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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ROYAL MEEKER, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES\
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S / * ’ ’
M I S C E L L A N E O U S

S E R I E S :

(WHOLE 1 7 A
I NUMBER l i t
NO.

11

SUBJECT INDEX
OF THE

PUBLICATIONS OF THE UNITED
STATES BUREAU OF LABOR
STATISTICS UP TO MAY 1, 1915




SEPTEMBER, 1915

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1915




CONTENTS.
Bage.

Introduction______________________________________________________
5,6
Chronological list of publications___________________________________
7-21
Annual reports-------------------------------------------------------------------------7
Special reports________________________________________________
7,8
Miscellaneous reports_________________________________________
8-10
Bimonthly bulletins-----------------------------------------------------------------10-18
19-21
Bulletins published in series since July 1, 1912_________________
Subject index_____________________________________________________ 22-209
Appendix.—Lists of libraries in which the publications of the Bureau
may be found___________________________________________________ 211-233
Government depositories_______________________________________ 211-223
Public libraries_______________________________________________ 223-227
School, college, club, municipal and State reference, and com­
mercial libraries (not Government depositories)______________ 227-233
Canadian libraries-------------------------------------------------------------------233
Other libraries_______________________________________________
233




3




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
WHOLE NO. 174.

W ASH INGTON.

SEPTEMBER, 1915.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE UNITED
STATES BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS UP TO MAY
1, 1915.
INTRODUCTION.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics of the United States Department
of Labor has published, since its organization in January, 1885, as the
Bureau of Labor in the Department of the Interior, 25 annual reports,
12 special reports, 173 bulletins, and about 50 volumes of miscel­
laneous reports, the last-named reports having been made in com­
pliance with acts of Congress.
While individual reports are in most cases provided with fairly
complete indexes, there has been up to the present time no adequate
key to the extensive and valuable body of information contained in
these publications, and the need has long been felt for a general index
which would bring together in convenient form references to specific
subjects treated in the reports and bulletins of the bureau. It is to
meet this need that this index has been prepared. In its preparation
many perplexities have arisen as to the amount of detail necessary.
An effort has been made to present a list of subjects comprehensive
enough to cover all the work of the bureau and at the same time avoid
excessive detail. In most cases specific references to pages are given,
but where a whole report refers to a particular topic, or where a
topic occurs in numerous statistical tables scattered throughout a
report, the page references are omitted.
No attempt has been made to classify according to subjects the
great mass of labor laws compiled by the bureau from time to time,
because the indexes already published in connection with such com­
pilations are complete and sufficient. Bulletin 126, for instance, re­
produces all the workmen’s compensation laws and Bulletin 148 all
other labor laws in existence in the United States on December 31,
1913. Elaborate indexes are published with these volumes. Bulletin
166 reproduces all the labor laws enacted in 1914, including work­
men’s compensation laws, and its cumulative index covers all the
material of Bulletins 126,148, and 166.




5

6

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

To have indexed separately all decisions of courts relating to labor
would have taken much space in the index, for altogether about
1,800 cases have been summarized in various reports and bulletins.
It was deemed sufficient to give general references showing where
decisions appear and to list according to subjects a few typical and
important cases.
Occupations, likewise, have not been indexed in detail because of
the great number of references involved. To locate data regarding
a particular occupation reference should be made to the industry in
which it occurs.
The names of the various industrial poisons and occupational dis­
eases discussed in the reports of the bureau appear as topics in this
index, but cross-references showing under industries the poisons and
diseases that occur therein are reserved for a special index on this
subject now in course of preparation by the bureau.
Although many topics have thus been omitted because of lack of
space and the danger of overshadowing the more important subjects
by a mass of details, it is believed that the subjects presented cover
in a fairly comprehensive way the work of the bureau since its
organization.
For those who wish to consult the various publications it may be
stated that the reports and bulletins which are at present available
will be furnished gratis upon application to the Commissioner of
Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. Publications the supply of
which has become exhausted are noted in the index by a star; these
may usually be purchased at cost from the superintendent of docu­
ments, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. The bureau
has on hand for free distribution a few of the reports which have
been published as Senate and House Documents, but usually such
reports may be secured only from Members of Congress or from the
superintendent of documents of the Government Printing Office.
In the United States 481 Government depositories, 133 public
libraries, and 187 school, college, club, municipal and State reference,
and commercial libraries, now receive the publications of the bureau.
(Lists of these libraries, by States, are given in the Appendix, p. 211.)
While the number of libraries receiving the earlier reports is less
than that at present on the mailing list, there has always been a
generous distribution of the bureau publications, and complete sets
are available in many libraries.
In foreign countries libraries of State labor and statistical offices
and many university libraries receive and keep on file these pub­
lications.
Before presenting the subject index proper the following list is
given, showing in chronological order the various reports and bulle­
tins of the bureau:




CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF PUBLICATIONS.

AN N U AL REPORTS.

♦First, 1886.
♦Second, 1886.
♦Third, 1887.
♦Fourth, 1888.
Fifth, 1889.
♦Sixth, 1890.
Seventh, 1891.
Eighth, 1892.
♦Ninth, 1893.
Tenth, 1894.
Eleventh, 1895-96.
Twelfth, 1897.
♦Thirteenth, 1898.
Fourteenth, 1899.
Fifteenth, 1900.
Sixteenth, 1901.
Seventeenth, 1902.
Eighteenth, 1903.
♦Nineteenth, 1904.
Twentieth, 1905.
♦Twenty-first, 1906.
♦Twenty-second, 1907.
♦Twenty-third, 1908.
♦Twenty-fourth, 1909.

Twenty-fifth, 1910.

Industrial Depressions.
Convict Labor.
Strikes and Lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Working Women in Large Cities.
Railroad Labor.
Cost of Production: Iron, Steel, Coal, etc.
Cost of Production: The Textiles and Glass (2 vols.).
Industrial Education.
Building and Loan Associations.
Strikes and Lockouts (1887 to 1894) (2 vols.).
Work and Wages of Men, Women, and Children.
Economic Aspects of the Liquor Problem.
Hand and Machine Labor (2 vols.).
Water, Gas, and Electric-light Plants under Private
and Municipal Ownership.
Wages in Commercial Countries (2 vols.).
Strikes and Lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Trade and Technical Education.
Cost of Living and Retail Prices of Food.
Wages and Hours of Labor.
Convict Labor.
Strikes and Lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Labor Laws of the United States.
Workmen’s Insurance and. Benefit Funds in United
States.
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation Systems in
Europe (2 vols.).
Vol. I. Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Ger­
many.
Vol. II. Great Britain, Italy, Norway, Russia,
Spain, Sweden.
Industrial Education.
SP E C IA L REPORTS.

♦First, 1889.
♦Second, 1892.
Third, 1893.

* Supply exhausted.




Marriage and Divorce.
Labor Laws of the United States (second edition,
revised, 1896).
Analysis and Index of all Reports Issued by Bureaus
of Labor Statistics in the United States prior to
Nov. 1, 1892 (supply exhausted1).
*New edition (1902) available for distribution.

7

8

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS.

♦Fourth, 1893.
*Fifth, 1893.
*Sixth, 1893.
* Seventh, 1894.
♦Eighth, 1895.
♦Ninth, 1897.
♦Tenth, 1904.
♦Eleventh, 1904.
♦Twelfth, 1905.

Compulsory Insurance in Germany.
Gothenberg System of Liquor Traffic.
Phosphate Industry of the United States.
The Slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New York, and
Philadelphia.
The Housing of the Working People.
The Italians in Chicago.
Labor La'ws of the United States.
Regulation and Restriction of Output.
Coal Mine Labor in Europe.
M ISC ELLA N EO U S REPORTS.

♦189T. White-pine Lumber in the United States and Canada. (Published as
S. Doc. 70, 55th Cong., 1st sess.)
♦1898. Total Cost and Labor Cost of Transformation in the Production of Cer­
tain Articles in the United States, Great Britain, and Belgium.
Published as S. Doc. No. 20, 55th Cong., 3d sess.)
♦1900. History and Growth of the United States Census. (Printed as S. Doc.
194, 56th Cong., 1st sess.)
♦1901. Effect of the International Copyright Law in the United States.
♦1902. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901. (First report,
printed as S. Doc. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.)
1903. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902. (Second report.
printed as S. Doc. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.; printed also in Bulletin
No. 47.)
1904. Trade and Technical Education in the United States. (Part of Bulletin
No. 54.)
1904. Housing of the Working People in the United States by Employers.
(Part of Bulletin No. 54.)
, 1904. Wages in the United States and in Europe. (Part of Bulletin No. 54.)
1904. Bureaus of Labor in the United States and Foreign Countries. (Part of
Bulletin No. 54.)
♦1904. Public Baths in the United States. (Part of Bulletin No. 54.)
♦1905. Labor Disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880 to 1904, inclusive,
with Correspondence Relating Thereto. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 122,
58th Cong., 3d sess.)
♦1905. Eight Hours for Laborers on Government Work. (Printed as a document
of House Committee on Labor, 60th Cong., 1st sess.)
1906. Third Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Ha'waii, 1905. (Printed
as H. Doc. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.; printed also in Bulletin No. 66.)
♦1909. Laws Relating to Compensation for Industrial Accidents in Foreign
Countries. (Part of 24th Annual Report, 1909.)
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Companies.
(Printed as S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.)
♦1910. Pension Funds for Municipal Employees and Railroad Pension Systems in
the United States. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
♦1910. Investigation of Telephone Companies. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 380, 61st
Cong., 2d sess.)
♦1910. Civil Service Retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Herbert D.
Brown. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
♦1910. Civil Service Retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert D.
Brown. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)




♦ Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

9

1910. Strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem, Pa. (Printed as
S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910. Increase in Cost of Food and Other Products. (12 tables.) (Printed as
S. Doc. No. 349, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1911. Fourth Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910. (Printed
as S. Doc. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.; printed also in Bulletin No. 94.)
1911. Conditions of Employment in the Iron and Steel Industry in the United
States. 4 volumes. (S. Doe. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.)
♦Vol. I. Wages and Hours of Labor.
♦Vol. II. Wages and Hours of Labor, General Tables.
Vol. III. Working Conditions and the Relations of Employers and
Employees.
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and Accident Prevention.
*1911. Vocational Guidance. (Part of 25th Annual Report, 1910.)
1912. Conciliation, Arbitration, and Sanitation in the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt
Industry in New York City. (Part of Bulletin No. 98.)
*1912. Strike of Textile Workers in Lawrence, Mass., in 1912. (Printed as
S. Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.)
1912. Miners’ Strike in Bituminous Coal Field in Westmoreland Counjty, Pa.,
in 1910-11. (Printed as H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.)
*1912. Summary of the Wages and Hours of Labor—From the Report on Condi­
tions of Employment in the Iron and Steel Industry in the United
States. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 301, 62d Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910-1912. Report on Condition of Woman and Child Wage Earners in the
United States. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*Vol. I. Cotton Textile Industry.
♦Vol. II Men’s Ready-Made Clothing.
♦Vol. III. Glass Industry.
♦Vol. IV. Silk Industry.
♦Vol. V. Wage-Earning Women in Stores and Factories.
♦Vol. VI. The Beginnings of Child-Labor Legislation in Certain
States; a Comparative Study.
♦Vol. VII. Conditions Under Which Children Leave School to Go to
Work.
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile Delinquency and Its Relation to Employment.
♦Vol. IX. History of Women in Industry in the United States.
♦Vol. X. History of Women in Trade Unions.
♦Vol. XI. Employment o f Women in Metal Trades.
♦Vol. XII. Employment of Women in Laundries.
♦Vol. XIII. Infant Mortality and Its Relation to the Employment of
Mothers.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of Death Among Woman and Child Cotton-Mill
Operatives.
♦Vol. XV. Relation Between Occupation and Criminality of Women.
*Vol. XVI. Family Budgets of Typical Cotton-Mill Workers.
♦Vol. XVII. Hookworm Disease Among Cotton-Mill Operatives.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of Women and Children in Selected In­
dustries.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor Laws and Factory Conditions.
1913. Mediation and Arbitration Laws of the United States.




* Supply exhausted.

10

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

3913. Compensation for Injuries to Employees of the United States arising
from Accidents Occurring Between August 1, 1908, and June 30. 1911.
(Report of Operations under the Act of May 30, 1908.)
*V.KI3. Increase in Prices of Anthracite Coal Following the Wage Agreement of
May 20, 1912. (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.)
1914. Federal and State Laws relating to convict labor. (Printed as S. Doc.
494, 63d Cong., 2d sess.)
1914. A Study of the Dress and Waist Industry for the Purpose of Industrial
Education. (Part of Bulletin No. 145.)
B IM O N TH LY B U L L E T IN S.
[Besides the articles
contain digests of
tical publications;
General, and labor

indicated below a majority of the Bulletins from No. 1 to No. 100
reports of State bureaus of labor statistics and of foreign statis­
also decisions of courts affecting labor, opinions of the Attorney
laws of the various States enacted from time to time.]

♦No. 1—Nov.,

1895. Strikes and lockouts in the United States from January 1,
1881. to June 30, 1894. (Summary of Third and Tenth
Annual Reports.)
Private and public debt in the United States, by George K.
Holmes.
Employer and employee under the common law. by V. H.
Olmsted and S. D. Fessenden.
♦No. 2—Jan., 1896. The poor colonies of Holland, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D.
The industrial revolution in Japan, by William Eleroy
Curtis.
Notes concerning the money of the L nited States and
T
other countries, by William C. Hunt.
The wealth and receipts and expenses of the United
States, by William M. Steuart.
-No. 3—Mar., 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin, France,
by W. F. Willoughby.
♦No. 4—May,

♦No. 5—July,

♦No. 6— Sept.,

♦No. 7—Nov.,

♦No. 8—Jan.,

♦No. 9—Mar.,




1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy. France,
by W. F. Willoughby.
The sweating system, by Henry White.
1896. Convict labor.
Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of Friedrich
Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby.
1896. Industrial communities: Familistere Society of Guise,
France, by W. F. Willoughby.
Cooperative distribution, by Edward W. Bemis, Ph. D.
1896. Industrial communities: Various communities, by W. F.
Willoughby.
Rates of wages paid under public and private contract, by
Ethelbert Stewart.
1897. Conciliation and arbitration in the boot and shoe industry,
by T. A. Carroll.
Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson, Ph. D.
1897. The padrone system and padrone banks, by John Koren.
The Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. Howard
Gore, Ph. D.
* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

11

*No. 10—May, 1897. Work and wages of men, women, and children. (Summary
of Eleventh Annual Report.)
Condition of the Negro in various cities.
Building and loan associations.
No. 11—July, 1897. Workers at gainful occupations at the Federal censuses of
1870, 1880, and 1890, by William C. Hunt.
Public baths in Europe, by Edward Mussey Hartwell,
Ph. D., M. D.
*No. 12— Sept., 1897. The inspection of factories and workshops in the United
States, by W. F. Willoughby.
Mutual rights and duties of parents and children, guard­
ianship, etc., under the law, by F. J. Stimson.
♦No. 13—Nov., 1897. The Italians in Chicago. (Summary of Ninth Special Re­
port.)
The anthracite mine laborers, by G. O. Virtue, Ph. D.
The municipal or cooperative restaurant of Grenoble,
France, by C. Osborne Ward.
*No. 14—Jan., 1898. The Negroes of Farmville, V a.: A social study, by W. E.
Burghardt Du Bois, Ph. D.
Income, wages, and rents in Montreal, by Herbert Brown
Ames, B. A.
*No. 15—Mar. 1898. Boarding homes and clubs for working women, by Mary S.
Fergusson.
The trade-union label, by John Graham Brooks.
•No. 16—May, 1898. The Alaskan gold fields and the opportunities they offer for
capital and labor, by Sam. C. Dunham.
*No. 17—July, 1898. Economic aspects of the liquor problem. (Summary of
Twelfth Annual Report.)
Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway employees, by
Emory R. Johnson, Ph. D.
The nations of Antwerp, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D.
*No. 18—Sept., 1898. Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870 to 1898.
*No. 19—Nov., 1898. The Alaskan gold fields and the opportunities they offer
for capital and labor, by Sam. C. Dunham.
Mutual relief and benefit associations in the printing
trade, by William S. Waudby.
*No. 20—Jan., 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter E. Weyl,
Ph. D.
*No. 21^—Mar., 1899. Pawnbroking in Europe and the United States, by W. R.
Patterson, Ph. D.
*No. 22—May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade unions, by Edward W.
Bemis, Ph. D.
The Negro in the black belt: Some social sketches, by
W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, Ph. D.
Wages in Lyon, France, 1870 to 1896.
*No. 23—July, 1899. The attitude of women’s clubs and associations toward
social economics, by Ellen M. Henrotin.
The production of paper and pulp in the United States,
from January 1 to June 30, 1808.
*No. 24—Sept., 1899. Statistics of cities.




Supply exhausted.

12

BULLETIN OF THE BTTKEATJ OF LABOR STATISTICS.

*No. 25—Nov., 1899. Foreign labor laws: Great Britain and France, by W. F.
Willoughby.
*No. 26—Jan., 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D.
Fessenden, A. B., LL. M.
Foreign labor laws: Belgium and Switzerland, by W. F.
Willoughby.
*No. 27—Mar., 1900. Wholesale prices: 1890 to 1899, by Roland P. Falkner,
Ph. D.
Foreign labor laws: Germany, by W. F. Willoughby.
*No. 28—May, 1900. Voluntary conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, by
John Bruce McPherson.
System of adjusting scale of wages, etc., in certain rolling
mills, by James H. Nutt.
Foreign labor laws: Austria, by W. F. Willoughby.
No. 29—July, 1900. Trusts and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W. Jenks,
Ph. D.
The Yukon and Nome gold region, by Sam. C. Dunham.
Labor Day, by Miss M. C. de Graffenried.
No. 30—Sept., 1900. Trend of wages from 1891 to 1900.
Statistics of cities.
Foreign labor laws: Russia, The Netherlands, Italy, Nor­
way, Sweden, and Denmark, by W. F. Willoughby.
*No. 31—Nov., 1900. The betterment of industrial conditions, by Victor H.
Olmsted.
Present status of employers’ liability in the United States,
by Stephen D. Fessenden.
Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi.
No. 32—Jan., 190}. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the United States,
by W. F. Willoughby.
Prices of commodities and rates of wages in Manila.
The Negroes of Sandy Spring, Maryland: A social study,
by William Taylor Thom, Ph. D.
The British workmen’s compensation act and its opera­
tion, by A. Maurice Low.
No. 33—Mar., 1901. Foreign labor laws: Australasia and Canada, by W. F.
Willoughby.
The British conspiracy and protection of property act and
its operation, by A. Maurice Low.
No. 34—May, 1901. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Azel Ames, M. D.
Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P. Gilman.
The workmen’s compensation act of Holland.
No. 35—July, 1901. Cooperative communities in the United States, by Rev.
Alexander Kent.
The Negro landholder of Georgia, by W. E. Burghardt Du
Bois, Ph. D.
*No. 36—Sept., 1901. Statistics of cities.
Statistics of Honolulu, Hawaii.
-No. 37—Nov., 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by Samuel
M’Cune Lindsay.
The Negroes of Litwalton, Virginia: A social study ot the
“ Oyster Negro,” by William Taylor Thom, Ph. D.




* Supply exhausted.

SUEJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OP THE BUREAU.

No. 38—Jan.,

No. 39—Mar.,
*No. 40—May,

No. 41—July,

♦No. 42—Sept.,

♦No. 43—Nov.,
*No. 44—Jan.,
No. 45—Mar.,
♦No. 46—May,
No. 47—July,

♦No. 48—Sept.,

♦No. 49—Nov.,

♦No. 50—Jan.,

♦No. 51—Mar.,

♦No. 52—May,
No. 53—July,

13

1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl, Ph. I>.
The Negroes of Cinclare Central Factory and Calumet
Plantation, Louisiana, by J. Bradford Laws.
Charts exhibited at the Pan American Exposition.
The Quebec trade disputes act.
19021 Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1901.
1902. Present condition of the hand-working and domestic in­
dustries of Germany, by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
Workmen’s compensation acts of foreign countries, by
Adna F. Weber.
Working of compulsory conciliation and arbitration laws
in New Zealand and Victoria.
The compulsory arbitration act of New South Wales.
1902. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Beef prices, by Fred C. Croxton.
The True Reformers, by William Taylor Thom, Ph. D.
1902. Statistics of cities.
Labor conditions in Cuba. (Amendatory of article in
Bulletin No. 41.)
Report to the President on anthracite coal strike, by Car­
roll D. Wright.
1902. Italian bureau of labor statistics.
1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F. W.
Doehring, Ph. D.
1903. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1902.
1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission.
1903. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii. (Reprint
of second Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, S. Doc. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.)
1903. Farm colonies of the Salvation Army, by Commander
Booth Tucker.
The Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study, by Richard
R. Wright, jr., B. D.
1903. Cost of living. (A summary of the Eighteenth Annual
Report.)
Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S. Clark,
Ph. D.
Industrial conciliation and arbitration act o f New Zea­
land.
1904. Labor unions and British industry, by A. Maurice Low.
Land values and ownership in Philadelphia, by A. F.
Davies.
1904. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1903.
The union movement among coal-mine workers, by Frank
Julian Warne, Ph. D.
1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R. Sewall,
Ph. D.
1904. Wages and cost of living.




* Supply exhausted.

14

BULLETIN OE THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

♦No. 54—Sept.,

1904. The working of the United States Bureau of Labor, by
Carroll D. Wright.
Bureaus of statistics of labor, by G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in foreign countries, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D.
Wright.
Strikes and lockouts in the United States, 1881 to 1900, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Wages in the United States and in Europe, 1890 to 1903, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Cost of living and retail prices in the United States, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Wholesale prices in the United States, 1890 to 1903, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Housing of the working people in the United States by
employers, by G. W. W. Hanger. Ph. D.
Public baths in the United States, by G. W. W. Hanger,
Ph. D.
Trade and technical education in the United States.
Hand and machine labor in the United States.
Labor legislation in the United States, by G. A. Weber.
Labor conditions in Hawaii.
♦No. 55—Nov., 1904. Building and loan associations in the United States, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
The revival of handicrafts in America, by Max West,
Ph. D.
♦No. 56—Jan., 1905. Influence of trade-unions on immigrants, by Carroll D.
Wright.
Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
♦No. 57—Mar., 1905. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1904.
Street railway employment in the United States, by
Walter E. Weyl, Ph. D.
The State cooperative accident insurance fund of Mary­
land.
No. 58—May, 1905. Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark,
Ph. D.
Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark. Ph. D.
The new Russian workingmen’s compensation act, by
I. M. Rubinow.
♦No. 59—July, 1905. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1904.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1904.
Laws relating to child labor in European countries.
♦No. 60—Sept., 1905. Government industrial arbitration, by Leonard W. Hatch,
A. M.
The eight-hour law and enforced labor contracts in the
Panama Canal Zone.
♦No. 61—Nov., 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E. Weyl,
Ph. D.
A documentary history of the early organizations of
printers, by Ethelbert Stewart.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

♦No. 62—Jan.,

♦No. 63—Mar.,
♦No. 64—May,

♦No. 65—July,

♦No. 66—Sept.,,
♦No. 67—Nov.,

♦No. 68—Jan.,

No. 69—Mar.,
♦No. 70—May,

♦No. 71—July,

♦No. 72—Sept.,

♦No. 73—Nov.,

♦No. 74—Jan.,

♦No. 75—Mar.,

15

3906. Municipal ownership in Great Britain, by Frederic C.
Howe, Ph. D.
Conciliation in the stove industry, by John P. Frey and
John R. Commons.
Laws relating to the employment of children in the
United States.
1906. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1905.
1906. Conditions of living among the poor, by S. E. Forman.
Benefit features of British trade unions, by Walter E.
Weyl, Ph. D.
1906. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1905.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1905.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii.
(Reprint of H. Doc. 580. 59th Cong., 1st sess.)
1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades, by Walter
E. Weyl, Ph. D., and A. M. Sakolski, Ph. D.
Cost of industrial insurance in the District of Columbia,
by S. E. Forman.
1907. Free public employment offices in the United States, by
J. E. Conner, Ph. D.
Laws of foreign countries relating to employees on rail­
roads, by Lindley D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
1907. Wholesale prices. 1890 to 1906.
1907. The Italian on the land: A study in immigration, by
Emily Fogg Meade.
A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain, by
A. Maurice Low.
British workmen’s compensation acts, by Launcelot
Packer, B. L.
1907. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1906.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1906.
1907. Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled immigrant
laborers in the United States, by Frank J. Sheridan.
Economic condition of the Jews in Russia, by I. M.
Rubinow.
1907. Laws relating to the employment of women and children.
Laws relating to factory inspection and the health and
safety of employees.
1908. The legal liability of employers for injuries to their em­
ployees in the United States, by Lindley D. Clark,
A. M., LL. M.
Summary of foreign workmen’s compensation acts.
British workmen’s compensation act of 1906.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907.
British trade disputes act of 1906.
1908. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1907.
Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.
* Supply exhausted.

95052°- Bull. 174—15----- 2



16

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

*No. 76—May,

1908. Tlie Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of
1907, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
What is done for the unemployed in European countries,
by W. D. P. Bliss.
♦No. 77—July, 1908. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1907.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1907.
Compensation for injuries of artisans and laborers in the
service of the United States.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal
industrial towns of Great Britain.
♦No. 78—Sept., 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Mexican labor in the United States, by Victor S. Clark.
Ph. D.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal
industrial towns of the German Empire.
British old-age pensions act of 1908.
♦No. 79—Nov., 1908. The mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman.
Charity relief and wage earnings, by S. E. Forman.
♦No. 80—Jan., 1909. Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by
Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Minimum wage act, 1908, New South Wales.
♦No. 81—Mar., 1909. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1908.
♦No. 82—May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing to
municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman.
No. 83—July, 1909. The women's trade-union movement in Great Britain, by
Katherine Graves Busbey, A. B.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal in­
dustrial towns of France.
Earnings and hours of labor in British textile industries.
No. 84— Sept., 1909. Accidents to railroad employees in New Jersey, 1888 to
1907, by Frederick S. Crum, Ph. D.
The Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, Ph. D.
No. 85—Nov., 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by Lindley
D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Laws of various States relating to labor, enacted since
January 1, 1908.
♦No. 86—Jan., 1910. Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by
Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United
States, by John B. Andrews, Ph. D.
List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld in col­
laboration with Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., and Dr. Felix
Putzeys.
International Association for Labor Legislation and its
publications.
British trade boards act, 1909.
Earnings and hours of labor in British clothing indus­
tries.




♦ Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

•No. 87—Mar.,

No. 88—May,

No. 89—July,
♦No. 90—Sept.,

♦No. 91—Nov.,

♦No. 92—Jan.,

♦No. 93—Mar.,

♦No. 94—May,

17

1910. Wholesale prices, 1890 to March, 1910.
Wages and hours of labor of union carpenters in the
United States and in English-speaking foreign coun­
tries, by Ethelbert Stewart.
Prices of wheat, bread, etc., in Milan, Italy, 1801 to 1908.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal
industrial towns of Belgium.
Earnings and hours of labor in British building and
woodworking industries.
1910. Cost of living of families of moderate income in Germany
in 1907-8.
Trend of wages in Germany, 1898 to 1907.
Wages and hours of labor in German woodworking indus­
tries in 1906.
Wages and hours of labor in Austria, 1906 and 1907.
1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz,
Ph. D.
1910. Fatal accidents in coal mining, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Recent action relating to employer’s liability and work­
men’s compensation, by Lindley D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Essential features of a compensation law; Chicago con­
ference of November, 1910.
Summary of foreign workmen’s compensation acts.
Cost of employer’s liability and workmen’s compensation
insurance, by Miles M. Dawson.
1910. Working hours of wage-earning women in selected indus*
tries in Chicago, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Labor laws declared unconstitutional, by Lindley D.
Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Old-age and invalidity pension laws of Germany, France,
and Australia.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark,
A. M., LL. M.
Laws of various States relating to labor enacted since
January 1, 1910.
1911. Industrial accidents and loss of earning power; German
experience in 1897 and 1907, by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Laws and bills.
1911, by Lindley D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the Inter­
national Association for Labor Legislation.
Report of Illinois commission on occupational diseases.
1911. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1910.
Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living in the
principal industrial cities of the United States.
Reports of British Board of Trade on cost of living in
England and Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and
the United States.
Hours of labor of men, women, and children employed in
factories in Austria.
1911. Fourth Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii.




* Supply exhausted.

18

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

*No. 95—July. 1911. Industrial lead poisoning, with descriptions of lead proc­
esses in certain industries in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D.,
F. R. C. P.
The white-lead industry in the United States, with an
appendix on the lead-oxide industry, by Alice Hamilton,
M. A., M. D.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning (actually reported)
in New York State in 1909 and 1910, by John B. An­
drews, Ph. D.
Laws enacted during 1911 requiring the report of occupa­
tional diseases.
*No. 96— Sept., 1911. Working hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
women workers in selected industries of Maryland and
of California, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Employment of children in Maryland industries, by Marie
L. Obenauer and Mary Conyngton.
Attitude of Massachusetts manufacturers toward the
health of their employees, by Wm. C. Hanson, M. D.
The workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911, of Ger­
many, translated by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
*No. 97—Nov., 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley D. Clark,
A. M., LL. M.
Laws of various States relating to labor enacted since
January 1, 1911.
*No. 98—Jan., 1912. Mediation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in the
United States, by Charles P. Neill.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907.
Conciliation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in
Great Britain. (Conciliation and arbitration agree­
ment of 1907.)
Attitude of employing interests toward conciliation and
arbitration in Great Britain, by A. Maurice Low, M. A.
Conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain. (Concilia­
tion act of 1S96.)
Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitration in
Great Britain, by Arthur E. Holder.
Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the cloak, suit,
and skirt industry in New York City, by Charles H.
Winslow.
Industrial courts in France, Germany, and Switzerland,
by Helen L. Sumner, Ph. D.
No. 99—Mar., 1912. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1911.
Wholesale prices in Canada, 1890 to 1911.
No. 100—May, 1912. List of industrial poisons and other substances injurious
to health found in industrial processes.
Act providing for a tax on white phosphorus matches and
for prohibiting their import or export.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

19

B U L L E T IN S P U B LISH ED IN S E R IE S SIN CE JU L Y i, 191a.

The publication of annual and special reports and of bimonthly bulletins was
discontinued July 1, 1912, and since that time bulletins have been published at
irregular intervals, each number relating to one of a series of general subjects.
These bulletins are numbered in each series and also carry consecutive whole
numbers beginning with No. 101. The designations of the series and the titles of
the bulletins in the order of their whole numbers follow ;
SERIES.

Wholesale prices.
Retail prices and cost of living.
Wages and hours of labor.
Women in industry.
Workmen’s insurance and compensation (including laws relating thereto).
Industrial accidents and hygiene.
Conciliation and arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
Labor laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to
labor).
Foreign labor laws.
Miscellaneous series.
BULLETINS.

No. 101. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man.
No. 102. British national insurance act, 1911.
No. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland.
No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sani­
tary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D.
No. 105. Retail prices, 1890 to 1911. Part I.
*No. 105. Retail prices, 1890 to 1911: General tables. Part II.
*No. 106. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1912. Part I.
No. 106. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1912: General tables. Part II.
No. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany, trans­
lated by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
No. 108. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1912.
No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the
United States, by Frank B. Sargent.
No. 110. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1912.
*No. 111. Labor legislation of 1912.
*No. 112. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1912, by Lindley D.
Clark, A. M., LL. M.
No. 113. Retail prices, 1890 to December, 1912.
No. 114. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1912.
No. 115. Retail prices, 1890 to February, 1913.
No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women
in selected industries in the District of Columbia, by Marie L.
Obenauer.
No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons.
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin, by Marie
L. Obenauer.




* Supply exhausted.

20

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D.
No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer, by N. C. Adams.
No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee, by Marie L.
Obenauer.
No. 123. Employers’ welfare work, by Elizabeth Lewis Otey, Ph. D.
No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New
York, by Charles H. Winslow.
No. 125. Retail prices, 1890 to 1913.
No. 126. Workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and foreign coun­
tries.
No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection,
by William C. Hanson, M. D.
No. 128. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries,
1890 to 1912.
*No. 129. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, mill work, and furniture in­
dustries, 1890 to 1912.
*No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer, by J. Chester Bowen.
♦No. 131. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1907 to 1912.
No. 132. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1913.
No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its
inquiry into industrial agreements.
No. 134. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe and hosiery and knit
goods industries, 1890 to 1912.
No. 135. Wages and hours of labor in the cigar and clothing industries, 1911
and 1912.
No. 136. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1913.
No. 137. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam rail­
road cars, 1890 to 1912.
No. 138. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1913.
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike.
No. 140. Retail prices, 1890 to December, 1913.
No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining o f lead, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. A., M. D.
No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain Euro­
pean countries, by Geo. M. Price, M. D.
No. 143. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1913.
No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York
City, by Charles H. Winslow.
No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist indus­
try of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece
rates in the dress and waist industry o f New York City, by N. I.
Stone.
No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in cloak, suit, and skirt industry,
with appendix showing plan for apprenticeship for cutters and the
education of workers in the industry.
No. 148. Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating
thereto.
No. 149. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1913.
No. 150. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries,
1907 to 1913.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

21

No. 151. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry .in the United
States, 1907 to 1912.
No. 152. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1913, by Lindley D.
Clark, A. M., L*L. M.
No. 153. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, mill work, and furniture in­
dustries, 1907 to 1913.
No. 154. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe and hosiery and under­
wear industries, 1907 to 1913.
No. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States.
No. 156. Retail prices, 1907 to December, 1914.
No. 157. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
No. 158. Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in
foreign countries.
No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
No. 160. Hours, earning, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mer­
cantile establishments and garment factories, by Marie L. Obenauer
and Frances W. Valentine.
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing ahd cigar industries, 1911 to
1913.
No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam rail­
road cars, 1907 to 1913.
No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer, by Newton H. Clark.
No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries, by Alice
Hamilton, M. A., M. D.
No. 166. Labor legislation of 1914.
No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
No. 168. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry in the United
States, 1907 to 1913.
No. 169. Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914.
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
No. 171. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y.
No. 173. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign
countries.




SUBJECT INDEX.

A.
Accident insurance:
♦Fourth Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany. The
law of compulsory insurance against accidents, pp. 79-152, 265-270.
*Bul. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson,
pp. 45^8.
*Bul. 17. July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, pp. 573-579.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 46-48, 70, 71,115.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1072-1098.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905- The State cooperative accident insurance fund of
Maryland, pp. 645-648.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 747-751.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 36-225.
Belgium, pp. 444-475.
Denmark, pp. 559-610.
France, pp. 681-797.
Germany, pp. 980-1176.
Great Britain, pp. 1499-1671
Italy, pp. 1701-1827.
Norway, pp. 2017-2059.
Russia, pp. 2092-2206.
Spain, pp. 2322-2354.
Sweden, pp. 2381-2410.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911. of
Germany, translated by Henry J. Harris, pp. 590-682.
Bui. 103, August 1, 1912. Sickness and accident insurance Inw of Switzer­
land, 1911, pp. 13-26.
1913. Compensation for injuries to employees of the United States, aris­
ing from accidents occurring between August 1, 1908. and June 30, 1911.
Report of operations under the act of May 30, 1908.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., pp. 73, 74.
Bui. 155, September, 1914. Compensation for accidents to employees of
the United States under act of May 30, 1908.
(See also Workmen’s insurance and compensation.)
* Supply exhausted.
22




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

23

Accident occurrence, fatigue as related to. (See Fatigue as related to accident
occurrence.)
Accidents, industrial, legislation relating to:
*Fourth Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany. The
law of compulsory insurance against accidents, pp. 79-152, 265-270.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 1-28.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. The State cooperative accident insurance fund of
Maryland, pp. 645-648.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 460, 461.
♦Bui. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 1049.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911,
of Germany, translated by Henry J. Harris, pp. .590-682.
Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 909-911.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bui. 103, August 1, 1912. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzer­
land, 1911, pp. 13-26.
♦Bui. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 29, 30.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, pp. 24, 25.
(See aJso Labor legislation.)
Accidents, industrial, prevention of:
♦Bui. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 795-798, 820-822.
France, pp. 846, 849, 850.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Bel­
gium, pp. 85-104.
♦Bui. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 335-337.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 575-577.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1020, 1021.
Netherlands, pp. 1041-1046.
Italy, pp. 1052, 1053.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 181-183.
New South Wales, pp. 238, 239.
South Australia, pp. 249, 250.
Queensland, pp. 259, 260.
Ontario, pp. 278, 279.
Quebec, pp. 298-301.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905. Austria, 1901,♦♦ pp. 671, 672, 676.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

24

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Accidents, industrial, prevention of—Concluded.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 79.
Belgium, pp. 570, 571.
Germany, pp. 1039-1052, 1089.
Italy, pp. 1704-1710, 1731.
Norway, pp. 2030, 2046.
Spain, pp. 2324, 2338, 2348.
Sweden, p. 2382.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Accidents, industrial, statistics of:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor, pp. 41, 42.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
Great Britain, pp. 42-45.
France, pp. 70-72.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 1-28.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 59-63.
Belgium, pp. 140-145.
France, pp. 208-216.
Germany, pp. 326-335.
Great Britain, pp. 443-453.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment in the United States,
by Waiter E. Weyl, pp. 635-637.
♦Bui. 67, November, 1906. France, 1904,♦♦ pp. 853-856.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908.
Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp. 523-529.
Railroad accidents, Great Britain, 1905,♦♦ pp. 613-615.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 417-465.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 119-225.
Belgium, pp. 470-475.
Denmark, pp. 573-582, 596, 600-607.
France, pp. 770-797.
Germany, pp. 1124-1176, 1270-1280.
Great Britain, pp. 1518-1533, 1637-1648.
Italy, pp. 1806-1827.
Norway, pp. 2052-2057.
Russia, pp. 2156-2206.
Spain, pp. 2350-2354.
Sweden, pp. 2401-2410.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

25

Accidents, industrial, statistics of—Concluded.
*Bul. 81, March, 1909. Pennsylvania, 1907,** p. 396.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Great Britain, 1908,** pp. 138-140.
Bui. 84, September, 1909.
Accidents to railroad employees in New Jersey, 1888 to 1907, by Fred­
erick S. Crum, pp. 183-337.
Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, pp. 367-377.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem, Pa.
(S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 120-125.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. Washington, 1908,** p. 223.
Bui. 88, May, 1910.
Pennsylvania, 1908,** p. 843.
Wisconsin, 1907,** pp. 848-850.
*Bul. 90, September, 1910. Fatal accidents in coal mining, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 437-674.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
*Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Industrial accidents and loss of earning power;
German experience in 1897 and 1907, by Henry J. Harris, pp. 1-96.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 378-396.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 87-92, 355-357.
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades, pp. 73-101.
*Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions, pp. 349-379, 562-589.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman.
Acetaldehyde as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 739.
Acetate of lead as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 19, 20.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning, with descriptions of lead
processes in certain industries in Great Britain and the western states
of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., p. 80.
Acetone as an industrial poison:
Bui. 120, May 13,1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 13.
Acridine as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 739.
Acrolein as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 739.
Administration of labor laws:
*Bul. 12, September, 1897. Inspection of factories and workshops in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 549-568.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903. Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 1176-1183.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain,
by Victor S. Clark, pp. 8-11.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 183, 184.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

26

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Administration of labor laws—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report oil condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
(See also Factory inspection; Factory legislation.)
African boxwood poisoning:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Ivober, M. D.,
p. 482.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,** p. 370.
'“Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 776.
Agreements between employers and employees:
*Bul. 8, January. 1897. Conciliation and arbitration in the boot and shoe
industry, by T. A. Carroll, pp. 11-13, 32, 33.
*Bul. 42, September, 1902. Bituminous coal mining, pp. 1057-1068.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal strike,
by Carroll D. Wright.
Bituminous coal mining, pp. 1218-1228.
Type-setting agreement, Chicago, pp. 1229-1232.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Bituminous coal mining. Hocking Valley, pp.
132-135.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission, pp.
486-494, 653-655.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Chicago bricklayers and stonemasons, pp. 903-909.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903.
Boston carpenters, pp. 1045-1049.
Iowa coal operators, pp. 1049-1063.
Bui. 49, November, 1903.
Boston master builders, pp. 1312. 1313.
Boston printing trades, pp. 1313-1316.
Buffalo manufacturers’ club, pp. 1316-1318.
Buffalo marine firemen, oilers, and water tenders, pp. 1319-1322.
Chicago bridge and structural-iron workers, pp. 1322-1327.
Chicago tailors, pp. 1328, 1329.
Plasterers, pp. 1329-1335.
Illinois Central Railroad Co. and blacksmiths employed thereon, pp.
1335, 1336.
Cincinnati bricklayers and hod carriers, p. 1337.
Buffalo longshoremen, marine and transport workers, pp. 1337-1339.
New York boiler makers and iron ship builders, pp. 1339, 1340.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904.
Printing trades, pp. 132-142.
Bricklayers, Missouri, pp. 142-145.
New York building trades, pp. 146, 147.
♦Bill. 51, March, 1904.
Philadelphia printing trades, pp. 415-421.
Philadelphia shoe manufacturers, pp. 421-424.
Iron molders, various cities, pp. 424—
135.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

27

Agreements between employers and employees—Concluded.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Bituminous coal mining, pp. 63S-650.
Bui. 53, July, 1904.
Meat packers, pp. 933, 934.
Garment workers, pp. 934-936.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904.
Printing trades, pp. 1623-1631.
Machinists, Illinois Central Railroad Co., pp. 1631-1634.
Amusement section, Central Trades and Labor Union of St. Louis,
pp. 1634, 1635.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Coal miners, pp. 244-257.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905. A documentary history of the early organiza­
tions of printers, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 1001-1033.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. Iron molders and metal workers, pp. .191-196.
♦Bui. 98, January, 1912.
Conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, pp. 150-160.
Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry in New York City, by Charles H. Winslow, pp. 210-270.
Bill. 133, August 18, 1913. Report of industrial council of the British
Board of Trade on its inquiry into industrial agreements.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Statis­
tics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper district,
pp. 137, 138.
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Bui. 147, June 13,1914. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak,
suit, and skirt industry of New York City and Boston, pp. 7-108.
(See, also, Conciliation and arbitration; Sliding scale; Union scale of
wages.)
Agricultural implements industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Agriculture:
♦Bui. 1, November, 1895.
Michigan,♦ p. 70.
♦
Minnesota,^ pp. 73, 74.
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896.
Annual report of the Bureau of Industries for the Province of On­
tario,♦ 1894, pp. 291-293.
♦
North Carolina,♦ p. 274.
♦
North Dakota,♦ pp. 275, 276.
♦
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

28

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Agriculture—Concluded.
^Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898. Wisconsin,** pp. 703, 704.
*Bul. 22, May, 1899. Indiana, 1898,** pp. 422, 423.
*Bul. 23, July, 1899. Massachusetts, 1895,** pp. 566, 567.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. North Carolina, 1899,** p. 325.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. North Carolina, 1901,** p. 1237.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. North Carolina, 1902,** p. 153.
Bui. 58, May, 1905.
Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 745-807.
Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 931-937.
Austria, 1901,** pp. 977, 978.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. North Carolina, 1903,** p. 325.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 747-757.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. North Carolina, 1904,** p. 292.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. North Carolina, 1905,** p. 144.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908. North Carolina, 1906,** pp. 943, 944.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. North Carolina, 1907,** pp. 92, 93.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. North Carolina, 1908,** p. 218.
Alaska:
*Bul. 16, May, 1898. Alaskan gold fields and the "opportunities they offer
for capital and labor, by Sam. C. Dunham, pp. 297-425.
*Bul. 19, November, 1898. Alaskan gold fields and the opportunities they
offer for capital and labor, by Sam. C. Dunham, pp. 789-828.
Bui. 29, July, 1900. The Yukon and Nome gold regions, by Sam. C. Dun­
ham, pp. 832-872.
Allen v. Flood, case of:
Bui. 33, March, 1901. The British conspiracy and protection of property
act, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 313-317.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain,
by A. Maurice Low, pp. 565, 566.
Ammonia as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. I).,
pp. 511, 530.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 155.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 739.
Amyl acetate as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 516.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 740.
Bui. 120, May, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 13.
Amyl alcohol as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer­
feld, p. 155.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 740.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

29

Analysis and index of labor reports:
Third Special Report. 1893. Analysis and index of all reports issued
by bureaus of labor statistics in the United States prior to Nov. 1, 1892.
(New edition, 1902, available for distribution.)
Aniline as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.f
pp. 516, 517.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 156.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, pp. 740, 741.
Animal dust, diseases of workers in:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 477, 478, 487, 488.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 784-829.
Ankylostomiasis:
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Brit­
ain,** p. 369. (See also Hookworm disease.)
Anthracite coal:
*1913. Increase in prices of anthracite coal, following the wage agree­
ment of May 20, 1912. (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.)
(See also Coal mining.)
Anthracite coal strike:
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal
strike, by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1147-1242.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission,
pp. 437-683.
Anthracite mine laborers, by G. O. Virtue:
*Bul. 13, November, 1897. (pp. 728-774.
Anthracosis:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 525.
Anthrax:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.
Rag and wool sorters, pp. 489, 577-581.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906.** Wool sorters, p. 369.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Rag industry, pp. 817-821.
Wool sorting, p. 801.
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Hides and skins, horsehair, and wool
industries, p. 1650.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
578, 579.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Report of the chief inspector of factories and work­
shops of Great Britain, 1908,** p. 141.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

30

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

A nthrax—Concluded.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.,
pp. 64, 68, 100, 234.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years
ending August, 1913, p. 48.
Antimonate of lead as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 20.
Antimony as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 157.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in tlie smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., p. 54.
Antimony compounds as industrial poisons:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 741.
Apprenticeship:
Eighth Annual Report. 1892. Industrial education.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl. France, pp. 66-68.
♦Bui. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
France, pp. 839-842.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Switzerland, pp. 138-148.
♦Bui. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 330-332.
♦Bui. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 572-575.
♦Bui. 31, November, 1900. Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr.
Luigi Einaudi, pp. 1260, 1261.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 174, 175.
New South Wales, pp. 235, 236.
Western Australia, pp. 265, 266.
Ontario, pp. 274-276.
♦Bui. 47, July, 1903. Agreements between employers and employees, Chi­
cago bricklayers and stonemasons, pp. 908, 909.
♦Bui. 49, November, 1903. Agreements between employers and employees:
Boston printing trades, p. 1314.
Chicago bridge and structural-iron workers, p. 1325.
Illinois Central Railroad and blacksmiths employed thereon, p. 1336.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
♦Bui. 51, March, 1904. Report of Commission on Apprenticeship, France,
1901, 1902, ♦* pp. 440-444.
♦Bui. 55, November, 1904. Agreements between employers and employees,
machinists, Illinois Central Railroad, p. 1632.
♦Bui. 60, September, 1905. France,♦ pp. 680-686.
♦
♦Bui. 61, November. 1905. A documentary history of the early organiza­
tions of printers, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 867-881, 891-896, 905-939.
* Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

31

Apprenticeship—Concluded.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. Conciliation in the stove industry, by John P.
Frey and John R. Commons, pp. 127, 128, 162-176, 191-194.
♦Bill. 67, November, 1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades,
by Walter E. Weyl and A. M. Sakolski, pp. 752-780.
♦Bui. 68, January, 1907. France, furniture industry, 1903,** pp. 161-166.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908. Massachusetts, 1906,** pp. 935, 936.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and. sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 20, 154, 171.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone, pp. 14, 19, 183, 184, 303.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Plan for apprenticeship for cutters in the cloak,
suit, and skirt industry of New York City, pp. 109-179.
(See also Industrial education.)
Arbitration. (See Conciliation and arbitration; Mediation and arbitration.)
Arsenic as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 13, 64.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. I).,
pp. 508, 509, 518.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report, 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe, Great Britain, p. 1650.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Report of the chief inspector of factories and work­
shops, Great Britain, 1908,** p. 141.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 157.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 742.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton. M. D., pp. 53, 54.
Bill. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.,
pp. 65, 68, 100, 232.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years
ending August, 1913, p. 48.
Arsenic compounds as industrial poisons:
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer­
feld, p. 157.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 742.
Arseniureted hydrogen as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer­
feld, p. 158.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 742.
Associations. (See Labor organizations.)
Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, by
Arthur E. Holder:
♦Bui. 98, January, 1912. pp. 179-202.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°— B u ll. 174—15------3




** Digest of State or foreign report.

32

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Attitude of women’s clubs and associations toward social economics, by Mien
M. Henrotin:
*Bul. 23, July, 1899. pp. 501-545.
Awnings, flags, sails, and tents, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.

B.
Bags, other than paper, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Bakeries:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 482.
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
518-537.
♦Bui. 131, August 15, 1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1907
to 1912.
Bui. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15,
1913.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1,
1914.
Benefit and retirement systems:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor. Beneficiary institutions, pp.
22-41.
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 242-246.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 343-351.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 488-510.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: Familist£re Society of
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 596-604.
♦Bui. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Various communities,
by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 700, 708, 717.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson,
pp. 39-57.
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, pp. 563-591.
♦Bui. 19, November, 1898. Mutual relief and benefit associations in the
printing trade, by William S. Waudby, pp. 829-851.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

33

Benefit and retirement systems—Continued.
*Bul. 20, January, 1809. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
France, pp. 62-66.
Belgium, pp. 85-87.
Saxony, pp. 105-110.
Switzerland, pp. 115-117.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade unions, by Edward
W. Bemis, pp. 361-400.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railroad employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1072-1098.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 63-77.
Belgium, pp. 145-158.
France, pp. 216-235.
Germany, pp. 335-358.
Great Britain, pp. 453-462.
♦Bui. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Yictor S. Clark.
Old-age pensions, pp. 162-164.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905.
Street railway employment in the United States, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 604-608, 629-635.
Austria, 1901,♦♦ pp. 668-675.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Yictor S.
Clark, pp. 850, 851.
1906. Third Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H.
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sesa), pp. 126-130.
♦Bui. 61, November, 1905. A documentary history of the early organiza­
tions of printers, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 864-867, 880-886, 940-954.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 699-848.
♦Bui. 66, September, 1906. Third Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 483-487.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, pp.
379-385.
♦1910. Civil service retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Her­
bert D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1910. Civil service retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert
D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1910. Pension funds for municipal employees and railroad pension sys­
tems in the United States (S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem,
Pa. (S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 120-125.
Bui. 88, May 1910. Germany, 1908,♦♦ pp. 866, 867.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

34

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Benefit and retirement systems—Concluded.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910.
Old-age and invalidity pension laws of Germany, France, and Aus­
tralia, pp. 965-1033.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 1049.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 455-461.
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention, pp. 237-262, 337-341.
*Bul. 111. December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 28, 29.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 24.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 42.
Benzine as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 513.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 743.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., pp. 11, 12.
Benzol as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer
feld, p. 158.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 743.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., pp. 12, 13.
Bethlehem strike:
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem, Pa.
(S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
Bisulphide of carbon as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F. W.
Doehring, p. 14.
Bituminous coal miners’ strike:
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pa., in 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
Blacklisting:
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment, by
Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 3-18.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1061-1072.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 39-42.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D, Clark, pp. 475, 476.
♦Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 874.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU *

35

Blacklisting—Concluded.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 9.
*Bul. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 13.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 15.
Black lung:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 525.
Boarding houses and homes for working women:
*Bul. 15, March, 1898. Boarding homes and clubs for working women, by
Mary S. Fergusson, pp. 141-196.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton-textile industry, pp. 542-547.
♦Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories, pp. 62-71.
Boards of arbitration. (See Conciliation and arbitration.)
Boards of grievances:
*Bul. 98, January, 1912.
Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain,
by Arthur E. Holder, pp. 179-202.
Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry in New York City, by Charles H. Winslow, pp. 203-272.
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914, Industrial court o f the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Boards of sanitary control:
*Bul. 98, January, 1912. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry in New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 253—
270.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 109-124.
Bolts and screws, manufacture of. (See Nuts, bolts, and screws, manufac­
ture of.)
Bonus systems:
*Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output, pp.
51, 122, 155, 766, 846.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 51, 52, 126-151.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem, Pa.
(S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 115-119.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and relations of employers and employees,
pp. 406-414, 464, 469.
*1912. Report on strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Mass. ( S. Doc. No.
870. 62d Cong., 2d sess.),.pp. 21-23, 78-86.




* Supply exhausted.

36

B U L L E T IN

OP T H E B U R E A U OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Bonus systems—Concluded.
Bui. 123, May 15, 1913. Employers’ welfare work, by Elizabeth Lewis
Otey, pp. 37-39, 53.
(See also Profit sharing.)
Bookbinding and blank-book making:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Boot and shoe industry:
*First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts ( 1S87 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 589-595, 839-863.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
592-603.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 15-17.
Bui. 134, August 26, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and knit goods industries, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 154, May 22, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and underwear industries: 1907 to 1913, pp. 5-76.
Bottle caps, manufacture of:
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, p. 35.
Bottling:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Boxes. (See Paper boxes; Wooden boxes.)
Boycotting:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886). De­
cisions of courts and legislation concerning strikes, combinations, con­
spiracy, boycotts, etc., pp. 1111-1164.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment, by
Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 3-7, 18.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Decisions of courts and legislation concerning strikes, combinations, con­
spiracy, boycotts, etc., pp. 874-1036.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Legislation concerning strikes, combinations, conspiracy, boycotts, etc.,
pp. 921-955.
( See also Decisions of courts relating to labor; Labor legislation.)




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

37

Brass founders’ ague:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D„
pp. 481, 517, 518.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 662, 663.
Brass industry, dangers to workers in:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 517, 518.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe, p. 1649.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 661-667.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Report of the chief inspector of factories and work­
shops of Great Britain, 1908,♦♦ p. 141.
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911. Report of Illinois Commission on Occupational
Diseases,♦ pp. 197, 198.
♦
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning, with descriptions of lead
processes in certain industries in Great Britain and the western States
of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., p. 83.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 35-38.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 20.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.,
p. 231.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years
ending August, 1913, pp. 47, 48.
Brewing industry:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905)
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Brickmaking industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 377-382.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Bui. 101, July, 1, 1912. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 42.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

38

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Bromine as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 75, Marel). 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. I).,
p. 512.
Broom-corn industry:
Bui. 127, August, 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 13.
Brooms and brushes, manufacture of:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway employees, by Emory R. Johnson:
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. pp. 552-596.
Brush making:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 488.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Buck Stove and Range case.
labor organizations.)

(See Decisions of courts relating to labor—

Building and loan associations:
♦Ninth Annual Report. 1893. Building and loan associations.
*Bul. 1, November, 1895. Missouri, 1894,♦♦ pp. 79, 80.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896.
Building and loan associations in California, 1894-95,♦♦ pp. 390- 392.
Cooperative savings and loan associations of New York, 1894,♦♦ pp. 393,
394.
♦Bui. 10, May, 1897. Summary of Ninth Annual Report, building and loan
associations, pp. 370-374.
♦Bui. 13, November, 1897. Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of
New Jersey on cooperative building and loan associations, ♦♦ pp. 778-780.
♦Bui. 16, May, 1898.
Annual report on the building and loan associations of Ohio, 1896,♦♦
pp. 431-433.
Annual report of the superintendent of banks, relative to cooperative
savings and loan associations of New York, 1896,♦♦ pp. 429, 430.
♦Bui. 21, March, 1899.
Second annual report on building and loan associations of Connecti­
cut, 1898,! ♦ pp. 315, 316.
*
Eighth annual report on building and loan associations of New York,
1898,♦♦ pp. 317, 318.
First annual report on building and loan associations of Wisconsin,
1898,♦♦ p. 319.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. Cooperative building and loan associations of New
Jersey, 1897,♦♦ pp. 426-428.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

39

Building and loan associations—Concluded.
Bui. 30, September, 1900.
Sixth annual report on building and loan associations of California,
1899,** pp. 1073, 1074.
Report of commissioner of building and loan associations of Con­
necticut, 1899,** pp. 1074, 1075.
Biennial report of the auditor of the State of Iowa, 1899,** pp. 1075,
1076.
Fourth annual report of department of state on building and loan asso­
ciations, Michigan, 1899,** pp. 1076, 1077.
Annual report of superintendent of banks on building and loan asso­
ciations, New York,** pp. 1077-1079.
Bui. 33, March, 1901.
Seventh annual report on building and loan associations of California,
1900,** pp. 332, 333.
Annual report of the superintendent of banks on building and loan
associations in New York, 1899,** pp. 333, 334.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Annual report of superintendent of banks rela­
tive to building and loan associations, New York, 1900,** pp. 1253-1255.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Building and loan associations in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1491-1572.
Building and repairing of steam railroad cars:
Bui. 137, December 1, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the building and
repairing of steam railroad cars, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 163, October 28, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the building and
repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
Building trades:
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Virginia, 1901,** p. 1241.
*Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
*Btil. 55, November, 1904. Economic condition of employees, New Jersey,
1902,** pp. 1648, 1649.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 87, March, 1910. Earnings and hours of labor of British building
and woodworking industries, 1906,** pp. 626-633.
Bui. 124, June 16, 1913. Conciliation and arbitration in the building
trades of Greater New York, by Charles H. Winslow.
*Bul. 131, August 15, 1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor,
1907 to 1912.
Bui. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor,
May 15, 1913.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Burial cases. (See Caskets, etc.)
Butter and cheese manufacture:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Butter prices, from producer to consumer, by Newton H. Clark:
Bui. 164, November 30, 1914.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

40

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Buttons, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Buttons, novelties, and specialties, metal, manufacture of:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 47, 48.
Buttons, pearl and bone, diseases of workers in the manufacture of:
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, pp. 606-615.

c
.
Cabinetmakers:
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 771-776.
Caisson disease or “ bends” :
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 521.
♦Bui. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,1♦ p. 370.
*
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911.
Report of Illinois Commission on Occupational Diseases, pp. 200-202.
Resolution of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the International
Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 192, 193.
Bui. 157. March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases reported in New York State two years
ending August, 1913, p. 48.
Canadian
♦Bui.
♦Bui.
♦Bui.
♦Bui.

Industrial Disputes Investigation Act of 1907:
74, January, 1908, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 159-167.
76, May, 1908, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 657-740.
86, January, 1910, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 1-29.
98, January, 1912, pp. 64-81.

Candy manufacture:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Canning industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911.
Working hours, earnings, and duration of employment of women
workers in selected industries of Maryland and of California, by
Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 347-465.
Employment of children in Maryland industries, by Marie L. Obenauer
and Mary Conyngton, pp. 466-487.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OP THE BUREAU.

41

Canning industry—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected industries,
pp. 39-55.
Bui. 119, May 5, 1913. Working hours of women in the pea canneries
of Wisconsin, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Cans and boxes, tin, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 51-53.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected industries,
pp. 55-66.
Car building.

(See Railroad car building.)

Carbolic acid as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 14.
Carbon dioxide as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 158.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 744.
Carbon disulphide as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.#
p. 514.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 159.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 744.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 14.
Carbon monoxide as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 13, 15.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 513.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 160.
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911. Report of Illinois commission on occupational
diseases, pp. 198-200.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 745.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory in­
spection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D., p. 232.




* Supply exhausted.

42

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Carbonate of lead as an industrial poison:
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 19-21.
Carbonic acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F
W. Doehring, p. 15.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 514.
Carburetted hydrogen as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
Carmen and carriers:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 487.
Carpet industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 808-813.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. Anthrax poisoning, New York State, p. 48.
Carriages and wagons, manufacture of:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Caskets, coffins, and undertakers’ goods, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Cassel yellow as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January. 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 20.
Catarrhs:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, fertilizer factories, p. 109.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

43

Catarrhs—Concluded.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.
Grain elevators and grain threshers, p. 482.
Tobacco workers, p. 482.
Petroleum oil refineries, p. 513.
Celluloid goods, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Cement workers:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 708-711.
Census, United States, history and growth of, by Carroll D. Wright:
*1900. (S. Doc. No. 194, 56th Cong., 1st sess.)
Ceramic industries. (See Potteries.)
Charity relief and wage earnings, Washington, D. C., by S. E. Forman:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908, pp. 876-922.
Chauffeurs, teamsters, and drivers:
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1. 1914.
Chemical industry, accidents in:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 426-428.
Children in industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
*Bul. 10, May, 1897. Work and wages of men, women, and children
(Summary of Eleventh Annual Report), pp. 237-256.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 800-811.
France, pp. 843-845.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 104-113.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp.. 580-583.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Netherlands, pp. 1033-1041.
Italy, pp. 1053-1056.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 183-186, 199, 200.
New South Wales, pp. 239-241.
South Australia, p. 250.
Queensland, pp. 260, 261.
Ontario, pp. 279-282.
Quebec, p. 301.
Bui. 36, September, 1901. Child labor in Minnesota, 1899, 1900,** pp. 968,
969.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Children employed in mines and factories in
Italy, 1896-1898,** pp. 1193, 1194.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 74-76.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

44

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Children in industry—Continued.
Bui. 39, March, 1902. Cliild labor in Wisconsin, 1898, 1899,** pp. 486, 487.
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Cliild labor in Italy, 1899, 1900,** pp. 152, 153.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Belgium, 1896,** pp. 924-926.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903.
Minnesota, 1901, 1902,** pp. 1066, 1067.
Great Britain, 1898,** pp. 1098, 1099.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 485-637.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905.
Laws relating to children in European countries, pp. 302-319.
Maryland, 1903,** p. 322.
*Bul. 60. September, 1905.
Minnesota, 1904,** pp. 667, 668.
New Jersey, 1903,** p. 674.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. Laws relating to the employment of children in
the United States, pp. 197-285.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906.
California, 1904,** p. 849.
Maine, 1904,** p. 853.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades,
by Walter B. Weyl and A. M. Sakolski, pp. 720^731.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Maine, 1902-1904,** p. 144.
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Maryland, 1905,** p. 424.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. Minnesota, 1905,** pp. 337, 338.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. California, 1905,** pp. 585.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907. Laws relating to employment of women and
children, pp. 655-816.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908. Maryland, 1906,** p. 175.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909:
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. dark,
pp. 1-85.
Maryland, 1907,** p. 89.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Maryland, 1908,** pp. 640, 641.
Bui. 85, November, 3909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 190*,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 483^91.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz,
pp. 1-413.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 1044-1046.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 184, 185.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911. Hours of labor of men, women, and children em­
ployed in factories in Austria. 1906,** pp. 591-606.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911:
Employment of children in Maryland industries, by Marie L. Obenauer
and Mary Conyngton, pp. 466-486.
Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 875-904.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 19-23.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

45

Children in industry—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry.
♦Vol. VI. The beginning of child-labor legislation in certain States; a
comparative study.
♦Vol. VII. Conditions under which children leave school to go to work.
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill op­
eratives.
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets among typical cotton-mill workers.
♦Vol. XVII. Hook-worm disease among cotton-mill operatives.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected industries.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
♦Bui. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, x> 18, 19.
p.
Bui. 117. April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and
young persons.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 19.
Bui. 166, December 15,1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, pp. 17-21.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914.
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 24.
(See also Decisions of courts relating to labor; Labor legislation;
Woman and child wage earners.)
Children, mutual rights and duties of parents and, under the law, by F. J.
Stimson:
♦Bui. 12, September, 1897. pp. 567-593.
Chimney sweepers’ cancer:
♦Bui. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,♦♦ p. 370.
Chloride of lime as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 160.
Bill. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 746.
Chlorine as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 511.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 161.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 746.
Chlorodinitrobenzol as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 746.
* Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

46

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Chromate of lead as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 20.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., p. 79.
Chromate of potassium as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
Chromatic acid as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
Chrome as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 517.
Chrome orange as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 20.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.
Chrome red (basic lead chromate) as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 20.
Bui. 100. May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.
Chrome yellow (neutral lead chromate) as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 20.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.
Chromium compounds as industrial poisons:
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 161.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.
Cigar boxes, manufacture of:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 66-76.
Cigar industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 555-585.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected industries,
pp. 88-111.
Bui. 135, September 2, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cigar and
clothing industries.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. Lead poisoning, New York State, p. 47.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

47

Cigar industry—Concluded.
Bui. 161, October 24, 1914. Wages anil hours of labor in the clothing and
cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
(See also Tobacco industry.)
Cigarettes, manufacture of:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 76-88.
Civil service retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Herbert D. Brown:
*1910. (S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
Civil service retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert D. Brown:
*1910 (S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
Clay and pottery products. (See Pottery industry.)
Cloak, suit, and skirt industry:
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Wages and regularity of "employment in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry, New York City and Boston, pp. 7-108.
Clocks and watches, manufacture of:
*First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1887).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. $Eand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 111-119.
Clothing industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. Report on labor conditions of garment workers,
Germany,♦* pp. 73-75.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Contracting garment workers, Missouri, 1902,** pp.
913, 914.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 531-554.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*Bul. 74, January, 1908. Austria, 1899,** pp. 184-186.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. Earnings and hours of labor in British clothing
industries, 1906,** pp. 192-206.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------4




** Digest of State or foreign report.

48

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Clothing industry—Concluded.
*Bul. 98, January, 1912. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in tlie
cloak, suit, and skirt industry in New York City, by Charles H.
Winslow, pp. 203-272.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing.
Bui. 135, September 2, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cigar and
clothing industries, 1911 and 19i2.
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry, New York City and Boston, pp. 7-108.
Bui. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.
Bui. 161, October 24, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing
and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
Clubs and associations, women’s, attitude of, toward social economics, by
Ellen M. Henrotin:
*Bul. 23, July, 1899. pp. 545-556.
Coach trimmings and manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 189£-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
Coachmen, cabmen, etc.:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
488-496.
Coal mining:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.,
pp. 195-243.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 228-264.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 335-359.
♦Bui. 13, November, 1897. Anthracite mine laborers, by G. O. Virtue,
pp. 728-774.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Bui. 40, May, 1902. Statistics of coal mining, 1883-1900, Great
Britain,** pp. 600-602.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
United States, pp. 383-529.
Great Britain, pp. 907-915.
*Bul. 51, March, 1904. The union movement among coal mine workers,
by Frank Julian Warne, pp. 380-414.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Austria, 1901,** pp. 968-973.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU,

49

Coal mining— Concluded.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907. Pennsylvania, 1905,** p. 663.
♦Bui. 74, January, 1908. Ohio, 1904, 1905,♦* p. 182.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908.
Illinois, 1903,♦♦ pp. 593, 594.
Pennsylvania, 1906,♦♦ pp. 605, 606.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 525, 526.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, pp. 436-438.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908.
Michigan, 1906, 1907,** pp. 927, 928.
Ohio, 1905, 1906,♦♦ pp. 934, 935.
♦Bui. 81, March, 1909. Pennsylvania, 1907,1♦ p. 399.
*
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Colorado, 1906,1♦ p. 106.
*
♦Bui. 87, March, 1910. Ohio, 1906-7,♦♦ p. 635.
Bui. 88, May, 1910. Pennsylvania, 1908,i ♦ p. 845.
*
♦Bui. 90, September, 1910. Fatal accidents in coal mining, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, pp. 437-674.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pennsylvania, 1910, 1911 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1913. Increase in prices on anthracite coal, following the wage agreement
of May 20, 1912 (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.).
Collective agreements. (See Agreements between employers and employees;
Conciliation and arbitration; Union scale of wages.)
Colorado strikes:
♦1905. Report on labor disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880 to
1904, inclusive ( S. Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.).
Comb manufacture:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
615-623.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 14.
Combinations, industrial:
Bui. 29, July, 1900. Trusts and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W.
Jenks, pp. 661-831.
Combinations of workmen:
Bui. 33, March, 1901. The British conspiracy and protection of property
act and its operation, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 305-322.
(See also Boycotting.)
Comfort of employees. (See Sanitation and hygiene.)
Commissions. (See Labor departments and commissions.)
Company stores:
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 504-508.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: Familistere Society of
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, p. 606.
♦ Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

50

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Company stores— Concluded.
1903. Second report of tlie Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902
(S. Doe. No. 181, 57tli Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 79, 80.
3900. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H. Doc.
No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), p. 97.
*1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii. 1910
(S. Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 28, 29.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 445-451.
*1910-1912. Report on conditions of woman and child wage earners in tlie
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 599-606.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 621-636.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pennsylvania, 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp.
217-222.
(■See also Truck system.)
Competition between the sexes:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected in­
dustries.
Compositors:
♦Bill. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 495.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 673-675.
(See also Printing trades.)
Compulsory insurance. (See Workmen's insurance and compensation.)
Conciliation and arbitration:
♦Bui. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Mariemont and Bascoup
Coal Mining Company, Belgium, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 697-700.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Conciliation and arbitration in the boot and shoe
industry, by T. A. Carroll, pp. 1-38.
♦Bui. 9, March. 1897. Strikes and lockouts settled by conciliation and arbi­
tration in Great Britain in 1895,♦♦ p. 164.
♦Bui. 16, May, 1898.
Tenth annual report of the board of mediation and arbitration of
New York, 1896,1* p. 434.
*
Eleventh annual report of the State board of arbitration and concilia­
tion of Massachusetts, 1896,♦♦ p. 433.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, Great Britain, pp. 40-42.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. Twelfth annual report of State board of arbitration
and conciliation. Massachusetts, 1897,♦♦ p. 428.
♦Bui. 23, July, 1899. Eleventh annual report of the board of mediation and
arbitration of New York, 1897, ♦ p. 568.
♦
♦Bui. 24, September, 1899. Twelfth annual report of the board of mediation
and arbitration of New York, 1898.** p. 713.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

51

Conciliation and arbitration—Continued.
*Bul. 25, November, 1S99. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. S32-835.
France, pp. 851-856.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900.
Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessenden,
pp. 54-73.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 119-135.
Switzerland, pp. 168-177.
First report of the board of mediation and arbitration of Connecticut,
1895,: * p. 181.
*
Thirteenth annual report of the State board of arbitration and con­
ciliation of Massachusetts, 1898,** p. 182.
Sixth annual report of the board of arbitration of Ohio, 1898.** pp.
182, 183.
Biennial report of the board of arbitration and conciliation of Wiscon­
sin, 1897, 1898,** p. 183.
*Bul. 27. March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 371-178.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900.
Voluntary conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, by John
Bruce M’Phersori, pp. 457-548.
System of adjusting scale of wagefe, etc., in certain rolling mills, by
James H. Nutt, pp. 549-551.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby, Austria, pp. 590-596.
First and second reports of proceedings under the conciliation act of
1896 of Great Britain,** pp. 604. 605.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby, Neth­
erlands, pp. 1046-1051.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900. Thirteenth annual report of the board of media­
tion and arbitration of New York, 1899,** p. 1271.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Fourteenth annual report of the State board of
arbitration and conciliation of Massachusetts, 1899,** p. 141.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 207-234.
New South Wales, pp. 246-248.
South Australia, pp. 252-257.
Canada (the Dominion), pp. 270-272.
Ontario, pp. 291-295.
Bui. 34. May, 1901. Conciliation and arbitration in France, 1893-1899,**
pp. 511. 512.
Bui. 35, July, 1901. Seventh annual report of the Ohio State board of
arbitration. 1899,** p. 787.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Fifteenth annual report of the State board of
arbitration and conciliation of Massachusetts, 1900,** p. 1178.
Bui. 38, January, 1902 Quebec trade disputes act. 11)01, pp. 127-133.
*Bul. 40, May. 1902.
Working of compulsory conciliation and arbitration laws in New
Zealand and Victoria, 1901,** pp. 552-560.
Compulsory arbitration act of New South Wales, pp. 561-571.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

52

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Conciliation and arbitration—Continued.
Bill. 41, July, 1902. Conciliation and arbitration in Canada, 1000-1901,**
p. 833.
*Bul. 42, September, 1902.
Sixteenth annual report of the State board of conciliation and arbi­
tration of Massachusetts, 1901,** p. 1070.
Fourteenth annual report of the board of mediation and arbitration
of New York, 1901,** p. 1076.
Conciliation and arbitration in France, 1900,** pp. 1080-1082.
Bui. 45, March, 1903. Third report of proceedings under the conciliation
and trades disputes act of 1896, Great Britain, for the years 1896 to
1901,** pp. 368, 369.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Arbitration agreement in building trades. Chicago,
1903-1905, pp. 903-909.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 1184-1198.
Industrial conciliation and arbitration act of New Zealand, 1900, pp.
1283-1311.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. Reports of State boards of arbitration: Colorado,
1902,** Illinois, 1902,** Indiana, 1899-1902,** Massachusetts, 1902,**
New York, 1901,** Ohio, 1900, 1901,** and Wisconsin, 1899-1900,** pp.
158-161.
*BuL 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 57-60, 78-162.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment iu the United States,
by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 627-629.
*Bul. 60, September, 1905. Government industrial arbitration, by Leonard
W. Hatch, pp. 389-655.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905. Great Britain, 1903,** pp. 1051, 1052.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906.
Conciliation in the stove industry, by John P. Frey and John R. Com­
mons, pp. 124-196.
Seventeenth Annual Report of the board of mediation and arbitration
of New York, 1903,** pp. 287, 288.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Eighteenth Annual Report of the board of medi­
ation and arbitration of New York, 1904,** pp. 837, 838.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. France, 1905,** pp. 678, 679.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Great Britain, 1903-1905,** pp. 601, 602.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908. Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of
1907, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 159-167.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908. Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of
1907, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 657-740.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Great Britain, 1896 to 1907,** pp. 565, 566.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. New Zealand,** p. 111.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, 476, 477.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 1-29.
France, 1907,** pp. 237-239.
Great Britain, 1903-1907,** p. 252.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foroi;;n r;p >rt.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

53

Conciliation and arbitration—Concluded.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Labor laws declared unconstitutional—Arbitra­
tion of labor disputes, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 962.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 912, 913.
*Bul. 98, January, 1912.
Mediation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in the United
States, by Charles P. Neill, pp. 1-63.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, pp. 64-81.
Conciliation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in Great
Britain, pp. 82-122.
Conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, pp. 123-160.
Attitude of employing interests toward conciliation and arbitration in
Great Britain, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 161-178.
Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain,
by Arthur E. Holder, pp. 179-202.
Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry in New York City, by Charles H. Winslow, pp. 203-272.
Industrial courts in France, Germany, and Switzerland, by Helen L.
Sumner, pp. 273-464.
Bui. 124, June 16, 1913. Conciliation and arbitration in the building
trades of Greater New York, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 133, August 18, 1913. Report of the industrial council of the British
board of trade on its inquiry into industrial agreements.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Statis­
tics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper district.
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt in­
dustry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, pp. 26, 27.
(See also Labor legislation.)
Conditions of entrance to the principal trades, by Walter E. Weyl and A. M.
Sakolski:
*Bul. 67, November, 1906, pp. 681-780.
Conditions of living among the poor (District of Columbia), by S. E. Forman:
*Bul. 64, May, 1906, pp. 593-698.
Confectionery industry:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage-earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess).
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 119-137.
Conspiracy:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886). Deci­
sions of courts and legislation concerning strikes, combinations, con­
spiracy, boycotts, etc., pp. 1111-1164.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment, by
Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 18-26.




* Supply exhausted.

54

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Conspiracy— Concluded.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1001. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Decisions of courts and legislation concerning strikes, combinations, con­
spiracy, boycotts, etc., pp. 874-1036.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. The British conspiracy and protection of property
act and its operation, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 305-322.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905),
Legislation concerning strikes, combinations, conspiracy, boycotts etc.,
pp. 921-958.
(See also Decisions of courts relating to labor; Labor legislation.)
Consumption.

( See Tuberculosis.)

Contract system.

(See Convict labor; Labor contract.)

Convict labor:
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Convict labor, pp. 443-478.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Report of the British departmental committee on
the importation into the United Kingdom of foreign prison-made goods,
1895,** pp. 70, 71.
Twentieth Annual Report. 1905. Convict labor.
♦Bui. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 1051.
♦Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 917, 918.
♦Bui. I l l, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 33, 34.
1914. Federal and State laws relating to convict labor (S. Doc. No. 494,
63d Cong., 2d sess.).
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 28.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 24.
Coolie labor:
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901
(S. Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), p. 33.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, p. 710.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 858-872.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905
(H. Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 59-64.
♦Bui. 66, September. 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 416-421.
Cooperage:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

55

Cooperation and cooperative enterprises:
*Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of
Anzin, France, by W. F. Willoughby. Cooperative distributive system,
pp. 250-252.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby. Cooperative
distributive stores, pp. 504-508.
♦Bill. 6, September, 3896.
Industrial communities: Familistere Society of Guise, France, by
W. F. Willoughby. Cooperative distribution, pp. 606-609,
Cooperative distribution, by Edward W. Bemis, pp. 610-644.
♦Bui. 9, March, 1897. Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. Howard
Gore, pp. 130-148.
*Bul. 12, September, 1897. Municipal cooperative restaurant of Grenoble,
France, by C. O. Ward, pp. 594-601.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. British report on contracts given out by public
authorities to associations of workmen, 1896,*♦ pp. 62-66.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, Belgium, pp. 83-85.
♦Bui. 22. May, 1899. Report of French bureau of labor on workingmen’s
cooperative associations in 1895,** pp. 433-436.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 452-464.
Bui. 35, July, 1901. Cooperative communities in the United States, by
Rev. Alexander Kent, pp. 563-646.
Bui. 41, July, 1902. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
756-764.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Report on workmen’s cooperative societies in the
United Kingdom, 1901,** pp. 931-934.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904.
New Jersey, 1902,** p. 1650.
Report of committee on cooperative credit systems in India,*♦ pp.
1669, 1670.
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905.
State cooperative accident insurance fund of Maryland, pp. 645-648.
Austria, 1901,♦♦ pp. 670, 671.
♦Bul. 77, July, 1908. Wisconsin, 1905,♦* pp. 359, 360.
♦Bul. 80, January, 1909. Germany, 1902, 1903,♦♦ pp. 98-100.
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914. by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 26.
Cooperative accident insurance fund of Maryland:
*Bul. 57, March, 1905, pp. 645-648.
Copper as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober. M. D.,
pp. 517, 518.
Copper mining:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 440, 441.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

56

Copper mining—Concluded.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Sta­
tistics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper
district.
Copyright law, international, effect of, in the United States, by Carroll I).
Wright.
Cordage and twine manufacture:
*1901. (Report made in compliance with resolution of the United States
Senate of January 23, 1900.)
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Core makers:
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 718, 719.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of women and children wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Yol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 137-147.
Cork manufacture:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 603-606.
Corset steels, manufacture of:
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 39, 40.
Corsets, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected industries,
pp. 147-162.
Cost of living:
♦First Annual Report 1886. Industrial depressions: Appendix B. Earn­
ings and expenses of wage receivers in Europe, pp. 411^56.
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Cost of living, pp. 605-1376.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of Production: The textiles and
glass. Part III. Cost of living, pp. 845-2013.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Retail prices of principal foods in Belgium, Feb­
ruary 29, 1896,♦♦ pp. 78, 79.
♦Bui. 18, September, 1898.
Mechanics and workingmen’s returns. Wisconsin, 1895,♦♦ pp. 704, 705.
Workingmen’s wages and budgets in 1853 and 1891. Belgium,** pp.
708-713.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

57

Cost of living—Continued.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, pp. 401-407. 413-424.
Bui. 35, July, 1901. Statistics of wage earners in Colorado. 1899.** p. 781.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Average yearly earnings and cost of living of
working people, Maine, 1900,** pp. 1171, 1172.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 70-73.
*1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 (S.
Doc. No. 169, 56th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 99-112, 241-253.
Bui. 41, July, 1902. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
677-684, 740-748.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the Anthracite Coal Strike Commission,
pp. 623-626.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902 (S.
Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 222-228.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 896-902.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903. Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study, by
Richard R. Wright, jr., pp. 1036-1038.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Analysis of eighteenth annual report, cost of living and retail prices
of food, pp. 1137-1141.
Massachusetts, 1902,** pp. 1350, 1351.
Bui. 53, July, 1904. Wages and cost of living, pp. 704-712.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Cost of living and retail prices in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1129-1164.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 229-241.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 838-842.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
943-946.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1904, pp. 148-301.
Railroad employees, Austria, 1898,** p. 330.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 776-778.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Conditions of living among the poor (District of
Columbia), by S. E. Forman, pp. 598-617, 634-698.
*Bul. 65, July, 1906. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1905, pp. 170-316.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H.
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 110-119, 309-317.
*Bul. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 467-476, 663-671.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1906, pp. 175-328.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907.
New Jersey, 1906,** p. 992.
Washington, 1906,** p. 996.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

58

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Cost of living—Continued.
♦Bui. 77, July, 1908.
Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries, 1890 to 1897.
pp. 1-180.
Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living of the working
classes of principal industrial towns of Great Britain, 1905,** pp,
336-854.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Report of British Board of Trade on cost of liv­
ing of the working classes of the principal industrial towns of the Ger­
man Empire, 1905,** pp. 523-548.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living of
the working classes in the principal industrial towns of France, 1905,**
pp. 66-87.
♦Bui. 87. March, 1910. Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living
of the working classes in the principal industrial towns of Belgium,
1908,** pp. 608-625.
Bui. 88, May, 1910. Report of Imperial Statistical Office of Germany on
cost of living of families of moderate income in Germany in 1907-1908, ♦
♦
pp. 697-794.
*1910. Increase in cost of food and other products (12 tables) (S. Doc. No.
349, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Bui. 93, March, 1911.
Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living in principal in­
dustrial cities in the United States, 1909,** pp. 500-556.
Reports of British Board of Trade on cost of living in England and
Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and the United States, 19081911,** pp. 557-570.
*1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910 (S.
Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 103, 104, 128-141.
*Bul. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 764, 765, 786-799.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912 (S.
Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 165-186, 486-491.
♦Bui. 105, August 23, 1912.
♦Retail prices, 1890 to 1911. Part I.
♦Retail prices, 1890 to 1911. Part II. General tables.
Bui. 106, August 28, 1912.
♦Retail prices, 1890 to 1912. Part I.
Retail prices, 1890 to 1912. Part II. General tables.
Bui. 108, October 1, 1912. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1912.
Bui. 110, December 4, 1912. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1912.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets of typical cotton mill workers.
Bui. 113, March 18, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to December, 1912.
Bui. 115, April 8, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to February, 1913.
Bui. 121, May 14, 1913. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer, by N. C.
Adams.
Bui. 125, June 28, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to April, 1913.
♦Bui. 130, August 15, 1913. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to con­
sumer, by J. Chester Bowen.
Bui. 132, August 15, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1913.
* Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

59

Cost of living—Concluded.
Bui. 136, September 15, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1913.
Bui. 138, December 1, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1913.
Bui. 140, February 10, 1914. Retail prices. 1890 to December, 1913.
Bui. 156, March, 1915. Retail prices, 1907 to December, 1914.
Bui. 164, November 30. 1914. Butter prices, from producer to consumer,
by Newton H. Clark.
Bui. 170, May, 1915. Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
(See also Retail prices; Wholesale prices.)
Cost of production:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions, pp. 90-141.
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and glass.
♦1897. White pine lumber in the United States and Canada (S. Doc. No.
70, 55th Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor (2 vols.).
♦1898. Total cost and labor cost of transformation in the production of
certain articles in the United States, Great Britain, and Belgium, by
Carroll D. Wright (S. Doc. No. 20, 55th Cong., 3d sess.).
♦Buli 18, September, 1898. Productive industries in New York, 1896,** pp.
699, 700.
Fourteenth Annual Report. 1899. Water, gas, and electric-light plants
under private and municipal ownership, pp. 224-307, 448-483, 664-751.
♦Bui. 24, September, 1899. Cost of production of grain in Wisconsin,
1896,♦* pp. 703-705.
♦Bui. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal strike,
by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1155-1159.
*1913. Increase in prices of anthracite coal, following the wage agreement
of May 20, 1912 (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.).
Cotton industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1S81 to 1886).
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and glass,
pp. 15-136.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1S87 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men. women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Bui. 50, January, 1904. North Carolina, 1902,♦♦ pp. 153, 154.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 483, 484.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 727-737.
*1910-1912, Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry.
♦Vol. XIY. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill oper­
atives.
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets of typical cotton-mill workers
♦Vol. XVII. Hookworm disease among cotton-mill operatives.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

60

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Cotton industry—Concluded.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Mass., 1912, (S. Doc. No. 870,
62d Cong., 2d sess.).
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 8-13.
Bui. 128, August 14,1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1890-1912, pp. 5-109.
Bui. 150, May 11, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1907-1913, pp. 5-91.
Cotton-mill anemia:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVII. Hookworm disease among cotton-mill operatives.
Court decisions. (See Decisions of courts relating to labor.)
Cracker and biscuit industry:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVIII, Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 162-179.
Cutlery and tool industry:
❖Thirteenth Annual Report 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. IX,
pp. 478, 479.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, p. 40.
Cyanide of potassium as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sominerfeld, p. 167.
*Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Cyanogen compounds as industrial poisons:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 167.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.

D.
Danbury Hatters’ case. (See Decisions of court relating to labor—labor
organizations—Loewe v. Lawlor.)
Dangerous and injurious occupations:
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 798, 822.
France, pp. 844, 845.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 85-107.
Switzerland, pp. 154-157.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 335-349.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

61

Dangerous and injurious occupations—Continued.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 575-577.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Netherlands, pp. 1044-1046.
Italy, pp. 1053-1055.
Norway, p. 106C
L
Sweden, pp. 1065, 1066.
Denmark, pp. 1068, 1069.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the
United States, fey W. F. Willoughby, pp. 1-28.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F.. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 180, 181.
New South Wales, pp. 238, 239.
Queensland, pp. 259, 260.
Ontario, pp. 278, 279.
Quebec, pp. 296-301.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 1-131.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 564, 565.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Austria, lead and zinc works, 1904,** pp.
842-848.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 470-545.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 417-465.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 633-875.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
471-638.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Great Britain, 1908,** p. 141.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. Accidents to railroad employees in New Jersey,
1888 to 1907, by Frederick S. Crum, pp. 183-337.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United States, by
John B. Andrews, pp. 31-146.
List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, pp. 147-168.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Yeditz.
Austria, pp. 15, 18, 74.
Belgium, pp. 104-107.
France, pp. 154, 155, 163-173, 216-224.
Germany, pp. 242, 243, 252-263, 271-278.
Italy, pp. 324, 325.
Switzerland, pp. 343, 344, 366, 367.
*Bul. 90, September, 1910. Fatal accidents in coal mining, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 437-674.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States.
•Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

62

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Dangerous and injurious occupations—Concluded.
*Bul. 92, January, 1011.
Industrial accidents and loss of earning power: German experience
in 1897 and 1907, by Henry J. Harris, pp. 1-96.
Resolutions of tlie sixth delegates’ meeting of the International Asso­
ciation for Labor Legislation, pp. 186, 187.
Industrial poisons, pp. 189-192.
Report of Illinois Commission on Occupational Diseases, 1911,** pp.
194-202.
♦Bul. 95, July, 1911.
Industrial lead poisoning, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 1-188.
White-lead industry in the United States, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.,
pp. 189-259.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning in New York State in 1909 and
1910, by John B. Andrews, pp. 260-2S2.
Laws enacted during 1911 requiring the report of occupational dis­
eases, pp. 283-288.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton-textile industry, pp. 380-386.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 65-80, 231-277, 355-357, 435-447.
*Vol. IY. Silk industry, pp. 208-212.
*Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades, pp. 16-18, 55-69.
*Yol. XII. Employment of women in laundries, pp. 20, 24, 26, 36, 52.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill op­
eratives.
*Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bul. 100, May, 1912.
List of industrial poisons and other substances injurious to health
found in industrial processes, pp. 733-759.
Act providing for tax on white phosphorus matches, pp. 760-762.
Bul. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary-ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bul. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D.
Bul. 127, August 12,1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D.
Bul. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Great Britain, pp. 34, 35.
Germany, pp. 123, 134, 135.
France, pp. 181-183.
Austria, pp. 228-234.
Belgium, pp. 250, 254.
Switzerland, pp. 274, 285.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Bul. 165, December 15, 1914. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of stor­
age batteries, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
(Sec also Accidents, industrial; Industrial poisoning; Occupational dis­
eases.)
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

S U B JE C T IN D E X OF T H E P U B L IC A T IO N S OF T H E B U R E A U .

63

Death benefits:
♦Bui. 5, July, 1890. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 489-494.
*Bul. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. John­
son, pp. 52-57.
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, pp. 553-590.
♦Bui. 19, November, 1898. Mutual relief and benefit associations in the
printing trade, by William S. Waudby, pp. 841-850.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Conditions of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, p. 110.
*Bul. 22, May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Edward
W. Bemis, pp. 361-400.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1076-1098.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Bui. 107, September 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany, pp. 15, 16.
(See also Funeral benefits.)
Death rates in various industries from accidents:
Agriculture—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 97.
France, p. 745.
Germany, p. 1276.
♦Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, pp. 6, 129, 130, 149.
Bakeries—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 130.
Boot and shoe industry—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 131.
Brick industry—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 132.
Building trades—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 107, 108.
France, pp. 745, 777.
'Germany, pp. 1152, 1275.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, pp, 6, 149.
Butchers—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 130.
*----------------------------------------------Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------5




64

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Death rates in various industries from accidents—Continued.
Chemical industry—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 101.
France, pp. 745, 775.
Germany, pp. 1151, 1276.
Great Britain, p. 1646.
Clothing industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 107.
France, p. 776.
Germany, p. 1275.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 149.
Coal mining—
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 59-61.
Belgium, p. 142.
France, pp. 212, 213.
Germany, pp. 326-335.
Great Britain, pp. 444^52, 459.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M, Kober, M. D.,
pp. 523, 524.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, pp. 437, 438, 461.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
France, p. 793.
Great Britain, pp. 1580, 1581, 1644.
♦Bui. 90, September, 1910. Fatal accidents in coal mining, by Fred­
erick L. Hoffman, pp. 437-671.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, pp. 6, 102, 107, 132.
Compositors—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 494.
Copper mining—
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, p. 440.
Cotton industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1518.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, pp. 123, 125, 132.
Domestic service—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 129.
Electricians—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick
L. Hoffman, p. 6.




♦ Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

65

Death rates in various industries from accidents—Continued.
Fisheries—
•Bui. 7S, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, p. 455.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 6, 130, 139, 140.
Flour mills—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, p. 97.
General accident death rate—
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Industrial accidents and loss of earning
power: German experience in 1897 and 1907, by Henry J. Harris,
p. 15.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 18.
Glass industry—
•Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 99.
Germany, pp. 1151, 1277.
Great Britain, p. 1646.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 132.
Gold and silver mining—
•Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, p. 441.
Iron and steel industry—
•Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 99, 100.
Gerniany, p. 1151.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States.
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention, pp. 25, 29-49.
•Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, pp. 425, 426.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, pp.
370-372.
Lead and zinc mining—
•Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, pp. 439, 440.
Leather industry—
•Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 105.
France, p. 776.
Germany, p. 1276.
Life-saving Service, United States—
•Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, p. 456.




* Supply exhausted.

66

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Death rates in various industries from accidents—Continued.
Lumber industry—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 6.
Manufacturing, general—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 6.
Masons—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 131.
Match industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, p. 102.
Metal trades—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and c o m ­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 100.
France, pp. 745, 777.
Germany, pp. 1151, 1277.
Great Britain, p. 1646.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 123, 125, 131, 149.
Mines and quarries—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. !>..
pp. 523-525.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
France, p. 745.
Germany, p. 1151.
Great Britain, pp. 1519, 1580, 1581, 1640, 1644, 1646.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick' L.
Hoffman, pp. 101-112, 128. 125.
Mining, metal—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com*
l)ensation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1646.
Bnl. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 6. 102, 103, 109.
Navigation—
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908 . Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man, p. 451.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report, 1909. Workmen's insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1518.
Bui. 157, March. 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick I..
Hoffman, pp. 6, 123. 125, 129.
Navy and Marine Corps—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 6.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

67

Death rates in various industries from accidents— Continued.
Paper industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 104, 105.
France, p. 745.
Germany, pp. 1151, 1278.
Great Britain, p. 1518.
Printing trades—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. 1).,
p. 494.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 108.
France, p. 776.
Germany, p. 127S.
Bui. 157. March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 130, 149.
1*rofessional service—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 129.
Quarries—
"Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 4,63.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 98.
Great Britain, pp. 1640, 1645, 1646.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 6, 110, 111, 132.
Railway labor—
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by
Walter E. Weyl (Great Britain), p. 43.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 445-449.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 97.
Great Britain, pp. 1519, 1640, 1646.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. Accidents to railroad employees in New
Jersey, 18S8-1907, by Frederick S. Crum, pp. 186, 288.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 6, 14, 19, 123, 125, 129.
Rubber industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, p. 105.
Seamen—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Great Britain, pp. 1640, 1646.
Silk industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, p. 103.




* Supply exhausted.

68

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Death rates in various industries from accidents—Concluded.
Soldiers, United States Army—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 6.
Street railway employees—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 6.
Telephone and telegraph employees—
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick I,.
Hoffman, p. 6.
Textile industries—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, p. 104.
France, pp. 745, 776.
Germany, p. 1279.
Great Britain, pp. 1640, 1646.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 149.
Tobacco industry—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance raid
compensation systems in Europe. Austria, p. 107.
Woodworking trades—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 105, 106.
France, p. 776.
Germany, p. 1152.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 131, 149.
Woolen and worsted industry—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1518.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 123, 125, 132.
Death rates in various industries from all causes:
x\griculture—
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober,
M. D., p. 473.
Bakeries—
’"Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 9.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 531-535.
Blacksmiths—
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober.
M. D., p. 473.




* Supply exhausted

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

69

Death rates in various industries from all causes—Continued.
Boot and shoe industry—
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober,
M. D., p. 473.
♦Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations
exposing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 600-602.
Brewers—
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 9.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober,
M. D., p. 473.
Butchers—
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober,
M. D., p. 473.
Carmen and carriers—
♦Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations
exposing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 487, 631-634.
Cigars and tobacco—
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober,
M. D., p. 473.'
♦Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations
exposing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 566-571.
Clothing industry, men’s (home finishers)—
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, p. 297.
Coachmen—
♦Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 488, 489.

Coal mine labor—
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal mine labor in Europe. France,
pp. 227-229.
Compositors—
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 494.
Coopers—
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial.hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
Cotton industry—
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 9.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill
operatives.
Engineers and firemen (not locomotive)—
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D..
p. 473.




* Supply exhausted.

70

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Death rates in various industries from all causes— Continued.
Flour mills—
♦Hill. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. P.,
1. 473.
>
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 515, 516.
Glass industry—
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 241-251.
Harness makers and saddlers—
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 585, 5S6.
Iron and steel industry—
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.t
p. 473.
Iron molders—
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade unions, by
Walter E. Weyl. p. 800.
Leather industry—
*Bul. 75, March, 1908, Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 579.
Machinists—
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
Masons—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
Miners—
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Health of Cornish miners (metalliferous),
Great Britain, 1900-1902,** p. 604.
*Bnl. 75, March. 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D ,
p. 473.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1651.
Plumbers—

*Bul. 75, March. 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
Printing trades—
♦Bill. 44, January. 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 9.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trades unions, by
Walter E. Weyl, p. 799,
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. I).,
pp. 473, 494.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Members of Typographical associaciation. Great Britain, p. 1G33.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

71

Death rates in various industries from all causes—Concluded.
Railway labor—
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen's insurance and benefit
funds in the United States, p. 284.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. IX,
p. 473.
Stone cutters—
♦Bill. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. 1>..
p. 473.
Tanners—
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, p. 581.
Textile mills—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
Woodworkers—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 473.
Death rates in various industries from sickness:
Agriculture—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Germany, p. 1298.
Bakeries—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 305, 325, 383.
Boot and shoe industry—■
♦•Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 309, 321, 382.
Brass workers—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 665, 666.
Brewers—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 305, 325, 341, 391.
Brick industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 337. 387.
Building trades—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and con>
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 300, 316, 377, 380.
Germany, p. 1282.
Butchers—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 305. 325, 383.
Carpet industry—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 811, 812.
Chemical industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Germany, 1292.




* Supply exhausted.

72

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Death rates in various industries from sickness—Continued.
Clothing industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 309, 321, 341, 392.
Germany, p. 1288.
Compositors—
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. IX,
p. 494.
Cotton industry—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 734-737,
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill
operatives.
Cutlery and edge tools—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 655, 656.
Flour mills—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 301, 317, 336.
Fur industry—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption 111 dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 7S8.
Glass industry—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 694, 695.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 301, 317, 337, 388.
Germany, p. 1304.
Hat industry—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 793-827.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 309, 321.
Hosiery and knit goods—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 744, 745.
Iron and steel industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 337, 387.
Jute manufacture—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 767.
Lace workers—
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 749, 750.
Laundries—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 305, 325.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

73

Death rates in various industries from sickness—Continued.
Lead industry—
*Bul. 67, November, 1906, Austria, lead mines and works, 1894-1903,**
pp. 845, 846.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
tlie western states of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D. (Great
Britain), p. 47.
Leather industry—
*Tweuty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 309, 321, 340, 381, 390.
Germany, p. 1294.
Lithographers—
*Rul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 721.
Match industry—
*: wenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
T
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 339, 389.
Metal trades—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
xlustria, pp. 308, 320, 337, 371, 381, 3.85.
Germany, p. 1312.
Mines, lead—
♦Bui. 67, November. 1906. Austria, lead mines and works, 1894-1903,**
pp. 845, 846.
Paper industry—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 770.
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 340, 390.
Germany, p. 1316.
Plasterers, paper hangers, and whitewashers—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 713.
Pottery industry—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 705, 706.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 337, 388.
Printing trades—
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 494.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffmfin. pp. 669-672.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 341, 384, 392.
Germany, p. 1320.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

74

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Death rates in various industries from sickness—Concluded.
Printing trades—Concluded.
♦Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
the western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D.
Holland, pp. 66, 67.
Germany, pp. 69, 74, 75.
Quarries—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, p. 337.
Railway labor—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 336, 370, 385.
Rubber industry—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, p.. 341.
Silk industry—
♦Bul. 79. November. 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 799.
Stone workers—
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty
trades, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 686-688.
Sugar industry—
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 341, 374. 386.
Tanners—
*Twenty-fourtli Annual Report, 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, 309, 321.
Textile trades—
^Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 304, 324, 340, 372, 385.
Germany, p. 1326.
Tobacco industry—
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 341, 376, 386.
Woodworking trades—
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 775-778.
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Austria, pp. 301, 317, 380.
Woolen and worsted industry—
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 806, 807.
Death rates, infant, as related to employment of mothers:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), Vol. XIII.
Decisions of courts relating to labor:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886). De­
cisions of courts concerning strikes, combinations, conspiracies, boycotts,
etc., pp. 1111-1145.
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor. Decisions of courts con­
cerning employers’ liability, pp. 55-57.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

75

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Continued.
♦Second Special Report, second edition revised, 1896. Labor laws of the
United States. Chapter III. Decisions of the courts, pp. 1251-1357.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Decisions of courts relating to strikes, combinations, conspiracies, boy­
cotts, etc., pp. 873-988.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. The British conspiracy and protection of property
act, by A. Maurice Low. Case of Allen v. Flood, pp. 313-317.
♦Tenth Special Report. 1904. Labor laws of the United States, with deci­
sions of courts relating thereto.
♦Bill. 50, January, 1904. Labor unions and British industry, by A.
Maurice Low. Taff Yale case, pp. 77-92.
♦Twenty-second Annual Report. 1907. Labor laws of the United States,
with decisions of courts relating thereto.
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907. A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain,
by A. Maurice Low. Case of Allen v. Flood, pp. 565, 566; Taff-Vale
case, pp. 566-572.
♦Bui. 112, March 5, 1913. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor,
1912, by Lindley D. Clark.
Bui. 148, April 10, 1914. Labor laws of the United States, with decisions
of courts relating thereto (2 vols.).
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor,
1913, by Lindley D. Clark.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor,
1914, by Lindley D. Clark.
[Court decisions appear in all bulletins from No. 1 to No. 100, except
Nos. ♦!, ^46, *54, *66, 85, *91, *94, *97, and 100. Buis. Nos. *112,
152, and 169 are entirely devoted to the reproduction of decisions.
Of the total cases presented (nearly 1,800) the following are listed
as representing some of the most important in the classes indicated :1
Contract of employment—
Bailey v. Alabama. Statute seeking to compel workman to render
service or repay money or supplies advanced by the employer de­
clared unconstitutional by United States Supreme Court (*Bul. 93,
p. 634), reversing decision of Supreme Court of Alabama (Bui. 83,
p. 147).
Huskie r. Griffin. Right of workman to sue former employer for in­
terfering with new employment affirmed; Supreme Court of New
Hampshire (*Bul. 87, p. 680).
Maynard v. Royal Worcester Corset Company. Right of employee to
damages for breach of contract by employer affirmed; Supreme
Judicial Court of Massachusetts (*Bul. 80, p. 173).
Taylor Iron & Steel Company v. Nichols. Injunction to compel em­
ployees to observe agreement as to the disclosure of facts as to
process of manufacture held too broad; court of errors and ap­
peals, New Jersey (*Bul. 80, p. 163).
Employers’ liability—
American Car & Foundry Company v. Inzer. Statute held to apply in
case of employee injured on railroad operated by private corpora­
tion and employer held liable under doctrine of last clear chance to
prevent accidents; Indiana Supreme Court (*Bul. 81, p. 415; ♦Bui.
82, p. 664; Bui. 152, p. 102).




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76

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Continued.
Employers’ liability—Concluded.
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Itailroad v. McGuire. Receipt of relief
benefits by injured workman not a bar to suit for damages; con­
stitutionality of Iowa statute upheld by United States Supreme
Court (*Bul. 93, p. 644).
Howard v. Illinois Central Railroad Company (first employers’ liabil­
ity cases). Law regulating commerce without limitation to inter­
state commerce held outside of Federal powers by United States
Supreme Court (*Bul. 74, p. 216), affirming judgments of United
States circuit courts (*Bul. 68, p. 192).
Illinois Central Railroad Company v. Behrens. Test of actual employ­
ment at time of receipt of injury applied to fireman on switch engine
(interstate commerce) ; United States Supreme Court (Bui. 169,
P. 91).
Mondou r. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company
(second employers’ liability cases). Constitutionality of Federal
Employers’ Liability Act relating to common carriers in interstate
commerce upheld and rights arising under the act held to be en­
forceable in the courts of the State; decision of United States
Supreme Court (*Bul. 9S, p. 470), reversing Supreme Court of
Errors of Connecticut (*Bul. 86, p. 322).
Pedersen v. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company.
Injury to track-repair man engaged in interstate commerce result­
ing from negligence of coemployee engaged in intrastate commerce;
Federal statute held to apply, and judgment given in favor of plain­
tiff by United States Supreme Court (Bui. 152, p. 85), reversing
judgment of United States Circuit Court ( *Bul. 95, p. 300) and
United States Circuit Court of Appeals (*Bul. 112, p. 89).
Streeter v. Western Wheeled Scraper Company. Assumption of risk
by workman continuing employment with knowledge of noncom­
pliance with factory law by employer; act held to apply without
notice from inspector, and employer held liable for injuries result­
ing from his neglect; Illinois Supreme Court (*Bul. 112, p. 69).
Employment of children—
Beauchamp v. Sturgis & Burn Manufacturing Company. Constitu­
tionality of statute fixing minimum of 16 years as the age limit for
certain employment upheld by United States Supreme Court (Bui.
169, p. 64), affirming judgment of Supreme Court of Illinois (*Bul.
96, p. 850) ; misrepresentation of age not a defense.
Louisville, Henderson & St. Louis Railroad Company v. Lyons.
Statute giving health officers powers of classification of dangerous
employments not an unlawful delegation of power; Kentucky Court
of Appeals (Bui. 152, p. 111).
Starnes v. Albion Manufacturing Company. Unlawful employment of
children under legal age limit as cause of injury; fundamental con­
stitutional principles supporting child-labor legislation; Supreme
Court of North Carolina (*Bul. 78, p. 584).
State v. Shorey. Constitutionality of statute prohibiting employ­
ment of children under 16 years of age for more than 10 hours per
day upheld by Supreme Court of Oregon (*Bul. 68, p. 203).




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SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

77

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Continued.
Employment of children—Concluded.
Stelile v. Jaeger Automatic Machine Company. Itight of parent to
recover for injury to child employed under legal age limit; child
unlawfully employed does not assume risks and is not chargeable
with contributory negligence; Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ( *BuL
78, p. 577; *Bul. 87, p. 642).
Employment of women—
Muller v. State. Eight-hour day; constitutionality of law fixing work­
day upheld by United States Supreme Court (*Bul. 75, p. 631),
affirming judgment of Supreme Court of Oregon (*Bul. 67, p. 877).
Riley v. Massachusetts. Statute requiring schedule of hours of labor
and rest to be posted and observed upheld by United States Supreme
Court (Bui. 169, p. 121), affirming judgment of Supreme Judicial
Court of Massachusetts (Bui. 99, p. 715).
W. C. Ritchie & Company v. Wayman. Constitutionality of Illinois
law providing for ten-hour day for female employees upheld by
State supreme court (*Bul. 89, p. 428).
Stettler v. O’Hara. Constitutionality of law providing for commission
to fix minimum wages, etc., for females and minors upheld by
Supreme Court of Oregon (Bui. 169, p. 173).
Hours of labor (regulation without reference to sex; see also Employment
of women)—
Atkin v. Kansas. Constitutionality of Kansas statute providing for
eight-hour day on public works affirmed by the United States Su­
preme Court (*Bul. 50, p. 177), affirming judgment of Supreme
Court of Kansas (*Bul. 40, p. 604; see also *Bul. 28, p. 610).
Erie Railroad Company v. New York. Eight-hour day for railroad
telegraph operators; State law held to be invalid by United States
Supreme Court in view of Federal enactment fixing standards in
the same field (Bui. 169, p. 123), reversing United States Court of
Appeals (*Bul. 89, p. 423).
Holden v. Hardy. Constitutionality of law of Utah providing for
eight-hour day in mines upheld by United States Supreme Court
(*Bul. 17, p. 625), affirming judgment of Supreme Court of Utah
( *Bul. 10, p. 387).
Lochner v. New York. Law providing for ten-hour day in bakeries
held unconstitutional by United States Supreme Court (♦Bui. 59,
p. 340), reversing judgment of Court of Appeals of New York (*Bul.
57, p. 698).
Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway Company v. United States. Sep­
arate penalties assessed for each employee worked overtime in vio­
lation of statute; period of time waited by employees during delay
for which company was responsible not allowed to reduce time
considered; judgment of circuit court of appeals affirmed by United
States Supreme Court (Bui. 152, p. 128).
State v. J. J. Newman Lumber Company. Mississippi statute provid­
ing for ten-hour day in manufactures generally upheld as constitu­
tional by State supreme court (*Bul. 112, p. 102; Bui. 152, p. 123).
(For Oregon statute see State v. Bunting, Bui. 169, p. 120.)




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78

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Continued.
Labor organizations (injunctions, boycotts, etc.) —
Adair v. United States. Federal statute forbidding discharge of work­
man on account of membership in labor unions held unconstitu
tional by United States Supreme Court (*Bul. 75, p. 634), reversing
United States District Court (*Bul. 72, p. 613).
A. It. Barnes & Company v. Berry. Powers of committees of employ­
ers’ and employees’ associations to contract for members, and right
of employers’ organization to obtain injunctions against strikes;
discussion of principles of common law by Federal courts (*Bul. 74,
p. 259; *Bul. 76, p. 1019; Bui. 84, p. 448).
Beck t*. Railway Teamsters’ Association. Modification and affirmance
of injunction forbidding boycotting and picketing; Supreme Court
of Michigan (*Bul. 22, p. 457).
Buck Stove & Range Company v. American Federation of Labor.
Boycotting, interfering with interstate commerce by use of “ un­
fa ir” list; violation of antitrust law; contempt of court; decisions
of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Court of Appeals
of the District of Columbia, United States Circuit Court of Appeals,
and the United States Supreme Court (* Bui. 74, p. 246; * Bui. 80,
p. 124; Bui. 83, p. 169; * Bui. 86, p. 355; * Bui. 95, p. 323; * Bui.
112, p. 155; Bui. 152, pp. 134, 218; Bui. 169, p. 133).
Connors v. Connolly. Right of workman expel led from union to sue
for damages on account of consequent loss of employment (hatters’
strike) upheld by Supreme Court of Errors of Connecticut (Bui. 152,
p. 289).
Coppage v. Kansas. Law forbidding employer to require pledge of
employee not to be member of labor union held unconstitutional
by United States Supreme Court (Bui. 169, p. 147), reversing Su­
preme Court of Kansas (* Bui. 112, p. 119).
Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Company i\ Glass Blowers’ Asso­
ciation. Picketing; injunction granted only against persons directly
engaged in acts of violence or coercion; Court of Chancery of New
Jersey (*Bul. 31, p. 1286).
Curran v. Galen. Action of nonunion workman for damages against
union workman for procuring his discharge; judgment for damages
affirmed by New York Court of Appeals (Bui. 11. p. 529).
Danbury Hatters’ case. (See Loewe v. Lawlor.)
Gray v. Building Trades Council. Publication of “ unfair” notice
(boycotting) ; mere publication held not subject to injunction, by
Supreme Court of Minnesota (Bui. 53, p. 955).
Hitchman Coal & Coke Company v. Mitchell. Right of workman to
organize labor unions upheld by United States Circuit Court of
Appeals (Bui. 169, p. 315), reversing judgment of United States dis­
trict and circuits courts, West Virginia (*Bul. 87, p. 686; Bui. 152,
p. 137).
Hopkins v. Oxley Stave Company. Injunction against persons en­
gaged in boycott of machine-made goods affirmed by United States
Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit (* Bui. 16, p. 459), sustain­
ing decision of United States Circuit Court for District of Iv;m«as
(* Bui. 7, p. 783).




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SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

79

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Continued.
Labor organizations (injunctions, boycotts, etc.)—Concluded.
Iron Holders’ Union v. Allis-Chalmers Company. Injunction of em­
ployer against unincorporated associations for interference with
employees; decision by United States circuit court of appeals (Bui.
83, p. 157), modifying and affirming injunction issued by United
States Circuit Court, Eastern District of Wisconsin (* Bui. 70,
p. 734).
Loewe v. Lawlor (Danbury Hatters’ case). Members of labor organi­
zations held liable for loss of trade through interference with inter­
state commerce, in violation of antitrust law; decision of United
States Supreme Court (Bui. 169, p. 137), affirming judgment of
Federal courts (* Bui. 61, p. 1067; * Bui. 70, p. 710; * Bui. 75, p. 622;
* Bui. 96, p. 780; * Bui. 98, p. 481.)
March v. Bricklayers’ Union. Recovery from union of fine collected
from manufacturer for selling to contractor classed by union as
“ unfair” ; Supreme Court of Errors of Connecticut (♦Bui. 67,
p. 884).
National Fire Proofing Company v. Mason Builders’ Association.
Third parties held to have no ground to complain of effect of col­
lective agreement, excluding them from business relations, in the
absence of malice or use of unlawful means; United States Circuit
Court of Appeals, Second Circuit (Bui. 84, p. 427), affirming ruling
of United States Circuit Court, Southern District of New York
(* Bui. 68, p. 224).
National Protective Association of Steamfitters v. Cumming. Refusal
to issue injunction against union threatening to strike if member
of other union was employed; New York Court of Appeals (* Bui.
42, p. 1118).
F. R. Patch Manufacturing Company r. Capeless. Members of labor
union held liable for judgment rendered against it; decision of
Supreme Court of Vermont (*Bul. 67, p. 879) sustaining judgment
of Rutland County court (* Bui. 59, p. 367).
Wright v. Hoctor. Statute providing for exclusive employment of
union labor on public works held unconstitutional by Supreme Court
of Nebraska (Bui. 169, p. 186).
Safety laws—
Chicago Dock & Canal Company v, Fraley. Law making certain
provisions for protection of employees engaged in construction, etc.,
of building upheld as constitutional, even though possibly imper­
fect; United States Supreme Court (Bui. 152, p. 42).
Fitzwater v. Warren. Negligence chargeable for failure of employer
to comply with statutes; New York Court of Appeals (♦Bui. 112,
P. 67).
Johnston v. Southern Pacific Company. Equipment of automatic
couplers for cars, etc., on railroad must be effective; United States
Supreme Court (*Bul. 56, p. 303), reversing Circuit Court of Ap­
peals, Eighth Circuit (♦Bui. 44, p. 167).
Southern Railway Company v. United States. Constitutionality of
Federal law requiring safety appliances on all cars on roads en­
gaged in interstate commerce upheld by United States Supreme
Court (*Bul. 98, p. 485).
*

95052°—Bull. 174—15------6



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80

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Continued.
Safety laws—Concluded.
Wilmington Star Mining Company v. Fulton. Constitutionality of
Illinois mining law requiring managers, etc., to be licensed upheld
by United States Supreme Court (*Bul. 71, p. 382).
Wages—
Knoxville Iron Company v. Harbison. Statute requiring store orders,
etc., issued as payment for wages to be redeemed in cash declared
constitutional by United States Supreme Court (*Bul. 40, p. 619),
affirming judgment of Supreme Court of Tennessee (*Bul. 27,
p. 415).
Malette v. City of Spokane. Constitutionality of statute fixing rates of
wages and hours of labor in employment for the city upheld by
Supreme Court of Washington (Bui. 169, p. 191), reversing same
court (*Bul. 112, p. 132).
Mutual Loan Company v. Martell. Validity of statute declaring
assignments of future earnings void, unless accepted by the em­
ployer and consented to by the wife, in case of married employees,
upheld by United States Supreme Court (Bui. 99, p. 696), affirming
judgment of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts (*Bul.
81, p. 405).
New York Central & Hudson River Railroad Company v. Williams.
Statute requiring railroad companies to pay their employees twice
monthly held constitutional by Court of Appeals of New York
(*Bul. 90, p. 854), affirming judgment of supreme court of same
State ( *Bul. 86, p. 340).
St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway Company v. Paul.
Constitutionality of statute providing penalty for failure of certain
employers to pay wages in full on discharge of workmen upheld
by United States Supreme Court, affirming judgment of Supreme
Court of Arkansas (*Bul. 23, p. 585).
Street v. Varney Electrical Supply Company. Statute fixing minimum
wages for employment of labor on public works declared unconsti­
tutional by Indiana Supreme Court (*Bul. 48, p. 1116).
Workmen’s compensation—
Borgnis v. Falk. Constitutionality of Wisconsin law taking away
common-law defenses of employer in employees’ suits for damages
for injuries and providing an elective system of compensation up­
held by Supreme Court of Wisconsin (*Bul. 96, p. 799).
Jeffrey Mfg. Co. v. Blagg. Ohio compensation law abrogating commonlaw defenses and excluding small employers from its application
upheld as constitutional by United States Supreme Court (Bui. 169,
p. 203).
Kentucky State Journal Company v. Workmen’s Compensation Board.
Workmen’s Compensation Act held compulsory in nature while elec­
tive in form and declared unconstitutional as not affording equal
protection of law and limiting recoveries for death; Kentucky Court
of Appeals (Bui. 169, p. 197).




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

81

Decisions of courts relating to labor—Concluded.
Workmen’s compensation—Concluded.
Sexton v. Newark District Telegraph Company. Due processes of
law, equal protection of law and guaranteed right of trial by jury
held not interfered with by elective statute of New Jersey; Supreme
Court of New Jersey (Bul. 152, p. 179).
State v. Clausen. Washington State insurance system held valid
against claims that it violated the due processes of law and un­
lawfully charged liability without fault; Supreme Court of Wash­
ington (*Bul. 96, p. 814).
State v. Creamer. Ohio law establishing a cooperative insurance
system held within police power of the State and not depriving of
equal protection of law; Ohio Supreme Court (Bul. 99, p. 698).
Denatured spirit as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
Department stores. (See Stores, employees of.)
Diamond cutting:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 699-701.
♦Bul. 95, July, 1905. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
western Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 76-78.
Diazomethane as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 748.
Dimethyl sulphate as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 748.
Dinitrobenzol as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 162.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 748.
Disputes, labor. (See Strikes and lockouts.)
Distribution of labor:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor. Distribution of labor, pp.
146-162.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled im­
migrant laborers in the United States, by Frank* J. Sheridan, pp. 407425.
Domestic and personal service:
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Seventh Special Report. 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia.
♦Bul. 1, November, 1895. pp. 66, 67, 69.
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. The Italians in Chicago.




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BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Domestic and personal service—Concluded.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Report on tlie money wages of indoor domestic ser­
vants, 1894-1S9S. Great Britain, 1899,** pp. 605-607.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*Bul. 76, May, 1908. Massachusetts, 1898-1905,** pp. 936, 937.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. IX. History of women in industry in the United States, pp.
175-185, 254.
*Vol. X. History of women in trade-unions, p. 196.
♦Vol. XV. Relation between occupation and criminality of women.
Domestic industries:
*Bul. 40, May, 1902. Present condition of the hand-working and domestic
industries of Germany, by Henry J. Harris, pp. 509-548.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report on the domestic results of the introduc­
tion of the electric motor on domestic industries in Belgium, 1902,**
pp. 1256-1260.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Belgium, 1896,** pp. 923, 924.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Revival of handicrafts in America, by Max
West, pp. 1573-1622.
Dress and millinery trimmings, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report, 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Dress and waist industry:
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Drivers and teamsters:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
481-486.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Drugs, medicines, paints, etc., manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Dusty occupations:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 1-131.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 476-497.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 833-875.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
471-638.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

83

Dusty occupations—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 365, 366, 408, 409.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 65-68.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill op­
eratives.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. Howard Gore:
♦Bui. 9, March, 1897. pp. 130-148.
Dyeing and printing textiles:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1905. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
western Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 79, 80.

E.
Earthenware and stoneware, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and 'Wages of men, women, and
children.
Economic aspects of the liquor problem:
Twelfth Annual Report. 1897.
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. (Summary of Twelfth Annual Report.) pp. 509-551.
Economic condition of the Jews in Russia, by I. M. Rubinow:
♦Bui. 72, September, 1907, pp. 487-583.
Eczema of hands, exposed to sand dust and steam:
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
File-cutting establishment, p. 233.
Education, industrial. (See Industrial education.)
Efficiency of labor:
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Efficiency of labor, pp. 581-601.
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children. Relative efficiency of women and children and of men engaged
in the same occupations, pp. 514-547.
Eight-hour day:
♦Bui. 12, September, 1897. The eight-hour work day in Michigan, 1897,♦*
pp. 605, 606.
♦Bui. 40, May, 1902. Hours of labor of employees in 5,000 establishments
in New York, 1891-1899,** pp. 581, 582.
*1905. Report on labor disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880
to 1904, inclusive (S. Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 51-67.
*1905. Eight hours for laborers on Government work (Document of House
Committee on Labor, 60th Cong., 1st sess.).
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♦* Digest of State or foreign report.

84

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Eight-hour day—Concluded.
*Bul. 60, September, 1905. The eight-hour law and enforced labor contracts
in the Panama Canal Zone, pp. 656-662.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 15-20, 157-192, 533-540.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 29-34.
Electric batteries:
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Lead poisoning, New York State, p. 47.
Electrical industries, accidents in:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 433-436.
Electrotyping. (See Printing trades.)
Emery and corundum industry:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 481.
Employer and employee under the common law, by V. H. Olmsted and S. D.
Fessenden:
*Bul. 1, November, 1895. pp. 95-107.
*1901. No. I l l of monographs on social economics. United States Depart­
ment of Labor exhibit, Pan American Exposition, 1901.
Employers’ liability:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor. Employers’ liability, pp.
42-56.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
Great Britain, pp. 45-48.
France, pp. 70-72.
Switzerland, p. 115.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900. Present status of employers’ liability in the
United States, by Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 1157-1210.
*1901. Present status of employers’ liability in the United States, by
Stephen D. Fessenden. No. IV of monographs on social economics.
United States Department of Labor exhibit, Pan American Exposition,
1901.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. The State cooperative accident insurance fund of
Maryland, 1902-1904,** pp. 645-648.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908. Legal liability of employers for injuries to their
employees in the United States, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 1-120.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 457-460.
Bui. 88, May, 1910. Wisconsin, 1907,** pp. 848-850.
*Bul. 90, September, 1910.
Recent action relating to employers’ liability and workmen’s compen­
sation, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 675-714.
Cost of employers’ liability and workmen’s compensation insurance
(United States and foreign countries), by Miles M. Dawson, pp.
749-831.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

85

Employers’ liability—Concluded.
♦Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D.
Clark, pp. 1046-1048.
♦Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 904-907.
♦Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, pp. 24-28.
♦Bul. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions
affecting labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 19-28.
Bul. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 19-23, 25, 26.
Bul. 166, December 15, 19J14. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 21-24.
Bul. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 24-32, 42.
(See also Decisions of courts relating to labor.)
Employment offices:
♦Bul. 22, May, 1899. Report relating to various agencies for securing em­
ployment to working people in Austria,♦ pp. 429-432.
♦
Bul. 35, July, 1901. Missouri, 1900,** p. 785.
♦Bul. 43, November, 1902. Ohio, 1901,** pp. 1240, 1241.
Bul. 47, July, 1903. Missouri, 1902,** p. 915.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903. France, 1893-1897,** pp. 1075-1083.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Connecticut, 1902,** pp. 1343, 1344
Montana, 1902,** p. 1352.
♦Bul. 50, January, 1904.
Maryland, 1902,♦♦ p. 149.
Ohio, 19|02,** pp. 156, 157.
♦Bul. 52, May, 1904. Wisconsin, 1901,** p. 653.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Missouri, 1903,** p. 1646.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. Ohio, 1903,** pp. 657, 658.
Bul. 58, May, 1905. Connecticut, 1903,** p. 962.
♦Bul. 59, July, 1905. Maryland, 1903,♦♦ p. 322.
♦Bul. 60, September, 1905.
Massachusetts, 1903,** pp. 663, 664.
Montana, 1904,** p. 671.
♦Bul. 62, January, 1906.
New York, 1903,** p. 286.
Ohio, 1904,** p. 295.
♦Bul. 63, March, 1906.
Connecticut, 1904,** p. 504.
Maryland, 1904,** p. 508.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. Wisconsin, 1904,** p. 857.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. New York, 1904,** p. 836.
♦Bul. 68, January, 1907.
Free public employment offices in the United States, by J. E. Conner,
pp. 1-115.
Connecticut, 1905,** p. 140.
Bul. 69, March, 1907.
Maryland, 1905,** pp. 423, 424.
West Virginia, 1906,** p. 427.
* Supply exhausted.



** Digest of State or foreign report.

86

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Employment offices—Concluded.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. Ohio, 1905,** pp. 659, 660.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907.
Connecticut, 1906,** pp. 988, 989.
Washington, 1905, 1906,** p. 998.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908.
Michigan, 1906,** p. 178.
Ohio, 1906,** p. 183.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Missouri, 1905,** pp. 596, 597.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908. What is done for the unemployed in European coun­
tries, by W. D. P. Bliss, pp. 741-934.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Minnesota, 1906,** p. 356.
*Bul. 77, July, 190S. Minnesota, 1906,** p. 356.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Missouri, 1907,** p. 555.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908.
Michigan, 1907,** pp. 92S, 929.
Ohio, 1907,** p. 935.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. Maryland, 1907,** p. 90.
*Bul. 81, March, 1909. Massachusetts, 1907,** p. 393.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909.
Maryland, 1908,** p. 641.
Michigan, 1908,** p. 642.
Bui. 83, July, 1909.
California, 1908,** pp. 104, 105.
Colorado, 1907,** p. 106.
Connecticut, 1908,** pp. 107, 108.
Montana, 1905 and 1906,** p. 112.
Bui. 84, September, 1909.
Missouri, 1908,** p. 399.
Montana, 1907, 1908,** pp. 400, 401.
New South Wales, 1900-1908,** pp. 402-404.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 479-482.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Minnesota, 1908,** p. 212.
Washington, 1907,** p. 224.
West Virginia, 1902-1908,** p. 226.
*Bul. 87, March, 1910.
Ohio, 1908,** pp. 635, 636.
Oklahoma, 1908, 1909,** pp. 636, 637.
Bui. 88, May, 1910. Wisconsin, 1907, 1908,** p. 851.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 1050, 1051.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 913, 915.
Bui. 109, October 15, 1912. Statistics of unemployment and the work of
employment offices, by Frank B. Sargent.
*Bul. I l l, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 32.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 27.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

87

Employment, protection of workmen in. (See Protection of workmen in their
employment.)
Employment, regularity of:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor. Time and earnings, pp.
75-881.
*Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Time and earnings, pp. 285-579.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass. Wages: Time and earnings, pp. 367-841.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment in the United States!,
by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 616-618.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Conditions of living among the poor, by S. E.
Forman, pp. 617, 618.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States.
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 21, 22, 203-228, 377-384.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911.
Working hours, earnings and duration of employment of women
workers in selected industries of Maryland and of California, by
Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 347-465.
Employment of children in Maryland canneries, by Marie L. Obenauer
•and Mary Conyngton, pp. 466-487.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
Bui. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 74-79.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak,
suit, and skirt industry of New York City and Boston, pp. 7-108.
Bui. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine, pp. 84r-90.
Enameled ware, manufacture of:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, p. 40.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 295-306.
Bui. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porce­
lain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Engravers:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report, 1898. Hand and machine labor.




* Supply exhausted.

88

BULLETIN OF THE BUKEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Engravers—Concluded.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. G76-G7S.
Erdman Act:
*Bul. 98, January, 1912. Mediation and arbitration of railroad labor dis­
putes in the United States, by Charles P. Neill, pp. 1-63.
Ether as an industrial poison:
*Rul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doeliring, p. 13.
Ethyl aldehyde as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 739.
Explosives, manufacture of:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
514, 515,
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 428, 429.
Exposition exhibits:
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 440-489.
*1901. Monographs on social economics. United States Department of
Labor exhibit, Pan American Exposition, 1901.
*1. The working of the Department of Labor, by Carroll D. Wright.
*11. The value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D. Wright.
*111. Employer and employee under the common law, by Victor H.
Olmsted and Stephen D. Fessenden.
*IV. Present status of employers* liability in the United States, by
Stephen D. Fessenden.
*V. Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fes­
senden.
♦VI. Public baths in Europe, by Edward Mussey Hartwell, M. D.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Charts exhibited at the Pan American Exposition,
pp. 121-126.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Exhibit of the United States Bureau of Labor
at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition.
Introduction, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 969-971.
The working of the United States Bureau of Labor, by Carroll D.
Wright, pp. 973-989.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in the United States, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 991-999.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in foreign countries, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1023-1086.
Value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D. Wright, pp.
1087-1096.
Strikes and lockouts in the United States, 1881 to 1890, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1097-1117.
Wages in the United States and in Europe, 1890 to 1903, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1119-1128.
Cost of living and retail prices in the United States, 1890 to 1903, by
G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1129-1164.
Wholesale prices in the United States, 1890 to 1903, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1165-1190.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

89

Exposition Exhibits—Concluded.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904—Concluded.
Housing of the working people in the United States by employers, by
G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1191-1243.
Public baths in the United States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1245-1367.
Trade and technical education in the United States, 1892, 1902, pp.
1369-1417.
Hand and machine labor in the United States, 1898, p. 1419.
Labor legislation in the United States, by G. A. Weber, pp. 1421-1486.
Labor conditions in Hawaii, 1901, 1902, pp. 1487-1490.

F.
Factories, employment of women in. (See Factory inspection; Factory legis­
lation; Woman and child wage earners; Women in industry.)
Factory inspection:
*Bul. 1, November, 1895. Minnesota, 1893,** p. 77.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Missouri, 1894, 1895,** p. 387.
*Bul. 12, September, 1897. Inspection of factories and workshops in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 549-568.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Report of the chief inspector of factories, work­
rooms, and shops, Victoria, 1900,** pp. 152-159.
*Bul. 63, March, 1906. Maryland, 1904,** p. 508.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. France, 1905,** pp. 852, 853.
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Maryland, 1905,** p. 424.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908.
Great Britain. Annual report of the chief inspector of factories and
workshops, 1906,** pp. 615-618.
New South Wales. Tenth annual report of the department of labor
and industry, 1906,** pp. 619-621.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Russia. Digest of reports of factory inspectors
for 1904,** pp. 574-576.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909.
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. g-11, 14-16.
Maryland. Report of bureau of statistics and information, 1907. In­
spection of clothing and other manufactures,** pp. 89, 90.
Great Britain. Annual report of the chief inspector of factories and
workshops, 1907,** pp. 101-103.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Annual report of chief inspector of factories and
workshops, Great Britain, 1908,** pp. 137-143.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz.
Austria, pp. 21-38.
Belgium, pp. 111-130.
France, pp. 176-221.
Germany, pp. 280-312.
Italy, pp. 321-326.
Switzerland, pp. 332-337, 372-402.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

90

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Factory inspection—Conel uded.
Bui. 142, February 27. 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
(See also Factory legislation.)
Factory legislation:
*Bul. 12, September, 1897. Inspection of factories and workshops in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 549-568.
♦Bill. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 787-825.
France, pp. 842-850.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 85-116.
Switzerland, pp. 145-168.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 333-369.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 586-589.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1028-1030.
Netherlands, pp. 1034-1040.
Italy, pp. 1054-1056.
Norway, pp. 1057-1063.
Sweden, pp. 1064-1066.
Denmark, pp. 1066-1070.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 177-200.
New South Wales, pp. 236-245.
South Australia, pp. 249-251.
Queensland, pp. 258-264.
Ontario, pp. 276-288.
Quebec, pp. 296-303.
Manitoba, pp. 303, 304.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Report of the chief inspector of factories, work­
rooms, and shops, Victoria, 1900,** pp. 152-159.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903. Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 1178, 1179, 1262, 1263.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Labor legislation in the United States, by G. A.
Weber, pp. 1422-1427.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 168-171.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. France, 1904,** pp. 852-854.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain,
by A. Maurice Low, pp. 534-560.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907. Laws relating to factory inspection and the
health and safety of employees.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain,
by Victor S. Clark, pp. 1-85.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 463-467.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

91

Factory legislation—Concluded.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz.
Austria, pp. 13-17.
Belgium, pp. 97-111.
France, pp. 152-176.
Germany, pp. 241-280.
Italy, pp. 321-324.
Switzerland, pp. 328-348.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910.
Labor laws declared unconstitutional, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 956,
957.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 1041,
1042.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 884-888.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
lindley D. Clark, pp. 14-17.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and cliild wage earners in tlie
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*VoL XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 17, 18.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 12-15.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 22.
Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F. W. Doehring:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903, pp. 1-131.
Factory school experiment, by Charles H. Winslow:
Bui. 159, April, 1915, pp. 80-93.
Farm colonies of the Salvation Army, by Commander Booth Tucker:
*Bul. 48, September, 1903, pp. 983-1005.
Farm labor. (See Agriculture.)
Fatal accidents. (See Accidents, industrial.)
Fatigue as related to accident occurrence:
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
*Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention, pp. 75-86.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Industrial accidents and loss of earning power:
German experience in 1897 and 1907, by Henry J. Harris, p. 50.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 395, 396.
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 94, 98, 100,

101.

Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman, pp. 62, 63.
(See also Physical strain.)




* Supply exhausted.

92

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Fertilizer industry, injurious conditions in:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. S7-113.
File making:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., p.
479.
♦Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
western Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, pp. 58-61.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.,
p. 233.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Yol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 48, 49.
Financial studies:
♦Bul. 1, November, 1895. Private and public debt in the United States, by
George K. Holmes, pp. 48-59.
♦Bul. 2, January, 1896.
Notes concerning the money of the United States and other countries,
by William C. Hunt, pp. 181-196.
The wealth and receipts and expenses of the United States, by William
M. Steuart, pp. 197-200.
Fire damp as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, b y *
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
Firearms and ammunition, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 41-43.
Fisheries, accidents in:
♦Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 454, 455.
Flax and linen manufacture:
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 750-757.
Flock fever:
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 815.
Flour-milling industry:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 482.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing:;
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
503-518.
Fluoric acid as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 749.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

93

Food prices. ( See Cost of living; Retail prices; Wholesale prices.)
Food prices, foreign, as affected by the war:
Bui. 170, May, 1915.
Foreign labor laws. (See Labor legislation—foreign laws.)
Formaldehyde as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer­
feld, p. 162.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 748.
Foundries:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 716-718.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades, pp. 43, 44.
Freight handlers:
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1,1914.
Freight rates:
*Sixth Annual Report.
pp. 269-282.

1890.

Fumes and vapors, dangers from.

Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.,
(See Dangerous occupations.)

Funeral benefits:
*Bul. 3, March 1, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of
Anzin, France, by W. F. Willoughby, p. 249.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 348~350.
*Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Vieille-Montagne Zinc
Mining & Smelting Co., by W. F. Willoughby, p. 710.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
France, p. 71.
Belgium, pp. 86, 87.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 699-848.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911, of
Germany, pp. 501-774.
(See also Death benefits.)
Fur industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 784-789.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Mercury poisoning, New York State, p. 48.




* Supply exhausted.

94

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Furniture industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
*Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
*Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 129, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1890 to 1912, pp. 123-178.
Bui. 153, May 21, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1907 to 1913, pp. 105-153.

G.
Garment industry. (See Clothing industry.)
Gas, illuminating, manufacture of:
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Gem finishers:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 480.
Glass industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 480.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 691-699.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great
Britain, 1908,** p. 103.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and glass,
pp. 215-269.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 597-662.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 80, January, 1909. Compensation for industrial diseases. Great
Britain. Glass workers’ cataract, 1908,*♦ pp. 103, 104.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
western Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D. Glass polishing and paint­
ing, pp. 80, 81.
* Supply exhausted.




* Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

95

Glass industry—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. III. Glass industry.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. Lead poisoning, New York State, p. 47,
Glassworkers* cataract:
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great
Britain, 1908.** Glass industry, p. 103.
Glazing, pottery, tiles, etc.

(See Pottery industry.)

Glove making:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
588-591.
Gold-leaf manufacture:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 660, 661.
Gothenburg system of liquor traffic:
♦Fifth Special Report. 1893.
Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign
countries:
Bui. 158, October 15, 1914.
Government contracts:
Buis. 5 to 31. July, 1896, to November, 1900. Contracts for constructions
and repairs entered into by Treasury, War, and Navy Departments.
Government employees:
*1905. Eight hours for laborers on Government work (Document of House
Committee on Labor, 60th Cong., 1st sess.).
*1910. Civil-service retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Her­
bert D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*1910. Civil-service retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert
D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
1913. Compensation for injuries to employees of the United States arising
from accidents occurring between August 1, 1908, and June 30, 1911.
Report of operations under the act of May 30, 1908.
Bui. 155, September 17, 1914. Compensation for accidents to employees
of the United States.
Government ownership:
*Bul. 31, November, 1900. Conditions of railway labor in Italy, by Dr.
Luigi Einaudi, pp. 1211-1261.
♦Bui. 68, January, 1907. Free public employment offices in the United
States, by J. E. Connor, pp. 1-115.
Bui. 158, October 15, 1914. Government aid to home owning and housing
of working people in foreign countries.
(See also Municipal ownership).
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------7



* * Digest of State or foreign report.

96

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Grain elevators:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 482.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
498-503.
Granite and stone trades:
Bui. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15,
1913.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Grievances, boards of.

(See Boards of grievances.)

Grinders’ asthma and grinders’ rot:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial Hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 478.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 645.
Grinders, metal, diseases of:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 479.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 644-649.

H.
Hair-goods industry:
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Mercury poisoning, New York State, p. 48.
Hand and machine labor:
*Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904 (charts), p. 1419.
Hand-working and domestic industries of Germany, by Henry J. Harris:
*Bul. 40, May, 1902. pp. 50&-548.
Handicrafts in America, revival of, by Max West ;
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. pp. 1573-1622.
Hardware and metal specialties, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Yol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 44-46.
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 180-194.
Harness making.

(See Saddle and harness making.)

Hat industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
*Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

97

Hat industry—Concluded.
Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 789-794.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 14, 15, 21.
Hatters’ case, Danbury.
v. Lawlor.

(See Decisions of courts—labor organizations—Loewe

Hawaii:
*Bul. 36, September, 1901. Statistics of Honolulu, Hawaii, pp. 959-962.
*1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 ( S. Doc.
No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.).
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902
(S. Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.).
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, 1902, pp. 685-902.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Labor conditions in Hawaii, pp. 1487-1490.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905
(H. Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.).
*Bul. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner o f Labor
on Hawaii, pp. 365-679.
*1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910
(S. Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.).
*Bul. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 673-1117.
Health.

(See Sanitation and hygiene; Sickness insurance.)

Heat and humidity:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
541-543.
1911. Conditions o f employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and
employees, pp. 287-332.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Yol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 360-365, 409.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 68-80.
*Yol. XII. Employment of women in laundries.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 9, 35, 65, 71.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Hemp and cordage manufacture:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 757-762.
Hides and skins, horsehair and wool industries:
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. •1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe (anthrax),** p. 1650.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Report of the chief inspector o f factories and work­
shops of Great Britain, 1908 (anthrax),** p. 141.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

98

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

History and growth of the United States census, by Carroll D. Wright:
*1900. (S. Doc. No. 194, 56th Cong., 1st sess.)
History of women in industry:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. IX. History of women in industry in the United States.
History of women in trade-unions:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. X. History of women in trade-unions.
Holidays and rest periods:
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Conditions of railway labor in Europe, by
Walter E. Weyl.
Prussia, pp. 92-94.
Saxony, pp. 101-103.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. New
Zealand, pp. 189, 195-199.
♦Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 1040.
♦Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 884.
*Bul. I l l, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 14.
Bul. 117. April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Bul. 118. April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women
and young persons.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. I).
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 12.
Home conditions:
♦Fourth Annual Report. 1888. Working women in large cities. Board­
ing homes, aids for working women, etc., pp. 29-57.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment, pp.
125-136.
Bul. 158, October 15, 1914. Government aid to home owning and hous­
ing of working people in foreign countries.
(See also Living conditions.)
Home work:
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905. Earnings in home industries, New York, 1902,**
pp. 650-651.
♦Bul. 80, January, 1909.
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 1—
85.
Report of select committee on home work, Great Britain, 1907,** pp.
104-110.
♦Bul. 81, March, 1909. France, 1907,** pp. 403, 404.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Great Britain, 1907,*♦ pp. 142, 143.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

99

Home work—Concluded.
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911. Resolution of the sixth delegates’ meeting of tlie
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 187, 188.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and cliild wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 213-818.
Hookworm disease:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 475.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVII. Hookworm disease among cotton-mill operatives.
Hosiery and knit goods industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in occupations ex­
posing to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 743-746.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 194-213.
Bui. 134, August 26, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and knit goods industries, 1890 to 1912.
Hosiery and underwear industry:
Bui. 154, May 22, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1913, pp. 77-118.
Hospital and medical service:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor, pp. 30-36.
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 253-255.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 350, 351.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 489-494,
513-515.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: FamilistSre Society
of Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 601-603.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson,
pp. 43-45.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 87-110.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1076-1085.
♦1905. Labor disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880 to 1904,
inclusive (S. Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.), p. 43.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States, pp. 609-633.




* Supply exhausted.

100

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Hospital and medical service—Concluded.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, pp.
378-379.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911, of
Germany, pp. 501-774.
Bui. 107, September 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany, pp. 16, 17.
Bui. 123, May 15, 1913. Employers’ welfare work, by Elizabeth Lewis
Otey.
Hotels and restaurants:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories.
Hours of labor:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions, pp. 295-410.
♦Seventh Special Report. 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia, pp. 212-459.
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children, pp. 639-645.
♦Bui. 2, January, 1896. Wages and hours of labor in Great Britain and
Ireland, 1893,♦♦ pp. 170-176.
♦Bui. 7, November, 1896. Rates of wages paid under public and private
contract, Baltimore, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, by Ethelbert
Stewart, pp. 728-747.
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. Italians in Chicago, pp. 53-273, 376-380.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. Reports on changes in wages and hours of labor
in the United Kingdom, 1894-1896, ♦ pp. 66-73.
♦
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. Wages and hours of labor of railroad employees in
Maryland, 1892, 1897,♦♦ pp. 616, 617.
♦Bui. 18, September, 1898. Fifth annual report on changes in wages and
hours of labor in the United Kingdom, 1897,♦♦ pp. 718-722.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
Great Britain, pp. 10-18.
France, pp. 52-55.
Belgium, pp. 76, 77.
Prussia, pp. 88-92.
Saxony, pp. 100-101.
Switzerland, pp. 110-112.
♦Bui. 21, March, 1899. France, 1891-1893,♦♦ pp. 320-327.
Fifteenth Annual Report. 1900. Wages in commercial countries.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Sixth annual report on changes in wages and
hours of labor in the United Kingdom, 1894-1898,♦♦ pp. 186-191.
♦Bui. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 349-363.
♦Bui. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 577-579.
Bui. 29, July, 1900.
Trust and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W. Jenks, pp. 766-812.
Railway employees in Prussia,♦ p. 877.
♦
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

101

Hours of labor—Continued.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Rus­
sia, pp. 1021-1024.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Prices and rates of wages.
Manila, 1900,** pp. 32-42.
Michigan,** pp. 137, 138.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Azel Ames, M. D.,
pp. 400-406.
Bui. 35, July, 1901. Report on changes in wages and hours of labor in
the United Kingdom, 1899,** pp. 788-793.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901.
Railway employees in the United States, by Samuel M’Cune Lind­
say, PP- 1034-1040.
Michigan, 1900,** 1176-1177.
*1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 (S.
Doc. No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 131-231.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Eighth annual report on changes in rates of
wages in the United Kingdom, 1900,** pp. 140-146.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal
strike, by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1200-1202.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902
(S. Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 128-221.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission,
pp. 613-617.
Bui. 47, July, 1903.
Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902, pp. 802-895.
Lumber industry, Washington, 1901, 1902,** p. 919.
Employees in industrial establishments, Belgium, 1896,** pp. 925, 926.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Labor organizations, Massachusetts, 1900, 1901,** pp. 1348, 1349.
Reports of persons employed in business offices and commercial estab­
lishments, Germany, 1901,** pp. 1355-1358.
Report of committee appointed to consider the early closing of shops,
Great Britain, 1901,** p. 1359.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
♦Bui. 50, January, 1904. Reports on changes in rates of wages and hours
of labor in the United Kingdam, 1901, 1902,♦* pp. 165-171.
*Bul. 51. March, 1904. Hours of labor of molders in foundries, 1903, p. 435.
*Bul. 52. May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 501-506, 554-558.
Bui. 53, July, 1904. Wages and hours of labor, pp. 712-932.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Wages in the United States and in Europe,
1890-1903, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1119-1128.
Twentieth Annual Report. 1905. Convict labor, pp. 34, 35, 182, 231, 271,
341, 345.
♦1905. Eight hours for laborers on Government work. (Document of
House Committee on Labor, 60th Cong., 1st sess.)
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905.
Street railway employment in the United States, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 592-595, 610-612.
New York, 1902,** p. 655.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

102

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Hours of labor—Continued.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in tlie Philippines, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 904, 905.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. Wages and liours of labor in manufacturing indus­
tries, 1890-1904, pp. 1-147.
*Bul. 60, September, 1905.
Austria, 1903,** pp. 676-678;'Germany, 1902,** pp. 687-690.
♦Bui. 61, November, 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 820-849.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H.
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 162-308.
*Bul. 65, July, 1906.
Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries, 1890 to 1905,
pp. 1-170.
Changes in rates of wages and hours of labor in the United Kingdom,
1903, 1904,** pp. 324-329.
♦Bui. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 512-662.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Laws of foreign countries relating to employees
on railroads, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 122-135.
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Wages and working time in textile industries of
Belgium, 1901,** pp. 434-437.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. New York, 1905,** pp. 655, 656.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing indus­
tries, 1890 to 1906, pp. 1-174.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907.
Laundries, Germany, 1905,** pp. 1007, 1011.
Employees engaged in internal navigation, Germany, 1907,** pp. 1011,
1012.

*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing indus­
tries, 1890 to 1907, pp. 1-180.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 30-34, 183-503.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain,
by Victor S. Clark, pp. 48-53.
Bui. 83, July, 1909.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal industrial towns
of France, 1905,** p. 85.
British textile industries, 1906,** p. 92.
Metal working industries, Belgium, 1903,** pp. 113-120.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 495, 496.
*1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.), pp. 28-38, 170-301.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem,
Pa. (S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 7-11, 61-108.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
British clothing industries, 1906,** p. 195. New York, 1907,** p. 215.
*Bul. 87, March, 1910.
Wages and hours of labor of union carpenters in the United States
and in English-speaking foreign countries, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp.
583-598.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

103

Hours of labor—Continued.
♦Bui. 87, March, 1910—Concluded.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal industrial towns
of Belgium, 1908,** pp. 624, 625.
British building and woodworking industries, 1906,** pp. 626-633.
Bui. 88, May, 1910.
German woodworking industries in 1906,** pp. 815-817.
Austria in 1906, 1907,** pp. 824-842.
Public service employees of principal cities of Germany, 1902 to 1907,**
pp. 863-864.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910.
Working hours of wage-earning women in selected industries in Chi­
cago, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 867-915.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 1040.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Vols. I and II. Wages and hours of labor.
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 15-20, 157-192, 533-540.
*1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910
(S. Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 142-459.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolution of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 185-187.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911.
Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living in principal indus­
trial cities in the United States, 1909,** pp. 512-514.
Reports of British Board of Trade on cost of living in England and
Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and the United States, 19081911,** pp. 563-565.
Men, women, and children employed in factories in Austria, 1906,**
pp. 591-606.
*Bul. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 800-1117.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911.
Working hours, earnings, and duration of employment of women
workers in selected industries of Maryland and California, by
Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 347-465.
Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 882, 883.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.),
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 257-275, 653-735.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 103-117, 552-623.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 93-104, 381-386, 653-670.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 137-142, 360-396.
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment, pp.
121-125.
♦Vol. XII. Employment of women in laundries, pp. 15-18.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions, pp. 157-217, 507-529.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

104

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Hours of labor—Continued.
*1912. Summary of wages and hours of labor from report on conditions
of employment in the iron and steel industry in the United States (S.
Doc. No. 301, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912 (S. Doc.
No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 71-75, 87-142, 322-371, 438-476.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 13, 14.
*Bul. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions af­
fecting labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 8-10, 16, 17.
Bui. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment
of wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and
young persons. (Memorandum of International Labor Office for inter­
national conference called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September,
1913.)
Bui. 119, May 5, 1913. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of
Wisconsin, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 73-92.
Bui. 128, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton,
woolen, and silk industries, 1890 to 1912.
*Bul. 129, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1890 4o 1912.
*Bul. 131, August 15,1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1907 to
1912.
Bui. 134, August 26, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and knit goods industries, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 135, September'1, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cigar and
clothing industries, 1911 and 1912.
Bui. 137, December 1, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the building
and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Michigan copper district strike. Hours of
labor of mine workers, pp. 1-25.
Bui. 143, Mar^h 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May
15, 1913.
Bui. 150, May 11, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 151, May 15, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel
industry in the United States, 1907 to 1912.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 12, 13, 15-17.
Bui. 153, May 21, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 154, May 22, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

105

Hours of labor—Concluded.
Bul. 161, October 24, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and
cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
Bul. 163, October 28, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the building and
repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 11.
Bul. 168, April, 1915. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel in­
dustry, in the United States, 1907 to 1913.
Bul. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 20-22.
Bul. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1,1914.
(See also Decisions of courts relating to labor.)
Housing:
*Seventh Special Report. 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia. Tenement statistics, pp. 574-613.
♦Eighth Special Report. 1895. Housing of the working people.
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 241, 242.
♦Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 340-343.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 482-488.
♦Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Netherlands Yeast and
Alcohol Factory, Agneta Park, Delft, Holland, by W. F. Willoughby,
pp. 716, 717.
♦Bul. 10, May, 1897. Conditions of the Negro in various cities. Household
conditions, pp. 291-304, 368, 369.
♦Bul. 14, January, 1898. Income, wages, and rents in Montreal, by Herbert
Brown Ames, pp. 39-51.
Bul. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, pp. 446-452.
♦Bul. 42, September, 1902. The housing question in London, 1900,♦♦ pp.
1086-1088.
♦Bul. 54, September, 1904. .Housing of the working people in the United
States by employers, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1191-1243.
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905. Austria, 1901,♦♦ p. 671.
♦Bul. 61, November, 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 789-792.
♦Bul. 64, May, 1906. Austria, 1902-1903,♦♦ pp. 858-860.
♦Bul. 74, January, 1908. Italy, 1905,♦♦ pp. 196, 197.
♦Bul. 80, January, 1909. Spain, 1907,♦♦ pp. 116-123.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Connecticut, 1908, ♦ p. 108.
♦
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 415-445.
♦Bul. 93, March, 1911.
Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living in principal cities
in the United States, 1909,! ♦ pp. 517-536.
*
Italy, 1908,♦♦ pp. 626-631.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

106

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Housing— Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 519-536.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 595-620.
*Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 310-321.
♦Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories, pp. 77-199.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill opera­
tives, pp. 154-161, 394, 395.
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets of typical cotton-mill workers.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pennsylvania, in 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp.
202-209.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912 ( S. Doc.
No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 143-162, 477-485.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Sta­
tistics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper dis­
trict, pp. 113-117.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., pp. 78, 79.
Bui. 158, October 15, 1914. Government aid to home owning and housing
of working people in foreign countries.
Hydric sulphide as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 757.
Hydrochloric acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. IX,
p. 510.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 162.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 748.
Hydrocyanic acid as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
Hydrofluoric acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 162.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 749.
Hydrogen gas as an industrial poison:
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Hydrogen sulphide as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 530.
Hygiene, industrial. (See Sanitation and hygiene.)




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

107

I.
Idleness.

(See Unemployment)

Illiteracy:
♦Seventh Special Report. 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia.
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. The Italians in Chicago.
♦Bui. 13, November, 1897. The Italians in Chicago (Summary of Ninth
Special Report), pp. 707-710.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. The Negroes of Farmville, Virginia: A social
study, by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, pp. 12-14.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. The Negroes of Sandy Spring, Maryland: A social
study, by William Taylor Thom, pp. 65-70.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. The Negroes of Litwalton, Virginia: A social
study of the “ Oyster Negro,” by William Taylor Thom, pp. 1142-1147.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. The Negroes of Cinclare Central Factory and
Calumet Plantation, Louisiana, by J. Bradford Laws, pp. 104-107.
♦Bui. 48, September, 1903. The Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study, by
Richard R. Wright, jr., pp. 1020-1023.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 249-251.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry.
♦Vol. IV. Conditions under which children leave school to go to work,
pp. 124-126.
♦Vol. XIII. Infant mortality and its relation to employment of
mothers, pp. 30-46.
♦Vol. XV. Relation between occupation and criminality of women.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bui. 159, April, 1915. A factory school experiment, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 80-85.
Immigrant labor:
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. The Italians in Chicago.
♦Bui. 9, March, 1897. The padrone system and padrone banks, by John
Koren, pp. 113-129.
♦1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 ( S. Doc.
No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 16-20.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902 (S.
Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 20-55, 107-110, 119.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 697-732, 784-787, 795.
♦Bui. 56, January, 1905. Influence of trade-unions on immigrants, by Car­
roll D. Wright, pp. 1-8.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (II,
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 9-68, 145-154.
♦Bui. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 502-511.
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907. The Italian on the land: A study in immigration, by
Emily Fogg Meade, pp. 473-533.




* Supply exhausted.

108

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Immigrant labor—Concluded.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907.
Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled immigrant laborers in the
United States, by Frank J. Sheridan, pp. 403-486.
Economic condition of the Jews in Russia, by I. M. Rubinow, pp.
487-583.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Mexican labor in the United States, by Victor
S. Clark, pp. 466-522.
*1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910 (S.
Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 51-62.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 83^96, 100-102.
Bui. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 715-726.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 99-118, 618-621.
*Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 43-71, 517-544.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 290, 417, 419, 615-650.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 61-67, 235, 236, 337, 338.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill
operatives.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
Income, family. (See Wages.)
Incomes, wages, and rents in Montreal, by Herbert Brown Ames:
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. pp. 39-51.
Index numbers:
Bui. 173, May, 1915.
Part I. The making and using of index numbers, by Wesley C. Mitchell,
pp. 5-114.
Part II. Index numbers of the United States and foreign countries,
pp. 115-322.
Index of labor reports:
Third Special Report. 1893. Analysis and index of all reports issued by
bureaus of labor statistics in the United States prior to November 1,
1892. (New edition of 1902 available for distribution.)
Industrial accidents. (See Accidents, industrial.)
Industrial combinations:
Bui. 29, July, 1900. Trust and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W.
Jenks, pp. 661-831.
Industrial communities:
*Bul. 3, March, 1896. Coal Mining Co. of Anzin, France, by W. F. Wil­
loughby, pp. 228-264.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy, France, by W. F. Wil­
loughby, pp. 335-359.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Iron and steel works of Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Ger­
many, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 479-517.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Familistere Society of Guise, France, by W.
F. Willoughby, pp. 567-609.




♦ Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

109

Industrial communities—Concluded.
*Bul. 7, November, 1896.
Mariemont & Bascoup Coal Mining Co., Belgium, By W. F. Wil­
loughby, pp. 694-704.
Vieille-Montagne Zinc Mining & Smelting Co., Belgium, by W. F. Wil­
loughby, pp. 704-714.
Netherlands Yeast and Alcohol Factory, Agneta Park, Delft, Holland,
by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 714-719.
Chocolate Factory of Menier, Noisiel, France, by W. F. Willoughby,
p. 719.
Iron and Steel Works, Schneider & Co., Le Creuzot, France, by W. F.
Willoughby, p. 720.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903.
Farm colonies of the Salvation Army, by Commander Booth Tucker,
pp. 983-1005.
Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study, by Richard R. Wright, jr.,
pp. 1006-1044.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Report of the Salvation Army colonies in the United
States and at Hadleigh, England, 1905,** pp. 861-880.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. The Italian on the land: A study in immigration, by
Emily Fogg Meade, pp. 473-533.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton-textile industry, pp. 517-612.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 595-620.
*Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 305-331.
Industrial conditions. (See Labor conditions.)
Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City, by
Charles H. Winslow:
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914.
Industrial courts in France, Germany, and Switzerland, by Helen L. Sumner:
♦Bui. 98, January, 1912. pp. 273-^64.
Industrial death rates. (See Death rates in various industries.)
Industrial depressions:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Connecticut, 1908, ♦ p. 107.
♦
Industrial diseases. (See Occupational diseases.)
Industrial education:
Eighth Annual Report. 1892. Industrial education.
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, p. 254.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities :* Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 510-513.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: Familistere Society of
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 604-606.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 488, 489.
Seventeenth Annual Report. 1902. Trade and technical education.
♦Bui. 54, September, 1904. Trade and technical education in the United
States, pp. 1369-1417.
♦Bui. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 188-196.
* Supply exhausted.



** Digest of State or foreign report.

110

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Industrial education—Concluded.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. Belgium, 1897-1901,** pp. 309-317.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades,
by Walter E. Weyl and A. M. Sakolski, pp. 752-780.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. France, 1905,** pp. 166-168.
*Twenty-fifth Annual Report. 1910. Industrial education.
*1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.), pp. 22-24.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Education of workers in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, pp. 179-191.
Bui. 159, April, 1915. Short-unit courses for wage earners and a factory
school experiment, by W. A. O’Leary and Charles A. Prosser.
Bui. 162, August, 1915. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va.
Industrial hygiene. (Bee Sanitation and hygiene.)
Industrial insurance:
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Cost of industrial insurance in the District of
Columbia, by S. E. Forman, pp. 781-822.
Industrial poisoning:
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, p. 822.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 94-99.
Switzerland, pp. 155-157.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 337-349.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 576, 577.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Netherlands, pp. 1045, 1046.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 12-113.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Austria, lead and zinc works, 1904,** pp. 842848.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
509-519, 551-582.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Annual report of the chief inspector of factories and
workshops, Great Britain, 1908,** p. 141.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United States, by
John B. Andrews, pp. 31-146.
Tentative list of industrial poisons, pp. 147-168.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911.
Resolution of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the International Asso­
ciation for Labor Legislation. Industrial poisons, pp. 189-192.
Report of Illinois commission on occupational diseases, pp. 194-202.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911.
Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and western Europe, by
Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 1-188.
White-lead industry in the United States, by Alice Hamilton, M. D..
pp. 189-259.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

Ill

Industrial poisoning—Concluded.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911—Concluded.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning in New York State in 1909 and
1910, by John B. Andrews, pp. 260-282.
Laws enacted during 1911 requiring tlie report of occupational dis­
eases, pp. 283-288.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 259-277.
Bui. 100, May, 1912.
List of industrial poisons and other substances injurious to health
found in industrial processes.
Act providing for tax on white phosphorus matches.
Bui. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory in­
spection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Bui. 165, December 15, 1914. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of stor­
age batteries, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
(See also Occupational diseases and specific entries under each of the
following-named poisons: Acetaldehyde, acetate of lead, acetone, acridine, acrolein, African boxwood, ammonia, amyl acetate, amyl alcohol,
aniline, antimonate of lead, antimony, arsenic, arseniureted hydrogen,
benzine, benzol, bisulphide of carbon, bromine, carbolic acid, carbon
dioxide, carbon disulphide, carbon monoxide, carbonate of lead, car­
bonic acid, carbureted hydrogen, Cassel yellow, chloride of lime,
chlorine, chlorodinitrobenzol, chromate of lead, chromate of potassium,
chromic acid, chrome orange, chrome red (basic lead chromate),
chrome yellow (neutral lead chromate), chromium, copper, cyanide of
potassium, cyanogen compounds, denatured spirit, diazomethane,
dimethyl sulphate, dinitrobenzol, ether, ethyl aldehyde, fire damp, fluoric
acid, formaldehyde, gas (illuminating), hydric sulphide, hydrochloric
acid, hydrocyanic acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen gas, hydrogen sulphide,
iodide of lead, iodine, lead, lead chloride, lead chromate, lead cyanide,
lead nitrate, lead oxychloride, linseed oil, litharge, manganese, manga­
nese dioxide, mercury, methyl alcohol, methyl bromide, naphs yellow,
nitraniline, nitric acid, nitrobenzine, nitrobenzol, nitroglycerin, nitronaphthalene, nitrous gases, orange mineral, organic fumes, oxalic acid,
oxide of lead, oxychloride of lead (yellow), Paris green, petroleum,
phenol, phenylhydrazine, phosgene, phosphorus, phosphorus sesquisulphide, phosphureted hydrogen, picric acid, pigments of lead, potash,
pyridine, quinine, red oxide of lead, salts of lead, sodium dichromate,
sulphate of lead, sulphide of hydrogen, sulphur chloride, sulphur
dioxide, sulphureted hydrogen, sulphuric acid, sulphurous acid, tallow,
tar, turpentine, white lead, wood alcohol, zinc.)
*----------------------------------------------Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------8



112

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS.

Industrial statistics:
Bul. 11, July, 1897. Report of the department of statistics of Indiana on
industrial and railroad statistics for 1895-96,** pp. 487-491.
♦Bul. 26, January, 1900. Report of bureau of labor statistics of the Aus­
trian Ministry of Commerce, 1898,** pp. 184-186.
Bul. 41, July, 1902. Industrial census of Belgium, 1896,** pp. 830-832.
Bul. 47, July, 1903. Finland, 1890-1900,** pp. 92&-931.
Bul. 55, November, 1904. Indiana, 1901, 1902,** pp. 1638, 1639.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. Virginia, 1903,** pp. 853, 854.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Virginia, 1903, 1904,** pp. 150-152.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. Indiana, 1902, 1903,** pp. 32&-331.
♦Bul. 73, November, 1907, Virginia, 1905,♦♦ pp. 994-996.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Virginia, 1906,** pp. 606-608.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Rhode Island, 1907,** pp. 556, 557.
(See also Manufactures, statistics of.)
Industrial survey of Richmond, Virginia, for the purposes of vocational edu­
cation:
Bul. 162, August, 1915.
Infant mortality:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of women and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XIII. Infant mortality and its relation to the employment of
mothers.
Influence of trade-unions on immigrants, by Carroll D. Wright:
♦Bul. 56, January, 1905. pp. 1-8.
Ink, mucilage, stove and shoe polish, etc., manufacture:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Insurance. (See Accident insurance; Industrial insurance; Life insurance;
Maternity insurance; Mutual aid societies; Old age and invalidity; Sickness
insurance; Unemployment; Workmen’s insurance and compensation.)
International Association for Labor Legislation:
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Bureaus of labor statistics in foreign countries,
by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1080-1086.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905,** pp. 331-333.
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. International Association for Labor Legislation
and its publications, pp. 169-184.
♦Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor^ Legislation, pp. 182-193.
Bul. 117, April 10, 1913. Memorandum of International Labor Office on
prohibition of night work of young persons, prepared for international
conference, called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September, 1913.
Bul. 118, April 10, 1913. Memorandum of International Labor Office on
ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons, prepared
for international conference called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, Sep­
tember, 1913.
International convention respecting prohibition of use of white phosphorus in
manufacture of matches:
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. p. 146.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

113

International copyright law in the United States, effect of, by Carroll D.
Wright:
*1901. (Report made in compliance with resolution of the United States
Senate of January 23, 1900.)
Intimidation:
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment, by
Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 26-36.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. The British conspiracy and protection of property
act and its operation, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 311, 312.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts. Laws relating
to intimidation, pp. 921-951.
Invalidity. (See Old age and invalidity.)
Iodide of lead as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 24.
Iodine as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 512.
Iron and steel industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.,
pp. 31-193, 245-263.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 479-517.
♦Bui. 23, July, 1899. Iron, steel, and tin-plate production in Pennsylvania,
1897,** pp. 558, 559.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulations and restriction of output,
pp. 233-262.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905),
pp. 474-487, 720-733.
♦Bill. 71, July, 1907. France, 1904,♦* p. 343.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Pennsylvania, 1906,** pp. 602-604.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 425, 426.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. The Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue,
pp. 338-396.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Vol. I. Wages and hours of labor.
*Vol. II. Wages and hours of labor, general tables.
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and
employees.
*Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention.
*1912. Summary of wages and hours of labor—From report on conditions
of employment in the iron and steel industry in the United States (S.
Doc. No. 301, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

114

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Iron and steel industry—Concluded.
Bui. 151, May 15, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel
industry in the United States, 1907 to 1912.
Bui. 168, April, 1915. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel
industry in the United States, 1907 to 1913.
Iron mining, accidents in:
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 438, 439.
Irregularity of employment. (See Employment, regularity of.)
Italian on the land: A study in immigration, by Emily Fogg Meade:
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907. pp. 473-533.
Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled immigrant laborers in the United
States, by Frank J. Sheridan:
♦Bui. 72, September, 1907. pp. 403-486.
Italians in Chicago:
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897.
♦Bui. 13, November, 1897. Summary of Ninth Special Report, pp. 691-727.

J.
Jewelry industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 657-660.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition.of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 46, 47.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 213-219.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Jute and jute goods, manufacture of:
♦First Annual Report, 1886. Industrial depressions.
Eleventh Annual Report, 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 762-767.
Juvenile delinquency:
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment.

L.
Labor conditions:
(The references given under this topic include only such articles or
reports as relate to labor conditions in a broad sense. For references to
specific conditions see specific topics.)
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896.
The sweating system, by Henry White, pp. 360-379.
Labor conditions in Germany, 1895,♦♦ pp. 403-416.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

115

Labor conditions—Concluded.
Bui. 11, July, 1897. Condition of the working people in Maine, ISOS,** pp.
492-4:94.
*Bul. 14, January, 1S98. Report on labor conditions of garment workers,
Germany,** pp. 73-75.
*Bul. 17, July, 1898, Condition of workingmen in Connecticut, 1897,** pp.
613, 614.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898. Mechanics’ and workingmen’s returns, Wis­
consin, 1895,** pp. 704, 705.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 1-117.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900.
The betterment of industrial conditions, by Victor H. Olmsted, pp.
1117-1156.
Condition of railroad labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi, pp. 12111281.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Azel Ames, pp.
377-439.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 1-94.
Bui. 41, July, 1902. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
663-793.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903. Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 1142-1281.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Labor conditions in Hawaii, 1900,** pp. 14871490.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 9-243.
Bui. 58, May, 1905.
Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 721-905.
Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 906-954.
♦Bui. 61, November, 1905.
Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 723-856.
Labor conditions in Austria, 1904,** pp. 1047-1051.
♦Bui. 67, November, 1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades,
by Walter E. Weyl and A. M. Sakolski, pp. 681-780.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908.
Mexican labor in the United States, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 466-522.
Report of committee appointed to inquire into conditions of factory
labor in India, 1907,** pp. 568-571.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel inudstry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and
employees.
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States. (See Woman and child wage earners, for titles.)
(See also Children in industry; Distribution of labor; Hours of labor;
Strikes and lockouts; Unemployment; Wages; Woman and child wage
earners; Women in industry.)
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

116

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Labor congresses, international:
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at tlie Paris Exposition, pp. 473, 474.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
International convention respecting tlie prohibition of the use of
white phosphorus in the manufacture of matches,, p. 146.
International Association for Labor Legislation and its publications,
pp. 169-184.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 182-193.
Bui. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
(Memorandum of International Labor Office for international conference
called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September, 1913.)
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and
young persons. (Memorandum of International Labor Office for inter­
national conference called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September,
1913.)
Labor contract:
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 784-787.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 84, 85.
Switzerland, p. 138.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 328-330.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Astria, pp.
569-571.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Rus­
sia, pp. 1018-1020.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New South Wales, pp. 234, 235.
Queensland, p. 258.
Western Australia, pp. 264, 265.
Ontario, pp. 273, 274.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902 (S.
Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.). History of penal labor contract, pp.
12- 20 .

Bui. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, 1902. History of the penal labor contract, pp. 689-697.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
926-931.
*Bul. 60, September, 1905. The eight-hour law and enforced labor contracts
in the Panama Canal Zone, pp. 656-662.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 474, 475.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 872-894.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 416-437.
*Bul. I l l, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, pp. 7-9.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OP TH E PUBLICATIONS OP TH E BUBEAU.

117

Labor contract—Concluded.
*Bul. 112, March 5,1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 11-13.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 13-15.
Bui. 166, December 15,1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, p. 7.
f Bu. 169, May, 1915. Revielw of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 17, 18, 23, 24.
Labor Day, by Miss M. C. de Graffenried:
Bui. 29, July, 1900. pp. 873-876.
Labor departments and commissions:
Third Special Report, 1893. Analysis and index of all reports issued by
bureaus of labor statistics in the United States prior to November 1,
1892.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. First biennial report of the Indiana labor com­
mission, 1897, 1898,** pp. 181, 182.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 378, 379.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria, pp.
596, 597.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, p. 234.
New South Wales, p. 248.
Canada (Dominion), pp. 272, 273.
Ontario, p. 295.
*1901. Monographs on social economics, United States Department of
Labor exhibit, Pan American Exposition, 1901.
*1. The working of the Department of Labor, by Carroll D. Wright.
*11. The value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D. Wright.
1902. Index of all reports issued by bureaus of labor statistics in the
United States prior to March 1, 1902.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Italian bureau of labor statistics, pp. 1233, 1234.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904—
The working of the United States Bureau of Labor, by Carroll D.
Wright, pp. 973-989.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in the United States, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 991-1021.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in foreign countries, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1023-1086.
Value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1087,
1096.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and
1909, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 456, 457, 462, 463.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 1035-1037, 1051.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 870-872, 915-917.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley I). Clark, pp. 6, 7, 32, 33.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

118

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Labor departments and commissions—Concluded.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 6, 7, 27, 28.
( See also Decisions of courts relating to labor.)
Labor disputes. (See Strikes and lockouts.)
Labor legislation:
[Labor laws enacted from time to time in the United States appear in
Buis. Nos. 7-9, 11-20, 22-45, 47-53, 55-82, and 89. The following list
shows, under the first subhead, the compilations and analyses of United
States labor laws published by the bureau. A second subhead relates
to foreign labor laws. As a complete subject index appears in connection
with each compilation of United States laws and because of limited
space, references in detail to the subjects of the various laws have not
been given in this index.]
United States laws—
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions: Appendix C.
Synopsis of labor legislation in the United States, pp. 457-485.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor. Convict labor laws in
the United States, pp. 507-604.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Legislation concerning strikes, combinations, conspiracies, boycotts,
etc., pp. 1146-1164.
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor, pp. 48-58. Employers’
liability laws of various States.
♦Second Special Report. 1892. Labor laws of the United States (sec­
ond edition, revised, 1896).
♦Bui. 1, November, 1895. Employer and employees under the common
law, by V. H. Olmsted and S. D. Fessenden, pp. 95-107.
♦Bui. 2, January, 1896. Extract relating to labor from the new con­
stitution of Utah, p. 219.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Abstract of laws relating to convict labor, passed
since 1885, pp. 471-478.
Twelfth Annual Report. 1897. Economic aspects of the liquor prob­
lem. Laws regulating the revenue derived from liquor production
and traffic, pp. 169-267.
♦Bui. 21, March, 1899. Pawnbroking in Europe and the United States,
by W. R. Patterson. Analysis of State laws and city ordinances
regulating pawnbroking, p. 256.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment,
by Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 1-76.
♦Bui. 312 November, 1900. Present status of employers’ liability in the
United States, by Stephen D. Fessenden, pp. 1157-1210.
Sixteenth Annual Report, 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Laws relating to strikes, boycotts, etc., pp. 989-1036.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 1-28.
♦Tenth Special Report. 1904. Labor laws of the United States, with
decisions of courts relating thereto.
♦Bui. 52, May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 558-637.
♦Bui. 54, September, 1904. Labor legislation in the United States, by
G. A. Weber, pp. 1421-1486.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT IN D fe OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

110

Labor legislation—Continued.
United States laws—Continued.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Building and loan associations in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1531-1570.
Twentieth Annual Report. 1905. Convict labor. Convict-labor laws
of the United States, pp. 613-787.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. The State cooperative accident insurance fund
of Maryland, pp. 645-648.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905.
Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 850-856.
Documentary history of the early organizations of printers, by
Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 857-1033.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to
1905). The law relating to strikes, blacklisting, boycotts, etc., pp.
917-960.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905
(H. Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 319-328.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. Laws relating to the employment of children
in the United States, pp. 197-265.
♦Bui. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor
on Hawaii, pp. 672-679.
♦Twenty-second Annual Report. 1907. Labor laws of the United
States, with decisions of courts relating thereto.
♦Bui. 68, January, 1907. Free public employment offices in the United
States, by J. E. Connor, pp. 106-115.
♦Bui. 73, November, 1907.
Laws relating to employment of women and children, pp. 655-816.
Laws relating to factory inspection and the health and safety of
employees, pp. 817-986.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States. The legal status of benefit and relief
organizations, pp. 749-793.
♦Bui. 74, January, 1908. Legal liability of employers for injuries to
their employees in the United States, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 1-120.
♦Bui. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for injuries of artisans and labor­
ers in the service of the United States, pp. 333-335.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable
Companies ( S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 513-536.
Bui. S5, November, 1909.
Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by Lindley D. Clark,
pp. 455-496.
Laws of various States relating to labor, enacted since January 1,
1908, pp. 497-816.
♦Twenty-fifth Annual Report. 1910. Industrial education. Chapter
XVI. Laws relating to industrial education, pp. 499-518.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. International Association for Labor Legisla­
tion and its publications, pp. 169-184.
♦Bui. 90, September, 1910. Essential features of a compensation law;
Chicago conference of November, 1910, pp. 715-717.




* Supply exhausted.

120

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LlBOR STATISTICS.

Labor legislation—Continued.
United States laws—Concluded.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910.
Labor laws declared unconstitutional, by Lindley D. Clark, pp.
916-964.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, pp.
1034-1051.
Laws of various States relating to labor, enacted since January 1,
1910, pp. 1052-1159.
Bui. 92, January, 1911.
Workmen’s compensation and insurance; laws and bills, 1911, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 97-181.
Resolution of sixth delegates’ meeting of the International Asso­
ciation for Labor Legislation, pp. 182-193.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Laws enacted during 1911 requiring the report of
occupational diseases, pp. 283-288.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911.
Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley D. Clark, pp.
869-918.
Laws of various States relating to labor, enacted since January
1, 1911, pp. 9)19-1470.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. VI. The beginnings of child-labor legislation in certain
States; a comparative study.
*Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912
(S. Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 495, 496.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Labor legislation of 1912.
1913. Mediation and arbitration laws of the United States.
Bui. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women
and young persons.
Bui. 126, December 23, 1913. Workmen’s compensation laws of the
United States and foreign countries.
1914. Federal and State laws relating to convict labor (S. Doc. No.
494, 63d Cong., 2d sess.).
Bui. 148, April 10, 1914. Labor laws of the United States, with de­
cisions of courts relating thereto.
Bui. 155, September 17, 1914. Compensation for accidents to em­
ployees of the United States, pp. 10-32.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Labor legislation of 1914.
Bui. 167, April, 1915. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States
and foreign countries.
Foreign laws—
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor, pp. 45-48. Employers’
liability act, 1880, Great Britain.
♦Fourth Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany, pp.
63-77, 105-152, 164-204, 304-358.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 770--835.
France, pp. 835-856.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

121

Labor legislation—Continued.
Foreign laws—Continued.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 77-136.
Switzerland, pp. 136-177.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 314-379.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 552-597.
Bul. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1015-1051.
Italy, pp. 1051-1057.
Norway, pp. 1057-1063.
Sweden, pp. 1064-1066.
Denmark, pp. 1066-1070.
Bul. 32, January, 1901. The British workmen’s compensation act and
its operation, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 103-132.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 174-234.
New South Wales, pp. 234-248.
South Australia, pp. 249-257.
Queensland, pp. 258-264.
Western Australia, pp. 264-269.
Canada (the Dominion), pp. 269-273.
Ontario, pp. 273-295.
Quebec, pp. 295-303.
Manitoba, pp. 303, 304.
British conspiracy and protection of property act, by A. Maurice
Low, pp. 305-322.
Bul. 34, May, 1901. Workmen’s compensation act of Holland, 1901,**
pp. 490-493.
Bul. 38, January, 1902. Quebec trade disputes act, 1901, pp. 127-133.
♦Bul. 40, May, 1902.
Workmen’s compensation acts of foreign countries, by Adna F.
Weber, pp. 549-551.
Working of compulsory conciliation and arbitration laws in New
Zealand and Victoria, 1901,** pp. 552-560.
Compulsory arbitration act of New South Wales, pp. 561-574.
Report by French bureau of labor on labor and social legislation
in Australia and New Zealand, 1901,** pp. 598, 599.
*Bul. 42, September, 1902. Law relating to railroad employees in
Cuba, 1902,** p. 1056.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Labor conditions id New Zealand, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
1176-1281.
Industrial conciliation and arbitration act of New Zealand, pp.
1282-1311.
Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 92-108.
Belgium, pp. 172-180.
France, pp. 257-272.
Germany, pp. 374-397.
Great Britain, pp. 522-538.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

122

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Labor legislation—Continued.
Foreign laws—Continued.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 168-175.
Bui, 58, May, 1905.
Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
851-853.
Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 918-923.
The new Russian workmen’s compensation act, by I. M. Rubinow,
pp. 955-959.
♦Bill. 59, July, 1905. Laws relating to child labor in European coun­
tries, 1897-1903,** pp. 302-319.
♦Bui. 60. September, 1905. Government industrial arbitration, by
Leonard W. Hatch, pp. 389-655.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Laws of foreign countries relating to employ­
ees on railroads, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 116-138.
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907.
A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain, by A.
Maurice Low, pp. 534-578.
British workmen’s compensation acts, by Launcelot Packer, pp.
o 19—
6o2.

Text of British workmen’s compensation acts, pp. 631-652.
♦Bill. 74, January, 1908.
Summary of foreign workmen’s compensation acts, pp. 121-143.
British workmen’s compensation act of 1906 (text), pp. 144-158.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by Vic­
tor S. Clark, pp. 159-167.
British trade disputes act of 1906, pp. 168, 169.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Ivober, M. D.
Regulation of dangerous trades in England, pp. 551-591.
*Bul. 76. May, 1908. Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of
1907, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 657-740.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. British old-age pensions act of 1908, pp.
549-552.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and
compensation systems in Europe. Appendix: Laws relating to com­
pensation for industrial accidents in foreign countries, pp. 2435-2726.
♦Bui. 80, January, 1909. Woman and child wage earners in Great
Britain, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 1-85.
*1910. Civil-service retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by
Herbert D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*1910. Civil-service retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Her­
bert D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by Victor
S. Clark, pp. 1-29.
International Association for Labor Legislation and its publica­
tions, pp. 169-184.
British trade boards act, 1909, pp. 185-191.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A.
Veditz, pp. 1-413.
* Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

123

Labor legislation—Concluded.
Foreign laws—Concluded.
♦Bui. 90, September, 1910. Summary of foreign workmen's compensa­
tion acts, pp. 719-748.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Old-age and invalidity pension laws of
Germany, France, and Australia, pp. 965-1033.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolution, of tlie sixth delegates’ meeting of
tlie International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 182-193.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Regulations for factories and workshops in cer­
tain industries using lead. Great Britain, Germany, France, Bel­
gium, and Netherlands, pp. 143-188.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911,
of Germany, translated by Henry J. Harris, pp. 501-774.
♦Bui. 98, January, 1912.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, pp. 64-81.
Conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, 1896-1910,*♦ pp.
123-141.
Bui. 102, July 15, 1912. British national insurance act, 1911.
Bui. 103, August, 1912. Sickness and accident insurance law of
Switzerland.
Bui. 107, September 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried
employees in Germany.
Bui. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women
and young persons.
Bui. 126, December 23, 1913. Workmen’s compensation laws of the
United States and foreign countries.
Bui. 133, August 18, 1913. Report of the industrial council of the
British Board of Trade on its inquiry into industrial agreements.
Bui. 142, February 27,1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Bui. 167, April, 1915. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States
and foreign countries.
( See also Decisions of courts.)
Labor organizations:
♦Bui. 2, January, 1896. Trade-unions in Great Britain and Ireland, 1893,♦♦
pp. 166-169.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Statistical report of trades guilds in Austria, 1895,**
pp. 526-529.
♦Bui. 9, March, 1897. Progress of organized labor, New York, 1894, 1895,**
pp. 151-155.
♦Bui. 10, May, 1897. Labor organizations in Colorado, 1895-96,** pp.
375, 376.
*Bul. 12, September, 1897.
Trade-unions in California, 1895, 1896,** pp. 603, 604.
Labor and employment in Montana, 1896,** pp. 607, 608.
Report on trade-unions in Great Britain and Ireland, 1894, 1895,**
pp. 615-622.
*Bul. 13, November, 1897.
Organized labor in North Carolina, 1896,** pp. 781, 782.
History and operation of trade-unions in the Netherlands, 1895,** pp.
797, 798.
♦ Supply exhausted.




*♦ Digest of State or foreign report.

124

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Labor organizations—Continued.
*Bul. 16, May, 1898. Ninth report on trade-unions in Great Britain and
Ireland, 1896,** pp. 435-438.
*Bul. 17, July, 1898. The nations of Antwerp, by J. Howard Gore, pp.
597-612.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898. Labor organizations in New York, 1894-1896,**
p. 701.
*Bul. 19, November, 1898. Mutual relief and benefit associations in the
printing trade, by William S. Waudby, pp. 829-851.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899.
Condition of railway labor in EuroxDe, by Walter E. Weyl.
Great Britain, pp. 30-37.
France, pp. 72, 73.
Switzerland, pp. 112-115.
Economic condition of organized labor, New York, 1897,** pp. 119,120.
*Bul. 21, March, 1899. Trade-unions in Michigan, 1897,** p. 312.
*Bul. 22, May, 1899.
Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Edward W. Bemis, pp.
361-400.
Ninth annual report on trade and agricultural associations in France,
1897,** pp. 432, 433.
*Bul. 24, September, 1899.
Organized labor in Connecticut, 1898,** p. 700.
Tenth report on trade-unions in Great Britain and Ireland, 1897,** pp.
722-725.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 771-784.
France, pp. 836-839.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900.
Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessen­
den, pp. 46-49.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Belgium, pp. 79-84.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany, pp. 318-328.
Organized labor in Virginia, 1898,** p. 382.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 555-569.
Bui. 29, July, 1900. Labor organizations in Kansas, 1898,** p. 880.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900.
Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi, pp. 12541256.
Economic condition of organized labor in New York, 1898,** pp.
1266-1268.
Report of French bureau of labor on trade and agricultural associa­
tions, and their influence on the condition of the working people,
1899,** pp. 1272-1274.
Eleventh annual report on trade-unions in Great Britain and Ireland,
1898,** pp. 1274-1278.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Labor organizations in Kansas, 1899,** pp. 134,
135.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

125

Labor organizations—Continued.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 175-177.
New South Wales, p. 236.
Queensland, p. 258.
Bul. 34, May, 1901. Organized labor in New York, 1S99,** pp. 494-496.
Bul. 35, July, 1901.
Labor organizations in California, 1900,** pp. 778, 779.
Organized labor in Colorado, 1900,** p. 780.
Organized labor in Indiana, 1899,** p. 783.
*Bul. 36, September, 1901.
Labor organizations in Connecticut, 1900,** pp. 965, 966.
Labor organizations in Minnesota, 1900,** pp. 967, 968.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Twelfth report on trade-unions in Great Brit­
ain and Ireland, 1899,** pp. 1184-1188.
Bul. 38, January, 1902.
Labor organizations in Kansas, 1900,** p. 135.
Labor organizations in Virginia, 1900,** p. 139.
*Bul. 40, May, 1902.
Wages and hours of union and nonunion workmen in New Jersey,
1899,** p. 580.
Labor organizations in New York, 1900,** pp. 582-585.
Labor organizations in Ohio, 1900,** p. 588.
Bul. 41, July, 1902.
Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 764-773.
Trade-unions in Iowa, 1900,** p. 823.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Membership of labor organizations in Virginia,
1900,** p. 1243.
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Trade, industrial, commercial, and agricultural
associations in France, 1900,** pp. 147-149.
Bul. 45, March, 1903.
Number and membership of labor organizations, West Virginia,
1901,** pp. 366, 367.
Trade-unions in Great Britain and Ireland, 1900 and 1901,** pp.
370-374.
Bul. 47, July, 1903.
Missouri, 1901,** pp. 914, 915.
New York, 1901,** pp. 916-918.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903.
Minnesota, 1902,** p. 1068.
France, 1901,** pp. 1083-1086.
♦Eleventh Special Report, 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904.
Labor unions and British industry, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 1-103.
Maryland, 1902,♦♦ p. 148.
Michigan, 1902,♦♦ pp. 150, 151.
♦Bul. 51, March, 1904.
The union movement among coal-mine workers, by Frank Julian
Warne, pp. 380-414.
Virginia, 1901,♦♦ p. 439.
Ontario, 1901,♦♦ p. 444.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

126

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Labor organizations—Continued.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Wisconsin, 1901,** pp. G53, 654.
♦Bui. 55, November, 1904.
Illinois, 1901,** pp. 1637, 1638.
Iowa, 1902,** p. 1641.
Kansas, 1901,** pp. 1643, 1644.
Missouri, 1902,** pp. 1645, 1646.
♦Twelfth Special Report, 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 77-84.
Belgium, pp. 159-166.
France, pp. 235-241.
Germany, pp. 358-370.
Great Britain, pp. 462-471.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905.
Influence of trade-unions on immigrants, by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1-8.
Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 175, 176.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905.
Street railway employment in the United States, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 618-625.
New York, 1902,** pp. 652-654.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. *
Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 842-850.
Connecticut, 1903,** p. 961.
Maine, 1903,** pp. 964, 965.
♦Bui. 59, July, 1905. Maryland, 1903,** p. 321.
*Bul. 60, September, 1905.
Michigan, 1903, ** pp. 666, 667.
Minnesota, 1904,** p. 669.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905.
Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 807-813.
A documentary history of the early organizations of printers, by
Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 857-1033.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906.
New York, 1903,** pp. 288-292.
Austria, 1900,** pp. 297-309.
*Bul. 63, March, 1906.
Kansas, 1903,** pp. 506, 507.
Maryland, 1904,** p. 509.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906.
Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter E. Weyl, pp.
699-848.
California, 1904,** p. 850.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905
(H. Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 130-135.
♦Bui. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 487-492.
♦Bui. 67, November, 1906.
Conditions of entrance to the principal trades, by Walter E. Weyl
and A. M. Sakolski, pp. 681-780.
New York, 1904,i ♦ pp. 838, S39.
*
Great Britain, 1904,♦♦ pp. 856-S60.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

127

Labor organizations—Continued.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907.
Connecticut, 1905,** pp. 139, 140.
Maine, 1905,** pp. 142, 143.
Bul. 69, March, 1907.
Kansas, 1905,** p. 421.
Maryland, 1905,** p. 425.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907.
A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain, by A. Maurice
Low, pp. 560-578.
New York, 1905,** pp. 656-658.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. Iowa, 1902,** p. 332.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Indiana, 1905,** pp. 587, 588.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907.
Connecticut, 1899-1906,** p. 989.
Washington, 1906,** p. 997.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report, 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States, pp. 23-267.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Missouri, 1904,** p. 596.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Minnesota, 1906,** pp. 355, 356.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Missouri, 1905, 1906,** pp. 554, 555.
*Bul. 81, March, 1909. Kansas, 1906-1908,** pp. 383-380.
Bul. 83, July, 1909.
Women’s trade-union movement in Great Britain, by Katherine
Graves Busbey, pp. 1-65.
Indiana, 1908,** p. 109.
Iowa, 1907,** p. 110.
Bul. 84, September, 1909.
Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, pp. 394-396.
Missouri, 1906, 1907,** pp. 398, 399.
Bul. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 491, 492.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Massachusetts, 1908,** pp. 209, 210.
Minnesota, 1908,** p. 212.
New York, 1907,** pp. 215-217.
*Bul. 87, March, 1910.
Wages and hours of labor of union carpenters in the United States
and in English-speaking foreign countries, by Ethelbert Stewart,
pp. 583-598.
Oklahoma, 1908, 1909,** pp. 636, 637.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 1050.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 107-156.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 912.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------9




** Digest of State or foreign report.

128

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Labor organizations—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 607-612.
*Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 325-331.
♦Vol. X. History of women in trade-unions.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912 (S.
Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 62-64.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pa., in 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
*Bul. 98, January, 1912. Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitra­
tion in Great Britain, by Arthur E. Holder, pp. 179-202.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 30, 31.
*Bul. 112, March 5,1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 28-31.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Statis­
tics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper district.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry, New York City and Boston.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 26-28.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 25, 26.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 42-46.
(See also Decisions of courts relating to labor.)
Labor reports, index of:
Third Special Report. 1893. Analysis and index of all reports issued
by bureaus of labor statistics in the United States prior to November 1,
1892. (New edition of 1902 available for distribution.)
Labor statistics, yalue and influence of, by Carroll D. Wright:
*Bul. 54, September, 1904, pp. 1087-1096.
Lace manufacture:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 746-750.
Land values and ownership in Philadelphia, by A. F. Davies:
♦Bui. 50, January, 1904. pp. 104-131.
Laundries:
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XII. Employment of women in laundries.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, p. 21.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATION'S OF THE BUREAU.

129

Lawrence strike:
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912 ( S. Doc.
No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
Laws, labor. (See Labor legislation.)
Lead and zinc mining, accidents in:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 439, 440.
Lead carbonate. ( See White lead.)
Lead carbonate and lead sulphate, solubility of, in human gastric juice:
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 22-32.
Lead chloride as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 24.
Lead chromate as an industrial poison:
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 19.
Lead cyanide as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 24.
Lead, harmless substitutes for, in paint industry:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 56-59.
Lead nitrate as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 24.
Lead oxychltride as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 24.
Lead poisoning:
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Bel­
gium, pp. 95-99.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 14-70.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Austria, lead and zinc works, 1904,** pp. 842-848.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 490-503, 551-568.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,** pp. 369, 370.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Annual report of the chief inspector of factories and
workshops, Great Britain, 1908,** p. 141.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 163.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911.
Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the International Asso­
ciation for Labor Legislation, pp. 189-192.
Report of the Illinois commission on occupational diseases, pp. 194197.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

130

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Lead poisoning—Concluded.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911.
Industrial lead poisoning with descriptions of lead processes in certain
industries in Great Britain and the western States of Europe, by
Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 1-188.
White-lead industry in the United States, with an appendix on the
lead-oxide industry, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., pp. 189-259.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning (actually reported) in New
York State in 1909 and 1910, by John B. Andrews, pp. 260-282.
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1649.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States ( S. Doc. jN o 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 259-277.
T.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 749.
Bui. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of tlie painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 18-66.
Bui. 127, August 12,1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 19.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.,
pp. 229-232, 254, 258.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years ending
August, 1913, pp. 47, 48.
Bill. 105, December 15, 1914. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage
batteries, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Lead sulphide ores and lead sulphide, solubility of, in human gastric juice:
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., pp. 82-84.
Leather and leather goods:
*First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
*Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
*Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
574-580.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Anthrax. Arsenic poisoning, New York State, p. 48.
Life insurance in connection with workmen’s dwellings:
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe. Spain, pp. 2373-2375.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

131

Life-saving Service, accidents in:
♦Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 455, 456.
Linen manufacture:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass, pp. 200-205.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 483.
Linoleum industry:
Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 79.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Lead poisoning, New York State, p. 47.
Linseed oil as an industrial poison when mixed with white lead:
Bul. 120, May 13,1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 9, 10.
Linseed oil, industrial poisoning in the manufacture of:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 81.
Liquor, family expenditure for:
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, etc. Part
III. Cost of living.
Pig-iron industry, pp. 767, 1187, 1277, 1317, 1361.
Bar-iron industry, pp. 889, 1213, 1284, 1324, 1361.
Steel industry, pp. 973, 1229, 1291, 1332, 1361.
Bituminous coal industry, pp. 1057, 1243, 1298, 1339, 1361.
Coke industry, pp. 1121, 1243, 1305, 1347, 1361.
Iron ore industry, pp. 1155, 1269, 1310, 1354, 1361.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass. Part III. Cost of living.
Cotton, pp. 1095, 1616, 1711.
Woolen, pp. 1339, 1645, 1721.
Glass, pp. 1515, 1701, 1731.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food,
pp. 453, 509, 511.
♦Bul. 54, September, 1904. Cost of living and retail prices in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1146, 1147.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XYI. Family budgets of typical cotton-mill workers.
Liquor, manufacture of:
First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Liquor problem:
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor, p. 21.
♦Fifth Special Report. 1893. Gothenburg system of liquor traffic.
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Report of the royal commission on the liquor traffic,
Canada, 1893,♦♦ pp. 289-291.
Twelfth Annual Report. 1897. Economic aspects of the liquor problem.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

132

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Liquor problem—Concluded.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Report of Massachusetts bureau of statistics of
labor on the relation of the liquor traffic to pauperism, crime, and in­
sanity, 1896,** pp. 58-67.
*Bul. 17, July, 1898. Economic aspects of the liquor problem (analysis of
Twelfth Annual Report), pp. 509-551.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, pp. 481-484.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 895.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 19.
Litharge as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 18, 19.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
the western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 17, 18.
(See also Lead poisoning.)
Lithographing:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 719-722.
Living conditions:
♦Fourth Annual Report, 1888. Working women in large cities, pp. 67, 68,
326-350, 482, 483.
♦Seventh Special Report, 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia, pp. 84-102, 574-613.
♦Eighth Special Report. 1895. The housing of the working people.
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. The Italians in Chicago, pp. 42-50.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. The Negroes of Farmville, Virginia: A social
study, by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, pp. 25-30.
♦Bui. 15, March, 1898. Boarding homes and clubs for working women, by
Mary S. Ferguson, pp. 141-196.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. The Negro in the Black Belt: Some social studies, by
W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, pp. 401^417.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. The Negroes of Sandy Spring, Maryland: A social
study, by William Taylor Thom, pp. 85-100.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. The Negroes of Litwalton, Virginia: A social
study of the “ Oyster Negro,” by William Taylor Thom, pp. 1150-1166.
♦1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 ( S. Doc.
No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 20, 21, 104-106, 246-253.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. The Negroes of Cinclare Central Factory and
Calumet Plantation, Louisiana, by J. Bradford Laws, pp. 113-120.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902 (S.
Doc. No. 181, 52d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 55, 87-89.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 732, 764-766.
♦Bui. 48, September, 1903. The Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study,
by Richard R. Wright, jr., pp. 1030-1033.
♦Bui. 54, September, 1904. Housing of the working people in the United
States by employers, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1191-1243.
* Supply exhausted.




*♦ Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

133

Living conditions—Concluded.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (Hf
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 110-123.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Conditions of living among the poor (Washington,
D. C.), by S. E. Forman, pp. 593-698.
♦Bui. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, 1905, pp. 467-480.
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907. The Italian on the land: A study in immigration,
by Emily Fogg Meade, pp. 473-533.
♦Bui. 72, September, 1907. Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled immi­
grant laborers in the United States, by Frank J. Sheridan, pp. 435-477.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Mexican labor in the United States, by Victor
S. Clark, pp. 501-504.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Charity relief and wage earnings, by S. E.
Forman, pp. 876-922.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 417-445.
♦1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii 1910 (S.
Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 42-50, 117-122.
♦Bui. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 706-714, 775-780.
♦1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1912 (S.
Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 145-186, 477-491.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pa., in 1910-11, pp. 202-216.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 517-548.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 254-295, 306-318.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 595-620.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 14, 310-321.
♦Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories, pp. 77-199.
♦Vol. VII. Conditions under which children leave school to go to
work, pp. 34-39.
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment, pp.
57-136.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill opera­
tives, pp. 154-161, 394, 395.
♦Vol. XV. Relation between occupation and criminality of women, pp.
90, 91.
Bui. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 8-13.
Bui. 158, October 15, 1914. Government aid to home owning and housing
of working people in foreign countries.
(See also Cost of living; Housing.)
Loan companies:
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Conditions of living among the poor (District of
Columbia), by S. E. Forman, pp. 622, 623.
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Maryland, 1905, ♦♦ p. 425.
Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

134

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Lumber industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894) .
♦1897. White pine lumber in the United States and Canada, by Carroll D.
Wright (S. Doc. No. 70, 55th Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report, 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
Bul. 47, July, 1903. Hours of labor and wages of mill and logging em­
ployees in Washington, 1901, 1902,** p. 919.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 429, 430.
♦Bul. 129, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1890-1912, pp. 5-85.
Bul. 153, May 21, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1907 to 1913, pp. 5-79.

M.
Machinery and hardware, United States:
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output, pp.
97-231.
Machines and machinery:
♦First Annual Report 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor. Effect of
machinery upon labor and cost of production.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 480.
Manganese as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D„
p. 517.
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 164.
Manganese dioxide as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 750.
Manufactures, statistics of:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass.
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Ninth report, Massachusetts, 1894,** pp. 283-288.
♦Bul. 13, November, 1897. Tenth report, Massachusetts, 1895,♦♦ pp. 784-789.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 15, March, 1898. Eleventh report, Massachusetts, 1896,** pp. 225-230.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

135

Manufactures, statistics of—Continued.
*Bul. 22, May, 1899.
Indiana, 1897, 1898,** pp. 421, 422
New Jersey, 1897,** pp. 425, 426.
*Bul. 23, July, 1899.
Massachusetts, 1895,** pp. 561-565.
Paper manufacture, Pennsylvania, 1897,** pp. 557, 558.
West Virginia, 1897,** pp. 559, 560.
Thirteenth annual report on industrial statistics of Finland, 1896,**
pp. 569,570.
*Bul. 24, September, 1899.
Conditions of manufacture in Connecticut, 1897, 1898,** pp. 699-701.
North Carolina, 1897,** pp. 701, 702.
Wisconsin, 1896, 1897,** pp. 705-707.
Twelfth report, Massachusetts, 1897,** pp. 708-712.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899.
Maryland, 1898,** p. 857.
New Jersey, 1897,** pp. 860-862.
Rhode Island, 1895,** p. 866.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900.
Thirteenth report, Massachusetts, 1898,** pp. 384-390.
Report of Danish statistical bureau on manufacturing industries and
handicrafts, 1897,** pp. 391-395.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900.
North Carolina, 1898,** pp. 598, 599.
Pennsylvania, 1898,** pp. 599-602.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900. Maine, 1899,** pp. 1262, 1263.
Bui. 33, March, 1901.
Connecticut, 1899,** pp. 323, 324.
Pennsylvania, 1899,** pp. 327-330.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. New York, 1896-1899,** pp. 496-498.
*Bul. 36, September, 1901.
Statistics of Honolulu, Hawaii, pp. 959-962.
Connecticut, 1900,** pp. 963, 964.
Bui. 39, March, 1902. Wisconsin, 1897, 1898,** pp. 487, 488.
*Bul. 40, May, 1902.
New Jersey, 1899,** pp. 576-579.
Ohio, 1900,** pp. 587-589.
Pennsylvania, 1900,** pp. 589-592.
Textiles, Rhode Island, 1898, 1899,** p. 593.
Bui. 41, July, 1902.
Connecticut, 1901,** pp. 816, 817.
Illinois, 1899,** pp. 818-821.
Iowa, 1900,** p. 822.
Maine, 1901,** pp. 825-827.
Missouri, 1900,** p. 827.
Montana, 1900,** p. 829.
*Bul. 42, September, 1902. New Jersey, 1899,** pp. 1071-1074.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902.
Fourteenth report, Massachusetts, 1899,** pp. 1244-1252.
North Carolina, 1901,** pp. 1237, 1238.
Ohio, 1900,** p. 1239.
Virginia, 1900,** p. 1242.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

136

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manufactures, statistics of—Continued.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903.
Michigan, 1901,** pp. 138, 139.
Finland, 1900,** pp. 146, 147.
Factory establishments in Hungary, 1899,** pp. 149-152.
Manufactures in Ontario, 1900,** pp. 153, 154.
Factory establishments in Sweden, 1899,** pp. 154-156.
Bui. 45, March, 1903.
New Hampshire, 1901,** pp. 359, 360.
Pennsylvania, 1901,** pp. 360-364.
Rhode Island, 1899,** pp. 364, 365.
West Virginia, 1901,** pp. 365, 366.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Missouri, 1901,** p. 915.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903. Sixteenth report, Massachusetts, 1900-1901,**
pp. 1070-1074.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Connecticut, 1902,** pp. 1341, 1342.
Maine, 1902,** pp. 1344-1347.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. Ohio, 1901,** pp. 155, 156.
*Bul. 51, March, 1904.
Textile manufactures, Rhode Island, 1900, 1901,** pp. 436, 437.
Virginia, 1901,** pp. 437, 438.
Ontario, 1901,** pp. 444, 445.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Wisconsin, 1899-1901,** pp. 651, 652.
Bui. 53, July, 1904. New Jersey, 1900,** pp. 937, 938.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904.
Illlinois, 1900, 1901,** pp. 1636, 1637.
Missouri, 1902,** p. 1645.
New Jersey, 1900, 1901,** pp. 1646-1648.
Pennsylvania, 1896-1902,** pp. 1650-1652.
*Bul. 57, March, .1905.
Ohio, 1902,** pp. 656, 657.
Seventeenth report, Massachusetts, 1901, 1902,** pp. 659-663.
Bui. 58, May, 1905.
Connecticut, 1903,** pp. 960, 961
Maine, 1903,** pp. 963, 964.
Virginia, 1902,** pp. 965, 966.
Austria, 1901,** pp. 973-975.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905.
New Hampshire, 1903,** pp. 323, 324,
North Carolina, 1903,** pp. 325, 326.
Rhode Island, 1902,** pp. 327, 328.
*Bul. 60, September, 1905.
Michigan, 1903,** pp. 665, 666.
New Jersey, 1902,** pp. 672-674
Finland, 1901,** pp. 679, 680.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905.
Pennsylvania, 1903,** pp. 1036-1039.
West Virginia, 1903,** pp. 1041.
Eighteenth report, Massachusetts, 1903,** pp. 1043-1046.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906.
North Carolina, 1904,** pp. 292, 293.
Ohio, 1904,** pp. 294, 295.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

Manufactures, statistics of—Continued.
*Bul. 63, March, 1906.
Connecticut, 1904,** pp. 503, 504.
New Jersey, 1904,** pp. 513, 514.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. Wisconsin, 1903,** pp. 855, 856.
*Bul. 65, July, 1906.
Pennsylvania, 1904,** pp. 317-321.
Rhode Island, 1903,** pp. 321, 322.
Belgium, 1896,** pp. 323, 324.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Massachusetts, 1903, 1904,** pp. 823-828.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907.
North Carolina, 1905,** pp. 145, 146.
Rhode Island, 1905,** pp. 147-150.
Finland, 1901,** pp. 153-161.
Bul. 69, March, 1907.
Maryland, 1905,** p. 423.
West Virginia, 1905,** pp. 426, 427.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907.
Ohio, 1904,** pp. 658, 659.
Pennsylvania, 1905,** pp. 660-664.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907.
Michigan, 1904,** pp. 334-336.
New Hampshire, 1905,** pp. 338, 339.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907.
Indiana, 1905,** p. 5S7.
New Jersey, 1905,** pp. 589-592.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907.
Connecticut, 1906,** pp. 987, 988.
New Jersey, 1905,** pp. 990, 991.
Washington, 1906,** p. 998.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908.
Michigan, 1906,** pp. 178-180.
Ohio, 1906,** pp. 181, 1S2.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908.
Illinois, 1904,** pp. 592, 593.
Missouri, 1904,** pp. 595, 596.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908.
Massachusetts, 1904, 1905,** pp. 938-943.
North Carolina, 1906,** pp. 944-946.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908.
Missouri, 1905,** p. 357.
Wisconsin, 1905,** pp. 362, 363.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908.
Missouri, 1907,** pp. 553, 554.
Bulgaria, 1904,** pp. 559-564.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908.
New Jersey, 1906,** pp. 930, 931.
Ohio, 1907,** p. 934.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909. New Hampshire, 1907,** pp. 91, 92.
*Bul. 81, March, 1909.
Massachusetts, 1905, 1907,** pp. 380-395.
Pennsylvania, 1907,** pp. 396-400.
Belgium, 1907,** pp. 401-403.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

137

138

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manufactures, statistics of—Concluded.
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909.
New Jersey, 1906,** pp. 643-645,
Rhode Island, 1905, 1906,** p. 648.
Bui. 84, September, 1909. Missouri, 1907,** pp. 397, 398.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Massachusetts, 1908,** pp. 210, 211.
North Carolina, 1908,** pp. 218-220.
Virginia, 1906, 1907,** pp. 221, 222.
Washington, 1908,** p. 224.
West Virginia, 1907,** pp. 224, 225.
♦Bui. 87, March, 1910.
Ohio, 1908,** p. 634.
Oklahoma, 1908, 1909,** pp. 636, 637,
Bui. 88, May, 1910.
Pennsylvania, 1908,** pp. 843-845.
Virginia, 1907, 1908,** i>p. 846, 847.
Wisconsin, 1906, 1907,** p. 850.
Marble and stone work:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 688-691.
Marriage and divorce:
*First Special Report. 1889. Marriage and divorce in the United States,
1867 to 1886, including an appendix relating to marriage and divorce
in certain countries in Europe.
Match industry, phosphorus poisoning in:
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 94, 95.
Switzerland, pp. 156, 157.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 337-339.
♦Bui. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria, pp.
576, 577.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Netherlands, pp. 1045, 1046.
Denmark, p. 1068.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.
Phosphorus, pp. 519, 520, 574-576.
♦Bui. 80. January, 1909. Italy, 1903, 1904,♦♦ pp. 114-116.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Annual report of the chief inspector of factories and
workshops. Great Britain, 1908,♦♦ p. 141.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United States, by
John B. Andrews, pp. 31-140.
Regulation of the match industry in Switzerland, pp. 141-144.
British white phosphorus matches prohibition act, 1908, p. 145.
T
International convention respecting the prohibition of the use of white
(yellow) phosphorus in the manufacture of matches, p. 146.
List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 147.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

139

Match industry, phosphorus poisoning in—Concluded.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. Act providing for a tax on white phosphorus matches
and for prohibiting their import or export.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, pp. 123,
250, 258, 273, 274.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Phosphorus poisoning, New York State, p. 4S.
(See also Phosphorus poisoning.)
Matches, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Maternity insurance:
♦Fourth Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany, pp. 59,
60, 67, 265.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
♦Bul. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911, of
Germany, pp. 541, 542.
Bul. 102, July 15, 1912. British national insurance act, 1911, pp. 14, 23,
84, 85.
Bul. 103, August 1, 1912. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzer­
land, p. 9.
Mattresses, pillows, and spring beds, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Mediation and arbitration. (See Conciliation and arbitration.)
Medical service. (See Hospital and medical service.)
Men’s furnishing goods:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
^Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Mercury as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 518, 519.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1650.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Annual report of the chief inspector of factories and
workshops, Great Britain, 1908,♦♦ p. 141.
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 164.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 750.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Great Britain, pp. 65, 68.
Germany, p. 123.
France, p. 183.
Austria, pp. 232, 245.
Switzerland, p. 274.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

140

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Mercury as an industrial poison—Concluded.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years ending
August, 1913, p. 48.
Metal trades:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 424, 425.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 644-648.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 17, 18.
*Bul. 131, August 15,1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1907 to
1912.
Bui. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15,
1913.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Metallic dust, diseases of workers exposed to:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
477-481.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 644-681.
Metals and metallic goods:
*First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor. (Iron pipe,
forgings, and chains.)
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries—
Hardware and metal specialties, pp. 180-194.
Jewelry, pp. 213-219.
Needles and pins, pp. 219-231.
Nuts, bolts, and screws, pp. 231-241.
Stamped and enameled ware, pp. 295-306.
Methyl alcohol.

(See Wood alcohol.)

Methyl bromide as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 751.
Mexican labor in the United States, by Victor S. Clark:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908, pp. 466-522.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

141

Michigan copper district strike:
Bul. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Statis­
tics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper district.
Millwork:
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 430, 431.
*Bul. 129, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1890 to 1912, pp. 86-122.
Bul. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15,
1913.
Bul. 153, May 21,1914. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork,
and furniture industries, 1907 to 1913, pp. 80-104.
Bul. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Mine labor:
*Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
*Bul. 13, November, 1897. The anthracite mine laborers, by G. O. Virtue,
pp. 728-774.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Statistics of mines and mine inspection in Tennessee,
1898,** pp. 602, 603.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the Anthracite Coal Strike Commission, pp.
437-683.
Bul. 47, July, 1903. Colorado, 1901,** pp. 912, 913.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
*1905. Report on labor disturbances in the State of Colorado, from 1880
to 1904, inclusive (S. Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.).
*Twenty-first Annual Report 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Austria, lead and zinc mines, 1903,** pp. 842848.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. France, 1904,** pp. 340-342.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Health of Cornish miners, Great Britain, 1902,
1903,** pp. 603-605.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
523-526.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,** pp. 369, 370.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 436-442.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Italy, 1905, 1906,** pp. 937-941.
*Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Great Britain, pp. 1650, 1651.
Bul. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 46&-471.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. Minnesota, 1907, 1908,** p. 213.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 1042, 1043.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 889-891.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

142

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOB STATISTICS.

Mine labor—Concluded.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pa., in 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong.. 2d sess.).
♦Bui. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 17, 18.
*Bul. 112, March 5,1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 17.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Statis­
tics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper district.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 16.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 23.
Mineral dust, diseases of workers in:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 477-481.
*Bul. 79, November, 190S. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 681-726.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 18.
Miners9 asthma:
*Bul. 75, March, 190S.
525.

Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., p.

Miners’ phthisis:
♦Bui. 72, September, 1907. Health of Cornish miners, 1902.** p. 604.
Minimum wage:
♦Bui. 7, November, 1896. Report of commission of Brussels, Belgium, ap­
pointed to investigate the subject of minimum-wage scale and municipal
employees, May, 1896, ♦♦ pp. 761-764.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. New
Zealand, pp. 205, 207-234.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Report of the chief inspector of factories, work­
rooms, and shops, Victoria, 1900,** pp. 152-159.
♦Bui. 40, May, 1902.
Working of compulsory conciliation and arbitration laws in New
Zealand and Victoria, 1901,** pp. 552-560.
Compulsory arbitration act of New South Wales, pp. 561-574.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903.
Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 1198-1214.
Industrial conciliation and arbitration act of New Zealand, pp. 12821311.
♦Eleventh Special Report, 1904. Regulation and restriction of output, pp.
56, 57.
♦Bui. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 60-78.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909.
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 1-85.
Minimum wage act, 1908, New South Wales, pp. 86, 87.
Victoria,** p. 110.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

143

Minimum wage—Concluded.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909—Concluded.
Reports of select committee on home work, 190T, Great Britain,
1908,** pp. 104-110.
Report of Mr. Ernest Ayes on wage boards and industrial conciliation
and arbitration acts of Australia and New Zealand,** pp. 110, 111.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. British trade boards act, 1909, pp. 186-188.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Protocol rates, pp. 124, 154, and folders.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone. Protocol rates, pp. 12-15, 301-304.
Bui. 167, April, 1915. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and
foreign countries.
Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue:
Bui. 84, September, 1909, pp. 338-396.
Monetary systems:
*Bul. 2, January, 1896. Notes concerning the money of the United States
and other countries, by W. C. Hunt, pp. 181-196.
Monographs on social economics, 1901. United States Department of Labor
exhibit, Pan American Exposition:
*1. The working of the Department of Labor, by Carroll D. Wright.
*11. The value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D. Wright.
*111. Employer and employee under the common law, by Victor H. Olm­
sted and Stephen D. Fessenden.
*IV. Present status of employers’ liability in the United States* by Stephen
D. Fessenden.
*V. Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessenden.
♦VI. Public baths in Europe, by Edward Mussey Hartwell.
Mortality statistics:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 859-875.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
471-638.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XIII. Infant mortality and its relation to the employment of
mothers.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-roili opera­
tives.
( See also Death rates in various industries.)
Municipal dust, diseases of workers exposed to:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
495-497.
Municipal employees:
*1910. Pension funds for municipal employees and railroad pension systems
in the United States (S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
Bui. 88, May, 1910. Germany, 1902-1907,** pp. 858-867.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------10




* * Digest of State or foreign report.

144

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Municipal or cooperative restaurant of Grenoble, France, by C. O. W ard:
*Bul. 12, September, 1897, pp. 594-601.
Municipal ownership and enterprises:
Bul. 11, July, 1897. Public baths in Europe, by E. M. Hartwell, pp.
434-486.
*1901. Monographs on social economics, United States Department of
Labor exhibit, Pan American Exposition, 1901. Public baths in Europe,
by E. M. Hartwell.
♦Bul. 12, September, 1897. The municipal or cooperative restaurant of
Grenoble, France, by C. O. Ward, pp. 594-601.
Fourteenth Annual Report. 1899. Water, gas, and electric light plants
under private and municipal ownership.
♦Bul. 20, January, 1899. Electric light and power, gas, and water plants,
New York, 1897,♦♦ pp. 120-122.
♦Bul. 21, March, 1899.
Pawnbroking in Europe and United States, by W. R. Patterson, pp.
173-310.
Electric lighting, gas, and water plants in Michigan, 1897,♦♦ pp. 313,
314.
♦Bul. 54, September, 1904. Public baths in the United States, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1245-1367.
♦Bul. 62, January, 1906. Municipal ownership in Great Britain, by Fred­
erick O. Howe, pp. 1-123.
♦Bul. 68, January, 1907. Free public employment offices in the United
States, by J. E. Connor, pp. 1-115.
(See also Statistics of cities.)
Musical instruments, manufacture of:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Mutual aid societies:
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 246-250.
♦Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 346-350.
♦Bul. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: Familist£re Society of
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 596-604.
♦Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Yieille-Montagne Zinc
Mining & Smelting Co., Belgium, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 708-711.
♦Bul. 9, March, 1897. The Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. II.
Gore, pp. 130-148.
♦Bul. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, pp. 552-596.
♦Bul. 19, November, 1898. Mutual relief and benefit associations in the
printing trade, by W. S. Waudby, pp. 829-851.
♦Bul. 37, November, 1901. Railroad employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1073-1076.
Bul. 41, July, 1902.
The True Reformers, by William Taylor Thom, pp. 807-814.
Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 760-764.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

145

Mutual aid societies—Concluded.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
(See also Benefit and retirement systems.)
Mutual rights and duties of parents and children, guardianship, etc., under
the law, by F. J. Stimson :
♦Bui. 12, September, 1897, pp. 569-593.

N.
Nails, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 479.
Naphs yellow (antimonate of lead) as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 20.
Naphtha as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 514-516.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., pp. 11, 12.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 20.
Nations of Antwerp, by J. Howard Gore :
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898, pp. 597-612.
Navigation, accidents in:
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 449-453.
Needle polishers:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908.
p. 479.

Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,

Needles and pins, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 219-231.
Negroes, studies and statistics of:
♦Bui. 10, May, 1897. Condition of the Negro in various cities, pp. 257-374.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898. The Negroes of Farmville, Virginia: A social
study, by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, pp. 1-58.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. The Negro in the black belt: Some social sketches,
by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, pp. 401-417.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. The Negroes of Sandy Spring, Maryland: A social
study, by William Taylor Thom, pp. 43-102.




* Supply exhausted.

146

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Negroes, studies and statistics of—Concluded.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 471-473.
Bui. 35, July, 1901. The Negro landowner of Georgia, by W. E. Burghardt
Du Bois, pp. 647-777.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. The Negroes of Litwalton, Virginia: A social
study of the “ Oyster Negro,” by William Taylor Thom, pp. 1115-1170.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Negroes of Cinclaire Central Factory and Calu­
met Plantation, Louisiana, by J. Bradford Laws, pp. 95-120.
Bui. 41, July, 1902. The True Reformers, by William Taylor Thom, pp.
807-814.
♦Bui. 48, September, 1903. Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study, by
Richard R. Wright, jr., pp. 1006-1044.
♦Bui. 63, March, 1906. Maryland, 1904,** p. 509.
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Maryland, 1904 and 1905,** p. 425.
Netting and seines, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Night work:
♦Bui. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 810, 811.
France, p. 845.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1021-1024.
♦Bui. 52, May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 503-506, 567, 568.
♦Bui. 59, July, 1905. Laws relating to child labor in European countries,
1897-1903,** pp. 302-319.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 70, 71.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Italy, 1906,** pp. 651, 657.
*1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.), pp. 24-38, 132-135.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 383, 384, 533-535.
*Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention, pp. 13, 15, 75-86, 153.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolution o f the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 184, 185.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911. Hours of labor of men, women, and children em­
ployed in factories in Austria, 1906,** pp. 580-583.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 284-293.
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 104-111, 386-389.
*Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 143, 144.
*Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories, pp. 201-216.
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment, pp.
113-136.
*Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions, pp. 157-217.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

147

Night work—Concluded.
Bul. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 38, 63-65.
Bul. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
(Memorandum of International Labor Office for international conference
called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September, 1913.)
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. - Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price. (Bee
also Labor legislation.)
Nitrous gases as industrial poisons:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 751.
Nitric acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 510.
Nitrobenzine as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 165.
Nitrobenzol as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 514, 515.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 751.
Nitroglycerin as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 752.
Nitronaphthalene as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 752.
Nitrous gases as industrial poisons:
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, p. 165.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 753.
Nuts, bolts, and screws, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 33-35.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 231-241.

o.

Occupational diseases:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring.
♦Bul. 67, November, 1906. Austria, lead and zinc works, 1904,** pp.
842-848.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Health of Cornish miners, 1902,** pp. 603-605.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
476-523, 551-568.
* Supply exhausted.




* Digest of State or foreign report.

148

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Occupational diseases—Continued.
♦Bui. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,** pp. 369, 370.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 633-875.
♦Bui. 80, January, 3909.
Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain, 1908,** pp. 103,
104.
Match industry, Italy, 1905,** pp. 115, 116.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
471-638.
♦Bui. 83, July, 1909. Report of chief inspector of factories and workshops,
Great Britain, 1908,** pp. 137-141.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe, Great Britain, pp. 1649-1651.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United States, by
John B. Andrews, pp. 31-146.
List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, pp. 147-168.
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911. Report of Illinois commission on occupational
diseases, pp. 194-202.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911.
Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and western Europe, by
Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 1-188.
The white-lead industry in the United States, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 189-259.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning in New York State in 1909 and
1910, by John B. Andrews, pp. 260-282.
Laws enacted during 1911 requiring the report of occupational dis­
eases, pp. 283-288.
♦Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 911, 912.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 237-277.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill opera­
tives.
Bui. 100, May, 1912.
List of industrial poisons and other substances injurious to health
found in industrial processes, x> 733-759.
p.
Act providing for a tax on white phosphorus matches and for pro­
hibiting their import or export, pp. 760-762.
Bui. 101, July 1, 1912. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany, by
Frederick L. Hoffman.
Bui. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
♦Bui. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, p. 30.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D.
♦ Supply exhausted.




♦♦ Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

149

Occupational diseases—Concluded.
Bul. 12T, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D.
Bul. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price.
Bul. 165, December 15,1914. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage
batteries, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases for which compensation is provided under
British Workmen’s Compensation Act of 1906, p. 122.
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 25.
(See also Industrial poisoning and specific entries undereach of the follow­
ing diseases: Ankylostomiasis; anthracosis; anthrax; black lung; brass
founders’ ague; caisson disease, or “ bends ” ; catarrhs; chimney sweep­
ers’ cancer; cotton-mill anemia; eczema; flock fever; glassworkers’
cataract; grinders’ asthma and grinders’ rot; hookworm disease; miners’
asthma; miners’ phthisis; shoddy fever; telegraphers’ cramp; trachoma;
tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases.)
Oil, cottonseed and linseed, manufacture of:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Oilcloth and linoleum industry, injurious conditions in:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 70-84.
Old age and invalidity:
♦Fourth Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany. Chap­
ter IV. The law of compulsory insurance against old age and invalidity,
pp. 153-204, 270-275.
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 242-246.
♦Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 343-345.
♦Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 492-498.
♦Bul. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: FamilistSre Society of
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 597-599.
♦Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communtiies: Various communities, by
W. F. Willoughby, pp. 700, 708, 717, 718.
♦Bul. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson,
pp. 49, 50.
♦Bul. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, p. 570.
♦Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
France, p. 62.
Belgium, p. 86.
Saxony, p. 107.
Switzerland, p. 115.
♦Bul. 22, May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Ed­
ward W. Bemis, pp. 361-400.




* Supply exhausted.

150

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Old age and invalidity—Continued.
*BuI. 23, July, 1899. Report of the imperial insurance bureau of Germany
on invalidity pensions, 1896,** pp. 570-573.
*Bul. 24, September, 1899. Report of the French labor bureau on em­
ployers’ superannuation funds in manufacturing establishments, 1896,
1897,** pp. 719-722.
Bui. 29, July, 1900. Provision for old age by Government action in cer­
tain European countries, 1899,** p. 888.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Belgium, 1900,** p. 335.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 66-73.
Belgium, pp. 148-157.
France, pp. 217-220.
Germany, pp. 352-358.
Great Britain, pp. 455-461.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark.
Old-age pensions, pp. 162-164.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905.
Street railway employment in the United States, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 604-608.
Austria, 1901,** pp. 668-673.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 759-769, 826-848.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. British old-age pensions act of 1908, pp. 549-552.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 395-413.
Belgium, pp. 494-535.
Denmark, pp. 623-649.
France, pp. 831-945.
Germany, pp. 1354-1444.
Great Britain, pp. 1671-1695.
Italy, pp. 1862-1904.
Russia, pp. 2254-2313.
Spain, pp. 2359-2372.
Sweden, pp. 2420-2427.
♦1910. ^ivil-service retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Her­
bert D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1910. Civil-service retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert D.
Brown (S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1910. Pension funds for municipal employees and railroad pension sys­
tems in the United States (S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Bui. 91, November, 1910. Old age and invalidity pension laws of Germany,
France, and Australia, pp. 965-1033.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and
•employees, pp. 455-461.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

151

Old age and invalidity— Concluded.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911,
of Germany, translated by Henry J. Harris, pp. 683-718.
Bui. 107, September 3, 1912. Laws relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany, pp. 14, 15, 19.
Opinions of the Attorney General on questions affecting labor:
♦Bui. 68, January, 1907, pp. 173-180.
♦Bui. 74, January, 1908, pp. 198-205.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908, pp. 950-952.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910, pp. 295-309.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911, pp. 775-778.
♦Bui. 112, March 5, 1913. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor,
1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 32-51.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 29-34.
Optical goods, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Organic dust, diseases of workers exposed to:
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
498-627.
Organic fumes as industrial poisons:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
Organizations, labor. (See Labor organizations.)
Output, restriction of:
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
♦Bui. 62, January, 1906. Conciliation in the stove industry, by John P.
Frey and John R. Commons, pp. 177-180.
Overstrain.

(See Fatigue as related to accident occurrence; Physical strain.)

Overtime:
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, Saxony, pp. 101-103.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1044-1047.
♦Bui. 71, July, 1907. Austria, 1903, 1904,♦♦ pp. 340.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 51, 72, 152, 178, 358,
502.
♦1910. Investigation of telephone companies ( S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong., 2d
sess.), pp. 128-135, 160-169, 172-179.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem, Penn­
sylvania (S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 11-16.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States ( S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 20, 21, 193-202.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

152

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

Overtime—Concluded.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 275-284.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 109-117.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 111-122, 389-398.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 142, 143.
*Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories, pp. 201-216.
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
Bul. 116, April 8,‘ 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 13-15, 22-25, 31, 33.
Bul. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and
young persons. (Memorandum of International Labor Office for inter­
national conference called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September,
1913.) Regulations as to overtime, pp. 14-43.
Bul. 119, May 5, 1913. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of
Wisconsin, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bul. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone, pp. 177-180, 304.
Bul. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.
Oxalic acid as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 754.
Bul. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., p. 14.
Oxide of lead as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 18.
Oxychloride of lead, yellow, as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 20.
Oyster-canning industry:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage-eamers in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 45-51.
Oyster Negro. (See Negroes, studies and statistics of.)

P.
Padrone system:
*Ninth Special Report. 1897. The Italians in Chicago, pp. 49, 50.
*Bul. 9, March, 1897. The padrone system and padrone banks, by John
Koren, pp. 113-129.
*Bul. 13, November, 1897. The Italians in Chicago, pp. 726, 727.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled immi­
grant laborers in the United States, by Frank J. Sheridan, pp. 435-456.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

153

Paint manufacture:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Painters’ trade:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 22-26.
♦Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of
the International Association for Labor Legislation, p. 189.
♦Bul. 95, July, 1911.
Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and western Europe, by
Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 20-34, 146-148, 177-180.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning (actually reported) in New
York State in 1909 and 1910, by John B. Andrews, pp. 260-282.
Bul. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Lead, arsenic, and wood alcohol poisoning, New York State,
pp. 47, 48.
Panama Canal:
♦Bul. 60, September, 1905. The eight-hour law and enforced labor con­
tracts in the Panama Canal Zone, pp. 656-662.
Bul. 155, September 17, 1914. Compensation for accidents to employees
of the United States.
Paper bags, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Paper boxes, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours o f labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades, pp. 53, 54.
♦Yol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 241-258.
Paper hangers, diseases of:
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 714-716.
Paper industry:
♦First Annual Report 1886. Industrial depressions.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Bul. 23, July, 1899.
Production of paper and pulp in the United States, January 1 to
June 30, 1898, pp. 546-550.
Paper manufacture in Pennsylvania, 1897,** p. 557.
Sixteenth Annual Report 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of
food.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

154

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Paper industry—Concluded.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 768-771.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States ( S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
Parents, mutual rights and duties of children and, under the law, by F. J.
Stimson:
*Bul. 12, September, 1897, pp. 569-593.
Paris green as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 493.
Pawnbroking and pawnshops:
*Bul. 1, November, 1895. Minnesota, 1893,** pp. 71, 72.
*Bul. 21, March, 1899. Pawnbroking in Europe and the United States, by
W. R. Patterson, pp. 173-310.
Bui. 41, July, 1902. Labor conditions in -Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp.
759, 760.
Pension and relief funds:
*Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 242-246.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 343-345.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities. Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 488-499.
*Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Various communities, by
W. F. Willoughby, pp. 700-719.
*Bul. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. John­
son, pp. 30-57.
*Bul. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, pp. 552-596.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
France, pp. 62-66.
Belgium, pp. 85-87.
Saxony, pp. 105-110.
Switzerland, pp. 115-117.
*Bul. 23, July, 1899. Germany, 1891 to 1896,** pp. 570-573.
*Bul. 24, September, 1899. France, 1895 and 1896,** pp. 719-722.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1072-1098.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 63-77.
Belgium, pp. 145-158.
France, pp. 216-235.
Germany, pp. 335-358.
Great Britain, pp. 455-461.
♦Bui. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 162-164.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

155

Pension and relief funds—Concluded.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905.
Street railway employment in the United States, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 604-608.
Austria; 1901,** pp. 668-675.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States, pp. 274, 382, 744, 771.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. British old-age pensions act of 1908, pp. 549552.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
♦1910. Civil-service retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Herbert
D. Brown, 1910 (S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1910. Civil-service retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert
D. Brown (S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1910. Pension funds for municipal employees and railroad pension systems
in the United States (S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Bui, 91, November, 1910.
Old age and invalidity pension laws of Germany, France, and Aus­
tralia, pp. 965-1033.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 1049.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 455-461.
Bui. 107, September 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany, pp. 16, 17.
(See also Labor legislation.)
Peonage:
♦Second Special Report. 1896. Labor laws of the United States, p. 1197.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 27—
31.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902 (S.
Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 12-20.'
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, pp.
689-697.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 775, 776.
♦Bui. 60, September, 1905. The eight-hour law and enforced labor contracts
in the Panama Canal Zone, pp. 661, 662.
1912. Report on the miners’ strike in the bituminous coal field In West­
moreland County, Pa., in 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.),
p. 93.
Bui. 148, Part II, April 10,1914. Labor laws of the United States, pp. 1345,
2355, 2408, 2423.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 26.
Petroleum as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 513.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

156

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Petroleum as an industrial poison—Concluded.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 754.
Bul. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 11, 12.
Petroleum refining:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Phenol as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 754.
Phenylhydrazine as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 754.
Phosgene as an industrial poison:
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 755.
Phosphate industry of the United States:
♦Sixth Special Report. 1893.
Phosphorus poisoning:
♦Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 94, 95.
Switzerland, pp. 156, 157.
♦Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 337-339.
♦Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 576, 577.
Bul. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Netherlands, pp. 1045, 1046.
Denmark, p. 1068.
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. I).,
pp. 519, 520, 574-576.
♦Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906,♦♦ pp. 369, 370.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen's insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe. Great Britain, p. 1650.
♦Bul. 80, January, 1909. Report on the match industry, Italy, 1903, 1904,♦♦
pp. 115, 116.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Report of the chief inspector of factories and work­
shops, Great Britain, 1908,♦♦ p. 141.
♦Bal. 86, January, 1910.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United States, by
John B. Andrews, pp. 31-146.
List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 166.
♦Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates' meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, p. 182.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 485, 486.
Bul. 100, May, 1 91 2List of industrial poisons, p. 755.
Act providing for a tax on white phosphorus matches and for pro­
hibiting their import or export, pp. 760-762.
* Supply exhausted.




♦* Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

157

Phosphorus poisoning—Concluded.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years
ending August, 1913, p. 48.
Phosphorus sesquisulphide as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 756.
Phosphureted hydrogen as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 756.
Photographs and photographic materials:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Physical deterioration:
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Report of the interdepartmental committee on
physical deterioration, Great Britain, 1904,** pp. 438, 439.
Physical strain:
*1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.), pp. 45-48, 59-76.
*1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States.
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 333-376.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 47-59, 111-122, 437-447.
*Vol. XII. Employment of women in laundries, pp. 26-63.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, pp. 18-29.
(See also Fatigue as related to accident occurrence; Speed and severity of
work.)
Picric acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 166.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 756.
Pigments of lead as industrial poisons:
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 18-22.
Planing mills:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Plasterers, diseases of:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 711-714.
Plumbers’ supplies, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Plumbing:
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D„ p. 78.
Plumbism. (See Lead poisoning.)
Poisons. (See Industrial poisoning.)
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

158

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Polishers, diseases of:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 479.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 649-652.
Porcelain enameled sanitary ware, manufacture of:
Bui. 104, August 7,1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porce­
lain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Potash as an industrial poison:
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 14.
Pottery industry:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 663-708,
♦Bui. 44, January, 1906. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 59-61.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 559-563.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 701-708.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 34-58.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Yol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 258-276.
Bui. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory in­
spection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D., p. 230.
Poverty and relief measures:
♦Bui. 2, January, 1896. The poor colonies of Holland, by J. Howard Gore,
pp. 113-126.
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896. Poor relief. Connecticut, 1895,♦♦ pp. 265, 266.
♦Bui. 48, September, 1903. Farm colonies of the Salvation Army, by Com­
mander Booth Tucker, pp. 983-1005.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Charity relief and wage earnings (District of
Columbia), by S. E. Forman, pp. 876-922.
Preferential union shop:
♦Bui. 98, January, 1912. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry in New York City, by Charles H. Wins­
low, pp. 215-217.
Bui. 144, March 19, 1914. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow, p. 57.
* Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

159

Preferential union shop—Concluded.
Bul. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 9, 36-45.
Bul. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City* by N. I. Stone, p. 302.
Prices:
*Bul. 3, March, 1896. Prices of wheat, rye, barley, and oats, for the years
1201 to 1800,** pp. 301-304.
Bul. 29, July, 1900. Trusts and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W.
Jenks. Market prices before and after combination, pp. 708-765, 813831.
Bul. 32, January, 1901. Prices of commodities and rates of wages in
Manila, pp. 29-42.
Bul. 41, July, 1902. Beef prices, by Fred C. Croxton, pp. 794-806.
Bul. 45, March, 1903. Graded prices in Massachusetts, 1816-1891,** pp.
357, 358.
*Bul. 87, March, 1910. Prices of wheat, bread, etc., in Milan, Italy, 18011908,** pp. 599-607.
Bul. 170, May, 1915. Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
(See also Cost of living; Wholesale prices; Retail prices.)
Print works, dye works, and bleacheries:
*First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Printing trades:
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 19, November, 1898. Mutual relief and benefit associations in the
printing trade, by W. S. Waudby, pp. 829-851.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 344-346.
Fifteenth Annual Report. 1900. Wages in commercial countries.
Sixteenth Annual Report 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Seventeenth Annual Report. 1902. Trade and technical education.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 33-95, 737-747.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905. Documentary history of the early organizations
of printers, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 857-1033.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States, pp. 152, 182, 684, 714.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 493-508.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------11




** Digest of State or foreign report.

160

BULLETIN OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Printing trades—Concluded.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 667-676.
Twenty-fifth Annual Report. 1910. Industrial education.
♦Bul. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 191, 192.
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and
the western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 64-76.
♦Bul. 131, August 15, 1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor,
1907 to 1912.
Bul. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May
15, 1913.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. Lead poisoning, New York State, p. 47.
Bul. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Prison labor.

(See Convict labor.)

Private and municipal ownership of public utilities:
Fourteenth Annual Report. 1899. Water, gas, and electric-light plants
under private and municipal ownership.
Private and public debt in the United States, by George K. Holmes :
♦Bul. 1, November, 1895. Pp. 48-59.
Production, cost of.

(See Cost of production.)

Profit sharing:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions: Profit sharing, pp.
279-286.
♦Eighth Special Report. 1895. The housing of the working people, p. 339.
♦Bul. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: Familist£re Society of
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 582-589.
♦Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Netherlands Yeast and
Alcohol Factory, Agneta Park, Delft, Holland, by W. F. Willoughby,
p. 716.
♦Bul. 31, November, 1900.
The betterment of industrial conditions, by Victor H. Olmsted, pp.
1138-1140, 1147, 1150, 1151.
Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi. System of
gain sharing in the stations, pp. 1232-1254.
Bul. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 445, 446.
Bul 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal strike,
by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1158, 1159, 1205.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 461-469.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 343-345.
Bul. 123, May 15, 1913. Employers’ welfare work, by Elizabeth Lewis
Otey, pp. 32, 39, 60, 69.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATION'S OF THE BUBEAU.

161

Prohibited occupations:
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by O. W. A. Veditz.
Austria, pp. 15-19.
Belgium, pp. 104-107.
France, pp. 154, 155, 163-166, 173, 216, 217.
Germany, pp. 242, 243, 252-263, 271-274.
Italy, pp. 324, 325.
Switzerland, pp. 343, 344, 364, 367.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
(See also Dangerous and injurious occupations.)
Protection of workers in their employment:
♦Bui. 12, September, 1897. The inspection of factories and workshops in
the United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 549-568.
♦Bui. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 795-798.
France, pp. 849, 850.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900.
Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessenden,
pp. 1-76.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Belgium, pp. 85-104.
Switzerland, pp. 140-168.
♦Bui. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 335-349.
♦Bui. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 575-577.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1020, 1021.
Netherlands, pp. 1041, 1046.
Italy, pp. 1052, 1053.
Sweden, pp. 1065, 1066.
Denmark, pp. 1067-1069.
♦1901. Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessen­
den. No. V of monographs on social economics. United States Depart­
ment of Labor exhibit.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the
United States, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 1-28.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 178-183.
New South Wales, pp. 237-239.
South Australia, p. 249.
Queensland, pp. 259, 260.
Ontario, pp. 277-279.
Quebec, pp. 290-301.
♦Bui. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by O. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 1-131.
♦Bui. 52, May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 561-565.




* Supply exhausted.

162

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Protection of workers in their employment—Continued.
♦Bui. 73, November, 1907. Laws relating to factory inspection and the
health and safety of employees, pp. 817-986.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
472-591.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 833-843.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark. Safety of employees, pp. 463-474.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United States, by
John B. Andrews, pp. 31-146.
List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, pp. 153, 154.
♦Bui. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Yeditz,
pp. 1^13.
♦Bui. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark. Safety appliances on railroads, p. 1043.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 139-141.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Attitude of Massachusetts manufacturers toward
the health of their employees, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 488-500.
♦Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark. Safety devices, pp. 888, 889.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 367-396.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 321-328.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 270, 271.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 20S-212.
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 16-26.
♦Vol. XII. Employment of women in laundries, pp. 10-14, 19-24.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.
Bui. 100, May, 1912.
List of industrial poisons, pp. 758, 759.
Act providing for a tax on white phosphorus matches and for pro­
hibiting their import or export, pp. 760-762.
Bui. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Bui. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and
young persons.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., pp. 60-66.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dust and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.




♦ Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

163

Protection of workers in their employment—Concluded.
Bul. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory
inspection in cretain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Bul. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by Lind­
ley D. Clark. Safety devices, p. 16.
Bul. 167, April, 1915. Minimum wage legislation in the United States and
foreign countries, by Charles H. Yerrill.
Protocol agreements:
*Bul. 98, January, 1912. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry in New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 210-270.
Bul. 144, March 19, 1914. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bul. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow.
Bul. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stan­
dardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Bul. 147, June 13,1914. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak,
suit, and skirt industry, New York City and Boston, pp. 7-108.
(Bee also Agreements between employers and employees.)
Prussic acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 167.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 747.
Public baths:
Bul. 11, July, 1897. Public baths in Europe, by E. M. Hartwell, M. D.,
pp. 434-486.
*1901. Public baths in Europe, by E. M. Hartwell, M. D. No. VI of mono­
graphs on social economics. United States Department of Labor exhibit,
Pan American Exposition, 1901.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Public baths in the United States, by G. W. W.
Hanger, pp. 1245-1367.
Public utilities and public service:
*Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Fourteenth Annual Report, 1899. Water, gas, and electric-light plants
under private and municipal ownership.
Sixteenth Annual Report 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment in the United States,
by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 550-048.
Bul. 58, May, 1905. Labor conditions in Java, Victor S. Clark, pp.
923-926.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, p. 1038.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 876-878.




* Supply exhausted.

164

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Public utilities and public service—Concluded.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 10, 11.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 8.
{See also Municipal ownership and enterprises; Statistics of cities.)
Purchasing power of money:
*Bul. 8, January, 1897. Report of the bureau of labor of Minnesota on
modern variations in the purchasing power of gold, 1895-1896,** pp.
67-69.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898. Comparative wages and prices in Massachu­
setts, 1860-1897,** pp. 694-697.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Charts exhibited at the Pan American Exposi­
tion, pp. 123, 124, and chart.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food,
pp. 658, 659.
Bui. 53, July, 1904. Wages and cost of living, pp. 722, 723.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1904, pp. 174, 175.
*Bul. 65, July, 1906. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1905, pp. 197, 198.
*Bul. 71, July, 1907. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1906, pp. 192, 193.
*Bul. 78, September, 1908. Cost of living of the working classes in the
principal industrial towns of the German Empire, pp. 538, 539.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Cost of living of the working classes in the principal
industrial towns of France, pp. 78, 79.
*Bul. 87, March, 1910. Cost of living of the working classes in the prin­
cipal industrial towns of Belgium, pp. 618, 619.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911. Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living
In the principal industrial cities of the United States, pp. 533-536.
Putty making:
*Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 78, 79.
Pyridine as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld,
p. 167.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 756.

Q.
Quarrying. (See Mine labor; Stone quarrying and cutting.)
Quinine as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
P, 517.

R.
Rag industry:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
489, 577-581.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 817-821.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OP THE BUREAU.

165

Railroad-car building:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894.).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Bui. 137, December 1, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the building
and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 163, October 28, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the building
and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
Railroad labor:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson,
pp. 39-57.
*BuL 17, July, 1898.
Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway employees, by Emory R.
Johnson, pp. 563-591.
Maryland, 1892, 1897,♦♦ pp. 616, 617.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 1-117.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. Indiana, 1898,1♦ p. 424.
*
♦Bui. 27, March, 1900.
Virginia, 1899,♦♦ p. 383.
Report of commission for investigating relations between railway
companies and their employees in Italy, 1896,♦♦ pp. 401-403.
Bui. 29, July, 1900. Hours of labor and of rest of railway employees in
Prussia,♦♦ p. 877.
♦Bui. 31, November, 1900. Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr.
Luigi Einaudi, pp. 1210-1219.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1023-1114.
♦Bui. 51, March, 1904. Virginia, 1901,♦♦ pp. 438, 439.
♦Bui. 55, November, 1904.
Iowa, 1901,1♦ p. 1642.
*
Kansas, 1901,♦♦ p. 1643.
New Jersey, 1902,♦♦ p. 1648.
Austria, 1898-1900,♦♦ pp. 1653-1662.
Bui. 58, May, 1905.
Maine, 1903,♦♦ p. 965.
Virginia, 1902,♦♦ p. 966.
♦Bui. 59, July, 1905.
North Carolina, 1903,♦♦ p. 326.
Austria, 1898,♦♦ pp. 329, 330.
♦Bui. 62, January, 1906. North Carolina, 1904,♦♦ pp. 293, 294.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Maine, 1904,♦♦ p. 852.
♦Bui. 68, January, 1907.
Laws of foreign countries relating to employees on railroads, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 116-138.
Maine, 1905,♦♦ p. 143.
North Carolina, 1905,♦♦ pp. 146, 147.
♦Bui. 71, July, 1907. Iowa, 1905,♦♦ pp. 332, 333.
* Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

166

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Railroad labor—Concluded.
♦Bul. 72, September, 1907. California, 1905, 1906,*- p. 588.
♦Bul. 73, November, 1907.
Virginia, 1905,** p. 995.
Washington, 1906,** p. 997.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in 'the United States, pp. 271-383.
♦Bul. 74, January, 1908.
Iowa, 1905,** p. 171.
Maine, 1906,** p. 174.
♦Bul. 76, May, 1908. North Carolina, 1906,** p. 946.
♦Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 444-449.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
♦Bul. 80, January, 1909. North Carolina, 1907,** p. 95.
Bul. 83, July, 1909.
Colorado, 1907,** p. 106.
Iowa, 1907,** pp. 110, 111.
Bul. 84, September, 1909. Accidents to railroad employees in New Jersey,
1888 to 1907, by Frederick S. Crum, pp. 183-337.
Bul. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 471-473.
*1910. Pension funds for municipal employees and railroad pension sys­
tems in the United States (S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910.
North Carolina, 1908,** p. 220.
Virginia, 1907,** p. 222.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 891-894.
*Bul. 98, January, 1912.
Mediation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in the LTnited
States, by Charles P. Neill, pp. 1-63.
Conciliation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in Great Britain,
pp. 82-122.
*Bul. I l l, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 18, 19.
*Bul. 112, March 5,1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 17, 18.
*Bul. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 18.
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 16.
Bul. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 22, 23.
Rates of wages.

(See Wages.)

Red oxide of lead as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 19, 20.
Bul. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., p. 19.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

Refrigerators, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report.
Regularity of employment*

167

1898. Hand and machine labor.

(See Employment, regularity of.)

Regulation and restriction of output:
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904.
Relation between occupation and criminality of women:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XV. Relation between occupation and criminality of women.
Relief and pension funds.
Respiratory diseases.
Rest periods.

(See Pension and relief funds.)

(See Tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases.)

(See Holidays and rest periods.)

Restriction of output.

(See Output, restriction of.)

Retail prices:
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Rhode Island, 1894,♦* p. 279.
♦Bul. 8, January, 1897. Retail prices of principal foods in Belgium, 1896, ♦
♦
pp. 78, 79.
♦Bul. 18, September, 1898. Comparative wages and prices in Massachu­
setts, 1872-1897,♦♦ pp. 694-697.
♦1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 (S.
Doc. No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 97-99, 232-237.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food,
Part II, pp. 635-853.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor, on Hawaii, 1902 (S.
Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 222-228.
Bul. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, 1902, pp. 890-902.
♦Bul. 54, September, 1904. Cost of living and retail prices in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1129-1164.
♦Bul. 59, July, 1905. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1904, pp. 148-301.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H.
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 309-317.
♦Bul. 65, July, 1906. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1905, pp. 171-316.
♦Bul. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 663-671.
♦Bul. 71, July, 1907. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1906, pp. 175-328.
♦Bul. 77, July, 1908. Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1907, pp. 181-332.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Cost of living of the working classes in the principal
industrial towns of France, 1905, *♦ pp. 71-80.
Bul. 84, September, 1909. Sweden, 1904-1907,♦♦ pp. 410, 411.
♦1910. Increase in cost of food and other products (12 tables). ( S. Doc. No.
349, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
♦Bul. 87, March, 1910. Cost of living of the working classes in the princi­
pal industrial towns of Belgium, 1908,♦♦ pp. 612-619.
♦1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910 (S.
Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 103, 104, 135-141.
♦Bul. 93, March, 1911. Reports of British Board of Trade on cost of living
in England and Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and the United
States, 1908-1911,** pp. 566-569,
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

168

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Retail prices—Concluded.
*Bul. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 793-799.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1912 (S.
Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 165-182.
*Bul. 105, August 23, 1912.
♦Retail prices 1890 to 1911. Part I.
♦Retail prices, 1890 to 1911. Part I I : General tables.
Bui. 106, August 28, 1912.
♦Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1912. Part I.
Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1912. Part I I : General tables.
Bui. 108, October 1, 1912. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1912.
Bui. 110, December 4, 1912. Retail prices 1890 to October, 1912.
♦1913. Increase in prices of anthracite coal following the wage agreement
of May 20, 1912 (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 67-82.
Bui. 113, March 18, 1913. Retail prices, 1890, to December, 1912.
Bui. 115, April 8, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to February, 1913.
Bui. 121, May 14, 1913. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer, by N. O.
Adams.
Bui. 125, June 28, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to April, 1913.
♦Bui. 130, August 15, 1913. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to con­
sumer, by J. Chester Bowen.
Bui. 132, August 15, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1913.
Bui. 136, September 15, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1913.
Bui. 138, December 1, 1913. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1913.
Bui. 140, February 10, 1914. Retail prices, 1890 to December, 1913.
Bui. 156, March, 1915. Retail prices, 1907 to December, 1914.
Bui. 164, November 30, 1914. Butter prices, from producer to consumer,
by Newton H. Clark.
Bui. 170, May, 1915. Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
Rope and bagging, manufacture of:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Ropemakers, diseases of: (See Cordage and twine.)
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 761.
Rubber industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 515, 516.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 277, 285.




♦ Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

169

Rubber industry—Concluded.
Bul. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Lead and mercury poisoning, New York State, pp. 47, 48.
Rug industry. (See Carpet industry.)

S.
Saddle and harness making:
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
584r-587.
Safeguards and safety devices.
ment.)

(See Protection of workmen in their employ­

Salts of lead as industrial poisons:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 24, 25.
Sandpaper, diseases of workers in manufacture of:
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 481.
Sanitary ware, porcelain enameled, manufacture of:
Bul. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Sanitation and hygiene, industrial:
♦Seventh Special Report. 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia, pp. 93-101, 601.
♦Eighth Special Report. 1895. The housing of the working people.
♦Bul. 10, May, 1897. Condition of the Negro in various cities. Sanitary
conditions of houses, pp. 366-369.
♦Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 792-795.
France, pp. 849, 850.
♦Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws: Belgium, by W. F. Willoughby.
Protection of health of employees, pp. 85-104.
♦Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 335-349.
♦Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 575-577.
Bul. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Netherlands, 1041-1046.
Russia, pp. 1020-1021.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 178-181, 195.
New South Wales, pp. 237, 238.
South Australia, p. 249.
Queensland, p. 259.
Ontario, pp. 277, 278.
Quebec, pp. 296-298.




Supply exhausted.

170

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Sanitation and hygiene, industrial—Continued.
♦Bui. 40, May, 1902. Repoi’t of French bureau of labor regarding indus­
trial hygiene, 1901,** p. 597.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, pp. 1-131.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 793-799.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H.
Doc. No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 119-123.
*Bul. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 476-480.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908.
Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp. 472-591.
Health of printers, New York, 1905,** pp. 601, 602.
Ventilation and sanitation of mines, Western Australia, 1905,** p. 621.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz,
pp. 1-413.
*Bul. 96, * September, 1911. Attitude of Massachusetts employers toward
the health of their employees, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp.
488-500.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 469-472.
*Bul. 98, January, 1912. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 253-270.
Bui. 104, August 7,1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porce­
lain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 355-396.
*Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 254-346.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 63-92, 335-357, 433-447.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 173-186.
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades, pp. 19-29.
♦Vol. XII. Employment of women in laundries.
♦Vol. XVII. Hookworm disease among cotton-mill operatives.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions, pp. 381-503, 590-651.
Bui. 120, May 13,1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in Mil­
waukee, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. 'Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., pp. 14r-17.
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory in­
spection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 109-124.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OP THE PUBLICATIONS OP THE BUBEAU.

171

Sanitation and hygiene, industrial—Concluded.
Bul. 165, December 15, 1914. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of
storage batteries, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
(See also Factory legislation; Dangerous occupations; Occupational dis­
eases.)
Savings institutions:
♦Ninth Annual Report. 1893. Building and loan associations.
♦Eighth Special Report. 1895. The housing of the working people.
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, p. 254.
♦Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 352-355.
♦Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Vieille-Montagne Zinc
Mining & Smelting Co., Belgium, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 711, 712.
♦Bul. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. John­
son, pp. 50, 51.
♦Bul. 10, May, 1897. Building and loan associations, pp. 370-374.
♦Bul. 16, May, 1898. Annual report of the superintendent of banks relative
to cooperative savings and loan associations of New York, 1896, ♦ pp.
♦
429, 430.
Bul. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 468-470.
Bul. 41, July, 1902.
Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 758, 759.
The True Reformers, by William Taylor Thom, pp. 808, 809.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States, pp. 739-746, 762-770.
♦Bul. 55, November, 1904. Building and loan associations in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1491-1572.
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment in the United States, by
Walter E. Weyl, pp. 608, 609.
Saws and files, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No> 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 48, 49.
Scale of wages. (See Union scale of wages; Sliding scale of wages.)
Schools, industrial. (See Industrial education.)
Seven-day week and twelve-hour day:
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 157-192, 541-547.
Severity of work. (See Speed and severity of work.)
Shipbuilding:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 801-838.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

172

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Shipbuilding—Concluded.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Shirts, overalls, and underwear, manufacture of:
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 285-295.
Shoddy, diseases of workers in manufacture of:
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 813-819.
Short-unit courses for wage earners, by W. A. O’Leary and Charles A. Prosser:
Bui. 159, April 1, 1915. pp. 5-79.
Sickness insurance:
♦Fourth Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany. The
law of compulsory insurance against sickness, pp. 51-77, 263-265.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, p. 347.
♦Bui. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 488-494.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Industrial communities: Familistdre Society ol!
Guise, France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 599-604.
♦Bui. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Various communities,
by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 700, 708, 717, 718.
♦Bui. 8, January, 1897. Railway relief departments, by Emory R. John­
son, pp. 45-48.
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, 1% Emory R. Johnson, pp. 573-579.
♦Bui. 19, November, 1898. Mutual relief and benefit associations in the
printing trade, by William S. Waudby, pp. 833-851.
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Edward
W. Bemis, pp. 361-400.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1076-1098.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905. Austria, 1901,♦♦ p. 669.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 744-746, 83&-848.
♦Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Austria, pp. 225-395.
Belgium, pp. 476-494.
Denmark, pp. 610-623.
France, pp. 797-831.
Germany, pp. 1176-1354.
Great Britain, pp. 1499-1671.
Italy, pp. 1828-1862.
Norway, pp. 2060-2073.
Russia, pp. 2206-2254.
♦ Supply exhausted.




♦ Digest of State or foreign report.
♦

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

173

Sickness insurance—Concluded.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911, of
Germany, translated by Henry J. Harris, pp. 537-589.
Bui. 102, July 15, 1912. British national insurance act, 1911, pp. 11-66,
80-85.
Bui. 103, August 1,1912. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzer­
land, 1911, pp. 7-13.
Bui. 107, September, 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany, translated by Henry J. Harris, pp. 16, 17.
Bui. 141, February 17, 1914. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining
of lead, by Alice Hamilton, M. D., pp. 73, 74.
Silk industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass, pp. 207-214.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1901. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 794-800.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry.
Bui. 128, August 14.1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1890 to 1912, pp. 171-206.
Bui. 150, May 11, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1907 to 1913, pp. 142-177.
Silverware, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Slaughtering and meat-packing industry:
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
pp. 709-716.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Sliding scale of wages:
♦Bui. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal strike,
by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1158, 1159, 1205.
♦Bui. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission, pp.
497, 498, 508.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output, pp.
237, 238.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry (S. Doc.
No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 132, 153, 154, 462.
Slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia:
♦Seventh Special Report. 1894.




♦ Supply exhausted.

174

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Snuff, manufacture of:
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations, exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 571—
574.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 307-322.
Soap, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Social economics:
♦Bui. 9, March, 1897. Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. Howard
Gore, pp. 130-148.
♦Bui. 23, July, 1899. The attitude of women’s clubs and associations
toward social economics, by Ellen M. Henrotin, pp. 501-545.
Bui. 32, January, 1901. The Negroes of Sandy Spring, Maryland: A social
study, by William Taylor Thom, pp. 43-102.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P.
Gilman, pp. 440-489.
♦Bui. 37, November, 1901. The Negroes of Litwalton, Virginia: A social
study of the “ Oyster Negro,” by William Taylor Thom, pp. 1115-1170.
♦1901. Monographs on social economics. United States Department of
Labor exhibit, Pan American Exposition, 1901.
Social insurance. (See Accident insurance; Maternity insurance; Old age and
invalidity; Pension and relief funds; Sickness insurance; Unemployment
insurance; Widows and orphans’ pensions; Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation.)
Sodium dichromate as an industrial poison:
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 493.
Soft-drink establishment employees:
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1,1914.
Speed and severity of work:
♦Eleventh Special Reprt. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relation of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 333-376.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 478-483.
Spinners, diseases of:
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 737-740.
Sporting goods, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.




Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

175

Stamped and enameled ware, manufacture of:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 295-306.
Standardization of wages:
Bul. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Starch, diseases of workers in manufacture of:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
537-541.
Statistics of cities:
*Bul. 24, September, 1899. Statistics of cities, pp. 625-698.
Bul. 30, September, 1900. Statistics of cities, pp. 916-1014.
*Bul. 36, September, 1901.
Statistics of cities, pp. 813-958.
Statistics of Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, pp. 959-962.
*Bul. 42, September, 1902. Statistics of cities, pp. 881-1055.
Stone quarrying and cutting:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
*Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 479, 480.
♦Bul. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 443, 444.
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 682-688.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, p. 471.
*Bul. 131, August 15, 1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor,
1907 to 1912.
Bul. 143, March 4,1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15,
1913.
Bul. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1. 1914.
Storage batteries:
Bul. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Bul. 165, December 15,1914. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage
batteries, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Stores, employees of:
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Changes in conducting retail trade in Boston
between 1874 and 1898,** pp. 1235, 1236.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—B u ll. 174—15------12




** Digest of State or foreign report.

176

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Stores, employees of—Concluded.
♦Bul. 91, November, 1910. Working hours of wage-earning women in
selected industries in Chicago, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 891-898,
913-915.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. Y. Wage-earning women in stores and factories.
Bul. 116. April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bul. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.
Stoves, manufacture of:
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
Strain, physical. (See Fatigue as related to accident occurrence; Physical
strain; Speed and severity of work.)
Street cleaning and refuse disposal:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
475-481.
Street railways and their employees:
*Bul 10, May, 1897. Street railway franchises in Missouri, 1895,** pp.
377, 378.
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment in the United States, by
Walter E. Weyl, pp. 550-648.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Electric railroads. Indiana, 1907,** p. 109.
Bul. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark. Street railway employees, pp. 473-474.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark. Protection of employees, pp. 1043-1044.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 894, 895.
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 19.
Bul. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, p. 16.
Strikes and lockouts:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Bul. 1, November, 1895.
Strikes and lockouts in the United States from January 1, 1881, to
June 30, 1894 (Summary of Third and Tenth Annual Reports),
pp. 9-25.
Great Britain and Ireland, 1888-1893,** pp. 26-35.
France, 1894,** pp. 36-41.
Italy, 1878-1893,** pp. 42-44.
Austria, 1891, 1892,** pp. 45-47.
*Bul. 2, January, 1896. Switzerland, 1860-1894,** pp. 177-180.
*Bul. 3, March, 1896. Austria, 1893,** pp. 294-299.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

177

Strikes and lockouts—Continued.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. France, 1895,** pp. 530-540.
*Bul. 6, September, 1896. Italy, 1894,** pp. 657-659.
*Bul. 7, November, 1896. Pennsylvania, 1895,** pp. 756, 757.
*Bul. 9, March, 1897. Great Britain and Ireland, 1895,** pp. 160-165.
*Bul. 10, May, 1897.
Austria, 1895,** pp. 381-384.
Switzerland, 1895,** pp. 384, 385.
*Bul. 12, September, 1897.
New Hampshire, 1895, 1896,** pp. 609, 610.
Italy, 1895,** pp. 627-629.
*Bul. 13, November, 1897. France, 1896,** pp. 792-797.
*Bul. 16, May, 1898. Italy, 1896,** pp. 438-441.
*Bul. 17, July, 1898. Austria, 1896,** pp. 618-621.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898. Great Britain and Ireland, 1896,** pp. 713-717.
*Bul. 19, November, 1898. France, 1897,** pp. 860-865.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
Great Britain, pp. 37-42.
Switzerland, pp. 112-115.
*Bul. 22, May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Edward
W. Bemis, pp. 361-400.
*Bul. 23, July, 1899. Eleventh annual report of the board of mediation and
arbitration, New York. Strikes in 1897,** p. 568.
*Bul. 24, September, 1899.
Twelfth annual report of the board of mediation and arbitration, New
York. Strikes and lockouts, 1898,** p. 713.
Strikes and lockouts in Austria, 1897,** pp. 714-717.
Tenth report on trade-unions in Great Britain and Ireland, 1897,** pp.
722-725.
Strikes and lockouts in Italy, 1898,** pp. 726-728.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Great Britain and Ireland, 1897,** pp. 867-871.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900.
Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D. Fessenden,
pp. 36-45, 54-73.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Belgium, p. 135.
First biennial report of the Indiana labor commission, 1897, 1898,**
pp. 181, 182.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Strikes in France, 1898,** pp. 395-401.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, p. 3033.
Italy, pp. 1056, 1057.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900.
Condition of railway labor in Italy., by Dr. Luigi Einaudi, pp. 12561260.
Thirteenth annual report of the board of mediation and arbitration,
New York, 1899,** p. 1271.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Bui. 32, January, 1901.
Austria, 1898,** pp. 142-146.
Italy, 1898,** pp. 147-149.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

178

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Strikes and lockouts—Continued.
Bul. 34, May, 1901.
Austria, 1899,** pp. 500-505.
France, 1899,** pp. 505-512.
Germany, 1899,** pp. 512-516.
Great Britain, 1899,** pp. 516-522.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Denmark, 1897, 1898,** pp. 1179-1184.
*1902. First report of tlie Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 ( S. Doc.
No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 112-115, 254-259.
Bul. 38, January, 1902.
Quebec trade disputes act, 1901, pp. 127-133.
Strikes and lockouts in Great Britain, 1900,** pp. 146-152.
*Bul. 42, September, 1902.
France, 1900,** pp. 1077-1082.
Germany, 1900,** pp. 1082-1086.
Italy, 1899,** pp. 1088-1093.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on the anthracite coal
strike, by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1147-1232.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 3902
(S. Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 113-115.
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Austria, 1900,** pp. 141-146.
Bul. 45, March, 1903. Italy, 1900,** pp. 374-379.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission, pp.
437-683.
Bul. 47, July, 1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 790-792.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903.
France, 1901,** pp. 1086-1092.
Great Britain, 1901,** pp. 1092-1097.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903. Massachusetts, 1900, 1901, pp. 1349, 1350.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. Labor unions and British industry, by A. Maurice
Low.
Taff-Vale case, pp. 77-92.
Maryland, 1902,** p. 148.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904.
Austria, 1901,** pp. 655-660.
Belgium, 1896-1900,** pp. 660-664.
France, 1902,** pp. 664-669.
Germany, 1902,** pp. 669-671.
Great Britain, 1902,** pp. 672-677.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Strikes and lockouts in the United States, 1881
to 1900, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1097-1117.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Report of commission on industrial disputes in
British Columbia, 1903,** pp. 1662-1664.
♦Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 85-92.
Belgium, pp. 166-172.
France, pp. 241-257.
Germany, pp. 370-373.
Great Britain, pp. 471-522.
♦1905. Report on labor disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880 to
1904, inclusive (S. Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.).
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

179

Strikes and lockouts—Continued.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905.
Massachusetts, 1902,** p. 258.
Austria, 1902,** pp. 261-266.
France, 1903,** pp. 266-271.
Germany, 1903,** pp. 272-277.
Great Britain, 1903** pp. 278-283.
Italy, 1903,** pp. 284-290.
Netherlands, 1901-1903,** pp. 290-296.
Bui. 58, May, 1905. Connecticut, 1903,** p. 962.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. Maryland, 1903,** p. 321.
Bui. 61, November, 1905. A documentary history of the early organizations
of printers, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 860-933.
*Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H. Doc.
No. 5S0, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 136-144.
*Bul. 62, January, 1906. Conciliation in the stove industry, by John P.
Frey and John R. Commons, pp. 125-155.
*Bul. 63, March, 1906.
Connecticut, 1904,** pp. 504, 505.
Kansas, 1905,** p. 507.
Maryland, 1904,** pp. 508, 509.
Austria, 1903,** pp. 517-523.
France, 1904,** pp. 523-529.
Germany, 1904,** pp. 530-535.
Great Britain, 1904,** pp. 535-541.
Netherlands, 1904,** pp. 542-546.
*Bul. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 493-501.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Massachusetts, 1905,** pp. 829, 830.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907.
Laws of foreign countries relating to employees on railroads, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 136-138.
Connecticut, 1905,** p. 140.
Bui. 69, March, 1907.
Kansas, 1905,** p. 421.
Maryland, 1905,** pp. 424, 425.
♦Bui. 70, May, 1907.
Short history of labor legislation in Great Britain, by A. Maurice Low.
Taff-Vale case, pp. 566-572.
Austria, 1904,** pp. 665-673.
France, 1905,** pp. 674-679.
Germany, 1905,** pp. 679-685.
Great Britain, 1905,** pp. 685-696.
Italy, 1902, 1903,** pp. 696-704.
Netherlands, 1905,** pp. 705-708.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907. Connecticut, 1906,** p. 989.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 159-167.
British trade disputes act of 1906, pp. 168, 169.
Maryland, 1906,** p. 176.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

180

BU LLETIX OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Strikes and lockouts—Continued.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by Victor S,
Clark, pp. 657-740.
Austria, 1906,** pp. 949-952.
Belgium, 1901-1905,** pp. 953-958.
France, 1906,** pp. 959-964.
Germany, 1906,** pp. 965-969.
Great Britain, 1906,** pp. 970-977.
Russia, 1895-1904,** pp. 977-985.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Italy, 1904,** pp. 571-574.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
♦Bui. 80, January, 1909. Maryland, 1907,** p. 91.
♦Bui. 81, March, 1909.
Kansas, 1906-1908,** pp. 384-386.
Massachusetts, 1907,** pp. 386-389.
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Maryland, 1908,** p. 641.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Connecticut, 1908,** p. 108.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem,
Pennsylvania (S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by Victor S.
Clark, pp. 1-29.
Massachusetts, 1908,** pp. 207*-209.
Austria, 1907,** pp. 227-232.
France, 1907,** pp. 233-239.
Germany, 1907,** pp. 239-244.
Great Britain, 1907,** pp. 245-252.
Italy, 1905,** pp. 252-264.
Netherlands, 1906,** pp. 264-269.
Norway, 1903-1906,** pp. 269, 270.
Russia, 1895-1905,** pp. 270-284.
Spain, 1906,** pp. 284-288.
Sweden, 1903-1907,** pp. 288-294.
♦1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910 (S.
Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 62-98.
*Bul. 92, January, 1911.
Austria, 1908,** pp. 203-209.
France, 1908,** pp. 209-215.
Germany, 1908,** pp. 215-220.
Great Britain, 1908, 1909,** pp. 221-231.
Netherlands, 1907, 1908,** pp. 231-239.
Spain, 1907,** pp. 239-242.
Sweden, 1908,** pp. 242-247.
*Bul. 94, May, 1911. Fourth Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, 1910, pp. 726-762.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 912, 913.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1912 ( S. Doc.
No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
* Supply exhausted.




*♦ Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU.

181

Strikes and lockouts—Concluded.
1912. Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County,
Pennsylvania, in 1910-11 (H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess!).
♦Bul. 98, January, 1912.
Mediation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in the United
States, by Charles P. Neill, pp. 1-63.
Canadian industrial disputes and investigation act of 1907, pp. 64-81.
Conciliation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in Great
Britain, pp. 82-122.
Conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, pp. 129-136.
Attitude of employing interests toward conciliation and arbitration
in Great Britain, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 161-179.
Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitration in Great Brit­
ain, by Arthur E. Holder, pp. 179-202.
Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry in New York City, by Charles H. Winslow, pp. 203-272.
Industrial courts in France. Germany, and Switzerland, by Helen L.
Sumner, pp. 273-464.
Bul. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Sta­
tistics in regard to strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper dis­
trict.
Subway employees, diseases of:
♦Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
490-495.
Sugar of lead.

(See Acetate of lead.)

Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer, by N. C. Adams:
Bul. 121, May 14, 1913.
Sulphate of lead as an industrial poison:
Bul. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., pp. 19-21.
Sulphide of hydrogen as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 14.
Sulphur chloride as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer­
feld, p. 167.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 756.
Sulphur dioxide as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 509, 510.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 757.
Sulphureted hydrogen as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 530.
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommer­
feld, p. 168.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 757.




* Supply exhausted.

182

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Sulphuric acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
•pp. 510, 511.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 758.
Sulphurous acid as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by
C. F. W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 168.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 757.
Sunday work:
*Bul. 7, November, 1896. Belgium, 1896,** pp. 764-772.
Bui. 11, July, 1897. Report of the Belgian labor bureau concerning Sun­
day work in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Italy, 1896,** pp. 495498.
*Bul. 13, November, 1897. Belgium, 1897,** pp. 790-792.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899.
Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter E. Weyl, Great
Britain, pp. 18-20.
Mining and quarry industries, Bengium, 1895,** pp. 127-130.
*Bul. 24, September, 1899. Belgium, 1898,** pp. 717-719.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 809, 810.
France, pp. 845, 846.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 363-366.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1021-1024.
*Bul. 31, November, 1900. Massachusetts, 1899,** pp. 1264-1266.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ontario,
p. 291.
Bui. 36, November, 1901. Minnesota, 1899,1900,** pp. 969, 970.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by
Samuel M’Cune Lindsay, pp. 1041-1044.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905. Street railway employment in the United States,
by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 612-616.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.). Rate o f pay for Sun­
days, pp. 96-124.
Bui. 85, November, 1909. Review’ of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909,
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 426.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem,
Pennsylvania (S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 11-16, 128.
*Bul. 89, July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz, pp. 1-413.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910.
Labor laws declared unconstitutional, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 951,
952.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 1040.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

183

Sunday work—Concluded.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
Yol. III. Working conditions ahd the relations of employers and em­
ployees, pp. 20, 198, 537.
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention, pp. 15, 151, 152.
*Bul. 97, November. 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 883, 884.
*Bul. I ll, Dec. 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by Lindley D.
Clark, p. 14.
Bul. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 33, 63-65.
Superannuation.

(See Old age and invalidity.)

Sweating system:
*Bul. 2, January, 1896. Sweat shops in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1894,** pp. 162,
163.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Sweating system, by Henry White, pp. 360-379.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Great
Britain, pp. 817, 818.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 187, 188.
Queensland, pp. 261, 262.
Ontario, pp. 287, 288.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. Maryland, 1902,** p. 149.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Wisconsin, 1900, 1901,** pp. 652, 653.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. Maryland, 1903,** pp. 321, 322.
*Bul. 63, March, 1906. Maryland, 1904,** p. 508.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. Wisconsin, 1903,** p. 855.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908. Ohio, 1906,** pp. 182, 183.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909.
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 36-47.
Reports of select committee on home work, Great Britain, 1907,**
pp. 104-110.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Women's trade-union movement in Great Britain, by
Katherine Graves Busbey, pp. 44-50.
*1910-1912. Report on c6ndition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. II. Men's ready-made clothing, pp. 492-509.
*Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions. Faetory-inspection
laws.
(See also Labor legislation.)

T.
Taff-Vale case:
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. Labor unions and British industry, by A. Maurice
Low, pp. 77-92.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain,
by A. Maurice Low, pp. 566-572.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

184

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Tallow, industrial poisoning in the manufacture of:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by O. F.
W. Doehring, pp. 84-87.
Tanners, diseases of:
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
580-584.
Tar as an industrial poison:
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 758.
Task system:
♦Bui. 31, November, 1900. Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi
Einaudi, pp. 1229-1231.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output, pp.
135-141, 543-549.
Teamsters and drivers.

( See Drivers and teamsters.)

Telegraph companies:
♦Third Annual Report 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.).
Telegraphers’ cramp:
♦Bui. 80, January, 1909.
Britain, 1908,1♦ p. 104.
*

Compensation for industrial diseases, Great

Telephone companies:
♦1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.).
Ten-hour maximum working-day:
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911. Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the
International Association for Labor Legislation, pp. 185-187.
Bui. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and
young persons. (Memorandum of International Labor Office for inter­
national conference called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September,
1913.)
(See also Hours of labor.)
Tenements.

(See Housing.)

Textile industries:
Seventh Annual Report 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and glass.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output,
Great Britain, pp. 895-905.
♦Bui. 75, March, 1908.
Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp. 484-487.
Report of Secretary of Internal Affairs, Pennsylvania, 1906,*♦ p. 606.
♦Bui. 78, September, 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman,
pp. 431-433.
Bui. 83, July, 1909. Earnings and hours of labor in British textile indus­
tries, 1906, pp. 88-103.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

185

Textile industries—Concluded.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1912 (S.
Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
(See also Cotton industry; Linen industry; Silk industry; Woolen in­
dustry.)
Tile works:
Bul. 104, August 7, 1912. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and
porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. D.
Tin cans and tinware.

(See Cans and boxes, tin, manufacture of.)

Tin-foil, manufacture of:
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 49, 50.
Tin plate, manufacture of:
♦Bul. 23, July, 1899. Iron, steel, and tin-plate production in Pennsylvania,
1897,** pp. 558, 559.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, pp. 50, 51.
Tinning of hollow ware:
♦Bul. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., p. 81.
Tobacco, family expenditure for:
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Part III. Cost of living.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass. Part III. Cost of living.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food,
pp. 453-469, 509, 511.
♦Bul. 54, September, 1904. Cost of living and retail prices in the United
States, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1146, 1147.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets of typical cotton-mill workers.
Tobacco industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output, pp.
555-585.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

186

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Tobacco industry—Concluded.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 482.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp.
541-571.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 307-322.
Tools and instruments, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 652-657.
Trachoma:
Bui. 142, February 27, 1914. Administration of labor laws and factory in­
spection in certain European countries, by George M. Price, M. D. Brick
kilns, cotton mills, flax mills, knitting mills, p. 234.
Trade agreements:
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission.
Proposed plan for trade agreements, pp. 651-665.
(See also Agreements between employers and employees; Protocol agree­
ments.)
Trade-union label:
*Bul. 15, March, 1898. The trade-union label, by John Graham Brooks, pp.
197-219.
Trade-unions.

(See Labor organizations.)

Transportation:
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Traveling benefits:
♦Bui. 22, May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Edward
W. Bemis, pp. 361-400.
♦Bui. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 754-758, 833-847.
Truck system:
♦Bui. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Great
Britain, pp. 826-832.
♦Bui. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Bel­
gium, p. 117.
♦Bui. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Ger­
many, pp. 369-371.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 589, 590.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

187

Truck system—Concluded.
Bul. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Rus­
sia, pp. 1030-1032.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 201-207.
Western Australia, pp. 267-269.
(See also Company stores.)
True reformers, by William Taylor Thom:
Bul. 41, July, 1902. pp. 807-814.
Trunks and valises, manufacture of:
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
Trusts and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W. Jenks:
Bul. 29, July, 1900, pp. 661-831.
Tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring. Oilcloth and linoleum manufacture, p. 79.
♦Bul. 72, September, 1907. Health of Cornish miners, 1902. Metalliferous
mining,** p. 604.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.
Animal dust, workers in, pp. 477, 478, 487, 488.
Bakeries, p. 482.
Brush-making industry, p. 488.
Coal miners, pp. 525, 526.
Compositors, p. 495.
Cotton industry, pp. 483, 484.
Cutlery and tool industry, pp. 478, 479.
Emery and corundum industry, p. 481.
File cutters, p. 479.
Flour-milling industry, p. 482.
Gem finishers, p. 480.
Glass cutting and polishing, p. 480.
Grinders, p. 479.
Linen manufacture, p. 483.
Machinery and metal supplies, p. 480.
Metallic dust, workers in, pp. 478-481.
Mica dust and bronzing powders, workers with, p. 480.
Mineral dust, workers in, pp. 477-481.
Nail cutters, p. 479.
Needle polishers, p. 479.
Polishers, p. 479.
Printing trades, pp. 493, 494, 498, 500.
Quarrymen, pp. 479, 480.
Sandpaper, manufacture of, p. 481.
Stonecutting, pp. 479, 480.
Textile industry, pp. 484-487.
Tobacco workers, p. 482.
Vegetable dust, workers in, pp. 477, 482-487.
*Bul. 77, July, 1908. Compensation for industrial diseases, Great Britain,
1906.** Mining, pp. 369, 370.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

188

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases—Continued.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman.
Animal and mixed fiber dust, occupations with exposure to, pp.
784-829.
Brass workers, pp. 661-667.
Cabinetmakers, pp. 771-776.
Carpet and rug manufacture, pp. 808-813,
Cement workers, pp. 708-711.
Compositors, pp. 673-675.
Core makers, pp. 718, 719.
Cotton ginning, pp. 727-729.
Cotton textiles, pp. 729-737.
Diamond cutters, pp. 699-701.
Engravers, pp. 676-678.
Flax and linen manufacture, pp. 750-757.
Foundrymen and molders, pp. 716-718.
Furriers and taxidermists, pp. 784-789.
Glass blowers, pp. 695, 696.
Glass cutters, pp. 696-699.
Glass industry, 691-696.
Glassworkers, pp. 691-695.
Gold-leaf manufacture, pp. 660, 661.
Grinders, pp. 644-649.
Hatters, pp. 789-794.
Hemp and cordage manufacture, pp. 757-762.
Hosiery and knit goods, pp. 743-746.
Jewelers, pp. 657-660.
Jute and jute goods, pp. 762-767.*
Lace manufacture, pp. 746-750.
Lithographers, pp. 719-722.
Marble workers, pp. 688-691.
Metal grinders, pp. 644-648.
Metal polishers, pp. 649-652.
Metallic dust, occupations with exposure to, pp. 644-681.
Mineral dust, occupations with exposure to, pp. 681-726.
Paper and pulp manufacture, pp. 768-771.
Paper hangers, pp. 714-716.
Plasterers, pp. 711-714.
Polishers, pp. 649-652.
Potters, pp. 701-708.
Pressmen, p. 676.
Printers, pp. 667-673.
Rag industry, pp. 817-821.
Ropemakers, p. 761.
Shoddy manufacture, pp. 813-817.
Silk manufacture, pp. 794-800.
Spinners, textile, pp. 737-740.
Stone industry, pp. 682-685.
Stone workers, pp. 685-688.
Tool and instrument makers, pp. 652-657.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

189

Tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases—Concluded.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908—Concluded.
Upholsterers and hair-mattress makers, pp. 821-825.
Yegetable-fiber dust, occupations with exposure to, pp. 726-784.
Weavers, textile, pp. 740-742.
Wood turners and carvers, pp. 776-780.
Woolen and worsted manufacture, pp. 800-808.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909.
Austria, pp. 299-362.
Germany, pp. 1199, 1283-1347, 1376, 1414, 1428.
Great Britain, pp. 1650, 1651.
Italy, pp. 1972-1976.
♦Bui. 82, May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing
to municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Bakeries, pp. 518-537.
Boot and shoe makers, pp. 592-603.
Carmen and carriers, p. 487.
Coachmen, cabmen, etc., pp. 488-496.
Comb manufacture, pp. 615-623.
Cork cutting and grinding, pp. 603-606.
Drivers and teamsters, pp. 481-486.
Flour-milling industry, pp. 503-518.
Glove makers, pp. 588-591.
Grain handling and storage, pp. 498-503.
Leather workers, pp. 574-580.
Municipal dust, occupations with exposure to, pp. 495-497.
Organic dust, occupations with exposure to, pp. 498-627.
Pearl and bone buttons, manufacture of, pp. 606-615.
Saddle and harness makers, pp. 584-587.
Snuff manufacture, pp. 571-574.
Starch manufacture, pp. 537-541.
Stonecutters, p. 471.
Street cleaning and refuse disposal, pp. 475-481.
Subway employees, pp. 490-495.
Tanners, pp. 580-584.
Tobacco and cigar industry, pp. 541-571.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Attitude of Massachusetts employers toward the
health of their employees, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 493-500.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong. 2d sess.).
*Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 240-250.
*Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill oper­
atives.
Bui. 101, July 1, 1912. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany,
Frederick L. Hoffman.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D.
Broom-com industry, p. 13.
Mineral workers, p. 18.
Tunnel construction, diseases of workers in. ( See Caisson disease or “ bends.” )




* Supply exhausted.

190

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Turpentine as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 14.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
p. 512.
♦Bul. 92, January, 1911. Report of Illinois commission on occupational
diseases, p. 200.
Bul. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 758.
Bul. 120, May 13,1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D., pp. 10, 11.
Type foundries:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1932. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong. 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, p. 53.

u
.
Underwear, women’s, manufacture of:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Unemployment:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions, pp. 65, 66.
♦Bul. 5, July, 1896. Report of the Massachusetts board to investigate the
subject of the unemployed, 1895,♦♦ pp. 523-525.
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. Italians in Chicago, pp. 381, 382.
♦Bul. 9, March, 1897.
Members of labor organizations employed and unemployed, July, 1894
and 1895, by industries, New York,** pp. 153, 154.
Insurance against idleness in Switzerland. Publication of the Mus6e
Social, Paris, France,♦♦ pp. 170-172.
Bul. 11, July, 1897. Census of unemployed in the German Empire, June
and December, 1895,♦♦ pp. 498-503.
♦Bul. 12, September, 1897. Report of French bureau of labor on proposal
to lessen nonemployment during industrial depressions, 1896,♦♦ pp. 622624.
♦Bul. 19, November, 1898. Occupations of the people, Rhode Island, 1894,
1895,** pp. 857, 858.
♦Bul. 22, May, 1909.
Benefit features of American trade-unions, by Edward W. Bemis,
pp. 361-400.
Report relating to various agencies for securing employment to work­
ing people in Austria,♦♦ pp. 429-432.
♦Bul. 23, July, 1899. Persons assisted in obtaining employment by the
department of labor of New Zealand, 1892-1898,♦♦ pp. 573, 574.
♦Bul. 26, January, 1900. Persons assisted in obtaining employment by the
department of labor of New Zealand, 1899,♦* pp. 191, 192.
Bul. 30, September, 1900. First and second progress reports of the unem­
ployed advisory board, New South Wales, 1899,** pp. 1081, 1082.
Bul. 33, March, 1901. Persons assisted in obtaining employment by the
department of labor of New Zealand, 1900,** pp. 340, 341.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

191

Unemployment—Continued.
Bul. 36, September, 1901.
Persons registered and sent to work by labor bureau of New South
Wales, 1893-1899,** p. 973.
Persons registered and sent to work by labor bureau of Queensland,
1898,** pp. 974, 975.
Bul. 39, March, 1902. Statistics of gainful professions or industrial occu­
pations in France, 1896,** p. 492.
Bul. 41, July, 1902. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, p. 775.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report of labor commission to provide work
for the unemployed in New South Wales, 1901,** pp. 1260-1262.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food.
Heads of families idle each specified number of weeks, pp. 286-297.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 176-181.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. Benefit features of British trade-unions, by Walter E.
Weyl, pp. 734-744.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Free public employment offices in the United
States, by J. E. Connor, pp. 1-115.
*Bul. 70, May, 1907. New York, 1904, 1905,** p. 654.
*Bul. 72, September, 1907. Relief work in Germany, 1905,** pp. 598-600.
*Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
*Bul. 76, May, 1908. What is done for the unemployed in European coun­
tries, by W. D. P. Bliss, pp. 741-934.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Belgium, pp. 535-554.
Denmark, pp. 649-672.
France, pp. 945-971.
Germany, pp. 1444-1490.
Great Britain, pp. 1615-1625.
Italy, pp. 1904-1934.
Norway, pp. 2073-2081.
Sweden, pp. 2427-2429.
*Bul. 82, May, 1909.
Maryland, 1908,** pp. 641, 642.
New South Wales, 1906,** pp. 657-659.
Bul. 83, Jul 1909. Germany, 1908,** pp. 120-136.
*Bul. 86, January, 1910, New York, 1906-7,** pp. 213, 214.
Bul. 88, May, 1910. Belgium, 1901-1908,** pp. 853-858.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911. Relief work for unemployed in Dusseldorf, Ger­
many, 1907, 1908,** pp. 616-621.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
*Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 242-246.
Bul. 102, July 15, 1912. British national insurance act, 1911, pp. 66-79,
85-87.
Bul. 109, October 15, 1912. Statistics of unemployment and the work of
employment offices in the United States, by Frank B. Sargent.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°— B ull. 174—15------13




** Digest of State or foreign report.

192

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Unemployment—Concluded.
Bui. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and condition of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.
Bui. 172, April, 1915. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. (by occu­
pations).
(Sec also Employment, regularity of.)
Union label:
*Bul. 15, March, 1898.
pp. 197-219.

The trade-union label, by John Graham Brooks,

(Jnion scale of wages:
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. System of adjusting scale of wages, etc., in certain
rolling mills, by James H. Nutt, pp. 549-551.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Report to the President on anthracite coal strike,
by Carroll D. Wright, pp. 1158, 1159, 1192, 1205, 1206, 1218-1222.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission, pp.
497, 498, 508.
’"Bui. 61, November, 1905. A documentary history of the early organiza­
tions of printers, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 863, 865, 872. 881, 883, 10011033.
*Bul. 131, August 15, 1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor,
1907 to 1912.
Bui. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May
15, 1913.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1,1914
(See also Agreements between employers and employees; Sliding scale of
wages.)
Upholsterers and hair-mattress makers, diseases of:
*Bul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 821-825.

y.
Ve*etrble dust, diseases of workers in:
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 477, 482-487.
*£ul. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 726-784.
Ventilation.

(See Sanitation and hygiene.)

Vocational education:
*Twenty-fifth Annual Report. 1910. Industrial education. Chapter XV.
Vocational guidance, pp. 409-497.
Bui. 162, August, 1915. Vocational education, survey of Richmond, Va.
(See also Industrial education.)




Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT IXDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

193

w.
Wage scales. (See Union scale of wages; Sliding scale of wages.)
Wages:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions, pp. 141-242, 295-457.
♦Fourth Annual Report. 1888. Working women in large cities. Earnings
and lost time, pp. 67-73, 484-625.
Fifth Annual Report. 1889. Railroad labor. Time and earnings, pp.
75-881.
♦Sixth Annual Report. 1890. Cost of production: Iron, steel, coal, etc.
Time and earnings, pp. 285-579.
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass. Part II, Wages, time, and earnings, pp. 367-841.
♦Seventh Special Report. 1894. The slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New
York, and Philadelphia, pp. 212-501.
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Bui. 2, January, 1896.
The poor colonies of Holland, by .T Howard Gore, pp. 113-126.
.
Wages and hours of labor in Great Britain and Ireland. 189.3,** pp.
170-176.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Wages of the manual labor classes in the United King­
dom of Great Britain and Ireland, 1893,♦* pp. 396-403.
♦Bui. 6, September, 1896. Wages of employees of the Government, manu­
facturers, and railroad companies of France in 1895,♦* pp. 654r-657.
♦Bui. 7, November, 1896.
Industrial communities: Yieille-Montagne Zinc Mining & Smelting Co.
Belgium, 1837-1888, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 706, 707.
Rates of wages paid under public and private contract, Baltimore,
Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, by Ethelbert Stewart, pp.
721-753.
♦Ninth Special Report. 1897. Italians in Chicago, pp. 53-273, 376-380.
♦1897. White-pine lumber in the United States and Canada, by Carroll D.
Wright (S. Doc. No. 70, 55th Cong., 1st sess.). Wages of employees in
lumber mills 1891-1896.
♦Bui. 10, May, 1897.
Work and wages of men, women, and children (summary of Eleventh
Annual Report), pp. 237-256.
Condition of the Negro in various cities, pp. 266, 267, 304-332.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor, pp. 427-1597.
♦Bui. 14, January, 1898.
Income, wages, and rents in Montreal, by Herbert Brown Ames, pp.
39-51.
Reports on changes in wages and hours of labor in the United King­
dom, 1894-1896,♦♦ pp. 66-73.
♦Bui. 17, July, 1898. Wages and hours of labor of railroad employees in
Maryland, 1897,** pp. 616, 617.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898.
Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870-1898, pp. 665-693.
Comparative wages and prices in Massachusetts, 1860-1897,** pp. 694697.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

194

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU O F . LABOR STATISTICS.

Wages—Continued.
*Bul. 18, September, 1898—Concluded.
Workingmen’s wages and budgets in 1853 and 1891, Belgium, 1897,**
pp. 708-713.
Fifth annual report on changes in wages and hours of labor in the
United Kingdom, 1897,** pp. 718-722.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl.
Great Britain, pp. 20-30.
France, pp. 55-59, 69.
Belgium, pp. 77-81.
Prussia, pp. 94-96.
Saxony, pp. 102, 103.
♦Bui. 21, March, 1899.
Wages of mechanics and laborers in Michigan, 1897,** pp. 311, 312.
Wages and hours of labor in France, 1891, 1893,** pp. 320-327.
*Bul. 22, May, 1899. Wages in Lyon, France, 1870 to 1896, pp. 418-420.
*Rui. 24, September, 1899. Average daily wages of railroad employees in
North Carolina, 1897,** p. 702.
Fifteenth Annual Report. 1900. Wages in commercial countries.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Payment of wages, Belgium, pp. 116-119.
Sixth annual report on changes in wages and hours of labor in the
United Kingdom, 1898,** pp. 186-191.
*Bul. 27, March, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Germany,
pp. 369-371.
♦Bui. 28, May, 1900.
System of adjusting scale of wages, etc., in certain rolling mills, by
James H. Nutt, pp. 549-551.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria, pp. 589, 590.
Report on the money wages of indoor domestic servants, 1894-1898:
Great Britain, 1899,♦♦ pp. 605-607.
Bui. 29, July, 1900.
Trusts and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W. Jenks, pp. 678707, 766-812.
State labor canvass of Michigan, 1898,♦♦ pp. 881-883.
Bui. 30, September, 1900.
Trend of wages from 1891 to 1900, pp. 913-915.
Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Russia, pp. 1030^-1032.
♦Bui. 31, November, 1900. Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr.
Luigi Einaudi, pp. 1219-1231.
Bui. 32, January, 1901.
Prices of commodities and rates of wages in Manila, pp. 29-42.
Labor canvass of Michigan, 1899,♦♦ pp. 137, 138.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 201-207.
South Australia, p. 251.
West Australia, pp. 267-299.
Report of French bureau of labor on law relating to the attachment
of wages of working people, clerks, etc., 1899,♦♦ pp. 336-340.
Bnl. 34, May, 1901. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Azel Ames, M. D.,
pp. 400-406.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF TH E BUREAU.

195

Wages—Continued.
*Bul. 36, July, 1901.
Statistics of wage earners in Colorado, 1899,** p. 781.
Wages in Great Britain (digest of various reports), 1894-1899,** pp.
788-796.
Wage statistics, Minnesota, 1899, 1900,** pp. 966, 967.
Salaries and wages of railway employees on railways of Switzerland,
1898,** p. 975.
*Bul. 37, November, 1901.
Railway employees in the United States, by Samuel M’Cune Lindsay,
pp. 1034-1040.
Labor canvass of Michigan, 1900,** pp. 1176, 1177.
*1902. First report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901 ( S. Doc.
No. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 96,. 97, 131-231.
Bul. 38, January, 1902.
Negroes of Cinclare Central Factory and Calumet Plantation, Louisi­
ana, by J. Bradford Laws, pp. 107-113.
Average rate of wages in certain cities of the United States, Great
Britain, France, and Belgium, 1870-1896,** pp. 124-126.
Eighth annual report on changes in rates of wages in the United
Kingdom, 1900,** pp. 140-146.
*Bul. 40, May, 1902. Wages of coal miners of Belgium in 1896 and 1900.**
pp. 595-597.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902.
Report to the President on anthracite coal strike, by Carroll D.
Wright, pp. 1155, 1156, 1200-1202.
Occupations and wages of railroad employees, 1901, in North Caro­
lina,** p. 1238.
Wages of employees in building trades in Virginia, 1900,** p. 1241.
Eighteenth Annual Report. 1903. Cost of living and retail prices of food,
pp. 264-285.
1903. Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902.
(S. Doc. No. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 128-221.
*Bul. 46, May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission,
pp. 599-612.
Bul. 47, July, 1903.
Second report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902, pp. 802895.
Agricultural labor, California, 1901-1902,** p. 910.
Lumber industry, Washington, 1901-1902,** p. 919.
Steam and street railway employees, Washington, 1901, 1902,** p. 919.
Employees in industrial establishments, Belgium, 1896,** pp. 926, 927.
*Bul. 48, September, 1903. Iron ore mining, Minnesota, 1900**, pp. 1065,
1066.
*Bul. 49, November, 1903. Minimum and maximum wages in principal
organized trades. Maine, 1902,** p. 1345.
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Eleventh Special Report. 1904. Regulation and restriction of output.
♦Bul. 50, January, 1904.
Railroad employees, North Carolina, 1902,♦♦ pp. 154,155.
Reports on changes in rates of wages and hours of labor in the United
Kingdom, 1901, 1902,♦♦ pp. 165-171.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

196

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

W ages—Continued.
*Bul. 51, March, 1904.
Minimum wage rates of molders in foundries, 1903, p. 435.
Textile industries—
Rhode Island, 1901,** p. 437.
Virginia, 1901,** p. 438.
*Bul. 52, May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R.
Sewall, pp. 494-501, 541-545.
Bui. 53, July, 1904.
Wages and cost of living, pp. 703-932.
Current graded weekly wages, New Jersey, 1901,** pp. 938, 939.
*Bul. 54, September, 1904. Wages in the United States and Europe, by
G. W. W. Hanger, 1890-1903, pp. 1119-1128.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Wages in skilled trades in Norway, 18801900,** p. 1670.
Twentieth Annual Report. 1905. Convict labor, pp. 31, 179, 231, 317, 330.
*Twelfth Special Report. 1905. Coal-mine labor in Europe.
Austria, pp. 42-58.
Belgium, pp. 125-140.
France, pp. 201-208.
Germany, pp. 310-325.
Great Britain, pp. 424-443.
*Bul. 56, January, 1905. Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 202-225, 235.
*Bul. 57, March, 1905.
Street railway employment in the United States, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 590-604.
Wages in clothing trades, New York, 1902,** p. 649.
Changes in rates of wages, New York, 1902,** pp. 654, 655.
Bui. 58, May, 1905.
Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark, pp. 900-905.
Austria, 1901,** pp. 969-978.
France, 1901,** pp. 978-980.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing in­
dustries, 1890-1904, pp. 1-147.
*Bul. 61, November, 1905.
Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E. Weyl, pp. 757-775,
820-849.
A documentary history of the early organizations of printers, by
Ethelbert Stewart, pp. 1001-1033.
1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905 (H. Doc.
No. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.), pp. 162-308.
*Bul. 65, July, 1906.
Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries, 1890 to 1905,
pp. 1-170.
Changes in rates of wages and hours of labor in the United Kingdom,
1903 and 1904,** pp. 324-329.
*Bul. 66, September, 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 512-662.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Laws of foreign countries relating to employees
on railroads, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 135.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OP THE BUREAU.

197

W ages—Continued.
Bul. 69, March, 1907. Wages and working time in textile industries, Bel­
gium, 1901,** pp. 428-437.
♦Bul. 71, July, 1907.
Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries, 1890 to 1906,
pp. 1-174.
Great Britain, 1896-1905,♦♦ pp. 351-358.
♦Bul. 72, September, 1907. Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled im­
migrant laborers in the United States, by Frank J. Sheridan, pp. 425435.
♦Bul. 77, July, 1908. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing indus­
tries, 1890 to 1907, pp. 1-180.
♦Bul. 79, November, 1908.
Charity relief and wage earnings (District of Columbia), by S. E. For­
man, pp. 888-893.
Russia, 1897,♦♦ pp. 942-949.
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Oable Com­
panies (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 42-50, 183-510.
♦Bul. 80, January, 1909.
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. Clark,
pp. 53-65.
North Carolina, 1907,5♦ pp. 93-95.
*
Bul. 83, July, 1909.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal industrial towns
of France, 1905, pp. 80-84.
Earnings and hours of labor in British textile industries, 1906, pp.
88-103.
Metal-working industries, Belgium, 1903,♦* pp. 113-120.
Bul. 84, September, 1909.
Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, pp. 386-394.
Missouri, 1908** p. 400.
Bul. 85, November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 492-495.
*1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.), pp. 84-97, 128-131, 180-322.
1910. Report on strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem,
Pennsylvania ( S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 57-108.
♦Bul. 86, January, 1910.
Earnings and hours of labor in British clothing industries, 1906, pp.
192-206.
New York, 1907,♦♦ p. 214.
♦Bul. 87, March, 1910.
Wages and hours of labor of union carpenters in the United States
and in English-speaking foreign countries, by Ethelbert Steward
pp. 583-598.
Cost of living of the working classes in the principal industrial towns
of Belgium, 1908, pp. 620-624.
Earnings and hours of labor of British building and woodworking
industries, 1906, pp. 626-633.
♦ Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

198

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Wages—Continued.
Bui. 88, May, 1910.
Trend of wages in Germany, 1898 to 1907, pp. 795-812.
Wages and hours of labor in German woodworking industries in
1906, pp. 813-823.
Wages and hours of labor in Austria, 1906 and 1907,** pp. 824-842.
Public service employees o f principal cities of Germany, 1902-1907,**
pp. 858—
867.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 1039, 1040.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1 sess.).
*Vols. I and II. Wages and hours of labor.
Vol. III. Working conditions and the relations of employers and
employees, pp. 22-24, 215-286, 385-414, 550-581.
*1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910 (S.
Doc. No. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 20-28, 104-107, 142-459.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911.
Report of British Board of Trade on cost of living in principal in­
dustrial cities of the United States, 1909,** pp. 502-512.
Reports of British Board of Trade on cost o f living in England and
Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and the United States, pp. 560563.
*Bul. 94, May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, pp. 684-692, 765-768, 800-1117.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911. Working hours, earnings, and duration of em­
ployment of women workers in selected industries of Maryland and of
California, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 347-465.
*Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 878, 882.
*1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 295-354, 653-735.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 119-212, 552-623.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry, pp. 12&-142, 399-425, 653-695.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry, pp. 147-171, 360-496.
♦Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories, pp. 37-48,
344-349.
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets of typical cotton-mill workers.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
♦1912. Summary of wages and hours of labor, from report on conditions
of employment in the iron and steel industry in the United States (S.
Doc. No. 301, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
♦1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1912 (S.
Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.), pp. 71-75, 87-142, 217-367, 372-473.
♦Bui. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 11-13.
♦Bui. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions
affecting labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 14-16.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

199

W ages—Continued.
Bui. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of
wage-earning women In selected industries in the District of Columbia,
by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in Mil­
waukee, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 82-92.
Bui. 124, June 16, 1913. Conciliation and arbitration in the building
trades of Greater New York, by Charles H. Winslow, pp. 25-29.
Bui. 128. August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton,
woolen, and silk industries, 1890 to 1912.
*Bul. 129, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1890 to 1912.
*Bul. 131, August 15, 1913. Union scale of wages and hours of labor,
1907 to 1912.
Bui. 134, August 26, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and knit goods industries, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 135, September 2, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cigar and
clothing industries, 1911 and 1912.
Bui. 137, December 1, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the building
and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 139, February 7, 1914. Michigan copper district strike. Wages of
mine workers, pp. 11, 21.
Bui. 143, March 4, 1914. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May
15, 1913.
Bui. 145, April 10, 1914. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the
dress and waist industry of New York City, by Charles H. Winslow,
pp. 124, 154, 173.
Bui. 146, April 28, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment and stand­
ardization of piece rates in the dress and waist industry of New York
City, by N. I. Stone.
Bui. 147, June 13, 1914. Wages and regularity of employment in the
cloak, suit, and skirt industry, New York City and Boston, pp. 7-108.
Bui. 150, May 11, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 151, May 15, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel
industry in the United States, 1907 to 1912.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions affect­
ing labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 15, 16.
Bui. 153, May 21, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 154, May 22, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe
and hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.
Bui. 161, October 24, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and
cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
Bui. 163, October 28, 1914. Wages and hours of labor in the building and
repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 9-11.




* Supply exhausted.

200

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

W ages—Concluded.
Bui. 168, April, 1915. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel
industry in the United States, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 18-20.
Bui. 171, May, 1915. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1,
1914.
( See also Decisions of courts relating to labor.)
Wall paper industry:
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦Bui. 95, July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning in Great Britain and the
western States of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., pp. 81-83.
Watches.

(See Clocks and watches, manufacture of.)

Wealth and receipts and expenses of the United States, by W. M. Steuart:
♦Bui. 2, January, 1896, pp. 197-200.
Wealth, distribution of:
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Massachusetts,♦♦ pp. 381-386.
Weavers, textile, diseases of:
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 740-742.
Welfare work:
♦Eighth Special Report. 1895. The housing of the working people.
♦Bui. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 240-257.
♦Bui. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 356, 357.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 482-488.
♦Bui. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Wal­
ter E. Weyl, France, pp. 59-62.
♦Bui. 31, November, 1900. Betterment of industrial conditions, by Victor
H. Olmsted, pp. 1117-1156.
Bui. 34, May, 1901. Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N P.
*.
Gilman, pp. 441-445.
♦Bui. 54, September, 1904. Housing of the working people in the United
States by employers, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1191-1243.
♦Bui. 57, March, 1905. Report of Austrian bureau of labor statistics on
employers’ institutions for the welfare of employees, 1898-1901,♦♦ pp.
664-677.
♦1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.), pp. 78-84.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911. Attitude of Massachusetts employers toward
the health of their employees, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 491,492.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry, pp. 593-599.
♦Vol. II. Men’s ready-made clothing, pp. 343-346.
Bui. 123, May 15, 1913. Employers’ welfare work, by Elizabeth Lewis
Otey.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUBEAU. 2 0 1

Welfare work—Concluded.
Bul. 139, February 7, 1914. Report of the Commissioner of Labor Statis­
tics in regard to the strike of mine workers in the Michigan copper dis­
trict, pp. 124-128*
Western Federation of Miners:
*1905. Report on labor disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880 to
1904, inclusive ( S. Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.), pp. 35-45.
Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Companies, investigation of:
1909. (S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.)
Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer, by J. Chester Bowen:
♦Bul. 130, August 15, 1913.
White lead.

(See Lead poisoning.)

White-pine lumber in the United States and Canada, 1897, by Carroll D.
Wright:
♦(S. Doc. No. 70, 55th Cong., 1st sess.).
Wholesale prices:
♦Bul. 27, March, 1900. Wholesale prices 1890 to 1899, by Roland P. Falkner,
pp. 237-313.
Bul. 39, March, 1902. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1901, pp. 195-485.
Bul. 45, March, 1903. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1902, pp. 203-356.
♦Bul. 51, March, 1904. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1903, pp. 219-379.
♦Bul. 54, September, 1904. Wholesale prices in the United States, 1890 to
1903, by G. W. W. Hanger, pp. 1165-1186.
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905. Course of wholesale prices. 1890 to 1904, pp. 389549.
♦Bul. 63, March, 1906. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1905, pp. 338-502.
Bul. 69, March, 1907. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1906, pp. 239-420.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Whohlesale prices, 1890 to 1907, pp. 283-471.
♦Bul. 81, March, 1909. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1908, pp. 195-382.
♦Bul. 87, March, 1910. Wholesale prices, 1890 to March, 1910, pp. 377-582.
♦Bul. 93, March, 1911. Whohlesale prices, 1890 to 1910, pp. 309-499.
Bul. 99, March, 1912.
Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1911, pp. 501-692.
Wholesale prices in Canada, 1890 to 1911,! ♦ pp. 693-695.
*
♦1913. Increase in prices of anthracite coal following the wage agreement
of May 20, 1912 (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.).
Bul. 114, April 4, 1913. Wholesale prices (United States and Canada),
1890 to 1912.
Bul. 121, May 14, 1913. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer, by N. C.
Adams.
♦Bul. 130, August 15, 1913. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to con­
sumer, by J. Chester Bowen.
Bul. 149, May 11, 1914. Wholesale prices 1890 to 1913.
Bul. 164, November 30,1914. Butter prices, from producer to consumer, by
Newton H. Clark.
Bul. 170, May, 1915. Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
Widows* and orphans’ pensions:
♦Bul. 3, March, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 245, 246.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

202

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Widows' and orphans' pensions—Concluded.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F. Willoughby, p. 348.
♦Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 492-498.
♦Bul. 7, November, 1896. Industrial communities: Various communities,
by W. F. Willoughby, pp. 700, 709, 718.
♦Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, pp. 33-87.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and compen­
sation systems in Europe.
Bul. 107, September 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany, pp. 9-15.
Wire and wire goods:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report 1898. Hand and machine labor.
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in the metal trades, p. 53.
Woman and child wage earners:
♦1910-1912. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. I. Cotton textile industry.
♦Vol II. Men’s ready-made clothing.
♦Vol. III. Glass industry.
♦Vol. IV. Silk industry.
♦Vol. V. Wage-earning women in stores and factories.
♦Vol. VI. The beginnings of child-labor legislation in certain States; a
comparative study.
♦Vol. VII. Conditions under which children leave school to go to
work.
♦Vol. VIII. Juvenile delinquency and its relation to employment.
♦Vol. IX. History of women in industry in the United States.
♦Vol. X. History of women in trade-unions.
♦Vol. XI. Employment of women in metal trades.
♦Vol. XII. Employment of women in laundries.
♦Vol. XIII. Infant mortality and its relation to the employment of
mothers.
♦Vol. XIV. Causes of death among woman and child cotton-mill op­
eratives.
♦Vol. XV. Relation between occupation and criminality of women.
♦Vol. XVI. Family budgets of typical cotton-mill operatives.
♦Vol. XVII. Hookworm disease among cotton-mill operatives.
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries.
♦Vol. XIX. Labor laws and factory conditions.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

203

Women in industry:
♦Fourth Annual Report. 1888. Working women in large cities.
*Bul. 1, November, 1895.
Indiana, 1893, 1894,** pp. 64, 65.
Report by Miss Collet on the statistics of the employment of women
and girls in England and Wales, 1891,** pp. 84-94.
*Bul. 4, May, 1896. Compensation in certain occupations of graduates of
colleges for women, pp. 380, 381.
Eleventh Annual Report, 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women, and
children.
*Bul. 10, May, 1897. Work and wages of men, women, and children (sum­
mary of Eleventh Annual Report), pp. 237-256.
*Bul. 15, March, 1898. Boarding homes and clubs for working women, by
Mary S. Ferguson, pp. 141-196.
*Bul. 17, July, 1898. Changes in employment of women and girls in flax
and jute centers, Great Britain, 1835-1895,** pp. 621-624.
*Bul. 20, January, 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter
E. Weyl, France, pp. 68-70.
*Bul. 25, November, 1899. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Great Britain, pp. 800-811.
France, pp. 843-845.
*Bul. 26, January, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Bel­
gium, pp. 104-113.
*Bul. 28, May, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby. Austria,
pp. 580-583.
Bui. 30, September, 1900. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
Russia, pp. 1025-1028.
Netherlands, pp. 1033-1041.
Bui. 33, March, 1901. Foreign labor laws, by W. F. Willoughby.
New Zealand, pp. 183-186, 199, 200.
New South Wales, pp. 239-242.
South Australia, p. 250.
Queensland, pp. 260, 261.
Ontario, pp. 279-282.
Quebec, p. 301.
Bui. 38, January, 1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl,
pp. 74-76.
*Bul. 43, November, 1902. Working women in Ohio, 1901,** p. 1240.
Bui. 47, July, 1903. Statistics of women wage earners.
Colorado, 1901, 1902,** pp. 911, 912.
Belgium, 1896,** pp. 924-926.
*Bul. 50, January, 1904. Ohio, 1901,** p. 156.
*Bul. 59, July, 1905. Maryland, 1903,** p. 322.
*Bul. 64, May, 1906. California, 1904,** p. 849.
*Bul. 67, November, 1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades,
by Walter E. Weyl and A. M. Sakolski, pp. 720-731.
*Bul. 68, January, 1907. Laws of foreign countries relating to employees
on railroads, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 121, 122.
Bui. 69, March, 1907. Maryland, 1905,** p. 424.
*Bul. 73, November, 1907. Laws relating to employment of women and
children, pp. 655-816.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

204

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Women in industry—Continued.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. IX,
pp. 530-535.
*Bul. 79, November, 1908, Maine, 1906,** pp. 924, 925.
*Bul. 80, January, 1909.
Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by Victor S. ( ’lark,
pp. 1-85.
Illinois, 1906,** p. 88.
Italy, 1903, 1904,** pp. 111-114.
Bul. 83, July, 1909. Women’s trade-union movement in Great Britain, by
Katherine Graves Bushey, pp. 1-65.
Bul. 84, September, 1909. Seamstresses, Norway, 1900-1906,** pp. 405-409.
Bul. 85. November, 1909. Review of labor legislation of 1908 and 1909, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 483-491.
*1910. Investigation of telephone companies (S. Doc. No. 380, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.).
Bul. 88, May, 1910. Women workers in the Milwaukee tanneries, Wis­
consin, 1908,** pp. 851, 852.
*Bul. 91, November, 1910.
Working hours of wage-earning women in selected industries in Chi­
cago, by Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 867-915.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 10441046.
*Bul. 93, March, 1911.
Hours of labor of men, women, and children employed in factories
in Austria, 1902, 1906,** pp. 578-580.
Germany, 1908,** pp. 622-626.
*Bul. 96, September, 1911.
Working hours, earnings, and duration of employment of women
workers in selected industries of Maryland and of California, by
Marie L. Obenauer, pp. 347-465.
Bul. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 895-904.
*1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Mass., in 1912 (S. Doc. No.
870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
*Bul. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 19-23.
*Bul. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions
affecting labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 18, 19.
Bul. 116, April 8, 1913. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment
of wage-earning women in selected industries in the District of Colum­
bia, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bul. 117, April 10, 1913. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
(Memorandum of International Labor Office for international conference
called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, September, 1913.)
Bul. 118, April 10, 1913. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women
and young persons. (Memorandum of International Labor Office for
international conference called to meet in Berne, Switzerland, Septem­
ber, 1913.)
Bul. 119, May 5, 1913. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of
Wisconsin, by Marie L. Obenauer.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

205

Women in industry—Concluded.
Bui. 122, May 15, 1913. Employment of women in power laundries in
Milwaukee, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions af­
fecting labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, p. 19.
Bui. 160, October 16, 1914. Hours, earnings, and condition of labor of
women in Indiana mercantile establishments and garment factories, by
Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 17-21.
Bui. 167, April, 1915. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States
and foreign countries.
Bui. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, p. 24.
( See also Decisions of courts relating to labor; Labor legislation; Woman
and child wage earners.)
Women’s clubs and associations:
*Bul. 23, July, 1899. The attitude of women’s clubs and associations
toward social economics, by Ellen M. Henrotin, pp. 545-556.
Wood alcohol as an industrial poison:
*Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 13.
*Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.,
pp. 488, 516, 517.
♦Bui. 86, January, 1910. List of industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld, p. 155.
Bui. 100, May, 1912. List of industrial poisons, p. 750.
Bui. 120, May 13, 1913. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. D., p. 13.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 21.
Bui. 157, March, 1915. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L.
Hoffman. Industrial diseases reported in New York State, two years
ending August, 1913, p. 48.
Wooden boxes, manufacture of:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Wooden goods, manufacture of:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Second Annual Report. 1886. Convict labor.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Twenty-first Annual Report. 1906. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1905).
Woodworking:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.




♦ Supply exhausted.

206

BULLETIN OP TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

W oodworking—Concluded.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 776-780, 847-858.
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes,
and methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., pp. 13, 14.
Wool sorters’ disease.

(See Anthrax.)

Woolen industry:
♦First Annual Report. 1886. Industrial depressions.
♦Third Annual Report. 1887. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Seventh Annual Report. 1891. Cost of production: The textiles and
glass, pp. 137-194.
Tenth Annual Report. 1894. Strikes and lockouts (1887 to 1894).
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96. Work and wages of men, women,
and children.
♦Thirteenth Annual Report. 1898. Hand and machine labor.
Sixteenth Annual Report. 1901. Strikes and lockouts (1881 to 1900).
♦Nineteenth Annual Report. 1904. Wages and hours of labor.
♦Bui. 79, November, 1908. Mortality from consumption in dusty trades,
by Frederick L. Hoffman, pp. 800-808.
♦1910-19i2. Report on condition of woman and child wage earners in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.).
♦Vol. XVIII. Employment of women and children in selected indus­
tries, pp. 322-339.
♦1912. Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Mass., in 1912 (S. Do c
j.
No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.).
Bui. 127, August 12, 1913. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and
methods of protection, by William C. Hanson, M. D., p. 15.
Bui. 128, August 14, 1913. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton,
woolen, and silk industries, 1890 to 1912, pp. 110-170.
Bui. 150, May 11, 1914. Wages and hours o f labor in the cotton, woolen,
and silk industries, 1907 to 1912, pp. 92-141.
Work and wages of men, women, and children:
Eleventh Annual Report. 1895-96.
♦Bui. 10, May, 1897. Summary of Eleventh Annual Report, pp. 237-256.
Workers at gainful occupations at the Federal censuses of 1870, 1880, and
1890, by W. C. Hunt:
♦Bui. 11, July, 1897.
Working conditions.

(See Labor conditions.)

Working hours of wage-earning women in selected industries in Chicago, by
Marie L. Obenauer:
♦Bui. 91, November, 1910, pp. 867-915.
Working women in large cities:
♦Fourth Annual Report. 1888.
Workmen’s dwellings.

(See Housing.)

Workmen’s dwellings, life insurance in connection with:
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe. Spain, pp. 2373-2375.




* Supply exhausted.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

207

Workmen’s insurance and compensation:
*Fourtli Special Report. 1893. Compulsory insurance in Germany, in-,
eluding an appendix relating to compulsory insurance in other countries
in Europe.
*Bul. 5, July, 1896. Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of
Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F. Willoughby. Working­
men’s Life Insurance Association, pp. 499-504.
*Bul. 7, November, 1S96. Industrial communities: Mariemont & Baseoup
Coal Mining Co., Belgium, by W. F. Willoughby. Workingmen’s sick
fund and old-age pension fund, pp. 700-703.
♦Bul. 17, July, 1898. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway em­
ployees, by Emory R. Johnson, pp. 563-591.
Bul. 32, January, 1901. The British workmen’s compensation act and its
operation, by A. Maurice Low, pp. 103-132.
Bul. 34, May, 1901.
Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P. Gilman, pp. 4G4468.
The workmen’s compensation act of Holland,** pp. 490-493.
♦Bul. 37, November, 1901. Proceedings under workmen’s compensation
and employers’ liability acts, Great Britain, 1899,** pp. 1188-1193.
♦Bul. 40, May, 1902. Workmen’s compensation acts of foreign, countries,
by Adna F. Weber, pp. 549-551.
♦Bul. 50, January, 1904. Statistics of proceedings under workmen’s com­
pensation and employers’ liability acts of Great Britain. 1900,** pp.
162-165,
Bul. 53, July, 1904. Germany, 1885-1903,** pp. 941-949.
*Bul. 55, November, 1904. Proceedings under workmen’s compensation
and employers’ liability act, Great Britain, 1897, 1900-1902,** pp. 16641669.
♦Bul. 57, March, 1905. State cooperative accident insurance fund of Mary­
land, pp. 645-648.
Bul. 58, May, 1905. The new Russian workmen’s compensation act, by
I. M. Rubinow, pp. 955-959.
♦Bul. 65, July, 1906. Report of departmental committee on workmen’s
compensation, Great Britain, 1904,** pp. 329-332.
♦Bul. 70, May, 1907.
British workmen’s compensation acts, by Launcelot Packer, pp. 579638.
Text of British workmen’s compensation acts, pp. 631-652.
Bul. 71, July, 1907. Proceedings under workmen’s compensation and
employers’ liability acts, Great Britain, 1904, 1905,** pp. 345-350.
*Twenty-third Annual Report. 1908. Workmen’s insurance and benefit
funds in the United States.
*Bul. 74, January, 1908.
Summary of foreign workmen’s compensation acts, pp. 121-143.
British workmen’s compensation act of 1906 (text), pp. 144-158.
♦Bul. 77, July, 1908.
Compensation for injuries of artisans and laborers in the service of
the United States, pp. 333-335.
Statistics of proceedings under workmen’s liability acts, Great Britain,
1906,** pp. 364-369.
*

Supply exhausted.

95052°—Bull. 174—15------14



** Digest of State or foreign report.

208

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Workmen’s insurance and compensation—Continued.
♦Twenty-fourth Annual Report. 1909. Workmen’s insurance and com­
pensation systems in Europe.
♦Bui. 80, January, 1909. Great Britain, 1908,** pp. 103, 104.
♦Bui. 90, September, 1910.
Recent action relating to employers’ liability and workmen’s compen­
sation, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 675-714.
Essential features of a compensation law; Chicago conference of
November, 1910, pp. 715-717.
Summary of foreign workmen’s compensation acts, pp. 719-748.
Cost of employers’ liability and workmen’s compensation insurance
(United States and foreign countries), by Miles M. Dawson, pp.
749-831.
*Bul. 91, November. 1910. Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 1046-1048.
1911. Conditions of employment in the iron and steel industry in the
United States (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.).
♦Vol. IV. Accidents and accident prevention, pp. 255-262.
♦Bui. 92, January, 1911.
Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Laws and bills, 1911, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 97-181.
Resolution of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the International Asso­
ciation for Labor Legislation, p. 193.
♦Bui. 96, September, 1911.
Workmen’s insurance code of July 19, 1911, of Germany, translated
by Henry J. Harris, pp. 501-774.
Bui. 97, November, 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley
D. Clark, pp. 904-909.
Bui. 101, July .1, 1912. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany, by
Frederick L. Hoffman.
Bui. 102, July 15, 1912. British national insurance act, 1911.
Bui. 103, August 1, 1912. Sickness and accident insurance of Switzer­
land.
Bui. 107, September 3, 1912. Law relating to insurance of salaried em­
ployees in Germany.
♦Bui. I ll, December 13, 1912. Review of labor legislation of 1912, by
Lindley D. Clark, pp. 24-28.
1913. Compensation for injuries to employees of the United States, arising
from accidents occurring between August 1, 1908, and June 30, 1911.
Report of operations under the act of May 30, 1908.
♦Bui. 112, March 5, 1913. Review of decisions of courts and opinions
affecting labor, 1912, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 10, 26, 27.
Bui. 126, December 23, 1913. Workmen’s compensation laws of the United
States and foreign countries.
Bui. 152, May 14, 1914. Review of decisions of courts and opinions
affecting labor, 1913, by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 23-25.
Bui. 155, September 17, 1914. Compensation for accidents to employees
of the United States, under act of May 30, 1908.
Bui. 166, December 15, 1914. Review of labor legislation of 1914, by Lind­
ley D. Clark, pp. 21-24.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

209

Workmen’s insurance and compensation—Concluded.
Bul. 169, May, 1915. Review of decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914,
by Lindley D. Clark, pp. 32-42.
(See also Accident insurance; Decisions of courts relating to labor; Labor
legislation; Old age and invalidity; Pension and relief funds; Sickness
insurance; Unemployment insurance.)
Workmen's trains:
Bul. 41, July, 1902. Report on workmen’s trains, Great Britain. 1900,**
pp. 834, 835.
Bul. 69, March, 1907. Great Britain, 1903. 1904,** pp. 439, 440.

z
.
Zinc as an industrial poison:
♦Bul. 44, January, 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F.
W. Doehring, p. 14.
♦Bul. 67, November, 1906. Austria, lead and zinc works, 1904,** p. 847.
♦Bul. 75, March, 1908. Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D., pp.
517, 518.
♦Bul. 92, January, 1911. Report of Illinois commission on occupational
diseases, pp. 197, 198.
* Supply exhausted.




** Digest of State or foreign report.




APPENDIX.—LIST OF LIBRARIES IN WHICH THE PUBLI­
CATIONS OF THE BUREAU MAY BE FOUND.
GOVERNMENT DEPOSITORIES.
ALABAMA.
Auburn_______________ Alabama Polytechnic Institute Library.
Birmingham__________ Howard College Library.
Public Library.
Mobile_______________ Association Public Library.
Montgomery__________ Department of Archives and Historical Library, State
Capitol.
State and Supreme Court Library.
_
Talladega_ ___________Public Library.
Tuskegee Institute____ Carnegie Library of Tuskegee Institute.
University____________ University of Alabama Library.
ALASKA.
Fairbanks____________ St. Matthews Free Public Library.
Juneau________________Alaska Historical Society and Museum Library.
ARIZONA.
Phoenix______________ Arizona State Library.
Tucson_______________ Free Public Library.
University of Arizona Library.
ARKANSAS.
Conway_______________Hendrix College Library.
Fayetteville__________ .University of Arkansas Library.
Jonesboro_____________ State Agricultural School Library.
Little Rock____________Arkansas State Library.
Magnolia_____________ State Agricultural School Library.
Pine Bluff____________ Branch Normal College Library.
CALIFORNIA.
Berkeley______________University of California Library.
Claremont____________ Pomona College Library.
Eureka_______________ Free Public Library.
Los Angeles___________Public Library.
Sacramento___________ California State Library.
Free Public Library.
San Diego____________ Free Public Library.
San Francisco_________Mechanics Mercantile Library.
Public Library.
Santa Rosa___________ Free Public Library.
Stanford University----- Leland Stanford Junior University Library.
Stockton______________ Free Public Library.




211

212

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

COLORADO.
Boulder_______________University of Colorado Library.
Colorado Springs_____ .Colorado College Coburn Library.
Denver_*_____________College of the Sacred Heart Library.
Colorado State Library.
Public Library.
University of Denver Library.
Fort Collins---------------- Agricultural College Library.
Pueblo________________ McClelland Public Library.
CONNECTICUT.
Bridgeport____________ Public Library and Reading Room.
Hartford_____________ Connecticut State Library.
Trinity College Library.
Middletown___________ Wesleyan University Library.
New Haven___________ Yale University Library.
New London__________ Public Library.
Storrs------------------------- Connecticut Agricultural College Library.
Waterbury------------------ Silas Bronson Library.
DELAWARE.
Dover_________________Delaware State Library.
Newark_______________ Delaware College Library.
Newcastle------------------- Newcastle Library Company.
Wilmington___________ Wilmington Institute Free Library.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
Washington----------------- Army War College Library.
Agriculture, Department of, Library.
Interior, Department of, Library.
Justice, Department of, Library.
Library of Congress.
Navy Department Library.
State, Department of, Library.
Treasury Department Library.
FLORIDA.
Deland_______________ John B. Stetson University Library.
Gainesville____________ University of Florida Library.
Winter Park_________ Rollins College Library.
Jacksonville___________Public Library.
Tallahassee----------------- Carnegie Library, The Florida State Normal and
Industrial School.
Florida State Library.
GEORGIA.
Athens------------------------University of Georgia Library.
Atlanta_______________ Carnegie Library.
Georgia State Library.
Augusta_______________ Young Men’s Library Association.
Dahlonega____________ Northern Georgia Agricultural College Library.
Douglas---------------------- Georgia Normal College and Business Institute Library.
Newnan---------------------- Carnegie Library.
Oxford------------------------Emory College Library.
Savannah-------------------- Georgia State Industrial College Library.
Public Library.



SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

213

HAWAII
Honolulu_____________ College of Hawaii Library.
IDAHO.
Albion________________ State Normal School Library.
Boise_________________ Idaho State Library.
Moscow_______________University of Idaho Library.
Pocatello_____________ Academy of Idaho Library.
Twin Falls___________ Public Library.
ILLINOIS.
Belleville_____________ Public Library.
Bloomington__________ Illinois Wesleyan University Library.
Carbondale------------------Wheeler Library, Southern Illinois State Normal Uni­
versity.
Chicago_______________ John Crerar Library.
Newberry Library.
Public Library.
St. Ignatius Library.
University of Chicago Library.
Danville______________ Public Library.
De Kalb----------------------Haish Library of the Northern Illinois State Normal
School.
Evanston_____________ Northwestern University Library.
Freeport_____________ .Public Library.
Galesburg_____________Free Public Library.
Jacksonville__________ Public Library.
Joliet-------------------------- Public Library.
Lisle__________________ St. Procapius College Library.
Monmouth------------------- Monmouth College Library.
Normal------------------------Illinois State Normal University Library.
Olney________________ -Carnegie Public Library.
Peoria________________ Public Library.
Rockford-------- ------------ Public Library.
Springfield---------------- -.Illinois State Historical Society Library.
Illinois State Library.
Urbana_______________ University of Illinois Library.
INDIANA.
Bloomington---------------- Indiana University Library.
Crawfordsville------------- Wabash College Library.
Evansville------------------- Willard Library.
Fort Wayne----------------- Public Library.
Greencastle----------------- De Pauw University Library.
Hanover---------------------- Hanover College Library.
Huntington------------------City Free Library.
Indianapolis---------------- Public Library.
Indiana State Library.
Jasper-------------------------Jasper College Library.
La Fayette------------------ Purdue University Library.
Merom________________Union Christian College Library.




214

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

INDIANA—Concluded.
Muncie_______________ Public Library.
Notre Dame----------------- Lemonnier Library-Uniyersity of Notre Dame.
Richmond_____________ Morrison Reeves Library.
Terre Haute-----------------Indiana State Normal School.
Valparaiso------------------ Valparaiso University Library.
IOWA.
Ames-------------------------- Iowa State College.
Boone------------------------- Ericson Free Public Library.
Cedar Falls-----------------Public Library.
Council Bluffs_________Free Public Library
Des Moines_*----------------Public Library.
Dubuque--------------------- Carnegie-Stout Free Public Library.
East Des Moines--------- Iowa State Library.
Fairfield----------------------Fairfield Free Public Library.
Fayette----------------------- Upper Iowa University Library.
Grinnell______________ Iowa College Library.
Iowa City------------------- State University of Iowa Library.
Mount Pleasant_______ Iowa Wesleyan College Library.
Mount Vernon________ Cornell College Library.
Sioux City------------------Public Library.
Tabor-------- ---------------- Tabor College Library.
KANSAS.
Baldwin______________ Baker University Library.
Emporia______________ Kansas State Normal Library.
Hiawatha____________ .Morrill Free Public Library.
Lawrence_____________ Spooner Library, University of Kansas.
Manhattan___________ .Kansas State Agricultural College Library.
Pittsburg-------------------- Public Library.
Sterling-----------------------Cooper College Library.
Topeka------------------------Kansas State Historical Society Library.
Kansas State Library.
Wichita-----------------------Fairmount College Library.
KENTUCKY.
Danville______________ Center College of Central University of Kentucky
Library.
Frankfort_____________ Kentucky State Library.
Henderson------------------- Public Library.
Lexington--------------------State University Library.
Louisville_____________ Free Public Library.
Simpsonville__________ Lincoln Institute of Kentucky Library.
Somerset______________Carnegie Public Library.
Winchester____________ Kentucky Wesleyan College Library.




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

215

LOUISIANA.
Baton Rouge__________Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University.
Natchitoches__________ State Normal School Library.
New Orleans__________ Howard Memorial Library.
Louisiana State Museum Library.
Louisiana State Library.
New Orleans Public Library.
Tulane University Library.
Ruston________________Louisiana Industrial Institute Library.
MAINE.
Augusta______________ Maine State Library.
Bangor_______________ Public Library.
Brunswick____________ Bowdoin College Library.
Lewiston_________ ____ Bates College Library.
Orono________________ University of Maine Library.
Portland______________ Public Library.
Saco__________________ Dyer Library Association.
Waterville____________ Colby University Library.
MARYLAND.
Annapolis-------------------- Maryland State Library.
United States Naval Academy Library.
Baltimore_____________ Enoch Pratt Free Library.
Johns Hopkins University Library.
Peabody Institute Library.
Chestertown__________ Washington College Library.
Frederick_____________ Frederick College Library.
Westminster__________ Western Maryland College Library.
MASSACHUSETTS.
Amherst_______________Amnerst College Library.
Massachusetts Agricultural College Library.
Boston________________ Boston Athenaeum Library.
Public Library.
State Library of Massachusetts.
Cambridge-------------------Harvard College Library.
Lowell________________ City Library.
Lynn_________________ Public Library.
Marlborough__________ Public Library.
New Bedford-------------- Public Library.
Salem________________ Essex Institute Library.
Taunton______________ Public Library.
Tufts College_________ Tufts College Library.
Watertown____________ Free Public Library.
Williamstown-------------- Williams College Library.
Worcester------------------- American Antiquarian Society Library.
Free Public Library.




216

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

MICHIGAN.
Ann Arbor------------------ General Library, University of Michigan.
Battle Greek__________ Public School Library,
Bay City_____________ Public Library.
Benton Harbor________Benton Harbor Public Library.
Detroit_______________ Detroit College Library.
Public Library.
East Lansing_________ Michigan State Agricultural College Library.
Grand Rapids_________ Public Library.
Houghton_____________ Library of the Michigan School of Mines.
Kalamazoo____________ Public Library.
Lansing_______________Michigan State Library.
Muskegon_____________ Hackley Public Library.
Orchard Lake_________ Polish Seminary Library.
Port Huron___________ Public Library.
Saginaw______________ Hoyt Public Library.
MINNESOTA.
DuluthFaribault—
Fergus
Minneapolis___
St. Cloud—
St.

Stillwater_
Winona___

___ Free Public Library.
___ Public Library.
___ High School Library.
___ Public Library.
University of Minnesota Library.
—State Normal School Library.
innesota Historical Society Library.
Minnesota State Library.
Public Library.
____Public Libra it .
____State Normal School Library.
MISSISSIPPI.

Agricultural College___ Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College Library.
Brookhaven___________ Public Libra ry.
Greenville____________ Public Libra ry.
Jackson_______________Oarnegie-Millsaps Library.
Mississippi State Library.
Oxford_______________ Mississippi State University Library.
MISSOURI.
Cape Girardeau_______ St. Vincent’s College Library.
Carthage_____________ Public School Library.
Chillicothe____________ Hazelton Public School Library.
Columbia_____________ College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts of Missouri
State University Library.
University of Missouri Library.
Fulton________________ Westminster College Library.
Hannibal_____________ Free Public Library.
Jefferson City_________ Missouri State Library.
Kansas City__________ Public Library.
Liberty_______________ Mount Jewell College Library.




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

217

MISSOURI—Concluded.
Perryville_____________ Public School Library.
Rolla_________________ Missouri School of Mines Library.
St. Joseph____________ Free Public Library.
St. Louis_____________ Christian Brothers College Library.
Public Library.
St. Louis University Library.
Washington University Library.
Springfield____________ Drury College Library.
Warrensburg__________ State Normal School Library.
MONTANA.
Bozeman______________Montana Agricultural College Library.
Butte_________________ Montana State School of Mines Libraiy.
Helena_______________ Historical and Miscellaneous Department of Montana
State Library.
Public Library.
Missoula______________ University of Montana Library.
NEBRASKA.
Grand Island_________ Carnegie Library.
Kearney----------------- .-—
Public Library.
Lincoln----------------------- Library of the University of Nebraska.
Nebraska State Library.
Omaha_______________ Public Library.
South Omaha_________ Public Library.
NEVADA.
Carson City---------------- Nevada State Library.
Reno_________________ University of Nevada Library.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Concord---------------------- New Hampshire State Library.
Dover------------------------- Public Library.
Durham______________ Hamilton Smith Public Library.
Hanover----------------------Dartmouth College Library,
Laconia_______________Public Library.
Manchester___________ City Library.
NEW JERSEY.
Atlantic City-------------- Free Public Library.
Bayonne--------------------- Free Public Library.
Camden---------------------- Free Public Library.
Elizabeth-------------------- Public Library and Reading Room.
Jersey City___________ Free Public Library.
New Brunswick_______ Free Public Library.
Rutgers College Library.
Newark_______________Free Public Library.
New Jersey Historical Society Library.




218

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

NEW JERSEY—Concluded.
Paterson______________Free Public Library.
Princeton_____________ Princeton University Library.
Trenton______________ Free Public Library.
New Jersey State Library.
NEW MEXICO.
Albuquerque__________ University of New Mexico Library.
East Las Yegas_______ New Mexico Normal University Library.
Santa Fe_____________ Territorial Library.
Silver City___________ Curry Public Library.
State College_________ General Library of New Mexico College of Agriculture
and Mechanic Arts.
NEW YORK.
Albany_______________ New York State Library.
Brooklyn_____________ Brooklyn Public Library.
Pratt Institute Free Library.
Buffalo_______________ The Grosvenor Library.
Public Library.
.Glens Falls___________ Crandall Free Library.
Hamilton_____________ Colgate University Library.
Ithaca____ ___________ Cornell University Library.
Keuka Park__________ Keuka College Public Library.
New York____________ Astor Branch New York Public Library.
College of the City of New York Library.
Columbia University Library.
Cooper Union for Advancement of Science and Art
Libra ry.
General Library of New York University.
Lenox Branch New York Public Library.
New York Law Institute Library.
The World Library, Pulitzer Building.
Newburgh____________ Free Library.
Plattsburg____________ Public Library.
Poughkeepsie_________ Adriance Memorial Library.
Rochester_____________ Rochester University Library.
Schenectady---------------- Union College Library.
Syracuse_____________ Syracuse University Library.
Troy_________________ Troy Public Library.
Utica_________________ Public Library.
West Point___________ United States Military Academy Library.
White Plains_________ Supreme Court Library.
Yonkers______________ Public Library.
NORTH CAROLINA.
Chapelhill____________ University of North Carolina Library.
Da vi son______________ Union Libra ry.
Durham______________ Trinity College Library.
Greensboro___________ Colored Agricultural and Mechanical College Library.
Hendersonville________ Fruitland Institute Library.



SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

219

NORTH CAROLINA—Concluded.
Newton_______________ Catawba College Library.
Raleigh_______________North Carolina State Library.
Wake Forest__________ Wake Forest College Library.
Washington___________ Public Schools Library.
NORTH DAKOTA.
Bismarck_____________ North Dakota State Library.
State Historical Society Library.
Fargo________________ North Dakota Agricultural College Library.
University____________ State University of North Dakota Library.
Valley City______ ____ State Normal School Library.
OHIO.
Alliance______________ Mount Union College Library.
Athens_______________ Carnegie Library.
Bucyrus______________ Public Library.
Cincinnati____________ Public Library.
Cleveland____________ Case Library.
Library of Adelbert College of Western Reserve Uni­
versity.
Public Library.
Columbus_____________ Ohio State Library.
Ohio State University Library.
Public Library.
Dayton_______________ Public Library and Museum.
Delaware_____________ Ohio Wesleyan University, Charles Slocum Library.
Gambier--------------------- Kenyon College Library.
Granville_____________ Denison University Library.
Hiram________________Hiram College Library.
Lebanon______________ Lebanon Public Library.
Marietta--------------------- Marietta College Library.
Oberlin----------------------- Oberlin College Library.
Oxford_______________ Miami University Library.
Portsmouth___________ Free Public Library.
Sidney_______________ Public Library.
Springfield------------------ Warder Public Library.
Steubenville----------------Carnegie Library.
Toledo______ ^________ Public Library.
Van Wert--------------------Brumpack Library of Van Wert.
OKLAHOMA.
Ada----------------------------East Central State Normal School Library.
Northwestern State Normal School Library.
Enid_____ —_________ Public Library.
Langston-------------------- Colored Agricultural and Normal University Library.
Muskogee--------------------High School Library.
Norman---------------------- University of Oklahoma Library.
Oklahoma------------------- Oklahoma State Library.
Stillwater------------------- Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College Library.
Tishomingo----------------- Murray State School of Agriculture Library.



220

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

OREGON.
Corvallis_____________ Oregon Agricultural College Library.
Eugene----------------------- University of Oregon Library.
Forest Grove_____ ____ Tualatin Academy and Pacific University Library.
Portland______________Library Association.
Reed College Library.
Salem------------------------- Oregon State Library.
PENNSYLVANIA.
Bradford_____________ Carnegie Public Library.
Carlisle_______________Tlie J. Herman Bosler Memorial Library.
Erie__________________ Public Library.
Gettysburg____________ Pennsylvania College Library.
Harrisburg___________ Fennsyhr
ania State Library.
Haverford____________ Haverford College Library.
Huntington___________ Juanita College Library.
Lancaster_____________ Watts De Peyster Library.
Meadville_____________ Allegheny College Library.
Norristown___________ William McCann Library.
Philadelphia__________ Free Library of Philadelphia.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania Library.
Library Co. of Philadelphia.
Mercantile Library of Philadelphia.
Philadelphia Museum Library.
University of Pennsylvania Library.
Pittsburgh____________ Carnegie Library.
University of Pittsburgh Library.
Reading______________ Reading Library.
Scranton______________Public Library.
South Bethlehem______ Lehigh University Library.
State College__________ Carnegie Library of Pennsylvania State College.
Warren_______________ Public Library.
Washington___________ Memorial Library, Washington and Jefferson College.
Wilkes-Barre__________Wyoming Historical and Geological Society Library.
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
Manila_______________ Library of Philippine Government,
RHODE ISLAND.
Kingston______________ Rhode
Arts
Providence____________ Brown
Public
Rhode
Westerly______________Public

Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic
Library.
University Library.
Library.
Island State Library.
Library.

SOUTH CAROLINA.
Charleston.




.Charleston College Library.
Charleston Library Society.

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

221

SOUTH CAROLINA—Concluded.
Clemson College_______ Clemson Agricultural College Library.
Columbia_____________ South Carolina State Library.
University of South Carolina Library.
Orangeburg__________ -Colored Normal Industrial Agricultural and Mechan­
ical College of South Carolina Library.
Rockhill______________ Winthrop Normal and Industrial College Carnegie
Library.
SOUTH DAKOTA.
Brookings_____________South Dakota State College of Agriculture and Me­
chanic Arts Library.
Mitchell______________ Dakota Wesleyan University Library.
Pierre________________ South Dakota State Library.
Sioux Falls___________ Carnegie Free Tublic Library.
Vermilion_____________ University of South Dakota Library.
Yankton______________ Yankton College Library.
TENNESSEE.
Chattanooga__________ Public Library.
Knoxville_____________ University of Teunessee Library.
Memphis__ .___________ Cossitt Library.
Murfreesboro_________ Middle Tennessee State Normal Library.
Nashville_____________ Carnegie Library.
Tennessee State Library.
Vanderbilt University Library.
Sewanee______________ University of the South Library.
Spring Hill-----------------Branham & Hughes School Library.
TEXAS.
Austin_______________ .Texas State Library.
University of Texas Library.
Clarendon_____________Clarendon College Library.
College Station________ Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas Library.
Dallas________________ Public Library.
El Paso_______________Public Library.
Fort Worth___________ Carnegie Library.
Galveston_____________ Rosenburg Library.
Georgetown----------------- Southwestern University Library
Houston______________ Lyceum and Carnegie Library.
San Antonio__________ Carnegie Library.
Waco_________________ Baylor Library.
UTAH.
Logan________________ Agricultural College Library.
Manti________________ High School Library.
Ogden__________ _____ Carnegie Free Library.
Provo________________ Brigham Young University Library.
Salt Lake City________ University of Utah Library.




222

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

VERMONT.
Burlington____________ Fletcher Free Library.
University of Vermont Library.
Middlebury___________ Middlebury College Library.
Montpelier____________ Vermont State Library.
Northfield___ _________ Carnegie Library of Norwich University.
VIRGINIA.
Blacksburg___________ Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Poly­
technic Institute Library.
Bridgewater---------------- Bridgewater College Library.
Emory------------------------ Emory and Henry College Library.
Hampden Sidney______ Hampden Sidney College Library.
Lexington--------------------Virginia Military Institute Library.
"Washington and Lee University Library.
Norfolk_______________ Public Library.
Richmond--------------------Richmond College Library.
Virginia State Library.
Salem________________ Roanoke College Library.
University____________ Virginia University Library.
WASHINGTON.
Everett_______________ Public Library.
Olympia________ _____ Washington State Library.
Pullman______________ State College of Washington Library.
Seattle_______________ Public Library.
University of Washington Library.
Spokane______________ Spokane Public Library.
Tacoma______________ .Tacoma Public Library.
Walla Walla__________ Whitman College Library.
WEST VIRGiNIA.
Charleston____________ Department of Archives and History, State Library.
Elkins________________ Davis and Elkins College Library.
Fairmont_____________ Normal School Library.
Institute_____________ -West Virginia Colored Institute Library.
Keyser______________ ^.Preparatory Branch West Virginia University Library.
Morgantown__________ West Virginia University Library.
Parkersburg__________ Carnegie Library.
WISCONSIN.
Appleton______________ Appleton Library, Lawrence University.
Beloit________________ Beloit College Library.
Eau Claire____________Public Library.
Fond du Lac--------------- Public Library.
La Crosse____________ Public Library.
Madison______________ State Historical Society library.
State Library.
Milwa ukee------------------ Public Library.
Racine________________Public Library.
Superior______________ Superior Public Library.




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

WYOMING.
Cheyenne-------------------- Wyoming State Library.
Laramie______________ University of Wyoming Library.
Sheridan_____________ Carnegie Public Library.
PUBLIC LIBRARIES.
ALABAMA.
Ensley________________ Public Library.
CALIFORNIA.
Corona_______________ Corona Public Library.
Fresno________________Public Library.
Healdsburg___________ Healdsburg Public Library.
La ton________________ Public Library.
Los Angeles__________ Arroyo Seco Branch Library.
Oakland---------------------- Public Library.
Pasadena-------------------- Public Library.
Pomona______________ Pomona Public Library.
Porterville____________ Porterville Public Library.
Redlands______________ A. K. Smiley Public Library.
Richmond--------------------Public Library.
San Francisco________ James Hugh Wise Library.
San Jose-------------------- Public Library.
San Mateo------------------ Public Library.
San Pedro____________ San Pedro Library.
Santa Ana____________ Free Public Library.
Santa Barbara------------ Free Public Library.
Visalia_______________ Visalia Free Library.
Whittier______________ Whittier Public Library.
CONNECTICUT.
Bristol_______________ Public Library.
Danbury______________ Public Library.
Hartford_____________ Public Library.
New Haven___________ Free Public Library.
Norwalk______________ City Library.
Southport_____________ Pequot Library.
Westport_____________ Westport Library.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
Washington___________ District of Columbia Public Library.
ILLINOIS.
Altamont---------------------Altamont Public Library.
Aurora_______________ Public Library.
Delavan---------------------- Ayers Public Library.
95052°—Bull. 174—15------15




223

224

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

ILLINOIS—Concluded.
Elgin-------------------------- Gail Borden Public Library.
Elmhurst_____________ Meusch Memorial Library.
Evanston_____________ Evanston Public Library.
Lincoln____ ___________ Lincoln Public Library.
Moline________________ Public Library.
Rock Island-----------------Public Library.
INDIANA.
East Chicago__________Public Library.
Gary_________________ Gary Public Library.
Lebanon______________ Lebanon Public Library.
Terre Haute__________ Emeline Fairbanks Memorial Library.
Wabash_______________Carnegie Library.
IOWA.
Iowa City------------------- Public Library.
New Hampton------------- Public Library.
Ottumwa_____________ Public Library.
Storm L ak e__________ Storm Lake Public Library.
Woodbine_____________ Woodbine Public Library.
KANSAS.
Osage City____________ Public Library.
Ottawa_______________ Carnegie Free Library.
Paola_________________ Free Public Library.
Wichita_______________Public Library.
MAINE.
Auburn_______________ Auburn Public Library.
Farmington___________ Public Library.
Lewiston_____________ Public Library.
MASSACHUSETTS.
Athol_________________ Athol Public Library.
Beverly_______________ Public Library, Cabot Street.
Brookline_____________ Public Library.
Fitchburg_____________ Public Library.
Haverhill_____________ Public Library.
Holyoke---------------------- Public Library.
Lawrence-------------------- Public Library.
Northampton__________ Forbes Library.
Salem________________ Public Library.
Somerville____________ Public Library.
Waltham---------------------Waltham Public Library.
Westfield---------------------Westfield Athemeum Free Public Library.
Woburn-----------------------Public Library.




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

225

MICHIGAN.
Adrian_______________ Public Library.
Grand Haven_________ Grand Haven Public Library.
Jackson______________ Public Library.
Manistee______________Manistee City Public and School Library.
Marquette____________ Peter White Public Library.
Menominee____________Spies Public Library.
Owosso_______________ Owosso Public Library.
MINNESOTA.
Hibbing______________ Hibbing Carnegie Library.
Minneapolis___________ Seven Corners Branch Library, 300 Fifteenth Avenue
south.
Seward School Branch Library, Twenty-eighth Avenue
south and Twenty-fourth Street.
Nashwauk____________ Nashwauk Public Library.
Spring Valley________ .Carnegie Library.
MISSOURI.
St. Louis_____________ Mercantile Library.
Savannah--------------------Savannah Public Library.
MONTANA.
Butte_________________Free Public Library.
Great Falls___________ Public Library.
Kalispell-------------------- Carnegie Public Library.
Missoula______________ Missoula Public Library.
NEBRASKA.
Broken Bow__________ Public Library.
Lincoln-----------------------Lincoln City Library.
Pawnee City--------------- Carnegie Public Library.
NEW JERSEY.
Newark-----------------------Business Branch Free Public Library, 18 Clinton Street.
Plainfield_____________ Public Library.
NEW YORK.
Brooklyn-------------------- Public Library, Brownsville Branch, Glenmore Avenue
and Watkins Street.
Elmira----------------------- Steele Memorial Library.
Jamestown------------------James Prendergast Free Library.
New Rochelle_________ Public Library.
New York-------------------New York Public Library, 476 Fifth Avenue.
Port Jervis___________ Free Library.
Rochester--------------------Reynolds Library. 150 Spring Street.
Syracuse--------------------- Public Library.




226

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

NORTH CAROLINA.
Greensboro____________Public Libra ry.
NORTH DAKOTA.
Bismarck_____________ Public Library Committee.
OHIO.
Cliillicothe____________ Public Library.
Middletown___________ Free Public Library.
Navarre______________ Navarre Public Library.
Newa rk_______________Public Libra ry.
Wooster______________ Public Library.
Youngstown___________McMillan Free Library.
OKLAHOMA.
Oklahoma____________ Carnegie Library.
OREGON.
Astoria_______________ Astoria Public Library.
Medford______________ 1*ubl ie Libra ry.
PENNSYLVANIA.
Allentown____________ Free Library, 914 Hamilton Avenue.
Beaver Falls__________ Carnegie Free Library.
Butler________________ Butler Free Library Association.
Canton_______________ Public Library.
Chester_______________ Chester Free Library, 116 East Broad Street.
Washington___________ Citizens’ Free Library.
Wilkes-Barre_________ Osterhout Free Library.
Williamsport__________ James V. Brown Library.
RHODE ISLAND.
Pawtucket____________ Deborah Cook Sayles Public Library.
Providence____________ Athenaeum Libra ry.
SOUTH DAKOTA.
Mitchell______________ Carnegi e Libra ry.
TENNESSEE.
Knoxville____________ Lawson-McGhee Library.
TEXAS.
Clebourne_____________Carnegie Public Library, 201 North Caddo Street.
Waco_________________ Waco Public Library, Twelfth and Austin Streets.
WASHINGTON.
Bellingham___________ Public Library.
South Bend___________ Public Library.
Walla Walla__________ Public Library.



SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

227

WISCONSIN.
Delavan__ ____________Aram Public Library.
Lake Geneva__________Public Library.
Madison______________ Wisconsin Free Library, legislative reference depart­
ment.
Marinette_____________ Stephenson Public Library, 1606 Main Street.
Neenah_______________ Public Library.
Portage_______________Public Library.
Stanley_______________ Public Library.
SCHOOL, COLLEGE, CLUB, MUNICIPAL AND STATE REFER­
ENCE AND COMMERCIAL LIBRARIES (NOT GOVERNMENT DE­
POSITORIES).
ARKANSAS.
Arkadelphia__________ Ouachita College Library.
CALIFORNIA.
Los Angeles___________High School Library.
University of Southern California Library.
Oakland______________ Mills College Library.
Oakland Free Library, municipal reference department.
Quincy-----------------------Women’s Christian Temperance Union Library.
San Anselmo__________ San Francisco Theological Seminary Library.
San Diego____________ San Diego High School Library.
San Francisco________ Associated Charities Library, 1500 Jackson Street.
Mills Building Law Library.
COLORADO.
Greeley_______________ State Teachers’ College Library.
CONNECTICUT.
Hartford_____________ State Board of Education Library.
Travelers’ Insurance Co. Law Library.
Watkinson Library of Reference.
New Britain__________ New Britain Institute Library.
New Haven----------------- Yale University, Political Science Library, 43 Hillhouse Avenue.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
Washington-----------------Census, Bureau of, Library.
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Bureau of, Library.
Georgetown University Library.
Howard University Carnegie Library.
Interstate Commerce Commission Library.
Library of Congress, Division of Documents.
Marist Seminary Library, Pleasant Hill.
Markets, Office of, Library, Department of Agriculture.
Public Documents Library.
Trinity College Library, Michigan Avenue.




228

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

GEORGIA.
Athens_______________ State Normal School Carnegie Library.
Atlanta_______________ Clark University Library.
Demorest_____________ Piedmont College Library.
IDAHO.
Caldwell______________ College of Idaho Library.
ILLINOIS.
Aurora_______________ Wells College Library.
Carthage_____________ Carthage College Library.
Chicago______________ City Club of Chicago Library, 315 Plymouth Court.
Lewis Institute Library, Madison and Robey Streets.
People’s Gas Light & Coke Co. Library.
University of Chicago, Harper Memorial Library.
Jacksonville__________ Illinois College Library.
INDIANA.
Earlham______________ Earlham College Library.
IOWA.
Cedar Palls___________ Iowa State Teachers’ College Library.
Cedar Rapids-------------- Coe College Library.
Decorah______________ Norwegian Lutheran College Library.
Des Moines___________ Des Moines College Library.
Iowa State Library, Legislative' Reference Depart­
ment.
Indianola_____________ Simpson College Library.
Lamoni_______________ Graceland College Library.
Sioux City____________Morningside College Library.
KANSAS.
Atchison______________ St. Benedict’s College Library.
Hays_________________ Western Branch State Normal School Library.
Lansing______________ Prison Library.
Lawrence_____________ University of Kansas, Spooner Library.
Ottawa_______________ Ottawa University Library.
Topeka_______________ Washburn College Library.
KENTUCKY.
Berea________________ Berea College Library.
Bowling Green________ State Normal School Library.
LOUISIANA.
New Orleans__________Manual Training School, Isadore Newman Library.




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATION'S OF THE BUREAU.

229

MAINE.
Bangor_______________ University of Maine Law Library.
MARYLAND.
Baltimore____________ St Mary’s Seminary Library, North Paca Street.
College Park__________Maryland Agricultural College Library.
MASSACHUSETTS.
Boston_______________ Boston University Law School Library, 11 Ashburton
Place.
Bureau of Statistics Library, State House.
Chamber of Commerce Library.
Civil Service House Library, 112 Salem Street.
Congregational Library, 14 Beacon Street.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Library.
School, Social Workers’ Library, 9 Hamilton Place.
Simmons College Library.
State House Library.
Cambridge____________ Andover Harvard Theological Library.
Harvard University, Social Ethics Library.
Lawrence_____________ Lawrence Law Library.
Northampton__________Smith College Library.
Peabody______________ Peabody Institute Library.
South Hadley________ Mount Holyoke College Library.
Springfield____________ City Library Association.
Y. M. C. A. International Training School Library.
Wellesley_____________ Wellesley College Library.
Worcester____________ Clark University Library.
Worcester Polytechnic Institute Library.
MICHIGAN.
Albion________________ Albion College Library.
Ann Arbor____________ University of Michigan Library (the Labadie Collec­
tion).
Calumet______________ Calumet & Hecla Mining Co. Library.
Holland______________ Hope College Library.
Marquette____________ Northern State Normal School Library.
Nazareth_____________ Nazareth Academy Library.
Olivet________________ Olivet College Library.
MINNESOTA.
Duluth_______________ Builders’ Exchange Library, 504 Lyceum Building.
Mankato______________ State Normal School Library.
Minneapolis__________ .Minneapolis Journal Library.
St. Paul______________ Hamline University Library.
Macalester College Library.
State Board of Visitors for Public Instruction Library.




230

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

MISSOURI.
Cape Girardeau----------- Missouri State Normal School Library.
Joplin------------------------- Y. M. C. A. Library, 117 East Fourth Street.
Marionville___________ Marionville College Library.
St. Louis---------------------Harris Teachers’ College Library, Park and Theresa
Avenues.
St. Louis School of Social Economy Library.
Young Men’s Sodality Library, 15 North Grand Avenue.
Springfield-------------------State Normal School Library.
MONTANA.
Bozeman______________ Agricultural Experiment Station Library.
NEBRASKA.
Bellevue_____________ .Bellevue College Library.
Lincoln_______________ Nebraska Legislative Reference Bureau Library.
Omaha_______________ University of Omaha Library.
University Place______ Nebraska Wesleyan University Library.
NEVADA.
Reno_________________ Agricultural Experiment Station Library.
NEW JERSEY.
Glassboro____________ J-Iigh School Library.
Hoboken______________ Stevens Institute of Technology Library.
Madison______________ Drew Theological Seminary Library.
NEW MEXICO.
Roswell______________ .New Mexico Military Institute Library.
NEW YORK.
Brooklyn_____________ Bureau of Charities Library, 60 Schermerhom Street.
Buffalo_______________ Charity Organization Society Library, 19 Tupper Street.
Clinton_______________ Hamilton College Library.
Geneva_______________ Hobart College Library.
New York_____________ American Protective Tariff League Library, 839
Broadway.
Bureau Social Service Library, 156 Fifth Avenue.
Church Association for Advancing Interest of Labor
Library, 416 Lafayette Street.
Engineering Societies Library, 29 West Thirty-nintK
Street.
Free Library, General Society Mechanics and Trades­
men, 16 West Forty-fourth Street.
High School of Commerce Library, 155 West Sixty-fifth
Street.
Merchants’ Association Library, 66 Lafayette Street.
Municipal Reference Library, 280 Broadway, room 150.




SUBJECT INDEX OF TH E PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU,

231

NEW YORK—Concluded.
New York (concluded)..National Civic Federation Library, 1 Madison Avenue.
New York University Law Library, 32 Waverly Place.
New York University School of Commercial Accounting
and Finance Library, 32 Waverly Place.
Rand School Library, 43 East Twenty-second Street.
Russell Sage Foundation Library, 130 East Twentysecond Street.
Searchlight Information Library, 450 Fourth Avenue.
Union Theological Seminary Library, Broadway and
One hundred and twentieth Street.
Y. M. C. A. Historical Library, 124 East Twenty-eighth
Street.
Y. M. C. A. Library, 215 West Twenty-third Street.
Poughkeepsie__________Vassal* College Library.
OHIO.
Cincinnati____________ Ohio Brewers’ Association Library, 22 Garfield Place.
Ohio Mechanics* Institute, Timothy G. Day Library.
University of Cincinnati Library.
Young Men’s Mercantile Library.
Cleveland_____________ Library of Research in Government, Western Reserve
University.
Columbus-------------------- Library, Industrial Commission of Ohio, Department of
Investigation and Statistics.
Dayton_______________ Chamber of Commerce Library.
Painesville____________Lake Erie College Library.
Springfield------------------ Wittenberg College Library.
Westerville__________ - Otterbein University Library.
Yellow Springs________ Antioch College Library.
OKLAHOMA.
Oklahoma____________ Historical Society Library, Carnegie Building.
OREGON.
McMinnville---------------- McMinnville College Library.
PENNSYLVANIA.
AJinville______________ Lebanon Valley College Library.
Bryn Athyn___________ Academy Library.
Bryn Mawr------------------Bryn Mawr College Library.
Chambersburg_________Wilson College Library.
Chester-----------------------Bucknell library.
CoUegeville----------------- Ursinus College Library.




232

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

PENNSYLVANIA—Concluded.
Easton------------------------Lafayette College Library.
Edinboro_____________ Northwestern State Normal School Library.
Lincoln University_ __ Vail Memorial Library.
_
Meadville-------------- ----- Meadville Theological School Library.
Philadelphia---------------- American Philosophical Society Library, 104 South
Fifth Street
Bourse Library.
Children’s Bureau Library, 419 South Fifteenth Street.
Drexel Institute Library.
Girard College Library.
Law Association Philadelphia Library, G O City Hall
O
Building.
United Gas Improvement Co. Library. Broad and Arch
Streets.
Pittsburgh____________ Carnegie Technical Schools Library, Commercial En­
gineering, Schenley Park.
RHODE ISLAND.
Providence------------------.Y. M. C. A. Library, 333 Industrial Trust Building.
SOUTH DAKOTA.
Canton------------------------Augustana College Library.
Huron________________ Huron College Library.
Spearfish---------------------Normal State School Library.

TENNESSEE.
Maryville_____________ Maryville College Library.
Nashville_____________ Fisk University Library.
Ooitewah_____________ James County High School Library.
TEXAS.
Galveston____________ .University of St. Mary Library.
Greenville____________ Chamber of Commerce Library.
Marshall_____________ .Bishop College Library.
San Antonio________ ^_.St. Mary's College Library, College Street.
VIRGINIA.
Hampton_____________ Hampton Institute Library.
Petersburg____________ Benevolent Mechanics’ Association Library.
Richmond____________ .Virginia Union University Library.
WASHINGTON.
Seattle________________Chamber of Commerce Library.
Post-Intelligencer Libra ry.




SUBJECT INDEX OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU.

WISCONSIN.
La Crosse_____________ State Normal School Library.
Milton________________ Milton College Library.
Milwaukee____________ Municipal Reference Library, City Hail.
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. Library.
Oshkosh______________ Normal School Library.
Prairie du Chien______ Sacred Heart College Library.
Ripon------------------------- Ripon College Library.
Stevens Point_________ Normal School Library.
Superior-------------------- .Superior State Normal School Library.
Watertown____________Northwestern College Library.
CANADIAN LIBRARIES.
Edmonton, Alberta_____Provincial Library.
Halifax, Nova Scotia___ Presbyterian College Library.
Kingston, Ontario_____ Queen’s University Library.
Montreal________ :____ .McGill University Library.
Ottawa_______________ Parliament Libra ry.
Toronto---------------------- Legislative Library of Ontario.
McMaster University Library, Bloor Street, W.
Public Library of Toronto.
University of Toronto Library.
Victoria University Library.
Victoria______________ Provincial Library, Parliament Building.
Winnipeg, Manitoba____Provincial Library.
OTHER LIBRARIES.
Havana, Cuba------------- Camara de Representantes.
Manila, P. I___________ Philippine Library.
San Juan, P. R_________Supreme Court Library.




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