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r
SOCIOLOGY DIVISION
SERIAL

STATE
JULY

I,

1950 TO JANUARY

I,

1952

Supplement to Bulletin 227, Revised

FEBRUARY I, 1952

BOARDS




U.

S.

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Maurice J.

Tobin,

Secretary

WOMEN’S BUREAU
Frieda S. Hiller, Director
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.




STATES WITH MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS
(Applicable to women and minors, unless otherwise noted)

Arizona
Arkansas (women and girls)
California
Colorado
Connecticut (any employee)
District of Columbia
Illinois
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana (women and girls)
Maine
Massachusetts (any person)
Minnesota
Nevada (women and girls)

New Hampshire (any employee)
New Jersey
New York (women and minors; men)
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma (adult women)
Oregbn
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island (women and minors; men
South Dakota (women and girls)
Utah
Washington
Wisconsin

Alaska (women)
Hawaii

Puerto Rico

(1)(women and girls)
(2) (any employee)

«.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —l

Colorado:
Laundry Industry,
No. 6, Feb.

11, 1951.

(Supersedes order 5
Aug. 7, 1941. )

Occupation or industrycovered

Laundry, i.e., any trade,
business, industry, club,
institution or branch
thereof engaged in (1) washing, ironing, or process­
ing incidental thereto, for
compensation, of clothing
napery, blankets, bed
clothing, or fabric of any
kind whatsoever; (2) the
collecting, sale, resale,
or distribution at retail
or wholesale of laundry
services; (3) the producing
of laundry service for
their own use by business
establishments, hospitals,
clubs, or profit-making
institutions; (4) self­
service laundries.

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Zone A (Denver and
Pueblo and a radius
of 5 miles beyond
the corporate
limits of these
cities; from June 1
to Oct. 1, covers
Colorado Springs
and Estes Park).

Zone B (remainder of
State and from
Oct. 1 to June 1,
Colorado Springs
and Estes Park).
All employees

1952 V

Minimum-wage
rates

55 cents an hour

55 cents an hour

li times employee's regular
rate.

45 cents an hour

45 cents an hour

li times employ­
ee 's regular
rate.

Hours

Up to and in­
cluding 40 a
week.
Over 40 and
including 44
a week.
Over 44 a
week; over 8
a day in
emergen4/
cies, —'
Up to and in­
cluding 38 a
week. —^
Over 36 and
including 44
a week.
Over 44 a
week; over 8
a day in
emergen­
cies. —l

See footnotes at end of table.



1

2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec—
?/
tive date —

Occupation or industry
covere d

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952

Minimum—wage
rates

Colorado - Cont.

Retail Trade Occupa­
tions, No. 7, Feb.
18,

1951.

(Supersedes order 2
of Jan. 10, 19 39. )




Retail trade, i.e., the per­
formance of any and every
type of work concerned with
or incidental to the sell­
ing or offering for sale
any commodity, article,
goods, wares, or merchan­
dise, to the consumer, not
for the purpose of resale
in any form.

Women and minors:
Experienced:
Zone A (Denver and
Pueblo and a radius
of 5 miles beyond
the corporate
limits of these
cities; from June
1 to Oct. 1, covers
Colorado Springs,
Manitou Springs,
and Estes Park).
Zone B (remainder
of State and from
Oct. 1 to June 1
the 3 resort
cities mentioned
in the Zone A
entry).
Inexperienced (192
hours in the occupa­
tion) - Both zones
All employees

55 cents an hour

45 cents an hour

80 percent of the
applicable
minimum-wage
rate. —^
li times employ­
ee's regular
rate.

f

Hours

Up to 8 a day,
48 a week. —

Do. ^

Do.

Over 48 a
week; over
8 a day in
emergen4/
cies. —

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —t

Occupation or industry
covered

Colorado - Cont.
Beauty Service Occupa- Beauty service, i.e., all
tions, No. 9,
services or operations
Mar. 4, 1951.
(Supersedes order 3
of Dec. 4, 1939.)

used or useful in the care,
cleansing, or beautification of the skin, nails,
or hair, or in the enhancement of personal
appearance, and also services or operations incidental thereto, including
the service of maids,
cashiers, reception or
appointment clerks.

•Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Senior operators
Junior operators
(First 12 months,
and operator
still in the
training period) —^
All other employees
All employees
*

Minimum-wage
rates

65 cents an hour
50 cents an hour

Do.
li times employee's regular
rate.

Hours

Up to 8 a day
or 44 a
week. —^

Do. ^
Over 44 a
week; over 8
a day in
emergencies. —^

See footnotes at end of table.




3

4
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Colorado - Cont.
Public Housekeeping
Occupations, No. 8,
Mar. 10, 1951.
(Supersedes order 4
of June 16, 1940. )




Occupation or industry
covered

Public housekeeping includes
hotels, restaurants, motels,
rooming houses, cottage
camps, clubs, hospitals,
convalescent homes, sani—
tariums, private schools,
colleges, and any establishment that prepares and
offers for sale food or
refreshments for consumption
either on or off its premises; any business which
offers lodging accommodations for hire to the publie, to employees, or to
members, whether such service is the principal
business of the employer
or merely incidental to
another business.

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Experienced:
Zone A (Denver and
adjoining area
extending 6 miles
from city's corporate limits).
Zone B (remainder
of State).
Inexperienced (192
hours in the
occupation) - Both
zones.
All employees

1952 V

Minimum-wage
rates

55 cents an hour

Hours

Up to 8 a day,
48 a week.

45 cents an hour

Do.

80 percent of the
applicable
minimum-wage
pr
rate. — /

Do.

li times employee's regular
rate.

Over 48 a
week; over 8
a day in
emergencies. —

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —/

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Connecticut:
Restaurant Occupation,
Nos. 4 A and 4B,
May 15, 1950.
(Set aside by the
Superior Court of
Hartford County on
Dec. 19, 1950, be­
cause of wageboard's failure to
comply with the
procedural provi­
sions of the State's
minimum-wage law.)

See footnotes at end of table.




1

5

6
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —!

Occupation or industry
covere d

1,

1950—JANUARY

Laundry Occupation,
Nos. 2A and 2B,
Apr. 17, 1951.
(Supersedes order 2
of Sept. 29, 1947
and extends cover­
age to adult males,
who had not been
covered in the
earlier order.)




Laundry establishments, i.e.,
any place in which any serv­
ice in connection with any
activity of the laundry
occupation is performed for
compensation, except in
domestic service.
Laundry occupation includes:
(1) any activity in the
washing, ironing or proc­
essing, incidental thereto,
of laundry wares and all
other operations carried
on in establishments en­
gaged in this.business;
(2) the collecting, sale,
resale, or distribution at
retail or wholesale of
laundry service and the
keeping of accounts, billing
and any other clerical work
in connection therewith;
(3) the producing of laundry
service for their own use
by business establishments,
clubs, hospitals, or other
public or private institu­
tions except those com­
pletely supported by the
State or a municipality.

Women and minors; adult
males engaged in production work.
Women and minors; adult
males engaged in pro­
duction work in laun­
dries, who do work
ordinarily performed
by females or minors
under 18.

1952 ^

Minimum-wa ge
rates

Class of employees
covered

C onnecticu t _ Cont.

1,

75 cents an hour 8/
—■

l£

times employee's
regular rate.

(Deductions for
meals and lodg­
ing allowed
when these
constitute a
condition of
employment.
Amounts must be
in accordance
with rates set
by the Labor
Commissioner
from time to
time. Such
deductions not
allowed during
the period em­
ployee is re­
receiving
training or new
experience.)

Hours

Up to and in­
cluding 44
a week. —^
Over 44
a week.

iQ/

State, title and number
of order, ajid effec­
tive date 2/

Connecticut - Cont.
Cleaning and Dyeing
Occupation, Nos. 3A
and 3B, June 37,
1951.
(Supersedes order 3
of June 2, 1947
and extends coverage to adult
males.)

Occupation or industry
covered

Cleaning and dyeing, i.e.,
cleaning, dyeing, re-dyeing,
or pressing garments (ineluding hats), upholstery,
rugs, or any other fabrics,
any process incidental
thereto, including collecting and receiving such
articles for the above
purposes, of giving out or
collecting such articles
after they have been
cleaned, dyed, re-dyed, or
pressed. Exception:
Any
such process when carried
on in establishments manu­
facturing textiles or gar­
ments (including hats ).

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

75 cents an hour

Women and minors; men.
Exception:
Adult
males receiving at
least $35 a week.

Hours

TJp to and in­
cluding 45
a week. —^

li times employee's Over 45 a
week, AQ/
regular rate.

«

See

footnotes at

end




of table.
7

8
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —t

Occupation or industry
covered

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY

Class of employees
covered

(Amends Minimum-Wage
Law to establish
statutory rate.)




1952 -1/

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

t

Connecticut _ Cont.
Session laws 1951,
Public Act 352,
July 1, 1951.

1,

Any industry or occupation,
with enumerated exceptions
such as agriculture,
domestic service, persons
covered by the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act and
others.

Women and minors; men
*

75 cents an hour

48 a week
(maximum
for women
and minors
in prac­
tically
all in­
dustries
or occu­
pations ).

State, title and number
of order, and effee—
tive date 2/

Connecticut _ Cont.
Mercantile Trade,
Nos. 7.4 and 7B,
Oct. 1, 1951.
(Supersedes1 orders
7A and 7B of
Mar. 18, 1946. )

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Mercantile trade, i.e., whole­
sale or retail selling of
commodities and any opera­
tion supplemental or inci­
dental thereto, including,
but not limited to, buying,
delivery, maintenance,
office, stock, and clerical
work. Exceptions: Repair
and service employees if
major portion of their
duties is unrelated to the
mercantile trade as herein
defined.

Women and minors; men:
Experienced full-time
and part-time
employees-.

Minimum-wa ge
rates

75 cents an hour

Hours

Full-time and parttime beginners (First
1,000 hours in the
trade. )

00 cents an hour

Up to and
including
44 a
week. —^
Do. W

Both groups. A3/

li times employee's
regular rate.

Over 44 a
week.

(Deductions for
uniforms or
other facilities
required by an
employer as a
condition of
employment and
the reasonable
cost of their
maintenance may
not be charged
to the employee,
if .this would
reduce employ­
ee's wage
below the mini­
mum prescribed
by this order.)

See footnotes at end of table.




9

10

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —/

r.onnfict i cut - Cont.
Beauty Shop
Occupation, No. 1,
Nov. 1, 1951.

(Supersedes orders
1A and IB of
Mar. 3, 1947. )




Occupation or industry
covered

Beauty shop, i.e., any shop,
store, or place, or part
thereof, in which is
conducted the business of a
hairdresser or cosmetician
as "these terms are defined
in the Cosmetology Act.

JULY 1,

1950 — JANUARY

Class of employees
covered

1,

1952

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Women and minors; men:
15/
3-year operators —
and clerks: —!
Full-time

$33 a week

Part-time —^

$6.50 a day

Overtime

95 cents an hour

Any part of 4
or more days
a week.
8-hour day or
part thereof.
Over 44 a
week or, if
part-time
worker, over
8 a day. —^

19/
2-year operators —'
and learner clerks:—^
Full-time
Part-time —^
Overtime

$28.50 a week
$6 a day
85 cents an hour

Same as shown
for 3-year
operators.

$26 a week
$5.50 a day
75 cents an hour

Same as shown
for 3-year
operators.

Weekly wage may
be prorated

Actual time
worked

1-year operators: —^
Full-time
part-time
Overtime
Full-time employees
hired after the
beginning of the week
or dismissed in good
faith as unsatisfac­
tory before the end

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —l

Connecticut - Cont.
Beauty Shop
Occupation - Cont.

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum—wage
rates

Hours

of the week or
voluntarily absent in
any week.
Maids, porters, and
cleaners

75 cents an hour
(Employee may
not be charged
for uniforms
or uniform
maintenance,
etc., if such
charge brings
the wage paid
below the
minimum.)

48 a week
(Maximum
for women
and
minors. )

See footnotes at end of table.



11

12

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

District of Columbia:
Laundry and Dry Clean- Laundry and dry cleaning, i.e.,
ing Occupation, No. 5,
any activity concerned with:
Aug. 82, 1951.
(Supersedes order 5
of July 8, 1946.)




(1) the washing, cleaning,
finishing, refreshing, pressing, mending, or dyeing of
wearing apparel (including
hats and shoes), household
furnishings, textiles, fur,
leather, or fabric of any
kind whatsoever, or (2) the
collection, sale, resale, or
distribution at retail or
wholesale of any laundry or
dry cleaning service. Covers
all other operations and
services connected with the
above or incidental thereto
including, but not limited
to, services of cashiers,
telephone operators, office
workers, store clerks, elevator operators, maintenance
workers; and any of the above
services performed by an
establishment or business for
its own use although such
services may be incidental to
the establishment's principal
business.

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 ^

Minimum-wage
rates

Women and minors

$30 a week

Employees beginning work
after the beginning of
a workweek or resigning before the end of
a workweek, or voluntarily absent in any
week.
Part-time

75 cents am hour

Overtime
If employee works a
split shift, or
spread of hours
exceeds 11.

Hours

Over 24 but
not more
than 40 a
week.
Actual time
worked.

85 cents am hour

24 or less a
we ek. —/

$1.12i cents an
hour.
75 cents a day in
addition to the
applicable minimum wage.

Over 40 a
week. —'

(Deductions against
the minimum wage
allowed only if
written consent of
employee and written approval of
the Minimum Wage
and Industrial
Safety Board are
obtained. )

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Kentucky:

Hotel and Restaurant
Industry.
Directory, Feb. 26,
1951. Mandatory,
Aug. 1, 1951.
(Supersedes order
(unnumbered) which
became mandatory
Apr. 1, 1943. )

Hotels, i.e., establishments
having more than 10 guest
rooms, which offer lodging
accommodations for hire to
the general public and have
transient guests.
Restaurants, i.e., establishments preparing and offering for sale food for
consumption.

Women and minors:
Zone I (cities of
20,000 or more
population and
contiguous territory within 5 miles
thereof):
Nonservice

60 cents an hour

90 cents an hour
Service

Zone II (cities of
4,000 to 20,000
population and
contiguous terri­
tory within 2
miles thereof):
Nonservice

45 cents an hour

67& cents an hour

58 cents an hour

87 cents an hour
Service

43 cents an hour

64i cents an hour

Up to and in­
cluding 48 a
week.
Over 48 a
week. £3/
Up to and in­
cluding 48 a
week.
Over 48 a
we ek. 22/

Up to and in­
cluding 48 a
week.
Over 48 a
week. 22/
Up to and in­
cluding 48 a
week.
Over 48 a
week 22/

See footnotes at end of table.




13

14

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Kentucky - Cont.
Hotel and Restaurant
Industry - Cont.




Occupation or industry
covered

1,

1950—JANUARY

Class of employees
covered

Zone III (remainder o f
State):
Nonservice

1,

1952

1/

Minimum-wag
rates

56 cents an hour

84 cents an hour
Service

41 cents an hour

61i cents an hour
If spread of hours ex­
60 cents a day in
addition to the
ceeds 12, or employee
hourly wages
has more than one inter­
val off duty (exclud­
earned.
ing any meal period of
1 hour or less) or if
(No deductions may
both situations occur.
be made against
the minimum wage
for meals.
Em­
ployer and
employee may,
however, volun­
tarily reach an
agreement but the
amount charged
may not exceed 25
cents a meal.)

Hours

Up to and in­
cluding 48 a
week.
Over 48 a
week. —^
Up to and in­
cluding 48 a
week.
Over 48 a
week.

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —/

Occupation or industry
covered
.

Massachusetts:
"Public housekeeping indusPublic Housekeeping
try" includes any activity
Occupation, No. 25-B,
in establishments directly
or indirectly connected
with the preparation of
(Supersedes order 25-A,
and offering of food or
mandatory Mar. 2,
beverages for human con1948. Transfers to
sumption; and the offer—
this present order
ing or furnishing of
occupations covered
rooms or lodgings for reby the Building Servnumeration, or other service order of 1949,
ices rendered, either to
if they are in es—
the public, employees,
.
tablishments covered
members or guests of memby this present
bers, paying guests, stuorder.)
dents, or others, whether
as the principal business
of the employer or as a
unit of another business.
Public housekeeping occupations include the work
performed by waitresses,
cooks, counter and salad
workers, food checkers,
bus and vegetable workers,
dish and glass washers,
kitchen help, maids,
cleaners, chambermaids,
housekeepers, practical
nurses, ward aides, housemen, stewards, parlormaids,
linen room girls, checkSee footnotes at end of table.
room attendants, matrons,
Aug. 1, 1950.




Class of employees
covered

Women and minors; men:
Non-service employees
(including counter
workers, unless
special permission
is granted by the
Minimum Wage Commission).
Service employees

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

05 cents an
24/
hour. £2/

9 a day, 48 a
week (maximum for wornen and
.
,
p.fi/
minors), —'
28/

45 cents an
.hour. —
24/

Do. 25/20/

(Deductions for
meals and
lodging permitted at
prices specified in the
order. But
deductions
bringing wages
below the
minimum allowed,
only if consent
of employee
and approval
of Minimum
Wage Commis—
sion are ob—
tained.)

1 e;

16

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —l

Massachusetts - Cont.
Public Housekeeping
Occupation - Cont.




Occupation or industrycovered

hosts, hostesses, elevator
operators, janitors, ship­
pers and receivers, bell men,
doormen, baggage porters,
and watchmen, including, but
not limited to, all nonpro­
fessional workers engaged in
public housekeeping estab­
lishments, except employees
specifically included under
another minimum wage order.
Establishments include restau­
rants, fountain lunch count­
ers, cafeterias, caterers,
and all other establishments
where lunches, meals, or
food in solid and/or liquid
form are prepared for and
served to the public or to
be consumed on the premises;
hotels, seasonal hotels,
camps, clubs, hospitals,
convalescent homes, private
schools, colleges, and other
establishments offering
rooms for rent.

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 V

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date 2/

Massachusetts - Cont.
Personal Services
Occupations, No. 23,
Dec. 14, 1950.

(Supersedes Beauty
Culture Order 23,
Mandatory Apr. 1,
1943. )

Occupation or industrycovered

Class of employees
covered

"Personal services industry" in­ Women and minors; men:
Barbering and hair­
cludes all establishments
which perform, directly or
dressing :
Experienced
indirectly, any service,
Inexperienced
operation, or process used or
useful in the care, cleans­
(First 1040 hours
ing, or beautification of the
in the occupation)
body, skin, nails or hair, or
in the enhancement of per­
All other employees
sonal appearance or health;
except maids.
including, but not limited
Maids
to, barber and beauty shops,
scalp treatment shops, bath
and massage parlors, physical
conditioning and weight con­
trol salons. Exceptions:
Cashiers, receptionists, ap­
pointment clerks, and cleri­
cal workers, whose jobs are
covered by the Clerical
Technical, and Similar Oc­
cupations Order.

Minimum-wa ge
rates

Hours

9 a day, 48 a
70 cents an hour
00 cents an hour —^ week (maxi­
mum for wom­
en and
minors). —^
70 cents an hour
60 cents an hour

(Deductions bringing
wages below the
minimum allowed
only if consent of
employee and ap­
proval of the
Minimum Wage Com­
mission are ob­
tained. )
(If employee is re­
quired to furnish
and/or launder his
or her own uniform
$1.50 a week must
be added to the
wage required by
this order.)

See footnotes at end of table.




17

18
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —l

Occupation or industry
covered

Massachusetts - Cont.
Food Processing Occupa­ Pood processing, i.e., the
preparation, processing, or
tions, No. 31, Oct.
20. 1951.
(Supersedes three
mandatory orders Canning and Pre­
serving, No. 19 of
Mar. 2, 1939;
Candy, No. 6 of
Mar. 1, 1943; and
Bread and Bakery
Products, No. 15-A
of Oct. 1, 1944.)




packaging of food for human
or other consumption, ineluding, but not limited to
canning, preserving, and
the production of candy,
confectionery, bakery prod­
ucts, dairy products, malt
beverages, or soft drinks.
Exceptions: Occupations
within the industry covered
by another minimum-wage
order.

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Women and minors; men: —^
Experienced
Inexperienced (600
hours)

”5 cents an hour
65 cents an
hour —^

9 a day, 48 a
week (maximum for wornen and
minors). —^
26/

(Deductions to
bring wages
below the
minimum allowed
only if consent of
employee and
approval of
Minimum Wage
Commission are
obtained.)
(Deductions for
meals and lodg­
ing permitted
at prices
specified in
the order.)

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Massachusetts - Cont.

Mercantile Occupations,
No. 26-B, Dec. 26,
1951.
(Supersedes mandatory
order 2Q-A of Oct.
1, 1948.)

Women and minors; men:—/
"Mercantile occupations" inelude any industry or busiFull-time employees:
ness connected with or
Experienced
operated for the purpose of
selling, purchasing, or distributing merchandise,
wares, goods, articles,
services, or commodities to
Inexperienced (780
retailers, wholesalers, or
hours)
industrial, commerical, or
individual users. Includes
all work connected with the
soliciting of sales or
opportunities for sales or
the distributing of such
Part-time employees:
Experienced
merchandise, wares, etc.,
and the rendering of servInexperienced (780
ices incidental to the
sales, use, or upkeep of
hours)
same, whether performed
on employer's premises or
elsewhere; the selling of
ice cream and soft drinks
where the selling of such
commodities is not the main
business of the establishment. Covers all types of
mercantile occupations other

$27 a week

67£ cents an hour
$24 a week

36 but not
more than 44
a week,
Over 44 a
week.
36 but not
more than 44
a week. —/

60 cents an hour

Over 44 a
week.

67i cents an hour

Less than 30 a
week. —/

60 cents an hour

Do.

(Deductions bringing wage below
the minimum
allowed only, if
consent of employee and approval
of Minimum Wage
Commission are
obtained.)

See footnotes at end of table.




19

20

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Massachusetts - Cont.
Mercantile Occupa­
tions. - Cont.




Occupation or industry
covered

than those determined by the
Minimum Wage Commission to be
of such a nature that the em­
ployer is unable to keep
true records of the number
of hours worked by the. em­
ployee - outside salesper­
sons and persons customarily
receiving gratuities are
named as such exceptions.
Permit must be obtained.
Exceptions: Functions with­
in the mercantile industry
specifically covered by
another minimum-wage order.
(Salespersons in laundry
and dry cleaning establish­
ments, however, are speci­
fically covered by the
present order.)

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 V

Minimum-wage
rates

(Payment to an em­
ployee for laun­
dering her
uniforms may not
be considered as
part of the wages.)

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

New Hampsh!re:
Restaurant Occupation, Restaurant occupation, i.e.,
No. 3A, Oct. 1,
1950.
(Supersedes mandatory
order 3 of Nov. 1,
1938.)

any activity directly con­
cerned with the preparation
and serving of food to the
public for pay, in any
establishment where at least
10 people are served per day
where lodging is not also
provided to the public for
pay.
Restaurant establishment, i.e.,
any establishment which pre­
pares and offers for sale
food for consumption either
on any of its premises, or by
catering and banquet service,
box-lunch, or curb service;
the term "food" includes
nutritive material intended
for human consumption, in
solid or liquid form, whether
cooked or uncooked, or other­
wise prepared, excluding,
however, medicinal or quasimedicinal preparations.

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Non-service employees
Service employees

Minimum-wag
rates

qi
50 cents an hour —'/
40 cents- an hour —^

Hours

(32)(33)
(32)(33)

(Deduction of 40
cents per meal
allowed but total
per week may not
exceed $4.80 or
12 meals.)

See footnotes at end of table.




21

22
ANALYSIS,OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952

Minlnum-wage
rates

New York:

Amusement and Recreation Industry.
No. 8, Apr. 22,
1951.




Amusement and recreation inWomen and minors; men:
dustry includes all esAll employees except
75
tablishments whose primary
as indicated below.
Cashiers, cleaners,
service is to provide
amusement, entertainment,
porters, and matrons
or recreation, including
in motion-picture
theaters:
establishments which produce and distribute motion
In cities of:
Over 50,000 pop75
pictures and services
allied to this such as
ulation and all
casting and rental of motioncommunities in
picture film or equipment.
Nassau and WestIncludes owners, lessees, and
Chester Counties.
concessionaires whose busi—
10,000 to 50,000
70
ness is incidental thereto
population
or in connection therewith,
except communior a part thereof, and such
ties in Nassau
services as are allied
and Westchester
Counties.
therewith.
The industry includes, but is
Less than 10,000
05
not limited to, motionpopulation ex—
picture and other theaters,
cept communidance halls and studios,
ties in Nassau
ballrooms, bowling alleys,
and Westchester
billiard parlors, skating
Counties.
rinks, riding academies,
race tracks, and stables,
amusement parks and centers,
penny arcades and other

cents an hour

cents an hour

cents an hour

cents an hour

V

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —l

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Hew York - Cont.

Amusement and Recrea­
tion Industry - Cont,

See footnotes at end of table



coin-operated amusement
device parlors, athletic
fields, arenas, ball parks
and stadiums, swimming pools,
beaches, gymnasiums and slenderizing salons, golf
courses, tennis courts, carnivals, circuses, boathouses,
card clubs, and other similar
establishments, as well as
play-producing or other
entertainment-producing companies, theatrical agents,
ticket-brokers, and professional-sports promoters; allied services operated in
connection with amusement and
recreation establishments,
such as check-rooms and
parking lots.
Exceptions: Establishments engaged in the operation of
radio and television broadcasting stations; non-profit
organizations organized exclusively for religious,
charitable, or educational
purposes; also summer-theater
apprentice actors, cabana
boys, and rolling-chair pushers; volunteer members of the
National Ski Patrol System,
Inc.

Ticket takers and doormen in motion-picture
theaters:
(Population groups
same as shown
for cashiers,
cleaners, etc.)
Ushers, ramp and checkroom attendants, other
unclassified-service
staff workers, and
messengers in motionpicture theaters;
bat boys, ball chasers;
score-board boys, and
messengers in professional sports promotion and exhibition:
In New York City, and
Nassau and Westchester Counties.
In the remainder of the
State.

70 cents an hour
05 cents an hour.
00 cents an hour

55 cents an hour

(34)

50 cents an hour

(34)

23

24

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952

^

Minimum-wage
rates

Hew York - Cont.

Amusement and Recrea­
tion Industry - Cont.




Beach chair and um­
brella attendants
and locker-room
attendants at beaches
and pools.
Pinsetters:
In New York City, and
Nassau and Westches­
ter Counties.
In the remainder of
the State.
Ushers at sports ex­
hibitions :
In cities of over
150,000 population.
In the remainder of
the State.
Golf caddies:
In New York City and
Nassau and Westchester Counties,

In the remainder of
the State.

55 cents an hour

12 cents per line

9 cents per line

$3 per event
$2 per event

$1 per bag for each
round of 9 holes
or less.
$2 per bag for each
round of 10 to
18 holes.
$1 per bag for each
round of 9 holes
or less.
$1.50 per bag for
each round of 10
to 18 holes

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —'t

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

New York - Cont.

Amusement and Recrea­
tion Industry - Cont,

(The value of meals
and lodging actu­
ally furnished to
an employee may
be considered an
addition to the
cash wages paid.
Maximum charges
permitted are
specified in the
order.)

See footnotes at end of table.




25

26
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1, 10SO—JANUARY 1, 1952 1-/

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

North Dakota:
Public Housekeeping
Occupation, No. 1,
Aug. 13, 1951.
(Supersedes order 1 of
May 6, 1940. )




Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Public housekeeping includes
Women:
the work of waitresses in
Full-time employees:
restaurants, hotel dining
Waitresses or counter
rooms, boarding houses, bars
girls
and taverns, and all attendants.employed at ice-cream,
light-lunch, and refreshment
stands, steam table or
counter work in cafeterias
and delicatessens where
freshly cooked foods are
served; the work of chambermaids in hotels, lodging
Chambermaids or kitchen help
houses, and boarding houses;
the work of janitresses, car
Part-time employees
cleaners, and kitchen workers
in hotels and restaurants;
elevator operators.

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

$23.25 a week;
$100.75 a month

Maximum 9 a
day, 58 a
week in
towns of
under 500
population;
8i a day, 48
a week elsewhere.

$22.15 a week; $90
a month
1/48 of weekly wage

(.Deductions allowed
for meals, lodg­
ing, or both, as
specified in the
order.)

Do.
For each hour
worked.

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date 3/

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

North Dakota - Cont.

Mercantile Occupation,
No.

3,

Aug.

14, 1951.

(Supersedes order 3
of May 9, 1946. )

Mercantile, i.e., work in establishments operated for
the purpose of trade in the
purchase or sale of any
goods or merchandise including the sales force, wrapping force, auditing or
checking force; shippers in
the mail-order department;
receiving, marking, and
stockroom employees; and all
other women, except those
performing office duties
solely.

Women:
Full-time employees:
Experienced

Inexperienced (l
year)
Part-time employees

$23.25 a week;
$100.75 a month.

$19. 25 a week;
$83. 40 a month.
1/48 of weekly
wage

Maximum 9
a day, 54
a week in
towns of
under 500
population;
84 a day,
48 a week
elsewhere.
Do.

For each
hour worked.

See footnotes at end of table.



27

28

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employee^
covered

Pood and lodging establishments
include all restaurants,
licensed or unlicensed,
operated as the principal
business of the employer oi
as a unit of another
business; restaurants
operated by governmental subdivisions including boards
of education, wherein food
in liquid and/or solid form
is prepared and served for
human consumption; catering
and banquet service, boxlunch service, or curb service; transit and residential
or apartment hotels, motels,
apartment houses, tourist
.homes and tourist cabin
reservations offering lodging
or living accomodations;
boarding houses serving one
meal or more a day; rooming
houses; hospitals, sanitariums, and rest homes; clubs,
private and public.
Exception: Establishments
operating "soda fountains"
where only non-alcoholic
beverages such as carbonated

Women and minors:
Non-service employees:
Cities over 100,000
population
Cities of 50,000 to
100,000 population
Cities of 5,000 to
50,000 population
Elsewhere in the
State
Service employees —/

1952

Minimum—wage
rates

Hours

Oh io:

Food and/or Lodging
Occupat ion.s, No. 3,
amended, Dec. 15,
1950.
(Supersedes order 3,
mandatory Mar. 30,
1937.)




in all four classifications above.
Employees working 30
hours a week or less
at the direction of
employer: 36/
Non-service employees;
Cities over 100,000
population
Cities of 50,000 to
100,000 population
Cities of 5,000 to
50,000 population
Elsewhere in the
State
Service employees
^
in all four classifications above.

Over 24 and up
to 48 a week.
Do.

55 cents an hour
53 cents an hour
51 cents an hour

Do.

49 cents an hour

Do.

40 cents an hour

Do.

60 cents an hour

! Up to 24 a
week. —!

58 cents an hour

Do.

56 cents an hour 52/

Do. ^

54 cents an hour —^

Do. ^

45 cents an hour —^

Do. 32/

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —!
Ohio - Cont.

Occupation or industrycovered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

.

Food and/or Lodging
Occupations - Cont.

beverages, soft drinks, milk
drinks, ice creams, etc., are
sold; inmates of institutions, sectarian or
nonsectarian; members of
religious organizations who
receive no compensation for
their services; women taking
a course of training in
housework, or preparing and
serving food in training
establishments; students, who
■ while regularly enrolled in
a recognized or accredited
school or other institution
of learning, are employed as
part-time workers in a
restaurant, cafeteria, or
lunchroom operated on a non—
profit basis by a board of
education, school, college,
university, hospital or
institution, or as nurses'
aides in a hospital.

Inexperienced (60 days)

10 cents an hour
less than the
applicable
minimum rates
cited above.
(By agreement of
employer and
employee, former
may charge
employee for
meals. Maximum
amounts specified in the order
order.
If agreed
to by both
parties, employer
may deduct not
more than $3.25
a week for
lodging furnished
the employee.)

See footnotes at end of table.



29

30
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 1/

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

0 regon:

Laundry, Cleaning and
Dyeing Occupation,

Laundry, cleaning and dyeing
occupation includes all
No. 7, Aug. 29, 1950.
places where two or more
persons are employed in
the process of receiving,
(Supersedes order 7 of
marking, washing, cleanFeb. 15, 194'7. )
ing, dyeing, ironing, and
distributing clothing and
materials.

Women and minors

Hospitals, Sanitariums, Hospitals, sanitariums, conConvalescent and Old
valescent or old people's
People 's Homes,
homes—cooks, kitchen

Women and minors:
Experienced

No. 5, Jan 7, 1951.
(Supersedes order 5A of
July 22, 1941, as
amended Nov. 20,
1941.)




helpers, waitresses, janitors, charwomen, and all
other women and minors
employed therein, Exceptions: Trained nurses,
student nurses, or other
professional or executive
help.

60 cents an hour

li times employee's regular
rate

Inexperienced:
First 200 hours
Second 200 hours

05 cents an hour

40 cents an hour
50 cents an hour
1± times employee's regular
rate.

8 a day, 44
a week
Over 8 a day,
over 44 a
week, in
emergencies,
on permit.

8 a day, 44 a
week.
Do.
Do.
Over 8 a day,
over 44 a
week, in
emergen­
cies. —/

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Oregon - Cont.

Minors, No. 10,
Oct. 11, 1951.
(Supersedes order 10
of July 22, 1941.)

Industries for which the State Minors (persons under 18
Wage and Hour Commission has
years of age.)
not established by individual
or special order a different
wage. Exceptions: Minors
employed at domestic work
and at chores in or about
private residences; newspaper
carriers and newspaper ven­
dors.

50 cents an hour

8 a day, 44
a week,
(maximum)

See footnotes at end of table.



31

32

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effective date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 1/

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Puerto Rico:

Pineapple Industry,
No. 17, Sept. 1,
1950.




Pineapple industry includes
the production, processing,
and canning of pineapples,
and any other operation or
service related thereto;
transportation of the product by the producer.

All employees other
than those in an
administrative, executive, or professional capacity:
In industrial
phase of the
industry.
In agricultural
phase of the
industry—
Zone I 42/

Zone II 42/

All employees covered

30 cents an hour

Range according
to type of work,
from $1.70 a
day to $3.20 a
day.
Range according
to type of work,
from $1.95 a
day to $4 a day.
Double the employee's regular
hourly rate.

8 a day, 48 a
week. —/

Do. M/

Do. 11/

Over 8 a day,
over 48 a
week.

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Puerto Rico - Cont.

Coffee Industry,
No. 19, Oct. 26,
1950,

Coffee Industry includes all
agricultural operations
necessary for the produc­
tion of coffee; drying,
hulling, and packing or
the transportation thereof
by the farmer.

All employees:
Coffee pickers

All others

50 cents an almud
which is 4/5 of
a liter.
$1.44 a day. —^

(42) .

See footnotes at end of table.



33

34
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —/

Puerto Rico - Cont.
Dairy Industry,
No. 18, Jan. 1,

1951.




Occupation or industry
covered

Dairy industry includes all
occupations, processes, or
services necessary or related to the production
of fresh milk, and the
haridllng, bottling,
pasteurization, homogenizatlon or processing of
the milk and its products,
and the transportation
thereof by the producer.

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

All employees:
In industrial phase
of the industry:
Zone I 43/
Zone II 41/
In agricultural
phase of the
industry:
Zone I 41/

Zone II —/

All employees covered

1952 I'

Minimum-wage
rates

35 cents an hour
30 cents an hour

Range according to
type of work,
from 23 cents
an hour to 50
cents an hour.
Range according to
type of work
from 20 cents
an hour to 40
cents an hour.
Double the employee’s regular
rate.
(Care and main—
tenance of
uniforms even
when employer
furnishes them

Hours

8 a day, 48
a week.
Do.

Do.

Do.

Over 8 a day,
over 48 a
week.

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or Industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Puerto Rtco - Cont.

Hospital, Clinic, or
Sanitarium Occupa­
tions, No. 4,
July l, 1981.
(Supersedes order 4
of July 17, 1943
as amended Jan. 17,
1944.)

is employee's
responsibility.)
Hospital, clinic, or sani­
tarium occupations include
any service in a public or
private establishment where
medical treatment is offered
or where patients are in­
terned, as well as any
dependency of such estab­
lishments, whose employees
are not covered by another
wage order. Excepts hos­
pitals of municipal govern­
ments from the provisions
applying to minimum-wage
rates and deductions for
services.

All employees other than
those in an administra­
tive, executive, or pro­
fessional capacity;
registered nurses, stu­
dent nurses in accred­
ited schools,
dietitians, and labora­
tory and X-ray techni­
cians.
All employees, except
office employees,
chauffeurs and man­
ual laborers (as
defined).
Office employees
Chauffeurs
Manual laborers:
Skilled (as defined)
Semiskilled (as de­
fined)
Unskilled (as de­
fined)
All employees covered

31 cents an hour

8 a day, 48
a week.

40 cents an hour
50 cents an hour

Do.
Do.

00 cents an hour
45 cents an hour

Do.
Do.

32 cents an hour

Do.

Double the employee's regular rate
Guaranty of payment
for 44-hour week

See footnotes at end of table.



Over 8 a day,
over 48 a
week.
At least 30
a week.
35

36
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

1952

1
State, title and number
of oi’der, and effec­
tive date —/

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Puerto Rico - Cont.

Hours

(Deductions allowed
for meals, lodging, and laundry
at rates specified in the
order.)

Printing, Publishing,
and Other Graphic
Arts Industry,
No. 20, Nov. 5,
1951.




Minimum-wage
rates

Printing, publishing, and other All employees other than
professional, adminisgraphic arts include all work
trative, and executive:
or services necessary or reNewspapers, monthly
lated to the printing or pubor weekly periodi—
lication of books, newspapers,
cals, photo—
reviews, pamphlets, maps,
engraving:
plans, music, advertisements,
All employees exor commercial or other type
cept repair and
of printing material, as well
maintenance.
as the manufacturing of rubCommercial printing
ber stamps and all work,
and publishing:
service, or products of printAll employees exing, type setting, electrocept repair and
typing, stereotyping, ruling,
maintenance:
photo-engraving, or any other
Zone I 44/
means of graphic reproducZone II 41/
tior. It also includes withitepair and mainteout limitation the preparation
nance employees
assembling, designing, laySkilled (as
out,, inserting, binding, and
defined)
distribution (if done by the
Semiskilled
administration) of such prod■
(as defined)
ucts.

60 cents an hour

8 a day, 44 a
11/
week Ai/

43 cents an hour
40 cents an hour

_
11/
DO. ii'
Do. ii/

60 cents an hour

Do.

45 cents an hour

do.

1y

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —t

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Puerto Rico - Cont.

Printing, Publishing
and Other Graphic
Arts Industry Cont.

Unskilled (as
defined)
Occupations include the acquisition, compilation,
writing, translation o$
news and Information, and
the supervision,■inspection,
moving of materials, cleaning, caretaking, 'and the repair and maintenance of the
building.

Employees not covered
by the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act
Employees covered by the
Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act
All employees

35 cents an hour

Double the employee's regular rat^
li times the employee's regular rate.
Double the employee's regular rate.

Do. W

Over 8 a
day.
Do.

Over 44 a
week.

See footnotes at end of table.



37

38

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1, 1950—JANUARY 1, 1952 i7

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —7

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Rhode Island:

Laundry and Dry Cleans­ "Laundry occupations," i.e.,
any activity concerned with
ing Industries, No.
3-R, June 1,

1951*

(Supersedes mandatory
order 3 of Sept. 12,
1938. )




the washing, ironing, or
processing incidental there­
to of any kind of fabric or
ladndry wares; the collec­
tion, distribution, or sale
of laundry service; the pro­
ducing or rendering of such
activity or service by the
employer upon his own b*half or for others, more
specifically by hotels,
overnight camps, clubs,
business establishments,
factories, bakeries, self­
service laundries, auto­
matic laundries, and any
type of rental laundries,
and other like establish­
ments.
Exceptions: Wards
or charges of charitable
organizations.
"Dry cleansing occupation,"
i.e., any^ activity con­
cerned with the cleaning,
refreshing, or restoration
of any fabric and/or of
any article of wearing
apparel including pressing

Women and minors; men:
Experienced
inexperienced ( 30
days)
Experienced and in­
experienced.' Ex­
Driver
ceptions!
salesmen and driver
saleswomen - they
must receive not less
than the basic mini­
mum for all hours
worked over 45 a
week.

70 cents an hour
65 cents an hour
$1.05 an hour

Up to 45 a
week. 45/
Do. 4*5/
Over 45 a
week. 46/

State, title and number,
of order, and effec­
tive date 3/

Occupation or industry
covered

Rhode Island - Cont.

Laundry and Dry
Cleansing Indus­
tries - Cont.

See footnotes at end of table.



or other work incidental
therto or performed in
connection therewith; th4
collection, distribution,
or sale of dry cleaning
service; the producing or
rendering of such activ­
ity or service by the
employer upon his own behalf
or for others, more specif­
ically by hotels, clubs,
and like business estab­
lishments or by automatic
cleansers, self-service
cleansers, or other types
of rental cleansers.

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

40

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industry
covered

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 1/

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Utain
Restaurant Occupation, "Restaurant," i.e., any place
No. 2, Nov. 20, 1947
as amended In May
1951. 42/
(Supersedes orders 4
of Aug. 5, 1940
and 2 of June 1,
1946.)




selling food or beverages in
solid or liquid form to be
consumed on the premises.
Exceptions: Retail icecream or retail soft-drink
(non-alcoholic) establishments where as much as 90
percent of the business
volume is from ice-cream or
soft-drink sales.

Women and minors:
Experienced full-time
employees in:
Class 1 cities
Class 2 cities 48/
Class 3 cities 41/
Class 4 cities 4®/
All cities - Voluntary absence of
employee whose
normal workweek
is 48 hours.
Experienced part-time
employees in:
Class 1 cities 1®'
Class 2 cities 4®/
Class 3 cities 4®/
All 3 classes of
cities
Inexp. -52/ (3 months):
Pull-time employees

Part-time employees

$21 a week
$20 a week
$19 a week
$17 a week
Weekly wage to be
prorated.

48 a week. 4®/
Do. 4®/
Do. 49/
Do. 41/
Actual working
time

57 cents an hour

First 2 in any
day.
Do.
Do.
After first 2
in any day.
49/

54i cents an hour
52 cents an hour
"Regular rate"

$1 a week less than
the applicable
minimum weekly
wage.
2 cents an hour less
than the rates
prescribed for ex­
perienced employees.
(Furnishing of meals
to employees al­
lowed if a mutual
agreement has been
signed and copy
filed with Industrial Commission.)

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Washington:
Minors, No. 49, July
iO, 1950.
(Supersedes order 42
of Oct. 1, 1942. )

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minors employed in any indus­
try or establishment who
are not expressly covered
by a special industrial
welfare order. Exceptions:
Agricultural labor; domes­
tic work or chores performed
in or about private resi­
dences; specific occupations
listed in the order such as
newspaper vendors and news­
paper carriers.

Minors, i.e., persons
under 10 years of age,
not expressly covered
by another minimumwage order.

Minimum-wage
rates

50.cents an hour

Hours

8 a day, 6
days a
week (maxi­
mum ).
Exceptions:
16 and 17year old
groups em­
ployed in
seasonal
industries;
cases of
emergency.

See footnotes at end of table.



41

42
ANALYSIS «0F STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Ma^hington - Cont.
Manufacturing and Gen­
eral Working Condi­
tions, No. 50, July
17,

1950.

(Supersedes order 40 of
Sept. 7, 1942 and
order 30 of 1922. )




Occupation or industrycovered

Manufacturing, i. e. , any
industry, business or estab­
lishment, wholesale or re­
tail, operated for the
purpose of making, remodel­
ing, repairing or fashion­
ing by preparing and com­
bining materials by nature
or machinery, or produc­
ing goods, wares and mer­
chandise by some industrial
process, including but not
being confined to work per­
formed in dressmaking,
millinery, drapery and
furniture-covering houses,
garment, art needlework,
furmaking operations, shoe
manufacturing atid repairing,
creameries, candy, floral,
bakeries, biscuit-making
and book-binding establish­
ments. Exceptions: Process­
ing by canning, freezing or
otherwise of fruits and
vegetables, fish or marine
or other agricultural prod­
ucts; any industry or occu­
pation specifically covered

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Experienced

Inexperienced:
First 320 hours
Next 100 hours

1952 1/

Minimum-wage
rates

65 cents an hour

55 cents an hour
60 cents an hour

Hours

8 a day.

(Maximum
set by Hour
Law for
mechanical
and other
establish­
ments.
The
term "me­
chanical "
is inter­
preted by
the State
to include
manufac­
turing ).
Do.
Do.

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Washington - Cont.

Manufacturing and Gen­
eral Working Condi­
tions - Cont.

by another minimum-wage
order; employees covered
by a certificate of the
Wage and Hour Division of
the Department of Labor,
permitting the employment
of learners, messengers, or
handicapped persons at a
wage rate lower than the
minimum fixed by this order;
minors engaged in vocational
education, work experience
or apprentice-training pro­
gram under conditions speci­
fied in the order.

See footnotes at end of table.




43

44
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, JULY 1,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date -/

Occupation or industry
covered

1950—JANUARY 1,

Class of employees
covered

1952 ^

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Wanhinoton - Cont,

Food Processing Indus~
try, No. 51, Mar.
12, 1951.
(Supersedes order 38
of July 3, 1942. )




Food processing, i.e., any
industry, business or es­
tablishment operated for
the purpose of processing
by canning, freezing, cook­
ing or otherwise of food for
human or other consumption,
including the processing of
fruit, vegetables, fish,
shellfish, dog food, or any
other products for the pur­
pose of preserving them for
food purposes, for human or
other consumption.
Exceptions: (Same as the two
last Exceptions shown for
the Manufacturing Order,)

Women and minors

65 cents an hour

(51)

J

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —^

Occupation or industrycovered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Mashington - Cont.

Fresh Fruit and Vegeta­
ble Packing Industry,
No. 52, Apr. 10,

1951

(Supersedes order 39 of
Sept. 7, 1942. )

Telephone and Telegraph
Industry, No. 53,
May 1,

1951.

(Supersedes order 27
of Dec. 14, 1921. )

Fresh fruit and vegetable
packing industry, i.e., any
industry, business, estab­
lishment, person, firm,
association or corporation
engaged in handling, pack­
ing, packaging, grading,
storing or delivering to
storage or to market or to
a carrier for transporta­
tion to market, any agri­
cultural or horticultural
commodity in its raw or
natural state as an inci­
dent to the preparation of
such products for market.
Exceptions: Same as for the
Food Processing Industry:
employees specifically
covered by another minimumwage and welfare order.

Women

65 cents an hour

(51)

Telephone and telegraph in­
dustry includes any busi­
ness or establishment
operated primarily for the
purpose of transmitting
messages for. the public by
telephone or telegraph for
hire.

Women and minors:
Experienced
Inexperienced ( 160
hours)

65 cents an hour
50 cents an hour

(51)
(51)

See footnotes at end of table.




45

46
ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date —7

Hiscon sin:
Factories Canning or
First Processing
Fresh Fruits and
Vegetables, special
order, 1951, (order
issued each season).




Occupation or industry
covered

Canning or first processing
fresh fruits or vegetables.

JULY

1,

1950—JANUARY

1,

1952 i7

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Women 18 years and over;
girls and boys 16 to
18 years of age.

Is times employee' s
regular rate —7

Over 9 to 11
a day or
over 54 to
60 a week,
whichever is
greater, on
12 emergency
days during
the season
of actual
canning of
a product.
53/

FOOTNOTES

1/ Provisions of flat-rate laws also included.

V Where only one date is shown the order became mandatory on that date.

A "directory" order is non-mandatory for a period during which publicity is the

only penalty for failure to pay the minimum wage.
4/ Part-time workers, called for less than one-half day's work, must be paid for at least 2 hours at the employee's regular hourly rate.

if Colorado's hour law sets 8 hours a day as the maximum women and girls may be employed in various establishments among which are laundries, mercantile
(see ftn. 8), hotels,

and restaurants.

In emergencies,

longer hours are allowed,

provided premium overtime is paid and employer has first obtained

a relaxation permit from the Industrial Commission.
4/ Number of employees receiving this lower rate may not exceed 20 percent of the total number of employees in any establishment at any one time.

If

fewer than 5 persons employed, establishment may employ one inexperienced person at this rate.
4/ An interpretation of the State's maximum-hour law by the Attorney General states that the term "mercantile establishment" includes beauty parlors.
8-hour day established by that law applies,

therefore,

The

to women employed in beauty service occupations as well as to those in mercantile and the

other industries listed in the law.
1/ The number of Junior Operators paid less than the established rate for Senior Operators may not exceed 20 percent of the total number of operators.
shops employing less than 5 operators
g/ The minimum fair-wage rate of all orders

issued or in effect

on July 1,

1951 became 75 cents an hour on October 1,

vision contained in the 1951 amendment to the State's Minimum-Wage Law.

Saturday is less than 4 hours,

1951,

in accordance withthe pro­

The minimum hourly rate established by the laundry order was 70 cents.

^47 Soiployee called to work on any day must be paid for at least4 hours for that day at his or her regular
(Adult males employed in cleaning and

In

one Junior Operator may be employed at the "Junior" rate.

rate or the minimum rate, whichever

dyeing occupations must be paid for 4 hours at the minimum rate. I

is higher.

If a laundry's regular working day

on

the guaranteed daily wage may be for 8 hours.

14/ Maximum hours for women and minors in "manufacturing and mechanical establishments," under which terms laundries and cleaning and dyeing are included,
are 9 a day,

48 a week.

National emergency,
11/

In emergencies, Labor Commissioner may allow 10 hours a day,

55 hours a week,

for 8 weeks in any calendar year.

In a

the number of weeks may be extended under the conditions specified in the Statute.

Bmployee calledto work on any day must be compensated for

a minimum of 4 hours' earnings at his or her regular rate.

In Connecticut mercantile estab­

lishments where instances of regularly scheduled employment of less than 4 hours have been agreed to in writing by employer and employee,
proved by the Labor Department,

and ap­

the 4-hour guaranteed wage may be waived, provided the minimum daily pay in every instance is at least twice the

applicable minimum hourly rate.
14/ Number of beginners over the age of 18 may not exceed 5 percent of the persons regularly employed in the establishment.

14/

For an employee receiving a conmission or bonus as part of his earnings, overtime may be figured at SI an hour in addition to an exclusive of all other
earnings, or at

lk times the regular hourly rate which when computed will include commissions in addition to the established hourly or weekly wage

or any combination thereof.
The order expressly exempts from the overtime provisions:

(1) executive,

administrative,

and professional employees;

12) outside salesmen and

automobile-service mechanics under the conditions specified.

14/ Maximum hours for females employed in mercantile establishments, 8 a day, 48 a week.
1J/ Defined as a person holding a registered hairdresser's and cosmetician's license issued by the State of Connecticut,

or a person holding an assistant

hairdresser's and cosmetician's license who has achieved 2,000 hours of experience under such license.

14/

Includes appointment clerks, desk clerks, telephone operators, bookkeepers,- stenographers,
than 8 months' or 600 hours' experience are termed "learner clerks."

11/ Part -time operators and clerks are defined as those employed on one,

typists,

two, or three days a week,

and other clerical employees.

Workers with less

irrespective of the number of hours worked on any one

day.

18/

Maximum hours for women and minors employed in hairdressing or manicuring establishments 9 a day,
week.




(10 allowed on 1 day in week),

48 a week,

6 days a

47

48
FOOTNOTE S—Continued

1ft/ Defined as a person holding an assistant hairdresser's and cosmetician's license issued by the State who has not as yet achieved 2,000 hours of ex­
perience under this license.
2&/ Defined as a person holding an operator's license issued by the State who has not yet achieved 2,000 hours of experience under this license.
21/ Employees, other than full-time students under 18 years of age on days when schools are in session, must be paid at least 4 hours' wages on any day
called to work.
22/ Maximum hours for women and minors 8 a day,

48 a week.

23/ Maximum hours for women and girls employed in hotels and restaurants in Kentucky are 10 a day,
21/ The Minimum Wage Commission may grant to any school,

college,

university, or summer camp,

60 a week.

an educational employment license, permitting payment of less

than the established minimum-wage rate in the case of students enrolled and employed in such institutions.
2J/ Employee reporting for work on any day at the time set by the employer, must be paid for at least 3 hotfrs at the applicable minimum rate.
conditions,

the Minimum Wage Commission may grant employer permission to employ workers for less than 3 hours.

order excludes charitable organizations,

hospitals, schools, colleges, universities,

and summer camps from the 3-hour provision;

the mercantile order

excludes newsboys.
24/ The hour law provides that if employment is determined by the labor department to be seasonal, women may be employed 52 hours a week,
weekly average may not exceed 48 hours.
employment.

The law permits overtime employment of hospital employees in emergencies,

but the year's

if Commissioner authorizes such

Personal secretaries and persons declared by the labor commissioner to be employed in a supervisory capacity are expressly exempted

from the hour law's provisions.
21/ The Minimum-Wage Commission may grant to any person,
essing

Under certain

The Massachusetts Public Housekeeping

including a learner or apprentice, whose employment in barbering or hairdressing or in food proc­

occupations is part of a Cooperative Educational Program including an On-the-Job-Training Program or an Apprentice-Training Program,

a special

license authorizing employment at wages less than the applicable minimum wage rates set by the order and for such period of time as shall be fixed by
the Commission and stated in the license.
23/ Order requires that home workers be employed at the established
23/ The Minimum-Wage Commission may grant employer a special permit
the weekly rate established in the order,

minimum rates or the equivalent in piece rates.
for a 48-hour week to cover peak periods of not more than8 weeks in calendar

year,

at

if he can show compensatory hours of employment.

23/

Maximum set by hour law for women and minors employed in mercantile establishments 9 a day,

31/

Labor Commissioner is authorized to make regulations with reference to the service of students employed in restaurants who receive meals in lieu of pay.

48 a week.

22/ Employee reporting for work on any day pursuant to employer's instructions must be paid for at least 8 hours' employment.
cifically state whether the regular rate or the minimum rate is to be used.
22/ Maximum hours for women and minors in other than manufacturing establishments,
32/

22/
34/
31/

Ohio's order bases such payment on the minimum hourly rate.
104 a day,

54 a week,

nection with and incidental to hotels are expressly exempted from the hour law.
Ushers in motion-picture theaters required to report for work on any day, must be paid for at least
those days on which a theater is open only in the

evenings from 6 p.m.

New Hampshire does notspe­

but dining and restaurant services operated in con­
4 hours; the

guarantee shall be 2 hours,

Definition of "service employees" includes bell boys
and page boys.
The part-time rate shall not apply to full-time employees who voluntarily absentthemselves for any period ina week.
High-school students enrolled in the part-time cooperative school-work program, known as the program of distributive education,
Department of Education,

conducted by the Ohio

are excluded for a period not exceeding one school year from the provision providing for premium rates

23/ Hours regulation not applicable in the event of disaster within the contnunity.
33/ Order expressly prohibits the employment of minors and of minor girls in several hazardous occupations.




however, on

oh.

for part-time workers.

12/ Zone I Includes farms (1) in the municipalities of Aguadilla, Cidra, Corozal, tajas, les Piedras, Mayaguez, Morovis, Naranjito, San German, Toa Alto;
(*>

in certain small Tillages;

Rico or of the Vest Coast.

(8) in the municipal jurisdiction of Bayamon;

Zone II.

and (4)

in any other municipality of the mountainous region of Puerto

Includes farms located in the remainder of the Territory.

11/ Order provides that the minimum-wage increase or decrease according to the price of coffee set by a Production Board.

A scale of prices attached to the

order shows the minimum-wage rates applicable as the price of the product is increased or decreased.
42/ "Day" is defined in the order as a period of 8 hours of work in any 24 consecutive hours.

No maximum hours are established for the industry in the order

or in the law.
18/ Zone I includes dairies in the municipalities of Loiza, Canovanas, Carolina, Caguas, Trujillo Alto, Rio Piedras, San Juan, Guaynabo, Catano, Bayamon,
Toa Baja, Toa Alta, and Dorado,

as well as any dairy the products of which are sold in whole or in part in any of the above-mentioned municipalities.

Zone II includes all dairies other than those included in Zone I.
44/ Zone I includes the capital; Zone II, all other localities in the Territory.
48/ Employee called to work on any day must be paid for not less than 4 hours at the employee's regular rate.

Provision not applicable to work done on

Saturdays.
4#/ Maximum hours for women and minors,
41/ The 1961
48/ Class 1

9 a day, 48 a week.

If 6-day week is worked, daily hours may be 9-8/5.

amendment of this order changes the minimum-wage rates for part-time employees.
- Salt lake City and Ogden;

City, American Pork,

Class 2 - Provo,

Helper,

Price, logan, Murray,

Bountiful, Cedar City, lehi, Payson, Richfield,

Smithfield,

Non# of the provisions of the 1947 order werechanged.

and Tooele; Class 8 - Bingham,
Spanish Pork, Springville,

Brigham City, Eureka, Midvale,Park

St. George, Nephi,

and Vernal;

Class 4 - Towns of 6,000 population or nnder.
42/ Hour law establishes a maximum week of 48 hours for women and 44 hours for minors nnder 18, permitting overtime in emergencies as specified.

The order

requires that a A-hour meal period be included as working time.
Order defines part-time employee as one who works less than 8 hours a day or less than 48 hours a week.
82/ Number may not exceed 1 learner to every 6 experienced employees in the establishment.
81/ Maximum hours of work are not established by this order;

it contains a provision, however, which states that the hours of employment of women and minors

"shall be subject to any applicable statutes of the State and the United States. "

The canning and packing of perishable fruits and vegetables are

expressly exempted from the State's 8-hour law.
82/ No basic

minimum-wage rate set in this order.

The State's order for any occupation,

trade, or industry sets three rates according to size of cityor

town:45 cents in cities of 8, 500 population or over; 40 cents in cities of 1, 000 up to 8, 500; and 38 cents elsewhere in the State.
68/ During the canning season, maximum hours for women and minors are 9 a day, 54 a week, except on 12 emergency days in the season of actual canning of a
product when women and minors 16 to 18 years of age may be employed 11 hours a day,

60 hours week.

for boys of 17 years in 10 weeks during canning season under conditions specified in the order.
are 9 a day,

50 a week,

for women 18 years and over;

8 a day,

Hour limitation and overtime pay may be waived

Before and after the canning season, maximum hours

48 a week for boys and girls of 17 years;

and 8 a day, 40 a week for boys and girls of

16 except that during school vacations they may work 48 hours a week.




40

30

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LEGISLATION
JULY 1,

1950—JANUARY 1,

1952

During the one and one—half year period covered by this analysis, Connecticut, Minnesota, and New Hampshire amepded their minimumwage laws as summarized below.

MINIMUM WAGE
CONNECTICUT
Amends the minimum—wage law to establish a statutory minimum of 75 cents an hour; retains wage-board procedure;
and extends court review to include power to remand to the commissioner for modification and, if necessary, resubmis—
sion to a wage board. Wage orders in effect or issued before July 1, 1951 must be modified to provide a basic hourly
minimum of 75 cents by October 1, 1951. Deletes the provision authorizing wage board to set wage differentials on the
basis of sex.
(Public Act 352, approved and effective 7/5/51.)

MINNESOTA
Amends the minimum-wage law to exempt domestic service in a private home and agricultural employment; deletes
provision that if Industrial Commission is of the opinion that one—sixth or more of the women or minors employed in an
occupation are paid less than living wages it shall proceed to establish minimum wages, and substitutes therefor the
requirement that interested persons shall be entitled to notification and opportunity for hearing; provides that mini­
mum wages be fixed on an hourly basis and that the Commission consider the prevailing number of hours of work in vari­
ous industries when making minimum-wage orders; makes advisory boards mandatory where formerly discretionary, but
provides that their recommendations shall be advisory only; reduces from one—fourth to one—tenth the ratio of employers
or employees required to initiate reconsideration of wage rates; provides for court review. (Ch. 453, approved 4/18/51;
effective 7/1/51.)

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Adds a section entitled Records and Adjustments to the minimum-wage law to require every employer subject to the
law to keep records of hours worked by, and wages paid to, his employees; to make such records available to inspection
by the labor commissioner or his authorized representative at any reasonable time and to furnish any such official, upon
demand, a sworn statement of the same. Authorizes the commissioner to make necessary adjustments of wages found to be
below the minimums established. (Ch. 82, approved and effective 4/20/51.)