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Subject Index
to the

M on th ly Labor R eview

VOLUMES 1 T O 11

July 1915 to December 1920

Bulletin ?S[o. 695

U NITED ST A T E S D EP A R T M EN T OF LABO R
B U R E A U OF L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S







U N IT E D ST A T E S D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
F ran ces P e rk in s, S ecretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
Isa d or L u b in , C om m issioner (o n le a v e )
A . F . H in rich s, A ctin g Com m issioner

+

Subject Index
to the

M onthly Labor R eview
V O L U M E S 1 T O 11

July 1915 to December 1920
♦
Prepared b y
E D IT O R IA L A N D R E S E A R C H D IV ISIO N
H ugh S. H anna, Chief

Bulletin Jb[o. 695

U N IT E D S T A T E S
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O FFIC E
W A S H IN G T O N : 1941

F o r sale b y th e S u p erin ten d en t o f D ocu m en ts, W a sh in g ton , D . C .




P rice 20 cen ts

U N IT E D S TA TE S D E P A R TM E N T OF LABO R
F r a n c e s P e r k in s , Secretary

+
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
I sador L ubin , Commissioner (on leave)
A. F. H inrichs , Acting Commissioner
D onald D avenport , Chief, Employ­
ment Outlook and Construction
Branch
H enry J. F itzgerald , Chief, Business
Management Branch
H ugh S. H anna , Chief, Editorial and
Research

A rynbss Joy , Chief, Prices and Cost
of Living Branch
N. A rnold T ollbs, Chief, Working
Conditions and Industrial Relations
Branch
Sidney W. W ilcox , Chief Statistician

CHIEFS OF DIVISIONS

H erman B. B yer , Construction and
Public Employment
J. M. C utts, Wholesale Prices

W.

D uane E vans, Productivity and
Technological Developments

Swbn K jabb, Industrial Accidents
J ohn J. M ahanby , Machine Tabula­
tion
R obert J. M yers , Wage and Hour
Statistics
ii




F lorence P eterson , Industrial Rela­
tions
C harles F. Sharkey , Labor Law
Information
B oris Stern , Labor Information
Service
Stella Stewart , Retail Prices
L ewis E. T albert , Employment Sta­
tistics
E mmett H. W elch , Occupational
Outlook
F aith M. W illiams , Cost of Living

Letter o f Transmittal

U n it ed S t a t e s D e p a r t m e n t of L abo r ,
B u r e a u of L abor S t a t ist ic s ,
Washington, D. C ., June 21,1941.

The S e c r e t a r y

of

L abor:

I have the honor to transmit herewith the Subject Index to Monthly
Labor Review, volumes 1 to 11, July 1915 to December 1920. The
index to volumes 12 to 51, January 1921 to December 1940, will be
found in Bulletin No. 696.
A . F.

H in r ic h s , Acting Commissioner.

Hon. F r a n c e s P e r k in s ,




Secretary of Labor.
h i




BU LLETIN NO. 695 OF THE UNITED STATES
B U REAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

SUBJECT INDEX OF THE MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW, JULY, 1915, TO
DECEMBER, 1920.
[This index is an analytical subject index. It also includes references to authors, officials, and official
and nonoffidal organizations whose publications and activities have entered into the text of the R eview .
The abbreviation B. L. S. means United States Bureau of Labor Statistics; I. A. I. A. B. C. means
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.]
A.
Page.
Abbott, Edith. Truancy and nonattendance in the Chicago public schools, 1917............ May, 1917: 772 9
Ability tests. (S ee Employment management.)
Abrasives. Niagara Falls, N . Y . Investigation by Federal authorities re employment of
women................: ..................................................................... .............................. ....................... Jan., 1919: 231-46
Absentee ownership. (Meeker)....................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 1,2-4
Absenteeism:
Eliminating lost time, from the industrial surgeon’s viewpoint......................................... N ov., 1918: 202
Per cent, cause, and seasonal variation in an industrial plant, 1919...............................N ov., 1920: 181-2
Coal mining. Great Britain...........................................................................July, 1916: 152; Apr., 1917: 535
------United States.................................................................................... 1.................................... N ov., 1918: 37
Cotton manufacturing. Great Britain.................................................................... ................ June, 1918: 160
Metal trades. United States. Timekeeping of men and women compared................ O ct., 1918: 195-6
Motor vehicles. United States................................................................................................ Oct., 1918: IO7II
Munitions. Scotland.................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 173
Shipbuilding. United States................................................................................................... May, 1918: 183-7
Street railways. New Y ork.......................................................................................................
May, 1918: 3
War contracts. Great Britain. Woman labor. Time lost............................................ Aug., 1918: 174r-6
War industries. France..............................................................................................................Sept., 1918: 230
(S ee also Alcoholism.)
Academy of Political Science:
Meeting, November, 1916. Resume........................................................................................ Jan., 1917: 19-25
Obligations of United States under League of Nations Covenant.................................... Sept., 1919: 32-6
Academy of Political and Social Science, American. (See American Academy of Political
and Social Science.)
Accessions. (S e e Mobility of labor.)
Accident benefits. (See Accident insurance, private; Establishment funds; Fraternal
orders; Labor organizations; Workmen’s compensation and insurance.)
Accident boards. (See Directories; Labor boards, commissions, etc.; also u n der various
Sta tes a n d countries.)

Accident insurance, private:
F . C. Huyck and Sons, referred to ....................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 518-20
New York State. Telephone industry.................................................................................... Dec., 1620: 121
Sweden. Provided by collective agreements......................................................................... July, 1919: 127
United States. Establishment funds. (W hitney.).......................................................... Feb., 1918: 192-9
(S ee also Establishment funds;. Fraternal orders; Labor organizations; Railroads,
United States: Funds; Workmen’ s compensation and insurance.)
Accident insnrance, State. (S e e Workmen’ s compensation and insurance.)
Accident insurance societies, Germany:
Statistics of Miners’ Trade Accident Association, 1914....................................................... May, 1916: 79-82
(S e e also Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Germany.)
Accident prevention, general:
Can serious industrial accidents be eliminated? (Chaney.).............................................. Aug., 1917: 1-16
Causation of injuries. Classification......................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 45-6
------Conclusions of B . L . S. and of British Health of Munition Workers Committee. Aug., 1918: 198-201
Codes and standards. American Society of Mechanical Engineers................................. Jan., 1917: 10-11
------California Industrial Accident Commission...................................................................... Mar., 1917: 410
------1. A . I . A . B . C....................N ov., 1915: 29; O ct., 1916: 43-6; Oct., 1917: 123-43; Jan.. 1920: 218-19
------National industrial safety codes conference........................................... Feb., 1919: 238; Apr., 1919: 17
------National Safety Council.......................................................... Nov., 1918: 207-8,213; N ov., 1920: 179-80
------New Jersey Department of Labor.................................................................................. Jan., 1918: 167-76
------Pennsylvania Department of Labor........................................ _ .................................. Jan., 1918: 167-76
- — Safety engineers of Government establishments......................................................... May, 1918: 257-8
Comparison of work of different States. (Hookstadt.)..................................................... Dec., 1920: 152-3
Conferences, conventions, etc. American Uniform Boiler Code Congress, 1916........... Jan., 1917: 10-11
------1. A . I. A . B . C ., 1914 to 1920.............................N ov.. 1915: 27-37; Sept., 1916: 16; Aug., 1917: 144-5;
Oct., 1917:108-9,111-21; Sept., 1918: 252-4; N ov., 1918: 205-26; Nov.J919: 266-93; Nov., 1920:10-19
------National industrial safety codes conference............................................F eb., 1919: 238; Apr., 1919: 17
------National Safety Council, 1916 to 1920........... Oct., 1916: 53-8; Mar., 1917: 436-9; O ct., 1917: 147-8;
Sept., 1918: 234r-5; N ov., 1918: 198-204; N ov., 1919: 258-60; N ov., 1920: 177-80
------New York State Industrial Safety Congress, 1916....................................................... N ov., 1917: 169-72
------Safety engineers’ conference............................................................................................... May, 1918: 257-8
Education............................................................ May, 1917: 762; Dec., 1918: 3,13-16; Nov., 1918: 206, 207-8
Effect of workmen’ s compensation laws. (Reply to British questionnaire.)................Apr., 1920: 30-1
' l Engineering revision.” (Chaney.)........................................................................................ Dec., 1918: 1-17
Eye protections............................................................. *............................. Aug., 1917: 86-7; Apr., 1918: 295-8
National Safety Code Committee, organization of.....................................................— N ov., 1920: 179-80
Problem in workmen’ s compensation................................................................................. . Oct., 1917: 111-13




2

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW.

Accident prevention, general—Concluded.
Page.
Protective appliances and safeguards. Army gas masks ,dust respirators, etc............. May, 1918: 254:
June, 1919: 240-3; Feb., 1920: 200
------Machinery...................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 199, 201; N ov., 1918: 207
------Practical devices................................................................................................................... O ct., 1916: 46-51
Publications. I . A . I. A . B . C., committee on statistics. Reports..............................N ov., 1915: 28-37;
Oct., 1916: 43-6; O ct., 1917: 123-43
------National Safety Council. Classified list and scope of bulletins............................... June, 1917: 980-3
------United States Bureau of Standards series of manuals, referred to.............................. M ay, 1918: 258
Recommendations of various organizations..................
1918—Mar. 178, 179; May 251; N ov. 57,191-2;
1920—Jan. 21-2; Feb. 30-2; July 20
Statement of United States Railroad Administration re promotion of safety w ork.. N ov., 1918: 203-4
Statistical method. (Meeker.)................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 1-3
Accident prevention, by locality:
Argentina. Law of 1915 for protection of woman and child labor................................... O ct., 1918: 248-9
California. Activities in safety work......... ....................Mar., 1917: 410; Feb., 1918:186; N ov., 1918: 206
Canada. Laws of various Provinces, referred to.................................................................... M ar., 1920: 180
Finland. Law of Apr. 4,1914............................... ................................................................... Aug., 1915: 23-4
Germany. Devices to permit of employment of injured and blind on machine tools. A pr., 1918: 129-31
Great Britain. Accident prevention and safety first. (Bellhouse.).............................. Dec., 1919: 302-4
------Causes............................................................... July, 1918: 161-4; Aug., 1918: 198-201; Sept., 1918: 48
------Plan for protection of workers........................................................................................... June. 1916: *90
------ Recommendations of Health of Munition Workers Committee..............., .................. Sept., 1918: 48
Illinois (Springfield). Survey.................................................................................................... O ct., 1916: '81-2
Massachusetts. Need urged by Governor............................................................................... Feb., 1918: 190
------Plan to conserve children m industry............................................................................. Dec., 1920: 127-8
------Suggested remedies for more effective safety work......... .......................................... Apr., 1917: 542-3
New Jersey. Safety work of Department of Labor.................... Mar., 1917: 434-5; Jan., 1918: 167-76
New York State. Fatal accidents due to falls in building work......................... ........June, 1917: 979-80
------Means of preventing based on survey of experience.................. ................................July, 1916: 107-17

Power of industriarcommission to require protection in dangerous trades.......... Jan., 1919: 243-5
----- R6sum6 of safety congress, Syracuse, 19i6....................*........................................ Nov., 1917: 169-72
----- Safeguards, cost of..................................................................................................... . Nov., 1918: 207
----- Various laws referred to.................... ........................................................................... Feb., 1916: 82
----- (Niagara Falls).............................................................................Jan., 1919: 231-46; Mar., 1920:161-8
Ohio. Summary.................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 206
----- Survey of infections following accidents and recommendations for prevention. Sept., 1917: 109-10
Ontario. Safety amendment to factory law, referred to................................................. Sept., 1920: 179
Pennsylvania. Standards for manufacture of high explosives................................... Jan., 1918: 167-76
----- Study of blast-furnace accidents, 1915......... ........................................................... May, 1918: 258-60
Russia. Code of labor laws of Soviet Russia............................................................... Apr*. 1920: 213-14
Switzerland. Legislation for safety of employees............................................................ Aug., 1915: 20
Washington. Safety and merit ratinglaw, 1919........................................................... May, 1919: 255-8
(See also Accident statistics; Fatigue; Hygiene; International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions; Lighting; National Safety Council; Protective
clothing; .Sanitation and working conditions.)
Accident statistics, general:
Cost of industrial accidents. (Meeker.).............. ............................................................. Apr., 1920: 1-13
Rates. Disability due to injury. Experience of Workmen’s Sick and Death Benefit
Fund.............. ................................................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 24
----- Experience pf Metropolitan life Insurance Co........................................................ July, 1917: 125-6
----- Frequency. Basis for measuring........................................................................... Jan., 1920: 218-19
------------Definitions................................................................................. July, 1916: 7-8; Oct.. 1917: 133-4
------------In relation to rate-fixing, workmen’s compensation......................................... Sept., 1918: 261
------------Nevada................................................................................ Feb., 1917: 262-4; Apr., 1919: 217-18
----------- Ontario, 1915to 1917........................................................................ ...................... July, 1919: 214
------------Wisconsin............... June, 1918: 195, 219; Oct., 1918: 207-14; Mar., 1919: 79-84; July, 1919: 184-5
i x v u i oof
Vi.work
w v i n.as
tworelated
i citwl/Vvito
vVaccident
a U / i u c i i t rate................................
i abC
.........................
v
u ij j x
c i o * 161-4; l u
a y • J1920: 158-63
----- Hours
July,
1918:
May,

- New method of computing adopted by B . L. S............................................................ July, 1916: 6-17
------Severity. Basis for measuring.......................................•.............................................. Jan., 1920: 218-19
------------- Comparison of systems of B . L . S. and I. A . I. A . B . C..................................... N ov., 1917: 166-9
- Definitions..................................................................................... July, 1916: 8-17; O ct., 1917:133^4
- Nevada, 1916 to 1918............................................................................................... A pr., 1919: 217-18
- Schedule by committee on statistics, I . A . I. A . B . C......................................... Dec., 1918: 23-4
------War caused enormous increase. American experience................................................. June, 1917: 877
Records............................................................................................................................................ 1918—F eb., 187;
Apr. 271; May 260; July 197; Oct. 207; N ov.
208, 209-10; 1919—Apr. 217; 1920—Mar. 1-3
Standardization........................................................................................................................ N ov., 1915: 28-37;
A pr., 1916: 76-8; O ct., 1916: 43-6; Oct., 1917: 123-43; N ov., 1919: 293; Jan., 1920: 218-19
Accident statistics, by industry:
Bridge and structural iron work, Chicago, 1916,1917........................ Feb., 1918: 186-9; Mar., 1919: 225-6
Cement. United States. Experience of Portland Cement Association..................... N ov., 1916: 87-91;
N ov., 1919: 261-2
Coal mines. United States. 1870 to 1915, 1918, and 1919-20.......................................... Aug., 1919: 261-2;
June, 1919: 235-7; June, 1920: 163
-------------Rates............................................................................................................................ A ug., 1916: 67-72;
Apr., 1917: 590; June, 1919: 235-6; O ct., 1919: 233-4
Coke ovens................................................................................................................................ Dec., 1919: 299-302
Gas industry. United States. Analysis of 10,000 accidents by causes, 1915,1916........ Dec., 1916: 26-7
Government shops. United States. Duration of disability............................................. A pr., 1916: 73-6
Iron and steel. Rates............................................................................................................... 1916—July 12-15;
1917—Aug. 1-16; Nov. 13-22; Dec. 161-5; 1918—Apr.
288-9; Dec. 1,2; 1919—Apr. 20-1; June 231-4; Sept.
272-81; Oct. 222-32; Nov. 253-7; 1920—June 151-63
------Various dates, 1913 to 1917................................................................ A pr., 1918: 288-9; Dec., 1918: 2, 316
Machine building. United States.................................................................... ..................... Dec., 1917: 166-8
------------- Rates............................................................ July, 1S16: 12-17; D ec., 1917: 166-8; Apr., 1919: 12-22
Metal mines. United States. 1914 to 1918...................................................................... July, 1916: 129-33;
June, 1917: 976-9; Aug., 1919: 215; June, 1920: 165




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 192&,

3

Accident statistics, by Industry—Concluded.
Page.
Metal mines, united States. Rates...................................................................................... July, 1910: 132:
Aug., 1916: 63; June, 1917: 978-9: Aug., 1919: 216
Metallurgical works, 1916 to 1917.............................. Mar., 1917: 433-4; May, 1918: 260-4; May, 1919: 244-5
Mines. Nevada, 1913 to 1916.......................................... : .......................................................... F eb., 1917: 263
------'New York State, 1914................................ >...................................................... .................. May, 1916: 69
------Pennsylvania, 1914 to 1918................................ .....................................................
O ct., 1919: 233-4
------United Kingdom, 1919............................................................. .................................... .
Dec., 1920: 133
------United States, 1916. Due to explosives......................................................................... N ov., 1917: 172-3
------ West Virginia. 1913 to 1916......................................................................................«,.. July, 1917: 119-23
Mines and quarries. Ohio, 1914 to 1917..........................................................................'. . . . May, 1916: 62-6;
Feb., 1917: 264-5; May, 1918: 26£4; June, 1919: 237
Munitions. Great Britain..................................... ...................................... July, 1918: 161-4; Sept., 1918: 48
------United States, 1917. (Two plants.).................................................................... ........ Apr., 1919: 15-16
Painting. Chicago......... .............................................. ........................................................... Feb.. 1918:187
Public employees of the Federal Government, 1916 to 1919.............................................Jan., 1918: 157-8:
Mar., 1919: 250-2; May, 1919: 254; June, 1919: 246-7; May, 1920: 164-3
Quarries. United States, 1917..................................... ; ....................... ............................... June, 1919: 284-5
Railroads. Connecticut, 1900 to 1910................................................... ................ ................... Mar., 1919: 234
------Illinois, 1905 to 1908................................................................................. ............................. Mar., 1919: 288
------New York, 1914-15.......................................................... . .................................................... Mar., 1919: 245
------United Kingdom, 1919........................................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 133-4
------United States. 1916 to 1918..................................... ........................................................ Oct., 1917: 146-7:
Apr., 1919: 1984; Mar., 1920: 159-60
-------------Various dates....................................... .................................................................... Mar., 1919: 230-48
Accident statistics, by locality:
Argentina, 1916 to 1 9 1 8 ........................................................ ...................................................... May, 1919: 279;
July, 1919: 164
British Columbia, 1917............................................................................................. ............... Oct., 1918:231-4
California, 1913 to 1919........................................ .............................. .'......................................Jan., 1916: 39-44L
Mar., 1917: 410; Feb., 1918: 184-6; July, 1918: 165-7; Mar;, 1919: 252-4; Feb., 1920: 216-19
Canada, 1917,1918.................................................................................: ...................................... Sept.. 1918: 263:
M ay., 1919: 246-7; Aug., 1919: 220-1
Connecticut, 1914 to 1918....................................................... ........................ Aug., 1910: 58: May, 1919: 258
District of Columbia, 1916............. .............................................................................................Jan., 1917:25-6
Germany, 1887,1897, 1907...................................................... .......................... ...................... Mar., 1919: 2344
Great Britain. ( S e e Accident statistics: United Kingdom.)
Idaho, 1918.................................................................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 247-8
m inds, 1914 to 1919....................................................................................................................... Apr., 1916: 55
Jan., 1917: 113-14; Mary 1917: 411-12; June, 1920: 176
Indiana, 1917 and 1918-19................................................................................ July, 1918: 168: Aug., 1920: 131
Iowa> 1914 to 1918...................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 117-18; Mar., 1919: 254-7
Kentucky, 1916-17 and 1916-19...................................................................... O ct., 1918: 229; June, 1920: 177
Maryland, 1914-15 to 1918-19..................................... .......................... ..................................... A pr., 1916: 50:
Sept., 1917: 111; Mar., 1918: 182-4; Jan., 1920: 248; May, 1920: 166
------Injuries to children, 1915....................................................................................................... A ug., 1916: 39
Massachusetts. Child workers, 1918-19.................................................................................... Dec., 1920; 128
------Various dates, 1912 to 1918........................................................ ..................................... Mar., 1916: 40-52;
Mar., 1917: 412-17; Apr., 1918: 289-91; Mar., 1919: 223-5; July, 1920: 165-6
Michigan, 1915,1916........................................................................................ Apr., 1910: 60-2; N ov., 1918: 254
Minnesota, 1913 to 1917-18......................................................................... July, 1917: 111-15; Mar.“ 1910: 259
Montana, 1915 to 1919........................................................................ *......................................... F eb., 1916: 69:
Dec., 1916: 24-5; N ov., 1917: 163; Dec., 1918: 321-2; Sept., 1919: 329; Jan., 1920: 250
Nebraska, 1915 to 1918................. ................................... Aug., 1916: 57-8; July, 1917: 116; Mar., 1919: 260
Nevada, 1913 to 1918...................................................... Sept., 1916: 58; Feb., 1917: 263; A pr., 1919: 216-17
New Jersey, 1913 to 1916 and 1918-19.......................................... : ........................................ Sept., 1916: 50-9:
July, 1917: 118;A u g .. 1920: 182
New York State. Survey of experience of various plants, 1913-1915............................July, I9i6: 107-13
------Various years, 1914 to 1920............................................................................................... 1910--May 58-62;
July 116-17; 1917—Mar.420; June 079-80; 1918—June
193-5; 1919—Apr. 220; 1980—Feb. 222; Deo. 132
Nova Scotia, 1917-1919................................................................................ July, 1919: 212: July. 1920: 166-7
Ohio, 1912 to 1914.................................................................................................................... July, 1916: 118-25:
Feb., 1917: 264-6; May, 1918: 262-3; May, 1919: 44: June, 1919: 237
Oklahoma, 1916 to 1918............................ ............................................ May, 1919: 259-60; Aug., 1920: 132-3
Ontario, 1917....................................................................................................................................July, 1919: 213
Oregon, 1915-16 to 1917-18........................................................................ Mar., 1916: 58-61; June, 1920: 176-9
Pennsylvania, 1916 to 1919......................................................................................................Jan., 1917: 119-20;
May, 1919: 262-3; O ct., 1919: 232-3; Sept., 1920: 154-6
Rhode Island, 1914,1915......................................................... : .................................................Jan., 1917: 120-1
South Dakota, 1917-18.................................................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 262
Switzerland. Report of Swiss Accident Insurance Institute, April 1, to December 31,
1918.................... . .............................................................. ................... ..................................... N ov., 1920r 189
Tennessee, 1917............................................................................................................................... July, 1918: 164
United Kingdom. Mines and railroads, 1919...................................................................... Dec., 1920: 133-4
Vermont, 1913 to 1918................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 424-5; A pr., 1919: 219
Virginia, 1918-19........................................................... ..............................................................May, 1920: 166-9
Washington, 1912 to 1916, and 1916-19...................................................................................Jan., 1916: 48-53:
Feb., 1916: 74-6; Mar., 1917: 478; A pr., 1917: 548; June, 1920: 180-1
West Virginia, 1913 to 1918....................................................................................................... Feb., 1916: 79-81;
July, 1917: 123; N ov., 1918: 255-6; July, 1919: 211-12
Wisconsin, 1911 to 1918.............................................................................................................. 1916-Jan. 57-62;
July 124-9; Nov. 83; 1918—June 219; Oct. 208
(S e e also Accident prevention; Workmen’s compensation ana insurance: Reports.)
Acetylene welding:
Description.................................................................................................................................... May, 1919: 223-4
Hazards............................................................................................................ Apr., 1910: 219; May, 1919: 228-9
Training by Federal Board for Vocational Education........................................................... Apr., 1918: 113




4

M O N TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Acetylene welding—Concluded.
Page.
Wage rates in shipbuilding................................. Mar., 1918: 70; A pr., 1918: 186; May, 1918: 128,134,140
Woman labor, united States. Extent and working conditions. (Fisk).................... N ov., 1918: 189;
May, 1919: 221-30
Add:
“ Acid cores” on hands of solderers from soldering fluids..................................................... N ov., 1920: 183
(See also Poisons and poisoning.)
Ackerman, L . War housing......................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 209-13
Acts. (See Laws and legislation.)
Adams, C. A . Plan for national industrial safety codes............................................................. Feb., 1919: 238
Adams, N . C.:
British railway strike............................................................................................................ .. Dec., 1919: 116-27
British railway wages................................................................................................................ Mar., 1920: 16-25
Cost of food in national restaurants in London................................................................... N ov., 1918: 121-2
Emergency housing schemes, Great Britain......................................................................... Dec., 1918: 332-5
Interallied Conference on After-Care of Disabled Men....................................................... Aug., 1918: 31-43
Reabsorption of labor and unemployment in the United Kingdom.............................Apr., 1920: 155-74
Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, September, 1917................... Mar., 1918: 29-51
Adams, T .:
Housing development as a post-war problem in Canada..................................................July, 1919: 248-55
Rtmdjplanning and development...............•.......................................................................... Apr., 1918: 283-6
Adams, w . W . Output of coal, various countries................................................................. Sept., 1920: 118-26
Adamson, G. P . Industrial poisons..................... ......................................................................... N ov., 1916: 102
Adamson, Rhoda H . B . Physical fitness of women for engineering work.......................... May, 1919: 237-9
Adamson A.cti
Decisions of Supreme Court..................................................................... May, 1917: 677-84; Oct., 1920: 203-4
Provisions................................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 116; July, 1920: 26, 27, 36
Referred t o ......................................................................... ................................ Sept., 1918: 190; Apr., 1920: 50
Addison, C. Statement concerning women’s wages.................................................................... May, 1918: 156
Adjustment Commission, National. (See United States: National Adjustment Commis­
sion.)
Admiralty. (S e e Navy yards; Seamen,; Shipbuilding.)
Adult working-class education:
Great Britain. Adult working classes................................................................................. N ov., 1920: 137-8
------Bibliography...........................................................................................................................Dec., 1918: 57-8
------Commission on Adult Education, Ministry of Reconstruction............................N ov., 1918: 63-70
United States. Adult working classes................................................................................. N ov., 1920: 138-9
Advisory Labor Council. (S e e United States: Department of Labor. Advisory Labor
Council.)
Aeronautics:
Dope poisoning in aeroplane industry................................................................. 1916—June 86; Nov. 105-8;
1917—Jan. 97-8; Aug. 84-5; Oct. 18-25; 1918—Feb. 37-64; 1920-A ug. 119
Canada. Government ownership of aircraft........................................................................... Dec., 1918: 355
France. Women employees in air service, September, 1918............................................. May, 1919: 190
Great Britain. Housing. Roe Green Village scheme, Kingsbury. England........... O ct., 1918: 251-7
------ Opportunities for employment of disabled in aircraft manufacture........ ............A ug., 1918: 111, 112
------Skilled work of women in aircraft....................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 173
------Training for women............................................................................................................Aug., 1918: 165-9
------ W om anlabor.....................1.................................................................................................... May, 1919: 89
------(Coventry, England). Strike, 1917................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 38-9
United States. W ar training for mechanics by Federal Board for Vocational Edu­
cation............................................................................................................................................ Apr., 1918: 113
Aeroplanes. (S e e Aeronautics.)
After-care. (S e e Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
After-war problems. (S e e Reconstruction.)
Age classification of employees. (S e e Classification of employees.)
Age factor in disability....................................................... Dec., 1918: 19; N ov., 1919: 26-39; Mar., 1920: 4-15
Age in relation to employment. Experience of Employers' Association of Chicago........June, 1918: 177
Age in relation to TN T poisoning. (Ham ilton)......................................................................... Jan., 1919: 255-7
Age of retirement. (S e e Old age and invalidity.)
Aged:
Massachusetts. Number of persons 65 years of age and over, April 1,1915................. Mar., 1917: 430-3
Ohio. Statistics, 1918....................................................; ..........................................................Mar., 1919: 275-7
Agreements. (S ee Collective agreements; Conciliation and arbitration; Treasury agree­
m ent.)
Agricultural cooperation. (S e e Cooperation: Agriculture.)
Agricultural councils. (S e e Economic councils.)
Agricultural credit:
France, 1918....................................................................................................................................Mar., 1919: 56-7
Italy.................................................................................................................................................. N ov., 1918: 73
Agriculture:
Bibliography. References on reconstruction....................................................................... Dec., 1918: 47-79
Camps. (See Agriculture: Housing.)
Child labor. Great Britain. Leaving certificates.............................. June, 1917: 888-90; July, 1917:31-2
------New York. Suspension of school-attendance law during war, referred to................ Sept., 1918: 267
Congresses. Farmer-Labor Cooperative, Chicago, November, 1919, and February,
1920.......................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 133-4; Apr., 1920: 128-30
------ Farmers' National, 1919....... ................................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 72-4
------ International Congress of Farm Workers. Amsterdam, 1920..................................... Dec., 1920: 167-8
Cooperation. (See Cooperation: Agriculture.)
Disabled. (See Agriculture: Soldiers and sailors.)
Education and training. Bibliography............................................................................ Aug., 1918: 164-71
------Canada. Provisions for ex-soldiers................................................. " . . . ......................... June, 1919: 56^8
------Great Britain. Continuation schools............................................................................. N ov., 1918: 69,70
------------- Cost................................................................................................................................. May, 1918: 62,63
------Iowa. Part-time classes................................................................................................... May, 1920: 117-18
------United States. Federal Board for Vocational Education................................. Jan., 1919: 77-8,81-2;
July, 1919:129-30
--------Negroes, South.
Jan., 1919: 81-2




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

5

Agriculture—Concluded.
Employment statistics. France................................................................... June, 1917: 921; O ct., 1919: 197
----- Germany........................................ Dec., 1917: 63-4; N ov., 1918: 47; Dec., 1918: 41; Feb., 1919: 137-8
------Ohio. Work of free employment bureaus................... ................................................ A pr., 1918: 53-63
------Ontario. Campaign for workers...................................................... ................................. May, 1918: 149
------United States.................................................................................. .
1918—Jan. 45; May 58-9,196-201;
June 177-8; July 135; Sept. 300, 301; Oct. 263-4; 1919— Feb. 121; A pr. 141-2
------ (S e e also Employment agencies.)
Hazards................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 408; Mar., 1918: 91; A pr., 1918: 297
Hours. Finland. Eight-hour day........................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 110
— - France. Agreement of August 8,1919.......................................................................... Mar., 1920: 123-4
------Great Britain. Saturday half holiday................................................... ........................ - N ov., 1918: 70
------------- Vacations......................................................................................................................... Nov-., 1918: 67
------Massachusetts. Law regulating Sunday labor............................ ................................. Sept., 1918: 267
------Poland. Eight-hour day.....................................................................................................
Jan., 1920: 8
Housing. Great Britain.......................................................................................... ................. N ov., 1918: 274
------Pacific States. Camp conditions....................................................................................... A pr., 1917: 558
------United States. Labor camps......................................................................................... May, 1918: 277-87
Mexican labor. United States. Order admitting temporarily....................................Nov. ,1918: 266-71
------------- Results of admission under departmental orders, 1920................ ....................N ov., 1920: 221-3
Organizations. France. National Federation of Agricultural Laborers. Organiza­
tion and program................................................... .................................................................Sept., 1920: 188
------Germany. Demands.......................................................................................................... N ov., 1918: 46-7
------Great Britain. Agricultural Laborers' Union. Resolution re government control
of agricultural land............................................................................................................N ov., 1918: 264
-------------Statistics of membership.............................................................................................. June, 1919: 305
------Sweden. National Organization of Swedish Trade-Unions. Propaganda among
rural workers....................................................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 181
Policies. Recommendations of international labor conference, 1919...............................Jan., 1920: 13-14
------Canada. Agreement with United States Government re labor recruiting..........May, 1918: 58-9;
O ct., 1918: 264
------ Germany. Privileges granted to laborers entering farm work, spring of 1919........Sept.., 1919: 174
-------------Program of agricultural council for 1920-21............................................................. Aug., 1920: 45-6
------Spain. Agrarian program.................................................................................................... June, 1919: 59
------United States. Agreement with Canada re labor recruiting.........May, 1918: 58-9; O ct., 1918: 264
-------------Policies of Federal Government..................................................... Jan., 1918: 50-3; Feb., 1918: 81
------------- Program of farmers' conference, 1919......................................................................... Mar., 1919: 72-4
------------- Statement of War Department, March, 1918........................................................ Apr., 1918: 105-7
Protective laws. Finland, April 4,1914................................................................................. Aug., 1915: 23-4
------Germany................................................................................................................................July, 1919: 235-7
Retirement. France. Administration of retirement fund, 1912 to 1916. Statistics... June, 1919: 293
Soldiers and sailors. Australia. Land settlements............................................................. O ct., 1917: 53-6
------Canada......................................................................................................... O ct., 1917: 53; June, 1919: 52-8
------France............. ........................................................ June, 1917: 856, 860; June, 1918: 70-1; A pr., 1919: 92
------Great Britain........................................................................................................................... Apr., 1916: 12;
Sept., 1916: 87-90; Nov, 1917: 64; Aug., 1918: 36, 111; Dec., 1918: 89
------Italy.................................................................................................. O c t., 1918: 74, 75-6; N ov., 1918: 73-4
Tenancy. United States. Recommendations of Commission on Industrial Relations. N ov., 1915: 57
Terms of employment. United States, by States............................................................ June, 1918: 177-8
Training. ( S e e Agriculture: Education and training.)
Wages. California. Minimum wage order for women and children cutting and pitting
fruit............................................................................................................................................... N ov., 1920: 112
--------Women in canneries and hop industry.................................................................. Apr., 1917: 568-9
- Canada, 1916,1917, and 1918........................................................... Apr., 1919: 178-9; Aug., 1919: 191-2
- Denmark. Average annual earnings, 1915.....................................................................
Oct., 1918: 88
- France. 1914 to 1916, and 1919.............................. Jail., 1918: 104;
1919: 243; Mar., 1 9 2 0 : 123-4
- Great Britain. Establishment of agricultural wages board................................... Jan., 1918: 97-100
--------Increases during war. ............................................................................................ July, 1919: 157-8
--------Minimum weekly rates... 1918—Jan. 99; June 147-9; Dec. 310-11; 1920—July 111; Aug. 84-5
------- - Woman labor..................... . ........................................................................................ May, 1918: 63-4
v Minimum weekly rates.......................................... June, 1919: 180-1; July, 1920: 111
------------- (Scotland.) Variouslodalities..................................................... O ct., 1917: 84; N ov., 1919: 208-9
-------------(W ales.)....................................................................................... Dec., J918: 310-11; A ug., 1920: 84-5
------ttaly, 1920................................................................................................................................. June) 1920: 224
------Japan. Various dates, 1905 to 1919................................... ........... N ov., 1917: 149; Aug., 1920: 89, 90
------Netherlands, 1914,1916, and 1917.......................................................... July, 1917: 63; Jan., 1918: 108-9
------Norway. Specified years, 1895 to 1915.................. ................... N ov., 1917: 112; Mar., 1919: 200, 205
------Ohio. Farm job versus city jo b ......................................................................................A pr., 1918: 59-60
------Ontario. 1917, and proposals for 1918.................................................................................. M ay, 1918: 149
------Philippine Islands, 1919-20................................................................................................. D ec., 1920 : 82
------Spain. Daily rates, 1916 and 1917.....................................................................................
Mar., 1919: 60
------Sweden. Increase during war........................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 193
------United States. ‘ Various dates, 1866 to 1919...................................................................June, 1918:122-3;
N ov., 1919: 193-4; A pr., 1920: 108-9; July, 1920: 107-8
-------------Various places. Farm hands.............................................................................. 1918— Feb. 125, 131;
Mar. 121,127; Apr. 165, 171, 177; June 129, 135, 141; Sept.
163, 169, 175, 181; Dec. 263, 269, 275, 281, 287, 293, 299, 305
-------------W hite and Mexican labor.Southern States.............................................................. N ov., 1920: 222
Wheatland riot. Referred to ....................................................................................................... May, 1918: 277
Woman labor. Australia. Opportunities for employment of immigrants.................. . A ug., 1920: 98
------Great Britain. 1914 and 1917........................................................................ O ct., 1917: 39; Jan., 1918: 65
-------------Report by British Association for the Advancement of Science........................ May, 1918: 61-4
-------------Training........................................................ July, 1917: 28-31; May, 1918: 62-3; Aug., 1918: 165-9
-------------(England.) Substitution for men during war.................................................. A pr., 1918: 209-17
------United States. Farm woman's problems........................................................................ Aug., 1920: 181
Workmen's compensation and insurance. Denmark...........................................................
Oct., 1918: 86
------United States.................................................... A pr., 1917: 554* N ov., 1918: 241, 248-9; Dec., 1918: 318
(S e e also Land settlement; Seasonal employment; United States: Department of
Agriculture.)




Sept.,

6

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Agriculture, Department of, United States. (See United States: Department of Agri­
culture.)
■
Aid, legal. (See Legal aid.)
Page.
Air hammer. Effects on hands of stonecutters. (Hamilton)............................................ Apr., 1918: 25-38
Air service. (See Aeronautics.)
Aircraft. (See Aeronautics.)
Alaskan Engineering Commission. (See United States: Alaskan Engineering Commis­
sion.)
Albaugh, R. P.:
Dangers connected with the spray method of finishing and decorating. 1916............ Feb., 1917: 275-7
Gasoline engine exhaust-gas poisoning. 1916............................................................... Feb., 1917: 272-5
Alberta:
Workmen's Compensation Board. Reports...................................... Aug., 1919: 222; Sept., 1920: 161-2
(See also specific subjects.)
Alberta Farmers' Cooperative Elevator Co. (Ltd.).............................................................. Aug., 1919: 127-8
Alcohol. Prices. Austria (Vienna). July, 1914, and 1918................................................... Dec., 1918: 194
Alcohol, denatured. Development of production for industrial purposes after prohibition . June, 1919: 43
Alcohol, wood:
Blindness from industrial use............................ ............................................................. Mar., 1918: 195-8
Hazards......... Dec., 1917: 203; Feb.,.1918: 45-8; May, 1918: 252-4; July, 1919: 174; Feb„ 1920; 197-201
Uses of....................... .......................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 199
(See also Poisons and poisoning.)
Alcoholism:
Effects oh maternity....................................................................................................... .. Nov., 1918: 195
Employers' rules against drinking....................................................................................June, 1919: 40-1
Relation to accidents................................................................. Aug., 1918: 199, 200-1; Mar.. 1919: 225-6
Relation to poisoning.................................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 245, 249
France. Ihterministerial commission on manual labor. Efledt of alcoholic liquors... Jan., 1918; 75-7
Germany. Decrease in iqental diseases due to alcoholism. Silesia. ............................. Nov., 1918: 25
Great Britain. Temperance plans of British Labor Party................................. ......... Apr., 1918: 75
Alden, P. What France is doing for her disabled soldiers and sailors............................. June, 1917: 851-64
Alexander;, M. W .:
Collective bargaining.......................................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 24
Compulsory insurance....................................................................................... ..............May, 1917: 750-1
Cost of health supervision in industry.............................................................................July, 1919: 227-8
Cost of labor turnover...................................................................................................... June, 1917: 892-4
Alien labor:
Housing. Mexicans at Tyrone, N. Mex...................................................................... Sept., 1918: 279-80
Recommendations. International labor conference, 1919...........................................Jan., 1920: 13-15;
Feb., 1920: 30; Sept., 1920: 200
----- International trade-union conference, 1917...................................... : ................ ........ Mar., 1918: 176
Treaties................................................................... Apr., 1919: 7-8; Feb.. 1920: 47-53; Aug., 1920: 183-4
France. Reconstruction program of Confederation Generate du Travail..................... Mar., 1919: 77-8
United States. Emergency admission of Mexicans for employment in agriculture.. Nov., 1920: 221-3
----- Legislation prohibiting employment on public works, various States............. .
Mar., 1917: 463-4
----- Rights to workmen’s compensation during war..................................................... Feb., 1918: 180-1
----- Women's clothing industry......................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 224
(See also Chinese labor; Japanese labor; Mexican labor.)
Aliens:
Attitude of United States Department of Labor toward admission of Chinese industrial
students.............................................................. ........................................................... Dec., 1920: 191-7
Deportations.................................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 194-201
(See also Immigration; Naturalization.)
All-American farmer-labor cooperative congress. (See Farmer-labor cooperative congress.)
Allen, Nila F. Statement re child labor law....................................... ................................ Apr., 1920: 178
Allowances. (See Allowances, family; Allowances in lieu of wages; Board and lodging in
lieu of wages; Bonuses.)
Allowances, family:
France......................................................................................................... May, 1918: 28; Apr.. 1920: 65-6
Germany...................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 161-2; Aug., 1918: 98-9,163
Sweden................................................................................................................ ................ May, 1918: 222
(See also Maternity insurance; Mothers' pensions.)
Allowances for soldiers' families. (See Widows' and orphans' pensions.)
Allowances in lieu of wages:
Alaskan Engineering Commission.................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 82-3
Great Britain. Subsistence, traveling, and out-of-work allowances.............................. Oct., 1918: 36-7
Italy. Merchant marine.................................................................................. Jan., 1920: 158-60, 163, 168
United States. Marine occupations...................*.................................July. 1920: 106; Sept., 1920: 104
(See also Allowances, family; Board and lodging in lieu of wages; Bonuses.)
Allport, F. Compensation table for visual losses of one eye............................................... Apr., 1920: 187-8
Alschuler, S. Awards in packing-house cases— May, 1918: 115-27; Mar., 1920: 113-14; July, 1920: 101-5
Alteration tailors. Defined......................................................................................................
Aug., 1918: 4
Amalgamated Association of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen. Great Britain. Mem­
bership and alliances.................................................. .................................. ......................... June, 1919: 171
Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America:
Awards of National War Labor Board............................... ...................................... ........ Apr., 1919: 258
Party to agreement of May 1,1916.................................................................................... Sept., 1916: 37-8
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America:
Agreement, January 3,1916, and January 3,1917................................................. Nov.. 1917: 24-7,3(H$
Chicago. Agreement, December, 1919............................................................................Apr., 1920: 141-2
New York City............................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 20, 22-6
Philadelphia......................................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 29
Rochester. Action in strike........................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 170-3
----- Employees'representation.. . ...................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 98-9
(See otoo united Garment Workers of America.)
Amalgamated Miners'Association. New South Wales. Strike. 1919...............................
July, 1920: 65
Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers' International Alliance. School for teaching metal
trade........................................................................................................................................ Oct.. 1920: 215
Amalgamated Society of Engineers. Australia. Shipbuilding dispute........................... Dec., 1918: 371-2




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

7

Amar.J.:
Paf A.max system of prothesis.................................................................................................June, 1917: 863-4
Reeducation of cripples....................................................................................................June, 1917: 850-1
Amatol, Hazards. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: TNT.)
Ambulance chasers. ( S e e Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Fraud.)
American Academy of Medicine. Prizes for essays on social insurance and child labor.. Apr., 1917: 573-4
American Academy of Political and Social Science:
Industrial stability............................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 22-5
Labor, management, and production........................................................................... Nov., 1920: 116-18
Modern insurance problems..............................................................................................May, 1917: 761-7
Personnel and employment problems..............................................................................Aug., 1916: 21-0
Prices..................................................................................................................................July, 1920: 89-93
American Association for Labor Legislation:
Addresses, convention, Richmond, 1918................. ................ Feb., 1919: 1-11,28-34; Mar., 1919:15-19
Health insurance................................................................................. Oct., 1916: 62-5; May, 1917: 746-51
Labor law administration in New York State..............................................................Sept., 1917: 87-91
Resolutions on maintenance of labor standards during war..........................................May, 1917: 656-8
Unemployment survey, 1914-15........................................................................................ Mar., 1916: 25-6
American Association of Industrial Physicians and Surgeons. Conventions.................Mar., 1919: 249-50;
Aug., 1919: 216-18
American Association of Masters, Mates, and Pilots, New York harbor. Organization and
activities............................................................................................ A u g.,1918: 45-6, 51-3; Feb., 1919: 148
American Association of Public Employment Offices:
Meetings, 1913 to 1920...................................................................................................... July, 1916: 47-50;
Sept., 1916: 13-16; Sept., 1917:155-6; Sept., 1918: 304; Dec.. 1919: 277-9; Dec., 1920: 106-7
Name changed to International Association of Public Employment Services.............. Dec., 1920: 106
Committee on standardization. Appointment of, and report........................................ Sept., 1916: 15;
Sept., 1917:155; Nov.. 1917:116-30
American Brotherhood of Steamboat Pilots. New York harbor. Organization............... Aug., 1918: 51
AmftrW n Chemical Society. Activities of Committee on occupational diseases.. . . . . . . . Nov., 1916: 100-1
American Civic Association. Industrial housing.......................................................... ___ Jan., 1917:136-3
American Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Manufacturers’ Association, New York City. Party to
agreements................................................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 44-5.55-60
American Clothing Manufacturers’ Association, New York City. Party to agreements. . . J a n .,^ i8 :^
American Economic Association. Addresses at conference, 1918.........................................Mar., 1919:’ 1-14
American Express Co. Pension system................................................................................. Nov., 1916: 130
American Federation of Labor:
Benefits, 1903 to 1915, for transportation of workmen seeking employment.................. June, 1919: 130
Conventions, 1916,1918,1919,1920........................................ ........................................... Jan., 1917: 5-10;
Sept., 1918: 310-16; Aug., 1919: 241-6; Aug., 1920: 168-71
Participation in Pan American conference. 1918............................. Nov., 1918: 257-9; Jan., 1919: 302-4
Re headquarters of International Secretariat during war............................................. Feb., 1917: 200-6
Re international trade-union conference, Bern, October, 1917........................................ Mar., 1918: 172
Reconstruction program...................................................................................................Mar., 1919: 63-72
Report of American labor mission to Great Britain and France..................................... Sept., 1918: 312
Report of commission sent to Mexico.................................................... Sept., 1918: 312; Nov., 1918: 258
Represented on War Labor Conference Board.............................................................. Apr., 1918:103-5
Resolution re scientific research as applied to industry...................................................Oct., 1919: 21-2
Statem ent on strikes, 1913-14,1914^15.......................................................Ju ly, 1915: 31-2; A p r., 1916: 26-8
Statistics o f m em bership an d ben efits...................................................................................... A u g ., 1920: 171
B uilding Trades D epartm ent. M inim um scale o f wages, b y cities................................O ct., 1920: 120-5
------Plan for settlem ent o f ju risdictional d i s p u t e s ............................................................A u g ., 1920: 36-8
M etal Trades D epartm ent. P arty to agreem ent, January, 1919.....................................F eb ., 1919: 143-4
State branches. A ttitu d e tow ard w om en in industry problem s................................S ep t., 1918: 317-19;
N ov., 1918: 288-9; Jan .. 1919: 127,219-21
A m erican Federation of Teachers. O rganization, activities, e tc .........................................A u g., 1919: 247-55
A m erican Foundrym en’s A ssociation. Code for w om en’ s w ork, referred to ..........................
Ja n ., 1918: 59
Am erican Gas Institute. Com m ittee on analysis o f accidents. R ep ort............................... D ec., 1916: 26-7
Am erican H om e E conom ics A ssociation. W om en in dom estic service............................... A p r., 1917: 570-2
Am erican Institue o f A rch itects. R esolution on war housing................................................ M ar., 1918: 208-9
Am erican Labor Y earbook. D escription o f............................................................................... N ov ., 1916: 134-5
A m erican M anufacturers’ E xport A ssociation. R esolution re foreign trade..........................
Jan., 1919: 84
Am erican M edical A ssociation:
A ttitude tow ard social insurance....................... O ct., 1916: 66-8; N ov., 1917: 199-200; D ec., 1919: 345-6
A utom obile exhaust gases. (H itch cock .)........................................................................... F eb ., 1919: 219-21
Council on health ana p u blic in struction............................................................................ A p r., 1917: 509-12
Section on preventive m edicine. A ddresses...................................................................... M ar., 1917: 439-49
A m erican P u blic H ealth A ssociation:
Addresses on industrial h ygiene............................................................................................ F eb .; 1917: 272-83
B rief accoun t................................................................................................................................ D ec., 1916: 29-31
Conventions, 1918,1919............................................................................................................. 1918—Sept. 250-1;
1919—Jan. 1-10, 49; F eb. 215-19; Sept. 300-1; D ec. 312-14; 1920—Jan. 220-6; F eb. 226
Section on industrial hygiene. Papers read at m eetings................................................. D ec., 1916: 29-31;
F eb ., 1917: 272-83; M ar., 1917: 453-5
A m erican Society of M echanical E ngineers. B oiler cod e.........................................................J a n ., 1917: 10-11
Am erican S ociological Society. P lan for cooperative research................................................ O ct., 1920: 227-8
A m erican Steam m ip A ssociation. O rganization, aim s, e tc............................. A u g., 1918: 48; Ju ly, 1919: 22
A m erican U niform B oiler Code Congress. R 6sum 6...................... ...........................................Jan ., 1917: 10-11
A m ericanization.............................................................................................................. 1916—A ug. 90-1; M ar. 9-11;
Sept. 17-21; 1917—A pr. 578; 1918—June 173; 1919—Jan. 315; M ay 104; A ug. 71-2
(See also N aturalization.)
Am oskeag M anufacturing Co. Em ploym ent records.................................................................. July, 1916: 67
Am usem ents. (S ee Theaters.)
A naconda Copper M ining Co. W age rates................................................................................. N ov., 1917: 105-7
Andrew s, Irene Osgood. Irregularity of em ploym ent and its bearing upon a livin g w a ge.. F eb., 1916: 94
Andrew s, J. B .:
International labor standards..................................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 34
Principles of labor legislation..................................................................... July, 1916: 147-9; N ov., 1920: 200




8

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Anemia. (See Diseases0
Page.
Amlin. Poisoning in the manufacture of anilin and anilin dyes......................................... June, 1916: 2-3;
Nov., 1916: 102; Feb., 1919: 207-10; June, 1920: 169-70
Anilin dye industry. (See Dye industry.)
Anilin poisoning. (See Poisons and jpoisoning.)
Annals of American Academy of Pohtical and Social Science. (See American Academy of
Political and Social Science.)
Annuity. (See Old age and invalidity.)
Anthracite coal (except mining). (See Coal.)
Anthracite Coal Commission. (See United States: Anthracite Coal Commission.)
Anthracite coal mining. (See Mines and mining.)
Anthracite Coal Strike Commission, 1903. (See United States: Anthracite Coal Strike
Commission, 1903.)
Anthracite wage board, United States. (See United States: Anthracite Coal Commission.)
Anthrax. (See Diseases.)
Antistrike provisions:
Canada. Government's policy and order............................................ Oct., 1918: 47-50; Jan., 1919: 307
Colombia. Law of November, 1919............................................................................ Sept., 1920: 197-8
France. War materials......................................................................................................
Jan., 1918i 73
Great Britain. Munitions.................................................................................................. May, 1918:154
Minnesota. Order to prevent strikes during war......................................................... Nov., 1918: 288-9
Rumania.............................................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 209
Various countries. Public utilities................................................................................. Jan., 1917: 11-19
Antitrust law. Supreme court decision..................................................................................July, 1917: 56-7
Apprenticeship:
Building industry. Chicago. Agreement of July, 1915................................................ Oct., 1915: 33-4
----- Great Britain. Report and recommendation........................................................ May, 1920: 119-22
----- New York City. Ceased to exist................................................................................ June, 1919: 63
Clothing, women's. Cleveland. Wage schedule............................................................. July, 1920: 56
----- New York City. Wage schedule, etc...................................................................... June, 1919: 10,11
----- Philadelphia. Wage schedule......................................... ................................................Jan., 1918: 32
Electrical work, inside. New York City. System......................................................... June, 1919: 62
Machinists. New York City............................................................................................ June, 1919: 63-4
Millinery, Boston and Philadelphia. Systems............................................................ Nov., 1916: 37-8
----- Massachusetts. Little or no wage.............................................................................. Oct., 1918: 187
Navy yards (including naval hospitals). United States. Wage schedule effective
September 16,1920........................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 109
Printing and publishing. Efforts to standardize working conditions........................... Oct., 1920: 214
----- Little Rock, Ark. Agreement re training.................................................................Nov., 1919: 224
----- Netherlands. Duration of periods.............................................................................. July, 1920: 129
----- New York City. System............................................................................................. June, 1919: 62
Railways. United States.............................................. Apr., 1918: 109; June, 1918: 33; Sept., 1918: 132
Shipbuilding. Argentina. Wages.................................................................................... July, 1919: 162
Stove industry. United States................................................................................ May, 1918: 167,178-9
Australasia, 1896 to 1911. Restrictions in various industries................................. .... Aug., 1916: 86-7
Austria. Compensation for accidents............................................................................. Feb., 1918: 181-2
Germany. Reforms recommended.................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 251
Glasgow. Scheme of Master Wrights' Association...................................................... Sept.. 1917: 133-4
Great Britain. Activities of industrial councils in various industries.. Aug.. 1919:134; May, 1920:119-22
----- Interrupted apprenticeship of soldier........................................................................ Jan., 1919: 64-5;
Apr., 1919: 182; Sept., 1919: 160; Apr., 1920: 171-2
----- Reports of departmental committees........................................................................... July, 1918: ,51-6
----- Workmen’s compensation............................................................................................’ Dec., 1918: 327
Wisconsin. Experience under law of 1915............................................. Oct., 1917: 163-6; June, 1920: 220
(See also Vocational education; Learners; Minimum wage.)
Approved societies. Great Britain. (See Health Insurance: Great Britain.)
Arbitration. (See Conciliation and arbitration.)
Arc welding. (See Electric arc welding.)
Architects. Salaries in Navy Department, 1893 to 1919....................................................... June, 1920: 24-9
Argentina:
Departamento national del trabajo. Creative act of December 6,1916......................... July, 1917: 140
(See also specific subjects.)
Minimum Wage Commission. Orders................................................... Nov., 1919: 215; Oct., 1920: 151
(See also specific subjects.)
Army:
Great Britain. Rates of pay, 1914 to 1919...................................................................... Jan., 1920: 156-7
United States. Pay of enlisted men............................................................................... Oct., 1919: 130-1
(See also Military service; Soldiers and sailors; United States: War Department, etc.)
Army clothing. (See Clothing, army.)
Army construction work. United States. Wages, various occupations........................ June, 1918: 112-21
Ardnovici, C. Housing survey, St. Paul, Minn................................................................... Mar., 1918: 206-8
Great Britain. Housing. Woolwich Arsenal. Dec., 1917: 225-8; June, 1918: 205-6; Oct., 1918: 258-60
United States. Accidents, 1912 to 1914,1917,1918. Analysis of reports.....................Apr., 1916: 73-6;
Apr., 1919: 16-17
----- Basic rates of wages, 1914 to 1919........................................................................... Oct., 1919: 126-30
----- Eight-hour day................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 190; Oct., 1919: 126
----- Woman labor. Watertown Arsenal...................................................................... Nov., 1918: 189-90
(See also Navy yards.)
Arsenic poisoning. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Artificial flowers. Wages. Massachusetts.............................................................................. Oct., 1918: 187
Artificial limbs for disabled:
Provisions under various State laws..............Oct., 1918: 218-21; May, 1919: 41; July, 1919: 194,199-200
(See also Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
Ash, C. E. Wages of anthracite miners............................................................................. Oct., 1920: 103,108
Associated Manufacturers and Merchants of New York State:
Attitude toward safety movement............ ....................................................................... Nov., 1917: 169
Attitude toward minimum-wage commission................................. ....................... .......... Jan., 1919: 214




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

9

A ssociation o f G overnm ental L abor O fficials o f the U nited States and Canada:
P age.
C onventions, 1916,1919,1920............................... S ept., 1916: 11-13; A u g., 1919: 256-7; S ep t., 1920: 201-2
Proposed am algam ation w ith I . A . I . A . B . C .................................................................. N ov ., 1918: 212-13
A therton, Sarah H . Survey o f wage-earning girls..................................................... ............... M ar., 1916: 37-9
A tlanta Gas lig h t C o. Agreem ent w ith u n ion ....................................................................... M ar., 1919: 159-60
A tla n tic agreem ent re w age rates for seam en.................................................................................. Ju ly, 1919: 15
A tm ospheric cond ition s. (See Sanitation and w orking con d ition s.)
A ttachm ent o f wages. R ailroads. Order o f D irector General, Septem ber 5,1918............O ct., 1918: 138-41
A ttorney’ s fees. (See F ees.)
A tw ater, W . O . F ood requirem ents, scale o f............................................................................... F eb ., 1919: 224
A ustralia:
Bureau o f Census and S tatistics. L abor and industrial branch. P rices, purchasing
pow er o f m oney, e tc ........................................................................................................ D ec., 1917: 131,142-3

(See also specific subjects.)

A ustralian W orkers’ U nion. A ttitu d e tow ard arbitration........................................................ June, 1919: 214
A ustria:
M inistry for P u blic W elfare. Scope of activities.............................................................. M ay, 1918: 289-90
M inistry o f P u blic H ealth. Scope of a ctivities.................................................................. M ay, 1918; 290-1

(See also specific subjects.)

A utom obile cleaning. W om en. New Y ork C ity .......................................................................
Jan., 1918: 61
A utom obile m anufacturing:
France (L y o n ). W ages............................................................................................................... O ct., 1920: 134
U nited States. T raining classes for em ployees.....................................................................D ec., 1920: 92-3
------ In d ex num bers o f em ployees and p ay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919................................. 1919—Jan. 143;
F eb. 133; M ar. 152; A p r. 152; M av 187; Ju ly 146
------ L abor turnover...................................................................................................................... O ct., 1918: 1-18
-— W ages and hou rs............................................................................................................... June, 1920: 82-94
A utom obile repairing:
H azards from gasoline..............................................................................................................June, 1919: 238-40
A viatoL **OSe?PoSlons and p oisonin g.)
A w ards. (See C ollective agreem ents; Conciliation and arbitration; W age adjustm ents
based on cost o f liv in g .)
B.
B abson, R . W .:
E m ploym ent problem s....................................................................................... ........................ June, 1917: 897
R econstruction program .............................................................................................................A p r., 1919: 75-6
B acon, H elen. D ilution and special training............................................................................... June, 1918:173
B ag factories. M anitoba. M inim um -wage order, 1918.............................................................. Jan ., 1919: 215
B afilie, G . H . W om en’s wages........... ........................................................................................... M ay, 1918:155-6
B aines, $*, H ousing p olicy o f B ritish G overnm ent.................................................................. O ct., 1918: 251-8
B aker, A . C . R etraining o f crippled soldiers............................................................................... D ec., 1918: 87-9
B aker. D . G . W om an lab or in m echanical trades....................................................................... S ep t., 1918: 215

Amsterdam. Increases in wages, 1917 over 1913.............................................................. July, 1917: 63
Canada. Wages, 1919..................................... .................................................................... Aug., 1919: 186
France (Lyon). Wages, 1914,1919, and 1920.................................................................... Oct., 1920:133
Germany. (Berlin and Munich). Wages............................................... Jan., 1917: 146; Oct., 1919:159
----- (Greater Berlin). Resolution re bread prices............................................................ Nov., 1918:15
Great Britain. Wages and hours............... .............................................. Dec., 1918: 35; July, 1919:158
----- (England). Night work............................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 147-9
Italy ( M m i). Wages, May, 1920...................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 150
Netherlands (Amsterdam). Wages, increase, 1917 over 1913.......................................... July, 1917: 63
New Zealand. Wages, 1913 to 1920........................................................... July, 1920: 113; Dec., 1920: 83
Norway. Wages. 1895 to 1915............................................................................................ Nov., 1917:112
South Africa. Wages.1918and 1919.................................................... ......................... Nov., 1920: 97
Spain (Salamanca). Wages, 1917 and 1918............ ..........................................................Sept., 1919: 245
United States. Union scales of wages and hours........................... Dec., 1918: 215-21; Jan., 1919: 172-7
Baltimore Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co., Baltimore. Wage rates................................... Apr., 1918: 183
Baldwin, F. S. Statement re New York State Insurance Fund... Sept., 1919: 312-25; Feb., 1920: 217-18
Banana oil poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: Dope.)
Bankers’ Trust Co., New York City. Cost-of-living bonuses............................................... Nov., 1918: 2-3
Banks and banking:
Cost-of-living bonuses. (Fisher.)— ............................................................................... Nov., 1918: 1-3
Argentina. " Raiffeisen funds ” ........................................................................................ Apr., 1919: 119
Germany. Raiffeisen and Schulze-Delitzsch banks..................................... .................. Mar., 1919:141
Great Britain. Banking, currency, and war finance. (Kirkaldy.).............................. July, 1920: 59
----- Replacement by women................................................................................................ Aug.,1918:172
Russia. Moscow Narodny Bank.......................................................................................Nov., 1918: 132
South Africa. Land and Agricultural Bank.........................................................
July,
Switzerland. Wages and hours of clerical employees, 1914 and 1918............................... June, 1919:185
United States. Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers’ Cooperative National Bank,
Cleveland, Ohio................................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 128
----- Old-age pensions to employees...................................................................................... June, 1916:111
----- .Trade-union bank of Seattle....................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 129
(S e e a lso Credit unions.)
Barbers and hairdressers:
Germany (Berlin). Wages................................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 159
Italy (Milan). Wages of barbers, May, 1920.......... .......................................................... Oct., 1920: 150
Minnesota. Wages of hairdressers fixed by minimum-wage order...............................Oct., 1918: 184-5
Switzerland. Wages, 1914 and 1918................................................................................... June, 1919:185
Bargaining, collective. (S e e Collective bargaining.)
Barnes, C. B .:
The Longshoreman............................................................................................................. May, 1916: 1-7
Quotation on London decasualization scheme for longshoremen................................... June, 1919: 22-3
Barnes, G. N. Peace Conference resolution re creation of organization for regulation of
labor conditions..................................................................................................................... May, 1919: 1,24
Barton, Eleanor. Women in the cooperative movement in England... ...................... July, 1919: 119-20
Basic 8-hour day. (S e e Eight-hour day.)
Basic wage. (S e e Living wage; Minimum wage.)




1919:128

10

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Page.
Baskerville, C. Occupational diseases.................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 101
Bathing facilities. (S e e Sanitation and working conditions.)
Bauer, S.:
International standardization of labor legislation............. ................................. Apr., 1919: 1 (footnote)
Labor legislation and the society of nations..................................................... Nov., 1918: 56 (footnote)
Road to the eight-hour day.............................................................................................Aug., 1919: 41-65
Bedding factories. Manitoba. Minimum-wage order, 1918............................................... Jan., 1919: 215
Beefpnces:
Chicago. Beef products compared with live cattle.................................................... Sept.. 1919: 99-107
Chicago and New York. Wholesale and retail, 1913 to 1919.......................................... July, 1919: 66-9
District of Columbia. Wholesale and retail (6 firms)................ .................................. Oct., 1919: 79-83
Paris, 1918. (Retail.).......................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 84
United States. Production and prices: ..................................... ................................... Nov., 1920: 57-8
(S e e also Retail prices, food; Wholesale prices, food.)
Beef products. ( S e e Slaughtering and meat packing.)
Beet industry. ( S e e Sugar-beet industry.)
Beisels-Tutzmg, Dr. Industrial poisoning............................ ............................... .............. Aug., 1920: 110
Belgium:
Office du travail. Revue du travail. (Bulletin.) Resumed publication March 15,
1919...................... .............................................................................................................
Oct., 1919: 35
(S e e also specific subjects .)

Bell. Rosalie. Investigation into aeroplane industry............................................................
Feb., 1918: 51
Bellhouse, G. Accident prevention and safety first.................................... ....................... Dec., 1919: 302-4
Belnap, H . W . Promotion of safety work on railways............................................ .. — Nov., 1918: 203-4
Bendixen, P. A. Infections of the upper extremities....................................................... Nov., 1919: 327-35
Benefit funds:
Establishment. (S e e Establishment funds.)
Labor organizations. ( S e e Labor organizations.)
Railways. ( S e e Railroads, United States: Funds.)
Benefits. (S e e Maternity insurance; Unemployment insurance; Workmen’s compensa­
tion and insurance: Benefits.)
Benzene. ( S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Benzyl chloride. ( S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Bergen Point Chemical Co. Threatened strike, 1915........................................................... July, 1916: 29-30
“ Berkshire” system, defined.................................................. ................................................ May, 1918: 170
Apr., 1919: 5
Berlin Conference of 1890, forerunner of Bern conferences.....................................................
Bern Conferences of 1905,1906, and 1913...................... Nov., 1918: 57; Apr., 1919: 5-7; Jan., 1920: 15,16,22
Bernhard, G. Cost of war pensions in Germany................................................................ Oct., 1918: 235-9
Apr., 1918: 295-8
Berry, G. L. Eye hazards............................................................................................... .
Berufsgenossenschaften (Germany). (S e e Accident insurance societies: Germany-.)
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation (Ltd.) agreement with metal workers............ .
Feb., 1919: 143-4
Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa.:
Collective bargaining plan.............................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 153-5
National War Labor Board award to employees..................................................... .
Sept., 1918: 27-30
War emergency training of employees.............................................. Aug., 1918: 112-13: Sept., 1918: 210
Bettoni. Emigration from Italy after the war..................................................................... Feb., 1919: 274-5
Beverages. (S e e Brewing industry.)
Beyer, Clara Mortenson:
Minimum wage for women in hotels and restaurants..... ..............................................Mar., 1920: 132-6
Wages of women and minors in the mercantile industry.......................................... June, 1919: 191-205
Wages of women employed as cleaners, maids, and elevator operators. .................... Nov., 1920: 102-8
Beyer, D. 8.: Accident prevention.............................................................. Oct., 1916: 46-51; May, 1917: 762
Bibliographies:
Communal kitchens. Great Britain............................; ...................................................
060^1918: 56
Cooperation........................................................................................................................ Oct., 1®0: 166-7
Employees’ representation. United States.................................................................. Sept., 1919: 124-5
Eye injuries and diseases...................... •........................................................................ Aug., 1917: 186-91
Health insurance. Referred to..........................................................................................
Oct., 1916: 63
Housing........................................................................................................ ...................Jan., 1917: 127-30
International Association on Unemployment. Publications.......................................Apr., 1916: 87-91
International Labor Office. Publications....................................................................... Dec., 1920: 166
Labor, publications relating to. ( S e e en d o f each n u m b er o f the M on th ly L a b o r R e v ie w .)
Labor and the war. Great Britain.................................................................................July, 1917: 172-5
National Child Labor Committee. Publications........................................................ July, 1916: 149-51
Occupational diseases—skin infections. (Yates)............................................................. Jan., 1919: 277
Periodicals....................................................................................... Sept., 1916: 127-8; June, 1919: 334-53
Reconstruction.................................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 47-79
Unemployment statistics.................................................................................................. Oct., 1915: 74-7
Vocational education and employment of handicapped— ................................... Sept., 1917: 187-212
Vocational guidance................................................................... ..................................... Jan., 1917: 68-75
Women for war work, training of.................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 164-71
Birge, E. G. Health hazards in the pearl-button industry............................................... Sept., 1920: 146-7
Birth rate. (S e e Vital statistics.)
Bituminous coal (except mining). (S e e Coal.)
Bituminous coal commission, United States. (S e e United States: Bituminous Coal Com­
mission.)
Bituminous coal mining. (S e e Mines and mining.)
Bituminous coal strike, 1919. (Stoddard)........................................................................... Dec., 1919: 61-78
Black damp. ( S e e Poisons and poisoning: Carbon dioxide.)
Blacklisting. Investigation of Lake earners’ Association................................................ . Apr., 1918: 257-9
Blacksmiths:
Denmark. Average annual earnings................................................................................
Oct., 1918: 88
Russia. Wages, 1914,1916, and 1917.............................................. . . . . . < ......................... July, 1918: 82
United States. Wages. Army construction work.....................................................June, 1918: 112-21
------------Navy yards............................................................................................................ June, 1918: 110
------------Shipbuilding..................................... Mar., 1918: 70; Apr., 1918: 186; May, 1918: 129, 134, 140




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L.Y,1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

11

Blaoksmltha—Concluded.
FW6United States. Wages. Various cities............... 1918—Feb. 124.130; Mar. 120,126; Apr. 164,170,176;
June 128,134,140; Sept. 162,168,174,180; Dec. 262,268,274,2807286,292, m 304
----- Wages and hours, union scale, manufacturing shops, 1918 tof 1920.. Nov., 1919:172; Oct., 1920: 75
Blast furnaces. Accident prevention...................................................... Nov., 1916: 94-6; May, 1918: 258-60
Germany. Experiment in employing on machine tools............................................ Apr., 1918:129-31
Italy. list of trades taught to blmded soldiers.............................................................06t.> 1918: 78,79
United States. Compensation under various State laws......... ................................... . Apr., 1918: 266
----- Eye hazards in industrial occupations.....................................................................Apr., 1918: 295-8
----- Report of National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness.,....................... Apr., 1918: 296-7
(See also Handicapped; Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
Blindness. {See Diseases.)
Blitstein, M. War nutrition and public health in Germany............................................Aug., 1918: 14841
Nov., 1918: 262
Block vote, defined............................................... ................................. ......................
Bloomfield, M.:
Employment management...................................................................... Jan., 1918: 118; June, 1918: 175
The new profession of handling men................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 576
Board and lodging. Cost, (See Cost of living.)
Board and lodgtniin lieu of wages:
Agriculture, England........................................................
June, 1918:148-9
----- France..................................................................................................
Mar.,
----- United States.................................................................... Apr., 1918: 59-60; June, 1918:122-3,177-8
Docks and harbors. New York..................................................... ; ..................... . Sept., 1 9 1 8 :7,16.24-6
Domestic service. Bavaria................................................................................................ Feb., 1 9 2 0 : 132
----- Germany.................................................
July, 1919:168-9
----- Great Britain.......................................................................................................Apr., 1919:1014
Hospitals. District of Columbia.........................................
Jan., 1920: 1474
Hotels, restaurants, etc. District of Columbia......... 1980—Jan. 1464; Mar. 1324; Apr. 113; June 116
----- Massachusetts................................................................................................... Oct., 1918:188-4,186-7
----- Oregon........................................................................................................................
Nov., 1918:176
----- Untied States..................................................................................................................Sept., 1919:193
----- Washingtonis.................................................................................................................. May, 1920: 111
Merchant sea service. United States. Deck and engine departments......................... July, 1918:105
Munitions. France..................................................................................... ...................... June, 1918:213
----- Great Britain........................................................................................................... June, 1918: 206-10
Public employees. France....................................................................................... .......... Jan., 1918:107
Railroads. United States. Maintenance-of-way employees................................ .......... Oct., 1918: 137
Various industries. United States.............................................................................. 1918-Feb. 123-35;
Mar. 11943: Apr. 16341; June 127-45; Sept. 16146; Dec. 260409
{See also Allowances in lieu of wages; Bonuses; Wages.)
Board for jurisdictional awards in the oullding industry. {See National board for jurisdic­
tional awards in the building industry.)
Board for Vocational Education. {See United States: Federal Board for Vocational Edu­
cation.)
Board of Commerce, Canada. {See Canada: Board of Commerce.)
Board of Control for Labor Standards. {See United States: War Department. Board of
Control for Labor Standards.)
Board of mediation and conciliation. {See United States: Board of mediation and concili­
ation.)
Board of Railroad Wages and Working Conditions. (See United States: Railroad Admin­
istration. Board of Railroad Wages and Working Conditions.)
Board of Sanitary Cantrd. (See Joint Board of Sanitary Control.)
Board of,Trade, Great Britain. {See Great Britain: Board of Trade.)
“ Board price,” stove industiy, defined.............................................................................— May, 1918: 172
Boarding houses. (See Hotels, restaurants, etc.; Housing.)
Boards, labor. (See Directories; Labor boards, commissions, etc.; also under States and
counmes.)
•
Bohlen, F. H . Some comparisons of workmen's compensation legislation.......................Dec., 1919: 3314
Boiler makers:

Wages- £hlpyard8...........................................Si
Great Britain. Time lost in three factories................................................................... Aug.. 1918: 1744
New Zealand. Wages, 1913 to 1919................................................................................... Jury, 1920: 113
South Africa. Wages, 1918 and 1919................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 97
United States. Union scale of wages and hours. 1913 to 1920.............Nov., 1919: 173-4; Oct., 1920: 76
----- Wage rates awarded in shipbuilding..........Mar., 1918: 70; Apr., 1918:186; May, 1918: 129,134,140
----- Wages. Navy yards........ . . ........... ! .....................................................................- June, 1918: 110
------------Various cities.............................................1918—Feb. 124,130; Mar. 120.126: Apr. 164.170.176;
June 128.134,140; Sept. 162,168,174,180: Dec. 262,268,274,280,286,292,298,304
Boilers. Code of safety standards. American Society of Mechanical Engineers.............. Jan., 1917: 10-11
Boils. (See Diseases: Infections.)
Boleo Mining Co., Mexico. Wages, conditions, cost of living, etc...................................... Oct., 1918: 121-2
Bolshevism:
Boycott by organized labor in Hungary.......................................... ................................ Sept., 1920: 184
Inquiry projected by League of Nations................................................................... — Apr., 1920: 197
Resolution of Philippine Labor Congress opposing.......................................................... Oct., 1920: 215
Bondfield, Margaret. On procedure of arbitration tribunals in British munitions............ May, 1918: 154
Bonuses, cost-of-living:
Austria. Public employees.........................................................................................
Sept.,
1917:119-20
Canada. Public employees............................................................................................ Sept., 1919: 22740
France. Munitions............................................................................................................. July. 1918: 126
----- Public employees.................................... Jan., 1918: 106,107; Apr., 1918: 198-202: Mar., 1920:120-1
----- Street railways..................................................................... .
A pr.,1918: 194-7; A pr.,1920: 65-7
Germany. Building trades............................................................................................ Aug., 1918: 1624
----- Compared with higher basic wages................................................................ Apr., 1918:15942
----- Domestic service........................................................................................................... July, 1919:168
----- During the war................................................. , .......................................................... July, 1920: 117
----- Public employees........................................................................................................ Aug., 1918: 98-100




19

12

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW

Bonuses,' cost-of-living—Concluded.
Germany. Various trades, 1917........................................................................................ Dec., 1917: 45
----- Woodworkers.................................................................. ..., ...................................June. 1917: 945-9
Great Britain. Coalmining............................................... ............................................ July, 1919: 155
- — Engineering trades.................................................................... ............................... July. 1919:155-6
----- Iron and steel................................................................................................................ July, 1919:155
----- Munitions...................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 155
----- Pottery industry........................................................................................................... Feb., 1919:191
----- Public employees.......................................... Aug., 1917: 139-42; Aug., 1918: 84-9; Oct.. 1918: 172-3
----- Railroads............................................................ . May, 1918: 42-3; July, 1918: 106-7; July, 1919: 154
----- Shipyards.................................................................................................................... July, 1919:155-6
----- Street railways........................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 295-7
----- (Bradford). Woolen industry...............-..................................... ............................... Feb., 1919: 190
----- (Ireland). Railways.......................................................... ......................................... July, 1918: 107
----- (South Wales). Tin-plate industry............................................................................ July, 1919:156
Italy. Iron and steel......................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 205
----- Merchant marine.................. ........................................................................... Jan., 1920: 158-67,172
----- Salaried employees........................................................................................................Sept., 1918:199
Netherlands. Municipal employees.................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 184
----- Various industries...................................................................................... .................. July, 1918: 81
Norway. Various industries and occupations........................................................... Mar., 1919: 197-208
United States. Clothing factory in Middle W est.................................................... Aug., 1920: 23,28,29
----- Various industries. (Fisher.)....................................................... ....... *................... Nov., 1918: 1-5
----- (Cleveland). Women’s clothing..................................................................................
Aug., 1918: 9
----- (New York City). Bankers’ Trust Co........................................................................ Nov., 1918: 2-3
(S ee also Bonuses, war; Wage adjustments based on cost of living.)
Bonuses, discharge. France................................................................................................... July, 1919: 143-4
Bonuses, war:
Austria. Public employees............................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 193-4
France. Street railways, railroads, civil employees...................... ........................... Apr., 1918: 194-202
Germany. Seamen............................................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 163
Great Britain. Building trades, 1914 to 1918............................................................... June, 1919:177-80
----- Engineers....................................................................................................................... June, 1920: 111
----- Government employees................ ............................................... Aug., 1918: 84-9; Oct., 1918: 172-3
----- Seamen.....................................................................................................................July, 1919:157,159
Italy. Merchant marine.................................................................................................Jan., 1920: 158-67
Netherlands...................................................................................................................... Sept.. 1917: 123-4
United States. Merchant sea service................................................................................ July, 1918: 105
(S ee a lso Bonuses, cost-of-living.)
Bonuses and premiums:
France. Public employees, 1917,1918............................................................................. Jan., 1919: 200-2
----- Railroads.....................................................................................................................Apr., 1918: 197-8
----- War industries......................................................................................................... .
Sept., 1919: 242
Germany. Various industries......................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 126-9
Great Britain. Munitions.................................................................................................Aug., 1918: 160
----- Railways, 1915. ........................................................................................................Aug., 1916: 81-2
— - Various industries........................................................................... Mar., 1919: 188-9: July, 1919: 158
----- (Nottingham). Street railways.............................. .................................................. May, 1918: 146^7
Mexico. Copper mines. (El Boleo Mining Co.).............................................................. Oct., 1918: 122
Russia. Railroads...................................................................................... ....................... May, 1920: 66-7
Switzerland. State railways............................................................................................. May, 1918: 36-7
----- Various occupations................................................................................................... June, 1919: 186-7
United States. Candy making. Massachusetts.............................................................. May, 1919: 204
----- Coal mines. Attitude of Fuel Administration................................................... .
Sept., 1918:188
----- Mercantile industry.
Boston.System of Filene.................................................... June, 1918; 152-3
------------District of Columbia.............................................................................................. . June, 1919: 199
----- Iron and steel industry............................................................................................ Sept.> 1919: 272-81
----- Navy yards.......... ; ................................. ..................................................................... June, 1918:108
----- Paper manufacturing.................................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 619
----- Shipbuilding...................................................... Mar., 1918: 71,73; Apr., 1918: 183-4; Dec., 1918: 203
----- Sugar industry, Hawaii................................................................... Sept., 1916: 48-9; Feb., 1917: 3ti0
----- Tool manufacturing. System of Fayette R.Plumb (Inc.).............. ...................June, 1917: 844-5
(S ee also Profit sharing.)

B ook and jo b prin tin g. (S ee P rin tin g and publishing.)
B ookbinding. (S ee P rintingj and publishing.)
Book reviews. (S e e en d o f each n u m b e r o f the M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w .)
Boot and shoe industry:
Austria. Socialized establishment organized..................................... ..................................Feb., 1920: 55-6
Denmark. Wages. 1914 to 1918............................................................................................M ar., 1919: 191-2
Germany. Wages and hours....................................................................... July, 1920: 127; O ct., 1920: 139
Great Britain. Employment statistics, January, 1919......................................................... A pr., 1919: 181
------Opportunities for employment of disabled............................. .................................. A ug.. 1918: 111, 112
------Replacement of men b y women............................................................
Aug.,
------Statistics of membership of labor organizations......... ...................................................
June, 1919:305
------Wage increases during war........... , ....................................................................................... July, 1919:157
------Wages. January, 1919, and increase over 1918................................................................. A pr., 1919:181
Japan. Wages, 1914,1918, and 1919.......................................................................................Aug., 1920: 89,90
Massachusetts. Survey of woman labor............. ................................................................. Feb., 1916: 49-51
New York. Case of Lottie Coons v . Endicott, Johnson & Co............................................ N ov., 1918: 235
New York City. Children’s shoes, agreement, April, 1918..............................................June, 1918: 165-7
New Zealand. Wages, 1913 to 1919...................................................... .................................... July, 1920: 113
Norway. Wages. Various dates, 1895 to 1916................................................................ N o v .,1917: 111,112
South Africa. Wages, 1918 and 1919........................................................................................ N ov., 1920: 97
United States. Employees and amounts of pay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919. (Index'
nuntbers.)..................................................................................................................................... 1919—Jan. 141;
Feb. 132; Mar. 151; Apr. 151; May 186
------Employment statistics. 1918......................................................................... ....................Apr., 1919: 174-5
------Reduction of hours and effect on output......... * ............................................................June, 1917: 841-8
------Wages and hours, 1910 to 1920.................. Apr., 1919: 174-6; Jan., 1920: 141,143-4; Aug., 1920: 74-81




19

SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

13

Page.
B ooth , G. W . P rotection from hazards in w elding..................................................................... M ay, 1919: 228
B orden, R . Presented labor clauses to Peace Conference......................................................... M ay, 1919: 25-6
B orgm ann, O . Suggestions for prevention o f anthrax___; .......................................................A ug., 1915: 28-9
B oston Cham ber of Com m erce. N onco'ntributory old-rage pensions and health insur­
a n ce................................................................................................................................................ M ay, 1917: 759-61
B oston Clothing M anufacturers’ A ssociation. (See Clothing M anufacturers’ A ssociation of
B oston .)
B oston Elevated R ailw ayC o.:
D___________________Var
ecision o f N ational W a_ Labor Board re controversy with employees........................ Apr., 1919: 254

Party ta agreement of May 1,1916................................................................................... Sept., 1916: 37-8
Boston Society of Psychiatry and Neurology. Referred to — .......................................... July, 1920: 162-4
Box industry:
Great Britain. Survey of wages. 1913,1914..................................................................... June, 1916: 62-9
Massachusetts. Accident hazard, referred to................................................................... June, 1916: 62
----- Survey of wages of women in paper box factories, 1913.......................................... June, 1916: 59-62
New York State. Survey of paper box factories. Referred to...................................... Feb., 1916: 96
(See also Paper goods.)
Boycott:
Court decision re transportation companies handling nonunion goods....................... Sept., 1920: 173-4;
Nov., 1920: 197-9
Hungarian Government, by organized labor...................................... Sept., 1920: 184-8; Oct., 1920: 230
Resolution of congress of Free Trade-Unions. Germany.................................................. Oct., 1919: 286
Boyd, J. H. Statement re negligence in industrial accidents............................................ Mar., 1919: 234-6
Boys:
Great Britain. Effect of war-time employment upon................................................ Mar., 1919: 218-22
----- Hours of labor in munition work................................................................................ Sept., 1918: 44
----- Report on night employment in factories and workshops, referred to..................... Sept., 1918: 46
----- Training for merchant marine.................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 91-2
(See also Child labor.)
Boys’ clothing. (See Clothing industries, men’s.)
Boys’ Working Reserve, United States. (See United States: Boys’ Working Reserve.)
Bradshaw, T. P. Report on eye hazards.............................................................................Apr., 1918: 295-8
Bradstreet’s price figures used m various cost-of-living studies................. Aug., 1918: 184; Nov., 1918: 1-5
Brain workers. Working hours of certain great intellectuals................................Aug., 1919: 59 (footnote)
Brandeis, L. D. Statements re shorter hours and night work............ June, 1916: 23,24; Feb., 1919: 261-2
Brass. Lead and arsenic poisoning, etc.............................................................................. July, 1919: 173-4
Brazil:
Department of Labor. Created October 16,1918............................................................. Aug., 1919: 261
----- Proposed issue of quarterly labor bulletin................................................................. Aug., 1918: 241
(See also specific subjects.)
Bread prices:
During war and readjustment period............................................................................. July, 1919: 66-71
District of Columbia. April 16 and May 3.1917.......................................................... June, 1917: 954-7
United States. Changes in weight and prices, May-September, 1916.......................... Nov., 1916: 41-6
----- R6sum6, August 15,1913,1914,1915,1916................................................................. Oct., 1916: 29-31
(See also Retail prices, food.)
Breckinridge, Sophonisba P. Truancy and nonattendance in the Chicago public schools,
1917........................................................................................................................................ May, 1917: 772-9
Breton, J. L. Appointed Minister of Hygiene, France......................................................... Apr., 1920: 185
Brewing industry:
Austria. Condition of industry.......................................................................................... Dec., 1918:192
Belgium. Wages, 1919....................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 211
Berlin. Wages, January, 1916............................................................................................. Jan., 1917:146
Boston. Wages, 1914 and 1920.......................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 79
Canada. Wages................................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 186
France. Regulation of manufacture and sale of beer.................................................. Nov., 1918: 125-7
Germany. Condition of industry.................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 23-4
----- Union activities.......................................................................................................... Dec., 1917: 138-9
Great Britain. Orders prohibiting use of grains.............................................................. Mar., 1917: 400
Hungary. Cooperative distilleries...................................................................................... July, 1920:150
India. Wages, 1914 to 1916............................................................................................... Nov., 1917: 78
Japan. Wages, 1905 to 1914............................................................................................... Nov., 1917: 149
Norway. Wages, 1895 to 1915............................................................................................ Nov., 1917: 112
United States. Prohibition amendment and its relation to labor................................. June, 1919: 42
Bziek and tUe manufacturing:
Hazards. Carbon monoxide gas in brick kilns, referred to............................................ July, 1919: 173
----- Effects of dust inhalation, silica bricks. (British report)..................................... Apr., 1918: 292-5
----- Lead glaze in tile works; rate of lead poisoning in 1911.......................................July, 1919: 170,171
Hours. New York. Ten-hour law in brickyards cited................................................. Oct., 1918: 242
Wages, hours, etc. United States................................................. Sept., 1919: 182-3; May, 1920: 92-107
Woman labor. Great Britain. Referred to..................................................................... Nov., 1918: 41
Bricklayers:
United States. Union scale ofwages,and hours, 1913 to 1920......... Nov., 1919: 173-4; Oct., 1920: 76-7
----- Wages. Specified cities, 1920.......................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 4
----- Wages. Various cities..................................... 1918—Feb. 124,130; Mar. 120,126; Apr. 16A170,176;
June 128,134,140; Sept. 162,168,174,180; Dec. 262,268,274,280,286,292,298,304
----- (Cincinnati). Arbitration re wages and hours........................................................ May, 1918: 143-5
(See also Building trades.)
Bricklayers’ Union No. 18, Cincinnati. Wage award......................................................... May, 1918: 143-5
Bridge, Dr. Dangers from nitrous fumes in TNT manufacturing....................................... Sept., 1918: 242
Bridge and structural-iron workers:
Chicago. Reports on accidents and accident prevention, 1916, 1917.......................... Feb., 1918: 186-9;
Mar., 1919: 225-6
Pacific coast. Minimum wage in shipbuilding................................................................ Mar., 1918: 71
United States. Union scale of wages and hours, 1913 to 1920............ Nov., 1919: 190; Oct., 1920: 91-2
----- Wages, specified cities, 1920..........................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 4
----- Wages, various cities................................. 1918—Feb. 129,135: Mar. 125,131,133; Apr. 169,175,181;
June 133,139,145; Sept. 167,173,179,185; Dec. 267,273,279,285,291,297,303,309
(See also Building trades.)
1401317 0 — 41--------2




14

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Page.
Bridge and Structural-Iron Workers* Union, No. 1, Chicago. Industrial accident reports. Feb., 1918: 186-9;
Mar., 1919: 226-6
Bridgeport plan. (See Employees* representation.)
Brissenden, P. F.:
Employment policies and labor mobility in a California sugar refinery ................. Dec., 1919: 138-60
Employment policy and labor stability in a Pacific Coast department store............ Nov., 1919: 88-127
Labor policies and labor turnover in the California oll-refinlng industry................... Apr., 1919: 23-52
Labor turnover among employees of a California copper mining and smelting com­
pany............................................................................................................................... May, 1919: 63-84
Labor turnover in the San Francisco Bay region................................................... ...... Feb., 1919: 45-62
Mobility of labor in American industry............................................................................June, 1920: 86-56
Productivity of laborin the anthracite coal mines......................................................... Aug.,1917: 37-43
“ Welfare plan” of the Lake Carriers* Association......................................................... Sept., 1917: 55-8
Bristol Association for Industrial Reconstruction, Great Britain. Women in industry
after the war............................................................................................................... ........... May, 1919: 87-8
British Association for the Advancement of Science:
Fatigue...........................................................................................
Industrial unrest.............................................................................................................. Apr., 1917:120-5
Industry and finance................................ ........................................................................ July, 1920: 57-9
Outlets for labor after the war....................................................................................... June, 1916: 91-101
Replacement of men by women in industry................................. Mar., 1917: 335-46; Aug., 1918: 172-8
Women in agriculture............................................................................................; ......... May, 1918: 61-4
British Columbia:
Committee of investigation on workmen’s compensation laws. Report.................... Nov., 1916: 10-15
Department of Labor. Report, 1918........................................................................... July, 1919: 152,153
Minimum Wage Board. Orders............................................ ........................................ June, 1919: 207-8
Workmen’s Compensation Board. Reports, 1917,1918................. Oct., 1918: 230-2; Aug., 1920: 131-3
(See also specific subjects.)
British consular service. (See Consular service.)
British Federation of Trade Unions. (See General Federation of Trade Unions.)
British Industries, Federation of. (See Federation of British Industries.)
British Institute of Mechanical Engineers. (See Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Great
Britain.)
British Labor Party. Reconstruction program................................................................... 1917—Dec. 80-1;
1918—Apr. 63-83; Sept. 319-27; Nov. 263
“ British made” butter, defined............................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 154
British railway strike. (Adams)......................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 116-27
British Trades-Union Congress. (See Trades-Union Congress.)
Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. Progress of housing reform................................................ Jan., 1917: 128-9
Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. Woman labor. (Squires)...................................................... May, 1918: 1-22
Brooins and brushes:
Anthrax from infected shaving brushes.......................................................................... July, 1917: 127-8
Anthrax in brush industry..................................................................................... ..........Aug., 1915: 28-9
Labor cost. Various kinds of brooms............................................................................... Oct., 1920: 227
Massachusetts. Effect of minimum wage decree, August 15,1914.......... . ................... Dec., 1915: 83-41
----- Minimum wage in brush industry........................................... June, 1916: 57-8; Oct., 1918: 188,188
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. Organization of Cooperative National Bank.......Sept., 1920: 128
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Englnemen:
Attitude toward Federal compensation............................................................................ Nov., 1919: 815
Demands for wage! ncreases................................... .......................................................... Apr., 1918: 188
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, Canada. Membership statistics.................................. Sept., 1918: 828
Browne & Sharpe Manufacturing Co., Providence, R. I. Training for women............... Sent., 1918; 107-8
Brownell, J. R. Accident prevention...................................................................................... Nov., I9i|i 201
Brushes. (See Brooms and brushes.)
Bryan. A. E. Wages and labor developments in Japan....................................................... Nov., 19fl(k 191
Bryant, R. C. Lumber prices.................................. , .......................... .................. ............. .. July, 18*k 80
“ Buck ” system, in stove industry, defined.................................. ......................................... May, 1918: 170
Budgets, community. Raw staples. Community of 2,500— .......................................... Aug., 1919: M l
Budgets, family:
Analysis or effects of increased cost of living. (Meeker and Kittredge)........................July, 1920: 1-10
Report of United States Railroad Wage Commission................................................... June, 1918: 38-42
Standard minimum of health budget. (Meeker)............................................................ Jan., 1919:1-10
What is the American standard of living r (Meeker)....................................................... July, 1919: 6-7
Argentina.......................................... ZT.................................... ..................................July, 1919: 115-16
Australia (New South Wales)........................... ................................................................ June, 1918: 107
Canada................. 1916—Mar. 81; July 83; Nov. 50; 1917—Feb. 245-6; June 962; 1996-Mar. 73; Oct. 71
Denmark........ ......................................................................................... Nov., 1918; 109: Nov., 1920: 70
District of Columbia............ ............................; ............................................................1918—Sept. 112-14;
1919—Jan. 9; Dec. 22-9; 1980—Jan. 98-9; June 1-18; Aug. 7-8
France........................................ Feb., 1917: 246; Jan., 1918: 101; Nov., 1918: 107-8; Sept,, 1919: 236-40
Germany.................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 159; Jan., 1920; 114
----- (Leipzig)........................................................................................................................ Apr., 1918:158
Great Britain......................................................................................... May, 1919: 171-3; Aug., 1919:128
Illinois. (Study of Holt Mfg. Co., Peoria)........................................................................ Jan., 1920: 150
Italy.......................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 90; Nov., 1920: 68-6
Japan..................................................................................... .............................................. Aug., 1920: 41
----- (Tokio)........................................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 103
Massachusetts. Lawrence, 1919....................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 71-2
New York City....................................................................................July, 1917: 138; Sept., 1918: 118-22
Norway....................................... June, 1917: 971; June, 1918: 104-6; Nov., 1918: 109; Mar., 1919:123-7
Ohio.............................................................................................................Apr., 1918: 60; Mar., 1919:288
Russia..................................................................................................................................July, 1918: 82-8
South Africa........................... ............................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 128
Sweden.............. July, 1916: 91; May, 1918: 109-12; Nov., 1918: 109; Dec., 1918: 158-7; Mar., 1919:192
Switzerland..................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 144-5; Nov., 1918:110-13
United States................................. ................................................................................. 1916-Apr. 191-2;
June 99-104; Aug. 132-5; Sept. 115-17; Oct. 112-20; Dec. 115-46; 1919—May 147-65; June
101-16; July 76-114; Nov. 1-14,15-19; 1980—Jan. 27-34, 97-8; May 84-7, 89, Sept. 75-61




Dec.,

19

SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

15

Budgets, family—Concluded.
Uruguay............................................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 71
(See also Cost of living; Dietary studies; Food consumption; Rents.)
Budgets, individual:
Arkansas.............................................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 151
California..................... ................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 114-15
Canada............................................................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 202-3
District of Columbia........................................................................................ 1918—Jan. 1-12; Feb. 1-12;
Mar. 1-13; Apr. 41-52; 1919—May 218; 1920—Jan. 35-44
Germany........................................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 9-10
Kansas................................................................................................................................. Feb. 1918:145
Massachusetts............................ Apr., 1919: 180-7; June, 1919: 206; Sept., 1919: 249; May, 1920: 110-11
New York............................................................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 213
Ohio........................................................................................................... Feb., 1916: 51-6; Apr., 1918: 60
Uruguay.............................................................................................................................. Aug., 1920: 71
Washington (State)........................... ................. Aug., 1916: 31-2; Mar., 1917: 477-8; Nov., 1918: 177-9
—— (Spokane)............................................. ..................................................................... Feb., 1919: 113
(See also Cost of living; Dietary studies; Food consumption; Rents.)
Builders’ Exchanges, National Association of. (See National Association of Builders’
Exchanges.)
Builders’ National Industrial Parliament of Great Britain and Ireland. Plan and
gg g g ess................ .............................................................................. . Oct., 1918: 54-61; Oct., 1920: 168-73
District of Columbia. Permits for dwellings and apartments, 1910 to 1919..................
Oct., 1919: 10
Germany. Decline in building activity, 1912 to 1916..................................................... Apr., 1918: 286
Netherlands. Permits issued, 1917................................................................................... June, 1918: 65
New York State. Activities m principal cities.. , .......................................................... 1917—Mar. 384;
Apr. 621; May 784; June 1010; July 161; Aug. 169-70; Sept. 164-5
Scotland. Increase in cost................................................................................................ May, 1918:288
Switzerland. War profits tax........................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 161
United States. Cost of building, 1913 and 1919. (Sherman)..................................... Feb., 1920: 247-53
Building laborers:
United States. Union scale of wages and hours, 1913 to 1920................ Nov., 1919: 174; Oct., 1920: 77
(See also Buildingtrades.)
Building materials. Prices:
England. Prewar and 1919.................................................................................. ....... Aug., 1919: 125^6
United States. During Civil War and World War...................................................... Jan., 1919: 105-9
Building trades:
Belgium. Wages, 1919.................................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 211-12
Canada. Wages...................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 185; Sept., 1919: 224
----- (Ottawa). Wages....................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 189-90
— - (Toronto). Industrial councils. Text of constitution, March 31,1919............... June, 1919: 137-8
Denmark, wages, various dates, 1914 to 1920....................... .........Mar., 1919: 191-2; Dec., 1920: 87-8
Finland. Accident prevention law of April 4,1914....................................................... Aug., 1915: 23-4
France. Wages in force March, 1919................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 121
----- (Lyon). Wages, 1914,1919, and 1920......................................................................... Oct., 1920: 133
Germany. Bonuses, 1917................................................................................................... Dec., 1917:45
----- Labor organizations......................................... Dec., 1917: 137-8: Apr., 1918: 160; Aug., 1918: 162-3
— Wages........................................................................................... ............................... Jan., 1917:146;
Dec., 1917: 43-6; Aug., 1918: 162-3; Oct., 1919: 157; July, 1920: 127
----- Wages and hours.......................................................................................................... Oct., 1920:141
----- (Berlin). Wages...................................T. ............... .................................................. Dec., 1917: 43-4
-— (Nuremberg). By-laws of German Building Trades Employers’ Federation re
^
strike inmiwnoe................................................ ....................................................... Oct., 1915:85
Great Britain. Apprenticeship. Report............... .................................................. May, 1920: 119-22
----- Demands of workers, 1990....................................................................................... June, 1920: 113-14
— Industrial councils.......... ............................................................ Dec., 1918: 35-6; Oct., 1920: 168-73
—
-(Nationallndustiial Parliament plan)............................................................ Oct., 1918: 54-61
----- Labor organisations. Statistics of membership...................................................... June, 1919:304
----- Lead poisoning among painters and plumbers, 1916 and 1917................................... Mar., 1918:198
----- Wages. Various dates, 1252 to 1920.......................................... ......................... 1919—June 177-80;
July 154; Nov. 207; 1980—June 113-14; Nov. 94-5
----- (Scotland). Wages...................................................................................................... July, 1918: 109
Italy. Wages, 1914 to 1919, and 1920........................................................................... Oct., 1920: 148,150.
Japan. Wages, 1905 to 1919................................................................ Nov., 1917: 149; Aug., 1920: 89,90
Netherlands. Unemployment.......................................................................................... July, 1915:75
----- Wage increases............................................................................................................. July, 1917r61-2
New Zealand. Wages......................................................................... July, 1920: 113,114; Dec., 1920: 83
Norway. Agreements, 1917............................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 215
----- Wages, 1895 to 1915....................................................................................................... Nov., 1917:112
Russia. Wages. 1914,1916, and 1917.................................................... ........................... July, 1918: 82
South-Africa. Wages, 1917 to 1919.................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 97-8
Spain. Wages, 1917,1918, and 1920......................................................... Sept., 1919: 245; Dec., 1920: 90
Sweden (Goitenborg). Hourly rates of wages during war.......................................... Mar., 1919:193-4
Switzerland. Wages and hours, 191£and 1918................................................. ............ June, 1919:185
United States,. Earnings for eight hours, 1911-12,1914,1917..................................... Apr., 1918:188-90
— Fatal aaddcntt due wfattain New York State, four years ending June 30,1914.. June, 1917:979-80
- JisrilM iflllOiAw W plan for settlement.,............................................................Aug., 1920: 36-8
son eight-hour basis, May, 1919 and 1920..........................Sept., 1919: 218-21;
Oct., 1920: 120,122-5
’■Union scales of wages and hours, 1913 to 1920.......... ............ ........ 1918—Sept. 134-50; Oct. 140-54;
Nov. 134-51; Dec. 227-9; 1819—Nov. 173-6,180-2,185-8; 1920—Oct. 76-9,82-4,87-90
t— * Wage paid to workers placed, December, 1917-October, 1918............................. 1918—Feb. 123-35;
Mar. 119-33; Apr. 163-81; June 127-45; Sept. 161-85; Dec. 260-309
----- Wage rates. May and August, 1920. (Craig)....................................................... Oct., 1920: 113-21
----- Boston. Wages, 1914andl920...................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 79
— - Chicago. Wages.......................................................................................................... Oct., 1915:30
— New York City. Agreement, November, 1919...................................................... Feb., 1920: 147-9




16

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

B uild in g trades—C oncluded.
Page.
U nited States. N ew Y ork C ity. C onditions of in d u stry.................................................. June, 1919: 63
------ N orfolk, V a. Agreem ent, A ugust, 1919....................................................................... F eb ., 1920: 149-51
------P ortland, Oreg. A greem ent.............................................................................................. D ec., 1920: 94-8
(S ee also B ricklayers; B ridge and structural-iron workers; Carpenters; Cem ent indus­
try ; G ranite and stone trades; H od carriers; P ainting and decorating; Plasterers;
P lum bing and gas fittin g ; Sheet-m etal w orkers.)
B u lkley, M . E . M inim um rates in the box-m aking industry, 1912,1913..............................June, 1916: 62-9
B unk housed. (S ee L abor cam ps.)
B unting v. Oregon. D ecision o f Supreme Court of the U nited States___ June, 1916: 23-8; O ct., 1918: 240
B urdick, A n n a. Industrial and trade training for w om en..................... A p r., 1918: 114-15- N ov., 1918: 200
B ureaus, labor. (S ee D irectories; Labor boards, com m issions, e tc.; also under States and
countries.)

B um s:
A d d bum s on hands o f solderers............................................................................................... N ov., 1920: 183
M ortality from bum s..................................................................................................................... Ju ly, 1917: 126
Treatm ent o f............................................................................................................................... N ov., 1917:178-9
B urry, J. T im e lost b y hernia cases............................................................................................ N ov., 1918: 238-9
~
1
r), defined...............................................................................................
l u g ., 1918:4
A pplication of Golden R ule to ................................................. .
Organic developm ent o f ............................................................
B utler, B . S. Copper prices............................................................
B utter:
Sw itzerland. P roduction, 1917.................................................
U nited States. Trend in wholesale and retail p rices..........
(S ee also R eta il prices, food ; W holesale prices, food .)
B utton in d u stry:
Hazards in pearl-button industry of New Jersey..................
Survey o f health hazards...... .......................... ...........................
W ages and hours. G erm any....................................................
B uttonhole Makers and B utton Sewers U nion, New Y ork C ity.
7,1919..................................................................................................

..........D ec., 1920: 102-8
............. O ct.. 1916: 86-8
.............
Ju ly, 1920: 90
............. D ec., 1918: 196
Jan., 1920: 100-8,113-14
.............................................. M ar., 19}7: 435
.......................................... S ept., 1920: 146-7
.............................................. O ct., 1920: 138
P arty to agreem ent, A p ril
..............................................
June, 1919: 9

Ci
C. G . T . (See Confederation G6n6rale du Travail.)
Cadmium poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Cafes. (See Hotels, restaurants, etc.)
Caisson disease. (See Diseases.)
California:
Board of Health. Sanitation in mines for the prevention and eradication of hook­
worm............................... ........................................................................................................... July, 1918:190-2
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Report, 1915,1916— ........................................................... June, 1917: 900-2
Commission on Immigration and Housing. Housing survey............................................ Jan., 1917: 130
------ Camp sanitation and housing. Referred to .......................................................May, 1918: 227,280,281
Industrial Accident Commission. Policy governing awards in cases of hernia___ N ov., 1918: 229,236
------ Report on serious permanent injuries, 1914 to 1918....................................................June, 1919: 247-53
------ Reports, 1913-14 to 1918-19............................. Jan., 1916: 39-44; May, 1916: 51-4; M ar., 1917: 407-10;
Feb., 1918:184-6; July, 1918: 165-7; M ar., 1919: 252-4; F eb., 1920: 218-21
------Table of permanent disability ratings, printing trades................................................. Sept., 1918: 85
------ Medical department. Examination o f injured employees............ O ct., 1918: 225; M ay, 1919: 52-3
------Safety department. Methods............................................................................................. N ov., 1918: 206
Industrial Welfare Commission. Orders....................1917—July 57-8; Sept. 116-17; 1918-%Fan. 119-20;
Nov. 171-3; 1919—Feb. 192-4; May 232-5; Aug. 203-5; Nov. 215-16; 1929—N ov. 108-12
------Report an fruit and vegetable canning, 1917................................................................ F eb., 1918:138-42
------Reports, 1913 to 1918........................................ Sept., 1915: 9-11; Jan., 1918: 114r-18; D ec., 1919: 261-3
Land Settlement Board. Progress under the Land Settlement A ct, 1919....................O ct., 1919: 280-2
Legislature. Committee on unemployment............................................ M ar., 1919: 56; A pr., 1919:145-7
Social Insurance Commission. Report, 1917..................... ..........Apr., 1917: 497-507; June, 1919: 270-80
State Committee on Soldiers’ Reemployment. Activities........... ...................................... Feb., 1920: 162
(S ee also specific subjects.)

C alifornia M etal Product
1
reducers’' Association.
Rates of wages in various occupations in gold

mining....................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 176-8; July, 1919: 152
Calwer. R. Cost-of-living studies................................. .......................................... l. . . A pr, 1918: 155-6,158
Cambria Steel Co. Physical examination of employees...................................................... Feb., 1917: 270-1
Campbell, Janet. Health of women munition workers............... .................................... Sept., 1918: 219-22
Camps. (See Company towns; Labor camps.)
Canada:
Board of Commerce. Creative act, 1919......................................................................... Oct., 1919: 101-2
Board of Inquiry into Cost of Living. Report............................................................... Apr., 1916: 51-4
Civil Service Commission. Bonus schedule................................................................ Sept., 1919: 227-30
Commission of Conservation. Rural planning and development................................ Apr., 1918: 283-6
Department of Health. Creative act................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 274
Department of Labor. Labor conditions in Canada as affected by the war............ June, 1917: 828-34
----- Labor legislation, 1918.................................................................................................. Sept., 1919: 344
----- Labor Research and Employment Service. Order establishing..................................... Feb., 1919:136-7
----- Reportsonlabor organizations, 1916to 1918. O ct.,1917:105-7;Sept., 1918: 328-9; Sept., 1919 : 354-6
----- Rise in prices and cost of Iivingin Canada, 1900 to 1914........................................... Apr., 1916: 51-4
----- Strikes and lockouts, 1901 to 1916.......................................................................................... May, 1918:297-9
----- Wages and cost of living. Referred to.............. ........................................................ Apr., 1918: 191
Department of Militia and Defense. Pensions to members of Canadian expeditionary
forces.............................................................................................................................. June, 1917: 874-6
Department of Soldiers and Sailors Civil Reestablishment. Duties, activities, etc___ May, 1918: 81;
Sept., 1918: 69; Aug., 1919: 164^5
----- Invalided Soldiers’ Commission. Activities.................................................................
Sept., 1918:69-74
Imperial Board of Munitions. Duties and personnel...................................................... June, 1917: 829
Military Hospitals Commission. Surveys... June, 1917: 867-74; Apr., 1918: 118-21; Sept., 1918: 69-74
National Industrial Conference, 1919. Agenda, proceedings, etc................................ Sept., 1919: 42-3;
Nov., 1919: 51-62; July, 1920: 171-2




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

17

Canada—Concluded.
Page.
Parliament. House of Commons. Special committee on prices. Report on high cost
of living....................................................................................................................... Sent., 1919: 113-18
Privy Council. Order of November 10,1916, on high cost of living.. June, 1917: 831-4; Dec., 1918: 150-2
Registrar of boards of conciliation and investigation. Operations, 1915-16................ Dec., 1916; 16-19
Royal Commission on Industrial Relations. Personnel, etc....................................... Sept., 1919: 36-43
Soldier Settlement Board. Duties, powers, etc.............................................................. June, 1919: 52-8
(See also specific subjects.)
Canadian Federation of Labor. Attitude toward Canadian industrial disputes act.......... Dec., 1916: 16
Canadianindustrialdisputes investigation act. (See Conciliation and arbitration: Canada.)
Canadian Manufacturers’ Association. Meeting, June, 1920.................................................. Nov., 1920: 101
Canadian Merchant Service Guild. Organization and dispute with shipowners..............Jan., 1919: 161-5
Canadian National Industrial Conference. (See Canada: National Industrial Conference.)
Canadian Patriotic Fund. Organization, activities, etc...................................................... July, 1917: 10-14
Canadian Railway War Board. Agreement with brotherhoods, establishing Canada Rail­
way Board of Adjustment No. 1......................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 165-6
Canal workers. (See Public employees.)
Cancer. (See Diseases.)
Candy industry. (See Confectionery.)
Canning. (See Food canning and preserving.)
Canteens. (See Lunch rooms.)
Capital and labor. (See Industrial relations.)
Capital Traction Co., Washington, D. C. Wage agreement of March 11,1916..................Apr., 1916: 28-35
Car building:
Employment of disabled workers in upholstering....................................................... Apr., 1918: 119-20
Labor turnover. Chicago. One establishment, 1918...................................................Sept., 1919: 49-51
Wages and hours. United States, 1919.......................................Sept., 1919: 182,183; June, 1920: 82-94
Car bunding and repairing. Employees and amounts of pay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919.
(Index numbers.)................................................................................................................... 1919—Jan. 143;
Feb. 133; Mar. 152; Apr. 152; May 187
Carfare. District of Columbia. B .
S. Cost-of-living study............................................. Mar., 1918: 12;
Dec., 1919: 22,28; Jan., 1920: 35,42
Carbolic acid. (See Poisons and poisoning: Phenol.)
Carbon dioxide. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Carbon monoxide. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Carbonyl chloride. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Referred to........................... Nov., 1916: 129-31
Carnegie Institute of Technology. Tests for vocational guidance. (Scott.) Referred to .. June, 1917: 897
Carpenter, O, F. Two years ofindustrial legislation in a large clotting factory...............Aug., 1920: 22-33
Carpenters:
Chicago. Agreement of July, 1915, re wages, hours, etc............................................... Oct., 19151 26-34
Germany (Berlin). Rates of wages of union carpenters................................................. Dec., 1917: 44
New York City. Wages and regularity of employment................................................. June, 1919: 63
Switzerland. Average wages per hour, March, 1917.................................., ................ Sept., 1917: 124-5
United States. Rates of wages, various cities... 1918—Feb. 124, 130; Mar. 120,126; Apr. 164,170,176;
June 128, 134, 140; Sept. 162,168,174, 180; Dec. 262, 268, 274, 280, 286,292, 298, 304
----- Union scales of wages, 1913 to 1920........................................................................... Dec., 1918: 227-8;
Jan., 1919: 178-9; Mar., 1919: 170-2; Nov., 1919: 175; Oct., 1920: 78
----- Wages, 1920. Specified cities......................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 4
(See also Building trades.)
Carpet factories. Germany (Berlin). Wages, 1919................................................................ Oct., 1919: 155
Carr., A. M. Plan for a group industrial surgical hospital................................................. Aug., 1920: 182-3
Carr, Elma B .:
.
Production, cold-storage holdings, and wholesale and retail prices of butter and
cheese............................................................................................................................ Jan., 1920: 100-14
Retail food prices, 1918................................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 103-10
Trend in retail prices of food............................................................................................ July, 1919: 57-60
Carrel-Dakin solution for treatment of wounds......................................................... Nov., 1917: 173-8,181-2
Carriage makers. Spain (Salamanca). Wages, 1917 and 1918.............................................. Sept., 1919: 245
Cartels. (See Monopolies.)
Carter, W . S. Argument and brief in railway wage demand, 1918.................................. Apr., 1918: 188-92
Cary, R. J. Statement re costs of liability.................................................................. Mar., 1919: 236, 246-7
Cassel, Gustav. Quoted.................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 193; July, 1920: 89
Casual labor. (See Migratory and floating labor; Seasonal employment.)
Casualties. (See Accidents^
Catastrophe hazard. (See Workmen’s compensation and insurance; Security.)
Cattle prices:
Austria (Vienna). July, 1914, and 1918............................................................................ Dec., 1918: 194
Chicago. 1913 to 1919. (Tables and charts).................................. July, 1919: 66-9; Sept., 1919: 99-107
(See also Slaughtering and meat packing; Wholesale prices.)
Caustic soda. Dye industry. Danger of burns. (Hamilton)............................................. Feb., 1919: 215
Cease, D. L. Attitude of railway transportation organizations toward Federal compen­
sation.................................................................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 311-16
Celluloid Co., Newark, N. J. Health insurance experience.................................................. May, 1917: 753
Cellulose industry. Norway. Eight-hour shifts................................................................... Aug., 1918: 215
Cement industry:
Oct., 1916: 57
Accident prevention. Addresses. Referred to......................... ...................... ..............
Accidents. Experience of Portland Cement Association, 1915... Nov., 1916: 87-91; Nov., 1919: 261-2
Germany. Hourly wage rate, December, 1917................................................................ Aug., 1918: 162
Germany (Berlin). Wages and hours.................................................. ............................ Oct., 1920: 141
United States, union scale of wages and hours, 1913 to 1920......... Nov., 1919: 175-6; Oct., 1920: 78-9
(See also Building trades.)
Census, Bureau of. (See United States: Bureau of the Census.)
Census.industrial- (See Employment statistics; Industrial census.)
Central Association or German Forestry, Agricultural, and Vineyard Workers. Demands. Nov., 1918: 46-7
Central Bureau of Planning and Statistics. (See United States: Central Bureau of Plan­
ning and Statistics.)
Central Committee on Women’s Employment, England. Organized August, 1914....... Apr., 1918: 205-6
Central Wages Board. (See Great Britain: Central Wages Board.)




L.

18

M ONTH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Ceramic industry. (See Pottery industry.)
Certificates of employment. (See Employment certificates.)
Chamber of Commerce of the United states of America:

Page.

M eetings, 1917,1918....................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 40-8; A u g., 1919: 76-8
R eferenda re labor principles..................................................................................................... S ent., 1920: 20-2
July* 1920: 21
R eport on proposed labor program , referred t o ........................................... ..........................
C ham berlain, J . P . Pow er o f the U n ited States under the C onstitution to enter in to labor
treaties............................................................................................................................................... S ept., 1919: 34-6
Cham bers o f labor:
A ustria. C reative a ct.............................................................................................................. June, 1920: 189-91
G erm any. O rganization.............................................................................................................. M ay, 1920: 174
C haney, L . W .:
A nalyses o f accident records o f certain steel p la n ts...............................................................
A p r., 1920: 4
Can serious industrial acciden ts b e elim inated?....................................................... ............ A u g., 1917: 1-16
Com parison o f arithm etic and ratio charts.................................... ..................... .............. M ar., 1919: 20-34
D eterm ination o f relative industrial hazards. R eferred to ................................................. N ov., 1918: 210
“ Engineering revision.” C lassification o f 207 severe accidents as regards possible
p reven tion........................................................................ ......................................................... D ec., 1918: 1-17
Forem an's bonus for accident redu ction............................................................................. S ept., 1919: 272-81
Influence o f the w ar on accident rates in the iron and steel in d u stry.......................... June, 1920: 151-63
Influence o f the w ar on accident rates in m achine bu ild in g............................................. A p r., 1919: 12-22
Pre-w ar and w ar-tim e accident rates in the iron and steel ind u stry..............................N ov., 1919: 253-7
Trend o f accident frequency rates in the iron and steel in d u stry .. N ov., 1917:13-22; D ec., 1917:161-6
W ar-tim e trend of em ploym ent and accidents in a group o f steel m ills........................ O ct., 1919: 222-32
C hapin, R . C .:
C ost-of-living stu d y............................................................................................... June, 1918: 40; N ov., 1918: 2
F ood requirem ents o f adult m ales, N ew Y ork C ity. R eferred t o .....................................
Jan., 1919: 9
Standard o f livin g in New Y ork C ity. Referred t o .............................................................
N ov ., 1917: 2
Charities, B rooklyn B ureau of. (S ee B rooklyn B ureau of C harities.)
Charts:
A ccid ent statistics, iron and steel...........................................................................................: . A p r., 1919:22;
Sept., 1919: 273,274; O ct., 1919: 228: Ju n M toO : 151-68
A ccidents....................................................................... July, 1916: 14-16; D ec., 1917:166: N ov ., 1917: 18-21
“ A rith m etic” and “ ra tio” com pared (C haney).................................................................. M ar., 1919; 20-34
Cost of livin g com pared w ith w a ges!........................................................................................ June, 1918:126
D isability experience.................................................................................................... N ov., 1919: 27,29, 34,36
E m ploym ent agencies. U nited K ingdom ....................................................................... A u g., 1919: 153,154
------U nited S tates........................................................................................................................... A ug., 1919: 149
F ood expenditures. U nited States.......................................................................................A u g., 1919: 13,14
F ood in storage. B u tter......... •......................................................................................... ......... Jan., 1920: 108
------ Cheese........................................................................................................................................ Jan .. 1920; 110
Governm ent salaries and food prices.............. ...................................................................... June, 1920; 31,33
H ours o f labor of hotel and restaurant em ployees. (P o p e )................................. M ar., 1920: 102,105,107
H o u s in g ....,...................................................................................................... A p r., 1918: 23; M ay. 1919: 34-7

Marketing plan. (MacKaye).............. ............................................................. Aug., 1920: 2,3,10,15,16
Mobility oflabor...................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 34; June, 1920: 45,52
Organization for personnel administration........................................................................ July, 1920: 25
Prices................................................................................................................................. Sept., 1919:100-5
Regularity of employment.............................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 13,17
Rent expenditures........................................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 14,15
Retail prices of coal............................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 60
Retail prices of food............................................................................................................. 191s—Sept. 64;
Oct. 62; Nov. 134; Dec. 166; 1920—Jan. 73; Feb. 67; Mar. 39; Apr. 75:
May 74; June 64; July 74; Aug. 54; Sept. 35; Oct. 36; Nov. 28; Dec. 33
TNT poisoning cases as related to weather conditions................................................. Feb., 1918: 34-5
Wages. Coalmines............................................................................................................. Dec., 1919: 218
----- Comparison of earnings with food prices.................................................................... Dec., 1920: 111
----- Germany.......................................................................................................... July, 1920: 119,120,122
----- Wisconsin...................................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 110
Wholesale prices.............................................................................................................Jan., 1920: 103.110
Workmen's compensation laws................................................................. Sept., 1915: 45; Apr., 1920: 32
(See a lso Illustrations; Maps.)
Charwomen. (See Woman labor.)
Chauffeurs. (See Teamsters, chauffeurs, etc.)
Checkweighing in Various Industries Act, 1919, Great Britain............... Feb., 1920: 238-9; Mar., 1920: 202
Cheese. United States. Trend in wholesale and retail prices. (Carr.)....................... .. Jan., 1920: 108-14
(See also Retail prices, Food; Wholesale paces.)
Chftmlnftl industry:
Accident prevention..............................................................................: ............................
Oct., 1916: 53
Employment statistics. Germany.................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 140
Hazards. Report of New York State Factory Investigating Commission, 1913........ Jan., 1919: 245-6
----- Survey of New York Industrial Commission.......................................................... Mar., 1920: 165-8
----- Survey showing effect of certain chemical industries on health of worker.......... Feb., 1917: 279-80
----- Symposium......................................................... ...................................................... Nov., 1916: 100-5
Hours. Belgium (Liege). Experience of Engis Chemical Works................................. Dec., 1916: 120
_ Switzerland
Atiffej 1919*
----- United StatM,‘l914 to 1919*..*.*.*.".'.*.*.".".*.*.' Sept'.,* 19i‘9Vl82,7&Y
*May, 1920: 92-107
Industrial council. Great Britain................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 34-5
Wages. Denmark, 1914and 1920....................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 89
-— Germany.................................................................Apr., 1918; 156; Oe$.,1918: 174; July, 1920: 128
----- Great Britain...........................
July, 1919:158
----- New York (State)....................... June, 1918:124; July, 1919: 147; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
----- Switzerland. 1918 increase over J.914..........
June, 1919:186
----- United States. Coal-tar chemicals........................................................................ Dec., 1918: 213-14
------------1914 to 1919.....................................Sept., 1919: 182,183; Jan., 1920: 142,143; May, 1920: 92-107
----- Wisconsin.................................................
Dec., 1920: 112
Woman labor. Great Britain, 1914 and 1917.......... ............................. Jan., 1918: 65-7; May, 1918:152
(See also Dye industry; Munitions; Poisons and poisoning; Tar products industry.)
Chemical Society, American. (See American Chemical Society.)
Choi, Ta. Labor situation in China................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 207-12




STTBJBOT HTDEX, JU L Y , 1916, TO DECEMBER, 1930.

19

Page.
1Mllunanufactureri. Em eW fowht management.....................July, 1916: 66; June, 1917: 897
md tow ardlatom aldsm ocraey....... .................................................
8ept« 1990: 0
_____„ ____________ jit M aroiaeturw 'iyieedatictt. Trade agreements, membership, etc. Feb., 1918: 66-9
Chicago
cn
nf
................. ....................
Mar.. 1917: 468-4
ChicagoOphthalmolorical Society. V isu allo em o fd m eye................................... ........... A pr.; 1920: 187-8
Chief Executives of Railroad Organisations. Wage movement of organized railway em­
ployees.............. .................................................................................................................................. May, 1920: 49
Child labor:
Accidents. Massachusetts............................................................. ......................................... Dec., 1920: 127-8
Agriculture. Germany......................................... .......... June, 1917: 926-7; N ov., 1918: 47: D ec., 1918: 41
— - Great Britain. Experience in granting exemptions from school............................. July, 1917: 81-8
— -O n tario. 1917and 1 9 1 8 ..................................................................................................... May, 1918: 149
Bibliography. Publications of National Child Labor Committee................................July, 1916:149-61
Bonuses. Great Britain. Public employees.......................................... Aug., 1918: 86-9; O ct., 1918: 172
------ Great Britain (Nottingham). Street railways............................................................... May, 1918:147
Employment agencies. Great B rita in ................................................... M ay, 1917: 664-7; Jan., 1919: 131
------ New York City. Work of noncommercial agencies ............................................. Aug., 1917: 158-63
------United States. Junior section established
........................................................ Feb., 1919: 117-19
Employment certificates. (S ee Employment certificates.)
Hazards. Effect of war-time employment on English boys............................ ............ Mar., 1919: 218-22
— - Influence of occupation on health during adolescence. Survey covering Massa­
chusetts........................... ........................... ........................................... ............................. N ov., 1916: 110-14
— — Mortality among persons under 18 in TN T work in Great Britain.................; ........ Sept., 1918: 239
------Provisions of law re maximum weights, Argentina.......................................
Oct., 1918: 249
Health certificates. Great Britain. Munitions.................................................................. Sept.>1918: 47-8
Home work. New York City. Millinery industry. .......................................................Aug., 1920: 107-8
Hours. Recommendation of International Association for Labor Legislation........... N ov., 1918: 66,57
------Great Britain. During war............................................................... /M a y , 1918: 158; Jan., 1919: 130-1
------------- Shifts in munition works............................................................................................. May, 1918: 158
------Japan. BajpiEted by lew ............................................................................................ Sept., 1918: 199-200
------Kansas. MinunqiBHwage order, 1918.....................................................................
July, 1918: 112
r—- Oregon, Minimiun-wage order, 1918..............................................................
N ov., 1918:176
Insurance. Switseriand. Statistics , 1917.........................
Apr., 1920: 198
Laws. Argentina...................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 247-9; A pr., 1919: 195-6
------ Belgium.......................................................................................................................... .
Sept., 1919: 345-7
------Canada, 1920. (Provinces).................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 179
------China (Hongkong).' Regulations of sanitary board.................................................. N ov., 1919: 251-2
------Czechoslovakia. December, 1918, and July 28,1919................ Feb., 1920: 241-2: A pr., 1920: 178-82
------G e rm a n y .................................................. .........................................Aug., 1918: 101; N ov., 1919: 250-1
------GreatBritain................................................................................................... ...................... Sept., 1918: 47
-------------Education act of 1918, England and W ales.............................................. ........... Dec., 1918: 42-6
------Italy............................................................................................................................... .
N ov., 1917: 215-17
------Mexico (Vera Cruz)..................................................................................... ..................... Sept., 1918: 276-7
------Peru.............: .................................................; .............................. ...................................... Sept., 1919: 847-9
— - Switseriand............................................................................................................................ A ug., 1915: 22
------Tennessee............................................................................................................................... July, 1918: 130
------United States. Act of September 1,1916.. Oct., 1916: 31-3: Sept.,1917: 48-58; July, 1918: 171-7
-------------Act of February, 1919. Mar., 1919: 217-18; June, 1919: 264; Feb., 1920: 174; A pr., 1920: 178
— - Washington (S tate)................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 569; Jim., 1918: 62
Minimum warn. (S ee Minimum wage; Child labor: Wages.)
Night work. Trance.......................... * ...................................! ................... Mar., 1918: 86; July, 1918: 123-4
------Germany (Prussia)....................... ............. ................................. ....................................... Aug« 1918: 101
----------------

___________
Dongrew of W o B n g W om en......................................Deo., 1919: M M ; Jam, 1920:10
- International ZAbwUonferenoes, 1919 and 1990..................... ....................................Jan., 1010:17-99;
Feb., 1990: 9 5 -9 ,3 1 -2 ^ 0 ^ ., 1990: 910
------International Labor Office.................................................................................................. May, 1990: 8,90
------Leeds International Conference........................................................................................... June, 1917: 914
------NationalCathoUoWarCouncil...................................... .................................................... June, 1919: 50
------President’s Industrial Conference.................. ..................................................... .............. Apry 1920: 38
------Trade-Union Conference, International. Bern, October, 1917.................................Mar.. 1918: 177-8
Reports, Argentina.................................................... ............................. A pr.. 1919: 195-7; July, 1919: 163
------California............. ............................
June, 1917: 902; Jan., 1918: 115-16,110-20; Feb., 1918: 138-42
------Connecticut.......... ........................................... .................................................. ............... Deo., 1920: 126-7
------Germany (Prussia), 1913 to 1917......................................................................................A ug., 1918: 100-3
------Great Britain........................................................................... Dec., 1916: 92-7: June/WIT: 878-9,884-8;
Jan., 1919: 129-34; Mar., 1919: 218-22; Sept., 1920: 109
------Illinois (Springfield)................................................................................... ......................... 0<$.,1916: 82-3
------ japan, l W .3 7 . .............................................................................................................June, 1919: 229-30
------ Maine. Employment, December, 1916.............................................................................. Sept., 1917:119
------Maryland 1 6 1 5 . ......................................................................................................... Aug. 1916: 88-43
------Massachusetts (W altham )......................................................... ................................... Feb., 1918:146-51
------Minnesota, 1918 to 1920..................................................................................................... Deo* 1920: 129-30
------N fW J «riiy /m 4 -1 5 ............................................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 436
— North Carolina, 1 9 1 9 ....................................................
Dec., 1920: 130
- — Oregon. Chinese and Japanese labor..........................................................................Dec., 1920: 212-13
------Pacino States. Summary re hours, wages, and working conditions......................... A pr., 1917: 559
------Tennessee, 1917............................. .................................................................................... July, 1918: 129-30
In lted States, 1910 to 1912. (B . L. S .). . . ..................................................................Mar., 1916: 88-7




ui?......................................................................................................... N ov., 1917: 213-16

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

20

Page.
C hild labor—C oncluded.
Standards. G erm any. R elaxation during w ar............................................................... A u g., 1918: 100-3
“ ritain......................................................................................June, 1917: 888-90; Ju ly, 1917: 33-4
U nited States. C hild W elfare Conference, M ay, 1919............................................. June, 1919: 219-20

- Children's Bureau..* May, 1917: 658-9; Nov., 1918: 43; Nov., 1919: 249-50; Feb., 1920: 174-5
------------National Child Labor Committee........................................... May, 1917: 658-9; Feb., 1918: 154
------------National Consumers’ League...........................................................................May, 1917: 659-60
- t----------President Wilson................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 146
------------War Department.................................................................................................. Dec., 1917: 53
------------War Labor Policies Board.............................................. Aug., 1918: 68,75-6; Feb., 1920: 174-5
Treaties. Provision of Franco-Italian treaty.................................................................. Feb., 1920: 51-2
Wages. Argentina, 1914 to 1917......................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 196
----- District of Columbia, February and March, 1919.................................................... June, 1919: 192-3
----- Germany. Minimum wage for boys 16 to 17.......................................................... Apr., 1918: 157-8
------------(Berlin), 1915-16.................................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 145
------------(Prussia). Mines, 1914,1917............................................................................. Sept., 1918: 196-8
----- Great Britain. Girls under 15 in munitions.............................................................. Aug., 1918: 161
------------(England). Earnings of boys during war....................................................... Mar., 1919: 220-1
------------(England and Wales). Rates fixed by Agricultural Wages Board, 1918.. Dec., 1918: 310-11
----- Netherlands. Surface workers in coal mines.................................................
June, 1919: 182
----- United States. Boys in navy yards........................................................................... June, 1918: 109
------------Wage increases, railroads............................................................. June, 1918: 18; Oct., 1918: 131
Welfare work. Great Britain.* Recommendations of Ministry of Munitions............ Sept., 1918: 50-1;
Jan., 1919: 132-3
(S e e also ‘Delinquency; Employment certificates; Minimum wage; United States:
Boys’ Working Reserve; United States: Children’s Bureau; Woman labor.)
Child Labor Committee, National. (S e e National Child Labor Committee.)
Child mortality. (S e e Vital statistics.)
Child welfare:
Infant welfare work in war time........................................................................................ Oct., 1917: 160-1
Standards of child welfare conference.......................................... June, 1919: 216-20; Nov., 1919: 249-50
Austria................................................................................................... May, 1918: 289; Dec., 1918: 195-6
France. Nursing rooms and day nurseries in factories................................................ Jan., 1918: 69-70;
Feb., 1918: 213-15; July, 1918: 127
Georgia...............................................................................................................................Dec., 1920: 186-8
Germany. During the war............................................................... May, 1918: 264-5; Oct., 1918: 201-6
Great Britain. Nursery schools under education act, 1918, England and Wales__Dec., 1918: 42,45
New York harbor. Life on New York harbor boats.............................................. ... July, 1918: 18-20
United States. State legislation affecting children....................................... ................. Oct., 1920: 222
Childbirth and employment. (S e e Maternity.)
Children Shoe Manufacturers’ Association of New York (Inc.).
Party to agreement_June, 1918: 165-7
Children Shoe Workers’ Union. Party to agreement......................................................... June, 1918: 165-7
Children’s Bureau, United States. (S e e United States: Children’s Bureau.)
Children’s dress industry. (S e e Clothing, women’s.)
Childs, R . S. What is a house?........................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 279-80
Chile:
Ofidna del Trabajo. Report of investigation of labor conditions in nitrate Adds........Nov., 1920: 224
(S e e also sp e c ific subjects.)

Chinese. Attitude of united States Department of Labor toward admission of Chinese
industrial students. (Stewart).......................................................................................... Deo., 1920: 191-7
Chinese exclusion. (S e e Immigration.)
Labor-emigration law of China, effective April 21.1918................................................. July, 1918: 158-9
Regulations for recruiting. Chinese laws of April, 1918.............................................. July, 1918: 158-60
Wages on American and foreign vessels.......................................................................... Oct., 1919: 141-5
Wages, employment statistics, etc., Oregon.................................................................. Dec., 1920: 212^13
Working and living conditions of Orientals in France.................................................. Mar., 1917: 480-1
Chinese Merchants’ Association. Activities in assisting Chinese industrial students to the
United States....................................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 193-6
Chlorine gas. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Chlorbenzenes. (S e e Poisons ana poisoning.)
Choice of occupation. (S e e Classification and description of Occupations; Vocational
guidance.)
Chromates:
Effect of chrpmates on health of workers................................................................ Aug., 1915: 25-6,28-9
(S e e also Poisons and poisoning.)
Church:
Attitude toward cooperative movement. Catholic agricultural associations in Belgium. July, 1920: 143
Attitude toward labor. Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America.........Aug., 1919: 66-75
-----Methodist Episcopal Church....................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 1-3
----- National Catholic War Council.................................................. .............................. June, 1919: 44-52
Attitude toward socialism. Catholic agricultural associations and the Socialist Party
in Belgium........................................................................................................................ July, 1920: 143
Cigar manufacturing:
Denmark. Wages, 1914 and 1920....................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 87
Manitoba. Minimum wage order, 1918.................................... ...................................Jan., 1919: 214,215
United States. Employees and amounts of pay rolls. 1915 to 1918 or 1919. (Index
numbers)......................... ................................ 1919—Jan. 143; Feb. 133; Mar. 152; Apr. 152; May 187
----- Out-of-work benefits by labor organizations............................................................... June, 1919: 131
----- Wages and hours of labor, 1919.............................................. Sept., 1919: 182,183; Mar., 1920: 77-90
Cincinnati:
Board of Health. Report on tuberculosis........................................................................ July, 1916: 100
Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Referred to................................................................ July, 1916: 100
Citizenship:
Aliens admitted to, 1918..................................................................................................Jan., 1919: 314-15
Convention under auspices of United States Bureau of Naturalization, 1916................Aug., 1916: 90-1;
Sent., 1916: 17-21
Training for, by United States Bureau of Naturalization............................................... Mar., 1916: 9-11
(S e e also Naturalization.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

21

City and town planning:
Garden cities, Paris.......................................................................................................... July, 1919: 262-3
Garden cities, Great Britain................................................................. Feb., 1918: 210; Aug., 1920: 151-3
Massachusetts Homestead Commission. Plans...................... . .................................... May, 1918: 274^5
Mill Green, Bridgeport, Conn. (Ilhis.)............................................................................May, 1919: 34-5
Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn. (Blus.)............................................................................. Apr., 1918: 1-25
Roe Green Village scheme, IQngsbury. England........................................................... Oct., 1918: 251-7
United States Housing Corporation. Activities. (Olmsted.) (Ulus.)....................... May, 1919: 34-8
(S e e also Company towns; Housing: Company.)
City employees. (S e e Public employees.)
Civic Federation, National. (S e e National Civic Federation.)
Civic kitchens. (S e e Communal kitchens.)
Civil Service Commission, United States. (S e e United States: Civil Service Commission.)
Civil service employees. (S e e P ublic employees.)
Civil service retirement. (S e e Old-age and invalidity; Public employees: Pensions.)
Civil War. Prices during Civil War and World War.......................................................... Jan., 1919: 105-9
Civil War Workers’ Committee. (S e e Great Britain: Ministry of Reconstruction. Civil
War Workers’ Committee.)
Claghom, Kate H . Juvenile delinquency in rural New York.......................................... Feb., 1919: 196-8
Clark, L. D.:
Court decisions on power of State industrial commissions to issue orders..................July, 1916: 136-47
Employees engaged in interstate and foreign commerce........................................... Nov., 1919: 294-310
Lack of uniformity in compensation legislation.......................................................... Nov., 1918: 240-53
Legislation as to rehabilitation of injured workers........................................................ Apr., 1920: 202-6
Medical and surgical provisions in compensation law.................................................. Oct., 1918: 215-28
Prohibitory amendment to the Constitution of the United States and its relation to
labor............. , ............................................................................................................... June, 1919: 38-43
Recent Supreme Court decisions and the labor contract............................................. May, 1917: 677-97
Scope and operation of the workmen’s compensation laws of the United States.........Apr., 1920: 14-32
Workmen’s compensation legislation............................................................................. Nov., 1917: 151-7
Clark, V. S. Prices and currency in Japan............................................................................. July, 1920: 95
Clark, W . I. Medical supervision of factory employees..................................................... Mar., 1917: 442-5
Classes for employees. (S e e Vocational education.)
Classification ana description of occupations:
Handbooks on trades and occupations................. Jan., 1917: 66-75; Dec., 1917: 72-9; Feb., 1919: 123-5
Acetylene welding........................................................................................................
May, 1919: 223-4
Aeroplanes. Doping aid taping.................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 50-1
Car upholstering............................................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 119-20
Core making........................................................................................................................Apr., 1918: 120-1
Com Products Refining Co...................................................................................................Jan., 1919: 31-2
Department stores.............................................................................................................. Sept., 1915: 32
Docks and harbors................................................................................................................ July, 1918: 4^15
Dressmaking...................................................................................................................... Sept., 1916: 63-6
Fur......................................................................................................... Dec., 1915: 24-6; Mar., 1916: 67-9
Lumber industry.............................................................................................................. . Oct., 1917: 69
Machine tools.................................................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 129-31
Office cleaning, marble work.............................................................................................. Oct., 1918: 197
Optical goods....................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 67-8
Printing and publishing........................................................................ Sept., 1918: 83-5: July, 1919: 166
Railroads............................................................................................................................ Nov., 1915: 77-80
Shell-loading, munitions.................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 27-8
Shipbuilding..................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 203-5; 208-12 (footnotes)
Shoemaking...................................................................................................................... Feb., 1916: 49-51
Silica brick manufacture....................................................................................................Apr., 1918: 292-5
Stonecutting....................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 26-7
Wood-alcohol manufacturing............................................................................................. May, 1918: 253
(S e e also Dangerous and injurious occupations.)
Classification Commission. United States. (S ee United States: Congress. Joint Com­
mission on Reclassification of Salaries.)
Classification of accidents. (S e e Accident statistics: Standardization.)
Classification of employees:
Age. Charwomen. Massachusetts................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 198
— - Retail stores. Connecticut........................................................................................ Sept., 1915: 13
------------United States....................................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 567
----- Wage-earning women. District of Columbia............................................................ Jan., 1918: 3,4
----- Women in munition factories. Great Britain......................................................... Oct., 1918: 209-1
----- Women’s clothing. Cleveland...................................................................................
Aug., 1918: 4
Conjugal condition. Injured workmen, Washington (State)......................................... Apr., 1917: 547
----- Wage-earning women. District of Columbia............................................................... Jan., 1918: 3
----- Women in factories, Uruguay..................................................................................... Aug;, 1920: 97
----- Women workers, Oregon...................................................................
Dec., 1920: 125
----- Women’s clothing, Cleveland......................................................................................
Aug., 1918: 4
Nationality. Bituminous coal, United States................................................................. Dec., 1919: 74
----- Copper mines, Arizona............................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 53
----- Iron and steti, United States..................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 90-1
----- Woman labor, Washington (State)............................................................................ Apr., 1917: 566
----- Women in industry, Connecticut......................................................................... Mar., 1917: 349, 350
----- Women’s clothing industry, Cleveland......................................................................
Aug., 1918: 4
(S e e also Reclassification.)
Classification of industries:
Committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost of I. A. I. A. B. C...........Nov., 1915: 28-37;
Sent. 1916: 56' Oct. 1916: 1 1 6
Workmen’s Compensation Service Bureau.............................................. Nov., 19i5: 32; Sept., 1916: 36
(S e e also Classification and description of occupations; Standardization.)
Clay industries. (S e e Pottery industry.)
Clayton A c t...,............................................................................................. Nov., 1918: 55; Oct., 1920: 205-7
Cleaning and dyeing:
Blindness from “ colorite” in hat cleaning..................................................................... Mar., 1918: 195-6
British Columbia. Wages, 1918........................................................................................ July, 1919: 153




M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW .

22

Cleaning and dyeing—Concluded.
Page.
California. Minimum-wage orders.................................................... Jan., 1918: 119; Nov., 1920: 100-10
Germany. Wages............................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 155
----- (Berlin). Wages and hours...................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 136-7
Minnesota. Minimum-wage order.................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 185
Oregon. Average weekly wages.. . .................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 123
Washington (State). Minimum-wage order.................................................................... Nov., 1918: 177
(Seealto Laundries.)
Clerical service:
Austria. Chambers of labor established to represent interests of salaried employees.. June, 1920:189-91
British Coluihbia. Minimum-wage order re wages and hours, effective August 16,
1919............................................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 219-20
California. Minimum-wage order of May 2,. 1918, re women in general and professional
offices............................................................................................................................. Nov., 1918: 172-3
District of Columbia. Wages, 1917............................................................................. Jan., 1918: 9-10,12
----- Wages of office employees In mercantile establishments, 1919.................................. June, 1919:195
Germany. Decree regulating salaried employees’ committees, 1918........................... . Apr., 1919: 161-4
----- Social insurance, salaried employees.........................................Apr., 1919: 222-5; Nov., 1920: 207-8
Great Britain. Membership of labor organizations......................................................... June, 1919: 305
----- (England). Substitution of women for men during war.......................................Apr., 1918: 209-9
Italy. Decree establishing employment office tor office workers.................................. Apr., 1920: 192
Manitoba. Minimum wage order re wages and hours, 1919......................... ................. Nov., 1919: 220
Massachusetts. Placements. 1918.................................................................................... June, 1919:132
Minnesota. Rates of wages In mercantile offices........................................................... Oct., 1918: 184-5
Norway. Wage Increases during war.......... ................................................... Mar., 1919: 198-9, 203, 207
Ohio. W ages.................................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 230
----- Wages, hours, and employment, 1914...................................„.................................Apr.,. 1916: 36-40
Oregon. Minimum-wage orders for office occupations................................... ................ Nov., 1918: 176
-----Wages. (Average weekly)......................................... ............................................... Dec., 1920: 123
Schenectady, N . Y . Wage award of National War Labor Board to employees of
General Electric Co.........................................................................................................
Jan., 1919: 37
Switzerland. Wages, 1914,1918....... .............................................................................. June, 1919: 186-6
United States. Railroads. Wages........ *........... .......................„........June, 1918: 44; Oct., 1918: 130r5
----- Stenographers. Wages........................... 1918-Feb. 128,134: Mar. 124,130,132; Apr. 168,174,180;
June 132, 138, 144; Sept. 166,172,178, 184; Dee. 266, 272, 278, 284,290, 296,302,308
----- Weekly hours prevailing............................................................................................. Jiily, 1&20: 98-9
Washington (State). Minimum-wage order re rates of wages........................................ Nov., 1918: 177
(See alto Minimum wage; Public employees; Stores.)
Clerks,.mercantile. (See Stores.)
Clerks and copyists. (See Clerical service; Public employees.)
Cleveland. Ohio:
Chamber of Commerce. Housing survey...................................................................... July, 1919: 260-2
----- Substitution of women for men in Cleveland industries......................................... Jan., 1919: 221-4
Cleveland Railway Co.:
Strike of male employees against employment of women as conductors.................... Jan., 1919: 224-30
Woman labor ana the National War Labor Board............................. Jan., 1919: 209; May, 1919: 230-2
Cleveland Welfare Federation. Survey of cripples................................................................Mar., 1919:84-8
Clinics. (S«s Medical and hospital service; Clinics.)
Cloak and suit industry. (See Clothing, women’s.)
Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Manufacturers’ Protective Association. Party to agreements........ Aug., 1915: 8;
Sept*, 1916: 25-9; Jan., 1917: 94; Dec., 1919: 52-5
(See alto Clothing, women’s.)
Clocks. (See Watches and clocks.)
Closed camps. (See Company towns: Labor camps.)
Closed shop. (See Open and closed shop.)
Oothcraft Shops. Employment management........................ .....................Dec., 1916: 29; June, 1917: 898
Cloth sponging. Hazards. Survey ana recommendations of New York State Industrial
Commission..................................................................... z................................................. Feb., 1919: 226-8
Clothier, R. C. British plan for demobilization and resettlement.................................. . Jan., 1919: 56-9
Clothiers’ Exchange, Rochester, N. Y .r
Agreements.......................................................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 170
Employees’ representation ............... ...............................................................................Dec., 1920: 98-9
Clothing:
Expenditures. District of Columbia. Clothing budget.................................................Jan., 1920: 37-9
----- Great Britain. Average for working-class families, 1914 and 1918........................... May, 1919: 173
----- New York shipbuilding district............................................................................ Sept., 1918: 119-22
—r— Ohio. 164 woman workers..............: ......................................................................... Feb., 1916: 66
----- St. Louis. Mo. Annual cost for women................... ................................................. Sept., 1916: 28
----- United States. Survey, various cities..................................................................... Nov., 1919: 1-14
Prices, France. Creusot region, 1914 to 1918............................................................ Sept., 1919: 237-40
----- Germany (Essen). 1914 ana 1920............................................................................... Nov., 1920: 78
(See alto Budgets; Cost of living.)
Clothing industries:
Belgium. Wages, 1919....................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 211
Boston. Wages, 1914 and 1920.......................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 79
Denmark., Wages, 1914 and 1920............... ...................................................................... Dec., 1920: 87
France. Saturday half holiday for w om en during w ar.......................................................
Jan., 1918: 75
Germ any. E m ploym ent statistics, 1913 ana after-war p rosp ects..................................... F eb., 1919: 141
------W ages, 1914and 1918_______*............................................................................................ D ec., 1919: 255
Great B ritain. M em bership in labor organizations.............................................................. June, 1919: 305
------Trade B oards. M inim um -wage rates..... .................................................................... N ov ., 1919: 207-8
------ W ages, January, 1919, and increase over 1918.................................................................. A p r., 1919: 181
Japan. W ages. Various dates, 1905 to 1919........................................ N ov ., 1917: 149; A u g., 1920: 89, 90
N ew Zealand. W ages, 1913 to 1919........................................................................................... Ju ly, 1920: 114
N orw ay. W ages, 1895 to 1915............................................................................................ N ov ., 1917: 112.113
O ntario. Survey o f opportunities for em ploym ent..............................................................
D ec., 1920: 93
Oregon. A verage d aily w ages................................................................................................... D ec., 1920: 122
South A frica. W ages, 1917 to 1919............................................................ ....: ..................... N ov., 1920: 99
Sw itzerland. W ages and hours, 1914 and 1918...................................................................... June, 1919:185
U nited States. E ight-hour day established during w ar..................................................... Sept., 1918:189




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

28

Clothing industries—Concluded.
Pagi.
United States. Employees’ representation. Leitch plan.......................................... Aug., 1920: 22-83
------------Rochester plan..................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 98-9
----- Five-day week. Experience of factory in Middle W est.......................................... Dec.', 1920: 80-1
----- Health of garment workers. (Schereschewsky.) ...................................................... Mar., 1916: 73-5
----- Letter to President Wilson re appointment of textile and clothing administrator.. May, 1920: 39-41
----- Wages.......................................................Dec., 1917: 33; Aug.,l& 0: 26-7,30-1,33; Dec., 1920: 103-8
Clothing industries, Army:
Decision of Supreme Court re injunctions against strikes during war emergency.........Nov., 1918: 53-5
Labor standards....................................................................................... Oct., 1917: 30-3; Apr., 1918: 108
Clothing industries, men’s:
Boston. Earnings of time workers and pieceworkers, April, 1920............................... Oct., 1920: 126-7
California. Wages and hours........................................................................................ Jan., 1918: 115-16
Chicago. Agreement, December, 1919........................................................................... Apr., 1920: 141-2
----- Eight-hour day in shops of Wholesale Clothiers’ Association.......................... .
Nov., 1916: 31
----- Hart, Schaffner & Marx labor agreement, effective May 1,1916...............................Jan., 1917: 43-5
Massachusetts. Provisions of minimum-wage decree................................................ Oct., 1918: 183,184
----- Survey of wages of women, 1915-16..................................................................
May, 1917: 670-3
New York City. Trade agreements. (Gormly.)...........................................................Jan., 1918: 18-26
New York State. Earnings of factory workers.....................................................
June, 1918: 124;
July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr.. 1920:110
Rochester, N. Y . Agreement of August 3, 1920.. (Text.).......................................... Dec., 19a0: 99-101
----- Court decision in injunction against strike to secure unionization........................... Sept., 1990: 170
St. Louis, Mo. Wages of woman labor................. ............................................................ Sept,, 1916: 29
United States. Employees and amounts of pay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919. (Index
numbers.) ..................... .............................1919*—Jan. 144; Feb. 133; Mar. 152; Apr. 152; May 187
----- Joint council, articles of federation...........................................................................Oct., 1919: 16-17
----- Overalls industries. Wages and hours...................................................................Apr., 1920: 95-104
----- Piece-rate wage systems. (Emmet.)...................................................................... Nov., 1917: 23-35
----- Profit sharing. Experience of tailoring establishment in Middle West............... Dec., 1920: 102-3
----- Wages................................................................ ......................................................... Nov., 1917: 26-7
----- Wages and hours........June, 1916: 33-4; Sept., 1919: 182,183; Mar., 1920: 77-90; Apr., 1920: 95-104
Clothing industries, women’s:
Boston. Trade agreements. (Emmet.)............ .-......................................; ................ Apr., 1918: 223-35
California. Wages of women........................ .................................................................Jan., 1918: 115-16
Chicago. Trade agreements. (Emmet.).................................................. ................. Feb., 1918: 65-76
Cincinnati. Trade agreements. (Emmet.).............. ..................................................... Mar., 1918: 61-6
Cleveland. Bonuses, cost-of-living. (Printz-Biederman Co.).........Aug., 1918: 183-4; Nov., 1918: 3-4
----- Substitution of women for men..................................................................................Jan., 1919: 221-3
----- Survey of cloak industry. (Emmet.). .................................................................... Aug., 1918: 1-36
----- Wage agreements..........................................................................Jan., 1919: 150-61; July, 1920:53^7
France (Paris). Wages, 1918..............................................................................................Sept., 1919: M3
Germany (Berlin). Wages and hours............................................................................... Oct., 1920: 138
Great Britain. Minimum-wage rates, corset trade board............................................... Nov., 1919: 207
Illinois. Garment and corset Industry. Hours in relation to output, 1918................. May, 1919: 207
Massachusetts. Dressmaking as a trade for women................................................... Sept., 1916: 63-6
----- Minimum-wage commission. Report...................................................................... Oct., 1918: 187-9
----- Minimum-wage orders.........................................Sept., 1918: 201; Oct., 1918: 188-9; July, 1920: 134
----- Report of women’s clothing wage board, July 19,1916.............................................. Sept., 1916: 66
New York City. Diseases among garment workers....................................................... Mar., 1916: 78-6
----- Joint board of sanitary control. Activities........ Mar., 1916: 73; Jan., 1917: 94-7; June, 1919: K 16
----- Overtime rates................................................................. ...................... . ................... Mar., 1929: 117
----- Protocol of peace of 1910............................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 26-8
----- Trade agreements. Children’s dress, 1913 to 1916.................................................... Dec., 1917:. 36-7
------------Cloak, suit, and skirt. Aug., 1915: 8-14; Sept., 1916: 26-0; Deo., 1917: 21-30; Dec., 1919: 42-30
------------Dress and waist industry........................Mar., 1917: 366-8; Dec., 1917:30-34; June, 1919: 1-17
------------Hat and millinery industry....... ........................................................................Dec., 1917: 37-0
------------House-dress and kimono industry, 1913 to 1917................................................. Dec., 1917: 85-6
------------Lace and embroidery............................................................................................ Dec., 1917: 89
------------Underwear......................................................................................................... .. Dec., 1917: 36
------------Waterproof garments, 1910 to 1916.........., ........................ ................................ Dec., 1917: 84-5
• New York State. Earnings of factory workers, 1914 and 1916 to 1919.................. . . June, 1918: 124-5:
July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
Philadelphia. Trade agreements. (Emmet.)............................................................... Jan., 1918: 27-89
St. Louis. Trade agreements. (Emmet.)...................................................................... Mar,, 1918: 61-6
Switzerland. Embroidery industry. Wages............................................................. .
Dec., 1917: 114
United States. Irregularity of employment. New York, Chicago, Cleveland, and
Boston................. ...........: ........... ....................................... .....r r ? ....................! . . . . Mar., 191ft: 22-6
----- Nonunion collective bargaining plan, a middle western firm............................... Aug., 1918: 180*4
----- Wages and hours. Survey, 1919.........................................
Sept., 1919: 182,183; Apr., 1920:96-104
(S e e also Glove industry; Millinery; Needle trades; Sewing-machine hands.)
Clothing Manufacturers’ Association of Boston. Survey of men’s clothing industry,
Boston.................................................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 126-7
Clothing requirements. (S e e Budgets; Cost of living.)
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated. (See Amalgamated Clothing Workers of
America.)
Clothing Workers, United. (S e e United Garment Workers of America.)
Clynes, J. R .:
Quoted re ending of party truce. Great Britain............................................................... Sept., 1918: 324
tatement re bread subsidy, British food control, etc..................................................... Aug., 1918: 145
Coach builders:
New Zealand. Wages, 1913 to 1919.................................................................................... July, 1920: 114
South Africa. Wages, 1917 to 1919.................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 98
Coal:
Distribution. United States, 1915.................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 590
Mining. (S e e Mines and mining.)
Prices. Austria. July, 1914, and 1918. (Vienna.)......................................................... Dec., 1918: 194
----- France. 1918........................................... ....................................................................Nov., 1918: 128-9
----- Great Britain. Causes of rise in retail prices........................................................... July* 1915: 45-56
------------1920 compared with 1913............... ,...................................................................... Aug., 1920: 70

§




24

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Coal—Concluded.
Prices. Switzerland. Increases during war....................................................... ....... Nov., 1918: 110-13
----- United States. Orders effective August 21, September 1, and October 29,1917. Nov., 1917: 89-91;
Dec., 1917: 110-11
------------Prices fixed by Fuel Administration..................................................................May, 1920: 31-4
------------Report of Federal Trade Commission, May 4,1917. (Anthracite.)............. June. 1917: 949-52
------------Retail prices. Various dates...............................1916—Sept. 43; 1919—Mar. 100-2; Sept. 80-7;
1920—Mar. 57-63; Aug. 56-8; Sept. 52-60; Oct. 52-5; Nov. 44-7; Dec. 51-3
----- Wales, 1918.................................................................................................................Dec., 1919: 250-1
Production. France. Statistics, various dates............................................................... Sept., 1920: 116
----- Germany, 1914 to 1919................................................................................................. Oct., 1919: 161-2
----- Great Britain. Organization to increase.......... July, 1915: 56-8; July, 1916: 151-3; Apr., 1917: 535
----- Nova Scotia. Statistics, 1919 compared with 1916.................................................... Sept., 1920: 127
----- South Wales, 1918 to 1920..............................................................................................Nov., 1920: 120
----- United States. Anthracite and bituminous.............................................................. Oct., 1920: 67-8
---------r— President’s proclamation, August 9,1918, urging............................................. Nov., 1918: 38
------------Production committees at bituminous coal mines............................................Nov., 1918: 36-8
------------Statistics, 1807 to 1916.............. r............................................. Aug., 1916: 67; Apr., 1917: 588-90
Shortage. United States. 1917-18. Causes and effects... J....................................... Dec., 1918: 164-7
(See also Fuel control: Mines and mining.)
Coal Commission. Colorado. (See United States: Colorado Coal Commission.)
Coal Commission, Germany, Colorado. (See Germany: Coal Commission.)
Coal Commission, Anthracite, United States, (See United States: Anthracite Coal Commission.)
Coal Commission, Bituminous, United States. (See United States: Bituminous Coal Com­
mission.)
Coal Industry Commission, Great Britain. (See Great Britain: Coal Industry Commis­
sion.)
Coal-leasing law, Alaska, 1914................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 133-4
Coal mining. (See Mines and mining, coal.)
Coal Owners’ Association of South Wales. Statement re wages of miners...................... Dec., 1919: 248-51
Coal Strike Commission, Anthracite, 1903. (See United States: Anthracite Coal Strike
Commission, 1903.)
Coal tar and its derivatives:
Employees, wages, etc., 1917.......... ............................................................................... Dec., 1918: 213-14
Hazards in anihn dye industry. (Hamilton)............................................................. Feb., 1919: 199-215
Poisoning, various industries...........................................................July, 1919: 175-6; Aug., 1920: 109-12
Poisonous compounds in dye industry. (Hamilton)...................................................... Dec., 1919: 1-21
Cobb, S. Application of psychiatry to industrial hygiene...................................................Jan., 1920: 226-9
Cocoa powder. Maximum prices, Great Britain,.1918........................................................... Dec., 1918: 155
Cocoa substitutes. Germany.................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 23
Codes. (See International relations; Laws and legislation.)
Coffee. (See Food control; Retail prices, food.)
Coflan making. St. Louis, Mo. Awa^d of National War Labor Board........................... Jan., 1919: 37,208
Cohen, J. H.:
Law and order in industry............ ............................................................ _ ..................... Oct., 1916: 26-8
Opinion on collective bargaining...................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 24
Propositions of “ League to enforce industrial peace ” . . . .................................................Jan., 1917: 24-5
Coke ovens:
Accidents, 1918............................................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 299-302
Carbon monoxide gas in coke by-products works................. .......................................... July, 1919: 173
Eight-hour.laws................................................................................................................... 06t., 1918: 242
Coke prices. (See Retail prices.)
Colcard, A . W . Is hernia a compensable injury or a disease ?.......................................... Mar., 1919: 249-50
Cold storage. (See Markets and marketing.)
Cole, G. D. H . National guilds movement in Great Britain................................ ............ July, 1919: 24-32
Collection of wages. (See Wage claims.)
Collective agreements, by industry:
Aeroplanes. Great Britain. Re shop stewards....................... ..................................... Mar., 1918: 84-5
Agriculture. France. Effective August, 1919...........................................................:. Mar., 1920: 123-4
----- Germany. January 24,1919......................................................................................July, 1919: 235-7
Bakeries. Great Britain, 1918................................................................ ...................... .
Dec., 1918: 35
Boots and shoes. New York City, April, 1918................................................................June, 1918: 165-7
Building trades. Cincinnati, May 1,1918........................................................................ May, 1918: 143-5
----- Germany, 1916..............
Dec., 1917: 137-8
----- London, 1920...........................................................................................
June, 1920: 113-14
----- New York City, November, 1919.............................................................................. Feb., 1920: 147-9
----- Norfolk, Va., August, 1919...................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 149-51
. ----- Ottawa. Terminating April 30, 1920....................................................................... Aug., 1919: 189-90
----- Portland, Oreg., May 1, 1920....................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 94-8
----- Scotland, 1918...........................
July, 1918: 108-9
Carpenters. Chicago. Effective July 10,1915, to May 31,1918................................... Oct., 1915: 26-34
China clay. Great Britain. Effective until June, 1919............... ................................ Dec., 1918: 35
Clothing, men’s. Chicago. Hart, Schaffner & Marx. Effective May 1; 1916..............Jan., 1917: 43-5
------------December, 1919.....................................................................................................Apr., 1920: 141-2
----- New York City (Gormly)..............................
Jan., 1918: 18-25
----- Rochester, N. Y y August 3, 1920. (Text)............................................................... Dec., 1920: 99-101
----- United States. National plan.............................................
Oct., 1919: 16-17
------------Two establishments, January, 1916, and January, 1917.......................... Nov., 1917: 24-7,30^5
Clothing, women’s. Boston. (Emmet)........................................................................Apr., 1918: 223-4
-----Chicago. (Emmet).................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 65-76
-----Cincinnati. (Emmet)................................................................................................ Mar., 1918: 61-5
-----Cleveland, Ohio. October, 1918, December, 1919..................... Jan., 1919: 150-61; July, 1920: 55-7
-----New York City. Various dates, 1910 to 1919........................................................... 1915—Aug. 8-14;
1916—Sept. 25-9; Oct. 26-8; 1917—Jan. 94; Mar. 366-8;
Dec. 19-39; 1916-Apr. 225; 1919—June 1-17; Dec. 42-60
----- Philadelphia. (Emmet)....................................................................................................... Jan., 1918:27-39
----- St. Louis. (Emmet)...................................................................................................Mar., 1918: 61-6
-----Nonunion plan of middle western firm. (Emmet)............................................... Aug., 1918: 180-4




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1815, TO DECEMBER, 1820,

25

OeBecUve agreem ents, b y Industry—C oncluded.
^
Pag&
C oalm ines. Canada. Ju ly, 1920............................................................... ........................ N ov ., 1920: 147-54
------France. P rovisions for m inim um w age........................................................................... S ept., 1920:114
------ P ennsylvania, A nthracite. V arious dates, 1916 to 1920........................................... A p r., 1916: 40-7;
June, 1916: 38-41; June, 1917: 983-4; O ct. 1920: 102-3
------U nited States. A nthracite and bitu m in ou s.............................................................N ov., 1918: 166-70
------------- B itum inous, 1917......... ..............................................................................................June, 1917: 984-5
------------- B itum inous. Increase in wages follow ing E xecu tive order............................ D ec., 1917: 110-11
------------- M aryland and U pper P otom ac settlem ent, M ay 6,1918.............................. .
S ep t., 1918:186-8
C ooperative stores. Great B ritain , A ugust, 1919............................................................... D ec., 1919: 267-9
C otton m anufacturing. Great B ritain , Ju ly 9,1919..............................................................S ept., 1919: 235
D ocks and harbors. G reat B ritain , A ugust 4, 1920.............................................................. N ov., 1920: 96
------Louisiana. C ourt decision in stevedore and longshore in d u stry. New O rleans.. . O ct., 1920: 204-5
------New Y ork , Septem ber, 1915; Ju ly, 1918.......................................... O ct., 1915; 34-5: S ep t., 1918: 25,26
------U nited States......................... ............................................................. M ay, 1919: 209-10; Ju ly, 1919: 20-2
Furniture trade. N etherlands. E ffective M arch, 1917, to F ebruary, 1920.................. Ju ly, 1917: 58-61
Iron arid steel in dustry. Ita ly , 1920......................................................................................... D ec., 1920: 205
Longshorem en. (S ee C ollective agreem ents: D ocks and harbors.)
M etal trades. A lberta (C algary). M ay 17,1919................................................................A u g., 1919: 190-1
- Ita ly . E ffective M ay M 9 1 9 ................... .......................................................................... June, 1919:183

----- With Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation (Ltd.)................................................ Feb., 1919: 143-4
Mining. (See Collective agreements, by industry: Coal mines.)
Oil industry. California................. ........................................... ..................................... Oct., 1920: 9-23
----- Russia. Baku firms, 1917. (Referred to)................................................................. Mar., 1919: 15
Petroleum industry. France. Effective June, 1919....................................................... Mm ., 1920: 123
Printing and publishing. France. Effective June, 1919....................................... ........ Mar., 1920: 122
----- Netherlands. Effective 1920.....................................................................................July, 1920: 126*9
Railroad shops. United States. Changes in working conditions...............................Apr., 1918: 108-9
Railroads. United States.................................... May, 1918: 180-2; July, 1918: 132; Mar., 1920; 116-17
Seamen. British Colombia, 1918.....................................................................................Jan., 1919:161-5
----- Germany, October, 1920............................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 90
----- Italy. Effective July, 1919..................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 158-73
----- Sweden, 1919............................................................................. Oct., 1919: 145-6; Dec., 1919: 258.259
----- United States. 1920. (Trans-Atlantic, Atlantic, and Gulf Coast services)-___ July, 1920: 106-7;
Sept., 1920: 103-4
------------Harbor marine and ocean marine industries................................................... July, 1919: 14-23
--------- — 1917....................................................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 170
Shipbuilding. Australia................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 371-2
----- Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation (Ltd.) and metal trades department of
American Federation of Labor............................................................................ Feb., 1919: 143-4
----- British Columbia.................................................................................... ................ Aug., 1918: 155-60
----- United States. Agreements with Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board.......... 1917—Oct. 26-9;
1913-Mar. 67-76; Apr. 182-8; May 136-42; Dec. 197-212; 1936-Mar. 114,115
Slaughtering and meat packing. March, 1918..............................................................May, 1918: 126-7
Stove industry. History of 26 years of conference agreements. (Emmet)...............May, 1918: 166-79
Street railways. Boston, May, 1916. (Effective 3 years)............................................. Sept., 1916: 37-8
----- Chicago, June 1,1915....................................................................................................Oct., 1915: 23-6
----- France. Effective August 18,1919............................................................................. Apr., 1920: 65-6
----- Washington, D. C., March, 1916.............................................
Sugar industry. Porto Rico.............................................................................................. Jan. 1919: 53-5
Textiles. France, October, 1919..................................................................................... Mar., 1920; 124-5
Woodworkers. Germany, November, 1916...................................................................June, 1917: 945-9
----- Sweden. Effective August, 1916, to April, 1918........................................................ July, 1917: 61
Woolen industry. BndanC 1919................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 182-4
Collective agreements, various industries:
Canada, 1918 and 1919. (Wages and hours)................................... Aug., 1919: 185-7; Sept., 1919: 224-6
Germany. Creation of archives for................................................................................ Feb., 1920: 152-3
----- Decree regulating, December, 1918............................................................................. Apr., 1919: 160-1
----- Number in force, minimum rates of wages, daily hours, 1914..................................Jan., 1917: 143-4
----- Wages, hours, etc., as fixed by agreements, 1919....................Oct., 1919: 153-60; Oct., 1920: 135-45
Netherlands. Increase in 1917; wagelncreases, various periods.......... July, 1917: 61-5; June, 1918: 67
Sweden. Number, industries, employees covered, provisions, etc., 1917.................... July, 1919: 126-7
Switzerland. Act of June 27,1919, regulating.................... i......................................... May, 1920: 184-5
----- Decision of Supreme Court re participation in political strikes and breach of con­
tract........................................................................................................................ July, 1920: 172-3
(See also Collective bargaining; Employees’ representation.)
Collective bargaining, United States:
Attitude of Methodist Episcopal Church..........................................................................
Aug., 1916: 1
Attitude of United States Anthracite Coal Commission.................................................. Oct., 1920: 101
Bridgeport plan of collective bargaining committees..................................................... May, 1919: 192-8
Debate and declaration, National Industrial Conferences, September and December,
1919............................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 43-6; Apr., 1920: 33, 37-8
Development of.in women’s clothing.............................................................................Apr., 1918: 223-5
Discussed by J. B . Andrews............................................................................................July, 1916: 147-9
Discussed by J. Cohen....................................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 26-8
Discussed by W . M. Leiserson....................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 234-6
Government-controlled telephone systems.................................................................... Aug., 1919: 137-8
Growth during 1918........................................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 153-62
History erfexperience la stove molding......................................................................... May, 1918: 166-79
National plan in men’s dotting industry....................................................................... Oct., 1919: 16-17
Nonunion plan in women’s clothing. (Emmet.)......................................................... Aug., 1918: 180-4
------7 issue hi steel strike <rfl919.................................................. ...............................Dec., 1919: 86-7
8of National War Labor Board............Nov., 1918: 184; Mar., 1919: 153-62; May, 1919: 192-8
_____ of War Labor Conference Board.............................................................................. May, 1918: 56
Principles established by President’s Mediation Commission of 1917.......................... Mar., 1918: 52-60
Recommendation of Commission on Industrial Relations............................................... Nov., 1915: 62
Collective bargaining, foreign countries:
Australia. Opinion of Judge Higgins............................................................................... June, 1919: 210
Canada. Findings of Royal Commission on Industrial Relations............................. Sept., 1919: 39-40
----- Resolutions, National Industrial Conference............................................................ Nov., 1919: 56-8




Apr.,1916:28-35

26

M ON TH LY LABOB REVIEW,

Collective bargaining, foreign countries—Concluded.
Page.
Canada. Resolution of Trades and Labor Congress....................................................... Dec., 1919: 367
France. Codification of rules and principles, 1919......................................................... Oct., 1919: 275-8
Great Britain. Findings of Employers* Industrial Commission of the United States.. May, 1919: 101-2
----- Recommendations of Devon and Cornwall Association for Industrial and Com­
mercial Reconstruction............................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 52
----- Views of National Industrial Conference, London, April, 1919................................. May, 1919: 106
(See also Collective agreements; Conciliation and arbitration; Employees’ represen­
tation.)
Colleges and universities:
Extent of labor questions as tonics of theses....................i ............................................ Oct., 1920: 228-9
Flea of American Sociological Society for cooperative research.................................... Oct., 1920: 227-8
Plan of cooperation of industry and colleges................................................... ..............Aug., 1920: 92-3
University activities in the field of labor..................................................................... . Nov., 1920: 230
University education and the working man..................................................................... Dec., 1918: 46
(See also Adult Working-class education; University extension.)
Collegiate Alumnae, National Association of. (See National Association of Collegiate
Alumnse.)
Collier, P. S. Minimum-wage legislation in Australasia..................................................... Sept., 1916: 71-7
Colonies:
Durham, Calif., land settlement...................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 280-2
Labor colonies for the feeble-minded. (Waggaman)................................................... Sept., 1920: 12-19
Llano del Rio cooperative colony. (Hanna)7............................................................... Jan., 1916: 19-23
Colonization. “ Crosser bill,” referred to................................................................................ Apr., 1919:122
Colorado:
Industrial Commission. Scope and activities___Dec., 1915: 10-12; Apr., 1916: 48; Mar., 1920: 216-17
(See also specific subjects.)
Colorado Coal Commission. (See United States: Colorado Coal Commission.)
Colorado Fuel & Iron Co.:
Case of election frauds....................................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 35-7
“ Colorado plan” of employees’ representation............................................................. Dec., 1915: 12-22:
Apr., 1916: 48; Jan., 1919: 42-3; Mar., 1919: 154
Colorado miners’ strike, 1914. Indictment and imprisonment of strikers.. Apr., 1916: 48-9; Aug., 1916: 35
“ Colorado plan.” (See Colorado Fuel & Iron Co.)
Ctiorite. Blindness caused by use of. Case cited........................
............................ Mar., 1918: 195-fi
Columbus, C.' J. Testimony on minimum-wage bill, District of Columbia...................... June, 1918: 150-1
Colver, W . B. Meat-packing legislation................................................................................ Feb., 1919: 67-8
Commerce Department. United States. (See United States: Department of Commerce.)
“ Commercial undertakings” defined....................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 17
Commission on International Labor Legislation. (See Peace Conference. Commission on
International Labor Legislation.)
Commission on Reclassification. (See United States: Congress. Joint Commission on
Reclassification of Salaries.)
Commissions, labor. (See Directories; Labor boards, commissions, etc.; also under States
and countries.)
Committee on Child Labor. (See National Child Labor Committee.)
Committee on Household Assistants, New York. Personnel, activities, etc............. .... Aug., 1919: 207-10
Committee on Statistics and Compensation Insurance Cost. (See International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions: Committee on Statistics and Compen­
sation Insurance Cost.)
Common labor. (See Unskilled labor.)
Commons, J. R .:
Industrial good will.......................................................................................................... July? 1919: 281-2
Principles
of llabor
July,
V U I J ,1916:
APXV.147-9^
A T I - 0 ,Nov.,
H V V 1920: 200
M AI
X
U U V ip iC d VA
a u u i legislation..............................................................
IC J U O ia blU U ................... * ...........................................................................

Commonwealth Edison Cos Chicago. System of job analysis.................... .................June, 1918: 174-5
Commonwealth Steel Co., Granite Cityyill. Experience in reducing to eight-hour shift... Dec., 1916: 119
Commonwealth Steel Co., St. Louis. Welfare activities.................................................... Apr., 1917: 578
Communal kitchens:
Austria............................................................................................... June, 1918: 62-3: Dec., 1918: 170
European countries. (Whitney)............................................................................... June, 1918: 58-63
Germany.,................................ May, 1917: 724^5; Jan., 1918: 93-4; June, 1918: 62-3; Nov., 1918: 25-6
Great Britain................................................................................... July, 1917: 77-8; June, 1918: 58-62
-----Select bibliography................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 56
Switzerland................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 217
United States. Cooked food agencies...................................................................... Aug., 1919: 211-12
(S e e also Lunch rooms.)
Communist Party:
Deportation cases in connection with membership in............................................. Oct., 1920: 194-201
Opinion of Secretary of Labor with regard to membership in................................. Mar., 1920: 218-21
Community kitchens. (S ee Communal kitchens.)
Community labor boards. United States........................................................................ Aug., 1918: 64-5;
Oct., 1918: 262-3; Nov., 1918: 282-3; Jan., 1919: 119-25
Community problems. Discussed at National Conference of Social Work, June, 1919.. July, 1919: 238-40
Community welfare:
Use of factory buildings................................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 203
Various activities authorised by education act, 1918, England and Wales.................. Dec., 1918: 44-5
(S e e also Housing; Recreation.)
Company control. (S e e Company towns; Labor camps.)
Company doctors. (S e e Medical and hospital service.)
Company hospitals. (S e e Medical and hospital service.)
Company housing. (S e e Housing. United States: Company.)
Company police. Recommendations of Federal Commission on Industrial Relations re
policing of industry......................................................................................................... Nov., 1915: 58-9
Company towns:
uoal mining districts. Colorado. Election frauds of 1914 and findings of court*........Aug., 1916: 35-7
Copper districts. Arizona. Deportations from Warren district................................Jan., 1918: 13-17
— -------Unrest.......................................................... ..................................................Mar., 1918: 53-4
-----El Boleo Mining Co., Santa Rosalia, Lower California......................................... Oct., 1918: 121-2
-----Tyrone, N. Mex. Described............................................................................. Sept., 1918: 278-84
Land area, value, etc. Gary, Ind. Referred to...................................Apr., 1918: 276; May, 1918: 269




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1916, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

27

Oonipany towns—Concluded.
-Bail.
Lend area, value, etc. Lackawanna, N . Y . Referred to ............. a____Apr., 1918: 279; May, 1918: 270
Morgan Ps^.JDulujbh^Minn. UnitedStates Steel C o rp oration ...... A pr., 1918: 1-25; May, 1918: 289
BJaptoyees’ Compensatlon Commission.)
Compensation Insurance funds. (S ee Workmen’ s compensation and Insurance.)
Compositors. (S ee Printing and publishing.)
Compulsory arbitration. (S ee Conciliation and arbitration.)
Compulsory health insurance. (S ee Health insurance.)
Compulsory old-age insurance. (S ee Old-age and Invalidity.)
Compulsory work:
Canada. Order in council, April 4,1918........................................................................... June, 1918: 199-200
Germany. Text of national auxiliary service law ......................................................... . A pr., 1918: 89-106
H e# Jersey. Act of February, 1918................................................................................. .... A pr., 1918: 277
United States. Laws, various States and District of Columbia.................... ........... Sept., 1917: 1X8-15:
June, 1918: 199-200; A ug., 1918: 209-10: Dec., 1918: 899-55
W est Virginia. Act of May 19,1917..................................... ........... A ug., 1917: 150-2; Sept., 1920: 175-4
Conciliation and arbitration, united States:
Conciliation work of the Department of Labor. (S ee n o tio n on Conciliation and arbi­
tration in each num ber o f the R eview .)
Conference on labor disputes and public service corporations. (Academy of Political
and Social Science).................................................................... ....................................... ..
Jan., 1917: 19-26
Discussion of the Supreme Court decision on the Adamson law ......................................M ay, 1917: # 9 4
History of laws re railway labor disputes.................................................................... ...........Got., 1916: 20-8
Principles and recommendations of Commission jon Industrial Relations.................... N ov., 1918: 87-41
Programs and proposals of National Industrial Conferences. .....................................N ov., 1919: 46-8:
Jan., 1920: 62-8; A pr., 1916: 88-40
Boots and shoes. Agreement in children’s shoe industry, in New York C ity............... June, 1918:167
Bricklayers. Cincinnati. Wage-award............................................................................... May, 1918: 148-5
Building trades. New York City and Norfolk................................................................ Feb., 1920: 149-50
------ Plan of American Federation of Labor............................................................................. Aug.,
1920: 68-8
------Portland, G reg....................................................................................................................... Dec.,1990: 94-8
Clothing, Arm y. (Roeenwasser Brothers.) Referred to .................................................... N ov., 1918: 58
------ Provision under collective agreement...........................................................................
N ov., 1917: 80-4
------ Rochester, N . Y . (Referred to )...........................................................................................Sept., 1920: 170
Clothing, women’s. Boston....... ......................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 281,264
------ Chicago.............. ................................................................................................................ Feb.. 1918: 66-9,75
------ Cincinnati........................................... .......................................... ......................................... M ar., 1918: 68
------ Cleveland............................................................................ ..................... Jan.. 1919:160-41; July. 1920: 84
------ New York C ity.................. Aug., IMS: 8-14; Sept., 1818: 28-8; M »r.,lb l7 : 888-8; June,» » : 12-18
------ St. LouisTTT..................................... ................... ................................................ . ................ M ar., 1918: 68
Coalm ines. Labor adjustment and the payment of bonuses....................................... Sept., 1918:195-6
Coal mines (anthracite). Wage situation and agreemen t.......................... ..................... N ov., 1918:1609
------Historical r&ram6 of various agreements........................................................................... Apr., 1916: 40-7
------ Joint agreements, 1903 to.1920.................................. ....................................................O ct., 1990: 98-109
— Wage hoard appointed; personnel................................. .. .............................................. July. I960: 88
Coal mines (bituminous). Award M ow ing strike of 1919and report of commission. A pr.,1490:40-80
Colorado Fuel and Iron Co.’s plan for adjusting disputes................................................ D ec., 1918:18-90
* * * * * * Orm m M m .......... Deo., 1617: 86-7; g a r., M l}: £ 4

M « a n $ W f i « ^ N e w i S S n a ^ I V .V .V .'^
w ,
,
_
.
,
^
^
M „ 1919: & B 7; A p r . , f A S * . , 1919: 178-18
Dredge and tugboat employees. G ieatLakas..................................................... ..J u n e, 1919:1 9 4 .7
Sectriolightabd powef, W
York C ity .......................................................................... 1919: 62
B to o tric a lV ty l^ r'(B e t h ]^ Steal Co.)............................................. ........................
jff-40
— i(General BlaatrleCo.)........................... ........................................ .
rfept., ills :
Government contracts................................................................................ Sept., 1917:. 71-4; G et,, 1917: 28-9
Iron and steel. (Birmingham district.).......................................................... ........ ........Sept., 1918: 88-6
------ (P oliakSteelC o.)..T ................................................................................... ........................ G et., 1918: 28-7
Lead mining. (St. Joseph Lead Co.)....................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 88
Longshoremen. Gulf district.............................................. ................................................. Feb.; 1919: 142-60
------ Personnel and function of commission.............................................................................
G et., 1917: 29
------R6eum6 of decisions of National Adjustment Commission........................................June, 1919:167-8
Lumber industry. Pacific Northwest....................................................................................Mar., 1918: 67-8
Machinists. (Bethlehem Steel C o.)................. ................................................... ........... Sept., 1918: 97-30
------ (Madfion, W ie.)................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 946-88
Marine occupations. Agreement affecting five marine occupations................................. Sept.. 1920:104
Minneapolis Steel and Machinery Co. award.......................................................................... Jan., 1919: 88 4
Motor vehicles. Plant in Middle W est................................................................................. O ct.. 1918:17-18
Munitions. (Smith and Wesson Arms Co.)......................................................................... Sept., 1918: 88 4
OU industry. (Bayonne, N . J .)....................................................................... ...................Jtity, 1916; 29-60

Pubttcuttoties. Antistrike Initiation...................................................
......................
Jan., 1917:19
------Rdsumd of conference, 1916.
...................................................................................... Jan., 1917:19-26
Railroads. Creation of railway boards of adjustment Nos. 1 ,2 , and 3 ................... .. .M a y , W llr .p
—
—

Decisions of Railroad Labor Board.......................................................Etirot^foi
Division of labor of Railroad Administration created..................................................Apr., 19!




28

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Conciliation and arbitration, United States—Concluded.
Railroads. Federal control.............................................................................................Mar., 1919; 292-4
----- History.................. T................-................................................................... ............
Oct., 1916: 20-3
----- Laws and legislation.. . . . Feb., 1917: 239-40; Apr., 1920: 50-7; May, 1920: 46-9; July, 1920:-26-43
----- Permanent wage tribunals recommendedby Railroad Wage Commission.......... . June, 1918: 35-6
----- Report of Board of Mediation and ConcOiato..................................................... Jan., 1918: 229-30
Shipbuilding. Decisions of Labor Adjustment Board................................................. 1818—Mar. 67-76;
Apr. 182-8; May 127-42; Dec. 197-212; 1820—Mar. 114-15; Nov. 229
Shipping. Joint Shipping Industrial Conference, June, 1919................... .................. July, 1919: 14-23
Slaughtering and meat packing. Chicago.........Mar., 1918: 58-9; May, 1918: 115-27; Juljyl920: 101-5
BtovemoMnig......... .............. .............................................................. . .......................... May, 1918: 168
Street railways. Boston.................................................................. - - ........................
Sept., 1916: 37-8
----- Cleveland.................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 224-30; May, 1919: 230-2
----- Kansas.......................................................................................................................... June, 1920: 106
----- Minneapolis and St^Paul........................ ............................... ........................j ... Apr., 1918: 302-4
----- New York City......................................................................................................
Sept., 1916: 29-37
----- Seattle.......................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 191
—r—Various cities............................................... . Sept., 1918: 30-2; Jan., 1919: 34-6; Apr., 1919: 252-5
Telegraph. National War Labor Board's decision sustained by President................. July, 1918: 22-3
..............Mar., 1918: 55-7
Telephone. Pacific coast............................................. ................ ..............
Waynesboro award.......................................................... .......... ^........... ....................... Aug., 1918: 73-5
Wheeling Mold A Foundry Co. award.............................................................. .............Nov., 1918: 29-34
Worthington Pump & Machinery Co. awards................................ Aug., 1918: 72-3; Feb., 1919: 259-65
Colorado. Compulsory industrial disputes investigation act....................................... Dec., 1915: 10-12
----- Creation of Industrial commission for adjustment of disputes............................. Mar.. 1920: 216-17
----- Scope otindustrial commission.......... : ........................ ............................................ Apr., 1916: 48
Kansas. First cases decided by court of industrial relations............................... ......... May, 1920: 52-4
— - Functions of court of industrial relations,............... ............................. ..............Mar., 1920: 214-15
Massachusetts. Disputes settled, December, 1919, to June, 1920................................... Nov., 1920: 219
----- Report on operation of law, 1915............................... ; ............................................. Sept,, 1916: 38-40
Minnesota. Disputes during war to be referred to board of arbitration............... ..... Nov., 1918: 289
Nebraska. Constitutional provision for creation of industrial court.............................Nov., 1920: 193-4
New York State. Personnel of board............................................................................... Nov., 1919: 342
----- Work of bureau of mediation and arbitration under proposed organization of
department of labor........................................................................... .........*................ Jan., 1920: 268
Ohio. Activities, January, 1914, to June, 1916.......... - ................ *.................................. Oct., 1916: 6-7
(S ee also United States: Board of Mediation and Conciliation; National Adjustment
Commission; National War Labor Board; President’s Mediation Commission; Rail­
road Labor Board: Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board.)
GondMatirin mid arbitrationJtordgn countries:
Alberta. Coal mines. Provisions of agreement of July, 1920....... ...................... .... Nov., 1920: 146-9
Argentina. Creation of labor chamber to regulate relations between labor and capital. Sept., 1920:197
Australia. Compulsory arbitration............... ........>...................................................... Jan!, 1917; 21, 22
----- Experience of Justice Higgins...................... .......... .............. Feb., 1916: 1-22; June, 1919: 208-15
----- Operation^ “ wages board” system and “ industrial arbitration court ” system. July, 1920: 61-2,66
— Public utilities. Antistrike legislation................... ........................Jan., 1917: 12: Feb., 1917; $539
—r- Shipbuilding. (By agreement)..................... .............. ............ ........................ Dec., 1918: 371-2
Austria. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation............................................ ............ Jan., 1917: 14-15
Belgium. Coal industry, 1919...................... ................................................................. Apr., 1920: 228-9
----- Order of minister of labor, 1919............................................ ...................... .............. Oct., 1919: 44
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation..,___ ;
.....................................................
Jan., 1917:15
British Columbia. Coal mines. Provisions of agreement of July, 1926..................... Nov., 1920: 148-6
— Inquiry and report by royal comthission, 1618..................................................... . Jan., 1919: lfflL-^5
— - Provisions of sMpbuildhM agreement, 1918..... v. . ........................... ................. Aug., 1018: 158
Canada. Industrial disputes investigation act. Amendments..................................... June, 1917: 912;
Sept., 1918: 271; Sept., 1920: 176
------- -— Experience under................................ Jan., 1916: 23-8; Dec., 1916: 16-20; May,1917: 697-701
------------ Purpose and scope. (Squires.).................................... ...................... ........... Sept., 1917: 1-U
----- Public utilities. Anratrike legislation..............................................Jan., 1917: 15; Feb., 1017; 239
Chile. Organisation of board for settling disputes............... ........................................ Sept., 1920:198
Columbia. Provisions of act of.November, 1919......................... . ......... ..................... Sept., 1920: 197-8
Denmark. Compulsory arbitration court. Organisation and activities................. . Aug., 1915: 14-15
----- Pubtik? utilities. Antistrike legislation........................ ........................... ............ Jan., 1917: 15-16
(S ee Sweden.)
Stance. Merchant marine.. Decree of December, 1917................................................Apr., 1918: 304-5
----- Munitions. Decree of January 17,1917.................................................................. Mar., 1917: 360-2
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation.....................................................................Jam, 1917: 16-17
----- Textile workers. In strike ofOetohsr, 1919........................... ..............................Mar., 1926: 124-5
----- - War industries. Decree of September 17.1917...................... .............................Jan., 1918: 73-5
Germany. Decree regulating arbitration of disputes, December, 1918....................... Apr., 1919: 164-7
----- Domestic service. Joint arbitration boaroprovlded....................... ....................... July, 1919:169
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation...................................................................
Jan., 1917: 17
Great Britain. Arbitration during war....... .................................. Feb., 1919: 276-2; Apr., 1920: 232-4
-1— Industrial councils. Plans o f rations councils........................................ ................ Aug., 1919: 134
------------Report of Whitley committee, 1918...................... ..... Aug., 1918: 81,237-40: Dec., 1918: 39-3
----- Industrial courts act........................................................................ Feb., 1920: 41-6; Mar., 1920: 201
------------Reporton dock labor......................................... ............ ..................................May, 1921k 54-62
----- Munitions of war act. Scope, etc......... Apr.. 1917:
May, 1918: 154.158-462; Apr., 1920: 283
----- Public employees.......................................Aug., 1917: 139-42: Aug., 1918: 84-9; Oct', 1918: 179-3
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation....................................... ...............................
Jan., 1917: 16
----- Shipping. Purpose of National Maritime Board.......................... .......................... July, 1920: 112
----- Shop stewards, function of. (Aeroplanes, Coventry, England)..............................Mar., 1918: .84-5
----- Wage awards by various arbitration boards...................................... .......... ........ Nov., 1919: 206-8
Italy. Iron and steel industry........................................................................................Dec., 1920: 203-6
----- Public utilities: Antistnke legislation..................................................................... Jan., 1917: 17
Jamaica. Appointmentuf conciliation board............................................................... Oct., 1918: 288-9
Mectico. Law of 1918. (Vera C r u z ) ................................................................. May,' 1919: 291-2
Netherlands. Printing trade. Board provided by collective agreement...................... July, 1920: 129
----- Public utilities-Antistrike legtiaMon..................................................................... Jan., 1917: 17




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBBB, 1920.

29

Conciliation and arbitration, foreign countries—Concluded.
Page.
New South Wales. Amendment to arbitration act, 1918..............................................July, 1918: 181-4
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation....................................................................... Jan., 1917: 12
New Zealand. Compulsory arbitration........................................................................ . Jan.. 1917: 21,22
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation...............................................Jan., 1917: 14; Feb., 1917:239
----- Summary of experience............................................................. Aug., 1916: 83-90; May, 1920: 216-18
Norway. Compulsory arbitration acts, 1915,1916, and 1919............ ........................... Nov., 1915: 81-3;
Sept., 1916: 78-9; July, 1919: 277
----- Wage award in iron and steel industry............................................................ .
Sept., 1920: 110-12
Portugal. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation.........................................................
Jan., 1917:18
ueensland. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation..................................................... Jan., 1917:13
umania. Law of August 21,1920................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 209
----- Public utilities. Antistnke legislation....................................................................... Jan., 1917:18
Russia. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation..... ........................................................
Jan., 1917:18
Jan., 1917: 13
South Australia. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation,.............................................
Spain. Establishment of labor commission in Catalonia...........................................Nov., 1920: 216-17
----- Public utilities. Antistrike legislation.....................................................................
Jan., 1917: 18
Sweden. Experience, 1918 (erroneously given as Denmark experience)...................Dec., 1920: 184-5
------ Proposed legislation............................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 64-5
Switzerland. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation...................................................Jan., 1917: 18-19
----- Provision for conciliation boards in factories.............................................................. Aug., 1915: 22
Tasmania. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation.......................................
Jan., 1917:13
Jan., 1917: 19
Transvaal. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation...................................
Turkey. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation............................... ..........................Jan., 1917: 17-18
Victoria. Summary of 20 years’ experience..................................................................Aug., 1916: 83-90
Western Australia. Public utilities. Antistrike legislation................ ...................... Jan., 1917: 13-14
(See also Collective agreements; Strikes and lockouts.)
Conductors. (See Street railways.)
Confectionery:
Belgium (Verviers). Wages, woman labor................................................................... Dec., 1920: 84^5
Connecticut. Working conditions, wages, etc., of women and girls, 1915 and 1916.. Mar., 1917: 348-51
France. Rwzulations of food controller...........................................................j ................ July, 1918: 100
Germany. Wages and hours............. ................................................................................ Oct., 1920: 141
Great Britain. Increase in wages during war.................................................................. July, 1919: 158
Japan. Wages, 1905,1909, and 1914...................................................................................Nov., 1917: 149
Massachusetts. Minimum-wage decree effective January 1, 1920............................... Sept., 1919: 248-9
----- Recommendation for minimum wage by candy board............................................ June, 1916: 57-8
----- Wages, 1918......................................................................................May, 1919: 201-4; June, 1919: 206
New York State Survey of candy industry. Referred to........................... ................ Feb., 1916: 95
United States. Wages and hours, 1919..................................... Sept., 1919: 182,183; Apr., 1920: 95-104
Confederaddn Regional Obrera Mexicans. Established in 1918................................. Nov., 1918: 258,259
Confederation g6n6rale du travail ( France):
Adoption of minimum standards at Leeds conference, July, 1916.............................. June, 1917: 912-13
Efforts to coordinate and internationalize labor legislation.......................................... Feb., 1917: 203-6
Re headquarters of international secretariat during war............................................... Feb., 1917: 203-6
Reconstruction program......................... ...... ................................................................... Mar., 1919: 75-8
Conference Board, National Industrial. (See National Industrial Conference Board.)
Conference Board of Physicians in Industrial Practice. Organization, officers, etc............ Dec., 1915: 43
Conference Council of the Printing Trades, Joint International. (See Joint International
Conference Council of the Printing Trades.)
Conferences. (See Congresses, conventions, etc.)
Congress, United States. (See United States: Congress.)
Congresses, conventions, etc.:
Academy of Political Science, New York.......................................... Jan., 1917: 19-25; Sept., 1919: 32-6
Berlin conference on protective labor legislation, 1890............................... Nov., 1918: 60; Apr., 1919: 5
Jan., 1917: 10-11
Boiler code congress........... .......................................................................................
Bombay mill hands, December, 1919..............................................................................Aug., 1920: 175-6
1918—Apr. 63-83; Sept. 319-27; Nov. 263; Dec. 71-2; 1919—N ov.66
British Labor Party...............
Chamber of Commerce of the United States........................................... Jan., 1919: 40-8; Aug., 1919: 78
Chemical Society, American.......................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 100-5
Child-welfare standards................................................................................................ June, 1919: 216-20
Citizenship............ .................................... .................................... ....................................Aug., 1916: 90-1
Constitutional convention, Nebraska, 1919.................................................................... Nov., 1920: 193-4
Cooperative...................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 130-2; Oct., 1919: 165-71;
Feb.. 1920: 133-4; Apr., 1920: 117-18,128-30; Nov., 1920: 130-2,132-3
Corporation Schools, National Association of.................................................................. Oct., 1916: 86-8
Cost of living, Gottenborg, Sweden.................................................................................... Oct., 1917: 65
Disabled Men, Interallied Conference on After Care of........................Aug., 1918: 31-43; Dec., 1918: 28
Economic Association, American......................................................... Feb., 1919: 85-6; Mar., 1919: 1-14
Economic conference of the allies, Paris, 1916..................................... ............................. Dec., 1918: 52
Employers and employees of South Africa, 1919............................................................... June, 1920: 224
Employers’ federations, Australian.................................................................. .............. Apr., 1920: 60-2
Employment Agencies, American Association of..................................... 1916—July 47-50; Sept. 13-16;
1917—Sept. 155-6; Nov. 116-30; 1918—Sept. 304; 1919—Dec. 277-9; 1996-Dee. 106-7
Employment agencies. Department of Labor conferences, August and December,
1915................. ..................................................... Oct., 1915: 5-13; Feb., 1916: 23-8; May, 1919: 178-81
Employment conference, Harrisburg, 1920.................................................................... Sept., 1920: 136-8
Employment management................. 1916—July 62-70; Aug. 17-26; 1917—Apr. 574-81; June 890-900;
Sept. 85-7; 1918—Feb. 173-4; June 168-77; 1919—Jan. 127; Apr. 53: 1986—July 179
Farm Workers, Amsterdam, August, 1920..................................................................... Dec., 1920: 167-8
Farmers’ National.Conference, Washington, D. C., 1919............................................. . Mar., 1919: 72-4
Household Employment, Commission on.......................................................................Mar., 1917: 352-8
Housing. American Civic Association............................ ..............................................Jan.. 1917:130-3
Housing and Town Planning Association, June, 1919..................................................July, 1919: 255-60
Housing Association, National, 1916,1917....................................... Nov., 1916: 60-3;. Dec., 1917: 215-18
Indiana conference on reconstruction and readjustment.................................................
Dec., 1918: 73
Industrial and efficiency engineers, Chicago..................................................................t. Aug., 1918: 170
Industrial and trade, Germany......................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 44-7
Industrial conference, London 1919.............................................................................. May, 1919: 104-8
t401317 0 — 41------- 3

S




80

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Congresses, conventions, etc.—Continued.
M
. &Bg6,
Industrial conference, Ottawa, 1919......................Sept., 1919: 42-3; N ov., 1919: 51-62; July, 1920: 171-2
Industrial conference, Washington, D . C., October ana December,1919........................N ov., 1919: 40-9:
^
Jim., 1920: 60-8; A pr., 1920: 83-40
Industrial Education, National Society for the Promotion o f.. . . . July, 1917:145-9; A pr., 1918:111-17
Industrial physicians.............................................................................................................. .
1915—Dec. 43:
1817— Feb. 267-72; N ov. 179-82; 1919—Mar. 249-50; Aug. 210-18; Sept. 287-91
Industrial Relations Association of America, Chicago, 1920............................... ............... July, 1920: 61-3
Industrial service conference^........ ........................................................................................... June, 1918:177
Insurance commissioners. 1916..................................................................................................N ov., 1916: 71-9
Insurance companies and Government departments re compensation for soldiers and
sailors....... . . . . ............................................. .............................................Aug., 1917: 102-4; Mar., 1918: 91-2
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, 1915 to
1920......... ............................................ ............................................ ............... ..................
1915—N ov. 27-37;
1916—June 49-53: 1917—Aug. 144-5; Oct. 108-9.111-21; 1918-Sept. 252-4:
N ov. 205-14; 1919-M ay 248-50; N ov. 266-79; 1980—N ov. 1-19; Deo. 135-56
Labor. Proposed world labor congress........................ ................................... .............. .... Feb., 1917: 204-6
Labor conference, interallied........ ............................... .................Sept., 1918: 312-13,327; N ov., 1918: 264
Labor conference, international. Geneva, 1921..................................................................... N ov., 1920:. 210
------Genoa, 1920............... ........................ ............................................ ... ................................ O ct., 1920: 209-11
------Leeds,1916............................ ................................ ............................................................June. 1917: 912-15
----- r Washington, 1919........................ 1919—Aug. 27-39; Sept. 31; Dec. 61; 1980-Jan. 1-26; Feb. 15-32
Labor Legislation, American Association for............................. Feb., 1919: 1-11,28-34; Mar;, 1919: 15-19
Labor Officials, Association of Governmental, 1916,1919,1920.......................................Sept., 1916: 11-13:
Aug., 1919: 256-7; Sept., 1920: 201-2
Labor officials, State. Washington, D . C., 1918.......................... ........................................N ov., 1918: 46-6
Labor organizations. (S ee Labor organizations.)
Labor political conference, St. Paul,M inn., 1918............................................................. Sept., 1918: 817-19
Labor sanitation conference, New York City,.1917....... ..................................................... May, 1917: 767-9
Manufacturers, National Association of, 1920............ ............ — ...................................Aug., 1920; 34-6
Mechanical Engineers, Institute of. Great Britain, 1918............................................. & Deo., 1918: 312-15
Medical
ArnAHnun................................. .................... ...................... ; ............ Feb., 1919: 219-21
Mine inspectors, State. Washington, D . C ., 1916............... ...............................................A pr., 1916: 76-8
Miners, Bochum, Germany, 1920......................................................................................... . Sept., 1920: 205-6
Miners, International Association oft Geneva, 1920........... ............................................. Oct., 1920: 212-44
Old age and State Invalidity insurance institutes. Germany (Berlin), 1918.................... Jan., 1919: 285
Our-oountry-flrst conference, Chicago, 1919.................................................................... . N ov., 1919: 46^50
Peace conference. Report ofthe Commission bn International Labor Legislation, 1919. May, 1919:1-26
Popular Government League, National, 1919.......... ............................... ........... ............. Feb., 1919: 67-70
Pottery Workers1 Society, National. Great Britain, 1920.,.......................... .................Dec., 1920: 168-9
Printing House Craftsmen, International Association of, 1920.................................... ..
O ct., 1920: 214
Printing. Joint International Conference Council, 1919........................ ............................ Jam. 1920: 272
Public Health Association; American.......................... ...........: .......................................
1516—Dec. 29-31;
1917—Feb. 272-83; 1916-Jan. 56-64: Feb. 14: Sept. 256-1; 1 8 1 9 Jan. 1-10,49; Feb. 215-19; Sept. 800-1; Dec. 312-14; 1980-Jan. 226-6
Reconstruction. Various. Referred to................................................................................Deo., 1918: 47-79
— Academy of Political Science, New York City, December, 1918..........................
Jan., 1919: 48
------American Public Health Association, 1918..,................
Jan., 1919: 49
------ Devon and Cornwall Association for Industrial and Commercial Reconstruction,
O ct., 1918t 51-4
1918......... ........................................................ ............................................................. .
— Governors of States, 1918.................... ................................................... Jan., 1919: 49; Mar., 1919: 53-5
— Governors of States and mayors, 1919......................................................................... Apr., 1919:71*4
i — Industry, commerce, and finance, Oxford, England, 1916........ ............... ............ Aug., 1917:129-88
------ League for National unity, 1918................................................................
Jan., 1919: 48
------ London meeting re relation of capital and labor, January, 1917............................. Mar., 1917: 479-86
— NationaldvicFederation, 1918................................. ........... ........................................ F eo;, 1919: 63-7
------ National Muitidpal League, 1918.......................................................
Jan., 1919: 49
Plymouth and Cornish dtisens. England. Referred to ......... ...................................
Dec., 1918: 67
- — Reconstruction committee of 1 0 0 ,1 9 1 8 ..............................................
Jan., 1919: 49
Safety codes, national industrial, 1919.......................................... ................................. ......... Feb., 1919: 238
Safety congress, industrial, New York State, 1916............ ....................................... .
N ov., 1917: 169-72
Safety congress, Harrisburg, Pa., 1 9 2 0 .,.. ..................................................................... .
Apr., 1920: 1-13
Safety Council, N ation a l..!................................................. 1916-O ct. 53-8; 1917—Oct. 147-3; Mar. 436-9;
1918—Sept. 234-5; Nov. 198-204; 1919—Nov. 234-6; 258-60; 1920—Nbv. 177-80
Safety engineers. United States Government establishments, 1918.................. ............. May, 1918: 257-8
Scandinavian-Fumish Socio-political Conference, Copenhagen, 1919........................... Aug., 1919: 258-60
Scandinavian industrial accident insurance conference..................................................... O ct., 1918: 85-90
Scandinavian Inter-Parlianientary Union, Copenhagen, 1919........................................... N ov., 1919: 85-7
Scandinavian Labor Congress, Copenhagen... . ................................ Jan., 1919: 305-6; Apr., 1920: 224-6
Seafarers,InternationalUDnIerence. 1920................... ................................... .............. .
O ct., 1920: 211-12
Seafarers’ Federation, International, 1920............................... .......................................... N ov., 1920: 210-12
Seamen’s conference, Genoa, 1920............................................................................................. May, 1920: 1-^20
Seamen’s Union, International............................................................ Mar., 1918: 169-71; Mar., 1920: 203-5
Shipbuilding conference called by Australian prime minister
................................... D ec., 1918: 371
Shinning industrial conference, 1 9 1 9 ..;... . . ..................................................................... July, 1919: 14-23
Shop stewards and workers’ committees, national conference of. Great Britain.
Referred to ........... ......................................... ............................... .......................................... Dec., 1918: 37-8
Social insurance, 1916......... ............................................................................N ov., 1916: 1-10: Jan., 1917: 1-5
Social labor narfy. Snain.
.................... ............................................................ ..........June. 1919: 58-9
Social WorkjNationSl Conference of, 1919........................ ........................ .. July, 1919: 1-13, lli-23* 238-55
Socialist and labor parties of France and England. London, 1915....................... .
Feb., 1917: 200-1
Socialist conference, Stockholm. Referred t o . . , ....................................................... .......... D ec., 1917:135
Socialist Conference, International. Paris, 1889. Referred to .............. N ov., 1918: 261; A ug., 1919: 47
Socialist Internationale, Copenhagen, 1910............................. ......................................... .
Apr., 1919:1-2
Statistical Association, American........ ..................................................... ............... ..........Feb., 1919: 35-44
Trade-unions. (S ee Labor organisations.)
Vocational Education, National Society for....................................... June, 1919: 68-9; A pr., 1920:136-40
War emergency conference, Washington......................................... ................................... N ov., 1918:178-9
War Invalids, interallied conference for the study o f.............................................. .......... May, 1918: 86-92
W omen. Conference of trade-union women, Washington, 1918.....................................N ov., 1918; 190-2




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

31

Congresses, conventions, etc.—Concluded.
Bag©.
Women in industry. London, 1917. Referred to ..................................................................
Jan., 1918: 57
W omen's Clubs, Chicago......................................................................................................... May, 1920: 113-14
W omen's Trade-Union League of America, National, 1919.............................................July, 1919: 267-72
Workers' councils, Berlin, 1919............................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 131-3
Working Women, International Congress of, 1919.............................................................D ec., 1919: 28MK)
Workmen's compensation insurance rates. New York City, 1915................................. A pr., 1916: 66-72
Conjugal condition of employees. (Sec Classification of employees.)
Connecticut:
Board of Compensation Commissioners. Awards, 1914, to May, 1916...................... . N ov., 1916: 79-80
------Reports................ ................................................................................ Aug., 1916: 52-6; May, 1919: 258-9
Bureau of Labor. Report on the condition of wage-earning women and girls, 1914,
•1916........................................................................................................ Sept., 1915: 11-16; Mar., 1917: 348-62
Commission on Public W elfare. Report, 1919....................................................................Aug., 1919: 224-7
Social Insurance Commission. Report, 1919................................................................. .
Aug., 1919: 224-7

(See also specific subjects.)

Connor, J. F .

Report on State Insurance Fund, New York................................................June, 1919: 253-5;
Sept., 1919: 307-12; Feb., 1920: 212-18
Conover, A . E . Labor exchanges in France, 1911 to 1918.................................... ............. O ct., 1919: 192-206
Conscription of labor. (See Compulsory work; Military service.)
Consolidated Gas Co., New York City. Sickness insurance plan.......................................... May, 1917: 753-4
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada (L td .). Accidents in 1917............................ O ct., 1918: 232
Conspir&cy. Court decision re right of workmen to sue for interference with employment. O ct., 1920: 202-3
Constitutionality of laws. (See Decisions of courts.)
Constitution. German Republic. Socio-political provisions................................................ Dec., 1919: 132-5
Construction:
Arm y camps. United States. Eight-hour day............................. ... .................................. Sept., 1918: 190
------------- Wage rates, May 1.1918...........................................................................................June, 1918: 112-21
Building erection. (See Building trades.)
Government work. United States. Eight-hour day established.................................... Sept., 1918: 188
- Mexican labor for Government in southwestern United States:...................... N ov., 1918: 266
ys. Norway. Wages.................................................................................................... N ov., 1917: 113
- United States. Convict labor for road work. Survey, 1914-15............................. A pr., 1917: 591-5
Irrigation works. Montana. Law re hours........................................................................... O ct., 1918: 242
Marine contracting. United States. Award, April 1,1919, for dredge and tugboat
employees.................^.....................................................................................: .......................June, 1919: 164-7
Railways, Alaska. Wage scale of employees, effective April 1, 1920............................Aug., 1920: 82-3
------ Norway. Increase in wages during war........................................................................... Mar., 1919: 201
------Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Portable buildings described........................................May, 1918: 286-7
Shipbuilding. (See Shipbuilding.)
Tunnels. United States. Hours....................................................................................
O ct., 1918: 242
(See also Housing; Labor camps.)
Consular service. Great Britain. Rates of pay and requirements to enter service............. Aug., 1920: 84
Consumers' cooperation. (See Cooperation.)
Consumers' League of the City of New York:
Behind the scenes in a restaurant......................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 258-61
Opinion on woman labor for street railways...........................................................................
May, 1918: 20
Report on laundries................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 203-5
Consumption, miners’ . (See Mines and mining, general: Diseases.)
Continuation classes. (See Vocational education.)
Continuous industry:
Draft convention, International Labor Conference, 1919................................................. Jan., 1920: 7 ,9 ,1 9
Minimum standard re shifts.................................................................................................... .. N ov., 1918: 57
Rest day in. Plans (Croxton)...........................................................................................Feb., 1920: 118-27
Schedule for 8-hour day and 6-day week......... *............................................................... N ov., 1919: 199-202
Six-hour day. Lord Leverhulme's plan, as regards shifts.............................................. July, 1919: 159-60
France. Eight-hour day............................................................................................................. July, 1919: 164
Italy. Forty-eight-hour week, effective July 1,1919. {Iron and steel)........................... June, 1919: 183
Massachusetts. Recommendations of special commission, 1917....................................Mar., 1917: 429-30
United States. Iron and steel. Seven-day week...........................Mar., 1918: 29-51; O ct., 1919: 104-26
------------- Shifts, Commonwealth Steel Co................................................................................. Dec., 1916: 119
------------- Shifts, United States Steel Corporation...................................... N ov., 1918: 133; Mar., 1920: 113
------Slaughtering and meat packing. Provisions of Alschuler award re shifts............. May, 1918: 115,
117,119-121,125
(See also Eight-hour day; Shifts; Twelve-hour day.)
Contract labor:
China. Labor-emigration law, April 21,1918...................................................................July, 1918: 158-9
France. Working and living conditions of 5,000 Chinese under contract.....................Mar., 1917: 480-1
Immigration act............................................................................................................................. N ov., 1918: 267
Labors peace program. Bern, October, 1917......................................................................... Mar., 1918: 176
Mexicanlabor. Regulations by United States Department of Labor for admission of. N ov., 1918:266-71
Mexicans and W est Indians. Permits for importation of................................................ Feb., 1919: 125-7
Contracting. Bricklayers’ Association, Cincinnati. Wage award...................................... . May, 1918: 143-5
Contracts:
Effects of wage increases. Printing and publishing, District of Columbia. Minimumwage order, 1919.......................................................................................................................... July. 1919: 165
United States Government work and 8-hour la w s.......................................................... Sept., 1918: 194-6;
O ct., 1918: 245-6; N ov., 1918: 40
Controlled establishments. (See Munitions.)
Convention of Bern, 1906. (See Bern Convention. 1906.)
Conventions (agreements). (See International relations.)
Conventions (meetings). (See Congresses, conventions, etc.)
Convict labor:
Atlanta penitentiary. Cotton manufacturing for Government purposes, law author­
iz in g ....................................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 39-40
Laws. United States. Digest of State laws........................................... Dec., 1915: 41-3; Apr., 1917: 595
Recommendations of United States Commission on Industrial Relations....................... N ov., 1915: 64
Road work. United States. Survey by Office of Public Roads................................... A pr., 1917: 591-5




32

M O N TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Convict labor—Concluded.
Page.
Statement of attitude of W ar Labor Policies Board............................................................. A ug., 1918: 75-6
Systems. United States. Various, described, and number employed under each in
the United States, specified years........................................................................................A pr., 1917: 591-2
Conyngton, Mary:
Alliance of miners, railwaymen, and transport workers of Great Britain...... ............ June, 1919: 169-77
Effect of the war upon the employment of women in England..................................... A pr., 1918: 204-17
Government residence halls, Washington, D . C .................................................................... Oct., 1919: 9-15
Government’s wage policy during the last quarter century............................................. June, 1920: 19-35
Separations from the Government service..,......................................................................... Dec., 1920: 11-24
Women in the munition trades in Great Britain............................................................... May, 1918: 151-63
Cooke, M. L. Quoted, re production......................... .................................................................... N ov., 1920: 116
Cooked food. (See Communal kitchens.)
Cooks. (See Domestic and personal service; Hotels, restaurants, etc.)
Coolie labor. Industrial students in United States technical and part-time schools not
coolie labor....................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 191-7
Cooperation:
Agriculture. Enterprises in Canada.................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 127-30
------ Farmers’ distributive organizations in the United States.......................................... Mar., 1919: 133-6
------ Movement in various countries. (Parker.)..................................................................... O ct., 1920: 156
------ Operations of farmers’ associations in New Zealand................................................ N ov., 1919: 221-2
------ Plan for cooperation between farmer and consumer. (M acKaye.)........................... Aug., 1920: 1-21
------Recommendation of President’s Industrial Conference................................................. A pr., 1920: 39
Bibliography.................................................................................................................................. O ct., 1920: 166-7
Argentina. Development, operations of societies, etc...................................................... Apr., 1919: 117-20
Austria-Hungary. Extent.....................................................................................................; Mar., 1919: 141-2
Belgium. Development............................................................................. Mar., 1919: 143; July, 1920: 142-5
Canada. Development........................................ Aug., 1919: 127-30; July, 1920: 145-6; N ov., 1920: 122-3
Czechoslovakia. Development, operations of societies, etc............................................. N ov., 1920: 123-5
Denmark. Development, etc..................................... Mar., 1919: 143; June, 1920: 130; N ov., 1920: 125-6
Apr., 1917: 531
France. Cooperative meat markets in Paris during war............................................
------ Development............................... Mar., 1919: 142;O ct., 1919: 178; June, 1920: 130-1; N ov., 1920: 126
------ Measures to combat high cost of living, mines and mining......................................................Jan., 1919:109-12
Germany. Development........................................................................Mar., 1919: 140-1; June, 1920: 132-5
Great Britain. Agreement between English cooperative societies and their employees.
jgjg
............. ................................. .................... .............................................. Dec. 1919: 267—9
------ Cooperative societies........................................ July, 1919: 119^20; Jan., 1920: *18*1-3; Apr.) 1920: 131-2
------ Memorandum to Peace Conference................................................................................... O ct., 1919: 176-7
------ Operations of copartnership productive societies, 1919................................................... N ov., 1920: 133
------ Origin, growth, etc............................................................................Mar., 1919: 138-40; O ct., 1919: 171-7
------ Plans to enlist trade-unionists to invest in agricultural and industrial develop­
ment
June, 1919: 123
------ Political action and alliances of cooperators................................................................. Sept.,1920: 128-30
------ (Scotland). Movement........... ........................................................................................ N ov., 1920: 127-8
Hungary. Development........................................................................................................ July, 1920: 146-50
India. Development.................................................................................................................June, 1920: 136-7
Italy. Development................................................ N ov., 1918: 72-3; Apr., 1920: 130-6; June, 1920: 137-8
Japan. Statistics on cooperative societies............................................................................... N ov., 1917: 150
Netherlands. Development.....................................................................................................June, 1920: 138-41
Norway. Development............................................................................................................... June, 1920: 141
Rumania. Development.................................................................................................. . June, 1920: 141-3
Russia. Growth of movement. N ov., 1918: 132; Mar., 1919: 144; July, 1919: 122-3; June, 1920: 122-30
South Africa....... * ........................................................................................ July, 1919: 128; D ec., 1919: 269-71
Sweden. Development..............................................................................June, 1920: 143-4; N ov., 1920: 12 7
Switzerland. Development.................................................................................................... N ov.,1920: 128-30
United States. Benefits of cooperative marketing............................................................... July, 1917: 135
------ Communities. Llano del Rio cooperative colony. (Hanna.).................................. Jan., 1916: 19-23
------ Congresses. All-American Farmer-Labor Cooperative Congress, 1920.................. Apr., 1920: 128-30
------------- Joint farmer-labor cooperative congresses.............................................................. Feb., 1920: 133-4
------------- National Cooperative Convention, 1918................................................................. N ov., 1918: 130-2
------ Consumers’ cooperation................................. Mar., 1919: 132-8; Feb., 1920: 134-7; June, 1920: 117-22
------Cooperative movement. (Parker.)...............................................................................Mar., 1920: 138-45
------Organizing and conducting societies. (Parker.)......................................................... July, 1920: 136-42
------ Plan for cooperation between farmer and consumer. (M acKaye.).......................... A ug., 1920: 1-21
------ Producers’. In various States......................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 133-6
------ Recommendations of President’s Industrial Conference............................................... Apr., 1920: 39
------ Rochdale principles............................................................................... Mar., 1919: 139; Mar. r 1620: 138-9
------Societies................................................................ N ov., 1918: 130; July, 1919: 120-1; Apr., 1920: 117-28
------(Illinois). Operations of societies, 1920......................................................................... N ov., 1920: 121-2
------(Wisconsin). Cooperative housing law of July, 1919................................................. Sept., 1919: 351-2
Cooperation of university with industrial establishments. (See University extension.)
Cooperative agriculture. ( S ee Cooperation: Agriculture.)
Cooperative associations. (See Cooperation.)
Cooperative banks. (See Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers’ Cooperative National
Bank; Credit unions.)
Cooperative buying. (See Cooperation.)
Cooperative marketing. (See Cooperation.)
Cooperative National Bank, Cleveland, Ohio. (See Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers’
Cooperative National Bank.)
Cooperative societies. (See Cooperation.)
Cooperative trade-unions. Denmark. (See Labor organizations: Denmark.)
Coopers:
Coffeyville, Kans. Wage award of National W ar Labor Board........................................
Jan., 1919: 36
South Africa. Wages, 1917 to 1919............................................................................................ N ov., 1920: 98
Copartnership. (See Cooperation; Profit sharing.)
Copper. Prices fixed by War Industries Board................................................... ....................... May, 1920: 38-9
Copper itch. (See Diseases.)
Copper mining. (See Minos and mining, copper.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

33

Copper poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Page.
Copper Queen Consolidated Mining Co., Arizona. Participation in Bisbee deportation... Jan., 1918: 15
Conner smelting. (S e e Metallurgy.)
Coppersmiths:
Wages. United States. Navy yards...................................................................................... June, 1918: 110
---------- r- Shipbuilding. Awards........................ Mar., 1918: 70; Apr., 1918: 186; May, 1918: 129,134,140
Core making. (S e e Foundries; Iron and steel.)
Corn. Production and prices. United States.............................................. .................................. N ov., 1920: 57
Corn meal. (S e e Food control: Retail prices, food.)
Corn production act. ( S e e Laws and legislation: Great Britain.)
Corn Products Refining Co. Award of National War Labor Board............................ Jan., 1919: 31-2,208-9
Comick, R. L .:
“ Employees’ representation.” Referred to........................................................................... Sept., 1920: 23
“ Organizing the shop for production/' Summarized......................................................... N ov., 1920: 117
Corporation schools. (S e e Vocational education.)
Corporation Schools, National Association of. (S e e National Association of Corporation
Schools.)
Corporations. United States. Pensions. Plans referred to........................„ ......................... N ov., 1916: 130
Corset industry. (S e e Clothing industries, women's.)
Cort, W . W . Hookworm among miners..................................................................................... July, 1918: 190-2
Corwin, E . H . Lewinski-. (S e e LewmsM-Corwin.)
Cost of food compared with wages:
New York State factories, various years..............................................................................June, 1918: 125-6;
July, 1919: 148; Oct., 1919: 146; Feb., 1920: 128; July, 1920: 108-9
United States. Retail prices of food and earnings of various workers.............................. June, 1920: 33
------Retail prices of food and salaries of Government employees, 1915 to 1919................. June, 1920: 31
— - Retail prices of food and union wage scales.................... *.____June, 1918: 146-7; Mar., 1919: 119-20
Cost of labor. (S e e Labor costs.)
Cost of living. United States:
Prices. Retail. Food* (S e e section o n P r ic e s a n d cost o f liv in g , in each n u m b e r o f the
R e v ie w . S e p tem b er. 1 9 1 5 , to D ecem b er , 19 £0 .)
------------- Coal.............................................. 1916—Sept. 43; 1918— Oct. 102-4; 1819—Mar. 100-2; Sept. 80-7;
1920—Mar. 57-63; Aug. 56-8; Sept. 52-60; Oct. 52-5; Nov. 44-7; Dec. 51-3
------------- Dry goods................................. 1917— Dec. 88-90; 1918—July 68-70; Dec. 101-4; 1919—July 52-6;
Oct. 68-74; Dec. 182-7; 1920—Apr. 77-82; July 76-82; Oct. 56-9; Dec. 54-60
------------- Gas............................ ......................................................................June, 1919: 92-3; June, 1920: 66-7
------Wholesale. Food............................................1917—N ov. 73-5; Dec. 91-3; 1918—Jan. 86-9; Feb. 10710; Mar. 108-11; Apr. 146-9; May 104-7; June 94-7; July 75-8; Aug. 126-9; Sept. 105-7;
125, 127-8; Oct. 108-10,126-7; N ov. 89-92; Dec. 105-7; 1919—Mar. 111-14; June 98-101;
Sept. 90-6; Dec. 192-5; 1920—Jan. 10 2 - 1 2 ; Mar. 68-70; June 71-3; Sept. 71-3; Dec. 64-7
------------- Various commodities............................................................................................................ 1916—Feb.
33-4; Sept. 43-5; 1917—Apr. 586; July 129; Aug. 54-5; Sept. 91-2; Oct. 57-9; Deo. 94;
1918—Feb. 102-6; Mar. 113; June 89-93.98; July 73-4; Aug. 131; Sept. 102-4,109; Oct.
106,111-12; Nov. 88 ; Dec. 109-14,146-9; 1919—Jan. 102; Feb. 105-9; Mar. 115-18; Apr. 10910; May 143-6; June 95-7; July 62; Aug. 111-16; Sept. 91-3,98; Oct. 78; Nov. 153,155-8;
Dec. 191,196-7; 1920-Jan. 93; Feb. 87-94; Mar. 68-7; Apr. 83-4; May 76-83; June 68 9.75; July 83-4; Aug. 59-65; Sept. 62-70,74-5; Oct. 60-2,68; N ov. 48-55; Dec. 61-3,68
Miscellaneous studies ana addresses. Analysis of price situation................................... July? 1920: 89-93
------Cost of ready-to-serve foods................................................................................................ N ov., 1916: 46-8
------Effects on family budgets. (Meeker and Kittredge.) ................................................July, 1920: 1-10
------Improbability of decrease. (Meeker.) ............................................................................ Feb., 1920: 95-7
------ Increase, 1913 to June, 1919. Index numbers....................... .......................................N ov., 1919: 193
------ Possibility of compiling a cost-of-living index. (Meeker.) .......................................... Mar., 1919: 1-9
------ Summary, July. 1914, to June, 1919. (Hanna.)........................................... ................. O ct., 1919: 1 - 8
Surveys. Bureau of Labor Statistics....................................................................................... 1918—Apr. 192;
1920—Jan. 97-8; May 84-7; June 76-9; Sept. 75-99; Oct. 65
------Bureau of Labor Statistics for Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board......... .......... 1918—Mar. 112;
Apr. 151-2; June 99-104; A im . 132t5; Sept. 115-17,118-22;
Oct. 112-20; Dec. 11546; 1919—May 166-8; Sept. 107-11
—— Bureau of Labor Statistics for National War Labor Board............1919—May 147-65; June 101-16;
July 75-114; Aug. 1-25,117-19; Sept. 9-30; Nov. 1-19; Dec. 29-41; 1920—Jan. 27-34
------National Industrial Conference Board............................................... Mar., 1920: 71-2; May, 1920: 88-9
------Railroad Wage Commission..............................................................................................June, 1918: 37-42
------ ( S e e also Cost of living, United States, by locality: District of Columbia.)
Cost of living, United States, by locality:
Alabama. (Birmingham and Mobile)................................... 1918—June 99; Oct. 120; Dec. 124,126,128,
137,139,141; 1919—May 167; Sept. 109,110; 1920—May 85; June 76; Sept. 78,81
------(Birmingham, Huntsville, and Mobile).............................................................July, 1919: 78-9,91, 98-9
Arizona. (B isbee)........................................................................................................................ July, 1919: 80
Arkansas. (Little Rock)............................................................................................................July# 1919: 94-5
California. (Bakersfield, Eureka, Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento, and San Fran­
cisco)................................................................................................................. July, 1919: 78,87,95,106,108-9;
------(Los Angeles, Oakland, and Ran Francisco)..............................................................
1918—Sept. 116;
Dec. 131,133,135; 1919—May 167; Sept. 109; 1920—June 78; Sept. 78,79
------(Los Angeles and San Francisco). Expenditure of self-supporting women.............. Sept., 1915: 11
Colorado. (Cripple Creek district, Denver, Pueblo, and Trinidad)............ July, 1919: 83,84-5,104,112
------(Penver)......................................................................... Sept., 1919: 110; June, 1920: 76; Sept., 1920: 81
Connecticut. (Bridgeport;......................................................................................................... May, 1919: 162
------(Waterburv). Survey of price levels............................................................................. Dec., 1919: 203-6
Delaware. (Wilmington)............................................................................................................ May, 1919:165
District of Columbia. Annual cost of clothing for single man and single woman..........Jan., 1920: 38-9
------Retail and wholesale prices of food................................................................................ June, 1917: 954-9;
Aug., 1918: 141-4; Sept., 1918: 112-14; Oct., 1919 79-93
------Various surveys........................... 1917— Oct. 1-17; N ov. 1-12; Dec. 1-18; 1918—Jan. 1-12; Feb. 1-12;
Mar. 1-13; Apr. 41-52; 1919—June 117; Dec. 22-9; 1920—Jan. 3544,98-9; Oct. 65
Florida. (Jacksonville)................. .................................... July, 1919: 92-3; May, 1920: 86; Sept., 1920: 77
-nr— (Jacksonville, Pensacola, and Tam pa)............................................................1918—June 100; Oct. 120;
Dec. 119,121,123,124,126,128,136,137,138,139,140,141; 1919—May 167; Sept. 108
Georgia. (Atlanta and Savannah)............................................................................. July, 1919: 76-7,109-10;
May, 1920: 86; June, 1920: 76; Sept., 1920: 80




84

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Cost of living, United States, by locality—Continued.
Page.
Georgia. (Atlanta, Brunswick, and Savannah)................................................................... 1918—June 101;
Oct. 120; Dec. 119,121,123,136,138,140; 1919—May 167: Sept. 108,110
Illinois. (Chicago)..................................................................................... . . ............................... 1918-O ct. 114;
Dec. 130,132,134; 1919—May 168; Sept. 109; 1920-M ay 87; Sept. 76
------------- Retail food prices.............................................................Mar., 1917: 387-8; Jan., 1920: 107. m 112
------(Chicago, Danville, East St. Louis, Moline, Pana,and Rock Island)____June, *1919: 104,10s, 114-15;
July, 1919: 106-7
------(Peoria). Relative costs for family of fiv e .*.................................................................. Jan.. 1920: 150
Indiana. (Brazil, Evansville, Fort Wayne, and Indianapolis).................. June, 1919: 102, 109,110,112
------ (Indianapolis)............................................................... Sept., 1919: 110; June, 1920: 76; Sept., 1920: 81
Iowa, (Davenport and Des Moines).............................................................June, 1919: 115; July, 1919: 85
Kansas. (Kansas City and W ichita)...................................................................................July, 1919: 93,113
Kentucky. (Louisville)......................................................................................................... June, 1919: 112-13
Louisiana. (New Orleans).....................................*____July, 1919: 100-1; June, 1920: 77; Sept,. 1920: 82
------ (Madisonville, New Orleans, and Slidell).............. \....................................................June, 1918: 101-2;
Dec., 1918: 125,127,129,137,139,141; Sept., 1919: 111
Maine. (Bath and Portland)................................................................................................. 1918-A ug. 132-3;
Oct. 118; Dec. 118,120,122; 1919—May 166; Sept. 108
------(Portland)..................................................................... May, 1919: 160-1; M ay, 1920: 84; Sept., 1&0: 79
Maryland. (Baltim ore)........................................................................................... 1918—Aug. 139; Oct. 117;
Dec. 119,121,123; 1919—May 150-1, 167; Sept. 108; 1920-M ay, 85; Sept. 76
Massachusetts... * .................................................................................... June, 1917: 959-60; Aug., 1920: 66-9
------(Boston)............................................................................................... .................................... 1918—Aug. 133;
Oct. 117; Dec. 118,120,122; 1919—May, 166; Sept. 108; 1920—May 84; Sept. 76
------(Boston, Fall River, Lawrence, and Westfield)................................ May, 1919: 151,154-5, 156,164-5
------(Lawrence).................................. .........................................................................................Mar., 1920: 71-2
Michigan. (Calumet, Detroit, an<f Grand Rapids)................................. June, 1919: 102-3,109-10,110-11
— -(D etroit).................................................................................................................................. 1918—Oct. 115;
Dec. 130,132, 134; 1919—May 168; Sept. 109; 1920—May 87; Sept. 77
Minnesota. (Duluth, Minneapolis, and St. Paul). Weekly expenditures of w om en.. Sept., 19l5: 26
------ (Duluth, Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Virginia)....................... June, 1919: 114; July, 1919: 86,112-13
(Minneapolis)................................................................ Sept., 1919: 111; June, 1920: 77; Sept., 1920: 82

Mississippi^ (Meridian)
July, 1919: 97
(Moss Point and Pascagoula)........................ June, 1918: 102; Dec., 1918: 124, 126,128, 137, 139,141
Missouri.
— 5 (Kansas City and St. Louis)...................... *........................................... July, 1919: 93, 106-7;

Sept.. 1919: 110, 111; June, 1920: 76, 77; Sept., 1920: 81, 83
------ (St. Louis). Annual cost of clothing of female employees........................................... Sept., 1915: 28
Montana. (B utte)....................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 80-1
Nebraska. (Grand Island and Omaha)................................... ..................................... July, 1919: 89,102-3
New Hampshire. (Manchester)............................................................................................. May, 1919: 156-7
------ (Portsmouth).................................................. Aug., 1918: 133; Oct. 1918: 118; Dec., 1918: 118,120,122
New Jersey. (Camden, Dover, Newark, and Trenton)............................ May, 1919: 154, 157,158-9,164
New York. Survey of women and girls in stores and factories...................................... Feb., 1916: 89-94
------ (Buffalo and New Y ork)......................1918—Apr. 151-2; Sept. 119-22: Oct. 115,119; Dec. 118,120,
122, 125,127, 129; 1919—May 166.168; Sept. 108,110; 1920—May 85, 87; Sept. 76, 78
------ (Buffalo, Johnstown, New York, and Syracuse)...................................May, 1919: 152-3,155, 158,163
------ (New York City.) Minimum expenditures, family of five..................................... July, 1917: 139-40
------------- Retail prices of clothing.......................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 119-22
------------- Retail prices of food...................................Jan., 1917: 50-1; Feb., 1917: 241-2; Mar.. 1917: 388-9
North Carolina. (Charlotte, Newbem, and Winston-Salem)................................ . July, 1919: 82, 99,114
Ohio. Increase in central coal field........................................................................ , ................ Dec., 1919: 76
------Survey of working women.................................................................................................. Feb., 1916: 51-6
------(Cincinnati, Cleveland, Lorain, and Toledo)............................................................ O ct., 1918: 114,115;
Dec., 1918: 125,127,129, 130,132, 134; May, 1919: 168; Sept., 1919: 110
------ (Cincinnati and Cleveland).....................................May, 1920: 87; June, 1920: 76; Sept., 1920: 77, 81
------ (Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, and Steubenville)..............................June, 1919: 105, 106-7,116
Oklahoma. (Oklahoma; C ity).................................................................................................... July, 1919: 10 2
Oregon. ( Astoria and Portland).................*.......................................................................July, 1919: 76,103
------ (Portland)..................................................................; ............................................................ 1918—Sept. 116;
Dec. 131.133, 135; 1919—May 168; Sept. 109; 1920-June 78; Sept. 79
Pennsylvania. Increase in central coal field........................................................................... Dec., 1919: 76
------ (Chambersburg, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Scranton)...........May, 1919: 153,158-9,159-60,162-3
------ (Philadelphia). Retail prices of food.............. .................................... Feb., 1917: 243; Mar., 1917: 389
------------- Women working in department stores............................... ..................................... Sept., 1915: 36
------ (Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Scranton)...................................1918—Mar. 1 1 2 ; Oct. 110; Dec. 119,
121,123; 1919—May 166; Sept. 108, 111; 1926—May 85; June 77; Sept. 79, 82,83
Rhode Island. (Providence)..................................................................................................... May, 1919: 161
South Carolina. (Charleston).................................................................................................... July, 1919: 81
Tennessee. (Knoxville and Memphis)............................................................................. July, 1919: 94, 96-7
------(Memphis).................................................... . ................ Sept., 1919: 111; June, 1920: 77; Sept., 1920: 82
Texas. Survey of women workers in four principal industries, 40 cities........................ Dec., 1920: 72-3
------(Beaumont, Houston, and Orange)....................................................................................1918—June 103;
Oct. 120; Dec. 125, 127, 129; 1919—May 167; Sept. 109
------ (Corsicana. Dallas, El Paso, and Houston)............................................July, 1919: 82-3. 84, 86-7,90-1
- — (Dallas). Survey covering 50 families...........................................................................July, 1917: 136-7
------ (Houston)...................................................................................................... May, 1920: 86 ; Sept., 1920: 77
Utah. (Salt Lake C ity).............................................................................................................. July, 1919: 108
Vermont. (Rutland)................................................... ............................................................... May, 1919: 162
Virginia. (Fredericksburg, Norfolk, Richmond, and Roanoke)...................July, 1919: 88-9,101,104-5
------(Newport News, Norfolk, and Richmond)....................................................................... 1918—Aug. 134;
Oct. 117; Dec. 119, 121,123, 136, 138, 140; 1919—May 167; Sent. 108, 111
------(Norfolk and Richmond)......................... ............... May, 1920: 85; June, 1920: 77; Sept., 1920: 78, 82
Washington. Cost of a household budget of 58 articles......................................................Aug., 1916: 31-2
------ Foodstuffs and fuel............................................................................................................. July, 1918: 78-80
—— (Everett, Seattle, and Spokane)............................................................................. July, 1919: 88 ,110-11
------ (Seattle)........................................................................................................ June, 1920: 78; Sept., 1920: 80
— (Seattleand Tacom a).. Sept,, 1918: 115; Dec., 1918: 131,133,135; May, 1919: 168; Sept., 1919: 109
------ (Spokane)................................ . . . ............................ .................
............. ..................... Feb., 1919: 113




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBBB, 1920.

35

Cost of living, United States, by locality—Concluded.
Pag&
W est Virginia. (Charleston)...................................................................................................... June, 1919: 108
Wisconsin. (Chippewa Falls, Green Bay, and Milwaukee)............................June, 1919: 104-5, 111, 113
------(Manitowoc and Superior)........................ O ct.. 1918: 114, 115; Dec., 1918: 130, 131, 132, 133, 134,135
Cost of living, United States'and certain other countries:
Index numbers of retail prices.. ................................................................................................. 1916—N ov. 49;
1918—Apr. 150-1: July 71-2; Oct. 111-12: 1919-Jan. 104-5; Apr. 111-12:
July 64-5; Oct. 96-7; 1920-Jan. 94-5; Apr. 85-7; July 86-7; Oct. 63-4
Index numbers of wholesale prices................................... ...................................................... 1918—Mar. 113;
June 98; Sept. I ll: Dec. 114; 1919—Mar. 117-18; Juhe 95-7:
Sept. 97-8; Dec. 195-7:1980-M ar. 66-7: June 75; Sept. 74-5; Dec. 68
{S e e also Bonuses; Budgets; Dietary studies; Food control; Fuel control; Prices; Prof­
iteering; Rents; Retail prices; wage adjustments based on cost of living; Wholesale
prices.)
Cost of living, foreign countries:
Argentina. Retail prices of food..............................Mar., 1919: 122-3; June, 1920: 80-1: Dec., 1920: 74-6
------Workingman's family, 1918.............................................................. .......................... . July, 1919: 115-16
Australia. Increase, various dates........................................................... N ov., 1919: 165-6; N ov., 1920: 64
------Retail prices of fobd........................... ...................................... .
1915-D ec. 45-6: 1916-N ov. 49-50;
1917—June 961; 1918-A pr. 150; July 71; Oct. i l l ; 1919-Jan. 104;
Apr. I ll; July 64; Oct. 96; 1920-Jan. 94; Apr. 86 ; July 86 ; Oct. 63
------Wholesale prices of various commodities.....................................1918—Mar. 113; June 98; Sept. I ll;
Dec. 114: 1919—Mar. 117-18; June 96-7; Sept. 98;'D ec.
196-7; 1920—Mar. 66-7; June 75; Sept. 7£»5; Dec. 68
------ (New South W ales)............................................................................ Feb., 1917: 296-9; June, 1918: 107
------(South Australia). Increase, 1918 and 1919......... ...........................................................N ov., 1920: 224
Austria. Retail prices of food............... .............................................. June, 1917: 961-2; D 6o., 1918: 168-96
------(Vienna). Retail prices of food.................................................................. 1915—Oct. 44-3; Dec. 44,46;
1918-M ar. 80; July 82-3: 1917— Feb. 244-5; 1918-A pr. 150;
July 71; Oct. I ll; 1919-Jan. 104; Apr. I l l; July 64; Oct. 98
-------------Retail prices of various commodities..................................................... ................... Dec., 1918: 194
Belgium. Retail prices of food..................................................... 1920—Feb. 98; Apr. 86 ; July 86 ; Oct. 63
------ Retail prices of various commodities.................................................. Aug., 1919: 120-2: Feb., 1920: 98
Brazil. Increase, 1917 over 1913................................................................................................. N ov., 1918: 107
------ Retail and wholesale prices of food..................................................................................... Sept., 1919:119
Canada. Cause of labor unrest................................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 38
------ Government regulations.................................... ............................ June. 1917: 831-4; Dec., 1918: 149-52
------Powers of board administering Combines andFair Prices Act, 19i9......................... O ct., 1919: 101-2
------Report of Parliamentary committee.............................................................................Sept., 1919:113-18
------Results of survey by special board submitted in 1914.................. ................................Apr., 1916: 51-4
------Retail prices of rood.................................................................................................. .........1915-*Sept. 47-8;
1918—
July 83; N ov. 49; 1917— Feb. 245-6; June 962; 1918—Apr. 150; July 71; Oct. I ll;
1919Jan. 104; Apr. I l l; July 64: Oct. 96: 1920-Jan. 94; Apr. 86 ; July 86 ; Oct. 63,71
------Retail prices of various commodities. Dec., 1915: 48; N ov ., 1916: 50; Mar., 1920: 73; O ct., 1920: 71
------Weekly cost of tomily budget........................................ Deo., 1915; 48; N ov., 1916: 50; O ct., 1920: 71
------Wholesale prices of various commodities........................................................................... 1915—Oct. 46:
1918—Mar. 113; June 98; Sept. I ll; Dec. 114; 1919—Mar. 117-18; June 96-7,118;
Sept. 97-8; Dec. 196-7; 1920—Mar. 66-7; June 75; Sept. 74-5; Dec. 68
------(New Brunswick). 1913 and 1919....................................................................................... July, 1920: 179
Chile. Relative retail prices of 10 articles of prime necessity in 3 large cities, 1911
to 1915........................................................................................................................................... June, 1917: 963
Cuba. Prices and increases, 1914 and 1918.............................................................................. Aug., 1919: 122
Czechoslovakia. Retail prices of food, April, 1914, and December, 1919........................ . Mar., 1920: 76
Denmark. Family of five, 1914 to 1920.............................. ................. ....................
N ov., 1920: 70
------Retail prices of food............................................................................................................ 1916—Sept. 48-9;
Deo. 48-9; 1918—N ov. 108-9; 1920-Jan. 94; Apr. 86 ; July 86; Oct. 63j/N ov. 71
------(Copenhagen). Retail prices of food............................................................................... 1916— Oct. 47-8;
Dec. 44; 1917— Feb. 250-1; June 959; Aug. 62; 1919—Mar. 122; 1920-N ov. 71
-------------Retail prices of various commodities...................... ........................ *................ .
1916-rOct. 47;
1917— Feb. 250-1; June 988-9; Aug. 61-2; 1919—Mar. 122; 1920—N ov. 71
------------- Workingman's fam ily, various periods............................................July, 1916: 84; N ov., 1916: 51
Finland, 1914andl915................................................ ......................... ................................... Sept., 1915: 49-50
France. Increase, various dates............................................................................................... 1916—July 84-5;
N ov. 51-2; 1917— Feb. 246; June 963-4; 1919—Apr. 82-4; Sept. 236-40,244; 1920-M ar. 74
------Measures to combat, mining centers.............................................................................. Jan., 1919; 109-12
----- : Retail prices of food................................................................................... 1915—Deo. 44; 1916—Nov. 49;
1918-Jan. 106; Sept. 130; Nov. 107-8,124; 1919—Sept. 237-40: Oct. 99-101
------Retail prices of various commodities.................................................................................. 1917— Feb. 246;
1918—Apr. 150; July 71; Oct. I ll; 1919—Jan. 104; Apr. I l l; July 64;
Sept. 237-40; Oct. 96; 1920—Jan. 94; Mar. 74; Apr. 86 ; July 86 ; Oct.63
------Wholesale prices of food........................................................................................................ 1916—Dec. 44:
1916—Mar. 81-2; 1917—Apr. 530; 1918-July 95-7,99; Sept. 130: N ov. 122
------Wholesale prices of various commodities........................................ 1918—Dec. 114; 1919—Mar. 117-18:
June 96-7; Sept. 98; Dec. 196-7; 1920—Mar. 66-7; June 75; Sept. 74-5; Dec. 68
------(Paris). Wholesale prices of various commodities..................................... ................... Dec., 1915: 49
Germany. Increase, vanous periods.................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 152-62;
O ct., 1918: 175; Jan., 1920: 114-17; Apr., 1920: 93-4
------Retail prices of food............................................................................................................... Dec., 1915: 50;
Jan., 1918: 93; N ov., 1918: 13-25; Sept.; 1919: 119-20; N ov.. 1919: 168-71
------Retail prices and depreciation of the mark......................................................................July, 1920: 93-5
------Wholesale prices of food................................................................................................... N ov., 1918:13,19
------(Berlin). Retail prices of food.............. ........................ 1916-Sept. 50-1; Dec. 44; 1916—Mar. 82-3;
July 85-6; 1917— Feb. 247; 1918-A pr. 150; July 71; Oct. I ll; 1919-Jan. 104
------(Essen). Prices of food, clothing, and fuel'...................................................................... N ov., 1920: 78
Great Britain. Cause of industrial unrest...............................................................................Jan., 1918:67-8
------Cost. February, 1919, compared with July, 1914...................................................... June, 1919: 119-20
------Dock labor. Report of court of inquiry...........................................................................May, 1920: 57-8
— Increase, 1914 to 1918...................................................................................................... * May, 1919: 169-77
------ Munition workers. Cost of m e a ls ................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 56-7




36

M O N T H L Y LABOR REVIEW,

Cost of living, foreign countries—Concluded.
Page.
Great Britain. Retail prices of coal. Increase................................................................. July, 1915: 45-56
------Retail prices of food........................................ ...................................................................... 1915—Sept. 52;
Dec. 44,51-2; 1916—Mar. 83-4; July 86-7; Nov. 49,52-3; 1917—Jan. 53;
June 961-5; 1918—Apr. 151; July 72; Oct. 1 1 2 ; 1919—Jan. 105;
Mar. 190; Apr. 112; July 65; Aug. 123; Oct. 97,98; N ov. 166-8;
Dec. 197-8; 1920—Jan. 95,96; Feb. 85; Mar. 75; Apr. 86, 88 ; May 90;
June 80; July 86, 88 ; Aug. 70; Sept. 61; Oct. 63,72; Nov. 63; Dec. 74
------------- (Miscellaneous articles)................................................................................................ 1917—Jan. 51-6;
1918—July 87-92; NoV. 1 2 1 ; Deq. 152-6; 1919—Jan. 115-18
------Retail prices of various commodities................................................................................. 1919—Aug. 123;
Oct. 98; N ov. 166-8; Dec. 197-8; 1920—Jan. 96; Feb. 85; Mar. 75; A pr. 88 ;
May 90; June 80; July 88 ; Aug. 70; Sept. 61; Oct. 72; N ov. 63; Dec. 74
------Wholesale prices of food................................................. ................ Jtfly,1918: 87-92; Jan., 1919: 115-18
------ Wholesale prices of various commodities....................................................................... A pr., 1917: 586-8
------ (London). Retail prices of food........................................................................................
O ct., 1920: 73
(S e e a lso Cost of living: united Kingdom.)
India. Wholesale and retail prices, food and other commodities, 1913 to 1917............. N ov., 1917: 76-9
Italy. Increase, various dates................................. May, 1919: 177; A pr., 1920: 89-93; N ov., 1920: 65-70
------Retail prices of food.......................................................................................... 1915—Sept. 52; Dee. 44,52;
1916—
Mar. 84; July 87-8; Nov. 49,53-4; 1817—Feb. 249; June 966; 1918-A pr. 151; July 72:
Oct. 112; 1919—Jan.105; Apr. 1 1 2 ; July65; Oct.97; 1920—Jan.95; Apr.87; July 87; Oct.64
------Retail prices of various commodities.................... 1916—Nov. 49; 1918—Apr. 151; July 72; Oct. 1 1 2 ;
1919—Jan. 105; Apr. 1 1 2 ; July 65; Oct. 97; 1920—Jan. 95; Apr. 87; July 87; Oct. 64
------Wholesale prices of various commodities............................................................ ..............
D ec., 1920: 68
------ (M ilan). Retail prices of various commodities............................................................. N ov., 1920: 65-7
Japan, 1919.......... ...................................................................................... ................................. O ct., 1919: 102-3
------Prices index, referred to........................................................................................................
July, 1920: 95
------ Report of British vice consul at Osaka........................................................................... Aug., 1920: 39-41
Mexico. Retail prices of food..................................................................................................... O ct., 1918: 122
Netherlands. Retail prices of food........... 1915—Sept. 53; Dec. 44; 1916—Mar. 85; July 88 ; N ov. 54-6;
1917—
Feb. 249-50; June 966-7; 1918—June 67; 1926-A pr. 87; July 87; Oct. 64; N ov. 72-3
------Retail prices of various commodities............................. ................................................... 1915—Sept. 53;
1916—Mar. 85; July 88 ; Nov. 49,54-5; 1917— Feb. 249-50; June 966-7; 1918-A pr. 153J
July 72; Oct. 1 1 2 ; 1919—Jan. 105; Apr. 1 1 2 ; July 65; Oct. 97; 1820—N ov. 72-3
New Brunswick. (S e e Cost of living: Canada (New Brunswick).)
New South W ales. (S e e Cost of living: Australia (New South W ales).)
New Zealand. Retail prices of food................... 1916—N ov. 49,55-6; 1918—Apr. 151; July 72; Oct. 1 1 2 ;
1919—Jan. 10/5; Apr. 112; July65,117; O ct.97; 1920—Jan.95; A pr.87; July87; O ct.64
------Wholesale prices of various commodities..........July, 1919:116-17; Sept., 1920: 74-5; D ec., 1920: 68
Norway. Retail prices of food................................................................................................ 1915—Sept. 53-5;
1916—N ov. 49,56-7; 1917—June970-1; 1918—Apr. 151; July 72; Oct. 1 1 2 ; 1919—Jan.105;
Apr. 112; July 65; Oct. 97; 1920—Jan. 95; Feb. 100; Apr. 87; July 87; Oct. 64
------ Retail prices ofvarious commodities...................... ........................................................ 1915—Sept. 53-5;
1916—Nov. 49,56-7; 1917—June 971; 1918—Apr. 151; July 72; Oct. 112; 1926-Feb. 100
------ Various dates................................................... June, 1918: 104-6; N ov., 1918: 108-9; Mar., 1919: 323-7
------(Christiania). Retail prices of food. 1917— Feb.251; June 968-9; Aug. 61-2; 1918-M ar. 121; July 118
-------------Percentage increase in various item s......................................................................... July, 1916: 89
------------ Retail prices of various commodities.. 1917—Feb.251; June 968-9; Aug. 61-2; 1919—Mar. 121
Peru. Retail prices of food and other commodities........................... . A ug., 1919: 124-5; O ct., 1920: 74
Portugal. W eekly expenditures of families......................................................................... July, 1917: 137-8
Rumania. Wholesale prices of food..........................................................................................
O ct:, 1915: 49
------ (Bucharest). Retail prices of foodstuffs and firewood................................................. May, 1920: 90-1
Russia. Food and other commodities, 1914 and 1917.. ......................................................July, 1918: 82-3
Scandinavia. (S e e Cost of living: Denmark; Norway; Sweden.)
South Africa. 1910 to September, 1919................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 75-6
------ Increase, July, 1914, to January, 1918........................................................................... June, 1918: 106-7
------ Retail prices of food............................................................................................................. Oct., 1918: 122-3
South Australia. (S e e Cost of living: Australia (South Australia).)
Spain. Retail prices of food.................................................................. ................................. 1915—Sept. 55-6;
1919—M ar.61; Aug. 125; 1920—A p r.87; July87; O ct.64; N o v .73-6
------Retail prices of various commodities...................... .......................................................... Mar., 1919: 61
------ (Madrid). Wholesale prices of food................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 125
Sweden. Conference, Goteborg, June, 1917................................................... ....................... . O ct., 1917: 65
------ Increase, various dates................................... M ay, 1918: 109-12; N ov., 1918: 108-9; D ec., 1918: 156-7
------ Retail prices of food................................................................................................................ Sept., 1915: 57;
D ec.,1915: 44,53; July, 1916: 89-91; N ov., 1916: 57-3; June, 1917: 972
------Retail prices pf various commodities...................................... ........................................... 1915—Sept. 57;
Dec. 53; 1916—July 89-91; N ov. 49,57-8; 1917—June972; 1918-A pr. 151; July 72; Oct. 112;
1919—Jan. 105; Apr. 112; July 65; Oct. 97; 1929—Jan. 95: Apr. 87; July 87; Oct. 64
------Wholesale prices of various commodities................ June, 1920: 76; Sept., 1920: 74-5; D ec., 1920: 68
------ (Goteborg). Increase during war....................................................................................... M ar., 191V VjfZ
------(Stockholm). Retail prices of food....................................................................................F eb., 1917: 251;
June, 1917: 968-9; Aug., 1917: 61-2; Mar., 1919: 121
------------- Retail prices of various commodities......................................................................... F eb., 1917: 251;
June, 1917:968-9; A ug., 1917: 61-2; Mar.. 1919: 121,
Switzerland. Retail prices of food___ June, 1917: 972-3; A pr., 1920: 87; July, 1920: 87; O ct., 1920: 64
------ Various dates.................................................. N ov., 1916: 5830; N ov., 1918: 110-13; June, 1919: 187-9
------ (Basel). Minimum cost.................................................................................................... Sept., 1977: 144-5
------ (Zurich). Retail prices of food and other commodities................................................July, 1916: 91-2
Turkey (Constantinople). Increase in cost of food and other necessities....................... Dec., 1920: 76-7
United Kingdom. Index numbers of wholesale prices of various commodities............. 1918—Mar. 313;
June 98; Sept. I ll; Dec.114; 1919—Mar. 117-18: June 96-7; Sept.98;
Dec. 196-7; 1920—Mar. 66-7; June 75; Sept. 74-5; Dec. 68
( S e e a lso Cost of living: Great Britain.)
Uruguay. 1919 compared with 1913........................................................................................ Aug., 1920: 71-2
------wholesale and retail prices of various commodities.................................................... Jan., 1919: 113-14
Various foreign countries. Food prices.......................... t ...........................July, 1915: 42-4; D ec., 1915: 44
Cost of living boards. (S e e u n d e r v ariou s S ta tes a n d coun tries.)
Cost of living bonuses. (S e e Bonuses.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

37

Cost of living commissions. (S e e u n d e r variou s States a n d co u n tries.)
_
Cost of living compared with wages:
“ a8e*
Opinions of various authorities.................................................................................................. July, 1920: 91-2
France. 1911 and 1910................................................................................. Jan., 1918: 101-6; Sept., 1919: 244
------ (Bordeaux). 1913 and 1918.................................................................................................May, 1918: 147-8
Germany. Relations during war period............. . Apr., 1918: 152-62; O ct., 1918: 174-5; Jan., 1920: 117
------ (Prussia). Mining industry................................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 198
Great Britain. Agriculture....................... ................................................................................ May, 1918: 63-4
------Railway workers, during war......................................................................... ✓ ............... July, 1918: ICG-8
------Shipbuilding wage decision............................................................................................. N ov., 1919: 209-10
Japan........................................................... *................................................................................ Aug., 1920: 39-41
Netherlands, 1914 to 1917........................................................................... Sept., 1917: 123-4; JuIy„lC18: 80-1
Norway, July, 1914, to Apr„ 1917............................................................................................... Oct., 1817: 85-7
Philippine Islands. Skilled, workman, 1919............................................................................ Dec., 1920: 82
Russia, 1914 and 1917.................................................................................................................... July, 1918: 81-3
Switzerland, Mar., 1917.............................. .................................................................................. Sept., 1917:125
United States. Candy making. (Massachusetts.)......................................................... May, 1919: 203,204
------Index numbers, 1907 to 1915.................................................................................................
July, 1916: 75
------------- 1913 to 1919............................... *..................................................................................N ov., 1919: 191-3
------------- 1913 to 1919, Great Lakes cities.................................................................................June, 1919: 104-7
- — Locomotive firemen, 1918................................................................................................ Apr., 1918: 188-92
------Marine and dock labor, 1914 to 1919.................................................................................... May, 1919: 212
------ Mining. (Ohio and Pennsylvania.)................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 76
------Street railways. (New York C ity.)................................................................................... May, 1918: 19
------Teachers, 1915 and 1918.................................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 239-48
------ (Washington State). Self-supporting women.............................................................. Apr., 1917: 560-1
------(Wisconsin). 1915 to 1920. (Chart.)........ ...................................................... : ................ D ec., 1920: 111
( S e e a lso Allowances; Bonuses; Wage adjustments based on cost of living.)
Cost of living in relation to health. (M e e k e r.).............................................Jan., 1919: 1 - 10 ; Feb., 1919: 218
Cost of living in relation to profits. Various opinions................................................................. July, 1920: 91-2
Cost of living in relation to sickness................... ......................................................................... Sept., 1919: 1 1 1 - 1 2
Cost of production. ( S e e Labor costs.)
Cost of wars. ( S e e Wars, cost of.)
Costs. ( S e e Cost of living; Labor costs, etc.)
Cottage industries. ( S e e Home work.)
“ Cottage rent ” ................................................................................................................................ June, 1918: 148-9
Cotton Control Board. Great Britain. ( S e e Great Britain: Cotton Control Board.)
Cotton. United States. Production and prices........................................................................ Dec., 1920: 69-70
Cotton manufacturing:
Austria. Conditions and outlook............................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 105
China. Application of Taylor system to large m ill in Shanghai........................................ Dec., 1920: 210
Great Britain. Activities of joint board of control............................................................... Mar., 1918: 81-3
------ Forty-eight-hour week recommended by agreement of July 9,1919..............................Sept.,
1919:235
------ Statistics of membership in labor organizations.................
June,
1919:305
------ Unemployment. Referred to ..................................... .......................... Aug., 1918: 162; July, 1919: 157
------ Wage increases........................................................................................July, 1919: 156-7; Sept., 1919: 235
------ Wages and output.............................................................. ............................................... Oct., 1920: 129-30
------ (Lancashire). Activities of cotton control board...................... .................................... Aug., 1918: 162
------------- Strike of September, 1918, referred to......................................................................... D ec., 1918: 39
------------- Wage increase, June, 1918............................................................................................. A ug., 1918: 162
Japan. Wages of cotton-spinning operatives, 1914 to 1919................................................... A ug., 1920: 40
Massachusetts. Influence of occupation on health during adolescence.......................N ov., 1916: 110-14
------Weekly rates ofpay to women, 1918..................................
June,
1919:206
------(Fall River). Facts as to death hazard of cotton operatives........................................ July,
1917:1 - 8
New Y ork (State). Average weekly earnings....................................................................... June, 1918: 124;
July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
North Carolina. Injunction against enforcement of Federal child-labor law............... July, 1918: 171-2
South Carolina. Employment statistics, 1919 and 1920..................................................... Oct., 1920: 224-5
------Sickness as related to income............................................................................................. Feb., 1919: 2 2 1-6
United States. Employees and pay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919. (Index numbers.)___ 1919—Jan. 141;
Feb. 132; Mar. 151; Apr, 151; May 186
------Hours. Certain State laws cited......................................................................................... Oct.,
1918:243
------Hours, relation to output and health.................................................................................Aug., 1918: 153-5
------Housing and living conditions.............................................................................................. Jan., 1919: 297-8
------Law re employment of prison labor on cotton fabrics for government purposes. Sept., 1918: 39-40
------Wages and hours, 1907 to 1914..................................................... July, 1916: 76-8; Jan., 1920: 142,143-4
------Woman and child wage-earners......................................................................................... Mar., 1916: 33-7
( S e e also Textile industry.)
Cottrell process of dust precipitation............................................................................................ Feb., 1919: 229-30
Council of National Defense. (S e e United States: Council of National Defense.)
Council of People’s Commissioners. Germany. (S e e Germany: Council of People’s
Commissioners.)
Councils, agricultural. (S e e Economic councils.)
Councils, economic. (S e e Economic councils.)
Country, factories in the. (S e e Decentralization of industry.)
Court decisions. ( S e e Decisions of courts.)
Courts, industrial. (S e e Conciliation and arbitration.)
Courts of inquiry. (S e e Conciliation and arbitration.)
Cousins, J. A ; Eliminating unnecessary lost tim e....................................................................... N ov., 1918: 202
Covington, J. H . “ Preservation of industrial peace” ................................................................. Sept., 1920: 25
Cowee, G. A . Practical safety methods and devices................................................................ Oct., 1916: 46-51
Craig, E . M . Wages in building trades, May, 1920...........................................: ...................... Oct., 1920: 113-19
Crhches. ( S e e Day nurseries.)
Credit unions:
Russia. Described......................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 122
United States. State laws, 1917................................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 138
Cripples:
Bibliography. Education and employment of crippled soldier................................ Sept., 1917: 187-212
California. Economic handicap and solution..................................... Mar., 1919: 254; June, 1919: 247-53
Cleveland, Ohio. Survey of cripples, 1915-16........................................................................ Mar., 1919: 84-8




38

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Cripples—Concluded.
Denmark. Annual earnings in manufacturing and agriculture........................................ Oct., 1918: 87-8
France. Problem of military cripple ............................................................................... July. 1919: 214-19
------Statistics of number of crippled soldiers............................................................................ June, 1918: 73
Great Britain. Earnings at diamond cutting........................................................................ Aug., 1918: 36
Massachusetts. W hat becomes of the men crippled in industry?.................................. July, 1918: 32-49
New York City. Study of civilian cripples........................................................................... Mar., 1918: 92-6
United States. Occupational opportunities in the printing trades................................. Sept., 1918: 83-5
------Problem of the crippled man in industry................................................................. .
Dec., 1*918: 18-30
------Symposium.................................................................................... *........................................N ov., 1918: 201
Wisconsin. Industrial status................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 85-7
(See also Handicapped; Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
Crop Estimates, Bureau of. (See United States: Bureau of Crop Estimates.)
Crosby, O . T . View on international prices. Referred to......................................................... July, 1920: 92
Grosser colonization bill. Principles approved by Department of Labor...................'.........Jan., 1918: 45,56
Croxton, F . C.:
Distribution of farm labor............................................................................................................ Apr., 1918: 53
Rest day in continuous operation industry........................................................................ Feb., 1920:118-27
W ar employment work in O h io .......................................................................................June, 1917: 995-1002
Crum, F . S. Mortality from diseases of the lungs.................................................................... Feb., 1917: 269-70
Crutches. Provisions of various State compensation laws re....................................... July, 1919: 194,199-200
Culpin, E . G. Housing in Great Britain.....................................................................................A ug., 1920:155-6
Curtis, W . G. Compulsory health insurance............................................................................Apr., 1917: 515-16
Curtis Aeroplane ana Motor Corporation. Seven days a week during war emergency....... Sept., 1918: 269
Curtis Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Labor turnover......................................................... N ov., 1918: 284
Cutlery and hand tools:
Fayette R . Plumb (Inc.), Philadelphia. Plan for reducing labor turnover............... June, 1917: 844-8
Wage awards for toolmakers.................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 73,74
Cutting compounds:
A cause for'dermatitis and wound infection..........................................................................Jan., 1919: 273-7
(See also Lubricants.)
Czechoslovakia!
Ministers de la Prevoyance Sociale. La Conference du Travail et VEtat TchrtcoSlovaque. 1 9 1 9 .:.................................................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 239-45
Ministry of Railway. Statement re labor conditions on railways................................... Aug., 1920: 43-4

(See also specific subjects.)

D.
D N B . (See Poisons and poisoning: Dinitrobenzene.)
D N P. (See Poisons and poisoning: Dinitrophenol.)
D N T. (See Poisons and poisoning: Dinitrotoluene.)
Dakin solution. (See Carrel-Dakin solution.)
Dallas, Tex. Wage Commission. Cost of living survey..........................................................July, 1917: 136-7
Damage-suit lawyers. (See Workmen's compensation and insurance.)
Dangerous and injurious occupations:
Definition of “ Industrial hazard.” (Meeker.)....................................................................... Sept., 1919: 1-8
Definitions under compensation laws......................... N ov., 1918: 248-9; Jan., 1920i 235; Feb., 1920: 209
Diseases of occupation and vocational hygiene. (K ober.)..................................................Jan., 1917: 92-4
Hazardous occupations. (H am ilton.)................................................................................... D ec., 1919: 287-8
Health hazards in industries of Niagara Falls................................... Jan., 1919: 231-46; Mar., 1920: 161-8
List of, in labor code, Vera Cruz, Mexico................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 277
Occupations hazardous to eyes................................................................................................... A pr., 1918: 296
Partial list of industrial hazards........... ..................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 434
Standard measure of industrial hazard and definitions.................................................... O ct., 1917: 125-34
Unhealthy processes. Recommendations to international labor conference.................Jan., 1920: 21-2;
Feb., 1920: 30-2
(See also Accident prevention: Diseases; Dusts; Eye injuries; Gases and fumes;
Hygiene: Poisons and poisoning; Protective clothing.)
Davis, W . J. Leader in movement to establish new labor party, Great Britain................Sept., 1918: 323;
N ov., 1918: 263
Dawson, M .M .:
Principles of health insurance......................................................................................... May, 1917: 747,749-50
Statement on Ohio State Insurance Fund, 1919..................................................................... O ct., 1919: 248
Statement re accident compensation......................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 247
Day labor. (Sec Migratory and floating labor; Seasonal employment.)
Day nurseries:
Argentina. Provisions of law..................................................................................................... O ct., 1918: 249
Chile. Provisions of law.............................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 234
France............................................................................ Jan., 1918: 69-70; Feb., 1918: 213-15; July, 1918: 127
Germany. Referred to ................................................................................................................ O ct., 1918: 206
Day of rest:
Programs. Adopted by Peace Conference, April, 1919......................................................May, 1919: 23,25
------International Association for Labor Legislation.............................................................. N ov., 1918: 57
------International Labor Conference. 1919......................................................................... Jan., 1920: 16,19-20
------International Trade-Union Conference, Bern, October, 1917................................. Mary 1918: 177,178
Austria. Domestic service law .................................................................................................. June, 1920: 191
California. Minimum-wage orders........................................................................................ N ov., 1918: 172-3
Chile. Required by law .......................... *.................................................................................. A ug., 1919: 234
Czechoslovakia. Law of December. 1918................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 241
France. Agreement of August', 1919, in agriculture........................................................... Mar., 1920: 123-4
------Order of Ministry of Public Works re railway employees.................... May, 1918: 29; Apr., 1920: 64
------Regulations of Ministry of Munitions re female labor, 1917................ Jan., 1918: 69; July, 1918: 122
Great Britain. Munitions................. D ec., 1916: 12 2 ; Feb., 1918: 83-5; Apr., 1918: 208; M ay, 1918:158
Italy. Railways........................ i .......................................................................May, 1918: 34; M ay, 1920: 210
Manitoba. Foodstuff factories................................................................................................. - O ct., 1918:190
Massachusetts. Hotels and restaurants................................................................................June, 1917: 905-7
Mexico. E l Boleo Mining Co............ ........................................................................................ O ct., 1918: 122
New York. Variations from law allowed during war.................................................... Sept., 1918: 268-70
Oregon........................ ..................................................................................................................N ov., 1918: 175-6




SUBJECT INDEX, J U L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

39

Day of rest—Concluded.
Page.
Peru. Provisions of compulsory-rest law ................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 279
Russia. Code of labor laws......................................................................................................... A pr., 1920: 2l3
Spain. Sunday rest day in printing trades............................................................................. July, 1920: 130
Switzerland. Factory labor. Regulations effective November 15,1917.......................... May, 1018: 78
------Sunday closing law of Geneva, effective September 1,1916......................................... July, 1917: 80-1
United States. Continuous industry. Schedule for 8-hour day and 6-day week. N ov., 1919: 199-202;
Feb., 1920: 118-27
------Government contracts. Clause providing for 6-day week............................................ N ov., 1918: 39
------Iron and steel........................................................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 40
------Railroads. Laws cited......................................................... ............................................. O ct., 1918: 244-5
------------- Statistics re women employees working seven days a week................................. Mar., 1919: 210
------Slaughtering and meat packing. Provisions of Alschuler award....................... . May, 1918: 121,125
------Standards re woman labor.................................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 217
(S e e a lso Collective agreements; Hours; Rest periods; Shifts.)
Days lost. (S e e Absenteeism.)
Deaf. (S e e Handicapped.)
Death benefits. (See Fraternal orders; Labor organizations; Life insurance; Workmen’s
compensation and insurance.)
^
Death rate. (See Vital statistics.)
Debts. (See Budgets; Cost of living compared with wages.)
Decentralization of industry:
Canada. Tendency of large manufacturers to move to rural and semirural districts... Apr., 1918: 284
Germany. Moving factories to the country............................................................................May, 1918: 72-3
United States. Census of manufactures gives evidence of.................................................. May, 1918: 268
(See a lso Company towns; Housing.)
Decisions of courts:
Aliens, deportation of. Membership in unlawful organizations.................................. O ct., 1920: 194-201
Child-labor law (Federal) declared unconstitutional. District court of North Carolina. June, 1919: 264
------United States Supreme Court.............................................................................................. July, 1918: 171
Coal-control law, Indiana...................................................... .............................................. Nov., 1920: 199-200
Collective agreements. Effect of, on individual labor contracts, stevedore and long­
shore industry......................................................................................................................... O ct., 1920: 204-5
------Switzerland. Participation in political strikes not a breach of............................... July, 1920: 172-3
Compulsory labor. W est Virginia. Law declared unconstitutional........................... Sept., 1920: 175-6
Election frauds. Findings in case of Colorado Fuel and Iron Co.....................................Aug., 1916: 35-7
Employment agencies, private. Supreme Court decision on law of State of Washing­
ton and citations.................................................................................................................... Aug., 1917: 152-8
Hours. Adamson law, waiver of, Arkansas case................................................................ O ct., 1920: 203-4
------Adamson 8 -hour law, March 19,1917............................................................................ May, 1917: 677-84
— - Eight-hour law. Alaska.................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 241
------Federal limitation of hours and opinions of judges.................................................... O ct., 1916: 116-33
------Ten-hour law. Mississippi.................................................................................................. O ct., 1918: 240
-------------- Oregon.............................................................June, 1916: 23-8; M ay, 1917: 684-6; O ct., 1918: 240
■----- Woman labor of W iscon sin ............................July, 1916: 136-47; Feb., 1917: 208-9: O ct., 1917: 81-3
Industrial commissions, State. Powers of....................................... July, 1916: 136-47; Feb., 1917: 203-9
Injunctions. Antitrust law ...................................................................................................... July, 1917: 53-7
------ Clayton act........................................................................................................................... O ct., 1920: 205-7
------ In strike for closed shop.......................................................................................... .........; . Aug., 1920: 141
------In strike to secure unionization, clothing industry.................................................... Sent., 1920: 170-3
------In strikes in industries making supplies for United States armed forces.................N ov., 1918: 53-5
Interference with employment................................................................................................ O ct., 1920: 202-3
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations...................................................................................N ov., 1920: 191-3
Labor. Important decisions of 1915 and 1916..................................... July, 1916: 133-5; Dec., 1917: 236-8
Labor contract. Massachusetts. Case Bogni v. Perotti, May 20,1916........................... Aug., 1916: 32-4
------United States. Recent decisions. (Clark.)................................................................May, 1917: 677-97
Labor organizations. Acts of members................................................................................Aug., 1919: 231-4
------Right of city firemen to belong to union....................................................................... N ov., 1920: 196-7
------Right of union to erect houses for discharged members............................................... O ct., 1920: 201-2
Minimupi wage. Various State laws.................................................. Mar., 1918: 144-5; Jan., 1919: 209-12
------Arkansas............................................................................................................................. N ov., 1917: 114-15
------District of Columbia...................................................................................
July, 1920: 131-2
------Massachusetts............................. Sept., 1918: 24; Jan., 1919: 209-10; May, 1919: 201; June, 1919: 207
------Minnesota................................................................................................ O ct., 1918: 184; July, 1920: 132-4
------ Oregon, April 9,1917................................................................................................ May, 1917: 673-7,687-8
------Washington (State)..............................................................................Jan., 1919: 209-10; O ct., 1920: 202
Night work. Women. New York.......................................................................................... May, 1919: 235
Nonunion goods, handling by transportation companies............... Sept., 1920: 173-4; N ov., 1920: 197-9
Payment of wages of seamen.................................................................. Feb., 1919: 253-6; June, 1920: 187-9
Public works. Cases re State regulation, on hours, wages, preference of citizens, union
labor, etc................................................................. r .......................... O ct., 1916: 116-33; Mar., 1917: 455-67
Reduced working capacity resulting from accidents, France.......................................... Sept., 1920: 162-4
Sabotage. Minnesota. . . . ............... ........ ............................................v ___ . . . . . . . . . . July, 1918: 177—i
Wages. Steam and electric railroad employees................................June, 1920: 106-7; Aug., 1920: 142-3
Workmen’s compensation. Various cases.......................................... Dec., 1916: 27-8; A pr., 1917: 549-52
------“ Arising out of and in course of employment.” (Kingston.)..................................... N ov., 1918: 214-26
------Constitutionality. Michigan.............................................................................................. Oct., 1916: 41-2
------------- Tennessee................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 211-12; Nov., 1920: 185-6
------------- Texas.............................................................................................................................June, 1919: 259-61
------------- Washington (State)................................................................................................N ov,, 1918: 243,245
------------- Wyoming..................................................................................................................... N ov., 1918: 253-4
------Diseases. Various cases...................................................................................................... July, 1917: 81-98
------------- Hernia............................................................................................................................ N ov., 1918: 232-7
------------- Massachusetts............................................................................................................... A iig., 1920; 140-1
------Extraterritoriality of law.
California............................................................................ Deb:, 1920: 158-9
------Hazardous occupations, scope of,under law.North Dakota.............................. Feb.# 1920: 209-10
------Interstate transportation......................................................................................................M y , 1917: 103-9
------Lump-sum payments. Nebraska................................................................... ........... .
D o c ., 1920: 160
------ M ed ica l a n a su rgica l a id .............................................................................................................. O ct., 1918: 215-28




40

M O N TH LY LABOR REVIEW,

Decisions of courts—Concluded.
Page.
Workmen’s compensation. Procedure of Colorado Commission..................................... Feb., 1919: 422-3
------Seamen and longshoremen.................................................................................................1917—July 100-3;
Sept. 12-22; Nov. 157; 1918~-Feb. 184-5; 1920—June 171-5; Nov. 4-9
------State funds. Ohio................................................................................. Aug., 1916: 60-1; Apr., 1917: 553
Decorators. (S e e Painting and decorating.)
Deductions from wages:
Clothing industry. New York City. Damage to materials regulated by agreement.. . June, 1919: 16
Domestic service. Berlin, 1919.................................................................................................. July, 1919: 169
Homework. Argentina. In case of lost or spoiled material............................................. June, 1919: 265
Labor camps. Ohio..................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 282
Stove industry. United States. Discounts for imperfect work........................ May, 1918: 169-70,173-4
Deeds, F . E . Epidemic of boils in a steel plant....................................................................... Sept., 1919: 296-8
Defense of the Realm A ct. Great Britain. (S e e Laws and legislation: Great Britain.)
Delevingne, M. Report on child labor......................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 17-20
Delinquency:
In rural New York. (Claghorn.^........................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 196-8
Negroes. Pittsburgh. Study oi migrants, 1917.................................................................... Feb., 1918: 157
Study of Manhattan borough.................................................................................................. Feb., 1918: 151-4
Truancy and irregular school attendance.............................................................................. May, 1917: 772-9
Demobilization:
Austria. Trade-union plans............................... ............................................................... z ... May, 1918: 73-4
Belgium. Law providing for reemployment of demobilized soldiers........... ................ Feb., 1920: 163-4
Canada. Employment service........................... ................................................................... Feb., 1919: 133-7
France. , Government plans.................................................................................................... July, 1919: 142-5
------Laws for maintenance of industrial activity....................................................................July, 1919: 232-4
Germany. Government plans..................................................................... .............................Jan., 1919: 74-6
------ National office for economic demobilization................................................................ May, 1919: 213-15
Great Britain. By service and by industrial group, to June 26,1919...........................Sept., 1919: 135-6
------ Government p la n ......................................... Jan., 1919: 55-66; Feb., 1919: 88-90; May, 1919: 85-100
------ Labor resettlement committee.................................................................................. - ____May, 1918: 64-8
------ Plans of British Labor Party............................................................................................. A pr., 1918: 67-70
------ Reabsorption of labor and unemployment.............................. Sept., 1919: 135-61; Apr., 1920: 155-74
------ Resolutions re relation of capital and labor................................................................... Mar., 1917: 479-80
----- - Statistics................................................................................................................................. May, 1919: 89-90
------ Work of port labor committees in transport labor problems.................................... . June, 1919: 32-7
United States. Factors in problem........................................................................................Jan., 1919: 59-61
------Plans and activities of Federal Employment Service................................................. Jan., 1919: 119-25;
Feb., 1919: 117-23; Apr., 1919: 143
------Plans of organized labor..................................................................... Jan., 1919: 50,221; Mar., 1919: 71-2
------Recommendations of California Joint Legislative Committee on unemployment,
1919................................................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 146
Democratic control. (S e e Employees' representation.)
Demos. Meaning of reconstruction............................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 74-5
Denatured alcohol. (S ee Alcohol, denatured.)
Denmark:
Arbejderforsikrings-Raadet. Report on industrially disabled........................................ Oct., 1918: 85-90
Statens Statistiske bureau. Yearbook, 1917 Trade-union statistics............................ May, 1918: 223-4
(S e e Sweden; a h o sp ecific subjects.)
Dennison Mfg. Co.:
Activities of employment management department......................................................N ov., 1918: 284,286
Job analysis.....................................................................................................................................
July. 1916: 65
Reducing turnover......................................................................................July, 1916: 69; N ov., 1918: 284,286
Densmore, J. B . Statement re labor shortage............................................................................... Mar., 1918: 78
Dental clinics. (S e e Medical and hospital service: Clinics.)
Department stores. (S e e Stores.)
Departmental committees of Great Britain. (S e e Great Britain.)
Departments, labor. (S e e Directories; Labor boards, commissions, etc.; also u n d er States
a n d co u n tries.)

Dependency:
Remittances of Italian immigrants to dependents in Ita ly................................................. N ov., 1920: 228
District of Columbia. Wage-earning women, by income group................................. Jan., 1918: 5-6,9-10
------Wage-earning women. Expenditures for dependents................................................... Mar., 1918: 13
France. Allowances to civil employees according to number of dependents......... .
Jan., 1918: 107-8
Kansas. Laundries. Per cent of women workers having dependents............................ Feb., 1918: 143
------ Mercantile industry. Per cent of women workers self-supporting...............
Feb., 1918: 143
Massachusetts. Hotels, restaurants, etc. Per cent of workers self-supporting............. Oct., 1918: 187
------Number 65 years or over receiving aid, 1914-15............................................................... Mar., 1917: 431
Oregon. Women supporting dependents, various industries............................................ Dec., 1920: 125
Dependent children. (S e e Mothers' pensions.)
Dependents of soldiers. (S e e Soldiers and sailors; Widows' and orphans' pensions.)
Deportations:
Bisbee, A riz.................................................................................................................................... June, 1918: 57
Warren district, Arizona. July, 1917..................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 13-17
Depression. (S e e Economic conditions.)
Dermatitis. (S e e Diseases.)
Dermatosis. (S e e Diseases: Dermatitis.)
Derrien's reaction in cases of dinitrophenol poisoning................................................. .............Sept., 1918: 246-8
Descriptions of occupations. (S e e Classification and description of occupations.)
Detective agencies. (S e e Company police; Strike breaking.)
Detroit Steel Products Co. Decision of court in compensation case........................................ Oct., 1918: 222
Detroit United Railway. Decision of court in compensation case........................ ................. Oct., 1918: 220
DeutschjJ. Demobilization in Austria......................................................................................... May, 1918: 73-4
Devine, E . T . Percentage of accident cases in which no recovery obtained, New York. . . Mar., 1919: 242
Devon and Cornwall Association for Industrial and Commercial Reconstruction. Report. Oct., 1918: 51-4
Diamond cutting and polishing:
England (Brighton). Enterprise to employ disabled men and establish new industry. Aug., 1918: 36
France. Wages decreased, 1911 to 1916.................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 103
Netherlands. Unemployment............................................Jan., 1917: 148; Oct., 1917: 104; July, 1918: 81




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY,

1915,

TO DECEMBER,

1920,

41

Dietary studies:
Page.
Analysis and cost of ready-to-serve foods............................................................................... N ov., 1916: 46-8
Analysis of dietaries, 1917. (Various cities.)........................................................................ Aug., 1919: 20-5
Atwater scale of basal food requirements. Referred to ....................................................... Feb., 1919: 224
Cost of adequate dietaries............................................................................ N ov., 1917: 2-3; Aug., 1919: 8-11
Cost of dietaries, 1907 and 1916, based on F. P. Underhill’s standard...............................
Jan., 1919: 9
Effects of underfeeding on public health, Austria...............................................................Dec., 1918: 195-6
Food consumed—prewar and July, 1918. Germany...........................................................N ov., 1918: 9-10
Food requirements, authorities cited........................! ................................ N ov., 1917: 2-4; Aug., 1918: 149
Food requirements, minimum quantity, family of five............................................... ..
June, 1920: 1-6
Food requirements of men, women, and children, comparison of........... ............... ....... 1917—Jan. 56-7;
Oct. 6; N ov. 2-3; Dec. 6-7; 1919—Feb. 224; May 148,172; July 4-5
Food requirements^ Study of munition workers, Great Britain.................................... Jan., 1917: 56-7;
Sept:, 1918: 46-7; Jan., 1920: 225-6
Nutriments and energy contained in the food of workmen in various countries....... . Aug., 1915: 26-8
Relation of diet to pellagra, cotton-mill villages.................................................................. Feb., 1919: 221-3
Study of the Bureau of Labor Statistics................................................................................. Dec., 1917: 1-18
W ar nutrition and public health in Germany................................................................... Aug., 1918: 148-51
W hat is the American standard of living (Meeker.)........................................................... July, 1919: 3-5
Diethylanilin poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dilution of labor:
Great Britain. A cause of unrest..............................................................................................
Jan., 1918: 67
------Dilution of labor bulletin, Ministry of Munitions........................................................... Sept., 1918: 216
— Effects of, in a shell factory........................................................... Mar., 1918: 79-81; O ct., 1919: 217-19
------ Work of Ministry of National Service............................................................................... Oct., 1918: 37-9
(S e e also Treasury agreement; Woman labor: Replacement and substitution.)
Dimethyl sulphate poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dimethylanilin poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dingley Act of 1884 (Seamen). Referred to .................................................................................. Feb., 1919: 253
Dinitrobenzene poisoning. ( S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dinitrochlorbenzene. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dinitrophenol poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dinitrotoluene poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Dinitrotoluol poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: Dinitrotoluene.)
Director General of Railroads. (S e e United States: Railroad Administration.)
Directories:
Employers. United States. Employers having some fdrm of disability benefit
fu n d .........................................................................................................................................Dec., 1916: 125-34
------------- Employers having welfare work in plants, by States....................................... Feb., 1917: 315-34
Employment offices. United States. July 31,1917........................................................... Sept., 1917: 80-2
Labor officials. Canada................................................... July. 1915: 89; N ov., 1915: 111; Sept., 1916: 127;
Sept., 1917: 183-4; Dec., 1918: 390-2; Dec., 1919: 393-5; July, 1920: 198-201
------ Foreign countries.........July, 1915: 89-90; N ov., 1915: 111-12; Sept., 1916: 127-8; Sept., 1917: 185-6
------Great Britain. Ministry of Labor............... .................................................................. July, 1920: 176-7
------United States.................................................July, 1915: 83-9; N ov., 1915: 104-11; Sept., 1916: 116-26;
Sept., 1917: 169-83; Dec., 1918: 375-90; Dec., 1919: 377-93; July, 1920: 181-98
“ Dirty iron,” stove industry. Defined................. ......................................................................... May, 1918: 174
Disability. (S e e Accident statistics; Sickness statistics; Workmen’s compensation and
insurance: Permanent disability.)
Disability benefits and funds. (S e e Accident insurance; Establishment funds; Fraternal
orders; Health insurance; Labor organizations; Workmen’ s compensation and insur­
ance: Permanent disability.)
Disability pensions. (S e e Old age and invalidity.)
Disabled. (S e e Handicapped; Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
Disabled Men (Facilities for Employment) Act, 1919. Great Britain..................................... Mar., 1920: 201
Discharge or quit:
Code of labor laws of Soviet Russia................................................................ Mar., 1919: 15; Apr., 1920: 212
Discharge books, Lake Carriers’ Association....................................... Mar., 1918: 170-1; Apr., 1918: 258-0
Domestic service code, Bavaria.................................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 131
Domestic service law, Austria.................................................................................................... June, 1920: 192
Tramways, France..................................................................*....................................................
Apr., 1920: 67
(S e e also Collective agreements; Dismissal wage: Employment management.)
Discrimination against union employees. (S e e Labor organizations.)
Diseases, general:
Compensation for occupational diseases, United States and foreign countries. (Hookstadt)
Apr., 1919: 200—
9
Definitions of “ occupational diseases” .......................................................July, 1917: 82-3; June, 19*18: 220
Disease as a compensable injury............................................................................................. July, 1917: 81-93
List of occupational diseases compensated in various States............................................ Apr., 1919: 202-4
Occupational disease as an industrial hazard. (Meeker.)................................................... Sept., 1919: 2-4
Occupational diseases. (Kober.)...............................................................................................Jan., 1917: 92-4
Occupational diseases in hospitals. (Edsall.)....................................................................Dec., 1917: 169-85
Reports and legislation. Great Britain........June. 1916: 83-8; June, 1917: 876-7; Sept., 1918: 41,43.48
------------- Laws and amendments re compensation for occupational diseases.............. N ov., 1917: 164-5;
Deo., 1918: 328-8; Apr., 1919: 205-7
------------- Statistics, 1917,1918..................................................................... Mar., 1918: 198; Dec., 1919: 315-17
------Massachusetts. Statistics on occupational diseases............................................. .
F eb., 1917: 280-3
Mar., 1917: 416-17; Dec., 1917: 202-4; A pr., 1918: 291; Apr.) 1919: 204-5
------New Jersey. Statistics on industrial diseases............................................................N ov., 1916: 99-100
------Ohio, infections following accidents.......................................................................... Sept., 1917: 109-10
------Pennsylvania. Survey of occupational diseases........................................................ July, 1919: 170-80
------United States. Proposed draft of uniform occupational diseases act...................June, 1918: 219-21
Resolutions re industrial disease problem......................................................................... May, 1918: 251-2
Diseases, specified:
Anemia, aplastic. From TN T poisoning................................................................................ May, 1918: 239
Anemia, spastjc. Hands of stonecutters.............................................................................. Apr., 1918: 25-33
Anthrax. An occupational disease. (Rand.)___ July, 1916: 1-5; Apr., 1917: 536-8; N ov., 1920: 183-4
------Preventive measures........................................Aug., 1918: 205-8; June, 1919: 243-5; July, 1919: 180-4
------Recommendation of International Labor Conference...................... Jan., 1920: 21-2; Feb., 1920: 30




42

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Diseases specified—Continued.
Page.
Anthrax. Argentina.................................................................................................................. May, 1919: 278
------Germany................................................................................................................................ Aug., 1915: 28-9
------Great Britain...........................................................................................................................
1916—July 3;
1917—July 127-8; 1918-Mar. 198; Aug. 205-8; 1919— Feb. 233; June 243-5; Dec. 315
------London, 1915...................................................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 108-10
------Massachusetts........................................................................ „ .............................................. Dec., 1917: 204
------New York.............................................................................................. Jan., 1917: 98-102; Apr., 1919: 203
------Pennsylvania................................................................ Mar., 1919: 261; Apr., 1919: 203; July, 1919: 178
------United States. Regulations............................................................................................. July, 1919: 180-4
Blindness. From industrial use of wood alcohol............................................................... Mar., 1918: 195-8
Bubonic plague. Argentina....................................................................................................... May, 1919: 278
Caisson disease. Compensable under Queensland law......... .............................................. May, 1919: 280
Cancer. Anilin dye industry................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 147-8
Consumption. (S e e Diseases, specified: Tuberculosis.)
Copper itch. Queensland............................................................................................................ May, 1919: 280
Dermatitis. Compensable in Pennsylvania........................................................................... Apr., 1919: 203
------Compensable in Queensland................................................................................................ May, 1919: 280
------ Cutting compounds as a cause of. (Yates.).................................................................. Jan., 1919: 273-7
------Leather trade...................................................... ................................................................ Apr., 1920: 184-5
------Survey of TNT plants. (Hamilton.)...................................................................... Jan., 1919: 264,267-8
------Survey to be made by special committee....................................................................... Feb., 1920: 206-8
Dysentery. Germany. From food substitutes.................................................................... Jan., 1918: 94-5
Erysipelas. Compensated in Connecticut............................................................................... Apr., 1919: 203
Eyestrain.......................................................................................................................................July, 19520: 160-2
------Mines....................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 43-6
—— Munitions........................................................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 538-40
------Pea picking............................................................................................................................. July, 1918: 114
-— References.......................................................................................................................... Aug., 1917: 186-91
Frostbite. Re workmen’s compensation.................................................................. ........Nov., 1918: 223-4
Heat stroke. Re workmen’s compensation............................................................................Nov., 1918: 223
Hernia. In industry.................................................................................. Feb., 1917: 272; Sept., 1919: 282-6
------Laundries. New York.......................................................................................................... Aug., 1918:203
------Occupations of disabled......................................................................................................... Apr., 1920:153
------ Preexisting disease as a cause of......................................................................................Nov., 1918: 232-7
------Re workmen’s compensation............. Nov., 1918: 215,227-40; Mar., 1919: 249-50; June, 1919: 246-7
------Woman labor..........................................................................................................................
May, 1919:238
Hookworm. Geographical extent in mines......................................................................... July, 1918: 190-2
Housemaid’s knee. Re workmen’s compensation................................................................ Apr., 1919: 203
Hunger typhus. Bohemia................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 169,195
Infections. Accidents and infections in Ohio.................................................................. Sept., 1917: 109-10
------ Cutting compounds. (Yates.).....................................................................................
Jan., 1919: 273-7
------ Epidemic of noils in a steel plant................................................................................... Sept.r 1919: 296-8
------ Upper extremities. (Bendixen.)..................................................................................Nov., 1.919: 327-35
------ Wound treatment with Carrel-Dakinsolution.................................................Nov., 1917: 173-8; 181-2
Influenza-pneumonia. (Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.)................................................Jan., 1920: 223-4
Jaundice. (S e e Diseases, specified: Toxic jaundice.)
Kidney diseases. In painting trade, from turpentine.......................................................... July, 1918: 186
Liver diseases. In painting trade, from turpentine.............................................................. July, 1918: 186
Locomotor ataxia.......................................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 153
Lumbago. Re workmen’s coiripensation................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 215
Lung affections. Germany. 1917. Statistics for Berlin.......................................................
Jan., 1918: 95
Miners’ itch. Re workmen’s compensation........................................................................... May, 1919: 280
Nephritis. Compensated in Indiana........................................................................................ Apr., 1919: 203
Neuritis. Compensated in Illinois............................................................................................ Apr., 1919: 203
Nystagmus. Compensable, Germany.................................................................................. Mar., 1918: 193-4
------ Extent in England and Germany..................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 43-50
Pellagra......................................................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 221-3
Phthisis. Brickmaking. (British report.)............................................................................. Apr., 1918: 293
— — Causes and prevention. Great Britain.(Moore.)........................................................ Feb., 1919: 234-7
------ Miners’ phthisis, Witwatersfand, Transvaal.................................................................... Jan., 1917: 102-5
------ Statistics for Berlin, 1917............................................................ .........................................
Jan., 1918: 95
Pleurisy. Compensated in New York..................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 203
Pneumonia* Germany. Statistics for Berlin, 1917.................. ...........................................
Jan., 1918:95
Potts disease........................ .......................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 152
Rheumatism. Prevention of.................................. .................................................................. Sept., 1918: 49
------ Re workmen’s compensation.............................................................................................. June, 1918: 221
Silicosis. Pottery trade. Great Britain................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 169
Skin diseases. (S e e Diseases, specified: Dermatitis.)
Tonsilitis. Re workmen’s compensation................................................................................ June, 1918; 221
Toxic jaundice. Aeroplane* industry..Nov., 1916:106-7; Jan., 1917:97; Oct., 1917:19; Feb., 1918:38,48,59
------ Extent in Great Britain, 1917 and 1918............................................................................... Feb.,1919: 233
— Munitions workers..........Aug., 1917: 63-74; Feb., 1918: 20; May, 1918: 238-50; Sept., 1918: 237-40
------ TNT plants. (Hamilton.)..................................................................................................Jan., 1919: 266-7
Tuberculosis. And mortality............................... Feb., 1917: 269-70; June, 1917: 989-90; July, 1917: 2-4
------ And stillbirths.......................................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 195
------ And workingmen’s organizations................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 107-11
------ Clothing workers. Home opened by New York City unions........................................
Jan.,1917: 96
------Iron and steel. Italy............................................................................................................... Apr.,1916: 84
------ Laundries. New York......................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 203
------ Miners. Southwestern Missouri.................................................*....................................Aug., 1917: 74-6
------ — Transvaal......................................................................................................................Jan., 1917:102-5
------Printers...................................................................... .............................. Jan., 1917: 87-91; July, 1919: 171
------ Soldiers and sailors...................................................................................................................
Oct.,1918: 79
—:— Bohemia.................................................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 195
------ Cincinnati, Ohio............................................................... .................................................July, 1916: 98-100
------ Great Britain. (Moore.).................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 234-7
— Massachusetts. Tenement dwellers................................................................................ Jan., 1917: 124-5
------New York. Compensated for.............................................................................................. Apr.,1919: 203




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

48

Diseases, specified—Concluded.
Page.
Typhoid fever. Compensated in Wisconsin........................................................................... Apr., 1919: 200
Venereal diseases............................................................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 278
Diseases, by industry:
Aeroplane industry. (S e e Diseases, specified: Toxic jaundice.)
Brickmaking. Phthisis. Great Britain................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 298
Button industry................................... ......................................................................... .............. Sept., 1920: 147
Chemical industry...................................................................................... .............................. Nov.,,1916: 100-6
• Cloth-sponging industry............................................... ........................................................... Feb., 1919: 227-8
Clothing workers. New York City......................................................................................... Mar., 1916: 73-5
Coalmines. ( S e e Diseases, by industry: Mining.)
Cotton manufacturing. Massachusetts.............................................................................. Nov., 1916: 112-18
------ (S e e also Diseases,specified: Pellagra.)
Dye industry, anilin. (S e e Diseases, specified: Cancer.)
Hat industry. New York City. Among fur and hatters1fur workers.......................... Dec., 1915: 27-83
Iron and steel workers. Epidemic of bolls in a steel plant............................................ Sept., 1919: 296-8
------Statistics, 1894 to 1913, Italy............................................................................................... Apr., 1916:82-4
Laundries. New York City................................................................................................Aug., 1918: 203,204
Leather trade. (S e e Diseases, specified: Anthrax; Dermatitis.)
Mining.............. . . ..................... .......................................................... ..................................... 1916-Aug. 43-50;
1917—Jan. 102-5; Aug. 74-6; 1918—Mar. 193-4; July 190-2; 1919—July 177; Sept. 291-4
Munitions...................................................................................................... June, 1916: 83-8; Sept., 1918: 48-0
------ (S e e also Diseases, specified: Toxic jaundice.)
,
Painters. Survey. (Harris).................................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 228-9
Printing. (S e e Diseases, specified: Tuberculosis.)
Stonecutting............................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 25-83
Tanneries. (S e e Diseases, specified: Anthrax; Dermatitis.)
War industries. Germany.................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 113-14
Wood industries. Germany. Wainscoting with moa wood.......................................... Dec., 1917: 204-5
(S e e also Dangerous and injurious occupations: Medical and hospital service; Physical
examination of employees; Poisons and poisoning; Sickness statistics; Workmen's
compensation and insurance: Diseases.)
Dismissal wage:
Legal dismissal wage. (Boss)................................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 15-19
War industries. Italy. Workers on railroads discharged before January 31,1919........ Apr., 1919: 226
(S e e also Unemployment insurance.)
Dispensary, medical. (S e e Medical and hospital service.)
Disputes. (S e e Conciliation and arbitration; Strikes and lockouts.)
Disputes, jurisdictional. (S e e Jurisdictional disputes.)
Disputes, methods of adjusting. (S e e Conciliation and arbitration.)
Distribution of labor. (S e e Employment agencies.)
Distributive cooperation. (S e e Cooperation.)
District of Columbia:
Commission to control rents. Act relating to rents........................................ ............... Nov., 1919: 159-65
Committee on supply of food* Report, 1917.......................................... .............................June, 1917: 957-9
Food Administration. Activities.......................................................Nov., 1918: 116-17; Dec., 1918: 162-4
Minimum wage board. Creation and personnel.................................. Oct., 1918: 177-81; May, 1919: 216
------Order No. 1-2, June 13,1919............................................................... ..............................July, 1919: 165-7
------Order No. 3, August 29,1919, and supplement.......................... Oct., 1919: 163-4; Nov., 1919: 217-18
------Order No. 4, March 26,1920................................................................................................. June, 1920: 116
------Report, 1919........................................................................................................................Apr., 1920: 112-15
------Wages of women and minors in the mercantile industry. June, 1919: 191-205; Aug., 1919: 197^200
------ Wages of women employed as cleaners, maids, and elevator operators, AprilMav, 1920........................ ................................. ............. ...................................................... Nov., 1920: 102-8
------Wages of women in hotels, restaurants, etc.................................. Jan., 1920: 144-8; Mar., 1920: 132-6
(S e e also sp ecific subjects.)

Dittmer, E. Higher basic wages or high cost of living bonuses.......................................... Apr., 1918: 159-62
Dock Adjustment Commission, United States. (S e e United States: National Dock
Adjustment Commission.)
Dock Industrial Council, United States. (S e e United States: National Dock Industrial
Council.)
Docks and harbors:
Canada. Wages and hours, 1919.................................................................Aug., 1919: 186; Sept., 1919: 226
France. Women as watchmen of ships, charwomen, and sack repairers....................... Sept., 1918: 229
Great Britain. Casual labor problems................... ; ........................................................... Nov., 1916: 131-4
------Court of inquiry. Report, March 31,1920....................................... May, 1920: 54-62; June, 1920: 114
------Hours and wages, 44-hour week adopted during war.................................................... July, 1919:157
------Hours and wages for timber-trade workers, atLiverpool docks..................................... Nov., 1919: 207
------Organizations, decasualization schemes, etc., of waterside workers. (Squires). June, 1919: 18-37
------Recommendations of National Transport Workers' Federation re working condi­
tions......................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 113-14
------Triple Alliance. Threatened strike, 1919.................................................................... June, 1919: 169-77
------Wage Agreement, April. 1920.............................................................................................. June, 1920: 114
------Wages on works controlled by railroads. (Agreement of August 4, 1920)................ Nov., 1920: 96
------(England). Strikes in 1889. Referred to...........................................................................Nov., 1918: 260
------(Scotland). Wages, 1918....................................................................................................... July, 1918:109
Honolulu. Wages, 1915. Longshoremen............................................................................... Feb., 1917: 300
New York Harbor. Agreement between United States Shipping Board and em­
ployees, October 15,1917.......................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 2-3
------Agreement re wages, hours, and working conditions, effective September 1,1915. Oct., 1915: 34-6
------Associations of boat owners............................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 45-50
------Children on New York Harbor boats................................................................................
July, 1918: 20
- — Irregularity of employment. Report on, October, 1916........................................... Feb., 1917: 290-4
------Labor organizations, Fort of New York. History, activities, etc.................. Aug., 1918: 45-7,50-62
------New York Harbor Board. Wage adjustment, strike settlement, etc.................... Sept., 1918: 1-26;
Feb., 1919: 12-27
------Overtime rates, longshoremen........................................................................................ Mar., 1920: 115-16
------Strikes................................................................................................................. 1918—July 206; Aug. 45-62;
1919—Feb. 12-27; Apr. 246-9; Aug. 173-85; Dec. 95-115




44

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW.

Docks and harbors—Concluded.
Page.
New York harbor. Survey of conditions, and recommendations for regularization
of employment......................................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 290-4
------ Survey of working conditions in longshore industry. (Barnes)................................. May, 1916: 1-7
------Wage adjustments, various agencies...........Sept., 1918: 1-26; Feb., 1919: 12-27; Aug., 1919: 173-85
------Wage increases, 1914 to 1920............................................................... May, 1919: 210-12; Oct., 1920: 126
------Wages...................... .......................................................... Sept., 1918: 6,14-15,24-6; Dec., 1919: 95-115
------Wages, hours, and working conditions. (Squires)....................................................... July, 1918: 1-21
Newr Zealand. Wages, 1913 to 1920. Waterside workers..........................July, 1920: 115; Dec., 1920: 33
Norway. Wages, 1895to 1915. (Stevedores)...................... ........................................... .
Nov., 1917: 113
United States. Agreements to govern industrial relations (tentative draft). Lock
and harbor marine sections.................................................................................................. July, 1919: 20-2
------Commission for adjusting disputes in loading and unloading ships, personnel and
function of................................................................................................ , ................................
Oct., 1917: 29
------ Conference,joint shipping industrial. June 4 to 6,1919............................................ July, 1919: 14-23
------Decision of Louisiana court as to effect of collective agreements on individual labor
contracts..................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 204-5
------Decision of Supreme Court re compensation on longshore work. (Jenson vs.
Southern Pacific)...................................................................................................................... July, 1917: 100-9
------ Employers7organizations, New York.History, activities, etc................................... Aug., 1918: 45-50
------ Employment in longshore work. (Squires)................................................................... Dec., 1919: 96-7
------ Freight handling.Passenger-freight steamers,
Great Lakes................................
Apr.,1918:33-40
------National Adjustment Commission. Activities and scope........................................... Sept., 1920: 202
------Shipping Board and longshore industry........................................................................... Sept., 1920: 202
------Wage increases, 1919 over 1914........................................................................................ May, 1919: 210-12
------Wage rates, hourly, 1914 to 1918, and per cent of increase of longshore labor........... June, 1919: 168
------Wage scale for Gulf district. November 11,1918...................................................... Feb., 1919: 149-50
------Wage scales of freight handlers......................................................... Sept., 1918: 159; Nov., 1918: 151-2
------Wages. United States. Various cities........... 1918—Feb. 125,131; Mar. 121,127; Apr. 165,171,177;
June 129 135,141; Sept. 163,169,175,181; Dec. 263, 269,275,281,287,293,299,305
Washington (State). Extent o f industrial and health hazards, and compensation
statistics, 1915.............................................................................................................................. Mar., 1917: 478
(S e e also Dredge and tugboat employees; Freight handling; Seamen.)
Doctors. (S e e Hygiene; American Association of Industrial Physicians and Surgeons;
Conference Board of Physicians in Industrial Practice; Medical and hospital service;
Physical examination of employees.)
Dodge Sales and Manufacturing Co., Mishawaka, Ind. Employees7benefit associations.
(Chandler)......................................................................................................................................... June,1917: 898-9
Doehler Die Casting Co., Brooklyn, New York. Dividend to employees..............................
N ov., 1918: 1
Domestic and personal service:
Australia. Opportunities for employment of immigrants as domestic servants............ Aug., 1929: 98
Austria. Protective law............................................................................................................ June, 1920: 191-3
Bavaria. Wages and hours...................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 131-2
British Columbia. Minimum wage order effective September 15,1919.......................... Dec., 1919: 264-5
District of Columbia. Wages andhours of women—cleaners, maids, and elevator oper­
ators. (Mortenson).................................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 102-8
Germany. Model contract drawn up by joint board, Berlin, 1919.....................................July, 1919: 168-9
Great Britain. Extent of movement from domestic service and dressmaking............... Aug., 1918: 179
------Survey and recommendations re training, distribution, and organization............ June, 1919: 226-9
------Transfer to war industries................................................................................................. Apr.,
1918:206-17
------Wages and hours................................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 130
------Wages, hours, and unemployment.................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 191-5
Oregon. Minimum-wage order................................................................ Nov., 1918: 175; Dec., 1919: 263-4
Salvador. Decree for formal contract for protection of servants leaving the country.. Dec., 1920: 165
Uni,ted States. Excluded almost entirely from benefits under compensation laws___ 1917—Apr. 554;
1918—Mar. 91; June 192; Nov. 248-9; Dee. 318
------Moral hazards to minor messengers. (Goldmark)..........................................................Jan., 1918: 61-2
------Plans for improvement...................................................................................................... May,
1920:112-16
------Survey: Advantages and disadvantages as wage-earning occupations..................... Mar.,1917: 352-8
------Survey: Efforts to standardize the working day.
(Waggaman)...........................Aug.,
1919:206-13
------Wages. (Cooks).................................................... 1918—Feb. 125,131; Mar. 121,127; Apr. 165,171,177;
June 129,135,141; Sept. 163,169,175,181; Dec. 263,269,275,281,287,293,299,305
------Wages. (House servants)...................................1918—Feb. 126,132; Mar. 122,128; Apr. 166,172,178;
June 130,136,142; Sept. 164,170,176,182; Dec. 264,270,276,282,288,294,300,306
(S e e also Barbers and hairdressers; Elevator operators; Hotels, restaurants, etc.)
Domestic science:
Classes for instruction in cookery, laundry work, housewifery, etc., provided under
British act, 1918..........................................................................................................................
Dec., 1918: 44
Cooking classes for employees. (Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn.)....................................... Apr., 1918: 21-2
Enrollment for home economics under Federal Vocational Educational Act, various
States, 1917-18..........................................................................................Jan., 1919: 77-8; July, 1919: 129-30
Opportunities for women, courses of instruction, etc......................................................... Apr., 1917: 570-2
Wages. United States. Survey, 1914.................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 570-2
Domestic system. (See Home work.)
Dope poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Double time. (S e e Overtime.)
Douglas, Dorothy W . American minimum-wage laws at work............................................... Jan., 1920: 180
Downey? E. H .:
Making rates for workmen's compensation insurance........................................................ Apr., 1918: 271-4
Ohio State insurance fund, 1919............................................................................................. Oct., 1919: 246-64
Draftsmen. Salaries. United States Navy Department, 1893 to 1919.. Dec., 1918: 203-4; June, 1920: 24,29
Drake, Barbara. Women in British engineering trades after the war............................... June, 1918: 156-60
Dredge and tugboat employees:
Great Lakes. Wage award of National Adjustment Commission, April 1,1919.........June, 1919: 164-7
(S e e also Docks and harbors; Seamen.)
Dress and waist industry. (S e e Clothing industries, women's.)
Dress and Waist Makers7 Union, Boston. Organization activities....................................
Apr., 1918: 233
Dress and Waist Manufacturers Association:
Boston. Membership activities.............................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 237
New York City. Party to agreement of April 9,1919. (Text in full)........ .................. June, 1919: 1-13




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY ) 1915) TO DECEMBER, 1920,

45

Dress and Waist Manufacturers Association—Concluded.
New York City. Party to protocol of peace, effective January, 1917............................. Mar., 1917: 366
Philadelphia. Trade agreement..........................................................................................Jan., 1918: 28,36-9
Dresser, F. F. Objections to compulsory health insurance.................................................. Apr., 1917: 517-18
Dressmaking. (See Needle trades.)
Drinker, C. K . Manganese poisomng......................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 238-40
Drivers. (S e e Teamsters, chauffeurs, etc.)
Drury, H .B . Marine and dock labor......................................................................................... May, 1919: 209-12
Dry cleaning. (S e e Cleaning and dyeing.)
Drygoods. Retail prices. United States. 1917—Dec. 88-90; 1918—July 68-70; Dec. 101-4; 1919—July 52-6;
Oct. 68-74; Dec. 182-7; 1926—Apr. 77-82; July 76-82; Oct. 56-9; Dec. 54-60
Dry goods stores. (S e e Stores.)
Dublin, L. I.:
Causes of death, by occupation, 1911 to 1913..................................................................... June, 1917: 989-991
Increase in industrial insurance accident mortality, 1916 over 1915................................ July, 1917: 125-6
Influenza-pneumonia................. ............................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 223-4
“ Dull iron,” stove industry. Defined......... ............................................................................... May, 1918: 173-4
Durham land settlement. California............................................... ........................................... Oct., 1919: 280-2
Dusts:
Brickmaking. Effects of inhalation of silica dust. Great Britain................................ Apr., 1918: 292-6
Classification of.......................................................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 105-6
Cottrell system of removing................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 229-30
Diseases. Compensable occupation diseases under Argentine workmen's compensa­
tion law...................................... ................................................................................................ May, 1919: 278
------Compensated under Michigan law............ . ...................................................................... Apr., 1919: 203
------Mortality from diseases of the lungs........................................; .................................... Feb., 1917: 269-70
Hazards in manufacture of abrasives, Niagara Falls, N . Y ..............Jan., 1919: 235-7; Mar., 1920: 162-3
Hazards in New Jersey industries and methods of combating them................................. Mar., 1917: 435
Hoods for removing................................................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 105-9
Mines. Operations causing dust, and methods of prevention..........................................Jan., 1917: 104-5
Munitions. France, regulations of ministry, July 1,1917...................................................
Jan., 1918: 71
Pearl-button industry. Survey of health hazards............................................................. Sept., 1920: 146-7
Respirators...................................................................................................................................... June, 1919: 241
Sana blasting. Protective apparatus. (United States Public Health Service)........May, 1920: 154r-7
Standardization of installations for the removal of dusts and fumes.............................. Mar., 1917: 434-6
Steel industry. Recommendations for prevention. (United States Bureau of Mines). Aug., 1917: 85-6
(S e e also Gases and fumes; Sanitation and working conditions.)
Dutch trade-unions, federation of. (S e e Federation of Dutch Trade-Unions.)
Dwellings. (S e e Housing.)
Dye industry:
Anilin. Dye workers'cancer................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 147-8
------Europe. Hygienic control of. (Hamilton).................................................................... Dec., 1919: 1-21
------United States. Poisoning. (Hamilton)................................................................... Feb., 1919: 199-215
------------- Poisons in manufacture................................................................................................
June, 1916: 2
Benzene and anilin poisoning. (Newton)................................................ ......................... June, 1920: 169-70
Germany. Medical statistical investigation of a large dye factory..... ............................Aug., 1915: 25-6
{ S e e also Poisons and poisoning.)
Dyeing. (See Cleaning and dyeing.)
Dysentery. (See Diseases, specified.)
E.
Earnings. (S e e Wages.)
Earthenware. (See Pottery industry.)
Eastlack, J. E . Wages in the building trades in British cities, 1914 to 1918.................... June, 1919: 177-80
Easton, W . H . Electrostatic dust precipitation................................... ................................. Feb., 1919: 229-30
Economic Association, American, (See American Economic Association.)
Economic conditions:
Austria. Price situation.............................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 77
------Return to peace basis....................................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 207-8
France. After the war............................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 82-8
Germany. Price situation.......................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 76
------Wage increases and economic condition of workers...........................................-..........Jan., 1920: 178-9
Rumania. Machinery and supplies provided by Government decrees......................... Oct., 1920: 231-2
Spain. Economic development since 1900.................... ..................................................... Mar., 1919: 59-62
(S e e also Cost of living; Prices; Wages.)
Economic councils:
Germany. Creation, organization, and function of Provisional National Economic
Council...................................................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 204-7
------Program of agricultural council for 1920-21..................................................................... Aug., 1920: 45-6
“ Economic rent” .................*....................................................................... *................................. June, 1918: 148-9
Edsall, D. L .:
Industrial clinics in general hospitals..................................................................... ............... Jan., 1920: 224-5
Manganese poisoning......................................................... ..................................................... Oct., 1919: 238-40
Occupational diseases in hospitals........................................................................................ Dec., 1917: 169-89
Education:
France. Rights of Italian workers under Franco-Italian treaty........................................ Feb., 1920: 52
Germany. Demands of Central Office for Juvenile Workers.......................................... Nbv., 1919: 250-1
Great Britain. Education act, 1918.........................................................................................Dec., 1918: 42-6
------ Plans of industrial councils.................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 134
------Requirements for entrance to consular service................................................................ Aug., 1920: 84
Italy. Requirements of children for admission into industry.......................................Nov., 1917: 215-17
------Rights of French workers under Franco-Italian treaty.................................................
Feb., 1920: 52
Russia. Educational activities of cooperative societies..................................................... June, 1920: 127-9
United States. Courses for enlisted men.............................................Aug., 1920: 91-2; Nov., 1920: 134-7
------Courses in cooperation...................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 119-20
------Courses in industrial medicine........................................................................................ May. 1920: 143-52
------ Educational work of the Government...............................................................................July, 1920: 46-7
------National emergency in. (National Educational Association)................................... Feb., 1919: 82-5
(S e e also Adult working-class education; Apprenticeship; Colleges and universities;
Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment; Vocational education;)
7401317 0 — 41--------4




46

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Education of immigrants. (S e e Adult working class education: Americanization.)
Educational association, Workers’ . (See Workers7 Educational Association.)
_
Edwards, G. W .:
Pa«eConservation of boy power.....................................................................................................Jan., 1919: 129-35
Employment service of Canada............................................................................................ Aug., 1919: 157-68
Efficiency:
Application of Golden Rule plan............................................................................. .............. Dec., 1920: 102-3
Effect of atmospheric conditions on. (Experiments)..................................................... Feb., 1917: 283-90
Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munitions factories— July, 1917: 14-19; Aug., 1917: 128-9
Munitions................................................................................................... July, 1917: 14-19; Sept., 1918: 40-53
Securing the initiative of the workman. (Wolf)........... ............. ......................................June, 1919: 134-6
Survey covering 169 representative manufactures: ........... .............................................. June, 1920: 219-20
Surveys of industrial plants show greater productivity.................................................. Nov., 1920: 118-19
Temperatures at which efficiency is maintained and impaired......................................... Feb., 1917: 269
( S e e also Employment management; Fatigue; Great Britain: Ministry of Munitions.
Health of Munition Workers Committee; Ohio Institute for Public Efficiency;
Woman labor.)
Eight-hour day:
Comparison of laws in various foreign countries................................................................ Mar., 1920: 184-98
Recommendations and discussions of International Labor Conference.......................... Jan., 1920: 6-12:
Feb., 1920: 15-20; Oct.. 1920: 210
Recommendations of International Congress of Working Women, 1919.......................Dec., 1919: 285-7;
Jan., 1920: 12
Road to the eight-hour day. (Bauer)..................................................................................Aug., 1919: 41-65
Alaska. Law of 1917referred t o ........ ..................................................Sept., 1918: 266; Oct.. 1918: 241,243
Argentina. Scope of eight-hour law..,..................................................................................... Dec., 1926: 164
------Shipbuilding. Buenos Aires yards. .............................................................................. July, 1919k 161
Australia. Shipping..................................................................................................................... Feb., 1920; 265
------ Steam railroads, Queensland............................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 118
Belgium. Experience of Engis Chemical Works, Liege...................................................... Dec., 1916: 120
------Movement of trademnions.................................................................................................... May, 1920: 200
British Columbia. Shipbuilding............................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 157
Canada. Mining......... ................................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 356
------Recommendation of Royal Commission on Industrial Relations............................... Sept., 1919: 39
------Resolutions of National Industrial Conference.............................................................. Nov., 1919: 54-5
Colorado. Administration of eight-hour law.......................................................................... Dec., 1920: 186
Denmark. Public employees..................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 150
Ecuador. Text of law...................... ......................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 151-2
Finland. Various occupations, 1917.............................. . .................................................... Jan., 1918: 109-10
France. Building and construction trades............................................................................. Mar., 1920: 122
------Metal and mining industries................................................................................................ July, 1919: 164
------ Munitions plants........................................................................................................... ......... July, 1918: 121
------ Petroleum industry............................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 123
------Printing and publishing....................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 122
------Steam railroads.................................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 64,67
Germany. Experience of Zeiss Optical Works, Jena...................................................... Dec., 1916: 119-20
------Legal introduction, November 23,1918......................................................................... May, 1919: 213-15
------Provided in various collective agreements................................................................... Oct., 1919: 153-60
Great Britain. Coalmines...................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 297-8
------ John Dawson Works, England...........................................................................................
Feb., 1920: 9
------Recommendation of Commission on Adult Education, Ministry of Reconstruc­
tion........................................................................................................................ ....................... Nov., 1918: 69
------Resolution of Trade-Union Congress, 1918........................................................................ Nov., 1918: 264
------Steam railroads....................................................................................................................... June, 1919: 169
Illinois. Woman labor.............................................................................................................. May, 1919: 204-9
Italy. Printing trade................................................................................................................... June, 1919: 183
,------Public employees.................................................................................................................... May, 1920: 204
----- ? R6sum6 of demand for......................................................................................................... June, 1919: 183
------Steam railroads....................................................................................................................... May, 1920: 210
Japan. Effect of adoption of eight-hour convention................................... Jan., 1920: 11; Aug., 1920: 39
Netherlands. Coalminers......................................................................................................... June, 1919: 182
------Municipal employees........................... ................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 184
Norway. Paper, cellulose, and wood-pulp industries.......................................................... Aug., 1918: 215
Nova Scotia. Woman labor. Attitude of employers......................................................... Sept., 1920: 144
Peru. Established for State industries and public works................................................Apr., 1919: 184-5
Philippine Jslarids. Resolution of Labor Congress referred to........................................... Oct., 1920: 215
Poland. Regulations governing application of law......................................................... Apr., 1920: 209-10
Russia. Code of labor laws of soviet Russia............... .*........................................................ Apr., 1920: 213
Scandinavian countries. Resolution of labor, conference.................................................. Jan., 1919: 305-6
Spain. Favored by Social Labor Party at convention, 1918.............................................. June, 1919: 58
------Laborers, operators, and skilled mechanics...................................................................... Dec., 1920: 90
------Regulations........................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 246; July, 1920: 129-30
Sweden. Introduced in certain State establishments.......................................................... Mar., 1919: 58
Switzerland. Introduced voluntarily or brought about by strikes................................... June, 1919: 187
United States. Clothing, men’s. Chicago............................................................................. Nov., 1916:31
------Coal mines. (S e e Eight-hour day: United States. Mines.)
------Coke ovens. Certain laws cited.............................................................................
Oct.,
------Construction work. Certain laws cited............................................................................ Oct., 1918: 242
------Continuous operation industry.............. Mar., 1917: 429-30; Nov., 1919: 199-202; Feb., 1920: 118-27
------Extent of.......................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 23-46; Sept., 1918: 188-96
------Government contracts. Various laws and orders.......................................................... 1917— May 660;
July 55; Aug. 148-9; Sept. 72-3; Oct. 30; 1918-Jan. 112; Sept. 193-6;266-8; Oct. 245-6
------Iron and steel. Basic 8-hour day adopted by U.S. Steel Corporation.........................Nov., 1918: 133
------------- Experience of Commonwealth Steel Co.,Granite City, 111...................................... Dec., 1916:119
------------- Various State laws cited................................................................................................. Oct., 1918:242
------Lumbering.............................................................................................................................. Mar., 1918: 57-8
------ Machine trades. List of firms having...............................................................................
Oct., 1915: 18
------ Marine occupations. Favored by seamen’s union......................................................... Mar., 1918: 171
------------- Provisions of agreements................................................................ July, 1920: 106; Sept., 1920: 104
------Mines. Anthracite coal. Apr., 1916: 45; June, .1916: 38-41; Aug., 1917: 37; Oct., 1920: 96,101,102




1918:242

SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

47

Eight-hour day—-Concluded.
United States. Mines. Bituminous coal.......................................... Apr., 1917: 590; Apr.,1920: 43,45-9
------------- State laws cited............................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 241
------Navy yards...................................................................................
------New York Harbor..................................... ............................................. Aug., 1918: 51; Apr., 1919: 247-8
------Oil industry. California.......................................................................................................
Mar., 1918: 55
------------ New Jersey....................................................................................................................... July', 1916: 30
------Plaster and cement.................................................................................................................. Oct., 1918:242
------Plate-glass works. Missouri.................................................................................................. Oct., 1918:242
------Printing and Engraving, Bureau of..............................................................................Aug., 1917: 149-50
------Public employees................................................... Oct., 1916: 24-5; Sept., 1918: 315; Oct., 1918: 246-7
------Public works........................................................................... Oct., 1916: 24-5,116-33; Mar., 1917: 455-67
------Railroads.................................................................................................................................1916— Oct. 23-4;
1917—May 677-84; 1918—Mar. 136-9; June 18-19; Sept. 131,133; Oct. 244-5
------Recommendation of President's Industrial Conference.................................................
Apr., 1920: 38
------Rubber industry. (Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co.)......................................................Nov., 1916: 105
------Shipbuilding................................................................................ Apr., 1918: 183; May, 1918: 128,132,138
------Slaughtering and meat packing................ Mar., 1918: 58-9; May, 1918: 118-21,125; July, 1920: 101-5
------’Smelting and refining. State laws cited............................................................................ Oct., 1918:241
------Telegraph and telephone. State laws for operatorson railroads cited....................... Oct., 1918:244
------Various industries. By States and industries..............................................................Sept., 1917: 43-6
------------- Employees affected by changes during war...................................................... Sept., 1918: 189-93
------------- Laws referred to.......................................................................... Oct., 1916: 124r-5; Oct., 1918: 241-7
------------- Lists of firms in which adopted.................................................... Feb., 1916: 37-8; June, 1916: 28
------------- Tables, 1915 to 1919.............. .................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 194-9
Uruguay. Enacted November 17,1915.................................................................................. Apr., 1916: 84^5
Various foreign countries. Comparison of laws................................................................ Mar., 1920: 184-98
(S e e also Forty-eight-hour week; Forty-four-hour week; Forty-hour week.)
Eight-hour movement. (S e e Eight-hour day.)
Election frauds. Supreme Court decision involving Colorado Fuel and Iron Co., etc....... Aug., 1916: 35-7
Electric arc welding. Bums from rays........................................................................................ May, 1919: 245-6
Electric light and power:
Austria. Law for socialization of electricity......................................................................... Nov., 1919: 84r-5
Canada. Wages, 1919................................................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 187
France. Eight-hour day, metal industry............................................................................... July, 1919: 164
------Importance and extent of development............................................................................ Apr., 1919: 87
------Wages in manufacture of artillery, March, 1919............................................................... Mar., 1920: 121
------(Rhone region). Wages of metal workers, 1914,1919,1920........................................... Oct., 1920: 133
Germany. General strike of 1919...........................................................................................Jan., 1920: 280-1
------Wages, 1914 and 1917............................................................................................................. Oct., 1918: 174
Great Britain. Board of Trade report on protection against foreign competition....... Aug., 1918: 90-3
------Development may revolutionize systems of supplying hot water to workmen's
homes....... ................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 337
------Opportunities for employment of disabled........................................................................Aug., 1918: 111
------Reconstruction program for generation and distribution of.......................................... Aug., 1918: 93-7
New York City. Inside electrical work. Conditions of employment............................ June, 1919: 62-3
June, 1918: 125;
New York State. Earnings of workers in factories.....................................
July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
United States. Army construction work. Wages.......................................................... June, 1918: 112-21
------Electric light and power companies. Pensions, insurance, etc............................ Feb., 1918: 192-204
------Inside wiremen. Union scale of wages and homs....................... Nov., 1919: 181-2; Oct., 1920: 83-4
-------------Wage rates, various cities........................... 1918—Feb. 126,132; Mar. 122,128; Apr. 166,172,178;
June 130,136,142; Sept. 164,170,176,182; Dec. 264,270,276,282,288,294,300.306
------Linemen and others. Wage awards..................................................................................
Jan., 1919: 36
------Navy yards. Wages................................................................... ......................................... June, 1918: 110
------Shipbuilding. Wages.................................... Mar., 1918: 70; Apr., 1918: 186; May, 1918: 129.134,140
------Theatrical employment. Union scale of wages and hours. May, 1917 and 1918. Mar., 1919: 172-4
------Training for electricians. Bulletin of Federal Board for Vocational Education.
Referred to....................................................................................... ........................................... Apr., 1918: 113
------Worthington Pump and Machinery Corporation, Cudahy, Wis. Wage award,
National War Labor Board................................................................................................ Feb., 1919: 259-65
Wisconsin. Average weekly earnings...................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 112
(S e e also Gas; International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.)
Electric power. (S e e Electric light and power.)
Electric railroads. (S e e Railroads; Street railways.)
Electric Railways Commission, United States. (S ee United States: Federal Electric Rail­
ways Commission.)
Electrical apparatus:
United States. Award to employees, General Electric Co.................................................. 1918—Aug. 71;
Sept. 34-5; Nov. 185; 1919—Jan. 37; Mar. 159
------Hazards ip manufacture of storage batteries............................... Jan., 1919: 237-8; July, 1919: 170-71
------Wages and hours.........................................................................
Sept., 1919: 182-3; June, 1920: 82-94
Electrical trades. (S e e Electric light and power.)
Electricians. (S e e Building trades; Electric light and power.)
Electroplate industry. Great Britain. Wage increases during war....................................... July, 1919: 156
Electrostatic dust precipitation, described (Easton)............................................................... Feb., 1919: 229-30
Electrotypers. (S e e Printing and publishing.)
Elevator operators. United States. Hazards, hours, etc., for women elevator operators. Jan., 1918: 61
Eleven-hour day:
Massachusetts. Recommended for tour workers in paper mills, 1917.......................... Mar., 1917: 429-30
New York. Law re grocery stores.................................................................. Oct., 1916: 25; Oct., 1918: 243
North Carolina. Laws. Factories............................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 243
United States. List of industries in which adopted............................................................ June, 1916: 29
Eliot, C. W .:
Criticism of Canadian industrial disputes investigation act................................................. May, 1917: 700
Profit sharing. Referred to........................................................................................................ Aug., 1917: 46
Elkus, A . I. Enforcement of international labor legislation..................................................... Sept., 1919: 34




June,

19

48

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Eltzbacher Commission. (S e e Germany: Eltzbacher Commission )
_
Embargoes. Great Britain. Scheme prohibiting certain firms from engaging skilled
.rage.
labor................................................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 289-94
Embroidery industry. (S e e Clothing industries, womens’ ; Needle trades.)
“ Emergency Engineer Corps.” Germany. St rike-breaking agency................................. Apr., 1920: 229-31
Emergency Fleet Corporation. (S e e United States: Shipping Board. Emergency Fleet
rislation (S e e Laws and legislation.)
Emigration:
Germany. As viewed by the German trade-unions.........................................................Dec., 1919; 376-6
Italy. After the war.................................................................................................................. Nov., 1917: 64r-5
------Proposal of Superior Labor Council................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 72
------Senator Bettoni, quoted re after-war emigration......................................................... Feb., 1919: 274-5
------ 1914 and 1915. Statistics...................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 277-9
Netherlands. Decrease.......................................... .................................................................... June, 1918: 64
(S e e also Immigration.)
Emmet, B.:
Disability among wage earners............................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 26-39
Duration of wage earners’ disabilities...................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 4-15
Labor survey of Cleveland cloak industry............................................................................. Aug., 1918: 1-29
Labor turnover in Cleveland and Detroit..............................................................................Jan., 1919: 11-30
Labor turnover and employment policies of a large motor vehicle manufacturing estab­
lishment....................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 1-18
Nonunion collective bargaining plan.....................................................................................Aug., 1918: 180-4
Operation of establishment and trade-union disability funds..........................................Aug., 1917: 17-36
Piece-rate wage systems in the mens’ clothing industry. . . . .......................................... N ov., 1917: 23-35
Trade agreements. Cloak, suit, and skirt industry. New York City........................ Dec., 1919: 42-60
------ Dress and waist industry. New York City............ ..................................................... June, 1919: 1-17
------ Stove industry.......................................................... ......................................................... May, 1918: 166-79
------ Women’s clothing industries. Boston........................................................................ Apr., 1918: 223-34
------------- Chicago.......................................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 65-76
------------- Cincinnati and St. Louis............................................................................................. Mar., 1918: 61-6
------------- New York City............................................................................................................ Dec., 1917: 19-39
------------- Philadelphia..................................................................................................................Jan., 1918: 27-39
W ill profit sharing solve labor difficulties?........................................................................... Aug., 1917: 45-52
Employees’ benefit associations. (S e e Establishment funds; Fraternal orders; Labor
organizations; Railroads: Funds.)
Employees’ committees. (S p e Employees’ representation.)
Employees’ compensation. (S e e Workmen’s compensation and insurance.)
Employees’ Compensation Commission. United States. ( S e e United States: Employees’
Compensation Commission.)
Employees’ representation:
Australia. Attitude of Australian employers’ federations.................................................. Apr., 1920: 61
------ Opinion of Judge Higgins..................................................................................................... June, 1919: 211
Austria. Works councils law, effective July 25,1919....................................................... Sept., 1919: 133-4
British Columbia. Shop committees in shipbuilding. Provisions of agreements
June 1,1918............................................ .................................................................................Aug., 1918: 157-8
Canada. Industrial councils. Resolutions of National Industrial Conference— Nov., 1919: 53,58-61
------Shop committees and industrial councils....................................................................... Sept., 1919: 40-2
■—1— (Ottawa). Industrial councilin building trades..................................................... Aug., 1919: 189-90
------ (Toronto). Joint industrial council in industry......................................................... June, 1919: 137-8
France. Steam railroads..................................................................... .................................... Apr., 1920: 63,65
Germany. Labor boards. (Employees committees for mining industries.)..............May, 1918: 68-72;
Apr., 1919: 160-7; June, 1919: 139-44
------ Works councils.................................................... Sept., 1919: 125-7; Oct., 1919: 288; May, 1920: 172-81
Great Britain. Attitude of British Labor Party........................................................... Apr., 1918: 66,72-6
------Attitude of Builders' National Industrial Parliament of Great Britain and Ire­
land.......................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 54-61; Oct., 1$20: 168-73
------Attitude of employers on industrial councils....................... Sept., 1918: 65,66; Oct., 1918: 44-7,52-3
------ Attitude of Government......................................................................................................July, 1918: 27-8
------ Attitude of National AEianee of Employers and Employed towards industrial
councils........................................................................................
------Bibliography.......................................................................................................................... Dec.,1918: 64,65
------Constitution and functions of district councils and works committees..................... Aug., 1918: 76-9;
Mav, 1919: 116-22
------Industrial councils. Recommendations of Plymouth conference............................. Oct., 1918: 52-3
------Movement..............................................................1918—Mar. 81-84; May 59-61; June 163-5; July 27-8;
Aug. 76-84; Sept. 53-66; Dec. 31-6; 1919—May 116-22; Aug. 131-6; Nov. 225-7,236-7
------Shop committees v. trade-unions. Advantages and disadvantages..........................Dec., 1918: 39-40
------Whitley committee. Reports and summaries____1917—Sept. 130-2; 1918—Mar. 81-4; Apr. 234-6;
May 59-61; June 163-5; July 27-8; Aug. 76-84,237-40; Sept. 53-64; Dec. 31-34
------ Building industry. Two years’ experience................................ Oct., 1918: 54-61; Oct., 1920: 168-73
------Dock labor. (Report of court of inquiry.)....................................................................... May, 1920: 61
------Government industrial establishments. Draft scheme approved early in 1919. May, 1919: 114-16
------Pottery trades............................................................L....................... Apr., 1918: 234-6; Oct., 1919: 241-2
------ Printing trades...................................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 241-2
------ Public employees................................................................................ July, 1919: 123-6; Jan., 1920: 195-6
------------- Bradford, England. City corporation and its employees.................................Apr., 1919: 157-8
------ Various industries having, as of May 1,1919...............................Aug., 1919: 131-6; Nov., 1919: 236-9
------ Wool manufacturing............................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 105
Italy. Demand of workers. Referred to................................ May, 1920: 204-5,210; Dec., 1920: 202,206
Norway. Works councils. Act of July 22,1920................................................................. Oct., 1920: 207-8
South Africa. Resolution adopted by conference of employers and employees, 1919.. June. 1920: 224
United States. Address by Royal Meeker............................................................................. Feb., 1920: 1-14
------ Bibliography................................................................................
------ Growth and development............................................................ Mar., 1919: 153-62; Nov., 1919: 225-33
------List of firms having............................................................................................................. Sept., 1919: 123-4
------ Opinions of various organizations..................... 1919— Feb. 69; Mar. 63-4; June 49; Nov. 43-6,234-6
------Opinions of various writers.................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 23




Jan.,1919

Sept.,1919:123

SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

49

Employees' representation— Concluded.
Page.
United States. Plan for bargaining committees. Bridgeport. (National War Labor
Board plan.)......................................................................................................................... May, 1919: 192-200
------------- Colorado Fuel & Iron Co.. Dec., 1915: 12-22; Apr., 1916: 48; Jan., 1919: 42-3; Mar., 1919: 154
------------- Hart, Schaffner & Marx................................. ........... .....................Jan., 1917: 43-8; Oct., 1919: 17
------------- Leitch plan........................................................... Sept., 1919: 41; Nov., 1919: 58; Aug., 1920: 22-3
------------- President's Industrial Conference........................................................................... Apr., 1920: 33-40
------------- Rochester plan, account of.......................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 98-9
------------- Various developments of. (Whitney.)............................................................... Nov., 1919: 225-33
------ Surveys...............................................................................................................................
Jan., 1920: 191-4
------Clothing........ Jan., 1917: 43-5; Feb., 1918: 67; Oct., 1919: 16-17; Aug., 1920: 22-3; Dec., 1920: 98-9
------ Docks and harbors................................................................... May, 1919: 209-10; July, 1919: 16-19.20-2
------Machine shops......................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 74
------Motor vehicles....................................................................... .............................................. Oct., 1918: 17-18
------Oilindustry of California..................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 9-23
------Retail stores. Filene's.
Boston. Referred to........................................................ June, 1918: 153-4
------Shipbuilding.................................................................................... May, 1918: 132,138; Dec., 1918: 201-2
------Stove molding. Shop committees to adjust local grievances...................................... May, 1918: 167
(S e e also Collective agreements; Collective bargaining; Shop stewards.)
Employees' welfare. (S e e Welfare work.)
Employers:
Objections to compulsory health insurance....................................................................... Apr., 1917: 513-18
Objections to statutory minimum wage, Massachusetts...................................................... Oct., 1916: 76-9
Employers' Association of Detroit. Agreement re advertising for labor................................
Jan., 1919: 29
Employers' associations:
Australia. Conference on industrial relationships.............................................................Apr., 1920: 60-2
Austria. (S e e Imperial Federation of Austrian Industries.)
Canada. ( S e e Canadian Manufacturers' Association; United Grain Growers (Ltd.);
Western Canada Coal Operators' Association.)
Germany. Agreement re 8-hour day................................................................................... May, 1919: 213-15
------ Agreement with labor organizations, 1918................................................................... Apr., 1919: 158-60
------ Attitude toward collective bargaining............................... ...................... ...................... Oct., 1920: 135
------ Financial statistics of strike insurance associations, 1911-1914.....................................Oct., 1915: 81-4
------ (See a lso German Building Trades Employers' Federation; United Employers'
Association )
Great Britain. Attitude of Government toward jointstanding industrial councils___ Mar., 1918: 81-4
------ Report of Whitley committee on industries less completely organized than others. Sept.,1918: 53-8
------ (S e e also Coal Owners' Association of South Wales; Engineering Employers' Fed­
eration; Federation of British Industries.)
New Zealand.. Membership, 1907,1914, and 1917........... ...................................................... May, 1920: 217
Scandinavian countries. Federations of employers into mutual strike insurance asso­
ciations.........................................................................................................................................
Oct., 1915: 86
United States. Attitude of Commission on Industrial Relations..................................... Nov., 1915: 61
------ (S e e a lso American Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Manufacturers' Association; American
Clothing Manufacturers' Association, New York City; American Manufacturers'
Export Association; American Steamship Association; Associated Manufacturers
ana Merchants of New York State; California Metal Producers' Association: Chicago
Cloak and Suit Manufacturers' Association; Children Shoe Manufacturers' Associa­
tion of New York (Inc.); Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Manufacturers' Protective Associa­
tion; Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N . Y .; Clothing Manufacturers' Association
of Boston; Contracting Bricklayers' Association, Cincinnati; Dress and Waist Manu­
facturers' Association; Employers' Association of Detroit; Garment Manufacturers'
Association, Cleveland; Joint International Conference Council of the Printing
Trades; Lake Carriers' Association; Lighterage Association of the Port of New York:
Merchants' and Manufacturers’ Association of the District of Columbia; Merchants'
Association of New York City; National Association of Builders' Exchanges;
National Association of Manufacturers; National Board of Steam Navigation; Na­
tional Federation of Clothing Manufacturers; National Industrial Conference Board;
National Safety Council; New York Boat Owners' Association; New York Coal
Barge Operators; New York Tow-Boat Exchange (Inc.); Northwest Cloak and
Suit Manufacturers’ Association, Chicago; Portland Cement Association; Stove
Founders' National Defense Association; Wholesale Optical Manufacturers' Assotion of New York; Women's Garment Manufacturers' Association of Philadelphia;
Women's Wear Manufacturers' Association of Philadelphia; Collective agreements;
Labor Organizations; Middle classes.)
Employers' Commission to Europe. (S e e United States:* Department of Labor. Em­
ployers^ Industrial Commission.)
Employers' liability:
UmtedStates. ConflictsbetweenFederalandStatejurisdictionsincommercecases. July, 1917: 100-9;
Sept., 1917: 12-22
------Experience under, compared with workmen's compensation systems............ Mar., 1919: 230-48
------Railway employees.............................................................................. Feb., 1919: 1-4; Mar., 1919: 237-44
Utah. Report of employers’ liability commission of 1916................................................ Mar., 1917: 421-4
(S e e a lso Workmen’s compensation and insurance.)
Employers' Liability and Workmen's Compensation Commission. United States. (S e e
United States: Employers' Liability and Workmen's Compensation Commission.)
Employment agencies, United States:
Activities of Division of Information, Bureau of Immigration, 1908 to 1917..................... Jan., 1918: 43;
Aug., 1919: 147
Activities of Federal, State, and municipal offices, July, 1915, to August, 1919. (S e e
section o n Employment and unemployment in each n u m b e r o f the R e v ie w .)
Activities of Public Service Reserve and other agencies during war..............................Sept., 1917: 74-9
American Association of Public Employment Offices. Proceedings, resolutions, etc. July, 1916: 47-50;
Sept., 1916:13-16; Sept., 1917:155-6; Nov., 1917:116-30;
Sept., 1918: 304; Dec., 1919: 277-9; Dec., 1920: 106-7
Attitude of trade-unionists.......................................................................................................... June, 1919:130
Compared with British labor exchanges............................................................................. Aug., 1919: 141-56
Conferences. Charleston, S. C., December, 1915................................................................... Fob. 1916: 23-8
------ San Francisco, Calif., August, 1915.....................................................................................Oct., 1915: 6-13




50

M ONTHLY

LABOK

K E V IB W ,

Employment agencies, United States—Concluded.
Page,
Conferences. Washington, D. C., April, 1919.................................................................... May, 1919: 178-81
Directories.........................Sept., 1917: 169-83; Dec., 1918: 375-90; Dec., 1919: 377-93; July, 1920: 181-98
Discussed by William B. Wilson....... ..................................................... Sept., 1917: 156; Oct., 1915: 10-12
Distribution of Federal offices, February, 1919.................................... ................................. Aug., 1919:142
Employment Service, Department of Labor. Agreement with Canadian Government
re agricultural labor.................................................................................................................. May, 1918: 58-9
------ Agreement with Federal Board for Vocational Education re employment of
returned soldiers............................................................................................. .......................
Dec., 1918: 82
------ Agreement with Shipping Board to supply shipyard workers................................ June. 1917: 993-4
-------Demobilization activities........................................................
Jan., 1919: 119-25; Feb., 1919: 117-23
------ Mobilizing workers for war emergency........................................................................ May, 1918: 191-205
------ Organization......................................................................................................................... 1917—Sept. 80-4;
Nov. 127-30; 1918—Mar. 76-8; Aug. 64-5; Oct. 261-5; 1920—May 127-40
------ Recruiting of unskilled labor...................................................... July, 1918: 136-7; Sept., 1918: 298-301
------Summary of activities................................ . July, 1918: 133-5; Apr., 1919: 140-5; Aug., 1919: 146,149
Legislation of 1915, various States, referred to........................................................... July, 1915: 15,16.17,18
Methods of meeting the demands for labor.................................................................... .
Sept., 1917: 74-9
Private agencies. Abolition approved by speakers at employment managers7 con­
ference ......................................................................................................................................... June, 1918:172
------ Recommendation of American Federation of Labor..................................................... Mar., 1919: 70
«— Work of trade-union bureaus; methods, policies, etc................................. .................. June, 1919:130
Recommendation of President’ s Industrial Conference......................................................... Apr., 1920: 40
Seamen. Fees for supplying ship’ s crews—provisions of seamen’s a c t......................... Feb., 1919: 253-6
------ “ Welfare plan” of Lake Carriers’ Association.................................Sept., 1917: 56-7; Apr., 1918: 258
Soldiers and sailors. Service and Information Department of War Department, for
placing ex-service men....................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 158-60
Standardization of records....................................... Sept., 1916: 14; Sept., 1917: 155-6; Nov., 1917: 116-27
California. Special committee on soldiers’ reemployment readjustment........................ Feb., 1920: 162
------ Statistics on activities, 1916.............................................................................................. June, 1917: 901-2
------Statistics on violation of law by private agencies............................................................Nov., 1920: 220
Connecticut. Report for Hartford, November, 1917...........................................................Jan., 1918: 133-4
Illinois. Applications and placements, September, 1920....................................................... Nov., 1920: 160
------Commission for obtainmg employment for soldiers...................................................... Feb., 1920: 161
------Survey. (Springfield.)......................................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 84
Indiana. Creation of commission for securing employment for ex-service men............ Feb.. 1920: 161
Massachusetts. Activities, 1917 to 1920......................................................... *....................July, 1918: 143-4;
June, 1919: 132; Sept., 1920: 134-5; Nov., 1920: 219
------Cost per position. (Public.)................................................................................................ June, 1919: 132
Missouri. Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Employment Organization............................................... Feb., 1920:161
Montana. Veterans’ Welfare Commission. (For soldiers.)................................................. Feb., 1920:161
Now York. Program of employment bureau under proposed reorganization of de­
partment of labor..................................... ................................................................................. Jan., 1920: 268
—— Recommendations of reconstruction commission....................................................... Nov., 1919: 245-8
------ Report of State bureau of employment, 1917................................................................Jan., 1918: 132-3
------(New York City). Placement of children by noncommercial offices................... Aug., 1917: 158-63
------------- Placement of disabled men by Hudson Guild........................................................ Apr., 1918: 117
North Carolina. Activities, 1919 and 1920............................................................................... Oct., 1920: 224
Ohio. Distribution of farm labor during war..................................................................... Apr., 1918: 53-63
------Job selling................................................................................................................................. Oct., 1916: 1-5
------Statistics on activities, 1915-16 and 1916-17................................ Sept., 1917: 156-8; Sept., 1918: 302-4
------ War employment work. (Croxton.)........................................................................ June, 1917; 995-1002
Oregon. Creation of soldiers’ and sailors’ commission............................ ........................ Feb., 1920: 161-2
Pennsylvania. Activities, March to December, 1919....................................................... Sept.. 1920: 136-7
Rhode Island. Employment offices for exservice men........................................................ Feb., 1920: 162
Washington Law of December 3,1914, and Supreme Court decision, 1916................Aug., 1917: 152-5
------Work of free employment agencies, 1915........................................................................... Mar., 1917: 477
Wisconsin. Activities^ 1919 and 1920..........................................................Nov., 1920: 161; Dec., 1920: 113
Employment agencies, foreign countries:
Argentina. Placements, 1915 to 1919........................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 115
Austria. Legal regulation........................................................................................................ Mar., 1916: 89-00
Canada. Activities of Provincial bureaus, October, 1916, to October, 1918. (S e e section
on Employment and unemployment in each n u m b e r o f the R e v ie w .)
------ Demobilization plans; orders in council.......................................................................... Feb., 1919: 133-7
------ Directories.....................Sept., 1917: 183-4; Dec., 1918: 390-2; Dec., 1919: 393-5; July, 1920: 198-201
------ Employment Offices Coordination Act, 1918...................................... . Sept., 1918: 79; Oct., 1918: 265
------ Survey of systems, private and public......................................................................... Aug., 1919: 157-68
European countries. Sources of unemployment statistics............................................... Oct., 1915: 54-77
Finland. Activities, 1913 and 1914, and 1910 to 1914........................................................... July, 1915: 63-4
France. Executive decree, October 18,1917, re distribution of labor...............................Sept., 1918: 272
------ Operations, etc., 1911 to 1918. (Conover.)..............................................................
Oct.,
1919: 192-206
------ Placements in 1919, by sex and industry.......................................................................... July, 1920: 157
------Special provision for crippled and invalid soldiers........................................................ July, 1919: 215-16
Germany. Activities, various dates, 1914 to 1919.................... ............................................. July, 1915: 68;
Aug , 1915: 18; Oct., 1915: 51-2; Jan. 1917: 139-41; Sept., 1919: 168-9
------ Employers’ point of view of system................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 351-2
------Labor distribution offices described.................................................................................. May, 1918: 220-1
------ Programs, German trade-unions..............................................................Apr., 1918: 85; Dec., 1918: 347
------ Reporting made compulsory, 1915........................................................................................Oct., 1915: 53-4
------ Rules governing cooperation with national auxiliary service, 1917.......................... Apr., 1918: 100-3
------ Social-Democratic program................................................................................................ Dec.,1918: 347-8
Great Britain. Activities, various dates, 1910 to 1920.......................................................... 1915—July 72-3;
Aug. 20; 1917—Oct. 101-2; Nov. 140-1; Dec. 1211; 1918—Jan. 127-8; Apr. 253-7
July 145-7; Oct. 271-3; 1919—Jan. 131,145-7; Apr. 153-5; June 133; July 138-40;
Aug. 152-6; Sei>t. 148-57; Oct. 188-90;. 1920—Jan. 202; Apr. 175; July 154-5; Oct. 177
------ Compared with United States employment offices. (Squires.)...............................Aug., 1919: 141-56
------ Distribution of public agencies, January, 1919.................................................................. Aug., 1919: 143
------ Embargo scheme of labor distribution...........................................................................Nov., 1918: 289-94
------ Juveniles. Vocational guidance carried on under............................... ........................ Jan., 1917: 70-5




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

51

Employment agencies, foreign countries—Concluded.
Page.
Great Britian. work ofjuvenlle employment committees........................................... May, 1917: 664-7
—
---- Work outlined at child welfare conference, 1919..................................................... June, 1919: 218
— Methods of conducting......................................... ........................................................... Sept., 1918: 304-9
— Placement of disabled soldiers................................................... .
Dec., 1917: 65-79; Aug,, 1918: 37-8
------ Placem ents women.......................................... May, 1917: 661-4; Apr., 1918: 210-17; June, 1919: 227
------ Port labor committees set up to regularize employment of dock labor................. June, 1919: 26-37
------ Review of British system orlabor exchanges. (B. L. S.Bulletin No. 206.).......... Feb., 1917: 295-6
------ Work of Ministry of National Service in distribution of labor ................................. Oct., 1918: 37-9
Hungary. Law of March 19,1916. Scope. (Public.)......................................................... Mar., 1917: 377
Italy. Bureaus for placement of disabled soldiers................................................................ Oct., 1918: 80-2
------Establishment of central employment office.................................................................. Apr., 1920: 191-2
------Government subsidies during war.................................................................................. June, 1917: 907-8
— Proposed legislation placing under State supervision................................................ Jan., 1917:152-6
Netherlands. Activities, 1913 to 1917....................................................................................... June, 1918: 65
------ Legal provision.................................................................................... June, 1917: 909-11; Dec., 1917: 132
New South Wales. Provided for by 1918 amendment to arbitration act..................... July, 1918: 183-4
Norway. Activities, various dates................................................................. July, 1916: 77; Jan., 1917: 149
Ontario. Activities. 1914............................................................................................................May, 1916: 31-3
Paraguay. Establishment o f...................................................................................... .............. Dec., 1920: 215
ueensland.. Established by act of October 25,1915.......................................... ..............July; 1916: 154-5
ussia. Distribution of labor................................................ .................................................. Apr., 1920: 211
Sweden. Activities, various dates...........July, 1915: 79; Oct., 1915: 52; Dec., 1915: 69; Jan., 1917: 149
Switzerland. Activities, 1914 and 1915............................ .......................... July, 1915: 80; Dec., 1915:. 70-1
------Creation of Federal central employment office................ ............................................ July, 1920: 177-8
United Kingdom. (S ee Employment agencies: Great Britain.)
(S ee also Recruiting of labor.)
Employment bureaus. (S ee Employment agencies.)
Employment certificates:
Recommendations of International Congress of Working Women, 1919................ .......... Jan., 1920: 20
Standards adopted at child welfare conference, May, 1919....... ..................... ..................... June, 1919: 220
Connecticut. Burvey................................................ ............................... July, 1915: 41-2; Dec., Ira): 126-7
District of Columbia; Child labor........................................................................ .................... Jan., 1919: 247
Great Britain. Exemptions during war to assist in farm work........................................July, 1917: 31-2
------ Relaxation of schodl-attendarice laws...........................................................................June, 1917: 888-90
------Suggested legislation...........................................................................................................June, 1917: 884-8
Illinois. (Springfield.) Survey............................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 82-3
Maryland. Experience of 1915............................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 39-43
Minnesota. Statistics, 1915 to 1920.......................................................................................Dec., 1920: 129-30
New York (State). Administration of law......................................................................... June, 1917: 903-4
Wisconsin. Statistics, IOIIh-IO...................................................................... : ..................... N ov., 1917: 213-15
(S ee also Child Labor.)
Employment exchanges. (See Employment agencies.)
Employment management:
Addresses, reports, etc. Development of employment managers’ associations— . . . Sept., 1917: 85-7
------ Hiring and firing. (Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.).............................................. Nov., 1918: 284-5
------Job selling practiced by foremen in industrial plants In Ohio ................................... Oct., 1916: 1-5
------Psychiatry as applied to industry. (Southard.).........................................................July, 1920: 162-4
—— Relations between employer and employee.
....................................................... Oct., 1919: 207-16
— — Report of special committee of National Association of Corporation Schools......... Oct., 1916: 87-8
— Scientific management and labor. (Hoxle.)............................ Jan.. 1916: 28-38; Mar., 1917: 449-53
Administration. Duties of employment superintendents as defined by Ministry of
Munitions, Great Britain...................................................................... July, 1918: 195-7; Sept., 1918: 50-1
— Function of employment department............................................................................ Aug., 1916: 21-6
Associations. (S ee Employment management: Conferences.)
Attitude of Federal Commission on Industrial Relations................................................... Nov., 1915: 64
Attitude of organized labor toward...................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 449-63
Conferences, 1916 to 1918,1920......................................... 1916—July 62-70; Aug. 17-28; 1917—Apr. 574-81;
June 899-900; 1918—Feb. 173-4; June 168-77; 1919-nTan. 127; Apr. 53; 1920—July 51-3
Discharge. Causes of.................................................................................................... Jan., 1919:28 (footnote)
Ford Motor Co. Discharges reduced by employment management; 1913 and 1915
compared......................................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 284
------Methods of motor vehicle plant...........................................................................................
Oct., 1918: 10
------ Payment of dismissal wage. (Ross.)............................................................................. Mar., 1919: 15-19
------ Payment of wages on termination of employment....................Mar., 1918: 72-3; May, 1918: 133,138
------Right of employee to appeal................................................................................................
O ct, 1918: 53
------Steam railroads. (Order of Director General.)......................................................... Oct., 1918: 133,136
Job analysis........................................................ June, 1918: 171,174-5; Nov., 1918: 284-5; Jan., 1919: 208-9
Learners. Outline of policy. (Bloomfield.).......................................................................... Jan, 1918: 118
Placement and selection............................................................................................................... 1916—Jan. 69;
Feb. 174; June 174; Aug. 227; Sept. 50; Oct. 10,263; Nov. 285
Promotions. Employees of United States Housing Corporation....................................May, 1919: 281-5
------Public employees. France..............................................................................................May, 1918: 149-60
-------— GreatBritain. (Admiralty.).................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 88
------Railways..................................................... Apr., 1918: 109; May, 1918: 27-8,33,36; O c t, 1918: 133,136
------Shipbuilding............................................................................................................................ Dec., 1918: 204
------ Various firms........................................................................................................................... N o v , 1918: 286
Records........................................................................... June, 1918: 170-1; July, 1918: 197; O ct, 1918: 13-14
Relation to turnover............................... 1919—Jan. 14-19; Feb. 45-9; Mar. 35-46; Apr. 62-70; May, 63-5
Sources of labor supply, methods of filling vacancies............................................................ N o v , 1918: 285
Training for..................... May, 1918: 190-1; Jan, 1919: 82-3,126-8; A u g , 1919: 139-40; A u g , 1920: 92-3
Transfer..............................................................................................................A p r, 1918: 113; N o v , 1918: 284
Woman labor................................................................................................... 1918—Apr. 219-20; June 159,174;
Sept. 229-31; Oct. 195; Nov. 190; Dec. 313; 1919—Jan. 218,222; May. 239-40
Specific industries and plants. Cheney Bros. (Gardner.)....... ............. July, 1916: 66; June, 1917: 897
------- V
&VVAAU&CliUoxavpo
—
Clothcraft
shops..................................................................................................................... June, 1917: 898
~ --------—
' - ' i s ; .......................................................................................................................
M ar, 1918: 53
----- Copper
mining.
— Department stoi
itores. System of one store described.................................................. N o v , 1919: 122-4

g




52

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW.

Employment management—Concluded.
Specific industries and plants. Fayette R . Plumb (Inc.), Philadelphia. AchievePage.
ments of the employment department.,.............................................................June, 1917: 844-8,899-900
------Filene’s Sons Co., W m . Employment problems. (Gilman.)......................... ..... June, 1917: 897-8
------ Labor camps................................................................................ ........................................... Apr., 1918: 283
------ Laundries. New York............................. ............................................................................. Aug., 1918: 205
------Motor vehicles.......................................................................................„................................ Oct., 1918: 1-18
------ Munitions. Recording and Computing Machines Co., Dayton, Ohio, described. Sept., 1918: 208-10
------ Oil refineries. .(Brissenden.)................................................................. ............................Apr., 1919: 24-5
------ Public employees. (Mosher.)........................................................................... l..............Jury, 1920: 11-25
------Shipbuilding. (Wolf.).........................................................................................................June, 1919: 135-6
------Shipping. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association....................... Mar., 1917: 170-1;
Apr., 1918: 25 7 -9
------Steam railroads. United States. UnderFederal control.............................................Mar., 1919: 292-4
------Sugar refining. (Brissenden.). ................. ................................... ; ............................ Dec., 1919: 139-41
------ Tailoring establishment in Middle W est........................................................................... Dec., 1920: 102-3
------War industries. Section of War Industries Board..........................................................Jan., 1919: 126-8
------Wood-pulp industry. (Wolf.)..........................................
June, 1919: 134-6
(S e e also Mobility of labor.)
Employment managers’ associations. (S e e Employment management: Conferences.)
Employment managers’ conferences. (S e e Employment management: Conferences.)
Employment of women. (S e e Woman labor.)
Employment offices. (S e e Employment agencies.)
Employment Offices, American Association Of. (S e e American Association of Public Em­
ployment Offices.)
Employment Services, International Association of Public. (S e e International Associa­
tion of Public Employment Services.)
Employment statistics, United States:
Agriculture . Terms of employment..................................................................................... June, 1918:177-8
Boots and shoes, 1918................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 1744>
Chemicals, 1917.......................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 213-14
Coal mines, 1807 to 1915................................................................................................................ Aug., 1916: 67
----- , Number employed, 1914,1915............................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 589
------ Anthracite, 1890 to 1915.......................................................................... ............................... Aug., 1917: 42
------ Bituminous, 1919 and 1920...............................................................................................June, 1920: 149-50
Docks and harbors........................................................................................................................ July, 1918: 5,8
Gold mining, 1916 and 1917......................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 177
Iron and steel, 1915 to 1917..................................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 29,41
Machine building, 1912 and 1917................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 13
Manufacturing, 1904, 1909, 1914............................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 136-8
Metal mines, 1916 and 1917..*.......................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 216
Munitions. Certain plants, various dates during war....................................................... May, 1918: 163-4
Public employees........................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 219,227,230
Steam railroads. Various dates, 1915 to 1919. June, 1918: 42-4; Mar., 1919: 237; Dec., 1919: 231,232,235
War industries...................................................................................................................... .
May, 1918: 201-2
Selected industries. (S e e section o n Employment and unemployment i n each n u m b er
o f the R e v ie w , J a n u a r y , 1916, to D ecem ber, 19 2 0 .)
Boston. Mercantile industry. (Filene’s.)...........................................................................June. 1918: 153-4
California. Canning, 1917............................................................................................................ Feb., 1918: 139
------ December 15,1916................................................................................................................... June, 1917: 902
Cleveland. Cloak industry, 1917-18........................................................................................ Aug., 1918: 1-29
District of Columbia. Woman labor, 1919.................... ......................................................... May, 1919: 216
Great Lakes. Freight handling, passenger-freight steamers................ ..........................Apr., 1918: 33-40
Michigan. Woman labor........................................................................................................ Sept., 1915: 18,19
New York City. Docks and harbors.. . ...........................................July, 1918: 5,8,20-1; Aug., 1918: 45-6
------Laundries. (Manhattan and Brooklyn.)............................... ...................................... Aug., 1918: 203-5
New York State. Various dates, 1914 to 1920...................... ............... 1915—Dec. 54-6; 1916—Mar. 14-15;
May 15-16; June 21-2; July 46-7; Aug. 15-16; Oct. 114-15; Nov. 25-8; 1917—Jan. 38-9;
Feb. 224-7; M ar.' 382-4; Apr. 620-1; May 782-4; June. 1008-10; July 159-61;
Aug. 167-9; Sept. 163-4; 1918—Jan. 132-3; Oct. 212; 1920—Sept. 135-6; Dec. 108
Niagara Falls industries, 1918.....................................................................................................Jan., 1919; 235
Ohio. Mines and quarries. 1914 to 1916............. May, 1916: 62-5; Feb., 1917: 264,266; May, 1918: 262-3
------ Various industries, 1914 and 1915................................................. Apr., 1916: 36-40; Feb., 1917: 227-30
Oregon. Woman labor.............................................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 122-3
South Carolina. Cotton mills, 1919 and 1920........................................................................Oct., 1920: 224-5
Vermont. 1918....... ................................................................................................................... .
Apr., 1919: 219
Washington. Salmon canning, 1915................ ......................................................................... Mar., 1917: 477
Wisconsin. Method of computing number of employees in manufacturing industries
and under compensation act............................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 211-14
------ Plan of Industrial Commission...................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 159-60
------Report of Industrial Commission................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 108-13
Employment statistics, foreign countries:
Africa (Tunis). Labor shortage................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 23b
Alsace-Lorraine. Coal, iron, and potash mines, 1913 to 1918........................................... June, 1919: 181-2
Argentina (Buenos Aires). Various dates, 1914 to 1919............................ July, 1919: 162; Dec., 1920: 114
Australia. Index numbers, 1909 to 1916................................................................................... Dec., 1917: 131
------ Sources of unemployment statistics................................................................................... Oct., 1915: 57-8
Austria. Sources of unemployment statistics......................................................................Oct., 1915: 58-60
------(Vienna). Confectionery industry, 1918........................................................................... Dec., 1918: 188
Belgium........................................................................... Oct., 1915: 60-2; Oct., 1919: 35-44; May, 1920: 62-5
Canada. Pulp and paper mills, 1915 Mid 1917.................................................................... Aug., 1919: 188-9
------ May, July, and September, 1915..............................July, 1915: 61-2; Oct., 1915: 49; Dec., 1915: 57-8
------Volume of employment for civic employees, July, August, and September, 1916. Jan., 1917:136-7
Denmark, 1914,1917, and 1918................................... . ................................................................ Mar., 1919: 191
------ Sources of unemployment statistics....................................................................................Oct., 1915: 62-3
France. Occupational census, 1911................. ......................................................................July, 1917: 43-54
------ Various dates, 1914 to 1919.1915—July 64-6; Dec. 59-60; 1916—July 92-3; 1917—Jan. 137-8; July 35-9;
Aug. 114-19; 1918—May 74r-7; 1919—May 188-60; July 142-5; 1920—Mar. 151-4; July 157-9
------ Sources of unemployment statistics....................................................................................Oct., 1915: 63-5




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

53

Employment statistics—Concluded.
Page.
France. Woman labor..........Sept., 1918: 224-7; Sept., 1919: 166-7; July, 1920: 159; Aug., 1920: 102-3
Germany. Sources of unemployment statistics.................................................................... Oct., 1915: 66-8
------Various dates, 1914 to 1918..........................1915-4uly 66-8; Aug. 16-18; Oct. 50-2; 1816—Mar. 87-8;
July 93-4:1917—Dec. 59-60; 1918—Aug. 102-3; Dec. 351-4; 1918—Feb. 137-41; May 191
------Woman labor. During the war...................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 162-5
Great Britain. Boots and shoes...................................................................Aug., 1918: 172; Apr., 1919: 181
------Coal mining, 1913 to 1915................. *................................................................................... July, 1916: 153
------Munitions..................................................................................................................... ..........Nov., 1918: 290
------Public employees. 1914,1918, and 1920............................................... Sept., 1918: 66-7; Oct., 1920: 181
------Sources of unemployment statistics....................................................................................Oct., 1915: 55-7
------Textiles. January, 1919................................................. ...................................................... Apr,, 1919: 181
------Various dates, 1914 to 1920............................................................... 1915—July 70-2; Aug. 18-20; 1916Mar. 88-9; July 95-6; 1917—Jan. 147; Oct. 102-3; Nov. 1454; Dec. 126-30; 1918—Jan.
135; Apr. 156-7; July 156-7; Oct. 279-80; 1919-Jan. 147-8; Apr. 155-6; May 85-100;
July 140-1; Oct. 190-1; 1920—Jan. 203-4; Mar. 150-1; Apr. 176-7; July 155-6; Oct. 179-80
------Woman labor. Various dates, 1914 to 1918.......... .............. 1916—June 91-5; 19lf-M a r. 335-7.347-8;
June 879-82; Oct. 3842; 1918—Apr. 204-17; 1919—May 236; June 298-303
------ (South Wales). Goal mines. Two-year period ending July 10.1920........................Nov., 1920: 120
Hungary. Sources of unemployment statistics.................................................................... .. Oct., 1915: 60
Italy. Sources of unemployment statistics............................................................................ Oct., 1915; 68-9
Japan. Glass industry............................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 195-6
------ Selected industries, May, 1920............................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 116
------ Selected years, 1895 to 1914...............................................................................................Nov., 1917: 147-8
------ Women and children, 1916..............................................................................................June, 1919: 229-30
Netherlands. 1914 and 1917...................................................................................................... . June, 1918:66
------ Sources of unemployment statistics................................................................................ Oct., 1915: 69-71
Norway, 1914.................
July, 1915: 75-6
------ Sources of unemployment statistics..............................
Oct., 1915: 71-2
Ontario, 1912 to 1914................................................................................................... ................. May, 1916: 30
Russia............................................................................................................................................. May, 1920: 65-7
Scandinavian countries. January, 1916, as compared with earlier dates.......................... July, 1916: 96-8
Sweden. Sources of unemployment statistics....................................................................... Oct., 1915: 72-3
Switzerland. Sources of unemployment statistics............................................................... Oct., 1915: 734
United Kingdom. (S e e Employment statistics: Great Britain.)
Uruguay. Women and minors, Montevideo.......................................................................... Aug., 1920: 97
( S e e a lso Employment agencies; Unemployment; a n d sp ecified in d u strie s .)
Employment systems. (S e e Employment management.)
Enameling industry. Hazards........................................................................... ...................July, 1919: 1704,173
“ Engel's law.” Referred to..............................................................................................................
July, 1920: 1
Engineering Commission, Alaskan. (S e e United States: Alaskan Engineering Commis­
sion.)
Engineering Employers' Federation. Great Britain. Agreement with certain tradeunions re shop stewards................. ............................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 84-5
“ Engineering revision” ..................................................................................Dec., 1918: 1-17; Sept., 1919: 278-81
( S e e a ls o Aceidentprevention.)
Engineering Society, Ifluminating. (S e e Illuminating Engineering Society.)
Engineering trades. Great Britain. (S e e Machinery ana machine shops; Metal trades;
Snipbuilmiig.)
Engineers:
Great Britain. Courses for women in Glasgow.............................................................. —
Aug., 1918:177
------Recommendations re training of........................................ ...............................................July, 1918: 534
New Zealand. Wages, 1913 to 1919........................................................................................... July, 1920: 114
Norway. Wage increases during war.................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 205-6
South Africa. Wages, 1917 to 1919............................................................................................ Nov., 1920: 98
United States. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Boiler code approved... Jan., 1917: 11
------ Classes for employees, motor company. Mechanical, electrical, and chemical____Dec., 1920: 92-3
------ Wages, 1893 to 1919............................................................................................................. June, 1920: 24,29
(S e e a lso Metal trades.)
Engineers, locomotive:
Great Britain. Amalgamated Association of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen.
Membership................................................................................................................................ June, 1919: 171
United States. Organize copperative bank............................................................................ Sept., 1920: 128
------Salaries.......................................................................................................................... June, 1918: 13-17,27-8
Engineers, marine. (S e e Seamen.)
Engineers, stationary. United States. Salary increases, 1918.................................................. Oct., 1918: 131
Enginemen. (S e e Firemen and enginemen, locomotive.)
Engis Chemical Works, Liege, Belgium. Experience with eight-hour day........................... Dec., 1916: 120
Engraving. ( S e e Printing and publishing.)
Enticing of labor. Shipbuilding........................................................................... Mar., 1918: 68; June, 1918: 171
Equal pay for equal work:
France. Munitions..................................................................................... July, 1918: 125; Sept.. 1918: 231-2
Great Britain. Attitude of British Women's Trade-Union League................................. July, 1919: 271
------Engineering trades...............................................
June, 1918: 157-8
------Metal trades. Comparison of rates of wages and earnings........................................ Mar., 1917: 342-3
------Munitions....................................................................................... ............May, 1918: 155; Aug., 1918: 161
------Principle of Industrial League lor Improvement of Relations..................................... Dec., 1918: 40
------Report of War Cabinet Commission on Women in Industry................................. Sept., 1919: 262-71
------ Report of Women's Employment Commission, Ministry of Reconstruction------ Dec.. 1919: 294-6
New South Wales. Amendment of New South Wales arbitration act, 1918.................. July, 1918: 182
New York. Statistics on, from study of women in war industries.................................. June, 1919: 223
------ Stieet railways. Women paid same as men...................................................................
May, 1918: 20
South Africa. Resolution. Conference of employers and employees.............................. June, 1920:. 224
United States. Attitude of National Catholic War Council............................................... June, 1919: 46
------ Demand of Women's League for Equal Opportunity...................................................
May, 1918: 21
------First importance as regards public health. (Goldmark.)...................... .....................Jan., 1918: 62-3
------ Metal trades........................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 1934
------Packing houses, awards of. (Judge Alschuler.).................. MayN1918: 124,126; July, 1920: 102,103




54

M ON TH LY LABOR REVIEW .

Equal pay for equal work—Concluded.
_
United States. Principle of shop management of Recording and Computing Machines
Co., Dayton, Ohio..... .........................................................................................................Sept., 1918; 210
----- Principle urged by conference of trade-union women..........................................
Nov.,1918;191
----- Public employees...................*................................................................................. Jany 1920; 213-17
------ R ailroads. B y order o f director general.................. June, 1918: 20; O ct., 1918: 134; M ar., 1919: 211

----- Recommendation of President's industrial Conference............................................. Apr.,, 1920: 38
----- Recommendation of Railroad Wage Commission........................................................ June, 1918: 34
----- Standards of National War Labor Board..................................................................... May, 1918: 57;
N ov ., 1918: 183-4,283; Jan., 1919: 31-2.203-9

----- Standard of War Labor Policies Board.....................................................
Jan., 1919: 217
■----- Statement of Ordnance Department re women in war industries.............................. Nov., 1918: 283
----- Street railways. Women conductors receive same rate as men.......................... Mar., 1919: 215-16
(S ee a lso B onuses; W om an lab or.)

Erdman A ct.......................... ................................................................ Oct., 1916: 21-3; Jtily, 1920: 26-43
Bell telephone system. Sickness, insurance, and death benefits...................................... May, 1917: 753
Celluloid Co., Newark, N . J. Experience in health insurance........................................... May, 1917: 753
Consolidated Gas Co.. N ew York City. Sickness insurance...................................
May, 1917: 753-4
Dodge Sales & Manufacturing Co., Mishawaka, Ind......................................................... June, 1917: 898-9
Electric Railway <fc Light Co., Mlwaukee........................................................................... Nov., 1919: 264-5.
Establishment disability funds. (Emmet.)....................................................................... Aug., 1917: 17-28
------(Whitney.)................ .......................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 192-9
General Electric Co. Benefits.................................................................................................... May, 1917:753
Huyck & Sons, Albany, N . Y ................................................................................................Apr., 1917: 518-20
List of employers who have disability benefit funds.......... ............................................. Dec., 1916: 125-34
Mutual aid funds. (Dawson.)...................................................................................................
Jan., 1917: 25
Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey. Annuity and benefit plans......................................... July, 1918: 168-9
Strawbridge & Clothier. Benefits........................................................................................... June, 1917: 899
Telephone industry of New York State. Pensions, sickness, accident, and death
benefits........................................................................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 121
Western Union Telegraph Co. Sickness disability benefits............................................... May, 1917: 754
(S e e also Fraternal orders; Labor organizations; Railroads. United States: Funds.)
Estes, W . L. Quoted re choice of physician in industrial accident cases...................... .
May, 1919: 48
Ethylchloracetate. (S e e Poisons ana poisoning: Dope.)
Evening classes. (S e e Vocational education.)
Ex-service men. (S e e Soldiers and sailors.)
Excess.profits. (S e e Profiteering.)
Executive committee of merchants and manufacturers. The minimum wage, a failing
experiment........................................................................... ..............................: .......... .................Oct., 1916: 76-9
Executive departments. United States. Personnel policy, as outlined in bill of Reclassi­
fication Commission. (Mosher.)................................................................................................ July, 1920: 11-25
Executive orders. (S e e United States: President Wilson. Executive orders.)
Executive’ s Club, Detroit. Standards for women in new occupations.................................Jan., 1918: 59,63
Exhaust gas. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Expenditures, clothing. (S e e Clothing: Expenditures.)
Expenditures, food. (S e e Cost of living; Food consumption; Food expenditures.)
Expenditues, fuel. (S e e Fuel expenditures.)
Expenditures, Government. Distribution of, among various branches.............................. July, 1920: 46-50
Explosives. (S e e Mines and mining; Munitions.)
Eye injuries:
Annotated bibliography on eye injuries and diseases.......................................................Aug., 1917: 186-91
Compensation.............................................................. .
Mar., 1919: 244; Apr., 1920: 186-8; Nov., 1920: 10
Eyestrain in relation to industry............................................................................................ July, 1920: 160-2
Glasses for protecting eyes.........................................................................................................Aug., 1917: 86-7
Hazards from wood alcohol................................................................. . . . . ................................ Dec., 1917: 203;
Feb., 1918: 45-8; Mar.. 1918: 195-8; May, 1918: 252-4; Feb., 1920: 197-201
Industries and occupations having greatest eyesight hazard............................................... Apr., 1918: 296
Preventing miner’s nystagmus................................................................................................. Aug., 1916: 43-6
Preventive measures..................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 48
Report of British Health of Munition Workers Committee...........................................Apr., 1917: 538-40;
Aug., 1918: 201; Sept.. 1918: 48
Report of National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness......................................Apr., 1918: 295-8
( S e e also Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Permanent disability.)

F. I. O. M. (S ee Federazione Italians Operai Metallurgies)
Fabian Research Committee, Great Britain. Attitude of trade-unions toward women in
engineering trades........................................................................................................................ June, 1918: 156-60
Fabian Society, Great Britain:
Attitude toward National Guilds movement, referred t o ................................................... July, 1919: 25
Re British Labor Party............................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 260
Fabian Women’s Group, Great Britain:
Attitude of trade-unions toward women in engineering trades......................................June, 1918: 156-60
Suggestions for solution of domestic-servant problem........................................................... Apr., 1919: 193
Factories. (S e e Hours; Sanitation and working conditions; Wages, etc.)
Factory administration. (S e e Employment management.)
Factory inspection bureaus. (See Directories; also specific States a n d co un tries.)
Factory legislation. (S e e Laws and legislation.)
Factory lighting. (S e e Lighting; Sanitation and working conditions.)
Factory location. (S e e Decentralization of industry.)
Factory management. (S e e Employment management.)
Factory ventilation. (S e e Sanitation and working conditions.)
Fair price committee. (S e e United States: Food Administration.)
Fair prices. (S e e Food control.)
Fair wage board. (S e e Manitoba: Fair wage board.)
Family allowances. (S e e Allowances, family; Bonuses.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

55

Family budgets. (S e e Budgets, family.)
Family expenditures. (See Budgets, family; Cost of living.)
Family income. (See Income.)
irage.
Faries, J. C. Economic consequences of physical disability.................................................... Mar., 1918: 92-6
Farm colonies. (See Colonies; Land settlement.)
Farm labor. (See Agriculture.)
Farm Workers, International Congress of. (See International Congress of Farm Workers.)
Farmer-Labor Cooperative Congresses, 1919 and 1920............................ Feb., 1920: 133-4; Apr., 1920: 128-30
Farmers' cooperation. (See Cooperation.)
Farmers' Cooperative Wholesale Federation of New Zealand (Ltd.). Operations.............. Nov., 1919: 222
Farmers' National Conference, Washington, D. C., January 6 to 8,1919................................ Mar., 1919: 72-4
Fatalities. (See Accident statistics; Vital statistics.)
Fatigue:
Canadian committee on industrial fatigue established......................................................... Sept., 1920: 205
Effect of atmospheric conditions on. (Winslow.)............................................................ Feb., 1917: 283-4X)
Factor influencing accident occurrence............................................................................. Aug., 1918: 199*200
Industrial physiology—a new science................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 294-6
Investigation of United States Public Health Service, National Research Council, and
Council of National Defense................................ .............................................................. May, 1920: 158-63
Relation to hours.......................................................................... .............................................. June, 1916: 25-7
Reports and recommendations. British Association for the Advancement of Science. Dec., 1916: 97-105
------British Health of Munition Workers Committee....................... ............................... 1916—June 79-81;
v
1917—June 876-7; July 14-19; Aug. 128-9; 1918—Sept. 43. 220-2
------ British Home Office............................................................................................................. Dec., 1916: 97-8
------Council of National Defense.............................................................................................. June, 1918: 217
Use of factory statistics in study of. (Florence.)................................................................ Feb., 1919: 230-2
(S e e also Health in relation to hours; Output in relation to hours.)
Fay, A . H .:
Accidents at metallurgical works, 1916.................................................................................. May, 1918: 260-2
Coal mine fatalities, 1870 to 1915............................................................................................. Aug., 1916: 61-72
Fayette R . Plumb (Inc.), Philadelphia, Pa.:
Employment department......................................................... ........................................... June, 1917: 899-900
Reduction of hours and effect................................................................................................. June, 1917: 844-8
Federal Board for Vocational Education. (S e e United States: Federal Board for Voca­
tional Education.)
Federal child-labor law. (S e e Child labor: Laws.)
Federal compensation. (S e e Workmen's compensation and insurance.)
Federal control. ( S e e Government control.)
Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America. -Social reconstruction program. . Aug., 1919: 66-75
Federal Electric Railways Commission. (S e e United States: Federal Electric Railways
Commission.)
Federal employees. (S e e Public employees.)
Federal employment service. (Sec Employment agencies, United States; United States:
Department of Labor. Employment service.)
Federal Engine Drivers' Association, Australia. Dispute with Amalgamated Miners'
July, 1920: 65
Association..................................................................................................... .............. ....................
Federal housing. ( S e e Housing.)
Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Survey of efficiency of labor................................... Nov., 1920: 118-19
Federal Reserve Board, United States. (S e e United States: Federal Reserve Board.)
Federal Trade Commission. ( S e e United States: Federal Trade Commission.)
Federation of agricultural laborers, France. (See Agriculture: Organizations. France.)
Federation of British Industries:
Membership, representation, etc................................................................................................
Oct., 1918: 44
Re industrial councils...................................................................................................................Oct., 1918: 44-7
Referred to........................................................................... May, 1918: 65; Dec., 1918: 41; Aug., 1920: 155-6
Educational committee report. (Opposition to education act.)....................................... Dec., 1918: 45-6
Housing committee report onjpublic utility societies.......................Nov., 1918: 272-5; Dec., 1918: 331-2
Federation of German Building Trades Workers. Report on wages of members............. Aug., 1918: 162-3
Federation of German Textile Workers. Investigation of wages, females, 1917, referred to. Apr., 1918: 156
Federation of Labor^American. " ( S e e American Federation of Labor.)
Federation of Metalworkers, France. Party to 8-hour-day agreement in metal industry,
1919....................................................... .............................................. ................................................. July, 1919: 164
Federation of Naval Construction Workers, Argentina. Shipyard workers of Buenos
Aires......................1............................................................................................................................. July, 1919: 161
Federation of Noncommercial Employment Bureaus, New York City. Activities....... Aug., 1917: 158-63
Federazione Italians Operai Metallurgici. Labor disturbances............................................. Dec., 1920: 200-6
Feeble-minded. Labor colonies. Various States.................................................................... Sept., 1920: 12-19
(S e e atso Handicapped.)
Fees:
Attorneys. In damage suits for personal injuries................................................... Mar., 1919: 235-6,247-8
Hospital and medical. Under workmen’s compensation laws.......................................... May, 1919: 53-8
Felt hat industry. (S e e Hat industry.)
Felt trades. Anthrax, assuming alarming proportions. (British report.)........................ Aug., 1918: 205-8
Felton, E. C. Education for war industries............................................................................. Apr., 1918: 111-12
Ferenczi, E . Food situation in Hungary....................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 73
Ferries. (S e e Docks and harbors.)
Ferrin, A. W . Development of the labor situation in Australia............................................July, 1920: 59-66
Fifty-four-hour week. (S e e Nine-hour day.)
Filene’s Sons Co., Boston:
Education of employees............................................................................. ................................July, 1916: 67-8
Employment problems. ( Gilman.) ...................- ............ ...............................................- - - June, 1917: 897-8
Fair minimum wage profitable to employer................................................................. June, 1918: 150,151-5
Fines. ( S e e Deductions from wages.)
Finishers and decorators. (S e e Painting and decorating.)
Finnish Cooperative Society, New York City. Housing activities.......................................... July, 1919: 121
Finnish Socialist Party, United States. Cooperative federation.............................................. Mar., 1919: 137
Firemen:
Discharge of city firemen for membership in unions, Texas............................................ Nov., 1920: 196-7
Great Britain. Survey of wages, hours, and conditions of service.................................. Nov., 1920: 92-3
Locomotive. (S e e Firemen and enginemen, locomotive.)




56

M O N TH LY LABOR REVIEW.

Firemen—Concluded.
Merchant marine. (S e e Seamen.)
ra g e .
Stationary. United States. Wage increases, 1918................................................................ Oct., 1918: 131
(S e e also Railroads.)
Firemen and enginemen, locomotive:
Court decision.............................................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 202-3
United States. Demand for wage increases. 1918............................................................. Apr., 1918: 188-92
------Wage rates on mileage bases, order of Director General.............. ..............................June, 1918: 13-17
(S e e also Railroads.)
Firemen and Oilers, Stationary, International Brotherhood. (S e e International Brother­
hood of Stationary Firemen and Oilers.)
First aid. (S e e Medical and hospital service.)
Fischer, R. Suggestions for prevention of anthrax.................................................................... Aug., 1915: 28-9
Fish, E. H. Plan of reducing turnover.......................................................................................June, 1917: 894-5
Fish canning. (S e e Food canning and preserving.)
Fisher, B.:
Methods of determining the cost of labor turnover........................................................ Apr., 1917: 579,581
Methods of reducing labor turnover........................................................................................ June, 1917: 894-5
Fisher, H . Education act, 1918........................................................................................................ Dec., 1918: 42-6
Fisher. I.:
Adjusting wages to the cost of living......................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 1-5
Need for health insurance............................................................................................................ May, 1917: 747
Price situation................................................................................................................................
July, 1920: 93
Ratio charts:................................................................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 20
Stabilizing the dollar............................................................................... Mar., 1919: 10-14; Mar., 1920: 222-3
Fishing industry. British Columbia. Minim urn-wage order................................................... Apr., 1920: 116
(S e e also Food canning and-preserving.)
Fisk, Helen G. Employment of women m acetylene welding............................................. May, 1919: 221-30
Fitch, J. A . Opinion on the industrial courts............................................................................... Sept., 1920: 24
Five and ten cent stores. (S e e Stores.)
Five-day week. (S e e Forty-hour week.)
Floating labor. (S e e Migratory and floating labor; Seasonal employment.)
Florence. P. S. Use of factory statistics in study of fatigue..................................... .............. Feb., 1919: 230-2
Flour. (S e e Retail prices, food; Wholesale prices.)
Flour and grist mills:
Germany. Union activities................................................................................. ................... Dec., 1917: 138-9
------(Berlin). Wages and hours, flour mills. (Maylander.)....................... f ..................... Oct., 1920: 142
Great Britain. Milling orders............................................................................................. Mar., 1917: 398-400
Pacific Northwest. Wage increases to meet cost of living..................................................
Nov., 1918: 4
United States. Flour milling profit regulations..............................Aug., 1918: 138-9; Sept., 1918: 124-6
------Pensions, insurance, etc................................................................................................. Feb., 1918: 192-204
“ Filing squad” defined. Substitutes for absent operatives, munitions, Scotland............. Aug., 1918: 173
Distribution. (S e e Markets and marketing.)
Prices. (S e e Cost of living; Retail prices; Wholesale prices.)
Food Administration, District of Columbia. (S e e District of Columbia: Food Administra­
tion.)
Food Administration, United States. (S e e United States: Food Administration.)
Food analysis. (S e e Dietary studies.)
Food canning and preserving:
Alaska. Salmon. Payment of wages.................................................................. ................. June, 1917: 901
British Columbia. Fruit and vegetable. Minimum-wage order....................................... Apr., 1920: 116
California. Fish-canning order, re wages and hours................................ Jan., 1918: 120; Nov., 1920: 109
------Fruit and vegetable. Hours and wages. Orders, 1917 and 1918.............................. July, 1917: 57-8;
Feb., 1918: 138-42; Nov., 1918: 171-2; Aug., 1919: 203-5
------------ Report of Industrial Welfare Commission, 1917...................................................... Feb., 1918: 138
------------- Survey in progress. Referred to........................... ....................................................
Sept., 1915: 9
District of Columbia. Sugar rationing to householders....................................................Aug., 1918: 142-3
Massachusetts. Minimum wage, decree effective September 1,1919............................Sept., 1919: 250-1
------ Weekly wage rate to women, 1918...................................................................................... June, 1919: 206
Oregon. Fruit and vegetable. Minimum-wage rates in effect June 30,1917................. Nov., 1918: 174
------------- Order re overtime, May 26,1915......................................................................... .......July, 1915: 40-1
Pacific States. Labor camp not uncommon in canneries.................................................... Apr., 1917: 558
United States. Sugar restrictions............................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 140
Washington (State). Employment statistics, wages, etc., 1915,1916............................... Mar., 1917: 477
------Fruit, berry, and salmon canning. Wages, hours, and working conditions............ Apr., 1917: 569
Wisconsin. Pea canneries. Order of April, 1918, affecting employment of women in. July, 1918: 114-15
------State v , Lange Canning Co............................................................... July, 1916: 136-7; Feb., 1917: 208-9
(S e e a lso Packing industry.)
Food consumption:
France. Yearly consumption, by household of four, in Paris, various commodities... Nov., 1918: 107
Germany. Food needs of the German people before the war.......................................... May, 1917: 705-9
------Individual, prewar, and now............................................................................................. Nov., 1918: 9-10
Great Britain. War and prewar compared, with table of food values.......................... July, 1918: 193-5
Norway. Changes, 1912-13 and 1916-17........... .................................................................... Mar., 1919: 123-7
Sweden. Changes in character of food consumption......................................................... May, 1918: 109-12
United States. Shipbuilding districts.................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 115-46
------Standard of measurement for wife and children of various ages.............................. Dec., 1918: 115-16
(S e e also Budgets; Dietary studies.)
Food control:
Austria. Rationing, summer of 1918................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 163-96
Bavaria. Regulation requiring simpler menus in hotels, restaurants, etc...................... Nov., 1918: 27
Brazil.............................................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 106-7
Canada. Order as amended November 29,1916.................................................................June, 1917: 831-4
------ Regulations, 1918..................................................................................................................Dec., 1918: 149-52
------ Resolution of Trades and Labor Congress, 1918............................................................... Dec., 1918: 356
District of Columbia. Regulations and fair price list....................................................... Aug., 1918: 141-4
------Regulations re public eating places................................................................................. Nov., 1918: 116-17
------ Sugar.............. ...............................................................................................................
Sept., 1918: 128-9
------Summary of acti vities........................................................................................................ Dec., 1918: 162-4




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

57

Food control—Concluded.
Page.
District of Columbia. Violation of regulations........ .......................................................... Oct., 1918: 127-9
European countries, 1918.........................................................................................................Mar., 1919: 128-31
------ Methods adopted in price fixing.......................................................................................... July, 1915: 44
France. Civil requisition........................................................................................................May, 1918: 113-14
------ Commissions to fix retail prices...................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 99-101
------ Conditions in 1918............................................. July, 1918:95-104; Sept., 1918: 130; Nov., 1918: 122-9
------ Law providing for requisition of commodities in storage.......................................... May, 1918: 113-14
------ Removal of restrictions........................................................................................................ Apr., 1919: 82-3
------ Resum6 of price fixing of food commodities..................................................................Apr., 1917: 525-33
------ Various Government regulations................................................................................... June, 1917: 915-21
Germany. Government control of food supplies. May, 1917: 703-27; June, 1917: 921-8; July, 1917: 66-9
------ Policy.....................................................................................................................................Dec., 1917: 99-100
------ Rationing of various commodities...................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 150
------ Recommendation of labor unions........................................................................................ Apr., 1918: 84
------ Reduction of bread ration................................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 146-8
------ Study and recommendations of Eltzbacher Commission...........................................May, 1917: 706-11
------ Supplies for mothers and children................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 204-5
------ 1917,1918................................................................. Jan., 1918: 91-5; May, 1918: 45-53; Nov., 1918: 5-28
Great Britain. Development since fall of 1917.................................................................... July, 1918: 84-94
------ Government control of food supplies............................................................................... July, 1917: 69-78
------ Maximum prices, various commodities...............................*..........................................Dec., 1918: 152-6
------ Ministry o f Food established December, 1916.................................................................. May, 1917: 770
------ Orders re food supplies..................................................................................................... June, 1917: 928-45
------ Rationing, supphes, gardens, etc..................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 144-6
------ Policy of national committee of British workers........................................................... July, 1917: 78-80
------ Summary and scope oflegislation....... ....................................Mar., 1917: 392-407; Nov., 1917: 91-104
------ Summary of conditions, 1918........................................................Nov., 1918: 117-20; Jan., 1919: 115-18
------ System in force...................................................................................................................... Dec., 1917: 100-1
------ Voluntary weekly ration set by controller........................................................................ July, 1918: 194
Italy. Decree establishing National Cooperative Union for Importation [of food­
stuffs)...........................................................................................................................................Apr., 1920: 130-1
—— Government control of food supplies............................................................................ May, 1917: 727-44
------ Turin consular district, 1917................................................................................................. May, 1919: 177
New York City. Attempts to eliminate waste of food....................................................... Sept., 1917: 96-8
Norway. Amounts allowed for family of six...................................................................... June, 1918: 104-6
Peru. Food prices fixed by Government...............................................................................
Oct., 1920: 74
Scandinavia. Pricesfor domestic consumption and export................................................N ov., 1918: 108
Sweden. Effects of rationing on family budgets.................................................................. May, 1918: 112
Switzerland. Demand of trade-unions and Socialist Party.......................................... Aug., 1918: 216-17
United States. Act re use of food,- etc., for beverages.............................. June, 1919: 41; Nov., 1919: 159
------ Grain, sugar, and live stock...............................................................................................Aug.. 1918: 137-41
------ Letter from President Wilson re organization of food administration.......................July# 1917: 65-6
------Licensingof dealers............................................................................... Nov., 1917: 85-6; Dec., 1917: 95-9
------ List of State foodradministrators............................................................................... .......Nov., 1917: 87-8
------ Orders and regulations......................................................................................................... Dec., 1917: 95-9
------ Organization of Food Administration............................................................................Sept., 1917: 67-71
------ Price fixing during the war. (Stoddard)........................................................................ May, 1920: 25-31
------ Progress oi. (Stoddard)......................................................................................................Nov., 1917: 80-91
------ Public eating places............................................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 114-16
------ Removal of restrictions after armistice........................................................................ Feb., 1919: 114-16
------Various commodities...................................... Sept., 1918: 123-8; Oct., 1918: 124-7; Dec., 1918: 158-62
Uruguay. Maximum prices fixed by National Suosistence Board.............................. Aug., 1918: 135-6;
Jan., 1919: 113-14
Washington (State). Effect of food control on family budgets.........................................Juiy, 1918: 78-9
( S e e also Communal kitchens; Price fixing; Retail prices; Wholesale prices.)
Food distribution. (S e e Markets and marketing.)
Food expenditures:
Great Britain. Average for working-class family, 1914 and 1918....................................... May, 1919: 172
Italy. Workman's family in Milan, December, 1919............................................................ Apr., 1920: 91
United States. Twenty-two articles combined, specified cities. (Carr)...................... July, 1919: 57r-60
------ Average annual expenditure, various cities. •(Ogbum)..............................................Aug., 1919: 1-25
------Average expenditure for 22 articles combined, specified cities................................. 1919—Aug. 108-9;
Sept. 88-9; Oct. 74-6; Nov. 150-2; Dec. 187-9; 1920—Jan. 91; Feb. 82; Mar. 55
------ Various shipbuilding districts......................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 115-46
Washington (State). Family of 5,1914 to 1918......................................................................
July, 1918: 80
(S e e also Budgets; Cost of living; Food consumption.)
Food industries:
Denmark. Wages. Bakers, millers, confectioners, etc., 1914 and 1920............................ Dec., 1920: 87
Germany. Food adulteration during war............................................................................. Nov., 1918: 27-8
------ Wages, 1914 and 1917........................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 174
------ Wages, 1919 and 1920................................................................................. Oct., 1919: 158; Dec., 1919: 255
Great Britain. Labor organization. Statistics of membership......................................... June, 1919: 305
India. Wages, 1914 to 1916. (Rice)......................................................................................... Nov., 1917: 78
Japan. Wages................................................................................................... Nov., 1917: 149; Aug., 1920: 89
Manitoba. Wages and hours................................................................................................. Oct., 1918: 189-91
New York. Food, beverages, and tobacco. Average earnings.........................................June, 1918: 125;
July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
------Suspension of law requiring weekly day of rest.............................................................. Sept., 1918: 269
Norway. Wages, 1895 to 1915.................; .................................................................................. Npv., 1917: 112
Oregon. Average daily wages.................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 122
Switzerland. Wages and hours, 1914 and 1918....................................................................... June, 1919: 185
Uruguay. Provisions of law of 1918 re hours..........................................................................Sept., 1918: 276
------ Regulation of night work..................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 276
Wisconsin. Average weekly earnings...................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 112
(S e e also Bakeries; Confectionery.)
Food requirements. (S e e Budgets; Dietary studies.)




58

M ONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

.r uvu supply;
Austria. Statement of food minister, quoted....................................................................... Aug., 1920: 72-3
------Summer of 1918. General summary............................................................................. Dec., 1918: 168-96
Canada. Prohibition of hoarding, by order in council......................................................... Dec., 1918: 150
District of Columbia. Report of committee....................................................................... June, 1917: 957-9
England. Summary, 1918.......................................................................................................Aug., 1918: 144-6
European countries. Summary, 1918.................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 128-61
France. Commission created September, 1918; duties.........................................................Nov., 1918: 125
Germany. Conditions, various dates, 1917 to 1919— ............................1917—May 711-27; June 927-8;
July 66-9; 1918—Jan. 91-5; May 45-53; Aug. 147-8; Nov. 5-28; 1919— Mar. 130-1
------Memorial of the Neukfilln city council.............. ............................................................... May, 1918: 45-9
------ Program of agricultural council for 1920-21....................................................................Aug., 1920: 45-6
------ Program of trade-unions.................................. .................................................................. Apr., 1918: 84-5
Great Britain. Supply available and recommendations for distribution..................... July, 1917: 69-78
------ Unreasonable withholding of food supplies act.............................................................. Mar., 1917: 392
Hungary. Statement of Emerich Ferenczi, quoted........ ........... ; 1............ ....................... Aug., 1920: 73
Italy. Production of foodstuffs before and during war................................................... May, 1917: 727-44
Switzerland. Conditions, 1918.............................................................. ................................... Nov., 1918: 113
United States. 1918................................................................................................................. Feb., 1919: 114-16
------Packing industry. Discussed by National Popular Government League............... Feb.,
1919:67-8
(S e e also Communal kitchens; Food control.)
Foot candle, defined........................................................................................................................... June, 1918: 216
Ford, C. E. Coordination of industrial and community health activities.......................... Feb., 1920: 201-2
Ford, J. Bad housing and ill health..................... ...................................................................... July, 1919: 243-8
Ford Motor Co.:
Employment department. Description.................. .............................................................. Aug., 1916: 20
Employment of cripples............................................................................................................ Dec., 1918: 85-86
Labor turnover..............................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 284
Fore River Shipbuilding Co.:
Apprenticeship classes.................................................................................................................. July, 1916: 66
Employment department.............................................................................................. ............July, 1916: 68-9
Employment management, welfare work, etc......................................................................Apr., 1917: 577-8
Foreign commerce. Workman's compensation for employees engaged in........................ Nov., 1919: 308-10
Foreign competition. Manufacturing. Great Britain.........................................................Aug., 1918: 90-1,93
Foreign labor. (S e e Alien labor.)
Foreign trade:
Need for foreign trade education................................................................................................ Jan., 1919: 83-5
Resolutions of reconstruction congress. (United States Chamber of Commerce), 1918. Jan., 1919: 45-8
Foreigners. (S e e Alien labor; Aliens; Americanization.)
Foremen:
Bonus for accident reduction. (Chaney.)......................................................................... Sept., 1919: 272-81
International Association of Printing House Craftsmen, September, 1919................... Oct., 1920: 214^15
Opportunities for women, Great Britain................................................................................. May, 1919: 240
(S e e also Employment management.)
Formaldehyde. Used in new process for destroying anthrax spores................................... Aug., 1918: 207-8
Forster, H . W . Safety................................................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 198,200
Fort Smith (Arkansas) Spelter Co. case. Award of Ernest T . Gundlach, arbitrator.___ Dec., 1920: 180-4
Forty-hour week:
Australia. Motive of recent strikes............................................................................... .......... July, 1920: 66
Canada. Resolution of Trades and Labor Congress......................................... ................... Dec., 1918: 356
Great Britain. Five-day week system of shortening hours described.......................... Dec., 1919: 253-4
South Africa. Resolution of conference of employers and employees.............................. June, 1920: 224
United States. Clothing. Experience of factory in Middle West................................... Dec., 1920: 80-1
------Department stores and factories, New York State...................................................... Dec., 1920: 79-80
------ Printing and publishing................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 249,250
Forty-eight-hour week:
Discussions and recommendations of International Labor Conference.......................... Jan., 1920: 6-12;
Feb., 1920: 15-20; Oct., 1920: 210
Principle recommended by Commission on International Labor Legislation............... May, 1919: 23,25
Recommendation of President's Industrial Conference........................................................ Apr., 1920: 38
Australia. Standard..................................................................................................................... June, 1919: 212
British Columbia. Extent of, referred to ................................................................................ July, 1919:153
France. Petroleum refineries and warehouses......................................................
Mar., 19201123
Great Britain. Experience of Salford Iron Works, Manchester......................................... Dec., 1916:120
------ Steam railroads. Demands, 1919....................................................................................... June, 1919:169
------Textile industries..................................................................................... July, 1919: 157; Sept., 1919: 235
------ Transport trades..................................................................................................................... July, 1919:157
------ Woolen industry, England................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 182
Italy. Metal workers................................................................................................................... June, 1919:183
Norway. Adopted January 1,1920.............................................................................................Sept., 1920: 111
South Africa. Resolution of conference of employers and employees.............................. June, 1920:224
Spain. Skilled labor. Barcelona.............................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 90
Sweden. Per cent of workers working 48 hours or less........................................................ July, 1919: 127
United States. Clothing industry, Chicago............................................................................ Nov., 1916: 31
------ Clothing, women's. Boston.......................................................................
Apr., 1918: 231
------------- Firm in Middle W est.................................................................................................... Aug., 1918:182
------ Fruit and vegetable canning, California.............................................................................. Nov., 1918: 172
------ Plans for rest day in continuous operation industry.
(Croxton.)....................... Feb., 1920: 118-27
------ Various Industries, 1915 to 1919....................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 194-9
(S e e also Eight-hour day; Forty-four-hour week.)
Forty-four-hour week:
British Columbia. Shipbuilding............................................................................................. Aug., 1918:157
Canada. Resolution o f Trades and Labor Congress............................................................ Dec., 1919: 367
Great Britain. John Dawson Works, England.....................................................................
Feb., 1920: 9
------ Manual labor............................................. ................................................Nov., 1918: 264; Feb., 1920: 257
------ Transport workers....................................................................................................
June, 1919:171
— Various trades..................................................................................................................July, 1919: 154,157
New South Wales. Progress of movement............................................................................. Dec., 1920: 84
South Africa. Resolution of conference of employers and employees.........................June, 1920: 224




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

59

Forty-four-hour week—Concluded.
Page.
United States. Building trades, New York City................................... ......................... Feb., 1920: 147
----- Clothing industry. New York City........................................June, 1919: 2,9; Dec.. 1919: 41,52,56
------------Factory in Middle West.......................................................................... .
Aug., 192d: 2ir-8
----- Printing industry, New York City............................................................................. Jan., 1920: 270
----- Shipbuilding. Delaware River and Baltimore. . ......................................... ......... Apr., 1918: 183
----- Various industries.........................................................................................Nov., 1919: 172-90,194-9
Forty-seven-hour week:
Finland. Metal trades............................................... ...................................................... Jan., 1918: 110
Great Britain. Building, metal, engineering, and shipbuilding trades, referred to. July, 1919: 154,156
Foundations. (S ee Ratsn Tata Foundation; Russell Sage foundation.)
Foundries:
Canada. Core^making. Survey by Military Hospitals Commission.......................... Apr., 1918: 120-1
Germany. Employment of women during war.......................................................... Apr., 1918: 219-22
Great Britain, payment by results, scheme of Priestman Bros. (L td .)................ Apr., 1919: 179-80
— Wage increases, December, 1919.................... ................................ ...................... Feb., 1920: 12S-30
Italy. Three-shift system.......... ..................................................................... ................. June, 1919: 183
Maryland. AgreementhN . W . L. B. (New York Central Iron Works Co.)................... Nov., 1918: 36
Milwaukee. Labor turnover study, 1918. (Kirk.)....................................................... Apr., 1919: 64-6
New York. Heavy lifting for women. Law.......... .......................................................
Jan., 1918:59
United States. Holders’ wages, various cities................................ 1916—Feb. 127.133: Mar. 123,129;
Apr. 167,173,1V9: June 131,137,143; Sept. 165,171.177,183; Deo. 265,271.277,283,289,295.301,307
----- Molders, iron. Union scale of wages and nours, 1913 to 1920... Nov., 1919: 184-5; Oct., 1920: 86-7
------------Wages, 1920. Specific cities......................................................... .................
Dec., 1920: 4
— Pensions, insurance, etc........................................................................................ Feb., 1918: 192-204
----- Wages and hours, 1919..................... ....................................................................... June, 1920: 82-94
West Virginia. Award re wages and hours. Wheeling Mold & Foundry Co...........Nov., 1918: 29-84
(S ee alio Iron and steel; Metal trades; Shipbuilding; Stove industry.)
France:
Direction du travail. Mesures tendant a maintenir l’activitd national pendant la
demobilisation, 1919..................................... .......... ..................................... ..............July, 1919; 232-4
----- Travaux des Commissions mixtes Ddpartementales pour le malntien du travail
national, 1918.................................................................................................................. July, 1919: 142-3
Minister of Agriculture and Food Supplies. Commission General of Petroleum and
Combustibles. Creative act...........................................................................................Nov., 1918: 128
----- Report and decree re retail prices of food.............................................................. Oct., 1919: 99-101
Ministers del’hygiene, del’assistance et de la prdvoyance sodales, created, personnel,
etc.:..................... .................................. .................................................. ...................... Apr., 1920: 185
Ministkre du travail et de la prdvoyance sociale. Bureau de la statistique gdndrale.
Resultatsstatistiquesdereoensementgdndral. 1911................................................ . July, 1917: 43-54
Ministry of Industrial Reconstitution. Created, 1918.................................................... Feb., 1919: 257
Ministry of Munitions. Change of name...................................................... ................... July, 1919: 143
----- Decree creating permanent boards of conciliation and arbitration, munitions
industry......................................................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 360-2
Ministry of Public Works, Food Supplies, and Transportation. Decree establishing,
and personnel.................................................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 532
Ministry of Social Hygiene, f-fodal Insurance, and Social Provision. Creation and per­
sonnel................................................................................................................................ Apr.. 1920: 185
National Office of Disabled and Retired Soldiers. Organisation, duties, etc.. . . . . . June, 1917: 852—3;
May, 1918: 81-6; Sept., 1918: 87-8; July, 1919: 217-18
(S ee also specific subjects.)

Francke, E . Scope of Imperial Labor Department, Germany............................................ Feb., 1919: 258
Francke, Marie. Opportunities for women in domestic science........................................ Apr., 1917; 570-2
Frankel, E .:
Freight handlers on passenger-freight steamers on the Great takes.............................Apr., 1918: 83-40
Labor turnover in Chicago............................................. ....................... ....................Sept., 1919: 44-59
Labor turnover in Cincinnati, 1917-18..................... .......................................................Mar., 1919: 35-62
Labor turnover of seamen on the Great Lakes.............................................................. June, 1918: ,46-53
Mobility of labor in American industry........................................................................ . June, 1920: 36-56
Frankel, L. K . Study of influenza-pneumonia.................................................................... Jan., 1920: 223-4
Franklin. F. Price situation................................................................................................... July, 1920: 90
Fraternal orders:
Argentina. Benefit associations. Development, membership, etc........................... Apr., 1919: 117-18
France. Statistics of mutual aid societies, 1901 to 1912................................................. sept., 1916: 90-6
United States. Employees’ benefit associations. Addresses. Referred to................. Oct., 1916: 57;
May, 1917: 749
----- Workmen’s Sick and Death Benefit Fund of the United States of America. Dis, ability experience. (Emmet.).............................................. ........Nov., 1919: 20-39; Mar., 1920: 4-15
(S ee also Establishment funds; Labor organizations.)
Fraternal societies. (S ee Fraternal orders.)
Frauds. (S ee Workmen’s Compensation and insurance: Fraud.)
Frayne, H . Production and unrest. Referred to....... May, 1917: 752; Nov., 1918: 45; Nov., 1919: 20,118
Free Federation of Laborers, Porto Rico. Convention, 1918................................................ Jan., 1919: 53-5
Free trade-unions. (S ee Labor organizations: Germany.)
Freedom of speech and assemblage. Steel strike, 1919......................................................... Dec., 1919: 91-2
Freedom of speech and press. Resolution of National Industrial Conference, Canada....... Nov., 1919: 61
Freight handling:
United States. Union scale of wages and hours, May, 1917 and 1918. (Docks and
harbors.)........................................................... ............................................................Nov., 1918: 151-2
----- Union scale of wages. Chicago, Cleveland, and Milwaukee..................................... Oct., 1918: 154
----- Great Lakes. Wages, hours, and working conditions, passenger-freight steamers.
(Frankel.)................. ! ................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 33-40
----- North Atlantic States. Union scale of wages and hours.......................................... Sept., 1918: 159
(S ee also Docks and harbors.)
Freight Tates:
France. State railroads.................................................................................................... May, 1918: 30-2
Great Britain. Increase in on railroads............................................................................ May, 1918: 43
Italy. State railroads........................................................................... ,........................... May, 1918: 84r5
Japan. Private and State railroads................................................................................. May, 1918: 41
Switzerland. Steam railroad............................................................................................. May, 1918: 38




60

M ONTHLY LABOE BE VIEW.

French, W . J.:
Page.
The larger idea in workmen’s compensation............................. , ...................................... Nov., 1919: 317-22
Trend of workman's compensation........................................................................................../ Nov., 1920: 1-9
Frequency rates, accident. ( S e e Accident statistics.)
Frev, J. F . The relation, of scientific management to labor....................................................... Dec., 1916: 30
Friday, D . Quoted re inefficiency of labor m relation to wages...............................................
July, 1920: 91
Friendly societies. ( S e e Health insurance, foreign countries.)
Frineke, M .C ., jr.:
Laws and agreements governing working conditions among American seamen............. May, 1920: 1-20
“ Loss of use” or the impairment of function.....................................................................Aug., 1920: 121-30
W hat the term “ medical service” in workmen's compensation laws includes......... July, 1919; 187-205
Frostbite. ( S e e Diseases.)
Fruit and vegetable canning. (S e e Food canning and preserving.)
Fruit and vegetable packing. (S e e Packing industry.)
Fruits. (S e e Retail prices, food.)
Fuel:
Retail prices. Austria, Vienna, July, 1914 and 1918............................................................. Dec., 1918: 194
------ Norway, 1914 and 1917 to 1919.............................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 100
------ Rumania. Firewood in Bucharest, 1911,1914, and 1919.............................................. May, 1920: 90-1
------ Switzerland........................................................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 110-12
( S e e a lso Coal; Fuel control; Retail prices.)
Fuel control:
France. Civil requisition....................................................................................................... May, 1918: 113-14
------ Conditions in summer and fall of 1918, summarized.........................................
Nov., 1918: 128-9
Germany. Control of selling organizations by legislation. (Coal mines.).....................Nov., 1915: 83-5
Great Britain. Board of Trade control of coal mines for period of war........................ Apr., 1917: 533-4
Indiana. Law giving State control of coal-mihing industry....................................... Nov., 1920: 199-200
United States. Food and fuel control act.............................................................................. May, 1920: 22-3
------ Heatless days. Reasons for and effect of; order quoted...............................................Deo., 1918: 164-7
------ Organization under act........................................................................................................ Sept., 1917: 67-71
------ Price-fixing during the war. (Stoddard.)....................................................................... May, 1920: 31-4
------ Progress of. (Stoddard.).....................................................................................................Nov., 1917: 89-91
------ Recommendations of Bituminous Coal Commission...................................................... Apr., 1920: 43
Uruguay, 1918............................................................................................................................ .
Jan., 1919: 114
(S e e also Coal.)
Fuel expenditures:
Switzerland. Quantity and costs, 1914 to 1917, family of five.......................................Nov., 1918: 111-12
United States. Various cities. Quantity and cost............................................................ Sept.. 1920: 92-9
Washington (State). Family of five, 1914 to 1918............................ ...................................
July, 1918: 80
(S e e also Budgets; Cost of living.)
Fullerton, H . Employment management and labor standards of women employees........ June, 1918: 174
Fulminate of mercury. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: Mercury.)
Fumes; (S e e Gases and fumes.)
Funds. (S e e Canadian Patriotic Fund; Establishment funds; Railroads: Funds.)
Fur hat industry. (S e e Hat industry.)
Fur industry:
Jan., 1918: 75
France. Saturday half holiday for women for duration of War..........................................
New York City. Processes, physical examination of employees, and working condi­
tions, fur hat industry............................................................................................................ Dec., 1915: 23-33
New York State. Average earnings.. June, 1918: 124; July, 1919: 147; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
(S e e also Hat industry.)
Furniture and house furnishings:
Denmark. Wages, 1914 and 1920............................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 88
Germany. Wages, Berlin, January, 1916................................................................................ Jan., 1917: 146
Great Britain. Furniture. Opportunities for employment of disabled...................Aug., 1918: 111, 112
—— Wages. Increase during war............................................................................................. July, 1919: 158
Netherlands. Wage agreement, March 1,1917, to February 29,1920A..........................July, 1917: 58-61
New York State. Earnings...............June, 1918: 124; July, 1919: 147; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
New Zealand. Rates of wages, 1913 to 1919.............................. ............................................ July, 1920: 114
South Africa. Rates of wages, 1918,1919................................................................................ Nov., 1920: 98
United States. Expenditures, various cities....................................................................... Jan., 1920: 27-34
------ Wages and hours, 1913 to 1919......................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 118-41
(S e e also Woodworking industries.)
Furuseth, A . Scope of the Seamen's Act............................................... Sept., 1917: 98-100; Mar., 1920: 203-4
Fusel oil poisoning. (S e e Ppisons and poisoning: Dope.)

Ge
Gadsby, Margaret A .:
Economic aspects of the disabled soldier problem with particular reference to Canada. Sept., 1918: 68-80
Federal intervention in railroad disputes............................................................................. July, 1920: 26-43
Finding jobs for Great Britain’s disabled soldiers...............................................................Dec., 1917: 65-79
Steel strike, 1919.......................................................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 79-94
Vocational education conference at Philadelphia.............................................................. Apr., 1918: 111-17
“ Gangway count.” Stove industry. Method of counting........................................................ May, 1918: 170
Gannon, V. F. Employment of men past the prime of life...................................................... June, 1918: 177
Garages:
Carbon monoxid poisoning. (Hitchcock.)........................................................................ Feb., 1919: 219-21
Exhaust gas hazard...................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 272-5; Feb., 1919: 220
Gasoline. Hazards........ : .......................................................................................................June, 1919: 238-40
G arden cities. (S e e City and town planning.)
Gardner, H . L. Selection problem of Cheney Bros...................................................................... June, 1917: 897
Garfield, H . A . Food and fuel control, orders, statement, etc.................................................. Nov., 1917: 80;
Sept., 1918: 186-8; Dec., 1918: 164-7
Garment industries. (S e e Clothing industries.)
Garment Manufacturers’ Association, Cleveland:
Settlement of disputes in Cleveland garment industry........................................................ July, 1920: 53-7
Survey of cloak, suit, and skirt industry............................................. .................................Aug., 1918: 1-29
Garment trades. (S e e Clothing.)
Garment workers’ union, international. (S ee International Ladies’ Garment Workers’
Union.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, 1 0 DECEMBER, 1920.

61

Garnishment. (S ee Attachment of wages.)
Garton Foundation. Industrial council for the building industry...................................... Oct., 1920: 168-73
Gary, E . H . Attitude toward steel strike, 1919.................... .......................... ......................... Dec., 1919: 79-94
Gas. Retail prices, 1913 to 1920........................................................................June,.1919: 92-3; June, 1920: 66-7
(S e e also Fuel control; Retail prices.)
Gas Co.. Consolidated, New York City. (S e e Consolidated Gas Co., New York City.)
Gas fitting. (S e e Plumbing and gas fitting.)
Gas industry:
Accidents. Analysis of 10,000 accidents, by causes, 1915-16.............................................. Dec., 1916: 26-7
Sickness insurance plan of Consolidated Gas Co., New York City..................................May, 1917: 753-4
(S e e also Electric light and power.)
Gas Institute, American. (S e e American Gas Institute.)
Gas masks. Army gas masks unsuited for use in industry....................................................June, 1919: 240-3
Gases and fumes:
Dangers from, and hoods for removing................................................................................ Sept., 1917: 105-9
Dust, heat, and fume act of New Jersey, referred to ............................................................. Mar., 1917: 435
Elimination of fumes. Cottrell system described............................................................ Feb., 1919: 229-30
------Masks and other protective appliances.......................................................................... June, 1919; 242-3
Hazards from, in Niagara Falls industries. (Public health report.)................................. Mar., 1920: 163
Hazards in chemical industry and recommendations for remedying. (New York
State Industrial Commission.)............................. ............................................................... Mar., 1920: 165-8
Various industrial gases described in report of Pennsylvania Health Insurance Com­
mission......................................................................................... t ....................................July, 1919: 173,174-5
(S e e also Diseases; Dusts; Poisons and poisoning; Sanitation and working conditions;
sp ec ific in d u strie s.)

Gasoline. Hazards........................................................................................ Feb., 1917: 272-5; June, 1919: 238-40
Geier, O. P. How can medical service be improved?............................................................. Nov., 1919: 323-6
General Confederation of Labor (France). (S ee Confederation generale du travail.)
General Electric Co.:
National War Labor Board awards......... 1918—Aug. 71; Sept. 34-5; Nov. 185; 1919—Jan. 37; Mar. 159
~
’*
"Preparation
. . for
. treating
. . . burns.
..................................... Nov., 1917: 178-9
West‘ Lynn
dispensary.
G neral Federation of Trade-Unions of Great Britain:
Declined to participate in international trade-union conference, Bern, October, 1917.. Mar., 1918: 172
Re headquarters of international secretariat during war................................................... Feb., 1917: 200-6
General Union of Workmen, Spain. Convention, 1918.............................................................. Mar., 1919: 61-2
General Workers’ Union, Great Britain. Demands................................................................... Nov., 1918: 201
Geological survey. (S e e United States: Geological Survey.)
Geologists. Salaries. United States Geological Survey, 1893 to 1919...................................June, 1920: 27,29
Geophone. Listening instrument for mine rescue work............................................... ...........Apr., 1920: 183-4
Georgia. Board of Public Welfare. Report...............................................................................Dec., 1920: 186-$
Gephart, F. C. Analysis and cost of ready-to-serve food......................................................... Nov., 1916: 46-8
German Building Trades Employers’ Federation. By-laws for strike insurance.................
Oct., 1915: 85
Germany:
Coal commission. Findings re working hours in Ruhr hard-coal mines....................... Jan., 1920: 173-7
Council of Peoples Commissioners. Decree regulating collective agreements, employ­
ees’ committees, and arbitration.................................................................................... .....Apr., 1919: 160-7
------Manifesto of November 12,1918...................................................................................... May, 1919: 213-15
------Referred to ............................................................................................................................ Feb., 1920: 152-3
Eltzbacher Commission. Study of food needs................................................................ . May, 1917: 706-11
Gewerbe-Aufsichtsbeamten und Bergbehorden. Jahresberichte, 1914 to 1918. Re­
ferred to.............................................................................July, 1920: 116; Aug., 1920: 112; Nov., 1920: 162
Imperial Economic Council. Established August, 1917..................................................... Dec., 1917: 61-2
Laws, statutes, etc. Die Verfassung des Deutschen Reichs vom 11. August 1919........ Dec., 1919: 132-5
National Economic Council, Provisional. Creation of..................................................... Nov., 1920: 204-7
National Office for Economic Demobilization. Order providing for 8-hour day___ May, 1919: 213-15
Reichsarbeitsamt (Labor Department). Established by decree of October 4, 1918.. Feb., 1919: 257-8;
Nov., 1919: 341
Reichswirischaftsamt (Economic Department), creation and scope of. Dec., 1917: 61-2; Nov., 1919: 341
Statistisches Amt. Labor-market and employment statistics, criticized by C. Hager. Dec., 1918: 351
------Die Rechtsberatung der minder bemittelten Volkskreise, 1909,1913,1914.......... Sept., 1916: 99-100
------Abteilung fur Arbeiterstatistik. Beitriige zur Kenntnis der Lcbenshaltimg im
vierten Kriogsjahre., 1919......................................................... .'......................................... Jan., 1920: 114-17
‘ —— Tarifarchiv (Archive for collective agreements, established)................................... Feb., 1920: 152-3
War nutrition office. Resume of duties, personnel........................ May, 1917: 712-13; Aug., 1918: 147-8
(S e e also specific subjects.)

Gigou, A . Dietary studies........................................................................................................
Aug., 1915: 26-8
Gilman, J. T. Employment problems, W m . Filene’s Sons Co............................................. June, 1917: 897-8
Girls. (S e e Child labor; Woman labor.)
Girls’ homes. (S e e Housing.)
Gisholfc Machine Co., Madison, Wis. Training courses............................... Aug., 1918: 170; Sept., 1918: 207
Glass workers:
Denmark. Wages, 1914 to 1920............................ ..................................................................... Dec., 1920: 88
Finland. Eight-hour day........................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 109
Great Britain. Glass bottle manufacturers. Wage increase during war........................ July, 1919: 158
Japan. Employment and wages........................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 195-6
Missouri. Eight-hour law for plate-glass works cited........................................................... Oct., 1918: 242
New York State. Earnings...............June, 1918: 124; July, 1919: 147; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
United States. Union benefits................................................................................................... June, 1919: 131
------Wages and hours.............................................................................. Sept., 1919: 182-3; May, 1920: 92-107
------Women and child wage earners................ ........................................................................ Mar., 1916: 33-7
(S e e also Glaziers.)
Glasses. Protection from injurious radiations.............................................................................Aug., 1917: 86-7
Glaziers:
Germany (Berliu). Wages, 1919 and 1920............................................................................... Oct., 1919: 15S
United States. Union scales of wages and hours.................................. Dec., 1918: 228-9; Jan., 1919: 179
Glove industry:
France. Saturday half holiday for women, on fabric gloves, for duration of war.........
Jan., 191S: 75
Germany (Magdeburg). Wages, 1914 and 1918...................................................................... July, 1920: 127
, Manitoba. Minimum wage order, 1919.................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 214
“ Go slow” policy...................... ................................ ........................................................................ July, 1920: 66
H O I 317 0 — 41------- r>




62

M ONTHLY LABOR itEVIEW,

Page.
Godfrey, H. Plan for training of management men.............................................................Aug., 1020: 92-3
Gold mining. (See Mines and mining, gold.)
Golden Rule plan. Experience of tailoring establishment in Middle west...................... Deo., 1920: 102-3
Goldmark, Josephine:
Brief in case re shorter work day for women................................................................... June, 1916: 23-9
Report on investigation of effects of industrial conditions on output.........................May, 1920: 158-63
Some considerations affecting the replacement of men by women workers................. Jan., 1918: 56-64
Goldsmiths:
Opportunities for employment of disabled. Gold, silver, jewelry, watch and clock,
Jobbing................................................................................................ ....................... Aug.. 1918: 111,112
Germany (Berlin). Wages....................................................................... ......................... Oct., 1920: 144
Norway. Wages, 1911 to 1915............................................................................................ Nov., 1917: 111
Gompers, S.:
Addresses....................................................................Sept., 1916: 19; May, 1917: 751-2; Feb., 1919: 65-6
Commission on International Labor Legislation, Peace Conference.............................. May, 1919: 2,11
Committee on labor, United States Council of National Defense...............................May, 1917: 647,655
Delegate to trade-union congress.......................................................................... ............. Nov., 1918: 265
Letter to Pan American Federation of Labor conference committee re proposed con­
vention at Laredo, Tex................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 258
Quoted, re production........................................................................................................ Nov., 1920: 116
Gormly, M. E. Trade agreements ip men’s clothing industry, New York City............... Jan., 1918: 18-26
Gothein, G. Labor market, Germany............................................................................... Feb., 1919: 137-41
Gould, G. M. Eyestrain in its relation to occupations....................................................... July, 1920: 160-2
Government control. (See Food control; Fuel control; Munitions; Price fixing; Rail­
roads; Shipbuilding; Telegraph; Telephone.)
Government employees. (See Public employees.)
Government expenditures. (See Expenditures.)
Government housing. (See Housing.)
Government insurance for soldiers. (See Soldiers and sailors; Widows’ and orphans’
pensions.)
Government labor. (See Public employees.)
Government ownership of public utilities. (See Public utilities.)
Government residence halls, Washington, D. C. Description (Conyngton and Magnusson.)........................................................................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 9-15
Government service. (See Public employees.)
Government shops. (See Arsenals; Navy Yards.)
Governmental labor officials:
Association of. (See Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the United States
and Canada.)
Directories. (See Directories.)
Governors’ and Mayors’ conference, 1919. Resolutions........................................................Apr., 1919: 71-8
Governors. Reconstruction conference at Annapolis, December, 1918................................ Mar., 1919: 53-5
Grain control. (See Food control.)
Grain elevators, Nebraska. Cooperat ve plan.............................. ......................................... Mar., 1919: 134
Grain standards act, United States. Referred to................................................................... Aug., 1918: 137
Granite and stone trades:
Boston. Wages, 1914 and 1920........................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 79
Denmark, wages, 1914 and 1920....................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 88
Germany. Employment Statistics, 1913 and after-war prospects.................................. Feb., 1919: 139
----- Wages...............................................Dec., 1917: 45; Oct., 1918: 174; Oct., 1919: 157; Dec., 1919: 255
New York State. Average earnings: June, 1918: 124; July, 1919: 147; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
Spain (Salamanca). Wages, 1917 and 1918...................................................................... Sept., 1919: 245
United States. Effect of air hammer on hands of stonecutters............... ................... Apr., 1918: 25-33
----- Union scale of wages and hours............................................................................... 1918—&ept. 160-1;
Oct. 154-5; Nov. 152-3; 1919—Nov. 179-80,189-90; 1980—Oct. 82,91
Wisconsin. Average weekly earnings.......... ................................................................... Dec., 1920: 112
Granite cutters. (See Granite and stone trades.)
Graphic industry. (See Printing and publishing.)
Great Britain:
Agricultural Wages Board. Duties...............................................................................Jan., 1918: 97-100
----- Minimum-wage orders...............................................................................................1918—June 147-9;
Dec. 319-11; 1919—June 180-1; Nov. 208-9; 1980—July 111; Aug. 84-5
Board of Agriculture and Fisheries. Report, 1917.........................................................Sept., 1918: 88-9
----- Committee on home production of focti. Report.................................................... Mar., 1917: 393
----- Committee on settlement and employment of sailors and soldiers on the land.
Reports and recommendations..................................................... Apr., 1916: 11-12; Sept., 1916: 87-90
Board of Education. Committee on juvenile education in relation to employment
after the war. Report....................................................................................................June, 1917: 884-8
Board of Trade. Food supply..................................................................................................... July, 1917:69-78
----- Memoranda relating to laws affecting strikes and lockouts. Various countries,
1912..................................................................................................................................Jan., 1917: 11-19
----- Order in council giving control of “ articles of commerce” to Board of Trade___ Mar., 1917: 403-7
----- Report on increased employment of women during the war.................................Aug., 1918: 178-9
----- Reports on British reconstruction programs for electrical, engineering, and iron
and steel trades............................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 90-3
----- Committees on electrical, iron and steel, and engineering trades. Reports.......... Aug., 1918: 99-3
----- Committee on prices. Report on meat, milk, and bacon, 1916............................... Jan., 1917: 51-0
----- — Bread, flour, and wheat prices; freight charges; potato, tea, and sugar
prices, 1917.................................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 112-16
----- Committee on rise in retail prices of coal. Report..................................................July, 1915: 45-56
----- Food control department. Orders re regulation of milk, flour, and bread, etc.,
1916............................................................................................................................. Mar., 1917: 398-407
Central Wages Board. Function-, personnel, etc.................................Feb., 1920: 237-8; Mar., 1920: 24
Coal Industry Commission. Creative act, 1919...................... ......................................... Mar., 1929: 201
----- Reports...................................................
May, 1919: 109-14; Aug.,>919: 78-86; Oct., 1919: 23-30
Commission of inquiry into industrial unrest. Reports...................Oct., 1917: 33-8; May, 1918: 169-1
Committee on relations between employers and employed. (See Great Britain: Min­
istry of Reconstruction. Committee on relation between employers and employed.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

63

Great Britain—Continued.
Conciliation and arbitration board for Government employees. Awards................. Aug., 1917: 140-42;
Aug., 1918: 84-9
Cotton control board. Referred to........................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 162
Department of Scientific and Industrial Research. Establishment of, antipersonnel. Apr., 1917: 535-6
Departmental committee on juvenile education. (See Great Britain: Board of Edu­
cation. Committee on juvenile education.)
Departmental committee on the home production of food. {See Great Britain: Board
of agriculture and fisheries. Committee on home production of food.)
Food control department. (See Great Britain: Board of Trade. Food control depart­
ment.)
Foreign Office. Report on Japanese labor.......................................................................... Aug., 1920: 38-43
Home Office. Protective clothing for women and girls in factories and workshops. . Apr., 1918: 217-19
------Regulations applying to TNT factories referred to......................................................... Oct., 1916: 53
------Report'on manufacture of silica bricks and other refractory materials used in fur­
naces, with special reference to effects of dust..................................................................Apr., 1918: 292-5
------Reports on industrial fatigue...................................... ..................June, 1916: 79-81; Dec., 1916: 97-105
------Substitution of women in nonmunition factories during the war........................... May, 1919: 239-42
------Coal mining organization committee. Reports............................................................ July, 1915: 56-8;
July, 1916: 151-3; Apr., 1917: 534r-5
------Committee on anthrax. Reports..................................................Aug., 1918: 205-8; June, 1919: 243-5
------Committee on compensation for disabled sailors and soldiers. Report...................June, 1919: 70-3
------Committee on workmen’s compensation. Report on working of law................ Sept., 1920: 156-61
—— Committee to inquire into hours, pay, and conditions of service of firemen. Re­
port..............................................................................................................................................Nov., 1920: 92-3
------Committee toinvestigate danger in use of lead in painting buildings. Report. . . N ov., 1915:38-40
------Factory Department. Dope poisoning...........................................................................Nov., 1916:105-8
------------- Reports, 1915,1917,1918. Dec., 1916:121-3; Sept., 1918: 236-42; Dec., 1919: 251-4,302-4,315-17
------------- TN T manufacture, precautionary measures, March, 1916.................................... Oct., 1916: 52-3
Industrial commissions. Activities............... .'.....................................................................Aug., 1917: 138-:9
Industrial Fatigue Research Board. Factors affecting relation between hours and
output.................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 217-19; Oct., 1920: 127-31
Inspector of mines. Report of accidents during 1919........................................................... Dec., 1920: 133
Interdepartmental committee on application of Whitley report to Government estab­
lishments. Report.................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 123
Local government board. Infant welfare in Germany during the war, 1918................Oct., 1918: 201-6
------Report on maternal mortality in connection with childbearing..................................Jan., 1917: 75-84
------Committee on housings. Activities of........................................................................... Oct., 1917: 156-7
Medical officer. Report............................................................................................................ July, 1917: 127-8
Medical research committee. (See Great Britain: National health insurance joint
committee. Medical research committee.)
Ministry of Food. Created December 22,1916....................................................................... May, 1917: 770
Ministry of Health. Act creating, and organization........ ................. Aug., 1919: 227-8; Jan., 1920: 52-7
------ Insurance department. Administration office of health insurance act.....................Sept., 1920: 7-8
Ministry of Labor. Creative act, personnel, etc----- May, 1917: 770: June, 1917: 817; July, 1920: 176-7
----- - Industrial reports, Number 1 -2 ,4 ..................Mar.. 1918: 81-4; Aug., 1918: 81—4; May, 1919: 116-22
------ Letter on Government's view of industrial councils, October 20,1917........................Mar., 1918: 81-4
------ Month’s Work. Ceased publication......................... ....................................................... Oct., 1920: 229
------Recommendations of machinery of Government committee, 1918, outlining pro­
gram..................................................... ......................................................................................Apr., 1919: 81-2
------ Report of proceedings under the conciliation act, 1914 to 1918.................................... Apr., 1920: 232-4
------ Report op profit sharing.................................
June, 1920: 144-5
------ Reports on openings in industry suitable for disabled soldiers and sailors..........Aug., 1918: 111-12
------ Resolution of Trades-Union Congress favoring the establishment of.......................... Aug., 1916: 82-3
------ Wage awards by arbitration boards............................................................................... Nov., 1919: 206-8
-------Works.committees............................................................................. June, 1918: 163-5; Aug,. 1918: 81-4
------ Committee of inquiry into night work in the bread baking and flour confectionery
trade. Report.......................................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 147-9
------ Employment department. Work of finding jobs for disabled soldiers.................... Dec., 1917: 66-79
------ Labor resettlement committee. Organization, first meeting, etc................................ May, 1918: 64r-8
------ Training department. Organization, scope, and direction.......................................... June, 1919: 73
------Wages board. Scope and activities re wages for disabled in suitable industries. . Dec., 1917: 68-9
Ministry of Munitions. Circulars re wages of women..................
Aug., 1917: 121-8; May, 1918:155-6
------Duties of welfare supervisors for women...........................................................................July, 1918: 195-7
------Emergency housing schemes. (Adams.)......................................................................... Dec., 1918: 332-5
------Interim report on labor embargoes, 1918..........................................................................Nov., 1918: 292-4
------Order abolishing leaving certificates.................................................................................. Dec., 1917: 57-8
— — Organization, June 9,1915................................................................. June, 1917: 816-17; May, 1918: 152
------Report on the output of munitions in France, 1916....................................................... June, 1916: 69-73
------Wage orders affecting women and girls......................................................................... June, 1917: 818-19;
Aug., 1917: 119-28; Oct., 1917: 83; May, 1918: 155-6; Aug., 1918: 160-1
------Health of munitions workers committee. Date of appointment,procedure, find­
ings...............................................................................................................May, 1918: 157-8; Sept., 1918: 215
--------------“ Dilution of labor bulletin,” scope...................................................................... Sept., 1918: 215-16
------------- Memoranda 1 to 21. (Listed.) .................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 41
-------------- Industrial employment of women and girls.
(Campbell.)........................... Sept.,1918: 219-22
------------- Report. Industrial fatigue and efficiency............................................................. July, 1917:14-19
------------- Report. Industrial health and efficiency...........................Aug., 1917: 128-9; Sept., 1918: 40-53
------Welfare department. Provisions for and scope of....................... Dec., 1916: 71-4; July, 1918: 195-7
------ Women’s trade-union advisory committee. Duties................. Nov., 1918: 291-4; May, 1918:162-3
Ministry of National Service. Activities re labor substitution......................................... July, 1917: 25-8
■.Civil staff employed by Government departments, 1914 and 1918..........................Sept., 1918: 66-7
------Functions and administration........................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 34-44
Ministry of Pensions. Established December 22,1916. Scope and duties............... May, 1917: 770-71;
Dec., 1917: 65
------Reports on openings in industry suitable for disabled soldiers and sailors............... Aug., 1918: 111
•----- Special grants committee. Organization, scope, and activities............................... Dec., 1917: 66-79




64

M ONTHLY

L A B O R R E V IE W .

Great Britain—Concluded.
Page.
Ministry of Pensions. War pensions statutory committee. Activities.....................Aug., 1918: 106-11
Ministry of Reconstruction. Advisory council. Women’s housing subcommittee.
Interim report..................................................................1— .............................................. Dec., 1918: 335-7
------Civil war workers’ committee. Quoted re substitute labor (dilution) during war. May, 1919: 87
------Coalconservafiion committee. Reports.......................................................................... Aug., 1918: 93-7
------Committee on adult education. Report.......................................................................Nov., 1918: 63-70
----- - Committee on relations between employers and: employed. Report on concilia­
tion and arbitration............. .......\................. ...................................................................Aug., 1918: 237-40
------------- Reports on joint standing industrial councils..................................................... Sept., 1917: 130-2;
May, 1918: 59-61; June, 1918: 163-5; Sept., 1918: 53-8; Dec., 1918: 31-4
------Industrial councils and trade boards............................................. ..............................Sept., 1918: 58-64
------Juvenile employment during the war and after......................................................... Mar., 1919: 218-22
------ List of commissions and committees to deal with after war problems. Referred to. Dec., 1918: 53
------Machinery of Government committee. Report, 1918................................................. Apr., 1919: 78-82
------Women’s advisory committee. Report on coordination of vocational training for
women.......................................... .............................*..............................................................Apr., 1919: 89-91
------------- Report on the domestic service problem, 1919..................................................... June, 1919: 226-9
------------- Report on postwar position of women...................................................................Oet., 1919: 219^21
—— Women1s employment committee. Report, 1919............ ..........................................Dec., 1919: 292-8
------Women’s housing subcommittee. Report on urban housing.................................... Dec., 1918: 335-7
Ministry of Shipping. Established, 1916. ^Duties........................................ ...................May, 1917: 770-1
Ministry of Transport. Created, August, 1919.............................................................. ........ Feb., 1920": 235
------Report on accidents occurring on railroads, 1919.........................................................1 Dee., 1920: 133-4
National health insurance joint committee. Organization and duties.......................Jan., 1920: 53-4,59
------Medical research committee. Report on causation and prevention of TN T poison­
ing........................................................... ..................................................................................May, 1918: 237-50
------ 1------Report on wastage of labor (labor turnover)......... ......................................... : Oct., 1918: 199-201
National Industrial Conference. Report and minutes of proceedings............................May, 1919: 104/8
National Maritime Board. Decision re rates of pay........................ May, 1918: 145-6; Sept., 1919: 231-4
------Report, 1917 to 1920....................................... ....................... ................................................ July, 1920: 112
National provisional j oint committee on application of Whitley report. Report......... Aug. , 1919: 132
National Wages Board. Organization..................................................................................... Mar ., 1920: 24
Overseas Settlement Committee. Report as to openings in Australia for women___ Aug., 1920: 97-8
Pfime Minister. Statement directing strikers to return to work................................... Nov., 1918: 291-2
Privy council. Committee for scientific and industrial research. Report 1917-18___ Feb., 1919: 72-6
Royal commission on sugar supplies. Scope of..................................................................... Mar., 1917: 392
Trade advisory committees. Activities in finding employment for disabled.............. Dec., 1917: 67-79
Trade boards act. Various awards under........................................................................... Nov., 1919: 206-8
Treasury. Old-age pensions scheme..................................... *.................................................July, 1917: 34-5
------Committee on approved society finance and administration. Report............
Nov., 1916: 118-22
------Committee on old-age pensions. Report....................................................................... Jan., 1920: 258-9
------ Committee on recruitment for the civil service after the war. Report................ Oct., 1919: 219-21
War cabinet committee on women in industry. Report.............................................. Sept., 1919: 262-71
War office. Woman’s war work...................... ‘ ...............................................'...................... Dec^, 1916: 91-2
War priority committee. Personnel................................... .................................................... Oct., 1918: 37-8
Whitley committee. ( S e e Great Britain: Ministry of Reconstruction. Committee on
relations between employers and employed.)
Working classes cost of livmg committee. Report, 1914 to 1918............... ................... May, 1919: 169-77

(See also specific subjects.)

Green, W . Health insurance.......................................................................................................May, 1917: 747,749
Greenwood, A . How readjustment may be facilitated after the war................................... Aug., 1917: 131-6
Greenwood, Major. Study of labor turnover in British munition factories employing
women............................................................................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 199-201
Grievance committees. (See Conciliation and arbitration; Employees’ representation.)
Groceries. Profits of retailers, District of Columbia. Wholesale and retail prices, Septem­
ber, 1919............................................................................................................................................. Oct., 1919: 84-93
(See also Retailprices, food.)
Group insurance. United States. (Whitney.)......................................................................... Feb., 1918; 202-4
Gruner, E . Scheme for compulsory unemployment insurance. Germany........................Feb., 1919: 244-5
Guards. (See Company police.)
Guerbet, M. Study of dinitrophenol poisoning. Referred to .................................................. Sept., 1918: 243
Guilds. National guilds movement in Great Britain. (Cole.).............................................. July, 1919: 24-32
Guilfoy, M. D. Occupation and mortality....................................................................................
Jan., 1918: 62
Gundlach, E. T. Award in the Fort Smith (Arkansas) Spelter Co. case............................Dec., 1920: 180-4
Gustafson, C. H . Cooperative marketing......................................................................................Feb., 1919: 68-9
Gymnasiums. (See Recreation.)
H.
Hackett, J. D . ; "Standardization of the causes of leaving jobs” ............................................... Nov., 1918: 285
Hager, C. New system of employment statistics...................................................................... Dec., 1918: 351-4
Haig, R. M. Land values.............................................................................................................. May, 1918: 269-70
Hairdressers. (See Barbers and hairdressers.)
Hamilton, Alice:
Causation and prevention of trinitrotoluene (TN T) poisoning. (Summary of British
report.)....................................................................................................................x. ............... May, 1918: 237-50
Dangers other than accidents in the manufacturing of explosives
............................Nov., 1916: 103-4
Dangers of using wood alcohol......................................................................... Feb., 1918: 47; Mar., 1918: 195
Dinitrophenol poisoning in munition works in France.................... *............................. Sept., 1918: 242-50
Dope poisoning in the making of aeroplanes........................................................................ Feb., 1918: 37-64
Dope poisoning in the manufacturing of aeroplane wings..................................................Oct., 1917: 18-25
Effect of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters....................................................... Apr., 1918: 25-33
Hygienic control of the anilin dye industry in Europe........................................................ Dec., 1919: 1-21
Industrial anilin poisoning in the United States (joint author)......................................... June, 1916: 1-12
Industrialpoisonmg in American anilin dye manufacture............................................ Feb.. 1919: 199-215
Industrial poisons in the manufacture of explosives....................... Feb., 1917: 177-98; July, 1917: 124-5
Occupational disease ctiriic of New York City Health Department................................. Nov., 1915: 7-19
Occupational diseases in Pennsylvania___ .‘........................... ................. ........................ July, 1919: 170-80




SU BJECT

IN D E X ,

JU LY,

1915, T O

D E C E M B E R , 1920,

65

Hamilton, Alice—Concluded.
Page*
Practical points in the prevention of T N T poisoning........................................................Jan., 1919: 248-72
Toxic jaundice in munition workers...................................................................................... Aug., 1917: 63-74
Hand tools. { S e e Cutlery and hand tools.)
Handbooks on various trades........................................................................... Jan., 1917: 68-75; Dec., 1917: 72-9
Handicapped:
Economic consequences of permanent disability. California study................................. Oct., 1918: 65-6
Various States. Disabled in industry. Laws re artificial limbs, training, etc..........Oct., 1918: 218-21
------------- Laws for rehabilitating injured workers............................. Oct., 1918: 218-21; Apr., 1920: 202-6
Blind. Germany. Experiment in employing onxnachine tools, etc.......................... Apr., 1918: 129-31
------Italy. List of trades taught to blinded soldiers........................................................... Oct., 1918: 78,79
------United States. Duration of compensation (various States compared to standard
of I. A. I. A . Bi C.)..................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 266
------------- Eye hazards in industrial occupations....... ...........................................................Apr., 1918: 296-8
Cripple. Association for aid of..................................................................................................Mar., 1918: 92-3
------Bibliography................................................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 187-212
------Probability of second injury. (Hookstadt.).................................................................Mar., 1919: 79-84
------Problem of the handicapped, man in industry. (Hookstadt.).. Mar., 1918: 87-92; Dec., 1918:18-30
----- California. Economic consequences of permanent disability accidents....................Oct., 1918: 62-6
------------- Survey of economic handicap and solution of problem— Mar., 1919: 254; June, 1919: 247-53
------Cleveland. Survey, 1915-16. Summary of report........................................................ Mar., 1919: 84-8
------ Denmark. Annual earnings of disabled persons in manufacturing and agri­
culture.......................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 87-8
------------- What becomes of the man disabled in industry.................................... .............. Oct., 1918: 85-90
------ France. Number of crippled soldiers................ ............................................................... June, 1918: 73
------------- Problem of the military cripple.................. ......................................................... July, 1919: 214-19
------ Great Britain. British labor party and the disabled........... .......................................Dec., 1917: 80-1
------------- Brighton, England. Earnings of disabled soldiers at diamond cutting
factory........................................................................................ : ................................................. Aug., 1918: 36
------ Massachusetts. What becomes of men crippled in industry. (Hookstadt.) — July, 1918: 32-49
------ United States. Problem of the crippled man in industry. (Hookstadt.).......... Dec., 1918: 18-30
------------- Responsibility for the industrial cripple, subject of symposium..................... .. Nov., 1918: 201
------------- Feeble-minded. Labor colonies in various States. (Waggaman.)............... Sept., 1920: 12-19
{ S e e also Eye injuries; Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment; Workmen’s
compensation and insurance: Permanent disability.)
Hanna, H . S.:
Can serious industrial accidents be eliminated? (Joint author.)..................................... Aug., 1917: 1-16
Llano del Rio Cooperative colony............................................................................................Jan., 1916: 19-23
Memorandum on accident reports from Federal Government shops............................... Apr., 1916: 73-6
Report cm u Wages and the war” (Locomotive firemen’s brief.)......................................... Apr., 1918: 188
Summary of increased cost of living, July, 1914, to June, 1919............................................ Oct., 1919: 1-8
Hansen, A . f i. Production. Quotation................................................................................July, 1920: 89,90,91
Hanson, W . C. Diseases of occupation..................................... *...................................................Jan., 1917: 92-4
Harbor adjustment commissions. { S e e United States: National Harbor Industrial
Council.)
Harbor Boatmen’s Union. Activities............................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 56
Harbors. { S e e Docks and harbors.)
Hardy, W . British wages in the building trades, 1252 to 1920................................................Nov., 1920: 94-5
Harness and saddlery. {S e e Leather goods.)
Harper, E. R . State insurance. (Quotation.)........................................................................... Nov., 1916: 77-9
Harper, Grace S. Vocational reeducation for war cripples in France....................................June, 1918: 72-6
Harrington, T . F. Fatal poisoning by gases and fumes.......................................................... Feb., 1917: 280-3
Harris. H . J.:
British national health insurance act of May 20,1920......................................................... Sept., 1920: 1-11
British national health insurance system. 1911 to 1919........................................................Jan., 1920: 45-59
Maternity benefit systems in certain foreign countries...................................................... Feb., 1920: 226-8
Harris, L. I.:
Carbon monoxide poisoning in factories................................................................................Nov., 1919: 263-4
Clinical and sanitary study of the fur and batters’ fur trade............................................ Dec., 1915: 23-33
Clinical study of lead, turpentine, and benzene poisoning, painting and decorating.. . Mar., 1919: 226-9
Industrial hygiene.............................................. .................................................................. Sept., 1919: 298-300
Some medical aspects of the high cost of living.................................................................Sept., 1919: 111-12
Study of working conditions in New York City laundries................................................... Aug., 1918: 203
Hart, H . Fluctuations in unemployment in cities of the United States, 1902 to 1917.
Referred to ......................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 212
Hart, Schaffner & Marx labor agreement effective May 1,1916, provisions of........................Jan., 1917: 43-5
Harvard University:
Department of social ethics. Low-cost housing.................................................................. Mar., 191g: 205-6
Graduate School of Business Administration. Operating expenses in retail grocery
stores, 1919. Referred to.......................................................................................................... July, 1920: 140
Harvest hands. { S e e Agriculture; Employment agencies, United States: Activities, etc.;
Seasonal employment.)
Hat cleaning. { S e e Cleaning and dyeing.)
Hat industry. Hazards in the fur and felt hat industries.....................................................Dec., 1915: 23-33;
Mar., 1916: 66-73; July, 1919: 174; Oct., 1919: 237-8
Havens, L. C. Health hazards in the pearl-button industry...............................................Sept., 1920: 146-7
Hayes, E. L . Classes for foremen, Detroit............................................................................... Aug., 1919: 139-40
Hayes Manufacturing Co., Detroit, Mich. Labor turnover reduced and output increased
by employment management.........................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 284
Hayhurst. E. R .:
Ideals in the organization of an industrial medical service.................................................. Oct., 1920: 184
Prevention of disease in bituminous coalmining............................................................... Sept.. 1919: 291-4
Haywood, W . D . Definition of sabotage....................................................................................... July, 1918: 179
Hazard, catastrophe. { S e e Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Security.)
Hazards. { S e e Dangerous and injurious occupations; Diseases; Dusts; Gases and fumes;
Poisons and poisoning; also sp ecific in d u stries.)
Health:
Addresses referred to............................................................ Oct., 1916: 56; June, 1918: 169; Nov., 1918: 201
Bad housing and ill health........................................................................................................ July, 1919: 242-8




66

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Health—Concluded.
_
Cotton manufacturing. Massachusetts. Influence of occupation on health during
-rage.
adolescence............................................................................................................................. Nov., 1916: 110-14
------United States. Hours as related to output and health............................................. Aug., 1918: 158-6
Mar., 1919: 210-22
Effect of war-time employment on English boys...............L....................................... .
Health conservation at steel mills................... ........................................................................ Nov., 1916: 97-9
Industrial physiology—a new science. (Lee.)................................................................... Sept., 1919: 294r-6
Laundry workers. New York City. Report by Department of Health and Con­
sumers’ League, summarized............................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 203-5
Physical fitness of women for engineering work.................................................................. May, 1919: 237-9
Women employed....................................................... June, 1918: 169; Sept., 1918: 219-22; Nov., 1918: 201
------ (See also Great Britain; Ministry of Munitions. Health of Munition Workers
Committee.)
(S e e also Health in relation to hours; Hygiene; Medical and hospital service; Physical
examination of employees: Public health; Sickness statistics; also health departm ents
u n d e r variou s co un tries a n a cities.)

Health, public. ( S e e Public health.)
Health expenditures, District of Columbia. Quantity-cost budget, single man or
woman........................................................................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 35,40-1
Health hazards. (S e e Dangerous and injurious occupations; Diseases; Dust; Gases and
fumes; Poisons and poisoning; sp ecific in d u stries.)
Health in relation to cost of living............................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 111-12
Health in relation to hours:
Coalmines, Germany.................................................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 174
Cotton manufacturing................................................................................................................ Aug., 1918: 153-5
Effect of long hours..................................................................................................................... July, 1917: 15-17
Woman labor. (Illinois survey.)............................................................................................ May, 1919: 204-9
Woolenindustry;....................................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 153-5
Health in relation to wages:
Cotton-mill villages. South Carolina....................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 221-6
Discussed by American Public Health Association, 1918................................................ Feb., 1919: 218-19
Some opinions quoted. (Goldmark.)...................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 62-3
Health insurance, United States, general:
Addresses and discussions. Brief............................................................................................. Oct., 1916: 62-5
------Conference. American Association for Labor Legislation....................................... May, 1917: 746-51
------------- National Civic Federation......................................................................................... May, 1917: 751-4
------Facts and fallacies of compulsory. (Hoffman.)........................................................... May, 1917: 754-9
------ Health insurance. (Lapp.).............................................................................................. Sept.,1919: 330-7
------Medical administration. (Hutchinson.)..................................................................... June, 1919: 285-92
------Medical aspects of administrative details. (Lewinski-Corwin.)........................... Sept., 1919: 338-41
- — Medical organization. (Lambert.)........ ......................................................................... May, 1917: 748
------Need for. (Fisher.).................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 513; M ay, 1917: 747
------ Principles. (Dawson.).............................................................................................. May, 1917: 747,749-50
------ Objections to compulsory................................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 512-18
------ Opposing compulsory. (Stone.)......................................................................................... May, 1917: 752
------ Program for social insurance conference........................................................ ...................
Nov., 1916: 8
------ Relation to the public health and dispensary, (Rubinow.).........................
Apr., 1917: 511-12
------ Standards. (Rubihow.)...................................................................................
Nov., 1916: 114-18
------ Vital facts. (Alexander.)................................................................................................... May, 1917: 750-1
Attitude of. American Medical Association.. . . Oct., 1916: 66-8; Apr., 1917: 509-12; Dec.. 1919: 345-6
------ American Public Health Association................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 226
------ Boston Chamber of Commerce..................................................
May, 1917: 759-61
------ Federal Commission on Industrial Relations........................................ ........................... N o v ., 1915: 63
------ Medical Society of the State of New York............. ........................................................ Jan., 1920: 255-8
------ National Civic Federation..........................
May, 1917: 754
------ Organized labor.................. May, 1917: 749,751-2; Mar., 1918: 176; Sept., 1918: 315; Nov., 1918: 192
Establishment funds. Bell telephone system........................................................................ May, 1917: 753
------ Celluloid Co., Newark, N. J . .........................................
May, 1917: 753
------ Consolidated Gas Co., New York City............................................................................ May, 1917: 753-4
------ Establishment disability funds. (Wnitney.).........................................
Feb., 1918: 192-9
------ General Electric Co......................... . ....................'................................................................ May, 1917: 753
------ Huyck & Sons.......................................
Apr., 1917: 518-20
------List of employers who have some form of disability benefit fund.......................... Dec., 1916: 125-38
------ Operation of establishment of disability funds. (Emm et.)........................................Aug.. 1917: 17-26
------ Pennsylvania Railroad. (Referred to.)............................................................................ July, 1919: 224
------ Standard Oil Co., of New Jersey..................................................................................... July, 1918: 168-9
------Strawbridgeand Clothier.........................................................
June, 1917: 899
------ Summary of survey on operations, plans, and methods. (Chandler.).................. June, 1917: 898-9
------ Telephone industry of New York State...............................................................
Dec., 1920: 121
------ Western Union Telegraph Co...........................................................................
May, 1917: 754
Fraternal orders. Disability experience of workmen’s sick and death-benefit fund.
(Emmet.)..............................................................................................Nov., 1919: 20-39; Mar., 1920: 4-15
------ Fraternal societies under universal health insurance. (Lentz.)................................. May, 1917: 749
------ Health insurance through local mutual funds. ( Rubinow.).................................... May, 1917: 748-9
Labor organizations. Health insurance by trade-unions. (Green.)..........................May, 1917: 747,749
------ Operation of trade-union disability funds. (Emmet.)................................................ Aug., 1917: 28-36
------ Sick benefits of American Federation of Labor...............................................................
Jan., 1917: 6
Standard bill of American Association for Labor Legislation........Apr., 1917: 501-4; May, 1917: 749-50
Health insurance. United States, by States:
California. Recommendations for, and draft bill........................ Apr., 1917: 499-507; June, 1919: 270-80
Connecticut. Report of commission on public welfare, 1919...........................................Aug., 1919: 224-5
Illinois. Report of health insurance commission.............................................................. Oct., 1919: 267-72
Massachusetts. Commission, scope, and personnel.............................................................. Dec., 1917: 206
------Bill of 1917.............................................................................................. Mar., 1917: 426; May, 1917: 759-61
------Recommendations of Governor McCall----------*......................... Feb., 1917: 206-8; Feb., 1918: 189-91
------Report of special social insurance commission............................................................. Mar., 1917: 426-7
New Jersey. Report of commission on old age insurance and pensions........................Apr., 1918: 274-6
Ohio. Act creating commission of investigation................................................................ Apr.,.1917: 507-8




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY,

19.15,

TO DECEMBER,

1920,

67

Health insurance, United States, by States—Concluded.
Page,
Ohio. Findings and recommendations of commission of 1917................................... Feb., 1919: 240-1:
Mar., 1919: 264-75; June, 1919: 280-2
Pennsylvania. Report of commission of 1917:.............................................................. July, 1919: 220-6
Wisconsin. Report of special commission on social insurance............... ........... .........May, 1919: 285-9
Health insurance, foreign countries:
Austria. Amendment of January 4.1917.................................................................... Sept., 1917: 130-44
— - Operations during 1912 and 1913............................................................................. Nov., 1916: 122-9
Canada. Resolution of National Industrial Conference............................................... Nov., 1919: 59-60
Czechoslovakia. Law of May, 1919................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 243-4
Europe. Extent of compulsory health insurance.............................. Mar., 1919: 272-3; Apr., 1919: 209
France. Features of system ofvoluntary state.subsidized sickness insurance............Sept., 1916: 90-6
—— Sick benefit. Street railways..................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 67
Germany. Amendment of law......................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 208
— Domestic service..................... ..................................................................................... July, 1919: 167
----- Effects of war on........................................................................................................ Apr., 1919: 222-5
----- Medical examination of members of sick funds..................................................
Juiv. 1920: 168-70
----- Membership of sick hands, January, 1920.................................................................... May, 1920: 140
----- Peace program of trade-unions.................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 87
— Statistics, 1885 to 1914......................................................................... May, 1916: 77; Jan., 1917? 133
Great Britain. Act of May 20,1920................................................................................ Sept., 1920: 1-11
— Proposed amendment to act of 1911...................................................................... Nov., 1916: 118-22
----- Summary of the provisions of acts of 1911 to 1919.................................................... Jan., 1920: 45-59
Norway. Provisions of laws of 1909,1911, and 19161.................................................... Dec., 1916: 68-71
Paraguay. Post-office employees in Asuncion. (Referred to.)..................................... Deo., 1920: 215
Portugal. Provisions of decrees of May, 1919.................................. Jan., 1920: 261-2; Dec., 1920: 161-2
Sweden. Provisions for sickness reliefin collective agreement of 1917........................... July, 1919: 127
Switzerland. Experience..................................................................... Sept., 1916: 96-8; Apr., 1920: 198
(See also Accident insurance; Maternity insurance; Medical and hospital service;
Workmen’s compensation and insurance.)
Health of munition workers’ committee. Great Britain. (See Great Britain: Ministry of
Munitions. Health of munition workers’ committee.)
Health supervision. (See Medical and hospital service; Physical examination of em­
ployees.)
Heat stroke. (See Diseases.)
Heatless days. (See Fuel control.)
Heating. (See Sanitation and working conditions.)
Heavy lifting. (See Woman labor.)
Hedges, Anna C. Vocational training of girls in the State of New York.............................Jan., 1917: 63-6
Herndon, J. G., 1r. South CarbBna Bureau of Marketing................................................... Jan., 1917: 58-63
Hernia. (See Diseases.)
Hexamethylene-tetramme poisoning. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Hides:
Prices, 1913, and 1917 to 1920..................................................................... Sept., 1919: 99-107; Dec., 1920: 72
(See also Leather tanning and dressing; Wholesale prices.)
Higgins, H . B . A new province for law and order................................. Feb., 1916: 1-22; June, 1919: 208-15
Highway construction. (See Construction; Highways.)
Higley, G. O. Safe limit of carbon dioxide in the working atmosphere..............................Mar., 1917: 453-5
Hill, L. E. Food of munition workers in Great Britain............................................................ Jan., 1917: 56-7
Hillman, S. J. Opinion on open shop. Referred to...................................................................
July, 1920; 52
Hinsdale, F. W . Expectancies of widows to death and remarriage.................................... Nov., 1919: 336-8
Hiring and firing. (See Employment management.)
Hitchcock, C. W. Carbon monoxide poisoning....................................................................... Feb., 1919; 219-21
Hobson, S. G. Joint author of “ National Guilds” .....................................................................
July, 1919: 25
Hod earners. United States:
Rates of wages.............................................................................1918— Feb. 125.131; Mar. 121,127; Apr. 165,
171,177; June 129,135,141; Sept. 163,169,175,181; Dec. 263,269,275.281,287,293, 299,305
Union scale of wages and hours, 1913 to 1920, by cities...................... Nov., 1919: 180-1; Oct., 1920: 82-3
(See also Building trades.)
Hodge, John. Quoted re 8-hour day............................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 50-1
Hoffman, F . L.
Attitude toward social insurance................................. Apr., 1917: 515; May, 1917: 754-9; Feb., 1919: 218
Compensation for industrial diseases. Referred to............................................................... Nov., 1917: 180
Hollander, J. H . Quoted, re price situation...............................................................................July, 1920: 89,92
Holmes, F. M. Investigation of hazards in industries of Niagara Falls............................... Mar., 1920: 161-5
Holt, Winifred. School for training of blind soldiers in Paris................................................June, 1917: 862-3
Home conditions. (See Living conditions.)
Home economics. (See Domestic science.)
Home industries. (See Home work.)
Home ownership:
District of Columbia..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1917: 8-9
France. Recent law grants credit facilities to war victims............................................... June, 1918: 70-1
Ohio........ .................... . .............................................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 275-6
St. Paul, Minn................................................................................................................................ Mar., 1918: 207
United States. Sale of houses to employees. (Magnusson.)........................................ Apr., 1919: 227-32
Home work:
Argentina. Law of 1918........................................................................... Jan., 1919: 300-1; June, 1919: 265-6
California. Minimum wage order of November 2,1918.................................................... Feb., 1919: 192-4
Chicago. Prohibited by trade agreement in cloak and suit industry............................... Feb., 1918: 67
Germany. Minimum wage for home workers....................................................................... Dec., 1917: 113
Great Britain. Extent in box industry................................................................................. June, 1916: 62-9
Illinois. Considered lawful employment................................................................................. Apr., 1920: 137
International trade-union conference, Bern, October, 1917. Peace program.................. Mar., 1918: 174
Japan. Domestic system of manufacture............... ... ............................................................ Aug., 1920: ‘42
New York City. Boots and shoes............................................................................................ June, 1918: 166
—— Dress ana waist industry.................................................................................................... June, 1919: 16
— Millinery industry............................................................................................................. Aug., 1920: 107-8
Norway. Home workers’ commission. Scope of............................................................. Sept., 1918: 204-5
Philadelphia. Women’ s clothing.............................................................................................
Jan., 1918:33




68

MONTHLY LABOE REVIEW.

Home work— Concluded.
Page.
Spain. Law July 5,1918..........................................................................................................June, 1919: 266-9
Switzerland. Census of home workers.................................................................................... June, 1920: 223
United States. Manufacture of army clothing........................................ Oct., 1917: 30-3; Apr., 1918: 108
Homes for girls. (S e e Housing.)
Homesteads. (S ee Housing.)
Homestead commission. Massachusetts. (S ee Massachusetts: Homestead Commission.)
Hoods. For removing dust, fumes, and gases...........................................................................Sept., 1917: 105-9
Hookstadt, C.:
Adequacy of workmen’ s compensation laws......................................................................Apr., 1918: 260-71
Comparison of Canadian workmen’s compensation laws.................................................Mar., 1920: 171-80
Comparison of compensation insurance systems as to cost, service, and security.. . . Dec., 1920: 135-56
Comparison of compensation laws in the United States....................................................Jan., 1920: 230-47
Comparison of workmen’s compensation and employers’ liability systems................ Mar., 1919: 230-48
Compensation for occupational diseases in United States and foreign countries......... Apr., 1919: 200-9
Medical benefits and the medical profession under workmen’s compensation laws. . . May, 1919: 39-61
Probability of industrial cripple sustaining second injury..................................................Mar., 1919: 79-84
Problem of the crippled man in industry............................................................................. Dec., 1918: 18- 30
Problem of the handicapped man in industry..................................................................... Mar., 1918: 87-92
Provision for second injuries under workmen’s compensation laws..............................July, 1919: 206-11
Resume of meetings of I. A. I. A . B. C., 1918, 1919, 1920:............................................. Nov., 1918: 205-14;
Nov., 1919: 266-79; Nov., 1920: 10-19
Tendencies in workmen’ s compensation legislation in the United States..................... Dec., 1917: 144-8
“ Tests of efficiency in workmen’s compensation administration” ............................... Dec., 1919: 318-30
Three important problems of workmen’ s compensation.................................................. Oct., 1917: 111-21
Various systems of compensation for permanent partial disability, United States and
Canada........ ................................................................................................................................ N ov., 1920: 12
Workmen’s compensation legislation of 1919—medical benefits...................................... Sept., 1919: 302-5
Hookworm. (S ee Diseases.)
Hoover, H . Food conditions in certain foreign countries..................................................... Mar., 1919: 129-30
Hop picking. Wages. Washington (State)...............................................................................Apr., 1917: 568-9
Hopkins, Mary D. Investigation of effects of industrial conditions on output.................May, 1920: 158-63
Horseflesh. Austria. Prices, extent of use, etc........................................................................ Dec., 1918: 180-1
Hosiery and knit goods:
France. Saturday half holiday for women for duration of war.........................................
Jan., 1918: 75
Massachusetts. Minimum wage. Rates effective July 1, 1920.......................................... May. 1920: 110
------Survey of wages of women, 1913.......................................................................................June, 1916: 59-62
Milwaukee. Labor turnover, 1918. (Kirk.)................................................... ...................Apr., 1919: 68-70
New York State. Average weekly earnings..................................... ...................................June, 1918: 124;
July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
United States. Employees and amounts of pay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919. (Index
numbers.).............................................................. 1919—Jan. 142; Feb. 132;. Mar. 151; Apr. 151; May 186
------Wages and hours, 1919................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182-3; Feb*., 1920: 101-17
Hospital service. (S ee Medical and hospital service.)
Hospitals:
Canada. Organization and work of military hospitals commission.............................June, 1917: 867-74;
Sept., 1918: 69-74
District of Columbia. Attitude of Children’ s Hospital toward minimum wage law .. July, 1920: 131-2
------Survey of wages paid to women, 1919.............................................................................. Jan., 1£}20: 147-8
Europe. Experience m returning disabled soldiers to civil life....................................... Oct., 1917: 48-52
Great Britain. Engaged in rehabilitation work................................. Aug., 1918: 38-41; Dec., 1918: 87-9
Italy. For disabled...................................................................................................................Qc£., 1918: 71-85
United States. Naval. Schedule of wages, effective September 16, 1920................... Oct.; 1920: 109-12
(S e e also Medical and hospital service.)
Hotels, restaurants, etc.:
Arkansas. Hours, 1919.............................................................................................................. . Nijv., 1919: 215
Austria.......................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 192-3
British Columbia. Minimum-wage order re wages and hours........................................... Nov., 1919: 219
California. Minimum wage orders re wages, hours, etc................................................Nov., 1919: 215-17;
Nov., 1920: 111-12
Connecticut. Wages, hours, etc................................................................ Sept., 1915: 15; Mar., 1917: 350-1
District of Columbia. Minimum wage for women........................................................... Mar., 1920: 132-6;
Apr., 1920: 112-15; June, 1920: 116
------Statistics of woman labor..................................................................... Jan., 1918: 1-12; Mar., 1918: 1-13
------Survey of wages paid to women....................................................................................... Jan.. 1920: 144-8
Kansas. Order of July, 1918, affecting employment of women........................................ July, 1918: 112
Massachusetts. Survey of wages and hours of women, 1916.............................. ............... May, 1917: 668;
June, 1917: 905-7; dOct., 1918: 183-4,186-8
------Weekly rates of wages, 1918.................................................................................................. June, 1919: 206
Minnesota. Wage rates for waitresses................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 184-5
New York State. Report on working conditions. New York City and six other
cities......................................................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 258-61
------Law prohibiting night work for women declared constitutional', 1919..................... M.ay, 1919: 235
Oregon. Provisions of minimum wage orders of 1918 and 1919........ Nov., 1918: 176; Dec., 1919: 263-4
------ Average weekly wages........................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 123
Saskatchewan. Minimum-wage orders..................................................... June, 1920: 116; Nov., 1920: 115
Switzerland. Wage reduction during war.............................................................................. June, 1919: 186
United States. Facilities for shipyard workers. (Emergency Fleet Corporation.)___Sept., 1918: 284
------Hours. (Pope.)................................................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 91-108
------Union scales of wages and hours of waiters, May, 1917 and 1918............................... Mar., 1919: 183-6
------Wages.................................................................. ............................................................. Sept., 1919: 190-217
— Wages. (Waiters and waitresses.)..................1918—Feb. 129,135; Mar. 125,131,133; Apr. 169,175
181; June 133,139,145; Sept. 167,173,179,185; Dec. 267, 273,279,285,291,297,303,309
Washington (State). Minimum wage rates.............................................. Nov., 1918: 177; May, 1920: 111
( S e e also Housing.)
Hours, general:
Child labor. (S e e Child labor.)
Discussion and draft convention of International Labor Conference, 1919...................... Jan., 1920: 6-12;
Feb., 1920: 15-20




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

69

Honrs, general—Concluded.
Pago.
Discussion by J. B . Andrews referred to.................................................................................. July, 1916: 147
Negroes. (S e e Negroes.)
Program ot international trade-union conference, Bern, October, 1917........... Mar., 1918: 174,176-7,178
Recommendation of Commission on International Labor Legislation............................May, 1919: 23,25
Resolution and discussion of International Congress of Working Women, 1919........... Dec., 1919: 285-7
Resolution of Leeds International Conference, 1916............................................................... June, 1917: 914
Shorter workday. Arguments for. (Goldmark.)............................................................... June, 1916: 23-8
------ Experience.................... : ....................................................................................................Dec., 1916: 105-20
Spread of hours. (S e e Spread of hours.)
Woman labor. (S e e Woman labor.)
Hours, specified industries, and occupations: (S ee also Hours, miscellaneous industries
and occupations.)
Agriculture. England...............................................................................June, 1918: 147; Dec., 1918: 310-11
------Finland....................................................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 110
------France.....................................................................................................................................Mar., 1920: 123-4
------Ireland................................................................................................................................... June, 1919: 130-1
------Italy....................................................... : ............................................... ..............................June, 1920: 223-4
------Wales.................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 310-11
Aeroplanes. United States......................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 58
Anthracite coal mining. (S e e Hours: Coalmining.)
Army construction work. (S e e Hours: Construction work.)
Arsenals. United States Government..................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 190
Automobile manufacturing. United States........................................... Sept., 1919: 182; June, 1920: 87-8
Bakeries. Canada, 1919............................................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 186
------Great Britain............................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 35; Oct., 1919: 147-9
------New Zealand, 1920..................................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 83
------ South Africa, 1919..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 97
------ United States...................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 215-21
Bank employees. Switzerland, 1914 and 1918........................................................................ June, 1919: 185
Barbers. Germany (Berlin)....................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 159
------Switzerland, 1914 and 1918.................................................................................................... June, 1919: 185
Bituminous coal mining. (S e e Hours: Coal mining.)
Blacksmiths. United States...........................................................................Nov., 1919: 172; Oct., 1920: 75
Boilermakers. Canada, 1919.......................................................................................................Sept., 1919: 225
------South Africa, 1919..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 97
------ United States............................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 173-4; Oct., 1920: 76
Boots and shoes. New York City. Children’ s shoes....................................................... June, 1918: 165-6
------South Africa, 1919..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 97
Brewing industry. Belgium...................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 211
------Boston, 1914 and 1920..........................................................................
------Canada...................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 186
Brick industry. United States...................................................................Sept., 1919: 182; May, 1920: 101
Bricklayers. United States....................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 76-7
Building trades. Belgium.....................................................................................................Nov., 1919: 211-12
------Boston, 1914 and 1920...............................................................................................................
Dec., 1920c 79
------Canada..........................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 185; Sept., 1919: 224
—-— Chicago. Agreement of July, 1915....................................................................................
Oct., 1915: 30
------France......................................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920:122
------Germany...................................................................................................... Oct,, 1919: 157; Oct., 1920: 141
------Great Britain................................................................................................ July, 1919: 154; Nov., 1919: 207
------New York City......................................................................................................................... Feb., 1920:147
------New Zealand, 1920....................................................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 83
------South Africa, 1918 and 1919................................................................................................ Nov., 1920: 97-8
------Sweden.........................................................................................................................
Mar.,
------Switzerland, 1914 and 1918..................................................................................................... June, 1919:185
------United States.................................................................................................................... 1918—Sept. 134-50;
Oct. 140-54; Nov. 134-51; Dec. 227-9; 1919—Jan. 178-80; Mar. 170-2;
Nov. 173-6, 180-2, 185-8; 1920—Oct. 76-9, 82-4, 87-90, 113-19, 120-5
Button industry. Germany...................... .............................................................................. Oct., 1920: 138
Canning industry. Washington (State).................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 569
Car building. South Africa, 1919.............................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 98
------United States......................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182: June, 1920: 88-9
Carpenters. (S e e Hours: Building trades.)
Carpet factories. Germany (Berlin)........................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 155
Cement finishers. (S e e Hours: Building trades.)
Charwomen. Massachusetts.................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 197-9
Chauffeurs. United States................................................................... Dec., 1918: 221-3; Feb., 1919: 179-82
Chemical industry. United States............................................................... Jan., 1920: 142; May, 1920: 101
Cigar industry. United States................................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 80-3
Clerical work. Great Britain..................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 64
------United States. Weekly hours prevailing....................................................................... July, 1920: 98-9
Clothing. Belgium......................................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 211
------Boston, 1914 and 1920...............................................................................................................
Dec., 1920:79
------ France. Saturday half holiday.............................................................................................
Jan., 1918:75
------South Africa, 1919..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1920:99
------Switzerland, 1914 and 1918..................................................................................................... June, 1919: 185
------ United States. Factory in Middle W est........................................ Aug., 1920: 27-8; Dec., 1920: 80-1
Clothing, men’s. Massachusetts................................................................................................. May, 1917:672
------ New York City........................................ ......................................................................Jan., 1918: 20,24,26
------ Rochester, N . Y ........................................................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 101
------United States...........................................................June, 1916: 33-4; Sept., 1919: 182; Mar., 1920: 84-6
Clothing, women’s. Boston............................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 228,231-2
------ Chicago....................................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 67,68,73,75
------Cincinnati...................................................................................................................
Mar.,
------ Cleveland................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 6, 8
------ Germany............................................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 137-8
------New York City............................................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 44,52,56
------Philadelphia.:........................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 30,31,36.38




Dec.,

1919:194

1918:63

19

70

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Hours, specified industries, and occupations—Continued.
Page.
Clothing, women’s. St. Louis............................................................ , .....................
Mar., 1918: 66
------United States......................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182; Apr.,-1920: 101-3
------------- Firm in Middle W est.................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 182
— (S e e also Hours: Millinery.)
Coalmining. Belgium, 1919....................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 228
------Germany..................................................................Jan., 1920: 173-7; Mar., 1920: 130-1; Oct., 1920: 140
------Great Britain.....................................................................................Nov., 1918: 297-8; May, 1919: 111-12
------United States. Anthracite............................................................................................. June, 1916: 38-41;
Sept., 1918: 190; Sept., 1919: 182; Dec., 1919: 208-24; June, 1920: 96-7; Oct., 1920: 92-109
------------- Bituminous......................................................................................................................Apr., 1917: 589;
Sept., 1918: 190; Sept., 1919: 182; Dec., 1919: 208-24; Apr., 1920: 43,47,48-9
Coke ovens. United States. Certain State laws cited.......................................... ............. Oct., 1918: 242
Compositors. (S ee Hours: Printing and publishing.)
Confectionery. United States......... ........................................................... Sept., 1919: 182; Apr., 1920: 103
Construction work. Belgium............................................................................................... Nov., 191$: 211-12
------Canada, 1919...............................................................................................................................Sept., 1919: 224
------France......................................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920:122
------Switzerland, 1914 and1918..................................................................................
June,
------United States. CertainState laws cited................................................................................. Oct., 1918:242
------------- (Army), 1918.................................................................................................................... June, 1918: 112
Cooperative societies. England................................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 135
Copper mining. California..........................................................................................................
May, 1919: 64
------Mexico......................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918:122
Copyists. United States.............................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 204
Corset trade. Great Britain....................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 207
Cotton manufacturing. Great Britain...................................................................................Sept., 1919: 235
------United States............................................................. Aug., 1918: 153-5; Oct., 1918: 243; Jan., 1920: 142
Docks and harbors. Canada, 1919........... •................................................................................. Sept., 1919: 226
------Great Britain............................................................................................. July# 1919: 157; Nov., 1919: 207
------New York.......................................... Oct., 1915: 35; July, 1918: 7,9,12,13,14,15; Sept., 1918: 7,25,26
------New Zealand, 1920..................................................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 83
------ (S e e also Hours: Freight handlers; Seamen.)
Domestic service. Efforts to standardize. (Waggaman.)........................................... Aug., 1919: 206-13
------Bavaria............................................. ..................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 131-2
------District of Columbia........................................................................................................... Nov.. 1920: 102-8
------ England.................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 191-5; Feb., 1920: 130
------Germany..................................................................................................................................... July, 1919:169
------Great Britain.......................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 64; Apr., 1919: 191-5
Draftsmen. United States............................................................................................................ Dec., 1918:204
Drivers, teamsters, etc. Boston, 1914 and 1920.....................................................................
Dec., 1920: 79
------Canada........................................................................................................................................ Aug., 1919:186
------Germany.................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 160; Oct., 1920: 144-5
------Switzerland, 1914 and 1918...................... ............................................................. *.............. June, 1919: 185
------United States...................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 224-7; Feb., 1919: 182-9
Dust and trash collection. Germany (Berlin)....................................................................... Oct., 1920: 144
Electrical apparatus manufacture. United States............................................................. June, 1920: 89-90
Electrical workers. Kansas....................................................................................................... May, 1920: 52-4
Electricians. United States.................................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 172-4
Electrotypers. (S e e Hours: Printing and publishing.)
Elevator operators. Washington (State)................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 179
Embroidery factories. Germany (Berlin)............................................................................... Oct., 1919: 155
Engineering trades. France....................................................................................................... July, 1919: 164
------Great Britain............................................................................................................................ July, 1919: 156
Engineers. Canada, 1919............................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 185
— - South Africa, 1919.................................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 98
Engravers and chasers. Germany.......................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 143-4
Expressmen. Canada, 1919...........................................................................................................Sept., 1919: 226
Food industries. Switzerland, 1914 and 1918......................................................................... June, 1919: 185
------Uruguay......................................................................................................................................Sept., 1918: 276
------ (S e e also Hours: Canning industry; Confectionery.)
Foundries. Canada...L............................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 120
------United States.......................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182; June, 1920: 90-1
Freight handlers. United States................................. Apr., 1918: 35-7; Sept., 1918: 159; Oct., 1918: 154
------ ( S e e also Hours: Docks and harbors.)
Furniture industry. South Africa, 1919................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 98
------ United States......................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182; Jan., 1920: 131-4
Glass industry. Finland............................................................................................................. Jan., 1918: 109
— Missouri...................................................................................................... ............................ Oct., 1918: 242
—— United States....................................................................................................................... May, 1920: 102-3
Glaziers. Germany (Berlin)....................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 158
------ United States........................................................................................................................ Dec., 1918: 228-9
Goldsmiths. Germany (Berlin)................................................................................................ Oct., 1920: 144
Granite and stone trades. Boston, 1914 and 1920..................................................................
Dec., 1920: 79
------Germany (Berlin)................................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 157
------United States..................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 160-1;
Oct,., 1918: 154-5; Nov., 1918: 152-3; Nov., 1919: 179-80,189-90; Oct., 1920: 82,91
Hod carriers. (S ee Hours: Building trades.)
Hop picking. Washington (State)........................................................................................ Apr., 1917: 568-9
Hosiery. Germany (Berlin)....................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 155
Hosiery and underwear. United States.............................................. Sept., 1919: 182; Feb., 1920: 106-10
Hotels,restaurants,etc.' Massachusetts...............................................................................June, 1917: 905-7
------New York State...................................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 259
------United States...................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 91-108
Iron and steel. Australia............................................................................................................ Oct., 1920: 131
------France........................................................................................................................................ July, 1919: 164
------Great Britain............................................................................................................................ July, 1919: 156
------Norway........................................................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 111
------United States....................................................................................................................... 1018—Mar. 29-51;
Oct. 242; Nov. 133; 1919—Sept. 182; Oct. 104-26; Dec. 88-90




1919:185

SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

71

Hours, specified industries, and occupations—Continued.
Page.
Iron mining. France................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 164
Janitors and janitresses. Switzerland, 1914 and 1918........................................................... June, 1919: 185
— Washington (State).............................................................................................................. A p r 1917: 568
Lauidries. Kansas....................................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 143
------ New York........................................................................................................................... .
Aug., 1918: 204
—— Oregon...................................................................................................................................... Sept., 1915: 31
------ United States......................................................................................................... .............. Mar., 1919: 167-9
Leather industry. Germany (Berlin)...................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 157
— P South Africa, 1919..............................................: ................................................................. Nov., 1920: 98
------Switzerland, 1914 and 1918.................................................................................................... June, 1919: 185
------ United States........................................................................................................................ May, 1920: 103-4
Linotype operators. ( S e e Hours: Printing and publishing.)
Logging. United States................................................................................ .............................Sept., 1919: 182
Longshoremen. (S e e Hours: Docks and harbors.)
Lumber, millwork, and furniture. United States. Oct., 1917: 66-79; Sept., 1919: 182; Jan. 1920: 125-34
Lumbering. United States...................................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182
Machine tool manufacturing. United States........................................................................June, 1920: 92-3
Machinery. France.................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 164
------United States........................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 182; June, 1920: 91-2
Machinists. Belgium...................... ...................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 210-11
------ Canada, 1919............................................................................................................................ Aug., 1919:. 185
------United States....................................................................................................................... Oct., 1915: 17-18;
Feb., 1916: 37-8; Aug., 1918: 74; Sept., 1918: 190; Oct., 1920: 85-6
Manual labor. Great Britain..................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 257
Meat packing. (S e e Hours: Slaughtering and meat packing.)
Men’ s clothing. (S e e Hours: Clothing, men’ s.)
Mercantile industry. Kansas................................................................................................. Feb., 1918: 143-4
------United States........................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 243
Merchant marine. (S e e Hours: Seamen.)
Metal mining. France................................................................................................................. July, 1919: 164
Metal trades. Boston, 1914nnd 1920........................................................................................
Dec., 1920: 79
------ Calgary, Alberta.................................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 190-1
------ Finland..................................................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 110
------ France....................................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 164
------ Great Britain........................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 156
------Switzerland, 1914and 1918................................................................................................
June, 1919:185
------ United States...................................................... Sept., 1918: 150-8; Nov., 1918: 154-66; Jan., 1920: 142
Millinery. Germany........................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 159; Oct., 1920: 137
Milling. Belgium. (Flour.)....................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 211
Millwork. (S e e Hours: Lumber, millwork, and furniture.)
Mining. United States. State laws cited.: ........................................................................... Oct., 1918: 241
------------- ( S e e also Hours: Coalmining; Copper mining; Iron mining; Metal mining.)
Holders. South Africa, 1919....................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 98
------United States..................................... .................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 86-7
Motor vehicles. United states...................................................................................................
Oct., 1918: 14
Moving-picture operators. United States........................................................................... Mar., 1919: 175-83
Munitions. France............................................................. Jan., 1918: 69; Mar., 1918: 86; July, 1918: 121-4
------ Germany................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 102
------ Great Britain...........June, 1916: 77-9; June, 1917: 876-7; Feb., 1918: 82-7; Sept., 1918: 44-6,219-20
------ United States.......................................................................................................................... June, 1918: 219
Navy yards. United States......................................................................... June, 1918: 108; Sept., 1918: 190
Needle trades. France.................................................................................................................
Jan., 1918: 75
OU industry. California................................................................... Mar., 1918: 55; Oct., 1920: 14,19,21,23
Overalls. United States................; ..............................................................Sept., 1919: 182; Apr., 1920: 104
Packing houses. (S e e Hours: Slaughtering and meat packing.)
Painters. (S e e Hours: Building trades.)
Paper and pulp.Canada.............................................................................................................. Aug., 1919: 189
------Finland...............................................................................................................................
Jan., 1918: 109
------ United States............................................................ Sept., 1919: 182; Jan., 1920: 142; May, 1920: 104-5
Paper box manufacture. United States................................................Sept., 1919: 182; Apr., 1920: 100-1
Petroleum refineries and warehouses. France....................................................................... Mar., 1920: 123
Photographers. Germany (Bavaria)....................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 159
Plasterers. (S e e Hours: Building trades.)
Plumbers. (S e e Hours: Building trades.)
Pottery industry. United States............................................................................................ May, 1920: 105-6
Printing and publishing. Boston, 1914 and 1920................................................................... Dec., 1920: 79
------Canada, 1918 and 1919............................................................................. Aug., 1919: 185; Sept., 1919: 225
------China........................................................................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 210
------France....................................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 122
—— Germany.......................*...................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 142-3
------New York City........................................................................................................................ Jan., 1920: 270
------South Africa, 1919...................................................................................................^.............. Nov., 1920: 99
———Spain............................ .......................................................................................................... July, 1920: 130
------Switzerland, 1914 and 1918.................................................................................................. June, 1919: 185
------United States........................................................................................................ 1918—Jan. I ll; Sept. 190;
Dec. 229-59; 1919—Jan. 180-99; Feb. 157-79; Nov. 176-9,182-3; 1920—Oct. 79-82,84-5
Public employees. Boston, 1914 and 1920.............................................................................. Dec., 1920: 79
------Great Britain........................................... ............................................................................. Aug., 1918: 88-9
------Netherlands............................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 184
------United States.(Bureau of Engraving and Printing.)..................................................... Aug., 1918: 219
------------- State and Federal laws cited..................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 246-7
Public utilities. New York City..........................................................................................- June, 1916: 29-33
Public works. Manitoba.........................................................................................................Nov., 1917: 107-8
------United States......................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 116-33; Aug., 1920: 83
Railroads. Australia............................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 118r-19
------Finland..................................................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 109
------France......................................................................... ...............................May, 1918: 28-30; Apr., 1920: 64
------Italy........ ............................................................................................ .
May, 1918: 33-4; May. 1920: 210




72

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW.

Hours, specified industries, and occupations—Concluded.
Railroads. Japan.................. . ....................................................................................... .......... May, 1918: 41
------Switzerland......... ..................................................................................... ............. ............. May, 1918: 37-8
------United States...................... ..........................................................................1918—Mar. 136-9: Apr. 108-6;
June 18-19.31-2,45; Oct. 133,136,138,244-5; Nov. 133-66; 1919—Mar. 210: Dec. 231,232
Rubber manufacttiring. Belgium.............................................................................................Nov., 1919: 211
------United States........................................................
Sept., 1919: 182; Jan., 1920: 142; May, 1920: 106-7
Sawmills. Arkansas— ........................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 242
Seamen. Agenda and discussion by International Labor Conference.......................... May, 1920: 2,4-7;
Oct., 1920: 209-10
------Principle of 8-hour day and48-hour week adopted by International Seafarers' Con­
ference..............................................................................................1........................................... Oct., 1920: 212
------ Resolution of International Seafarers' Federation..................................................
Nov.,
----- - Australia...................................................................................
------ British Columbia...................................................... : ...................................................... .
Jan., 1919: 163
------ Italy. (Merchant marine.)................................................................................... ..........Jan., 1920: 158-73
------ United States......................................................................................... . July, 1920: 106; Sept., 1920: 104
------ ( S e e a lso Hours: Docks and harbors; Freight handlers.)
Sheet-metalworkers. United States.......................................................................................Oct., 1920: 90-1
Shipbuilding. Argentina. (Buenos Aires yards.)............................................................... July, 1919: 161
------ British Columbia...................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918:157
------ Canada, 1919.........................................................................................
------ Great Britain...........................................................................
------ South Africa, 1919.......................................................................................................... .
Nov., 1920: 97
------ United States............... ............Mar., 1918: 68,71,72; Apr., 1918: 183; May, 1918: 127-8,132,137,142
Shipping. { S e e Hours: Seamen.)
Shipyards. {S e e Hours: Shipbuilding.)
Silk manufacturing. United States.........................Sept., 1919: 182; Jan., 1920: 142; Feb., 1920: 110-13
Silversmiths. Germany (Berlin).............................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 144
Slaughtering and meat packing. South Africa, 1919— ..........................................z^ .. . . Nov., 1920: 99
------ United States................................................................ May, 1918: 116-17,118-22,125; July, 1920: 101-5
Steel workers. ( S e e Hours: Iron and steel.)
Stonecutters. { S e e Hours: Granite and stone trades.)
Stores. (S e e Hours:. Mercantile industry.)
Stove industry.
UnitedStates................................................................................................ May, 1918: 177
Street railways. Canada, 1919....................................................................................................Sept., 1919: 226
------ Chicago..................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1915: 24-5
------ France...................................................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 67
------ Germany (Berlin). (Omnibus conductors, drivers, etc.).............................................. Oct:, 1919: 160
------ New York. Woman labor...................................................................................................May, 1918: 4-13
------ South Africa, 1919..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 99
------United States. Various State laws cited........................................................................... Oct., 1918: 245
------Washington, D . C .^ ..............................................................................................................Apr., 1916: 34-5
------ Washington (State)...............................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 179
------ Wisconsin. Woman labor..................................................................................................... June,1918: 161
Structural-iron workers. United States....................................................Nov., 1919: 190; Oct., 1920: 91-2
Sugar industry. Porto Rico.........................................^............................................................ Jan., 1919: 53-5
Teamsters and drivers. (S e e Hours: Drivers, teamsters, etc.)
Telegraph. Oregon....................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 175-6
------ United States. Operators on railroads................................................. Oct., 1918: 244; Mar., 1919: 165
Telephone. Kansas...................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 182
------ Montana...................................................................................................................................... Oct, 1918: 242
------ New York Stfrte . ............................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 117-18
------ Oregon................................................................................................... ...............................Nov., 1918: 175-6
------Southern New England Telephone Co............................................................................... Sept., 1915: 14
------United States. Operators on railroads................................................. Oct., 1918: 244; Mar., 1919: 165
Textiles. Belgium.......................................................................a................................................ Nov., 1919: 211
------ Canada.................................................................................
------ England......................................................................................................................
Apr.,
— — Germany.......................... ........................................................................Apr., 1916: 81-2; Oct., 1920: 136
Theaters. United States......... .................................................... i ......................................Mar., 1919: 170-83
Timber trade. Great Britain. Liverpool docks...................................................................Nov., 1919: 207
------ New Zealand, 1920.................................................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 83
Tin box trade. Great Britain.................................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 208
Dec., 1920: 83
Tinsmiths. New Zealand, 1920.............................................................................................. .
Tobacco trade. Great Britain................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 207
Typewriter industry. United States......................................................... Sept., 1919: 182; June, 1920: 93-4
Waiters. United States............................................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 183-6
Watch service. United States. Shipbuilding awards......................................................... Dec., 1918: 205
Women's clothing. (S e e Hours: Clothing, women's.)
Woodworking industry. Boston, 1914 and 1920....................................................................
Dec., 1920: 79
------ Germany.......... ....................................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 139
------ United States......................................................................................................................Jan., 1920: 118-41
Woolen industry. United States.....................: .......... Oct., 1918: 243; Feb., 1919: 153-5; Jan., 1920: 142
Hours, miscellaneous industries and occupations: (S e e also Hours, specified industries and
occupations.)
Australia. Regulation by "wages board” system and "industrial arbitration court”
system............................ ............................................................................................................July, 1920: 61-2
Belgium. Conditions during and since the war.................................................................. Oct., 1919: 35-44
------ 1919. (Ghent.)...................................................................................................................Nov., 1919: 210-12
Boston. 1914 and 1920................................................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 79
Canada. June, 1919........... ....................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 204-5
China. Discussed by International Labor Conference, 1919......................................1. . . Jan., 1920: 11-12
Czechoslovakia. Law of December, 1918............................................................................. Feb., 1920: 240-1
Denmark. 1919............................................................................................................................. Oct., 1919: 150
------ Study of industrial workers by statistical office............................................................May, 1920: 108-9
France. Changes, March to August, 1919........................................................................... Mar.‘, 1920: 119-24
Germany. Daily hours stipulated in collective agreements, December 31,1914............ Jan., 1917: 144
— — During the war...................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 176; Dec., 1919: 257-8




1920:211
Feb.,

Sept.,

19
July,

De
1919: 182

SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

73

Hours, miscellaneous industries and occupations—Concluded.
Page.
Germany. Effects of revolution................................................................................................
Oct., 1919: 45
Great Britain. Changes in 1918 and 1919.............................................. Mar., 1919: 189-90; Apr., 1920: 111
------Established by various industrial councils................................................................... Aug., 1919: 133-4
------In report of committee on adult education.................................................................... Nov., 1918: 63-4
------ Methods of reducing hours of work.................................................................................. Dec., 1919: 251-4
------ Recommendations of committee to National Industrial Conference........................... May, 1919: 106
India. Discussed by International Labor Conference, 1919................................................
Jan., 1920: 11
Japan. Discussed by International Labor Conference, 1919.............................................Jan., 1920: 10-11
------Long hours and overtime work prevail............................................................................. Aug., 1920: 39
Massachusetts. Recommendations of special commission, 1917................................... Mar., 1917: 429-30
New York. Trend toward shorter work week.................................................................... Dec., 1920: 79-80
------(Niagara Falls.) Federal survey..................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 240-2
Ohio. Survey of wage earning occupations, commercial.and office work, 1914........... Apr., 1916: 36-40
Russia. Code of labor laws o f Soviet Russia.......................................................................... Apr., 1920: 213
South Africa. Resolution adopted by conference of employers and employees............. June, 1920: 224
Sweden. Fixed by collective agreements, 1917...................................................................... July, 1919: 127
Switzerland. Factory regulations.................................................................. -Aug., 1915: 21; May, 1918: 77
------ Weekly, 1914 ana 1918, and per cent of reduction........................................................ June, 1919: 184-7
United.States. Continuous industry.............................................Nov., 1919: 199-202; Feb., 1920: 118-27
------ Legislation............................................................................................. 1915—July 14-19; 1916—June 23-8;
Oct. 23-4.24-6,116-33; 1917—May 660; 1918—Mar. 136-9; Apr. 188; Sept. 193-6; Oct. 24Q-7
------Prevailing hours per week, 1914 and 1909...................................................................... Sept., 1917: 23-46
------Prevailing weekly hours in skilled and unskilled trades, and in clerical occupa­
tions............................................................................................................................................. July, 1920: 96-9
------ Recommendation of Commission on Industrial Relations............................................ Nov., 1915: 52
------ Recommendation of President’ s Industrial Conference................................................. Apr., 1920: 38
------Reconstruction program of American Federation of Labor......................................... Mar., 1919: 65
------Summary of B . L . S. industrial survey, 1919— ........................................................ Sept.* 1919: 184r-6
------Union scales, various dates, 1907 to 1920............................................. 1916—July 74-6; 1917—Apr. 585;
Sept. 35-42; 1918—Jan. 110-11; Sept. 134-61; Oct. 139-71; Nov. 133-66; Dec. 214r-59;
1919—Jan. 172-99; Feb. 156-89; Mar. 119-20,166-86; Nov. 172-90; 1920—Oct. 75-92
{S e e also Child labor; Collective agreements; Eight-hour day; Eleven-hour day;
Forty-eight-hour week; Forty-four-hour week; Forty-hour week; Forty-seven-hour
week; Lunch periods; Night work; Nine-hour day; Output in relation to hours;
Overtime; Six-hour day; Spread of hours; Sunday work; Ten-hour day; Twelve-hour
day; Woman labor.)
Hours in relation to health. {S e e Health in relation to hours.)
Hours in relation to output. {S e e Output in relation to hours.)
House-dress and kimono industry. { S e e Clothing industries, women’ s.)
House furnishings. {S e e Furniture and house furnishings.)
Household assistants. { S e e Domestic and personal service.)
Housekeepers’ Alliance, Washington, D. C .................................................................................... May, 1920: 115
Housemaids’ knee. {S e e Diseases.)
Housework. { S e e Domestic and personal service.)
Housing, United States:
Activities of Housing Corporation............................................................................................. 1918—Aug. 69;
1919—Feb. 246-51; May 27-38,281-5; Aug. 238-40; Oct. 9-15
Associations. American Institute of Architects................................................................. Mar., 1918: 208-9
------ Emergency Housing Association of District of Columbia............................................. Feb., 1918: 209
------ Housing and Town Planning Association, Pennsylvania........................................July, 1919: 255-66
------ National Housing Association........................................................Nov., 1916: 60-3; Dec., 1917: 215-18
Attitude of Methodist Episcopal Church................................................................................ Aug., 1916: 2-3
Attitude of National Catholic War Council............................................................................ June, 1919: 47
Bibliography. Some recent housing literature.................................................................. Jan., 1917: 127-30
Company. Anthracite region, Pennsylvania.................................................................... May, 1920: 186-95
------ Bituminous coal field. United States............................................................................ Apr., 1920: 215-22
------ Colorado Fuel and Iron Co..................................................................................................Dec., 1915: 21-2
------ Copper mining and smelting..................................................... ........Sept., 1918: 278-84; May, 1919: 65
------ Cost. (Allen.)...................................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 208-9
------ Norton Co., Worcester, Mass. (Indian Hill development.)........................................ Nov., 1918: 203
------ Oil refining, California...................................................... ................................................... Apr., 1919: 26
------ Rdsum6 o fB . L . S. bulletin............................................................................................. Nov., 1917: 35-60
------ Sale of company houses to employees...........................................................................Apr., 1919: 227-32
------ Sanitary aspects.................................................................................................................. Jan., 1919: 289-99
------United States Steel Corporation. (Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn.)......................... Apr., 1918: 1-25
------ Woodlawn Co.. Wilmington, Del....................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 132
Conferences......... ......................................................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 60-3;
Jan., 1917: 130-3; Dec., 1917: 215-18; July, 1919: 240-8,255-66
Government residence halls, Washington, D . C ....................................Oct., 1919: 9-15; Jan., 1920: 36,37
Home ownership. { S e e Home ownership.)
Low-cost housing. (Hamlin.)................................................................................................ Mar., 1918: 205-6
Negroes. Pittsburgh................................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 155
Plans and illustrations............... ......................................1917—Nov. 57-60; 1918—Apr. 1-25; Sept. 278-83;
Oct. 254-7; Dec. 330-1; 1919—May 34-7; Oct. 9-15; 1920—Apr. 215-22; May 186-95
Programs, recommendations, etc...........................................................1915—Nov. 52-3; 1317—Dec. 218-20;
1918—Feb. 204-8,209-13; Mar. 203-9; 1919—Mar. 70; Aug. 71; 1920-Apr. 38
Relation to land problem......................................................................Apr., 1918: 279-80; May, 1918: 268^-77
Surveys........................................................................................................................................ 1917—Nov. 35-60;
1919—Jan.289-99; A p r .227-32; July?; Sept.27-30; 1920—A p r.215-22; Sept.84-91
Tenements. Massachusetts. Survey and recommendation............................................ Jan., 1917:122-7
War housing, provisions of bill re............................................................................................Apr., 1918: 278-9
War housing and the American Institute of Architects.....................................................Mar., 1918: 208-9
Bridgeport, Conn. Inadequate. Recommendations for improvement.........................
Jan., 1917:127
California. Proposed tenement-house law and plan for housing survey. Referred to. .Tan., 1917:130
Cleveland, Ohio*. Survey, 1918................................................................................................July, 1919: 260-2
District of Columbia. Conditions in 1916................................................................................ Nov., 1917: 8-9
------Government residence halls........... .....................................................................................Oct., 1919: 9-15
------Minimum requirements, family of five....................................................................... . June, 1920: 10-13




74

M ONTHLY LABOR REVIEW.

Housing, United States—Concluded.
Page.
District of Columbia. Rates in boarding houses, girls’ homes, etc................................. Mar., 1918: 1-13
Massachusetts. State aid............................................................................. Nov., 1916: 63; Jan., 1917: 125-6
New York City. Survey, 1915...................................................................................................May, 1916: 41-7
Pennsylvania. Anthracite coal fields.................................................................................. May, 1920: 186-95
------Discussed at coriference of Housing and Town Planning Association..................... July, 1919: 255-8
Providence, R. I. Survey'.............................................................................. .......................... Jan., 1917: 129
St. Paul, Minn. Survey........................................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 206-8
Wisconsin. Homes for working men, Kenosha. (Cost, plan, etc.)................................. Jan., 1917: 131
------Municipal and cooperative housing made possible by legislation of July, 1919.. Sept., 1919: 351-3
Housing, foreign countries:
Argentina. Number of persons occupying one-room dwellings......................................... Dec., 1920: 76
Austria. State aid for meeting shortage..-......................... .................................................... Aug., 1920: 166
------Under new Ministry for Public Welfare............................................................................ May, 1918: 289
Belgium. Shortage ana measures for remedying.............................................................Aug., 1920: 159-60
Canada. Housing development as a postwar problem................................................... July, 1919: 248-55
------Order in council, December, 1918, re State loans........................................................... Feb., 1919: 351-2
------Recommendations of Trades and Labor Congress........................................................ Dec., 1919: 366-7
------Reconstruction bibliography...............................................................................................Dec., 1918: 47-8
------Resolution of National Industrial Conference.................................................................. Nov., 1919: 61
------ (Ontario.) List of municipalities conforming to housing act of 1919......................... July, 1919: 252
------------- Loans, Federal and provincial................................................................................ June, 1919: 294-7
Czechoslovakia. Shortage and measures for remedying...................................................... Aug., 1920: 159
Denmark. Survey, 74 cities, 1916............................................................................................. Oct., 1917: 158-9
Finland. Shortage; Government aid..................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 162-4
France. Artillery and munition workers............. ................................................................. July, 1917: 42-3
------Law authorizing loans to war pensioners........................................................................Oct., 1918: 69-71
------Laws re cheap dwellings..................................................................... Mar., 1919: 285-7; Feb., 1920: 253-5
------Munitions. Regulations re employers..............................................................................
Jan., 1918: 70
------Reconstruction bibliography......................................................................... .....................Dec., 1918: 50-1
------Report on proposed garden cities..................................................................................... July, 1919: 262-3
------Shortage; State aid................................................................................................................. Aug., 1920: 164
Germany. Program of trade-unions............................................................. * ........................Apr., 1918: 88-9
------Report of two investigations................................................................................................Apr., 1918: 286-7
------Requirements for miners...................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 130-1
------Shortage; State aid................................................................................................................ Aug., 1920: 164-6
Great Britain. Aeroplanes. ROe Green Village scheme.................................................. Oct., 1918: 251-7
------ Billeting of civilians act...................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 275-6
------Boarding and lodging houses. Well Hall.........................................................................Dec., 1917: 228;
June, 1918: 205-6; Oct., 1918: 258-60
------Building guilds, work of.....................................................................June, 1920: 220-1; Aug., 1920: 156-7
------Cost.............................................. -.......................... June, 1918: 201-6; June, 1920: 114; Aug., 1920: 153-5
------Hostels. Costs, maintenance, etc................................................................................. June, 1918: 206-10
------Legislation. Various acts................................................................ Dec., 1917: 220-9; Aug., 1920: 145-6
------Munition workers..................................................................................................................Aug., 1917: 91-2;
June, 1918: 201-6, 206-10; Sept., 1918:52;Oct., 1918: 258-60; Dec., 1918: 331-5
------Plans...................................................................
Oct., 1918: 254-7; Dec., 1918: 330-1
------Reconstruction bibliography...........................................................................................
Dec.,1918:59-61
------Report of women’s housing subcommittee, Ministryof Reconstruction.................... Dec., 1918: 335-7
------Report on public utility societies by housing committee of Federation of British
Industries.................................................................. ............................................................... Nov., 1918: 272-5
------Shortage and plans for relief. Oct., 1917: 156-7; Dec., 1917: 220-9; Oct., 1918: 257-8; Oct., 1920: 172
------Summary of experience.................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 144-57
------“ Tied house system.” Disadvantages of........................................................................... Nov., 1918: 273
------Well Hall housing scheme for Woolwich arsenal workers............................................... Dec., 1917: 228;
June, 1918: 205-6; Oct., 1918: 258-60
Italy. State aid...................................................................................... . Oct., 1919: 282-3; May, 1920: 195-6
Mexico. El Boleo Mining Co., Lower California.................................................................Oct., 1918: 121-2
Netherlands. Government loans for low-cost housing......................................................... June, 1918: 65
------Shortage and measures for remedying.............................................................................. Aug., 1920: 160-1
New South Wales. Workingmen’s cottages by GovernmentinSydney...........................Dec., 1917: 234-5
Norway. Conditions in cities. (Official report.).............................................................. July, 1919: 263-6
------State aid..................................................................................................................................... Aug.,1920: 162
Peru. Law of December 28,1918............................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 283
Scotland. Extent, costs, etc. (Gretna and Queensferry.)................................................. June, 1918: 204
------Official report on housing after the war.............................. ............................................May, 1918: 287-9
------Plans for workmen’s dwellings, Dundee.......................................................................... Oct., 1917: 157-8
------Report of royal commission on housing............................................ .•......................... Dec., 1917: 229-34
South Africa. Resolution adopted by conference of employers and employees............. June, 1920: 224
Spain. Moderate-priced houses for workmen, favored by Social Labor Party............... June, 1919: 58
------Shortage and measures for remedying....................................... . .................................. Aug., 1920: 158-9
Sweden. Shortage and measures for remedying............................................................... Aug., 1920: 161-2
( S e e also Building; Labor camps; Rents.)
Housing Committee, United States. (See United States: Council of National Defense.
Committee on housing.)
Housing Corporation, United States. (S e e United States: United States Housing Corpo­
ration.)
Hpxie, R. F. Scientific management and labor......................................Jan., 1916: 28-38; Mar., 1917 : 449-53
Hubbell, N. D. Organization and scope of employment department................................. June, 1917: 896-7
Humidity. .( S e e Sanitation and working conditions.)
Hunger typhus. ( S e e Diseases: Hunger typhus.)
Hunt, Caroline L. Method of calculating food values.................................................................... July, 1920: 10
Hutchinson, W . Medical administration of health insurance...............................................June, 1919: 285-92
H uyck.F. C. and Sons, Albany. N. Y . Establishment benefit fund.................................. Apr., 1917: 518-20
Hyde, Elizabeth A . Social betterment work among employees’ families........................ Jan., 1918: 195-205
Hydrogen arsenide poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Hygiene:
Addresses, reports, etc. American Public Health Association...................................... Dec., 1916: 29-31;
Feb., 1917 : 272-83; Mar., 1917: 453-5; Feb., 1919: 215-19
Creation of Service of Industrial Hygiene at International Labor Office......................
Dec., 1920: 132




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

75

Hygiene—Concluded.
Page.
" ‘ Diseases of occupation and vocational hygiene.’ ’ (Kober.).............................................Jan., 1917: 92-4
Ideals in the organization of an industrial medical service. ( Hayhurst.)........................ Oct., 1920: 184
Industrial hygiene, coordination of Federal, State, and local agencies...........................Feb., 1920: 202-5
Industrial medicine. Opportunities for studving in United States. (Shuford.).... May, 1920:142-54
Industrial medicine, use of psychiatry in. (Cobb.)............................................................Jan., 1920: 226-9
Qualifications and activities ofindustrialphysician..........................................................Sept., 1920: 145-6
Relation ofhospitaltoindustrial hygiene. (Wright.)......................................................... Mar., 1917: 447
Relation ofthe Public Health Service to problems ofindustrial hygiene. (Kerr.)... Mar., 1917: 448-9
Resolution of International Trade-Union Conference, Bern, October, 1917...................... Mar., 1918: 177
Resolution of Leedsinternational conference, 1916................................................................ June, 1917: 914
Safety provisions. Protection against accidents. (S e e Accident prevention.)
------Protection against dusts. (S e e Dusts.)
------Protection against gases and fumes. (S e e Oases and fumes.)
------Protection against poisoning. ( S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Argentina. Provisions ofl aw for protection of women and children.............................. Oct., 1918: 248-9
Finland. Protection of workmen, law of April 4,1914...................................................... Aug., 1915: 23-4
France. Ministry of Social Hygiene, Sodarinsurance, and Social Provision, created. Apr., 1920: 185
------Regulations concerning dangerous or objectionable establishments............. ..........May, 1918: 254-6
t — Regulations of Ministry of Munitions re femalelabor in war industries............... Jan., 1918: 69-73
Germany. Articles on poisoning, chromates, food requirements, and anthrax, sum­
marized .................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1915: 24-9
------ Regulations for ship painting..........................................................................................July, 1918: 186-90
Great Britain. Effect ofindustrial conditions on the eyesight of munition workers. .Apr., 1917: 53840
------Factory conditions and pulmonary phthisis. (Moore.)............................................ Feb., 1919: 234-7
------Health of Munition Workers* Committee reports......................... ............... Sept., 1918: 40-53,215-22
------Health of munition workers outside the factory..............................Aug., 1917: 91-2; Apr., 1918: 311
New Jersey. Reports of activities of Department of Labor............................................ Mar .,1917: 434-5
New York City. Work of division ofindustrial hygiene of department of health.... N ov., 1915: 7-19;
Dec., 1915: 22-5; May, 1918: 251; Sept., 1919: 298-300
New York State. Health hazards in certain industries......... ........Feb., 1919: 226-8; Mar., 1920: 161-8
------Medical protection in dangerous trades.......................................................................... Jan., 1919: 243-5
------Various laws referred to ........................................................................................................ Feb., 1916: 82
Switzerland. Health provisions in factory. Law................................................................ Aug., 1915:20
------Hygiene and safety law, June 18,1914............................................................................... Aug., 1915: 20
United States. Division of Working Conditions Service, United States Department of
Labor, officered by Public Health Service........................................................................... Feb., 1919: 217
------Executive order re industrial hygiene of Federal Government................................... Aug., 1918: 202
( S e e also Accident prevention; Medical and hospital service; Physical examination of
employees; Sanitation and working conditions; a n d vario u s specific in d u stries,)

I. A . 1. A. B. C. (S e e International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions.)
Idaho. Industrial accident board report, Jan. 1,1918, to Oct. 31,1919.................................Jan., 1920: 247-8
Ihlder, J. The Houses of Providence.......................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 129-30
Illinois:
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Reports on industrial accidents, 1914,1915...................... Mar., 1917: 411-12
Health insurance commission report, 1919........................................................................... Oct., 1919: 267-72
Industrial board. Opinions in cases arising under workmen’s compensation act — Feb., 1916: 56-61
------Reports, 1914-15 and 1915-16............................................................ Apr., 1916: 54-5; Jan., 1917:112-15
Industrial commission report, 1918-19...................................................................................June, 1920: 175-6
Industrial survey commission. Hours and health of women workers.......................... May, 1919: 204-9
Pension laws commission. Reports on pensions for public employees........................ Aug., 1917:145-8;
Apr., 1920: 189-90
( S e e a lso s p e c ific sub jects.)

Illiteracy. (S e e Literacy test.)
Illness. (S e e Sickness statistics.)
Illuminating Engineering Society . Code of lighting. (Text.)............................................... July, 1916: 101-7
Illumination of factories. (S e e Lighting.)
Illustrations:
Housing.........................................................................................................1917—Nov. 57-60; 1918—Apr. 1-25;
Sept. 278-88; Dec. 330-1; 1919—May 34-7; Oct. 9-15; 1920—Apr. 215-22; May 186-95
Infections of the upper extremities........................................................................................ Nov., 1919: 331-3
Woman labor in war work. Referred to .................................... .......................................... Dec., 1916: 91-2
( S e e also Charts; Maps.)
Immigration:
Australia. Opportunities for employment of women......................................................... Aug., 1920: 97-8
Brazil, 1919................................................................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 218-19
Peru. Text of law of October 10,1919...................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 164
United States. Attitude of Federal Department of Labor toward admission of Chinese
industrial students..................................................................................................................Dec., 1920: 191-7
------Attitude of Federal Department of Labor re membership in Communist Party. Mar., 1920: 218-21
------Cessation of. Effects on clothing industries, various cities........................... . Jan., 1918: 19-20,27-8;
Feb., 1918: 65; Mar., 1918: 61; Apr., 1918: 228
------Chinese exclusion. Recommendations of Commission on Industrial Relations.. N ov., 1915: 65-9
------Italian immigrants’ remittances to relatives in mother country................................ Nov., 1920: 228
------Mexican labor. Regulations of Department of Labor............................................Nov., 1918: 266-71;
Feb., 1919: 125-7; Nov., 1920: 221-3
------Provisions of act effective May 1,1917, re literacy test............................................... Mar., 1917: 487-8
------Restrictions, recommendations for..........................June, 1917: 913; Mar., 1918: 175; Apr., 1919: 145
------Statistics. ( S e e section on. Im m ig ra tio n i n each n u m b e r o f the R e v ie w .)
( S e e also Americanization; Emigration; United States: Bureau of Immigration;)
Imperial Federation of Austrian Industries, formation of...........................................................
Oct., 1918: 61
Imperial Munitions Board, Canada. (S e e Canada: Imperial Board of Munitions.)




76

M ON THLY LABOR REVIEW,

Income:
Relation
infant mortality. (Lathrop.)................................................................................ Feb., 1919: 219
Relation to sickness, cotton-mill villages, South Carolina................................................. Feb., 1919: 224-6
Swollen incomes in Germany during war.............................................................................Sept., 1918: 196-7
( S e e a lso Cost of Living; Wages.)
Independent Labor Party, United States. Purposes and aims................................................
Jan., 1919: 52
Index numbers. ( S e e Cost of living; Retail prices; Wholesale prices.)
India:
Department of Statistics. Prices and wages in India.........................................................Nov., 1917: 75-9
Kamgar Hitwardhak Sabha. (Conference of Bombay mill hands.).............................Aug., 1920: 175-6
Indian labor. Employment in salmon canning. Washington (State).................................... Mar., 1917: 477
Indiana:
Department of Women and Children. Report, 1918-19................................................... Aug., 1920: 100-2
Industrial Board. Reports, 1916-17; 1918-19............................................ July, 1918: 168; Aug., 1920: 131
State board of accounts. Authority to control coal mining industry........................ Nov., 1920: 199-200
State board of education. Vocational education surveys............Mar., 1917: 469-76; July, 1917: 149-52
( S e e a ls o sp e c ific s u b jec ts .)

Industrial accident boards, International association of. (S e e International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.)
Industrial accidents. ( S e e Accident statistics.)
Industrie land trade conference, Germany. Report................................................................... Oct., 1919: 44-7
Industrial betterment. (S e e Welfare work.)
Industrie 1canteens. (S e e Lunch rooms.)
Industrial census:
France. Occupational census, 1911........................................................................................July, 1917: 43-54
Germany. Order outlining plan, August 15,1917................................................................ Dec., 1917: 60-1
Switzerland. Home workers.................................................................................................... June, 1920: 223
United States. Summary of the census of manufacturers, 1904,1909,1914...................Nov., 1916: 136-8
Industria 1clinics. ( S e e Medical and hospital service: Clinics.)
Industrial conditions. (S e e Economic conditions; Employment statistics; Unemployment; Unrest; etc.)
Industrial conference:
Canada. (S e e Canada: National Industrial Conference.)
Great Britain. ( S e e Great Britain: National Industrial Conference.)
United States. (S e e United States: National Industrial Conference.)
Industria I Conference Board, N ational. (S e e National Industrial Conference Board.)
Industrial conferences, United States. (S e e Congresses, conventions, etc.; United States:
National Industrial Conference.)
Industrial councils. ( S e e Employees representation.)
Industrial courts. ( S e e Conciliation and arbitration.)
Industrial cripples. (S e e Handicapped.)
Industrial democracy. (S e e Employees' representation.)
Industrial diseases. (S e e Diseases.)
Industrial disputes. ( S e e Conciliation and arbitration; Strikes and lockouts.)
Industrial education. ( S e e Vocational education.)
Industrial education survey committee. New York City. (S e e New York City: Indus­
trial education survey committee.)
Industrial Fatigue. (See Fatigue.)
Industrial hazards. (S e e Dangerous and injurious occupations; Diseases; Dusts; Gases
and fumes; Poisons and poisoning; S p e c ific in d u stries.)
Industrial housing. (See Housing.)
Industrial hygiene. (S e e Hygiene; Medical and hospital service; Physical examination
of employees.)
Industrial League for the Improvement of Relations between Employers and Employed,
Great Britain, purpose of.......................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 40-1; 66
Industrial medicine. (S e e Hygiene; Medical and hospital service; Physical examination
- of employees.)
Industrial pensions. (S e e Old age and-invalidity.)
Industrial physicians. (S e e Medical and hospital service.)
Industrial physicians, American Association of. (S ee American Association of Industrial
Physicians and Surgeons.)
Industrial poisons. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)

Industrial police. ( S e e Company police.)
Indus
_____ trial reconstruction. (S
x e e Reconstri
Reconstruction.)

Industrial rehabilitation. (S e e Rehabilitation, reeducation, and reemployment.)
Industria 1relations:
Australia. Conference of Australian employers’ federations..............................................Apr., 1920: 60-2
Austria. Capital and labor after the war............................................................................. Aug., 1918: 103-5
Canada. Royal commission. Report and recommendations........................................ Sept., 1919: 36-43
------ War labor policy................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 47-50
Germany. Agreement between labor organizations and employers’ associations,
1918........................................................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 158-60
Great Britain. Board of trade reconstruction committees. Recommendations......... Aug., 1918: 92-3
------ Federation of British industries. Program..................................................................... Oct., 1918: 44-6
------Industrial League for the Improvement of Relations between Employers and
Employed. Aims..................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 40-1
------National alliance of employers and employed. Aims.................. Dec., 1918: 40-1; Jan., 1919: 67-70
------Nationalindustrial conference. 1919 report.................................................................. May, 1919: 104-8
------United States Employers’ Industrial Commission. Report.......................................... May, 1919: 101-2
United States. Address of J. D. Rockefeller, jr. Quotation............................................. Jan., 1919: 42-3
------Address of V . Everit Macy. Quotation.......................................................................... Feb., 1919: 63-4
------Chamber of Congress of the United States of America.Principles and referenda. Aug., 1919: 76-8;
Sept. 1920: 20-2
------Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America. Social reconstruction pro­
gram........................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 66-75
------Industrial relations commission. Report......................................................................... Nov., 1915: 53-5
------Industry and humanity. (King.).................................................................................. Feb., 1919: 79-81
------National Association of Manufacturers. Labor principles........................................... Aug., 1920: 35
------Nationalindustrial conference. Principles..................................................................... Nov., 1919: 42-9
------President’s Mediation Commission. Recommendations.............................................. Mar., 1918: 60
------Relations between employer and employee. (Leiserson.)....................................... Oct., 1919: 207-61




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

77

Industrial relations—Concluded.
Page.
United States. Resolutions by Our-Country-First Conference, Chicago, 1919___ , . . Nov., 1919: 49,50
------Senate resolution for promotion of better social and industrial conditions, 1918... Jan., 1919: 49
------Stability^ and peace in industrial life................................................................................ Sept., 1920: 22-5
------War Labor Conference Board. Activities.....................................................................Apr., 1918: 103-4
(S e e also Collective bargaining; Conciliation and arbitration; Employees’ representa­
tion.)
Industrial Relations Association of America:
Conventions, 1916, 1918,1920.............................................................................. 1916—July 62-70; Aug. 17-26;
1917—Apr. 574-81; June 890-900; 1918—Feb. 173-4; June 168-77; 1920—July 51-3
Formerly National Association of Employment Managers.................................................. July, 1930: 179
Industrial representation. (S e e Employees’ representation.)
Industrial research. (S e e Research.)
Industrial safety. (S e e Accident prevention; Hygiene; Lighting; Sanitation and working
conditions.)
Industrial Safety Congress of New York State, 1916. R6sum6 of addresses..................... Nov., 1917: 169-72
Industrial training. (S e e Vocational education.)
Industrial Truce, Great Britain. (S e e Treasury agreement.)
“ Industrial undertakings.” Defined by International Labor Conference, 1919................. Jan., 1920: 15,16
Industrial unrest. (S e e Unrest.)
Industries, classification of. (S e e Classification of industries.)
Industries Board, War. (S e e United States: War Industries Board.)
Infant mortality. (S e e Vital statistics.)
Infant welfare. (S e e Child welfare.)
Infants’ nursing rooms. (S e e Day nurseries.)
Infections. (S e e Diseases.)
Influenza. (S e e Diseases.)
Information and education service. (S ee United States: Department of Labor. Informa­
tion and education service.)
Injunctions:
Against mass picketing............................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 194-5
Against picketing motion-picture theater.............................................................................Nov., 1920: 195-6
Against strike to secure unionization....................................................................................Sept., 1920: 170-3
Against strikes during war emergency.................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 53-5
As affected by the Clayton act......... ...................................................................................... Oct., 1920: -205-7
In strike for closed shop upheld................................................................................................. Aug., 1920: 141
Labor injunctions in Massachusetts..................................................................................... June, 1917: 911-12
United States. Under antitrust law....................................................................................... July, 1917: 56-7
(S e e also Strikes and lockouts.)
Injuries. (S e e Accident prevention; Accident statistics; Diseases; Eye injuries; Rehabilita­
tion, reeducation, and reemployment; Workmen’ s compensation and insurance, United
States; Injuries; Permanent disability.)
Injurious occupations. ( S e e Dangerous and injurious occupations.)
Inland Steel Co. Collective bargaining....................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 154-7
Inside wiremen. (S e e Building trades; Electric light and power.)
Instability of labor. (S e e Absenteeism; Mobility of labor.)
Institu.t fur Gewerbehygiene, Frankfort. Schriften.......................................................... ........Aug., 1915: 24-9
Institute for Crippled, and Disabled Men. Work of finding employment for disabled
civilians. (Stem.).......................................................................................................................Apr., 1920: 147-54
Institute for public efficiency, Ohio. (S e e Ohio Institute for Public Efficiency.)
Institute of industrial hygiene, Frankfort, Germany. (S e e Institut fur gewerbehygiene.)
Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Great Britain. Women munitions workers. Quota­
tion................................................................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 312-15
Insurance. (S ee Accident insurance; Group insurance; Health insurance; Life insurance;
Marine insurance; Maternity insurance; Old age and invalidity; Social insurance; Soldiers
and sailors; Strike insurance; Unemployment insurance; War-Risk Insurance Act;
Workmen’ s compensation and insurance.)
Insurance agreements. (S e e International relations.)
Insurance commissioners, national convention of. Addresses................................................ Nov., 1916: 71-9
Insurance companies:
Iowa. Statistics on workmen’ s compensation business................................................. Jan., 1917: 118,122
Massachusetts. Investigation by legislative committee re workmen’ s compensation.. Jan., 1916: 45-8
------Statistics of experience............................................................................*............................ May, 1916: 54-7
New York State. Experience of liability insurance companies........................................ Mar., 1919: 242
Ohio. Stock companies in workmen’ s compensation insurance.. . Aug., 1916: 60-1; Apr., 1917: 552-4
Pennsylvania. Experience in workmen’ s compensation insurance............................... May, 1919: 260-3
United States. List of companies having old-age pension systems.................................. June, 1916: 111
Wisconsin. Workmen’ s compensation experience................................................................ Nov., 1916r 84
(S e e also Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Prudential Life Insurance Co.)
Insurance funds. (S e e Establishment funds; Fraternal orders; Labor organizations;
Benefit funds; Workmen’ s compensation and insurance: State funds.)
Insurance societies. Germany. (S ee Accident insurance societies. Germany.)
Interallied Conference on After-Care of Disabled Men. London, 1918. (Adams.)..........Aug., 1918: 31-43
Interallied Food Council, organization of........................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 128
International Allied Printing Trades Association. Unions composing................................... Jan., 1920: 270
International Association for Labor Legislation:
Historical summary....................................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 3-4
Postwar program........................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 55-62
(See also International Labor Office.)
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions:
Addresses at congresses. (In full.)..................................................................................... 1918—Nov. 214-26;
1919—May 248-50; Nov. 280-93; 1920—Oct. 1-8; Nov. 1-9; Dec. 135-56
Committee on jurisdictional conflicts. Report..................................................................Dec., 1917: 148-57
Committee on social insurance. Personnel and advisors.....................................................Nov., 1916: 3-4
Committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost. Reports, 1915 to 1917... Nov., 1915: 28-37;
June, 1916: 50; Oct., 1916: 43-6; Oct., 1917: 123-43
------Standard definitions and tables adopted....................... .............................................. Oct., 1917: 133-43
------Standard measure for accident rates................................................................. ........... Jan., 1920: 218-19
------System of weighting accidents............................................................................ ............... Oct., 1918: 207
Conference on social insurance, 1916........................................................... Nov., 1916: 1-10; Jan., 1917: 1-5
1401317 0 — 41—




6

78

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

International Association on Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions—Concluded.
Page.
Conventions, 1915to 1920... Nov., 1915: 27-37; June, 1916: 49-53; Aug., 1917: 144^5; Oct., 1917: 108-9,
111-21; Sept., 1918: 252-4; Nov., 1918: 205-14; Nov., 1919: 286-79; Nov., 1920: 10-l4
Executive committee. Personnel........................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 18
Medical section. Personnel................................................................................ ...................... June, 1916: 51
Safety committee meeting, July, 1916................................................................................ .
Sept., 1916: 16
International Association of Machinists. Firms having 8-hour day........ Oct., 1915: 17,18; Feb., 1916: 37-8
International Association of Miners. Congress, Geneva, 1920............................................... Oct.> 1920: 212-14
International Association of PrintingHouse Craftmen. Organized September, 1919.... Oct., 1920: 214-15
International Association of Public Employment Services. Officers, 1920-21"................... Dec., 1920: 106-7
( S ee also American Association of public employment offices.)
International Association on Unemployment:
Organization and list of publications...,.................................................Apr., 1916: 85-91; Nov., 1918: 60
French section. Report on prices and wages...............................................................
Sept., 1919: 235-44
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers:
Activities in Pacific coast strike of telephone industry...................................................... Mar., 1918: 55-6
Wage awards..................................................................................................................................
Jan., 1919: 36
International Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, Canada. Membership
statistics............................... . . ; ......................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 328
International Brotherhood of Stationary Firemen and Oilers, Kansas. Decision re
wages of......................................................„.................................................................................. Aug., 1920: 142-3
International Conference of Seafarers. (S e e International Seafarers' Federation.)
International Congress of Farm Workers, Amsterdam, 1920. Resolutions, ofllcers......... Dec., 1920: 167-8
International Congress of Working Women:
Meeting 1919. (Waggaman.)................................................................................................. Dec., 1919: 280-90
Resolutions re child labor, continuation schools, 8-hour day, etc.................................... Jan., 1920: 12,20
International Cooperative Alliance Congresses.......................................................................... Oct., 1919: 165-71
International Cooperative Congress, Paris, 1889. Definition of “ Profit sharing” ........... .
Aug,, 1917: 45
International Federation of Trade-unions: '
Activities during war, headquarters, membership, etc...............................................Feb., 1917: 199-206
Boycott of Hungary................................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 184-8
Conference proceedings..........................................Mar., 1918: 172-9; Dec., 1919: 359-65;,Aug., 1920: 173-4
Resolution re appointment of “ social attaches” ....... .......................................................... Sept., 1920: 25-6
International Harvester Co. Accident experience, 1914-15........................................................ July, 1916: 109
International insurance agreements. (S e e International relations.)
International JLiabor Conference, 1919, Washington, D. C:
Draft conventions and recommendations adopted.......................... Feb., 1920: 15-32; Mar., 1920: 186-90
Organization^.............................................................................................................................. May, 1919: 3-5
Referred t o ..> *....................................................................Aug., 1919: 27-8; Sept., 1919: 31; Dec., 1919: 61
Summary of proceedings. (Turner.)....................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 1-26
International Labor Conference, 1920. Genoa:
Agenda.......................................... ..................................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 25
Summary of proceedings................................................................................... ..................
Oqt,, 1920: 209-11
International Labor Conference, 1921. Geneva. Agenda.......................................................... Nov., 1920: 210
Intemationallabor legislation. (S e e International relations.)
Interactional labor movements. (S e e International relations.)
International Labor Office (1901-1919):
Historical summary...................................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 3-4
(S e e also International Association for Labor Legislation.)
International Labor Office (League of Nations):
Personnel and plan of organization.............. ........Jan,, 1920: 22-3; May, 1920: 197; Sept., 1920: 199-301
Publications.............................., .................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 166
Service of Industrial Hygiene, creation of................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 132
(S e e also League of Nations.)
International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union:
Boston. Party to agreements.................................................................................................. . Apr., 1918: 234
Chicago. Party to agreements............................................................................................... Feby 1918:. 66,75
Cincinnati. Party to agreements.............................................................................................
Mfar., 1918: 62
Cleveland. Settlement of disputes.................................................................................. .
July, 1920: 53
New York City. Party to agreements...................................................................................
Aug., 1915: 8;
Sept., 1916: 25; Mar., 1917: 366; June, 1919: 1; Dec., 1919: 43
Philadelphia. Party to agreement...........................................................................................
Jan., 1918: 31
St. Louis. Party to agreement.................................................................................................
Mar., 1918: 65
International Holders’ Umon of North America:
Attitude toward membership of negroes......... ..................................................................... Sept., 1920: 183-4
Pajrty to agreements...................................................................................................................... May, 1918: 167
International relations:
Bern conventions, 1905,1906, 1913............................Nov., 1918: 57; Apr., 1919: 5-7; Jan., 1920: 15,16,22
Franco-Italian labor treaty, September 30,1919.................................................................. Feb., 1920: 47-53
International Association for Labor Legislation. Memorandum...................................Nov., 1918: 55-62
International labor conference, 1919 and 1920. Conventions and recommendations.. . 1920—Jan. 1-26;
Feb. 15-32; Mar. 186-90; Oct. 209-11
International labor legislation. (Magnusson.)......................................................................Apr., 1919: 1-11
International Labor Office. Diplomatic Division. Scope of work..................................Sept., 1920:199
International relations of labor during the war................................................................ Feb.. 1917: 199-206
Internationalism in labor standards. (King and Tead.)................................................. Feb., 1919: 79-82
Inter-Scandinavian association for labor legislation. Proposed cooperation in labor
matters............................................................................................................................ ..........Nov., 1Q19: 85-7
Italo-Argentine convention on the compensation of industrial accidents..................... Nov., 1920: 187-8
Labor provisions in the Peace Treaty................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 27-39
Labor treaties and their enforcement...................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 6-10
League of Nations. Covenant. . .•................................. *........................................................ Sept., 1919: 32-6
Draft convention......................................................................................................................... May, 1919: 11-26
Leeds Conference, 1916, resolutions of........................................................................ .
June, 1917: 912-15
Military service. Convention between the United States and Great Britain.................
Oct., 1918: 44
Road to the 8-hour day. (Bauer.) Translation................................................................Aug., 1919: 41-65
Seamen, code for. Recommendation of International Labor Conference................... Oct., 1920: 210-11
Social and accident insurance treaties......................................................................................
Apr., 1918: 8
Spanish Chamber of Commerce recommendation for convention re Spanish workmen
in France.......................................................................................................... ....................... Aug., 1920: 183-4
( S e e a lso International Labor Office)




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

79

International Seafarers’ Federation.

Conferences........................................................................Mar., 1920: 204;
Oct., 1920: 211-12; Nov., 1920: 210-12
Conventions, membership, etc...................Sept., 1917: 98-100;
Mar., 1918: 169-71; Mar., 1920: 203-5; Oct., 1920: 215
International secretariat of national trade-union centers. Headquarters during war___ Feb., 1917: 200-6
International Socialist Bureau. (S e e Internationale.)
International Steel and Ordnance Cd., Parlin, N . J. Experience with poisoning in muni­
tions. (Rice.)................................................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 278
International Trade-Union Congress. (S e e International Federation of Trade-unions.)
International Typographical Union of North America:
Decision re open shop................................................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 214
Membership, earnings, etc......................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 203-4
Mortality records of members, 1893-1915....................................................................... .
Jan., 1917: 87-8
International Union of Clothing Workers. Congress, Copenhagen, 1920. Resolutions____ Sept., 1920: 204
International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter workers. Committee of, in arbitra­
tion case...........................................................................................................................................Dec., 1920: 180-4
International Union of Woodworkers, Conference at Amsterdam, 1919..................................May, 1920: 201-2
Internationale. Date of formation, headquarters, etc................ Nov., 1918: 261 (footnote); Apr., 1919: 152
Interstate Commerce cases under workmen’s compensation. (S e e Workmen’s compensa­
tion and insurance: Interstate railroad and maritime employments.)
Interstate Commerce Commission. (S e e United States: Interstate Commerce Commission.)
Interurban electric railways. (S e e Street railways.)
Interurban railways. (S e e Street railways.)
Invalid soldiers’ commissions. Canada. (S e e Canada. Department of soldiers and
sailors’ civil reestablishment: Invalid soldiers’ commission.)
Invalidity insurance. (S e e Health insurance; Old age and invalidity.)
Invalidity pensions. ( S e e Old age and invalidity.)
Investigation and inspection service, United States. (S e e United States: Department oi
Labor. Investigation and inspection service.)
Iowa Industrial Commission reports........................... Feb., 1916: 61-3; Jan., 1917: 115-19; Mar., 1919: 254-7
Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Survey of public schools of Fort
Dodge................................................................................................................................................ Oct., 1917: 161-3
Iowa University. Survey of hazards in pearl-button industry............. .............................. Sept., 1920: 146-7
Ireland:
Agricultural wages board. Minimum rates of wages........................................................ June, 1919: 180-1
------Minimum-wage order.............................................................................
Iron and steel:
Australia. Daily rates of wages. Newcastle....................................................................... Oct.. 1920: 131-2
France. Eight-hour day by agreement, 1919......................................................................... July, 1919: 164
Germany. Employment statistics, 1913, and after-war prospects..................................... Feb., 1919: 138
------ Wages to 1913 to 1918.............................................................................. Oct., 1918: 174; July. 1920: 124-5
Great Britain. Bonuses, cost of living..................................................................................
July,1919:155
------Hours. Experience of Salford iron works with shorter workday................................ Dec.,1916: 120
------------- Introductions of 8-hour day in 1906.......................................................................... Aug., 1919: 50^1
------Reconstruction program. Board of Trade....................................................................... Aug., 1918: 90-3
------Technical and industrial training, Recommendations of Board of Trade................... July, 1918: 52-3
------Trade-union membership....................................................................................................... June, 1919: 304
------Wage increases.......................................................................................... July, 1919: 155; Noy., 1919: 208
Hungary. Membership in trade-unions.................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 214
Italy. Labor disturbances. (Maylander.)................................... ................................. Dec., 1920: 197-206
------Mortality and morbidity statistics, 1893-1913................................................................. Apr., 1916: 82-4
Norway. Wage award....................................................................................................... . Sept., 1920: 110-12
United States. Accident prevention. Addresses, referred to...........................................
Oct., 1919: 54
------ — — Can serious industrial accidents be eliminated? (Chaney and Hanna.)........ Aug., 1917: 1-16
------------- 11 Engineering revision” as seen by safety committees. (Chaney.)..................Dec., 1918: 1-17
------------- Foreman’ s bonus for accident reduction. (Chaney.)......................... ........... Sept., 1919: 272-81
------------- Health conservation in steel mills................ ........................................................... Nov., 1916: 97-9
---------- Safety movement, 1907-1917...................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 316-17
------------- Three cardinal methods of safety movement.......................................................... June, 1920: 163
------Accident statistics. Rates........................................1917—Nov. 13-22; Dec. 161-5; 1918—Apr. 288-9;
1919—Apr. 18-22; June 231-4; Sept. 272-81; Oct. 222-32; Nov. 253-7; 1920—June 151-63
------Employees representation plans........................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 153-7
------Establishment funds.......... f . ................................................................................. Feb., 1918: 193,198,200
------Hazards. Blast-furnace operation............................................. ; ............ i ..................May, 1918: 258-60
------------- Carbon monoxide poisoning.................................................. Aug., 1917: 76-8; July, 1919: 173,176
------------- Injurious dusts............................................................................................................. Aug., 1917: 85-6
— Hours, 1913 to 1919............................................. Mar., 1918: 29-51; Oct., 1918: 242; Oct., 1919: 104-26
------------- Eight-hour day.................................................... Dec., 1916: 119; Nov., 1918: 133; Mar., 1920: 113
------Housing. Morgan Bark, Duluth, Minn. (Magnusson.)............................................. Apr., 1918: 1-25
------Negro migrants in Pittsburgh............................................................................................ Feb., 1918: 156-7
------Physical examination of 12,302 men of Cambria Steel Co.............................................Feb., 1917: 270-1
------Prices fixed by Industrial Board.................................................... Apr., 1919: 115-16; May, 1920: 37-8
------Strikes, 1919. (Gadsby.)..................................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 79-94
------Training of women workers. Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa *....................... Sept., 1918: 210
------Wages, 1913 to 1919.......... . . 1918—Mar. 29-51; June 124; Oct. 26-7; 1919—Jan. 36-7,142; Feb. 132;
Mar. 151: Apr. 151; Mayl86; July 147; Oct.,104-26; Nov. 192; D ec.87-8;<1926-Apr. 110
(S ee also Blast furnaces; Foundries; Metal trades; Shipbuilding.)
Iron mining. ( S e e Mines and mining, iron.)
Iron molders. ( S e e Foundries; Iron and steel.)
Irregularity of attendance. (S e e Absenteeism.)'
Irregularity of employment. (S e e Mobility of labor; Seasonal employment; Unemploy­
ment.)
Italian Federation of Metal Workers. (S e e Federazione Italiana Operai Metallurgies)
Italy:
Commissariato Generale dell’ Emigrazione. Bollettino della Emtgrazione. Referred
to.......................................................! ..........................................................................................Nov., 1920: 187
Consiglio superiore del lavoro. Recommendations re employment bureaus................ Jan., 1917: 152-5
International Seamens’ Union of America.




July,1920:111

80

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Italy—Concluded.
Page.
Consiglio superlore del lavoro Reconstruction program.................................................. Nov., 1918: 72-4
Direzione Cehtrale di statistics. Statistics della emigrazione, 1914 and 1915________Aug., 1919: 277-9
Ministeroperil Lavoro ela Previdenza Sociale............................. ....................................... Sept., 1920: 205
Officio nazionale per il collocamento e la disoccupazione. Established October 19,
1919............................................................................................................ ................................Apr., 1920: 193-7
TJfficio del Lavoro. Requisiti d’istruzioue per l ’ammissione dei fanciulli a! lavoro
industriale. 1917.................................................................................................................. Nov., 1917: 215-17
( S e e a ls o s p e c ific s u b jec ts.)
( S e e Poisons and poisoning.)

Ivy poisoning.

jr.
Jackson, W . C. Death notice............................................................................................................ May, 1920: 199
Jacksonville Traction Co. Recommendations of the National War Labor Board re con­
troversy with employees................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 254
Jacobstein, M. Can industrial democracy be efficient............................................................... Dec., 1920: 98-9
Jansen, A . W . Hazards in electric arc welding........................................................................ May, 1919: 245-6
Japan. Department of Agriculture and Commerce. Report, 1920— ............................. Aug., 1920: 88-90
Japanese labor:
Hawaii.............................................................................................................................................. Sept., 1916: 51
Oregon. Employment statistics, wages.................................................................... ........Dec., 1920: 212-13
Jaundice. ( S e e Diseases.)
Jewelry industry. Opportunities for employment of disabled.......................................... Aug., 1918: 111,112
Job analysis. ( S e e Classification and description of occupations; Employment manage­
ment.)
Job printing. (S e e Printing and publishing.)
Job selling. ( S e e Employment agencies.)
John Dawson works. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Employees’ managemen t............................ Feb., 1920: 9-10
Johns Hopkins University study. Unemployment and American trade-unions.............June 1919: 128-31
Joint board of sanitary control, New York City. Activities..................................................... Mar., 1916: 73;
Jan., 1917: 94-7; June, 1919: 8,16
Joint boards. ( S e e Collective agreements; Conciliation and arbitration; Employees’ rep­
resentation; sp ecific in d u stries.}
Joint Congressional Commission on Reclassification. (S e e United States: Congress. Joint
Commission on Reclassification of Salaries.)
Jomt council in the clothing industry. Articles of federation................................................. Oct., 1919: 16-17
Joint councils. ( S e e Employees’ representation.)
Joint industrial councils. (S e e Employees’ representation.)
Joint International Conference Council of the Printing Trades. Meeting, 1919...................... Jan., 1920: 272
Joint shipping industrial conference. Ocean marine and dock and harbor interests, 1919.
(Squires.)...................................................*.................................... •-..................- ........................... July, 1919: 14-23
Joint standing industrial councils. ( S e e Employees’ representation.)
Jones, M. Address on trade tests. Referred to ........................................................................... June, 1918: 174
Joseph, G. W . N . Effect of employment of mothers upon sickness among school children.
Quotation......................................................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 167,8
Jouhaux, L. Reconstruction program of Confederation General© Du Travail.................Mar., 1919: 75,78
Judson, F. N . Responsibility of railroad companies for accidents................................... Mar., 1919: 234,247
Jurisdiction in commerce cases. ( S e e Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Inter­
state railroad and maritime employment.)
Jurisdictional conflicts, committee on. (S e e I. A . I. A . B . C.: Committee on jurisdictional
conflicts.)
Jurisdictional disputes. Building industry, plan of settlement.............................................. Aug., 1920: 36-8
Juvenile delinquency. (S e e Delinquency.)
Juvenile employment. (S e e Child labor.)
Juvenile IabOT exchanges. (S e e Employment agencies.)
K.
Kamgar Hitwardhak Sabha, India. (S e e India:.Kamgar Hitwardhak Sabha.)
Kansas:
Court of Industrial Relations. Act creating...................................................................... Mar., 1920: 214-17
------Decision re wages on electric railways........................................................................... June, 1920: 106-7
------Decision re wages on steam railroads.............................................................................. Aug., 1920: 142-3
------Decisions of courts re constitutionality..........................................................................Nov., 1920: 191-3
Industrial welfare commission. Creation of......................................................................... Nov., 1915: 44,5
------Orders... Oct., 1917: 80; Apr., 1918: 203; July, 1918: 111-12; Oct., 1918: 181-2; Nov., 1919: 218-19
------Report, July 1,1915, to June 30,1917.............................................................................. Feb., 1918: 142-5
------ Report on laundries and stores, 1917, summarized...................................................... Feb., 1918: 142-5
( S e e a lso s p e c ific s u b jects.)

Kansas City Railways Co.:
Award of National War Labor Board to women employees................................................. Jan., 1919: 204
Employment of women as conductors........ ........................................................................ Mar., 1919: 215-16
ICefauver, Christine. Elimination of industrial poisoning in felt hat making.................... Oct., 1919: 237-8
Kellaway, F . G. Heavy work done by women. Quotation.................................................... Sept., 1918: 217
Kentucky. Workmen’s Compensation Board. Reports, 1916-17 and 1918-19................Oct., 1918: 228-30;
June, 1920: 176-7
(S e e also s p e c ific su b jects.)

Kerenski, A. Labor conditions in Russia. Referred to......................... Sept., 1918: 326-7; May, 1920: 65-7
Kerr, J. W . Industrial hygiene........*........................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 448-9
Kidney diseases. (S e e Diseases.)
King, C . L. Price situation. Quotation.......................................................................................
July, 1920: 89
King, V /. L. M. Industry and humanity................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 79-81
“ King’s National Roll.” Outline of scheme.............................................................................. Jan., 1920: 205-7
Kingston, George A . “ Interpretation of injuries arising out of and in course of employ­
ment” .....................................................................................................................................* .... Nov., 1918: 214-26
Kirk, W . F. Labor turnover in Milwaukee............................................................................... Apr., 1919: 53-70
Kirk, W . T . Industrial rehabilitation in Oregon......................................................................... Oct., 1920: 1-8




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

81

Page.

Borkaldy, A. W .:

Capabilities of women in industry. Quotation......................................................................Sept., 1918: 215
Industry and finance....................................................................................................................July) 1920: 57-9
Labor, finance, and the war................................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 335-48
Kitchens. (S e e Communal kitchens.)
Kittredge, Dorothea D. Analysis of some effects of increased cost of living on family
budgets.......................................................................................... .....................................................July, 1920: 1-10
Knickerbocker Ice Co. v . Stewart. Decision, May 17, 1920..................................................... June, 1920: 171-5
Knit goods. ( S e e Hosiery and knit goods.)
Knox, J. Port Sunlight works contmuation school.................................................................Nov., 1920: 143-6
Kober, G. M. Diseases of occupation and vocational hygiene.................................................Jan., 1917: 92-4
Kobick, H . G. Job analysis of Commonwealth Edison Co.................................................... June, 1918: 174-5
Koelsch. Industrial poisoning. Referred to ............. ........................... Oct., 1917: 20; Feb., 1918: 41-2,45,48
Kofoid, C. A . Hookworm among miners. Quotation.............................................................July, 1918: 190-2
Kopetzky, S. J. Fallacies of arguments against compulsory health insurance..................... Apr., 1917: 517
Krail, S. Poisons in the rubber industry....................... . ........................................................ June, 1920: 168-70
Krupp Works, Essen, Germany. Medical examination of healthy members of sick fund. Julv, 1920: 169-70
tu
Labor. (S e e Alien labor; Child labor; Chinese labor; Compulsory work; Convict labor;
Japanese labor; Mexican labor; Oriental labor; Woman labor; United States: Depart­
ment of Labor.)
Labor, Department of, United States. (S e e United States: Department of Labor.)
Labor accidents. (S e e Accident statistics.)
Labor adjustment commission. (S e e United States: Labor Adjustment Commission.)
Labor adjustments. ( S e e Conciliation and arbitration.)
Labor agencies. (S ee Employment agencies.)
Labor agreements. (S e e Collective agreements-)
Labor and the church. ( S e e ' Church: Attitude toward labor.)
Labor army, Russia. Proclamation of Trotsky........................................................................... July, 1920: 180
Labor bibliographies. (S e e Bibliographies.)
Labor boards, commissions, etc., general:
Directories................................................................................................................................... July, 1915: 83-90;
Nov., 1915: 104-12; Sept., 1916: 116-28; Sept., 1917: 169-86;
Dec., 1918: 375-92; Dec., 1919: 377-95; July, 1920: 181-201
Interhational Labor Office. Personnel and plan of organization.....................................Jan., 1920: 22-3;
May, 1920: 197; Sept., 1920: 199-201
Periodicals. List of labor papers and journals............................... Sept., 1916: 127-8; June, 1919: 334-53
Labor boards, commissions, etc., United States:
Boys’ Working Reserve. Organization............................................................................... June, 1917: 991-3
Commission to report to Congress plans for work in United States penitentiaries.
Appointment.............................................................................................................................. Sept;, 1918: 39
Community labor boards. Organizations, etc....................................................................Jan., 1919: 119-25
Court decisions on power of State industrial commissions to issue orders.................... July, 1916: 136-^7
Fuel Administration. Bureau of labor appointed to settle labor controversies in coal
mining during war..................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 186
Labor Adjustment Commission. Creation, function, etc................................................. Sept., 1917: 71-3
National Adjustment Commission. Creation........................................................................
Oct., 1917: 29
Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board. Creation.............................................................. Oct., 1917: 26-9
State labor bureaus. Reports of activities----- 1920—Sept. 180-2; Oct. 222-6; Nov. 218-20; Dec. 186-90
------ (S e e also sp ecific S ta te s .)
War Department. Board of control for labor standards. Personnel and fimction___Oct., 1917: 30-3
War Labor Conference Board. Personnel, e t c . .............................................................Apr., 1918: 103-5
Indiana. Department of Women and Children. Scope, organization, and activities. Aug., 1920: 101-2
Kansas. Industrial Welfare Commission. Creation............................ Nov., 1915: 44-5; Feb., 1918: 142
Massachusetts. Department of Labor and Industries. Creation............... ............. Nov., 1919: 339-40:
Mar., 1920: 209-13
New York (State). Proposed organization of Department of Labor............................. Jan., 1920: 266-9
abor boards, commissions, etc., foreign countries:
Argentina. Commissions of employers and employees to fix minimum wage............June, 1919: 265-6
------Department of Labor established 1916...................... ....................................................... July, 1917: 140
Austria. Ministries of Public Welfare and Public Health. Fimctions...................... May, 1918: 289-91
Brazil. Department of Labor created 1918............................................................................. Aug., 1919: 261
France. Department of Industrial Reconstitution. (Succeeds Armament Depart­
ment.)........................................................................................................................ ; ................ Feb., 1919: 257
------Ministry of Social Hygiene, Social Insurance, and Social Provision. Personnel.. Apr., 1920: 185
Germany. Bill for creation of labor boards......................................................................... May, 1918: 68-72
------Imperial Economic Department. Established 1917..................................................... Dec., 1917: 61-2
------Imperial Labor Department. Established 1918.......................................................... Feb., 1919: 257-8
Great Britain. Agricultural Wages Board. Constitution, etc...................................... Jan., 1918: 97-100
------Ministry of Food. Established 1916; duties..................................................................... May, 1917: 770
— - Ministry of Labor. Organization, duties, and personnel.............................................. Mav, 1917: 770;
June, 1917: 817; July, 1920: 176-7
------------- Resolution of organized labor favoring creation.................... : .............................. Aug., 1916: 82-3
------Ministry of Munitions. Organized 1915........................................June, 1917: 816-17; May, 1918: 152
------Ministry of Pensions. Powers and duties......................................... May, 1917: 770-1; Dec., 1917: 65
------Ministry of Shipping. Duties.......................................................................................... May, 1917: 770-1
-------Port labor committees for assisting in placing transport workers during war and .
demobilization.........................................................................................................................June, 1919: 27-37
Italy. Employment office. Establishment and functions............................................. Apr., 1920: 191-7
------ Ministry of Labor and Social Thrift. Established 1920..................................................Sept., 1920: 205
Mexico (Coahuila). Bureau of Labor established 1916...................................................... Oct., 1917: 171-2
Netherlands. Bureau of Labor established 1916.................................................................... Dec., 1917: 132
------Office of Unemployment Insurance and Public Employment Service. Estab­
lished 1916....................................................................................... .*...................................... June, 1917: 909-11
Norway. Wage boards established by law of February, 1918.......................................... Sept., 1918: 204
Portugal. Ministnr of Labor. Established 1916................................................................... July, 1917: 141
Prussia. Proposed wages department............................................................................... Nov., 1919: 213-14
Russia. Department of Labor. Constitution.................................................................... July, 1917: 141-2




MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

82

Labor boards, commissions, etc., foreign countries—Concluded.
Spain. Commissions for determining minimum wage in home industry....................... June, 1919: 268
------Labor Commission for Settlement of Disputes in Catalonia.........................•..........Nov., 1920: 216-17
Switzerland. Labor department, proposed........................................................................ May, 1920: 182-5
( F o r activities, rep o rts, etc., see specific S tates a n d coun tries.)

Labor camps:
Arizona. Conditions surrounding. Illegal deportations from Warren district,
Arizona....'........................................................................................................................................... Jan., 1918:13-17
California....................................................................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 222-4
Colorado. Closed camps and election frauds of 1914........................................................... Aug., 1916: 35-7
New York (State). Sanitary codes. Referred to ................................................................ May, 1918: 280
Ohio. Report and recommendations.......................................................................................Apr., 1918: 280-3
United States. Agricultural camp housing. (Magnusson.)...................... ....................May, 1918: 277-87
------Convict labor, 1914-1915.........................................................: ............................................. Apr., 1917: 595
------Regulations oflabor camps in Pacific States........................................ Apr., 1917: 558; Mar., 1918: 57
------United States Steel Corporation. Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn..................................Apr., 1918: 7-11
Labor codes. (S e e Laws and legislation.)
Labor colonies. (S e e Colonies.)
Labor conferences. (S e e Congresses, conventions, etc.)
Labor congresses. (S e e Congresses, conventions, etc.)
Labor contract:
Austria. Legal regulation...................................................................... Apr., 1917: 596-600; Feb., 1920: 240
Germany. Model contract of employment.......................................................................... July, 1919: 168-9
------Provisions governing agricultural workers........................................................ ............July, 1919: 235-7
Massachusetts. Supreme court decision re injunctions in labor disputes...................... Aug., 1916: 32-4
United States. Recent Supreme Court-decisions and the labor contract. (Clark.). . May, 1917: 677-97
------Regulation of wage contracts by Seamen’ s A ct.......................... Feb., 1919: 253-6; June, 1920: 187-8
(S e e also Collective agreements; Payment of wages.)
Labor conventions (agreements). (S e e International relations.)
Labor conventions (meetings). (S e e Congresses, conventions, etc.)
Labor copartnership. (S e e Cooperation; Profit sharing.)
Labor costs:
Broom making................................... ............................................................................................ O c t 1920: 227
Garment trades. Cleveland...................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 9-10
Lumber industry. (Squires.).................................................................................................. Oct., 1917: 66-79
Wood pulp, Sweden................................................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 193-5
(S e e also Wages.)
Labor council, advisory. United States. (S e e United States: Department of Labor.
Advisory labor council.)
Labor councils. (S e e Chambers of labor.)
Labor distribution offices. (S e e Employment agencies.)
Labor embargoes. (S e e Embargoes.)
Labor exchanges. (See. Employment agencies.)
Labor flux. (S e e Mobility of labor.)
Labor hygiene. (S e e Hygiene.)
Labor increase. (S e e Mobility of labor.)
Labor injunctions. (S e e Injunctions.)
Labor laws. (S e e Laws and legislation.)
Labor Legislation, American Association for. (S e e American Association for Labor Legis­
lation.)
Labor market. (S e e Employment statistics; Unemployment.)
Labor mobility. (See Mobility of labor.)
Labor Office, International. (S e e International Labor Office.)
Labor officials. (S e e Association of Governmental Labor Officials; Directories.)
Labor Officials, Association of Governmental. (See Association of Governmental Labor
Officials.)
Labor organizations, general:
Benefits distributed by trade-unions, various countries.......................................................
May, 1916: 83
International Association of Miners. Congress, 1920........................................................ Oct., 1920: 212-14
International Conference of Seafarers, June, 1920............................................................... Oct., 1920: 211-12
International Congress of Farm Workers, Amsterdam, 1920............................................ Dec., 1920: 167-8
International Federation of Trade-Unions. Congresses.................................................. Mar., 1918: 172-9:
Decv 1919: 359-65; Aug., 1920: 173-4
International Labor Office. (S e e International Labor Office.)
International relations of labor during the war................................................................ Feb., 1917: 199-206
International Seafarers’ Federation. Congress, 1920....................................................... Nov., 1920: 210-12
International secretariat of national trade-union centers. Headquarters during war. Feb., 1917: 200-6
International trade-union statistics..................................... .................................................... May, 1916: 82-3
International trade-unionism...................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 2-3
International Union of Clothing Workers. Congress, 1920........... . ................................... Sept., 1920: 204
International Union of Woodworkers. Conference, 1919................. ............................... May, 1920: 201-2
Offices issuing statistics on trade-unions, various countries.............................................. Oct., 1915: 54-77
Periodicals, various countries.................................................................................................June, 1919: 334-53
Right to organize. Labor’s peace program............................................................................. Mar., 1918: 176
------Principle adopted by Peace Conference, April, 1919.....................................................May, 1919: 23,25
Labor organizations, United States:
Activities to improve working and living conditions, New York City........................ Jan., 1917: 107-11;
May, 1917: 767-8
Apprenticeship. Electrical work (inside), New York City...............................................June, 1919: 62-3
Attitude of American Federation of Labor toward labor parties.......................................Mar., 1919: 66-7
Attitude of courts.......................... Mar., 1917: 4; Aug., 1919: 231-4; Oct., 1920: 201-2; Nov., 1920: 196-7
Attitude of Postmaster General re membership in unions................................................Jan., 1918: 153-4;
Feb., 1919: 146-7; Aug., 1919: 137-8
Attitude of railroad transportation organizations toward Federal compensation.
(Cease.)................................. .................................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 311-16
Attitude of State federations of labor toward reconstruction.............................................. Jan., 1919: 50-2
Attitude of State federations of labor toward women-in-industry problems............... Jan., 1919: 219-21
Attitude toward compulsory arbitration....................................................Jan,, 1917: 22; May, 1917: 697-8
Attitude toward compulsory health insurance....................................... May, 1917: 751-2: May, 1918; 230
Attitude toward employment management..........Jan., 1916: 28-38; Mar., 1917: 449-53; Jan., 1919: 127




SUBJECT INDEX, JU LY , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

83

Labor organizations. United States—Concluded.
Page.
Attitude toward. Industrial education....................................................................................... June. 1919: 60
Attitude toward industrial representation plan of Colorado Fuel and Iron-Co............... Apr., 1916: 48
Attitude toward minimum-wage legislation............................................................................ Sept .,*1916: 67
* Attitude toward nationalization of coal mines. (Stewart.).......................................... Nov., 1919: 66-70
Attitude toward part-time education................................................................................... May, 1920: 118-19
Attitude toward physical examination of employees......................................................... Feb., 1920: 164-5
Attitude toward profit-sharing schemes................................................... June, 1916: 47; Aug., 1917: 49-50
Attitude toward safety movement................................ ................:. . .................................... Nov., 1917: 170
Attitude toward scientific research........................................................................................ .. Oct., 1919: 22
Attitude toward socialegislation.............................................................................................. Jan., 1917: 5-10
Attitude toward strikes and lockouts during war.................................................................. Nov., 1918: 288
Attitude toward woman labor..................................................................Jan., 1919: 219-21; June, 1919: 225
Benefit funds. Age at death of members of certain trade-union benefit funds............Jan., 1917: 84-91
------ Health insurance by trade-unions. ( Green.) ......... ..................................... ................. May, 1917: 749
------ Operation o f disability funds. (Emmet.).................................................. : ................ Aug., 1917: 28-36
------ Sick benefits of American Federation of Labor, 1916.....................................................
Jan., 1917: 6
— Transportation of workmen seeking employment......................................................... June, 1919:130
------Unemployment benefits...................................................................................................... June, 1919:131
Congresses. American Federation of Labor, 1916,1918,1919, and 1920...........................Jan., 1917: 6-10;
Sept., 1918: 310-16; Aug., 1919: 241-6; Aug., 1920: 168-71
------International Seamen’ s Union of America, 1917 and 1920.... Mar., 1918: 169-71; Mar., 1920: 203-5
------ Labor political conference, August, 1918..............................: ...... .............................. Sept., 1918: 317-19
•
------Trade-union women, conference of, 1918. (Called by United States Govern­
ment).........................................................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 190-2
Directories. Classified list of organizations of New York City........... ............................May, 1917: 768-9
— Organizations issuing periodical publications.................................................... : . . . June, 1919: 334-42
Discrimination against union employees.................Apr., 1918: 302; July, 1918: 22-3; Nov., 1920: 196-7
Grievances, protests, and demands.........................................................................................Feb., 1920: 33-41
Historical development of unions. New York Harbor employees................................ Aug., 1918: 45-62
------ Teachers. American Federation of Teachers............................................................ Aug., 1919: 247-55
------ Women’s Trade-Union League of America, National.
(Waggaman.)...............Apr., 1919: .237-44
Membership statistics, Massachusetts, 1915..........................,................................................July, 1917: 162-3
Nonpartisan League and........................................................................................................ Sept., 1918: 317-19
Organized labor and production........................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 116-18
Policies of trade-unions....... ................................................................................. •...................... Nov., 1915: 61
Recognition of union. Lumbering, Pacific Northwest. Attitude of operators............. Mar., 1918: 67
------ Stove industry....................................................................................................................... May, 1918: 178
------ Wholesale Clothiers’ Association of Chicago recognizes no unions.............................. Nov., 1916: 31
Reconstruction and organized labor........................................................ Jan., 1919: 56-2; Mar., 1919: 63-72
Restriction of output. Attitude o f National War Labor Board................ ......................
May, 1918: 57
------ Attitude of President’s Mediation Commission.............................................................. Mar., 1918: 59,60
------ Attitude of Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board. .*...........
Apr., 1918: 184
------ Declaration opposing, stove industry......................................................
May, 1918: 166
Right to organize. Attitudes and opinions. Commission on Industrial Relations—
Nov., 1915: 51
------------- Federal Department of Labor.....................................................................................
Jan., 1918: 40
------------- National Catholic War Council................................................................................... June, 1919: 49
------------- National War Labor Board.............................................................. May. 1918: 66; Apr., 1919: 254
--------- :— President’s Industrial Conference, re public employees.. . Jan., 1920: 61,67-8; Apr., 1920: 39
------ City firemen, Texas.................................................................................................
Nov.,
------ Coalmines, Kentucky......................................................................................
Oct.,
— Street railways, New York City........................................................................................ Sept., 1916: 33
Right to strike. Declaration of organized labor................................................................... Feb., 1920; 36-7
------ Federal act, 1919, re policemen, District of Columbia.................................................... Jan., 1920: 153
------ President’s Industrial Conference. Views and recommendations re public em­
ployees........................................................................ , .............................Jan., 1920: 61,67-8; Apr., 1920: 39
—— Recommendation of Minnesota State Federation of Labor re prevention of strikes
andlockouts during war.......................................................................................................Nov., 1918: 288-9
Shop committees ana................................................................................................................. Jan., 1920: 193-4
Strikes in specified unions, 1914-15........................................................................................... Apr., 1916: 26-8
Unemployment and American trade-unions. (Smelser.).............................................. June, 1919: 128-31
Unemployment statistics, various dates. New York State.................................................. Dec., 1915: 66
Union scales of wages ana hours. (S e e Wages; Hours.)
Wage movement of organized railway employees, 1919-20................................................ May, 1920: 46-52
Works councils and....................................................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 192
(See also Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of
America: Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America; Amalgamated Sheet-Metal
Workers’ International Alliance: American Association of Masters, Mates, and
Pilots: American Federation of Labor; American Federation of Teachers; Brick­
layers’ Union No. 18, Cincinnati; Bridge and Structural Iron Workers’ Union No. 1,
Chicago; Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen; Buttonhole Makers
and Button Sewers Union of New York City: Children Shoe Workers’ Union: Dress
and Waist Makers’ Union, Boston; Harbor Boatmen’s Union; International Asso­
ciation of Machinists; International Association of Printing House Craftsmen; Inter­
national Brotherhood of Electrical Workers; International Brotherhood of Sta­
tionary Firemen and Oilers; International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union; In­
ternational Holders’ Union of North America; International Seamen’ s Union of
America;International TypographicalUnion; International Union of Mine, Mill, and
Smelter Workers; Ladies' waist and Dress Makers Union, New York City; Lighter
Captains’ Union, New York Harbor; Marine Workers’ Affiliation of the Port of
New York; National Women’s Trade-Union League of America: Tidewater Boati
men’s Union; Union of Sailors, Firemen, and Cooks of the Atlantic District; United
Garment Workers of America; United Mine Workers of America.)
Labor organizations, foreign countries:
Alsace-Lorraine. Amalgamation with French Federation, conference, 1919................ Apr., 1919: 244-5
Argentina. Organization of Federation of Naval Construction Workers........................ July, 1919: 161
Australia. Membership statistics, 1906-1916, and 1919.....................Dec., 1917: 142-3; July, 1920: 59-61
------ Recognition of union. Opinion of Judge Higgins............................................... .......... June, 1919: 211
—— Restriction of output. Lazy strike and go-slow policy............................................... July, 1920: 66
— Unemployment statistics, 1891 to 1914.............................................................................. July, 1915: 61




1920:196-7
1920:201-2

84

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Labor organizations, foreign countries—Continued.
Page.
Austria. Membership statistics, 1913 to 1919......................................... Dec., 1917: 140; June, 1920: 194-5
Belgium. Conditions during and since war........................................................................... Oct., 1919: 42-3
------Membership, 1913 and 1919................................................................................................... May, 1920: 200
Canada. Attitude toward industrial disputes investigation act......... Dec., 1916: 16; May, 1917: 697-8
------Congresses. Trades and Labor Congress, 1918 to 1920..............................................Dec., 1918: 355-8;
Dec., 1919: 365-8; Dec., 1920: 166-7
------ Recognition of union. Resolutions of National Industrial Conference....................Nov., 1919: 56-8
------Right to organize. Principle of royal commission on industrial relations................ Sept., 1919: 39
------------- Resolutions of National Industrial Conference...................................................... Nov., 1919: 56-8
------Statistics re membership, benefits, etc., 1916 to 1919................................................... Oct., 1917: 105-7;
Sept., 1918: 328-9; Sept., 1919: 354-6; Aug., 1920: 171-3
------ ( S e e also Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, Canada; Canadian Federation of
Labor; Canadian Merchant Service Guild; International Brotherhood of Maintenance-of Way Employees; Metal Trades Council, Canada; Trades and Labor Congress,
Canada; United Mine Workers of America.)
China. Types............................................................................ ................................................. Dec., 1920: 208-9
Czechoslovakia. General Federation of Trade-Unions. Membership statistics........June, 1920: 195-6;
Oct., 1920: 215-16
Denmark. Convention of cooperative trade-unions, 1919................................................ Aug., 1919: 257-8
------Membership statistics........................................ May, 1918: 223-4; Aug., 1918: 215-16; June, 1920: 197
------National Federation of Trade-Unions. List of affiliated unions
..................... May, 1918: 223-4
------------- Statistics, 1914 to 1917.............................................................. May, 1918: 223^1; Aug., 1918: 215-16
-— Unemployment statistics........................................................................July, 1915: 62-3; Dec., 1915: 58
France. Confederation Generate du Travail. Adoption of minimum standards at
Leeds conference, 1916.......................................................................................................... June, 1917: 912-13
------------- Efforts to coordinate and internationalize labor legislation............................... Feb., 1917: 203-6
------------- Reconstruction program.............................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 75-8
------ Law extending civil rights of unions.............................................................................. Nov., 1920: 203-4
------ Program of National Federation of Agricultural Laborers........................................... Sept., 1920: 188
Germany. Agreement with employers* associations, 1918............................................. Apr., 1919: 158-60
------Benefits, 1914 to 1917.............................................................................................................. Dec., 1918: 346
------ Conference of hotel and restaurant keepers, June, 1918................................................Nov., 1918: 26-7
------Conferences of free trade-unions................................................................................... Dec., 1917: 133-40
------ Demands re activities of Economic Department of Government................................ Dec., 1917: 62
------ Reconstruction program................................................................... Apr., 1918: 83-9; Dec., 1918: 345-51
------ Relation to workers* councils.................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 128-9,132
------ Right to organize. Magna Charta of German labor......... ..........................................Apr., 1919: 158-60
------------- Socio-political program of United Employers* Association.................................. Nov., 1918: 71
------ Right to strike. Strike-breaking corps and trade-union attitude toward........... Apr., 1920: 229-31
------Statistics re membership, 1913 to 1920..................................................Jan., 1917: 142; June, 1917: 945;
Feb., 1918: 175-9; Sept., 1919: 356; Mar., 1920: 206-8; June, 1920: 194
------ Unemployment statistics, various dates......................................................................... 1915—July 67-8;
Aug. 17; Oct. 51; Dec. 61; 1917—Jan. 141-2
------Woman labor. Organization during war..................................................................... Feb., 1920: 258-63
------ (S e e a lso Central Association of German Forestry, Agricultural, and Vineyard
Workers; Federation of German Building Trades Workers; Federation of Textile
Workers; Metalworkers* Federation, Germany.)
Great Britain. Attitude toward Government hostels....................................................June, 1918: 209-10
------Attitude toward nationalization of coal mines...............................................................Nov., 1919: 63-6
------Attitude toward woman labor......................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 345-6;
Aug., 1917: 135; May, 1919: 241; Oct., 1919: 32-5
------Congresses. Conference of working-class associations, 1916.......................................Aug., 1917: 129-38
------------- National Pottery Workers* Society, 1920...............................................................Dec., 1920: 168-9
------------- Trades-Union Congress, 1915,1918,1919, and 1920— .........................................Aug., 1916: 82-3;
Nov., 1918: 259-65; Feb., 1920: 256-8; Nov., 1920: 213
------ Directory. List of organizations................................................................. «. . . June, 1919: 304-6,349-51
------Docks and harbors. List of, and attempts to amalgamate...................................... June, 1919: 18-37
------Guilds movement. (Cole.).............................................................................................. July, 1919: 24-32
------Industrial councils. Letter of minister of labor to trade-unions re........................... Mar., 1918: 81-4
------Membership statistics............................................................................................................1918—Aug. 178;
1919—June 303-6; Dec. 297; 1920—Apr. 223-4; July 57-8; Dec. 169-70
------Recognition of union. Conceded by State during war................................................. Aug., 1917: 133
------------- Employers’ attitude...................................................................................................... May , 1919: 101
------------- Government gives full recognition to railway unions............................................ Mar., 1920: 24
------------- Police union denied recognition by Government....... ................................... Nov., 1918: 294,295
------Reconstruction policies......................................................................................................Aug., 1917: 135-8
------ Resolution re proposed ministry of labor, 1915............................................................... Aug., 1916: 82-3
------ Restoration of pre-war practices act.....................................................Oct., 1919: 30-5; Mar., 1920: 201
------Restriction of output. Attitude of board of trade committee, engineering trades. Aug., 1918: 92
------Right to strike. Railwaymen’s attitude......................................................................... Mar., 1920: 24-5
------Trade-union advisory committee. Statement re leaving certificates....................... Dec., 1917: 58-9
------Trade-union labor party, movement to establish......................... Sept., 1918: 323-4; N ov., 1918: 263
------Trade-unions versus shop stewards................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 37-8
------Treasury agreement........................................................................................................... 1917—June 822-7;
1918—May 151-2,153-4; June 156-7; Sept. 320-1; 1920—Apr. 232
------Triple Alliance. Organization, development, and demands.. June, 1919: 169-77; Dec., 1920: 176
------Unemployment statistics.................... July, 1915: 69; Dec., 1915: 63; Jan., 1917: 147; May, 1919: 98
------Women. Growth of trade-unionism among women during war. (Waggam an.)......................................................................................................................................June, 1919: 298-303
------------- Report of women’s employment commission, Ministry of Reconstruction... Dec., 1919: 297
------ (S e e also Amalgamated Association of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen, Great
Britain; General Federation of Trade-Unions of Great Britain; General Workers*
Union, Great Britain; Miners* Federation of Great Britain; National Alliance of
Employers and Employed, Great Britain; National Federation of Women Workers,
Great Britain; National Pottery Workers* Society, Great Britain: National Transort Workers* Federation, Great Britain; National Union of Railwaymen, Great
iritain; Scientific Instrument Makers* Union, Great Britain; Trades-Union Con­
gress, Great Britain.)

S




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

85

Labor organization, foreign countries—Concluded.
Hungary. Boycott of Government by international organized labor. Sept., 1920: 184-8; Oct., 1920: 230
-----Congress of August, 1917................................................................................................... Dec., 1917:140-2
-----Membership statistics................................................................... Aug., 1918: 214-15; June, 1920: 198-7
India. Activities of Bombay mill hands. (Kamgar Hitwardhak Sabha.).................. Aug., 1920: 175-9
Italy. Benefits. Government subsidies during war........................................................ June, 1917: 907-8
-----Congresses. General Federation of Labor, 1920.......................................................... Dec., 1920:202-3
-----Demands............................................................................................. May, 1920: 209-12; Dec., 1920: 200
Japan. Becent developments..................................................................... Aug., 1920: 43; Nov., 1920: 101
Mexico. Mexican Federation of Labor. Conference, 1918.............Nov., 1918: 258-9; Jan., 1919: 302-4
Netherlands. National Federation of Trade-Unions. Congress, June, 1920............ Nov., 1920: 214-15
-----Statistics of membership, etc.............................. June, 1918: 67; June, 1920: 197; Nov., 1920: 214-15
-----Unemployment statistics..............................................June, 1915: 75; Dec., 1915: 67; Oct., 1917: 104
New South Wales. Amendments concerning, in arbitration act..................................... July, 1918: 183
-----Dispute between rival unions in mining industry........................................................ July, 1920: 65
New Zealand. Attitude of National Assembly toward..................................................... Aug., 1916: 88
-----Membership, 1907,1914, and 1917.................................................................................... May, 1920: 217
Norway. Manifesto, embodying economic and political program, 1918.......................... Mar., 1919: 57
-----National Federation of Trade-Unions. Membership statistics___ Aug., 1918: 215; Mar., 1919: 57
-----Unemployment statistics...................................................................... July, 1915: 77; Jan., 1917: 148-9
Pan American Federation of Labor. Organizat ion.........................Nov., 1918: 257-9; Jan., 1919: 302-4
Paraguay. Movement to form one general federation, referred to................................... Dec., 1920:. 215
Philippine Islands. Labor Congress, referred to................................................................. Oct., 1920: 215
-----Membership................. ...................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 81
Porto Rico. Free Federation of Laborers. Convention, 1918..........................................Jan., 1919: 53-5
Scandinavia. Scandinavian Labor Congress..................................... Jan., 1919: 305-6; Apr., 1920: 224-6
South Africa. National Union of Commercial Workers. Organization and conference. Oct., 1920: 216
-----Recognition of union. Conference of employers and employees, 1919...................... June, 1920: 224
South Australia. Membership, 1919......................................................................................Nov., 1920: 223
Spain. General Union of Workmen. Convention, 1918.................................................. Mar., 1919: 61-2
Sweden. Attitude of Government toward demands......................................................... Mar., 1919: 57-9
-----Membership, 1916 to 1917................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 215
-----National Organization of Swedish Trade-Unions. Congress, 1917........................ Mar.,1918: 180-1
-----Unemplovment statistics, various periods... r.......................................................... July, 1915: 78;
Oct., 1915: 52; Dec., 1915: 70; Jan., 1917: 149
Switzerland. Economic demands................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 216-17
-----Membership statistics..................................................................................................... June, 1920: 197-8
-----Right to strike. Decision of court re collective agreements and strikes..................July, 1920: 172-3
-----Statistics for 1916..............................................................
( S ee also Chief executives of railroad organizations; Collective agreements; Concili­
ation and arbitration; Employees7 representation; Middle classes; Strikes and
lockouts; Union scales.)
Labor parties:
Australia. Program of official labor party........................................................................... July, 1920: 61
Germany. Attitude of trade-unions...................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 285
-----Social-Democratic Partv. Resolutions, programs..................................................... Dec., 1917: 62;
Aug., 1918: 101; Oct., 1918: 175; Jan., 1919: 70-4
Great Britain. British Labor Party. Attitude toward disabled...................................Dec., 1917: 80-1
-----------Conference.............................................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 319-27
------------ Policy on reconstruction.....................................................................................Apr., 1918: 63-83
-----------Resolution on Government control of mines......................................................... Nov., 1919: 66
-----Trade-union labor party, movement to establish........................ Sept., 1918: 323-4; Nov., 1918: 263
Norway. Strength, representation, and manifesto............................................................. Mar., 1919: 57
Spain. Social labor party. Platform..................................................................................June, 1919: 58-9
Sweden. Strength, representation, and programs................................ Mar., 1918: 181; Mar., 1919: 57-9
United States. Attitude of American Federation of Labor............................................ Mar., 1919: 66-7
-----Independent Labor Party. Purposes and aims........................................................... Jan., 1919: 52
-----Labor political conference, St. Paul, Minn............................................................... Sept., 1918: 317-19
Labor poaching............................................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 290
Labor policies:
Canada. Government's declaration of a war policy......................... June, 1917: 828-9; Oct., 1918: 47-50
France. Precautions re employment of women in war industries.................................Jan., 1918: 69-73.
Germany. Socio-political program of German employers....................................*.......... Nov., 1918: 70-2
——Socio-political provisions of new' German constitution............................................. Dec., 1919: 132-5
Great Britain. Commission of inquiry into industrial unrest. Recommendations... Jan., 1918: 67-8
-----Labor in war time.......................... *.............................................................................June, 1917: 810-27
-----Ministry of Munitions re rates of wages of female workers.......................................... Aug., 1917: 120
United States. Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America. Lauor prin­
ciples.......................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 76-8; Sept., 1920: 20-2
-----Commission on Industrial Relations..............................................................................Nov., 1915: 48-76
-----Council of National Defense. Statement...................................................................... Feb.,1918: 78-81
-----Department of Labor. War labor administration................... Feb., 1918: 77-81; Aug., 1918: 63-71
-----Government's wage policy during last quarter of a century.(Conyngton.)-------- June, 1920: 19-35
----- Minnesota. Basic principles to govern disputes during war.................................... Nov.,1918: 288-9
-----National Association of Manufacturers. Labor principles........................................ Aug., 1920: 34-6
-----National War Labor Board..........................May, 1918: 54-8; June, 1918: 54-6; Nov., 1918: 182-90
-----Navy Department, announcement of............................................................................ May, 1917: 660-1
-----President's Mediation Commission. Report and recommendations...................... Mar., 1918: 52-60
-----War Department..................... ........................Dec., 1917: 51-3; Apr., 1918: 105-7; Nov., 1919: 243-5
-----War Labor Conference Board.......................................................... Apr., 1918: 103-5; May, 1918: 54-8
-----Wrar Labor Policies Board.............1918—June 56-7; July 23-7; Aug. 65-6; Sept. 193-6; Nov. 38-40
----------- Re child labor and prison labor..............................................................................Aug., 1918: 75-6
-----Women in industry..............................Aug., 1918: 67-8; Nov., 1918: 182-90,282-4; Jan., 1919: 216-9
{ S e e also Collective bargaining; Industrial relations; Labor standards; Reconstruction.)
Labor recruiting. ( S ee Recruiting of labor.)
Labor regulations. ( S e e Laws and legislation.)
Labor resettlement committee. ( S ee Great Britain: Ministry of Labor. Labor resettle­
ment committee.)
Labor safety. ( S e e Accident prevention: Hygiene: Sanitation and working conditions.)




May, 19

86

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Labor shortage. (S e e Employment statistics.)
Labor standards:
General. Standards of labor legislation, suggested in resolutions of Leeds conference,
1916 .......................... .......................................................................................................... June, 1917: 912-15
France. Factory laws relaxed by order of minister of labor and orders withdrawn. . . Mar., 1918: 85-6:
„
0
,
^ ^
July, 1918: 121
Germany. Suspension during war........................................................................................ Aug., 1918: 100-3
Great Britain. Laws regulating work of women and children relaxed during the
war................................................................ Dec., 1916: 94-7,121-3; June, 1917: 888-90; May, 1918: 156-8
Japan. Memorial of employers against en forcement of law regulating hours of women
and children........................................................................................................................ Sept., 1918: 199-200
United States. Advisory committee on labor. Personnel, statements, resolutions,
etc............................................................................................................ May, 1917: 647-61; June, 1917: 807-8
------American Association for LaborLegislation.
Resolution....................................... May, 1917: 656-8
------Board of control for Army clothing.
Reportand recommendations................................. Oct., 1917:30-3:
Apr., 1918: 108
------Children's Bureau. Declaration for the protection of children in war time............ May, 1917: 658
------Conference of State labor officials, 1918. Resolution..................................................... Nov., 1918: 46
------Council of National Defense. Committee on labor. Recommendations, April 8,
1917 .....................................
May, 1917: 655-6
------Executive orders. Emergency suspension of labor laws.............................................. 1817— May 660;
July 55; Aug. 148-9; 1918—Jan. 112; Sept. 193-6,366-70
------National Consumers' League.Declaration of April 6,1917........................................ May, 1917: 659-60
------National War Labor Board. Policy re............................................................................
May, 1918: 57
------Navy Department. Policy re maintenance of protective standards, April 16,
1917............................................................................................................................................. May, 1917: 660-1
------New York State Industrial Commission. Statement re woman labor..................... Aug., 1918: 171
------State War Board of Kansas. Policies concerning maintenance andimprovement
of standards............................................................................................................................ July, 1918: 113-14
------War Department. Policy re.maintenance of protective standards, November 15,
1917............................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1917: 51-3
------War Emergency Conference of Washington State. Recommendation.....................Nov., 1918: 179
------War Labor Pohcies Board. Standardized contract clauses for Government pur­
chases................................................................................................................................... .
Nov., 1918: 38-40
------William B . Wilson.Statement, April 23,1917............................................................... June, 1917: 808-9
(S e e also Labor policies; Laws and legislation; Sanitation and working conditions.)
Labor Statistics, Bureau of, United States. (S e e United States: Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics.)
Labor supply. (S e e Employment statistics.)
Labor temple. Built by trade-unions in Seattle.......................................................................... Apr., 1920: 129
Labor treaties. (S e e International relations.)
Labor turnover. (S e e Mobility of labor.)
Labor unrest. (S e e Unrest.)
Laborers. (S e e Unskilled labor.)
Lace and embroidery industry. (S e e Clothing industries, women's.)
Ladies' waist and dressmakers union, New York City. Party to agreement........................
June, 1919: 9
Lake Carriers' Association:
Employment system........................................ v...................................... Mar., 1918: 170-1; Apr., 1918: 257-9
Labor turnover............................................................................................................................ June, 1918: 46-53
“ Welfareplan"............................................................................................................................ Sept., 1917: 55-8
Lambert, A . Medical organization under health insurance....................................................... May, 1917: 748
Land settlement:
Australia. Settlement of soldiers on land................................................ Oct., 1917: 53; Oct., 1920: 229-30
California. Progress under land settlement act, 1919......................................................... Oct.,*1919: 280-2
Canada. Provisions and operation of soldier settlement act of 1917................................ June, 1919: 52-8
------Report of Commission of Conservation........... ............................................................. Apr., 1918: 283-6
France. Loans for farming on abandoned farms, 1918........................................................ Mar., 1919: 56-7
------ Small holdings for laborers................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 255
------ Small holdings for war victims.............................................................................................June, 1918: 70-1
Germany. Principles of National Committee for the Relief of Disabled Soldiers___ Apr., 1918: 123-8
Great Britain. Employment of discharged soldiers. Departmental committee reports
and recommendations..........................................................................Apr., 1916: 11-12; Sept., 1916: 87-90
------ Farm colonies under Small Holding Colonies Act, 1916............................................... Sept., 1918: 88-9
------ Village settlements for disabled soldiers.......................................................................... Mar., 1918: 96-8
United States. Federal policy..................................... Oct., 1915: 13; Apr., 1916: 11-12; Jan., 1918: 53-5
------For returned soldiers. (MacKaye.)................................................................................ Jan., 1918: 48-56
------Legislative programs. (MacKaye.).............................................................................. Apr., 1919: 121-39
------Schemes tor ex-service men of various States............................................................... Feb., 1920: 161-2
Land values:
Plan for conservation of, at Ojibway, Canada............. ....................................................... May, 1918: 272-3
Relation of industrial housing to........................................................................................... May, 1918: 268-77
Relation to problem of housing wage-earners. (Childs.)................................................ Apr., 1918: 279-80
Lane Commission. (S e e United States: Railroad Wage Commission.)
Lange Canning Co., Wisconsin. Case re violation of hours of labor of women. Supreme
court opinion in full.............................................................. ........................................................ Feb., 1917: 208-9
Lapp, J. A . Health insurance...................................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 330-7
Lascar. Wages on British ships, 1919.................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 141-2,145
Lathers. ( S e e Building trades.)
Lathrop, Julia C.:
Income and infant mortality....................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 219
Public protection of maternity................................................................................................. May, 1917: 747-8
Lauck w . J .:
Ra'ilroad labor arbitrations.......................................................................................................... Oct., 1916: 20-3
Report on “ Cost of living and the w a r "............................................................................... Apr., 1918: 190-2
Report on “ Wages and the w a r".................................................................................... .
Apr., 1918: 188-90
Production and profiteering. Referred to............................................................................... Sept., 1920: 24
Laufler, C. A. Hernia in industry............................................................................................... Sept., 1819: 282-6




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

87

Laundries:
Page.
British Columbia. Minimum wage. Orders effective March 31,1919..........................June, 1919: 207-8
------Wage rates, 1918...................................................................................................................... July, 1919: 153
California. Orders re wages and working conditions........................................................ May, 1919: 232-5;
Dec., 1919: 261-3; Nov., 1920: 109-10
------Wages, hours, etc., 1916.....................................................................................................Jan., 1918: 116-17
Connecticut. Wages, 1915,1916............................................................................................. Mar., 1917: 349-50
Great Britain. Wages awarded............................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 206-7
Kansas. Orders affecting employment of females...................................... Oct., 1917: 80; July, 1918: 111
------Strikes, Kansas City, Mo.......................................................................................................July, 1918: 206
-r— Wages, hours, and working conditions......................................................................... Feb., 1918: 142-5
Little Rock, Ark. Wage award of National War Labor Board.......................................Jan., 1919: 205-8
Manitoba. Minimum wage order......................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 202-3
Massachusetts. Recommendations and provisions for minimum wage........................June, 1916: 57-8;
Oct., 1918: 183
Minnesota. WTage order.............................................................................................................. Oct., 1918: 185
New York City. Working conditions. Report of Department of Health and Con­
sumers1 League....................................................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 203-5
New York State. Average earnings.. June, 1918: 124^-5; July, 1919: 148; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
Oregon. Provisions of minimum wage orders...................................... Nov., 1918: 175; Dec., 1919: 263-4
------Sanitary standards. Recommendations of Industrial Welfare Commission........... Sept., 1915: 31
------Wages and hours in power laundries in Portland........................................................ Sept., 1915: 30-1
Saskatchewan- Provisions of minimum wage order effective October 1,1919..........1.. Dec., 19i9: 266
Washington (State). Minimum wage order........................................................................... Nov., 1918: 177
Wisconsin. Restriction upon night work........................................ ..................................... Oct., 1917: 81-3
United States. Union scales of wages and hours, May, 1917 and 1918.......................... Mar., 1919: 167-9
------Wages. Various cities.................................................................................................... 1918— Feb. 123-35;
Mar. 119-33; Apr. 163-81; June 127-45; Sept. 161-85; Dec. 260-309
Laws and legislation:
Civil service retirement and old-age pensions in various countries............................... June, 1916: 101-10
Comparison of foreign eight-hour laws................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 184-98
Conciliation %nd antistrike legislation relating to public utilities, various countries.. Jan., 1917: 11-19
Housing measures in various European countries............................................................ Aug., 1920: 158-67
Methods of adjusting disputes between railroads and their employees, various coun­
tries.......................................................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 239-40
Proposed international agreements ........................................ .........................................Nov., 1918: 55-62
Recommendations of Commission on International Labor Legislation.......................... May, 1919: 23,26
Standards of labor legislation in resolutions of Leeds international conference, 1916.. June, 1917: 912-15
Alabama. Workmen’s compensation.................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 230
Alaska. Coal-leasing law, 1914............................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 133-4
------Eight-hour law.................................................................................................................. Oct- 1918: 241,243
Alberta, Canada. Workmen’s compensation..................................... Aug., 1918: 210-11; Feb., 1919: 244
Argentina. Act creating department of labor....................................................................... July, 1917: 140
------Child labor.............................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 195-6
------Eight-hour law........................................................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 164
------Home work........................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 300-1; June, 1919: 265-6
------Retirement of railroad employees......................................................................................Apr.. 1920: 206-9
------Strike breaking. (Referred to.)......................................................................................... July, 1919: 163
-— Workmen’ s compensation................................................................... Oct., 1918: 218; May, 1919: 271-9
------(Buenos Aires.) Woman and child labor....................................
Oct., 1918: 247-4
Arkansas. Minimum wage law of 1915.................................................................................... Aug., 1915: 5-6
Australia. Antistrike..................................................................................................................
Jan., 1917: 12
------Conciliation and arbitration............................... Jan v 1917: 12; July, 1918: 181-4; June, 1919: 208-15
------Labor laws, and program of Labor Party, summarized................................................ July, 1920: 61
----- - Shipbuilding.......................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 372
------ (S e e a lso Laws and legislation, specific States.)
Austria. Annual leave for manual workers, August, 1919............................................... Feb., 1920: 245-6
------Antistrike legislation.................................
Jan., 1917: 14-15
------Chambers of labor established........................................................................................June, 1920: 189-91
------Domestic service................................................................................................................. June, 1920: 191-3
------Eight-hour day........................................................................................................................ Mar., 1920: 190
------Health insurance............................................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 139-44
------Labor contract.................................................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 596-600
------Overtime, compensation for................................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 110
------Protective labor legislation to be under new Ministry for Public Welfare................ May, 1918: 289
------Socialization......................................................................................................................... Nov., 1919: 79-85
------Unemployment insurance act, March 24, 1920............
Aug., 1920: 137-8
------Workmen’s accident insurance, amended 1917.............................................................. Feb., 1918: 181-2
------Works councils compulsory............................................................................................. Sept., 1919: 133-4
Belgium. Conciliation and antistrike legislation..................................................................
Jan., 1917: 15
------Housing................................................................................................................................ Aug., 1920: 159-60
------Woman and child labor, 1919........................................................................................... Sept., 1919: 345-7
Brazil. Food control..................................................... .......................................... ..................Nov., 1918: 106
------Publication of agricultural labor bulletin............................................................ ; ........... Aug., 1918: 241
------Workmen’s compensation. Decree of January 15,1919................................................June, 1919: 261-3
British Columbia. Workmen’s compensation................................... Nov., 1916: 15-16; Oct., Igl8: 230-2
California. Health insurance................................................................................................ June, 1919: 270-80
------Labor laws, violations of...................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 220
------Land settlement act, June, 1917........................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 280-2
------Overtime work, compensation for...................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 110
------Single tax. Proposed amendment.............................................................................. Nov., 1916: 135-6
------Woman labor. Laundries.................. ........................................................... ............ ^ . May, 1919: 232-5
Canada. Antistrike...........................................................Jan., 1917: 15; Oct., 1918: 47-50; Jan. 1919: 307
------Compulsory work............................................................................................................ June, 1918: 199-200
------Conciliation and arbitration...............................................................................
Jan., 1916: 23-8;
Dec., 1916: 19-20; Jan., 1917: 15; June, 1917: 912; Dec., 1918: 355,390
------Cost of livine....................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 149-52
------Criminal code.......................................................................................................................... Dec., 1918: 150




88

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Laws and legislation—Continued.
Page.
Canada. Employment agencies............................................................................................ Sept., 1918: 79;
Oct., 1918: 265; Dec., 1918: 390; Feb., 1919: 134-7; Aug., 1919: 162-3
-----Food control........................................................................................................................ June, 1917: 831-4
-----Housing............................................................................................................................ Feb., 1919: 251-2
—— Minimum-wage— ....................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 112-15
-----Ministry of Health act........................................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 274
-----Resolution of National Industrial Conference, urging uniform labor legislation.. July, 1920: 171-2
-----Soldiers and sailors.....................................................................June, 1917: 867,873-4; June, 1919: 52-8
-----Summary of labor laws...................................July, 1919: 229-30; Sept., 1919: 344; Sept., 1920: 176-9
-----Technical education act.............................................................................
Oct., 1919: 181-2
-----Workmen’s compensation...............................July, 1918: 179; Mar., 1920: 171-80; Sept., 1920: 177-9
----- ( S e e a ls o Laws and legislation, s p e c ific P r o v in c e s .)
Chile. Retirement of railway employees.............................................................................. Feb., 1918: 183
-----Summary of labor laws.....................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 234-7
China. Labor-emigration law and labor-recruiting regulations, 1918..........................July, 1918: 159-60
-----(Hongkong). Child labor.............................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 251-2
Colombia. Antistrike act of November, 1919..................................................................... Sept., 1920: 197-8
Colorado. Disputes. Function of industrial commission..................................................Dec., 1915: 10-12
-----Industrial commission created..................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 216-17
Connecticut. Child labor........................................................................................................ July, 1915: 41-2
-----Workmen’s compensation................................................................................................. July, 1919: 186
Czechoslovakia. Child-labor law, July 28,1919...............................................................Apr., 1920: 178-82
-----Eight-hour day.................................................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 190-1
-----Housing................................................................................................................................ Aug., 1920: 159
-----Woman and child labor, December, 1918...........................
Feb., 1920: 241-2
Delaware. Workmen’s compensation...................................................................................June, 1917: 973-5
Denmark. Compulsory arbitration......................................................................................Aug., 1915: 14-15
— - Conciliation and antistrike legislation............................................................................Jan.. 1917: 15-16
-----Hours of labor.......................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 191; May, 1920: 108
----- ( S e e a U o Laws and legislation: Scandinavian countries.)
District of Columbia. Compulsory work.............................................................................. Aug., 1918: 209
-----Housing. (Referred to.).................................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 209
-----Minimum wage................................................. June, 1918: 150-1; Aug., 1918: 213; Oct., 1918: 177-81
-----Police.....................................................................................................................................Jan., 1920: 153-5
-----Rent profiteering................................................................................................................Nov., 1919: 160-5
-----Retirement system for school-teachers, January, 1920............................................... Feb., 1920: 224-5
Ecuador. Eight-hour day........................................................................ Jan., 1917: 151-2; Mar., 1920: 191
-----Overtime, compensation for.......................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 110-11
England. Conciliation............................................................................................................. Jan., 1917: 16
Finland. Eight-hour day........................................................................................................ Mar., 1920: 192
-----Housing........................................
Aug., 1920: 162-4
-----Overtime work, compensation for.......................... .................................................... Mar., 1920: 110-11
-----Protection of workmen. (Factories, building trades, and agriculture.)................. Aug., 1915: 23-4
France. Accident insurance law includes diseases......................................................... Jan., 1920: 259-61
-----Antistrike legislation..............................................................................Jan., 1917: 16-17; Jan., 1918: 73
-----Bonuses for civil employees................................................................ Jan., 1918: 107; Jan., 1919: 200-2
-----Collective bargaining......................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 275-8
-----Conciliation and arbitration.............................................................. Mar.,1917: 360-2; Jan., 1918: 73-5
-----Eight-hour day.................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 192
-----Food control.......................................................Apr., 1917: 525-33; June, 1917: 915-21; July, 1918: 99
-----Franco-Italian labor treaty............................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 47-53
-----Housing................................................................................................................................ Aug., 1920: 164
-----Labor organizations......................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 203-4
-----Liquor control...................................................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 76
-----Loans to war pensioners..................................................................... June, 1918: 70-1; Oct., 1918: 69-71
-----Minimum-wage........................................................
Dec., 1915: 36-41
-----Ministry of Public Works, Food Supplies, and Transportation................................. Apr., 1917: 532
-----Nationalization of mines, law of September 9,1919.................................................. Dec., 1919: 129-32
-----Night work of women during war................................................................................... Mar., 1918: 85-6
-----Overtime work, compensation for.........................................
Mar., 1920: 110-11
-----Recruiting and distribution of labor..................................................................................Sept., 1918: 272
-----Retirement........................................................................................... Oct.,1918: 233; Feb., 1920: 229-31
-----Saturday half holiday, women in clothing trades......................................................... Jan., 1918: 75
-----Soldiers and sailors............................................................................... May, 1918: 81-6; July, 1919: 144
-----Unemployment insurance................................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 234-5
Georgia. Workmen’s compensation, 1920.......................................................................... Oct., 1920: 185-6
Germany. Agricultural labor law abrogated....................................................................... July, 1919: 235
-----Auxiliary service law.......................................................................................................Apr., 1918: 89-103
-----Cartels in coal-mining industry.....................................................- ............................... Nov., 1915: 83-5
-----Child labor.............................................................................................Aug., 1918: 101; Nov., 1919: 250-1
-----Collective agreements.............................
Apr., 1919: 160-1
-----Conciliation and antistrike legislation............................................................................. Jan., 1917: 17
-----Domestic service, referred to............................................................................................. July, 1919: 168
-----Eight-hour day.................................................................................... May,1919: 213-15; Mar., 1920: 193
-----Emergency measures.......................................................................................................June, 1919: 139-44
-----Employees’ representation. Decree of February8,1919........................................... June, 1919: 139-44
-----Employment agencies. Reporting made compulsory, 1915...................................... Oct., 1915: 53-4
-----Food control.................................................................................................................. May, 1917: 703-27
-----Housing............................................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 164-5
-----Imperial Labor Department established..................................................................... Feb., 1919: 257-8
-----Labor boards. Summary of bill.................................................................................... May, 1918: 68-72
-----Labor code, proposed.......................................................................................................... July, 1919: 235
-----Maternity insurance, 1919............................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 232-4
-----Protective legislation........................................ Apr., 1918: 87-8; July, 1918: 187-9; Aug., 1918: 100-3
-----Provisional National Economic Council created........................................................ Nov., 1920: 204-7
-----Public employees................................................................................................................ Aug., 1918: 100
-----Social insurance. Code of June 12, 1916...................................... Oct., 1916: 58-61; Nov., 1920: 207-8
-----Socialization........................................................................................................................ Nov., 1919: 72-8




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

89

Laws and legislation—Continued.
Baee.
Germany. Unemployment relief................................................................................... May, 1920: 181-2
-----Wages department, proposed. Functions, etc......................................................... Nov., 1919: 213-14
-----Works council law of January. 1920............................................................................. May, 1920: 172-81
Great Britain. Antistrike legislation..................................................... May, 1918: 154; Feb., 1919: 270-2
-----Checkweighing in various industries act, 1919................................ Feb., 1920: 238-9; Mar., 1920: 202
-----Child labor............................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 47; Dec., 1918: 42-6
-— Choice of employments act, referred to.......................................................................... Jan., 1919: 129
-----Coalmines.................................................................Apr., 1918: 67; Mar., 1920: 201; Nov., 1920: 201-2
-----Conciliation and arbitration......................................................... Aug., 1918: 238-9; Apr., 1920: 232-4
-----Corn production act, August 21,1917___ «.................................................................... Jan., 1918: 97-100
-----Defense of the realm act, referred to................................................................................ Nov., 1918: 291
-----Disabled men (facilities for employment) act, 1919....................................................... Mar., 1920: 201
-----Education........................................................................................... June, 1917: 884-8; Dec., 1918: 42-6
-----Electric power. Various acts referred to..................
Aug., 1918: 94
-----Factory laws.......................................................... Dec., 1916: 121-3; Apr., 1918: 67; Feb., 19J9: 232-3
-----First aid.....................
Sept., 1918: 48
-----Food control............................................................................... Mar., 1917: 392-407; Nov., 1917: 91-104
1 -----Health insurance.............................................................................................................Nov., 1916: 118-22;
Jan., 1920: 45-57; Mar., 1920: 201-2; Sept., 1920: 1-11
-----Housing............................................................................................................................. Dec., 1917: 220-9;
June, 1918: 202; Nov., 1918: 275-6; Dec., 1918: 59-61,332; Aug., 1920: 145-6
-----Industrial courts act (1919).............................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 41-6
-----Industrial training. Order permitting allowances to widows undergoing train­
ing......................................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 121-3
-----Labor exchanges act (1909) referred to..........................
Jan., 1919: 129
-----Land-settlement. Small holding colonies act, 1916, referred to.............................. Sept., 1918t 88-9
-----Maternity. Maternity and child welfare act, 1918, referred to................................... Dec., 1918: 59
-----Ministries and secretaries act............................................................. May, 1917: 770-1; Apr., 1920: 233
-----Ministry of Health act, in effect July 1,1919................................................................... Aug., 1919: 227
-----Munitions..................................................................... 1916—Dec. 71-4; 1917—June 847-19; July 19-25;
Aug. 119-28; Sept. 126-7,128-9; Oct. 83; Nov. 63-4; 1918—Jan. 67; Apr. 89; Aug. 160-1
-----National defense act.......................................................................................................... May, 1920: 21-2
—— National service................................................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 34-44
-----Old-age pensions act, 1919................................................................................................ Mar., 1920: 131-2
-----Overtime work, compensation for.................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 111
-----Profiteering act, 1919.............................................................................................>.... Mar., 1920: 190-200
-----Protective legislation......... '.............................Nov.,. 1915: 38-40; Dec., 1916: 81-8; Feb., 1918: 59-61
-----Reconstruction, referred to.............................................................................................. Dec., 191.3: 53
-----Restoration of trade-union conditions....................... .................................................... Oct., 1919: 30-2
-----Restricted occupations..................................................................................................June, 1917: 835-41
-----Summary of legislation in 1919........................................................................................ Mar., 1919: 200-2
-----Trade boards act................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 55; Nov., 1918: 179-81
-----Transport act, August, 1919........................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 235-8
-----Unemnloymentinsurance..- ........................................................Nov., 1916: 65-8; Sept., 1920: 165-9
-----Vacations with pay....................................................-...................................................... Nov., 1918: 67
-----Wages (temporary regulation) act, 1918. ............Apr., 1919: 233; Mar., 1920: 200-1; Apr., 1920: 233
-----War emergency. I....................................... Apr., 1917: 520-5; June, 1917: 816-17; Sept., 1917: 125-30
-----Welfare.................................................................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 42
-----Workmen's compensation...........................Dec., 1918: 326-S; Apr., 1919: 205-7; Sept., 1920: 156-61
Hawaii. Workmen's compensation.......................................................................... ............ Apr., 1919: 220
Holland. { S e e Laws and legislat ion: Netherlands.)
Hungary, Employment agencies. Scope of act of March 19,1916.................................. Mar., 1917: 377
-----Rents..................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 167
Idaho. Workmen's compensation........................................................................................ July, 1917: 96-8
Illinois. Recommendations of pensions laws commission............................................ Apr., 1920: 189-90
-----Workmen's compensation...................................................................... Jan., 1917: 112; Feb., 1918: 181
Indiana. Coal control law...............................................................................................Nov., 1920: 199-200
-----Creation of commission for securing employment for ex-service m en....................... Feb., 1920: 161
-— Woman labor.................................................................................................................. Apr., 1919: 188-90
Italy. Antistrike legislation................................................................................................... Jan.. 1917: 17
-----Auxiliary service............................................................................................................ Sent., 1918: 273-6
-----Child labor............................................................................................
Nov., 1917: 215-17
-----Compulsory insurance against unemployment............................................................Apr., 1920: 193-7
-----Cost-of-living bonuses to salaried employees made obligatory................................... Sept., 1918: 199
-----Decree re organization of industries on basis of participation of workers in manage­
ment.......................................................................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 206
-----Educational requirements of children for admission into industry.........................Nov., 1917: 215-17
-----Employment agencies.......................„.............................................................................Jan., 1917: 152-5
-----Food control.-.................................................................................................................... May, 1917: 727-44
-----Franco-Italianlabor treaty.............................................. .............................................. Feb., 1920: 47-53
-----Unemployment benefits................................................................. June, 1917: 907-8; Apr., 1919: 225-6
Japan. Factory law regulating hours of women and minors..................................... Sept., 1918: 199-200
Kansas. Court of industrial relations established January, 1920............................. .. Mar., 1920: 214-15
-----Minimum wage..................................................................................... Nov., 1915: 44-5; Feb., 1918: 142
-----Overtime work, compensation for.................................................................................... Mar., 1920; 110
-----Sanitary codes.................... ...................................................................;............................ Feb., 1918: 144
Kentucky. Workmen's compensation...............................................................................Apr., 1916: 56-7;
June, 1916: 56; June, 1918: 192: Oct., 1920: 186
Louisiana. Recommendations in report of Department of Labor and Industrial
Statistics................................................................................................................................ July, 1920: 175-6
Luxemburg. Eight-hour day................................................................................................. Mar., 1920: 193
-----Workmen's compensation............................................... ............................................... Oct., 1920: 186-3
Manitoba. Industrial conditions act, 1919....................................................................... July. 1919: 229-30
Maryland. Child labor.............................................................................. Aug., 1916: 38-43; Nov., 1918: 43
-----Workmen's compensation.................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 188
Massachusetts. Administration of various labor laws....................................................... N ov., 1920: 213
-----Child labor. General provisions, referred to................................................................. Feb., 1918: 147
-----Health insurance................................................................................ Mar., 1917: 426; Mav, 1917: 759-61




90

M O N THLY LABOR REVIEW.

Laws and legislation—Continued.
Page.
Massachusetts. Hotels and restaurants. One day's rest in seven recommended.. . June, 1917: 905-6
------Hours. Recommendations of special commission..................................................... Mar., 1917: 429-30
------ Industrial education. (Referred to.).............. ................................................................. June, 1917: 850
------ Labor provisions of consolidation act of 1919................................................................Nov., 1919: 339-40
------ Maternity................................................................................................................................. Mar., 1917: 427
------ Minimum wage. Constitutionality.............................
Jan., 1919: 209-12
------Minimum wage commission reorganization.................................................................... Mar., 1920: 136-7
------ Old-age pension....................................................................................................................... May, 1917: 761
------Organization of department of labor and industries.................................................. Mar., 1920: 211-13
------ Preference of employment act (1919)................................................................................. Feb., 1920: 161
------ Recommendations of governor...................................................... Feb., 1917: 206-8; Feb., 1918: 189-91
------ R6sum6ofl916...................................................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 34-5
------Training of disabled soldiers and persons crippled in industry................................. July, 1918: 50-1
------Workmen’s compensation...................................... Apr., 1917: 541-3; June, 1918: 192; Oct., 1920: 188
Mexico. Labor provisions of constitution of February 5,1917....................................... Oct., 1917: 167-71
------ Mining codes...................................................................
Apr., 1919: 233-6
------ Protective....................................... ............................... ......................................................... Nov., 1918: 59
------Workmen’s compensation, various States.........................................................................July, 1919: 231-2
------ (Coahuila.) Summary of labor laws.................
Oct., 1917: 171-8
------ (VeraCruz.) Woman and child labor.......................................................................... Sept., 1918: 276-7
Minnesota. Constitutionality of sabotage law .................................................................... July, 1918: 177-9
------Order of Commission of Public Safety to prevent strikes during war.......................Nov., 1918: 288-9
Mississippi. Hours....................................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 240
Missouri. Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Employment Organization.............................................. Feb., 1920: 161
------Workmen’s compensation...........................................
June, 1919: 256-7
Montana. Compulsory work.................................................................................. ...................Aug., 1918: 209
------ Workmen’ s compensation.................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 241
Nebraska. Industrial court.................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 193-4
Jan., 1917: 17
Netherlands. Conciliation and antistrike legislation..........................................................
------ Eight-hour day...................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 193-4
------ Housing...................................................................................................
Aug., 1920: 160*1
------ Unemployment insurance............................................................................................... June, 1917: 909-11
New Brunswick. Workmen’ s compensation.....................................................................July, 1918: 179-81
New Jersey. Compulsory work................................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 277
------ Factory laws.......................................................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 434-9
------ Health insurance.................................................................................................................... Apr., 1918: 274
New Mexico. Workmen’s compensation................................................................................ May, 1917: 745
New South Wales. Amendment to arbitration act, 1918.................................................... July, 1918: 182
------Conciliation and antistrike legislation...............................................................................
Jan., 1917: 12
New York. Administration of various laws.. Sept., 1916: 77-8; Sept., 1917: 87-91; Nov., 1920: 219-20
------Civil service............................................................................................................................Jan., 1917: 47
------Dangerous trades..................................................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 244
— - Health insurance............................................................................... May, 1918: 227-30; Jan., 1920: 256-8
------ Labor provisions of proposed constitution...................................................................... Oct., 1915: 37-43
------ Minimum wage. Needed in laundry industry................................................................Aug., 1918: 204
------ Rehabilitation law of May 13,1920...................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 139
------ Suspended sentences in labor law cases........................................................................... Mar., 1920: 183-4
------ Woman labor..................................................................... Jan.,.1918: 59; May, 1918: 20; May, 1919: 235
------ Working conditions................................................................................................................ Feb., 1916: 82
------ Workmen’ s compensation..................................... Nov., 1918: 205; Aug., 1920: 139; Oct., 1920: 188-9
N ew Zealand. Conciliation and antistrike legislation.........................................................
Jan., 1917: 14
North Carolina. Child-labor law of 1919.................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 130
North Dakota. Workmen’s compensation.. . June, 1919: 257-8; Feb., 1920: 209-10; Dec., 1920: 157-8
Norway. Conciliation and arbitration.................................................. Nov., 1915: 81-3; Sept., 1916: 78-9
------ Eight-hour day....................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 194
------ Health insurance..................................................................................................................Dec., 1916: 68-71
------ Housing..................................................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 162
------ Minimum wage........................... .......................................................... Sept., 1918: 204-5; Mar., 1919: 198
------ Works Council Act, July 22,1920....................‘ ................................................................ Oct., 1920: 207-8
------ (S e e also Laws and legislation: Scandinavian countries.)
Ohio. Health insurance........................................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 507-8
------Old-age insurance.................................................................................................................Apr., 1917: 507-8
------ Workmen’ s compensation............................................................... Apr., 1917: 553-4; Oct., 1920: 189-90
Oregon. Hours of labor.................................................................................June, 1916: 23-8; Oct., 1918: 240
------Overtime work, compensation for....................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 110
------ Soldiers and sailors ............................................................................... Feb., 1920: 161-2; Oct., 1920: 1,3
------ Workmen’s compensation........................................................................... *........................ Oct., 1920: 190
Ottoman Empire. ( S e e Laws and legislation: Turkey.)
Pacific States.............................................................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 557-60
Panama. Eight-hour day....................................................................... ........................... Mar.,1920: 194-5
Pennsylvania. WToman labor................................................................. .............................. Sept.,1918: 267
Peru. Compulsory rest law..................................................................... ............................. Oct., 1919: 279
------Eight-hour day..................................................................................... ............................. M ar.,1920: 195
------Immigration law of October 10,1919............................................... ............................. Dec., 1920: 164
------ Woman and child labor law, November 25,1918......................... .......................... Sept,, 1919: 347-9
Philippine Islands. Compensation for overtime work...................... ............................. Mar., 1920: 110
Poland. Compensation for overtime work.......................................... ............. ; ......... Mar., 1920: 110-11
------Eight-hour day..................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 195; Apr., 1920: 209-10
Porto Rico. Labor 1egislation of 1917.................................................. . ............................. July, 1919: 231
------ Overtime work, compensation for.................................................... ............................. Mar., 1920: 110
------Payment of wages........................... ; ......................................... ........ ............................. July, 1919: 231
------Protection of New Industries Act.................................................... ............................. July, 1919: 231
------ Workmen’s compensation.......................................................... .
. Sept., 1918: 262-3; Oct., 1920: 190
Portugal. Act of March 16,1916, establishing department of labor .............................. July, 1917: l4l
------ Antistrike legislation.......................................................................... .............................
Jan., 1917:18
------ Compensation for overtime work.................................................... ........................ Mar., 1920: 110-11
------ Eight-hour day................................................................................... ........................... Mar.,1920: 195-8
------ Social insurance.................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 261-5; Dec., 1920: 161-2
Quebec. Child labor.............................................................................. ............................... Sept., 1920: 17»




SUBJECT INDEX,

JU LY,

1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

91

Laws and legislation—Continued.
Page.
Quebec. Workmen's compensation............................................................................ Aug., 1918: 211-12
Queensland. Conciliation and antistrike legislation— ........................................ ........ Jan.,1917:13
----- Employment agencies........................ .......................................................................July, 1916:154-6
----- Workmen's compensation........................................................................................ May, 1919: 279-80
Rhode Island. Compulsory work..................................................................................... Aug., 1918:209
----- Workmen*s compensation............................................................................................ Oct., 1920: 190
Rumania. Antistrike legislation..................................................... ...... Jan., 1917: 18; N ov., 1920: 209
----- Reconstruction............................................................................................................ Oct., 1920: 231-2
Russia. Antistrikelegislation.......................................................................... ................ Jan., 1917: 18
----- Code of labor laws................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 210-14
----- Eight-hour d ay...................................................................... .................................... Mar., 1920: 196
----- Termination of employment........................................................................................ Mar., 1919:15
Salvador. Decree requiring formal contract-tor protection of domestic servants.......... Dec., 1920: 165
Saskatchewan. Child labor;............................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 179
Scandinavian countries. Legislation affecting seamen's wages..............................
Dec., 1919: 258-60
South Africa. Profiteering act, 1920......................................................, ..................... Nov., 1920: 202-3
South Australia. Conciliation and antistrike legislation................................................. Jan., 1917:13
South Dakota. Workmen's compensation...................................................................July, 1917: 98-100
Spain. Antistrike legislation..................................................................... Jan., 1917: 18; Dec., 1920: 179
----- Central board of mobilization of civilindustries created.........................................Oct., 1920: 232-3
----- Eight-hour law.............................................................................. Mar., 1920: 197; July, 1920: 129-30
----- Home work. R6sum6 Oflaw of July 5,1918........................................................... June, 1919: 266-9
— Housing............... ................................................................................................. Aug., 1920: 158-9
Sweden. Disputes............................................................................................................ Nov., 1916: 64-5
—— Eight-hour day......................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 197-8
— Housing.................................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 161-2
----- Seamen's code......................................................................................................
Dec., 1919: 258-60
r— - Unemployment insurance........................................................................................ May, 1918: 221-2
----- (See also Laws and legislation: Scandinavian countries.)
Switzerland. Conciliation and antistrike legislation.....................................................Jan., 1917:18-19
----- Factory regulations. (Hours, night work, woman and child labor, etc.)............. Aug., 1915: 20-2;
May,
77-8
M
ay, 1918: 77------Hours. Eight-hour day....................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 1
1
198
------Proposed labor department, wage commission, and wage boards............................ M ay, 1920: 182
: 182-5
------ Sunday closing law ...............*............................................................................ .
July, 1917:: 80
80-1
Tasmania.
&nd antistrike legislation.............................
.................................
Jan.,
1917::
_________ Conciliation
__________________________
v_______________________________________
______
17:13
Tennessee. Child-labor law,in effect September, 1917.................................................... July, 1918:130
----- Workmen’s compensation....................... ................................. June, 1919: 258-9; Feb., 1920: 211-12
Texas. Workmen’s compensation.......................................... ....................................June, 1919: 259-61
Transvaal. Conciliation and antistrikelegislation..........................................................
Jan., 1917:19
Turkey. Conciliation and antistrikelegislation............................................................ Jan., 1917:17-18
United States. Principles oftabor legislation............ ...................... July, 1916:147-9; Nov., 1920: 200
----- Recommendations of American Federation of Labor.. . , .................................... Aug., 1920: 169-71
Administration. (See specific subjects, i. e.tChild labor: Reports; Minimum wage;
Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Reports, etc.)
----- Child labor...............................................................................
Oct., 1916: 31-3; Sept., 1917: 46-53;
July, 1918: 171-7; Mar., 1919: 217-18; June, 1919: 264; Feb., 1920: 174; Apr., 1920: 178
----- Clayton Act, referred t o ..................................................................Nov., 1918: 55; Oct., 1920: 205-7
——*Commission on Industrial Relations created.......................................................
Nov., 1915: 49
— <- Compulsory work. (Various States.). Sept.. 1917: 113-15; June, 1918: 199-200; Dec., 1918: 829-80
:— Conciliation and arbitration.. . . Oct., 1916: 21-3; Jan., 1917: 19; Apr., 1920: 50; July, 1920: 26-48
----- Contract labor. Mexicanlabor............................................................................ Nov., 1918: 266-71
----- Convict rabot...................................... ..............Dec., 1915: 41-3; Apr., 1917: 695; Sept., 1918: 39-40
----- Education. Bill to create department of education referred to........ Dec., 1918: 75; Feb., 1919: 85
----- Eight-hour day. (See Laws and legislation: United States. Hours.)'
----- Employment agendas........................... ......... Nov., 1917:127-30; Jan., 1918: 42-3; Sept., 1918: 298
----- Food................................................................................................... Sept., 1917: 67-71; June,-1919: 41
----- Health insurance................................. Apr., 1917: 501-4.514-15; May, 1917: 749-50; May, 1918: 227
----- Hours..............................1915—July 14-19; Wit—June 23-9; Oct. 23-4,24-6,116-33: 1817—May 660;
July 55; Aug. 148-9; 1818—Jan. 112; Mar. 136-9; Apr. 188; Sept. 193-6; Oct. 240-7
----- Housing..................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 205,207: Apr., 1918: 278-9
----- Immigration.................................................. . Mar., 1917: 487-8; Jan., 1918: 44; Nov., 1918: 266-71
----- Mediation. Erdman and Newlands Acts, referred to............................................... Apr., 1920: 50
----- Mother's pensions....................................................................................................... Dec., 1919r 847-8
— Overtime work, compensation tor.............................................................................. Mar., 1920: 109
----- Permission to use alcohol for Industrial purposes.................................................... Feb., 1920: 198-9
----- Prohibition................................................................................................................... June, 1919: 88-43
----- Protective legislation..................................................................................................June, 1917: 914;
Jan., 1918; 47,62; Apr., 1918: 110; Nov., 1918: 39-40,45n6,55-62; Apr., 1919: 6
----- Public employees........................................... Jan., 1920: 251-4; June, 1920: 184-6; July, 1920: 11-25
----- Public lands.................................................................................................................. Jan., 1918: 48
----- Public works................................................ Oct., 1916: 116-33; Mar., 1917: 455-67; Mar., 1919: 54-5
----- Railroads............................................................ Oct., 1916: 23-4; Apr., 1920: 50-7: July, 1920: 26-43
----- Reconstruction............................................................... .............. Nov., 1918: 48-53; Dec., 1918: 73-8
----- Rehabilitation of the disabled.............................................. 1918-Apr. 116; May 79-81; July 2M 1:
Nov. 212,213,214; 1920—Jan. 188-6;, Feb. 138; Apr. 202-6; June 186-7; Dec. 91-2
----- Retirement of civil service employees........................................................................June, 1920: 184-6
----- Seamen......... 1918—Mar. 171; Apr. 40; 1919— Feb. 253-6; 1920-May 1-20; June 187-9; Oct. 210-11
----- Standards....................................................... June, 1917: 912-13; July, 1917: 54; Sept., 1918: 266-70
----- State control of telegraphs......................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 145-7
----- Summary ofiabor legislation in 1915............................................July, 1915: 14-19; Feb., 1916: 45-7
----- Unemployment........................................................................... Nov., 1915: 40-2; Apr., 1919:121-39
----- Uniformityin legislation................. June, 1918: 210-21; Nov., 1918: 45-6,240-53; Nov., 1919: 280-2
----- Vocational education.................................... . Apr., 1917: 581-3; Apr., 1918:113-14; Apr., 1920: 133
----- Wages. Billincreasing salaries of postal employees.’................................................ July, 1920: 100
----- War-risk insurance...................................Aug., 1917: 92-104; Sept., 1917: 100-3; Nov., 1917: 183-99
----- Woman labor...................................................... ...............................July, 1915: 33-8; Mar., 1916: 36
----- Women's Bureau created............................................................................................ July, 1920: 174-5




92

M O N TH LY LABOR REVIEW.

Laws and legislation—Concluded.
Page.
United States. Workmen’s compensation................................... 1915—July 14-19; Sept. 45; 1916—Feb.
43-5; Apr. 56; Sept. 52-5; Oct. 33-41; 1917—Apr. 554-6; May 744-6; June 973-5; July 100;
Nov. 151-7, 158-60; Dec. 144-8; 1918—Mar. 88-91; Apr. 260-71; June 191-3, 219-21;
Nov. 240-53; Dec. 318-20; 1919—June 255-9; Oct. 243-6; Dec. 331-9; 1920—Jan. 230-47,
251-4; Apr. 1-2, 5-6, 14-32; June 171-5; Aug. 121-30; Oct. 185-91; Nov. 185
------ ( S e e also Laws and legislation: sp ecific S ta tes.)
Uruguay. Eight-hour l a w . ....................................................................... Apr., 1916: 84-5; Mar., 1920: 198
------Pensions...................................................................... ............. ........ Sept., 1919: 349-50; Aug., 1920: 135-7
------ Working conditions. Seats for female workers................................................................ Dec., 1918:330
Utah. Workmen’ s compensation..................... Mar., 1917: 421-4; June, 1917: 975-6; Mar., 1918: 186-91
Venezuela. Safety and health, hours. . . 2............... ............................ ................................. Dec., 1917: 238
Vermont. Workmen’s compensation...................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 219
Virginia. Recommendations of United States Women’s Bureau..................................... Aug., 1920: 100
------ Workmen’ s compensation.. Nov., 1917: 160-1; June, 1918: 191-3; Apr., 1920: 186; Oct., 1920: 191
Washington (State). Child labor................................................................... Apr., 1917: 569; Jan., 1918: 62
------Education. Compulsory school law referred to............................................................... Apr., 1917:569
------ Factory laws, violations, 1915-16...................................................................................... Mar., 1917: 476-7
------ Labor standards........................................................................................................................ Apr., 1917:561
------ Recommendations of commissioner of labor, 1916............................................................ Mar., 1917:479
------ Workmen’s compensation.................................................................... Dec., 1918: 325; May, 1919: 255-8
West Virginia. Compulsory work................... ................................. Aug., 1917: 150-2; Sept., 1920: 175-6
Western Australia. Conciliation and antistrike legislation.............................................. Jan., 1917:13-14
Wisconsin. Apprenticeship law.............................................................................................. Oct., 1917:163-6
------ Housing.................................................................: ............................................................. Sept., 1919: 351-3
------ Workmen’ s compensation........................................................................ July, 1919: 186; Oct., 1919: 266
Wyoming. Workmen’s compensation.................................................................................... Nov.,1918: 254
Yugoslavia. Eight-hour day................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 196-7
------ Provisions re compensation for overtime work........................................................... Mar., 1920: 116-11
(S e e also Decisions of courts.)
“ Lazy strike” ........................................................................................................................................
July, 1920: 66.
Lead. Hazards. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Lead mining. (S e e Mines and mining, lead.)
Lead paints. Great Britain. Proposed prohibition................................................................Nov., 1915: 38-40
Lead poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Lead smelting. (S e e Metallurgy.)
League for Women’s Service, National. (S e e National League for Women’s Service.)
League of Nations:
Draft convention.................................................. ...................................................................... May, 1919: 11-26
International Labor Office. (S e e International Labor Office.)
International labor standards and the League of Nations covenant................................ Sept., 1919: 32-6
Labor provisions in the Peace Treaty................................................................................... Aug., 1919: 27-39
Learners:
Factory allowances for learning time in clothing factory..................................................... Aug., 1920: 31
Outline of a policy submitted by Meyer Bloomfield............................................................. Jan., 1918: 118
(S e e also Apprenticeship; Minimum wage; Vocational education.)
Leather goods:
Germany. Employment statistics, 1913, and after-war prospects..................................... Feb., 1919: 141
------Membership in unions, wage disputes, etc................................................................... Dec., 1917: 139-40
------Wages, 1914 and 1917............................................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 174
Great Britain. Labor organizations. Statistics of membership....................................... June, 1919: 305
New York. Earnings of factory workers............................................................................... June, 1918: 124;
July, 1919: 147; Sept., 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
United States. Eight-hour day established on Government work in harness and
saddlery...........................................................................................................................: .......... Sept., 1918: 189
------Employees and amounts of pay rolls, 1915 to 1918 or 1919. (Index numbers.)------ 1919—Jan. 144;
Feb. 133; Mar. 152; Apr. 152; May 187
----- . Production and prices........................................................................................................ Dec., 1920: 71-2
------Wholesale prices............................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 108,109
(S e e also Boot and shoe industry; Glove industry.)
Leather tanning and dressing:
Anthrax among tannery employees.......................................................... July, 1916: 1-5; Apr., 1917: 536-8
Denmark. Wages, 1914 and 1920............................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 87
Germany. Anthrax in tanneries and methods of combating........................................... Aug., 1915: 28-9
------Membership in unions, wage disputes, etc................................................................... Dec., 1917: 139-40
Great Britain. Dermatosis among workers. (W hite.).................................................... Apr., 1920: 184-5
New York State. Anthrax. Report and recommendation for prevention................Jan., 1917: 98-102
Pennsylvania. Anthrax, cases of, 1913 to 1915...................................................................... July, 1919: 178
United States. Anthrax, regulations for prevention......................................................... July, 1919: 181-4
------Wages and hours, 1919...................................................................................................... May, 1920: 92-107
Leaving certificates:
Germany. Provisions of law............................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 91,95,99
Great Britain. Grievance pertaining thereto............................................................. May, 1918: 154,158-62
------Orders and regulations............................................ Sept., 1917: 126-7; Dec., 1917: 57-8; Jan., 1918: 67
Lee, F. S. Industrial physiology, a new science...................................................................... Sept., 1919: 294-6
Leeds International Conference, 1916. R6sum6 and resolutions re standards of labor
legislation...................................................................................................... Feb., 1917: 202-6; June, 1917: 912-13
Legal aid:
Germany. Legal information bureaus maintained by trade-unions..-............................ Feb., 1918: 177
------Operation of legal aid bureaus, 1909, 1913,1914........... .............................................. Sept., 1916: 99-100
Legal holidays with pay. (See Collective agreements.)
Legge, T. M. Articles on industrial poisoning___ Sept., 1918: 236-42; Dec., 1919: 315-17; Jan., 1920: 21-2
Legien, C. Statement, re headquarters of International Federation of Trade-Unions
during war................................................................................................................................ Feb., 1917: 199,201-6
Legislation. (S e e Laws and legislation.)
Lehlbach-Sterling bill. Civil Service employees’ retirement, enacted May 22,1920........... June, 1920: 184-6
Lehmann, K . B .:
Effect of the absorption of chromates into the humansystem...........................................Aug., 1915: 25-6
Experiments in dope poisoning............. ................................................ Oct., 1917: 20; Feb., 1918: 39-40,49




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 19^0,
Leiserson, W . M.:

93
Page.

Attitude on collective bargaining and employees representation.................................. Sept., 1920; 5
Employees’ participation in management........ ...........................................✓ ............. Nov., 1920: 117
Mobilizing and distributing farm laborIn Ohio.........................................................Apr., 1918: 53-63
Relations between employer and,employee............................................................... Oct., 1919: 207-16
Leitch plan. (See Employees’ representation.)
Lemon, C. H .:
How industrial medicine is extended through mutual benefit associations,............. Nov., 1919: 264-6
Medical supervision of street railway employees........................................................ Mar., 1917: 446-6
Length of life of workmen: (See Age in relation to employment.)
Length o f service. (See Mobility of labor.)
Lennon, J. B. Vocational education................................................................................ Nov., 1915: 63-4
Lentz, J. J. Fraternal societies under universal health insurance..................................... May, 1917: 749
Leonard, R. J. Survey erf vocational training in the paper-box industry, New York State.
Referred to............................ . ........................................................................................ Feb., 1916: 96
Le Sueur, A. Markets and marketing............................................................................... Feb., 1919: 68
Letter carriers. (See Postal service.)
Leubuscher, Charlotte. Development of woman-labor organization in Germany during
the w a r ..................................... : .............................................................................. Feb., 1920: 258-63
Lever Bros., soap manufacturers, England:
Outline,of proposed plan for six-hour day................................................................. July# 1819: 159-61
Port Sunlight works continuation school...................................................................Nov., 1920: 143-6
Leverhulme, Lord. The six-hour day............................................. Apr., 1919: 168-73; July, 1919: 159-61
Lewinski-Corwin, E. H. Medical aspects of health insurance administration............. Sept., 1919: 338-41
Lewis, J. L. Position of bituminous coal miners..............................................................Apr., 1920: 41-2
Lewy, R. Choice of physician in industrial accident cases...................................... ......... slay, 1919: 47
Library employees. United States Library of Congress. Salaries, 1897 to 1919............. June, 1920: 23,29
Life insurance:
Queensland. Organized by act of 1916...................................................................... May, 1918: 235-6
(See also Establishment funds; Fraternal orders; Group insurance; Labor organiza­
tions: Benefit funds; Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; War Risk Insurance Act.)
Lifting. (See Woman labor: Hygiene and sanitation. Heavy lifting.)
Light and power. (See Electric light and power.)
Lighter Captains' union, New York harbor. Organization, objects, etc................ Aug., 1918: 45,46,57;
Sept., 1918: 5
Lighterage Association of the Port of New York. Organization; arbitration award.. Aug., 1918: 46,49-60;
Sept., 1918: 5
lightermen's Brotherhood Association. (See Lighter Captain's Union.)
Lighthouse service. Retirement system. Act of June 20,1918.......................................... Sept., 1918: 270
British Health of Munition Workers’ Committee.........June, 1916: 83; Aug., 1918: 201; Sept., 1918: 49
Code. (Illuminating Engineering Society.)...................................................................July, 1916: 101-7
----- (United States Council of National Defense.)...................................................... June, 1918: 215-16
Eyestrain in its relation to industry. (Gould.).............................................................July, 1920: 160-2
Hygienic conditions ofillumination in women's garment industries. New York City.
(Schereschewsky.)........................................................................................................... Mar., 1916: 75-6
Importance of proper illumination............................. ....................................................... Nov., 1916: 98
List of States that have adopted codes..............................................................................Nov., 1920: 219
Report. (National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness.) Referred to............ Apr., 1918: 298
Safeguard against accidents. (Marks.) Referred to....................................................... Nov., 1917: 171
(S e e also Sanitation and working conditions.)
Lignite mining. (S e e Mines and mining, lignite.)
Limestone:
Study of effect of air hammer on hands..........................................................................Apr., 1918: 25-33
(S e e a lso Quarries.)
Lincoln Motor Co., Detroit, Mich. Training of women.................................................. Sept., 1918: 210-11
Lind, J. Statement of war labor administration.......................... ...................................... Apr., 1918: 103-5
Lindsay, S. M. Social insurance in the United States....................................................... Feb., 1919: 28-34
linen industry:
Great Britain. Short time and unemployment during war........................................... July, 1919: 157
Ireland. Wage of mechanics in mills and factories, Belfast............................................Nov., 1919: 209
(S e e also Textile industry.)
Linotype operators. (S e e Printing and publishing.)
Lint packers. Effects of overtime on output.......................................................................Dec., 1916: 100-2
Lipmann, Otto. Vocational guidance on a psychological basis......................................... Apr., 1918: 131-5
Liquor problem and trade. ( S e e Alcoholism; Brewing industry.)
List of employers. (S e e Directories.)
List oflabor officials. (S e e Directories.)
Literacy test. United States. Immigration act of 1917.......................... Mar., 1917: 487-8; Nov., 1918: 267
Lithographers. (Se# Printing and publishing.)
Liver diseases. (S e e Diseases.)
living conditions:
District of Columbia........................................................................................................... 1917—Oct. 1-17;
Nov. 1-12; Dec. 1-18; 1918—Jan. 1-12; Feb. 1-12; Mar. 1-13; Apr. 41-52
Germany. Board and lodging systems combated by trade-unions................................ Feb., 1918: 177
----- Wage increases have not improved economic conditions.........................................Jan., 1920: 178-9
Great Britain. Health of Munition Workers’ Committee activities outside the factory. Aug., 1917: 91-2;
Sept., 1918: 51-2
----- Relation to adult education.......................................................................................Nov., 1918: 68-9
Great Lakes. Seamen and freight handlers....................................Apr., 1918: 38-40; June, 1918: 46-53
Iowa. Workers in pearl-button industry......................................................................... Sept., 1920: 147
India. Resolutions of Bombay mill hands, 1919...........................................................Aug., 1920: 175-6
Japan. Factory labor......................................................................................................... June, 1919: 230
New York City. Harbor employees. (Squires.)..........................................................July, 1918: 15-20
----- Self-supporting women.................................................................................................Mav, 1916: 41-7
----- Women employees of laundries.............................................................................Aug., 1918: 203,204
Norway. During the war............................................... ............................................. Mar., 1919: 197-208
Pittsburgh. Negro migrants........................................................................................... Feb., 1918: 155-6
f4()1317 0 — 41------- 7




94

M ON THLY LABOR REVIEW.

Living conditions—Concluded.
Page.
United States. What is the American standard of living? (Meeker.)........................ July, 1919; 1-13
(See also Board and lodging In lieu of wages; Company towns; Housing; Labor camps;
Standard of living.>
Living wage:
A living wage by legislation. The Oregon experience. (O'Hara.)............................... Oct., 1916: 73-6
Method of flxing in New South Wales................................................. Feb., 1917: 293-9; July, 1918: 183
Statement by official bodies............................................................................................... 1916--Sept. 21;
1917—Mar. 427; 1918—May 122-3; Aug. 57,72,75; 1989-May 53; Sept. 143; Oct. 26,109
Statements by various organizations............................. Aug., 1916: 3; May, 1919: 23, 25; June, 1919: 47
• (See also Minimum wage.)
Llano del Rio cooperative colony, Los Angeles County, Calif. Description...................... Jan., 1916: 19-23
Llewellyn, T. L. Research into miners' nystagmus.......... ............................... ..................Aug., 1916: 45-6
Lloyd George, D .:
Attitude toward organized labor.....................................................*................ Nov., 1918: 291-2,294, 295
Policy of Government re rates of wages of female workers............. ................................ Aug., 1917: 120
Treasury agreement, March, 1915...................................... ............................................. Sept ., 1918: 320-1
Loans to soldiers:
Canada. Operation of act of April 5,1918........................................................................ June, 1919: 55
France. Law of April 9 ,1 9 1 8 .......................... i .......................... — .......................... Oct., 1918: 69-71
Italy. Provisions of law..................................................................................................... Oct., 1918:85
Local government board. (See Great Britain: Local government board.)
Lockouts. (See Strikes and lockouts.)
Locomotive engineers; (See Engineers, locomotive.)
Locomotive firemen and enginemen. (See Firemen and enginemen, locomotive.)
Locomotor ataxiai. (See Diseases.)
Lodging. (See Board and lodging.)
Lodging houses. (See Hotels, restaurants, etc.; Housing.)
Log system of piece-rate. Definition......................................................................................June, 1919: 6,11
Logging. (See Lumber, logging, and sawmills.)
London County Council. Administration of housing at Well Hall, Kent....................... Oct., 1918: 259-60
Longshoremen. (See Docks andjiarbors.)
Louisiana. Department of Labor and Industrial Statistics. Report, 1919-1920..............July, 1920: 175-6
Low-cost housing, (See Housing.)
Lowman, J .B . Physical examination................................................................................. Feb., 1917: 270-1
Lubricants. Cause of skin infection and bcdls...................................... Jan., 1919; 273-7; Sept., 1919: 296-8
Luce, R. V. Industrial anilin poisoning in the United States....................................... . June, 1916: 1-12
Lukens Steel Co. Collective bargaining............................................................................... Mar., 1919: 154-7
Lumbago. (See Diseases.)
Lumber, logging, and sawmills:
British Columbia. Accidents, 1917................................................................................. Oct.. 1918: 231-2
California. Safety orders effective in 1917....... ........................... .................................... Feb., 1918:186
Great Britain. Wages and hours of timber trade workers, Liverpool docks.................Nov., 1919: 207
New Brunswick. Cost of lumbering operations, 1919.................... ................................ July, 1920: 179
Norway. Wage increase during war......... ......................................................... Mgr., 1919: 200-1,203-4
Pacific States. Bight-hour day.................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 189,191
----- Extent of conditions in camps...................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 558
Mar., 1918: 67-8
Unrest in lumber industry.................................................................................... .
United States. Addresses on accident prevention. Referred to...................................
Oct., 1916:58
----- Changes in hours, wages, etc., 1913 to 1919.............................................................. Jan., 1920: 118-41
— — Plan for employment for returned soldiers............................................................. Apr., 1919: 125-6
----- Timber culture versus " timber.m ining".................................................................. Jan., 1918: 50-1
— Wages and hours. (Squires.)...................................................................................Oct., 1917: 66-79
Washington (State). Statistics on production and employment, 1915.......................... Mar., 1917: 477
(See also Labor camps; Woodworking industries.)
nbering. (See Lumber, logging, and sawmills.)
_np-sum payments. (See under various Itinds of insurance.)
men periods:
British Columbia. Shipbuilding. Provisions of agreement, June 1,1918.................... Aug., 1918:157
California. Laundries and manufacturing industry..................................... ................. May, 1919: 234
England and Wales. Agriculture workers....................................................................... Dec., 1918: 310
Finland. Metal trades........ ............................................................................................... Jan., 1918: 110
France. Experience in munitions..................................................................................... July, 1918: 122
Kansas. Laundry and hotel employees.......................................................................July, 1918: 111-12
Manitoba. Food industries................................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 190
New York City. Children's shoe industry►.................................................................. June. 1918:165-6
— —Street railways.................. ; ......................................................................................... May, 1918: 19
Switzerland. Factory labor. Regulations effective November 15,1917.......................
May, 1918: 77
United States. Slaughtering and meat packing. Alschuler award........................ May, 1918: 122,125
----- Woman labor. Policy suggested by conference of State labor officials..................Nov., 1918: 45-6
------------Standards of War Labor Policies Board.............................................................. Jan., 1919: 217
Washington (State). Regulations establishing in various industries............................ Apr., 1917: 561
Wisconsin. Orders covering various industries............................................................. Oct., 1918: 250-1
(See also Collective agreements; Sanitation and working conditions.)
Lunch rooms:
District of Columbia. Prices standardized by agreement between proprietors and
Food Administration................... ................................. .............................................Nov., 1918: 116-17
----- - Public employees. United States Government.................................................. Aug., 1918: 218-21
----- Rations........................... ............................................................................................Aug., 1918: 143-4
France. Industrial canteens..........................................................June, 1918: 211-14; Jan., 1919: 111-12
----- Regulations of Ministry of Munitions. July 1,1917................................................. . Jan., 1918: 71
Germany. Extent of feeding by war kitchens in 1917.................................................. Nov.,. 1918: 25-6
Great Britain. Canteen construction and equipment.............................June, 1916: 91; Sept., 1918: 63
----- Canteens tor munitions workers................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 46-7
----- Dye industry........................................................................... ...................................Dec., 1919: 19-20
----- Food served by munitions canteens....................... ................................................. July. 1918: 193-5
—— Lever Bros., soap manufacturers. Proposal of Lord Leverhulme......................... July, 1919: 1§0
——-National restaurants in London.............................................................................. Nov., 1918: 121-2
----- Value of industrial canteens............................................................................ ......... May, 1916: 66-70




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBEB, 1920.

95

Lunch rooms—Concluded.
Bage.
Minnesota. Wage rates fixed for waitresses................................................................... Oct., 1938: 184-5
United States. Lunch rooms for employees of various industries. (Whitney.). . . . Dec., 1917: 207-15
----- Motor vehicles plant........................... ........................................................... .
Oct., 1918: 14-15
----- Restaurant facuities in shipyards........... , ........... ...................................................... Sept., 1918: 284
Washington. Wage Order and rate fixed..-....................1............................................... Nov., 1918:177
Wisconsin. Order to factories having lunch rooms......................................................... Oct., 1918: 251
(S e e also Hotels, restaurants, etc.; Sanitation and working conditions.)
Lung affections. ( S e e Diseases.)
MCe

McArthur. Mary:
Industrial unions as distinct from craft-fcombinations................................... *................Nov., 1918: 264
Work as chairman, Women’s trade-union advisory committee, for munition workers.
Great Britain........................................................................................................
May, 1918: 192-3
McCall, S. W .:
Compulsory health insurance and old-age pensions in Massachusetts..........................Feb., 1917: 206-8
Social insurance and accident prevention..................................... ..................... .........Feb., 1918: 189-91
McCord, C. Qualifications ofindustrial physician........................................................... . Sept., 1920: 145-6
Machine building. ( S e e Machinery and machine shops.)
Machine shops. (S e e Machinery and machine' shops.)
Machinery and machine shops:
Cutting compounds as a cause of dermatitis and wound infection. (Yates.)..............Jan., 1919: 273-7
Training of women for war work, a bibliography. (Turner.)................................ Aug., 1918: 164-71
Denmark. Machinists, annual earnings, Copenhagen.................................................... ^ Oct., 1918: 88
France. Eight-hour day by agreement, 1919.................... .............................................. July. 1919: 164
Germany. Employment of disabled men on machine tools...................................... Apr., 1918:129-31
----- Employment statistics, 1913................................... .............................................. Feb., 1919:139-40
— - Standardization of machinery and machine tool industry...................................... May, 1 9 1 8 : 7 3
------ Wages, 1914-1918.............................. .............................................. Oct., 1918: 174; July, 192p: 124-3
----- Woman labor...................... ................. ................................ ...... ............................... Apr., 1918: 225$
Great Britain. Board of Trade committee on engineeringtrades. Report arid recom­
mendations....................................... ..................................... ....................................... Aug., 1918: 90-3
— - Comparative wages of men and women...........................................: ..................... Mar., 1917: 342-3
----- Employment statistics and wages................................................. *.........................June, 1916: 100-1
----- Payment by results, Priestman Bros. (Ltd.), Hull, England....................... ...... Apr., 1919: 179-80
Apr., 1918: 219
- — Protective clothing for women....... ............ .......................................... ..............
— r- Wage increases............................................ July, 1919:155-6; Feb., 1920: 128-30; June# 1920: 108-9
----- Woman labor in engineering trades...............................................................
1917—Oct., 39-42;
1918—Jan. 65-7; May 152; June 160; Dec. 314; 1919—May 237-6
Italy. Wages, 1914 to 1919, and 1920......................... ,,......................................... Oct., 1920: 146,148,150
United States. Accident and accident prevention in machine building.....................Dec., 1917:166-8
----- Accident rates, influence of the war on. {Chaney.)............................................... Apr., 1919; 12-22
----- Machinists. Union scale of wages and hours, 1913 to 1920............Nov., 1919: 184; vet., 1920: 85-6
----- Machinist’s wages.......................................... ....................................................... 1918—Feb. 123-35;
Mar. 119-33; Apr. 163-81; June 127-45; Sept. 161-85; Dec. 260-309; 1926—Dec. 4
— - National War Labor Board award. Bridgeport machinists.................................Oct., 1918:19-25
------------Madison, W is...................................................................................................Apr., 1919; 249-52
-------------Minneapolis, Minn...............................................................................................Jan., 1919: 32-4
------------Waynesboro controversy................................................ ....................................Aug., 1918: 72-5
------------Worthington Pump and Machinery Corporation, Cudahy, W is................
Aug., 1918: 72-3;
Feb. 1919: 259-65
----- Partial list of firms with 8-hour day............................................. Oct., 1915: 17-18; Fei>., 19i6: 37-8
— Pensions, insurance, etc......................................... ....... ..................................... Feb., 1918: 192-204
----- Training for the job.......................................... Apr., 1918:113; Sept., 1918: 207-11; Apr., 1920: 135
----- Wages and hours......................................................................................................June, 1920: 82-94
----- Woman labor. Women in the mechanical trades. (Turner.)...........................Sept., 1918: 206-15
----- (Milwaukee). Labor turnover in a foundry and machine shop..............................Apr., 1919: 64-5
— - (New York City). Survey of conditions...................... .......................................... June, 1919: 63-4
----- (New York State). Average earnings........................................................................ June, 1918: 124;
July, 1919:147; Sept, 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
(S e e also Foundries; Iron and steel; Metal trades; Munitions; Navy yards; Shipbuild­
ing; Woman labor.)
Machinery of government committee, Great Britain. (S e e Great Britain: Ministry of
Reconstruction. Machinery of government committee.)
Machinists. ( S e e Machinery and machine shops; Shipbuilding.)
Machinists, International Association. ( S e e International Association of Machinists.)
Mack, J. W . Provision for pensions of American soldier................................................... Aug., 1917: 100-1
MacKaye, B .:
The soldier, the worker, and the land’s resources........................................................... Jan., 1918: 48-56
Making new opportunities for employment..................................................................Apr., 1919: 121-39
. A plan for cooperation between farmer and consumer....................................................Aug., 1920: 1-21
McLeod, F . H . Cost ofliving in Great Britain................................................................. June, 1919:119-20
McMurtrie, D. C. Red Cross Institute for crippled and disabled men, work of..................Apr., 1918: 117
MacNanr, E . E . Training for shipbuilding............................................................................ Apr., 1918: 112
Macy, V . Industrial relations.................................................................................................Feb., 1919: 63-4
Macy board. ( S e e United States: Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board.)
" Magna Charta of German labor.” Agreement between labor organizationsa nd employers’ assoeiations...................................................................................................................Apr., 1919: 158-60
Magnuson, B . P. Contract system of medical service in accident cases — Nov., 1918: 210; May, 1919: 53
Magnusson, L .:
Agricultural camp housing............................................................................................. May, 1918: 277-87
Canadian industrial conference ........................................................................... ...........N ov., 1919: 51-62
Financia1aspects of war housing in Great B ritain.,.................................................... June, 1918: 201-6
Housing ana the land problem...................................................................................... May, 1918: 268-77
Company housing i n anthracite region of Pennsylvania.............................................. May, 1920: 186-95
Company housing in the bituminous coal fields...........................................................Apr., 1920: 215-22
Comparison of foreign eight-hour laws.......................................................................... Mar., 1920: 184-98




M ON THLY LABOR REVIEW,
Page.
Magnusson, L.—Concluded.
"Control' of labor conditions by international action...................... .................. ............ Apr., 1919: 1-11
Employers* housing in the united States..................................................................N ov., 1917: 35-60

_ deraiintervention in railroad disputes................................................... ................... July, 1920: 26-43
Government residence halls, Washington, D. C............................................................... Oct., 1919:9-15
Methods of sale of company houses............................................................................... Apr., 1919: 227-32
A modern copper-mining town..................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 278-84
A modern industrial suburb................................................................................ .
Apr., 1918:1-25
Practice regarding the payment of punitive overtime rates........ ............................... Mar., 1920: 109-17
Sanitary aspects of company housing........................ ...................................................Jan., 1919: 289-99
War housing in Great Britain........... ............................................... *............................Dec., 1917: 220-9
Mail-order houses. Saskatchewan. Minimum wage........................................................
Dec., 1919: 266
Maine:
Department of Labor and Industry. Biennial report, 1915,1916...........................Sept., 1917: 117-19
(See also specific subjects.)
Maintenance-of-way. (See Railroads.)
Malay seamen. Wages on British ships, 1919............................................. ................. Oct., 1919: 141-2,145
Manganese poisoning. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Bureau of Labor. Report. 1918.................................................................................. . Sept., 1919: 257-8
Fair wage board. Schedule of hourly wage rates, 1917-18........................................... Noy., 1917:107-8
Minimum wage commission. Award in food industries..............................................Oct., 1918:189-91
Workmen's compensation board. Reports, 1917-1919................................................. Jan., 1919: 281-2:
Aug., 1919: 223; June, 1920: 182-3
(See also specific subjects.)
Manly, B . M. Profits and cost ofliving............. ................................................................... July, 1920: 91
Mann. Kristine. Conserving the health of women in industry............................................. June, 1918:169
Manufacturers, National Association. (See National Association of Manufacturers.)
Manufacturing statistics. (See Employment statistics; Specific industries and subjects.)
Maps:
.
-Employment agencies. United Kingdom....................... ............................................... Aug., 1919:143
----- United S ta tes............................................ ..................................... Aug., 1919:142: M ar.,1920: 129
Marketing plans........................................ ........................................................Aug., 1920: 11-12,17-18,20
Workmen’s compensation laws........................... ....................................N qv., 1918: 244; Jan., 1920: 232
(See also Charts.)
Marble cutters. (See Granite and stone trades.)
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. Wages award............................... ...................................... . Feb., 1919: 150
Marine contracting. (See Construction: Marine contracting.)
Marineengineers. (See Seamen.)
Marine!insurance:
Great Britain. Schedule o f ........................................................................................... June, 1918: 67-9
United States. Insurance by Federal Government for property losses, 1914-1916....... Aug;, 1917: 92
Marine occupations. (See Seamen.)
Marine Workers* Affiliation of the Port of New York. Organization, etc.......................A u g.,1918: 58-62;
Sept., 1918: 2
Marital condition. (See Classificat*----- ' ----- ’ -------x
Maritime service. (See Seamen.)
Markets and marketing:
Canada. Agricultural cooperative enterprises.............................................................Aug., 1919: 127-30
----- Distribution of products— .................. .......................... ....................................Sept., 1919:113-18
France. Municipal and cooperative markets....... ... Apr., 1917: 530-2; Nov., 1918:127; Apr., 1919: 84
New York (State). Waste in food distribution......... ...................................................Sept., 1917:95-8
South Carolina. Activities of bureau of marketing................................................ .
Jan., 1917: 58-63
United States. Cold storage holdings of butter and cheese. (Carr.)......................... Jan., 1920: 100-14
------Conditions of trade in food products................ .................................................... Aug., 1917: 56-9
------ Establishment and operation of municipal markets............................................... July, 1917:131-5
----- Plan for cooperation between former and consumer. (MacKaye.)...................... Aug., 1920: 1-21
(See also Food control.)
Married women employed. (See Maternity; Woman labor.)
Marsh, A . R . Workmen’s compensation payments to enemy aliens................................ Feb., 1918:180-1
Marsh, E . P . Wage adjustments in California oil Adds........... . .......................................... Oct., 1820: 9-23
Martin, E . Poisoning from dinitrophenol...........................................................................Sept., 1918: 242-3
Maryland:
Bureau of Statistics and Information. Report, 1915.................................................... Aug., 1916:38-43
Industrial Accident Commission. Reports 1914-15,1918-19........................................Apr., 1916: 57-60;
Sept., 1917:119-13; Mar., 1918:182-4; Jan., 1920: 248-9; May, 1920:166-7
(See also specific subjects.)
Masons. (See Building trades.)
Mass feeding. (See Communal kitchens; Lunchrooms.)
Massachusetts:
Bureau of Statistics. Laborinjunctions, 1916............. ................... ...................... . June, 1917:911-12
------Labor organizations, 1915............................................... ........................................... July, 1917:162-3
------Report on employment.............................. ................. ................................ .........May, 1918: 215-17
------Reportrelative to aged and dependentpersons...................................................... Mar., 1917:430-3
------Report on public employment offices, 1917-1918.......................July, 1918:143-4; June, 1919:132
Commission onhealthinsurance, organization, personnel,and activities....................... Dec., 1917:206
Commission on the necessaries oflife. Report,1920...................................................... Aug.. 1920:66-9
Commission on pensions. Report.1914............... ....................................................... June, 1916:113-17
Commission on socialinsurance. Report, 1917................................. July, 1916:133; Mar., 1917:426-30
Commissions on cost oHiving. Report, February, 1917............................................. June, 1917:969-60
Commissionersforpromotionofuniformityof legislationin the United States. Report,
1917................................................................. 1 . . . .................................................. June, 1918:219-21
Committee on workmen’s compensation insurance rates and accident prevention.
Reports........... .................................................................................. Jan.,1916:45-8: Apr., 1917:541-3
Department of Labor and Industries. Bulletin of currentactivities. Scope..........Nov., 1920:218-19
----- Conserving children in theindustries of Massachusetts............. - .......................... D ec.,1920:127-8
— Industrialreview inaugurated, March, 1920...........................................................Sept.,1920:202-3
----- Minimum wage orders, women’s clothing and paper box workers.........................July, 1920:134-5
----- Organisation, including creative act............. .................
Nov., 1919:339-40; M ar.,1920:209-13




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER. 1920.

97

Massachusetts—Concluded.
Page.
Department of Labor and Industries. Production in certain factories............... - ....... Sept., 1920:126-7
Homestead Commission. Report............................................................................................ Jan., 1917:122-7
------Committee on housing. Report.......................................................................................May, 1918:274=6
Industrial Accident Board. Reports 1916-14,1917-18...................................................... Mar., 1916: 40-52;
Mar., 1917: 412-17; Apr., 1918: 289-91; Mar., 1919: 223-5; July, 1920: 165-6
------Reports of cases under the workmen's compensation act, 1913-1915........................... Feo., 1916:63-7;
Nov., 1916: 80
------Division for training and instruction of industrially disabled. Organization......... Oct., 1918: 219
Insurance department. Report, 1917....................................................................................... Jan., 1919: 280
------Experience under workmen's compensation act, 1912 to 1914.....................................Sept., 1915: 37-44
Minimum Wage Commission. Act placing office under Department of Labor and
Industries................................................................................
Mar., 1920: 136-7
------Activities of wage boards........................................................................June, 1916: 57-8; Sept., 1916: 66
------Orders.................................................................................................... 1915—Nov. 42-4; 1918—Sept. 201-2;
Oct. 182-4;. 1919—Feb. 194^5; Apr. 186-7; Sept. 243-51; 1920—May 110; July 134-5
------Reports, 1915-1918...................................................................................................................June, 1916:57-8;
May, 1917: 667-9; Oct., 1918: 186-9; June, 1919: 205-7
------Wages of women employed as cleaners.............................................Sept., 1918: 202; Oct., 1918:196-9
------Wages of women in brush industry................................................................................... Dec., 1915: 33-6
------Wages of women in candy factories....................................................................................May, 1919: 201-4
------Wages of women in canning and preserving establishments.......................................Sept., 1919: 250-1
------Wages of women in clothing industry................................................... Sept., 1916: 66- Sept., 1918: 201
------Wages of women in hosiery and knit-goods factories.....................................................June, 1916: 59-62
------Wages of women in men's clothing and raincoat factories......................................... May, 1917:670-3
------Wages of women in millinery.........................................................Sept., 1918: 201-2; Nov., 1919: 202-4
------Wages of women in paper-box factories..........................................................................June, 1916: 59-62
------Wages of women in retail stores...................... Nov., 1915: 42-3; Mar., 1916: 18-21; Feb., 1917: 251-8
State Board of Conciliation and Arbitration. Report, 1915................. .......................... Sept., 1916: 38-40
State Board of Education. Report relative to training for injured persons............... June, 1917:848-51
State Board of Labor and Industries. Report, 1916......................................................... Dec., 1917: 202-4
------Report relative to conditions in hotels and restaurants..............................................June, 1917:905-7
Teachers' retirement board. Report, 1916............................................................................July 1917:152-4
(S e e a lso sp ecific subjects.)

Massachusetts General Hospital:
Cases of lead poisoning diagnosed in industrial clinic....................................................... Dec., 1917:189-93
Occupational diseases and industrial clinic in. (Edsall and Wright.)........................ Dec., 1917:169-93
Match industry:
Agreement to prohibit use of poisonous phosphorus, various countries, 1906............. Nov., 1918: 56,57;
Apr., 1919: 6,9; Jan., 1920: 22; Feb., 1920: 32
Japan. Child labor....................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 200
Maternity:
Employment of women before and after childbirth. International Labor Conference,
1919.......................................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 2,16-17; Feb., 1920: 21-3
France. Measures of protection for working women..........................................................July, 1917:39-41
------ Regulations for munition workers, July 1,1917..................................................... .......Jan., 1918: 69-70
Germany. Effects of employment......... ................................................................................. Nov., 1920:175
Great Britain. Child mortality and industrial employment of married women........... June, 1917: 989
------Effects of employment on maternity. Women's industrial council, London. . . Nov., 1918:193-7
------ Maternity and child welfare actt 1918, referred to............................................................ Dec., 1918: 59
------ Mortality in connection with childbearing. (Local government board.)...............Jan., 1917:75-84
------ Restriction of factory act re employment......................................................................... Dec., 1919: 296
Massachusetts. Recommendation oflegislation establishing a maternity board.......... Mar., 1917:427
Mexico. Provisions of law.......................................................................................................... Sept.. 1918: 277
United States. Maternal mortality—a field of conservation........................................... June, 1917: 985-7
Washington (State). Recommendation of War Emergency Conference re employ­
ment of women........................................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 178
(S e e a lso Child welfare; Day nurseries; Maternity insurance.)
Maternity benefit. (S e e Maternity insurance.)
Maternity insurance:
Extent of......................................................................................................................................... Mar., 1919: 274
International Congress of Working Women, 1919. Discussion and resolution............ Dec., 1919: 282-3
International Labor Conference, 1919. Draft convention........................Jan., 1920: 2,17; Feb., 1920: 22
Maternity benefit systems in certain foreign countries. (Harris.)................................. Feb., 1920:226-8
Public protection of maternity. (Lathrop.)........................................................................ May, 1917:747-8
Austria. Provisions for........................................................................................................ Sept., 1917:139,144
Germany. Allowances during war......................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 202-6
------Regulation of September 26,1919..................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 232-4
Great Britain. Benefits under health insurance system..................................................... Jan., 1920: 48-9
------ Proposed scheme for national endowment of motherhood.......................................... Jan., 1919: 282-5
------ Provisions of act of 1920.........................................................................................................
Sept., 1920: 4
Switzerland. Cost, 1917............................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 199
(S e e a lso Mothers' pensions.)
Maximum prices. (S e e Food control; Fuel control.)
Maxwell, W . F . American Association of Public Employment Offices. Resumti of
meeting................. •...........................................................................................................................Dec., 1919: 277-9
Maylander, A .:
Collective agreements and wage awards in Germany..................... Oct., 1919: 153-60; Oct., 1920: 135-45
Compulsory old-age and invalidity insurance law of Italy.............................................. Dec., 1919: 349-58
Cost of living and wages in Germany................................................................................... Apr., 1918:152-62
European trade-union statistics.............................................................................................. June, 1920: 194-8
Food situation in Austria during the summer of 1918.......................................................Dec., 1918: 168-96
Food situation in Germany...................................................................... May, 1918: 45-53; Nov., 1918: 5-28
German workers' councils, their organizations and functions........................................ Sept., 1919:125-33
Housing shortage and housing measures in European countries................................... Aug., 1920: 158-67
Labor disturbances in the Italian iron and steel industry............................................. Dec., 1920: 197-206
Road to the 8-hour day..............................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 41-65
Socialization measures in Germany and Austria............................................................... Nov., 1919: 71-85
Standard rates of pay of officers and crews of Italian merchant marine........................Jan., 1920: 158-73




98

M O N THLY LABOR REVIEW,

Maylander, A .—Concluded.
Page.
Strikes of Italian Government employees............................................................................May, 1920: 204-15
Unemployment and unemployment relief in Germany, 1919.........................................Sept., 1919: 167-75
Wages in Germany during the war....................................................................................... July, 1920: 116-28
Woman labor in Germany during the war......................................................................... Nov., 1920: 162-76
Mayor’ s committee on unemployment, New York City. (S e e New York City: Mayor’s
committee on unemployment.)
Meat prices:
During war and readjustment period..................................................................................... July, 1919: 66-71
Important beef products compared with live cattle prices, Chicago............................ Sept., 1919: 99-107
Wholesale and retail prices ofbeef, 1919. District or Columbia....................................... Oct., 1919: 79-82
(S e e a lso Retail prices, food; Wholesale prices, food.)
Meat packing. (S e e Slaughtering and meat packing.)
Mechanical Engineers, American Society of. (S e e American Society of Mechanical
Engineers.)
Mechanical trades. (S e e Machinery and machine shops.)
Mediation. ( S e e Conciliation and arbitration. United States: Board of Mediation and
Conciliation; United States: President’s Mediation Commission.)
Medical aid. (S e e Child welfare; Medical and hospital service; Physical examination of
employees: Welfare work.)
Medical and hospital service:
Addresses, reports, etc. Advantages of mutual benefit associations to industrial
medicine. (Lemon.)..............................................................................................................Nov., 1919: 264-5
------ Health insurance in relation to the public dispensary. (Rubinow.).....................Apr., 1917: 511-12
------ How can medical service be improved? ( Geier.)...................................................... Nov., 1919: 323-6
------------- (Thompson.).................................................................................................................Dec., 1919: 340-4
------Ideals in the organization of an industrial medical service. (Hayhurst.)................ Oct., 1920: 184
------Industrial health medical service for Great Britain urged......................................... Feb., 1919: 234-7
------ Industrial medicine—its present and future. (Mock.)........................................... Sept., 1919: 287-91
------ Medical administration of health insurance. (Hutchinson.)..................................June, 1919: 285-92
------Medical and surgical service for employees in industrial establishments.
(Selby.)....................................................................................................................................Aug., 1919: 218-20
------ Medical, hospital, and surgical treatment for employees...........................................Sept., 1917: 59-67
------Medical organization under health insurance, 1916. (Lambert.)................................ May, 1917: 748
------ Occupational diseases in hospitals. (Edsall.)............................................................. Dec., 1917: 169-85
------Plan for group industrial surgical hospital. (Carr.).................................................. ' Aug., 1920: 182-3
------Relation of hospital to industrial hygiene. (Wright.).................................................. Mar., 1917: 447
------Relation of public health service to problems of industrial hygiene. (Kerr.). . . Mar., 1917: 448-9
Clinics. Advantages of clinics in general hospitals. (Edsall.)........................................ Jan., 1920: 224-5
------Massachusetts General Hospital. (Edsall.)......................... ......................................Dec., 1917: 169-93
— Occupational disease clinic of New York City health department.......................... Nov., 1915: 7-19
------Out-patient clinics. Resolution of New York Academy of Medicine.....................May, 1918: 251-2
------ Workmen’ s organizations’ aid.........................................................................................Jan., 1917:107-11
Conferences. Industrial physicians, 1916 to 1919............................................................ Feb., 1917: 267-72;
Nov., 1917: 179-82; Mar., 1919: 249-50; Aug., 1919: 216-18
------Membership and organization of conference board of physicians in industrial prac­
tice.................................................................................................................................................
Dec., 1915: 43
Costs. Various industries, 1916. (Alexander.).................................................................. July, 1919: 227-8
Dental work. ( S e e Medical and Jiospital service: Clinics.)
First aid. Necessity of, stressed by speakers at congress of National Safety Council. Nov., 1918: 198-204
------Instructions to miners, compiled by United States Bureau of Mines...................... Jan., 1917: 106-7
------ Motor vehicles plant in Middle W est.................................................................................
Oct., 1918: 15
s----- Munitions. Great Britain. Recommendations of Health of Munition Workers
Committee.................................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918: 48
------ Public employees. United States. Various facilities described.............................Aug., 1918: 221-3
------Shipbuilding. United States....................... Mar., 1918: 73; May, 1918: 133,138,139; Dec., 1918: 202
Industrial clinics. (S e e Medical and hospital service: Clinics.)
Labor camps. Ohio. Provisions outlined in official report, 1917___ .*......................... Apr., 1918: 281-2
Jan., 1918: 73
Legislative provisions. France. Recommendation of Ministry of Munitions...............
------Great Britain. Provision of act of 1920............................................................................ Sept., 1920: 2-3
------------- Recommendation of Health of Munition Workers Committee............................ Sept., 1918: 48
------------- Recommendation of joint health commission of pottery and printing coun­
cils---------------------------- ............................................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 241-2
------New York. Powers of industrial commission to require medical supervision of
dangerous trades......................................................................... ............................................... Jan., 1919: 244
------Ohio. Recommendations of health insurance commission re hospital legislation Mar., 1919: 270-1
------Pennsylvania. Report of health insurance commission............................................ July, 1919: 223-4
------Switzerland. Statistics of funds and persons insured................................................Apr., 1920: 198-9
Physician. Choice of. Discussed at I. A . I. A . B . C. convention....................................Nov., 1918: 205
------Physicians’ compensation under social insurance........................................................ Apr., 1917: 573-4
------Qualifications ofindustrial physicians......................................... Feb., 1920: 201-2; Sept., 1920: 145-6
------ Relation of physicians to health insurance laws and their remuneration under
such laws................................................................................................................................. Apr., 1917: 510-11
------ Scope of duties of the industrial surgeon. (Mock.)...................................................Mar., 1917: 439-41
Public employees, United States. Recommendation of District Council .of Defense... Aug., 1918: 231
------ Recommendation of Reclassification Commission..........................................................
July*1920: 19
------ Various departmental facilities described. (Norton.)........................................Aug., 1918: 218,221-3
Special plants. Company hospital at Tyrone, N . Mex., described.................................. Sept., 1918: 283
------El Boleo Mining Co., Mexico............................................................................................... Oct., 1918: 121
------ Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light Co. Experience ‘of chief surgeon.............Mar., 1917: 445-6
------Motor vehicle plant in Middle W est..................................................................................
Oct., 1918: 15
------Norton Co. and the Norton Grinding Co., Worcester, Mass. Experience.
(Clark.)...................................................................................................................................... Mar.. 1917: 442-5
------United States Steel Corporation, Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn...................................
Apr., 1918: 7
------ Various industries. Medical, hospital, and surgical treatment for employees.
(Whitney.).............................................................................................................................. Sept., 1917: 59-67
Medical research committee. Great Britain. (S e e Great Britain: National Health Insur­
ance Joint Committee. Medical research committee.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920,

99

Page.
Medical Society of the State of New York. Attitude toward compulsory health insurance. Jan., 1920: 255-8
Medical supervision. (S e e Medical and hospital service; Physical examination of em­
ployees.)
Medicine, American Academy of. (S e e American Academy of Medicine.)
Medicine, industrial. (S e e Hygiene; Medical and hospital service; Physical examination
of employees.)
Meeker R f:
Analysis of some effects of increased cost of living on family budgets.............................. July, 1920: 1-10
Conference on social insurance, 1916.......................................................................................... Jan., 1917: 1-5
Cost of industrial accidents........................................................................................................ Apr., 1920: 1-13
Cost ofliving in relation to health............................................................................................. Feb., 1919: 218
Employees’ representation in management of industry...................................................... Feb., 1920: 1-14
Improbability of decrease in prices and cost of living.......................................................... Feb., 1920: 95-7
Industrial hazards.........................................................................................................................Sept., 1919: 1-8
Lacks in workmen’ s compensation.......................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 1-11
Letter to President Wilson re appointment of a textile and clothing administrator.. May, 1920: 39-41
Minimum requirements in compensation legislation....................................................... Nov., 1919: 280-93
Possibility of compiling a cost-of-living index......................................................................... Mar., 1919: 1-9
Prevention of accidents by the statistical method................................................................. Mar., 1920: 1-3
Relation of cost ofliving to the public health......................................................................... Jan., 1919:1-10
Social insurance.............................................................................................................................. Feb., 1919: 218
W hatis the American standard of living................................................................................July, 1919: 1-13
__ igs, Grace L. Infant welfare work in war time..................................................................... Oct., 1917: 160-1
“ Mein ktinftiger Beruf” series of pamphlets on vocational guidance....................................Jan., 1917: 69-70
Men’s clothing industries. (S e e Clothing industries, men’s.)
Mental diseases. (See Diseases.)
Mercantile industry. (S e e Stores.)
Merchant marine. (S e e Seamen.)
Merchant sea service. (S e e Seamen.)
Merchants’ and Manufacturers’ Association of the District of Columbia. Attitude toward
minimum-wage law.......................................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 112
Merchants’ Association of New York City:
Inquiry into efficiency of labor.................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 119
Labor mobility in factories...................................................................................................... Nov., 1920: 158-9
Mercurial poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: Mercury.)
Mercury poisoning. ( S ee Poisons and poisoning.)
Merit rating. (S e e Workmen’s compensation and insurance.)
Merritt, W . G. Opinion on employees representation................................................................ Sept., 1920: 23
Metal mining. (S e e Mines and mining, metal.)
Metal trades:
Training of women for war work, a bibliography. (Turner.)....................................... Aug., 1918: 164-71
Calgary, Alberta, trade agreement........................................................................................ Aug., 1919:190-1
Denmark. Wages, various occupations, 1914 and 1920........................................................ Dec., 1920: 88
Finland. Agreement re hours, overtime rates, etc......................................................... Jan., 1918:109,110
France. Eight-hour day by agreement, 1919......................................................................... July, 1919:164
------Wages in military establishments, March, 1919............................................................... Mar., 1920: 121
------Wages, Rhone region............................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 133
Germany. Effect of wage increases on economic condition of workers....................... Jan., 1920: 178-9;
Mar., 1920: 207-8
------Employment statistics...................................................................................................... Feb., 1919:139-40
------Labor organizations, 1917....................................................................................................... Apr., 1918:160
------Metal workers’ federation, manifesto, resolution, etc........................ Mar., 1920: 207; Oct., 1920: 135
------Movement for standardization............................................................................................. May, 1918: 73
------Strikei nsurance association, Berlin.................................................................................... Oct., 1915: 84
------Strike of 1919........................................................................................................................ Jan., 1920: 279-81
------Wage rates, 1914-1918............................................................................. Oct., 1918:174; July, 1920: 124-8
------Wages and cost ofliving, Leipzig...................................................................................... Apr., 1918:157-9
------Woman labor..................................................................................... Sept.,1917:134-5; Jan.,1918: 57,59
Great Britain. Board of trade committee. Recommendations on engineering trades. Aug., 1918: 90-3
------Comparative wages of men and women.......................................................................... Mar.,
1917: 342-3
------ Employment statistics, May, 1915....................................................... July, 1915: 70-1; June, 1916:100
------ Protective clothing for women.............................................................................................. Apr., 1918:219
------ Wageincreases................................................. July, 1919:155-6; Feb., 1920: 128-30; June, 1920: 108-9
------ Woman labor......................... Oct., 1917: 39-42; Jan., 1918: 65-7; May, 1918: 152; June, 1918:156-60
------Womanlabor, physical fitness. (Adamson.)................................................................ May,
1919: 237-9
------Women’s capacity for engineering work............................................................................. Dec., 1918:314
Hungary. Increased membership in unions during war..................................................... Aug.,1918: 214
Italy. Forty-eight hour week by agreement.......................................................................... June, 1919: 183
------Training school for female metal turners........................................................................ Sept.,
1918: 232-3
— - Wage rates, 1914,1919, and 1920................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 146,150
Japan. Wages, Yokohama, 1914to 1918, onefactory........................................................ Oct., 1919: 152-3
Switzerland. Wages and hours, 1914 and 1918...................................................................... June, 1919: 185
United. States. Agreement bet ween metal-trades department of American Federation
of Labor and Betiilehem Shipbuilding Corporation (L td .)........................................... Feb., 1919: 143-4
------ Overtime................................................................................................................................ Nov., 1918:154r-66
------ Saturday half holiday........................................................................................................ Nov., 1918:154-66
------ Training of women—Bibliography.................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 170-1
------Union scale of wages and hours................ Sept.,1918:150-8; Oct., 1318:155-71; N ov., 1918:154-66
------ Wages and hours, 1914 to 1919..........................................................................................Jan., 1920: 142,143
------Womanlabor..........................................................................................Sept., 1918: 212; Oct., 1918: 192-6
------WOman labor in the mechanical trades. ( Turner.)................................................... Sept., 1918: 206-15
------Womanlabor, Cleveland, Ohio............................................................................................Jan., 1919: 221-3
------New York State. Average earnings.................................................................................June, 1918: 124;
July, 1919: 147; Sept.. 1919: 223; Apr., 1920: 110
(S e e also Foundries; Iron and steel; Machinery and machine shops; Munitions; Sheet
metalworkers; Shipbuilding.)
Metal Trades Council, Canada. Demands re shipbuilding industry................................Aug., 1918: 156,157




100

M ONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Metal Workers' Federation, Germany:
Page.
Aims, benefits, etc...................................................................................................................... Mar., 1920: 207-8
Attitude toward collective bargaining...................................................................................... Oct., 1920: 135
Effect of wage increases on workers........................................................................................... Jan., 1920: 178
Metallic poisons. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Metallurgy:
California. Labor turnover, wages, hours, copper smelting............................................. May, 1919: 63-84
France. Wages, various occupations, 1920.............................................................................. Oct., 1920: 134
United States. Accidents in ore dressing and smelting plants, 1915-1917...................Mar., 1917: 433-4;
May, 1918: 260-2; May, 1919: 244-5
------Hours in smelting and refining............................................................................................ Oct., 1918: 241
------ International union of mine, mill, and smelter workers................................................ Dec., 1920: 180
------ Zinc smelting. Award in Fort Smith (Ark.) Spelter Co. case.................................Dec., 1920: 180-4
------------- Cadmium'poisoning.................................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 148-9
Utah. Workmen's compensation. Schedule of insurance rates..................................Mar., 1918: 186-91
( S e e also Mines and mining; Oil industry.)
Metanitranilin poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Methodist Episcopal Church. Attitude towards labor.............................................................. Aug., 1916: 1-3
Methyl alcohol poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: Alcohol, wood.)
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.:
Causes of death, by occupation..............................................................................................June, 1917: 989-91
Experience in industrial insurance accident mortality.......................................................July, 1917: 125-6
Hiring and firing...................... ................................................................ ................................Nov., 1918: 284-6
Influenza-pneumonia among industrial policy holders....................................................... Jan.. 1920: 223-4
Sickness rate. Referred to.......................................................................................................... Feb., 1919: 225
Unemployment in Philadelphia, 1915.......................................... ...........................................Mar., 1916: 27-9
Mexican Federation of Labor. Participation in Pan American Conference, 1918............Nov., 1918: 258-9;
Jan., 1919: 302-4
Mexican labor:
Grievances laid before Pan American Conference.................................................................. Jan., 1919: 303
Labor organization..................................................................................................................... Nov., 1918: 258-9
Regulations by United States Department of Labor for temporary admission___ Nov., 1918: 266-271;
Feb., 1919:125-7
Results of admission to United States for employment in agriculture.......................... Nov., 1920: 221-3
Mexico. Labor provisions of new constitution......................................................................... Oct., 1917: 167-71
— — (Coahuila). Bureau of labor created September 28,1916.................................................. Oct., 1917: 171-2
Michaels, Stern & Co., Rochester, N . Y . Decision of New York Supreme Court on injunc­
tion against strike to secure unionization............................................................................... Sept., 1920: 170-3
Michigan:
Industrial Accident Board. Reports. 1915,1916..................................... Apr., 1916: 69-2; Nov., 1918: 254
------Workmen's compensation cases to July, 1916.................................................................. Oct., 1916: 41-2
Reconstruction committee. Report.......................................................................................May, 1919: 102-4
State commission of inquiry into conditions of labor for women. Report, 1915........ Sept., 1915: 16-22
( S e e a lso sp e c ific su b jects.)

Middle classes:
Belgium. Middle classes' committee for the protection of civic rights............................ Aug., 1920: 183
Great Britain. Middle classes union.....................................................................................June, 1920: 221-3
New York. Public imion (Inc.). Incorporation articles approved by supreme
court........................................................................................................................................... June, 1920: 222-3
Midvale Steel and Ordnance Co. Collective bargaining........................................................... Mar., 1919: 154-7
Migratory and floating labor:
United States. Commission on Industrial Relations. Recommendations for improv­
ing conditions............................................................................................................................... Nov., 1915: 60
------ Negroes.......................................................................Jan., 1918: 45-3; Feb., 1918: 155-7; Sept., 1918: 37
------ President's Mediation Commission. Recommendations.......................................... Mar., 1918: 53,57
( S e e a lso Labor camps; Mobility of labor; Seasonal employment; Unskilled labor;
S p e c ific i n d u s trie s . )
Militarism. Reconstruction program of American Federation of Labor re.......................... Mar., 1919: 70-1
Military hospitals. (See Hospitals.)
Military service:
Convention between Great Britain and United States.........................................................
Oct., 1918: 44
Great Britain. Release of men for coal mines........................................................................Nov., 1918: 297
—— Status of civil service employees under military service acts................................... Sept., 1918: 66-7
------ Strikers in munition plants and military service acts................................................ Nov., 1918: 291-2
United States. Industrial and agricultural labor in army draft..................................... Apr., 1918: 105-7
( S e e also Army; Navy.)
Milk regulations. (S e e Food control.)
Millinery:
Germany, Berlin. Wages and hours........................................................................................ Oct., 1920: 137
Massachusetts. Minimum wage orders.............................................. Sept., 1918: 201-2; Feb., 1919: 194-5
------Wages.................................................................................................Oct., 1918:187,188; N ov., 1919: 202-4
New York City. Poisonous materials used in dyeing, cleaning, etc..............................Aug., 1920:107-9
New York State. Earnings, 1914and 1916 to 1919.. Tune, 1918:124-5; July, 1919:148; Apr., 1920:110
Ontario. Wages............................................................................................................................. Dec., 1920: 93
Saskatchewan. Minimum-wage order......................................................................................Nov., 1920:115
United States. Survey covering 86,000 women.................................................................... Nov., 1916: 32-8
Milling. ( S e e Flour and grist mills.)
Millwork:
United States. Union scale of wages and hours, 1917 and 1918... Dec., 1918: 227-0; Jan., 1919: 178-80
------Wages and hours.................................................................................Oct., 1917:66-79; Jan., 1920: 118-41
( S e e a lso Carpenters; Woodworking industries.)
Milwaukee. Housing Commission. Report....................................... ..................................... Sept., 1919: 352-3
Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light Co. Medical supervision and its results............ Mar., 1917: 445-6
Mine accidents. ( S e e Mines and mining.)
Mine workersof America. ( S e e United Mine Workers of America.)
Mineralindustries. ( S e e Metallurgy; Mines and mining.)
Mineralpoisoning. (See Poisons and poisoning.)
Miners. International Association of. (See International Association of Miners.)
Miners' Congress, International. (See International Association of Miners.)
Miners' consumption. (See Mines and mining, general: Diseases.)




SUBJECT INDEX, JU L Y , 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

10 1

Miners’ Federation of Great Britain. Demands; Proposed strike; Acceptance of GovernPage.
merit's terms............................................................................... *....................May, 1919: 109-14; June, 1919:172
Miners' itch. ( S ee Mines and mining, general: Diseases.)
Miners' nystagmus. (S e e Mines and mining, general: Diseases.)
Miners' phthisis. (S e e Mines and mining, general: Diseases.)
Mines and mining, general:
Accident prevention. Addresses, National Safety Congress, referred to......................... Oct., 1916: 54-5
------ Dust respirators and other masks designed by Bureau of Mines................................. June, 1919: 241
------ Federal Bureau of Mines Experiment Station, Pittsburgh....................................... Nov., 1919: 260-1
------ First-aidinstructions................................................................................ : ..........................Jan., 1917:106-7
------ Geophone for mine rescue work........................................................................................Apr., 1920: 183-4
------ Organizing and conducting safety work......................................................................... Aug., 1917: 88-90
- Standardization of statistics............................................................................................... Apr., 1916: 76-8
eases. Black damp................................................................................................................Nov., 1916: 91-4
------ Consumption.............................................................................................Aug., 1917: 74-6; July, 1919: 177
------ Hookworm..................................................................................................... .......................July, 1918:190-2
------ Itch............................................................................................................................................. May, 1919: 280
------ Nystagmus...........................................................................................Aug., 1916: 43-50; Mar., 1918:193-4
------ Phthisis...................................................................................................................................Jan.. 1917:102-5
------Respiratory diseases other than tuberculosis.................................................................... July, 1919:177
Mines and mining, coal:
Alsace-Lorraine. Wages, 1913 to 1918....................................................................................June, 1919:181-2
Australia (New South Wales). Output per man....................................................... Sept., 1920: 120,125-6
------ Strike. Broken Hill, 1919................ .....................................................................................July, 1920: 64-5
Austria. Output per man............................................................................................... Sept.. 1920: 123,125-6
------ Socialization of mines............................................................................................................Nov., 1919: 83-5
Belgium. Labor conditions................................................................. Oct., 1919: 35-7,43; Apr., 1920: 228-9
------ Output per man........................................................................................................Sept., 1920:123-4,125-6
Canada. Strikes, 1917................................................................................................................... June, 1918:228
------ Trade agreement, July, 1920..............................................................................................Nov., 1920: 147-54
------ (British Columbia.)Accidents, 1917................................................................................. Oct., 1918: 231-2
------------- Output per m an..................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 121,125-6
------ (Nova Scotia.) Production.............................................................................. Sept., 1920:120,125-6,127
France. Cost oiliving, measures to combat....................................................................... Jan., 1919:109-12
------ Employment statistics............................................................................ July, 1916: 92-3; Jan., 1917:138
------ Nationalization of mines. Law of 1919........................................................................... Dec., 1919:129-32
------ Output per man........................................................................................................ Sept. 1920: 122-3,125-6
------ Production, 1914 to 1919.....................................................................................................Sept., 1920:113-17
------ Wages, 1914to 1919...........................................................................Jan., 1918: 104-5; Sept., 1920:113-17
Germany. Accident insurance and accident statistics...................................................... May, 1916: 79-82
------ Employment statistics, 1913................................................................................................. Feb., 1919:138
— Government supervision of selling organizations......................................................... Nov., 1915: 83-5
------ Hours........................................................................Jan., 1920: 173-7; Mar., 1920: 130-1; Oct., 1920: 140
— — Labor boards (Arbeitskammem) by decree............................................................... June, 1919:139-44
------ Nystagmus............................................................................................ Aug., 1916: 47-8; Mar., 1918: 193-4
------ Output.......................................................................................... Oct., 1919:161-2; Sept., 1920: 122,125-6
------Socialization of mines.........................................................................Nov., 1919: 73-5; Sept., 1920: 205-6
------Wages, 1914 to 1920........................................................ 1918-Apr. 80-1; May 79-82; 1917—Sept. 121-3;
Dec. 47-8; 1918-Sept. 197-8; 1919— Oct. 161-2; 1920—Oct. 140; Nov. 100-1
------Wages of women and young persons..................................................................................
Oct., 1917: 85
Great Britain. Accident statistics, 1919................................................................................... Dec., 1920: 133
------ Coal Industry Commission (Sankey). Creative act, 1919.............................................. Mar., 1920: 201
------------- Reports...................................................... May, 1919: 109-14; Aug., 1919: 78-86; Oct., 1919: 23-30
------ Employment statistics, May, 1915....................................................................................... July, 1915: 70-1
------ Government control of coal mines during war period................................................. Apr., 1917: 533-4
------ Labor organizations. Statistics of membership............................................................... June, 1919: 304
------ Laws........................................................................Feb., 1920: 238-9; Mar., 1920: 201; Nov., 1920: 201-2
------ Nationalization of mines...................................Aug., 1919: 78-86; Oct., 1919: 23-30; Nov., 1919: 63-6
------ Nystagmus..............................................................................................................................Aug., 1916: 43-7
------ Output per man...........................................................................................................Sept., 1920:121,125-6
------ Reports of committee appointed to inquire into conditions in coal-mining industry
due to war................................................................. July, 1915: 56-8; July, 1916: 151-3; Apr., 1917: 534-5
------ Situation, 1919........................................................................................................................ Oct., 1919: 23-30
------ Strike of Yorkshire miners................................................................. Nov., 1918: 297-8; Oct., 1919: 26-8
------ Strike settlement, November, 1920....................................................................................Dec., 1920: 175-8
------ Threatened strike of Triple Alliance, 1919....................................................................June, 1919:169-77
------ Wage increases, various dates................................ July, 1915: 59; July, 1919: 155; June, 1920: 109-11
------ (South Wales). Number of persons employed and output, 1918 to 1920...................Nov., 1920: 120
------(Wales). Wage increases during war........................................................................... Dec., 1919: 248-51
India. Output per man...........................................................................................................Sept., 1920: 125-6
International Association of Miners, Meeting, 1920......................................................... Oct., 1920: 212-14
Japan. Output per man...............................................................................................Sept., 1920: 124-5,125-6
Mexico. Mining code..................................................................................................................Apr., 1919: 235-6
Netherlands. Average earnings per shift, various occupations.......................................... June, 1919:182
New Zealand. Nationalization of mines............................................................................... Dec., 1919:135-7
Spain. Development, 1907 to 1916............................................................................................. Mar., 1919: 59
United States. Accident statistics....................................................................................... Aug., 1916:61-72;
Nov., 1917: 172-3; June, 1919: 235-6; June, 1920: 163-4
------Agreement between Fuel Administration and United Mine Workers...................Sept., 1918:186-8
------Anthracite Coal Commission. Appointment, personnel, and report........................ July, 1920: 53;
Oct., 1920: 92-109
------Bituminous Coal Commission. Report......................................................................... Apr., 1920: 40450
------Collective bargaining, historical resume. (Anthracite.)............................................. Apr., 1916: 40-7
------ Diseases. Black damp........................................................................................................ Nov., 1916: 91-4
------------- Nystagmus..................................................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 48-9
------------- Prevention, Ohio and Illinois...................................................................................Sept., 1919: 291-4
------ Employment statistics, 1919 and 1920. (Bituminous.)............................................June, 1920: 149-50
------Employment statistics, fatality rate, hours, strikes, etc. (Bituminous.)............ Apr., 1917: 589-60
------ Hours, 1919.................. .................................................................................................. Dec., 1919: 207-29




10 2

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Mines and mining, coal—Concluded.
United States. Housing and living conditions.............................. Jan., 1919: 289-99; Apr., 1920: 215-22
------Mexican labor admitted, text of order......................................................................... Nov., 1918: 266-71
------Mineral-land development for employment of returned soldiers; legislative pro­
grams............................................................................................................................... Apr., 1919:126-7,131-6
------ Nationalization of mines, trade-union attitude toward..............................................Nov., 1919: 66-70
------ Output......................................................................................... Aug., 1917:37-43; Sept., 1920:119,125-6
------ President's proclamation to miners......................................................................................N ov., 1918: 38
------ Production committees, bituminous coal mines............................................................ N ov., 1918:36-8
— — Standardization of statistics and mininglaws and regulations..................................Apr., 1916:76-8
------Strike, bituminous coal, October and November, 1919..................................................Dec., 1919: 61-78
------Wages. (Anthracite and bituminous.).........................................................................June, 1917:983-5;
Nov., 1918: 166-70; Dec., 1919: 207-29; Oct., 1920: 103-9
------“ Washington agreement"{wages], of October6,1917. (Bituminous.).............. D ec.,1917:110-11;
Nov., 1918:167; Dec., 1919: 61; Apr., 1920: 42,47
------(Colorado). Survey of labor conditions, 1914-15............................................................Apr., 1916: 47-9
------ (Illinois). Prevention of disease among soft-coal miners...................................
Sept., 1919:291-4
------------- Survey covering wages, irregularity of employment, etc., Springfield............... Oct., 1916: 83
------------- Wage scale for bituminous miners.............................................................................. Dec., 1920: 78
------(Indiana). Law giving State control of industry................................................... Nov., 1920: 199-200
------( Kentucky). Decision of court re right of labor organizations to erect houses for
discharged members........................................., .....................................................................Oct., 1920: 201-2
------(Ohio). Mine accidents and compensation, 1914 to 1917...............................................May, 1916: 62-5;
Feb., 1917: 264-5; May, 1918: 262-3; June, 1919: 237
------------- Prevention of disease among soft-coal miners........................................................ Sept., 1919: 291-4
------------- Wage increases, Hocking Valley District...................................................... June, 1920:104-6
------( Pennsylvania). Housing...............................................................................................May, 1920: 186-95
------------- Mortality statistics, 1911 to 1918.................................................. July, 1919: 177; Oct., 1919: 233-4
------------- Provisions of wage agreement of May 5,1916.
(Anthracite.)........................... June, 1916: 38-41
------------- Wages and hours, 1919 and 1920. (Anthracite.)................................................June, 1920: 95-103
------------- Workmen’s compensation............................................ i .........May, 1919: 260-3; Sept., 1919: 326-8
------( West Virginia). Accident statistics, 1913 to 1916.............................................
July, 1917: 119-23
(S e e a lso Coal; Fuel control.)
Mines and mining, copper:
Arizona. President’s Mediation Commission. Report.....................................................Dec., 1917: 53-7;
Jan., 1918: 13-17; Mar., 1918: 52-4
------Strike of October, 1915, and settlement.............................................................................July, 1916: 30-1
------ Training for the job. (Copper Queen Mine, Bisbee.)................................................ Oct., 1919:179-81
California. Labor turnover, one company, 1917-18.............................................................. May, 1919: 63-84
Mexico. Wages, hours, cost of living, etc. (E l Boleo Mining Co.)..................................Oct., 1918:121-2
Montana. Comparative wage rates, September, 1917. (Anaconda Copper Mining
Co.)........... ........................................... .....................................................................................Nov., 1917: 105-7
New Mexico. Housing, Tyrone. (Phelps-Dodge Corporation.)................................. Sept., 1918: 278-84
United States. Housing and living conditions.................................................................. Jan., 1919: 289-99
------Wages, various districts, 1913 to 1918...............................................................................Apr., 1919: 177-8
Mines and mining, gold:
Arizona (Bisbee). Wages, etc. (Phelps-Dodge Corporation.).......................................... July, 1919:152
France. Wages, 1914 and 1916.................................................................................................... Jan., 1918:105
Transvaal. Miners’ phthisis. Prevalence, and recommendations of committee........Jan., 1917:102-5
United States. Housing and living conditions.................................................................. Jan., 1919: 289-69
------Report of commission appointed by Secretary of Interior, 1918..................................Apr., 1919: 176-8
Utah. Schedule of insurance rates.......................................................................................Mar., 1918:186-91
Mines and mining, iron:
Alsace-Lorraine. Wages, 1913 to 1918....................................................................................June, 1919:181-2
France. Eight-hour day by agreement, 1919.......................................................................... July, 1919:164
------ Wages, Maine-et-Loire district, 1914 and 1916.................................................................. Jan., 1918:105
Great Britain. Employment statistics, May, 1915...............................................................July, 1915: 70-1
United States. Housing and living conditions.................................................................. Jan., 1919: 289-99
United States Steel Corporation. Eight-hour basic day adopted..................................... Nov., 1918: 133
Utah. Schedule ofinsurancerates..............................................................................'.____Mar., 1918:186-91
Mines and mining, lead:
Great Britain. Employment statistics, 1910.......................................................................... Nov., 1915: 40
United States. St. Joseph Lead Co. Wage award................................... .......................... Sept., 1918: 35
Mines and mining, lignite. Germany. Accident statistics, accident insurance, and
wages................................................................................................................May, 1916: 79-82; Sept., 1917: 121-3
Mines and mining, metals:
Nevada. Accidents and fatality rate, 1913 to 1916................................................................ Feb., 1917: 263
United States. Accidents, 1914 to 1918...............................................................................July, 1916: 129-33;
June, 1917: 976-9; Nov., 1917: 172-3; Aug., 1919: 214-16; June, 1920: 164-5
Utah. Schedule ofinsurance rates.......................................................................................Mar., 1918: 186-91
(S e e aU o Metallurgy.)
Mines and mining, ore:
Germany. Accident statistics, accident insurance, and wages........................................May, 1916: 79-82
------Wages, 1914 to 1917.............................................................................................................. Sept., 1917:121-3
'
Mexico. Mining code................................................................................................................ Apr., 1919: 233-5
Mines and mining, potash. Alsace-Lorraine. Wages, 1913 to 1918.......................................June, 1919: 181-2
Mines and mining, salt:
Germany. Wages, 1914 to 1917.............................................................................................. Sept., 1917:121-3
------Wages, women.........................................................................................................................
Oct., 1917: 85
Mines and mining, shale. Great Britain. Employment statistics, May, 1915.....................July, 1915: 76-1
Mines and mining, silver. United States. Wages, various districts, 1913 to 1918............ Apr., 1919: 177-8
Mines and mining, zinc. Missouri. Miners’ consumption. (Study of 433 cases.)............. Aug., 1917: 74-6
Mines and mining. (S e e a lso Oil industry; United States: Bureau of Mines.)
Minimum of subsistence. (S e e Dietary studies.)
Minimum wage, United States:
Laws, January 1,1915...................................................................................................................July, 1915: 33-8
Oct., 1917: 80
List of States having minimum wage commissions...............................................................
Minimum wage by law— ..................................................................... ...............................Sept., 1916: 67-71
Minimum wage laws at work. (Douglas.).............................................................................. Jan., 1920: 180




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

103

Minimum wage, United States—Concluded.
Page.
National War Labor Board decisions....................................................................................... Aug., 1918: 72-5;
Jan., 1919: 203-9; Feb.. 1918: 263
Navy yards................................................................................................................................. June, 1918:108-11
Railroads....................................................................................................................................... Sept., 1918:131-4;
Oct., 1918: 130-9; Nov., 1918: 134
Retail stores. (Statement by Edward A . Filene.).............................................................June, 1918: 151-5
Shipbuilding.........................................Mar., 1918: 70-1; Apr., 1918: 185-8; May, 1918: 128-30,133-5,140-2
Stove industry................................................................................................................................May, 1918: 172-3
Arkansas. Court decision, upholding act of 1915............................................................. Nov., 1917: 114-15
------Law of 1915................... ........................................................................................................... Aug., 1915: 5-6
------ Orders...........................................................................................................Nov., 1919: 215; Oct., 1920: 151
California. Investigation of fruit and vegetable canning industry, 1917..................... Feb., 1918: 138-42
------Orders............................................................................ 1917—July 57-8; Sept. 116-17; 1918—Jan. 119-20;
Nov. 171-3; 1919— Feb. 192r4; Aug. 203-5; Nov. 215-16; 1920—Nov. 108-12
------Reports, 1913 to 1918.........................................Sept., 1915: 9-11; Jan.,.1918: 114-18; Dec., 1919: 261-3
Connecticut. Report of CQmmission on Public Welfare, 1919.............................................Aug., 1919: 226
District of Columbia. Court decision re constitutionality of law ................................... July, 1920: 131-2
------Investigations.................................................... : ............................................................. 1919—May 216-19;
June 191-205; Aug. 197-200; 1920-Jan. 144-8; Mar. 132-6; Nov. 102-8
------Law........................................................................ June, 1918: 150-1; Aug., 1918: 213; Oct., 1918: 177-81
------Orders..................................... July, 1919: 165-7; Oct., 1919: 163-4; Nov., 1919: 217-18; June, 1920: 116
------Report, 1919......................................................................................................................... Apr., 1920: 112-15
Kansa?. Legislation......................................................................................Nov., 1915: 44-5; Feb., 1918: 142
------Orders............................... 1917— Oct. 80; 1918—Apr. 203; July 111-12; Oct. 181-2; 1919—Nov. 218-19
.------Report, July 1,1915, to June 30,1917............................................................................... Feb., 1918: 142-5
Massachusetts. Constitutionality of law............................................................................. Jan., 1919: 209-12
------Investigations............... 1915—Dec. 33-6; 1916—Mar. 18-21; June 59-62; Sept. 66; 1917— Feb. 251-8;
May 670-3; 1918-Oct. 196-9; 1919— May 201-4; Sept. 250-1; Nov. 202-4
------Legislation. Act placing office under Department of Labor and Industries. . . . Mar., 1920: 136-7
------Objection of employers to statutory minimum wage..................................
Oct., 1916: 76-9
------Orders.................................................................................................... 1915—Nov. 42-4; 1918—Sept. 201-2;
Oct. 182-4; 1919— Feb. 194-5* Apr. 186-7; Sept. 248-51; 1920—May 110; July 134-5
------Reports, 1915 to 1918............ June, 1916: 57-8; May, 1917: 667-9; Oct., 1918: 186-^9; June, 1919: 205-7
Michigan. Tentative minimum-wage bill referred to....................................................... Sept., 1915:16,22
Minnesota. Constitutionality of law.................................................... Mar., 1918: 144-5; July, 1920: 132-4
------Orders............................................................................................ Oct., 1918:184-5; Sept., 1919: 251-3,256
------Report and activities of commission, 1913-1914................................................................ Sept., 1915: 23-7
New York. (City.) Unskilled labor. Rate based on cost of living............................ Oct., 1915:18-21;
July, 1917: 138-40
Oregon. Court decision..................................................................................................May, 1917:673-7.687-8
------Experience, 1913-1916......................................................................................
Oct., 191o: 73-6
------Investigations................................................................................................................. Sept., 1915: 5-8,30-1
------Orders.......................................July, 1915: 40-1; Oct., 1918: 182; Nov., 1918: 173-7; Dec., 1919: 263-4
Washington. Law held constitutional................................................... Jan., 1919: 209-12; Oct., 1920: 202
------Orders..................................... Dec., 1917: 112-13; Nov., 1918: 177; Jan., 1919: 212-13; May, 1920: 111
------ Recommendations of War Emergency Conference......................................................Nov., 1918: 178-9
------Report, 1915-16..................................................................................................................... Apr., 1917: 560-9
Wisconsin. Orders................................................................................July, 1918: 114-15; Sept., 1919: 254-6
Minimum wage, foreign countries:
Argentina............................................................................................................ June, 1919: 266; July, 1919: 162
Australasia..................................................................... Feb., 1916: 97-9; Aug., 1916: 84-8; Sept., 1916: 71-7
Australia. Experience of president of court of conciliation and arbitration................. Feb., 1916: 1-22;
June, 1919: 208-15
------(New South Wales.) ..........; .........Feb., 1917: 296-9; July, 1918: 182; July, 1920: 62; Oct.. 1920: 152
Austria. Provisions for enforcement of laws...................................................................... Dec., 1917: 113-14
Canada. (British Columbia.) Law............................................................................... - ____Aug., 1918: 212
------------- Orders..........................June, 1919: 207-8; Nov., 1919: 219-20; Dec., 1919: 264^5; Apr., 1920: 116
------(Manitoba.) Law.................................................................................................................. Aug., 1918: 213
-------------Orders...........................................................................................................................Sept., 1918: 202-3;
Ont., 1918: 189-91; Jan., 1919: 214-15; Sept., 1919: 257-8; Nov., 1919: 220
------(Nova Scotia.) Recommendations of Commission on Women in Industry-------Sept., 1920: 143-4
------(Quebec.) Creation of boar d ........................................................ , ..................................... July, 1919: 230
------(Saskatchewan.) Creation of board................................................................................... July, 1919: 230
— --------- Orders....................................................................Dec., 1919: 266; June, 1920: 116; Nov., 1920: 115
------(Various Provinces.) Legislation................................................................................Nov., 1920: 112-15
France. Departments in which boards are established and administration of laws. . . Sept., 1916: 77
------Legislation...........................................................................................Dec., 1915: 36-41; Mar ' 1917: 362-5
Germany................................................................................ Dec., 1917: 113; Apr., 1918: 157: July, 1919: 168
------(Bavaria.) Domestic service........................................................................................ . Feb., 1920:131-2
Great Britain. Agriculture___1918—Jan. 97-100; June 147-9; Dec. 310-11; 1920—July 111; Aug. 84-5
----- - Box-making industry, 1912,1913.......................................................................................June, 1916: 62-9
------Dock labor. Report of court of inquiry...................... .•............................................. May, 1920: 56-9,62
------Domestic service, England................................................................................................... Feb., 1920: 130
------Minimum-wage rates proposed or awarded, various trade boards, 1919................. Nov., 1919: 207-8
------Trade-boards act amendment, 1918. Scope................................................................ Nov., 1918: 179-81
Ireland. Agriculture....................................................................................June, 1919: 180-1; July, 1920: 111
Norway. Law........................................................................................................................ .. Sept., 1918: 204-5
Switzerland. Minimum piece and time wages...................................................................... Dec., 1917: 114
(S e e a lso Living wage; Wages.)
Minimum wage for men:
England and Wales. Agricultural laborers under 21............................................................ Aug., 1920: 85
France. Coalmines...................................................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 114
Kansas. Provision for, by Court of Industrial Relations...............................................Mar., 1920: 214-15
Norway. Iron and steel....................................................................................................... Sept., 1920: 110,112
Oregon. Proposed legislation................... ................................................................... .........Mar., 1920: 214-15
Mining. (S e e Mines and mining.)
Ministries. (S e e Labor boards, commissions, etc.)
Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Co. Right of National War Labor Board to assume juris­
diction in controversy....................................................................................................................... Jan., 1919:32-4




104

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Minnesota:
Page.
Board of Arbitration. Petition from capital and labor re prevention of disputes dur­
ing war........................................................................................................................ *............ Nov., 1918: 288-9
Commission of Public Safety. Order re prevention of strikes and lockouts during
war............................................................................................................................................. Nov., 1918: 288-9
Department of Labor and Industries. Court decisions, etc., re workmen's compensa­
tion. Referred to....................................................................................................................... Nov., 1916:80
------ Reports, 1915-16,1917-18.................... .............................................July, 1917:111-15; Mar., 1919: 257-9
------ Women wage earners. 1918-19........................................................................................ Sept., 1920: 139-43
Minimum-Wage Commission. Orders......................................... Oct., 1918: 184-5; Sept., 1919: 251-3,256
------ Report, 1913-14......................................... .............................................. .............................Sept., 1915: 23-7
( S e e also s p ecific subjects.)

Minors. ( S e e Child labor; Minimum wage.)
Missouri:
Senate wage. Commission for Women and Children. Report....................................... Sept., 1915: 27-9
Soldiers' and Sailors' Employment Organization. Organization and scope.................. Feb., 1920: 161
( S e e a lso s p e c ific subjects .)
Mitcnell, J. Compensation for permanent partial disability......................................................Nov., 1918: 209
Mitchell. W . C.:
Gold, prices and wages under the greenback standard................. ....................................... Jan., 1919:105
History of prices during the war.......................................................................................... Dec., 1919: 199-203
Need for systematic development of social statistics........................................................... Feb., 1919: 35-44
Moa wood. Cases of illness of workers on.....................................................................................Dec., 1917: 204-5
Mobility of labor:
Child labor. Instability of child workers, Connecticut......................................................Dec., 1920: 126-7
------ Leaving jobs, Maryland....................................................................................................... Aug., 1916: 40-1
Cost of labor turnover............................................................................Apr., 1917: 579,581; June, 1917: 892-4
Definitions and measurement......................................................................................................1918—June 172;
1919—Jan. 11; Feb. 47; Mar. 35; Apr. 29,54; May 66; Sept. 44; 1920—June37-40
Fluctuation of employment in Ohio....................................................................................... Apr., 1916:36-40
Hiring and firing. (Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.)...................................................... Nov., 1918: 284-6
Labor turnover in certain industries of Niagara Falls........................................................... Mar., 1920: 164
Labor turnover in Chicago. (Frankel.)............................................................................... Sept., 1919: 44-59
Labor turnover in Cincinnati. (Frankel.)............................................................................Mar., 1919:35-52
Labor tumoverinCleveland and Detroit. (Emmet.)....................................................... Jan., 1919:11-30
Labor turnover in Milwaukee. ( Kirk.)................................................................................ Apr., 1919:53-70
Labor turnover in the San Francisco Bay region. (Brissenden.)..................................Feb., 1919:45-62
Mobility of labor in American industry. (Brissenden and Frankel.)........................... June, 1920: 36-56
Reducing labor turnover..................................1916—July 69; Aug. 18; 1917—Apr. 578; June 844-8,894-6;
1918—Feb. 174; Mar. 200-2; Aug. 67; Nov. 284-6; Dec. 198; 1919-Mar. 19; 1920—Jan. 192
Woman labor. Great Britain. Migration through employment exchanges................May, 1917:661-4
------ United States. Experience in metal trades.................................................................. Oct.. 1918:195-6
Specific industries. Canning, California................................................................................... Feb., 1918:139
------ Clothing. Cleveland. Women’ s cloak industry........................................................... Aug., 1918: 5-7
------------- United States. Principal centers, extent and causes.......................................... Mar., 1916: 22-5
------ Copper mining and smelting, California. One company. (Brissenden.)........... May, 1919: 63-84
------ Department stores. Reducing labor turnover a part of work of educational de­
partment.................................................................................................................................. zApr.,1917: 579-80
----------— Pacific coast. (Brissenden.)................................................................................. Nov., 1919: 88-127
------ Dressmaking trade. Massachusetts................................................................................... Sept., 1916:65
------ Factory workers. New York City. Rate of turnover among skilled and un­
skilled.........................................................................................................................................Nov., 1920:158-9
------ Freight handlers. Great Lakes steamers. (Frankel.)...............................................Apr., 1918: 33-40
------ Hotels, restaurants, etc. District of Columbia...................................i ........................... Jan., 1920: 145
------ Laundries.............................................................................................. Jan., 1918:116; Aug., 1918: 204,205
------ Longshoremen. New York City. Causes, results, and recommendations for
removing....................................................................................................... May, 1916: 3-4; Feb., 1917: 291-4
------ Lumbering. Pacific Northwest.......................................................................................... Mar., 1918:57
------ Motor vehicles. Establishment in Middle W est. ...........................................................Oct., 1918:1-18
------ Munitions. Great Britain. Wastage of woman labor............................................Oct., 1918:199-201
------ Oil refining. California. (Tworefineries.)
(Brissenden.)..^...............................Apr., 1919: 23-52
------ Public employees. District of Columbia................................................................Aug., 1918: 218,228-9
------------- United States. Separations from Government service. (Conyngton.)___ _ Dec., 1920:11-24
------ Seamen. Great Lakes. (Frankel.)................................................................................June, 1918: 46-53
------ Shipbuilding. United States. Methods of computing, statistics, etc...........May, 1918:136,188-91
------ Street railways. New York. Woman labor................................................... ;•............ May, 1918: 21-2
------ Sugar refining. California. One refinery............................................................ .
Dec., 1919:141-4
------ Telephone. New York State. Labor turnover and length of service..................Dec., 1920: 119-20
( S e e a lso Employment management; Seasonal employment; Unemployment.)
Mock, H . E .:
Industrial medicine and surgery............................................................................................ Mar., 1917: 439-42
Address on Industrial medicine—its present and its future........................................... Sept., 1919: 287-91
Does industrial medicine pay....................................................................................................Oct., 1919: 235-7
Moilen, M. Indicted under Minnesota Sabotage law................................................................. July, 1918:177-9
Moldenhauer, P. Social insurance in Germany after the war................................................ Apr., 1919: 222-5
Molders. ( S ee Foundries; Iron and steel.)
Money, purchasing power of. (S e e Purchasing power of money.)
Monkhouse, Miss O. E . Women munition workers................................................................Dec., 1918: 312-15
Mononitrobenzene poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning.)
Monopolies:
Germany. Government supervision of cartels in coal mining industry.........................Nov., 1915:83-5
------Program of German Social Democratic Party re control of cartels.............................. Jan., 1919:72
Montana:
Industrial Accident Board. Reports, 1915-1918-19........................................................... Feb., 1916: 67-71;
Dec., 1916: 22-6; Nov., 1917: 162-4; Dec., 1917: 160;
Dec., 1918: 320-2; Sept., 1919: 328-9; Jan., 1920: 249-51
( S e e also s p e c ific subjects.)

Montana Veterans’ Welfare Commission. Scope.......................................................................... Feb., 1920; 161




SUBJECT INDEX, JULY, 1915, TO DECEMBER, 1920.

105

Monthly Labor Review; published by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
P^ge*
Scope................................................................ ....................................................................... July, 1915: 5-6
Moore, B .:
Factory conditions and pulmonary phthisis in Great Britain...................................... Feb., 1919: 234-7
Research into causes and prevention of TNT poisoning........... May, 1918: 237-50; Sept., 1918: 236,241
Morbidity. (See Sickness statistics.)
Morgan, B . H .:
Heavy work by women. Quotation................................................................................. Sept., 1918: 217
Women munition workers............................. ................................................................ Dec., 1918: 312-15
Morgan Park, Duluth, Minn. Housing project of Uhited States Steel Corporation...........Apr., 1918:1-25
Mortality. (See Vital statistics.)
Mortensen, Clara E . (See Beyer, Clara Mortenson.)
Moses, M. Compulsory arbitration in Great Britain during war....................................... Feb., 1919: 270-2
Mosher, W . E . Federal personnel policy......................................*......................................July, 1920: 11-25
Mothers’ pensions:
Laws relating to mothers’ pensions................................................................................. Dec., 1919: 347-8
Ontario. Report cmproposed scheme and rates ofenacted law...........May, 1920: 170-1; Dec., 1920:161
United States. Laws on, 1915................................................................................. July, 1915:17,19,33-8
(See also Maternity insurance.)
Motion picture theaters. (See Theaters.)
Motor vehicle manufacturing. (See Automobile manufacturing.)
Motormen. (Sec Street railways.)
Mowell, J. W .:
Experience of State of Washington with medical aid provisions of compensation act. Nov., 1918: 210-11
Selection of the physicianundercompensationlaws.................................................. ... May, 1919:248-50
Municipal employees. (See Public employees.)
Municipal markets. (See Markets and marketing.)
Municipal ownership of public utilities. (See Public utilities.)
Munitions:
Bibliography. Training of women. Various countries..............................................Aug., 1918:164-71
Canada, imperial Board of Munitions. Duties and personnel.....................................June, 1917: 829
France. Compulsory arbitration decree, January 17,1917........................................... Mar., 1917:360-2
----- Housing regulations............................................................................. July, 1917:42-3; Jan., 1918:70
----- Industrial canteens.................................................................................................... June, 1918:211-14
----- Minimum-wage decree, January 17,1917....................................................................Mar., 1917: 362-5
----- Poisoning........................................ . ........................................ Sept., 1918:242-50; Dec., 1919:305-12
----- Safety provisions and regulations............................................... Jan., 1918: 71-3; Dec., 1919:309-10
----- Training. Establishment of trade schools, March 1,1917............Oct., 1917: 43-4; Sept., 1918: 207
----- Woman labor. Statistics re wages, hours, conditions, etc...................................... June, 1916:69-73;
Jan., 1918:57-8.69-73; July, 1918: 116-29; Sept., 1918: 226-7
Germany. Hours in establishments producing war supplies......................................... Aug., 1918:102
----- Industrial poisoning......................................................................; .........................Aug., 1920:112-20
----- Wage rates, 1914-1918, and earnings per shift, 1915-1918................................... Julv7l920:123-4,128
Great Britain. Accidents and accident prevention...................................................... 1916—June 89-91;
1918—Feb. 17; July 161-4; Aug. 201; Sept. 48-9
----- Bonuses........ ................................. ....................................................... Aug., 1918:88; July, 1919:155
----- Child labor, problems of...............................................................................................Dec., 1916:92-7
----- Compulsory arbitration........................................................................................
Feb.. 1919:270-2
----- Demobilization of labor........................................ . May, 1918:65-6; Jan., 1919:65-6; May, 1919: 91
----- Diseases and preventive measures..............June, 1916: 83-90; Apr., 1917:538-40; Sept., 1918: 48-9
----- Efficiency and fatigue.....................................June, 1916: 88-91; July, 1917:14-19; Sept., 1918: 43
----- Employment statistics......................................................................June, 1916:100-1; May, 1919: 86
----- Food and canteens.................. May, 1916: 70; Jan., 1917: 56-7; July. 1918:193-5; Sept., 1918:46-7
----- Hostels......................................................... June, 1918: 206-10; Oct., 1918:258-60; Dec., 1918:331-5
----- Hours........................................................................................ ... 1916—June77-9; Dec. 105-19,122;
1817—Nov. 61-2; 1918—Feb. 82-7; May 156-8; Sept. 44-5; 1919—Oct. 217-19
----- Labor embargoes........................................................................................................ Nov., 1918:292-4
----- Labor supply.....................................................Feb., 1918: 87-90; Sept., 1918: 304-9; Dec., 1918: 312
----- Labor turnover......................................................................................Oct., 1918:199-201
----- Laws. Munitions of war act, 1915-1917...................... ........................................... 1917—June817-19;
July 19-25; Sept. 126-9; Nov. 63-4; 1929—Apr. 233
----- Leaving certificates.........................................Sept., 1917:125-30; Dec., 1917: 58; May, 1918:158-63
----- List of memoranda published by health of munition workers’ committee.............. Sept., 1918:41
----- Munitions tribunals. Creation, function, grievances...................................... .
July, 1917:19-25;
Aug., 1917: 123-8;May, 1918:158-63
----- Output in relation to hours...................................................................................... Oct., 1919:217-19
----- Poisons and poisoning..............................................................................................June, 1916:83-90;
Oct., 1916: 52-3; Aug., 1917: 63-74; May, 1918:237-50; Sept., 1918: 2315-42
----- Sanitation and working conditions. (Welfare work.)____1916—May 68-70; June74-6; Dec. 71-4;
1917—Jan.-150-l; June 876-7,883-4; Aug. 91-2; 1918-195-7; Aug. 177-8; Sept. 40-53
----- Strikes......................................................... ................................................... ......... Nov., 1918:289-94
----- Sunday labor.......................................................
May, 1916:66-8; Sept., 1918: 45-6
----- Training.........................................................................
Apr., 1918:207-8; Sept.,1918: 207
----- Treasury agreement, March, 1915................................................ June, 1917:822-27; Apr., 1920: 232
----- Wages. Comparative earnings of men and women...............................................
Mar., 1917:343
------------Women and girls........ Aug., 1917:119-28; Oct., 1917: 83; May, 1918:153-6; Aug., 1918:160-1
----- Weekly rest day............................................................................................................. Dec., 1916:122
----- Woman labor. Experience, statistics, etc................................... 1916—Dec. 88-92; 1918—Jan. 65-7;
Mar. 79-81; Apr. 206-17; May 151-63; Sept. 40-53; Dec. 312-15; 1919—May 87
------------Health...................................................................... June, 1916: 88-9; Sept., 1918: 47-8,219-22
----- (See also Great Britain: Ministry of Munitions.)
Italy. Woman labor..............................................................................Mar., 1917: 358-60: Jan., 1918: 58
United States. Accident prevention................................................................................. Feb., 1917: 279
----- Accident statistics.......................................................................................................Apr., 1919:15-16
----- Employment statistics, various dates....................................................................... May, 1918:163-4
----- Equal pay for equal work.Statement of Ordnance Department. . . ......................... Nov., 1918: 283
----- Hours. Executive order, March 22,1917, suspending 8-hour day on munitions
contracts.............................................................................................................................. May,
1917:660
----- Housing. Federal policies............................................... ......................................... Feb., 1918: 204-8




106

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW,

Munitions—Concluded.
PageUnited States. Poisons and poisoning...................... .......................1916—Nov. 103-4; 1917— Feb. 177*98,
277-9; July 124-5; Dec. 195-202; 1918—Feb. 13-35; June 218-19; 1919—Jan. 248-72
------Protective clothing. Experiment at Frankford Arsenal........................................... May, 1918:164-5
------ Sanitation and working conditions. Addresses.......................................................... Feb.,1919: 216-17
------------- Code of......................................................................................................................... June, 1918: 218-19
------------- Practical points in the safe handling of TN T. (Schereschewsky.)...............Dec., 1917: 195-202
------------- Work of women's branch, industrial service section, Army Ordnance......... Nov., 1918: 188-60
------------- ( S e e a lso Munitions: United States. Poisons and poisoning.)
------ Training. Recording and Computing Machines Co., Dayton, Ohio................... Sept.,1918: 208-10
------ Woman labor on acetylene welding.............................................................................................. May, 1919:221-30
------ Connecticut. Woman labor. Wages, working conditions.......................................... Mar., 1917: 349
------ New Hampshire. Protective labor laws suspended during war................................. Aug., 1918: 267
(S e e a lso Arsenals; Foundries; Machinery and machine shops; Metal trades; Navy
yards.)
Munroe, J. P .:
Provisions of Smith-Hughes act.............................................................................................Apr., 1918: 113-14
New order in business................................................................................................................ Apr., 1917: 574*5
Museums. Location and scope of various safety museums........................................................
Jan., 1917: 92
Mutual aid funds. (S e e Establishment funds; Fraternal orders; Labor organizations:
Benefits.)
Mutual aid societies. (S e e Fraternal orders.)
N.
Naphtha poisoning. (S e e Poisons and poisoning: Naphtha.)
Nassauer, M. Dye worker's cancer.............................................................................................. Sept., 1920: 147-8
National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council. (S e e United States: National
Research Council.)
National Adjustment Commission, United States. (See United States: National Adjust­
ment Commission.)
National Alliance of Employers and Employed, Great Britain. Organization, aims,
etc.............................................................................................................Dec., 1918: 40-1. 331-2; Jan., 1919: 67-70
National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. Workingmen's
organizations in local antituberculosis campaigns........................................................... .
Jan., 1917: 107-11
National Association of Builders' Exchanges. Wage scales in building trades, August 31,
1920.,.................................................................................................................................................. Oct., 1920: 120-1
National Association of Collegiate Alumnae. Opportunities for women in domestic
science................................................................................................................................................ Apr., 1917: 570-2
National Association of Corporation Schools. Committee on vocational guidance. Report. Oct., 1916: 86-8
National Association of Cotton Manufacturers. Data re hours as related to output, cotton
manufacturing.......................................................................................... ..........................................Aug., 1918:154
National Association of Credit Men. Investigation of efficiency of labor........ ................. June, 1920: 219-20
National Association of Employment Managers. (S e e Industrial Relations Association of
America.)
National Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. (S e e International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.)
National Association of Manufacturers:
Labor principles adopted at convention, May, 1920............... .............................................Aug., 1920: 34-6
Resolution indorsing National War Labor Board................................................................. Aug., 1918: 71
National Auxiliary Service. (S e e National service.)
National Board for Jurisdictional Awards in the Building Industry. Organization and
scope................................. ................................................................................................................... Aug., 1920: 36-8
National Board of Steam Navigation. Organization, aims, and membership...................... Aug., 1918: 47
National Catholic War Council. Reconstruction program......................................................June, 1919: 44-52
National Child-Labor Committee:
Recent publications, list...........................................................................................................July, 1916: 149-51
Relation between juvenile delinquency and juvenile employment................................ Feb., 1918: 151-4
Wage-earning girls.........................................................................................................................Mar., 1916: 37-9
National Civic Federation:
Objections to compulsory health insurance............................................................................. Apr., 1917: 514
Labor situation in Great Britain and France....................................................................... Dec., 1919: 127-9
Minimum-wage commission. Minimum wage by law. A survey................................Sept., 1916: 67-71
Reconstruction committee. Conference, 1918........................................................................ Feb., 1919: 63-7
Social insurance department. Compulsory health insurance conference. Address-----May, 1917: 751-4
National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness:
Eye hazards.................................................................................................................................. Apr., 1918: 295-8
Feb., 1920: 199-201
Regulations suggested for the uniform control of use of wood alcohol..................
National Conference of Employment Managers. (S e e Industrial Relations Association of
America )
National Conference of Social Work, 1919. Addresses.......................................July, 1919: 1-13,119-23,238-55
National Consumers’ League:
Maintenance of labor standards during war time...............................................................May, 1917: 659-60
Wage-earning women and girls.................................................................................................. Mar., 1916: 37-9
Wages and hours of employees of public utility companies, New Y ork........................ June, 1916: 29-33
National Cooperative Association. Organization of..............................Nov., 1918: 130-2; Apr., 1920: 117-18
National Cooperative Wholesale Association. Organization, activities, etc........... Apr., 1920: 117-18,120-1
National Dock Adjustment Commission. (S e e United States: National Dock Adjustment
Commission.)
National Dock Industrial Council. (S e e United States: National Dock Industrial Council.)
National Economic Council, Provisional. ( S e e Germany: National Economic Council,
Provisional.)
National Education Association. Commission on emergency in education. Summary of
statement...........................................................................................................................................Feb., 1919: 82-4
National Employment Service, United States. (S e e United States: Department of Labor.
Employment service.)
National Federation of Clothing Manufacturers. Articles of federation...................... . . . . Oct., 1919:16-17
National Federation of Trade-Unions, Netherlands:
Congress, June, 1920.................................................................................................................. Nov., 1920: 214-15
Membership statistics........................................................................................ June, 1918: 67; June, 1920: 197
National Federation of Tradei-Unons, Norway. Membership statistics. . . Aug., 1918: 215; Mar., 1919: 57




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107

Page.
National Federation of Women Workers. Membershi p ............................... Aug., 1918: 178; July, 1920: 58
National Harbor Industrial Council. (See United States: National Harbor Industrial
Council.)
National healthinsurance. Great Britain. (Set? Great Britain: National health insurance
j oint committee. Health insurance.)
National Housing Association. Conference addresses, 1916,1917........Nov., 1916: 60-3; Dec., 1917: 215-18
National Industrial Conference:
Canada. (See Canada: National Industrial Conference.)
Great Britain. (See Great Britain: National Industrial Conference.)
United States. (See United States: National Industrial Conference.)
National Industrial Conference Board:
Conciliation and arbitration in New Zealand................................................................ May, 1920: 215-18
Cost ofliving, 1914 to 1919................................................ ................................................. May, 1920: 88-9
Cost ofliving. Lawrence, Mass...........................................................................................Mar., 1920: 71-2
Hours of work as related to output. Cotton manufacturing....................................... Aug., 1918:153-5
— Woolen industry......................................................................................... ............ Feb., 1919:153-5
Industrial conditionsin Europe....................................................................................... Oct., 1919:18-21
War-time changesin wages...............................................................................................Jan., 1920: 141-4
War-time employment of women in the metal trades.................................................... Oct., 1918:192-6
Works councils in the United States................................................................................Jan., 1920: 191-2
National kitchens. (See Communal kitchens.)
National League for Women’s Service. Activities............................................................ June, 1917: 1002-4
National League on Urban Conditions among Negroes. Activities..................................... Feb., 1918:157
NationalMantime Board. (See Great Britain: National Maritime Board.)
Nationalminimum. British Labor Party,program........................................................... Apr., 1918: 66-71
National Popular Government League Conference. 1919...................................................... Feb., 1919: 67-70
National Pottery Workers’ SocietyTGreat Britain). Membership, wages, etc.................Dec., 1920: 168-9
National Refining Co» Coflfeyville. Kans. Award of National War Labor Board.............. Oct., 1918: 25-6
National Research Council, United States. (See United States: National Research
Council.)
National Safety Council:
Conference addresses and proceedings, 1916-20.................................. 1916—Oct. 53-8; 1917—Mar. 436-9;
Oct. 147-8; 1918-Sept. 234-5; Nov. 198-204; 1919—Nov. 234-6,258-60; 1990-Nov. 177-80
List and scope of bulletins............................................................................................... June, 1917: 980-3
Accident prevention division. Uniform safety standards........................................... Nov., 1918: 207-8
Health service section. Coordination of industrial and community health activities.. Feb., 1920: 201
— Industrialdermatoses................................................................................................ Feb., 1920: 206-8
National service:
Germany. National auxiliaiy service law................................................................... Apr., 1918: 89-103
Great Britain. Ministry of National Service. Activities, etc......................................July, 1917: 26-8;
Sept., 1918: 66-7; Oct., 1918: 84-44
Great Britain. Women’s land army. Activities.......................................... .......... ....... July, 1917: 28:
Apr., 1918: 214-15; May, 1918: 62; Aug., 1918:179
----- Women’s National Land Service Corps. Activities................................................. Apr., 1918: 212
Italy. Decree establishing civilian auxiliary service................................................... Sept., 1918: 273-6
United States. National League for Women’s Service........................................... .. June, 1917: 1002-4
National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education. (See National Society for
Vocational Education.)
National Society for Vocational Education:
Conference addresses and proceedings, 1917-1919. July, 1917: 145-9; Apr., 1918:111-17; June, 1919: 68-9
Federal and State aided vocational education.................................................................July, 1917:142-5
Vocational education survey, Minneapolis..................................................................... Mar., 1917: 467-9
Committee on women in industry. Report on vocational training........................... Apr., 1920: 136-40
National trade-unionf ederations. (See Labor organizations.)
National Transport Workers’ Federation, Great Britain:
Demands and recommendations.......................................... .......... June, 1919. 171-2; Decv 1920: 118-14
Organization and affiliated unions...................................................................................... June, 1919: 21
Statistics ofmembership..................................................................................................... June, 1919: 304
National Union ofCommercial Workers, South Africa. Organization and conference....... Oct., 1920: 216
National Union ofRailwaymen, Great Britain:
Demands....................................................................July, 1918: 106; Nov., 1918: 261; June, 1919:169-71
Report..................................................................................................................................Aug., 1916: 81-2
National War Labor Board. (See United States: National War Labor Board.)
National Women’s Trade-Union League of America:
Convention, 1919............................................................... *.............................................July, 1919: 267-72
History. (Waggaman.)..................................................................................................Apr., 1919: 237-44
Protests re women conductors, Cleveland Railway Co..................................................... May, 1919: 230
Reconstruction program................................................................................................... Apr., 1919: 243-4
Commission to Peace Conference, Pails. Report, 1919................................................ July, 1919: 269-70
National Workmen’ s Compensation Service Bureau:
Grouping ofindustries................................................................................ Nov., 1915: 32; Sept., 1916: 56
History and theory ofworkmen’s compensation insurance rates...............................Sept., 1918: 254-62
Manual ofcompensation rates........................................................................................... Nov., 1916: 85-7
Rates for mining and smelting, Utah................................................................................. Mar., 1918: 186
Nationality of employees. (See Classification of employees.)
Nationalization. (See Nationalization of mines; Public utilities; Railways.)
Nationalization ofmines:
International miners’ congress, Geneva, 1920. Resolution.............................................. Oct., 1920: 213
France. Law of September 9,1919................................................................................ Dec., 1919:129-32
Great Britain. Trades-union congress, 1919. Resolution............................................... Feb., 1920: 256
----- Reports of coal industry commission, 1919.............................. May, 1919:110-14; Aug., 1919: 78-86
----- Situation reviewed...................................................................................................... Oct., 1919: 23-30
— — Trade-union attitude toward. (Stewart.)......... .....................................................Nov., 1919: 63-6
New Zealand. Board of Trade inquiry into coal industry. Recommendation.........Dec., 1919:135-7
United States. United mine workers attitude ........................................................... Nov., 1919: 66-70
(See also Socialization.)
Nationalization of railways. Effects on wages, hours, and rates, various countries......... May, 1918: 23-44




10 8

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW.

Naturalization:
Page.
Aliens admitted to citizenship, 1918.................................................................... .................Jan., 1919: 314-15
Scope of work of the Federal bureau................................................................. Jan., 1916: 6; Sept., 1916: 18
(S e e a lso Americanization; Citizenship; United States: Bureau of Naturalization.)
Naval hosp