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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES \
Ik
T
BUREAU OF LA B O R S T A T I S T I C S / .................. I lO o
INDUSTRIAL

ACCIDENTS

AND

HYGIENE

J AA
B

SERIES

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL
ACCIDENTS IN THE UNITED
STATES TO THE END OF 1927

AUGUST, 1929

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON ; 1929

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C,




Price 30 cents

A C K N O W LE D G M E N T

This bulletin wa$ prepared by Lucian W. Chaney and C. F. Stod­
dard, of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
ii




CONTENTS

Page
C hapter I.— Introduction________________________________________________
1-5
Relation of statistics to industrial safety_____________________________
1, 2
Scope of the bureau’ s accident reports_______________________________
2 -4
Accident prevention possible_________________________________________
4, 5
C hapter II.— Statistical items essential for accident prevention w ork____ 6-10
Number of accidents__________________________________________ ______
6
Exposure to hazard___________________________________________________
6, 7
Accident rates________________________________________________________
8, 9
9, 10
Classification of industry_____________________________________________
Causes of accidents___________________________________________________
10
Conclusion___________________________________________________________
10
C hapter III.— Accidents in manufacturing industries__________________ 11-117
General scope of surveys made_______________________________________ 11, 12
Accident data reported by the States, 1917 to 1927__________________ 12-15
Accident data gathered by the bureau covering manufacturing indus­
tries_______________________________________________________________ 16-117
Accidents and accident rates, 1925 to 1927, by industry and
State_________________________________________________________ 17-114
Accidents and accident rates, in specified States, by industry. 32-67
Accidents and accident rates, in specified industries, by
States___________________________________________________ 68-114
Accidents in specified industries, classified by nature of
injury, 1927_____ ______________________________________ 115-117
C hapter IV .— Accident experience in the iron and steel industrj^ to the
end of 1927___________________________________________________________ 118-157
Accident experience of selected plants, 1907 to 1927_______________118-187
The industry and its departments_____________________________ 120-126
The industry________________________________________________
121
Blast furnaces____________________________________________ 121, 122
Bessemer converters________________________________________
122
Open-hearth furnaces_____________________________________ 122, 123
Foundries_________________________________________________ 123, 124
Heavv rolling mills_______________________________________ 124, 125
Plate "mills__________________________________________________
125
Sheet mills__________________________________________________
125
Tube mills__________________________________________________
126
Mechanical department_____________________________________
126
Accidents and accident rates, by year and period_____________ 127-137
Accident rates in the industry, 1922 to 1927, by States___________ 137-139
Analysis of accident causes in the industry by department________ 139-146
M achinery_______________________________________________________
140
Power vehicles___________________________________________________
141
H ot substances__________________________________________________
142
Falls of persons________________________________________________ 142, 143
Falling objects_________________________________________________ 143, 144
Handling______________________________________________________ 144, 145
Miscellaneous causes__________________________________________ 145, 146
Accident experience of the departments analyzed by cause________ 146-157
B lastfurn aces_____ r _____________________________________________
147
Bessemer converters___________________________________________ 147, 148
Open-hearth furnaces____________________________________________
148
Foundries________________________________________________________
149
H eavy rolling mills____________________________________________ 149, 150
Plate mills_______________________________________________________
150
Sheet mills_______________________________________________________
151
Tube mills_____________________________________________________ 151, 152
Fabricating shops________________________________________________
152
Mechanical department__________________________________________
153
Yards__________________________________________________________ 153, 154
Miscellaneous rolling mills_______________________________________
154
Electrical department____________________________________________
155
Wire drawing__________________________________________________ 155, 156
H ot rolling of sheets______ _______________ _____________________ 156, 157




hi

IV

CONTENTS
Page

V.— Accidents and accident rates in mines, quarries, and metal­
lurgical works________________________________________________________ 158-171
Coal mines_________________________________________________________ 159-161
Location and causes of accidents______________________________ 159—
161
Metal mines________________________________________________________ 161-165
Quarries____________________________________________________________ 165, 166
Metallurgical w orks________________________________________________ 166, 167
Coke ovens_________________________________________________________ 167-169
All mineral industries______________________________________________ 169-171
C h a p t e r VI.— Casualties attending the operation of steam and electric
railways______________________________________________________________ 172-181
Marked improvement noted_______________________________________ 172, 173
Casualties to trainmen on Class I railroads, 1916 to 1927_________ 173-178
Nontrain accidents, 1917 to 1927__________________________________ 179, 180
Grade-crossing accidents, 1890 to 1927_____________________________ 180, 181
Electric railways______________________________________________________
181
C h a p t e r V II.— Record of accidents in the Federal departments, 1921 to
1927__________________________________________________________________ 182-184
C h a p t e r V III.— Industrial accident experience of members of the N a­
tional Safety Council___________________ _____________________________ 185-187
C hapter




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON

No. 490

AUGUST, 1929

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES TO
THE END OF 1927
Chapter I.— INTRODUCTION
RELATION OF STATISTICS TO INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

The purpose of the collection and publication of industrial accident
statistics is to offer a basis for the promotion of safety in industry.
The use of such data is essential to an effective operation of any wellplanned safety program. To be intelligently applied this informa­
tion must be analyzed and presented in such a way as to show, by
the use of accident rates (explained on p. 8), the frequency with
which accidents are occurring in any particular department or occu­
pation of a plant, how serious these accidents are in terms of degree
of disability measured by time loss, and the relative importance of
the causes operating to produce such accidents. With this informa­
tion at hand the plant manager or safety director is able to proceed
with his program for the conservation of human life within his estab­
lishment, knowing that a plan worked out in cooperation with his
foremen or his plant committees, or by other approved method, and
vigorously and consistently applied, with special emphasis where the
T
need is shown by the accident rates to be greatest, will, in the absence
of fortuitous circumstances, result in a reduction of injuries of all
kinds.
The enactment of compensation laws in nearly every State1
focused attention upon the necessity for accident statistics which
would shed light upon the various problems of compensation
insurance. As this principle of compensating workmen for injuries
received in the course of their employment has developed in recent
years, some State administrative bodies have come to realize the
value of such data in the work of accident prevention and are making
the information available to industry. Unfortunately, however, the
States have adopted procedures sufficiently different to make it
difficult, and in many cases impossible, to combine these records in
a general exhibit of interest and utility. The primary reasons for
this are, first, lack of funds, because of which handicap many States
have been unable to develop their statistical organizations sufficiently
i South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, and Arkansas had no such law.
ture passed a compensation law at its session in 1929,




The North Carolina Legisla­

1

2

ST A TIST IC S OF IN D U S T R IA L A CCID EN TS

to utilize the enormous quantity of raw material of accident statistics
which has accumulated in the course of the administration of the
workmen’s compensation laws; and, second, the fact that the State
agencies have found themselves so involved in the multiplicity of
problems of compensation that they have been unable to give adequate
attention to the really more important problems of accident prevention.
Ultimately it will be necessary for all States to do what some have
already done, namely, to grapple with the matter of accident preven­
tion. It is to be hoped that when this time comes there will be an
intelligent correlation of the statistical service and the inspection
service, so that the statistical information may contribute its full
share to the desired end.
A complete compilation of industrial accident statistics has never
been attempted by any Government agency. Here, again, insuffi­
cient appropriations have made impossible the nation-wide first-hand
survey of industry rendered necessary by the absence of provisions
in State laws calling for uniform methods of reporting accident data,
including definitions, industry classification, report forms, time and
extent of reporting, etc., and the centralization of such records in
some Federal department at Washington.
SCOPE OF TH E BUREAU’ S ACCIDENT RE PO R TS

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics has issued four
bulletins 2 bringing together, so far as possible, the important records
of industrial accidents throughout the country. Two of these were
prepared by Dr. Frederick L. Hoffman and were issued in 1908 and
1914. The third, prepared by the bureau staff and published in 1923,
brought the data for the most part down to the year 1920. In 1927
the fourth report was issued, including, so far as possible, accident
records to the end of 1925. In all of these bulletins the data are based
largely upon State and other official published reports, but the fourth
bulletin, in addition to this, includes the results of the first attempt
to collect directly from the States and from industry itself (other
than the iron and steel industry, for which accident data have long
been available) adequate statistics of accidents in manufacturing
industries in a manner to make possible the computation of compar­
able accident rates. This record was supplemented in 1927 by the
publication of a pamphlet giving the accident experience in the iron
and steel industry and in a selected group of other manufacturing
industries to the end of 1926.
In the introduction to the second bulletin Doctor Hoffman com­
ments as follows: “ At the present time there are no entirely complete
and trustworthy industrial accident statistics for even a single im­
portant industry in the United States. The most reliable data are
for the iron and steel industries, mining, and the railways.” As time
has gone on, the three Federal agencies concerning themselves with
accident statistics, namely, the Interstate Commerce Commission,
the Bureau of Mines, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, have so im­
proved their methods of collecting and handling accident data that
2 IT. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. 78: Industrial accidents; Bui. N o. 157: Industrial accident sta­
tistics; Bui. 3,39: Statistics of industrial accidents iu the United States; Bui. 425: Record of industrial
accidents in the United States to 1925.




IN TR O D U C TIO N

3

what they offer may fairly be claimed to be “ trustworthy,” though
in the nature of the case it would be beyond reasonable expectation
that they should be “ entirely complete.”
The present bulletin brings the statistical data regarding industrial
accidents down to the end of the year 1927.
The first accident data assembled by the bureau on a large scale
pertains to the iron and steel industry. Beginning in 1911, when the
first comprehensive report was issued as Volume IV of Senate Docu­
ment 110 (62d Cong., 1st sess.), the work has been carried on an­
nually and the results published from time to time,3 culminating in
the figures offered in the present bulletin, which gives the accident
experience of this great industry for a period of 19 years. Having
secured the cordial cooperation of the industry to the extent that
accident reporting is now regular and complete and susceptible of
analysis for the application of accident prevention measures, the
bureau has turned its attention to obtaining reports concerning manu­
facturing industries in general, continuing, however, to regard the
iron .and steel industry as a separate group. Data for this industry
therefor are, in consequence, omitted from the general tabulations
herein and presented as Chapter IV. The record of the other indus­
tries first published was for the year 1925 (Bui. 425); it was followed
by data for 1926 (Labor Review, Oct., 1927), and now by data for
1927.
In addition to the data gathered first hand by the bureau’s repre­
sentatives, considerable statistical material compiled by other agencies
has been included in the present bulletin. The bureau’s presentation
of accidents in manufacturing industries and in the iron and steel
industry is followed by tabulations published by the United States
Bureau of Mines, covering mines, quarries, and metallurgical works,
and by the Interstate Commerce Commission, covering the steam
and electric railways of the country. These tables are supplemented
by charts prepared by the bureau. The Federal Employees’ Com­
pensation Commission compiles statistics relating to accidents among
Government employees in the civil service, and these figures have
been included in this report.
Other accident experience of sufficient volume to be significant has
been taken from the latest report of'the National Safety Council,4
which gives for the year 1927 a record of 2,089 establishments em­
ploying 1,565,747 workers, with a total of 3,742,404,981 man-hours’
exposure. These figures cover 16 industrial groups.
In some instances the accident rates taken from the other sources
noted have, where it was possible to do so, been recomputed, on the
basis of man-hours’ exposure so that they may be more nearly com­
parable with the rates given in the bureau’s tabular matter. In other
instances, where no rates are given in the original report, they have
been computed. After all, the rates are the significant factors for use
in any accident-prevention campaign, and all presentations of acci­
dent statistics, whether by official or unofficial organizations or by
industry itself, which do not include accident rates, lose much of their
value from the standpoint of safety of workers.
3 Later complete reports on this industry are included in V , S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Buis, 234 and
298.
4 108 East Ohio Street, Chicago.




4

S T A TIST IC S OF IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID EN TS

Recapitulating, it may be stated that this bulletin includes accident
data covering the following:
1. Manufacturing industries (except the iron and steel industry,
which is treated separately in Chapter IV).
2. Iron and steel industry.
3. Mines, quarries, and metallurgical works.
4. Steam and electric railways.
5. Federal departments.
6. Members of the National Safety Council.
ACCIDENT PREVEN TION POSSIBLE

That accidents can be prevented by an intelligent study of the
situation, which is possible by the publication of statistics of this kind,
is well illustrated by the record of the iron and steel industry. (See
Table 11, p. 127). In 1910, before the accident situation was brought
forcibly to the attention of the officials in that great industry through
the computing and classification of accident rates, the workers were
being killed and injured at the rate of 74.7 for every million man-hours
of exposure, and for every thousand hours of exposure 7.2 days were
being lost on account of disabling accidents. This was, of course,
recognized as a serious economic loss that should be prevented. A
definite safety policy was inaugurated and has been consistently
maintained and rigorously enforced throughout the years, resulting
in material, though intermittent, decrease in accident rates, until in
1927 the frequency rate had declined to 19.7 and the severity rate to
2.3, a drop of nearly 74 per cent in the former and of about 56 per
cent in the latter.
In considering other manufacturing industries, an average rate for
the entire group is not significant, first, because of possible violent
fluctuations in the amount of exposure or the number of establish­
ments included in the computation, both of which may vary widely
from group to group and from year to year, and, second, because of
the differences in the extent of reporting accidents in the various
States. For these reasons average rates have been omitted from the
totals in all tables. But industries may be compared with each other,
and the record of accidents within any State may be compared from
year to year, such comparison being possible because of the introduc­
tion of rates to interpret the significance of the abstract numbers.
However, the value of such rates lies not alone in the making of
comparisons but in the use of the information to improve conditions
by the institution of comprehensive accident-prevention methods and
their application where most needed.
The record of the iron and steel industry is very striking. It is
possible for other industries to duplicate this record. Indeed, some
have done much along this line, as, for example, the Portland Cement
Association whose plants, through the careful utilization of informa­
tion revealed by classified accident statistics, effected a reduction
from 1919 to 1927 of 67.17 per cent in their total frequency rate and
49.28 per cent in their total severity rate. Table 1 summarizes the
published reports of a number of representative industry groups, show­
ing in a rather impressive manner the effective results of safety efforts.




5

IN TR O D U C TIO N
T a b le

1. — Com parative results o f accident prevention efforts in a group o f selected
industries in specified years

Industry

Number
of fullyear
workers

Number
of acci­
dents

Accident frequency
rates (per 1,000,000
hours’ exposure)

Rate

Iron and steel:
1910_____________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Portland Cement Association:
1919____________ _______ _________________
1927_____________ ________ _______________
Paper mills: 1
1920_____________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Chemicals:1
1923_____________________________ _____
1927_____________________________________
Power presses:1
1926___________________________ ______
1927_____________________________________

202,157
395, 707

45, 283
23, 338

74. 67
19. 66

16, 247
31, 290

2,119
1, 340

43.47
14. 27

26, 525
Cl, 790

3,684
5,084

46. 34
27.42

6, 015
84, 682

443
4, 364

24. 55
17. 80

126, 387
149, 359

9,184
8, 717

Per cent
of de­
crease

24.23
19.45

1 Industrial accident experience of members of the National Safety Council.




Accident severity
rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Rate

Per cent
of de­
crease

73.67

5.20
2. 30

55. 77

67.17

.69
.35

49. 28

40. 83

2.60
1. 57

39.62

27. 49

4. 78
1.90

60. 25

19. 73

1. 39
.93

33.09

Chapter II.— STATISTICAL ITEMS ESSENTIAL FOR ACCIDENT
PREVENTION WORK

Before entering upon a more detailed discussion of the data con­
tained in subsequent pages, it may be well to review the five statistical
items which must be known regarding groups of accidents if their
study is to be of the greatest service in the work of accident preven­
tion as is clearly reflected in the record of the iron and steel and
other industries. These items are as follows: (1) Number of acci­
dents; (2) exposure to hazard; (3) accident rates; (4) classification
of industry; (5) causes of accidents.
NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS

The need of a record of the total number of accidents is obvious,
but to obtain this record is not so simple as might appear. The
difficulty is that the States put various interpretations upon what
constitutes an accident. A tabulatable accident, that is, one
“ resulting in death, permanent disability, or in the loss of time other
than the remainder of the day, shift, or turn on which the injury was
incurred, ” as defined by the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions,1 is the designation adopted by
most States and their reports are on this basis. However, some of
the State reports also include all injuries which do not incapacitate
for more than one day or exclude all which do not disable for more
than two days or three days or one week or even two weeks, these
being sufficient in number to render incomplete the total number
of reported accidents occurring in all States or in all industries.
This lack of uniformity also invalidates to a large degree a com­
parison of the reported accidents of one State with those of another
even if the industry groups in each State are identical, and therefore
impairs the value of the record as a comparative index of changes
taking place. The form of definition of an accident is not so im­
portant, perhaps, but that in order to compile from State records
satisfactory national statistics of accidents, it should be a definition
uniformly recognized must be evident.
EXPOSURE TO HAZARD

Exposure to hazard is the basis for the computation of accident
rates under the method noted in the next section. By this is meant
the number of actual man-hours worked in an establishment during
the period covered by the accident reports, usually a year. The
method of expressing this element of exposure to hazard was first
advanced by the Germans. Their solution was to note the number
of days each workman was employed and then to divide the sum of
these days by 300 on the supposition that the usual working year
i See U . S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bull. 276, p. 17,




ITE M S E S S E N T IA L F O R A C C ID E N T PR E V E N T IO N W O R K

7

was one of 300 days of 10 hours each. This gave the number of
300-day or full-year workers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics adopted
this basis for calculating accident rates when it began its accident
studies. There were, however, troublesome difficulties in the use of
this base and the International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions finally determined, at the instance of its
committee on statistics and accident insurance cost, to abandon the
idea of the number of workers and use instead the hours of employ­
ment 2 so that all rates are now computed on the basis of actual
reported man-hours, although a reduction to full-year workers is
made to avoid the use of large figures in tabulations and also to give
some idea of the extent of employment represented. This reduction
is obtained by dividing the number of man-hours by 3,000.
To illustrate the convenience and importance of knowing the
exposure, reference is made to Table 6. That there were 390 accidents
in the manufacture of cotton goods in Georgia in 1927 and 127
in the same industry in Virginia would on its face indicate a greater
volume of production in Georgia or that the production was attended
with greater hazard, or the larger number of accidents in Georgia may
be only the natural result of a larger number employed, which is
shown by the number of full-year workers in each State. Yet, when
the total number of man-hours or full-year workers in each State,
representing the exposure to hazard in that industry, is considered in
relation to the number of accidents and frequency rates determined,
it will be noted that workers in the Virginia industry apparently have
the greater likelihood of being injured, for there a frequency rate of
6.85 is indicated, while in Georgia the rate is 6.13. This, however,
does not take into account severity, to be considered later. Thus it
will be seen that it is necessary to know how many employees there are
in each industry group and something regarding the length of time
during which these workers are subject to the dangers of their calling.
Without this base to which to relate the number of accidents in both
the industrial and the cause classification, the place most needing the
application of accident prevention measures is not disclosed.
The importance of exposure as an element in the study of industrial
accidents has become recognized more and more with the passage of
time. The Bureau of Labor Statistics was the first to utilize it on an
extended scale. For some years now the Bureau of Mines and the
Interstate Commerce Commission have presented their facts on this
basis, and many sections of the National Safety Council, as well as a
few independent industrial groups, develop their accident data in
this way.
Unfortunately, records of exposure are lacking in most of the States,
so that accident rates do not appear in their reports. This condition
offers another obstacle to the compilation of national accident
statistics of value. It is to be hoped that compensation officials will
require the reporting of man-hours where the law does not specifically
prohibit it, or seek legislative enactment permitting it if necessary,
so that their published accident figures may be of real value to their
local industries in the promotion of safety.
2 See U . S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. 276, pp. 17 and 68.




STA TIST IC S O F IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID EN TS

8

ACCIDENT RATES

The mere collection of numbers of accidents leads nowhere.
To be of value the number must be reduced to some common basis
that will permit of comparison. This basis is the accident rate of
which two forms are recognized— a frequency rate and a severity rate.
The former facilitates a comparison of the occurrence of accidents in
various industries, or departments, or States or cause groups, as the
case may be, while the latter, expressed in terms of days lost, indicates
the comparative seriousness of the various types of accident, or of
the same kind of accident under different conditions.
Frequency rate.— In determining the frequency rate two factors are
necessary— the exposure to hazard and the number of accidents.
This rate is derived h j dividing the number of accidents by the number
of man-hours expressed in millions.
Severity rate.— It is of course recognized that some industries natu­
rally have a higher proportion of severe injuries, while others pre­
dominate in the number of minor injuries. Also, the industry having
the more severe accidents., indicated by days lost, may actually have
numerically fewer accidents. The frequency rate, being computed
from the actual number of accidents, would therefore give misleading
information as to the real hazard of the industry, and a comparison
of industries, or of departments or occupations within an industry,
on this showing alone should not be made if a true basis for safety
work is desired.
To meet this situation the severity rate was devised as a more
accurate indication of the real hazard. It is evident that in frequency
rates a death influences the accident rate to the same extent as does
a temporary disability of one day, thus preventing the development
of a true and complete picture of the accident situation. The first
effort to meet this 'difficulty w the separation of the accidents into
^as
three groups according to their result, namely, death, permanent
disability, and temporary disability. While this made possible a
separate comparison of each result in different industries, it did not
afford comparability of the permanent and the temporary disabilities
with each other and with the fatalities. It was necessary to translate
the different casualties into common terms. This was accomplished
by means of a schedule of fixed time allowances,3 beginning with
6,000 days for death and the loss of any two members, 4,000 days for
the loss of an arm or a leg, 3,000 days for the loss of a hand, 1,800
days for the loss of an eye, and so on through the list of permanent
disabilities. The application of these constants gives for each sort
of casualty a value in terms of days somewhat proportional to its
economic importance. The duration of temporary disabilities is of
course definite in each case.
The severity rate is determined by dividing’ the number of days lost
by the number of man-hours ’ exposure and expressing the result in
terms of 1,000 hours * exposure. The change from 1,000,000 hours
used in frequency rates to 1,000 hours is to obviate the use of small
decimals. Thus we find, to revert to the example already cited on
page 7, that the severity rate for accidents in the manufacture of
cotton goods in Virginia in 1927 is 0.77 day per 1,000 man-hours’
3 See U . S, Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. 276, p. 77,




ITEM S E S S E N T IA L F O R A C C ID E N T P R E V E N T IO N W O R K

9

exposure, which figure may be brought into comparison with the
severity rate in Georgia, namely, 1.07, thus indicating the greater
hazard in this particular industry in the latter State. It has been
observed that high frequency rates are rather apt to accompany
low severity rates, and this fact is made evident by the form oI
statistical presentation just described. In other words, when the
number of accidents is increased, giving a high frequency rate, the
severity rate is not correspondingly increased because of the large
relative proportion of temporary disability cases in which the timeloss factor is comparatively small.
The result of bringing together the exposure to hazard, the number
of accidents, and the da}^s lost is well illustrated by the following
record of the automobile industry for the year 1927 covering only
the group of States reporting disabilities extending beyond one
week (see Table 4):
Number of cases:
D eath_______________________________________ __________
61
Permanent disability___________________________________
649
Temporary disability__________________________________ 4, 491
T ota l________________________________________________ 5, 201
Accident frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure):
D eath_______________________________________ __________ __0.11
Permanent disability___________________________________ __1. 21
Tem porary disability_____________________________________8. 36
T o ta l________________________________________________
Accident severity rates (per 1,000 hours’ exposure):
D eath__________________________________________________
Permanent disability___________________________________
Tem porary disability___________________________________
T o ta l__________________________ ______________________

9. 68
0. 68
. 90
. 22
1.80

It will be noted that in frequency rates the figures are progressively
larger for death, for permanent disability, and for temporary dis­
ability. It is hardly possible to avoid the impression that the nu­
merically larger figure for temporary disability is important in pro­
portion to its size. As a corrective to this impression we need the
severity rates, in which all injuries, including death, are weighted
according to their severity. The frequency rate fails to tell the whole
story because in it units are combined that are not comparable. The
severity rate corrects this condition through the use of a procedure
which reduces these units to approximately common terms.
What is needed is an expression that will combine the two rates into
one accident rate, giving proper weight to the relative importance of
each. Whether this can be developed is problematical. Meanwhile
the almost universal practice is to consider the severity rate as the
true measure of the hazard involved and comparisons are usually
made on this basis.
CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRY

A heterogeneous mass of figures of accidents within a State having
varied industries, no matter how extensive the classifications, is worse
than confusing; it is useless. The fact that there were 158,690




10

ST A TIST IC S O F IN D U ST M A Li A C C ID E N T S

nonfatal industrial accidents in Pennsylvania in 1927, as shown in
Table 3, gives us no information for purposes of accident prevention,
even though an accident rate may be obtained. Some of these
accidents may have occurred in connection with structural iron work,
for example, which is apparently the most hazardous industry in that
State as revealed by Table 5, while other accidents may have occurred
in the manufacture of bricks where the hazard is relatively small.
When, however, the accident in the various industries are separated
and rates computed, as has been done in this table, some hint is offered
regarding the point where accident prevention effort is needed. Ob­
viously a further analysis is required for definite action.
CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS

In order to apply effectively a program of accident prevention the
safety man must know what needs to be done as well as where remedial
effort is demanded. Not only does he require information as to the
occupations of the men injured, in what departments they were
working, and how long they were incapacitated for work, but he must
have data relative to the causes of accidents so as to know just what
to do to prevent recurrence. This presents another phase of the
safety program, namely, the mechanical aspect, which is no less
important than the human side. Both must be considered together
and to this end an analysis of accident causes is essential.
A word of caution as to the accuracy of reporting causes is not out
of place in. this connection. Frequently the cause of an accident is
set down as due to a physical or mechanical defect, whereas a careful
check may reveal the real cause as disobedience of safety regulations.
For example, a case where an employee was reported as injured by a
revolving wheel was found, upon close examination, to be due to the
fact that he had removed the guard contrary to instructions. Such
an inaccurate report would cause a misapplication of safety methods,
and for this reason statistical agencies should insist that reports be
filled in accurately and precisely.
CONCLUSION

In addition to the items listed as prerequisites to adequate accident
prevention in industry, a certain value attaches to information re­
garding nature of injury and location of injury, although these items
are of much less practical importance than are accident causes.
The view of the several States as regards the importance of the
above items may be inferred from the records for 1920, the year for
which the most nearly complete information is available: Number of
States recording number of accidents, 42; number classifying by
industry, 22; number classifying by cause of injury, 18; number
classifying by location of injury, 11; number determining exposure, 2;
number determining accident severity rates, 3. No State covers all
items, and in most States no attempt is made to report the important
item of exposure to hazard, thus making a complete study of accidents
from all standpoints utterly impossible.




Chapter IIL— ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
GENERAL SCOPE OF SURVEYS M AD E

When the bureau began the collection of accident data covering
manufacturing industries, beginning with the year 1925, it was
possible to get records of 1,282 establishments in 24 industry groups,
employing 555,996 full-year workers in 11 States. In 1926 and
again in 1927 the work was extended, including in the latter year
1,075,282 full-year workers in 2,676 establishments and covering 29
industry groups in 26 States. (See Tables 2 and 4.) The records
of accidents have been secured directly from State authorities to
whom, under the various workmen’s compensation laws, establish­
ments are required to report. For the most part the number of manhours has been obtained directly from individual establishments,
request being made therefor by correspondence. The cooperation of
State officials and representatives of industry thus enlisted has been
cordially given and makes possible this report.
Here again it should be stated that the iron and steel industry
was not included in the general survey, since it has been made the
subject of special investigation from year to year, the results of which
have been published and which are brought down to date in Chapter
IV.
Table 2 exhibits the progress made by the bureau in the extent of
the three nation-wide surveys of the manufacturing industries thus far
completed :
T a b le

2 .— Comparative statement of extent of industrial accident surveys, 1925,

1926, and 1927
1926 i
Item

1925

1927

Number

Establishments______________________________________
Full-year workers.__ _ . _________ ______ ________
States___________________________________ __
Industry groups______ __________ _ _ ___ __________
Fatal accidents_________________________ ___________
Permanent disabilities, ___________________________
Temporary disabilities________ _____________________
Total accidents.. ____________ . . _

1,282
555,996
11
24
171
2,047
21,496
23, 714

Per cent
increase
over 1925

2,209
991,082
25
30
370
4,090
44,041
48, 501

72.31
78.25
127. 27
25.00
116.37
99.80
104. 87
104. 52

Per cent
increase
over 1926

Number

2,676
1,075,282
2 26
3 29
459
3,949
57,072
61,480

21.14
8.50
4.00
4 3.33
24.05
4 3.45
29. 59
26. 76

1 Figures include the carriages and wagons industry group, which has been discontinued.
2 Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas added; no reports received from Montana and South Dakota as in 1926.
2 Carriages and wagons group not included, being discontinued.
4 Decrease.

While practically all of the industrial States and every industry
group in the bureau’s classification, which follows substantially the
census classification, are now included in this statistical presentation,
it is the purpose of the bureau to extend its records, as facilities may




1
1

12

STATISTICS OF IN D U S T R IA L ACCID EN TS

offer, from year to year to include more establishments in each
industry and a greater number of full-year workers, so that the
resultant accident rates may be based upon the largest possible
exposure and thus add materially to their significance.
ACCIDENT DATA REPORTED BY THE STATES, 1917 TO 1927

In gathering from each State the record of its fatal and nonfatal
industrial accidents during any calendar year, as presented in Table 3,
it has been practically impossible to secure figures that may be con­
sidered complete or accurate. In its request for this information the
bureau asked three questions as follows, the data to cover a calendar
year:
1. Number of fatal industrial accidents?
2. Number of nonfatal industrial accidents (including permanent disabilities
and tem porary disabilities lasting beyond the day of injury)?
3. Number of industrial accidents that were compensable?

The purpose of question 2 was to include accidents which are
tabulatable under the^standard definition,1 thus excluding a large
number of accidents requiring medical attention only but which are
reported in some States. Question 3 was asked primarily to get
some statement of nonfatal accidents in the event that question 2
could not be answered, the thought being that it involves very
little extra work to determine the number of cases which by their
nature must be considered more or less in detail under compensation
laws. However, the replies received were in some instances quite
unsatisfactory.
One factor operating to render the figures somewhat inaccurate is
that in many of the States those charged with the collection and pre­
sentation of accident statistics (usually the same organization which
administers the workmen’s compensation law) are handicapped by
lack of sufficient funds to employ the help necessary to compile
detailed statistical reports, or any reports at all, even omitting to
tabulate cases involving compensation, although data required for
fairly complete reports may be at hand. In some instances, therefore,
the figures given are estimates by the States.
But perhaps the greatest obstacle to a satisfactory showing of the
true accident situation in the various States is the absence of uni­
formity in the extent of reporting required from industrial establish­
ments. This in turn is influenced largely by the provisions or absence
of certain provisions in each State workmen’s compensation law. A
State, generally speaking, requires only such information as will
enable it to administer its law, and very little attempt is made, except
in a few instances, to gather or tabulate complete statistical data.
Thus we find that some States do not require the reporting of accidents
which cause a disability of less than the waiting period prescribed by
law, others require the reporting of all accidents wherein the disability
extends beyond the day of injury, and still others require that every
accident, no matter how trivial, shall be reported. Reference to this
lack of uniform reporting has been repeatedly made, but so serious is
this handicap in the vigorous application of accident prevention
measures that its repetition seems justified.
1 See U . S. Bureau of Labor Statistic Bui. 276, p. 17; also, p. 6 herein.




AC CID EN TS IN M A N U F A C TU R IN G IN D U ST R IE S

13

All of these factors, and others of minor importance, modify the
reports presented in Table 3. In noting, for example, that there
were 10,193 fatal and 1,979,830 nonfatal industrial accidents reported
for 1927 as compared with 10,338 fatal and 1,825,401 nonfatal acci­
dents reported for 1926, the explanations offered must be borne in
mind lest a wrong impression of the relative significance of the totals
be gained.
In so far as practicable the variations in reporting have been indi­
cated by footnotes. It should be stated, in fairness to the States,
that wherever “ no report” is indicated, it does not mean that the
report is missing because of lack of desire to cooperate, but because
of some factor already mentioned, or some other reason of local
importance which renders a report impossible. To note each of these
reasons would multiply the footnotes unduly.
It will thus be seen that a comparison of the records of the various
States with each other would not be justified, and Table 3 is not
presented for that purpose, but merely as an attempt to show, in a
general way, the extent of industrial accidents throughout the country.
It is probably the most nearly complete report of industrial accidents in
this country ever assembled and it is published for its value as such.
36904°— 29-------2




14

ST ATISTICS OF IN D U ST R IA L ACCID EN TS
T a b le

3 .— Num ber o f fatal and nonfaial accidents

1918

1917

1920

1919

1921

State
Fatal

Nonfatal

(2
)
59, 055
12,480

Conn____
D e l ...........
G a ........ ..
Idaho i.__
Ill.i_______

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
3 21
492

* 46,935
(2
)
(2
)
3 854
36, 268

Ind_______
Iowa_____
Kans __ __
K y ----------La________

305
159
83
(2
)
(2
)

M e .............
M d _______
M a s s .. __
Mich
Minn

131
3 998

1 110
593
14
706
202

136
3 1, 261
150
57, 014
14, 730

(2
)
^64
629

* 43,188
6,107
(2
)
6 3,785
37,618

42,148
24, 520
6, 371
1212, 665
1 819
3

373
187
93
96
1 1
3

37,147
15,420
6, 342
13, 557
1 980
3

63
« 131
481
386
183

13,738
37, 303
78, 308
112, 477
30,926

83
“ 163
438
320
251

16, 557
42, 407
77,067
256, 309
29,716

M o _______
Mont _ _
N ebr_____
N e v ______
N. H

(2
)
307
15
52
9

(2
)
8,018
13, 278
1,958
459

(2
>
124
13
39
10

(2
)
5,697
7, 053
1,960
759

N. J
N . Mex___
N. Y
N . D a k ...
O h io ____

361
(2
)
1, 570
(2
)
855

12, 392
(2
)
311,836
(2
)
158, 786

16185
3 28
1,504
(2
>
956

Okla
Oreg_____
Pa________
R. I
S. D a k ___

141
190
3,072
i 27
37

15, 027
1 12, 044
224,808
1 3, 053
3 583

Tenn ____
Tex___ _.
Utah
V t ________
V a _______

26
(2
)
(2
)

1,465
(2
)
(2)

Wash
W . V a ___
W is ......... ..
W yo
United
States 2 _
C

(2
)

41

Fatal

(2
)
3 62
(2
)
586
201
(2
)
(2
)

34
51
535

Nonfatal

(2
)
31,127
(2
)
57,991
11,157
^ 42, 513
4, 853
(2
)
3,836
37, 753

Fatal

1 135
3 53
16
592
179
(2
)

36

(2
)

83
597

Nonfatal

Fa­
tal

1 7,144 1 144
3 958 3 22
1,405 (2
)
69,813 453
14,100 151
0

1 108
3 82
(2
)
626
300

Nonfatal

G
O
C
O

A la_...........
Ariz...........
A rk______
Calif_____
Colo_____

Fatal

96
18
82
63
498

22,800
3,882
8 11, 696
4, 564
43,024

42, 703
14, 283
6,891
15, 662
(2
)

263
113
71
120
(2
)

34,133
14, 839
6, 240
16, 789
(2
)
12, 778
36, 896
53, 017
100,176
34, 447

291
154
118
493

52
» 183
356
256
215

18, 666
46, 692
66,884
231, 421
27,068

60
« 153
376
313
201

18,463
49
4
53, 525 1 116
65,112 296
227,045 266
32,659 134

(2
)

122
28
35

C)
2

(2
)

(2
)
5, 353
11, 245
1,177
(2
)

(2
)
4, 820
13, 626
1,143
3, 385

if 37, 003
i
3 543
285, 367
(2
)
161, 253

524
3 21
1,815
(2
)
870

30, 728
(2
)
286, 629
(2
)
151, 401

195
1 103
3,403
1 49
20

19, 723
1 12, C38
181, 441
1 3, 133
1,750

(2
)
1 147
2, 569
1 28
23

(2
)
1 14, 333
149,975
1 2, 666
2, 228

1, 613
52, 502
U, 782
7,160
1 846
7

(2
)

30

13 1

1 4,155
3 509
(2
)
61, 814
13, 753

2,611
(2
)
5, 367
49,988

34,964
10,926
6, 322
13, 810
1 876
3

268
181
101
118

N on­
fatal

(2
)
83
30
20
8 10

(2
)
3, 421
11, 326
1, 247
9 1, 523

285
3 32
1, 236
4
764

28, 556 282
1 16
7
(2
)
344,436 1,777
720
9
182, 206 649

27, 754
(-)
293, 292
1, 296
111, 626

130
1 144
2, 528
1 28
21

22, 584
85
1 13, 275 1 138
172, 451 1,924
1 2, 951 1 24
2,230
23

22, 779
1 20, 318
138, 273
1 2,952
2, 701

94
50
33
40

73
28
144

1,190
(2
)
8,816,
6, 258
10,776

109
400
99
32
172

17,455
65, 600
10, 084
8,048
12,151

96
308
91
29
133

17,093
94, 256
9,932
7,724
5,327

32
1 63
7

(2
)
1 512
7

49
223
90
49
1741

320
488
219
19 37

22,156
22,903
20, 341
1726

414
547
163
24

26,892
23,832
19,198
571

368
(2
)
244
36

21,905
(2
)
18, 204
605

369
(1 )
8
171
43

25,924
(1 )
8
18, 270
776

287
429
181
51

19, 729
20, 398
18, 806
2,042

227

2 15,849
1

438

23, 680

499

25,171

427

19, 653

362

18, 042

(2
)

4
5
5
5
^
3
4
T o t a l... 2211, 338 2 1, 363, 080 2 12, 531 2 1, 545, 787 2 10, 806 2 1, 365, 520 2 11,062 2 1,636, 837 9,992 1, 327, 369
1 Compensable cases.
2 No report.
3 Mines only.
4 Includes fatal accidents, which are not reported separately.
8 Estimated by State.
6 One-half of number reported for a 2-year period, 1925-26.
7 Reports received from 4 of the 5 compensation districts and are in part merely estimates.
Some of the
nonfatal reports include fatals, and some include disabilities of 1 day or less.
8 March to December.
9 Covers 10 months only.
1 Includes all nonfatal accidents reported.
0
1 Includes all nonfatal accidents except cases denied compensation.
1
1 Includes fatal accidents, which are not reported separately. Covers claims filed for 11 months only.
2
1 Figures are for New Orleans Parish.
3




15

A C C ID E N T S IN M A N U F A C TU R IN G IN D U ST R IE S
as reported by the States, 1917 to 1927, by year

1922

Fatal Nonfatal

i 231
a 30
(2
)
708
155

i 5, 538
s 374
(2
)
84,028
12, 704

(2
)
19
92
44
534

6 20, 407
4,997
17,429
2,232
46, 238

198
77
(2
)
62
(2
)

1923

Fatal

(2
)
3 54
(2
)
71f
168

1924

Nonfatal

(2
)
3 717
(2
)
92>, 744
15,194

Fatal

1925

Nonfatal

Fatal

(2
)
3 40
(2
)
645
140

(2
)
3 887
(2
)
101,633
17, 373

i 235
3 40i
(2
)
307
50

(2
)

« 35, 350
4, 827
26,770
3, 523
53,000

(2
)

22
109
83
646

15
125
59
(2
)

1926

Nonfatal

1 6,453
3 724
(2
)
104, 361
18,093

Fatal

1927

Nonfatal Fatal

N on­
fatal

132:
48
710'
173

(2
)
13,172
237
93,096
19, 624

1 180
106
(2
)
714
180

1 6,892
11,109
(2
)
91,671
1 5, 571

(2
)
4, 637
28, 655
7,019
(2
)

6130
16
125
56
(2
)

6 32, 778
2, 530
27,445
1° 14,457
(2
)

7 61
(2
)
120
54
720

7 28, 279
(2
)
26,863
1 7, 867
1
5 50, 000

(2
)

12
109
57
675

* 37, 000
6,611
22,319
3, 237
61,135

38, 405
11,410
(2
)
18, 549
(2
)

268
112
72
108
(2
)

54, 582
13,834
9 ,9:)9
23,892
(2
)

274
119
84
97
(2
)

48, 730
13, 610
10,890
28,036
(2
)

328
69
87
193
(2
)

45, 648
13, 266
11,027
26,490
(2
)

265
118
81
208
(2
)

42,873
«12, 021
10, 417
25, 496
(2
)

237
149
75
(2
)
(2
)

38,967
11, 803
10, 015
(2
)
(2
)

62
123
308
360
113

14, 731
33, 493
50, 799
i 30, 831
31, 571

64
1 126
*
330
326
204

16, 311
40,913
64, 560
i 29,953
40, 245

38
14139
336
1276
123

H 168
38,833
61, 640
i 27, 451
36,123

59
» 160
309
280
150

13,844
39,069
58,771
28, 015
45,181

44
14162
443
315
114

15,075
59
4
15, 337 1 189
317
59,175
1 32,105
378
46,339
109

15,195
45, 738
64,167
209, 998
44, 339

(2
)
51
32
24
22

(2
)
3,317
13,900
1, 377
1,835

(2
)

(2
)
5, 739
16,964
1,494
2,249

61
178
42
27
14

246
1 11
7
1,421
7
676

(2
)

(2
)

81
30
31
13

(2
)
5,048
16,162
1,113!
1,434

33, 483
1 369
7
292, 423
1,192
108, 824

290
(2
)
1, 665
11
803

(*)
i 124
1, 890
1 26
25

25, 633
1 21, 721
144, 365
1 3, 482
3,282

67
214
69
24
144

(2
)

40,892
1 6, 726
1018, 671
3,047
2, 033

(2
)
88
32
(2
)
is

n

(2
)
7, 024
7,181
(2
)
is 3,001

525
21
1,828
10
931

44,976
234
1 23, 519
237
400
1 13
7
(2
)
(2
)
414, 702
482, 786 1,042
1, 787
2,100
23
2,958
25
199, 271 1 1,023 !4 205,141
958
4

1 25, 631
(2
)
517, 255
3, 210
215, 532

46, 517
i 25,811
175, 330
1 3, 758
4,518

(2
)
i 150
2,011
38
22

52,000
i 27, 596
174, 370
28, 357
4, 394

(2
)
144
2,127
38
20

50,962 (2
)
31, 652
163
178, 284 2, 053
38
31,160
22
4, 888

43, 944
20,063
158, 660
29,309
1 5, 402
5

142
299
281
43
180

21, 222
92, 613
13,919
10, 507
7,899

161
357
112
32
198

25, 408
91,065
14, 203
9,497
7, 605

169
343
183
37
1 152

23, 643
97,9781
1 14,160
9,581
8, 430

31, 081
28, 269
22, 099
1,719

385
751
134
88

39, 270
30,608
25,062
1,669

384
586
246
(2
)

42, 003
31,045
20,891
(2
)

374
759
187
140

42,126
36, 477
26, 056
1 2,845

387
(2
)
210
45

42,6C4
(2
)
5 36, 683
1,188

17,713

278

20, 260

314

20, 374

318

19,209

357

20,190

87
35
31
19

(2
)
5, 702
15,000
1, 346
2,442

49, 002
(2
)
345,180
1, 654
176, 427

283
(2
)
1,927
13
933

47,958
(2
)
369, 781
1,809
180,677

(2
)
1 178
2,412
i 31
18

34,908
i 30, 013
198, 023
1 4, 098
3, 455

(2
)
i 142
2, 209
i 31
17

18, 557
95,109
8, 388
• 564
6,
6,498

90
253
84
35
145

25, 008
86, 482
13,137
9, 356
6, 518

227
443
191
33

18, 453
21,855
20, 750
1,198

398
501
168
82

353

17,905

279

79
36
36
16

9,434 1, 214, 220 10,999 1,641,145 11,479 1,666, 522 10, 559 1,687,957

137
16,9C8
514 1 125,051
0
94
14,895
36
11,018
101
1 6, 279

11,238 1,825, 401 10,193 1,979,830

1 Number of claims filed.
4
1 Fiscal year ending June 30, 1928.
5
1 Covers 8 months only.
6
1 Coal mines only.
7
1 Records destroyed by fire.
8
1 Covers 15 months.
9
2 United States Employee’s Compensation Commission.
0
2 Includes cases reported from Sept. 7, 1916, to Dec. 31, 1916.
1
2 Fatal cases in Connecticut and Kentucky are included under nonfatal cases, not being reported separ*
2
ately.
2 Includes fatal accidents in Connecticut and Kentucky, the number of which is not reported.
3
2 Fatal cases in Connecticut are included under nonfatal cases, not being reported separately.
4
2 Includes fatal cases in Connecticut, the number of which is not reported.
5




16

STATISTICS O F IN D U S T R IA L ACCID EN TS

ACCIDENT DATA G ATH ERED BY THE BUREAU COVERING
FACTURING INDUSTRIES

M AN U ­

Tables 4, 5, and 6 present summaries of the accident data gathered
by the bureau covering miscellaneous manufacturing industries
(except iron and steel which is considered separately in Chapter IV),
but there are certain modifying factors as regards these tables which
should be noted, in order to caution the reader against possible error
in drawing conclusions therefrom. First, in some States those
accidents in which the disability terminated in the first week (the
waiting period under most of the compensation laws) are not reported
and therefore were unavailable for these tabulations. This neces­
sarily vitiates somewhat the comparability of the accident rates.
In the second place, reports of accidents causing temporary disabili­
ties were not available in California and Pennsylvania for 1925 and
1926 and in California for 1927, while fatal cases are not being
reported in Oklahoma.
These factors, especially the omission of fatalities, make a com­
parison of industries in the various States somewhat misleading. In
Alabama no accident reports are filed where the disability terminated
within two weeks. This fact, of course, removes a comparatively
large number of temporary accidents from consideration in calcu­
lating rates for this State. The accidents in any industry in Alabama,
therefore, could hardly be brought into a fair comparison with those
in the same industry in a State like Massachusetts where all accidents
are reported. This is reflected in the rates for cotton goods, for ex­
ample. For Alabama in 1927 the frequency rate is 3.67 and the sever­
ity rate is 0.18, while for Massachusetts the corresponding rates are
14.74 and 0.55, respectivly. Were all tabulatable accidents reported
in Alabama as they are in Massachusetts, with no change in exposure,
the rates in the former State would more nearly approach those in
Massachusetts and might even exceed them. Of course differences in
the extent of accident prevention work would also modify the result.
In an attempt to minimize the effect occasioned by this difference
in reporting accidents, and also to prevent, so far as possible, mis­
leading conclusions, the industries and States in Tables 4, 5, and 6
have been grouped on the basis of completeness of the reports received
by the various States. Thus in Table 4, for example, all States report­
ing accidents in which the disability extended beyond the day of
injury appear in the first group headed “ Accidents for States report­
ing all disabilities extending beyond day of injury/7and the industries
there listed include data for such States only.2 This group, in 1925,
included 17.2 per cent of the total full-year workers. In 1926 the
percentage was 28.6 and in 1927 more than half (56.6 per cent) of
2 States for which all accidents resulting in death, permanent disability, or temporary disability extend­
ing beyond the day of injury are reported, include the following: Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky,
Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York (in
1927), North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania (in 1927), South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and W est Virginia.
Those States in which the accidents reported include death, permanent disability, and those temporary
disabilities which extended beyond the first week, are as follows: Georgia, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey,
N ew York (in 1925 and 1926), Virginia (in 1927), and Wisconsin.
The record for 1926 in Virginia includes accidents resulting in death, permanent disability, and only
those temporary disabilities which extended beyond 10 days.
Accidents which resulted in temporary disability which lasted less than 2 weeks are not reported in
Alabama.
In Oklahoma only those accidents in which the disabilities extended beyond five days are included.
California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926.




AC CID EN TS IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U ST R IE S

17

the workers covered by the reports were in States making complete
reports of accidents. It is hoped to increase this percentage from
year to year.
ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES, 1925 TO 1927, BY INDUSTRIES AND
STATES

Table 4 presents in summary form data which are given in more
detail in Tables 5, 6, and 7. It shows for each industry (except iron and
steel) and State covered, by years, the total accident record as­
sembled by the bureau in its efforts to include the largest possible
representation of workers in manufacturing industries throughout the
country.




T a b l e 4 . — N um ber o f accidents and accident frequen cy and severity rates f o r specified industries and States in 1925, 1926, and 1927

Statistics for specified industries
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death

Permanent disability

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
Sever­
Sever­
Fre­
Fre­
ber of
Full-year
ity rate
quency ity rate N u m ­ quency
estab­
Num ­
workers N um ­ rate (per
(per
(per
rate (per
lish­
ber of
ber of
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
1,000
1,000,000
ments
cases
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Sever­
Fre­
ity rate
quency
N um ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
cases
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

Sever­
Fre­
quency ity rate
(per
rate (per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

1. 65

1. 53
2.54
1.28

1. 46
3. O
S
1.10

554
598

39.64
36.03
27. 37

0.64
.58
. 46

762
593
632

41. 55
38. 57
28. 92

4. 39
3. 66
3. 21

.12
.05

.71
.29

14
180
142

1.05
2.12
.97

.97
5.19
1.27

313
2, 145
1, 852

23.49
25.21
12.63

.31
.35
.23

327
2,335
2,001

24.54
27.45
13.65

1.28
6. 25
1. 79

3
3
7

.07
.06
.08

.40
.33
.46

52
32
61

1.16
.59
.66

1.06
.46
.51

2, 962
2, 913
3, 771

66. 32
54. 07
40. 95

.74
. 72
! 73

3,017
2,948
3, 839

67. 55
54. 72
41. 69

2.20
1.51
1. 70

8,50
14,779
39, 763

1
1

.02
.01

. 14
.05

5
69

.11
. 58

. 05
.47

54
316
892

21.14
7.13
7. 48

.44
.09
.14

54
322
962

21.14
7.26
8.07

.41
.28
.66

41
46
110

4, 778
4, 703
13,497

3
3
9

.21
.21
.22

1. 26
1. 28
1.33

5
11
31

.35
.78
. 77

.49
1. 67
. 75

724
809
1,436

50. 51
57.34
35. 46

.63
.92
.55

732
823
1, 476

51.07
58. 33
36.45

2.38
3.87
2.63

3
23
14

1,482
15, 321
679

1

.02

.13

12
14

.26
6. 87

.25
6. 75

19
214
79

4.31
4.66
38.78

.08
.11
.81

19
227
93

4.31
4.94
45.65

.08
.49
7.56

5
11
35

1,330
3,117
8, 510

1
2
17

.25
. 21
6t
>

.03
.06
.68

44
124
308

11.03
13. 26 ,
12.02 1

.25
.25
.22

45
126
330

11. 28
15.47
12. 88

.33
.31
2.07

6,113
5,126
7, 282

7

0. 38

2.29

6

.27

9
24
53

4,441
28, 360
48, 886

10
7

12
13
30

14, 888
17,951
30,696

7
40
68

j

1

__________!_________ ;
I
.20 ;
i . 17
5 ,

.

ACCIDENTS




!
28
39
28

31
29
39

INDUSTRIAL

States
Agricultural implements:
4
1925_____________________________________
7
1926
9
_________________________________
1927.
Automobiles:
2
1925_
____
___
________________
3
1926
_________________________________
5
1927______________________________
Automobile tires:
1
1925 _____________ _______ _____________
3
1926_ __________________________________
5
1927 __________________________________
Boots and shoes:
1
1925
4
1926
___________________________
6
1927
____________________ ______
Brick:
5
1925
_____________ _____ ________
8
1926
____________________________
11
1927 1
_____________ ______ _________
Carpets:
1
1926
3
1927
_______________________________
8
Carriages and wagons: ^ 1926
Chemicals:
1
1925
.
3
1926
7
1927
------- -------- ----------- -----------------------

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

STATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

Num ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

48

.04

.21

23
57

.17
.33

.14
.33

1,171
2,258

8. 83
13.23

.18
.27

1,194
2,321

9.00
13.60

.32
.81

7,499
18,137
60, 927

2
11

.04
.06

.22
.36

10
56
210

.44
1.03
1.15

.42
.64
1.02

520
1,095
2,611

23.11
21.13
14. 28

.20
.37
.36

530
1,153
2,832

23. 55
22.20
15.49

.62
1.23
1.74

1, 309
2,498

1
3

.26
.40

1.54
2.40

2
7

.51
.93

.28
1. 79

174
261

44.54
34.83

.88
.66

177
271

45.31
36.16

2.70
4.85

27
54
119

3,615
3, 889
7,107

4
4
5

.37
.34
.23

2.21
2.06
1.41

7
15
25

.65
1.29
1.17

.57
1.94
.90

203
310
477

18. 72
26. 57
22. 37

.27
.50
.41

214
329
507

19.74
28.20
23. 77

3.05
4.50
2.72

73
104
258

14,902
27,069
72,963

5
17
38

.11
.21
. 17

.67
1.26
1.04

45
85
338

1.01
1.05
1.54

.92
1.05
1. 33

2,282
3,193
6,356

51.04
39. 32
29.05

.51
.58
.51

2,332
3,295
6,732

52.16
40.58
30.76

2.10
2.89
2.88

85

9,467
11, 726
21, 918

5

.08

0.46

27
60
124

2.01
1. 71
1.88

1.26
1.44
1.43

639
795
1,296

47.68
22.60
19.70

.58
.53
.30

666
855
1,425

49.69
24.31
21.66

1.84
1.97
2.19

2,603
6, 717
19, 267

1
14

.05
.24

.30
1.45

4
17
24

.51
.84
.42

.54
1.04
.35

479
797
2,233

61.34
39. 55
38.63

.57
.49
.51

483
815
2,271

61.85
40.44
39.29

1.11
1.83
2.31

3, 764

1

.09

.53

5
15

1.88
1.33

.73
1.02

75
330

28.22
29.22

.58
.44

80
346

30.10
30.64

1.31
1.99

5, 530
11,521

2
3

.12
.09

.72
.52

7
19

.42
.55

.62
.41

187
948

11. 27
27.43

.26
.43

196
970

11.81
28.07

1.60
1.36

3,562
5, 242
9,416

1
3
9

.09
.19
.32

.56
1.14
1.91

11
47
72

1.02
2.99
2.55

1.24
2.15
2.64

204
467
634

19.09
29. 70
22.44

.29
.65
.57

216
517
715

20.20
32.88
25.31

2.09
3.94
5.12

2, 248
5, 302
13,631

1
15
22

.15
.94
.54

.89
5.66
3.23

5
33
130

.74
2.07
3.19

.95
3.28
3.74

125
1,012
2,386

18.53
63.62
58. 46

.51
1.59
1. 25

131
1,060
2,538

19.42
66.63
62.19

2.35
10.51
8. 22

1,887
9,303
12,207

3

.11
.08

.64
.49

2
15
28

.35
.54
.76

.45
.32
.70

253
623
780

44.69
22.32
21.30

.38
.25
.34

255
641
811

45.04
22.97
22.14

.83
1.21
1. 53

1,814
16,770
26,074

1
7
18

.18
.14
.23

1.10
.83
1. 38

11
36
126

2.02
.72
1.61

1. 71
.83
1.62

217
1,562
2, 224

39.87
31.05
28.43

1.70
.51
.60

229
1,605
2,368

42.07
31.91
30.27

4.51
2.17
3.60

3, 783
19, 951

25

.42

2. 51

6
67

.53
1.12

.32
1.12

99
1, 979

8.72
33.04 ,

.20
.52

105
2,071

9.25
34. 58

.52
4.15

102

177

3

1 The record for Kansas, included herein, covers six months only (July to December).




2 This industry group has been discontinued.

INDUSTRIES

6

I MANUFACTURING
N

44,194
56, 903

ACCIDENTS

Cotton goods:
1926 .............................................
1927 ............................................
Electrical machinery:
1925. _______ _____________ ___________
1926_____________________________
1927-_______ _________________ _______
Fertilizers:
192 6
192 7
Flour:
192 5
....................................
192 6
1927 i ________________________________
Foundry and machine shop products:
192 5
................................................
192 6
..............................................
1927 i ________________________________
Furniture:
192 5
________
192 6
1927 i ____________________ ______ ____
Glass:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Hardware:
1926__________________
1927_ _______ ________________________
Leather:
192 6
192 7
Lumber— Planing mills:
192 5
.
192 6
192 7
Lumber— Sawmills:
192 5
_____ ________________
192 6
192 7
Machine tools:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Paper and pulp:
192 5
192 6
1927 i______________________________ _
Petroleum refining:
1926__________ __________________
1927_____ _______ ________ ___________

CO

T a b l e 4.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates for specified industries and States in 1925, 1926 , and 1927 — Contd.

to
O

Statistics for specified industries— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death

Permanent disability

Num ­
Sever­
ber of
Fre­
Fre­
Sever­
Full-year
quency ity rate
quency ity rate
estab­
workers N um ­
N um ­
lish­
rate (per
(per
rate (per
(per
ber of
ber of
ments
1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
1,000
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Total

Sever­
Fre­
Fre­
Sever­
quency ity rate
quency ity rate
Num ­
rate (per
(per
rate (per
(per
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
1,000
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

O
P

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued

0.51
.66

1
2
6

0.28
.17
.33

0.50
.36
.18

80
142
229

22.12
12.00
12.61

0.31
.25
.17

81
145
237

22.40
12.25
13.05

0.81
1.12
1.01

.28

1.66

2
36

.89
2.00

1.92
2.58

123
798

55.03
44.25

.96
.76

125
839

55.92
46.53

2.88
5.00

3
8
15

.13
.13
.14

.80
.81
.83

40
93
136

1. 78
1.56
1. 25

1.90
1.50
1.00

878
2,935
3,810

39.09
49.39
35.05

.62
.66
.54

921
3,036
3,961

41.00
51.08
36.44

3.32
2.97
2.37

1,473
2 ,84S
6, 260

2

•H

.64

3
25
34

.68
2.93
1.81

.54
2.10
1.10

75
175
234

16.97
20.48
12.46

.19
.22
.29

78
200
270

17.65
23.41
14.38

.73
2.32
2.03

11
16
41

936
5,897
19,396

2

.03

.21

2
7
27

.71
.40
.46

.37
.77
.27

165
966
1, 630

58.76
54.60
28.01

.74
.57
.36

167
973
1,659

59.47
55.00
28.50

1.11
1.34
.84

20
30
44

2, 724
4,379
7,515

1

.04

.27

3
21
25

.37
1.60
1.11

.35
1.93
1.04

352
532
1, 002

43.08
40.50
44.44

.45
.62
.62

355
553
1,028

43.45
42.10
45. 59

.80
2.55
1.93

24
21
55

1,992
1, 737
8,862

3
12
23

.50
2.30
.87

3.01
13.82
5.20

7
12
20

1.17
2.30
.75

1.15
3.78
. 51

465
358
1,046

77.81
68.70
39.43

.91
1.32
.61

475
382
1,089

79.48
73.30
41.06

5.07
18.92
6.32

1.206
3; 946
6,053

1
2

4
12

745
6,011

5

6
34
77

7,488
19,809
36,222

7
11
20

•

0.08 1
.11

ACCIDENTS




1
4

i
7
14
25

INDUSTRIAL

Pottery:
States
1
1925. ______ _____________________________
1926___________________ _________________
5
7
1927____ _______ ____ _________ ___________
Shipbuilding, steel:
1926_____________________________________
2
1927_______________ _____ ________________
4
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1925_____________________________________
2
1926_____________________________________
8
1927 i ___________________________________
Stamped and enameled ware:
1925. ______ _____________________________
3
1926._______ ____________________________
4
1927_____________________________________
6
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1925 ______ ________ ______ _______________
3
5
1926
______________________________
1927 _______ ___________________________
7
Stoves:
3
1925
_____________ __________________
9
1926
________________________________
11
1927_____________________________________
Structural-iron work:
4
1925_________________ ___________________
7
1926_______________________________ _____
11
1927 ..................................... ............................

STATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

N um ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

Woolen goods:
192 6
1927 i _______________
All industry groups;
192 5
192 6
192 7

7
12

21
56

1, 737
8,979

12
23

5
15
17

459
858
1, 776

95,816
283,172
608, 247

31
94
250

2.30
.85

13. 82
5.12

12
20

2. 30
.74

3. 73
.50

278
855
1,896

358
1,061

68.70
39. 39

1.32
.61

11, 761
24,002
43, 037

382
1,104

73.30
40.98

18.92
6.23

61.51
34.90
71.19
5. 34
8.64
17. 51
22.29
17. 54
42. 74

1. 02
.82
4. 73
.09
.20
1. 53
2. 28
.34
.54

12, 070
24,951
45,183

All industry groups: 1927__________

5, 461

220

3.03

3.18

2.25
.29

1.16
1.71
.09

4 30
4 21
45
1
17
56
107
59
15

61. 51
34. 90
68. 16
5. 34
8.64
16. 62
20.04
17.25
42. 74

1.02
.82
1. 55
.09
.20
.37
.57
.25
. 54

351

^ 30
4 21
4 47

41

4 17
4 59
4 119
4 60
4 15
369

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

3
3
2

19
28
23

8,899
9,881
8,931

2
3
1

0.07
.10
.04

0.45
.61
.22

47
54
46

1.
1.
1.72

1.26
1. 55
1.51

323
499
347

12.10
16.83
12.95

0.26
.43
.29

372
556
394

13.93
18.75
14.71

1.97
2. 59
2.02

5
5
4

59
63
58

177,092
213,978
179,064

51
49
61

.10
.08
.11

.58
.46
.68

690
876
649

1.30
1.36

1.21

1.01
1.08
.90

3,893
5, 595
4,491

7.33
8.72
8.36

.16
.27
.22

4,634
6, 520
5,201

8.73
10.16
9.68

1.75
1.81
1.80

1
2
2

7
7
4

2,749
4,875
3,697

1
2

.12
.14

.73
.82

10
23
7

1.21
1.57
.63

2.03
1.16
.85

97
196
70

11.76
13.40
6.31

.37
.37
.16

108
221
77

13.09
15.11
6.94

3.13
2.35
1.01

3
5
5

16
27
24

7,653
25,942
6, 735

4

.05

.31

6
61
17

.26
.78
.84

.19
.53
.62

198
449
131

8.62
5.77
6.48

.16
.20
.15

204
514
148

8.88
6.60
7.32

.35
1.04
.77

3
4
4

34
46
33

6,710
8,000
6,427

3
1
1

.15
.04
.05

.89
.25
.31

1.04
1.58
1.19

1.17
2.34
1. 38

326
435
263

16.19
18.13
13.64

.49
.48
.30

350
474
287

17.38
19. 75
14.88

2.55
3.07
1.99

i The record for Kansas, included here, covers six months only (July to December).




21

38
23

3 Data for Oklahoma only.

* Fatal cases not reported.

INDUSTRIES

Agricultural implements:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Automobiles:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Automobiles tires:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Boots and shoes:
192 5
192 6
1927_ _______ _________
Brick:
192 5
_____ _
192 6
192 7

MANUFACTURING

62
656
1, 123
1, 779
1,140
117

163
201

I
N

Brick: 1927_________________
Flour: 1927________________________________
Foundry and machine shop products: 192'
Furniture: 1927____ _____
Glass: 1927________________________________
Lumber— sawmills: 1927_________________
Petroleum refining: 1927_________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927___
Structural-iron work: 1927_______________

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days 3

T a b l e 4.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates for specified industries and States in 192-5, 1926, and 1927— Contd.

to

Statistics for specified industries— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Permanent disability

Death

Num ­
Sever­
Fre­
Sever­
Fre­
ber of Full-year
ity rate
estab­ workers N u m ­ quency ity rate N u m ­ quency
(per
rate (per
(per
rate (per
lish­
ber of
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
ments
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours'
hours'
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Fre­
ity rate
quency
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
cases
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

Sever­
Fre­
quency ity rate
(per
rate (per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours'
exposure) exposure)

6,428
8, 704
923
116

3
1

0.16
.04

0.93
.23

30
20
3
3

1.56
.77
1.08
8. 62

2.43
.61
1. 37
8.62

94
143
28
7

4.87
5.48
10.11
20.11

0.15
.28
.21
.45

127
164
31
10

6.59
6.29
11.19
28.73

3.51
1.12
1.58
9.07

24
34
29

10,014
11, 523
8,804

3
6
12

.10
.17
. 45

.60
1.04
2. 73

34
46
55

1.13
1.33
2.08

1.72
1. 71
1.84

148
382
387

4. 93
11. 05
14.65

.17
.44
.42

185
434
454

6.16
12.55
17.18

2.49
3.19
4.99

18
26

24,360
32, 389

1
7

.01
.07

.08
.43

35
55

.48
.57

.31
.49

350
484

4. 79
4.98

. 13
. 12

386
546

5.28
5. 62

.52
1.04

35
47
41

33, 727
36,106
18,984

6
5
1

.06
.05
.02

.36
.28
.11

150
188
64

1.48
1. 74
1.12

1.47
1.74
1.09

650
997
368

6. 42
9.20
6.46

.25
.49
.16

806
1,190
433

7.96
10.99
7.60

2.08
2. 51
1.36

7
26

1,087
2, 764

1
4

.31
.48

1.84
2. 89

2
23

.61
2. 77

2.45
2.94

46
167

14.11
20.14

.45
.51

49
194

15.03
23. 39

4. 74
6.34

12
11

2,042
953

1

.05

.27

11
3

1.80
.14

1.91
.05

103
43

16. 81
1.96

.74
.05

114
47

18.61
2.15

2.65
.37

75
117
96

33,379
44,932
27, 295

8
29
8

.08
.22
.10

.48
1. 29
.59

232
418
246

2. 32
3.10
3.00

1.96
2. 65
2. 78

1,139
2,845
1, 569

11. 37
21.11
19.16

.40
.73
.49

1,379
3,292
1,823

13. 77
24.43
22.26

2.84
4.67
3.86

48
96
81

10, 659
20, 745
20, 225

3
1

.05
.02

.29
.10

36
123
77

1.13
1.98
1.27

.97
1. 72
.87

264
613
489

8. 26
9. 85
7. 73

.23
.23
.IS

300
739
547

9.39
11.88
9.02

1.20
2.24
1.15

ACCIDENTS




5
8
3
4

INDUSTRIAL

States
Carpets:
2
1925
__________________
o
1926
___ ____________
1
1927
4
Carriages and wagons*2 1926
Chemicals:
2
1925
___
_________________________
5
1926
______ __________
5
1927
_________________________
Cotton goods:
4
1926
________________________________
4
1927
_________________________________
Electrical machinery:
3
1925
_________________________________
5
1926
__________________________ _____
3
1927
______________________
Fertilizers:
4
1926
_____________________
5
1927 __________________________________
Flour:
4
1926
...........
5
1927
_
___________________ _____
Foundry and machine-shop products:
5
1925
________ ________________________
6
926
________ _____________________
6
1927
_______ _________________________
Furniture:
4
1925
_
_
5
1926 ___________ _______________________
6
1927_____________________________________

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued

STATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

N um ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

3, 023
3, 586
5. 431
9; 775
8,181

2
2

1

. 50
1.16

.76
1.83

50
64

3.60
8. 21

.10
.21

58
73

4.17
9.40

1.29
2.04

3.86
3. 35

2.08
3.26

86
86

9. 48
7.99

.28
.20

121
122

13.34
11.34

2.36
3.46

.12
.07
.04

.74
.41
.24

28
58
42

1 72
1. 98
1. 71

1.36
1.92
1.97

182
406
227

11.17
13.85
9.25

.29
.57
.21

212
466
270

13.01
15.90
11.00

2.39
2.90
2.42

5, 555
8, 463
5, 215

5
11

.30
.43
.19

1.80
2. 60
1.15

45
78
47

2.70
3. 07
3.00

3.60
3. 62
2. 78

337
695
360

20. 22
27.37
23.01

.62
1.06
.67

387
784
410

23.22
30.87
26.20

6.02
7.28
4.60

7, 975
7,121
9,400

10
9
16

.42
.42
.57

2. 51
2.53
3.40

19
34
35

.79
1. 59
1.24

.57
1. 63
1.21

442
867
1,052

18.47
40. 58
37.30

.48
1. 37
1.16

471
910
1,103

19.68
42. 59
39.11

3.56
5. 53
5.77

3,027
5, 635
3, 793

2

.11
•06
.18

.66
.35
1.05

15
48
23

1.65
2. 84
2.02

1.26
2.63
1.70

79
252
130

8.70
14. 91
11.42

.23
.51
.27

95
301
155

10. 46
17. 81
13.62

2.15
3.49
3.02

7, 796
17, 649
8,630

10

12

.13
.23

.77
1. 36
2.32

66
126
29

2.82
2.38
1.12

4.12
2.60
.72

373
1, 263
386

15.95
23.85
14.91

.53
.77
.40

442
1,401
425

18.90
26. 46
16.42

5. 42
4. 73
3.44

9

.23
.03

1.35
.21

92
69

2.30
2.40

3.00
2, 89

293
140

7.33
4.87

.27
12

394
210

9.86
7. 30

4.62
3. 22

1.03
. 51

2
8
5

.34
.68
.68

1.10
.66
.93

76
132
100

13.04
11.14
13.61

.41
.34
.40

79
141
105

13. 55
11.90
14. 29

2.54
1. 51
1.33

.26
.29

1.54
1.73

32
28

2. 05
1.62

1.45
.70

187
232

12.00
13.41

.59
.40

223
265

14.31
15.32

3.58
2.83

.24
.09
.18

1.46
.56
1.05

41
121
155

83
1.61
2.48

.50
1. 57
2. 55

767
1,292
1,201

15.58
17.18
19.18

.33
.39
.40

820
1, 420
1, 367

16.65
18.88
21.84

2.29
2. 52
4.00

.59

53
18

1.73
1. 51

1.08
.80

180
64

5.88
5.35

.25
.09

236
82

7. 71
6.86

1.92
.89

13,320
9,579
1,943
3, 948
2,450

1
1

3

1
1
1

5,196
5, 765
16,412
25, O
SS
20,868

12
11

10, 204
3,985
2,607
5,813
3,411

.06
.10

.34
.59

30
48
32

3.84
2. 75
3.13

4.10
2.34
3.15

170
380
185

21.74
21. 79
18.08

.74
.87
.42

200
429
218

25. 58
24. 60
21.31

4.84
3. 55
4.16

3.160
2,079

.11
.16

.63
.95

12
9

1.27
1.42

1.16
1.94

146
60

15.40
9.47

. 52
.23

159
70

16.78
11. 05

INDUSTRIES




.43

I MANUFACTURING
N

2 This industry group has been"discontinued.

.07

7
9
35
36

4,632

ACCIDENTS

Glass:
192 5
................................................
1927................................................................
Hardware:
192 6
_______ ________________
192 7
_______ ____________
Leather:
192 5
_________
192 6
______
192 7
_____ ____
Lumber— Planing mills:
192 5
_____ _________ _
192 6
192 7
Lum ber— sawmills:
192 5
_____ ________________
192 6
192 7
Machine tools:
192 5
192 6
_____ _
192 7
Paper and pulp:
192 5
_____ __________
192 6
192 7
_____
Petroleum refining:
192 6
192 7
Pottery:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Shipbuilding, steel:
192 6
192 7
Slaughtering and meat packing:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Stamped and enameled ware:
________ ______ _______
192 6
192 7
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
192 5
_____ ___________________
192 6
_______ ___________
192 7
...............................................
Stoves:
1926. _______________________________
1927___________________________________

2.31
3.12
bO
CO

T a b l e 4 .— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates for specified industries and States in 1025, 1926, and 1927— Contd.

E
O

Statistics for specified industries— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Permanent disability

Death

Num ­
Sever­
Fre­
Fre­
Sever­
ber of Full-year
quency ity rate
ity rate
estab­ workers N u m ­ quency
N um ­
(per
rate (per
lish­
rate (pel ' (per
ber of
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
1,000
ments
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

i

Sever­
Sever­
Fre­
Fre­
quency ity rate
quency ity rate N u m ­
rate (per
(per
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
1,000
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

1,850
2,428
2,274

4
18
16

361,448
538, 836
415,871

2.16
5. 77
1. 76

6,910
5, 722
6,876

481
859
729

0. 36
.96
.29

114
173
150

25
28
30

4. 50
3.84
4.40

4.97
2. 85
4.22

94
215
286

16.94
29. 52
41.92

0. 57
1.17
1.02

121
250
318

21.80
34. 32
46. 61

7. 70
9. 79
7.00

9
23
18

2
7
2

.43
1. 34
.87

.22
1.56
.94

33
75
67

1. 59
4. 37
3. 25

.06
.20
.08

42
98
85

2.02
5. 71
4.12

.28
1.76
1.02

3.60
10.00
34.23
4.84
27. 51
25.00
39.54
11.18
36.67
25.00
21.62
11.67

0.92
1.14
13.06
1.00
16.52
3.53
8.34
1.61
1.30
7.86
3.12
.33

11,392
21,996
15, 460

9, 735
19,129
13,457

1,543
2,694
1,853

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days8

Boots and shoes: 1926.________ ____________
Brick: 1926___ _____________________________
Chemicals: 1926___________ _ ___________
Cotton goods: 1926 ______________________
Fertilizers: 1926 _______________ _______ _
Flour: 1926 . . .
_____________________
.
Foundry and m&chine-shop products: 1926
Furniture: 1926
______________________
Leather: 1926
_ ___________
Lumber— Planing mills: 1926_.
_ ______
_
Lumber— Sawmills: 1926-_ _______
_____
Paper and pulp: 1926----------------------------------




1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

5
3
1
3
3
2
3
2
1
2
5
2

1,664
274
851
5,999
517
78
717
559
113
480
3,288
388

2

0.77

4.70

4

2.50

15.48

1

.45

2.79

1
2

. 71
.20

4.16
1.21

2
1
9
10
1
1
6
5

0.40
1.25
3.46
.56
.63
5.00
2. 73
2.94

0. 86
.91
7.28
.87
.19
2. 57
4.65
1.34

4
17

2.86
1.72

3.22
1.22

16
7
78
77
39
4
80
14
11
30
195
14

3.20
8.75
30.00
4.28
24. 38
20.00
36.36
8.24
36.67
21.43
19. 70
11.67

0.06
.23
1.08
.13
.85
.96
.90
.27
1.30
.48
.69
.33

18
8
89
87
44
5
87
19
11
35
214
14

ACCIDENTS

16
18
15

INDUSTRIAL

States
Structural ironwork:
1925 ____________________________________
5
5
1926 ___________ ________________________
5
1927 _ _________________________________
Woolen goods:
1
1925
5
1926
- _______
5
1927
.
__________________
All industry groups:
5
1925
6
1926
6
1927
__________ ______ ____ _____ ______

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued

STATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

Num ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

Pottery: 1926.______________________________
Ship building, steel: 1926__________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1926______
Stoves: 1926______ ________________________
Structural-iron work: 1926.. ___________ _
W oolen goods: 1926_________ _______________

1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
2

167
4,233
53
73
43
446

All industry groups: 1926....................... ..

1

39

19,943

2

.16

.94

31

2.12

1
12

2.44
10.00

23. 76

88

2
112

4.00
8.82

0.05
.22

2
145

4.00
11.42

.05
3.28

g
3

35.00
80.00
2.30

.62
3.45
.06

7
9
3

35. (K
90.00
2.30

.62
27.21
.06

697

797

All industry groups:
1926__________________
1927............................................................

1
1
1

9
10
5

5,917
6,353
196

1
1

3
4

2,092
1,888

1
1
1

5
4
1

2,312
2,182
250

1
1

1
2
18
26

10,368
11,055

1
1

0.18

62
66
3

3.48
3.46
5.10

0.12
.12
. 28

67
70
3

3.76
3.67
5.10

0.41
.18
.28

6
7

.95
1.24

.84
! 66

102
54

16.19
9.53

.45
. o'*

108
A
0O
z

17.14
in. yo
qc
iu

1.29
OA
A
Z. uu

4
g
2

1.06

0.29
.06

.58
1.22
2.67

.43
1.37
7. 75

48
78
22

6.96
11.92
29.38

06

! 92

0/
24

*7 O
/. Aft
o
13.29
32.05

2.85
8.67

1
4

1

0.28
.21

10.00
7.16

.15
.27

1
4

10.00
7.16

.15
.27

47
186

1
1

5
4

.14
.15

.86
.92

1
2

15
21

213
997

1. 4o

229
250

1

Agricultural implements:
1925_____________________________
..
1926_____________________
1927______________________
Automobiles:
1925______________________
1926_____________________________
1927______________
Automobile tires:
1925_ ______________________
1926___________________________________
1927_________________________ _____ ______

1

5
8
3

1, 282
1,019
614

1
2
1

5
14
5

7,851
9,555
915

1
2
1

6
8
2

2,459
4,246
2,165

1
2

3
5
3
5
6

0. 21
.21

2
1

. 16
.15

5 B ata are for Virginia only.
6 Data are for Alabama only.
7 Data are for California and Pennsylvania in 1925 and 1926, and California in 1927,




1. 27
1.26

.94
.82 .

0. 78
1. 64
1.09

0.34
.93
.51

3
5
3

0. 78
1.64
1.09

0.34
.93
.51

41
46
3

1. 74
1. 60
1.09

1. 22
1. 37
. 51

46
52

1.95
1.81
1.09

2.49
2. 63
.51

9
12
4

1. 22
. 94
.62

1.13
.63
.57

9
14
5

1. 22
1.10
.77

1.13
1. 57
1.49

INDXJSTEIES

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities 7

I MANTJFACTUEING
N

Cotton goods:
1926___________________ _______________
1927_______ _______ _______ _________
Fertilizers: 1927_______ ___ ...........................
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926__________________________
1927_________________ _______
Lumber— Sawmills:
1926_________________________
1927______________
Shipbuilding, steel: 1927
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926_________________
1927__________________________ ___________

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks 6

T a b l e 4. — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates for specified industries and States in 1925, 1926, and 1927— Contd.

to

Statistics for specified industries— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 19261

Permanent disability

Death

Num ­
Sever­
Fre­
Sever­
Fre­
ber of
Full-year
ity rate
quency ity rate N u m ­ quency
estab­
workers N um ­ rate (per
(per
rate (per
(per
lish­
ber of
ber of
1,000
1,000
1,000,000
ments
cases 1,000,000
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Fre­
Sever­
quency ity rate
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

Sever­
Fre­
quency ity rate
(per
rate (per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)




2,697
3,539

19
40
11

4,106
6,037
2,567

2
3
2

0.16
.17
.26

0.97
.99
1.56

3
17

0.24
.94

0.30
.67

5
20
2

0.40
1.11
.26

1.27
1.66
1.56

14
11
2

4,571
2,440
53

2

.15

.88

3
4

.22
.55

.08
.41

5
4

.37
.55

.96
.41

2
4
2
6

2,626
1,166
373
2, 539

1
1

.29
.89

1. 72
5. 36

1
1
3

.29
.89
.39

.09
.45
.20

2
2
3

.58
1.78
.39

1.81
5.81
.20

13
14
1

19,441
21,146
201

7
4

.12
.06

.72
.38

69
21

1.18
.33

.80
. 22

76
25

1.30
.39

1.52
.60

2
3
4

142
68
93

109
102
18

27,121
30, 483
2,056

5
17
2

.06
. 19

.37
1.12
1.95

47
123
14

.58
1.35
2. 27

.53
1.10
1.92

52
140
16

.64
1. 54
2. 59

.90
2.22
3.87

........___i.................. \_________

ACCIDENTS

Txraorvnci*

8
13

INDUSTRIAL

States
Boots and shoes:
1
1925
1
1926
Bricks:
1
1925
1926
1
1927
Carpets:
1
1925
1
1926
1
f^orriacrPQ cmrl
2 1Q9A
.Chemicals:
1
1925
1
1926
1
1927
1
Cotton goods- 1926
Electrical machinery:
1
1925
1
1Q26
1
1927
Fertilizers:
1
1926
1
IQ27
Plni-ir- i oofi
1
Foundry and machine shop products:
1
1925
1926
1
1927______________________________ _____ -

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities— Continued

BTATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

Num ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

1

32
32
7

4, 393
3, 839
1,108

25
22
3
5

17
12
9

1. 29
1.04
2.71

.76
.64
2.91

7
18
2
11

.48
1.25
1.02
1. 57

.59
2. 63
3. 21
.53

2
11
4

.17
.82
2.41

.05
1.41
4. 39

2
15
33

.91
1.65
1.73

1.91
.99
4. 23

115
62

2.84
2.97

5.69
5.67

.50

2

3.34

10.68

.30
.24

4
6

.87
.80

1.61
1.83

.49
2. 55

.22
1.44

21
45

1.15
3.82

4.17
9.08

2

2. 67

1.07

3

4.01

9.10

12
8

1.12
.91

.48
.46

15
11

1.40
1.25

2.16
2. 51

.94

.43

6

1.41

3.29

.33

2. 31

1

.33

2.31

7
3

.87
.46

1.01
1.08

.26
.80
3. 58

1.58
2. 73
1. So

17
12
8

1.29
1.04
2. 41

7
14
1
11

.48
.97
.51
1. 57

.59
.97
. 15 ________ j__________
.53

.89
3. 61

2
9
3

. 17
.67
1.80

.05
. 52
! 78

.53

3.13

2
15
23

.91
1.65
1.20

1.91
.99
1.10

27
15

.67
.72

3.99
4.31

88
47

2.17
2.25

1,119
196

1

1.67

10.18

1

1.67

4
6

1,532
2, 501

1
2

.22
.27

1.31
1.59

3
4

. 65
.53

1

9
2

6,072
3,927

12
15

.66
1.27

3.95
7.64

9
30

1
1

1
2

277
249

1

1.34

8.03

1

3
2

3, 563
2,924

3
3

.28
.34

1.68
2.05

1
1

6
4

1,102
1,424

2

.47

2. 81

4

1
1

2
3

108
410

1

1

2,669
2,173
43

2
1

.12
. 15

6
2

.75
.31

.26
.16

1

24
11
2

1
1
1

9
5
2

1, 264
821
280

1
1

.26
.40 j

1
3

.40
3. 58

.30
1.85

1

.30

1.81

4, 903
4, 833
653
2, 337

4
1

.28
.51

1. 66
3.06

14
22
5

3, 870
4, 510
554

2
1

. 15
.61

1

5
24
17

735
3,038
6, 371

10

1

23
16

13. 520
6, 958

1
1

7
3

1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1

1. 58
2.43

i
i

____ j_____
i

i

1

1.70
1.36

I

j

!
1

!

1
2

3

!

INDUSTRIES

.75
.92

.76
. 64
1.10

I MANUFACTURING
N

1

ACCIDENTS

Furniture:
1925__________
1926 ___________
____________
1927_ _________
________________
Glass:
1925 ____________________ _____ _________
1926 ____________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Hardware: 1926_____ _______________________
Leather:
1925
1926_____________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Lum ber— Planing mills:
1925_____________________________________
1926_____________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Lumber— Sawmills:
1926_____________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Machine tools:
1925_____________________________________
1926_________________ _______ ____________
Paper and pulp:
1925_____________________________________
1926_____________________________________
Petroleum refining:
1926______________________
_____ _
1927_____________________________________
P ottery
1926_____________________________________
1927_______________________
______
Shipbuilding, Steel:
1926_____________________________________
1927__________
____
_________
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926_____________________________________
1927___________ _____ _____________________
Stamped and enameled ware:
1926_____ ______ _________________________
1927_____________________________________
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1925_________________ ___________________
1926_____________________________________
1927____________ ________ ____ _____ ______
^Stoves:
1925_____ _______________________________
1926_____________________________________
1927._____ ______________ ________________

2 This industry group has been discontinued.




bO
-<I

T a b le

4. — N um ber o f accidents and accident frequen cy and severity rates fo r specified industries and States in 1925, 1926, and 1927 — Contd.

tO

00

Statistics for specified industries— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1S2C]
Permanent disability

Death

Total

Temporary disability

N um ­
Sever­
FreSever­
Fre­
Sever­
Fre­
ber of
Full-year
ity rate
! quency
quency ity rate
quency ity rate
estab­
Num ­
Num ­
workers N u m ­
rate (per
(per
(per
rate (per
(per
lish­
rate (per
ber of
ber of
ber of
1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
1,000
1,000
ments
1,000,000
cases
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Fre­
quency ity rate
(per
rate (per
1,000,000
1,000
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities— Continued

1
1
1
1
1
11
25
26

20
18
4

2,681
3,374
647

1
4
2

0.12
.40
1.03

0. 75
2.37
6.19

10
21
4

1.24
2.07
2.06

0.45
1.08
.98

11
25
6

1.36
2.47
3.09

1.20
3.45
7.17

21
15
1

5, 772
4,041
141

2

.06

.35

4
6

.23
.49

.26
.66

5
6

.29
.49

.61
.66

342
435
115

98, 732
138, 763
34, 648

26
90
57

226
438
161

1, 282
555,996
2, 209
991,082
2, 676 1,075, 282

171
370
459

2,047
4,090
3,949

36. 78
29.60
23. 66

1.06
5.59
1.75

252
528
218

ACCIDENTS

Grand total— All industry groups:
1925
1926
1927

States

23, 714
48, 501
64, 480

21, 496
44,041
57, 072

Statistics for specified States
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

Indiana:
1925.
1926.
1927.




Industries
13

22
23

122
153
165

20, 587
39,907
47,110

1
12
16

0.02
.10
.11 1

0.10
.60
.68

51
229
149

0.83
1.91
1. 05

0.46
4. 55
.74

2,219
3, 326
3,180

35.93
27. 59
22.50

0. 50
.44
.33

2,271
3,567
3, 345 |

INDUSTRIAL

A ll industry groups:
1925
1926
1927............................................................

O
F

Structural-iron work:
1925
1926
1927
Woolen goods:
1925
1926
1927

STATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

Num ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

11,073
12,105
12,437
11,281

2
6
6
3

0.06
.17
.16
.09

0.36
.99
.97
.53

40
39
50
10

1.20
1.07
1.34
.30

1.01
.90
.74
.13

880
1,024
1,179
813

26.49
28.21
31.60
24.02

0.40
.54
.52
.29

922
1,069
1,235
826

27.75
29.45
33.10
24.41

1.77
2.43
2.22
.95

11
10

24
18

7,181
6,671

2

.10

.60

47
40

2.19
2.00

1. 71
1. 55

1, 267
922

58.93
46.06

.78
.63

1,314
964

61.12
48.16

2.49
2.78

9
8

24
24

12,389
13,318

1
5

(8
)
.13

(8
)
.75

21
28

.57
.70

.53
.81

1,005
711

27.04
17.80

. 45
.36

1,027
744

27.61
18.63

.98
1.92

12
20
20

52
74
84

7,198
13,864
15, 3i0

1
5
8

.05
.12
.17

.28
.72
1.05

12
35
71

.56
.84
1.55

.84
.64
1.48

478
826
1, 0C
6

22.13
19.86
21.90

.45
.44
.45

491
866
1,085

22.74
20.82
23.62

1.57
1.80
2.98

15
15

156
164

76,568
80, 205

7
3

.03
.01

.18
.07

50
75

.22
.31

.16
.20

1,990
3,496

8. 62
14.53

.20
.33

2,047
3,574

8.87
14.85

.54
.60

12
13
12
2

60
66
68
4

13, 744
14,0*8
14,857
934

14
16
16
2

.34
.38
.36
.07

2.04
2.28
2.15
4.28

55
1C4
111

1.33
2.47
2.49

1.46
2. 78
1.84

1,141
2,645
1, 751
64

27. 67
62.83
39.28
2.29

.49
1.16
.83
.37

1,210
2,765
1,878
66

29.34
65.68
42.13
2.36

3.99
6.22
4.82
4.65

6
6

23
22

6,078
6,080

3
1

.16
.05

.99
.33

15
9

.82
.49

1.33
.32

712
717

39.05
39.31

.48
.50

730
727

40.03
39.85

2.80
1.15

5
5
25

15
14
209

15,253
15,679
103, 638

1
2
40

.02
. C4
.13

.13
.26
.77

5
12
751

.11
.26
2.42

.07
.26
2.39

650
557
3,924

14.19
11.84
12.62

.29
.23
.47

656
571
4,715

14.32
12.14
15.17

.49
.75
3.63

3
4

7
5

137
154

1
1

2.50
2.15

14. 59
8.60

60
43

150.00
92.47

2. 59
.95

61
44

152.50
94.62

17.18
9. 55

15
25
27
29
3

171
190
360
379
4

43,214
64,208
115,303
119,254
1,080

13
35
52
54
1

.10
.18
.15
.15
.31

.60
1.08
.90
.91
1.85

120
100
2C
8
171
10

.93
.93
.60
.48
3.13

.93
.£3
.75
.30
1.02

7,043
8,343
10,275
8,875
253

54. 32
42.16
29.70
24. 81
79.06

.56
.56
.47
.31
1.04

7,176
8, 5C
8
10, 535
9, IC
O
264

55.35
43.32
30.45
25.44
82.50

2.09
2.42
2.12
1.52
3.91

17
16
11

40
40
72

10,171
9, 771
26, 357

3
2
32

.10
.07
.40

.59
.41
2.43

67
32
159

2.20
1. C9
2.01

1. 51
.83
2.49

938
727
4,012

30.74
24.80
50.74

.37
.29
.80

1,008
761
4,203

33.04
25.96
53.15

2.47
1.53
5.72

12
11

27
25

9,249
10,822

2
8

.07
.25

.43
1.48

42
19

1.52
.59

2.04
.48

899
849

32.45
26.15

.51
.39

943
876

34.04
26.99

2.98
2.35

21
459
30
808
29 1 1,806

95, 816
283,172
613, 708

31
94
250

278
855
1,914

I The record for Kansas included her&covers 6 months only (July to December).

12,070
24,951
45. 552

11, 761
24,002
43. 388
8 Less than 0.005/

INDUSTRIES




54
51
57
70

I MANUFACTURING
N

Total:
1925.
1926.
1927..

9
11
11
9

ACCIDENTS

36904°—29--------- 3

Iowa:
1925-......... .............
192 6
_____
192 7
Kansas: i 1 927 ...........
K entucky:
192 6
192 7
M aine:
192 6
_____ _
192 7
M aryland:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Massachusetts:
192 6
................
192 7
Minnesota:
192 5
192 6
192 7
M ontana: 1926______
Nebraska:
192 6
192 7
N ew Hampshire:
192 6
192 7
N ew York: 1927_____
N orth Dakota:
192 6
192 7
Ohio:
_____ _
192 5
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania: 1927..
South Dakota: 1926.
Tennessee:
192 6
192 7
..............
Texas: 1927__________
W est Virginia:
1926______________
1 9 2 7 ..___________

fcO

CO

T able

4. — Number o f accidents and accident frequency and severity rates for specified industries and States in 1925, 1926, and 1927— Contd.

W

Statistics for specified States— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death

Permanent disability

Temporary disability

Num ­
Sever­
ber of
Sever­
Fre­
Fre­
Full-year
estab­
ity rate
ity rate
quency
workers N u m ­ quency
N um ­
Num ­
lish­
(per
rate (per
(per
rate (per
ber of
ber of
ber of
ments
1,000
1,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
cases
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)
exposure) exposure)

Fre­
Sever­
quency ity rate
rate (per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

Total

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Fre­
quency ity rate
rate (per
(per
1,000,000
1,000
hours’
hours’
exposure) exposure)

9

30

5,461

_________ 1

(0

18

1.10

0.94

351

21.42

0.47

i 369

22. 52

1.41

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week




32
47

23,322
25,868

4
7

0.06
.09

0.34
.54

45
52

0.64
.67

0.59
.55

471
653

6.73
8.41

0.16
.21

520
712

7.43
9.17

1.09
1.30

120
208
204

51, 329
80,033
74,644

21
24
20

.14
.10
.G
9

.82
.CO
. 54

134
399
512

.87
1.66
2.29

.69
1.49
2.27

1,737
3,182
3,063

11.28
13.25
13.68

.27
.33
.30

1,892
3,605
3,595

12.29
15.01
16.06

1.78
2.42
3.11

44
181
186

165,918
227,350
200,895

48
75
78

.10
.11
.13

.58
.65
.78

580
837
677

1.17
1.23
1.12

.90
.85
.76

3,624
6,900
5,751

7.28
10.12
9.54

.16
.32
.27

4,252
7,812
6,506

8.55
11.46
10.79

1.64
1.82
1.81

113
126
141

46,064
50,102
53,601

7
3
6

.03
.02
.04

.30
.12
.22

223
344
405

1.03
2.29
2.52

1.57
2.53
2.98

1,010
1,237
1,080

4.65
8.23
6.72

.21
.19
.17

1,240
1,584
1,491

5. 71
10.54
9.28

2.08
2.84
3.37

131
207
47

70,055
112,942
17,880

26
48
10

.12
.14
.19

.74
.85
1.12

511
865
56

2.43
2.55
1.04

2.79
2.65
.67

1,733
4,618
721

8.25
13.63
13.44

.37
.73
.36

2,270
5,531
787

10.80
16.32
14.67

3.90
4.23
2.15

ACCIDENTS

Indus­
Georgia:
tries
1926....................................................................
10
1927_____________ _____ ________ _________
11
Illinois:
1924____________________________ ________
13
1926_____________________________________
24
1927__________________________ _______ _
23
Michigan:
1925_____________________________________
7
1926_____________________________________
24
1927____________________ ______ _________
22
N ew Jersey: 9
1925___________________________ ________
14
1926._______ _____ _____ _________________
20
22
1927..................................................................
N ew York:
1925_____________________________________
15
25
1926______ ______ _________________ ______
Virginia; 1927........................................................
17

INDUSTRIAL

Oklahoma: 1927_ ...............................................

O
F

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

STATISTICS

Industry or State, and year

Num ­
ber of
States
or
indus­
tries

Wisconsin:
1925_...........................................
1926_____ _____ _________
.
1927 ....... ..........................................

11
20
19

28,082
45,087
42, 983

12
19
29

21
29
29

Total:
1925_ .....................................................
1926.. ...................
1927______________ _____ _ _

73
105
104
481
859
729

361,448
538, 836
415,871

114
173
150

.14
14
.22

.85
.84
1.35

95
204
151

1.13
1. 51
1.17

.55
1.18
.71

1,543
2, 694
1, 853

1,631
2, 721
2,189

19. 36
20.11
16. 98

.41
.48
.43

9,735
19,129
13, 457

1, 738
2,944
2,369

20.63
21.76
18.37

1.81
2.50
2.49

797

13.32

3.20

229
250

10.61
7.53

1.07
1.23

11, 392
21,996
15,460

Virginia: 1926_______

18

39

19,943

12

0. 20

1. 20

88

1.47

1.65

697

11.65

0.35

Alabama:
1926__________________
1927______________

4
6

18
26

10,368
11,055

1
2

0.03
.06

0.19
.36

15
21

0.48
.63

0. 60
.60

213
227

10.10
6.84

0.28
.27

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

16
22

108
115

30, 703
34,648

41
57

0. 45
. 55

2. 67
3. 29

147
161

1.60
1. 55

1.18
1. 00

188
218

2.05
2.10

3.85
4. 29

19
28

342
327

98, 732
108,060

26
49

. 26
.16

1. 54
. 95

226
291

2 23
.94

1. 66
.70

252
340

2.49
1.10

3. 20
1.65

Total:
1925_________________
1926______________________
1927......... ............................

19
30
22

342
435
115

98, 732
138, 7C3
34, 648

26
90
57

226
438
161

Grand total, all State groups:
1 9 2 5 .................................................
1926____________________________
1927_________________________________

24
30
29

1,282
555, 996
2, 209
991,082
2,676 1, 075,282

171
370
459

2,047
4, 090
3,949




|

4 Fatal cases not reported.

|

i
1

252
528
218

1

21, 496
44, 041
57, 072

23, 714
48, 501
61, 480

INDUSTRIES

California:
1926______________________ .
1927_ ______________________
Pennsylvania:
1925_________________________
1926__________________________

I MANUFACTURING
N

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

9 Closed cases only are reported.

CO

32

STATISTICS O F IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID E N T S

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES IN SPECIFIED STATES, BY INDUSTRY

A new feature in this report is found in Table 5, wherein the accident
data for each specified State is presented by industry, thus affording
an opportunity for each State to compare its experience in a particular
industry during the years covered. The States are grouped according
to the extent to which accidents are reported. Thus those States
reporting all accidents in which the disability extended beyond the
day of injury will be found in the first group, comprising therefore
the most complete reports and rendering the resultant rates more
accurate and more nearly a true picture of the accident hazard in
each industry. Those States reporting accidents in which disabilities
extended beyond the first week, 10 days, and the second week, respec­
tively, are found in subsequent groups.
It is earnestly to be hoped that all States will soon require the
reporting of all accidents, so that a fair and uniform basis will be
afforded for the computation of industrial accident statistics. To
omit that large group of accidents in which the disabilities last beyond
the day of injury but which terminate within the first week, minimizes
the importance and lessens the value of accidents rates, and in most
instances results in the computation of rates that are actually
misleading. For effective accident prevention work it is essential
that all accidents be reported.




T a b l e 5« — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Sever­
Frequen­
Frequen­
ity rate
ity rate
cy rate
cy rate
Num ­
(per
(per
(per
(per
1,000
ber of
1 000,000
,
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
ex­
ex­
exposure)
exposure)
posure)
posure)

1 000,000

,

I

1,000

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1, 000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)




3, 732
1,410
1,136

4
9
9
1

2, 239
12, 581
17,312
190

10
9
9
2

696
686
649
94

1
1

1, 300
1, 343

2
2

515
553

3
5
5

3, 0S0
3,904
4, 792

3
5

105
194

6
6

185
1S6

1

0. 09

0. 54

1

.29

1.76

4
2

.11
.04

64
.23

1

.51

3.08

1

1.38
6.90

488
149
118

43. 59
35. 48
34. 61

0. 72
.90
.72

506
167
120

45. 20
39. 77
35.19

2.64
7. 80
2.57

1.34
2.15
.77
1.75

.47
9.67
.55
.53

176
898
847
17

26. 21
23.82
16.31
29.82

.27
.27
.20
.54

185
983
889
18

27. 55
26.08
17.12
31. 57

.74
10.58
.98
1.07

.95
.51

.14
1.60
1.54

166
185
122
8

79. 56
88.10
62. 69
26. 67

.71
1.22
.68
.58

167
187
124
8

80.04
89.05
63. 71
26.67

.85
2.82
5.30
.58

57
45

.

1.52
4.29
.29

14. 62
11.16

.18
.14

57
45

14. 62
11.16

.18
.14

i
!

.39
.45

18
12

12.00
7. 24

.13
.18

19
14

12.67
8.44

.52
4.25

.10
1.39
.62

184
275
162

19.91
23.50
11.27

.17
.35
.17

187
298
183

20.23
25.47
12. 73

.27
1.74
.79

1.72

3. 62

.67
.60
.32
1.97
1.46

.60

3.09

23
20

76. 67
34.36

.80
.56

23
21

76. 67
36.08

.80
3.65

5.00
1.79

6.49
.54

12
15

20.00
26.88

.31
.31

15
16

25.00
28. 67

6.80
.85

i
i
1
i

!

INDUSTRIES

i This industry group has been discontinued,

9
7
7

I MANUFACTURING
N

Indiana
Agricultural implements:
192 5
192 6
192 7
1_____
Automobiles:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Automobile tires: 1927____________________________
Brick:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Carriages and wagons:1 1926_____________________
Chemicals:
192 6
192 7
Cotton goods:
192G____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Electrical machinery:
192 5
.
192 6
192 7
....................................................................
Fertilizers:
192 6
192 7
.......................................................................
Flour:
1926____________________________________________
1927_____________ ______________________________

ACCIDENTS

Industry and year

Permanent disability

OO
OO

T a b le

5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

CO

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Industry and year

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
N um ­
(per
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

N um ­
ber of
cases

Total

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Indiana-—Continued

1
2
3
3
2

124
248
204

1

3
3
3

560
307
269

2

1
1

3, 614
3,518

4

2
2

303
314

418
412
277

73.76
60.59
45. 58

0.94
4.31
5.11

.60
2.07
2.12
.60

.26
1.92
1.59
.40

458
453
433
316

25.09
23.47
23.59
37.97

.24
.68
.32
.66

469
493
472
321

25.69
25.54
25. 71
38. 57

.50
2.60
1.91
1.06

2
13
2

1.07
6.19
1.05

.32
7.10
1.89

93
83
68

49. 71
39. 52
35.73

.35
.53
.65

95
96
72

50. 78
45. 71
37.83.

.67
7.63
8.85

3.03

12.12

21
23

70. C
O
69. 70

1.35
2.13

21
24

70.00
72.73

1.35
14. 25

1.63

1.96

15
24
3

40.32
34.28
4.90

.60
.29
.10

15
25
4

40.32
35. 71
6. 53

.60
8.35
2.06

3
3

1. 79
3.33

.80
8.13

50
40
43

29.78
44.44
53. 22

3.63
.36
1.16

53
45
43

31. 57
49.99
53.22

4.43
21.49
1.16

2. 27

.38

0.78
.82
.67

13.00

2. 22

73.23
58. 68
43. 61

5
4

.46
.38

.30
.11

70
70

6.48
6.63

.14
.12

75
78

6.94
7. 39

.44
2.50

1.11
1.06

.33
.32

12
12

13. 33
12.74

.23
.18

13
13

14.44
13.80

.56
.50

95
110

2
3

2

0.29
.49

1.78
2.96

6.31

1.05

1.43

8.06

1

1
1

,

ACCIDENTS




624
711
634

415
399
265

6,086
6,418
6,119
2, 774

8
10
10

0.16
1.71
1.48

1

50
52
52
11

0. 53
1.62
1.48

1

1,889
2, 250
2,025

3
11
9
11
40
39
5

15
12
12

INDUSTRIAL

Foundry and machine-shop products:
1925
.................................
1926
___________ i _________
................................. ........................
1927
Furniture:
1925
.................
1926
.
_______
1927
_____________ _______ ________________
Glass- 1927
Lumber— Planing mills:
1925
_____
1926
....................................... ..
1927
_________________________________
Lumber— Sawmills:
1Q26
1927
___________ _________________
M achine tools:
1925
1926
- - - - - ______
1927
_____________________
Paper and pulp:
1925
___________ . . _______
1926
__________________________________
1927
Petroleum refining:
1926
- - ___________ ________
1927
.................................................................
Pottery:
1926
_____________ ____________
1927.............................................- ..................................

STATISTICS

Death

8
9

3, 393
3,083

2
2
2

1
1

.10
.11

.59
.65

1.96
.32

349
404

34. 22
43.67

.48
.58

367
414

35.99
44.75

3.03
1.55

588
654
514

3
4

1.50
2.60

2.34
1.36

24
43
21

13.61
21. 50
13.63

.14
.23
.18

24
46
25

13.61
23.00
16.23

.14
2.57
1.54

1
2
1

244
235
250

3
1

4. 29
1.33

12. 32
.40

43
44
44

58. 71
63.86
58.69

.55
.41
.57

43
47
45

58.71
67.15
60.02

.55
12.73
.97

9
8
8

572
612
662

1
2
2

. 58
1.11
1.00

. 17
3* 59
l! 21

72
77
85

41.96
42. 77
42.80

.54
.68
.69

73
79
87

42.54
43.88
43.80

.71
4.27
1.90

5
5
5

153
287
279

1
3
4

2.17
3.33
4.78

1. 30
13! 69
2.15

35
86
35

76.07
95. 55
41.81

.52
1.54
.87

36
91
40

78.24
101.10
47.78

1.82
29.15
10.19

38
42
35

30.27
35.00
27.50

0.44
.60
.34

38
42
35

30.27
35.00
27. 50

0.44
.60
.34

74
101
81
2

24. 36
48.10
. 31.72
40.00

.45
.84
.72
1.37

76
104
81
2

25.02
49.53
31.72
40.00

2.53
4.12
.72
1.37

9
17

20.86
24.84

.57
.22

9
17

20.86
24.84

.57
.22

2
1

2.22
1.19

13.92
7.17

Iowa
Agricultural implements:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Brick:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Carriages and wagons:1 1926___________
Fertilizers:
192 6
192 7
Flour:
1925____________________________
1927__________________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Furniture:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Lumber— Planing mills:
192 5
192 6
192 7
1 This industry group has been discontinued.




4
4
4

418
397
424

16
12
12
1

1,013
702
851
17

1
1

17
18

6
7

143
228

10
10
9

2, 785
2, 557
2, 559

5
4
4

504
559
600

7
8
8

1, 770
1, 820
1, 566

1

1
1

0.33

.12
.13

1.98

.72
.78

1
3

0. 33
1.43

0.10
3. 28

.36
.42

2.19
2. 55

1.80
.65
1.04

1.38
.29
.49

316
120
137

37.82
15.59
17.85

.52
.35
.37

332
126
145

39.74
16.37
18.89

2.62
1.42
.86

1

2
2

15
5
8

.59

.18

36
34
22

23. 79
20.00
12.23

.19
.62
.24

36
35
22

23.79
20. 59
12.23

.19
.80
.24

5
12
6

. 94
2.18
1. 28

1. 24
L36
.57

44
75
58

8. 29
13. 64
12.35

.20
.33
.29

49
89
66

9.23
16.18
14.05

INDUSTRIES

1. 67
.97

I MANUFACTURING
N

17
9

ACCIDENTS

Slaughtering and meat-packing:
192 6
_______
192 7
______________________________
Stamped and enameled ware:
192 5
_______
192 6 _____ __________________________
192 7
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
192 5
192 6
192 7
_____ ______________________
:Stoves:
192 5
_____ ___________
192 6
1927__________________________________
Structural-iron work:
192 5
________ ____________________
192 6
_______
1927— . ________ ______________________

1.44
3.88
3.41
OJ
Oi

T a b l e 5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

00

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

Fullyear
workers

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000 hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Total

Temporary disability

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

4
8
9

4,
5, 816 i
5, 980 !
1

C6
f.3
46

2. 73
3.33

2. 05
7.09

18
14
25

49.11
46. 67
82. 44

1.36
.70
1. 39

19
15
25

51.84
50.00
82.44

3.41
7. 79
1,39

18
15
36

1.41
.86
2.01

1.11
.52
1.19

345
625
794

27. 04
35. 92
44. 26

.40
.61
.64

363
643
834

28.45
36.95
46.49

1. 51
2.16
3.17

1

5.00

. 17

1

5.00

.17

10

20.00
72.47

3. 55
3.09

12
10

30.60
72.47

30. 76
3.09

r.4
C4

1
1
1

1
1

3
4

1.C3
1.34

0.17

i
|
2

10.00

27. 21

i

1
0

Kansas 3

Brick: 1927
_
■
Chemicals: 1927
Flour: 1927_
_______ ______________________ J
Foundry and machine-shop products: 1927
1
Furniture- 1927
'
Paper and pu<p: 1927
__
!
Petroleum refining' 1927
1
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927. __ _ . . . _!
Structural-iron work: 1927
i
1




8
3 1
44 ;
2
1
1
1
S

367
459
l,5.r3
250
11
140
303
7,770
428

I
I
!
|
2
!
1
' ______ 1
1
i
!

!
.

,

1

!

i
i
2.57 j

__ _

0. 43

I

1
1
2

1

1 |

0. 72
.43

0. 22
.26

2.37

.71

1.10
_________I
1

6

.26 |

.11

28
25
108 !
!

25. 41
18.14
23.18
21.30

0.32
.19
.34
.41

28
26
112
16

25.41
18.86
24.04
21.30

0.32
.11
3.17
.41

14 !
45 '
533 |
44

33. 24
49.45
22. 87
34. 27

.37
.41
.27
.52

15
46
539
44

35. 61
50. 55
23.13
34. 27

1.08
7.00
.38
.52

16

ACCIDENTS

|
i

122
113
101

1
1

!

I

i
I

1
1
1

INDUSTRIAL

Paper and pulp:
1925
1926 _
1927
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1925
192 6
1927 . . .
.
_______ ______________________
Stoves:
1926
1927
Structural-iron work:
1925
1926 _______________________________
...
1927
__

O
F

Iowa— Continued

STATISTICS

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Industry and year

Permanent disability

Kentucky

537
333
263

5
4
10

3.12
4.01
12.50

0.93
3.16
14.00

70
30
35

43. 75
30.05
43.75

0.55
.86
1.00

75
34
45

46.87
34.06
56. 25

1.48
4.02
15.00

536
584

1
3

.63
1.71

.47
2.88

24
21

15.00
12.00

.24
.16

25
24

15.63
13.71

.71
3.04

329
302

2
2

2.00
2.20

.61
.66

33
57

33.00
62.83

.36
.86

35
59

35.00
65.03

.97
1.52

640
206

10
5

5. 26
8.09

5.60
9.47

87
79

45. 79
127. 87

.78
1.96

97
84

51.05
135.96

6. 38
11.43

324
284

1
1

1.00
1.17

.31
.35

6
6

6.00
7.05

.11
.14

7
7

7.00
8.22

.42
.49

1

3.62

2. 72

5
11

16. 67
39.86

.22
.80

5
12

16.67
43.48

. 22
3.52

S23
£19

14
20

5.60
8.14

1.94
5. 72

198
100

79. 20
40. 70

1.87
1.40

212
122

84.80
49. 65

3. 81
12.00

216
252

1
2

1.67
2. 64

6.17
.79

64
44

106. 67
58.15

1.11
.59

65
46

108.34
60. 79

7. 28
1. 38

3, 257
3, 744

3
2

.31
.18

.32
.05

718
573

73. 26
51.01

.71
.46

721
575

73. 57
51.19

1.03
. 51

27
1

54. 00
6.05

.98
.33

27
1

54.00
6.05

.98
! 33

151
55

Maine
Carriages and wagons: 1 1926__________
Cotton goods:
192 6
192 7
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 6
192 7
______ _______________
Furniture:
192 6
192 7
________ _________ _____ _

47

1

10.00

12. 82

15

150.00

1.31

16

160.00

14.13

6
6

6,046
6,155

7
14

.39
.76

.52
.99

279
288

15. 41
15.60

.26
.29

286
302

15. 80
16. 36

.78
1.28

2
2

288
194

3
1

3.33
1. 72

2.49
1.03

86
33

95. 56
56. 82

.78
1.03

90
34

100.00
58.54

10. 21
2.06

1
1

156
150

6
9

12.00
20.03

. 15
!7Q

6
9

12.00
20! 03

. 15
.
‘ 70

1
1

i This industry group has been discontinued.

1.11

6. 94

2 Record is for six months only (July to December),

dV




1

ACCIDENTS IN MANIJFACTUIUNG INDUSTRIES

Agricultural implements:
192 6
_______ ____________
192 7
Carriages and wagons: 1 1926____________
Cotton goods:
192 6
192 7
Flour:
192 6
192 7
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 6
192 7
Furniture:
192 6
192 7
Leather:
192 6
192 7
Lumber— Planing mills:
192 6
192 7
Slaughtering and meat packing:
192 6
192 7
Steam fittin gs, apparatus, and supDlies:
192 6
1 _____
192 7
Stoves:
192 6
192 7

T a b le

5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified Slates, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

00

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury—
-Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death
N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Temporary disability

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

52
48

4
5

209
237

5
4

3.745
2,897

3
4

1.746
3, 545

2. 51
6. 52

7
14

23.33
50. 70

0.59
.57

8
15

26.66
54.32

3.10
7.09

2
4

3.33
3. 62

10.00
27.93

.19
.59

2
4

10.00
27.93

.19
.59

1
.58

3.45

.42

38
26

63.33
36.45

.96
1.00

38
27

63.33
37.86

.96
1.42

9
10

.80
1.15

.52
1.28

522
259

46.61
29.80

.84
.66

531
274

47.41
31.53

1.36
5.39

1

5

1.41

.09

.03

50
78

9.61
7. 33

.21
.13

50
79

9.61
7.42

.21
.16

Maryland
Automobile tires:
1926 ...................................................- ............‘...........
1927 ...........................- ..................- ............................
Boots and shoes:
1925
1926
1927
_________ _______ ________
Brick:
1925
1926
...........................................................................
1927................................................................................




1
1

1,907
1, 730

7
7 '
7

1.05
1.16

850
962
1,015

5
5
5

470
537
444

1

0.16
.19

.63

3. 78

2
1

0.08
.19

0.10
.06

156
134

27.49
25. 82

0.39
.50

159
136

27.73
26.20

1.54
1.72

3

1
1

.99

.39

54
34
46

21.14
11.73
15.11

.44
.27
.22

54
34
49

21.14
11.73
16.10

.44
.27
.61

1
1

.63
.75

1.11
.38

52
56
46

36.88
35.00
34.53

.99
.62
.60

52
58
47

36.88
36.26
35.28

.99
5.52
.98

ACCIDENTS

1
1

1
1

100
92

INDUSTRIAL

1
1

O
F

Maine— Continued
Hardware:
1926
-.................................
1927
Lumber— Planing mills:
1926
.....................................
1927
Lumber— Sawmills:
1926
- -1927
....................................................... ............
Paper and pulp:
1926
_____________ _________________
1927
.....................................................................
Woolen goods:
1926
___________ ______ - ................
1927
.
.....................................................

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Permanent disability

1,330
1,768
1,763

2
3
3

851
1,045
1,039

5
8

714
821

2
4
4

29
76 .
68

6

.48
1.22

2.80
7.31

4. 89

1. 52

20.00

.04

.11
1.49

45
69
81

11.28
13.01
15.32

.32
.41
5.23

1.09
2.04

30
41
37

11.75
13.23
11.87

.24
.28
.26

30
48
44

11.75
15.49
14.11

.24
1.37
2.30

.48
2.03

.23
3.09

112
116

53. 33
47.09

1.18
1.12

114
124

54. 29
50.34

4. 21
11.52

8.48

3
14
12

33.94
70.00
58.63

.90
1.19
1.09

4
14
13

45. 25
70.00
63.52

9.38
1.19
30. 41

1. 52
2.11

3. 35
.61
.63

155
17
18

39. 22
34.00
38.03

.64
.56
.60

162
18
19

40.99
36.00
40.14

5. 53
1.17
1.23

29.32

.25

6

.25
.30
.34

11.31

3.40

.04

11.03
12.64
13.62

2.26
2.24

.57

20.00

44
67
72

.25
.37
1.13

10
1
1

1,317
165
158

7
10
11

422
649
768

1.50
3.04

.85
2.34

30
34
29

23.72
17. 89
12.59

.58
.31
.21

30
37
36

23.72
19.47
15.63

.58
1.16
2.55

4
4
4

1,051
1,012
1,151

.63
.33
1.74

.19
.79
1.39

65
78
85

20. 61
26. 33
24. 62

.31
.56
.56

67
79
91

21.24
26.66
26.36

.50
1.35
1. 95

4
4

569
548

1.18
.61

3.05
2.44

14
17

8.23
10.34

.30
.15

16
18

9.41
10.95

3. 35
2.59

5
8
8
1

272
C07
538
20

1.23
1.78

3.68
.76
3. 59

38
50
42
2

46. 55
27.78
26.00
33.17

1.15
.79
.66
1.18

39
54
45
2

47.78
30.11
27.86
33.17

4.83
4.84
4.25
1.18

1
2

1,083
1, 313

.18
.69

56
82

17.50
20.81

.59
.39

58
86

18.13
21.83

.77
1.08

2
2

189
154

12
11

20.00
23. 79

.51
.62

12
11

20.00
23. 79

.51
.62

2
3
2

546
1,045
7G0

.63
1. 91
4.22

.18
2.52
3.33

36
34
134

22. 50
10.84
56.54

.68
.28
.95

37
40
144

23.13
12. 75
60.76

.86
2.80
4.28

1
3
4

187
°47
766

1.79
1.79
3.48

.54
2.11
1.37

6
43

2.14
18.72

.05
. 56

1
11
51

1.79
3.93
22.20

.54
2.16
1.93

2.00

1.86
.63

1.02

INDUSTRIES




96

5
8
9

I MANUFACTUBING
N

i This industry group has been discontinued.

2

ACCIDENTS

Carriages and wagons: 1 1926.................
Chemicals:
1925_________ _______ ______ ________
1926.................................. ........................
1927___________ _____ _______ _______
Electrical machinery:
192 5
________ _____ _______
192 6
.............................................. ..
192 7
_______ _______ _____ ____
Fertilizers:
192 6
____________
192 7
_____
Flour:
192 5
_________________ _________
192 6
_____ _____________
192 7
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 5
_____________________
192 6
________ _______
192 7
_______
Furniture:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Glass:
192 5
192 6
_____ ______________________
192 7
Leather:
192 6
_________ ________
192 7
______ ________
Lumber— Planing mills:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Lumber— Sawmills: 1925______________
Paper and pulp:
192 6
_____ _________________
192 7
Pottery:
192 6
_____ ________
192 7
_______ ______
Shipbuilding, steel:
192 6
_________ _____________
192 7
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927.
Stamped and enameled ware:
1925________________________________
1626________________________________
1S27________________________________

CO

o

T able

5.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry

Continued

^

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary

disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1826]

Industry and year

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullvear
workers

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
N um­
"(per
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
Num ­
(per
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000 hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Maryland-—Continued

_

____________________

235
219

2
2

377
459

1

0.91

0.66

5
6
3

4.18
5.45
1.92

0.14
.21
.05

5
7
3

4.18
6. 36
1.92

0.14
.87
. 05

2
1

2. 86
1. 52

.85
2. 74

11
20

15. 71
30. 47

.31
.37

14.
21

20.00
31.99

9.68
3.11

1
1

.91
.73

.66
.22

20
25

18.18
18.16

.28
.37

21
26

19.09
18.89

.94
. 59

521

1
1

s
!

|

399

1.43

1

8.51

i

Massachusetts
Automobile tires:
1926
1927
- - Boots and shoes:
1926
- _ - _
1927
.
_________________________ _____
Brick:
1095
1Q
27
Carpets:
1Q
9fi
1Q27
Cotton goods:
1926____________________________________________




4
3
28
32
1
2

2, 765

0.31
.74

0. 39
.45

120
142

9. 23
11.60

0.27
.30

124
151

9. 54
12. 34

0. 66
. 75

4
4

.12
. 10

.05
.16

81
177

2. 51
4. 36

.05
.10

85
182

2. 63
4.48

. 10
.41

13. 33
47. 50

.09
1. 37

4
10

13. 33
47. 50

.09
1. 37

19
13

4. 31
1.57

.08
.03

19
13

4.31
1. 57

.OS
.03

366
1,205

5.41
14.47

.33
.33

371
1, z2S

5.48
14. 74

.20
. 55

93
70

3
3

4
9

4
10

__________ !_________
4.323 _______1
i
4,079 !_______
’
1
!
!
10,772
. 15
1
0.02
13,529 !

30
25

|
!
!

5
22

.07
, 26

.07
* 15 ,

ACCIDENTS

3
1
3

INDUSTRIAL

Stoves:
1925
199Q
1927
Structural-iron work:
1926
1927
Woolen goods:
1926
1927

STATISTICS

Death

2
1

.07
.04

.42
.26

18
18

.63
.79

.38
.46

589
524

20. 52
23.10

.45
.61

609
543

21.22
23.93

1.25
1.33

21
20

6,504
4,946

2

.10

.62

5
9

.26
.61

.14
.30

206
335

10. 56
22.58

.27
.53

213
344

10.92
23.19

1.03
.83

5
6

624
717

2

.93

.42

11
18

5.79
8.37

.19
.15

11
20

5.79
9.30

.19
.57

13
17

4,251
4,451

2

.16

.94

2
2

.16
.15

.05
.04

125
333

9. 77
24.94

.23
.38

129
335

10.09
25.09

1.22
.42

15
13

4,917
4,475

1

.07

.40

2
1

.14
.07

.06
.04

70
129

4.73
9.61

.09
.20

73
130

4.94
9.68

.55
.24

13
12

6,008
5,539

5
4

.28
.24

.34
.10

208
368

11.56
22.15

.24
.48

213
372

11.84
22.39

.58
.58

5
6

1,500
1, 524

2

.44

.13

57
138

12.66
30.19

.23
.59

57
140

12.66
30.63

.23
.72

3
2

943
673

3
1

1.07
.50

1.17
1.48

64
59

22. 86
29.22

.34
.51

67
60

23.93
29. 72

1.51
1.99

2
3

246
257

1

1.30

.39

25

12.86
32.44

.30
.87

9
26

12.86
33. 74

” .30
1.26

2
1

2,777
1,859

2

.24

.07

61
20

7. 35
3. 58

.26
.12

63
20

7.59
3.58

.33
.12

20
74
35

7. 53
38.95
9.24

0.08
.61
.12

24
81
39

9. 03
42.63
10.29

5.16
4.61
2.18

20
28
6
7
1

9. 52
9. 57
34.90
70.00
43.17

.12
.08
.33
2.35
2.37

20
29
6
8
1

9. 52
9.91
34.90
80.00
43.17

.12
.34
.33
6.03
2.37

191
156
137

18.49
20.00
18.48

.25
.52
.35

201
167
146

19.46
21.41
19.69

3.09
4.58
1.61

9

Minnesota

Agricultural implements:
1925 ..............................................................................
1926
____ _
______
1927............................... .................................. ...............
Boots and shoes:
1926
___
____
1927
_____ . .
_
___________
Brick: 1925
___
__
________
______
Carriages and wagons: 1 1926..................................
Electrical machinery: 1925
Flour:
1925 ___________________________________________
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
i This industry group has been discontinued.




5
3
3

886
645
1,262

3
4
1
1
1

693
975
57
27
8

19
22
22

3, 443
2,596
2,471

2

0. 75

4. 52

1

.26

1.58

2. 32
3.08
.81

0.56
4.00
.48

.34

.26

1
.39
.51
.13

0. 75
3.68
.79

1

4
4
1

2
7
3

10.00

3.68

.58
.90
1.08

.52
.98
.45

6
7
8 ,

INDUSTRIES

9,551
7,560

I MANUFACTURING
N

11
9

ACCIDENTS

Electrical machinery:
1926
.................................................................
1927..
_______________________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926
_______________________________________
1927
________________________ _______
Furniture:
1926
......................... ..........................................
1927
_______ __________________ ________
Leather:
1926
______ ___________________________ _______
Iy27
...........................................................................
Machine tools:
1926
__________ _______________________
1927
................... ............................................
Paper and pulp:
i926
___________ _______________ _______ ____
__________
1927
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
..................................
1926
1927
_________ _____ ________ ______
Stoves:
1926
....................... ..........................................
1927_
_________________ _________ _________
Structural-iron work:
1926
....................................................................
1927_
W oolen goods:
1926__________ ________ _________ _____ _________
1927.........................................................................

T a b l e 5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

^

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1S26]
Death

|

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Sever­
Sever­
Frequen­
Frequen­
Fullity rate
ity rate
cy rate
cy rate
year
(per
(per
Num ­
•Num­
(per
(per
workers
ber of
1,000
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
1,000,000 hours’
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
ex­
ex­
exposure)
exposure) posure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’ j
ex­
exposure) |
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

!

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Total

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

Minnesota — Continued
i
9
5
6
8
9
9

1i

1, 282
897
1,061
634
1,002
918

!

i
1 !

1.56
2. 23
1. 89

4
5
6

1. 04
1.85
1.89

1. 25
2. 27
.66

70
104
69

IS. 20
38. 52
21.69

0.41
1.18
.40

75
110
76

19. 50
40. 74
23.89

3. 22
5.68
2.95

.36

2.18

8
4
10

4. 20
1.33
3. 63

2. 76
1. 76
1.80

38
93
70

19.97
31.00
25. 42

.36
.60
.44

46
97
81

24.17
32.33
29.41

3.12
2.36
4.42

5
3

3.13
2.68

3.15
2. 59

2
25
9

1. 45
15. 63
8. 05

.01
.36
.35

2
30
13

1.45
18. 76
11.62

.01
3. 51
8. 31

i
1

;

4
5
5

458
523
373

1 i

.89

5. 37

5
5
5

2. 228
1,988
1,995

1 I
9
6

. 15
1.50
1.00

.90
9. 05
6. 01

5
25
29

.75
4.17
4.84

.96
6. 81
3. 87

123
756
571

18.40
126.00
95. 38

.50
3. 29
2.92

129
790
606

19.30
131.67
101. 22

2. 36
19.15
12.80

3
3
3

1,132
1,072
1,231

1
2
I

.29
.63
.27

1. 77
3.73
1. 62

7
7
8

2.06
2.19
2.17

2.12
1. 07
2.14

149
267
189

43.89
83. 44
51.16

. 1.00

.78
1. 03

157
276
198

46.24
86.26
53. 60

4.67
5.83
4.76

2
5
6

3, 236
3,902
3,641

3

.31

1.85

3

.27

1.65

22
35
32

2. 27
2.99
2.93

2.94
2. 86
2.55

5. 33
1, 077
574

54.91
92.05
52.55

.91
1.15
.80

558
1,112
609

57.49
95.04
55.75

5.70
4.01
5.00

1
1
1

26
27
24

1

13. 70

8. 22

2
2
1

25. 55
24. 69
13. 70

.40
.47
.75

2
2
2

25. 55
24.69
27.40

.40
.47
8.97

2
2

304
360

7
9

7.77
8.33

7.84
3.61

32
31

35. 55
28. 71

.81
.41

39
40

43.33
37.04

8.65
4.02

i
!

i
!

ACCIDENTS

0.26 j
.37
.31

INDUSTRIAL




O
F

Foundry and machine-shop products:
1925_______________________________________ _____
1926____________________________________________
1927______________
___________________________
Furniture:
1925
.................................
1926
_
_
__ _______________
1927____________________________________________
Lumber— Planing mills:
1925
1926
_
1927__________________________________________
Lum ber— Sawmills:
1925____________________________________________
1926 ___________________________________________
1927 - __________________________________ ______
Paper and pulp:
1925 ______________________ _______ _____________
1926 ___________________________________________ f
1927 _______________________ ______ ________ ____
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1925____________________________________________
1926 _
.
..
_____________________________
1927 ___________________________________________
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1925
1926
1927
____________________ _____ _
Stoves:
1926
1927_____________________ ________ ______ _______

Structural-iron work:
1925________ ______
192 6 .........................
1927..........................

2
2
2

354
372
546

2

1.88

11.29

1

.61

3.66

1
1
1

0.94
.91
.61

1.13
.53
1.83

6
32
37

5.65
29.09
22.58

0.27
.48
.33

9
33
39

8.47
30.00
23.80

12.69
1.01
5.82

13
51

32.50
20.91

0.14
.40

13
53

32.50
21.73

0.14
5.32

271
256

63.75
84.60

0.26
.70

51
65

63.75
84.60

0.26
.70

118

50.00
36.10

.96
.23

20

11

50.00
36.10

.96
.23

61.43
52.59

.85
.97

45
41

64.29
52.59

14.64
.97

80.00
56.18

2.71
.90

40

80.00
60.74

2.71
2.27

34.31
36.03

541
559

35.36
36.49

2.54
1.16

50.00
27.01

25

11

50.00
27.01

.91
.43

Montana
2
2

121
813

2

0.82

4.92

Nebraska

102
218
260

13.79

207

220

4.56

5,098
5,106

.85

1.00
.32

525
552

166
136




5
5

11,345
13, 519

3
3
1
1

0.09
.20

0.03
.27

373
414

10.97
10.21

0.23
.20

376
424

11.06
10.46

0.26
.77

1,046
933
103
121

.32
.71

.57

78
52
19

25.16
18.57
61.49

.29
.26
.27

79
54
19

25.48
19.28
61.49

.86
.64
.27

1
1

367
365

.91
1.83

.27
. 55

76
50

69.09
45.66

.93
1.19

77
52

70.00
47.49

1.20
1.74

5
4

2, 392
741

104
41

14.44
18.45

.45
.21

105
41

14.58
18.45

INDUSTRIES

New Hampshire
Cotton goods:
192 6
_____ _
192 7
______ ____________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 6
192 7
Furniture: 1926_________ ______________
Lumber— Planing mills: 1927...............
Paper and pulp:
192 6
192 7
Woolen goods:
192 6
_____ ________ _______ _____
192 7
..................................

I MANTJFACTTJRING
N

Agricultural implements:
192 6
.................................................
192 7
.........................................
Brick:
192 6
______ _______ ________ _
192 7
...........................................
Flour:
192 6
________ _______ _
192 7
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 6
192 7
_____ _
Slaughtering and meat packing:
192 6
________ ___________________
192 7
Structural-iron work:
______ ________________
192 6
192 7

ACCIDENTS

Flour: 1926.................. ........
Lumber— sawmills: 1926.

1.28
.21

0.30

.83

00

T a b l e 5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Industry and year

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

Permanent disability

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
N um ­
(per
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
N um ­
(per
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

New York

1,764
10, 221
17, 696
1, 552
8,339
1,729
1, 490
19,047
126
1,224
13,411
3, 916
266
1,824
3,080
1, 374
6,155
1,141
260
2,333
2,452
576
1, 723
403
616
917

1
4

0.19
.13

1.13
.78

2
1
1

.43
.04
. 19

2.58
.24
1.16

6

. 11

.63

1
11
1

.27
.27
.09

1. 63
1.64
.51

1
1

.18
.11

1.10
.65

7

.38

2. 27

1
2

.14
.27

.85
1. 63

10
77
60
14
10
10
1
111
1
9
186
30
3
8
32
14
87
10
1
22
28
11
10
2
2
2

1.89
2.51
1.13
3.01
.40
1.93
.22
1.94
2.64
2.45
4. 62
2.55
3.76
1. 46
3.46
3.40
4. 71
2.92
1.28
3.14
3.81
6.36
1. 93
1.64
1.08
.73

2.30
41
316
1.79
.89
459
3. 03
134
.35
59
1. 75
31
35
. 17
2.04
657
10.56
7
44
3.11
4. 55
654
106
2.39
4.88
6
.99
115
169
4. 79
3. 52
55
5. 02
485
2. 54
73
.38
4.23 .........73"
185
4. 44
4.28
47
108
1.43
22
2.71
.32
31
12
1. 31

7.75
10. 31
8.65
28.78
2. 36
5.97
7.83
11.50
18.48
11.99
16.25
9.02
7.51
21.02
18.29
13.34
26.26
21.31

0.23
.39
.17
.99
.12
.17
.19
.50
.45
.52
.76
.30
.60
.55
.65
.44
.81
.98

io." 43~
25.14
27.18
20.89
18.08
16.78
4.36

1.07
1.12
.69
1.01
1.07
.19

52
397
519
150
70
42
36
774
8
54
851
137
9
124
202
69
579
83
1
96
215
58
118
24
33
14

9.82
12.95
9. 78
32.22
2.80
8.09
8.05
13. 55
21.12
14. 71
21.14
11.66
11.26
22.66
21.86
16.74
31. 35
24.23
1.28
13. 71
29.22
33.54
22.82
19.72
17.86
5.09

3. 66
2.96
1.06
6.60
.71
3.08
.36
3.17
11.01
5.26
6.95
3.20
5.48
2.64
6.00
3. 96
8.10
3.52
.38
5.56
7.14
5.40
2.12
3.72
1.39
1.50

ACCIDENTS




4
17
10
14
5
8
2
11
2
4
23
20
1
9
19
9
19
2
1
4
6
2
6
3
5
3

INDUSTRIAL

Agricultural implements: 1927___________________
Automobiles: 1927_________________________________
Boots and shoes: 1927 _
.
_____ ________ __
Brick: 1927...................................... ....................................
Carpets: 1927_______ ___________________ __________
Chemicals: 1£27.................................................................
Cotton goods: 1927___ ___________________ ______ __
Electrical machinery: 1927_____ __________________
Fertilizers: 1927___________________________________
Flour: 1927______________ ________ _________________
Foundry and machine-shop products: 1927______
Furniture: 1927..................................................................
Hardware: 1927
_____________
Leather: 1 9 2 7 ..___________________ _____ ___________
Lumber— Planing mills: 1927.......... ............................
Machine tools: 1927
____________________
Paper and pulp: 1927......................................................
Petroleum refining: 1927
Pottery 1927
Shipbuilding steel: 1927___________________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927____________
Stamped and enameled ware: 1927
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies: 1927-----Stoves* 1927
-- __________ Structural-iron work: 1927
Woolen goods: 1927 _____________________________

STATISTICS

Death

North Dakota

3
2

58
44

2
1
2
1
1

1
1

30
4

150.00
30.45

3.66
.55

31
5

155.00
38.06

37.99
31.00

34
7

4

40.00

.26

4

40.00

.26

45
33
70

26
20
19

192. 59
200.32
89.91

2.98
1.06
1.24

26
20
19

192. 59
200. 32
89.91

2. 98
1.06
1.24

34. 33
30. 45

5.00
7. 61

ACCIDENTS

3 6 9 0 4 ° — 2 9 -------------- 4

Brick:
1926.................................................................................
1927................................................................................
Flour:
1926.................................................................................
1927____________________________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926................................................................................
1927.....................................................................
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927____________

Ohio




1.24

7.43

1

.22

1.34

9
5
5

2.78
1. 09
1.12

3.02
~ . 94
.87

181
152
228

56.00
33.04
50.89

0.90
.37
.74

194
157
234

60.02
34.13
52. 23

11. 35
1.31
2.95

2,202
14,122
14,351

4
1

.09
.02

.57
.14

5
59
10

.76
1.39
.23

1. 50
1.19
2.23

137
1,016
471

20. 73
23.96
10.94

.35
.38
.18

142
1,079
482

21.49
25.44
11.19

1.85
2.14
2.55

12
8
18

14,888
11, 721
22,543

3
2
6

.07
.06
.09

.40
.34
.53

52
26
47

1.16
.71
.69

1.06
.54
.59

2,962
2, 637
3,341

66. 32
74. 91
49.40

.74
.95
.87

3,017
2,665
3,394

67. 55
75. 68
50.18

2.20
1.83
1.99

2
2

2,352
2,849

1

, 14

.85

1

.14

.09

181
121

25.49
14.15

.18
.21

183
121

25. 77
14.15

1.12
.21

9.
12
19
1
5

2,542
2,496
2,835
17
574

2
2
4

.26
.27
.47

1.57
1.60
2.82

3
4
6

.39
.53
.71

.84
.74
.58

426
413
423

55.86
55.07
49. 73

.62
.90
.66

431
419
433

56.51
55.87
50.91

3.03
3.24
4.06

30

17. 43

.33

30

17.43

.33

17
12
21

3, 560
3,637
10,612

7
8
23

.66
.73
.72

.81
.40
.63

305
190
530

28. 56
17.43
16.65

.22
.23
.24

312
198
553

29. 22
18.16
17. 37

1.03
.63
.87

3
12

255
527

1

1.25

.78

27
48

33. 75
30.36

.55
.38

28
48

35.00
30.36

1.33
.38

1
6

38
195

1

I- 71

2.57

11

80.00
18. 83

.70
.37

8
12

80.00
20. 54

.70
2. 94

13
10
12

1,077
1,537
1,494

5
13
17

____ 1

8

INDUSTRIES

i This industry group has been discontinued.

4

I MANUFACTURING
N

Agricultural implements:
1925__________ ______ _________________ ________ _
1926_______________ _____ ______________ ________
1927____________________________________________
Automobiles:
1925___________________________________
1926_________________________________
1927____________________________________ _____ _
Automobile tires:
1925______________________
_
1926_______________________
1927________________________________
Boots and shoes:
1926_________________________
_____
1927____________________________________
Brick:
1925_________ ______
1926______________________________________ . . . .
1927____________________________________________
Carriages and wagons: 1 1926______________________
Chemicals, 1927____ __ .......................
Electrical machinery:
1925__________ _____ __________________
1926____________________________________________
1927..............................................................................
Fertilizer:
1926________________________ ___________________
1927_____________ ___________________ __________
Flour:
1926__________________________________ ______ _
1927____________________ _____ - ..............................

Ox

T a b le 5 .— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

^

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Ohio— Continued

0.74
1.13
.81

0.46
1.12
.52

1,326
1,897
1,632

57.93
53.44
30.93

0.43
.67
.46

1,345
1,947
1,686

58. 76
54.85
31.95

1.41
3.48
2.23

8

1.46

1. 26

9

.94

. 57

77
15
210

14.09
10.00
21. 94

.29
.21
.28

85
15
220

15. 55
10.00
22.98

1. 55
.21
1.48

.89
2. 52

2
6
8

.43
.90
.48

.77
.73
.50

414
358
608

88.93
53.43
36. 49

.75
.62
.49

416
365
623

89.36
54.48
37.39

1. 52
2. 24
3.51

2.39

4
7

1.67
2. 79

.51
1. 55

68
104

28.33
41.46

.58
.82

72
112

30.00
44. 65

1.09
4. 76

1
1

1.11
1.02

1. 36
1.22

16
30

17.78
30.50

.34
.63

17
31

18.89
31.52

1.70
1.85

3

2.28

2.28

27
16
45

20. 53
14. 55
27.65

.33
.20
.51

31
16
45

23. 57
14. 55
27.65

7.17
.20
.51

1

10. 68

6.41

4
11

35.78
117. 52

.67
1. 55

5
12

44.72
128.20

54.33
7.96

2
13
11

.38
1.04
.69

.48
.65
.55

238
529
529

44.99
42. 66
33. 27

.37
.42
.44

240
543
543

45. 37
43. 78
34.15

.85
1. 55
2.12

0.52
1.69
1.25

1

.10

.63

1
7

.15
.42

1

.40

7,629
11,829
17, 590

15
8
27

1,821
496
3,191

5
6
14

1, 552
2,249
5,554

3
5

786
836

1
1

295
328

3
5
8

438
368
543

1

.76

4. 56

1
1

37
31

1

8.94

53.66

19
25
45

1,763
4,138
5,300

1
3

.08
.19

.48
1.13

ACCIDENTS




17
40
43

0.09
.28
.21

2
10
11

29
40
69

INDUSTRIAL

Foundry and machine-shop products:
1925.................................................................................
1926
........................................... ........................
1927____________________________ _______________
Furniture:
_____ ___
1925
.
1926
1927.________ ______ ____________________________
Glass:
1925
1926
____________________________________
1927____________ _______________________________
Hardware:
1926
-- -- - --1927___ ______ __________________________________
Leather:
1926
.
...............
1927
.................
L u m ber-P lan in g mills:
1925.
____________ ______ _________ _______
1926
1927
Lumber— Sawmills:
1926
1927
...............................
Machine tools:
1925
___
1926
.....................................................
1927.................................................................................

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Total

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

Death

3,501
4, 709

.29
. 14

169
168

4
6

.38
.42

.92
.52

251
443

23.90
31. 36

.27
.46

258
451

24. 57
31.92

2.90
1.83

1

1.71
.85

2.00

.59

29
20

58.00
39. 60

1. 32
1. 44

30
21

60.00
41.58

1.91
13.32

1

.28

.50

.32
.14
.74
.45

1.95
.83
4. 47
2.70

2
1
3

.28
.37
.45

.08
.22
.92

80
46
126
215
128

22.12
14. 84
17. 52
80. 07
19.18

.31
. 15
. 17
1.68
.27

81
47
129
218
134

22. 40
15.16
17. 94
81.18
20.08

.81
2.10
1.08
6.37
3.89

641
1,330

.25

1.50

2
7
11

.95
2. 85
2. 76

1.00
1.56
1.99

51
77
85

24. 34
29. 60
21.30

.28
.46
.37

53
84
97

25.29
32.45
24.31

1.28
2.02
3.86

2
1
3

1.00
.38
.14

.53
.68
.13

120
145
210

60.10
55. 05
9. 99

.82
.67
.15

122
146
215

61.10
55.43
10.23

1.35
1.35
.85

666

878
7,007

.10

1, 753
1,028
2,924

.11

.68

2
5
4

.38
1.61
.46

.48
1. 65
.90

275
79
428

52. 30
25.48
48. 79

.49
.38
.64

277
84
433

52.68
27.09
49. 36

.97
2.03
2.22

1, 419
378
2 202

.23
8.18
.61

1.41
47. 59
3.63

5
4
4

1.17
3.64
.61

1.20
2.12
.18

424
185
174

99. 57
168.18
26. 33

1.15
2.86
.43

430
198
182

100.97
180.00
27. 55

3.76
52.57
4.24

2

.32

.33

4
74

6. 66
11.79

.28
.17

4
76

6.66
12.11

.28
.50

137
61
480
142
105
56
701
40
1
2,657
209
844
206
414

27. 35
9. 70
21.19
5. 50
26. 23
11. 23
13. 32
8. 30
13. 07
26. 92
2.69
33. 01
21.25
39.31
26. 72
35.00

0. 38
.13
.26
.85
.33
.15
.21
.10
.23
.35
.03
.40
.26
.44
.30
. 45

46
213
140
62
489
144
106
60
735
40
1
2,720
218
849
210
421

30. 70
10.43
21.65
5. 59
26.72
11. 39
13. 45
8.90
13. 70
26. 92
2. 69
33. 79
22.16
39. 55
27. 24
35. 59

5.98
.48
.40
1.12
1.10
.36
.97
1.98
1.12
.35
.03
1. 73
1.08
1. 59
.56
1.61

,

213
2,093

I MANUFACTURING
N

1,206
1,027
2,397
895
2, 225

ACCIDENTS

Paper and pulp:
192 6
....................................................
192 7
Petroleum refining:
192 6
_________ ________
192 7
Pottery:
192 5 ______ _______ _______ ________
192 6
192 7
Shipbuilding, steel: 1927________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927.__
Stamped and enameled ware:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
192 5
192 6
: ______________
192 7
Stoves:
192 5
192 6
192 7
___________________________
Structural-iron work:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Woolen goods:
192 6
_____ ____
192 7
..................................

Pennsylvania




500
6,806
2,154
3,699

6,100

4, 217
2,627
2,246
17, 877
495
124
26, 830
3,279
7,156
2,570
3,943

1

0.68

4.00

2

.11

.66

1
2
4

.13
.30
.07

.76
1.78
.45

12

. 15

.89

4

. 19

1 .12

2

. 17 1

1. Cl

4
15
3
1
7
2

2. 67
.73
.46
.09
.38
.16

1.60
.35
.14
.27
.11
.21

2
30

.30
.56

.10
.44

51
9
1
4
5

.63
.91
.05
. 52
.42

.44
. 82
.03
. 25
. 15

INDUSTRIES

Agricultural implements: 1927. ..................... .
Automobiles: 1927.................................................
Automobile tires: 1927-________ ____________
Boots and shoes: 1927______ ______ __________
Brick: 1927...... .........................................................
Carpets: 1927_________________ _____ _________
Chemicals: 1927. ....................................................
Cotton goods: 1927____________ _______ ______
Electrical machinery: 1927_________________ _
Fertilizers: 1927___________ _______ ______ ___
Flour: 1927___________________________________
Foundry and machine shop products: 1927.
Furniture: 1927______________________________
Glass: 1927___________________________________
Hardware: 1927______________________________
Leather: 1927......................................................... .

T a b le

5. — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued
Accidents for States reporting ail disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
{Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

Fullyear
workers

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000 hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Total

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Pennsylvania— Continued

621
330
854
2, 769
4,454
381
1, 607
1, 585
95
5,124
901
3,856
6,054

2.17
1. 35

3
5
1
4
3

1. 61
5. 05
.39
.48
. 22

0.48
1. 82
.29
.25
. 10

56
159
64
202
238

30. 07
160. 65
24. 97
24. 32
17.81

0.42
2. 21
.33
.32
. 26

59
165
65
209
244

31.68
166. 71
25. 36
25.16
18. 25

0.90
10.09
.62
2. 74
1.71

2. 49

3

.62

.50

8

.52

.22

6
4

.52
.22

.39
. 09

361
145
11
556
61
544
186

74. 84
30. 48
38. 65
36.17
22.58
47.02
10. 24

. 77
.36
.44
.40
.26
.54
.13

366
145
11
564
61
566
191

75. 89
20. 48
38. 65
36. 69
22. 58
48. 92
10. 52

3.76
.36
.44
.62
.26
9.23
.55

5
248

50.00
80.00

1.15
1. 05

5
259

50.00
83. 55

1.15
4.07

16.00
14. 69 |
1

0.33
[
. io ;

1

1.01

6. 06

3
3

.36
. 22

2

.41
!

16
1

1. 38
.06

8.30
.33

South Dakota

Brick* 1926
Flour' 1926
- - ______________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1926____________

1
2
1

13
44
1,023

[
1
1

.32

1. 95

10

3.23

1.07

Tennessee
Agricultural implements:
1926
____________ _____ _____
1927...................................................................- ............ 1




2
1

329
113

1

2. 94

1
17.63 !

4
1
i 1

4.00
2,94 !

4. 61
.88 |
1

16
5

20
7

20.00
20. 57 !
I

4.94
18.67

ACC IDENTS

6
1
6
7
5
2
1
9
1
14
8
21
19

INDUSTRIAL

Lumber— Planing mills: 1927 ___ __ __ _ _____
Lumber— Sawmills: 1927___________________ ______
_ _______
_
Machine tools: 1927
_ _
_
Paper and pulp: 1927.
__________________________
Petroleum refining: 1927___ _______________________
Potterv: 1927
Shipbuilding, steel: 1927 _ __
_
_ _________
_
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927
Stamped and enameled ware: 1927 _ _
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies: 1927 ___
Stoves: 1927
_______________________
Structural ironwork: 1927_________________________
Woolen goods: 1927..........................................................

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Permanent disability

Automobiles:
1926-...............................................................................
1927
..................................................

8.00

1,657
195
118

2
2

49
45

3
3

3,175
3,146

3
5

218
200

3
5

248
302

1. 43
1.10

2
3

298
945

1. 76

5
5

910
837

1
1

40

5.17

46.20
34.08
15.00

.67
.83
.35

273
20
8

54. 60
34.08
20.00

8. 25
.83
2.04

111
132

11. 63
13. 99

.11
. 15

117
133

12.31
14.10

.38
.23

12
8

17.14
13. 33

.36
.51

12
8

17.14
13. 33

.36
.51

22
16

31.43
17.64

.23
.10

23
17

32. 86
18. 74

2. 65
.43

39
34

43. 33
11.99

.47
. 12

39
39

43. 33
13. 75

.47
2. 45

102
82

37. 78
29.15

?30
.27

109
94

40. 37
33.42

1. 62
3. 20

210
176

10
12

16.67
22. 71

.22
. 17

10
12

16. 67
22.71

.22
.17

2
2

333
827

18
15

IS. 00
6.04

.36
.07

18
15

18.00
6.04

.36
.07

2
2

861
1,062

44
58

16. 92
17. 58

.29
.22

46
60

17.68
18.83

2. 72
2. 95

1
1

98
204

20
1

66. 67
1.64

.05
.02

21
1

70.00
1. 64

1.06
.02

1
1

212
214

7
5

11.67
7. 78

.05
.29

7
6

11. 67
9. 34

.05
3.09

3
3

319
350

2.00
.95

4. 49
.29

42
27

42.00
25. 69

.52
.30

44
28

44.00
26. 64

5.02
.59

4
4

879
926

1.15
2. 52

.91
1. 03

245
306

94. 23
110.17

1. 22
l! 24

248
313

95. 38
112. 69

2.13
2.27

1
1

252
128

13
8

16. 25
20. 76

.15
.13

13
8

16. 25
20. 76

.15
.13

Too’

231 !
20 j
6 j
1
i

. 11
.63

.33
.31

2. 32
1. 83

2.59
4. 27

.33
.94

2. 42
.33

1. 32
2.93

. 11

.85
1.01

I MANUFACTURING
N

7

12

.27
.13

ACCIDENTS
INDUSTRIES

Chemicals:
...........................................................
1926
1927.
____________ ______ ________________
Cotton goods:
192a
................................
1927
............... - .....................
Fertilizers:
1926. ..........................................................................
1927
........... .......................
Flour:
1926
_________ ________________ ________
1927-..
_________ _______________ _________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926
_ _
_____________________
1927____________ _______________________________
Furniture:
.................
...........
1926
1927.
_ _ _________________________
Glass:
1926________ ____ _________ ________
1927____________________________________________
Lum ber— Planing mills:
1926. _________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Lum ber— Sawmills:
1926____________________________________________
1927___________________________________________ _
Paper and pulp:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Pottery:
1 9 2 6 -__________________________________________
1927________ _______ ______________ ________ _____
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926.................................................................................
1 9 2 7 ..._______________________ _________________
Stoves:
1926____ ________________ _______________________
1927.................................................................................
Woolen goods:
1926._______ ______________ _____ ________________
1927................................................................................

2. 41

2
1
3

This industry group has been discontinued.




CO

T a b le

5. — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925} 1926 , and 1927, by industry— Continued

g

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 192G]

Death
N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours'
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Total

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Texas

11

!
!
433
' '
"
1,449 ............ 1
"
117 .........1 ...............
1
.........
1 """
'
187
1
1
1, 340
1
0. 64 i
3.84
521
1.35 l
8.12
246
1
2.81
12
8, 538
.47 !
.51 !
3.09
16
10, 367
.12 i
.71
2, 832
1
7.21
277
1
1.20 |

1

0.69
1.15

1.24
1. 59

1
8
4
3
83
50
3
1

1. 78
1. 99
2.56
4.06
3. 24
1. 61
.35
1. 20

1. 07
2. 20
2.02
1. 62
4. 58
1. 79
.16
.36

.

97
95
22
18
272
64
68
1, 461
1, 533
267
115

67.00
21. 85
C2. 68
32.07
67.64
40.95
91. 98
57.04
49. 29
31.43
138.19

0. 74
. 29
.77
. 54
1.01
.56
1. 21
1.04
.70
*55
1. 84

98
100
22
19
280
69
72
1,556
1, 599
271
117

67. 69
23.00
62. 68
33. 85
69. 63
44.15
97. 39
60.75
51.41
31.90
140. 59

1.98
1.83
.77
1.61
3. 21
6.42
10.95
8.43
5.58
1.42
9.41

West Virginia

Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926
________________________________ _____ _
1927 _
______________________ _______________ _
Furniture:
1926.
_________ ______ ____ _____ _
______
1927.
...............................................................
Glass:
1926
____________ ______ _
____
1927. _ ...............................- ........................................
Leather:
1926
__________________
1927____ _____ __________________________________




j

j
4
1

4.00
1. 27

7. 67
2. 29

86
46

86.00
58. 53

1.11
.69

90
47

90.00
59. 80

8. 78
2.98

1

343
262

4
4

485
507

1

0. 66

3.95

4
1

2.67
.66

1. 86
.49

22
38

14.67
24. 99

.23
.36

40

17. 34
26. 31

2.09
4.80

5
4

3,246
2, 456

3

.41

2. 44

10
4

1.03
. 54

1. 39
.45

351
368

36.19
49.93

.41
.63

361
375

37. 22
50.88

1.80
3. 52

2
2

310
335

2
1

2 °2
.*96

3. 55
.29

27
28

30.00
26. 75

. 55
.29

29
29

32.22
27.71

4.10
.58

ACCIDENTS

1
5
9
4
3
17
5
7
3

INDUSTRIAL

Brick: 1927 ................................. .................. ...............
Cotton goods: 1927
_
_
Fertilizers: 1927.
_________________
Flour: 1927
_____
Foundrv and machine-shop products: 1927______
Furniture: 1927 ____________ ____________________
Lumber— Planing mills: 1927________ ___________
Lumber— Sawmills: 1927_________
_____________
Petroleum refining: 1927__ __ _________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927____________
Structural iron work: 1 9 2 7 -- .____________________

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

2,215
2,333

1

. 14

.86

199
131

98
79

25.13
19. 83

.74
.62

107
88

27.43
22.09

6.75
4.38

2.14

3. 85

108
63

77.14
55.01

1. 30
.97

111
63

79.28
55.01

5.15
.97

1
1

. 15
. 14

.60
.04

65
75

9.85
10.72

.30
.17

66
77

10.00
11.00

.90
1.07

1. 67
10.17

6. 71
15. 25

87
115

145.00
292. 30

1. 71
3. 33

88
119

146.67
302.47

8.42
18.58

50.00
15.48

.35
.30

5
4

50.00
15.48

.35
.30

49
27

27.22
3.02

.26
.05

59
28

32. 77
3.13

2.6
.72

1
6

476
382

2. 92
.75

5
4

3. 09
3. 01

1. 79
1. 76

1
4

. 51
.50

7
7
3

2
2

10.00
87. 98

.65
1. 64

1
6

10.00
87. 98

.65
1. 64

61. 51
34.90
71.19
5. 34
8. 64
17. 51
22.29
17. 54
42. 74

1.02
.82
4.73
.09
.20
1. 53
2.28
.34
.54

42

86

606
2,979

10
1

. 11

5. 55

2. 39

.67

28
23

459
858
1, 776

95, 816
283,172
608, 247

31
94
250

12, 070
24, 951
45,183

11, 761
24, 002
43, 037

278
855
1, 896

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

I MANUFACTURING
N

All industry groups, all States.
______ _________
192 5
192 6
192 7
_____________

1, 299
1, 328

ACCIDENTS

Lumber— Sawmills:
192 6
..............................
_______ _________
192 7
Paper and pulp:
192 6
............................................
192 7
Pottery:
1926_____________________________
1 9 2 7 ... .
___________________
Shipbuilding, steel:
192 6
..........................................
192 7
Slaughtering and meat packing:
192 6
192 7
Stamped and enameled ware:
1926____________ _____ __________
1927._______ .
__________________________
Stoves:
192 6
_____________
192 7
..........................................-

Oklahoma

3
8
5
1
5
2
3
2
1

163
201
220
62
656
1, 123
1,,779
1, 140
117

2

3.03

3.18

3
12
1

.89
2. 25
.29

1.16
1.71
.09

30
21
45
1
17
56
107
59
15

61. 51
34. 90
68.16
5. 34
8.64
16.62
20.04
17.25
42.74

1.02
.82
1.55
.09.
.20
.37
.57
.25
.54

3 30
3 21
3 47
31
3 17
3 59
3 119
3 60
315

INDUSTRIES

Brick: 1927._______________________ _________
Flour: 1927----------------------------------------------------Foundry and machine-shop products: 1927.
Furniture: 1927________________ ________ —
Glass: 1927.____________________ _____ ________
Lumber— Sawmills: 1927-----------------------------Petroleum refining: 1927____________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927---------Structural-iron work: 1927...............................
s Fatal cases not reported.




Or

T a b l e 5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925 , 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

g

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Sever­
Frequen­
Frequen­
ity rate
ity rate
cy rate
cy rate
(per
(per
N um ­
(per
(per
1,000
ber of 1,000,000
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
ex­
ex­
exposure)
exposure)
posure)
posure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

O
F

Georgia




5

0. 08

0.47

24
36

0.41
.57

0.25
.47

290
349

4.99
5.48

0.12
.13

314
390

5.40
6.13

0.37
1.07

639
983
21

1
1

.53
.34

3.13
2. 03

1
7

.53
2. 37

2.09
2. 29

18
72
1

9.47
24.40
16.03

.22
.60
.45

20
80
1

10. 53
27.11
16.03

5.44
4. 92
.45

6
6

1,300
1,204

1

.26

1.54

12
4

3.08
1. U

2.49
1.12

84
77

21.54
21.32

.48
.62

97
81

24.88
22. 43

4.51
1. 74

3
3

500
505

3

2. 00

2.60

9
12

6.00
7. 92

.08
.25

12
12

8.00
7. 92

2. 68
.25

1
1

451
320

1
1

.71
1.04

2. 66
.31

28
26

20.00
27.12

.39
.63

29
27

20. 71
28.16

3. 05
.94

2
2

177
222

1
2

62
587

1
1

228
230

1
1

218
213 ,

12
16

19,369
21,195

3
12
1

1

2. 00

11.30

1
2

2.00
3.00

1.16
1.35

9
7

18.00
10.51

. 57
.17

11
9

22.00
13.51

13.03
1.52

1

.57

3. II

1

.57

.17

5
72

25.00
40. 91

.91
1.12

5
74

25.00
42. 05

.91
4. 70

1

1.43

8. 78

7
5

10.00
7. 25

.22
.30

8
5

11.43
7. 25

9.00
.30

8
13 ,

11.43
20.31

.23
.42

10
13

14.29
20.31

5. 72
.42

2

2.86

5. 49

INDUSTRIAL, ACCIDENTS

Cotton goods:
1926 __________ ________ ________ _________ _____
1927 ________________________ _____ _____________
Fertilizers:
1926
_______________ ________________________
1927. __________________________________ ______
Flour- 1927
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926
_________________________________ ____
1927
.....................
.........
Furniture:
1926
______________________________
1927
___
.....................
Leather:
1926
__ __________
__ _____ _____
1927
............. ....
_ .............
Lumber— Planing mills:
1926________ ______ _____________________________
1927
.
________ _____ _________________
Lumber— Sawmills:
1926
.
____________ _______________
1927 ________ _____________________________ _____
Petroleum refining:
1926
.....................................
1927
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926
....................................... ..
1927_________________ _____ _____ _______________

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Permanent disability

W oolen goods:
192 6
192 7
..

378
38S

[

!
l i
1

|

f

.90
.86

1.59 !
.26 i

13
19

11.81
16. 34

.23
.38

14
20

12.71
17.20

1.82
.64

!
Illinois
1.07
1. 80
.1.39

0. 68
1.78
1.34

65
284
329

7.72
17.64
12. 74

0.15
.50
.29

74
315
366

8.79
19.56
14.16

0.83
3.03
1.86

7
15
32

.78
1. 35
3.09

.27
1. 25
3. 79

45
66
63

5.02
5.95
6.08

.11
.14
.17

54
82
95

6.02
7.39
9.17

1. 71
1.93
3.96

5
8

.30
.74

.09
.53

124
39
59

12 39
2.34
5.44

. 19
!05
.13

124
44
67

12.39
2.64
6.18

19
114
.66

6
15
15
3

.53
1. 53
1.41
15.00

1.13
2.46
1.71
17. 75

197
249
161
3

17.27
25.41
15.09
15.00

.45
.63
.32
.28

204
264
177
6

17.89
26.94
16.59
30.00

2.11
3.09
2.59
18.03

3
18

. 65
4.06

.29
2.98

89
88

19.35
19.86

.56
.53

93
106

20.22
23.92

2.16
3.51

4,944
6,908
7,270

14
36
28

.94
1. 74
1.28

.54
1. 34
1. 30

54
147
135

3.64
7.10
6.19

.07
.19
.12

69
183
163

4.65
8.84
7.47

1.01
1.53
1.42

68
530

10

6.29

2.54

10
46

50.00
28.92

62
.71

10
57

50.00
35! 84

. 62
7.02

244
236

1
1

1.43
1.42

.41
.71

12
23

17.14
32.54

.31
.63

13
24

18. 57
33.96

.72
1.34

26
55
66

.84
2.55
3.29

.78
1.82
2.71

239
328
274

7.74
15.19
13.69

.26
.36
.32

266
386
342

8.61
17.88
17.08

1.23
3.01
3.63

10
22
22

1.18
1.68
1.11

.71
1.14
.99

97
168
150

11. 43
12.82
7. 54

.26
.23
.16

107
190
173

12.61
14.50
8.70

.97
1.37
1.45

2,250
2,481

24
15

3. 53
2.01

2. 32
1. 79

61
47

8.97
6. 31

.18
.14

85
62

12.50
8. 32

2.50
1.93

1,378
1, 594
2,431

7
17
20

1.69
3.54
2.74

1.91
3.14
2.60

58
79
60

14.03
16. 46
8. 23

.34
.61
.20

65
96
80

15. 72
20.00
10.97

2.25
3.75
2.80

2,990
3,689
3,452

0. 75
.23
1. 34
.54

3,336
5, 556
3,618
3,802
3,265
3, 554

.09

.56

1, 527
1,477

1. 31

10,293
7,203
6, 674
2,828
4, 356
6, 630

.53

.19
.83
.60

.05

INDUSTRIES

9
29
36

0.12
.03

I MANUFACTURING
N




2,808
5, 357
8,608

ACCIDENTS

Agricultural implements:
192 5
____________________ _______ _
192 6
_______ __________________ _
Iy27................. ...............................................................
Automobiles:
192 5
_____ _______ __________ _
192 6
_____ _________ ________ _
192 7
_______ ___________________ _
Boots and Shoes:
1925__________________ ______ ___________________
ly26____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Brick:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Carriages and wagons
1926_____________________
Chemicals:
192 6
192 7
Electrical machinery:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Fertilizers:
192 6
192 7
Flour:
192 6
______
192 7
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 5
.
192 6
192 7
________ _____ ___________
Furniture:
192 5
...................................... ..............
192 6
________ _______________
192 7
......................................................................
Hardware:
192 6
....................................................................
192 7
................................ ................................
Leather:
192 5
_______ _________________ _
192 6
__________________
192 7
_________________________
i This industry group has been discontinued,

Or
03

T a b le 5 .— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

Or

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Sever­
Frequen­
Frequen­
ity rate
ity rate
cy rate
cy rate
(per
Num ­
(per
(per
(per
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
ex­
ex­
exposure)
exposure) posure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000 hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Illinois—-Continued

1.50
2.96
4.71

2.40
4.36
5.23

28
126
142

14.00
3.33
30.39

0.48
.62
.80

33
145
164

16.50
26.85
35.10

8 .8S
8. 31
6.03

8.01

5
7

5.56
9.34

4.37
16.22

36
48

40.00
64.08

.78
1.48

41
56

45.56
74.76

5.15
25. 71

.33

2.00

3
11
10

.84
1.89
1.67

.25
1.17
.92

20
66
72

5.57
11.38
12.04

.19
.48
.28

23
77
84

6.41
13.27
14.04

.44
1. 65
3.20

.88

5.29
1
5

.63
2.80

1.91
1.29

14
16
31

12. 34
10.00
17.37

.21
.31
.35

15
17
36

13.22
10.63
20.17

5.50
2.22
• 1.64

2
6

.39
1.49

.41
1.79

16
61

3.14
15.17

.12
.41

24
68

4.71
16.91

7.50
3.69

2
4

6.67
•8.12

2.31
4.06

2
9

6.67
18.27

.10
.58

4
13

13.34
26.39

2.41
4.64

41
105
149

.83
1.57
2.79

.50
1.61
2.94

767
1,142
1,057

15. 58
17.12
19.78

.33
.38
.42

820
1,254
1,215

16.65
18.79
22.74

2.29
2.62
4.37

4
3

.25
2.11

.19
1.27

29
17

1. 76
12.00

.04
.26

33
20

2.01
14. U

.23
1.53

1.00
.56

6.00
3.33

309
250

1

1.34

5
11
11

1,197
1,933
1,992

2

5
7
7

378
523
595

1

2
2

1,710
1,340

6
1

1
1

87
164

*
7
li
8

16,412
22,228
17,806

2
2

5,462
472

667
1,802
1,557

2
3

12
7
9

1.18
.25

.24
.10
.17

6.97
1.49

1.46
.63
1.01

ACCIDENTS




3
16
22

2
3

8
17
16

INDUSTRIAL

Lum ber— Planing mills:
1925
____________ ____________________________
1926
___________________________________
_____ __________
1927
Lum ber— Sawmills:
1926
- _____________
1927
_______ ______________ _____
M achine tools:
1925
_ .
______
1926
- 1927
- - - - ______ ____________
Paper and pulp:
1925
1926
_
_
1927
Petroleum refining:
1926____________ _______ _____________
- ___
1927..
______________________________________
Shipbuilding, steel:
1926
- - _____- _____
1927
____________
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1925 ___________________________________________
1926 ___________________________________________
1927
________ ______ ________ ____________
Stamped and enameled ware:
1926
- _______ ___________
1927............. ............................................................. —

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Total

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

Death

1926]

4
4

2,085
1, 732

19
21

3.02
4.04

2.43
5.51

153
123

24.28
24. 23

.63
.52

172
147

27. 30
28. 30

3.07
f> 03
.

6
6

1, 387
1,130

2
3

.48
.88

.14
1.74

16
13

3.80
3.83

.13
.08

18
16

4.28
4.71

.27
1.82

3
4
4

296
434
645

8
7
11

9.02
5. 38
5. 68

9.58
4.14
5.89

29
45
52

32. 69
34:61
23.87

1.11
1.02
.54

38
53
64

42.84
40. 75
33.07

17.45
9.76
9.53

1
1
1

1.13
.76
.52

6.76
4.60
3.10

Michigan
Automobiles:
192 5
_________ ______
192 6
_______ ________________ _______
192 7
Automobile tires:
192 6
______ __
192 7
______ ________________________
Boots and shoes:
192 6
_____ _______
192 7
Brick:
192 6
192 7
Carriages and wagons: 1 1926_____________________
Chemicals:
192 6
192 7
Electrical machinery:
192 6
192 7
Fertilizers:
1 926 ..__________ ________________________
1927_______ _____ ________________ _______________
Flour:
192 6
192 7
_____ ________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Furniture:
1925 .
- ........................................................
1926 .
_____ _____ ______ _________________
1927____________________________________________
Hardware:
192 6
______ _________ ___________________
192 7
_____ _________
* This industry group has been discontinued.




25
29
40

152, 620
190, 210
168, 325

42
46
59

0.09
.08
.12

0. 55
.48
.70

549
677
566

1. 20
1.19
1.12

0.91
.82
.79

3, 210
4, 766
4,172

7.01
8.35
8. 26

0.14
.25
.22

3,801
5,489
4, 797

8.30
9. 62
9.50

1.60
1.55
1.71

1
1

2,860
1, 790

2

.23

1.40

13
2

1. 51
.37

. 96
.28

101
51

11.74
9. 50

.38
.23

116
53

13.48
9.87

2.74
.51

4
4

522
273

4
4

2. 50
4.88

.09
. 11

4
4

2.50
4.88

.09
. 11

2
2
1

156
143
10

4

2, 528
3,018

1
1

113
107

1
1

249
207

1

1.61

5
5

468
428

2
1

5 !
26 |
24 I
1
5 !
37 !
36 |
3
3 !

1

.53
. 66

3.16
3. £8

.G
4

8
4
1

16. 00
9.30
33.00

.44
. 11
.56

9
4
1

18.00
9.30
33.00

1.08
.11
.56

2
6

.26
.66

.28
.43

72
148

9.47
16. 34

.27
.60

78
160

10.26
17.66

3.71
5.01

1

4
6

2. 00

.33

.08

1

.33

.08

1.93

10
6

14. 29
9.67

.57
. 24

10
7

14.29
11.28

.57
2.17

1.43
.78

.43
.23

24
9

17.14
7. 02

.48
. 25

26
10

18. 57
7 .80

.91
.48

4,078
6, 375
5, 531

1
8
2

.08
. 42
.12

.49
2. 51
.72

15
15
11

1.23
.79
.66

.94
.53
.32

133
482
328

10.87
25. 24
19. 77

.26
.63
.56

149
505
341

12.18
26.45
20. 55

1.69
3.67
1.60

2,013
9, 052
8,937

3

. 11

.66

48
36

1.76
1.34

1.28
. 66

32
229
211

5. 30
8. 42
7. 87

.20
.27
. 18

32
280
247

5. 30
lo! 29
9. 21

.20
2.21
.84

9
4

6. 43
2. 64

1. 82
.99

20
15

14. 29
9.90

. 49
141

29
19

20. 72
12! 54

2 31
1.40

ACCIDENTS IN MANXJFACTXJBING INDUSTRIES

Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1926________________________________ ___________
1 9 2 7 ...___________________________________ _____
Stoves:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Structural-iron work:
1925__________________ ____________*........................
1926_______________________________
. _
1927_________ ______ ________ ______ _____________

476
505 ______ l

Or
Oi

T a b le

5. — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by

in d u s tr ij— C o n tm u e .d

Or

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Industry and year

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
N um ­
(per
1,000
ber of 1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
N um ­
(per
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000 hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

SeverFrequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours*
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

o
f

Michigan--Continued

C■ o tta r'vOrl o - r\ CiriQTT)P]prl
lf
n

1Q9f)

Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1926
___________ _______________
1927........................................- ........... - ..........- ..........




3
4

1. 76
2. 51

0.89
1. 32

40
29

23.53
18.18

1.47
.42

43
33

25.29
20.69

2. 36
1.74

7. 69
2.11
2. 38

2
16
9

2.56
2.81
1.79

2.50
2. 67
1.25

39
159
118

49. 99
27.89
23.43

1.04
.77
.79

42
177
129

53.83
31. 05
25.62

11.23
5. 55
4. 42

.24
.28
.69

1.47
1.67
4.14

7
13
10

.43
1.81
1.38

.47
1.62
1.23

120
344
282

7.33
47. 78
38.90

.23
2.07
1.55

131
359
297

8.00
49.87
40.97

2.17
5. 36
6.92

1

.59

3.48

3
4

1. 76
3.43

.69
1.29

36
15

21.18
12.87

.56
•52

40
19

23.53
16.30

4.72
1.81

3
2

.26
.27

1. 53
1.60

3
15
6

.85
1.28
.80

.25
.83
.73

73
369
175

20.63
31.54
23.38

.54
1.03
.60

76
387
183

21.48
33.08
24.45

.79
3.39
2. 93

1

.42

2,48

4
9

1.67
5. 26

1.24
1.84

39
52

16.25
30.41

.42
1.30

44
61

18. 34
35.67

4.14
3.14

3
2
11

1.07
.51
12.22

1.08
.15
3.82

64
59
13

22.86
15.24
14.44

.57
. 35
.26

67
61
24

23.93
15. 75
26.66

1.65
.50
4. 08

2
3

.67
1.12

.19
•33

33
37

11.00
13.75

.26
.40

36
41

12. 00
15. 24

2. 44
2. 96

2
2

560
532

1
16
16

260
1,893
1,679

1
2
2

1.28
.35
.40

5
17
17

5,455
2,394
2,416

4
2
5

7
5

574
389

1
8
7

1,179
3,902
2,495

2
2

807
570

4
5
1

930
1,291
314

3
4 .

1,003
897

1
1

.33
.37

1.99
2.23

in d u s t r ia i. a c c id e n t s

Leather:
1926
_____
1927
Lumber— Planing mills:
1925
______________________________
1926
______ ____________________________
1927
_________ ________________________
Lumber— Sawmills:
3925
________________________ ______
1926
________ ___________ _______ 1927
________________________________
Machine tools:
1926
.
________________________________
1927
________ ______
Paper and pulp:
1925
__ _________
1926
_________ __ ____________
1927
. . _________________________
Shipbuilding, steel:
1926
- - - ___________ ____________
1927
_ . _________
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926
_________
1927
_ _________

St a t is t i c s

Death

2
1

723
379

1
1

.45
.88

2. 76
5. 28

2
3
2

313
537
368

1

.62

3. 72

4
4

694
615

20. 45
9. 68

.53
.37

46
L12

20.90
10.56

3.30
.5.65

4

4. 26

7.98

2

1.81

.54

18.09
23.13
12.67

.62
1.02
.25

21
38
16

22.35
23.75
14.48

8.60
4.74
.79

1

.54

.16

1.42
5.96

.06
.17

3
12

1.42
6.50

.06
.33

New Jersey 4

2, 749
2, 015
1,907

1

. 12

.73

009
237
1,900
2, 631
2, 473

1

1

857
905
923
18

1
|
!

I
j

2.28
10.94
5.00

72
88
48

7.71
12. 94
7. 33

0.19
.29
.17

97
125
73

10. 39
18. 38
11.15

2.47
12.11
5.17

10
10
5

1.21
1. 67
.87

2.03
1.43
1.39

97
95
19

11. 76
15. 83
3. 32

.37
.37
.09

108
105
24

13.09
17. 50
4.19

3.13
1.80
1.48

1. 41

4.22

6
3

3. 33
4. 22

.07
.11

6
4

3.33
5.63

. 07
4 33

1.40
1.14
1.08

1.01
1. 79
1.13

70
69
86

12.28
8. 73
11. 58

.28
.17
.27

78
78
94

13.68
9. 87
12.66

1. 29
1.96
1.40

3
3
3

0.88

2. 68
5.29
3.82

8
9
8

0.15

25
36
25

1

1

1.17
1.11
1.08

3. 23
.33
1. 37

27
38
28
2

10. 50
14.07
10.11
20.00

.29
.29
.21
1. 30

30
41
31
2

11.67
15.18
11.19
20.00

3.52
.62
1.58
1.30

6, 778
3, 302
3, 449

1

. 05

.30

2

.19

1.16

12
15
29

.59
1. 52
2.80

.65
1. 57
2. 99

89
80
90

4. 38
8. 08
8. 70

.13
.18
.21

102
95
121

5.02
9.60
11.69

1.08
1. 75
4.36

3, 558
5,000

1

.07

.40

7
9

.65
.60

.34
.85

23
17

2.15
1.13

.05
.04

30
27

2.80
1.80

.39
1.29

1
1

.04
.04

.24
.25

1

1.17

7. 02

62
48
32
5

2.48
1.98
1. 21
5.85

2.47
1.74
1.18
14. 50

140
134
133
15

5.60
5. 51
5.03
17.54

.15
.12
.14
.43

203
183
165
21

8.12
7. 53
6.24
24.56

2.86
2.11
1.32
21.95

. 12

.71

. 14

.85

55
82
125
7

3. 23
5. 66
8. 81
5. 20

.41
.27
.82
.25

291
325
348
18

17.10
22.42
24. 53
13.36

3.43
5.12
11.18
6.55

8, 329
8,090
8, 819
285

5, 672
2
4,833
4, 727
2
449
i This industry group has been discontinued.

2.31
234
3. 75
4. 85
243
16. 76
9. 91
221
15. 58
6.31
11
8.16
* Closed cases only are reported.

INDUSTRIES




3,113
2, 271
2,180

I MANUFACTURING
N

Automobiles:
192 5
192 6
______
192 7
Automobile tires:
192 5
_
1926__.________ _________
1927_________________________________
Boots and shoes:
192 6
192 7
Brick:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Carpets:
1926______________
192 6
.
1927. .
__________________________
Carriages and w agons:1 1926 __________
Chemicals:
192 5
1926.______ ____________________
192 7
_____ _______ _______
Cotton goods:
192 6
192 7
Electrical machinery:
192 5
1926. .
__________________
1927.............................................................
Fertilizers: 1927________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1925. .
__________________________
192
6
__________________________
192 7
__________ _________________
Furniture: 1927___________________ _____

ACCIDENTS

Stoves:
192 6
................
192 7
Structural-ironwork:
192 5
_____ _
192 6
1927.____________
W oolen goods:
192 6
192 7

Or

T a b le

5.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry—

C o n tin u e d

Or

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

Permanent disability

Sever- •
Sever­
Frequen­
Frequen­
ity rate
ity rate
cy rate
cy rate
(per
(per
N um ­
(per
(per
1,000
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
ex­
ex­
exposure)
exposure)
posure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Temporary disability

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
c y rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

New Jersey— Continued

0. 50
1.16
9.45

0. 76
1.83
11.25

50
64
24

3. 60
8.24
13.34

0.10
.21
.26

58
73
41

4. 71
9.40
22.79

1. 29
2.04
11. 51

1,455
2,286
2,256

15
16
14

.43
2.32
2.07

2.11
1.36
3.62

33
60
39

7.56
8.70
5.76

.23
.29
.11

48
76
53

10.99
11.02
7.83

2.34
1,65
3.73

5
7
G

477
729
422

6
7
8

4.19
3.18
6.33

3.78
5.57
9.57

19
19
10

13.28
8.63
7.90

.29
.16
.12

25
26
18

17.47
11.81
14.23

4.07
5. 73
9.69

2
2

10, 208
8, 009

66
63

2.16
2.62

2.88
3.16

126
74

4.12
3.08

.10
.07

192
137

6.28
5.70

2.98
3.23

6
8
8
1

1, 943
2, 720
2,310
316

2
5
5
2

.34
.61
.72
2.22

1.10
.85
.98
1.27

76
114
97
10

13.04
13.90
13.99
11.11

.41
.36
.39
.43

79
119
102
13

13.55
14.51
14.71
14.44

2.54
1.21
1.37
8.03

2
2

485
503

8
8

5.33
5.30

2.47
2.48

14
11

9. 33
7.28

.35
.10

22
19

14.66
12. 58

2.82
2.58

5
3
3

1,149
968
782

9
7
8

2.61
2.41
3.41

4.23
1.00
1.15

70
30
22

20.30
10.34
9. 38

.56
.28
.23

79
37
30

22.91
12. 75
12. 79

4.79
1.28
1.38

1
1

747
519

6
6

2.72
3.85

2.41
4.12

66
30

30.00
19. 25

.83
. 42

72
36

32. 72
23.10

3.24
4.54

4,632
2,588
600

7
10
9

1

0.07

0.43

!

1

. 17

1.03

1

1.11

6.33

ACCIDENTS




7
9
17

6
6
4

INDUSTRIAL

Glass:
1925................................................................................
1927
Hardware: 1927
_ ___
Leather:
1925
1926
___________
1927
_______________________________
Machine tools:
1925
_________________ .
1926
_________ ____________________
1927
. . .
.
Petroleum refining:
1926
...........
1927
___ __ . _____________
Pottery:
1925
__________________________________
1926
__________________
1927
_______________________
Shipbuilding, steel: 1926__________________________
Stamped and enameled ware:
1926
................................... ....................
1927
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1925
_____________
1926
_____________
___
1927
...........................................
Stoves:
1926
1927___________________________ _____ ___________

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Structural iron work:
1925-..............................................................................
1926.........................................
1927____________________________________________
Woolen goods:
1925........................... .................................... .................
1926_________ _____ ___________________ _________
1927___________________ _______________ _________

2
1
3

100
8
218

4
6
6

6,910
3,403
4,945

21.45
.43
1.66
1. 08

.22
1.91
1.27

1.59
1.96
1.75

3.70

2.02
3.62
2.83

.06
.04
.04

.27
1.95
1.31

1
1

0.21
.18

1.24
1.09

14
12

2.89
2.18

3.14
2.02

30
65

6.19
11.82

0.23
.17

45
78

9.29
14.18

4.61
3.28

15
18

11,919
11,178

6

.17

1.01

85
104

2.38
3.10

2.42
3.27

188
358

5.26
10.69

.25
. 62

279
462

7.81
13.79

3.68
3.89

: 7
10

2,238
17,220

4

.08

.46

4
51

.60
.99

.51
.72

21
363

3.13
7.02

. 11
.27

25
418

3.73
8.09

.62
1.45

10
14

1,008
1,948

2
1

.66
.17

3.97
1.03

7
13

2.31
2.24

1.62
3.00

59
109

19.51
18.79

1.03
.66

68
123

22.48
21.20

6.62
4.69

2
5

5,571
7, 799

3
1

.18
.04

1.08
.26

27
17

1.62
.73

2.31
.64

67
105

4.01
4.49

.13
.28

97
123

5.81
5.26

3.52
1.18

7
10
2

3,236
4,152
1, 413

2
1
1

.21
.08
.24

1.24
.48
1.42

22
26
4

2.27
• 2.08
.95

3.96
3. 22
1.03

59
141
36

6.08
11.28
8. 57

.26
.71
.52

83
168
41

8.56
13.44
9.76

5.46
4.41
2.97

9
10
2
4

20,454
20,800
131
1,312

4
4

.07
.06

.39
.38

74
104
1
8

1. 21
1.67
2.50
2.05

1.29
1.89
10.14
2. 74

456
711
8
58

7.43
11.39
20.00
14. 87

.33
.73
1.25
.83

534
819
9
66

8. 71
13.12
22.50
16.92

2.01
3.00
11.39
3.57

15
22

10,104
16,425

3
14

.10
.28

.59
1.70

128
199

4. 22
4.04

3.90
3.71

322
844

10. 62
17.12

.58
1.16

453
1,057

14.94
21.44

5.07
6.57

14
18
1

2.930
3,621
297

23
39
2

2. 62
3. 58
2.22

2. 70
4.09
. 68

53
129
5

6.03
11. 83
5. 56

. 27
.20
. 66

76
168
7

8. 65
15.41
7. 78

2.97
4.29
1.34

6
8

763
1,849

1

.44

2.62

3
17

1.31
3.09

1.84
3. 75

17
102

7. 43
18. 55

.35
.73

21
119

9.18
21. 64

4.81
4.48

14
20

2,682
2,928

1
3

.12
.34

.75
2.04

31
40

3.85
4. 55

6.03
5.48

84
248

10.44
28.18

.51
1. 60

116
291

14. 41
33.07

7.29
9.12

6
9

551
1,282

1

.61

3.63

3
23

1.82
6.05

2.18
5.46

10
83

6.05
21.84

.27
,97

14
106

8.48
27.89

6.08
6.43

i
l

INDUSTRIES

1,615
1,835

I MANUFACTURING
N




1
3
5

ACCIDENTS

New York
Agricultural implements:
192 5
192 6
Automobiles:
192 5
192 6
Boots and shoes:
192 5
_____ _______ ______
192 6 _____ _______________________
Brick:
192 5
192 6
Carpets:
______ ________________
192 5
192 6 _______ _____ ______ ___________
•Chemicals:
1925________ ________________________
1926_______________________________ _
Cotton goods: 1926.....................................
^Electrical machinery:
192 5
_____ ________ ______
192 6
________ __________________
Fertilizers: 1926________________________
Flour: 1926_____________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 5
192 6
______
Furniture:
192 5
192 6
Hardware: 1926_________ ______ _______
Leather:
192 5
192 6
Lumber— Planing mills:
192 5 _____ _______________________
192 6
_________
Machine tools:
192 5
...............................................
192 6
.............................

Or
CO

T a b le

5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

g

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­ ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours'
hours'
ex­
exposure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

4, 597
8,163
1,174
1, 228
3,044
1,170

4
6
3

929
821
1,092

0.44
1.95
3. 40
1.62
1. 31

1,458
1, 757
303

7
6
4

0.07
.33
.57
.27
.22

1
5

.36
2.00

2.15
12.17

58
92
24
3
24
18

4.21
3. 76
6.86
.81
2.64
5.14

6.77
4. 30
8. 26
.24
1.95
4.12

235
692
144
18
62
79

17.04
28. 24
41.14
4.86
6. 81
22. 57

0.67
.93
2.01
.29
.73
1.45

294
792
170
22
88
97

21.32
32. 33
48. 57
5.94
9. 67
27.71

7.88
7.18
13.67
2.15
3.99
5.57

21
20
4

1
8
2
1
2

4.80
3. 77
4.44

4.00
4.17
5.50

100
164
19

22. 86
30. 94
21.11

.88
1.87
1.46

121
184
23

27.66
34. 71
25. 55

4.88
6.04
6.96

11
15
5

3.95
6.00
1. 51

3.78
4. 83
1. 67

32
44
31

11.48
17. 60
9. 39

.45
1. 27
.77

44
64
36

15.79
25. 60
10.90

6. 38
18. 27
2.44

16
12
59
116
28
1
86
7
10
21

7. 20
15. 57
23. 35
6.26
12.29
.96
30. 86
3.90
26. 84
14.61

0.19
.40
.46
. 19
.35
.03
.76
.08
.88
.33

17
12
61
127
29
3
91
12
11
27

7. 65
15. 57
24.14
6.85
12.73
2.88
32. 66
6. 68
29. 52
18. 78

1.00
.40
.70
.77
2.98
6.07
3.63
2.00
5. 71
3.77

Virginia

Boots and shoes* 1927
Brick* 1927
Chemicals' 1927
___ _
. . _ _
Cotton goods: 1927____________________________
Fertilizers- 19^7
Flour: 1927____ ____________________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products: 1927 _
Furniture- 1927
Leather- 1927
Lum ber— Planing mills: 1927-------------------------------




5
3
1
4
10
2
4
2
1

741
257
842
6,173
759
67
930
599
124
479

1
1
1
1
1

0. 05
.44
.96
.36

0. 32
263
5. 75
2.15

0. 45

0.81

2
10

.79
.54

.24
.26

1
4
5
1
6

.96
1. 44
2.78
2.68
4.17

.29
.72
1.92
4. 83
3.44

ACCIDENTS

12
19
2
2
4
3

INDUSTRIAL

Paper and pulp:
1925__________ __________________________________
1926
_____________________
Petroleum refining: 1926________________ _______
Pottery: 1926 _____________________________________
_______________ Shipbuilding, steel: 1926 _____
Stamped and enameled ware: 1926
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1925
1926
- - - - - . . ____
Stoves* 1926
Structural ironwork:
1925
___________ ____________________
1926
_________________________________
Woolen goods: 1926

O
F

New York— Continued

STATISTICS

Industry and year

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

4
2
1
1
1
2
2

1,380
362
140
4,089
51
452
435

3

.72

4.34

2

4
1.47

.14
1.38

120
21

3
104

13

1.06

.50

7

3

.24

.48
3.69

5.16

6.08

107
4

28.98
19.35
7.15
8.48
39.14
78.89
3.06

.87
1.94
.07

6

.90
.6 8

.50
.2 2

125
25
3
120
6

114
4

30.18
23.04
7.15
9.78
39.14
84.05
3.06

5.38
2.06
.50
2.19
.87
8 .0 2

.07

Wisconsin




10

.05
.05
.13

.31
.30
.78

2,079
2.035

24
44
26
2

5
7

1,866

16.98
18.52
18.59

0.34
.47
.46

253
163
28

2 0 .1 2

1. 74
1.23

19.62

6 . 39

1.24

.62
1.41
.94

378
317
208

19.53
15.93
13.58

.41
.34
.29

403
362
236

20.82
18.19
15.41

1.34
2.05

1.70
.32
.82
1.25

.14
.49
.38

53
37
49

8.50
6.07
8 .75

.17
.1 1
.2 0

55
42
56

8.82
6.89

1 0 .0 0

.23

1

1 0 .0 0
1 0 .0 0

.31
.60
.58
.23

2

24
13

37.94

.49

6

113.81

455.72

1 0 .0 0

1
2

1 0 .0 0

31.08

.27
.30

31.08

.27
.30

100'

6.67
11.96

. 15
.33

4
105

6.67
12.56

.15
1.34

90.00
14. 91

6.83
.37

9
9

90.00
14.91

6.83
.37

211

22 0

2 2 .6 8

922
620

34.92
25.11

1.37
2.98
1.67

85
89
85

9.81
9.28
9.13

1 .1 2

78
103

14.17
11.32
8.73

1.53
2.48
1.05

2 .2 1

32
14
18

4

75.87

455. 23

20
21
195
2,788

4
1

. 12

.72

4

.48

.29

18

201
3,232
8,796
8,229

.1 0
.1 1

.62

8

3

.6 8

1

.04

.24

55
36

1

2,888

3

3,216
3,105

11

1,835
3.035
2,518

7
1
2
1

.18
.2 2

.13

1.09
1.32
.79

3
4
2

.82
2.08
1.46

.32
1.71
.8 6

864
583

21.76
32. 73
23.61

.43
.59
.57

.35
1.15
.76

.14
.92
.39

82
78
78

9.46
8.13
8.37

.2 0
.2 0

.55
.44
.26

.16
.65
.08

74
97
63

13.44
1 0 .6 6
8 .34

.17

.28
.51
.18 !

66

18.84

2 .0 1

.31
.59

INDUSTRIES

i This industry group has been discontinued.

1
1
2

0.45

228
150
18

9
9

6,450
6,630
5,107

0.07

0.95
.76
5.93

1
2

1

1.79
1.60
1.03

1

4,476
2 ,6b9
323

I MANUFACTURING
N

Agricultural implements:
192 5
________ ___________
192 6
_____ _______ _
192 7
______________ ___________
Automobiles:
192 5
..................................................
192 6
____________
192 7
________ ______ _________
Boots and shoes:
192 5
______ ________
192 6
_______ _____________
192 7
_______ _______
Carriages and wagons: 1 1926__________
Chemicals:
1926_____________ _________ ________
1927... .
_________ __________
Cotton goods:
192 6
...................................................
192 7
__________ _________________
Electrical machinery:
192 6
_____ ___________
192 7
Flour:
192 6
____________
192 7
Foundry and machine-shop products:
192 5
______ _
192 6
_____________
192 7
.................................
Furniture:
192 5
______ _______ ____________
192 6
_________________________
1927 .. .
...............
Leather:
192 5
______ _____________________
192 6
_
192 7

ACCIDENTS

■6S— 0 * 0 6 9 8

Lumber— Sawmills: 1927..
Paper and pulp: 1927_____
Pottery: 1927........ ..................
Shipbuilding, steel: 1927..
Stoves: 1927__________ _____
Structural-iron work: 1927
Woolen goods: 1927_______

T a b le

5.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926 , and 1927 , by industry— Continued

O

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Sever­
Frequen­
Frequen­ ity rate
ity rate
cy rate
cy rate
(per
(per
Num ­
(per
(per
1 ,0 0 0
ber of
1,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
ex­
ex­
exposure)
exposure) posure)
posure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

O
F

Wisconsin— Continued

1,946
1,663
1,278

1
2
1

0.17
.40
.26

1.03
2.40
1.56

11

2,520
4,356
4,767

6
6

.79
.53
.42

4.76
3.21
2.52

18
16

9
5

1.54

8

2.09

1 .0 0

0.80
.93
1.80

186
153
72

31.86
30.60
18.77

0.76
.92
.58

196
160
81

33.57
32.00
2 1 .1 2

2.59
4.25
3.94

.79
1.45
.85 ;

322
482
530

42.59
36.79
37.06

1 .0 1

340
505
551

44.97
38.54
38. 53

6.56
5.69
4.40
1 .2 1

12

1.59

16
15

1 .2 2

3
4

1.25
1 .2 1

.62
.98

.34

.1 0

30
48
33

12.47
14.54

1

7

1 1 .1 1

.23
.23

33
52
34

13. 72
15.75
11.45

1 .0 1

1.05

1.03
1.03
.2 2

.84

5
4

802
1,117
990

5
9
9

1,642
5,061
5,178

1
1
8

.2 0

1 .2 2

.07
.52

.39
3.09

5
18
14

1.18
.90

.40
1.29
.60

51
186
159

10.35
12.24
10.23

.23
.34
.29

57
205
181

11.56
13.49
11.65

3.98

2
2

942
942

2

.71

4.24

2

.71

.32

74
67

26.43
23.70

.36
.61

74
71

26.43
25.12

.36
5.17

2
2

1,712
1, 558

11

2.16

.8 8

2

.43

2.57

4

.8 6

.32

78
72

15.29
15.40

.33
.30

89
78

17.45
16.69

3.19

1
1

2,773
3,010

3

.36

2.16

12

1.44
.78

1 .0 0

7

.45

45
36

5.42
3.99

.16
.07

60
43

7.22
4.77

3.32
.52

2

212

4

628
59i

2
6
8

3.15
3.16
4.51

1.65
1.83
3.64

16
89

25.17
46.84
56.94

.57
1.28
1.51

18
95

101

110

28.32
50.00
62.02

3.11
8.54

2

1

1

.57

3.38

.33
1.85
2 .0 2

1 .2 1

2 .2 2

ACCIDENTS




9
9
9

INDUSTRIAL

Lumber— Planing mills:
1925.................................................................................
1926_______________________ _________ - ..................
1927_ ________
_______ _______ _________________
Lumber— Sawmills:
1925
____________ _____ _____
1926_______ ______ ______________________________
1927 ________
_______________________________
Machine tools:
1925
. ___________
1926
___ _________________
1927
__ ________________________
Paper and pulp:
1925 ___________________________________________
1926
___ ____________________________
1927
________ _________________ _____
Shipbuilding, steel:
1926
1927
____________ _____ - - - ________
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926
.......................- ............
1927
.........................................................
Stamped and enameled ware:
1926
.....................- ......................- ..................
1927
......................... ..........
Structural-iron work:
1925
.............................
1926
__________________
1927............................. ..........- ......................................

STATISTICS

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Total

Temporary disability

Permanent disability

Death

Industry and year

disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Woolen goods:
1926.............................................................................
1927 . . . ________ ________________ _______________

2
2

155
493

All industry groups, all States:
1925.........................................................................
1926_________________ ______________
1927___________ _____ ______________________

481
859
729

361,448
538,836
415,871

8

7
114
173
150

1,543
2,694
1, 853

1.60
4. 74

g

0.32
.13

1.60
4.74

.32
.13

.33
.05
.22

87
44
5
87
19
11
35
214
14
2
145

10.00
34.23
4.84
27. 51
25.00
39.54
11.18
36.67
25.00
21.62
11.67
4.00
11.42

0.92
1.14
13.06
1.00
16.52
3. 53
8.34
1.61
1.30
7.86
3.1 2
.33
.05
3.28

.62
3.45
.06

7
9
3

35.00
90.00
2.30

.62
27. 21
.06

9, 735
19,129
13,457

7

11,392
21,996
15,460

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia
1,664
274
851
5,999
517
78
717
559
113

0.

77

4. 70

2. 50

"l5.”48

.45
.71
.20

1. 21

0.86

2.86
1. 72

3.22

.91
7.28
.87
.19
2.57
4. 65
1.34

1.22

2.12

.94
10.00

3.20
8 . 75
30.00
4.28
24.38

20.00
14

11

30
195
14
2

112

35.00
80.00
2.30

23.76

All industry groups: 1926____________

36. 36
8.24
36. 67
21.43
19. 70
11. 67
4.00
8.82

0.06
.23
1.08
.13
.85
.96
.90
.27

697

797

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks

INDUSTRIES

167
,233
53
73
43
446

4.16

0.40
1.25
3.46
.56
.63
5.00
2 . 73
2.94

I MANUFACTURING
N

Boots and shoes: 1926............................... ...........
Brick: 1926________________________ __________
Chemicals: 1926._____________ _______________
Cotton goods: 1926__________________________
Fertilizers: 1926___________________ _____ _____
Flour: 1926______________ _____ _______________
Foundry and machine-shop products: 1926.
Furniture: 1926_______________ _____ _________
Leather: 1926________________________________
Lumber— Planing mills: 1926_______________
Lumber— Sawmills: 1926____________________
Paper and pulp: 1926________________________
Pottery: 1926_________________________________
Shipbuilding, steel: 1926____________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1926______
Stoves: 1926__________________________________
Structural-iron work: 1926__________________
Woolen goods: 1926____ ______ ________ ______

Alabama
Cotton goods:
1926__________________________________________
1927___________________________________
Fertilizers: 1927. ____________________ _____ . . .
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926-__________ ___________________ ________
1927__________________________________________ _




9

5,917

10

6 ,353

5

196

3
4

2,092
1 ,8 8 8

0.28
.21

0.29
.06

62
66

3
.95
1.24

.84

102

54

3.48
3.46
5.10

0 .1 2
.1 2

.28

67
70
3

3.76
3.67
5.10

0.41
.18
.28

16.19
9.53

.45
.34

108
62

17.14
10.95

1.29
2.06

.

00

T a b l e 5 . — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by industry— Continued

C>

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours'
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Temporary disability

N um ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

O
F

Alabama —Continued

5
4
1

2,312
2,182
250

1
2

47
186

18
26

10, 368
11,055

1
1

0.86
.92

1
2

4
8
2

0. 58
1.22
2. 67

0.43
1. 37
7. 75

48
78
22

6.96
11.92
29. 38

0.14
.56
.92

53
87
24

7.68
13.29
32.05

1.42
2.85
8.67

1
4

0.14
.15

10.00
7.16

. 15
.27

1
4

10.00
7.16

.15
.27

213
227

15
21

229
250

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California

Agricultural implements:
192 6
192 7
Automobiles:
192 6
192 7
Automobile tires:
192 6
192 7




3.85
3.26

448
614
1,031
915

0. 32

1.94

1,891
2,165

.18
. 15

1.06
.92

INDUSTRIAL

Lumber— Sawmills:
1926 ___________________________ _______________
1927____________________________________________
Shipbuilding, steei: 1927___________ ___ . ______
Slaughtering and meat packing:
1926
1927
All industry groups:
1926
1927
_ .
_
. .

STATISTICS

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Industry and year

Permanent disability

2.12
2.61

5
6

3.85
3.26

2.12
2.61

.32
1.09

.16
.51

2
3

.64
1.09

2.10
.51

.62

.35
.57

6
5

1.06
.77

1. 41
1.49

1,909
2,567
373
201
68

1
2
1

. 18
.26
.89

1.05
1. 56
5. 36

3
1

.89

. 45

17
18

1,936
2,056

1
2

.17
.32

1.03
1.95

14
14

2.41
2. 27

7
7

916
1,108

1

.30

1.81

2
8

2
3

171
653

1

.51

3. 06

1

5
5

544
554

1
1

.63
.61

3. 68
3. 61

3

17
17

2,266
6,371

10

.53

3.13

15
23

21
16

12,136
6,958

25
15

.69
. 72

4.12
4. 31

84
47

3
2
2

4,460
3,927
249

7
15
1

. 52
1. 27
1. 34

3.12
7. 64
8. 03

2
2
4

2,154
2,924
1,424

2
3
2

.31
.34
.47

1.86
2. 05
2.81

2
3

108
410

2
2
2

76
43
280

4
4

466
647

2
1

191
141

.42

1. 47
1. 56
5. 81

15
16

2.58
2.59

3.94
3.87

. 74
2. 41

. 65
1.10

2
9

.74
2.71

65
91

.51

. 15

2

1.02

3.21

1.80

. 78

1
4

.63
2.41

3.68
i 39

2. 21
1.20

1. 33
1.10

15
33

2.21
1.73

1.33
4.23

2. 31
2. 25

1. 75
1. 36

109
62

3.00
2.97

5.87
5.67

7
30
2

. 52
2. 55
2.67

. 22
1. 44
1. 07

14
45
3

1.04
3.82
4.01

3.34
9.08
a 10

7
8
4

1.08
.91
.94

.51
. 46
.48

9
11
6

1. 39
1.25
1.41

2.37
2.51
3.29

.33

2.31

.33

2.31

3. 58

1. 85

3

3.58

1.85

3
4

8. 59
6.19

2.14
2. 06

.96
.98

5
£

3.56
3.09

9.55
7.17

i
1

INDUSTRIES

2.91
1.92

3
1.42
1.03

. 71
. 26
1.78

1

2
2

4
2

I MANUFACTURING
N




14
11
2
1
3

ACCIDENTS

Brick:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Chemicals: 1927. _________________________________
Electrical machinery: 1927.
________ _____ __
Fertilizers: 1927. _________________________________
Foundry and machine-shop products:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Furniture:
1928____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Glass:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Leather:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Lumber— Planing mills:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Labor— Sawmills:
1926_______________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Petroleum refining:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Pottery: 1927______________________________________
Shipbuilding, steel:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1927. __________
Stamped and enameled ware:
1926_______________________________
_
1927_________________ _____ _____________________
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1926________ ____________________________________
1 927 .._______ __________________________ ________
Stoves: 1927........ ................................................................
Structural iron work:
1 9 2 6 ...________________________ _____ _____ _____
1927.................................................... ............................
W oolen goods:
1926_..............................................................................
1927_...............- ............................................................

j
!

O)
Cm

T a b l e 5 .— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified States, 1925, 1926 , and

by industry— Continued

05

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary

Death
N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fullyear
workers

N um ­
ber of
cases

Permanent disability

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure)
posure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Sever­
Frequen­
ity rate
cy rate
(per
(per
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ex­
exposure) posure)

O
F

Pennsylvania




3

0. 78

0. 34

3

0. 78

0.34

1.27
1.17

41
45

1. 74
1.76

1.22
1.52

46
50

1.95
1.96

2.49
2.69

.14

.85

9
7

1.22
.99

1.13
.85

9
8

1. 22
1.13

1.13
1.70

2
2

.16
. 16

.97
.97

3
14

.24
1.13

.30
.78

5
16

.40
1.29

1.27
1.75

2

.15

.88

3
4

.22
.55

.08
.41

5
4

.37
.55

.96
.41

1

.29

1. 72

1
3

.29
.39

.09
.20

2
3

.58
.39

1.81
.20

7
4

. 12
.06

.72
.38

69
21

1.18
.33

.80
.22

76
25

1.30
.39

1.52
.60

5
5

1,282
571

5
9

7,851
8,524

5
5

0.21
.20

6
6

2,459
2,355

1

g
13

2,697
3,539

19
26

4,106
4,128

14
11
2

4, 571
2,440
53

2
4
6

266
1,166
2, 539

13
14
2
4

19,441
21,146
142
93

INDUSTRIAL, ACCIDENTS

Agricultural implements:
1925
1926
Automobiles:
1925
1926
Automobile tires:
1925
1926
Boots and shoes:
1925
1926
Brick:
1925
1926
Carpets:
1925
1926
qtiH
1 1Q2fi
Chemicals:
1925
1926
Cotton goods* 1926
Electrical machinery:
1925
1926
^orHli7Pf<*' IQ fi
O
Flour; 1926........ ..................................................................

STATISTICS

Industry and year

disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Grand total:
1925__________________________
1925___________________________ . _
1927_____________________________________
1 This industry group has been discontinued.




5
16

32
25

4, 393
2,923

25
20
5

4,903
4,662
2,337

4

.29

1.72

14
17

3,870
3,966

1

.08

5
7
2

735
772
1,384

2

7
3

1,119
196

4
6
6
1
1
6

1,532
2,501
1,612
277
1,409
1,102

24
9

.06
.19

.37
1.12

47
109

.58
1.27

.53
.98

52
125

.64
1.46

.90
2.10

17
10

1.29
1.14

.76
.63

17
10

1.29
1.14

.76
.63

7
14
11

.48
1.00
1.57

.59
1.07
. 53

7
18
11

.48
1.29
1.57

.59
2.79
.53

.50

2
9

.17
.76

. 05
. 59

2
10

.17
.84

.05
1.09

2

.91

1.91

2

.91

1.91

.48

2.89

4

.95

1. 22

6

1.43

4.11

1

1. 67

10.18

1

1.67

. 50

2

3.34

10.68

1
2
5

.22
.27
1.04

1. 31
1.59
6.18

3
4
2

. 65
.53
.42

. 30
.24
.21

4
g
7

.87
.80
1.46

1.61
1.83
6.39

1

.24

1.42

5

1.19

.43

6

1.43

1.85

2,669
2,097

1
1

. 12
.16

. 75
.95

6
2

. 75
.32

. 26
!l7

7
3

.87
.48

1.01
1.12

9
5

1,264
821

1
1

.26
.40

1. 58
2.43

1

.40

. 30

1
2

. 26
*80

1.58
2.73

20
14

2,681
2,908

1
2

.12
. 23

.75
1.37

10
18

1.24
2.07

.45
1.10

11
20

1.36
2.30

1.20
2.47

21
13

5, 772
3,850

1

.06

.35

4
6

.23
.52

.26
. 69

5
6

.29
.52

.61
. 69

342
435
115

98, 732
138, 763
34,648

26
90
57

226
438
161

1,282
555,996
2,209
991,082
2,676 1,075, 282

171
370
459

2,047
4,090
3,949

252
528
218
21,496
44,041
57,072

23,714
48,501
61,480

INDUSTRIES

.

27,121
28,547

I MANUFACTURING
N

A ll industry groups, all States:
1925__________ _______ _________________
1926__________ _______ __________________
1927____________ ______ _________________

109
85

ACCIDENTS

Foundry and machine-shop products:
1925________________________
1926________________________
.
Furniture:
1925_____________________ _____ __
_
1926____________________
Glass:
1925___________________________________
_
1926- ...................................
_
Hardware: 1926._ _____________
Leather:
1925________ ________________ ________
1926__________________ _____ .
Lumber— Planing mills:
1925_______________________________
1926____________________________________
.
_
Lumber— Sawmills: 1926_____________________
Machine tools:
1925____________________________________________
1926__________________________ .
Paper and pulp:
1925__________ _____ _________
„
1926_________________ ______ ___________
Petroleum refining: 1926______________
_
Pottery: 1926_____________________________
_
Shipbuilding, steel: 1926___________. . . ______
Slaughtering and meat packing: 1926...................
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies:
1925__________________________
1926___________________________
Stoves:
1925__________________________
1926_______________________________
.
Structural-iron work:
1925____________________________________________
1926.____________ ______________________________
Woolen goods:
1925______________ ______________________
1926________ _____ ______________________________

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES IN SPECIFIED INDUSTRIES, BY STATES

O

Table 6 brings together by industry the accident data for specified States, grouped according to the extent acci­
dents are reported, as in Tables 4 and 5. It must be borne in mind, in consulting this table, that the rates for a
particular industry group represent only a sample in each State and should be used therefore with caution. No claim
to completeness is made. One industry which was covered in 1926, the manufacture of carriages and wagons, has
since been discontinued.
STATISTICS

T a b le

6 .— N um ber o f accidents and accident frequen cy and severity rates in specified ind ustries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States
Agricultural implements

[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

Permanent disability

Total

Temporary disability

O
F

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
(per
rate (per
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

Num ­
ber of
cases

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

INDUSTRIAL

State and year

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities'extending beyond day of injury




9
7
7

3, 732
1,410
1,136

4
4
4

886
645
1,262

2
2
4

271
256
1, 764

1.76

537
333

5
3
3

0.54

.29

17
18
1

1.52
4.29
.29

1.38
6.90
.09

418
397
424

1
1

0.09

1

488
149
118

43.59
35.48
34.61

0.72
.90
.72

506
167
120

45.20
39.77
35.19

2.64
7.80
2.57

38
42
35

1

30.27
35.00
27. 50

.44
.60
.34

38
42
35

30.27
35.00
27.50

.44
.60
.34

5
4

3.12
4.01

.93
3.16

70
30

43.75
30.05

.55
.86

75
34

46.87
34.06

1.48
4.02

.75
3.68
.79

.56
4.00
.48

20
74
35

7.53
38.95
9.24

.08
.61
.12

24
81
39

9.03
42.63
10.29

5.16
4.61
2.18

1. 89 !

2.30

51
65
41

63. 75
84.60
7. 75

.26
.70
.23

51
65
52

63.75
84.60
9.82

.26
.70
3.66

2

.75

4.52

1

.26

1. 58

2
7
3

1

.19

1.13

10

ACCIDENTS

Indiana:
_________ ________ _______________________
1925
1926 __________________________________________
1927 ___________________________________________
Iowa:
1925 __________ ________________________
1926___________________________________________
1927 ___________________________________________
Kentucky:
1926
_________________________
___
1927
. . ______________________________
Minnesota:
1925
. ______________________________
1926
____________________________________
1927
_____________________________________
Nebraska:
1926
- -- ~ -___
1927
.
___
N ew York: 1027___________________________________

Ohio:
1925................... ..............................................................
___
1926______________________ ______ ____
1927_____________ _____ ______________ __________
Pennsylvania: 1927................ ....................................... ..
Tennessee:
1926__......................................... ...................................
1927......... .................................. .....................................

13
10
12
5

1,077
1,537
1,494
500

2
1

329
113

4

1.24
.22
.68
2.94

17. 63

2. 78
1.09
1.12
2. 67

3. 02
.94
.87
1.60

181
152
228
41

56.00
33. 04
50.89
27.35

.90 1
.37
.74
.38

4
1

1.34
4.00

1

9
5
5
4

7.43

1
1

4.00
2. 94

4.61
.88

16
5

16.00
14. 69

.33
.16

60.02 i
34.13
52.23
30.70

11.35
1.31
2.95
5.98

20
7

20.00
20. 57

4.94
18.67

194
157
234
46

i

0. 68
1.78
1.34

65
284
329

7. 72
17. 64
12. 74

0.15
.50
.29

74
315
366

8. 79
19. 56
14.16

0.83
3.03
1.86

- 14
12

2.89
2.18

3.14
2.02

30
65

6.19
11. 82

.23
.17

45
78

9.29
14.18

4.61
3.28

24
13
10

1.79
1.60
1.03

.95
.76
5.93

228
150
18

16.98
18. 52
18. 59

.34
.47
.46

253
163
28

18.84
20.12
19.62

1.74
1.23
6.39

2, 61

3.85
3.26

2.12
2.61

.34

.78

2,808
5,357
8,608

2
1

0.12
.03

0. 75
.23

9
29
36

3
5

1,615
1,835

1
1

.21
.18

1.24
1.09

3
2
2

4,476
2,689
323

1

.07

. 45

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania:
192 5
192 6

3. 85
3. 26

448
614
1,282
571

2.12

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
1925..................................................................................
1926__......................................... ...................................
1927_ ........................................... ...............................
N ew York: 1927.................................................................
Ohio:
1925
1926
_________________________________________
1927 _____________________________ ______________
Pennsylvania: 1927 __ ______ .......................................
Tennessee:
1926___________ _______ ______ __________________
1927_......... .....................................................................




4
9
9
17

2,239
12, 581
17,312
10, 221

5
13
17
9

2, 202
14,122
14,351
6,806

2
1

1, 657
196

9
81
40
77

1.34
2.15
.77
2 51

0. 47
9. 67
55
1.79

176
898
8417
316

26. 21
23. 82
16. 31
10. 31

.57
.14

5
59
10
15

.76
1.39
.23
.73

1.50
1.19
2. 23
.35

137
1,016
471
198

2.41

40

8. 00

5.17

231
20

4
2
4

0.11
.04
.13

0. 64
.23
.78

4
1

.09
.02

2

.40

0.27
.27
.20
.39

185
983
889
397

27. 55
26.08
17.12
12.95

0.74
10.58
.98
2.96

20. 73
23.96
10. 94
9. 70

142
.35
.38 i 1,079
:
482
.18 1
213
. 13

21.49
25.44
11.19
10. 43

1.85
2.14
2. 55
.48

46. 20
34. 08 1

!83

273
20

54. 60
34.08

8.25
.83

INDUSTRIES

Automobiles

I MANUFACTURING
N

1
1.07
1.80 !
1. 39

13
21
21

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Illinois:
1925______________________ _____ ________________
1926_________ ______________________ __________
1927..................... ...........................................................
N ew York:
1925____________________________________________
1926.................................................................................
Wisconsin:
1925___________________ ______ _________ ________
1926_ __
1927................................................................

T a b le

6.—Number

—Continued

of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States

^

Automobiles— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Permanent disability

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
(per
N um ­
N um ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

2,990
3,689
3,452

2
1

0.22
. 09

1.34
.54

7
15
32

0. 78
1. 35
3.09

0.27
1. 25
3. 79

45
66
63

5.02
5.95
6.08

0.11 ;
.14 ;
.17 '

54
82
95

6.02
7.39
9.17

1.71
1.93
3.96

25
29
40

152,620
190, 210
168,325

42
46
59

.09
.08
.12

.55
.48
.70

549
677
566

1.20
1.19
1.12

.91
.82
.79

3, 210
4, 766
4,172

7.01
8.35
8.26

.14
.25
.22

3,801
5,489
4,797

8.30
9.62
9.50

1.60
1.55
1.71

5
3
5

3,113
2,271
2,180

1

.15

.88

25
36
25

2.68
5.29
3.82

2.28
10.94
5.00

72
88
48

7.71
12.94
7.33

.19
.29
.17

97
125
73

10.39
18.38
11.15

2.47
12.11
5.17

15
18

11,919
11,178

6

.17

1.01

• 85
104

2.38
3.10

2.42
3.27

188
358

5.26
10.69

.25
.62

279
462

7.81
13.79

3.68
3.89

6
4
5

6,450
6,630
5,107

1
1
2

.05
.05
.13

.31
.30
.78

24
44
26

1.24
2.21
1.70

.62
1.41
.94

378
317
208

19.53
15.93
13.58

.41
.34
.29

403
362
236

20.82
18.19
15. 41

1.34
2.05
2.01

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926
.........................................................................
1927
______________________ ________________
Pennsylvania:
1925
__________ ______________
1926
.................- ______ __________________




5
5

1,031
915

1

5
9

7,851
8, 524

5
5

0. 32
.21
.20

1.94

1
3

0. 32
1.09

0.16
.51

2
3

0. 64 |
1.09

2.10
.51

1. 27
1.17

41
45

1. 74
1. 76

1.22
1. 52

46
50

1.95 !
1.96 1

2.49
2.69

ACCIDENTS

8
9
8

INDUSTRIAL

Illinois:
1925
...............................................................
1926
............................................. ................
1927................................................................................
Michigan:
1925 _____________ ____________________________
1926 __________________________________________
1927
_________________ _________ ________
N ew Jersey:1
1925
_____
__________________________
1926
_________
____ ____________________
1927
______________________________________
N ew York:
1925
.................................................................
1926 ________________________ _________ ________
Wisconsin:
1925.................................................................................
1926................... ..............................................................
1927............................. ....................................................

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

STATISTICS

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

Automobile tires
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

4
3
12
8

14,888
11,721
22,543
2,154

18
7

3
2
6

0.16
.19

.07
.06
.09

1.05
1.16

.40
.34
.53

1.75

0.53

17

29.82

0.54

18

31.57

1.07

2
1

.08
.19

.1 0

.06

156
134

27.49
25.82

.39
.50

159
136

27.73
26.20

1.54
1.72

4
9

4,323
4,079

1
1

.31
.74

.39
.45

120

142

9.23
11.60

.27
.30

124
151

9.54
12.34

.75

52
26
47
3

1.16
.71
.69
.46

1.06
.54
.59
.14

2,962
2,637
3,341
137

66.32
74.91
49.40
21.19

.74
.95
.87
.26

3,017
2,665
3,394
140

67.55
75.68
50.18
21.65

2 .2 0

.6 6

1.83
1.99
.40

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Michigan:
1926____________ ________ ______________________
1927
.
. . ................................
N ew Jersey:1
1925
..................................
1926
.
.............
1927
..................................

!
1
1

2,860
1,790

2

7

2,749
2,015
1,907

1

6

3

0.23

1.40

13
2

.1 2

.73

10
10

5

51

11.74
9.50

.38
.23

116
53

13.48
9.87

2.74
.51

97
95
19

11.76
15.83
3.32

.37
.37
.09

108
105
24

13.09
17.50
4.19

3.13
1.80
1.48

0. 35
.57

6

1.06
.77

1.41
1.49

1.13
.85

9
8

1 .2 2

1.13
1.70

1.51
.37

.96
.28

1 .2 1

2.03
1.43
1.39

1. 67
.87

1 .0 1

I
N MANUFACTURING

1,907
1,730

1

190

1
1

ACCIDENTS

1

M aryland:
1926 ............................... ..
.....................................
1927............................. ....................................................
Massachusetts:
1926
......................
1927
. _ _____________
Ohio:
1925
__________ ________ ______________
1926
________ __________________ _____________
1927_
........................................................................
Pennsylvania: 1927..
__
_____________

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities




.

...............................
...................................

2
2

1,891
2,165

1
1

. 18
. 15

1.06
.92

5
4

0 .8 8

____________
____________________

6
6

2,459
2,355

.14

.85

9
7

1 .2 2

1

.62
.99

5

1.13

INDUSTRIES

California:
1926
. . .
1927
.
Pennsylvania:
1925
1926.
.
.

T a b le 6.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued

^

Boots and shoes
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Permanent disability

Death

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

7
7
7

_____________________________
____________________________

28
32

10,772
13,529

_ _ . _________
_____

3
4
10

2,352
2,849
3, 699

...............
_____

1

1

.14

0.15

.85

0.39

54
34
46

21.14
11. 73
15.11

0.44
.27
.22

54
34
49

21.14
11.73
16.10

0.44
.27
.61

4
4

.12
.10

.05
.16

81
177

2. 51
4. 36

.05
.10

85
182

2.63
4.48

.10
.41

.34
1.13

.26
.89

20
28
459

9.52
9. 57
8.65

.12
.08
.17

20
29
519

9.52
9.91
9.78

.12
.34
1.06

1

.14

.09

1

0.02

0.99

1
60

693
975
17,696

2
2
13

3

850
962
1,015

.09

.27

181
121
61

25.49
14.15
5. 50

.18
.21
.85

183
121
62

25.77
14.15
5.59

1.12
.21
1.12

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Illinois:
1925
_ _______ ____ __
1926
_____________________________
1927
_______________________ __ __
Michigan:
1926
1927
______
N ew Jersey:1
1926
_______________
1927_______ _____________________________________




5
4
7

3,336
5,556
3,618

4
4
4
1

609
237

I

0.30
.74

1.41

0.09
.53

4.22

124
39
59

12.39
2. 34
5.44

0.19
.05
.13

124
44
67

12.39
2.64
6.18

0.19
.14
.66

4
4

522
273

5
8

2.50
4.88

.09
.11

4
4

2.50
4.88

.09
.11

6
3

3. 33
4. 22

.07
.11

6
4

3.33
5.63

.07
4.33

ACCIDENTS

- - - -........._ . __________

INDUSTRIAL

M aryland:
1925
1926
1927
Massachusetts:
1926
1927
Minnesota:
1926
1927
N ew Y o rk - 1927
Ohio:
1926
1927
Pennsylvania: 1927

STATISTICS

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

N ew York:
192 5
192 6
Virginia: 1927
Wisconsin:
192 5
192 6
192 7

7
10
5

2, 238
17,220
741

4
5
7

2,079
2,035
1,866

.60
.99
.45

21
363
16

3.13
7.02
7.20

.11
.27
.19

25
418
17

3.73
8.09
7.65

.62
1.45
1.00

.32
.82
1.25

0.08

53
37
49

8.50
6.07
8. 75

.17
.11
.20

55
42
56

8.82
6.89
10.00

.58

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia: 1926.

1, 064

0.40

0.86

16

3.20

0.06

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
8
13

!
i
!

2,697
3, 539

i
i
!
I
I
--------------------- --------- 1
----------- i ----------------!-------------i
j
!
|

[

1
i
I

j

Brick

16
12
12
8

1, 013
702 !
851 :
367

5
5
5
1
2
1

i

3
2
14
i,
1 Closed cases only are reported.

m

!

3.08

i

.33

1.98

1
2
1

0.48
.95
.51

0.14
1.60
1.54

166
185

1
3

.33
1.43

i

|

.63

3. 78

0.71

1.22

167
187
124

80.04
89.05
63.71

0.85
2.82
5.30

24.36
48.10
31. 72
25.41

.45
.84
.72
.32

76
104
81
28

25.02
49.53
31.72
25.41

2.53
4.12
.72
.32

52
56
46

36.88
35.00
34. 53

.62
.60

52
58
47

36.88
36.26
35.28

5.52

4

1
1

.63
.75

1.11
.38

i
j

13. 33
47.50
34. 90

.09
1. 37

4
10

13.33
47.50
34.90

.09
1. 37
.33

50.00
36.10
.23
28.78
.99
December.)

20
11
150

50.00
36.10
32.22

.96
.23
6.60

88.10

101

74

10

!

i
2 !

79.56

122
81
28

i

|
470
537 1
444 !
93 I
70 1
57 i
!
118 !

0. 51

00.

696
686
649

20
11
3.01
3.03
134
2 Record is for six months only (July to

62.69

INDUSTRIES




10
9
9

coo

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
1925______________________________________
1926________________________________________ _
1927_____________________________
Iowa:
1925__________________
1926___________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Kansas: 1927 2_____________________________________
M aryland:
1925____________________________________________
1926_______________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Massachusetts:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Minnesota: 1925 __________ . . . __________ _____
Nebraska:
1926________ ____________________________________
1927____________________________________________
N ew York: 1927____ ______ _ ___________ _____

I MANUFACTURING
N

Pennsylvania:
1925_______________________________________
1926__________________________
____ . .

•<r
oo

T a b le

6.—Number

o f accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries,

1 9 2 5 ,1 9 2 6 and 1 9 2 7 , by States— Continued

M

Brick— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
workers N u m ­ quency
rate (per
ber of
cases 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Permanent disability

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
(per
(per
Num ­
rate (per
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Total

Severity
rate
(per
N um ­
1 ,0 0 0
ber of
hours’
cases
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1 ,0 00

hours'
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
3
2

9

58
44

1
1

5.00
7.61

34.33
30.45

30
4

150.00
30.’ 45

.84
.74
.58
.1 1

426
413
423
480

55.86
55.07
49.73
26.23

1.24

97

67.00

2,542
2,496
2,835

4

.26
.27
.47

1.57
1.60
2.82

3
4

19
26

6 ,1 0 0

2

.1 1

.6 6

7

.39
.53
.71
.38

1
11

13
483

1

.69

12

2
2

6

31
5

155. 00
38! 06

37 99
31.’ 00

.62
.90

56. 51
55.87
50.91
26. 72

3.03
3.24
4.06

.33

431
419 '
433
, 489

.74

98

67.69

1.98

3 30

61. 51

1 .0 2

3.09
2.59

.6 6

1 .1 0

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

Oklahoma: 1927

3

163

(3
)

..................................... .............|
...................

61. 51
.................!

1 .0 2

30

Accidents for Stat<3s reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Illinois:
1925............. .
1926..............
1927...............
Michigan:
192 6
192 7




3,802
3,265
3,554
156
143

1

0.09

0.53

1

.09

.5 6

0. 53
1. 53
1.41

1.13
2.46
1.71

2 .0 0

.64

197
249
161

17.27
25.41
15.09

0. 45
.63
.32

204
264
177

17.89
26.94
16.59

8

16.00
9.30

.44
.1 1

9
4

18.00
9.30

4

2 .1 1

1.08
.1 1

ACCIDENTS

3. 6 6
.*55

INDUSTRIAL

North D akota:
1926_______ ________ _________ __________________
1927____________ _____ ____ ______ ______ ________
Ohio:
1925________ __________ ________________ _____
1926.................................................................................
1927__________ _____ ____________________________
Pennsylvania: 1927____________________ ___________
South Dakota: 1926_______________________________
Texas: 1927..........................................................................

STATISTICS

State and year

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 19261

N ew Jersey : 1
192 5
192 6
192 7
N ew York:
192 5
192 6
Virginia: 1927.

12

15
15
10

14
3

1,900
2,631
2,473
1,008
1,948
257

1.40
1.14
1.08

1.01
1.79
1.13

70
69

8

86

12.28
8.73
11.58

.28
.17
.27

7
13

2.31
2.24

1.62
3.00

59
109
12

19.51
18. 79
15.57

1.03
.66
.40

8

9
2
1

3. 97
1.03

.6 6

.17

13. 68
9.87

12.66
22.48
21.20
15.57

123
12

1.29
1.96
1.40
6.62
4.69
.40

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia:
1926.............

10.00

8.75

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
14
11

1,909
2,567

1
2

0.18
.26

1.05
1.56

19
26

4,106
4,128

2
2

. 16
.16

.97
.97

4
.24
1.13

1.47
1.56

5
16

.30
.78

0. 71
.26
.40
1.29

1. 27
1. 75

19
13
70
144

4. 31
1.57
2.80
11.39

0.08
.03
.71
.36

Carpets
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Massachusetts:
192 6
_____________ ___________________

192 7

____ _______________ _____ _

N ew York: 1927........ ............................. ..........I ..
Pennsylvania: 1927................................................

3
3
5
15

1,482
2,765
8 .339

1

0.04

0.24

4,217

10
2

0. 40
.16

0.35
.2 1

19
13
59
142

4.31
1.57
2.36
11.23

0.08
.03
.1 2

.15

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
New Jersey: 1
192 5 ............................................................
192 6
........................................................ ..........

192 7

N ew York:
192 5
......................................... - .......................
192 6
..............




3
3
3

857
905
923

2

5,571
7,799

5

1 Closed cases only are reported.

3
3
3
3
1

0.18
.04

1.08
.26

3.23
.33
1.37

27
38
28

10. 50
14. 07

0.29
.29

1.08

1.17

1 0 .1 1

.2 1

30
41
31

11.67
15.18
11.19

3.52
.62
1. 58

27
17

1.62
.73

2.31
.64

67
105

4.01
4.49

.13
.28

97
123

5.81
5.26

INDUSTRIES

2

I MANUFACTURING
N

California:
1926.............
1927...........
Pennsylvania:
1925.............
1926_...........

3.52
1.18

1 .1 1

8 Fatal cases not reported.

•<1
Cn

T a b le

6.— Number

of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued
Carpets— Continued

[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­ rate (per
ber of 1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
N um ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours'
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
Num ­
ber of
1,000
hours’
cases
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

4,571
2,440

2

0.15

0,88

3
4

0.22
.55

0.93
.41

26. 67
40.00
56. 25
160.00

0.58
1.37
15.00
14.13
.04

20.00

Carriages and wagons4
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

Indiana: 1926 ___
Iowa: 1926--------K entucky: 1926.
M aine: 1926____
M aryland: 1926.
Minnesota: 1926
Ohio: 1926______
Tennessee: 1926.

2
1
3
1
2
1
1
3

12.50
10.00

14.00
12.82

10.00

3.68

70.00

0.58
1.37
1.00
1.31
.04
2. 35

' T o 5'

94
17
263
47
96
27
17
118

"1.69

15.00

.35

26.67
40.00
43. 75
150.00

20.00

20.00
80.00

2.04

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

Illinois: 1926______
Michigan: 1926._._
N ew Jersey:1 1926
Wisconsin: 1 9 26 ...




1
1
1
1

56
10
18
32

3

1
15.00 j
!

17.75

3
1
2
1

15.00
33. 00
20.00
10.00

0.28
.56
1. 30
.23

6
1
2
1

30.00 1
33.00
20.00
10. 00
____ ______

18.03
. 56
1.30
.23

ACCIDENTS

0.37
.55

5
4

0.08
.41

INDUSTRIAL

14
11

O
F

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
Pennsylvania:
1925
1926

STATISTICS

State and year

Permanent disability

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
j

j

2 |

|

]

53

L.................
................ j ..............

!

Chemicals
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

1
1
3
5
8
9
8
5
7

1,330
1,768
1,763
1,729
574
2,627

2
2

I

1,300
1,343
459

j
!

57
45
25

14.62
11.16
18.14

0.18
. 14
.19

57
45
26

14.62
11.16
18.86

0.18
.14
.41

44
67
72
31
30
105

11.03
12.64
13.62
5.97
17.43
13. 32

.25
.30
.34
. 17
.33
.21

45
69
81
42
30
106

11.28
13.01
15. 32
8.09
17.43
13.45

.32
.41
5.23
3.08
.33
.97

49
45

1

3
1

0. 57
.19

1

. 13

0.22

1
2
6
10

3.40
1.16

0. 72
.25
.37
1.13
1.93

.08
. 11
1.49
1. 75

. 76

i

!
1

!

;

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

* Closed cased only are reported.




4
4

1,527
1,477

1

0. 22

1.31

3
18

0. 65
4.06

0. 29
2.98

89
88

19. 35
19.86

0. 56
. 53

93
106

20.22
23.92

2.16
3.51

2
4

2, 528
3,018

4
6

. 53
.66

3.16
3.98

2
6

.26
. 66

.28
.43

72
148

9.47
16.34

.27
.60

78
160

10. 26
17.66

3. 71
5.01

17
17
19

6,778
3,302
3,449

1

.05

.30

2

.19

1.16

12
15
29

.59
1.52
2.80

.65
1.57
2.99

89
80
90

4.38
8.08
8. 70

.13
.18
.21

102
95
121

5.02
9.60
11.69

1.08
1.75
4.36

7
10
1

3,236
4,152
842

2
1

.21
.08

1.24
.48

22
26
2

2.27
2.08
.79

3.96
3. 22
.24

59
141
59

6.08
11.28
23.35

.26
. 71
.46

83
168
61

8. 56
13.44
24.14

5.46
4.47
.10

1
1

14
18

4

75.87

455. 23

2

37. 94

.49

6

113.81

455.72

2 Record is for six months only (July to December.)

* This industry group has been discontinued.

INDUSTRIES

Illinois:
1926............................ ....................
1927_________________________________
Michigan:
1926_______________________________________
1927 ________________________________
N ew Jersey:1
1925_____________________________________
1926_____________________________ ______
1927__________________________________________
N ew York:
1925_____________ __________________________
1926_____________ ____________________________
Virginia: 1927_____________________________________
Wisconsin:
1926________ _______________ ____________________
1927_____________ _____ _________________________

T MANUFACTURING
:<

Indiana:
1926................................................ ...............................
1927................................................................. . . .
Kansas: 1927 2
M aryland:
19125_________________________________________
1926__________________________________________
1927__________________________________________
N ew York: 1927_____________________________
Ohio: 1927 _______________________________
Pennsylvania: 1927_____ _____ ____________ _
Tennessee:
1926______________ __________________________
1927_..................................................... ..............

ACCIDENTS

■6S— of0698

!
Pennsylvania: 1926_____________________ _________

-4

T a b le

6.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in

specified industries, 1 9 25 ,19 26 , and 1921 , by States

Continued

^

Chemicals— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Permanent disability

Death

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
quency
Full-year N um ­ rate (per
workers ber of 1 , 000 ,0 0 0
cases
hours'
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
ber of
1,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
cases
hours’
cases
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
1 ,0 0 0
ber of
hours’
cases
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000

hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

......................................... ..........

1

851

2

0. 77

4.70

9

3.46

7.28

34.23

13.06

2

1.78

5.81

2

. 58

1.81

0.13
. 18

19
14

12. 67
8 .44

0 .52
4.25

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

flfllif/ifTiiQ' 1097
Pennsylvania:
1925 __________ ________________________________
1926................................................................................

2
2

4

373
266
1,166

1

0.89

5.36

1

0.89

i

0.45

i
1

.29

1. 72

1

.29

.09

i

|

Cotton goods
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
1926
_ ________________
1927
_________________________ ____________
Kentucky:
1926
____________
1927
_ ________________
Maine:
1926
______
1927............................................................. - ..................




18

1 2 .0 0

12

7. 24

.47

24

15.00

2 .8 8

21

1 2 .0 0

.24
.16

25
24

15.63
13.71

.71
3.04

15.41
15.60 I

.26
.29

286
302

15.80
16. 36

.78
1.28

1
1

0.67
.60

0.39
.45

536
584

1

.63
1. 71

6,046
6,155

7
14

.39
.76

.52
.99

279
288

2
2

515
553

2
2
6
6

1

0.60

3.62

ACCIDENTS

89

1.08

30.00

78

INDUSTRIAL

Virginia: 1926

STATISTICS

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

30
35

22,577
27,761

5
5
2
6

11,345
13,519
1,490
2,246

3
3
7

.01

.07

2

.05

1927
. 30

2

.30

1.78

5
22

.07
. 26

.07
.15

366
1,205

5. 41
14.* 4.7
JC
.T

.13
•OO

3
g
1
2

. 09
* 20
.22
.30

.03
.27
.17
.10

373
35
u
O

10.97
in 91
IU, ZX,
7.83
8.30

g
1
5

3,175
3,146
1,449

1

.63
.11
1.15

.27
.13
1. 59

ill
132
95

11.68
13.99
21.85

371
1,228

5.48
1 *. 74
4

.20
.55

.23
♦on
AJ
.19
•in
JU
L

376
36
A
H
D
U

11.06
1ft Vft
IU. A)
8.05
8.90

.26
.77
.36
l!98

.a
.15
.29

117
133
100

12.31
14.10
23.00

38
!28
1.88

AOA

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
19,369
21,195

5

0.08

0.47

24
36

0.41
.57

0.25
.47

290
349

4.99
5.48

0.12
.13

314
390

5.40
6.13

0.37
1.07

3
5
2
4

3,558
5,000
1,413
6,173

1
1
1

.07
.24
.05

.40
1.42
.32

7
9
4
10

.65
.60
. 95
*.54

.34
.85
1.03
.26

23
17
36
116

2.15
1.13
8.57
6.26

.05
.04
.52
.19

30
27
41
127

2.80
1.80
9.76
6.85

.39
1.29
2.97
.77

1
1

20
21

1
2

10.00
31.08

.27
.30

2

10.00
31.08

.27
.30

87

4.84

1.00

67
70

3.76
3.67

0 .41
.18

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia: 1926......................................................................

3

5,999

10

0.56

0.87

77

4.28

0.13

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks
I
Alabama:
1926.................................................................................
1927..................................................................................

9
10

5,917
6,353

5
4

0.28
.21

0.29
.06

62
66

3.48
3.46

0.12
.12

INDUSTRIES

12
16

I MANUFACTURING
N

Georgia:
1926...............................................................
1 9 2 7 ..............................................................
N ew Jersey: *
1926.....................................................................
1927.............................................................................
New York: 1926.............. ........................
Virginia: 1927__________ ________ _____
Wisconsin:
1926................................... ..........................................
1927.................... ..................................

ACCIDENTS

Massachusetts:
1926........... ..................................................................
1927.................................... ..........................................
New Hampshire:
1926_................... ..........................
__________ __________________
N ew York: 1927____ _____ ___________
_
Pennsylvania: 1927_____________ _______ _____
Tennessee:
1926_..................... ................................
1927........... ............................
Texas: 1927..................................................

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
Pennsylvania: 1926..........................................................




6

2,539

3

0.39

0.20

3

n so

0.20
•<r
CO

T a b l e 6 .— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries , 1925, 1926 , and 1927 , by States— Continued

Q
O

Electrical machinery
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Permanent disability

Death

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
Full-year N um ­
rate (per
workers ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours'
exposure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

STATISTICS

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

i

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

2
3
3

9,551
7,560
8
19,047

17
12
21
13

3,560
3,637
10,612
17,877

1

1

i

187 i
298 i
183

20. 23
25.47
12.73

0.27
1.74
.79

.24
.28
.26

30
48
44

11.75
15.49
14.11

.24
1. 37
2. 30

20.52
23.10
43.17
11.50

.45
.61
2.37
.50

609
543
1
774

21. 22
23.93
43.17
13.55

1. 25
1.33
2.37
3.17

28. 56
17.43
16. 65
13. 07

.22
.23
.24
.23

312 !
198
553
735

29.22
18.16
17. 37
13. 70

1.03
.63
.87
1.12

1.01
1. 53
1.42

3
23
21

0.32
1.97
1.46

0.10
1.39
.62

184
Ai 5
162

19. 91
23.50
11.27

0.17
.35
.17

7
7

851
1,045
1,039

11
9
1
11

i

3,080
3,904
4,792

2. 26
2.24

1.09
2.04

30
41
37

11.75
13.23
11.87

2
1

0.07
.04

0.42
.26

18
18

.63
.79

.38
.46

6

. 11

.63

111

1.94

2.04

589
524
1
657

. 45-

7
8
23
30

.66
.73
.72
.56

.81
.40
.63
.44

305
190
530
701

__
............"07"

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Illinois:
1925
.......................................
1926
.....................
1927
............... ..
Michigan:
1926
1927................................................................................




13
20
20

4,944
6,908
7, 270

1
1

113
107

1

0.07

0.40

14
36
28

0.94
1.74
1.2S

0.54
1.34
1.30

54
147
135

3.64
7.10
6.19

0.07
.19
.12

69
183
163

4.65
8.84
7.47

1

.33

.08

1

.33

1

.08

ACCIDENTS

3
5
5

INDUSTRIAL

Indiana:
1925
1926
_________
_____
1927
Maryland:
1995
1926
1927
- - Massachusetts:
1926
- - _________
1927
\fiTinAsntPi* 1Q
2/5
N ew York: 1927___________________________________
Ohio:
1925
1926
_
_
1927
.
________ ___________
Pennsylvania: 1927______________ ________ _______ _

13
13
17

8,329
8,090
8,819

1
1

9
10

20,454
20,800

4
4

3
3

195
2,788

1

.04
.04
.07
.06
. 12

i

.24
.25
. 39
. 38
.72

2.48
1.98
1.21

2. 47
1. 74.
1.18

140
134
lo*±
133

74
104

1. 21
1. 67

1.29
1.89

456
711
4

4

.48

1

.29

1 00

1
•10

9H
& )o
\3

14

165

a 1^
o. 19
7 Oo
(. *3
6.24

7.43
11.39

• 33
OO

^34
Oo

.73

ftlQ
o iy

8. 71

13 I
1 . 19
0

6. 67
11.96

.15

4

6.67

f\K
1UD

19
1 * . OO

.15
1 o4
1. q a

76
25

62
48
32

1.30
. 39

1. 52
.60

O* Du
i

03

19
• 1&
•

• 33
Oo

1

j
j

o ni
z. l

1.32
2 01
3! 00

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
1

201

13
14

19,441
21,146

7
4

0.12
.06

0.72
.38

69
21

1.18
.33

0.80
.22

Fertilizers
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

3
5

105
194

1
1

17
18

5
8
2

714
821
126

3
12
4

255
527
495

3
5
1

218
200
117

23
20

1. 72

0.48

1.22

2.80
7.31

76.67
34.36

0.80
.56

23
21

76. 67
36.08

0. 80
3. C
.l

2.03
2. 64

.23
3. 09
10. 56

112
116
7

53.33
47.09
18.48

1.18
1.12
.45

114
124
8

54.29
50.34
21.12

4.21
11. 52
11.01

1. 25

.78

27
48
40

33. 75
30.36
26.92

.55
.38
.35

28
48
40

35.00
30.36
26.92

1.33
.38
.35

12
8
22

17.14
13.33
62.68

.36
.51
.77

12
8
22

17.14
13.33
62.68

INDUSTRIES

Indiana:
1926......................
1927____________
Iowa:
192 6
192 7
Maryland:
1926.___________
1927____________
N ew York: 1927___
Ohio:
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania: 1927.
Tennessee:
192 6
192 7
_____
Texas: 1927________

I MANUFACTURING
N

California: 1927..............................................
Pennsylvania:
1925..................................... ....................
1926....................................................................

ACCIDENTS

N ew Jersey: *
1925__________________________
1 9 2 6 ................... ........................
1927................. ...................... * _____
N ew York:
1925______________________ _______ _____________
1926_...............................................
Wisconsin:
1926..........................................
1927.....................................................

.36
.51
.77

l Closed cases only are reported.




OO

T able

6.

-Number o f accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926 and 1927, by States— Continued

00
fcO

Fertilizers— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 19261

Permanent disability

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Severity
Fre­
Fre­
rate
rate
rate
quency
quency
N um ­
(per
Num ­
(per
N um ­
(per
rate (per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of 1,000,000
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
cases
hours'
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
expo­
exposure)
exposure)
sure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
1
1

0.53
.34

3.13
2.03

1
7

0.53
2.37

2.09
2.29

18
72

9.47
24.40

0.22
.60

20
80

10.53
27.11

5.44
4.92

1
2

68
530

1

.63

3. 77

10

6.29

2. 54

10
46

50.00
28.92

.62
.71

10
57

50.00
35.84

.62
7.02

1
1
1
2
10

1

639
983

249
207
285
131
759

1

1.17

7. 02

1
5
1

1.61
5.85
2. 50

1.93
14. 50
10.14

1

.44

2.63

10
6
15
8
28

14.29
9.67
17. 54
20.00
12. 29

.57
.24
.43
1.25
.35

10
7
21
9
29

14.29
11.28
24.56
22.50
12.73

.57
2.17
21.95
11.39
2.98

44

27.51

16.52

5.10

0.28

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia: 1926

3

__________ ____ ___

517

]
A lf l h f t m f l’ 1097

4

2. 50

15. 48

1

0.63

0.19

0. 85

24. 38

39

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks
5

196

5 .10 I

3

0.28

3 t
1

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
r 'a l if n r r n n *

1Q97




3
2

68
142

1 ____ |
_____
!

i

...........
i

1

.

ACCIDENTS

3
12

INDUSTRIAL

Georgia:
1926
.
. _ .......................................................
...........- ..........- ..........- ......................
1927
Illinois:
1926
1927
_ _________________ _____ _
Michigan:
1926
1927
N ew Jersey: 1927 _ _____________________________
New York* 1926
_____ I
Virginia* 1927

STATISTICS

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

Flour
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

185
186

5.00
1. 79

6.49
.54

12
15

26.88

2

.43

.26

9
17
108

2
2

2.00
2.20

. 61
. 66

1

11.31

8.48

.58
.90
1.08

.52
.98
.45

20.00

2

0.43

2. 57

329
302
29
76
1

.39
.51
.13

2.32
3.08
.81

6
7
8
2

2.86

13. 79

1

.27

1.63

9

2.45

3.11

121
218
260
1,224
34
7

1

1. 71

2.57

248
302
187

1
1
1

1.43
1.10
1.78

2.42
.33
1.07

24.84
23.18

.57
.22
.34

112

9
17

20.86
24.84
24.04

.57
.22
3.17

33.00
62.83

.36
.86

35
59

35.00
65.03

.97
1. 52

33.94
70.00
58.63

.90
1.19
1.09

4
14
13

45.25
70.00
63.52

9.38
1.19
30.41

18.49
18.48
32.50

.25
.52
.35
.14

167
146
13

19.46
21.41
19. 69
32.50

4.58
1.61
.14

43
41
44

61.43
52.59
11.99

.85
.97
.52

45
41
54

64.29
52.59
14.71

14.64
.97
5.26

40.00

40.00

.26

8
11
1
5

80.00
18.83
2.69
50.00

.70
.37
.03
1.15

80.00
20.54
2.69
50.00

.70
2.94
.03
1.15

22
16
18

31.43
17.64
32.07

.23
.10
.54

32.86
18.74
33.85

2.65
.43
1.61

191
156
137
13

20.86

20.00

201

INDUSTRIES

195
124
44

6.80
.85

3
14
12
‘

25.00
28.67

33
57

29. 32

4
4
1

3,443
2,596
2,471

4.89

15
16

4

143
228
1, 553

0.31
.31

I MANUFACTURING
N

3
1

ACCIDENTS

Indiana:
192 6
192 7
Iowa:
192 5
1927____________
Kansas: 1927 2______
K entucky:
192 6
192 7
M aryland:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Minnesota:
192 5
1926.____________
1927____________
M ontana: 1926_____
Nebraska:
192 6
192 7
N ew York: 1927____
North Dakota:
192 6
192 7
Ohio:
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania: 1927South Dakota: 1926
Tennessee:
1 9 2 6 -....................
1927_____________
Texas: 1927___.........

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days
Oklahoma: 1927-

(3
)
1 Closed cases only are reported.




2 Records for six months only (July to December).

0.82
3 Fatal cases not reported.

34.90 i

00
CO

T able

6.—Number

of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States—Continued

00

Flour— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Permanent disability

Death

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
N um ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

21

1

16.03

0.45

1

16.03

0.45

2
2

244
236

1
1

1.43
1.42

0.41
.71

12
23

17.14
32.54

.31
.63

13
24

18. 57
33.96

.72
1.34

5
5
4
2

468
428
1,312
67

2
1
8
1

1.43
.78
2.05
.96

.43
.23
2.74
.29

24
9
58
1

17.14
7.02
14.87
.96

.48
.25
.83
.03

26
10
66
3

18.57
7.80
16.92
2.88

.91
.48
3.57
6.07

1
1

18
201

9
9

90.00
14.91

6.83
.37

9
9

90.00
14.91

6.83
.37

5

25.00

3.53

1

5.75

0.96

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

Virginia* 1926

- - - - - ____

2

78

1

1

2. 57

5.00

4

20.00

0.96

1
Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

P on T icvlT TQ n iQ • 1Q9,fi




4

93

|
I

ACCIDENTS

1

INDUSTRIAL

Georgia* 1927
Illinois:
1926
...................................
1927
Michigan:
1926
1927
_________
N ew York* 1926
Virginia: 1927. _ _________________________________
Wisconsin:
1926
1927

STATISTICS

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

State and year

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Foundry and machine-shop products
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

0.16
1.71
1.48

415
399
265

73.23
58.68
43.61

0.78
.82
.67

418
412
277

73. 76
60.59
45.58

0.94
4.31
5.11

15
5
8

1.80
.65
1.04

1.38
.29
.49

316
120
137
16

37. 82
15. 59
17.85
21.30

.52
.35
.37
.41

332
126
145
16

39.74
16.37
18.89
21.30

2.62
1.42
.86
.41

10
5

5.26
8.09

5.60
9.47

87
79

45. 79
127.87

.78
1.96

97
84

51.05
135.96

6.38
11.43

6.94

3
1

3.33
1.72

2.49
1.03

86
33

95. 56
56.82

.78
1.03

90
34

100.00
58.54

10. 21
2.06

25

1.52

6
1
1

1.52
2.00
2.11

3.35
.61
.63

155
17
18

39.22
34.00
38.03

.64
.56
.60

162
18
19

40. 99
36.00
40.14

5.53
1.17
1.23

2

.10

.62

5
9

.26
.61

. 14
.30

206
335

10.56
22.58

.27
.53

. 213
344

10.92
23.19

1.03
.83

1
1
1

.26
.37
.31

1. 56
2.23
1.89

4
5
6

1.04
1.85
1.89

1.25
2.27
.66

70
104
69

18.20
38.52
21. 69

.41
1.18
.40

75
no
76

19.50
40.74
23.89

3.22
5.68
2.95

207
220

3

4.56

48
1.37

80.00
37

2. 71
56.18

.90

48
40

80.00
60.74

2.71
2.27

3
3
23

1,046
933
13,411

1
2
186

.32
•71
4.62

.57
.38
4. 55

78
52
654

25.16
18. 57
16. 25

.29
.26
.76

79
54
851

25.48
19.28
21.14

.86
.64
6.95

2
1

45
33

26
20

192. 59
200.32

2.98
1.06

26
20

192.59
200.32

2.98
1.06

29
40
69
92

7,629
11.829
17,590
26.830

2
3

298
945

10
10
9
2

2,785
2,557
2,559
250

2
2

640
206

2
2

288
194

1

1.11

10
1
1

1,317
165
158

1

21
20

6,504
4,946

9
5
6

1,282
897
1,061

3
3

2
3

0.29
.49

1.78
2.96

1
1

. 12
.13

.72
.78

11

2
10
11
12

.27

.09
.28
.21
.15

1.64

.52
1.69
1.25
.89

17
40
43
51

.74
1.13
.81
.63

.46
1.12
.52
.44

1,326
1,897
1,632
2,657

57.93
53.44
30.93
33.01

.43
.67
.46
.40

1,345
1,947
1,686
2,720

58. 76
54.85
31.95
33.79

1.41
3.48
2.23
1.73

5

1.76

2.33

39
34

43.33
11.99

.47
.12

39
39

43.33
13.75

.47
2.45

INDUSTRIES




0. 53
1.62
1.48

1,889
2,250
2,025

I MANUFACTURING
N

J Records for six months only (July to December).

3
U
9

15
12
12

ACCIDENTS

Indiana:
1925 ................... ............................................................
1926_________________________________ __________
1927____________________________________________
Iowa:
1925___________________ _____ ______ _____ _____
1926___________________________________ ________
1927____________________________________________
Kansas: 1927 2 _____________ _____________________
Kentucky:
1926____________________________________________
1927___________ ________________________________
Maine:
1926____________________________________________
1927_______________________________ _____ _______
Maryland:
1925________________________________ ____________
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Massachusetts:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Minnesota:
1925____________________________________________
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Nebraska:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
N ew Hampshire:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
N ew York: 1927___________________________________
N orth Dakota:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Ohio:
1925__________________________________ ________ _
1926____________________________________________
1927______________________________________ ______
Pennsylvania: 1927________________________________
■Tennessee:
1926____________________________ ______ ________ _
1927................................................................................

00
Ox

T a b l e 6«— N um ber o f accidents and accident frequen cy and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States — Continued

[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 192G]
Death

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours'
exposure)

Permanent disability

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
hours’
cases
hours’
expoexpo­
exposure)
j sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Total

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

STATISTICS

State and year

00
05

Foundry and machine-shop products— Continued

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued

O
F

i
9

1,340

8

1.99

2.20

272

67. 64

1.01

280

69. 63

3.21

1
1

343
262

4
1

4. 00
1. 27

7. 67
2.29

86
46

86.00
58. 53

1.11
.69

90
47

90.00
59.80

8.78
2.98

347

71.19

4.73

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

Oklahoma: 1927___________________________________

5

220

2

(3
)

3.03

3.18

J

45

68.16

1.55

______- ..........- ____ - .................................

Illinois:
] 925
- _________ _______________ _____________
1926
_________________________________
1927
_____________________________
Michigan:
1925
...........................................................................
1926
_______ ___________________ _____
1927
_________ ____________________________
N ew Jersey:1
1925 _____________ _____________________________
1926
.......................................................................
1927..................................................................................




6

1, 300

1

0. 26

1.54

12

3, 08
1.11

2. 49

84

21. 54

0. 48
.62

97
81

24. 88
22. 43

4. 51
1. 74

20
26
25

10,293
7,203
6,674

1
3
2

.03
. 14
. 10

. 19
.83
.60

26
55
66

.84
2. 55
3.29

.78
1.82
2. 71

239
328
274

7.74
15.19
13.69

.26
. 36
.32

266
386
342

8. 61
17.88
17.08

1.23
3.01
3.63

5
26
24

4,078
6,375
5,531

1
8
2

.08
.42
.12

.49
2.51
.72

15
15
11

1. 23
.79
.66

.94
. 53
.32

133
482
328

10.87
25.24
19.77

.26
.63
.56

149
505
341

12.18
26.45
20. 55

1. 69
3.67
1.60

21
20
20

5,672
4,833
4,727

2

.12

.71

2

.14

.85

55
82
125

3.23
5.66
8. 81

2. 31
4.85
9. 91

234
243
221

3. 75
16.76
15.58

.41
. 27
.42

291
325
348

17.10
22.42
24.53

3.43
5.12
11.18

ACCIDENTS

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Georgia:
1926

INDUSTRIAL

Texas: 1927_____ _____ _________________________ _
West Virginia:
1926_________________________________ ______ __
1927____________ ________ _____ _______________

New York:
192 5
192 6
Virginia: 1927
Wisconsin:
192 5
192 6
192 7

15
22

4
14
17
17

10,104
16,425
930

3
14

3,232
8,796
229

3

.1 0
.1 1

1

.04

.24

8,

1
1

.1 0

.28
.36

.59
1.70
2.15

128
199
4

4.22
4.04
1.44

3.90
3.71
.72

.62

8

.6 8

55
36

.82
2.08
1.46

.32
1. 71
.8 6

322
844
86
211

864
583

10.62
17.12
30.86

.58
1.16
.76

453
1,057
91

21. 76
32. 73
23. 61

.43
.59
.57

5.07
6.57
3.63

2 2 .6 8

922
620

34.92
25.11

1.37
2.98
1.67

87

39.54

8.

108
62

17.14
10.95

1. 29
2.06

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia: 1926.

3

717

1

0.45

2.79

6

.

2.73

4.65

80

36. 36

0.90

34

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks
Alabama:
192 6
192 7

3
4

2,092
1 ,8 8 8

6
1

0.18

1.06

7

0. 95
1.24

0. 84

102

.6 6

54

16.19
9.53

0.45
.34

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania:
192 5
.
192 6
.

1,936
2,056

1
2

0.17
.32

1.03
1.95

14
14

2.41
2. 27

2.91
1.92

15
16

2. 58
2.59

3.94
3.87

109
85

27,121
28, 547

5
16

.06
.19

.37
1 .1 2

47
109

.58
1. 27

.53
.98

52
125

.64
1.46

2 .1 0

469
493
472

25. 69
25.54
25.71

0.50
2.60
1.91

36
35

23.79
20.’ 59
12.23

. 19
.80
.24

.90

Furniture
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
192 5
.
192 6
192 7
Iowa:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Kansas: 1927 a.

50
52
52
5
4
4




504
559
600

1

1 Closed cases only are reported.

6,086
6,418
6,119

11

1

0.26
1.92
1.59

458
453
433

25.09
23.47
23.59

0.24

2 .1 2

.18

36
34

23.79

.59

22

11

40
39

0.60
2.07

12.23

. 19
.62
.24

2 Record is for six months only (July to December).

2 0 .0 0

.6 8

.32

22

* Fatal cases not reported.

INDUSTRIES

17
18

I MANUFACTURING
N

220

ACCIDENTS

14.94
21.44
32.66

00

T a b l e 6 .—

Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued
Furniture— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Death
N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N u m ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Permanent disability

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
N um ­ quency
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
1,000
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
hours’
cases
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Total

Severity
rate
(per
Num ­
ber of
1,000
hours’
cases
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

STATISTICS

State and year

00
00

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
0.11
. 14

7
7

7.00
8.22

0.42
.49

12.00
20.03

.15
.70

6
9

12.00
20.03

.15
.70

.85
2.34

30
34
29

23. 72
17.89
12.59

.58
.31
.21

30
37
36

23.72
19.47
15.63

.58
1.16
2.55

.93

.42

11
18

5.79
8.37

.19
.15

11
20

5.79
9.30

.19
.57

4.20
1. 33
3.63

2.76
1.76
1.80

38
93
70
19
106

19.97
31.00
25.42
61.49
9.02

.36
.60
.44
.27
.3 0

46
97
81
19
137

24.17
32.33
29.41
61.49
11.66

3.12
2.36
4.42
.27
3.20

14.09
10.00
21.94
21.25

.29
.21
.28
.26

85
15
220
218

15. 55
10.00
22.98
22.16

1. 55
.21
1.48
1.08

1
1

156
150

7
10
11

422
649
768

3
7

1.58
3.04

5
6

624
717

2

8
9
9
1
20

634
1,002
918
103
3, 916

15
8
27
30

1, 821
496
3,191
3,279

5
5
4
4
4

1.00
1.17

0. 31
.35

1

0. 36

2.18

8
4
10

1

.09

.51

30

2. 55

2.39

8

1.46

1.26

9
9

.94
.91

.57
.82

77
15
210
209

1

.10

.63

910
937
521

1

.64

3. 84

7
12
4

2.59
4.27
2.56

1. 32
2.93
2.02

102
82
64

37.78
29.15
40.95

.30
.27
.56

109
94
69

40.37
33.42
44.15

1.62
3.20
6.42

485
507

1

. 66

3. 95

4
1

2.67
.66

1.86
.49

22
38

14.67
24.99

.23
.36

26
40

17. 34
26.31

2.09
4.80

ACCIDENTS

6.00
7.05

324
284

INDUSTRIAL




6
6
6
9

1
1

3
3

O
F

Kentucky:
192 6
192 7
M aine:
192 6
____
192 7
M aryland:
192 5
192 6
.1927________________
Massachusetts:
192 6
192 7
Minnesota:
192 5
192 6
192 7
New Hampshire: 1926.
New York: 1927______
Ohio:
192 5
926________________
1927________________
Pennsylvania: 1927___
Tennessee:
192 6
192 7
.........
Texas: 1927___________
W est Virginia:
1926_______________
1927______________ _

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

Oklahoma: 1927.................................................................

1

62

1

(?)
1

5.34

0.09

21

5.34

0.09

1

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

3
3

500
505

16
25
25

2,828
4,356
6,630

5
37
36
2

2,013
9, 052
8,937
449

14
18
2
13
13
13

3

2.00

2.60

9
12

6.00
7.92

0.08
.25

12
12

8.00
7.92

2.68
.25

10
22
22

1.18
1.68
1.11

.71
1.14
.99

97
168
150

11. 43
12.82
7.54

.26
.23
. 16

107
190
173

12.61
14. 50
8.70

. 97
1. 37
1. 45

- 48
36
7

1.76
1.34
5.20

1.28
.66
6.31

32
229
211
11

5.30
8.42
7.87
8.16

.20
.27
.18
.25

32
280
247
18

5.30
10.29
9.21
13.36

. 20
2. 21
.84
6. 56

2,930
3,621
599

23
39
5

2.62
3. 58
2.78

2. 70
4. 09
1. 92

53
129
7

6.03
11.83
3.90

.27
.20
.08

76
168
12

8.65
15.41
6.68

2.97
4.29
2.00

2,888
3, 216
3,105

3
11
7

.35
1.15
.76

.14
_ .92
.39

82
78
78

9.46
8.13
8.37

. 17
.20
.20

85
89
85

9.81
9.28
9.13

.31
1.12
. 59

19

11.18

1
3

0- 05
.11

0.30
. 66

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia:
1926.................................................................................

2

559

5

2.94

1.34

14

8. 24

0.27

1.61
i
1

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926.................................................................................
1927.............................................................................. ..
Pennsylvania:
1925__________ _______ ____________________ _____
1926_____________ ______ ______ ______ ________ _




7
7

916
1,108

32
25

4,393
2,923

1 Closed cases only are reported.

1

0. 30

1. 81

2
8

0. 74
2.41

0. 65
1.10

2
9

0.74
2. 71

0. 65
2. 91

17
10

1. 29
1.14

. 76
.63

17

1, 29
1.14

. 76
.63

3 Fatal cases not reported.

10

ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTUBING IN D U STBIES

Georgia:
1 9 2 6 ................................. ........................................
1 9 2 7 -_____________________________ ________
Illinois:
1925______________ _____ _________________
1926.............................................................................
1927________________________________ _________
Michigan:
1925________________________________________
1926_____________________________ ___________
1927_______________________________ ________
N ew Jersev:1 1927______________ ______
New York:
1925_______________________________
1926_____________________________ ______
Virginia: 1927________________________ _____ .
Wisconsin:
1925______________________ ______ _____________
1926_____________________ ______ _________
1927______________________ ____ ___________

T a b le 6. — Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926 , and 1927 , by States— Continued

CO

Glass
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1926 and 1926]

Death
N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
cases
hours’
exposure)

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
N um ­
(per
(per
rate (per
ber of
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0
1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
cases
hours'
cases
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Total

Severity
rate
N um ­
(per
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
cases
hours'
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 0 0 0

hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,00 0

hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

11

5

2,774
1 ,0 1 2

1,151

1
1

0 .6 6

321

38.57

1.06
.50
1.35
1.95

1

7
4

3,246
2,456

0.15
.42
.19

0.89
2.52
1 .1 2

.63
.33
1.74

.19
.79
1.39

65
78
85

20.61
26.33
24.62

.31
.56
.6 6

67
79
91

21.24
26.66
26.36

2
6
8
1

.43
.90
.48
.05

.77
.73
.60
.03

414
358
608
844

88.93
53.43
36.49
39.31

.75
.62
.49
.44

416
365
623
849

89.36
54.48
37.39
39.55

1.52
2.24
3.51
1.59

16.67
22.71

.2 2

.17

10
12

16.67
22.71

.17

351
368

36.19
49.93

.41
.63

361
375

37.22
50.88

1.80
3.52

317

8.64

.2 0

68

4.71
9.40

1.29
2.04

2 10

5
4

37.97

10
12

1, 552
2,249
5,554
7,156

14
25

316

2
1
6

1,051

6
6

0.40

176
10

3

.41

2.44

4

1.03
.64

1.39
,45

.2 2

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five day*
fllrlflhnma* 1Q27

6

656

17

(8
)

8.64

0 .2 0

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
N ew Jersey: 1
1926
1927

_______________________ ___________
.
____




6
6

4,632
2,588

1

0.07

0.43

7
9

0.50
1.16

0. 76
1.83

50
64

3.60
8.24

0 .1 0
.2 1

73

ACCIDENTS

4
4
4

0.60

INDUSTRIAL

Indiana* 1927
______ _ _ _ _ _
Maryland:
1926
........................... .
1926
.....................
1927
.............................
Ohio:
1925
_ _ __ ...............
1926
_____________ __________________
1927
________________________________
Pennsylvania: 1927
__ ______________________ - Tennessee:
1926
1927
__ ...................................
W est Virginia:
1926
.................- ........................................
1927
.............................................................

STATISTICS

State and year

Permanent disability

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania:
1925............
1926.............

2
3

171
653

25
20

4,903
4,662

1
4

0. 51
.29

I

0. 51

0.15

2

1.02

3.21

1.72

7
14

.48
1.00

.59
1.07

7
18

.48
1.29

. 59
2.79

Hardware
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
1
1
1

100
92
266

3
5
6

786
836
2,570

1
1
3
1

0.40

2. 39

3.33
3.62
3.76

4
7
4

1.67
2.79
.52

2.51
6.52
4.88

•

7
14
6

23.33
50.70
7.51

0.59
.57
.60

8
15
9

26.66
54. 32
11.26

3.10
7.09
5.48

.51
1.55
.25

68
104
206

28.33
41.46
26. 72

.58
.82
.30

72
112
210

30.00
44.65
27.24

1.09
4.76
.56

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
6
6

2, 250
2,481

24
15

3.53
2.01

2.32
1.79

61
47

8.97
6.31

0.18
.14

85
62

12.50
8.32

2.50
1.93

3
3
4
1

476
505
600
297

9
4
17
2

6.43
2.64
9.45
2.22

1.82
.99
11. 25
.68

20
15
24
5

14.29
9.90
13.34
5.56

.49
.41
.26
.66

29
19
41
7

20. 72
12.54
22.79
7.78

2.31
1.40
11.51
1.34

1. 57

0.53

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
Pennsylvania: 1926.




2,337
1 Closed cases only reported.

0. 53

INDUSTRIES

Illinois:
1926_ ....................
1927.......................
Michigan:
192 6
192 7
New Jersey: 1 1927.
New York: 1926___

I MANUFACTURING
N

M aine:
192 6 ..................
192 7
N ew York: 1927........
Ohio:
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania: 1927..

ACCIDENTS

3.06

8 Fatal cases not reported.

CO

T able

6.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued

J©

leather
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of 1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
(per
Num ­
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Kentucky:
1926
1927
M aryland:
1926
1927
- .
Massachusetts:
1926____________________________________________
1927
. . . .
N ew York: 1927___________________________________
Ohio:
1926
.................
1927
______________
Pennsylvania’ 1927
W est Virginia:
1926
1927

1
1

105
92

1

3. 62

2. 72

5
11

16.67
39.86

0.22
.80

5
12

16.67
43.48

0.22
3.52

4
4

569
548

2
1

1.18
.61

3.05
2.44

14
17

8.23
10.34

.30
.15

16
18

9.41
10.95

3.35
2. 59

13
17
9

4,251
4,451
1,824

1
1
17

295
328
3,943

2
2

310
335

2

0.16

0.94

1

. 18

1.10

2
2
8

.16
.15
1. 46

.05
.04
.99

125
333
115

9.77
24.94
21.02

.23
.38
.55

129
335
124

10.09
25.09
22.66

1.22
.42
2.64

2

.17

1. 01

1
1
5

1.11
1.02
.42

1.36
1.22
.15

16
30
414

17.78
30.50
35.00

.34
.63
.45

17
31
421

18.89
31.52
35.59

1.70
1.85
1.61

2
1

2.22
.96

3. 55
.29

27
28

30.00
26.75

.55
.29

29
29

32.22
27.71

4.10
.58

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Georgia:
1926
.
___
1927
................................... ............
Illinois:
1925
1926
______
1927____________________________________________




1
1

451
320

5
7
7

1,378
1, 594
2. 431

1
_____
I ______

1
1

0.71
1.04

2.66
.31

28
26

20.00
27.12

0.39
.63

29
27

20.71
28.16

3.05
.94

7
17
20

1.69
3.54
2.74

1.91
3.14
2.60

58
79
60

14.03
16.46
8.23

.34
.61
.20

65
96
80

15. 72
20.00
10.97

2.25
3.75
2.80

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

State and year

Permanent disability

2
2

560
532

3
4

1.76
2.51

1 .32

40
29

23.53
18.18

1.47
.42

43
33

25.29
20.69

OO
Q
A
O

7
10
9

1,455
2,286
2,256

15
16
14

3.43
2.32
2.07

2.11
1.36
3.62

33
60
39

7.56
8.70
5.76

.23
.29
.11

48
76
53

10.99
11.02
7 .0 0
1 as

9 04
A
1 A
K
i« O
O
Q <0
O 40
. 7

6
8
1

763
1,849
124

1

3
17
1

1.31
3.09
2.68

1.84
3.75
4.83

17
102
10

7.43
18.55
26.84

.35
.73
. 88

21
119
11

9.18
91 »G
4
* 1 04
29.52

4.81

4
5
5

1,835
3,025
2,518

1
2
1

3
4
2

.55
.44
.26

.16
.65
.08

74
97
63

13.44
10.66
8.34

.28
.51
.18

78
103

14.17
11 .32

66

8.73

1.53
2.48
1.05

11

36.67

1.30

1

0.44

.18
.22
.13

2.62

1.09
1.32
.79

. 89

1 . *A
X 7

AA
Q
K 11
O 71
.

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia: 1926..

1

113

11

36.67

1.30

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926__.........
1927_______
Pennsylvania:
1925_______
1926...........

5
5

544
554

1
1

0.63
.61

3.68
3.61

14
17

3,870
3,966

1

.08

.50

3

1.80

0.78

4

0.63
241

3.68
4.39

2

. 17
.76

.05
.59

2
10

.17
.84

.05
1.09

9

lu m b er— Planing mills
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
1925................................................. ..
1926_.....................................................
1927__________
________ ______
Iowa:
192 5
.
192 6
192 7
............................................ .
Kentucky:
192 6
________
192 7
i Closed eases only are reported.




8
10
10

624
711
634

2

1.05

7
8
8

1,770
1,820
1,566

2
2

2
2

823
819

2

2

13
6.

31

2

.36
.42

2.19
2. 55

12
6

.81

4.88

20

5

14

1.07
6.19
1.05

0.32
7.10
1.89

93
83
68

49. 71
39.52
35.73

0.35
.53
.65

95
96
72

50.78
45. 71
37.83

0.67
7.63
8.85

.94
2.18
1.28

1.24
1.36
.57

44
75
58

8.29
13.64
12.35

.2 0

.33
.29

49
89

9.23
16.18
14.05

1.44
3.88
3.41

5. 60
8.14

1.94
5. 72

198
100

79.20
40.70

1.87
1.40

84.80
49.65

ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

36904°— 29-

Michigan:
192 6
192 7
N ew Jersey:1
192 5
192 6
192 7
N ew York:
192 5
192 6
Virginia: 1927
Wisconsin:
192 5
192 6
192 7

1 2 .0 0

66
212

. 122

3.81
CO

00

T a b le

6.— Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued
Lumber— Planing mills— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities,

Permanent disability

Death

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N u m ­
rate (per
ber of 1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours'
cases
cases
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours'
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours'
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
M aine:
1926
1927
Maryland:
1925
1926
1927
Minnesota:
1925
1926
1927
XTattt TT <>
•
■ha
»
JN6W JtLampsmre.»
New Y ork: 1927
Ohio:
1925
1926
1927

1
1

____________________________ -

___
1007

...

___________

-------------------------------------------------------------- - —

- ____-

5
8
8

272
607
538

4
5
5
1
19

458
523
373
121
3,080

__

v i v a n ip • 1Q27

Tennessee:
1926
1927
Texas: 1927

____________

__________ _________

3
5
8
6

438
368
543
621

2
2

______________________________

2
4

52
48

338
827
246

3!

1

0. 55

3.29

10.00
27.93

0.19
.59

2
4

10.00
27.93

0.19
.59

1
3
3

1.23
1. 78
1.86

3.68
.76
3.59

38
50
42

46.55
27.78
26.00

1.15
.79
.66

39
54
45

47.78
30.11
27. 86

4.83
4.84
4.25

3.13
2.68

3 15
2.59

2
25
9

1.45
15.63
8.05

.01
.36
.35

2
30
13

1.45
18. 76
11.62

.01
3.51
8.31

1

.89

5.37

5
3

1

.11

.65

32

3.46

4.79

169

18.29

.65

202

21.86

6.00

3

.2.28

2.28

3

1. 61

.48

27
16
45
56

20.53
14.55
27.65
30= 07

.33
. 20
.51
.42

31
16
45
59

23.57
14.55
27.65
31.68

7.17
.20
.51
.90

3

4.06

1.62

18
15
68

18.00
6.04
91. 98

.36
.07
1. 21

18
15
72

18.00
6.04
97.39

.36
.07
10.95

1 ;!
1
9

22.00
I
13.51 |

13.03
1.52

1

.76

1. 35

1

4.56

8.12

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Georgia:
1926

_______________________________

1Q27

_____________________________________




|
2 1
o

!
177 |
222

1

i j

j
2. 00 |
____i

11.30

1
2

,0 0
3.00

1.16 :
1.35

9
7

18.00 j
10. 51 I

0.57
-17 I

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

State and year

and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

8
17
16

667
1,802
1,557

2
3

1.00
.56

6.00
3. 30

3
16
22

1.50
2.96
4.71

2.40
4.36
5.23

28
126
142

14.00
23. 33
30.39

.48
.62
.80

33
145
164

16.50
26.85
35.10

8.88
8.31
6.03

1
16
16

260
1,893
1, 679

1
2
2

1.28
.35
.40

7.69
2.11
2.38

2
16
9

2.56
2.81
1. 79

2.50
2.67
1. 25

39
159
118

49.99
27. 89
23.43

1.04
.77
.79

42
177
129

53.83
31.05
25.62

11.23
5.55
4.42

14
20
2

2, 682
2,928
479

1
3

.12
.34

.75
2.04

31
40
6

3.85
4.55
4.17

6.03
5. 48
3.44

84
248
21

10. 44
28.18
14.61

. 51
1.60
.33

116
291
27

14.41
33.07
18. 78

7.29
9.12
3.77

9
9
9

1,946
1, 663
1, 278

1
2
1

.17
.40
.26

1.03
2.40
1. 56

9
5
8

1. 54
1.00
2.09

.80
.93
1.80

186
153
72

31.86
30.60
18. 77

.76
.92
.58

196
160
81

33. 57
32.00
21.12

2. 59
4. 25
3.94

35

25.00

7.86

15
33

2.21
1.73

1.33
4.23

2

.91

1.91

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia: 1926.............................................................

2

480

1

0.71

4.16

4

2.86 |

3.22

30

j

21.43

0.48

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926.........................................................................
1927_ ...............................................................................
Pennsylvania:
1925__________ __________________________ ______
1926_______________________________ _____ _______

17
17

2,266
6, 371

5
7

735
772

10

3.13

15
23

2.21
1.20

1.33
1.10

2

0.53

.91

1.91
j

i

Lumber— Sawmills
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
1926________________________ _______ _______
1927 .......................................................................
Maine:
1926 _____________________________
1927 _______________________________ __________
M aryland: 1925-------------- --------------------------- -----------




1
2

95
110

4
5
1

209
237
20

1

3.03

12.12

70.00
69.70

1.35
2.13

70.00
72.73

1.35
14.25

1

1.41

.42

63. 33
36. 45
33.17

.96
1.00
1.18

63.33
37.86
33.17

ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

Illinois:
1925_____________ ______________________________
1926-_______ _______ ____________________________
1927______________________
_______
____
Michigan:
1925____________________________________________
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
New York:
1925____________________________________________
1926____________________________________________
Virginia: 1927_______________________________ ___ _
Wisconsin:
1925___________________________________
1926_______________________________________
1927________________________ _________________

1.42
1.18

CD
Ol

T a b l e 6 .—

Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued

O

Lumber— Sawmills— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Permanent disability

Death

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
(per
(per
Num ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­ rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
'rate
(per
N um ­
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

0.50
3.29
2.92
.40

129
790
606
53

19.30
131.67
101.22
21.73

2.36
19.15
12.80
5.32

6.41
1.82

4
11
159

35.78
117. 52
160.65

.67
1.55
2.21

5
12
165

44.72
128.20
166. 71

54.33
7.96
10.09

.38
.94
3.24

.11
.85
4.58

44
56
1,461

16.92
17.58
57.04

.29
.22
1.04

46
60
1,556

17.68
18.83
60.75

2.72
2.95
8.43

1.79
1.76

2.92
.75

98
79

25.13
19.83

.74
.62

107
88

27.43
22.09

6. 75
4.38

359

17.51

1.53

0.96
6.81
3.87

6.06

1
5

10.68
5.05

2. 32
1.88
2.81

1
3
83

3.09
3.01

7
7

1
9
6
2

0.15
1.50
1.00
.83

0.90
9.05
6.01
4.92

1
1
1

37
31
330

1

8.94

53.66

1

1.01

2
2
17

861
1,062
8,538

1
1
12

.38
.31
.47

4
4

1,299
1,328

2
2

.51
.50

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days
Oklahoma: 1927............................................................. - -

2

1,123

3

(3
)

0. 89

1.16

56

16. 62

0. 37 |

i
Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

Georgia:
1926
1927................................................................. ................
Illinois:
1926
1927__---------------------- ------------------------------------------




-

- _____

1
2

62
587

1

0.57

3.41

1

0.57

0.17

5
72

25.00
40.91

0.91
1.12

5
74

25.00
42.05

0.91
4.70

2
3

309
250

1

1.34

8.61

5
7 ,

5.56
9.34

4.37
16.22

36
48

40.00
64.08

.78
1.48

41
56

45.56
74. 76

5.15
25.71

ACCIDENTS

18.40
126.00
95.38
20.91

0.75
4.17
4.84

2,228
1,988
1,995
813

INDUSTRIAL

123
756
571
51

5
25
29

5
5
5
2

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
Minnesota:
1925
.......................
1926
___________
1927
__ ____________
M ontana- 1926
Ohio:
1926
1927
_______
Pennsylvania: 1927________________________________
Tennessee:
1926
- - _______
1927
...........................
Texas: 1927__________________________ _____ ________ j
W est Virginia:
1926
__________________ !
1927__________ _______ — ---------------- ------------------

STATISTICS

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

Michigan:
1925................................... .............................................
1926............... ............................................................
1927_............................................................... ...............
Virginia: 1927
Wisconsin:
1925........... .............................................................. .......
1926..................... ............................................................
1927............................................... ..................................

5,455
2,394
2,416
1,380

4
2
5
3

.24
.28
.69
.72

1. 47
1.67
4.14
4.34

7
13
10
2

.43
1.81
1.38
.48

.47
1.62
1.23
.14

120
344
282
120

7.33
47.78
38.90
28.98

.23
2.07
1.55
.90

131
359
297
125

8.00
49.87
40.97
30.18

2.17
5.36
6.92
5.38

11
18
16

2,520
4,356
4,767

6
7
6

.79
.53
.42

4.76
3.21
2.52

12
16
15

1.59
1.22
1.05

.79
1.45
.85

322
482
530

42.59
36. 79
37.06

1. 01
1.03
1.03

340
505
551

44.97
38.54
38.53

6.56
5.69
4.40

214

21. 62

3.12

53
87

7.68
13.29

1.43
2.85

109
62
6

3.00
2.97
1.43

5. 87
5.67
4.11

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

Virginia: 1926______________________________________

5

3,288

2

0. 20

1.21

17

1. 72

1.22

195

19. 70

0.69

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyong two weeks
Alabama:
1926....................... .............................................. ..........
1927....................... ................................................ .........

California:

192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania: 1926.

5
4

2,312
2,182

1
1

0.14
.15

0.86
.92

4
8

0.58
1.22

0.43
1.37

48
78

6. 96
11. 92

0.14
. 56

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
21
16
2

12,136
6,958
1,384

25
15
2

0.69
.72
.48

4.12
4. 31
2.89

84
47
4

2.31
2.25
.95

1.75
1. 36
1.22

Machine tools
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
192 5
192 6
______ ______ _
192 7
Massachusetts:
192 6
_________ _____
192 7
___________
N ew York: 1927........................ ..
Ohio:
1 9 2 5 ........................ .................
192 6
_____ _____
192 7
_____ _
Pennsylvania: 1927. .. .................
3 Fatal cases not reported.




3
3
2

124
248
204

15
13
9

4,917
4,475
1,374

19
25
45
6

1,763
4,138
5,300
854

1

1.63

1.96

15
24
3

40.32
34.28
4.90

0.60
.29
.10

15
25
4

40.32
35. 71
6.53

0.60
8.35
2.06

2
1
14

.14
.07
3.40

.06
.04
3.52

70
129
55

4.73
9.61
13.34

.09
.20
.44

73
130
69

4.94
9.68
16.74

.55
.24
3.96

2
13
11
1

.38
1.04
.69
.39

.48
.65
.55
.29

238
529
529
64

44.99
42.66
33.27
24.97

.37
.42
.44
.33

240
543
543
65

45.37
43.78
34.15
25.36

.85
1.55
2.12
.62

1.43
.07

.40

.48
1.13

ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

5
17
17
4

CD

T a b le

6.—Number

o f accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued

CD
00

Machine tools— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Permanent disability

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
quency
Full-year N um ­ rate (per
workers ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
N um ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours'
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

1,197
1,933
1,992

7

574
389

5
7
6
6
9

551
1,282

2
5
4

2.00

.59

3.48

1

.61

3.63

0. 25
1.17
.92

20
66
72

5. 57
11.38
12.04

0.19
.48
.28

23
77
84

6.41
13.27
14.04

0.44
1.65
3.20

3
4

1.76
3.43

.69
1.29

36
15

21.18
12.87

.56
.52

40
19

23.53
16.30

4.72
1.81

4.19
3.18
6.33

3. 78
5. 57
9.57

19
19
10

13.28
8.63
7.90

.29
.16
.12

25
26
18

17.47
11.81
14.23

4.07
5.73
9.69

3
23

1.82
6. 05

2.18
5.46

10
83

6.05
21.84

.27
.97

14
106

8.48
27.89

6.08
6.43

3
4
1

802
1,117
990

0.33

1

0.84
1.89
1.67

6
7
8

477
729
422

2

3
11
10

1.25
1.21
.34

.62
.98
.10

30
43
33 |
1

12.47
14.54
11.11

.22
.23
.23

33
52
34

13.72
15.75
11.45

.84
1.21
.33

2

3. 34

10.68

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

Pennsylvania:
192 5
192 6




7
3

1,119
196

1

1.67

10.18

1

1.67

0.50

ACCIDENTS

5
11
11

INDtJSTEIAL

Illinois:
192/;
1926
____
1927____________________________________________
Michigan:
1926____________________________________________
1927
New Jersey: *
1925
__________
1926
1927
New York:
1925
_ ___
___ ___ ______________
1926
Wisconsin:
1925
.
________ __
1926
___ ___________ _____________
1927
____________________________________

STATISTICS

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

Paper and pulp
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

Pennsylvania: 1927............. ..........................................
Tennessee:
1 9 2 6 ............................................................................
1927................................................ ................................
W est Virginia:
1926____________ ___________________ __________
1927.................................... ............................................




3
3

1.79
3.33

0.80
8.13

50
40
43

29.78
44.44
53.22

3.63
.36
1.16

53
45
43

31.57
49.99
53.22

4.43
21.49
1.16

1
1

2.73
3.33

2.05
7.09

1

2.37

.71

18
14
25
14

49.11
46.67
82.44
33.24

1.36
.70
1.39
.37

19
15
25
15

51.84
50.00
82.44
35.61

3.41
7.79
1.39
1.08

9
10

.80
1.15

.52
1.28

522
259

46.61
29.80

.84
.66

531
274

47.41
31.53

1.36
5.39

2
4

.63
1.02

1.8
.69

56
82

17.50
20.81

.59
.39

58
86

18.13
21.83

.77
1.08

5
4

.28
.24

.34
.10

208
368

11.56
22.15

.24
.48

213
372

11.84
22. 39

.58
.58

1.77
3.73
1.62

7
7
8

2.06
2.19
2.17

2.12
1.07
2.14

149
267
189

43.89
83.44
51.16

.78
1.03
1.00

157
276
198

46. 24
86.26
53.60

4.67
5.83
4.76

.38

2.27

1
2
87

.91
1.83
4.71

.27
. 55
5.02

76
50
485

69.09
45.66
26.26

.93
1.19
.81

77
52
579

70.00
47.49
31.35

1.20
1.74
8.10

3
2

.29
.14

1.71
.85

4
6

.38
.42

.92
.52

251
443

23.90
31.36

.27
.46

258
451

24.57
31.92

2.90
1.83

3

.36

2.17

4

.48

.25

202

24.32

.32

209

25.16

2.74

1

3.33

1.01

20
1

66.67
1.64

.05
.02

21
1

70.00
1.64

1.06
.02

3

2.14

3.85

108
63

77.14
55.01

1.30
.97

111
63

79.28
55.01

5.15
.97

3
3
3

560
307
269

1
1
1
1

122
113
101
140

5
4

3,745
2,897

1
2

1,083
1,313

13
12

6,008
5„539

3
3
3

1,132
1,072
1,231

1
2
1

.29
.63
.27

1
1
19

367
365
6,155

7

4
6

3,501
4,709

7

2,769

1
1

98
204

2
1

476
382

i Closed cases only are reported.

2

5

2.22

.58

13.00

3.45

ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

Indiana:
1925_...............................................................................
1 9 2 6 ....................................................................
1927.................................................................................
Iowa:
1925.................................................................................
1926 . . . ..............................................................
1927.................................................................................
Kansas: 1927 2........ ............................................................
Maine:
1926.................................................................................
1927.................................................................................
Maryland:
1926______________ _________ ________ __________
1927................................................................................
Massachusetts:
1926________________________ ______________
1927 _______________________ _____ ___________
Minnesota:
1925..............................................................................
1926__________________ ________________
1927._______________________________________
N ew Hampshire:
1926___________________ _______________
1927._____________ ________ ________ _____
N ew York: 192 7 ............................................................
Ohio:
1926________________________ ___________________
1927......................................................... .......................

a Record is for six m onths only (July to December).

CO
CO

Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued

Paper and pulp— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
N um ­ quency
workers
ber of rate (per
cases 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Permanent disability

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
N u m ­ quency
N um ­
(per
(per
ber of rate (per
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
1,0 0 0
cases 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1 ,00 0

hours’
expo­
sure)

STATISTICS

State and year

100

'T a b l e 6 .—

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

O
F

5
7
7

378
523
595

1
8

1,179
3,902
2,495

7

1

1 0 .0 0

.31
.35

15
17
36

13.22
10.63
20.17

2 . 22

17.37

6

.85
1.28
.80

.25
.83
.73

73
369
175

20.63
31.54
23.38

.54
1.03
.60

76
387
183

21.48
33 08
24.45

.79
3.39
2.93

58
92
4

4. 21
3.76
3.69

6.77
4.30
1.38

235
692

17.04
28.24
19.35

.67
.93

21

.6 8

294
792
25

21.32
32.33
23.04

7.88
7.18
2.06

5
18
14

1 .0 1

1.18
.90

.40
1.29
.60

51
186
159

10.35
12. 24
10.23

.23
.34
.29

57
205
181

11.56
13.49
11.65

3.98

0.33

14

11.67

0.33

4

0.87
.80

1.61
1.83

1

2

.26
.27

1.53
1.60

.07
.33

.44
1.95

3

4,597
8,163
362

1
8

5
9
9

1,642
5,061
5,178

1
1
8

.2 0

1 .2 2

.07
.52

.39
3.09

3
15

5.50
1. 64

1.85
2 .0 2

Accidents for State reporting disabilities extending beyond 10 day3

Virginia* 1926

____________________________

2

14

388

11.67

Accidents for State reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
Pennsylvania:
1925
1926




.......................................
.................

4
6

1,532
2,501

1
2

0 .2 2

.27

1.31
1. 59

3
4

0.65
.53

0.30
.24

!
i

6

ACCIDENTS

0 . 21

1.91
1.29

14
16
31

12.34

0.63
2.80

5.29
5

2

12

19

0 .8 8

INDUSTRIAL

Illinois:
1925
1926
.........................................
.........................................
1927
_
..
Michigan:
1925
...................... . .
1926_____ ____________ _____ __________________
1927_____ ___________ _____ ___________________
N ew York:
1925 .............................................................................
1926___________________ _____ ________ _____ _____
Virginia: 1927
_____________________________
"Wisconsin:
1 9 2 5 ._______ _________ _________________________
1926_______________________ _____ _______________
1927_______________________________ _____________

Petroleum refining
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

1
1
1
2
1
1

5
5

0.38

1

1 .1 0

2.27
6.59

70
70
45
73

6.48
6.63
49. 45
21. 31

0.14
. 12
41
.98

75
78
46
83

6.94
7.39
50.55
24.23

0.44
2.50
7.00
3.52

1

1.98
.2 2

1.35
3.09

.59

29
238
1,533

58.00
39.60
17.81
49.29

1.32
1.44
.26
.70

30

. 10
1.79

244
1,590

60.00
41.58
18.25
51.41

1.91
13.32
L 71
5.58

3 119

22.29

2.28

11.43
7.25

ft. 0 0
.30

0.30

2.92

2.54

2 .0 0

3
50

.2 2

.1 1

1 1 .8 8

3
16

0.46
.38

1

169
168
4,454
10,367

4

5
4
10

3,614
3,518
303
1,141

.51

20
1.

61

21

m

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

3

1, 779

0

12

)

2.25

1. 71

107

20.04

0.57

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

1
1

228
230

1

1.43

8.78

7
5

2
2

1,710
1,340

6
1

1.18
.25

6 .97

1.49

2
6

2
2
2

10,208
8,009
1,174

2

.57

3.40

63
24

66

0.39
1.49
2.16
2.62
6 .8 6

1 0 .0 0

0 .2 2

8

7.25

.30

5

0.41
1.79

16
61

3.14
15.17

.1 2

24

.41

68

4.71
16.91

7.50
3.69

2 .8 8

126
74
144

4.12
3.08
41.14

.1 0

192
137
170

6.28
5.70
48. 57

2.98
3.23
13. 67

14
45
7

1.04
3.82
1.46

3.34
9.08
6.39

3.16
8.26

.07
2 .0 1

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926.........................
1927— ...................
Pennsylvania: 1926i Closed cases only are reported.




3
2
6

4,460
3,927
1,612

7
15
5

0. 52
1.27
1.04

3.12
7.64
6.18

7
30
2

0.52
2.55
.42

0 .2 2

1.44

2 Record is for 6 months only (July to December).

.2 1

3 Fatal cases not reported.

INDUSTRIES

Georgia:
1926.................... ..........................................................
1927................................................... ..........................
Illinois:
1926..................................... .......................................
1927........................... .....................................................
N ew Jersey: *
1926...................................................... .........................
1927......... ........................................................................
N ew York: 1926_ ................. ...........................................

MANUFACTURING

Oklahoma: 1927_______________________ _________

ACCIDENTS

Indiana:
1926.................................................................................
1927. ............................................................... ..............
Kansas: 1927
_________ __________ _
N ew York: 1927................................................................
Ohio:
1926 ...............................................................................
1927............... ..................................................................
Pennsylvania: 1927................ .....................................
Texas: 1927..........................................................................

6*— Number

of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued
Pottery

[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Death

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1 , 000 ,0 0 0
cases
hours'
exposure)

Permanent disability

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
(per
Num ­
N um ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
ber of
1,000
1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
cases
cases
hours’
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
N um ­
(per
ber of
1 ,0 0 0
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,00 0

hours'
expo­
sure)

1
1

1.06

0.33
.32

2
2
1

189
154
260

i

1.28

7
2

1,206
1,027
2,397
381

1
1

214

3
3

2,215
2,333

13.33
12. 74

0.23
.18

13
13

14.44
13.80

0.56
.50

2 0 .0 0

.51
.62

12
11
1

2 0 .0 0

.51
.62
.38

.38

6

1 .1 1

23. 79

23.79
1.28

1

0.32
.14

1.95
.83

.28

.50
.08

14.84
17.52

.31
.15
.17

81
47
129

22.40
15.16
17.94

2 .1 0

.28

80
46
126

2 2 .1 2

2

1.56

2.80

7
5

11.67
7.78

.05
.29

7

1

1
1

6

11.67
9.34

.05
3.09

1
1

.15
.14

.60
.04

65
75

9.85
72

.30
.17

77

1 0 .0 0
1 1 .0 0

.90
1.07

13.55
14.51
14.71

2.54

5.94
7.15

2.15
.50

212

1

.14

.8 6

10.

66

.81
1.08

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
New Jersey: 1
1925.................................................................................
1926
...................................................
1927
....................................................... N ew York:
1926.............................................................................
Virginia, 1927
__




1,943
2,720
2,310

1

2
1

1,228
140

1

0.17

.27

1.03

1.62

0.34
.61
.72

1 .1 0

5
5

6
8
8

3

.81

.24

2

.85
.98

76
114
97

13.04
13.90
13.99

0.41
.36
.39

18
3

4.86
7.15

.29
.50

79
119
102
22

3

1 .2 1

1.37

INDtTSTRIAIi ACCIDENTS

303
314

12
12
12
11

2
2

14

O
F

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
1926.........
1927....................................... .... .................................
Maryland:
1926
...........
1927
N ew York: 1927 .
______
Ohio:
1925
____
1926.
. ...................................................................
1927.................................................................................
Pennsylvania: 1927
Tennessee:
1926
1927.................................................................................
W est Virginia:
1926_________
_________ ___________________ _
1927................................................................... ..............

STATISTICS

State and year

12
0

T a b le

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days
Virginia:
1926............................... - ................................................

1

I

167 |

2

4.00

0.05

2

4.00

0.05

3

4.01

9.10

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

2
1

249
277

1

1.34

8.03

2

2.67

1.07

!

Shipbuilding, steel

ACCIDENTS

i
California: 1927........................... ......................................
Pennsylvania: 1926...... ................................... ................

I
N

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
2
3
4
2
I
'

2

j

2

546
1,045
2,333
895
1, 607

!..........
i______
;
1
j
2
:
2

|
0.14
.74
.41

0.86
4.47
2.49

199 !..........
131 ______

1
6
22
1
i

3
1

4

0.63
1. 91
3.14
.37
.62
1.67
10.17

0.18 1
2. 52 !
4.23
.22
.50
6 . 71
15.25

I
36 I
34
73
215
361
87
115

22.50
10.84
10.43
80.07
74.84

0.68
. 28
! 47
1.68
.77

37
40
96
218
306

23.13
12. 75
13! 71
81.18
75.89

0.86
2* go
5 .56
6.37
3.76

145.00
292. 30

1.71
3.33

88

119

146.67
302. 47

8.42
18.58

4
13

13.34
26.39

2.41
4.64

44
61
13

4.14
3.14
8.03
3.99
2.19

MANUFACTURING

Maryland:
1926— .................
1927____________
N ew York: 1927— .
Ohio: 1927_________
Pennsylvania: 1927
W est Virginia:
192 6
_______
192 7
______

.36
5.17

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
_______
192 6
192 7
Michigan:
192 6
192 7
N ew Jersey: 1 1926N ew York: 1926___
Virginia: 1927______
Wisconsin:
192 6
192 7

6.67
164 j.
I
807
570
316
3,044
4,089
942
942

2.31
4.06

2

6.67
18.27

0 .1 0

9
39
52

16.25
30.41

10

1 1 .1 1

2.64
1.06

1.24
1.84
1.27
1.95
.50

62
104

6.81
8.48

.42
1.30
.43
.73

.71

.32

74
67

26.43
23.70

8.12
0. 42

1.11

.22
.24

2.48
6.33
1.31
1.47

1.67
5. 26

2.22

.58

.2 2

88
120

18.34
35.67
14.44
9.67
9. 78

.36
.61

74
71

26.43
25.12

INDUSTRIES

Illinois:

1 Closed cases only are reported.




O
CO

T a b le

6 .—

Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927 , by States— Continued

Shipbuilding, steel— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Death
N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
N u m ­ quency
(per
N um ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Total

Severity
rate
(per
Num ­
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

1

4,233

2

0.16

0.94

31

2.44

2.12

112

8.82

0.22

11.42

3.28

24

32.05

8.67

1.39
1.25
1.43

2.37
2.51
1.85

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks

Alabama: 1927______________________________

1

0

250

2.67

7.75

22

29.38

0.92

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926.............................................................................
1927........................................................................... ..
Pennsylvania: 1926__________________________

2
2
1

2,154
2,924
1,409

2
3
1

0.31
.34
.24

1.86
2.05
1.42

7
8
5

1.08
.91
1.19

9
n
|
6 1
I
1

0.51
.46
.43

Slaughtering and meat packing
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

Indiana:
1926.
1927.

9

3,393
3,083

1925.

4

4, 252

Iowa:




8

1
1

0 .1 0
.1 1

0.59
.65

17
9

1.67
.97

1.96
.32

349
404

34*22
43.67

0.48
.58

367
414

35.99
44. 75

3.03
1. 55

18

1.41

1 .1 1

345

27.04

.40

363

28. 45

1. 51

ACCIDENTS

145

INDUSTRIAL

Virginia: 1926.....................................................................

STATISTICS

State and year

Permanent disability

g
9
8

3
2
2
2

5
6

5
5

.17
.2 2

1.03
1.34

216
252
790

35.92
44.26
22.87

.61
.64
.27

643
834
539

36.95
46.49
23.13

2.16
3.17
.38

1.67
2.64
4.22

6.17
.79
3.33

64
44
134

106.67
58.15
56.54

1 .1 1

65
46
144

108.34
60.79
60.76

7.28
1.38
4.28

2.27
2.99
2.93

2.94

533
1,077
574

54.91
92.05
52.55

.91
1.15
.80

558
1 ,1 1 2

609

57.49
95.04
55.75

5.70
4.01
5.00

34. 31
36.03
25.14
89.91
19.18
30.48
80.00

.36
.45
1.07
1.24
.27
.36
1.05

541
559
215
19
134
145
259

35.36
36.49
29.22
89.91
20.08
30.48
83. 55

2.54
1.16
7.14
1.24
3.89
.36
4.07

1.85

22

.27

1.65

35
32

3

.2 0

.07
.27

1.18
.39
1.63

28

3

.45

2.70

3

.45

.92

1

.32

1.95

.1 0

3.23

1.07

525
552
185
19
128
145
248

9
9

2
1

2 .0 0

1

.1 2

.71

4.49
.29
.16

42
27
267

42.00
25.69
31. 43

.53
.30
.55

44
28
271

44.00
26.64
31.90

5.02
.59
1.42

5
4

50.00
15.48

.35
.30

5
4

50.00
15.48

.35
.30

3 60

17.54

0.34

13
6

3

.85
.39
3.81

2 .8 6

2.55

.95
.35

1 .0 0

.32
4.44

42
1

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days

Oklahoma: 1927_________ _____ _____________ _______

2

1,140

1

(*)

0.29

0.09

59

17. 25

0.25




1
1

218
213

7
11
8

16,412
22,228
17.806

4
5

930
1,291

2
2

1,712
1, 558

2

2 .8 6

5.49

8

13
12

0.24

7
9

.1 0

1.46
.63

.17

1 .0 1

11.43
20.31

0.23
.42

10

13

14.29
20.31

5.72
.42

3 Record is for 6 months only (July to December).

767
1,142
1,057

15.58
17.12
19.78

.33
.38
.42

820
1,254
1,215

16.65
18.79
22.74

2.29
2.62
4.37

1.07
.51

1.08
.1 5

64
59

2 2 .8 6

15.24

.57
.35

67
61

23.93
15.75

1.65
.50

11

2.57

.50
1.61
2.94

2

.43

83
1. 57
2.79

3

2

41
105
149

2.16

.8 8

.8 6

.32

78
72

15.29
15.40

.33
.30

89
78

17.45
16.69

INDUSTRIES

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Georgia:
1926.................................................................................
1927..................................................................................
Illinois:
1925_ ...............................................................................
1926_..............- _____ _______________ _____________
1927.................................................................................
Michigan:
1 9 2 6 -......................................................... ................. ..
1927_..................................... .........................................
Wisconsin:
1926.................................................................................
1927..................................................................................

MANUFACTURING

.31

86

6
1

.59
.95

I
N

625
794
533

1
2

319
350
2,832

1
1

.1 1

3

5,098
5,106
2,452
70
2,225
1,585
1,023

3
3
7

.52
1.19

.26

3

3,236
3,902
3,641

1

.8 6
2 .0 1

1
2
10

3
4

15
36
6

5,816
5,980
7,770

ACCIDENTS

1926.................................................................................
1927_________ ___________________ _______________
Kansas* 1927 2
Kentucky:
1926.............
.................
1927_________
M aryland: 1927_______ __ — _ __________________
Minnesota:
1925___________________ _________________________
1 9 2 6 --............................ ................................................
1927_._............................... ...........................................
Nebraska:
1926................................ .. . . ......... .....................
1927-............................................... ...............................
N ew York: 1927_____________________ ______________
N orth Dakota: 1927
Ohio: 1927______________________________ __________
Pennsylvania: 1927
South Dakota: 1926
Tennessee:
...........
1926...........................
1927................................................................................
Texas: 1927____________________ ________ _______
W est Virginia:
1 9 2 6 -.-.........................................................
1927................................................................................

3.19

4

3 Fatal cases not reported.

1 .2 1

0
01

T a b le

6*—

Number o f accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industriesy 1925, 1926, and 192 /, by States

Continued

Slaughtering and meat packing— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and

Permanent disability

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
1,000
ber of
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N u m ­
rate (per
ber of 1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

O
F

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

i
Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond two weeks

Alabam a1926..,
1927..

i !

j

47
186

!

_

j

l
4

_______
!

10.00
7.16

0.15
.27

1
4

10.00
7.16

0.15
.27

1.41

3.29

13. 61
23.00
16.23

0.14
2.57
1.54

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

4
6

1,424
1,102

1
2 j

0,47

2. 81

4

0. 94

I
6 j

0.48

1
Stamped and enameled ware
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

Indiana:
1925.
1926.
1927.




2
2
2

588
654
514

!
i
________ !_______ ___________
1.50
_________!
3
2. 60
................ I
4 I

2.34
1.36

24
43
21

13. 61
21. 50
13. 63

0.14
.23
.18

24
46
25

ACCIDENTS

1

2 I

INDUSTRIAL

!

1

53 |

Virginia: 1926.

STATISTICS

State and year

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

1
5
8
11

698
641
1,330
95
606
2,979

0.25

1.50

1

.11

.54
2.11
1.37
4.28

11

.95
2.85
2. 76

10

1

1. 79
1. 79
3. 48
6. 36

2

187
947
766
576

6
43
47

2.14
18. 72
27.18

.05
.56
1.12

1
11
51
58

1. 79
3.93
22. 20
33. 54

.54
2.16
1.93
5.40

1.00
1.56
1.99

51
77
85
11

24.34
29.60
21.30
38. 65

.28
.46
.37
.44

53
84
97
11

25.29
32.45
24.31
38.65

1.28
2.02
3.86
.44

5.55

2. 39

49
27

27. 22
3.02

.26
.05

59
28

32. 77
3.13

2. 65
.72

.67

Accidents for States reporting only disabilties extending beyond one week
Illinois:
192 6
192 7
............
Michigan: 1926____
N ew Jersey: 1
192 6
192 7
N ew York: 1 9 2 6 ...
Wisconsin:
192 6
_____
192 7

2
2
1

5,462
472
314

4
3
11

0. 25
2.11
12. 22

0.19
1.27
3. 82

29
17
13

1.76
12.00
14. 44

0.04
.26
.26

33
20
24

2. 01
14.11
26.66

0.23
1. 53
4.08

2
2
3

485
503
1,170

8
8
18

5. 33
5. 30
5.14

2. 47
2.48
4.12

14
11
79

9. 33
7. 28
22. 57

.35
.10
1.45

22
19
97

14. 66
12.58
27.71

2.82
2.58
5.57

1
1

2, 773
3,010

12
7

1.44
.78

1.00
.45

45
36

5.42
3. 99

.16
.07

60
43

7.22
4.77

3.32
.52

0.33 j

2.31

3

0. 36

2.16

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities
California:
1926.. .
1927......................

108
410

Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
Indiana:
192 5
192 6
1 9 2 7 ... .
Kentucky:
1926_________ ______ ______ _______
1 9 2 7 ... .
............................
i Closed cases only are reported,




244
235
250

4.29
1. 33

12. 32
.40

43
44
44

58. 71
62. 86
58. 69

0. 55
.41
.57

3,257
3,744

.31
.18

.32
. 05

718
573

73. 26
51.01

. 71
. 46

58. 71
67.15
60.02
721
575

0.55
12.73
.97

73. 57
51.19

1.03
.51

ACCIDENTS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

Maryland:
1925.. .
192 6
192 7
N ew York: 1927. __
Ohio:
1925.___________
1 9 2 6 - ............
1927____________
Pennsylvania: 1927
W est Virginia:
192 6
192 7
..........

o

T a b le

6.—Number

o f accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925 , 1926 , and 1927 ,

6 States— Continued
?/

Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no

temporary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Permanent disability

Death

Fre­
Full-year N um ­
quency
workers ber of
rate (per
cases
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
N um ­
(per
Num ­
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

O
P

Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury— Continued
1,500
1,524

2

0.44

0.13

57
138

12.66
30.19

0.23
.59

57
140

12.66
30.63

0.23
.72

1
1
1
6

26
27
24
1,723

1
10

13. 70
1.93

8.22
1.43

2
2
1
108

25.55
24.69
13.70
20.89

.40
.47
.75
.69

2
2
2
118

25. 55
24.69
27.40
28.82

.40
.47
8.97
2.12

9
7
12
14

666
878
7,007
5,124

2
1
3
8

1.00
.38
.14
.52

.53
.68
. 13
.22

120
145
210
556

60.10
55.05
9.99
36.17

.82
.67
.15
.40

122
146
215
564

61.10
55.43
10.23
36.69

1.35
1.35
. 85
.62

2

.10

.57

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Illinois:
1926
.....................................
1927
.........................................
Michigan:
1926
.........................................
1927......... ................................................................
New Jersey:1
1925
...................
1926
.................1927
N ew York:
1925
1926_.....................................— - ..................................




19
21

3.02
4.04

2.43
5. 51

153
126

24, 28
24.26

0.63
.52

172
147

27. 30
28.30

3.07
6.03

2
3

.67
1.12

.19
.33

33
37

11.00
13. 75

.26
.40

36
41

12.00
15.24

2.44
2.96

1,149
968
782

9
7
8

2.61
2.41
3.41

4.23
1.00
1.15

70
30
22

20.30
10.34
9.38

.56
.28
.23

79
37
30

22.91
12. 75
12. 79

4.79
1.28
1.38

1,458
1,757

21
20

4.80
3. 77

4.00
4.17

100
164

22.86
30.94

.88
1.87

121
184

27.66
34. 71

4.88
6.04

4
4

2,085
1, 732

3
4

1,003
897

5
3
3
4
6

1
1

0.33
.37

1.99
2.23

ACCIDENTS

5
6

INDUSTRIAL

Massachusetts:
1926
1927
...................
Minnesota:
1925
1926
1927
___
N ew York* 1927
.........
Ohio:
1925
. .................
1926
....................... 1927
_
Pennsylvania: 1927..........................................................

STATISTICS

State and year

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Total

Temporary disability

1926..................................................................................
1927..................................................................................

2
2

76
43

1925_...............................................................................
1926..................................................................................

24
9

2,669
2,097

Pennsylvania:

1
1

0.12
.16

0.75
.95

6
2

0. 75
.32

7

0.26
.17

3

0.87
Ao
•rQ
fc

1.01
1.12

Stoves
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury
1
2
2

1
1

54
64

5.00

2
1

151
55

54.00
6.05

.33

54.00
6.05

.33

3
1
3

399
380
021

1

.91

.66

4.18
5.45
1.92

.14
.21
.05

4.18
6.36
1. 92

.14
.87
.05

3
2

943
673

3
1

1.07
.50

1.17
1.48

22.86
29.22

.34
.51

23.93
29.72

1. 51
1.99

2
2
3

304
360
406

7
9
2

7.77
8. 33
1. 64

7.84
3. 61
2.71

32
31
22

35.55
28. 71
18.08

.81
.41
1.01

40
24

43.33
37.04
19. 72

8.65
4.02
3.72

8
8
11
8

1,753
1,028
2,924
901

2
5
4

.38
1.61
.46

.48
1.65
.90

275
79
428
61

52.30
25.48
48. 79
22.58

.49
.38
.64
.26

277
84
433
61

52.68
27.09
49.36
22.58

.97
2.03

4
4

879
926

3
7

1.15
2. 52

.91
1.03

245

94.23
110.17

1.22
313

95.38
112.69

2.13
2.27

1
1

28
23

10.00

0.65
1.64

10.00

0.65
1.64

1

.11

.68

0. 58
1.11
1.00

0.17
3.59
1.21

41.96
42. 77
42.80

87. 98

0.54
.68

42.54
43.88

0 .7
4.27
1.90

5.00

1.24

87. 98

2.22
.26

INDUSTRIES




572
612
662

MANUFACTURING

i Closed cases only are reported.

9
8
8

I
N

Indiana:
192 5
..............
192 6
192 7
_____
Iowa:
192 6
192 7
Kentucky:
192 6
______
192 7
Maryland:
1925__...............
192 6 .................
192 7
Massachusetts:
192 6 ..............
192 7 ................
Minnesota:
1926____________
1927____________
N ew York: 1 9 27 ....
Ohio:
192 5
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania: 1927
Tennessee:
192 6
192 7
West Virginia:
1926. .
..
1927. .
.

ACCIDENTS

■6S— oH>698

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

California:

T a b le

6 .—

Continued

Number of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 192?, by States
Stoves— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no

accidents occurred.

California reported no

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Permanent disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
(per
N um ­
(per
rate (per
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Total

Temporary disability

Num ­
ber of
cases

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

N um ­
ber of
cases

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure),

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

-

-

.................

723
379

1
1
3
1

747
519
303
51

1
1

0.45
.88

0.48
.88

0.16
13

3.80
3.83

0.13
.08

18
16

4.28
4.71

0.27
1.82

45
11

2
3

1,387
1,130

20.45
9.68

.53
.37

46
12

20.90
10.56

3.30
5.65

66
30
19
6

30.00
19.25
21.11
39.14

.83
.42
1.46
.87

72
36
23
6

32.72
23.10
25.55
39.14

3.24
4. 54
6.96
.87

7

35.00

0.62

1. 85

3

3.58

1.85

.30

1
2

.26
.80

1.58
2.73

0.14
1.74

2. 76
5.28
6
6
4

2. 72
3. 85
4.44

2.41
4.12
5. 50

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

I

35. 00

73

0. 62

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

dniifnrrti a • 1Q97
Pennsylvania:
1925
1926




2

1,264
821

3

280

9
5

1
1

0.26
.40

1. 58
2.43

1

3.58
.40

ACCIDENTS

6
6
2
1

.....................

INDUSTRIAL

Illinois:
1926
1927
Michigan:
1926
1927
N ew Jersey : 1
1926
1927
N ew York* 1926
Virginia' 1927

STATISTICS

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

State and year

°

temporary disabilities, and

Death

^

Structural-iron work
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

2
3
2
2
2

354
372
546

2
2
5

166
136
616

16
8
10
21
3

1,419
378
2,202
3,856
277

8. 51

1 43
\

2

1.88

11.29

1

.61

3.66

1
9
4
16
1

.23
8.18
.61
1. 38
1.20

1.41
47.59
3. 63
8. 30
7.21

76. 07
95! 55
41.81

0. 52
l! 54
.87

36
91
40

78. 24
101! 10
47. 78

t O
1. so
t>
29.15
10.19

10.00

27. 21

10
10
44

20. 00
72.47
34 27

3. 55
3. 09
! 52

12
10
44

30.00
72.47
34.‘ 27

30. 76
3 09
! 52

2
1

2.86
1. 52

.85
2. 74

11
20

15. 71
30.47

.31
.37

14
21

20.00
31. 99

9.68
3.11

1. 30

. 39

25

12.86
32! 44

. 30
! 87

9
26

12. 86
3 *. 74
3

30
l] 26

1
1
1

.94
.91
.61

1.13
. 53
1.83

6
32
37

5.65
29. 09
22! 58

.27
. 48
.33

9
33
39

8.47
30.00
23.’ 80

12.69
1.01
5.82

2

246
257

1

35
86
35

9

235
219

1. 30
13. 69
2.15

1.08

.32

25
11
31

50. 00
27. 01
1 *. 78
6

. 91
. 43
l! 07

25
11
33

50.00
27. 01
17l 86

. 91
43
l! 39

5
4
4
6
1

1.17
3.64
.61
.52
1.20

1.20
2.12
.18
.39
.36

424
185
174
544
115

99.57
168.18
26. 33
47.02
138.19

1.15
2.86
.43
.54
1.84

430
198
182
566
117

100.97
180.00
27.55
48.92
140. 59

3.76
52.57
4.24
9. 23
9.41

3 15

42.74

0.54

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond five days
Oklahoma: 1927_____________________

1
1

1 Closed cases only are reported.




117

(3)

I

15

42.74

0.54

1
2 Record is for 6 months only (July to December).

3 Fatal cases not reported.

INDUSTRIES

1
1

13.92
7.17

2.17
3. 33
4.78

1

66
53
46
428

2.22
1 .19

MANUFACTURING

1
1
1
2

2
1

1
3
4
2

153
287
279

I
N

5
5
5

ACCIDENTS

Indiana;
1925.................................................................................
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________ ______ _
Iowa:
1925____________________________________________
1926_____________________________________ ______
1927________________________________ _________
Kansas: 1927 2______________________ _______ _______
M aryland:
1926____________________________________________
1927____________________________________________
Massachusetts:
1926____________________________________________
1927_______________________________ _____ _______
Minnesota:
1925___________________ _____ __________________ _
1926________________________________ ____________
1927___________________________________________ _
Nebraska:
1926____________________________________ _______
1927____ ______ __________________________ _____ _
N ew York: 1927____________________________ _____ _
Ohio:
1925_____________________________ _______________
1926_________________________________ __________
1927____________________________________________
Pennsylvania: 1927------------------------------ -----------------Texas: 1927....... ..................................................................

T a b le

6.—Number

of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925,1926, and 1927, by States— Continued
Structural-iron work— Continued

[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

Permanent disability

Death
Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours’
exposure)

Total

Temporary disability

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
quency
Num ­
N um ­
(per
(per
rate (per
1,000
ber of
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
hours’
cases
cases
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
Num ­
(per
ber of
1,000
cases
hours’
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week

1.13
.76
.52

6. 76
4.60
3.10

2
3
2

313
537
368

I

.62

100
1
8 1
218 j

7
6
2

929
821
452

2
4
4

212
628
591

29
45
52

32.69
34.61
26.87

1.11
1.02
.54

38
53
64

42.84
40. 75
33.07

17.45
9.76
9.53

4.26

7.98

1.81

.54

17
37
14

18.09
23.13
12. 67

.62
1.02
.25

21
38
16

22.35
23. 75
14.48

8.60
4.74
.79

3. 72

2
1
3

9.58
4.14
5.89

2
1
5 j
!

1

.36
2.00

2.15
12.17

.57

3. 38

3.06

3. 22

12

18. 39

.48

14

21.45

3.70

11
15
7

3.95
6.00
5.16

3. 78
4.83
6.08

32
44
107

11.48
17.60
78.89

.45
1.27
1.94

44
64
114

15.79
25.60
84.05

6.38
18.27
8.02

2
6
8

3.15
3.16
4. 51

1.65
1.83
3.64

16
89
101

25.17
46.84
56.94

.57
1.28
1.51

18
95
101

28. 32
50.00
62.02

2.22
3.11
8.54

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

Virginia: 1926______________________________________




1

43

1

10.00

23.76

8

80.00

3.45

9

90.00 |

27.21

ACCIDENTS

1
1
1

9.02
5.38
5.68

2

296
434
645

8
7
11
4

3
4
4

INDUSTRIAL

Illinois:
1925______________________ _______________ ______
1926____________________________________________
1927_______________________ _____ _______________
M ichigan:
1925 __________________________________________
1926
1927 __________________________________________
N ew Jersey:1
1925
1926
1927 ___________________________________________
.N ew York:
1925____________________________________________
1926 ____________________ _____ ______________
Virginia: 1 9 2 7 ._ __ _____________________________
_
Wisconsin:
1925............... .................................................................
1926______________________ ______ ____ _______
1927 ................................................................................

STATISTICS

State and year

^

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]

Accidents for States reporting only fatalities and permanent disabilities

California:
192 6
192 7

2
2

1.42
1.03

8.59
6.19

3
4

2.14
2.06

0.96
.98

5
6

3. 56
3.09

9.55
7.17

192 5
192 6

20
14

2,681
2,908

1
2

.12
.23

.75
1.37

10
18

1.24
2.07

.45
1.10

11
20

1. 36
2.30

1.20
2.47

50
79

9.61
7.42

0 .2 1

21

19.09
18.89

.94
. 59
M
•O
O

Woolen goods
Accidents for States reporting all disabilities extending beyond day of injury

1,746
3,545

2
2

377
459

2
1

2,777
1,859

5
4
3

2,392
741
917

1

4
19

213
2,093
6,054

1
1

252
128

50
78

1

0.09

0.03

1
1

.91
.73

.6 6
.2 2

25

2

.24

.07

61

.13
.28
.37

26

7.35
3.58

.26

63

.1 2

20

7.59
3.58

14.44
18.45
4.36

.45
.2 1

.19

105
41
14

14.58
18.45
5.09

4
6 .6 6
.33
74
11.79
!Pennsylvania: 1927
09
10.24
186

.28
.17
.13

1G
1
lul

13

0.14

.15
.13

0.83

104
41
2

.06

.33

.73

2
1

0 .2 1

18.18
18.16

20

20
1

9.61
7.33 |

.32

4

1.31

.2 2

12

8

!

16.25
20.76

4
76
13
8

.16

.1 2

1.28
.2 1

1.50

6 66
12 ! 11
in. ro
1U

. 28
.*50
re
•O
O

16.25
20.76

.15
.13

12.71
17.20

1.82
.64

1.42
6.50

.06
O
Q
•66

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week
Georgia:
1926............................................................
1927................................................................................

Michigan:
1926.............................................................................
1927................................................................................

New Jersey:1
1925_...............................................................................
1926.................................................................................
1927.................................................................................




2
2

378
388

1
1

0.90
.8 6

1.59
.26

13
19

11.81
16.34

0.23
Q
O
•oo

20

4
4

694
615

3
1

.54

.16

11

1.42
5.96

.06
.17

12

1.59
1.96
ri. 75

.06
.04
.04

42
37
42

4

6,910

g

3,403

.43

.2 2

33

6
6

4,945

17
16

1 .6 6

1.08

1.91
1.27

26

20

14
3

2 .0 2
9 aq
0 .0 *

2.83

INDUSTRIES

3
4

MANUFACTURING

M aine:
1926............. ...................................................................
1927 ............................................................. ..................
Maryland:
1926____________________ _______ _____ __________
1927_...............................................................................
Massachusetts:
1926________________________ _____ ______________
1927____________________________
.
N ew Hampshire:
1926______________________________ _________
1927____________________________________________
N ew York: 1927___________________________
Ohio:
1926____________________________
1927________________________________
............ ....................
__
Tennessee:
1926...................................................
1927......................................................................

I
N

466
647

ACCIDENTS

4
4

Pennsylvania:

.27
1.95
1.31

00

6.—Number

of accidents and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, 1925, 1926, and 1927, by States— Continued

14
1

T a b le

Woolen goods— Continued
[Where no figures are shown no accidents occurred.

California reported no tem porary disabilities, and Pennsylvania reported none for 1925 and 1926]
Permanent disability

Death

Severity
Severity
Fre­
rate
rate
Num ­
(per
N u m ­ quency
(per
rate (per
ber of
1,000
ber of
1,000
1,000,000
cases
hours’
cases
hours'
hours’
expo­
expo­
exposure)
sure)
sure)

Fre­
Full-year
quency
workers N um ­
rate (per
ber of
1,000,000
cases
hours'
exposure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
N um ­
1,000
ber of
hours’
cases
expo­
sure)

Fre­
quency
rate (per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure)

Severity
rate
(per
1,000
hours’
expo­
sure)

_

____

2
2

1.51

1.67

155
493

9.39
3.06

0. 77
.07

36
4

10.90
3.06

2.44
.07

1.60
4.74

.32
.13

8
7

1.60
4. 74

.32
.13

3

2.30

0.06

0.29
.52

0.61
.69

Accidents for State reporting only disabilities extending beyond 10 days

2

Virginia* 1926

!
1
!

446 1
!

|

1
1

1
L_ _______
1

3

2.30

0.06

Accidents for States reporting only permanent disabilities and fatalities
California:
1927
Pennsylvania:
1925
1926

i
!

2
1

1Q9f}

_______________________ ______

Grand total:
1925
1926
1927




191
141

21
13

5,772
3,850

1

555, 996
1,288
991,082
2,209
2,676 1,075, 282

171
370
459

0.06

0. 35

= = = = = =====

i

4
6
2,047
4,090
3,949

0.23
0.26
.52
.69
======== _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

5
j
6 !
21,496
44,041
57,072

23, 714
48, 501
61,480

ACCIDENTS

31
4
8
7

5

1,092
435

INDUSTRIAL

4
2

N ew York* 1026
Virginia* 1927
Wisconsin:
1926
1927

O
F

Accidents for States reporting only disabilities extending beyond one week— Continued

STATISTICS

Num ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

State and year

Total

Temporary disability

ACCIDENTS IN SPECIFIED INDUSTRIES, CLASSIFIED BY NATURE OF INJURY, 1927

T a b le 7. — Number of accidents in 1927 in specified industries residting in death, permanent disability, or temporary disability beyond day
of injury , by nature of injury

I
N

Permanent partial disability 2
D eath 1

Loss
of 1
arm

Loss Loss
of 1 of 1
foot eye

Loss
of 1
thumb

Loss
of 1
fin­
ger

20
417
34
50
17
8
27
61
126
8
16
256
88
16
23
24
47
87
23
81

Loss
of 2
fin­
gers

Loss
of 3
fin­
gers

|
Loss Loss of Loss of Loss of
of 4 thumb thumb thumb
fin­ and 1 and 2 and 3
gers finger fingers fingers

Loss of Loss Loss
thumb
of
of
and 4 great any 2 Other Total
fingers toe
toes

54
15
73
116
271
30
28
604
209
34
51
64
140
223
51
155

1 Fatal cases not reported in Oklahoma.
^
2 Amputation between the knee and the ankle or between the elbow and the wrist is considered as loss of foot or hand; at or above the knee or elbow, as loss of a leg or an arm.
L oss of a phalanx, permanent malformation, or permanent stiffness of a joint is regarded as loss of a member.
Ql




INDUSTRIES

Agricultural implements______________
Automobiles___ __________________ _____
Automobile tires_____ _________________
Boots and shoes_________ _______ ______
Brick___________________________________
Carpets-------------------------------------------------Chemicals______________________________
Cotton goods----------------------------------------Electrical machinery_______ _____ _____
Fertilizers------------------- -------------------------Flour. ____________ ______ _______________
Foundry and machine-shop products.
Furniture______ ____________________ ___
Glass_________ _____ _____________ _____
Hardware---------------------------------------------Leather-------------------------------------------------Lumber— Planing m ills----------------------Lumber— Saw m ills____________________
Machine tools---------------------------------------Paper and pu lp________________________

Loss Loss
of 1
of 1
hand

MANUFACTURING

Industry

ACCIDENTS

Table 7 analyzes the accident data by nature of injury and extent of disability and covers only the year 1927.
Here no frequency and severity rates are given. While these rates are desirable if a detailed study is to be made, for
example, of the relative importance of the loss of an arm and the loss of an eye, the demand for information of this
character does not appear to justify the time and space required to compute and publish these statistics. Should a
sample exhibit of this kind be desired, reference is made to the Labor Review for January, 1928 (p. 73), where
such information for the year 1926 is published.

l

T a b le

7. — Number of accidents in 1927 in specified industries resulting in death, permanent disability, or temporary disability beyond day
of injury , by nature of injury — Continued
Permanent partial disability

Industry

Loss
of 1
foot

8
1

8

8
1
5
8
1
1
1
2
2

41
3
13
28
2
3
2
27
1

6

5
1
2

1

1
1

459

70

213

56

5
6

20
1

1

4
--

113

Loss Loss
of 1
of 1
eye thumb

8
1
7
7
5
2
1
218

10
1
6
21
6
7
6
9
3

Loss Loss of Loss of
of 4 thumb thumb
fin­ and 1 and 2
gers finger fingers

Loss
of 1
fin­
ger

Loss
of 2
fin­
gers

Loss
of 3
fin­
gers

62
6
29
98
31
23
13
18
13

15

2
7
3
3

i
7
1
1

Loss of Loss Loss
of
of
thumb
Other Total
and 4 great any 2
fingers toe
toes

2

368 1, 722

3
36
6
3
4
3
328

7
1
2
1

Loss of
thumb
and 3
fingers

1

2
1

1

5
1
3
3
1
3
1
1

4

133

60

2
1
1
1

1
118

46

58

20

4

5

40
2
13
67
1
5
4
9
2

178
13
74
295
52
59
37
54
28

407

3, 939

Permanent total disability 2

Agricultural implements..
Automobiles........ ................
Automobile tires_________
Boots and shoes....... ...........
Brick______________ _______
Carpets_______________ ____
Chemicals_________ _______
Cotton goods--------------------Electrical machinery___ —
Fertilizers..-------- -------------Flour...................................




Loss Loss
of
of
both both
arms

Loss Loss
of
of
both both
hands feet

80
794
72
86
54
15
73
116
274
30
28

222
743
1,135
327
449
33
80
834
644
57
192

245
1,994
826
259
415
86
199
564
736
125
115

163
1,235
726
160
473
65
140
431
546
115
73

100
674
397
67
139
19
74
267
262
32
40

59
444
248
49
90
10
55
197
208
14
31

114
984
482
114
112
11
98
423
402
68
48

11
209
25
30
24
18
25*
75
134
8
18

31
60
2
17
27
24
17
47
12
24

945
6,343
3,841
1,023
1, 729
242
695
2,808
2,979
431
541

ACCIDENTS

Industry

Temporary disability3 terminating in Grand
total
perma­
nent
Dura­
Sixth Four­
Total
partial
Loss
tion
teenth
to
tempo­
and
of dis­
First Second Third Fourth Fifth
of
Other Totai
thir­ week
rary
both
total week 4 w eek5 week
week week
ability
teenth
or
dis­
dis­
not
week later
ability
known
ability

INDUSTRIAL

Loss
of 1
leg

O
F

Total___________ ____________________________

Loss Loss
of 1
of 1
arm hand

STATISTICS

Petroleum refining.........................................................
Pottery.................................................................................
Shipbuilding steel______________________ _________
Slaughtering and meat packing_ _____ _ _______
_
Stamped and enameled ware____
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies
Stoves_______________
___________
Structural ironw ork._ _ _ __ _
____________
Woolen goods____
. _

Death

3

607
209
34
51
64
142
223
51
155
178
13
74
296
52
59
37
54
28

2,020
523
797
67
289
174
460
306
712
934
81
313
1,452
67
771
444
360
113

2,179
477
717
150
367
245
884
210
621
460
94
242
1,442
71
436
229
363
148

1,545
314
392
99
221
153
662
131
396
274
62
179
850
58
282
143
281
131

3,949 14, 599 14,899 10,300

733
148
157
35
103
103
494
77
255
149
33
96
426
34
105
71
114
41

481
79
78
22
60
63
301
82
140
91
19
55
242
16
62
80
74
28

749
152
147
28
110
171
534
79
313
190
35
122
414
34
128
81
103
44

212
28
16
6
14
54
127
15
102
59
5
32
79
13
22
10
31
4

13
169
5
9
4
21
2

8,024
1,766
2,314
416
1,175
994
3,572
910
2,610
2,226
329
1,052
5,074
298
1,815
1,062
1,347
511

5, 243 3,387

6,290

1,406

946

57,072

105
45
10
9
11
31
110
10
62
71

INDUSTRIES




MANUFACTURING

2 Am putation between the knee and the ankle or between the elbow and the wrist is considered as loss of foot or hand: at or above the knee or elbow, as loss of a leg or an
arm. Loss of a phalanx, permanent malformation, or permanent stiffness of a joint is regarded as loss of a member.
3 N o temporary disabilities reported by California.
*
The following States do not report temporary disabilities ending in the first week (see notes 3 and 5): Alabama, California, Georgia, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey. New York.
Oklahoma (only those over five days are included), Virginia, Wisconsin.
5 Covers all States included in this report except Alabama and California.

I
N

Total..

1

ACCIDENTS

Foundry and machine shop products___
Furniture_________________________________
Glass______________________________________
Hardware__________ _______ ______ _______
Leather_____________________ ______ _______
Lumber, planing mills....... ........... ................
Lumber, sawmills__________________ _____
Machine tools_____________________________
Paper and pulp____________ _____ ______ . . .
Petroleum refining............ ..............................
Pottery____________________ _________ ______
Shipbuilding, steel_____________ _________
Slaughtering and meat packing__________
Stamped and enameled ware____________
Steam fittings, apparatus, and supplies.
Stoves______________________ ______________
Structural-iron work_____________ ________
Woolen goods_____________________________

Chapter IV.— ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN THE IRON AND
STEEL INDUSTRY TO THE END OF 1927

The first attempt of the bureau at a complete presentation and
statistical analysis of accident data in any industry was in Senate
Document 110 (62d Cong., 1st sess.), published in 1913, which gave
the results of a detailed study of accidents and accident prevention in
the iron and steel industry. This record was brought down to date in
Bulletins 234 and 298 of the bureau. Since 1910 accident records in
this industry have been collected annually and published from time
to time, although an exhaustive analysis of these figures has not been
made since that included in Bulletin 298, which was issued in June,
1922, and presents the record in detail to the end of 1919. Data for
a further critical study are now being assembled covering the 10-year
period since 1919. In the present report there is included only a brief
review of the accident records of the industry and of its various depart­
ments, with a limited analysis of accident causes for the entire period
of the bureau’s investigations down to the end of the year 1927.
ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE OF SELECTED PLAN TS, 1907 TO 1927

For the purposes of this annual review the data available are pre­
sented in two groups. The first group is composed of the plants which
were pioneers in accidents prevention and have maintained from year
to year a continuous and energetic effort to reduce their accident rates.
The second group includes all plants from which information could be
obtained, including the selected plants in the first group. Table
8 presents the facts for the selected group from 1913 to 1927.
T a b le 8.—-Accident frequ en cy rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure) fo r a selected
group of iron and steel plants, 1913 to 1927, by product and year

Year

Fabri­
cated
products

Sheets

Wire
and
products

Miscellan eous steel
prod[ucts
Tubes

Total
Group A

1913-___ ________________________
1914_____________________________
1915__ ___________________________
1 9 1 6 . __________________________
1917 _ y___________________________
.1918______________________________
1919______________________________
1920_________ ____________________
1921_____________________________
1922______________________________
1923______________________________
1924_____________________________
1925______________________________
1926______________________________
1927______________________________

100.3
59.0
53. 5
52.1
51. 3
38.2
32.8
35. 3
28.4
33.8
32.6
33.4
27.4
24.3
18.0

61.6
47.2
37.3
34.0
33.9
25.9
25.8
22.7
17.5
16.9
17,2
10.3
11.4
9.4
8.4

59.3
46.2
52.4
48.2
32.5
18.8
12. 5
12.0
7.5
7.9
7.9
6.2
4.2
3.9
3.5

27.2
12.5
10.8
12.4
10.2
9.1
9.1
8.9
6.1
7.1
7.0
5.1
4.0
3.6
2.5

Group B

70.9
50. 7
51.9
67.6
51.3
42. 0
39. 7
35. 3
15. 8
14. 5
13.9
11. 8
9.8
6. 6
5.1

41.3
27.6
23.0
28.2
20.5
31.4
23.0
18.6
12.1
10.8
9.8
7.9
3.7
3.8
2.7

60. 3
43.5
41.5
44.4
34. 5
28.8
26.1
22.9
13.2
13.0
12,7
10.2
8.2
6.8
5.3

It will be observed that there is a continuous and considerable
r
decline in the rates in each of the processes covered by the table.
The degree of this change for the better will be more evident if the
118




119

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCEi IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

year 1913 be compared with 1927, the decline between these two years
being as follows: Fabricated products from 100.3 to 13; sheets from
61.6 to 8.4; wire and its products from 59.3 to 3.5; tubes from 27.2 to
2.5; miscellaneous steel products, group A, from 70.9 to 5.1; miscella­
neous steel products, group B, from 41.3 to 2.7; all processes from 60.3
to 5.3.
Table 9 presents the same data as that in Table 8 from the standpoint of accident causes:
T a b le

9.— A ccident freq u en cy rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure) f o r a selected
group o f iron and steel plants, 1913 to 1927, by year and cause

Accident cause

1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927

M achinery____________ 7.3 5.0 4.9 5.4 4.5 4.0 3.3 3.4
Working machines. 3.8 2.7 2.6 2.6 2.0
1.8 1.4 1.5
.9
1.0
Caught in_____ 2.5
1.8 1.7 1.7 1.2 1.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
Breakage_____
.1
.1
.1
M oving mate­
.7
.4
.8
.8
.8
.4
.6
rial in----------- 1.2
Cranes, etc________ 3.5 2.3 2.3 2.8 2.5 2.2 1.9 1.9
Overhead_____ 2.8 1.9 2.0 2.5 2.2 1.9 1.6 1.5
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
Locomotive- __
Other hoisting
.1
apparatus-__ .4
.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1
1.9
1.6 1.7 1.7 1.3 1.2
Vehicles_______________ 2.3
Hot substances________ 5.4 3.6 3.7 4.5 3.6 3.0 2.8 2.5
#2
.3
.3
Electricity_________
.5
.4
.2
.4
.3
Hot metal_________ 3.6 2.1 2.3 3.0 2.5 2.1 2J) 1.8
Hot water, etc____ 1.3
1.1
1.2 1.1
.8
.6
.6
.4
Falls of persons. ___ __ 4.5 4.1 3.5 3.7 3.2 2.8 2.8 2.5
.3
.1
.1
.1 ., .1
.2
From ladders_____
.1
.1
#2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
From scaffolds____
.3
.2
.2
.1
’1
.
.1
Into openings___
.1
.1
.3
Due to insecure
2.6
2.3 2.3 2.1
footing__________ 3.8 3.7 3.1 3.1
Falling material not
.4
.7
.3
.4
otherwise specified— 1.2
.7
.6
Handling _______ ___ 26.7 19.4 20.6 21.5 15.7 12.8 11.7 10.4
Dropped in han­
dling- __________ 11.2 7.3 7.6 8.4 6.1
5.5 5.0 4.4
2. 1 1.7 1.7
1.3
Caught between _ __ 3.4 2.6 2.6 3.1
.9
.7
Trucks_______r____ 1.9
1.0 1.4
1.4 1.2
.6
1.4 1.4 1.1
Lifting __________ 2.5 2.3 2.5 2.5 2.0
Flying from tools_ .2
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
Sharp points and
1.5
edges____________ 3.8 3.4 3.8 3.1 2. 2 1.5 1.3
Tools______________ 3.7 2.6 2.6 2.9 2.0 1.7 1.4 1.4
Miscellaneous_________ 12.9 8.8 6.5 7.0 5.4 4.6 4.1 3.1
.2
.1
Asphyxiating gas _ _ .3
.2
1
.1
.1
.1
Flying, not strik­
ing eye------- ------.8
.6
.6
.4
.5
.3
.3
.5
Flying,
striking
eye---------------------- 2.9 2.1
1.7 1.9 1.6 1.6 1.3 1.1
H eat_______________
.9
.8
.4
.4
.2
.1
.1
.1
Other ____________ 8.0 5.1 3.7 4.1 3.2 2.2 2.2
1.5

1.8
.8
.6
.1

2.2
1.1
.8
.1

2.3
1.0
.7
(0

2.0
.8
.6
0)

1.6
.7
.5
0)

1.5
.7
.5
0

1.3
.5
.4
0)

.1
1.0
.8
.2

.3
1.2
1.0
.1

.2
1.3
1.1
.1

.2
1.2
.9
.1

.2
.9
.7
.1

.2
‘9
.
.7
.1

.1
.8
.6
.1

.1
.5
1.2
.1
.8
.2
1.7
.1
.1
.1

.1
.4
1.1
.1
.7
.3
1.5
.1
.1
0)

.1
.6
1.2
0)
.9
.2
1.4
.1
.1
.1

.1
.5
.9
.1
.6
.2
1.4
.1
.1
0)

.1
.3
.6
0)
.4
.1
1.1
0)
.1
0)

.1
.3
.5
.1
.4
.1
1.0
.1
.1
0)

.1
.2
.4
0)
.3
.1
.7
C)
1
.1
0)

1.4

1.3

1.1

1.1

.9

.8

.6

.1
6.5

.1
5.8

.1
5.5

.1
3.9

.1
,3.4

.1
2.9

0)
2.0

2.6
.7
.5
.8
.1

2.6
.7
.4
.8
.1

2.3
.7
.4
.5
.1

1.9
.5
.2
.3
0)

1.5
.4
.2
.3
0)

1.2
.3
.2
.3
0)

.9
.2
.1
.2
0)

1.1
.8
1.3
.5

.6
.7
1.9
0)

.6
.8
1.8
.1

.3
.6
1.6
(0

.4
.5
1.1
G)

.4
.5
.4
0)

.3
.3
.6
0)

.2

.1

.3

.2

.1

.1

.1

.5
.1
.6

.4
1
1.3

.2
0)
1.1

.3
.1
1.0

.2
0)
.8

.1
0)
.2

.1
0)
.3

Grand total_____ 60. 3 43. 5 41. 5 44.4 34.5 28. 8 26.3 22.0 13.3 13.0 12.8 10.2

8.2

6.8

5.3

.

.

1 Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.

It is quite possible for an unsatisfactory condition to be concealed
in some portion of an experience which had been inadequately
analyzed. To determine whether accident reduction effort had been
effective in all phases of the various processes, rates were determined
for the causes of accident. This brought out the pervasive character
of the accident-prevention efforts and also served to indicate the
relative importance of the causes. One rather striking fact comes to
light in this presentation— namely, that machinery still has a degree
of importance as a cause of accident. It has been quite customary
to regard the machine as being now so well guarded as to be almost
nonhazardous. The table shows that while the machine is now much




STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

120

less of a menace than formerly it has not gained in safety as compared
with other causes.
The foregoing represents the high-water mark thus far attained in
controlling the accident situation in the iron and steel industry.
Attention will now be given to the industry as a whole.
THE INDUSTRY AND ITS DEPARTMENTS

Table 10 presents the facts for such departments as could be
treated in the manner shown. Accident frequency and severity are
shown by means of a 5-year moving average; that is, each year is
considered as ending a 5-year period. For example, for the five
years ending with 1911 all the departments shown in the table have
an average frequency rate of 69.2 and a severity rate of 5. When
the 5-year period ending in 1927 is reached the frequency rate has
dropped to 24.7 and the severity rate to 2.4 The decline is remark­
ably regular. This makes more conspicuous the unfortunate excep­
tion in the foundries. It is clear from the experience of some of the
foundry companies and of certain individual plants that it is possible
to conduct foundry operations just as safely as any other branch of
the iron and steel industry. It is therefore disappointing to find that,
from year to year, when rates are calculated, the foundries show little
or no improvement.
T able

10.— Accident rates in the iron and steel industry, by department and period

Period

All de­
part­
ments

Blast
furnaces

Bessemer
con­
verters

Open
hearth

Foun­
dries

H eavyrolling
mills

Plate
mills

Sheet
mills

Frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

1907-1911.........................
1908-1912........................
1909-1913.........................
1910-1914........................
1911-1915......................
1912-1916........................
1913-1917................... 1914-1918........................
1915-1919-____ _______
1916-1920...............
1917-1921_____________
1918-1922_____________
1919-1923_____________
1920-1924...................
1921-1925.......................
1922-1926.........................
1923-1927.......................

69.2
65.1
62.1
59.2
53.3
51.3
48.2
43.6
41.5
41.1
39.5
36.5
34.9
33.6
31.3
29.9
24.7

76.1
67.7
62.4
62.3
50.3
47.8
41.4
40.5
39.0
38.0
36.3
34.0
32.9
30.7
29.0
28.7
24.6

101.5
79.5
92.3
89.8
65.0
76.1
68.3
60.7
57.7
53.1
47.0
39.9
30.5
24.9
17.0
16.7
13.5

84.2
79.5
78.6
75.0
67.6
64.8
58.4
53.5
50.5
50.2
44.8
41.3
33.0
32.9
29.9
28.3
22.9

60.1
61.5
65.1
63.6
59.3
57.8
60.4
57.0
61.0
61.0
63.1
60.4
61.7
62.7
63.1
62.8
55.1

61.0
57.0
51.7
46.1
39.4
37.3
32.1
31.1
32.4
31.4
29.9
27.6
23.8
21.2
18.1
16.6
13.2

69.4
60.8
55.9
49.9
44.7
41.5
36.6
39.8
39.2
38.4
37.6
36.7
31.4
29.4
26.8
25.6
19.2

44.1
47.9
49.1
51.1
48.1
47.4
41.3
35.8
32.7
33.7
33.4
35.237.2
35.1
33.2
30.6
22.9

5.1
4.1
3.8
3.9
3.1
2.8
2.6
2.6
2.5
2.6
2.5
2.5
2.4
2.4
2.6
2.6
2.2

3.1
2.8
3.0
2.6
2.2
2.3
2.1
1.8
1.5
1.8
1.7
1.8
1.9
2.1
1.9
1.8
1.0

Severity rates (per 1,000 hours’ exposure)

1907-1911........................
1908-1912......................
1909-1913.......................
1910-1914.......................
1911-1915........................
1912-1916............... ..
1913-1917........................
1914-1918.....................
1915-1919........................
1916-1920........................
1917-1921.........................
1918-1922.........................
1919-1923.........................
1920-1924........................
1921-1925.........................
1922-1926.........................
1923-1927.........................




5.0
4.3
4.4
4.1
3.6
3.7
3.7
3.5
3.6
3.5
3.4
3.1
3.0
2.8
2.7
2.8
2.4

10.6
8.8
8.3
7.0
6.2
5.8
5.6
5.4
5.8
5.7
5.7
5.5
5.0
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.1

7.6
7.4
6.7
6.4
5.3
6.1
7.1
7.3
6.9
6.3
5.4
4.2
3.2
2.6
3.2
4.0
3.7

7.5
6.6
6.8
6.6
5.8
5.5
5.1
5.8
6.5
6.3
5.8
5.3
4.2
4.2
4.0
4.6
4.3

2.7
3.1
3.5
3.6
3.3
3.1
3.3
3.2
3.4
3.2
3.2
2.7
2.7
2.8
3.1
3.2
2.9

4.4
4.2
4.0
3.6
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.4
3.9
3.5
3.3
2.9
2.4
2.3
2.6
2.6
2.4

121

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

The trend of accident frequency and severity in the industry as a
whole and in the various departments thereof, as shown by the
experience in the three 5-year periods from 1910 to 1924 and in the
3-year period from 1925 to 1927, is next presented. The 3-year
period is brought into comparison with the three 5-year periods in
order to show the almost universal downward trend of accident rates
in representative departments in the industry more accurately than
would be accomplished if the records for 1925, 1926, and 1927 were
brought into comparison as separate years. A statistical picture of
a group of years is always more satisfactory in a historical presenta­
tion of accident data than a record giving each year by itself, because
the inequalities produced by unusual circumstances, such as a catas­
trophic occurrence, are smoothed out where a group of years is
utilized.
It will be noted that the periods are consecutive and not over­
lapping, as in Table 10. Since the rates for these four periods are,
on account of the greater volume of accident cases included, more
reliable than the annual record they will be made the basis of com­
ment, as will also the situation in 1926 and 1927.
Charts showing the accident trend from 1910 to 1927 for the indus­
try as a whole and for four selected departments are also presented.
These charts indicate the trend of accident frequency and severity
rates as expressed by index numbers, using the year 1910 as the base,
or 100. Because of the difference in the method of determining these
rates, the one in terms of a million man-hours and the other in terms
of a thousand man-hours, the charting thereof would require a scale
that is too extended to be practicable here. The reduction of these
rates to index numbers avoids this difficulty, and the method shows
very clearly the relative changes in the two rates.
THE INDUSTRY

The following figures show the downward trend in frequency and
severity rates for the industry as a whole:
Frequency rate

1910-1014___________________________________________59.
1915-1919___________________________________________41.
1920-1924___________________________________________33.
1925-1927___________________________________________24.

2
6
6
5

Severity rate

4.
3.
2.
2.

1
6
8
5

In 1926 frequency declined and severity increased; in 1927 both
frequency and severity rates declined.
Chart 1 indicates the trend of accident rates in the industry as a
whole. It will be noticed that the downward trend, which appears
both in frequency and severity, is more pronounced in frequency.
This relation, which is indicated in each chart except that for foundries,
is almost an invariable rule.
BLAST FURNACES

The blast furnaces have a deserved reputation for hazard. If an
extradangerous operation like this can show such improvement as
that indicated by the rates below, any department should be able to
improve its record.
Frequency rate

1 9 2 0 - 1 9 1 4 ____________________________________________________
1 9 1 5 - 1 9 1 9 ____________________________________________________
1 9 2 0 - 1 9 2 4 ____________________________________________________
1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 ____________________________________________________




6 2 .3
39. 0
30 . 7
2 4 .4

Severity rate

7 .0
6. 1
4. 5
4 3

122

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS
C hart 1

In 1926 both rates rose slightly and in 1927 frequency dropped
sharply while severity remained stationary.
BESSEMER CONVERTERS

In 1926 both frequency and severity rates rose, while in 1927 both
rates went down sharply. This is rather characteristic of the Bessemer
operations. They are of a nature particularly difficult to safeguard.
This erratic tendency is aggravated by the fact that the exposure in
this instance is rather small. The rates for the four periods are as
follows:
Frequency rate

1910-1914_________________________________________
1915-1919_________________________________________
1920-1924_________________________________________
1925-1927_________________________________________

89.
57.
24.
10.

8
7
9
4

Severity rate

6.
6.
2.
4.

4
9
6
9

OPEN-HEARTH FURNACES

Open-hearth furnaces show a drop in frequency rates of about 30
per cent in each period, while severity rates also declined in each period
except the last. In 1926 frequency declined, while severity sharply
increased; in 1927 a marked decline occurred in both rates.




ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

123

C hart 2

Frequency rate

1 9 1 0 -1 9 1 4 .___________________________________________
1915-1919_____________________________________________
1920-1924_____________________________________________
1925-1927_____________________________________________

7 5 .0
50. 5
3 2 .9
22. 1

Severity rate

6 .6
6. 5
4 .2
4. 7

FOUNDRIES

On the whole the foundries have not kept pace with the other
departments of the industry as regards reduction of accidents. This
is the more disappointing when it is observed that some foundry
organizations have made excellent records. The rates in 1926 and
in 1927 declined only slightly and during the four periods very little
improvement is shown
Frequency rate

Severity rate

1910-1914___________ ______ __________________________ _6 3 .6
1914-1919______________________
________________ 6 1 .0
1920-1924___________________ _________________________ _62. 7

3 .6
3 .4
2. 8

1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 . .................................................................. —

3. 2




.................. ..6 0 . 1

124

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

The upward trend of severity rates as compared to the sharp down­
ward trend of frequency rates is brought out in the following chart:
Ch art 3

HEAVY ROILING MILLS

The 18 years which are under consideration include the war period
with its extraordinary demands upon the industry. There can be no
doubt that under such industrial stress there is a strong tendency to
rising accident rates. It is very probable that in this case changes
which were made in these mills, in order to meet the situation created
by the war, were a considerable factor in a reduced hazard. With
the calling of many workers into war service it became necessary to
substitute mechanical devices for the manual power which had before
been used. In the development of machine design attention was given
to safety of operation, with the result that in many cases the tendency
to rising rates was held in check.
In the following rates it will be noted that during the period covering
the World War, 1915 to 1919, a marked decline occurred in the fre­
quency rate (29.7 per cent), with but slight advance in the severity
rate.




125

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
Frequency rate

1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 4 ____________________________________________________
1 9 1 5 - 1 9 1 9 ____________________________________________________
1 9 2 0 - 1 9 2 4 ____________________________________________________
1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 ____________________________________________________

46.
32.
21.
12.

1
4
2
3

Severity rate

3.
3.
2.
2.

6
9
3
5

In 1926 both rates dropped, and in 1927 a further decline occurred.
Chart 4

PLATE MILLS

In the plate mills in 1926 and again in 1927 a decline of both rates
occurred. The plate mills have shown about as regular a lowering
of the rates as has happened in any of the departments which have
been covered.
Frequency rate
Severity rate
1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 4 __________________________________________________
1 9 1 5 - 1 9 1 9 __________________________________________________
1 9 2 0 - 1 9 2 4 __________________________________________________
1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 __________________________________________________

49.
39.
29.
17.

9
2
4
5

3.
2.
2.
2.

9
5
4
4

SHEET MILLS

In 1926 both rates declined and in 1927 there was a further sharp
reduction. The rates for the four periods are as follows:
Frequency rate

1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 4 ___________________________________________________51. 1
1 9 1 5 - 1 9 1 9 __________________________________________________ 3 2 . 7
1 9 2 0 - 1 9 2 4 __________________________________________________ 3 5 . 1
1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 .......................................................................................- . 2 3 . 4
3 6 9 0 4 ° — 2 9 ---------9




Severity rate

2. 6
1. 5
2. 1
1.3

126

ST ATISTICS OF IN D U ST R IA L ACC ID E N T S
TUBE MILLS

In 1926 frequency slightly increased and severity declined some­
what; in 1927 the reverse was the case. These changes are not
sufficient to be of great significance. An abrupt drop in the fre­
quency rate is noted in the 3-year period.
Frequency rate

Severity rate

1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 4 __________________________________________________ _40. 5
1 9 1 5 - 1 9 1 9 __________________________________________________ _22. 4
1 9 2 0 - 1 9 2 4 __________________________________________________ 22. 7
1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 __________________________________________________ 16. 2

2.
1.
1.
1.

2
8
9
7

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT

Frequency rose slightly in 1926 and declined rather sharply in
1927. Severity declined in both years. There is a reduction in
frequency rate of 75.4 per cent in the period from 1925 to 1927 as
compared with the first 5-year period; and a drop of 37.5 per cent
in the severity rate.
Frequency rate

1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 4 __________________________________________________
1 9 1 5 - 1 9 1 9 __________________________________________________
1 9 2 0 - 1 9 2 5 __________________________________________________
1 9 2 5 - 1 9 2 7 __________________________________________________

_62.
_41.
_23.
_15.

Severity rate

7
3
7
4

4.
3.
2.
2.

0
5
8
5

C hart 5

IRON AMD S T E E L
TREND OF ACCIDENT RATES EXPRESSED BY INDEX NUMBERS
M ECHANICAL DEPARTMENT.
(1910 = IOO.)
■

FREQ
UENCY EXPERIENCE______
TREND
SEVERITY EXPERIENCE................
TREND

150

/
/;
/•

rso

c.
\
X
*.\

/

\

100

100
\

*
•

:\

..\\ _. •y
•
A
\

\

\
.*/
it

V

'•

V

SO

\
\

so
\V
—

—

R
f

131
1




11
93

11
95

1917

11
99

19
21

1923

192?

1927

127

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES, BY YEAR AND PERIOD

The foregoing gives an idea of the trend of events in the iron and
steel industry to the close of 1927. Those interested in further
details will find them in Table 11, which presents the experience of
the industry and its departments by years and also for the four periods.
T able

11 .— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927 ,
by departm enty year, and period

THE INDUSTRY
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

1907______
191 0
191 1
191 2
191 3
191 4
191 5
191 6
191 7
191 8
191 9
192 0
192 1
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
1910-1914.
1915-19191920-1924_
1925-1927-

Fullyear
workers

27, 632
202.157
231, 544
300,992
319, 919
256, 299
116, 224
166, 646
410,852
474,435
377, 549
442, 685
237, 094
335, 909
434, 693
389, 438
443.158
436, 261
395, 707
1,310,911
1, 545, 706
1, 839, 818
1, 275,126

Per­
T em ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

61
327
204
348
426
219
87
159
523
543
419
327
156
236
314
312
277
322
245
1, 524
1, 731
1, 345
844

106
848
931
1,241

1,200
860
372
728
1, 268
1,253
848
1,084
527
878
1,188
1,133
1,091
,
1, 033
5,080
4, 469
4,810
3, 326

1 202

Total

6, 697
6, 530
44,108 45, 283
34, 676 35, 811
54, 575 56,164
55, 556 57,182
37,390 38,469
13.481
13,940
20,655 21, 542
57, 094 58,885
54,293 56,089
41, 009 42,276
49.482 50,893
21, 279 21, 962
32,120 33, 234
41, 766 43, 268
34,481 35, 920
36,404 37, 772
31, 420 32,944
22, 060 23, 338
226, 305 232,954
186, 532 192, 732
179,128 185, 277
89, 884 94, 054

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

0.7
.5
.3
.4
.4
.3
.2
.3
.4
.4
.4
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2
.4
.4
.2
.2

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­ Tem ­
ma­
po­
Death nent rary To­
tal
disa­ disa­
bility bility

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

To­
tal

1.3
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.3
1.1
1.1
1.4
1.0
.9
1.0
.8
.7
.9
.9
1.0
.8
.9
.9
1.3
1.0
.9

78.8
72.7
49.9
60.4
57.9
48.6
38.7
41.3
46.3
38.1
40.2
37.3
29.9
31.9
32.1
29.5
27.3
24.2
18.6
57.5
40.2
32.5
23.4

80.8
74.7
51.5
62.2
59.6
50.0
40.0
43.0
47.7
39.4
41.6
38.3
30.8
33.0
33.2
30.8
28.3
25.3
19.7
59.2
41.6
33.6
24.5

4.4
3.2
1.8
2.3
2.7
1.7
1.5
1.9
2.5
2.3
2.2
1.5
1.3
1.4
1.4
1.6
1.2
1.7
1.2
2.3
2.2
1.5
1.3

2.3
1.2
.8
1.1
.8
1.0
.7
1.3
.9
.6
.7
.5
.5
.7
.8
.9
.7
.8
.8
1.0
.8
.7
.8

97.1 101.3
85.5 87.9
51.3 52.9
58.8 60.8
58.1 59.8
49.4 51.0
30.5 31.8
39.4 41.2
40.9 42.5
35.0 36.4
38.0 39.7
30.2 31.1
25.0 26.0
29.4 30.8
30.3 31.7
29.7 31.3
23.1 24.3
24.2 25.5
21.4 22.8
60.4 62.3
37.4 39.0
29.4 30.7
23.1 24.4

11.5
6.9
4.8
5.4
5.3
3.5
3.5
3.1
4.4
4.9
5.7
2.7
3.0
4.2
3.6
4.0
3.1
3.2
3.4
5.2
4.7
3.4
3.2

1.1

7.2
5.2
3.5
4.2
4.3
3.2
2.7
3.5
4.0
3.6
3.6
2.7
2.5
2.7
2.7
3.0
2.5
2.9
2.3
4.1
3.6
2.8
2.5

Blast furnaces
1908________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916-_______
1917_.............
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914.
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927___

1, 566
19, 389
21,479
27,154
31,988
26, 572
10,721
14,905
36, 202
41,449
32,889
35,470
15,486
17,933
29, 698
25,268
25,819
25,893
22,870
126, 582
136,166
123,854
74,582




9
68
52
73
86
45
19
23
79
102
94
47
23
38
53
50
40
42
39
324
317
211
121

11
68
54
87
80
77
23
57
93
72
67
58
24
35
68
66
51
63
58
366
312
251
172

456
4, 971
3, 303
4, 790
4, 749
3,935
981
1, 763
4, 430
4, 358
3, 745
3, 214
1,160
1, 586
2, 702
2,248
1, 789
1, 881
1,489
22, 578
15, 287
10,910
5,159

476
5,107
3,409
4, 950
4,945
4, 057
1,023
1,843
4,612
4,532
3,906
3,319
1,207
1, 659
2, 823
2, 364
1, 880
1,986
1, 586
23, 268
15,916
11, 372
5,452

1.9
1.2
.8
.9
.9
.6
.6
.5
.7
.8
1.0
.4
.5
.7
.6
.7
.5
.5
.6
.9
.8
.6
.5

2.7
1.7
.9
1.0
1.0
1.0
.6
.9
.9
.8
1.0
.9
.5
.4
.1
1.1
.9
.8
.7
1.0
.9
.7
.8

1.8 16.0
1.0 9.6
.8 6.5
.8 7.2
.9 7.2
.7 5.2
.4 4.5
.6 4.6
.5 5.8
.5 6.2
.5
7.2
.4 4.0
.4
3.9
.5
5.1
.5 4.2
.5
5.6
.4 4.4
.5 4. 5
.4 4.5
.8
7.0
.5
6.1
.5 4.5
.3 4.3

128
T a b le

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

11,— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927,
by department, year, and period— Continued
Bessemer converters
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

1 9 0 7 .-..........
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914.—
1915-1919.__
1920-1924-—
1925-1927-__

Fullyear
workers

967
5,070
5,155
6, 521
6, 885
4, 470
3,160
4,070
5,979
5,881
6, 555
6,907
3,440
4, 778
6,080
4, 943
4,834
4, 526
4, 344
28,101
25, 645
26,147
13, 704

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

1
20
6
9
16
6
2
13
20
13
14
5
4
2
6
7
9
6
4
57
62
24
19

5
18
24
37
42
25
21
34
21
18
18
9
6
8
20
10
10
19
7
146
112
53
36

383
1,943
1,237
1,892
1, 610
685
494
848
1,194
877
849
750
252
233
367
274
115
178
78
7,367
4, 262
1, 876
371

Total

389
1,981
1,267
1,938
1,668
716
517
894
1, 235
908
881
764
262
243
393
291
134
203
89
7, 570
4,436
1, 953
426

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

0.3
1.3
.4
.5
.8
.4
.2
1.1
1.1
.7
.7
.2
.4
.1
.3
.5
.6
.4
.3
.7
.8
.3
.5

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

Total

1.7 132.0 134.0
1.2 127.7 130.2
1.6 79.9 81.9
1.9 96.7 99.1
2.0 77.9 80.7
53.3
1.8 51.1
2.2 52.1
54.5
2.8 69.5 73.4
1.2 66.6 68.9
51.4
1.0 49.7
.9
43.2 44.8
36.2 36.8
.4
.6
24. 4 25.4
17.8
.6
16.3
1.1
20.1
21.5
.7
IS. 5 19.7
.7
7.9
9.2
1.3
13.1
14.8
6.8
.5
6.0
1.7 87.4 89.8
1.5 55.4 57.7
.7
23.9 24.9
.9
9.0
10.4

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
T o­
rary
tal
disa­
bility

2.1
7.9
2.3
2.8
4.6
2.2
1.3
6.4
6.7
4.4
4.3
1.4
2.3
.8
2.0
2.8
3.7
2.7
1.8
4.0
4.8
1.8
2.8

0.9
.9
1.1
1.0
1.2
1.2
1.4
2.1
1.3
1.0
.5
.3
.4
.5
.5
.6
.7
4.7
.3
1.1
1.1
.4
1.8

2.4 5.4
1.6 10.4
1.1 4.5
1.5 5.3
1.2 7.0
.9
4.3
.8
3.5
1.2 9.7
1.2 9.2
.8
6.2
.9
5.7
.6
2.3
.4
3.1
.3
1.6
.5
3.0
.3
3.7
.2
4.6
.3
7.7
.2
2.3
1.3 6.4
1.0 6.9
.4
2.6
.3
4.9

1.6 101.3 104.5
1.8 103. 6 106.4
1.4 58.8 60.8
1.9 77.6 80.4
1.5 70.7 72.8
1.1 64.3 65.8
1.1 46.5 48.0
1.3 50.3 52.0
1.3 49.5 51.5
1.3 50.3 52.5
1.0 45.6 47.4
.8 37.0 38.3
.6 28.2 29.0
.8 32.6 33.8
1.0 28.6 30.2
1.0 28.9 30.4
1.1 25. 8 27. 3
1.0 20.0 21.8
1.0 15.8 17.2
1. 5 72. 8 75. 0
1.2 48.6 50. o
.9
31.5 32.9
1.0 20.6 22.1

9.3
6.0
3.4
5.3
3.4
2.2
2.7
2.5
4.4
5.4
4.7
3.0
1.4
2.2
3.4
3.0
2.2
4.6
2.5
4.0
4.4
2.7
3.1

4.0
2.4
1.1
1.9
1.4
1.5
.9
.8
1.2
1.4
1.3
.8
.4
.9
1.1
.9
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.2
.9
1.2

1.1 14.4
1.4 9.8
.9
5.4
1.0 8.2
1.0 5.8
.8 4.5
.6 4.2
.9 4.2
6.4
.8
7.9
1.1
.8
6.8
.5
4.3
.5
2.3
.5
3.6
.7
5.2
.5
4.4
.5
3.7
.5
6.3
.4 4.3
1.0 6.6
.9
6.5
.6 4.2
.4 4.7

1.1
1.5
1.4
1.9
1.6
1.2
.5
l! 6
1.1
1.1

2.1
.8
2.7
2.1
1.7
1.6

0.3
1.0
1.0
1.5
1.2
1.0
.2
.6
1.0
1.0

1.0
.6
.6
.8
.8
.7
.4
.7
.9
.7

Open-hearth furnaces
1907________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927__
1910-1914___
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927-

2, 987
9, 739
10, 718
17,355
20, 604
12, 877
5, 969
9, 654
21,457
26,410
22,685
28,823
12, 783
19, 805
24,917
21, 493
22,837
22, 727
19,143
71, 293
86,175
107, 820
64, 707

14
29
18
47
35
14
8
12
47
71
53
43
9
22
42
32
25
51
24
143
191
148
100

14
53
45
99
95
41
20
37
86
103
71
70
21
46
74
67
73
67
60
333
317
278
200

908
3, 028
1, 890
4,039
4, 368
2,484
832
1,458
3,187
3, 983
3,103
3,164
1,082
1,936
2,145
1,864
1, 769
1, 322
908
15, 809
12, 563
10,191
3, 999

936
3,110
1,953
4,185
4,498
2,539
860
1, 507
3, 320
4,157
3. 227
3, 277
1,112
2,004
2, 261
1,963
1, 867
1, 440
992
16,285
13, 071
10, 617
4,299

1.6
1.0
.6
.9
.6
.4
.4
.4
.7
.9
.8
.5
.2
.4
.6
.5
.4
.8
.4

.7
.7
.5
.5

Foundries
1907________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915
1916..... ..........
1917_.............
1918...............

939
16, 885
13,499
23, 294
24,605
17, 634
1, 309
1, 231
31,805
32,181




1
7
18
23
22
14
1
45
23

3
78
57
135
118
61
2
6
101
106

179
2, 615
1,970
4,512
5, 236
3,432
118
145
6,810
5, 482

183
2, 700
2,045
4,670
5, 376
3,507
120
152
6,956
5, 611

0.4
.1
.4
.3
.3
.3
.3
.5
.2

63.5
51.6
48.6
64.6
70.9
64.9
30.0
39.3
71.4
56.8

65.0
53.2
50.4
66.8
72.8
66.4
30. 5
4.1.2
73.0
58.1

1.6
2.8
1.5

3A
2A
4.2
4A
3.1
3.5
A
2.{
4 .;
3.5

129

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
T a b le

11.— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927,
by department, year, and period— Continued
Foundries— Continued
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

191 9
192 0
192 1
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
1910-1914.
1915-1919.
1920-1924.
1925-1927.

Fullyear
workers

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

Total

62
97
34
59
126
143
128
178
106
449
277
459
412

4,125
6, 798
2,799
4,205
7, 323
6, 984
7, 032
7,580
4, 893
18, 298
16,965
28,109
19, 505

24,220
35, 300
15, 338
22, 770
38, 660
37, 325
35, 570
41, 501
31,136
95, 917
92, 746
149, 441
108, 207

4,048
6,688
2,756
4,134
7,171
6, 820
6, 877
i 7, 376
1 4, 769
; 17, 765
| 16, 604
i 27, 569
I 19, 022

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

0.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.3
.3
.2
.2

Tem ­
po­
T o­
rary
tal
disa­
bility

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

56.8
64.2
60.6
61.6
63.2
62.4
65.9
60.6
52.8
63.6
61.0
62.7
60.1

1.2
.7
1.2
1.1
1.4
1.1
1.5
1.3
1.2
1.8
1.8
1.1
1.3

0.8

.9
1.2
1.3
1.2
1.4
1.1
1.6
1.0
1.0
1.3

55.7
63.2
59.7
60.5
61.8
60.9
64.5
59.0
51.5
61.7
59.7
61.5
58.6

0.7
1.2
1.5
1.0
.5
.4
.9
.9
1.4
.6
1.0
1.1
1.1
1.1
.8
1.0

59.5
85.8
86.5
43.9
49.9
44.8
39.8
34.6
36.4
23.2
24.2
16.0
30.0
65.6
35.3
23.1

60.3
87.4
88.4
45.2
50.5
45.3
40.7
36.1
37.8
24.0
25.4
17.2
31.1
67.0
36.3
24.2

0.6
2.6
2.1
2.1
.4
.5
3.7

1. 7
1. 1
.6

0.6
.5
1.0
.7
.5
.2
1.0
.8
.7
.2
.9
.4
1.3
.7
.6
.8

0.7
1.1
1.0
.7
.7
.5
.6
.5
.6
.5
.4
.3
.4
.7
.5
.4

64.0
76.5
43.9
49.1
36.2
25.0
27.8
31.7
29.0
32.0
32.4
26.3
16.5
17.2
17.7
20.0
15.0
9.5
9.0
44.4
30.8
20.2
11.2

64.3
79.2
45.4
50.3
37.6
26.8
29.4
33.4
30.9
33.5
33.8
27.0
17.1
18.7
18.6
21.5
16.3
10.6
10.0
46.2
32.4
21.2
12.3

3.5
4.0
1.4
2.3
1.7
1.5
2.8
1.4
2.9
2.4
2.3
1.2
.6
1.2
1.0
2.7
1.6
1.0
1.4
2.1
2.4
1.3
1.3

0.3
1.5
.9
.9
.6
1.0
1.0
1.3
1.0
.9
1.1
.4
.3
.9
.8
.8
1.1
.8
.7
.9
1.0
.6
.9

1.0
1.0
.7
.7
.6
.4
.3
.5
.5
.5
.5
.4
.3
.4
.3
.4
.3
.2
.3
.6
.5
.4
.3

0.9

Bar mills
191 5
191 6
191 7
191 8
191 9
192 0
192 1
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
1915-1919
1920-1924
1925-1927

3, 232
3,042
7, 472
5, 734
4,601
3, 880
1, 912
3, 780
4,003
4, 093
4, 471
3, .042
2,387
24, 081
17, 666
9, 900

7
11
34
18
7
5
5
10
17
7
13
10
8
77
44
31

577
783
1,940
756
689
525
228
392
443
285
324
146
215
4, 745
1, 869
685

585
798
1, 982
780
697
531
233
409
460
294
339
157
223
4, 842
1,923
719

0.1
.4
.4
.3
1
1

.
.

.6
.2
.2
.1
.3
.2
.1

1.0
.9
.7

Heavy-rolling mills
1907________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________ 1
1914________ !
1915________
1916________ 1
1917________ j
1918________ ;
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914.__
1915-1919.__
1920-1924-__
1925-1927.__

4, 556
9, 442
12,409
16, 258
17. 569
11, 985
7,148
10,076
20, 530
19, 807
17, 605
20, 787
9,000
14, 574
16. 602
13,162
16, 553
14, 553
18,171
67, 663
75,166
74,944
49, 277

8
19
9
20
16
10
10
7
30
24
20
12
3
9
8
18
13
7
13
74
91
50
33




10
57
48
41
60
55
24
44
87
67
53
34
15
56
36
39
50
38
41
261
275
180
129

874
2,167
1, 636
2, 395
1, 910
899
596
959
1,784
1, 900
1, 711
1, 638
485
752
882
789
747
417
494
9, 007
6, 950
4, 5^6
1, 608

892
2, 243
1, 693
2, 456
1,986
964
630
1,010
1, 901
1,991
1,784
1,684
503
817
926
846
810
462
548
9, 342
7,316
4, 776
1, 820

0.6
.7
.2
.4
.3
.3
.5
.2
.5
.4
.4
.2
.1
.2
.2
.5
.3
.2
.2
.4
.4
.2
'2

0.7
2.0
1.3
.8
1.1
1. 5
1.1
1.5
1.4
1.1
1.0
.5
.5
1.3
.7
1.0
1.0
.9
.8
1.3
1.2
.8
.9

1.9
4.2
4.0
3.5
1.6
1.2
1.6
5.0
1.3
1.7
2.2
1.4
1.7
3.1
2.2
1.8

130
T able

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS
11 .— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927 ,
by department, year , and period— Continued
Plate mills
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours' exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

1907________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914,__
1915-1919.__
1920-1924.__
1925-1927.__

Fullyear
workers

1,915
3,287
4,390
5,128
5,430
3, 476
42,086
4,681
6, 764
9, 650
11, 892
11, 928
4, 580
6,198
8, 731
6, 454
5, 734
7, 306
8, 550
27, 711
35,073
37,891
21, 590

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

4
7
5
2
3
2
1
3
4
8
9
9
3
2
5
3
6
4
5
19
25
22
15

12
27
15
25
25
13
9
15
22
19
24
23
7
26
24
18
15
25
19
105
89
98
59

637
602
590
893
725
319
121
436
766
1,446
1,247
1,147
318
581
662
506
370
396
295
3,129
4,016
3, 214
1,061

Total

653
636
610
920
753
334
131
454
792
1,473
1,280
1,179
328
609
691
527
391
425
319
3, 253
4,130
3, 334
1,135

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

0.7
.7
.4
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.3
.3
.2
.1
.2
.2
.4
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

Total

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
T o­
rary
tal
disa­
bility

2.1 110.9 113.7
2.7 61.1 64.5
1.1 44.8 46.3
1.6 58.0 59.7
1.5 44.5 46.2
1.2 30.6 32.0
1.4 19.3 20.9
1.1 31.0 32.3
1.1 37.7 39.0
.7 49.9 50.9
35.0 36.0
.7
32.1 33.0
.6
23.1 23.8
.5
1.4 31.2 32.7
25.3 26.4
.9
27.1
.9
26.1
21.5 22.8
.9
19.4
18.1
1.1
12.4
11.5
.7
1.6 48.0 49.9
38.2 39.2
.8
28.3 29.4
.9
16.4 17.5
.9

4.2
4.3
2.3
.8
1.1
1.1
1.0
1.3
1.2
1.7
1.5
1.5
1.3
.6
1.1
.9
2.1
1.1
1.2
1.8
1.4
1.2
1.4

3.7
1.6
1.0
2.0
1.2
1.0
.6
.7
.9
.6
.5
.6
.3
.9
1.2
.6
1.2
1.0
.5
1.4
.6
.8
.7

1.2
.7
.6
.8
.6
.5
.3
.5
.5
.7
.5
.4
.4
.5
.4
.5
.4
.4
.2
.7
.5
.4
.3

9.1
6.6
3.9
3.6
2.9
2.6
1.9
2.5
2.6
3.0
2.5
2.5
2.0
2.0
2.7
2.6
3.7
2.5
1.9
3.9
2.5
2.4
2.4

0.5
2.2

0.6
.4
.1
.8
1.1
1.2
2.8
1.5

.6
.7
1.0

46.2
45.5
28.8
40.3
57.6
63.9
49.9
42.5
38.8
42.6
60.3
43.8

.4
.8
1.5

0.6
.6
.4
.6
1.0
1.2
.9
.8
.9
.6
1.1
.9

1.7
3.2
.5
2.4
2.1
2.4
3. 7
3.5
.9
1.9
1.9
2.4

1.6
2.1
1.5
1.1
1.4
.8
1.0
.6
1.1
.8
.8
1.0
.1
1.5
.9
.7

37.0 38.6
34.6 36.7
47.1 49.1
35.9 37.5
24.9 26.6
30.7 31.6
20.0 21.0
24.7 25.4
20.2 21.4
15.0
15.9
16.7 17.7
15.5 16.8
11.6 11.8
37.7 39.5
22.7 1 23.7
14.7 15.6

0.7
1.9
1.4
1.0
1.4
.5
.7
.5
1.3
.7
1.0
.7
.1
1.3
.8
.6

0.5
.5
.5
.6
.5
.4
.3
.5
.3
.4
.3
.4
.3
.5
.4
.3

1.2
2.4
4.7
4.7
3.5
1.4
1.0
1.8
2.2
1.8
2.7
2.7
1.2
3.6
1.7
2.2

Puddling mills
1917________
1918________
1919 . . .
1920________
1923
1924 . . .
1925
1926________
1927 .
.
1917-1919.__
1920-1924
1925-1927.

4,129
2,712
1, 619
2,007
1,620
814
1,108
1,591
1,040
8,460
4,406
3, 739

1
3
1

1
4
1

10
4
1
10
3
4
6
5
15
9
11

572
370
140
243
280
156
166
204
121
1,082
797
491

583
377
141
254
283
160
172
210
121
1,101
806
503

0.1
.4
.2

.2
.2
.1

0.8
.5
.2
1.7
.6
1.6
1.8
1.0

47.1
46.4
29.0
42.2
58.2
65.5
51.7
43.7
38.8
43.4
61.0
44.9

1.0

1.2
.9
.5

Rod mills
191 5
191 6
191 7
191 8
191 9
192 0
192 1
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
.
192 6
192 7
1915-1919.
1920-1924.
1925-1927.




2,062
2,493
4,951
3, 249
2,463
3,729
2,099
2,645
3, 224
2, 828
2,907
2, 569
2,433
15, 218
14, 425
7,909

7
5
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
14
4
5

10
16
23
11
10
9
6
5
10
7
7
8
1
70
37
16

229
259
699
350
184
344
126
196
189
127
146
119
84
1, 721
982
349

239
275
729
366
196
354
132
202
200
135
155
129
86
1,805
1,023
370

0.5
.5
.3
.1

.1
.1
.1
.2
.3
.1
.3
.1
.2

2.8
3.1
1.6
.5
.8
.6
.7
1.4
1.6
.8
1.8
.6
1.3

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
T able

131

11.— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927 ,
by department, year, and period— Continued
Sheet mills
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

1907________
1910..... .........
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923..............
1924________
1925________
1926-.............
1927________
1910-1914-__
1915-1919-__
1920-1924-__
1925-1927-__

Fullyear
workers

Per­
T em ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

2,211
18,501
29,710
32, 087
25,938
22,187
16,266
24, 722
26, 855
17, 278
19, 214
24, 279
15,845
24,391
29,814
28,247
32,043
31, 713
34,896
128, 423
104,335
121, 552
98,652

2
28
9
19
21
11
7
13
11
3
3
14
5
10
14
7
10
6
4
88
37
50
20

8
52
71
67
67
51
23
62
38
17
32
59
38
66
61
54
56
55
47
308
172
278
158

274
3,310
3,625
5,497
3, 717
3,113
1,901
2,655
2,687
937
1,854
2,979
1, 702
2,951
2,390
2,457
3,096
2,100
1, 537
19,262
10,034
12,479
6,733

Total

284
3,390
3,705
5, 583
3,805
3,175
1,931
2,730
2,736
957
1,889
3,052
1,745
3,027
2,465
2,518
3,162
2,161
1,588
19, 657
10,243
12, 807
6,911

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

0.3
.5
.1
.2
.3
.2
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
0)
.2
.1
.1
.1

Tem ­
po­
Torary
tal
disa­
bility

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
rary T o­
disa­ tal
bility

1.2
.9
.8
.7
.9
.8
.5
.8
.5
.3
.6
.8
.8
.9
.7
.6
.6
.6
.4
.9
.5
.8
.5

43.3
59.6
40.7
57.1
47.8
46.8
39.0
35.8
33.4
18.1
32.0
40.1
35.8
40.3
27.6
29.0
32.2
22.1
14.6
50.0
32.1
24.2
22.8

44.8
61.0
41.6
58.0
49.0
*47.8
39.6
36.8
34.0
18.5
32.7
41.0
36.7
41.3
28.5
29.7
32.9
22.8
15.0
51.1
32.7
35.1
23.4

1.8
2.9
.7
1.2
1.6
.9
.9
.6
.8
.3
.3
1.2
.6
.8
1.0
.5
.6
.4
.2
1.4
.7
.8
.4

1.9
.8
.7
.7
.5
.5
.3
.5
.6
.5
.4
.7
.5
.8
.7
.7
.5
.5
.4
.6
.4
.7
.5

0.4
.6
.4
.7
.6
.6
.5
.5
.5
.2
.4
.8
.5
.9
.5
.5
.6
.3
.2
.6
.4
.6
.4

4.1
4.3
1.8
2.6
2.7
2.0
1.7
1.6
1.9
1.0
1.1
2.3
1.6
2.5
2.2
1.7
1.7
1.2
.8
2.6
1.5
2.1
1.3

0.7
.9
1.3
1.2
1.3
.9
1.0
.8
.9
.7
.7
1.0
.8
.7
.7
1.0
.8
1.0
.8
1.1
.8
.9
.9

95.5
54.9
50.7
42.0
28.0
28.6
8.5
12.5
33.1
20.3
20.4
31.9
19.1
22.7
17.4
17.2
14.9
15.9
14.6
39.2
21.4
21.7
15.2

96.4
55.9
52.0
43.7
29.6
29.7
9.6
13.4
34.3
21.1
21.3
33.1
20.0
23.5
18.2
18.4
15.8
17.0
15.6
40.5
22.4
22.7
16.2

1.0
.6
.2
1.3
1.6
1.0
.6
.4
1.7
.9
1.0
1.1
.5
.6
.6
1.2
.8
.6
1.0
1.0
1.0
.9
.8

0.6
.4
.8
.8
.7
.6
.6
.3
.5
.4
.6
.5
.5
.6
.6
.6
.6
.7
.4
.7
.5
.6
.6

1.5
.7
.5
.5
.4
.4
.2
.3
.4
.3
.3
.5
.4
.4
.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.5
.3
.4
.3

3.1
1.7
1.5
2.6
2.7
2.0
1.4
1.0
2.6
1.6
1.9
2.1
1.4
1.6
1.5
2.1
1.7
1.5
1.6
2.2
1.8
1.9
1.7

1.1 112.3 113.7
1.2 53.2 54.7
1.1 67.8 69.1
1.2 72.0 73.5
1.1 51.6 52.9
1.1 36.2 37.5
1.0 38.0 39.2
.7
50.8 51.6
.7
36.0 36.9

2.1
1.5
1.5
2.0
1.0
.9
1.2
.7
1.2

1.6
1.1
1.0
1.1
.8
.5
.6
.7
.5

1.3
.7
.9
1.0
.7
.4
.7
.7
.5

Tube mills
1907________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914-_ .
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927___

2; 007
9,767
13,676
17,080
18,909
13,906
7,109
11,355
19,819
18,499
18,326
22,666
14,622
19, 535
24, 766
22,655
25,511
32,089
26,794
73,338
75,108
104,577
84,394

1
3
1
10
15
7
2
2
17
8
9
13
4
6
8
14
10
9
13
36
38
45
32

4
25
53
60
72
39
21
26
51
41
39
71
35
40
54
68
64
95
61
249
178
268
220

575
1,608
2,080
2,154
1,586
1,195
182
425
1,967
1,127
1,127
2,166
840
1,332
1,292
1,185
1,142
1, 524
1,175
8,623
4,825
6,815
3,841

580
1,636
2,134
2,224
1, 673
1,241
205
453
2,035
1,176
1,172
2,250
879
1, 378
1,354
1, 267
1,216
1,628
1,249
8,908
5,041
7,128
4,093

0.2
.1
0)
.5
.3
.2
.1
.1
.3
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1

Unclassified rolling mills
1910-.............
1911-.............
1912__...........
1913..............
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918..............

14,434
21,231
22,909
23,382
22,873
4,367
8,082
27,978
37,163

15
16
16
24
11
2
5
10
22

49
76
76
84
75
14
25
60
74

i Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.




4,861
3, 388
4.660
5,051
3, 541
475
922
4,265
4,015

4,925
3,480
4,752
5,159
3, 627
491
952
4,335
4 111
L

0.3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

132
T able

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS
11. — Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927,
by department, year, and period— Continued
Unclassified rolling mills— Continued
Frequency rates (per
expo1,000,000 hours’ <
sure)

Number of cases
Year or
period

Fullyear
workers

1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927...............
1910-1914.__
1915-1919._ .
1920-1924.__
1925-1927_—

25,106
21,055
12,068
19. 382
26, 357
21, 664
26, 353
25, 268
21,126
104, 829
102, 696
109, 555
72, 747

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility
14
16
4
10
11
11
9
5*
14
82
53
55
28

45
68
36
59
92
77
59
66
105
360
218
345
230

Total

2,967
2, 785
1, 479
2, 416
2,830
2,193
1,836
1, 630
1,246
21, 501
12,644
12, 631
4,712

3,026
2, 869
1, 519
2, 485
2,933
2, 277
1,904
1, 701
1,365
21,943
12,915
13,027
4,970

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility
0.2
.3
.1
.2
.1
.2
.1
.1
.2
.3
.2
.2
.1

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)
Per­ Tem ­
ma­
po­
To­
Death nent rary
tal
disa­ disa­
bility bility

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

Total

39.4
44.1
40.9
41.5
35.8
33. 5
23.2
23.5
19.7
71.8
41.0
39.4
21.6

40.2
45.4
42.0
42.7
37.1
34.9
24.1
24.5
21.6
73.3
41.9
39.6
22.8

1.1
1.5
.7
1.0
.8
1.0
.7
.4
1.3
1.7
1.0
1.0
.8

0.4
.9
.9
.9
1.3
1.3
.5
.7
1.3
1.1
.5
1.1
.8

0.6
.5
.7
.7
.6
.6
.4
.4
.4
.9
.6
.6
.4

1.9 91.5 94.4
1.3 149.2 150.9
1.6 55.4 57.1
1.4 79.2 81.0
1.1 80.6 82.1
1.2 65.6 67.0
1.3 41.1 42.7
49.3
1.7 47.1
.9
59.2 60.4
.3
58.0 58.6
.5 47.3 47.9
54.2
1.3 52.7
1.2 50.9 52.2
.8
69.6 70.7
.8
59.4 60.3
1.0 28.3 29.4
.7
18.2 19.0
1.4 16.4 18.0
.6
6.4
7.1
1.3 78.3 79.9
.7
54.3 55.2
1.0 51.5 52.7
.9
13.8 14.8

5.8
2.5
.7
2.1
2.2
1.2
1.6
2.8
1.8
1.5
.7
1.6
.8
1.7
.8
.5
.4
.9
.5
1.7
1.5
1.0
.6

2.9
1.0
1.0
.9
.8
1.0
.6
.7
.6
.5
.3
1.1
.7
.8
.7
.8
.9
1.0
.4
.9
.5
.8
.8

0.8
1.9
.6
.8
.8
.7
.7
.9
.7
.6
.5
.6
.6
.8
.7
.5
.4
.4
.2
.8
.6
.6
.3

1.5
1.2
1.8

1.2
2.6
1.4
.9
1.1

1.6
1.1
.3
.8
1.0
1.7
.9
1. 5
.9
.4
1.1
.6
1.1
1.2
.8

1.3
.7
.6
.7
.7
.9
.7
1.2
.8
.7
.5
.7
.9
.9
.7

4.4
3.0
2.7
1. 5
3.9
5.2
2.6
2.7
3.3
1.1
2.8
3.9
3.4
3.0
2.6

1.0
.6
.6
.9
.4

2.6
2.0
2.5
1.1
1.3

0.7
.6
.7
.7
,5

4.3
3.2
3.8
2.7
2,2

0.6
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.2
1.2
.8
.9
1.7
1.2
.7
1.0
1.1

2.1
2.9
2.3
2.6
2.7
2.9
1.6
1.5
3.0
3.7
2.1
2.7
2.0

Fabricating shops
1907________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918 _______
1919________
1920._
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924. .............
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1924...
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927___

2,081
8, 713
19,530
28,988
30,470
20,837
3,818
4,980
23, 614
29,166
19.407
17; 216
12,908
16,184
22, 547
10, 626
15, 718
15,467
14. 523
108, 538
80.985
89,880
45, 708

6
11
8
32
34
13
3
7
21
22
6
14
5
14
9
5
4
7
4
98
59
47
14

12
33
92
119
104
77
15
25
67
29
27
68
45
41
52
63
35
64
25
425
163
269
124

571
3,901
3,244
6,890
7,368
4,103
471
703
4,192
5, 077
2,752
2,721
1,971
3,381
4,019
1, 787
857
756
283
25,506
13,195
13,879
1,896

589
3,945
3, 344
7,041
7,506
4,193
489
735
4, 280
5,128
2,785
2,803
2,021
3,436
4,080
1,855
895
827
312
26, 029
13, 417
14,195
2, 034

1.0
.4
.1
.4
.4
.2
.3
.5
.3
.3
.1
.2
.1
.3
1
.1
1
.2
.1
.3
.2
.2
1

.
.

.

1
9.5
5.4
2.3
3.8
3.8
2.9
2.9
4.4
3.1
2.6
1.5
3.3
2.1
3.3
2.2
1.8
1.7
2.3
1.1
3.4
2.6
2.4
1.7

Forge shops
1917________
1918________
1919________
____
1920
1921________
1922________
1923__
1924..
___
1925________
1926 _______
1927_.............
1910-1914___
1915-1919___
1929-1924___
1925-1927.__

3, 881
6,408
2,169
2,197
902
1,514
2,049
2,272
3,794
1, 790
1,645
6,249
12, 667
8,901
7,229

3
4
2
1
2
1
3
1
8
9
4
4

15
26
4
5
3
8
9
9
11
7
10
19
45
34
28

917
1,009
257
380
107
233
309
567
893
263
108
1,080
2,189
1, 596
1, 264

935
1,039
263
385
111
243
319
576
907
270
119
1,107
2,243
1,634
1,296

.3
.2
.3
.4
.4
.2
.3
.2
.4
.2
.1
.2

1.3
1.4
.6
.8
1.1
1.8
1.5
1.3
1.0
1.3
2.0
1.0
1.2
1.3
1.3

78.8
53.2
39.5
58.6
39.5
51.3
50.2
83.2
78.5
48.7
21.9
57.6
57.6
59.8
58.3

80.4
54.8
40.4
59.4
41.0
53.5
51.9
84.5
79.8
50.0
24.1
59.0
59.0
61.2
59.8

2.7
2.3
2.7
1.5
1.4

74.7
59.0
67.1
66.4
50,6

77.6
61.4
69.9
68.1
52,1

2.2
2.6
1.0
1.6

Wire drawing
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913..............
1914...............




10,370
11,819
13,059
12,769
11,468

5
4
4
6
2

84
89
104
59
47

2, 323
2, 270
2,627
2,542
1, 742

2, 412
2,363
2, 735
2,607
1, 791

0.2
1
.1
.2
.1

.

133

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
T a b le

11.— Accidents

and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927,
by department, year, and period— Continued
Wire drawing— Continued
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Number of cases
Year or
period

1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919 __
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914___
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927___

Fullyear
workers

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
Death nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

Total

62
104
63
60
32
63
36
53
54
44
47
34
41
383
321
250
122

1,894
1,872
1,766
1,055
658
1, 317
567
893
975
755
987
638
401
11,908
7,245
4, 507
2,026

7,859
9, 551
13, 727
12,790
8, 739
13, 243
9,186
13, 836
14, 783
11, 567
13, 758
13, 329
11,870
59,481
52, 666
62,614
38,957

1
4
3
4
2
4
3
2
2
3
5
21
12
11
10

1,831
1, 764
1,700
991
626
1, 252
527
837
919
711
938
601
355
11, 504
6,912
4,246
1,894

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility
0.3
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.4
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

2.6
3.6
1.5
1.6
1.2
1.6
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.3
1.1
.9
1.1
2.1
2.0
1.3
1.0

Tem ­
po­
Torary
tal
disa­
bility

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)
Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

77.7
61.6
41.3
25.8
23.9
31.5
19.1
20.2
20.7
20.5
22.7
15.0
9.9
63.5
43.7
22.6
16.2

80.3
65.3
42.9
27.5
25.1
33.2
20.6
21.6
21.9
21.8
23.9
16.0
11.1
65.7
45.8
24.0
17.3

0.3
.8
.4
.6

61.6
43.0
45.9
41.1
43.1
12.5
58.9
43.4
34.1
34.7
30.0
20.7
15.5
16.6
14.3
12.3
9.6
7.7
45.2
38.5
19.7
9.6

89.1
54.8
56.3
62.4
69.0
59.1
31.9
44.2
52.0
34.8
36.8
36.2
22.7
17.9
18.2
17.8
15.6
16.1
11.6
61.0
39.9
22.6
14.5

Tem ­
po­ T o­
rary
tal
disa­
bility

.3
.5
.8
.7
.5
.4
.5

2.4
2.9
1.0
1.2
1.0
1.7
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.8
1.2
.8
1.0
1.9
1.6
1.5
1.0

0.8
.6
.6
.4
.4
.5
.4
.4
.4
.3
.4
.3
.2
.6
.5
.4
.3

3.5
4.3
2.0
2.2
1.4
2.5
2.7
2.1
1.9
2.1
1.9
1.6
2.0
3.2
2.6
2.3
1.8

62.7
44.5
47.7
43.5
45.1
13.5
61.3
45.8
35.5
36.1
30.6
21.2
16.0
17.6
15.4
13.2
10.4
8.6
47.1
40.3
20.5
10.5

2.6
2.2
3.1
7.0
6.9
3.3
7.3
7.3
4.2
5.6
2.2
1.3
2.3
2.3
3.5
3.0
2.6
3.5
4.6
5.7
2.4
3.0

0.9
.9
1.7
1.2
1.0
.2
.4
1.3
1.1
.9
.1
.6
.1
.4
.4
.6
.3
.5
1.2
1.0
.3
.5

0.7
.5
.5
.5
.5
.1
.8
.7
.4
.5
.4
.3
.4
.3
.3
.3
.3
.4
.5
.5
.3
.3

4.2
3.6
5.3
8.7
8.4
3.6
8.5
9.3
5.7
7.0
2.7
2.2
2.8
3.0
5.2
3.9
3.2
4.4
6.3
7.2
3.0
3.8

91.3
56.4
58.0
64.2
70.9
60.5
33.6
46.1
53.7
36.0
37.9
37.2
23.6
19.0
19.4
18.9
16.6
17.0
12.5
62.7
41.3
23.7
15.4

4.9
2.3
1.5
1.8
2.9
2.0
1.0
1.1
2.6
1.9
2.2
1.5
1.7
1.6
2.0
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.0
2.1
2.0
1.7
1.5

0.6
.9
1.1
1.2
1.0
1.0
.7
1.5
1.0
1.0
.7
.6
.5
.7
1.0
.6
.7
.6
.9
1.1
1.0
.7
.7

1.1
.5
.7
.8
.9
.7
.4
.6
.8
.4
.5
.5
.4
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
.8
.5
.3
.3

6.6
3.7
3.8
3.8
4.8
3.7
2.1
3.2
4.4
3.3
3.4
2.6
2.5
2.6
3.3
2.6
2.7
2.5
2.1
4.0
3.5
2.8
2.5

.3
.9
.4
.3

Electrical department
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914...
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927___

1,526
2,700
3, 796
4,012
2,327
612
1, 635
4,385
4, 747
4,644
4,473
3,025
3, 528
4, 325
3,989
4,011
4,611
5,157
14,921
16,023
19,339
13,779

2
3
6
14
8
1
6
16
10
13
5
2
4
5
7
6
6
9
33
46
23
21

3
9
15
15
6
1
6
16
10
7
3
3
1
8
6
5
6
5
48
40
21
16

282
356
523
495
301
23
289
571
485
483
403
188
164
215
171
148
131
119
1,957
1,851
1,141
398

287
368
544
524
315
25
301
603
505
503
411
193
169
228
184
159
143
113
2,038
1,937
1,185
435

0.4
.4
.5
1.2
1.1
.5
1.2
1.2
.7
.9
.4
.2
.4
.4
.6
.5
.4
.6
.8
1.0
.4
.5

0.7
1.1
1.3
1.2
.9
.5
1.2
1.2
.7
.5
.2
.3
.1
.6
.5
.4
.4
.3
1.1
.8
.4
.4

Mechanical department
1908________
1910________
1911________
1912________
1913________
1914________
1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914.
1915-1919.
1920-1924...
1925-1928...

1,619
15,927
17,863
21, 591
24,009
17, 772
5,987
16,920
33,328
58,002
40, 609
34, 648
25,036
30,324
37,449
31, 331
36,666
38,953
37, 531
97,161
154,846
162,121
113,150

4
18
13
19
36
18
3
9
43
54
45
36
■21
25
37
29
31
32
19
104
154
138
82




7
56
80
95
103
60
27
86
134
162
83
68
41
75
102
80
71
74
80
392
492
366
225

430
2,618
3,015
4,040
4,972
3,149
573
2,245
5,201
6,054
4,483
3, 767
1,703
1,626
2,045
1,855
1, 717
1,887
1,309
17,794
18,556
10,996
4,913

441
2,692
3,108
4,154
5, 111
3, 227
603
2,340
5,378
6,270
4,611
3,861
1,775
1,726
2,184
1,964
1,819
1,993
1,408
18,292
19,202
11,510
5,220

0.8
.4
.2
.3
.5
.3
.2
.2
.4
.3
.4
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
.4
.3
.3
.2

1.4
1.2
1.5
1.5
1.4
1.1
1.5
1.7
1.3
.9
.7
.7
.5
.8
.9
.8
.7
.6
.7
1.3
1.1
.8
.7

134

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T a b l e 11 .— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1927 ,
by department, year} and period— Continued

Power houses
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

Fullyear
workers

1917...............
1918________
1919— .........
1920________
1921...............
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1912_1914___
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927. __

4,552
3,699
4,093
4,591
2,344
3,361
4, 070
4, 511
4, 218
3,446
3,888
8,083
13, 219
18,878
11, 552

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
Death nent porary
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

7
9
11
4
2

7
10
2
1
5
4
8
4
3
8
21
21
18
15

6
5
3
3
6
27
17
6

210
254
213
172
77
115
117
157
183
56
98
544
739
638
337

Total

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

224
273
226
177
79
120
127
170
190
62
106
571
787
673
358

0.5
.8
.9
.3
.3
.5
.4
.2
.3
.2
.7
.3
.2

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­ Tem ­
ma­
po­
T o­
Death nent rary
tal
disa­ disa­
bility bility

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

Total

16.4
24.6
18.4
12.9
11.2
11.9
10.4
12.6
15.0
6.0
9.1
23.5
19.8
11.9
10.3

3.1
4.9
5.4
1.7
1.7

.5
.3
.6
.3
.3
.7
.9
.5
.3
.4

15.4
22.9
17.3
12.5
10.9
11.4
9.6
11.6
14.5
5.4
8.4
22.4
18.6
11.3
9.7

1.2
1.0
1.6
1.9
1.4
1.6
1.3
2.4
1.6
1.2
1.6
.9
1.3
.7
1.4
.8
1.0
.7
.9
1.5
1.6
1.0
.8

64.8
43.0
49.0
57.8
52.0
41. 2
36.2
39.4
38.0
31.1
33.7
25.4
24.1
22.4
27.5
24.9
32.8
16.0
8.6
48.6
35.2
25.0
19.0

66.6
44.8
51.0
60.4
54.2
43.2
37.5
42.3
40.4
33.0
36.1
26.6
25.7
23.7
29.4
26.1
34.3
17.4
10.0
50.8
37.5
26.4
20.4

3.8
5.0
2.4
4.1
4.7
2.5

110.4
87.0
135.3
101.8
92.0
121.7
103.0
76.2
89.2
102. 7*
71.2
85.3
58.8
121.7
107.2
97.5
72.2

0.5
.9
.2
.1

.7
.4
.6
.3
.4
.2
.8
.6
.3
.3

0.3
.4
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.3
.1
1
.3
.3
.2
.2

4.4
5.8
5.7
1.9
1.9
.9
3.4
3.0
2.0
2.2
.3
2.6
5.0
2.3
1.5

3.1
4.6
4.0
4.9
1.7
2.1
3.8
2.9
2.4
3.1
3.9
2.8
4.0
3.9
2.5
3.3

2.6
1.0
1.9
1.4
1.0
1.4
1.0
2.2
1.7
1.2
1.9
1.3
1.9
.5
1.9
.9
1.6
.6
.9
1.4
1.6
1.2
1.0

1.1
.5
.7
.8
.7
.6
.4
.6
.6
.6
.6
.4
.5
.5
.4
.5
.6
.4
.2
.6
.6
.4
.4

7.5
6.5
5.0
6.3
6.4
4.5
1.4
5.9
6.9
5.8
7.4
3.4
4.4
4.8
5.2
3.8
5.3
4.9
3.9
6.0
6.1
4.1
4.7

19.9
19.8
20.8
16.2
12.9
19.7
17.5
16.8
6.6
19.8
19.2
28.4
7.4
24.1
18.1
15.6
18.4

4.3
1.7
4.0
2.0
1.3
3.7
1.1
2.5
1.6
3.4
2.2
2.3
1.1
5.5
2.6
2.5
1.9

1.2
1.7
2.2
1.4
1.3
2.5
1.7
1.8
1.2
1.9
1.0
1.3
1.0
1.8
1.6
1.8
1.1

25.4
23.2
27.0
19.6
15.5
25.9
20.2
21.1
9.4
25.1
22.4
32.0
9.5
31.4
22.3
19.9
21.4

2.9
2.2
1.4
1.7
1.5
4.1
1.8
1.0

1.0
.5
.1
0)

.

Yards
1907_.............
1910________
1911_______ _
1912________
1913________
1914
191 5
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920_.............
1921...............
1922________
1923...............
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1910-1914—
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927.__

2,618
15,932
9,085
11,180
11,859
7,879
3,843
7,853
15, 732
16,354
10,108
12,087
5,840
7,969
8,381
8,269
7,683
9,857
7,198
55,932
53,890
42, 546
24, 738

5
40
11
23
28
10
12
36
33
25
10
6
15
12
10
12
19
10
112
106
53
41

10
49
43
64
' 50
37
15
56
77
62
48
33
22
16
35
19
24
19
19
243
258
125
62

509
2,054
1,336
1,940
1,807
975
417
929
1, 792
1,526
1,021
922
422
536
693
617
755
474
185
8,112
5,685
3,190
1,414

524
2,143
1,390
2,027
1,885
1,022
432
997
1,905
1,621
1,094
965
450
567
740
644
791
512
214
8,467
6,049
3,366
1,517

0.6
.8
.4
.7
.8
.4
.5
.8
.7
.8
.3
.3
.6
.5
.4
.5
.7
.5
.7
.7
.4
.6

Erection of structural steel
1915________
1916________
1917__...........
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1912-1914___
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927.

803
1,011
1,156
1,234
775
637
573
595
912
1,009
937
774
816
2,157
4,979
3,726
2,527

8
10
12
10
5
6
5
5
3
10
9
11
3
26
45
29
23

i Less than one-tenth per cent.




7
3
15
3
7
12
4
2
7
10
3
5
7
24
35
35
15

251
251
442
364
214
204
168
129
234
291
188
180
134
738
1,522
1,026
502

266
264
469
377
226
222
177
136
244
311
200
196
144
788
1,602
1,090
540

3.3
3.3
3.5
2.7
2.2
3.3
2.9
2.8
1.1
3.3
3.2
4.8
1.2
4.0
3.0
2.6
3.1

2.9
1.0
4.3
.8
3.0
6.6
2.3
1.1
2.6
3.3
1.1
2.2
2.9
3.7
2.3
3.1
2.0

104.2
82.7
127.5
98.3
86.8
111.8
97.8
72.3
85.5
96.1
66.9
78.3
54.7
114.0
101.9
91.8
67.1

A C E T EXPERIEN IN IR N A D STEEL IN U Y
C ID N
CE
O N
D STR
T a b le

135

1 1 .— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to
1927 , by department, year, and period— Continued
Coke o ven s2
Frequency Bates (per
1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

Fullyear
workers
Death

1915............1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921...............
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1912-1914___
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1926.-.

1,648
2,195
6,641
9,395
9,022
8,620
5,768
6,554
8,961
7,506
7,599
10, 745
10,117
13, 282
28,901
37,409
28,461

2
5
26
21
12
6
2
2
7
9
4
19
7
27
66
26
30

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

4
6
10
14
10
11
4
1
14
15
14
22
14
39
44
45
50

128
150
508
662
647
518
182
207
416
254
142
277
191
1,651
2,095
1, 577
610

Total

134
161
544
697
669
535
188
210
437
278
160
318
212
1,717
2,205
1,648
690

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

0.4
.8
1.3
.7
.4
.2
.1
.1
.3
.4
.2
.6
.2
.7
.8
.2
.4

0.8
.9
.5
.5
.4
.4
.2
.1
.5
.7
.6
.7
.5
1.0
.5
.4
.6

Tem ­
po­
Torary
tal
disa­
bility

25.9
22.7
25.5
23.5
23.9
10.0
10.5
10.5
15.5
11.3
6.2
8.6
6.3
41.4
24.1
14.1
7.1

27.1
24.4
27.3
24.7
24.7
10.6
10.8
10.7
16.3
12.4
7.0
9.9
7.0
43.1
25.4
14.7
8.1

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

2.4
4.6
7.8
4.5
2.7
1.4
.7
.6
1.6
2.4
1.1
3.5
1.4
4.1
4.6
1.4
2.1

Tem ­
po­
rary T o­
disa­ tal
bility

0.6
.5
.5
.5
.6
.7
.3
.2
1.1
.9
.9
.7
.5
1.5
.5
.7
.7

0.3
.4
.4
.4
.4
.3
.2
.2
.3
.1
.2
.2
.2
.6
.4
.2
.1

3.3
5.5
8.7
5.4
3.7
2.4
1.1
1.0
3.0
3.5
2.2
4.4
2.0
6.2
5.5
2.3
2.9

3.1

0.3
.1
.9
1.1
.7
.7
.5
l
.1
.2
.1
3.2
1.6
.7
.3

.

3.4
.l
.9
5.0
.7
.7
8.7
i
1
4.3
.l
6.0
6.7
1.9
1.7

0.7
2.1
.9
.6
1.0
.6
.7
.6
.8
.8
.6
.4
.3
1.3
1.0
.7
.5

1.0
8.5
5.9
1.7
3.2
1.5
4.9
.6
2.8
2.9
1.9
2.C
3.9
4.7
3.9
2.3
2.4

Miscellaneous departments
Axle works3

1915 _______
1916________
1917...............
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921...............
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1912-19141915-1919...
1920-1924...

191
372
713
609
582
743
242
490
774
516
436
340
1,326
2,467
2,764

1
3
1
1

1

2

4
4
4
1

2

21
17
81
156
63
100
12
11
30
22
6
9
438
338
175

22
17
81
159
63
100
13
11
30
24
6
13
444
342
178

1.7

1.3
.6
.5
.2

36.6 38.3
15.2 15.2
37.9 37.9
1.6 85.4 87.0
36.1 36.1
44.8 44.8
16.5 17.9
7.5
7.5
12.9 12.9
14.2 15.4
.6
4.6
4.6
.4
.9
1.3
1.0 110.1 111.6
.5
45.7 46.2
.1
21.1 21.5

3.9
8.3
3.9

.2

~~2.~8~
2.1
1.2
1.4
0

3.0

.
.

Car wheels

1915...............
1916-_______
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920. ______
1921________
1 9 2 2 ...
1923________
1924________
1925________
19 2 6 --. . . .
1927________
1912-1914___
1915-1919___
1920-1924___
1925-1927...

389
734
1,296
1,866
1,619
1,215
552
1,102
1,099
1,083
931
792
552
2,367
5,904
5,050
2,275

2
3
1
1
1
1
1

3
7
3

1
2
4
11
4
2
1
3
3
3
4
15
18
10
10

25
348
250
337
353
170
92
78
116
137
69
32
17
609
1,313
595
118

26
352
257
338
365
174
95
78
118
141
72
35
21
627
1,338
608
128

0.9 21.4 22.3
0.9
.9 158.0 159.0
.8
1.0 64.3 66.1
.2
60.2 60.4
.2 " * 2 .T 72.6 75.1
1.0 46.7 47.7
.6
1.2 56.7 58.6
23. 6 23.6
.3
.3
35.2 35.8
.3
.9 42.2 43.4
1.1 24.7
25.8
1.2 13.3
14.5
2.4 10.3
12.7
.4
2.1 85.8 88.3
.4
1.0 74.1
75.5
.2
.7
39.3 40.2
1.5 17.3 18.8

5.4
4.6
1.1
1.2
3.6
1.8
1.8

2.5
2.4
1.2

0.3
1.0
.4
1.0
.9
.5
.2
.3
1.3
1.6
3.6
.9
.5
.4
1.9

1 Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.
2 This section of the table covers only those coke ovens operated in connection with steel works. For more
complete information, see publications of the Bureau of Mines; also p. — of this bulletin.
8 The 1927 record is so small that the figures have been included in “ Unclassified.” The 1925-1927 group­
ing has therefore been omitted.




136

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T a b l e 1 1 .— Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to
1927 , by department, year , and period— C o n tin u e d
M is c e lla n e o u s d e p a r t m e n t s — C o n tin u e d

Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ <
exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

Fullyear
workers
Death

Per­ Tem ­
ma­
porary
nent
disa­
disa­
bility
bility

Total

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
rary
disa­
bility

To­
tal

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

T em ­
po­ T o­
rary
tal
disa­
bility

Docks and ore yards

1915________
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922_______
1923________
1924________
1925________
1926________
1927________
1911-1914 —
1915-1919___
1920-1924__ _
1925-1927.

115
195
353
368
352
379
235
271
538
340
388
389
603
1,293
1, 383
1, 761
1, 380

3
2
1
1
3

2
2
1
1
6
2
3
3
4

2
1
3
6
4
3

1
1
11
12
12
2

7
16
78
35
39
12
11
7
15
12
7
8
1
139
175
57
16

9
21
81
37
45
15
11
13
18
16
9
9
4
153
193
73
21

5.1
1.9
.9
.9
3.7

5.8
3.4
.9
.9
5. 7
1.8
3.7
1.9
3.9

1. 7
.6
.8
1.4
.8
.7

.1
.6
2.8
2.9
2.3
.5

20. 3
27.4
73.6
31.7
37.0
10.6
15.6
8.6
9.2
11. 8
6.0
.7
.6
35.8
42.2
10.8
3.9

2.4
38.6
13.0
6.0
10.9
8.3
.5
30.1
4.1
14. 7
10. 6
2.9
3.5
8.2
13.3
10.6
5.3

26.1
2.3
35.9
7.3
30.8
76.4
.7
11.3
33.5
5.4
.3
10.4
42. 7
13.3
5.3
2.9
15.6
16.0 ~~22.2~ ~~7~6
11.1
3.9
15.7
14.4
7.7
10. 3
.8
2.6
1.8
3.3
.2
39.4
4.6
2.8
4.1
46.5
8.7
13.9
4.5
5.8
5.1
4.3
.8

0.1
.5
1.0
.3
.5
.1
.5
.3
.2
.3
.3
.3
0)
.8
.5
.3
.2

65.2
40. 7
28.3
17.9
9.9
16.4
30.0
19.8
26.6
17.6
27.6
22. 3
13.6
33.4
21.4
21.2

1. 2
3.0
2.1
1.0
.6
2.9
.8
.7
.5
1.3
.2
.5
1.0
1.6
1.2
.6

I
0.5
1. 7
.4 ! 3. 4
.4 | 2. 5
.2 1 1. 2
.2
2.3
.2
3.1
.4
1.2
.4
1.1
.2
1.9
.2
1. 5
.4
.6
.3
.8
. 1 1.1
.3
2.2
.3
1.8
.3
.9

1.7
1.0
2.1
1. 2
.5
.8
.6
1.3
1.2
1.0
1.6
.1
1
1.3
1.0
.6

0.3
1.4
.3
.2
.1
.1
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
1
.3
.2
.2

Woven wire fence

1915
-- .
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920........... .
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924________
1925________
1 9 2 6 ._..........
1927________
1915-1919-_.
1920-1924-_.
1925-1927._.

1, 552
1, 623
1,269
1, 531
1, 336
1,097
1, 095
1, 528
1,603
1, 301
1,290
1, 363
1,204
7, 311
6, 623
3,857

1

1

1
1

10
18
10
5
4
6
3
6
3
6
2
6
2
47
24
10

294
180
98
77
35
48
79
85
124
63
105
83
47
684
399
235

304
198
108
82
40
54
82
91
128
69
107
89
49
732
424
245

0.2

.2

.1
.1

2.1
3. 7
2.6
1.1
1.0
1.8
.9
1.3
.6
1.5
.5
1.5
.6
2.1
1.2
.9

63.1
37.0
25. 7
16.8
8.7
14.6
24.1
18. 5
25.8
16.1
27.1
20. 8
13.0
31.2
20.1
20.3

1.5

1.2

.3
.3

Nails and staples

1915...............
1916________
1917________
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921________
1922________
1923________
1924._
1925 _
1926________
1927--_
1915-1919-_.
1920-1924- __
1925-1927--.

1, 546
1, 993
2, 323
1, 916
2,040
2, 364
1, 718
2, 366
3,404
1,939
1, 925
2,658
1,424
9, 818
10,890
6,007

1
1

1
1
1

2
3

12
10
16
10
8
8
6
10
7
6
6
2
1
56
37
9

i Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.




181
236
184
123
58
164
91
121
131
81
88
100
35
782
588
223

194
246
201
133
66
172
98
132
139
87
94
102
36
840
628
232

0.2
.1

.2
.1
.1

.1
.1

2.6
.2
2.3
1. 7
1.3
1.1
1.2
1.4
.9
1.0
1. 0
.3
.2
1.9
1.1
.5

39.0 41.8
39. 5 39. 7
26.4 28.8 i
21.4 23.1 1
9. 5 10.8
23.1 24.2
17.7 19.0
17.0 18.5
17.4
18.5
13.9 I 14.9
15. 2 i 16.2
16.4
16. 7
8.2
8.4
26.5 28.5
19.2
18.0
12.4 12.9

1.3
-9

1.2
.8
.8

.

.4
.6

.

3.3
2.4
3.3
1.4
.6
.9
2.1
2.4
2.2
1. 2
1. 8
.3
.2
2 !o
1.8
.8

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
T able

137

1 1 . — Accidents and accident rates in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to
1927, by department, year, and period— Continued
M iscellaneous departments— Continued
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ i
exposure)

Number of cases

Year or
period

Fullyear
workers

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
porary
iDeath nent
disa­
disa­ bility
bility

Total

Per­
ma­
jDeath nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
T o­
rary
tal
disa­
bility

Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
ma­
Death nent
disa­
bility

Tem ­
po­
Torary
tal
disa­
bility

Hot mills

1 9 2 3 --...........
1924..............
1925________
1926________
1 9 2 7 --..........
1920-19241925-1927.--

6,374
5, 789
7,773
4, 319
8,649
30,018
20,741

2
1
4
4
1
11
9

9
7
19
15
11
39
45

820
634
913
834
673
3,223
2,420

831
642
936
853
685
3, 273
2,474

0.1
.1
.2
.3
o
.1
.1

0.5
.4
.8
1.2
.4
.4
.7

42.9
36.6
39.1
64.2
25.8
35.8
38.9

43.5
37.1
40.1
65.7
26.3
36.3
39.7

0.6
.3
1.0
3.9
.2
.7
.9

0.4
.5
.7
1.3
.5
.4
.6

0.5
.6
.6
1.6
.3
.5
.5

1.5
1.4
2.3
6.8
1.0
1.6
2.0

38.7
38.4

1.2

0.8
.4

0.4
.6

1.2
2.2

43.3
38.6
39.3
35.2
30.7
36.7
28.9
29.9
35.3
30.0
27.7
25.7
21.7
35.9
32.6
25.4

1.5
1.4
1.8
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.0
1.1
1.4
.7
1.0
1.0
1.6
1.2
.9

0.6
1.4
.8
.9
.7
.9
.8
.8
.9
.9
.7
.7
.8
1.3
.9
.7

0.6
.6
.5
.5
.4
.5
.5
.4
.5
.5
.4
.3
.3
.5
.5
.4

2.7
3.4
3.1
2.9
2.6
2.8
2.6
2.2
2.5
2.8
1.8
2.0
2.1
3.4
2.6
2.0

Cold rolling *

1926 ...........
1927_.............

1,824
1,686

1

2
6

211
187

213
194

.2

0.4
1.2

38.3
37.0

Unclassfied

1915-.............
1916_.............
1917-.............
1918________
1919________
1920________
1921..... .........
1922-.............
1923________
1924________
1925- ______
1926-.............
1927________
1915-1919.-1920-1924--.
1925-1927-.-

21, 547
24, 216
71,249
97, 513
78,804
104, 741
53,403
79,405
95,138
93,018
132, 291
112,826
95,957
293,329
425, 704
341,074

16
41
17
72
164
65
79
284
60
145
72
261
134
36
39
233
52
273
66
285
45
308
58
306
49
282
237
706
265 1,186
152
896

2, 749
2,714
8,165
9,930
7 ,0t>4
11, 208
4,468
6,848
9, 719
8,032
10, 648
8,325
5,907
30, 612
40, 275
24,880

2,806
2,803
8, 394
10, 293
7, 259
11,541
4,638
7,120
10,044
8,383
11,001
8, 689
6, 238
31,555
41, 736
25,928

0.2
.2
.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.*2
.1
.2
.2
.3
.2
.1

0.6
1.0
.8
1.0
.6
.8
.8
1.0
1.0
1.0
.8
.9
1.0
.8
.9
.9

42.5
37.4
38.2
33.9
29.8
35.7
27.9
28.7
34.1
28.8
26.8
24.6
20.5
34.8
31.5
24.4

1 Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.
* The 1925-1927 grouping has been omitted since data for 1925 are not available.

ACCIDENT RA TES IN TH E IN D U STRY, 1922 TO

1927, BY STATE

It is not claimed that the following table is complete; it simply
records by States and years such information as has been accumulated
from year to year, and probably represents something like 90 per
cent of the industry. Where the bureau’s records showed less than
1,000 full-year workers in a State that State has been omitted. The
general trend in the rates has been quite constantly downwards, and
this downward trend is more pronounced in those States where
accident prevention has been applied to the problem for the longest
time and with the utmost energy. When these figures are compared
with the best that are on record, however, it is clearly evident that
further progress is still possible.




138
T a b l e 1 2 .—

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS
Accident frequency and severity rates in the iron and steel industry,
1922 to 1927, by State and year
Frequency rates (per
1,000,000 hours’ exposur e)

Number of cases

State and year

Fullyear
workers

Per­
ma­
nent
disa­
bili­
ty

Death

Alabama:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
----California:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Colorado:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Connecticut:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Illinois:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Indiana:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Kentucky:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Maryland: 1927____
Massachusetts:
1922 ......... .
192 3
192 4
1925 1926 - ...........
192 7
Michigan:
1922..............
1923 - ...........
1924 - ...........
192 5
1926 1927 Missouri:
1922________
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927 _




Severity rates (per 1,000
hours’ exposure)

PerPer­
Tem­
TemTem ­
ma­
pora­
pora­
S | P oraTo­
nent
ry Total Death disa­ ry Total Death disa­ ry
ta l!
disadisa­
disa­
bili­
bili­
bility
bility
bility
ty
ty

10, 998
11, 915
13, 705
15, 244
19, 887
14, 493

51
78
41
46
130
77

1,163
1,348
1,127
508
1, 370

1, 224
1,433
1,184
568
1, 530

0. 30
.20
.39
.31
.50
.28

1. 55
2.18
1.00
1.00
2.18
1. 77

35.25
37. 74
27.41
12.07
22.95
18.61

37.10
40.09
28.80
13. 38
25.63
20. (56

1.82
1.18
2. 33
1. 84
3.02
1.

1.17
1. 77
1.06
1. 37
1. 56
1.43

0.48
.87
.62
.19
.39
.36

3.47
3.82
4.01
3.40
4.97
3.45

4,013
3,113
2,901
3, 018
2,
1, 370

35
11
16
10
16
4

711
597
522
278
825
225

749
611
540
289
841
229

.25
.32
.23
. 11

2.91
1.18
1.84
1.11
1.
.97

59.05
63.92
59. 97
30.70
95. 93
54. 76

62. 21
65.42
62. 04
31. 92
97. 82
55. 73

1.50
1.93
1.38
.66

2. 63
1.19
1.43
1.56
2.
1.02

.75
1. 34
.71
1.20
.91

4.93
3.87
4.15
2. 93
3.29
1.93

3, 351
4,164
4, 269
4,243
4, 507
4, 074

2
13
22
14
13
27

367
462
452
592
668
474

372
482
480
609
683
507

.20
1.04
1.72
1.10
.96
2. 21

36.51
36.98
35.29
46.50
49. 48
38. 78

37. 01
38. 58
37. 48
47. 84
50. 59
41. 48

1. 79
3. 36
2.81
1. 41
.89
2. 95

1. 52
.93
1.15
1. 75

.36
.76
.63
.78
.71
.51

2. 42
5.34
4.96
3.12
2. 75
5.21

3, 778
5,307
5,
7, 263
2,908
4,

22
34
40
49
47
27

510
446
522
778
366
276

535
485
568
832
414
304

1.94
2.14
2. 36
2.24
5. 40
1.97

44.99
28.01
30. 85
35.72
42. 07
20. 09

47.19
30.46
33. 56
38.19
47. 60
22.13

1. 59
1.
2.13
1. 38
.68
.44

1. 38
1.58
1.31
.28
2.47
1.58

.67
.27
.43
.35
.72
.34

3. 64
3. 73
3. 87

2,481
3, 963
3,081
2,691
3,055
1, 755

1.32
1.42
1.13
1.12

33.02
31.20
26. 26
23.75
1.01 25.87
10.83

34. 56
32. 94
27. 58
25.06
27.10
11. 79

1. 34 1.00
1.95 1.63
1.13 .98
1.12 1.32
1.33 .82
.81 .76

.44
.55
.21
.36

2.78
4.13
2. 32
2.80
2. 53
1.76

.27
.33
.28
.31
.22
.19

2.20

23,926
40, 097
38,147
35, 810
37, 574
49,576

16
39
21
20
25
20

95
171
126
120
114
124

2,370
3, 753
2,934
2,551
2,916
1,611

36,683
22, 887
34,846
32, 743
38, 735
43,120

18
12
30
25
42
13

113
67
69
86
133
92

2,200 2,331

1,396
2,601
1,734
2,550
3,744
4,450
10,973

2
5
1
13
3
5
18

10
477
18
922
899
9
154
144
15
221
193
30
273
300
26
295
326
15 1,080 1,113

5,610
5,018
7,580
6,645
7,150
7,230

7
4
3
1
5
5

337
230
246
126
247

1.03 20.05 21. 24
.98 25.43 26. 58
.66 15. 22 16.17
21.48 22. 61
1.14 12.09 13.59
.71 10.07 10.88

1,746 1, 825
1,591 1,690

2,110 2,221
1,405 1, 580
1,302 1,407

373
260
271
134
270
247

.48
.64
.19
1.70
.26
.37
.55

2.39 113.89 116.76
2.31 115. 22 118.17
1.73 27.68 29.60
1.
25.23 28.89
2. 67 24.37 27.30
1.95 22.10 24.42
.46 32. 81 33.82

.41 1. 71
.27 1.73
.13 .97
.05 .35
.23 .83
.23 .60

19. 90
15.28
10.82
6.32
11.48
10.56

.27

1.22

1.05
1.72
1. 53
2.17
.60

2.01

3.81
2.36

2. 34
2.75
2.57
3.37
1.37

6.12

2.87 1.43
3.84 4.31
1.15 1. 58
10.20 1.83
1.60 2. 57
2.25 1.62
3.28 .52

1.82
.87
.39
.39
.25
.35
.58

9.02
3.12
12. 42
4. 42
4. 22
4. 38

22. 02
17. 28
11. 92
6. 72
12. 54
11. 39

2.48 1.64
1.59 1.
.79 1. 55
.30 .33
1.42 .78
1. 38 .63

.53
.57
.29
.21
.32
.27

4. 65
3.24
2. 63
.84
2.52
2.28

3,928
4,
2,457
4,
5,643
3,489

916
984 1,014
601
583
1,093 1.105
1, — 1.105
620
632

.51 1.36 77.73 79.60
.83 1.44 74. 57 76. 84
.54 1.90 79.08 81. 52
.27 .56 74. 83 75. 66
. 18
95 64.15 65. 28
. 19 . 96 j 59. 23 60. 38

3.05 1.29
5.00 1. 05
3.26 3.
1.64 .70
1.06 .67
1.15 .51

.90
.92
.89
.79

5.20
6.98
7. 72
3.26
2.62
2.45

4,676
4,255
1,284
3,662
3,215
2,913

12 1,632 1,650
907
903
266
275
297
294
443
452
272

. 86;il6. 35 117. 64
. 311 70.74 71.05
2.08! 69.06 71.40
.18! 26.76 27. 03
.61 46.14 47.06
. 34' 30,671 31.12

2. 57 1.01
.33
1.56 1. 78
.19
.55
1.
.68
,69 .19

1.41
.84
.76
.34
.54
,56

4.99
1.17
4.10
1.08
3.08
1.44

139

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
T a b le

1 2 .—

Accident frequency and severity rates in the iron and steel industry,
1922 to 1927, by State and year— Continued
Frequency rates (per Severity rates (per 1,000
1,000,000 hours’ exposure]i
hours’ exposure)

Number of cases

State and year

New Jersey:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
New York:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
1927_______
Ohio:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Pennsylvania:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5
192 6
192 7
Tennessee:
192 2
192 3
192 4
192 5

Fullyear

Per­
ma­
nent
Death
disa
bility

1

Per­
Per­
TemTemTem ­
ma­
ma­
. pora. porapora­
nent
nent
To­
ry Total Death
' ry Total Death
' ry
disa­ disa­
disa­
tal
disa­
disa­
bili­
bili­
bility
bility
bility
ty
ty

0.05■ 1.87
2.13
2.18
.19 1. 49
.16 1.26
.27 1. 89

31. 58
35. 42
35.87
37.03
23.96
14.87

33. 5C
i
37.55
38. 05
37. 71
25.38
17.03

1.20
2.17
2.69
1.16 1.46
1.01
.92
1.62 1.68

.43
.26
.24
.22
.24
.19

1.85
1.90
2.46
2.12
1.51
1.71

64.13
62. 73
53.46
87.58
64. 34
33. 54

66. 42
64.89
56.16
89.92
66.09
35.44

2.60
1. 58
1.45
1.35
1.48
1.14

1.82
1.84
2.03
2.35
.90
1.32

.99
.73
.94
.89
.95
.73

5.41
4.15
4.42
4.59
3. 33
3.19

5,435
6,003
5,461
5,242
5,850
5,540

.27
.17
.25
.13
.17
.13

.81
.86
.80
.58
.62
.69

34.15
24.63
23.13
19.42
20. 25
19.38

35. 23
25.66
24.18
20.13
21.04
20.20

1.63
1.00
1.54
.76
1.03
.81

.66
.87
.98
.53
.44
.58

.48
.39
.36
.25
.23
.32

2.77
2.26
2.88
1.54
1. 71
1. 71

8,364
12,188
8, 382
9, 527
7, 763
6,727

8,527
12, 544
8,680
9, 820
8,044
7,069

.20
.27
.12
.18
.13
.23

.34
.58
.53
.49
.34
.54

27. 28
28. 97
18. 05
21.30
13.17
15. 30

27. 82
29.82
18. 70
21.97
13.64
16. 07

1.17
1.60
.70
1.01
.79
1.41

.34
.59
.34
.45
.09
.53

.45
1.03
.30
.26
.20
.31

1.96
3.22
1.34
1.72
1.08
2. 25

1

220
437
77
196
32
114

228
465
86
199
33
116

1.49
7 .97i 2.26
3. 99 1.60
1.59 1. 67
1.75
1.48 .44

.69
1.03
.25
.69
.13
.48

2.18
11.23
5.84
3. 95
1.88
2.40

6
1
2
3
6
2

80
77
66
181
148
69

86
78
68
186
155
71

53. 70
5.99
32. 51 _______ | . 13
1 1.49
37. 61
3. 31 1. 27
51.27
38. 30
1.48 .96
31.04
1. 57

.59
.50
1.49
1.15
>48
.58

6. 58
.63
.88
5. 73
2. 92
2.15

1. 48 .84
1.71 .54
3.03 1.53
3.26 .67
1. 70 .41
2.42 .56

.85
.33
1.70
.28
.35
.56

3.17
2. 58
6. 26
4. 21
2.46
3. 54

1. 39
1.23
1.57
2.11
1. 76
1.66

.73
.78
.68
.81
.55
. 59

2.12
3.42
3.45
3.69
3.45
4.25

4
4
6

37
47
47
31
30
42

625
780
772
769
568
331

663
827
819
804
602
379

9.785
11.377
6,903
10,372
9,442
8.785

11
9
5
7
7
5

47
65
51
66
43
45

1,625
2,141
1,107
2,725
1,821
884

1,683
2,215
1,163
2, 799
1,871
934

51,424
77,979
75,282
86,820
92,678
91.377

42
39
57
33
48
37

125
201
181
150
172
190

5,268
5,763
5, 223
5,059
5,630
5,313

102,186
140,259
154,800
149, 089
196.124
146, 595

60
112
54
75
77
103

103
244
244
218
204
239

1, 543
2, 258
1, ““
1, 256
1,139
1,354

9
3
1
1
1

4
19
6
2

1927________
Washington:
192 2
534
192 3 .........
2,258
192 4
1, 503
192 5
1,256
192 6 .........
1,348
192 7
763
W est Virginia:
192 2
2,702
192 3
9,336
1924 .
........................
4, 613
192 5
7,964
192 6
........................
14.124
192 7
12,414
Wisconsin:
1 9 2 2 .. .
5,441
1923..............
4,264
192 4
8,321
1925 .
........................
6,089
1926_ .............
10,481
1927..............
3,992

2
1

.86 47. 52 48. 38
1.33 2.80 64.50 68.63
.67 1.33 17.08 19. 07
.27 .53 52.02 52.82
9. 41 9. 71
.30
.25 .25 28. 07 28. 57
3. 75
.42
1.11
.55 .83
.25 .15
.87

49. 95
32. 09
36. 50
49. 89
37.00
30.17

2
8
7
13
12
15

6
592
600
13
749
770
18
806
831
14
537
564
30 1, 306 1, 348
21 1,279 1,315

.24 .74 73.03 74. 01
.29 .46 26. 74 27.49
.51 1.30 58. 24 60.05
.54
.59 22.48 23. 61
.28 .71 30.87 31.86
.40 .56 34.34 35. 30

3
5
2
6
4

790
20
810
708
728
171
47! 1,275 1,327
34 1,121 1,157
66 1,214 1,286
641
671
26

.23
.20
.13
.19
.33

1. 23
1.33
1.88
2.18
2.10
2.17

48.40
55.34
51.08
72.02
38.66
53.52

49.63
56.90
53.16
74.33
40.95
56. 02

0.30

1.41
1.20
.77
1.14
2.00

0.55i 2.05
.57 2.74
.70i 3.39
.59| 3.21
.37 2.30
.30 3.60

AN ALYSIS OF AC C ID EN T CAUSES IN TH E IN D U ST R Y BY D E P A R T M E N T

The comparison in this section is based on the records of two 5-year
periods. A third period will not be completed until the end of 1929.
The tables present the experience of 13 departments for 7 large
groups. In the portion of the tables pertaining to 1915-1919 the
departments were arranged in the order of their accident severity.
To make comparison of the two periods as easy as possible, in the




140

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

portion of the table relating to 1920-1924 the departments are given
the same order as for 1915-1919 and not according to their accident
severity.
The most striking feature of these tables is the constancy with
which practically every department records lower rates in the second
period.
It should be noted that, in order to avoid the use of small decimals
in this group of tables, the frequency and severity rates have been
figured on the basis of 10,000,000 and 10,000 hours’ exposure,
respectively.
MACHINERY

In the first period the electrical department suffered most severely
from accidents. In the second period there is but one department
with a lower severity rate. Evidently the high severity rate of the
first period is not wholly typical. Since the group of the second
period is much larger, it may be assumed that it more accurately
reflects the relations of the departments.
The highest accident frequency (158.7) of the first period is found
in the fabricating department. In the second period the highest fre­
quency (114) appears in foundries.
13 .— Machinery as a cause of accident: Number of cases and accident
frequency and severity rates, 1915 to 1919, and 1920 to 1924, by department

T able

Nutaber of cases

Department and
period

Fullyear
work­
ers

Per­
ma­
nent
Death
dis­
abil­
ity

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Per­
Tem ­
po­
ma­
rary
nent
Death
dis­ Total
dis­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
Tem ­
ma­
po­
rary
nent
Total Death
dis­
dis­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity

Tem ­
po­
rary
dis­ Total
abil­
ity

1915-1919
4,191
Electrical__________
Open hearths_____ 20, 525
Fabricating_______ 11,110
Bessemer__________
5, 450
Blast furnaces____ 17, 621
Yards_____________
9,819
Foundries_________ 10,222
Plate mills________ 14, 711
Tube mills________ 11, 621
Mechanical________ 24,752
Heavy rolling mills 27,123
Sheet m ills________
5,920
Unclassified_______ 55,534

4.0 4.8 51.7 60.5
2.6 3.6 59.3 65.5
1.5 12.0 145.2 158.7
2.4 2.4 28.1
33.0
1.7 3.6 23.6 28.9
1.7 3.1 29.5 34.3
1.3 3.9 100.4 105.6
1.4 4.3 78.6 84.3
1.2 5.0 29.0 35.2
1.1 4.4 80.4 85.9
5.1 49.5 55.5
.9
4. 5 36.6 41.1
1.1 4.1
67.5 72.7

23. 86
15. 59
9.00
14.68
10. 22
10.18
7.83
8.16
7.10
6.46
5.16

18

6
65
76
403
22
365
484
529
40
46
54
4
19
125
153
87
9
101
308
324
12
347
19
372
17
98
119
33
597
638
42
403
452
8
65
73
68 1,125 1,211

2
24
6
3
11
5
6
7
8
12
16
7
22

8
90
100
36
533
593
21
485
512
9
119
131
187
23
221
12
116
133
49 1,215 1,270
18
220
245
53
416
477
61
793
866
35
556
505
44
339
390
851
49
922

.5
1.3
1.0
.5
.7
.8
.5
1.0
.4
.5
1.1
.5
.7

1.9 21.4 23.8
2.0 29.6 32.9
3.5 80.6 85.1
1.5 20.0 22.0
1.4
11.4 13.5
2.0
19.2 22.0
4.4 109.1 114.0
2.7 32.7 36.4
2.6 20.3 23.3
2.3 29.5 32.3
2.4 35.0 38.6
3.2 24.8 28.5
1.5 26.4 28.6

2.86
7.99
5.99
3.02
4.02
4. 97
3.23
6.24
2.34
2.68
6.66
3.07
4.10

5
16
5
4
9
5
4
6
4
8
7

6.44
2.12
6.74
1.28
3. 72
2.78
3.18
2. 65
3.99
3.17
4. 32
2. 70
6. 48 3.64

1.08
1. 54
2.81
.78
.58
.60
2.04
1.87
1. 20
1.53
1.23
.84
1.47

31.38
19.25
18. 55
16.74
14.52
13. 57
13. 05
12.68
12.29
11.16
10.71
3. 54
11. 59

1.64
1.83
3.53
1.53
1.16
1.83
2.56
1.23
1. 52
1.78
1. 39
2. 77
1.29

.51
.76
1. 75
.55
.29
.45
2.05
.84
.56
.58
.97
.65
.61

5.01
10.58
11. 27
5.10
5.47
7.25
7.84
8. 31
4.42
5.04
9.02
6.49
6.00

1920-1924
Electrical__________
Open hearths_____
Fabricating_______
Bessemer__________
Blast furnaces_____
Yards_____________
Foundries_________
Plate m ills________
Tube m ills. .............
Mechanical________
Heavy rolling mills
Sheet m ills________
Unclassified.............




14,002
60,087
20,049
19,853
54, 773
20,118
37,129
22,428
68, 335
89,481
48,082
45, 618
107,317

141

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY
POWER VEHICLES

As might be expected yards have the greatest accident severity
(54.35 in 1915-1919 and 31.83 in 1920-1924) from power vehicles.
In accident frequency also this is the leading accident cause (165.3 in
1915-1919 and 66.4 in 1920-1924).
In the first period blast furnaces (18.96) stand next in severity
while in the second period open hearths (7.24) occupy this position.
It will be noticed that their rates are very much lower than those
for yards. In fact, yards present a serious problem to any safety
man. It has been noted elsewhere that in many cases motion is the
element of hazard. A localized machine with its moving parts pre­
sents dangers. When to the machine is added a motion from place
to place the dangers multiply. That the difficulties are not insoluble
the records of the two periods strikingly indicate.
14 .— Power vehicles as a cause of accident: Number of cases and accident
frequency and severity rates, 1915 to 1919 and 1920 to 1924} by department

T able

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases

Department and
period

Fullyear
work­
ers

Per­
ma­
nent
Death
dis­
abil­
ity

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
Tem ­
Per­ Tem ­
po­
ma­
ma­ po­
rary
nent rary
Death nent
Total
Total Death
dis­
dis­
dis­ dis­
abil­ abil­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity
ity
ity

Tem ­
po­
rary
Total
dis­
abil­
ity

1915-1919
Yards_______ ______
Blast furnaces------Bessemer__________
Open hearths______
Heavy rolling mills
Mechanical________
Tube mills ______
Electrical-. ______
Foundries
_
_
Fabricating______
Plate mills________
Sheet mills________
Unclassified_______

9,819
17,621
5,450
20,525
27,123
24, 752
11, 621
4,191
10, 222
11,110
14, 711
5,920
55, 534

20
15
3
8
6
2

24
3
5
16
7
2
2

443
131
41
178
48
48
7
7
21
13
20

487
149
49
202
61
52
9
7
21
13
20

6.8
2.8
1.8
1.3
.7
.3

14

7

192

213

.8

.4

11.5

20,118
54, 773
19,853
60, 087
48, 082
89, 481
68, 335
14,002
37,129
20,049
22,428
45,618
107,317

24
8
1
16
4
4
2
2
1
1

23
2

4.0
.5
.2
.9
.3
.2
.1
.5
.1
.2

1
13

4
8

401
160
68
300
71
99
58
14
79
32
12
65
332

3.8
.1

21
5
4
1

354
150
67
263
62
91
55
12
76
31
12
60
311

.1
.4

.3
.3

58. 7
9.1
11.3
14.6
4.3
3.4
2.7
2.9
6.8
5.2
1.8
4.4
9.7

8.1 150.4 165.3
24.8 28.2
.6
3.1 25.1 30.0
2.6 28.0 32.8
.9
7.5
5.9
.3
7.1
6.5
2.1
2.7
.6
5. 6
5. 6
6.8
6.8
3.9
3.9
4.5
4.5

40. 74
17.03
11. 00
7. 80
4. 42
1. 62

9.86
1.45
1.28
3. 21
1. 22
.86
.62

3.75
.48
1. 22
.76
.28
.28
. 18
. 16
. 12
. 10
.07

54. 35
18.96
13. 50
11. 77
5. 92
2. 76
.80
. 16
.12
.10
.07

12.7

5.04 1.17

.23

6. 44

66. 4
9.7
11.4
16.6
4.9
3.7
2.8
3.3
7.1
5.3
1.8
4.7
10.3

23.86 6. 33
2. 92 .16
1.01
5. 33 1.49"
1.66 .59
.89 .19
.59 .01
2. 86
.54 .05
1.00

1.64
.22
.34
.42
.12
.13
.07
.06
.15
. 14
.08
.08
.24

31.83
3. 30
1. 35
7.24
2. 37
1.21
.07
2.92
.74
1.14
.08
1.00
3.17

1920-1924
Yards_______ ______
Blast furnaces_____
Bessemer
__
Open hearths- - __
Heavy rolling mills
Mechanical
Tube mills ______
Electrical___ ______
Foundries_________
F a b ric a tin g ...___
Plate mills________
Sheet mills________
Unclassified-----------

36904°— 29-------10




2

1.2
.4
.6
.6
.2

.44
2. 42

.48
.51

142

ST A TIST IC S OF IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID EN TS

HOT SUBSTANCES

Accidents due to hot metal and the electric current are character­
istic accidents of the iron and steel industry. It is, however, some­
what surprising that the electrical department has, in both periods,
the second highest accident frequency (98.7 in 1915-1919 and 42.1
in 1920-1924).
This is, of course, due to the instances where electricians handle
live parts and get more or less severe burns. A comparison of the
two periods indicates that the precautions which have come into
use in the last five years have been very effective.
15 .— Hot substances as a cause of accident: Number of cases and accident
frequency and severity rates} 1915 to 1919 and 1920 to 1924, by department

T able

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases

Department and
period

Fullyear
work­
ers

Per­
ma­
nent
Death
dis­
abil­
ity

Tem ­
Per­
po­
ma­
rary
nent
Total Death
dis­
dis­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Tem ­
Per- Tem ­
po­
m a - 1 po­
rary
nent! rary
Total
Total Death
dis­
dis­ dis­
abil­
abil­ abil­
ity
ity
ity

1915-1919
Electrical.-..............
Bessemer_________
Blast furnaces____
Open hearths.........
Foundries...............
H eavy rolling mills
Plate mills_____
Mechanical____
Tube mills_____
Fabricating____
Sheet m ills_____
Y a rds__________
Unclassified____

4,191
5,450
17.621
20, 525

10, 222

27,123
14, 711
24, 752
11.621
11,110
5,920
9, 819
55, 534

4
6
13
14
3
6
2
3
1
1
8

1
5
3
3

4

119
114
418
764
167
236
160
181
53
40
39
51
632

124
120
436
781
170
245
162
184
54
41
39
51
.644

3.2
3.7
2.5
2.3
1.0
.7
.5
.4
.3
.3

174
165
576
894
440
245
116
382
302
78
300
68
628

177
168
610
916
442
248
118
391
305
81
301
68
645

.7
.5
1.8
1.1

.5

0.8

94.7 98.7
69.7 73.4
79.1 82.5
124.1 126.9
54.5 55.5
.4
29.0 30.1
36.3 36.8
24.4 24.8
15.7 16.0
12.0 12.3
22.0 22.0
17.3 17.3
.2
37.9 38.6
.9
.5

19.09 4.77
22.02
14.76 2.21"
13.64 .66
5.87
4. 42 .66
2. 72
2.42
1. 78
1. 80
2.88

.40

1.12
2.01
1. 57
2.35
1.15
.62
.42
.37
.40
.15
.28
.27
.66

24. 98
24. 03
18. 54
16. 65
7.02
5. 70
3.14
2. 79
2.18
1.95
.28
. 27
3.94

.7
.6
.8
.9
.6
.3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.3
.2
.3

4.9
3.7
12.3
7.8
.9
1.3
1.3
2.2
1.2
2.5
.8
.2
2.8

1920-1924
‘Electrical...................
Bessemer...................
Blast furnaces_____
Open hearths...........
Foundries_________
H eavy rolling mills
Plate mills...............
Mechanical________
Tube mills. ...........Fabricating............
Sheet m ills............. .
Yards_______ ______
Unclassified.............

14,002
19,853
54,773
60,087
37,129
48,082
22,428
89,481
68, 335
20, 049
45,618
20,118
107,317

3
3
30
20
2
1
8
3
2
1
12

4
2
2
1
1
1
1
5

.1
.2
.3
.2
.3
.1
.4

.2
.1
.2
.1
.2
.0
.2
.2

41.4
27.7
35.0
49.6
39.5
17.0
17.2
14.2
14.7
13.0
22.0
11.3
19.5

42.1
28.2
37.1
50.8
39.7
17.2
17.5
14.6
14.9
13.5
22.0
11.3
20.0

4.3
3.0
11.0
6.7

.6
.2
.3
.1
.1
.2

.8
.9
1.8
.9
2.0 ” .~3~
.4
2.2

.3

FAILS OF PERSONS

That the electrical department again heads the list in the first period
in severity (11.21) of accidents due to falls of persons and is next to the
highest (3.40) in the second period is due in part to inclusion of line­
men, whose duties call for work at a height from which a fall may
easily occur. It is quite possible that some of these falls are charge­
able to electric shock. In the first period the electrical department
also has the highest accident frequency (58.1), followed by open
hearths (45.8).




143

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

In the second period the highest accident frequency (28.0) is found
in foundries; in the second period the highest severity rate (3.71) is in
blast furnaces.
16 .— Falls of persons as a cause of accident: Number of cases and accident
frequency and severity rates, 1915 to 1919 and 1920 to 1924, by department

T able

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases

Department and
period

Fullyear
work­
ers

Per­
ma­
nent
Death
dis­
abil­
ity

Tem ­
Per­
po­
ma­
rary
nent
Total Death
dis­
dis­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Tem ­
Per­ Tem ­
po­
ma­ po­
rary
nent rary
Total Death
dis­
dis­ dis­
abil­
abil­ abil­
ity
ity
ity

1915-1919
Electrical__________
Blast furnaces_____
Mechanical________
Foundries_________
Fabricating_______
Tube mills________
Bessemer__________
Open hearths______
Heavy rolling mills
Plate mills__.......... ..
Sheet mills________
Yards_____________
Unclassified_______

4,191
17.621
24,752

10,222
11,110
11.621
5,450
20,525
27,123
14, 711
5,920
9,819
55,534

71
191
289
75
93
37
47
282
203

73
199
294
77
94
38
47
282
204

120

120

40
73
537

40
73
547

85
274
506
312
138

87
286
522
312
140
214
73
427
256
94
195
149

.8

.7
.3
.3
.3

.4

.2

56.5
36.1
38.9
24.5
27.9
10.9
28.7
45.8
24.9
27.2
22.5
24.8
32.2

58.1
37.7
39.6
25.1
28.2
11.2
28.7
45.8
25.0
27.2
22.5
24.8
32.8

20.2

1.6

20.7
17.4
19.5
28.0
23.3
10.4
12.3
23.7
17.8
14.0
14.3
24.7
21.7

9.54
4.54
4.04
1.96
1.80
1.78

2.52

1.67

.68

.20

.89
.30
.50
.35
1.36
1.04
.53
.41
.41
.38
.57

1920-1924
Electrical____ _____
Blast furnaces_____
Mechanical________
Foundries................
Fabricating________
Tube mills...............
Bessemer— ...........
Open hearths______
Heavy rolling mills
Plate mills________
Sheet mills...............
Yards______ _______
Unclassified.............

14,002
54,773
89,481
37,129
20,049
68,335
19,853
60,087
48,082
22,428
45, 618
20,118
107,317

212

73
419
253
92
193
148
684

.0

16.3
18.9
28.0
22.9
10.3
12.3
23.2
17.5
13.7
14.1
24.5
21.3

2.86
3.29

2.68
2.00
.59

2.00
.83
.99
2.24

.54
.36
.50
.39
.47
.26
.35
.50
.36
.23
.26
.45
.40

FALLING OBJECTS

The high accident severity rate (8.61) for falling objects in the
Bessemer department in the first period is, in part at least, associated
with the feeding of scrap into the converting vessels. In the older
types of construction this was done in a maimer permitting the
material to fall rather frequently and endangering the men working
below, but in recent construction this hazard has been largely over­
come.
In the first period the highest accident frequency (78) is found in
foundries. The same department also has the highest frequency
(82.2) in the second period. This is one of the few cases in which
the second period has a higher rate than the first.




144

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL! ACCIDENTS

17.— Falling objects as a cause of accident: Number of cases and accident
frequency and severity rates, 1915 to 1919 and 1920 to 1924, by department

T a b le

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases

Department and
period

Fullyear
work­
ers
Death

Per­
ma­
nent
dis­
abil­
ity

Per­
Tem ­
po­
ma­
rary
nent
Total Death
dis­
dis­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
Tem ­
po­
ma­
rary
nent
Total Death
dis­
dis­
abil­
abil­
ity
ity

Tem ­
po­
rary
dis­ Total
abil­
ity

1915-1919
Open hearths--------Foundries_________
Blast furnaces.........
Fabricating_______
Y ards_____________
Mechanical_______
Plate mills...............
H eavy rolling mills
Sheet mills...............
Tube mills...............
Electrical.................
Unclassified_______

5,450
20,525
10, 222
17, 621

11,110

65
351
235
185
192

9, 819
24, 752
14, 711
27,123
5,920
11, 621
4,191
55, 534

380
299
307
39
63
32
860

19,853
60,087
37,129
54, 773
20,049
20,118
89,481
22,428
48,082
45, 618
68,335
14,002
107, 317

167
622
912
291
255
146
626
262
389
213
460
70
790

102

361
239
190
197
104
384
302
316
40
64
32
875

1.2
1.1
.7

57.0
76.6
35.0
57.6
34.6
51.8
67.7
37.7

22.0
.39
......

.5

42.2
58.6
78.0
36.0
59.1
35.2
52.4
68.4
38.8

22.6

18.6
25.5
51.6

18.9
25.5
52.5

28.0
34.5
81.9
17.7
42.4
24.2
23.2
38.9
27.0
15. 6
22.4
16.7
24.5

28.6
35.5
82.2
18.0
43.6
24.4
23.7
39.2
27.6
15.6
23.0
16.9
24.9

7. 34 0.37
6. 82 .24
3. 92 .20
4.54 . 14
1.80 .26
2. 04 .10
1. 62 .08
.75
.92
.17
.19

0.90
1.00
1.68
.82
.94
.80
.84

1.11

8.61
8.06
5.80
5.50
3.10
2.94
2.54

1. 86

.75
.72
.54
.53

1. 67
.89
.73
.53

1.63
3.65
1.47
1.33
4.08
.59
1. 43
2.40

.61

1920-1924
Open hearths--------Foundries_________
Blast furnaces_____
Fabricating----------Y a r d s ................ ..
Mechanical..............
Plate mills________
Heavy rolling mills
Sheet mills________
Tube mills________
Electrical__________
Unclassified_______

170
640
915
296
262
147
637
264
398
214
472
71

1.01

.10

.73

.32
.17
.22

.52
.67
1.30
.38

2.00 1.20

.88

2.66

. 10

.67
1.78

1.12

.24
. 20'
’
.02
.13
.07
19

.49
.52
.62
.63
.33
.46
.32
.53

1. 66

.35
1.47
.39
1. 84

HANDLING

It will be noted on inspecting Table 18 that the accidents recorded
exhibit high frequency and relatively low severity. A moment’s
reflection will make it clear that it is natural that in the manual
movement of material minor injuries might occur. In the absence
of severity rates this fact has been the cause of a somewhat erroneous
view regarding the importance of this type of injury. It has been
thought that the rapid reduction of this sort of cases represented a
highly successful accident prevention effort. In some instances
attention has been so completely directed to methods bringing about
decline in frequency that, while it was going on, the severity of
accidents was actually increasing. It is very clear that sufficient
study should be devoted to those departments and causes where
severity is high to bring about as large a reduction as circumstances
will allow, as it is the accidents of high severity which are costly and
disastrous.

In all preceding tables, sheet mills have been well down the list.
In the present cause group these mills are at the top in the first
fieriod in accident frequency (220.7) and in accident severity (5.49).
n the second period they occupy the same place in accident severity




ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

145

(3.83) and are next to the top in accident frequency (127.4). This
arises in connection with the process of opening the packs of sheets.
No way has been discovered to do this except by hand. The sheets
have sharp and somewhat jagged edges on which the opener is
often cut and lacerated. The striking decline from the first to the
second period is evidence that care on the part of the worker will give
results even in so distinctively a hand operation as this.
1 8 .— H andling objects and tools as a cause o f accident: N um ber of cases,
and accident frequen cy and severity rates, 1915 to 1919, and 1920 to 1924, by
department

T a b le

Number of cases

Department and
period

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Fullyear
work­
ers

Per­ Temma­ po- I
nent
Death
dis­
abil­ abil­
ity
ity

d£r Total

Per-1 TemPer­
m a -! poma­
nent rary
nent
Total Death
Death
dis- | disdis­
abil­
abil- abil­
ity
ity
ity

Tem ­
po­
rary
Total
dis­
abil­
ity

1915-1919
Sheet mills_____
Mechanical____
Foundries______
Tube mills_____
Blast furnaces. _
Open hearths...
Yards................. .......
Heavy rolling mills
Plate mills_____
Bessemer_______
Electrical............
Fabricating_____
Unclassified____

5,920
24, 752

10, 222

11, 265
17, 621
20, 525
9,819
27,123
14,711
5,450
4,191
11,110
55, 534

392
380
L 064 1, 089
,
552
546
221
2.14
584
576
867
881
294
300
761
780
621
613
128
132
88
84
409
405
2,612 2,652

0.1

217.3
143.3
178.0
63.3
109.0
140.8
19.8
'3. 5
138.9
78.3
66.8
121.5
156.8

220.7
146.7
180.0
65.4
110.5
143.1
101.8
95.8
140.7
80.7
70.0
122.7
159.2

1.
0.81 2. 53
2.18
1
,
1.15
1.14 1.48
.97 .90
1.78
1. 47
.75
.73
1. 31
. 36 !
1.39

3. 63
1.91
2. 21
1.13
1.41
1. 76
1.
1.36
1.74
1. 52

5.49
5.25
4.39
4.06
4.03
3. 63
3.36
2.83
2.49
2. 26
2.24

1
.’
2. 24

2.00
3. 63

1920-1924
Sheet mills_____
45, 618
Mechanical........
89, 481
Foundries______
37,129
Tube mills_____
68, 335
Blast furnaces. .
54,773
Open hearths.
60, 087
Yards......... .........
20,118
Heavy rolling mills 48,0s2
Plate mills.........
22, 428
Bessemer_______
19,8o3
Electrical_______
14,0u2
Fabricating_____
20, 0*9
Unclassified____
107, 317

1,743 1, 719
1,484
2,264
1, 005
700
1,240
371
855
446
364
158
551
2,046

V

2,246
973
683
1,195
358
827
433
351
154
538
2,022

1. 53 125. 61 127.
1.19i 53.98 55. 28
1. 62 201. 64 203. 26
1.32 47.46 49.02
.97 41.57 42. 60
2. 39 66.29 68. 79
1.
59. 32 61.48
1.
57. 33 59. 27.
1.93 64. 35 66. 28.
2.18 58. 93 61.11.
.95 36. 66 37. 61 .
2.16 89. 45 91.61 .
.65 62.80 63. 541

1. 32
.67
1.46
.37
.67
.99

.74
.74
.58
.43
1.32
1.11
.84
1. 60
.98
.29
2.12
.46

2.46
.80
.69
1.06
.98
.92
.90
.98
.52
1. 50
1.00

3.83
2.25
3.20
2.84
1. 49
3. 05
3.08
1. 76
2. 50
1. 96
.80
3. 62
2.02

MISCELLANEOUS CAUSES

The causes grouped under the term “ miscellaneous” are so varied
from department to department that the rates are not of very great
significance.
The high accident severity (14.03) in blast furnaces during the
first period is due to asphyxiating gas, a hazard not found to any
great extent in any other department. This department also leads
in accident severity (5.15) during the second period.




146

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

19 .— Miscellaneous causes of accident: Number of cases and accident
frequency and severity rates, 1915 to 1919 and 1920 to 1924, by department

T able

Frequency rates (per
10,000,000 hours’ expo­
sure)

Number of cases
Fullyear
work­
ers

Department and
period

Per­
ma­
nent
Death
dis­
abil­
ity

Severity rates (per 10,000
hours’ exposure)

Per­
Tem ­
Per­ Tem ­
ma­
po­
ma­ po­
nent
rary
nent rary
Total Death dis­
Total Death
dis­ dis­
dis­
abil­
abil­ abil­
abil­
ity
ity
ity
ity

Tem ­
po­
rary
Total
dis­
abil­
ity

1915-1919
Blast furnaces_____
Y ards. .......................
Electrical__________
Tube mills________
Mechanical________
Plate mills________
H eavy rolling mills
Fabricating_______
Open hearths...........
Bessemer................
Foundries_________
Sheet mills___
Unclassified______ _

17,621
9,819
4,191
11, 265
24, 752
14,711
27,123
11,110
20, 525
5, 450
10, 222
5,920
55, 534

3
11
4
4
1
2
2
2
7 ,
2
3 ~’ T
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
10
11

414
400
185
177
88
89
113
117
540
m
288
286
331
327
301
298
452
449
90
91
263
266
130
129
997 1,018

0.52
.75
.48
~~27~ .53
1.94
.61
.71
".‘ 22"
.53
.18
.61
.58
.58
1.10
.64
.79
.78
.17
1.20
.74
3.60 .97

14.03
12.09
5. 25
4.35
4.17
3.43
2.96
2.59
2.13
1.74
1. 57
1.37
5.30

.31
.45
.36
.35
.30
.44
.40
.51
.37
.38
.77
.43
.37

5.15
.75
1.93
1.74
1. 62
1.37
.84
.51
2.74
2.45
1.00
.89
3.54

12.49
8.15
4.77
3. 55
1.62
2. 72
2.21
1.80
.97

1.02
3.19

2.1 0.6
1.4 1.4
.8
.6 " W
.3
.9
.5
.1
.4
.6
.3
.2
.4
.6
1.0
.6
.7
.6

75.7
60.1
70.0
33.4
72.7
64.8
40.2
89.4
72.9
55.0
85.8
72.6
59.8

78.4
62.9
70.8
34.6
73.9
65.3
40.7
90.3
73.5
55.6
86.8
73.2
61.1

.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.3

27.7
34.5
29.8
29.2
28.7
38.8
25.9
49.4
33. 7
32.9
88.7
41.9
28.0

4.75 .09
28.7
.30
34.6
30.2 ~~I.~43~ .14
29.7
1.17 .22
1.12 .20
29.0
.89 .04
39.6
26.2
.44
49.4
’ ."§7"
34.3 ‘ W
33.8
1.01 1.06
88.9
.23
.44 .02
42.0
2.98 .19
28.8

1920-1924
Blast furnaces.........
Yards............... ..........
Electrical..................
Tube mills________
Mechanical________
Plate m ills............ ..
H eavy rolling mills
Fabricating_______
Open hearths______
Bessemer...................
Foundries_________
Sheet mills________
Unclassified_______

ACCIDENT

54, 773
20,118
14,002
68,335
89, 481
22,428
48,082
20,049
60,087
19,853
37,129
45, 618
107,317

13
1
4
5
1
6
1
1
16

EXPERIENCE

3
1
1
6
4
1
4
4
4
2
1
9

455
208
125
599
770
261
374
297
608
196
988
573
902

OF

471
209
127
609
779
263
378
297
618
201
990
575
927

.8
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.1
.5

.2
.7
.2
1
.3

.

THE DEPARTMENTS
CAUSE

ANALYZED

BY

That the extremes of change may be shown, the tables in this
section (Tables 20 to 34) consist of two 5-year periods separated by
a 5-year interval. In order to give readily comparable rates they
are computed on the basis of 10,000,000 hours’ exposure for frequency
and 10,000 hours’ for severity.
It is well to note in this connection that the severity rates are
necessarily more irregular than the frequency rates. This is due
to the fact that in frequency a case of injury counts as one unit,
since in determining frequency rates the number of accidents is
divided by the number of man-hours while in severity the same case,
if a death, is rated at 6,000 units because each fatal accident is charged,
under the standard time-allowance schedule, with 6,000 days7 lost
time.
In a number of the tables which follow it will be observed that
for the first period rates for the causes which may be regarded as
characteristic of the department are given, while those which the
department shares with other industries are not separately given but
are included under “ Unclassified.” This omission which makes
comparison of the two 5-year periods difficult, is due to the fact that




A C C ID E N T E X P E R IE N C E IN IR O N A N D S T E E L IN D U S T R Y

147

when the rates for the first period were compiled only the character­
istic causes were considered, and when at the close of the second
period it seemed desirable to show all the primary cause groups it
was not possible to go back and compute the missing items.
BLAST FURNACES

In 1910 the highest frequency rate (143) was for falling objects;
in 1924 the highest (35.3) was for handling. In severity falls of
persons was highest (34.3) in 1910 and hot substances (19.73) in 1924.
T a b le

2 0 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for blast furnaces, 1910 to 1914

and 1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

21.6
19.7
113.2
78.7
143.0
108.3
138.0

38.3
2.3
132.7
33.7
55.3
94.3
65.0

23.0
6.0
89.3
53.0
66.7
74.3
103.0

28.0
4.0
86.6
26.0
62.3
56.3
40.3

57.4
43.0
31.7
43.0
65.7

17.6
13.7
50.0
23.1
21.9
61.2
41.7

7.2
8.7
30.2
17.9
14.3
41.4
26.5

10.1
8.1
32.6
12.7
16.6
27.9
27.9

12.2
9.1
34. 5
14.7
15. 6
37.1
20.9

15.2
6.8
30.2
15.8
18.7
35.3
20.5

Total.................................. .. 622.5

421.6

415.3

303.5

249.5

229.2

146.2

135.9

144.1

142.5

Machinery__________ _____ ____
Vehicles_______________________
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects________________
Handling ___................................
Unclassified___________________

8.7

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery................... .................
Vehicles____ ___________ ______
Hot substances______________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects__________ _____ _
Handling______________________
Unclassified-. _______________
Total___________________

1.3
5.3
2.0
34.3
1.7
3.3
20.3

0.6
16.0
20.3
1.0
2.7
1.3
16.7

2.0

14.0

0.3

.6
.7
.7
1.3
14.3

4.3
14.0
.3
2.3
14.0

4.6
1.0
.7
2.3
39.0

3.31
2.12
11.87
.31
1.08
1.56
3.00

1.10
.11
18.08
13.38
.28
.88
5. 68

7.11
4. 55
9.41
2.80
.37
.83
2.81

7.60
7.14
4.76
3. 79
.43
1.14
7.01

8.04
2.05
19.73
2.32
4.35
2.82
7.76

68.2

56.6

19.6

48.9

47.9

23. 25

39. 51

27. 88

31. 87

47.07

BESSEMER CONVERTERS

The exposure available for Bessemer converters is not so large as
could be desired. In general it is not considered good practice to
compute rates unless the number of w
rorkers is 1,000 or more, but an
exception has been made in the case of the Bessemer department
because it is still an important steel-making process.
In both 1910 and 1924 the highest accident frequency is found to
be due to handling (136 and 34.4, respectively). In severity hot
substances are highest in 1910 and falling objects (5.32) in 1924.




148

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T a b le

21 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for Bessemer converters, 1910 to
1914 and 1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1912

1911

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery_______________
81.0
Vehicles. ____ _______________
51.0
H ot substances_______________ 106.0
Falls of p e rso n s................... .. .
0)
Falling objects____ ___________
0)
Handling______________________ 136.0
_
_ ______ 463.0
_
U n c la ssifie d .._

45.0
?5.0
70.0
0)
0)
65.0
259.0

25.0
30.0
140.0
0)
0
21.0
334.0

42.0
15.0
91.0
0)
0)
65.0
206.0

69.0
0)
(i)
17.0
98.0

38.6
14.7
36.7
17.3
35.2
99.9
64.4

16.9
15.6
27.1
11.6
30.9
66.9
36.2

9.1
4. 5
27.2
6.4
17.3
40.0
29.1

18. 5
14.8
30.3
16.3
34.8
65.2
17.8

16.3
7.3
17.1
7. 2
22.0
34.3
17.2

837.0

464.0

550.0

419.0

219.0

302.1

205.2

133.6

197.7

121.5

T o t a l ... ______________ _

35.0

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours' exposure)

Machinery___________ ________
Vehicles _______ _______________
Hot substances_______________
Falls of p e r s o n s .-.____
Falling objects___ __
_
Handling _ _ _ _____________
Unclassified__________ ________

2.0
1.0
61.0
0)
0)
2.0
37.0

1.0
1.0
2.0
0
(i)
14.0
3.0

1.0
1.0
2.0
0)
0)
.3
8.7

1.0
27.0
2.0
0)
(!)
1.0
3.0

2.0
0)
0)
5.0
46.0

6.19
.41
4.69
.35
.65
2.47
1.70

8.09
.38
.64
.39
.48
1.75
1. 61

0. 22
. 13
.67
. 17
. 52
1.72
.40

9.14
4.97
9. 57
.59
. 94
2.38
3.03

1. 79
. 24
.42
. 19
5. 32
1. 22
5.09

Total_____________ ______

103.0

21.0

13.0

34.0

59.0

16.46

13. 34

3.83

30.62

14. 27

6.0

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified.”

OPEN-HEARTH FURNACES

In the first period the greatest accident frequency (133) in openhearth furnaces is found in hot substances in 1911 while hot substances
leads in severity (23) in 1914. In the second period frequency is
highest in handling (99) and severity in machinery (15.37), both in 1920.
Frequency shows a very marked decline from period to period,
while severity is irregular with only a slight tendency downward.
T able

22.— Accident frequency and severity rates for open-hearth furnaces, 1910 to
1914 and 1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

j 1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

M ach in ery.................................... 86.0
Vehicles . . ..................................
28.0
Hot substances.______________ 122.0
Falls of persons.......... .................
0)
Falling objects ----------------------0)
Handling.................. ..................... 111.0
292.0
Unclassified...............................

70.0
27.0
133.0
0)
0)
82.0
198.0

61.0
42.0
127.0
0)
0)
84.0
209.0

44.0
49.0
110.0
0)
0)
77.0
225.0

47.0
8 .0
83.0
0)
0)
75.0
169.0

49.6
28.0
72.1
27.8
41.0
99.0
51.7

26.0
15,0
50.2
28.]
42.7
87.9
43.2

25.9
13.3
39.8
21.4
37.5
57.8
30.5

33. 5‘
13.6
47.1
21.7
29.7
47.6
26.7

23.2
10.1
43.4
23.2
33.1
59.8
21.4

639.0

510.0

523.0

505.0

382.0

369.2

293.1

226.2

219.9

214.2

Total___________________

Severity rate (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery......................... ...........
Vehicles..........................................
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons............................
Falling objects .............................
H and ling......................................
U nclassified.................................

19.3
11.0
3.0
0)
0)
3.0
13.7

10.0
10.0
3.0
0)
0)
1.0
3.0

2.0
12.0
9.0
0)
0)
1.0
10.0

1.0
17.0
18.0
0)
0)
1.0
44.0

1.0
4.0
23.0
0)
(0
2.0
3.0

15.37
11.15
8.62
1.75
5.66
3 76
3.55

3.40
2.90
5.62
.50
.73
5.43
5.11

6. 62
2.41
7.56
.38
2. 59
1. 30
.90

13.28
11.08
9.49
5.03
4.07
2. 21
3.89

10.87
5.24
6.48
4.59
2.63
3.05
.26

Total....................................

50.0

27.0

34.0

81.0

33.0

49.86

23. 69

21. 76

49.05

33.12

1Not separately show included in “ U classified
n;
n
.***




ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

149

FOUNDRIES

The foundries show on the whole high accident frequency and
moderate accident severity. The downward trend is not clearly
traceable, although a different presentation indicates that there
was such a trend, though not very pronounced.
The irregular character of the rates in this department is illustrated
when it is noticed that the highest frequency (251.6) occurs in han­
dling in 1923 of the second period, while the highest severity (57) is
in machinery in 1912 of the first period.
The failure of the foundries to make a significant change for the
better is disappointing, since some large concerns have done excellent
safety work with marked success.
T a b le

3 3 .—

Accident frequency and severity rates for foundries , 1910 to 1914 and
1920 to 1924 , by y e®r and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922 | 1923 J 1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours* exposure)
84.0
Machinery................................. . . 131.0
3.0
Vehicles..........................................
Hot substances...................... . . 118.0 " o i.'o "
Falls of persons............................
0)
0)
Falling objects...........................
0)
0)
H a n d lin g .............................. ....... 165.0 206.0
Unclassified................................... 320.0 236.0
Total....................................

737.0

617.0

183.0
3.0
79.0

74.0
7.0
81.0

108.0

205.0
275.0

145.0
191.0

120.0
260.0

116.6
6.0
38.4
23.0
80.6
195.1
94.5

0)
0)

0)
0)

0)
0)

745.0

498.0

428.0

554.2

6.0
34.0

98.1
7.0
20.5
27.5
53.7
151.3
84.1

123.8
7.6
48.4
32.7
118.6
236.2
109.1

62.4
10.0
45.4
33.6
79.7
251.6
112.2

442.2

676.4

594.9

84.1

5.0
38.8
23.9
69.9
151.8
111.3
484.8

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)
Machinery---------------------- -------Vehicles_______________________
Hot substances.......................... ..
Falls fp erso n s ___ ______ . . .
Falling objects.............. ...............
Handling
____________ _____
Unclassified ________ _____ ____
Total____________________

1.0
6.0

0)
0)

6.0
33.0

0)
0)

0)
0)

4.0
3.0

1.0
.3
1.0
0)
0)
7.0
.7

12.0

72.0

66.0

35.0

10.0

3.0

32.0

57.0

1.0

2.0

1.0

4.0

27.0

0)
0)

2.0
3.0

8.83
.24
1.27
.26
1.22
2. 74
1. 55

2. 73
4.50
1.63
.34
1.18
3.10
.81

9.10
.23
.60
.62
1. 73
3.26
.94

10.66
.22
.70
.44
1.10
4. 56
1.05

4.96
.07
.62
.28
2.19
2. 03
1.17

16.11

14.29

14.48

18. 73

11.32

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified.”

HEAVY ROILING MILLS

In Table 24 there is a very conspicuous decline in frequency in
the second period and a less marked decline in severity.
The highest frequency (82) appears in machinery in 1911 and the
highest severity (14) is also in machinery in 1910 and in hot sub­
stances in 1913.




150

STATISTICS O F IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID E N T S

24 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for heavy rolling mills, 1910 to

T able

1914 and 1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause
Accident cause

1910

1911

Machinery. ______ ___________
Vehicles_______________________
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects________________
Handling____ . . . . . . . . .
Unclassified. . _________

75.0
13.0
40.0
C)
1
0)
0)
343. 0

82.0
10.0
34.0
0)
0)
0)
339.0

56.0
11.0
37.0
0)
0)
0)
339.0

51.0
11.0
30.0
0)
0)
0)
240.0

45.0
3.0
25.0
(0
0)
0)
118.0

44.8
7.4
25.9
22.3
33.1
89.7
37.8

36.1
3.4
15.4
16.8
23. 7
60.9
21.4

34.4
3.8
12.6
13.2
30.6
45.9
23.6

33.9
5.0
15.1
15.4
21.2
42.0
18.8

40.6
3.0
11.0
18.9
24.9
38.8
21.4

Total___________________

471. 0

465.0

443.0

332.0

191.0

261.0

177. 7

203.5

151.4

158.6

1912

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 1.0,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)
14. 0
1.0
5.0
0
0)
0)
23.0

12.0
.3
6.0
(0
(0
0)
20.7

2.0
1.0
6.0
0)
0)
0)
7.0

1.0
.3
14.0
(0
0)
0)
4.7

2.0 1
1.0
8.0
0)
0)
0)
4.0

Total____________________ j -13.0

39.0

16.0

20.0

15.0

Machinery.
------------------------V e h i c l e s . . ________ . . . . .
Hot substances________ . . . _
Falls of persons____________
Falling objects_______ _ ____
Handling______________________
Unclassified.. _______________ 1

9. 09
.51
1.82
1. 79
2.10
1.68
.45

6. 87
1.17
.38
.45
.92
2. 01
.29

7. 30
4. 27
2. 37
2. 44
1.16
1. 63
1.18

8. 91
3. 71
.92
.38
2. 52
1.93
1.74

13. 52
2.87
.15
.29
.94
1.56
.46

17. 44

12. 09

20. 35

20.11

19.79

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified.”

PLATE MILLS

Plate mills are among the most regular in declining accident rates
of any department covered by this study. Machinery in 1910 has
the highest accident frequency (164) and the same cause has the
highest accident severity (34) in the same year.
Table 25 illustrates again rather forcibly that frequency rates are
not a complete indication regarding the places where accident pre­
vention may be profitably applied. If in the second period frequency
alone be considered, it would appear that in every year of the
period except 1924 accidents due to handling should have the major
share of attention. Turning to severity, however, it will be found that
from that standpoint only in 1922 is handling of param ount importance.
T able

25 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for plate mills, 1910 to 1914 and
1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause
1912 j 1913

1914

Accident cause

1910

1911

1920

1921 | 1922

Machinery____________________
Vehicles_______________________
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects________________
Handling______________________
Unclassified___________________

164.0
18.0
53.0
0)
0)
0)
491.0

120.0
12.0
47.0
0)
0)
0)
450.0

135.0
18.0
55.0
0)
0)
0)
552.0

93.0
17.0
55.0
0)
0)
0)
434.0

49.0
2.0
24„0
0)
0)
0)
220.0

49.3
1.6
23.0
16.1
40.8
101.0
68.4

31.9
2.2
15.4
11.0
27.5
87.6
39.5

35.4
1.6
24.4
15.0
53.5
62.1
40.1

27.5
3.4
11.0
8.9
33.7
41.2
9.6

82.0

Total....................................

726.0

629.0

760.0

599.0

295.0

300.2

215.1

232.1

135.3

163.2

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

12.0
17.6
38.4
34.4
28.8

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)
Machinery........... - ........................
Vehicles. ____
_ _________
Hot substances.. ____________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects________________
Handling______________________
Unclassified.. . ______________

34.0
15.0
1.0
0)
0)
0)
11.0

2.0
.3
1.0
0)
(9
0)
10.7

8.0
.3
1.0
0)
0)
0)
21.7

17.0
14.0
1.0
0)
0)
0)
6.0

18. 83
.01
3. 77
.21
.56
1.12
3. 76

1. 52
.02
.19
.11
6. 82
3. 77
.70

1. 66
.20
.54
.33
.82
2.36
.44

5. 35
.16
.20
4. 72
.64
3.58
.23

8.08

.3
0)
0)
0)
5.4

Total____________________

61.0

14.0

31.0

38.0

7.0

28.26

13.13

6. 35

14.88

17.63

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified.”




1.3

.39
.42
5. 57
2.49
.68

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

151

SHEET MILLS

It was found in an earlier study1 of sheet mills that, in the 5-year
period ending in 1914 the hot-mill crews had rising accident rates
both in frequency and severity. While Table 26 does not go into
details as did the table in the earlier study, the rates shown for machin­
ery and handling give an approximate idea of what is happening
among hot-mill workers. An examination of these groups in the
second 5-year period will show somewhat lower rates and a tendency
to decline.
Since neither the machines nor the handling operations have been
materially modified, in the second period as compared with the first,
this improvement must be largely due to greater skill and care on the
part of the workers.
The highest frequency (186) is found in handling in 1912 and the
highest severity (11) in machinery in 1911.
T able

2 6 .—

Accident frequency and severity rates for sheet mills, 1910 to 1914 and
1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

M achinery............................... ..
Vehicles.......................... ...............
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects_______ ________
Handling............ ................. .........
Unclassified............... ...................

43.0
0)
16.0
0)
0)
147.0
135.0

64.0
0)
15.0
0)
0)
103.0
181.0

59.0
(0
25.0
0)
0)
186. 0
305.0

T otal.............. .....................

341.0

363. 0

491.0

,

66.0
0)
10.0
0)
0)
125.0
256.0

61.0
0)
21.0
0)
0)
61.0
166.0

32.0
3.1
28.3
13.3
14.2
158.7
59.5

29.2
3.9
23.5
15.2
18.4
154.9
54.0

34.0
8.7
30.4
24.6
29.3
179.6
55.0

29.9
4.1
15.3
10.5
14.6
85.8
27.1

15.6
4.0
11.8
7.8
7.8
57.3
13.4

381.0

309.0

309.3

299.1

361.6

187.3

117.1

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery___________ ________
Vehicles____________ __________
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons_______________
Falling objects_____ __________
Handling________________
Unclassified._________________

4.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
2.0
40.7

11.0
0)
.3
C)
1
0)
1.0
35.7

5.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
2.0
12.7

8.0
0)
.3
C)
1
0)
2.0
13. 7

2.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
1.0
15.7

5.58
2.08
.31
.27
.14
4. 30
.44

8.09
.06
.23
2.90
.39
2.98
3. 23

4.99
.19
2.64
.33
1.07
5. 43
.62

8.24
2.18
.32
.17
.39
3.56
.30

5.74
.08
.29
2.56
.23
2. 50
.32

Total___________________

47.0

48.0

20.0

24.0

19.0

13.12

17. 88

15. 27

15.16

11. 72

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified. ”

TUBE MILLS

While accident frequency rates in tube mills were very high in the
early part of the first 5-year period, a very rapid decline occurred
before the close of that period and continued to 1924. A decline in
accident severity in the first 5-year period is not easily observable
and in the second period the irregularities obscure the trend, but if a
12-month moving average be computed a downward trend will be
indicated.
When the two periods are considered in comparison it will be
evident that a remarkable reduction of both frequency and severity
has taken place.
Accident frequency (150) was highest in 1910 in machinery, while
accident severity (28) was highest in 1912 in machinery.
i U . S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. N o. 298, p. 81.




152

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T able

27.— Accident frequency and severity rates for tube mills, 1910 to 1914 and
1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1911

1912

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 hours’ exposure)

M achinery......... .
Vehicles________
Hot substances..
Falls of persons..
Falling objects...
Handling_______
Unclassified____

150.0

89.0

52.0

20.0

82.0
0)
0)
0)
522.0

50.0
(0
0)
0)
422.0

16.0
0)
0)
0)
194.0

17.0
0)
0)
0)
114.0

33.8
3.6
23.5
10.1
20.0
73.9
48.6

23.9
1.6
17.1
9.3
23.3
48.7
39.4

21.2
4.6
17.7
15.0
27.2
50.9
35.7

26.0
2.6
11.6
10.3
27.8
46.6
18.4

11.1
1.0
5.5
7.0
17.0
25.5
12.0

762.0

Total..

149.0

60.0
0)
0)
0)
552.0

753.0

561.0

262.0

151.0

213.5

163.3

172.3

143.3

79.1

6.55

3.40

1. 53
1.60

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

18.0

1.0
0)

.3
0)

8
9.0

0)
7.7

18.0

Total..

2.3

1.0
0)

Machinery_____
V eh icles..............
Hot substances..
Falls of persons..
Falling objects. _
Handling_______
Unclassified____

8

4 .7

1.0
0)
0)
0)
28.7

0)
0)
0)
8.0

4.09
2.75
1. 76
1. 53
1.79
1.47
1.76

11.0

33.0

31.0

10.0

15.15

1.3

2.0

4. 51
.09
2.80
.22
.58
3. 34
1.23

3.53
.14
.49
.41
.51

3.38

4.10
.75

.13
.17
3.06
2.83
1.43

12.77

11.12

15.50

11.04

2. 66

.02

i Not separately shown; included in “ Unclassified.”

FABRICATING SHOPS

Machines, including cranes and hoists, are the important elements
of hazards in these plants. Accident frequency reaches the top record
(373) for machinery in 1912 and drops to 51.4 in 1924; the percentage
of decline is 86.2.
Accident severity goes from 43 in 1910 to 8.68 in 1924, a drop of
79.8 per cent.
T able

28 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for fabricaiing shops, 1910 to
1914 and 1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1912 j 1913

1911

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

M achinery......... ........................... 293.0
Vehicles................................... ..
0
21.0
H ot substances............................
Falls of persons............................
0)
Falling objects.......... ............. ..
0)
Handling______________ _______
0)
U n classified ................................ 633. 0
T o ta l...........- ------------------ 947. 0

292.0
0)
26.0
0)
0)
0)
673. 0

373.0
0)
35.0
0)
0)
0)
640.0

357.0
0)
29.0
0)
0)
0)
550.0

991.0 1,048.0 | 966. 0

220.0
116.2
7.8
0)
11.0
20.5
24.9
0)
56.6
0)
140.2
0)
430. 0 ! 96.0
061. 0

462.2

84.9
4.8
10.9
18.4
49.2
98. 3
47.9

92.6
3.9
10.4
24.6
44.4
88.9
67.1

77.2
6.0
12.7
19.5
36.0
74.9
16.5

51.4
3.5
10.5
26.6
33.8
57.2
21.9

314.4

331.9

242.8

204.9

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

M achinery____________________
Vehicles___ __ _ _ ___________
Hot substances
Falls of persons _. _ . ..........
Falling objects________________
Handling________________ _____
Unclassified________ _______
Total___________________

5.0
I1
)
0.3
0)
0)
0)
18.0

18.0
C)
1

0)
0)
0)
7.0

33. 0
0)
1.0
0)
o
0)
24.0

25.0

58.0

23.3

43.0
0)

18.0
0)

0)
0)
0)
31.0
74.0

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified ”




0)
0)
0)
8.0

11.94
.11
4. 58
.35
.94
2. 96
.81

17.80
.28
2. 33
.16
1.54
2.81
.47

13.68
.09
. 15
.57
6.41
2. 98
.74

7.39
4. 62
.28
.35
7.25
4. 74
.20

8.68
.14
4.34
9. 25
3.85
4.34
.34

26.0

21. 69

25. 39

24. 62

24.83

30.94

ACCIDEN T EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL IN D U STRY

153

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT

Machinery is naturally a more important hazard in the mechanical
department than in most of the other departments. While frequency
of machine accidents declines, the rate going from 140 in 1910 to
19.3 in 1924, the severity of such accidents seems rather to increase.
However, the general frequency and severity are decidedly lower in
the second period than in the first. In the second period accidents
due to handling are the most frequent in each of the five years. The
severity rates are on the whole highest for machinery, followed by
those due to falls of persons.
T able

29 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for mechanical departments, 1910
to 1914 and 1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

M achinery.. . ____ ___________ 140.0
Vehicles_______________________
0)
33.0
H ot substances_______________
Falls of persons______________
0)
Falling objects_________ ______
0)
Handling_____________ _______ _
0)
Unclassified....... ........................... 442.0

125.0
0)
50.0
0)
0)
0)
311.0

101.0
0)
30.0
0)
0)
0)
279.0

51.0
0)
35.0
0)
0)
0)
282.0

64.0
0)
18.0
0)
0)
0)
273.0

54.0
4.8
24.8
27.3
34.1
95.5
53.1

36.2
2.9
15.0
20.6
30.1
65.8
34.5

24.9
3.6
11.4
20.2
21.3
50.0
26.9

20.3
3.9
10.5
14.2
14.6
34.0
16.5

19.3
2.5
8.4
13.2
16.8
23.6
16.3

615.0

486.0

410.0

368.0

355.0

93.6

205.1

158.3

114.0

100.1

T o ta l..................... .............

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery_____ _______________
Vehicles. __ ..................................
Hot substances_______________
Falls of persons____ __________
Falling objects________________
Handling______________________
Unclassified....... ....................... ..
Total _

3.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
0)
40.0

3.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
(l)
27.0

4.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
0)
16.0

2.0
0)
10.0
0)
0)
(0
25.0

7.0
0)
.3
0)
0)
0)
6.0

5. 73
1.04
2. 99
5.08
.75
2.12
.35

3. 41
.12
.23
4. 51
1.51
1. 69
.76

4.04
3. 70
2.44
.79
.55
4. 70
2. 48

5.89
1.39
2.40
1. 52
2. 67
2. 36
4.66

5. 49
.20
2. 27
3.78
1. 52
.79
.56

45. 3

30.3

20.3

37.0

13.3

18.06

12. 23

18. 70

20.89

14.61

i N ot separately shown; included with “ Unclassified.”

YARDS

The interest as to yards centers around the experience with power
vehicles. The frequency rates of such accidents go from 123 in 1910
to 41.9 in 1924. This would be an excellent record if severity were
not considered. In 1910 severity of vehicular accidents was 26 and
in 1924 it was 37.03. In four of the five years the second period
records higher severity rates than corresponding years of the first
period.
It is a well-recognized fact that the hazards of power-vehicle oper­
ation are difficult to combat. The steel mills have always had the
dangers arising from the steam locomotive, both standard gauge
where the railways enter for bringing raw material and narrow gauge
for intraplant transportation. In recent years there has been an
increased use of motor trucks, thus transferring to new localities the
hazard of such moving bodies. Whether this has influenced the
severity rates it is not possible to determine from the available data.
The severity rates for machinery are, in general, next to those for
vehicles.




154

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T a b le

30.— Accident frequency and severity rates for yards, 1910 to 1914 and 1920
to 1924j by year and accident cause
1910

Accident cause

1911

1912

1913

1914

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

T o ta l...................

-

23.0
123.0
19.0
0)
109.0
(0
209.0

18.0
79.0
17.0
0)
83.0
0)
166.0

40.0
112.0
14.0
0)
67.0
0)
172.0

22.0
67.0
11.0
0)
36.0
0)
104.0

17.0
74.0
5.0
0)
27.0
0)
118.0

19.0
88.9
16.5
21.5
17.5
70.4
46.9

23.0
69.5
15.0
27.1
31.3
94.9
36.2

17.7
40i8
2.6
14.2
18.6
40.8
19.5

31.7
73.6
9.2
36.8
37.8
50.1
33.7

21.6
41.9
8.8
28.9
24.8
44.0
25.7

483.0

M achinery____________________
Vehicles.-- __ ______ TTnt, snhst.a nr.p.s
Falls of persons
__
Falling objects__________ - _
Handling
________
Unclassified___________ ______

363.0

405.0

240.0

241.0

280.7

297.0

154.2

272.9

195.7

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

T o t a l___________ _____

1.0
26.0
1.0
0)
1.0
0)
6.0

1.0
27.0
.3
0)
2.0
0)
4.0

14.0
11.0
.3
0)
3.0
0)
2.0

0.3
4.0

2.0
3.0

0)
1.0
0)
2.0

35.0

Machinery_____ _______________
Vehicles_______________________
Hot substances.
Falls of persons____ _____ _____
Falling objects_______
_
_
H a n d lin g __________ _____ __ _
Unclassified_____ _____ ________

34.3

30.3

7.3

0)
1.0
0)
19.0

0. 51
37. 33
.22
.38
.36
2.83
.44

11.24
22. 31
.24
.57
.56
2.11
2. 23

11.59
22.29
.05
5. 68
.49
6. 37
.24

11.13
35.20
. 14
.56
. 72
2. 70
.45

8.17
37. 03
.22
.45
1.13
1.07
.76

25.0

42.07

40. 26

46. 71

50.90

48.83

1 N ot separately shown; included in “ Unclassified.”

MISCELLANEOUS ROLLING MILLS

The group of miscellaneous rolling mills is of interest because it
contains a large number of hand-operated mills and may be regarded
as giving a fair idea of the experience of such mills. The records
cover only the last 5-year period. In that period there has been a
marked decline in accident frequency and a definite downward trend
in accident severity.
T able

31. — Accident frequency and severity rates for miscellaneous rolling mills,
1920 to 1924, by year and accident cause
Accident cause

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery_____________________________________________
Vehicles------------------------------------------------------------------------Hot substances________________________________________
Falls of persons________________________________________
Falling objects_________________________________________
Handling_______________________________________________
U n c la s s ifie d ..._____________ ______ ___________________

64.5
5.0
44.1
22.5
31.5
124.0
31.9

54.5
5.6
28.6
16.0
31.4
94.8
30.0

39.7
6.0
27.2
7.8
41.9
49.7
27.6

44.4
2.8
18.0
15.6
27.1
60.4
22.9

29.1
2.9
22.6
16.0
34.3
58.5
18.2

Total.............................................. ...................................

323.5

260.9

199.9

191.2

181.6

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery...................................................................................
Vehicles------------------------------------------ ----------------------------H ot substances........................ ............... ................. ...............
Falls of persons................ „.......................................................
Falling objects........ ...................................................................
Handling.................. ................................... ....................... .......
Unclassified.................................................................................

3.62
2.26
3.65
1.83
3.17
2.71
.46

4.02
.18
.51
.20
.67
3.03
.52

3.39
2.82
4.87
2.83
.97
1.35
.39

4.97
.04
.37
.40
2.61
2.62
.55

7.97
.14
.53
.29
.86
1.36
.34

Total..................................................................................

17.70

9.13

16.62

11.56

11.49




155

ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN IRON AND STEEL IN D U STRY

ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT

In the electrical department during the five years 1920 to 1924
accident frequency declined but accident severity increased. Since
the same condition is found in the large group in which causes were
not recorded, it seems necessary to conclude that safety effort in this
department has not been so successful as in others.
Two observations are pertinent to the situation: 1. When there
is a marked decline in accident frequency it is very easy to regard
this as a true index and to overlook the fact that accident severity is
rising; 2. The use of electricity has been increasing enormously and
it may well be that this increase has outrun the precautions taken
to render its use safe.
T able

32 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for the electrical department, 1920
to 1924, by year and accident cause

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

Accident cause

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours' exposure)
M achinery____
Vehicles_______
Hot substances.
Falls of persons.
Falling objects..
Handling______
Unclassified___

14.5
5.8
72.6
42.5
27.0
80. 2
42.6

23.9
2.6
38.8
^9.5
17.4
49. 5
52.4

27.6
1.3
40.7
26.3
18.4
14.4
18.4

25.7
6.1
24.4
28.1
9.8
24.4
19.6

26.2
17.8
9.5
8.4
16.7

Total____

284. 2

214.1

147.1

138.1

91.7

13.1

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)
Machinery_____
Vehicles________
Hot substances .
Falls of persons.
Falling objects..
Handling______
Unclassified___

1.48
5.85
.85
5.78
.77
1.64
.31

Total____

1

0.37
.01
8.64
.48
.26
.57
1.53

2.82
7.88
.56
.71
.41
.21
.19

2.30
.20
7.89
8. 55
.15
.82
.34

11.98
7.00
7.82
.65
.25
.49
.41

16.68

11.86

12. 78

20. 25

28.60

WIRE-DRAWING

Only the experience of the last 5-year period is available for the
wire drawing department. The record shows that accident fre­
quency declined to a considerable degree while accident severity
was pretty nearly the same in three of the years, going up sharply in
the other two. In 1921 there were serious accidents in the handling
of material, while in 1923 machinery furnished the heaviest severity
(22.50). With the old type of wire-drawing benches there was
very great danger that a workman’s hand would be caught in a kink
of the wire. If this happened, the loss of part or all of the hand was
almost sure to occur. The modern type of mill, now almost uni­
versal, has an automatic stop which greatly reduces this hazard.




156

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T a b le

33.— Accident frequency and severity rates for wire
by year and accident cause
1920

ing, 1920 to 1924>

1921

1922

1923

1924

Accident cause
Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery____
Vehicles_______
Hot substances.
Falls of persons.
Falling objects..
Handling______
Unclassified___

42.0
2.0
21.0
21.0
17.0
123.0
89.0

20. 9
3.0
17.9
18.0
6.0
66.0
29. 9

21.0
3.0
6.0
8.0
9.0
68.0
50.0

32.6
2.5
15.1
7.5
.12.6
50.2
60.2

33.0

Total____

315.0

161.7

165.0

180.7

109.0

6.0
6.0
8.0
34.0
22.0

Severity rates (p«ir 10,000 hours’ exposure)

8. 20

Machinery_____
Vehicles________
Hot substances..
Falls of persons..
Falling objects...
Handling_______
Unclassified____

4. 70
2. 00

3.60
0)
.10

.20
4. 70

4.20
.70
14. 30
5.20

.20
.20
1. 30
8.60

14.10

31.10

14. 00

0)

Total..

.10
.10

22.50
.70
.23
.11
.30
1.23

13.60
.20
0)I

11.20

.30
.50

.20

36.27

14.80

1 N ot separately; included in "Unclassified.”

HOT ROLLIING

OF SHEETS

The group on which the accident rates for hot rolling of sheets are
based is rather small and may not represent typical conditions. Both
frequency and severity rates are highly irregular and do not exhibit
a consistent trend.
T able

34 .— Accident frequency and severity rates for hot sheet rolling, 1920 to 1924>
by year and accident cause

Accident cause

1920

1921

j

1922

1923

1924

Frequency rates (per 10,000,000 hours’ exposure)

M achinery..... ..................... ............. ................... ................. ..
Vehicles.
_______________ _________ ______ ______ _
Hot substances._ ________________ __________ _____
Falls of p e r s o n ..____________ ___________ ___________
. . . . . . _ _________
Falling objects_______________
Handling
__________________________ ____ ________ ____
Unclassified______________________ - ________________

28.0
2.0
14.0
26.0
25.0
180.0
72.0

11.7
23.0
17.0
41.0
40.0
103.0
30.0

36.0
18.0
16.0
53.0
180.0
71.0

90.0
26.0
10.3
77.0
77.0
130.0
23.2

36.0
3.0
3.0
11.0
15.0
67.0
17.0

T otal. ____________ ____ . . . _________ _____________

347.0

265.7

374.0

433.5

152.0

Severity rates (per 10,000 hours’ exposure)

Machinery_____
Vehicles________
Hot substances .
Falls of person..
Falling objects._
Handling_______
Unclassified____
Total..




2. 80
.20
.20
.50
2.20
.70

2. 30
.30
1.20
1.20
2. 70
1.30
1.40

0.90
.10
. 10
3. 30
1.50
1.80
4. 70

8.90
3.00
2.00
4. 60
1.20
1. 37
3. 60

12.30
.10
. 10
.50
9. 40
1.30
.50

6.60

10.40

12.40

24. 67

24. 20

ACCID EN T EXPERIEN CE IN IRON AND STEEL, IN D U ST R Y

157

The foregoing discussion gives a fair idea of the relative importance
of the main cause groups. Considered from the standpoint of accident
severity machinery still contributes the largest share of the damage.
On the accident frequency side handling of tools and material is the
major factor.
This situation suggests at once the nature and the point of appli­
cation of remedial measures. Machine accidents are mainly con­
trollable by various forms of “ engineering revision.” 2 The cases due
to handling may be reduced by instruction, which renders the worker
skillful and properly careful. Too much emphasis can not be placed
upon the fact that the development of skill is much more important
than cautionary exhortation.
2 See U . S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bui. 298, pp. 192-214.

36904°— 29------- 11




Chapter V.— ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES IN MINES,
QUARRIES, AND METALLURGICAL WORKS

The information in this section is derived from the publications of
the United States Bureau of Mines, which issues very detailed annual
statements covering accidents in mines and kindred industries. The
statistical record is supplemented by two charts showing the 17-year
trend (15 years for coke ovens) in each industry group of fatal and
nonfatal (fatal only in coal mines) accidents.
The trends of accident frequency and severity rates for all industry
groups, including railroads, based on data set forth in the next chapter,
appear in the following two charts:
C

hart

6

Rates

1.40

C hart 7

158




159

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES
COAL M IN E S

The accident rates for coal mines have been converted to the number
per 1,000,000 hours* exposure, in order to render them comparable
with those found in other portions of this bulletin. Only fatal acci­
dents are included, as the record of nonfatal injuries is not available.
It will be noted that in Table 35 two methods of presenting the
facts are used, namely, the rate per 1,000,000 hours* exposure and the
rate per 1,000,000 tons mined. Consideration of both these rates
is desirable inasmuch as they give two distinct views of the conditions
reviewed. The rate per 1,000,000 hours measures the hazard to which
the men are exposed, while the rate per 1,000,000 tons measures the
cost of coal in terms of human injury. A lessened cost accompanied
by increased hazard can not be regarded as satisfactory. In fact,
the only condition which can be so regarded is one in which both
rates are declining with reasonable rapidity.
From 1907 to 1927 fatalities per 1,000,000 hours* exposure declined
28.8 per cent, while fatalities per 1,000,000 tons mined declined 45
per cent. This more rapid decline of cost as compared with hazard
is largely due to the introduction of machinery and improved methods.
Although improvement in the rates has not been at all regular or
consistent through the years, the substantial drop in 1927 as compared
to 1907 is worthy of note.
T

able

3 5 . — M en employed, average production per man, men killed, and fatality

rates in coal mines in the United States, 1907 to 1927, by year

M en employed

Year

Tons mined
(short
tons)

M en
killed
Fullyear
work­
ers

Actual
number

1907.
19081909.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
192119221923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.

477,892,536
409, 309,857
460,807, 263
501, 596,378
496,371,126
534, 466, 580
570,048,125
513, 525,477
531, 619,487
590,098,175
651, 402,374
678, 211,904
553,952,259
658, 264,932
506,395,401
476,951,121
657,903,671
571,613,400
581,869,890
657,804,437
| .'<97,858,916

Average
production
per man
(tons)

674,613
678,873
666,535
725,030
728,348
722,662
747, 644
763,185
734,008
720, 971
757,317
762,426
776,569
784,621
823,253
848, 932
860, 560
779, 613
748,805
759,033
759,177

519,452
441, 267
531, 689
534,122
541, 997
593,131
526, 598
511, 598
565, 766
634, 666
654,973
542, 217
601, 283
474, 529
405, 056
560, 000
499, 894
480, 227
559, 426
503, 065

LOCATION AND

Per
year

Per
day

708
603
691
692
682
740
762
673
724
818
860
890
713
839
615
565
764
733
777
867
788

3.07
3.09
3.14
3.10
3. 29
3.20
3.25
3. 46
3. 48
3. 42
3.45
3.41
3. 65
3. 56
3.92
3. 91
3. 81
4.04
3. 92
3. 96

3,242
2,445
2,642
2,821
2,656
2, 419
2,785
2,454
2,269
2,226
2,696
2,580
2,317
2,271
1,987
1, 979
2,458
2, 381
2,230
2. 518
2,231

Fatality
rate per
1,000,000
hours’
exposure

Produc­
tion per
death
(short
tons)

2.08
1.85

147,407
167,407
174,416
177,808
186,887
220,945
204, 685
209, 261
234,297
265,094
241, 618
262,873
239,082
289,857
254,854
233, 576
267,492
240,072
260,461
261, 241
267, 978

1.77
1.66
1.49
1.57
1.55
1.48
1.31
1.42
1. 31
1.42
1.26
1.40
1. 63
1.46
1.59
1. 55
1.50
1.48

Fatali­
ties per
1,000,000
tons
mined

6.78
5.97
5.73
5.62
5.35
4.53
4.89
4.78
4.27
3. 77
4.14
3.80
4.18
3.45
3.92
4.15
3. 74
4.17
3.84
3.83
3. 73

CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS

Table 36 summarizes the facts regarding the place of occurrence
and the causes of accidents in coal mines from 1916 to 1927. The
underground occupations have much the larger share of fatalities,




160

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

and fully half of the underground fatalities are due to falls of mate­
rial from roof or face. This suggests that there has been a tendency
to overemphasis on the startling “ major casualties” in which an
explosion of gas or dust suddenly snuffs out perhaps hundreds of
lives. Inspection of Table 36 will show that explosions are third in
order of importance, except in 1924, when they were in second place.
The records (not included here) show that up to 1916 considerable
improvement occurred. Since that year the changes have been
irregular with a somewhat upward tendency.
T able

36 .— Fatalities in coal mines in the United States, 1916 to 1927, by year,
place of occurrence, and cause

Place and cause

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

Number of fatalities
Underground:
Falls of roof or face_____
Cars and locomotives. _
Explosions, gas or dust.
Explosives_ __________
_
Electricity
_________
M iscellaneous-________

962 1, 218 1,294 1,100 1,132 1,024
482
390
381
408
341
506
362
129
191
164
170
116
111
135
152
206
128
146
90
79
88
69
76
80
127
129
130
112
269
118

905 1,162 1,062 1,078 1, 214
341
415
350
433
360
311
372
422
536
345
92
114
100
102
96
74
75
81
84
96
77
100
117
104
100

1,149
355
247
110
100
119

Total underground— 2,027 2,379 2,281 2,077 2,020 1,831 1,800 2,255 2,229 2,069 2,365

2,080

Shaft________________________

49

52

52

53

56

36

41

46

29

34

35

29

Surface:
Haulage_______________
Machinery_____________
M iscellaneous__________

75
26
49

114
51
10Q

118
’47
82

93
28
66

78
29
88

45
17
58

54
23
61

59
26
72

70
8
60

40
9
78

50
9
59

46
10
66

Total surface_________

150

265

247

187

195

120

138

157

138

127

118

122

Grand total__________ 2,226 2,696 2,580 2,317 2,271 1,987 1,979 2, 458 2, 396 2,230 2,518

2,231

Fatality rates (per 1,000,000 hours* exposure)
Underground:
Falls of roof or face_____ 0.57
Cars and locomotives. _ .23
Explosions, gas or dust. .10
Explosives------------ -------.09
Electricity--------------------.05
M iscellaneous.________
.16

0.64
.25
.19
.06
.04
.07

0. 66
.26
.07
.07
.04
.06

0. 68
.23
.12
.13
.04
.08

0. 63
.23
.09
.07
.04
.06

0. 72
.24
.08
.11
.06
.08

0. 74
.28
.26
.08
.06
.06

0. 69
.25
.22
.07
.04
.07

0.70
.23
.36
.07
.05
.07

0.75
.25
.24
.07
.06
.07

0. 72
.26
.25
.06
.06
.06

0.76
.24
.16
.07
.07
.08

Total underground—

1.19

1. 25

1.16

1.28

1.12

1.29

1. 48 | 1.34

1.48

1.44

1.41

1.38

Shaft-.................... .....................

.03

.03

.03

.03

.03

.03

.03 i .03

.02

.02

.02

.02

Surface:
Haulage________________
Machinery_____________
Miscellaneous__________

.05
.02
.03

.06
.03
.05

.06
.02
.04

.06
.02
.04

.04
.02
.05

.03
.01
.04

.05
.02
.05

.04
.01
.04

.05
.01
.03

.03
.01
.05

.03
.01
.03

.03
.01
.04

Total surface. ...............

.09

.14

.12

.11

.11

.08

.12

.09

.09

.09

.07

.08

Grand t o t a l ................ |1. 31

1.42

1. 31

1.42

1. 26

1.40

1.63 | 1.46

1.59

1.55 | 1.50

1.48

Table 37 presents a comparison of the hazards of coal mining and
railway operation. The occurrence of a sudden catastrophe in a coal
mine, resulting in the killing of many workers and followed by pro­
longed rescue work which is detailed in the public prints, has given
rise to the general impression that coal mining is unusually hazardous,
even more so than the operation of the railroads of the country
where only one or two workers at a time meet with an accident. The
records prior to 1919 indicate the invalidity of this impression, for




161

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES

the following table shows that in 1919 for the first time the fatality
rate for anthracite mining exceeded that of the railways; it has been
higher each year since except 1920 and 1922. Compared to the
fatality rate in bituminous coal mining the railway rate has been con­
sistently lower each year from 1921 to 1926, inclusive. Considering
the spread of 18 years, there has been a reduction in the fatality rates
of 16.8 per cent in anthracite mines, 14.7 per cent in bituminous coal
mines, and of 59.3 per cent in railway operation.
T able

37.— Comparison of coal mine and steam railway fatality rates, 1910 to 1927,
by year

Fatality rates (per 1,000 em­
ployees)

Fatality rates (per 1,000 em­
ployees)
Year

Year
An­
thracite

1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915.
1916.
1917.
1918.

Bitumi­
nous coal

3.55
4.02
3. 45
3. 52
3. 31
3. 32
3. 47
3. 77
3. 75

4.00
3. 53
3. 36
3.79
3.19
3.02
2.98
3. 50
3. 30

5.41
5.49
5. 22
5.08
4. 73
3.53
4. 07
4. 23
4. 39

A n­
thracite

Railway
trainmen

1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.

4.11
3.38
3.43
1.91
3.23
3.10
2.50
3. 37
3.94

Bitumi­ Railway
nous coal trainmen

2.71
2.78
2.18
2.45
2.77
3.08
3.12
4.86
4.60

3.02
3.60
2.15
2.27
2.61
1.95
2.14
2.08
1.98

Chart 8

M ETAL M INES

Table 38, while not giving a very clear idea of the trend of accident
experience in metal mining, does give an idea of the relative impor­
tance of the accident hazard in various types of mining. It is notice­
able that since 1917 there has been a considerable decrease in the
number of men employed, there being 200,579 in 1917 and 119,699
in 1927. This is due in part to changed methods of mining.




162

STATISTICS OP INDUSTRIAL. ACCIDENTS
38 .— Number of men employed, number of accidents, and accident rates in
metal mines in the United States, 1917 to 1927, by kind, of mine and year

T able

!
t

Kind of mine and year

Fatal accidents

Number
Active
operators employed
Number

Nonfatal accidents 1

Rat e (per
Rate (per
1,000 em­ K umber 1,000 em­
ployees)
ployees)

K in d o f mine
1917
Copper......... .
..............................................
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals-----Lead and zinc (Mississippi V alley)_____ _
N onmetallic mineral _. _
________________

649
3,166
205
309
248

61,275
51,892
57, 230
20, 269
9,913

374
196
191
G
8
23

6.10
3. 78
3.34
3. 35
2.32

19,935
8, 385
12, 278
4, 544
1,144

325.33
161.59
214. 54
224.18
115. 40

T o ta l. .............. ...........................................

4,637

200, 579

852

4. 25

46, 286

230. 76

Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley)-----------Nonmetallic mineral_______________________

524
2, 429
176
236
271

59, 447
43, 643
53,665
14,004
11,847

220
181
179
47
19

3.70
4.15
3. 34
3. 36
1.61

20, 513
7,847
9, 621
3, 746
1,188

345.06
179. 80
179. 28
267. 50
100. 28

Total ............................................................

3, 636

182, 606

646

3. 54

42, 915

235. 01

Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley)___
Nonmetallic mineral_______________________

410
2,430
157
141
245

39,327
32,130
47,676
12, 968
13,161

140
126
139
45
18

3.56
3. 92
2. 92
3. 47
1. 37

12,236
5,469
9,098
3,185
1,518

311.13
170. 21
190.83
245. 60
111. 34

Total._________ _________________ ______

3, 383

145, 262

468

3. 22

31, 506

216. 89

1920
Copper
___________________________________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals____
Iron_____________________________________ ___
Lead and zinc (Mississippi V alley)_______
Nonmetallic mineral_________ __ __________

387
2, 358
154
119
263

35, 254
29, 933
45,990
11, 638
13, 768

128
117
106
36
38

3. 63
3.91
2.30
3.09
2. 76

12,047
5, 704
9, 072
3, 607
2,132

341. 70
190. 56
197. 26
309. 93
154. 85

T otal..................... .......................................

3,281

136, 583

425

3.11

32, 562

238. 40

1921
Copper________________ ________ __________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals____
Iron_______
____________________________
Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley)_______
Nonmetalllic mineral............. ......................... .

357
2,135
122
66
216

18, 300
26, 516
30, 559
6,948
11,606

55
78
65
14
18

3.01
3.06
2.13
2.15
1.55

4,722
5, 352
4,507
2,062
1,961

258.03
209. 75
147. 49
317. 33
168. 96

1918
Copper_____________________________________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals____

1919
C o p p e r_____________________________________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals------

T o ta l-..........................................................

2,896

93.929

230

2. 45

18,604

198.06

1922
Copper_____________________________ _ _ ___
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals____
Iron_____________________________________
Lead and zinc (Mississippi V a lley )......... .
Nonmetallic mineral__________ ______ ______

274
1,942
110
74
199

25,739
27,614
32, 241
8,990
11,113

75
140
83
22
24

2.91
5. 07
2. 57
2. 45
2.16

8,025
6,805
4, 901
3,868
2, 481

311. 78
246. 43
152. 01
430. 26
223. 25

T o ta l.............................................................

2, 599

105, 697

344

3. 25

2G, 080

246. 74

1923
Copper____________________ _________ _______
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals____
Iron_________________________________________
Lead and zinc (Mississippi V alley)____ ___
Nonmetallic mineral_______________________

306
2,104
115
82
218

32,477
30, 525
38, 419
10, 226
11.632

107
114
89
27
30

3.29
3. 73
3. 32
2.64
2.58

11,993
8, 672
5,616
4,894
2,388

369. 28
284.10
146.18
478. 58
205. 30

2, 825 | 123,279

367

2.98

33,563

272. 25

1
271 '
2, 097 ;
104
87
224

32,477
29,718
36,629
12,734
11,570

121
145
97
34
21

3. 73
4.88
2. 65
2.67
1.82

11,858
8,649
4,959
5,718
1,934

365.12
291.04
135.38
449.03
167.16

123,128

418

3. 39

33,118

T o ta l................... ........................................
1924
Copper______________________________________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals____
Iron_______________________________________
Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley)—...........
Nonmetallic mineral_______________________
T o ta l......................................... ................. .
1925
Copper___________________________ ___ _______
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals
Iron_________________________________________
Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley) __...........
Nonmetallic minerals______________________
Total ________ __________________ _____
T im e lost more than 1 day.




2,783
!
249 1
1,989 j
96 j
107
231 |

33,266
33,230
34,339
12,913
12,965

2,672 1 126,713

|
102 1
128
80
40
21
371

268.97

3.07
3. 85
2. 33
3.10
1. 62

12.179
10, 276
5,013
5,636
2,028

1
'
!
i
|
j

366.11
309.24
145.99
436.46
156.42

2.93

35,132 i

277.26

163

A C C ID E N T S AND A CCID EN T K ATES

38. — Number of men employed, number of accidents, and accident rates in
metal mines in the United States, 1917 to 1927, by kind of mine and year— Con.

T a b le

Fatal accidents
Kind of mine and year

Ac-live
-Cumber
operators employed

Nonfatal accidents

Rate (per
Number 1,000 em­ Number
ployees)

Rate (per
1,000 em­
ployees)

K in d of mine— Continued
1926
Copper_____________
______ __
- ____
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals
Iro n ..___________ ____________________ _
Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley)______
Nrm metal lip. minerals
T o ta l. ..........

.................................. .

1927
Copper___________________ ________________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metals
Iron____ ______ ______________________
- -Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley)

Nonmp.ta.llip. minerals

T o ta l..................... ............................. .......

223
2,000
101
112
243

32,723
33, 940
33,158
14,479
13, 523

121
108
129
39
33

3.70
3.18
3.89
2.69
2. 44

10,102
9,878
4,082
3,885
2,403

308. 71
291. 04
123.11
268. 32
177. 70

2,679

127, 823

430

3. 36

30,350

237. 44

211
1,960
104
92
260

30, 724
30,461
33,386
12,499
12,629

111
114
73
28
26

3.61
3. 74
2.19
2.24
2.06

8,379
8,162
3,409
3,152
2,031

272. 72
267.95
102.11
252.18
160. 82

2,627

119,699

352

2.94

25,133

209. 97

C49
524
410
387
357
274
£06
271
249
233
211

61, 275
59,447
39, 327
35,254
18, 300
25, 739
32.477
32.477
33, 266
32, 723
30, 724

374
220
140
128
55
75
107
121
102
121
111

6.10
3.70
3. 56
3.63
3.01
2.91
3.29
3. 73
3.07
3. 70
3.61

19, 935
20, 513
12, 236
12,047
4, 722
8,025
11, 993
11,858
12,179
10,102
8, 379

325. 33
345.06
311.13
341. 70
258. 03
311. 78
369. 28
365.12
366.11
308. 71
272. 72

3,166
2.429
2.430
2,358
2,135
1, 942
2,104
2,097
1, 989
2,000
1,960

51,892
43, 643
32,130
29,933
26, 516
27, 614
30, 525
29, 718
33.230
33,940
30,461

196
181
126
117
78
140
114
145
128
108
114

3.78
4.15
3.92
3. 91
3.06
5.07
3. 73
4.88
3.85
3.18
3.74

8, 385
7,847
5,469
5,704
5, 352
6,805
8, 672
8. 649
10; 276
9,878
8,162

161. 59
179. 80
170. 21
190. 56
209. 75
246. 43
284.10
291.04
309. 24
291.04
267. 95

205
176
157
154
122
110
115
104
96
101
104

57.230
53, 665
47, 676
45x990
30, 559
32,241
38,419
36, 629
34, 339
33,158
33,386

191
]179
139
106
65
83
89
97
80
129
73

3.34
3.34
2.92
2.30
2.13
2. 57
3. 32
2. 65
2. 33
3.89
2.19

12, 278
9,621
9,098
9,072
4,507
4,901
5,616
4,959
5,013
4,082
3,409

214. 54
179. 28
190. 83
197. 26
147. 49
152.01
146.18
135. 38
145. 99
123.11
102.11

369
236
141
119
66
74
82
87
107
112
92

20, 269
14,004
12,968
11, 638
6,948
8,990
10,226
12, 734
12,913
14,479
12,499

68
47
45
36
14
22
27
34
40
39
28

3. 35
3. 36
3.47
3.09
2.15
2.45
2. 64
2.67
3.10
2.69
2.24

4,544
3,746
3,185
3, 607
2,062
3,868
4,894
5, 718
5,636
3,885
3,152

224.18
267.50
245.60
309. 93
317. 33
430. 26
478. 58
449.03
436.46
268.32
252.18

248
271
245
263
216
199
218
224
231
243
260

9,913
11,847
13,161
13,768
11,606
11,113
11,623
11,570
12,965
13,523
12, 629

23
19
18
38
18
24
30
21
21
33
26

2.32
1. 61
1. 37
2.76
1.55
2.16
2.58
1. 82
1. 62
2.44
2.06

1,144
1,188
1,518
2,132
1, 961
2,481
2,388
1, 934
2,028
2,403
2,031

115.40
100. 28
111. 34
154. 85
168. 96
223. 25
205. 30
167.16
156.42
177.70
160.82

Year
Copper:
1917.......................................................... .........
1918.................................... ...............................
1 9 1 9 ..._________________________________
1920____________ ______ __________________
1921_____________________________________
1 9 2 2 ...__________________________________
1923_____ _______________________________
1924_____________________________________
1925.____ _______________________________
1926____ ____ _________________________
1927.._______ _________________________
Gold, silver, and miscellaneous metal:
1917.................................. ........... .....................
1918_____________________________________
1919_____________________________________
1920_____________________________________
1921_________ _________________________
1922_________ _______________________
1923___________________________________
1924_________ _______________________
1925___________________________________
192 6
192 7
_____________________________
Iron:
1917_____________________________________
1 9 1 8 -..______ _______________________
1919____________________________________
1920_____________________________________
1921___________________________________
1922________________________________
1923___________________________________
1924____________________________________
1925________________________________
1926___________________________________
1927_____________________________________
Lead and zinc (Mississippi Valley):
1 9 1 7 ............................................................
1918______________________________ _
1919_____________________________________
1920___________________________________
1921_____________________________________
1922___________________________________
1923________________________________
1924_____________________________________
1925_____________________________________
1926_____________________________________
1927____________ _____ _________________
Nonmetallic mineral:
191 7
_____ ________________________
191 8
.
. _
_
1919____________________________________
1920_____________
_____________
1921_____________________________________
1922_____________________________________
1923_____________________________________
1924____________________________________
1925_____________ _________ ___________
1926_____________________________________
1927_____________________________ _______




164

STATISTICS OF IN D U ST R IA L AC C ID E N T S

Table 39 shows accident rates for all metal mines from 1911 to 1927.
The rate for fatalities declined somewhat, but the rate for nonfatal
accidents has a rising tendency.
T a b le 39 .— Number of full-year workers and accident frequency rates for metal
mines in the United States, 1911 to 1927, by year

Frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure)
Full-year workers
Fatalities

Year
Under­
ground

98,389
105,153
121,293
91,659
89,821
125, 601
126,815
113,441
85, 769
80, 215
45,199
59,454
73, 669
72, 631
78, 784
78,985
71,307

1911......... .................................
1912-...................................—
1913......... ................... - ............
1914__________ _____ _______
1915......... ............. ..................
1916____________________ _
1917_____________ _____
1918 ..........................................
1919. .................................... ..
1920_________ ________ _____
1921.........................................
1922......... ......................... ..
1923......... .................................
1924......... ........... .....................
1925-................................ ..
1926-........................................
1927..........................................

Surface

57,700
56,509
62,300
50,960
52,176
66,854
65, 270
67, 565
50, 513
54,325
29, 311
37,684
48,197
46,482
45,124
44,885
42,140

Nonfatal accidents

Under­
ground

Total

Surface

Total

Under­
ground

1.83
1.65
1. 51
1.70
1.67
1.52
1.91
1.51
1.51
1.39
1.34
1.67
1.31
1.62
1.32
1.48
1.36

0.88
.82
.72
.61
.65
.61
.64
.66
.53
.56
.55
.41
.54
.46
.94
.54
.49

1.48
1.36
1.24
1.31
1.30
1.21
1.48
1.19
1.14
1 05
:i. 03
L 18
1.00
1.17
1.00
1.16
1. 03

72.43
78.81
70.15
87. 27
106. 62
102.04
96.61
96.87
96.39
103.66
104. 28
116. 24
120.85
122. 27
121. 65
102.86
95. 59

156,089
161, 662
183, 593
142, 619
141,997
192,455
192, 085
181,006
136, 282
134, 540
74, 510
97,138
121,866
119,113
123,908
123,870
113,447

Surface Total

30.03
34. 65
39.84
40. 68
41.95
48.80
48. 67
49.08
44. 25
46. 73
50.76
47. 30
47.40
46. 43
46. 85
45.00
37.23

56. 76
63. 37
59.86
70. 62
82.85
83. 55
80. 32
79.03
77.06
80. 67
83. 23
89. 49
91.80
92. 68
94.51
81.67
73. 85

C hart 9
i ...i
.........i

Rates

i

i

i

i

i

i-

i

i

r

l

i

i

Ra t e s

_
_

l.l 0
1.0 0

'

1.20
L 0
I

=

1.30 _
1.2 0 __

1.40

_

1.40

1.0 0

1.30

.9 0
.80

.90
£0

.7 0

_

.6 0 _

—

.6 0

.5 0 _
.40 .50 _

_

.5 0
.40
.30

TREN D

OF

ACCIDENT

RATES

M E T A L MI NES
r a tai

-

_

.2 0
0

-

.. 1.

191! 12




i

I

13

14

l . l

I

15 16

17 18

I

l ..

i

I

l ... I

I 9 20 2 I 22

23

1.

1.. L

24 2 5

.70

.2 0
J 0

..

2 6 1927

165

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES
C h a r t 10

QUARRIES

The increase in injury rates for quarries which appears in Table 40
is undoubtedly due to more complete reporting. The fatality rate
for the first 5-year period is slightly higher than that for the second
period and in the last period there has been a further pronounced
drop. The exposure during the interval has been singularly uniform.
The declining death rate, which reaches its lowest point in 1927,
reflects the improvement in equipment and in method.
40. — Number of men employed, number of accidents, and accident frequency
rates for quarries in the United States, 1911 to 1927, by year and by 5-year periods

T able

M en employed

Accidents

Frequency
rates
( p e r 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’ exposure)

Year
M en
killed

Actual
number

Full-year
workers

110,954
l i 3 , 105
lu6, 2'7
8
87,936
100, 7*0

84 417
93,837
87,141
68,187
82/447

188
213
183
180
148

Average, 5 years............................. .........

103,803

83, 206

182

7,437

.73

29.80

1 9 1 6 ...______________________________________
1917.......... ..................... ........... ....................... ..
1918.............................. ......................... ........... .
1 9 1 9 .........................................................................
1920...........................................................................

90, 707
82,290
68,332
75, 505
86,488

76,457
71,525
59, 285
63, 794
77,089

173
131
125
123
178

13,427
13,2*12
8,719
9,199
11,217

.75
.61
.70
.64
.77

58.54
61.71
49.02
48.07
*8.50

1911................................ ........... ...............................
1912___________________________ ______________
1 9 1 3 ...____________________ ______ __________
1914............................ ............................. ..................
1915_____________ ____________________________

M en
injured

5,390
6,552
7,739
7,836
9,671

Fatal

0.74
.76
.70
.88
.60

Non­
fatal

21.28
23.67
29.60
38.31
39.10

Average, 5 years______ ______ ______

80, 682

69, 630

146

11,161

.70

53.43

Average, 10 years. ..................................

92, 243

76, 418

164

9,299

.72

40.56

1921_____________ ___________________________
1922.................... ................... ...................................
1923.................................... ......... ......... ...................
1 9 2 4 ................... ......... ...................... ...................
1925............................ ...............................................

77,185
79,081
92,455
94, 242
91, 872

59,958
68,861
85,153
84,246
83,487

120,
132
143
138
149

10,465
11,839
14,990
14,777
14,165

.67
.64
.56
.54
.59

(58.18
57.31
58.68
58.34
56.56

Average, 5 years..................... .....

86,967

76,377

136

13,247

.59

57.81

1926............................................................................
1927............................................................................

91,146
91,517

82,361
82,609

154
135

13,201
IS, 459

.62
.64

53.43
54.31




166

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS
C h a r t IT

C h a r t 12
Ratcs

R /\TE5

60.00

60.00

50.00

T rend or

a c c i de n t

rates

QUARRIES

Non / a i a i

_L

1 1 1 13 14 15 1 17 1 1 20 21 22 23 24 25 261927
91 2
6
8 9
M ETALLU RGICAL W O R K S

Ore-dressing plants and auxiliary works show no material improve­
ment in accident experience in the interval under consideration in
Table 41, In smelting plants the fatality rates declined from 0.64 to
0.27 and injury rates declined from 58.24 to 28.56, a drop of 51 per
cent.




167

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES
T able

41.— Accidents and accident rates in metallurgical plants in the United
States, 19IS to 1927, by year

Accidents

M en employed

Frequency
rates
(p e r 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’ exposure)

Kind of plant and year
Men
killed

Men
injured

Nonfatal

Actual
number

Ore-dressing plants:
1913______________ ______ _____ _________ ._
1914................................ ............................ ..
1915_________________ _____ ______________
1916 i___________________________________
1917 i___________________________________
1918 i___________________________________
1919 i___________________________________
1920 i___________________________________
1921 i___________________________________
1922 i___________________________________
1923 i___________________________________
1924 i______ _____________________________
1925 i____ ____________ _______ __________
19261______ __________________________
1927 i_____ _____ ______ __________________
Smelting plants: 2
1913______________________________ _____
1924________________________________ __
1915_____________________________ _______
1916 i___________________________________
1917 i___________________________________
1918 i___________________________________
1919 i___________________________________
1920 i___________________________________
1921 i___________________________________
1922 i___________________________________
1923 i___________________________________
1924 i___________________________________
1925 i___________________________________
1926 i___________________________________
1927 i___________________________________
Auxiliary works:
1913, 1914, 191 o.«
1916_____________________________________
1917_____________________________________
1918_____________________________________
1919_____________________________________
1920_____________________________________
1921_____________________________________ 1
1922_____________________________________ i
1923..___________________________________i
1924_____________________________________ J
1925_____________________________________ !
1926________________________ ____________
1927___________________ ____________ ____!

Full-year
workers

14,985
15,128
18, 564
22,470
24, 111
21,809
17, 262
16,827
10,047
11, 676
14,899
15, 735
16,945
16,685
15,328

16,154
15,225
19,107
23, 470
24,372
22, 517
16,862
16,813
8,037
11,025
14, 782
16,093
17,082
17,385
15, 643

16
23
30
33
47
35
25
21
4
12
24
20
17
13
17

1,977
1,434
2,095
3,184
2,952
3,142
2,057
2,624
1,214
1,984
2, 549
2,511
2,232
2,294
1,801

0.33
.50
.52
.47
.64
.52
.49
.42
.17
.36
.54
.41
.33
.25
.36

40. 79
31. 40
36. 55
45. 22
40. 37
46.51
40.74
52. 02
50. 35
59. 84
57. 48
52.01
43. 55
43.92
38.38

20, 564
27,879
31,327
43, 829
44, 376
39,899
28, 777
26,099
14,621
19,495
22,439
24,941
25,144
24,399
22, 696

24,309
32, 336
36, 262
49,363
50,659
45,439
31, 324
30, 411
14, 204
20,887
26, 677
29,231
29, 658
29,049
26,693

47
33
38
36
53
42
34
20
14
16
17
16
19
20
22

4,247
5, 673
5, 718
9,656
7,745
6, 743
4,431
4,147
2,129
3,002
3,487
3,293
3,376
3,181
2,287

.64
.34
.35
.24
.35
.31
.36
.22
.33
.26
.21
.18
.21
.23
.27

58.24
58. 48
52. 56
65. 20
50. 96
49. 47
47.15
45. 46
49.96
47.90
43. 57
37. 55
37. 94
36. 50
28. 56

14,007
15, 555
18,044
15,081
16, 306
8, 762
12,829
16,533
15, 520
16,846
16,642
15, 453

15,763
17,014
20, 111
16,172
18,363
8,308
14,069
18,040
17, 624
19,480
19, 253
17, 955

14
16
17
5
20
9
17
17
19
8
15
15

2,240
2,881
2,808
1,638
2,092
1,151
1, 692
2,388
2,422
2,103
1,804
1,653

.30
.31
.28
.10
.36
.36
.40
.31
.36
.14
.26
.28

47. 37
56. 44
46. 54
33. 76
37.97
46.18
40.09
44.12
45. 81
35. 99
31.23
30. 69

Fatal

i

1 Not including auxiliary works such as shops, yards, etc.
2 Not including iron blast furnaces.
3 Included under ore dressing and smelting plants.

COKE OVENS

A striking feature of Table 42 is the very great falling off in the
number employed in the beehive ovens. In 1916 there were 18,570
workers; in 1927 the number had declined to 3,976. This represents
the discarding of a wasteful and inefficient process. The larger use of
machinery in by-product ovens has not resulted, as might be antici­
pated, in higher accident rates, but in material drops in both fatality
and injury rates. For coke ovens as a group the fatality rate has
declined from an average of 0.60 for the 5-year period 1916 to 1920,
to 0.47 for the 5-year period ending with 1925, and to 0.36 for the
year 1927.




168

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T able

42. — Number of men employed, and accidents and accident rates in beehive
and by-product coke ovens, 1910 to 1927, by year

M en employed

Frequency
rates
(p e r 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
hours’ exposure)

Accidents

Year
Actual
number

Full-year
workers

M en
killed

M en
injured

Beehive ovens:
1916............................................ .......................
1917...................................................................
1918.____ __________________ ________ _
1919.............................. ................... .................
1920— ............ ................. ...............................

18, 570
18,820
16,442
13,333
10,955

18, 591
19,295
16,436
10,829
10, 094

24
25
19
10
11

1,866
1,822
2,155
1,364
1,035

Fatal

0.43
.43
.39
.31
.36

N on­
fatal

33.46
31.48
43.70
41.99
34.18

Average, 5 years______________ _______

15, 624

15,049

18

1,649

.40

33. 53

1921.................. ............................. .
_
1922................................................................
1923....................... ............... ...........................
1924_...................... 1............................. ...........
1925....................................................................

6,011
7, 871
8, 515
6,450
7, 246

2,835
4, 823
7,144
4,025
5,140

5
8
12
3
4

336
474
875
457
498

.59
.55
.56
.25
.26

39. 51
32. 76
40. 83
37.85
32.30

Average, 5 years............................ ...........

7,219

4,793

7

528

.49

36.70

1926.............................................................
1927.................................................... .........

6, 605
3,976

4, 874
3,071

6 I
2 !

645
287

.41
.22

44. 36
31.15

By-product ovens:
1916.......... .................................................
1917......... ....................................................
1918......... ........................................... .............
1919......... ..................................... ...............
1920.......... .....................................................

13,033
13, 597
15,947
15,408
17,184

15,528
16, 300
19,040
16,845
19, 827

21
51
54
43
38

3,371
4,891
5, 637
2,667
2,380

.45
1.04
.95
.85
.64

72.36
100.02
98. 69
52. 78
40.01

15,034 i

17,508

41

3,789

.78

72.14

1921........................................... ........... .........
1922....................................................................
1923..................................................................
1924___ _________ ______ ________________
1925...................................................................

Average, 5 years_______________

10,193
11,407
15, 214
14,001
16,008

11,033
13,413
18,483
16, 656
18,914

12
21
33
21
24

1, 517
1,236
1, 718
1,188
1,918

.36
.52
.60
.42
.42

45.83
30. 72
30.98
23. 78
21.11

Average, 5 years_______ _______ ______

13,365

15, 700

22

1, 371

.47

29.12

16,510
16, 691

19,441
20,152

45
23

1, 277
998

.77
.38

21.90
16. 51

All coke ovens:
1916....................................................................
1917....................................................................
1918............................................ .......................
1919............................................ ............... .......
1920.............................. ................. ................. ..

31,603
32,417
32, 389
28,741
28,139

34,119
35, 595
35,476
27, 674
29,921

45
76
73
53
49

5,237
6, 713
7, 792
4,031
3,415

.44
.71
.69
.64
.55

51.16
62.86
73. 21
48. 55
38. 04

Average, 5 years.......................................

30, 658

32, 557

59

5, 438

.60

55. 68

1921................................ ................... ...............
1922____________ __________ _____________
1923__________________________ __________
1924________________________ ____________
1925_____________________________________

16,204
19, 278
23, 729
20,451
23, 254

13, 868
18, 236
25, 627
2, 681
24, 054

17 1
29
45
24
28

1,853
1, 710
2, 593
1,645
1,696

.41
.53
.59
.39
.39

44. 54
31.26
33. 73
26. 51
23. 50

20, 583

20,493

29 j

1,899

.47

30.89

23,115
20, 667

24, 288
23, 223

51
25

1,922
1,285

.70
.36

26. 38
18. 44

1926.........................................- .....................
1927..................................................................

Average, 5 years.

.......................... .

1926 ____________________________________
1927 .................................. ....... ......... .............




169

ACCIDENTS AND ACCIDENT RATES
C h a r t 13

1911 12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19 20

2!

22

23 24 2 5

26

1927

C h a r t 14

1911

12

13 14

15 16

17

18

19

20 21

22 23 24

25 26

1927

ALL M IN ERAL IND USTRIES

The record of accidents, as measured by frequency and severity
rates, covering all branches of the mineral industry in the United
States, for the years 1911 to 1927 is set forth in Table 43; nonfatal
injuries in coal mines are, however, omitted as the record thereof is
not available.




T able 43.— Accident frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure), in the mineral industries in the United States, 1911 to 1927, by year
Fatal accidents
1927

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

C oalm in es________ __
____________________
A ll metal m ines. _______ _ _ _______ _____ ____ _____
Copper m ines. _ __
_
___
_ ________ __
_
Gold m ines._ __________ _ __ _____________ _____
Iron mines________ ______ ___________ ___________
Lead and zinc mines
_
_ ____ ________ __
_
Nonmetallic mines
_
_______ ______ ______
A ll quarries, including outside works
Cement rock quarries
__ _
_
_ ___________
Granite quarries
__
_ _
________ __
Limestone quarries. _
_ __ ______ ______
_
Marble quarries
_ _
Sandstone and bluestone
_
_ __
_
Slate quarries ________ ________ __ .
___________
Trap-rock quarries ________
_ ___________ _
_
A ll quarries, excluding outside works _____________
A ll quarries, outside works on ly_____________________
Metallurgical works:
Ore dressing_______ __
_______ __ _ __________
Smelters_____________ __ _______ ___________ __
_ ________ __ _ ______
_
Auxiliary w o r k s __
A ll coke ovens______ .
___ __ _____ _______
______
Beehive ovens _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _
________
By-product ovens _______ _ _ _________________

1.66
1.48
1. 73
1.43
1. 55
1. 34
.67
.74
1. 32
.64
.74
.24
.61
.87
.59

1.49
1. 36
1. 51
1.44
1.32
1.43
.55
.76
1.16
.62
.75
.83
.39
.87
1.03

1. 57
1.24
1. 36
1.28
1.10
1. 30
1.01
.70
1.00
.49
.71
.60
.44
1.02
.80

1 55
1.31
1.28
1.35
1.26
1.44
1.24
.88
1.32
1.12
.79
.91
.48
1.00
.83

1. 48
1. 30
1.24
1.60
.96
1.79
.81
.60
.53
.76
.57
.33
.31
.67
1.15
.72
.35

1.31
1. 21
1. 21
1.35
1.14
1.05
1.00
.75
.79
.62
.79
.39
.43
.87
1.48
.77
.72

1. 42
1.48
1.96
1.34
1.18
1. 36
.83
.61
1.00
.51
.60
.19
.33
.44
.87
.67
.51

1. 31
1.19
1.15
1.42
1.15
1.19
.56
.70
.71
.70
.60
.71
.79
1.05
1.49
.73
.66

1.43
1.16
1.18
1.47
1.03
1.38
.55
.64
.89
.60
.66
.17
.25
.59
.85
.76
.45

1. 26
1.05
1.14
1.40
.78
1.09
.96
.77
.92
.69
.86
.31
.19
.50
.87
.94
.53

1.40
1.03
1.23
1.10
1.01
.86
.66
.67
.64
.86
.66
.50
.42
.47
.96
.74
.56

1.63
1.18
1.00
1.78
1.00
.88
.80
.64
.76
.47
.62
.14
.40
1.05
1.12
.77
.46

1.46
1.00
1.04
1. 31
.79
.91
.89
.56
.56
.30
.62
.20
.16
.71
1.12
.66
.42

1.60
1.17
1.18
1.66
.98
.92
.65
.54
.75
.40
.55
.41
.63
.19
.61
.63
.41

1.55
1.00
.98
1.28
.95
1.11
.57
.59
.59
.32
.59
.19
1.11
.87
1. 38
.76
.41

1.50
1.16
1.15
1.09
1.41
1.02
.87
.62
.50
.74
.70
.56
.34
.70
.80
.86
.37

1.48
1.03
1.15
1.30
.82
.88
.73
.54
.18
.84
.72
.28
.50
.73
.97
.77
.29

.33
.64

.50
.34

.52
.35

.66

.71

.40
. 22
.58

.47
.24
.30
.44
.43
.45

.64
.35
.31
.71
.43
1.04

.52
.31
.28
.69
.39
.95

.49
.36
.10
.64
.31
.85

.42
.22
.36
.55
.36
.64

.17
.33
.36
.41
.59
.36

.36
.26
.40
.53
. 55
.52

.54
.21
.31
.59
.56
.60

.41
.18
.36
.39
.25
.42

.33
.21
.14
.39
.26
.42

.25
.23
.26
.70
.41
.77

.36
.27
.28
.36
.22
.38




ACCIDENTS

i9i3

INDUSTRIAL

1912

O
F

1911

STATISTICS

M ineral industries

Nonfatal accidents

14.46
11.56
5.91
23. 25

59.86 70. 62 82. 85 83. 55 80. 32 79. 03 77. 87 80. 67 83.23 89.49 91.80 92.68 94. 51 81.67
76. 93 104. 06 107. 34 106. 53 104. 45 107. 37 103. 20 107. 73 105.84 106.93 116. 36 115.94 116.87 96.10
23.46 42. 30 67.16 63. 60 57.50 61. 73 63. 76 68.27 75.15 86. 76 99.62 99.27 102.47 99. 83
89.44 74. 69 77.84 80.06 75.85 61.82 67. 45 66. 83 70.30 59.18 50.08 50.34 53.14 44.64
44. 50 63.00 79.42 87.70 91.00 106. 51 97.43 109. 32 126. 56 154. 74 165.22 154. 72 156.02 101.40
28.29 33.25 35.93 48.23 41.19 34.90 46.42 53. 96 71.82 82.50 70.82 59.58 55.13 63.58
29.60 38. 31 39.10 58.54 61. 71 49.02 48. 07 48.50 58.18 57. 31 58.68 58.34 56. 56 53.43
69. 33 75.40 49.42 82.94 92.58 79.55 77.19 60.83 71.17 63. 69 71.24 56. 38 34. 52 28. 57
23.20 36.40 32.24 48.00 63.24 36.56 41.57 43. 51 44.70 49. 07 59. 33 65.24 67. 51 61.71
29.68 38.08 42.48 58. 70 58. 51 47.11 44. 68 47.70 59. 51 59.24 56.43 57.86 64.49 66.89
22.89 40.44 31. 27 41. 73 33.40 19. 34 25.09 30. 66 33. 62 42.59 42.63 43.96 38. 68 48. 27
24.79 23.03 22.19 42.62 39.63 49. 35 43.99 33. 52 52. 07 33.54 39.81
56.36 66. 77 53.89
6.27
9.54
11. 03 28. 33 37. 35 32.10 32. 84 36. 07 45.06 42.47 49. 70 53. 33 56. 33 60.91
29.26 50.85 77.62 79.28 74.31 68. 39 62.16 69. 63 76.64 86.00 76.16 78.13 108.29 83.19
42. 52 52.88 54. 32 49.43 48.88 46.54 55. 70 59. 05 59.37 59. 33 65.01 62.49
32. 30 68.69 74.60 48. 34 46. 76 51. 35 61.93 54.92 57.68 56.87 47.02 43.67
40.79
58.24
35.91

31.37
58.48

36. 55
52.56
30. 26
13.28
46. 67

45. 22 40.37
65. 20 50.96
47. 37 56.44
51.16 62.86
33.46 31.48
72. 36 100.02

46. 51
49.47
46.54
73. 21
43. 70
98. 69

40.74
47.15
33. 76
48. 55
41.99
52. 78

52.02
45.46
37.97
38.04
34.18
40.01

50.35
49.96
46.18
44.54
39. 51
45. 83

59.84
47.90
40.09
31.26
32. 76
30. 72

57.48
43. 57
44.12
33. 73
40.83
30.98

52.01
37. 55
45.81
26. 51
37.85
23.78

43. 55
37.94
35.99
23.50
32.30
21.11

43.98
36.50
31.23
26.38
44. 36
21.90

73.85
87.05
93.26
38.21
99. 22
57.07
54. 31
23.05
72.63
69. 79
41. 58
63. 33
61.43
83. 63
64.50
44.06
38. 38
28.56
30.69
18.44
31.15
16.51

ACCIDENT
RATES




.

22 66

63.37
86.14
31.01
80.60
52.76
22.13
23.27
46.53
14.96
26.66
14.12
15.09
5.00
22.96

AN
D

i Coal mine injuries not available.

56. 76
75.08
26. 78
84.10
46.47
11.34
21.28
45. 51
17. 69

ACCIDENTS

Coal mines 1______________________________
All metal mines__________________________
Copper mines________________________
Gold mines___________________________
Iron mines___________________________
Lead and zinc mines________________
Nonmetallic mines__________________
A ll quarries, including outside works
Cement rock quarries_______________
Granite quarries_____________________
Limestone quarries__________________
Marble quarries_____________________
Sandstone and bluestone____________
Slate quarries.......................... ..................
Trap-rock quarries__________________
A ll quarries, excluding outside works. __
A ll quarries, outside works only________
Metallurgical works:
Ore dressing__________________________
Smelters—_______ ______ ______________
Auxilliary works_____________________
A ll coke ovens___________________________
Beehive ovens_______________________
By-product ovens___________________

Chapter VI.— CASUALTIES ATTENDING THE OPERATION OF
STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILWAYS

The Interstate Commerce Commission publishes accident bulletins
at regular intervals in which may be found detailed information
regarding the accident experience of American steam railways.
From these bulletins the tables which follow have been derived.
Charts showing the trends of accident frequency and severity rates
as compared with those in mining operations appear on page 158.
M A R K E D IM P R O V E M E N T N O TED

The marked improvement in accident experience of American rail­
ways is brought out by Table 44, which is drawn from a presentation
found in Bulletin 96 (p. 6) issued by the commission. This table
shows the highest accident rates for both freight and passenger
trainmen, with a single exception, to be in 1913. The lowest rates
are found in 1927.
T able

44.— Accident rates (per 10,000,000 train-miles), for trainmen in freight and
passenger service, 1918 to 1927, by year

Freight service

Passenger
service

Freight service

Year
Fatal

1913_____________
1914
................ ..
1915
.................
1916_ ___________
1917______________
1918_ .....................
1919______________
1920______________

Non­
fatal

Fatal

15.6
13.9
8.9
9.9
12.1
14.1
9.4
10.0

468.7
432.4
355.1
343.2
395.9
374.0
308.2
349.8

2.8
2.6
1.7
1.7
2.4
2.9
2.3
2.7

Non­
fatal

67.5
65.0
51. 7
52.2
62.1
62.1
54.5
64.5

Fatal

1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926
1927.

6.1
6.7
7.1
5.3
5.1
5.2
5.1

N on­
fatal

256.2
275.3
285.9
239.8
231.4
232.9

201.0

Fatal

1.7
1.
9
4
7
1.6
1.4

N on­
fatal

47.3
55.2
58.2
49.4
44.6
46.9

Table 45 gives the number of casualties on steam railways for
passengers, employees, and other persons from 1888 to 1927. For
no other branch of American industry has such a record been kept
for so long a time.
172




173

STEAM AND ELE C TR IC R A IL W A Y C A S U A L T IE S

45. — Number of passengers, employees, and other persons killed or injured
in reportable steam railway accidents of all kinds in the United States, 1888 to 1927,
by year 1

T able

Passengers

Employees

Other persons

Total

Year ending—
Killed

June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
June 30
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 31

1888___________ __________
1889___________ ______ ____
1890__________ ___________
1891______________________
1892______________________
1893______________________
1894______________________
1895______________________
1896______________________
1897______________________
1898______________________
1899______________________
1900______________________
1901______________________
1902______________________
1903______________________
1904______________________
1905_____________ ________
1906______________________
1907______________________
1908______________________
1909______________________
1910______________________
1911______________________
1912______________________
1913______________________
1914______________________
1915______________________
1916______________________
1916______________________
1917______________________
1918______________________
1919______________________
1920______________________
1921______________________
1922____________________ _
1923______________________
1924______________________
1925______________________
1926______________________
1927______________________

Injured

Killed

Injured

Killed

315
310
286
293
276
299
324
170
181
222
221
239
249
282
345
355
441
537
359
610
381
253
324
299
283
350
232
199
239
246
301
471
273
229
205
200
138
149
171
152
88

2,138
2,146
2,425
2,972
3, 227
3,229
3,034
2,375
2, 873
2, 795
2,945
3,442
4,128
4,988
6, 683
8,231
9, 111
10,457
10, 764
13,041
11, 556
10, 311
12,451
12,042
14,938
15.130
13,887
10,914
7,488
7,152
7,582
7, 316
7,456
7, 591
5, 584
6,153
5,847
5, 354
4,952
4,461
3,893

2,070
1,972
2,451
2,660
2,554
2, 727
1,823
1,811
1,861
1,693
1, 958
2, 210
2, 550
2, 675
2,969
3,606
3, 632
3, 361
3,929
4, 534
3,405
2,610
3, 382
3,602
3, 635
3, 715
3, 259
2,152
2,687
2,941
3,199
3,419
2,138
2, 578
1,446
1, 657
2,026
1, 543
1, 599
1, 672
1, 569

20,148
20,028
22,396
26,140
28, 267
31, 729
23,422
25, 696
29,969
27, 667
31, 761
34,923
39, 643
41,142
50, 524
60,481
67,067
66,833
76, 701
87,644
82,487
75,006
95, 671
126,039
142,442
171,417
165, 212
138,092
160, 663
176,923
174, 247
156,013
131,018
149,414
104, 530
117,197
152, 678
125, 319
119, 224
111, 903
88, 223

2,897
3, 541
3,598
4,076
4,217
4,320
4,300
4,155
4,406
4, 522
4,680
4, 674
5,066
5,498
5,274
5, 879
5,973
5,805
6,330
6, 695
6,402
5,859
5, 976
6, 495
6, 667
6,899
6,811
6, 270
6,438
6, 814
6, 587
5, 396
4, 567
4,151
4,345
4,468
5, 221
4,925
4,996
5, 266
5, 335

Injured

Killed

3,602
5,282
4,135
6, 823
4,206
6,335
4, 769
7,029
7,147
5,158
5,435
7, 346
5,433
6, 447
5,677
6,136
5,845
6,448
6,437
6, 269
6,176
6,859
7,123
6, 255
6,549
7, 865
7,209
8,455
7,455
8, 588
9,840
7,841
7,977
10,046
9,703
8, 718
10, 241 10, 618
10, 331 11, 839
10,187 10,188
8,722
10,309
11,385 : 9, 682
12,078 10, 396
12,158 10, 585
13, 761 10, 964
13, 563 10,302
8,621
13, 034
12, 224
9, 364
12, 647 10,001
12, 976 10,087
11,246
9,286
10,579
6,978
11, 304
6,958
10, 571
5,996
11, 521
6, 325
13,187
7, 385
13,066
6, 617
13, 259
6, 766
13, 871
7,090
12, 701
6,992

Injured

25, 888
26, 309
29,027
33, 881
36, 652
40, 393
31, 889
33, 748
38, 687
36, 731
40, 882
44, 620
50, 320
53, 339
64, 662
76, 553
81,155
86,008
97, 706
i ll , 016
104, 230
95, 626
119, 507
150,159
169, 538
200, 308
192, 662
162,040
180, 375
196, 722
194, 805
174, 575
149,053
168, 309
120, 685
134,871
171, 712
143, 739
137,435
130, 235
104, 817

i Figures for years 1911 to 1915 include industrial and other nontrain accidents to employees only; and
for years 1908 to 1910 do not cover switching and terminal roads; otherwise, the statement covers all reportable accidents.

CASUALTIES TO T R A IN M E N ON CLASS I RAILRO AD S, 1916 TO 1927

Table 46 is drawn from Bulletin 96 (p. 106) of the Interstate Com­
merce Commission, but has been rearranged to render possible certain
comparisons difficult to make in the original form. The rates in the
report are in terms of 1,000 employees, but these have been recom­
puted on the basis of 1,000,000 man-hours’ exposure. In this conver­
sion it is assumed for convenience, as has been done throughout this
bulletin, that each man works 10 hours per day for 300 days in the
year, making a total of 3,000 man-hours. The change in rates has
therefore been made by the simple expedient of dividing the rates in
the report by three. The resulting rates are fairly comparable with
those for other industrial groups in this bulletin. Rates in this table
are made the basis for determining the accident trend exhibited in the
charts on pages 176 and 177.
36904°— 29-------12




174

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

The following observations regarding accident frequency will be
found to be justified by inspection of the table:
1. There is a marked downward tendency in the period 1916 to 1927.
2. There are two years during the period (1920 and 1923) in each
of which there is a decided upward tendency as compared with the
earlier years.
3. In fatalities the lowest rates are found in 1924, while the lowest
rates for injuries are in 1927.
T a b l e 4 6 . — Number of trainmen in service on Class I railroads, number of acci­

dents and accident frequency rates among trainmen, 1916 to 1927, by year and
occupation

Number of trainmen in service
Occupation

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

Yard service:
Engineers___
Firemen.........
Conductors __
Brakemen___

15,878
16,190
15,362
40,175

18,933
19, 516
18,703
48,451

21, 310
21,979
20,823
53, 790

19,625
20,031
19, 325
49,303

21, 363
21, 549
20,236
50, 799

16,929
17,343
16,745
42, 721

18, 703
19,249
18,639
46,953

22,142
22,664
22,002
55,301

20,593
21,106
20, 545
51, 775

21,349
21,804
21,170
52,952

22,253
22, 727
22,066
55, 334

21, 562
22,100
21,437
53, 653

T otal______
R o a d freigh t
service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors __
Brakemen___

87,605 105,603 117,902 108,284 113,947 93, 738 103, 544 122,109 114,019 117,275 122,380 118, 752

31,675
33,637
25,430
63,285

34,155
36,828
27,152
67,818

34,990
38,102
27,679
69,048

30,907
32,938
25,181
61,989

33,594
35,756
27,297
67,127

28.317
30.317
22, 598
56,620

29,372
31,507
23,254
57, 746

34,137
36,504
26,901
65, 750

31,015
33, 346
24,864
60, 539

30,653
32,714
24,919
59,981

31,563
33,544
25,733
61, 576

30,521
32,315
24,821
59,384

Total______ 154,027 165,953 169,819 151,015 163, 774 137,852 141,879 163,292 149,764 148, 267 152,416 147,041
Road passenger
service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors __
Brakemen___
Baggagemen.
Total______

13, 429
13,131
10,633
14,800
5,618

13,297
13,105
10, 655
14,854
5, 524

12, 709
12,419
10,444
14,423
5,371

12,442
12,112
10, 382
14,904
5,442

12,930
12,630
10, 788
15,849
5,661

12,924
12, 768
10, 546
15, 315
5, 751

12, 710
12,491
11,380
14,350
5,729

13,042
12, 754
11, 756
14, 558
5,871

12,977
12,674
11, 730
14,369
5,846

12,930
12, 561
11,726
14,218
5,801

13,027
12,946
11,710
14,072
5,768

12,971
12, 254
11,652
13,938
5,712

57,611 57,435 55,366 55,282 57,858 57,304 56,660 57,981 57,596 57,236 57,073 56,527

All train­
men_____ 299,243 328,991 343,087 314,581 335,579 288,894 302,083 343,382 321, 379 322, 769 331,869 322,320

Fatalities among trainmen
Number
Yard service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors . .
Brakemen___

11
22
71
341

16
23
78
401

11
27
73
397

15
14
50
235

9
18
67
363

11
7
39
169

12
5
43
202

12
17
59
263

7
5
45
195

12
9
44
238

9
4
53
222

3
6
49
208

T o t a l _____

445

518

508

314

457

226

262

351

252

303

288

266

R o a d freight
service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors- .
Brakemen___

70
107
72
432

72
122
88
478

84
132
104
527

66
70
63
310

63
84
62
396

32
36
48
186

46
44
37
201

55
59
60
262

3?
43
47
168

34
30
40
188

25
30
59
197

37
46
43
172

Total______

681

760

847

509

605

302

328

436

295

292

311

298

Road passenger
service:
Engineers___
Firemen. ___
C onductors..
Brakemen___
Baggagemen.

45
52
6
8
2

56
49
5
18
8

59
50
11
25
5

50
51
6
17
4

69
52
6
16
4

37
36
9
10
2

40
39
3
9
6

44
45
7
10
3

32
31
4
13
1

44
36
5
7
4

39
37
5
8
3

34
30
5
2
4

Total............

113

136

150

128

147

94

97

109

81

96

92

75

Grand total

1,239

1,414

1,505

951

1,209

622

687

896

628

691

691

639




175

STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY CASUALTIES

46 .— Number of trainmen in service on Class I railroads, number of acci­
dents and accident frequency rates among trainmen, 1916 to 1927 , by year and
occupation— Continued

T able

Fatalities among trainmen— Continued
Occupation

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

Frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Yard service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors. _
Brakemen___

0.23
.35
1.54
2.83

0.28
.39
1.39
2. 76

0.17
.41
1.17
2.46

0. 25
.23
.86
1.59

0.14
.28
1.10
2. 38

0.22
.13
.78
1.32

0.21
.09
.77
1.43

0.18
.25
.89
1.59

0.11
.08
.73
1.26

0.19
.14
.69
1.50

0.13
.06
.80
1.34

0.05
.09
.76
1.29

1. 69

1.64

1.44

.97

1. 34

.80

.84

.96

.74

.86

.78

.75

R oad freight
service:
Engineers___
F ir e m e n ____
Conductors. _
Brakemen___

.74
1.06
.94
2.28

.70
1.10
1.08
2. 35

.80
1.15
1.25
2. 54

.71
.71
.83
1.67

.63
.78
.76
1.97

.38
.40
.71
1.09

.52
.47
.53
1.16

.54
.54
.74
1.33

.40
.43
.63
.93

.37
.31
.54
1.04

.26
.30
.76
1.07

.40
.47
.58
.97

Total______

1.47

1.53

1. 66

1.12

1.23

.73

.77

.89

.66

.66

.68

.68

1.12
1.32
.19
.18
.12

1.40
1.25
.16
.40
.48

1. 55
1. 34
.35
.58
.31

1. 34
1.40
.19
.38
.25

1.78
1.37
.19
.34
.24

.95
.94
.28
.22
.12

1.05
1.04
.09
.21
.35

1.12
1.18
.20
.23
.17

.82
.82
.11
.30
.06

1.13
.96
.14
.16
.23

1.00
.99
.14
.19
.17

.87
.82
.14
.15
.23

Total______

Road passenger
service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors. _
Brakemen___
Baggagemen _
Total______

.65

.79

.90

.77

.86

.55

.57

.63

.47

.56

.54

.44

Grand total-

1.38

1.43

1.46

1.01

1.20

.72

.76

.87 j

.65

.71

.69

.66

727
1,104
1, 498
8, 328

654
1,123
1, 595
8, 663

721
1,117
1, 739
9, 369

566
866
1,416
7, 552

Injuries am ong trainmen
Number
Yard service:
Engineers___
908
1, 078 1,032
Firemen_____
1,644 1,905 1,708
Conductors. _ 1, 993 1,815 1, 440
Brakemen___ 12, 209 12,004 10,472
Total____

16,924 16, 756 14, 528 11, 396 15, 987

Road freight
service:
2,360 2, 578 2,547
Engineers___
Firemen
5,145 6,232 5,706
Conductors. _ 3,051 3,099 2,832
Brakemen___ 13,115 13,004 11,938
Total____

680 1,023
1,171 1, 791
1,249 1,607
8,296 11, 666

546
854
1,094
6, 711

756
835
1,082 j 1,561
1,414 1,630
7,562 10,223

9,205 10,804 14,249 11, 657 12,035 12, 946 10, 400
1

1,888 2,130
3,945 5,085
2,253 2, 593
8,829 11, 439

1,404
2, 791
1,921
7,012

1, 649
3, 274)
2, 227S
7, 613

1,832
4,036
2, 501
9, 409

1, 370
2,747
2, 209
7,629

1, 271
2, 5S4
2, 223
7, 632

1,343
2, 645
2, 378
7, 904

959
2,016
2,118
6, 758

23, 671 25,003 23,023 16,915 21, 347 13,128 14, 763| 17,778 13,955 13, 710 14, 270 11,851

Road passenger
ser-'ce:
Eng^^ers
Fire n e n ____
Conductors. _
Brakemen___
Baggagemen.

714
1,245
298
718
361

738
1,444
327
699
368

777
1,253
304
674
283

660
1,176
263
579
292

804
1, 535
274
688
344

602
997
209
570
269

715
1,144
282
570
308

761
1,295
304
639
316

617
1,017
302
587
303

532
943
241
533
303

582
957
274
572
263

445
792
251
468
255

Total______

3, 336

3, 576

3, 291

2,970

3, 645

2, 647

3,019

3, 315

2,826

2, 552

2, 648

2,211

__

Grand total- 43,931 45, 335 40,842 31, 281 40,979 24, 980 28, 5861 35, 342 28,438 28, 297 29,864 24, 462




176
T

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

4 6 . — Number of trainmen in service on Class I railroads, number of acci­
dents and accident frequency rates among trainmen, 1916 to 1927, by year and
occupation— Continued

able

Injuries among trainmen— Continued
Occupation

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

Frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure)
Yard service:
Engineers----Firemen_____
Conductors..
Brakemen___

22.63
33.85
43.25
101. 90

18.17
32.54
32.35
82. 59

14. 20
25.90
23.05
64.89

11.55
19.49
21. 54
56.09

15.96
26.16
26.47
76.55

10. 75
13.41
21.78
52. 36

13.30
18.74
25. 29
53. 68

12. 57
22.97
24. 69
61.62

11. 77
17.44
24. 30
53. 61

10. 21
17.17
25.11
54.53

10.80
16. 38
26. 27
56.44

8. 75
13.06
22. 02
46.92

Total______

64.40

52.89

41.07

35. 08

46. 77

32. 73

34. 78

38.90

34.08

34.22

35.26

29.19

24.83
50.99
39.99
59.08

25.16
56.41
38. 05
64. 36

24.26
49.91
34.10
57. 63

20. 36
39.92
29.81
47.48

21.13
47.40
32.98
56.80

16.53
30. 69
28. 34
41.28

18. 71
34. 64
31.92
4.95

17.90
36.85
20. 99
47. 70

14. 72
27.46
29. 61
42.01

13.82
26. 33
29. 74
42.41

14.18
26. 28
30.83
42. 79

10.47
20.80
28.44
37.93

Total______

51.23

50. 22

45.19

37. 34

43.45

31. 74

34. 68

36. 29

31.06

30.82

31. 21

26.87

Road passenger
service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors..
Brakemen___
Baggagemen.

17. 72
31. 60
9. 34
16.17
21.42

18. 50
36. 73
10. 23
15. 69
22. 21

20. 38
33. 63
9.70
15. 58
17. 56

17.68
32.36
8.44
12.95
17.89

20.73
40.51
8.47
14. 47
20. 26

15. 53
26.03
6. 61
12.41
15. 56

18.75
30. 53
8. 26
13. 24
17.92

19.45
33. 87
8. 62
14. 63
17.94

15.85
26. 75
8. 58
13. 62
17.28

13. 71
25. 02
6.85
12. 50
17.41

14.89
25. 53
7.80
13. 55
15.20

11.44
21. 54
7.18
11.19
14.88

R o a d freigh t
service:
Engineers___
Firemen_____
Conductors _ _
Brakemen___

T o t a l _____

19.30

20. 75

19.81

17.91

21.00

15.40

17.43

19. 06

16.36

14.86

15.47

13.04

Grand total.

48.94

45. 93

39.68

33.15

40.70

28.82

31.54

34.31

29. 50

29. 22

30.30

25. 30

Table 46 furnishes the data on which the following charts are
prepared.
C h a r t 15

WE
TS

~

1 .... 1

— |
------1 j ..... ■|
.........................j ...... 1... ~T

T

'"“ 7

......T ”

r ..

_

1.40

_

1.30

_

10
.2

—

-

L 0
I

-

-

R
ates
1.40

1.30

-

~
-

1 _
.00

1 0
.2
1 Io
.
1 0
.0
.90

.90

_

.6 0

_

.80

.70

_

.10

.60

.6 0

.S O

.50

.40
.3 0

TREND

-

OF ACCIDENT R a t e s
RAILROADS

-

.20
.1 0

-

ra fat

_

.40
.30

.2 0

-

. 1

-

1 1 1
1911 12 13 14 1 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2 6 1927
5
i




f

i

i

f

I

f

I

I

' i l l

0

177

STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY CASUALTIES
C h a r t 16

1911 1.2

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 2 1 22

23

24

25

26

1927

Tables 47 and 48 show the number of train and train service
accidents and the number due to specified causes. These tables are
chiefly interesting in that they evidence the fact that the improved
condition of American railways is a pervasive change. In whatever
way the accident data are analyzed it will appear that improvement
has taken place. For example, in 1911 collisions caused 297 deaths
while in 1927 there were but 65. Injuries due to collisions during
the same period declined from 3,071 to 547. In 1911 there were 209
deaths from coupling cars and in 1927 there were 48.
T

able

47 .— Number of train accidents, 1911 to 1927, by year and kind of accident

Year ending—

Colli­
sions

Derail­
ments

Locomo­
Other
tive
locomo­
boiler
tive
accidents accidents

Miscel­
laneous

Total

Fatalities
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec, 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,

1911______ _____ _______ __________
1912________________________________
1913____ ____ ___________ _______
1914___________________________
1915. __________________ _____ _____
1916
_________ __
1916________________________________
1917________________________________
1918.- ________________________
1919________________________________
1920________________________________
1921
. . . ________________
1922________________________________
1923___________________________
1924_____ _____ _____________________
1925_____________________ _____ _____
1926________________________________
1 9 2 7 _____________________________

* Included under “ Miscellaneous.”




297
275
280
224
76
139
169
235
274
136
182
54
103
112
85
84
104
65

249
244
227
211
127
131
154
155
218
159
160
101
119
115
97
121
64
82

56
64
41
11
13
24
25
44
41
40
50
29
24
42
24
15
14
25

0)
0)
0)
0)
0
1
2
6

1

18
13
9
6
5
10
9
4
14
22
24
11
7
6
10
11
8
22

620
596
557
452
221
304
357
439
547
359
422
195
253
275
216
232
190
194

178
T able

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS
47.— Number of train accidents, 1911 to 1927, by year and kind of acci­
dent— Continued
Colli­
sions

Year ending-

Derail­
ments

Locomo­
Other
tive
locomo­
boiler
tive
accidents accidents

M iscel­
laneous

Total

Injuries

June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,

1, 748
2,380
2, 243
1,820
1, 348
1,230
1,249
1,320
1,433
1,083
1,240
606
709
839
652
616
596
616

3, 071
3, 060
3,367
2,250
1,360
1,630
1,953
2, 388
2, 257
1,276
1,607
559
872
940
709
696
840
547

1911.
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926.
1927

1, 092
936
1,002
630
443
296
346 ;
326
294
203
246
54
47
57
45
42
34
21

690
722
293
123
211
196
183
122
146
344
235
59
54
88
58
112
102
117

0)
0)
0)
(!)
0)
0)
0)
58
49
49
57
18
29
15
13
17
17
13

6, 601
7,098
6,905
4,823
3,371
3,352
3,731
4, 214
4,179
2,955
3,385
1,296
1, 711
1,939
1,477
1, 483
1, 589
1, 211

i Included under “ Miscellaneous.”

T a b le 48.— Number of train-service accidents, 1911 to 1927, by cause of accident

Year ending—

Cou­
Cou­
pling
pling
air
cars
hose

Strik­
Get­ High­
M isOper­
ing
Struck
ting way
celating
or run
fixed
on or cross­
Ianeswitches struc­
over
oil
ings
ous
tives ibrakes
tures

ating

°Peratmg
j hand
i

Total

Fatalities
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,

1911.
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915.
1916.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
19261927.

209
192
195
171
90
123
136
166
164
108
151
78
81
103
72
64
64
48'

!
48
44
30
34
27
16
27
21
19
20
21

22
31
14
23
31
20
14
11
22

i

45
3
50 1
2
22
37
1
24
34
33 i
3
29!_________
321
1
1
:

2

j

1

76
77
94
89
45
59
63
95
83
55
83
45
43
47
36
38
45
47

160
164
154
113
81
94:
106
109
131
92
96
65
63
101
62
65
62
68

20
1

7, 530
8,150
9,358
8,498
6,366
7. 234
8, 403
8, 601
7, 755
6,162
8, 773
5, 510
6,157
8,096
6, 564
6,680
7,165
5, 665

39
1

4
6
13
22
29
30
29
48
27

1,197
1, 264
1,296
1,132
722
925
1,033
1, 222
1,229

410
522
388
400
498
403:

589
626
643
566
435
467
515
537
561
975
1, 232
635
292
403
310
331
325
306

2, 251
2,324
2,382
2,071
1,373
1,668
1,853
2,177
2, 212
1,334
1,685
901
988
1,288
976
986
1,102
975

25, 330
27, 081
33, 007
31, 424
23, 932
26, 893
30, 562
32, 801
28, 866
13, 371
16, 919i
10, 759
11.844
13, 517
11,608
11, 946
12, 276
10,592

39, 247
42, 022
49, 714
46, 018
34,689
39, 074
44, 579
48, 022
42, 782
33,325
43,535
27, 228
30,481
37,537
30,097
30, 762
32,337
26, 715

Injuries
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,

1911.
1912
1913
1914.
1915.
1916
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925
1926.
1927.




2,
3, 234
3, 360
2, 692
1, 993
2,194
2. 440
2,508
2, 332
1,975
2,450
1,540
1.498
1,954
1,592
1,538
1, 591
1, 325;

I

!

664
580
425
590
378
393
520
430
452
455
308

1
7, 379
9, 426
5, 732
6,187
8,043
5, 877
5. 458
5, 697
4, 467

1, 9"1
2, 592
1, 623
1,987
2,571
2, 042
2,229
2, 474
2,158

995
1, 453
847
m
1,084
1, 050
930
1,142
802

1, 510
1, 523
1,835
1, 490
1,083
1,310
1,538
1,572
1,349
1,000
1, 293
775
722
859
730
724
665
590

47
39
64
88
100
97
96
104
89

1,872
2, 033
2,154
1, 914
1,315
1,443
1, 636
1,876
1,890

703
707
709
768
629

179

STEAM A N D E L E C T R IC R A IL W A Y C A SU A L T IE S

NO N TR AIN

ACCIDENTS, 1917 TO 1927

Table 49 shows how the hazard of various accident causes has varied
during the period covered. It was possible in the earlier years to
determine an exposure and to calculate frequency rates. Since it is
impossible to do this for the later years the rates are omitted altogether.
T a b le

49 .— Nontrain accidents on Class I railroads in the United States, 1917 to
1927, by cause of accident

Fatalities
1917

j

1918

1919

1920 | 1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926 | 1927

Cause of accident
Number

W orking machin­
ery, engines, e tc..
Transmission appa­
ratus_____________
Handling___________
Flying particles
Hot substances_____
Electric currents___
Collapse, fall, etc.,
of objects_________
Falls of persons____
Miscellaneous______
Total_________

15

38

17

22

13

18

29

16

31

20

30

5
38
1
21
24

7
42
4
21
25

6
52

7
25
2
13
16

4
18
3
20
19

5
29
2
3(5
27

3
13

16
22

3
39
1
13
9

17
32

1
18
1
17
19

3
22
3
14
11

4
17
2
10
20

42
98
132

58
111
149

42
89
115

44
76
154

27
59
92

40
87
242

45
74
195

48
49
205

31
41
223

31
52
227

31
51
254

376

453

359

361

254

451

441

383

282

383

419

4,699

3,156

2,986

Injuries
Number

W orking machin­
4,741
ery, engines, etc._
Transmission appa­
530
ratus--------------------Handling __
_____ 44, 855
7,423
Flying particles___
2,949
Hot substances_____
185
Electric currents___
Collapse, fall, etc.,
of objects. _______ 14,087
Falls of persons____ 13,892
Miscellaneous______ 28, 548

4,835

3, 885

4,087

2,919

2,997

2,344

1,614

460
489
585
495
343
37,196 33, 340 35, 489 25, 858 28,862
6,897 5, 536 5,744 4, 227 4, 759
2,857 2,356 2,648 1,875 2,467
223
221
124
273
245

302
553
272
247
39,193 33,077 31,827 28,842
6, 760 5,483 5,006 3,948
3. 757 2,765 2,201
1,845
270
235
195
174

171
22,889
2,930
1,230
157

13,132 10, 536 11,822 8. 341 10,165
12,474 9,871 10,906 7,725 9,642
26,679 24, 635 26,887 20,037 24,926

15, 251 11,980 10, 735 9,113
11,614 10, 270 8, 722 7,941
30,199 25,117 24,347 22,987

6.401
6,412
17,421

Total................ 117, 210 104,900 90,842 98,293 71,449 84,586 112, 296 92,385 86, 291 77,441

59, 225

Tables 50 and 51 present rates for the nontrain occupations from
1917 to 1921. Since 1921 exposure has not been reported in terms of
man-hours, it has not been possible to extend the significant portion
of the tables. This grouping brings out some interesting points
regarding the movement of the rates and the relations of the several
occupations, and therefore these tables are presented although the
data therein can not be extended beyond 1921.
It may be noted that shopmen have consistently the highest rates
and that these are not widely different from those prevailing in the
departments of the iron and steel industry. These comparatively
high rates for shopmen are emphasized in Table 51 which covers a
5-year period.




180

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

50.— Number of nontrain accidents, exposure, and accident frequency rates
for industrial employees on Class I railroads in the United States, 1917 to 1921, by
year and occupation

T a b le

1917

1918

1919

1921

Occupation
Number of accidents

Shopmen________________
Station m en______________
Trackmen_______________
Bridge and building men
Other employees_________

67,445
15, 635
21,036
5.104
7, 375

63,951
12,150
17,498
4,200
6,499

52,318
11, 206
17, 250
3, 835
5, 806

57,397
11,664
19,113
4,167
5, 653

41, 748
6,944
15, 778
3, 398
3, 835

T o ta l.........................

116, 595

104, 298

90, 315

97, 994

71, 703

Hours of exposure (thousands)

Sh opm en .............................
Station m en_____________
Trackmen. ____________
Bridge and building men
Other employees...............

1,400,734
689,174
1,019, 263
203, 314
415,005

1, 582,114
690,048
1,031, 366
202, 575
418,927

1,456,460
620, 370

T o ta l........................

3, 727,490

3,925,030

165,072
391, 372

1, 584,884
644, 202
955, 570
168, 550
410, 764

1,150, 383
511,918
678,478
117, 742
349,977

3, 521,480

3, 763,970

2,8

888, 2C6

Accident frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure)

Shopmen..............................
Station m e n . . . ...................
Trackmen________________
Bridge and building men.
Other employees................

48.15
22.69
20.64
25.10
17. 77

40.42
17.61
16.97
20. 73
15. 51

35. 92
18. 06
19. 42
23. 23
14. 83

36. 22
18.11

.

24. 72
13. 76

36. 29
13.56
23. 25
28.87
10.96

T o ta l.........................

31.28

26. 57

25. 68

26.03

25. 53

20 00

Table 51 shows the frequency rates per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure
for nontrain employees for the 5-year period, 1917 to 1921.
T able

51 .— Accident frequency rates (per 1,000,000 hours’ exposure) for nontrain
employees on Class I railroads in the United States, 1917 to 1921

Occupation

Fatalities

0.09
.03
.10
.30

Shopmen____ _________________ ____________________ ____________________ ________ _____
Station men
_ ________________________ __________________________________________
Trackmen.
_ _______________________ ________________________________________
_
Bridge and building m en.. _______________________ _____ ______________ ___________

G R A D E -C R O SS IN G

A C CID EN TS, 1890 TO

All acci­
dents

39. 54
18. 30
20.00
24. 29

1927

Table 52 emphasizes in a striking way the change in conditions
brought about by the introduction of the automobile. Fatal acci­
dents at grade crossings first went over 1,000 in 1912. From that
time there has been a steady increase of such occurrences. The year
1926 has the bad distinction of the greatest number to date, with
2,491. When from 1923 to 1924, there was a slight decline in fatal
cases it was hoped that a turning point had been reached. This
hope was rudely disturbed when each of the three following years had
a greater number of fatalities.




181

STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY CASUALTIES

The railways, which have earnestly striven to improve the situa­
tion, have thus far been unable to make headway against the mount­
ing hazard due to an increased number of automobiles and probably
an increased number of dangerous drivers. Undoubtedly the im­
provements which have been made in cars have a bearing upon their
safety of operation and as the older models go out of use it is reasonable
to expect a lessened number of casualties.
52 .— Number of persons and of trespassers killed or injured in railway
accidents at highway grade crossings in the United States, 1890 to 1927, by year

T a b le

Number of
persons—

Number of
trespassers—

Number of
persons—

Year ending—
Killed

June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30^

Number of
trespassers—

Year ending—

1890____
1891____
1892____
1893____
1894
1895
1896____
1897
1898
1899____
1900
1901____
1902____
1903
1904____
1905
1906
1907
1098
1909____

402
564
568
596
571
508
615
575
657
674
730
831
827
898
808
838
929
934
837
735

Injured Killed

675
863
942
1,064
817
961
1,058
1,033
1,123
1,087
1, 297
1, 354
1, 335
1,481
1,463
1, 574
1,892
1,817
1, 762
1,833

Killed

Injured

98
167
137
163
119
133
171
116
151
170
171
209
265
271
197
215
250
237
216
112

151
162
176
179
136
176
248
197
202
168
204
242
272
247
224
256
226
274
323
211

June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
June 30,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,

1910____
1911____
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916____
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927

839
992
1,032
1,125
1,147
1,086
1, 396
1, 652
1,969
1, 852
1,784
1, 791
1,705
1, 810
2, 268
2,149
2,206
2,491
2, 371

Injured Killed

1,939
2, 434
2, 506
3,080
2, 935
2,981
3, 267
3, 859
4, 764
4. 683
4, 616
5,077
4,868
5, 383
6, 314
6, 525
6, 555
6, 991
6, 613

Injured

129
148
136
145
122
83
86
121
131
137
107
100
106
96
133
107
120
103
109

153
124
138
172
119
72
83
101
128
140
216
273
166
163
148
168
178
194
140

ELECTRIC RAILW AYS

The accident experience of the electric railways, as published by
the Interstate Commerce Commission, is rather limited, and accident
rates on the basis of man-hours exposure are not available. Table 53
presents the latest and most significant data reported.
T a b le

53 .— Accident experiences of 105 American electric railways in 1928 and
1924

Item

1924

1923

448,489, 978
Car-miles operated.
Passengers carried___ 3,051,621,122

Item

445, 200, 730
3, 239,039, 582

Accidents per 1,000,000 car-miles— Con.
B y collision with
cars____________

9. 65

8.08

To employees___
To passengers____
To other persons.

10.87
44.11
21. 61

10.39
40.29
21. 91

...............

76. 59

72.59

Accidents to passen­
gers per 1,000,000
passengers carried..

6.48

5.53

Number of accidents
f rv__
to
Employees............
Passengers_______
Other persons___

4,875
19, 784
9,691

4,627
17,935
9, 758

T o ta l..................

34,350

32,320

337

338

Number of fatalities. _
Accidents per 1,000,000 car-miles:
B y collision with
motor vehicles.




195.87

194.35

Total

1923

1924

Chapter VII.— RECORD OF ACCIDENTS IN THE FEDERAL
DEPARTMENTS, 1921 TO 1927

The United States Employees’ Compensation Commission com­
piles figures showing the accident experience in the Federal depart­
ments, covering civil employees only. The record of that experience
is available for a 7-year period, and is set forth in Table 54.
Lacking precise information as to the total hours worked by Gov­
ernment employees in any department it has been assumed for the
purpose of computing rates that an 8-hour day is uniform. The
hours worked by Federal civil employees range from 7 to 9 and even
10 per day, and it may be that the 8-hour assumption is liberal and
as a result that the number of man-hours used as a divisor is some­
what larger than it should be, which would render the rates smaller
than they would be if the data were more complete.
When the 1926 figures became available it was noted that the
Department of the Interior, the Department of Labor, the Depart­
ment of the Treasury, the Department of War, and the “ Other
Government services’ ’ group showed declining rates from 1925 to
1926, while increases were shown in those for the Department of
Agriculture, the Department of Commerce, the Department of the
Navy, the Post Office Department, and the Government Printing
Office.
In 1927 the record was hardly more satisfactory, the number of
departments showing an increase in rates being six instead of five,
but including the Department of the Treasury, the Department of
War, and “ Other Government services7 which showed declines in
7
the preceding year, and excluding the Department of Commerce
and the Department of the Navy, which in 1927 took their places
among those recording declining rates.
The most notable improvement was made by the Department of
Labor, the total rate for which declined 16.9 per cent between 1926
and 1927. The greatest increase in rate (58.7 per cent) was made
by the Department of the Treasury. For the Federal departments
as a whole a slight increase is recorded for every one of the years
included except 1923 and 1926.
Generally speaking, the situation in the Government may not be
considered satisfactory when it is observed, by reference to Table 9
(p. 119), that the rates are markedly higher than those prevailing in
the better steel mills.
182




R E C O R D O F A C C ID EN TS IN F E D E R A L D E PA R TM E N T S
T able

183

54 .— Number of accidents and accident frequency rates in the Government
service, 1921 to 1927, by department and year

[Rased on number of employees shown by the Civil Service Commission’s yearly reports and on num­
ber of accidents reported to the United States Employees’ Compensation Commission]

Frequency rates (per 1,000,000
hours’ exposure)

Number of accidents
Year

Number of
employees
Nonfatal

Fatal

Nonfatal
Fatal
accidents accidents

Total

Total

All Government Services

1921............... .......................
1922_____________________
1923_____________________
1924_____________________
1925_____________________
1926_____________________
1927-________ ___________

560, 673
535,185
535, 781
546, 981
538, 290
536,426
525, 843

362
353
279
278
314
318
357

18,042
17,905
17, 713
20, 260
20, 374
19, 209
20,190

18,404
18,258
17, 992
20,538
20, 688
19, 527
20,547

0.25
.26
.20
.20
.23
.25
.28

12.88
13. 38
13.22
14. 82
15.14
15.08
15. 99

13.13
13. 64
13. 43
15.02
15. 37
15.33
16.27

Total........................

3, 779,179

2, 261

133, 693

135, 954

.25

14.75

15.00

Department of Agriculture

1921_______ ______ _______
1922......... ............... .............
1923_____________________
1924_____________________
1925________ _____ _______
1926......... ................... .........
1927_____________________

18, 722
19, 773
20,078
20,385
20,098
20,688
21, 518

10
11
17
25
26
34
27

638
919
971
1, 287
1,291
1,652
1, 760

648
930
988
1, 312
1, 317
1,686
1,787

0.22
.22
.34
.49
.52
.68
.52

13.63
18. 59
19. 34
25. 25
25. 69
33.27
34.08

13.85
18.82
19.68
25.74
26. 21
33.95
34. 60

Total. ......................

141,262

150

8,518

8,668

.44

25.12

25.56

Department of Commerce

1921............................. .........
1922_____________________
1923_____________________
1924_____________________
1925_____________________
1926_____________________
1927- __________________

11, 748
11, 267
11,199
12,119
14, 631
14, 682
14, 950

9
15
11
8
11
11
11

246
272
332
319
348
433
414

255
287
343
327
359
444
425

0.31
.53
.40
.26
.30
.30
.31

8. 38
9.66
11. 86
10.52
9. 52
12. 28
11.54

8. 69
10.19
12.25
10. 79
9.82
12.58
11. 85

Total------- -------------

90, 596

76

2,364

2,440

.35

10. 87

11.22

8.09
6.26
4. 21
4.13
2. 71
£ 95
4.29

8.27
6. 36
4. 21
4.13
2. 71
4! 05
4.29

Government Printing Office

1921_______ _____ ________
1922_____________________
1923_______ _____ ________
1924- _______ ___________
1925_____________________
i926_____________________
1927____________ _____

4,403
4,024
3,989
4,269
3, 984
4, 109
4,078

2
1

Total____ ________

28,856

4

1

89
63
42
44
27
39
42

91
64
42
44
27
40
42

0.18
.10

346

350

.06

4. 98

5.04

.10

Department of the Interior

1921- .............................. ..
1922-........................ ...........
1923. __________ _________
1924_____________________
1925. _______ ____________
1926_____________________
1927_____________________

19, 735
17,834
17,092
16, 679
13,125
13,468
14, 960

14
18
16
19
11
8
9

957
1,041
1,415
1,676
1,019
609
676

971
1,059
1,431
1, 695
1,030
617
685

0.29
.41
.37
.46
.34
.25
.25

19.39
23. 35
33.12
40.20
31.06
18.84
18.83

19,68
23. 75
33.49
40.64
31. 39
19.09
19.08

Total____________-

112,893

95

7,393

7,488

.35

27. 29

27.64




184

STATISTICS OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

T able

54.— Number of accidents and accident frequency rates in the Government
service, 1921 to 1927, by department and year— Continued
Frequency rates (per 1,000,000
hours’ exposure)

Number of accidents
Year

Number of
employees
Nonfatal

Fatal

Total

Fatal
Nonfatal
accidents accidents

Total

Department of Labor
1921.......................................
1922. .....................- .............
1923
_____
1824......... ............... .............
1925......... - ...........................
1926___________ _____ _ .....
1927— ........................ ..

3, 768
3,744
3,821
3, 876
3, 614
4, Oil
4, 050

1
2
1
5
2
2

112
100
112
111
107
90
74

113
102
112
112
112
92
76

Total........................

26, 884

13

706

' .11
.55
.21
.21

11.89
10.68
11.72
11.46
11. 84
9.45
7. 82

11.99
10.90
11.72
11. 56
12.40
9. 66
8.03

719

s 20

10. 94

11.14

0. 24
.25
.30
.26
.23
.38
.26

19. 25
14. 27
14.04
17.64
15. 52
17.24
16. 36

19. 48
14. 52
14. 33
17. 90
15.74
17. 62
16. 62

.28

17. 01

17.29

0.11
.22

Department of the Navy
1921.......................................
1922_______ ______ _______
1923....... ......................... —
1924_____ _____ __________
1925_____________________
1926_________ ________ —
1927_________ ________ —

60,653
42, 515
40, 557
42, 686
42, 842
42, 973
43,198

36
27
30
28
24
39
27

2,918
1,516
1,423
1,882
1, 662
1, 778
1, 696

2,954
1,543
1,453
1,910
1,686
1,817
1,723

Total............ ...........

315, 424

211

12, 875

13,086

|
|
1
;

Post Office Department
1921.......................... ...........
1922__________ __________
1923_____________________
1924_____________________
1925_____________ ______ 1926_____________________
1927......... .............................

281, 658
284, 207
294, 226
301,000
304,092
289, 980
278, 637

62
64
50
42
47
56
54

5, 218
6,196
6, 559
7, 395
7,488
7,896
8, 862

5, 280
6, 260
6,609
7,437
7, 535
7, 952
8, 916

0. 08
.10
.07
.06
.06
.08
.08

7.42
8.72
8.92
9. 83
9. 85
11. 35
13. 25

7.50
8. 81
8. 99
9.89
9. 91
11.43
13. 33

Total........................

2,033, 8.00

375

49, 614

49, 989

.08

10.17

10. 24

Department of the Treasury
1921....... ....................... .
1922....................... ...............
1923_____________________
1924_____________________
1 9 2 5 ..___________________
1926______ _______________
1927..................... - ..........-

68,648
56, 392
53, 604
52.121
52. 607
51, 569
51, 741

30
44
17
16
22
19
22

1,157
1, 203
938
1,013
1,037
864
983

1,187
1,247
955
1,029
1,059
883
1,005

0.18
.31
.13
. 12
. 17
. 11
.18

6.74
8. 53
7.00
7. 63
7.88
4. 93
7. 92

6. 91
8.84
7.13
7.75
8. 05
5.04
8.10

Total____ ________

387, 682

170

7,195

7, 365

. 18

7. 70

7. 88

Department of War
1921......................... ..............
1922_____________________
1923________ ____________
1924_____________________
1925_________ ___________
1926_____________________
1927......... .............................

53, 553
46, 840
44,842
45,906
38,975
45, 285
42, 771

124
104
96
102
115
63
124

6,125
5, 648
4,913
5, 295
5, 793
4,700
4,496

6,249
5, 752
5,009
5, 397
5,908
4, 763
4,620

0.92
.89
.85
.89
1.18
.58
1. 21

45.74
48. 23
43. 82
46.14
59. 45
43.24
43. 80

46. 68
49.12
44. 68
47. 03
60.64
43. 82
45.01

Total_____________

318,172

728

36, 970

37, 698

.95

48. 42

49. 37

Other Government Services
1921....................... ...............
1922______ ______ ________
1923.....................................
1924________ ______ ______
1 9 2 5 ....................................
1926_____________________
1927.......................................

37, 785
48, 589
46, 373
46, 940
44, 322
49, 661
49, 940

74
67
42
37
53
85
81

582
947
1,008
1, 238
1, 602
1,148
1,187

656
1,014
1,050
1, 275
1, 655
1, 233
1, 268

0.78
.55
.36
.31
.48
.71
.68

6.16
7.80
8.70
10. 55
14.46
9.63
9.90

6.95
8.34
9.06
10. 86
14.94
10. 34
10. 58

Total........................

323, 610

439

7, 712

8,151

.57

9. 93

10. 50




Chapter V III.— IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID E N T E X P E R IE N C E
OF MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL

Comprehensive industrial accident statistics are being put out
annually by the National Safety Council.1 The report consists al­
most exclusively of tabular matter and presents the experience of
members of the council only. Sixteen industrial groups are included
in this membership, and in 1927 accident reports were filed by 2,089
establishments employing 1,565,747 workers with an exposure of
3,742,404,981 man-hours, which record is an increase over 1926 of
approximately 21 per cent in the number of establishments, 28 per
cent in the number of workers, and 23 per cent in the number of
hours’ exposure. A summary of the latest report, giving the com­
parative experience of a 3-year period, 1925 to 1927, is presented in
Table 55. The accident frequency and severity rates for death,
permanent disability, and temporary disability, respectively, have
been computed, since they do not appear in the report, while the
total rates as given in the report have in some instances been modified
as indicated by the items on which they are based. To this extent
they do not agree with those appearing in the report. Total average
rates have not been included, although given in the original report,
because they are so readily affected by variation in the number of
establishments included in any industrial group and are, therefore,
of questionable value.
Without giving the details upon which the information is based,
the following brief summary is reproduced from the report:
Eight facts of m ajor im portance are revealed by the industrial accident statis­
tics tabulated by the National Safety Council for 1927:
1. Tw o thousand and eighty nine establishments reported for 1927; 1,725 in
1926; an increase of 21 per cent.
2. In 1927, 1,565,747 persons worked 3,742,404,981 hours, while in 1926,
1,221,094 persons worked 3,033,416,031 hours.
3. A gradual decrease in the hours of exposure per man has occurred in the
past three years. In 1927, 2,390; 1926, 2,480; and in 1925, 2,930.
4. 1927 average accident frequency rate equals 25.95. The average for two
years previous equals 31.31; a reduction of 17 per cent.
5. 1927 average accident severity rate equals 1.88. The average for two
years previous equals 2.50; a reduction of 24 per cent.
6. The ratio of persons em ployed to lost-time injuries 2 is 16 to 1. Days
lost per injury equals 71. The ratio for two years previous equals 12 to 1, with
73 days lost per injury.
7. The ratio of nonfatal injuries equals 155 to 1. Ratio for tw o years previous
equals 154 to 1.
8. One hundred and thirty three establishments, or 7 per cent of the total,
completed the year of 1927 without a lost-time injury.
1 Data in this report, which are copyrighted, are reproduced through the courtesy of the National Safety
Council, 108 E. Ohio Street, Chicago.
2 Only lost-time personal injuries are considered and tabulated throughout this report. A tabulatable
personal injury is one arising out of employment and resulting in death, permanent disability, or loss of
time from work other than the remainder of the day or shift on which the injury was incurred.




185

T able

55.— Number of accidents, and accident frequency and severity rates in specified industries, reported by National Safety Council, 1925
to 1927
25
Death

Industrial group

Num ­
Fre­
Fre­
Fre­
Fre­
Sever­
Sever­
Sever­
ber of
Sever­
quency
quency
quency
Full-year
quency
ity rate
ity rate
ity rate
ity rate
estab­
rate (per
rate (per
rate (per
rate (per
workers
lish­
N um ­
(per 1,000 N u m ­ 1,000,000 (per 1,000 N u m ­ 1,000,000 (per 1,000 N u m ­ 1,000,000 (per 1,000
1,000,000
hours’
hours’
ber
ber
ber
hours’
ber
hours’
ments
hours’
hours’
hours’
hours’
expo­
expo­
expo­
expo­
expo­
expo­
expo­
expo­
sure)1
sure)1
sure)!
sure)1
sure)1
sure)1
sure)1
sure)1

22
29
16

0.03
.07
.04

0.17
.40
.24

560
484
382

0. 73
1.13
.96

0.32
.63
.46

17,279
9, 554
8,176

22. 65
22.40
20. 46

0.53
.33
.33

17,861
10,067
8,574

23.41
23.60
21.46

1.02
1.36
1.03

65
108
148

41, 383
65,444
85, 676

38
50
52

.31
.25
.20

1.84
1. 53
1.21

86
141
156

.69
.72
.61

.57
.46
.50

2,473
3, 393
4,248

19.92
17. 28
16. 53

.31
.29
.29

2,597
3, 584
4,458

20.92
18. 25
17. 34

2. 72
2.28
2.01

36
51
65

8,487
22,343
19, 903

24
40
39

.94
.60
.65

5. 66
3. 58
4.82

18
122
97

.71
1.82
1.62

.81
.94
1.32

1,736
3,705
3,749

68. 78
55. 27
62. 79

1.11
.91
.99

1, 778
3,867
3,885

69. 93
57. 69
65.06

7. 57
5.43
7.13

63
124

18,802
33,485

4
11

.07
.11

.42
.66

48
61

.85
.61

.33
.35

1,279
1,903

22.67
18. 95

.64
.33

1,331
1,975

23. 59
19. 67

1. 39
1.34

280
318
466

220, 397
228, 738
294,820

86
127
114

. 13
.19
.13

.78
1.11
. 77

545
796
937

.82
1.16
1.06

.60
.78
.69

18,915
23,405
21, 892

28.60
34.10
24. 75

.41 219, 546
.55 24, 328
.42 22,943

29. 55
35.45
25.94

1.79
2.44
1.88

17
16
28

11,828
6, 512
11, 266

1

.03

. 17

1

.03

.18

41
13
29

1.16
.67
.86

.65
1.14
.32

1,383
1,137
1, 505

38. 97
58.20
44.53

.45
.61
.50

1,425
1,150
1,535

40.16
58. 87
45.42

1.27
1.75
1.00

99
133
186

34,874
42, 235
61,790

21
22
27

.20
.17
.15

1.20
1.04
.87

57
67
63

.54
.53
.34

.38
.39
.34

3,943
4, 570
4,994

37.69
36.07
26.94

.57
.52
.36

4,021
4, 659
5,084

38.43
36. 77
27.43

2.15
1.95
1.57

18
20
24

71, 352
83, 601
91,150

47
60
64

.22
.24
.23

1.32
1.44
1.40

208
233
267

.97
.93
.98

.58
.64
.54

5,600
7,039
7,615

26.16
28.06
27.95

.43
.40
.47

5,855
2 7,332
7,946

27.35
29.23
29.16

2.33
2.48
2.41

145
204

126, 387
154, 325

26
16

.07
.03

.22
.21

417
451

1.10
.97

.59
.49

8,741
8,436

23.05
18. 22

.29
.24

9,184
8,903

24. 22
19. 23

1.10
.94

ACCIDENTS

254,188
142, 258
133,179

INDUSTRIAL

196
98
129

O
F




Total

Temporary disability

STATISTICS

Automotive:
1925________________________________________________
1926_______________________________________________
1927_______________________________________________
Chemical:
1925_______________________________________________
1926_______________________________________________
i
1927_______________________________________________ :
Construction:
1925_______________________________________________
1926_______________________________________________
1927_______________________________________________ !
Tood:
1926_______________________________________________
1927_______________________________________________
M etals:
1925_______________________________________________
1926_______________________________________________
1927_______________________________________________
Packers and tanners:
1925 _
_________________________________ ______
1926
1927_______________________________________________
Paper and pulp:
1925
______________________________________
1926
_________________________________
1927_______________________________________________
Petroleum:
1925
. _______________________________
1926.. ___________________________________________
1927_______________________________________________
Power press:
1926___
_________________________________________
1927_______________________________________________

Permanent disability

h-

1

132
322

73,954
186, 216

129
243

.58
.43

3.49
2.61

53
125

.24
.22

.37
.31

7,308
16,743

32.94
29.97

.46
.41

7,490
17, 111

33. 76
30. 62

4.32
3.33

36
28
31

5,108
5,096
5,175

13
13
9

.84
.85
.58

5.09
5.10
3.48

23
17
15

1.50
1.11
.97

1.78
1.13
.94

708
841
810

46. 21
55.01
52.18

.77
.80
.79

744
871
834

48. 55
56.97
53.73

7.64
7.03
5.21

22
32
45

57,813
58,899
68,747

10
10
10

.06
.06
.05

.35
.34
.29

70
86
69

.40
.49
.33

.37
.40
.25

4,974
5,217
6,083

28. 68
29. 52
29.49

.39
.43
.39

5,054
5,313
6,162

29.14
30.07
29.87

1.11
1.17
.93

32
49
86

25,975
36,828
46, 738

1
4
3

.01
.04
.02

.08
.22
.13

31
49
47

.40
.44
.34

.21
.25
.26

1,029
1,396
1,699

13. 21
12.64
12.12

.16
.18
.15

1,061
1,449
1,749

13.62
13.12
12.48

.45
.65
.54

100
136
167
64

23,297
32,982
37,079
17, 920

11
31
17

.16
.31
.15

.95
1.88
.92

128
129
143
4

1.83
1.30
1.29
.07

.96
1.19
.73
.13

2,948
5,977
5,143
664

42.21
60.40
46.24
12. 37

.84
1.44
.58
.15

3,087
6,137
5, 303
668

44.20
62.01
47. 68
12.44

2.75
4. 56
2.23
.28

............T

EXPERIENCE




ACCIDENT

1 These rates have been computed and the total rates have been recomputed from the items as given in the report.
2 This is the total of the items, but is not the total given in the report, and the discrepancy is not explained.

INDUSTRIAL

Public utilities:
1926___________ ________ ___________________________
1 9 2 7 ...___________ ________________________________
Quarry:
1925___________ ______ ____________________ ________
1 9 2 6 ...________ _____________ _____ _________________
1927________ ______ ________________________________
Rubber:
1925___________ ________ ___________________________
1 926 ..______________ ______ _________________ ______
1927__________________________ ____________________
Textiles:
1 9 2 5 ...____________ _______ _______________ ________
1926.________ ______________________________________
1927_______________________________________________
Woodworking and lumber manufacturing:
1925_______________________ _______________________
1926_________________________________ _____ ________
1927_______________________________________________
Miscellaneous: 1927__________________________________

00




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
T h e f o l l o w i n g is a li s t o f a ll b u l l e t i n s o f t h e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s
p u b l i s h e d s i n c e J u l y , 1 9 1 2 , e x c e p t t h a t in t h e c a s e o f b u l l e t i n s g i v i n g t h e
r e s u lts o f p e r io d ic s u r v e y s o f th e b u re a u o n ly th e la te s t b u lle tin o n a n y o n e
s u b j e c t is h e r e l i s t e d .
A c o m p l e t e li s t o f t h e r e p o r t s a n d b u l l e t i n s is s u e d p r i o r t o J u l y , 1 9 1 2 , a s
w e l l a s t h e b u l l e t i n s p u b l i s h e d s i n c e t h a t d a t e , w ill b e f u r n i s h e d o n a p p l i ­
c a tio n .
B u lle tin s m a r k e d th u s (* )a r e o u t o f p r i n t .
Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
*No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York. [1913.]
•No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade c»n its inquiry into industrial
agreements. [1913.]
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
No. 144. Industrfal court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City. [1914.]
No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of New York City.
[1914.]
*No.
*No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
N o.
No.
No.

191.
198.
233.
255.
283.
287.
303.
341.
402.
468.
481.

Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry. [1916.]
Collective agreements in the m en’s clothing industry. [1916.1
Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc. [1921.]
Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
Trade agreements, 1927.
Joint industrial control in the book and job printing industry. [1928.]

Cooperation.
No. 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
N o. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricultural).
Employment and Unemployment.
*No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices [in the United States]. [1913.]
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City. N . Y . [1915.]
*No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries. [1915.]
*No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
No. 196. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis, M inn., January 19
and 20, 1916.
♦No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association of Boston, Mass., held
M ay 10,1916.
No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
No. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3,1917.
No. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
•No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
No. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N . Y ., M a y 9-11,1918.
No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes. [1922.]
No. 409. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.
Foreign Labor Laws.
*No 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European countries.
Housing.
*No. 158,
No. 263.
No. 295.
N o. 469.

[1914.]

Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign countries. [1914.]
Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1921 to] 1927.

36904°— 29-------13




[i]

Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.
♦No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories.
[1912.1
N o. 120. Hygiene of tlie painters’ trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection. [1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.]
♦No.
*N o.
♦No.
N o.

157.
165.
179.
188.

Industrial accident statistics.
[1915.]
Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead in the painting of
buildings. [1916.]

♦No. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. [1916.]
♦No.
*N o.
♦No.
N o.
N o.
♦No.
♦No.
N o.
N o.

207.
209.
219.
221.
230.
231.
234.
236.
249.

♦No.
No.
N o.
No.
N o.
N o.
N o.
No.
N o.

251.
256.
267.
276.
280.
291.
293.
298.
306.

No. 339.
N o. 392.

Causes of death by occupation. [1917.]
Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives. [1917.]
Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts). [1918.]
Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Munition Workers’ C om ­
mittee. [1919.1
Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
Standardization of industrial accident statistics. [1920.]
Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates. [1921.]
Carbon-monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910-1919.
Occupational hazards and diagnostic sigps: A guide to impairments to be looked for in
hazardous occupations. [1922.]
Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States. [1923.]
Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]

N o. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and in the preparation of phosphorus.
[1926.]
N o. 425. Record of industrial accidents in the United States to 1925.
N o. 426. Deaths from lead poisoning. [1927.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
N o. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at Washington, D . C .,
July 14-16, 1926.
N o. 460. A new test for industrial lead poisoning. [1928.]
N o. 466. Settlement for accidents to American seamen. [1928.]
No. 488. Deaths from lead poisoning, 1925-1927. (In press.)
Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.
No. 237. Industrial unrest in Great Britain.
N o.
No.
N o.
No.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.

340.
349.
361.
380.
383.
384.
399.
483.

[1917.]

Chinese migrations, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
Labor relations in the Fairmont (W . Va.) bituminous-coal field. [1924.]
Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
Works council movement in Germany. [1925.1
Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920-1924.
Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States.
Conditions in the shoe industry, Haverhill, Mass, 1928. (In press.)

[1925.]

Labor Laws o f the United States (including decisions o f courts relating to labor).
No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.1
No. 229. Wage-payment legislation in the United States. [1917.1
No.
No.
No.
No.
-

285.
321.
322.
343.

Minimum-wage laws of the United States: Construction and operation.
Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]

No.
No.
N o.
No.
N o.

370.
408.
444.
467.
486.

Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto.
Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1926.
M inim um wage legislation in various countries. [1928.]
Labor legislation of 1928.




[1921.]

[1925.]

Proceedings o f Annual Conventions o f the Association o f Governmental Labor Officials o f the United
States and Canada. (Name changed in 1928 to Association o f Governmental Officials in Industry o f
the United States and Canada.)
*No.
No.
No.
No.
*No.
*No.
No.
No.
No.

266.
307.
323.
352.
389.
411.
429.
455.
480.

Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
Eighth, New Orleans, La., M ay 2-6, 1921.
Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., M a y 22-26, 1922.
Tenth, Richmond, Va., M a y 1-4, 1923.
Eleventh, Chicago, 111., M ay 19-23, 1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
Fourteenth, Paterson, N . J., M ay 31 to June 3, 1927.
Fifteenth, New Orleans, La., M ay 15-24, 1928.

Proceedings o f Annual M eetings o f the International Association o f Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions.
No.
N o.
No.
*No.
N o.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

210.
248.
264.
273.
281.
304.
333.
359.
385.
395.
406.
432.
456.
485.

Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25, 1917.
Fifth, Madison, W is., September 24-27, 1918.
Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24,1920.
Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
Ninth, Baltimore, M d ., October 9-13, 1922.
Tenth, St. Paul, M inn., September 24-26, 1923.
Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake C ity, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Fourteenth, Atlanta, Ga., September 27-29, 1927.
Fifteenth, Paterson, N . J., September 11-14, 1928. (In press.)

Proceedings o f Annual Meetings o f the International Association o f Public Employment Services.
No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20, 1913; Second, Indianapolis, September 24 and 25, 1914;
Third, Detroit, July 1 and 2, 1915.
N o. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N . Y ., July 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N . Y ., September 7-9, 1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D . C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., M ay 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N . Y ., September 15-17, 1925.
No. 478. Fifteenth, Detroit, M ich., October 25-28, 1927.
Productivity of Labor.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
N o. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry. [1926.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
N o. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]
N o. 474. Productivity of labor in merchant blast furnaces. [1928.]
No. 475. Productivity of labor in newspaper printing. [1928.]
Retail Prices and Cost of Living.
*No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
*No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
No. 357. Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
No. 369. The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
No. 464. Retail prices, 1890 to 1927.
Safety Codes.
*N o. 331. Code of lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
No. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
N o. 350. Specifications of laboratory tests for approval of electric headlighting devices for motor
vehicles.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

351.
375.
378.
382.
410.
430.

Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
Safety code for laundry machinery and operation.
Safety code for woodworking plants.
Code of lighting school buildings.
Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.




[in ]

S afety Codes— Continued.
N o. 433. Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
N o. 436. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
N o. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
N o. 461. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
N o. 463. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus.— First revision.
Vocational Workers’ Education.
*N o. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment. [1915.]
*N o . 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va.
[1915.1
N o. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, M inn. [1917.]
N o. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States. [1920.]
N o. 459. Apprenticeship in building construction. [1928.1
W ages and Hours o f Labor.
*N o. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in the dress and
waist industry of New York City. [1914.1
*N o. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry. [1914.]
N o. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
N o. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
*N o. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907 to 1914.
N o. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.1
N o. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1915.
N o. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
N o. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
N o. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
N o. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
N o. 360. Tim e and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
N o. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
N o. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines. 1924.
N o. 407. Labor costs of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
[1926.]
N o. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
N o. 413. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1925.
N o. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and 1924.
N o. 435. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1926.
N o. 438. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1925.
N o. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1926.
N o. 446. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
N o. 450. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1926.
N o. 452. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1926.
N o. 454. Hours and earnings in bituminous-coal mining, 1922, 1924, and 1926.
N o. 471. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1927.
N o. 472. Wages and hours of labor in slaughtering and meat packing, 1927. (In press.)
N o. 476. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, 1927. Supplement to Bui. 457. (In press.)
N o. 482. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, M ay 15, 1928.
No. 484. Wages and hours of labor of common street labor, 1928.
No. 487. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1928.
Welfare Work.
*N o. 123. Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
N o. 222. Welfare work in British munition factories. [1917.]
*No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United States.
N o. 458. Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments, 1926.
Wholesale Prices.
No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign countries.

[1919.]

[1921.]

N o. 440. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1926.
No. 453. Revised index number of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
N o. 473. Wholesale prices 1913 to 1Q27.
W omen and Children in Industry.
N o. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in selected industries
*No.
N o.
N o.
*No.
N o.

117.
118.
119.
122.
160.

in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile establishments and
garment factories. [1914.]




[IV ]

W om en and Children in Industry— Continued.
*N o. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries. [1915.]
*No. 175. Summary of the report on condition of women and child wage earners in the United States.
[1915.1
*No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
*No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women. [1915.]
*No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of Boston, Mass. [1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.1
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
*N o. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of industrial employ­
ment of women and children. [1918.]
N o. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war. [1917.]
No. 253. Wom en in the lead industries. [1919.]
Workmen’ s
*N o. 101.
*N o. 102.
No. 103.
No. 107.
*N o. 155.

Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).
Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
British national insurance act, 1911.
Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland. [1912.]
Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]

N o. 212. Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Washington, D . C ., December 5-9,1916.
*No. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign countries, 1917 and 1918.
N o. 301. Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration. [1922.]
N o. 312. National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921.
N o. 379. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of January 1,1925.
N o. 423. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada as of July 1,1926.
No. 477. Public-service retirement systems, United States and Europe. [1928.]
Miscellaneous Series.
*No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to M a y
1, 1915.
N o. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
N o. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
N o. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
N o. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington, D . C. [1921.]
N o. 299. Personnel research agencies: A guide to organized research in employment management,
industrial relations, training, and working condifions. [1921.]
N o. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization. [1922.]
N o. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
[1923.]
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
No.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.

342.
346.
372.
386.
398.
401.
420.
439.
461.
462.
465.
479.
489.

International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and problems.
Humanity in government. [1923.]
Convict labor in 1923.
Cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
Family allowance in foreign countries. [1926.]
Handbook of American trade-unions. [1926.]
Handbook of labor statistics, 1924 to 1928.
Labor organizations in Chile. [1928.]
Park recreation areas in the United States. [1928.]
Beneficial activities of American trade-unions. [1928.]
Activities and functions of a State department of labor. [1928.]
Care of the aged in the United States. (In press.)




[V]

[1923.1