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U N IT E D STA TES D E P A R T M E N T OF LA BO R
Frances P erk in s, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
Isador L u b in , Commissioner (o n lea ve)
A.
F. H in rich s, A cting Commissioner

+

Subject Index
to the

M onthly Labor R eview
VOLUMES 12 TO 51

January 1921 to December 1940
+

Prepared by
ED IT O R IA L A N D R ESEA R CH DIVISION
H ugh S. H anna, C hief

Bulletin 7s[o. 696

U N IT E D S T A T E S

G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICE
W A SH IN G T O N : 1942

F or sale b y th e S u p erin ten d en t o f D ocu m en ts, W ashington, D . Cm




Price 40 c en ts

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
F rances P e r k in s , Secretary

+
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
• I sador L u b in , Commissioner (on leave)

A. F. H in r ic h s , Acting Commissioner
D onald D a v e n p o r t , Chief, Employ­ A r y n e s s J oy , Chief, Prices an d Cost

ment and Occupational
Branch

O u tlo o k

H en r y J. F itzg er ald , Chief, Business

Management Branch

of Living Branch
N. A rnold T olles , Chief, Working
Conditions and Industrial Relations
Branch

H ugh S. H a n n a , Chief, Editorial arid S id n e y W. W il c o x , Chief Statistician

Research
CHIEFS OF d iv isio n s

H erm an B. B y e r , Construction and R o bert J. M y e r s , Wage Analysis

Public Employment
J. M. C u t t s , Wholesale Prices
J o seph D r ag er , Machine Tabulation

F lorence P e t e r so n , Industrial Rela­

tions
B oris S t e r n , Labor Information Service

W. D u a n e E v a n s , Productivity and S tella S te w a rt , Historical Studies of
Technological Development
Wartime Problems
D al H itchcock , Post-War Labor Prob­
L e w is E. T a l b e r t , Employment Sta­
lems
tistics
E th el D. H oo ver , Retail Prices
E mmett H. W elc h , Occupational Out­
W a lter G. K e im , Price Analysis
look
M a x D. K o ssor is , Industrial Injuries
n




F a ith M. W illia m s , Cost of Living

Letter o f Transmittal

U nited S tates D epartm ent of L abor ,
B u r ea u of L abor S tatistics ,

Washington, D. C., June 21, 1941T he S ecretary of L abo r :

I have the honor to transmit herewith the Subject Index to volumes
12 to 51, Monthly Labor Review, January 1921 to December 1940,
prepared by Elizabeth L. Black, assisted by Mary Lee Nichol. The
index incorporates the 6-month indexes which are prepared by
Jeannette M. Watson.
The index to volumes 1 to 11, July 1915 to December 1920, will be
found in Bulletin No. 695.
A. F. H in r ic h s ,
Acting Commissioner
Hon. F rances P e r k in s ,
Secretary oj Labor




.
iii

.

Key to Abbreviations
AAA — Agricultural Adjustment Administration
A. F. of L. — American Federation of Labor
App. — Appeals
A. S. A. — American Standards Association
BLS — Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bull. — Bulletin
COC — Civilian Conservation Corps
C. I. O. — Congress of Industrial Organizations
Cir. —■Circuit
Com. — Committee
Cong. — Congress
Ct. — Court
dW A — Civil Works Administration
Dist. — District
Fed. — Federal
FE R A -— Federal Emergency Relief Administration
FH A — Federal Housing Administration
FSA — Farm Security Administration
I. A. G. L. O. — International Association of Govern­
mental Labor Officials
I. A. I. A. B. C. — International Association of In­
dustrial Accident Boards and Commissions
ICC — Interstate Commerce Commission
ILO — International Labor Office
I. W. W. — International Workers of the World
STt. — Joint
Jud. — Judicial
IV




Leg. — Legislative
M. L. R. — M onthly Labor Review
N IR A — National Industrial Recovery Administra­
tion
N IR B — National Industrial Recovery Board
N L B — National Labor Board
N L R B — National Labor Relations Board
N R A — National Recovery Administration
N Y A — National Youth Administration
Pub. — Public
PW A — Public Works Administration
REA — Rural Electrification Administration
Res. — Resolution
RFC — Reconstruction Finance Corporation
Sess. — Session
Spec. — Special
Sup. — Supreme
T N E C — Temporary National Economic Com­
mittee
TVA — Tennessee Valley Authority
IT. M. W. — United Mine Workers
U. S. — United States
USHA — United States Housing Authority
U. S. S. R. — Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
W PA — Work Projects Administration (formerly
Works Progress Administration)

Bulletin J\[o. 696 of the
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
Subject Index to M on th ly Labor R eview
Volum es 12-51
January 1921-December 1940
N o t e .—

This is a Subject Index. Names of authors do not appear as main entries.
(See Key to abbreviations)

Abrasive grain industry. N R A code, effective June 11, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions______________ __________________________________ _____________________
1934—July 46
Abrasive industry. D ust hazard in____ _____________ _____________________________ 1926—Jan. 179-81
Abrasives (coated) industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 8, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions____ ____ _______ ______ __________ ____ ________________________________ 1934—Feb. 298
Anthracite industry. Average absence rate, all workers, 1921______________________
1923—Oct. 19
Great Britain. Coal mines, English and Scottish, rate of absenteeism, 1927 and 1928. __ 1931—July 92-4
Industrial. (Hackett)___ __________ _____ __________ ____________ ____________ 1922—June 19-22
----- Study of. (Quinby). . . ____ _________________ ______________ ______________ 1921—Oct. 1-9
Penalties for absence from work. Policies in factories, 348 c o m p a n ie s .......................... 1937—July 66
Textile mills. Philadelphia, 1920 to 1922.._______ ______ ________________________ 1923—Jan. 122-4
Academic costume industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 5, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions____ ______________ _________ ____________ ___________ _________________ 1934—Apr. 809
Accident compensation. (See Workmen’s compensation.)
Accident, industrial, and occupational disease. (See Occupational diseases, under Indus­
trial diseases and poisons; also under Workmen’s compensation.)
Accident insurance, United States:
And health. Coverage, nonoccupational accidents only, maximum benefit $40 per
week___ ____ ____________ ________________________ ____________ _____ ___ ____ 1932—July 66-6
----- Provided by companies for employees; findings of National Industrial Conference
Board, 1935__________________________________________________________________ 1936—July 89
Group accidental death and dismemberment. Similar to double indemnity of ordinary
insurance___________________________________________________________________
1936—July 66
Older workers. Employers’ expenses for, not greater than for younger workers____ 1939—M ay 1078-9
(See also Workmen’s compensation.)
Accident insurance, foreign countries:
Netherlands. N et cost, in percentage of wages, 1932-34, by industry.. 1938—Feb. 435; 1939—Jan. 41-2
New Zealand. Law of Sept. 14, 1938, provisions___ _____ _____________ _________ 1939—Feb. 325-6
Sweden. Compulsory, under law of 1916_____ ______ ___________ ________________
1938—Jan. 98
Switzerland. N et cost, in percentage of wages, 1932-34, by industry___ 1938—Feb. 435; 1939—Jan. 41
(See also Workmen’s compensation.)
Accident prevention, general:
A scientific approach. (Heinrich)______________________________________________ 1931—June 73-4
Accidents and production. Relationship between, American Engineering Council
study, summary of findings___________________________________________________ 1927—Dec. 64-8
Are accidents increasing? (Stewart)....................................................................................... 1926—Aug. 46-60
Bibliography..... ...................................... .................................................................................... 1927—Sept. 236-45
Burns from storage batteries________________________________ ____ ____________ 1923—Jan. 153-4
Causes of accidents. Analysis of. (Chicago Bureau of Safety)................................... .
1922—Mar. 145
----- Fatigue and temperature, effects of, Great Britain...................................................... 1923—Feb. 230-1
----- Six principal. Concentration of effort on, Ohio........................................................... 1932—Oct. 845-6
Company plans. Findings of National Industrial Conference Board......... .................
1936—July 90
Congresses re accidents. (See under Conventions, meetings, etc.).
Cost of accidents. In the home________________________________________________ 1927—Mar. 36-7
----- Industrial, to the State, the employer (measurable incidental), and the man.
(Heinrich).................. ............... ............................................................... 1927—Aug. 46-50; 1930—Nov. 72-80
Dust explosions. (See under Dusts, industrial.)
Electric wiring and apparatus. National safety code, approved Sept. 1,1933................. 1934—Jan. 90-1
Elevator interlocks, mechanical. Effectiveness of_____________________ _________ 1923—Apr. 1-10
Eye hazards, injuries, and preventive measures. (See under Eye injuries.)
Federal civilian employees. Safety work, effectiveness...................................... .............. 1936—Aug. 360-2
Federal Interdepartmental Safety Council. Establishment, composition, and objec­
tives.............................................................................................................................. ................ 1939—June 1331-2




2

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Accident prevention, general—Continued.
P age
Federal projects. Recommendations of I. A. Q. L. O. convention, October 1935_____ 1935—N ov. 1267
Foremen’s responsibility for accidents. (Speech, Heinrich)____ _____ _____________ 1930—Feb. 83-8
Gas masks and respirators, in railroad tunnels.......... .............................................................. 1923—Feb. 288-9
Government Printing Office. Safety work............................................................................. 1936—Aug. 360-1
Illumination. (See Illumination, workplace.)
Industrial-accident prevention and workmen’s compensation problem. (Stewart) 1928—Jan. 67-73
Injured worker and his needs. (French)_______________________________________ 1923—June 204-5
I. A. I. A. B. C. Proceedings of annual conventions. (See Conventions, meetings,
e t c —Accident Boards and Commissions.)
Legislation. (See Laws and legislation, under specific subject.)
Lighting. (See under Illumination, workplace.)
Machinery, safeguarding of in manufacture. (I. A. G. L. O., 1939, resolution)_____ 1939—N ov. 1128
N avy Department, shore establishments, civilian employees, safety work________ 1936—Aug. 360-2
Problems of (addresses on)___________ _______ _________________ 1926—Aug. 45-6; 1928—Jan. 67-73
Progress in accident prevention, the acid test of. (Stewart)_______________________ 1927—Jan. 61-4
Public Works, Federal Emergency Administration of. Contract stipulation................. 1933—Oct. 799
Reduction of accidents in industry. (Bowers)________________________ __________ 1930—July 79-80
Reporting, and administration of compensation acts, State agencies........................... 1921—Jan. 171-4
Safety. Activities of U. S. Government. (Stew art).____________________ _______ 1923—Feb. 220-3
----- American industry. (D avis)__________ _____ _____________________________ . 1924—Nov. 193-5
----- And industrial health. National Conference on Labor Legislation, October 1935,
committee report and recommendations______________________________________ 1935—N ov. 1252-3
----- And production. American Engineering Council study and report............... 1926—Aug. 53-4;
1928—M ay 70-3
----- And regulations, industrial. Status of, various States. (Baldwin)................... 1933—N ov. 1103-19
----- Conventions, etc., on. (See under Conventions, meetings, etc.)
----- Employees’ representation with reference to. (M cClellan)............. ........................... 1922—N ov. 22-6
— = French Indo-China, Labor Code, decree of Dec. 30, 1936.............................................. 1937—Aug. 380
----- Industrial. (American Academy of Political and Social Science)______________ 1926—Mar. 131-4
----- Legislation. (See Laws and legislation, U . S., Federal and general—Safety.)
----- Policy, Westinghouse Air Brake Co., cooperation versus compulsion________ _____ 1927—July 57-8
----- Statistics, National Safety Council annual meeting, October 1938.................................. 1939—Jan. 116
Safety campaigns. Value of, to industrial workers. (Price).............................................. 1923—July 192
Safety codes. Basic principles of standards council, A. S. A., text.................................. 1931—M ay 63-4
----- Best methods of securing adoption____________________ _______ _______________ 1925—Apr. 209
----- Code work of U. S. Bureau of Standards transferred to A. S. A ________________ 1933—Sept. 581-2
----- Compressed air (caisson and tunneling) work, scope of proposed code, A. S. A ___ 1933—M ay 1069
----- D ust explosions. In industrial plants________________________________________ 1927—M ay 77-9
'------------Prevention of. (BLS Bull. No. 562)________________ ____ ______________ 1932—Feb. 305-6
-—- Elevators, dumb-waiters, and escalators, approved by A. S. A ________________ 1932—Mar. 569
----- Factories, mills, and other workplaces, illumination of, code of 1921 revised. (BLS
Bull. No. 556)______________________________ , ________________________________ 1931—Dec. 106
----- Floor and wall openings, railings, and toe boards______________________________ 1933—Mar. 519
----- For health protection and safety, recommendations of National Conference for
Labor Legislation, February 1934____________________________________________ 1934—Apr. 780-1
----- Lighting factories, mills, and other workplaces, standard code revised. ................ . 1931—Apr. 110
----- List of, recommended by American Engineering Council______________ ____ ___ 1924—N ov. 206
----- Mechanical power-transmission apparatus. (BLS Bull. No. 364)_____________ 1924—N ov. 206
----- Mechanical refrigeration. Commercial and domestic, outline, subjects covered,
A. S. A ______________________________________________________________ ______ _ 1932—Jan. 47-8
------------Revision approved, Jan. 5, 1933, A. S. A ........... ........................................................ 1933—M ay 1068
----- National, State action on___________________________ ____ _____________ _____ 1926—Oct. 47-50
----- “ Of ethics” ______________________________________________________________ 1926—Mar. 130-1
----- Preparation of, auspices of American Engineering Standards Committee. (Lloyd) _ 1922—Sept. 1-8
----- Should be written into agreements and contracts.
(Stewart)________________ 1929—June 134-6
----- “ Standards of School Lighting,” new code approved, Sept. 15, 1932, A. S. A _____ 1933—M ay 1069
----- Use of, recommendation, American Engineering Council_______________________ 1924—July 191
Safety “conscience.” Importance of developing in the individual_______________ 1926—Mar. 129-31
Safety contests. Mines and quarries, companies operating in 35 States, results, 1928. _ 1929—Aug. 81-3
Safety court. Reduction of accidents through, Newport Rolling M ill Co___________ 1926—Oct. 50-1
Safety director. Every foreman one--------------- ----------------- --------------------------------- 1927—Sept. 52-3
Safety engineers. Achievements and further utilization of, address. (Cahn)_____ 1925—Mar. 1,3,4
Safety Institute of America (New York City). Creates a bureau of accident statistics. 1922—July 201
Safety movement. And the International Labor Conference. (Magnusson)_.............. 1928—Oct. 40-2
----- Progress in. (D eB lois)___________________________________________ ________ _. 1926—Mar. 1-3
Safety regulations. Uniformity in, State, importance of______i ...................................... 1929—Oct. 71-2
----- Rules or orders, list of, by State and subject, Jan. 1, 1928.......................................... 1929—Mar. 103-15
----- (See also Safety codes, this section.)
Safety section. Establishment of, ILO ________________________________ _______ 1922—Mar. 140-50
Safety standards. Use of codes in industry. (Ainsworth)________________________ 1930—N ov. 80-5
Safety work. American Engineering Standards Committee, yearbook report, 1923_ _ 1923—M ay 195-6
----- In the plant, most important factor for. (Address, T insley)......................... ............. 1925—Aug. 1-3
----- Specified Government agencies, specified years______________________________ _ 1936—Aug. 360-2
Securing dependable workers through systematic accident and health work_____ 1926—Mar. 136-7
Small plants. Keeping and analyzing records, importance of_______________________ 1927—M ay 73
Standardization, extent of movement for. (Report of American Engineering Standards
Committee)_______________________________________________ ________________ 1925—Sept. 202-4
Statistics. Groundwork of safety measures, discussion at Washington, D . C ., con­
ference. ________________________________ _______ __________ ____ ______________ 1926—Aug. 45
----- Need of more detailed. (Stewart)......... ...................................... ......................... ............. 1929—M ay 124
----- Value of, in accident work. (R oach )..................................... ............................................ 1924—Dec. 1-5
----- (See also under Accident statistics.)
TVA project. Measures adopted, 1937-38...................... .......................................... j
............... 1939—Mar. 553
W alkway, safe. (Stairs, ramps, floors, and sidewalks)____________________________ 1927—Mar. 35-6
War Department (U. S. Engineer Department of). Civilian employees, safety work.. 1936—Aug. 360-2
(See also Accident prevention, by industry, and by locality; Accident statistics; Fatigue;
Illumination, workplace; Sanitation, working conditions, and factory inspection.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1944)

3

Accident prevention, by industry:
Page
Building construction. Address of John P. M eade__________________________ _____ 1929—Dee. 55-7
----- Demolition and excavation work, need of safety standards. (Stewart)____ _____
1929—Jan. 66
----- Hazards, and relation to cost of accidents___________ ______ ___________________ 1927—Aug. 50-2
----- ILO consideration of convention, 1936 Conference___________________ _________ 1936—Apr. 965-6
----- ILO safety code adopted by June 1937 Conference__________________ _____ ___ 1937—Aug. 352-3
----- Methods used in erection of Sir Francis Drake Hotel, San Francisco___________ 1929—Apr. 96-7
----- Safety instruction, fire-prevention measures_______ __________________________ 1930—Feb. 88-90
----- Safety regulation by legislation. (Stewart)____ ______ ________________________
1929—Jan. 67
----- W ithout accident, methods__________________________________ _____ _________
1926—Dec. 60
Cement industry. Report of Portland Cement Association for 1935________________ 1936—Oct. 890-3
Construction industry. Building, heavy, and railroad, and highway work, with injury
rates for, 1939____________ _________ __________________________ _____ ________ 1940—Oct. 935-46
-----Fatal and serious disabling accidents in 1936 and 1938, causes, w ith directions for
avoidance of such injuries. (Kossoris and Kjaer)......................... 1938—Aug. 337-40; 1939—Sept. 667-73
----- Hazards in, relative importance of........................ ............................................................ . 1927—Aug. 50-2
----- (See also Building construction, this section.)
Copper foundries. Safety record of Utah Copper Co............................ ............................... . 1927—Feb. 28
Cotton-textile industry. Safety programs................................................. ........................... 1936—June 1491-2
Defense industries. Safety committee for_____________________________________ 1940—Sept. 568-9
Fertilizer industry. 1936 and 1937; also description of accident and safe practice___ 1938—Apr. 842-5;
1939—Apr. 869-71
Foundry workers. Safety codes, tentative code of 1922 revised........ .............. ............... 1933—Mar. 519
----- Utah Copper Co., safety record______________________________________ ______ _ 1927—Feb. 28
Iron and steel industry. Causes and prevention, 1910 to 1919.(BLS Bull. No. 298)____ 1922—Oct. 161-3
----- Frequency rates reduced by safety work______________________________________ 1936—June 1501
Lumber industry. Logging, sawmills, planing mills. Certain injuries, 1939, with
means for avoidance of such injuries. (Kjaer and Kossoris)____________________ 1940—Sept. 676-9
Manufacturing industries.
M inim um standards for safety and health, list of
(N R A )________ _______ _____ ___________ ____ _____________________________ 1934—M ay 1089-93
Mercantile establishments. M inim um safety and health standards adopted for N R A
codes______ _____ _________________________________________________________ 1934—Dec. 1392-4
M ining. Safety activities, Government, and establishment of U . S. Bureau of
M ines_____. . . . _____________________ __________ _____ ________________ _______ 1938—Feb. 300
----- Safety labels of U. S. Bureau of M ines........................................................... .................. 1927—Mar. 37-8
----- Safety measures in small m ines------- ---------------------------------------------------------- 1923—June209-11
----- Safety work, U . S. Bureau of M ines, year ending June 30,1930. ............................... 1931—Feb. 91
Mining, coal. Dust explosions. And other accidents___________________________ 1924—June 14-17
-------!
— Prevention of. (See under Dusts, industrial.)
----- Explosions, analysis by hour of occurrence, recommendations. (U. S. Bureau of
M ines)____________________________________________________________________ 1924—Dec. 136-7
----- Mechanical systems and increased hazards, study of, and recommendations____ 1928—Aug. 49-51
----- Safety organizations in_______________ _____ ________________________________ 1927—Dec. 71-3
----- Transportation, safety code—outline, subjects covered, A. S. A __________________ 1932—Jan. 47
Mining, coal, bituminous. D ust explosions. (See under Dusts, industrial.)
Mining, coal, and metalliferous. First-aid and rescue training, reduction of fatality
rates________________ _____ ___ ______ _________________________ - ..................... . 1921—June 108-10
Mining, metalliferous. Fires, methods and systems to control.................................... . 1923—June 208-9
----- Safety bonus. (U. S. Bureau of Mines report)______________________________ 1924—Sept. 153-5
Motion-picture projection rooms. Safety standards for construction, maintenance,
and ventilation of - ______ _________________ _____ ___________________________ 1938—Jan. 115-31
Motor company. Safety activity of a large........ ............................... ................................. 1922—Sept. 193-4
Portland Cement Association, campaign, results of_________________ 1927—Sept. 51; 1928—Aug. 51-2
Quarries. Safety precautions, Wisconsin Industrial Commission general orders.......... 1922—Apr. 212
Railroads. Norfolk & Western, plan, experience_________________________________ 1927—June 60-1
----- Safety program legislation, summary________________________ 1937—Oct. 899; 1940—Dec. 1435-6
Refining plant. Analysis of causes--------------------------------------- --------------------------- 1927—June 64-5
Rubber making industries. Lead poisoning____________________________________ 1924—Aug. 170-1
Ship loading and unloading. ILO convention No. 28, adopted 1929, revised 1932____ 1936—Apr. 965
Shipping industry. Need for safety work. (Paper, J. J. Rosedale)...... .............. ............ 1926—Dec. 60-1
Steel company. Safety rules for foundry, and “ fellowship program” ............ ................. 1927—June 61-2
Sugar refining. California & Hawaiian Sugar Refining Corporation.............................t_ 1929—July 72
Tobacco industry. Safety work in plants, 1935___________________________________ 1937—Feb. 339
Truck drivers. Hours of, relation to. (U. S. Supreme Court decision upholding New
Hampshire law )___________________________________________________________ 1939—Mar. 619-20
Window cleaners. Safety code development___________________________________ 1928—M ay 67-70
Accident prevention, by locality;
Alabama. Mining, accident record (3 mines), 1923 to 1928. (Activities of Holmes
Safety Association)___ _____ _______________________________________ _____ ____
1930—Apr. 97
Australia. (New South Wales). Coal Commission, recommendations in 1939 report. 1940—Apr. 910-11
Austria. 1920............... ............................................................................ ................................... 1923—M ay 199
Belgium. 1920.................... ....................... ............................................................................... 1923—M ay 199-200
California. Industrial safety work. (French)............................................... ...................... 1922—Nov. 185-6
----- Mining. Argonaur mine fire, report o n ------------------------------ ------------------------ 1923—Apr. 124-5
------------Fire-control orders, Industrial Accident Commission........................... 1923—Jan. 215, Apr. 153
----- Safety orders, task of drawing u p_______ _______________ ____________ ____ ____ 1923—Jan. 215
----- (San Francisco). Building construction, outstanding record, Sir Francis Drake
Hotel_________________________________ _____________________________________ 1929—Apr. 96-7
Canada. Policy toward, during war, and list of questions asked employers by Indus­
trial Accident Prevention Associations_________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1362
Chile. Safety campaign and prize award, Nitrate Producers' Association, 1929............ 1929—Aug. 84
China. Coal mining__________________________________ _____ ______ _____ _______ 1930—Dec. 62
----- Safety and health provisions, factory law of 1929................................... ......................... 1930—June 110
Colombia. Construction workers, December 19,1939, law_________________________ 1940—July 70-1
District of Columbia. Steam-boiler inspection (under Public Act No. 794)_________ 1936—Aug. 378
Erie (Pa.). No-accident campaign, 26 manufacturing plants, August 1927. ...........
1928—
Jan. 81
Germany. (Prussia). M ining accidents, prevention and safety work, principles o f.. 1923—M ay 200
Great Britain. 1920.................................................................................................................... - 1923—M ay 197-8




4

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Accident prevention, by locality—Continued.
P age
Illinois. Plans of Department of Labor. (Cahn)............................. ............................ ....... 1925—Mar. 2-5
----- Safety organization, plants with and without, accident experience, by industry
group and number of em ployees.------ --------------------------------------------- ---------------- 1929—July 101-3
Iran. Legislative provisions, August 1936 (industrial establishments)......................... 1937—Oct. 902-3
Japan. Cotton mills, provisions for safety and health.............. .............. ..........................
1926—N ov. 25
Louisiana. Accident reporting, shortcomings of the law as to ............................................ 1922—July 194
Massachusetts. Building construction, address of John P. M eade................................. 1929—Dec. 55-7
----- Compressed-air work, regulations and rules, text................. ....................................... 1931—Jan. 115-20
----- Lighting, safety code--------------------- ----------------------------------------------- 1922—Mar. 183-4, July 155
----- Organization of safety council through Department of Labor and Industries----------1921—Apr. 183
----- Recommendations of Department of Labor and Industries_____________________ 1921—M ay 173
----- Reports on, Division of Industrial Safety..................... .......................... 1922—Feb. 113; 1925—Mar. 264
----- Safety work, radio to arouse public interest in................................................................. 1923—June 260
Mexico. Use of machinery, factory regulations, summary_____ _____ .......................... 1923—Dec. 19-20
Michigan. Campaign to prevent accidents................................ ......................... .................... 1922—Apr. 235
Minnesota. Building construction, safety code for wrecking operations-------------------- 1930—June 94
Nevada. M ine safety law not applicable to work on Hoover Dam, court decision____ 1932—Aug. 288-9
N ew Jersey. Safety museum, establishment of------ ----------------------------------------------- 1921—N ov. 197
----- (West Orange). Safety education, 4-year experiment, Essex County Vocational
School________________________ ___________ _____________________________ ____ 1928—Aug. 52-3
N ew York. Elevator safety code....................................................................- ........................... 1923—Apr. 187
----- Laundries............................................................................................. ............................. ......... 1925—Jan. 154
----- Lighting safety code............................................................................................................... 1922—Aug. 164-5
----- Lighting, tunnel work, safety c o d e ..------------------------------------- ----------------------- 1922—July 154-5
----- Safety campaign, labor unions cooperating w ith State authorities...............................1931—Feb. 91-2
----- Window cleaning, safety devices for cleaners (industrial code enforcement) and
safety rales_____________________________ _____ ___ __________ 1922—Sept. 220-1; 1933—N ov. 1119
N ew York City. Building construction, safety specifications of Building Trades Em­
ployers’ Association____________________________ ________________________ ___ 1929—M ay 129-32
Ohio. Elevators, dumbwaiters, escalators, etc., revised safety code effective Jan. 1,
1933_________________________________________ ____ ___ _______________________ 1933—M ay 1070
----- Machinery safety code, revisions of, effective Jan. 1,1933............................................ _ 1933—M ay 1070
----- Refrigeration, new safety code effective Jan. 1,1933................ ..................................... 1933—M ay 1069-70
----- Work of Industrial Commission division of safety, 1919-20............ .......................... 1921—N ov. 200-1
Oklahoma. Protective appliances and safeguards............................................................ 1921—Sept. 210-11
----- Safety work, progress in, summary, 1922.................... ..................................................
1922—Sept. 222
Oregon. “ Safety N ew s,” publication started______ ______ —...................................... . 1921—N ov. 201-2
----- Safety work of Industrial Accident Commission.......................................................... . -1922—Apr. 237-8
Pennsylvania. Head and eye safety code----------------- ---------------- ------------- ---------1922—Mar. 187
----- Industrial Board, activities----------------------------------------------------------------------- - 1922—N ov. 230-1
----- Laundries, scaffolds, and mechanical-power transmission, safety codes__________ 1922—July 196
----- Lighting safety code..................................................................... ...................................... 1923—July 259
----- Safety course in school curriculum.......................................................... ........................ 1922—Oct. 163-4
----- Safety program, comprehensive...... ................................................................................. 1921—Jan. 225-6
----- Safety work, neglect of......................................................................................................... 1922—Sept. 224
----- Society of Safety Engineers, organization of............... ................................................. . 1922—Aug. 240-1
Spain. Institute of Social Reform, functions of------------------------------------------------------ 1922—July 166
Sweden. Safety paint, color change at specified temperatures, on m arket.._________ 1925—Mar. 159
Switzerland. 1920______________________________________ _____________________ 1923—M ay 198-9
Turkey. Provisions of national labor law effective June 1937---------------------------------- 1937—Mar. 641
United States. Administration of laws, State agencies for............................. .................... 1921—Jan. 171-4
Wisconsin. Electrical safety code_________________________ _______ — ..................... 1923—Dec. 157
----- Favorable effect upon workmen’? compensation rates............ .................................... . 1939—N ov. 1129
----- Quarries, general order of Industrial Commission......... ............... ................................. 1922—Apr. 212
----- Responsibility for industrial safety----------.............. .............. ........................................ 1921—Apr. 100-1
----- Safety codes, reports of Industrial and Railroad Commissions................................... . 1923—Dec. 157
----- Safety orders, penalties for violation................................................. ................................... 1927—Oct. 60
- — (Milwaukee). Safety school for foremen......................................... .......................
1925—Mar. 164-5
Accident statistics, general:
Accidents. And accident rates, classification, resolution of International Conference
of Labor Statisticians__________ . — .............. ................................................................... 1924—M ay 216-18
----- Causes of, attempt at new standard classification_______________ ____________ 1922—Mar. 145-7
----- Cost and estimated annual number, United States. (Hookstadt)---------- 1923—N ov. 1-9, Dec. 162
----- (350,000 industrial), causes of, analysis by insurance companies..................................... 1923—Oct. 143
Accurate statistics. Value of, in accident work. (Roach)...................................... ......... 1924—Dec. 1-5
. Child labor. (See under Child labor and welfare.)
Collection. Present accomplishments, discussion at Washington (D . C.) conference,
1926_______________________________________________ _______ - ................................ 1926—Aug. 43-5
Employment decrease during depression, effect of, 1929-35----------------- ---------------- - 1938—Mar. 579-94
E ye injuries. (See E ye injuries.)
Falls, by origin of hazard, policyholders of Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., 1926-29___ 1929—Dec. 61-2
Fatal accident rates per 100,000 population, by eause and country, 1911 and 1924_____ 1926—Dec. 65-6
Federal civilian employees. All departments, and by department, 1919-35__________ 1921—Apr. 106;
1926-M ar. 147, Oct. 1-3; 1928—Feb. 89-91; 1931—Mar. 103-5; 1934—Mar. 550-5; 1936—Mar.
643-4, Aug. 356-62
Government agencies having authority over reporting, list of------------------------------- 1921—Jan. 171-4
Inadequacy of, in State reports. (Gadsby)................................. ................................... 1921—Mar. 167-76
Industrial accidents. American experience, by industry, 1925. (Summary, BLS
Bull. No. 425)____________________ ______ ____________________ 1926—Oct. 41-2; 1927—Mar. 31-2
----- United States, 1921 (Chaney) and 1922 (Hookstadt)_________ 1922—Dec. 159-73; 1924—Jan. 145-50
Injuries, industrial. B y industry, 1939, showing extent of disability; relation of expo­
sure, frequency, and time loss; disability distribution; and trend since 1926............. 1940—July 86-108
----- 1932, 1933, and 1934, by State and sex______________________________________ 1939—Mar. 615-18
----- 1937 and 1938, by industry and extent of disability. (Kossoris and Kjaer) _ __ 1939—Mar. 597-615,
Oct. 869-83
International comparisons, effort to standardize terms and categories.............................. 1938—Feb. 433-5
National accident statistics, the problem of. (Hatch)................................. ........................ 1926—Oct. 42-7
National Safety Council. For 1934-35 by Industry group________________ 1936—Apr. 991-4, Aug. 363
----- (See also under Conventions, meetings, etcO




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0
Accident statistics, general—Continued.
_
Nation-wide, State-wide, problem of securing, discussion at Washington (D. C.)
.rage
conference__________________________________________ _______________ ______ 1926—Aug. 42-3
Older workers. Male factory workers. 2 New England plants, 1937________ ____ 1939—Apr. 774
----- Relation of age to extent of disability________________________________________ 1929—Oct. 69-71
Policyholders, industrial. Death rates. (See under Vital statistics—Metropolitan Life
Insurance Co.)
Public accidents, 1932. (National Safety Council study)____________________ 1933—Aug. 297-8, 300
Rates, frequency and severity. Conference on, called by Department of Labor_____ 1924—Jan. 142-4
Speed, penalty American Nation pays for________________________________________ 1927—Oct. 56-6
Standard and American accident tables, comparison of. (Hookstadt)............................. 1921—July 1-5
----- October 1938, summary of reports of...................................................................................... 1930—Jan. 116
TVA project. 1937-38.'_______________________ _________________________________ 1939—Mar. 553
W hite males (policyholders, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.), fatalities, 1912 to 1920.. 1922—Aug. 163
Working boys (policyholders, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.), fatalities, 1921___ 1922—June 149-50
Works program, 1935-36. Frequency rates and compensation, comparison with
former experience of CWA and F E R A ---------------------- --------------------------- ------ 1937—July 197-8
(See also Accident statistics, by industry, and by locality.)
Accident statistics, by industry:
Agricultural implements. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of in ju ry .................... 1927—N ov. 64-5,67;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Aircraft operation, injuries to workers in, 1932------------------------------------------------------ 1933—M ay 1068
Automobile accidents. Death cl aims due to, fraternal benefit societies........................ 1929—Mar. 97-100
Automobiles. (See Motor-vehicle industry, this section.)
Boots and shoes. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury.. 1927—N ov. 64-5, 68; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Brick. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury. _____ _____ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 69; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Building construction. Accident costs, and building operation costs, relation be­
tw een________________________________________________ _____ 1927—Aug. 51; 1932—Dec. 1339-40
----- Accidents in, grave concern to compensation administrator. (Stew art)................. 1929—Jan. 63-8
----- Massachusetts, 1925 to 1928____________________________________________ _____ 1929—Dec. 57
----- N ew York. Compensated construction machine accident cases, 1928-29_____ 1930—Mar. 73-4
------------ Experience, 1927 to 1929_________________ __________ 1929—Jan. 68-9; 1930—June 95-7
----- N ew York City, by trade group, 1928 to 1931.............................. 1931—Sept. 71-2; 1932—June 1321-3
Carpets. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury------------------ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 69; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Carriages and wagons. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury. _ 1927—N ov. 65, 69; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Cement industry, Portland. Experience, 1918 to 1935___________________________ 1921—Oct. 177;
1923—Aug. 165-6; 1924— Aug. 170; 1925—N ov. 188-9; 1926—Aug. 54-5; 1928—Aug. 51; 1929—
Aug. 80-1; 1930—Mar. 67; 1931—Dec. 106-7; 1932—Sept. 554-5; 1933—Sept. 683-4; 1936—Oct. 890-3
Cement mills and quarries. 1926__________________ _____ _____ ______________ ___ 1927—July 53-4
Chemicals. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury_________ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 70; 1928—Jan. 74-80
CCG employees. December 1933 to March 1934; enrollees, to Sept. 30,1935.......... . 1936—Mar. 644-5
Clay. Ohio, 1926_______________________________________________________________ 1928— Apr. 71
Coke ovens. 1914 to 1934______1921—Jan. 160, Dec. 156-7; 1922—Dec. 171; 1923—Feb. 224-5; 1924—Jan.
148-9; 1925—June 112-15; 1926—Jan. 175-6; 1927—Mar. 32-4, Dec. 70; 1928—Aug. 48-9; 1929—
July 99-101; 1930—July 80-3; 1932—June 1319-20; 1933—Jan. 107; 1934—Mar. 557; 1936—Aug. 363
Construction industry. Building, highway, heavy, and railroad, 1936,1938, and 1939.
(Kossoris and Kjaer)........ ................................... 1938—Aug. 329-37; 1939— Sept. 658-73; 1940— Oct. 935-43
----- Ohio, 1926____________________ ____________________________________________ 1927—M ay 76
Cotton goods. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury.............. 1927—N ov. 65, 70; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Domestic and personal service, Massachusetts, 1919-20........................................................ 1922—Dec. 165
Electric railways. United States, 1923 and 1924.................................... ........................... 1925—N ov. 187-8
Electrical accidents. Reports, desirability of more detail_________ _______________ 1927—N ov. 81-2
Electrical machinery. 1925and 1926, by Stateandtype of in ju ry... 1927—N ov. 64-5,71; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Electrical workers. United States, fatal accidents and deaths from occupational dis­
eases, 1923-24________________________________________________________________ 1925—M ay 172
Electric-utility industry. Experience, member companies of National Electric Light
Association, 1923 to 1928---------------------------- --------------------------------------------------- 1930—June 86-7
Elevator. Pennsylvania, 1924. _________________________________ ____________ 1926—Feb. 167
Explosives. Mine accidents due to. (U. S. Bureau of Mines study) ....................... 1927—Mar. 34
Fertilizer industry. 1925 and 1926, 1936 and 1937_______________________________ 1927—N ov. 65, 71;
1928—Jan. 74-80; 1938—Apr. 831-42; 1939—Apr. 856-69
Flour. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury____________________________ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 72;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Food products. N ew York State Department of Labor, Bureau of Industrial Hygiene,
special bulletin__________________________________________________________ _____ 1929—Jan. 190
Foundries and machine shops. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury ........ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 72;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Furniture. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury.................. 1927—N ov. 64-5, 73; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Glass. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury........ .............. . 1927—N ov. 64-5, 73; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Government service. (See Public service, this section.)
Gray iron foundries. Frequency and severity rates, United States-------------------------- 1927—M ay 73
Gypsum. Ohio, 1926______________________________________________ ____ _______ 1928—Apr. 71
Hardware. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury_________ 1927—Nov. 65, 74; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Home accidents. 1932. (National Safety Council study)___________________ 1933—Aug. 297-8, 300
Industry groups. Injury frequency and severity rates, 1934 and 1936- _. 1936—Apr. 993; 1938—July 18-30
Iron and steel industry. 1913 to 1939_________________________________________ 1921—Sept. 1-6,
Oct. 174-6; 1923—Oct. 131-40; 1924—N ov. 195-201; 1925—Dec. 142-6; 1926—Dec. 50-60; 1927—
Aug. 43-5, Oct. 35-52, N ov. 60-2; 1929—Oct. 32-42; 1931—Apr. 93-110, N ov. 25-37; 1933Mar. 520-34, M ay 1071, Sept. 566-81; 1936—June 1496-1502, Dec. 1370-84; 1938—M ay 1153-66;
1939—M ay 1089-1100, N ov. 1111-20; 1940—Aug. 322-33
----- Indiana, 1925-26_______________________________________________________ ____ 1927—Sept. 56
----- Selected establishments, frequency rates, specified years, 1913-35 and 1936-39___ 1936—Dec. 1382-4;
1940—Aug. 333
----- Small plants................................................................................................................................ 1927—M ay 73
----- Specified State jurisdictions, 1922 to 1925................... .................. ...................................... 1927—Aug. 43-5
Laundry industry. N ew York State, 1924 to 1926----------------------------------------------- 1927—Sept. 53-4
Leather industry. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury,. 1927—N ov. 64r-5, 74; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Locomotive firemen and enginemen, killed and injured, 1916 to 1925......... ........................ 1927—Sept. 50
Logging. (See under Lumber industry, this section.)
Longshoremen and harbor workers. 1928-29,1929-30, and 1934-35......... ................ ......... 1930—Mar. 71;
1931—Mar. 105-6; 1936—Mar. 645




6

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Accident statistics, by industry—Continued.
,>
Lumber industry. Logging, sawmills, planing mills. Injury, rates by geographical
.rage
district, cause, severity, time lost, and size of establishment. (Kjaer and Kossoris). 1940-Sept. 663-76
—— Logging industry. Oregon, 1919-20________________________________ _____ 1922—Mar. 148-9
------------Washington State, progressive reduction of fatalities, 1924 to 1928---------------1929—Apr. 97
----- Planing mills, 1926 and 1926, by State and type of injury----- 1927—N ov. 64-6, 75; 1928—Jan. 74-80
----- Sawmills, and logging__________________________ 1927—M ay 73, N ov. 64-5, 75; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Machine shops with foundry. Frequency and severity rates, United States------------- 1927—M ay 73
Machine tools. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury---------- 1927—N ov. 64-5, 76; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Machinery. And machine tools, frequency and severity rates, United States-............- 1927—M ay 73
----- Massachusetts, 1925 compared with 1919______________ ______ _____ ___________ 1927—Sept. 57
----- Pennsylvania, 1924_________________________________ ______ _________________ 1926-i-Feb. 167
Manufacturing industries. 1926 to 1936_______________________ 1931—M ay 1-5; 1932—M ay 1029-33;
1933—Apr. 780-5, Dec. 1388-94; 1936—Oct. 846-56; 1937—Jan. 101-12; 1938—Mar. 675-85
----- Frequency rates and extent of disability, 1934-35 and 1929 to 1935. (Kossoris)-- - 1937—Jan. 104-5;
1938—Mar. 579-94
' ----- Pennsylvania, 1932, by industry group______________________________________ 1934—Mar. 557-8
Messengers. Western Union Telegraph Co., 1924 to 1932 _____________________ ___
1934—Jan. 15
Metal trades, and woodworking industries, United States, 1922---------------------------- 1923—Aug. 166-7
Metallurgical works. 1916-32 and 1934-------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—June 107-8;
1922—M ay 169-70; 1923—M ay 194; 1924—Apr. 144-5; 1925—June 111-13; 1927—Jan. 64-7, July
51-3; 1928—Nov. 56-7; 1930—M ay 86-8; 1932—Mar. 573, Oct. 842; 1933—July 72; 1936—Aug. 363
----- Colorado, 1925 and 1926____________________ ________________________________ 1927—Sept. 55
----- Idaho, 1924,1928, and 1929___________ ____ _________ 1925—Aug. 159; 1929—Aug. 83; 1930—July 85
Mineral industries. 1934, by industry__________________________: ----------------------- 1936—Aug. 362-3
Mining. Alabama, accident record, 3 mines, 1923 to 1928___________________________ 1930—Apr. 97
----- Alaska, 1920 to 1922___________________________ 1921—Aug. 142; 1922—Sept. 194; 1923—Oct. 144
----- Arizona* 1922 and 1923_______ 1923—Oct. 144; 1924—M ay 238; 1925—M ay 235; 1928—July 201
----- Australia (New South Wales), by kind of mine, 1920________________________ 1921—Sept. 175-6
----- B y type of mine (except coal), 1933-34______________________________________ 1937—Mar. 634-5
----- Canada (Ontario), and metallurgical works, quarries, clay and gravel pits.......... 1921—June 117;
1927—Sept. 58
----- Colorado, 1920 to 1927___________________________________ ___________________ 1922—June 224;
1923—Feb. 229-30; 1925—Aug. 158; 1926—June 234; 1927—Sept. 54; 1928—Sept. 70, 221
----- Germany, 1920_____________________________________________________________ 1923—M ay 200
----- Idaho, 1922 to 1929_________________________________________________________ 1923—July 193;
1925—Aug. 159; 1926—Aug. 59; 1927—Sept. 55-6; 1926—Aug. 83; 1930—July 85-6
----- India, 1923 to 1929________________ 1925—M ay 188-9; 1926—Mar. 28; 1930—Apr. 98; 1931—Apr. 85
---- Industrial injuries, 1934 and 1935_________________________________________ 1937—June 1459-63
----- Mexico, 1926 to 1929____________ _______ *___ 1927—Dec. 75-6; 1930—Feb. 91-2; 1931—Jan. 123
----- Minnesota, 1922 and 1923____ _________________ ________________________ ____ 1925—Mar. 160
----- Missouri, 1926, 1928, and 1929____________________________________ 1927—July 59; 1930—Aug. 62
----- Responsibility of management and workers. (U. S. Bureau ofMines report)____ 1930—July 77-8
----- Safety contest, 1928, results of. (U. S. Bureau of M ines)_______________________ 1929—Aug. 81-3
----- South Africa, alluvial diggings, mines and quarries____________________________ 1926—Jan. 68-9
----- United States. Accident data, 2-year study, analysis. (Paper read, A d a m s ) 1924—Dec. 132-5
------------Fatality rate per 1,000 workers, 1911-1920_____ ______ ____________________ 1921—June 109
Mining, clay. Missouri, fatalities, 1929_____________________ _____________ ____ 1930—Aug. 62
----- Ohio, 1926______________________ ____ _______________ ______________________
1928—Apr. 71
Mining, coal. Accident costs, 1926 and previous years. (U. S. Bureau of Mines
study)________________ - ____ ________________________________ ____ _______ 1929—Dec. 57-61
----- Alabama. 1923____________________________________________________________ 1924—Dec. 138
------------Record of “no accident,” 5-year period, certain m ines_____________________
1927—Aug. 52
----- Anthracite and bituminous. Frequency rates by year, 1930-39, and summary. _ 1940—Dec. 1417-18
----- Canada (Nova Scotia), fatalities and output, 1908 to 1924_________ 1923—June 212; 1925—M ay 186
----- Colorado, 1920 to 1929_________________________ ___________________________ 1921—June 198;
1922—June 224; 1923—Oct. 144; 1925—Aug. 158; 1927—Sept. 54-5; 1930—Aug. 62
----- Europe and United States, fatalities, 1911 to 1922. (Bureau of Mines report)_____ 1924—July 191-3
----- Explosives, fatalities due to _________________________________________________ 1923—Oct. 142;
1924—Dec. 137-8; 1926—Aug. 51-3; 1927—Mar. 34-5, Dec. 73; 1930—Mar. 66-7
----- Falls of roof, accidents due to, 1919-1928____________________ _________________ i 1930—Apr. 96
----- Fatalities. Injuries, production, etc., 1911 to 1933____ _____ _ 1933—Dec. 1395-7; 1936—Jan. 116-18
------------ 1929. (U. S. Bureau of M ines)_______________________________________ 1932—Mar. 569-71
------------United States, Great Britain, France, Belgium, and Prussia, 1922 to 1930___ 1932—Dec. 1337
----- France, 1928________________________________________________________________ 1931—Jan. 122-3
----- Great Britain (United Kingdom), mines and quarries, 1920 to 1924____________1921—Sept. 172;
1922—Sept. 195; 1923—Jan. 94; 1925—M ay 188; 1926—June 97-9, Sept. 46-7
----- Illinois, fatalities by years, 1919 to 1929_______________________________________ 1923—M ay 196:
1924—Sept. 157; 1925—M ay 182-3; 1927—Oct. 60-1; 1930—Sept. 56
----- Indiana, 1926.. ____________________________________________________________ 1927—Sept. 56
----- Iowa, 1896 to 1925’ ________ _______ ______________ 1923—Jan. 156; 1925—Sept. 132:1927—Sept. 56
.
----- Japan, 1919________ ______ ________________________________________________ 1922—Apr. 186-7
----- Mexico, 1929 to 1931_________ _______ ________________ _______ 1931—Jan. 123; 1933—M ay 1070-1
----- Missouri, 1926, 1928, and 1929____________ _______________________ 1927—July 59; 1930—Aug. 62
----- Ohio, mines and quarries, 1923 and 1926_______ 2 _______________ 1925—Mar. 163-4; 1928—Apr. 71
----- Pennsylvania. Bituminous mines, rates, mechanical loading and hand labo^,
1930 to 1932______________________________ _________________________________
1933—July 71
----------- Statistical analysis, 1916-20 and to 1922. ................................. 1923—Oct. 144-6; 1924—June 153-5
----- Tennessee, 1923 and 1926__________________ _______ ___________ 1924—Dec. 138-9; 1927—Oct. 63-4
----- United States, 1916-20 to 1934_____________________________________ 1921—Jan. 159, Aug. 141-2;
1922—June 146-7; 1923—Jan. 154-5, Oct. 140-1; 1924—N ov. 204-6; 1925—Mar. 154, Aug. 154-5;
1926—Aug. 51-3; 1927—M ay 73-5, Dec. 70; 1928—Apr. 67-9; 1929—M ay 124-7; 1930—July 83-5;
1932—Mar. 569-71, Dec. 1338-9; 1936—June 1543, Aug. 363; 1937—Mar. 631-3
----- Virginia, 1924 and 1925_________________________ _____________ 1925—Apr. 203-4; 1926—June 97
----- Washington, 1914 to 1923............................................................. 1923—Jan. 156, 172; 1924—Oct. 84, 170
----- West Virginia, 1920-21 and 1924-25____________________________ 1922—Oct. 209; 1927—Aug. 53-4
Mining, copper. Anaconda (Mont.) Copper M ining Co., 6-year accident record___ 1921—Oct. 176-7
Mining, iron. Experience, 1920. (U. S. Bureau of Mines report)............. ...................1921—N ov. 161-2
Mining, lead and zinc. Missouri, 1928 and 1929....... .............................................................. 1930—Aug. 62




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

7

Accident statistics, by industry—Continued.
P age
Mining, metal. B y kind, 1919 to 1931--------------------------- --------- -------------------------- 1921—July 191-2;
1922—M ay 168-9; 1923—Aug. 164-5; 1924—Apr. 142-3; 1925—Aug. 156-7; 1926—Apr. 130, Nov.
51-3; 1927—Dec. 68-70; 1929—M ay 127-9, Dec. 57-61: 1930—June 87-90, Sept. 55; 1932—Mar.
571-2, Oct. 841; 1933—Dec. 1397-8
----- Colorado, 1925 to 1927________ ________________________ ____ ____ 1927—Sept. 55; 1928—Sept. 70
----- France, 1928_________________________ ____ __________________________ ______ 1931—Jan. 122-3
----- Mexico, mines and mills, 1929 to 1931________________________ 1931—Jan. 123; 1933—M ay 1070-1
Mining, metal and nonmetal. Frequency rates, by year, 1931-39, and experience, by
kind of mine, 1938_________________________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1418-20
----- 1934________________________________ _____ ________ 1936—July 67, Aug. 363; 1937—Mar. 634-35
Mining, shale Missouri, fatalities, 1929______________ __________________________ 1930—Aug. 62
Motor-vehicle industry. Rates, 1922 to 1926. ---------------------------------------------------- 1922—Dec. 173;
1927—M ay 73, N ov. 64-5, 67; 1928—Jan. 74-80
----- Death claims for automobile accidents, fraternal benefit societies, 1923 to 1928___ 1929—Mar. 97-100
----- 1932. (National Safety Council study)_________________________________ 1933—Aug. 297-8, 300
----- Safety and accident record, January to June 1922, large motor works__________ 1922—Sept. 193-4
National Safety Council report. B y industry, 1925-35____________ 1926—N ov. 50-1; 1927—Oct. 54r-5;
1930—Feb. 90-1; 1931—Mar. 93-4, June 72-3, Oct. 92-3; 1932—Oct. 837-40; 1936—Aug. 363-7
----- Metals and woodworking sections (member plants), 1924-------------------------------- 1925—Aug. 153-4
Occupational accidents. 1932, by industry. (National Safety Council study)----- 1933—Aug. 297-300
Oil fields. (See Petroleum industry, this section.)
Paper and pulp. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury___________ 1927—M ay 73, N ov. 64-5, 76;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Petroleum industry. B y State and type of injury, 1925 and 1926. _ 1927—Nov. 65, 77; 1928—Jan. 74-80
----- California, oilfields, 1921-22to 1928______________________ _________________ 1924—Mar. 148-50,
Sept. 156-7; 1926—Dec. 65; 1927—Aug. 52-3; 1928—Dec. 97-8; 1929—Dec. 62-3
----- Injuries, by department, 1932____________________________________ ____ _____ 1933—Sept. 582-3
----- Oklahoma, pipe-tool accidents, 1923------- --------- ------ ------------ ---------------- ---------1928—Aug. 54
Police departments. 1934, by size of city ----------------------- --------- --------------------------- 1935—Oct. 863-4
Pottery industry. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury___ 1927—Nov. 64-5, 77; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Public accidents. 1932. (National Safety Council study) __________________ 1933—Aug. 297-8,300
Public service. Federal Government employees, 1921 to 1932______________________ 1921—Apr. 106;
1926—Mar. 147, Oct. 1-3; 1928—Feb. 89-91; 1934—Mar. 550-5
Quarries. And cement mills. (Portland Cement Association report)______________ 1927—July 53-4
----- And stone products. 1934_____________ ________________ ____________________ 1936—Aug. 363
----- Colorado, 1922,1925, and 1926................................................................ 1923—Feb. 229-30; 1927—Sept. 55
----- France, 1928__________________________ _________________________ ________1931—Jan. 122-3
----- Great Britain (United Kingdom), 1 9 2 0 ...._____________ _____ _________________ 1921—Sept. 172
----- Ohio, 1914-15________________ ______________________________________________ 1928—Apr. 71
----- 1911 to 1939______________________________________________ 1921—M ay 127-8; 1922—June 147-8;
1923—Aug. 163; 1924—M ay 182-3; 1925—M ay 171-2, June 112; 1926—Sept. 38-9; 1927—Oct.
53-4, Dec. 70; 1929—Feb. 45; 1930—Sept. ^4-5; 1931—Sept. 69-70; 1932—Oct. 842-4; 1934Mar. 556; 1936—Jan. 118-19; 1937—Mar. 663-4, June 1459-63; 1940—Dec. 1420-1
----- Pennsylvania, 1916 to 1920______________________________________ _____ _____ _ 1922—Dec. 164
----- Safety contest of 1928,results of. (U.S. Bureau of M ines)_________ ____________ 1929—Aug. 81-3
Railroads. American Railway Association, safety section, 1923 and 1926____________ 1927—Aug, 45-6
----- B y type of accident and severity of injury, 1936-37___________________________ 1939—Jan. 116-18
----- Costs, by type of accident, manner of settlement, and district. (Beyer and
Fitch)___________________________________ _____________________________ 1935—Sept. 552-8
----- Experience, 1922 to 1935. (ICC reports)____________________________________ 1922—Dec. 160-8;
1924—Jan. 150-4; 1925—Nov. 187; 1926—Feb. 158-61; 1928—Feb. 88-9, Sept. 68-9; 1929—June
136-7; 1932—M ay 1070-1; 1933—Dec. 1394-5; 1936—Feb. 373-5; 1937-J u ly 195-7; 1939—Jan.
116-18
----- Injuries to employees, passengers, trespassers, and in rail-highway accidents,
1930-39_____________________________________________________________ ______ 1940—N ov. 1171-5
----- Maintenance of W ay Employees, Brotherhood of. Report, 1928_______________ 1930—June 90-1
----- Norfolk & Western Railway Co., experience, 1912 to 1928_____________ _______ 1929—June 137-8
----- Great Britain, by class of accident and group of persons_______________________ 1923—Jan. 157;
1927—Dec. 75; 1934—Jan. 92-4
Rubber industry. 1922 and 1923 (National Safety Council member plants) _. 1923—Oct. 143, Dec. 161-2
----- Tires, 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury______ ____ 1927—Nov. 64-5, 67; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Sawmills. (See Lumber industry, this section.)
Seamen. Summary, by method of settlement. (BLS study, 1926)___ _____________1928—June 6-15
Shipbuilding, steel. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury___ 1927—N ov. 65, 77; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Slaughtering and meat packing. 1925 and 1926, b y State and type of injury.......... 1927—N ov. 64-5,78;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Stamped and enameled ware. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury_______ 1927—N ov. 64-5,78;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury.. 1927—N ov. 64-5,
79; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Steel plant. Age and experience, factors in accident occurrence........................ ................ 1932—Oct. 845
Stoves. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury_____ _____________________ 1927—N ov. 64r-5, 79;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Street railways. Age factor, Boston Elevated Railway experience.......... .................... 1932—Oct. 844-5
Structural-iron work. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury______________ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 80;
1928—Jan. 74-80
Telegraph messengers. Lost-time injuries, analysis of, 1931. (M atthews)........ ............ 1934—Jan. 14-31
Textile industries. Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, 1919-20_____ _______ _______ 1922—Dec. 164-5
Tobacco industry. Pennsylvania, 1919-20-------- ---------- ----------------------------------------- 1922—Dec. 164
Transmission. Pennsylvania, 1924_____________ „____ _______________ ______ . ____ 1926—Feb. 167
Understatement of disabling injuries in depression years, estimate of________________ 1938—Mar. 593-4
Window cleaners. B y State, 1923 to 1926_______________________________________ 1929—M ay 57-70
Woodworking. N ew York State, analysis of accidents...________ _________________ 1926—Feb. 166
Woolen goods. 1925 and 1926, by State and type of injury_____ 1927—Nov. 64-5, 80; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Accident statistics, by locality:
Alabama. Industrial and home, by year, 1933-38, and proportion occurring on farms. 1940—July 109-11
Argentina. 1916 to 1924__________________ ___________________ 1925—Jan. 156-7, Apr. 144, Sept. 135
Arkansas. Biennial reports, 1928-30 and 1930-32...... ......................................................... 1933—June 1256-7




8

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Accident statistics, by locality—Continued.
P age
Australia. (Queensland). 1916 to 1920__________________ ____ _____ . __________ 1921—Feb. 163-4
Austria. Frequency rates by age, ILO stu d y ................................................................
1940—Oct. 790, 798
Bulgaria. B y cause and severity, 1922 to 1926- ........................................ ........................ 1929—Dec. 67-8
California. Employed minors, 1932, by age and sex. (Stone)..................................... 1934—N ov. 1078-94
----- Fatalities in petroleum industry............................................ ............................................ 1929—Dec. 62-3
----- Minors under 16 and under 18, 1926-27____ ____ ____________ _______ _____ _____ 1928—M ay 64
----- 1913 to 1931____________ _______ ______ 1921—Jan. 176-7; 1925—Jan. 162-3, Aug. 160; 1932-Aug. 284
Canada. B y industry. 1935. ------- ----------------------------------------------------------------- 1936—June 1543-4
----- Fatal accidents, by industry, 1920 to 1934 and 1939_____________________________ 1921—M ay 130;
1922—M ay 171; 1924—M ay 196, July 195; 1925—M ay 185; 1926—M ay 91; 1927—M ay 84; 1928—M ay
74; 1929—M ay 133; 1930—July 86; 1931—M ay 64; 1932—M ay 1072; 1934—M ay 1100; 1935—M ay
1245; 194.0—July 111
----- (Alberta). B y cause, 1927................................................................................................ 1928—Dec. 120
----- (Nova Scotia). Report, 1924. ............................................ ............................................. 1925—July 155
----- (Ontario). Frequency rates................................................ ................................................. 1927—Sept. 58
----- (Saskatchewan). Report, 1923.---------------------- ---------------------------------- ------------ 1925—Mar. 165
Chile. 1910 to 1924______________ _________________ 1921—Mar. 178; 1925—July 147; 1927—Jan. 73
China. (Shanghai). Cotton mills, Yangtzepoo district. (Ta Chen)______ ____ _ 1924—N ov. 43-4
Colorado. 1922_________________________________________________ '___________ 1923—Mar. 115-16
Cuba. 1918-19 to 1925-26_____________________________________ 1925—Mar. 165; 1927—Apr. 41
District of Columbia. Compensation cases reported, 1928-29 and 1929-30. ................... 1930—Mar. 70-2;
1931—Mar. 106-7
----- Private employees, 1934-35 (report of U. S. Employees’ Compensation Commis­
sion)---------------------------- ------ „-------------------------------------- ------------------------------- 1936—Mar. 645-6
Erie (Pa.). Fatalities, 1930___________________ __________ _______ _______________ 1930—Apr. I ll
Estonia. B y industry or occupation, 1922 to 1927. ................................................................ 1929—N ov. 43-4
Finland. B y result of injury, 1921................................ ............................................................... 1925—Dec. 153
France. B y industry, result, age, and sex, 1912-26 to 1935........................................... . 1929—Jan. 70;
1930—June 97-8; 1931—Sept. 72-3; 1938—M ay 1167-8
----- Metallurgical and mining industries, frequency rates, 1929 to 1932________________
1933—July 73
----- Mines, quarries, railroads, 1923 to 1928---------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Jan. 122-3
Germany. B y cause group and type (reportable, compensable, and fatal), 1927 to
1930__________________________________________________________ ____ ________ 1933—June 1257-8
----- Child labor, accidents due to relaxation of rules during war......... ...................................1921—July 14-15
----- Workers on way to and from work, 1927-31......... ............ ............................................. 1936—Jan. 119-20
----- (The Ruhr). M ining, 1928............................................................... .................................... 1929—Dec. 68-9
Great Britain. Building industry-------------------------------------------- -----------------------1934—Aug. 335
----- B y industry and by sex, 1928,1932, and 1935.......... ...................... 1934—Oct. 906-7; 1937—N ov. 1156-7
----- Compensable cases (fatal and nonfatal), 1919 to 1931..----------- ------------------------ 1929—Apr. 122-3;
1930—M ay 93-5; 1933—Aug. 317-19
----- 1920 and 1935_________________________________ ________ _ 1923—M ay 197; 1936—N ov. 1167,1171
----- Railway, by class of accident, and group of persons...------- ------------------------------- 1923—Jan. 157;
1927—Dec. 75; 1934—Jan. 92-4
Hawaii. Accidents and accident costs (compensation, medical, etc.), 1929.................. 1931—Mar. 100-1
Idaho. B y industry and extent of disability, 1921-22...... ............ ....................... ............ 1923—July 203-4
----- M ines and mills, 1929------- --------------------------------------------------- ----------------------- 1930—July 85-6
Illinois. B y cause, extent of disability, etc., 1925-26............................... 1928—Aug. 66; 1929—Mar. 100-1
----- Cost of accidents, by extent of disability, 1924_________________________________ 1926—Aug. 64
----- Minors, by industry and extent of disability, 1923, 1928, and 1931_______________
1928—Jan. 64;
1929—Sept. 68; 1932—Aug. 286
----- Minors under 18 years of age, m onthly publication of accident statistics_________ 1926—Feb. 253
India. (Bombay Presidency). 1923------------------- ---------------------------------------------- 1925—Jan. 19-20
Indiana. 1924 to 1927____________________ ______ _ 1925—Aug. 161; 1927—Sept. 56; 1928—Apr. 69-70
----- Elegally employed minors, 1921 and 1923._____ ______________ 1922—June 115-17; 1924—July 127
Iowa. 1921-22 and 1925-26______________________________________ 1923—Mar. 116-17; 1927—Dec. 74
Italy. Agricultural and industrial accident cases handled by National Institution for
Social Assistance, 1926 to 1929................. ......................... ......................................................
1930—Aug. 70
----- Agriculture, 1919 and 1920_________ _____ ______ _______ _____ _____ _____ ______ 1923—Jan. 31-2
----- Classified wage groups, 1915 to 1922—
............. .................................... .......................... . . . 1922—Apr. 91-2
----- 1923, and index numbers, 1905 to 1923.......................... ............................ .................... 1926—June 109-10
Kansas. Compensation cases, 1920, 1926, and 1928.......... 1921—Sept 178; 1927—Dec. 74; 1928—Pec. 116
----- Fatalities, by type of accident, 1930 and 1932............... 1932—Apr. 817, Aug. 284-5; 1933—Aug. 301-2
Latvia. B y month, 1928-29----------------------------------------------- ------ -------------------------- 1929—N ov. 44
Lithuania. Industrial workers, compulsory system, introduced by law of Apr. 30,
1936_____ ______________________________________________ __________________ 1936—N ov. 1146-8
Maine. Infection, cases of, following injury, by industry, 1931............... 1932—Sept. 555-6, Dec. 1340-1
Maryland. 1914-15_______________________________________________ __________ 1925—July 149-50
Massachusetts. B y industry, extent of disability, etc., 1920 to 1932_______________1922—Dec. 164-5;
1923—Mar. 117-19; 1927—Sept. 57-8; 1929—Feb. 48-50, Dec. 63-4; 1933—Jan. 108, Nov. 1101-2
----- Children under 18, 1917-18 to 1923-24______________ ____ _____________ ________1926-Dec. 93-4
----- Domestic and personal service, 1919-20............. ....................................... ................... .
1922—Dec. 165
------(Boston). Child labor............................................................. ............................................
1921—Jan. 55
Mexico. 1920 to 1923_______________________________ 1921—Feb. 150; 1922—June 155; 1924-^Dec. 140
----- Mining (coal and metal) and metallurgical plants, by cause, 1929 to 1931---------- 1933—M ay 1070-1
Minnesota. Compensation cases closed, 1920-22, by extent of disability and c o st... 1923—Mar. 119-20
Montana. Compensable accidents, 1916-22, by extent of disability. ................... ....... 1923—Mar. 120-3
Netherlands. Insurance records compared with those of Switzerland............................. 1938—Feb. 435
New Hampshire. B y extent of disability, 1923-24 to 1929-30..................................... 1925—Apr. 143-4;
1927—Apr. 39; 1931—Apr. I ll
N ew Jersey. Compensated cases, by industry, cause, extent of disability, and cost,
1923-24 to 1932____________________________________ ____ ______________________ 1925—M ay 184;
1926—July 59-61; 1928—Dec. 98; 1931—Mar. 101; 1933—Mar. 549-50; 1934—Jan. 91-2
----- Minors, industrial accidents to, 1919-20. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study).............. 1926—June 86-9
----- Ohio, and Wisconsin. Women, by industry groups, 1919-20.__________________ 1927—Oct. 56-9
New Orleans (La.). Persons injured and days lost, 1931. (Factories Inspection D e­
partment report).......................................... ........................................................................... 1932—June 1320-1
N ew York. Accidents to men and women, comparison......... ........ ..................................1921—Feb. 148-9
*— Accidents to women, after effects of............. .................. ................. ....................... .
1925—Feb. 174-6




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0
Accident statistics, by locality—Continued.
P age
N ew York. Age distribution of workers injured, 1933-37__________________ ____ 1940—Oct. 789-804
----- Compensation cases, by industry, cause, or extent of disability, M ay 1924 to
1929-30_____ 1924—July 195; 1928—Jan. 81-3, Dec. 98-100, 114-15; 1931—Mar. 102; 1932—Sept. 556-7
----- Compensation cost, 1923-24-______ ___________________________ ____________ 1925—Sept. 144-5
----- Construction-machine accidents, compensated cases, 1928-29........ ........................ . 1930—Mar. 73-4
------ Deaths per 1,000 injuries, by age group and sex, 1933-37......... .................................194Q—Oct. 800, 802
----- Infection cases, hands and fingers, by cause, 1927 and 1928______________________ 1928—Dec. 100
----- Permanent partial disability cases, weeks of compensation, 1927 and 1924 compared. 1928—Feb. 92-3
New Zealand. Report, Department of Labor, factories, 1925______________________ 1926—Dec. 70-1
North Dakota. B y cause, and extent of injury, 1928-29 ...................................................... 1930—Apr. 100
----- Fiscal years, 1919-20 to 1929-30........ .................................................................................. 1931—Jan. 120-1
Ohio. B y six principal causes, 1931________________ ______ ___________ _________ 1932—Oct. 845-6
----- Deaths and total accidents, 1912-20, premium receipts and expenditure_______ 1921—M ay 129-36
----- Minors under 18,1926................................................................. ............ ......... 1927—Oct. 61-2; Dec. 114-16
-----Quarries and mines, 1926...................................................................................................... 1928—Apr. 71
Oregon. Industrial fatalities, by cause, 1923-24................................................................... 1924—Sept. 158-9
Pennsylvania. B y extent of disability, etc., 1916-20 to 1929__________ ___________ 1921—Feb. 161-2;
1924—Feb. 181, Oct. 169, 177-8; 1928—Mar. 42-3; 1930—Apr. 101-2
----- B y industry group, fatalities, etc., 1927, 1928 and 1933____ ___________________ 1928—Sept. 70-1;
1929—June 138-9; 1934—Apr. 827-8
----- Manufacturing, 1932, by industry group.......................................................... . . .......... 1934—MTar. 657-8
----- Married men, leaving dependents, 1929.......... ....................................... ....................... 1931—Jan. 121-2
----- Minors under 16,1923. (Consumers’ League study)................................................... 1926—June 89-90
----- Minors under 21, compensated accidents to, 1924............. ............................ ................. 1928—Jan. 64-6
Peru. (Lima). B y industry, 1924 to 1928___________________________ 1928—Feb. 93; 1930—Feb. 92
Philippine Islands. Fatal and nonfatal, number compensated, by year, 1935-39------- 1940—Mar. 730
----- Fatal, temporary, and permanent, 1920 to 1929___________________________ ____ 1921—Oct. 218;
1926—M ay 91; 1928—M ay 73; 1929—Feb. 50; 1930—Apr. 97; 1931—June 74
Rumania. Oil industry, 1919 to 1928_______________________________________ ____ 1930—Jan. 64-5
South Dakota. Injuries reported, by occupation, 1927-28 and 1931-32._ 1929—Mar. 101; 1933—Jan. 124
Soviet Union. Industrial accidents and temporary disabilities, 1932, by industry. ~ 1935—M ay 1245-6
Spain. B y industry and result, 1922 to 1926---- ------ -------------------------- 1927—Apr. 42; 1929—Mar. 102
Sweden. B y industry group, 1919,1921, and 1926... 1923—Aug. 174-5; 1925—Jan. 160; 1929—Dec. 69-70
‘
Switzerland. Experience, 1930-34, age distribution____________________________ 1940—Oct. 790-804
----- Insurance records, comparison with the Netherlands________ _____ ____________ 1938—Feb. 435
----- 1917 and 1918; 1918 to 1927_____ _____ ________________________ 1921—Feb. 152-3; 1929—Dec. 70
United States. Accidents in 1932, by type. (National Safety Council study)___ 1933—Aug. 297-300
----- Death rates, by cause, international comparison. ________________ _________ 1926—Dec. 65-6
----- Fatal and nonfatal injuries, by State, in 1917 to 1932_____ 1926—Mar. 132; 1934—M ay 1093-1100
----- Federal employees. (See Accident statistics, general—Federal employees.)
----- Frequency and severity rates, by industry ana by State, 1925 and 1926........ ........... 1927—N ov. 62-80
----- Occupational injury rates, 1933, by industry. (National Safety Council
study)________ ____ ____________ - ......................................................1933—Aug. 299; 1934—Aug. 333-4
----- Record to 1921. (Chaney)................................................................................................ 1922—Dec. 159-73
----- Reports, various States, 1923 and 1924.................................................... ........................ 1925—M ay 168-71
----- Selected manufacturing industries, 1925 to 1928...................._. 1929—Mar. 87-97; 1930—Jan. 54-64
----- Women, occupational injuries to, 1930 and 1931 (16 States), compared with m en .. 1935—Oct. 980-1
Uruguay. 1909 to 1928________ ____ _ 1921—Feb. 150-2; 1925—Oct. 105; 1927—June 68; 1931—Aug. 40-1
Vermont. Compensation cases reported, by industry and cause, 1921-22, 1928-29, and
1929-30__________________ _____ _____________ ____ __________ 1923—Mar. 126; 1931—Mar. 102-3
Virginia. B y extent of disability, biennium 1923-25__________ _____ _______ _____ 1926—Apr. 144
Washington. Compensable accidents, 1916 to 1920, by industrial classes, 1914 to 1920,
by cen su s........................... .......................... ........................................................... ................1921—July 193-4
Wisconsin. Age distribution of Workers Injured.. ......................................................... 1940—Oct. 789-804
----- Agriculture, corn-shredder accidents, 1911 to 1922_____________ ____ __________1923—N ov. 176
----- Analytical study, by cause, severity, and cost, 1921 and 1922.............. .................... 1923—Aug. 179-81
----- Compensable accidents, by cause, 1915-20 and 1927.................... 1922—Apr. 191-3; 1928—Dec. 118-19
----- Hand-tool accidents and injuries........................................................ ........................... 1924—M ay 195-6
----- Industrial accident frequency, 1915-20, by months. _____________________ ____ 1921—June 1-5
----- Minors, industrial accidents to, 1919-20. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study)_____ 1926—June 86-91
Accountants, Bookkeepers, and Stenographers, Union No. 12646. Agreement, New York
City provisions of standard form, text_______________ _____ ________________________ 1926—June 209
Accounts, publicity of. Anthracite industry. (Report of U. S. Coal Commission).............. 1923—Aug. 25
Acme Machine Products Co. Decision, N L R B , Dec. 29,1934____ _____ ______ ____ 1935—Feb. 376-7
Actors. Employment through W PA projects, status, April 1937........................................... 1937—Dec. 1364-5
Actors, dramatic stage:
Collective bargaining b y__________________ ____ ______ __________ ____________ _ 1926—M ay 50-2
Great Britain. Joint negotiating council established as result of adoption of “E quity
Shop” principle- .................................................................................................................... 1935—M ay 1222-3
Homes for, Percy Williams and Edwin Forrest......................... ............. .............................. 1929—Sept. 8-4
Actors’ E quity Association:
Attitude of members toward “talking movies”. . ..................................................................... 1928—N ov. 160
Formation, and collective-bargaining experience.............. - ............................. - .............. .......1926—M ay 50-2
Membership statistics, 1915 to 1920.................... ............ .......... .............. .................................. 1922—
July 169
Salary reductions, control of through “cuts board,” union regulations_______________ 1934—N ov. 1137
Acts, legislative. (See Laws and legislation.)
Actuarial audit of State insurance fund, Utah, report, 1924------------ --------------------------- 1925—N ov. 194-5
Adhesive and ink industry. N R A code, effective Oct. 1, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions ..................... .......................................................................................................... .........1934—N ov. 1099
Adjustment boards. (See under specific industry or name of board.)
Administrative justice. (Sm ith)_______________________ _____ _____ _______________ 1924—M ay 13-22
Admiralty, court decisions. (See under Decisions of courts—Admiralty.)
Adult education:
Banks. Training provided through American Institute of Banking______ _________ 1935—July 58-9
Federal Emergency Relief programs. Projects included under......................................... 1934— ay 1122
M
----- Scope of, February 1934, by type of project and by States......................................... 1934—Oct. 908-10
Federal grants for. Recommendations of Advisory Committee on Education___ _ 1938—July 86, 88-9
Resident schools and camps, unemployed women, F E R A project, work of.....................1934—N ov. 1110




io

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Adult education—Continued.
P age
Workers’ Education Bureau (W PA) and CCC, activities---------------- - ______ _______ 1938—Feb. 320
W PA classes, as of M ay 31, 1936_____________________________________________ 1936—Oct. 900,901
W PA program, status, March 1937------------------------------------------------------- ------ ----- 1937—July 140-2
(See also Vocational education; Workers’ education.)
Adulteration and misrepresentation of products-------------------------------------------------------- 1927—Sept. 204-5
Advertising, help-wanted, as an indicator of labor dem and___________________ ____ ___ 1929—Dec. 190-2
Advertising specialty manufacturing. N B A code, effective N ov. 13,1933, tabular analysis
of labor provisions; amended Jan. 15, 1935----------------------------------------- 1933—Dec. 1334; 1935—Mar. 654
Advertising trade:
Car. N B A code, effective Dec. 3, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_________
1935—Jan. 62
Display installation. N B A code, effective Feb. 9,1934, tabular analysis of labor provi­
sions--'------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Mar. 531
Distributing. N B A code, effective Feb. 27,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1934—Apr. 809
Outd oor. N B A code, effective Mar. 6,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_____ 1934—Apr. 816
Advisory Council, N B A . (See National Becovery Administration.)
Advisory councils, relation to public employment services. (See under Employment
agencies, foreign countries.)
Aeronautics. (See Air-transport industry.)
Affiliated Schools for Workers. Coverage of activities.................... .......................................... 1939—July 20-1
Age and unemployment. (See under Older workers.)
Age certificates. (See Child labor and welfare—Employment certificates.)
Age discrimination, employment. (See under Older workers.)
Age factor:
Accidents. (See under Accident statistics, general.)
Employment. Women in business and professions, study of, 1931. (U. S. Women’s
Bureau)-------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------- ------------- 1934—Aug. 336-40
(See also under Older workers.)
Age limit for employment. (See Older workers.)
Age of retirement. (See Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Aged, indigent persons, care of, United States:
Ancient Order of Gleaners. New home for, Alma, M ich— ........................................... .
1931—Feb. 89
Church pension and relief plans for ministers, by denomination_________ ________ 1929—May 92-109
Delaware. State Welfare Home established, October 1933, description of__................. 1934—Jan. 11-13
Dependency. (See Old-age dependency.)
Homes for aged. Actors, dramatic stage, Edwin Forrest and Percy Williams hom es.. 1929—Sept. 3-4
----- Administration and conditions______________________________________________ 1929—July 1-21
----- Business and professional people, Seabury Memorial Home and Ward Homestead. 1929—Sept. 4-5
----- Care provided, kind, age, size, capacity, sponsoring organizations, entrance re­
quirements, sodrces of income, and geographical distribution, 1939_____________ 1940—M ay 1043-61
----- Certain occupational groups-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1929—Sept. 1-7
----- Colored people only______________________________ ____ ___________________ 1929—Aug. 10-14
----- Firemen’s Home, New Jersey and New York................................................................ 1929—Sept. 5-6
----- Maintained by fraternal organisations............... ................................. .............. ............ 1929—Mar. 3-11
----- Maintained by nationality groups-------------------- --------- --------- ----------- ---------- 1929—Apr. 1-7
----- Maintained by religious organizations............................... ........................................... 1929—Mar. 12-30
----- Ministers, 6 denominations________________ _________ _____________ ________1929—Sept. 6
----- Music teachers, Presser Home, Philadelphia........ ................................ ......................... .
1929—Sept. 6
----- Private benevolent. (BLS study, 1929)_____________________________________ 1929—Apr. 7-26
----- Private, 1930, by metropolitan area. (Steele)_____________________________ i_ 1932—Feb. 259-60
----- Problem of idleness in_____________________________ _____ __________________ 1929—Dec. 13-25
----- Bochester (N. Y.) Community Chest survey, summary and recommendations. 1940—N ov. 1114-19
----- Sailors’ Snug Harbor, Quincy (Mass.) and Staten Island (N. Y .)_______________ 1929—Sept. 6-7
----- Trade-union, disabled, and tubercular..................... ............................. ............................. 1928—Feb. 1-29
Homes for, and old-age pensions. BLS study of, 1929.......................... 1929—Mar. 1-2; 1930—Jan. 100-2
----- Trade-union action on, 1929_________________________________________________ 1930—Jan. 103
Maryland. Dependency, study of, 3 typical counties, and recommendations for care
of needy aged--------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ------------------- 1933—Oct. 856-7
Ministers. Church pension and relief plans, by denomination__________________ 1929—M ay 92-109
----- Betired, homes for, 6 denominations_________ _______________________________
1929—Sept. 6
New York. Public and private care, report of, 1931-32________________________ 1934—Mar. 540-2
Pensions. (See Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Public and private institutions, number of inmates, etc., 1930. (Steele)...................... 1932—Feb. 253-61
Public care of aged, 1930------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1932—Feb. 253-9
Aged, indigent persons, care of. Great Britain (Neweastle-on-Tyne), municipal homes for
1932—July 52
aged people------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------Agreements. (See Collective agreements; also under name of labor organization.)
Agricultural Adjustment Administration (U. S. Government). Parity payments to pro­
ducers of certain products provided for by Work Belief Act of 1938___________________ 1938—Aug. 348
Agricultural and Cannery Workers. Tax for workers’ education voted, 1937..........................
1939—July 15
Agricultural implements, manufacture of:
Accident statistics, by State and type of injury, 1925 and 1926___ 1927—N ov. 64-5, 67; 1928—Jan. 74-80
Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Trend in employment, hours, earnings, and production under the N B A , October 1932March 1934_______________________________ ____ _________________________ 1934—M ay 1019, 1025
Agriculture, United States:
Accident statistics. Alabama, 1932-38_________________________________________ 1940—July 109-11
Arizona. Agricultural Workers’ Health and Medical Association. Beasons for organ­
ization and operation___________________________________ •_
___________________ 194(1—Aug. 333-7
Automotive power, effects upon labor requirements. (See under M echanizationAgriculture.)
California. Agricultural Workers’ Health and Medical Association. Beasons for or­
ganization and operation____________________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 333-7
Camps. (See under Camps.)
Capital, gross income, and selected expenditures, current value of, 1928-32..................... 1934—Jan. 65
Censuses of 1920 and 1930, workers and wage earners, number and percent____________ 1936—Feb. 341
Child labor. Berry fields, orchards, and hop-raising districts, northern Pacific coast. _ 1926—Apr. 80-1
----- Cotton fields, Texas, 1923. (National Child Labor Committee study)_________ 1925—Sept. 81-2
----- Cotton-growing areas, Texas, 1920-21. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study) ................ 1924r-July 128-30




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

11

Agriculture, United States—Continued.
Page
Child labor. Farms and beet fields, Colorado, survey, 1924.......................................... . 1930—Mar. 61-3
----- Tobacco-growing areas, United States, 1922-23..-........... ................................................. 1926—May 90
-----Wisconsin Industrial Commission, attitude of_________ ________ _____ _______ 1924—Dec. 62
----- (See also Child labor and welfare, U. S.—Farm work.)
Codes,jurisdiction over, Executive order of Jan. 8,1934, concerning..................... ............ 1934—Feb. 290-1
Congresses. (See under Conventions, meetings, etc.)
Cooperative associations. (See under Cooperation—Agriculture, also Farmers.)
Corn crop, labor requirements__________________________________________________ 1927—Aug. 36-7
Corn growing, labor productivity in, changes from 1909 to 1936___________________ 1938—Sept. 533-5
Cost of living. (See Cost of living, U. S.—Farm families.)
Cotton Belt. Labor displacement through power farming. (See under Mechanization.)
Cotton crop. Labor requirements______________________________ ________________ 1927—Aug. 35-6
Cotton fields. Mexican workers, malaria among, M ississippi--------------------------------- 1927—July 50-1
Cotton growing. Acreage, production, and labor required, specified periods, 1907-36.__ 1939—Jan. 62
Cotton harvesting. Labor requirements and costs, Oklahoma and Texas____________ 1928—Oct. 50-2
----- Mechanical pickers, and sleds, displacing hand labor_______________ _____ ______ 1928—M ay 42
Cotton picker, stripper, and eleaner. Description of machines................. ......................... 1927—N ov. 31-3
Cotton pickers, migratory. Arizona. Situation leading to use___________________ ___ 1940—Jan. 64
----- Southwest ana Pacific coast__________ _____ ______ ______ _____ _____________ 1937—Mar. 539-41
Cotton plantations. Tenancy of farmers, eastern Cotton B elt___________________ 1937—M ay 1179-81
Cotton production. Hired workers and sharecroppers, employment trends, residence
instability, and economic status____________________________________________ 1940—N ov. 1151-5
Crop yields. Increase in, per unit of man-labor, through new processes and methods. 1933—N ov. 1036-8
Crops. Labor cost, irrigated farms, Colorado, 1922 to 1927_________________________ 1930—Mar. 32
-----Mexican labor, preference for, California______________________________ ____ _
1931—Jan. 87
Dairy farms. Mechanization on, development and effect on labor requirements____ 1933—Mar. 515-16
Date packing. N R A code, effective N ov. 20,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1934—Jan. 42
Demand for products, limitations on, and decline in acreage required.._____________ 1939—Aug. 290-1
Education and training. (See under Vocational Education, U . S.)
Electricity, benefits from and new uses of on farms_____________________________ 1939—Apr. 905-10
Electrification of farms, extent of________________________________________________ 1933—Mar. 517
Employment. (See under Employment statistics—Agriculture.)
Employment opportunities. Decline in, on farms, and causes________ ____ ______ _ 1939—Aug. 287-94
----- Seasonal variation in demand for farm workers_______________________________ 1940—July 186-7
----- Youth, inadequacy of. (W PA study)_________________________________ ____ 1939—Mar. 573-4
Engineering progress, changes in farm machinery, electrification, etc_______________ 1928—Mar. 37-9
Family and hired workers on farms, employment statistics by areas and seasonal varia­
tion, 1909 to 1938_________________ ______ _______________ ___________________ 1939—June 1241-52
Farm and city families, food habits of_________________________________________ 1926—Dec. 219-20
Farm children, vocational education for, “4-H Club” .extension work______________ 1927—Aug. 3-10
Farm colonies, Italians in development of, New Jersey. (Jacob)___________________ 1923—Jan. 1-22
Farm crops. Labor requirements----------------------------------------------------------------------- 1927—Aug. 35-7
Farm employment. Conditions, 1909-38. (Bowden)__________________________ 1939—June 1241-57
Farm families. Improved living standards under rural-rehabilitation program of
FSA _____________________ ____ ____ ____ ____________________________________ 1939—Aug. 400-2
----- Submarginal, causes for smallness of incomes_________________________________ 1938—Oct. 753-4
Farm labor. (Hired), distribution of, by geographic division, and number per farm.
(W endzel)____________________ ____ ________________________________________ 1937—Sept. 561-8
----- Louisiana, problem of, 1922-23 and 1924-25----------------------------------------------------- 1926—July 39-40
----- Migratory, in United States. (Taylor)------------------------------------------------------- 1937—Mar. 537-49
----- Ohio farms, exodus from------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—Jan. 207
----- Philadelphia children employed a t__________________________________________ 1929—Mar. 82-3
----- Productivity, effects of depression upon---------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Jan. 63-5
----- Wages as compared with cost of living, index numbers, 1906 to 1925-------------------- 1926—Sept. 115
Farm laborer, as a human being________________________________________________ 1927—July 27-30
Farm living standards, effect of rural electrification upon________________________ 1939—Apr. 905-10
Farm machinery. Changes in, electrification, etc., engineering progress____________ 1928—Mar. 37-9
----- Wholesale prices, revised indexes, 1913-34. (Cutts)_________________________ 1935—Aug. 526-32
Farm mechanization. (See under Mechanization.)
Farm ownership. Decrease in prevalence of since 1900------------------------------------------- 1939—Mar. 573
----- Negroes, West Virginia_____________________________________________________
1927—Aug. 29
----- Occupancy and tenancy, 1922_______________________________________________
1923—M ay 38
Farm population. (Estimated) and migration to and from farms, by geographic
division, 1931_______ : _____________________________________________________ 1932—Sept. 512-13
----- N et increase in, 1932______________________________________________________ 1932—Dec. 1304-5
Farm prices and wages, trend of, compared with certain other trends (index numbers). . . 1924—Oct. 64
Farm products. Apples, cost and margins in marketing of, study of----------------------- 1925—Feb. 81-2
v ----- Demand for, effect upon, by displacement of horses and m u les............................ . 1930—June 70*^2
----- Prices, purchasing power, etc_____ _______________________ _______ - .................. - 1922—Jan. 88-91
----- (See also Wholesale Prices.)
Farm tenants. (See Tenancy, also Tenant farmers, this section.)
Farm work and city-school attendance_______________________________________ 1922—Dec. 150-2
Farmers. Incomes, purchasing power, New York, 1914 to 1923--------------------- -------- 1925—Feb. 79-82
-----Marketing cooperatives. (See under Cooperation—Agriculture, also Farmers.)
----- Working hours of._________________________________________________________ 1927—Aug. 103-5
Farming, part time, in Southeast, extent of, and economic aspects_______________ 1938—Mar. 641-5
Floating labor problem. Oregon harvest centers_____________ _____ ___ ________1925—Oct. 13-15
Governors’ messages, recommendations, specified States_________________________1921—Mar. 187-8;
1925—Apr. 12-13; 1926—June 45-6; 1931—Apr. 58-60
Graduate school in United States Department of Agriculture, courses, etc_________ 1922—N ov. 232-3
Grain sorghums. Labor requirements and costs in harvesting-------------------------------1929—Jan. 49
Harrowing, disking, and seeding. Hand and machine labor requirements__________ 1931—Oct. 8-9
Harvesting. Apples, Wenatchee Valley, Wash., labor conditions, 1926. (Shields) __ 1927—Apr. 13-20
----- Hand and machine labor requirements____________________________________ 1931—Oct. 10-13
----- Labor in the wheat belt, conditions, 1920 and 1921_____________________ ____ 1923—Feb. 44-50
----- Labor recruiting and distributing, United States Employment Service__________ 1931—Jan. 26-7
Hawaii. Labor conditions and trends_______________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1310-21
History. Colonial period, United States.............................................................. ............. 1931—Oct. 3-4




12

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Agriculture, United States—Continued.
P age
Horses and mules. Displacement of, effect upon demand for farm products. ............. 1930—June 70-2
Income and wages of farm workers, 1909-38____________________________ _________ 1939—July 59-71
Labor cost, crop production on irrigated farms, Colorado, 1922 to 1927........................ .
1930—Mar. 32
Labor, on farms. (See Farm labor, this section.)
Labor organization__________________________________________________________ 1937—Feb. 310-17
Labor phases, agricultural wage earners in the United States. (Turner).................... 1922—Dec. 22-40
Labor supply and demand, specified months, 1929 to 1938________________________ 1930—Dec. 161;
1933—Mar. 618; 1934—Mar. 675, June 1455, Sept. 732; 1935—Sept. 689, Dec. 1607; 1936—Dec.
1502; 1937—Oct. 955; 1938—Sept. 621
Laws, protective. (See under Laws and legislation—Farm.)
Living standard of families (72) of a fertile section near markets (Carroll County, M d.).
Average expenditures by income groups, specified item s------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 403-4
Living standards on the farm. (1929 report, U. S. Secretary of Agriculture)________ 1930—Jan. 198-9
Malt industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 7, 1935, tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1935—Feb. 302
Mechanization. (See under Mechanization.)
Migratory, casual, and part-time workers, conditions affecting_____________ ____ 1939—June 1252-7
Migratory labor. (See Migration—Agricultural workers, also Farm families.)
Mississippi cotton farmers’ adult children, occupations of----------------------------- _r.___ 1938—Oct. 754-7
Mississippi plantations, hired labor and sharecroppers on----------------------------------- 1939—N ov. 1104-6
Mules, displacement of, on farms, effect upon demand for farm products................. . 1930—June 70-2
N R A codes. (See Date packing, M alt, Wine, this section.)
New Jersey. Fruit and vegetable farming, migratory children in, legislative commis­
sion inquiry and report, 1930_________________________________________________ 1931—June 64-6
Operation of farms, change in basis of, Indiana___________________________________ 1923—Mar. 2-3
Part-time farming to supplement income. Extent of and living standard of families. 1939—Sept. 623-8
Plowing, hand and machine labor requirements.............................. ..................................... 1931—Oct. 4-8
Power farming. (See under Mechanization.)
Puerto Rico. Farmer, small, measures to aid, 1929-30----------------------------------- -------- 1930—Dec. 59
----- Real wages, decrease in, 1915 to 1925___ '.---------------------------- -------------------------- 1926—June 68-9
Problems. President’s (Harding) recommendations______________ ______________ 1922—Jan. 3-4
President’s Committee on Farm Tenancy. Report of, 1937, summary--------------- 1937—M ay 1177-9
President’s (Coolidge) message to Congress, 1925________________________________ 1926—Jan. 58-9
Production and productivity. (See under Productivity of labor, U. S.—Agriculture.-)
Rural rehabilitation. Federal programs— farm-relief families, and under workrelief_________________________________________ ____ ____ - 1934—July 39-40; 1935—Mar. 638-40
-----(See also Farm Security Administration.)
Sharecropping. Mississippi plantations, decreasing as hiring of labor increases___ 1939—N ov. 1104-6
Stamp plans, food and cotton, of Surplus Marketing Administration. Objectives,
methods, and relation to defense____________________________________________ 1940—N ov. 1066-5
Statistics. United States, 1910,1920______ *
------------------------------------------- ------------ 1922—Dec. 22-8
Strawberry pickers, Arkansas and Kentucky, living conditions and child labor------- 1946—June 1416-17
Sugar-beet industry. (See under Sugar-beet industry.)
Technological changes. Effect on farm employment....................................................... 1939—Aug. 282-92
----- Improvement through, and forces offsetting------------------------------------------------ 1939—Aug. 287-90
Technological labor displacement, and the unemployment situation-------------------- 1931—Oct. 30-1
Tenancy. Eastern Cotton Belt, last quarter century__________________________ 1937—M ay 1179-81
----- On farms, status (summary of report and recommendations (1937) of President’s
Committee)______________________________________________________________ 1937—M ay 1177-9
Tenant farmers. Displacement of, by mechanization, Cotton Belt—Northwest Texas,
southwestern Oklahoma, and Mississippi Delta______ ______ _______ 1938—Mar. 601-7, Apr. 852-65
—— From Cotton Belt farms, relocation problems________________________________
1937—July 12
----- Sharecroppers, and laborers, opportunity for farm purchase, FSA p la n ............. ....... 1939—Aug. 402
Threshing, hand and machine labor requirements_______________________________ 1931—Oct. 13-21
Tractor and plow operation held dangerous occupation w ithin meaning of State childlabor law (Kans. Sup. C t.)..................................................................................................... 1939—Mar. 620-1
Tractors. (See under Mechanization.)
Training. (See under Vocational education, U . S.)
Truck farms. New Jersey, working conditions on, 1922---------------------------------------- 1925—Aug. 7-10
Unemployment. Survey of, agricultural and industrial, Puerto Rico resolution,
July 19,1929_________________ ___________ _______ - ____________ ______________ 1929—N ov. 117
Virginia. Recommendations in message of Governor, concerning immigration of
desirable skilled farm laborers from certain parts of Europe______________________
1926—June 46
Vocational education. (See under Vocational education, U . S.)
Wage earners, studies of ILO and other research organizations, concerhing United
States and other countries______________________ _________ _________________ 1936—Feb. 339-46
Waste from economic and industrial inertia___ ______________ __________ _________ 1924—July 5-7
W heat-Belt migration, effect of mechanization u p o n ........................................................... . 1937—Mar. 539
Wheat farming, productivity of labor in______________________________ _____ _____ 1926—Dec. 34-6
Wine industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 3,1934, tabular analysis of laborprovisions. 1934—Oct. 879
Working conditions. Massachusetts farms, 1921---- ------------------------------------------ - 1924—July 38-41
Yakima Valley farms. Distribution by type, size, and crops............................................ 1937—Aug. 362
(See also Land settlement and reclamation.)
Agriculture, foreign countries: *
General. Collective bargaining among agricultural laborers, practice in various
countries_________ ____ ____ _________________ ____ ___________________________ 1936—Jan. 77-9
----- Family-allowance principle followed_____________________________ ____________ 1926—M ay 11
----- International Labor Conference, draft conventions, Geneva, 1921.......... ................. 1922—Jan. 52-4
----- Labor organizations among farm workers------------- ------------------------- ------------- 1936—Feb. 344-6
----- Occupational diseases of laborers. (ILO study)________________________ _____ 1927—Dec. 80-1
----- Right to organize. International labor convention (agreement) 1921.............. . . . 1934—Apr. 776-7
----- Working conditions, 1921. (ILO survey)_________ ____ _______ _______________ 1922—Aug. 20-3
Argentina. Farm lease law, Oct. 7,1921___________________________________ ____ _ 1922—Feb. 136-7
----- Immigration, encouragement of_________________________________________ ____ 1925—Feb. 220
Australia. Census of 1921, workers and wage earners, number and percent................... 1936—Feb. 341
Belgium. Census of 1920, workers and wage earners, number and percent...................... 1936—Feb. 341
Brazil. Coffee growing, plantation (fazenda) sy stem ...________________ _____ _____
1925—Sept. 1
----- Laborers, need of__________________________________________ ______ ________ 1927—Feb. 214-15
Bulgaria. Censuses of 1920 and 1926, workers and wage earners, number and percent.. . 1936—Feb. 341




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

13

Agriculture, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Canada. Censuses 1921 and 1931, workers and wage earners, number and percent.......... 1936—Feb. 341
----- Effect of war upon, appraisal of.................................................. ...................................... 1940—M ay 1123
----- Government assistance, act of 1937_____ ____ __________________________ ____ _ 1937—July 191-2
----- (British Columbia). Orientals, land owned or leased b y______________________ 1927—M ay 274
----- (Quebec). Farm settlements, racial distribution of population and migration _ _ 1932—Sept. 614-15
China. Farmers’ leagues, development of. (Ta Chen)_________ ________________ 1930—July 10-13
----- Farmers’ unions in _______________ ____ ___________________________________
1927—M ay 67-9
----- Woman labor_____________________________________________________________ 1922—Dec. 146-7
----- (Nanking and Suancheng). Farmers’ remunerative activities in slack seasons._ 1929—Jan. 52-3
----- (Ningsha Province). Settlement to be established by Government____________ 1940—June 1385
----- (North). Labor exchanges, rural............ .............. ............................. .............................. 1926—N ov. 44-5
----- (Wuhu). Land ownership, type of, rice center.............................................................. 1926—Apr. 181-2
Cuba. Education and training, farm schools______________________ _____ _____ ____ 1921—Apr. 189
Czechoslovakia. Censuses of 1921 and 1930, workers and wage earners, number and
percent_____________________________________________________________ ______
1936—Feb. 341
Denmark. Census of 1921, workers and wage earners, number and percent .......... .
1936—Feb. 341
----- Classes of wage earners......... ......................................................................... .................... 1922—N ov. 130-1
----- Collective agreements............................................................................................................... 1924—Apr. 119
----- Farm labor, organization of................................................................................................
1922—N ov. 131
----- Master and servant law, M ay 1921. ...................................... .............................. ............. 1922—Feb. 140
----- Woman labor___________________ _____ _____________ _______________ ________ 1922—N ov. 131
Ecuador. 1938 labor code, provisions....................................................................... ............... 1940—Mar. 683
England. (See under Great Britain, this section.)
Estonia. Census of 1922, workers and wage earners, number and percent. ........ ......... 1936—Feb. 341
Europe. Collective agreements, practices abolished and regulated by. (ILO study). 1933—July 113-16
Finland. Censuses of 1920 and 1930, workers and wage earners, number and percent.. 1936—Feb. 341
France. Census of 1926, workers and wage earners, number and percent____________ 1936—Feb. 341
----- Compensation for accidents, act of Apr. 30, 1926...................................... ...................... 1926—Dec. 81
----- 8-hour day. General attitude................................................................... ................ ........... 1923—July 45
----- Family allowances........................................... ......................................................................... 1923—July 44-6
----- “Family-wage” system, expansion of.____ _____________ ______ _____ _________ 1923—Oct. 5-6
----- Foreign labor, employment of, 6-year experience, to 1925_______________________ lf}27—Jan. 68-9
----- Social-insurance system, coverage, provisions of 1930 law, and operations to Dec.
31, 1932_________________________ ____ _____ _____ ____ 1930—Sept. 84-5; 1934^-Sept. 635-6,637,638
----- Trade-unionism_________________ _________________________________________ 1923—July 39-40
Germany. Censuses 1925 and 1933, workers and wage earners, number and percent— 1936—Feb. 341
----- Labor corps organized to aid unemployed, growth of, Apr. 15, 1933, to Feb. 15,
1934____ _________________ _____ __________ ______________________ _________ 1934—Aug. 314-15
----- Land settlement. (See under Land settlement and reclamation.)
----- (East Prussia). German and non-German workers, differences in hours and remu­
neration, labor rules, M ay 17,1940............................................ .......................................... 1940—Aug. 313-14
— (Saxony). Farm labor, situation. ................... .......................................................... 1922—Dec. 45-6
—
Great Britain. Allowances in kind__________ _____________________________ ____ 1922—July 81-2
----- Conciliation committees as substitutes for wage boards________________________ 1922—July 76-6
----- Corn production acts, repeal of, and pre-war agreements under.. 1921—N ov. 180; 1922—July 84-5
----- Organization of, and labor aspects______ _______________ _______________ ___ 1940—M ay 1110-11
----- Trade-union organization________________________ _______________________ _
1922—July 76
----- Unemployment-insurance system extended to workers_____ _________________ 1936—June 1512-14
----- Wage payment, board and lodging__________________________________ ____ ___ 1922—July 82-3
----- (England). Labor efficiency in potato harvesting, milking cows, hop picking, and
poultry work, 1926-28________________________________________ ______ ________ 1930—Oct. 119-22
----- (England and Wales.) Decrease in number of workers, by class, 1930 and 1931.. 1932—Dec. 1308
------------Farm labor in. (Turner)______________________________________________ 1922—July 71-86
----------- 1921 and 1931 censuses, workers and wage earners, number and percent.......... . 1936—Feb. 341
------------Occupations or classes, description of____________________________________ 1922—July 71-4
----- (Scotland). Census of employment and motive-power equipment, 1925 to 1931. _ 1934—June 1346-7
------------Censuses of 1921 and 1931, workers and wage earners, number and percent___ 1936—Feb. 341
------------Employed workers. Housing, general working conditions, hiring m ethods.. 1937—Jan. 160-2
------------Wage-fixing system extended from England to Scotland__________________ 1937—Oct. 953-4
------------Wage regulation system recommended by Government committee_________ 1937—Jan. 162
Hungary. Census of 1920, workers and wage earners, number and percent__________ 1936—Feb. 341
Irish Free State. Census of 1926, workers and wage earners, number and percent___ 1936—Feb. 341
Italy. Almond growing, conditions in industry_________________________________ 1923—Feb. 60-1
----- Censuses of 1921 and 1931, workers and wage earners, number and percent.......... . 1936—Feb. 341
----- Collective agreements, 1923-24_____________ _____ _________________________ 1924—Sept. 108-10
----- Share system (mezzadria) __________ _______________________________________ 1928—July 31-2
----- Statistics, 1919 and 1920___________________________________________________ 1923—Jan. 31-2
----- Workmen’s compensation and insurance, compulsory accident-insurance la w ... 1923—Jan. 26-32
Japan. Economic conditions of laborers_______________________________________ 1921—Dec. 11-12
----- Rental disputes______________________________________ ______ ___ _________ 1923—Nov. 214-15
Java. Working conditions, etc., on plantations____________ ______ ______ _______ 1921—Jan. 117-19
Korea. Agrarian situation, tenancy disputes, 1920 to 1928________________________ 1930—N ov. 30-2
Lithuania. Census of 1923, workers and wage earners, number and percent......... ........ 1936—Feb. 341
Manchuria. Native farmers displaced by Japanese immigration, aid for_________ 1940—June 1385-7
Mexico. Farm labor, cost of living__________ _________________________________ 1926—N ov. 131-2
----- (Nuevo Laredo and Coahuila). Labor cost of crops, per item, per acre, irrigated
lands_______________________________________ : _________________ ___________ 1932—Mar. 560-1
Netherlands. Censuses of 1920 and 1930, number and percent _______ ___________ 1936—Feb. 341
----- Collective agreements, r6sum6, January 1920 to June 1937_____________________ 1938—Apr. 897-9
New Zealand. Census of 1921, workers and wage earners, number and percent______ 1936—Feb. 341
Norway. Censuses of 1920 and 1930, workers and wage earners, number and percent. _ 1936—Feb. 341
----- Wage earners, classes of, cost of living, etc. (Turner)................................................. 1922—Sept. 116-21
Paraguay. Labor situation...... .............. .............................................................. .................. 1925—Feb. 161-2
Peru. Working conditions of laborers, e t c .. . ...................................................................... 1922—July 87-8
Scotland. (See under Great Britain, this section.)
South America. Adult farm labor, vocational education of------------------------------------ 1922—Aug. 160
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Apportionment of time of farm hand on collective farm,
1934.................. ........................................................................................................................ 1935—N ov. 1220-1

201042*




14

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Agriculture, foreign countries—Continued.
P age
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Decree fixing wages and prescribing standard yearly
output of plowing___ ________________ ______________ _____ __________ _______ 1935—Sept. 707-9
----- Employment on large-scale farms, specified dates, 1927-32................. ........................... 1935—Jan. 47-8
Spain. Almond growing, conditions in the industry---------------------------- ---------------- - 1923—Feb. 60-1
----- Workmen’s compensation, proposal to include agricultural workers.......................... 1921—July 229
Sweden. Budgets, laborers' household, 1920___________________________________ 1922—June 66-8
----- Census of 1920, workers and wage earners, number and percent_______ ______ 1936—Feb. 341
----- Collective agreement, Oct. 14, 1936_________________________________ ________1937—Mar.
676
----- Employees' and employers’ organizations--------------- --------- ------------------------- 1922—Sept. 124-5
----- Labor supply, wages and hours, 1924------------------- ------------ ---------------------------- 1926—Jan. 124
----- Wage earners, classes of, cost of living, etc. (Turner)................... ................ ............ 1922—Sept. 121-30
-----Woman and child labor, survey, 1915_______________________________________ 1922—Sept. 124
Switzerland. Censuses of 1920 and 1930, workers and wage earners, number and percent. 1936— Feb. 341
Yugoslavia. Education and training courses in army of----------------------------- -------- 1922—Aug. 245
Agriculture, Department of (U. S. Government). Transfers affecting, under Reorganization
Plans Nos. 1 and 2, effective July 1, 1939 ................. ............ ......................................... ....... 1939—Aug. 379-81
Ague, brass foundrymen’s, history of attacks...................... ............................ ............................... 1926—July 57
Aid, legal. (See Legal aid.)
Air Hygiene Foundation of America, creation of, and purposes............... ................................... 1939—Feb. 349
Air service. (See Air-transport industry.)
Air-transport industry:
Aeronautics, civil, progress in, 1926 to 1931_______________________________________ 1932—Aug. 348
Aircraft manufacture. And supply. Contracts, U. S. Government minimum-wage
determination, Dec. 29,1938________________________________________________ 1939—Feb. 369-70
----- Canada. Worker training and labor dilution, contract provisions for, 1940_____ 1940—July 27-9
----- Collective agreements, provisions of------------------------------------------- --------- ----- 1940—Aug. 290-302
Aircraft operation, injuries to workers in, 1932------------------------------------- --------- ----- 1933—M ay 1068
Airplane doping and spray painting, Army Air Corps orders--------------------------------- 1929—M ay 42-3
Airplane industry. Employee representation, elections (N L B ), tabular analysis of
results---------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ----------------------1935—Jan. 9
----- Employment opportunities, prospects as to increase in -------------------------- --------- 1936—Oct. 871-3
----- Employee representation, elections (N L B ), tabular analysis of results............................ 1935—Jan. 9
----- Growth of, 1914 to 1927__________________________________________________ 1930—June 180-2
----- Minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts Act, to Aug. 31, 1940. .......... . 1940—Oct. 814
Airplane manufacture. Employment and production in ________________ ______ 1929—Aug. 62-3
Aviators. Examination and licensing of------------------------- --------------------- ------------ 1924—Mar. 161
Civil aeronautics, progress in, 1926 to July 1, 1933________________________________ 1934—Mar. 664-5
Civilian-pilot training program. U. S. Civil Aeronautics Authority, summary of first
annual report and outlook for 1940-41-------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—July 80-4
Commercial air lines and employees, subject to Railway Labor Act of 1936__________ 1938—Mar. 702
Commercial aviation. N R A code, effective Sept. 10, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions____________________________________________ ________________ _____ 1934—Oct. 876
Labor organization___________________________ _____ _____ ____________________ 1937—Feb. 306-7
Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Mechanics and radio operators, collective agreements filed, 1936___________________ 1938—Mar. 702
N R A code, effective N ov. 27, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions______________ 1934—Jan. 36
Railway Labor Act of 1936, amended to include air carriers and employees________ 1936—Aug. 374-5;
1938—Mar. 702
Working conditions, report of Federal Coordinator of Transportation______________ 1936—Sept. 678-84
Workmen's compensation not applicable to employees in actual flying (decision,
Wash. State Sup. C t.)______________________________________________- ________ 1939—N ov. 1140
Air-valve industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 9,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions. 1934—M ay 1064
Air conditions, workplace. (See Sanitation, working conditions, and factory inspection—
Ventilation.)
Aircraft manufacture and operation. (See Air-transport industry.)
Airplane industry. (See Air-transport industry.)
Alaska Fishermen’s Union, agreement_______________________________ _______ _______ 1921—July 159
Alcohol and alcoholism. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Alcoholic beverage industry:
Importing. N R A code, effective July 30, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions. _ 1934—Sept. 628
Importing and wholesale. N R A codes, except labor provisions, approved__________ 1934—Feb. 305
Wholesale. N R A code, effective M ay 28, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions... 1934—July 52
Alcoholism. Accident occurrence, Bridge and Structural Iron Workers, C hicago.............. 1921—July 195
Aliens, United States:
And Latin American countries, legal restrictions upon employm ent---------------------- 1940—Dec. 1352-4
Employment distribution in industry as indication of companies’ policies. (National
Industrial Conference Board survey)------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Dec. 1354-5
Illegally in U. S. Prohibition of employment by U. S. Deficiency Relief Appropria­
tion Act, 1936________________________________________________________________ 1936—Aug. 379
Registration and fingerprinting required under act of 1940, and educational program
included---- ----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------- 1940—Sept. 569-71
Registration of, required by Pennsylvania law of 1939; law declared unconstitutional
(U. S. Dist. Ct. in P a .)_____________________ ____ _________1930—N ov. 1135-6; 1940—Mar. 669-70
Relief employment prohibited (U. S. Pub. Res. No. 1, approved Feb. 4, 1939)_______ 1939—Mar. 622
Restrictions upon employment of, Federal and State legislation, June 1940_________ 1940—Aug. 245-9
Undesirable and “illegal entrants,” law prohibiting employment of, provisions,
Michigan______________________ _
x........................... ........................... ................................
1932—July 88
(See also Foreigners, employment of; Immigration; Naturalization.)
Aliens, foreign countries:
Brazil. Employment limited, law of 1930__________ _____________ ____ ___________ 1940—June 1400
Cuba. Constitution approved July 5, 1940, provisions________ _____ _____ _________ 1940—Oct. 880
France. Repatriation, policy of Ministry of Labor r e. ................................................... 1935—Oct. 936-7
Latin America. Legal restrictions upon employment of__________ r______ ____ _
1940—Dec. 1352-4
(See also Immigration.)
Alkali wounds. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
All-American cooperative congress, February 1921-------------------------- ------------------------ 1921—Mar. 118-21
Alley Dwelling Authority (U. S. Government), District of Columbia:
Extension of slum-clearance work through loan from U. S. Housing Authority.............. 1938—Jan. 94-5
D . C. housing. Small-dwelling project (Hopkins Place)_ ______________________ 1937—Mar. 550-8
_
Work of, from 1934 to 1937............................................... ......................... 1936—Oct. 886-7; 1938—Mar. 711^13




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

15

P ag*
Allied Building M etal Industries of New York City, agreement, June 4,1923--------------- 1923—Aug. 131-4
All-met^l insect screen industry. N R A code, effective N ov. 27, 1933, tabular analysis of
labor provisions_________________________________________________________________
1934—Jan. 36
Allowances, family. (See Family allowances.)
Allowances in lieu of wages. (See Bonuses; Fam ily allowances.)
Allowances, maternity. (See M aternity and infant welfare; Maternity insurance and
benefits.)
Allowances, soldiers’ families. (See under Fam ily allowances.)
Alloy casting industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 4, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions_____ ____ _______________________________________________________________ 1934—Mar. 531
Alloy, new (Krupp “widia”) for cutting tools, description and use-------------------------------- 1929—Mar. 58
Alloys industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 15,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions.- 1934—Nov. 1099
Almond industry. Conditions in, Italy and Spain____ _____ ___ _______ ______________ 1923—Feb. 60-1
Almshouses:
Cost of, United States. (Summary of BLS Bull. No. 386).......... ................................... 1925—N ov. 28-30
Effect of Social Security program upon, status in 1937_________ _____ ____ _______ 1938—Sept. 518-24
Missouri. Condition of institutions and characteristics of population, 1936 .......... .
1939—Jan. 67-9
Old-age security laws, effect of, on influx of new inmates, nine States_____________ 1933—N ov. 1095-6
States reporting reduction (16), no change (16), and increase (6) in number since opera­
tion of Social Security A ct______________________________________________ ____ 1938—Sept. 521-4
Tennessee. Policies, and care of the indigent, study of, 1937_____________ _______ 1938—Sept. 518-21
Wisconsin. Effect of old-age assistance system on almshouse populations................. . 1935—Jan. 70-1
Aluminum industry:
Collective agreements. Aluminum Co. of America, with Federal labor unions.......... 1937—Feb. 425-7
Labor turn-over. September 1940 rate_____ ____________________ _______ ______ 1940—Dec. 1466
N R A code, effective July 11, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions______________ 1934—Aug. 320
Secondary. N R A code, effective Feb. 22, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions___ 1934—Apr. 818
Amalgamated. (See under inverted titles.)
American Academy of Political and Social Science:
“Present-day immigration” (Annals, January 1921)..........................................................1921—Mar. 213-15
Wage adjustment factors (Annals, March 1922)___________________________ ____ 1922—June 76-81
American Arbitration Association. Creation of Voluntary Industrial Arbitration Tri­
bunal, October 1937__________________________ _______ _________________________ 1937—Dec. 1411-13
American Association of Public Employment Offices. (Name changed to International
Association of Public Employment Services See under Conventions, meetings, etc.)
American Communications Association. Educational and recreational activities................
1939—July 15
American Construction Council:
Apprenticeship program, national....................................... .................. .................................... 1924—Mar. 23
Organization and program.............................................................................................................. 1923—Jan. 148
American Engineering Council:
Safety and production study under w ay.............................................................. ..................... 1926—Aug. 53-4
Safety codes, use of, recommendation_____________ ______________ ____ __________
1924—July 191
American Engineering Standards Committee. C
Name changed to American Standards
Association, which see).
American Express Co. (See Express companies, railway.)
American Federation of Labor:
Achievements. (Report, 1927, executive council)_________ _____ ______ _________ 1927—N ov. 117-18
Basic principle for determining wages, trade-union viewpoint, resolution..................... 1926—Mar. 65-6
Benefits paid, 1938, by union and type of benefit____________________ _____________ 1940—Jan. 91-3
Blindness, prevention of, joint Nation-wide educational campaign................................ . 1929—Jan. 74-5
Building-trades department. Reestablished Mar. 25,1936________________ ______ 1936—M ay 1278-9
------Signatory to Board of Trade Claims agreement, Mar. 3,1931................................... 1931—July 106-7
----- Superseding Structural Building Trades Alliance............................................................ 1927—June 10S
Conference. Declaration of principles.............................. ......................................................1921—Apr. 144-5
Conventions, annual. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.)
1928—Dec. 16
General health work of_________________________________________________________
Labor principles adopted by representatives, February 1921............................................ 1921—Apr. 144-5
Membership. And finances. (1927 report, executive council)........................................... 1927—N ov. 116
----- Increase in, report to 1939 convention.......................................................................... 1939—N ov. 1130-2
----- Oct. 2, 1933, and 1913-33; 1934 to 1940____________________ ____ _____________ 1933—Nov. 1127-8;
1935—Feb. 352-5, N ov. 1245-6; 1937—Jan. 129-30; 1938—Nov. 1037-8; 1940—Dec. 1456
Metal-trades department. Agreement with Sinclair Oil Co., effective to M ay 1, 1936,
provisions............... ........................................................................ ....................... .................. 193&—July 109-10
Personnel, changes in ......................................................................................... ............................. 1925—Jan. 209
Policies. Formulated at 1934 convention............................................................................. 1934—Dec. 1401-9
-----Internal, action on, 1935 convention............................................................................... 1935—N ov. 1242-7
----- On wages__________________________ ______ ___ _____ _____________ _________ _ 1925—Dec. 194
Problems facing trade-unions. (Report, 1927, executive council)____________ ____ 1927—N ov. 119-20
Railway employees’ department. Research foundation incorporated, purposes, etc. 1929—Sept. 49-50
----- Stabilization program for shop crafts employment____ ______ _____ _________ 1930—Aug. 24-6
Reaffiliation with European labor movement, July 1937.............................. ................... 1937—Sept. 633-5
Relations with International Federation of Trade Unions.................................................... 1931—Apr. 30
Shorter workweek. Resolution, October 1926___________________ ______ __________ 1926—Dec. 14r-16
State branches. Colorado, committee report on workers’ education................................. 1924—Oct. 183
----- Illinois, committee report, convict labor............................................................................ 1922—June 207
----- Wisconsin, workers’ education conference_______________________ ______ ______ 1926—Aug. 77-8
----- (See also under Labor organizations, United States.)
Subjects upon which union policies should be formulated. (Report, 1927, executive
council)____________________________________________ ________________ _____ 1927—Nov. 118-19
Unemployment emergency-relief plan, winter of, 1931-32................................... ................1931—Nov. 40-3
Unemployment insurance, attitude or statement of position........................................... 1931—Nov. 105-6
Wage determinations on basis of cost of living, opposed to ................................................... 1922--June 78-9
Wage policy, statement of, and com m ents. ............. ................ ................................. ....... 1927—Oct 129-34
Workers' Education Bureau. (See under Workers’ education.)
American Federation of Musicians. Out-of-work relief plan___________________________ 1924—July 28-9
American glassware industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 31,1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions_________________________________________ _____________________________ 1934r—
Mar. 531
American Institute of Architects. (See under Architects.)




16

m onthly

labor

REVIEW

P age
American Iron and Steel Institute. 12-hour day, committee report on, M ay 25,1923_____ 1923—July 92-5
American match industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 8, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions___________________________________________ _____ ____________________ _ 1934—Feb. 297
American Multigraph Co., employees representation schem e................................................... 1921—July 18-21
American Museum of Safety:
Accident-prevention prizes, award of................... ............................................ ..........................
1925—Jan. 17
Opening............................................................................................................................................. 1924—Mar. 212
American Newspaper Publishers' Association:
Arbitration agreement. Expired, Apr. 30, 1922, text. (Weiss)....................................... 1923—July 26-31
----- History of. (W eiss)__________ ______ _______________________ _____________ 1923—July 17-33
Arbitrator’s award, Oct. 8, 1923_____________________________ __________________ 1924—Jan. 104-10
American Railway Express Co. (See Express companies, railway.)
American Rolling Mills Co. Cost of living, methods of determining. ............................ . 1922—M ay 85-93
American Shoe Workers' Protective Union:
N ew York City. Agreement...................................................................................................... 1925-Feb. 103-4
----- Arbitration board, wage reduction...................................................................................... . 1922—Feb. 100
American Standards Association:
Change of name from American Engineering Standards Committee, history, aims,
procedure, and projects___________________ ______ ____________________________ 1923—M ay 195-6
Industrial standardization in G erm any..________ ____ ______________________ 1921—Dec. 10-11
Organization and functions_____________________________________________________ 1922—Sept. 3-8
Standardization, extent of movement for. (Report of American Engineering Standards
Committee)------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1925—Sept. 202-4
Safety-code work transferred to, from U. S. Bureau of Standards.................................. 1933—Sept. 681-2
American Statistical Association:
Committee on measurement of employment, suggestions................................................... 1923—M ay 187-8
Employment statistics, plan for national collection.......................................................... 1927—Apr. 137-40
Labor Statistics, Governmental, Committee on, annual report.......... ................ ........... 1924—Mar. 126-30
Americanization. (See under Naturalization.)
Ames Baldwin Wyoming Co. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 15,1934 (election)______________ 1934—N ov. 1156
Ammunition, and small arms, manufacturing. N R A code, effective Apr. 16,1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions__________ _____ _______ ____ ___________________________ 1934—M ay 1072
Amoskeag textile mills. Shut-down, September 1935, economic effects of, to 1938_____ 1940—June 1380-4
Amusement industry:
Legitimate theater (drama and musical comedy) waning in competition with soundmotion pictures-------------------------------- ------ ------------- ---------------------------------------- 1931—Aug. 4-5
Legitimate theatrical and burlesque N R A codes, summary of labor provisions____ 1933—Sept. 531-2,
Dec. 1338; 1934—M ay 1065, Dec. 1362
Musicians, theatrical, increased unemployment am ong........................ ............1931—Aug. 2-3, Nov. 7-9
Radio broadcasting. (See Radio-broadcasting industry.)
Technological changes. Effects of, on employment_______________________________ 1931—Aug. 1-7
----- Labor displacement due to, digest of BLS studies....................................................... 1932—N ov. 1031-2
Television, as commercial entertainment, problematic......... ................................................. 1931—Aug. 6-7
Vaudeville theater, doomed, in competition with sound-motion pictures............................. 1931—Aug. 6
(See also Motion-picture industry.)
Anaconda Copper Co. Wage-adjustment provision in agreement with mine, mill, and
smelter workers’ union..................................................................................................................... 1940—Jan. 13-15
Anemia. (See Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Anilin, poisoning. (See Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Animal glue industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 3, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions___________________________________________________________________ _______ 1934—Oct. 876
Animal soft hair industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 12, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions-------------------------------------------- ------------------- , ----- --------- --------------------------- 1934—Apr. 809
Annual earnings. (See under Wages and hours.)
Annual leave. (See Vacations with pay.)
Annual wage, stabilization plans. (See under Employment, stabilization of.)
Annuities:
1939—Jan. 70
Government. Canada, statistics of operation, 1909—37................................... ............ .......
Insurance. (See Life insurance, annuities.)
(See also Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Anthracite. (See Mining, anthracite.)
Anthraco-silicosis. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Anthrax. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Antifriction bearing industry. N R A code, effective Dec. 7, 1933, tabular analysis of labor
provisions--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- : ----------------1934—Jan. 36
Antihog cholera serum and hog-cholera virus industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 9, 1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions----------------------- ------------------------------------------------ 1934r— ay 1073
M
Anti-injunctions. (See Decisions of courts—Injunctions; and under Laws and legislation.)
“ Anti-kick-back" legislation. Federal and State, provisions, and court decisions con­
cerning_______________________________________ _____ __________________________ 1939—May 1103-5
Antileanet ordinances. Constitutionality of, court decisions, Federal and State courts-. 1939—Apr. 881-5
Antioch College, Yellow Springs (Ohio). Reorganization, department of industrial health
established______________________________________ ____ ____ ____ _____ ____________ 1922—Dec. 251
Antiunion contract laws. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Antiunion contracts, constitutionality. (See Decisions of courts—Contract of employ­
ment.)
Apache Indian camps. Improved housing conditions under Emergency Conservation
Work...................................................................................................................................................... 1934—Oct. 960-1
Apartment houses:
Construction of. (See under Housing.)
Domiciles for old-age-assistance recipients, various plans and experiments.................... 1939—Aug. 296-8
Family units, costs of. (See under Housing—Costs.)
Aponaug Manufacturing Co. Decision, Textile Labor Relations Board, Dec. 27, 1934
(Kosciusko, M iss.)---------- --------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1935—Apr. 975-6
Apparel industry:
Industry committee appointed for, under Fair Labor Standards A ct_________ ______ 1939—Feb. 368
Learners, employment of, provision under Fair Labor Standards Act______ ____ ___ 1940—N ov. 1205
(See also Clothing industries.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

17

Apprentice Training, Federal Committee on (U. S. Government):
P age
Established as unit of Department of Labor by statute, 1937- ................................... . 1938—Jan. 100-1
Established by Executive order, June 27,1934, duties of......... ...................... 1934—Sept. 623-4, Oct. 872-3
Progress of program during 5 months’ operation_____ _______ ____ _________________ 1935—Feb. 297
Transferred to National Youth Administration................................................................... . 1937—Oct. 882
Work of, and connection with Labor Department................................................................ 1938—Feb. 319
Apprenticeship, United States:
Aircraft manufacture. Collective agreements, provisions_______________________ igiO^Aug. 299-300
American Federation of Labor attitude toward regulation of (1934 convention)........... . 1934—Dec. 1406
Automotive industry. Training workmen, employers’ attitude toward......... .............. . 1925—Dec. 6-7
Brewery industry. Trade-union regulations, 1935, analysis of agreements................ 1936—Apr. 1017-18
Bricklayers. Campaign for more apprentices................................... ................................ . 1924—July 221-2
----- Increase in number, 1921 to 1925.............. ................................................. .......................... 1925—Sept. 206
Buffers. Indianapolis, agreement provisions.......................................................................... 1925—July 106
Building trades. Apprentice quotas__________________________________ ______ ___ 1928—June 21
----- Boston Building Congress, commission on apprentices......................... ....................... 1925—Apr. 186
----- Carpenters. Ohio (East Liverpool), agreement provisions.._________ __________ 1925—Dec. 102
----- Cleveland school for, classes, graduation, etc_________________ _____ 1925—M ay 218-19, Dec. 182
----- Conditions. (Summary, BLS Bull. No. 459).............................................. ................. 1928—June 15-28
----- Craft organizations, national programs................................................... .......................... 1928—June 22-7
----- Contractors, attitude of........... .................................................................... ........................ 1928—June 21
----- Failure of system____________________ _____________________ _____ ____ ______ 1923—Jan. 146
----- New York Building Congress. System approved, and work of_______ ________ 1922—Oct. 152-4,'
1925—July 180-1
----- Organized systems in operation________________
1928—June 17-20
----- Problem of apprenticeship, different aspects of_________________ _____ ________ 1924—Mar. 22-3
----- Requirements, in union agreements, 1925. (11 important trades)............ ............. 1926—Mar. 174-7
----- School work required, by trade and city----------------------------------- ------ -------------- 1928—June 16
----- Schools, various cities___________________________________________ ____ _____ 1923—Jan. 146-7
----- Standards of training. (Federal Board for Vocational Education)_____________ 1924—Jan. 141
----- Supply of trainees_________________________________________________________ 1928—June 20-1
----- Survey of conditions. (Summary of BLS Bull. No. 459)...................................... 1928—June 15-28
----- Trades having no training policy__________________
1928—June 27-8
----- Training new workers, two distinct lines of................................. —.......................... . 1923—Jan. 146-8
----- Training on the job_______________________________________ _________________ 1928—June 22
----- Union agreement provisions, analysis of.......................................... ........................... 1936—Dec. 1403-4
----- Unions, attitude of____________________________________________ ____________ 1928—June 22
----- Washington, D . C., study of conditions. (Conyngton)_____________ ______ ____ 1925—Jan. 1-7
----- Woodworking trades, system, work of New York Building Congress__________ 1922—Oct. 152-4
Building Trades Employers, National Association of. Convention, discussion____ 1924—Mar. 22-3
Clothing industry. Chicago, cutting-room apprentices, arbitrator’s decision_______ 1923—Oct. 85-7
Company plans and number of trainees, by industry. (Survey of National Industrial
Conference Board)__________________________________________________________ 1938—Jan. 101-3
Egg inspectors. Chicago, agreement provisions, April 1926_______________ _________ 1926—June 210
Electrical workers. Conditions imposed, Washington. (Conyngton)............................. 1925—Jan. 2,4
----- Mount Vernon (N. Y .), agreement, July 1,1924___________________ __________ 1924—Sept. 95-6
----- Philadelphia. Local No. 90, night course____________________________ _______ 1928—Apr. 91-2
----------- Union No. 98 and public schools in cooperation, training system_____ _____ 1931—M ay 81-4
----- Program--------- ------ ----------------------------------- ---------- ----------------- ------------------- 1928—June 25-6
----- Washington (D . C.), ratio, etc., agreement..................................................................... 1924—Dec. 76
Electrotypers. Chicago. Agreement, M ay 1,1924................................... ......................... 1924—Aug. 131-2
----------- Limitation, agreement_____________________________ _____ ___ __________
1923—Apr. 82
Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, interpretations and regulations under____________ 1939—Jan. 154;
1940—Apr. 945-6, Sept. 558:
Federal aid for promotion of, training. Recommendations of Advisory Committee on
Education____________________________________________ ____ ________________ 1938—July 86,88
Federal Committee on Apprentice Training. (See Apprentice Training, Federal
Committee on.)
Foundry trades. Philadelphia------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Feb. 203-4
Foundrymen’s Association, American. Committee report, 32d annual meeting____ 1929—Apr. 126-8
Fur dressers. New York (Brooklyn), agreement, 1925__________ ______ ___________
1925—June 60
Fur industry. N ew York City, agreement, Feb. 1,1924________________________ 1924—Sept. 99-100
Government Printing Office (Washington, D . C.). Training courses in ........ ............ 1922—Sept. 163-4
Incentives, experience of electric and manufacturing company ___________________ 1927—Apr. 58
Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Machinists. Chicago, agreement provisions, M ay 1,1925...... .............................................. 1925—Sept. 89
Maritime Service, United States. Provisions for.......................... - ..................................... 1939—Dec. 1416
Metal polishers. Indianapolis, agreement provisions............................................................ 1925—July 106
Minimum wage. (See under M inimum Wage.)
National Conference on Labor Legislation, 1938, resolution (text)............................... . 1939—Jan. 130-1
N R A code provisions, analysis of. (Schoenfeld)............. ................................................... 1935—Mar. 593-5
N Y A . (See under National Youth Administration.)
Newspapers, composing rooms. Trade-union regulations and agreements___________ 1936—Jan. 174
Occupational data, need for, stressed. (Address, Patterson of Federal Committee on
Apprentice Training) ------ ----- ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1935—July 70-1
Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers, Brotherhood of. Rules revised, P itts­
burgh____________________ ____________ __________________ _____ _____. 1924—June 104-5
Plumbers, National Association of Master. Program_____ ______ ______ _____ 1928—June 23-4, 26-7
Polishers, metal. South Pittsburg, Tenn., term of, and ratio, agreement, 1926........... 1926—Sept. 188
Printing pressmen. School, N ew York C ity......... ............................................................. 1927—Jan. 116-18
Printing pressmen and assistants. N ew York City, agreement, July 17, 1924................ 1924-Dec. 83-4
----- System and correspondence courses confirmed, convention........................ .............. . 1926—N ov. 77
Printing trades. Cleveland, agreement regulations, Apr. 1,1922.................................. 1922—Sept. 143-4
----- Olosed-shop branch, situation in, N ew Y ork._____ ________________________ _ 1922—N ov. 111-13
----- Government Printing Office, Washington, D . O. Training courses in ________ 1922—Sept. 163-4
----- Importance of, discussed by International Joint Conference Council____ ____ ___ 1921—Jan. 29, 40-1
----- Los Angeles (Calif.), agreement provisions, text, December 1925............................... . 1926—Apr. 85-6
----- Newspaper. Hartford (Conn.), agreement provisions................................................. 1925—Oct. 72
----- Provisions of union constitutions and collective agreements, 1936,- . . - , . . . 1 9 3 7 —Mar. 703-4




18

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Apprenticeship, United States—Continued.
Page
Printing trades. Washington (D . C.). Agreement 1926.................................................... 1926—July 166
----- Arbitrator’s decision_________________ _______ ____________ __________________ 1923—July 138
Railroad shops. Helpers and helpers' apprentices, classification and schedule of work,
etc. Railroad Labor Board decisions......... ............ ........................................................ 1922—Jan. 134-49
Railroads. Training scheme, Union Pacific system___................................................... 1928—Nov. 99-101
Retail clerks. Butte, M ont., new working agreement.................................................... 1924—Apr. 117-18
Rubber industry. Collective-agreement provisions concerning...................................... 1939—Sept. 616
Sheet-metal workers. Pittsburgh (Pa.), agreement, 1925....... ........................................... . 1925—June 65
----- Rochester (N. Y .), agreement, Apr. 1, 1924......... .................. ........................................
1924—July 136
Shipbuilding industry. Collective agreement provisions, summary................... ......... 1940—Sept. 608-9
Sign, scene, and pictorial painters. Chicago, agreem ent..................................................
1924—July 137
Silk-ribbon industry. Greater New York, agreement........ ........................................... 1921—Sept. 137-9
hterhouse employees. Rochester (N. Y.) agreement, November 1924................... 1925—Apr. 106
>rs in industrial pursuits, training. _______________________________ ______ 1925—Jan. 209-10
Standardization. W isconsin Industrial Commission report, extract, 1920-22________ 1923—Aug. 265
Stereotypers. Youngstown (Ohio), agreement provisions, September 1925..................... 1926—Apr. 86
Stereotypers and electrotypers. Springfield (Ohio), agreement.......................................... 1926—Mar. 94
Stonecutting industries. Pennsylvania Industrial Board, ruling....................................... 1922—N ov. 230
TVA projects. Management through joint committees........................................................ 1939—Mar. 552
Terms of employment in NRA industrial codes clarified__________________________ 1935—M ay 1188
Training. Federal Committee on. (See Apprentice Training, Federal Committee on.)
----- N ew York Shipbuilding Corporation, features of system................................. ......... 1940—Sept. 609
Union rules responsible for scarcity of apprentices_____________ _____________ _
1926—M ay 115-16
Upholsterers. And floor-covering trades. Provisions in agreements................. ......... 1937—N ov. 1127-8
----- Cleveland (Ohio), agreement provisions, 1926............................... .............................. 1926—June 218-19
Wisconsin. Experience under law of 1915........ ........................................ 1925—Aug. 183; 1926—June 147-8
----- Statistics, 1921_____ ........................................ ................................................................... 1922—Mar. 190-1
----- System, statistics of indentures, 1912 to 1931................................... ............. ............. 1932—N ov. 1104-6
----- Where graduate apprentices find work_____________________________ __________ 1924r—
July 222
Youth Administration, National. (See National Youth Administration.)
(See also Learners; Minimum wage; Vocational education.)
Apprenticeship, foreign countries:
Australia. Metal trades, regulations amended, 1933....................................................... .
1935—Jan. 92
----- Training regulations, etc., 1934, by Province............................ ................................ 1935—N ov. 1269-70
----- Wartime training and reinstatement policies......................................... ......................... 1940—Oct. 854-5
----- (New South Wales). Bricklayers, regulations, and intensive training.............. 1923—Dec. 186;
1924—July 222-4
-----(Queensland). Apprentices and minors’ act of
1929,provisions......... ................... 1930—July 150-1
-----(South Australia). Compulsory training, results........................................................ 1925—Mar. 239-41
----- (Victoria). Act effective M ay 8,1928............................................................................... 1929—Feb. 93-4
Austria. Conditions, pre-war and post-war............. .............. ............. ............................. 1925—M ay 219-21
----- Vocational guidance and placement of, changes in organization for......................... 1935—Jan. 92-3
Belgium. (Brussels). Placement, guidance, etc_____________________ _____ _____ 1923—Dec. 187-9
Canada. Building trades, scheme for apprenticeship council___________ ____ ____ 1921—Apr. 145-6
----- Development_________ ____ ____ ______ ____ _______- ............................................... . 1921—Sept. 216
----- Plans, types of, as of January 1937.................. .................................................................. 1938—Apr. 886-7
----- (Ontario). Building trades, provisions of law .............................................................. . 1919—Jan. 101-2
—---------Conditions in 1934................................................................... .................................... 1935—Nov. 1270
China. Admission age lowered, 1932.................................................................. ............... .
1935—Jan. 93
----- Factory law of 1929, provisions of____ ____ — ............................................................ 1930—June 112-13
----- (Nanking). Barbers........... ..................................................................................... .............
1925—Jan. 61
----- (Peking). Match factories................................................................................................... 1925—June 118
------------ Rug industry................................................................................................................. 1925—Feb. 9-12
----- (Shansi). Various trades______________________ _______________ _____________ 1925—Sept. 13
Cuba. Minimum wages and other conditions of work..... ................................................... 1937—Mar. 687
Ecuador. Labor code of 1938, provisions....... ................................. ................ ....................... 1940—Mar. 676
France. Developments re contracts, training, taxes, etc., 1933........................................... 1935—Jan. 93-4
----- Tax used to extend work of vocational, etc., schools............... ..................................... . 1926—Aug. 80
----- (Grenoble). Glove making, school for--------------------------------- ------------- ----------- 1921—Sept. 217
Germany. Iron and steel industry, typical collective agreements, text............................ 1926—N ov. 126
----- Regulation through collective agreements, 1924................................... ............................. 1926—Sept. 194
----- Standard contracts, regulations, and agreement provisions, 1934............................. 1935—N ov. 1272
■
-----State railroads, and Berlin metal industry, system ................... ............ .................... 1924—M ay 178-80
----- War, effect of, on system .......... ......................... .......... ....................................................... 1921—July 11
Great Britain. (And Northem Ireland). Skilled occupations, methods of training in,
Ministry of Labor final report................ ..................... ................................. .................... 1928—Sept. 105-7
----------- Training methods, specified industries, Ministry of Labor investigations of
1925 and 1926.................................................... .................................. 1928—Jan. 104-6, Apr. 93-4, Aug. 98
----- (England). Building trades, plans for increasing apprentices__________________ 1925—M ay 222
----------- Building trades, recommendation of National House Building Committee. 1925—N ov. 230-2
----- (Scotland). Bricklayers and plasterers, need for more............................................. . 1925—Sept. 160-1
India. (Jamshedpur). Tata Iron and Steel Co. technical departments, training for.. 1922—Jan. 235
International Labor Office. Director of, report, 1929.......................... ....................... 1930—Aug. 128-30
----- Recommendation, June 1939 Conference, summary__________________________ _ 1939—Aug. 331
New Zealand. Repeal of act requested because of economic conditions, 1934................ 1935—N ov. 1273
----- Technical school attendance counted toward completion of, 1933_______________ _ 1935—Jan. 96
----- Work (1924-25) under act of 1923, and work under act of 1924. __ 1925—Dec. 182-4; 1927—Jan. 122-4
South Africa, Union of. Act of 1922, provisions of; and progress under, 1923-27_____ 1925—N ov. 215-16;
1929—Apr. 130-1
----- Skilled trades, colored and white, 1926, 1927, and 1928............. ............................... 1930—M ay 68-70
----- (Transvaal.) Coal mining, period of training................................................................. 1924—N ov. 129
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R.). Crafts, regulations concerning, 1933._....................................
1935—Jan. 97
Sweden. Board of Trade, and Board of Education, plans____________ ____________ 1924—M ay 181
----- Shipyard and metal workers, period of and minimum wage scale............................ 1938—June 1446
(See also Learners; Vocational education.)
Arbitration. (See Conciliation and arbitration.)
Arbitration awards and decisions. (See under specific industry; also under Conciliation and
arbitration.)

S




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

19

Architects:
American Institute of. Agreement, upholding National Board of Jurisdictional
-rage
Awards----------- --------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1922—Apr. 126
----- 1921 convention, cooperative needs in building industry discussed_____________ 1921—Sept. 164-6
Emergency Planning and Research Bureau, Inc. Boston, unemployment relief work
done b y ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1932—Dec. 1272-4
Engineers, Chemists, and Technicians, Federation of. Technical and vocational
school held, 1937_____________________________________________________________
1939—July 15
Archives, National (U. S. Government). Transfers affecting, under Reorganization Plan
No. 2, effective July 1, 1939_______________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 381
Argentine Social Institute (Museo Social Argentino), formation, purpose, and membership. 1923—July 246
Argonaut mine fire, California, report of Governor’s special investigating committee____ 1923—Apr. 124-5
Army. (See M ilitary service; also Soldiers and sailors.)
Arsenals:
Japan. Bonuses to discharged workers__________________________________ ________ 1923—Mar. 54
United States. Civilian employees and occupations, manufacturing plants of War
Department________ ________. __________________ ____ ______________________ 1922—M ay 134-7
(See also N avy yards.)
Arsenic trichloride poisoning. (See under Industrial diseases and poisoning.)
“Artels,” Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). (See under Cooperation, foreign countries.)
Arts, popular. Development of, during workers’ leisure time. (ILO study)________ 1935—N ov. 1235-40
Artificial flower and feather industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 25, 1933, summary of
labor provisions; amended Feb. 23, 1934, and Aug. 14, 1934_______________ 1933—Oct. 819-20, Dec. 1334;
1934—Apr. 821, Oct. 876
Artificial flowers industry. Learners, employment of, provisions under Fair Labor Stand­
ards A ct____________________________________________ ____ ______________________ 1940—N ov. 1206
Artificial limb manufacturing. N R A code, effective Sept. 17, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions; amended Mar. 30,1935_________________________ ___ 1934—Oct. 876; 1935—M ay 1192
Artists. Employment through W PA projects, status April 1937...................... .................... 1937—Dec. 1364-9
Asbestos dust. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Asbestos industry:
Contracting by union members, agreement provision against___ ____ ______ ________
1930—Sept. 9
Employers doing journeyman work, agreement provisions_________ _________ _____ 1931—Sept. 61
N R A code, effective N ov. 13,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions_________ ______ 1933—Dec. 1334
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions.............................................. . 1931—Aug. 116
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions. _ ............................................ 1930—N ov. 129
Union members, employment of, agreement provisions_________________ __________ 1931—Oct. 122
Asbestosis, pulmonary. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Asphalt and mastic tile industry. N R A code, effective Dec. 18, 1933, tabular analysis of
labor provisions___________________________ _____ ______ __________________________ 1934—Feb. 297
Asphalt shingle and roofing. N R A code, effective N ov. 20, 1933, tabular analysis of labor
provisions------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1933—Dec. 1334
Assembly, freedom of, Austria, law providing protection of....................... ................................ 1930—Oct. 136
Assets ana liabilities, family. 5 California cities, 1934-35 (BLS s tu d y )............................. 1937—Se^t. 673-5
Assignments, wage. (See Wage executions.)
Associated Fur Manufacturers (Inc.). Agreements, New York C ity._____ ____________ 1922—Mar. 104;
1924—Apr. 114-15, Sept. 98-101
Associated General Contractors of America:
Agreements, to uphold National Board of Jurisdictional Awards___________________ 1922—Apr. 126
Apprenticeship program________________ ______ ________________________________ 1924—Mar. 23
Associated Leather Goods Manufacturers of U. S. A. (Inc.). Agreements, New York City,
August 1922 and June 1924_____________ ______________________ 1922—Nov. 149-51; 1925—Mar. 110-12
Associated Publishers of the District of Columbia. Agreement, expiring Sept. 6,1923___ 1922—July 109-13
Association. (See under inverted title.)
Asthma. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Atlanta Hosiery Mills. Decision, N L R B , N ov. 5, 1934______________________________ 1935—Jan. 126-7
Athletic goods manufacturing. N R A code, effective Feb. 12, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions_________ ____________________________________________________________ 1934—Apr. 809
Atmosphere conditions, workplace. (See Sanitation, working conditions, and factory
inspection—V entilation.)
Attachment of personal property. Landlord’s surrender of clothing and tools, through
conciliation in small-claims court (Dist. of Col.)____________________________________ 1939—Aug. 275
Attachment of wages. (See under Wage executions.)
Attorney’s services, cost of. Suggestions for meeting difficulty_______________________ 1936—July 11-13
Auction and loose-leaf tobacco warehouse industry. N R A code, effective July 9, 1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions------------------- ------ ---------------------------------------------- 1934—Aug. 324
Australian Workers’ Union. Aims, etc____________________________________________ 1921—N ov. 18-19
Automatic sprinkler industry. N R A codes, effective Oct. 19, 1933, summary of labor
provisions__________________________________________________________ 1933—Nov. 1058-9, Dec. 1334
Automobile accidents, death claims due to, fraternal benefit societies...... ....................... . . 1929—Mar. 97-100
Automobile-exhaust gas. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Automobile “floater,” problem of. Oregon. (Shields)_____________ _________________ 1925—Oct. 13-15
Automobile Labor Board:
Activities, Mar. 29, 1934-Feb. 5,1935_____________ ______ ____________ - .................... 1935—Apr. 977-9
Decisions, M ay 23-Oct. 31, 1934___ ___________________________________________ 1934—Dec. 1435-7
Automobile manufacturing industry. (See Motor-vehicle industry.)
Automobile-repair shops. (See Garages, commercial.)
1937—M ay 1189-91
3t
Automobile trailers. Migration by, effects on labor conditions and on society..
Automobile Workers, United:
Decision, N L R B . Bendix Products Corporation, Jan. 25, 1935........................................ 1935—Mar. 698
----- Carl Pick Mfg. Co., Nov. 10, 1934_________ ______________________ ____ _____ 1935—Jan. 119-20
----- Houde Engineering Corporation, Aug. 30, 1934.______________________________ 1934—Oct. 932-4
Educational activities for workers_______________________________________________
1939—July 15
Automobiles, bodies, parts, and equipment. Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Automobiles:
Ownership and expenditures for, by workers’ families, 1934r-36___________________ 1940—Mar. 558-73
Ownership and purchase, new and second-hand, by New York City families at different
consumption levels, 1934-36________________________________________________ _
1937—Jan. 234
Ownership, families at different economic levels. California cities (5), 1934-35_______ 1937—Sept. 671




20

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Automobiles—Continued.
P age
Ownership, families at different economic levels. Michigan cities (4), 1934-35............ 1936—June 1745
----- N ew Hampshire communities, 1933-34.____ ________________________________ 1936—Mar. 561-3
----- Pennsylvania cities (5), 1933-35___________________________ _______ _________1937—June 1503
----- Rochester, Columbus, Seattle, 1933-35____________ ____ ______________________ 1936—Dec. 1616
Automotive chemical specialties manufacturing industry. N R A code, effective Oct. 7,1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions........................... ........................................................ ......... 1934—N ov. 1099
Automotive parts and equipment industry:
Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
N R A code, effective Nov. 18, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions; amended Mar.
29.1934_________ ____ _____________ _____________________ ____ 1933—Dec. 1334; 1934^-May 1074
(See also Motor-vehicle industry.)
Available Truck Co. (Chicago). Decision, N L R B , Dec. 29,1934................................ ............ 1935—Feb. 379
Aviation, and aviators. (See Air-transport industry.)
Awards—trade-boards, impartial chairman, etc. (See Conciliation and arbitration; Wage
adjustments (cost-of-living basis); also name of specific industry, firm, or labor union.)
Automobile-tire industry. (See under Rubber industry.)

B
Babson’s Statistical Organization. Arrangement with Department of Labor................ 1922—Aug. 109-10
Bakeries, cooperative. (See under Cooperation.)
Bakery and confectionery workers:
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses........................ ..... .............. ........... 1931—M ay 143
(See also Baking industry.)
Bakery and Confectionery Workers International Union of America:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Convention. N ew York City, August 1926, problems discussed____________________ 1926—N ov. 78
Out-of-work relief plans, local unions------------------------------------------------------- --------- - 1924—July 14-17
Tuberculosis sanatorium, Duarte (Calif.), joint interest in------------------------------------- 1928—Feb. 28
Bakery and milk wagon drivers. Denver (Colo.), decision, discharged men, and union
recognition in arbitrating disputes, Dec. 5, 1933__________________________________ 1934—Mar. 598-9
Bakery trades. Holidays, union-agreement provisions concerning--------------------------------- 1936—Apr. 915
Bakery Wagon Drivers’ and Salesmen’s Union. San Francisco, arbitration award re
wages and working conditions, January 1934_____________________________________ 1934—Aug. 386-7
Bakery Wagon Drivers’ Union. Detroit (M ich.), decision, N L R B , Oct. 3,1934______ 1934—Dec. 1534-5
Baking industry, United States:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Bread making in the modern bakery. (Billups)------------------------------------------- ------ 1923—Dec. 1-12
Bread. Technological changes and productivity. (Digest of BLS studies).................. 1932—N ov. 1035
Colorado Industrial Commission decision, bakery workers, July 6,1931_____________ 1931—Oct. 132
Decisions, trade-board, etc. Denver (Colo.), Union No. 26, wage cut disapproved,
Apr. 20, 1932_____________________________________________________________ 1932—June 1351-2
Employers doing journeyman work, agreement provisions, bakery and confectionery
workers---------------------------------------------------- --------------------- ------------------------------ 1931—Sept. 61
Holidays provided by collective agreements............................ .................. ................ ............
1930—Aug. 2
Machinery used, description of________________________________________________ 1923—Dec. 6-10
N R A code, effective July 9,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions; amended Mar. 27,
1935__________________________________ _____ ________________ 1934—July 46; 1935—M ay 1192
Occupations, description of____________________________ _____________________ 1923—Dec. 10-12
Paym ent of wages, time and method, agreement provisions................................................. 1931—N ov. 128
Personnel policies and working conditions. (Jones)------------------------------------------ 1936—N ov. 1102-21
Puerto Rico. N R A code, effective Jan. 7,1935, tabular analysis of labor provisions------ 1935—Feb. 301
Sanitation, modern bakeries________ _____ ________ ___ _______ _______ ____ _______ 1925—M ay 180
Trade-union membership, 1915 to 1920___________________ ____ ____________________ 1922—July 168
Unemployment benefits, bakery and confectionery workers. Buffalo and St. Louis,
Locals Nos. 16 and 4________________________________________________________ _ 1933—Jan. 26-7
----- N ew York City and Washington (D . C.), Locals N os. 22 and 1118______ ______ 1933—Jan. 27-8
----- Seattle, Spokane, and Madison (W is.), Locals Nos. 9, 74, and 233_____________
1933—Jan. 28
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions, bakery and confectionery
workers---------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------1931—Dec. 94
----- Employment of, agreement provisions, bakery and confectionery workers_______ 1931—Oct. 122
Working conditions of employees. (BLS s u r v e y )............. ................................... 1936—N ov. 1115-20
Baking industry, foreign countries:
Argentina. (Cordoba.) N ight work, act of Jan. 30, 1925, prohib itin g.......................... 1925—Aug. 84
----- (Tucum&n). N ight work, act of Oct. 26,1925, forbidding............................................ 1926—Apr. 64
Canada. Costs of making and selling bread, 1929................................................................ 1931—July 227
----- (British Columbia). 8-hour day, exemption under law _________________________
1925—July 90
Chile. N ight work, decree and enforcement______________________ 1927—Mar. 95, July 45, Aug. 227
International Federation of Trade-Unions, resolution, night w ork__________________ 1924—Sept. 186
International Labor Conference, draft conventions, night work_____ 1924—Sept. 181; 1925—Aug. 187
Spain. (Madrid.) Strike, April 1920, nonunion employees...............................................1921—M ay 158-9
Ball clay production. N R A code, effective Jan. 29, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provi­
sions------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1934r—Mar. 531
Baltimore Transfer Co. Decision. N L R B , Sept. 7, 1934_______________________________1934r—
Nov. 1155
Band instrument manufacturing. N R A code, effective Feb. 21, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions__________________________ ____ _____ ____ ___________ ____________ 1934—Apr. 809
Bangor-Nazareth Transit Co., agreement_______________________ _____________ _______ 1924—Oct. 98-9
Bank and security vault manufacturing. N R A code, effective M ay 11,1934, tabular anal­
ysis of labor provisions___________________________________________________________
1934—July 46
Bankers, investment. N R A code, effective Dec. 11, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provi­
sions....................................... ............................................................................................................ .
1934—Jan. 38
Bankruptcy among earners.................................................................................................................1931—Sept. 64-6
Banks:
Commercial. Bankers, N R A code, effective Oct. 16, 1933, summary of labor provi­
sions........................................................................................................................ 1933—N ov. 1050-1; Dec. 1334
----- “ Pay-roll check plan,” attitude................. —...........- ......................................................... 1929—Sept. 36
Cooperative. (See under Cooperation.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 19 4 0 '

21

Banks—Continued.
P age
Investment. N R A code, effective Dec. 11, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1934—Jan. 38
Labor. (See under Cooperation.)
Personnel plans. Study, Industrial Relations Section, Princeton University______ 1935—July 56-61;
1940—Aug. 315-19
Savings, mutual. N R A code, effective Oct. 23, 1933, summary of labor provisions___
1933—N ov.
1063-4, Dec. 1393
Barbers:
District of Columbia. Shop-closing law, approved Dec. 19, 1932, te x t.____ ________ 1933.—Feb. 820
Employers doing journeyman work, agreement provisions. __ :______ ____ __________ 1931—Sept. 61
Examination and licensing of, and regulation of schools, Federal law providing for___ 1938—Sept. 564
Holidays provided by collective agreements___________________________ ____ _____ _ 1930—Aug. 2-3
Licensing or registration, fees and training requirements, by State________________ 1931—June 1296-9
Norttr Carolina act, constitutionality upheld................. .................................................. . 1930—July 109-10
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses.......... ............................ ............... . 1931—M ay 143
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions...................... ................................... 1931—Dec. 94-5
----- Employment of, agreement provisions_______________________________________ 1931—Oct. 122
Union shops. Working conditions and wages, agreement provisions as of 1938___ 1939—June 1287-99
Barbers, Associated Master, of America. Tipping system, opposition to_______ ____ 1927—Oct. 4
Barbers' International Union of America, Journeymen:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, by U . S. industry.)
Arbitration award. Chicago, Local No. 548..................._.......... ........................................... 1930—Dec. 124
Convention. Indianapolis, Sept. 9 to 17, 1924............ .......................................................... 1924—Dec. 166
Tipping system, opposition to ................................................ ........................ ................. .........
1927—Oct. 4
Barber-shop trade:
N R A code, effective Apr. 19, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions______________ 1934—June 1333
Wisconsin Recovery Administration code, effective July 16, 1935, tabular analysis of
labor provisions____ _________________________________________ __________ ____ 1936—Mar. 629
Bargaining, collective. (See Collective agreements; Collective bargaining.)
Barter-exchange organizations. (See Self-help organizations.)
Basic 8-hour day. (See Shorter working time.)
Basic wage. (See Minimum wage.)
Batteries, manufacture of dry-cell and storage. Occupations, description of_..................... 1928—N ov. 123-7
Batting and padding industry. N R A code, effective M ay 14, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions_________________________________________________________________
1934—July 46
Beauty and barber shop mechanical equipment manufacturing. N R A code, effective
Feb. 26,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_________________ _____________ ____ 1934—Apr. 809
B eauty shops:
Employment conditions, survey of 4 large cities. (U. S. W omen’s Bureau)........... . 1935—Aug. 433-9
New York. Minimum-wage ruling, effect on operators’ incomes_________________ 1940—Apr. 948-9
Quebec. Regulation of, under labor laws______________________________________ 1935—Aug. 408-9
Bedding manufacturing. N R A code, effective Jan. 29, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions------------------------------------------------------ ------ --------------------------------------------- 1934—Mar. 531
Bedeaux system:
Cotton-textile industry, wage payment (1934)___________________________________ 1936—June 1488
“M inute system ,” or “stretch-out system ” of efficiency, footnote explanation_______ 1929—M ay 171
Bedspreads:
Candlewick. N R A code, effective June 11,1934 , tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1934—Aug. 320
N ovelty curtain draperies and pillows. N R A code, effective N ov. 11, 1933, tabular
analysis of labor provisions-------------------------------------- ---------- --------------------------- 1933—Dec. 1339
Beet-sugar industry. (See Sugar-beet industry.)
Bendix Products Corporation. Decision, N L R B , Jan. 25,1935 (automobile workers)____ 1935—Mar. 698
Benefits and benefit fu n d s, United States:
Baking industry. (BLS survey)_______________________________________________ 1936—N ov. 1121
Conventions, mutual benefit associations. (See under C onventions,m eetings ,etc.)
Benefit cases, and benefits paid, establishment funds, by industry_________________ 1927—July 25-6
Benefits, eligibility for, length of membership required, establishment fu nds............... 1927—July 23-4
Boot and shoe workers, trade-union benefits, 1922 to 1925________________________ 1925—Sept. 145-6
Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers’ International Union, mortuary and relief bene­
fits, 1915 to 1926________________ ____ _____________________________, __________
1927—July 71
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental Iron Workers, International Association of, benefit
system, death, old age, and disability, revision of, 1932___________________________ 1933—Jan. 97-8
Cloth Hat and Cap Makers of North America, United, agreement creating security
trust fund, July 1, 1924, text______________________________________ __________ 1924—Aug. 132-4
Diamond Workers’ Protective Union, unemployment benefits_____________ ______ _ 1928—Mar. 17
Disability benefits. Trade-unions. Amount paid, 1933-35, by organization______ 1934—Dec. 1365-7;
1936—Jan. 42-4, Dec. 1410-12
Disability from nonoccupational illness or accident, plan of E. I. du Pont de
Nemours__________________________________________________________________ 1937—July 105-6
Establishment of. Disabled workers; disability funds____________ 1927—July 20-6; 1928—Apr. 18-19
----- Service payments for workers, plan________________________________________
1922—M ay 21-3
----- Unemployment insurance and guaranty plans, specified companies_____________ 1931—Mar. 5-8
----- W aiting tim e ..___________________________________________________________ 1927—July 24-5
Fraternal societies. Death claims due to automobile accidents_________________ 1929—Mar. 97-100
Labor organizations. Out-of-work benefit plans, local, national, and international
unions___________________________________________________________ ___
1931—Mar. 3-5
Mutual associations, employees’. Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. (Wis.), medical
and hospital benefits__________________________ _______________ ______________ 1930—M ay 83-5
----- Analysis of plans__________________________________ _______________________ 1930—Mar. 72-3
----- California & Hawaiian Sugar Refining Corporation____________ ...............................
1929—July 72*
----- Findings of National Industrial Conference Board. .....................................................
1936—July 89
----- Health promotion b y ...................................................... ............................................. .......... 1929—Jan. 72-4
----- Trend of activities.............................................................................................. ..................... 1931—July 75-6
----- Work of, survey, Public Health Service report________________________________ 1931—Nov. 75-8
Photoengravers’ unions, local and international, benefits paid, amount and kind, 1930
to 1933____________________ 1931—M ay 36-7; 1932—Apr. 793-4, Nov. 1085; 1933—July 40, N ov. 1098
Pocketbook Workers' Union, International, unemployment benefits_________ ____ 1928—Mar. 17,19
Printers’ unions, local and international, benefits paid, by type, 1931-32.................. 1932—Nov. 1083-5
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America, International....... ............ 1925—July 213




22

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Benefits and benefit funds, United States—Continued.
Public service. Government employees, Washington (D. C.), mutual-relief associaPage
tions___________________________ _____________ - .........- ................................................ 1921—Feb. 160-1
Sick benefits. Gary (Ind.) Railways Co., agreement clause providing............................ 1931—Apr. 87
----- Trade-unions. Payments by national organizations, 1934........... ................................. 1936—Jan. 42-4
----- Tuberculosis treatment benefit paid by certain trade-unions______________ _____ 1928—Feb. 27-8
Sick, death, unemployment, etc., benefits. Paid by American Federation of Labor,
1930 and 1931.................................................................................................................................. 1933—Jan. 144
----- Paid by American trade-unions, 1930........................................ ........................................ 1931—Dec. 92-3
----- Paid by specified unions, national and international, 1931......................................... 1933—Feb. 312-14
Siderographers, International Association of, unemployment benefits____ _____ _____ 1928—Mar. 17
Spaulding Bakeries, Inc., Binghamton (N. Y .), benefit society (members allowed free
choice of dentist and physician), year’s experience________________ __________
1933—Aug. 295-6
Stereotypers and Electrotypers’ International Union, benefit payments, by type, an­
nual amount, 1932 and 1933______ _______ ____ ___________ ___________________ 1933—Sept. 560-1
Street and Electric Railway Employees, Amalgamated Association, and its locals,
amounts paid, by type of benefit, 1929 and 1932......................................... 1930—M ay 114; 1933—July 39
Structural-iron workers, benefit system, revision of, 1932................... .............................. 1933—Jan. 97-8
Tobacco industry, 1935______________ _________ ______ _______ ____________ 1937—Feb. 337, 339-40
Trade-unions. American, beneficial activities of. (Summary of BLS Bull. No. 465). 1929—Jan. 26-32
----- Benefits paid members by A. F. of L. affiliates and by 4 railroad brotherhoods,
1936 and 1938_________________ ____ _______________________ 1937—Dec. 1360-2; 1940-Jan. 91-3
----- Expenditures of national and international unions, by type of benefit, 1929 to 1935. 1930—Nov. 121,
Dec. 106-8; 1933—Feb. 312-14, Nov. 1130, Dec. 1374-6; 1934—Dec. 1365-7; 1936—Jan. 42-4,
Dec. 1409-12
----- Kind and amount of benefit, year of establishment, specified unions.. .................... 1928—Jan. 1-10
----- Practices of standard national organizations, by type of benefit. ............................ 1936—Jan. 39-42
Tuberculosis treatment, benefit provided by certain trade-unions.................................... 1928—Feb. 27-8
Typographical Union, International_____________________________ ___________ 1922—Nov. 205-6
----- And its locals, amounts paid, by type of benefit, 1931 and 1932
............................. 1933—July 38-9
Unemployment benefits. (See Unemployment compensation.)
Wage-loan plans established for slack-work periods, by General Motors, Jan. 1, 1939 __ 1939—Jan. 66-7
Westinghouse Air Brake Co. Pension and group-insurance plans.................................... 1927—July 57-8
Workmen’s Sick and Death Benefit Fund of the United States of America, annual
report, 1923............. .................................. ........................... .................................................. 1924—M ay 198-201
Benefits and benefit funds, foreign countries:
Argentina. Sickness, mutual-aid societies, number of organizations, membership,
requirements, and service_________________________________________________ 1938—N ov. 1014-17
Australia. (Victoria). Friendly societies, statistics of operations, 1926-27 to 1928-29. 1930—N ov. 107-8
Belgium. M utual insurance funds, report of operations, 1928__________ __________
1929—Sept. 92
Canada. Canadian Kodak Co. (Ltd.) unemployment benefit plan________________
1931—July 74
----- Trade-union expenditures, 1930 to 1937, by type of benefit paid, specified u n ion s... 1931—June 113;
1932—July 56; 1936—Jan. 45, Dec. 1412-13; 1937—Dec. 1362-3; 1939—Apr. 812; 1940—June 1409
China. (Canton and Hongkong). Death benefits for woman workers, cigarette manu­
facturing company_____________________ ____________________ _______________ _
1922—Jan. 234
France. Death benefits, act of Mar. 14, 1928.......................... ....................... ............ ........... 1928—M ay 85
Great Britain. Friendly Societies, trade-unions, annual report of chief registrar........... 1922—M ay 180;
1923—Mar. 143-4
----- Old-age pensions and retirement. Employers plans, by industry or service, end of
1936_____________________ ________________________________________________ 1938—Aug. 299-302
Netherlands. Health (sickness) insurance payments, by type, 1930-34......................... 1937—Dec. 1354
Norway. Federation of Trade-Unions, strike-benefit statistics........................................ 1925—Feb. 190-1
Sweden. Trade-union movement and strike benefits................... ........................................ 1928—Aug. 215
Bennett Shoe Co. (Marlboro, M ass.). Decision, N L R B , Dec. 10, 1934.................................... 1935—Feb. 384
Benzene, poisoning. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Benzol poisoning. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd. Decision, N L R B , Feb. 13,1935....................... 1935—Apr. 972
Beverage dispensing equipment industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 26, 1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions; amended Mar. 16, 1935------------------------- 1934—M ay 1064; 1935—M ay 1192
Bias tape industry. N R A code, effective June 4, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions. 1934—July 46
Bibliographies:
Absenteeism in industry............................ ............... ............. ................................................ 1927—July 190-7
Adult workers’ education, recent references on. (Thompson) ........ ................. .
1924—Sept. 190-203
Child labor. (T hom pson )..._______ ____ ____ ________________ ____ ___________ 1925—Jan. 71-101
Child labor and welfare. United States Government Printing Office, Superintendent
1928—M ay 205
of Documents, list of publications......................................................................................
Children in street trades, United States. (Thom pson).................................................. 1925—Dec. 81-92
Convict labor, recent references on. (Stone)................................................................... 1928—M ay 199-203
Cooperative movement. (Parker)............. ........................................ 1925—Mar. 201-32; 1930—Sept. 230-49
Cost of living, list of articles on, published in M onthly Labor Review, July 1917 to
October 1922............................ ........................................................... ..................................... 1922—N ov. 104-5
Dism issal compensation, list of references. (Schwenning)........... ................................... 1932—Feb. 478-92
5-day week.............. .................. .............. ............ ............ ............................................................ 1927—Jan. 237-41
----- And other proposals for a shorter workweek; a list of references. (Thompson).. _ 1931—Feb. 247-64
Housing. Federal. State, and municipal aid. United States and foreign countries. 1923—Feb. 192-210
Immigration, restriction of, 1920 to 1925. (MacGeorge). ........................ ........................ 1926—Feb. 238-52
Industrial hygiene. Current literature and organizations. (Hayhurst)........................ 1930—Nov. 91-3
_ Industrial safety, outline of source material on.................................................................. 1927—Sept. 236-45
Injunctions in labor disputes. (T hom pson).......................................... .......................... 1928—Sept. 201-20
Labor banks in the United States. (Thompson) ................... .................. .................... 1926—Sept. 205-14
Labor, publications (official and unofficial) relating to. (See last section, each issue of
M . L. R.)

Labor turn-over______________ _____ _____ ___________ ____________ _________ 1927—Apr. 188-203
National economic councils. List of references. (Thompson)...................................... 1931—M ay 217-26
Negro, the. (Pier and Spalding)____________________ _____ ____________________ 1926—Jan. 216-44
Old-age pensions, public. United States, 1929 to 1931, list of references. (Stone). . . 1932—Mar. 738-46
Older worker in industry, the. List of references. (Thom pson).............................. 1929—July 237-42
Polish people in the United States. (Kenton)------------------ --------------------------------- 1926—Mar. 192-8
Profit sharing and labor copartnership, United States and foreign countries.............. 1923—Apr. 167-79




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUABY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

23

Bibliographies—Continued.
•
Page
Public old-age pensions. Australia. (T hom pson )........................................................... 1929—Mar. 260-3
----- Canada. (Thompson)................................................................................................ ....... 1929—Feb. 212-17
----- New Zealand. (Thompson)_____________________ ____ ____________________ 1929—Mar. 263-5
----- United States. (Stone).............. ........................... ........................ 1926—June 238-46; 1929—M ay 247-61
Safety, industrial. Official regulations, orders, advisory pamphlets, and laws, by
State_______________________ _____________ ____ ____________ _______________ 1930—Feb. 271-84
Stock ownership, employee, in the United States.___________ ___________________ 1927—June 214-23
Union-management cooperation________________________________________________ 1927—Oct. 220-7
Vocational education. (Library leaflet No. 15, Department of the Interior, Bureau of
Education)_______________________________________ __________________________ 1922—Aug. 248
Workers’ education, United States and foreign countries. (Thompson)__________ 1922—June 181-98;
1924—Sept. 190-203
Workers’ leisure. (Thompson)------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1927—Mar. 166-7
Bicycle manufacturing. N B A code, effective M ay 31, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
1934—July 47
visions. ____________________________________________________ ____ ______________
Bill posters. Union members, discharge of, agreement provisions______________________ 1931—Dec. 95
Bill Posters and Billers of America, International Alliance of. Agreement, Dayton, Ohio,
Local No. 53, 1-year, Oct. 3, 1925______________________________________________ 1925—Dec. 99-100
Biological Survey, Bureau of (U. S. Government). Transfer under Reorganization Plan
No. 2, effective July 1,1939______ __________ ___ ______ _____ ______________________ 1939—Aug. 381
Births. (See under Vital statistics.)
Bituminous Coal Commission, National (U. S. Government). (See under Mining.)
Bituminous-coal mining. (See under Mining.)
Bituminous road-material distributing. N B A code, effective N ov. 25,1934, tabular analy­
sis of labor provisions____________________________________________________________ 1934—Dec. 1360
Blackboard and blackboard eraser manufacturing. N R A code, effective Sept. 3, 1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions..... ............ ............. ................ ............ .................................. 1934—Oct. 876
Blacksmiths, drop forgers, and helpers:
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions................................................. 1930—Nov. 130
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses.......................................................... 1931—M ay 145
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions.........................................................
1931—Dec. 97
----- Employment of, agreement provisions_____________ ___ _______ _______________ 1931—Oct. 127
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of. Union wage
scales, with date of agreement, by city and occupation_________________ ______ _____ 1933—Aug. 355-7
‘‘Blanket code.” (See Reemployment Agreement, President’s (Roosevelt).)
Blast furnaces. (See under Iron and steel industry.)
Blasters, silicosis among. (See Industrial diseases and poisons—Silicosis.)
Bleached shellac manufacturing. N R A code, effective Apr. 30, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions___________ __________ ________________ __________________________ 1934—June 1333
Blind pensions, United States:
Costs. Proportions borne by States and by counties in 1935________________________ 1936—Aug. 315
Experience under State laws, 1934 and 1935___________________ 1935—Sept. 584-94; 1936—Aug. 305-15
Legislation, State. (See under Laws and legislation, U . S., Federal and general.)
Blind persons, aid to, United States:
Appropriations for American Printing House for Blind, functions transferred to Federal
Security Agency under Reorganization Plan No. 2, effective July 1,1939___________ 1939—Aug. 381
Arkansas. “Indigent blind fund,” act approved Mar. 20, 1931, provisions of______ 1931—Oct. 110
Blindness. Educational campaign, Nation-wide, American Federation of Labor jointly
with National Society for Prevention of Blindness____________ ____ ____________ 1929—Jan. 74-5
Employment opportunities, promotion of. (Public Act No. 732)___________________ 1936—Aug. 380
Federal Government grants to States, 1936______________________________________ 1937—M ay 1124-6
Indiana. Board of Industrial Aid for, reports 1925-26 and 1930___ 1927—Sept. 99-100; 1931—Oct. 110-11
Louisiana. State board for aid of, created, powers___________ ____________________ 1928—Dec. 159
Massachusetts. Commission on the Blind, final report...... .............................................
1925—Aug. 213
Mississippi. State commission for aid of, created, powers________________________ 1928—Dec. 59-60
Pennsylvania. Commission to study conditions, report___________________________ 1926—July 209
Social Security. Federal and State statistics by 6-month period 1936-39, and by month
1938 to August 1939_________________________________________________________ 1939—Dec. 1393-4
----- State plans approved to June 30,1937________________________________________ 1937—Sept. 583-4
(See also Blind pensions: Eye injuries; also under Laws and legislation.)
Blind persons, aid to, foreign countries:
Argentina. Industrial aid for___________________________________________________
1927—Dec. 98
Canada. National Institute for the Blind, activities, year ending Mar. 31, 1931___1931—Oct. 111-12
----- Pensions provided for by legislation of 1937_________________________________ 1937—July 192-3
----- Resolution to extend, Mar. 9, 1936________________________________ __________ 1936—Sept. 620
----- Under old-age-pension law, amendment Mar. 22, 1937__________ ________ ______ 1939—Mar. 548
Great Britain. Industrial psychology, application of, to the blind................................... 1931—July 109
New Zealand. Pensions for, legislation and expenditures, 1924-25_____ _____ _____ 1925—N ov. 198-9
Sweden. Government pensions granted, 1938_____________________________ _____ ___ 1940—July 73
Block signal system, railroads. (See under Railroads.)
Blouse and skirt manufacturing. N R A code, effective Dec. 31, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions__________________________________________________________________ 1934—Feb. 297
Blue-prmt and photo-print industry. N R A code, effective Dec. 31, 1934, tabular analysis
of labor provisions____________________________________________________ _________1935—Feb. 301
Board of Sanitary Control, Joint. (See Joint Board of Sanitary Control.)
Board rates per month, western mining districts, 1923___________________ ______ ____ 1923—June 115-17
Boarding houses:
Cooperative. (See under Cooperation.)
For old-age-assistance recipients, legislative restriction discussed............. .................... 1939—Aug. 299-300
Boards, labor. (See Directories; also under name of board.)
Boards of arbitration. (See under Conciliation and arbitration.)
Boat building and boat repairing. N R A code, effective M ay 4, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions________________________________________________________________ 1934—June 1333
Bobbin and spool industry. N R A code, effective May 13, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions_______________________________________________________________ ____ 1934—July 47
Bobbinet industry. Minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts Act, Feb. 13,1939,
and Aug. 31, 1940
_______ ________ ______ ____________________ 1939—Mar. 661-2; 1940—Oct. 815




24

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

P age
Bohemian-Slavonic Typographical Union. New York City, agreement, Sept. 1,1924........ 1925—Apr. 102
Boiler inspection. (See under Sanitation, working conditions, and factory inspection.)
Boiler-manufacturing industry. N R A code, effective Oct. 16, 1933, summary of labor
provisions____ _____ _______________________________________________ 1933—Nov. 1051-2, Dec. 1334
Boiler (steel tubular and fire-box) industry. N R A code, effective Nov. 6, 1933, summary
of labor provisions_____________________________ _____________ _______ _ 1933—Nov. 1072-3, Dec. 1342
Boilermakers and iron-ship builders:
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions................................................. 1931—Aug. 118
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions............................................... 1930—N ov. 130
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses----------------- ------------------------- 1931—M ay 145
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions. _ ......................... ............... .......... 1931—Dec. 97
----- Employment of agreement provisions------------------------------------------------ ---------- - 1931—Oct. 127
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of:
Agreement, Davenport (Iowa), Local No. 377, June 1, 1925.......................................... . 1925—Dec. 100-1
Decision, N L R B , Oct. 1,1934 (Columbian Steel Tank Co.).................................. ........... 1934—N ov. 1155-6
Bolshevism:
China. Propaganda a cause of unrest------------------------------------------- --------------------- 1921—Aug. 17
Germany. Prevalence of, activities of various parties._____________________ ____ 1921—Apr. 160,167
Bonus, cost-of-living. (See under Wage adjustment (cost-of-living basis).)
Bonuses, wage-system, United States:
Airplanes and aircraft engines industry------------------ , ---------------- ------------------------- 1930—June 178
Building trades. Bonus contract, standard form, text, Industrial Association of San
Francisco------------------------ -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—Jan. 107-9
Cigarette manufacturing, 1930____________________ __________________ ___________ _ 1930- Oct. 168
Cotton-textile industry. N R A ruling to include, in wage calculation...... ..................... 1934—N ov. 1096
----- Systems used in various mills, 1934-------------------------------------------------- --------- 1936—June 1489-90
Hat manufacturing company. Bonus plan, effect on labor turn-over______________ 1927—Mar. 29-30
Hawaii. Pineapple canneries, 1929________________________ ___________________ 1931—Apr. 15-16
National Industrial Conference Board. Findings of, concerning use of bonus system s.. 1936—July 89
Petroleum industry. Pipe-line and oil-well companies________________- ___________ 1930—Mar. 121
Portland cement plants. B y kind, 1929____________________ ___________________ 1930—Aug. 168-9
Printing trades. Premium wage situation, closed-shop branch.. i ___ _____ ________ 1922—N ov. 108-13
----- Wage scales, with emergency bonuses, by locality, Nov. 15,1921________________ 1922—Jan. 108-15
Profit sharing. (See under Profit sharing, United States.)
Railroads. Expense in handling trains, bonus based on reduction of, Southern Rail­
w ay________________________________________________________________________ 1924—M ay 131
Seamen. American vessels in overseas trade, 1934______________ ____________ _____ 1936—Jan. 20-2
Shipping industry, Great Lakes, policies of three com panies........... ..............................
1937—Aug. 276
Stock purchases by employees, bonus on............... ......................... ......................... ............ 1922—June 17-19
Tobacco industry. March 1933 and March 1935................... .............................................. 1937—Feb. 329-32
Wage-termination bonus. (See Dismissal wage.)
Bonuses, wage-system, foreign countries:
Belgium. (Ghent District). Linen industry........... ............................................................. 1932—Jan. 169
Germany. (Ruhr District). Mining, coal, production bonus................. ......................... 1923—Jan. 87-8
Great Britain. Open-hearth furnaces, production bonus, spring of 1926...................... . 1926—Oct. 135-7
----- Profit-sharing bonuses, 201 firms by trade, 1921______________________________ 1923—Jan. 115-16
----- South Wales Siemans Steel Association, special bonus, agreement, 1920-............. . 1926—Oct. 154-5
Japan. Military and naval arsenals, workers discharged, allowances_______________ 1923—Mar. 54
Java. (Native States). Tobacco industry, bonuses and supplem ents.____________ 1932—N ov. 1079
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Building trades, production and time bonuses, decree law
of Feb. 12, 1936______________________________________________________________ 1936—June 1523
----- Coal mines (Don Basin), monthly productivity bonus by class of workers______ 1933—Aug. 398
Book and job printing. (See under Printing and publishing; Printing trades.)
Book cloth and impregnated fabrics, leather cloth and lacquered fabrics, and window shade
cloth and roller industry. N R A code, effective M ay 14, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions______________________________________________________________________
1934—July 49
Book industry, loose leaf and blank. N R A code, effective M ay 14,1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions_______________________ ____ ________________ _____ _______________
1934—July 49
Bookbinders. (See under Printing trades.)
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of:
Agreement. New York City, Bindery Women’s Union No. 43, Jan. 1, 1923................ 1923—July 131
Membership. 1915 to 1920_____________________________________ ____ ______ ______ 1922—July 168
Transformation from hand to machine trade, resolution, July, 1928_________________ 1928—N ov. 113
Bookkeepers, Stenographers, and Accountants’ Union, New York City. Typical agree­
ment form, text__________ ______________________________________________________ 1926—June 209
Bookkeepers, stenographers, and typists:
Holidays provided by collective agreements....................................................................... .
1930—Aug. 7
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions..:..................................................... 1931—Dec. 95
----- Employment of, agreement provisions____________________________ ____ ______ 1931—Oct. 122
Boot and shoe industry, United States:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Benzol poisoning, woman employees, rubber shoes________________________________ 1927—N ov. 86
Conciliation. Brockton (Mass.). Wage reduction awarded_____________................ . 1922—M ay 127
----- Chicago. Wage reduction denied, Florsheim Shoe Co., text of board award____ 1922—Mar. 114-19
----- Haverhill (Mass.). Faulty work, responsibility of piece workers______________
1926—Mar. 94
------------Penalty for defective work, M ay 16, 1925------------ ------ ------------------------------ 1925—Aug. 103
------------Reinstatement of discharged operative, etc............. ...................... 1925—Mar. 116-18, Julyll4r-15
------------Segregation of particular work, text, July 6, 1925__________________________ 1925—Oct. 75-8
----- Lynn (Mass.). Wage reduction awarded, United Shoe Workers.____ ________ 1922—Aug. 123-4
----- New York City. Wage reduction ordered, American Shoe Workers’ Protective
U nion______________________________________________________________________ 1922—Feb. 100
----- Rochester (N. Y .). Elimination of “percentages and bonuses,” text of board
award______________________________________________________________________ 1923—June 165
------------Wage reduction denied, recommendation________________________ ____ ___ 1921—Dec. 116
----- Wage reduction denied, text of decision. U. S. Department of Labor....... ................1921—Sept. 146-8
Decisions, trade-board, etc. Auburn (Maine), shoe cutters, wage cut reduced from
15 to 9 percent, Aug. 29,1932........ .......................................................................................... 1933—Mar. 569-70
Employment, indexes of-..........................................................- ................................................. 1926—
July 12-15




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

25

Boot and shoe industry, United States—Continued.
Haverhill (Mass.). Conditions in shoe industry 1928. (Summary, BLS Bull. No.
rage
483)____________________________________________________________ ______ _____ 1929—Feb. 1-20
----- Shoe Manufacturers’ Association, membership, funds, etc..................................... ....... 1929—Feb. 15
----- Union membership, etc--------------- ------------------------------- ----------------------- ------ 1929—Feb. 12-15
----- (See also Conciliation, this section.)
Job-assurance (salary-contract) plan, Nunn-Bush Shoe Co., effective July 4, 1935,
provisions of_______________________ ___ ____________ _______ ______ _______ 1935—Aug. 352-3
Labor conditions, shoe industry, M assachusetts................................................................. 192.5—July 15-17
Labor organization, 1929 to 1937, under A. F. of L ................................................................ 1937—Feb. 297-9
Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Mechanization and its effect on labor productivity. (Stern)_____ _____ _____ ____ 1939—Feb. 271-92
N B A code, effective Oct. 13, 1933, summary of labor provisions______ 1933—N ov. 1040-1, Dec. 1334
N B A influence upon labor productivity----------- -------------------- ---------- ---------------- 1939—Feb. 291-2
Output, labor cost per 100 pairs of shoes--------------------------------------------------------------1922—July 10
Pasted shoe-stock industry. N B A code, effective M ay 13, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions---------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- ---------1934—July 51
Productivity. Before invention of machinery, 1806,1817 to 1822__________________ 1929—June 113-14
----- Index of, 1899 to 1925 and 1927---------------------- 1926—July 12-15; 1927—Jan. 37, 40-42; 1930—Mar. 7
----- M en’s and women’s shoes, trend, by output of plant and by grade of goods manu­
factured, 1923-36------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- 1939—Feb. 279, 281, 283-4
Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928..................... ............................ 1929—Mar. 43-5
Stabilization of employment. (Stewart).............................................. ................................... 1931—Jan. 52-3
Style factor, effect upon productivity of labor------------------------------------------------------ 1939—Feb. 287-8
Technological changes and productivity, digest of BLS studies____________________ 1932—N ov. 1043
Unemployment and retirement plan, Hill Bros. Co., shoe manufacturers, Hudson
(M ass.)__________________________________________ _________ ______________ 1933—N ov. 1096-7
Unemployment, result of overdevelopment of industry......... ............................................... 1925—Oct. 9-10
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions.. ......................................................
1931—Dec. 96
----- Employment of, agreement provisions___________ _____ ___ ___________________ 1931—Oct. 125
Wage earners, number of, actual and per million population, 1850 to 1931__________ 1933—N ov. 1026
Women, savings of workers, Lynn (M ass.)____________________________________ 1921—N ov. 149-51
Boot and shoe industry. Great Britain (England), agreement, National Union of Boot and
' Shoe Operatives, November 1924__________________ ____ ______________ ____ _____ 1925—Feb. 116-17
Boot and Shoe Workers Union:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Benefits, sick, disability, and death, expenditures, 1922 to 1925................... .................... 1925—Sept. 145-6
Conciliation. Chicago, Florsheim Shoe Co., board award, text_______ ____________ 1922—Mar. 114
Haverhill (M ass.), local membership, dues, etc__________ ________________________
1929—Feb. 14
Membership, 1915 to 1920---- ------ ----------- ------------------------- ----------------------------1922—July 169
(See also Shoe Workers of America, United; Shoe Workers’ Protective Union.)
“ Bootleg” mining. Anthracite, survey in Southern Pennsylvania, 1936-37____________ 1937—Dec. 1323-6
Borax industry. Agreement, wage rates effective Feb. 1, 1935, by occupation, and other
provisions____________________________________________________________________ 1935—Sept. 676-7
Borrowers, small-loan. (See Cooperation—Credit unions; Small-loan companies and bor­
rowers.)
Boston League. Workers’ education activities, summary of........... ................ ........................
1939—July 18
Bottled soft-drink industry:
N B A code, effective June 18,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_______________ 1934—Aug. 320
Wisconsin Becovery Administration code, effective Aug. 24, 1935, tabular analysis of
labor provisions______________________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 629
Bottling machinery and equipment manufacturing. N B A code, effective Apr. 15, 1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions_________________________________ ______ ________ 1934—June 1333
Boulder Dam. Strike, July 11-26, 1935, causes of and settlem ent.--........ ............................ 1935—Sept. 660-1
Bowling and billiard:
Bowling alleys, game rooms____________________________________________________
1927—Sept. 8
Bowling trade. Wisconsin Becovery Administration code, effective Aug. 1,1935, tabu­
lar analysis of labor provisions________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 629
Equipment industry and operating trade. N B A codes, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions______________________________________________________ 1934—M ay 1064; 1935—M ay 1190
Box industry, fiber. Decision, N L B B , N ov. 5,1934 (Terre Haute, Ind.)------------------------ 1935—Jan. 124
Boxboard, paper. (See Paper and pulp industry.)
Braiding and wire-covering machine (and parts) industry. N B A code, effective Oct. 13,
1933, summary of labor provisions______________________________________________ 1933—N ov. 1043-4
Brass and bronze alloys, smelting and refining of secondary metals into, in ingot form.
N B A code, effective Dec. 31, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions________________ 1934—Feb. 304
Brass, bronze, and copper products. Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Brass dust, health hazards, etc. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Brattice cloth manufacturing. N B A code, effective Dec. 6, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions___________________________________________________ ___________________
1935—Jan. 62
Brazilian walnut, skin disease. (See Industrial diseases and poisons—Dermatitis.)
Bread:
Costs of making and selling, Canada 1929----------------------- ------------------------ ----- ------ 1931—July 227
Prices. (See Betail prices.)
Brewery, flour, cereal, and soft-drink workers:
Holidays provided by collective agreements................................. - ................ ........................
1931—Aug. 3
Minimum pay, agreement clauses_____ _________________ _________________ _______ 1931—M ay 143
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions------------------------------------ 1931—N ov. 128
Unemployment benefits, New York City, Local No. 1___________________ ____ ____
1933—Jan. 28
Union members, soft drink and yeast makers, employment of, agreement provisiohs. - 1931—Oct. 122
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers of America, International Union of
United:
Agreement. Baltimore, yeast workers, Mar. 13,1926......................................................... 1926—Aug. 218-19
— r Duluth (M innd, effective to M ay 1,1927--------------------------- ---------- ------------- 1926—Sept. 180-2
----- New Orleans (La.), brewery workers and drivers, Feb. 1, 1925______ __________ 1925—N ov. 93-4
----- New York City, mineral water workers, 1925 and 1926......... ............ 1925—June 63; 1926—July 157
----- Portland (Oreg.), soft-drink workers, M ay 16, 1923........................................................ 1923—Feb. 173-6
----- Union label, use of, text_____ ____ ________________________ __________— .......... 1926—Jan. 134




26

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers of America—Continued.
Agreement. Wilkes-Barre (Pa.). Stegmaier Brewing Co. and Local No. 163, from
P age
Mar. 6, 1925------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Sept. 85-6
----- Yeast companies, national agreement...................................................... ........................ 1924—Mar. 103
Arbitration policy with employers.............................................................................................
1928—Oct. 18
Collective agreements, 1935, analysis o f.............................................................................. 1936—Apr. 1012-23
Membership, 1915 to 1920.............................................................................. ................................ 1922—July 168
Brewery workers:
Union. A. F. of L. committee appointed 1939 to study situation as to jurisdiction over
brewery drivers---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Nov. 1131
(See also Brewery, flour, cereal, and soft-drink workers.)
Brewing industries:
Germany. Sales price of product, proportion of wages to, 1913 to 1 9 2 4 .................... . 1925—Sept. 78-9
United States. Labor organization, situation since 1933________________________ 1937—Feb. 299-300
----- N R A code, effective dates—Dec. 10, 1933, and labor provisions, Apr. 2, 1934,
tabular analysis--------------------- --------- ----- ---------- ------------------------------- 1934—Feb. 305, M ay 1073
Brick and clay workers:
Employers doing journeyman work, agreement provisions, brickmakers.............. ........... 1931—Sept. 61
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions-------------------- ------ ------ 1930—Nov. 128-9
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses---------------------------------- --------- 1931—M ay 143
Union members, brickmakers, employment of, agreement provisions----------------------- 1931—Oct. 122
Brick and Clay Workers of America, United:
Agreement. Chicago (111.). Brickmakers’ District Council No. 1, M ay 1, 1924___ 1925—Mar. 105-9
------------Cook County and vicinity employers, Nov. 1, 1921___________________ ____
1922—Feb. 93
----- Kenosha (Wis.), Local No. 396, July 5, 1924----------------------------- ----------------------- 1925—Jan. 103
----- N ew Straitsville (Ohio), Union No. 387, M ay 2, 1924_________________ ______ _ 1924—N ov. 136-7
Brick and tile industry. Shift-work conditions and experience, United States. ................ 1922—N ov. 30-1
Brick-manufacturing industry. Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Brick, prices. (See Wholesale prices.)
Brick, sand-lime, industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 5, 1935, tabular analysis of labor
provisions______________________________________________________________________ 1934—M ay 1071
Brick, tile, and terra cotta industry. Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Bricklayers, masons, and plasterers:
Contracting by union members, agreement provisions against--------------- ------------ ----- 1930—Sept. 10
Employers or contractors doing journeyman work, agreement provisions...................... . 1931—Sept. 62
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions--------------------------- --------- 1931—Aug. 116
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions.............................................. 1930—N ov. 129
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses....................... .................................. 1931—M ay 143
Superannuated union members, wage scale provisions in agreements.............................. . 1932—M ay 1098
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions........................ .................................. 1931—Dec. 95
----- Employment of, agreement provisions_____________________ __________________ 1931—Oct. 123
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers’ International Union of America:
Agreements. (See Collective agreements, U. S., by industry.)
Apprenticeship. Building trades, Washington, D. C. (Conyngton)___......................... 1925—Jan. 1-7
----- Program------------------------------------------- ---------------- ---------- ----------------------------- 1928—June 23-5
----- Statistics, bricklayers, 1921 to 1925-------------------------------------------------- ------ ------- 1925—Sept. 206
Arbitration. Abrogation of agreement with plasterers’ international union, decision,
Jan. 28, 1927............. ...............................- ................ ................................................................ 1927—Apr. 171-7
----- Policy with employers-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 1928—Oct. 12
Board of Trade Claims agreement, Mar. 3, 1931, not signatory to ....................................... 1931—July 108
Conciliation, New York City, duration of bonus---------------------------------------- ------- 1924—Apr. 200-1
Days worked, average per year, bricklayers, Philadelphia, 1909 to 1920....................... . 1921—M ay 108
Injunctions, consent decree enjoining officers and members, Feb. 28,1922.............. . . . 1922—Apr. 204-10
Jurisdictional dispute with plasterers’ union------ --------------- ------ ------------- ------------- 1925—Dec. 5-6
Membership statistics________________ ___________ - .........-----........... 1922—July 167; 1925—Sept. 206
Mortuary and relief benefits, 1915 to 1926------------------------------------- ---------------- -----1927—July 71
Old-age pensions, amount and requirements for receipt of, 1930......... ............................. .
1931—M ay 34
Workdays per year, Philadelphia, bricklayers, and roofers (slate and tile)..................... 1921—M ay 107-10
Bricklaying:
Labor productivity and costs, by c it y ..- .......................................................................... 1924—Nov. 2-3, 6-9
Straightaway, man-hour productivity. (Digest of BLS studies)__________________ 1932—N ov. 1033
Brickmaking industry. Technological changes and productivity. (Digest of BLS
studies)------------------------------------------------------------ ------ ---------------------------- ------ ----- 1932—N ov. 1043
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental Iron Workers, International Association of:
Accidents. Chicago, Union No. 1, statistics-------------J------------------------------------------ 1921—July 195
Agreement, New York City, Housesmith’s Union, Local No. 52, June 4,1923, text___ 1923—Aug. 131-4
Benefit system, death, age, and-disability, revision of, 1932_____, __________________ 1933—Jan. 97-8
Membership, 1915 to 1920------------ ---------- ----------------------------------- - ............................. 1922—July 167
Old-age pensions, amount and requirements for receipt of, 1930— .................................... 1931—M ay 34
Signatory to Board of Claims agreement, Mar. 3, 1931------------------------------------------- 1931—July 107
Trade-board decisions. Denver (Colo.), Local Union No. 24, wage increase denied,
Jan. 28, 1930______________ ____ _____________ - .........- ----------------------------------- 1930—Apr. 131-2
See also Structural and ornamental ironworkers.)
British Labor Party. Conferences........................................................ - .........1921—Sept. 183-4; 1922—Aug. 197
Brookwood Labor College:
Activities from founding, 1921, to closing, 1937.........................................................................
1939—July 7
Workers’ education. ................................................ ...................................... ...........................
1926—July 94
Broom and mop handles. N R A code for lumber- and timber-products industries amended
to include, Dec. 7, 1933.------------- ------------------- -----------------------------------------------------1934—Jan. 33
Broom and Whisk Makers’ Union, International:
Agreements. (See Collective agreements, U. S., by industry—Broom industry.)
History since 1893, under A. F. of L .................................................................. ....................... 1937—Feb. 296
Membership, broom makers, 1915 to 1920................................................................................. 1922—July 169
Broommakers:
Payment of wages, time and method of, agreement provisions................................... ........ 1930—N ov. 129
Union members, employment of, agreement provisions.................. ......................... ............ 1931—Oct. 122
Broom-manufacturing industry. N R A code, effective July 2, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions.......... ............................................................................................................ .......... 1934—A u g.320




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

27

Brotherhood of. (See under inverted title.)
P age
Brush industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 2,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions___ 1934)—M ay 1064
Bryn Mawr College. (See under Workers’ education, United States.)
Budd Manufacturing Co., E. G. Controversy re reemployment of strikers, settlement
March 1934, provisions of________________________________________________________ 1934—M ay 1062
Budget, Bureau of the (U. S. Government). Transfer under Reorganization Plan No. 1,
effective July 1, 1939____________________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 378
Budgets, cost-of-living, United States:
Bank employees, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, family and individual.......... . 1921—Feb. 78-80
“ Bare essentials,” working girls, Dallas (Tex.)___________________________ ______ 1929—Apr. 88
Beet-sugar workers, families of, 1935. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study)____________ 1938—Feb. 338-9
Brotherhood of Railway Clerks, resolution_______________________________________ 1928—Aug. 211
Business women. Expenditures, influence of depression on, 1931 and 1932______ 1933—Dec. 1359-60
----- (See also Woman workers, this section.)
Buying habits of population of Virginia, change in (census returns 1929,1933,1935)___ 1936—Feb. 455-6
Chicago standard budget. Dependent families, fourth revised (March 1932)________ 1932—N ov. 1211
----- Unskilled and semiskilled laborers, estimated, comparison of family earnings
w ith---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1927—July 108-11
Cities, small northern (5) and southern (5), food and general items. (BLS survey)___ 1939—July 22-37
Clothing. And household articles, textile materials used for, trend________________ 1929—July 76-9
----- Budget of a high-school girl--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—M ay 102
----- Expenditures, wage earners and clerical workers, 11 New Hampshire communities,
1933-34. (W illiams)_______________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 554-61
Consumer purchases, Chicago families, 1935-36_________________________________ 1939—M ay 1007-25
Dependent families or children, budget for, prepared by Heller Committee, University
of California_______________________________________________________________ 1932—July 234-5
Electrical appliances and equipment, expenditures for, by families of workers, 1933-36
(42 cities)__________________________________________________________________ 1938—Feb. 447-54
Expenditure groups and items, weighting, four methods_____________ ___________ 1922—M ay 85-93
Expenditures, distribution. Alabama, Iowa, and Kansas farm fam ilies.......................... 1925—Dec. 38
----- California State employees, minimum health and comfort, 1921. ........................... 1923—Mar. 43-5
----- Cincinnati families, 1920____________________________________________________
1921—M ay 45
----- New York City, worker’s family of five, in minimum health and decency, Novem­
ber 1920____________________________________________________________________ 1921—Feb. 65-6
----- Use of data in wage adjustments. (Stewart)_________________________________ 1928—Mar. 1-8
Factory workers (1,665 in 16 cities). Items on which increase in remuneration would
be spent______________________ ______ ________________________________________ 1939—
;Jan. 105
Families. California, 5 cities, 1934-35_____________________________________ . ___ 1937—Sept. 663-9
----- Chicago. Expenditures for contributions and personal taxes, percent distribution,
1935-36_____________________________________________________________________ 1939—M ay 1020
----------- Expenditures for various general items, percent distribution, 1935-36_____ 1939—M ay 1010-17
----- Patterns of expenditures, percent of increase, higher incomes over lower, by item.. 1939—M ay 1020-5
----- Pennsylvania, 5 cities, 1933-35______ _____ ____________________ ____ _______ 1937—June 1494-9
Family budget. And home ownership, ratio of expenditure_________ ______ ______ 1929—M ay 243-4
----- Coal-mining towns________________________________________________ ________ 1922—Apr. 9-12
----- Cost factors, methods of determining, Nation-wide basis, four sources................... 1922—M ay 85-93
----- Manual workers, 4-person, maintenance level, 31 cities, December 1938_____ ____ 1939—Mar. 535
----- 1,000 workers, Connecticut, 1919-20________________________________ ______ ___ 1921—Aug. 205
----- Printer’s, annual expense, Omaha_____________________________ ____ __________ 1927—M ay 263
----- Typographical Union members, San Francisco, 1921_________________________ 1930—Mar. 204-5
----- Wage earners and low-salaried workers, new study (BLS) of purchases. (Wil­
liams and Schm idt)________________________________________________________ 1935—Apr. 861-6
Family expenditures, changes in items, etc., since World War I. (Williams)_____ 1938—N ov. 967-79
Farm families. Fertile section near markets (Carroll County, M d.), average expendi­
ture by specified item _________________________________________________ _ 1939—Aug. 403-4
----- Value of goods used (purchased or produced), Lebanon (Conn.), 1923________ 1925—Sept. 49-51
Farm-laborer families, Indian-Mexican village, New Mexico, 1935______________ 1939—Jan. 105-7
Federal employees, Washington, D . C. Indexes, specified dates, March 1933 to April
1936—Sept. 792-4
1936_______________________________________________________ ___________ _
Food consumption at different economic levels. (W illiams)........ .................................. 1936—Apr. 889-94
Food supply of low-income families, 1933 (nine localities)_________________________ 1936—Sept. 600-5
Ford Motor Co. employees, 100 families in 1929, Detroit_________________________ 1930—June 14-54
Individual. Kansas, wage-earning woman, suggested expenditures, per week and year 1922—June 59
----- Massachusetts, basis for minimum wage, four industries_____________ _______ 1927—Feb. 25
----- Minneapolis (M inn.), teachers, for fixing minimum salaries__________ ______ _ 1926—Nov. 201
----- Ohio, woman workers________________________________ ______ ___ ____ ______ 1921—Feb. 98
Maintenance. Budgets, graduated according to size of family_________________ 1931—M ay 148-50
----- Level. Annual, 31 cities, by item, for 4-person family (manual worker’s) estimated
as of June 15,1939, and indexes_____________________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1164-7
----- (W PA hypothetical). Cities, 36, northern and southern, December 1938______ 1939—July 35-8
Philippine Islands (Manila). Family expenses, daily, 1926......................................... .
1927—N ov. 54
Post-war and recent standard, formation of___________________________________ 1940—Jan. 115-18
Puerto Rico. Family budgets, items and weekly cost____________________________ 1930—Aug. 49
Rents paid by lower-income families proportionately high, report of National Housing
Committee_____ ______ _____ ________ ___ _______ ___________________________ 1937—Mar. 709-11
Richmond (Va.). Working girls (47 clerical and 24 factory), income and expenditures,
by item, 1931_____________________________________________________________ 1932—Oct. 972-86
San Francisco (Calif.). Family budget, executives, clerks, and wage earners, quantity
and cost, November 1932, 1933, and 1934___ 1933—Aug. 470-1; 1934—M ay 1260-2; 1935—May 1386-8
----- Streetcar men’s family budgets, expenditure by item, 1924-25________________ 1931—June 213
Wage earners and clerical workers. Birmingham, New Orleans, and Richmond,
1933-34..__________ __________ ______________ ________ ____________________ 1936—M ay 1457-64
----- Boston and Springfield, M ass________________ _____ _____________________ 1936—Sept. 783-92
----- 42 cities, by size and source of income, household composition, race, occupation,
and item of expenditure, 1934-36................................... .................................... ............. 1939—Dec. 1311-34
----- Michigan, 4 cities, 1934-35______ _______ ____ ____ ________________ _____ _ 1936—June 1744-53
----- New Hampshire, 11 communities, 1933-34. (W illiams)............................. ............ 1936—Mar. 554-63
----- New York City, 1934-36. (BLS su rv ey )................................................................... 1937—Jan. 232-40




28

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Budgets, cost-of-living, United States—Continued.
_
Wage earners and clerical workers. Small cities in North (5) and in South (5), cost
irage
and percentage distribution of items, as of December 1938. (BLS survey)............ 1939—July 22-35
Woman workers. Dallas (Tex.), “bare essentials,” working g i r l s ........... . ............
1929—Apr. 88
----- Expenditures, business women, influence of depression on, 1931-32___________ 1933—Dec. 1359-60
----- Kansas, suggested expenditures, individual budget, per week and year_________ 1922—June 59
----- New York State. Living alone or as members of families, computed by State
department of labor as of 1938.................................................................................................1939—Aug. 404-5
------------Living costs, 1937. (M iller).............................................................................. ......... 1938—Mar.. 571-8
----- Ohio..........................................— ---------------------------— ............................................ 1921—Feb. 98
----- Richmond (Va.), income and expenditures (47 clerical and 24 factory working
girls), by item, 1931............. ................. . .............. ............................................................... 1932—Oct. 972-86
(See also Cost of living, U. S.)
Budgets, cost-of-living, foreign countries:
Algeria. Family budget, relative importance, major items, international comparison. _ 1927—Sept. 213
Argentina. (Buenos Aires.) Income and expenditure, average annual, laborer’s
family, 1926________________________________________________________________ 1927—Oct. 202-4
------------Laborer's family, income and expenditure, by means of support, 1928 and
1929....................... ..................................................................................... 1929—Dec. 229-30; 1931—Mar. 236
------------ Worker's families, M ay 1940.................................................................. ................ 1940—Dec. 1567-8
Australia. Fam ily budgets, relative importance of major items, international com­
parison. ___________________ _______ ______________________ ___________________ 1927—Sept. 213
Belgium. Fam ily budgets, relative importance of major items, international compar­
ison____ ______________ ______ ______ ______ __________________________________ 1927—Sept. 213
----- Wage earners’ and salaried employees’ families, 1928-29_______________________ 1935—N ov. 1425-8
Canada. Family budget (staple foods, fuel and lighting, rent) changes in cost per week,
1914 to 1934______ _____ ______________________________________________________ 1925—Sept. 51;
1926—Apr. 59; 1927—Apr. 170; 1928—Apr. 173-4; 1929—Apr. 216-17; 1930—Apr. 231-2; 1931Mar. 237; 1932—Apr. 1003-4; 1933—Apr. 965-6; 1934^Apr. 1006-7; 1935—Apr. 1096-7
- — Fam ily budgets, relative importance of major items, international comparison___ 1927—Sept. 213
----- Wage earners’ families, British and French, expenditures by item, and by nunber of
children in family, year ending Sept. 30, 1938-------------------------------------------------- 1939—Sept. 709-11
----- (Nova Scotia). Budget for single women, experienced workers, minimum wage
board finding, 1931___________________________________________________________ 1932—Sept. 729
----------- Family budget, earnings and balance for living expenses, coal miner, 1924.......... 1925—July 192
----- (Ontario). Independent woman workers, by item, October 1928_________ ____ 1929—Oct. 255
------------ Minimum wage board weekly budget, working woman, Toronto, annual
report for 1932_______________________________________________________ ________ 1933—Oct. 860
Chile. (Chilian). Food and housing expenditures, urban families (60), 1935................. 1937—Feb. 520
China. Family, economic definition of------- -------------------------------------------------------- 1932—Apr. 799
----- Family budget, unskilled and semiskilled laborers, by city, and item of expendi­
ture, 1930.........................................._............................................................................................. 1933—Jan. 182
----- (Peking). Family, artisans and coolies............................................................................. 1927—Jan. 217
----------- Family budgets (60), detailed analysis----------------------------------- --------------- 1928—Oct. 191-4
----- (Shanghai). Family budget, annual expenditure, by income group, 1929-30______ 1931—Mar. 240;
1935—Oct. 1142-7
----- (Tangku). Expenditure, by item (percent), factory workers...................................... 1929—Feb. 38-9
Colombia. (Bogota). Low-income families, survey, September 1936------------------- 1938—Sept. 539-42
Czechoslovakia. Fam ily budget, relative importance of major items, international
comparison---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1927—Sept. 213
Denmark. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international compar­
ison___________________________ ________________ _____________________________ 1927—Sept. 213
— 1 Household budget. Change .in cost (percent), 1920 and 1921.......................... ............. 1921—Dec. 79
------------Standard, estimated cost, working man, 1914 to 1921.. 1921—M ay 46, Dec. 80; 1923—M ay 108
----- (Copenhagen). Family budget, index numbers of cost, 1921 and 1922----------------1922—Apr. 78
Ecuador. Working-class family, average, distribution of monthly expenditure_______ 1936—N ov. 1339
Egypt. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison. 1927—Sept. 213
Estonia. Fam ily budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison. 1927—Sept. 213
Finland. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison. 1927—Sept. 213
France. Annual budget, single working woman________________________________ 1930—June 261-2
----- Fam ily budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison____ 1927—Sept. 213
----- Working-class family of 4 persons, 5-item budget, weights, 1930 index base_______ 1932—N ov. 1216
----- (Paris). Index numbers, 1919 to 1921________________________________________ 1922—Apr. 78-9
French Indo-China. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international
comparison__________________________________________________________________ 1927—Sept. 213
Germany. Fam ily budget, relative importance of major items, international compar­
ison___________________________________________ ______________ ______________ 1927—Sept. 213
----- (Berlin). Food budget, minimum quantity cost, 1913 and 1921...................................
1922—Jan. 92
----------- Household budget, workman’s family, cost by item, 1922---------------- ----------- 1923—Apr. 55
----- (Danzig). Family budget, relative importance of major items, international com­
parison___ ____ _____________________________________________________________ 1927—Sept. 213
Great Britain. Fam ily budget, relative importance of major items, international com­
parison______________________________________________________________________ 1927—Sept. 213
Greece. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison.. 1927—Sept. 213
Hungary. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international com­
parison______________________________________________________________________ 1927—Sept. 213
----- Household budget, workman’s family, weekly cost, 1922 and 1923_______________ 1921—Feb. 96
India. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison. 1927—Sept. 213
----- Individual and family budgets, working-class_________________________________ 1921—July 41-2
----- (Bombay). Clerical workers, family budgets, 1924_______ ________ ___________ 1925—July 66-7
------------ Expenditures, distribution, by family income class, and by item, 1921-22,
1932-33______________________________________________ ______ 1923—July 88-9; 1936—Feb. 507-10
----------- Single men, 1921-22_____________________________________________________
1923—July 91
----- (Bombay Presidency). Expenditures, family and individual distribution,
1923_______________________________ ____________________ _______ ____________ 1926—N ov. 21-2
----- (Burma). Fam ily and individual, 1927 and 1928. __________________________ 1929—Mar. 252-6
Irish Free State. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international
comparison_______________________ ____ _______ ________________________ ______ 1927—Sept. 213
Italy. Fam ily budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison.. 1927—Sept. 213




SUBJECT? rNDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

29

Budgets, cost-of-living, foreign countries—Continued.
Italy. (Commune of Urbania). Average weekly food consumption by agricultural
Jrage
group, 1931-32-------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------- 1937—Feb. 523-4
----- (M ilan). Family budget, workman’s, quantity and weekly expenditures, by item,
1914 and 1921.____ ___________ ____ - ......................... - .................. - .............— . 1921—June 141, N ov. 88
Japan. Agricultural laborer’s fam ily.............. ......................................................................... 1921—Dec. 12
----- Family budgets, salaried workers and manual workers, September 1926...............
1928—Mar. 200
----- Salaried employees and wage earners. First official study, 1926-27........................1931—M ay 210-14
------------M onthly expenditure, distribution of, 1932-33 to 1936-37__________ _____ _ 1935—Apr. 1097-8,
Dec. 1729-30; 1937—Sept. 689; 1938—Oct. 837-8
Mexico. Expenditures, distribution, workers’ families, by State and class of workers,
1924_____________________________________ _________________________ ________ 1925—Dec. 39-40
----- Family budget, workman’s, quantity and cost------- ---------------------- 1923—M ay 106-7, June 128-9
----- (Mexico City). Working-class families (281). Distribution of weekly expendi­
ture, July to September 1934------------------------ ------ ------------------------------------------- 1936—Sept. 796
Netherlands. Family budget, relative importance of major items, international com­
parison------ ---------- -------------- -------------------------------------- ---------------------------------- 1927—Sept. 213
----- (Amsterdam). Family budgets, study of, 1923-24 and 1930._ 1928—Jan. 189-91; 1933—M ay 1204-5
----------- Household expenditures, distribution, 1910-11,1917, and 1918--------------------1921—N ov. 89-92
New Zealand. Family budget. Relative importance of major items, international
comparison.............. ............................................................... ................ ......................... ............ 1927—Sept. 213
----------- Study of_____________ _______ — ................................. ............ ............ ................ 1931—Feb. 241-2
Norway. Family budget, relative importance of major items, International com­
parison____________________________ ______ ____________ _______________ ______ 1927—Sept. 213
----- Household budget, standard, monthly cost, by item, 1914, 1920 to 1923. _ ............... 1921—Dec. 79;
1923—M ay 110
South Africa. Fam ily budget. Expenditures, 1925 and August-0ctober 1928.......... 1926- July 152-3;
1928—Oct. 194-5
------------Relative importance of major items, international comparison________ ____ _ 1927—Sept. 213
Soviet Union. (Moscow). Family budget, skilled workers, 1927 (and correction)___ 1927—Dec. 212;
1928—June 174
Sweden. Agricultural laborer’s household, expenditures, distribution, by item, 1920. 1922—June 66-8
----- Family budget, relative importance of major items, international comparison____ 1927—Sept. 213
----- Household budget, change in cost (percent), 1920 and 1921_____________________
1921—Dec. 79
----- Survey, 1933, preliminary results, income and expenditures, distribution of and
analysis-------------------- ------ ---------------------------------- --------- -------------------- -------- 1935—Sept. 838-42
----- (Stockholm). Household budgets, study of, 1922-23— __________ ___________ 1927—Sept. 214-16
Switzerland. (Zurich). Expenditures, distribution, by item, workmen’s and salaried
employees’ families, 1919...... ............................................................ ............................................ 1921—Oct. 92
(See also Cost of living, foreign countries.)
Buffing and polishing composition. N R A code, effective N ov. 4,1933, tabular analysis of
labor provisions______ _______________ _______ ____________________________________ 1933—Dec. 1335
Buffing and polishing wheel industry. N R A code, effective Nov. 4,1933, tabular analysis
of labor provisions__________________ ____________________ _______________________ 1933—Dec. 1335
Builders’ supplies trade. N R A code, effective Oct. 13,1933, summary of labor provisions;
amended Oct. 25, 1934______ _______ _______________ ____ 1933—N ov. 1042, Dec. 1335; 1934—Dec. 1362
Building and common laborers. (See under Unskilled labor.)
Building and loan associations, United States:
Assets. (See Statistics, this section.)
Oompanv plans. Findings of National Industrial Conference Board............... ................ 1936—July 89
Conventions. (See under Conventions, meetings, etc.)
Failures and estimated losses, 1920 to 1936.............................—.................... 1926—Dec. 1435; 1938—Jan. 109
Home-financing activities, 1923-25...................................................... ............................ ......... 1926—Feb. 201
Investment by industrial employees in. (Princeton University study)___________ 1932—June 1305-7
Loans outstanding, assets, and membership, 1920 to 1934___________ 1933—Dec. 1416; 1935—Dec. 1513
Membership. (See Statistics, this section.)
N R A code, effective Dec. 31, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions............................. 1934—Feb. 303
N ew Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance, report_______________________ 1922—June 234-5
New York State League of Savings and Loan Associations. Group retirement plan
adopted, 1939........................................................ .................................. ................................... 1940—Oct. 887-8
Statistics of assets, membership, etc., by State, 1922-23 to 1938_____________________ 1923—Oct. 192;
1924—Dec. 165; 1927—Mar. 42, Oct. 70-1; 1928—N ov. 91-2; 1929—Nov. 58-9; 1930—N ov. 11415; 1932—Feb. 328, Oct. 882; 1933—Deo. 1414-16; 1934—N ov. 1136; 1935—Dec. 1511-13; 1936Dec. 1433-5; 1938—Jan. 107-9; 1939—Feb. 336-7, Dec. 1417-18
United States League of Local, annual report of secretary, 1928......................................... 1929—N ov. 58-9
(See also Building societies; Cooperation—Housing.)
Building and loan associations, foreign countries:
Denmark. Mutual-credit and mortgage associations, practices of..................................... 1938—June 1366
Great Britain. Financial status 1937, compared with preceding years...... ...................... 1938—June 1366-8
----- Growth in number of societies and assets, 1913 to 1934.............................................. 1936—June 1548-50
----- Statistics, by year, 1928 to 1938.......... ........................ ................................... .................. 1939—July 135
Building-construction industry (general). Safety standards, code adopted by 1937 ILO
Conference......... ........................................................................ ........................ ....................... . 1937—Aug. 352-3
Building-construction industry, United States:
Accident (compensation) costs and building operation costs, relation between______ 1932—Dec. 1339-40
Accident prevention. (See Accident prevention, by industry—Building construction.)
Accident statistics. (See Accident statistics, by industry—Building construction.)
Apartment dwellings. (See under Housing.)
Apprenticeship. (See Apprenticeship—Building trades.)
Arbitration awara. Carpenters, Protheroe Construction Co., Colorado Springs
(Colo.), Oct. 6, 1931............................ ................................................................. .......... .........1931—N ov. 131-2
Board of Trade Claims, organization of, under agreement of Mar. 3, 1931; in lieu of
National Board for Jurisdictional Awards, abolished 1927.......... ..................................... 1931—July 106-7
Bricklaying, straightaway, man-hour productivity. (Digest of BLS studies)_______ 1932—N ov. 1033
Building permits, estimated costs. (See Housing—Costs (building-permit estimates.)
Building situation, summary of survey, Secretary Hoover’s recommendation, Mar. 16,
1923................................................................................................................................................ 1923—M ay 184-7
BLS method of securing data____ ____ ______ _____________ . _________. . . . . . . . . ___ 1938—Jan. 252-4
2 0 1 0 4 3 °— 42------ 8




30

Mo n t h l y labo r r e v ie w

Building-construction industry, United States—Continued.
Cities leading, in total expenditures for all classes of buildings, 1922-35 (first half, each
P age
year)------ ----------------- --------------------------------------- ------------ --------1934—Sept. 699; 1935—Oct. 1113
Comparison of summary figures. Identical cities, with preceding month and year,
October 1935 to March 1936_________________________________________________ 1936—Jan. 236-42,
Feb. 482-5, Mar. 796-800, Apr. 1119-22, M ay 1429-34, June 1721-26
----- Identical cities, year 1935 with year 1934_____ ___________________ _________ 1936—Apr. 1126-9
Conditions, volume of work done, etc., 1922___________________________ ________ _ 1923—Jan. 144-9
Connecticut. Building operations, 1918-20. (Summary of State report)__________ 1921—Sept. 203
Contracts let, value of. B y district...... ....................... ................. .................. 1921—Sept. 160-4, N ov. 152-3
----- F. W. Dodge Co. report_____________ ______ . . . _____ ________ 1921—Feb. 179; 1923—Jan. 144-5
Convention covering safety provisions proposed for consideration at June 1937 ILO
Conference-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- 1937—Apr. 888-9
Costs. (Building-permit estimates). (See under Housing.)
----- Building small houses, statistics by cities, January 1936............................................ 1936—Mar. 647-8
----- Metropolitan districts (59 specified), 1935........................................................... ........... 1936—June 1728
----- (See also under Housing.)
Costs, material and labor. Analysis of, in construction of apartment house. (Topkis)________________________________________________ ______ _____ . _________ 1935—Sept. 541-51
----- 11-room frame dwellings, by item, Massachusetts____ ................................................. 1923—Mar. 72
----- PWA building construction, relative costs. (Byer).................................................. 1935—July 117-19
----- PW A units. (Byer and Trum p).................................................................................. 1939—Sept. 578-86
—— Relative cost----------------------------- ----------------- --------------------- 1929—Jan. 1-8; 1932—Oct. 763-72
----- (See also under Material costs.)
Costs, per cubic foot, by class of building, Detroit, Mich., 1915 to 1933____________ 1931—Apr. 174-6;
1933—Oct. 910-11
Elapsed time, between date of permit, start of work, and completion of building, 1931. 1933—Jan. 158-69
Employment, irregularity of. Address of Secretary Hoover, American Institute of
Architects-------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------ ----- 1921—July 165-8
Ethics, code of. Work of New York Building Congress___________________ _____ _ 1922—Oct. 150-2
Expenditures (estimated). And families provided for, 257 identical cities, 1921-35... 1936—Apr. 1130
----- Five leading cities, by years, 1921 to 1936.___________________ 1936—Apr. 1135; 1937—M ay 1317-18
Families provided for. (See under Housing.)
Federal construction projects. (See under Construction industry.)
40-hour (or less) working time, prevalence of, in 1936-------------------------------------------- 1937—Oct. 791-9
40-hour workweek. Draft convention to be considered by 1936 ILO Conference......... 1936—Apr. 962-3
Gypsum Industries Association, consent decree limiting activities of. N ew Y o r k ... 1923—Mar. 73-4
Home building, revival in 1935, summary for year............... .......................................... 1936—Apr. 1125-35
Housing shortage, Senate Select Committee on Reconstruction and Production (Calder)
report, 1921--------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------------------------------------- 1921—June 96-100
How the building dollar goes, residential and nonresidential buildings, by city and
class of work______________________________________ ______________________ 1932—Oct. 769-72
Illinois. Legislative commission of inquiry created............................................................... 1921—Dec. 16(1
Important building projects. Permits issued. First half of 1936...................................... 1936—Oct. 1035
------------November 1935-July 1936_____________________________________________ 1936—Jan. 235-6,
Feb. 478-9. Mar. 792-3, Apr. 1116, M ay 1425, June 1717-18, July 208, Aug. 512-13, Sept. 742
Industrial disputes. Adjustment machinery provided by collective agreements____ 1940—Feb. 297
Jurisdictional awards, National Board for. Abolished, 1927, Board of Trade Claims
organized to replace, Mar. 3, 1931------------------------- --------------------- ----------------- 1931—July 106-7
----- Authority of, agreement (five bodies) to uphold, text............................................. ....... 1922—Apr. 126
Jurisdictional disputes, steps to eliminate--------------------------------------------------- --------- 1930—Mar. 96
Mason, concrete, and carpenter division. Wisconsin Recovery Administration Code,
effective Aug. 21, 1935, labor provisions___________________________ ______ _______ 1936—Mar. 630
Material and labor costs. (See Costs, material and labor, this section.)
Nails. Problem of, in colonial times. (Excerpts from BLS Bull. No. 499)________ 1930—Jan. 14-15
New York. Collective agreements creating monopoly, court decisions, Brescia Con­
struction Co----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—June 124-5
----- Industrial Survey Commission, second report, 1928____________ ____ _______ ___ 1928—Sept. 47
----- Safety specifications of Building Trades Employers’ Association........................ 1929—M ay 129-32
----- (New York City). Building activity, comparative figures, 1923 and 1924............. 1924—June 149-50
N ew York Building Congress, work of__________________________ _____________ 1922—Oct. 150-4
Non-Federal construction projects. (See under Construction industry.)
Nonresidential buildings, per capita expenditure, in representative cities.................. . 1927—July 17-19
One-family houses, by cities, permit valuation, and “size of builder,” 1938................. 1940—Sept. 732-9
Permits issued. (See under Housing.)
Prices of materials, trend of wages, and cost of living, index numbers. ......................... 1922—Dec. 107-9
Principal cities. (See Statistics, this section.)
Projects financed from Federal funds. Employment statistics. (See under Employ­
ment statistics, United States.)
----- Value of contracts awarded. (See under Construction industry, U. S.)
Public buildings. Federal and State. Contracts awarded, value of, September 1932
and 1933_________________________ __________ ___________ ____________________ 1933—N ov. 1159
------------Contracts for, 1934-35, by geographic division__________________ ____ ______ 1935—Sept. 700
------------Monthly reports. (See under Building Operations, each issue of M . L. R.,
January 1936-December 1940.)
----- Value of awards by State governments. First half 1935 and 1936_______________ 1936—Oct. 1039
Relative costs of labor and material. (See Costs, material and labor, this section.)
Residential. New nonfarm units, first quarter and first half of 1940 and 1939;
permit valuation, same periods 1940------------------------------------------- 1940—Aug. 481-7, Oct. 998-1003
----- Number of units to private project, indicated by permits, 30 cities, 1938__________ 1939—Oct. 998-9
----- Permit fees. Type by locality and size of city. (BLS survey) ................... . 1940—Dec. 1535-8
----- Volume of, 1920-37, urban and nonfarm areas______________________ ____ 1938—Jan. 248-52, 254-6
Safety instruction, fire-prevention measures------- ----------------------------------------------- 1930—Feb. 88-90
Schools. Labor requirements in man-hours at and off site, and material and labor
costs, per million dollars of contracts, 1935-38_________________________________ 1939—June 1300-1
Seasonal employment. Cleveland Home Builders’ Exchange, continuous employment
policy, and results____________________________________________ _______________ 1923—Feb. 211
----- Irregularity, study of, Committee on Seasonal Operation in the Construction In­
dustries_________________ ______________ __________________________________ 1924—N ov. 158-60




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

31

Building-construction industry, United States—Continued.
Page
Seasonal employment. Methods to reduce...................................................................... ....... 1922—Jan. 162
----- Practicability of winter construction, Ohio_______ _______ ___________________ 1927—July 117-20
----- Winter building not only practicable but profitable___ _____________________ 1924—N ov. 169-60
Seasonal fluctuations. Causes of, winter operations______________________ ______ 1931—Sept. 6-33
Stabilization of. Methods of a construction company, North Central States.................1922—Jan. 162-4
----- Suspension of operations to effect____________________________________ ____ _ 1923—July 174-7
Statistics. First half of 1936 and 1937, long-time trend, principal cities, first half each
year. 1922 to 1937_____________ ____ ______________________ 1936—Oct. 1029-31; 1937—Oct. 1005-13
----- Number and kind of buildings, permit valuation, and families provided for, princi­
pal cities, October 1936 to October 1940. (See section Building Operations, each issue
of M . L. R ., January 1937-December 1940.)
Summary. Reports, M ay 1935 to October 1940. (See section Building Operations, each
issue of M . L. R., July 1935-December 1940.)
----- Years 1935 and 1936__________________________________ 1936—Apr. 1125-38; 1937—M ay 1300-21
Trade board decision. Portland (Oreg.), mortarmen, wage increase, effective Jan. 1,
1930_______________________________________________________ _____ ___________ 1930-Apr. 131
Unemployment. Statistics, Massachusetts organized workers___________________ 1927—Sept. 162-4;
1928—Oct. 159-60; 1929—Mar. 222-3; 1930—Jan. 172
Unionism, craft and industrial, trend__________________ ____ ____________________ 1927—June 107-8
Union-supported building companies, establishment of, St. Paul (M inn.), Jackson
(Mich.), Reading (P a.)_______________________________________________________ 1922—Jan. 221
Washington, D. C. Apartment house, 117-unit, man-hours spent on each class of work,
1931-32_____________________________________________________________________ 1932—Oct. 782-9
Wisconsin. Employment conditions, 1922 and 1923, Labor Market r ep o rt............... 1923—Aug. 156-7
Wrecking operations. Eliminating labor in_____ ____________________ _________ 1929—June 114-15
----- Labor-saving experiment. (Digest of BLS studies)........................................................ 1932—N ov. 1034
----- Minnesota, safety code............................................................................................................ 1930—June 94
Building-construction industry, foreign countries:
Australia. Conciliation, allowances for time lost, building laborers, February 1923.. 1925—Mar. 151-2
Canada. Activities. St. John (N. B.) and Vancouver___________________________ 1921—M ay 166
----------- Volume and value, 1918 to 1920__________________________________________ 1921—Aug. 131
----- Joint conference, employers, employees, and Government, Ottawa, M ay 1921.._ 1921—July 181-8
Costa Rica. 5-year 1,000-dwelling project____________ ______ _____________________ 1925—N ov. 219
Denmark. Dwellings under construction, 1919 to 1921........ ......................................... . 1921—Oct. 172-3
Germany. Building funds, tax on rents to provide____________________________ 1923—June 199-201
----- Building materials, prices of, and building costs, index num bers........... ................... 1923—June 82-3
Great Britain. Employment statistics, by occupation, 1932-35.......................................1937—M ay 1175
----- Housing policies of Government, 1919-37___________________________________ 1937—Oct. 800-15
-----Housing program of Government, report on building costs, England and Scot­
land____________ _____ ____________________________________________________ 1921—Nov. 154-6
----- Industries in and related to, employment and unemployment statistics, 1932-35. 1937—M ay 1174-6
----- (England). Agreement________ ____________________________________________ 1927—Jan. 225
----------- Building guilds, in field of private building; principles and activities........... 1921—Dec. 147-53;
1923—Jan. 149-52
------------Municipal authorities, activities, Nottingham.......................................................... 1921—M ay 166
Sweden. Depression, 1940, compared with 1939......... ............................................................ 1940—Dec. 1370
----- Home-building activities___________________________________________________ 1921—Aug. 132
----- (Stockholm). Suburban house building by owners’ labor, plan described_____ 1935—Sept. 630-3
Building contractors. Regulation of Massachusetts, report and recommendations of special
com m ission..--------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------- ------------- 1934—N ov. 1187-9
Building materials:
Costs. (See Building-construction industry—Costs.)
Index numbers, prices, estimated expenditures, union wages, rents, 1921-34................... 1935—Apr. 1092
(See also Housing; Wholesale prices.)
Building operations, principal cities. (See under Housing.)
Building permits. (See Housing—Costs.)
Building Service Employees’ International Union:
Agreement. Settling jurisdiction with steam and operating engineers, 1926................ 1926—M ay 258-9
New York City. Decision, Apr. 20,1936, on wage rates__________________ ______ _ 1936—June 1583-4
Building societies:
Company employees, encouragement by employers______________________ ____ ____ 1927—Oct. 80-1
Great Britain. Membership and financial condition report, chief registrar of friendly
societies_____________________ _________________ ___________ ____ 1925—Jan. 148; 1927—M ay 102
Home-financing activities, United States, 1923-25. ............................................................ 1926—Feb. 201
(See also Building and loan associations.)
Building trades, United States:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Apprenticeship. (See Apprenticeship—Building trades.)
Cleveland Trade School, annual commencement (fourth)................................................... 1928—M ay 102
Conciliation. Cedar Rapids (Iowa), wage adjustments, mode o f . .. .............................1921—Aug. 126-30
----- Chicago (111.), Judge Landis wage scale award, January 1922________ , ..................... 1922—Apr. 127
----- Cincinnati, arbitrator’s wage scale award_______________________________ _____ 1922—Feb. 93-4
----- San Francisco (Calif.), wage board decision, scale, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1922________ 1922—Feb. 95-6
----- Syracuse (N. Y.) carpenters, arbitration plan, made part of working agreements,
te x t..._________________________ ____ ____ _____ ___________________________ 1923—Sept. 111-12
----- Westchester County (N . Y .), arbitrator’s award, wages and conditions, October
1920___ ___________ __________ ________________________ ____________ _______ 1921—Sept. 143-6
Cooperative associations. (See under Cooperation.)
Craftsmanship. New York Building Congress certificates o f.................. ......................... 1926—Jan. 260-1
----- Philadelphia Building Congress certificates of___________ .......................................... 1926—Feb. 255
Decisions, trade-board, etc. Pueblo (Colo.), new wage scale, by occupation, Apr. 25,
1932._______ _____ ____________ ____ _______________________ ______ ____ _______ 1932—June 1352
----- San Francisco, working conditions and wage scale, N ov. 9,1932......... ....................... 1933—Mar. 568-9
Department of, American Federation of Labor, reestablished Mar. 25, 1936........ . 1936—Mar. 1278-9
Employment, continuity of. Cleveland (Ohio), Home Builders’ Exchange, policy
and results................................... .............. .................. .............. ........................ ......................... 1923—Feb. 211
----- San Francisco (Calif.). Industrial Association, taking up the “slack” __________ 1923—Apr. 106
----- Study of Committee on Seasonal Operation in the Construction Industries... 1924—Nov. 158-60




32

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Building trades, United States—Continued.
P age
5-day week. All trades, Monmouth County (N. J.), M ay 5, 1928................... ................. 1928—June 124
— B y city............... .........................................................................................................- ........ . 1930—Mar. 137
Holidays. Provided by collective agreements................................... 1930—Aug. 11-12; 1936—Apr. 905-6
Hours of labor, 1936. (BLS s u r v e y ) _________ _______________________________ 1937—Oct. 791-9
Injunctions. Consent decree, promulgation by Attorney General (Daugherty), Feb.
28,1922____ _________ ___________________________________ ____ ____________ 1922—Apr. 204-10
Jurisdictional Awards, National Board for. Agreement of five bodies to uphold.......... 1922—Apr. 126
Jurisdictional disputes. (Secretary D avis)__________ ____ _____________ __________ 1925—Nov. 1-3
Labor organizations under A. F. of L., 1929 to 1937______________________________ 1937—Feb. 293-6
Prevailing rate of wage. Building crafts, Louisiana (M o.), decision of Secretary of
Labor, Apr. 15, 1935_______________________________________________________ 1935—June 1550-1
----- Carpenters, Baltimore (M d.), decision of Secretary of Labor, Apr. 12, 1935... 1935—June 1549-50
Productivity of labor and costs, certain occupations. (Commissioner Stewart)_____ 1924—Nov. 1-15
Territorial jurisdiction of local u n io n s___________________ _______ _____________ _ 1936—Apr. 906-7
Trade-union membership, 1915 to 1920___________________________________________ 1922—July 167
Unemployment statistics. Organized workers, Massachusetts, by occupation_____ 1928—Jan. 143-5,
June 147-8; 1929—July 206
Union scales. (See under Wages and hours.)
Unionism, craft and industrial, trend______________________________ __________ _ 1927—June 107-8
Workdays per year. Building workers. (Address of Secretary Hoover)...................... 1921—July 166
----- Philadelphia, bricklayers, roofers (brick and tile)_____ _____________________ 1921—M ay 107-10
Building trades, foreign countries:
Australia. (Queensland). 40-hour week, attempt to establish, proceedings against- 1927—June 129-30
Canada. National Apprenticeship Council, creation, and plan__________________ 1921—Apr. 145-6
----- (Montreal, Quebec). Agreement, juridical extension of______________________ 1934—Sept. 673
----- (Ontario). Legalized schedules of wages and hours, effective June and July
1935______ j ________________ _________________________________ ____ ________ 1935—Oct. 1008-9
----- (Quebec). Legalization of agreements establishing wage rates, etc............ ............ 1934—Oct. 985-6
Germany. Carpenters, masons, etc., shortage of skilled w orkers________________ 1925—July 213-14
----- Establishments and workers, statistics, 1913 to 1922___________________________ 1924—Jan. 136
----- (Stuttgart). Unemployment relief through loans to building contractors at low
interest_________ ____ _______________________________ ______________________ 1932—Oct. 800-2
Great Britain. Labor unrest. (Turner)..................................................................... ......... 1923—June 47-51
----- Unemployment relief measures__________________________ ______________ _____ 1921—Mar. 203
----- (England). Agreement, 44-hour week year round, London..................................... 1926—Jan. 121-2
--------- — Apprenticeship, campaign general plan_________________________________ 1922—M ay 222
----------- Apprenticeship, results of National House Building Committee recommenda­
tions----------____ _______________________ ____ _______________ _______________ 1925—Nov. 230-2
----------- Arbitration award, M ay 15, 1923______________________________________ 1923—Aug. 159-60
------------Housing program, number of workers required, by trade, per annum........... 1921—Jan. 218-20
------------Rationalization, policy of, tendency and effect— ........... ........................................ 1930—Sept. 47
----- (Scotland). Apprenticeship, campaign on______________________________ _
1925—Sept. 160-1
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Regulation of working conditions, decree law of Feb. 12,
1936_____ _____ ______ ________________ ____________________________________ 1936—June 1521-4
Building Trades Employers, National Association of. Board of Trade Claims agreement,
Mar. 3,1931, signatory to __________________________________________ _________ ____ 1931—July 106
Building, wrecking operations. (See under Building-construction industry.)
Bureau (U. S. Government). (See under inverted title.)
Bureaus, etc., of labor, list of. (See Directories; Labor offices, governmental.)
Burial associations, cooperative. (See under Cooperation.)
Burial costs:
Cooperative associations. (See under Cooperation—Burial associations.)
Funerahcosts, present-day, reasons for excessive. (Survey by Metropolitan Life In­
surance Co.)______________________________ ------------------------------------------------- 1928—June 173-4
Burials and funerals, municipal, account of, Milan, Italy....... .............................. .................. 1932—Aug. 440-1
Burial societies, cooperative. (See under Cooperation.)
Bum s. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Bus operators. (See Street and electric railway employees; Street railways.)
Business:
And professional people, Seabury Memorial Home and Ward Homestead for________ 1929—Sept. 4-5
Place of, removal of, and possible loss to employees, Massachusetts legislation______ 1928—Sept. 78-9
Business cycle. Industrial injuries, trend of, 1929-35. (Kossoris)____________________ 1938—Mar. 579-94
Business furniture, storage equipment, and filing supply. N R A code, effective N ov. 14,
1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions________ __________________________ _____ _ 1933—Dec. 1335
Business system, American. Structure, population affected, and problems. (Hearings
held by T N E C , December 1938)___________________________________ _____________ _ 1939—Jan. 9-15
Business women, budget expenditures. (See under Budgets, cost-of-living.)
Butcher workmen. (See Meat cutters and butcher workmen.)
Butter. Creamery, economics of consumption. (Stewart).............................. ......................... 1925—July 1-6
Button manufacturing:
Celluloid. N R A code, effective Apr. 30,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions........ 1934—June 1333
Covered. N R A code, effective M'ar. 26, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions___ 1934—M ay 1066
Fiber and metal work clothing. N R A code, effective Mar. 27,1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions......... .............. ........................................ ....................................................
1934—M ay 1067
Pearl, fresh water. N R A code, effective Mar. 12, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provi­
sions.................................................................................. ............................................................. 1934r—
Apr. 813
Vegetable ivory. N R A code, effective June 18, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provi­
sions.................................................................................................................................................. 1934—Aug. 323

c
Cadmium poisoning. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Cafes. (See Hotels, restaurants, etc.)
Cafeterias. (See Lunch rooms for employees.)
Caldwell & Co., Edward F. (New York City). Decisiori, N L R B , Aug. 9,1934________ 1934—Oct. 939-40
Calendar Simplification, National Committee on, for the United States, report____ —___ 1929—Oct. 43-6




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

33

Calories, food:
P age
Finland, per unit of measure (43 articles), and price per 1,000........................................... . 1925—Mar. 63
(See also Cost of living—Dietary studies; and under Nutrition.)
Camera industry. Benzol poisoning, woman employees........................................... - ................ 1927—N ov. 86
Camps, United States:
Apache Indians, Emergency Conservation Work, Arizona, housing conditions... 1934—Oct. 960-1
Educational, for young women, N Y A program___________________________________ 1937—Oct. 881
Labor. California. Conditions (2,366 agricultural, etc., camps), 1929______________ 1930—Apr. 86-8
------------Inspections, camp sanitation report____________________________________ 1921—June 197-8
------------Ranch and industrial camps, population, nationality, etc., inspection data,
1929, 1930____________________________________________________ ____ ________ 1932—Feb. 294-8
------------(28 forestry and 2 highway camps established), r6sum6 of operations, 1932.
(Unemployment Commission report) _ *_________________________ ____ ______ 1932—N ov. 1066-70
----- Evils of, regulation and control. (Paper read, Eldridge)____________________ _ 1930—Sept. 36-40
----- Pennsylvania, highway construction, emergency unemployment relief.............. 1932—June 1289-91
Legislation of 1923. (Clark)_______________________________________________ _____ 1924—Mar. 189
Migratory labor, agricultural. Camps established by FSA to June 30, 1939............. 1940—Mar. 625-7
Camps, labor, foreign countries:
Canada. (Ontario). Highway-construction camps for the unemployed, results,
1931-32_______ ____ ________________________________________________ ______ _ 1932—No v , 1071-3
Germany. Women, labor service camps for, operations of, since Feb. 1,1932.......... 1934—M ay 1079-81
----- (Schleswig-Holstein). Land reclamation projects, housing difficulties................. 1932—N ov. 1074-5
Great Britain. Camp life for unemployed men_________________ ____ _____ ____ _
1932—Aug. 283
----- (England). Grith Fyrd Camps, unemployment relief measure for young men,
March 1932-------- ------ --------------------------- ------ ----- ------------------------------------------- 1933—M ay 1066
Can manufacture:
Baltimore plant. Benzol poisoning in__________________ _____ ________________ _ 1923—June 205-6
N R A code, effective Dec. 30,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions______________ 1934—Feb. 297
Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation Act. (See under Conciliation and arbitration.)
Canal-boat children. (Springer)______________________________ _____ _______________ 1923—Feb. 1-21
Cancer. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Candle manufacturing and beeswax bleachers and refiners industry. N R A code, effective
Mar. 5, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions____________________________________ 1934—Apr. 809
Candlewick bedspread industry. N R A code, effective June 11, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions--------------------------------- ---------------- ------------------------------------ ---------- 1934—Aug. 320
Candy-manufacturing industry:
Factories. Boston, school girls as apprentices every other w eek______________ _____ 1928—July 77-8
----- New York, sanitary and hygienic standards, report by Consumers’ League............ 1928—M ay 46
N R A code effective June 25,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions............................. 1934—Aug. 321
Cane sugar, refining. (See under Sugar industry.)
Canneries. (See under Food canning and preserving.)
Canteens:
Germany. “Public feeding” in communal kitchens, development of movement_____ 1939—Oct. 810
Japan. Factory and independent, furnishing meals to industrial employees, status,
June 1939___________________________________________________________________ 1940—June 1388
Canvas goods industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 21,1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—M ay 1065
Canvas stitched belt manufacturing. N R A code, effective M ay 21, 1934, tabular analysis
of labor provisions------------- ----- -------------- ------ ----------------------------------------------------1934—July 47
Cap and closure industry. N R A code, effective Oct. 31, 1933, summary of labor pro­
visions------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------ 1933—N ov. 1070, Dec. 1335
Cap and cloth hat industry:
N R A code, effective June 18,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions................................ 1934—Aug. 321
(See also Hat, cap, and millinery industry.)
Cap makers. (See Cloth Hat and Cap Makers of North America, United; Hat, Cap, and
M illinery Workers’ International Union, Cloth.)
Capital goods, production of. Effect of changes upon employment---------------------------- 1937—N ov. 1072-3
Car-advertising trade. . N R A code, effective Dec. 3, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions------------------------------------- ------ -----------------------------------------------------------------1935—Jan. 62
Carbon-black manufacturing. N R A code, effective Feb. 19, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions___________________________________ _____________ _______________ _ 1934—Apr. 810
Carbon dioxide, liquid, safe substitute for explosives, in mining coal------------------ - .............. 1927—July 58-9
Carbon monoxide, poisoning. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Carbon paper, poisoning from. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Carbon tetrachloride, occupational hazards. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Card clothing industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 28, 1934, tabular anlaysis of labor pro­
visions_____________________________________________________ _____________ ______ 1934—Mar. 531
Cargoes, ship, loading and discharging. (See Transportation—Water.)
Carl Pick Manufacturing Co. (West Bend, Wis.). Decision, N L R B , NoV. 10,1934 (auto­
mobile workers)-------------------- -------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- 1935—Jan. 119-20
Carmen of America, Brotherhood of Railway. Cooperative policy with employers............. 1928—Oct. 15
Carpenters and joiners:
Apprenticeship. (See under Apprenticeship—Building trades.)
Decisions, trade-board, etc. Denver (Colo.). Building Trades Council, wage cut
approved, Nov. 28, 1931........ ........................................................................................... ......... 1932—Jan. 104
----------- Local No. 55, against wage-cut, Apr. 22,1931.......................................... ................ 1931—July 104-5
----------- M illmen’s Local No. 1583, wage cut disapproved..................................................... 1932—Jan. 103
----------- Wage cut disapproved, M ay 17, 1932, Industrial Commission........... .................. 1932—July 103
Employers or contractors doing journeyman work, agreement provisions........................ 1931—Sept. 62
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions.................................................. 1931—Aug. 116
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions................. ................................. 1930—N ov. 129
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses------------------ ------ ----------------- 1931—M ay 143
Superannuated union members, wage-scale provisions in agreements................................ 1932—M ay 1098
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions--------------------- ----------------------- 1931—Dec. 95
----- Employment of, agreement provisions............................_.................................................. 1931—Oct. 123
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Award. Colorado, Industrial Commission, findings and award to district council of
Denver and vicinity, Apr. 9,1926........................................................................................... 1926—June 219-20




34

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of—Continued.
P age
Board of Trade Claims. Agreement, Mar. 3, 1931, not signatory to.................................. 1931—July 107
Home for aged, disabled, and tubercular members. Lakeland (Fla.)...... ................ .........
1928—Feb/ 7
Industrial unionism affecting policy of........................ ......................... . ............................... 1927—June 107-8
Labor platform, or policies of-------- --------------------------------------- ------------------------ - 1927—N ov. 120-2
Old-age pensions. Amount and requirements for receipt of, 1930...................................... 1931—M ay 34
----- Plan, adoption of.............................................. ..................—................................................. 1928—N ov. 112
Out-of-work relief plans.................... ............................ ......................................................... 1924^-July 11-12
Carpet and rug manufacturing:
N R A codes, tabular analysis of labor provisions___________________________ 1934—Mar. 531, Oct. 877
Trend in employment, hours, earnings, and production under the N R A , October 1932March 1934_____________________________________________________________ 1934—M ay 1019,1022
Wool, minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts Act, to Aug. 31, 1940— ........ 1940—Oct. 813
.
Carpet and rug weaving:
1924—Dec. 63
Algeria. Child labor in___ ______ ________________________ _____ ________________
Axminster weave, carpets, manufacturing process described................................................ 1930—Mar. 31
Chenille weave, rugs, manufacturing process described................................... ............... 1930—Mar. 31-2
Dyeing pile yarns, description of process..................................................... ........................... 1930—Mar. 38-9
Pattern designing, description of process ........ ................................................................... 1930—Mar. 29
Persia. Working conditions, measures for improving_________________ 1922—M ay 232; 1925—Jan. 20
Spinning wool and worsted yarn, description of process----------------- ----------------------- 1930—Mar. 27-8
Tapestry and velvet weaves, rugs, manufacturing process described............................. . 1930—Mar. 30-1
Trade-union cooperation with employers________________________ _____ __________
1928—Oct. 10
Wilton weave, carpets, manufacturing process described................................................... 1930—Mar. 29-30
Carton makers, output, effect of short time on................................................................................. 1925—Jan. 67-8
Carvers, stone. (See under Granite and stone trades.)
Cast-iron industry:
Boilers and radiators. N R A code, effective Feb. 10, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions____________________________________________ ______ ________________ 1934—Apr. 810
Pipe. Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Pressure pipes. N R A code, effective Jan. 1,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1934—Feb. 297
Soil-pipe industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 11, 1933, summary of labor provisions;
amended Dec. 18,1933............... ............................. 1933—Oct. 812-13, Dee. 1335; 1934—Feb. 305, Oct. 879
(See also Iron and steel industry.)
Castor-bean dust, asthma from, linseed and castor oil manufacture___________________ 1928—Mar. 52-3
Casual labor. (See under Docks and harbors; Migration; Seasonal employment.)
Casualties, rates. (See under Accident statistics.)
Cataract. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Cattle killing. (See Slaughtering and meat packing.)
“ Cellosolve” vapors. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Cement finishers:
Employers of contractors doing journeyman work, agreement provisions......................... 1931—Sept. 62
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions................................................. 1931—Aug. 116
Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions............................................. 1930—N ov. 129
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses................................................. ......... 1931—M ay 143
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions....................................... ................... 1931—Dec. 95
----- Employment of, agreement provisions_________________________________ ______ 1931—Oct. 123
(See also Plasterers and Cement Finishers International Association, Operative.)
Cement industry:
Accidents. (See under Accident statistics, by industry.)
Collective agreements (47). Analysis of provisions as of 1938_.................................... . 1938—Oct. 785-91
D ust hazards. Degree of, and other dust characteristics.................................................... 1934—Feb. 321
Employment and productivity, 1928 to 1933, summary statistics__________ ____ ___ 1935—Oct. 965-6
Health of workers in a Portland cement plant. (U. S. Public Health Service Bull.
No. 176)_____________________________________ __________ ____________________ 1928—Oct. 56-9
Labor requirements in manufacture, 1934. (T opkis)............................................ .......... 1936—Mar. 564-77
Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Material consumed and man-hours of employment furnished on Federal construction
projects, 1933-35____________________________________ ___ _______ ___________ _
1936—Mar. 577
Minimum scale on 8-hour basis, by city, June 1921............................... .......................... 1921—Sept. 118-21
Minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts Act, to Aug. 31,1940_________ 1940—Oct. 818-19
1934—Jan. 36
N R A code, effective Dec. 7,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions......................... .
Processes of manufacture, shipping, and transportation of Portland cement_______ 1936—Mar. 564-73
Productivity. (See under Productivity of labor.)
Shift-work conditions and experience, United States..........................................................
1922—N ov. 30
Technological changes and labor productivity, 1919-38_____________ ______________ 1940—July 47-50
Cement Masons Union, United. Agreement, New York City (Local No. 1), to January
1926_____ ______________________ ____ _____________ __ ______ ___________ _________ 1924—Dec. 69-76
Census, industrial, United States:
Aged persons, 65 years and over, gainfully employed, 1930, by States________________ 1934—Jan. 78
Agricultural workers, and wage earners, specified countries and census years________ 1936—Feb. 341
Blast furnaces, steel works and rolling mills, wage earners in, actual and per million pop­
ulation, 1850 to 1931... ____________________ ____ ___________ _________________ 1933—N ov. 1026
Boot and shoe industry, wage earners in, actual and per million population, 1850 to 1931 _ 1933—N ov. 1026
Children. Gainfully employed, 1920 and 1930_________________________________ 1932—Dec. 1334-6
----- 10 to 15 years of age, school attendance and gainful employment, 1910, 1920, 1930____ 1933—July 48
----- Report, 1910 to 1920_______________________________________________ ______ _ 1924—June 95-6
Families, composition and distribution of, by color and nativity, 1930........................ 1933—June 1244-6
Gainful workers. Age distribution, 1920 and 1930________ ___________ __________ 1933—M ay 1057-8
----- B y industry group and sex, United States, 1930_____________________________ 1931—Oct. 59-60
----- Percentage distribution, by sex and general occupational division, 1910, 1920, and
1930_________________________________________ _____________________________ 1932—Dec. 1303-4
Manufactures. Census data, 1914-19 and 1921-27.._______________ 1922—Mar. 75-9; 1929—Apr. 82-4
----- 1899 to 1931, summary table (employees, earnings, production, horsepower, etc.).1933—Feb. 307-8
----- Lawrence, Lowell, and N ew Bedford (Mass.), 1920,1922, and 1924..------------------ 1925—N ov. 265
----- 1929, results, preliminary reports______________________________________ ____ 1930—Dec. 52-4
*
----- 1930, new features of__________________________________________________ _____ 1929—Nov. 21
----- Production and workers, general indexes, 1925 in relation to 1899 and 1919.......... - 1927—Oct. 26, 28




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

35

Census, industrial, United States—Continued.
Page
Mexican population. By sex, State, and geographical division or section, 1920 and 1930- 1933—July 46-8
Motor-vehicle industry. Wage earners in, actual and per million population, 1860 to
1931----------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------- ----------------- - 1933—Nov. 1026
Negroes. Occupational distribution, 1930, by industry and occupation........................ 1930—Apr. 975-6
----- West Virginia, occupational distribution, 1930________________________________ 1934—Jan. 76-6
Occupational changes, as shown by decennial Census reports, 1850 to 1930_______ 1933—N ov. 1017-27
Occupational distribution. Gainful workers on urban relief rolls, M ay 1934_____ 1935—M ay 1219-21
Occupations, 1930. Gainful workers classified into social-economic groups, 1910, 1920,
and 1930______________________________ ________ ___________________________ 1938—June 1391-3
Relief stores, employment and wages in, 1929........................................................... ......... 1933—N ov. 1193-9
South Carolina. 1925, compared with 1908._____ ______ _____ ___ ____ ____________ 1926—July 182
Textile industries (cotton, hosiery, silk, woolen), wage earners in, actual and per million
population, 1850 to 1931----------------- ------ ---------- ----------------- ------ ------ ---------- 1933—N ov. 1026
“White-collar workers,” by occupation and sex, 1930 and 1870. (Edwards)............. 1934—Mar. 501-5
Women, gainfully employed, marital condition, 1930....... ......................... ...................... 1932—Dec. 1313-14
Census, industrial, foreign countries:
Argentina. Unemployment, by sex, and duration of, report of chief of census, 1932___
1933—Jan. 78
Canada. Wage earners at work and not at work, by Province, sex and cause, June 1,1931
(Seventh Census)_______________________ ____ ___ __________ ______________ 1933—Jan. 78-80
China. 1930, by industrial group............... .................................... .................................... . 1934—Sept. 652
France. Working population, census of 1931, by industry group................................... 1935—Dec. 1501-2
Germany. B y industry group, 1913 to 1922............................................................................ 1924—Jan. 134-9
----- Population changes, by industry groups, 1925 to 1933................ ................................. 1934—Dec. 1373-5
----- Skilled, semiskilled, and unskilled workers, by industry, 1925_________ ______. . . 1931—Sept. 67
Great Britain. 1921 ana 1931, by occupational group and sex_____________ _______ 1934—Sept. 652-3
----- Occupational distribution of insured persons, 1923 to 1933____________ _________ 1934—Jan. 68-70
Japan. Population of, distribution of, 8 occupational groups, October 1930.................. 1933—June 1247
Census, population. (See Population.)
Census, unemployment, United States:
B y class, sex, State, and geographic divisions April 1930 to January 1931...................... 1931—Apr. 35-41
Census of 1930. Analysis of returns............................................................. ........................... 1931—Sept. 37-41
----- Inclusion of; preliminary returns......... ................................................. 1929—Aug. 164; 1930—Oct. 74-6
Massachusetts. Jan. 2, 1934, by sex, industry, and occupation___ 1934—Dec. 1332-7; 1935—Apr. 871-6
Methods used. (See Unemployment—Surveys.)
**
Michigan. Population and unemployment_________________ 1936—N ov. 1157-61; 1937—M ay 1173-4
----- State Emergency Relief Administration, 1935, objectives and results____________ 1939—Jan. 17-24
National Census of, 1937, findings of--------------- ---------------- ........................... ................ 1938—Feb. 355-62
1937. Occupational distribution of registrants________________________ ____ ____ 1938—Aug. 322-6
Partial employment, unemployment, and occupations November 1937. Data com­
pared with active files of U. S. Employment Service. (Hollander and Wellemeyer), 1938—June 1456-64
Percentage distribution, by age, sex, and color, November 1937 (partial employment,
unemployment, and occupations)............................................................................ ......... 1938—June 1457-9
Unemployment relief, October 1933, statistics......................................................................... 1934—July 31-34
Central Statistical Board (U . S. Government):
Activities, year ended June 30, 1937, summary of report..................................................... 1937—Mar. 725-6
Formation, make-up, and duties_____________________ __________ _ ____________ _ 1933—Sept. 552
_
Transfer under Reorganization Plan No. 1, effective July 1,1939................... ................... 1939—Aug. 378
Central Statistical Committee (U. S. Government). Abolishment and transfer of functions
under Reorganization Plan N o. 1, effective July 1, 1939____________ _________________ 1939—Aug. 378
Century Electric Co. Decision N L R B , Sept. 17, 1934______________ ______ __________ 1934—N ov. 1155
Century of Progress Exposition, Chicago, 1933, exhibits of Department of Labor and its
Bureaus..... .......... ........................... ......................... ....................................................................... 1933—N ov. 1086-8
Ceramic industry. (See Pottery industry.)
Cereal workers. (See Brewery, flour, workers, etc.)
Certificates, employment. (See under Child labor and welfare.)
Chambers of labor, foreign countries:
Austria. Function, plan of orgaization, etc__________________________ __________ 1927—Feb. 7-13
France. Decree defining constitution and duties of Superior Labor Council............... 1921—June 134r-5
Germany. (Bremen). Creation by law .......................... .............. ___________ _______ 1921—N ov. 204-5
Italy. Origin, function, and activities........................................... ................. ................... 1921—June 139-40
Chain stores. (See under Stores.)
Charles Pfizer & Co. (New York City). Decision, N L R B , Dec. 5, 1934 (chemical work­
ers)____________________________________________________________________________ 1935—Jan. 118
Chauffeurs. (See Teamsters and chauffeurs; Teamsters, Stablemen and Helpers of America,
International Brotherhood of.)
Chautauqua system. (See under Workers' education.)
Cheap labor, waste through employment of. (Stewart)................................................................. 1924—July 2
Check-off system:
Brick and clay industry, Kenosha (W is.)________ ____ ___________________________ 1925—Jan. 103
Closed shop, and preferential shop. Provisions in collective agreements, summary___ 1939—Oct. 830-5
Collective agreement provisions for, by industry__________________________________ 1930—Jan. 1-5
Hosiery workers. Full-fashioned, national agreement clause, Sept. 21, 1931_________ 1932—Jan. 100
Mine Workers of America, United. Injunction, District of Indiana. (Judge Ander­
son) ________________ _______ _____________________ ______ ____________ ______ 1922—Feb. 128-31
Mining. Anthracite. Demand for, in 1923 agreements_________ _____ ___________ 1925—July 83
----- Bituminous-coal. Strike issue, Mar. 31, 1922, vital to labor organization.
(Gadsby)______ _____ __________________________ _____________ _____ ________ 1922—N ov. 12-14
Rubber Industry. Provisions in 7 collective agreements__________________________ 1939—Sept. 607
Cheese industry. Package and pasteurized, blended, and process, N R A code effective
Feb. 11, 1935, tabular analysis of labor provisions............................................................... . 1935—Apr. 896
Chemical industry, United States:
Decision, N L R B , Nov. 13,1934 (North Shore Coke and Chemical Co., Chicago)_____ 1935—Jan. 125
40-hour week. Discussions, ILO conference, December 1936, and 1937___ 1937—Jan. 77-8, Aug. 348-9
Health conditions among workers, with respect to earnings______________________ 1924—Jan. 154r-6
Manufacturing. N R A code, effective Feb. 20, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provi­
sions.......................................... ............ ................ ........................................................................ 1934—Apr. 810
Shift-work conditions and experience, United States............................................................ 1922—N ov. 30-2




36

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Chemical Industry, United States—Continued.
P age
Soap and scouring-powder factories, acute silicosis in, report of. three cases............. 1932—June 1316-18
Soap factory. Guaranty of employment............................................................. ................. 1924—Apr. 167-9
Varnishes, enamels, fillers, etc., employees of plant manufacturing. Unemployment
benefits, United States................. .......................................................................................... 1924—Apr. 171-2
Chemical Industry, foreign countries:
Germany. Employment statistics....................................................................................... 1924—Jan. 135,137
----- Xlluminants, soap, fats, oil, etc., number of workers and of establishments, 1913 to
1922— .....................— ................ ............................................... .............. ......................... 1924—Jan. 135,138
Great Britain. Cooperation between employer and employees, plan...............................
1927—Dec. 59
----- Imperial Chemical Industries (Inc.) employment-guaranty scheme........................... 1930—M ay 39
Chemical Workers' Union, Allied. Decision, N L R B , Oct. 3,1934 (Buffalo, N . Y .).............. 1934—Dec. 1432
Chemical Workers’ Union, United. Decision, N L R B , Dec. 5,1934 (Charles Pfizer & Co.). 1935—Jan. 118
Chewing gum manufacturing. N R A code, effective Feb. 9, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions............ ................................................................... .............................................................. 1934—Mar. 532
Chicago Defender, Inc. Decision, N L R B , Oct. 19,1934 (newspaper unions)......................... 1934—Dec. 1430
Chicago Motor Coach Co. Decision, N L R B , Aug. 2,1934______ ____ _______ __________ 1934—Oct. 937
Chief Clerks of the Executive Departments, Association of. Survey of rents in District
of Columbia......................................- ____ _______________ ______ - ............................. .............. 1921—Jan. 96-8
Chicle industry. British Honduras, conditions in, because of depressed market; destruc­
tion of trees (sapodilla)............................... ........................................................... ....................... . . 1934—Oct. 984
Child endowment. (See Family allowances.)
Child labor and welfare, general:
Conventions (agreements) to be considered at June 1937 ILO Conference................... 1937—Apr. 887-8
Employment at sea, minimum age. Convention adopted, and discussions of Interna­
tional Labor Conference_____________________ __________- .............. —- 1936—M ay 1184-5,1196,1198
ILO 14-year minimum-age convention, industrial and nonindustriai, revision by Con­
ference of June 1937____________________ ____ ______________ - ------------------------ 1937—Aug. 351-2
Minimum-age standard, discussion. Labor Conference of American States, Santiago,
Chile, Jan. 2-14, 1936— ..............- ......................................................................................
1936-M ar. 691-2
Child labor and welfare, United States:
Accidents. California, industrial accidents to employed minors, 1932. (S ton e).__ 1934—N ov. 1078-94
----- Illinois. 1923, employed minors..------------------------ ---------------------------- -----------1928—Jan. 64
----- ------ 1928, minors under 16 injured, by industry and legality of employm ent............ 1929—Sept. 68
------------1931, rhinors, by industry and extent of disability-------------------------------------- 1932—Aug. 286
—s Massachusetts. 1924, children under 18-------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Dec. 93-4
—
------------New Jersey, and Wisconsin, 1920 and 1922. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study). 1926—June 86-92
----- N ew York, 1920........... ........................................................................................................ . 1923—Apr. 126^8
----- Ohio, 1926. (Consumers’ League report)...................................................................... 1927—Dec. 114-16
----------- Injuries to minors under 18...................... ..................................................................... 1927—Oct. 61-2
----- Pennsylvania, 1924, compensated accidents to working children............... ................. 1928—Jan. 64-6
----- Policyholders (boys) Metropolitan I jfe Insurance Co., fatalities, 1921................... 1922—June 149-50
Adolescent children in industry, protection of health of................... ..................... ........... 1922—Jan. 180-1
Aid to dependent children under Social Security Board. (See under Children, de­
pendent, aid to.)
Amendment to Constitution. Governors’ recommendations..............................................
1925—Apr. 12
----- President’s message...................................................................................................................
1923—Jan. 24
----- Proposed (1924); ruled subject to ratification (U. S. Sup. C t.)------ 1924—July 127; 1939—July 142-4
----- Ratified by Kansas, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, in 1937................................. 1938—Jan. 133
----- Status, 1939_____________ ______ _______________________________ __________ 1939—Aug. 376-8
----- Text, submission to States and ratification status, as of Sept. 1, 1933.................... 1933—Sept. 556-7
A. F. of L. 1935 convention, discussions.............................................................................. 1935—Dec. 1549-50
Arkansas. Strawberry pickers, migratory, living conditions......................................... 1940—June 1416-17
Beet fields. Colorado and Michigan, 1920........................................ ................................... 1923—M ay 161-5
Bibliography. Children in street trades.................. ............................... .............................. 1925—Dec. 81-92
----- Federal control, list of references. (Thompson).......................... ................................. 1925—Jan. 71-101
Boston. Working children under 16. (U. S. Children’sBureau study)........................ 1922—Oct. 106-9
Boys. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. policyholders, fatalities. 1921....... ................. 1922—June 149-50
----- Working. Physical condition of, study of 2,000, N ew York C ity.................. .......... 1927—July 48-50
California. Children (minors under 16), employment of, restrictions.............................. 1928—May 53-4
----- Mexican children, health relief and delinquency conditions................................. ......... 1931—Jan. 87-9
Canal-boat children------------------------------- ----------------------------------------- ----------------- 1923—Feb. 1-21
Canneries. Fruit and vegetable. Pennsylvania, conditions in 1925________________ 1926—Apr. 82-3
------------Survey, 7 States, seasons of 1923, 1925, and 1926. (U. S. Children’s Bureau
study).......... ...................................................- .............. - ------------------- -------------------------- 1930—Sept. 51-3
— - Fruit packing and canning industries. Washington. (U. S. Women’s Bureau
s t u d y )....................................................................................... - ......................- .............. ............. 1926—June 84
----- Indiana.................. ............................ .................. ............ ..................................................... 1923—M ay 166-8
----- Maryland. Child workers in, 1929 and 1937-38 reports............ 1930—Aug. 57-8; 1940—N ov. 1136-8
------------Field work and canneries.............................................. - ............................................ . 1929—July 86-7
----- Oyster and-shrimp, Gulf coast........................................... —— .............. ..................... 1922—July 118-19
Census. (See under Census, industrial, U . S.)
Certificates, employment. (See Employm ent certificates, this section.)
Child-labor standards, cooperation on, resolution of Association of Governmental Offi­
cials in Industry______________________________ ________________ ______ ________
1931—July 91
Children of wage-earning mothers. (Chicago, 111.). (U. S. Children’s Bureau study) 1922—July 119-20
Children, working. Physical condition of, study of 412 (New York C ity)............... 1925—June 57-8
Cincinnati. Children (aged 16 and 17) out of school, work records................................ 1932—N ov. 1080-2
Colorado. Beet fields, children 6 to 16. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study).......... ......... 1923—M ay 161-5
----- Farm and beet field working children, survey, 1924........... ............ ....................... ....... 1930—
Mar. 61-3
Compensation status. (See Workmen’s compensation—Minors, illegally employed.)
Conferences on. (See under Conventions, meetings, etc.)
Consumers’ League of Connecticut, child-labor b r ie f.......................................................... 1924—Jan. 96-7
Cost of bringing up a child___________ ______ ___________ ____ ________ ___________ 1926—July 51-3
Cotton fields, Texas. National Child Labor Committee study, 1923......................... . 1925—Sept. 81-2
Cotton-growing areas, Texas, welfare of children in ____________________________ 1924—July 128-30
Court decisions. (See Decisions of courts—Child labor.)
Crippled children. Federal Government grants, 1936, and service plans of Children’s
Bureau................................................................................................................................... 1937—M ay 1124,1126




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 0 4 0

37

Child labor and welfare, United States—Continued.
_
Dependent children, aid to. (See Children, dependent, aid to.)
-rage
District of Columbia. Act of 1908 superseded by act of M ay, 1928. analysis. _ 1928—July 66-8, Aug. 92
----- Housing, connection between low standards and juvenile delinquency, (PW A
study)____________ __________________________________ __________ __________ 1936—Aug. 343-5
Employment. Virginia, statistics, 1922 and 1923, street trades, mercantile and manufac­
turing employments________ ____ ________________ _____ ____________ _____ ____ 1924—June 97
Employment certificates. Delaware, work permit statistics, 1917 to 1923____________ 1924—Mar. 96
----- Iowa, statistics_____________________ _______________________ 1922—Jan. 227-8; 1924—Feb. 122
----- Issued in 1934, analysis of. (M erritt)___________ _____ _____ ______________ 1935—Dec. 1477-91
----- Louisiana.......................................... ............ ............ . 1921—June 199; 1922—July 192; 1924—Aug. 129
----- Maine, statistics____ _____________ _______ _____________________ 1924—Mar. 97; 1925—Aug. 90
----- Maryland, experience____ ________ _____ _______ _____________________________ 1922—N ov. 228;
1923—June 175; 1925—July 98; 1926—Aug. 40; 1940—Nov. 1138
----- Massachusetts, law effective 1921............. ....................................................................... 1921—Sept. 189-90
----------- (Boston), survey.............................................................................................................1921—Jan .47-50
----- North Carolina, statistics.................................................................................................... .. 1926—Mar. 85
----- Oregon (Salem)______________________________ _______________ ______________ 1923—Mar. 172
----- Requirements, by States, as of September 1936______________ _______________ 1937—Feb. 357-8
----- Statistics. B y age group, State, and city, years, 1927-33 and 1936-38-.1931—Jan. 102-7; 1933—Dec.
1361-73; 1934—Dec. 1320-31; 1940—Jan. 35-41
------------B y State and city, sex and occupational distribution of applicants, 1927-36.
(M erritt)................................ ............................................................................................... 1937—Dec. 1371-90
----------- B y year, 1929-38............................................................................. .................... 1940-Jan. 33,37-8,41-2
----------- 1913 to 1920, (McGill) and 1920 to 1931....... ............................. 1921—Apr. 1-14; 1932—Dec. 1322-33
------------ 1926-27. (U. S. Children’s Bureau)_________ ____ ______________ _______ 1928—Feb. 85-6
----- Variations in school-attendance laws, United States....... .................. ................... ......... 1921—Aug. 173
— - Wisconsin. Child-labor permits issued, 1925 to 1929__________________________
1930—July 57
------------Statistics............................................. . 1921—Mar. 157, M ay 124-5; 1922—Mar. 189, N ov. 154-6;
1923—June 176-7; 1924—Dec. 60-2
------------(Milwaukee), statistics of placements, boys and girls employed..__ 1922—July 200, N ov. 154-6
Employment of minors as affected by compulsory school attendance, status, 1936__ 1937—Feb. 356-8
Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. Interpretations and regulations under__________ 1939—Jan. 155-6
----- Provisions of_______________________ ___________ ___________ 1938—July 109-10; 1940—Sept. 562
Farm work. And city school attendance, Philadelphia____________ _____________ 1922—Dec. 150-2
----- California, survey, 1924______________________ _____ _______________ ________ 1925—Aug. 88-90
----- Character of________________ ____ _____________________________________*......... 1922—Dec. 28
----- “ Clubs. 4-H”, extension work in agriculture and home economics............................. 1927—Aug. 3-10
----- Colorado, children on farms............................................................. ................................... 1927—M ay 154-5
----- Illinois, truck and general farming___________________________ ______________ 1927—M ay 152-3
----- Maryland truck farms, 1921. (U. S. Children’s Bureau survey)
...................... 1923—Dec. 118-19
----- New Jersey truck farms. (U. S. Children’s Bureau stu d y )---...........................
1924—M ay 115-16
----- Norfolk (Va.) truck farms. (U. S. Children’s Bureau s tu d y )..;............................. 1924—Apr. 103-4
----- Northern Pacific coast, berry fields, orchard and hop-raising districts, study oL__ 1926—Apr. 80-1
----- Pennsylvania, study of children employed at farm labor, 1928__________________ 1929—Mar. 82
----- (See also Agriculture, U. S.—Child labor.)
Federal amendment proposed (1924). (See Amendment to Constitution, this section.)
Gainfully employed workers. (See under Census, industrial, U. S.—Children.)
Girls with heart disease, employment and workshop for, New York C ity________ _ 1929—Aug. 64-5
Glass industry. Minors under 16 years, 1880 to 1919. (BLS stu d y)____________ _ 1927—Apr. 11-13
Governors’ messages, recommendations, 9 specified States, 1931____________ ____ ___
1931—Apr. 64
Hazardous occupations. Minors under 18 and minors under 16, general and specific
recommendations, list____________________________________________ ______ _
1932—Dec. 1315-22
----- Regulation of employment of minors................................................... .........................
1932—July 64
Health. Adolescent children, special need for protection of. (M itchell)___________ 1922—Jan. 180-1
----- Needs of child workers.(M itchell)__________________________________________ 1921—Aug. 133-4
----- Working children, New York C ity__________________________ 1925—June 57-8; 1927—July 48-50
Home work. Connecticut, lace and fabricated-metal industries, survey of, 1933 and
1934__________________________________________________ ____ ______ _______ 1935—Sept. 625, 627
----- N ew Jersey, 1925. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study).................. .................................. 1929—Mar. 81-2
----- N ew York C ity tenements____________________ ______ _____________________ 1921—Feb. 187-8
----- Pennsylvania, 1924___________________ _____________ _________________ _____ _ 1927—Jan. 128-9
----- Rhode Island. 1918_______________________ ____________ ____________ _____ _ 1922—Sept. 146-8
Hours of labor. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Illegal employment. Fruit and vegetable canneries, survey in 7 States, 1923, 1925, and
1926_____________________ __________________________________________________ 1930—Sept. 52-3
Indiana. School attendance. (National Child Labor Committee survey)_________ 1928—Sept 61-2
Industrial life, effect on child workers-------- ------ --------- -------------- ------ ----------------- 1921—Aug. 133-4
I. A. G. L. O. resolutions concerning, 1938 and 1939_____________ 1938—Oct. 766-7; 1939—N ov. 1127-8
Interstate compacts affecting, recommendations of joint meeting of New England
States, Jan. 10,1934__________________________________________________________ 1934r-Apr. 835
Junior employment problems under present industrial conditions, New York State. 1932—Dec. 1269-72
Juvenile delinquency. (Detroit, M ich.), housing study in relation to________ _____ 1929—Dec. 120-1
----- (Washington. D. C .). effect of unsatisfactory housing conditions. (WP A stu d y). 1936—Aug. 343-5
Kentucky. State law held applicable to interstate commerce, court decisions________ 1929—Aug. 71
----- Strawberry pickers, migratory, living conditions______________ ____________ 1940—June 1410-17
Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general,
and by States.)
Malnutrition (undernourishment), school children, extent of, conference discussion,
Oct. 6, 1933_______________________________________________________________ 1933—N ov. 1084-5
Maryland. Berry and vegetable pickers. (Anne Arundel County)..................... . 1929—July 86-7
----- Canneries. (See under Canneries, this section.)
Messengers, telegraph. Night work prohibited, age and hours specified, by State
(footnote)_____________ ____ ____________________________________________ ____
1934r—
Jan. 24
Michigan. Beet fields, children 6 to 16. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study)________ 1923—M ay 161-5
Migrant families, Philadelphia to New Jersey for agricultural labor. Poor working
conditions and loss of schooling involved_______ ______ ____ . _____ ____________ 1939—M ay 1078-5




38

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Child labor and welfare, United States—Continued.
P age
Migratory child labor. California and elsewhere.................................. ............................. 1929—Sept. 57-9
----- Conference of State representatives (Delaware, Maryland, N ew Jersey, and
Pennsylvania), Jan. 21-22, 1930-------------- ------------------------------------------------------- 1930—Mar. 60-1
----- National Child Labor Committee, recommendations for legislation_____________ 1939—M ay 1075
Miniature golf courses. California, child-labor law held applicable to, July 29, 1930.. 1930—Sept. 64
Minimum age on ships. ILO convention, 1936, ratified by U. S. Senate, June 1938,
provisions---------------------------- ------ . . . ------ ----------------------- ------ ---------------------- 1938—Aug. 285-6
Minimum wage. (See under Laws and legislation; Minimum wage.)
Mining. Anthracite. Welfare work------------------------------------------- ------ --------------- 1922—Nov. 152-4
-----Coal. 18-year age minimum established under Fair Labor Standards Act, Sept.
1, 1940______ _____________ _____ __________ ______ ____________________________ 1940—Oct. 892
Minors illegally employed. (See under Decisions of courts—Workmen’s compensation;
also under Workmen’s compensation.)
National Association of Manufacturers, statement of principles concerning protection
of young workers----------------------------------- --------- ....................... . . .................................. 1927—N ov. 110
National Conference on Labor Legislation. 1938, resolution (text).................................... 1939—Jan. 130
----- 1936, action and recommendations of_____________________ _____ _____________ 1936—Dec. 1439
N R A codes. Effect of, on employment of children------------------------------------------------ 1933—Dec. 1373
----- Effect on labor standards and employment, 1934 (analysis of employment cer­
tificates issued)--------------------------------------- ------ ------------------------------------------ 1935—Dec. 1477-91
----- Provisions, analysis of. (Schoenfeld)---------------------------------------------------------- 1935—Mar. 591-2
New Jersey. Migrant children in agriculture, loss of schooling, supplementary com­
mission report, January 1932------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1932—June 1304
----- Migratory children, employment of, survey, commission appointed____________ 1930—Oct. 129
----- Vegetable and fruit farming, migratory children in, legislative commission find­
ings, 1930___________________________________________________________ ______ 1931—June 64-6
New York. City and State, trends in child labor, 1918 to 1930___________________ 1932—Mar. 563-5
----- Junior employment, problems re types of applicants and job opportunities____ 1932—Dec. 1269-72
----- Physical condition of youthful workers and relation to jobs............. ........................ 1925—June 57-8
Newsboys declared employees of publishers by Wisconsin law................... ...................... 1937—Sept'. 539
Newspaper and magazine distributing, employment of children under 16, survey of,
1934. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study)----- ---------------------------------------------------- 1935—M ay 1234-9
Night work. Cotton mills, gradual elimination of, plan of Cotton Textile Institute. _ 1939—N ov. 79-1
----- Laws governing, provisions of, by State____________________________________ 1930—Oct. 123-8
North Dakota. Study of child labor on farms, etc. (U. S. Children’s Bureau)____ 1924—Feb. 123-4
Nutrition and child health, conference discussion, Washington, D . C., Oct. 6, 1933._ 1933—N ov. 1084-5
Occupations. Automobile and metal manufacturing_______ _____ ______________ 1924—Feb. 122-3
----- Entered b y children, by year, 1936-38---------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Jan. 38-9,42
----- Hazards, advisory committee working in cooperation with Children’s Bureau,
report, 1932___________________________________________________ ______ _____ 1932—Dec. 1315-22
----- Injurious to health and morals,* ruling, Oklahoma.........................................................1921—Mar. 185
----- Juvenile workers in Detroit (M ich.). (Crockett and C law )................... ................ 1923—Dec. 120-1
----- Newsboys, Springfield (Mass.), study of---------------- ----------------------- ---------------- 1924—Jan. 97-8
----- Street trades. List of references. (Thompson)___ ______ ___________________ 1925—Dec. 81-92
------------Massachusetts, act of Aug. 18, 1921--------------------------------------------- ------------ 1921—Sept. 190
------------Virginia, mercantile and manufacturing employments, statistics______ _____ 1924—June 97
----- Theatricals, children in, conference on, Harrisburg, Jan. 30, 1922________________ 1922—Mar. 187
Occupations and industries prohibited, legislative provisions, by State____________ 1930—Nov. 53-70
Oklahoma. Child workers, at school and part-time employment, survey__________ 1929—M ay 120-1
Pacific coast (northern). Rural child labor. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study)______ 1926—Apr. 80-1
Pennsylvania. Children under 16 years of age at work and at school____________ _
1928—June 48
----- Women and children in industries of. (Pugh)________________________ _____ 1924—M ay 118-19
Permits, employment or work. (See Employment certificates, this section.)
Philippine Islands. Employment of minors under 18, statistics, 1928_______________ 1930—June 85
----- (Manila). Woman and child labor employed in inspected establishments, sta­
tistics, 1928 and 1929_________________________________________________________
1931—June 69
Physical examination of employment-certificate applicants, Milwaukee (Wis.),
1930—July 57
results------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Policyholders (boys). Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., fatalities, 1921...................... 1922—June 149-50
Protection of young workers. International, minimum program......................... ............ 1928—Feb. 86-7
-----Principles concerning. (National Association of Manufacturers)_______________ 1927—Nov. 110
Puerto Rico. Child welfare in. (U. S. Children’s Bureau study)_________________ 1924—Feb. 26-8
Recommendations, conventions, etc. American Federation of Labor______________ 1925—Feb. 187
----- Outlines for study of, 1921. (Federal Board for Vocational Education, Bull. 65).. 1922—Mar. 137
----- Southern Regional Conference on Labor Standards, January 1936_______________ 1936—Mar. 627
School attendance. Gainful employment, children 10 to 15 years of age, 1910, 1920,
and 1930----------------------------------- ------ ------------------------------------------------------------1933—July 48
----- Iowa, reasons for leaving school_____________________________________________ 1927—Jan. 127-8
----- Massachusetts (Boston). Children leaving school to go to work_______________ 1922—Oct. 106-9
----------- Working children, before and after leaving school________________________ 1921—Jan. 45-59
Schooling of children going to work, and effect of employment-certificate system upon
school attendance____________________________________________ l ___________ 1937—Dec. 1388-90
Social security. (See under Children, dependent, aid to.)
Social statistics, collection of, program, Children’s Bureau. (S teele)..................... . 1930—Oct. 111-15
Special licenses, minimum-wage commissions____________________ ____ _____ ____ 1921—Mar. 10-11
Standards during and following N R A period_____________________________ 1937—Dec. 1372-80,1390
Standards recommended. National Conferences on Labor Legislation, February 1934
and October 1935____________________________________________ 1934—Apr. 783; 1935—Nov. 1250-1
-----Southern Regional Conference on Labor Legislation and Economic Security (Jan.
20-21,1935)__________________________________________________________________ 1935—Mar. 671
State legislation. (See under Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general,
also by States.)
Street trades. Employment of children and school attendance. (U. S. Children’s
Bureau study)_______ _ ___ _______ ________ ____ _ ____________________ 1928—Sept. 60-2
----- List of references. (Thompson)___________________________________________ 1925—Dec. 81-92
----- State laws regulating, as of Jan. 1, 1929 (tabular analysis, by State)__________ 1929—May 113-19
-----Virginia, statistics_________________________________________________________
1924r—
June 97




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

39

Child labor and welfare, United States—Continued.
p
Sugar-beet industry. Colorado and Michigan, work of children and mothers in
xag-e
fie ld s.................. .............. ....................— _______________________________________ 1923—M ay 161-5
-----1Work under contract system and school attendance________ ______ _______ _ 1938—Feb. 328-30
Tennessee. Child labor law liberally construed, court decision_________ ______ ___ 1928—N ov. 89-90
Tobacco-growing areas. Employment of children in, 1922-23. (U. S. Children's
Bureau study)_____________________ _________________________________________
1926—M ay 90
Tractor and plow operation held dangerous occupation for minor (Kans. Sup. C t.)— 1939—Mar. 620-1
Transients. (See Transients—Youth.)
Trend. Child labor in 34 cities, 1922 and 1923.......................................................... .......... 1924—M ay 114-15
----- N ew York S ta te ................................................................................................................... 1924—Apr. 102-3
----- 1937-39. (Merritt)........................................................................................... ..................... 1940—Jan. 28-42
----- 1920 to 1923................................................................................................... - 1923—Sept. 101-5, N ov. 121
----- (See also Employment certificates, statistics, this section.)
Unemployment. Effect of, Racine (Wis.) and Springfield (M ass.)................................ 1924—Feb. 147-8
United States Children’s Bureau, creation of, functions, and activities................. 1938—Feb. 302,316-17
Wages and hours. (See under Wages and hours.)
White House Conference on Child Health and Protection. Recommendations____ 1931—June 15-22
----- Report of subcommittee on child labor, review of. (M erritt)__________ _____ 1932—June 1278-85
White House Conference on Children in a Democracy. Apr. 26, 1939, sections formed
and objectives............... ...................................... ........................................... ..................... 1939—June 1312-13
----- January 1940. Subjects discussed and statement by National Citizens’ Com­
mittee___________ ________________ ______________________________ 1940—Mar. 635, Sept. 567-8
Wisconsin. Child labor law, summary of operation, 5-year period, 1918 to 1922............ 1923—Oct. 73-5
----- Compensation cases of minors closed in 1931.------- ---------------------------------- ------ 1932—Aug. 286-7
----- Employment of minors, statistics, 1928....................... ......................... ........................... 1929—June 124-5
Work certificates or permits. (See Employment certificates, this section.)
(See also School children.)
Child labor and welfare, foreign countries:
General. Minimum employment age. International Labor Conventions (agree­
ments), 1919-21, 1932, provisions of....... .................................................. .......................... 1934—Apr. 768-70
Algeria. Carpet industry, lowering age lim it........................................................................ 1924—Dec. 63
Argentina. Employments prohibited, women and children............................................... 1928—Mar. 41
----- Rest periods, application of labor law provisions......................................... ................... 1926—M ay 81
----- Work permits issued, statistics________________________ __________ 1922—July 202; 1925—Dec. 94
Belgium. Compulsory care of health, decree providing................ .................................. 1921—Aug. 175-6
Brazil. Federal decree, protection of minors, principal provisions_________ _________ 1928—Feb. 87
----- (Pernambuco). Law, employment of women and children, city of Recife............... 1927—June 92-3
Bulgaria. Compulsory work for school children................................................................1921—Aug. 134-5
Canada. Paper read before Canadian Council on Child Welfare.................................... 1926—Jan. 131-3
Chile. Legislation, 1924........ ....................................................................................... ............... 1926—Jan. 211
----- Office workers, employment of minors as, law of Apr. 14,1925...................... .................... 1926—June 157
China. Cotton and silk mills, working conditions, 1924....................................................... 1926—Nov. 28
----- Factory law of 1929, provisions of............... ................................................................... 1930—June 107,110
----- Present conditions. (T so ).._____ __________________ ______________________ 1928—Apr. 47-50
----- (Shanghai). Child Labor Commission, appointment of, and report.................... 1924—Mar. 99-100,
N ov. 132-5
------------International settlement, silk filatures, efforts to abolish child labor in, 1938. _ 1939—N ov. 1103
Cuba. Conditions, affecting employment of minors, legislation concerning.........
1935—June 1509-10
----- Constitution approved July 5, 1940,provisions........................................ ... .................. 1940—Oct. 879
Ecuador. Labor code, provisions concerning. ...................... ...................................... .......... 1940—Mar. 676
Egypt. Bill regulating employment, July 26,1933, summary............................................ 1933—N ov. 1137
----- Labor conditions, survey of, and recommendations_________________ ________ ^ 1932—Sept. 535-6
----- Law of 1919 and law promulgated by committee created in 1931............................ 1936—June 1515-16
France. Employment age 13, labor code provision................. ........................................... 1933—Mar. 624-5
----- Labor Code provisions. ------------ --------- ------ ---------------------------------------------- 1932—Jan. 170
----- Night work, law regulating_______________________ _____________ ____________ 1925—Apr. 101
French Indo-Chma. Labor code, decree of Dec. 30,1936............................ ......................... 1937—Aug. 379
Germany. War, effect of, on working children. (K alet)......... ...................... ................. 1921—July 6r-17
Great Britain. Boys, employment of, on docks, Liverpool_______________ ________ 1922—Feb. 12
----- Children and young persons, act of July 12,1932, (sects. 49-58), summary.................. . 1932—Sept. 537
----- Compulsory schooling for unemployed juveniles............ .............. .............................. 1936—Feb. 376-83
----- Education act of 1918, limitation of........... ..................................... ...............................
1922—July 123
----- Evacuation from cities, 1939............ ............................................ .................................... 1939—N ov. 1090-1
----- Juvenile employment, report of advisory committees on, 1928_________________ 1930—July 59-61
----- Lead and zinc works, employment restricted________________________________ 1921—Mar. 157-8
----- School-leaving age, raising to 15 years postponed by Education (Emergency) Act
1939.___________________________ _____ _______________ ____ __________________
1940—Jan. 57
----- Transfer and training of unemployed insured juveniles, report for 1933__________ 1934—Aug. 382
----- Young persons and women, 2-shift system, factory occupations, report, 1931__ 1932—Sept. 537-9
----- (England). Advisory committees for juvenile employment, report, 1927........... 1928—N ov. 53-5
------------ Age of compulsory school attendance raised from 14 to 15, effective Apr. 1,
1931_____________________________ __________________________________________ 1929—Sept. 59
----------- Employment of children under 14, by occupation, 1931____ ________________ 1934—Mar. 539
------------Juvenile employment, local committees for, work of, 1931, summary................. 1933—Jan. 106
------------Juvenile labor, changes in supply of____ _______ ________ ________________ 1929—Aug. 72-3
------------ Juvenile unemployment centers___ ____________ _____ _________________ 1925—July 145-6
------------Juveniles under 18, unemployment among, employability, and insurance.
status............................................................................................. ................................... . 1932—Nov. 1062-5
------------Unemployment among boys and girls .................. ............................................... 1926—July 53-5
------------Unemployed young men, training of, scheme......... .............. ................ ................ 1925—N ov. 232-3
----------- Young persons and women, 2-shift system for, continuance_____ 1928—Apr. 124-5, M ay 124-5
----- (England and Wales). Juvenile labor, available supply of, M ay 1930___________ 1931—Sept. 60-3
----------- “ Unregulated occupations,” hours of employment, report (National Advisory
Council for Juvenile Employment), Jan. 13,1932...___________________________ 1933—Sept. 557-9
----- (London). Juvenile workers, placement of, 1932 and 1933, by occupation and
sex............................................................... ............... ............................. ................................ 1934—June 1319-20
Guatemala. Labor law of-1926, employment of women and children...... ......................... 1926—Aug. 90
India. Age of employment, regulations.............................................................................. .
1922—Oct. 191




40

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Child labor and welfare, foreign countries—Continued.
Pag®
India. Factories, proportion of children employed in, 1892 to 1917-18................. ......... 1922—Mar. 15-16
----- Factory work prohibited, law of Apr. 8, 1939..................... .......................... ........... . . . 1939—Nov. 1102
----- (Bombay Presidency). Employment statistics, 1919 to 1923.......................................
1925—Jan. 19
----- (British). Employment of Children Act, 1938, provisions..........................................1939—M ay 1076
----- (Burma). Factory conditions, 1924.......................... ..................... .................................... 1925—Oct. 22-3
Irish Free State. Conditions of Employment Act, 1936, provisions...................................1936—M ay 1252
----- Expenditures for child welfare during 1934-35................................................................... 1935—M ay 1203
Italy. Legal restrictions, age limit, etc.................................................................................. 1928—M ay 127-8
Japan. Cotton mills, 1923............................................................................................................ 1926—Nov. 23
----- Employment, extent of............................................ ....................... .....................................
1921—July 54
----- Mining. Coal, night work and underground work prohibited for women and
persons under 16, effective Sept. 1, 1933.................... ................ .................................... 1933—Oct. 848-9
.................................. 1928—N ov. 55
------------Prohibition of child labor....... .................................................. T
Korea. (Chosen). Extent of employment of children, rates paid, and daily hours
worked------- ----------------- ------ -------------------------------- „-------------------------------------- 1939—Dec. 1611
Latvia. Children of agricultural laborers, act of M ay 1,1935, provisions............................ 1937—Sept. 649
------Number employed, legal restrictions, 1930...................... .............. .................................... 1932—July 38
Mexico. Minimum wage, right of minors to, law of 1934..................................................... 1936—Sept. 607
----- (Jalisco). Law of Aug. 13, 1923, provisions......... ........................................... .................. 1924—June 30
New Zealand. “Shojjs and offices act" of 1921, changes in, as to hours, etc.................... 1922—July 158
Persia. Carpet weaving, protective measures for working children................................... 1924—Sept. 93
Peru. Cotton and woolen mills____ _________________________ ___________________ 1921—Sept. 217
Portugal. Provisions concerning, in law of Aug. 24,1936..................................................... 1937—Sept. 643
Russia. Labor code. Provisions.------------------------------ --------------------------------------1928—July 35
----- Labor code, work of young persons, 1922........................................................ ............... 1923—July 216-17
Sweden. Agriculture, survey, 1915................. ........................................................................... 1922—Sept. 124
Syria. Act of 1930, principal provisions....... ............................. ........................................... .
1931—Jan. 107
----- Restrictions imposed by legislative decree....................................................................... 1937—July 193-4
Uruguay. Legislation in force-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1927—Oct. 15-16
----- Remuneration and length of working day for minors, regulation in constitution of
1934_______________ __________ ____ ________ _____________ ________ ___________ 1936—Sept. 608
Venezuela. Labor law of 1928, principal provisions............................................................ 1928—Dec. 134-5
----- National Labor Law, 1936, provisions of............................................................................. 1936—Dec. 1455
Child mortality. (See under Vital statistics.)
Childbirth and employment. (See under Maternity and infant welfare.)
Children, dependent, aid to:
1
Federal Government grants to States, 1936------------------------------------------------------- 1937—M ay 1124-5
Social Security. Federal and State. Statistics, 1936-37 and 1937-38—
______________ 1939—Mar. 545
------------Statistics, by 6-month periods 1933-39, by month 1938 to August 1939........... 1939—Dec. 1393-4
----- State plans approved to June 3 0 ,1937„_-------- ----- ---------- ----------------------- ------ 1937—Sept. 583-4
Social Security Act, August 1935. Provisions re, and child health and welfare services. 1935—Sept. 577-80
Sweden. Government allowances, 1938............................ ....................................................... 1940—July 73
Children’s allowances. (See Family allowances, foreign countries.)
Children’s Bureau. (See under Labor, Department of, United States Government.)
Children’s clothing industry. (See under Collective agreements.)
Children’s insurance. Spain. Operation and status, as of Dec. 31,1934------------------------ 1936—July 34-5
Chilled car-wheel industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 26, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions----------------------------------- ------ ---------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Apr. 810
China clay producing industry. N R A code, effective Oct. 2, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions________________________________________________________ _____________ 1934—Nov. 1099
China, vitreous or vitrified, industry. Minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts
Act, to Aug. 31, 1940________________________________ _____ ______ _______ __________ 1940—Oct. 812
Chinaware and porcelain manufacturing industry. N R A code, effective Dec. 7, 1933,
tabular analysis of labor provisions; amended Feb. 11, 1935--------------------- 1934—Jan. 36; 1935—Apr. 897
Chlorine control apparatus industry and trade. N R A code, effective Dec. 28,1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions-------------------------- ------ -------------------------------------------------- 1935—Feb. 301
Christianity and labor. Great Britain. Application of Christian principles to industrial
and commercial life, movement for--------------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—Aug. 213-14
Christmas savings clubs. Membership, distributions, etc., December 1930........................... 1932—June 1309
Chromium compounds, poisoning. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Chromium platmg, health hazard. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Church and labor. (See Christianity and labor.)
Church homes for the aged. (See under Aged, indigent persons, care of.)
Church of England, family allowances, experiment__________________________ _________1932—Dec. 1357
Church pensions for ministers. (See under Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Church tax assessed. Germany *............................................................... .............. .......... ............ 1933—Apr. 911
Cigar container industry. N R A code, effective Dec. 11, 1933, tabular analysis of labor
p r o v is io n s ................................................ ..........................................................................................
1934—Jan. 36
gars. (See under Tobacco industry.)
Cigarettes. (See under Tobacco industry.)
Cigarmakers’ International Union of America:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, U. S., by industry.)
Arbitration policy with employers........................ ........................................... ..........................
1928—Oct. 18
Court decision. Injunction (Schwartz v. Union), Wayne County, Michigan.................1921—June 121-3
Decision. N L R B , Oct. 26, 1934 (York County, P a .)_______ ___________ _________ 1934—Dec. 1434
----- Secretary of Labor, re wages, Gradiaz-Annis & Co., Tampa, Fla., Jan. 16,1934........ 1935—Mar. 704-6
Out-of-work-benefit plan abandoned.............................. ......................... ...............................
1924—July 13
President I. M . Ornbum succeeds G. W. Perkins, retired................................................... 1927—Mar. 165
Unemployment benefits___________________________ ______ _______ _____ ________ 1928—Mar. 18-19
Cinders, ashes and scavenger trade. N R A code, effective Jan. 8, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions, canceled by Presidential order, Dec. 19, 1934______ ____ 1934—Feb. 297; 1935—Feb. 296
Cinema. (See Motion-picture industry.)
Cinematographic Institute, International Educational, of the League of Nations, work o f.. 1929—Oct. 48
Cities. Labor and other problems and suggestions for solving, U. S. National Resources
Committee............................................................................................ .......... ................................. 1937—N ov. 1130-2
Citizenship. (See under Foreigners, employment of; also Naturalization.)
C ity and town planning, Great Britain. (See under Housing, foreign countries.)
C ity employees. (See Public Service—Municipal employees.)

d




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

41

City-park systems. (See under Recreation, U . S.)
C ivil Aeronautics Authority (U. S. Government). (See under Air-transport industry.)
Civil Liberties Committee (U. 8. Congress, Senate). Hearing and reports on “violations
1 a^e
of free speech and rights of labor,” summary........................... ................................. .............. 1939—M ay 1062-3
Civil service. (See Public service.)
Civil Service Commission (U. S. Government). Organization and functions, appropri­
ation for 1930......................... ............— ____ _______________________________________ .• 1931—Mar. 35-41
Civil-service (Federal) retirement fund. (See under Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Civil Works Administration (U. S. Government):
Creation of, N ov. 9, 1933_____________________ ______ ____ _______ _______________ 1933—Dec. 1332
Employees on pay rolls, Dec. 2, 1933-Apr. 26, 1934_ _____________________________ 1934—Jan. 211,
_
Feb. 442-3, Mar. 723-4, Apr. 973-4, M ay 1237-8, June 1518
State and local expenditures, 1933-36...................... ................................................................. 1937—Sept. 605
Work and policies of_____ _______ ____ _____________________ _________ ______ _ 1934—Feb. 312-14
Works projects, number employed and wages paid, Jan. 18,1934...............................1934—M ay 1052-3
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), U. S. Government:
Activities, expansion and replacement program, June-August 1935.______ _______ 1935—N ov. 1209-11
Consolidation with N Y A recommended by Advisory Committee on Education_______ 1938—July 88
Educational activities. (See Education—CCC.)
Eligibility standards and methods of enrolling____________________ ______________ 1938—Apr. 846-50
Employment status of former members of, summer 1933 and winter 1933-34 terms,
statistics_____________________ _____ _____ ___________________ 1934—Aug. 308-10; 1935—Jan. 45-7
Enrollees. Age, schooling, and other d ata...................... ............................................ ......... 1938—Apr. 850-1
Indians. Activities for, 1933-39, summary_____________ __________________________ 1939—July 94-5
Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general.)
Leisure-time activities of enrollees________________________ ___________ ____________ 1936—July 61-2
Morbidity and mortality among enrollees, 1938................................ ....................................... 1939—Feb. 340
Negro enrollees. Statistics. And beneficial effects of work upon............... .................... 1939—Apr. 846-7
----------- And resultant addition to family incomes, 1933-39.................................................. 1940—Aug. 354
Operations. 1936, and work accomplished.......................... ................................................... 1937—Apr. 896-8
■
-----2 years—Apr. 6, 1933-Mar. 31, 1935—report o n ..____ _____________________ ____ _ 1935—July 53-6
Organization and accomplishments of, under Emergency Conservation Work pro­
gram, 1933.................................................................................................... .............................. 1934—Mar. 518-22
Permanency of, move tow ard.......... ......................................... ............. .............................. .
1938—Apr. 851
Selecting 1,800,000 for. (Persons)_____________ *_____________ ____ ________ ____ 1938—Apr. 846-51
Selection of men, principles of and procedure for............. ................................................. 1935—M ay 1162-9
Soil erosion control work_____________ ______ _______________ ______ _____ ________ 1935—N ov. 1210
Transfer under Reorganization Plan No. 1, effective July 1, 1939................... 1939—Aug. 379, Dec. 1409
Vocational education______________________________________ _______________ ____ 1935—N ov. 1211
Vocational training and general education furnished for enrollees, 1938................................ 1938—Feb. 388
Work accomplishments. And operations, 1936____ _______________ ______________ 1937—Apr. 896-8
----- Fiscal year 1938, by type of project__________________________________ _______ 1939—Feb. 338-9
Work projects. Educational activities, cooperation of outside agencies, 1933-39......... 1939—Dec. 1409-12
Youths. Number in camps, M ay 1935__________________________ ________________
1936—July 47
Civilian employees. M ilitary and Naval Establishments, United States. (See under
Employment statistics; Wages and hours.)
Civilian Pilot Training program. Operations, 1939__________ _______ _______________ _ 1940—July 80-4
Clay, glass, and stone industries. Labor organizations under A. F. of L. 1929 to 1937........... 1937—Feb. 297
Clay machinery industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 2,1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions__________________ _____________ _________________ _____ __________________ 1934—M ay 1065
Clay products:
Decline in Brazil (Ind.), due to decreasing demand for clay conduits_____________ 1940—Sept. 589-91
Drain tile. N R A code, effective Apr. 3,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_____ 1934—M ay 1065
Labor requirements. (T opkis).________________ ____ __________________ ____ 1937—Dec. 1391-1410
Processes and methods of production__________________________________________ 1937—Dec. 1395-7
Roofing tile, clay and shale. N R A code, effective Apr. 16,1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions________ ___ ______________________ ______ _______________ ____ _____ 1934—June 1333
Structural clay products. N R A code, effective Dec. 7, 1933, tabular analysis of labor
provisions___________________________________________________________________
1934—J an. 40
Vitrefled clay sewer pipe manufacturing. N R A code, effective Dec. 11, 1933, tabular
1934—Jan. 41
analysis of labor provisions_________________________________________________ i._
Clayton Act. (See under Decisions of courts—Antitrust acts.)
Cleaners’ and Dyers’ Union. Decision, N L R B , Jan. 12,1935. (Plainfield, N . J.).............. 1935—Mar. 692-3
Cleaners, dyers, and pressers:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Holidays provided by collective agreements___________________ _______ _______ _____
1930—Aug. 4
Paym ent of wages, time and method, agreement provisions................................................. 1930—N ov. 130
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses.......................................................... 1931—M ay 144
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions...................................... .................... 1931—Dec. 96
----- Employment of, agreement p rovision s..._____ _____________ ______ ____ _______ 1931—Oct. 125
Cleaning and dyeing industry:
Arbitration award. Operating engineers, wage reduction not approved, Denver
(Colo.), Sept. 19,1931______________________________________ _______ __________ 1931—N ov. 132
Chicago. Arbitration award, full-time employment guarantee, etc_________________ 1930—M ay 122
Labor conditions. New Jersey act regulating declared unconstitutional by U . S. Dist.
C t______________________________________________________________ ____ ____ 1936—Apr. 933-4
N R A code, effective N ov. 20,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions_______________
1934—Jan. 37
N ew Jersey. Code adopted by State trade board, effective Dec. 20,1935, provisions of. _ 1936—Jan. 71-2
Wisconsin Recovery Administration code, effective July 29, 1935, tabular analysis of
labor provisions________________________________________________________ _____ 1936—Mar. 630
Cleaning powder. Silicosis caused by exposure to, London factory, two cases___________ 1930—Dec. 93-5
Cleaning tissue and sanitary napkin industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 19,1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions.......................................................................... ... .............. ......... ........ 1934—Mar. 536
Clerical workers. (See Office employees.)
Clerks and freight handlers, railway and steamship:
Holidays provided by collective agreements................ .............................. ............................ 1930—Aug. 10
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions, railway clerks................... 1931—Aug. 118
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses.......................... ............................... 1931—M ay 145
Superannuated union members, wage-scale provisions in agreements............................ 1932—M ay 1100




42

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of Railway and
Steamship:
_
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
rage
Award. Boston & Maine Railroad, rate change refused— .................................................. 1929—Apr. 155
Arbitration award. Great Northern Railway...................................................................... 1928—June 175-6
----- Kansas C ity Terminal Co., wage increase.............................. ........................................... 1929—Mar. 162
----- Missoun Pacific Railroad, terminal Employees, wageincrease.................................... 1929—Feb. 102
----- New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Co., wageincrease-................................. 1930—Feb. 106
----- Pay increase, 1927.......... .................................... ....................................................................... 1927—M ay 262
----- St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Co., Aug. 2, 1928. .................................................. 1928—Oct. 202-3
----- Wabash Railway Co., wage dispute.................... .............. ............................................._. 1928—Jan. 196
Cost-of-living budget study, resolution___________________________ ______________ 1928—Aug. 211
Court decision. Right to collective bargaining upheld, Texas---------- 1928—June 97-8; 1929—Oct. 78-80
Employee-representation plan of Pennsylvania Railroad, status............. ..................... 1923—Aug. 124-6
Labor-management cooperation------------------------------------------------------------ ------------- 1931—M ay 44
Membership, 1915 to 1920_______________________________________________________ 1922—July 169
Railroad Labor Board decision. Portland Terminal Co., extension of leave, checker. 1926—Apr. 91-2
Tuberculosis, treatment, benefits...................................... ....................................................... 1928—Feb. 27-8
Clerks. (See also under Office employees; Stores.)
Cleveland Garment Manufacturers’ Association:
Continuing agreement........ ................ .............. ......................................................................... 1922—July 103-9
Employment guarantee, experience under, 1921...... .................................................................. 1922—Aug. 138
Clinics. (See Medical and hospital service, industrial.)
Clinton Mills, Inc. Decision, Textile Labor Relations Board, Dec. 7, 1934. (Clinton,
S. C .)_______________________ ____ ______________________________________________ 1935—Apr. 975
Cloak and Suit Manufacturers’ Association, American. Agreement and decision, levy on
pressing machines to support unemployment fund, August 1932---------------- ------------------ 1932—Oct. 889
Cloak, Skirt, Dress, and Reefers’ Union, Joint Board. Agreements. (See under Collective
agreements, U. S. by industry—Clothing industry, women’s.)
Cloak, suit, and skirt industries. (See under Clothing industry, women’s.)
Closed shop. (See under Collective agreements, U. S., general; Decisions of courts, U. S.)
Cloth examiners and shrinkers. (See under Collective agreements, U. S., by industry.)
Cloth hat and cap industry. (See Hat, cap, and millinery industry.)
Cloth Hat and Cap Makers of North America, United:
Agreements. (See Collective agreements, U . S., by industry—Hat and cap industry,
cloth.)
(See also Hat, Cap, and Millinery Workers’ International Union, Cloth.)
Cloth reel industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 26,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions. 1934—Apr. 810
Clothing:
Expenditure for. (See under Budgets, cost-of-living.)
Retail prices, (See under Retail prices.)
Clothing industry:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Canada (Quebec). Agreement effective Apr. 1, 1935, enforceable as law, provisions
of— ................... .......................................................................... .............................................. 1935—M ay 1278-9
Cap and cloth hat. (See under Hat, cap, and millinery industry.)
Coat and suit. (See under Clothing industry, women’s.)
Connecticut. Lighting conditions in factories. (U. S. Women’s Bureau survey)___ 1935—Oct. 972-4
Cotton garment. (See under Cotton-garment industry.)
Employee representation. Elections (N L R B ), tabular analysis of results.................
1935—Jan. 9
Glove manufacturing. (See under Glove manufacturing.)
Infants' and children’s wear. N R A code, effective Apr. 9, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions------- ------------------------------------------------- ---------------- ----------------- 1934—M ay 1067
Jackets, leather and sheep-lined and wool and wool-lined. Contracts, U. S. Govern­
ment, minimum-wage determinations, April 1938........................................................ 1938—June 1418-19
Labor organization, 1929 to 1937........ .................. .................................. .............. ....................... . 1937-Feb. 297-9
M inimum wage. (See under Minimum wage.)
Neckwear. (See Neckwear workers; also under Clothing industry, men’s and women’s.)
Needle trades industry. (See Needle trades.)
Tailoring, merchant and custom. N R A code, effective Aug. 10, 1934, tabular analysis
of labor provisions________________________________________________ __________ 1934—Sept. 626
Trade-board decisions. Baltimore. Fixing work, “verbal leave of absence” ________ 1924—Nov. 138-9
----------- Lay-off............................................................................................................................ 1926—Sept. 189-90
----------- Stoppages............................................................................................................................. 1925—Sept. 94
------------Wrongful discharge-............... ....................................... .............................................. 1924—July 139
----- Canada. (Toronto), stoppage of work____________________________ __________ 1926—Oct. 221-2
----- Chicago. Absence without leave, introduction of pressing machines..................... 1925—Apr. 112-13
----------- Change in machinery, union work............................... .................. ............................. . 1926—July 161
----------- Discharge and pay for holiday work.................................. .................................... 1924—N ov. 139-40
------------Mistakes of workers.................. ...................................................................................... 1927—N ov. 215
----------- Pay for holiday during suspension................................................................................ 1926—Dec. 231
----------- Wage adjustment............................ ....................... .................................................... . 1921—June 59-61
----- N ew York City. Contract-shop employees in inside sh o p .......................................... 1926—Sept. 190
-----------Discharge of shop chairman.............................................. ........................................... 1925—Nov. 98-9
----------- Existence of strike or lockout.............................................................................. ......... 1925—Sept. 94-5
----------- Firm’s request for additional contractor...................................................................... 1925—Apr. 113
----------- Meaning of “47 weeks of work” _________________ ____________ _________ 1926—N ov. 211-12
------------Nonunion contractor, pay for legal holidays, buttonhole piece rates................... 1925—M ay 121-3
------------Sending work to nonregistered s h o p ............... .......’ ______________ ________ 1925—Dec. 104-5
.
------------“Underproduction” .......... ............................................................................................ 1926—Dec. 232
----- Rochester (N. Y .). Discharge............................................ 1925—Sept. 95, Dec. 105-6; 1926—July 162
------------Putting workers on piece-work basis..................................................................... 1921—July 153-4
------------Reopening general wage question............ ^ .......................................... ....................1922—Mar. 98-9
------------ Stoppages, and “direct action” : ____________ ___________________ 1925—June 73-4, Sept. 95
Unemployment fund. Cleveland garment industry, rules governing, and changes.. 1922—Apr. 139,
140, Aug. 135-8; 1924—Apr. 115-16
(See also Knitted-wear industry; Underwear industry.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

43

Clothing industry, men’s:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, U. S. by industry; also Collective
bargaining.)
Amalgamated Clothing Workers and New York Clothing Manufacturers’ Exchange,
effective to June 30, 1935----------- --------------- ------------------------------------------------ 1935—Nov. 1296-7
Bargaining. (See under Collective bargaining, U. S.)
Cincinnati. Health service of Amalgamated Clothing Workers’ locals____________ 1930—M ay 82-3
Collective agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Cutters (dismissed or quit), absorption of, into other trades_____________________ 1929—Oct. 186-90
Employment stability (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928-------------------------------------- 1929—Jan. 13-16
Garter, suspender, and belt manufacturing. NR,A code, effective N ov. 19, 1933, tab­
ular analysis of labor provisions. ...... .............. ....................... —....................................... 1933—Dec. 1339
Health services, Cincinnati.......................................................................................................... 1930—May 82-3
Home work. N ew York City and Rochester (N. Y.), 1924-25..................................... 1927—Feb. 14-15
Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
N R A code. Effective Sept. 11,1933, summary of labor provisions; amended, Dec. 18,
1933........ — ..............................- ....................... ................ — 1933—Sept. 547-50, Dec. 1339; 1934—Feb. 306
Neckwear. Home work prohibited, M ay 1937. ............... ............ ................ ............... . 1937—Apr. 905-6
----- N R A code. Effective Apr. 2, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions................. 1934—M ay 1068
----- Public contracts minimum wage determinations issued to Aug. 31,1940................. 1937—Sept. 694;
1940—Oct. 810
Payment of wages, time and method of, agreement provisions__________ ____ ______ 1930—N ov. 130
Raincoats. Public contracts, minimum wage determinations issued to Aug. 31,1940.. 1937—Sept. 695;
1940—Oct. 811
Trade-board decisions. Baltimore. Lost tim e....................................................................... 1926—Mar. 95
------------Spite work policy................................................................................ ....................... 1926—M ay 210-11
------------Stoppage of work................................................................................ 1925—Sept. 94; 1926—Feb. 106-7
------------Trimming methods_________________ ____ . ________________ __________ 1925—Jan. 114-15
----- Chicago. Abusive and improper or profane language in shop.- 1924—Oct. 108-9; 1926—M ay 211
------------Apprentices in cutting rooms................................. .............. .................................. 1923—Oct. 85-7
--------- — Changing from week to piece work----- --------- ----------------------------------------- 1925—Mar. 118
----- .----- Discharge, discipline of foreman, holiday pay, and lost time (4 cases).......... . 1928—Mar. 204-5
------------Discharges (1 probationary worker) and reinstatement------- 1923—Mar. 67-8; 1925—N ov. 98
------------Discipline of workers, of foremen, and removal of shop chairman ................ 1925—Aug. 99-102;
1927—Feb. 203
------------Division of work.................................. .........- ........................................................... 1924—M ay 131-2
------------Examination of goods, pay for lost tim e................................................................ 1926—Jan. 136-7
------------Examiners’ work................................................... . . . .............. ....... ............................... 1927—Sept. 217
------------Inspection of w o rk ...................................................... ............ .................................... 1925—Dec 104
------------Interfering with foreman............. ..................................... ..................................... . . . 1927—Aug. 216
------------Introduction of pressing machines.---------- ------------------------------------------- 1925—Apr. 112-13
------------ Stoppages of work_______ ______ _________________ ______ 1923—Apr. 86; 1927—Sept. 217-18
----------- - "Union cloth examiner” ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Dec. 104
------------Wage level raised......... ........................................... .................................. .................... 1923—July 128
------------Work improperly done------------------- ------ ----------------------- ----------------------- 1924—July 140-1
----- Cleveland. Discharge of shop chairman.............................. ......................... .................. 1923—Mar. 65
------------W ages-------------------------------------- ------ ------- ----------------------- ------------------ - 1923—July 127
----- New York City. Alleged lock-outs................. ............................................................... 1927—Apr. 172-3
------------Allotment of work________________ __________ _____ ______ ___ _____ _____ 1926—Apr. 90
------------Bribery charges, and strike— 1........... ...................................................................... 1925—Dec. 104-5
------------Change of contractor................................................ .......................... ........................... 1925—July 113
------------ Contractor for new grades............. .............. ........................... ...................................... 1927—Sept. 218
------------Discharge of shop chairman__________ ______ ________________________ _ 1925—N ov. 98-9
------------Pay for holiday------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------ 1926—June 220
------------Requests for cheaper contractors (4 cases)........................... 1927—Aug. 216-17; 1928—Mar. 205-6
------------Seniority claim_______________________ _________________ ____________ 1927—Sept. 218-19
------------Strike or lock-out............................................ ............................................................... 1925—Sept. 94-5
------------Union labor for unfair shop, raincoats________________________________ ___ 1926—June 220
----- Philadelphia. 10-percent wage cut approved, June 27,1932-.................................... 1932—Sept. 578-9
----- Rochester (N . Y .). Discharge---------------------------------------------------- ---------------- 1925—Dec. 105-6
------------Reopening general wage question______________________________________ 1922—Mar. 98-9
------------ Stoppages of work-------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—Apr. 85; 1925—Sept. 85
Unemployment insurance. Chicago. And Rochester plans, 3-year agreements.......... 1928—July 56-7
------------ Experience of Amalgamated Clothing Workers................................................... 1925—N ov. 133-4
------------ N ew York, and Rochester.......................................................................................... . 1930—M ay 33-4
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions...................................................... .
1931—Dec. 96
----- Employment of, agreement provisions_______________________________________ 1931—Oct. 125
Work clothing. Minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts Act, to Aug. 31,
1940_________________________ ______ ____________________________________ ____ 1940—Oct. 809
(See also Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated; Hat, cap, and millinery indus­
try; Shirt industry.)
Clothing industry, women’s:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, U. S. by industry.)
And children’s. Minimum wage rate set July 15,1940_____________________ _______ 1940—Oct. 902
Blouse and skirt manufacturing. N R A code, effective Jan. 1, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions____________________________________________________ _________ 1934—Feb. 297
Cloak industry. N ew York, decisions of impartial chairman, levy on pressing machines
to support unemployment fund, August 1932_____________ ______ ____________ _
1932—Oct. 889
Cloak manufacturing. N R A code, effective Mar. 18, 1935, tabular analysis of labor
provisions----------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 1935—Apr. 896
Cloak, suit, and skirt industry. N ew York City, conditions, production, etc............... 1926—July 31-5
----- New York industrial area, union-management relations, status 1 9 3 6 . __________ 1936—July 30-3
Coat and suit industry. Labor standards and fair-trade practices established, July 15,
1935. (National Coat and Suit Industry Recovery Board)......................................... 1936—Apr. 934-8
----- N R A code, effective Aug. 7,1933, summary of labor provisions; amended Aug. 20,
1934______________________________________________ 1933—Sept. 523-7, Dec. 1335; 1934—Oct. 880
Dress industry. N ew York City, arbitration in the. (Stone)......... ............................. 1931—Dec. 17-30
----- N ew York industrial area, union-management relations, status 1936........................ 1936—July 25-30
----- N R A code, effective N ov. 13,1933; amended Dec. 15,1933, and Feb. 26,1935; tabular
analysis of labor provisions................................................. 1933—Dec. 1336; 1934—Feb. 306; 1935—Apr. 898




44

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Clothing industry* women's—Continued.
P age
Dress industry. Study of, Connecticut, 1933__________ ___________________ _____ 1934—Apr. 925-9
Garment trades, adverse conditions in, strike of July 1, and threatened strike Dec. 1,
1929.................................................................... .............. ............................................................ 1929—Sept. 21-32
Guaranty of employment. Cleveland, experience................... ............................................ 1922—Aug. 135-8
Health (prosanis) label, use of, in women’s garment trades, ............................................. 1925—July 13-14
Injunction. Cloak makers’ unions, N ew York City, against employers............. ____ 1922—Jan. 217-20
Joint Board of Sanitary Control. N ew York, activities of; and work of, since 1910.. 1925—July 13-14;
Ladies’ garment workers. (See Garment workers; also Garment Workers Union,
International Ladies'.)
Minimum wage. (See under M inimum wage.)
Neckwear and scarf manufacturing. N B A code, effective Jan. 7,1935, tabular analysis
of labor provisions______________________________________ ____________________ 1935—Feb. 302
N ew York. Governor’s Advisory Commission, report on conditions_____ 1926—June 65-8, July 31-5
----- Joint Board of Sanitary Control— ---------------- ------ --------------- 1925—July 13-14; 1926—Apr. 25-7
Physical examination, N ew York C ity-------------------------------------------- ----------------- 1924—Mar. 147-8
Strike. New York City, children’s clothing, Jan. 26-31, 1928___________ ____ ______ 1928—Mar. 118
Trade-board decisions, etc. Chicago. Ladies’ garment workers, award effective July
31, 1933_________________________________ _______________________ ___________ 1933—Oct. 890-1
-— Cleveland. Unemployment compensation........................................................ ............ 1927—Mar. 155
----------- Wage scale.. 1921—June61-7; 1922—Mar. 101, July 101-3; 1923—July 122-5; 1926—Aug. 220-3
----- New York City. Children’s and house dressmakers, impartial chairman’s findings
and award, effective Oct. 20,1930-------------------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Jan. 181-3
------------Cloak industry levy on pressing machines to support unemployment fund,
August 1932--------------------- ------ ------------------------------------------- ----------------- ------- 1932—Oct. 889
------------Cloak makers, award, jobbing-submanufacturing system ................... ................ 1927—Feb. 201-3
------------Stoppage of work........................................ ............................... .................................... 1927—Feb. 203-4
Trade-union cooperation with employers--------------------------------------- -------------------- 1928—Oct. 12-13
1927—July 42
Unemployment. As source of waste, cloak industry, Cleveland....................... ...........
----- Compensation plan, Cleveland. (M ack)________________ __________ _______ 1922—Apr. 137-41
----- Insurance. N ew York City. (Extracts from address of James A. Corcoran)___ 1926—Apr. 138-42.
Union-management relations, N ew York industrial area, status in 1936_____________ 1936—July 24-33
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated:
Activities in labor disputes------ ------------------------ ---------------------------------------------1921—Oct. 199-200
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, United States, by industry.)
Beneficial activities......................................................................................................................... 1929—Jan. 28-9
Business enterprises, trade-union, statement of purpose________ ______ ___ _________ 1929—Jan. 31
Collective bargaining, beginnings and development. (Gadsby)---- ------------------------ 1922—June 1-16
Contract relations with David Adler & Sons, broken; operation of new plant by union,
Milwaukee (W is.)------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------ 1928—Dec. 171-2
Cooperative apartment building, seventh erected in N ew York C ity .............................. 1929—Mar. 138
Cooperative bank. Chartered, Chicago------------------------------------------------------„------ 1922—June 214
----- Condition of, statistics. (See under Cooperation—Banks, labor.)
----- Housing project, New York City (Bronx)-------------------- ------ ................................
1930—Apr. 144
----- Policy with employers___________________ _______ ____________ ____ ____ 1928—Oct. 11-13,22-3
Decision, impartial chairman. N ew York discharge of cutters not in good standing,
Oct. 15, 1931_________ ____________________________________________ ____ _____ _ 1931—Dec. 151
Decision, N L R B . Cleveland Joint Board and Kaynee Co., Dec. 15, 1934..... .............. 1935—Feb. 375-6
----- Patrick, Inc., Dec. 31, 1934________________________________________ ____ _____ 1935—Feb. 382
----- Plainfield, N . J., Jan. 18, 1935................................................................................................ 1935—Mar. 696
----- Steiner-Liberty Corporation, Jan. 25, 1935................................................................... 1935—Mar. 696-7
Educational activities for workers...................... ............................... ................ ...................... 1939—July 11-12
Educational program, resolution------------------------------------------------------------- --------1927—Jan. 116
Employment guaranty for 9 months, N ew York City, agreement, Oct. 1, 1932.............. 1933—Feb. 336
5-day week. Statement of Mr. Sydney Hillman, president.............. .......... ..................... 1926—Dec. 15-16
Health service, Cincinnati locals................................... ............................................................ 1930—M ay 82-3
Health work of, general..................... ...............................- ........................................................... 1928—Dec. 18-19
1930—Aug. 4
Holidays provided by collective agreements___ _____________ _______________ _____
Housing activities, New York C ity....... ............... ......... 1928—Aug. 2-9; 1929—Mar. 138; 1932—M ay 1090
Labor banks. Condition of. {See under Cooperation—Banks, labor.)
Origin, solidarity, membership, etc. (Gadsby).................................................................... 1922—June f - 14
Out-of-work relief plans........................... ............................... .............................. ......... 1924—July 22-5, 30, 32
Slack season provisions in agreements....................................... ............................................ . 1922—Jan. 160-1
Strike workers on children’s clothing, New York City, Jan. 26-31,1928.......................... 1928—Mar. 118
Trade-board decision. Canada (Montreal). Wage cut_____________ ___________. 1922—Mar. 99-100
----- Chicago. Wage scale and enforceable standards............. .............................................. 1921—June 59-61
----- Cleveland. Wage increase__________________ __________ _____________ _______ 1923—July 127
----- N ew York City. Agreement and wage adjustment, Shirt and B oys’ Waist
Makers’ Union______________________________________ _______ ____________ 1922—Mar. 101-3
----------- Stoppages in contractors’ shops, shirt manufacture............................................ . 1926—Apr. 95-6
------------Union labor for unfair shop, raincoats_____________ ^.......................................... . 1926—June 220
----------- Wage increase, shirt makers_________________________________________1923—Sept. 113-14
Tuberculosis sanatorium. Duarte (Calif.), joint interest in___r___________________ 1928—Feb. 28
Unemployment benefits. Joint agreement with employers, Chicago, N ew York City,
and Rochester, N . Y ., experience to 1932_______ ___ ____ _____ _____ _____ _____ 1932—Dec. 1242-4
Unemployment insurance. (See under Unemployment compensation, U . S.)
Clothing Workers, United. (See Garment Workers of America, United.)
Cloths and clothing, wholesale prices. (See Wholesale prices.)
Coal:
Anthracite. (See under Mining.)
Bituminous. (See under Mining.)
Prices. (See Retail prices—Coal.)
Production. (See under Productivity of labor.)
(See also Mine Workers of America, United.)
Coal-dock industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 26, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions, by division___________________________ ______ __________________ - .............. 1934—M ay 1065-6
Coal-dust explosions. (See under Dusts, industrial.)
Coat and suit industry. (See under Clothing industry, women’s.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

45

Coated abrasives industry. N B A code, effective Jan. 8, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
Page
provisions_____________ _____ _________________________ __________________________ 1934—Feb. 298
Cocoa and chocolate manufacturing industry. N R A code, effective June 18,1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions_______________________________________________________ 1934—Aug. 321
Code authorities under N R A . (See National Recovery Administration.)
Codes, labor. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Codes (of fair competition), industrial:
Analysis of provisions (N R A report on operation of the N IR A )____________________ 1936—Apr. 886-8
Employment provisions, hearing to consider policies governing, Jan. 30 and Feb. 2,
1935............................ .............. ........................................................ ................. ..................... 1935—Mar. 647-50
Enforcement methods under the N R A .................................................................................. 1934—June 1326-7
Groupings. Classification into 22 divisions under 4 basic groups.................................... . 1934—Oct. 874
Hawaii. Exemptions extended to Oct. 1,1934, order of Sept. 4,1934................................. 1934—Oct. 874-5
Labor and consumers’ advisers to Administration members of code authorities, all
industries---------------------------------------- ------ ----------------------------------------------------- 1934—M ay 1057
Labor provisions of N R A codes, analysis of. (Schoenfeld)______________________ 1935—Mar. 574-603
Minimum-wage and maximum-hours provisions, reported observance and departure
from________________________ ______ ________________ ______ ________ ________ 1936—M ay 1235-7
N R A codes. (See under specific industry.)
Posting of labor provisions. Extension of time to M ay 15, 1934.......................................... 1934—June 1326
----- Regulations governing, orders of Feb. 28, and Sept. 1, 1934...................... 1934—Apr. 804-5, Oct. 873
.
President’s (Roosevelt) Reemployment Agreement. (See Reemployment Agreement,
President’s (Roosevelt).)
Provisions govern when union agreement less favorable, N R A decision_____________ 1936—M ay 1188
Violations of. Reported by employees, protection from dismissal or promotion, Exec­
utive order of M ay 15,1934_________________ ____ ______________ _____________ 1934—July 44
Wisconsin Recovery Act. Labor provisions, specified industries— ............................ 1936—Mar. 628-31
(See also under specific industry.)
Codes, safety. (See under Accident prevention, general.)
Codification Board (U. S. Government). Transfer under Reorganization Plan No. 2,
effective July 1, 1939.......... ................................................................................................................ 1939—Aug. 381
Coffee industry:
Brazil. Fazenda (plantation) system, brief description..................................................... .
1925—Sept. 1
----- Labor conditions on plantations......... ................................................ ................. .......... 1930—July 169-71
Hawaii. Acreage and production, 1929.......... .........................................................................
1931—Apr. 17
Puerto Rico. History and conditions in 1939................... ................ ........................ ......... 1940—Aug. 446-7
United States. N R A code, effective Feb. 6, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions;
amended Feb. 19,1935_____________ _____________________________ 1934—Apr. 810; 1935—Apr. 898
Coin-operated machine manufacturing. N R A code, effective Feb. 2,1934, tabular analysis
of labor provisions........................................................ ...................................................................... 1934—Mar. 532
Coke ovens:
Accident statistics. (See under Accident statistics, by industry.)
_
1925—June 53
Belgium. Production of ovens, and output per worker, 1913, 1922, to January 1925_
Cold-storage door manufacturing. N R A code, effective July 23, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions______ ____ ____________________ _____ ___________________________ 1934—Sept. 625
Coleman Bronze Co. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 8, 1934______ _______________ _____ _____ 1934—N ov. 1155
Collapsible tube industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 2, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions.................................................... . . ................................................. . ................................ 1934—M ay 1066
Collection of wages. (See under Wage claims.)
Collective agreements, United States, general:
Annual-wage and guaranteed-employment plans, provisions included........................... 1940—Aug. 283-9
Bargaining. (See Collective bargaining.)
Check-off provisions in, by industry------------------ ----------------- ----- ------------------------- 1930—Jan. 1-5
Closed-shop and check-off provisions in, summary____ __________ _______________ 1939—Oct. 830-5
Code requirements govern when union conditions less favorable, N R A decision_____ 1935—M ay 1188
Company unions. Extent and character of, BLS survey, April 1935 (preliminary
report)____ _____________ ______________________________ - ..................................... 1935—Oct. 874-5
Contracting by union members, provisions against, by industry...................................... 1930—Sept. 8-11
Court decisions. (See under Decisions of courts—Labor organizations.)
Definition_____ __________________________________________ ____ . . . _______ ______ 1921—Feb. 168
Employers or contractors doing journeyman work, agreement provisions, by industry. 1931—Sept. 61-3
Enforcement clauses, r6sum§ of provisions and samples_________________________ 1940—Apr. 849-54
Grievances. Settlement provisions and examples, various industries______ ____ _ 1940—Feb. 286-311
Health of union members, analysis of provisions for protection of, by trades_______ 1934—Mar. 545-9
Holiday observance, provisions for, by industry, 1930 and 1937---- 1930—Aug. 1-12; 1938—Feg. 346
Hours of work provisions, 1937................................................................. ............... : ............ 1938—Feb. 341-8
Industrial conference plan, Paterson (N. J.)................. .......................................................... 1923—Apr. 79-80
Military-service provisions as to seniority__________________ _____ ____________ 1940—Oct. 859-60
Negro workers, New York. Employment of white-collar workers, Coordinating Com­
mittee for Employment and Uptown Chamber of Commerce, Aug. 7, 1938______ 1938—Sept. 557-8
Out-of-town work, compensation for, provisions for, by trade........................................ 1931—Aug. 115-18
Payment of wages, time and method, provisions for, by occupations........................... 1930—N ov. 128-31
Reporting time and minimum-pay provisions, by occupation......................................... 1931—M ay 142-6
Safety code should be written into agreements and contracts. (Stewart)............ ....... 1929—June 134-6
Seniority provisions, principles and application. (BLS survey)________________ 1938—Dec. 1250-60
Sharing work, provisions concerning............. .................... 1939—Apr. 833, Sept. 611-12; 1940—June 1340-8
Shift systems, provisions concerning, 1937............................................ 1938—Feb. 344-5; 1940—Oct. 860-72
Shorter working time, agreements providing____________________________________ 1938—Feb. 341-4
Sunday and holiday work. Provisions concerning, various crafts------ 1936—Apr. 905-6,912,915,917-19
Superannuated union members, wage scale provisions, by occupation__________ 1932—M ay 1098-1100
Trade agreements. As industrial constitutions. (Leiserson)_____________________ 1922—Aug. 14-16
----- 1925,1926, and 1927________________________ 1926—Sept. 178-80; 1927—Oct. 209-10; 1929—Feb. 23-9
Trade-practice agreements, labor provisions in, approval by Federal Trade Commission,
Executive order authorizing (Sept. 26, 1935)................. ...................................... ................ 1935—N ov. 1203
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions....................... ...............................1931—Dec. 94-8
----- Employment of, agreement provisions.............................................................................. 1931—Oct. 121-8
. Vacations with pay............................................................................................................ ........... 1929—Apr. 31-4
2 0 1 0 4 3 ° — 42------4




46

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Collective agreements, United States, general—Continued.
P age
Vacations with pay. Stipulations and proportion of agreements providing.............. 1940—N ov. 1070-7
Wage adjustment provisions. Permissive and automatic plans____________________ 1940—Jan. 6-15
Wisconsin. Collective bargaining, new statute governing, text...... ........................... .......1931—Aug. 53-7
Collective agreements, United States, by industry:
,
Actors, collective bargaining by. (Summary of BLS Bull. No. 402)-......................... 1926—M ay 50-2
Aircraft manufaqturing. Provisions, summary----------------------------- ------ - ............ 1940—Aug. 290-302
Air-transport industry, 1936________________________________________________ ____ 1938—Mar. 702
Aluminum Co. of America with federal labor unions, Dec. 2, 1937, provisions______ 1937—Feb. 425-7
Anthracite industry. (See Mining, anthracite, this section.)
Automobile workers. Chevrolet and Fisher Body, text of memorandum of negotiations,
M ay 11, 1935________________________________________________________________ 1935—July 85-6
Baggage handlers. N ew York City, Westcott Express Co., 1925-28________________ 1925—N ov. 92-4
Bakeries. Provisions of. As of 1936 and 1939------- ------------------- 1937—Apr. 970-6; 1940—Jan. 199-200
------------Specified conditions, analysis of.................- ------ --------------------------------------- 1930—Aug. 2;
1931—Sept. 61, Oct. 122, Nov. 128, Dec. 94
, Bakers. Little Rock (Ark;)--------------------------------------- --------------------------------------- 1924—Aug. 130
----- Lynn (Mass.), Hebrew Local No. 183________________________________________ 1926—Aug. 213
----- San Francisco--------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Oct. 69-70; 1926—N ov. 202-3
1925—Oct. 69
Barbers, journeyman. Brooklyn (N. Y .), Local No. 657, M ay 1925...................... ...........
----- Cleveland (Ohio), Local No. 129, Apr. 1, 1926................... ................................................ 1926—June 208
----- Union, general provisions, 1938--------------------------------------------------- ------------- 1939—June 1287-90*
----- White Plains (N. Y.), Local No. 816, 1926_________________ _________—.......... _-- 1926—Oct. 210
Bill posters. Dayton (Ohio), 1 year, Oct. 3, 1925----------------------------- ---------------1925—Dec. 99-100
Bituminous-coal industry. (See Mining, bituminous coal, this section.)
Boilermakers. Davenport (Iowa), June 1, 1925------------------------------------ -------------- 1925—Dec. 100-1
----- (See also under Boilermakers and iron-ship builders.)
Bookkeepers, stenographers, and accountants. N ew York City, typical agreements,
clauses of, text_______________________________________________________________ 1926—June 209
Boot and shoe industry. Brockton and Haverhill (M ass.)--------------------------------- 1924—Mar. 112-14
----- Haverhill (Mass.). Shoe Workers Protective Union, N ov. 12, 1920, text.............. 1921—Jan. 136-8
------------Wood-heel makers____________________________________________________ 1926—Jan. 135-6
;---- N ew York City, American Shoe Workers, Protective Union, In c ......................... 1925—Feb. 103-4;
1926—M ay 206-7
----- Rochester (N . Y .), United Shoe Workers of America, M ay 11,1921_____________ 1921—July 159
----- United Shoe Workers of America, 20 agreements with manufacturers, general pro­
visions a so f 1938__________________________________________________________ 1938—N ov. 1001-8
Borax industry. Pacific coast. Wage rates effective Feb. 1, 1935, and other provisions.. 1935—Sept. 676-7
Brewery industry, 1935, analysis of provisions---------- --------------------------------------- 1936—‘
Apr. 1012-23
Brewery workers. (See under Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United.)
Brick and clay workers. (See under Brick and Clay Workers of America, United.)
Bricklayers. International union, tripartite agreements with carpenters and electrical
workers, M ay 17, 1931------------------------------------------------------------------ ----------------- 1931—Aug. 71-2
----- Jurisdictional dispute with plasterers’ union................................................................. . 1925—Dec. 5-6
----- New York City, helpers...................................... .................................................................... 1922—Sept. 135
----- Pittsburgh (P a.)_________________________________________________________ 1924—Aug. 130
Broom industry. Chicago______________________________________________ _____ 1923—Jan. 106-7
----- Renewal of international agreement, Broom Manufacturers’ Association_____ 1922—Mar. 97;
1923—Jan. 106-7
Building trades. Apprenticeship requirements, 11 important trades--------------------- 1926—Mar. 174-7
----- Boston (Mass.), arbitration board created, etc., July 14,1922; signatory trades___ 1922—Sept. 134-5;
1925—July 102
----- Chicago (111.), Building Trades Council to end June 1,1929____________________ 1927—Jan. 219-20
----- Engineering Council et al., upholding National Board for Jurisdictional Awards. 1922—Apr. 126
----- Jurisdiction of steam and operating engineers------------------------------------------------- 1927—M ay 258-9
----- Jurisdictional Awards, National Board for, agreement upholding authority of____ 1922—Apr. 126
----- Marysville (Calif.), certain contractors and Yuba and Sutter Building Trades
Council, 1926______________________________________________________________ 1926—Aug. 213-14
----- New York City. Bricklayers’ helpers’ wage scale, etc., June 5,1922_____________ 1922—Sept. 135
------------Housesmiths’ Union, prohibiting “snowballing” of wages, June 24, 1923____ 1923—Aug. 131-4
------------Structural-iron workers------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1923—Aug. 131-4
----- Pittsburgh (Pa.), Carpenters’ District Council, Mar. 1,1923____________________ 1923—Oct. 81-2
----- Reporting time and minimum pay, union provisions for,by trade and city______ 1928—Jan. 121-7
----- San Francisco (Calif.). Industrial__ Association, standard_form of“bonus con­
tract,” text
_______ 1923—Jan. 107-9
----------- Permanent board of adjustment, provision for, text____________ ________1921—Mar. 128-9
----- Union agreements, analysis of provisions, in effect M ay 15,1936........................ 1936—Dec. 1397-1405
Bus operators. (See Transit lines, this section..)
Butchers. (See Slaughtering and meat packing, this section.)
Carpenters. Chicago district_________________________________________ _________ 1925—Jan. 103-5
----- Cleveland------------------------------------------------------------------ - ........................... .......... 1923—M ay 154-7
----- East Liverpool (Ohio), Aug. 8,1925_______________________ __________________ 1925—Dec. 101-2
----- International union, tripartite agreement with bricklayers and electrical workers,
M ay 17, 1931-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Aug.71-2
----- Pittsburgh (Pa.) and vicinity_________________ ____________ _ 1921—N ov. 116; 1923—Oct. 81-2
----- Syracuse, arbitration clause text--------------------------------------- ------------ ------------- 1923—Sept. 111-12
Carpet sewers and layers. (See Upholsterers, this section.)
Cement industry. Analysis of provisions (47 contracts) as of 1938---.............................. 1938—Oct. 785-91
Cement masons. N ew York C ity-------------------------------------------- ----------------------- 1924—Dec. 69-70
Chauffeurs. (See Teamsters, chauffeurs, etc., this section.)
Cigar makers. St. Paul (M inn.)______________________________ ____________ ___ 1926—Feb. 101
----- Tampa (Fla.), the Leveling (Nivelation) system ______________________ _______ 1925—July 102-4
Cleaners and dyers. Chicago, imparital chairman, appointment, and duties of______ 1930—Mar. 97-8
----- Detroit______________________________________________________________ ____ 1926—July 154-5
----- N ew York C ity__________________________________________________________ 1924—July 131-2
Clerks, freight handlers, express and station employees. American Railway Express
Co., modification______________________________________________ ____________ 1922—Apr. 117
----- Boston & Maine Railroad,creating board of labor adjustment-_____ __________ 1924—June 105-6




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

47

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
Page
Clerks, freight handlers, etc. Interpretation (No. 5), Railroad Labor Board................. 1921—Aug. 106-7
----- N ew England railroads, creating board of adjustment....... ............ ............................ 1924—Feb. 132-4
Clerks, retail. (See Stores, this section.)
Cloth examiners and shrinkers. Employers or contractors doing journeyman work,
agreement provisions. ........ . _.......................................... - ------ --------- ------ -------------- 1921—Sept. 63
----- N ew York............... ............. ............................................... . . .............. ....................... ...........1921—Sept. 137
----- Union members, employment of, agreement provisions. ................................. ............ 1931—Oct. 126
Cloth hat and cap industry. (See Hat and cap industry, cloth, this section.)
Clothing industry. Action by employees to enforce agreement. (Clark) ............ 1922—Oct. 179-85
----- Cincinnati, 4-year, from Jan. 5,1926............................................................................. . 1926—Mar. 90-1
----- Constructive provisions in agreements. (Waggaman)------------------------------------ 1922—Jan. 160-1
----- N ew York City. M en’s and children's clothing, and cutters, ending strike____ 1924—Aug. 131
------------9-months’ employment guaranty, Oct. 1, 1932----------------------------------- ------- 1923—Feb. 336
----- Philadelphia, standard form, condensed______ ____ _____ ______________ _______ 1924—Sept. 94
----- Rochester.............................................................................................................. .................... 1922—June 6-13
----- Shirts, agreement provisions...____ _______ _______________ __________________ 1937—July 26-7
----- Study by National Industrial Conference Board................................. ...................... 1921—N ov. 116-18
Clothing industry, children’s. New York C ity_______________ 1924—Aug. 131; 1925—N ov. 94-5
Clothing industry, men’s. Amalgamated Clothing Workers and N ew York Clothing
Manufacturers’ Exchange, effective to June 30,1937__________ ________________ 1935—N ov. 1296-7
----- (And children’s). N ew York City, terminating strike (Amalgamated Clothing
Workers of A m erica)........................ ..................... ................................................................... 1924—Aug. 131
----- Baltimore (M d.)________ _____ ____ ____ ________ ____ ___________ __________ 1922—June 7-13
-----: ----- Boston, Cleveland, N ew York, and Rochester,wage increases....................... 1923—July 126-7
----------- Henry Sonneborn & Co., 1921-22------ --------------------------------------------------- 1921—Mar. 127-8
----- Boston............................................................................................... 1922—June 6; 1923—Feb. 167, July 126
----- Buffalo, “open-shop” pledge............................................................................................. 1922—June 15-16
----- Chicago........ ................................................................... ........................... .............................. 1922—June 7-13
----------- And Rochester, 3-year, providing unemployment insurance fu nd.................... 1928—July 56-7
------------Beginning of collective bargaining. (Gadsby)____________________________ 1922—June 1-4
----------- Unemployment insurance fund____ _________ 1922—June 8-9; 1923—July 128-30, N ov. 125-30
----- Cincinnati.A. Nash Tailoring Co. 4-year, from Jan. 5,1926_________ __________ 1926—Mar. 90-1
----------- Ending M ay 1, 1923----------------------------- ---------- -------------------------------------- 1923—July 131
----- Cleveland............ ..................................................................................................................... 1922—June 6-13
----- Collective bargaining, development of, 7 cities. (Gadsby)------------ : _____ _____ _ 1922—June 1-16
----- Constructive provisions in agreements.
(Waggaman)-------- ------- ----------------- 1922—Jan. 160-1
----- Dispute-adjustment processes under........................ ............... ........................................ 1940—Feb. 301-5
----- Indianapolis. ....................................................................... ................................................. 1923—July 131
----- Milwaukee___________________ __________ - ------ ------------ -------- 1923—July 131; 1925—Oct. 70-1
----- N ew York C ity .--------------- ------------------------- --------------------------------------------- 1921—July 154-5;
1922—June A-6; 1923—Nov. 124-5; 1926—Aug. 91-3; 1926—Sept. 186-7
----------- Shirtmaking_____ ______ ______________ 1922—Mar. 101-4; 1923—M ay 157-9; 1927—Mar. 153
------------Unemployment insurance provision.......................................... 1925—Aug. 91-3; 1928—Sept. 96-7
----- Philadelphia................................................ ............................... — --------------------- -------1922—June 6
----- Rochester (N. Y .)----------------- ------ ----------------------- ---------------- 1922—June 6-13; 1923—July 126
----- Shirt and Boys’ Waist Makers’ Union, N ew York City--------- 1922—Mar. 103-4; 1923—M ay 157-9
----- Study by National Industrial Conference Board------------------------------- --------- - 1921—N ov. 116-18
-----Suit and coat, shirt, and custom and alteration-tailoring branches, provisions___ 1937—July 24-8
Clothing industry, women’s. Boston-------------------------------------------------------------- 1926—June 211-16
----- Chicago, cloak and suit workers. ---------------------------- ---------------1921—Sept. 136; 1922—Mar. 97-8
----- Cincinnati, ladies’ garment workers__________________________________________ 1921—Sept. 137
----- Cleveland_____________________________ _____ ___ 1922—July 103-9; 1923—Mar. 56-60, July 122-5
----- Cloak, skirt, dress, and reefer makers’ unions. Ending strike, 1926------------------ 1927—Mar. 151-2
----------- N ew York C ity------------------------------------------------------- 1924—Dec. 77-9; 1927—Mar. 89,151-2
----- Coverage and provisions of, specified cities, second quarter of 1935---------------- 1936—N ov. 1297-1302
----- Dispute-adjustment process under.-------- ------------------------------------------------------ 1940—Feb. 305-9
----- New York C ity____________________________________________________ ____ _ 1924^-Aug. l$5-8,
Dec. 77-9; 1925—June 62-3, July 104-5, N ov. 94-5; 1927—Mar. 151-2, M ay 255-6
----------- Cloak and skirt makers__________________________________ 1921—July 155; 1922—N ov. 147-8
----------- Hemstitchers, and other security trust funds, etc., text__________________ 1924—Aug. 135-8
------------“ Social shop” ____ _______________________ _________________ 1923—June 138-41, N ov. 124-5
------------Trade agreements, workings of. (Gadsby)------------------------------------------- 1923—June 138-60
----- N ew York industrial area, status, 1936------------ ----- --------------------------------------- 1936—July 24-33
----- Philadelphia, cloak and skirt workers________________________ 1921—Oct. 131-2; 1925—Apr. 103-4
----- Study of experience, by National Industrial Conference Board________________ 1921—N ov. 116-18
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated. Baltimore. Renewal. 1921—Mar. 127-8; 1922—June 7-13
----- Boston. Renewal----------------------- --------------------------------------------- 1922—June 6; 1923—Feb. 167
----- Chicago. Renewal----------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------- 1922—June 7-13
----------- To establish and operate unemployment fu n d ................. 1923—July 128-30; N ov. 125-30
----- Cincinnati___________________________________ ____________ __________ _____ 1926—Mar. 90-1
----- History since 1910 and outline of provisions__________________________________ 1937—July 17-28
----- Indianapolis................................................................................................... ......................... 1923—July 131
----- Milwaukee......................................... ........................................................ . 1923—July 131; 1925—Oct. 70-1
----- N ew York................................................................................................ 1921—July 154-5; 1926—Sept. 186-7
----- N ew York City. Children’s clothing industry--------------- --------- --------- --------- 1925—N ov. 94-5
----------- Shirt and B oys’ W aist Makers’ Union___________________ 1922—Mar. 103-4; 1923—M ay 157-9
----------- Terminating strike, m en’s clothing, children’s clothing____________________ 1924—Aug. 131
------------Unemployment insurance______________________________ 1925—Aug. 91-3; 1928—Sept. 96-7
----- Newark (N . J.). Local No. 178, sheepskin leather coat and overall workers............... 1924—Oct. 97-8
----- Philadelphia. Standard form condensed...................... ................................ .................... 1924—Sept. 94
----- Some constructive provisions. (Waggaman)____________________ ____________ 1922—Jan. 160-1
Cone makers. N ew York City, Amalgamated Food Workers of America____________ 1925—Feb. 102
Construction industry. N R A approval of, to November 1934 (electrical workers,
painters, masons, plumbers, specified localities)_________________________ _____ 1934—Dec. 1357-8
----- N R A code, area wage agreements, approved, to Jan. 9,1935_____________________ 1935—Feb. 297
----- Provisions of agreements approved by N L R B , by division of industry________ 1935—June 1484-7
Coopers. Dallas (Tex.), 1925_______ _______ ___________________________________ 1925—July 104-5




48

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
P age
Coopers. Spokane (Wash.), 1926........ ....... ..................... - ------------ ---------------------------. . . 1926—Sept. 18
Corporate successor to employer. Creation of prohibited for life of contract (Gas, Coke,
and Chemical Workers)..................... . .................. .............................. ......................... .........-. 1930—Apr. 830
Corrugated-paper manufacturers (4) of San Francisco, w ith local of International
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America................................. . . 1937—Feb. 427-8
Deck hands. (See Clerks, freight handlers, etc., also Docks and harbors, this section.)
Deck officers. (See Seamen, this section.)
Diamond workers. Manufacturers’ Association of America................................................ 1923—June 166
Docks and harbors. Atlantic and Gulf ports, longshoremen, stevedores, and U. S.
Shipping Board.................................... *................................................- 1921—M ay 72-3; 1922-D ec. 122-3;
1923—Jan. 112; 1924—Feb. 128-31; 1925—Jan. 108; 1926-Feb. 101-3; 1927—Feb. 196
----- Atlantic ports. Longshoremen and U. S. Shipping Board........... ............................. 1922—Dec. 122-3
----- Baltimore. Grain and general cargo handling, stevedores___ 1922—Feb. 97-8; 1923—M ay 160
----- Boston (Mass.). Longshore work, stevedores, and U. S. Shipping Board............. 1922—Mar. 105;
1923—July 121; 1926—Feb. 101-3
----- Emergency Fleet Corporation and locals of International Longshoremen’s Asso­
ciation-------------- ------ -------------------- ------------- ---------- ------------------------ -----------—- 1923—J an. 112
----- Gulfport (M iss.). Longshore work, stevedores, and steamship companies.......... 1922—Feb. 99-100
----- Hampton Roads (Va.). Stevedores and U. S. Shipping Board_______________ 1922—Apr. 129-30*
1925—Apr. 104-5; 1926-Feb. 101-3
----- N ew York. Longshoremen and lighter captains................................................ .......... 1923—Dec 127
----------- Stevedores, longshoremen, and U. S. Shipping Board-------- ---------------------- 1922-^-Jan. 152-3
1923—M ay 159, Dec. 125; 1924—Dec. 81; 1926—Feb 101-3
----- Philadelphia. Longshoremen---------------- --------------------------------------------------- __ 1923—M ay 159
----- Portland (M aine). General cargo handling stevedores and U. S. Shipping
Board............................- ...................................... 1922—Feb. 98-9; 1925—Apr. 104^5; 1926-Feb. 101-3
-— San Francisco longshoremen...... ..................................- ....................... .............. ............... 1923—M ay 160
— U. S. Shipping Board, steamship agents, stevedores and longshoremen’s locals. _. 1927—Feb 195
Dyers, Finishers, Printers, and Bleachers of America, Federation of. Standard agree­
ment with 122 companies, status, 1936-------- --------- -------------------------------- --------- 1936—Oct. 910-21
Egg inspectors. Chicago.-- - .- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------------ - - - ----------------- ------------ 1926—June 210
Electric railways. Chicago & Joliet Electrio Railway Co., sickness and accident in­
surance, 1927-29----------------------------- --------- ----- --------- - ...................................... ............ 1927—Aug. 216
Electrical construction. Pittsburgh------------- ------------------------------- -------- ------------ 1923—Jan. 110-12
Electrical workers. Atlanta (Ga.), 1926............. - ................................................................ 1926—Sept. 183-6
----- Bloomington (111.), 1926........................................ ............................................................ . . 1926-Feb. 104-6
----- Cleveland, wage cut to hire salesmen, Mar. 1,1930 (3-year).......................................... WSS-^Jan. 146
----- Galveston (Tex.). 1926.--------------------------------------------- ------------------------ --------- 1926—Mar. 91
----- Insurance provisions------ --------- ---------------- ------ ------------- ------ --------------------- 1930—N ov. 105-6
----- International union. Old-age pensions, amount and requirements for receipt of._ 1927—Dec. 88;
1930—N ov. 105-6; 1931—M ay 34
----------- Tripartite agreement with bricklayers and carpenters, M ay 17,1931. .......... . 1931—Aug. 71-2
----- Jurisdiction, dispute with painters--------- --------- ------------------------------ ------------- 1927—M ay 257-8
----- Mount Vernon (N . Y .), 1924------ ------ --------------------------------------------- ------------- 1924—Sept. 95-6
----- N L R B order invalidating contract, Consolidated Edison Co., held without au­
thority (U. S. Sup. Ot. decision)......................................................................... ................ 1938—Jan. 121-6
----- Portland (Oreg.)......................................... .................................. — 1925—July 142-3; 1926—Oct. 211-14
----- St. Louis (and five specified cities), reduced wage rates to hire salesmen_________ 1933—Aug. 331
----- Washington (D. C .)------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1924—Dec. 75-6
Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America, United, since 1935, general pro­
visions of (120 agreements)_______________________________ ______ _____________ 1938—July 67-77
Electro typers. (See Stereo typers and electrotypers, this section.)
Elevator operators. Chicago, Union No. 66, operators and starters— 1924—M ay 133; 1926—June 210
Engineers. Hoisting. N ew York City, 1926................................................... ..................... . 1927—Apr. 171
----- Marine. Shipping B o a rd -.................................................................................................1921—July 156-8
----- Steam and operating. Chicago (111.), Coal Merchants Association (Inc.), 1926._ 1926—Aug. 216
----------- Detroit (M ich.), Feb. 12, 1924......................... ............................. ......................... 1925—M ay 116-17
----------- Jurisdiction, dispute with Building Service Employees, 1926............................ 1927—M ay 258-9
Engravers, photo. (See Photoengravers, this section.)
Express workers. American Railway Express Co------ 1924—Oct. 100-2; 1926—Apr. 117-21, N ov. 204-5
Fancy leather goods. (See Leather goods, fancy, this section.)
Filling-station employees, Indianapolis. Guaranteed minimum earnings and working
conditions, M ay 1935-36------------- ------ ----------------- ----------------------------------------- 1935—Sept. 677-8
Firm name of employer changed. Contract still effective until expiration date (TJ. S.
Conciliation Service award)............................................................ ............. ............................. 1939—Apr. 838
Fishermen. Alaska...........................u.............. - ............ 1921—July 159; 1924—Sept. 96-8; 1927—June 201
----- Atlantic coast ports.............................................................................1921—Jan. 138-9; 1925—Dec. 169-70
----- Trawling branch, provisions............................................................................................. 1921—Jan. 138-9
Foundries. Molders, national agreements................. 1924—Mar. 105; 1926—Apr. 84; 1927—Apr. 171
Freight handlers. (See Clerks, freight handlers, etc.; also under Docks and harbors
this section.)
Fur workers. Brooklyn (N . Y .), dressers and floor workers, 1925-27............................. 1925—June 60-1
----- Chicago (111.). 1926-29....................................................................................................... 1926—Dec. 223-5
----- N ew York C ity............................................................ 1922—Mar. 104; 1924—Apr. 114-15; Sept. 98-101
Gas and oil fillers. West Frankfort (111.)................................................................................. 1924—Sept. 101
Gas, Coke, and Chemical Workers, with 127 employers, status, March 1939, and
general provisions----------------------------------------- ---------------------------- ---------- ----- 1939—Apr. 829-36
•Gasoline filling-station employees,'provisions of uniforms, decision of Petroleum Labor
Policy Board, Sept 4, 1934.................................................... ................................................ 1934—N ov. 1158-9
Glass industry. Flat-Glass Workers, Federation of. With flat-glass manufacturers. 1936—M ay 1211-15
----------- W ith Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. and Libby-Owens-Ford Glass Co., 1937___ 1937—Mar. 670-2
----- Flint Glass Workers' Union, American, with manufacturers’ associations........... 1936—M ay 1204-7
----- Flint, national agreement................................................... .................................................. 1921—Oct. 128
----- Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the U. S. and Canada with manufacturers. 1936—M ay 1207-8
----- Window Glass Cutters’ League of America, with flat-glass manufacturers........... 1936—M ay 1208-11
----- Window-glass workers. National agreements.............................. 1922—Dec. 125-6; 1926—Dec. 229-31
Glaziers. Boston................................................. ................................................ ......................... 1924—Mar. 104




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

49

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
P age
Glove workers. Minneapolis, to M ay 18, 1924......................................................................... 1925—June 168
Granite cutters. Barre (V t.)................................................................................................... 1922—M ay 119-24
----- New England firms to Mar. 31,1925...................................... ........................................... 1923—Mar. 61-4
----- Quincy (Mass.), polishers and tool sharpeners’ union, 1925........................................... 1925—July 105
Hat and cap industry, cloth. Baltimore, Jan. 14, 1927...................................................... 1927—M ay 254-5
----- Chicago (text in part)............................................................................................................... 1926—Mar. 90
----- Lowell (Mass.), 1926.............................................................................................................. 1927—Feb. 194
----- Milwaukee (Wis.), Aug. 1, 1925.............................................. ........................................... 1926—Jan. 134-5
----- N ew York C ity................................................1921—July 151-2; 1922—Feb. 97, Apr. 127-9, Sept. 135-8;
1923—N ov. 123-4; 1926—Oct. 210-11, N ov. 203-4, Dec. 221-2
------------Ladies* hat frame workers............................................................................................ 1924—Dec. 79-81
------------Unemployment fund,security trust fund,etc..................................................... 1924—Aug. 132-4
------------Women’s Headgear Group (Inc.), Mar. 1, 1932........................................................ 1932—June 1351
----- Philadelphia (Pa.), unemployment fund; pay for holidays...................................... 1925—Mar. 100-10
----- St. Louis (M o.), employment guaranty; apprentice clause................ .......................... 1928—Feb. 166
----- St. Paul (M inn.), unemployment insurance; guaranty of production........................ 1925— Apr. 103
Hat manufacturers. Puerto Rico and mainland, wage differences adjusted. ................ 1935—June 1488
Hoisting engineers. (See Engineers, hoisting, this section.)
Hosiery industry. Administration of, by imp&rtial chairman....................................... 1936—Sept. 567-72
----- Dyeing and finishing. Status 1936................................................................................. . 1936—Sept. 666-7
----- Full-fashioned. National agreements, effective Aug. 1, 1930, and Sept. 21, 1931,
terms of.......................... .................................. ............................ 1930—Mar. 97; Sept. 103; 1932—Jan. 99-100
------------Status 1936............................................................................................. ......................... 1936—Sept. 560-4
----------- Unemployment-insurance provision, effective Aug. 1, 1930.................................. 1930—Sept. 103
----- Seamless. Norristown (Pa.), provisions of........................................................................ 1935—Sept. 679
----- — Status 1936..................................................... ................................................................. 1936—Sept. 664-6
Hotel and restaurant employees. Cleveland, 1924............................................................ 1925—Jan. 105-7
----- San Francisco, waiters’ union.............................................................................................. 1925—Sept. 87-8
----- Vallejo (Calif.)........................................... ................................................. ............................ . 1927—July 176
Ice-cream workers. Washington (D. C .)_.......... .......................... ............................ ......... 1926—Oct. 214-15
Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers, Amalgamated Association of, with United States Steel
Corporation subsidiaries, 1937------ ------- -------------------------- ----------------- ---------- 1937—M ay 1237-8
Iron and steel industry, July 1, 1922................................ _......................... ........................... 1922—Sept. 139
Ladies’ garment workers. Cleveland, coverage and provisions of, M ay 1935. ......... 1935—N ov. 1297-8
----- Milwaukee, coverage and provisions of, July 1935_________ _______ ______ _ 1935—N ov. 1297-1300
----- New York, coverage and provisions of, July 1935................................................ 1935-Nov. 1297,1300-1
----- West coast, coverage and provisions, 1935............................................................. 1935—N ov. 1297,1301-2
Laundries. Brockton (Mass.,) June 1, 1923............. ............ ................................................. . 1923—Oct. 84-5
----- Detroit............... ................ ................................... .......................................... ..................... 1926—June 216-17
Leather goods, fancy. Chicago 1925........................ ............................... ................................ 1926—Mar. 92
----- New York C ity........................ ......................................................... 1921—Nov. 115-16; 1922—Nov. 149-51
----------- Pocketbook workers........................................................ ....... 1925—Mar. 110-12; 1927—Feb. 199-200
Lithographers. National, union label....................... .......................... ................................... 1926—M ay 207
Longshoremen. (See Docks and harbors, this section.)
Machinists. Baltimore & Ohio cooperative plan, Chicago, text______ ____________ 1927—Feb. 195-7
----- Chicago district........... ........................................ 1925—Sept. 88-9; 1926—Aug. 215; 1927—Feb. 195-7
----- Duquoin (111.), effective until 1926................................. .................................. ............. 1925—M ay 115-16
----- Jurisdiction, dispute with steam and operating engineers, 1926.............................. 1927—Mar. 152-8
----- Maine. Pejepscot Paper Co., M ay 15, 1924...................... ............................................... 1924—Sept. 103
----- Metal Trades Council, Chicago, 1925......... ................ ............ ............................................ 1925—Dec. 102
----- Sewing-machine, Philadelphia, Lodge No. 712, provisions of............ ............... .......... 1933—June 1292
----- Union-management agreement, Yeoman Bros. Pump Co., pledging cooperation..
1931—Apr. 78
Mailers. New York City, ending July 1,1929.................... ................................................ 1926—Dec. 225-7
Marine officers. (See Seamen, this section.)
Meat cutters. (See Slaughtering and meat packing, this section.)
Metal polishers. Indianapolis Stove Co,, 1925........................................................... .......... 1925—July 105-6
----- South Pittsburg (Tenn.), 1926.................. .................................... .................................... 1926—Sept. 187-8
Metal trades. Chicago, 1925........... ....................................... ............ ............ ......................... . 1925—Dec. 102
----- Department (A. F. of L.) and Sinclair Co. (oil), effective to M ay 1,1936................... 1935—July 109-10
----- Pittsburg (Pa.), 1925-26, Local Union No. 12.................. ............................ .................... 1925—June 65
----- Rochester (N. Y .), sheet-metal workers, Local No. 46.................................................... 1924—July 136
Metallurgical works. Punxsutawney (Pa.), smelters______________ ______ _______ 1926—Oct. 217-18
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers, International Union of, with mine operators and
smelting and refining companies, provisions__________________________________ 1938—
^Sept. 591-8
Mineral water workers. (See Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United—Agreements.)
Mining, anthracite. Anthracite Coal Strike Commission, renewal with exceptions.. . 1923—Oct. 83-4;
1925—July 81-3
----- Districts 1, 7, and 9, Sept. 1, 1930, to Apr. 1,1936, terms o f .................. ................... 1930—Sept. 103-4
----- Pennsylvania, 1926, terminating su sp en sio n ..._____ __________________________ 1926—Mar. 89
----- United M ine Workers of America and operators, M ay 7,1936, provisions............ 1936—June 1581-2
Mining, bituminous-coal. Appalachian agreement, under N R A code, text______ 1933—N ov. 1074-81
----- Appalachian agreement renewed, Sept. 26, 1935, provisions........... ......................... 1935—Dec. 1576-80
----- B y district, since July 1928, summary______ ____________________ ___________ 1929—Feb. 204-8
----- Coal River Collieries (W. V a.)______ _______________________________________
1923—Oct. 84
----- Illinois and Indiana, wage contract of Aug. 10, 1932, extended to Mar. 31, 1935-.. 1933—Mar. 568
----- Interstate, 1924-27____________________________ ______ _______________________ 1924- Apr. 114
----- Southern Colorado and New Mexico, effective Nov. 1 , 1933-Apr. 1,1934_______ 1934—Jan. 119-21
----- Summary of contracts prior to stoppage of work, M:arch 1939, and text of agree­
ment signed M ay 12, 1939________ ______________ ______ __________ _________ 1939—Sept. 691-703
----- Tri-State—Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, 1923_______ ____________________________ 1923—Mar. 56
----- Under N R A code, United Mine Workers of America and two associations, Presi­
dential (Roosevelt) approval, Sept. 22, 1933_____________________________ _____ _ 1933—Oct. 825
Mining, coal. Rocky Mountain Fuel Co. and United Mine Workers....................... 1928—Oct. 196-202;
1930—N ov. 132
----- United Mine Workers of America and Pittsburgh Terminal Coal Corporation,
June 23, 1931 ................... ......................... ........................................ .......................................... 1931—Aug. 71
----- U. S. Coal Commission, recommendations as to wage agreem ents............... ............ 1923—Aug. 26
----- Wage payments, time and method of, general provisions_____________ __________ 1930—N ov. 131




50

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
Molders. (See under Molders’, Union of North America.)
Faff®
Motorbus employees. N ew York City, provisions and status, 1937...______________ 1938—Mar. 691
Motortruck drivers. Organizations, general provisions and status, 1936-38............ 1937—M ay 1245-61;
1938—Mar. 748-51; 1939—Mar. 688-92
----- Overtime and holidays, provisions------------------------- ---------- --------------------------- 1936—Apr. 919
Motor-vehicle industry. United Automobile Workers of America (International
Union) and General Motors Corporation, Feb. 11,1937.................................................. 1937—Mar. 669-70
Musicians, American Federation of. - Bylaws, amendments affecting local agree­
m ents____________________________________________________________ _____ _
1927—Feb. 197-9
----- Summary of provisions in 932 contracts, June 1939....... ........................... .................. 1940—Mar. 716-26
Neckwear workers. St. Louis, union label agreement, text________________________ 1926—June 217
N ew contracts effected in 1938, and tabular analysis of prevalence w ithin various in­
dustries___ ____ ____ ___________ ____ _______ __________ _____ ___________ 1939—Mar. 505-6, 508
Newsboys. Everett (Wash.), 1926-27........................................................................................ 1926—Aug. 215
Newspaper Guild, American. Contracts, March 1940, provisions................................ 1940—Apr. 825-38
Newspapers. (See Printing, newspaper, also Printing trades, this section.)
Oil industry. (See Petroleum industry, this section.)
Packing-house employees. (See Slaughtering and meat packing, this section.)
Packing industry. Birmingham (Ala.) union shop, and other provisions____ _______ 1935—Sept. 679
Painters, decorators, and paperhangers. Atlantic City (N . J.), paperhangers local
No. 1061______________________________ „
_____________________________________ 1925—Apr. 106
----- Baton Rouge (La.), Local No. 954, three clauses in working agreement, text........... 1923—Sept. 113
----- Boston (Mass.), Glaziers* Local No. 1044, N ov. 1,1923................... ............................... 1924—Mar. 104
----- Jurisdiction (dispute with electrical workers, international, 1927)______________ 1927—M ay 257-8
----- New York City. District No. 9, and Master Painters and Decorators, Aug. 25,
1936 (final agreement)------------- 1925—July 186-90, Sept. 89-90; 1926—M ay 210-11; 1936—N ov. 1221-3
----- Pittsburgh. Apprenticeship and working conditions, text....................................... 1924—June 104-5
----- Springfield (Mass.), local union No. 257, Apr. 1, 1924......... ........................................ 1924—Sept. 102-3
----- Syracuse (N . Y .), local union No. 1, extra pay for dangerous work............................. 1924— ov. 137
N
----- Washington (D . C.), paperhangers, terminating strike, 1925-27.............................. 1925—July 189-90
-v — Westchester (N . Y .), terminating, July 1926......... ...................................... ................... 1925—June 64
Painters, sign, scene and pictorial. Chicago__________________________ __________ 1924—July 137
Paper and pulp industry. Maine, Pejepscot Paper Co. and paper makers, M ay 15,
1934___________________________________________ _____________________________ 1924—Sept. 103
----- Pacific coast, wages and hours................................ ..................................... ...................... 1935—Aug. 405
----- Pacific Northwest, 1934 to 1937............. ............................. ........................... ............... 1936—N ov. 1176-7
----- Union scales, by locality and occupation, with date of agreement........... ............... 1933—Oct. 941-2
Paper cutters. N ew York City, 1923, wage increase........................................................... 1923—July 131
Paper handlers. N ew York C ity (Union No. 1), 1923, wage increase............................ 1923—July 131-2
Paving cutters. N ew England granite industry................. ................................................ 1923—Mar. 61-4
----- New York, N ew Jersey, and Yonkers............................................................................... 1926—June 218
----- Redgranite (W is.)_______________________________________________ _______ 1926—Aug. 215-16
Petroleum industry. Craft unions, Shell companies, Illinois and California_______ 1935—Aug. 403-4
----- International Association of Oil Field, Gas Well, and Refinery Workers of America,
with Sinclair Company and others........ ............................................ 1934—Aug. 383; 1937—Feb. 419-25
----- Sinclair Co. (oil). M etal Trades Department (A. F. of L.), effective to M ay 1,
1936, provisions of. _...................................... ........................................ .................................1935—
July 109-10
------------Oil field, gas well, and refinery workers, June 1, 1934__............. ............. ...1935—Aug. 403-4
Photoengravers. Chicago, 1924........................................................................ ........................ 1924—Aug. 134-5
----- New York City, Local Union No. 1........................................... ............ 1922—Mar. 106; 1924—M ay 135
----- Philadelphia, Local Union No. 7__................................................ ..................................... 1924—M ay 135
----- Wichita (Kans.), Local No. 73, 1925_____ ____ _______ _______________________ 1925—Aug. 94-5
----- (See also Printing, and Printing trades, this section.)
Piano movers. Chicago, closed shop, April 1926______ ____ ___________________ 1926—Oct. 215-16
Pilots. (See under Seamen, this section.)
Plasterers and cement finishers. Baltimore (M d.), local No. 155, ending M ay 1,1925.. 1924—Oct. 97
----- Decision relative to abrogation of certain provisions of agreement of Oct. 2, 1925,
arbitration board___ _____ _________________________________________________ 1927—Apr. 171-2
----- Jurisdictional dispute w ith bricklayers union, agreement of Oct. 2, 1925, text_____ 1925—Dec. 5-6
Plumbers and steam fitters. Jacksonville (Fla.)................... .......................... .................. 1926—Sept. 188-9
----- Lafayette (Ind.), scale, 1927-29............... .............. ................................................................
1927—July 98
----- National agreement, with automatic sprinkler association, M ay 1, 1930__________ 1930—Apr. 130
Pocketbook workers. N ew York C ity ._____ _______ ________ 1925—Mar. 110-12; 1927—Feb. 199-200
Polishers, buffers, and platers. (See Metal polishers, this section.)
Pottery industry. United States Potters Association...... ..................................................... 1923—Mar. 57
Poultry dressers. San Francisco.................... ............ ............................................. ................. 1924—Aug. 138
Pressmen. (See under Printing, newspaper, also Printing trades, this section.)
Pressmen and feeders. Service Bureau summary, 125 local unions................................... 1922—July 109
Printing. Book and job. Chicago__________________ ___________________________ 1921—Aug. 109
------------Milwaukee, Typographical Union, 1923-24....................................................... 1923—Jan. 113-14
■
----------- New York C ity ._____ ________________ 1921—Mar. 81-4; 1922—Sept. 144-5; 1923—July 131-3
----- Newspaper. Arbitration agreements, history of. (Weiss)____________________ 1923—July 15-33
------------Boston, Typographical Union No. 13, 1923-26_____________________________ 1924^-Mar. 110
------------Composing rooms, analysis of situation and review of agreement provisions
(435 establishments, U. S. and Canada)...... ................................................................ ......... 1936—Jan. 170-5
------------Hartford (Conn.), printers, 1925-26.............................................................................. 1925—Oct. 71-2
------------Los Angeles........ ..................................... ......................................................................... 1926—Apr. 84-6
----------- Milwaukee. .................................................................................................................... 1924—Jan. 99-110
------------N ew Y ork-C ity............. ........................................................................... 1924—Mar. 110-12, June 105
----------- Pressmen, New York C ity.......... ................................................. .................. ............ . 1924—Dec. 81-5
----------- rWeb pressmen, New York C ity..................... ............................. ............................. 1923—Dec. 127-9
Printing trades. Beardstown (111.), (Typographical Union), scale, 1927___________ 1927—July 104
-----Chicago, Typographical Union No. 16, agreement of Oct. 1, 1929, modified______ 1932—Dec. 1374
----- Cleveland, printers, model universal contract form, text_______________ _____ 1922—Sept. 139-44
----- Foreman required to be union member........................... ................ .................................. 1937—Mar. 704
----- Hartford (Conn.), printers______ ____ _____________ _________________________ 1925—Oct. 71-2
----- Joliet (111.). Wage scale________________________ ______ _____________________
1927—July 98
-— Joplin (M o.)f (Typographical Union), scale, 1927........................................................... 1927—July 104




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

51

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
Page
Printing trades. Lowell (Mass.), printers................................................................................. 1925—June 67-8
----- National council for the. (Walker).............................................__.i,-----------------------1921—Jan. 23-44
----- New York City. Bohemian-Slavonic Printers________________________________ 1925—Apr. 102
----------- Typographical Union No. 6, wage-scale reduction, arbitration stipulations.... 1933—Feb. 337
----- Pittsburg (Kans.), (Typographical Union), scale, 1927-------------------------------------- 1927—July 104
----- Press Feeders and Assistants’ Union. (Washington, D . C .)__________________ 1923—July 134-9
----- Pressmen. And Assistants’ Union, Concord (H. H .), rebate on earnings to stabilize
employment________________________________________________________________ 1932—Sept. 578
------------New York City, supplementary agreement Mar. 7, 1932, to spread work___ 1932—M ay 1046-7
------------Washington (D. C.), 1 922-23--._____ ________ _________ _____________ 1922—July 109-13
----- Washington (D. C.), 44-hour week.................................................................................... 1922—Mar. 107-8
----- Washington (Pa.), (Typographical Union), scale, 1927— .............................................. 1927—July 104
----- Zanesville (Ohio), (Typographical Union), scale, 1927.-------- ---------------- ------------ * 1927—July 105
----- (See also Photoengravers, and Stereotypers and electrotypers, this section.)
Public service. Concord (N. H .), city employees________________________ ________ 1926—Aug. 214
Pulp and paper industry. (See Paper and pulp industry, this section.)
Quarry workers. Concord (N. H.) and Lanesville and Rockport (M ass.)................... 1925—June 64-5
Radio telegraphers. (See Telegraphers, this section.)
Railroad workers. Gradual restoration of 10 percent pay cut, effective to July 1,1935- 1934—June 1390-1
Railroads. Board of adjustment. American Railway Express Co. agreement creat­
ing_______________________________________________________________________ 1926—N ov. 204-5
----------- Office and station service, creation of, Boston & Maine Railroad__________ 1924—June 105-6
------------Train service, Western and Southeastern Regions created___ 1921—Nov. 114; 1922—Jan. 151-2
----- Committees representing personnel and railroad managements, M ay 21,1936. __ 1936—June 1503-5
----- Copy to be furnished National Mediation Board........... ................................ .............. . 1936—Mar. 688
-----Conductors. And trainmen, Southern Railway lines..................... ........................ 1924—M ay 129-31
----------- Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co., 1927 scale............................ ...........................
1927—July 99 „
----------- Pullman Co. abrogating 1927 agreement.................. ............................................... 1928—M ay 193-4
----- Dining-car employees, N . Y ., N . H. & H. R ailroad....................................... ............ 1926—Dec. 222-3
----- Dismissal wage, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co__________________________ ____ 1935—Apr. 979
-----Employees’ right to bargain collectively upheld, Texas_________________________ 1928—June 96-8
----- Employment conditions (20 unions and 200 companies, Jan. 31, 1932), provi­
sions of___________________________________________________________________ 1932—Mar. 613-18
-----Engineers, firemen, hostlers and helpers, D . L. < W. Railroad Co______________ 1922—M ay 126
fr
----- Pay reduction of 10 percent, agreement extended to Oct. 31,1933, 21 unions and 200
companies______________________________________..____________________________ 1933—Feb. 336
-----Pullman Co. Blacksmiths, machinists, sheet-metal workers, electrical workers,and carmen__________ ______ : ____________________________________________ 1921—Dec. 115-16
----------- Porters and maids, 1924_______________________________________________ 1924—July 132-3
----- Shopmen. New Orleans Great Northern Railroad Co., scale, by occupation, 1927. 1927—July 100
----------- New Orleans Public Belt Railroad, scale, by occupation, 1927______________ 1927—July 100
----------- Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis, scale, by occupation, 1927_____ 1927—July 100-1
----- Signalmen. Specified railroads, scale, 1927___________________________________ 1927—July 101
----- Train crews, pay basis changed from mileage to month-hours, Delaware & Hudson
experiment_____________________________________________________ ___________ 1932—N ov. 1119
----- Trainmen, firemen, and enginemen, Alaska R ailroad.._________
1925^May 112-14
----- Train-service crews, N . Y ., N . H ., & H. Railroad C o ...--------------------------------- 1924—July 133-6
----- Wage changes, by occupation, specified roads_______________________________ 1929—June 187-9
----- Wage reductions (20 unions and 200 companies, Jan. 31,1932), rrovisions of___ 1932—Mar. 612-13
-----Workweek, modification to permit shortening of_________ _____________ ____ 1931—Aug. 119
Roofers. Cleveland, to Feb. 29,1928------------------- ------ ----------------------------------------- 1925—Sept. 90
----- Youngstown (Ohio), 1925___________________________________________________
1925—Aug. 95
Rubber industry. Period required to negotiate, and number of conferences required. 1939—June 1285-6
----- Provisions of (United Rubber Workers of America)________________________ 1939—Sept. 604-17
----- 73 contracts, by year signed and number of workers covered, July 1932 to March
1939________________________________________________________________________ 1939—June 1284
----- Unions and Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., B. F. Goodrich Rubber Co., and Fire­
stone Tire and Rubber Co., Mar. 21,1936_______________________________ 1936—M ay 1288,1292-3
Scene and pictorial painters. Chicago______________________ ____ ________________ 1924—July 137
Seamen. Deck and engineer officers, Shipping Board vessels____ 1922—Mar. 108-9; 1927—Feb. 194-5
----- Great Lakes, sailors’ union__________________________________________________ 1923—June 169
----- Hampton Roads (Va.) and Portland (Maine), Shipping Board vessels................. 1923—July 120-2
----- Marine Cooks and Stewards Associations. 1927 wage scale_____________________ 1927—July 98
------------ Pacific coast, agreement and arbitration award effective to Sept. 30, 1935.._ 1935—July 107-9
----- Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association and Seamen’s Union with 4 employing
companies, San Francisco____________________________________________________ 1936—Oct. 867-9
----- Marine firemen, oilers, water tenders, etc. Atlantic and Gulf, wage scale, 1927...
1927—July 98
------------Pacific coast, agreement and arbitration award effective to Sept. 30, 1935___ 1935—July 107-9
----- Marine officers and engineers, Shipping Board vessels.._______ ________________ 1924—Sept. 102
----- Masters, mates, and pilots, Shipping Board v essels...________ _____________ 1921—Sept. 139-40;
1922—Mar. 108-9; 1924—Sept. 102
----- Minimum-wage rates established, effective Jan. 1,1935______________________ 1936—Jan. 19-20
----- Unlicensed deck and engine crews, Shipping Board vessels___________________ 1923—July 121-2
-----Unlicensed men, Shipping Board vessels___________________________________ 1922—Mar. 110-11
Seamless hosiery industry. (See under Hosiery industry, this section.)
Sheepskin, leather coat, and overall workers. Newark (N . J.)_____________________ 1924—Oct. 97-8
Sheet-metal workers. (See Metal trades, this section.)
Shipbuilding industry. Provisions in 28 contracts____________________________ 1940—Sept. ,597-613
Shipping industry. Pacific coast, and arbitration award, effective to Sept. 30, 1935,
provisions of_________________________________________________ ______________ 1935—July 107-9
Shirt industry. (See under Clothing industries, this section.)
Shoe workers. (See Boot and shoe industry, this section.)
Sign writers. N ew York C ity________________________ ________________ _________ 1924—N ov. 138
----- St. Joseph (M o.)_________________ _________________________________________ 1926—Mar. 93-4
Silk industry. New York City, ribbon______ 1921—Sept. 137-9; 1923—June 169-70; 1924—Feb. 125-6
Slaughtering and meat-packing industry. Indiana and Iowa, effective July 16, 1934._ 1934—Oct. 932
— Meat cutters. Dubuque, Iowa, to N ov. 1, 1925______________________________ 1925—Feb. 102
—
----------- East St. Louis (111.)____________________________________________________ 1926—M ay 208




52

MONTHLY LABOB REVIEW

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
Page
Slaughtering and meat-packing industry. Meat cutters. Herrin (111.), 1926.............. 1927—June 201-2
---- ----- Rochester (N. Y .).......................................................................................................... 1925—Apr. 105-6
— ----- Westchester Cpunty (N . Y .), 1923 and 1925............................1924—Feb. 131-2; 1926—Mar. 92-3
- — N ew York district, packing houses, wage adjustments, 1 9 2 1 . ..................................1921—Sept. 141
— Packing-house employees, butchers, Rochester (N . Y .), 1924............ ................... 1925—Apr. 105-6
Smelters. (See Metallurgical works, and M ine, Mill and Smelter Workers, this section.)
Soft-drink workers. {Seconder Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United—Agreements.)
Stereotypers and electrotypers. Boston (M ass.), electrotypers and Norwood Press,
1924-25_________________________ _______ ________________________________ ____ 1927—July 103
— Chicago, electrotypers, Dec. 31,1922................................................ 1923—Apr. 81-3; 1924—Aug. 131-2
----- Milwaukee, stereotypers, to Jan. 19, 1928...................................................................... 1925—July 107-8
— Norwood (Mass.) Press, electrotypers.................................................................................. 1924—June 103
—
----- Springfield (Ohio), stereotypers............................................................................................... . 1926-Mar. 94
* Stockton (Calif.), stereotypers, 1924 to 1 926-........... ............................................. _......... 1925—Mar. 112
----— Youngstown (Ohio),stereotypers.......................................... .............................................. 1926—Apr. 86
----- (See also Printing and Printing trades, this section.)
Stevedores. (See Docks and harbors, this section.)
Stonecutters. Boston, 1926..................................................... .................... ........................... 1926—No'v. 205-6
Stores (retail clerks). Anaconda (M ont.), Local No. 1041,1926....................................... 1926—Oct. 216-17
----- Belleville (111.), Local No. 219, scale 1927-29___________________________________ 1927—July 103-4
----- Butte (M ont.), clerks union, text....................................................................................... 1924—Apr. 116-18
----- Chicago, 1926........................................................................................................................... 1926—July 158-9
----- Marion (HI.)............................................................ .................................................... ......... 1927—June 202-3
-----Seattle (W ash.)................. .................................................................................................. — 1926—Mar. 93
Stove industry. Indianapolis, mounters, Jan. 1,1925—..................................................... 1925—July 105-7
----- N ew Athens (111.), mounters............................................................................ .................... 1926—Feb. 103-4
----- Stove Founders’ National Defense Association----------------------------------------------1921—Sept. 142;
1922-M ay 124; 1923—Mar. 57; 1924—Mar. 105-6; 1927—Apr. 171
Street railways. Analysis of provisions, as of M ay 15,1936, June 1,1938, and 1939____ 1937—Apr. 977-83;
1939—Feb. 379-81; 1940-Feb. 432-48
----- Atlanta (Ga.), Georgia Railway & Power Co. with Electrical Workers’ local___ 1926—Sept. 183-6
----- Aurora, Elgin & Fox River Electric Co., 1927------------------------------- ------------------- 1927—June 202
----- Boston, Elevated Railway Co., and Division No. 589; 1933 wage increase and vaca­
tion period............................................. ................................................... 1926—N ov. 206-7; 1933—Dec. 1435-9
----- Canton (Ohio), M ay 1 ,1 9 2 5 -............................................................................................. . 1925—Oct. 72-3
----- Chicago, 1927-29............................................. *....................................................................... . 1927—Aug. 216
----- Cincinnati & D ayton Traction Co................................................................................. 1926—July 159-61
----- Cincinnati Street Railway Co., July 1,1929............. .................. ..................................... 1929—N ov. 112-13
----- Clinton, Davenport & Muscatine Railway Co., June 1,1925....................................... __ 1926—Apr. 87-8
- — Connecticut, The Connecticut Co. and its employees.................................................. 1926—Dec. 227-9
----- Gary (Ind.), providing life insurance and sick benefits.................................................. 1931—Apr. 87
----- Illinois and Indiana traction systems, wage changes........................................................ 1929—Apr. 155
----- Lansford (P a.)------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------- 1927—M ay 256-7
----- Memphis (Tenn.), Mar. 24,1925.......................................................................................... 1925—Aug. 95-6
----- M itten Management (Philadelphia and Buffalo), 1928................................................. 1928—M ay 191-3
----- Morris County Traction Co., N ew Jersey____________________________ ______ . 1925—Sept. 86-7
----- Newburgh (N . Y .), M ay 1,1926______________________________________ _____ 1926—Aug. 217-18
----- New Jersey Public Service Transportation Co. with 9 local divisions, 1924............. 1925—M ay 114-15
----- Pen Argyl (Pa.), Aug. 1 , 1924_.__.......................................... . . ....................................... . 1924—Oct. 98-9
----- Philadelphia, fare increase and 77-cent w age........................................ ......................... 1926—Apr. 89-90
----- Pomeroy (Ohio), 1924............................. ........................................ ................. ............ .......... 1925—M ay 117
----- San Antonio (Texas), renewal............. ....................................... .................................... . 1925—Mar. 113-14
----- Springfield (Ohio),renewal, Oct. 1,1925.................................................... .....................
1925—Dec. 103
----- Toledo (Ohio), Community Traction Co............................................ ............................. 1922—Oct. 75-81
----- Trenton (N . J.), renewal............. .................. ................................... 1925—June 65-6; 1927—July 103
----- Wheeling (W. Va.), Apr. 1,1926._____________ ____________ ________________ 1926—Oct. 218-21
----- (See also Transit lines, this section.)
Structural-iron workers. (See under Structural and ornamental-iron workers.)
Tailors. Chicago, Wholesale Tailors’ Association............................................................... 1922—June 10-13
----- San Francisco, 1927.. ........... ............................. ................................................................... 1927—M ay 259
Taxicab industry. N ew York City, 5 companies, status 1937-------------- ------ ---------- 1938—Mar. 691-3
----- Rochester (N . Y .)________________________________ _______________________ 1923—Dec. 129-30
Teamsters, chauffeurs, etc. American Express Co. and employees, with national union,
working conditions............ .......................................................... ......... 1922—Apr. 117-21; 1924—Oct. 100-2
----- Boston, coal teamsters.......... ....................................... ..................................................... 1923—June 167-8
----- Chicago. H ay and grain teamsters.................................. .................................................. 1927—Feb. 200
------------ Piano movers, local No. 738........ ......................... . ................................................... 1926—Oct. 215-16
------------ Roofing and material teamsters....... . ......................................................................... 1924—Aug. 139
------------ Truck drivers and chauffeurs_________________ _____________ _____ ______ 1925—June 66-7
- Cleveland. Ice and Water Drivers’ Union......................... ........................................ 1925—Aug. 93-4
-— Delawanna (N. J .).................................................................................................................. 1926—M ay 210
—— New York City. Baggage handlers..... ............................................ ............................ 1925—N ov, 92-3
----- St. Louis (M o.), chauffeurs, Jan. 1,1925......................................................................... . 1925—M ay 115
----- San Francisco (Calif.), ice teamsters................... ................................................................ 1923—Sept. 112
Telegraphers. Commercial. Canada and United States................................................. 1923—N ov. 130-3
------------ Marconi system ............................................. .............. ............................................. 1926—July 155-7
------------ Press services____________________ _______ _________________ ___________ 1924—Dec. 70-5
----- Radio. Pacific coast, new wage rates, passenger ships, by company and service,. 1935—July 106-7
------------ U. S. Shipping Board_________________________________ 1921—July 158; 1922—Mar. 109-10
----- Railroad. Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway Co. scale, 1927.................. 1927—July 101-2
. Telephone systems. Bloomington (111.), operators______________________________ 1926—Feb. 104-6
Textile industry. Bridgeport (Conn.), Salt’s Textile Manufacturing Co. and weave
shed e m p l o y e e s _________ ____ ____________________ ____ ________________ 1925—N ov. 95-6
----- New York, Textile Finishers’ Association and Cloth Examiners and Shrinkers’
Union_________________________________________________ ____ — .........- ................- 1921-Sept. 137
----- Passaic (N. J.) Worsted Spinning Co. and United Textile Workers of America.. 1927—Feb. 200-1




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

53

Collective agreements, United States, by industry—Continued.
Textile industry. Standard agreement, Federation of Dyers, Finishers, Printers, and
Page
Bleachers of America, and 122 firms..................................................... ............................. 1936—Oct. 919-21
Tobacco workers. Louisville (K y.), union label........ - ______ _____________ ______ 1934—Dec. 1439
Transit lines. Bus operators, Bayonne (N. J .)______________ 1926—May* 114-5; 1927—Mar. 15i
----- (Electric-railway, motor bus, and taxicab employees). N ew York City. History
and status, 1937______________________________ _______________ _____________ 1938—Mar. 686-93
----- (See also Street railways, this section.)
Typographical Union of North America, International. (See Printing trades, this
section.)
Upholsterers. Boston................................................................................................................... 1927—Mar. 163
----- Cleveland.................................................................................................. ........................... 1926—June 218-19
----- N ew York C ity....... ............................................................ .................................................. 1925—Apr. 107
------------ Carpet sewers and l a y e r s .................................. ........................................................
1924—Oct. 99
----- Sacramento (Calif.)__________________ __________ _______________________ _
1927—Feb. 101
Upholstery and floor-covering trades. General provisions (61 contracts), and union
scales _ ____ _____________________________________________________________ 1937—N ov. 1121-8
Upholstery industry. Philadelphia, weavers’ and workers’ union, Apr. 8,1932____ 1932—Dec. 1374-5
Vacations with pay, production workers, provisions for_________________________ 1937—June 1486-8
Wallpaper crafts. National agreement------------------------------------------------------------- 1924—July 137-8
Water transportation, domestic. Provisions re hours and overtime compensation
1936—Dec. 1497
Yeast workers. (See under Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers of Amer­
ica, International Union of United—Agreements.)
(See also Collective bargaining; Conciliation and arbitration; Employee representa­
tion.)
Collective agreements, foreign countries:
General. Agricultural unions in European countries, practices abolished and regulated
by. (ILO study)__________________________________________________________ 1933—July 113-15
----- Legalization and extension of, provisions for, in democratic countries...................... 1939—N ov. 1060-2
Argentina. Wage provisions_________________________________________________ 1940—Feb. 462-3
Austria. Act of Apr. 5, 1930 (antiterror law), principal provisions_____________ .... 1930—Oct. 135-6
Canada. Legal extension of, recommendations, Royal Commission on Price Spreads,
Apr. 12,1934________________________________________________________________
1935—July 62
----- Legalization of (in three Provinces)------ ------------- ------------------------------------------- 1936—Aug. 400
----- Mining, coal_____________________________________________________________ 1924—Jan. 193-6
----- (Alberta, Ontario, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Saskatchewan). Industries and trades
covered by legalized contracts__________________________________ __________T__ 1937—Oct. 948-9
----- (And United States). Newspapers, composing rooms, 435 establishments, review. 1936—Jan. 170-5
----------- Telegraphers, 1923__________________________ _________________________ 1923—N ov. 130-3
----- (Montreal). Clothing industry, production standards, 1921__________________ 1921—Sept. 136-7
----------- Clothing, men’s______________________________________ 1921—Sept. 136; 1922—Mar. 99-100
----- (Ontario). Building trades, legalized schedules of wages and hours__________ 1935—Oct. 1008-9
----- (Ontario and Alberta). Legalization of, principal provisions of Industrial Stand­
ards Act, 1935______________________________________________________________ 1935—Aug. 405-8
----- (Quebec). Building trades, legalization of, wage rates, etc___________________ 1934—Oct. 985-6
----------- Clothing industry, agreement effective Apr. 1, 1935, enforceable as law, pro­
visions of___________________________________________ _____ _______ _________ 1935—M ay 1278-9
----------- Legalization of, 1934, provisions of act............. ................. ............ . . . ................ . 1934—Sept. 672-3
Chile. Bakeries, prohibition of night work, e tc ............................................. ............... ....... 1927—Aug. 227
----- Labor contract law of Sept. 8,1924_________________________________________ 1926—Jan. 209-11
Colombia. (Cartagena). Cigar factory, reinstatement of workers and wage provisions
in settlement________________________________________________________________ 1939—Oct. 963
Cuba. Registration of labor contracts required, decree-law of Aug. 24,1934_________ 1934—N ov. 1131
Czechoslovakia. Legalization of, textile industry, eastern Bohemia________________ 1936—Aug. 399
----- Statistics, 1921____________ ________________ ________________________________ 1925—Sept. 15
Denmark. A g r ic u ltu r e ........... ............ ................................. .................. 1922—Nov. 135-8; 1924—Apr. 119
----- Dairy workers_______________________________ _____________ 1925—Jan. 119-20; 1926—Feb. 109
----- Labor tribunal established. “ September Agreement” (1899), provisions of_____ 1935—M ay 1280-1
----- Wage schedules, provisions of and legislation al:ecting, 1931 and 1932_________ 1933—Aug. 379-80
----- (And Norway). Termination of agreements_________________________________
1923—Apr. 65
England. (See under Great Britain, this section.)
Europe. Wage rates established, specified industries and occupations, by city, 1926... 1927—Aug. 132
Finland. Arbitration of disputes, cooperatives and trade-unions___________________ 1933—Jan. 138
----- Central Federation of Trade-Unions and Employers’ Central League, agreement,
Jan. 23, 1940_______________________________________________________________ 1940—Apr. 855-6
----- Cooperative associations, ILO analysis_______________________________________ 1939—Feb. 344
France. Agreements, by industry, reported to M inistry of Labor____ 1924—July 143; 1931—Oct. 133
----- Analysis of, 1920; and of agreements reported in 1931__________ 1931—M ay 89-93; 1932—Sept. 580
----- B y industry, Sept. 7, 1936, and Dec. 15, 1937; and r6sum6 of law covering_____ ' 1937—Oct. 861-3;
1938—M ay 1148-9
----- Cooperative associations, ILO analysis_______________________________________ 1939—Feb. 344
----- General Federation of Labor and Consultative Chamber of the Workers’ Coop­
erative Productive Associations____________________________________________ 1924—Apr. 204-5
----- Joint committee for concluding, provided by law of June 1936................................ 1936—Sept. 623-4
----- Law of June 24,1936, status of progress under. _______ ___ __________________ 1938—Sept. 624-5
----- Legalization of, provided for by law of June 1936__________ _______ 1936—Aug. 403-4, Sept. 623-4
----- Seamen, mercantile marine, 1921__________ _____ ___________ _______ _________ 1921—Oct. 103
----- Shipbuilding industry. Metal workers and port laborers, 1924________ ____ ____
1925—Jan. 62
----- Statistics___________________________________ 1922—Feb. 101; 1925—N ov. 102-3;1930—Jan. 106-7
----- Survey of existing law and practices, summary of report of National Economic
Council_________ _________ _________ _____ ________________________________ 1935—Oct. 959-64
Germany. Agreements in effect, 1924 to 1928, statistics_________ ______________ _ 1929—N ov. 113-15
----- Bargaining, guiding principles_____________________ ____ _________________1921—Dec. 102-4
----- Collective bargaining, growth of under agreements in 1924.................................... . 1926—Sept. 190-4
----- Iron and steel industry, typical agreements_____________ ___________ ______ 1926—Nov. 121-9
----- Pottery industry, national agreement, Feb. 1, 1926................................................... 1926—Dec. 135-43
----- Prevalence of, since World War______ ____ ____________ ____________ _________ 1921—Apr. 168
----- Printing trade, minimum wage rates, under agreements of 1912 and 1921................ 1922—Jan. 121-3
----- Seamen, Aug. 15, 1922, with shipowners.............................................................................. 1923—Aug. 139




64

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Collective agreements, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Germany. Shorter working time, 8-hour day, workers’ activities________________ 1923—June 123-4
----- Statistics, and development of collective bargaining__________ 1921—N ov. 119-25; 1925—June 76-7
— (Silesia). Lumber industry, wages, Jan. 2, 1934, minimum rates, by occupation
and district___________________ - _________________________________________ 1935—June 1570-1
Great Britain. Agencies and procedure for negotiating agreements, handling claims,
etc____ ___________________________________________________ _______________ 1935—Feb. 338-45
----- Analysis of agreements in effect in more important industries________ ________ 1935—Feb. 338-45
----- Boot and shoe industry, 1924______________________________ _______________ 1925—Feb. 116-17
----- Characteristics of. (Report of United States Commission, 1938)............................. 1938—Oct. 720-1
----- Cooperative associations, ILO analysis_______________________________________ 1939—Feb. 344
----- Cotton-textile industry, legalization of, provisions re wages and multiple-loom
1935—Sept. 680-1
----- Engineering trades, affecting 500,000 workers, Aug. 2 3 ,1937__.................................... 1937—Oct. 959-60
----- Holidays with pay, provisions for_________________________________________ 1925—M ay 96-7
----- Industrial disputes, provisions concerning mode of settlement......... .......................
1938—July 47
----- Leave with pay in British factories_______________________________________1923—Feb.
162-3
----- Modification, compensation for lost time due to air-raid precautions......................
1940—Jan. 55
----- Negotiation, industrial, methods of______________________________ ________1923—Mar.
10-14
----- Paid-vacation provisions, status, 1938----- --------- ----------------------- -------------------- 1939—Aug. 343-7
----- Railways. Provisions re collective bargaining, Jan. 22, 1934................................... 1935—M ay 1223-4
------------Revision of wage scales, Aug. 10,1934------------------------------------------------- 1934—Oct. 988-9
------------Wage-cut agreement of Aug. 13, 1928, continued to M ay 13,1930____________ 1929—Dec. 164
----- Retail trade, Feb. 19,1937, provisions________________________________________ 1937—Apr. 932-3
----- Seamen, Merchant Marine, through National Maritime Board, June 17, 1936,
provisions re shorter workweek, effective Oct. 1, 1936________________ 1936—Aug. 470, Dec. 1513-14
----- Shorter working time, 8-hour day secured in principal trades by collective agree­
ments_____________________________________________________________________ 1923—M ay 126-7
----- Stores, mercantile (chain-grocery), N ov. 22, 1937-------------------------------- --------- 1938—Mar. 705-6
----- Transport and General Workers’ Union, 40-hour week agreement....... .................. 1933—Jan. 188-9
----- Vacations with pay, analysis of agreement provisions__________________________ 1934—Sept. 715
----- (England). Cotton-textile industry, “ Six looms per weaver’’ agreement, effective
January 1933, summary of terms_____________________________________________ 1933—Mar. 563-4
----------- Cotton-textile industry, wage rates, 4-loom weavers_____________________ 1934—Dec. 1487-8
- ----------Engineering industry, new agreement, June 23, effective July 6, 1931, sum­
mary------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1931—Sept. 113
------------Legalization of cotton-textile wage agreement, M ay 1934......... .......................... 1934—Aug. 387-8
----------- Mining, coal__________________________________________________________ 1927—Feb. 22-3
------------Motorbus industry, agreement effective to Sept. 30, 1934, provisions of___ 1934—Apr. 934-5
----------- Pottery industry--------------------------------------------------------- --------------------- 1926—Dec. 115-20
------------Railroads, wage-cut agreement, Aug. 13,1928— '....................................... ....... 1928—Sept. 149-50
----------- Silk industry, Leek, 1920.................... ......................... ....................... ................. . 1921—Nov. 103-5
----------- Terms of coal truce...................... ........................... ‘......... ........................... .............. 1925—Oct. 19-22
----------- Woolen and worsted industry--------------------------------------------------------------- 1928—Sept. 23-4
----- (Lancashire). Textile industry, cotton-weavers, legalization provided for by
law of M ay 1934___________________________________________ ____ ____________ 1936—Aug. 398-9
-----(Lancashire district). Cotton-textile industry, December 1936------------------------ 1937—Mar. 672-6
----- (London). Transportation employees. Provisions concerning vacations with
pay______________________________________________________ _________________ 1937—Mar. 704-5
----- (South Wales). Iron and steel industry, sliding scale_______________________ 3926—Oct. 153-5
----- (Stoke-on-Trent). Pottery industry, 1923---------------------------------------- ---------- 1923—June 44-5
Irish Free State. Legalization of provided by 1936 labor law_------ ------------------------ 1936—Aug. 402-3
Italy. Agriculture__________________________________________ 1921—July 130-4; 1924—Sept. 108-10
----- Bargaining, rapid growth of........................ ...................................... ..............- ................ 1921—July 160-1
----- Confederation of Fascist Trade-Unions.............................. .......................................... 1923—N ov. 138-9
----- Daily hours and hourly wage rates established............................................................... 1930—M ay 173-5
----- Decree regulating, 1923................. ............ .............. ........................................................... 1923—Dec. 130-1
----- Family-allowance provisions, 1939.......... .............................................. ........................ 1940—M ay 1165-7
----- Facist employees’ and workers’ confederations in industry and commerce,
effective Dec. 1, 1939 and Jan. 1, 1940-------------------------- --------- -------------------------- 1940—Jan. 57-8
----- 40-hour week adopted to reduce number ofunemployed, N ov. 8,1934.................. . 1935—Mar. 736-7
----- Gas industry, national agreement, Jan.1,1928.............................................................. 1929—July 178-9
----- Legislation, 1925................ .................................................................................................... 1926—Mar. 164-5
----- Seamen__________ ____ _____ _____ ________ _____ ____ ______ ______ _________ 1922—Aug. 101-2
----- Sugar industry, tripartite agreement, growers, manufacturers, and laborers, 1923. 1923—N ov. 138-40
----- Tugboat employees----------------------- ------- --------------------- ------------------------------ 1921—Feb. 92-5
----- (Naples). Port Workers, National Federation o f------------- -------------------------- 1922—Aug. 102-3
Mexico. Bargaining, under State labor laws. (Dobbin)................. 1923—Aug. 189-204, Sept. 146-58
----- Cotton-textile industry, provisions, as of 1938 and 1939........ 1939—Feb. 399,403-4; 1940—M ay 1140-6
----- Industries covered by national organizations as of 1938................. ............................ 1939—Feb. 398-404
----- Legalization of, silk and artificial-silk industry......................................... ................. . 1936—Aug. 399
----- Mazapil Copper Co., averting shut-down, July 21,1927............................................... . 1927—N ov. 144
----- Rubber industry, provisions, as of 1938.............................. ............................................ 1939—Feb. 399,402
----- Silk and artificial-silk industry. Provisions, as of 1938............................................ 1939—Feb. 398-400
------------ Statutory effect given. ............... ...................................... ........................................... 1936—Aug. 399
----- Sugar, alcohol, and allied industries, provisions, as of 1938...................................... 1939—Feb. 399,402-3
----- Textile industry, 1928________________ .v .................................................................. . 1929—Mar. 68-9
----- Woolen-textile industry, provisions, as of 1938................. ....................................... .. 1939—Feb. 399-401
----- (Tamaulipas). Labor law provisions, 1925...................... ........................................... 1925—Nov. 207
Netherlands. Agricultural workers, r6sum6 of, January 1920 ) June 1937.................... 1938—Apr. 897-9
----- Extent and provisions, 1919 and 1921........... ......... ................ ............ ......................... 1923—Apr. 86-8
----- Footwear industry. Fam ily allowances provided f o r ............. ............................ 1937—Sept. 650-1
------------ Legalization Dec. 24, 1937, to be effective to June 30, 1938. Provisions of
agreement.......................... .................................. ................................................................... 1938—M ay 1211-13
----- Number of contracts, enterprises, and workers involved, b y specified years,
1911 to 1936; law authorizing legalization, 1937___________ _____________ _____ 1938—Aug. 313, 318
----- Seamen; ships’ officers un ion................................................. ................................ ..........- 1925—June 78-82
----- (Rotterdam). Harbor workers, wages and working conditions, effective Oct. 18,
1937— ................................ - ...................................1.................................................................... 1938—Mar. 756-7




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

55

Collective agreements, foreign countries—Continued.
„
New Zealand. Legalization of, under Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
irage
Amendment Act of 1936............... . . .............. .......................................................................... 1938—Aug. 293
Norway. Cooperative associations, ILO analysis........ ....................................................... 1939—Feb. 344
----- Seamen and dock laborers, 1922_____________________________ _______________ 1922—Apr. 97-8
----- Seamen’s Association and Shipowners’ Association, “America Agreement,”
effective Oct. 1, 1939... ..................... ................................................................................. 1939—Dec. 1380
----- Shipping industry, wage scale, 1925..................................................... ............................... 1925—July 116
----- Statistics, 1923_______________ ________. . . . _____ ____ _________ 1925—Feb. 191; 1926—Jan. 143
----- Wage scales renewed, adjustments deferred until spring of 1935________________ 1933—June 1294
Poland. (Dabrowa Basin). M ines,machinery for settlement of disputes and making
agreements, 1921______ ____________ ____________ __________________ ________ 1922—June 112-14
Russia. Labor Code, 1922.................................................. .......................................................... 1923—July 212
South Africa. Building trades, Aug. 30, 1932, provisions of._....................................... 1933—Jan. 189-9Q
----- Gold mining. Closed shop policy, effective June 1, 1937...................................... 1937—Sept. 635-6
----- (Natal). Mining, coal_________________ _____ . . ____ . ___________ ____ _____ 1922—June 95-6
Spain. (Vizcaya). Mining, coal, wage scale_________ _______________ ____________ 1925—July 116
Sweden. Agriculture, farm labor, 1920 and 1936, provisions_________ 1922—Sept. 128; 1937—Mar. 676
----- Basic, between employers’ and employees^ organizations, 1938, provisions............ 1939—Apr. 841-4
----- Compulsory arbitration, act of M ay 25, 1928..................................................................... 1928—Aug. 118
----- Cooperative associations, ILO anaylsis.............................................................................. 1939—Feb. 344
----- Development, provisions, coverage, etc.............................................................................. 1924—Dec. 91-6
----- Newspaper printing, Dec. 1,1937— .................................................................................... 1938—Mar. 706
----- Report of United States Commission....................................................... .............. .......... 1938—Oct. 723-7
----- R6sum6 of status in 1938. ............................................................................... ..................... 1939—Sept. 617
----- Shipbuilding trades, conditions under................................................................................. 1938—Jan. 98-9
----- Statistics..------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—July 139; 1926r-Apr. 96-7
----- Trade-unions and employers’ federation, sliding wage scale under............................ 1940—Apr. 984-5
Yugoslavia. Provisions of new labor law, Feb. 13, 1937.......... .......................................... 1937—July 136-7
Collective bargaining, United States:
Beginning of, men’s clothing industry, Chicago. (Gadsby)................................................ 1922—June 1-4
Cement industry. Status, and provisions of agreements as of 1938. ................... ....... 1938—Oct. 785-91
Clothing industry (men’s). Amalgamated Clothing Workers, history of agreements
since 1910............... ......................... — ....................................................................... - ............ 1937—July 17-28
----- Beginning of, Chicago. (Gadsby)...................................................... ............................... 1922—June 1-4
Cooperative associations, extent of, study of, 1936 and 1937........ ............ ......................... 1938—Sept. 497-9
Elections for employee representatives. (See under Employee representation.)
Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers, United, since 1935, and general provisions of
agreements.................................................... .............................................................................. 1938—July 67-77
Employee elections. (See under Employee representation.)
Extent of, in 1938.......................... ........... ................... ................................................................ 1939—Mar. 506-8
Geographic areas covered by, in certain industries.............................................................. 1939—Aug. 306-7
Glass industry, 1935-36.................................................................................. ........................ 1936—M ay 1204-15
Hosiery industry, status in 1936................. .................................. ......................................... 1936—Sept. 558-72
Labor organizations with employers’ associations. Summary, and relative frequency
by trade or industry..------------------------ ------------------- ---------------- --------- --------- 1939—Aug. 302-10
Legislation—Labor relations. {See under Laws and legislation, United States, Federal
and general.)
Mining industry. Coal. Workers with employers’ associations................................... 1939—Aug. 303-4
----- Metal. Development, 1867 to 1937._________ _______________________ _______ 1938—Sep t 591-8
National Industrial Recovery Act, methods in use under, study of extent of.............. 1934—Feb. 308-11
Newspaper Guild, American. March 1940 status............................................................. 1940—Apr. 825-42
Petroleum industry, development since 1934.......................... ............................................. 1937—Feb. 419-25
Promotion of, by U. S. Department of Labor, 1918 to 1938. ........................................... 1938—Feb. 309-10
Pulp and paper industry, Pacific Northwest........................................................... .......... 1936—Nov. 1176-7
Railroads. (See under Railroads.)
Right of labor to. Senate resolution, 1936, directing investigation as to undue inter­
ference w ith------------------ ----- ------------- ------------------ ---------------- --------------------- 1936—Aug. 378
----- Upheld, railroad employees, Texas
1928—June 96 8: 1929—Oct. 78-80, Dec. 82; 1930—Aug. 88-91
Rubber industry, since 1933, sum m ary..................................... ......................................... 1939—Sept. 604-17
Status in 1935, study by National Industrial Conference Board, Inc........... .................... 1936—July 88
Trade-union incorporation, historical review of............................. .............. ......................... 1935—Jan. 38-43
Transit lines (electric-railway, motorbus, and taxicab employees) N ew York City.
History, and status 1937.................................................................................................... . 1938—Mar. 686-93
{See also under Collective agreements.)
Collective bargaining, foreign countries:
Agricultural laborers, practices in various countries---------- ------ ----------------------------- 1936—Jan. 77-9
France. Survey of existing law and practices re collective agreements, summary of
report of National Economic Council_______________________ _________________ 1935—Oct. 959-64
French Indo-China. Labor code, decrees of Dec. 30, 1936_________________________ 1937—Aug. 380
Germany. Replaced by labor regulations_______________________________________
1938—Jan. 95
Great Britain. History of, and summary of law, report by U. S. Commission, 1938. 1938—Oct. 715-23
Sweden. Summary of status. Report of U. S. Commission, 1938________________ 1938—Oct. 724-7
{See also under Collective agreements.)
Collective manufacturing for door-to-door distributing. N R A code, effective Aug. 13,1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions___________________ ______________ ______________ 1934—Oct. 877
College graduates:
Employment status and average annual salaries. (Purdue University report)---------- 1936—Oct. 875-7
Occupational and income status, 1936. (Summary of U. S. Office of Education report). 1939—M ay 1171-5
Colleges and universities:
Family allowances for professors and ministers------- ----- ------ -------------------- -----------1931—June 115-16
France. Labor university founded in Paris________________________________ _____ 1923—M ay 256
Great Britain. (England). Village colleges to serve groups of neighboring villages,
plan for______________________________________________________ ____ _________ 1930—July 151
United States. Salaries paid in 401, 1919-20______________________________________ 1921—Jan. 110
----- Workers’ universities................. ...................................................................... ..................1921—June 185-92
----- Yale University, Institute of Human Relations established-------------- ---------------- 1929—June 109
{See also under Workers’ education.)
Colonial times, history of wages from, in United States_____ ____ - ........................................ 1929—Dec. 122-4




56

m onthly

labor

r e v ie w

Colonization:
Argentina. Railway companies, association of, to settle agricultural lands by families
P age
from abroad_______________________________________________________ _______ 1927—Oct. 211
Bethlehem Steel Co. Mexican labor colony at Bethlehem, P a ______________________ 1931—Oct. 74-8
Brazil. Colonies established, immigration policies and legislation, statistics.
(Cameron)--------- ---------------- ------ ------- -------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Oct. 36-46
----- (Amazonas). State government concessions, agricultural development, Japanese. 1927—Aug. 98
Manchuria. N ative farmers displaced by Japanese immigration, plans for.. ______ 1946—June 1385-7
----- (Sankiang Province). Rehabilitation plan considered for native farmers displaced
by Japanese.. ---------------------- ------------------- ------ ------- -------------------- --------1946—June 1385-6
Panama and Guatemala. Schemes......................................... .................................. ............ 1925—Mar. 266-1
Peru. Presidential decree regulating.................................... ..................... .............................. 1927—June 212
Spain. Cooperative societies............................................... ........................... ............................ 1927—Oct. 72-4
(See also Land settlement and reclamation.)
Colony for aged. Cottages for recipients of old-age assistance or war pensions (Cumberland
County, N . J .)-------- ------ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 306-1
Colored persons, aged. Homes for.............................................................................................. . 1929—Aug. 10-14
Colored workers. (See Negro workers; also Negroes.)
Columbian Iron Works Co. (Chattanooga, Tenn.). Decisions, N L R B , N ov. 8, 1934,
and Feb. 18; 1 9 3 5 . ---------------------- --------------------------------------- ------------- 1935—Jan. 126, Apr. 973
Columbian Steel Tank Co. Decision, N L R B , Oct. 1,1934...................................... .............. 1934—N ov. 1155-6
Combines. (See Mergers, combines, etc.)
Commander Mills, Inc. Decision, Textile Labor Relations Board, Dec. 12, 1934 (Sand
Springs, Okla.)------------------------------------------------------------------------ -------------------------- 1935—Apr. 975
Commerce, Department of (U. S. Government):
Division of Review, Division of Cooperation, and Advisory Council transferred from
N R A , Jan. 1,1936__________________________ ____ __________ _____ ___________ 1936—Feb. 334-5
Functions in behalf of miners and seamen_____________ ____ _____ _______________ 1931—Mar. 23-8
Transfers affecting, under Reorganization Plans effective July 1,1939-................... 1939—Aug. 378, 380-2
Commercial aviation. (See under Air-transport industry.)
Commerical and breeder hatchery. N R A code, effective Jan. 1, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions---------------------- ---------------------- ------- ------ -------------------- ---------- ------ 1934—Feb. 305
Commercial employees:
Peru. Law regulating working conditions-............................................................................
1926—Aug. 93
Salvador. Protective legislation, 1926...................................................................................... 1926—N ov. 91-2
Commercial fixture industry. N R A code, effective M ay 14, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions____________ _______ - ------------------------------------------ -------------------------------1934—July 48
Commercial refrigerator industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 1, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions____________________________________________ ____________________ 1934—Feb. 298
Commercial telegraphers. (See under Telegraph industry.)
Commercial vehicle body industry. N R A code, effective July 36, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions--------------- ------ -------------------------------- -------------------------------- ---------- 1934—Sept. 625
Commissions on industrial conditions. (See Industrial conditions, reports on, by com­
missions, etc.)
Commissions, investigative. Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Committee for Industrial Organization. (See under Labor organizations.)
Committee of Industrial Analysis. Creation of by Executive order, Mar. 21, 1936, to com­
plete summarization of N R A accomplishments.................................... .................................. 1936—M ay 1234-5
Commodity Credit Corporation (U. S. Government). Transfer under Reorganization
Plan No. 1, effective July 1, 1939__________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 379
Common labor. (See Unskilled labor; also under Wages and hours—Unskilled labor.)
Common laborers’ union. (See Hod Carriers, Building and Common Laborers’ Union of
North America, International.)
Commonwealth College, Mena (Ark.):
Workers’ education. ........ ...................................................... .................................................. 1926—July 99-106
----- Courses.................... ................................................................................................................. 1939—July 7-8
Commonwealth Shoe & Leather Co. (Whitman, Mass.). Decision, N L R B , Dec.
1,1934------------------ ------------------------------------------ ---------------------------------- ------- 1935—Jan. 118-19
Communications industries. Labor organizations................................. ................... ............. 1937—Feb. 309-10
Community welfare. (See under Welfare' work.)
Company benefit plans for employees. (See under Benefits and benefit funds.)
Company housing. (See under Housing, United States.).
Company (industrial) police. Employer’s liability for actions of, court decisions...............1925—Jan. 170-1
Company insurance for employees. (See under Life insurance (group).)
Company loans. (See Loan funds and plans, employer-to-employee.)
Company medical service. (See under Medical and hospital service, industrial.)
Company pension plans. (See under Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Company stores:
Economic and social implications of script system. (N R A study).................................. 1935—July 45-53
3e
Reduction in cost of living by, Arizona......................... ........................ ................................... 1923—Apr. 53
Script payment of wages and protection of employees as traders, legislation re............... 1936—July 74-6
Company towns. (See under Housing.)
Company unions:
Characteristics of. (Peterson and Senturia)....................................... ............ .................... 1938—Apr. 821-30
Employer-employee dealing, extent of type used, as of April 1935. (Senturia)............ 1935—Dec. 1441-66
Extent and characteristics of. (BLS survey, April 1935, preliminary report)______ 1935—Oct. 865-76
Greyhound Lines, Inc., Pennsylvania and Pacific. N L R B orders, order for with­
drawal of recognition upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.).................................................................... 1938—Apr. 904-7
N R A period, changes during............................................................................................. ......... 1938—Apr. 828-9
Compensation benefits. (See Workmen’s ^compensation.)
Compensation, dismissal. See Dismissal wage (compensation).)
Compressed-air industry. N R A code, effective Oct. 22, 1933, summary of labor provi­
sions............................................................................................................................... 1933—N ov. 1060-1, Dec. 1335
Compressed-air work:
Maine act of 1931, text.............................................................................................................. 1931—June 92-100
Safety rules (caisson and tunneling), scope of proposed code, A. S. A ............................ 1933—M ay 1069
Compulsory arbitration. ((See under Conciliation and arbitration.)
Compulsory health Insurance. (See under Health (or sickness) insurance.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

57

Compulsory labor, foreign countries:
Page
General. Draft convention, International Labor Conference, June 1920.......................... 1930—Sept. 93
----- For private employers, colonial possessions____________________________ ____ _ 1930—M ay 57-67
----- Suppression of, international labor conventions (agreements), 1930, provisions of- 1934—Apr. 777-8
Bolivia. Decree of July 6, 1936, providing for compulsory employment_____________ 1936—Oct. 895
Bulgaria. Conscript labor for new roads and railways, 1925_______________________
1925—Apr. 28
----- Conscription of labor act, June 10, 1920. Economic and political background,
administration and results. (Lazard)_________ _____ ____ ______ ______________ 1923—June 19-33
------------Principal provisions___________________________________ _________ _____ 1921—Jan. 197-8
----- System of, results since 1921......... ............................................................................. ...........
1925—June 12
China. Males, between 18 and 45 years.......... ........................................... ...................... 1937—Sept. 613-14
Czechoslovakia, German-occupied (Bohemia-Moravia). Decree, July 25, 1939, provi­
sions_____________________________________________________________________ 1939—Dec. 1406-7
French Indo-China. Order of Governor General restricting and abolishing, provi­
sions of_______________ _____ ____________ ____ ____________________________ 1932—Dec. 1309-10
Germany. Extension of, to include students and civil-service officials____ _________ 1935—Apr. 883
----- Opposition penalized by Government orders, 1940_________ ____ _______________ 1940—Sept. 584
----- Prerequisite to army service, and made universal, provisions of 1935 laws____ 1935—N ov. 1218-20
----- Prisoners, decree of M ay 1938_______ ______________________________________ 1939—Feb. 350-1
----- Service to include all young men, effective Jan. 1,1934_________ _____ _________ 1933—Aug. 286-7
----- State agencies empowered to assign to work or training, decree of June 22,1938. _ 1938—Sept. 542-3
----- Young workers, enrollment and financing, 1931-33_____________________ ______ _ 1933—July 30-1
Great Britain. Colonial possessions in South Africa, vagrancy ordinance-.................. 1930—M ay 59-60
India. Summary of situation in _ _........ ............ ................................................................... . 1929—Aug. 67-8
----- (Hyderabad). Serfdom systems briefly described..................................................... 1932—Dec. 1308-9
Japan. System established by imperial order of July 8, 1939____ _____ _____ ____ 1939—Dec. 1380-1
Liberia. Slavery and Forced Labor, International Commission of Inquiry into Ex­
istence of, report (September 1 9 3 0 ) _______________ _________________________ 1931—M ay 58-62
Nicaragua. New road-conscription law_____ ______________ _____________________
1926—Oct. 98
Paraguay. M en between 18 and 50, for agriculture and public works, laws of October
and December 1936________________________________________________ ____ ____ 1937—Mar. 637-8
Russia (U. S. S. R .). Lumber industry, forced and convict labor in............................. 1930—June 78-9
Compulsory old-age insurance. (See under Old-age pensions and retirement.)
Compulsory rest. (See Sunday and holiday work.)
Conciliation and arbitration, United States:
Adjustment agencies during the war, functions of................................................ .............. 1921—Apr. 174-6
Adjustment machinery under collective agreements, examples, various industries.. 1940—Feb. 295-311
Agencies. Governmental and other, for adjustment of industrial disputes. (Peter­
son)__________ _____ _____ ____ ____ ______ _______________________ ________ 1939—N ov. 1023-44
----- Nongovernmental (union—employer arrangements; American Arbitration As­
sociation; local committees)________________________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1026-8
American Arbitration Association decision, increase in piece-work rate on foundry
o p era tio n .......................................................... ..................... ............................................. .
1939—Apr. 838
Arbitration. Awards (decisions). (See under specific industry.)
----- Board, creation and duties of, Ponca City (Okla.)__............................................. . . . 1925—Dec. 202-3
----- Cases involving wages and hours, results, 1865 to 1929.............................................. 1929—Nov. 14-20
Awards and findings, trade-board. (See under specific industry.)
Board of Labor Review organized by Public Works Administration, duties of..........
1934—Jan. 34
Boot and shoe industry. (See under Boot and shoe industry.)
Building trades. (See under Building trades.)
Chairman, impartial, decisions of. (See under specific industry.)
Change of firm name. Obligation of employer to fulfill terms of collective contract
still in existence (U. S. Conciliation Service award)_________________ ______ _____ 1939—Apr. 838
City conciliation boards, extent of use by municipalities and Toledo and Newark
organizations________________________________________________ . ___________ 1939—N ov. 1043-4
Closed shop, claim for, upheld by small claims and conciliation branch of District of
Columbia Municipal Court (Gas Workers’ Union)_____________ ___________ ____ 1939—Apr. 837
Conciliation tribunals, in small claims adjustments, experience. (Taft)____________ 1926—M ay 34-6
Conciliators, specially trained, usefulness. (Davis)______________________ ________ 1922—Jan. 6-8
Courts, industrial. Act, advisability of, report of American Bar Association.......... 1926—Oct. 35-7
----- Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. Annual reports_____________________ 1921—June 133-4;
1922—Sept. 12-13; 1923—Aug. 43-4; 1925—June 123-4
------------ Operations, 1920-23, and opposition to _______________________ _____ ___ 1939—N ov. 1030-1
Decisions, industrial commission. (See under specific industry.)
Department of Labor. Activities of United States Conciliation Service. (See each
issue, M . L. R., January 1933 to December 1940.)
----- Functions and procedure o f._________ ____ _______________________________ 1939—N ov. 1034-5
----- Work of, by States and industries, years ending June 30, 1938, 1939, and 1940... 1638—Oct. 851-3;
1939—Sept. 705-7; 1940—Oct. 966-7
Disarmament in industry, Secretary of Labor. (D avis).......... ........................................... 1922—Jan. 5-11
Dress industry, N ew York City, arbitration in the. (Stone)—..................................... - 1931—Dec. 18-30
Federal and State, types of, and specific agencies.................... ........................................ 1939—N ov. 1028-44
Federal Service created 1913, activities year, 1938................ .................. .............................- 1939—Mar. 499
Gas, coke, and chemical workers, collective-agreement provisions................................ 1939—Apr. 831-2
Gas industry, industrial dispute, settlement effected by D . C. Small-Claims C ourt.. . 1939—Aug. 280
Governmentaland other agencies for adjustment of industrial disputes. (Peterson).. 1939—N ov. 1023-44
Hosiery industry, Reading (Pa.) strike adjusted, National Labor Board, text of agree­
ment, Aug. 11, 1933..___________ _____________________________________________ 1933—Sept. 553
Industrial Arbitration Tribunal, Voluntary. Creation (1937), structure, and pur­
pose. ..................... ........................................... ............... ............. ................................
1937—Dec. 1411-13
Industrial courts. (See Courts, industrial, this section.)
Investigation of industrial disputes, compulsory. Colorado, provisions, effectiveness,
etc., of la w ............................... .............................. ...................... ......................................... 1928—Feb. 113-17
Jurisdictional disputes. Building trades, steps to eliminate......... ...................................... 1930—Mar. 96
----- Secretary of Labor (D avis)._____ _____ _____________________ ________________ 1925—N ov. 1-3
Laborers, building, Denver (Colo.), wage increase denied, Jan. 14,1930....... .................... 1930—Mar. 98
Lay-off of employees (wholesale shoe) covered by collective contract (U, S. Conciliation
Service award)............................ ....................... ...................................................................... 1939—Apr. 839-40




58

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Conciliation and arbitration, United States—Continued.
P age
Local unions providing by agreement for joint settlement of disputes............................. 1928—Oct. 17-18
Mediation, United States Board of. (See Mediation, U. S. Board of.)
Municipal labor boards, Toledo (Ohio) and Newark (N . J.), summaries of cases
handled..."_______________________ _____ _______ _____________ ___ _______ ___ 1939—N ov. 1043-9
National Labor Board. (See National Labor Board.)
National Labor Relations Board. (See National Labor Relations Board.)
National Labor Relations (Wagner-Connery) Act. (See under Decisions of courts;
also Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general.)
National Mediation Board (U. S. Government). (See National Mediation Board.)
Petroleum industry. Labor Policy Board. (See Petroleum Labor Policy Board.)
Railroad Emergency Boards. (See Railroads—Emergency boards.)
Railroads. Boards of adjustment, dissolution----------------------------------------------- - 1921—Feb. 115-16
----- Developments since 1888, including Federal boards established........................ . 1939—N ov. 1032-4
----- Federal power in settlement of disputes. (Fisher)-------------------------------------- 1922—M ay 199-201
----- Pennsylvania Railroad, memorandum of understanding with employees______ 1921—Mar. 122-5
----- Work of National Mediation Board and National Railroad Adjustment Board.
(See under names of Boards.)
Railway Labor Act, 1926. (See under Decisions of courts; Laws and legislation; Rail­
roads—Awards.)
Referees’ decision. (See under specific industry.)
Replacement of workers discharged (wholesale dry-goods). Collective-agreement pro­
visions upheld by U . S. Conciliation Service------------------------------------------------------ 1939—Apr. 839
Round table, the industrial, in labor disputes. (M arks)-------------------------------------- 1925—June 1-10
Rubber industry. Collective agreement provisions concerning-------------------------- 1939—Sept. 614-16
Ship Clerks’ Union (San Francisco), wages and vacations with pay awarded, and added
to agreement, 1940________________________________________________________ 1940—N ov. 1086-93
Shipbuilding industry. Collective agreement provisions for........................................ 1940—Sept. 612-13
----- Labor Adjustment Board, history of............................... ............................................... 1921—June 183-4
State machinery for, status------------------------------- ----------------------- ------ ------------- 1939—N ov. 1036-43
Trade-board decisions. (See under specific industry.)
Upholsterers and floor-covering trades, provisions m collective agreements.............. 1937—N ov. 1122-3
Wage disputes. Settlement of. (F eis)------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—Dec. 181-4
Wartime controversies, adjustment of. (B ing)------------------------------------------------- - 1921—Apr. 174-6
When required, in connection with industrial disputes. (Peterson).......................... 1939—N ov. 1024-6
(See also under National Labor Relations Board.)
Conciliation and arbitration, foreign countries:
General. Industrial disputes, legislative provisions in democratic countries, summary
of___________________________________ _____ ______________________________ 1939—N ov. 1050-74
----- Journalists, settlement of disputes--------------------------------------------------------------. _. 1929—Jan. 46
Australia. Commonwealth Court of. Composition and functions.............................. 1938—Dec. 1290-2
---------— Decision establishing minimum-wage increase------------- ------------------------- 1937—Sept. 697-9
----- Employers’ attitude toward conciliation and arbitration la w .................. ................. . 1923—Jan. 220
----- Federal system of arbitration, Government bill to repeal................... ...................... 1929—N ov. 80-1
----- Proposed changes in plan________________________________________ ______ 1922—Feb. 138-9
----- (Queensland). Act of 1929 (effective Jan. 23,1930), principal features___________
1930—Aug. 94
----------- Board of Trade and Arbitration, new industrial court, law of October 1925... 1926—Feb 231
----------- Law substituting new system of (assented to Jan. 6,1933), powers of arbitra­
tion court, and agreements__________________________________________________ 1933—July 108-9
Bolivia. Decree of Sept. 29,1920, text_________________________________________ 1921—Feb. 174-5
Canada. Electrical-construction industry, council on industrial relations for, crea­
tion_______________________________________________________________________ 1921—Mar. 126-7
----- Industrial Disputes Investigation Act of 1907. Amendments, validity, and pro­
cedure under_______________ 1924—N ov. 254; 1925—Mar. 196, M ay 200-3, Sept. 190-1; 1940—Jan. 44
----- ------ Results under, 1907 to 1925___________________ i ........................................ ......... 1928—Jan. 48-53
----- Railway dispute, arbitration award, N ov. 8 ,1921...________ _______ __________ 1922—Jan. 156-6
----- (British Columbia). Act of 1937, provisions_________________________________ 1938—Apr. 895-7
----- (Manitoba). Joint Council of Industry, basic principles of settling disputes, organ­
ization, and activities___________________________________________ 1922—Feb. 13; 1923—Mar. 6-7
----- (Montreal). Clothing industries, arbitration decision, Jan. 3, 1922..................... 1922—Mar. 99-100
----- (Nova Scotia). Coal mining, wage decision________________________________ 1922—Apr. 131-3
------------“Industrial Peace A ct,” M ay 7, 1925.................................. ..................................... 1925—Sept. 191-2
----- (Quebec). Municipal Strike and Lock-Out Act, summary.............................. ........... 1921—July 213
----- (Toronto). Clothing industry, stoppage of work...................................................... . 1926—Oct. 221-2
Chile. Labor disputes, procedure for settlement o f . ..................................................... 1926—Oct. 116-17
China. Act of June 9, 1929, translation of text. (T so)................................................... 1929—Sept. 98-102
----- M ediation methods, in strikes........................................................................................... . 1926—Oct. 102-3
Colombia. Decree of Oct. 4,1920, collective labor disputes.................................. ..........1921—Aug. 178-9
Cuba. Compulsory arbitration of labor disputes, maritime work, in port..................... 1924—N ov. 254
Czechoslovakia. Activities of arbitration boards, 1922. _________________ _________ 1923—Sept. 178
Denmark. Board of Arbitration, establishment (April 1910) and duties of_______ 1935—M ay 1280-1
----- Conciliation system. Simplified procedure in administration of justice. (Smith) _ 1926—M ay 40-9
----- Laws of 1934,1936, and 1937__________________________ ______ _____ _________ 1937—Sept. 572-7
----- Permanent Arbitration Court, functions and activities_______________________ 1922—M ay 202-3
----- Permanent Labor Tribunal established (Sept. 1899), functions and activities o f._1935—M ay 1280-2
----- Proposals to terminate general lock-out of Feb. 15, 1922_______________________ 1922—July 176-7
England. (See under Great Britain.)
Egypt. Labor Conciliation Commission, established Aug. 18, 1919, function of____1921—Aug. 45-7
Estonia. Methods established by law of Mar. 12,1937__________________________ 1937—Sept. 577-8
Finland. Cooperatives and trade-unions, procedure in case of disputes, agreement-- 1933—Jan. 138
----- Law on conciliation in labor disputes, 1925________ ______ ____________________ 1935—Oct. 180
France. Compulsory, law of 1936, and decrees of 1937_______________ 1937—Apr. 902-3, Dec. 1413-14
----- High Court of Arbitration, act of 1938, organization, functions, operation, and
background________________________ --------------------------------------------------------- 1938—N ov. 1008-11
----- Law of Mar. 4,1938, application of provisions relating to cost of living___________ 1939—June 1416
----- Procedure under collective agreements and in other cases, under law of 1938___ 1938—June 1352-6
----- Superior Labor Council, resolutions______________________ ______________ _____ 1925—Jan. 199
Germany. Arbitration. Award, metal workers, wage increase..-.................................. 1929—Jan. 137-8




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

59

Conciliation and arbitration, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Germany. Arbitration. Machinery, new.............................................. ............................. 1924—June 18-21
------------System, functioning of, unsatisfactory..................................... ................................ 1925—July 201-2
-----Industrial conciliation, 1924__________ _____________________ ______ ____ ____ _ 1926—Apr. 170
----- Labor courts. Local, provincial, and Federal, activities of, 1929................................ 1929—Dec. 109
----------- Under act of Dec. 23,1926, operation____ _______________ ______________ 1928—Aug. 117-18
----- Merchant marine, arbitration board ( Tarifschiedsgericht) ________: _____________ 1923—Aug. 140
----- M etal workers. Lock-out, N ov. 1,1928, and compulsory arbitration. (Speek). 1929—Jan. 116-20
----------- Unions, Minister of Labor award, wage reduction. _ ........................................ 1930—N ov. 132-3
----- Revision of conciliation and arbitration laws, provisional-................................... .
1924r—Feb. 233-5
----- Settlement of disputes. Methods of. (Frankel)............. ............... ............................ 1923—Sept. 8-17
----------- Typical collective agreements___ ______________________ ________________ 1926—N ov. 125
Great Britain. Actors, joint negotiating council established to settle all disputes._ 1935—M ay 1222-3
----- Agricultural conciliation committees (quasi-statutory) set up, Oct. 1, 1921, and
objection to__........ ............................ .............................................- .............. .......1921—N ov. 180, Dec. 104-5
----- Civil service, arbitration within the____ _______ _______________________ ______ 1925—Sept. 192
----- Compulsory settlement, by national arbitration tribunal created July 18, 1940.. 1940—Sept. 576-7
----- Cooperative societies. And employees, arbitration, provision for..____ _________ 1927—Mar. 46
----------- Machinery for settling d isp u tes...__________________ ________ ____________ 1926—July 86-7
----- Industrial Court, functions of personnel, and operation_____ 1921—N ov. 189-91; 1928—July 102-5
----- Machinery for, and summary of settlements effected, 1924-36...................... ............ 1938—July 46-51
----- Methods of industrial negotiation______ ____________________ ______________ 1923—Mar. 10-14
----- Midland Iron & Steel Wages Board, rules and instructions___________________ 1926—Oct. 147-51
----- Railway-Staff National Tribunal, decision July 31,1936, wage scale----------------- 1936—Oct. 917-19
----- Welsh Tin Plate and Sheet Joint Industrial Council, constitution, rules, and
procedure_______________________ _________________ _____ ___________________ 1926—Oct. 151-3
----- (England). Building trades, award. ____________________ _____ ____________ 1923—Aug. 159-60
----------- Cotton-textile industry, arbitration award, wage reduction, Aug. 15, 1929.. 1929—Oct. 181-2
----------- Industrial court award, seagoing wireless operators’ strike-------------------------- 1926—N ov. 129
----------- M ining, coal, settlement of dispute, and terms of truce.............. 1925—Sept. 179-86, Oct. 19-22
----------- National Railway Board award, Mar. 5,1931________________ ___________ 1931—M ay 159-60
------------Railway shopmen, conciliation machinery............................................................. 1927—N ov. 143-4
------------Railway shopmen, negotiations and terms secured, 1931-32................................ 1931—M ay 161
------------Shipbuilding industry, conciliation plan for_______________________ _______ 1926—Apr. 171
----- (South Wales). Coal miners’ wage scale, local board award, Mar. 6,1931.......... .
1931—M ay 161
Iceland. Fishing industry, mediation, law of June 27,1925________________________ 1926—Apr. 172
India. Court of inquiry proposed by industrial disputes committee........ ..................
1922—July 180
----- Trade disputes act effective M ay 8,1929, synopsis.................................................... 1929—Sept. 102-3
Italy. Arbitration of labor disputes, compulsory, law of 1925......................... ............... 1926—Mar. 162-7
----- Industrial arbitration, decree, Dec. 2,1923................................................. ....................... 1924—July 232
----- Works councils and workers’ committees............................. ............................................. 1921—July 161
Japan. Law, effective July 1,1926, provisions.................................................... ................. 1926—N ov. 90-1
Mexico. Boards of conciliation and arbitration..................................................................... 1922—Dec. 197
----------- Compulsory submission of labor disputes to .......................................................... 1923—Sept. 151-8
----- Central boards, work of, 1926........... ............ ...................................................................... . 1927—Oct. 125
----- (Durango). Appointment of central board..__________________ _______________ 1924—Sept. 213
----- (Guanajuato). Permanent central conciliation board, duties_________________ 1922—Feb. 141-2
----- (Jalisco). Organization, powers, and duties, and procedure of conciliation boards,
law of Aug. 13, 1923______ ________________ ____ _____________________________ 1924—June 26-8
----- (Nayarit). Organization of boards, law of 1918_ ______ ___________________
_
1924—Aug. 181-2
----- (Tamaulipas). Conciliation boards provided for, labor law of 1925..................... 1925—N ov. 213-14
Netherlands. Abolition of official concilation boards........................... .............................. . 1923—M ay 227
----- Industrial Advisory Councils (joint), functions............................................................ 1937—Apr. 903-4
----- Legislation, act of M ay 4, 1923.............. .......... .................................................... ........... 1925—Sept. 192-4
----- Proposed law for voluntary arbitration_________________________________ _____ 1921—June 204
N ew Zealand. Arbitration court. Conciliation council, functions of_____________ _ 1921—Dec. 26-7
------------Historical summary from 1894 and effect of 1936 and later legislation_____ 1938—Aug. 290-3
------------Order, wage reductions__________ ____ _____________________________ ____ 1923—M ay 130
----- Compulsory arbitration abolished, act of Apr. 8,1932 (amending act of 1925)___ 1932—Sept. 576-7
----- Labor’s attitude toward compulsory arbitration, change in ...................................... . 1921—Dec. 27-8
----- Law amended, July 18,1939, provisions...... ............ ................................................. . 1940—Mar. 620-1
----- Procedure under law, since 1894....................................................................................... 1938—Aug. 289-95
Norway. Compulsory arbtiration of labor disputes act................. ............ ........................
1927—July 76
----- Conciliation procedure in administration of justice. (Smith)_________________ 1926—June 23-31
Peru. Collective labor disputes. Decree of M ay 30, 1939, provisions; and claims and
matters not covered__________________ ______________________________________ 1939—Oct. 907-8
----- Individual claims (for wage payment, dismissal indemnity, or Indians’ employ­
ment contracts). Summary of provisions_____ _________________ _________ _
1939—Oct. 909-10
Poland. Labor courts in former Russian and Austrian territory.-_______________ 1928—July 105-6
----- (Dabrowa Basin). Coal mines, arbitration committees, mines committees, miners’
delegates, functions___________ _____ ___________________ _____ _____________ 1922—June 112-14
Rumania. Compulsory conciliation, experience, 1920 to 1925..................................... 1927—M ay 148-51
----- Law on obligatory conciliation......................................... ................................................. 1921—M ay 150-1
Russia. Labor Code, settlement of disputes, 1922............................................................. . 1923—July 218
South Africa. Conciliation machinery for mining Industry______________________ 1923—Feb. 256-8
----- Industrial councils and conciliation boards, functions of, and procedure under act
of 1924_______________________________________________________ 1924—July 232-3; 1925—N ov. 216
Spain. Committees established by governmental d e c r e e __________ _____________ 1921—M ay 165
----- Compulsory arbitration, decree of Nov. 26,1926......................................... .................... 1927—M ay 151
----- Joint committees for settlement of labor disputes......................................................... 1923—June 240-1
Sweden. Central arbitration board created— ...................................................................... 1921—Jan. 232
----- Conciliators, official, work of, 1924________________ ____ __________ _____ _____ _ 1926—Apr. 172
----- Cooperative societies and employees, arbitration, provisions for__............................. 1927—M§r. 47
----- Labor courts, under act of M ay 25, 1928, operation_______________________ ____ _ 1928—Aug. 118
----- Laws of 1906 and later years including 1936_________ ____ ___________________ 1937—July 58,61-4
Turkey. Machinery provided for settlement of disputes, national labor law effective
June 1937_______ _____________ ___________ _________________________________ 1937—Mar. 641-2
Venezuela. National labor law of 1936, provisions_______________ ____ ____ _____ 1936—Dec. 1458-9
----- Settlement of labor disputes, law for..................... ............................................................... 1928—Dec. 135
(See also Collective agreements; Industrial disputes.)




60

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Conciliation courts. (See Small-claims courts.)
Concrete products, etc., industries:
Floor treatments, waterproofing, dampproofing, and calking compounds manufacturing.
P age
N R A code, effective Dec. 4,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions.^______________
1934—Jan. 41
Masonry. N R A code, effective Dec. 11, 1933, amended Oct. 10, 1934, tabular analysis
of labor provisions------------------------- ------------------ -------------------- 1934—Jan. 37; 1935—Mar. 654
Pipe manufacturing. N R A code, effective Jan. 14, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions-----------------. _ 1--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Feb. 298
Ready-mixed concrete. N R A code, effective Mar. 9, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions------ --------- ----------------------------------- -------------------------------------- ---------- 1934—Apr. 187
Conductors of America, Order of Railway:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements, U . S., by industry—Railroads.)
Court decision. Liability for interfering with employment, Colorado............ 1 ______ 1926—Jan. 202-3
Home for superannuated and disabled members, Savannah, Ga................................ 1928—Feb. 15,19-21
Labor-management cooperation___________________________ _______ __ ___________ 1931—M ay 44
Cond uctors, Order of Sleeping Car:
Cooperative policy with employers____ _________________________________________
1928—Oct. 12
Rest periods, working conditions, etc., Railroad Labor Board decisions..1924—Apr. 108; 1925—Apr. I ll
(See also under Railroads.)
Conductors, street railway. (See under Street and electric railway employees.)
Cone makers, New York City. Food Workers of America, Amalgamated, agreement____ 1925—Feb. 102
Confectioners, wholesale, industry. N R A code, effective June 11,1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions_________________________________ ____ ________________ _____ _____ 1934—Aug. 324
Confectionery and Bakery Workers’ Union. Decision, N L R B , Oct. 3, 1934 (Fort Worth,
T ex.)-------------------------------------------------------------- ------ --------------------------- ------------- 1934—Dec. 1431-2
Confectionery industry:
Minimum wage. Massachusetts, budget basis and rate............................................. ........... 1927—Feb. 25
(See also Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union of America; Baking
industry; Candy-manufacturing industry.)
Conferences, congresses, etc. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.)
Congress of Industrial Organization. (See under Labor organizations.)
Conscription of labor. (See Compulsory labor.)
Conservation and reforestation:
Forest and lumber. Problems and methods.............................. ..................................... 1940—July 53-5, 60-1
Indian lands. Activities of CCC (Indian divisions), sum m ary. ..................................... 1939—j uiy 94.5
N ew York State. Reforestation program, and legislative history, final report of Re­
forestation Commission, 1932 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1933—June 1241-2
Resources. Address of Stuart Chase at Power Conference, Washington, 1936_____ 1936—N ov. 1166-7
Soil. Great Plains, relation to migration from section_____ ____ ____________________ 1937—July 11
Southern States. Conservation of forests, necessity fo r .................................................. 1922—M ay 15-17
Unemployment relief through reforestation, Federal legislation, 1933. 1933—M ay 1039-40; 1934—Aug. 349
Conservation Work, Emergency. (See Emergency Conservation Work.)
Consolidated Film Co. (New York City and Fort Lee, N . J.). Decision, N L R B , Dec. 5,
1934 (printing pressmen)_______________________________ : ---------------------------------- 1935—Jan. 120-1
Construction, building. (See Building-construction industry; also under Housing.)
Construction industry, United States:
Accident experience, by cause, Ohio, 1926.......... ........................................................ ..............
1927—M ay 76
Accidents, causes and directions for prevention, and injury rates, 1936, 1938, and 1939,
by type of construction. (Kossoris and Kjaer)---------------------------------------------- 1938—Aug. 329-40;
1939—Sept. 658-73: 1940—Oct. 935-43
Building, heavy and railroad, and highway, accident-frequency rates, 1939, and pre­
ventive measures indicated------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Oct. 935-46
Collective agreements under code, N R A approval of to November 1934_____________ 1934—Dec. 1357-8
Collective-bargaining agreements under code, provisions of, by division of industry.. 1935—June 1484-7
Contracts. List of, entered into by United States Government__________________ 1922—M ay 144-50,
June 124-32, July 126-30, Aug. 138-47, Sept. 151-8, Oct. 89-91, Nov. 161-7
mployment fluctuation in. (See under Employment statistics.)
ederal funds, financed from. Labor requirements---------------------------------------------- 1937—M ay 1152
----- 1935 and 1936, value of contracts awarded, and force-account work started, by
Government agency________________________________________ 1936—Oct. 1038; 1937—M ay 1318-20
----- Value of contracts awarded and force-account work started, by month. (See
. section Building operations, each issue M . L. R ., October 1934-December 1940.)
Federal projects (regular governmental appropriations, financed from). First half of
1935 and 1934, value of contracts awarded, by type of project and geographic di­
vision____________________________________________ ____ ___________________ 1935—Oct. 1124-5
----- Value of contracts awarded, by geographic division and type of project. (See
section Building operations, each issue M . L . R ., October 1934-November 1935.)
----- (See also under PW A projects.)
Federal projects (PW A funds). 1934 and first half of 1935 and 1934, value of contracts
awarded, by type of project and geographic division____________ . . . 1935—Apr. 1093-4, Oct. 112 0 -2
----- Value of contracts awarded, by geographic division and type of project. (See section
Building operations, each issue of M . L. R ., January 1935-March 1936.)
Highways. Wisconsin Recovery Administration code, effective July 15, 1935, tabular
analysis of labor provisions____________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 630
Municipal funds, financed from (wholly or partly). Contracts awarded for street
paving, value of, by month, 1935 and 1936_______________________________ ______ 1937—May 1321
N R A code. Area wage agreements approved, to Jan. 9,1935............ ................ ............. 1935—Feb. 297
----- Effective Mar. 2,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_______________________ 1934—Mar. 532
Non-Federal projects (PW A funds). 1934 and first half of 1935, value of contracts
awarded, by type of project and geographic division___________________ 1935—Apr. 1094-5, Oct. 1123
----- Value of contracts awarded, by geographic division and type of project. (See
section Building operations each issue of M . L. R ., January 1935-March 1936.)
Paving work, operations performed by crews employed in ------- ------ ----------------------- 1931—Dec. 1-8
Power projects (6) completed by PW A, man-hours of labor created and value of ma­
terials ordered_____________________________________________________________ 1936—N ov. 1150-2
Projects financed from Federal funds. Cement Industry, material used and employ­
ment furnished______________________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 577
— Employment statistics, October 1935-March 1936___________________________ 1936—Jan. 213-27,
—
Feb. 462-74, Mar. 774-89, Apr. 1100-8, M ay 1411-21, June 1705-14

f




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

61

Construction industry, United States—Continued.
Projects financed from Federal funds. Value of contracts awarded, by Government
Page
agency financing and by type of project, 1934 to 1936___________________________ 1936—Jan. 243-4,
Feb. 486-7, Mar. 801-2, Apr. 1123-4, Apr. 1136-7, M ay 1435, June 1726-7, Oct. 1038
Public building. Federal and State. (See under Building-construction industry.)
----- State government awards. (See State governments, this section.)
PW A contracts and force-account work started, July 1933 to June 1936, by type of
project-------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ____i----------------------- 1936—Oct. 840
PW A projects. Employment created by, 1933-37_______________ 1936—Oct. 838-45; 1938—Jan. 16-26
----- Man-hours of overhead work created since 1933______________________________ 1940—Feb. 334-7
----- Value of orders placed, July 1933 to June 1936, by type of material_____________ 1936—Oct. 843-4
----- (See also under Employment statistics, general, U. S.)
River, harbor, and flood-control projects, Federal contracts awarded, value of, Septem­
ber 1933------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1933—N ov. 1160
Road and street building. And ditch digging, productivity of labor in _____________ 1931—Dec. 1-10
■ - Federal contracts awarded, value of, September 1933_________________________ 1933—N ov. 1160
----- Technological changes and labor displacement. (Digest of BLS studies)_____ 1932—N ov. 1033-4
Roads (highways). Board and lodging, Minnesota highway construction camps, 1930. 1931—Apr. 81
■ -Concrete-road building, Illinois, productivity of labor in 1919,1925,1930, and 1931.
(BLS study)_____________________________________________ . ____
____ 1932—Nov. 1026-9
----- Contracts awarded, Federal and State, value of, September 1932 and 1933______1933—N ov. 1160
----- Federal projects. Labor and material costs, by type of construction, July 1935August 1937------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Apr. 824-6
----------- Labor requirements per million dollars of contracts awarded, July 1935 to
August 1937________________________________________________________________ 1939—Apr. 824-8
----- Labor and living conditions. Minnesota highway construction camps summer
of 1930_____________________________ _________________________________________ 1931—Apr. 80-3
----- Public-road work. Emergency and nonemergency projects, number of employees,
by occupation, August 1933________________________________________________ 1933—N ov. 1204-6
------------Occupational terms__________________________________________________ 1933—N ov. 1206-7
----- State projects, employment statistics, September-December 1935 and JanuaryMarch 1936______________ 1936—Jan. 228, Feb. 475, Mar. 789; 1936—Apr. 1109, May 1421, June 1714
----- Value of awards made by State governments, by month. (See section Building
operations, each issue M . L. R ., July 1934-December 1940.)
----- Years 1934 and 1935, and first half of 1935 and 1936, value of awards made by State
governments__________________________________________ ____________ 1936—Apr. 1137, Oct. 1039
State governments. Public-building and highway-construction awards. Reported
monthly. (See section Building Operations, each issue M . L . R ., July 1934-December
1940.)
------------Value of, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936______________ 1935—Apr. 1095, Oct. 1125; 1937—M ay 1320
Street paving. Value of contracts awarded and force-account work started. Cities
over 150,000, first half 1935 and 1936_____________________________ 1935—Oct. 1126; 1936—Oct. 1040
----------- Financed wholly or partially from municipal funds, March 1934 to December
1935________________________________________________________________________ 1936—Apr. 1138
Water and sewerage systems. Relative cost of material and labor on PW A projects _.. 1935—Jan. 145-6
(See also Building-construction industry.)
Construction loans. Reconstruction Finance Corporation, amount of, by type of project,
and by geographic divisions______________________________________________________ 1934—M ay 1182
Construction machinery distributing industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 5, 1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions_______________________________________________________ 1934—Mar. 532
Consumer debt. Study inaugurated April 1934 by Consumers’ Advisory Board, con­
tinued by Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and Russell Sage
Foundation (footnote)___________________________________________________________ 1936—Feb. 285
Consumer economics. Workers’ education classes, and information service.____ __________ 1939—July 4
Consumer purchases by families (32 American cities), 1934-36_______________________ 1938—Mar. 608-21
Consumers’ agencies, Federal. Reorganization of, under Executive order of July 30, 1935. 1935—Sept. 623
Consumers’ Club New York City, a new guide in purchasing_________________________ 1928—Aug. 211
Consumers’ cooperative societies. (See under Cooperation.)
Consumers’ Counsel (for National Bituminous Coal Commission, United States Govern­
ment). Abolishment and transfer of functions under Reorganization Plan No. 2, effec­
tive July 1, 1939_______________________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 380-1
Consumer’s dollar—distribution, etc. (See under Budgets, cost-of-living; also Purchasing
power of money.)
Consumers’ Research Club. Formed to serve as consumers’ guide in purchasing (New
York C ity)__________ ______________________________________________________ ____ 1928—Aug. 211
Consumption (disease). (See Industrial diseases and poisons—Tuberculosis.)
Consumption habits of the American people, 1934-36. (BLS studies)_______________ 1938—Mar. 608-21
Continuation schools. (See under Vocational guidance.)
Continuous-operation industries. (See Shift systems.)
Contract labor:
Factory operating subject to National Labor Relations Act (U. S. Sup. Ct. decision). 1939—June 1334-5
Hawaii. Sugar Planters’ Association contract system, Filipino laborers under------ 1926—Oct. 4-9
Silk industry, Paterson (N. J .)_____________________________________ __________ 1929—Aug. 3-10
(See also Decisions of courts—Contract of employment.)
Contractors of America, Associated General. (See Associated General Contractors of
America.)
Contracts, employment:
Brazil. Theatrical artists and musicians, legislation____________________________ 1928—Dec. 130
Colombia. Regulation of, provisions of law No. 10 (Nov. 20, 1934)------- -------------- 1935—Aug. 378-9
Engineering profession. Extent of use and periods covered, 1934------------------ ------ 1937—M ay 1114-16
Oregon. Discrimination against labor organizations, illegal, act of Mar. 6, 1931--------- 1931—M ay 72
(See also Labor contracts.)
Contracts, labor (agreements). (See Collective agreements, foreign countries.)
Contracts, public works. Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Contracts, separation. Engineering profession, extent of use and periods covered, 1934. 1937—M ay 1117-18
Contracts, State, for public printing. Prevailing hours and conditions required by statute
upheld by Colorado Supreme Court........................................................................................ 1939—Feb. 355-6
Contracts, union. (See Collective agreements.)
2 0 1 0 4 3 °— 42------ 5




62

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Contracts, U. S. Government:
P age
Construction, list of, entered into............................................................... ............ .............. 1922—M ay 144-50,
June 124-32, July 126-30, Aug. 138-47, Sept. 151-8, Oct. 89-91, N ov. 161-7
Minimum-wage determinations. (See Minimum wages—Contracts, U. S. Govern­
ment.)
1937—Jan. 12
Public Contracts Board. Appointment, October 1936, by Secretary of L ab or.............
Public Contracts, Division of. Established in U. S. Department of Labor___ ____ _ 1940—Oct. 820-2
Public roads, wage rates, by occupation and type of work, March 1922.......................... 1922—June 74-5
Purchases. Law regulating labor conditions, effective Sept. 28, 1936............... ............. 1937—Jan. 10-12
Contracts (U. S. Government) for equipment and material purchased:
Industry committees (apparel and textile) appointed by Administrator of Fair Labor
Standards Act, 1938_________________________________________________________ 1939—Feb. 368-9
Wage determinations. (See Minimum wages—Contracts, U. S. Government.)
Walsh-Healey Act, 1936, operations under to 1940............................................................... 1940—Oct. 805-22
Convalescents. (See under Medical and hospital service, industrial.)
Conventions (agreements). (See under International Labor Organization.)
Conventions, meetings, etc.:
Accident Boards and Commissions, International Association of Industrial (I. A. I. A.
B. C.). Annual meetings, proceedings--------------------- ----------------------------------- 1921—Nov. 166-7;
1922—N ov. 187-90; 1923—N ov. 179-82; 1924—Oct. 175-7; 1925—Oct. 122-6; 1926—Nov. 58-9!
1927—N ov. 104-6; 1928—Nov. 76-8; 1929—N ov. 48-9, Dec. 73; 1930—N ov. 101-3; 1931—N ov
93-6; 1932—N ov. 1100-2; 1933—N ov. 1099-1100; 1934—Nov. 1133-5; 1935—Nov. 1264-6; 1936—
N ov. 1198-9; 1937— Sept. 637-9; 1938—N ov. 1032-3; 1939—N ov. 1129-30; 1940—Oct. 875
Accidents and Occupational Diseases, International Congress of Industrial. 1925
and 1929. __________ _______ ____ ___________ _____ __________ 1925—June 116-17; 1929—Jan. 76-7
Accidents, industrial. Conference on, called by Secretary of Labor (D avis)_________ 1924—Jan. 142-4;
1926—Apr. 181, June 86, Aug. 41-6
----- Congress on, Spain................................................ —....................................................... .
1922—June 150
Agricultural Conference, President’s. Recom mendations............................................. . 1925—Mar. 20-30
Agriculture, International Congress of, Warsaw, Poland__________________________
1925—Oct. 172
American Bar Association. Labor-legislation discussions, annual meeting September
1937------------------------------------------ ---------------------------------------------------------------- 1937—N ov. 1162
American Federation of Labor. Annual conventions, proceedings________________ 1921—Aug. 151-4;
1922—Aug. 189-93; 1923—Dec. 173-5; 1924—Dec. 194-6; 1925—Feb. 186-9; 1926—Dec. 91-6; 1927Dec. 131-5; 1929—Jan. 103-6, Dec. 94-7; 1930—Nov. 119-25; 1931—Nov. 101-8; 1933—Jan. 139-45,
N ov. 1120-31; 1934—Dec. 1401-9; 1935—Nov. 1242-7, Dec. 1548-54; 1937—Jan. 124-30, Dec. 142731; 1938—N ov. 1034-8; 1939-N ov. 1130-4; 1940—Dec. 1456-9
----- Internal policies, action on, 1935 c onvention ................................. .............................. 1935—N ov. 1242-7
----- National questions discussed, 1935 convention..................................... ....................... 1935—Dec. 1548-54
----- Policies adopted, etc., 1934 convention.................................................... ....................... 1934—Dec. 1401-9
----- State branches, N ew England States, congress............................................................. 1929—Dec. 34-5
American relations with China, conference on, Baltimore, 1925-------------------------------- 1926—Mar. 20-4
American States, International Conference. December 1933, labor program of.............. 1934—Oct. 923-8
------ Havana, Cuba, 1939, proceedings_______________________________ __________ 1940—Jan. 59-61
----- Lima, Peru, 1938, declaration adopted as to rights of women........................................ 1939—M ay 1072
----- Santiago, Chile, January 1936_______________________________ ____________ _ 1936—Mar. 690-4
American Vocational Association. Conference, 1927__________________ ___________ 1928—Apr. 88-90
Anthracite miners and operators, joint conference New York City, 1922......................... 1922—M ay 18-20
Architects, American Institute of. M ay 1921____________________________________ 1921—Sept. 164
Asiatic Labor Congress. Colombo. Ceylon, M ay 1934, first session, objectives of___ 1934—OcL 928-9
Benefit associations, mutual. National conference______________________________ 1928—Dec. 104-5
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of. Annual convention, San Francisco, July
1928.---------- --------------------------------------- ------------------------ -------------------------------- 1928—Nov. 113
Building and Construction Industries, National Joint Conference Board. Canada,
meeting and proceedings___________________ ____ ___________________ 1921—Apr. 145-6, July 181-8
Building and Loan Associations, United States League of. Annual convention_______ 1923—Oct. 192
Building Congress, N ew York. Statement on building situation...... ............................ 1924—June 149-50
----- Work of---------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------- 1922—Oct. 150-4
Building Employers, National Association of. Chicago, January 1924_______ _______ 1924—Mar. 22-3
Building Workers, International Federation of. Congress, proceedings_______________ 1923—Feb. 253
Business leaders and public officials. White House Conference, for continued business
progress----------------- --------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1930—Jan. 35-9
Canadian Trades and Labor Congress. (See Labor organizations, foreign countries.)
Career conferences for youth, N ew York City, 1936 and each subsequent year, and re­
lated activities------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Oct. 897-8
Catholic Conference on Industrial Problems, Detroit, discussion, case of steel-mill
laborers with large family------- ----------------- -------------------------------------------- -------- 1927—N ov. 34-8
Child health and nutrition, conference, Washington, D. C., October 1933__________ 1933—Nov. 1084-5
Child labor, migratory. Conference of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Penn­
sylvania State representatives, Baltimore (M d.), January 1930______________ ____ 1930—Mar. 60-1
Child welfare. White House Conference on Child Health and Protection,
November 1930---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Jan. 101-2, June 15-22
----- White House Conference on Children in a Democracy. (Fourth meeting)
April 1939. Formation of sections and objectives__________________________ 1939—June 1312-13
------------ January 1940, subjects discussed________________ ____________________
1940—Mar. 635
Children in theatricals, conference on, Harrisburg, Jan. 30, 1922__________ ____ ___
1922—Mar. 187
Civil Servants, International Federation of, first congress, Paris, M ay 1925________ 192,5—Aug. 188-9
Code authorities and trade association code committees, conference, March 1934___ 1934—Apr. 800-3
Commercial Employees, Association of. Brazil (Rio de Janeiro), March 1930_____
1930—N ov. 125
Commissioners of Uniform State Laws, National Conference. Atlantic City, N . J.
September 1931, proposed mechanic’s lien law______ ____ ____________________
1931—N ov. 85
Confederation of Labor, General (C. G. T .). France. (See Labor organizations, for­
eign countries.)
C .I. O. Atlantic City, November 1940 convention, proceedings__________ 1940—Dec. 1456, 1459-61
----- First constitutional convention, Pittsburgh, November 1938, proceedings___ 1938—Dec. 1326-30
----- San Francisco, October 1939 convention, proceedings_____________________ 1939—N ov. 1132-4
Convict labor. Committee on Allocation of Prison Industries, first conference___ 1924—Sept. 204-5
Cooperatives. All-American Cooperative Congress, addresses, discussions, etc.
(Parker)...................................................................................................................................... 1921—Mar. 118-21




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

63

Conventions, meetings, e t c —Continued.
Pago
Cooperatives. Austria. Union of Cooperative Societies................................................. 1922—Oct. 196
----- Belgium, congress of cooperative unions_____________ ___________ 1922—Oct. 197: 1923—Sept. 184
----- Consumers’ societies, congresses___________________________ 1922—Dec. 232-7; 1928—Dec. 138-45
----- Cooperative League of the U. S. A ---------------- 1921—Jan. 127-32; 1922—Dec. 232-7; 1924—July-217;
Dec. 150-7; 1926—Oct. 92, Dec. 83-7; 1930—Nov. 111-14; 1932—N ov. 1095-7
----- France, Federation of Consumers’ Societies__________________ 1922—Oct. 198; 1923—Sept. 184r-6
----- Great Britain.......................... 1922—Oct. 198-9; 1923—Sept. 186; 1924—N ov. 236-7; 1925—Sept. 170-2
------------ Conference on business policy. _________________ _____ __________________ 1929—Dec. 92
------------ W omen’s Cooperative G u ild .................................................. ................................. 1921—Sept. 184-5
----- International Cooperative Alliance______ ______ ___________ 1921—Dec. 187; 1924—Dec. 157-61;
1927—Dec. 99-101; 1930—Aug. 116, N ov. 116-17
----- International Cooperative Congress____________ ______________________ _______ 1924—June 170
----- National Cooperative Convention____________ , __________________ _____ ___ 1921—Jan. 127-32
----- Russia, Centrosoyus (All-Russian Union of Consumers’ Societies)_ ................... . 1925—Sept. 166
Council for Industrial Progress, session, December 1936_________________________ 1937—Feb. 374-5
Economic Committee, Temporary National. (See Temporary National Economic
Committee.)
Economic conference. Australia (New South Wales)............................ ........................... 1922—June 232-3
Education, National Council of. Canada, conference__________________________ 1929—June 128-9
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of. Twentieth regular convention,
Miami (Fla.), September 1929______________________________________________ 1930—June 124-6
Emigration. International Commission. Meeting and report.. 1921—N ov. 206; 1922—Feb. 149-50
Emigration and immigration. Rome, international conference, scope and character. 1923—Dec. 210-11;
1924—Oct. 195-6
Employers and employees. China, first industrial administration conference...____ 1925—Sept. 207
----- Great Britain. National industrial conference________ ______ ______________ 1921—Mar. 197-9
------------ Organized employers and Trades-Union Congress______ 1929—June 168-9; 1930—Feb. 52-3
----- Mexico, textile industry____________________________________________________ 1925—Dec. 212
Employers, associations of. Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland, eighth con­
1923—Dec. 215
ference__________________________________________ _________________________
----- Spain, third congress-------------------------------------------------------------------------------1921—Oct. 223-4
Employment Services, International Association of Public. Annual meetings___ 1921—N ov. 139-41;
1928—N ov. 160-1; 1932—N ov. 1099-1100; 1935—Dec. 1624-5
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive. Conventions, triennial___ 1927—Sept. 95-6; 1930—Sept. 92-3
Engineers, Society of Industrial. National convention...................................... ............. 1922—Dec. 247-8
Family-allowance funds. Belgium, annual congress............................................................ . 1926—Feb. 219
----- France, annual congress----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1926—July 36-8;
1927—Aug. 31-2; 1928—July 40-1; 1929—Aug. 95-8; 1930—Sept. 88-9; 1932—Oct. 862-3
Family allowances. French congress on, 1935, 1936, and 1937______________________ 1935—Sept. 651;
1936—Sept. 699-700; 1937—Sept. 647-9
----- Great Britian, London School of Economics conference, April 1932......................... 1932—July 106-9
Family Endowment Society. Great Britain, public conference...................... _................ 1928—Mar. 106
Farm workers. Agriculture, International Congress of (twelfth)______ ____________ 1925—Oct. 172
Federation of Labor, American. (See American Federation of Labor, this section.)
Federation of trade unions, foreign. (See Labor organizations, foreign countries.)
40-hour week. Tripartite conference (employer, employee, and Government represen­
tatives), preparatory, Geneva, January 1933__________________ ______________ 1933—M ay 1159-60
Foundrymen’s Association, American. Annual meeting________________ ______ _ 1929—Apr. 126-8
Governmental Labor Officials, International Association of (I. A. G. L. O.). 1934 to
1940, summary of proceedings--------------- ------ ---------------------------------------------- 1934—N ov. 1118-19;
1935—N ov. 1266-8; 1936-N ov. 1200-2; 1937—Oct. 875-92; 1938—Oct. 764-8; 1939—N ov. 1125-9;
1940—Oct. 873-5
Governmental Officials in Industry, Association of, United States and Canada. An­
nual convention_____________________________________________________________ 1921—June 6-9;
1922—July 189-92; 1923—June 246-8; 1924—July 34-7; 1925—Oct. 16-18; 1926—Aug. 35-6; 1927—
July 39-40; 1928—Aug. 36-7; 1929—Aug. 118; 1930—July 33-4; 1931—July 89-92; 1933—N ov.
1088-9
Governors of States. Unemployment Commission, organization meeting, New York
City, M ay 1931______________________________________________________________
1931—July 60
----- Unemployment conference, Albany, N . Y ., January 1931_____________ _______ 1931—Mar. 64-6
Great Britain. General Federation of Trade Unions, July 1935.................................. 1935—Dec. 1557-9
----- Women’s trade-union organizations, conferences held in 1936 (3)________________ 1937—Jan. 131
Health Association, American Public. 1933 and 1935 annual meetings, industrial
health discussions__________________________________________ 1933—Dec. 1377-84; 1935—Dec. 1524
Health associations, cooperative and group, New York, 1939_______________________ 1940—Mar. 657
Health authorities, State and Provincial, of North America___________ _____ _______ 1924—Dec. 130
Health Conference, National. Washington, July 1938, called by Federal Interdepart­
mental Committee to Coordinate Health and Welfare Activities; text of report by
Technical Committee on Medical Care____________ * ________________________ 1938—Sept. 527-32
_
Health Conference, National Labor. First, Cleveland, Ohio, June 1927____________ 1927—Sept. 61-2
Health, Industrial Council on (auspices American Medical Association). First annual
congress, January 1939, summary of proceedings_________________________ _____ 1939—Mar. 595-6
Health Service, Public. Women’s Advisory Council of, conference. ................... . 1922—Dec. 248-50
Housing Conferences, National. 1923, 1935, and 1936___________________________ 1924—Feb. 173-5;
1935—Dec. 1518-19; 1936—Mar. 649
----- Social aspects of public aid to, Washington, D . C., 1934______________________ 1934—Mar. 624-6
Hygiene specialists, international. First congress, nine countries, resolutions______ 1924—Dec. 124-5
I. A. G. L. O. (See Governmental Labor Officials, International Association of, this
section.)
I. A. I. A. B . C. (See Accident Boards and Commissions, International Association
of Industrial, this section.)
Industrial conference. Czechoslovakia.________ _________________________________ 1921—Aug. 215
----- Ne\y England Council, to study power situation........................................................ . 1927—Sept. 46
----- New England, to promote regional development along social and economic lines.. 1927—Sept. 45-6
----- N ew York State, annual................................. ................. ............... . 1923—Mar. 3-6; 1925—Jan. 16-17
----- Railroad employees and United Mine Workers of America.................................. ....... 1922—M ay 179
----- W omen’s. (Called by U . S. Women’s Bureau). 1923—Feb. 50-7; 1924^-Feb. 121; 1926—Mar. 73-82




64

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Conventions, meetings, e tc —Continued.
Industrial Relations Association, International. Conference, June-July 1929, GerRage
many-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------- 1929—Aug. 66-7
----- World Social Economic Congress, Amsterdam, August 1931....................................... 1931—Dec. 131-2
Industrial Welfare, international. Conference, 10 countries------------------------------------ 1925—Apr. 209
‘Insurance Institute, National. Spain (Institute National de Prevision), conference.._ 1923—June 224-6
Intellectual Workers. International Confederation of. Congress, 1921----------------- 1921—N ov. 186-7
----- International Federation of. Congress, proceedings.. ......... ....... 1924—M ay 218-19; 1925—N ov. 234
Interfaith Conference on Unemployment, Washington, D . C., June 1940. Composi­
tion, aims, and findings-------- ------------------ -------------- - .............. .................................... 1940—July 41-3
International Labor Conference. Annual sessions------ ---------- ------------- ----------------- 1921—Mar. 183;
1922—Jan. 51-5, June 228; 1923—Jan. 192-5, June 262; 1924—Feb. 202-7, Apr. 222, Sept. 177-83;
1925—Aug. 184-8; 1926—Sept. 27-8; 1927—Aug. 80-1; 1928—Sept. 103, Oct. 40-2; 1929—Aug. 11819; 1930—Sept. 92-3; 1931—Aug. 31-2; 1932—July 32-3; 1933—Sept. 554-5, Dec. 1290-8; 1934Sept. 602-17; 1935—Aug. 327-30; 1936—Apr. 953-68, Aug. 316-27; 1937—Apr. 885-93, Aug. 34455; 1938—Aug. 278-85; 1939—Aug. 325-32; 1940—Apr. 856
----- 1938, results of, and personnel of American delegation. (Gambs)......... ................. 1938—Aug. 278-85
----- United States delegation to, 1934, report of-------------------------------------------------- 1934—Sept. 602-17
----- United States four official observers, report of 1933 conference, text....................... 1933—Dec. 1290-8
----- Welfare of seamen, special session...................................... ................................. .............
1930—Jan. 87
----- (See also under International Labor Organization.)
International Labor Organization. Governing Body. Sessions, February and Novem ­
ber 1936 and October 1937________ _____ 1936—Apr. 969-73, July 40-4; 1937—Jan. 72-7, Nov. 1134-5
----- Maritime Conference, October 1936, Geneva........... .................................................... 1937—Feb. 349-55
----- Textile experts, meeting of, Paris, Feb. 26-27, 1936.................. .................................... 1936—Apr. 973-4
----- World Textile Conference. Washington, April 1937........................... ................. . 1937—M ay 1132-5
Interstate compacts affecting labor and industries. (See Interstate compacts, etc.)
Labor conferences. American States. (See American States, this section.)
----- China, national_____________________________ _________ ______ 1922—Oct. 211; 1927—M ay 64-5
Labor congress. N ew England, Workers’ Education Bureau and State federations of
labor, October 1929----------------- ------ ----- ---------------- --------------------------------------- 1929—Dec. 34-5
Labor legislation. Eastern interstate conference of governmental labor officials (10
East Central States) Harrisburg, Pa., June 1931.._______________________________1931—Aug. 42-9
----- International Association for. General meeting, agenda-------- 1922—Feb. 134-5; 1925—Dec. 196-7
----- Interstate conference of governmental labor officials, Boston, January 1933____ 1933—Mar. 537-41
----- National Conferences on, 1935 to 1938, summary of proceedings_____________ 1935—N ov. 1247-64;
1936—Dec. 1438-42; 1937—Nov. 1159-61; 1939—Jan. 130-3
----- Southern Regional Conference on Economic Security, January 1935------- ------ 1935—Mar. 670-2
----- Southern Regional Conferences on labor standards, January 1936_____________ 1936—Mar. 627-8
----- Southern Regional Conference on, New Orleans, February 1938, proceedings____ 1938—Apr. 875-7
----- Washington conference, February 1934, committee reports and recommenda­
tions------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1934—Apr. 779-89
Labor organizations, foreign. (See Labor organizations—foreign countries.)
Labor Party. Belgium, activities, resolutions, etc___________________ ___________1921—Apr. 147-54
----- British, annual conference___________________________ _______________ ______ 1921—Sept. 183-4
Labor protection. Central American countries, conference, uniform legislation______ 1923—Oct. 205
Labor standards, conferences on, December 1934 and January 1936_____ 1935—Jan. 72; 1936—Mar. 627-8
Labor statisticians, international conferences... 1924—M ay 215-18; 1925—July 185-6; 1931—Oct. 61-4
Management Institute, International. Geneva, July 1931, recommendations________ 1931—Oct. 72-4
Mental hygiene. International congress (first), Washington, D . C., M ay 1930_____ 1930—June 67-70
Metal Workers’ Federation, international congress (ninth), Lucerne, Switzerland,
August 1921___________________________________ _________ _______ __________1921—N ov. 184-6
Michigan Labor Legislation Institute, March 1934______________________________ 1934—M ay 1047-9
Migrants. Permanent Conference for the Protection of. Session, Geneva, September
1931________________________________________________________________________ 1931—Nov. 109
----- Private Associations for theProtection of, International Conference (fourth), 1928. 1928—Feb. 248-9
Migration. Conference of American States (ILO members), Havana, 1939__________
1940—Jan. 60
----- World Congress, London__________________________________________________ 1926—Sept. 201-2
Migratory Labor, Interstate Conference on, Baltimore, 1940, proceedings__________ 1940—Apr. 857-8
Miners. Congress, Interaationl. Twenty-eighth, proceedings__________________ 1928—Sept. 103-4
----- Federation, National. Great Britain, conference and resolutions......... ..................... 1921—Nov. 184
----- International Federation of. Conventions___________________________________ 1922—Dec. 246
Minimum wage, uniform. Northeastern States, M ay 1934, compact signed, text of___ 1934—July 61-5
National. (See under inverted titles.)
Negro and Negro youth, problems of, National Conferences, Washington, January 1937
and 1939, proceedings summarized____________________________ 1937—Feb. 345-8; 1939—Mar. 576-7
Negro, economic status. Washington (D. C.) conference, M ay 1933.................................. 1933—July 42-4
Nonmanual Workers, International Federation of________________ ________________ 1921—Nov. 186
Nursing, industrial. Pennsylvania, conference on_____________ _______ ___________
1927—Aug. 59
Occupational Conference, National, organization of, and program__________ ____ _ 1933—June 1288-9
Old-Age Security, American Association for. Annual conferences, proceedings_____ 1929—June 130-2;
1930—June 80-1; 1932—July 40-5
Pacific Relations, Institute of. Biennial conferences, proceedings. 1925—Oct. 19; 1930—M ay 56-7
Pan Amcriean Federation of Labor. Congress proceedings._______ ______________ 1923—M ay 239;
1927—M ay 277, Aug. 80, Sept. 90-5
Paper box-board manufacturers. Shorter working hours conference, Washington
(D. C.)_------- ---------------------------------------------------------- ------ - 1924—June 1-10; 1925—Mar. 23-6
Personnel Association, National. Meeting, merger______________________________
1923—Feb 269
Personnel Research Federation. Annual meeting, New York City, November 1931___ 1932—Jan. 40-1
----- Organization, status and plans, first annual meeting______ _______ ___________ 1922—Jan. 48-50
Physicians in Industrial Practice, Conference Board_____________________________ 1925—Mar. 158-9
Power, Third World Conference, Washington, September 1936......................... ........... 1936—Nov. 1163-7
Price research. Conference on, held at National Bureau of Economic Research, New
York, Nov. 29-30, 1935__________ _____ _________________________ __________
1936—Mar. 836-7
Printing Pressmen and Assistants’ Union, International (Pressmen’s Home, T en n.). . 1926—N ov. 77
Psychology. Applied to vocational guidance (3d international conference)_________ 1923—Feb. 270
----- International Congress of. Appraisal of industrial psychology in United States,
1929............................................................................................................................................... 1930—Jan. 80-2
Public. (See under inverted titles.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

65

Conventions, meetings, etc.—Continued.
F age
Purchasing Agents. National Association of. Annual meeting....................................... 1923—July 256-8
Race Relations, Institute of. Philadelphia, July 1934_________ ____________________ 1934—Sept. 651
Railroad Labor Institute. Sessions..------------- ------ ----------------------------------- --------- 1926—July 94-5
Railway employees. Chile, congress, formation of new federation_________________ 1923—Jan. 195-6
Railway employees and executives. Regional conferences, call of Secretary of Com­
merce (Hoover)______________________________________________________ ______ 1922—Apr. 105-6
Railway Fuel Association, International. Annual meeting and addresses___________
1922—July 89
Reconstruction. Genoa Conference on Economic, resolution, 1922__________ ____ _
1922—Aug. 242
Recreation. Annual congress________________________________________________ 1932—Feb. 279-81
----- Outdoor. Conference of 128 national organizations interested in ............................. 1925—Mar. 233-5
Rehabilitation Association, National, Washington, D . C., October 1935........... ......... 1935—Dec. 1546-7
Safety conference. Pennsylvania, M ay 1932__________________________ _________
1932—July 65
Safety congress. All-Ohio (5th annual), Columbus, April 1932__________________ 1932—June 1323-4
----- Massachusetts Safety Council (4th annual), address on safety work. (T insley).. 1925—Aug. 1-3
----- N ew York State______________________ _______ ______________ _____________ 1928—N ov. 57-8
----- Pennsylvania--------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- ------ 1924—Apr. 221
Safety Council, National. Annual meetings________________________ ____ ______ 1921—Dec. 154—
6;
1922—Oct. 159-61; 1923—Oct. 1-5; 1924—M ay 184-93, N ov. 202-4; 1925—N ov. 178-80;
1927—Dec. 53-5; 1928—Mar. 53-4; 1929—N ov. 41-3; 1930—Nov. 86-7; 1931—Dec. 104-5;
1932—N ov. 1102-3; 1933—N ov. 1100-1; 1937—Jan. 113; 1939—Jan. 116
Scientific organization of labor. International congress for--------------------- ---------------- 1924—N ov. 223
Seafarers’ Federation, International________________________ ______________ _____ 1922—Dec. 246-7
Seamen’s Union of America, International. Annual convention...................................... 1926—Aug. 73
Sick Funds, Central Associations of. Denmark____________________ _____________ 1925—Jan. 168
-----Organization, National. Norway, health-insurance meeting, first_________ _____ 1923—N ov. 188
Silicosis, National Conferences on. Washington (D. C.), 1936 and 1937..................... 1936—June 1545-6;
1937—Apr. 909-14
Social Insurance. International Association for. Merger_________________________ 1923—Feb. 271
Social Legislation, Southeastern Interstate Conferences on, December 1933........ ..........- 1934—Jan. 95-6
Social Policy, International Congress on_____________ _____ ______________ ______ . 1924—Dec. 167-9
Social Progress, International Association for. Meetings------ ------ ----------------------- 1927—Jan. 114-15;
1930—Jan. 45-6; 1932—Feb. 343-4
Social Security, National Conference on. New York, April 1934_________________ 1934—June 1342-3
Social welfare. Conference of national social agencies, coordination of social work___ 1921—M ay 177
Social work, conference on. First regional (California, Oregon, Washington), Yosemite
National Park, M ay 1928______________________________ _______ _______________ 1928—Aug. 37-9
Socio-Economic Congress. International______ 1923—July 244-6; 1924—Dec. 166-7; 1925—July 186-7
Sociological Congress, International. Third, resolutions________________ ____ ____ 1924—Oct. 180-2
Southern Regional Conferences. (See under Labor legislation, this section.)
Statistical Institute, International. Resolution, uniformity in migration statistics___ 1930—Jan. 203
Syndicalism. Syndical Commission of the Labor Party and independent unions,
congress, Belgium____________________________________________________________ 1921—Oct. 36-7
Teachers’ Associations, International Federation of. Annual congress, Stockholm,
August 1931____________________________________ ____ ____________ ___________ 1932—Feb. 343
----- Workers’ education. Annual conference_______ _____ ______ _____ ______ ______ 1925—Oct. 169
Technical education. Canada, national conference. -------------------------------------- ----- 1927—Ap \ 59
Textile experts, international meeting of, under auspices of ILO, Paris, February 1936. 1936—Apr. 973-4
Trade Secretariats, International. Conference, resolution on organization and affilia­
tion______________________________________________________________________ 1924—M ay 219-20
Trade-Unions. International Confederation of Christian Congress, proceedings. - 1925—Dec. 197-8
----- International Federation of. Congresses, proceedings______ 1922—Aug. 195-6; 1924—M ay 219-20,
Sept. 183-7; 1926—Sept. 201-2; 1927—Oct. 84-5; 1931—Apr. 32-3; 1936—Sept. 573-83
Trades-Union Congresses. (See Labor organizations, foreign countries under name of
country.)
Transport Workers. International Federation of. Congress proceedings________ 1923—Feb. 253-4,
Aug. 205, Oct. 192; 1924—N ov. 222; 1925—Oct. 172-3
----- National Federation of. Great Britain, conference____________________________ 1921—Sept. 184
Unemployment. Central Conference of American Rabbis, permanent preventives. 1931—Mar. 66-72
----- Conference, trade-unionists, economists, statisticians, etc., Bryn Mawr College. 1927—N ov. 122-5
----- Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, permanent preventives. 1931—Mar. 66-72
----- Governors’ conference, seven industrial States, Albany, N . Y ., January 23-25,
1931_______________________________________________ T
____ ______ ____________ 1931—Mar. 64-6
----- International Association of. Meetings, and proceedings. ........... . 1923—Feb. 269-70, Dec. 144—
5;
1924—July 169-82
----- National Catholic Welfare Conference, permanent preventives_______________ 1931—Mar. 66-72
----- President’s Conference__________________________ 1921—Nov. 126-34, Dec. 119; 1923—M ay 188-9
Vocational education. Citizens Conference (representing 42 national organizations),
Washington, D . C., M ay 4-5,1933____________________________________________ 1933—July 97-9
----- Federal Board for. National conference___________________________________ 1922—June 229-30
----- Serb-Croat-Slovene Chambers of Commerce, congress and report_______________ 1925—Feb. 204
Vocational guidance. American Vocational Association, annual convention, dis­
cussion ___________________________________________________________________ _ 1928—Apr. 88-90
----- National Vocational Guidance Association, annual conference, major topics____ 1932—Apr. 847;
1933—June 1287-8
----- Of Women, International Congress on, resolutions_______________ ___________ _ 1927—Jan. 119
. ----- Regional conference, Johnsonburg, N . Y ., 1933, recommendations___________ 1934—Jan. 122-3
Vocational rehabilitation. Civilian workers, national conference________________ 1924—Mar. 156-9;
1926—Aug. 81-3; 1937—Dec. 95-7
Washington’s Birthday Conference of Teachers in Workers’ Education, annually from
1924_______________ _____ _____________ ______________________________________
1939—July 21
Welfare Council, New York City. Unemployment conference. ..................... ............ 1928—Apr. 148-9
W hite House Conference. (See specific subject under this section.)
Woman workers. International conference________________________________ _____ 1927—Oct. 85-6
Women Clerks and Secretaries, Association of. Great Britain (England)______ ____ 1921—Aug.' 140
Women in India, National Council of. 1934, resolutions re social reforms___________ 1934—Sept. 659
Women’s Cooperative Guild. Great Britain ( E n g l a n d ) _________ ______________ 1921—Aug. 140
Women’s Trade-Union League. Great Britain (England)................................................... 1921—Aug. 140




66

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Conventions, meetings, eto.—Continued.
Page
Women’s Trade-Union League of America, National______ ______________________1922—Aug. 193-6;
1924—Oct. 180; 1926—Oct. 118-19; 1929—June 163-8
Workers’ education. Colorado Federation of Labor convention, resolution-------------- 1924—Oct. 183
----- International conference, 11 countries, 23 institutions__________________________ 1922—N ov. 173
----- New England congress, Worcester (Mass.), October 25-7, 1929.................................... 1929—Dec. 34-5
----- Wisconsin Federation of Labor conference, resolutions_________________ 1926—Aug. 77-8, Oct. 122
Workers’ Education Bureau of America. Conventions, proceedings______________ 1923—June 202-3;
1927—Aug. 76-7; 1929—M ay 162-7
Working Women, International Federation of. Congress proceedings---------------------- 1922—Feb. 112;
1923—Nov. 121-2; 1925—June 177-8
World Migration Congress. Resolutions-----------------------------------------------------------1920—Sept. 201-2
World Textile Conference, Washington, D . C., 1937, planned for by ILO Governing
Body---------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------ - ............ ...........
1937—Jan. 72
World Youth Congress, First, Geneva, 1936, proceedings........ ............................... ......... 1937—Mar. 587-8
(See also under Labor organizations, foreign countries.)
Convict camps. Georgia. Report of U. S. Prison Industries Reorganization Adminis­
tration, 1937______________________- -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1938—Jan. 163-5
Convict labor. (See Prison Labor.)
Cooking and heating appliance manufacturing industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 12,
1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions------------------------------------------ *---------------------- 1934—Mar. 532
Cooks. (See Culinary workers; Hotel and restaurant employees; Marine Cooks and
Stewards Association.)
Cooling systems, theaters and buildings, labor-cost reduction in manufacture of____.......... . 1929—N ov. 21
Cooperation (union-management). (See Labor-management cooperation.)
Cooperation, United States:
Accounting, uniformity in---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1926—Dec. 85-6
Agricultural associations. B y type, membership and business, 1930-31__ 1932—M ay 1090-1, N ov. 1097-8
----- Development in cooperative methods, purchasing, etc_________________________ 1922—Dec. 234;
'
1929—Jan. 97-8; 1936—Feb. 364-9
----- Farmer members (stockholders) not exempted from provisions of Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act__________________________________ ____ _______ _____ _____________ 1939—June 1329-30
----- Farmers’ business associations, operations (sales, etc.) by type of business_______ 1925—Apr. 176
----- Farmers’ buying associations, survey by Department of Agriculture_____________ 1929—July 117
----- Farmers’ tanning association, Pope County (Ark.), formation__________________ 1923—Apr. 163
----- Legal status, types, and business methods______________________________ ____ 1936—Feb. 366-9
----- Marketing. Contractural relations, trend in------------------------------ ----- ------------1928—Oct. 72-3
------------Court decisions. (See under Decisions of courts.)
----------- Distributive departments, activities, 1929........................... .................................. 1930—Oct. 21-34
----------- Farm women____________________ ____ _________________ _____ _________1922—Aug. 220
----------- Federal Trade Commission report on_______________________ __________ 1928—Dec. 147-52
----------- Law authorizing formation of______________ ____________________________ 1922—Apr. 224-5
------------Legislative acts, 28 States................. ............ . ........................................................ 1925—Feb. 198-201
----------- Loans under Federal Warehouse Act__________ ___________________________ 1925—Jan. 180
----------- Membership, by name (cotton, etc.)_______________________________ ____ 1923—Sept. 180-1
----------- Production and marketing, problems of............... ............................................. . 1924—Aug. 190-1
------------Progress and policies,............................................................... ................................... 1926—Sept. 55-6
------------South Carolina, 1922............ ............................... ................................................. ......... 1923—July 232-3
----------- (See also Marketing, this section.)
----- Marketing and purchasing. 1919, 1924, and 1929. (Bureau of the Census)_____ 1933—Sept. 593-4
----------- Statistics, membership, sales, etc___________ 1922—Feb. 143; 1928—Apr. 86-7; 1931—Dec. 127
----- Membership and business, 1934-35 and 1937-38_______ ______ . . . 1936—Sept. 596-7; 1939—July 132
----- Membership, by State____________________ ___________ _________ 1923—Mar. 155; 1928—Aug. 80
----- Minnesota, typical areas------------------ ------ --------- --------- ------------------------------------- 1928—Oct. 73
■
-----North Central States, operations (sales, etc.), farmers’ associations______________ 1923—Mar. 155
-----Number of farmers’ associations, b y kind of business_______________________ 1922—Aug. 215-16;
J924—Feb. 217; 1925—Apr. 176; 1926—June 126
----- Purchasing. Estimated membership and business, 1937-38___________________ 1939—July 131-2
■ ------- Statistics of membership, business (by commodity), finances, patronage
refunds, etc., 1913-39 and trend 1930-38---------------------------------------------------------- 1937—June 1436-8;
1938—Oct. 804-5; 1939—June 1326-9; 1940—Mar. 665-6
----- (See also Farmers, this section.)
Alaska. Cooperative stores, established by Bureau of Education__________ ________ 1927—Oct. 76-7
Apartment residents, Philadelphia (Carl Mackley H o u s e s ) .___________________ 1937—Aug. 312-15
Associations as employers. Personnel policies, wage r^tes compared with rates in
private industry, and hours of work.____ ______________ ____ ________________ 1938—Sept. 485-99
Bakeries. Development and operation................................................... 1925—June 166-8; 1930—Oct. 21-34
----- Discussion, fourth congress of Cooperative League, 1924______ _______ __________ 1924—Dec. 153
----- Membership and operating statistics, by n a m e........... ........................................... 1925—Sept. 162-3
Banking and credit. Discussion, Cooperative League congress......... ............................. 1922—Dec. 234-5
----- Societies, number of, by country, 1920,1921, and 1922__________________________ 1923—Oct. 185
Banks. Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Cleveland, statem ent............................ 1921—Jan. 130
----- “ Cooperative,” formation and powers, Iowa, law of 1927—......... ................... ............. . . 1927—Oct. 70
----- Cooperative chartered, Chicago____________ ____ ____ _______ _________________ 1922—June 214
----- Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative Association, 1939............................................ ......... 1940—Mar. 658
----- Railroad Telegraphers, Order of, to establish...............................................................
1921—July 227
Banks, labor. Advantages, and possible dangers______________ _____ ____________ 1925—Oct. 164*-6
----- American Federation of Labor, report of executive council____ _________________ 1925—Feb. 187
----- Bibliography..______ ______ _____ _______________________ ________________ 1926—Sept. 205-14
----- Condition of, statistics, 1920 to 1940, by bank_______________________________ 1924—July 217-18;
1925—Dec. 167-8; 1926—M ay 104-5, Oct. 92-3; 1927—Mar. 43, Sept. 75-6; 1928—Oct. 71-2;
1930—N ov. 115-16; 1931—N ov. 100; 1932—Aug. 312; /1936—Feb. 371-2, Nov. 1191-2; 1937—Oct.
911-12; 1938—Oct. 806; 1939—Sept. 654-5; 1940—Oct. 933-4
----- Established and projected_____ ____________________________________________ 1923—Apr. 162-3
----- List of, in operation....... ................ .......................... ..................................................... ......... 1924—Feb. 215
----- N ew ly chartered, clothing workers, railroad employees, etc.......................................... 1922—June 214
----- Rise and development of m ovement..................... ............................................................ 1929—Dec. 83-8
Bibliography. Cooperative movement, the. (Parker).................................................. 1925—Mar. 201-32
----- Material published since March 1925........................ ..................................................... 1930—Sept. 230-9
Boarding houses. Associations in northern Wisconsin................................................... . 1937—Dec. 1330




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

67

Cooperation, United States—Continued.
Page
Boardinghouses, Study of activities, 1929........ .................................................................... 1930—Oct. 21-34
----- (And hotels). Finnish, statistics, by locality.................. . ................ ............................
1929—Jan. 96
----- (And restaurants). California, 1934-35---------- -------------------------------------------- 1936—M ay 1223-4
Bookkeeping. Accounting and auditing, committee report, congress of Cooperative
League_____ ________________________________________________________________ 1924^-Dec. 156
----- Jointly done for 3 Minnesota oil associations, 1938, summary of advantages______ 1939—Jan. 108
Brasstown (N . C.) developments________________________________________________ 1929—Oct. 103
Brokerage commissions, payment permissible under N R A codes, order of Oct. 12,1934. _ 1934—Dec. 1358
Building and loan associations. (See Building and loan associations.)
Building guilds____________________________________ ____ ______ ___________ ____ 1922—Jan. 221
Building-Trades Unions’ Construction and Housing Council, Boston. (C onyngton).. 1922—M ay 162-5
Burial associations. Iowa, Minnesota, and South Dakota, operations, 1930_________ 1931—Oct. 79-82
----- N ot prohibited from seeking new members, Wisconsin Attorney General’s ruling.
1940—Jan. 95
----- Statistics, 1939, 5 Midwestern States................ ................................... ............ ............ 1940—N ov. 1160-7
----- Status in 1936 and history of. (BLS survey)_______________________
1938-Mar.647-52
Buying clubs. Cleveland, purposes and policies..__________ ____ _______________ 1937—Sept. 551-3
Cafes. Cooperative Temperance Cafe (“Idrott”), Chicago, membership, operations.. 1929—July 116
California. Almond Growers’ Exchange, statistics of operation___________________ 1923—Aug. 223
- — Consumers’ organizations, 1934-35______________________________ ____ ____ 1936—M ay 1216-25
----- Federal and State grants to self-help agencies, as of June 30,1936__________________ 1937—Aug. 376
----- Self-help activities, membership statistics, and real incomes of workers, 1935-36.. 1937—Aug. 373-6
Central States Cooperative League, formation of______________________ ____________ 1925—Oct. 166
Cheese factories. Membership and sales, 1923_________________________ _________
1925—Jan 178
----- Trenary (Mich.) Farmers’ Cooperative Store, new departm ent................................... 1929—Dec. 93
Chicago area. Consumers’ societies. (Gubin)......... .............. ..................... .................... 1937—Oct. 816-38
Coalmining. Bergholz (Ohio), two companies.............................. ............. ........................... 1925—Feb. 202
----- Himlerville (Ky.), experiment............................. .......................................................... 1922—June 214-16
Colleges. Self-help cooperatives, character and aims of_______ __________________ 1939—Apr. 851-2
----- Students’ enterprises, dormitory and dining-room associations, and money pro­
ducing activities. (U.S. Office of Education report, summary of)............. ................ . 1939—Apr. 850-1
Company cooperative stores______________________________________ __________ _ 1921—Dec. 185-6
Congresses. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.—Cooperatives.)
Consumers’ and cooperative-marketing movement, relations between.............................
1926—Dec. 86
Consumers’ central purchasing organization, steps to form, Pacific coast................. ....... 1928—Apr. 85-6
Consumers’ Cooperative Services (Inc.) of New York City. Development-................. . 1925—Dec. 174
----- Operating statistics_________________ ______ ________ ______________ _________ 1929—Oct. 103-4
Consumers’, development, 1920 to 1936, and statistics................. ............ ........................ 1938—Aug. 223-39
Consumers’ enterprises. Development, 1920 to 1925_____________________________ 1927—Jan. 20-34
----- Growth from first instance in 1845, extent in 1936, and trends. (Parker) .. .......... 1938—Aug. 223-9
Consumers' institute, first, Brookwood College____________________________________ 1929—Oct. 96
13
Consumers’ movement in Illinois_________________ ______ _____ 1925—Dec. 172-4; 1927—Jan. I ll—
Consumers’ societies. As regulators of retail prices_________ _____ _______________ 1927—Juy 63-4
----- Chicago area, activities and operating policies_________ _____ ________________ 1937—Oct. 819-29
----- Chicago, increased interest in _____________________ _____ __________ _____
. 1930—June 121
----- Cleveland. Federated activities as of 1937.................... .......................................... . 1937—Sept. 554-7
------------Survey in 1937. (W ilk e).. ........... ........... ........................................................ 1937—Sept. 541-60
----- Exempt from Federal income tax......... .............. ...................................... ................. .
1923—Aug. 219-20
----- Federation of, progress toward_______________________________________________
1930—Jan. 75
----- Legislation. (See Laws and legislation, United States Federal and general—Coop­
erative associations.)
----- Membership, by State_____________________________________________________ 1929—M ay 160
----- Membership problems____________________________________________ _________ 1927—Sept. 75
----- Northern Wisconsin (Mermin), Maj' and June 1937.
(BLS survey)................. 1937—Dec. 1327-44
----- Number in operation_______________ _____ ____ ____ ____________ _________ 1922—Aug. 215-16
----- Operating expense, by type of society, 1925__________________________________ 1927—M ay 18-21
----- Operations of. 1927 to 1939, 1934 and 1936, by type of society_____ 1928—Aug. 77; 1929—M ay 160;
1930—Oct. 21-34; 1931—May 99-100; 1932—July 115; 1933—July 116-18; 1935—Dec. 1510-11;
1938—Aug. 228-9, Dec. 1312-25; 1939—Sept. 640-54; 1940—Mar. 657-65, Oct. 926-33
----- ------ 1933, by type of society. (Parker)--------- ------------------------------------------ ‘ 1934—N ov. 1041-66
----- Retail. Operations, 1935 and 1940_________________________ 1936—Nov. 1187-91; 1940—Oct. 928
----- Review of__________________________ _____________ _______ ______ ____ _____ 1928—Aug. 75-8
----- Wholesales. Activities, 1934 to 1939______________________________________ 1936—June 1551-60;
1938—Aug. 235, Dec. 1317-25; 1939—Sept. 643-54; 1940—Oct. 929-33
------------ Trends, 1929 to 1939___________________________________________________ 1940—Oct. 932-3
Contract, practicability of use in consumers’ societies------------------------------------------- 1927—Mar. 44-5
Contracts with associations, court decisions. (See under Decisions of courts—Coopera­
tion.)
“Co-op” label. Increase in use and quality of goods handled under---------------------- 1940—Mar. 660-1
Cooperative buying and discounts, company employees, thrift encouragement by em­
ployers_____________________________________________________________________ 1927—Oct. 81-2
Cooperative Central Exchange, Superior (Wis.). Operating statistics (sales, etc.)___ 1923—Aug. 225;
1924—July 218-20; 1926—Nov. 74-5; 1927—Dec. 105-6; 1929—July 115
----- Theatricals, and technical adviser service____________________________________ 1929—Dec. 92-3
“ Cooperative D ay,” international, establishment of________________________ ____ . . 1923—Aug. 217
Cooperative Grange League Federation Exchange (Inc.). Store system____________ 1925—Dec. 175
Cooperative League of the U. S. A. Biennial congresses. (See under Conventions,
mootings* etc.)
----- Development since 1915............................... ...................................... ................... ............ 1930—July 116-19
----- Functions and affiliations__________________________________________________ 1936—June 1559
----- Organization and object__________________________ _____ ___________________ 1921—Jan. 131-2
, ----- Pay-roll totals and average wages, by State and type of society, 1930____________ 1932—Apr. 843
----- Share capital, total business, gain or loss, 1930_________________________ _____ 1932—Apr. 841-2
Cooperative organizer employed by State Federation of Labor, Pennsylvania_______ 1923—Aug. 225
Cooperative Trading Co., Waukegan (111.), recreation activities____________________
1929—Dec. 92
Cooperative Workers’ Union. Mesabe Range district, Minnesota, establishment of
and purposes________________________________________________________________ 1931—M ay 94
Cooperative Youth League. Activities in Cooperative Central Exchange territory... 1931—Mar. 122
Cooperators Syndicate, Minnesota...................... ............................................................______ 1925—Sept. 163




68

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperation, United States—Continued.
P age
Cotton-marketing associations. Membership, by States_____________ _____________ 1924—Mar. 193
County councils formed. (Mo., Oreg., M inn., Tex., Wash., W is.).................................. 1940—Mar. 663
Court decisions. (See under Decisions of courts—Cooperation.)
Creameries. Activities, 1929__________________ _______ _____ ____ ______________ _ 1930—Oct. 21-34
----- Butter production, percent of, by State.................................... .......................................... 1929—Oct. 105
----- Farmer-controlled-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1924—Feb. 218
----- Franklin Creamery. Minneapolis, educational committee, work of................. . 1929—Sept. 11-12
Credit to the needy worker------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1927—Aug. 68-71
Credit trading. Drive for elimination of, 1939------------------------------------------------------ 1940—Mar. 657
Credit unions. Affiliated with Cooperative League of U. S. A. status of, Dec. 31, 1928. 1930—July 119
----- Apartment residents (Carl Mackley houses, Philadelphia)............................ .............. 1937—Aug. 313
----- Borrowers, and amount of loans, 1929, by State........................................................... 1931—Mar. 120-1
----- Comparative development, 1929 to 1934---------------------------------------------------------- 1935—Oct. 990
----- Credit pool of Eastern States Cooperative League established, M ay 21, 1932____ 1932—Sept. 563-4
----- Development. (See Credit unions—Operations, this section.)
----- District of Columbia, analysis of Public Act No. 190, approved June 23, 1932.. 1932—Aug. 311-12
----- Dividend practice of--------------------- ------ . ---------- ------------------------------------------- 1939—Apr. 852
----- Employees’, membership and fiscal statistics, by field of membership, 1936. (BLS
survey)._____ ___________________________ _____ _____ ______ _______________ 1938—June 1357-61
----- Expansion, 1939----------------------- ----------------------------------------------- ----------------- - 1940—Mar. 658
----- Federal act creating national system of cooperative credit---------------------------------- 1934—Aug. 372
----- Federal'chartered. (See under Credit unions—State and Federal chartered, this
section.)
----- Federation among, and membership of State leagues, 1939-------- -------------- ------ 1940—Sept. 660-1
----- Federation of, number and membership, 1935_______________________________ 1936—Dec. 1428-9
----- Financial condition. (See Credit unions—Operations, this section.)
----- Franklin Cooperative Creamery, activities, 1927 to 1929.......... ...................................... 1930—Aug. 114
----- Government Printing Office, operations, 1935-------------------------------------------------- 1936—Apr. 942
----- Legislation. tfSee Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general—
Credit unions.)
----- Loans of, by States, 1933--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Apr. 853-4
----- Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Capital, loans, deposits, earnings....................... 1924—N ov. 229
----- Membership. (See Credit unions—Operations this section.)
----- Method of operation and fundamentals of cooperative credit.—................................ 1940—Sept. 661-2
----- Movement in 1929_________________________________________________________ 1930—N ov. 1-11
----- National Extension Bureau, Boston, purpose and activities........................... ....... 1930—Jan. 76-7
----- National Industrial Conference Board, findings of........................................................
1936—July 89
----- Nebraska farmers, development, 1931 and 1932_____________________________ 1933—June 1285-6
----- New York State. Chartered associations, liquidation cases, reasons for and sta­
tistics, 1929-37____ _______________________ ____ ___________________________- 1940—Mar. 660-7
------------Loans and deposits, 1929 and 1931------------------------------------------------ ------- 1933—Jan. 125
----- Operations and membership. 1911-28 (Mass., M inn., N . J., N . Y .)------------------1930—Feb. 16
------------1929 to 1939__________________________________________________________ 1930—Feb. 14-15,
N ov. J - ll ; 1931—Mar. 120-1; 1932—Sept. 560-3; 1933—Oct. 771-5; 1934—Sept. 551-70; 1935—
Oct. 987-90; 1936—Dec. 1420-9; 1938—Apr. 878-84, June 1357-61, Oct. 801-4; 1939—Aug. 370-3;'
1940—Sept. 654-9
----- Operations in 1933, study of. (Parker)---------------------------- -------------------------- 1934—Sept. 551-70
----- Organized in 1928, by State and in Postal Service______________________ _______ 1929—M ay 161
----- Postal employees. Development, statistics of operation, 1923-1931...................... . 1926—Feb. 207-8;
1927—July 65; 1928—July 47; 1930—M ay 110-11; 1931—M ay 101; 1932—Apr. 844; 1933—June 1285
----- Princeton University study on employee-savingsprograms, 1937, findings........... 1937—Sept. 609-12
----- Rock Island Railroad Co_________________________________________________ 1932—June 1341-2
----- Size and business of------------------ ---------------------------------------------------------------- 1926—Apr. 154-5
----- State- and Federal-chartered, by State, number, 1939, and trend, 1936-39____ 1940—Sept. 656, 660
----- Status of, end of 1925__________________________ _____ _____________ _________ 1926—N ov. 1-13
----- W hy workers borrow, study of 4,000 loans......... .............................................................. 1927—July 6-16
Development, by type of society, 1934, review of----------------------------- 1936—Jan. 91, 93, 94, 101-2, 104
Development of movement. Comparison with foreign countries, 1929 to 1931, 1932,
and 1935-36_____________ 1932—Oct. 872-81; 1933—Dec. 1406-12; 1937—Jan. 79-96; 1938—Aug. 229-31
Directory of consumers’ societies compiled and mimeographed_____________________ 1932—Mar. 574
Distributive associations. Membership and sales, percent of increase, specified periods. 1938—Aug. 235
----- Retail. Facilities operated by; membership statistics, operations, 1936; composi­
tion, etc___________________________________________________________ ____ 1938—M ay 1068-84
----------- (See also Retail-store associations, this section.)
Distributive and housing societies affiliated with Cooperative League of U. S. A., status
of, Dec. 31, 1928_____________________________________ .1 --------------------. --------- 1930—July 118
District leagues and wholesale societies................................................. . . . ............................. 1926—Dec. 83-5
District Park Association, Marquette (M ich.).......... .......................... .................. .............. . 1929—Pec. 92
Dorchester (Wis.) and its vicinity, conference............................... ............... ..................... 1929—Oct. 104-5
Eastern Cooperative Wholesale (Inc.), formation______________ ________________ 1928—Oct. 71
Eastern States Cooperative League, formation and purpose___________________ ____ 1925—Apr. 173
Economic reform, constructive, a study in ________________ ____ ________________ 1921—Aug. 194-6
Education______________________________________________________ 1922—Dec. 232-3; 1926—Dec. 85
----- Concerning cooperatives. Federated associations in Northern Wisconsin, survey
May-June 1937-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------- 1937—Dec. 1334
----- Cooperative guilds (Northern States and Kansas-Missouri area)............................. 1949—Mar. 664
----- Development of facilities, 1937................................ ........................................................... 1938—Dec. 1314
----- For workers, Commonwealth College (Mena, Ark.)....................................................... 1939—July 7-8
----- Midland and Central wholesales, 1939................................................. .......................... 1940—Mar. 664-5
----- Rochdale Institute, 1939 curriculum, features.................... ............................................ . 1940—Mar. 665
----- Training. Courses in, Minneapolis_______ ___________________ ______________ 1923—Dec. 193
----------- Development and status, 1937.................................. ................................................ 1938—Dec. 1314
------------School, for cooperative employees, by Eastern States Cooperative L eague... 1927—M ay 103
----- Work of Chicago Cooperative Federation_______ ___________________________ 1937—Oct. 837-8
Educational and recreational activities, consumers’ societies, Cleveland, Ohio______ 1937—Sept. 553-4
Electricity. Distributive associations in TV A area_______________________ ______ 1939—Mar. 587-8
----- Rural electrification projects, loans made by REA up to July 14,1936................. 1936—Sept. 594-5
----- Rural electrification societies under R E A program........................... ......................... 1936—Sept. 593-6
----- Service associations. Use of R EA loans.....................>................................................. 1939—Apr. 905-10




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

69

Cooperation, United States—Continued.
Page
Electricity. Supply associations. Assisted by R E A ....... ....................... ..................... 1938—Jan. 112-14
----------- Prior to REA program__________________________________________ _____ lOSS1 Jan. 110-12
—
Employees’ cooperative purchasing schemes_____________________________ _______ 1924—Dec. 162-4
Employees’ status in the cooperative movement__________________________________ 1921—Oct. 213
Failure of certain societies. Causes of, 1920 to 1925_______________________ _______ 1926—July 20-5
----- Discussion, congress of Cooperative League_______________________________ 1924—Dec. 154-5
Fair Labor Standards Act applicable to member-workers in cooperatives__________ 1939—Mar. 586
Farm Bureau, Indiana. Cooperative production b y______________________________ 1928—Mar. 94
Farmers. Cooperation among, discussion, Cooperative League___________________ 1924—Dec. 155
Farmers’ cooperative associations. Consumers’ purchasing departments, California,
1934-35______________________________________________________________________ 1936—M ay 1225
----- Educational and Cooperative Union of America, growth, by States, 1908-10 to
1917-19______________________________________ _
•_____________________________ 1921—July 220-1
----- Insurance, fire, windstorm, livestock, and crop______________________________ 1925—Dec. 170-1
----- Marketing cooperatives and consumers’ cooperatives, relations between. (Her­
ron)_______________________________________________________________________ 1928—Dec. 145-7
----- Organization among________________________________________________ _____ 1921—Feb. 102
----- (See also Agricultural associations, this section.)
Farmers’ Union Exchange, Omaha (Nebr.). Dividend policy.________ _____ ______ 1929—Oct. 105
----- Operations (sales, etc.)-------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------ 1929—July 115
Farmers’ Union Jobbing Association, Kansas City, formation and nature of busi­
ness___________________________________________________________ 1923—Aug. 223; 1924—July 219
Farmers’ Union of Nebraska. Activities, summary of_________________________ 1930—Mar. 80-1
Farmers’ Union State Exchange, Omaha (Nebr.), formation and nature of business-. 1924—July 219-20
Federal Farm Board. Creation and function___________________________________ 1929—Oct. 96-9
“Federated Seed Service,” formation and purpose______________________________ 1925—Feb. 202
Federations. Northern Wisconsin, kinds, organization, and operation, survey 1937. 1937—Dec. 1331-5
----- Wholesale and other, activities, 1937, survey of--------------------------------- --------- 1938—Dec. 1317-25
Fellowship colony, Santa Barbara (Calif.)_________________________ __________ ___ 1922—Jan. 234
Finnish Cooperative Trading Association, Brooklyn, progress, 1924________ ____ _ 1925—June 169-70
Fishermen’s 5-year marketing agreement---------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Dec. 169-70
Franklin Cooperative Creamery, Minneapolis, activities and development, 1920 to
1929______________________________________________________________________ 1930—Aug. 112-14
Funeral aid (“ Cooperative mortuary funds”), State of W ashington............................. . 1939—Jan. 109-10
Funeral associations. (See Burial associations, this section.)
Gardens for unemployed, plan of B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, O hio........................... 1933—Apr. 771-4
Gasoline and motor oils. (See Petroleum associations, this section.)
Health clinic, establishment of by Franklin Cooperative Creamery Association, M in­
neapolis_____________________________________________________________________ 1925—June 168
Home ownership______________________________________________________________ 1926—Sept. 1-6
Homes for recipients of old-age assistance (Washington State)------------------------------ 1939—Aug. 298-9
Hospital. Oklahoma, Beckham County, Elk City, establishment of, prospects___ 1932—Feb. 329-30
Hospital associations, campaigns for organization of, Oklahoma, 1939______________ 1940—Mar. 657-8
Housing. Apartment houses and residential hotels, societies operating, 1929________ 1931—Jan. 47-51
----- Associations. Activities and development, 1927-28 and 1933____ 1928—Aug. 78; 1935—Apr. 867-70
----------- Principles on which to base_____________________________________ ______ 1921—Oct. 171-2
-----Character of projects, administration, value, etc. (BLS survey, 1936)_______ 1937—N ov. 1146-54
----- Consumers’ Cooperative Services (Inc.), New York City, housing venture_____ 1930—M ay 111-12
----- Farbank Housing Corporation,Jewish, cooperative activities___________________ 1929—Sept. 106
----- Home ownership, “cooperative plan” . _____________________________________ 1926—Sept. 1-5
— M ilwaukee_________________________________ _____ __________ ________ 1922—Dec. 155-8, 235
----- New York C ity__________________________________________________________ _ 1924—Apr. 202
----------- Amalgamated Clothing Workers’ project (Bronx); apartments completed.. 1930—Apr. 144;
1932—M ay 1090
------------Finnish Cooperative Trading Association activities_____ _____ __________ 1925—June 169-70
------------Labor Home Building Corporation______________________________________ 1925—Sept. 163
----------- Paul Laurence Dunbar Apartments, Harlem, Negro cooperative project____ 1929—Sept. 107-8
----- 1936, data from BLS general survey of cooperative societies___________ ______ 1937—N ov. 1146-54
----- Self-help cooperative. Uniontown (Pa.) and Iona (Idaho), development of proj­
ects, and status, 1938______________________________________________________ 1939—Sept. 566-7.7
Idaho. Emergency Relief Administration, self-help activities, 1931-36____________ 1937—Sept. 620-3
Income tax, Federal, liability of cooperative societies for__________ _____________ 1923—Aug. 217-20
Indian societies. Provision for by legislation of 1934 and 1936.............................. ............ 1937—Jan. 95-6
----- Types and operation______________________________________________________
1937—Jan. 95-6
Initial enterprise, best types of business for, discussion, congress of Cooperative
League____________________________________________________________________ 1924—Dec. 152-4
Institute of Cooperation, American, 4 weeks’ summer course_______________________ 1925—June 166
Insurance. Casualty and fire. Service, Cooperative League, new activities_________
1931—Feb. 95
----- Electrical workers, formation of, Union Cooperative InsuranceAssociation____ 1925—Mar. 267
----- Life. Low-cost term, plan based on patronage________________________________ 1939—Jan. 109
----- Societies affiliated with Coo )erative League of U.
S. A., status of,Dec. 31, 1928.. 1930—July 119
International Cooperative Alliance, membership and business statistics____________ 1931—M ay 109
International relations________________________________________________________ 1936—June 1559
International trade. Part played in, by agricultural organizations........................ ........... 1927—July 65
----- Problem o f ______________________________________________________________ 1923—Aug. 220-2
----- Purchases, 1923 and 1924____________________________________________________ 1926—Feb. 208
Iowa. Grain, dairy, and livestock associations, number in operation, and statistics of
operation___________________________________________________________________ 1925—Apr. 163
Labor banks. (See Banks, labor, this section.)
Labor organization. Cooperative Workers’ Union and general attitude toward
unions_______________________________ _____________________________________ 1938—Sept. 496-7
Laundries. Activities, 1929______________________________________ __________1930—Oct. 21-34
Leagues and wholesales, coordination of_____________________________ _______ ___ 1940—Mar. 662-3
Legislation. Committee report on, congress of Consumers’ Societies____________ 1922—Dec. 233-4
----- (See also Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general—Cooperative
associations, and Credit unions.)
Lithuanians in the United States_____________________________________________ 1924—Aug. 192-4
Livestock. Agencies, Farmers’ Educational and cooperative union (Nebr.), opera­
tions, (scales, etc.)............................................................................. ........................................... 1923—Aug. 225




70

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperation, United States—Continued.
Livestock. Marketing associations, membership and operating (sales, etc.) statistics,
Page
by State-------------------- --------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Jan. 178-9
*— Shipping, Iowa_____________________________________ _______ _____________ 1922—Apr. 221-2
=
Llano Cooperative Colony. California and Louisiana, vicissitudes, 1914 to 1930___ 1931—M ay 101-9
----- Leesville, La_______________________________________________________________ 1921—Jan. 130
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Cooperative National Bank, Cleveland (Ohio),
report, 1921---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1922—Feb. 144
Management. Accounting, share capital, patronage refunds, and life insurance, new
procedures affecting, 1938_______________________________ ___________________ 1939—Jan. 108-9
----- Cooperative stores, report, congress of Cooperative League...................................... . 1925—Jan. 176-7
Marketing. Fruits, livestock, and grain............... ...................................... ............ .......... 1924—June 169-70
----- Grain, schemefor_______ ______________ r................................................................. 1921—July 219-20
----- M ilk, fluid__________________ ____ — .............................................. 1925—Dec. 171-2; 1930-Aug. 122
----- Potatoes, M innesota............................................................................................................ 1922—Apr. 222-3
----- Studies by Department of Agriculture.............. ............................................................ . 1923—Jan. 204-5
----- Wheat, National agency established..................... . ..................................................... . . 1923—Aug. 222-3
----- Wool, 1922 to 1924................................................ .............................................................. . 1925—N ov. 220-1
----- (See also Agricultural associations, this section.)
Massachusetts. Shoe factories, stock-selling practices, legislative investigation,
results------------------------------------------------------------------ ------ ------------------------------ 1931—Mar. 123-5
Medical and health service. Hospital, establishment of, Elk City (Okla.)_______ 1932—Feb. 329-30
----- Societies providing------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------- 1931—July 114-15
Medical-care associations. Progress of movement. 1937, and opposition encoun­
tered...................................... .......................................................................... ........................ 1938—Dec. 1313-14
----------- 1939, and first convention. . ........................................................................... ................ 1940—Mar. 657
Mesabe Range Cooperative Federation, creamery and sausage factory, operations of,
1934_________________ ____________________________________ _____ - ............ ......... 1935—Oct. 990-1
Middle West societies, operating (sales, etc.) statistics................ .................................... 1923—M ay 229-30
Milk distributing plant, formula for successful operation of_ ............................................ 1922—Dec. 236
Minneosta. Buying and selling societies, operating (sales, etc.) statistics, by kind of
business-------------------------------------- 1---------------------------- ----------------- --------------- 1923—Aug. 223-4
----- Creameries and cheese factories, number in operation------------- r............................. 1923—Apr. 163-4
----- Income-tax law amended, 1937, to exempt only farmers’ cooperatives. __............. .
1938—Dec. 131
----- Oil associations, patronage dividends.................... .............................................................
1929—Jan. 97
M ovement. Condition of....................................................................................................... 1922—Aug. 214-20
----------- Illinois____________________________________ ________________________ 1925—M ay 208-10
----- “ Outstanding weakness,” lack of “human interest” ------------------- ------------------- 1927—Dec. 101-3
----- Review of, throughout world. (See under Cooperation, foreign countries—
General.)
----- Various countries, comparative study. (Parker)................................ ...................... 1923—Oct. 184-90
Moving pictures, Illinois and Pennsylvania.......................................................................... . 1922—Apr. 222
National Cooperative Wholesale Federation, formation................................ ....................... 1925—Feb. 202
National Cooperatives, Inc., pool buying agency for member wholesale societies, formed
in 1933_______________________________________________ _________________ 1933—Dec. 1417-18
Nebraska. Operating (sales, etc.) statistics, by type of society..................................... 1922—Apr. 223-4
Negroes. Consumers’ Cooperative Trading Co. of Gary, I n d ..................................... 1936—Feb. 369-71
----- Housing project, Paul Laurence Dunbar Apartments (Harlem, N . Y .)________ 1929—Sept. 107-8
New Hamsphire. Farmers’ buying and selling organizations, number in operation. __ 1923—Apr. 164
North Dakota. Division of Cooperatives established in Department of Agriculture and
Labor, 1939__________________________________________________________________
1940—Jan. 94
Northern States Cooperative League. Membership and sales_____________________ 1929—Oct. 104
----- Yearbooks, 1926-27____ ____ ______________________________ 1926—N ov. 74-6; 1927—Dec. 104-5
Ohio (Cleveland). Consumers’ organization, as of June 1937. (W ilke)__________ 1937—Sept. 541-60
Oil associations. (See Petroleum associations, this section.)
Park association, northern Wisconsin (Brule) membership and activities____________ 1937—Dec. 1335
Patronage dividends paid out of actual earnings permissible under N R A , Executive
order of Oct. 24, 1933---------------------- : ------------------------------------------------------------- 1933—Dec. 1416
Patronage refunds. (See under type of society.)
Penn-Craft. Self-help housing plan (Uniontown, Pa.), development and status..1939—Sept. 566-75
Pennsylvania. Assistance to societies from expert cooperative advisors____________ 1923—Aug. 225
----- Unusual forms of societies, eastern anthracite region___________________ ____ ___ 1931—Aug. 65
Petroleum associations. Development and spread of_______ ______ ______________ 1930—Jan. 77-8
----- Distributing, Northern Wisconsin, survey May-June 1937___________________ 1937—Dec. 1333-4
----- Gasoline and motor oils, cooperative buying___________ ______ 1927—July 66; 1928—Mar. 93-4
----- Gasoline and oil stations. Of cooperative stores, 1929____ ___________________ 1930—June 117-18
------------ Survey of activities, 1929___________________ _____ ___ ______ 1930—Sept. 11-18, Oct. 21-34
----- Indexes of sales, net earnings, and patronage refunds, 1920-36______ ____________ 1938—Aug. 236
----- Kansas, Union Oil Co________________ _____ __________ _______ _____ _______ 1929—Sept. I ll
----- Minnesota, Rochdale basis............................ ............ .................................................... . 1927—Dec. 103-4
----- North Central States. Operating (sales, etc.) statistics......................................... . 1929—July 96-7
------------ Sales and net gain, 1930........................................................................................ ......... 1931—Aug. 64
----- Minnesota, patronage dividends, oil associations............................................................
1929—Jan. 97
----- Patronage refunds, 1925-36............................ .................................................. .......... 1938—Aug. 232-3, 236
----- Sales and net savings (oil associations), by States, 1935, compared with 1934____ 1936—Nov. 1188
Philadelphia. Apartment houses (Carl Mackley), activities of residents. (Lorwin). 1937—Aug. 312-15
Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co., welfare association______________________________
1925—Feb. 6
Philippine Islands. Rural agricultural credit associations, operations, 1924-28_______ 1930—M ay 113
Postal credit unions. (See under Credit unions, this section.)
Problems and sociological significance of movement, northern Wisconsin, survey,
May-June 1937_________________________ ______________________ ___________ 1937—Dec. 1336-44
Productive enterprises. (See Workers’ productive associations, this section.)
Production. Butter and meats, consumers’ cooperatives, Minnesota, report of opera­
tion, 1934____________________________________________________________ ______ 1935—Oct. 990-1
----- “ Co-op” labels and kind of goods manufactured by associations, summary, 1939.. 1940—Mar. 661
Publishing associations, northern Wisconsin, survey, May-June 1937______________ 1937—Dec. 1334-5
Recreation. Activities of consumers’ societies............................................... ..................... 1929—Oct. 63-5
----- Cleveland cooperative societies, activities, 1937. ........................................................ 1937—Sept. 553-4
----- Minnesota and Wisconsin societies, joint a ctivities.................................. ................. . 1931—Mar. 121-2




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

71

Cooperation, United States—Continued.
Page
Regional associations, Chicago a r ea .................................................................................... 1937—Oct. 832-8
Restaurants. Activities, 1928................................... ............................................................... 1930—Oct. 21-34
----- Distribution of milk, M inneapolis..................................................................................... 1923—Dec. 192
----- Requisites for successful operation__________ _____________ __________________ 1922—Dec. 235-6
Retail-store associations. Indexes, sales, net earnings, and patronage refunds, 1920-36.. 1938—Aug. 236
. ----- Northern Wisconsin, operation, employment, and summary statistics, 1930-36_ 1937—Dec. 1328-30
----- Patronage refunds, 1925-36 ___________________________________________ 1938—Aug. 232-3,236
----- Sales and net savings, by States, 1935, compared with 1934____________________ 1936—N ov. 1188
----- Study of activities, 1929; and statistics, 1936 and 1937______ 1930*—Oct. 21-34; 1938—Dec. 1315-17
----- (See also Consumers’ societies, and Distributive associations—Retail, this section.)
Rural associations of assistance in TV A program______________________________ 1939—Mar. 587-8
Rural electrification. Projects. (See under Electricity, this section.)
Savings effected, six members of Villa Grove Cooperative Society.......................... ........... 1927—July 66
Savings returns, the question of_______________________________ ____ __________1924—Mar. 192-3
Savings through cooperation, possibilities, Farmers’ Union State Exchange, Omaha
(Nebr.), note____________________________________________________ __________
1930—Feb. 119
Self-help activities. Older workers, cooperatives for (University of Caliornia)------- 1939—M ay 1081-3
----- Unemployed Barter and exchange, use of scrip, etc., Los Angeles (Calif.)
region, su r v ey ..__________________ ________ _____________________________ 1933—Apr. 717-40
----------- Federal aid by W PA provided for by 1938 legislation____________________ 1939—Jan. 111-13
----------- Historical summary from 1931, geographic distribution, activities, govern­
ment, membership, and financial statistics, 1936___________________________ _____ 1938—July 1-17
Self-help organizations. Consumers’ purchasing sections, California, 1934-35______ 1936—M ay 1224-5
-----Future of, discussed (University of California study)___________ ____________ 1939—M ay 1082-3
-----Growth 1931-38, membership by States (20), June 1938, and activities to 1938 in
California, District of Columbia, Idaho, Utah, Virginia, Virgin Islands_________ 1939—Dec. 1335-47
----- Wholesales. Aims, development, and geographical location________________ 1936—June 1559-60
Selling to or through bona fide organizations ruled no violation of N R A codes, Executive
order of Feb. 17, 1934___________________________ _____________ ____ __________
1934—Apr. 853
Services and facilities of associations, expansion, 1939_____________________ _____ _ 1940—Mar. 658-61
Share capital. Practice relative to, 3 principal plans............... .......................................... 1937—M ay 1186-8
----- Procedure, new variants in, 1938. ............... ........................................... .....................
1939—Jan. 108-9
Shingle mills, Washington, western____________________________________________ 1924—Jan. 170-6
Shoe shops. Massachusetts, relation of employer and employee, investigation
authorized_____________________________________ ____ ________________________ 1930—Oct. 107
Societies. Failure of. (See Failure, this section.)
----- Number in operation, by nationality of members, New England, New Jersey,
and New York__________________________________ __________ _________________ 1926—N ov. 76
----- Unusual forms of, anthracite region, eastern Pennsylvania....... ............... .................... 1931—Aug. 65
----- (See also under specific subject or type of association, this section.)
Statistics of operation, etc. (See under specific type of association, this section.)
Store associations. (See Retail-store associations, this section.)
Store management. Committee report, congress of Cooperative League..................... 1924—Dec. 155-6
Stores. Consumers’, California, 1934-35............................................................................. 1936—M ay 1216-22
----- Location of, guiding points in ................... ........................................................................ 1923—Dec. 193-4
Strikes, effect of, on cooperative stores.................................................................................. . 1923—July 236-1
Students’ associations. California, 1934-35........................................................................ 1936—M ay 1222-3
----- Federation, 1939........................................ ....................................................... ..................... 1940—Mar. 663-4
Students’ eating clubs (Chicago area)......... .......................... ............................................. 1937—Oct. 818-19
Taxation and legislation. Committee report, congress of Cooperative League............ 1924—Dec. 156
Teaching of, Wisconsin, text of law providing for_________________ ____ _____ _____ _ 1935—Oct. 991
Telephone associations. History, extent, characteristics, types, and status, 1936.
(Parker)____ __________________________________________________________ 1938—Feb. 392-413
----- Legal status, varying State regulations_____________________ ________________ 1938—Feb. 404-5
----- Practice, procedure, properties, and equipment. (Parker)___________________ 1938—Feb. 406-9
Training. (See under Education, this section.)
Undertaking business. United Mine Workers of America.................................................. 1922—Oct. 196
----- (See also Burial associations, this section.)
Unemployed. (See under Self-help activities, this section.)
Universities, cooperation courses given b y ______________________________________ 1922—Mar. 168-9
Utah. Self-help organizations, activities, and status as of Mar. 31, 1936................. 1936—Aug. 349-55
Virgin Islands. Government-subsidized activities____________ _____ _____ ______ 1937—Feb. 359-62
Wage policies in Chicago area_________________________________________ __________ 1937—Oct. 830
Wages and hours. Fair Labor Standards Act applicable to cooperatives____________ 1939—Mar. 586
Wenatchee District Cooperative Association, statement of president on marketing___ 1927—Apr. 17
Wheat Growers’ Association, Oklahoma, operations_______________________________ 1923—Aug. 225
Wheat-marketing agency. Formation of American Wheat Growers, Associated
(Inc.)_._.______ ____ _______________________________________________________ 1923—Aug. 222-^3
Wholesale associations. Development, 1920 to 1929_____________________________ 1930—M ay 108-10
----- Employment and total and average pay rolls, 1934 and 1935, by individual
society______________ i _________________________ _____ ___ _______ ____________ 1936—June 1559
-----Employment and working conditions, 1938......... ....................... ................................. 1939—Sept. 654
----- First steps in participation in international trade, 1935..................... ............................. 1936—June 1559
----- Individual societies, development over stated periods of years............................... 1936—June 1557-8
-----International, problems in establishing............................................................................ 1926—June 126-8
----- Lines of goods handled and other services provided........................................................ 1936—June 1553
----- List by name, type, location, and services, as of 1937.__________________ ____ 1938—Dec. 1319-21
----- Membership, resources, business operations, etc., 1933-38----------------------------- 1935—Aug. 364-8;
1936—June 1555-9; 1937—Jan. 88-94; 1938—Sept. 559-60, Dec. 1322-5; 1939—Sept. 643-53
-----Northern Wisconsin, survey, May-June 1937_______________________________ 1937—Dec. 1331-3
----- Products manufactured and value of goods, by State, 1938____________ ____ ____ 1939—Sept. 653
-— Regional. Chicago area, status, 1937___ _________________________ __________ 1937—Oct. 832-6
-------------Interregional, and district, status of movement and statistics, 1936............... 1938—Sept. 559-60
----- Retail outlets o f.____ ______ _- ______ _______________ ____ ___ _____ __________ 1936—Jan. 106
■
-----Sales and price indexes, changes in, United States and certain foreign countries,
1930 and 1931........................................... ............................................ .............................. 1933—Mar. 551-2




72

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperation, United States—Continued.
P age
W omen’s guilds. Status, 1939___________________________________ ____ ___________ 1940—Mar. 664
Workers’ productive associations. Distribution (industrial and geographic), mem­
bership, employment, wage, and operating statistics. (BLS survey, 1937)___ 1938—N ov. 991-1000
----- Enterprises, operations in 1933____________________________________________ 1935—Feb. 257-65
----- Number of societies and members, total and average share capital, business, net
earnings, and bonuses, 1925, 1929, 1933, and 1936_________________________________ 1938—N ov. 1000
---- Study of________________________________________________ 1926—Aug. 23-30; 1930—Dec. 25-32
Youth department formed in Central States Cooperative League, 1939______________ 1940—Mar. 664
Youth League Cooperative. Activities in Cooperative Central Exchange Territory.._ 1931—Mar. 122
Cooperation, foreign countries:
General. Consumers’ and farmers’ societies, statistics showing extent of in 1935:
Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, France, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden,
Switzerland_________________________________________________________________ 1937—M ay 1186
----- Consumers’ societies. Employment furnished by, specified countries, 1934............
1937—Jan. 95
------------ Membership and business statistics, specified countries__________________ 1939—July 123-4
----- Development of movement in relation to population, specified countries______ 1939—July 129-30
----- International association, first formed, electrical-light bulbs (Sweden)___________ 1932—Mar. 574
----- Membership, etc., specified types of societies, by countries__________ ____ 1937—Jan. 80-3,86-7;
1939—July 106-9
----- President’s Commission for Study of Cooperatives in Europe, report 1937,
summary_________________________________________________________________ 1937—M ay 1182-6
— - Wholesale societies. Business done, etc., and value of goods produced, specified
countries_________________________________________________________ ____ _____ 1939—July 125-9
------------Retail outlets of___________ ____________________________________________ 1936—Jan. 106
----------- Sales and price indexes, changes in, United States and certain foreign countries,
1930 and 1931_____________________________________________________________ 1933—Mar. 551-2
----- Wholesale Society, International Cooperative. Functions and history (review
of); affiliations____________________________________________________ 1936—Jan. 106-7, June 1559
----- Women in agriculture, survey by Women’s Cooperative Guild------------------------- 1929—Oct. 60-2
----- Women’s Cooperative Guild, history and functions of, review of____ 1927-June 37; 1936—Jan. 107
----- World movement, 1922 to 1937, by countries_______ . ____________ _______ . . . . 1923—Oct. 184-90;
1924—N ov. 229-32; 1927—June 28-40; 1929—Oct. 99-101; 1932—Oct. 872-81; 1933—Dec. 1404-14;
1936—Jan. 89-109; 1937—Jan. 79-95; 1939—July 104-31
----- (See also Europe, and international, this section.)
Argentina. Agricultural and urban societies, by type, operating statistics-------------- 1923—Aug. 226-7
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925______________ _____ ____________ 1930—Sept. 239
----- Center of cooperative studies established-......... .............................................................. . 1925—M ay 214
----- Societies, by kind, number, capital, and years in operation.......................................... 1921—Aug. J96;
1922—Feb. 144-5; 1931—Sept. 87
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Armenia. Cooperative Union (Aykoop), societies, membership, and sales, 1925_______ 1925—N ov. 221
— - (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Australia. Bibliography, publications since March 1925........ .................. .............. ............. 1930—Sept. 239
----- Butter (export) trade, percent of, handled cooperatively.---------------------------------- 1930—Aug. 116
----- Statistics, 1922 and 1923_____________________________________ 1923—Dec. 196; 1925—Aug. 177-8
----- (N ew South Wales). Consumers’ cooperative movement, development________ 1930—Mar. 82-3
------------Statistics, 1909 to 1919__________________________ ____ __________________ 1921—Aug. 196-7
----- (Queensland). Agricultural societies, development__________________________ 1925—N ov. 221-2
----- (South Australia). Registered societies, statistics of operation. ........... ..................... 1921—Feb. 104
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Austria. Activities of unions, 1914, 1919 to 1925--------------------------------------- ------ ------ 1923—Jan. 205;
1924—Apr. 203; 1925—N ov. 222-3; 1926—Dec. 87-8
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925---------- --------- ------------------------------- 1930—Sept. 239 ----- Development, by type of society, 1934, review o f............................ 1936—Jan. 91-2, 94-5, 101-3, 105
----- General condition of movement_________________ ____ ___ ____ _______________ 1934—June 1368
----- Post-war conditions____________________________________ ______ ____________ 1928—Mar. 94-5
----- Registered cooperative societies, statistics, 1921 and 1924-------------- 1923—Sept. 187; 1926—June 128
----- Retail consumers’ societies, statistics, 1923____________________________________ 1925—Apr. 176
----- Seed potato trade, percent of, handled cooperatively----------------------------------------- 1930—Aug. 115
----- Union of Cooperative Societies, congress_____________________________ ____ ____ 1922—Oct. 196
----- Union of Distributive Societies, statistics_________ __________________________ 1921—Feb. 103-4
----- Union of German-Austrian Consumers’ Societies, affiliations, 1924____ __________ 1926—Apr. 156
----- (Vienna). Labor Bank, report, 1929, and activities of......... .............. 1930—July 119-20, N ov. 117-18
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Baltic countries. Trend of movement______________________ ____________________ 1924—Sept. 174
Belgium. Agricultural and consumers’ societies, operations................. ......................... 1925—Apr. 176-7
• - Agricultural societies, activities, 1922 and 1923_______________________________ 1926—Sept. 56-7
—
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925____ _________ ____ ____________ 1930—Sept. 239-40
----- Congress of cooperative unions, 1922 and 1923_____........................ . 1922—Oct. 197; 1923—Sept. 184
----- Consumers’ cooperative movement, conditions of.-------------------------------------------- 1925—Aug. 178
----- Consumers’ societies, productive societies, statistics of development, 1925-27______
1928—July 48
----- Cooperative Office. Combined membership, sales, etc______ ____ _____ ________ 1929—Oct. 104
----- ------ Congress, affiliations, functions_____________________________ ___________ 1921—Feb. 104-5
----- Cooperatives affiliated to Socialist Party, increase in sales and activities, 1929___ 1931—Feb. 98-9
----- Development, etc., statistics------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1921—Apr. 148;
1923—Apr. 164; 1924—N ov. 232-6; 1926—Apr. 156; 1928—Oct. 74; 1936—Jan. 91-2, 94-6, 101,
103,105
- — Fishing, cooperative, beginnings of------------------------------------------------------------ 1922—Jan. 221-2
— International Cooperative Congress, 1924------- ------------------------------------------------ f924—June 170
- — League of Peasants, structure and activities__________ *_____________________ 1929—Mar. 141-3
*— Medical and health service, societies providing_______________________________ 1931—July 116
----- National organizations, statistics of operation, 1926._________ __________________
1928—July 48
----- Office of Commerce and Cooperation created______ ____ ____ ______ ______ _____ 1922—Jan. 222
----- Operations. (See Belgium—Development, this section.)
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Brazil. Agricultural cooperation, legislation.......... ............................... .............. ................ 1924—Mar. 193-4
----- Progress of movement_____________ ________________ ________________________ 1923—M ay 231
*— (See also General—World movement, this section,)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

73

Cooperation, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Bulgaria. Agricultural societies, statistics, 1922......................................................... .......... 1923—Sept. 187
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925.................. ................................................. 1930—Sept. 240
----- List of societies, by type, 1920_____________________________________________ 1922—Apr. 225-6
----- Statistics, 1920-22____ ______________________ 1923-M ar. 156; 1924—June 171-2; 1926—Sept. 57-8
----- Sugar trade, percent of, handled cooperatively_____________________ ______ ____ 1930—Aug. 115
- — (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Canada. Associations, by type, membership, 1931__________ _______ ____ _______ 1933—Feb. 322
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925....................................... ................. ....... 1930—Sept. 240-1
----- Canadian Wheat Pool, study of. (Irwin)________________ __________________ 1929—N ov. 59-60
----- Consumers’ and marketing societies, statistics, 1923_____ ____ 1925—Jan. 180-1; 1926—Feb. 211-12
----- Consumers’ societies. Membership, by Province, 1932________________________ 1933—Feb. 322
------------Statistics of operation___________________ 1922—Feb. 145; 1923—Dec. 196-7; 1928—Mar. 95-6
------------Wholesales, credit unions, and banks, status, 1939_____________________ 1940—N ov. 1167-70
----- Contract, use of, by consumers’ societies----------------------------------------------- ------ 1930—June 120-1
----- Cooperative Union not limited to consumers’ societies.......................... ...................... 1928—N ov. 92-3
----- Credit unions, status, by Province, 1938___________________________________ 1940—N ov. 1168-9
----- Marketing apples, grain, and wool, percent of trade handled cooperatively_______ 1930—Aug. 116
----- Marketing, compulsory____________________________________________________* 1927—M ay 103
----- Medical and health service, societies providing_____________________________ 1931—July 116-17
----- Union-management cooperative plan on National Railway System_____________ 1925—Dec. 212
----- 'United Grain Growers and Retail Consumers’ Societies, statistics of operation,
1928______________________________________________________________________ 1929—Sept. 113-14
----- United Grain Growers (Ltd.), statistics of operation__________________________ 1924—Apr. 203;
1927—Mar. 45; 1928—Aug. 80-1
----- Wholesales, Provincial and inter-Provincial federation, status, 1940____ ________ 1940—N ov. 1168
----- (Alberta). Farmers’ cooperative movement________________________________ 1922—M ay 204-5
' ----- (Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan). Wholesales, Provincial, total sales and net
gain_______________________________________________________________________ 1940—N ov. 1168
----- (British Columbia). N ew marketing law, fruit and vegetable growers................. . 1927—July 67-8
----- (Maritime Provinces). Fishermen, Government recommendations.................... 1929—July 117-18
----- (Newfoundland). Building association, formation_________________ _________ _ 1921—Feb. 112
------------Fishermen’s Protective Union, rapid growth.......... .......................................... 1929—July 118-19
----- (Ontario). Law applying to cooperative associations............ ................................ ....... 1922—Aug. 220
------------United Farmers’ Cooperative Co., chain stores____________________ _______ 1923—July 233
----- (Quebec). Agricultural societies, activities, 1928...................................................... ....... 1930—M ay 113
----------- Banks, development, 1934 to 1938________________ ______ _____________ 1940^Nov. 1169-70
------------People’s banks, financial and membership statistics______________________ 1924—N ov. 229;
1925—Aug. 179; 1926—June 128; 1930—M ay 113; 1931—M ay 109-10
----- : (Saskatchewan). Agricultural associations, conference of managers and directors. 1925—Oct. 167
----------- Farm supplies purchasing, grain elevators, creameries, development______ 1921—Feb. 105-6
------------Progress of m ovem ent---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—N ov. 192
------------Statistics----------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—Jan. 205-6, Mar. 156, Dec. 197
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Ceylon. Cooperative societies, 1923________________ _____________________________ 1925—Apr. 177
----- Development of societies, statistics, 1922 to 1924_______________1923—Dec. 197-8; 1925—Dec. 175
Chile. National Confederation of Cooperative Societies, establishment of, and pur­
pose, note____________________________________________________________ _______ 1930—Feb. 119
----- General—World movement, this section.)
China. Bibliography, publications since March 1925___ __________________________ 1930—Sept. 241
----- Cooperative movement, and spread of enterprises___________ 1924—Nov. 47-8; 1929—Sept. 114-15
----- Cooperative societies, capital and membership, by Province or city, 1931_______ 1933—Jan. 125
----- Credit societies, development, to April 1931______________________ ____________ 1933—Jan. 126
----- Raiffeisen credit system, introduction of, and development of rural societies, 1923
to 1929____________________________________________________ 1925—N ov. 223-4; 1931—Sept. 88-91
----- Society for native industries being organized____________________ _____________ 1930—Aug. 123
----- (Fukien Province.) Placement societies for skilled workers________ ____ _______ 1940—June 1385
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Cuba. Formation and regulation provided for in 1940 constitution_________________ 1940—Oct. 882
Cyprus. (See General—World movement, this section.)
Czechoslovakia. Bibliography, publications since March 1925........... ................. ........... 1930—Sept. 241
----- Building and housing societies, 1922_________________ ________________________ 1923—Dec. 198
----- Central Union, statistics of operations, 1924__............................................ ...................... 1926—Feb. 212
----- Cooperative community (Prikazy village)____________________________________
1927—July 67
----- Credit societies, statistics, 1921______________________ _______ ________________ 1924—Apr. 203-4
----- Development and operations, etc. of societies_______________ 1921—N ov. 192-3; 1922—Aug. 220-1;
1924—June 172, Aug. 195; 1925—Jan. 181, June 170, Dec. 176; 1926—Dec. 88; 1927—Sept. 77-8;
1933—Mar. 552
----- Farming societies, 1923_____________________________________________________ 1925-^-May 215
----- Housing, data reported by TJ. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enterprise, 1937____ 1937—June 1444-5
----- Progress of movement, to 1924________________________ ______ 1924—Sept. 174; 1925— ov. 224-5
N
----- Raiffeisen credit societies, operations, 1919 to 1922____ ____________ ____________ 1925—Apr. 178
----- Saltpeter trade, percent of, handled cooperatively................. ......................................... 1930—Aug. 115
----- Schulze-Delitzsch credit societies, operations, 1921 to 1923__________ ____________ 1925—Dec. 176
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Denmark. Bibliography, publications since March 1925—
................................................... 1930—Sept. 241
----- Cooperative Union campaign against trusts, note________ ____ ________________ 1930—Feb. 120
----- Insurance associations, State supervision and regulation of................... ........................1934—M ay 1076
----- Labor bank, annual report, 1929_____________________________________________ 1930—July 119
----- Marketing butter and eggs (export), percent of trade handled cooperatively______ 1930—Aug. 116
----- Retail trade, percent of, handled cooperatively, by commodity_________________ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Statistics, 1922-24_____ _______________ ____ ___ 1923—Sept. 188; 1924r—Apr. 204; 1925—Apr. 178-9
----- Trend of movement___________________ ______________ ____ ________________ 1924r—Sept. 172-3
----- Wholesale society. Affiliations, 1924.................... ................ ....................... ...................... 1926—Apr. 157
------------Statistics of operation, 1920 and 1925..................... ......................... . 1922—Jan. 222; 1926—Dec. 88
----- Workers’ National Bank, development, 1919 to 1923.................................................... 1924—N ov. 236
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Egypt. Obstacles to progress of societies_________________ ______________________ 1940—July 43-5
Estonia. Bibliography, publications since March 1925.......................................................... 1930—Sept. 241




74

monthly labor review

Cooperation, foreign countries—Continued.
P age
Estonia. Dairy, credit, consumers’, and agricultural wholesale societies, etc_____ 1923—July 233-4
----- Marketing butter and eggs export, percent of trade handled cooperatively............. 1930—Aug. 116
----- Statistics of development, by type of society, 1920 to 1924................................... ........... 1926—June 129
----- Wholesale, and affiliated societies, statistics, 1923 and 1924-................................„......... 1925—N ov. 225
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Europe. Consumers’ societies as regulators of retail prices, specified countries.............. 1927—July 63-4
----- Educational work........................................................................... ...................................... 1927—June 37, 39
----- Employment conditions, various countries................................................................... 1939—Feb. 341-7
----- Housing in various countries (reported by U. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enter­
prise).................................... ................................................................................................... 1937—June 1439-46
----- International wholesale society, formation and purpose............................................... 1927—June 39
----- Retail societies, statistics, 1924. .. .......................................................................................... 1926—Apr. 155
----- Trend of m ovem ent. ........................................................................................................... 1924—Sept. 170-5
----- Wholesale societies. Sales, 1921-25.............................1_____ _____________________ 1923—Apr. 166;
1924—July 220; 1925—Sept. 165; 1927—Jan. 113
------------Statistics, 1923................................................................................................................... 1924—N ov. 232
Federated M alay States. Statistics, 1923.......... .............................. ....................................... 1924—Aug. 195
-----(See also General—World movement, this section.)
■
Finland. Bank (Svenska Finlands Andelsbank) founded in Helsingfors.................- ......... 1921—Jan. 135
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925....... ......................................................... 1930—Sept. 241-2
----- Collective agreements, provisions of, as analyzed by ILO ................................... . 1939—Feb. 344
----- Consumers’ cooperative m ovem ent........... ............ ..................... .................................. 1929—July 119-20
----- Employment and working conditions as analyzed by ILO.......................................... 1939—Feb. 341-7
----- Marketing butter and cheese, percent of trade handled cooperatively. ....................... 1930—Aug. 116
----- Membership statistics, old and new groups.............................................. ...................
1929—July 120
----- Movement in 1921, and trend of, to 1924............................................ 1922—Aug. 221; 1924—Sept. 173
----- Rural Banks, Cooperative, development since 1902...................................................... . 1931—Feb. 99
----- Societies, by type, and statistics of operation..................................................................1921—Feb. 107-8,
Aug. 197; 1923—M ay 232, July 235; 1924—Aug. 195-6; 1925—Apr. 179; 1926—June 129, Sept. 58
----- Trade-unions and the “K. K .” (Central Union of Distributive Cooperative Soci­
eties in Finland), disputes procedure, agreement________________________________ 1933—Jan. 138
-— Wholesale society (O. T. K .). And consumers’ societies (K. K .), business, 1918
to 1924.................. ................ ............. ..................................................... ................................. 1925—June 170-1
----- Wholesale society (S. O. K .). Medical and health service___ _______________ 1931— July 117
------------ Operations, 1921 to 1924.................................................. ........................... ...........
1922—Feb. 145;
1923—Jan. 206, Sept. 188-9; 1925—Sept. 165-6
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
France. Agriculture. ................... ............................................................................................. 1922—Nov. 222
----- Bakeries, breweries, and grocery stores, membership and sales, Jan. 1, 1930.............. 1933—Jan. 127
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925................................................ ............... 1930—Sept. 242-3
----- Consultative Chamber of the Workers’ Cooperative Productive Associations,working agreement with General Federation of Labor..................................................... 1924—Apr. 204-5
----- Consumers’ societies, development, statistics, 1913 to 1930....................................... 1923—Aug. 227-9;
1928—Mar. 96-7; 1930—Feb. 114r-16; 1933—Jan. 127
----- Employment and working conditions, as analyzed by ILO ...................................... 1939—Feb. 341-6
----- Familistere of Guise, Society of the. Organization, history, and status............. 1930—Aug. 116-19
----- Federation of Consumers’ Societies, annual conferences_______ 1922—Oct. 198; 1923—Sept. 184-6
----- Housing (report by U. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enterprise), 1937_____________ 1937—June 1445
----- Labor associations—number and distribution; statistics, 1920_____ 1922—Oct. 199-200, N ov. 222-3
----- Medical and hospital service, societies providing.............................................................. 1931—July 117
----- Printing industry, “commandite” sy ste m ..................................................................... 1926—Feb. 208-11
----- Progress of movement.............................................. ............. ................ 1921—N ov. 193-4; 1923—Apr. 165
-----Statistics, 1913 to 1923__________ ___________ 1923—July 235-6; 1924—Aug. 196; 1925—Apr. 179-81
----- Tradesmen, small, cooperative societies o f.............................. .................................... 1930—June 118-20
----- Wholesale Society, business and value of goods made, 1924 to 1931............................ . 1926—Apr. 157;
1933—Jan. 127-8
----- Workers’ productive associations. B y industry, number, membership, and busi­
ness, 1928, 1930, and 1931........................................................................ 1931-Dec. 128-9; 1932—M ay 1091-2
----------- Intermittent existence o f............................. ...................................... ........................... 1922—Jan. 222
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Germany. Bank of Workers, Salaried Employees, and Civil Servants, report, 1929;
profits and dividends, 1924-31..................................................................... 1930—July 120; 1932—Dec. 1364
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925................................................................. . 1930—Sept. 243
----- Boatmen’s cooperative societies, development.................... ............. ......................... 1930—Aug. 122-3
----- Central Federation, affiliated societies by type, statistics of operation..................1921—Feb. 108-10
----- Central Union and Wholesale Society, statistics of operation..................... ........... 1925—Aug. 179-80;
1928—Mar. 97-8
----- Consumer cooperation, Government attitude, note.................................................... 1930—Feb. 119-20
----- Consumers’ cooperative movement, financial condition..................... ........................ 1925—Dec. 177-8
-----Consumers’ Societies and Wholesale Society, development, 1930___________ _____ 1931—Aug. 66
----- Cooperative movement, condition, Jan. 1, 1932........................................................... 1932—June 1343-4
----- Farmers’ (agricultural) societies, by type, volume, and value of business, 1930
and 1931......................... ......................................................................................— .............. 1933—Jan. 128-9
----- Housing societies, summary data, 1929______________________ _________________
1931—Feb. 99
-----Labor Bank, report for 1929, and profits and dividends, 1924-31.................................. 1930—July 120;
1932—Dec. 1364
----- Labor banks. Consolidation of, 1924................................................................................... 1925—Jan. 182
----------- Operations of, 1929 to 1931........................................................................................ 1932—Dec. 1362-4
---- - Medical and health service, societies providing..................... ................... ..................... 1931—July 117
-----Raiffeisen Societies, General Union of, report, 1920 and 1922.............................. .......... 1922—Feb. 146;
1924—Apr. 205
----- Registered societies, by type, 1923 and 1924........................................................................ 1925—June 171
— r Retail trade, percent of, handled cooperatively, by commodity................................. 1930—Aug. 115
----- Societies, dissolved and newly formed, by type, 1931................................................ 1932—June 1344
----- Statistics................................................... - ........................ - ............ - --------- ----------------- 1921—Aug. 198;
1923—Jan. 206-7, Mar. 156-8, M ay 232, July 236-7; 1924-June 172-3, Aug. 196-8; 1926—June 130,
July 85-6
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

75

Cooperation, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Great Britain. Agricultural and fishing societies, statistics of operation.......................... 1925—Jan. 184;
1930—Feb. 117
----- Agricultural Organization Society, report, 1921 and 1922............. ............................... 1924—N ov. 237-8
----- Agricultural societies, 1921 and 1923...................................... . ......... 1923—Apr. 165-6; 1926—June 131-2
----- Arbitration between societies and employees, provision for........................................... 1927—Mar. 46
----- Beginning in Rochdale, 1844.............. ......................... . .................................................... 1938—Aug. 223-4
----- Collective agreements, provisions of, as analyzed by ILO___....................._................ . 1939—Feb. 344
----- ‘’Consumers’ Cooperative M ovement.” (W e b b )-.................................................. 1922—N ov. 223-6
----- Consumers’ societies, registered, operations (reports of Registry of Friendly Socie­
ties).......... - ......................................... ....................... 1922—Feb. 148; 1923—Jan. 207; 1924—Feb. 219-20;
1925-Jan. 182-3, Dec. 178-9; 1926—Feb. 212-13; 1929—Mar. 143
----- Conventions, etc. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.—Cooperatives.)
-----Cooperative Productive Federation societies, capital, sales, net gain, etc., 1923 to
1931---------------- --------- ------------------------------------------ --------------------------------------- 1933—Mar. 553
----- Cooperative Union. Activities, 1924, by type of society............................................... 1926—Apr. 160
------------ Its work, departments, and congresses................................................. ................... 1937—Oct. 917
----- Copartnership Productive Societies, results of operation, annual report________ 1921—Oct. 213-14;
1922—Nov. 226-7; 1925—Oct. 167-8
----- Disputes with employees, machinery for settling........ ................ ................................ 1926—July 86-7
----- Employees, sales, wages, hours, and output, 1912 to 1923......... ................................. . 1925—Nov. 225-6
----- Employment and working conditions, as analyzed by ILO ...................................... 1939—Feb. 341-6
----- Housing (reported by U. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enterprise), 1937.................... 1937—June 1445-6
----- Housing societies, statistics of activities, 1919 to 1924................................................... . 1926—Feb. 213
----- Industrial societies, statistics of operation, 1923_________ ____________________ 1925—Jan. 183-4
----- Labor Copartnership Association. Annual report, 1922-23 .............1923—Dec. 194-5; 1924—N ov. 238
----- Marketing societies, general situation, and activities, 1923-24_________ ________ 1926—Feb. 214-24
----- Membership statistics, 1926, retail and wholesale societies____________________ 1929—Mar. 144-5
----- National economy, position in, and operation, of retail and wholesale societies.. 1937—Oct. 913-17
----- Newspaper, cooperative____ ____ _______ ________________________ __________ _ 1937—Oct. 916
----- Operation of streetcars by Newcastle Cooperative Society_______________ _____ 1923—M ay 233
----- Profit-sharing plans, results, by type of society, 1925 to 1931....................................... 1932—Sept. 564-5
----- Retail branches opened by English Wholesale Society............... ............................... 1934—June 1368-9
----- Retail trade, percent of, cooperatively handled, by commodity_________________ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Statistics. 1919 to 1930........................ ............ 1921—Aug. 202-3; 1923—July 237-8; 1924—Apr. 205-6,
June 173; 1930—Feb. 116-17; 1931—Feb. 95-6; 1932—M ay 1092-4
------------(See also General—World movement, this section.)
----- Trend of movement__________ ______ ______________________________________ 1924—Sept. 171-2
----- Vauzhall Colliery (North Wales, cooperative experiment, and failure)......... . 1925—M ay 37, Sept. 14
----- Village industries’ revival_______________________ _____ _______ ____ ______ _ 1922—Oct. 212-13
----- Wages award of employees in cooperative societies____ ________ _____________ 1922—Aug. 221-2
----- Wholesale societies, trading operations, 1924 and 1925__________ 1925—June 171-2; 1926—June 130
----- Workers’ productive enterprises, statistics of operation, 1924-25.. 1925—Dec. 178-9; 1928—Mar. 98-9
----- Working conditions of employees_________________________ ____________ ____ 1937—Oct. 916
----- (And Ireland). Bibliography, publications since March 1925________________ 1930—Sept. 243-4
----- (England). Cooperative Wholesale Society, manufacturing plants, by kind of
output, and number of employees, 1929________________________________________ 1931—M ay 110
----------- Employees’ position, works committees, etc., Fabian Society pamphlet___ 1923—Sept. 179-80
------------Royal Arsenal Cooperative Society, Woolwich, departments maintained___ 1929—Sept. 113
------------Trawling Society (Ltd.), formation_____________________________________ 1921—Feb. 106-7
------------Wholesale Society*s factories at Pelaw and Silvertown, strike, 1922_______ 1923—Oct. 193-5
----------- Wholesale Society pension scheme in effect July 15_______________________ _ 1929—Oct. 105
----------- Women’s Cooperative Guild, purpose and work o f ..____ _______ _______ 1928—Apr. 83-5
----- (London). London Cooperative Society, short history of____________________ 1929—Oct. 101-3
----- (Scotland). Agricultural cooperation movement, committee report, 1930_____ 1930—Aug. 119-22
----------- Wholesale Society, sales-------------------------------------------------------- ---------------- 1925—M ay 215
Greece. Development, by type of society, 1934, review o f . .. ........ ............. .....................
1936—Jan. 91
----- Headway of cooperative movement__________ _____ _____________ ____ ____ _ 1934—Apr. 206-7
----- Societies, distribution of, and operations, by type, 1924 and 1925____ 1925—Aug. 180; 1926—Oct 94
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Hungary. Bibliography, publications since March 1925_________________________ 1930—Sept. 244 -5
----- Central Institute of Credit Cooperative Societies, activities (farming)___________ 1930—Mar. 18
- — “ Hangya” (central cooperative union), activities, and operations of affiliated so­
cieties, 1914-25.^.___________ 1921—Aug. 199; 1923—Mar. 158, Aug. 229-30; 1926—Apr. 157, July 87
----- Honey (export) trade, percent of, handled cooperatively_______________________ 1930—Aug. 116
----- Medical and health service, societies providing_______________ _____ ___________ 1931—July 118
----- Navvies’ societies (road construction work)_____________________________ ____ 1930—Mar. 81-2
----- Retail trade, percent of, handled cooperatively, by commodity_________________ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Statistics. B y type of society, and unions, operations, 1923_______ ____ ___ ______ 1925—Apr. 181
------------(See also General—World movement, this section.)
----- Surgical instruments factory, establishment of, 1920........ ........................... ............. ....... 1922—Jan. 223
Iceland. Cooperative movement, prospects____________ _______________________ 1921—Feb. 110-11
----- Farm products (export) trade, percent of handled cooperatively..,........................ . 1930—Aug. 116
----- (See also General—world movement, this section.)
India. Agricultural and nonagricultural societies, operations, 1921-23. ______ 1925—Apr. 182, Aug. 181
----- Agriculture, and Bombay mills, cooperative societies in, importance of..............1921—July 34, 39
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925______ ______ __________ _______ ___ 1930—Sept. 245
----- Development of movement, 1905-20_______________ ____ _____________ _________ 1922—Apr. 226
----- Grants to productive associations of unem ployed.......................................................... . 1940—Mar. 668
----- Medical and health service, societies providing_______________________________ 1931—July 118
----- Membership and financial statistics, by Province and type of society, 1923-24____ 1925—Aug. 181
----- Operations, 1923, by Province and type of society___________________________ 1924—Nov. 239-40
----- Statistics, 1920-22, and 1906-7 to 1922-23................ 1922—Aug. 222-3; 1923—July 239-42; 1925—Apr. 182
----- Summary of cooperative movement........... .......... .................................. ................. 1924—June 173-6
----- (Punjab). Statistics, 1921-22......... ....................... ............. .......................................... 1923—Dec. 198
------------Weavers’ societies_____________________ ______ ____ _______ ____ _______ _ 1922—M ay 206-7
----- fSind Province). Cooperative movement, prospects........... ............................................1921—Feb. I ll
----- ( See also General—World movement, this section, i




76

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperation, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
International. The Cooperative Republic. (Poisson)_________ _____ _______ _____ 1926—July 82-4
----- Cooperative subcontracting (commandite), report on, IL O .____ ____________ 1929—Aug. 115-16
----- Cooperative Women’s Guild survey, women in agriculture_____________________ 1929—Oct. 60-2
----- Trade, part played in, by agricultural organizations,specified countries_________ 1927—July 64-5
International Cooperative Alliance. Banks (44) in 24 countries,, statistics________ 1924—Feb. 216-17
----- Congresses. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.)
'
----- History and work of, review of______________ ____ _____ --------------------------------- 1936—Jan. 107-9
----- Membership and business s t a t i s t i c s - - ------- -----------------------— 1931—M ay 109; 1932—July 116-17
----- Relation to cooperatives in United States_________ ___ _____ ______ ___________ 1936—June 1559
International Institute of Cooperation, creation________________________________ 1924—June 170-1
International Labor Office. A ttitude_______________________ ______ ____________ 1921—Jan. 132-4
----- Prospects, press release_____________________________________________________ 1926—Aug. 71-2
Ireland. Agricultural Organization Society, statistics of operation_________________ 1924—Feb. 221
----- Development_____________________________________________ 1922—Feb. 146-8; 1924—Sept. 172
----- Statistics, b y type of society, 1919____________________________________________ 1921—Aug. 203
Irish Free State. (See General—World movement, this section.)
Italy. Agricultural Federation, development, 1893 to 1923_________________________ 1925—Jan. 185
----- Agricultural societies, grape growers, etc., headway and final g o a l..:____________ 1928—N ov. 98
----- Banks. Association of People’s, statistics_____________ ____ ____ 1924—Apr. 207; 1925—M ay 215
------------ Raiffeisen societies, housing societies---------- --------- ----------------------------------- 1928—N ov. 98
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925--------------------------------------------------- 1930—Sept. 245
----- Consumers’ societies, historical survey__________________'____________________ 1928—N ov. 94-7
----- Cooperative Garibaldi, formation and purposes; financial condition______ 1921—Jan. 135, Aug. 199
----- Development of movement________________ 1922—Apr. 227; 1923—Mar. 158-9; 1925—Dec. 179-81
----- Fascist activities___________________________________________________________ 1926—Feb. 215
----- Fascist cooperatives and labor cooperatives_____________________ __________ 1923—Dec. 198-200
----- Labor societies, cooperative, success of______________________________________ 1931—July 121-3
----- Medical and health service, societies providing___________ _______ ____ _______ 1931—July 118
----- National Credit Institute, report, 1920---------------------------------------------- ------------- 1922—Jan. 223
----- Silk-cocoon drying societies, business handled 1927 to 1930_____________________ 1931—Feb. 100
----- Workers’ productive societies, historical survey_______________________________ 1928—N ov. 97-8
----- Workmen, Amalgamated Union of Cooperative Societies, plan for improving
conditions_________________________________________ ____ ___________________ 1921—Oct. 222-3
----- (Milan). Cooperative Wholesale Society, liquidation.................. ........................
1923—Aug. 230
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Japan. Bibliography, publications since March 1925--------- ------ ------------------------- 1930—Sept. 245-0
----- Consumers’ societies. Development_________________________________________ 1928—Mar. 100
------------ Survey by Central Cooperative Union, 1929____ ______ ____ ______ ________ 1931—Dec. 129
----- Cooperative movement and statistics________________________ _
•_____ 1924—Feb. 221-3, Aug. 198
----- Earthquake damage to cooperative societies______________________ ____________ 1924—June 176
----- Marketing raw silk, percent of trade handled cooperatively— ------- ------- ----------- 1930—Aug. 116
----- Statistics, by type of society, 1916 and 1917,1911-21,1922-24---------------------------- 1921—Aug. 200-2;
1923—Aug. 230; 1926—Apr. 157
----- Wholesale societies, statistics, 1923,1924, and 1925. ............................ 1925—Aug. 182; 1927—Jan. 113
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Java. (See General—World movement, this section.)
Latin America. Development of movement____________________________________ 1928—N ov. 93-4
Latvia. Agricultural supply trade, percent of handled cooperatively, by commodity.. 1930—Aug. 115
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925__________________________________ 1930—Sept. 246
----- Butter and bacon (export) trade, percent of, handled cooperatively_____________ 1930—Aug. 116
----- Development, 1922 and 1924___________________________________ 1924—Mar. 194; 1926—Feb. 216
----- Statistics, “Konsums,” 1921____________________________ ____________________ 1923—M ay 237
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Lithuania. Cooperative movement, prospects............................................................... . 1921—Feb. 111-12
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925________________________ ______ 1930—Sept.
246
----- Statistics, 1923-------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ----------------------- 1924—Aug. 198
----- Union and affiliated societies, financialstatistics, 1919 to 1923___________ _______ 1925—Jan. 185-6
----- Union of Cooperative Societies, development, 1924. -------- ------------- --------- --------- 1925—N ov. 226
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Luxemburg. (See General—World movement, this section.)
Morocco. (See General—World movement, this section.)
Mauritius. Report, Colonial Office, Great Britain----------------------------- . ----------------- 192A—Feb. 223
Mexico. Agricultural societies, formation of, under laws of Feb. 10,1927, and Jan. 21,
1931_________________ ____________ _______________________________ - ................ 1932—Sept. 566-7
----- Peasant cooperative societies________________________________________________ 1924—Apr. 207
----- Students’ society, industrial, technical, and commercial training. _______ _______ 1928—Mar. 100
Netherlands. Bibliography, publications since March 1925________________________ 193C—Sept. 246
----- Central Societies, development, 1910 to 1923_______________________________ 1925—N ov. 226-7
----- Consumers’ federations, operations, 1925----------------- --------------------------------------- 1926—Apr. 158
----- Cooperative movement____________________________________________________ 1924—Feb. 223-4
----- Law, M ay 28,1925_______________________________ ____ _____________________ 1925—N ov. 228
----- Marketing butter, cheese, and eggs, percent of trade handled cooperatively______ 1930—Aug. 116
----- Medical and health service, societies providing________________________________ 1931—July 119
----- Societies, types and number of, 1910-23 and 1929------------------„___ 1924—Mar. 195; 1930—Aug. 123
----- Statistics, 1910 to 1922_____________________________________________________ 1924—June 176-7
----- Wholesale society (Handelskamer), operations, 1922,1923, and 1925_____________ 1923—July 242;
1925—Apr. 182-3; 1926—Sept. 58
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
N ew Zealand. Agricultural societies, development____________________ _________1921—Feb. 112-13
----- Marketing butter, percent of trade handled cooperatively............................................. 1930—Aug. 116
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Norway. Agricultural-Societies, Union of, report, 1920................ ........................................ 1922—Feb. 148
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925--------------- ------------ ----------------------- 1930—Sept. 246
----- Collective agreements, provisions of, as analyzed by ILO---------------------------------- 1939—Feb. 344
----- Consumers’ Societies, Cooperative Union and Wholesale (N. K. L.) development,
1907 to 1925_____________ ____________________________________________________ 1922—Jan. 224,
Aug. 224; 1923—Aug. 230; 1925—Apr. 183, N ov. 228; 1926—Sept. 59, Oct. 94




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

77

Cooperation, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Norway. Employm ent and working conditions, as analyzed by ILO_____________ 1939—Feb. 341-7
----- Housing construction up to 1928 (report, U. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enter­
prise)
________________________________________________ ___________________ 1937—June 1442
-----Industrial disputes, procedure and settlement, trade-union agreement with Co­
operative Union________________________________________ ______ ______________ 1932—June 1345
----- Medical and health service, societies providing________________________________ 1931—July 120
----- Statistics, consumers’ and agricultural societies, 1919 to 1922_________ ____ ______ 1924—June 178
----- Wholesale Society. Office employees, strike, Nov. 12-19, 1930__________________1931—M ay 92-3
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Palestine. Agricultural and other societies, development and activities, 1930, and
value of crops marketed_________________________ ___________ 1931—Feb. 96-7; 1932—July 117-18
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925__________________________________ 1930—Sept. 246
----- Building society, central (Solel Boneh), activities, conditions of membership, and
policies______________________________________________________ 1926—Oct. 95; 1927—Sept. 78-81
----- Marketing trade, percent handled cooperatively, by commodity________________ 1930—Aug. 116
----- Types of societies, and characteristics of movement_____________ 1926—Oct. 94; 1929—Dec. 89-91
----- (See also General—World movement, this section).
Peru. Agricultural societies, organization of farmers into, law requiring____________ 1931—July 123
Poland. Auditing Union of Polish Agricultural Cooperative Societies, statistics, 1921. 1924—Apr. 207
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925__________________________________ 1930—Sept. 247
----- Consumers’ cooperative movement, progress___ 1921—Nov. 194; 1923—Jan. 208; 1929—July 121-2
----- Consumers’ Societies, Union of, statistics, 1920_______________________________ _ 1922—Jan. 224
----- Retail trade, percent of, handled cooperatively, by commodity_________________ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Societies, by type, statistics, 1922, and 1924 to 1926_____________________________ 1923—Dec. 200;
1925—Apr. 183-4; 1926—Sept. 59-60
----- Wholesale Society (V. D . P.), operating statistics, 1925_____________ ________1926—Oct. 95-6
----- Workingmen’s Consumers’ Societies, Union of, Warsaw, statistics, 1922__________ 1923—Sept. 189
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Portugal. Development_______ ______ _______________________ _____________ ____ 1921—Aug. 202
----- Statistics, National Federation of Cooperative Societies, 1922__............................. 1924—Apr. 208
Rumania. Bibliography, publications since March 1925...................................................... 1930—Sept. 247
----- “ Central” or wholesale society, activities, 1919 to 1924.............................................. 1926—Apr. 158-9
----- Banks, development o f ...____ _________ ______________ _____ ________________ 1924—Aug. 199
----- Societies, by type, development, 1919 to 1934___________________________ ___ 1923—M ay 235-7;
1925—Aug. 182; 1928—Nov. 93-4; 1936—Jan. 91, 93, 101, 103
Russia. (See Soviet Union (U. S. S. R.), this section.)
Siam. (See General—World movement, this section.)
South Africa, Union of. Agricultural and trading societies, 1923.................................. 1925—M ay 215-16
----- Agriculture, compulsory cooperation in_______________ _______________________ 1925—N ov. 229
----- Associations, by type, membership and business, 1930-31............................................. 1933—Feb. 323
----- Cooperative trading societies, bill providing for................ ............. .............................. 1921—Aug. 202
----- Farmers’ association, development.................. ................................ .................................. 1924—Feb. 230
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Agricultural, consumers’, and workers’ productive soci­
eties, development---- ------ ------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------- 1926—Feb. 216
----- Agricultural societies, development of, 1922 to 1925______ ____ _________ ______ 1926—Dec. 88-9
----- Artels (workers’ productive societies), progress of, 1932, and program under Gov­
ernment second 5-year plan....................................... ............................................................ 1933—Mar. 554
----------- Structure and methods___________________ ___________________ _____ 1932—June 1345-50
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925.---------- --------------------- --------- 1930—Sept. 247-8
----- Central Union (Centrosoyus) and provincial unions (Goobsoyus), decree of Mar. 20,
1919_ ___________ _____________________ __________ _____ _________________ 1921—Feb. 113-14
_
----- “ Centrosoyus.” Activities, statistics, 1921...... .............................. 1922—Apr. 227-8; 1923—M ay 237-8
------------Female membership and activities, Jan. 1, 1931__.................. ............. ................ 1931—July 123-4
------------Societies affiliated with, 1925_________________________________ _________ _ 1925—Sept. 166
----- Consumers’ societies (Centrosoyus), organization and other activities__________ 1930—June 121-2
----- Cooperative movement and conditions......... .............. ............... 1924—Feb. 224-9; 1925—M ay 210-14
----- “Differential” share capital, introduction of_______ ___________________ _______ 1930—Mar. 84
----- History of movement from 1917________________ _____________________ _____ 1925—Jan. 186-9
----- Housing and leasing societies, legislation and development, 1924and 1925.......... 1925—N ov. 228-9
----- M aternity and infancy, Centrosoyus fund for protection of------------------------------ 1929—Sept. 115
----- Medical and health service, societies providing.......... ............. ............................-___ 1931—July 120
----- M otion pictures in cooperative-educational work___________________________ 1929—Aug. 116-17
----- Movement to establish cooperative trade w ith_______ ______ ______________ ___ 1922—Aug. 225
----- Regional unions, sales, 1922 to 1924_______________________ ______ ____________ 1925—June 172
----- Statistics, by type of society, 1924-25 and 1925-26........................ . 1926—Sept. 60; 1928—Mar. 100-1
----- Training for supervisory work, 2-year courses__________________________________ 1929—Oct. 104
----- Workers’ productive (kustar) societies, statistics, by type, Oct. 1, 1930............... . 1931—Sept. 91
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Spain. Agricultural cooperative movement, since 1911..................................................... 1922—Jan. 224-5
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925...................... ........................................... 1930—Sept. 248
----- Catalonian Societies, Federation of, membership and sales................................... 1925—M ay 216-17
----- Colonization societies___________________________________ _____ ____________ 1927—Oct. 72-4
----- Consumers’ societies_______________________________________ _________________ 1927—Oct. 72
- — Cooperative Societies of Northern Spain, federation of business, 1924____________ 1925—M ay 210
----- Decree of July 4, 1931, regulating societies, principal provisions__________________ 1931—Dec. 130
----- Development of movement__________________ 1923—July 242; 1924—Apr. 208; 1928—N ov. 93-4
----- Fishermen’s societies (Positos maritimos), development— ............. 1927—Oct. 74-5; 1931—Aug. 67-8
----- Medical and health service, societies providing---------------- ------------ ----------------- 1931—July 120-1
----- .(See also General—World movement, this section.)
Sweden. Arbitration between societies and employees, provision fo r ..-____________ 1927—Mar. 47
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925__________ _______________ ________ 1930—Sept. 248
----- Bread grain trade, percent of, handled cooperatively___________ ____ __________ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Collective agreements, provisions of, as analyzed by ILO _____________ ____ ___ 1939—Feb. 344
----- Cooperative Union (“K. F .”) Campaign against trusts, note______ _____ _______ 1930—Feb. 120
------------ Development of_____________________________________ ____________ ___ 1928—Mar. 101-5
----------- Statistics, 1925____________ ____ ............ .......... ................ ...................................... 1926—Dec. 89-90
----- Employment and working conditions as analyzed by ILO......................................... 1939—Feb. 341-6

201043°-—42------ 6




78

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cooperation, foreign countries—Continued.
P age
Sweden. Housing accomplishments since World War I . . : ___________ __________ 1936—Nov. 1182-6
----- Housing construction, status 1936 (report, U. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enter­
prise)— ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1937—June 1442-3
----- International association formed, electric-light bulb manufacture________________ 1932—Mar. 574
----- Progress of m ovement---------------------------------------------- --------1921—Nov. 194-5; 1924—Sept. 173
----- Registered societies, statistics, by type of society, 1924____ ____ _______________ 1926—Sept. 60-1
----- Statistics, 1914 to 1922------------------------------------------------ ------ 1923—Jan. 208-9; 1925—Sept. 166-9
----- Superphosphate trade, percent of, handled cooperatively______ _______________ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Union and Wholesale, sales, 1924_______________ ____ _________ ____ ____ _____ 1925—June 172
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Switzerland. Agricultural societies, number and membership of each type, 1910,1920.. 1922—N ov. 227
----- Bibliography, publications since March 1925------------------------------------ ------------ 1930—Sept. 248-9
----- Collective agreements, provisions of, as analyzed by ILO______________ _______ 1939—Feb. 344
----- Consumers’ Societies and Koncordia Societies, statistics, 1923,1924____ 1925—Jan. 189, Sept. 170
----- Employment and working conditions, as analyzed by ILO ___________________ 1939—Feb. 341-6
----- Federation of Trade-Unions, new agreement pledging support to cooperative
movement--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1931—Feb. 98
----- Flour (production) trade, percent of handled cooperatively....... ................................ 1930—Aug. 115
----- Housing (report, U. S. Inquiry on Cooperative Enterprise), 1937— ............. ........... 1937—June 1444
----- Medical and hospital service, societies providing------- -------------------------------------- 1931—July 121
----- Statistics of operation, 1900-1922........................................ 1923—Mar. 159, July 243; 1925—Apr. 184-5
----- Trend of movement_____________________ ________________ _____ _____________ 1924—Sept. 174
----- Types and number of societies, 1922 and 1924_________________ 1924—Mar. 195-6; 1926—Apr. 159
----- Union of Consumers’ Societies (V. S. K.), activities------------------------------------- 1922—Aug. 224-5;
1924—Apr. 208, June 178-9; 1925—June 172-3; 1926—June 132; 1930—June 122-3
----- Union of Koncordia Societies, sales and capital, 1923---------------------------- 1925—Jan. 189, Sept. 170
----- Union of Swiss Cooperative Societies, growth, 1918 to 1 9 2 0 ...................... .................. 1921—N ov. 195
----- (Basel). Consumers’ societies, development, 1866 to 1926................ ..................... 1927—Sept. 81-3
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Thailand. (See Siam.)
Turkey. Fig Growers’ Society of Aidin (Asia M in o r )........ ............................................ 1930—Feb. 118-19
Ukrainia. Bibliography, publications since March 1925 ....................... ......................... 1930—Sept. 249
----- Progress of movement---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—M ay 238
Yugoslavia. Cooperative movement. History, and statistics up to 1921 and 1923_ 1923—Aug. 231;
_
1924—Aug. 199
----------- Prospects----------------------------------------------------- --------- - 1921—Feb. Ill; 1923—M ay 229-30
----- Medical and health service, societies providing.......................................... .... ............... 1931—July 121
----- (See also General—World movement, this section.)
Cooperation, labor management. (See Labor-management cooperation.)
Cooperative Alliance, International. (See Cooperation, foreign countries—International.)
Cooperative League of the U. S. A. (See under Cooperation, United States.)
Cooperative self-help, unemployed. (See Cooperation—Self-help activities.)
Coopers:
Payment of wv ges, time and method, agreement provisions--------------- ------ ------------- 1930—N ov. 130
a
Union members. Discharge of, agreement provisions.........................................................
1931 —Dec. 96
----- Employment of, agreement provisions----------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Oct. 126
(See also under Collective agreements, U. S., by industry.)
Coordinator for Industrial Cooperation (U. S. Government):
Functions modified by Executive order? Mar. 30,1936_____________________________ 1936—M ay 1234
Meetings held, and formation of Council for Industrial Cooperation................................. 1936—Feb. 335
Office created by Executive order, Sept. 26,1935, duties of_______________________ 1935—N ov. 1203-4
Program endorsed by Council for industrial Progress, December 1936 meeting______ 1937—Feb. 374-5
Work of Council for Industrial Progress reported by Coordinator, Mar. 13, 1936____ 1936—Apr. 932-3
Copper and brass mill products. N R A code, effective N ov. 13, 1933, tabular analysis of
labor provisions------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1933—Dec. 1335
Copper industry:
Company stores and scrip system, study of economic and social implications (NRA) _ 1935—July 45-53
N R A code, effective Apr. 26,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_____________ 1934—June 1334
Copper mining. (See Mining, copper.)
Copper plate printers. (See Printers, D ie Stampers, and Engravers’ Union of North
America, International Plate.)
Copper, smelting and refining. (See Metallurgical works.)
Cord industry, solid braided. N R A code, effective Mar. 12,1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Apr. 818
Cordage and twine industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 7,1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- . --------- 1934—Apr. 811
Cork industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 22,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions___ 1934—Mar. 532
Corn-cob pipe industry. N R A code, effective Aug. 20,1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ------------------------------ 1934—Oct. 877
Corn growing. (See Agriculture.)
Corporations. Size and concentration factors. (Hearings held by T N E C , December 1938. 1939—Jan. 11-12
Corrugated and solid fiber shipping containers. N R A code, effective Feb. 12, 1934, tabu­
lar analysis of labor provisions____________________________________________________ 1934—Apr. 811
Corrugated-paper industry. Agreement, International Printing Pressmen and Assistants’
Union of North America, with 4 San Francisco manufacturers______________^_______ 1937—Feb. 427-8
Corrugated rolled-metal culvert pipe industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 7,1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions_______________________________________________________ 1934—Oct. 877
Corset and brassiere industry. N R A code, effective Aug. 28, 1933, summary of labor pro­
visions.---------- ---------------- ------ --------------------------------------------------------- 1933—Sept. 529-30, Dec. 1335
Cosmetic industry:
Occupational diseases among workers, New York---- ------ -------------------- . __________ 1928—Oct. 55-6
Perfume, and other toilet preparations. N R A code, effective Apr. 2, 1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions------------------- --------------------------------------------------------- 1934—May 1069
Cosmetologists. Federal law providing for examination and licensing of and regulation of
schools---------------------------------------------- --------------------- --------------------------- --------- ----- 1938—Sept. 564
Cost of living, United States:
Adulteration and misrepresentation of products.......................... . -................................... 1927—Sept. 204-5
Agricultural labor, increase as affecting Puerto Rico, 1915 to 1925...................................... 1926—June 68-9




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

79

Cost of living, United States—Continued.
Amalgamated Housing Corporation dwellings, 400 families in, household expenditures,
Page
1930-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 1931—Dec. 240-2
Articles on, published in M. L. R., July 1917 to October 1922, list___________________ 1922—N ov. 104-5
Bank employees, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, budget expenditures________ 1921—Feb. 78-80
Births (including layettes, etc.), total cost, Minnesota village and town families, 1929.. 1929—N ov. 175
Bituminous-coal mine workers___________________________________ 1922—M ay 113; 1924—Mar. 60-1
Bread and flour consumption, survey of, Pennsylvania................................................. 1927—Sept. 209-10
Budget, family and individual. (See Budgets, cost-of-living.)
California. (5 cities), money disbursements of wage earners and lower-salaried clerical
workers, 1934-35. (BLS study)------------------------------------------------------- --------- 1937—Sept. 663-75
-----Mexican families, size and income of_________________ ______ . _____ ___________ 1931—Jan. 89
Changes. B y city and item of expenditure__________________ ____ _____________ 1921—Feb. 52-61,
July 105-12, N ov. 76-83; 1922—Feb. 56-64; M ay 68-76, Aug. 64-72; 1923—Feb. 122-31,
M ay 91-100, Aug. 96-104, N ov. 87-100; 1924—Feb. 81-94, M ay 78-90, Aug. 78-90, N ov. 102-14
1925—Feb. 65-78, Aug. 63-76; 1926—Feb. 62-75, Aug. 197-210; 1927—Feb. 168-81, Aug. 202-15
1928—Feb. 218-31, Aug. 186-99; 1929—Feb. 178-92, Aug. 16-30; 1930—Feb. 241-55, Aug. 248-63;
1931—Feb. 213-29, Aug. 191-207; 1932-Feb. 463-72, Aug. 421-31; 1933—Feb. 429-39, Aug.
455-66; 1934—Feb. 476-89, Aug. 523-38; 1935—Feb. 511-25, Dec. 1714-22; 1937—Mar. 790, June
1513, 1521-3, Sept. 676-80, Dec. 1444-9, 1456-7; 1938—Mar. 727-30, July 195-8, Oct. 823-6,
Dec. 1344-7; 1939—Mar. 639-42, June 1351-4, N ov. 1153-5; 1940—Jan. 135-8, Apr. 912-16, Julv
139-42, Oct. 1008-11, Dec. 1552-5
----- B y geographic division and city, for specified periods__________________ _______ 1936—Apr. 1160
----- Cost of goods purchased, Apr. 15, July 15, and Sept. 15, 1936. ........................ 1936—July 256-65, Oct.
1063-72, Dec. 1617-25
----- From Oct. 16, 1935, and earlier dates, to Jan. 15, 1936________________________ 1936—Apr. 1156-65
----- January 1933-January 1935; 1929 and 1932 to January 1936. (Bowden)_____ 1935—Mar. 564-73;
1936—Apr. 859, 877-9, 882-3
----- 1913 to March 1917 (World War I period_____________________________________ 1939—Oct. 786-8
Child, cost of bringing up ------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1926—July 51-3
Cities (small). North (5) and South (5), differences between, average annual expendi­
ture and indexes, by commodity groups, December 1938 and February 1939___ 1939—July 22-38
Clerical workers. (See Wage earners and clerical workers, this section.)
Clothing. Cost and quantity purchased by workingmen’s families in 1 year________ 1922—Sept. 49-65
----- Cost factors, family budget, methods of determining---------------------------------------- 1922—M ay 88-91
—— Expenditures, annual average, by sex, age, race, economic level, and item (12
months in period, 1934-36)------ ------ ---------------------------- ------------------------------- 1940—Feb. 267-85
----- Small cities (Southern, North Atlantic, and East North Central regions), expendi­
ture per family by income class, 1934-36------- ----------------- ------ ----- ------------ ---------1939—July 26
Coal-mining towns_____________________ _____ ___________ _____ _____ ________1922—Apr. 9-12
Colored families. (See Negro families, this section.)
Columbia University students in economics, school year, 1923-24............. ..................... 1925—N ov. 20-4
Company stores, new type of, worker cobeneficiary, Arizona mining cam ps.. . ........ .
1923—Apr. 53
Consumer. Aid and protection for, in purchase of standard product_______________ 1927—Sept. 208-9
----- Expenditure. Families and single individuals, by item and economic level,
1935-36-------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------- --------- 1940—Feb. 377-81
----- Purchases, Chicago, 1935-36, study of, by income levels----------------------- --------- 1939—M ay 1007-25
Consumption habits of American people (32 cities), 1934-36. (BLS studies).............. 1938—Mar. 608-21
Cotton-plantation tenants, Eastern Cotton B elt____________________________ ____ _ 1937—M ay 1180
Cotton-textile wage earners, southern towns and cities, 1933-34___________ ______ _ 1935—Mar. 623-5
Crozet (Va.). Expenditure, by item, of white and colored families, city, farm, and
village, 1929-30___________________________________________________________ 1932—N ov. 1212-15
Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers______________________ ____ ___ 1932—Mar. 733
Dietary studies. Cost, female students in economics, Columbia U niversity............ . 1925—N ov. 22-3
----- Italians in American cities------------------------ ----------------- ------------------------------- 1923—M ay 100-1
----- Low-income families, 1933 (9 localities)......... ............................................................... 1936—Sept. 600-5
----- (See also under Nutrition.)
Education. Expenditures of workers’ families_________________________________ 1940—M ay 1075-6
Electrical appliances and equipment purchased by families of workers, 1933-36 (42
cities)____________________________________________________ 1938—Feb. 447-54; 1940—June 1361-2
Executive clerk, and wage earner, San Francisco, typical family budget, November
1934______________________________________________________________________ 1935—M ay 1386-8
Expenditure habits of wage earners and clerical workers, 42 cities. (Williams and
Hanson)___________________________ ____________________________________ 1939—Dec. 1311-34
Expenditures, distribution. B y item and annual income group, American consumers,
1929______ ____ ____________________________________________________________ 1932—N ov. 1210
----- Professional man’s family, 1916-17 and 1926-27, Washington. D . C-------------------- 1929—Dec. 222-8
Factory workers (1,665 in 16 cities), distribution by spending habits_______________ 1939—Jan. 104-5
Families. And individuals. B y income level and item, 1935-36. (National Resources
Committee estimates)_____________________________________________________ 1940—Feb. 379-81
----- Average workingmen’s, food consumption of, 128 articles, 11,900 families in 92 lo­
calities, 1918-19...__________________________________________________________ 1922—M ay 77-80
----- Budgets, need of a new survey of, general welfare aspects, economic and merchan­
dising aspects______ _______________________________________________________ 1931—Nov. 246-8
----- B y income classes, Chicago, percent having surplus or deficit___________________ 1939—M ay 1011
----- Wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers. (See under Wage earners and
clerical workers, this section.)
----- W ith incomes from $1,200 to $1,500, average change (1 year) in resources, 1934-36
compared with 1917-19, by city _______________________________________________ 1938—N ov. 978
Family of five. Worker’s budget expenditures, New York C ity_____________ ______ 1921—Feb. 64-6
Farm families, Expenditures. For housefurnishings_____________________________
1926—Aug. 211
------------With special reference to health_____ _____ _____ ______________________ 1927—Apr. 169-70
----- Lebanon (Conn.), 1923____________________________________________________ 1925—Sept. 49-51
----- Low income, improved standards under Farm Security Administration p la n ... 1939—Aug. 400-2
----- W hite and Negro, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Texas, 1919____________________ 1925—Apr. 59-61
Farm labor. Index numbers of, and of wages, 1906 to 1925___________ _____________ 1926—Sept. 115
Farm-laborer families, Indian-Mexican village, New Mexico, 1935_________________ 1939—Jan. 105-7
Farm wages and cost of living........ ............. .......................... .................................................. 1922—Dec. 33
Farmers, living expenses, by item of expenditure. ............. .............................. .................. 1927—Feb. 192-3




80

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cost of living, United States—Continued.
£age
Farming communities. Alabama, Kansas, and New York, 1923 and 1924___________ 1925—Dec. 37-8
----- Iowa, Ohio, and Alabama_____________ ______ ___________ ______ ___ _________ 1924—Dec. 37-9
Federal employees. Five cities (5C6 families). Part 1, summary (August); part 2, food
consumption (September); part 3, miscellaneous expenditures (October); part 4,
installment buying (November)____________ ,.1929—Aug. 41-61, Sept. 248-59, Oct. 241-54, N ov. 1-10
----- Washington, D . C. Changes, and indexes of__________ 1934—Feb. 379, July 213-24, Aug*. 538-41;
1935—Feb. 529-31; 1936—Sept. 792-4; 1937—Mar. 794-6; 1939—M ay 1141-4, 1940—Apr. 826-9
--------- - Measuring changes in. (W illiams)____ _____ _____________ ____ _______ 1934—Mar. 511-17
- ---------- Rents, 1917 to 1920_____________________________________________________ 1921—Jan. 96-8
“ Food basket” (14-commodity), cost of, United States and 20 other countries, October
1932______________________________________________________________________ 1933—June 1463-5
Food consumption. A t different economic levels. (W illiams).......... ........................... 1936—Apr. 889-94
—— Average workingmen’s families, 128 articles______________ _______ __________ 1922—M ay 77-80
Food. Cost factors, family budget, methods of determining__________ __________ 1922—M ay 92
----- Costs as affected by State sales taxes_______ _____ ___________________________ 1937—Jan. 241-5
----- Dollar, proportion of expenditure going to specified agencies. (Lazo and B letz). 1939—Mar. 655-6
----- Expenditures for. C ity workers, and estimated cost of adequate diet_________ 1939—Apr. 910-13
------------Wage earners and clerical workers, 11 New Hampshire communities, 193334. (W illiams)______ ______________ ______________________________________ 1936—Mar. 554-61
----------- Workers’ families, annual per capita and proportions of various types pur­
chased (12 months in period 1934-36).:_________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 257
------------Workers’ families, b y consumption level (12 months in period 1934-36)______ 1940—Aug. 253
----------- Workers’ families, by income level and family type (12 months in period
1934-36)___________________________________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 250-2
----------- Workers’ families, percent of total living cost (12 months in period1934416).. 1940—Aug. 252
----- Habits of farm and city families___________________________________________ 1926—Dec. 219-20
----- Method of grouping expenditure data and calculating weights for indexes_______ 1935—Sept. 833-6
Ford Motor Co. Employees, 100 families in 1929, Detroit_________________________ 1930—June 11-54
' ----- ILO study in wages necessary in 17 European cities to maintain standard of living
comparable to that in Detroit__________________ 1929—Dec. 229; 1930—June 11-54; 1932—Jan. 1-4
----- Unskilled workers, Detroit and 16 European cities, comparative cost and minimum
wage rates__________________________________________________ ________________ 1932—Jan. 3-4
Fuel and light. Cost factors, family budget, methods of determining.............................. 1922—M ay 92
Funeral expenditures. Reason for present-day costs_________________ _______ ____ 1928—June 173-4
----- Workers’ families (12 months in period 1934-36)__________________________ 1940—M ay 1077,1079
Furniture. And housefurnishings. Cost factors, family budget, methods of deter­
mining___________________ ^----- ------ ------------- ------------------------------------------------- 1922—M ay 92
------------Quantity of and expenditures for, and for miscellaneous items, workingman's
family, 1 year__________________________________________ ___________________ 1922—Oct. 47-50
----- Expenditures, workers’ families, by item ................................................................... . 1940—June 1359-61
Gifts and contributions, expenditures for, workers’ families________________________ 1940—M ay 1077
Goods purchased by wage earners and lower-salaried employees, computed cost and
indexes_____ _________________________________ ____ _____ _____ ___________ _
1936—Sept. 827
Home ownership and family budget, ratio of expenditure___________ ___________ 1929—M ay 243-4
Housefurnishings and equipment. Expenditures of workers’ families.............. ......... 1940—June 1349-66
Household operation. Expenditures of workers’ families_______________________ 1940—June 1349-59
Housing. And facilities. Expenditures of workers’ families, by tenure and type of
dwelling----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ - 1940—Apr. 807-24
----- Or shelter. Cost factors, family budget, methods of determining........... .............. .
1922—M ay 91
----- Owner-occupied and rented, geographic variations and factors affecting________ 1939—N ov. 1094-7
Illinois, farm and small-town families, living expenditures, 1929 and 1930_____ _______ 1932—Aug. 434-7
Income and standard of living, unskilled labor, Chicago______________ ____ _______ 1928—Feb. 236-7
Income, size, and economic level, of workers’ families. White and Negro___________ 1940—Jan. 115-34
Indexes. All goods purchased, by city (32), specified periods June 1926 to Mar. 15,
1937--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1937—June 1518-19
----- And percentage changes, earlier 3-month periods to Mar. 15,1937.. 1937—Mar. 785-93, June 1509-22
----- Boot and shoe factory workers, 1906 to 1924___________________________________
1926—Jan. 18
----- Compared with wages per hour and real wages, 1913 to 1934..................................... 1936—Mar. 719-20
----- Comparison between cities, method of obtaining........................................................ . 1940—Oct. 1018
----- Cotton-mill workers, 1906 to 1924___________________________ _________________
1926—Jan. 18
----- Food, clothing, fuel and light, rent, and general comparison with certain foreign
countries, by year and specified period, 1914 to 1938_____________________________ 1922—Dec. 74-80;
1923—July 80-6; 1924—Jan. 67-75, July 92-7; 1925—Jan. 49-55, July 58-63; 1926—Jan. 100-7;
1927—Feb. 182-92; 1928—Aug. 201-10; 1920—Feb. 193-202, Aug. 31-40; 1930—Feb. 256-65,
Aug. 264-74; 1931—Feb. 230-9, Aug. 208-17; 1932—Feb. 473-5, Aug. 431-3; 1933—Feb. 440-2,
Aug. 466-9; 1934—Feb. *491-3, Aug. 542-4; 1936—Feb. 532-4, Dec. 1725-8; 1936—Apr. 1167,
July 267, Oct. 1074, Dec. 1627; 1937—Mar. 796-9, June 1522-5, Sept. 685-8, Dec. 1457-60;
1938—Mar. 738-40, July 198-208, Oct. 826-33, Dec. 1347-54; 1939—Mar. 651-4, June 1361-3
----- Goods purchased by wage earners and lower-salaried workers, revision of.
(Williams and others)...................................................................................... ................... 1935—Sept. 819-37
----- Iron and steel mill workers, 1907 to 1924.............................................................................
1926—Apr. 3
----- Massachusetts, July to December 1921.......... ................ ... ................ ............................ .
1922—June 60
----- Method of computing, by country_____________ _____________________________ 1922—Dec. 81-5;
1924—July 98; 1925—Jan. 56, July 64: 1926—Jan. 108
----- Methods of computing, (BLS, National Industrial Conference Board, American
Rolling Mills Co., or Holt Manufacturing Co.) relative weight of 7 cost factors___ 1922—M ay 85-93
----- (1913 base). B y items of expenditure, 32 cities combined, specified periods, 1913 to
Sept. 15,1937--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1922—Dec. 75, 77, 79,80,108;
1925—Jan. 50, 52, 54, 55; 1926—Jan. 102,104,106, 107; 1927—Feb. 183; 1936—Apr. 1162, July 262,
Oct. 1069, Dec. 1625; 1937—Dec. 1455
----- (1935-39 base). BLS new index. Items and relative importance; methods of de­
riving and combining group and city; and comparison with original____________ 1940—Aug. 367-92
----------- B y item and cities (33), quarterly (Mar. 15-Sept. 15,1940); all cities combined,
specified periods 1913 to September 15, 1940.................... 1940—July 143-6, Oct. 1011-18, Dec. 1555-60
----------- Purchases, total and by item, workers’ families, 32 cities, specified periods 1913
to March 1940........................................................................................................................... 1940-Aug. 392-404




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

81

Cost of living ?United States—Continued.
Indexes. (1923-25 base). B y cities (32), and by item of expenditure, specified periods,
rage
1913 to Dec. 15, 1939__________________ ___________________________________ 1935—Dec. 1723-4;
1937—June 1515-19, Sept. 680-4, Dec. 1448-54; 1938—Mar 730-7, July 198-208, Oct. 826-33,
Dec. 1347-54; 1939—Mar. 642-8, June 1354-9, N ov. 1155-64; 1940—Jan. 138-46, Apr. 916-23
------------Method of construction described______________________________________ 1938—July 205-8;
1939—Mar. 648-51, June 1360-1; 1940—Apr. 922-3
----- (1923-25 and 1913 bases). B y expenditure group, December 1914 to March 1937,
yearly, 6-month, and shorter periods (32 large cities combined). . 1937—Mar. 792-3; June 1515-16, 1520
----- (1926 and 1932 bases). B y item, yearly, 1926-37 (32 large cities combined)_______ 1937—Nov. 1075
----- Railroad section men, 1906 to 1924-------------------------------------------- -------------------1926—Apr. 4
----- Rochester (N. Y .), 1921 and 1922_________________________________ __________ _ 1922—June 60
----- Trends of various items, and changes in cost of typical budgets, 1938__________ 1939—Mar. 531-5
----- Woolen-mill workers, 1906 to 1924__________________________________ __________ 1926—Jan. 18
Industrial centers. Food consumption (128 articles), average quantity, 11,000 work­
ingmen’s families_________________________________________________________ 1922—M ay 77-80
Intercity differences (31 large cities), estimated annual family expenditure, specified
periods, by item__________ 1939—N ov. 1164-6; 1940—Jan. 147-9, Apr. 923-5, Oct. 1019-22, Dec. 1561-4
International Labor Office, projected inquiry by, comparison with European countries. 1929—Dec. 229
Italians in American cities, dietary study of____________________________________ 1923—M ay 100-1
Kansas. Wage-earning women, June and July 1921________________ _________ 1922—June 58-9
Legal costs. Expenditures of workers’ families________________ ____ _______ ____ _ 1940—M ay 1077
Life insurance. Low-income families, ratio of premiums to income_________ _______ 1940—Dec. 1347
Low-salaried workers. (See Wage earners and clerical workers, this section.)
Maintenance budget, 36 specified cities, December 1938 (W PA hypothetical estimate). 1939—July 35-8
“Maintenance” level, annual (31 cities) by item, 4-person manual worker’s family,
estimated as of June 15, 1939_______________________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1164-7
Manchester (N. H .). Wage earners and low-salaried workers, year ending Aug. 31,
1934________ ______________________________________________________________ 1935—Apr. 864-6
Massachusetts, Special Commission on Necessaries of Life________________________ 1922—M ay 235;
1923—Mar. 71-2, June 263; 1927—July 220; 1929—Mar. 266, M ay 262
Meats, dressed, per capita consumption by kind, 5-year periods____________________ 1928—Apr. 172
Medical and hospital care. Miners (bituminous coal), Arkansas. Family expendi­
tures, average for various items____________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1422-3
Medical care. Expenditures of workers’ families________________________ 1940—M ay 1062-72,1078-9
Methodist Episcopal Church clergymen, annual family expenditures, survey of____ 1932—Aug. 438-40
Minnesota. Village and town families, income and expenditures, 1929___________ 1929—N ov. 171-5
Negro families. Farms, selected localities, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Texas, 1919.._ 1925—Apr. 59-61
— Philadelphia. 100 migrant, .study of, 1919. (Mossell)__________________ ______ 1922—Jan. 44-8
----- Workers’. Adult members, average by sex and economic level_____________ ____ 1940—Feb. 278
------------Expenditures for various items, compared with white families___________ _ 1940—M ay 1079
New York City. Expenditure for education of children, families of wage earners and
lower-salaried clerical workers__________________________________________________ 1937—Jan. 239
----- Family budgets. Changes in percentage expenditures, 1907 to 1936_____________ 1937—Jan. 239
----- Family expenditures, wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers, savings
and deficits, 1934-36___________________________________________________________ 1937—Jan. 240
----- Money disbursements of wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers,
1934-36. (BLS study)_____________________________________ ____ ___________ 1937—Jan. 232-40
----- November 1920, Labor Bureau (Inc.)______________________________________ 1921—Feb. 61-6
Pennsylvania. Wage earners and clerical workers in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh,
Scranton, Johnstown, and Lancaster, study, 1933-35................................... .............. 1937—June 1493-1508
Personal care, family expenditure for. 5 California cities..................... ........................ . 1937—Sept. 673
----- 5 Pennsylvania towns___________________________ _______________________ 1937—June 1505-6
----- Workers’ families (12 months in period 1934-36)__________________ ______ ____ 1940—M ay 1072-5
Philippine Islands. Agricultural workers, monthly, by item, 1936............................... . 1940—Feb. 383
----- Average per day, skilled workers and common laborers, 1928_______ ____ ________ 1930—June 261
----- B y city or town, average per day, skilled and common labor, 1929.......................... . 1931—June 215
----- Family budget, 1926______________________________________________________ 1927—N ov. 54-5
----- Skilled and common laborers, 1920____________________________________ _______1921—Oct. 218
----- (Manila). Foodstuffs, retail prices by item, June 1937 and 1938_________ ____ 1938—Nov. 1203'
------------ Industrial groups, average monthly, by skill, income, and item, 1938_____ 1940—Feb. 381-2
------------Laborers, average monthly, 1932 and 1933__________________ 1934—Apr. 995; 1935—M ay 1389
----- (Manila and Provinces). Comparison, for family of 5, 1936_________________ 1937—Sept. 721-2
Pork products, increasing consumption of______________________________________ 1928—Feb. 232-3
Portland (Oreg.). Household equipment, telephone, radio, etc., and income. (R. L.
Polk & Co. survey)_______________________________________ ______ __________ 1932—Sept. 726-7
Prices, trend of. (See Retail prices; Wholesale prices.)
Products sold to consumer, dangerous or useless________________ _______________ 1927—Sept. 205-7
Public employees. California. (Civil Service Commission survey)........ ..................... 1923—Mar. 43-5
Purchasing price of dollar. (See Purchasing power of dollar.)
Real wages and cost of living, comparison, United States and Germany................ ....... 1927—Apr. 27-8
Rents. (See Rents, United States.)
*
Retail prices. Index numbers, July 1914 to December 1920................. ...................1921—Jan. 92, Apr. 50
— —Relative. Food....................................................................................................................... 1921—Feb. 16
----- Virginia, 1929, 1933, and 1935, by kind of business....................................................... 1938—Feb. 455-6
----- (See also Retail prices.)
Retail stores, problem of “returned goods” .......................................................................... . 1927—Oct. 201-2
Revision of methods in calculating indexes-------------------------------------------------------- 1935—Dec. 1724-5
Richmond (Va.). Budgets of working girls (47 clerical and 24 factory), income and
expenditures, by item, 1931.________ _____ ___________ __________ ___________ 1932—Oct. 972-86
San Francisco (Calif.). Families of executives, clerks, and wage earners, typical budget
cost at November 1932 prices_______ ______________________ ____ ___ _________ 1933—Aug. 470-1
----- Fam ily budgets, executive, clerk,-and wage earner, November 1933................. . 1934—M ay 1260-2!
----- Streetcar men’s families, income and expenditure, 1924-25........................... ...........1931—June 212-15
----- Typographical Union workers’ families (82), budget, 1921............................. ........... 1930—Mar. 204-5
Savings of workers’ families, year’s changes in assets and liabilities............................... 1940—July 119—
39*
Short weight and short measure, package goods___________________________________ 1927—Sept. 207
Small cities (5 in North and 5 in South). Differences between, average annual expendi­
ture and indexes, by commodity group, December 1938 and February 1939.......... 193t—July 22-38




82

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cost of living, United States—Continued.
Stamp plans, food and cotton, under Surplus Marketing Administration. Objectives,
irage
methods, and operations----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—N ov. 1060-5
Styles and sizes of goods, elimination of superfluous_______________________________ 1927—Sept. 208
“ Sundries" and “miscellaneous items," cost factors, family budget, methods of deter­
mining................................. ......................... ........................... ............. - ...................................... 1922—M ay 93
Survey, resolution in favor of a new basic........................... ...................................... .............. 1928—Feb. 232
Taxes. Paid by workers’ families.................. ......................... ............................. ........... 1940—M ay 1077,1079
Teachers. Minneapolis, costs and standards of living, 1926______________________ 1926—N ov. 200-1
Texas. Investigations for determining minimum wages for women, referred to _____ 1921—Jan. 124-6
Transportation expenditures. Negro families, Richmond, Birmingham, New Orleans,
1933-3 4 ........... ..................................... .................................................. .................................. . 1937—Apr. 1067
----- Workers’ fam ilies............................................ ...................................... . : .................. ....... 1940—Mar. 656-73
Unskilled laborers. Incomes of, adequacy, Chicago......................................................... 1927—July 108-11
----- W ith large families, the problem of.................................................................... ............... 1927—N ov. 34-8
Vocational activities. Expenditures of workers’ families------------------------------------ 1940—M ay 1075-6
Wage adjustments based on. (See Wage adjustments (cost-of-living basis).)
Wage earners and clerical workers. Actual current expenditures by families in Phila­
delphia, Pittsburgh, Scranton, Johnstown, Lancaster---------------------------------- 1937—June 1493-1508
----- Automobiles, ownership of (Rochester, Columbus, Seattle), 1933-35_____________ 1936—Dec. 1616
----- Birmingham, New Orleans, and Richmond, money disbursements, 1933-34... 1936—M ay 1457-64
----- Boston and Springfield, Mass., 1934-35............. ............................................................ 1936—Sept. 783-92
----- Certain groups in 3 cities, money disbursements, 1934-35...................... .................. 1935—Dec. 1607-17
----- Changes in, in large cities, from first 6 months 1928 to November 1934..................... 1935—Feb. 525-8
----- Columbus, Ohio, money disbursements, 1934-35..................................................... 1936—Dec. 1611-13
----- Expenditure habits, 42 cities. (Williams and Hanson)_____________________ 1939—Dec. 1311-34
-----Families, average actual expenditures, 1934-36 compared with those of 1917-19
and with estimated cost in 1917-19 of items purchased in later period, by city___ 1938—N ov. 969-76
----- Indexes and percentage changes, earlier dates to Sept. 15, 1936----------------------- 1936—Apr. 1164-5,
July 256-65, Oct. 1063-72
----- Indexes, cost of goods purchased, Jan. 15,1936, by city------------------------------------- 1936—Apr. 1163
----- Michigan (Detroit, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Marquette), family expenditures,
1934-3 5 ....----------- ---------------1-------------------------------------------------- ----------------- 1936—June 1744-53
-----Negro, families of, in Richmond, Birmingham, and N ew Orleans------------------- 1937—Apr. 1060-9
----- New budgetary study of purchases. (Williams and Schmidt).____ ___________ 1935—Apr. 861-6
----- New Hampshire, 11 communities, money disbursements, 1933-34. (Williams). 1936—Mar. 554-63
----- Radios, ownership of (Rochester, Columbus, Seattle), 1933-35_______ ________ 1936—Dec. 1616-17
----- Rochester, N . Y ., money disbursements, 1934-35....................................................... 1936—Dec. 1609-11
-----Seattle, Wash., money disbursements, 1934-35.......... ............ ......................... ........... 1936—Dec. 1613-16
Wage rates, are they keeping pace with increase in? (Stewart)__________ 1926—Jan. 16-20, Apr. 1-4
Washington, D . C. Federal employees. (See Federal employees, this section.)
What women wore in the nin eties........................................................................ ..................... 1920—Sept. 260
Woman workers. Budget expenditures, weekly average, Ohio.......................................... 1921—Feb. 98
—— Kansas, suggested budget, 1921. (Court of Industrial Relations survey)............... 1922—June 58-9
----- New York State, 1937. (M iller)............................................... ................. .......... ......... 1938—Mar. 571-8
W PA workers. Estimated total expenditures per month and percentage distribution
by item, January to March 1940. ............................................ ............................ ....... 1940—Apr. 929-30
(See also Budgets, cost-of-living; Cost of living, compared with wages; Minimum wage;
Rents, working-class; Retail prices; Standard of living; Wage adjustments (cost-ofliving basis); Wholesale prices.)
Cost of living, foreign countries:
General. “ Food basket,” 14-commodity, cost of, October 1932, United States and 20
other countries. (ILO study)___________ ____ ______________________________ 1933—June 1463-5
----- Indexes. B y expenditure group, by year 1914-38, and b y specified periods shown:
Argentina (Buenos Aires) to February 1940; Australia to February 1940; Austria
(Vienna) to December 1938; Belgium to March 1940; Brazil (Rio de Janeiro) to 1938;
Bulgaria to M ay 1940; Burma (Rangoon) to March 1940; Canada to M ay 1940; Chile
(Santiago) to April 1940; China (Peiping and Tientsin) to 1936, (Shanghai) to April
1940; Colombia (Bogota) to April 1940; Costa Rica (San Jos6) to M ay 1940; Czechovakia (Prague) to July 1939; Danzig, Free City of, to June 1939; Denmark to March
1940; Egypt (Cairo) to March 1940; Estonia (Tallinn) to M ay 1940; Finland to January
1940; France (Paris) to December 1938, other than Paris to M ay 1940; Germany to M ay
1940; Great Britain and Northern Ireland to M ay 1940; Greece to M ay 1940; Hungary
(Budapest) to April 1940; India (Bombay) to March 1940, (Ahmedabad) to February
1940; Indo-China (Saigon) to November 1939; Iran to November 1939; Ireland to M ay
1940; Italy to July 1939; Japan (24 cities) to March 1940, (13 cities) to January 1940,
(Tokyo) to April 1940; Latvia (Riga) to M ay 1940; Lithuania to M ay 1940; Luxem­
burg to April 1940; Mexico (Mexico City) to January 1940; Netherlands (Amsterdam)
to March 1940; Netherland Indies (Java and Madura) to March 1939, (Batavia) to
April 1940; N ew Zealand to February 1940; Norway to April 1940; Palestine to Feb­
ruary 1940; Peru (Lima) to M ay 1940; Poland (Warsaw) to July 1939; Portugal to
M ay 1940; Punjab (Lahore) to March 1939; Rumania (Bucharest) to March 1940;
Southern Rhodesia to M ay 1940; Spain (Madrid) to December 1939; Sweden to March
1940; Switzerland to M ay 1940; Tunisia (Tunis) to August 1939; Turkey (Istanbul) to
November 1939; Union of South Africa to M ay 1940; Uruguay (Montevideo) to March
1940; Yugoslavia (Belgrade) to M ay 1940, (Croatia and Slavonia) to M ay 1940___ 1922—Dec. 74-80;
1923—July 80-6; 1924—Jan. 67-75, July 92-7; 1925—Jan. 49-55, July 58-63; 1926—Jan. 100-7;
1927—Feb. 182-92; 1928—Aug. 201-10; 1929—Feb. 193-202, Aug. 31-40; 1930—Feb. 256-65,
Aug. 264-74; 1931—Feb. 230-9, Aug. 208-17; 1932—Feb. 473-5, Aug. 431-3; 1933—Feb. 440-2,
Aug. 466-9; 1934—Feb. 491-3, Aug. 542-4; 1935—Feb. 532-4, Dec. 1725-8; 1936—Apr. 1167-9,
July 267-9, Oct. 1074-6, Dec. 1627-9; 1937—Mar. 796-9, June 1522-5, Sept. 685-8, Dec. 1457-60;
1938—Mar. 738-40, July 208-10, Oct. 833-6, Dec. 1354-7; 1939—Mar. 651-4, June 1361-3, Nov.
1167-70; 1940—Apr. 930-3, Dec. 1564-7
----- International Labor Office study, on request of Ford Motor Co.................................. 1932—Jan. 1-4
----- Methods of computing index numbers by country.................... ............ ....................... 1922—Dec. 81-5;
1924—July 98; 1925—Jan. 56, July 64; 1926—Jan. 108
Algiers. Food prices (retail) and wages or salaries, 1904, 1914, and 1924 ....................... 1925—Sept. 52-3
Arabia. (Aden). Wages and cost of living, 1922_........ ....................................................... 1922—Oct. 05-6
Argentina. Clothing, cost of, index numbers, 1919 to 1920..................................................... 1921—Sept. 63




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

83

Cost of living, foreign countries—Continued.
Pag©
Argentina. Food costs, and general costs, index numbers, 1910 to 1919..............................1921—July 113
-----*Income and expenditure, laborer’s family, food, rent, etc., 1925.............................. 1926—Sept. 175-6
----- Increase in, as cause of unrest_________________________________________ _______ 1922—Jan. 23-4
----- Index numbers, 1914 to 1923__________________________________________________ 1924—Dec. 39
----- Low-cost restaurants operating under Governmental authority, 1936__________ ____ 1940—Jan. 150
----- Rent. Index numbers, by city, 1919 and 1920________________________________ 1921—Dec. 75-6
------------ Legal measures regulating, September 1921________________________________ 1921—Dec. 161
----- (Buenos Aires). Average prices of prime necessity articles, 1924 and 1925_________ 1925—Aug. 77
------------ Foodstuffs and rents, price reduction efforts of Government________________ 1931—M ay 210
------------ Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------ Index numbers, food, rent, clothing, and other expenses, 1914 to 1926______ 1929—July 232-3
------------ Laborers’ families, annual income and expenditure, by supporting member,
1929________________________________________________________________________ 1931—Mar. 236
------------ Measures to reduce____________________________________________________ 1923—M ay 103
------------ Worker’s families, by item, 1929-40______ '________________ ____________ 1940—Dec. 1567-8
------------Working classes, distribution of expenses, 1926-31_______________________ 1934—Mar. 749-50
Australia. Conditions, various dates____________________ ____ ___________ ____ 1921—N ov. 8-9
----- Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers__________________________ 1932—Mar. 733
----- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Purchasing power of money in six capitals_______________________________ _____ _ 1921—June 44
----- Variations in, and corresponding basic wage changes___________________________ 1927—M ay 172
----- (Western). Commodity costs, commission to inquire into, appointment________ 1925—Dec. 39
Austria. (Vienna). Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers___________ 1932—Mar. 733
^
------------Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------ Index numbers, 1920 to 1932____________________________________________ 1932—Aug. 432
Belgium. Commission to investigate appointed, membership_____________________ 1930—N ov. 242
----- Decline and peak since January 1926, index numbers__________________________ 1932—Mar. 733
----- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Prices and index numbers, 1921_____________________________________________ 1922—Feb. 64-5
----- Purchasing power and consumption, working-class families, changes, 1853,1891, and
1929______________________________________________________________________ 1932—Sept. 727-8
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1919 and 1920______________________________ 1921—Jan. 92, Apr. 50
----- Wage earners’ and salaried employees’ families, 1928-29_____________ _______ 1935—N ov. 1425-8
----- (Antwerp). Middle-class family, income of $2,127 per year, by ite m .......................1931—Feb. 240
Bermuda. Food, rent, and lighting costs, 1924_____________________ ____ ___________ 1925—Jan. 57
Brazil. Attempt of Government to reduce________________________________ ____ 1924—June 203
----- Family expenditures, food, rent, clothing, miscellaneous ....................... ................ 1937—Jan. 245-53
----- Low-cost restaurants, establishment of________________________________________ 1940—Jan. 150
----- (Rio de Janeiro). Average prices and index numbers, specified articles, specified
dates________________________________________________________________________ _ 1925—
June 41
------------ Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- (S&o Paulo). Family budget, composite 88 families, April to June 1934__________ 1937—Jan. 253
------------Prices, 1925________________________________________________ ______ _
1926—Mar. 69-70
----------- Scale of living of the working class, April to June 1934. (D avis)_________ __ 1937—Jan. 245-53
British Honduras. Index, 1929-33____ _______________________________ _________
1934—Oct. 985
Bulgaria. Increase, March 1929________________________________________________ 1929—Sept. 261
----- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section).
Canada. Changes in cost of family budget per week, specified months, 1923-33____ 1934—Apr. 1007
----- Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers__________________________ 1932—Mar. 733
----- Family budget, quantity and cost per week (foods, fuel and light, rent, and starch),
1921 to 1932_______________________________________________ 1931—Mar. 237; 1933—Apr. 965-6
----- Index numbers. B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------ 1914 to 1920, by year_____________________________________________ 1921—Jan. 92, Apr. 50
----- Wage earners’ families, British and French, characteristics at progressive income
levels and expenditures by item, 1938________________________________________ 1939—Sept. 708-9
Chile. Actual prices and index numbers, 1913 to 1922________ ____ ______________ 1922—Nov. 105-6
----- Index numbers, 1913 to 1924; and food prices, 1912 to 1925______ 1924—Dec. 39-40; 1926—Aug. 212
----- Items of cost, distribution of income b y _______________________________________ 1925—Mar. 62
----- Low-cost restaurants, establishment and operation__________________________ 1940—Jan. 151-2
----- Workers’ family, typical, 1928-39 _________________________________________ 1940—Oct. 1022-3
----- (Chilian). Food and housing, expenditures for, by 60 urban families in 1935____ 1937—Feb. 520
----- (Santiago). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes,
this section.)
China. Expenditures for specified items, cotton-mill workers, villagers, and farmers,
since World War_____________________________________________________________ 1921—Dec. 6-7
----- Family budget and family basis_______________________________ 1925—May 35-6; 1926—N ov. 29
----- Family, economic definition of_____ _____________ __________________________ 1932—Apr. 799
----- Immediate cause of labor unrest............................. - .......................... ..................... .......1921—Aug. 17-18
----- Present conditions. (Tso)_______________________ _________________________ 1928—Apr. 53-5
----- Survey, projected_________________________________________________________ 1924—Nov. 265
----- (Peiping and Tientsin). Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes,
this section.)
----- (Peking). Prices, wages, and the standard ofliving, 1900-24............... ...................... 1927—Jan. 216-18
------------ Tsing Hua College employees___________________________ _____________ 1925—Jan. 57-8
------------ Workingmen’s diet____________________________________________________ 1926—June 237
----- (Shanghai). Decline, and peak since January 1926,index numbers______________ 1932—Mar. 733
------------ Fam ily budget inquiry, 1929-30, distribution of income and expenditures- 1935—Oct. 1142-7
------------ Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------ Index numbers, 1875 to 1923_____________________ ______________________ 1924—Oct. 66-7
------------ Workers’ families, living standards, 1929______________________________ 1931—Mar. 238-40
----- (Tangku). Income and budget expenditures,by item,factoryworkers, 1927____ 1929—Feb. 37-9
Colombia. (Bogota). 85 working-class families, experimental study, June 1936____ 1937—Feb. 520-2
------------ Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------ Low-income families, survey, September 1936________________________ 1938—Sept. 539-42
Costa Rica. Food and housing, 1938_________________________________________ 1940—Nov. 1253-4
----- (SanJos6). Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Cuba. (Cienfuegos). Food, rents, clothing, 1926________________________________ 1926—July 45-6
Czechoslovakia. Index numbers, change in method of computing___ ____ ___________ 1925—July 64
----- German-occupied (Bohemia and Moravia) wage rates, regulation concerning.. 1940—May 1230-1




84

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cost of living, foreign countries—Continued.
P age
Czechoslovakia. (Prague). Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers___ 1932—Mar. 733
------------ Index numbers, by expenditure group (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Denmark. Changes, 1922_________________________________________________ _____ 1922—Oct. 55-7
----- Decline, and peak since January 1926, index num bers...................... ............................ 1932—Mar. 733
----- Household budget, itemized, money cost, 1914 to 1921.....................................................1921—Dec. 80
----- Increase, household budget, 1920 and 1921 over 1914-------------------------------------------- 1921—Dec. 79
----- Index numbers. 1914 to 1920, by year----------- ------ -------------------------------- 1921—Jan. 92, Apr. 50
------------ (See also General—Indexes, this section.)
----- 1914 to 1923______________________ _____________________ 1921—M ay 46; 1923—M ay 107-9, 115
----- Various dates___________________________ _____________ ______________________ 1921—June 56
----- Wage increases as compared with, agriculture_____________________ __________ 1922—N ov. 131-5
----- Wages to be adjusted to, under collective agreement, N ov. 13, 1939.................. 1940—Feb. 475-6
----- (Copenhagen). Fam ily budget, index numbers, 1922__________________________ 1922—Apr. 78-9
----- ------ Middle-class family, income of $3,022 per year, by item ------------------------------- 1931—Feb. 240
Dominican Republic. Food, rent, clothing, 1926_______________________________ 1926—Aug. 119-20
Ecuador. Urban workers, average distribution of monthly expenditures and quanti­
ties of certain items of food consumed, 1934-------------------------------------------------------- 1936—N ov. 1339
----- (Quito and Guayaquil). Food (17 articles) retail prices............................................... 1928—Mar. 199
Egypt. 1920___________________________________________ ___________ __________ 1921—Apr. 62-3
----- Rent, law regulating, 1919 and 1920_________________________________________ 1921—Aug. 39-40
----- (Cairo). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
section.)
Estonia. Index numbers, 1927-33_______________________________________________ 1934—Sept. 734
----- (Tallinn). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
section.)
Europe. And in the United States, comparison, projected inquiry of ILO..................... 1929—Dec. 229
Finland. Caloric value of foods, per unit of measure, December 1924.......... .................... 1925—Mar. 63
----- Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers................................... ............... 1932—Mar. 733
' ----- Family budget items, index numbers, 1921-22............... .................................................. 1922—June 61
----- Food articles, and other items, index numbers, 1921..................................................... 1922—Feb. 65
----- Index numbers. And real-wage indexes, 1928-34------------------ --------- ----------------- 1936—Jan. 184
----------- B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- 1920 to 1922______________________________ ____ ____________ 1921—June 56; 1923—M ay 113-15
----- Rapid increase, 1919 and 1920f-------------------------------------- ----------------- --------------1921—Oct. 34
France. Agriculture, index numbers of wages, 1921 and 1922.-------- -----------------------1923—July 41
■
-----Basis of salary increase to civil-service employees--------------------------------------------- 1925—Jan. 61-2
----- Board and lodging. Cost and index numbers, 1928 and 1929_____ 1930—June 197; 1932—June 1428
----------- Cost per month, October 1931-32 and 1934-36_____________________________ 1933—June 1393;
1935—June 1568; 1936—July 157; 1937—June 1547
----- Comparison with wages, 1911,1921, and 1924------------------------------------------- ------1925^-May 93
----- Five-item budget, working-class family of 4 persons, index of expenditure, M ay 1931
and 1932____________________ ____ ___________________________________________ 1932—N ov. 1216
----- Increase, 1935 to 1937________________________________________________________ 1938—June 1444
----- Index numbers. (1914=100), by region, department, or locality, 1920 and 1921___ 1921—Oct. 80-1
----------- Wages, board and lodging, and retail prices of food, 1921_____________________
1923—July 41
----- Middle-class family, income of $2,565 per year, by item ________________________ 1931—Feb. 240
----- Retail prices, of various commodities, index numbers, 1914 to 1920__________ 1921—Jan. 92, Apr. 50
----- Variation of wages in relation to, 1937-38, and provisions of law of Mar. 4,1938____ 1939—June 1416
----- Various dates______________________________________________________________ 1921—M ay 48-9
----- (Paris). Decline and peak since January 1926, index numbers.............. ...................... 1932—Mar. 733
----------- Family budget items, index numbers, 1919 to 1921_________________________ 1922—Apr. 78-9
----------- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Germany. Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers__________________ 1932—Mar. 733
----- Fam ily of 5. Changes, index numbers, by State or city, 1920___________________1921—Apr. 55-7
----------- Index numbers, changes, 47 cities_______________________________ 1921—Sept. 67, N ov. 84-5
----------- Index numbers, 1920 and 1921___________________________________________ 1922—Feb. 66-7
----- Food and other necessaries rationed under Government decree of Feb. 16,1939__ 1939—Sept. 711-13
----- Index numbers. B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------B y family budget items, July 1930—______ ______________________________1930—Oct. 228
----------- Change in method of computing___ __________ __________________________
1925—July 64
----------- 19 cities__________________________________ _____ —--------------------------------- 1921—July 116
----- Rabbit raising for food supply, Oct. 6,1939, order______________________ ______ 1940—Feb. 383-4
----- Statements of trade-unions and employers’ association_____ _____ _______ ____ 1921—Nov. 182-3
----- Working-class families, Hamburg and Germany, 1925-29_____________________ 1932—July 235-40
----- (Berlin). Middle-class family, income of $3,076 per year, by item _______________ 1931—Feb. 240
------------Minimum weekly food requirements------------------------------- 1922—Jan. 91-3; 1923—M ay 103-4
------------Workman’s family budget, 1922_________________________________________
1923—Apr. 55
Great Britain. Basis for wage scale of boot and shoe workers______________________ 1925—Feb. 117
----- Clothing, retail prices, specified articles, working-class grades, 1914 to 1921_____ 1921—Sept. 68-9
----- Family budget, increase in, June 1920 to August 1921, compared with July 1914... 1921—Nov. 86-7
----- Fluctuations in general level, 1930__________________________ ^________________ 1931—Mar. 182
----- Index numbers. B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------Iron and steel trades, 1920-25__________ _________________________________
1925—Mar. 89
----------- 1914 to 1923_____________________________________ 1922—Dec. 76, 78-80; 1923—July 82, 84-6
------------Specified months, 1932-35, by expenditure group.................................................. 1935—Dec. 1728
----- Labor committee, joint, final report_____________________________ ___________ 1921—Oct. 86-8
----- Middle-class households, increase, October 1921 and Jan. 31, 1922............................ .
1922—May 97
----- 1920 as compared with 1914_________ ____________ ____ _________!............................ 1921—Apr. 57-8
----- Rent, increases in, 1914 to 1921 ............................_............................................ ....................1921—Dec. 76-7
----- Retail prices. Food___________________ _____________ ______ _____ _____ 1921—Jan. 92, Apr. 50
------------Percent of increase.1 ___________________________________________________
1921—Jan. 99
----- Rise under war conditions, in connection with wage increases__________________ 1940—Sept. 577
----- Workers and their families, survey begun October 1937 by Ministry of Labor,
methods____________________ ______________________________________________ 1938—Feb. 456-7
----- (England). Middle-class family, income of $2,433, per year, by item ____________ 1931—Feb. 240
------------Rent, clothing, fuel and light, food, percent of increase, 1914 to 1931_________ 1931—June 211
----- (Stockton-on-Tees). Foodstuffs purchased, effect on, of rent increase from slum
demolition. 1928-32........................................................................................................................ 1933—Oct. 913




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

85

Cost of living, foreign countries—Continued.
Great Britain. (United Kingdom). Decline and peak since January 1926, index numPage
b e r s--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- ------------------ 1932—Mar. 733
------------Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------Index numbers, 1920 and 1921; 1924 to 1932__________________ 1921—July 118; 1933—Apr. 871
Greece. Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Hungary. Effects on prices of the lower standard of living_______________________ _ 1924r—Feb. 98
----- Food control, State Council of, establishment of, 1921__________________________ 1922—Mar. 193
----- Living cost, heat and light, rent, and clothing, index numbers, 1914 to January
1925______ ____ ____________ _______ _______ ____________________________ 1925—July 58, 60, 62-3
----- Standard of living, decline in, for working classes_____________________________ 1924—Feb. 95-8
----- (Budapest). Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
1925—M ay 75
Iceland. (Reykjavik). Budget for family of 5, specified periods___________________
India. (Ahmedabad). Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
section.)
----- (Bombay). Clerical workers’ families, budget expenditures, 1924_______ ______ 1925—July 65-7
------------Decline and peak since January 1926, index numbers___________ _________1932—Mar. 733
----------- Distribution of average monthly expenditure, by item, 1932-33______ ____ 1936—Feb. 507-10
----------- Family budgets (2,473) and single men’s budgets (603), summary__________ 1923—July 87-91
------------Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------Index numbers, by year, 1914 to 1920___________________________________ 1921—Dec. 76, 78
----------- Percent of increase, working classes________________________________ 1922—June 64, Dec. 87
----- (Bombay Presidency). Indexes, December 1933, and real wages_______________
1935—Jan. 171
Iran. Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Ireland. Decline and peak since January 1926, index numbers_____________________ 1932—Mar. 734
-----Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Italy. Cause of unrest______________________ ________________________________ 1921—June 140-1
----- Family budget, expenditures, 1914 and 1921___________________ _______ _______ 1921—N ov. 87-8
----- Index numbers. B y city (19), family budget, working class_______________ ____ 1921—N ov. 89
----------- B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1914 to 1920_____________________________ _ 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
----- (Milan). Decline and peak since January 1926, index numbers_________________ 1932—Mar. 734
----------- Family budgets, salaried employees and working class________________
1921—N ov. 88-9
----------- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------Municipal funerals and burials, account of, system ______________________ 1932—Aug. 440-1
-----(Turin). Increase. 1920 over 1918___________________________________________ 1921—Feb. 68
Japan. Cotton-mill workers, 1923 and 1924______________________________________ 1926—N ov. 25-6
----- Family-budget survey, 1933-34 to 1936-37, by item of expenditure and income
group__________ _____ _________- ...................... 1935—Dec. 1729-30; 1937—Sept. 689; 1938—Oct. 837-8
----- Increase. 1920 over 1914, and since World War________________________ 1921—July 54, Dec. 3-5
----- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Price and wage indexes, 1912 to 1919__________________________________________ 1925—N ov. 19
----- Price control. Central and local committees to regulate, ordinance of April 1938.1938—Sept. 689-90
----- Wage and comparison_____________________ _______________________________ 1929—Oct. 54-5
----- (Osaka). Among laborers, 1920_____________________ _________________ _____ 1921—Oct. 88-90
----- (Tokyo). 1914 and 1919 compared with 1909_______________________________ __. 1921—Feb. 69
Latvia. (Riga). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
SCCttOTl

)

----- (Riga and 19 provincial cities). 1935,1936, and January 1937___________________ 1937—July 207
Lithu ania. Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Luxemburg. Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
section.)
Mexico. Agricultural laborers.. ........ ............ ........................... ............. .......................... 1926—N ov. 131-2
----- American families............................................ .................................................................. .
1925—June 41-2
----- Dietary study, family budget of workman. _ ......................... ...................................... 1923—M ay 106-7
----- Fam ily of 4, by State and Federal District, 1922 to 1927_____________________ 1929—Oct. 255-6
----- 1910,1920, and 1922___________ 1921—Jan. 98; 1923—M ay 106-7, June 128-9
----- Wages and budgetary expenditures, workers’ families, 1924__________________ 1925—Dec. 39-40
----- (Durango). Retail prices, 1925__________________________________ ____ _______ 1925—Sept. 52
----- (Mexico City). Food, index numbers, March 1925 and 1926_____________ ____ 1926—Sept. 177
----------- Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----------- Working-class families, July 9 to Sept. 9,1934___________________________ 1936—Sept. 794-7
----- (Nayarit). M onthly expenditure, by item and class of workers, December 1925..
1926—July 47
Netherland West Indies, 1935_________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 721-2
Netherlands. Percent increase__________________ ____ _________________________ 1921—Apr. 61-2
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1914 to 1920_______________________________ 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
----- (Amsterdam). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes,
this section.)
------------Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers_____________________ 1932—Mar. 734
----------- Fam ily budget survey, 19 households, 1930____________________________ 1933—M ay 1204-5
----- (Rotterdam). Middle-class family, income of $2,370 per year, by item _________ 1931—Feb. 240
New Zealand. Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers_______ ^_____ 1932—Mar. 734
----- Family budgets, study of, 1930_____________________________ _______________ 1931—Feb. 241-4
----- Food, rent, fuel and light, price indexes, 1925 and 1928_________________________ 1930—Dec. 167
----- Index numbers. B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----------- B y year, 1914 to 1920____________________________________________ 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
Norway. Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers______________ _____ 1932—Mar. 734
----- Fam ily of 5____________________ __________ _____________ __________ 1923—M ay 109-11, 115
----- Farm labor, 1920______________________ _____ _________________ ______________ 1922—Sept. 121
----- Household budget, percent increase__________________________________________ 1921—Dec. 79
----- Index numbers. B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
------------(1914= 100), family of 4__________________________________________________ 1921—June 55
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1914 to 1920.____________ __________________ 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
----- Trend, by item, 1938-40_____________________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 405
----- Wage adjustment demanded by transportation workers, and Government order
for arbitration, Nov. 13,1939________________________________________ ____ _____ 1940—Feb. 476
----- (Oslo). Middle-class family, income of $3,285 per year, by item ------------------------- 1931—Feb. 240
Paraguay. Teachers and telegraph operators___________________________________ 1921—Apr. 52-3
Peru. Food (15 articles), retail prices, 1913 and selected years________ 1928—Feb. 238; 1930—Feb. 268
----- Food, rent, clothing, and miscellaneous, index numbers, 1913 to 1928.------- -------- 1929—Oct. 256




86

MONTHLY LABOE REVIEW

Cost of living, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Peru. Low-cost restaurants administered by Government-------------- --------------------- 1940—Jan. 152
—— (Lima). Average prices and index numbers, food articles, since 1913, by y e a r ... 1925—June 42-3
—
--------- Budget expenditures, index numbers, 1913 to June 1921----------------------------- 1922—Mar. 71-2
----------- Index numbers by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
Poland. (Warsaw). Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers_________ 1932—Mar. 734
----------- Index numbers by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----------- Worker’s family of 4 persons_________________________________ ____ ______ 1921—N ov. 92
Portugal. Index numbers. 1 9 2 1 ...----------------------------------------------- ----------------- 1922—Feb. 69
----------- B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- (Lisbon). Cost of various commodities, recent dates compared with 1914_____ 1921—Jan. 100-2
Rumania. (Bucharest). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See G eneralIndexes, this section.)
South Africa, Union of. Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers______ 1932—Mar. 734
----- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Report, conditions in 1925 ---------------------- -------------------------------------------------- 1926—July 152-3
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1914 to 1920___________ __________________ 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
Southern Rhodesia. Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
section.)
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Abolition of ration cards and fixing of food prices, decree of
Dec. 8, 1934_____________________________________________________ ____ ______ 1936—Jan. 268-72
----- Index numbers, 1921 to 1924__________________ ____________ ___________ ______
1924—July 92
----- Rabbit raising by peasants and factory workers.............................................................. 1940—Feb. 384
Spain. Budget, workingman’s family_______ ____________ _____ ________ ____ ____
1925—Jan. 60
----- Measures for reduction_______________________________ - ---------------------------- 1923—Aug. 106-8
----- 1914, 1920, and 1924____________________ _________— ................— - 1921—M ay 164; 1924—Dec. 42
----- (Catalonia). Index numbers, 1912 to 1921— -------- -------------------------------- ------ 1922—June 66
----- (Madrid). Heat and light, index numbers, 1914 to February 1925_______ ____ _ 1925—July 59, 61
------------Index numbers and wholesale prices, 1923 and 1924_______________________ 1925—Apr. 61-2
----------- Indexes, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- (Madrid and Barcelona). Food articles, retail prices and index numbers, 1914 to
1924__________________________________________ ____ __________ _______ - ........... 1925—N ov. 70
------------Index numbers, 1914 to 1925..................... .......... . . .................. .................................... 1926—Feb. 76
Sweden. Agricultural laborers, household budgets, 1920...... ............ ................................ 1922—June 66-8
----- Decline, and peak since January 1926, index num bers.............. ................................... 1932—Mar. 734
----- Expenditures, distribution and analysis of, 1923 and 1933........... ............ .................. 1935—Sept. 840-2
----- Farm labor, 1920______ _____ ______ _______ _______________ ____________ _____ 1922—Sept. 127
----- Increase, household budget, 1920 and 1921 over 1914—__________________________ 1921—Dec. 79
----- Indexes. B y expenditure group___________ ___________________ 1921—June 54-5; 1923—M ay 112
------------(1913=100), in comparison with wages, 1934, 1935, and 1936_____________ 1938—N ov. 1142-3
------------Relation in 1940-41 to wage rates, under collective agreement in printing
trades_____________________________________ _____________ _______________ . . 1940—N ov. 1254-5
------------(See also General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1914 to 1920— ......... ..................... ........................ . 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
----- Wage-scale adjustment to, asked by Federation of Labor__________________ ____ 1940—Feb. 477
----- (Stockholm). Middle-class family, income of $3,368 per year, by item ___________ 1931—Feb. 240
Switzerland. Budget items of expenditure 1912 to 1921-------------------------------- 1922—Jan. 126, Feb. 72
-----Decline, and peak since January 1926, index numbers__________________________ 1932—Mar. 734
----- Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
----- Retail prices, index numbers, 1914 to 1920__________________ ___________ 1921—Jan. 93, Apr. 51
----- (Zurich). Food and rent, itemized expenditures, M ay 1921.......... ...................... .
1921—Sept. 73-4
------------ 1920 and 1921_______________________________ _____ . __________ ________ 1921—Oct. 91-3
----------- Rent, flats (with kitchen), per annum, July 1, 1921............................................1921—Sept. 74
Tunisia. (Tunis). Indexes. (See General—Indexes, this section.)
United Kingdom. (See Great Britain, this section.)
Uruguay. Index numbers. B y expenditure group. (See General—Indexes, this
----------- ’ B y item, 1915 to 1926.________ ___________________________________ _____ 1928—M ay 129
------------Worker’s family, 1914 to 1929___________ _______ _________________________ 1930—N ov. 242
----- Low-cost restaurants administered by Government_____ ____ _______ __________ 1940—Jan. 153
----- Rents, law of June 20, 1921________ ____ __________________________________ 1921—N ov. 159-60
Venezuela. (Caracas). Low-cost restaurants, plan and operation, 1940___________ 1940—Dec. 1569
Yugoslavia. (Belgrade). Index numbers, by expenditure group. (See General—
Indexes, this section.)
Cost of living, compared with wages, United States:
Food prices and wages, N ew York factories_______________________ 1921—Jan. 111-12, June 82-3
Ohio. 1917 to 1919____________________________ _________________________ ______ 1921—Feb. 97-8
Painting trades, Philadelphia__________________ ________________________________
1921—Oct. 97
Printing trades. _ ____________ _____ __________________________________ 1921—Jan. 32-6, July 156
Shoe workers, Chicago_________ _______________ „______________________ ____ _ 1922—Mar. 114-15
(See also Bonuses; Fam ily allowances; Wage adjustment, cost-of-living basis.)
Cost of living, compared with wages, foreign countries:
Argentina. 1918 to 1923________________ _____ __________________________________ 1924—July 100
Australia. (New South Wales). Food cost and average wages, agricultural workers,
1871 to 1920................................ ................................................ .......................................... 1921—Dec. 13-17
, Austria. Various dates___________________________________________ __________1921—M ay 81-3
Canada. Joint Building Conference, resolution, 1921. i ................................... .............. 1921—July 185-7
France. 1911,1916, and 1921.._________________________ _______ _________________ 1921—Dec. 98
Germany. 1920 and 1921____________ ____________ _____ _____________________ 1922—M ay 116-18
India. Inadequacy of income to meet expenses__________________________________ 1921—June 40-2
Italy. (M ilan). Food prices and wages, 1912 to 1920____________ ___________ _____ 1921—June 143
Japan. Index numbers, wages and wholesale prices, 1914 to 1920___________________ _ 1921—July 135
----- (Tokyo). School teachers, 1920_______ _____ ____ ______ ______________________
1921—Dec. 3
Latvia. July 1919 to June 1921__________________ ____________________________ 1922—Jan. 123-4
Mexico. (Federal district). 1922..__________ ___________ _____________________ 1923—June 127-9
Norway. 1914, to 1917 and 1919_______________ ____ ___________________________ 1921—Oct. 21-2
Paraguay. School teachers and telegraph operators___ _____ ____________________ 1921—Apr. 52-3
Rumania. Index numbers, 1922, 1923, and 1924___________ ____________________ 1924—N ov. 115-17
Switzerland. Adult laborers, 1912 to 1920__________________________________ ______ 1922—Jan. 126
----- (Zurich). Salaried employees and workmen’s families, 1919....................................1921—Oct. 92




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

87

Costs. (See under specific subject—Labor costs; Material costs; etc.)
Costs and margins:
'
.
Jrage
Anthracite. Mine operators’ and wholesalers’ prices and profits..................................... 1925—Sept. 45-8
Canada. Bread-baking and selling, 1929.................................... ................................................1931—July 227
New York (Port of). Bread, meat, fruits and vegetables, cotton cloth............................ 1925—July 47-53
Cotton Belt:
Farm tenants, migration and relocation. (See Agriculture—Tenancy.)
Power farming and labor displacement. (See under Mechanization.)
Cotton, change to rayon for certain garments______________________________ __________ 1929—July 76-9
Cotton-cloth manufacturing. D ust hazards, degree of, and other dust characteristics____ 1934r—
Feb. 321
Cotton compresses. Processes and operation, description................. .............................. . . 1928—June 109-10
Cotton-garment industry:
Contracts, U . S. Government. Minimum-wage determinations issued July 1937 to
Aug. 31, 1940______________________________ 1937—Sept. 695-6; 1938—M ay 1210-11; 1940—Oct. 809
Decision, N L R B , Feb. 14, 1935 (Stahl-Urban Co., Terre Haute, Ind.)_____________ 1935—Apr. 968-9
N R A code. Effective Nov. 27,1933, amended Dec. 18,1933, and Aug. 21, 1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions_____________________________________ 1934—Jan. 37. Feb. 306, Oct. 880
----- Revision of hours and wages, Dec. 1, 1934 (recommendations of special commit­
tee) _________ _______________________________________________________ _____ 1934—Dec. 1351-3
Pennsylvania. Labor conditions under N R A, study of___________________ _____ 1934—Dec. 1481-6
Prison-labor competition, report on, and recommendations of special committee_____ 1935—Jan. 73-5
Prison-made goods, use of Blue Eagle on, court decision upholding________________ 1935—Mar. 672-4
Production, shop-management systems. (Stone)____________________________ 1938—June 1299-1320
Cotton-ginning machinery industry. N R A code, effective July 23,1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions_____________________________________________________ ____ _______ 1934—Sept. 625
Cotton gins. GinhouSe and gin stand, mode of operating............................................................ 1928—M ay 112
Cotton-goods industry:
Historical comparison, earnings as between August 1934 and April 1937......................... 1938—Apr. 974-80
(See also under Cotton-textile manufacturing.)
Cotton growing and harvesting. (See Agriculture.)
Cotton-picking industry. N R A code, effective M ay 28,1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1934—July 48
Cotton-st amp plan. Surplus Marketing Administration. Objectives, methods, and extent
of available market_______________________ _____ _________________ ______________ 1940—N ov. 1063-5
Cotton-textile manufacturing, United States:
Age distribution, woman workers, mills, North and South.......................... ...................... 1920—N ov. 22-4
Board of Inquiry, appointed Sept. 5, 1934, report and recommendations of_______ 1934—N ov. 1115-17
■ Cabinet committee. Recommendations and report on conditions and problems____ 1935—Oct. 944-6
Competitive character of industry, and consumption of goods_______ ___________ 1938—Dec. 1239-42
Cotton production and consumption, 1913 to June 1926_____ _____ _________________ 1926—Dec. 217
Earnings and real income, wage study, 1933-34. (Hinrichs)_____________________ 1935—Mar. 612-25
Employment and earnings, trend, New England, Middle Atlantic, and Southern mills,
1923 and 1924_________________________________________________________ ____ _ 1924-Sept. 120-2
Hookworm disease, mill villages of Alabama and Georgia.................................................... 1927—Jan. 72-3
Labor requirements, by departments, 1910 compared with 1936.................................... 1937—Aug. 321-36
Labor turn-over. (See Labor turn-over.)
Management (personnel policies), 1934. (BLS study)_____________________ ____ 1936—June 1477-95
Manufacturers’ Association, National. President’s speech before convention, 1925.— 1925—M ay 23-4
Mechanical changes, 1910-36. (Stern)
_____________________________________ 1937—Aug. 316-41
M inimum wage under Fair Labor Standards Act, order of Oct. 24, 1939_________
1939—Dec. 1446-7
N R A code, effective July 17, 1933, labor provisions, and amendment, July 25, 1933. 1933—Aug. 267-72,
Sept. 519-20, N ov. 1081-2, Dec. 1335; 1934—Mar. 537
Night work. (See under N ight work, U . S.)
1923—Jan. 216
North Carolina. Statistics____________________________ ______________________ _
Occupational requirements to produce identical amounts of cloth, 1910 and 1936___ 1937—Aug. 337-41
President’s (Roosevelt) approval and order, text_________________ _________ 1933—Aug. 267-8, 271-2
Production control authorized under N R A code, December 1933____________________ 1934—Feb. 295
Productive capacity temporarily curtailed, order of N L R B , Mar. 26, 1935. ............... 1935—M ay 1186-7
Productivity. (See under Productivity of labor, U. S.)
Profits, labor costs, and mill margins______________ ___________________________ 1938—Dec. 1240-1
Rayon, utilization of, effect----------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ----- 1929—June 108-9
Rayon-weaving, cotton-textile and. N R A code, effective July 17,1933; amended July
25, 1933; labor provisions.... 1933—Aug. 267-72, Sept. 519-20, N ov. 1081-2, Dec. 1335; 1934—Mar. 537
Regional differences in wages, 1928-37, and trend of man-hours and employment,
1936-37. (Tolies)___________________________________________________________ 1938—Jan. 36-47
Shorter working time. Alabama manufacturers, views of________________________ 1932—N ov. 1165
----- American Cotton Manufacturers’ Association, views of retiring and incoming
presidents, Boston meeting, September 1932______ ..____________________________ 1932—N ov. 1165
South Carolina. Pellagra (endemic) in mill villages______________________________ 1929—Jan. 75-6
----- Working conditions, group insurance, production, etc______________________ 1921—June 199-201
Spinning rooms, work conditions, 1926. (U. S. Women’s Bureau Bull. No. 72)_____ 1930—Mar. 24-5
Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928__________ ___________ 1929—June 218-20
Strikes. (See under Industrial disputes, U. S., by industry.)
Technological changes and productivity. (Digest of BLS studies) ........................... 1932—N ov. 1048-9
Trade and output, changes in United States and other countries_____________________ 1927—June 43
Trend in employment, hours, earnings, and production under the N R A , October 1932March 1934_____________________________________________________________ 1934—M ay 1019,1022
Union-management cooperation, Naumkeag Cotton Mills, developments and plan of
joint research________________________________________________________ ______ 1930—Apr. 81-3
Wage earners, number of, actual and per million population, 1850 to 1931____________ 1933—N ov. 1026
Wage rates and differentials, historical review of, 1912-34. (Hinrichs) ........ ....... 1935—M ay 1170-80
Wage structure in. Summary of results of BLS investigations, August 1938.
(Hinrichs)________________________________________________________________ 1938—Dec. 1239-49
Woman workers, lost time and labor turn-over, 1922. (U. S. Women’s Bureau study). 1927—Feb. 39-41
Work assignments, restrictions continued (Feb. 4, 1935) pending submission of report
to the President_______________________________________________ ______________ 1935—Mar. 651
Workers. Type, race, sex, and age, Northern and Southern mills (1934)__________ 1936—June 1478-81
(See also Textile industry.)




88

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Cotton-textile manufacturing, foreign countries:
P age
China. Development and labor conditions........................................................................ 1926—N ov. 14-29
----- Spinning, development of, 1921........................................................... ................ .............. 1922—June 231-2
----- Woman labor_______________________ _____ _________________ ________ ____ _ 1922—Dec. 144-5
----- (Shanghai). Strike, employees of Nikka m ill___________________________ ______ 1922—July 175
Great Britain. Agreement re wages and multiple-loom operation, legalization of___ 1935—Sept. 680-1
----- Artificial humidification, effect on sickness rates, cotton mills____ _______ _______ 1928—Mar. 47-8
----- Board established to promote export trade,.1940___ ______ _____________________ 1940—M ay 1127
----- Fines for poor work, weavers, illegal------------------------------------------------------------- 1930—July 110-11
----- Reorganization of industry, provisions of law of Aug. 4, 1939, amended Oct. 30,
1939_____________________ ____________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1080-9; 1940—Jan. 70
----- (England). Burnley district, “6 looms per weaver” agreement, effective Janu­
ary 1933------------------------- ------ ------ ---------------------------------------------- ------ ------ -- 1933—Mar. 563-4
----------- Committee of inquiry, cotton-textile industry, report, 1930............................ . 1930—Sept. 47-50
------------Prospective experiment at Nelson, 8 looms per weaver_____________________ 1931—Sept. 68
------------Spinners, short-time policy-------------------------------------------- 1926—Feb. 156-7; 1927—Feb. 75-6
------------Spinning industry, reorganization and amalgamations____________________ 1929—Mar. 66-8
----- (England, Lancashire). Burnley district, dispute, more-looms per weaver, ended
Feb. 16, 1931------ -------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Apr. 134-6
----------- Lancashire Cotton Corporation (Ltd.) merger____________________________ 1931—M ay 51-2
------------Underemployment of weavers, investigation covering 6-Week period, 1 9 3 8 .1 9 3 9 —July 100-3
India. Seasonal employment. (D as)------ ---------------- -------------------------------------------- 1922—Mar. 21
----- Statistics, 1880 to 1920----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 1922—Oct. 213
----- (Bombay). Cotton operatives, incidence of illness among____________________ 1931—June 70-1
------------Labor conditions________________________________________ ______ .............. 1927—Sept. 46t8
------------Strike of 1925, end of_____________________________________ _____ _______ 1926—Feb. 226-8
Italy. Unemployment, Aug. 1,1921. ________ ____ _______________________________ 1921—Oct. 150
Japan. Spinning and weaving, efficiency of labor........ ............. ............. ........................... 1929—Oct. 57-9
Mexico. Agreement, Apr. 27, 1939, provisions._______ ________________________ 1940—M ay 1140-6
----- Labor conditions----------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------------------- --------- 1921—Jan. 211
Cottonseed-oil industry. Shift work conditions and experience, United States__________ 1922—N ov. 32-3
Council for Industrial Progress:
Formation and first session, Jan. 6,1936_____________________________ ___ _________ 1936—Feb. 335
Legislative program endorsed at December.1936 session...................................................... 1937—Feb. 374-5
Work reported by coordinator for Industrial Cooperation, Mar. 13,1936__________ 1936—Apr. 932-3
Counseling service for unemployed. New York City, activities of Adjustment Service.. 1934—Apr. 797-9
Country and town workers, Puerto Rico, survey------------------------------------------------------ 1930—Aug. 46-51
Court costs and fees. Situation in United States, and suggestions as to remedies. (Smith
and Brad w ay)_________________________________________ ________________________ _ 1936—July 7-13
Court decisions. (See Decisions of courts.)
Courts, industrial. (See under Conciliation and arbitration.)
Courts, small-claims. (See Small-claims courts.)
Craftsmanship:
New York Building Congress, plan for recognizing............................................................... 1926—Jan. 260-1
Philadelphia Building Congress, recognition of..................................................................... 1926—Feb. 255
Craftsmen. (See Handicrafts.)
Creameries:
Cooperative. (See under Cooperation.)
Decision, N L R B , Feb. 1, 1935 (Strouse’s Creamery, Grand Rapids, M ich.).__.......... . 1935—Apr. 970-1
Credit unions. (See Cooperation—Credit unions.)
Crescent Furniture Co. (Warren, Pa.). Decision N L R B , Jan. 17, 1935________________ 1935—Mar. 695
Criminal cases. Public-defender system in, experience_______________________________ 1926—M ay 36-7
Cripples (handicapped workers), employment of. (See under Rehabilitation, reeducation,
and reemployment.)
Crops, labor cost. (See under Agriculture.)
Crown manufacturing. N R A code, effective Nov. 12, 1933, tabular analysis of labor
provisions--------------------------------------------------- ------------- ------ ----------- ----------- ------ 1933—Dec. 1336
Crude-petroleum producing. (See under Petroleum industry.)
Crushed stone industry:
Employment statistics, and productivity of labor, 1913-37__________ _____________ 1939—Apr. 820-3
Sand and gravel. Wisconsin Recovery Administration code, effective Aug. 28,
1935, tabular analysis of labor provisions_______________________________________ 1936—Mar. 630
Sand and gravel and slag. N R A code, effective N ov. 20,1933, tabular analysis of labor
provisions___________________________________________________ _______ __________ 1934—Jan. 37
Culinary workers:
Agreement. Vallejo (Calif.), Local No. 560.................................................................... 1927—July ©7-8, 176
Cultural wage. Address. (Young)______________________ _________________ _____ 1927—N ov. 46
Pueblo (Colo.), decision of Industrial Commission, Aug. 13,1931__________________ 1931—Oct. 132-3
Curled hair manufacturing and horsehair dressing industry. N R A code, effective M ay
28, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions_______ ______ __________________________
1934—July 48
Curtain draperies, novelty, bedspreads, and novelty pillows. N R A code, effective Nov.
11, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions_________________ _______ _____ ____ _____ 1933—Dec. 1339
Cutters, granite and stone. (See Granite and stone trades.)
Cuttifig tools. (See under Machine shops.)
Cyanides, poisoning from. (See Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Cylinder mold industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 2, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions............................................................................................................................................... 1934—M ay 1006

D
Dairy industry:
Creamery butter consumption, economics of. (Stewart).................................... __............ 1925—July 1-6
Decision, N L R B , under sec. 7 fa), Aug. 9, 1934. (Ira Wilson and Sons Dairy Co.,
Detroit)_______ ________ - — ............................. ............................................................ . — 1934—Oct. 940-1
Mechanization in dairy farming........................................................ ...................................... 1933—Mar. 515-16
Production economies and efficiency. (Larson).............................................................. 1929—June 116-17
(iSee also M ilk distribution, etc.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

89

Dairy products cotton wrappings and milk-filtering materials industry. N R A code,
P age
effective Apr. 30, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions__________________________ 1934—June 1335
Dampproofing, waterproofing, calking compounds, and concrete floor treatments manu­
facturing. N R A code, effective Dec. 4,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions______
1934—Jan. 41
Danbury and Bethel Fur Co. (Conn.). Decision, N L R B , N ov. 22, 1934____ ____ _____ 1935—Jan. 127-8
Dangerous occupations and trades. (See under Dusts; Eye injuries; Industrial diseases
and poisons; Occupations—Hazardous.)
Date-packing industry:
Imported. N R A code, effective July 31, 1934, tabular analyss of labor provisions___ 1934—Sept. 626
N R A code, effective N ov. 20, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions.................. .........
1934—Jan. 42
Davidson Transfer and Storage Co. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 8, 1934................................ .. 1934—N ov. 1155
Day nurseries. Chile, acts of 1917 and 1921.................................................................................. 1921—Aug. 135
D ay of rest. (See Laws and legislation—Sunday labor.)
Days of work obtainable per year, building trades................................................... 1921—M ay 107-10, July 166
Deaf persons:
Employment opportunities and vocational guidance, survey of. (Report of U. S.
Office of Education)_____________________ ____________________ ____ ________ 1936—Dec. 1416-19
(See also under Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
Death benefits:
Canada. Central labor organizations, amounts paid 1935 and 1938. _. 1936—Dec. 1412; 1940—June 1409
France. Provisions for, social insurance law of 1930____________________________ 1934—Sept. 634-5
----- Provisions under law enacted Oct. 1935............ ................................................................ 1936—Feb. 331
Trade-unions. Amount paid, 1933, by organization........... ............................. .............. 1934—Dec. 136 -7;
1936—Jan. 42-4, Dec. 1410-12
(See also under Benefits and benefit funds; Life insurance (group); Workmen’s
compensation.)
Death by wrongful act. Liability for. Legislation, 1937, various States________________ 1938—Jan. 148
Death, fatality, and mortality rates. (See under Accident statistics; Industrial diseases and
poisons; Vital statistics.)
Death notices, labor officials. (See Obituary.)
Debts and debtors. Characteristics of, part II of Wage Executions for Debt. (Nugent,
Hamm, and Jones)____________________________________________________________ 1936—Mar. 578-91
Decasualization, port. (See under Docks and harbors )
Decentralization of industry. Trend, statistical analysis of locational changes, specified
years, 1899-1933. (Study, Wharton School of Finance and Commerce)____________ 1935—N ov. 1212-13
Decibel, definition, unit of noise measurement (footnote)______________________________
1930—June 1
Decisions and awards, trade-board, impartial chairman, etc. (See under specific industry.)
Decisions, N L RB . (See under National Labor Relations Board; also under specific in­
dustry, firm, or labor union.)
Decisions of Acting Comptroller General (U. S. Government):
“Anti-kick-back” regulations to govern in District of Columbia (ruling, Jan. 19,1939). 1939—M ay 1104
8-hour law. Laborers and mechanics, Federal projects or contracts, Soil Conservation
Service question as to farm workers_________________________________ ______ 1939—Apr. 916-18
----- Workers on orthopedic supplies, etc., included, ruling Oct. 14, 1938......... ............. 1939—Apr. 916-17
Decisions of courts, United States:
Absent voters. Arkansas law constitutional___________________________________ 1925—Jan. 173-4
Accident or disease. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
Admiralty. Judicial Code amendment, constitutionality_____________ ___________ 1923—July 206
----- Recovery precluded when workmen’s compensation accepted (Calif.)______ ____ 1935—Jan. 80-1
----- (See also Seamen; Workmen’s compensation—Maritime employments, this section.)
Agricultural Adjustment Act. Declared valid with power to issue and revoke licenses
(Dist. of Col.)______________________________________________________________ 1933—N ov. 1136
Air-transport employees in actual flying held not covered by workmen’s compensation
(Wash. State Sup. C t.)__.___________________________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1140
Alien-registration law (Pennsylvania), 1939. Held unconstitutional (U. S. Dist. Ct. in
Pa.; U. S. Sup. C t.)______________________________________________ 1940—Mar. 669-70, Aug. 364
Aliens. Deportation as, of expatriated native Americans_________________ _____ __ 1926—Mar. 157
----- “Nonquota” immigrants, wives and children of admitted immigrants.............. . 1924—July 239-40
----- Poll tax (Calif.)____________________________________________________________ 1921—Dec. 158
----- Workmen's compensation benefits. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this sec­
tion.)
A. F. of L. Union held entitled to recover property taken over by seceding members to
C. I. O. union (Oreg. Sup. C t.)______________________________________________ 1939—Apr. 886-7
Antihand bill and anticircular ordinances held unconstitutional by U. S. Supreme
Court, 1939___________ _____________________________________________________ 1940—Jan. 101-2
“Anti-kick-back” legislation. Charges of violation held to be unfounded (Dist. Ct. of
Pa., 1935, and U. S. Dist. Ct. for Eastern Dist. of P a.)________ _____ ____________ 1939—M ay 1105
----- N ew York State, upheld__________________________________________________ 1939—M ay 1105
Antileaflet ordinances. Rulings by Federal and State courts as to constitutionality. 1939—Apr. 881-5
Antipicketing laws (Ala. and Calif.) held unconstitutional (U. S. Sup. C t.)_______ 1940—June 1436-7
Antitrust acts. (Clayton Act.) Contempt of court under, jury trials for................ . 1923—Mar. 131;
1924—Dec. 144-6
----------- Injunctions as affected b y __________________________ ___________________
1922—Jan. 198
----------- Picketing under (American Steel Foundries case)........... ............ ....................... 1922—Jan. 190-3
------------Secondary boycott (Duplex Printing case)______________________ ______ 1921—Febr. 165-8
----- Employment registry as violation of, Pacific Coast Shipowners’ Association___ 1927—Jan. 132-4
----- Sherman Act. And labor. The Coronado case______________________________ 1927—Dec. 107-9
------------Applicability to labor unions and their activities (U. S. Sup. C t.)_________ 1940—Aug. 360-1
Antiunion contracts. (See under Contract of employment, this section.)
Assaults, horseplay. (See under "Workmen's compensation, this section.)
Assembly. Peaceable, for lawful discussion, Oregon criminal-syndicalism law uncon­
stitutional as applied to (U. S. Sup. C t.)...................... ...................... .......................... . 1937—Feb. 401-4
----- Unlawful. (See under Industrial disputes, this section.)
Assignment of wages. Contract with employer not to assign, invalid, Illinois.........1931—Dec. 108-10
Associations, employers’. Creating monopoly. Brescia Construction case, New Y ork.. 1923—Mar. 133-4
----------- Plumbers, Colorado._________ _____________ ________________ __________ 1923—Mar. 133-4
----------- Printers’ board of trade, San Francisco_________________ _______________ 1922—Dec. 219-21
----- Dealers liable for damages in refusing to sell materials, carpenters............... ............ 1922—June 165-6




90

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
Associations, employers’. Enforceability of contract by member, building trades,
.rage
Indiana-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- 1925—Sept. 148-9
----- Interference with union organizers, coal operators, West Virginia.......................... 1923—June 227-8
----- Restraint of trade, “American plan” in building industry, SanFrancisco............. 1924—Apr. 198-97;
1925—June 136-8
Automobile damage from collision, responsibility for (D. C. Small Claims C t.)............ 1939—Aug. 277
Barber shops. 6-day law held unconstitutional (Calif. Sup. C t.)_________________ 1937—Mar. 636-7
Barbers. Mississippi, injunction suit, seeking opinion on validity of act, dismissed.. 1933—Apr. 792-3
----- North Carolina, constitutionality of law upheld___________________ _________ 1930—July 109-10
----- “ Oral lease” agreements held to be contracts Within meaning of unemploy­
ment-compensation act (Wash. Sup. C t.)___________________________________ 1938—Dec. 1309-10
----- Texas, constitutionality of law upheld-------------------------------------------------------- 1932—N ov. 1092-3
Beauty-school instructor. N ot included under minimum-wage order for beauty-shop
operators (Wash. Sup. C t.)--------------------------------- ------------------------ ------ ------------ 1940—Oct. 952
Bituminous-Coal Conservation Act of 1935 (Guffey Coal Act) held unconstitutional,
M ay 18, 1936, opinions_______________________________________________________ 1936—July 68-74
Blacklisting. (See under Employers’ liability, also Labor organizations, this section.)
Bonus. (See under Wages, this section.)
Car-shed act. Missouri, unconstitutional---------------------------------------------------------- 1923—M ay 207-8
Casual employments. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
Casualty-insurance contracts to be made through registered resident agents. Virginia
statute upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)----------- ------------------------------------------------------------ 1940—Aug. 364
Child labor. Amendment to U. S. Constitution proposed 1924 still subject to ratifica­
tion (ruling by U. S. Sup. C t.).----- ------------------------------------ --------------------------- 1939—July 142-4
----- Compensation status, children unlawfully e m p lo y e d ...______ _________________ 1921—N ov. 176
----- Delivering milk not farm labor, Virginia............... ......................... ............. .................... 1923—June 227
----- Federal tax law of Feb. 24, 1919, unconsitutional....... ...................1921—Oct. 191-2; 1922—June 163-5
----- Home work under factory act, New York_______ _____ ________________ _______ 1925—June 58-9
----- Kentucky State law held applicable to interstate commerce...................... ................ 1929—Aug. 71
----- Law liberally construed, Tennessee_______________ _________________________ 1928—N ov. 89-90
----- Law violation through employment in dangerous occupation (Kans. Sup. Ct.)_ 1939—Mar. 620-1
----- (See also under Workmen's compensation, this section.)
Chinese restaurant keeper as “merchant” ----------------------------------------------------------- 1924—June 165-7
City held liable for damage to restaurant during strike (W. Va. Sup. Ct. of A ppeals).. 1939— Apr. 885
Clayton Act. (See under Antitrust acts, this section.)
Closed shop. Claims for, by Gas Workers’ Union, upheld (D. C. Small Claims Ct.)-_ 1939—Apr. 837
----- Contract with employer having monopoly of local transportation business held
void (Ohio Ct. of Appeals)---------------- -------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 384
----- Contracts invalid at common law, Oregon statute____________________________ 1921—Jan. 194-7
----- Interference w ith employment, status of worker seeking employment, Massa­
chusetts----------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ 1923—Mar. 134-5
----- (Open and closed shop). Injunction, Amalgamated Clothing Workers, New
York_____________________________________________ _______________________ 1921—Oct. 199-201
----- Union having contract not compelled to admit nonunion men to membership
(N . Y. Sup. Ct. for N . Y . C ounty)_____________ ______________________________ 1939—Oct. 888
Coal control. Ohio statute unconstitutional...................................................................... .
1923—N ov. 203
Collective bargaining, right upheld, railroad employees, Texas------------------------------- 1928—June 96-8;
1929—Oct. 78-80, Dec. 82; 1930—Aug. 88-91
Commerce, interstate. (See under Employers’ liability, also Labor organizations, this
Common-law liability. Employer exempt when contributing to State insurance fund
(O hio)._______ ____________________________________________________ ________ 1935—Apr. 943-4
Company union. Disestablishment by N L R B upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)................... .
1940—Aug. 359
----- N L R B order for withdrawal of recognition upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)....... .............. 1938—Apr. 904-7
Competition, right of a State to limit, denied------------------------- ------ -------------------- 1932—M ay 1073-5
C. I. O. cannery workers’ union held liable for breach of contract executed before seces­
sion from A. F. of L. (Sup. Ct. of W ash.)-------------------------- ------ ------------------------ 1939—Apr. 887
Conspiracy. To collect money for strike settlement, carpenters and ironworkers,
Chicago_____ _____ _______________________________________________________ 1924—Apr. 199-200
----- To interfere with interstate commerce (Coronado Coal Co. case)_______________ 1924—Jan. 164-5
Constitutional (Federal) amendment. Congressional power to set time limits for
ratification of amendment to Federal Constitution------------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 376-8
Constitutionality of labor laws. Arkansas full-crew law upheld___ ____ ___________ 1931—June 87-8
----- Federal Longshoremen’s Act of 1927, valid---------- *---------------- 1928—Dec. 112; 1932—Mar. 577-81
----- 44-hour-week law for certain male employees, 1937, held unconstitutional, 1938
(Pa. Sup. C t.)____ ________________________ ____ ___________________________ 1938—Sept. 548-51
----- History of laws declared unconstitutional. (Summary of BLS Bull. No. 321)____ 1923—Mar. 130
---- LLicensed Pharmacist Act (1927), Pennsylvania, unconstitutional.............................. 1929—Feb. 77-8
----- Louisiana Act. No. 103, 1926 (“shrimp act”), unconstitutional..................................... 1929—Jan. 82-4
----- Prevailing-wage law. Illinois, void.......... . . . .................................. ............................. . 1932—Mar. 581-2
------------Indefinite and uncertain, hence invalid (Ariz. Sup. C t.)..................................... 1932—Jan. 49-52
Contempt of court. Criticism of injunction by newspaper.............................................. 1924—Dec. 147-8
----- Penalty inflicted, nature of, Wisconsin____ ____ _____________ ______________ 1922—July 155-7
----- (See also under Antitrust acts, this section.)
Continuation school. N ew York law constitutional. . _----------------- ----------------------- 1928—Sept. 77-8
Contract of employment. Alabama, contract for indefinite period terminable at w ill. 1931—Jan. 130-1
----- Antiunion contracts. Adair, Coppage, and Hitchman cases. (U. S. Sup. C t.). 1920—Aug. 112-14
------------Statute forbidding, unconstitutional............... ...................................... .................. 1924—Mar. 183-4
------------Unconstitutional, Massachusetts, advisory opinion of court to legislature.. 1930—July 107-8
----- Breach, injunction, ladies’ garment industry, New York............... ........................ 1922—Apr. 210-11
----- Conditioned on purchase of employer’s capital stock held unconstitutional, Massa­
chusetts............................................. ................................... ....................................... ............ 1929—Aug. 104-5
----- Employees on strike, status, under violated agreement_______________________ 1921—Sept. 186-8
;---- Film actress making suggestions or objections to stage director held no breach,
California______________________________ ___________________________________ 1932—Feb. 323-4
----- Individual labor contract (Interborough Rapid Transit Co. v. Latin), N ew Y ork.. 1928—M ay 97-8
----- Individual, with employer, not invalidated by employee’s joining union which
made a different contract (Wash. Sup. C t.)______ _______ _______________ _______ 1940—N ov. 1179
----- Permanent employment in lieu of damages, contract of, lumbering operations___ 1926—Feb. 198




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

91

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
P age
“ Contract shop” subject to National Labor Relations Act (U. S. Sup. C t.)_______ 1939—June 1334-5
Contracts, public printing, Colorado, statute regulating held constitutional............... 1939—Feb. 355-6
Convict labor. (See Prison labor, this section.)
Convicts, former, civil rights. Employers' liability_______________________________ 1927—Aug. 72
Cooperation. “ Farm supplies” ruled not to cover general-store items (Va. Sup. Ct.)__ 1938—Dec. 1314
Cooperative associations. Assessment of stockholders for debt of reorganized society,
Minnesota_________________________________________________________________ 1925—Apr. 173-4
----- Electric, nonprofit, serving members only, held not subject to jurisdiction of State
Department of Public Service (Wash. Sup. C t.)_____________ ____ _______________ 1940—Jan. 95
----- Marketing act. Florida, constitutional______________________________ ______ 1927—Sept. 76-7
----------- Kentucky, validity__________________ ________ _______ _______ . . . ____ ___ 1928—Aug. 78-9
----------- Minnesota, validity_____________ _______ _____ ____ _______ ____________ 1925—Sept. 164-5
------------Tennessee, validity_______________________ _____ _____________________ 1925—Apr. 174-5
----- Marketing contracts with. Specific States_________________ 1922—Dec. 237-8; 1923—M ay 230-1,
Sept. 181-4, Oct. 191; 1924—Feb. 218-19, Sept. 166-9; 1925—Apr. 174-5; 1926—M ay 105-9
Cotton-garment code amendment, use of Blue Eagle on prison-made goods upheld___ 1925—Mar. 672-4
Court of Industrial Relations (Kansas). Act creating constitutional______________1921—July 208-9
----- Gompulsory arbitration provisions of law—construction of; unconstitutionality
of_________________________________________________________ 1924—M ay 205-8; 1925—June 130-6
----- Decisions b y ________________________________________ 1921—Apr. 122-5, June 133-4, July 206-8
----- Wage-fixing power invalid, decisions affecting status________________________ 1923—July 208-11
----- Wage-scale regulations, decisions affecting status__________________ 1922—Jan. 194-5, N ov. 200-2
Department-store claim ruled against, account inferior material sold (D. C. Small
Claims C t.)_______________________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 278-9
Detectives, industrial and private. (See Licensing business, occupations, etc., this
section.)
Disease, occupational, and other than occupational. (See under Workmen’s compen­
sation, this, section.)
Dyeing-plant operator processing materials moving through interstate-commerce chan­
nels subject to National Labor Relations Act (U. S. Sup. C t.)_________ 1940—July 117, Aug. 358-9
8-hour-day statute for retail employees, certain cities, held constitutional (Mont. Sup.
C t.)_____________________________________________________________________ 1938—July 114-16
Electric cooperative association, nonprofit, serving members only, held not subject to
jurisdiction of State Department of Public Service (Wash. Sup. C t.)______________
1940—Jan. 95
Electric railway determined by ICC not interurban, ruling upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.)___ 1939—Jan. 128
Emigrant agents. Alabama law, constitutionality____________________________ 1924—Feb. 199-201
----- Florida law unconstitutional______________________________________________ 1924—M ay 204-5
Employee election conducted by N L R B not subject to court interference (3 cases,
U. S. Sup. C t.)______________________________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 357
Employer-dominated union. Disestablishment by N L R B upheld by U . S. Supreme
Court__________________________________________________________________ ____ 1940—Jan. 103
Employers’ liability. Acts of employees_______________________________________ 1924—Dec. 146-7
----- Amended complaint, continuity of litigation broken____________ _____ ______ 1930—M ay 97-8
----- Appeal by employer, penalty against, Arizona law unconstitutional_____________ 1924—Aug. 176
----- Assumption of risk. Defense barred by violation of safety-appliance statute.._ 1930—June 105-6
----------- Held a defense, under Federal act_____________________________________ 1932—Feb. 325-6
----------- Insanitary work place (New York)____________________ _____ ___________ 1926—Oct. 97-8
----------- Railroad fireman______________________________________________________ 1931—Aug.* 50-1
----- Blacklisting system as interference with interstate commerce, shipowners (Oregon) 1925—Dec. 162
----- Blacklisting union member, damage suit for (North Carolina)_______________ 1929—June 148-50
----- Child unlawfully employed, death of (Virginia)_______________________________ 1925—Dec. 163
----- Compensation and liability statutes, relation_______________________________ 1921—M ay 144-5
----- Compensation payable for accident resulting from failure to comply with Safety
Appliance Act_____________________________________________________________ 1935—M ay 1253-4
----- Convicts, former, civil rights of_____________________ _________________ ____ _ 1927—Aug. 72
----- Executors’ right dependent upon continuance of right in injured employee____ 1931—Aug. 49-50
----- Federal railroad statute. Compensation award not a bar,to suit under________ 1925—Oct. 131-2
------------Limitation of time for bringing suit____ ______________________ ________ 1926—June 155-6
------------ 1906 and 1908__________________________________________ _______________ 1923—Oct. 177
------------Recovery under, barred by fraud in obtaining employment______ _____ _ 1926—Aug. 105-6
----- Industrial police, acts of, cotton mills, Mississippi. _________________________ 1925—Jan. 170-1
----- Insurance. Lead poisoning through unusual working conditions held accidental
1940—Oct. 953
and within coverage (U. S. Cir. Ct. of App. for 5th Cir.)________________________
----------- Policy of, conflicting interest under, right of employer and insurance carrier
to defend___________________________________________________________ ____ _ 1925—Aug. 170-2
-----Interference with employment, blacklisting, shipowners, Portland (Oreg.)_______ 1925—Dec. 162
----- Interstate “commerce” and interstate “transportation,” distinction___________ 1932—Feb. 324-5
----- Interstate commerce, railroads, pipe lines, longshore work. (Clark)__________ 1922—Aug. 169-79
-----Interstate or intrastate commerce____________________________ _____________ 1923—Feb. 247-9
----- “ Lawful requirement” provision of Ohio constitution_________________________ 1924—Jan. 165-7
----- Longshoremen and repair workers on vessels in port, compensation status.
(Clark)____________________________________________________________________ 1924—Feb. 190-2
----- Negligence. Casual, shown by evidence, necessary to establish respondent’s right
to recover, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co__________________________ 1932—June 1325
----------- Proof of, necessary to recovery of compensation________________________ 1930—M ay 98-100
-------------Set distance of semaphore from track, Atlantic Coast Line Railroad C o......... 1931—July 103
----------- Under “lawful requirement” provision of constitution, Ohio______________ 1923—Jan. 181-6
— r- Occupational diseases, Illinois____________________________________________ 1923—Oct. 177-8
< — Personal injury from negligence includes pneumonia under provisions of Merchant
—
Marine (Jones Act) Act of 1920_____________________________________________ 1933—M ay 1074-6
----- Railroad. Negligent “in part” only, held liable, N ew York___________________ 1933—Apr. 791-2
N ot chargeable with negligence in handling mail sacks, same being Govern­
ment work__________________________________________________________ ____ 1932—Mar. 575-6
----- Recharging storage batteries used in railroad signaling held “interstate commerce,”
U tah_____________________________________________________________________ 1933—Jan. 119-20
----- Recovery by personal representative, Arizona.......................... ............. ..................... 1925—Nov. 200-1
----- Release of one joint defendant, Oregon........................................................................... 1926—M ay 118-19
----- Safe place and appliances, railroads. ............................... ................................................. 1926—M ay 119




92

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Decisions of courts. United States^-Continued.
Employers’ liability. “Safe place to work’' rule not applicable when employee chooses
.rage
own place of work (Sup. Ct. of Ark.) _ _--------------------------------------------- ---------------- 1939—Oct. 889
----- Street railway not a “common carrier by railroad” ------------------------------------------ 1939—May 101-2
----- Train guard killed by robbers assumed risk of employment, Missouri Pacific Rail­
road Co________________ ___________ ___ ______ - __________________________ 1932—M ay 1077-8
* ----- Strike guards. State police acting as, T exas.------- ----------------------------------------- 1926—Dec. 106-7
Employment agencies. Liable in damage for loss caused by violation of licensing
statute (Dist. of Col.)________________________________________ T----------------------- 1932—Jan. 50-1
Employment contracts restricting collective bargaining. M ay be invalidated by
N L R B (U. S. Sup. C t.)______________________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 358
Employment offices. Fee-fixing provision, New Jersey law, unconstitutional_____ 1928—July 68-72
----- Limiting fees of, California. ------- ------------------- -------------------------------- ------------ 1924—June 167
----- Regulation of, under State police power----------------------------------------------------------- 1922—Oct. 20-2
----- Shipowners’ agency not a combination in restraint of trade, Pacific coast_______ 1928—Dec. 127-30
Enticing away an employee. Second employer not liable to original employer on jus­
tifiable breach of employment contract------------------------------------------------------------ 1931—Sept. 78-9
Examination, licensing, etc. (See Licensing business, occupations, etc., this section.)
Factory, etc., regulations. Texas fire-escape law unconstitutional__________________ 1923—M ay 210
Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. Applicability to production of goods within State
(decision of Fed. Dist. Ct. in Ga. appealed to U. S. Sup. C t.)_____________________ 1940—Aug. 364-5
----- Requirement for production of wage and hour documents upheld. (U. S. Dist. Ct.
for Northern Dist. of 111.)_____________________________________________________ 1940—Jan. 102
----------- (U. S. Sup. Ct. refusal to review decision of Fed. Dist.C t. in Chicago and Cir.
Ct. of A pp.)_________ ____________ _________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1436-7
----- Watchman tending boiler held to be engaged in production of goods for interstate
commerce (U. S. Sup. C t.)______________--------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Dec. 1437
Federal employee’s salary subject to State (New York) income tax (U. S. Sup. Ct.)_. 1939—M ay 1106-7
44-hour-week law for certain male employees, 1937, held unconstitutional, 1938 (Pa.
Sup. C t.)_________________________________________________________________ 1938—Sept. 548-51
Free speech, employment of speaker, secret organization. ---------------------------------- 1925—Sept. 149-50
Fruit-paeking company (Oakland, Calif., plant) engaged in limited amount of inter­
state and foreign commerce, N L R B order upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)----------- ----------- 1938—M ay 1169-72
Full-crew law not applicable to electric cars, O h io ..--------------------------------------------- 1931—June 91-2
Fur-coat repair, controversy concerning payment for (D. C. Small Claims Ct.)_........ . 1939—Aug. 276
Glass Workers, National Wincow. 2-period system of production............................... 1923—Apr. 146-8;
1924—Feb. 195-6
Group Health Association, D . C., upheld by D. C. Court of Appeals, 1939------------------ 1940—Mar. 657
Harbor improvement work. Workmen’s compensation statute applicable to, O hio... 1925—Oct. 134-5
Hawes-Cooper Act. Convict labor laws, right to challenge denied------------------------- 1934—Mar. 578-9
----- Upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.), Mar. 2,1936------------------------------------------------------------ 1936—
Apr. 998-9
Home work. Purchase (by manufacturer) of infants’ hats made in home without cer­
tificate, held violation of law (Ct. of Spec. Sess., City of N . Y .)____________________ 1940—June 1438
Horseplay, assaults, etc. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
Hospital kitchen held not be manufacturing establishment, Kansas_________________ 1935—Apr. 937
Hours of work. 8-hour day, retail stores, 1933 law upheld (Mont. Sup. Ct.), 1938-.. 1938—July 114-16
----- 44-hour week law for certain male employees, 1937, held unconstitutional, 1938
(Pa. Sup. C t.).___________________________________________________________ 1938—Sept. 548-51
— —Lessor of store held to be employer (Mass. Sup. Jud. Co.)------------------------------- 1940—Oct. 951-2
----- Motor bus and truck drivers, N ew York law limiting (with certain exceptions) held
constitutional (State Ct. of A pp.)________________________________ _______ ____ 1940—Feb. 374-5
----- New Mexico, 8-hour law for male employees in mercantile establishments, held un­
constitutional___________ •_______________________________________________ 1933—Dec. 1399-1400
----- Nonoperating employees of truck and bus companies in interstate commerce, not
under jurisdiction of ICC (U. S. Sup. C t.)---- --------------------- --------------------------- 1940—July 115-16
----- Public works. N ew York________________________ _______________ ___ ____ _ 1921—Sept. 192-3
------------ Wyoming statute, validity___________________ ____ _______________ ____ 1926—Jan. 205-6
----- South Carolina, act held invalid by State supreme court------------------------------------ 1939—M ay 1106
----- Truck drivers, specified transportation, statute (New Hampshire), upheld (U. S.
Sup. C t.)_________________________________________________________________ 1939—Mar. 619-20
----- Underground mines or “workings,” applicable only to employees in mining and
smelting operations (Utah Sup. C t.)__________________________ ________________ 1940—N ov. 1178
-----Woman workers, New Jersey law upheld (State sup. c t.)_______________________ 1940—M ay 1175
----- Women, New York statute fixing, unconstitutional__________________________ 1924—M ay 210-11
Housing. State legislation. Held constitutional by highest courts (16 States), lower
courts (2 States)__________________________ ____ ______ ____ ___________ ____ ___ 1940—Jan. 104
----------- Upheld by highest courts (12 States).......................... ................ .......................
1939—June 1333-4
Immigrants. (See under Aliens, this section.)
Industrial commission. Arizona, right of Governor to remove, upheld---------------- 1933—Sept. 588-90
Industrial disputes. Delay of work, as affecting employers’ contract-------------------- 1924—Dec. 148-9
----- Interference with interstate commerce, Coronado Coal Co. c a s e ...____ _______ 1925—Aug. 172-3
----- Investigation act. .Massachusetts, constitutional-------------------------------------------- 1921—N ov. 178
----- Restaurant employees in violation of contract, injunction granted employer (N. Y.
Ct. of A pp.)_________________________________________________________________ 1939—Feb. 355
----- Strike. Pending investigation and arbitration, mining (Colorado)____________ 1921—June 120-1
------------Theater employees, not necessarily terminated, and picketing not unlawful,
when employer’s operation became normal (Conn. Sup. Ct. of Errors)................. ....... 1939—Aug. 386
----- Strikes and boycotts interfering with interstate commerce........... ............................. 1923—Mar. 131-3
----- Strikes, illegal, statute prohibiting, constitutionality.. . ________ _______ _____ _ 1926—Dec. 105-6
----- Unlawful assembly and unlawful arrest. Silk mills, N ew Jersey............................. 1928—Sept. 74-5
------------Weld County, Colo__________________________ _________________ ______ _ 1928—Sept. 75-6
----- (See also Sit-down strike, this section.)
Injunctions. Anti-injunction acts. Arizona, unconstitutional_______ ___________ 1922—Feb. 124-8
------------Constitutional status of............................................................................................. 1929—Aug. 106-11
----- Building trades, various cases............................ .............................................................. 1922—Apr. 204-10
----- Check-off system, United Mine Workers____ _____ ________________________ 1922—Feb. 128-31
----- Cigar industry, against breaching collective agreement to furnish employment
(M ichigan)______ _________________________ __________ ____ _______ - .............1921—June 121-3




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

93

Decisions of courts, U nited States:—Continued.
T)q
Injunctions. Closed shop, etc., labor organization’s attempts to gain, reversal of decree
.rage
granting, N ew York___ ______________________ _____________________ _______ 1934—N ov. 1120-1
----- Federated Shop Crafts strike_______________ ______________ 1922—Oct. 176-8; 1923—N ov. 201-3
----- Illinois statute limiting issue of, in labor disputes, constitutionality______ ______ 1925—Oct. 132
----- Relief denied. Employer violating spirit of labor laws, Cook County, 111.......... 1933—N ov. 1133-4
------------Southport Petroleum Co. v. Secretary of Interior (Ickes), N R A valid.......... 1933—N ov. 1134-6
----- Restricted use of, under Norris-LaGuardia Act, constitutionality upheld............ 1934—N ov. 1120-1
----- Unwarranted unless acts of union are unlawful_____________________ __________ 1931—Sept. 77-8
----- Violations of, in labor disputes_________ ____ ______________________ ______ __ 1924—Jan. 163-4
----- (See also Labor organizations—Picketing; and under Picketing, this section.)
Installment-credit firm ordered to return money already paid for unsatisfactory article
(D. C. Small Claims C t.)___________________ ____ ___________________________ 1939-Aug. 277-8
Insurance, group-life. Deductions from employee's salary by employer as premiums
hold insurer liable for policy amount, A labam a------------------------------------------------ 1933—M ay 1072-3
----- Law (Virginia) affecting workmen’s compensation contracts upheld (U. S. Dist.
Ct. for Eastern Dist. of V a.)_______________________________ _______________ 1939—N ov. 1139-40
Interference with employment. (See under Employers’ liability and Labor organiza­
tions, this section.)
Inventions of employees. Rights to. (Clark)--------------------------------------------------- 1926—June 12-23
Iron and steel wage determination Mar. 1, 1939, one of 6 specified wage localities, held
invalid (U. S. Ct. of App. for D . C .)________________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1136-7
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. (See Court of Industrial Relations (Kansas),
this section.)
Kentucky. Federal child-labor amendment ratification declared invalid by State
supreme court, 1937___________________________________ _______ _____ ______ ___ 1938—Jan. 133
Labor disputes. (See Industrial disputes, this section.)
Labor laws. Cases on. (Sayre)_____________________________________________ 1922—Dec. 217-19
----- Legal decisions on, international survey b y ILO, 1927________________ _________ 1929—June 150
Labor organizations. Attempts to gain closed shop and union recognition, reversal of
decree granting injunction, New York----------------------------------------------------------- 1934—N ov. 1120-1
----- Blacklisting union members, damage suit for, upheld (North Carolina). . . ......... 1929—June 148-50
----- Boycott of person not employer, unlawful_________ _______ __________ _______ 1925—Dee. 159-60
----- Boycott, secondary, enjoined____ _____________________ ___________________1921—June 129-30
----- Civil rights (constitutional) of members___________________________ ______ ____ 1921—June 126
----- Clayton Act and secondary boycotts (Duplex Printing case)_________ ____ _____ 1921—Feb. 165-8
----- Closed-shop contracts, invalid at common law, Oregon statute________________ 1921—Jan. 194-7
----- Collective agreements. Action by employees to enforce.(Clark)______________ 1922—Oct. 179-85
----------- Action to enforce, Cleveland garment worker____________________________ 1927—M ay 128-9
----------- Affecting production, window glass__________ __________ 1923—Apr. 146-8; 1924—Feb. 194-8
----------- As restraint of trade, non-union-made millwork.__________ ______________ 1927—Jan. 131-2
, ----------- Breach injunction against, cigar makers_____ ___________________________ 1921—June 121-3
----------- Legal effect of. (Clark)..................................... .........................................................1921—Feb. 168-71
----------- Nature and effect of, shoe workers___________________ ___________ _______ 1923—Oct. 173-6
----------- Right of unions and employers to contract, machinists___________________ 1921—M ay 14.5-7
----- Discriminating against outside contractors.- 1924—July 215-16; 1925—Jan. 171-3; 1927—Mar. 69-70
----- Injunctions. (See Injunctions, this section; also under specific subjects.)
----- Interference with business on account of employer’s nonunion status, New York. _ 1921—June 124-5
----- Interference with employment. Closed shop, status of worker seeking employ­
ment (M ass.)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1923—Mar. 134-5
----------- Liability for, railway conductors, Colorado______________________________ 1926—Jan. 202-3
----------- Nonunion workmen, refusal to work with, pipe-organ builders, N ew York
C ity________________________________________ _____ _________________________ 1928—Sept. 83-5
----- Interference with interstate commerce_________________________ 1924—Sept. 162; 1927—June 91-2
----- Jurisdictional dispute, followed by breach of collective agreement_____________ 1925—Sept. 152-3
----- Membership, criminal offense in International Workers of the World (IWW)___ 1923—Feb. 145-7
----- Membership rights, wrongful expulsion_____________________ 1924—M ay 203-4; 1925—Dec. 160-1
----- Nonunion goods, handling. D uty of transportation companies and workers___ 1921—Apr. 125-6,
July 210-11
------------Refusal held obstruction of interstate commerce_________________________ 1927—M ay 125-8
----- Picketing. And secondary boycott, to enforce u n io n iz a tio n .____ ______ ____ 1923—Apr. 149-50
------------And the Clayton Act__________________________ ______________ _________ 1922—Jan. 190-3
------------Enjoined, cigar m a k ers..._________________________ ____________________1921—June 121-3
----------- Enjoined, ladies’ garment industry (New York)___________ _____________ 1923—May 208-9
----------- In violation of city ordinance prohibiting banners________________________ 1922—June 166-7
----------- Indianapolis antipicketing ordinance held constitutional_________________ 1925—Mar. 195-6
------------Injunctions against; distinction between permissible and enjoinable______ 1921—Dec. 159-60
----------- River front docks and wharves_________________ _______________________ 1924—M ay 208-9
----------- To enforce unionization, motion-picture theater................. .................................. 1922—Mar. 154-5
------------(See also Picketing, this section.)
----- Process on, service of__________________________ ______________ _____________ 1926—Jan. 203-4
----- Property, ownership of, grand or local lodge__________________________________ 1922—M ay 175
----- Right of incorporation, N ew York State, upheld (State Sup. Ct. for Albany
C ounty)__________________________________________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1137-8
----- Unincorporated. Held subject to suit (M d. Superior Ct. of Baltimore C ity)___ 1939—N ov. 1138
----------- Status of, as to liability for acts affecting interstate commerce.____ _______ 1922—July 147-52
Labor relations. Cases, 1939-40 (U. S. Sup. C t.)________ _______________________ 1940—Aug. 356-9
Leave of absence not property right of Federal Government employees (Dist. of Col.). 1935—Jan. 77-8
Lessor of store held to be employer under hours of labor law (Mass. Sup. Jud. C t.)-- 1949—Oct. 951-2
Licensing business, occupations, etc. Industrial detectives, Wisconsin law constitu­
tional ____________________________ ______ ____________________________________ 1928—Sept. 83
----- Paperhangers. Maryland act of 1935 declared unconstitutional by State Court of
Appeals_____________________________________ ______ ______________________ 1936—M ay 1247-8
----- Plumbers, Arkansas law unconstitutional................ ........................................ .............. 1925—Apr. 164-5
----- Private detectives, Wisconsin__________________ ______ __________ _____ ______ 1925—Dec. 164
----- Traveling salesman held to be peddler or hawker requiring license, Pine Bluff
(Ark.)_____________________ _______ __________ ____ _____ __________________ 1932—Dec. 1352-3
Life-insurance agents held not covered by State unemployment compensation law
(Conn. Sup. C t.)...... .................................................................................................................. 1939—M ay 1108
201 0 4 3 °




94

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
P age
Lifetime employment. Agreement to give to injured employee held unenforceable (Md.)__ 1935—Apr. 938
----- Promise to give held not enforceable (La.)_______________ _____________ _______
1935—Jan. 79
"Loan-shark” claims for unpaid balances. Dismissal of (D. C. Small Claims C t.)_____ 1939—Aug. 277
Longshoremen. (See Workmen’s compensation—Maritime employments, this section.)
Maritime employments. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
Married woman workers in public service. Legislation prohibiting held void (Mass.
Sup. Judicial C t.)------------------------------------ ---------------------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 382-3
Mechanics’ lien. Acceptance of wages (in cash and note for balance) at date of discharge
precludes recovery of penalties (L a.)----------------------------------------------------------------- 1933—June 1278
Medical and hospitalization service, nonprofit group held not engaged in illegal practice
of medicine (U. S. Dist. Ct. for D . C .)___________________________________________ 1938—Oct. 820
M ilk, sale of, N ew York statute regulating, constitutionality upheld______________ 1934—Apr. 829-31
Mine Workers of America, United. Interference with union organizers, West Virginia. 1923—June 227-9
Minimum wage. Arkansas law, constitutionality_______________ _________________ 1927—Apr. 31
----- Common labor, fixing rate of pay, policy upheld, Arizona........ .................................... 1934—July 65-7
----- Constitutionality of legislation. Brief history of court action. .................. .............. 1936—Mar. 656-8
----------- Various States. (Clark.) (Summary of BLS Bull. No. 285)_______________ 1921—Mar. 3-5
----- District of Columbia law, constitutionality.. 1921—July 202-5; 1922—Dec. 221-6; 1923—M ay 134-43
----- Due even though employee signs contract for less amount (Washington)_______ 1936—June 1564-5
----- Kansas law, unconstitutional______ ____ _______________ •___________ ________ 1925—Oct. 133-4
----- Maximum hours legislation held constitutional (Okla. Sup. C t.)............. .................. .. 1940—Feb. 314
----- Minnesota. Blanket wage order, women in all industries, challenged....................... 1939—Feb. 295
----------- Enforcement, minor of "ordinary ability” .................. ................ ............................ 1922—Jan. 197
----------- Law constitutional..-------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Apr. 166-7
----- N ew York State. Law declared unconstitutional (U. S. Sup. Ct.,), June 1,1936._ 1936—July 78-82
------------Law of 1933 declared unconstitutional as to women’s work, Mar. 3, 1936 (N. Y.
Ct. of App.)__-------- ----------------- --------- ------ ----------------- -------------------------------- 1936—Apr. 995-7
----- Oklahoma, constitutional right to fix men’s rates. .......................................................... 1939—Feb. 295
----- Orders, review refused (Ct. of Dauphin County, P a.)............. ................................. 1940—Feb. 313-14
----- Texas law, constitutionality________ ______________________________________ 1921—Jan. 124-5
----- Utah law held constitutional. Retail clerks, first order declared void, inadequate
hearing provided-------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------ 1939—Feb. 295,353
----- Washington State. Law upheld by State supreme court.......... ......................... . 1936—June 1564-5
----------- Public housekeeping, constitutionality of law____________________________ 1921—Feb. 96-7
----- Weekly rate for hotel waitresses employed
hours daily upheld (Wash. Sup. C t.). 1938—Dec.1309
----- Wisconsin law, as affecting adult females, unconstitutional_____________________
1924—Dec. 64
----- Women and minors, Washington State, law upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.), March
1937------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------— 1937—M ay 1202-5
Minors, employment of. (See under Child labor, this section.)
Minors illegally employed. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
Misconduct. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
"Monopoly” in private business. (See Associations, employers’, this section.)
Mortgage-moratorium law of 1933 held valid, Minnesota---------------------------------------- 1934—Feb. 323-6
Motor vehicles used to carry other vehicles. State (Pa.) regulation of operation held
constitutional (U. S. Sup. C t.)----------------------------------------------------------- 1940—July 116, Aug. 362-3
Motortrucks and semitrailer motortrucks, size and weight regulation, South Carolina
statute upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)-------------------------------------------------------------------- 1938—Apr. 910-12
Municipally owned and operated public utility held subject to State Labor Mediation
Act (Mich. Sup. C t.)-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Dec. 1439
Mushroom culture held subject to "provisions of unemployment-compensation law
(Colo. Sup. C t.)____________________________________________________________ 1938—Dec. 1310
National Industrial Recovery Act. Constitutionality upheld, Aug. 15,1933______ 1933—N ov. 1134-6
----- Declared unconstitutional, text of decision (U. S. Sup. Ct.), M ay 27, 1935 (Schechter
y . U . S . ) _______ - ________________________________________________________ 1935—June 1466-83
National Labor Relations Board. Company-union disestablishment upheld (U. S.
Sup. C t.)----------------------------------------------- ------ ------------------------------------------------ 1940—Jan. 103
----- Exclusive power to make findings of fact from evidence upheld (U. S. Sup. C-t.)._ 1940—Apr. 888
----- Findings of fact by, not to be reviewed by courts (U. S. Sup. C t.)____________ 1940—Aug. 357-8
----- Jurisdiction in case of company (Oakland, Calif.) with limited interstate business
upheld (U. S. Sup. C t)---------------------------------------------------------- ------------------ 1938—M ay 1169-72
----- Limits upon courts’ authority to review actions (U. 8. Sup. Ct., 3 decisions, Jan. 2,
1940)__________________________________________ 1___________________________ 1940—Feb. 372-4
----- May invalidate individual employment contracts restricting collective bargaining
(U. S. Sup. C t.)___________________________________________________________ 1940—M ay 1172-3
-----Reinstatement of strikers ("Little Steel” strike, 1937) order upheld (U. S. Cir. Ct.
of App. and U .S . Sup. C t.)-------------------------------- ------ ------------- ------------------------ 1940—June 1437
---- Suit for enforcement of orders province only of Board and not of union (U. S. Sup.
C t.)_____________________________________________________________ 1940—M ay 1171-2, Aug. 358
N L R B orders. Alleging lock-out (machine-shop employees). Ruling against, by lower
court, upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)---------- ------- --------- ------------------------------------------ 1939—Apr. 877-9
----- Invalidating contracts between Electrical Workers (International Brotherhood of)
and Consolidated Edison Co. declared without authority (U. S. Sup. C t.)_______ 1939—Jan. 121-6
----- Reinstatement of strikers. Radio and telegraph company workers. Ruling upheld
(U. S. Sup. C t.)____________________________________ - _______________ ________ 1938-July 82-5
----------- (Sit-down) (iron, steel and tin workers). Ruling against, by lower court
(1938), upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.), Feb. 27, 1939_________________ 1938—Oct. 817-18; 1939—Apr. 872-7
----------- (Violating nonstrike agreement), ruling against, by lower court, upheld (U. S.
Sup. C t.)_____ - _________________________ :__________________ 1938—Oct. 817; 1939—Apr. 879-81
National Labor Relations (Wagner-Connery) Act sustained (U. S. Sup. Ct. opinions). 1937—M ay 1192-6
News agent on train entitled to same protection as other passengers, Iowa_______ 1934—M ay 1103-4
Nonpayment of wages. Seamen, insolvency of owner sufficient cause for--------------- 1930—June 103-4
Nonunion goods, handling. (See under Labor organizations, this section.)
Norris-LaGuardia Act held constitutional____________________________ ________— 1934—N ov. 1120-1
Occupational disease. (See under Workmen’s compensation, this section.)
Old-age pensions. Federal Social Security Act, provisions upheld (U .S . Sup. Ct.) _ 1937—July 179,182-4
----- Pennsylvania law, unconstitutional_______________________________________ 1925—M ay 199-200
----- Washington, law held mandatory upon counties------------------------- -------------------- 1934—Apr. 824
----- West Virginia. Pension from private corporation held assignable. ......... —......... 1934—M ay 1101-2
Open and closed shop. (See Closed shop, this section.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

95

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
Oregon criminal-syndicalism law declared (U. S. Sup. Ct.) to be unconstitutional as
Page
applied to peaceable assembly for lawful discussion_______ ____ ________________ 1937—Feb. 401-4
Painters, decorators, and paperhangers. Union rule. Discrimination against outside
contractors______ _____ _______________ ____________ ________________________ 1924—July 215-6
------------District of Columbia and N ew Jersey____________________________________ 1925—Jan. 171
Pamphlets, distribution of. Laws (municipal) prohibiting or limiting held invalid
(U. S. Sup. C t.)------ -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Aug. 300
Pension from private corporation held assignable right of retired employee (W. V a.). 1934—M ay 1101-2
Pensions for employees, Morris & Co. plan_____________________________________ 1928—Sept. 76-7
Picketing. Cases involving, 1939-40 (U. S. Sup. C t.)___________________________ 1940—Aug. 350-60
----- Constituting “secondary boycott" held unlawful (N . Y . Ct. of A pp.)_________ 1939—N ov. 1138-9
----- Force and violence held infraction of State riot statute (Minn. Sup. C t.)________ 1939—Apr. 886
----- Injunction restraining. Permissible when strike in violation of contract_______ 1939—Oct. 888-9
------ Libelous signs, use of, held unlawful (111. Sup. C t.)__________________________ 1939_X>ec. 1426
----- Meat market where only proprietor was employed, held unlawful (Tenn. Sup.
C t.)----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—M ay 1108-9
----- Minority union, of employer having closed shop with union certified by N L R B
held not lawful (Wash. Sup. C t.)__________________ ___________________________ 1940—Oct. 952
----- Misrepresentation of facts and false statements by picketers. Held unlawful
and temporary injunction granted store owner (Ind. Sup. C t.)__________________ 1939—Aug. 384-5
-----Oregon act regulating. Upheld (Oreg. Cir. Ct. for Multnomah C ounty)................. 1939—Sept. 679
—— Peaceful. Prohibition of, held unconstitutional (Colo. Sup. C t.)______ ______ 1939—July 146
----------- Prohibitory ordinance held unconstitutional (Wash. Sup. C t.)....... ................ . 1939—Dec.'1425
----------- Private dwelling, held unlawful (Minn. Sup. C t.)____________________ ____ 1939—July 146
----- Prohibitory laws (Ala. and Calif.) held invalid (U. S. Sup. C t.).. 1940—June 1436-7, Aug. 359-60
----- Provisions of Wisconsin labor code upheld M ay 24,1937 (U. 8. Sup. C t.)_______ 1937—July 187-91
— “Secondary boycott” through, held unlawful (N. Y. Ct. of A pp.)_____ ______ 1939—N ov. 1138-9
—— Selling to customer not in good standing with union held labor dispute under
anti-injunction law (Wash. Sup. C t.)________________ _______________________ 1940—Dec. 1438-9
----- Store, nonunion, to compel Wednesday afternoon closing, held unlawful (Mass.
Sup. Jud. C t.)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Sept. 680
-----Suit for injunction to restrain held to constitute labor dispute (Minn. Sup. C t.). 1939—Feb. 353-4
— To bring about closed-shop policy. Held to be labor dispute (U. S. Sup. Ct.,
reversal of lower-court decision)_____________________________________________ 1938—Apr. 907-10
----- To compel closed-shop contract, illegal where no labor dispute existed, and
employer entitled to damages, ruling (Mass. Sup. Jud. C t.)_____________ ______ _ 1939—Feb. 354-5
----- To compel closing of store upheld (Calif. Fourth Dist. Ct. of A pp.)___________ 1938—Oct. 816-17
----- To compel employees to join union, employer entitled to injunction and damages-- 1939—Oct. 889
------ To compel employment of Negroes held a labor dispute (U. S. Sup. C t.)_____ 1938—M ay 1172-4
----- To compel employment of union members instead of stockholders, held unlawful
(N. Y. Ct. of A pp.)„_--------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 385
-----To compel union recognition not a labor dispute, ruling (Wash. Sup. C t.)______ 1939—Feb. 354
-----When no employer-employee dispute, unlawful, and injunction not barred by
Anti-Injunction Act (Wash. State Sup. C t.)____________________________________ 1939—N ov. 1139
----- When resulting in unlawful conduct may be enjoined (N. Y. Ct. of A pp.)_______ 1939—Sept. 679
----- (See also under Labor organizations, this section.)
Prevailing wage. California, law held constitutional........................... ......................... 1932—Oct. 847-50
----- Massachusetts law held unconstitutional________________________ _________1933—Mar. 541-2
----- Texas, law held unconstitutional, as being vague and indefinite_______________ 1932—Sept. 547-9
Price-fixing provisions of New Jersey State code regulating cleaning and dyeing in­
dustry declared unconstitutional (U. S. D ist. C t.)____________________________ 1938— Apr. 933-4
Prison labor. Ashurst-Summers Act upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.), Jan. 4, 1937______ 1937—Feb. 397-401
----- Hawes-Cooper Act. Right to challenge denied______________________________ 1934—Mar. 578-9
----------- Upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.), Mar. 2, 1936__________________________________ 1936—Apr. 998-9
Prison-made goods. Hawes-Cooper and Ashurst-Summers Acts upheld, reversing
lower-court decisions (U. S. Sup. C t.)_____________________________ _____ ____ 1940—June 1424-5
----- Utah, prison board contracts with manufacturers____________________________ 1924—Aug. 176-7
-----Wisconsin law requiring labeling of such goods from another State held uncon­
stitutional______________________ ____ ______ _______________________________ 1935—Mar. 675-6
Processor whose goods are moved to aad from plant, through interstate commerce
channels, subject to N L R B (U. S. Sup. C t.)_________________________ 1940—July 117, Aug. 358-9
Public Contracts (Walsh-Healey) Act, wage requirements under, held not subject to
judicial review (U. S. Sup. Ct.)__-------------------------------------------------- 1940—July 114-15, Aug. 361-2
Public printing. State act regulating contracts for held constitutional (Colo.
Sup. C t.)_________________________ __________ _______ _____ _________________ 1939—Feb. 355-6
Public utility, municipally owned and operated, held subject to State Labor Media­
tion Act (Mich. Sup. C t.)____________________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1439
Public works. Municipality contracting for, may not stipulate minimum wage, hand
or machine labor, Salt Lake City (U tah)____________ __________________ ____ _ 1932—June 1325-8
Railroad employees. Right to bargain collectively upheld, Texas_________ ______ . . . 1928—June 96-8
Railroad Employees’ Retirement Act. Declared unconstitutional. (D. C. Sup. Ct.,
U. S. Sup. Ct., M ay 6, 1935; Dist. Ct. for D . C.)__ 1935—Jan. 76-7, June 1511-22; 1936—Aug. 328-30
Railroad Labor Board. Award, power to enforce____ 1922—June 160-3, Sept. 202-4; 1925—N ov. 201-3
-----Findings, enforcement of-................... 1924—Feb. 193-4, July 213-15; 1925—Jan. 169-70, Apr. 162-4
----- Order, effect of, on working agreement, station employees_____________________ 1923—Jan. 180-1
----- Orders of, enforceability. .......................... .................................... 1924—July 213-15; 1925—Jan. 169-70
----- Power to procure witnesses_________ ____ ___________________ ______________ 1925—Aug. 174-5
----- Powers of (Pennsylvania R. R. case)_____ _______________ ______ ____ ________ ^923—Apr. 143-6
Railroad regulations. Arizona law (telephone operator qualifications), unconsti­
tutional______________________ ___________ ________________ ______ _____ _____ 1928—Sept. 81-3
----- Engine-cab curtains, Wisconsin.................................................. ......................... ............ . 1926—Feb. 200
-----State versus Federal__________________ ____ _______________________________ 1927—Jan. 130-1
Railroads. Consolidations to include provision for economic interests of employees
(U. S. Sup. C t.)___________ _____________________________ __________________ 1940—Jan. 102-3
----- Federated Shop Crafts, restraining order against strike and picketing, July 1,1922. 1922—Oct. 176-8
----- Full crew, personnel qualifications, and train length. State laws, validity of
(U. S. Sup. Ct. rulings)................................................................ .................................. . 1940—June 1429-34
-----Reasonable care, standard required in maintenance of station platforms (Nebr.)____ 1935—Apr. 939




96

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
Railway Labor Act, 1926. Arbitrators “agreeing to disagree” prior to time at which
irage
arbitration agreement ends, not permissible___________________________________ 1928—Sept. 73-4
----- Upheld (U. S. Sup. Ct.) March 1937. Opinions_________________________ 1937—M ay 1197-1201
Refund of amount charged for repair work damaging fur coat (D. C. Small Claims
C t.)------------------ -------------------------------------- ------ ----------------- ------ — ....................- 1939—Aug. 276
Rehabilitation. C alifornia law unconstitutional....................................... ........................ 1922—Mar. 153-4
----- N ew York law constitutional... ------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—June 125
Reinstatement of strikers. (See under N L R B orders, this section.)
Rent owed former landlord to be paid in weekly installments (D . C. Small Claims
C t.)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 279-80
Rent regulations. District of Columbia and N ew York, Rent Control Act, operation. 1924—June 164-5
Right of assembly and distribution of literature. Jersey City ordinances held invalid
(U. S. Sup. C t.)------ --------------------------------------------- : ------------------------------------- 1939—July 140-2
Sabotage and criminal syndicalism. (Callahan)----------------------------- ------------ 1922—Apr. 195-204
“Safe place to work.” (See under Employers’ liability, this section.)
Safety, health, etc., cases, 1939-40 (U. S. Sup. C t.)---------------------------------------------- 1940—Aug. 362-5
Sawmills. Operation by farmer not agricultural nor casual employm ent-................... 1925—Sept. 151-2
Scrip. Employer required to redeem in cash on regular pay day, Kentucky............ 1933—M ay 1073-4
‘ ----- Issuance of, coercion of employees in, Kentucky___________________________ ___ 1929—Dec. 80
Seamen. Allowances in addition to dam ages............................. ............ .......................
1929—Feb. 76-7
----- Death of, law governing____________________ _____ _______ _____________ ___ 1927—M ay 129-30
----- Emergency Fleet Corporation, liability o f_._............................................................... 1925—July 163-5
----- In juries, recovery for-------- ------------------------------------------------------------ --------- 1924—Sept. 162-4
----- Maintenance, cure, and wages allowed in addition to d a m ages............. ............. . 1929—Feb. 76-7
----- On ships lost at sea, no recovery for death of------------------------------------------------- 1929—July 110-11
----- Right to extra compensation denied when master’s noncompliance result of
seaman’s conduct------ -------------- ---------- --------- ---------------------------- ------ --------- 1935—Feb. 348-51
----- Shipowner’s employment agency not a combination in restraint of trade, Pacific
coast------- ---------------- ------------------------------------------------------ ----------------- ------ 1928—Dec. 127-30
----- Wages and watches of (Calif.)............................................ ................................................ 1927—Apr. 65-6
----- (See also Admiralty, this section.)
Seniority rights. Loss of wage based on, recoverable, railroads (M inn.)------------------ 1931—June 90-1
Service letters. Statutes requiring, constitutionality____________________________ 1922—Aug. 183-4
Service of papers. Small-Claims Court, by registered mail, upheld (U. S. Ct. of App.
for D . C .)--------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1940—Dec. 1426-7
Sherman Act. (See under Antitrust acts, this section.)
Sit-down strike. Damages awarded for, under Sherman Antitrust Act (Fed. Dist. Ct.
in Pa.)---- -------------------------- -------------- --------- ---------------------------------- ------ 1939—June 1335-6
----- Held not violation of Sherman Antitrust Act (U. S. Sup. C t.)----------- ------------- 1940—Aug. 360-1
----- Hosiery workers. Held not violation of Sherman Antitrust Act (U. S. Sup. Ct.)._ 1940—June 1434-5
----- To force company to enter closed-shop contract. Held not violation of Sherman
Antitrust Act (U. S. Ct. of App. for 3d Cir.)---------------------------------------------------- - 1940—Mar. 670
6-day law for operation of barber shop held unconstitutional (Calif. State Sup. Ct.)_-_ 1937—Mar. 636-7
Small loans. Georgia. Constitutionality of act of 1920 again upheld--------------------- 1933—June 1277
----- Usurious rates declared public nuisance, injunction against agency upheld (Minn.
Sup. C t.)------ ---------------------------------------------- ------ -------------------------------------- 1939—Aug. 383-4
----- Usury, injunction to curb, small-loan business (Kansas)......... ................................ 1930—Jan. 72-3
Social-security acts declared constitutional, M ay 24, 1937 (U. S. Sup. C t.)________ 1937—July 179-87
State (California) held not entitled to injunction restraining enforcement of Federal
Railroad Retirement and Carriers Taxing Acts (U. S. Sup. C t.)__________________ 1939—Jan. 127
State (Missouri) university required to admit Negro petitioner to law school in absence
of other provision for his legal education (U. S. Sup. C t.)------------------------------------- 1939—Mar. 577
Stevedores, jurisdiction. (See under Workmen’s compensation—Maritime employ­
ment, this section.)
Strike in violation of contract illegal if interfering with business (restaurant), and owner
entitled to injunctions and damages, ruling (N. Y. Ct. of A p p .)................................. . 1939—Feb. 355
Strikes. (See under Industrial disputes, this section.)
Striking employees, reinstatement of. (See N L R B orders, this section.)
Sugar producers held subject to Fair Labor Standards Act, and 5th amendment to
U. S. Constitution held not violated thereby (U. S. Disjt. Ct. of P. R .)___________ 1939—N ov. 1136
Summary of BLS bulletins. 1921 (No. 309); 1922 (No. 344); 1923 and 1924 (No. 391);
1926 (No. 444); 1929 and 1930 (No. 548))____________________________________ 1923—Feb. 244-5;
1924—Jan. 162; 1926—Jan. 201; 1927—N ov. 98; 1932—Jan. 49
Sunday labor and weekly rest statutes, Federal and State________________________ 1940—Apr. 886-8
Sunday labor law, distributing Sunday newspapers a “work of necessity” (Kans. Sup.
C t.)___________________________________________________ ____ _____________ 1932—Jan. 51-2
Syndicalism and sabotage, criminal, leading cases. (Callahan)— .......................... 1922—Apr. 19.5-204
Tipping practice. Review of__________________ __________ __________________ 1937—Dec. 1315-18
Trade-marks (union labels) of trade-unions, various States__________ j __................ . 1937—June 1472-5
Truck and bus companies. Nonoperating employees, hours of work ruled under
jurisdiction of Wage and Hour D ivision instead of ICC (U. S. Sup. C t.). 1940—July 115-6, Aug. 362
Truck drivers, specified transportation, statute (N. H.) regulating hours of work held
constitutional (U. S. Sup. C t.)-------------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Mar. 619-20
Unemployment compensation. Alabama law upheld by U. S. Supreme Court. _ 1937—July 184-7
----- Arkansas act upheld by State supreme court__________________________________ 1939—June 1337
----- Creation of work, bituminous-coal fields, held not compensable (10 States),
compensable (4 States)----------------- ---------------------------------------------- ------------- ----- 1939—Sept. 696
----- Disqualification for by participation in industrial disputes, decisions of State
tribunals summarized _____________ __________________________ 1________ 1940—Dec. 1375-91
----- Due from date of discharge to employee allowed to leave work before discharge
date (Sup. Ct. of P a .)___________ __________________________________________ 1939—Mar. 621-2
----- Employee not participating in strike entitled to benefits (N. J. Sup. C t.)--------- 1940—N ov. 1178-9
----- North Carolina act held applicable to banks and insurance companies by State
supreme court...............................- ------ --------------------------------------------------------------- 1939—July 144-5
----- Life-insurance agents not covered by statute (Conn. Sup. Ct. decision)----------- 1939—M ay 1108
----- Ruled to be due employee deprived of work when employer discontinued manu­
facturing certain goods (Wis. Sup. C t.)________________________________________ 1939—July 145-6
----- Federal Social Security Act and Alabama law upheld, M ay 24, 1937 (U. S. Sup.
C t.).................................................................................................................................... 1937—July 179-82, 184-7




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

97

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
Unemplopment compensation. New York law held constitutional by State court of
-rage
appeals_____________ ____ _____________________________ ____ _______________ 1936—June 1506-7
----- N ot due to employee leaving service account of health (Sup. Ct. of Pa.)________ 1939—Mar. 621
----- Tax on employers under Federal Social Security Act (decision of U. S. Sup. Ct.
upholding, H a y 1937) ---------- ------------------ -------------------- ------------- ------------1937—July 179-82
----- “Voluntarily leaving” as used in State law, defined (Sup. Ct. of Pa.)_................... 1939—Mar. 621-2
Unemployment relief. Right of legislature to appropriate money for, upheld,
Washington State.__________ ________________________________________ ____ 1933—Sept. 514-15
Unfair labor practices. Federal District Court held not authorized to enjoin N L R B
from holding hearings on charges against employers (U. S. Sup. C t.)____________ 1938—Mar. 702-5
Unincorporated union held subject to suit (Md. Superior Ct. of Baltimore C ity)___ 1939—N ov. 1138
Union-contract provisions (wage), not applicable to employee continuing work under
individual contract (Wash. Sup. C t.)_______________________________________ _ 1940—N ov. 1179
Union’s right to incorporate despite opposition of other unions upheld (N. Y. State
Sup. Ct. for Albany County)________________________________ _____ _________ 1939—Nov. 1137-8
United States Supreme Court. 1939-40, summary of cases............................................. 1940—Aug. 356-65
Unlawful assembly. (See under Industrial disputes, this section.)
Usury. (See under Small loans, this section.)
Voting by employees on employers’ time. Illinois law unconstitutional......................... 1923—M ay 207
Wage assignments. Ruling by municipal court, and discouragement of by D . C.
Small Claims Court_________________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 280
Wage determination under Public Contracts Act, steel industry, injunction against,
Mar. 27, 1939 (D . C. Ct. of A p p .)._________ ____ _____________ _____ _____ _
1939—M ay 1145-6
Wage payment. A t specified times, su m m a ry ....................................................... 1938—Dec. 1298-1302
----- Carpenter’s claim (D. C. Small Claims C t.).................. ....................... ........................ 1939—Aug. 276
----- Domestic servant (D. C. Small Claims C t.)-------- --------------------------- ---------------- 1939—Aug. 274
----- Waitress (D. C. Small Claims C t.)_________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 274r-5
Wage requirements under Public Contracts (Walsh-Healey) Act not subject to judicial
review (U. S. Sup. C t.)___________ ____ ____________ _____ ____ _ 1940—July 114-15, Aug. 361-2
Wages. And hours. Cases, 1939-40 (U. S. Sup. C t.)_______________ ____________ 1940—Aug. 361-2
------------Oklahoma State law upheld (Okla. Sup. C t.)................................................... . 1939—M ay 1105-6
----- Bonus. Basis for computing______________________________________________ 1926—Jan. 204-5
------------ Right to, employee wrongfully discharged_____________________________ 1923—Mar. 135-6
----- Exemption of property from execution for, statute modifying unconstitutional
(Washington)______________________________________________________________ 1925—Sept. 153-4
----- Nonpayment, Indiana law providing penalty, unconstitutional....... .............. ......... 1923—Apr. 148-9
----- Payment on discharge................... ...................................................................................... 1924—Dec. 162-3
------------ Indiana law unconstitutional..................................................................................... 1923—July 207-8
----- Payment on termination of employment........................................................................ 1923—M ay 210-11
----- Rates on public works____________________________________________ _____ 1922—Sept. 205-6;
1924—M ay 209; 1926—Feb. 198-9, Aug. 87-8; 1927—June 90-1
Wisconsin Recovery Act held constitutional by State supreme court, 1936_______ 1936—May 1238-40
Woman workers. Entertainers in restaurants, inclusion under law prohibiting work
after 10 p. m. upheld (Conn. Sup. Ct. of Errors)_________ ______________________ 1940—Oct. 951
----- Hours of labor law upheld (N. J. Sup. C t.)__________________________________ 1940—M ay 1175
----- Michigan statute requiring pay equal to pay of men doing same work upheld
(Mich. Sup. C t.)_________________________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1437-8
----- Seats for female employees, law on, not applicable to elevator operators (M ich.). 1930—Feb. 103
Workmen’s compensation. Absence from work, temporary, not covered by act of
M ay 17,1928, first case (D. C. Ct. of A p p .)._ ._________________________________ 1931—M ay 71-2
----- Acceptance. B y both employer and employee held not bar to legal action against
employer in case of occupational disease (Fed. Dist. Ct. in Colo.) ______________ 1940—Oct. 953-4
------------Compensation installments, bars suit under employers’ liability (Wash.)___ 1932—Feb. 326-7
------------Pension under city retirement system in lieu of compensation, bars suit for
damages, Detroit (Mich.) fireman__________________ _________________________ 1933—June 1280
------------Precludes recovery in admiralty (Calif.)....................................... ............................ 1935—Jan. 80-1
----- Accident, compensable, anthrax as (Tex.;........................................................................
1926—Dec. 74
----- Accident or disease, phosphorus poisoning (M d.)___________________________ 1925—July 165-7
----- Admiralty employments.
(See Seamen, also Workmen’s compensation—
Maritime employments, this section.)
----- Agreement to pay wages in lieu of compensation illegal (Pa.) ____ __________ 1933—June 1280-1
----- Agricultural workers. Operating sawmill______________________ _____ ______ 1925—Sept. 151-2
------------Operating sorghum mill on farm, injury held noncompensable (Iow a)______ 1935—Oct. 986
-----Alien beneficiaries, nonresident____________________________________________ 1925—Jan. 174-5
----- Amendment (regulating medical practice) to N ew York State law, upheld by
State supreme court, June 2, 1936__________________ ______ __________________ 1936—Sept. 625-6
-----Applicable in city ordinance violation (T enn.)______ ____ _________________ 1930—N ov. 109-10
----- Application of act to local maritime matters—, __________________ ___________ 1934—Jan. 99-100
----- Arising out of and in course of employm ent____________ ______ 1926—Aug. 60-1; 1927—Mar. 70-1
------------Covers poisoning by contact with poison oak, Oregon__________________ 1933—M ay 1077-8
------------Excludes voluntary assumption of “added” risk________________________ 1931—Sept. 76-7
----------- Newspaper solicitor’s fall on street so held (D. C .)_____________ _______ 1933—Mar. 544-5
----- Arizona, act of 1921 void; statute constitutional____ 1921—Sept. 188-9; 1926—Mar. 141, Apr. 135-8
----- Asphyxiation in employee’s garage, held “ in line of duty” __________..__________ 1930—Jan. 73-4
----- Assaults, horseplay, etc__________________________________ ____ ______________ 1921—Jan. 176
----- Assignment in payment of prior debt void____________________________________ 1931—Jan. 131-2
----- Attorney’s fees provided for (Mass, act), held constitutional, both Federal and
State______________________________________________________________ ____ 1932—M ay 1081-4
----- Award. Held permissible, lacking evidence that unemployment was due to
business conditions (M ass.)_________________________________________ _______ 1934—N ov. 1132-3
------------Nervous break-down, District of Columbia (U. S. Ct. of App.)_.................. 1937—Sept. 645-6
------------Not a bar to suit under Federal liability statute...................... ........................... 1925—Oct. 131-2
----- Awards and premiums, unpaid, priority in bankruptcy.......................................... . 1924—Feb. 198-9
----- Awards in interstate commerce____________________ ____ ______________ ____ 1926—June 153-4
----- Basis of establishing fund, individual or collective...................... ....................................
1927—July 74
----- Beneficiaries, nonresident alien, rights of (P a.)_________________ ____ _________ 1925—Jan. 174-5
- — Beneficiary, provision for State to be when employee accidentally killed leaves
no dependents upheld (Idaho Sup. C t.)................................ . ...................................... 1938—Dec. 1310-11




98

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
Workmen’s compensation. Bite of infected wood tick held “accident” compensable
Jrage
for death of traveling salesman (Idaho)______________________________________ 1933—Aug. 314-15
3— Blindness due to ultra-violet rays not injury (Ohio)---------------------------- ------ 1925—July 168-9
----- Blood clot from jarring in operation of gas shovel held compensable (Ga. Ct. of
A pp.)_______________________________________________________________________ 1940—Mar. 671
-------Blood poisoning from infection through trimming horse’s manes held compensable
(Utah Sup. C t.)_____________________________________________________________ 1939—Jan. 129
----- Business agent awarded compensation as “employee” of trade-union (“employer”),
District of Columbia____ ____________________________________________________ 1933—Oct. 867-8
----- Cancer caused by sand in shoe of workman operating building-block-manufactur­
ing machine held accidental injury and compensable (N . J. Ct. of Errors and A pp.)___ 1939—Aug. 387
----- Casual employment__________________________________________________ ____ 1921—Oct. 195-6
----- Charity workers held not employees within meaning of compensation acts.......... 1933—Feb. 316-18
----- Child labor, unlawful employment of, treble compensation, W isconsin.............. 1921—Mar. 179-80
----- Children unlawfully employed. New Y ork............................ .................. ................... 1921—N ov. 176
------------West Virginia________________________________ _______ __________________ 1921—June 128
----- Claim. For payment of benefits held not assignable (Sup. Ct. of M ich.)_________ 1939—Dec. 1426
------------Occupational disease, clear recognition of symptom as such before duty to give
notice arises (Conn.)____________ _____________________________________________ 1935—Jan. 81-3
------------Statutory time limitation for filing, held absolute (N. M ex.)______________ 1931—Dec. 111-12
----- Common-law liability, employer contributing to insurance exempt from (O hio).. 1935—Apr. 943-4
----- Compensation status not variable with economic conditions. Georgia..................... 1932—Jan. 78-9
----- Concurrent employments__________________________________________________ 1922—Sept. 204-5
----- Congressional act directing Employees’ Compensation Commission to review order
terminating compensation, held not violation of due-process clause, and not exercise
of judicial function (U. S. Sup. C t.)------------ ------ ---------------------------------------------- 1940—Aug. 363
----- Corporation executive held “not an employee” (Ind.)------------------------------------ 1932—Dec. 1342-3
----- County jail prisoner held not an “employee,” compensation denied (M ass.)____ 1933—Jan. 116-17
----- Coverage regardless of hazard, employer entitled to (Tex.)___________ _________ 1930—Oct. 133-5
----- Death benefit as vested interest, passing under will (Tex.)____________ __ ____ 1926—Mar. 160-1
----- Death by shot from robber held compensable (Ind. Appellate C t.)___________ 1937—Oct. 909-10
----- Death following disability------------------------------------ ------ ------ ------------------------ 1923—July 206-7
----- Death following operation not due to injury (M aine)__________________________ 1921—N ov. 177
----- Death of employee killed while driving at excessive speed held compensable (Tenn.) 1935—Apr. 945
----- Death resulting from vaccination held compensable__________________________ 1930—M ay 100-1
----- Death superinduced by lowered resistance following accident held compensable
(Mich. Sup. C t.)____________________________________________________________ 1940—June 1438
----- Death while traveling for employer, from shot by highwaymen held compens­
able (Nebr. Sup. C t.)_______________________________________________________ 1936-Sept. 626-7
----- Dependency, after-discovered child_____________ ____ __________ ______ _______ 1926—Mar. 161
----- Dependents, alien, right to benefits________________________ _______________ 1926—June 151-2
----- Deposit to guarantee payments, use of (N. Y . and T ex.)-------------- -------------------- 1923—Oct. 176
----- Disability. Recurring, beginning of, Colorado------------------------------------------------ 1927—June 89
----------- Resulting from being lost in coal mine compensable (W. V a.).......................... 1935—M ay 1255-6
----- Disobedience of orders______________________________________________________ 1926—N ov. 85
----- Disqualification of physician who testified for insurance companies not upheld
(Mass. Sup. Jud. C t.)________________________________________________________ 1940—Apr. 889
----- Drinking polluted water, death from, compensable accident. Indiana____________ 1931—June 88-9
----- Drowning of painter held not compensable because workman disobeyed instruc­
tions by risking life (N. C. Sup. C t.)-------- ------------------------------------------------------- 1939—Jan. 127-8
----- Drowning, while employed on vessel in navigable waters held compensable under
Federal Longshoremen’s and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, regardless of
whether member of crew (U. S. Sup. C t.).............................................................................. 1940—Aug. 363
----- Election. Erroneous, ignorance not excuse for (Tex.).................................................. 1926—Mar. 159-60
------------Omission of prescribed form (K y.)_________________ _______ ___________ 1921—Oct. 196-7
------------To have State compensation law govern, bars recovery under Federal safetyappliance acts— _________________________________________ ____ ____________ 1934—June 1366-7
----- Electric fan, illness caused by draft from, held compensable (N . Y . Ct. of App.)_ 1937—N ov. 1164-5
----- Employee killed on way to work, compensation denied (U tah)____ ___________ 1929—N ov. 56-7
----- Employee of United States------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1925—Mar. 194-5
----- Employees without dependents, assessments on employers having, New Y ork.. 1924—July 199-200
----- Employer held negligent when minor, lawfully employed, engaged in prohibited
w ork-_-------- ------------------------------------------------------------- --------- -------------------- 1934—M ay 1118-19
----- Employer liable for employee’s death resulting from noncompensable disease,
West Virginia_____________________________________________________________ 1933—June 1282-4
----- Employment contracts substituting other method for, held invalid (Sup. Ct. of
N . M ex.)— _____ _____________________________________ ____________________1938—Oct. 818
----- Enforcement (Wash. State)_______________________________ _______ ________ _ 1923—Jan. 186-7
----- Epilepsy held no bar to recovery of compensation (Dist. of Col.)_......... _.............. . 1932—Oct. 852-3
----- Employee receiving unemployment benefits not held disqualified (Mich. Sup.
C t.)__________________________________________________________ ____________ 1940—Mar. 670-1
----- Employees cannot be held to have voluntarily elected, when employer’s compli­
ance notice not posted (Sup. Ct. of App. of Va.)------- ------------------------------------------ 1940—M ay 1173
----- Exposure to tuberculosis through another employee’s negligence held compensable
accident (U. S. Sup. C t.)___________________ ________________ _______________ 1940—N ov. 1179-80
----- Extrahazardous employment, warehousing-------------------------------------------------- 1921—Sept. 193-4
----- Facts as found by State industrial board upheld, not subject to judicial review,
N ew York_________ _______________________________________________ ____ _____ 1932—Mar. 576
----- “ Farm laborer” held to include nursery employee, Tennessee________________ 1932—N ov. 1091-2
----- Farmer wrecking buildings under contract held liable to compensation for injury
to employee (P a.)____________________________ ____ — ----------------------------------- 1933—M ay 1078
----- Farmers exchanging work, status (Conn.)............... ......................................................... 1925—Aug. 172
----- Fatal injury in work on Federal building held compensable under N ew York law
(U. S. Sup. C t.)___________________________________________________________ 1940—M ay 1174-5
----- Federal post office building (New York), State building regulation Gabor law) not
displaced although construction under Federal sovereignty (U. S. Sup. C t.)----------- 1940—Aug. 364
----- Findings of fact by Compensation Commission conclusive if supported by evidence,
not subject to review by courts (Dist. of Col.)..................... .............................................. 1933—Apr. 795-7




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

99

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
P age
W orkmen’s compensation. Firemen, city .......................................................................... 1921—N ov. 178-9
----- Food sold by employer to employee, injury from held compensable (N. C. Sup. C t.). 1939—Feb. 356
----- Government clerk receiving compensation for disability, status (D. C .)_______ 1925—Mar. 194-5
----- Gradual breaking down of tissue in hand not compensable injury (M ass.)______ 1931—June 89-90
----- Granite-dust accumulation in lungs of stonecutter, causing incapacity for work,
held compensable (Mass. Sup. Jud. C t.).......... ........................... .................................... 1939—Sept. 679-80
----- Harbor improvement work, statute applicable to, O h io -____ _________________ 1925—Oct. 134-5
----- “Hazard,” test of (New York)____________________________________________ 1922—Aug. 179-83
----- Heart attack suffered by milk-truck driver on duty ruled compensable (Ct. of
Errors and Appeals of N . J .)________________________________________________ 1939—Aug. 386-7
----- Heatstroke causing death held to be accident w ithin meaning of act (Minn. Sup.
C t.)----------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1938—Oct. 819
----- Hernia_____________________________________ ____ _____________________ _ 1925—N ov. 203-6
------------Caused by coughing spell a compensable accident (Ohio)________ _________ 1930—Mar. 78-9
----- Horseplay, injury due to (New York)____ ___________________________________ 1921—Jan. 176
----- Illness from draft from electric fan held compensable (N. Y . Ct. of A pp.)_____ 1937—N ov. 1164-5
----- Injuries sustained outside State_______________ ____ _______ 1935—May 1256-7; 1939—M ay 1107
----- Injury. Accidental shooting of night worker____________________________ ____ _ 1926—M ay 120
------------Although not compensable entitled to hospitalization (Mont. Sup. C t.)____ 1932—July 89-90
----------- Blindness due to ultra-violet rays not an (Ohio)____________________ ______ 1925—July 168
------------B y assault of fellow employee, compensable (Okla.)______________________ 1930—Mar. 77-8
------------Caused by willful attempt to injure another, denied compensation (La.)__ 1932—Dec. 1343-4
------------From food sold to employee by employer held compensable (N. C. Sup. C t.)-_ 1939—Feb. 356
------------From hurricane by collapse of factory wall held compensable (Mass. Sup.
Jud. C t.)___________________________________________________________________ 1940—June 1439
----------- In course of illegal employment not compensable, New Jersey_____________ 1931—July 102
---------— In transportation on navigable waters held compensable (U. S. Sup. Ct.)___ 1937—Mar. 643-4
------------Incurred during strike held within purview of compensation act (N. Y .)____ 1930—Apr. 103
------------Infection of open sore as compensable____________________________________
1926—Dec. 74
------------Received while temporarily in State held compensable by State in which
injury occurred (Calif. Sup. C t.)___________________________ _________________ 1938—Oct. 818-19
------------Suffered in labor dispute held compensable (Ohio)_______________________ 1935—July 102-3
------------To employee while attending meeting on employer’s premises held not com­
pensable (2d Dist. Ct. of App. of Calif.)_______________________________________ 1939—Jan. 128-9
------------To interstate-bus-service employee held compensable (Ohio Sup. C t.)_____ 1936—Sept. 629-31
------------To vocational-school student working as apprentice for lumber company held
compensable (Calif.) ___ _________________________________________________ 1936—June 1561-2
----- Insurance. Basis of establishing fund, individual or collective (Ohio)__________ 1927—July 72-4
------------Carrier may sue third party for wrongful death of employee, District of
Columbia------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ -------- 1933—Mar. 546-7
----------- Contracts law (Virginia) affecting upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)-__..........................._ 1940—Aug. 364
----------- Enforcing, New York_____________ _________ ___________ _____ ________1921—Jan. 174-5
------------In stock companies unlawful, O h io ............. ......................... ................................. 1921—Feb. 173-4
----- Interstate or intrastate commerce. Railroads and pipe lines___________ _____ _ 1922—Aug. 170-6
------------(See also under Employers’ liability, this section.)
----- Jones Act (Merchant Marine Act of 1920) gives right of action for pneumonia as
“personal injury” from “negligence” —______ ________________ _____ __________ 1933—M ay 1074-6
----- Judicial Code admiralty amendment unconstitutional-______________ __________ 1923—July 206
----- “Law requirement” provision of Ohio constitution________ __________________ 1924—Jan. 165-7
----- Lead poisoning contracted through unusual circumstances held accidental injury
rather than occupational disease (U. S. Cir. Ct. of App. for 5th Cir.)______________ 1940—Oct. 953
----- Liability and compensation statutes, relation_______________________________ 1921—M ay 144-5
----- Lightning bolt a causative danger “arising out of employment,” injury compens­
able (Okla.) - _ ______ __________________________________________ ____ ________
1932—Jan. 79
----- Longshoremen. (See below under Maritime employment.)
----- “ Loss of eye” compensable regardless of visual capacity (M inn.)______________ 1925—Apr. 165-6
----- Loss of wooden leg not a compensable injury (Calif. Sup. C t.)_________________ 1932—Jan. 75-7
----- Lumber-camp employee’s death from accidental use of carbolic acid held com­
pensable (W is.)_________________ _____ ____________________________________ 1934—June 1365-6
----- Lump-sum. Payment contrary to policy of law (R. I.)___________ ______ _____ 1930—Sept. 66-7
----------- Settlement, effect of, and release.—------- --------------------------------- --------- 1925—July 167-8
----- Malpractice, action against physician not barred by award of additional compensa­
tion (Calif.).................- ____ ______ ____ _______ _______________________________ 1931—M ay 70-1
----- Maritime employment. Compensation status______________________________ 1921—Oct. 192-5;
1922—Feb. 131-3, Mar. 151-3; 1926—Mar. 158-9
----------- Engineering construction_____________________________________________ 1925—Oct. 134-5
----------- Federal act of 1927, declaration of deceased employee as evidence of fact_____
1929—Dec. 81
------------Federal longshoremen and harbor workers act of 1927, constitutionality____ 1928—Dec. 112;
1932—Mar. 577-81
----------- Injury received on vessel held governed by Federal law (U. S.Sup. C t.)____ 1935—July 104-9
------------Ironworker repairing vessel, covered by Federal longshoremen’s act_________ 1930—Aug. 93
---------- 1 Longshoremen_____________________________ 1922—Feb. 131-3, Aug. 176-9; 1926—Dec. 75-6
----------- Longshoremen’s act, finding of fact of deputy commissioner final__________ 1929—Apr. 124r~5
------------Railroad car float, covered by Federal longshoremen’s act________________ 1930—Aug. 91-3
----------- Seamen. (See Seamen, this section.)
----------- Stevedore injured on foreign ship regarded as American seaman (U. S. Sup.
C t.)___________ ____ ___________ ____ ___________ ______ ___________________ 1931—Apr. 115-16
----------- Stevedores_______________________________ ______ ____________________ 1924—Apr. 196-8
----------- Within admiralty jurisdiction, (U. S. Sup. C t.)........................... .................... 1921—Oct. 192-5
------------Workmen’s compensation acts held applicable to local matters...... .............. 1934—Jan. 99-100
----- Maritime service. Extraterritoriality____ _______________ ____ . . . _____ . ____ 1921—Sept. 191-2
------------Inclusiveness. (Clark)___________ ____ ___________ _
•___________________ 1926—Apr. 8-18
----- Massachusetts act applicable to employees of interstate carriers engaged in intra­
state commerce. _________________________________________________________ 1932—M ay 1078-9
----- Maximum medical fee provision of act not binding on physician, K ansas........... . 1931—Mar. 96-7
----- Medical and surgical treatment (California)................................................................ .
1921—N ov. 177
------------Death following operation (M aine)............................................................................. 1921—N ov. 177




100

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
_
Workmen's compensation. Medical treatment and hospitalization ruled not part of
Jrage
total payable for permanent total disability (N . C. Sup. Ct.)_....................... .............. 1940—July 117-18
----- Merchant marine act (Federal) exclusive, supersedes State statutes----------------- 1930—June 104-5
----- Military reservation (Federal) not covered by State compensation law (Okla.). 1936—June 1562-3
----- Mine safety law Nevada, not applicable to work on Hoover D am ------------------- 1932^-Aug. 288-9
----- Minister doing janitor work in parsonage denied compensation for injury (N. J.)__ 1932—Sept. 558-9
----- Minor, death of, earning less than cost of support-....................................... - ............. 1924—Sept. 164-5
----- Minor illegally em ployed........................................ ................. ........................................... 1935—N ov. 176
—
--------- Covered by compensation act, M assachusetts--------------------- --------------------- 1929—July 87-8
------------M ay recover under both statute and common law (New Jersey)..................... 1932—July 90-1
------------N ot entitled to (Pennsylvania)------- --------------------------------------------------- 1934—M ay 1117-18
------------Right of action against employer for injury received upheld (Kans.
Sup. C t.)._ ........ ................................... ....................................................................................... 1939—Mar. 620-1
----- Minors employed, status (W. V a.)................................................................... ...............
1921—June 128
----- Misconduct, serious, willful, in ten tion al.-.................................................................. . 1921—Feb. 171-3
----- Municipalities.......... ............................. ................................................................................- 1927—Mar. 56-7
----- Nervous break-down, award for, upheld by court (D. C .)----------------- ------ 1937—Sept. 645-6
----- Murder of employee on duty held to be compensable (C olo.).-------------------------- 1935—Oct. 985
----- Noon-hour injury regarded as “arising out of and in course of employ­
m ent” (T enn.)----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - ............. 1931—Apr. 118
----- North Dakota, law constitutional----------------------------------------------- ------ ------------ 1925—Apr. 167
----- Occupational disease. Cancer caused by industrial accident------------------------------ 1925—Sept. 150
------------Claim for compensation, clear recognition of symptom as such before duty
to give notice arises (Conn.)-------------------------------------------------------------------- ------- 1935—Jan. 81-3
----------- Dermatitis, not compensable after employer-employee contract relation
ceases (W is.)____ _____ _______________________________________ ____ _______ _ 1933—Apr. 797-8
------------From inhaling gypsum dust, not “accidental injury” (Okla.) .......................1931—Mar. 99-100
------------N ot compensable (Texas)_____________________________ ___________ _____ 1927—Feb. 44-6
----- Officers of corporation, president working as employee________________________ 1927—M ay 130-1
----- Operation of motor vehicle without license not bar to recovery for injury (M aine). . 1934—Jan. 98-9
----- Organic disease resulting from constant jarring of truck held compensable (Nebr.
Ct. of A pp.)--------- -------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------- 1936—Sept. 627-8
----- Part-time household servant held not a “casual” employee (N. J.).......................... 1933—Dec. 1400-1
----- Payment to injured workman ordered (D. C. Small Claims C t.)______ ______ ___ 1939—Aug. 275
----- Pennsylvania. Acts, certain portions held invalid (Pa. Sup. C t.)............................ 1939—June 1336-7
------------Procedure and practice, handbook, third volume of cases_____________ _ 1922—Apr. 211-12
----- Physical disfigurement compensated when earning capacity impaired (M ass.).. 1935—Apr. 946-7
----- Pipe lines, petroleum industry, status of injured employee.................... ....... ............ 1922—Aug. 174-6
----- Poisoning, phosphorus, disease or accident (M d.)-------- ---------------------------------- 1925—July 165-7
----- Pneumonia, death from as result of extreme changes in temperature in perform­
ance of work held compensable (Ct. of App. of Ohio)---------------------------------------1940—Oct. 954
----- Premium rate based on individual accident experience upheld (O hio).................... 1932—Aug. 289-91
----- Premiums a preferred claim against bankrupt’s assets (N. Y .)......... ........................ 1933—June 1279-80
----- Priority, in bankruptcy, of unpaid premiums and awards (W is.)---------------------- 1924—Feb. 198-9
----- Prisoner at work painting county jail held not an employee entitled to compensa­
tion for injury (Okla.)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1933—Aug. 315-16
----- Protection of employee from physical danger required of employer (La.).................
1933—Sept. 586
----- Puerto Rico. Law constitutional---------------------------------------------------- ------ ------ 1921—Oct. 201
------------Lower court not to be overruled on its construction of local statutes unless for
manifest error (U. S. Sup. C t.)______________________________________ _____ ___ 1940—Aug. 363-4
----- Rabbjt fever (tularaemia) held traumatic injury by accident (K y.)_____________ 1932—M ay 1076-7
----- Radio station employee held engaged in interstate commerce (W ash.)____________ 1931—Feb. 93-4
----- Railroads. Employee’s accidental death while riding on pass to work held com­
pensable (N. J. Dept, of Labor)-------------------------- ------------------------------------------ 1940—Nov. 1180
------------Preference to personal-injury claims in equity receivership under bankruptcy
act upheld (U. S. Sup. C t.)------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1940—Aug. 363
----- Recharging storage batteries used in railroad signaling held “interstate commerce”
(U tah)_______ ____ ________________________________________________________ 1933—Jan. 119-20
----- Recoverable by employee injured while violating rules (Ohio Sup. C t.)................. . 1939—M ay 1108
----- Recoverable for injury incurred outside State (Sup. Ct. of Calif.)............. .............. . 1939—M ay 1107
----- Recovery for recurring injury not barred by former release (M ass.)........... .................. 1931—Mar. 97-9
----- Refusal of employee to undergo operation upheld (Mass. Sup. Jud. Ct.)_................. 1937—Oct. 908-9
----- Refusing proper medical aid defeats claim for compensation......... ..................... 1930—Dec. 104-5
----- Rehabilitation law, N ew York, constitutionality_______________ ___________ _
1921—June 125
----- Relief works, employees on, status under laws of various States______________ 1934—Sept. 659-69
----- Religious order, members and novitiates of, not covered by compensation act
(M ich.)------------------- ------------------------------------------- ------------- ------------------------ 1932—Mar. 583-4
----- Remarriage of widow, effect on child’s right....................................... ............................... 1925—Feb. 185
----- Review of evidence by only one member of industrial commission ruled not suffi­
cient (Wis. Sup. C t.)----------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------- 1939—June 1337
----- Right of action against employer in case of occupational disease (not covered by
provisions) upheld______ _____ _____________________________________________ 1940—Oct. 953-4
----- Safety order violation by employer warrants additional compensation (C alif.).. 1933—Aug. 313-14
----- Salesman held not an employee (M ass.)______________________________________ 1930—Oct. 133
----- Sawmill operated by farmer not agricultural or casual employment (M in n .).. 1925—Sept. 151-2
----- Seamen. (See Seamen, this section.)
----- Seasonal “shut-down” only (not period of employment) warrants reduced com­
pensation (Iowa)------------ ----- ------------------- -------------------- ------------------- ------------1933—Sept. 587
----- Second injuries................ .......................................... ........................................................ 1924—July 199-200
------------Resulting in death.......................................................................................................... . 1926—Dec. 73
----- “ Serious misconduct” (Calif.)____ _________r.............................................................. 1921—Feb. 171-3
----- Silicosis claims, cases involving, 1924 to 1935 (W is.)_____________________ ___ 1937—M ay 1089-93
----- 6-day week used to compute, practice upheld (Ky. Ct. of A pp.)________________ 1940—Feb. 374
----- Skin infection held compensable as industrial accident (Maine Sup. Jud. C t.). 1937—N ov. 1163-4
----- State act held applicable to injury received on Federal property (M ass.)_______ 1933—Mar. 543-4
----- State cannot recover from claimant the excess compensation awarded (W ash.). 1933—June 1281-2
----- State fund act upheld (Okla. Sup. C t.)........... ....................... ....................................... 1937—Oct. 906-7
----- State fund classification upheld (Ohio)........................................................................... 1928—Dec. 112-13




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

101

Decisions of courts, United States—Continued.
Workmen’s compensation. State senator injured while returning from funeral of
irage
colleague held entitled to workmen’s compensation (Calif. Dist. Ct. of App.)___ 1940—Aug. 889-90
----- Statute of one State enforceable in another State only by com ity........................1931—Sept. 75-6
----- Sunstroke held “accident” and thereforecompensable, (D. C .)_______________ 1932—Oct. 851-2
----- Teacher injured while attending teachers’ institute held compensable (Ct. of
App. of O h io )-..___ _____________ ____ ________________ ___________ __________ 1939—Dec. 1425
----- Teacher killed en route to school, compensation denied, Ohio________________ 1934—Aug. 373-4
----- Testim ony of witness, power of industrial commission to compel, upheld (N. C.)„ 1931—Apr. 116-18
----- Texas Employers’ Insurance Association, selection of risks, no discretionary
power........... ............................. .......................................... — ............................... ..................... 1928—Oct. 69-70
----- Third party liability (W is.)................................................................ ............................... 1921—Oct. 202-4
----- “T ips” are wages, waitress (M ass.)------------- --------- ---------------------------------------- 1931—Aug. 51-3
----- Transportation on navigable waters, injury in, held compensable (U.S. Sup Ct.)_ 1937—Mar. 643-4
----- Traveling investigator’s death in hotel fire held compensable (Ga. Ct. of App.)_ 1940— M ay 1173-4
----- Treaty provisions (Yugoslavia) control when in conflict with statutory time-limit
of filing claim (W. V a.)------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------- 1933—Aug. 316-17
----- Tuberculosis contracted by meat-market clerk held compensable (Appellate D iv.,
N . Y. Sup. C t.)......... .................................................. - _____________________ ____ _ 1937—N ov. 1165-8
----- “ Unusual cases” ........................................................................................... .............. ........... . 1926—Aug. 60
----- Utah law constitutional.. ..................................................................................... ........... 1921—Mar. 180-1
----- Vermont act held bar to action in N ew Hampshire_________________________ 1931—Dec. 112-14
----- Violation of rules, injury resulting from held compensable (Ohio Sup. C t.),. 1939—M ay 1108
----- “Wages” includes money compensation and board, (D . C.)________________ 1932—M ay 1079-81
----- Widow. Common law, may recover compensation (D .C .)____________________ 1931—Oct. 94-6
------------Compensation right of, held not restored by annulment of second marriage. 1933—Jan. 117-19
----- Wife granted compensation, held an “employee” of husband, Iowa—. ...................... 1933—Sept. 585
----- Woods rider (turpentine business) not a “farm laborer” (Ga.)_________ ________ 1932—Jan. 77-8
----- Worry over injury not sufficient cause for delay in filing claim (T e x a s ).................. 1934—Jan. 101
“Yellow dog” contracts. (See under Contracts of employment, this section.)
Decisions of courts, foreign countries:
Argentina. Rent laws upheld__________________ r ____________________ 1922—Feb. 137-8, Oct. 185
Australia. Minimum-wage increase, June 1937 (Commonwealth Ct. of Cone, and
A rb .)____________________________________________________________________ 1937—Sept. 697-9
----- Wage rates to be adjusted to cost of living (Commonwealth Ct. of Cone, and Arb.,
Dec. 28, 1939)_______________________________________________________________ 1940—M ay 1230
Canada. Industrial Disputes Investigation Act invalid________________ 1925—Mar. 196, M ay 200-3
----- Social legislation of1934and1935, decisions of British Privy Council upon______ 1937—Apr. 877-8
----- Supreme Court, onrecentsocial legislation_________________________________ 1936—Sept. 620-1
Czechoslovakia. Overtime pay under 8-hour day act, ruling of Supreme Court_____
1925—Apr. 92
France. Labor organizations, suit to dissolve the C. G. T. (General Confederation
of Labor)__________________________ _______________________________________ 1921—Feb. 191-2
Germany. Works councils, rights of_______ ____ _______ _________________________
1921—Oct. 40
Great Britain. Unemployment compensation, labor-dispute disqualification not ap­
plied to individual not participating nor interested (8344 Bu-806)_______________ 1940—Dec. 1387-8
----- Unemployment-insurance and health-insurance systems, nonmanual workers
(artists) allowed protection, Dec. 9,1937_________________ ____ _______ _________ 1938—M ay 1137
----- (England). Fining weavers for poor work, illegal__________________________ 1930—July 110-11
Mexico. Dismissal-wage law, clarification of constitutional and labor-law provisions. 1935—Apr. 940-2
Switzerland. Labor organizations, individual rights of members___________________ 1921—M ay 148
----- Legal aid for poor held obligatory, summary of cases (Federal Swiss courts)___ 1940—June 1420-1
Decisions, railroads. (See Railroad Labor Board; also Railroads—Train service board .of
adjustment.)
Decisions, trade-board. (See under specific industry.)
Decrees. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Deductions from wages. (See under Wages and hours—specific industry or country.)
Defense policies, United States:
Advisory Commission, National Defense. Announcement as to hours, wages, working
conditions, etc. September 1, 1940___________________________________________ 1940—Oct. 850-1
Child conservation. White House Conference on Children in a Democracy, National
Citizens’ Committee, statement by (text)____________________________________ 1940—Sept. 567-8
Employment-clearance system. Inaugurated October 1940 by United States Employ­
ment Service, outline of plan____________________________________ _ ________ 1940—Dec. 1356-7
Food supplies available for consumption in 1940-41. Comparison with previous years. 1940—Oct. 851-3
Housing program. Recommendations of Housing Committee of Twentieth Century
Fund summarized_______________________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1412-16
Industry, limited conscription of. Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, provi­
sions_______________________________________________________________________
1940—Oct. 835
Job seekers’ at public employment agencies, inventory of April 1940. Occupational,
industrial, regional, skill, and sex distributions________________________________ 1940—Oct. 836-50
Manpower, National Committee for Conservation of (U. S. Dept, of Labor). Func­
tions and plan of operation__________________________________________________ 1940—Sept. 568-9
Safety experts (8). Appointed for industry by Secretary of Labor, July 28,1940_____ 1940—Sept. 568-9
Selective Training and Service Act of 1940. Effects upon labor and management___ 1940—Oct. 835-5
Stamp plans, food and cotton, under Surplus Marketing Administration. Summary
of objectives, methods, and operation___________________________________ 1940—Nov. 1060-5
Woman workers. Standards for employment (U. S. Women’s Bur. report), summary
of_______ _________________________________________________________________ 1940—Sept. 564-7
Delinquency, juvenile (See Child labor and welfare—Juvenile delinquency.)
Dental goods and equipment industry and trade. N R A code, effective July 16, 1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions________________________________________________ 1934r—Sept. 625
Dental laboratory industry. N R A code, effective Feb. 1, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
p r o v is io n s _______________________________________________________ ____________ 1934—Mar. 533
Dental service. (See under Medical and hospital service.)
Denver Labor College. Forums held with Social Security Board cooperation..................... 1939—July 17
Denver Opportunity School, origin, aims, and curriculum.............. .................................... 1931—Sept. 98-102
Department stores. (See under Stores.)
Departments of United States Government. (See under inverted titles)
Dependency, old-age. (See Old-age dependency.)
Dependent children, aid to. (See Children, dependent, aid to.)




102

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Deportations:
Page
Aliens, by principal classes, years ended June 30, 1935-39..................................... .............. 1940—Jan. 167-8
(See also Immigration—Statistics.)
Depressed areas, Great Britain. Development and improvement, legislation of 1934 and
1937, provisions.. ...................... ............. ............ ..........................................r------------------- 1939—Mar. 555-8
Depressed communities, United States. Worked-out mines, cut-over timber lands, and
declining manufacture of specialized products. (W PA study)_____________________ 1940—Sept. 588-91
Depression, etc., period, effects of. (See under Economic conditions, United States.)
Dermatitis. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Dermatosis. (See under-Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Detectives, industrial. (See under Decisions of courts—Licensing business, occupations,
etc.)
Detroit Board of Street-Railway Commissioners. Decision, N L R B , Oct. 24,1934... 1934—Dec. 1433-4
Deutsche-Amerikanische Typographia, unemployment benefits. (See under Unemploy­
ment compensation, United States.)
Dial telephone. (See under Telephone industry.)
Dials, watch, luminous-paint poisoning. (See Industrial diseases and poisons—Radio­
active substances.)
Diamond Crystal Salt Co. (Mich.). Decision, N L R B , Dec. 22, 1934........ ................_............. 1935—Feb. 380
Diamond Workers’ Protective Union of America:
Agreement, Manufacturers’ Association of A m erica............................................... ............. 1932—June 165
Membership, 1915 to 1920.......... ........................................................................................ ......... 1922—July 167
Out-of-work relief plan-------------- --------- ------- ------ ..-------------------------------- ------------ 1924—July 10-12
Unemployment benefits. (See under Unemployment compensation, U. S.)
Die-casting manufacturing. N R A code, effective Mar. 18,1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions-------------------------------------------------------- ------ ------------------------------------------ 1934—M ay 1066
D ie stampers. (See Printers, D ie Stampers, and Engravers’ Union of North America,
International Plate.)
Diets. (See under Nutrition; also Cost of living—Dietary studies.)
“ Differential” share capital, introduction of, cooperation, Russia_______ ____ __________
1930—Mar. 84
Dining Car Employees, Brotherhood of. Agreement with N ew York, N ew Haven and
Hartford Railroad........................................................ ......................... ................ ................ ......... 1926—Dec. 222-3
Directories:
Consumers’ cooperative societies, list of, compiled and mimeographed........................... . 1932—Mar. 574
International Labor Directory--------------------- ------ ----------------------- ----------------------- - 1922—Feb. 162
Labor offices. Canada—Dominion and Provincial------------------------- ------------ --------1921—July 246-8;
1922—July 224-6; 1933—Aug. 487-90; 1935—July 276-9
----- Foreign countries...---------- -------------- ---------- --------------------------------------------- 1923—July 278-86;
1924—July 259-66; 1925—July 229-36; 1926—July 203-8; 1927—July 213-19; 1928—July 192-8;
1929—July 257-64; 1930—July 253-9; 1931—July 247-52; 1932—Aug. 443-59; 1934—July 241-7
----- Latin America, national labor and welfare offices, by country................................. 1939—Apr. 988-90
----- United States, Federal, State, and Territorial______________________________ 1921—July 230-45;
1922—July 207-23; 1923—July 262-78; 1924—July 245-59; 1925—July 215-29; 1926-July 188-202;
1927—July 198-213; 1928—July 178-92; 1929—July 243-57; 1930—July 238-52; 1931—July 231-47;
1932—Aug. 443-59; 1933—Aug. 472-87; 1934—July 225-41; 1935—July 259-76
----- United States and Canada (BLS Bull. N o. 681)________ ______________________ 1936—Aug. 346
Legal Aid Organizations, National Association of, members.......................................... 1928—July 199-200
Personnel re search agencies-------------- ---------------- ---------------------------- 1922—Jan. 51; 1930—Sept. 46-7
State officials in charge of agriculture............................................................ .............................
1921—Jan. 20
Workmen’s compensation offices................................... ........... ................................................. 1921—Jan. 171-4
(See also Labor offices, governmental—Appointments, etc.)
Disability—Benefits; due to sickness; etc. (See under Benefits and benefit funds; Sickness
statistics; Workmen’s compensation.)
Disabled. (See under Handicapped workers; also Rehabilitation, reeducation, and re­
employment.)
Disarmament in industry. (D avis)____ _____ ____ __________________________________ 1922—Jan. 5-11
Disaster Loan Corporation (U. S. Government). Transfer under Reorganization Plan
No. 1, effective July 1,1939............................................................................. ................................... 1939—Aug. 380
Discharge of workers:
Aircraft manufacturing. Collective agreements, provisions, general------------------------ 1940—Aug. 299
Argentina. Indem nity due to employee dismissed account of marriage........................... 1939—Mar. 623
Cotton-textile industry. (BLS study, 1934)___________________________________ 1936—June 1483-5
Czechoslovakia. Factories and shops, decree restricting (June 30,1935) provisions of.. 1935—Oct. 935-6
Factories (348 companies), survey. (National Industrial Conference Board)_______ 1937—July 67
Hosiery industry, provisions of collective agreements____________________________ 1936—Sept. 571-2
Immediate replacement of, under collective agreement (wholesale dry goods). U . S.
Conciliation Service award_________________ _____________ _______ _____________ 1939—Apr. 839
Office and clerical, common causes, survey of........ ................................................................ 1936—Feb. 346-7
Discharge or quit rates. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Discharged workers, period of unemployment of....................... ..................................................... 1929—June 223
Diseases, industrial. (See Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Disinfectant and insecticide manufacturing. N R A code, effective Apr. 17, 1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions______ ________________ ________________________________ 1934—June 1335
Dismissal wage (compensation), United States:
Agreements between locals of Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association and Seamen’s
Union, and four employing companies, San Francisco__________________________ 1936—Oct. 867-9
American industry, study of plans. (Hawkins)............................................................... 1934—N ov. 1067-77
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co., agreement......................................................................... .
1935—Apr. 979
Banks. Factors governing amount of___________________________________________ 1935—July 60-1
Bibliography, books and reports, newspaper and periodical articles, laws and decrees.
(Schwenmng) _ ____ _____ __________________________________________________ 1932—Feb. 478-92
Connecticut. Dismissal-wage bill, principal points, proposed in Unemployment Com­
mission report, December 1932_________________ ____________ ____ ___________ 1933—Feb. 279-80
Cutters, Hart Schaffnerand Marx, Chicago___________ ______ _____ ______________ 1929—Oct. 187
Department-store schedules to complement N ew York State unemployment-compen­
sation law ______________________________ ____ _____ __________________________ 1939—Mar. 544
Definition____________________________________ _____ ___________ ______________ 1931—Oct. 180
Food-manufacturing company, termination allowances adopted, 1938. ......................... 1939—Mar. 542
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. plan (correction)....................................................................... 1930—July 172




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

103

Dismissal wage (compensation), United States—Continued.
Hartford (Conn.) Rubber Co., removal of plant to Detroit, and “wage-termination
Fage
bonus” ......................... ................................................................................................................ 1929—N ov. 118
Lay-off problem, experience of a group of employers__________________ _______ ____ 1930—Sept. 22
National Industrial Conference Board, Inc., findings of, concerning. 1936—July 89; 1937—Dec. 1355-60
Newspaper editorial employees, study of policies, 1934 (31 dailies).................................... 1935—M ay 1146
1930—Apr. 1-5
Paym ent of, specified firms, United States and foreign countries................................. .
Plans adopted. 80 companies in 27 cities. (Princeton University supplementary
study)_________________ _____ _____________________________________________ 1933—Mar. 496-7
----- Types of, spread of policy, 1931. (Princeton University survey, 49 companies) __ 1931—Oct. 179-84
Policies and plans, changes in since 1935, summary. (Hawkins)........ ......................... 1939—Mar. 538-44
Railroads. Employees displaced by consolidations of system s_____________ ____ _ 1936—June 1503-5
Rubber-manufacturing plants, Connecticut, effect on readjustment of workers dis­
placed by plant shut-downs________ _____ _________________________________ 1934—Dec. 1368-73
Separation or dismissal bonuses, manufacturing establishments paying, by industry.
(BLS 224-plant survey).................. ................ .................................................. ............... 1932—N ov. 1013-14
U. S. Rubber Co., N ew Haven (Conn.) plant...................................................................... 1931—Apr. 72-3
Dismissal wage (compensation), foreign countries:
Brazil. Law of June 5, 1935. ..................... .................................................... ..................... 1936—M ay 1227-8
Chile. Legislation of 1937, provisions...................... .............. ................................................. 1937—N ov. 1115
Colombia. Construction workers. Provision in law of Dec. 19, 1939. ............... .
1940—July 70-1
----- Law No. 10 regulating, provisions of (Nov. 20, 1934)__________ _______________
1935—Aug. 378
Ecuador. Labor Code of 1938, provisions..................... ....................................................... 1940—Mar. 676-7
----- M anual and office workers, laws of 1928 and 1936____________________ _______ 1936—Oct. 869-70
Germany. Voluntary plans, experience under. (Hawkins)_______________ ________ 1935—Apr. 858
Great Britain (England). Rowntree & Co. (Ltd.) “dismissal gratuity” plan______ 1930r-Feb. 40-1
----- Voluntary plans, experience under. (Hawkins)------------------------------- ---------- - 1935—Apr. 857-8
Holland. Voluntary plans, experience under. (Hawkins)___________ ____________ 1935—Apr. 858
Italy. Voluntary plans, experience under. (Hawkins)—.......... .............. ....................... 1935—Apr. 858-9
............... ........................... .......... 1935—Mar. 665-6
Japan. Factories and mines, 1931-32. (Waggaman)—
----- Factory law and temporary workers............ ........................... .............. ............................ 1930—Aug. 182
----- Law effective Jan. 1, 1937, provisions........................................ .......................... ......... 1937—Apr. 878-82
----- Voluntary plans, experience under. (Haw kins).____ ______________________ 1935—Apr. 859-60
Legislation on, development of, types of, coverage, etc., study of. (Hawkins)____ 1935—Apr. 847-57
Mexico. Civil-service employees------- --------------------------------------------------------------- 1934—Oct. 898
----- Court decisions clarifying constitutional and labor-law provisions. ...................... 1935—Apr. 940-2
Spain. Voluntary plans, experience under. (Hawkins)................. ............ ....................... 1935—Apr. 859
(See also under Laws and legislation, foreign countries.)
Dismissals, regulation of, by agreement, journalists, various countries._________________
1929—Jan. 48
Displaced workers. Readjustment of, study, rubber-manufacturing plant shut-downs,
Connecticut....................... ........................................................... .............................................. 1934—Dec. 1368-73
Displacement of labor. (See Mechanization—Labor displacement.)
Disputes, industrial. (See Industrial disputes.)
Disputes, methods of adjusting. (See Conciliation and arbitration.)
Distilled spirits industry. N R A code, effective dates—N ov. 27, 1933, and Mar. 26, 1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions____ ___ ____ __________________________ 1934—Feb. 305, M ay 1073
Distilled-spirits rectifying industry. N R A code, effective dates—Dec. 10, 1933, and labor
provisions, M ay 7, 1934, tabular analysis___________________________ ______ 1934—Feb. 305, July 53
Ditch digging. (See Construction industry—Road and street building.)
Docks and harbors, United States:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements.)
Baltimore. Longshore labor conditions.......... ............................. ........................................ 1930—Oct. 18-20
Boston. Longshore labor conditions.......................... ........................................................... 1930—Oct. 15-16
Decasualization of ports, employment conditions under......................................... ............. 1930—Oct. 3-7
Dock labor. New York, displacement by power trucks...... ............................................... 1926—Oct. 32-3
----- Seattle (Wash.), decasualization-------------------------------------- ---------------------------- 1924—Oct. 134-6
Houston and Galveston. Longshore labor conditions.................................................... . 1930—N ov. 14-15
Longshore labor conditions and port decasualization. (Stern)________________ 1933—Dec. 1299-1306
Longshoremen. Accident compensation, legislation and court decisions. (Clark). . . 1926—Apr. 5-18
----- Ask congressional action. (Shields)--------------------------------------------------------------- 1927—Jan. 1-6
----- Decisions, National Longshoremen’s Board, October 1934, Pacific coast ports.. 1934—Dec. 1437-8
----- Employment, conditions of_________ __________ ____________________________ 1930—Oct. 2-7
----- Gulf coast. Strike called October 1935, status in December 1935...................... 1936—Feb. 392-5
----- Hiring-hall system under Pacific coast agreement, summary.......................... ......... 1940—Feb. 309-11
----- Holidays. Provided by collective agreements................. .............................. ............ 1930—Aug. 11-12
----------- Union agreement provisions concerning ...................................... ........................ 1936—Apr. 917
----- Labor conditions in major ports_____________ ____ _______ ________ 1930—Oot. 7-20, Nov. 11-25
----- Labor efficiency (labor cost and output). (BLS stu d y ),..................... ................. 1924—Feb. 111-17
----- Nature of work described................................. ..................................................................... 1930—Oct. 1-2
----- New York harbor, labor efficiency. (Squires)......................................................... 1924—Feb. 109-11
----- Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions.......................................... 1931—Aug. 118
----- Pacific coast, safety work program ............ ......................... .......................................... 1926—Dec. 60-1
----- Payment of wages, time and method, agreement provisions_________ _____ _____ 1930—N ov. 130
----- Productivity. (See under Productivity of labor—Water transportation.)
----- Refusal to go through picket line of ship clerks and checkers upheld by arbitrator
for port of San Francisco____________________________ _____ ______ ____ _______ 1939—Apr. 840-1
----- Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses_____ ___________________ 1931—M ay 145
----- Safety program, proposed for marine and longshore workers, Pacific coast_______ 1926—Dec. 66-1
----- Seattle (Wash.), stabilizing (decasualizing) longshore work____ 1922—Dec. 40-2; 1924—Oct. 134-6
----- “ Shape,” or gathering of, seeking work, description___________________________
1930—Oct. 4
----- Ship clerks union (San Francisco), wages and paid vacations, arbitration award,
1940 (text).............................................................— ......................... .............................. 1940—N ov. 1086-93
----- Strikes. (See Industrial disputes—Longshoremen.)
----- Trade-union membership statistics, 1915 to 1920............... ............................................... 1922—July 169
----- Union members, employment of, agreement provisions______ __________________ 1931—Oct. 126
Longshoremen and harbor workers. Compensation act, 1927. Districts and offices
established under. .................................................................. ..................... ......................... 1927—Aug. 60-1
--------- = 1-year experience under_______________________________________________ 1928—Sept. 90-3
—
•
------------(See also under Decisions of courts—Workmen’s compensation—Maritime
emDloyment and under Laws and legislation, United States, Federal and general.)




104

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Docks and harbors. United States—Continued.
Pag©
Los Angeles. Longshore labor conditions............. .................................... ........................... 1930—N ov. 21-4
N ew Orleans. Longshore labor conditions........... ........................................... .................... 1930—N ov. 11-14
N ew York. Longshore labor conditions................................................................ . ................ 1930—Oct. 7-14
Philadelphia. Longshore labor conditions------- . . --------- ------------------- ---------------1930—Oct. 16-18
Portland. Longshore labor conditions-------------------------------------------------------------- 1930—Nov. 17-19
San Francisco. Longshore labor conditions............................ .............................................. 1930—N ov. 19-21
Seattle. Longshore labor conditions.................................................... ................................... 1930—N ov. 15-17
----- Water-front employees, wage award— ............................................................................... 1924r-Mar. 105
Stevedores. Displacement of, by power trucks, N ew York-------------- ---------------------- 1926—Oct. 32-3
----- Injured in course of employment. Status. (Clark)_________________________ 1924—Feb. 186-92
------------(See also under Workmen’s compensation—Longshoremen and harbor work­
ers.)
Docks and harbors, foreign countries:
Australia. Waterside workers, strike, August to October 1928........................................... 1929—Jan. 120
Belgium (Antwerp). Employment stabilization plan, dock lab or.,----------- ----------- 1930—Aug. 39-41
----- Society (pool) formed to improve conditions at port and promote insurance................ 1930—July 169
Germany. (Hamburg). Employment stabilization plans...... ......................... ............... 1930—Aug. 34-6
Great Britain. Dock labor decasualization, report on........................................................ 1924—Sept. 144r-5
----- Mobile force provided for by Government-assisted scheme- .......................................
1940—Jan. 56
----- (Bristol). Dock workers, registration of---------------------------------------- --------------- 1926—Aug. 124-5
----- (England). Decasualized ports, employment conditions in, study o f............... 1934—Oct. 886-95
----- (Liverpool). Boy labor on docks
.......................... ........................................................ 1922—Feb. 12
------------Clearing house scheme for dock labor.......................................... ............... - ............ 1925—Aug. 151
------------Employment stabilization plans, dock labor............................. .............................. 1930—Aug. 36-7
------------Labor conditions of dock workers, decasualization, etc------------ ------------------- 1930—Dec. 43-9
Netherlands. (Amsterdam and Rotterdam). “ Dock Reserve,” institution and work­
ing of, decasualization----- --------- ---------------------------------------------- -------------------- 1923—Sept. 127-8
----- (Rotterdam). Employment stabilization plan, dock labor_____________________ 1930—Aug. 38-9
Dog-food industry. N R A code, effective June 11,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions.
1934—July 48
Doles. (See under Unemployment insurance and benefits, foreign countries.)
Doll and toy workers. Decision, N L R B , Feb. 13,1935 (New York C ity)---------------------- 1935—Apr. 969-70
Dollar, purchasing power. (See Purchasing power of money.)
Domestic and personal service, United States:
Accident statistics. Massachusetts, 1919-20----- ----------------- ------ --------- ------ ----------- 1922—Dec. 165
Connecticut. Study of working conditions, Hartford, Waterbury, and Litchfield.. 1936—Dec. i508-13
Domestic servants, “scarcity” of, and immigration restriction--------------------------------- 1927—July 1-6
Domestic service. Hours of work limited to 60 per week (Wash. State)_____________ 1938—Jan. 134
----- Labor standards, recommendations of placement agencies, study. (U. S. Women’s
Bureau)________ ____________________________- ......................... ............................. 1934—N ov. 1110-12
----- Negro women in, northward migration. (H ill)......... ................................................ 1924—Mar. 11-12
----- Placements, N ew York State, by occupation, July 1938 to June 1939---------------- 1940—Oct. 907-9
----- Positions not filled by placement agencies, and reasons suggested (New York
State)____________________________________________________________________ 1940—Oct. 909-10
----- Trained persons, demand for, as reported by United States Employment Service.. 1939—Jan. 115
----- Training courses, Philadelphia Institute on Household Occupations........................ 1938—Mar. 653-5
----- W PA training courses, r§sum6, 1936-38------------------------------------- --------- ------- 1939—Jan. 114-15
Domestic workers in Baltimore. (U. S. Women’s Bureau Bull. No. 39)____________ 1925—Feb. 7-9
Employment, fluctuation of, by sex, Ohio, 1924 to 1928________________ 1930—Apr. 32-57, M ay 19-28
Office cleaners. New York City, survey. (Consumers League)_________________ 1923—Feb. 181-2
Philadelphia. Household employment in, survey, 1928. (U. S. W omen’s Bureau Bull.
No. 93)...........— __________________________________________________ ________ 1932—July 33-5
Placement code recommended by Big Sister organization, Scranton (P a.)..................... . 1936—Aug. 382
Unemployed young women trained for, by various organizations................................... 1936—Aug. 381-2
(See also Hotel and restaurant employees.)
Domestic and personal service, foreign countries:
Bolivia. Paid-vacation provisions, labor code of M ay 24. 1939...... ................................... 1940—M ay 1129
Canada. Standardization of domestic service, committee report..................... ............. 1921—June 103-5
Chile. Vacations with pay, legislative provisions. ----------------------------- --------------- 1940—May 1132
China. Women in domestic industry_______________ ________ ______ ___________ 1922—Dec. 145-6
Cuba. Rest periods, domestic service, under decree Oct. 15,1938................................. 1938—Dec. 1286-7
Ecuador. Labor Code of 1936, summary of provisions................................................... 1940—Mar. 681-2
----- Vacations with pay, provisions of Labor Code of 1938 ........................ 1940—Mar. 681, May 1134-5
France. Compensation law, extension of, to domestic service------- ------ ------------------- 1923—Dec. 170
Germany. Domestic service. 1 year of housework obligatory for single young women
seeking employment in offices or trades______________ _____ ____________________ 1938—M ay 1176
------------Promoted by Government to release women from industrial, etc., pursuits.. 1935—Aug. 362-3
---------— (Westfalen-Niederrhein), working conditions__________________________ 1940—Oct. 910-11
Great Britain. Domestic science, courses in cookery, laundry, housewifery, etc____ 1921—July 228-9
Sweden. Domestic service. Training courses, with and without State subsidy, review
of ILO survey_________________________________________ _____ __________ _ 1937—Dec. 1415-19
------------Working conditions investigated by survey--------------------- ---------------------- 1937—Mar. 607-9
Domestic freight-forwarding industry. NRA code, effective Dec. 28,1933, tabular analysis
of labor provisions_________________________________ ____ ___ _______ ______ ________ 1934—Feb. 298
Domestic service. (See Domestic and personal service.)
Door manufacturing:
Cold storage. N R A code, effective July 23, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions. 1934—Sept. 625
Upward-acting. N R A code, effective Aug. 20,1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions.. 1934—Oct. 879
Door-to-door distribution, collective manufacturing for. N R A code, effective Aug. 13,1934,
tabular analysis of labor provisions...... .......................... ............ ................................................... 1934—Oct. 877
“Dopolavoro” (leisure hours). (See under Leisure time—Italy.)
Double time. (See Overtime.)
Dowel-pin manufacturing. N R A code, effective June 1, 1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions__________________________ __________ ______________ ______ ____________
1934—July 48
Drama. Used as labor educational agency--------------------------------------------- ------------------- 1939—July 10
Draperies (novelty curtain), bedspreads, and novelty pillows. N R A code, effective Nov.
11, 1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions.................................................................................. 1933—Dec. 1339




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

105

Drapery and upholstery:
P age
Textile industry. N R A code, effective Dec. 11,1933, tabular analysis of labor provisions. 1934—Jan. 41
Trimming industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 26, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions______________________________________________________________________ 1934—Mar. 533
Dress industry. (See under Clothing industry, women's.)
Dress Manufacturers, Association of (Inc.). Agreement, New York City, Feb. 5,1925___ 1925—July 104
Dried fruit industry, Pacific coast. N R A code, effective Feb. 5, 1935, tabular analysis of
labor provisions_________________________________________________________________ 1935—Mar. 653
Drinking straw (bulk), wrapped drinking straw, wrapped toothpick, and wrapped mani­
cure stick industry. N R A code, effective Mar. 26, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions____ _________ ___________________________________________ r_______________ 1934—M ay 1064
Drivers and salesmen. Bakery wagons, San Francisco. Decision re wages and working
conditions. January 1934________________________________________________________ 1934—Aug. 386-7
Driver’s Union, department and furniture store. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 22,1934 (Emery
Bird Thayer Drygoods Co.)___________________________ __________________________ 1934—N ov. 1155
Drop forging industry. N R A code, effective M ay 21, 1934, tabular analysis of labor pro­
visions________________________________________________ _____________ ___________
1934—July 49
Drought-area relief. Emergency W PA projects, 1935 and 1936.................................................. 1937—Feb. 366
Drought refugees:
Exodus from Great Plains, 1935-37, and relocation problem............................................
1937—July 11
Migration to California. 1936. (Rowell).......................................................................... . 1936—Dec. 1355-63
----- June to December 1935. (Taylor and Vasey)_________________ _____________ 1936—Feb. 312-18
Drought relief, United States. Student aid, additional, granted by N Y A _____________ 1937—N ov. 1112
Drug and medicine industry. Minimum-wage provisions under Public Contracts Act, to
Aug. 31,1940_______________________________ _____________ ______ _________________ 1940—Oct. 817
Drug and pharmaceutical manufacturing. 5-day week. England (Nottingham), effect
of shorter workweek___________ ____________________________________ ___________ 1935—Sept. 702-5
Drug trade, retail. N R A code, effective Oct. 30,1933, labor provisions________ 1933—N ov. 1069, Dec. 1341
D ry and polishing mop manufacturing. N R A code, effective Dec. 25,1933, tabular analysis
of labor provisions______________ ______________________________ ____ _____________ 1934—Feb. 298
Dry color industry. N R A code, effective M ay 5, 1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions. 1934—June 1334
D ry goods cotton batting industry. N R A code, effective Apr. 30, 1934, tabular analysis of
labor provisions__________ _____ _______ ___ ____ . ______________________ _______ 1934r—
June 1334
Dry goods, prices. (See Retail prices.)
Drygoods Co., E ly & Walker. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 25, 1934________________________ 1934—N ov. 1157
Drygoods Co., Emery Bird Thayer. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 22,1934 (drivers)________ 1934—N ov. 1155
Duplan Silk Corporation. Decisions, Textile Labor Relations Board, Dec. 11, 1934 (Hazle­
ton and Wilkes-Barre, Pa.).................................................................... .......................................... 1935—Apr. 976
Dusts, industrial, United States:
Arsenic dust in copper smelting. ..................... ........................................................................... 1921—Apr. 103
Asbestos. (See under Industrial diseases and poisons.)
Ax factory. D ust hazards, grinding and polishing, New England--------------------------- 1921—Jan. 163-4
Brass dust, effects on industrial workers_________________________ 1925—M ay 176-7; 1926—July 56-8
Cement industry, Portland. Calcium dust, pathological effects. (U. S. Health Serv­
ice Bull. No. 176)_____________ ____________ ______________ _____________ _____ _ 1928—Oct. 56-9
Cottrell electrical precipitator......... ......................................................................................... . 1921—Feb. 145-6
Diseases. Skin, zinc oxide workers_________ ___________________________ _______ 1922—Jan. 179-80
----- Underground miners, engineering problem re preventive measures............................. 1934—Jan. 87-8
D usty trades. Health of workers, and degree of dust hazards___________ ______ 1934—Feb. 320-1
Explosions. Coal-dust. In industrial plants. (Bureau of Mines report)________ 1921—June 110-11
------------Prevention of, in mines________________________________ 1924—June 14-17; 1929—Oct. 68-9
------------Rock dust, use of to prevent,in m in es.- 1925—Mar. 155-6; 1926—Aug. 51-3; 1927—Aug. 54-5
------------Rock-dusting, inadequacy of provisions_______________________ 1929—Feb.
46-8
------------Tests in mines, series of, results___________________ ____ _________ •_.......... 1923—Feb. 225-8
----- Cost, in life and property______________________________________________ ____ _ 1927—M ay 78
----- In industrial plants. Causes and methods of prevention_____________ ____ ____ 1926—Jan. 177-9
------------(Price and Brown)__________ _________________________ ____ ______ _____ 1922—Apr. 180-1
------------Safety codes______________________________________________________
_ 1927—M ay 77-9
----- Minimizing effects of, demonstration of, U. S. Department of Agriculture............ 1934—Jan. 89-90
----- Pittsburgh experimental mine, tests, Bureau of M ines________________________ 1923—Feb. 225-8
Flaxseed dust, dermatitis from, linseed oil mills___________ ___________ __________
1927—Sept. 70
Fur dust, health hazards in hatter’s furriers trade, women........ ...................................... . 1927—Sept. 66-7
Grain elevators. Wisconsin Industrial Commission, recommendations____ ____ ____ 1922—July 199
Granite cutting. D ust hazards, degree of, and other dust characteristics____________ 1934—Feb. 321
Granite dust. Phthisis problem______________________________________________ 1922—Sept. 178-9
----- Silica dust, effect on workers, 14 plants. (Public Health Bull. No. 187)_________ 1929—Dec. 45-8
----- Silicosis and tuberculosis problem, granite workers, Barre (V t.)________________ 1927—Sept. 67-9
----- Silicosis, problem in granite and foundry industries, Massachusetts, special com­
mission report and recommended legislation. _______________________________ 1934—M ay 1086-8
Grinding shops. Ax factory, tuberculosis incidence. N ew E ngland................................ 1921—Jan. 163-4
Hazards, degree of, by types of dust_____________________________________________ 1934—Feb. 321
Lead and soapstone dusts, storage-battery industry, health hazards__________ ______ 1927—Sept. 64
Mining. Anthracite. Dust hazards. (U. S. Coal Commission report)____________ 1923—Aug. 24
------------And bituminous coal, degree of dust hazards, and other dust c h a r a c t e r is tic s 1934—Feb. 321
------------Pennsylvania fields, exposure to mine dust and measures for control, study
of__________________________________ __________ ____________________________ 1935—Oct. 974-8
----- Arsenic, lead, mercury, and zinc dusts_______________________ *____________ _ 1925—Mar. 155
----- Elimination, engineering-hygienic aspects____________________ ____ _________ 1925—Sept. 127-30
----- Engineering problem re preventive measures, dust diseases___________________ 1934—Jan. 87-8
----- Smelting. Common mercury, effects of, and prevention of poisoning_________ 1922—July 139-40
----- Wet stopers, dust reduction b y ____________________________________________ 1922—Jan. 181-2
Occupations exposing to certain dusts, symptoms of disease________________________ 1921—Mar. 161
Organic. Relation to fibrous inflammation of lungs____ _____ ________ __________ 1925—Mar. 157-8
Printing industry. D ust phthisis. (Hoffman)___________ _____________________ 1922—Sept. 179-91
Rock drilling dust eliminator, test of, new air-suction device________________ _____ _ 1931—Sept. 74
Safety codes for prevention of dust explosions. (BLS Bull. No. 562, summary)........ 1932—Feb. 305-6
Trades, dusty. Health hazards_________'_______________________________________
1931—Apr. 92
Ventilation. As applied to harmful dusts, gases, and fumes. (R oach).......................... 1925—July 6-12
----- Shop sanitation, lead works____________________________ _______ __________— 1921—Feb. 144-8
Wood industry. Exposure of workers to dusts and resin, effects.................................... 1932—Feb. 301-4




106

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Dusts, Industrial, foreign countries:
rage
Great Britain. Asbestos dust and pulmonary asbestosis, study of. (Oliver)________ 1930—July 74-6
----- Granite workers, silicosis among, study of, 1929--------- -------------------------------------- 1932—Sept. 543
----- Metal gripders, effects on____________________ ____ ____ _________________ 1924—Nov. 210-12
----- Mining, coal, nystagmus, causes-and measures to lessen ....................................... 1922—July 140-1
Mexico. Factory regulations, summary---------- ---------------------------------------------- 1923—Dec. 16, 20-1
Dwellings and dwelling units. (See under Building-construction industry; Housing.)
D ye making. Taught in school of weaving at Quebec, Canada---------------------------- -------- 1932—Mar. 560
Dyeing and finishing textiles:
Labor turn-over. M onthly rates, M ay to September 1940-------------------------------------- 1940—Aug. 462,
Sept. 707, Oct. 971, N ov. 1195, Dec. 1466
Unemployment sinking funds, textile-finishing establishments___________________ 1924—Apr. 160-1
D yes and coal-tar chemicals, industrial census. (Tariff Commission report).................... 1922—Mar. 194-5

E
Eagle Rubber Co. Decision, N L R B , N ov. 8, 1934_______ ___________________________
1935—Jan. 122
Earnings. (See Wages and hours.)
Earthenware manufacturing:
N R A code, effective Mar. 23, 1934, tabular analysis of labor preventions; amended
Jan. 23, 1935................................... ......................................................- ......... 1934—M ay 1066; 1935—Mar. 654
(See also Pottery industry.)
Economic advisory council, Great Britain. Established functions of--------------------------- 1930—Apr. 88-9
Economic Committee, Temporary National. (See Temporary National Economic Com­
mittee.)
Economic conditions, United States:
American Indians, economic situation of th e---------- --------------------------------------------- 1928—Oct. 43-7
Basic problems of the National economy, summary of hearings held by T N E C , Decem­
ber 1938. (M artin)___________________________________________________________ 1939—Jan. 1-15
Concentration of employment and production in large firms, degree of, in 8 selected in­
dustries, 1935_____ _____ _____________________________________________________ 1940—Dec. 1529
Depression and recovery period. Labor, economic changes affecting 1929-37. (Bow­
den)____________________ ________ ______ _______________________ __________ 1937—Nov. 1045-81
----- Negro youth as affected b y . .. ........... ............................. ........................................ , ......... 1940—Aug. 352-5
■
-----Occupational shifts, heads of households, Maryland................................ .............. 1939—N ov. 1108-10
Depression, effects of. On employee stock ownership__________________________ 1933—Aug. 279-83
----- On consumption of commodities, 1930-32. (Harvard and Minnesota University
studies)— . : ______________ __________ ________ _____________________________ 1933—Nov. 1090-2
----- On farm-labor productivity__________________________________________ _______ 1934—Jan. 63-5
----- On health, 1929 to 1932. (U. S. Public Health Service study)................. ............... . 1934—Jan. 82-7
---- On junior employees of railroads, 1929 to 1933____________________ _________1935—July 11-12
----- On Negro in West Virginia, 1929-32__________________________________ ____ ___
1934—Jan. 77
Depression, influence of, on expenditures of business women, 1931 and 1932.......... . 1933—Dec. 1359-60
Depression unemployment, extent of waste from_____________________________ 1939—N ov. 1075-9
Economic balance (equilibrium) between production and consumption................. 1933—Feb. 299-300
Economic institutions, current changes in. need for economic planning____________ 1933—Feb. 300-1
Energy resources and national policy. (Summary of U. S. National Resources Com­
mittee report, 1939)_______________________________ ____ ____________________ 1939—Nov. 1082-5
Hawaii. R6sum6 of, in relation to labor situation_____________________________ 1940—Dec. 1305-27
1928—Jan. 48
Indexes, economic progress, 1922-27 (from report of Secretary of Commerce)_________
Industrial growth in New York City since 1933______________ ____ ____ _______ _ 1937—Nov. 1129-30
Labor in society, consumers and their perplexities...................... ................... ................... 1933—Feb. 301-2
Negro, in West Virginia_________________________________________ ______ _______ 1923—Apr. 21-3
President’s Unemployment Conference Committee report on changes, sum m ary... 1929—June 96-107
Railroads. Effect of depression upon junior employees of, 1929 to 1933_____________ 1935—July 11-12
Railway employees, earnings and living standards during depression (study in 1933). 1934— Oct. 853-6
Shorter work periods. (See Shorter working time.)
Social changes interrelated, summary of principles---------------------------------------------- 1933—Feb. 303-4
Social trends, findings of President’s (Roosevelt) Research Committee on_______ 1933—Feb. 297-304
Southern United States. W hy resources fail to meet needs. (R6sum6, National
Emergency Council report, 1938)--------- -------------- ------------------------------- ------------ 1938—Oct. 751-2
Virgin Islands. Governor’s report, annual________ ___________ 1932—M ay 1056-9; 1933—Mar. 506-8
(See also Labor and industrial conditions; Social conditions.)
Economic conditions, foreign countries:
Canada. Business expansion since January 1939_______________ ____________ _
1940—M ay 1134-5
----- (And United States). Report of British delegation................................ ..................... 1927—June 45-6
Chile. Economic and labor situation, 1921 and 1922...... .............. ............... ................... 1922—Dec. 43-4
Countries with depreciated currency. ILO study-------------------------------------- -------- 1925—Aug. 82-4
Egypt. Summary of, with account of measures undertaken for improvement______ 1940—July 43-5
Germany. Condition of industrial production___ _______________________________ 1922—Dec. 44-5
----- Student body, economic situation of____ ____ _______________ ____ __________ 1923—N ov. 10-16
Great Britain. Depression, wage reduction as a remedy............... ................................... 1931—Sept. 53-6
----- (Liverpool, England). Seamen, survey of, 1929-32. ................................................ 1934—Oct. 883-6
Italy. Wage rates and economic conditions of workers...................... ................................ 1925—Oct. 65-8
Japan. Industrial depression and unemployment....................... ...................................... 1921—Jan. 210-11
Korea. Factory workers and miners__________ ______ ______________ __________ 1930—N ov. 27-30
Palestine. Unemployment, wages, and working hours, labor legislation, 5-year period,
1926-30.____ _____________ ____ ______ _________________________________ ____ 1932—Mar. 561-2
South Africa. Economic and wage commission, report, 1925....................... .................. 1926—Sept. 20-30
----- Natives, 1933.......... ...................................... ........................................................................... 1934—Jan. 78
Tibet. Production—agricultural, industrial, and handicraft............................................. 1936—Jan. 79-80
(See also Labor and industrial conditions; Social conditions.)
Economic councils:
Canada. Act of 1935 creating Economic Council of Canada, summary of provisions.. 1935—Dec. 1543-4
China. National Economic Council established. M ay 30, 1931, draft regulations___ 1931—Sept. 66-7
France. National Economic Council, established Jan. 16,1925, functions___________ 1931—Jan. 2-4
Germany. Attitude toward provisional national economic council________ ____ 1921—Apr. 157-8
----- Provisional Federal economic council, created M ay 4, 1920, composition and
and work of..........................- ......................................................................................................... 1931—Jan 6-7




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

107

Economic councils—Continued.
Germany. State labor and economic council formed for coordinating policies of State
Jrage
Economic Chamber and Labor Front_______ _________ ______ ___ ____ ______ _ 1935—June 1531-2'
Great Britain. Economic Advisory Council, established Jan. 27,1930, purposes_____ 1931—Jan. 4-6
Italy. National Council of Corporations, established Apr. 21, 1930, membership and
fun ctions___ _______ ____________________________ _______ _________________ ___ 1931—Jan. 8-9
----- Superior labor council, reorganization, Oct. 27, 1922.—.......................... ............... ......... 1923—Mar. 140
Economic currents in the United States, personnel of committee appointed to inquire into
changes in ..................................................................,................................. ....................... ............... 1928—Apr. 58-9
Economic plannings:
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Coordination of efforts to increase industrial production
and labor efficiency............... ................ ..................................... ........................ ................... 1938—Oct. 741-2
----- Third 5-year plan, features and objectives
............................................................... 1939—Aug. 358-9
Economic problems. Attitude of American youth on. (Summary of American Youth
Commission interviews)________ ___________ ____ _______ ______ _____ __________ 1940—June 1418-19
Economic Security, Committee on. Report and recommendations of, Jan. 15, 1935, sum­
mary of............................................................................................. ................ ........................... . 1935—Feb. 304-13
Economic security. Provisions for, under company industrial-relations program. (Find­
ings of National Industrial Conference Board, Inc.)................................. ................................. 1936—July 88-9
Economics of creamery butter consumption. (Stewart)
........ .............. ............. .................. 1925—July 1-6
Editorial employees, newspaper. Working conditions, personnel policies, salaries, etc.,
1930-34 (31 dailies)......... ............ .............. ................................................................................... 1935—M ay 1137-48
Education, United States:
Advisory Committee on (U. S. Government). Recommendations in report, Feb­
ruary 1938, summary of____________________ ______ _______________ ____________ 1938—July 86-9
A. F. of L., action of 1934 convention regarding free schooling____________________ 1934—Dec. 1405-6
California (Imperial County). Children in migratory families, Mexican and nonMexican, enrollment by months, 1929-30 to 1934-35............. ............................ ............ 1938—N ov. 985-90
Camps for young women, N Y A _________________________ ________ _____ _________ 1937—Oct. 881
CCC. Activities, status February 1936, and fiscal year 1938____ 1936—Nov. 1203-4; 1939—Feb. 339
----- Camps. Elementary and higher subjects, and cooperation with schools and col­
leges, 1938— ........ ......................................................... ................................................................ 1938—Feb. 388
----- Opportunities given and accomplishments, 1936.............................................................. 1937—Apr. 897
----- Program of, purposes, etc., of. (Paper by C. S. March)........................................ 1934—Aug. 375-7
Cooperation, training in. (See under Cooperation—Education.)
Domestic service, W PA training courses, 1936-38__________________ ______ _______ 1939—Jan. 114-15
Eighth-grade graduates (7 cities), employment experience of. (W PAsurvey, 1938). 1939—N ov. 1098-1102
Engineering profession. Qualifications required for. (BLS study 1 9 3 4 ) ............... 1936—June 1528-42
Federal aid to needy college and university students, November 1934.......................... . 1935—Feb. 292-3
High-school enrollments, increase of in depressions (1920-38)_______________________ 1938—Jan. 103
Housing projects, management, 4-month course to train students for, Washington,
D . C., Dec. 15, 1935__________________________________________ _____________ 1936—Feb. 361
Immigrant. (See under Naturalization.)
Indians. Loans, 1936. (Report of U. S. Office of Indian Affairs)........... ...................... 1936—Dec. 1460-1
Industrial education, 1926-28. (U. S. Bureau of Education Bull. No. 21)................... . 1930—Jan. 79-80
Industrial hygiene. Course in, University of Michigan................................................. 1935—Dec. 1527-8
Mississippi. Cotton-farming group, lack of opportunities for
....................... ............ 1938—Oct. 756-7
Negro enrollees in CCC, opportunities provided to ______________________________ 1939—Apr. 846-7
Negro institutions offering college work in 1936 compared with similar facilities in
1916_________________________ _______ _____________________ _______ ________ 1939—Sept. 629-30
Negro youth, in depression period____________________________ ______________ 1940—Aug. 354-5
Negroes. School buildings constructed in South as work projects_________________ 1939—June 1320
Occupational Information and Guidance Service (U. S. Government), established, and
functions______________________________________ ____________ _____ _________ 1939—Mar. 578-9
Parent education. W PA classes, as of M ay 31, 1936-_................................................... 1936—Oct. 900,902
Prisoners, Federal. Summary of activities for_________________________________ 1940—M ay 1176-9
Public-school work as related to vocational training in industrial plants through use of
Federal funds (report of advisory committee)___________________ _____ ________ 1936—Mar. 650-4
Self-help colleges for students without funds, character and aims of............................... 1939—Apr. 851-2
Southern United States. Problem related to resources.......... ........................................ .
1938—Oct. 751
Woman workers, university-trained, economic status of_________________________ 1940—M ay 1176-9
Work history of former high-school students, Rochester, N . Y ., survey 1936. ............ 1938—Sept. 536-8
Workers. Retail salesmanship, training in _________________________ ___________ 1937—Oct. 892-4
Working-class. (See Vocational education; Workers’ education.)
W PA emergency program. As of M ay 31, 1936........................ ............................... .......... 1936—Oct. 900-2
----- Education program, and student enrollment, March 1937______ _____ ___ _____ 1937—July 140-2
Youth Administration, National. Provision for (under Emergency Relief Appropria­
tion Act of 1935)______________________________________________________ _____ 1935—Aug. 347-8
(See also Adult education; Apprenticeship; and under specific types of education.)
Education, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Unemployed juveniles, compulsory schooling for.................................. 1936—Feb. 376-83
Japan. (Nagoya). Textile industry. Facilities provided for employees.......... - ......... 1938—Dec. 1414
Portugal. National Board established M ay 19,1936_____________ ______________ 1937—N ov. 1143-4
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R .). Decrees issued December 1938, designed to bring about
improvement__________________________________ .___________________________ 1939—Mar. 567-9
Education and rehabilitation. Committee on Economic Security, recommendations and
report, Jan. 15, 1935_______ _____ ________________________ ____ ___ _____ ___________ 1935—Feb. 312
Educational projects, Federal Emergency. Coverage of, February 1934, by type of project
and by States________________________________________________________________ 1934—Oct. 908-10
Efficiency, Bureau of (U. S. Government). Organization and functions, appropriation for
1930___________________________________________ _______________________________ 1931—Mar. 41-3
Efficiency of labor, etc. (See under Productivity of labor.)
Eight-hour day. (See under Shorter working time.)
Elderly workers. (See Older workers.)
Elections, employee. (See under Employee representation.)
Electric and neon sign industry. N R A code, effective Sept. 3,1934, tabular analysis of labor
provisions_________________________________________________________ 1934—Oct. 877; 1985—Feb. 803
Electric hoist and monorail manufacturing. N R A code effective July 24, 1934; amended
Mar. 30,1935; tabular analysis of labor provisions. ....................................... 1934—Sept. 625; 1935—M ay 1192




108

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Electric Home and Farm Authority (U. S. Government). Transfer under Reorganization
P age
Plan No. 1, effective July 1,1939---------------------- . ---------------------------------- ----------------- 1939—Aug. 380
Electric-lamp industry, assembly plants, technological changes and employment, 1920 to
1931____________________________________________ ____________________________ 1933—June 1213-28
Electric light and power industry:
Accident experience, member companies of National Electric Light Association, 1923
to 1928____________________________________________ __________________ _______ 1930—June 86-7
Council on industrial relations, formation of, text of plan___________________ _____ 1921—Mar. 126-7
Development and changes, since 1882 (first public power plant established)___ ____ 1932—Aug. 250-1
Employment opportunities, effect of automatic equipment on------------------------------ 1932—Aug. 255-6
Great Britain. (England). RewSearch work, results, electrical and allied industries___ 1927—M ay 72
Productivity and displacement of labor in 1902-31--------------------------------------------- 1932—Aug. 249-59
Shift systems, conditions and experience_______________________ _________________ _ 1922—N ov. 34
Shop rules and working conditions, Railroad Labor Board r ev isio n ............................ 1922—Jan. 143-5
Technological changes and productivity. (Digest of BLS studies)---------------------- 1932—N ov. 1034-5
Trade-union activities. (See under Electrical workers, International Brotherhood of.)
Trade-union membership, electrical workers. United States, 1915 to 1920___________ 1922—July 167
Transmission and distribution of current, wide adoption of automatic substations. __ 1932—Aug. 258-9
(See also Electrical workers.)
Electric power. (See Electric light and power industry.)
Electric railway employees. (See Street and Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of.)
Electric railways. (See under Street railways.)
Electric storage and wet primary battery (parts and accessories) industry. N R A code,
effective Oct. 16,1933, summary of labor provisions___ ______ ____________ 1933—N ov. 1052, Dec. 1336
Electric-utility industry. (See Electric light and power industry.)
Electric wiring and apparatus. Safety code, approved as “American Standard,” Sept. 1,
1933------------------------- ------ ----------------------- --------- ------------ ------ ------------------------------- 1934—Jan. 90-1
.electrical apparatus and construction (installation) industry:
Council on Industrial Relations. Origin, purposes, decision.......... . 1923—Aug. 26-43; 1924—Feb. 126-7
National Council on Industrial Relations, decisions and code of policies in strike adjust­
ments____________________________________________________________________ 1932—Oct. 826-9
National labor council, electrical construction industry, text of plan................................ 1921—Mar. 126-7
Electrical appliances and equipment industry:
Expenditures for, by families of workers, 1933-36 (42 cities)...... ........................................ 1938—Feb. 447-54
Union organization and collective bargaining since N IR A (1933)................. ................. 1938—July 67-77
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies, manufacture of:
Employment and production. Concentration in largest companies, year 1935________ 1940—Dec. 1529
Trend in employment, hours, earnings, and production under the N R A , October 1932March 1934______________________ ________ _____________________________ 1934—Mar. 1019, 1025
Electric-machinery industry. Labor turn-over. (See under Labor turn-over.)
Electrical-manufacturing industry:
Employee representation. Elections, N L B , tabular analysis of results--------------------1935—Jan. 9
N R A code, effective Aug. 15, 1933, summary of labor provisions.______ 1933—Sept. 527-9, Dec. 1336
Wage payments below code minimum, restrictions on, N L R B ruling of Mar. 7,1935.. 1935—M ay 1187
Electrical products. Manufacture and distribution. Labor requirements in, 1937------ 193&—Mar. 559-63
Electrical workers:
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements.)
Apprentices, training system for. (See under Apprenticeship.)
Contracting by union members, agreement provisions against........................ .................. 1930—Sept. 10
Decision, trade-board. Denver (Colo.), proposed wage reduction allowed as modified,
Mar. 31, 1932________________________________ ___________________ ___________ 1932—M ay 1102
Denver (Colo.). Hearing on wage-scale increase, and award, N ov. 17, 1933.................. . 1934—Mar. 598
Employers or contractors doing journeyman work, agreement provisions........................ 1931—Sept. 62
Insurance features (new), in agreements with employers--------------------------------------- 1930—N ov. 105-6
N L R B order invalidating contracts with Consolidated Edison Co. declared without
authority (court decision)................................................................... .............. ..................... 1938—Jan 121-6
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions...... ........................................... 1931—Aug. 116
Paym ent of wages, time and method of, agreement provisions............................................. 1930—N ov. 129
Reporting time and minimum pay, agreement clauses........................................................ 1931—M ay 143
Union members, employment of, agreement provisions....................................................... 1931—Oct. 123
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of:
Activities in electric-power ind ustry.......................................................................................... 1930—Jan. 86-7
Agreements. (See under Collective agreements—Electrical workers.)
Apprenticeship. (See under Apprenticeship.)
Arbitration policy with employers------------------------------------------------ ---------------------1928—Oct. 21
Cooperative plan for adjusting industrial relations— a strikeless industry........................ 1932—Oct. 826-9
Council on industrial relations, formation of, text of plan---------------------- ---------------- 1921—Mar. 126-7
Decision, N L R B , N ov. 16, 1934 (Pacific Gas & Electric Co.)-------------------------------- 1935—Jan. 121-2
Fatal accidents and deaths from occupational disease, statistics, 1922 to 1924............... 1925— May 172-3
Giant-power institute, at Brookwood Labor College---------------------------------------------- 1926—Oct. 120
Jurisdictional disputes in building trades. Board of Trade Claims, agreement organiz­
ing, Mar. 3,1931, not signatory to___________________________ _____ ___________
1931—July 107
N ew York Local No. 3, reorganization in 1926, and activities........................................... 1930—June 124-6
Old-age pensions. Amount and requirements for receipt of, 1930...................................... W31—M ay 34
----- Plans___________________________________________ ____ ____________ _________ 1927—Dec. 88
Tri-city (Aurora, Elgin, Wheaton, 111.) “post graduate club,” new instruction method
in electrical field___________________________________________________________ 1932—M ay 1095-6
Union Cooperative Insurance Association (Co.). Organized by, 1924............................... 1927—Apr. 43
----- Sixth year of operations, statement, 1930......................................................................... 1931—June 111
Electricity, retail prices. (See under Retail prices.)
Electrification:
Railroads. (See under Railroads.)
Rural. (See inverted title.)
Electrotypers. (See Printing trades; Stereotypers and electrotypers; Stereotypers and
Electrotypers Union of North America, International.)
Electrotyping and stereotyping industry. N R A code, effective Jan. 1,1934, tabular analysis
of labor provisions............................................— ............ - ................ .............................................. 1934—Feb. 299




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

109

Elevator constructors:
P age
Out-of-town work, compensation for, agreement provisions.................................................. 1931—Aug. 116
Payment of wages, time and method of, agreement provisions.......................................... 1930—N ov. 129
Trade-union membership. United States, 1915 to 1920__________________ _________ 1922—July 167
Union members, employment of, agreement provisions____________________________ 1931—Oct. 123
Elevator Constructors, International Union of. Signatory Board of Trade Claims agree­
ment, Mar. 3,1931__________________ ______ _____ ____ ____________________________ 1931—July 107
Elevator Operators’ and Starters’ Union, agreement. Chicago________ 1924—M ay 133; 1920—June 210
E ly & Walker D ry Goods Co. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 25, 1934______________________ 1934—N ov. 1157
Embroidery industry:
Azores (Angra). Development of_________________________ ____________________ 1925—June 208-9
Description; method and scope of wage and hour survey of 1940_______ _____ ____ 1940—D ec. 1503-8
Hand, and pleating, stitching and bonnaz. N R A code, effective Feb. 19,1934, tabular
analysis of labor provisions_______________ ______ _____________________________ 1934—Apr. 817
Philippine Islands. Labor practice in________ _________________________________ 1926—M ay 58-9
----- Status in 1935_____________________________________________________________ 1937—M ay 1264
Schiffli, hand machine, and thread and scallop cutting. N R A code, effective Feb. 12,
1934, tabular analysis of labor provisions........... ..................................................... .......... 1934—Apr. 818
(See also Needle trades.)
Emergency Conservation Work:
Arizona. Apache Indian camps, improved housing conditions..................................... 1934—Oct. 960-1
CCC camps. (See Civilian Conservation Corps.)
Report of work during 1933________________________________ _________________ 1934—Mar. 518-22
Emergency Council, National. (See National Emergency Council.)
Emergency Fleet Corporation of Shipping Board (U. S. Government). Housing for war
laborers in shipyards. Summary of activities. 1918-20..................................... ..................... 1940—July 6-9
Emergency hospital. (See under Medical and hospital service.)
»
Emergency legislation. (See under Laws and legislation.)
Emergency (Presidential) boards, railway disputes. (See under Railroads.)
Emergency relief. (See Relief Administration, Federal Emergency.)
Emery-Bird Thayer Drygoods Co. Decision, N L R B , Sept. 22,1934....................................... 1934—N ov. 1155
Emigration:
Africa. (Nyasaland Protectorate). N ative laborers, to Southern Rhodesia_________
1927—Oct. 23
Austria. Statistics______________________ ___________ 1922—Apr. 241, June 222-3; 1923—June 256-7
----- (Burgenland). To United States____ ______ _______________________________ 1922—Aug. 231-2
Brazil. Labor and emigration, reciprocal agreement with I ta ly ......... 1922—M ay 217-19; 1923—Oct. 205
Canada. Immigration and emigration, 1924............... .............................. ............................ 1924—M ay 235
Conferences (international) on. (See under Conventions, meetings, etc.)
Czechoslovakia. First quarter, 1922............................. ............... ....................................... 1923—Mar. 165-7
----- Law, Feb. 15, 1922_____________ ______ ___________ ________________________ 1922—Aug. 185-7
Denmark. Statistics, 1923....................... .............................................. ....... 1924—Apr. 218; 1925—Apr. 202
Emigrants returning without funds, discussion, Permanent Conference for Protection
of M igrants............................................................ ................................. .................................... 1931—N ov. 109
Finland, 1923........ .............................................................................. ............................................ 1924—M ay 236
French and Italian treaty............................................................................................................1921—Oct. 221-2
Germany. Estimated, 1919 and 1920. ............................ .......................... ............................. 1921—M ay 179
----- Oversea, in 1921__________________________ 1______________________ _______ 1922—Aug. 233-4
Great Britain. Conference on Empire Migration, policy and program recommended
to G overnm ent.______ ___________ __________________________________________ 1935—Dec. 1731
----- Migration from, effect of social insurance upon_____ _____ ___________________ 1926—June 105-7
----- (United Kingdom). Migration within the Empire, Economic Advisory Council
committee report, 1932______________________________________________ _____ _ 1932—Sept. 731-2
Inspection of emigrants on board ship. International labor convention (agreement),
1926, provisions of---------------------- ------------------------ -------------------- --------------------- - 1934—Apr. 777
Intellectual workers, foreign countries.................. .................................................................. 1924—July 180-1
International Labor Conference, recommendation________________________________ 1926—Sept. 27-8
Italy. Interprovincial organization for distribution of labor______ _________________ 1930—July 52-3
----- Labor and emigration, reciprocal agreement with Brazil___ 1922—M ay 217-19; 1923—Oct. 205
----- Recent measures for protection of emigrants....................................................................... 1923—Dec. 212
----- Statistics_________________________________________________ 1921—Feb. 220-2; 1923—Oct. 203
Japan. Emigrants domiciled in various countries, 1920_____________________ ____ _ 1922—Oct. 206-7
----- N ew policy adopted____________________________ ______________ ____ _______ 1927—M ay 274-5
Mexico. Nonquota immigrants into United States........ ............ ................................... 1928—Mar. 213-14
----- Restriction upon, into United States, petition of labor................................................ 1928—Jan. 202
----- Russians and Germans in agricultural w o rk ...____ __________ _____ ____ ______ 1921—Apr. 189
Norway. Overseas, 1924.................................................................................. ............................. 1925—July 208
----- Statistics, 1900-23.......... .............. ........................................... .............. .............. ........... 1924r—Sept. 218-19
Portugal. Effect on labor supply, Oporto............................................. .................................. 1921—Jan. 211
Spain. Migration to cities.................... ....................................................... ......................1926—Sept. 31
----- Statistics.................................................... ............ .................................................................. 1924—Jan. 200
Sweden. Migration between United States and, 1916 to 1924.......................... ................. 1925—Dec. 210
United States. Comparison with immigration, by period............................. ...................... 1927—Feb. 6-7
----- Emigrant agent legislation_________ _____ _____ _______ __________ 1924—Feb. 199-201, Mar. 174
----- Georgia. Emigrant agents, enforcement of law regarding______________________ 1924—Oct. 199
------------ Laborers__________ _____________ _____ ______________________________ 1925—Oct. 210-11
----- Hawaii. Filipino laborers emigrating to and returning from, 1909 to 1925; 1922 to 1926;
1923 to 1927; 1928 to 1932______ 1926—Oct. 5-6; 1928—M ay 197-8; 1929—Feb. 210-11; 1934—M ay 1267-8
------------ Sugar-plantations. Filipinos emigrating to _____________________________ 1927—N ov. 51-2
----- Philippine Islands. Filipino workers going to and returning from Hawaii, 1909 to 1925,
1922 to 1926, 1923 to 1927, 1929 to 1936.............. 1926—Oct. 5-6; 1928—M ay 197-8; 1929—Feb. 210-11;
1935—M ay 1416; 1937—Sept. 613
------------ Filipinos to Hawaiian sugar plantations................................................................. 1927—Nov. 51-2
----- Statistics________________________________________________ _________ 1921—Jan. 200, Feb. 220
------------ (See also each issue of M . L . R ., March 1922-April 1933.)
------------ Last half of 1933______ _____________________________ _______________ 1934—M ay 1264-5
(See also Immigration.)
Employability of urban population receiving relief, survey of, M ay 1934.............................. 1935—Mar. 640-5
Employee elections. (See Employee representation—Elections.)
2 0 1 0 4 3 °— 42-------8




110

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employee morale. Factors affecting, survey of department-store employees by National
P age
Retail D ry Goods Association.................. ................ ..................................................................... 1939—July 96-7
Employee representation, United States:
American Multigraph Oo. Scheme......... ............ . . ............ ................................................. 1921—July 18-21
Bargaining committees. Colorado Fuel & Jron Co. plan....... ................ .......................... 1925—Apr. 21-6
Bleachery, Wappingers Falls (N . Y .)----------------------------------------------------------------- - 1925—Feb. 3-5
Cleveland firms (600), plans in operation, report, Chamber of Commerce..-............... 1923—July 47-50
Colorado Fuel & Iron Co., experience under plan------------------ ------------------------------ 1925—Apr. 21-6
Company unions. Extent and characteristics of, BLS survey, April 1935 (preliminary
report)_____ ______________ ________________ _____ _________________________ 1935—Oct. 865-76
Elections. Clothing industry, held by N L R B , tabular analysis of results__________
1935—Jan. 9
----- Held by N L R B . Analysis of, July 10, 1934, to Jan. 9 and to June 16, 1935.
(Wheeler)______ ____ ____ _____________ ______________ ________1935—M ay 1149-54, Oct. 956-9
------------1935-36,1936-37, and 1938-39_____________ 1937—Mar. 613; 1936—M ay 1144-7; 1940—Mar. 616
------------October 1935 to December 1937. (Marks and B artlett)....................................... 1938—July 31-8
----- Massachusetts Labor Relations Board (conducted by), 1938-39......................... . 1940—Mar. 616-17
----- New York Labor Relations Board (conducted by), 1937-39..................................... 1940—Mar. 617-19
----- Number held, by industry, October 1935—December 1937______________________
1938—July 38
----- Petroleum Labor Policy Board, analysis of certifications issued, Mar. 1, 1934, to
Feb. 28,1935. (M oscovitz)------------------------ --------- ----------------------------------------- 1935—Oct. 931-6
----- Regulation of, by National Labor Board______________________________ ______ 1934—M ay 1061
----- Supervised by National Labor Board, results of, August 1933-March 1934............ 1934—M ay 1060
----- Under National Labor Board, stud,y of results. (Brown)_____ ________ ________ 1935—Jan. 1-18
----- Under State labor-relations acts (Mass., N . Y ., Pa., Utah, and Wis.) to July 1,
1938_____________ __________ _____________________________________________ 1939—Feb. 315-21
Electrical construction industry. Council on industrial relations, creation, etc_____1921—Mar. 126-7;
1923—Aug. 26-43; 1924—Feb. 126-7
Employee elections. (See Elections, this section.)
Ladies garment industry. Cleveland, shop committee, supplementary agreement___ 1922—July 106
Lumber industry. West coast (Oreg. and Wash.) industrial relations, summary of
Bui. No. 349------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ----------------- 1924—Apr. 60-1
Packing company, plant assembly plan of, grievances handled______ _____________ 1924—July 37-8
Paterson (N . J.) silk mills, industrial conference p la n ............ ............................ ............ 1923—Apr. 79-80
Plans in operation, Cleveland.............................................................. ................. ................. 1923—July 47-50
Post Office Department plan----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—Aug. 16
Printing trades. A national council for the. (Walker)................................ ......................1921—Jan. 23-44
Railroads. Decisions of Railroad Labor Board.......... ...................................................
1925—M ay 119-21
----- Election of, Railroad Labor Board decision______________________ ________1924—Apr. 110-13
----- Elections. Held by National Mediation Board, 1934-35, analysis o f............. ....... 1936—Mar. 683-5
------------ 1935-36, under amended Railway Labor A ct--------------------------------------- 1937—Mar. 614-16
----- Memorandum of understanding between management and employees, Pennsyl­
vania Railroad...........................................................................................................................1921—Mar. 122-5
----- Shop-committee plan.................................... .......................................................................... 1923—July 46-7
----- Speech (Gen. W. W. Atterbury), Industrial Club, Chicago. .................................... 1925—M ay 31-2
Selection of, through N L R B elections, study of. (Brow n). _________ ____________ 1935—Jan. 1-18
Street railway company. Philadelphia, cooperative council---------------------------- ____
1925—Feb. 6
TVA. Provisions in general labor policy, announced Aug. 28, 1935______________ 1935—N ov. 1222-3
Types of employer-employee dealing, analysis of extent, April 1935. (Senturia)____ 1935—Dec. 1441-66
With reference to safety. (M cClellan)— ______________________________________ 1922—N ov. 22-6
Employee representation, foreign countries:
Argentina. Joint councils__________________________- ..................... .................. .......... 1922—Mar. 192-3
Austria. Works councils, operation of--------------------------------------------------------------- 1922—June 23-5
Belgium. Establishment of industrial councils___________________________________ 1921—Apr. 154
Canada. Development of joint industrial councils discussed at building conference. 1921—July 182-3
----- (Manitoba). Joint Council of Industry.................... ............................. ........................... 1923—Mar. 6-7
China. Works councils, factory law of 1929, provisions of. .............................. ............... 1930—June 111-12
Czechoslovakia. Law establishing workmen’s committees.............................................. 1921—N ov. 203-4
----- Operation of works’ committees, 1922------ ----------------------------------------------------- 1924—July 44-7
Denmark. Proposal of Federation of Trade Unions to introduce shop councils____ 1921—Jan. 208-9
Estonia. “Shop elders,” election of and functions, law of 1931-------------------------------1932—Jan. 52
Germany. Corporations. Representation of works councils on board of directors. __ 1922—July 30-2
----- Council movement----------------------- ---------------------------- ------------------- ------ 1921—Apr. 155-8, 168
----- Factory inspectors’ reports on operation of works council.......................... ................ 1922—Feb. 1-12
----- Metalworkers. Demand for greater rights........................................................... ......... 1922—Apr. 33-4
------------Federation, platform, plank on “ industrial democracy” — ................. ................
1924—Apr. 52
----- Works councils. Duties of................ ......................... ............ ............................ ............ 1925—July 18-19
------------Movement in. (Stern).................................................................................................... 1925—July 239
------------Operation of. ...................................................................1922—Feb. 1-12; 1923—Mar. 7-10, Dec. 48-9
------------Recent developments................................................................................................. . 1921—June 135-7
------------Rulings on rights o f ............................... ..................................................................... 1921—Oct. 40-1
----- Trade-union courses of instruction for works council members------------------------ 1922—June 203
Great Britain. Demand of workers for share in management; nonapplication of W hit­
ley plan.................. .............. ............................................................................. ........................ 1921—Mar. 200-1
----- Joint councils on railway industry......... ...........................................1921—Sept. 17-18; 1922—Apr. 34-5
----- Joint industrial (W hitley) councils. Origin, 1917, organization, operation, and
list as of 1938........................ ................. ......................................... ..................................... 1939—M ay 1046-54
----- Works committees, position of, in cooperative movement.............. .......................... 1923—Sept. 179-80
----- (England). Joint industrial councils. Ministry of Labor report on.......................... 1923—N ov. 27-9
International Congress on Social Policy, 1924. Works council, discussion....................... 1924—Dec. 167
Italy. Act of Dec. 11,1925, principal provisions.............. .................................................. 1926—Mar. 162-7
----- Works councils, movement for, Government proposals, etc.....................1921—Juno 149-54, July 161
Luxemburg. Works councils, reestablishment of, and fu n c tio n ........................ ........... 1925—Sept,. 14-15
Netherlands. Industrial councils act, Oct. 25,1932, principal provisions.......... .............. 1933—Feb. 309
Norway. Temporary law providing, 1920.................................................. .........................
1922—N ov. 43
Yugoslavia. Act of Feb. 28, 1922, scope, principal provisions____________________ 1923—Sept. 159-66
Employees' benefit associations. (See Benefits and benefit funds.)
Employees’ committees. (See Employees’ representation.)
Employees’ compensation. (See under Laws and legislation; also Workmen’s compensation.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

111

Employees' Compensation Commission (U. S. Government). Organization and funcPage
tions— ------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------ 1931—Mar. 44-6
Employer-employee cooperation, Finland. Employers' Central League and Central
Federation of Trade-Unions, agreement between, provisions______________ _________ 1940—Apr. 855-6
Employer-employee relations, United States:
Factors affecting employee morale, evaluation of, by National Retail Dry Goods Asso­
ciation---- ------ ----------------------------------------------------- -------------- ---------- ------------- 1939—July 96-7
Management and labor. (Address, Young)............. ............................................................ . 1927—N ov. 47
N IR A , methods of conducting under, study of extent of use of...... .................. „........... 1934—Feb. 308-11
Report to employees of company's operation..................................................................... 1938—M ay 1147-8
Trends shown in employers' conferences and management attitudes, year 1938.......... 1939—Mar. 501-5
Types of dealing, analysis of extent of, as of April 1935. (Senturia)........................... 1935—Dec. 1441-66
Wage-loan plan of General Motors established Jan. 1, 1939................................................. 1939—Jan. 66-7
(See also Labor-management cooperation; and Profit sharing.)
Employer-employee relations, foreign countries:
Great Britain. And Northern Ireland. Profit-sharing plans, by type, coverage, and
industry group, 1 9 3 7 . -------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- 1938—Dec. 1283-4
----- (England). Chemical industry, plan of employer-employee cooperation................ 1927—Dec. 59
Netherlands. Industrial advisory councils (joint), composition and functions_____ 1937—Apr. 903-4
Employers' associations, United States:
Agreements, with labor unions. (See Collective agreements, by industry; also name
of union.)
Building construction industry. National Board for Jurisdictional Awards, agreement
(4 associations) to uphold authority_____________________ ____ _____ ___________ _ 1922—Apr. 126
Clothiers, National Association of Retail, distribution costs........................................... 1922—Dec. 104-6
Collective bargaining with labor organizations, sum m ary.............................................. 1939—Aug. 302-10
Conventions, meetings. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.)
Democratic countries. Summary of status.......... ......... ................................ *..................... 1939—N ov. 1054
_
Denver (Colo.). Masters Builders’ Association, award........ ................. ..................... 1926—June 219-20
Electrical Contractors and Dealers, National Association of. Council on industrial
relations, creation.-------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1921—Mar. 126-7
ILO report upon tripartite collaboration between public officials and workers’ and em­
ployers’ organizations. Summary___ ________________________ ______________ 1940—Sept. 613-21
Metal manufacturers. Philadelphia, reports on hourly earnings of metal workers... 1927—Apr. 95-9
Printing trades, a national council for the. (Walker)........ . . . J ....... ..................................1921—Jan. 23-8
Shirt Manufacturers’ Association, N ew York City, registration of contractors.......... 1922—Oct. 72-5
Window Glass Manufacturers, National Association of, curtailing production, court
decisions.___________________ _______________ _____ — .............. 1923—Apr. 146-8; 1924—Feb. 195-8
Employers’ associations, foreign countries:
Canada (Manitoba). Council of industry, organization and activities............................. 1923—Mar. 6-7
■
-----Joint industrial council, basic principles of settling disputes.........................................
1922—Feb. 13
Chile. Development...... ....................................... ....................... ................................................
1922—Jan. 31
----- Industrial Association (Associacion del Trabajo) , work of—
............................................. 1924—Apr. 223
Denmark. Management of prison labor................................................................................... 1923—Nov. 224
----- Membership, e tc .......... .................................... .......................................................................
1921—Oct. 31
Europe, specified countries, and United States, trend in policies................................... 1923—Feb. 58-60
France. Membership sta tistic s................... ............. . 1923—N ov. 207; 1925—N ov. 240; 1926—Jan. 245
Germany. Attitude toward wage policy proposed by trade-unions.......................... 1923—N ov. 112,114
----- Employers' organizations, four groups, v. workers’ organizations, five classes of. 1921—Mar. 129-36
----- Status m 1921............................................................................................................................. 1923—Jan. 33-40
Italy. Legislation recognizing, 1925—
..................................................................................... 1926—Mar. 163-5
----- Registration of employers’ and workers’ associations, decree of Oct. 29,1922, text. 1923—Mar. 140-1
Mexico. Contracts of employment and workers’ organizations.......... ..................... 1923—Aug. 199-204
----- (Durango). Employers’ and workers’ organizations, act of Oct. 14, 1922, provi­
sions. (Yohe)_______________________________________________________________ 1924—Apr. 188
----- (Jalisco). Status and regulation, act of Aug. 13, 1923, provisions. (Larson)__ 1924—June 24-5
Portugal. Organization of and duties, law of 1933, regulating.._____ _____________ 1934—Apr. 838
South Africa. Number and membership________________________________________ 1921—N ov. 21
Spain (Barcelona Province). Right of association, decree regulating......................... 1923—M ay 212-13
Sweden. Membership, growth, etc__________________________ __________________1921—Oct. 27-8
----- Report of United States Commission, 1938....................................................................... 1938—Oct. 723-7
----- Tobacco Monopoly Co. (Ltd.), report, 1921................... ............................................ 1922—N ov. 139-41
Venezuela. Law for employers' and workers’ organizations......... ...................................... 1928—Dec. 136
“Employer’s Labor Statement,” proposal............................................................. ......................... 1929—Aug. 65-6
Employers’ liability. (See under Decisions of courts; also Workmen’s compensation.)
Employers’ organizations. (See Employers’ associations.)
Employment agencies, United States:
Chicago. Handicapped, placement services for, activities, 1930-34............................... 1935—N ov. 1200-2
CCC. Placement and guidance activities................................. ........................................... 1936—N ov. 1205
Committee on Economic Security, recommendations and report, Jan. 15,1935......... 1935—Feb. 311-12
Conferences, etc. (See Conventions, meetings, etc.)
“ Emigrant employment agencies,” Texas, licensing and operation---------- ------ ------ 1923—Mar. 89-90
Employment Division of Office of Indian Affairs, and National Reemployment Service,
placement of Indians, fiscal year 1934-35............................................... ............................. 1936—Apr. 942-4
Federal Employment Service. Report (Secretary of Labor), 1931-32.............................. 1933—Jan. 82-3
----- (See also U. S. Employment Service, this section.)
Forty Plus Club (New York City). Activities first held 1940.................................... ....... 1940—Sept. 623
Governmental, State, and Federal activities since 1890______________________ 1938—Feb. 301,312-14
Governors’*messages, recommendations, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, and New York,
1931______ __________________________ _______________________________ ______ 1931—Apr. 66
Handicapped workers, placement work of State public employment services................ 1931—Jan. 29-31
Indians, American, placement of, 1936-37. .........................................................................
1938—Feb. 363
Job-getting organizations, and techniques, r6sum6 of.......................................- ............. 1940—Apr. 797-806
Junior placement. Offices of N Y A .. . . ................. ..................... ......................................... . 1937—Oct. 882
----- Service inaugurated by U. S. Employment Service and N Y A ....... ............................. 1936—Oct. 989-91
Junior services, N Y A program, activities March 1936 to July 1, 1940_............................. 1940—Sept. 630
Juveniles, placement work of State public employment services....................................... 1931—Jan. 27-9
Labor clearing-house established, Spokane (W ash.)............................................................... 1921—N ov. 203




ii2

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment agencies, United States— Continued.
Legislation. Eastern States conference, Harrisburg, Pa., committee recommendations,
±*age
public and private offices____________ ________________________________________ 1931—Aug. 44-5
■ -Recommended, National Conference for Labor Legislation, February 1934.......... 1934—Apr. 785-6
----- (See also under Laws and legislation.)
National services. (See U. S. Employment Service, this section; also under Laws and
legislation U. S., Federal and general.)
National Youth Administration (U. S. Government). Junior placement service___ 1936—Apr. 924-5,
Oct. 989-91
----- Placement work for young women in camps for unemployed___________ ____ __ 1936—Apr. 925-6
----- Placements in cooperation with public services in 76 cities (31 States), July 1,1936,
to Jan. 1,1938________________________________________ ____ __________________ 1938—July 64r-6
New Jersey. Federal-State-Municipal Employment Service of New Jersey; report
and recommendations of advisory committee on employment problems.----------------1931—N ov. 57-9
----- Fee-fixing provisions of law held unconstitutional-------------- ---------------------------- 1928—July 68-72
New York City. Applicants to State Employment Service, by occupation, sex, and
age group, 1939______________________________________________ ______________ 1940—Apr. 861-2
----- Coordinating Committee on Employment Activities, formation and functions.. 1921—July 170-1
----- Emanuel Federated Employment Service, unit training courses inaugurated,
January 1931_______________________________________________________________ 1932—Mar. 600-3
----- Employment Bureau for the Handicapped, work of------------------------------------- 1923—Dec. 157-61
New York State. Employment Service, Division of Junior Placement, problems under
present industrial conditions. (Lewis)--------------------- ---------------------------------- 1932—Dec. 1269-72
Pacific coast shipowners’ Marine Service Bureau not a combination in restraint of
trade, court decision____________ ____ ______________________________________ 1928—Dec. 127-30
Philippine Islands. Private employment agency law, effective Jan. 1,1933, full tex t.. 1933—July 93-6
Placement procedure, State public employment services------------------- -------------------- 1931—Jan. 22-4
Private and public. California, report, 1927-28, fees,protective features, etc_______ 1930—Feb. 49-51
Private (fee-charging). License fees.Range of,and State revenues from.(W itte).. 1930—Apr. 150-1
------------Revenue derived from, State laws. (W itte)----- ------ ------------------------------- 1931—July 56-7
----- Louisiana, license law violations................... .............. ......................................................... 1922—July 194
----- Nevada, activities, 1920 to 1930....... ........................................... .......................... ............. 1931—June 48
----- New Jersey, placement fees increased, Jan. 1,1931...................... ................................. 1932—Feb. 298-9
----- Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation, United States.)
■ -Placements. California______________________________________ ________ ____ 1923—Feb. 187-9
------------Cincinnati, Consumers' League survey, December 1928.................................... 1929—Sept. 184-93
------------Colorado..................... ................... .................................................................................... 1923—Feb. 189
------------N ev a d a ............................................ ................................ ................. ............................. 1923—Apr. 106
------------Oregon........... .............. ..........................................................................- 1923—Mar. 88; 1925—Mar. 266
----- Tennessee, discontinuance............................................................... ................................... 1922—July 198-9
----- Wisconsin, fees, tentative regulations______ ___________ ____ __________________ 1922—July 200
Public employment offices, resolution, Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry---------------------- ----------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------------1931—July 91
Public employment services. Development of. Functioning, placement procedures,
etc______ ____________ ___________________________________ 1931—Jan. 10-32; 1935—June 1587-93
----- Federal and State. Activities. (See Public (free), also U. S. Employment Service),
this section.
Public (free). Activities, in cooperation with U. S. Employment Service--------------- 1921—Feb. 123
----- Boston (Mass.) Applicants (543') during January 1930, study of. (W ilke)------- 1930—Sept. 1-7
------------ Mercantile and office branch opened. -------------------------------------------------- 1922—Feb. 153
----- California. Filling jobs, cost of, biennium ending June30, 1930----------------------- 1932—Jan. 27
------------Placements, cost of; biennium ending June 30, 1932._____ ________ ______ 1933—M ay 1040-1
----- Cincinnati, Consumers’ League survey, December 1928. ____ _______________ 1929—Sept. 184-93
----- Massachusetts. Placement work, cost of.................. .................................... ................... 1921—Dec. 126
------------Placements, by age group and sex, 1928..................................................................— 1930—Jan. 49-50
----- Montana. Efforts to establish-------------------------------------------------------------------- 1922—M ay 223
----- North Carolina. Deaf, placement of, report, 1923-24............... ................................. 1925-May 151-2
----- Ohio. Plan to improve efficiency of__________________________ __________ ____ 1930—Apr. 63-4
----- Operations, statistical data. Arkansas------------- ------------------------------ ------ - 1921—Feb. 125, 214;
1922—Feb. 105; 1925—Jan. 133, Feb. 132
------------California......................................... ............ ............................................. 1923—Feb. 187-9, Aug. 150-1
------------Colorado. __________________ _________________________ 1922—Feb. 105-6; 1923—Feb. 189
------------Connecticut_____ _____________________________________________ 1921—June 81, Sept. 203;
1922—Aug. 131, Oct. 92; 1923—Feb. 189-90, Mar. 83-4; 1924—Feb. 149, Apr. 134-5, July 158,
Oct. 125, Dec. 109; 1925-July 131, Aug. 127, Oct. 94, Nov. 120, Dec. 124; 1926—Jan. 160, Feb.
125, Mar. 116, M ay 139
------------Illinois________________________ ___________ 1921—Jan. 143-4, June 81, July 169, Sept. 205;
1922— Feb. 106, Aug. 131-2, Dec. 136-7; 1923—Mar. 84-5, Apr. 104, M ay 179, June 189-90, Aug.
152, Sept. 124, Oct. 128-9; 1924—Feb. 149-50, Mar. 130-2, Apr. 135, M ay 151-2, June 126-7,
July 158-9, Aug. 153, Sept. 124, N ov. 162; 1925—Jan. 133-4, Feb. 133, Mar. 137-8, Apr. 129,
M ay 138, June 97, July 131, Sept. 112-13, N ov. 121; 1926—Jan. 161, Feb. 126, Apr. 115, M ay 139
------------Indiana__________ __________________________________ 1923—M ay 180-1; 1924—July 159-60
------------Iowa____ _____ _____ ______ ___________________________________________ 1922—Jan. 227;
1923—Mar. 86, Aug. 153; 1924—July 160, Aug. 154, Sept. 125, Oct. 125-6, Nov.162; 1925—Jan.
134, Feb. 133, Mar. 138, M ay 138, June 98, July 131, Aug. 128, Sept. 113, Oct. 94, N ov. 121,
Dec. 125; 1926—Feb. 126, Mar. 116, Apr. 115, M ay 139
------------Kansas____________ ____ _____________ _______ ______ ______ _____ _______ 1925—June 98
------------Kentucky......... .............. ................... ........................... .............. .................................... 1924—Sept. 125
------------Maryland....... ........................................................... .................................. 1924—Apr. 138, M ay 155
------------Massachusetts________________________________________________ 1922—M ay 155-6, Oct. 92;
1923—Mar. 86-7, M ay 182, July 152-3, Aug. 154, Sept. 125; 1924—Jan. 130-1, July 160-1, Aug.
154, N ov. 162; 1925—M ay 138, Aug. 128, Sept. 133, N ov. 121, Dec. 125; 1926—Jan. 161, Feb.
127, Mar. 116, Apr. 116, M ay 140
------------Minnesota___________________________________________________________ 1921—Oct. 136-7;
1922—Nov. 169, Dec. 137-8; 1923—Mar. 87, Apr. 105; Dec. 144; 1924^-Mar. 135, M ay 156, Aug.
154; 1925—Mar. 139, M ay 138-9, Aug. 128
------------Missouri....................................... ...................................................................................... 1923—July 153
------------Nebraska..................................................................... .................................... 1922—Feb. 106, Dec. 138
------------- N evada................................................................................. .............________________ 1923—Apr. 106
------------N ew Hampshire.................................................................................... 1923—M ay 182; 1925—Apr. 130




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

113

Employment agencies, United States—Continued.
* ag€
Public (free). Operations, statistical data. New Jersey........ ............................. ............. 1921—N ov. 198
------------N ew York____ ____________ _____ ____ _____________ ___________________ 1922—Feb. 106,
Mar. 185, Nov. 169; 1923—Feb. 154, Oct. 130; 1924—Mar. 135-6
------------North Carolina................................... 1921—M ay 173; 1923—Mar. 87-8, Sept. 126; 1925—M ay 139
------------North Dakota.............................................__...............................
1921—June 126; 1923—Mar. 87-8
------------O hio____________________________ _____________________________________ 1921—June 85,
July 169, N ov. 199; 1922—Aug. 134; 1923—June 193, Aug. 154, Sept. 126; 1924— Jan. 131, Feb.
154, M ay 158-9, Aug. 155, Sept. 126, Oct. 126, Nov. 163; 1925—Jan. 135, Feb. 133, Mar. 139, Apr.
130, M ay 140, July 132, Aug. 129, Oct. 94, Nov. 122, Dec. 125; 1926—Jan. 161, Feb. 127, Mar. 117,
Apr. 116
------------Oklahoma________ ______ _____________ _____________________ _______ ___ 1921—Mar. 185;
1924r—N ov. 163, Dec. 110; 1925—Feb. 134, Mar. 139, Apr. 130, M ay 140, June 98, July 132, Sept.
113, Oct. 95, N ov. 122, Dec. 126; 1926—Jan. 161-2, Feb. 127, Mar. 117, M ay 140
------------Oregon___________________ ______ _______ ______ __________ 1923—Mar. 88; 1925—Mar. 266
------------Pennsylvania_________________________________ ____ ___ ____ ______ 1922—July 133-4,
Aug. 134, N ov. 171, Dec. 139-40; 1924—Feb. 155-6, Mar. 137, M ay 159, July 161, Aug. 155, Oct.
126, N ov. 164, Dec. Ill; 1925—Jan. 135, Feb. 134, June 99, Aug. 129, Sept. 114, Oct. 95, Dec. 126;
1926—Jan. 162, Mar. 117, Apr. 116, M ay 140
------------Philippine Islands.................. ............................ ....................................................... 1926—M ay 167
------------Texas............ ........................................ ..............................................1921—Aug. 210; 1923—Mar. 89-90
------------Virginia......... .................................................................................................................... 1925—Apr. 121
---------- West Virginia.................. .................................................... *.......................................... 1923—M ay 184
------------Wisconsin__________ ____ ______________________________ ____ ______ 1921—Mar. 144-5,
June 86; 1922—Mar. 188-9, Apr. 145-6, M ay 156, Aug. 134-5; 1923—Mar. 90, June 194, Sept. 127;
1924—Feb. 156, July 161, Aug. 155, Sept. 126, N ov. 164, Dec. Ill; 1925—Jan. 135, Feb. 134, Mar.
140, Apr. 131, M ay 140, July 132, Aug. 129, Sept. 114, Oct. 95, N ov. 122-3, Dec. 126; 1926—Jan.
162. Feb. 128, Mar. 118, Apr. 117
----- Wisconsin. State and local public employment offices, expenditures, 1928 to 1931-. 1933—M ay 1041
Public, private, and plant employment offices. Recruitment of labor, practice of firms,
by industry___________________________________________ _____________ - .......... 1932—N ov. 1006-7
Public service. Extension of, for benefit of older worker--------------- ------------------------ 1933—July 27-9
----- National Conference on Labor Legislation, October 1935, committee report and
recommendations________________________ __________________________________ 1935—N ov. 1255-6
Puerto Rico. Report on, 1921-22. (Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor)_____ 1923—Dec. 213-14
Registrants, U . S. Employment Service. (See under U. S. Employment Service),
this section.
Rochester (N. Y .). Placement difficulties, older workers..................... ............................ 1930—Mar. 45-6
----- Public Employment Center. Applicants interviewed, study of 7,600................... 1932—Apr. 782-3
------------Methods of__________________________________________________ ________ 1932—Apr. 778-81
San Francisco, the Employment Aid of. Philanthropic placement bureau, work of,
8 months, 1929-30__________________________________________________ ____ ____ 1930—Sept. 31-4
Standards recommended by Southern Regional Conference on Labor Legislation and
Economic Security (Jan. 20-21,1935)____________________________________ ______ 1935—Mar. 672
State services. Affiliated with U. S. Employment Service, status Dec. 31,1936______ 1937—Feb. 289
-----Growth and work of, 1933 to December 1936. (Webber)_______________ ______ 1937—Jan 285-91
•
----- Labor clearance procedure in cooperation with U . S. Employment Service......... 1937—June 1405-6
----- Present organization and a c t iv it ie s .____ ________ _____ ______________ _____ 1931—Jan. 20-32
■----Statistics of operation. (See Public (free), this section; also each issue M . L. R.,
February 1935-December 1940.)
Toledo (Ohio) employment security center. Veteran-placement plan, 1940. .......... 1940—N ov. 1120-2
Unemployment reported. (See Unemployment.)
U. S. Employment Service. Active file of applicants. Compared with Unemploy­
ment Census of November 1937__________________________ __________________ 1938—June 1456-64
------------Influenced by unemployment and unemployment compensation, 1936-38.. 1938—July 160-3
------------M ovement parallel to movement of unemployment, employment, and indus­
trial-production indexes, 1934-38_____________________________________________ 1938—July 156-60
----- Age classification (applicants'* and placements, during year ended June 1935___ 1936—Mar. 734-7
----- Age distribution. Relief and nonrelief placements, 1935-36__________________ 1937—Jan. 169-75
----- Applicants. Distribution (percentage), by age, sex, and color, November 1937_ 1938—July 1457-9
------------ Placement experience of young ana old, January 1936 to June 1937..........1938—Jan 3-15
------------ Characteristics of____________________________________________________ 1937—Oct. 966-75
------------ 1935-36 and April 1940, by age, sex, industrial and occupational group, and
unemployment status____________________________ _________ 1936—Dec. 1522-8; 1940—Oct. 836-50
----- Clearance system inaugurated October 1940................................ ............. - ............ 1940—Dec. 1356-7
----- Clearing labor between States_________________ ____ ______ ____ ___________ _ 1937—June 1401-6
----- Cooperation of States in providing employment service organizations....................... 1937—Feb. 285-91
----- Establishment of, and relation to State services____________ ____ ____________ _ 1938—Feb. 312-14
----- Functions and methods of operation, 1936______________________ ___________ 1937—Apr. 1006-7
----- Geographical distribution of applicants and placements, 1936-37____ ____ _____ 1937—Oct. 969-70
----- Industrial classification of placements. September-October 1935.. 1936—M ay 1380-90, June 1666-81
----------- Year ended June 30,1935_______________ ___________________ 1936—Jan. 188-9, Apr. 1075-80
----- Industrial-experience distribution of applicants by sex, age group, and State, April
1940__________________________________________________________ __________ _ 1940—Oct. 843-50
----- Industrial, occupational, and age distribution of clients, June 1936........................ 1936—N ov. 1268-76
----- Length of unemployment of new applicants, September 1935..................................... 1936—Mar. 738-40
----- National Reemployment Service. Activities by States, November 1935-March
1937. (See Employm ent Offices, each issue M . L. J?., February 1936-May 1937.)
------------Organization of, 1933-34_____________________________ __________________ 1934—Oct. 847-8
----- Occupational classification of new registrants and persons placed, June 1935------ 1936—Feb. 431-5
----- Occupational distribution of applicants by skill, sex, age group, State, and area,
April 1940___________________________ _____ - ............ - ................................. 1940—Oct. 836-43, 848-9
----- Occupational qualifications of applicants to________________________________ 1937—Mar. 712-19
----- Occupational research programs________ ____ ______ _____ ____ _____ _______ 1935—N ov. 1350-2
----- Operations. Analysis of, M ay-July 1935............... 1935—Sept. 716-21, Oct. 1050-6, Dec. 1617-24
------------ First year........................................................................................ ............................. 1934—Oct. 847-52




114

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment agencies, United States—Continued.
U . S. Employment Service. Operations. M onthly statistics, November 1934 to
_
September 1940. (See each issue of M . L. R., February 1935-December 1940.)
.rage
----------- Years, ending June 30,1934-37, and years 1938 and 1939___________________ 1934—Oct. 847-52;
1935—Aug. 449-50; 1936—Aug. 478-80; 1937—Aug. 451-3; 1939—Feb. 431-3; 1940—Apr. 874-7
----- Placements. Classification of persons by length of period of unemployment,
October 1935........ ............. - ........................................................................................ ........... 1936—June 1666-81
----------- Made through clearance between States, January 1936 to March 1937........... ....... 1937—June 1402
----------- Private industry, 1936, increase over 1935.._____ ______________ ____ ____ 1936— Oct. 985-9
----- Private-placement program, progress January 1935 to February 1937, by State.. 1937—Apr. 1001-07
----- Reemployment Service, function of, in program of P W A _____________________ 1933—Oct. 800-2
----- Registrants. Characteristics, analysis of, as of August 1938. (W ellem eyer).*.. 1939—Apr. 948-52
----------- Unemployed, year ending June 1938, numerical, industrial, occupational, and
age distribution ............................................................................. .................................... 1938—Oct. 907-15
----- Reports of, used as measures of unemployment. (Hollander and Vinogradoff). 1938—June 1456-61,
July 156-63
----- Transfer of, under Reorganization Plan No. 1, effective July 1,1939...................... ....... 1939—Aug. 379
----- Unemployment estimates from active file of registrants______________ _____ 1937—Nov. 1093-1109
-----Wagner-Peyser Act, 1933. (See under Laws and legislation, U. S. Federal and
general.)
Veterans, placement of. Public employment services, by State. (See each issue of
M . L. R., February 1935-December 1940.)
----- Youth organizations, private. (Job Hunters of Boston; East Side Job Council,
New York City; Under Thirty Club of Houston; Eighteen to Thirty Associates,
San Francisco). Activities summarized................................ ........................................ 1940—N ov. 1128-33
(See also Employment statistics; Recruitment of labor.)
Employment agencies, foreign countries:
General. International labor convention (agreements), 1919,1920,1933, provisions of.. 1934—Apr. 774-6
----- Public employment services. Development of, historical sketch_____________ 1935—June 1587-93
------------ Meaning of---------- ------------- ----------------- ----- --------------------------------------- 1930—M ay 42-3
----- Public offices, in operation, by country, in relation to area and population, and
activities................................... ............................................................................................. ....... 1930—M ay 55
----- Seamen. Convention adopted by ILO (1920)......................................................... 1936—M ay 1184-5
Argentina. Public (free), developm ent.............................................................................. 1930—M ay 43-4
Australia. Public (free), statistics, by State, 1928.............................................................. 1930—M ay 44-5
Austria. Public (free), legislation, and activities in 1927______ ____ _____________ 1930—M ay 45
Belgium. Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to public
employment services..................................... ........................................................................... 1936—Dec. 1541
-----National Employment and Unemployment Office established............. .................. 1935—Dec. 1625-6
----- Public employment offices, decree regulating.......................................................... . 1924—July 182-3
-----Public (free), legislation and activities..................................... .......................................... 1930—M ay 45
Canada. Employment Service. Dominion and Provincial, operations____________ 1925—Feb. 158;
1929_Mar 224-6
----------- Establishment of, Employment and Social Insurance Act, June 28,1935..:. 1935—Sept. 609-11
-----National Employment Commission provided for by law of 1936________________ 1936—Sept. 618
----- Provincial and interprovincial clearance system, and statistics for 1928..................... 1930—M ay 45
------ Recommendation of building conference. M ay 1921......................... .............................. 1921—July 183-4
China. Labor exchanges, rural, in North China-....................................... ... ...................... 1926—Nov. 44-5
-----Law regulating employment exchanges, 1935__________________________________ 1936—Jan. 190
----- Placement services for war refugees_____________________ _________________ 1940—June 1384-5
% ----- War-emergency placement work, various organizations............................................ 1938—N ov. 1019-20
Colombia. Labor inspectors' duties and registrations, 1930_____________________ _
1930—M ay 46
Czechoslovakia. Free public and private, regulations, and statistics for1927............ .
1930—M ay 46
Denmark. Act effective Jan. 1, 1922, provisions______________ ____ ___ ___________ 1922—July 162
----- Arbedjsanvisingskontor system, outline and working methods_____________ ____ 1930—M ay 46-8
----- Operation under law of March 1937................ ......................... ....................................... 1937—Aug. 360
Dominican Republic. State office created in 1929.............................................................. .
1930—M ay 48
Estonia. Public (free), statistics, January 1930................. ..................................................... 1930—M ay 49
European labor exchanges, the work of. (Speek)................................................. .............. 1928—Dec. 49-61
Finland. Public (free), statistics for 1927____________ ___ ____ ____________________ 1930—M ay 49
France. Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to public
employment services______________________ ______ _______ _______ _________ 1936—Dec. 1538-40
---- - Operations, etc., 1911 to 1918............ ........................... ......................................................... 1925—M ay 166
-----Operations, public employment offices, 1917-34....... ......... ............................ .............. 1935—Dec. 1626-7
----- Public (free), and regulations for private (fee-charging) offices_______ __________ 1930—M ay 49-50
Germany. Bureau for Employment and Unemployment Insurance, functions of, and
costs of administration, e t c _______ _________________________________________
1936—Jan. 23-37
----- Consolidation of, since 1923, under Governmental control_________ ___________ 1939—Oct. 806-8
----- Legislation. (See under Laws and legislation, foreign countries.)
----- National employment service, development of, and statistics for 1928....... .......... .. 1930—M ay 50-1
----- Prisoners, number of and occupational characteristics to be reported by public
employment offices under decree M ay 1938________________ ___________________ 1939—Feb. 350-1
----- Private commercial companies liquidated with compensation and supplanted by
Federal Bureau, Dec. 31, 1930_____ ______ ________________________ .____________ 1931—June 57-9
----- Seamen, free employment exchanges for, decree of N ov. 8,1924..................... ........... 1925—Mar. 152-3
----- Woman labor, stabilizing demand for.............................. „......................... ..................1921—Aug. 135-40
----- (Saxony). Technische Hochschule students’ employment bureau, Dresden______ 1923—June 195
Great Britain. Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to
public employment services___________________ ___________________________ 1936—Dec. 1529-34
-----National system, employment exchanges. Development of, and statistics for 1928.
1930—M ay 51
---------- r Records for 1934 and 1935___________ ______________ _________________ 1936—Nov. 1170-1
-----Operations.'_______ _____ ________________________ _____ ____ ________________ 1921—Jan. 150,
Apr. 87-8, M ay 111-12, July 171-2, Oct. 162; 1922—Jan. 174-5, Apr. 155, July 136-7, Oct. 103-4
----- Placement work, pfogress of, 1923 to 1933___ ______ ________________________ 1934—Aug. 311-14
----- Recruiting of seasonal labor, methods developed to meet demands, 1933-34___ 1935—July 171-2
----- Seasonal labor, Placements, 1933-34, by type of employment............. ............... . 1935—July 172-4
------------Supply of, through employment exchanges, 1932.................................................... - 1933—July 33
----- (And Ireland). Operations..................................................................................... 1923—Jan. 135, Apr. 119




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

115

Employment agencies, foreign countries—Continued.
Page
Great Britian. (England). Employment exchanges, work of, 1927, 1928, and 1929. 1930—Sept. 28-30
----------- Vacation season, placements at holiday resorts___________________________ 1931—July 63-4
------------Vacancies reported to and filled by employment exchanges, 1922 to 1930_____ 1931—Aug. 75
----- (London, England). Clerical workers_______________________________________ 1935—Apr. 918
----------- Placement of juvenile workers, 1932 and 1933, by occupation and sex_____ 1934—June 1319-20
Hungary. Public (free), statistics for, 1927______________________________ ______ 1930—M ay 51
Italy. Central employment office, establishment o f_______________________ _____ __ 1925—Jan. 210
----- Employment exchange system, changes in, by decrees, 1928 and 1929____________ 1930—July 51-2
----- Public employment offices, agricultural and commercial, decree and operation. - . 1930—June 65-6
----- Public (free), legislation, and registrations for January 1930_____________________ 1930—M ay 51
Japan. Act of Apr. 8, 1921, provisions___ ____________ ____ ______ 1921—N ov. 147; 1922—Aug. 187
----- Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to public em­
ployment services_____ _____ ________________ ____________________________. . . 1936—Dec. 1540-1
----- Labor-market questionnaires to be received from local authorities periodically.. . 1940—June 1376-7
----- Public (free). regulation and activities, 1925........ .......... ..............................................
1930—M ay 52
Latvia. Public (free), activities in, December 1929............ .............................................. . 1930— M ay 52
Mexico. Establishment of free agencies, regulations effective Apr. 14,1934. ........... 1934—June 1320-4
----- Operations................. ........................... .................................................. ................ ............ .
1921—N ov. 148
----- Private (fee-charging), regulations____ ____________________ __________________ 1930—M ay 52
Netherlands. Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to
public employment services_____ _______ _____________ ____________ ______ ___ 1936—Dec. 1534-7
----- Public (free), national system, activities in, 1926__________________ ___________ 1930—M ay 52
New Zealand. Public (free), and private (fee-charging), development of................. . 1930—M ay 52-3
Norway. Applicants per 100 vacancies, 1919-20 to 1923-24.. ......................................... 1925—Feb. 159-61
----- Public (free), development, and operations in,1929............ .......................................... 1930—M ay 53
Poland. Public (free)’, regulations, and activities in, January 1929.................................... 1930—M ay 53
Rumania. Public (free), statistics for, 1 9 2 5 ............................ ....................... ..................... 1930—M ay 53
South Africa. Public (free), in connection with post offices, statistics, 1927_________
1930—M ay 54
Soviet Union (U. S. S. R.) Public (free), compulsory use of, and statistics, 1927 and 1928. 1930—M ay 53
Sweden. Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to public
employment services______________________________________ ________________ 1936—Dec. 1541-2
----- Public (free), national system, statistics, 1928__________________ _______ ___ r___ 1930—M ay 53
Switzerland. Advisory councils—composition, functions, activities, in relation to pub­
lic employment services_______________________________ _____ _______________ 1936—Dec. 1537-8
----- Public (free), establishment of? and activities during 1928______________________ 1930—M ay 53-4
Turkey. Government service provided for by national labor law, effective June 1937.. 1937—Mar. 641
----- Private offices, provision for abolishing, national labor law, effective June 1937.. 1937—Mar. 641
Uruguay. Public (free), labor inspectors’ duties, statistics, 1925____ , ............ ................ 1930—M ay 54
Venezuela. Provision, 1936, national labor law ...... .............. ................................................. 1936—Dec. 1459
Yugoslavia. Act'(in effect) June 14, 1922, provisions of................................................... 1923—Sept. 164-6
-----Public (free), central and local offices, 1927....................................................................... . 1930—M ay 54
(See also Employment statistics: Recruitment of labor.)
Employment assurance. (See Employment, stabilization of.)
Employment bureaus. (See Employment agencies.)
Employment by two companies. Joint responsibility for payment of minimum wage
under Fair Labor Standards A ct________________________________________________ 1939—June 1368-9
Employment certificates. (See wader Child labor and welfare.)
Employment conditions. (See Employment statistics; Labor and industrial conditions;
Sanitation, working conditions, etc.; Seasonal employment; Unemployment.)
Employment contracts. (See Contracts, employment; also Labor contracts.)
Employment exchanges. (See Employment agencies.)
Employment fluctuations. (See Employment statistics.)
Employment, government control of. Germany. Steps toward regimenting workers,
1934-38_________ _____ _____ ___________________________________________________ 1938—June 1393-5
Employment guaranty. (See Employment, stabilization of.)
Employment management. (See Management, employment (personnel).)
Employment, methods and extent of increasing or “spreading work.” (Barrett)--------- 1932—Sept. 491-2
Employment of foreigners. (See Foreigners, employment of.)
Employment of women. (See Woman workers.)
Employment offices. (See Employment agencies.)
Employment opportunities:
Agriculture. (See under Agriculture.)
Construction industry. Grade-crossing elimination, man-hours of labor created----- 1937—Sept. 581-2
Deaf. Survey of. (Report of U. S. Office of Education)___________________ 1936—Dec. 1416-19
Latin America. For North Americans, not inviting______________________________ 1926—Feb. 157
Lumber and timber products. Shifting and declining nature, and causes for changes. 1940—July 56-61
Manufacturers, location of, affecting. Study of, 1899-29_________________________ 1934—Apr. 795-7
Mineral industry. In future, as affected by mechanization.................................... ......... 1937—July 124-6
New industries. Possibilities in_____________________________________ ________ 1936—Oct. 871-2
Occupational titles, dictionary of (U. S. Employment Service), resume of------------- 1940—June 1379-80
Older workers. Analysis of, factors affecting, in New England industries, 1938___ 1939—Apr. 765-80
Petroleum and natural-gas industry, general discussion. (Rogers)_____________ 1940—June 1293-1307
Potential, from recovery of wasted human and material resources. (U. S. National Re­
sources Committee report)_____________________________________ ____ _______ 1939—Nov. 1075-9
Radio-broadcasting industry. Musicians and actors___________________ __________ 1931—Aug. 6-7
Tung-oil production. Probable increase in jobs as industry develops.......... .............. 1940—Aug. 308-11
Women. Technological changes and their effect, analysis. (U. S. Women’s Bureau
Bull. No. 107)______ _________________________________________________________ 1936—Jan. 81-4
Employment outlook:
Graduates of 1940 (high-school and college) and specially trained students of next 5
years. Survey by Ohio Unemployment Compensation Bureau, summary_____ 1940—Oct. 898-900
M ining industry, iron. Technological changes and other factors causing decline in
opportunities_________ ___________________________________________ _______ 1940—Oct. 883-6
Service, recommended by Advisory Committee on Education_____ ____________ 1938—July 86-8
Employment plans, public works. Consideration by ILO conferences, 1935, 1936,1937. 1937—Sept. 596-G02
Employment prospects and possibilities. (See Employment opportunities; Employment
outlook.)




116

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Employment provided:
p ag.p
Man-hours of labor required for typical plumbing and heating supplies in dwellings,
s
as of 1935_____ __________________ __________—............................................................ 1938—June 1383-5
PW A construction, directly and indirectly, 1933-37---------------------------------------------- 1938—Jan. 16-26
PW A non-Federal construction projects, man-hours of overhead work since 1933___1940—Feb. 334-7
Rail transportation of construction materials, labor requirements------------------- ------ 1937—Oct. 846-53
Employment, registry of. antitrust act. (See Decisions of courts—Antitrust acts.)
Employment, selected industries. (See Employment statistics.)
Employment services, public. (See wider Employment agencies.)
Employment, stabilization of:
Annual wage on guaranteed employment. Plans of 3 companies (Proctor & Gamble,
Nunn-Bush, and Geo. A. Hormel & C o.)............................................................................... 1938—July 52-9
----- TJnion-agreement provisions............................................................................................... 1940—Aug. 283-9
Australia. Seasonal fluctuations and business stability------------------------- ------------- 1928—Dec. 78-82
Automobile industry. Instability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928. 1920—Feb. 20-3
----- Packard Motor Car Co., policy of stabilizing production----------------------------------- 1930—Mar. 49
----- Survey of possibilities of regularizing employment, authorized N ov. 21, 1934
(recommendations)------------------------ ------ -------------------------------------------- 1935—Jan. 60, Mar. 646-7
Baltimore. Municipal Commission on Employment Stabilization, program of
activities----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1931—Dec. 79-80
Boot and shoe industry. Irregularity of employment. (Stewart)—.................................. 1931—Jan. 52-3
----- Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923-28______________ ________1929-Mar. 43-5
Brattleboro (Vt.). Working women, operation of trust fund for shop girls, seam­
stresses, etc________________________________________________________________ 1925—July 98-101
Brazil. Commercial employees, guaranty of employment and stability of salaries,
Executive decree (No. 183) of Dec. 26, 1934-------------- ------------------------------------------ 1935—June 1492
Building trades. Continuity of employment in — ............................................. .............. . 1923—Feb. 211
----- Fluctuating employment in, and remedy, Ohio.......................................................... 1927—July 117-20
----- Regularizing employment in, San Francisco ................................................................. 1923—Apr. 106
----- Seasonal irregularity in ........................ ............................................... ............................... 1924—N ov. 158-60
California Chamber of Commerce. Program, adopted by 450 State firms......................1931—N ov. 55-7
Chemical industry. Soap factory, employment guaranty plan, 48 weeks in each year. 1924—Apr. 167-9
Cincinnati: Citizens’ committee (with 10 subcommittees, creation of), and functions. 1929-Nov. 117-18
----- Plan in operation............. ................ .......................................... ......................................... 1930—M ay 31-3
Cloth hat and cap industry, St. Paul, guaranty provisions in agreement____________ 1925—Apr. 103
Clothing industry. Guaranty of employment, N ew York City, clothing workers,
1-year agreement, Oct. 1, 1932_____________________________ ___________ ____ ___ 1933—Feb. 336
----- M en’s. Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928. .................... 1929—Jan. 13-16
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated. Employment guaranty for 9 months,
New York City, agreement, Oct. 1,1932--------------------- ------- -------------------- --------- 1933—Feb. 336
Coal industry. Irregularity of employment in. (U. S. Coal Commission study)___ 1924—Jan. 123-9
Columbus (Ohio). Trend toward...... ........................................ .......................... ................
1926—July 28
Committee on Economic Security, recommendations and report, Jan. 15,1935...... ......... 1935—Feb. 307
Consolidated Water Power & Paper Co. Minimum annual income guarantee p la n ... 1929—Sept. 182
Cotton industry. Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928_____ 1929—June 218-20
Dock labor (Antwerp, Hamburg, Liverpool, and Rotterdam). Plans in operation,
sum m ary. ........ .............. .................................................................................................. ....... 1930—Aug. 33-41
Employers’ organizations’ committee r ep o r t.............................. .......................................... 1930—June 56
Fair Labor Standards (Wage and Hour) Act. Guaranteed annual wage p lan ......... 1940—Sept. 560-1
Federal Employment Stabilization Act, Feb. 10, 1931, analysis of_________________ 1931—Mar. 62-4
Fertilizer industry. Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928.__ 1929—June 221-2
Financial house, permanence of workers in ______________________________________ 1927—M ay 37-8
France. Workers called to military service, former positions guaranteed, decree-law
of Apr. 21,1939--------- ------------- ------ ----------------------------- -------------------------------- 1939—June 1369
' General Electric Co. Plans outlined by president, June 16,1930, and Sept. 16,1931 _. 1930—Aug. 31-2;
1931—Nov. 45-53
----- Revision of plan, N ov. 1,1934, and unemployment benefits.. ________________ 1934—Dec. 1363 -5
1930—M ay 39
Great Britain. Employment guaranty plan, Imperial Chemical industries, L td ____
Guaranteed annual wage encouraged by Fair Labor Standards A ct_______________ 1939—Apr. 914-16
Guaranty, employment. Findings of National Industrial Conference Board, 1935____ 1936—July 89
Hartford County (Conn.). Manufacturers’ Association, devices for creating work,
N ov. 11, 1931________________________________________________________________ 1932—Jan. 27-8
Hoover (President-elect) plan for three billion dollar reserve construction fu n d ............ 1928—Dec. 48-9
Insurance company, stability of woman workers._________________________________1927—M ay 38-9
International Harvester Co. Plan for unemployment income through savings and
extra-compensation system......... ............ .............................................. .............................. 1940—Sept. 631-3
Iron and steel industry. Stability of employment in________ _____ ______ __________ 1928—N ov. 1-3
Job-assurance (salary-contract) plan. Nunn-Bush Shoe Co., effective July 4, 1935,
provisions o f . . . , ______________________________________________ ______ ______ 1935—Aug. 352-3
Lay-off problem. Experience of a group of employers____________ __________ ____ 1930-r-Sept. 19-23
Leather industry. Stability of employment (percent of full time), 1923 to 1928............. 1929—Mar. 42-3
Longshore work, Seattle (W ash.)____ ____ ______________________________________ 1922—Dec. 40-2
Lumber industry. Wisconsin, plan to avoid complete shut-downs.................................... 1931—Dec. 82-3
Massachusetts. Legislative resolution for survey, 1929............... ..................................... 1929—N ov. 116-17
----- Measures for, report on. (Bellerby)____________________ ___________ _______ 1926—July 101-2
----- Special commission on. Final report, bill proposing system of compulsory un­
employment reserves_____________________ _____ ____ _______________ ___ ____ 1933—Feb. 280-2
------------Preliminary report, 5-year State construction plan____ ____ _____ ____ _____ 1932—Feb. 282
M eatpacking industry. (George A. Hormel Co., Austin, M inn.). Employment as­
surance plan_________________________________________ _____________ ________ 1935—June 1462-3
------------Straight time of guaranteed employment, description of plan_______________ 1938—July 56-9
----- Indiana and Iowa, agreement providing guaranteed employment, effective July 16,
1934__________ ______ ________________________________________________________ 1934—Oct. 932
Mining, bituminous coal. Shut-down of 10 mines. Consolidation Coal Co. marketing
and operating policy________________________ ____ ______ ____________________ 1928—July 27-8
Minnesota, University of. Employment Stabilization Research Institute, three pro­
jected studies_________________________________________ __________________ ____ 1932—Jan. 28-9
Motor-vehicle industry. Attempt to regularize in 1935________________ ________ 1936—Mar. 539-40
National Association of Manufacturers’ study of plant experience. R6sum6 of find­
in g s - . . .................................................................................................................................... 1940—M ay 1118-21




SUBJECT INDEX, JANUARY 1 9 2 1 TO DECEMBER 1 9 4 0

117

Employment, stabilization of—Continued.
Tnge,
N ew England industrial plants. Research departments, work and results of______ 1929—M ay 89-91
N ew York. Advisory Committee on Employment Problems, report, June 20, 1930. 1930—Sept. 23-5
----- Committee on Stabilization of Industry for the Prevention of Unemployment,
reports of_______________________________________ ____ ______ 1930—Aug. 26-31; 1931—Jan. 61-74
Ohio. Columbus unemployment survey, fluctuations in certain industries__________ 1926—July 25-8
----- Plan for stabilizing industry and employment, approved by governor, text______ _ 1930—Apr. 62-6
Paper and pulp industry. Stability of employment (percent of full tim e), 1923 to 1928 1929—Apr. 45-6
Paper mills. Guaranteeing full-time earnings_________________________________ 1926—M ay 121-3
Philadelphia. Chamber of Commerce plan______________________________ _______ _ 1930—Feb. 41-2
Pottery industry. Stability of employment, 1923 to 1928__________________________ 1929—July 180-1
President’s Emergency Committee for Employment, recommendations___________ 1931—June 35-40
Public works. Jones bill (S. 626, 71st Cong., 1st sess.) to stabilize employment, and
State precedents for_________________________________________________________ 1929—Oct. 184r6
Puerto Rico. Legislative resolution for survey, 1929________ _____ ____________ 1929—N ov. 116-17
Radio industry. Radio tubes, fluctuation of employment, 1929___..................................1931—June 45-8
----- Receiving sets, fluctuations of employment, 1929______________________________ 1931—June 41-5
Railroads. Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and Shop Craft System Federation No. 30
agreement, Feb. 10,1930; plan, text of__________________ __________________ 1930—Apr. 66, Aug. 26
----- Displacement of railroad labor. (Stewart)........ ............ ..........................i ________ 1929—Mar. 49-52
----- Maintenance-of-way work__________________________ ______________________ 1924—July 156-8
----- Railroad shop crafts, program of A. F. of L. Railway Employees’ D epartm ent... 1930—Aug. 24-6
----- Seaboard Air Line Railway. Shop craft employees, plan____________ ________ 1930—M ay 34-5
------------ Steady employment guarantee, shop employees__________________________ 1929—Sept. 183
----- Stability of employment, by road and by occupation, 1922-27. (Dunlap).......... 1928—Aug. 19-28
Rochester (N. Y .). Methods followed, 14 plants_______________________ _____ _____ 1931—Apr. 47
Seasonal employment, efforts to regularize employment, certain industries..................... 1922—Jan. 157-68
Share-the-work provisions in collective agreements____________________________ 1940—June 1340-8
Shoes (men’s, manufacture of (Nunn-Bush Shoe Co.). Yearly salary, guarantee of,
description of plan_________________________________________________________ 1938—July 54-6
Silk industry. Paterson (N. J.), Broad Silk Manufacturers’ Association, program,
4-day basis__________________________________________________________________ 1929— Dec. 165
----- Percent of full-time employment in, 1923 to 1928_____________________________ 1929—M ay 87-9
Slaughtering and meat-packing industry. Stability of employment (percent of full
time), 1923 to 1928__________________________________________________________ 1929—Apr. 46-8
Soap manufacturing (Procter & Gamble). Guaranty of regular employment, plan
described___________________________________________________________________ 1938—July 52-4
Springfield (M ass.). Department stores, employment of older persons in. (H ewes). 1932—Oct. 773-81
“ Steady employment plan.” Joint operation by three companies, Fond du Lac, W is. 1930—Dec. 70-1
1929—July 74
Sugar-refining industry. California & Hawaiian Sugar Refining Corporation. ..........
Tool (geometric) manufacturing industry. Geometric Tool Co. experience
..........1931—Sept. 34-5
Trade agreements (229 locals), analysis of provisions for regularity of em ploym en t... 1929—M ay 79-86
Unemployment fund. Keeds & Northrup Co., Philadelphia. ______ __________ 1927—June 134-5
Union-agreement plans. Limited guaranty_____________________________________ 1940—Aug. 287-9
----- W ithout restrictions______________________________________________________ 1940—Aug. 284-6
United States Chamber of Commerce program, long-time, and immediate measures.. 1931—N ov. 43-5
Employment Stabilization Office, Federal (U. S. Government). Transfer, under Reorgan­
ization Plan No. 1, effective July 1,1939________ ____ ______________________________ 1939—Aug. 378
Employment statistics, general, United States:
Aliens in American industry. National Industrial Conference Board survey____ 1940—Dec. 1354-5
Arkansas. M o n th ly__________________________ 1930—Dec. 193; 1931—Jan. 224, Feb. 184, Apr. 230,
M ay 191, June 186, July 205, Aug. 167, Sept. 229, Oct. 225, N ov. 227-8
----- Trend, State and local_______________________________1921—Mar. 141-3, M ay 103-5, Dec. 125-6
B y industry. (See Employment statistics, by industry.)
California. Handicapped persons in employment, 1934-35_______________________ 1936—Apr. 926-7
----- Trend, State and local______________________________ 1922—M ay 153, Aug. 129-30, N ov. 168-91;
1923—Feb. 187-9, Aug. 150-1; 1924—N ov. 164-5, Dec. 112-13
------------(See also each issue of M . L. P., January 1925-November 1931.)
Changes in. January 1933-January 1935, by industry group. (Bowden) ......... ....... 1935—Mar. 541-73
----- 1932 to January 1936, by industry group. (Bowden)________________________ 1936—Apr. 851-88
----- Selected industries. (See section Employment, each issue of M . L. R ., January
1921-March 1924.)
------------And index numbers. (See section Trend of Employment, each issue of
M . L. R ., April 1924-December 1940.)
Changes (revised percentage) 1935 to 1936, specified States and geographic divisions. _ 1936—Dec. 1562
Changes since 1914. Census of Manufactures figures_________ ____ ______________ 1926—Dec. 168-74
Character and value of________________________________________________________ 1928—Dec. 34-41
Children, employment certificates issued. (See under Child labor and WelfareEmployment certificates.)
Cincinnati (Ohio). B y emplovability and race, percent full and part time, years
1929-39, and trend______________ ___________________________ 1938—Oct. 771-3; 1939—Oct. 836-7
----- Census of employment, M ay 1934 and 1929-34 and 1936________ 1934—Sept. 647-9; 1936—Oct. 873-5
----- Children 16 and 17 years old, experience by race and s e x .................... ..................... . 1932—N ov. 1080
----- Employment conditions in M ay 1931_________________ ______ ______________ 1931—July 65-6
----- Full- and part-time, number working, by year, 1929-39__________________ _____ 1939—Oct. 838
Cities (500,000 population or over). Fluctuations in employment and pay rolls, M ay
1932 to September 1940. (See section Trend of Employment, each issue of M . L. R.,
July 1932-December 1940.)
Civil service, executive branch. Number of employees, 1930 to July 1934. (See section
Trend of Employment, each issue of M . L. R., February 1932-September 1934.)
----- Summary reports, October 1934 to October 1940. (See section Trend of Employ­
ment, each issue of M . I,. R ., October 1934-December 1940.)
Civil Works Administration. Employees on pay roll, Dec. 2, 1933-May 31, 1934_____ 1934—Jan. 211,
Feb. 442-3, Mar. 723-4, Apr. 973-4, M ay 1237-8, June 1518, July 164-5
Civilian Conservation Corps. Former members, status, summer term 1933, winter
term 1933-34, and summer term 1934__________________________ 1934—Aug. 308-10; 1935—Jan. 45-7
Cleveland and Cuyahoga County (Ohio) industries. Relative importance of male and
female workers, 1923 and 1928___________________________________________ _____ 1931—Sept. 43-4
Cleveland manufacturing plants, extent of normal employment in, June 1931______1931—Sept. 42-3




118

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW '

Employment statistics, general, United States—Continued.
Page
Collection of. National scale, plan of American Statistical Association.................... 1927—Apr. 137-40
----- Resolution of Association of Governmental Officials in Industry....... .................. . 1931—July 91-2
College graduates, Purdue U niversity..------- ---------------- ------------------------- ------------- 1936—Oct. 876
Colorado. Person employed, by industry and sex, 1921..................................... ............... . 1922—Mar. 183
Concentration in selected industries, percent of, 1935...... .................................................... 1940—Dec. 1529
Connecticut. Manufacturers’ Association (Inc.) report, 1921.......................................... 1922—Mar. 125-6
----- State and local trend________________________________________ ____ _________ 1923—Aug. 151-2
Construction projects. Financed by U. S. agencies (PW A, RFC , Works Program,
W PA, N Y A , CCC), July 1934-October 1940. (See section Trend of Employment
(Summary of Reports), each issue of M . L. R ., October 1934-December 1940.)
»
----- Financed from regular governmental appropriations, October 1934 to October 1940.
(See section Trend of Employment (Summary of Reports), each issue of M . L. R .,
January 1935-December 1940.)
Denver (Colo.). Heads of families, percent employed full time, November 1929 and
1933, by scholastic training and age------------ ---------------------------------------------- ----- 1934^-Nov. 1231
Depression and recovery period, 1929-37.____ ________________________ _____ 1937—Nov. 1045-81
District of Columbia. Race, sex, and class distribution, 1930---------------------------------- 1937—Sept. 612
Emergency Conservation Work (CCC). M ay 1933 to September 1936. (See section
Trend of Employment, each issue of M . L. R .t January 1934-December 1936.)
----- October 1935 to October 1940. (See section Trend of Employment (Summary of
Reports), each issue of M . L. R .t January 1936-December 1940.)
Emergency Work Program. B y geographic division, April 1934 to September 1935.
(See section Trend of employment, each issue of M . L. R .f July 1934-December 1936.)
----- Summary of Reports, October 1934 to October 1940. (See section Trend of Employ­
ment, each issue of M . L. R ., January 1935 to December 1940.)
Employable persons. Proportion employed, Philadelphia, by year, 1929-37_________ 1937—Sept. 606
Federal emergency work, shown by National Unemployment census, 1937__________ 1938—Feb. 360
Federal Government. B y branch of service. (See section Trend of Employment, each
issue of M . L. R ., February 1934-December 1940.)
----- Civil service, executive branch. (See section Trend of Employment, each issue
of M . L. R .y February 1932-J anuary 1934.)
Federal Reserve Bank districts............................ ................................................................... 1921—June 76-81
Geographical distribution by industries, 1937________________ ___________ _____ 1940—M ay 1219-20
High-school graduates, former, of Rochester, N . Y ., survey 1936_............................... . 1938—Sept. 536-8
Illinois. Changes---------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- ------ 1922—M ay 154,
Aug. 131-2, Dec. 136-7; 1923—Mar. 84-5, Apr. 104, M ay 179-80, June 189-90, Aug. 152, Sept. 124,
Oct. 128-9; 1924—July 162-3, Sept. 126-7, Oct. 127-8, Nov. 166-7, Dec. 114-15
------------M onthly and yearly. (See section Trend of Employment, each issue of M .
L. R ., January 1925-Novembar 1931.)
Identical establishments, by geographic division-------------------------------------------------- 1932—Jan. 206-9
Indexes. Adjusted to 1937 Census of Manufactures (4th biennial adjustm ent)_____ 1939—Oct. 975-6
-----B y region and industry, variation between spring and fall of 1933___________ 1936—Oct. 963-6,972-3
----- Employment and pay-roll totals. (See section Trend of Employment, each issue
of M . L. R., April 1924-December 1940.)
------(1923-25=100). Employment and pay rolls, by years 1923-38 and by months 1938,
and by industry g r o u p ________________________________________________ . . . 1939—Mar. 727-37
----- Price movement and employment, 1920 and 1921______________________________
1921—Oct. 85
----- Revised, aircraft, durable goods, and all manufacturing (including pay rolls),
January 1939-September 1940__________________________________________ ______ 1940—Dec. 1591
Indians. In Government service and in other employment, fiscal year 1934-35......... 1936—Apr. 942-4
----- The increasing employment of_____________________________________________ 1926—Aug. 147-8
Industrial and business. B y States, geographic divisions, and principal cities (in­
cluding pay rolls), October 1937 to October 1940. (See section Trend of Employment,
each issue of M . L. R ., January 1938-December 1940.)
Iowa. Trend of emp