 1938, and numbers in prin­
cipal cities, Jan. 1, 1939. 19U — Jan. 35.
U
Netherlands Indies. By nationality and geographic
area, 1930. 19U — May 975-976.
U
Norway. 1930 census. Industrial distribution of
gainfully occupied. 19U — Sept. 479-499.
U
Panama. Total; occupational distribution, whole
country, canal zone, and cities of Panama and
Colon, 1940 census. 19U — June 1195-1196.
U




151

Peru. Total, 1940, and number gainfully occupied.
19U — Jan. 61.
U
South Africa, Union of. Estimated total, and
racial distribution, 1940. 19U — Sept. 473.
S
Thailand. Distribution, by nationality and sex,
1937. 19UU— June 1171.
Portal-to-Portal A ct:
Court decisions on. See Court decisions— Portalto-Portal Act.
Effect of, on Fair Labor Standards Act. 19U8—
Sept. 274.
Enacted May 14, 1947. Provisions. 19U7— Aug.
199-202.
Idaho. Claims restricted by 1947 law; methods of
determining “hours worked” set up. 19U7— Sept.
283.
Mt. Clemens Pottery Workers’ claim. Court de­
cision on. Summary. 19U7— Mar. 483-484.
Postal Telegraph Cable Co. Dispute with American
Communication Association (C IO ). National W ar
Labor Board refusal to act in case covered by agree­
ment. 19 U2— June 1344.
Postal workers. Rural mail carriers, annual and sick
leave provisions; amendment Apr. 30, 1947, to July
6, 1945, law, bettering. Postmasters, fourth class;
compensation to persons substituting for, July 22,
1947, law. 19U7— Sept. 344.
Post-defense problems. BLS study authorized by
Congress, 1941. 19U2— Mar. 699.
Postwar periods. See specific subject .
Pottery manufacture. East Liverpool (Ohio) area,
development of industry and scope of BLS survey,
October 1944. 19U5— July 105-108.
Power. See Electric light and power industry.
Power laundries ( s e e a lso Wages and hours) :
Characteristics of industry and scope and method
of BLS 1943 study. 19UU— Jan. 157-159.
Cleaning and dyeing. Collective agreements (33
plants, covering 65 percent of total production
workers under union contracts), 1946; analysis
of provisions. 19U7— Aug. 158-166.
Power-transmission equipment, mechanical. Character­
istics of industry, and scope of BLS study, 1942.
19US— Jim. 109-113.
Poxon plan. U. S. Supreme Court decision concerning.
19U5— Jan. 121-122.
Prefabricated housing. See Housing.
Preferential hiring. National War Labor Board order,
May 16, 1942 (to United States Lines Co. and Mas­
ters, Mates, and Pilots of America). 19U2— Sept.
490-491.
Premium pay (see also typ es of) :
Canning and preserving. Shift differentials, se­
lected States, 1948. 19U9— July 20-21.
Computation of, for sixth and seventh workdays;
types of absences ruled excusable by National
War Labor Board. 19U — Oct. 847.
U
Petroleum industry. Refining. Shift differentials,
1948. 19U9— July 25.
Prohibition of, for week-end work, by Executive
order 9240, and decisions of National W ar Labor
Board in specific instances (Feinberg & Dadian).
19U — Aug. 364-373.
U
Shift differentials, by type of payment and num­
ber of agreements and employees affected, 27
manufacturing and 7 nonmanufacturing indus­
tries. 1948-49. 19U9— July 6-7.
Week-end work, Aluminum Co. of America, 193950. 1950— Dec. 691.
President’s messages to Congress:
Aid to Europe. Interim and long-term, and in­
flation control at home, principal recommenda­
tions (Nov. 17, 1947); long-term aid program
outlined (Dec. 19, 1947). 19U — Jan. 44-45, Mar.
S
280.

152

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

President’s message to Congress— Continued
Annual. 1945, 1946, and 1948. Labor subjects
treated. 1945— Feb. 297-298; 1946— Apr. 592593.
Economic reports. January 1948. Summary. 1949—
Mar. 278-279.
----- - Midyear report, July 21, 1947. Economic
situation, appraisal o f; developments since first
report (Jan. 8, 1947). 1947— Sept. 321-325.
------- Review of 1946, goals for 1947, recommen­
dations (Jan. 8, 1947). Summary. 1947— Feb.
234-238.
State of the Union. Jan. 7, 1948. Review of 10
years’ progress, goals for next 10 years. 1946—
Mar. 280.
------- Jan. 5, 1949. Request for anti-inflation,
labor, and other legislation. 1949— Mar. 293294.
Price control. See Prices— Control.
Price stabilization. See Prices— Control.
Prices, United States:
Actual, selected commodities, retail and primary
market levels, selected periods August 1939 to
December 1947; highest 1947; lowest 1947.
1948— Mar. 269.
Agricultural. Received and paid by farmers, in­
dexes (1010-14— 100) 1939 and 1943. 1944— Jan.

20.

Agricultural machinery and equipment. Indexes,
primary market; revision of, summary of
methods used by BLS. 1948— Oct. 403-405.
------- Indexes, wholesale, monthly, 1946-47. 1948—
Oct. 405.
Basing point system. Supreme Court ruling in
cement industry, implications. 1948— Aug. I l l ;
1949— Feb. 166.
Budgets. See Budgets, cost-of-living.
Building materials. Changes, 1946 to 1948, by
quarter. 1947— Mar. 390-391, June 1084-1085,
Sept. 311-312; 1948— Mar. 275, June 620.
------- Changes, 1948; combined index, September
1948; index, lumber, end of 1947, end of August
1948. 1949— Feb. 169-170.
------- Indexes of, and percentage increases, speci­
fied periods from July 1914 to June 1947. 1947—
Sept. 312.
------- Market prices, in two wars. Indexes, by
item, 1914-18 and 1939-43. 1944— Mar. 640649.
BLS program for reporting, fiscal year 1947-48.
1947— Oct. 410-411.
Chemicals and allied products. Changes, last
quarter 1946 to first quarter 1948, and in 1948.
1947— Mar. 393-394, June 1087-1089, Sept. 212213; 1948— Mar. 277-278, June 621; 1949— Feb.
170-171.
Clothing. Moderate-income families. Changes, per­
cent, Sept. 15, 1939, to Mar. 15, 1944; relative
increases in costs of men’s and women’s apparel;
composition of BLS index covering; Govern­
ment regulations affecting quality of items
priced. 1944— July 161-178.
------- Percent of change, Sept. 15, 1939, to Dec.
15, 1941. 1942— Apr. 837-838.
------- Quality affected by rising costs (Brown).
1941— Feb. 286-291.
------- Retail. Method of collecting data for BLS
cosfi-of-living index. 194U— July 172-177.
Clothing and textile products. Changes in last
quarter 1946 and first quarter 1947. 1947—
Mar. 383-384, June 1078-1080.
Coal. Average, by kind. Quarterly periods, De­
cember 1940 to December 1945. 1941— Mar. 742745, June 1595-1597, Sept. 775-778, Dec. 1596;




1942— Mar. 790-793, June 1425-1426, Sept. 622623, Dec. 1306-1307; 1948— Mar. 608-609, June
1223-1224, Sept. 596-597; 1944— Jan. 195-196,
Apr. 870-871; 1945— Apr. 871-873; 1946—July
115-116.
------- Changes during World W ars I and II. 1943—
May 999-1000.
------- Indexes. By year, 1929-45; by month, March
1939 to December 1945. 1941— Mar. 744; 1 9 4 3 —
Mar. 610; 1944— Apr. 871; 1945— Apr. 873;
1946— July 116.
------- Monthly collection plan begun by Bureau
of Labor Statistics. 1941— Jan. 229.
,
Collective bargaining, developments at year’s end
as factor in. 1948— Jan. 1.
Commodity exchange. Domestic crops. Mar. 31
to June 30, 1948 (chart). 1948— Sept. 252-253.
Commodity markets. Effects of war years 1939-41
on (Nelson). 1941— Nov. 1071-1102.
------- Percent change, June 30 to Sept. 30, 1948,
and Dec. 31, 1948, to Sept. 30, 1949 (charts).
1948— Dec. 605; 1949— June 641, Sept. 255, Dec.
659.
Comparison of prices, World W ar II and 1950.
1950— Sept. 318-322.
Construction machinery. Indexes showing trend
August 1939 to December 1945, for combined
items and for groups of items. 1946— Mar. 491493.
Consumer and industrial goods. Trend in 1944,
summary. 1945— Feb. 389-400.
Consumer credit. Changes in 1947. 1948— Mar.
274.
Consumer goods and services, primary markets,
by item, second quarter 1945 to first quarter
1947. 1945— Sept. 540-547, Dec, 1206-1213;
1946— Mar. 366-373, June 955-962, Sept. 4 0 9 417, Dec. 979-990; 1947— Mar. 380, June 1075.
Consumer goods, primary markets. Percent of
change, by commodity group, specified periods
to March 1945. 1945— June 1160.
Consumers’.
Inflationary
and
disinflationary
events, second quarter 1949, summary. 1949—
Sept. 252-253.
------- Large cities. Percentage change, by city,
August 1939 to June 1946. 1946— Oct. 527.
------- Southern cities and war production centers.
Percentage changes, August 1939 to June 1946
or June 1940 to March 1945. 1946— Oct. 529.
------- Wartime and postwar; comparison with rise
in earnings, weekly and hourly (gross), private
building construction workers. 1949—
-Jan. 3 9 40.
Consumers’ and primary markets. Indexes, by
month, January 1914 to December 1923. 1945—
Nov. 874-875.
------- Trend in year 1947; persistent upward
movement and reasons for; percent change, by
commodity group, specified periods, July 1914
to December 1947. 1948— Mar. 268-278.
------- Percent change, 1941-46, by year and item.
1947— Mar. 378-380.
------- See also Wholesale, this section.
Consumers’ price index. Actual expenditures, wage
earners’ and clerical workers’ families (BLS
survey). Methods of calculating relative—
im­
portance figures for items. 1948— Aug. 156-158.
— — Construction, limitations, methods of pric­
ing, sources of price quotations, calculation pro­
cedures, relative importance of items. 1 9 4 9 —
Sept. 284-290.
------- Essential facts concerning; purpose and
meaning, structure, methods of compilation;
movement since spring 1940. 1948— July 8-11.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- Intercity indexes of total cost of goods and
services. Comparison of city formula index with
city worker's family budget, March 1946 and
June 1947. 1949— Mar. 315-320.
—
Items included and their relative importance
in major groups and in total index, December
1948 and 1949 (table). 1 U 8 — Aug. 159-160;
1949— Sept. 289-290.
------- Large cities. Average, specified periods from
1913; monthly (May 15, 1946-Oct. 15, 1950),
by commodity grouping. See Current labor sta­
tistics, table D - l , each issue July 1947-December 1950.
------- ------- By month, and percent changes, June
1941 to April 1947, and by year or month since
1935. See sections on Cost of Living, each issue
January 1941-August 1943; Cost of Living and
Retail Prices, each issue September 1943October 1945; and Prices and Cost of Living,
each issue November 1945-June 1947.
------- Major groups, relative importance and in­
dexes for December 1947. 194-8— Dec. 631.
------- Moderate-income families. By city, selected
periods Aug. 15, 1939, and June 15, 1946, month­
ly May 1947-October 1950. See Current labor
statistics, table D -2, each issue July 1947December 1950.
---------------- Large cities, by group of commodities,
selected years, 1913-48, monthly, May 1946October 1950. See Current labor statistics, table
D -l , each issue July 1947-December 1950.
---------------- Monthly (Apr. 15, 1947, to Oct. 15,
1950), by city and commodity group. See Cur­
rent labor statistics, table D -3, each issue July
1947-December 1950.
------- Nonfarm housing. Estimated changes in
supply, April 1940-December 1948.
1949—
July 47.
------- Percent change, compared with manufactur­
ing wage rates, hourly and weekly earnings;
war and postwar periods. 1949— Feb. 163.
------- Percent changes, specified periods, 1948 to
1949 (charts). 1948— Sept. 250, Dec. 604; 1949—
June 639, Sept. 252, Dec. 657.
------- Rent. See Rents, this s ectio n ; also Rent.
------- Revision of, started in 1949. Nature of the
index, need for revision, program for the re­
vision, and progress to June 1950. 1950— July
129-132.
------- See also Cost of living. United States.
Control. Coal, bituminous. Adjustments by OPA
to meet part of cost of wage provisions ap-*
proved in April 1945. 1945— June 1210.
------- Commodities and services (including rents).
Regulations issued by Office of Price Admin­
istration, Apr. 28, 1942. 1942— June 1336-1340.
------- Cost-of-living changes for first 3 months
from establishment of system May 1942. Sum­
mary. 1942— Oct. 760-771.
------- Discussion in President's 1946 message to
Congress. 1946— Apr. 592-593.
------- Emergency Act of 1942. Effect of Oct. 2,
1942, amendment, providing for Office of Eco­
nomic Stabilization. 1942— Oct. 679, Nov. 917924.
------- ------- Summary of provisions. 1942— Mar.
794-799.
------- Indirect price increases. Office of Price Ad­
ministration measures to restrict. 1942— Nov.
912.
------- Legal sanctions, defense agencies concerned
in, relaxation on signing of armistice; World
W ar I ; summary. 1 9 4 1 — Feb. 271-285.
------- Price-ceiling orders issued Feb. 17, to Sept.
20, 1941. 1 9 4 1 — Nov. 1100-1102.




153

------- Progress to September 1942 (Nelson). 1942—
Oct. 659-679.
------- Rationing. See Rationing.
------- Relaxation of price-wage control. National
Wage Stabilization Board statement of June
17, 1946, concerning probable effect. 1 9 4 6 —
July 104-105.
------- Stabilization. Provisions for in Defense Pro­
duction Act of Sept. 8, 1950. 1950— Oct. 454.
------- Terminated by President, Nov. 9, 1946, (ex­
cept on sugar, rice, and rents). Summary of
situation. 1946— Dec. 977-978.
------- Union officials' attitudes toward, in summer
and fall of 1946. 1946— Aug. 219-220, Sept. 399400, Nov. 777.
Control, wartime. All commodities affecting cost
of living. Executive order of Apr. 8, 1943. Pro­
visions. 1948— May 876.
------- Ceilings for farm products provided under
amendment of Oct. 2, 1942, to Emergency Price
Control Act. 1943— May 882.
------- Conditions to govern increases prescribed by
Executive order 9697 of Feb. 14, 1946. 1946—
Mar. 397-398.
------- Cost-of-living changes under, from March
1942 to May 1943. 1943— July 66-81.
------- Food items and rent. Development of system
and movement of costs under, to October 1942;
month when rent control became effective, vari­
ous cities. 1943— Jan. 104-108.
------- General Maximum Price Regulation, Apr. 28,
1942, under Emergency Price Control Act of
1942. Operation to September 1942 and to
August 1945, with outlook for next few years.
1942— Oct. 659-679; 1945— ' ct. 675-693.
O
------- Stabilization order (Executive Order No.
9238) of Apr. 8, 1943. Provisions; supplement­
ary direction of May 12, 1943 (text). 1 9 4 3 —
May 876-877, June 1090-1092.
------- Textiles and leather (shoe) materials, Office
of Price Administration and W ar Production
Board orders on quality. 1943— Sept. 421-434.
------- World W ar I (1917-18). Objectives, legal
sanctions, work of various Government defense
agencies, and list of mimeographed reports
(Stewart). 1941— Feb. 271-285.
Cost of living. See Budgets, cost-of-living; also
Cost of living.
Department stores. Indexes, inventory, by depart­
ment groups, 1941-47. 1948— Jan. 58.
Developments. Monthly; influences affecting and
future predictions; indexes. See Labor Month
in Review, pp. I II-IV , each issue July 1947December 1950.
------- 1948, first quarter; resume for year. 1948—
June 617-622; 1949— Feb. 140.
Electricity. See Gas and electricity, this section .
Export and import; indexes, by country, various
months, 1947 and 1948. 1948— Nov. 474.
Fact-finding activities of BLS concerning. 1 9 4 5 —
May 945-952.
Farm products. Changes in 1947. 1948— Mar. 270271.
Farm products and foods. Changes, 1947 and
1948, by quarter, selected items. 1 9 4 7 — Mar.
381-383, June 1075-1078, Sept. 305-307; 1 9 4 8 —
June 618-619.
Food and meat, by group, March to September
1948. 1948— Sept. 250-251, Dec. 604.
Foods. Average, by item (large cities combined);
indexes by commodity group (and all foods
combined), by city; November 1940 to April
1947, and trend since year 1913. See articles on
Retail Prices of Food, or Food Prices, each
issue January 1941-June 1947.

154

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Prices, U. S.— Continued
Foods. BLS store samples for combining into aver­
ages and index numbers. Revision of methods
(completed in June 1946) described; effects.
1947— Jan. 90-100.
------- Changes in 1947. 1 9 4 8 — Mar. 270-271.
-------Cost index changes effective March 1943.
1943— May 997, June 1214-1215.
------- Indexes. By city, August 1939 and June
1946, and monthly. December 1946-October
1950. See Current labor statistics, table D -5,
each issu e, July 1947-December 1950.
---------------- By commodity group and by city, com­
pared with previous year. See articles on Re­
tail Prices of Foods or Food Prices, each issue
January 1941-June 1947.
---------------- By commodity group, selected periods,
1923-49, and monthly May 1946-October 1950.
See Current labor statistics, table D -4 , each
issue July 1947-December 1950.
----------------Old (62 foods) and revised (44 foods),
comparison of, all foods and major commodity
groups, 56 cities combined, quarterly 1939-46
and February 1947. 1948— Oct. 398.
---------------- Revision of, August 1947; summary of
methods used by BLS. 1948— Oct. 397-402.
------- List formerly priced, foods in revised index,
foods eliminated, and imputation of weights.
1948— Oct. 399.
------- Retail prices, by group. Percent change Dec.
15, 1948-Sept. 15, 1949 (chart). 1949— June 639,
Sept. 253, Dec. 657-658.
------- Sampling errors. Comparison of, average
retail prices of certain foods, computed with
and without stratification among independent
stores, March 1947. 1948— Oct. 401.
---------------- Distribution of, prices reported by in­
dependent stores, New York and Chicago, March
1947. 1 9 4 8 — Oct. 400.
------Selected commodities. Average monthly
prices, May 1947-October 1950. Indexes, August
1939 and monthly, May 1946-October 1950.
See Current labor statistics, table D -6, each
issue July 1947-December 1950.
------- Summary, year 1940 and indexes by year
and item, 1923-40. 1941— Mar. 738-742.
Fuels. Changes in index, December 1947 to De­
cember 1948 compared with previous year.
1949— Feb. 171.
Fuels and utilities. Changes, 1947, and last
quarter 1946 to first quarter 1948. 1 9 4 7 — Mar.
388-389, June 1083-1084, Sept. 312; 1 9 4 8 — Mar.
274-275, June 620.
Gas and electricity. Price changes, quarterly or
longer periods, December 1940 to December
1949, and indexes for specified years. 1941—
Feb. 468-474, May 1291-1292, Aug. 518519, Nov. 1313-1314; 1 9 4 2 — Feb. 518-522, June
1427, Aug. 384-385, Nov. 1075-1077; 1943—
Feb. 378-382, May 998, Aug. 372-373, Dec.
1230; 1 9 4 4 — Mar. 636-639, June 1288-1289,
Dec. 1277-1280; 1 9 4 5 — Mar. 645-654, Sept. 564;
1 9 4 6 — Apr. 655-657, Sept. 43-3-434; 1 9 4 7 — Nov.
563; 1 9 4 8 — July 39-40; 1 9 4 9 — June 641-642;
1950—
June 649.
Hides and leather products. Changes, last quarter
1946 to first quarter 1948. 1947— Mar. 384-385,
June 1078; 1948— June 619-620.
------- Changes in 1947 and 1948. 1 9 4 8 — Mar. 273;
1 9 4 9 — Feb. 170.
Hides, skins, leather. Percent changes, specified
periods, August 1939 to end of March 1948.
1948— May 527.




Hosiery. Average, 33 cities combined, March 1939
to September 1940, and specifications on which
based. 1941— Jan. 230-231.
Housefurnishings. Changes, last quarter 1946 to
second quarter 1947. 1947— Mar. 386-387, June
1080-1082, Sept. 308-309; 1948— June 620.
------- Changes in 1947. 1948— Mar. 273-274.
Housing. Changes in 1947. 1948— Mar. 275-276.
------- One-family houses started. October 1946September 1947, selected areas; cost. 1949— Jan.
44-45.
------- Nonfarm. Location, shifts in, and reasons,
1947 and 1948 compared with 1939 and 1920;
average unit cost, first quarter 1948 compared
with first and last quarters 1947, and reasons
for advances. 1949— Feb. 180.
Housing and fuel, city families, expenditures for,
1941 and 1944. 1947— May 868-877.
Indexes. Goods in various stages of fabrication,
1939-48, 9 countries and United States. 1948—
Nov. 474.
------ S ee also CPI, Food, and Wholesale, this
section .
Industrial goods, primary markets. Changes, by
commodity group, specified periods, August
1949-September 1946. 1945— June 1167, Sept.
547-552, Dec. 1213-1219; 1946— Mar. 359-366,
June 949-955, Sept. 409-410, 417-423, Dec.
979-982, 990-995.
Intercity living costs, index, selection of items,
and method of computing. 1949— Mar. 315-320.
Iron and steel. Price movement 1939-42; develop­
ments 1943-47; increases, first quarter 1948.
1948— May 524-526.
------- Steel products. Effect of indirect price in­
creases. 1942— Nov. 906-908.
Levels. Actual, 1941, 1944, and 1945; estimated,
1950. 1947— Feb. 175-176.
------- Changes during 1948; consumers' (services
and residential rents) and wholesale, by com­
modity group. 1949— Feb. 166-171.
Metals and machinery. Changes, last quarter
1946 to second quarter 1947. 1947— Mar. 3 9 1 398, June 1085-1087, Sept. 310-311.
Metals and metal products. Changes, 1947 and
first quarter 1948. 1948— Mar. 276-277, June
620-621.
Milk (Chicago). Trend since 1923 and effects of
growth of vendor system. 1942— June 12931299.
Miscellaneous goods and services. Changes in last
quarter 1946 to second quarter 1947. 1947—
Mar. 388, June 1082-1083, Sept. 308-309.
Paper and pulp. Changes, 1947 and last quarter
1946 to second quarter 1947. 1947— Mar. 395,
June 1089, Sept. 313; 1948— Mar. 278.
Primary markets. See Consumers' and primary
markets, also Wholesale, this section .
Puerto Rico. Food. Average, 1939-40, and com­
parison with prices in United States. 1 9 4 1 —
Apr. 796-799.
----------------Increase March 1941 to July 1943; OPA
control regulation; comparison with Continental
U. S. 1943— Oct. 808-816.
Rents. Changes and factors affecting in last quar­
ter 1946 and first quarter 1947. 1947— Mar. 385386, June 1082.
------- Index (C P I). Number, total, and selected
periods, permanent 2-fam ily and multifamily
dwellings authorized within housing-market
areas, 34 large cities, by source of funds, 194049. 1949— July 46-47.
------- See also Rent.
Rents, residential. Changes, second quarter 1947;

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
changes in Federal law controlling; local ad­
visory boards provided fo r; their duties. 1947—
Sept. 309-310.
------- Changes in 1948. 1949— Feb. 167-168.
Retail. Decline in consumers’ price index. May
1949, compared with 1935-39 average. 1949—
July IV.
------- Indexes. Cost of living, specified months
August 1939 to November 1946 (with those of
foreign countries). 1947— Jan. 38-40.
------- ------- Department store inventory, by de­
partment group, 1941-47. 1948— Jan. 58.
------- 1949, second quarter and year, summary.
1949— Sept. 253; 1950— Mar. 264.
------- Stores. Differences among and effect upon
BLS cost-of-living index. 1944— Feb. 239-241.
------- War conditions, effect of, and changes from
June 1939 to August 1941. 1941— Nov. 1096-

1100.

Retail and wholesale. Changes to December 1945,
from specified periods beginning with August
1939. 1944— Sept. 613-622, Dec. 1258-1267;
1945— June 1158-1174, Sept. 539-552, Dec. 12041219; 1946— Mar. 357-358, June 947-949.
------- See also Retail, and Wholesale, this section .
Rubber and rubber products. Changes, last quar­
ter 1946 and first quarter 1947. 1947— Mar.
395-396, June 1089-1090.
Rubber. Changes, 1947 (year and second quarter);
1948 (year and first quarter). 1947— Sept. 313314; 1948— Mar. 278, June 622; 1949— Feb. 171.
Services, miscellaneous, (personal care, public
transportation, laundry, etc.). Changes in 1947
and 1948. m # — Mar. 273-274; 1949— Feb. 167.
Shoes, factory and retail, first quarter 1948;
effects of consumer resistance; percent changes,
specified periods. August 1939-March 1948.
1948— May 526-527.
Stabilization of. See Control, this section.
Steel products. See Iron and steel, this section .
Strategic and critical materials. Definition, and
calculation of special indexes showing changes
Aug. 5, 1939, to Sept. 1, 1945, by Bureau of
Labor Statistics. 1945— Nov. 1018.
Structural-steel forms. Increases, indirect, by
change in basing point. 1942— Nov. 908.
Textile and leather products. Changes, 1947 (year
and second quarter); 1948 (year and first quar­
ter). 1947— Sept. 307-308; 1948— Mar. 271-272,
June 619; 1949— Feb. 170.
Textiles. Quality affected by rising costs (Brown).
1941— Feb. 286-291.
Trends. Daily spot market, wholesale, and retail,
January through September 1949. 1948— June
618, Dec. 603; 1949— June 638, Sept. 252, Dec.
656.
------- Quarterlv reports, 1947 to 1950. 1947— Sept.
304-305;
1948— Sept.
249-253;
1950— Mar.
263-265.
------- Years 1943, 1946, and 1949. Food, textiles
and apparel, housefurnishings and equipment,
fuel, electricity, ice, and housing (in connection
with cost of living) ; farm products, metals and
machinery, building materials, chemicals and
allied products, petroleum products, paper and
pulp, miscellaneous goods and services. 1944—
Feb. 244-268; 1947— Mar. 378-396; 1950— Mar.
263-265.
------- See also Consumers’ price index and Whole­
sale, this section.
Urban areas. Movements of consumers’, in com­
parison with gross and real manufacturing
wages, January 1941-September 1947 (chart).
1948— Jan. 46.




155

Wartime, indirect increases caused by advancing
costs and material shortages (Ulm er). 1942—
Nov. 903-912.
Wholesale. Building materials. Market rates in
two world wars compared: indexes, by month,
1914-18 and 1939-43. 1944— Mar. 640-649.
------- Carpets and rugs. BLS survey, publication
of results. 1941— Apr. 1027.
------- Coal, bituminous. Average per ton as com­
puted for minimum-price schedules, and effect
of 1941 wage changes. 1941— Aug. 304-309.
------- Consumers’ and spot market (28 commodi­
ties), indexes 1939-48 (charts). 1949— Feb. 166168.
------ Defense program. Strategic and critical
materials, separate indexes for. 1 9 4 1 — May

1302-1303.
------- Drugs and chemicals. Indexes October 1941
to December 1944, revised. 1945— May 10961097.
------- Farm products and foods. Changes in 1948.
1949— Feb. 168.
------- Gas. Revision by BLS of series (incorporated
in index in March 1946). 1946— July 123.
------- Imported articles, as affected by increases in
shipping costs, 1939 to 1940. 1944— Mar. 650655.
------- Index. Abbreviated, commodities included in,
classified by groups in the comprehensive whole­
sale index. 1948— Sept. 296-298.
------- ------- Description of, and present methods
of revision and correction. 1948— Aug. 153155.
------- Indexes. By commodity groups and sub­
groups. August 1939 and June 1946; monthly,
(May 1946-October 1950), by commodity group
and subgroup. See Current labor statistics,
table D -9, each issue , July 1947-January 1949;
table D -8, each issue February 1949-December
1950.
---------------- By commodity groups and subgroups,
1944 and earlier years. 1945— Feb. 413-416.
---------------- By commodity groups, selected periods;
monthly, May 1946-October 1950. See Current
labor statistics, table D -7, each issue July
1947-December 1950.
---------------- By item, monthly and weekly changes,
November 1940 to April 1947; and changes,
specified periods, 1926-47. See article on Whole­
sale Prices, each issue January 1941-June 1947.
---------------- By item, 1943, 1946, and 1949 and spe­
cified earlier years. 1944— Feb. 418-421; 1947—
Feb. 293-294; 1 9 5 0 — Mar. 264-265.
----------------By month, June 1914 to December 1923.
1941— Nov. 1121-1122.
------- ------- Comparison with foreign countries,
specified months August 1939 to November
1946. 1947— Jan. 40-41.
------- ------- Comprehensive monthly and weekly,
and abbreviated weekly, monthly, from January
1947 to March 1948. 1948— Sept. 291.
------- ------- Daily, spot primary market prices,
foodstuffs and raw industrial commodities, first
quarter 1948. 1948— June 618.
----------------Farm products, foods, metals and metal
products, March to June 1948 (charts). 1948—
Sept. 252-253.
---------------- Monthly and weekly. Origin and uses,
limitations, method of collection, sources of
data, and calculation procedures. 1949— Nov.
541-545.
------- ------- United States and United Kingdom,
1939 to 1948. 1948— Nov. 475.

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

156

Prices, U. S.— Continued
Wholesale. Indexes. Weekly, by commodity group,
Apr. 5, 1947, to Jan. 4, 1949. See Current labor
statistics, table D -8, each issue July 1947-January 1949. N ote . Discontinued after January 1949
issue.
---------------- Weekly comprehensive and abbreviated
series, by group, January 1947-March 1948.
191*8— Sept. 293.
------- ------- Weekly, new series, April-October
1948. 191*9— Jan. 68.
------- ------- Weekly, new index issued on current
basis, fall of 1948, in place of weekly index
issued since 1932; development of commodity
sample, relationship to BLS monthly wholesale
price index. 191*8— Sept. 290-298.
------- Industrial commodities and consumer goods,
trend, first and second quarters 1944. 191*1*—
June 1292-1299, Sept. 613-622.
------- Lumber, Douglas fir. Trend in relation to
hourly earnings, 1935-41. 191*1— Oct. 861.
------- Machine tools. Reports covering 11 standard
or nonspecialty types. 191*1— May 1303.
------- Metals and metal products. Changes in 1948.
191*9— Feb. 168-169.
------- Paper and pulp. Index numbers, general
and for subgroupings, year 1926 to 1945; state­
ment as to availability quarterly from BLS.
191*6— July 122-123.
------- By year and by item, 1941-46 (primary
markets). Percent changes. 191*7— Mar. 378380.
------- ------- Monthly, quarterly reports, 1946 to
1948. 191*7— Mar. 380, June 1075; 191*8— Sept.
251-252, 295, Dec. 603-606; 191*9—June 640,
Sept. 254-255, Dec. 658-659.
------- W ar conditions, effect of, and changes Au­
gust 1939 to September 1941. 191*1— Nov. 1071-

1102.
------- W ar, effects upon, to end of 1940, resume
(Nelson and Joy). 191*1— Jan. 49-65.
------- Waste and scrap materials. Calculation of
weekly indexes for 44 materials from Jan. 7,
1939, announced. 191*2— Jan. 248.
World. Levels, postwar changes in; consumers’
and wholesale indexes, by country, 1945 and
mid-1948. 191*8— Nov. 471-475.
------- 1948 compared with 1949. Summary. 191*8—
Nov. 467-475.
------- Relationships. Postwar changes in and rea­
sons for. 191*8— Nov. 473-475.
Prices, foreign countries:
General. Black markets, activities in 1948 (Western
Germany, Czechoslovakia, Finland). 191*9— Feb.
184-185.
------- Control. And trends since VE-day. 191*6—
May 777-790.
------- ------- World W ar II and postwar periods,
summary. (Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil,
Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, Egypt, France,
Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zea­
land, Norway, Palestine, Poland, Soviet Union,
Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.) 191*5—
Nov. 882-899.
-------Comparison of wages and prices in the United
States and 18 other countries, methods used and
results. 191*9— Nov. 487-493.
------- Family allowances, effect of on earnings and
purchasing power in terms of food in 11 coun­
tries (table). 191*9— Nov. 490.
------- Indexes. Warning note on use of in policy
formulation in postwar era. 191*7— Jan. 36-37.
-------Military purchases under European Recovery
Program, effects upon certain markets. 191*9—




Feb. 166.
-------Purchasing power of hourly earnings in terms
of food, food prices, and hourly earnings ^of
industrial wage earners, indexes, 18 foreign
countries, selected periods, 1948-49 (table).
191*9 — Nov. 489.
------- Retail and wholesale. Indexes, August 1939
to February 1946. (Australia, Canada, China,
Denmark, Egypt, Iran, New Zealand, Norway,
Palestine, Sweden, Switzerland, United King­
dom.) 191*6 — May 782-785.
---------------- Indexes, specified months 1939-41, and
monthly January 1942-July 1945, with discussion
of trends. (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Boli­
via, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark,
Germany, Iran, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand,
Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.)
191*5— Oct. 624-637.
------- Working time (in minutes) required to earn
enough to buy various foods, 18 foreign countries
and the United States, selected periods, 1948-49
(table). 191*9— Nov. 492-493.
Australia. Control. Order issued Sept. 8, 1939,
provisions. 191*2— Mar. 630-631.
Austria. Black market. Decline in, after currency
reform of December 1947, and effects. 191*8—
July 45-46.
---------------- Effects of on price trends and real in­
come. 191*8— Jan. 20-22, 24.
----------------Vienna. Food prices. Indexes, by month,
August 1947 to April 1948. 191*8— July 45.
---------------- Vienna. Legal and black-market prices,
1945-47; ratio to legal food prices, selected
periods, 1938-47; cost-of-living, family of 4 per­
sons. 191*8— Jan. 21-22.
-------Currency reform of December 1947 and effects
on prices. 191*8— July 45-47.
------- Indexes; changes, monthly, August 1947 to
April 1948. 191*8—July 45.
------- Policy 1938-47; postwar trends; regulations
in effect during German occupation; postwar
criteria for granting price increases, methods
of enforcement; stabilization program adopted,
August 1947. 191*8— Jan. 20-27.
------- Wholesale, food and industrial materials,
indexes, March 1948. 191*8— July 46-47.
Belgium. Food prices, increases, 1936-38 to Febru­
ary and March 1946. 191*6— July 30.
------- Government’s postwar reconstruction pro­
gram, to bring wage-price relationship into
balance.
Stabilization program, success of.
191*8— Mar. 289-292.
Brazil. Control by Government of retail and whole­
sale rates established by order of Jan. 8, 1943.
Provisions. 191*8— Mar. 610-611.
------- Food. Sao Paulo, August 1943, and July and
August 1944, by item. 191*1*— Dec. 1280-1281.
British Commonwealth. Retail. Indexes (cost-ofliving), specified months August 1939 to Novem­
ber 1946. United Kingdom, Australia, Canada,
India (Bombay), New Zealand, Palestine, Union
of South Africa. 191*7— Jan. 39.
------- Wholesale. Indexes, specified months, August
1939 to November 1946. United Kingdom, Aus­
tralia, Canada, India (food only), New Zealand,
Palestine, Union of South Africa. 191*7— Jan. 41.
------- See also Great Britain, this section .
Canada. Control. Establishment and maintenance
of, and relation to other wartime controls. 191*2—
Dec. 1158-1160.
----------------Government subsidizing of certain foods.
191*8— Jan. 32.
------- ------- Order (P.C. 8527) effective Nov. 17,
1941. Provisions. 191*1— Dec. 1394-1396.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
------- ------- Regulations promulgated by Wartime
Prices and Trade Board effective Dec. 1, 1941.
1942— Jan. 54-55.
------- ------- Regulations providing for. 1947— Oct.
426, 429-430.
--------------- Wartime, from August 1939 to December
1944, summary. 1945— Aug. 243-254.
---------------- Wartime Prices and Trade Board,
powers expanded, Aug. 29, 1941, orders-in-council 6834-6835. 1941— Nov. 1154-1155.
------- Retail. Indexes. Rural, (1926=100) annual,
1913-40; urban, (1 9 35-39= 100), annual, 191340, monthly 1940. 1941— Apr. 836.
------- Retail and wholesale. Changes, specified
periods, August 1939 to December 1944. 1945—
Aug. 253-254.
------- Trends, 1939-June 1947; legislation affect­
ing; wartime and postwar stabilization pro­
gram; reliance on subsidies. 1947— Oct. 426-430.
------- Wholesale. Butter price fixed by Wartime
Prices and Trade Board, Dec. 12, 1940. 1941—
Mar. 589.
------- ------- Indexes (1 926= 100), annual, 1913-40,
monthly 1940. 1941— Apr. 836.
Chile. Control of. Economic Powers Act of Dec. 23,
1943. Provisions. 1944— Apr. 792, 794-795.
China. Control conditions since VJ-day. 1946—
May 789.
Colombia. Control. Law of Mar. 2, 1943, provisions.
1943— July 40-41.
Denmark. Control conditions after YE-day. 1946—
May 786-787.
------- Indexes, cost of living, 1939-47. 1948— Mar.
293-294.
------- Price control, wartime, and cost-of-living
supplements. 1948— Mar. 295.
------- Wholesale, various items, indexes, 1939 and
1941. 1941— Aug. 368.
Dominican Republic. Food (8 items) November
1944 compared with 1939-40 levels. 1945— Oct.
792.
Egypt. Control conditions since VE-day. 1946—
May 789.
Europe and Middle East. Retail. Indexes (cost-ofliving) specified months August 1939 to Novem­
ber 1946. Denmark, France, (Paris), Norway,
Sweden, Switzerland, Egypt, Iran. 1947— Jan.
39-40.
------- Wholesale. Indexes, specified months, August
1939 to November 1946. Denmark, France
(Paris), Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Egypt,
Iran (Teheran). 1947— Jan. 42.
France. Black market. Growth of, late 1945 and
1946, and effect on real wages. 1947— Aug. 152,
154-156.
------- Control conditions after VE-day, summary.
1946— May 787-788.
------- Indexes (Paris), 1938-47. 1947— Aug. 150.
------- Wartime policies and controls, 1939-47; sta­
bilization program, 1946-47, and problems of
enforcement. 1947— Aug. 154-157.
Germany. Retail. Price-fixing plan, and difficulties
in carrying out, especially for margarine. 1941—
Jan. 232-233.
Great Britain and dominions (Australia, Canada,
New Zealand, United Kingdom). Control condi­
tions after VE-day, summary. 1946— May 786.
Great Britain. Control. Food and clothing, sum­
mary. 1942— May 1222-1223.
------- ------- Government subsidizing of certain ar­
ticles to prevent rise in retail prices. 1943—
Jan. 32.
------- ------- Methods, and penalties prescribed for




157

violation of regulations. 1942— Oct. 732-733.
------- Retail. Indexes, by commodity groups, speci­
fied dates, Sept. 1, 1939, to Jan. 1, 1942. 1942—
Apr. 1003-1005.
------- ------- Interim indexes of, July 1947; former
cost-of-living index terminated; differences in
weights and items priced. 1 9 4 7 — Aug. 195-196.
------- Stability of, wartime and postwar periods;
cost-of-living indexes, 1938-47; wartime stabili­
zation policies. 1947— Sept. 285-288, 290-291.
------- Subsidy (price) as related to cost-of-living
and retail-price indexes, 1939-44. 1944— Sept.
611-612.
------- Wholesale. New sensitive index (1935 = 100)
of London Daily Economist, by year 1913, 1920,
and 1936-40. 1941— Feb. 484-485.
------- See also British Commonwealth, this section.
India (Calcutta). Wholesale. Index numbers, se­
lected articles, specified periods, 1914-43. 1943—
Oct. 697-698.
Iran. Control conditions since VE-day. 1946— May
789.
Italy. Control. Conditions after VE-day. 1946—
May 788.
-------Foods, specified, official and black-market
rates, indexes, May and December 1944. 1945—
May 1013.
Japan. Control conditions since VJ-day. 1946—
May 789-790.
------- Government action on, July 1947. Details of
stabilization program. 1947— Sept. 339-340.
Latin America. Control (Argentine, Bolivia, Brazil,
Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru,
Uruguay, Venezuela). Trends after VE-day
summarized. 1946— May 779-781.
-------Retail. Cost-of-living indexes, specified months
August 1939 to November 1946. Bolivia (La
Paz), Brazil (Rio de Janeiro), Chile (Santiago),
Colombia (Bogota), Costa Rica (San Jose),
Mexico (Mexico City), Peru (Lim a), Uruguay
(Montevideo), Venezuela (Caracas). 1947— Jan.
38.
--------------- Food and clothing. Indexes, 1945 or 1946
(August 1939 as base), compared with cost-ofliving indexes. Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile,
Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru,
Uruguay. 1946— May 779.
------- Wholesale. Indexes, specified months, August
1939 to November 1946. Argentina (Buenos
Aires), Chile (Santiago), Colombia (Bogota),
Costa Rica (San Jose), Mexico (Mexico City),
Peru (Lim a), Venezuela (Caracas). 1946— May
779; 1947— Jan. 40.
Mexico. Control measures by Government, sum­
mary of, to May 1943. 1943— Aug. 246-248.
------- Retail rates, Mexico City, April 1943, com­
pared with ceiling rates, by item (11 markets
covered). 1943— Aug. 247.
------- Wholesale. Indexes, by year, 1929-42; by
month. August 1942 to February 1943. 1943—
Aug. 245.
New Zealand. Control, wartime, under Government
measures, summary. 1943— Aug. 250-253.
Palestine. Control conditions since VE-day. 1946—
May 789.
Peru. Copper-mine and Lima stores, prices com­
pared, December 1939 and April 1945. 1945—
July 54.
South America. Consumers’ price index, 6 cities,
selected periods, 1941-48, all items and food;
method of computing and coverage. 1949— May
548-551.
South Africa, Union of. Control, wartime, 1941
and 1942 measures. 1943— Sept. 476-478.

158

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Prices, f. c.— Continued
Soviet Union. Consumers. Changes in, open mar­
ket, ration, commercial store (Moscow), as result
of Sept. 16, 1946, decree. 1947— July 28-35.
------- Retail. Government stores. Consumers1 goods
(food, clothing, and textiles), by item, 1936,
1939, and 1940. 1941— Feb. 474-476; May 12921296.
Sweden. Control. Conditions after VE-day. 1946—
May 786-787.
----------------Under stabilization measures introduced
Nov. 1, 1942. 19U — Apr. 857.
-------Wartime stabilization program; Price Control
Act, 1941, and its effects; cost-of-living index,
January 1943 and December 1946. 1947— Oct.
431, 434-435.
Switzerland. Control. Conditions after VE-day.
1946— May 788.
---------------- Wartime, by Government. Status sum­
marized. 1944— Dec. 1282.
-------Indexes, cost-of-living, 1939-47. Wartime price
control and rationing program, success in assur­
ing adequate distribution of war-reduced sup­
plies; postwar stabilization program. 1948—
Mar. 296-300.
Uruguay. Food, household articles, rent, clothing,
and general expenses, August and September
1944. 1945— June 1301.
Printers, union. Lengthened life span in 1942 as com­
pared with record for 1892. 1942— Sept. 527-529.
Printing and publishing. See Wages and hours.
Printing trades:
Shift differential. Extent of use of, as of January
1948. 1948— Aug. 145.
Union wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Prison camps. Purposes, and adjustment aids given
inmates. 1942— Mar. 705.
Prison industries, Federal. See Federal Prison Indus­
tries, Inc., U. S. Government.
Prison labor:
Activities, production, value of goods, and condi­
tions summarized from report for 1941. 1942—
Mar. 704-705.
Federal and State prisons. Summary of systems,
trends in population, employment, and produc­
tion; employment status by State; productive
employment in relation to sex, by State; weekly
working hours; percent of prisoners productively
employed, by State and by hours per week; types
of industry, by State; types of product; sale of
goods, and production under public works and
ways system, by State, 1940 (Jones). 1941—
Sept. 578-606.
Wartime production, industrial and agricultural,
State prisons, 1942 and 1943 and in Federal
prisons, 1943. Summary. 1944— July 137-138,
Oct. 764-765.
Prisoners of war, United States:
Employment. Agricultural and other. Status in
summer of 1945 summarized. 1945— Nov. 9 10911.
------- Nonagricultural labor. Man-days worked,
June 1945, by Army Service Command and by
State. 1945— Nov. 911.
------- Logging and lumbering. Instructions by W ar
Manpower Commission Jan. 22, 1944. 1944—
Mar. 529-530.
------- Policies and standards announced by W ar
Manpower Commission, May 22, 1944. 1944—
July 93.
------- Priorities in allocation determined by W ar
Manpower Commission. 1944— June 1189.
------- Under ILO 1929 Convention. Procedures,
camps, and remuneration. Summary. 1944— Jan.
58-59.




Hours of work. Regulations issued early in 1945.
1945— July 46.
Prisoners of war, foreign countries:
Canada. Use of labor on farms, 1943. 1944—
Jan. 60.
Various countries. Employment conditions. World
W ar II, under ILO 1929 Convention. 1943— May
891-895.
Prison-made goods. Study of, authorized by Congress,
1940. 1941— Mar. 658.
Processed-waste industry. Definition and characteris­
tics, regional distribution, and scope of earnings and
hours survey, September 1940. 1941— June 15361538.
Product, gross national. See Production.
Production, United States:
Agriculture. Portion of expense represented by
farm wages, 1910-14, 1935-39, and 1944. 1946—
July 43-44.
------- Volume of, and production per worker, in­
dexes, 1910-46; reasons for wartime increases.
1947— Dec. 651-653.
Aircraft industry. Number of units (and total
weight) accepted each month, January 1941 to
August 1944. 1944— Nov. 930.
Airplane. Statistics, by month, November 1943 to
June 1944. 1944— Sept. 478-479.
Aluminum. Primary and secondary, net domestic
consumption by year, 1913-43; and distribution
of consumption by type of use. 1944— Feb. 300-

302.
Automobiles, electric power and construction at
peak levels, June 1949. 1949— July III.
Coal. World W ar II, production and distribution.
1943— May 1000-1001.
Construction materials. Increase in 1948 over 1947.
1949— Feb. 169.
Defense Production Act of Sept. 8, 1950; pro­
visions for production. 1950— Oct. 455.
Expansion of, assigned to various agencies by the
President, Executive Order No. 10161, Sept. 9,
1950. 1950— Oct. 457
Gross national product. As related to national
income, by year, 1939-43. 1944— July 152.
------- Government and private (product or expen­
diture), 1929-47; private, by factors, 1946.
1946— -Sept. 326-327.
------- 1941 and 1945; assumption for 1950. 1947—
Feb. 172.
------- Percentage of, furnished by construction
industry. 1947— Nov. 539.
Gypsum and gypsum products. Annual, in the
United States, 1936-46. 1947— Oct. 453.
Indexes. September 1945, June 1947 (1938 = 100),
including data for 7 western European coun­
tries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Ireland, Neth­
erlands, Norway, Sweden) participating in ERP.
1947— Dec. 678.
Iron ore. Tonnage, by district and by specified
years, 1880-1915 and 1920-43. 1944—^June 1251.
Levels, adjustments in, nondurable goods indus­
tries. 1949— Feb. 174.
Lumber (softwoods and other kinds). W est Coast
as percentage of whole country, 1925-40. 1941—
Oct. 851.
Maximum, and means of achieving. Council of
Economic Advisers, second annual report De­
cember 1947, summary. 1948— Mar. 279-280.
Milling industry. Conditions 1919-40. 1941— July
83-94.
National. Developments, selected industries, 1948
compared with 1947, resume. 1949— Feb. 140-142.
Physical, over-all. Index, selected industries, as
measured by the Council of Economic Advisers,
1948. 1949— Feb. 140-141.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Postwar adjustment program announced by W ar
Production Board, March 1945. Summary. 1945—
June 1211-1212.
Statistics. Indexes of manufactures, minerals, and
carloadings; short tons of bituminous coal; and
( beginning , May 1945 issue) kilowatt hours of
electric energy. Specified periods. See p. vi, each
issue July 1944— except October 1946, p. 590— to
July 1947.
Steel and coal industries, reduction of operations,
June 1949. 1949— July III.
Textiles and leather (shoes), as affected by war.
1943— Sept. 421-434.
Production, foreign countries:
General. Fuel and energy, World, by area, 1938
and 1947. 1948— Nov. 469.
------- Gross national product. Percentage distribu­
tion, 9 countries, 1938 and 1947. 1948— Nov. 470.
------- Indexes, September 1945, June 1947 (1 938=
100), ERP participating countries (Belgium,
Denmark, France, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway,
Sweden) and United States. 1947— Dec. 678.
------- Industrial. Indexes, 1947 and first half of
1948 (1938 = 100), specified countries; second
quarter 1948 (1937 = 100), specified products.
1948— Nov. 468-469.
Austria. Industrial output, late summer 1947, and
factors underlying low rate; comparison with
1938 output. 1948— Jan. 20-21.
Canada. Indexes (1926 = 100), annual 1919-40,
monthly 1940. 1941— Apr. 836.
China. Expansion, 1941 to 1942, by industry, under
supervision of Ministry of Economic Affairs.
1943— Oct. 719-720.
Denmark. By commodity groups, indexes (1935 =
100), 1939 and 1941. 1941— Aug. 367.
-------Indexes (1935 = 100) by industry group, 1930
and 1943. 1946— Feb. 196.
France. Effects of war upon, in a coal company
and 7 other selected enterprises. 1945— Aug.
240-242.
------- Indexes, 1938-47 (1938 = 100). 1947— Aug.
152; 1948— July 44.
Great Britain. Coal, cotton textiles, steel and
shipbuilding; amounts produced and index, 194748. 1949— Mar. 281.
—— Coal. Saturday tonnage, December 1947,
January and February 1948. 1948— Aug. 119.
------- Postwar plans for, methods used to expand.
1949—
Mar. 278-283.
------- Wartime. Increase September 1941 to April
1942. 1942— July 29-30.
Production committees. See Joint production commit­
tees.
Productivity, United States ( see also Labor require­
ments) :
Agriculture. Increase due to mechanization and
improvements in farm methods. 1950— July 15.
------- Indexes of employment, production, and
production per worker 1910-46; reasons for
wartime increases. 1947— Dec. 651-653.
------- Trend in period 1909-42, factors affecting,
and outlook. 1944— Mar. 514-520.
Aircraft industry. Weight per employee in accepted
product, each month January 1941 to August
1944. 1944— Nov. 930-931.
Airframe industry. Wartime changes (including
indexes by month, January 1942 to May 1945)
and outlook for industry and employment. Sum­
mary. 1945— Aug. 215-225.
BLS program for reporting, fiscal year 1947-48.
1947— Oct. 413-414.
Bituminous-coal mining. See Mining, this section.
Cement industry. Man-hour requirements per 100
barrels, 1934 and 1945-46; by department and




1 59

by region, 1945-46; trend by year, 1930-45.
1P40— Sept. 355-363.
Chemicals industry. Indexes 1929-40, and effect of
technological changes (BLS study). 1942— July
53-57.
Coal mining (anthracite). Summary by year 193741. 1943— Feb. 270-271.
Concrete, ready-mixed. Man-hour requirements to
batch, mix, and deliver 100 cubic yards of readymixed concrete, by major operation and plant
size, 1946—
47. 1948— June 634—
635.
Construction, house, new. One-family. Man-hours
required to build, 18 industrial areas, 1946-47.
Occupational distribution, by type of exterior
wall material; by construction cost classifica­
tion; by size of operation; by selected area.
1948— Dec. 611-614.
------- One- and multi-family projects. Man-hour
requirements, 1946-47, by construction cost
class, exterior wall material, size of project, and
region. (18 areas.) 1949— May 518-519.
------- ------- Man-hour requirements, 1946-47, dis­
tribution by cost, type of exterior wall material,
by weeks of operation; and specified occupations,
by stage of construction. 1949— May 523-525.
Construction machinery. Man-hour requirements.
Effects of technological changes on. 1949— Jan.
28.
---------------- 1945-47, average per unit, for specific
types, by type of labor. 1949— Jan. 24-30.
---------------- 1939-45, by type of product and of labor,
and by year; analysis of trends. 1947— July 41-47.
Consumer-goods industries. Man-hour requirements.
Selected durable and nondurable, 1946-48.
1949— Mar. 274-277.
Cotton-textile manufacturing. Indexes, by quarter,
1938-42. Factors influencing, and outlook (BLS
study). 1942— July 47-53.
Defense industries. Line production, job simplifica­
tion, tool specialization, new methods, and ma­
terial substitution; effects; and problems for
future. 1942— Jan. 34-48.
Dress shirts, men’s. Man-hour requirements per
dozen to produce, 1937-47, by price line, plant
size, and by type of labor and department. 1948—
Sept. 254-256.
Effects of long hours on output; study of. 1947—
July 5-14.
Electric-energy generation, hydroelectric and fuel
plants. Increase, 1937-42, and factors affecting.
1944— Jan. 25-31.
Electrical appliances, household. By type of labor,
unit man-hour trends, by product, and by plant
characteristics, 1939-48. 1950— July 122-124.
Fertilizer manufacturing. Indexes, man-hours ex­
pended per ton, by types of fertilizer, 1939-46;
trends, by type of labor, by product and plant
size. 1948— Sept. 258-260.
Footwear manufacturing. Man-hours expended per
pair. Indexes, all shoes reported by class and
factory price line; trends, by type of shoe, area,
and plant size. 1948— Sept. 256-258.
Grinding machines, selected. Percent change in
unit man-hours, by type of labor. 1948— Dec. 617.
Gypsum products. Calcined gypsum, man-hour
requirements to process into 1,000 square feet of
%-inch board or into 1 ton non-sanded plaster,
by major department and plant size, 1946.
Plants and wallboard, man-hour requirements
per unit of product, by major operation, 1946.
1947— Oct. 453-456.
Hardwood flooring. Man-hour requirements, by
operation, process and plant department, 1946;
comparison with 1935 requirements. 1947— July
49-53.

160

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Productivity, U. S.— Continued
Increases, general, in recent years, and economic
effects. 1941— Mar. 537-538.
Industrial. Source of national strength in the
United States, 1900-50. 1950— July 5.
Leather manufacturing. Man-hours required to
manufacture a pound or square foot, selected
types of leather, 1946. Indexes, 1939-46, all
reported types combined. 1948— Oct. 383-385.
Lumber. Southern pine industry. Man-hour require­
ments, by operation, 1946 and 1935; and by size
of tree, 1935. 1946— Dec. 941-953.
Machine tools. Industrial equipment, and construc­
tion machinery manufacture; indexes by type
of product and labor; trends, 1947-48. 1950—
June 645-648.
------- Selected types. Man-hour requirements, 193947; trends, by type of machine tool and by type
of labor; size of plant and by type of labor;
establishments having wage incentive systems,
compared with plants on hourly wage basis.
1948— Dec. 615-617.
------- ------- Indexes of man-hours (direct and in­
direct lab or); plant trends and influences caus­
ing; factors affecting efficiency. 1947— Aug. 186192.
Machine-tool-accessories industry. Number worked
per week, by month, 1939-43. 1944— Feb. 310.
Man-hour output. Selected industries and periods,
advances between 1919 and 1940; estimated
change in productivity, 1939-50, by industry
group. 1947— Feb. 169-171.
------- Specified industries, indexes by year 190039; in war and other industries, 1940-45; labor
cost 1939-45; and significance of changes. 1946—
Dec. 893-917. See also Costs, U. S.— Labor, unit.
Man-hour requirements. Measurement. Limitations
of productivity measures; methods, sources, and
calculation procedures of industry indexes and
reports. 1950— Feb. 169-176.
Manufacturing, bituminous-coal mining, and rail­
roads, indexes, 1937-41. 1941— Dec. 1388-1391.
Manufacturing. Changes and indexes by industry
(59), 1935, 1937, and 1939-41. Summary. 1942—
May 1071-1072.
------- Wartime conditions; output per man-hour
and unit labor cost, indexes (selected industries),
by year, 1939-42. 1943— May 885-887.
Milling industry. Changes in, 1919-40, factors
affecting, and employment prospects. 1941—
July 83-94.
Mining. Anthracite. By year, 1936-43. 1941— Sept.
618-619; 1943— Sept. 506-507; 1944— Nov. 962.
------- Bituminous coal and lignite. 1943 and earlier
years, as reported by United Mine Workers
(1944 convention). 1944— Dec. 1195.
------- Bituminous coal, manufacturing, and rail­
roads. Indexes, 1937-41. 1941— Dec. 1388-1391.
------- Coal. Output, per man-shift, year 1938, May
1947; percent change, 1938 to 1947. (Data for
United Kingdom, Netherlands, Germany (British
and French Zones), France, and Belgium in­
cluded.) 1947— Dec. 681.
------- ------- Petroleum, gas, and gasoline; iron,
copper, lead, and zinc ore. Production and output
per man-hour, indexes, 1939-42. 1943— Aug.
255-257.
------- Copper. Changes 1935-42 (indexes), and fac­
tors affecting. 1943— Aug. 258-264.
Plywood (softwood). Man-hour requirements, by
department of industry, 1946; comparison with
1935 requirements. 1947— Jan. 67-73.
Portland-cement* industry. Summary of develop­
ment, 1919 to 1940, and factors affecting. 1941—
Oct. 862-874.




Prisons, Federal. 1943 report summarized. 1944—
Oct. 764-765.
Radio receivers, home. Unit man-hours expended
in manufacture. Indexes of trends, by type of
labor, by type of radio receiver, and by size of
plant, 1939-47. 1950— May 517-519.
Railroad transportation. Indexes, 1935-42, and
effect of technological developments. 1943— Sept.
444-451.
Railroads, manufacturing, and bituminous-coal
mining, indexes, 1937-41. 1941— Dec. 1388-1391.
Rise, 1900-50. Factors responsible for and recom­
mendations, set forth in Committee for Eco­
nomic Development report. 1950— Aug. 238239.
Sand and gravel industry. Man-hour requirements
to extract and process 100 tons of sand and
gravel, by operation and general type of plant,
1946-47; comparison with 1937 requirements.
1948— June 631-634.
Shipbuilding. Liberty ships, construction of. Man­
hour and time requirements, with indexes by
month, December 1941 to April 1943. 1943—
Nov. 861-864.
------- November 1940 to November 1942. Defense
program,
labor
requirements.
1941— Mar.
571-576.
------- Wartime programs. Man-hour and time re­
quirements for various types of vessels, and
probable effect upon postwar methods and prac­
tices. 1945— Dec. 1132-1147.
Slaughtering and meat packing 1919-41, resume.
1942— May 1092-1099.
Soap and glycerine manufacturing. Unit trends
per operation, by type of labor, 1939-47. 1948—
Dec. 618-619.
Standards and speed-up on various operations.
Collective-agreement
provisions* 1941— Nov.
1134-1136.
Statistical methods of computing indexes of unit
man-hours expended in industries, BLS survey.
1950— Feb. 169-176.
Study of, authorized by Congress, 1940. 1941—
Mar. 658.
Tobacco industry (cigars). Hand and machine
production, 1940. 1941— July 95-98.
Unit man-hours. See Man-hour output, or •
name
of industry , this section.
World’s economic income, percent produced by the
United States, 1948; effects of annual increases
in productivity. 1950— July 8.
Productivity, foreign countries:
Canada. Shorter hours (without decrease in earn­
ings) adopted by Toronto plant through in­
creased efficiency. 1945— Apr. 853.
Europe, Western. Changes in and factors affect­
ing, prewar and postwar periods. 1947— Dec.
681-682.
------- Mining, coal. Output, per man-shift (United
Kingdom, Netherlands, Germany (British and
French zones), France, Belgium) 1938 to 1947;
United States data included. 1947— Dec. 681.
France. Effect of war upon, in a coal company
and 7 other selected enterprises. 1945— Aug.
240-242.
------- Output per man-hour, indexes, 1938-47, by
industry, Monet Plan to increase. 1948— July
44-45.
Germany. Ammunition manufacture. Mechaniza­
tion and its effects on productivity and costs.
1945— Mar. 540-541.
------- Increases in, through improvement and
standardization of machinery; and problems in­
volved. 1944— Mar. 521-523.
Great Britain. Anglo-American Production Coun-

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
eil, establishment, September 1948, recommen­
dations. 1949— Mar. 283.
------- Cotton industry. Wartime needs and prob­
lems. 1945— Mar. 543-544.
------- Effects of continued overtime work on ef­
ficiency (Kossoris). 1941— June 1337-1346.
-------Efforts to increase. 1949-50, summary. 1950—
Dec. 704-706.
---------------- Union attitude towards, and efforts to
cooperate. 1948— Oct. 366, 369-371.
------- Engineering plants, report by Amalgamated
Engineering Union of factors affecting, April
to September 1942. 1948— June 1110-1112.
------- Mining, coal. Methods suggested for increase
in. 1944— July 115.
------- ------- Output, annual, average weekly, and
average per man-shift, 1936 to 1949. 1948— Oct.
371; 1950— Jan. 22.
---------------- Tonnage produced, average weekly per
man-shift, November 1948, year 1948; compari­
son with 1938. 1949— Mar. 283.
------- ------- Variation, from outbreak of war to
June 1942, and causes. 1942— Nov. 945-946.
------- ------- Wartime. Decline from 1938 to 1943.
1944— Oct. 767-768.
------- Mining, coal and metals. (Prussia and Aus­
tria), World W ar I ; (Germany and Japan),
since 1933 and World W ar II. 1948— Aug. 256257.
------- Need of raising, and problems in cotton and
coal industries. 1945— Mar. 541-545.
------- W ar work, selected factories. Effect of
shorter hours. Summary of study by Industrial
Health Research Board. 1944— Oct. 765-767.
Japan. Index of, April 1947; reasons for low out­
put. 1947— Sept. 338-339.
Peru. Copper industry. Mining and milling proces­
ses, 1939 and 1944. 1945— July 54.
Professional training. Workers having, estimate of
supply to be available. 1942— Aug. 247-250.
Professional workers. Construction, contract. Number
employed, by occupation and sex, July 1942, and
estimated changes to December 1942. 1942— Nov.
932-935.
Profits, United States:
Corporate. Totals, before and after taxes, 1947
and 1948; relationship to sales and net worth.
1949— Feb. 141.
Overtime pay in relation to. 1941— July 9-17.
Profits. Ireland. Restrictions on, under emergency
order No. 83) of May 1941. 1941— Oct. 992-994.
Profit sharing, United States:
Office workers. Boston, January 1950. 1950—
July 119.
------- Detroit, Mich., April 1950. 1950— Sept. 350.
------- Indianapolis
and
Milwaukee,
JanuaryFebruary 1950. 1950— July 117.
------- Large cities, 11, first half of 1950. 1950—
Nov. 580.
------- New York City, February 1950. 1950—
Aug. 238.
Plans, survey o f; case studies under collective
bargaining; economic and legal aspects. 1949—
Apr. 424-426.
Profit sharing, foreign countries:
Peru. Minimum proportion for employees estab­
lished by Jan. 5, 1943, law. 1948— July 64-65.
Venezuela. Amendment May 4, 1945, of 1936 law.
Provisions. 1946— Feb. 261-262.
-------Compulsory scheme amended by Dec. 15, 1941,
decree. Provisions. 1942— Apr. 1021.
Promotion. Retail stores (Boston). Avenues of, and
policies of employers. 1941— Aug. 324-325.
Promotion and assignment. Provisions for, collective
agreements; selected clauses (text). 1948— Nov. 490-




161

493.
Propeller plant. St. Paul. Wartime labor force, sum­
mary of conditions. 1946— Jan. 93-103.
Prosperity. Postwar. How to promote it (outline by
State Department). 1945— May 974-977.
Psychologists. Employment outlook, 1950. 1950— May
510-511.
Public assistance:
Extent of, 1949, 1948, 1944, and 1942. Persons
dependent upon, annual cost, use, types, origin,
history, amount of assistance needed. 1950—
Feb. 132-137.
Plans established by the Social Security Act of
1935. Summary. 1950—July 34-36.
Program changes under discussion and future role
of assistance. 1950— Feb. 137-139.
Social Security, report on to the Senate Committee
on Finance from the Advisory Council (Senate
Doc. No. 204, 80th Cong., 2d sess.. Washington,
1948). Summary of recommendations. 1949—
Jan. 53-54.
Summary statistics for year 1944. 1945— June
1237.
Public contracts. See Contracts, U. S. Government.
Public Contracts Division, Department of Labor (U . S.
Government). Merged with Wage and Hour Division
of Department of Labor, Oct. 15. 1942. 1942— Oct.
843.
Public employees. See Government employees.
Public employment service. See Employment agencies,
United States.
Public utilities, State legislation. See Legislation, U. S.
by States.
Public Welfare Association, American. Annual con­
ference, Washington, D. C., Dec. 1-3, 1949. Sum­
mary of discussions. 1950— Jan. 51-52.
Public works, United States. Effect upon economic con­
ditions and employment; limitations; stabilization
aspects; need for advance planning. 1950— July 109-

112.
Publications:
BLS monthly subject index of economic data; first
issue, June 1947. 1947— Aug. 174.
Notes on Labor Abroad. To be made available to
public at irregular intervals; instructions for
obtaining. 1947— Aug. 174.
Exchange of, between countries (State Depart­
ment outline). 1945— July 41-42.
Of labor interest. See section , Recent Publications
of Labor Interest, each issue January 1941-June
1947; Publications of Labor Interest, each issue ,
July 1947-December 1950.
Significant books, 1900 to June 1950, on labor.
1950— July 87-103.
Pullman Palace Car Co. Strike of employees for higher
wages, 1894, developments, and use of Federal
troops. 1941— Sept. 565-566.
Pulp and paper industry. See Paper and pulp industry.
Pulpwood logging:
Fair Labor Standards Act. Hazardous Occupations
Order No. 4. Most jobs included, effective Feb.
2, 1948. Other orders with effective dates.
1948— Apr. 410.
Work injuries and accident causes, 1944; working
conditions, study of. 1947— Aug. 175-180.
Purchases. Consumer durable goods, and housing,
1946, estimated volume and amount. 1946— Aug.
256-258.
Racial discrimination. See Discrimination.
Racial distribution:
Common labor, by entrance wages paid, July 1940.
1 9 4 1 — Jan. 7-11.
Hawaii. Employees in woman-employing industries,
1939, by sex. 1941— Feb. 365.

162

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Racial distribution-Continued
Migrants, labor, into California, 1935-40. 1941—
July 21-22.
Population of U. S., 1940 Census, by age group.
1942— Aug. 265.
Unemployed, Cincinnati, 1933-38. 1938— Oct. 772.
Radio and phonograph industry (including television).
Employment, production workers. Weekly hours and
labor turn-over, December 1946 to January 1949.
191*9— Mar. 276-277.
Radio manufacture ( see also Wages and hours) :
Condition, 1900, 1925, and 1950. 1950— July 6.
Receivers, home. Unit man-hours, requirements
and trends; indexes of, by type of labor, by type
of radio receiver, and by size of plant, 1939-47.
1950— May 517-519.
Raffia-handbag industry. Puerto Rico. Minimum-wage
rate set, effective May 19, 1941. 191*1— Oct. 991.
Railroads, United States:
Employment. See Employment statistics.
Government control of, Dec. 27, 1943, to Jan. 18,
1944. Summary. 191*1*— Feb. 319-321.
Grievance cases docketed, closed, and pending, year
ended June 30, 1949, National Railway Adjust­
ment Board. 1950— Apr. 403-404.
Historical summary of Federal industrial-relations
laws affecting. 191*7— May 839-844.
Industrial-relations activities, June-July 1950.
1950— Aug. 242-243.
Labor disputes. See Labor-management disputes—
Railroads.
Legislation, Federal. See Legislation, U. S., Fed­
eral and general.
Mediation Board, National. See Conciliation and
arbitration— Railroads.
Mexican track workers admitted for railroads, un­
der W ar Manpower Commission regulation of
June 17, 1943; plans for return at end of war.
191*8— Aug. 240-241; 191*5— Nov. 910.
Minimum wage. Rate set, effective Mar. 1, 1941.
191*1— Jan. 173-174.
Nonoperating
employees.
Special
Emergency
Board created by President to reconsider claims,
Oct. 16, 1943. 191*3 — Dec. 1128.
Pennsylvania Railroad. Negro employees, by occu­
pation, Sept. 28, 1942. 191*3— Mar. 484-485.
Pension plans, private, for employees, 1949. Eligi­
bility requirements and benefits; financing;
vested rights of employees. 1950— June 639-641.
Railway Labor Act. Supreme Court sanction; de­
velopments following. 1950— July 53.
------- See also Court decisions.
Railway Labor Panel, National. Establishment by
Executive order, 1942, and members appointed.
191*2— July 92-93.
Retirement benefits. Payments, by class, fiscal years
1936-37 and 1941-42 to 1943-44, and benefits in
force. 191*2— Oct. 743; 191*3— Nov. 945-946;
191*5— June 1237-1239.
Section men. Historical background of wage-rate
structure. 191*5— May 1068-1070.
Selective Service deferment of employees on west­
ern lines, on account of Pacific war (June 1945).
191*5— Sept. 437.
Sickness and maternity benefits, July 1947. 191*7—
Aug. 194-195.
Sickness compensation, Federal program under
Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act, analysis
of first 6 months’ operation. 191*8— Apr. 402.
Transportation Act of 1940, summary of provi­
sions. 191*1— Mar. 655.
Unemployment-insurance and retirement-benefit
legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general— Railroads.




Unemployment insurance. Benefit exhaustions.
Rates among beneficiaries, by occupational group
and by age and sex, July 1948-June 1949. 1950—
Mar. 300-301.
----------------Trends in rates among beneficiaries and
benefits received, 1939-40 to 1948-49. 1950—
Mar. 299-300.
Union shop and hourly wage increase asked by
15 organizations, Sept. 25, 1942; report of Emer­
gency Board May 24, 1943, summarized. 191*3—
July 46-57.
Wage changes. See Wages and hours, U. S.
Wage disputes. See Labor-management disputes—
Railroads.
Wartime conditions. Productivity of labor, indexes
1935-42; technological developments; and out­
look. 191*3— Sept. 444-451.
Women workers. Employment, by occupational
group, January 1943 and 1944, April 1944 and
1945; and comparison with total employment.
191*U Sept. 590-591; 191*5— Sept. 506-507.
—
------- Postwar decrease in employment. 191*6— July
90-91.
Railroads, foreign countries:
New Zealand. Government Railways Industrial
Tribunal provided to become effective Jan. 1,
1945, by amendment (Apr. 4, 1944) to Railways
Act. 191*1*— Aug. 356.
Norway. State railways. Social insurance provi­
sions for salaried employees. 191*1*— Sept. 512.
Railroads and property carriers. Puerto Rico. Mini­
mum wage effective Apr. 7, 1942. 1942— May 1190.
Railways. See Railroads.
Raincoats (men’s) industry. Minimum-wage determi­
nation extended to cover all types of rainwear not
previously covered, on bids solicited on or after Mar.
6, 1941. 191*1— Apr. 968.
Ranger Aircraft Engines. Employees’ wage-increase
request. National W ar Labor Board decision, June
12, 1942. 191*2— Sept. 486.
Rationalization, United States. Wage rationalization
program in U. S. Steel. 191*7— June 967-982.
Rationalization. German industry. Improvement and
standardization of machinery to increase production.
191*1*— Mar.

521-523.

Rationing, United States:
Gasoline. Atlantic Seaboard. System inaugurated
July 22, 1942. 191*2— Aug. 282-283.
------- Registration, May 1942, conditions and regu­
lations. 191*2— June 1334-1336.
Shoes. Coverage, objectives, and effect upon quali­
ty. 191*3— Sept. 428-430.
Sugar. Consumer registration, May 1942, and
summary of regulations. 191*2— June 1333-1334.
Rationing, foreign countries:
Australia. Meat. Plan introduced Jan. 17, 1944.
Provisions summarized. 191*4— Apr. 751.
------- Price control and rationing, World W ar II
and postwar periods. 1945— Nov. 884-885.
Belgium. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumer. 1943— July 38.
Bolivia. Controls, World W ar II and postwar peri­
ods. 1945— Nov. 895-896.
Bulgaria. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1948— July 38.
Canada. Butter, system introduced Dec. 21, 1942.
1943— Feb. 257.
------- Commodities affected by, July 1, 1942, and
systems governing sugar and gasoline. 1942—
Aug. 283-284.
-------Meat (system introduced May 27, 1943, under
order of Nov. 1, 1941) ; and summary of other
items previously covered. 1943— July 39-40.
------- Price control, World W ar II and postwar
periods. 1945— Nov. 885.

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Chile. Provision for in Economic Powers Act of
Dec. 23, 1943. 1944— Apr. 794-795.
------- World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 896-897.
China. Controls, World W ar II and postwar peri­
ods. 1945— Nov. 897-898.
Denmark. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 38.
Finland. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 38.
France. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 38.
------- World War II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 888-889.
Germany. Food. Development, 1939-41; weekly ra­
tion, July 1941; and special rations for certain
workers; First and Second World Wars— poli­
cies followed. 1941— Aug. 283-286.
------- World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 898.
Germany and Protectorate. Weekly amounts of
principal foodstuffs, 1943, by classes of consu­
mers. 1943— July 37.
Great Britain. Canned foods, system instituted
Dec. 1, 1941. 1942— Feb. 461.
-------Clothing. System effective June 1, 1941, with
sample lists for men and for women. 1941—
July 73.
------- Food and clothing, extension of practice in
1942. 1942— May 1222-1223.
-------Food. Changes, July 1, 1941, and civilian and
Army allowances per week, Sept. 15, 1941 . 1941—
Dec. 1402.
------- Fuel. Plan submitted to Parliament, April
1942, but (up to October 1942) not adopted.
1942— Nov. 946-947.
------- World W ar II and postwar controls, and ef­
fects on welfare of workers. 1945— Nov. 886887; 1948— Aug. 117-118, 122.
Hungary. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 38.
Iran. World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 893.
Italy. Food, additional amounts provided for those
performing heavy work. 1941— May 1160-1161.
------- Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 37.
------- World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 889-890.
Japan. World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 898-899.
Mexico. World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 893-894.
Netherlands. Weekly amounts of principal food­
stuffs, 1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July
37.
New Zealand. World W ar II and postwar periods.
1945— Nov. 883-884.
Norway. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 38.
------- World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 890-891.
Palestine. World W ar II and postwar periods.
1945— Nov. 893.
Poland. World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 892.
Slovakia. Weekly amounts of principal foodstuffs,
1943, by classes of consumers. 1943— July 38.
Soviet Union. Steps toward elimination of, Sep­
tember 1946; results. 1947— July 28-35.
------- World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 887-888.
Sweden. World W ar II and postwar periods. 1945—
Nov. 891-892.




163

Switzerland. World W ar II and postwar periods.
1945— Nov. 892.
Rayon and silk industry (see also Wages and hours):
Characteristics; and scope of BLS studies. 1941—
Aug. 482-487; 1947— May 816-823.
Holidays paid, shift differentials, vacations with
pay, April 1948. 1948— Sept. 269-270.
Rayon. Characteristics, scope, and method of BLS
survey, 1944. 1944— Dec. 1141-1148.
Workweek, length of, April 1948. 1948— Sept. 270.
Ready-mixed concrete. Characteristics of industry and
method and scope of 1947 labor-requirements survey.
1948— June 634-635.
Real wages. See Wages, real.
Reconstruction, foreign countries:
Australia. Employment, full. Recommendations of
White Paper, May 1945. 1945— Aug. 257-260.
-------Plan announced by Ministry of Postwar Re­
construction. Scope; administrative machinery;
provisions concerning housing and use of war
plants; recommendations of Rural Reconstruc­
tion Commission. Summary. 1944— Oct. 754-758.
Brazil. National Council of Industrial and Com­
mercial Policy formed November 1943. Compo­
sition and functions. 1944— Mar. 566.
------- National Economic Planning Commission in­
stalled Oct. 3, 1944. Functions and organization
summarized. 1945— Aug. 260-261.
Canada. Construction-industry planning. National
Joint Conference Board. Recommendations of.
1941— Apr. 838-839.
------- Dominion-Provincial conference to discuss,
August 1945. Proposals made by Dominion.
1946— Jan. 67-68.
------- Employment and income. Program proposed
for maintenance at high level (White Paper
provisions summarized). 1945— July 56-60.
------- Employment, social security, housing, and
agriculture, postwar period. Planning for sum­
marized. 1944— Sept. 522-530.
------- Plans for, including demobilization, and vet­
erans’ affairs, and proposed legislation, sum­
mary. 1944— July 98-99.
Caribbean countries. Recommendations of West
Indian Conference, (Barbados, March 1944). Re­
view of. 1944— July 110-111.
China. Industrialization plans, summary of. 1945—
July 60-61.
------- Labor and industry, plans discussed. 1944—
Feb. 340-342.
Egypt. Government and other agencies provided
to deal with problems. 1945— July 62-64.
Europe. Cooperatives, possibilties for use of.
1944— Aug. 209-231.
France. Cooperative associations, work done by,
following World W ar I. 1943— Aug. 278-283.
------- Damage, war, extent of (by type of building
and department) ; manpower needs; and legis­
lation during war and after liberation. 1945—
Nov. 925-929.
Great
Britain.
Demobilization, reconstruction,
housing, veterans’ rehabilitation; plans for.
Summary. 1944— July 99-106.
------- Government plans for reallocation of work­
ers after close of European phase of war. 1945—
Jan. 43-45.
------- Land-utilization policies, reports of Scott
and Uthwatt committees to Parliament sum­
marized. 1943— Jan. 46-52.
------- Minister of Reconstruction, functions of.
1944— Mar. 566-567.
------- Postwar training for young persons, under
certain circumstances, summary of Government
plan. 1943— July 112-113.

164

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Reconstruction, f. c.— Continued
India. Hyderabad. Postwar Planning Board to be
created, functions. 1944— Feb. 344.
------- Mysore. Rural; 5-year plan to better living
conditions. 1944— Feb. 344.
------- Plans for, by Government, by private in­
dustry, and by Indian Federation of Labor.
Summaries. 19 44— Feb. 343-344; 1945— Apr.
800-804.
Italy. Problems of, fuel supply, transportation,
and rehabilitation of industry, 1945. 1945—
Sept. 463-464.
Latin America. Membership and objectives of post­
war planning boards in Argentina, Bolivia,
Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Re­
public, Ecuador, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Pana­
ma, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. 1944— July
108-109.
Mexico (Federal District). Government encourage­
ment of postwar industrial expansion, summary.
1945— Jan. 73.
Netherlands. Economic conditions. Postwar meas­
ures planned to stabilize, and to promote employ­
ment and welfare of labor. 1945— June 12141215.
New Zealand. Policies for postwar period sum­
marized. 1945— Jan. 70-73.
South Africa, Union of. Postwar plans summa­
rized. 1945— June 1215-1221.
Sweden. Postwar Economic Planning Commission.
Reports (first two) summarized. 1944— Sept.
530-532.
W est Indies. Postwar policies discussed and plans
made at West Indian Conference (Barbados,
March 1944). 1944— July 110-111.
Reconversion, United States:
Buffalo area. Technological and employment prob­
lems. Summary. 1944— Dec. 1117-1136.
Federal agencies' orders and policies, following
issuance of Executive order Aug. 18, 1945 (No.
9599). Summary. 1945— Oct. 669-675.
Postwar. First phase. Workers' experiences sum­
marized. 1946— May 707-717.
------- New England. Cotton-textile industry. Work
and wage experience of skilled workers. 1946—
July 8-15.
------- ------- Manufacturing employment, by State,
through March 1946. Summary. 1946— July 1-6.
------- Plans for, to mitigate unemployment. Sum­
mary. 1944— Nov. 965-967.
Prices. Standards to be set by OPA. Discussion of
problems. 1944— Dec. 1259-1260.
Reconversion. Finland. Employment outlook favorable
for postwar period. 1945— Oct. 728-729.
Recreation, United States:
Community. 1940 and 1941 activities and expendi­
tures for (from report of National Recreation
Association). 1941— Nov. 1213-1214; 1942— Aug.
286-288.
------- 1942 and 1944 activities, including special war
services,
summarized.
1943— Aug.
284^286;
1945— Sept. 511-513.
Mining areas (coal). Facilities and programs; use
of leisure time. Findings of survey. 1947— June

1002.

Public housing projects. Tenants' activities. 1942—
Jan. 102.
Wage earners, 1900-50, educational and recrea­
tional facilities. 1950— July 28-30.
Recreation. Italy. “ Dopolavoro," objectives, benefits,
and growth, to 1938. 1943— Nov. 929-930.
Recruitment of labor, United States:
Alaska. Employers recruiting labor from outside
the Territory required to pay return transporta­




tion

upon

termination

of

employment,

1949.

1950— Jan. 46.
Arkansas. Regulation of employment agents hir­
ing workers in Arkansas for work outside the
State provided by legislation. 1950— Jan. 46.
Interregional Recruitment Program of WMC.
Numbers referred and placed under, in 1944.
1945— Feb. 290-291.
Workers obtained by scattering of circulars in
remote sections from aeroplane. 1944— July 89.
Recruitment of labor, foreign countries:
French Indo-China. Contract and noncontract
methods, and working conditions. 1944— July
54-56.
Poland. By Nazi authorities after German con­
quest. Methods and numbers obtained. 1944—
July 69.
. .
_ .
Redcaps. Employment conditions, and effect of Fair
Labor Standards Act. 1942— June 1398-1399.
Reemployment, United States:
Deterrents to, 1900—
50. 1950— July 19—
20.
Seniority rights. National W ar Labor Board order
concerning employees transferred under W ar
Manpower Commission rules. Summary. 1945—
May 1015-1016.
Veterans. See Veterans— Reemployment.
Workers released for war jobs. Problems concern­
ing. 1942— Dec. 1154-1155.
Reemployment, France. Ex-servicemen and others.
n-f Mnr 1 1945. nrovisions. 1945— Oct.
Refrigerator and refrigerator-equipment industry. Em­
ployment, production workers. Man-hours and labor
turn-over, June 1948-January 1949. 1949— Mar. 275—
277.
. .
,
Refrigerating-equipment industry. Characteristics, and
scope of 1942 BLS survey. 1943— Apr. 768-771.
Regional W ar Labor Boards (U. S. Government) : ^
Chicago. Decision involving inclusion of unionshop clause. 1944— May 1024.
Cleveland. Decision concerning veterans reemploy­
ment rights. 1944— May 1026.
Dallas, Tex. Decision concerning check-off. 1943—
Dec. 1197-1198.
Detroit. Decision in seniority case. 1945— Jan. 124.
San Francisco. Decision concerning union securi­
ty. 1943— Dec. 1198.
Regulations, Federal or State. See Legislation.
Rehabilitation, United States:
, _
Farm families, through loans from Federal Securi­
ty Administration. 1941— Oct. 930.
Recommendations for improved services at 1950
Workmen's Compensation and Rehabilitation
Conference. 1950— May 511-513.
Rural. F SA program for, summary of status, 1941.
1941— Dec. 1379-1382.
Servicemen, returned, after World W ar I, public
attitude toward (Jessup). 1943— Dec. 1060-1073.
Vocational. See Vocational education and train­
ing, also Vocational rehabilitation.
Rehabilitation, foreign countries:
Canada. Cabinet committee to consider problems,
constituted Dec. 8, 1939. 1941— Jan. 96.
------- Ex-servicemen. Government measures to pro­
mote aid to, including employment service. 1941—
Mar. 592-593.
-------Postwar. Recommendations of Joint Con­
ference of Employers and Employees in Build­
ing and Construction Industry. 1941— Apr. 8 38839.
Great Britain. Disabled persons, plan for train­
ing, and allowances to trainees. 1942— Feb. 4 0 7 408.
India. Demobilized men and evacuees from danger
zones. Plan for Government aid proposed. 1944—

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
Feb. 343-344.
Korea. Industrial development, 1945-48; number
of firms, wages, living costs, and consumption
levels. 191*9— Apr. 401-406.
New Zealand. Servicemen. Provisions summarized.
191*5— Jan. 64-69.
Vocational. See Vocational education and training.
Reindeer industry. Alaska. Eskimo rights under 1937
law and establishment of program, 1941. 191*2— Mar.
649.
Relief. Recipients, Indiana (Marion County). Family
composition, age, race, and employability status of
workers, May 1940. 191*1 — June 1937-1401.
Remington Rand Co.:
Tonawanda plants. Wage increase, general, re­
fused by National W ar Labor Board decision,
July 27, 1942. 191*2. Sept. 488-489.
Union-security provision. National W ar Labor
Board decision. 191*2 — June 1350.
Rents, United States:
Changes. Factors affecting, last quarter 1946 and
first quarter 1947. 191*7 — Mar. 385-386, June
1082.
-------Large cities, since September 1939; BLS sur­
vey, summer and fall 1947; summary. 191*8 —
Jan. 14-19.
City families. Expenditures for, 1941 and 1944.
191*7— May 868-877.
Contract (average). Changes, compared with
changes in CPI rent index, 34 large cities, April
1940 and April 1947. 191*8 — Dec. 634-635.
-------Comparison. 1944 and 1945, with 1940, select­
ed small cities not under rent control; all
changes in rental market reflected by compari­
son (chart). 191*8 — Dec. 635-636.
Control. District of Columbia. Law effective Jan.
1, 1942. Provisions. 191*2 — Jan. 145-148.
------- Factor in home ownership increase, during
World W ar II. 191*6— A p r . 562-563.
------- Factor in keeping down proportion of income
spent for rent, 1947; percentages spent, non­
farm families, by income group. 191*8— Nov. 516.
------- Federal. Extension of, 1950. 1 9 5 0 — Aug. 218.
-------Housing and Rent Act. See Legislation, U. S.,
Federal and general.
------- Housing Expediter; actions of, on local ad­
visory board recommendations, July 1-Nov. 28,
1947. 191*8— Jan. 17-18.
------- Importance of, as factor in keeping down
proportion of income spent for rent during
1947. 191*8— Nov. 516.
------- Measures for suggested by OPM; fair-rent
committees, function of. 191*1 — Dec. 1488-1489.
-------Regulations issued Apr. 28, 1942, summary of
provisions. 191*2 — June 1339-1340.
------- Wartime. Cities having, and month of 1942
in which policy took effect. 191*3 — Jan. 108.
---------------- Decline in rates under OPA “ roll-back”
orders. 191*3 — July 80.
Decontrol areas. Decontrol actions by type of
authority, July 1, 1947— Jan. 15, 1950; effects
of decontrol. 1 9 5 0 — Mar. 256.
------- Extent, large cities, by population and num­
ber of cities, February 1950. 1 9 5 0 — Apr. 401.
------- Local advisory board recommendation for;
actions of Housing Expediter, specific areas.
191*8— Jan. 17-18.
Defense housing, Bridgeport area. Comparison
with rent previously paid by occupants. 191*2 —
May 1082-1083.
District of Columbia. Level, 1941, and relation to
incomes. 191*1 — Nov. 1230-1234.
Housing and Rent Acts. See Legislation, U. S.
Federal and general.
Increase (percent and amount) in residential units




165

after Decontrol Rent Act of 1949, by rent and
income group, 1949, Knoxville, Dallas, Spokane,
Salt Lake City, Jacksonville area, Topeka, and
Houston area. 1950— Mar. 253-256.
Index. Compared with BLS consumers' price index
(CPI) ; basic concepts underlying. 191*8— Dec.
631-637.
------- Methodology of measurement, problems; size
and design of sample; survey procedures; edit­
ing and calculating procedures. 191*9— Jan. 60-68.
Landlord-tenant agreements, voluntary; number of
leases filed under by month, all areas, July 1 Dec. 31, 1947. 191*8— Jan. 17.
New rental construction, relative importance of,
34 large cities. 191*9— Jan. 63-64.
Proportion of income spent for, nonfarm families,
various income groups, 1947; effects of rent
control. 191*8— Nov. 516.
Residential. Dwellings and proportion affected by
increases, selected large cities, June to October
1947; increases, by region and structure type.
191*8— Jan. 15-17.
------- Increase after passage of Housing and Rent
Acts of 1947, large cities. 191*9— Feb. 180.
------- Indexes, changes in, 1939-48. 191*9— Feb.
167-168.
-------Indexes (1 935-39= 100) and percent changes,
selected periods, 34 large cities, September 1939
to October 1947. 191*8— Jan. 18-19.
Seattle. Percent tenant units having facility in­
cluded in rent, 1935-39 and 1944. 191*8— Dec. 635,
637.
Urban and rural nonfarm areas, United States.
Median monthly (average), by type of dwell­
ing, April 1940. 191*8— Dec. 635.
Rents, foreign countries:
Australia. Control regulations effective in July
1945. 191*5— Nov. 912.
Belgium. Allowance (gauged by size of family)
to part-time workers. 191*1— Oct. 899.
Ecuador. Control. Decree, Sept. 2, 1944 (pending
passage of new rent law) to freeze rates May 1,
1944. Provisions. 191*1*— Nov. 1027-1028.
India. Control order of 1939, provisions. 191*1*— June
1192.
Mexico. Control. Decree of July 10, 1942, provi­
sions. 191*3— Aug. 249.
Netherlands. Laws enacted 1938 to 1941; wartime
and postwar controls. 191*6— Jan. 70.
New Zealand. Fair Rents Act of 1936 (as amend­
ed). Provisions of regulations under. 191*3— Aug.
251.
Peru. Copper-mine and industrial workers, 1945,
by size of dwelling. 191*5— July 54.
South Africa, Union of. Wartime control measures,
1941 and 1942. 191*3— Sept. 477.
Reparations. Austria. Soviet claim to “ German ex­
ternal assets” as payment o f; removal of industrial
equipment by Russians. 191*8— Jan. 21.
Reporting time pay; Aluminum Co. of America, 193950. 1950— Dec. 691.
Reports. See specific subject.
Research:
Industrial. Laboratories for. Professional-person­
nel requirements. 191*1— Oct. 875-876.
Trade-unions. Work done by, and roster of work­
ers. 191*3— Feb. 296-307.
Rest day. Japan. Rest days (two per month), 1939
law. 191*5— Oct. 659.
Rest homes. Soviet Union. Workers' vacation homes
provided by trade-unions. Restoration after war.
191*5— Oct. 729.
Rest, preventive. Chile. Must be granted by employers
when recommended by commission. 191*1— Feb. 381384.

166

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Retirement, United States ( see also Pensions):
Clothing industry. Coats and suits, men’s. Extent
and methods of provision for. August-September 1948. 1949— Feb. 192.
-------Collective agreements, 1948; provisions, meth­
ods of financing, total workers covered. 1949—
Feb. 146.
Collective-bargaining negotiations on plans, m id1949. 1949— Sept. 239-240.
Dietitians, 1949. 1950— Feb. 152.
Military forces, 1948; recommendations for read­
justment (Hook Commission). 1949— June 658659.
Office workers. Atlanta, Memphis, and Oklahoma
City, January-February 1950. 1950— June 632.
------- New York City. Extent of provision for,
January-February 1948. 1948— July 29.
Older workers, problems. 1950— May 506-508.
Payments under public programs, 1948. 1950—
Jan. 49.
Railroads. See Railroads.
Scientists, industrial research, late 1949. 1949—
Apr. 372-373.
Tobacco workers, A F L . 1949— Oct. 371-376.
“ Townsend Plan.” Features of proposal summar­
ized. 1946— Mar. 394-395.
United Hatters, Cap, and Millinery Workers. Plan,
for officers, executives and employees, 1944.
1944— Sept. 559-560.
------- Plans in 1948 collective agreements and meth­
ods of financing. 1949— Feb. 147.
United Mine Workers of America. Welfare and re­
tirement fund. See Labor organizations, U. S.—
Mine Workers, United.
Retirement, foreign countries:
Bolivia. Salaried employees. Compulsory at 65, un­
der amendment of Nov. 23, 1943, to labor code.
1944— May 1027.
Canada. Manufacturing plants employees. Benefit
plans provided for. Summary. 1945— June 1243.
Cuba. Sugar-industry workers. Fund created Mar.
21, 1941, law and Nov. 16, 1943, regulations.
1944— Mar. 569.
Uruguay. Domestic servants brought under cover­
age of Fund for Industry, Commerce, and Pub­
lic Services, July 22, 1942, law. 1948— June
1116-1117.
-------Registry, during July 1944, by Retirement In­
stitute, of workers for eligibility under newly
established contributory plan. 1944— Nov. 964.
Venezuela (Maracaibo). Oil companies’ contribu­
tory plan for foreign employees, May 1945.
1948— Aug. 339.
Retraining and Reemployment. Administration (U . S.
Government). Establishment by President Feb. 24,
1944. Composition and functions. 1944— Apr. 759760.
Rice-milling industry. Characteristics; scope and meth­
od of BLS 1941 survey. 1941— Nov. 1274-1279.
“ Right to work.” Summary of State laws prohibiting
closed shop. 1947— June 1056-1059, Sept. 279-280.
Robins Dry Dock & Repair Co. Maintenance-of-mem­
bership clause in agreement ordered by National W ar
Labor Board. 1942— Sept. 492.
Rubber Development Corporation (U . S. Government).
Transferred to Office of Economic Warfare by Execu­
tive order of July 15, 1943. 1943— Sept. 470.
Rubber industry ( see also Wages and hours) :
Labor turn-over, 1939 and 1940. Rates by branch
of industry and size of plant. 1941— Apr. 956966.
Mechanical goods. Characteristics of industry and
scope of 1942 BLS survey. 1943— Mar. 542-547.
Overtime provisions in collective agreements.
1941— Apr. 849-850.




Seniority (Akron area). Summary of practices
and policies. 1944— Oct. 788-796.
Strike restrictions, arbitration, duration and re­
newal of contract. Summary of provisions in
collective agreements. 1941— Mar. 560-561.
Rubber-products industry. Minimum-wage order under
Fair Labor Standards Act, effective July 28, 1941.
1941— Aug. 479-480.
Rubber (synthetic) industry:
Labor requirements. By branch of industry and
occupational category, 1944. 1945— May 990-999.
------- Estimated number, 1944, by department;
processes; recruitment and training. 1943— May
837-845.
Production (U. S. and Canada), by quarter, Jan­
uary 1943 to June 1944. 1945— May 993.
Rubber tire and tube industry:
Boots and shoes, and “ other.” Scope and character­
istics and definitions of various branches. 1941—
June 1490-1493, 1501, 1503.
Characteristics; scope and method of August
1942 study. 1943— Feb. 233-242.
Employment, production workers. Weekly hours
and labor turn-over, November 1946-January
1949. 1949— Mar. 275-277.
Soldiers experienced in industry furloughed to
alleviate labor shortage. 1944— Sept. 516.
Rural Electrification Administration (U . S. Govern­
ment) :
Accomplishments, first 5 years, and statistics (Dec.
31, 1941) of cooperatives financed. 1943— Jan.
91-93.
Activities, years 1935-36 to 1939-40, summarized.
1 9 4 1 — Apr. 896-900.
Cooperatives aided. Operations to end of 1942
summarized. 1944— Feb. 326-330.
Rural rehabilitation. See Rehabilitation.
Ryan Aeronautical Co.:
Employees granted wage increase by National W ar
Labor Board decision June 18, 1942. 1942— Sept.
486.
Union-security issues. National W ar Labor Board
decision. 1942— Sept. 493-494.
Safety, United States ( see also Accident prevention):
California. Industrial Safety Board, and Industrial
Welfare Commission. Activities. 1947— Apr. 677678.
Industrial, national. President’s conferences. See
Conventions, meetings, etc.
------- Recommendations of National Conference on
Labor Legislation, Washington, D. C., Novem­
ber 1949. 1950— Jan. 40.
Legislation. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general, and by States.
Mining. Activities of U. S. Bureau of Mines, 194849. 1950— Sept. 346-348.
Power laundries, cleaning and dyeing. Provisions
for, in collective agreements, 1946. 1947— Aug.
164.
Programs in industries, 1900-50, affecting phys­
ical aspects of job. 1950— July 22.
Scientists, industrial research, provisions, late
1949. 1950— Apr. 373.
Shipyards. Elimination of accident hazards, need
for, and suggested methods. 1 9 4 4 — July 13-23.
------- Navy and Maritime Commission program
adopted, 1943; methods and effectiveness of.
1943— July 5-8.
Southern States. Recommendations made by con­
ferences on labor legislation. 1946— Oct. 542.
Textile Workers Union and Forstmann Woolen
Co., 1945-48, joint program. 1949— Apr. 430432.
Union agreements, 1950, provisions. Types of

INDEX — JANUARY 1941 TO DECEMBER 1950
safety clauses; prevalence of joint committees;
jurisdiction and pay of committee members and
meeting schedule. 1950— Sept. 342-346.
Safety, foreign countries:
Belgium. Program planned under decree of Feb.
11, 1946. 1946— July 31-32.
Great Britain. Emphasis on, since nationalization
of coal mines, and methods to achieve. 194-8—
Aug. 120.
Peru. Mines. Protective measures required by
resolutions of Aug. 31, 1943. 1944— Jan. 100—

.

101

St. Louis Smelting & Refining Co. Wage increases
granted employees by National W ar Labor Board
decision. 1942— June 1345-1346.
St. Paul Cooperative Housing Association. Home­
building plan begun July 1940. Summary and status,
October 1940. 1941— Feb. 313-317.
Salary control. See Wage control,.
Salaries. See Wages and hours.
Sampling, U. S. Occupational wage surveys. Technical
procedures used in selecting samples, weighting, and
determining error. 1950— Apr. 410-417.
Sanatoriums. Soviet Union. Restoration after war of
trade-unions institutions. 1945— Oct. 729.
Sand and gravel. Characteristics of industry and meth­
od and scope of 1947 labor-requirements survey.
1948— June 630-634.
San Francisco Hotel Employers’ Association. Unionsecurity issues. National W ar Labor Board decision.
1942— Sept. 492-493.
Saturday, Sunday, and holiday work:
Half-holiday, Saturday, suspension during emer­
gency, civil employees of Coast Guard and War
Department within United States and in Alaska,
Puerto Rico, and Hawaii; Executive orders,
July 5 and Aug. 20, 1941. 1941— Aug. 365,
Oct. 881-882.
Premium pay. Cases affected by Wartime order
(Exec. No. 9240, of Sept. 9, 1942). 1944— Aug.
364-373.
W ar industries. Sunday work, BLS survey Febru­
ary 1942, summary of. 1942— May 1064-1065.
Wartime. Double pay prohibited by Executive order
of Sept. 9, 1942; certain exceptions authorized
by supplemental order of Sept. 17, 1942. 1942—
Oct. 717-719.
Savings:
Amount per spending unit in 1945; expected
changes in 1946; correction (pp. 256-257).
1946— Aug. 256-258, Oct. 612.
Birmingham, Indianapolis, and Portland (Oreg.).
Average money income, expenditures, and sav­
ings, families and single persons, by income
class, 1945; comparison with mid-thirties; cor­
rection (p. 624). 1948— June 622-626, Nov. 518.
City families and single persons, 1944, as related
to income and expenditures. 1946— Jan. 1-5.
Consumer. Changes in, 1945-49. 1949— Dec. 619628.
------- Declining rate during 1947, and reasons for;
most frequent forms. 1948— Sept. 287, Nov.
515-516.
Hawaii (Honolulu). W ar bond and other, wageearner and clerical-worker families, by income
class, June 1943. 1944— Apr. 714.
Individual, by type, fiscal years, 1945-49, Securi­
ties and Exchange Commission estimates. 1949—
Dec. 625.
Positive, negative, and net. Proportion accounted
for by each tenth of the Nation’s spending units
when ranked by size of income, 1941 and 194548, Federal Reserve estimates. 1949— Dec. 628.
Wartime. City families, 1941 and first quarter of
1942. 1942— Sept. 419-434.




167

------- Farm and nonfarm families, 1935-36, 1941,
and 1942. 1942— Oct. 706-713.
Workers’ families in 1940, estimate of by National
Resources Committee. 1941— July 62-63.
Savings and loan associations. See Cooperation.
Savings-bank life insurance. See Life insurance.
Sawmills. See Lumber industry.
School attendance. See Legislation, U. S., Federal and
general.
School enrollment. Grades 1 through 12. Forecasts*
1947-60. 1950— Feb. 146.
Seaboard Airline Railroad. Guaranteed employment
plan; summary. 1947— Aug. 167-171.
Seamen, United States:
Great Lakes area. Recruitment instructions issued
by W ar Manpower Commission, Apr. 24, 1944,
to regional offices. 1944— June 1199.
Hazards of employment, and practices in recover­
ing damages for injuries. 1946— June 851-857.
Merchant marine. Offshore. War Shipping Ad­
ministration vessels, total jobs, and number con­
trolled by unions, February 1946. 1947— Feb.
257-261.
------- Reemployment rights of personnel, June 23,
1943, law, provisions summarized. 1948— Aug.
307.
------- Required personnel, by occupation, and po­
tential wartime labor supply. 1942— Sept. 435—
440.
War-risk bonuses. Developments concerning, since
May 1917; summary of situation, 1943, includ­
ing rates paid. 1 9 4 4 — Jan. 8-14.
Welfare committee for, in Port of London, in ac­
cordance with ILO
recommendation. 1941—
Sept. 613.
Workmen’s compensation. Interdepartmental Com­
mittee’s plan for; attitude of seamen. 1946—
June 853-861.
Seamen, foreign countries:
Japan. Conscription from occupied territories for
merchant marine, under program effective April
1944. 1944— May 1002-1003.
------- Insurance. Compulsory. Law of Apr. 5, 1939.
Provisions. 1945— Oct. 666.
Netherlands. Working conditions (1942 and ear­
lier), as regulated by collective agreements and
by law. 1944— Jan. 43-46.
Secondary boycotts. See Court decisions, U. S., also
National Labor Relations Board— Decisions.
Second-injury funds. See Legislation, U. S., Federal
and general, also by States.
Selective Service:
Act of 1948. Amendments, 1950, extension provi­
sions. 1950— Sept. 359.
-------Purpose and coverage; grounds for exemption;
effects on labor-market situation. 1948— July
IV.
------- Summary of provisions. 1948— Oct. 373-374.
Classification
policies,
occupational,
amended,
first part of 1944. 1944— July 89-92.
Defense program. Manpower needs, fiscal year
1949. 1948— Oct. 373-376.
Deferments. And exemptions under Selective Serv­
ice Act of 1948. 1948— Oat. 374-375.
------- Critical activities and programs, list submit­
ted by Inter-agency Committee on Occupational
Deferment, May 24, 1944. 1944— July 90-92.
------- Critical occupations. Defined by W ar Man­
power Commission, Jan. 12, 1944. (178 occupa­
tions.) 1944— Mar. 529.
------- ------- List, entitling workers to deferment;
list of nondeferable activities. War Manpower
Commission regulations effective Aug. 16, 1943;
supplementary rules of Sept. 7, 1943. 1948—
Oct. 704-711.

168

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Selective Service— Continued
Deferments. Men over 30, local boards requested
to liberalize deferments, May 1945, but to review
certain cases in age group 18-25, 1945— July 46.
------- Occupational. Men under 26, instructions re­
garding. 1944— M ay 997-998.
----------------Reclassification of men who change jobs
without bettering war effort. 1945— Mar. 536538.
---------------- Rules, Dec. 16, 1944, instructions to lo­
cal boards requiring stricter interpretation.
1945—-Feb. 296.
------- Railroad employees, specified occupations on
western lines, June 1945. 1945— Sept. 437.
Educational and work plans of young men, as af­
fected by. BLS inquiry, fall of 1940. 1941—
May 1146-1147.
Extended-service resolution, 1941, authorizing ex­
tension of periods of service under 1940 Selec­
tive Service Act. 1942— Mar. 697.
Nondeferrable jobs for men, list issued Feb. 3,
1943. 1943— Mar. 468-469.
Reemployment rights of servicemen, provisions of
Selective Training and Service Act of Septem­
ber 1940. 1941— Mar. 650; 1942— Mar. 696-697,
Sept. 473, Dec. 1147-1155.
Replacement schedules. Fathers to be included,
W ar Manpower Commission instructions, June
15, 1943. 1943— Aug. 238-239.
Strength of Armed Forces authorized. 1949— Feb.
172.
Transfer to W ar Manpower Commission, Execu­
tive Order No. 9279 of Dec. 5, 1942. Provisions.
1943— Jan. 26-27.
Self-help associations. See Cooperatives.
Seniority:
Collective-agreement provisions. See Collective
agreements.
National W ar Labor Board order covering reem­
ployment rights of employee released for other
work under W ar Manpower Commission rules.
Summary of provisions. 1945— May 1015-1016.
Rubber industry (Akron area). Summary of gen­
eral policies and those concerning work sharing,
lay-offs, rehiring, transfers, reemployment of
veterans, women workers, Negro workers. 1944—
Oct. 788-796.
Service establishments, United States:
Employment trends, 1929-49. 1950— Aug. 201.
Hours and earnings. See Wages and hours.
Servicemen’s Readjustment Act (G. I. Bill of Rights).
See Veterans.
Seven-day week. War-industry workers (New York
State). Dispensations granted under State law of
January 1942. 1943— Jan. 38-39.
Seventh day. President’s so-called “ premium pay or­
der.” Ruling of Secretary of Labor concerning in­
terpretation. 1943— Mar. 591.
Severance pay or separation allowances. See Dismissal
compensation.
Sharing work. Belgium. Reduction of hours to spread
employment, in textile, dress, and diamond indus­
tries ordered by decree, May 7, 1941. 1941— Oct.
899-900.
Shift differentials:
Aluminum Co. of America, 1939-50. 1950— Dec.
690.
Cotton-, rayon-, nylon-, and silk-textile industries,
selected occupations and areas, April 1950.
1950—-Oct. 469.
Fertilizer industry. Extent of use, as of March
1948. 1948— Nov. 505.
Foundry industry, ferrous and nonferrous. Extent
of use, 1946, 1949, and 1950. 1947— Aug. 183;
1949— Nov. 533; 1950— Dec. 693.




Gas utilities. Extent of use, January 1947. 1948—
Jan. 57.
Glassware industry. Extent of use, January 1947
1947— Nov. 551.
Grain-milling industry. Extent of use, January
1948. 1948— July 32.
Industrial chemical industry. Extent of use, Jan­
uary 1948. 1948— Aug. 142-143.
Machinery industries. Extent of use, October 1946
and November 1949. 1947— Sept. 320; 1950—
May 529.
Machine-tool accessories industry. Extent of "use,
December 1947. 1948— May 516.
Machine-tool industry. Status of operations, March
1941, and comparison with December 1940 sta­
tus. 1941— June 1380-1385.
Manufacturing. Extent of use, 1945-46, by shift
and industry; practices in selected groups.
1947— Aug. 183-185.
Meat-products industries.