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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES)
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS)
INDUSTRIAL

ACCIDENTS

AND

*

#

*

HYGIENE

ft

ARR

SERIES

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS
TO AMERICAN SEAMEN




OCTOBER, 1928

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON
1928

Acknowledgment
This bulletin was prepared by Mortier W. La Fever, of the
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
ii




CONTENTS
Page
Introduction and summary. ______ _________ __________- ..........- .................. 1-14
Scope of study___________________________________________ _________
2, 3
Hypothetic application of compensation law________________________
3
3-7
Comparative summary____________________________________________
Legal fees_________________________________________________________ 7-14
Provisions of the longshoremen’s act and method of application_________ 14-19
Records fragmentary__________________________________________________ 19-21
Regulations affecting seamen___________________________________________21-28
Reporting injuries and illness______________________________________ 24-31
Injured seaman’s right to wages___________________________________ 32, 33
Provided hospital treatment_____________________________ __________34-37
Records of treatment unsatisfactory____________________________________ 37, 38
Making claims_________________________________________________________ 38-40
Methods of settlement_________________________________________________ 41, 42
Methods of underwriting_______________________________________________ 43, 44

Appendixes
Appendix A.— Maritime law___________________________________________ 45-54
Development and adoption________________________________________
45
Status and rights of seamen suffering injury________________________45-54
Distinctive features___________________________________________ 45, 46
Summary of admiralty rights__________________________________
46
Employers’ defenses__________________________________________ 46, 47
Maintenance, cure, and wages_________________________________47, 48
Unseaworthiness______________________________________________ 48, 49
Joinder of claims______________________________________________
49
Procedure____________________________ ________________________
49
Modification by statute______________________________________
50
Merchant marine act_________________________________________ 50, 51
Limited liability______________________________________________
52
“ Death a ct” of 1920__________________________________________52, 53
State laws____________________________________________________ 53, 54
Foreign seamen_______________________________________________
54
Summary_________________________________________________________
54
Appendix B.— General Table________________________________________ _ 55-101
Methods used in tabulation________________________________________55-57
Accidents to seamen of the United States merchant marine, by
individual cases—---------------------------------------------------- ---------------- 58-101




h i




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
NO. 466

WASHINGTON

October, 1928

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN
Summary and Introduction
ARITIME law has long provided that a seaman 1 who is injured
on duty or who becomes ill while on duty shall be entitled
to maintenance and cure and to wages to the end of the
voyage. Aside from these legal provisions, whatever compensation
for accident he may receive is obtained through agreement with his
employer or through court action.
When the longshoremen’s and harbor workers’ compensation bill
was introduced in Congress in 1926 it included seamen as well as
the designated maritime workers, but before passage the provision
relating to seamen was eliminated. The contention was made dur­
ing the hearings on the bill that the rights of seamen were adequately
protected under maritime law, which secured not only a continuation
of wages and maintenance and “ cure” in the sense of necessary
treatment and reasonable care but also the right to prosecute for
indemnity if the ship is liable for the accident through unseaworthiness
or negligence.
That contention raised the question of how injured seamen actually
fare under existing law. Discussions and hearings following the
introduction of compensation legislation for maritime workers devel­
oped the fact that there was a remarkable absence of information
regarding accidents to workers of that class. This condition was
also brought out in a speech before the marine section of the National
Safety Council at Chicago in September, 1927, by Capt. Irving L.
Evans, urging shipowners to keep complete records, during which
he said:

M

The marine industry is seriously handicapped in that there is no central source
of information, reliable or otherwise, showing even approximately the number
of deaths and permanent personal injuries, to say nothing of accidents of a less
serious nature occurring aboard ship. * * *
The shipowner has complete information or “ statistics,” as to the methods
and sources of obtaining cargo and passengers to carry and thereby earn revenue.
If they are to compete successfully with foreign-flag vessels they must look not
only to increasing the tonnage to be carried in American bottoms but also to the
reduction of overhead and operating expenses. This can be done, to some
1 Section 4612 of the Revised Statutes defines master, seaman, vessel, and owner as follows: “ In the con­
struction of this title, every person having command of any vessel belonging to any citizen of the United
States shall be deemed the ‘ master’ thereof; and every person (apprentices excepted) who shall be
employed to serve in any capacity on board the same shall be deemed and taken to be a ‘ seaman*; and the
term ‘ vessel’ shall be understood to comprehend every description of vessel navigating on any sea or
channel, lake, or river, to which the provisions of this title m ay be applicable, and the term ‘ owner’ shall
be taken and understood to comprehend all the several persons, if more than one, to whom the vessel shall
belong,”




1

2

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

extent at least, by wise and intelligent handling of the information constantlypassing through the office of every shipowner. It is in the form of reports of
accidents, damage, and loss, also the payment of many claims.
Complete information covering accidents and claims will not only enable the
shippwners to reduce the number of accidents and claims, and thereby save
through a reduction in the total amount paid for claims, insurance premiums, or
assessments under compensation laws, but will place them in a position to deal
successfully and intelligently with proposed legislation, whether favorable or
adverse.

In view of the lack of data the Bureau of Labor Statistics undertook
a study to determine the actual status of seamen with regard to
injuries and recovery therefor. Its study covered three points:
(1) The physical injury, (2) the compensation received therefor
through personal settlement or court action, and (3) an estimate of
the compensation which would have been payable if the injured
seamen had been covered by compensation legislation similar to that
enacted by Congress in 1927 for longshoremen and harbor workers.
Accident rates and insurance rates were not included in the study.
Data were completed for 1,195 cases, of which 899 were direct settle­
ments and 296 involved legal representatives for the seamen and the
consequent payment of legal fees.
It was found that the average settlement in the 899 cases not
involving legal fees was $262.47 per case as compared with the average
estimated settlement of $352.56 under the adaptation of the provisions
of the longshoremen’s and harbor workers’ compensation act employed
in this study.
In the 296 cases involving legai fees the amount of the settlement
included the amount paid by the seaman as legal fees. Such informa­
tion as could be obtained indicated that the cases were taken by the
attorney on a contingent fee. This was stipulated as one-half or
more than one-half of the amount recovered in 87 per cent of the
62 cases in which the fee was learned. The average of the gross
amounts paid by the insurance or shipping company in the 296
cases was $1,317.03 per case. Assuming that the legal fees in these
cases were as low as 40 per cent of the settlement, the average net
amount received by the seaman would have been $790.22 as com­
pared with the average estimated settlement of $821.07 under the
assumed conditions of this study.
Scope of Study
The bureau’s study covered all claims settled in the 1926 business
year by the more important shipping companies and marine under­
writers in the New York City area, for which the bureau was able
to obtain sufficient information concerning disability and settlement
to make a comparison with the provisions of the longshoremen’s
compensation act. The 1,195 cases shown are representative of
settlements consummated in one year for injury to all classes of Ameri­
can seamen (except those on the'Great Lakes), even though some
of the injuries occurred one, two, or even five years prior to settlement.
The initial information obtained from the company records of
claims closed was supplemented by data gathered from other sources.
No data were collected as to the number of ships operating, the num­
ber of seamen employed, or the number t)f accidents occurring to
seamen. Further, the bureau made no attempt to determine how
often injuries result in a claim, or how many injuries there were for




INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

3

which no claim was made, but which were deserving of recompense.
There were a considerable number of injuries for which seamen would
have been recompensed had claims been filed. This indicates a lack
of knowledge on the part of seamen as to their rights when injured,
or a feeling of the futility of trying to prosecute a claim because of
inexperience in these matters.
Hypothetic Application of Compensation Law
An estimate was also made of the total amount which would
probably have been recovered had the same accident cases been
adjudicated according to the provisions of a compensation law such
as the longshoremen’s and harbor workers’ compensation act, retain­
ing, however, the seaman’s present right to maintenance and cure,
and wages to the end of the voyage.
The longshoremen’s act was made the basis of comparison because
the original bill (S. 3170) included seamen and hence is suppositionally
the kind of instrument which would cover seamen if they were made
subject to such legislation; and, moreover, because longshoremen and
seamen often work side by side, and in some cases longshoremen and
seamen are injured in the same accident.
In estimating the probable amount payable to seamen under a
compensation law, the compensation allowed longshoremen for com­
parable disabilities was applied, as nearly as practicable, to each of
the 1,195 cases of injured seamen.
Comparative Summary
Table 1 shows averages for all cases studied (including 29 cases in
which the injury was not followed by an incapacitating disability) as
well as for those cases in which the mjury was followed by disability
as defined by the longshoremen’s compensation act, viz, “ incapacity
because of injury to earn the wages which the employee was receiving
at the time of the injury in the same or any other employment.”
Another subdivision is made of the latter class for those cases in which
the disability continued beyond the duration of the seaman’s contract
(articles).
The cases in each division are classified according to whether or
not their settlement involved the payment of legal fees.
Of the 29 cases included in the first division which were followed
by no technical disability, the injuries in 14 were not severe enough
for the seaman to leave his duties except for first-aid treatment; 8
caused the seaman to be relieved from duty for a short time as, for
example, the remainder of the watch; and 7 of the injuries were more
severe, but because of the nature of their duties the seamen were able
to stand regular watch. In one instance a radio operator sprained
his knee, while in another a second engineer was bruised and scalded
about the head and face. None of these cases would have received
any consideration under a compensation law because there was no
incapacity to earn wages.




4

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

T a b l e 1 . — Average

amounts paid to injured seamen and estimated amounts
payable under adaptation of longshoremen’s act, and average days of total dis­
ability, by method of settlement
Cases involving disability

A ll cases s tu died 1

Prob­
able
Aver­
recov­
M ethod of settling cases
ery un­
age
der
Total amount
actually com­
paid
pensa­
tion
act

Beyond duration of
seaman’s articles
Prob­
A v­
able
erage
recov­
P rob­
Aver­
days
ery un­
able
age
of to­ Total amount
der
Aver­
recov­
tal
age
ery un­
actually com ­
dis­
pensa­ Total amount
der
paid
abil­
tion
actually com ­
ity
act
paid
pensa­
tion
act
Cases Involving no legal fees

Settled b y personal agree­
m ent................................
N o claim filed...................

874
25

Total and average.

899

$269.81 $351.29
6.02 396.94
262.47

352.56

49.4
41.8

856
25

49.1

881

$272.99 $358.67
6.02 396.94
265.41

359.76

712
21
733

$305.27 $410.13
6.85 461.96
296.72

411.62

Cases involving legal fees
Settled b y agreement b y
attorney..........................
A ction compromised........
Settled b y jury or ju d ge..
Total and average.
Grand total and
average.................

80 2 $507.40 $497.90 86.5
182 2 1,169.29 844.01 86.0
34 24,012.89 1,458.69 144.9
296 >1,317.03
1,195

a 523.60

821.07

92.9

468.61

60.0

78 2 $518.49 $510.66
173 2 1,222.90 887.92
34 24,012.89 1,458.69

70 2 $565.51 $564.62
148 21,390.05 1,027.48
28 24,745.09 1,75X56

285 21,362.95.

246 2 1,537.30

978.41

3 608.45

554.04

1,166

852.76

3 533.681 480.26

979

* Including 29 in which a settlement was made for injury which caused no disability.
* Gross amount; includes seaman’s net recovery and all fees charged b y his attorney.
3, pages 7 and 8, for details of fees charged in some cases.
8 Includes “ gross amounts” of settlements in 296 cases involving legal fees.

See Tables 2 and

Cases involving no legal fees.—In the cases involving no legal fees
the amounts shown as actually paid are the net amounts received
by the seamen. The 874 cases settled by personal agreement include
all cases settled by agreement between the seamen and a claim
adjuster for the shipping company or the underwriter, a comparatively
small number referred by mutual agreement to the United States
Compensation Commission for adjudication, and a few cases in which
the seaman retained an attorney but later personally made a settle­
ment with the claim adjuster without the knowledge of the attorney.
The actual average net settlement in these 874 cases was $269.81.
Under the adaptation of the longshoremen’s law as made in this
study the average estimated settlement would have been $351.29,
or $81.48 more than the seamen actually received.
The 25 cases in which no claim was filed are those in which the
seamen were disabled and would have been entitled to compensa­
tion under the adaptation of the longshoremen’s law, or to wages
and maintenance under their maritime rights had they presented
claims. The wages paid to seaman when put ashore constituted
the only settlement in any of these cases. In three cases there were
no wages due, as the accident occurred just at the end of the voyage.
In one other case no part of the wages due under this right was paid




INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

5

because the seaman was put ashore when his incapacity began and
was never heard from in regard to a settlement. In 10 cases the
seaman remained aboard and was paid wages up to the time of
expiration of his articles. The other 11 seamen were put ashore
before the end of the voyage and were paid at that time. They did
not receive the additional wages to which they were entitled, in most
cases probably because they took no steps to recover such wages.
The average actual net payment to the seamen in these cases after
being injured was $6.02, while the probable recovery under the
compensation act would have averaged $396.94.
It is noted that the period of total disability in the cases settled
by personal agreement averaged 49.4 days, while in the cases for
which no claim was filed total disability lasted 41.8 days. The aver­
age probable recovery under the compensation act for these two
groups of cases would have been $351.29 and $396.94, respectively.
The latter average is considerably higher than the former because
the latter group includes one case of arm dismemberment and two
cases of finger amputation in which the computed compensation is
based on the permanent partial disability schedule in the long­
shoremen’s law, which provides a much longer period of payment
than the actual total days of disability. After having received hos­
pital treatment, the seaman whose arm was dismembered was deported
and no action was taken to recover for the injury. Three per cent
of all cases settled by personal agreement involved amputation and
dismemberment, while 12 per cent of the cases in which no claim was
filed were injuries of this type.
The average net settlement per case for both groups combined
was $262.47, while the probable recovery under a law similar to the
longshoremen’s act would have been $352.56, or $90.09 more per case.
Cases involving legal fees.—In these cases the bureau secured data
regarding the amount of the settlement as paid by the shipowner or
the underwriter, but except for a comparatively few cases the amount
which the seaman actually received could not be ascertained. All
of the amounts shown as settlements in these cases include the
amounts later paid by the seaman in legal fees, but do not include
court costs.
Information as to the amounts of such fees was extremely difficult
to obtain. The amount of the legal fee has been verified in 22 cases.
In 12 of these the fee formed 50 per cent of the amount recovered,
in 3, 40 per cent, and in the other 7 cases 60, 53, 43, 39, 29, 27, and
25 per cent, respectively. The simple average of attorney charges in
the 22 cases is a little over 45 per cent.
The average actual “ gross” settlement per case in the cases involv­
ing legal fees was $1,317.03, as compared with a probable “ net”
settlement of $821.07 under the longshoremen’s act. Estimating
the average fees charged by the attorney in such cases at 40 per cent
of the amount of the settlement, the “ net” amount received by the
seaman would have averaged $790.22 per case, or $30.85 less than
he would have received under the adaptation of the longshoremen’s
act. If the lawyer’s fees had averaged as much as 50 per cent of
the amount of the settlement, the average net amount received
by the seaman would have been $658.52, or $162.55 less per case than
the estimate under the compensation law.




6

SETTLEMENT FOE ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

In the 80 cases settled by agreement between a claim adjuster and
an attorney acting for the seaman the average gross amount actually
paid per case was $507.40, while the estimated recovery under the
longshoremen’s act would be $497.90, or 98.1 per cent of the former
amount.
In the 182 cases settled by compromise between the attorneys of the
two parties after legal action to recover damages for injury had been
commenced, the settlements shown include the legal fees. The settle­
ments in these cases averaged $1,169.29, while the probable settle­
ment under the act would have been $844.01, or 72.2 per cent of the
actual settlement.
The majority of the 34 cases prosecuted to judgment were tried
before a jury, but in a few instances the trial by jury was waived and
the settlement was the result of the court’s judgment. The average
actual gross settlement in these 34 cases was $4,012.89, while the
probable settlement under adaptation of the act would have been
$1,458.69. In 1 of these cases the verdict was for $34,000; in 8 cases
the verdicts ranged from $7,500 to $14,700; in 1 case the verdict
was for $5,000; and in 15 the verdict ranged from $130 to $2,500. In
9 cases the court’s decision was adverse to the seaman, although in
each case there was actual disability arising “ out of and in course of
the employment, ” and settlement with the seaman to the extent of
wages and maintenance would have been made had he chosen to keep
his case out of court. In four of the nine cases the seaman began
legal action because he thought the ship could be proved liable, but in
each case he failed to prove liability and the case was dismissed. In
three cases action was started, but when the case came to trial the
plaintiff failed to appear and the case was dismissed. In one the sea­
man sued the wrong party, and in the ninth case the statute of limi­
tations barred the seaman from proceeding with his case. The high
verdicts first mentioned were what might be termed “ sympathy
verdicts. ”
The reason for the differences in the ratios between the estimated
settlement and the average length of the disability shown for the
three groups of cases in which legal fees were involved is the difference
in the nature of the cases included in the different groups. The
ratios are, respectively, an estimated settlement of $497.40, based on
86.5 days’ average diasbility; $844.01, based on 86 days’ average
disability; and $1,458.69, based on 144.9 days’ average disability.
One per cent of the cases closed by settlement with the attorney, 6
per cent of the cases settled by compromise, and 12 per cent of the
cases settled by jury or judge were dismemberments or amputations.
For such permanent partial disabilities the longshoremen’s law pro­
vides a schedule specifying the number of weeks’ compensation to be
paid and this schedule raises the basic period for which compen­
sation was computed far above the actual period of disability.
All cases studied.—The average settlement for all cases studied was
$523.69. Assuming that legal fees in the 296 cases in which an attor­
ney was engaged averaged as low as 40 per cent of the settlement in
each case, and basing a grand average for all cases on this assumption,
the actual net recovery by the seaman in each case would have aver­
aged $393.19. This average is $75.42, or 16.1 per cent .less than the
amount ($468.61) which would probably have been recovered under
the longshoremen’s act, as adapted. If the legal fee in the 296 cases




7

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

had averaged as much as 50 per cent the seamen would have
recovered an average of $360.57, which is $108.04, or 23.1 per cent,
less than the probable recovery under the longshoremen’s act.
Legal Fees
Information as to legal fees charged in a number of cases in the
study was obtained from legal documents, depositions, reports, at­
torneys, and also directly from the seamen themselves, through the
cooperation of the Seaman’s Church Institute, New York City.
Such information indicates that the legal fees charged are almost
without exception contingent upon recovery and in most cases are
specified as 50 per cent of the settlement, although an occasional
case may specify as low as 25 per cent. A very few minor cases are
handled by representatives of charitable organizations for a small
fee, usually not exceeding 10 per cent.
Table 2 shows detailed figures for 22 cases in which the amounts
of the fees collected were verified. In reference to case No. 182 for
which data are shown in the table, it is necessary to point out that
the contract of retainer specified that the fee would be 50 per cent of
the settlement. The suit was brought through a representative of
the seaman’s widow, the widow at the time being a nonresident
alien. The attorney in the case, after collecting 50 per cent of the
settlement, also collected the sum of $594.94 to cover “ expenses”
said to have been incurred in the prosecution of the case. The fees
shown in the table do not cover any of the legitimate fees, court
cost, or other expense items usually incurred in the trial of such
cases, and all such charges have been eliminated from any of the
figures shown as settlements in this study.
T

able

2 .—

Net amount received by seaman or beneficiary in 22 cases
Fee

M ethod of settlement

Agreement b y attorney:
Case N o. 45_____ _______ _______________ _____
Case N o. 53__ ______ _________________________
Case N o. 56__ ________ _______________________
Case N o. 70____ ____ _________________________
Action compromised:
Case No. 9................................... . . . .........................
Case No. 13____________ _______ ______________
Case No. 27___________ ____________ ______ ___
Case N o. 76-..............................................................
Case N o. 77.... ....................................... ...................
Case No. 81................................. ..............................
Case No. 87...............................................................
Case No. 89...... .............................. ......... ................
Case No. 9 0 . _______ _________ ______________
Case No. 117_____ _________ _______ ____ _____
Case N o. 166_________ ________________________
Case No. 179______________ ___________________
Case No. 182______________________ ______ ____
Case No. 10_________________________ _____ ___
Case No. 28_____ _____ _________________ _____
Case No. 106_________________ ________________
Case No. 132__________________________________
Case settled b y jury or judge:
Case N o. 2 9 ...................... .................... .................

Amount of
settlement

Net recovery
b y benefi­
ciary

Amount

Per cent
of total
recovery

$183.00
125.00
100.00
250.00

$133.00
62.50
75.00
150.00

$50.00
62.50
25.00
100.00

27
50
25
40

150.00
100.00
100.00
75.00
1,000.00
1,175.00
300.00
2,750.00
175.00
100.00
2,500.00
150.00
5,000.00
75.00
1,000.00
3,000.00
150.00

75.00
50.00
50.00
37.50
500.00
715.00
180.00
1,375.00
125.00
57.00
1,250 00
75.00
11,905. 06
30.00
500.00
1,795.00
70.00

75.00
50.00
50.00
37.50
500.00
460.00
120.00
1,375.00
50.00
43.00
1,250.00
75.00
2,500.00
45.00
500.00
1,205.00
80.00

50
50
50
50
50
39
40
50
29
43
50
50
50
60
50
40
53

8,000.00

4,000.00

4,000.00

50

1 $594.94 was collected b y the attorney to cover “ expenses” said to have been incurred in prosecuting the




8

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Table 3 below shows for 40 cases the amount of the fee specified in
the contract of retainer in each case, but the net recovery by the
seamen could not be obtained. Some of the cases may be similar
to case No. 182 shown above.
TabxjE 3 .— Amount of fee specified by contract of retainer in 40 cases
Amount

Amount

M ethod of settlement

M ethod of settlement
Settle­
ment

Agreement b y attorney
Case No. 4 ________
Case No. 6________
Case No. 8___........ .
Case No. 11..............
Case No. 15_______
Case No. 20............ .
Action compromised:
Case No. 3..... ..........
Case No. 25_______
Case No. 28..............
Case No. 35_______
Case No. 53_______
Case No. 54__........ .
Case No. 56..............
Case N o. 5 8...........
Case N o. 63_______
Case N o 65_______
Case No. 66_______
Case No. 67. ..........
Case No. 69__........
Case No. 71_______

Settle­
ment

Fee

$400.00
225.00

$200.00

3,500.00
125.00
30.00

1.750.00
62.50
15.00

5.000.00
500.00

2.500.00
250.00
500.00
50.00
2.500.00
50.00
50.00
37.50
125.00
50.00
225.00
3.750.00
112. 50
2, 000. 00

112.50

2 0 .0 1 0 .0
,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

1 0 .0
.0 0 0

100.00
5.000.00

10 0
0 .0
10 0
0 .0

75.00
250.00
100.00
450.00
7, 500. 00
225.00
4.000.00

Action compromised—Con.
Case No. 75.....................
Case N o. 91___________
Case No. 97......................
Case No. 105....................
Case No. 107___________
Case No. I l l ..... ..............
Case N o. 123....... ............
Case N o. 124...................
Case N o. 125..... .............
Case N o. 129__________
Case N o. 131......... ..........
Case N o. 143..... ..............
Case N o . 161__________
Case No. 164__________
Case No. 165......... .........
Case N o. 166__________
Case No. 167....... ............
Case No. 169__________
Case No. 176...................
Case No. 181__________

$150. 00
25.00
3,000.00
750.00
500.00
500.00
325.00
1, 650. 00
250. 00
50.00
200.00
46.00
50.00
600.00
50.00
2,500 00
50.00
300. 00
40.00
750.00

$75.00
12.50
1,500.00
375.00
250.00
250.00
162.50
825.00
125.00
25.00
100.00
23.00
25.00
300.00
25. O
P
1,250.00
25.00
150.00
20.00
375.00

Some of the types of blank contracts or forms used by attorneys or
their runners in signing the injured seamen as clients are printed
below. It will be seen that the first form shown specifies “ Fifty
(50%) per cent of any sum recovered by way of settlement, verdict,
or otherwise.”
The agreement as to the amount of the fee in the second form
peculiarly states “ that I (the seaman) am to receive--------- of any
verdict or settlement and that the said (attorney or attorneys) are
to receive the other half thereof, together with taxable costs.”
The third form is drawn in somewhat more flexible terms and pro­
vides that “ Said attorney to receive a reasonable percentage of the
net recovery, his fee to be contingent upon recovery.”
[Form 1]

— , Manhattan, New
I hereby retain
attorney at law, of
York, to institute legal proceedings against -or other such corporations, part­
nerships, or individuals who may be responsible, to recover damages in behalf of
--------------------- , and hereby assign the costs and agree to pay him 50 per cent of
any sum recovered by way of settlement, verdict, or otherwise. No charge to be
made unless a recovery or settlement to be had.
Dated

Witness •
[Form 2]

residing at
Street (Avenue), city of New York,
i,
do hereby retain
attorney at law, of •
Borough of —
Borough of Manhattan, New York City, to prosecute or settle my claim for
damages arising from personal injuries received b y ----------on t h e -------- day of

-------- , 192-, through the negligence o f------------------ or other persons, and do




9

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

hereby give the sa id --------------------- the exclusive right to take all legal steps to
enforce my said claim.
In consideration of the services rendered and to be rendered by the said-------------------it is agreed that I am to receive-----------of any verdict or settlement and
that the sa id --------------------- are to receive the other half thereof, together with
taxable costs.
New Y o rk ----------, 192-.
--------------------- . [l . s.]
(Signature)

W itness;---------------------,
[Form 3]

--------------------- against---------------------Know all men by these presents that I the undersigned hereby retain-------------------, o f ---------- Street, New York City, as my attorney to prosecute, com­
promise, or settle my claim f o r ----------against-----------under the following terms:
Said attorney to receive a reasonable percentage of the net recovery, his fee to
be contingent upon recovery. In case of a disagreement as to the amount of a
reasonable percentage as herein described the matter shall be referred to the
court or five members of my union for a decision.
I by these presents constitute, make, and appoint said---------------------as my true
and lawful attorney in fact for me and in my name and give him full power and
authority to commence suit or compromise and settle my claim, and to receive
for me any moneys that may be due me by way of judgment, compromise or
settlement, or in any other manner, and I further give him specific authority to
execute a general release or releases and receipts in my name and on my behalf
in full settlement or discharge of said claim.
I further authorize s a id --------------------- to endorse in my behalf any cheeks
or drafts which may be received in settlement, or compromise of my said claim
and to hold such funds as may be received by him until I call for same or other­
wise direct.
It is further understood that any funds received by settlement, compromise,
or suit shall be delivered to me after deducting said attorney ’&fees, at any place
or time I may direct.
--------------------- . [l . s.]
Name (in fu ll)---------------------address---------- .

Capacity---------- .

Wages----------.

On th is------ day o f ----------- 192-, before me personally appeared---------------------to me known and known to me to be the individual described in and who executed^
the foregoing power of attorney and he duly acknowledged to me that he executed
the same.
Whenever possible, this paper should be acknowledged before a notary public, commissioner of deeds,
magistrate, or attorney.

Table 4 shows the average period of total disability, of treatment,
and of convalescence; the average period for which the seamen were
entitled to wages, the average amounts of wages and maintenance, and
wages to which they were entitled, and the average amounts actually
paid, as well as the estimated recovery under the adaptation of the
longshoremen’s act. The table also shows the number of cases in
which the separate items were involved. For example, of the cases
settled by personal agreement, the days of treatment on ship in the
555 cases in which such treatment was given averaged 9.9 days per
case. Based on the whole number of cases (874) settled by personal
agreement, this average was 6.3 days.
The table, like Table 1, is divided into two sections. The first section
includes figures for cases in which the seamen had no legal fees to pay
because the settlement was consummated after agreement between
the seaman and the claim adjustor. The second section includes cases




10

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

settled by an attorney acting for the seaman either by agreement with
the claim adjustor, compromise after legal action was commenced, or
by the prosecution of the case in the courts. The fee of the seaman’s
attorney is included in the amount of the settlements in these groups.
Totals are shown for each section and for both sections combined.
The chief value of the latter totals is that the figures shown represent
the actual average amounts paid by the shipowner or the underwriter
to the seamen or their attorneys in settlement of the cases covered in
this study.
T a b l e 4 . — Accidents

to seamen of United States merchant marine, summarized
by method of settlement
Cases involving no
legal fees

Item

All

ftASAS

.

Per­
sonal
agree­
ment
874

T otal disability:
Cases involving_________________
843
Average days per case having___
51.2
Average days, all cases__________
49.4
Treatment:
Cases receiving—
On ship_____________________
555
As inpatient________________
452
As outpatient_______________
463
Average days per case receiving—
On ship____________ ________
9.9
As inpatient________________
32.7
As outpatient_______________
23.4
Average days, all cases—
On ship_____________________
6.3
As inpatient___________ ____
16.9
As outpatient_______________
12.4
Convalescence:
Cases involving_________________
429
Average days per case having___
27.9
Average days, all cases__________
13.7
Wages:
Period to which entitled—
Cases involved______________
787
Average days per case in­
volved............... .....................
16.0
14.4
Average days, all cases............
Amount payable—
Cases involved.................. .......
787
Average per case involved—
$44.29
Average, all cases___________ $39.88
Maintenance:
Period to which entitled—
C ases involved.........................
739
Average days per case in­
volved_____________ ______
30.1
Average days, all cases............
25.5
Am ount payable—
Cases involved..........................
Average per case involved___
Average, all cases___________
Period from injury to settlement:
Cases involved........................ .........
Average days per case involved, _
Average days, all cases____ ______
A m ount actually paid as:
Wages—
Cases involved..........................
Average per case involved___
Average, all cases .....................

739
$70. 71
$59.78
866
86.4
85.6
781
$29.85
$26.65

No
claim
filed i

Cases involving legal fees

Agree­
Total ment
b y at­
torney

Com ­
pro­
mised

Jury or
judge

Total

Both
types
of
cases

25

899

80

182

34

296

1,195

25
41.8
41.8

868
50.9
49.1

77
89.8
86.5

162
96.6
86.0

32
153.9
144.9

271
101.5
92.9

1,139
62.9
60.0

13
21
7

568
473
470

54
50
40

103
107
69

21
25
11

178
182
120

746
655
590

5.4
35.8
8.6

9.8
32.9
23.2

9.4
57.3
32.8

13.7
82.0
35.1

15.5
136. 7
14.9

12.6
82.7
32.5

10.5
46.7
25.1

2.8
30.1
2.4

6.2
17.3
12.1

6.4
35.8
16.4

7.8
48.2
13.3

9.6
100.5
4.8

7.6
50.9
13.2

6.5
25.6
12.4

7
23.4
6.6

436
27.9
13.5

41
54.0
27.7

74
67.4
27.4

10
101.8
29.9

125
65.8
27.8

561
36.3
17.1

22

809

68

149

30

247

1,056

16.8
14.8

16.0
14.4

13.8
11.7

20.9
17.1

23.1
20.4

19.2
16.0

16.8
14.8

22
809
68
$45.42 $44.32 $30.91
$39.97 $39.88 $26.27

149
$45.76
$37.47

30
$55.60
$49.06

247 1,056
$42.87 $43.98
$35.77 $38.86

11

750

63

114

18

195

945

20.4
9.0

30.0
25.0

56.0
44.1

64.6
40.5

65.7
34.8

61.9
40.8

36.6
28.9

11
750
63
$47.41 $70.36 $119.15
$20.86 $58, 70 $93.83

114
$139.55
$87.41

18
$136.06
$72.03

80
236.1
236.1

177
652.1
634.2

31
801.5
730.7

21
802
67
$7.17 $29.26 $23.22
$6.02 $26.08 $19.45

144
$24.08
$19.05

30
$36.39
$32.11

11
12.2
5.4

877
85.5
83.4

195
945
$132.64 $83.21
$87.38 $65.80
288
552.7
537.7

1,165
201.0
195.9

241 1,043
$25.37 $28.34
$20.66 $24.74

1 Oases in which injured seamen were paid wages when put ashore and made no further claim, but who
would have been entitled to compensation under the adaptation of the longshoremen’s act.




11

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY
T a b le

4 .—

Accidents to seamen of United States merchant marine, summarized
method of settlement— Continued
Cases involving no
legal fees
Item

Per­
sonal
agree­
ment

No
claim
filed

by

Cases involving legal fees

Agree­ Com ­
ment
Total b y at­
pro­
torney mised

Jury or
judge

Total

Both
types
of
cases

Am ount actually paid as— Contd.
Maintenance—
Cases involved..........................
620
620
14
21
1
36
656
$51.24 $151.61 $160.00
Average per case involved___ $51.24
$20.00 $152.85 $56.81
Average, all cases___________ $36.37
$35.36 $26.53
$18.46
$0.59
$18.59 $31.20
Other settlement—
Cases involved..........................
749
749
75
177
25
277 1,026
$241.30 $492.18 $1,163.75 $5,413.05 $1,365.43 $544.79
Average per case involved___ $241.30
$201.04 $461.42 $1,131. 78 $3,980.19 $1,277.78 $467.74
Average, all cases ..................... $206.79
Total—
Cases involved______________
872
21
893
80
182
293 1,186
31
Average per case involved___ $270.43
$7.17 $264.24 $507.40 $1,169. 29 $4,401.23 $1, 330.52 $527.66
Average, all cases..................... $269.81
$6.02 $262.47 $507.40 $1,169.29 $4,012.89 $1,317.03 $523.69
Probable recovery under compensa­
tion act:
Cases involved.................................
856
25
34
285 1,166
881
78
173
Average per case involved............. $358.67 $396. $4 $359. 76 $510.66 $887.92 $1,458.69 $852.76 $480.26
Average, all cases—
A m ount..................................... $351.29 $396.94 $352.56 $497.90 $844.01 $1,458.69 $821.07 $468.61
Compared with actual recov­
ery (4th fig. line above)____ 2$81.48 2$390.92 2$90.09 3$9.50 3 $325.28 3$2,552.19 3 $495.72 3$55.08
Period used in computation of com­
pensation:
Cases involved.................................
950
699
21
68
25
230
720
137
Average days per case in volved . _
70.7
152.0
73.1 140.5
201.6
472.3
213.0 106.9
Average days, all c a s e s .............
85.0
58.5 119.4
56.5
127.7
347.3
165.5
151.8
2 Greater.

3 Less.

Table 5 presents the 1,195 cases covered distributed by principal
injury or condition and grouped by the method of settlement. It
shows that the largest number of cases grouped by principal injury
were the 451 resulting from abrasion, bruise, laceration, or puncture,
while the next largest group was the 253 cases falling under concus­
sion, dislocation, or fracture. In many of these cases there were
other injuries in addition to the “ principal injury” indicated, but in
making the distribution the bureau has regarded the most serious
phase or that part of the injury which primarily caused the disability
as the “ principal injury,”




12

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

T a b l e 5 * — Cases

covered distributed by principal injury or condition and method
of settlement
M ethod of settling cases

Injury or condition

Number
of cases

Num ber of cases
involving no
legal fees
Personal
agree­
ment

N um ber of cases involving
legal fees

Agree­
ment b y
attorney

No
claim
filed

1

10

4

3
8
3
5
4
7
26
5
4
9
4

6
8
20
12
6
13
57
15
3
9
5
3
7
8

1
4
4
1

Jury or
judge

Amputation or dismemberment__________
Concussion, dislocation, or fracture:
Head_________________________________
B o d y ________________________________
Arms and legs________________________
Hands and wrists____________________
Ankles and feet_______ ______________
Burn and scald_______________ ___________
Abrasion, bruise, laceration, or p u n ctu re..
Sprain_________________ ____ ____________
Strain.................................................................
Hernia___________________________________
Foreign matter embedded________________
Occupational disease_____________________
T>eatb
...............
Other causes. ___________________________

47

29

24
53
71
70
35
116
451
87
62
83
28
13
22
33

14
33
41
52
25
92
346
66
51
62
18
10
13
22

13
1
3

cases___________________________

1,195

874

25

• 80

182

34

Followed b y infection____________________

156

116

7

11

18

4

,

ah

3

Action
compro­
mised

3

1

1
1

4
9
1
3
1
2

Table 6 shows the per cent of the total cases closed by each method
of settlement distributed by the principal injury or condition. It
shows that 20 per cent of the cases settled by personal agreement
and 12 per cent of the cases in which no claim was filed were the result
of concussion, dislocation, or fracture, as compared with 29 per cent
of the cases in the “ Agreement by attorney” group, 28 per cent in
the “ Action compromised” group, and 30 per cent in the “ Jury or
judge” group, while 21 per cent of the total cases covered resulted
from those causes. The table shows also that 40 per cent of the
cases settled by personal agreement and 52 per cent of those in which
no claim was filed were caused by abrasion, bruise, laceration, or
puncture, as compared with 33 per cent in the “ Agreement by at­
torney” group, 31 per cent of the “ Action compromised” group, and
26 per cent of the “ Jury or judge” group. It will thus be seen that
more than half of the cases covered in which seamen retained legal
aid originated from injuries included in the two groups mentioned.




13

INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY
T

able

6 . — Per

cent of total cases settled by each method distributed by principal
injury or condition
M ethod of settling cases

Injury or condition

Per cent
of all
cases

Per cent of cases
involving no
legal fees
Personal
agree­
ment

Amputation or dismemberment__________
Concussion, dislocation, or fracture:
Head____________________________ ___
B od y___________________ ______ _____
Arms and legs________________________
Hands and wrists____________________
Ankles and feet______________________
Burn or scald___________________ ________
Abrasion, bruise, laceration, or pun ctu re..
Sprain______________________________ ____
Strain ________________________________
Hernia____________________ ____ _________
Foreign matter embedded............................
Occupational disease_____________________
Death.................................................................
Other causes__________________ _________ _
A ll cases__________________ ______ _
Followed b y infection............. .......................

Per cent of cases involving
legal fees

No
claim
filed

Agree­
ment b y
attorney

12

Action
compro­
mised

1

6

12

4
10
4
6
5
9
33
6
5
11
5

3
4
11
7
3
7
31
8
2
5
3
2
4
4

3
12
12
3

Jury or
judge

4

3

2
4
6
6
3
10
38
7
5
7
2
1
2
3

2
4
5
6
3,
10
40
7
6
7
2
1
1
3

100

100

100

100

100

100

13

8

28

14

10

12

12

52
4
12
4

1
4

12
26
3
9
3
5

Table 7 shows the per cent of total cases in each principal injury
or condition group distributed by the method of settlement. The
percentages here shown indicate that seamen suffering from injuries
caused by concussion, dislocation, or fracture retain legal aid more
often than those suffering from other kinds of injuries. In this group
34 per cent of the seamen retained counsel, distributed as follows:
9 per cent in the “ Agreement by attorney” group, 21 per cent in
the “ Action compromised” group, and the other 4 per cent in the
“ Jury or judge” group. Legal aid was involved in 32 per cent of
the cases in each of the groups, “ Amputation or dismemberment”
and “ Foreign matter embedded.” In the first of these groups 2 per
cent were settled by agreement between the claim adjuster and an
attorney acting for the seaman, 21 per cent by compromise after
legal action had been commenced, and 9 per cent by a jury or a judge,
while in the second group 14 per cent were in the “ Agreement by
attorney” group, 18 per cent in the “ Action compromised” group,
and none in the group settled by “ Jury or judge.”
105676°—28----- 2




14

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

T a b l e 7 . — Per

cerd of total cases under each principal injury or condition distrib­
uted by method o f settlement
M ethod of settling cases
Per cent of cases
N um ­ involving no legal
ber
fees
of
cases
Per­
No
sonal
claim
agree­
filed
ment

Injury or condition

47
253
116
451
87
62
83
28
13
22
33

62
65
79
77
76
82
75
64
77
59
67

All cases...............................................

1,195

73

2

Followed b y infection..... .......................... .

156

74

4

Amputation or dismemberment__________
Concussion, dislocation, or fracture_______
Burn and scald__________________________ _
Abrasion, bruise, laceration, or puncture..
Sprain. .......................................................... .....
Strain................................................................ .
Hernia............ .................................................. .
Foreign matter em bedded................. ............
Occupational disease..... ...................... ..........
D eath..................................................................
Other causes____ ________ _____ ___________

6
1
3
1
5
4

Per cent of cases involving
legal fees
Total
Agree­ Action
com ­
ment
pro­
by
attorney mised
2
9
6
6
6
6
11
14

Jury or
judge

21
21
11
12
17
5
11
18
23
31
24

9
4
4
2

5
6

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

7

15

3

100

7

12

3

100

5
3

2
3

Tables 5, 6, and 7 also show that 156 injuries out of the 1,195
cases studied or 13 per cent were followed by infection; that 74 per
cent of the infected cases were among those settled by personal
agreement, 4 per cent among those in which no claim was filed, 7 per
cent in the group settled by agreement between a claim adjuster
and an attorney for the seaman, 12 per cent in the group settled by
compromise after legal action had been commenced, and 3 per cent
among those settled by court decision.
The tables show that the study covered 22 death cases. Drowning
caused 5 deaths; fractures, 4; burns, 3; gas asphyxiation, 2; exposure,
1; explosion, 1; internal injuries, 1; laceration, 1; and collision, 1.
The exact nature of the injury in the latter case is unknown.
The cases included under “ Other causes” are those resulting from
such causes as traumatic arthritis, hydrocele, neurosis, osteitis,
thrombosis, hypertrophy, paralysis, and one case of endarteritis
obliterans.

Provisions of the Longshoremen’s Act and Method of
Application
'T ’HE provisions of the longshoremen's and harbor workers' comA pensation act which have been used as the basis for computing
estimated compensation for seamen are as follows:
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
(b)
Compensation for disability shall not exceed $25 per week nor be less than
$8 per week: Provided, however, That if the employee’s wages at the time of injury
are less than $8 per week he shaU receive his fuU weekly wages.
Compensation for disability
8. Compensation for disability shall be paid to the employee as follows:
(a)
Permanent total disability: In case of total disability adjudged to be
permanent 66% per centum of the average weekly wages shall be paid to the
employee during the continuance of such total disability. Loss of both hands,
Sec.




PROVISIONS OP ACT AND METHOD OF APPLICATION

15

or both arms, or both feet, or both legs or both eyes, or of any two thereof shall,

in the absence of conclusive proof to the contrary, constitute permanent total
disability. In all other cases permanent total disability shall be determined in
accordance with the facts.
(b) Temporary total disability: In case of disability total in character but
temporary in quality 66% per centum of the average weekly wages shall be paid
to the employee during the continuance thereof.
(c) Permanent partial disability: In case of disability partial in character
but permanent in quality the compensation shall be 66% per centum of the average
weekly wages, and shall be paid to the employee, as follows:
(1) Arm lost, three hundred and twelve weeks compensation.
(2) Leg lost, two hundred and eighty-eight weeks ’ compensation.
(3) Hand lost, two hundred and forty-four weeks7 compensation.
(4) Foot lost, two hundred and five weeks’ compensation.
(5) Eye lost, one hundred and sixty weeks’ compensation.
(6) Thumb lost, seventy-five weeks’ compensation.
(7) First finger lost, forty-six weeks ’ compensation.
(8) Great toe lost, thirty-eight weeks’ compensation.
(9) Second finger lost, thirty weeks’ compensation.
(10) Third finger lost, twenty-five weeks’ compensation.
(11) Toe other than great toe lost, sixteen weeks’ compensation.
(12) Fourth finger lost, fifteen weeks’ compensation.
(13) Loss of hearing: Compensation for loss of hearing of one ear, fifty-two
weeks. Compensation for loss of hearing of both ears, two hundred weeks.
(14) Phalanges: Compensation for loss of more than one phalange of a digit
shall be the same as for loss of the entire digit. Compensation for loss of the first
phalange shall be one-half of the compensation for loss of the entire digit.
(15) Amputated arm or leg: Compensation for an arm or a leg, if amputated
at or above the elbow or the knee, shall be the same as for a loss of the arm or
leg; but, if amputated between the elbow and the wrist or the knee and the ankle,
shall be the same as for loss of a hand or foot.
(16) Binocular vision or per centum of vision: Compensation for loss of binocu­
lar vision or for 80 per centum or more of the vision of an eye shall be the same as
for loss of the eye.
(17) Two or more digits: Compensation for loss of two or more digits, or one
or more phalanges of two or more digits, of a hand or foot may be proportioned
to the loss of use of the hand or foot occasioned thereby, but shall not exceed the
compensation for loss of a hand or foot.
(18) Total loss of use: Compensation for permanent total loss of use of a
member shall be the same as for loss of the member.
(19) Partial loss or partial loss of use: Compensation for permanent partial
loss or loss of use of a member may be for proportionate loss or loss of use of the
member.
(20) Disfigurement: The deputy commissioner shall award proper and equi­
table compensation for serious facial or head disfigurement, not to exceed $3,500.
(21) Other cases: In all other cases in this class of disability the compensation
shall be 66% per centum of the difference between his average weekly wages and
his wage-earning capacity thereafter in the same employment or otherwise, payable
during the continuance of such partial disability, but subject to reconsideration
of the degree of such impairment by the deputy commissioner on his own motion
or upon application of any party in interest.
(22) In case of temporary total disability and permanent partial disability,
both resulting from the same injury, if the temporary total disability continues
for a longer period than the number of weeks set forth in the following schedule,
the period of temporary total disability in excess of such number of weeks shall
be added to the compensation period provided in subdivision (c) of this section:
Arm, thirty-two weeks; leg, forty weeks; hand, thirty-two weeks; foot,
thirty-two weeks; eye, twenty weeks; thumb, twenty-four weeks; first finger,
eighteen weeks; great toe, twelve weeks; second finger, twelve weeks; third
finger, eight weeks; fourth finger, eight weeks; toe other than great toe, eight
weeks.
In any case resulting in loss or partial loss of use of arm, leg, hand, foot, eye,
thumb, finger, or toe, where the temporary total disability does not extend beyond
the periods above mentioned for such injury, compensation shall be limited to
the schedule contained in subdivision (c).
(d) Any compensation to which any claimant would be entitled under sub­
division (c) excepting subdivision (c-21) shall, notwithstanding death arising




16

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

from causes other than the injury, be payable to and for the benefit of the persons
following:
(1) If there be a surviving wife or dependent husband and no child o f the
deceased under the age of eighteen years, to such wife or dependent husband.
(2) If there be a surviving wife or dependent husband and surviving child or
children of the deceased under the age of eighteen years, one half shall be payable
to the surviving wife or dependent husband and the other half to the surviving
child or children.
(3) The deputy commissioner may in his discretion require the appointment of
a guardian for the purpose of receiving the compensation of the minor child.
In the absence of such a requirement the appointment for such a purpose shall not
be necessary.
(4) If there be a surviving child or children of the deceased under the age
of eighteen years, but no surviving wife or dependent husband, then to such child
or children.
(5) An award for disability may be made after the death of the injured em­
ployee.
(e) Temporary partial disability: In case of temporary partial disability
resulting in decrease of earning capacity the compensation shall be two-thirds of
the difference between the injured employee’s average weekly wages before the
injury and his wage-earning capacity after the injury in the same or another em­
ployment, to be paid during the continuance of such disability, but shall not be
paid for a period exceeding five years.
(f) Injury increasing disability: (1) If an employee receive an injury which of
itself would only cause permanent partial disability but which, combined with a
previous disability, does in fact cause permanent total disability, the employer
shall provide compensation only for the disability caused by the subsequent in­
jury: Provided, however, That in addition to compensation for such permanent
partial disability, and after the cessation of the payments for the prescribed
period of weeks, the employee shall be paid the remainder of the compensation
that would be due for permanent total disability. Such additional compensation
shall be paid out of the special fund established in section 44.
(2)
In all other cases in which, following a previous disability, an employee
receives an injury which is not covered by (1) of this subdivision, the employer
shall provide compensation only for the disability caused by the subsequent
injury. In determining compensation for the subsequent injury or for death
resulting therefrom, the average weekly wages shall be such sum as will reason­
ably represent the earning capacity of the employee at the time of the subsequent
injury.
(g) Maintenance for employees undergoing vocational rehabilitation: An
employee who as a result of injury is or may be expected to be totally or partially
incapacitated for a remunerative occupation and who, under the direction of the
commission as provided by section 39 (c) of this act, is being rendered fit to engage
in a remunerative occupation, shall receive additional compensation necessary
for his maintenance, but such additional compensation shall not exceed $10 a
week. The expense shall be paid out of the special fund established in section 44.
Compensation for death
S e c . 9. If the injury causes death, the compensation shall be known as a death
benefit and shall be payable in the amount and to or for the benefit of the person
following:
(a) Reasonable funeral expenses not exceeding $200.
(b) If there be a surviving wife or dependent husband and no child of the
deceased under the age of eighteen years, to such wife or dependent husband 35
per centum of the average wages of the deceased, during widowhood, or dependent
widowerhood with two years’ compensation in one sum upon remarriage; and if
there be a surviving child or children of the deceased under the age of eighteen
years, the additional amount of 10 per centum of such wages for each such child
until the age of eighteen years; in case of the death or remarriage of such surviv­
ing wife or dependent husband any surviving child of the deceased employee, at
the time under eighteen years of age, shall have his compensation increased to
15 per centum of such wage, and the same shall be payable until he shall reach the
age of eighteen years: Provided, That the total amount payable shall in no case
exceed 66% per centum of such wages. The deputy commissioner having juris­
diction over the claim may, in his discretion, require the appointment of a guard­
ian for the purpose of receiving the compensation of a minor child. In the




PROVISIONS OP ACT AND METHOD OF APPLICATION

17

absence of such a requirement the appointment of a guardian for such purposes
shall not be necessary.
(c) If there be a surviving child or children of the deceased under the age of
eighteen years, but no surviving wife or dependent husband, then for the support
of each such child under the age of eighteen years, 15 per centum of the wages
of the deceased: Provided, That the aggregate shall in no case exceed 66% per
centum of such wages.
(d) If there be no surviving wife or dependent husband or child under the age
of eighteen years or if the amount payable to a surviving wife or dependent
husband and to children under the age of eighteen years shall be less in the
aggregate than 66% per centum of the average wages of the deceased; then for
the support of grandchildren or brothers and sisters under the age of eighteen
years, if dependent upon the deceased at the time of the injury, 15 per centum
of such wages for the support of each such person until the age of eighteen years
and for the support of each parent, or grandparent, of the deceased if dependent
upon him at the time of the injury, 25 per centum of such wages during such de­
pendency. But in no case shall the aggregate amount payable under this sub­
division exceed the difference between 66% per centum of such wages, and the
amount payable as hereinbefore provided to surviving wife or dependent husband
and for the support of surviving child or children.
(e) In computing death benefits the average weekly wages of the deceased
shall be considered to have been not more than $37.50 nor less than $12, but the
total weekly compensation shall not exceed the weekly wages of the deceased.
(f) All questions of dependency shall be determined as of the time of the injury
(g) Aliens: Compensation under this chapter to aliens not residents (or about
to become nonresidents) of the United States or Canada shall be the same in
amount as provided for residents, except that dependents in any foreign country
shall be limited to surviving wife and child or children, or if there be no surviving
wife or child or children, to surviving father or mother whom the employee has
supported, either wholly or in part, for the period of one year prior to the date of
the injury, and except that the commission may, at its option or upon the applica­
tion of the insurance carrier shall, commute all future installments of compensa­
tion to be paid to such aliens by paying or causing to be paid to them one-half
of the commuted amount of such future installments of compensation as deter­
mined by the commission.
Payment of compensation
S e c . 14.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

(j) Whenever the deputy commissioner determines that it is for the best
interests of a person entitled to compensation, the liability of the employer for
such compensation may be discharged by the payment of a lump sum equal to
the present value of all future payments of compensation computed at 4 per
centum true discount compounded annually. The probability of the death of
the injured employee or other person entitled to compensation before the expira­
tion of the period during which he is entitled to compensation shall be deter­
mined in accordance with the American Experience Table of Mortality. The
probability of the happening of any other contingency affecting the amount or
duration of the compensation shall be disregarded.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

(m) The total compensation payable under this act for injury or death shall
jn no event exceed the sum of $7,500.

In applying other provisons of the longshoremen’s law to the settled
claims certain assumptions have been made to make the provisions
of the law apply to the conditions obtaining in the shipping industry.
Section 12 (a) of the law provides that “ Notice of an injury or a
death in respect of which compensation is payable under this act
shall be given within thirty days after the date of such injury or
death (1) to the deputy commissioner in the compensation district
in which the injury occurred, and (2) to the employer.” Under
the administration of the longshoremen’s act the “ districts” are
limited to the United States, while accidents covered in this study
occurred in various other parts of the world. The assumption has
been made, therefore, that any injury to an American seaman arising



18

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

out of and in the course of his employment no matter where it occurred,
provided the injury resulted in sufficient disability, would be com­
pensable.
Section 12 (b) provides in reference to (a) that “ Such notice shall
be in writing, shall contain the name and address of the employee
and a statement of the time, place, nature, and cause of the injury,
or death, and shall be signed by the employee or by some person in
his behalf, or in case of death, by any person claiming to be entitled
to compensation for such death or by a person on his behalf.”
Obviously many accidents might occur in which it would be im­
possible for the seaman to make a report within 30 days after the
accident occurred. If such notice were not signed by the injured it
must be signed by some one in his behalf, which would mean that were
a seaman injured on the Indian Ocean in all probability he must
have a representative in the United States who will, upon notifica­
tion, take care of his interests and serve the properly signed notice
with the deputy commissioner. Here again the question of what
district the accident may have occurred in arises and it is not hard to
conceive the difficulties that would follow an effort to apply the above
provisions of the longshoremen’s act to seamen. It is assumed that
these conditions would be obviated if the law were applied to seamen.
In the determination of the average wage the longshoremen’s act
specifies the methods to be used in the computations. The applica­
tion of these provisions in this study have been disregarded and the
wage rate as specified for the occupation in which the injured seaman
was employed at the time of his injury plus an allowance of $30 for
food and $15 for quarters per month have been used in making all
computations, except for some seamen employed on harbor craft
who do not receive food and quarters in addition to the money rate,
and also where the seaman was working as a work-a-way at the time
of injury. In the latter case the rate applying to his regular occupa­
tion, plus the allowances above stated, has been applied.
Section 6 (a) of the longshoremen’s act provides that—
No compensation shall be allowed for the first seven days of disability, * * *
Provided, however, That in case the injury results in disability of more than
forty-nine days, the compensation shall be allowed from the date of disability.

The waiting period which has a definite function in all compensa­
tion laws would present a rather unusual problem were it applied to
seamen. The provision is designed mainly to lessen the opportunity
for malingering and at the same time to develop precaution and safer
methods. If the seaman were to receive wages to the end of the
voyage, in about 40 per cent of compensable cases the waiting period,
if applied, would fall somewhere between the middle and the end of
the actual period of disability. Hence, if a waiting period were ap­
plied at the end of the period for which the seaman receives wages it
could not perform a clearly defined function and the bureau has there­
fore computed compensation from the date that wages ceased to the
date the seaman was able to resume work in every case. The only
function left the waiting period would be to prevent an award from
exceeding the irreducible minimum of expense in the administration
of each case adjudicated.
Other necessary considerations in applying such an act to seamen
would be the requirements for satisfactory evidence, especially in
cases where the seaman was left in a hospital in a foreign port and



RECORDS FRAGMENTARY

19

the ship upon which he was injured was at sea. At the present time
depositions in many cases can not be obtained until long after the
accident when the incidents of its occurrence have dimmed in the
memory of witnesses and details appearing to be minor in nature at
the time but vital in making a just settlement are not available. The
agencies through whom settlements are now negotiated often experi­
ence great difficulty in obtaining unquestionable facts in regard to an
accident. One of the marine underwriters in a memorandum to
each of their clients in regard to statements of witnesses to accidents
said, “ It seems that masters are under the impression that inasmuch
as the agency has a representative who boards the vessel on arrival,
it is not necessary for the master or his officers to take any action
other than to make out a very hasty report.” This statement seems
to express the general tendency of reports of accidents as the bureau
has found them in this study.
There is also the question of limitations. The voyages of some
vessels cover a period of a year or more with an indeterminate end­
ing. Some ships that carry on the trade of the northern seas sail
with the intention of an early return, but are often frozen in for the
winter in inaccessible locations. Such incidents can never be fore­
cast and voyages are thus necessarily lengthened. It is obvious that
limitations that apply to the laws of the land would in many instances
be far too rigid and prejudicial to the interests of injured seamen.

Records Fragmentary
inauguration of a general system of keeping records of details
uf injuries to American seamen would work for the interests of
both the shipping companies and the seaman. It is not unusual for
accident claims to be filed among those for property damage, cargo
shortage, cargo damage, hospitalization of alien seamen, etc. Approx­
imately 6,000 such cases were consulted to obtain the 1,195 cases of
injury used in this report.
Approximately 90 per cent of the injury cases in the primary
sources were incomplete for the purposes of this study. The bureau
therefore proceeded to various other sources for information and in
so doing has been able to complete a total of 1,195 cases out of 1,981
cases obtained in the primary sources. Additional information
necessary was obtained partly by correspondence and partly by
sending representatives of the bureau directly to trace records of
ships’ logs, hospital treatment, treatment by private physicians,
records of attorneys, shipping commissioners, and the seamen them­
selves. In this work agents of the bureau visited, in addition to
the New York area, 12 ports on the east coast, 5 ports on the Gulf
of Mexico, and 6 ports on the west coast; a total of 38 hospitals,
9 physicians, 8 attorneys, 24 shipowners, and many individuals
including seamen.
In the consideration of data collected in this study no weight
could be given the unknown factor in a large number of cases—that is,
all the claims covered, with few exceptions, have brought the injured
man in direct contact with the claim adjuster of either a shipping
company or a marine underwriter during settlement negotiations,
while in this study the bureau has had oi5y cold facts to work with
and has had no opportunity to appraise the actual disability.




20

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

The bureau has taken each case only on the merits of the records,
many of which may not have shown a period of convalescence which
was actually spent before the seaman could return to work. Prob­
ably the most difficult record to find was the date the seaman could
resume his duties. Disabilities in which the exact date of return to
work was obscure have been treated only to the last known date of
disability where the seaman was about able to resume work when
discharged from the hospital, while others not so definite were rejected
entirely.
As already stated, the records of facts concerning injured seamen
are to a large extent fragmentary. Many cases appearing to be
relevant were scheduled at the primary sources—the shipowners* and
the underwriters’ records. Additional information from other sources
showed that 786 cases, or approximately 40 per cent of the cases
covered at the primary sources, could not be used. Two hundred
and eight of the 786 rejected cases could have been used had the
bureau been able to obtain complete information in each case. One
hundred and forty-eight of the 208 cases were injury cases, 28 death
cases, 11 were cases in which no time was lost but a money settle­
ment was made, 5 cases were unproved injury, and 16 were false
claims which were settled for small sums by the shipowner or under­
writer rather than pay legal fees necessary in the case of litigation.
In 96 of the 148 injury cases no claims were filed and no money
was paid. In 24 the claims totaled $205,759, but were settled with
no payments, and in the other 28 cases the claims totaled $56,208.63
and were settled for $11,927.09.
In 15 of the 28 death cases no claims were filed. A gratuity of $500
was paid in one of the 15 cases. The claims in the other 13 cases
totaled $256,450 and were settled for $22,800.
In 175 cases no time was lost by the injured seaman and all were
very minor injuries. There was no claim filed in 154 of them. In
10 cases claims totaled $33,787.50 but were settled with no money pay­
ments. In the other 11 cases the claims totaled $81,963.27 and were
settled for $3,921.27.
Four claims amounting to $90,000 were found to have been appealed
to a higher court which had not yet rendered judgment and they
were therefore rejected.
Two injuries were found to have arisen “ in the course o f” but not
“ out of the employment.”
Thirty cases were found probably due to willful misconduct. No
claims were filed in any of these. They were of three types: Intoxi­
cation, venereal diseases, and aggressors in fights. Because of the
doubtful nature of these cases with no proof one way or the other,
the bureau thought it best not to include them in the report.
Ten cases were rejected because the alleged injury was not proved,
although it possibly existed. No records could be found in any of
them to support the allegation. In five no claims were filed. In the
other five the claims amounted to $35,355 and were settled for $205.
Twenty-nine claims after thorough investigation were found to be
false. In some of these the ship’s articles, the pay rolls, and the ship­
ping commissioner’s records for the voyage upon which the accidents
causing injury were alleged to have occurred gave no evidence of the
plaintiff having been employed in any capacity. Thirteen of these
claims amounted to $121,000, but were settled with no money pay­




REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

21

ments. The other 16 claims totaled $131,038 and were settled for
$417.54. This amount was the aggregate of very small payments
which were paid the claimants rather than allow the cases to go into
litigation.
Fifty-four other cases were found to be for illness other than
“ Occupational disease,” making a total of 480 rejected cases involving
American seamen. No claims were made in 353 of these. In 53
the claims totaled $460,546.50 and were settled with no money pay­
ments, while the claims in the remaining 74 cases amounted to $581,014.90 and were settled for $41,270.90.
Three hundred and six other cases after further research were
rejected because they were not applicable to the study. Thirty were
for hospitalization of alien seamen, 57 were seamen on ships of foreign
registry, 154 were longshoremen, 27 were passengers, 14 were repair­
men, 10 were dock employees, 8 were painters, 2 were lightermen,
and there was one each of the following: Customs inspector, immigra­
tion inspector, cattle tender, and a canal employee.

Regulations Affecting Seamen
T^HE life of a seaman is distinctly different from that of a landsman and is governed by various other factors. The statement is
made in Appendix A, page 45, that “ Among the several factors that
operate to give to seamen a legal and economic status that differs
from that of employed persons generally, two may be noted as
especially influential: First, the absolute dependence of the sailor
upon his master for the necessaries of life—food, lodging, care in case
of sickness or accident, etc., on account of his isolation from other
recourse; and second, a like dependence of the master upon the con­
tinued and constantly available services of his employee till the
completion of his undertaking.” To afford a better understanding
of the material presented in this report, details of some of the
more important factors governing the seaman's life will be explained.
The navigation laws of the United States provide that—
The master of every vessel bound from a port in the United States to any
foreign port other than vessels engaged in trade between the United States and
the British North American possessions, or the West India Islands, or the Re­
public of Mexico, or of any vessel of the burden of seventy-five tons or upward,
bound from a port on the Atlantic to a port on the Pacific, or vice versa, shall,
before he proceeds on such voyage, make an agreement, in writing or in print,
with every seaman whom he carries to sea as one of the crew, * * * .

It is not unusual, however, for the masters of ships engaged in
trade exempted from the quoted law to sign their crews on articles
for their own protection as if it were a legal obligation. The same
form is used in coastwise and foreign shipping, differing only by
additional inserted stipulations. Such inserted stipulations for coast­
wise and other trade not subject to the law referred to usually
designate the voyage as from one port to the next so that in case of
accident or injury the seaman may be released from the articles and
put ashore at the next port, and the ship, for this reason, is not liable
for wages for any period after the seaman goes ashore.
The form of the articles used in the signing of the crew is also
specified by the navigation laws and is shown below;




22

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Form of articles of agreement
U

n it e d

States

op

A

m e r ic a .

Allotment payable to

I what capacity
n

Shipping commissioner’s
signature o initials
r

Time a which h is to
t
e
be o board
n

Place and time of entry

Whole wages

Wages due

Days

Tim e of
service

Months

Wages per run

Wages per month

Hair

1
fa

|Inches

Birthplace

Age

Signature of
crew

Descrip­
tion

Complexion

Height

| Amount of allotment

|
|

|

|
|

(Date and place of first signature of agreement, including name of shipping
office.)
It is agreed between the master and seamen or mariners of th e --------------------- ,
of w h ich --------------------- is at present master, or whoever shall go for master,
now bound from the port o f ----------, ---------- , t o ---------- , ---------- (here the voyage
is to be described and the places named at which the vessel is to touch, or if
that can not be done, the general nature and probable length of the voyage is
to be stated).
And the said crew agree to conduct themselves in an orderly, faithful, honest,
and sober manner, and to be at all times diligent in their respective duties, ana
to be obedient to the lawful commands of the said master, or of any person who
shall lawfully succeed him, and of their superior officers in everything relating
to the vessel, and the stores and cargo thereof, whether on board, in boats, or on
shore; and in consideration of which service, to be duly performed, the said master
hereby agrees to pay the said crew, as wages, the sums against their names res­
pectively expressed, and to supply them with provisions according to the annexed
scale. And it is hereby agreed that any embezzlement or willful or negligent
destruction of any part of the vessel's cargo or stores shall be made good to the
owner out of the wages of the person guilty of the same; and if any person enters
himself as qualified for a duty which he proves himself incompetent to perform,
his wages shall be reduced in proportion to his incompetency. And it is also
agreed that if any member of the crew considers himself to be aggrieved by any
breach of the agreement or otherwise, he shall represent the same to the master
or officer in charge of the vessel, in a quiet and orderly manner, who shall there­
upon take such steps as the case may require. And it is also agreed that (here
any other stipulations may be inserted to which the parties agree, and which are
not contrary to law).
In witness whereof the said parties have subscribed their names hereto on
the days against their respective signatures mentioned.
Signed b y --------------------- , master, on th e ------ day o f -----------, nineteen hundred
a n d ------ .

!
I

1
1
1

O

Such articles may specify the length of the voyage as one or more
round trips, a voyage to any port, or for a voyage not to exceed a
specified length of time. Generally only those ships which maintain
a regular schedule from an American port to certain foreign ports
and return end their voyage at the port of shipment.
The common practices of maritime law holding an American ship
engaged in foreign trade responsible for the return of its sick or
disabled seamen to the port of shipment, unless signed off by mutual
consent, have been upheld by the courts, and steamship companies
in general provide the necessary transportation as soon as such sea­
men are able to travel. Under the provisions of the navigation laws,
there is also appropriated a special fund “ to provide for the seamen
of the United States who may be found destitute” in the various con­
sular districts of foreign countries ‘ ‘ sufficient subsistence and passage
to some port in the United States, in the most reasonable manner,



REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

23

at the expense of the United States, subject to such instructions as
the Secretary of State shall give. The seamen shall, if able, be bound
to duty on board the vessels in which they may be transported, accord­
ing to their several abilities.” This destitute seaman’s fund is avail­
able for use by the consuls and vice consuls who look after the interests
of sick and disabled seamen put ashore in foreign ports and often
make complete arrangements for the return of the seamen to the
United States either as a “ consular passenger” or, if able to perform
duties, as a “ work-a-way.”
Reporting Injuries or Illness
The routine of events following every case of illness or injury
of a seaman begins with the entry in the ship’s log showing the
nature of the injury or illness, the medical treatment given, and
usually if an injury, the manner in which it occurred. The master
then makes up in duplicate or triplicate a report of the occurrence to
be forwarded to the offices of the owner and to the underwriter or
insurance broker if the owner is not a “ self-insurer.” Although
these reports provide space for a complete description of nearly all
pertinent matters concerning the seaman and his injury, the bureau
found that the reports are seldom filled in completely and often some
of the more important items are wanting. Shown below are two
types of forms largely used in reporting injuries, and two used for
illnesses.




24

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

REPORT OF PERSONAL INJURY
as.
Managing Agent .
Date of Sailing__
Voyage N o .-------Articles N o ..

Name.
Address ...
Occupation .
Age ......

Citizen or alien .
Color_____ ________

S e x ____________

Mamed or single. .
Relationship .

Name of nearest relative__ ______ ________
Address________________________________
2. (a) In whose employment when injured___

(c) Wages per week 1

(6) How long em ployed--------------------------3. (a) Date man signed o n ---------------------------

(6) Where

(c) Before w h om ________________________
4. (a) Date when man was paid o f f _____________
(c) Before w h om ___________________________

...

(jb) W here-----------------

...

(d) Amount of wages paid .

5. Date crew paid off for voyage, if known__________________________________________:-------------------6. Injury received: (a) D a te______________

(&) H our______________

(c) P la ce---------------------------

(d) To whom first reported___________________________________________

(e) When -------------------

7. Describe fully what was being done, how the accident happened, and nature of injuries —

8. What machinery or gear was in usefl____
Was it in good order?
j

9. Was steamer loading or disc
From or to dock or lighter?
10. Name of person in charge of work at time of accident.




REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

11* (a). Was the man perfectly sober?______ _____

25

(5) Was he careless?

(c) Was any other person at fault? If so, who and in what w a y ? ___

12. What was done for man after accident, with name and address of attending physician and hospital, if any ?

13. Diagnosis__:_____________________________________________

14. Was man able to return to d u ty ?____________

If so, when?

15. State probable period of disablement____ .__________________
16. Give statement, if any, made by injured person_____________

17. Remarks:

Names o f witnesses to accident, persons assisting in
work, and those nearby

(Signature of Master)




(Signature of Surgeon)

Addresses

(Signature of Department Head)

26

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

REPORT OF PERSONAL INJURY

I mportant.—An immediate investigation should be held by ship's officers, of every accident, however slight.

Signed statements of witnesses should be attached to this form. Send this report to the owners with*
out delay. Report all injuries to crew, stevedores or other persons.
S .SFlying what flag..-

-Date o f Sailing™

-Voyage N o_

Nanfe—
AddressI.—Injured
Person

A ge-

-Color_

-Married?—

-H ow many children?—

OccupationName o f nearest relative—
Address________________

2.—*Date man signed oa_

-Where—

3.—Date crew paid off for current voyage, if known4.—Date upon which man was paid off_______ _____

-Where .

Before whnm

-Amount of wages paid...

5.—Wages per month6.— (a) In whose employment(b ) How long employed---7.—Injury received: (a) Date—

- ( b ) Hour_

(d ) T o whom first reported&—In what ]port was ship at time of'accident—
9.—Describe fully how and where the accident happened-

10.—Describe as fully as possible nature and extent of injury




___ (c ) Place- ( e ) When___

REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

ll.—State what was done for the man after the acci­
dent, with name and address of attending physi­
cian or hospital, if any________; _________'—
_

12.—State probable period of disablement--------------13.—
-Give statement, if any, made by injured person.

14.—Name of person in charge or superintending work \
at time of accident..... ............... .......... .........J
15.—Was-man able to return to duty?------------------------- If so, when?.
16.—Was steamer loading or discharging? From or t o ) ___________
dock or lighter?------------------------------------------ j
~
17.—What machinery or gear was in use, and was it in ) ___________
good order?-----------------------------------------------)

18.— (a) Was the man perfectly sober?--------------------(b) Was he careless?-------------------------------------(c) Was any other person at fault? If so, who
and in what way?---------------------------------

19.—Was substitute signed on?---------------------------------On what date-----------------------------20.—Name of substitute......... — -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Signature of Master. Surgeon a t Officer.

Date:..

,,—__ ______________________________
_

N ames o r W itnesses to A ccident and P ersons
A ssisting in W ork




H ome A ddresses

27

28

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

REPORT OF ILLNESS
s. s._______
Managing Agent.
Date of Sailing..
Voyage No. ___

j

h

J Occupation-------------------- *—________
JA ge ---------------

Color----------------------

-----------

Citizen or alien

S ex______________

Married or single____

[ Name of nearest relative---------------------------------------------------------

Relationship____

2. (a) In whose employment when taken ill__
(6) How long employed---------------------------------------- (c) Wages p e r j ^ ^ j 3. (a) Bate man signed on------------------------------------------

(6) W here_________

(c) Before whom------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(d) Physical condition on examination, if any, prior to signing articles ...

4. (a) Date when man was paid off.----------------------------------

(b) Where___________________

(c) Before whom -------------------------------------------------------

(d) Amount of wages paid------

5. Date crew paid off for voyage, if known_______________________________________________
6. Illness contracted: (a) Date---------------------------- (b) Hour------------------(d) To whom first reported-------------------------------------------- „--------------

(c) Place______
(e) When_______

(f) What was done for sick person )>y party to whom first reported?________________ ___

7. Physical signs and symptoms

8. Diagnosis




29

REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

9. Treatment, give full details............

10. Final disposition of patient..

11. If sent to hospital, state where, when admitted, and at whose request________

12. Probable period of disability..
13. Had intoxication or venereal diseases anything to do with

illn e s s ?

If

so, give details..

14.‘ If ill before embarkation, by whom treated.....................................
{a) Where...............................................................
15. Give statement, if any, by sick person.

(b) How long-

....................................... .

16. Similar previous illness if any: (a) When ..
(jb) Where______ ,______________________ _.

17 .

Remarks.

____

(c) Detail.............. - ..............................

. ____________________ _____

NAMES OF PERSONS WHO KNEW 0 7 ILLNESS
AND TREATMENT AFFORDED

(Signature o( Matter)

<555f

...........................

105676°—28----- 3




ADDRESSES

(Signature of 8urjieon)

"owS

(Signature of Department Head)

”

&m

---

30

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

REPORT OP ILLNESS
N otice.— It is extremely important that the following questions be fully answered.
Patient should be questioned regarding details not known to person making report.

Name of VesseL.

------------------------------------------- Flag____________

-Voyage Number™

Name ..
Address ..
Age-------

..Married?..—

...U. S. Citizen?-

Rating or capacity on vessel™
I.*—
The Patient

Wages per month__________
Name and address of nearest relative or friend ..

Date and hour illness first reported—
To whom reported________________
Complaint and statement made by patient™
2.—The Illness
Physical signs and/or symptoms™

Diagnosis----------------------------------------------------------------------D escribe in full all treatment given to patient on board vessel—

By whom was patient treated on board vessel...
Name and address of attending physician, if any-

Was patient able to resume full duties on vessel —

Treatment
on Board
3.—and Final
Disposition
o f Patient




Was patient sent to hospital on shore-----------------_
By whom_ _________________ ___ At what port
Name and address of hospital----------------------------

Date and hour on which patient was sent to hospital __
If patient was not sent to marine hospital, state reason -

ftafl patient suffered similar illness before joining vessel.

\

31

HEGtTLATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

4.—On what date did man sign articles_________
5.—Before whom_______ ____________________
6.—At_what port_______ _______________ ,______
7.—Date on which voyage commenced__________
8.—From what port-------------------- ----_r ..........
—
9.—Date on which voyage ended----------------------10.—At what port.-------------------------------- -----------11.—Date on which crew was paid off for voyage.
12.—Date on which patient was paid off._________

13.—Was substitute signed on
14.—On_what date...._ _____
_
15.—Name o f substitute____
16.—Remarks

Signed...
. Master.
Date............................... ................ ............................
N ames of Crew or P ersons W ho K now F acts
C oncerning I l l n e s s a n d T r e a t m e n t
on B oard V essel




A ddresses

32

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Injured Seaman’s Right to Wages
In the case of a seaman injured in the service of a ship, where the
injury is of a serious nature, the master is obligated to direct the ship
to the nearest port where proper treatment can be obtained. If the
injury is not of a serious nature and reasonable medical attention can
be given him on board ship the voyage may continue to the next
regular port of call. If the seaman is left in the intermediate port
or the next regular port of call, the master must pay him at that time
the accrued wages up to the time he leaves the ship. This is done
before a duly authorized shipping commissioner, or, if the ship is in
a foreign port, before a consular officer.
The general maritime law, as adopted by the courts of the United
States, allows a seaman falling sick or injured during the course of a
voyage wages to the end of the voyage, whether he remains on board
or is left in a port for medical treatment.
Very often—probably in the greater number of cases— when the
injury is of a minor nature, the seaman continues the voyage doing
less important tasks and receiving full wages to the end of the voyage
although his value to the ship is considerably impaired. Injured
seamen left in a foreign port are, when practicable, returned to the
port of shipment on the same ship or another ship belonging to the
same company. If they recuperate sufficiently, they sometimes work
their way back aboard other ships, or seek other employment ashore.
After a seaman has recovered from an injury or an illness, it is his
duty, as expressed in some court opinions, to seek employment to
minimize the amount of wages that the vessel owner may be called
upon to pay.
Wages for the period from the time a seaman is put ashore for
medical treatment after being injured to the termination of the ship’s
articles are usually a constituent part of the settlement made by the
shipowner or the underwriter with the seaman in closing claims for
damages, pain and suffering, maintenance, etc., due as a result of
the injury.
A number of cases were used in the study in which the seamen,
left ashore for treatment, were able to go to work prior to the date
of the end of the voyage on which the injury occurred. The settle­
ment in some of the cases was negotiated with the respective seamen
at the time a medical examiner pronounced him fit for duty. The
bureau could neither establish the date on which the seaman actually
went to work, if at all, nor the amount of earnings, if any, earned
before the end of the voyage. Hence the amount of wages the seaman
was entitled to in such cases was computed to the date the seaman
was physically able to work, on the assumption that he did find em­
ployment immediately and earned an amount equivalent to his former
wage plus maintenance.
A brief summary of the development and the adoption of maritime
law by the United States and a brief outline of court decisions con­
struing the seaman’s right to wages, prepared by the legal department
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, follows:
The present maritime law, which allows a seaman injured in the
service of the ship full wages at least to the end of the voyage, is based
on the Laws of Oleron but probably has an earlier origin. (Arts.
6, 7 , 1 Pardess 327); the Laws of Wisby (arts. 19, 20, 2 1 ,1 Pardess,




REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

33

473, 474); and the Laws of the Hanse Towns (arts. 39, 40, 45, 46;
1614, t. 14, arts. 1, 8, 2-2 Pardess 519, 521, 556). He receives full
wages for the whole voyage because the disability is supposed to have
continued until the termination of the voyage. (See opinion by J.
Davis in Natterstrom v. The Hazard, Bee 441, Fed. Case No. 10055.)
This principle of general maritime law has been adopted by several
countries. (See French Ordinances, liv. 3, tit. 4; Des Loyers des
Matelots, art. 11-4, Pardess 366; Code de Commerce, art. 262; L’Ord
de la Marine, liv. 3, tit. 4, art. 11; England, Chandler v. Grieves
(1792), 2 H. Bl. 606, note (a); see Abbot, Merchant Ship, 14th Ed.,
London, 1901, p. 250.) This principle of maritime law has been
adopted in the United States.
The general maritime principle that a seaman injured in the per­
formance of his duties is entitled to receive full wages at least to the
end of the voyage has been construed to include wages to the end of
the voyage of the ship whether he remains on board or is left in a
foreign port. (See George Ticknor Curtis’s Treatise on the Rights
and Duties of Merchant Seamen, Boston, 1841, page 290.)
Cases adopting these principles in the United States are as follows:
Firfeman injured on outbound trip from New York to Rio de
Janeiro, placed in hospital at St. Thomas, picked up on return trip
and returned to New York though he was unable to work on the
return trip, was entitled to wages for the entire voyage. (The North
America (1872), D. C. E. D. N. Y., Fed. Case No. 10314.)
Seaman out of Boston was injured and discharged at Melbourne
and was shipped home by consul. He was entitled to wages to end
of voyage. (Gallon v. Williams (1871), D. C. D. Mass., Fed. Case
No. 2324.)
Seaman injured on trip from New York to Vera Cruz was cared
for at the expense of the ship and wages paid to the end of the voyage.
Apparently he continued on board. (The City of Alexandria (1883),
D. C. S. D. N. Y., 17 Fed. 390.)
Seaman on ship from San Francisco to Australia via Puget Sound
was. injured at Puget Sound while loading the ship and was imme­
diately sent to a hospital and paid off. Held he was entitled to
wages from time of accident to the date of the vessel’s return from
Australia to an American port. (The Governor Ames (1891), D. C.
D. Wash.; N. D. 55, Fed. 327.)
Cook was injured while ship was being towed from dock at Seattle
to open water on trip to Alaska and was immediately put ashore
and caused to be taken to a hospital. Held injured man was entitled
to wages to end of voyage. (Wilson v. Manhattan Canning Co.
(1914), D. C. W. D. Wash.; N. D. 210, Fed. 898; affirmed on appeal
(1914), C. C. A. 9th Circuit, 217 Fed. 41.)
Share fisherman, third mate, on trip to Alaskan coast, was injured
and may recover wages based on share of catch to end of voyage.
(Olsen v. Whitney et al. (1901), D. C. N. D. Cal., 109 Fed. 80.)
Seaman was injured on the return trip from New Orleans to New
York. Held he was entitled to his wages to end of voyage. (The
Cortes (1872), D. C. E. D. N. Y., 6 Fed. Case No. 3258.)
Seaman was injured on return trip from Darien, Ga., to New
York and put ashore at Wilmington. Held he was entitled to his
wages to end of voyage. (The Robert C. McQuillen (1899), D. C. D.
Conn., 91 Fed. 688.)




34

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Provided Hospital Treatment
In event the ill or injured seaman is put ashore in a foreign port
and placed in a hospital, the cost of hospitalization is paid either by
the shipowner, or, if discharged by mutual consent, by the consul.
If the seaman is kept aboard the ship until it arrives in a port where
there is a United States marine hospital, he is given a “ hospital
certificate” (a copy of the form is shown below) and placed in the
marine hospital, where he receives free treatment. In other ports
of the United States he is placed in public hospitals, where the cost
is charged to the ship and the seaman is usually transferred to a
United States marine hospital as soon as his condition will permit.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT
U. S. Public Health Sebvicb
F o r m 1915
Revised August, 1028

MASTER’S CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE OF SICK OR INJURED SEAMEN

------------------------ ------- ----------------, 19-----M e d ic a l O f f ic e r in

U.

Charge,

S . P u b l ic H e a l t h Se r v ic e .

I certify, on honor, th a t_________________________________________________ _ whose signature
and description appear below, has been employed on board in the care, preservation, or navigation,
or in the service on board of those so employed, of th e...............................................................................
(Naim and .class of vessel)

of .....______________________________________________________ _ Official Registry N o........................ .
(Home port, where permanent document issues)

a vessel whose personnel is entitled to medical treatment by the U. S. Public Health Service. His
period of service on the above-named vessel was from the_________.....d a y o f______________________
19----- , to t h e -------------------day o f --------------------------------, 19____

I further certify that the person

named herein has, in m y presence, signed his name in the blank space provided below for that
purpose.*
Master of the above-named vessel.

Signature of the person named above........................................................................................ .................
Nativity--------------------------------------------------- , a g e ----------------years, height______fe e t______inches,
Color of eyes------------------------------- , color of hair----------------------------------------, distinguishing marks

Previous service.

Total service on U. S. vessels-------------------years---------------- ... months.
* The medical officer, or attending physician, should compare the aeanon’s signature with that given In the certificate, as a means of lndeqtlflcatloa.
N o t i c e .— This Certificate is merely for information at Public Health Service officers at Marine Hospitals and
other relief stations of the Public Health Service. It does not authorize relief by any private agency.




REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

35

American seamen were given the right to free treatment in the
United States marine hospitals under authority of section 4803 of the
Revised Statutes, which provides:
S e c . 4803.
* * * Such fund is appropriated for the expenses of the
marine-hospital service, and shall be employed, under the direction of the Secre­
tary of the Treasury, for the care and relief of sick and disabled seamen employed
in registered, enrolled, and licensed vessels of the United States.

This fund was originally raised under authority of legislation
providing for hospital dues to be assessed from seamen’s wages.
This legislation was repealed by the act of June 26,1884, chapter 121,
section 15 (23 S. 57), as follows:
S e c . 15. Sections 4585, 4586, and 4587 of the Revised Statutes, and all other
acts and parts of acts providing for the assessment and collection of a hospital
tax for seamen are hereby repealed, and the expense of maintaining the marine
hospital service shall hereafter be borne by the United States out of the receipts
for duties on tonnage provided for by this act; and so much thereof as may be
necessary, is hereby appropriated for that purpose.

The act of March 3,1875, chapter 156, section 3 (18 S. 485) defines—
The term “ seaman ” wherever employed in legislation relating to the marine
hospital service, shall be held to include any person employed on board in the
care, preservation, or navigation of any vessel, or in the service, on board, of
those engaged in such care, preservation, or navigation.

In practice the treatment of patients in public hospitals differs
considerably from that afforded seamen by the Public Health Service
in the marine hospitals. Customarily if a seamen is placed in a
public hospital he would be discharged as soon as able to care for
himself and live at an outside residence. In the marine hospitals,
conditions permitting, the seaman may remain and receive food and
quarters, until he is fit for duty.
It should not be understood, however, that a large percentage of
seamen patients remain until they are fit for duty. Many of them
are discharged sooner with such notations as “ Granted a pass and
did not return,” “ Absent without leave/’ “ Discharged at own re­
quest,” which is usually followed by “ against advice.” Such dis­
charges may be due to a large extent to the roving nature of most
seamen who are probably somewhat bored at the confinement while
not going anywhere. The more legitimate discharges are followed
by such notations as “ Recovered,” “ Cured,” “ Fit for duty,”
“ Treatment completed,” “ No further hospitalization necessary,”
“ Transferred” (to another hospital), etc.
The United States Public Health Service publishes figures showing
the extent of the services rendered seamen by the Public Health Service
in thp marine hospitals and relief stations. The figures are for sea­
men becoming ill or being injured on American-flag ships.
Table 8, drawn from the 1926 Annual Report of the Public Health
Service, shows that American seamen constituted 43.2 per cent of the
total number of patients treated and 55.4 per cent of the number
treated in the hospitals; that of the total number of deaths occurring
in the hospitals 75.9 per cent were seamen; that 66.4 per cent of the
total number of days of relief furnished in hospital were given seamen;
that 40.7 per cent of the number of patients furnished office treatment
were seamen; and that 45.5 per cent of the total number of office
treatments were given seamen.




36

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

T a b l e 8 . — American

seamen as beneficiaries of United States Public Health
Service in marine hospitals

[Drawn from U. S. Public Health Service Report, 1926]

Total
number
of
patients
treated

Beneficiaries

Grand total________________________

248,889

Number
of
patients
treated in
hospitals

Died

888 1,321,309

42,290

American seamen:
First-class stations___________________
69,351
18,149
__________________
Other 38,243stations
relief
5,297
Total________ _____________________
Per cent____________________________

Num ber
Num ber
Number
of
of days
patients of times
office
relief in furnished
relief was
hospital
office
furnished
relief
206,599

572,139

511
163

753,720
123,861

51,202
32,946

183,924
76,370

107,594

23,446

674

877,581

84,148

260,294

43.2

55.4

75.9

66.4

40.7

45.5

Table 9, also drawn from the 1926 Annual Report of the Public
Health Service, shows by broad groups of complaints the number of
American seamen compared with the number of all other patients
discharged in the year, the percentage which seamen were of the total
number, the number of hospital days spent by American seamen
compared with the number spent by all other patients, the percentage
of total hospital days spent by American seamen, and the average days
of hospitalization for American seamen compared with the average
number for all other patients. The figures in the table are based on
the records of patients discharged whether the patient was discharged
as cured, improved, not improved, or because of death, or for other
reasons.
T a b l e 9 . — Number

and per cent of patients and hospital days and average days of
hospitalization for patients discharged from United States marine hospitals ana
relief stations during the fiscal year 1926, by groups of conditions
[Drawn from annual report, U. S. Public Health Service, 1926]
Number of
patients

Group

Abnormalities and congenital mal­
formations.........................................
Blood and blood-forming organs,
diseases and injuries of...................
Bones and cartilages, diseases and
injuries of..........................................
Circulatory system, diseases and
injuries of..........................................
Communicable and infectious dis­
eases, not including tuberculosis
and venereal.....................................
Dental....................................................
Digestive system, diseases and in­
juries of..............................................
Ear, nose, and throat, diseases and
injuries of..........................................
Endocrines, diseases and injuries of.
E ye and annexa, diseases and in­
juries of..............................................
Genito-urinary system, diseases
and injuries of (exclusive of ve­
nereal)................................................




Number of days
in hospital
Per
cent
seamen
are of
Amer­
All
Amer­
All
total
other
other
ican
ican
patients seamen patients
seamen patients

Per
cent of
total
days in
hospital
spent
by
seamer*

Average days of
hospitalization

Amer­
All
ican
other
seamen patients

17

15

53.1

501

180

73.6

29.5

"36

17

67.9

2,221

1,338

62.4

61.7

78.7

1,060

606

63.6

53,005

28,405

65.1

50.0

46.9

805

386

67.6

48,979

15,660

75.8

60.8

40.6

1,159
118

638
91

64.5
56.5

21,252
1,819

9,869
1,185

68.3
60.6

18.3
15.4

15.5
13.0

1,769

977

64.4

39,678

18,718

67.9

22.4

19.2

1,467
96

1,533
59

48.9
61.9

19,443
4,939

16,919
2,767

53.5
64.1

13.3
51.4

11.0
46.9

203

142

58.8

6,767

3,371

66.7

33.3

23.7

777

258

75.1

27,326

6,427

81.0

35.2

24.9

•

12.0

37

REGULATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN
T a b l e 9 . —Number

and per cent of patients and hospital days and average days of
hospitalization for patients discharged from United States marine hospitals and
relief stations during the fiscal year 1926, by groups of conditions— Continued
N um ber of days
Per
in hospitals
cent
seamen
are of
All
Amer­
Amer­
All
total
other
ican
other patients
ican
seamen patients
seamen patients
N um ber of
patients

Group

Hernia-..................................................
769
Joints and bursae, diseases and in­
juries of..............................................
660
1
Leprosy.................................................
Lym phatic system, diseases and
injuries of..........................................
299
Muscles, fasciae, tendons, and ten­
don sheaths, diseases and injuries
620
of............................................ ...........
Nervous system, diseases and in­
452
juries of..............................................
Obstetrics and gynecological con­
14
ditions................................................
Parasitic diseases. ...............................
78
Poisonings and intoxications............
218
Psychiatric diseases............................
193
Respiratory system, diseases and
injuries of (exclusive of tubercu­
962
losis)............... ......... ........................
Skin and its appendages, diseases
504
and injuries of..................................
Tuberculosis........................................
828
274
Tum ors—..............................................
Venereal diseases................................. 4,507
Inoculations_______________________
Under observation..............................
216
Miscellaneous....................................... 3,072
Total cases................................. 21,174

Per
Average days o f
cent of hospitalization
total
days in
hospital Amer­
A ll
spent
other
ican
seamen patients
seamen

482

61.5

25,801

13,103

66.3

33.6

27.2

380
65

63.5
1.5

32,286
49

14,389
36,863

69.2
.1

48.9
49.0

37.9
567.1

78

79.3

10,030

1,814

84.7

33.5

23.3

512

54.8

11,121

7,564

59.5

17.9

14.8

266

63.0

42,195

11,659

78.4

93.4

43.8

7
108
113
140

66.7
41.9
65.9
58.0

259
1,909
3,106
9,096

73
4,176
1,155
18,617

78.0
31.4
72.9
32.8

18.5
24.5
14.3
47.1

10.4
38.7
10.2
133.0

556

63.4

27,511

10,676

72.0

28.6

19.2

279
532
90
1,352
36
450
1,933

64.4
60.9
75.3
76.9

16,131
118,406
11,675
175,370

5,203
30,720
1,980
43,626
147
3,534
38,479

7$.6
79.4
85.5
80.1

32.0
143.0
42.6
38.9

37.6
66.0

12,101

63.6

348,617

69.3

9.9
24.3
37.2

18.6
57.7
22.0
32.3
4.1
7.9
19.9

32.4~ "'"2,"i32_
61.4
74,541
787,548

28.8

The table shows that American seamen constituted 63.6 per cent
of the number of beneficiaries discharged from the marine hospitals
and relief stations in 1926; that 69.3 per cent of all hospital days
were spent by American seamen; and that American seamen averaged
37.2 days of confinement as compared with 28.8 days for all other
beneficiaries.
The table also shows that more seamen were discharged in each
disease group ^except leprosy and parasitic diseases than all other
patients combined in the respective group; that except for leprosy,
parasitic diseases, and psychiatric diseases, American seamen spent
more than half of the total one-man hospital days for each respective
disease group; and that excepting diseases of the blood and blood
forming organs, leprosy, parasitic and psychiatric diseases, American
seamen averaged more days of confinement for each respective
complaint than all other beneficiaries combined in each respective
disease group.

Records of Treatment Unsatisfactory
TN THE effort to secure continuous records of seamen’s disabilities
A a small percentage, chiefly aliens, was found who used assumed
names in signing articles or upon admittance to the marine hospitals.
This was determined by the fact that some very serious injuries could
not be found under the proper name on the records of the hospital to
which the injured man was taken. Such names as “ Joseph Johns”
were found to be entered as “ John Josephs,” etc., making the tracing
of the records difficult in a number of cases. In some instances the
agents of the bureau could find no record of treatment at all, while



38

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

in others the names were substantially different but all other facts
concerning the injured man agreed. Company records in an exem­
plary case showed the seaman as “ Reggio” while the hospital
records were “ Roggas. ” Numerous instances were found where a
seaman who had received a slight injury had left the ship with no
hospital certificate, and later, although the wound was treated
properly on the ship, it had become infected and the seaman had
gone to the marine hospital for treatment. Several such cases for
which data were obtained resulted in the amputation of a member.

Making Claims
TX/TIILE the seaman is confined in the hospital generally no claim
* * is presented and no steps are taken by the shipowner or under­
writer toward a settlement. There are, on the other hand, a few com­
panies and agencies who make a practice of starting settlement nego­
tiations as soon as an opinion can be obtained from their physican on
the possible length of the man’s disability. The seaman, however, is
more often notified to call on the claim adjuster as soon as he is able
to get around. At that time, if an attorney has not been retained,
the seaman presents his claim. If an agreement is reached the claim
is paid in cash or by voucher as soon as the proper releases have
been executed and the case is considered closed by the shipowner or
the underwriter. Such settlements are based usually on the amounts
which the seaman is entitled to as maintenance and as wages to the
end of the voyage. Often the seaman makes demand for wages
during disability with no mention of his right to maintenance. The
adjuster in these cases usually computes the amount the seaman
should receive as maintenance and wages, and limiting his settle­
ment to that amount proceeds to settle on the basis of “ wages during
disability” not to exceed the computed figure. Cases were found
where the settlements made under these conditions were more than
the amount demanded though the usual aim seemed to be to please
the injured seaman without payment of further sums.
Many settlements are based on very meager information. The
claim adjuster may have a master’s report showing that a seaman
was injured aboard a ship on a certain date. No claim is presented
immediately, but after a period of possibly three months, six months,
or a year, the seaman presents himself and asks for a settlement.
The adjuster inquires as to the treatment which the seaman obtained
after the accident and then makes an effort to verify what the sea­
man has related. This can sometimes be done and sometimes it
can not. For example, it may be that the seaman was burned and
a report was made by the master, but no record of his having obtained
treatment after leaving the ship could be found, yet he may have dis­
played the scars resulting from the bum. The adjuster calls in his
examining physician and makes a settlement on the basis of the
doctor’s opinion of probable disability and the facts shown in the
master’s report of the injury. Should there be any possible chance
of the seaman’s going to an attorney on the ground that the ship
was unseaworthy the settlement may be for a considerable amount*
Such action is taken as a preventive measure on the theory that the
costs of litigation would be far more than the amount of the settle­
ment personally negotiated with the seaman. Settlements negotiated
on questionable grounds are usually termed “ nuisance” values.




MAKING CLAIMS

39

There is also a class of accidents which results in a known period of
disability in which the ship is definitely liable. In these cases the
settlement is usually much higher than in a similar case not involving
liability. This is, of course, a matter of policy on the part of the
shipowner to protect himself against a possible action for damages
on the basis of unseaworthiness of the ship. Many cases are entered
on the court calendars regardless of the facts as to whether liability
exists or not. Usually they are carried up to the point of being ready
for trial and then the attorney for the plaintiff, rather than take the
case to court, offers a compromise which often results in a settlement
by the shipowner on his own terms.
In such cases the result is that the final settlement, which may be
for approximately the amount first offered by the shipowner, is de­
layed sometimes for the greater part of a year and sometimes for
several years, and from the amount obtained the legal fees of the
plaintiff’s attorney have to be deducted. All in all, the seaman who
was injured usually gets no more out of the claim than the attorney
who was not injured.
In claims where there is a bona fide liability on the part of the
ship, the settlement is made, if possible, by the shipowner directly
with the seaman at the earliest possible opportunity, and usually for
a liberal amount to prevent the claim from going into the hands of
negligent lawyers for the injured. It is not uncommon in this type
of case for the settlement to be made long before the extent of the
seaman’s disability can be determined, and before any sort of claim
has been presented. For this reason there is an occasional case
where the amount of the settlement does not equitably recompense
the seaman for the disability sustained. Some cases of this type
were found in the course of the study in which the seaman presented
further claim even though the usual releases had been signed at the
time the original settlement was made, and the claim was reopened.
The seaman sometimes refuses the wages due at the time he is
put ashore for treatment, probably on the “ theory” that the accept­
ance of wages might jeopardize his chances of getting a settlement
for the injury. At any rate, in several cases where wages were
refused, the wages due were never collected and the voucher for the
wages as it was originally drawn is still held as “ unclaimed wages.”
In one case this was for the amount of $156.61. (Case 371, “ Per­
sonal agreements.” )
Settlements of claims were found to be delayed in many instances
because the seaman signed articles for a voyage before the settle­
ment was consummated. The lapse of time from the injury to the
settlement in these cases was often more than a year.
As soon as an agreement is reached between the claim adjuster
and an injured man the proper releases are executed and the seaman
is paid either in cash or by voucher. The case is considered settled
by the shipowner or underwriter as soon as the releases are executed.
Two forms used in closing cases, by settlement for injury, are shown
below.
To all to whom these presents shall come or may concern, greetings:
Know ye, that I , --------------------- , for and in consideration of the sum o f ---------dollars, lawful money of the United States of America, to me in hand paid by
--------------------- by the hand of its agents,-----------------------the receipt whereof is
hereby acknowledged, have remised, released, and forever discharged, and do
by these presents for myself, my heirs, executors, and administrators, remise,




40

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

release, and forever discharge the said---------------------their successors and assigns,
the several steamships of the said companies, their officers and crews, their
heirs, executors, administrators, and assigns, and in particular the steamship
----------of and from all, and all manner of actions, suits, liens, debts, dues, tres­
passes, damages, injuries, wages, sums of money, controversies, agreements,
claims, and demands whatsoever, in law or in admiralty, which against any one
or more of said companies, or against any steamship thereof, or running in said
lines, I ever had, now have or may have, for, upon, or by reason of any matter
or thing whatsoever, from the beginning of the world to the date of these presents;
and particularly, but not exclusively, for all losses, injuries, or damages.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal th e -----day o f ------ in the year one thousand nine hundred a n d --------.
Sealed and delivered, in the presence of
S

t a t e

o f

---------------- ,

County of - -------- , ss:
On th e ------ day o f ----------- , in the year one thousand nine hundred a n d -------,
before me personally ca m e --------------------- , to me known and known to me to
be the individual in and who executed the foregoing instrument a n d ------ ac­
knowledged th a t------ executed the same.
_____________________________ RELEASE_____ _______PAID

B Y D R A F T N o. -

DISTRIBUTION:
— ---------------------------------$-------------

------------------------------------$--------------

OCCUPATION:

THIS RELEASE MUST EXPRESS”THE WHOLE CONSIDERATION
W hereas , ---------------- , the undersigned--------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------- -------

Company o f

of_____________________________________ ___ ______ have a claim against th2

for damages growing out o f— ----------------------------------------------- --- ------------ ------------------------------...----------------------

which claim..... ..............have agreed to settle for the sum of

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Now. therefore, in consideration o f said payment, the receipt whereof is herehv acknowledged. *...,— ..—

_____...hereby compromise said claim, and acquit, discharge, and release said Company, and any other person or companies
that may be liable therefor, their officers, agents, and employe ss, of and from any and all liability for said accident and injury,
or any results direct or indirect, arising therefrom, and acknowledge full accord and satisfaction therefor.
.And I hereby expressly state that the above'consideration is in fu ’l for this release, and that there is no understanding
or agreement o f any kind for any further or future consideration whatsoever, implied, expected, or to come to me, in money,
employment. Or otherwise.
I further represent and covenant that before signing and sealing this release and receiving' said payment, I was fully
informed o f its contents and execute it with full knowledge thereof.
Witness my hand and seal, this------------- day o f.... ............................... ........... A. D. 192.---------at— ----- ------------------------ .-----

W NS E:
IT E S S
--------------.--------------------------------------------------------------

_...---------- -------------- -------------.------------------------------------ Seal

•Insert here any other .consideration there may he: for example, “ and of the promise of free medical treatment by the Comv
pany’s Surgeon___________ - ______________ _______ so long as he may deem it necessary,” or "as well as of payments heretofore made by
the Company for my account, and of the promise by the Company to pay physician’s and nurse’s bills already incurred by me.
amounting to $_________ . . . . ________”
APPROVED AS TO FORM:




CORRECT:

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

41

Methods of Settlement
T 1NDER the present methods of settling claims for injuries the sea^
man may be compensated in each of the following manners:
1. He may be paid wages through the period of his disability not
exceeding the remainder of the voyage during which the injury was
received.
2. He is customarily paid a sum as maintenance at a specified rate
per day or week through that portion of his disability during which
he may be forced to pay for food and quarters, i. e., during out­
patient hospital treatment and convalescence.
3. If he is entitled to an additional amount as indemnity, it is
secured either through agreement with the claim adjuster of the
shipping company or of the underwriter, or by direct litigation.
Generally there is a difference in the policy of steamship companies
in settling the claims of their licensed officers as compared with the
unlicensed personnel.
Some continue the wages of the officer
throughout his period of disability even though he is entitled to wages
only to the end of the voyage. Others pay their officers wages only
to the end of the voyage and pay in addition a liberal amount as
indemnity, while still others give no special consideration, except
that the rate paid for maintenance is usually somewhat higher than
for the unlicensed seamen.
In many cases an attorney negotiates the settlement for the seaman
even though it is made by agreement and is never taken into the
courts. An interesting sidelight on this phase of settlements is a
practice which the bureau found operating in the following manner:
The arrival of an injured seaman in the port of New York, especially
if he stops at the places frequented by seamen instead of the hospital,
kindles a spontaneous desire on the part of his friends, and seamen in
general, to help him—usually in the way of free advice. A novel
method of capitalizing on this practice has been developed by a few
seamen who have been injured and are experienced in the methods
used by certain agencies in making settlements. One of these sea­
men makes a bargain with the injured man to show him for a stipulated
fee how he can realize a cash settlement immediately. The injured
man is then escorted to the proper claim adjuster for the purpose of
making an agreement and getting a settlement. If it is negotiated,
the “ adviser ” gets his fee from the seaman and the case is a closed
incident. No information could be obtained on the extent of this
practice nor the amounts of the fees charged except that the fee is
usually a nominal sum.
The business of soliciting clientele among injured seamen has
become well established not only among the so-called “ sea lawyers”
but also among a certain class of admiralty lawyers who have built up
an organization by means of which they get injured seamen to sign
their retainer contract in almost any part of the world.
This practice is carried on usually through “ runners,” seamen and
others, who have at all times a supply of blank retainers. In case of
accident they make it their business immediately to approach the
injured with promises of prompt action and a lucrative settlement.
The runner in turn usually receives a fee from the attorney for each
retainer contract which he may secure.
One example of the methods used may be cited in connection
with case No. 106 (in the “ Personal-agreement” tabulation). In



42

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

this instance the widow was approached by the runner of a New
York attorney and offered $1,000 in advance if she would give the
attorney in question “ powers of attorney” in the case.
It is not uncommon for an injured seaman remaining aboard ship
to be approached in several ports by these runners, and neither is it
uncommon for a seaman to sign a number of these retainer contracts.
In one instance the seaman had retained three attorneys, each in a
different port, to look after his interests. The attorney last retained
negotiated a settlement for the seaman under a contract to receive a
fee of 50 per cent contingent upon any recovery. Not long after the
settlement was completed it was found that each of the first two
attorneys had also secured a signed contract entitling each to 50
per cent of any settlement, also contingent on recovery. In another
case (No. 177, tabulated under “ Compromised actions” ) the injured
seaman was treated on the west coast by a physician who in turn
depended upon the attorney retained in the same locality by the sea­
man for his medical fees, amounting to between two and three hundred
dollars. The seaman, however, proceeded to the east coast, where
he retained another attorney. The last-mentioned attorney com­
pleted the settlement for the seaman and neither the physician nor
the attorney on the west coast received any remuneration.
Many methods of obtaining information or gaining access to the
confidence of the injured seaman are resorted to by attorneys and
their runners. Several cases were investigated, one where the injured
seaman was taken to a hospital. The seaman was of Spanish nation­
ality. A visitor who represented himself as a cousin (but obviously
not of the same nationality) was later found to be a runner for certain
attorneys. In another instance correspondence was shown by rela­
tives of the injured seaman in which an attorney had appealed to
them to be informed concerning the injured man in his interest and
behalf.
Information which would be held vitally pertinent to an unprej­
udiced settlement, especially in legal cases, is usually available to
the plaintiff’s attorney while considerable “ red tape” has to be re­
sorted to by the shipowner to obtain the same information. The
record of treatment given by the Public Health Service in the marine
hospitals, for instance, is extremely important in many cases. Present
regulations, however, prohibit the use of such records without the
signed approval of the seaman. The shipowner has to make appli­
cation for this information on a form supplied by the Surgeon Gener­
al’s Office. If the seaman signs the form the record is then made
available to the shipowner, but in legal cases the seaman is often
advised by his attorney not to give any information. In such cases
the hospital record becomes available only after an order of a court
in the proper jurisdiction has been secured. On the whole, infor­
mation concerning injured seamen is probably more available to
to attorneys specializing in such cases and less available to the em­
ployer than similar information in any other industry. Certain
hospital authorities informed the representatives of the bureau in
substance that “ we have suspected some employees at times of aiding
runners by notifying them of the arrival of injured seamen, but
because of the ease of stepping into a telephone booth and calling
such people without proof of the act, such suspicions could not be
proved as fact,”




SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

43

Methods of Underwriting
COME shipping companies underwrite their own claims and are
^ known as “ self-insurers.” Others insure with .protective and in­
demnity companies. Some companies are managing operators for
Shipping Board vessels in addition to operating ships of their own.
Claims arising from the operation of the Shipping Board ships,
whether the claim is for property damage, personal injury, cargo
shortage, etc., become the business of the United States Protective
and Indemnity Agency (Inc.). This organization was incorporated
for the purpose of settling all claims arising against vessels owned by
the United States Shipping Board. The premium charged for such
coverage is a flat rate per gross ton of each ship.
The claims arising from the operation of ships owned by the manag­
ing operator are sometimes only partially covered by their underwriter;
that is, such companies have an agreement with the underwriter
known as a “ deductible franchise.” As applied to injury claims
the franchise operates in the following manner. A minimum amount
is specified in the franchise, for instance, $500 and all claims for
amounts under this sum are settled by the shipowner and such claims
do not become the business of the underwriter. For claims in excess
of the stated figure, the excess is paid by the underwriter. The
premium for such coverage is inverse to the amount of the franchise;
that is, the premium for coverage in a $50 deductible franchise
would be somewhat higher than in the example given above.
A unique method of covering injury claims is employed in one
instance. An insurance company has issued an accident policy to
which is attached what is termed a “ Voluntary compensation in­
dorsement/’ This indorsement obligates the insurance company
to pay injured employees of the insured an award in the amount
that would be payable were the accident legally covered by the New
York State compensation law. The indorsement is shown below.
Voluntary compensation indorsement (New York)
In consideration of the premium provided for in the policy, the company
hereby agrees to voluntarily pay to employees injured in the course of their
employment and covered by said policy, or to their dependents in fatal cases,
such amounts as would be payable according to the New York workmen’s com­
pensation law, including the cost of such medical, surgical, and hospital treatment
as is provided in said law, even though such persons may not have a legal claim
under said compensation law against this employer; provided, however, that
such payment shall be made only on condition that the employee or dependents
shall execute a full legal release of all claims against this employer as may be
required by the company and shall in addition execute an assignment to the
company of any right of action which may exist in behalf of the injured employee
or any person claiming by, through, or under him against any person, firm,
corporation, or estate other than this employer which is or may be legally liable
for such injury. If the company proceeds upon such assignment and recovers
and collects a judgment against the party at fault in excess of the amount of
compensation voluntarily paid and incurred under this policy, the company
shall first take the necessary expenses of the procedure and shall pay any remain­
ing balance of such excess so obtained to the person or persons executing the
assignment. The company shall have full power and discretion to proceed
against the party at fault or to settle with such party upon such terms as may
seem desirable to the company, either without litigation or during the pendency
thereof.
If the injured employee or any person claiming by, through or under him
shall refuse to accept the voluntary compensation payments offered under the
provisions of the preceding paragraph, then the company shall be permitted at




44

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

any time in its discretion to withdraw such proposal to pay compensation without
notice, under which circumstances the company will be no longer bound by the
undertakings expressed in the preceding paragraph. If thereafter any claim,
suit or demand is made upon this employer for damages, for such injuries, the
obligations of the company as expressed in paragraph 1 (B) of the policy, as
well as all parts of the policy having reference thereto, shall be available to this
employer and shall be and remain the obligations of the company as fully and
completely as if this indorsement had not been written.
This indorsement is effective as of policy date.
Nothing herein contained shall waive, vary, alter or extend any provision or
condition of the undermentioned policy other than as above stated.

There remains considerable room for conjecture as to how a com­
pensation law for seamen would effect the premium rates for injury
insurance. Compensation, if the same as the longshoremen’s, would
limit settlements for injury and death to a maximum of $7,500, all
of which is payable to the beneficiary. Litigation under present
methods occasionally results in verdicts for the seamen of $25,000
or $30,000 and cases are on record as high as $50,000. Out of all
court verdicts however must come attorneys’ fees and other expenses,
possibly reducing the net compensation to one half of the verdict.




APPENDIXES

APPENDIX A.—MARITIME LAW
B y L in d l e y D . C l a r k

Development and Adoption
T^HE maritime law of the United States at present is a composite
of court decisions of varying degrees of modernness, and codes
and compilations of law running back to the middle ages and beyond.
No recent codification of this law has been attempted; and while it is
assumed to be of general acceptance by the nations of the world
interested in maritime affairs there are considerable local variations.
Like international law, maritime law has effect in any country only
in so far as it is accepted and enforced therein.
Without definition, the Constitution, Article III, declares that the
Federal judicial power extends “ to all cases of admiralty and maritime
jurisdiction.” The only implication can be that a general under­
standing of the meaning of such language was assumed. What it
then signified is of less importance than what its present meaning is,
as indicated by the decisions of courts and modified in measure by
congressional enactment.
A brief summary of its provisions and of the acts affecting the older
constructions is submitted as of interest in a study of accidents and
recoveries therefor, and especially in view of the great difference
between admiralty and the widely prevalent idea of compensation.

Status and Rights of Seamen Suffering Injury
Distinctive Features
Among the several factors that operate to give to seamen a legal
and an economic status that differs from that of employed persons
generally, two may be noted as especially influential: First, the absoute dependence of the sailor upon his master for the necessaries of
life—food, lodging, care in case of sickness or accident, etc., on
account of his isolation from other recourse; and second, a like de­
pendence of the master upon the continued and constantly avail­
able services of his employee until the completion of his undertak­
ing. These facts alone are sufficient to go far toward explaining the
peculiarities evident on the one hand in the rules of liability for care
and cure, and the application of the fellow-service rule, and the doc­
trines of assumed risks and contributory negligence, all of which are
differently developed in admiralty from the more familiar forms of
the common law; and on the other hand, in the methods of enforcing
the performance of contracts (e. g., by fines, imprisonment, or fiog105676° 28
i
45

!

—

--------------




46

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

ging) which, although now modified by statute, led the Supreme
Court of the United States so recently as 1897 to say of seamen (one
justice dissenting): “ It can not be open to doubt that the provision
[of the United States Constitution] against involuntary servitude
was never intended to apply to their contracts.” (Robertson v.
Baldwin (1897), 165 U. S. 275, 17 Sup. Ct. 326.)
Another element in the situation is the persistence from very early
times of rules and customs that grew up under conditions and rested
on theories that long since lost influence in every other field of em­
ployment, but whose dominance in this field has only comparatively
recently been modified and is yet far from complete abrogation.
Summary of Admiralty Rights
Passing by the incidents of wage payments, penalties for desertion,
the methods of seeming employment, the use of the log book, etc.,
all of which are distinctly maritime in form and effect, the rights of
recovery for personal injury to seamen may be concisely stated in
the words of the Supreme Court:
1. That the vessel and her owners are liable, in case a seaman falls sick, or is
wounded, in the service of the ship, to the extent of his maintenance and cure,
and to his wages, at least so long as the voyage is continued.
2. That the vessel and her owner are, both by English and American law,
liable to an indemnity for injuries received by seamen in consequence of the
unseaworthiness of the ship, or a failure to supply and keep in order the proper
appliances appurtenant to the ship.
3. That all the members of the crew, except perhaps the master, are as be­
tween themselves, fellow servants, and hence seamen can not recover for injuries
sustained through the negligence of another member of the crew beyond the
expense of their maintenance and cure.
4. That the seaman is not allowed to recover an indemnity for the negligence
of the master, or any member of the crew, but is entitled to maintenance and
cure, whether the injuries were received by negligence or accident. (The Osceola
(1903), 189 U. S. 158, 175, 23 Sup. Ct. 483.)

No right to recover in fatal cases existed under the maritime law.
{The Harrisburg (1886), 119 U. S. 199, 7 Sup. Ct. 140.)
Employers’ Defenses
While the defense of fellow service is seen to be very broad, that
of contributory negligence is modified in admiralty so as to permit a
recovery in the measure of the excess of the employer’s negligence
over that of the injured employee. This defense may even be
barred for the same reasons that operate in connection with that of
assumption of risks, as set forth below. (Eldridge v. Atlas S. S. Co.
(1892), 134 N. Y. 187, 32 N. E. 66.)
As to the third defense so frequently referred to in common-law
activities—that of the assumption of risks—it has been broadly said
to be “ a long and well-established principle that a seaman does not
assume the risks of his employment. The rule is grounded in sound
public policy.” (Dopico v. New York Marine Co. (1926), 217 N. Y.
Supp. 295.) “ If vessel owners sail their ships with improper appli­
ances, they must assume the risks; not the seamen.” (Ib.) And this
is true even though the seaman knew of the imperfection when sail­
ing. (Cricket S. S. Co. v. Parry (C. C. A. 1920), 263 Fed. 523.)




APPENDIX A .— MARITIME LAW

47

The rule is peculiarly applicable in connection with obedience to
orders, though not restricted thereto. As said in Lafourche Packet
Co. v. Henderson (1899), 94 Fed. 871, 36 C. C. A. 519:
A seaman aboard ship is bound to perform such services as may be required
of him in the line of his employment. He can not hold back and refuse prompt
obedience because he may deem the appliances faulty or unsafe. Masters of
ships exercise large powers, and they may legally compel observance to orders.
A seaman necessarily surrenders much of his personal liberty and freedom of
action, and he is never at liberty, like the landsman, to quit or make much objec­
tion to the circumstances surrounding the work commanded.

And in Panama R. R. Co. v. Johnson (C. C. A. 1923; 289 Fed.
964), it was held that the Jones Act, incorporating the Federal
liability law as to railway service in the seamen’s act of 1915 by the
amendment of 1920 (see p. 51), did not thereby fix the rule as to the
assumption of risks by seamen, the court saying that, in view of the
obligations devolving upon seamen to carry out orders, they can not
be said to assume the risks, which must be a voluntary act to oper­
ate as a defense.
However, the rule is not absolute, as appears from a finding that
a fireman on a seagoing vessel assumes as an ordinary risk of his
employment that of an unsecured ladder being thrown down by the
pitching of the boat during a storm (Balleng v. S. S. Co. (1899), 58
N. Y. Supp. 1074, 28 Misc. 238); and that a deck hand on a tugboat
assumes the risk of slipping on the deck and being caught in the towline (Direct Nav. Co. v. Anderson (1902), 69 S. W. 174, 29 Tex. Civ.
App. 65).
Maintenance, Cure, and Wages
It is evident from a perusal of the statement in the Osceola case
that there is, under the maritime law, a broad general right to main­
tenance, cure, and wages, but that this right is not enlarged by reason
of the negligence of fellow servants, including the master of the
vessel.
The question of indemnity, or compensatory damages, arises only
when unseaworthiness or a failure to supply and maintain proper
equipment is proved.
The term of the payment of wages is said to be “ at least as long as
the voyage is continued.” No fixed rule seems to exist as to the
exact duration of wage continuance, or of the period during which
maintenance and cure must continue. “ Cure” is not used in the
absolute sense, as it may often be impossible, but only as meaning
proper care in view of the circumstances. (The Mars (1907), 149
Fed. 729, 79 C. C. A. 435.) What the standard is “ has been the
subject of discussion in several cases; but each depends so largely
upon its own particular facts that the rule laid down in one may
afford little or no aid in determining another.” (The Iroquois (1904),
194 U. S. 240, 24 Sup. Ct. 640.)
An indemnity was held recoverable where the treatment given an
injured man was evidently the best the ship afforded, but where it
was held that the master was negligent in failing to put into harbor
at an intermediate port, even at some expense and delay, in order to
secure better surgical treatment. (Ib.) That negligence in the
attempted treatment, or refusal to treat, entails liability is obvious.
And even though the master believes that the injured man was
shamming and refuses him treatment or excuse from duty on that




48

SETTLEM ENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

ground, there is still liability. (Morris v. United States (C. C. A.
1924; 3 Fed. (2d) 588.) The compulsion to perform work while the
injured man “ was entitled to be maintained in rest for cure” was
held to furnish a basis for a compensatory recovery representing
wages for the period.
Naturally, the term of treatment reasonably required to effect a
cure may extend beyond the term of the contract of employment,
and it has been held that such continuance is a right. ( The Bouker,
No. 2 (1917), 241 Fed. 831, 154 C. C. A. 533; Great Lakes S. S. Co. v.
Geiger, C. C. A. 1919; 261 Fed. 275.) But such extension does not
carry with it a right to continuance of wages, and a judgment to the
contrary was reversed by the court of appeals in the Geiger case,
supra, though the judgment for maintenance was held proper.
Unseaworthiness
The term seaworthiness, the lack of which affords a basis for in­
demnity, is defined as “ the sufficiency of the vessel in materials,
construction, equipment, officers, men and outfit, for the trade or
service in which it is employed.” (Bouvier: Rawle’s 3d Revision.)
A few cases under this head may be noted by way of illustration. In
one of these (Carlisle Packing Co. v. Sandanger (1922), 259 U. S. 247,
42 Sup. Ct. 475), a seaman undertook to start a fire “ according to
the prevailing custom in those waters,” using firewood upon which
he had poured coal oil, as he supposed. In fact, he had used a can
so marked, but it contained gasoline; an explosion occurred and the
man was badly burned. He jumped into the water to extinguish his
flaming clothes, but delayed in an effort to find a life preserver.
None was to be found, and the court ruled that it would have been
a proper instruction to say that the vessel was unseaworthy by reason
of the gasoline found in a can marked “ coal oil” ; also that it was
unseaworthy if no life preservers were on board when the boat left
the docks. For both these reasons the injured man “ was entitled
to recover compensatory damages.”
A second aspect of unseaworthiness entailing indemnity was a case
in which, during a storm, an engine cover fell upon a seaman because
of insufficient fastening (The Drumelton (1907), 158 Fed. 454); like­
wise where a skid of known defectiveness was kept in use, causing
a barrel being moved thereon to fall upon and seriously injure a
seaman. (Lafourche Packet Co. v. Henderson (1899), 94 Fed. 871.)
A third phase appeared in a case in which the vessel employed a
mate “ with a reputation for ferocity as wide as the seven seas.”
He was physically powerful and so maltreated the seamen under him
that various ones suffered serious and permanent injuries. The boat
was held liable on the assumption of the master’s knowledge of the
assaults, a denial of which would be “ simply to trifle with the court.”
Since seaworthiness implies that a boat be properly manned, the
condition was found wanting in this case, with corresponding lia­
bility. {The Rolph (1923), 293 Fed. 269.)
It will be observed that in none of these cases was there a circum­
stance affecting the staunchness of the vessel or its fitness for the
general purposes of navigation, to which the rule would obviously
apply.
In a fourth case, unseaworthiness was charged where the master
ordered a stick intended for one use to be applied to another use for



APPENDIX A .— MARITIME LAW

49

which it was not fitted, injury resulting. The injured man was denied
full indemnity, however, inasmuch as the fault lay, not in the equip­
ment supplied, but in the “ improvident order of the master, for which
the owners are not liable. ” (John A. Roebling’s Sons Co. v. Erickson
(C. C. A. 1919), 261 Fed. 986.)
Joinder of Claims
A point of interest in this case was a requirement by the trial court
that the seaman elect whether to “ stand upon his right to wages and
expenses of maintenance and cure to the end of the voyage,” or to
sue for indemnity. The court of appeals ruled that this was error,
since he was entitled to the former “ under any and all circumstances,
except his own willful misconduct. If he recover indemnity, it will
be included; but if he claim indemnity, and fail to get it, he is not
for that reason to be deprived of his right to wages and expenses of
cure and maintenance to the end of the voyage.”
However, since this action was for an indemnity that was denied,
with no other claim before the court, a new trial must be had.
Procedure
Before taking up the statutory changes made by Congress in the
rights of recovery, certain differences between the common law and
admiralty may be referred to as regards the general subject of actions
by an injured employee. Thus, under the maritime law two forms
of procedure are possible, one against an individual, as the master,
captain, or owners of a vessel, known as an action in personam,
and another known as a proceeding in rem, in which the action is
brought against a vessel, its cargo, or other such matter as defendant,
not naming an individual, and accompanied by a provisional seizure
of the article or object against which the action is brought, a form of
attachment as by lien being an essential factor. The Federal Con­
stitution provides that the judicial power of the United States shall
extend “ to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction,” assum­
ing a common understanding of the meaning of such language. The
desirability of a certain measure of flexibility in regard to recovery
of damages for maritime torts was indicated, however, in the pro­
vision found in the Judicial Code granting to the courts of the United
States jurisdiction over “ all civil causes of admiralty and maritime
jurisdiction,” by a provision “ saving to suitors in all cases the right
of a common-law remedy where the common law is competent to
give it.” (Judiciary act of 1789, R. S. sec. 563.)
This grant relates to “ the right of a common-law remedy,” and this
may be prosecuted in the State courts; however, it does not confer
common-law rights, but only permits the common-law courts to
enforce maritime rights by common-law procedure, and therefore
gives them no power to proceed except against individual defendants,
by actions in personam. (Chelentis v. Luckenbach S. S. Co. (1918),
247 U. S. 372, 38 Sup. Ct. 501.) Proceedings in rem can be brought
only in admiralty courts. (The Moses Taylor (1867), 71 U. S.
(4 Wall.) 411, 431; The Glide (1897), 167 U. S. 606, 17 Sup. Ct. 930.)




50

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Modification by Statute
The grant given by the Judicial Code enacted in 1789 was the sole
provision on the subject until 1915, when the seamen’s act of that
year (Ch. 153; 38 Stat. 1164, sec. 20) provided:
That in any suit to recover damages for any injury sustained on board vessel
or in its service seamen having command shall not be held to be fellow servants
with those under their authority.

Within the year of this enactment a fireman was injured on the
high seas and charged “ negligence and an improvident order of a
superior officer. ” A common-1aw action was instituted in the su­
preme court, New York County, N. Y., demanding full indemnity
for injuries sustained. The case was removed to a Federal court on
grounds of diversity of citizenship. There was no charge of unsea­
worthiness, which would base an action for damages under the
maritime law; nor was there any claim made for maintenance, cure
or wages. In other words, maritime rights were remitted and a
common law recovery sought.
Both the trial and appeals courts denied such recovery, and the
case came to the Supreme Court, where the judgment below was
affirmed. (Chelentis v. Luckenbach S. S. Co., supra.) It was pointed
out that “ the distinction between rights and remedies is funda­
mental/J and that while the saving clause of the Judicial Code per­
mitted any “ right sanctioned by the maritime law” to be enforced
“ through any appropriate remedy recognized at common law,” the
act of 1915 did not indicate “ an intention to give the complaining
party an election” between common law and maritime rights.
“ Under the circumstances here presented, without regard to the
court where he might ask relief, petitioner’s rights were those recog­
nized by the law of the sea.” The provision against fellow service
as between those in command and those under their authority should
be given “ full effect whenever the relationship between such parties
becomes important. But the maritime law imposes upon a ship­
owner liability to a member of the crew injured at sea by reason of
another member’s negligence (i. e., for maintenance, wages, and cure)
without regard to their relationship; it was of no consequence there­
fore to petitioner whether or not the alleged negligent order came from
a fellow servant; the statute is irrelevant.”
Merchant Marine Act
Passing over two attempts to amend the Judicial Code so as to
permit the application of State compensation laws to localized mari­
time employments, both of which were held to violate the provisions
of the Constitution as to fundamental requirements of uniformity
in maritime law, an effective change is found in a provision of the
merchant marine act of 1920 (ch. 250; 41 Stat. 1007, sec. 33), amend­
ing the section of the seamen’s act of 1915 above considered. This
amended section applies to “ any seamen who shall suffer personal
injury in the course of his employment,” and gives him the option
of suing “ for damages at law, with the right of trial by jury, and in
such action all statutes of the United States modifying or extending
the common law right or remedy in cases of personal injury to rail­
way employees shall apply.” Injuries causing death are included.




APPEN D IX A .— MARITIME LAW

51

This is obviously a modification of the maritime law, since it gives
the “ common-1aw right” as well as remedy, the measure being the
provisions of the Federal statute of 1908-1910, relating to employees
on railways. Naturally, such a departure from the old rule of non­
liability (beyond the expense of maintenance and cure) for injuries
due to negligence of the members of the crew, including the officers,
as was involved in this amendment by a substitution of the doctrine
of indemnity or compensatory damages gave rise to objections as to
its constitutionality.
In what appears to be the first case reaching the Supreme Court
involving an application of the liability principle of this act (Panama
R. R. Co. v. Johnson (1924), 264 U. S. 375, 44 Sup. Ct. 391), the
United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit had
maintained the validity of the law (289 Fed. 964) in this case, which
involved an injury suffered at sea by a seaman while ascending a
ladder from the deck to the bridge. There was allegation of negligence
in regard to the adequacy of the ladder, for which the employer was
held responsible, and also the negligence of the officers of the vessel
in permitting an unsafe arrangement with regard to it, and in ordering
him to go up the ladder. The charge of unseaworthiness was not
stressed, but the action was brought on charges of negligence—a
common-law basis—but modified by statute. It was held by the
Supreme Court that such a modification of the law by act of Congress
was within its power, and that no reason appeared why it might not
bring maritime rules applicable to injuries to employees “ into relative
conformity to the common-law rules or some modification of the
latter, if the change be country-wide and uniform in operation.”
The law was held not to withdraw “ injuries to seamen from the reach
and operation of the maritime law, nor to enable the seaman to do
so.” An election between alternatives is granted, making use of the
maritime law as modified, if desired, or pursuing maritime remedy
according to the old rule.
In contrast with the act of 1915, the court held that the amendment
of 1920 disclosed a purpose to modify existing law, if the injured
person so elected, by extending to maritime cases the common-law
right and remedy enjoyed under Federal statutes by railway employ­
ees. This provision operates only in case of proceedings in personam,
as on the common-law side, when there may be a trial by jury; mari­
time law is not dispensed with, and if the action is in admiralty the
issues would still be tried by the court under the new rules embodied
in the act. “ So construed, the statute does not encroach on the
admiralty jurisdiction intended by the Constitution, but permits
that jurisdiction to be invoked and exercised as it has been from the
beginning.”
The contention that the act is discriminatory and arbitrary in
permitting seamen to elect which form of action to employ, while
failing to grant such rights to the employer, was rejected. To permit
a choice between alternatives was held not to be a denial of due process
of law; and “ in the nature of things, the right to choose can not be
accorded to both parties, and, if accorded to either, should rest with
the one seeking redress rather than the one from whom redress is
sought,”




52

SETTLEMENT FOE ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Limited Liability
As already stated, the amendment of 1920 gives a right of action
in case of death, but it does not affect the shipowner’s right to plead
limited liability as that right existed in admiralty prior to the amend­
ment. The principle is expressed by the Supreme Court in The
China (1868), 74 U. S. (7 Wall.) 53, as follows:
Originally, the primary liability was upon the vessel, and that of the owner
was not personal, but merely incidental to his ownership, from which he was
discharged either by the loss of the vessel or by abandoning it to his creditors.

Thus, where his administratrix sued under the act of 1920 to
recover for the death of the captain of a tug which sank because
of the explosion of its boiler, the defendant company pleaded limited
liability. The district court denied the plea on the ground of a
repeal of this rule so far as applicable to such a case. (In re East
River Co., 294 Fed. 686.) The case reached the Supreme Court on
this question, where it was held that the owner was entitled to an
injunction restraining further prosecution of the suit. (Same case
(1924), 266 U. S. 355, 45 Sup. Ct. 114.) Assuming the complete loss
of the sunken tug, the basis of recovery was nil, the court saying that
while the act of 1920 “ determines the extent of the seaman’s sub­
stantive rights and the measure of damages,” the source from which
the damages could be recovered, in those exceptional cases in which
the surrender of the ship is made, is fixed by the earlier law.
What this signifies is more fully set forth in an earlier case (The
City of Norwich (1886), 118 U. S. 468, 16 Sup. Ct. 1150), where it
was held that the value of a surrendered ship and the freight earned,
as a basis of recovery of damages, was the value at the termination
of the voyage; and if she was lost at sea that would be the termination
for the purpose of fixing the owner’s liability, her value as a sunken
vessel being the limit. A subsequent raising and repair, giving an
increased value, would not affect this limit; nor would any insurance
be construed as a part of the owner’s interest or enter into the amount
for which he would be liable.
Other provisions of law limit an owner’s liability to the interest
he has in the vessel attached and provide for the pro rata adjustment
of losses where they exceed such value. This limitation operates
where the employment relation is in effect, but where the death of a
seaman was caused by a collision between two vessels, both being at
fault, even though as against his own vessel recovery would be subject
to limitation as above indicated, no restrictions would exist in so far
as the other vessel was concerned. (The Hamilton (1907), 207 U. S.
398, 28 Sup. Ct. 133.)
It may be noted in passing that none of these limitations affects
the right to compensation secured by the longshoremen and harbor
workers’ compensation act of March 4, 1927. (Public Act No. 803.)
This act, by its terms, does not apply to “ a master or member of a
crew of any vessel, ” but does apply quite generally to other maritime
employments.
“ Death Act ” of 1920
A second statute that modifies the maritime law was also enacted
in 1920 (Ch. I ll, 41 Stat. 537), providing recovery in case of death
“ by wrongful act, neglect, or default occurring on the high seas
beyond a marine league from the shore of any State,” This law is




APPEND IX A .— MARITIME LAW

53

not applicable to the Great Lakes or other inland waters, and, by its
terms, does not in any wise affect any State statute regulating rights
of action or remedies for death. The action provided for is “ a suit
for damages in the district courts of the United States, in admiralty.”
The principle of comparative negligence embodied in maritime law is
retained.
This statute, like the Lord Campbell’s or “ death acts” of the
States generally, is not essentially an employee's act, but is available
for seamen on the same terms as other persons exposed to maritime
hazards, thus curing the defect of nonrecovery for death which ad­
miralty shared with the common law until corrected by statute.
The act provides that, if a person die of the injury during the
pendency of a suit for damages, the personal representative may
proceed with the suit. It has been held, however, that where a
seaman was injured on the high seas and carried ashore, dying before
action is begun, no survival of right exists under this act, as the pro­
vision of law is for a survival of action and not for a survival of a
cause of action, a court of admiralty having no jurisdiction over a
cause arising on land. (Pickles v. F. Leyland & Co. (1925), 10 Fed.
(2d) 371.) Such a construction is out of harmony with the reason­
ing in Van Doren v. Pa. R. (C. C. A. 1899, 93 Fed. 260), where it was
said: “ The fact of death is not the tort, but its consequence” ;
while in an action under the Jones Act (1920; ch. 250, sec. 33), it
was said that the fact of a death on land from an injury on board
ship did not affect the right of relief accorded his personal repre­
sentative. (Luckenbach S. S. Co. v. Campbell (C. C. A. 1925), 8
Fed. (2d) 223.) And independently of both statutes, jurisdiction
was maintained in a similar case, the court saying that “ it is well
settled by the weight of modern authority that the place of the
injury is the test of the jurisdiction. (Hamburg-Amerikanische
P. A. G. v. Gye (C. C. A. 1913), 207 Fed. 247.) (See also the Greenwaid case below.)
State Laws
Prior to the enactment of the death statute, recourse could be had
to State laws giving damages if a death occurred on waters under the
jurisdiction of the State, but subject to the terms of such State laws
m respect to limitations, contributory negligence, etc., although differ­
ing in these regards from the practice in admiralty. (Western Fuel
Co. v. Garcia (1921), 257 U. S. 233,42 Sup. Ct. 89; The A. W. Thomp­
son (1889), 39 Fed. 115; O'Brien v. Luckenbach S. S. Co. (C. C. A.
1923), 293 Fed. 170.) Thus the Supreme Court found it necessary
to reverse a judgment in favor of the administrator of a seaman
killed in San Francisco Harbor, the case being heard under the death
act of California. The district court had held that the limitation of
one year therein prescribed, while binding on State courts, was not
binding in a proceeding in admiralty, a finding that the Supreme
Court rejected. (Garcia case.)
A State statute (or to be exact, one of the District of Columbia)
was held to be applicable to a case of death in 1919, chargeable to
the neglect of the owner of a ship and its agents in respect to the
supply of proper food. Though the cause of death was illness occa­
sioned by food supplied on the vessel, and the death took place in
Africa, in a country governed by Great Britain, the liability was
held to be fixed by the law of the flag of the vessel on board which



54

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

the injury was suffered, and which was owned in the District of
Columbia. ^Recovery was therefore allowed under the death act of
that jurisdiction. (United States Shipping Board E. F. Corp. v.
Greenwald (C. C. A. 1927), 16 Fed. (2d) 948.)
Foreign Seamen
Section 33 of the Jones (merchant marine) act of 1920 is held to
apply to employees of foreign corporations doing business in the
United States (Stewart v. Pacific Steam Nav. Co. (1924), 3 Fed. (2d)
329; and to injuries to seamen on foreign vessels injured while in an
American port, The A'purimac (1925), 7 Fed. (2d) 741); for while
“ the jurisdiction and laws of a nation accompany her ships not only
over the high seas, but into ports and harbors, or wheresoever else
they may water borne” (United States v. Rodgers (1893), 150 U. S.
249, 265, 14 Sup. Ct. 109), “ in the present state of international
intercourse and commerce, all persons in time of peace have the
right to resort to the tribunals of the nation where they may happen
to be, for the protection of their rights.” (Benedict Adm. 1925,
sec. 82.)
For “ where a foreign merchant vessel comes into our ports, like a
foreign citizen coming into our territory, it subjects itself to the
jurisdiction of this country.” (Patterson v. Bark Eudora (1903),
190 U. S. 169, 23 Sup. Ct. 821.)

Summary
The early developments of maritime law that controlled recovery
for injury to seamen up to the opening of the present decade have
been largely modified by the enactment of statutes that affect cases
in which the rule of fellow service was formerly excluded. Negligence
of the master or other member of the crew is basis for an action for
damages, while improper or defective equipment not only give ground
for an action in admiralty as for unseaworthiness, but would also
base a suit in the forms of the common law in line with the terms
of the Federal statute governing railroad employees. No repeal is
made by any law of the provision relative to maintenance, cure, and
the payment of wages to the end of the voyage; and in case of death,
suit may be brought under the railroad act, the death act of 1920, or,
locality permitting, under State laws.
No redress beyond the maritime allowance of maintenance, etc.,
is available in any case in the absence of proved negligence or wrongful
act, established before the court alone in admiralty proceedings, or
by a jury trial in an action at common law.
State courts have jurisdiction concurrently with the Federal courts,
except as to actions under the death act of 1920, where proceedings
can be initiated only in the United States district courts.
In the absence of treaty provisions to the contrary, the laws of
the United States may be availed of by foreign seamen in American
waters seeking redress in courts of the United States.




SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

55

APPENDIX B.— GENERAL TABLE
The general table shows in detail for each accident case covered the
occupation, age, wage rate, the nature of the injury, the number of
days of disability, the number of days of treatment and convalescence,
the number of days during which the seaman was entitled to wages
and the amount of wages to which he was entitled under the principles
of maritime law, the amounts actually paid as wages, maintenance, or
other settlement, and the estimated total amount that would have
been paid under the adaptation of the longshoremen’s act, with the
number of days for which compensation was computed. The cases
are grouped by method of settlement as follows:
1. Cases settled by agreement between the seaman and the claim
adjuster of the shipping company or the underwriter, also including a
small number of cases which were referred to the United States Com­
pensation Commission for adjudication.
2. Cases in which the injured seamen made no claim but were
entitled to some money settlement.
3. Cases in which the seaman retained an attorney to look after his
interests, the attorney having settled the case by agreement with the
claim adjuster of the shipping company or the underwriter.
4. Cases in which legal action was commenced and settlement
reached by compromise before or during trial.
5. Cases in which legal action was taken and the case prosecuted
to judgment.

Methods Used in Tabulation
Occupation.—The occupation as shown in the tabulations of this
report is the regular occupation at which the injured seaman was
employed and does not necessarily mean the particular occupation
at which he was working at the time of the accident. For instance,
data are reported for several accidents which occurred while the
seaman was returning to the United States as a work-a-way. In
such cases the seaman is usually bound to do duty at a very low
rate—often at $0.01 per month. The occupation shown in such
cases is the customary occupation of the seaman.
Wage rate per month.—The wage rate per month as shown in the
tabulation, except work-a-ways and those noted otherwise, is the
rate per month at which the seaman was signed on articles or per­
forming service under contract of hiring at the time of his injury. In
computing the compensation for disability the bureau has added to
the rate shown an allowance of $30 per month for food and $15 per
month for quarters in each case where the money rate did not include
such allowances.
Part of body injured.—If the accident caused injury to more
than one part of the body, the entry has been made for each part
injured with respect to the nature of injury of the different parts
affected. See “ Nature of injury” below.
Nature of injury.—Injuries affecting various parts of the body
show the nature of the injury entered respectively with the part of
the body to which it applies. For instance, “ Second degree burns
of the face and comminuted fracture of the right arm” is entered
under the above heading in the tabulations as “ Burns; fracture,”




56

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

and under “ Part of body” as “ Face; right arm,” inasmuch as the
degree or extent is indicated by the length of the ensuing disability.
Disability.—Disability as shown in the tabulations of this report is
the time during which the injured man was unable to render any
service in his regular occupation, or during which he rendered service
in another occupation at a lower wage because of incapacity to work
at his regular occupation. Many seamen who are injured continue
to render only partial service through the remainder of the voyage
for which they are signed and at the same time draw full wages for
the partial service. Unless the seaman was unable to render any
service in such cases while wages were continued the bureau has not
considered any disability during the voyage. If an injured man
recovers to a degree which enables him to work at another occupation,
but not at his own occupation, the bureau has considered the period
at the other occupation as partial disability, provided the wages
earned in the second occupation were less than he would have earned
in his regular occupation. Compensation for such partial disability
was computed on the basis of two-thirds of the difference between
the injured seaman’s weekly wage before the injury and the weekly
wage at the second occupation, during the continuance of his em­
ployment in the second occupation.
Treatment.—Treatment on ship is the number of days that a sea­
man was aboard a ship after becoming unable to render service. It
includes the days he continued aboard the ship on which he was in­
jured and the days, if any, aboard another ship while being brought
ashore or while being returned to the port of shipment.
In-patient treatment is the period of confinement on land during
which the seaman was furnished subsistence, either by shipowner,
marine hospital service or the consular service.
Out-patient treatment is the total number of days during the sea­
man’s disability that he was maintaining himself while visiting either
a hospital, dispensary, or a private physician for treatments.
Convalescence.— The period shown as “ convalescence” in this
report is that portion of the seaman’s disability after the cessation of
treatments during which he obtained board and lodging at his own
expense. This is so shown to make the total of the out-patient
treatment and the convalescence represent the period during which
the seaman is entitled to an allowance for maintenance.
Days entitled to wages.—The number of days shown under this
heading is the number of days from the beginning of the seaman’s
disability to the end of his agreement as practiced under maritime
law. (See p. 32.)
Days entitled to maintenance.—The number of days a seaman is
entitled to maintenance is the total of the days shown as an out­
patient and as a convalescent.
Amount entitled to as wages.—The sum shown as the amount of
wages to which the seaman was entitled is wages computed at straight
rate from the beginning of his disability to the end of the voyage in
accordance with the practice of wage continuance. One thirtieth
of the monthly wage was used as the daily wage. (See pp. 18, 32.)
Amount entitled to as maintenance.—The sum shown as the amount
entitled to as maintenance was computed by allowing each unlicensed
seaman (except steward) $2 per day and licensed officer and steward
$3.50 per day for each day of out-patient treatment and convalescence




APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

57

shown in the tabulation. If the maintenance allowance was specified
in any case as being more or less than the above amounts the specified
figure was used and the tabulation noted accordingly.
Days from injury to settlement.—The days from the injury to the
settlement indicates the lapse of time after the injury before the
seaman realized compensation for time lost, pain and suffering, or
for indemnity. In cases where payments were made at different
times the lapse of time shown is from the date of the injury to the
date of the first payment.
Amount actually paid as wages.—The amount shown as wages
actually paid is the unearned wages at straight rate paid the seaman
under his right to wages to the end of the voyage. It does not in­
clude pay for extra work, overtime, or for any period during which
he was rendering service. Such items were due the seaman in some
cases and were included in the final settlement but were deducted
before entering the amount in the tabulation. For instance, in one
case a seaman was entitled to unearned pay for six watches ($15) to
the end of the voyage. The wage voucher which the seaman actually
received was for $29.80, which included pay for overtime earned
before the beginning of disability. The amount shown as wages
paid in this case is $15.
Amount actually paid as maintenance.—The amount shown as
maintenance actually paid includes all sums paid to the seaman as an
allowance for maintenance and also any amounts that were paid
directly to other parties by the shipowner or the underwriter to
satisfy bills for board and lodging which accrued against the seaman
during his out-patient or convalescent period of disability.
Amount actually paid as other settlement.—The amounts shown as
other settlements are sums paid the seaman in settlement of his
claim other than for wages and maintenance, except in cases where
the sums representing wages to the end of the voyage and mainte­
nance were obscure and neither indicated nor specified in the records
of settlement. In such cases the amount shown is the full amount
of the entire settlement.
Total amount actually paid.—The total amount actually paid is the
amount paid by the shipowner or the underwriter to the seaman or
his attorney to satisfy the claim. If the settlement was made by
personal agreement, the amount is net to the seaman. If the settle­
ment is through agreement with the seaman’s attorney, a compro­
mised action, a jury verdict, or a court decree, the amount shown
includes the plaintiff’s attorney’s fee but not court costs.
Amount of probable recovery under compensation act.—The amount
payable under the adaptation of the longshoremen’s act includes the
following items:
(1) The amount to which the seaman was entitled as wages shown
in the tabulation;
(2) The amount to which the seaman was entitled as maintenance
as shown by the tabulation; and
(3) The lump-sum value of compensation payable by applying
the provisions of the longshoremen’s act as discussed in this report.
(See pp. 14 to 19.)




58

SETTLEMENT FOE AC ciD EN TS TO AMERICAN SEAMSM

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Wage
rate
Age per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

D ays of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In­ Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

PERSONAL AGREEMENT
1
2
3
4

Oiler...................—
Fireman................
Chief mate...........
Fireman................

36
25
0
27

$72.50
65.00
185.00
65.00

5

A ble seaman........ 31

62.50

6
7
8
9
10

Fireman................
W iper....................
Chief mate...........
A ble seaman........
Boatswain............

25
29
49
29
37

65.00
57.50
185.00
62.50
70.00

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18

Coal passer...........
Able seaman........
Messman..............
Ordinary seaman
Steward................
Fireman................
A ble seaman........
Oiler......................

48
33
28
22
26
26
26
20

60.00
62.50
40.00
47.50
105.00
62.50
55.00
65.00

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

Able seaman_____
Oiler......................
Ordinary seaman
First engineer___
A ble seaman........
Ordinary seaman
Mess b o y ........ .
Ordinary seaman
Second engineer..
Oiler......................
A ble seaman........
........ d o....................
Ordinary seaman
____ d o ....................
........ d o ....................
Oiler......................
Ordinary seaman
Second engineer..
Fireman................
A ble seaman........
____ do...................
Second engineer. _
Able seaman........
Boatswain______
Second m ate____

29
24
24
34
(*)
21
21
23
25
0)
30
33
27
29
21
34
20
27
28
24
22
42
21
42
58

55.00
65.00
40.00
260.00
62.50
47.50
42.00
47.50
165.00
65.00
55.00
62.50
40.00
40.00
47.50
72.50
47.50
130.00
57.50
62.50
62.50
135.00
62.50
70.00
135.00

44
45

Able seaman........ 29
Engineer............... 41

55.00
150.00

46
47
48

Boatswain............ 32
Coal passer........... 38
C ook...................... 37

75.00
60.00
110.00

49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57

A ble seaman........
Second m ate........
Able seaman........
Second engineer—
Radio operator. _.
Third engineer. _.
Mess b o y ..............
W iper....................
Oiler.......................

28
23
28
34
28
23
24
39
39

62.50
165.00
62.50
165.00
105.00
150.00
42.00
57.50
72.50

58
59
60

Coal passer______ 33
First engineer___ 57
W iper.................... 24

60.00
135.00
50.00

Scald, right foot....................................
Burn, right hand and foot..................
Fracture, ribs........................................
Abrasion and laceration, head; frac­
ture, arm.
Laceration, infection, first finger4
right hand.
Hernia, left groin................................ .
Laceration, right arm..........................
Hernia, left groin..................................
Bruise, left testicle...............................
Bruise and laceration, second and
third fingers6 left hand.
Bruise, left breast; fracture, rib.........
Strain, right side..................................
Bruise, groin.........................................
Hernia....................................................
Bruise, left knee.........- ........................
Bruise, left hand..................................
Bruise, left foot.....................................
Bruise, right shoulder; laceration,
left eye.
Dislocation, left knee...........................
Bruise, left thum b...............................
Bruise, foot............................................
Bruise, coccyx.......................................
____d o......................................................
Malaria, developing pneum onia8-~ .
Malaria 8....... .......................................
Sprain, left thum b...............................
B um , arms and legs............................
Bruise, fourth finger left han d ..........
Laceration, forehead............................
Scald, head, neck, and b od y..............
Foreign matter in eye.........................
Strain, back...........................................
Fracture, first finger left hand...........
Bruise, left knee and scapula.............
Lacerated right th u m b ......................
Bruise and scald, face and head........
B um , arms and side............................
Bruise, left knee...................................
Bruise of m outh....................................
Bruise, right knee................................
Sprain, ankle.........................................
Bruise, right knee................................
Bruise, right forearm; laceration,
left shin.
Laceration, forehead...................
Laceration, head; dislocation, infection, thum b right hand.
Bruise, head; laceration, face_______
M alaria8
_____ _____ ______ _____ _
Laceration, infection, second finger
left hand.
Strain, back......................................... .
M alaria8
................................................
Strain, back......................................... .
M alaria8
............................................... .
____d o.8...................................................
------do.8...................................................
Laceration and fracture, second
finger left hand.
Fracture, great toe left foot............... .
Sprain, left shoulder..........................._
Laceration, second finger right hand.

* N ot reported.
8 A t $3.50 per day.
9 N o record; left hospital against advice.




31

12

42
59

29

20

<
*
>

*41
30
41
28
6 61
35
4
29
7

10
30
15
125
99
44
15

5
29

41
15

45
44
3

(»)

(9
)

94
13
3

(9
)

1

12
21

(9
)

(#
)

6

52

93

(»)

20

22
25
21

9
2

67
58
40
29
38
23
34
70
46
48
48
52
29
56
46

5
_ 20'

37

6

3"
6

22

* Permanent loss of use.
« Partial disability for life.
6 Amputation resulting.

‘ 27’

59

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases
Am ount en­
titled to as—

Days en­
titled to—

W a-

Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
to
settle­
te­
nance ment

Maintenance

Probable recovery un­ D ays
der compensation act
for
which
compen­
sation
Compared
Total
was
compen­ Amount with actual com ­
sation
recovery
puted

Am ount actually paid t

M ain­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

PERSONAL AGREEMENT
12
29

$45.92 $24.00
10.83
135.67 *l6i."50
99.67
2.08

35

28.00

2.17
78.58
49.33
8.33
11.67

60.00
92.00
2 98.00

50.00
54.17
5.33
55.42
199.50
2.08
18.33
2.17

70.00
” 8.00

58.00
2 28.00
14.00
18.00
16.00

14.67
13.33
20.00
8.67 *105.00
10.42
69.67
90.00
58.80
69.67
82.50

8.00
8 .0
80
8 .0
80

29

2.08
1.33
16.00
3.17
9.67
1.58

190.00
26.00
50.00

10 0
1 .0

2.00
72.00
20.00

27.08 1 62.50
0
27.50 2 73.50
2.08
40.00

H0 .0
12 0

45

140.00
2129.50
58.80
12.00
92.00
16.92
90.00
12.00
130.50
76.67

$52.00
41.00
70.00

116

2.08

46
95
26
64

2.17
78.58
49.33
8.33
2.33

20

56

88

31
36
81
15
49
9
44
30
9
29

22

99
99

120
60
16
14

111

20
10
25

50.00
18.75
5.33
20.58
199.50
2.08
1.83
2.17

14
9
18
123
24
16
52

+$2.99
—4.74
+102.93
+31.42

62.08

790.92

+728.84

4 322

62.17
78.58
154.33
47.91
502.33

224.12
186.35
322.33
53.22
984.62

+161.95
+107.77
+168.00
+ 5.31
+482.29

67
7
49
19
6 385

109.02
126.67
55.33
68.08
289.50
102.08
51.83
34.67

260.73
148.68
20.80
174.41
326.41
51.52
36.33
35.09

+151.71

61
40
4
30
30
15

14.67

-1 2 .1 6
-125.00
+7.00
+113.57
-9 .3 7
+194.66
+217.43
+6.09
-352.00
-4 0 .0 0
-5 5 .0 0
-175.84

105.00
39.58
500.00
$59.02

2 28.00
14.00

107.92
7 50.00
47.50
62.00

86.00

50.00
32.50

1.83

7 25.00
7 125.00

58.00

18.00
150.00
429.00
7 40.00
7 55.00
242.00

7 20.00

27.50

75.00
26.00
35.00

99.00
7 260.00
148.50
7 31.25
7 45.00

17.25
4.17
37.50
24.00
21.00
49.50 2143.50

10 0
0 .0

10 0
0 .0

”"§ 3 .3 3
227.24
42.05
324.33
255.83
157.67
82.50
126.24
1.33
16.00
386.29
87.31
100.37

"36.77
4.17

46.00
36.50

37.50
91.00
229.50

78.57
65.20
75.33
339.43

-3 4 .5 3
+106.33
+36.91
-5 0 .5 6
-1 5 .5 0
+ .4 2

-20.00

-1 2 .8 3
+308.12
-4 7 .3 6
+63.79
-260.00
-134.98
-3 1 .2 5
-4 5.0 0
-21.43
+27.70
-1 5.6 7
+109.93

13

29

10
81
57

28
95

20
24

22

4

12
41

1.83
5.00

7 25.00
7 150.00

26.83
155.00

3.83
15.00

-2 3.0 0
-140.00

80
556
34

169.20
30.00

50.00

169.20
80.00
130.00

169.20
199.98
164.07

+119.98
+34.07

32
104
32
27
187
115
55
48
41

4.17
27.50
2.08

55.00
73.50
55.00

59.17

11 0
0 .0

10 0
0 .0

10 0
0 .0
150.00
58.80
92.00
106.92

127.39
215.29
94.06
223.43
330.80
293.79
70.80
92.00
223.15

+114.29
+36.98
+133.43
+230.80
+143.79

34
70
46

+116.23

45

42.00
305.50
106.67

65.06
321.43
168.67

+23.06
+15.93
+62.00

27

1 0 0 20.00
1 .0
90.00

150.00
58.80
92.00
16.92

90.00

130.50
76.67

30.00
175.00
30.00

? Nuisance value.
8 Occupational disease.
•Alleged further disability could not be verified*




26.83
7 125.00
26.33
113.67
51.42
129.67
38.40
151.58
434.50
7 40.00
7 55.00
302.08
21.33
28.83
78.17
134.67
36.58
7 260.00
165.75
35.42
7 45.00

+22.01

15

20

887
31

12.00
294.50
92.00

$100.91
47.09
308.60
131.09

60.00

13.00
13.33
8.67 2105.00
10.42
23.00
69.67
60.00
8.40
30.00
1.58
5.50
2.08
1.33
1.33
3.17
9.67
1.58

12

$97.92
51.83
205.67
99.67

60.00

10

43.75
12.00
21.00
24.00
49.50 2143.50

169.20
38.00

$45.92
10.83
135.67
99.67

156

58.00

17.25
4.17

1.83
15.00

204
45

57.08
90.00

+
68.22

+
12.00

» A t $2.50 per day.
u A t $3 per day.

10
16
32

22

60

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Age

Wage
rate
per
month

Days
Nature of

and part of body
iected

Days of treat­
ment received

total
disa­ On
bility ship

Days
of
con­
In­ Out- vales­
pa­
cence
tient tient

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued
61

A ble seaman .
Oiler...........
M otorm an.

$55.00
65.00
65.00

40.00
65.00
90.00
125.00
62.50

65.00
40.00
65.00
. 60.00
40.00
60.00
57.50
55.00
57.50

Third engineer___

100

65.00
90.00

Ordinary seaman
Oiler......................
Chief cook ______
Third engineer. __
A ble seaman __
Fourth mate - .
Chief steward___
Fireman..........
Boatswain___
Third mate, jr___
Boats v a in ___
Ordinary seaman _
M otorm an____
Quartermaster .
Ordinary seaman.
Quartermaster
Fireman..........
A ble seaman. _
Fireman..........

70

35.00
90.00
50.00
40.00
40.00
65.00
125.00

Oiler......................
Radio operator..

67

W aiter________
Radio operator.
W iper___________
Ordinary seaman
____do....................
Oiler.................
Third engineer...

125.00

A ble seaman----Boatswain..........
Oiler....................
W iper..................
A ble seaman----Radio operator. _
Able seaman___
W iper..................

55.00
65.00
65.00
50.00
55.00
105.00
55.00
50.00

10 0
1 .0
10 0
2 .0
57.50
65.00

10 0
1 .0

101

102

M essm an.
Oiler..........

45.00
65.00

103
104

____d o..................
Coal passer.........

65.00
50.00

105 Water tender..
106 Chief mate___
107 ____do....................
108 Boatswain............
109 ____ do....... ............
Ordinary seaman
Second m ate........
112 Boatswain............
113 W iper....................
114 Oiler......................
115 Ordinary seaman.
116 Third engineer . . .

10
1
111

65.00
162.50
180.00
75.00
75.00
47.50
165.00
75.00
57.50
72.50
47.50
150.00

Bruise and laceration, head, left
hand, and legs.
Bruise, third finger right hand..........
Laceration, right ear and shin; in­
fection of shin wound.
Bruise and laceration, back and arm.
Strain, left knee.....................................
Fracture, third finger...........................
Dislocation, first finger left hand___
Laceration, infection, thigh................
Laceration, right cheek.......................
Burn, face, neck, left arm, hands,
right knee.
Bruise and laceration, forearm______
Dismemberment, second finger1 left
2
hand; laceration, infection, third
finger left hand.
Fracture, r i b s . .. ...................................
Dismemberment, left thum b6..........
Fracture, right leg....... .........................
Fracture, ankle.....................................
Laceration, infection, right arm ........
Hernia, groin-.........................................
Foreign body, embedded in left knee.
Bruise, part not reported....................
Laceration, fourth finger right hand.
Bruise, back and left leg......................
Sprain and strain, left leg...................
Bruise, stomach; fracture, rib............
Eyes, irritated b y gas...... ....................
Strain, legs and stom ach.....................
Sprain and strain, back and s p in e ...
Abrasion arid bruise, left foot.............
Burn, left arm and shoulder...............
Bruise, left foot......................................
Laceration, second and third fingers
left hand; swelling, left testicle.
Bruise, laceration, lower right jaw,
tw o teeth broken.
Sprain, ankle.............—.........................
Fracture, wrist.......................................
Strain, right ankle................................
Abrasion, left temple............................
Fracture and sprain, ankle.................
Bruise, knee...........................................
Fracture, back.......................................
Laceration, fracture, first finger left
hand.
Fracture, left leg and hip....................
Fracture, left hand, and dismember­
m ent.1
*
Foreign matter in eye..........................
Bruise, face; laceration, head; dis­
location, right shoulder and arm.
Foreign matter in right eye................
Burned, death resulting.....................
Bruise, finger.........................................
Strain, groin...........................................
Bruise, right foot...................................
Bruise, left leg.......................................
Laceration and fracture, right leg___
Bruise, foot.......................... .................
Bruise and laceration, right a n k le ...
Laceration, right hand........................
Fracture, arm, head, and jaw ............
Laceration, fourth finger left ha n d ...

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
« Partial disability for life.
• Amputation resulting.




140

117
23

14
38

22

17

19

6

24

8

60

12

16
23
19

46
*26
80
50
19
76

1
1

33

39

22
22

35

10

14
«43

7
7
17
59

8

23

15

149
40
75
46
26

27
24
19
23

14

1

5

31
19
485

64
5 748
64
178
5 92

21

157

92

50

14
70
23
32
132
4
45
40
90

(1> (1>
7 7

* Nuisance value.
• Alleged further disability could not be verified,
*» A t $2.50 per day.

18
40

• C
1 O

23

1

16
'26’

61

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
to
te­
settle­
nance ment

Wa- Maintenance

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Amount actually paid a s-

Main­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

Total
compen­
sation

Days
for
which
compen­
Compared sation
was
Amount with actual com ­
recovery
puted

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued
117

10

$44.00 $234.00

154

$44.00

$400.00

$444.00

+$89.03

116

2.17
2.17

48.00

20.00

25
46

2.17
2.17

$48.00
20.00

22.00
78.00

72.17
100.17

108.18
130.94

+36.01
+30.77

24
45

10.50

24

10.00

13
60
758
79
140

10.50

10.00

75.50
^ 175.00
65.00
27.33
64.67
25.00
323.33

29.29

16.00
2122.50

55.00
7175.00
60.00
6.00
50.00
9.00
167.50

103.85
44.54
66.96
35.34
341.54

-4 6.2 1
-175.00
+38.85
+17. 21
+2.29
+10.34
+18.21

52

30.33
6.00

20.00

5.00

55.33
6.00

50.33
401.55

-5 .0 0
+395. 55

24.00
6.50

46.00

79.00
575.00

149.00
581.50

183.33
2.08
29.33

105.83

122.32
1,321. 50
241.67
320.26
47.58
411.01

-2 6.6 8
+740.00
+31.67
+31.10
+15.50
+153.68

53.33
21.33
14.67

38.00
12.00
28.00
16.00
33.33 2122.50

6

31

20.00
84.00

14

46.00
46.00
2.00
183.33 2115.50
8.00
39.58
3136.50

26
6
78

30.33

6.00
24.00
6.50

20 0
1 .0

21

19
46
59

20 0
2 .0
88.00

15
44

22

149
27

14.00
15.17
25.67
4.33 « 37.50
88.00
1.33
44.00
80.00 298.00
54.00
45.33
150.00
88.17
50.00
50.00
1.83
46.00
38.33

12 0
2 .0

51.33
224.00
23.83
106.67

124.00
46.00
970.00

18
40

45.00
106.17

36.00
80.00

4.33
21.67

77
42

10 0
1 .0

111

10

86.25 i«24.00
64.00
96.67
15.83
52.00

10.00

20 0
1 .0

80.00
45.33

10.00
88.17
1.83
38.33

8

38.50
2.17
108.33

45

203

48
15
90
7
62
23
94
105
13
84
71
234
531




10

» 62.50

39.17

-2 3 .3 3

77.83
262.17
181.17
7 125.00
76.83
282.00
2,801.83
322.67

78.50
269.20
238.50
250.08
270.00
6,721.91
216.67

+ .6 7
+7.03
+57.33
-125.00
+173.25
+3,920.08
-106.00

‘ 735

14.00

22 .0
10

7.00

37.50

96.00

34.00
229.00
6.00

138.00
21.33
35.00
46.00

260.00
72.84
”7~

25.50
46.00

125.66

88.00

16

-100.00
-5 7 .5 0

29.17
46.67
78.09
197.71
97.18
629.48
110.54
150.00
138.17
106.79
187.96

-7 .0 0
+36.26
+106.38
+63.18
+320.48
+59.21

15
58

22

109

+2.00

+28.67
+69.96
+11.63

25
46

10

~5L33
224.00
1.83
106.67

10 0
1 .0

2,800.00
106.00

3.00
106.17

80.00

1,335.50

203.00
1,521.67

373.83
1,370.57

+170.83
-151.10

148
1 490
4

2.00

7 73.00
700.00

79.33
721.67

6.33
98.89

-7 3 .0 0
-622.78

37

7 40.00

740.00

r 500.00
,
93.64
228.68
59.50
56.67
857.00

-4 0 .0 0
-2,500.00
-2 6.3 6
+43.68
-3 7 .5 0
+ 4.42
+94.71

4.33
21.67

30.00 2 31.50
46.00
35.00
57.50
2.00
12.67
590.79 2171.50

12.00

20 0
0 .0

1 ,0 0 0 1 ,0 0 0
0 0 .0 0 0 .0
10 0
2 .0
58.50
104.00
37.50
39.58

185.00
97.00
52.25
762.29

10.00
110.25
152.61
751.58
7 HO. 00

110.25
160.67
230.46

56.00

-12.00

10.00

66.17
91.78
750.00
7 150.00

10.00
44.08
4.83
1.58

1 Amputation of distal phalange.
3
;3 N ot including $50 for dentist s bill which was
retained b y seaman.
“ Amputation of first finger and half of metacar­
pal bone.

105676°— 28------ 5

28
6 525

50.00

10 0
0 .0

12.50
65
19
115
30
51
770

8

92.00

37.33

7 57.50
15.17
25.67
4.33
1.33

20 0
1 .0

13

289.16
32.08
257.33
188.00
7 57.50
29.17
53.67
41.83
91.33
34.00
309.00
51.33
148.00
109.50
36.83
176.33

30.00
190.67

88.00

10

2.00

lOo.OO

30.00 2 31.50
35.00
46.00
57.50
2.00
6.00
50.67
610.50 a 171.50

4
45
40

120
96
111
21

40.00

62
23
485
55

5
14
23
32

9
7
7

8 17.50

38.50
2.17
108.33

49

1

22 .0
10

29.17

5.00
21.33
14.67

+ 8.06
-521.12
-150.00

34

(15)
9
56

21
80

15 Dependent wife 43 years of age; children 7 and
5 years of age.
1 A t $1.50 per day.
6
17 Continued duties; was treated on ship 20 days
to end of voyage; no further disability,

62

SETTLEMENT FOB ACCIDENTS TO AM ERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

N o.
of

Occupation

Age

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

D ays of treat­
m ent received

Days
of
con­
total
disa­ On In­ Out­ vales­
bility ship pa­ pa­ cence
tient tient
Days

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued
117
118
119

120

121

A ble seaman___
Second engineer.
Second m ate___
Boatswain..........

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141

Mess b o y .......... .
Second m ate___
Fireman............ .
Mess b o y .......... .
W iper......... ........
Fireman_______
Mess b o y ______
Boatswain_____
Able seaman___
First engineer...
Able seaman___
Second cook___
Messman.......... .
Third engineer .
Second cook___
A ble seaman___
Boatswain_____
A ble seaman___
W iper_________
Fireman............ .
A ble seaman___

142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150

Oiler................. .
Fireman.......... .
Water tender..
Fireman.......... .
A ble seam an...
W iper.............. .
Oiler................. .
First engineer..
Fireman........ .

151
152

Machinist..
Firem an._.

153
154
155
156
157

M achinist...........
Second engineer.
D eck b o y ............
Fireman..............
Able seaman___

122

158 Fireman............ .
159 ........ do..................
160 ___ do..................
161 Chief cook........ .
162 A ble seaman—
163 Fireman............ .
164 Third engineer..
165 ........ d o..................
166 A ble seaman—
167 Oiler....................
168 ____do................ .
169 Coal passer____
170 Chief m ate.____
171
172
173
174
175
176
177

A ble seaman-----Coal passer.........
A ble seaman____
First engineer___
A ble seaman____
Fireman..............
First pum p man

178 ! Chief mate..

$62.50
165.00
165.00
75.00

Strain, groin........ ..................................
Burn, face and arms............ ...............
Hernia, left groin..................................
Bruise, first and second fingers right
hand.
42.00 Bruise, head...........................................
165.00 Hernia, groin.........................................
65.00 Bruise and laceration, left foot..........
42.00 Strain, back..................... ....................
57.00 Strain, groin..........................................
65.00 Fracture, rib.........................................
40.00 Laceration, left thum b........................
75.00 Strain, groin...........................................
9
62.50 Fracture, nose, upper jaw, and skull1 .
185.00 Fracture, left ankle______ _________
Mashed third finger, right hand____
55.00
70.00 Laceration, mouth; broken teeth___
45.00 Laceration, right leg.......................
150.00 Burn, left side..................................
70.00 Bruise, head and chest...................
55.00 Frozen hands...................................
65.00 Crushed third finger; i2 infection----55.00 Bruise, second finger left hand...........
50.00 Laceration, knee...................................
57.50 Bruise, second finger right hand____
55.00 Sprain, left knee; laceration and
strain, leg.
65.00 Laceration, right forearm.................«.
57.50 Sprain, right ankle...............................
65.00 Burn, face and b od y...........................
57.50 Bruise, right hand................. i ............
55.00 Bruise, right side and knee.................
50.00 Burn, left hand.....................................
65.00 Rupture, right lower abdom en-------150.00 Fracture, right thum b.........................
57.50 Swelling, infection, first finger8right
hand.
80.00 Strain, groin..........................................
65.00 Bruise, left hip and back; laceration,
left elbow.
80.00 Strain, sid e...........................................
165.00 Foreign body in right eye...................
25.00 Fracture, right elbow..........................
65.00 Burn, thighs..........................................
62.50 Abrasion and bruise, head; lacera­
tion, right ear.1
9
67.50 Hernia, left inguinal....... .....................
57.50 Dislocation, shoulder...........................
67.50 Strain, left knee....................................
Strain, groin..........................................
62.50 Sprain, right hand...............................
65.00 Laceration, left arm.............................
150.00 Laceration, wrist..................................
150.00 Sprain, back..........................................
62.50 Bruise, left ankle..................................
72.50 Fracture, knee cap; hernia................ .
72.50 Bruise, first finger left band...............
60.00 Blister, infection, right hand............. .
150.00 Fracture and laceration, first finger«
left hand.
62.50 Laceration, tight hand........................
Strain, back and intestines............... .
60.00
55.00 Bruise, left leg..................................... .
183.33 Bruise, arms, legs, face, and b o d y ...
62.50 Bruise, right leg.............................
65.00 Bruise, arm, side; fracture, left hip..
91.00 Fracture, right leg; laceration, head
and left eye.
182.00 Bruise, head; fracture, ribs...............

10 0
1 .0

1 N ot reported.
3 A t $3.50 per day.




* Partial disability for life.
« Amputation resulting.

72
19
71

22
17
104

W5
3

22

27

64

14
(1) (1)
8 8

86

31
17

11

12

61
«262
71

'9 4 '

64

25

15
29

21
(1) (1)
8 8

11

10

(5)

34

23

46

41

27
73
53

35
40

21

11

10

10

10

20

“

8

15"

1

25
58

31
103
5 81
56

60
55
48

63
62

20

*29

28
41
9

61
56
65
51

22

10
17

52
153

21

"96’

163
9

10
*90

"29”

61

2

27
56
23

“li

11

5

3
29
90

14

35

14 ........

* Nuisance value.

21

63

A PPE N D IX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to­

A m ount en­
titled to as—

Main­
w a­
te­
ges nance Wages

Possible recovery un­ Days
A mount actually paid as—
Days
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
sation
Other
M ain­
M ain­
Total
to
Compared
was
te­
te­
compen­ Amount with actual com ­
settle­
settle­ Wages
sation
ment
recovery
nance ment
nance
puted

PERSONAL AGREEM ENT-■Continued
$149.99
104.50
187.00 n$81.00
2.50
44.00
23.80
28.00
352.00 2 49.00
2.17
8.40 ” 76." 66"
58.90
36.83 ” 34. ' 66"
1.33
24.00
152.50
6.25 188.00
197.33 2 73.50
1.83
70.00
2.33
12.00
22.50
98.00
5.00 2 35.00
7.00
26.00
3.67
42.00
23.83
13.33
9.58
3.67

46.00
32.00
82.00

8
12
102
187
61
106
5
25

8
8
6
29
73
35
5

6

1.40
352.00
2.17
8.40
11.40
36.83
1.33
110.00
6.25
197.33
1.83
2.33
22.50
5.00
7.00
3.67
23.83
13.33
9.58
3.67

28.00
2 49.00

70.00
17.87
24.00
188.00
2 73.50

12.00
98.00
2 35.00
26.00
42.00

32.00
82.00

22.40
1.00
350.00
42.00
100.00
11.0 0
65.82
2,987.75
10.67
140.00
38.00
2.00
10.00
39.00
58.00
150.00
7 50.00
- 35.00
9 43.00
33.00

$149.99
120.50
249.50
46.50

$149.99
104.50
400.14
101.88

51.80
402.00
352.17
120.40
111.40
54.70
36.33
175.82
3,182.00
281.50
141.83
52.33
122.50
50.00
72.00
103.67
173.83
7 50.00
48.33
84.58
118.67

51. £0
543.86
84.35
231.43
58.90
70.83
45.88
152.50
806.23
410.12
148.78
26.97
217.45
75.71
63.33
105.03
235.33
113.60
77.63
182.41

+141.86
-267.82
+111.03
-5 2 .5 0
+16.13
+9.55
-2 3 .3 2
-2,375.77
+128.62
+6.95
-2 5 .3 6
+94.95
+25.71
- 8 .6 7
+ 1.36
+61.50
-5 0 .0 0
+65.27
-6 .9 5
+63.74

132.50
111.08
88.00
56.92
101.83
25.67
67.16
170.50
507.67

85.51
277.36
200.59
41.19
78.32
15.33
119.17
730.93
796.75

-4 6 .9 9
+166.28
+112.59
-1 5.7 3
-2 3.5 1
-1 0.3 4
+52.01
+560.43
+289.08

-$16.00
+150.64
+55.38

37

21

40
34
80

35
5
49

1
0
12
1 8 y2
27
27

16
44

1
2

172
18

37.33
2.17

200.00

237.33
77.17

185.68
289.28

+ 12
2 .11

-5 1 .6 5

54
65

37.33
82.50 2 168.00
9.17
43.33
60.42

194
48

37.33
82.50
9.17
2.08

237.33
332.50
30.76
20.00
502.08

185.68
421.93
87.64
43.33
60.42

-5 1 . 65
+89.43
+56.88
+23. 33
-441.66

54
48
51

48

200.00
250.00
21.59
20.00
500.00

56.00
106.00
128.00
16.00
30.00
20.00
2 182.00
2 28.00
42.00
180.00
18.00

61
50

44.00

206.84
216.02
287.40
196.26
81.98
41.67
369.14
600.14
91.34
597.02
41.25
42.76
1,251.50

+106.84
+77.82
+219.15
+97. 76
+51.98
+ 1.67
+298.14
+199.02
+44.26
+141.82
-8 .7 5
+23.76
+351.50

61

900.00

100.00
138.20
68.25
98.50
30.00
40.00
71.00
401.12
47.08
455.20
50.00
19.00
900.00
102.08
152.00
31.83
136.68
31.25
122.50
1,106.07

67.51
145.66
94.20
72.04
6.25
62.83
269.64

-3 4 .5 7
- 6 .3 4
+62.37
-6 4 .6 4
-2 5 .0 0
-5 9 .6 7
-836.43

26
51

235.93

+59.93

20

1 .0
00

25

66

41
27
41

$129.16
16.00
$62.50
44.00

100.00

20
.0

48

61

$20.83
104.50
187.00
2.50

32.50
63.25
47.83
13.00
7.67 ” 26: 66’
18.33
38.00
11.67
2.00
10.83
20.00 150.50
7.67

32.50
24.00
63.25 124.00
65.00
80.00
7.67
20.00
18.33
38.00
13.33
67.17
52.00
20.00 2339.50
61.33
65

104
16
47
40

37.33
2.17

92.00
13.50
91.67
21.67
5.00
90.00
2.08
58.00

130.00

2 0 2 .0
.0 0 0

73
55
9
14

8

53

20
84

66

2
0

2
1
54
6
6

17
124
63
30
261
55
11

92.00
13.50

5.00
90.00
2.08
55.20

75.00

56.00
46.20
54.75

2 28.00

10.00
1.83
36.68
6.25
62.83
45.50
91.00

500.00

98.50
30.00
40.00
66.00
283.12
45.00
400.00
50.00

2.00

17.00

4.00
18.00
44.00
2 17.50

2.08
2.00
1.83
36.68
6.25
32.50
45.50

4.00

2 17.50

96.00
150.00
30.00
82.50
7 25. 00
90.00
1,060.57

2 73.50

91.00

2 73.50

11.50

2 101.50

2.08

75.00
29.25
45.50
12.00
56.33

11 A t $3 per day.
12 Amputation of distal phalange.




176.00 ;

w N o record of further disability.
19 Resulted in disfigurement; extent not reported.

40
23

6
10
104
#322

8

26

2
2
51
135

20

139
9
9

22
5

75

64

SETTLEMENT FOB ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Age

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days
of
total
disa­
bility

Days of treat­
ment received

Days
of
con­
Out- vales­
On j *?pa­ cence
sWPjtfent tient

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued
179 Chief cook............
180 First engineer___
181 Fireman...............
182 A ble seaman-----183 ____do__________
184 Second c o o k ......
185 Steward................
186 Ordinary seaman.
187 Fireman...............
188 ........ do....................
189 Able seaman........
190 Ordinary seaman.
191 Fireman...... ........
192 Boatswain...........
193 A ble seaman.......
194 Fireman .............
195 A ble seaman.......

30 $100.00
49 275.00
24
65.00
38
62.50
41
64.35
26
75.00
46
96.00
23
47.50
25
65.00
26
65.00
43
62.50
19
47.50
30
62.50
29
75.00
42
62.50
38
65.00
21
67.50

196
197
198
199

Chief cook..........
A ble seaman-----Boatswain_____
Fireman. ........
A ble seaman----Oiler.....................
....... d o ..................
203 A ble seaman----204 Second engineer.
205 ____ do.................-

29
28
44
27
24
59
38
36
27
39

100.00
62.50
75.00
65.00
62.50
72.50
72.50
62.50
165.00
160.00

206

Oiler.....................

0)

72.50

207
208
209

A ble seaman-----Chief steward___
Fireman________
A ble seaman-----____ do__________
Mess b o y _______
Boatswain______
Oiler-----------------Firem an...............
O ile r ...................
Fireman.............
Able seaman____
Oiler.............. ......
Second cook_____
____ do........... ........
Second engineer..
Coal passer_____
Third m ate.........
Able seaman____
Fireman...............
W iper...................
Mess b o y .............
Ordinary seaman.
Oiler......................
A ble seaman........

20
0)
27
29
26
38
33
39
27
33
31
24
34
40
41
38
34
36
40
18
30
24
0
33
32

62.50
110.00
65.00
62.50
62.50
42.00
75.00
72.50
67.50
72.50
67.50
62.50
72.50
80.00
80.00
165.00
60.00
150.00
62.50
65.00
57.50
42.00
47.50
72.50
62.50

20
0
21
0
22
0

20
1
21
1
22
1
213
214
215
216
217
218
219

220

221

222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
233
234
235

Deck b o y ____
Second cook ..
Able seaman.
Fireman........
W iper.............

237 Second engineer.
238 A ble seaman----239 ........ do...................
240 Mariner...............
241 A ble seaman___




24
25.00
32
80.00
21
62.50
26 . 65.00
34
57.50
25 165.00
33 ; 62.50
26
62.50
33 ; 55.00
26
62.50

Strain, right groin.................................
B um and scald, left cheek and e y e ..
Fracture, little toe right foot..... .........
Laceration, left l e g . ............................
Laceration and abrasion, left h a n d . .
Burn, left hand................... ......... .......
Strain, back—........................................
Strain, left side......................................
Laceration, finger.................................
Abrasion, infection of foot...................
Gassed, death resulting.......................
Bruise, left knee................................ .
Burn, face, neck, back, hands, arms.
D r owned......... ..................................... .
Fracture, ribs— ........................... .......
Scald, right foot....................................
Abrasion, bruise, infection, left fore­
arm.
Bruise, strain, right knee....................
Laceration, back and head..................
Bruise, right leg.................. .................
Bruise, left leg and ankle............. .......
Fracture, left arm...... ...........................
Fracture, i^rist; hernia........................
Laceration, h e a d ......................... .......
Fracture, right w r is t ..........................
Abrasion, elbow; burn, back.............
Bruise, infection, third finger left
hand.
Laceration, second finger» right
hand.
Fracture, nose........................................
Laceration, infection, finger...............
Laceration, left eye...............................
Puncture, infection, f o o t - - .................
Fracture, right wrist............................
Fracture, shoulder................................
Strain, left groin. .................................
Sprain, right ankle...................... .........
Sprain, back................................. .........
Bruise, left knee....... ............................
Burn, left arm and face.......................
Dislocation, ankle.................................
Fracture, right ankle. ..........................
Fracture, fingers left hand..................
Scald, left foot................ ......................
Laceration, infection, left knee...........
Abrasion, back and hips........ ...........
Sprain and fracture, right ankle........
Sprain and strain, left knee................
Sprain and bruise, ankle.....................
Sprain, left knee and ankle.................
Puncture, infection, left hand............
Strain, groin..........................................
Abrasion, left eye;2 bruise, face.........
3
Abrasion, bruise, laceration, infec­
tion, first finger left hand.
Foreign b od y in right eye, infection.
B um , left eye, hands, arms................
Bruise, left hand...................................
Bruise, left hand...................................
Bruise of right ankle resulting in
nicer.
Laceration, right eye............................
Bruise, infection, leg............................
Puncture, left foot..................... ..........
Bruise, right leg.................. ..................
Strain, back......... ............ .....................

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
5 Partial disability for life.
7 Nuisance value.

2

80

20

13

32
18
31

21
’ 21"
19
54

21
73

2

127
7

110

17
33
45
30
24
119
49

12

43
45
71

22

74
28
38

13

17

21

«47
19
28
4
56
80
40
66
272
42
14
87
128
70
89
40
5
23
23
142
30
60
92
5 30
17

2
~~2 l

30
"

120"

2

26
55
13

2

91

2

18
43

130
27

18

10
20

11

42
42
30

21

29

10

10 A t $2.50 per day.
“ A t $3 per day.
« Am putation of distal phalange.
» Dependent child 13 years of age.

7

65

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Possible recovery un­ Days
Am ount actually paid as—
Days
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
Other
Main­
Total
Compared sation
M ain­
to
was
compen­ Amount with actual
settle­
te­
settle­ Wages
te­
com ­
sation
recovery
ment
nance
nance ment
puted
1

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Main­
W a­
te­
ges nance Wages

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued

2

16

22

18
25
19
56

2

11
1

2.17
"~ 2 .l5
5.00
233.60
8 6 .6 7
1 5 .1 7

26.92
2.08

$4. U0
2 5 6 .0 0
4 4 .0 0
3 6 .0 0
5 0 .0 0
3 8 .0 0
a 196.00
4 .0 0

22 0
2 .0
6 .0
60

93.75
65.00
54.00
31

62.00
253.33
102.08
2.50 "22.OO
93.17
93.75
34.00
113.58
50.75
22.00
29.17 148.00
1
154.00 1 69.00
2 98.00

”8 "0
40

53
16 $183.33
2.17
27

6

9
26
79
38
44
89
534
23
4
743
57
47
76

10
0

81
123
98
54
57
249
82
44
128

54.17

2

3
56

21
" 16
*

10
2

13.00
8.33
62.50

60
.0
12 0
1 .0

"eaoo
10 0
1 .0
8 .0
80

80
.0

38.00
182.00
36.00
36.00

86.00

2 .0
20

30.00 10235.00
56.00
14.00
20.00
2.08
40.00
61.33
18.00
41

100.16

35.42
15.75

33.00 2 143.50
56.25
29.17
12.00
44.00

20.00

76
23

6

31
35
42
60
26
30
163

"~45."00
25.00
272.00
7 25.00

$50.00
$258.97
239.33
315.17
77.17
35.00
78.53
124.24
97.15
93.11
30.00
329.60
429.60
7 25.00
8.07
518.96
186.83
15.17
2.17
0 861.08
2,350.00
26.92
26.92
207.49
115.50
908.78 212,117.70
93.75
91.67
65.00
65.00
103.08
54.00

11 0
2 .1

253.33
102.08
24.50
95.33
86.08
134.17
111. 16
60.00
229.00

+$208.97
-7 5.8 4
+43.93
+43.53
+27.09
+63.11
+100.00
-1 6.9 3
+332.13
+13.00
-1,488.92
+91.99
+1,208-92
+ 2.08

80
31
18
13
09
2
87
(20)
(21)

59

-4 9 .0 8
+199.05

43

+29.01
-2 .1 6
+91.67
+75.40
-3 8.4 1
+258.94
-6 .0 0
+145. 71

11

12 105

88.00

253.33
2.08
2.50
41.17
2.08
113.58

13.00
2.08
81
85
82
134
41
14
126
128
52
72
56
5
44
23
142
31
48
61
196

$46.00
75.84
31.00

2,350.00
17.42
113.42
908.78
56.25
65.00
87.33

9.50
2.08

54.17

52.00
2 66.50
22 4.45

42.00
’ 67."55'
91.83
2.25 240.00
53.17
4.00
31.50
52.08 132.00
4.83
64.00
98.67
64.00
143.00 2 24.50
10.42
69.33
23.00
49.00
44.33
70.08
14.58

86.67
2.17

44.00
35.00
50.00

12.50
87.00
2.25
29.83
31.50
43.75
4.83
98.67
64.00

6 .0
60
80
.0

10.42
69.33
23.00
49.00
44.33
2.42
14.58

150.40

29.17

152.82

384.78

+231 96

40.00
150.00
22.56
175.00

96.00
40.00
167.45
24.64
175.00

106.17
131.24
70.62
14.33
235.93
195.03
101.78
224.15
912.39
104.83
35.50
330.58
440.27
253.33
330.56
217.50
10.31
82.14
90.95
517.22
99.55
132.82
260.43
2,962.88
60.21

+10.17
+91.24
-9 6 .8 3
-1 0.3 1
+60.93
+95.03
+34.28
+38.43
+310.14
+75.00
-2 0.5 0
+136.83
+235.44
+99.33
+176.56
+102.00
+2.31
+8.64
+38.03
+162.89
+44.55
+53.42
+144.10
+2,760.46
+10.63

62
126
33
65
14
1
23
18
110
18
25
64
231,120
10

255.00
81.00
22.08
40.00
79.33

409.63
86.48
43.35
88.34

11 6
0 .8

+154.63
+5.48
+21.27
+48.34
+22.53

94
6
9
20
10

159.00
56.25
39.17
42.50

305.07
63.34
45.71
66.99
43.63

+146.07
+ 7.09
+6.54
+24.49
+23.63

36
3
7
5
10

22.00
54.16
84.00

20.59

2 .0
20

"89.16"
60.00
229.00

4 1 .8 3

2T 4
2 5

10 0
0 .0

240.00

'T oo*

10 0
1 .0
55.33
88.00

55.00
98.72
360.00
20.50
150.00
90.00

20
.0

49.50
38.00
182.00
32.00
30.40
72.00
22.00

30.00 10225.00
56.00
14.00
2.08
20.00
40.00
61.33
18.00
33.00

88.00

452.38
102.08
53.51
93.17
177.75
209.57
72.75
318.94
223.00
233.71

10 0
0 .0

2.42

113.58
19

2.15
5.00
57.60

$4.00
2 56.00

73.50
4.50
103.00

20 0
0 .0
13.00
11.00

126.00
56.25
10.00
42.50
20.00

10 0
0 .0

67.50
185.72
602.25
29.83
56.00
193.75
204.83
154.00
154.00
115.50

80
.0

73.50
52.92
354.33
55.00
79.40
116.33
202.42
49.58

2 .0
00

24
60
38

19
22
26
80
13
28
271
20

8 Dependent mother 55 years of age; 50 per cent of compensation payable, nonresident alien beneficiary.
1
2 Actual expenses.
2
2 N inety per cent loss of vision.
3




66

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

A ceidents to seamen of the United States

N o.
of

Occupation

Wage
Age rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of b od y
affected

Days
of
total
disa­
bility

Days of treat­
ment received

Days
of
con­
In- Out­ vales­
On
ship pa­ pa­ cence
tient tient

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d
242
243
244

A ble seaman..
Chief cook___
Fireman........ .

$65.00

245
246
247
248
249

___ d o...............
Able seaman. .
Second engineer _.
Ordinary seaman.
Fireman..........

70.00
65.00
160.00
47.50
67.50

250
251
252
253

Second m a t e ...
Second cook___
Oiler...................

—d
o...........

65.00
155.00
70.00
70.00

254
255

Chief mate..
Oiler.............

165.00
70.00

256
257

Messman........
Second engineer..

50.00
155.00

258
259
260
261
262
263
264

W iper_______
Second mate..
Oiler..............
Boatswain—
A ble seaman.
___ d o.............
Fireman........

50.00
165.00
72.50
75.00
55.00
62.50
65.00

265
266

Third m ate_____
Ordinary seaman.

125.00
30.00

267

Fourth m ate.

10 0
0 .0

First engineer___
Junior engineer...
270 W atchman______
271 Able seaman-----272 ____do.... ........ —
273 ........do___________
274 Second engineer..
275 Oiler ...............—
276 Able seaman____
277 Chief mate______
278 Ordinary seaman.
279 Able seaman------

10 0
0 .0
70.00

165.00

10 0
0 .0
45.00
55.00
55.00
55.00
155.00
72.50
62.50
185.00
47.50
62.50

280

Messman.

45.00

281
282

Able seaman.
Fireman--------

62.50
57.50

284

........ do........... ........
Coal passer___

285

Fireman..

286
287

Able seaman___
Second engineer.
Able seaman___
____do__________
Oiler........ - .........
Second steward.
Yeom an________
Waiter____ ____
Fireman_______
Able seaman___

290
291
292
293
294

57.50
50.00
57.50
62.50
140.00
62.50
62.50
72.50

10 0
0 .0
62.50
50.00
65.00
62.50

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
* Partial disability for life.
7 Nuisance value.




100
Fracture, left ankle..............................
Sprain, left ankle.......... .................... .
Strain, groin; bruise, left testicle
(removed).
160
Injury to nerves of right arm.............
23
Sprain and strain, back and arm s...
15
Bruise, right foot.................................
50
Strain, right groin...............................
Laceration and fracture, fourth
finger left hand.
37
Bruise, left testicle..............................
72
Hernia, groin................ ........... ..........
Laceration, fourth finger left hand
20
Abscess, infection, first finger1 right
2
5 99
hand.
11
Abrasion and bruise, right hand.......
159
Bruise and laceration, right wrist;
infection, first finger and thumb.
17
Burn and scald, both feet.......... ........
51
Bruise, arm and shoulder; fracture
of clavicle.
Bruise, left leg.......... .......... .................
30
Foreign matter in right eye..............
42
37
Strain, groin. -------- --------------------Crushed, second finger left hand —
107
Fracture, l e g . . .................... .................
136
Laceration, left hand; fracture, wrist.
176
Bruise, infection, right leg; swelling
110
groin.
Laceration, elbow and hand...............
Bruise and laceration, first finger
left hand.
Fracture, pelvis, femur, and 2 lum­
223
bar vertebrae.
Gassed, death resulting____________
Burn, face and eyes------------------------25
Dislocation left wrist; fracture, arm . _
76
62
Fracture, first finger right hand____
Laceration, left shoulder---------------29
Strain, groin; internal injuries______
242
Bruise, infection, finger.....................
43
Strain, back......... .................................
45
12
Scald, back.............. ..............................
108
Fracture, foot........ ...............................
Sprain, ankle.........................................
7
Bruise, laceration, infection, first
25
finger left hand.
Puncture, infection, th u m b 1 left
2
«123
hand.
12
Laceration, left foot........ .....................
Bruise, infection, thumb right hand—
26

571

91

2
19
5

38
9
13

19
4

16

25

11
15
20

41

28
7
14

3
29
1
1

58

1
28

10
7

18

1
20

1
9
1
12
30
3
17
3

28
9
72

5
20
24
83
74
91
(9
)

28
13
14

12
23
14
64
39
102
11

(9
)

(9
)

13
8
9
20
52
18
24

9

127

96
12
5
31

30
2

7

5

Y

125
8

30
58
17
42

3"
19
14

60
13
25

63
22
9
189

16
44
51
4
5

3
3

120

2
16

10
10

Strain, knee........... .......................... .
Burn, infection, third and fourth
fingers left hand.
Burn, infection, first finger left hand.

37
43

17
15

8
28

46

14

32

Strain, shoulder...... ........ ..............
Strain, hernia, groin.......................
Sprain, back____________________
Bruise, laceration, face; bruise, leg—
Abrasion, bruise, infection, left ankle.
Bruise, legs............................................
Hernia, groin........... ..........................
Bruise, left arm.................................
Dislocation of lens, left eye............... .
Abrasion and fracture, great toe left
foot.

36
59
20
26
48

16
22
6

31

16
1
10
28
19
26

20

12

21

51
93
46

20
" ’ l3‘
26
10
20

6
1
22
21

” 65
27
42

9 Alleged further disability could not be verified.
1 A t $2.50 per day.
0
1 A t $3 per day.
1
1 Amputation of distal phalange.
2

67

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual eases— Continued
D a y s en­
titled to—

W a­
ges

A m o u n t en­
titled to as—

M ain­
W ages
te­
nance

A m o u n t actu ally p aid as—
D a ys
from
in­
ju ry
O ther
M a in ­
M a in ­
to
T o ta l
settle­
com p en ­
te­
settle­ W ages
te­
m ent
sation
nance
nance m ent

P ossible reco v e ry u n ­
der com pensation act

A m oun t

D ays
for
w h ich
com pen­
sation
C om pa red
w as
w ith actual
com ­
recov ery
p u te d

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C on tin u e d

23
25
125
19
15
30
30

$ 2 .0
10 0

10

$6.50
76.67
14.00

250.00
38.00
2 52.50
60.00
60.00

77
27
348
754
47

39.67
10.83
99.00

661
226
19
75

99.00

21

7.00

97
43
37

59.67
45.83
52.50
60.00
159.00

651.05
92.34
106.07
161.64
225. 77

+ 591.38
+ 46. 51
+ 5 3 .5 7
+ 101.64
+ 6 6 .7 7

143
18
15
50
27

147.68
431.14
83.96
546.87

+102.51
+ 241.39
+ 4 2 .9 6
+ 396.87

30
72
17
12 161

10.00

45.17
189. 75
41.00
150.00

20 0
0 .0

30.00
50.00

35.50
261.67

75.07
600.85

+ 3 9 .5 7
+ 339.18

8
154

28.83
125.33

41.35
272.90

+ 1 2 .5 2
+ 147.57

6
43

26.33
23.00
99.67
222.50
301.83
98.33
47.50

110. 51
279. 50
117.42
407. 57
366.78
616. 51
285.63

+ 8 4 .1 8
+ 2 56.50
+ 1 7 .7 5
+ 185.07
+ 6 4 .9 5
+ 518.18
+ 238.13

25
42

30.00

50.00

4.17
52.84

- 6 1 .8 3
+ 2 .8 4

3,055.50

3,503.33

1,155.38

- 2 ,3 4 7 .9 5

15,000.00 15,000.00
336. 67
300.00
83.00
234.00
142.00
258.67
44.00
156.00
53.07
151.83
150.00
111. 17
2 56.00
3.50
99.83
95.00
15.00
40.00
405.00
19.75
7.00
52.50
15.00

7,500.00
81.29
289.50
168.63
71.17
909. 69
225.53
203.89
25.00
679.57
70.04

- 7 ,5 0 0 .0 0
—255. 38
+ 5 5 .5 0
-9 0 .0 4
+ 1 8 .1 0
+ 757.86
+ 114.36
+ 104.06
-1 5 .0 0
+ 274.57
+ 1 .1 3
+ 1 7 .5 4

87

7
26

18.33 810.50
41.33 ii 78.00

17
37

6
18.33 1 10.50
41.33 ii 78.00

20 0
0 .0

8.33
89.42
47.50
51.33
25.00
19.50

50.00

2 129.50
28.00
128.00
78.00
204.00

22.00

4.17

2 .0
00
127

+$224.46
+ 9 6 .3 9
+ 9 3 .5 0

30.00
189.75

10
0

11

$360.96
289.72
157.50

34.00
140.00

15.17

5.50
11.67

12
0

$136. 50
193. 33
64.00

60.00

60.00
H174.00
7.00
34.00
140.00

40.66

20.00

39.67
10.83

76.00
50.00

16.50 ii 30.00
11.67

25
37
14
64
39

$0 0
1 .0
35.00
52.50
60.00

37
52
44

15.17
58
17
70

$ 2 .0
10 0

76.00
50.00

$6.50
76.67
14.00

18.00

17
171
36
45
97

. 88

21
2
70
63

3.33 2444.50
36.67
9.00 142.00
58.67
44.00
53.17
18.00
1.83 378.00
51.67 2 56.00
4.83
88.00
25.00
185.00 2*216.00
4.75
16.00
37.50

80
.0

8.33

18.00

89.42
47. 50
51.33
25.00
19.50

10.25
128.00
78.00
73.33

23.00

28.00

2 .0
00

12
1
84
23

36.67
9.00
58.67
53.07
1.83
51.67
4.83
25.00
185.00
4.75
37.50

47.00
172.50

76 .0
60

3.33 2444.50
75
32
64
40
28
245
42
114
534

60
.0

80
.0

60
.0

20 0
2 .0

2 .8
08

88
108
164
101
9

22
2
(24)

14
70
241
33
43
78
4
7

162.50

559.88

+ 397.38

22

6
6.25 2 18.00
30.67
20.00

24.25
50.67

45.52
73.20

+ 2 1 .2 7
+ 2 2 .5 3

6
32.58 1 30.00
26.67 28 50.00

30
45

32.58
26.67

20.00
i 50.00

52.58
76.67

107.64
133.02

+ 5 5 .0 6
+ 5 6 .3 5

28.75 1 80.00
0

24

28.75

37.50

66.25

178.59

+ 112.34

31

60.42
312.66
47.50
127.08
103.67
53.33
65.83
178.33
95.17
78.25

116.31
296.33
80.58
113.15
185.32
117.07
162.71
311.91
160.43
240.48

+ 5 5 .8 9
-1 6 .3 3
+ 3 3 .0 8
-1 3 .9 3
+ 8 1 .6 5
+ 6 3 .7 4
+ 9 6 .8 8
+ 133.58
+ 6 5 .2 6
+ 162.23

19

40.50

126

6.25 26 18.00
30.67

2 .0
00

35.42
275.33
12.50
2.08
38.67
3.33
20.83
48.33
41.17
31.25

2 36.00
6
2 21.00
io 35.00
52.00
64.00
1 50.00
0
* 45.00
130.00
54.00
84.00

12

131

2
0
1
0
27

12

35.
107.

12.

2.

38.
3.

20.
48.
41.
31.

156.50

25.00
205.33
1 35.00
0
52.00
64.00
1 50.00
0
2 45.00
7
130.00
54.00
47.00

“ A t $1.50 per d a y .
2
4 D ep en d en t w ife, 35 years o f age, ch ildren 11, 9,
and 5 years o f age.




73.00

1.00

2* A t $4.00 per d ay .
26 A t $12.50 per w eek,
27 A t $15 per w eek.

9

10

20

27

14
25
32

2
0

41
64
27
53

68

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

N o.
of
case

Occupation

Wage
Age rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In­ Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T —Continued

W7
300
801
30?
303

Chief mate
Able seaman
Carpenter__
Fireman „ ...
AWe SA»rnan
Waiter_________
AMe seaman
Carpenter

39 $190.00
25
62.50
31
80.00
65.00
0)
19
62.50
40
50.00
?4
62.50
80.00
0)

304 Oiler........ ............ . 0)
305 ........ d o .................... 57

72.50
72.50

315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325

Chief engineer___ 51
49
Able seaman
0)
d o . _______ 40
Ordinary seaman. 32
Fireman
37
First engineer----- 4?
F i r e m a n . ___ 32
40
FirArrian ,..
0)
Ahie W t n p
30
Fireman________ 47
W iper___________ 26
41
FiremanAble seaman _ _ 36
Mess b o y _______ 38
Able seaman____ 31
Chief cook______ 28
Able seaman
25
Chief mate______ 30

250.00
65.00
62.50
75.00
40.00
55.00
140.00
55.00
62. 50
65.00
62.50
65.00
57. 50
67.50
62.50
42.00
62. 50
100.00
62. 50
185.00

326
327
328

Fireman________
Boatswain______
Fireman________

38
32
20

65.00
75.00
65.00

29
329 Able seaman _
330 ____ d o ___________ 28
331 First engineer___ 32
332 W iper___________ 23
39
333 Pum p
334 Oiler................... . 23
22
335 Fireman
336 Chief engineer___ 26
33
337 Chief cook............
29
338 Pum p man

55.00
62.50
180.00
57.50
102.50
72.50
65.00
275.00
100.00
102.50

339
340

Oiler..................... 22
First engineer----- 52

72.50
185.00

341
342

Third engineer.. . 30
Chief mate______ 56

150.00
185.00

343 Machinist_______ 39
344 Ordinary seaman. 26
345 A ble seaman____ 22
346 ........ d o....... ........... 33
347 Fireman________ 30
348 ____ do.................... 36
349 Able seaman........ 29
350 Fireman________ 26

80.00
47.50
62.50
62.50
65.00
65.00
65.00
65.00

30
25
39
22

72.50
72.50
62.50
45.00

306
307
308
309
310
311
31?
313

351 Oiler......................
352 ........ d o....................
353 A ble seaman__
354 Messman_______




Sprain, back _ _ _ ............. ...........
Sprain, left. ankle
........... . . ..
■Rrnisp., finger left h a n d ............ ........ .
Burn, eyes............................. ................
Sprain, wrist
Laceration, first finger
.... .......
Sprain, ankle........... .................... ....
Bruise and fracture, great toe left
foot.
Burn, face and neck........... .................
Fracture, rib; dislocation, bruise,
right hip.
Scald, left shoulder, arm, and neck ..
Spr^in, strain, back
Fracture, ribs____ _____ ___________
Sprain, laceration__ _____ _________
Burn, left eye 4________ ____ _______
Fracture, ninth rib left sid e________
314
Bruise, head; nervous shock_______
Sprain, laceration, infection, ankle..
Fracture, second toe right foot_____
Hernia, groin______________________
Bruise, left ankle___________________
Strain, legs . . _ _________________
Fracture, rib
_ _______________
Cellulitis, finger.... ................. ..............
Laceration, right hand_____________
Hernia, abdomen _______ _________
Crushed, third finger left hand
Fracture, laceration, left foot, infec­
tion.
Hernia, left groin__________________
Bruise, chest_______________________
Scald, face, left side of head, arm,
body.
Sprain, left ankle ______ _
__
Bruise, head; laceration, right arm
Dislocation, right s h o u ld e r ._______
Abrasion, bruise, right foot ...............
Bruise, left elbow __
Bruise, laceration, infection, left hand.
Burn, infection, right hand and arm..
Fracture, third finger left hand
Laceration, infection, finger________
Laceration, fracture, second finger
left hand.
Hernia, groin.........................................
Burn and scald, feet, left shoulder,
right elbow, and hip.
Scald, back and arms______ _____ _
Sprain, left knee. _________________
Burn and scald, back
. . _____
Bruise, h a n d ........................................
Sprain, back_______ __ __________
Strain, back
. _
Fracture, collar bone, left side _ .
Scald, infection, left hand. . _______
Hernia, groin
____ ______________
Burn and scald, infection, right hand
and wrist.
Fracture, collar b o n e ______________
Laceration, first finger right hand ___
Fracture, left hand...............................
Bruise, infection, thum b and second
finger left hand.

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
* Permanent loss of use.

197
36
33
31
45
34
1 41
8
13

11
8
18
21
10
6
4

72
1 63
8

17
13

16
23

58
29
92
2
57
3
41
4
572
17
155
8
1854
91 "~3l‘
47
1
27
119
55
35
8
55
25
63
7
60
54
66
19
42
177
15

14
29

63
42
104

25
22

186
26

1

1
15

16

7
28
37
4

(1 )
8
9

39
27

(18)
44

15
12
11
11
28
54

10
12

16
1
119
(18)

22

75
42
10
43
(18)
60
25

26
44
3
30
56

29
21 "33 "
47
42
88
74
56
13
54

5
4
12

40

3
8
1
5
1

94 410
7 —. . .

31

2
16

37

5 512
17
27
25
41
60
81
76

20
24

4
20
18
_~~6~ "

19
11

36

52
47

4

26

4
12

65

59
24

76

1

16

9
21
20
21
42

18
31
1
24
119
22
25
40 ” 16"
68
16
94
30
56
39
10
70

22
47

12
5
24
97
18
30
28
14

6
25
7
24
50

56
1
6

* Partial disability for life.
7 Nuisance value.
1 N o record of further disability.
8

22

39
9
3

39

69

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to­

A mount en­
titled to as—

Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
to
te­
settle­
nance ment

wa­ Main­
te­
ges

nance

Am ount actually paid as—

M ain­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

Total
compen­
sation

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
sation
Compared
was
Amount with actual
com ­
recovery
puted

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d

8

18

21

11

19
28
37
13

$63.33 2
$651.00
16.67
54.00
48.00
30.00
45.50
20.00
22.92
38.00
46.00
8.33
74.00
26.00

197
35
24
29
14
35

27

10

111. 17
152.25

78.00
54.00

35
448

111. 17
9.67

350.00 25176.00
62.83
8.33 180.00
7.50
84.00
52 00
1.33
38.50
88.00
149.33 28327.25

129
81
92
19
24
141
190
143
56
34
27
118
38
55
32
72

8.33
2.17
8.33
7.50
1.33
18.33
9.33

186
27
15

1
0

46
42
29
4
3

1
21

32
31
47
27
55

90
42
26
44
119
25

8

25

1 .0
00

64.58
101.83
56.25
119.17
15.33
56.25
14.60

10 0
2 .0
50 00
52 00
40.00
54.00
60.00

112 do
62 00

54

1

11250

1 00
2 0

6 .0
60

22

8
8

42

37

1

6

2

2
0
1
25
1
19

1
1
18

1
1
1
0
19
1

23
25
40
49

56

1
1
0
6

23
177
249
42

105.00
47.67

2
2
19

84.00
2 08
252.83 2«352.00
14.00

42

41

410
9

22

24
41
60
” 76

5.50

80
.0

56.00

74.00 1,151
26
148

114.00 21,435.00
18.00
1.92
44.00
20.50
48.00
4.83
82.00
43.33
9.17 2210.00
83.33
3.42 152.00

80
.0

8
12

4
19

8

81
3

$63.33 2$651.00
40.00
16.67
30.00
48.00
45.50
22.92
38.00

2 .0
00

1 .0
00
8.33

64.58
52.17
56.25

m . 17
15.33
56.25
14.60

2 .0
00

2 .0
00
10 0
2 .0
52 00
70.00
54.00
60 00
112 00
60.00
18.08

112.50
119.67
2.08
84.00
252.83 25352.00

56.00

2
2

90.00 2 77.00
67.83 2164.50

52
46

90.00
67.83

2 77.00
98.00

64
13
24
299
61
44

2.67
30.08
2.08
47.92
2.17
21.67
2.17
67.17

135.33
2.42
20.83
9.00

48.00

78.00
18.00
84.00

12
0
95

95
75
18

8

2 A t $4 per day.
5
8 A t $2.75 per day.
8
9 50 per cent loss of use of right arm.
9




26
16

1,034.34

130.58
119.67
86.08
1,639.17

583.14
62.83
386.26
233.91
128.07
2,588.90
915.87
118.72
326.35
151.83
108.25
313.87
130.16
190.44
256.56
176.77
178.50
215.61
182.96
1,090.54

+149.15
+2.07
+2fe2.09
+161.41
+106.74
+1,570.57
+579.29
—46 28
+51.36
+99.66

88.00

433.99
60.76
104.17
82.50
21.33
1,018.33
336.58
165.00
274.99
52.17
103.25
189.17
69.33
116.25
214.60

14.00
105.00
197.67

166.28
113.00
301.88

1 0 .0
,0 0 0
327 25
165.00
90.41

50.00

2.42
2.42
4.17
9.00

94.00
190.00
190.00
505.00
47.00
31.00

10 0
1 .0
1 .0
20

10 0
1 .0

+124.70
+60.83
+74.19
+41.96
+66.77
+47.92
+95.94
+96.88
-548.63

1
0

34
28
37
13

54
40

‘1 2
,1 0
123
54

64
27
30

55
60
“ 30
41
136

+152.28

+8.00

+104.21

33.50
48.00

90.00
70.00
253.00

105.50
7 90.00
2,054.00
66.92
95.50
54.83
77.17
309.17
153.33
408.42

90.00
3.50

135.92
116.83

157.23
159.76

+21.31
+42.93

40
13

178.00

345.00
165.83

288.43
360.90

-5 6.5 7
+195.07

34
36

80.00

5.50
114.00 21,435.00
1.92
18.00
44.00
20.50
48.00
4.83
33.84
43.33
9.17 2210.00
83.33
3.42 152.00
245.50

10 0
0 .0

+136.82
+147.58

14.00
105.00
47.67

45.92
67.83

14.00

256.32
206.25

425.66
58.59

19

1 .0
20

119.50
58.67

62.00

10 0
0 .0
1 .0
20

95.84
75.00

245.50

60.00
48.00

187
28
15

49.00

45.92
67.83

26.67
30.08
2.08
47.92
54.17
86.67
106.17
186.33

+$884.72
+80.16
+41.21
+24.17
+18.34
+14.44
+141.43
+49. 71

8.33

4
13
47

$795.33 $1,680.05
136.83
56.67
119.21
78.00
89.67
65.50
122.92
141.26
124.44
28.33
169.76
61.71

$81.00

82.67
63.58
51.08
197.92
54.17
86.67
3 177.34
0
186.42

60.65
114.47
104.43
274.75
68.17
86.67

+50.89
+53.35
+76.83
+14.00

74.92
82.42
129.17
84.00

20
.0

10
.0

150.00
52.00
65.00
30175.17
119.25
72.50
80.00
125.00
75.00

160.85
+55.35
-9 0 .0 0
6,477.57* +4,423.57
55.97
-1 0.9 5
132.57
+37.07
+57.41
112.24
176.09
+98 92
429.88
+120.71
261.81
+108.48
-9 .8 9
398.53

37

2 i, 380
®

16
21
23

2
1

59
56
75

-22.02

8
12
23
96

20 0
0 .1

+22.76"
+119.25

19

305.67

135.33
178.57
38.83
219.63

+60.41
+96.15
-9 0.3 4
+135.63

8

64

30 Including duplicate of one month earned wages
paid in error.

70

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Wage
Age rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Outbility ship pa
pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

PERSONAL AGREEMENT-Continued
A ble seam an...

$62.50

356 ____ do................
357 Chief engineer..
358 Engineer...........
Messman..........
Fireman............
361 Messman..........
362 Fireman............
363 Second m a t e ...

62.50
235.00
155.00
45.00
67.50
42.50
65.00
135.00

370
371

Fireman............
Messman..........
Fireman............
Able seaman—
Fireman............
Able seaman.
Messman..........
A ble seaman—

67.50
45.00
65.00
62.50
65.00
62.50
42.00
62.50

372

Chief cook.

10 0
0 .0

373
374
375

Second m ate.
Fireman........
Oiler...............

130.00
67.50
65.00

376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387

A ble seaman.......
W iper...................
Chief mate...........
A ble seaman.......
Chief mate...........
Ordinary seaman.
Head waiter.........
Surgeon................
Carpenter.............
Oiler......................
Dishwasher.........
Steerage cook-----

85.00
57.50
180.00
62.50
180.00
47.50
50.00
150.00
70.00
72.50
30.00
75.00

Fireman...............
Oiler......................
First engineer___
Bell b o y ...............
Chief cook...........
W aiter..................
Water tender___

65.00
72.50
175.00
45.00
138.00
45.00
65.00

Second baker___
Master................
Water tender....
Boatswain..........

60.00
300.00
72.50
80.00

400
401
402
403
404

— d o....................
W iper...............
Storekeeper..........
Ordinary seaman
Oiler......................
Third engineer...

80.00
55.00
72.50
47.50
72.50
150.00

405
406

Oiler.................
Chief engineer___

72.50
275.00

407
408

A ble seaman........ 21
W iper.................... 37

409
410

Second engineer..
Ordinary seaman.

355

364
365
366
367

390
391
394
395
396
397

47.50
55.00
170.00
47.50

1 N ot reported.
2 At $3.50 per day.
* Permanent loss of use.
* Partial disability for life.
6 Amputation resulting.




Laceration, second finger * and third
finger6 left hand.
Strain, back...........................................
Sprain, back; fracture, rib, left side...
Scald, frozen right arm and w r is t___
Laceration, hand, first finger4...........
Hernia, left side....................................
Hernia, groin.........................................
____do......................................................
Bruise, infection, fourth finger left
Burn, left hand.....................................
Bruise, scald, face and shoulders___
•Laceration, forehead...........................
Laceration, fourth finger left hand ...
Sprain, right leg..........
Laceration, left elbow
Laceration, infection, left hand.........
Abrasion head; fracture, arm; sprain,
hip.
Puncture, infection, second finger
right hand.
Bruise, right leg....................................
Double rupture, groin.........................
Bruise, laceration, third and fourth
fingers left hand.
Laceration, chin...................................
Strain, right groin................................
Fracture, right ankle_______________
Sprain, left foot.....................................
Fracture, right leg..... ..........................
Abrasion, infection, left leg................
Fracture, left leg..................................
Fracture, rib..........................................
Bruise, infection, right leg..................
Burn, left arm ......................................
Hernia, abdom en.................................
Laceration, infection, fourth finger
right hand.
Burn, scald, face, neck, left arm -----Bruise, right hand...............................
Fracture, tw o ribs right s id e ............
Dislocation, left knee...........................
Laceration, left hand.......................... .
Sprain, back..........................................
Bruised fingers; laceration, right
hand.
Fracture, wrist...................................Bruise, infection, leg-------- -------------Bruise, left shoulder........................... .
Bruise, laceration, fracture, right
hand; dismemberment, thum b.
Foreign b od y in right eye--------------B um , feet and ankles..........................
Sprain, right knee............................... .
Bruise knee; laceration, face and neck
Bruise, left leg..................................... .
Scald, infection, face, chest, and left
arm.
Hernia, groin.........................................
Compound fracture, infection, left
arm .6
Foreign matter, right eye................. .
Dismemberment, second finger; lac­
eration, first and third fingers.
Burn, infection, back......................... .
Laceration, left hand..........................

*16

16
40

43
44
38
*53
59
62

1
0

2

44
25

2
2

28
30

18
8
44

(1)
8
2

2
0

15

1
2

17
18
23
23
14
63
124

13

‘ ‘ 2(j‘

1
2

36
141
50
35
79
116
29
62
94
52
106
36
16
61
13

62
46
27
35
4
59
28

24

2
2
61

14
23
54
75

2
2
49

6

1
0

19
31

13

93
17
54
*90

(•
)
1
0

38
71
82
42

2
2

157

34

74
13
40

19

12
1
*2 2
1
3
*74

” 47'
19
15

163

2
2

76
25

1 Nuisance value.
• Alleged further disability could not be verified,
u A t $3 per day.
u Amputation of distal phalange,
is N o record of further disability.

43

71

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to­

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Main­
wa­
te­
ges nance Wages

Am ount actually paid as—
Days
from
in­
jury
Other
M ain­
Total
M ain­
to
compen­
settle­
settle­ Wages
te­
te­
sation
ment
nance
nance ment

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
Compared sation
was
A mount with actual com ­
recovery
puted

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T —Continued
$2.08

$2.08
4.17 2«$75.00
“ 132.00
25."67* U22.50
4.60
58.00
60.00
17.33
72.00 2 10.50

140

30.00
24.00
36.00
44.00
44.00
7
2.08 2 30.00

7
5
15

12 0
0 .0

11.25
7.50

8 .2
80
56.25

23.33

1 .0
00
1 .0
20

6
6

30
3
42
43

2
2
2

3
232
126

$500.00

$502.08

$911.78

+$409.70

31385

4.17

75.00

79.17
132.00
330.67
194.50
125.00

176.05
289.14
264.60
743.60
203.90
178.20
• 17.33
182.50

+96.88
+157.14
—66.07
+549.10
+78.90
+125.37
-125.00
+10.50

41
44
34
* 322
59
60

78.34
55.24
79.51
98.06
93.83
62.80

+24.09
-2 .2 6
-2 0 .4 9
+20.98
+ 4.00
+30.72

15
12
18
22

$132.00
20.67 2 122.50
4.50
58.00
2.83
17.33
72.00 2 10.50

12 0
0 .0

11.25
7.50

30.00
24.00
36.00
2.08
44.00
40.00
49.83
7
2.08 2 30.00

1,934
99.17
98
54.00
109.25
480
246.00 2 168.00
24
38.00
2.08
62
372.00
53
34.83 160.00
24
56.00
1.67
74
95.00 174.00
7
2.33 2 30.00
310
2.42
30.00
257
32.50* 2715.00
13

5.67
1.92
246.00
3 2.08
8
372.00
34.83
1.67
95.00
2.33
2.42

30.33
2.42
44.00
40.83 2185.50
13.50 132.00
4.60
26.00
9.00
17.33

2 .0
00

1
1
2

60
.0

90.00
43.50
21.33

13

101.33
55.00

82
19
97

164.00
38.00
2.42
44.00
450.00 2339.50

63
163

30

36.25 126.00
531.67 2570.50

1

2
2

43

4.75
64.17
34.00
1.58

1
1

44
23
54
27
17
19
31

20
.0
2 42.00
6 .0
80

34
74

20
.0

8 .0
60
H1 .0
20 0
48.00

86
.6

49

6
6

54.25
57.50

8 .2
80

8 .2
80

77.08
89.83
32.08

35.33

+13.66

576.00
181.75
58.66

133.14
455.51
211.85

-442.86
+273.76
+153.19

30
64
46

99.17
109.25
439.93
61.08
372.00
161.04
141.67
345.00
32.33
37.42
250.00
47.50

99.17
212.81
681.86
106.24
372.00
341.20
164.11
579.71
120.78
71.16
222.56
47.50

+103.56
+241.93
+45.16

22
75
28

55.33
32.42
128.34
213.50
46.00
28.50
56.50

30.33
103.24
394.19
276.09
56.74
60.72
72.92

7 75.00
270.00
82.00
436.00

83.00
270.00
193.50
605.33

160.57
204.48

70.00
350.00
150.00
125.00
925.00

67.43
38.00
126.21
56.00
174.00
30.00

30.00
87. 51
132.00

136.67
405.00
150.00
161.42
52.42
930.00

174.00
3,829.50

“ 5 .'5 "
05
93.50
107.33
126.50

2 .0
10

84.00
76.00
30.00
5.00
250.00

22
47
66
9
13
23

-7 5 .0 0
-109.43
+10.98
+285.13

8
36
12 262H

1,028. 79

-9 .3 4
-257.86
+225.79
-4 8.3 8
+48.24
+98.79

41
82
19
21
67

336.25
4,418.33

412.79
8,602.17

+76.54
+4,183.84

97
2,184

4.75
64.17

7 100.00

104.75
376.83

4.75
381.02

-100.00
+4.19

53
28

34.00
1.58

1 105
2

15.00
56.00

259.00
57.58

494.00
98.37

+235.00
+40.79

70
24

6 .0
80
41.40

20
.0
6 .0
80

148.00

44.00

8 .0
60
H1 .0
20 0

+180." 16* " ' " 72"'
+22.44
51
+234.71
87
+88.45
35
+33.74
15
-2 7 .4 4
61
-2 5 .0 0
+70.82
+265.85
+62. 59
+10. 74
+32.22
+16.42

" i9 .50

36.25 126,00
18.33 2570.50

248
31

13

—872.64" ■ " ' 97’

39.17

8.50

66.67
55.00
36.42
2.42
5.00

8 .2
80

295.45

28

21.67

* A t $12.50 per week.
2 A t $15 per week.
7
* Permanent loss of use of second finger; amputa­
tion of third finger.




10 0
0 .0

7 25.00
2.42
40.83
13.50
4.60
9.00
17.33

43.50
21.33
156
73
415
649
7
196

142.33
172.00

13.00
26.00
64.00
31.00

550.00

32.50 2715.00

60
.0

148.00
26.00

67.00
50.00
125.00
89.50

21.67
26.00
173.25

12 0
2 .0

8 .0
80

74.70 821,093.39 821,168.09

53
81
124.00
92.00 1,403

26.00
173.25

"187.50

60
.0

80
.0

127.33
147.14
375. 79
113.04

10 6
0 .6

3 Settlement, $1,250. T he sum of $156.61, earned
2
wages refused b y the seaman upon leaving the ship
was deducted.
3 Voucher for this amount still unclaimed.
8

72

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

I
N o.
of

Occupation

rate
I per
j month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­
On In­ Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T —Continued
411

Able seaman.

$62.50

412

Fireman........

65.00

413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420

A ble seaman........
Chief mate........ .
Fireman................
Second m ate........
Second cook..........
Able seaman........
W ater tender____
Boatswain........ .

421 Engineer........
422 Deck b o y ____
423 A ble seaman..
424 Third m a te..
425 A ble seaman.
426 ....... d o .............

62.50
185.00
65.00
165.00
80.00
62.50
72.50
75.00
165.00
25.00
62.50
150.00
62.50
62.50

427
428

Ordinary seaman.
Oiler......................

47.50
72.50

429
430
431
432

A ble seaman
Ordinary
Oiler.......
Fireman.

62.50
47.50
72.50
62.50

433 ____d o ..................
434 A ble seaman___
435 ___ d o ..................
436 O ile r ................
437 A ble seaman___
438 W iper..................
439 Second engineer.
440 A ble seaman----441 ........ d o ..............

50.00
62.50
62.50
72.50
62.50
50.00
165.00
62.50
60.00

442
443
444
445

65.00
62.50
165.00
72.50

Fireman..............
A ble seaman___
Second engineer.
Oiler.....................

446 ------ d o ......... .
447 ....... d o...........
448 Pantrym an.

70.00
72.50
42.00

449

Oiler.............

72.50

450
451
452

Fireman........ .
Oiler..............
A ble seaman..

65.00
65.00
55.00

453 ....... d o ....................
454 Messman_______
455 Fireman________
456 Messman............ .
457 A ble seamen____
458 ....... d o.... ...............
459 W iper.................. .
460 Second m ate____

55.00
40.00
57.50
40.00
55.00
55.00
.50.00
140.00

461
462
463
464
465

65.00
55.00
65.00
55.00
285.00

Oiler................. A ble seaman___
Oiler............... —
A ble seaman___
Chief engineer—

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
3 Partial disability for life.
7 Nuisance value.
8 Occupational disease.




Fracture, laceration, infection, left
thumb.
Burn, left arm, left thigh; inguinal
hernia.
Laceration, right foot...........................
Fracture, left arm.................................
Burn, arm, face, back; infection____
Sprain, back........................................ .
Abrasion, head......................................
Bruise, back............................ ..............
Hernia, groin.......................................
Fracture, laceration, fourth linger
right hand.
Abrasion, infection, right leg........ .
Fracture, second finger right h a n d ...
Laceration, infection, left hand..........
Fracture, leg..........................................
Internal injuries___________________
Bruise, infection, leg; bruise, foot;
ulcer, varicose veins on hip.
Fracture, right heel........................ .
Dismemberment, second and third
fingers left hand.
Abscess, right h a n d .......................
Bruise, hand......................................
Laceration, fracture, finger_________
Laceration, left arm; burn, elbow
and neck.
Burn, arms, right shoulder, and ear.
Pleurisy, resulting from accident___
Sprain, left ankle..................................
Fracture, great toe, left foot................
Fracture, sprain, ankle........................
Scald, feet...............................................
Scald, face, arms, legs, and feet..........
Bruise, back..........................................
Laceration, fracture, right leg; strain,
back.
Malaria,8 bronchitis, pneumonia___
Fracture, right arm............................ .
Fracture, left leg...................... ...........
Bruise, laceration, infection, second
finger right hand.
Laceration, fourth finger left h a n d ...
Strain, groin............................... ..........
Puncture, infection, fourth finger ™
right hand.
Fracture, clavicle; laceration and
bruise, head and feet.
Burn and scald, hips and legs______
Hernia, abdom en.................................
Puncture, infection, first finger left
hand.
Burn, right foot....................................
Laceration, infection, forehead..........
Sprain, ankle........................................
Burn, legs. . ..........................................
Fracture, head and arm...................
Bruise left side; laceration, right hand
Crushed left hand............................. .
Laceration, bruise, infection, right
a rm .3
6
Bruise, first finger3 right hand...... .
7
Bruise, eye...........................................
Fracture, wrist......................................
Laceration, bruise, fracture, head___
Fracture, left toe...................................

23

78

59

33
<0
12
0
1
2

10
0
33
3

24

1

18
70
56

39
23
28

45
34
141
40
65

~A
4

44
525

1
0

46
125
31
35

4
4
28

34
60

38

90

2

14

17

2
1

3

14
39
43
35
44
19

"l9 "

14
30

14
47'

'

1
0

1
0
4
2
1
34

14
41
71
39
55

1
0
n
(5
)

32

(9
)

57
35

6
8
60

9 Alleged further disability could not be verified,
ii A t $3 per day.
w A t $1.50 per day.
2 At $4 per day.
3
^ A t $12.50 per week.

30
19
16

73

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE'

merchant marine, by individual eases—Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Wa-

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Possible recovery un­ Days
Amount actually paid a sDays
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
Other
M ain­
Mainto
Total
Compared sation
was
tecompen­ Amount with actual com ­
te­
settle­ Wages
settle­
ment
sation
recovery
nance ment
nance
puted

Maintenance

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C on tin u e d

11

51

1

59
100
33
12

48
1
24
18
18
49
45
34
/
40
21

92

$47.92

23

1
39
48
38
34
120
44

2.08

118.00
2
*400.00
104.00
66.00
5.50 11 36.00
64.00
37.50
2.00
78.00
45.00
96.00
269.50
37.50
76.00
70.83
68.00
35.00 H360.00
83.33
43.75
88.00

$6.25

25
116

12
0

35
113
136

0)
57

196
365

2.08

118.00
2*400.00

104.00
5.50
4.17
5.00

184
92
487

10

7.25

20.00

53
24

7.25

46
28
31
1

4
94
30
14

95.83
44.33
74.92
2.08

8.00
188.00
60.00
28.00

26
63
29
25

37.08
44.33
74.92
2.08

22
1

25

1.67
22.93
29.17
2.42

27
77
47
150

1.67
44.00
2.08

3
19
14
30

1.67
43.75
6.00
29.17
2.42
38.00
89.58
1.67 I* 21.00
44.00 2 105.00
2.08
2.00

14

12 0
1 .0

2 .0
00

280.00

307.25

89.45
1,021.65

+89.45
+714.40

33 5
58

117.25
57.90
28.00

103.83
429.52
134.92
110.42

+66.75
+267.94

97

47.00

37.08
161.58
132.82
77.08

+33.34

"34"

101.67
43.76
79.17
202.42
42.00
22.67
152.50
102.08
1.752.00

35.06
49.75
29.17
138.57
89.58
93.63
277.57
44.61
228.10

-6 6 .6 1
+ 5.99
-5 0 .0 0
-6 3 .8 5
+47.58
+70.96
+125.07
*+57.47
-1,523.90
+19.67
-105.87

10 0
0 .0
38.00

is2 .0
10

20.83
50.00
162.00
42.00
108.50

10 0
0 .0

1,750.00

+2.10

182.00

276.58

308.96

302.17
80.17
158.00

225.69
80.17
59.17
129.05
76.61
256.08
136.34
100.83
18.33
1.67
1,170.00

- 9 .6 2
+1.61
+108.08
-1 4.9 9
-251.00
-8 7 .1 7

793.49
134.76
190.10
142.00
552.50

+578.32
+58.76
-9 1 .0 7
+28.33
+115.50

44

16

34
36
18

1
2

-7 6 .4 8

138.67
75.00
148.00
151.33
351.83
105.50
111.67

134

+32.38

300.00

'28.66"

2.17
80.17
1.83
102.67

120.00
64.00

80
192
73
4

11
2
24
1
0

23.00
1.33
1.83
5.50
1.67

6 .0
80
28.00

7
44

6
8

176
46

64.00

1 .0
10

8 .0
60
10 0
0 .0
7 110.00
1 0 .0 1 0 .0
,1 0 0 .1 0 0
2 0 0 215.17
0 .0
350.00

15.17

106.17
3.67
437.00

128.17
36.00
75.00
125.00

233

38.00

8 A t $15 per week.
7
3 Performed partial duties at full pay 77 days to
4
end of voyage, when he entered hospital to have
arm reset.




" 4’
4

+40.98
+56.89
-159.08

26.58

30
19
16
33

-3 3 .0 0
+76.83
+66.75
+198.57
-4 2 .0 8
+107.97

1
1

"+I5 .97"
4

73

15.17
11.00
60.00
106.17
38.00
110.00
32.00
437.00 ,2 115.50

269.50
113.50
138.83
873.57
83.33
235.72

103.31
240.56
511.32

113
37
79

7
6
49
60
46

302.50
36.67
72.08
675.00
125.41
127.75

62.33
183.67
670.40

14.00

136.08
1.33
100.83
18.33
1.67

70
38

17.14
137.75
509.00

68.00

60
32

—131."33
+198.38
+124.21

190.83
27.00
64.00
166.66
60.42

2.33 2 42.86
0
45.92
15.40 146.00

71.50
80.17
31.17

71
1
55
10
1

77
130
54

5
164
96

26.58

102.67

+174 94
+464.29
-6 0 .3 0
+48.29

130.84
146.21
137.50
224.14

7

56

302.02
864.29
300.53
80.79
64.00
39.50
258.80
241.21

111. 17
252.08
137.50
69.17

34

14’

127.08
400.00
360.83
32.50
64.00
170.83
60.42
117.00

102.50
250.00
132.00

11

2.33 2 42.86
«
111. 17
8.00
119.00 136.00

75

7.00

43
51

33
37
17

24
4
68

—66.71

70.00

20
.0

1
46
85

21

—$4.16

307.12

8.67
2.08
5.50
24.17 2 45.00
7

47
1
25
10

101.83
2.08
137.50
24.17 2745. 00”

$47.92

373.83

302.50
36.67
2.08
5.00
14.58
43.75

6
6

6 .0
60

$52.08

248.00

670.00
110.83
84.00

$ 0 .0
12 0

3

1
21
14
1
43
1
8
1
1

$45.83

23.83

23.83 $102.00

65.00
137.00

10 0
1 .0

76.00
281.17
113.67
437.00

61

47
8*134

-9 8 .8 3

-110.00
+70.00

1
2

41

38

3327^
6
37322
29
19

** Amputation of tw o phalanges.
3615 per cent loss of use.
3 Amputation of distal phalange and permanent
7
loss of use.

74

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Age

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In­ Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days

of

con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T — Continued
Messman.......... .
467 Chief steward. _.
468 Quartermaster..
469 Fireman............
470 Mess b oy ..........
471 Third m ate____
472 Oiler...................
473 ____ d o ................
474
475
476
477
478
479

A ble seaman.
___ do..............
Boatswain___
Fireman........
___ do.... ........
Boatswain___

$40.00
105.00
55.00
67.50
40.00
125.00
65.00
65.00
55.00
55.00
62.50
67.50
67.50
75.00

480 Mess b o y ______
481 Able seaman___
482 Second cook.......
483 Fireman..............
484 Able seaman___
485 Oiler.....................
486 Fireman..............
487 Coal passer.........
488 ........ d o..................
489 Storekeeper........
490 Refrig, engineer .
491 Carpenter...........
492 A ble seaman___
493 Mess m an______
494 A ble seaman___
495 Chief engineer. _
496 Pantrym an____
497 Third engineer..
498 Oiler....................

42.00
62.50
80.00
67.50
62.50
72.50
67.50
65.00
60.00
65.00
90.00
70.00
55.00
50.00
55.00
285.17
50.00
90.00
65.00

499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519

55.00
55.00
55.00
60.00
55.00
65.00
65.00
55.00
55.00
80.00
90.00
40.00
139.36
139.62
189.80
130.00
130.00
131.04
131.04
183.04
139.10

520
521
522
523

A ble seaman.......
. . . . d o ...................
........ d o ...................
Firem an...............
A ble seaman____
Boatswain...........
Oiler......................
A ble seaman____
........ d o . . ...............
C ook.....................
Junior engineer...
Ordinary seaman.
Fireman 40.......... .
____d o .40...............
Engineer
.........
C aptain40............
____d o .40...............
D eckhand40____
Firem an40.......... .
........ d o .40...............
........ d o .40...............
Engineer40..
M a te 40........
Firem an40..
E ngineer40..

524 F loatm an40_
525 Engineer 40__.
526 O iler40..........
527 F loatm an40.
528 ........ d o .40____
529
. . d o . 40____




189.80
104.00
85.28
189.80
124.80
189.80
135.20
124.54
124.80
129.48

Hernia, right groin...............................
____do......................................................
Foreign matter in eye........................ .
Hernia, abdomen................................ .
Puncture, infection, foot.....................
Rupture, stom ach.......... ....................
Dismemberment, third finger.......... .
Bruise, shin; laceration, infection,
scalp.
Bruise, laceration, left hand.............
Fracture, thigh, knee,3 left hand____
8
Bruise, laceration, face, shoulder, legs.
Fracture, left th u m b ..........................
Strain, back............................................
Abrasion and bruise, left hand, right
foot.
Hernia, right groin...............................
Fracture, wrist......................................
Laceration, forehead.........................—
Bruise, second finger right hand_____
Hernia, abdom en...............................
Sprain, ankle..........................................
Hernia, right groin...............................
Bruise, back......................................... .
Burn, right arm, hand, thigh, face___
Laceration, left arm..............................
Foreign matter in eye_____ ________
Abrasion left elbow, right leg—..........
Bruise, finger.....................................—
Bruise, chest..........................................
Sprain, left wrist...................................
Fracture, left patella.______________
Abrasion, infection, scalp...................
Scald, left hand............... ................
Bruise, second and third fingers
right hand.
Puncture, infection, right hand____
Bruise, infection, right h a n d ............
Hernia, groin............ ...........................
Burn, left eye............................. ..........
Hernia, abdom en. ...................... ........
Abrasion, left leg.......... ............ ..........
Bruise, great toe left foot----------------Bruise, right wrist...............................
Bruise, hand______ _______ ________
Bruise, foot..........................................
Abrasion, left rib............................. .
Bruise, shoulder................... ...............
Burn, infection, hand.........................
Bruise, left foot..................... ...............
Burn, both legs................. ..................
Sprain, left ankle; bruise, leg________
Bruise, right shoulder, thorax............
Bruise, right shoulder.........................
Bruise, leg..............................................
Burn, face__..........................................
Concussion, brain; abrasion and
bruise, back.
Fracture, second finger left hand____
Concussion of brain.............................
Puncture, left hand.............................
Fracture and laceration, second fin­
ger left hand.
Synovitis, left knee..............................
Bruise, left knee....................................
Laceration, left finger..........................
Sprain, right thigh...............................
Bruise, left l e g .................................... .
Sprain, infection, left foot................. .

i N ot reported.
1 A t $3.50 per day.
• Amputation resulting.
7 Nuisance value.

96
58
65
94
46
38

0

58
43
76
16

0)

(9

29
15

0)
14

72
199

2

63
170

11
1
8

2
0
26
80
"77"

lo"

60
35
64
14
60

■ 41’

‘35'

1
1

18
32
41
23
42

22
1

133

23
18

2
2
0
33

76
91

75
(1)
8

18
8

1 A t $2.50 per day.
0
1 N o record of further disability.
8
3810 per cent loss of use.

(1)
8
16
25

75

A P P E N D IX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual canes—Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Main­
W a­
Wages
te­
ges nance

Possible recovery un­ Days
A m ount actually paid as—
Days
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
M ain­
M ain­
to
Other
Total
Compared sation
was
te­
settle­ Wages
te­
compen­ Amount with actual
settle­
com ­
nance ment
nance
ment
sation
recovery
puted

|
M

PERSONAL AGREEMENT —Continued

1
43
1
23
2 45
38
15
0) (0
14
14

$1.33 $116.00
50
49.00 a 150.50 1,147
1.83 130.00
5
420
51.75
2.67 10112.50
17
158.33 2 52.50
23
478
28.00
5
2.17

0)

0)

132.00
170.50
4.17
'36.'55'
2.50
166.67
296.00

11
1

35
32
41
13
38
133

1
1
18

6.25
84.58
144.00
8.67
28.00
23.83
54.00

120.00
70.00*
56.00
180.00
154.00
16.00
40.00
'82.00*

173
84

11
1
177
63
35
167
16
36

1
1

64.00
"1.83
82.00
18.33
26.00
76.00
9.17
104.50 2 465.50
21.67
22.00
3.00 3» 40.50
4.33
27.50

10.00

25.67
26.00
14.67

(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)

106
255
554
93
41
40

66.00
178.00

4.33
16.50
5.50
5.33
3.00
10.67

22.00
142.00
10.00
16.00
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)

(40)
(40)

(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)

(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)

(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)

0
°)
\
°)

18
56
41
23
42
69
23
18

2
2
0
2
76
91

8

9
13
81
7
9
17

8
2
2
17
39
31
54
34
13
34
28

$1.33 $116.00
3.50
1.83 130.00
40.50
2.67
154.17
28.00

38.50
14.67
4.17
18.00
2.50
166.67
270.00

132.00
613.73
4.17
268.37
36.00
164.80

+16.00
-650.94
-3 0.0 0
+208.37

50.00
346.67
270.00
25.00
66.25
84.58
63.00
43.67
73.50
48.83
101.25
25.00
26.83
53.33
69.17
2,523.85
96.67
41.25
44.33

176.51
559.33
450.00
35.78
180.93
84.58
226.00
32.84
204.13
23.83
54.00
144.87
171.77
69.38
166.52
1,287.86
64.54
93.94
4.33

+126.51
+212.66
+180.00
+10.78
+114.68

63.00
35.00
45.50
25.00
47.25

10.00

25.67" 66.00
26.00 178.00
14.67
4.33
16.50
5.50
5.33
3.00
10.67

116.00
1,264.67
34.17
60.00
36.00
77.50

25.00
60.00

25.00
25.00
” 1.83
26.00
18.33
60.00
9.17
104.50 2 465.50
22.00
21.67
38.25
3.00
4.33
27.50

+$168.51
+133.07
-4 .2 9
-113.18
+82.72
+56.66
+73.00
-168.33

180.00

6.25
84.58
8.67
28.00
23.83
54.00

350.00
207.00

$294.84
344.57
272.54
227.32
197.39
210.83
423.00
68.84

50.00

2.17

$126.33
211.50
276.83
340.50
114.67
154.17
350.00
237.17

77.50
1,250.00
7 30.00
60.00
18.00
75.00

il2:00

22.00
142.00
10.00
16.00
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)
(40)

9
25
19
26

(40)

25
60
18
14
14

(40)
(40)
(40)

1
0

$9.00
208.00
145.00
300.00

8

(40)

:<
o
)
:<
°
)
;<
°
)

9.00
1,953.85
53.00

’ M.'O'
OO
15.20
7 £5.00
34.00
102.00
56.00
7 40.00
43.00
104.25
60.00
14.00
200.00
25.00
43.00
40.00
252.00
45.00
152.00
50.00
25.00
50.00
50.00

52.70
48.49
7 55.00
125.67
227.98
306.00
383.96
70.67
14.67
7 40.00
69.33 "" 52.92"
262.75
316.80
75.50
24.29
35.33
40.56
203.00
50.47
35.67
10.67
43.00
49.01
40.00
58.30
252.00
192.86
54.29
45.00
152.00
154.29
50.00
54.72
25.00
40.32
50.00
114.29
50.00
88.66

6 175
16

s21
0*
""60*”

+87.30

+163.00
-1 0.8 3
+130.63
-2 5 .0 0
-4 7.2 5
+119.87
+144.94
+16.05
+97.35
-1,235.99
-3 2.1 3
+52.69
-4 0 .0 0
-4 .2 1
-5 5 .0 0
+102.31
+77.96
-5 6 .0 0
-4 0 .0 0
-1 6.4 1
+54.05
-5 1.2 1
+5.23
-152.53
-2 5.0 0
+6.01
+18.30
-5 9.1 4
+9.29
+2.29
+4.72
+15.32
+64.29
+38.66

45.00
42.00
39.00
85.00

45.00
42.00
39.00
85.00

42.86
50.29
37.49
96.43

-2 .1 4
+8.29
-1 .5 1
+11.43

55.00
91.00
45.00
24.00
24.00
23.00

55.00
91.00
45.00
24.00
24.00
23.00

68.57
125.00
56.46
35.58
35.66
25.61

+13.57
+34.00
+11.46
+11.58
+11.66
+2.61

w A t $2.25 per day.
40 E m ployed on harbor craft six days per week- -in practice not given allowance for maintenance.
allow for subsistence ashore.




95
44
64
71
44

90

8

57

1
0

46
32
40

1
2
37
21
0
1
0
17

62
78

1
1

72
4
7
16

16
19
54
19
54
19
14
32
29

1
2
.2
1
2
0
27

25
35
19
13
13
9
Wages

76

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN’ SEAM EN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d
$72.50

530

Water tender____(»)

631
632
633
634
635
536

Able seaman __
. . . . d o . - - .............
____do....................
Oiler-------------W iper...............
O iler................

62.50
62.50
85.00
72.50
57.50
72.50

537
538
539

Fireman...............
Able seaman____
Third engineer...

65.00
62.50
150.00

540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557

Able seam an..
____do................
------do...............
Fireman..........
------ do...............
Second engineer..
Able seam an..
Boatswain___
Oiler.................
Boatswain___
O iler............
Fireman..........
____do________
Baker________
Able seam an..
M essman____
Oiler.................
------ do....................

65.00
62.50
62.50
65.00
65.00
165.00
62.50
75.00
72.50
75.00
60.00
65.00
65.00
90.00
55.00
40.00
72.50
72.50

558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568

___ do............. .
Boatswain___
A ble seam an..
___ do...............
Fireman..........
____do..................
O iler................
Steward______
Mess b o y ____
Fireman..........
W iper..............

72.50
75.00
55.00
55.00
57.50
65.00
72.50
115.00
40.00
65.00
57.50

570
571

O iler..............
Fireman........
A ble seaman .

572

72.50
65.00
45.00

Second engineer..

145.00

573 Coal passer—
574 ____d o ....................
575 W aiter.................
576 Able seaman-----577 ____ d o ................. .
578 Chief engineer....
579 W iper........... ........
580 First engineer___
581 Chief steward___

40.00
40.00
45.00
55.00
55.00
275.00
55.00
180.00
110.00

Messman_______
Oiler.....................
Fireman..............
A ble seaman____
First engineer___
Third engineer...
W iper...............

40.00
57.50
55.00
75.00
185.00
165.00
55.00

583
584
585
586
587
588

Laceration, infection, face, arms,
and body.
Fracture of skull and scapula........... .
Drowned................................................
Bruise, leg and groin...........................
Rupture of urethra..............................
Foreign matter in left eye..................
Laceration, first and second fingers
left hand.
Strain, groin..........................................
Bruise, great toe left foot................. .
Laceration, infection right thumb;
dislocation, distal sinews.
Fracture, 3 ribs; sprain, back......... .
Laceration, second finger right hand.
Puncture, left foot...........................
Laceration, left foot_____ _______
Strain, groin................. ...................
Burn, right arm and hand............
Fracture, left thigh; ankylosis, leg 4_.
Bruise and laceration, left foot.......
Hernia* groin......... .............................
Bruise, stomach___________ _____
Bruise, right leg; fracture, left leg—
Laceration, infection, right hand___
Burn, eyes___________________ _____
Bruise, right buttock; sprain, b a ck ..
Bruise, ribs right side...... ...................
Laceration, infection, left thum b___
Sprain, back; laceration, left leg........
Laceration, sccond and third fingers
right hand.
Laceration, left foot.............................
Fracture, lower jaw .............................
Fracture, leg.........................................
Bruise and laceration, knee..... ..........
Bruise and laceration, left hand........
Burns, death resulting........................
Burn, right foot........ ............................
Bruise and laceration, right knee___
Burn, right shoulder and arm...........
Strain, groin.......... ........... ..................
Dismemberment, third finger left
hand.
Strain, left rib muscles........................
Bruise and laceration, face.................
Puncture and fistula, rectal region
and urinal channel.
Fracture patella tibia; sprain right
knee; bruise, arm, thigh.
Burn, left foot.......................................
Burn, feet..............................................
Laceration, right hand........................
Foreign matter in eye.........................
Burn, leg..............................................
Burn, infection, finger.........................
Strain, knee...........................................
Nervous shock, bladder......................
Abrasion, infection, first finger left
hand.
Scald, right foot....................................
Bruise, left thum b...............................
Bruise, right testicle............................
Fracture, right leg..... ..........................
Bruises, death resulting....................
Bruise, infection, left leg................... .
Traumatic arthritis, right elbow___

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
a N o record; left hospital against advice.




31

75

37

2
1

34

1
0

94
81

14

2
1

26

40

36
7
56

3
46

37
23
15
51
94
42
* 168
15
62
76
117
35
142
39
50
3
41

14

'~\
2
28
98
13
108

0) 0)
4
29
3

1
2
1

2
1

~‘ §7'

35
113
56
72
59
42 3
62

35

42

1
0

38
*28

14

’ 24"

(8
)

(3
)

2
2
42

2
1

2
1
1
1

15
14
251

131

153
76
56

2

264
17

263

1
(3 (3
) )
16

2
1
2
1

“ 26

2
2

46

18

76

16
28
59
255
4213
47
55

4
13

42
13
31

eo
13

1
0

* Permanent loss of use.
5 Partial disability for life.
7 Nuisance value.

34

45

77

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual ca.net,— Continued
D a y s en­
titled to—

W a-

A raou n t en­
titled to as—

A m o u n t actually pa id as—

D ays
from
in ­
ju r y
M a in ­
to
settle­
te­
nance m ent

M aintenance

M a in ­
te­
nance

O ther
settle­
m ent

T o ta l
com pen ­
sation

P ossible re co v e ry u n ­
der com pen sation act

A m ount

D ays
for
w h ich
com pen­
sation
C om pa red
w as
w ith actual
com ­
recovery
p u ted

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T — C o n tin u e d
68

2
1

$72.60 $136.00

39

2.08

42.00

172.83
55.58
5.75
33.83

20.00
28.00

13
108

0)
33

27
51
15
42
93
33
411
14
49
125
52
35
51
3

60
.0
1.83

” 2."42
35

II3.O
8

3

6.50
24.17

11

” 70* 66’
53." 07

1
1
1

4
13
0)

2.1/

74

131

357.67

3
3
1
1
13
13

_

104. 00
2 73. 50

"I4."C7
33

28

1
21
2
1
1
1
14
20
8

44. 00
84. 00
118. 00

1
16
20
22
18
42
25
59
60
34
45

2.42
1.50

1.33
28.00
3.00
1.83
1.83
9.17
25.67

80
.0
0

20
.0
” § .’ 55'
2

2 70.00
44.00
120.00 2 63.00
29.33 2147.00
4.00
5.75
1.83
2.50
80.17
71.50

120.00
2119.00
90.00

75.00
4.00
52.00

92.33
12.08
403.00

85.01
22.26
415.29

- 7 .3 2
+ 1 0 .1 8
+ 1 2 .2 9

28

5.33

77.33
38.33
17.08
152.17
258.33
205.50
9,014.58
60.00
205.00
285.00
1,523. 00
75.00
279.83
156.00
226.83
25.00
152.42
75.00

103.42
91.22
35.16
123.03
245.67
360.50
4,911.44
65.01
205.83
192.74
461.94
110.60
553.47
115. 78
175.56
11.61
181.73
96.24

+ 2 6 .0 9
13
+ 5 2 .8 9
19
+ 1 8 .0 8
14
- 2 9 .1 4
50
- 1 2 .6 6
+ 155.00
- 4 ,1 0 3 .1 4 42, ole
+ 5 .0 1
11
+ .8 3
- 9 2 .2 6
20
-1 ,0 8 4 .0 6
104
+ 3 5 .6 0
35
+ 273.64
119
- 4 0 . 22
37
- 5 1 .2 7
49
- 1 3 .3 9
3
+ 2 9 .3 1
40
+ 2 1 .2 4
21

100.00

110.00
352.50
196.83
85.00
191. 33
4,500.00
99.17
75.00
27.67
50.00
101.92

160.40
297.86
155.79
242.30
231.08
7,506. 50
282.48
147. 33
14.67
167.85
152.23

+ 5 0 .4 0
- 5 4 .6 4
-4 1 .0 4
+ 157.30
+ 39. 75
+ 3 ,0 0 3 .5 0
+ 163.31
+ 72.33
-1 3 .0 0
+ 117.85
+ 50.31

38
4 43%
4

20.00
30.00
42.00
23.00
55.17

49.83

196.00
26.00
216.00

1.83

66.00

" 2."42

76.00
42.00

60
.0

2.50
56.83
113.03

8
6

60
.0

44.00
85.00
78.25

2.67

"1.9
2

15.00
150.00
12.66
9,000.00
. 24.00
232.50
1,304. 00
49.00
14.00
150. 00
159.00
19. CO
74.00
33.00
110.00
350.00
90.00
4,500.00
75.00
75.00
25.00

’ 24." 17

143
75
36
27

50.00

6

18

35
112
25
72
(43)
52
21

2.42
2.17
1.50

23.00

268

150.00
39.00
2,000.00

152.42
67.17
2,001.50

46.58
59.59
496.14

-1 0 5 .8 4
- 7 .5 8
-1 ,5 0 5 .3 6

14
13
250

138

357.67

2458.50

1,188.66

2,004.83

1,098.31

-9 0 6 .5 2

79

141
56

1.33
28.00
3.00
1.83
1.83
9.17
25.67

74.00
13.33
7 31.00
300.00

29.33

2147.00

141.47
93.40
5.00
580.05
69.01
150.60
140.02
186.57
408.02

+ 6 6 . 14
+ 5 2 .0 7
-3 1 .0 0
+ 278.22
+ 3 7 .8 5
-6 0 .7 7
+ 7 9 .3 5
+ 6 0 .5 7
+ 5 3 .6 9

75
35

29."33
2 70.00
35.00

75.33
41.33
36.00
301.83
31.16
211.37
60.67
126.00
354.33
24.00
105.75
76.83
302.50
4,638.66
131.50
125.00

28.29
112.07
247.35
792.33
7,580.17
311.93
210.92

+ 4 .2 9
+ 6 .3 2
+ 170.52
+489.83
+ 2,9 4 1 .5 1
+ 180.43
+ 8 5 .9 2

59

1

2

264
17

2
0

27
125
65

6

32
161

0)
32

4 D ep en d en t father 64 years o f age.
1
4 Before death.
2
48 D ep en d en t m other 48 years o f age.

105676°—28----- 6



52.00

54
(41)
33
58
18
26

10.00

15
50.00
118.00

45

+ 6 9 .5 9
+ 2,0 85.8 7
+114. 29
+ 5 5 .5 8
-1 0 9 .4 5
+ 6 4 .1 5

149.83
52. L0
23.00

48
359
34
30
56
45

26.00
2
458.50

+ $105.40

171.67
2,821.23
287.12
233.39
46.30
152.98

52.00
8.33
2.08
2.17
203. 67
205. 50
14.58

2
1
5
1
2

76.00
42.00
70.00

2.50
56.83

1,
0

0) 0
6 .0
6
60
.0

$324.73

102.08
735.36
172.83
177.81
155.75
88.83

42.00

87.83
55.58
5.75
33.83

35
7
72

52.00
20.00
8.33
38.00
2.08
2.17
203.67
42.00
231.00 2 129.50
147.92
10.00
23.00
149.83
56.00
140.00
2<3.00 196.00
23.00
49.83 216.00

$219.33

58.00
735.36
85.00
122.23
150.00
3.00

2.08

144
18

60
.0

$10.83

17.33
2.03
6.00
190.00 2 161.00

<
9

52.00

17.33
2.08
190.00 2 161.00

14

$72.60 $136.00

45
150
, 889

60
.0

4.00
5.75
1.83
2.50
80.17
71.50

20
.0

50.00
75.00

120.00
60.00
90.00

132.20
120.00
178.00
20.00
50.00
180.00
4,558.49
35.66

4 25 per cent loss o f use.
4
4 D ep en d en t w ife 50 years o f age; 1 c h ild 7
5
o f age.

263
16
20
32
1

68

13
25
58
254
(45)
34
55

78

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United, States

No.
of

Occupation

Age

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­
On In- Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

j
Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued
589
590
591
592

Chief cook............
Able seaman........
Oiler......................
Boatswain.......... .

593
594

Fireman................ 23
Oiler...................... 49

595
596
597
598
599
600
601

39
22
37
0)
39
37
42

602
603

Chief engineer___
Able seaman........
Second engineer..
Third engineer. __
Oiler.....................
Boatswain........ .
S econ d p u m p
man.
Third engineer. _.
A ble seaman........

Fracture, right arm............................ .
Abrasion, infection, left thum b.........
Laceration, scalp..................................
Laceration, head and face; bruise,
ear; fracture, hip and 2 ribs.
65.00 Burn, scalp, face, neck, chest, arms..
72.50 Dismemberment, second finger1 left
2
hand.
250.00 Hernia, abdom en.................................
62.50 ____d o.................. ................. .................
155.00 Scald, arms, chest, stomach...............
150.00 Scald, left arm ......................................
72.50 Scald, face, neck, right shoulder.......
80.00 Laceration, right thum b.....................
80.00 Ulcer, leg................................................

39
52

150.00
62.50

604

Oiler......................

22

72.50

605 Messman_______ 27
606 A ble seaman........ 37
607 ........ d o .................... 34

50.00
55.00
55.00

37 $105.00
22
62.50
72.50
(1
)
29
80.00

608
609

Third mate..........
Oiler......................

35
26

125.00
65.00

610

W iper.................... 18

50.00

611
612
613
614
615

Third engineer...
First engineer___
W iper....................
Oiler...... ................
Deck engineer___

27
44
0)
26
25

125.00
165.00
50.00
65.00
80.00

616 F ir e m a n ............. 42
617 ........ d o .................... 24
618 ........ d o .................... 28

67.50
67.50
67.50

619 ........ d o .................... 35
620 Able seaman........ 49
621 First engineer___ 37
622 Coal passer........... 32
623 Marine engineer. 47
624 Master................... 39
625 Machinist............. 28

67.50
62.50
165.00
60.00
165.00
300.00
90.00

626
627

Ordinary seaman. 21
Chief engineer___ 45

40.00
255.00

628
629

Ordinary seaman. 21
Fireman................ (0

40.00
65.00

630

Ordinary seaman. 28

47.50

631

W iper....................

24

57.50

632 A ble seaman.
633 ........ d o ....................
634 Ordinary seaman.
635 Fireman................

29
27
21
20

62.50
65.00
47.50
60.00

636
637
638
639

A ble s e a m a n .:...
Marine engineer..
Oiler.......................
Chief mate............

0)
37
29
41

62.50
260.00
72.50
180.00

640

A ble seaman.

28

62.50




Burn, eye..............................................
Bruise, right hand; laceration, left
hand.
Laceration, right thumb; sprain and
bruise, back.
Bruise, right elbow............................. .
Hernia, groin..... ................................. .
Laceration and bruise, first, second,
and third fingers.
Fracture, finger19........................ ........
Laceration, infection, palm right
hand.
Laceration, fourth finger left hand;
bruise, upper lip.
Puncture, left eye...............................
Fracture, first finger * right han d ....
Bruise, right leg; sprain, right sid e..
Laceration, infection, scalp............... .
Laceration, infection, second finger
left hand.
Burn, foot..............................................
Fracture, great to e ...............................
Fracture, third metatarsal bone left
foot.
B um , infection, right arm..................
Bruise, right leg....................................
Hernia, groin....................................... .
Fracture, lower ja w ............................ .
Sprain, back........................ ..................
Fracture, infection, le g 6.................... .
Laceration, infection, first finger left
hand.
Sprain, left ankle..................................
Laceration and fracture, second and
third fingers left hand.
Bruise and laceration, left leg.......... .
Bruise, infection, second finger left
hand.
Dismemberment, four fingers left
hand.
Abrasion, bruise, and laceration,first
finger right hand.
Bruise, left leg..................................... .
Bruise, left side and arm ....................
Laceration, first finger right hand___
Laceration, infection, third finger
right hand.
Foreign matter in eye........................ .
D ouble hernia, groins.........................
Dismemberment, second toe 1 left foot
2
Laceration, hand and face; fracture,
arm.
Bruise, right knee...............................

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
* Permanent loss of use.

85
38
29
37

17

14

50
13

12
1

5 53

2
1

51
97

1
0

1
0

29
31
17
63
64

2
2

18

....
34

26

35

28

8
6
6
8

13
42

(46)

180

55

2
1

1
0

18
*95
19
41

36

13
37
7

1
2
2

16
44

45

14

33
39
85
60
7
* 138
37

2
2
67

75

1
0

13

39

23

93
33

15

18
14

552

40

53

36

15
27

5

49

35

1
2

9
128
«85
150
33

« Partial disability for life.
• Amputation resulting,
w A t $2.50 per day.

36
44
150

18

13

79

APPENDIX B — GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
A m o u n t en­
titled to as—

D a y s en­
titled to—

D ays
from
in­
ju r y
M a in ­
to
settle­
te­
nance m ent

W a - M ainW ages
tenance

Possible reco v e ry u n ­
der com pen sation act

A m o u n t actu ally pa id a s -

M ain tenance

O ther
settle­
m ent

T otal
com pen­
sation

A m ount

D ays
for
w h ich
com pen­
sation
C om pa red
w as
w ith actual
co m ­
re co ve ry
p u ted

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T —Continued
6
9
10
25

67
13
16
19

$21.00 $134.00
18.75
26.00
24.17
32.00
66.67
38.00

36
27
15
57

$21.00 $134.00
26.00
18.75
4.92
24.17
10.67

60
3

46
51

130.00
7.25

92.00
102.00

82
39

130.00
7.25

21

2 73.50

10

1 30.00
1

108
0
20
66
27
48
40

19
5

95.00
12.08

18

36.00
66.00

33

92.00
102.00

$171.00
143.75
29.09
510.67

$415.47
113.27
105.26
137.63

+$244.47
- 3 0 .4 8
+ 7 6 .1 7
- 3 7 3 .0 4

321.65
109.25

347.69
244.85

+ 2 6 .0 4
+ 13 5 .6 0

255.64
229.20
65. 71
130. 71
115.23
46.70
239.07

+ 182.14
+ 169.20
+ 35.71
-3 9 .2 9
- 1 2 .1 9
- 3 .3 0
+139.07

51
97

170.00
79.34
50.00
34.00

73.50
60.00
30.00
170.00
127.42
50.00
100.00

$16.00
99.00
500.00
99.65

2 73.50
60.00
ii 30.00
12.08

36.00
66.00

79
29
19
52

4 52^
4
1
0
1
0

26
17
63

30
10

38

150.00
20.83

2133.00

36
168

150.00
2.08

2133.00

347.00
40.00

630.00
42.08

404.43
49.18

- 2 2 5 . 57
+ 7 .1 0

34

5

28

12.08

56.00

8

12.08

56.00

149.00

217.08

145.57

- 7 1 .5 1

30

39
1
28

13
42
36

65.00
1.83
51.33

26.00
84.00
72.00

86
28
44

65.00
1.83
51.33

84.00

16.00
15.00

65.00
101.83
66.33

189.10
233.13
140.92

+ 124.10
+ 131.33
+ 7 4 .5 9

47
67

350.00
417.66

1
2

8

180

153

390.00

306.00

257
222

58.50

350.00
359.16

696.00

-3 5 0 .0 0
+ 278.34

21

10

35.00

20.00

163

1.67

125.00

126.67

55.00

- 7 1 .6 7

2
47
19
9
12

13
73
7
32
9

8.33 2 45.50
258.50 2 255. 50
31.67
14.00
19.50
64.00
32.00
18.00

12
454
18
297
30

8.33
22.00
8.33
19.50
32.00

245.50

139.50
450.00
2.00
75.00
16.00

193.33
472.00
24.33
94.50
48.00

110.98
1,664.00
45.67
160.85
50.00

- 8 2 .3 5
+ 1 ,1 9 2 .0 0
+ 2 1 .3 4
+ 6 6 .3 5

16
4 322

7
2

2
16
45

15.75
4.50

4.00
32.00
90.00

36
22
5

15.75
4.50

4.00
32.00
90.00

46.00
23.00
20.00

65.75
59.50
110.00

91.46
120.58
201.29

+ 2 5 .7 1
+ 6 1 .0 8
+ 91.29

29
34
45

6
1

14
22
67

13.50
2.08

28.00
44.00
2 234.50

18
39
387
60
27
431
57

13.50
2.08

28.00
25.00

3.00
467^50
250.00
45.00
2,959.40
200.00

44.50
27.08
467.50
258.00
83.50
3,059.40
242.00

108.27
135.87
538.07
137.20
38.50
7, 572.50
131.00

+ 6 3 .7 7
+ 108.79
+ 7 0 .5 7
-1 2 0 .8 0
- 4 5 .0 0
+ 4 ,5 1 3 .1 0

27
38
85
56

111. 33
4 400.00
7

182.00
400.00

89.36

- 9 2 .6 4
-4 0 0 .0 0

200.00
65.00

201. 33
97.50

209.24
143.86

+ 7 .9 1
+ 4 6 .3 6

92

740.00

741.58

1,771.85

+ 1,0 3 0 .2 7

6 812

101.92

184.67

+ 8 2 .7 5

33

40.00
67.50
22.96
102.00

62.08
69.67
22.96
202.00

55.16
128.01
25.00
210. 74

-6 .9 2
+ 5 8 .3 4
+ 2 .0 4
+ 8 .7 4

14

15.00

15.00
143.33
223.33
456.00

39.27
608.62
500.51
988.14

+ 2 4 .2 7
+ 465.29
+ 2 77.18
+ 532.14

22.08

103.69

+ 8 1 .6 1

14.00

4
7
31
37

75
10

29

16

38.67

32.00

39
205

38.67

33

18
18

1.33
71.50

36.00
36.00

O
49

1.33
32.50

26

40

41.17

80.00

54

1.58

20

36

38.33

72.00

22

38.33

63.59

10
27
3
49

2.08
20.00
41.17 io 67.50
19.00
6.00
2.00
98.00

10
28
92
34

2.08
2.17

20.00

2.00

98.00

9
36
44
150

18.00
43.33 2 126.00
48.33
88.00
6.00 H450.00

28
128
55
176

1

1
19
12

1

5
20

1
1

8.00
38.50
310.00 2262.50
20.00

11 0
1 .0

13

2.08

26.00

22

8.00
38.50
100.00
42.00
32.00

43.33 100.00
48.33
88.00
6.00 H450.00
2.08

87.00

20.00

A t $3 per day.
1 A m p u ta tio n o f distal phalange.
8
1 R esu lted in disfigurem ent; extent n o t reported.
9
h




+2.00

-111.00

‘

44 25 per cent loss o f use.
46 N o tim e lost.
47 G ra tu ity .

32

6 ,9
1
1
0

8

48
9'
123

12 h i

149

32

80

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Age

rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
m ent received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d
641
642
643

Chief mate___
Able seam an..
Ordinary seaman.

644

First engineer-----

645
646
647
648
649
650

Oiler.....................
Able seaman----Third engineer. _
Machinist______
Oiler...................
Able seaman___

651

Oiler-

652
653
654
655
656
657

Chief engineer...
Oiler............. ......
____do..................
Fireman_______
Chief steward___
Able seam an..

658
659
660
661
662
663
664

670
671
672
673

Coal passer..........
____do............. .......
Radio operator. . .
Coal passer______
Master-at-arms. __
Able seam an..
Scullion.........
Fireman_____
____d o....................
Coal passer___
Fireman........ .
____d o...............
Oiler_________
Coal passer___
Deck b o y ........
Oiler............—

674

Able seam an..

675
676
677
678
679
680
681

____d o....................
Pantryman_
_
Fireman..........
Deck b o y ........
W iper...............
Messman____
Asst, storekeeper.
A ble seaman __

683
684
685

S cullion..........
Fireman..........
____d o .------ --------Assistant steward
Fireman-------____ do....................
____d o ............
Able seaman—
Oiler.....................
Assistant steward
Fireman..............
........d o .................

667

66
8
687

........d o ..................
........d o - ...............

$185.00
55.00
47.50

2
2

Burn, right leg......................................
Fracture, ankle......................................
Fracture second lumbar vertebra*
sprain and bruise, ankle.
185.00 Abrasion, bruise and fracture, sec­
ond and third fingers * left hand.
72.50 Laceration, hand..................................
62.50 Bruise, infection, right leg..................
150.00 Bruise, toe._ ............................. ...........
100.00 Bruise, thum b right hand............. .
72.50 Bruise and laceration, left leg............
62.50 Fracture, metacarpal bone, thumb
left hand.
72.50 Bruise and laceration, infection sec­
ond finger.
330.00 Hernia, groin....................................
72.50 Fracture, infection, legs............... —
65.00 Hernia, groin.........................................
57.50 Sprain, ankle................... ....................
105.00 Bruise, infection right knee.......... .
55.00 Dismemberment, first finger1 right
2
hand.
60.00 Incised paronychia, great toe left foot.
60.00 Burn, right arm..................................
135.00 Abscess, right h a n d ............................
60.00 Bruise, left leg........................ ..............
75.00 Pleurisy, sid e8............... ........ .............
62.50 Laceration and bruise, right hand—
50.00 Synovitis, knee............................ ........
62.50 Sprain, right ankle............... — ..........
67.50 Hernia, right groin............................. .
60.00 Sprain, ankle....................................... .
65.00 Hernia, right groin............................. .
67.50 Laceration, forehead.......................... .
72.50 Abrasion, infection, thumb left hand.
60.00 Laceration, great toe left foot............
35.00 Laceration, left eye and elbow ..........
72.50 Laceration, first, second, third fin­
gers right hand.
62.50 Fracture, distal phalange second fin­
ger.
62.50 Laceration, infection, finger-----------110.00 Hernia, groin............................. _____
65.00 Fracture, hand------ ------------T----------35.00 Fracture, left arm; bruise, b ack ____
57.50 Strain, groin................... ........... ..........
60.00 Burji, left foot......................................
65.00 Abrasion, right leg................. .............
62.50 Abrasion and bruise, face; fracture
and bruise, hand..
50.00 Sprain, ankles.......................................
65.00 Strain, left knee....................................
65.00 Abrasion, left knee............................. .
50.00 Fracture, second rib right side..........
65.00 Bruise and laceration, infection, foot.
65.00 Sprain, right wrist . .............................
65.00 Bruise, right testicle........................... .
62.50 Sprain, a n k l e .................................... .
72.50 Fracture, thum b right hand_______
50.00 Hernia, right groin.
65.00 Bruise, back and right h ip ............... .
65.00 Laceration and bruise, thumb and
first finger right hand.
62.50 Laceration, arm...................................
65.00 Bruise, first finger right hand...........

60
109
48 50

9
18

27
63
21

* 17
95
67
35
5° 61
36
49

45
"ll
14
46

1 ____
21
53
25
41
73

80
41
36
39
61
48
15
14
8
25
35
12
7
43
40
12
30
4
49
95
9
8
43

___
3
1

1
71
16
1
1
15 ” 79’
5
5
11
7
13
3
1
4
10

27
53

3

35
180
36
44
94
«51

11

28
8

17
23
14
10
5 4
0
19
3

15

78
33
15
11
197
35
19
14
55
105
53
18
14
20
7
«62

33
9

14
14
127
11
7
49

13
2

4
15
14
4
26
11

2
2

13
20
47
22
5
3
9
3

5

22
16
3

9
8
7
1
7
59

6
77
19
3
1
28
36
28
4

6
80
37

5
8
11
4

4
31

3
33
7
3
4

9
17
1
7

16

7
3
12

22
9

(18)

28
28
30
8
(18)

4
11
43
3
8
4
43

2

"'i< r
7

15

8
2

14

8
10
6
62

26

1 N ot reported.
1 A t $3 per day.
1
2 A t $3.50 per day.
1 Amputation of distal phalange.
2
* Permanent loss of use.
1 N o record of further disability.
8
* Partial disability for life.
8 A t $4 per day.
5
8 Occupational disease.
8 A t $15 per week.
7
*8 Unable to bend for 6 months while wearing Taylor brace, but able to resume his trade (optician) with
no probable loss of earnings.




81

APPEN D IX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marinef by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

W a-

Possible recovery un­ Days
Am ount actually paid e
Days
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
Compared sation
Other
Main­
Total
M ain­
to
was
compen­ Am ount with actual com ­
te­
settle­
te­
settle­ Wages
recovery
sation
nance
ment
nance ment
puted

A m ount en­
titled to as—

MainteWages
nance

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C on tin u e d
$98.67 1199.00
74.00
16.50
33.25
16.00
17

259.50

27
55.58
54.00
53
29.17 106.00
22
C . 00 2 77.00
O
57 5 90.00 114.00
1
17
45.92 34.00
46
6.25 92.00
14
14
127

1
1

17
14

1
0

103
30
3
14
28
45
28

$98.67 1199.00
25.33
16.50
33.25

$322.90

55.58
29.17
60.00
70 5190.00
32
45.92
5
6.25
82
26

2
2

54.00
106.00
35.00
71.67
34.00
92.00

$354.82
310.36
108.20

-$165.75
+268.53
—925.05

44
100
29

185.00

20
2

$520.57
41.83
1,033.25
185.00

1,709.50

+1,524.50

4 462
9

26.00
69.00

135.58
204.17
95.00
51161.67
95.92
156.25

295.55
260.40
219.14
5 326.29
1
123.83
206.94

+159.97
+56.23
+124.14
+164.62
+27.91
+50.69

72
53
23
5057
17
46
14

1 0 .0
,0 0 0

16.00
58.00

28.00

19

2.42

50.00

52.42

66.58

+14.16

385.00 2 56.00
5
210. 25 254.00
22.00
84.33
3.50 2 70.00
1.83 102.00

187
248

274.00
2.42

167
95
51

7.67
3.50
1.83

56.00
1,500.00
200.00
187.83
15.00
148.00

330.00
1,502.42
200.00
195.50
88.50
251.83

441.00
704.46
109.02
84.33
380.13
457.80

+ 111.0 0
-797.96
-9 0 .9 8
-111. 17
+291.63
+205.97

126.00
71.50

140.00
103.50
30.50
37.00
190.00
110.42
23.33
29.08
75.75
103.00
31.50
67.30
27.08
47.00
64.00
252.42

191.65
105.22
100.00
42.00
723.32
141.31
43.55
57.17
194.45
327.95
182.36
68.29
49.33
44.76
26.31
277.97

+51.65
+1.72
+69.50
+5.00
+533.32
+30.89
+ 20.22
+28.09
+118.70
+224.95
+150.86
+ .9 9
+22.25
-2 .2 4
-3 7 .6 9
+25.55

2.42

2 0 1 .0
.0
20

22
1

77
32.00
34.00
2
4.50 5 45.50
76
22.00
18
40.00 206.00 1,113
30.42
60.00
48
8.33
18
28.00
29.17
51
7
15.75 2 60.00
26
28.00
90.00
71
15.17
56.00
2.25
24.00
14.00
12.08
14
23
33
14.00
118.00
7

10
0

2 .0
00
60
.0

1
2
7
20
1 2 .0
7
"'2 2
.-4
10.42

6
8
2
0

20
.0

1 .0
20
160.00

3.67
43.33
10.50
37

51
84
54

24.00
8.67
2.08
16.67
36.83
2.17
11.67

‘l5
.‘l7
10.83
27.08

80
.0

62.00
56.00
56.00
74.00
16.00

24
36.00

2 .0
20
8 .0
60
22.00

2
1
63
36
37
34

1
1

12.00
2.17 156.00
7
4.33 2 15.00

19
177
259
34
4

6.25
16.00
34.67 2 (J0.00
7

24
16

36.00

80
.0

2 0!
.0

32.00 !.
4.50 ! 26.00
15.00
22.00
40.00
10.42
60.00
8.33
2.08
7
15.75 2 60.00
75.00
28.00
6.50
2.25
12.08
14.00
22.00

60
.0

2.42
10.42

48
41
26
18
49
17
59
4

270.OO
102.00

"li'oo

118.00
12.00

150.00
40.00
9.00
27.00
25.00
65.05

10
.0

25.00
50.00
132.00

80
.0

160.00
3.67
43.33
10.50
24.00
8.67
2.08
16.67
36.83
2.17
11 67
15.17
10.83
27.08
2.17
4.33

80
.0

50.00
56.00
56.00
44.00

4.00
15.00
60.00
30.00

30.00
30.00
30.00
70.00
22.00

80
.0

10.00
30.00
12.00
156.00
7 15.00

3.00
24.40

6.25
15.00
34.67 2 60.00
7

93
36
93
12161
77
17
14
181
30
14
48
91
46
17
9
9
7
61

30.42

36.60

+6.18

6

160.00
11.67
93.33
70.50
56.00
68.00
23.67
62.08

349.04
147.95
144.00
119.26
193.42
181.06
51.26
9.17

+189.04
+136.28
+50.67
+48.76
+137.42
+113.06
+27.59
-5 2.9 1

80
40
16
30
61
36
11
3

46.67
66.83
32.17
41.67
70.00
45.17
20.83
57.08

47.98
116.34
50.76
11.67
189.94
116.94
27.75
103.25
18.33
114.27
385.39
36.25

+1.31
+49.51
+18.59
-3 0.0 0
+119.94
+71.77
+ 6.92
+46.17
+18.33
+99.27
+202.82
+16.92

15
18
11
43
33
7
17
4
49
94
7

34.06
159.93

+12.81
+65.26

5
27

15.00
182.57
19.33
21.25
94.67 !

4 27 per cent loss of use of hand.
9
so Worked 23 days as oiler (at $72.50 per month) because of partial disability while returning to the Uaited
si Does not include $55.58 earned while partially disabled.
5 At $3.25 per day,
2




82

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

rate
per
month

Occupation

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
Days ment received
of
total
disa­ On In- Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d
697
700
701
702
703
704
705

Ordinary seaman..
Able seaman____ .
I
A ble seaman.
.
____do.............
Carpenter___
A ble seaman.

21
0)
20
45
27
23

$47.50
62.50
47.50
110.00
62.50
65.00

48
30
. 0)

80.00
62.50
62.50

706 Messman____
707 Able seaman.
708 Messman____
.
709
.
710
711 Oiler.
712
I
713 A ble seaman____
714 ____ d o .............. . .
715 ____do.................. ..
716 Fireman...............
717 Able seaman
-

27
30
21
21
44
48
36
32
27
54
35
0)

50.00
62.50
42.00
62.50
47.50
72.50
50.00
62.50
62.50
62.50
62.50
117.00

718 Fireman.............. 50
719 W a t c h m a n ___ 48
720 Oiler.................... - 0
721 A ble seaman___
26
722 Machinist______ 43
723 Fireman_______
27
724 Carpenter...........
42
725 Able seaman___
29
726 ____d o__________ . 21
727 Fireman_______
25
728 Chief mate.......... . 34
729 Pum p man_____ . 52
730 Chief steward.. . . 33
731 Able seaman___
49
732
. 42
733 Second m ate.
51
734 A ble seaman .
25
735 Deck hand—_
46
736 A ble seaman.
25

62.50
117.00
72.50
60.00
110.00
62.50
80.00
60.00
62.50
62.50
155.00
85.00
115.00
62.50
165.00
140.00
62.50
85.00
62.50

737 ____d o .........
38
738 M otorm an.
- (9
. 24
739
740 Messman .
. 30
. 32
741
742 Oiler........ .
21
743 Chief engineer___. 33
744 Fireman____
.. 30
745 Able seaman.
19
746 Oiler...........
. 26
747
. 46
748 Captain_____
51
749 Steward_____
39
750 Able seaman.
- 0)
. 21
751 Oiler...............
752 Third engineer—. 24
.

60.00
65.00
165.00
45.00
165.00
72.50
260.00
65.00
62.50
72.50
150.00
175.00
120.00
62.50
72.50
125.00

753 Able seaman..
754
.
755 Fireman. .
.
756 Ordinary seaman..
757 Able seaman
758 Mess b o y ___
759 Fireman____
760 ____d o ......... _
•
761 Able seaman.
.
762 Fireman____
763 B oatsw ain...
764 W ip e r ....___




23
32
28
25
20
21
50
0
28
34
23
30

62.50
260.00
65.00
47.50
55.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
55.00
65.00
65.00
67.50

Bruise, foot.......................................
Bruise, infection, left wrist and chest.
Bruise, neck and shoulder.............
Fracture, right foot.........................
Sprain, left w rist.............................
Laceration, abrasion, and bruise,
forehead.
Laceration, first finger right ha n d ..
Bruise, infection, right leg..................
Abrasion and bruise, second finger
left hand.
Burn, chest and thigh....................
Sprain, right knee............................
Fracture, rib.....................................
Fracture, fourth finger...................
Fracture, sixth rib right side........
Bruise, hydrocele, scrotum............
Hernia, groin............ ......................
Bruise, first finger right hand----Burn, right arm and fingers.........
Cellulitis, right thum b...................
Burn, hands.....................................
Fracture and laceration, third finger
left hand.
Laceration, fourth finger left hand..
Bruise, shoulder; strain, arm...........
Bruise, fourth finger right hand-----Fracture, fourth finger left hand-----Abrasion, left thigh, leg, and knee..
Bruise, little toe right foot.................
Puncture, left foot..............................
Sprain, left ankle— ............... ..........
Sprain, ankle_____________ _______
Fracture, nose................... - ............ —
Bruise, left thum b------- -----------------Bruise, right knee...............................
Fracture, right ribs................ ............
Bruise, knee------- --------------------------Dislocation, knee cap---------- ---------Hernia, left groin— ..........................
Foreign matter in left eye-------------Fracture, leg-------- ------------------------Laceration, infection, first and second
fingers6 right hand.
Abrasion and bruise, arm and eye—
Laceration, left wrist.................. .
____ d o .................................................
Laceration, thum b................. —
Fracture, left foot............. .............
Laceration, first finger right hand—
Sprain, right hip; strain, back—
Burn, hand-------------- -----------------Bruise, right wrist............ .............
Strain, back.....................................
Hernia, abdomen................... .........
Bruise...............................- .......... ........ i
Bruise, infection, elbow -------------------i
Abscess from shock, ear-------------------!
Fracture, rib...... .........- .......................
Puncture, infection, first finger right
hand.
Bruise, left arm; internal shock------Foreign matter in eyes........................ j
Scald, stomach—............. — ................i
Sprain, ankle......................................... J
Bruise, right side....... ........ ............ — J
Laceration, hand------ --------------------- !
Strain, back........................................-J
Scald, feet, chest, and back....... .........1
L e g ....................... - ..................... ........ i
Bruise, infection, thum b right hand.j
Bruise lips; sprain, hand__.................
Laceration, left foot........ ..................... 1

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
3 Partial disability for life.

21
16
62
43
15
2
15
32
13
12
44
38
27
15
23
55
15
13
29
29,
24
10
18
15
28
8
6
14
22
7
34
29
48
30
27
122
56
24
10
241
25
72
18
35
111
40
92
14
18
12
14
18
22
92
20
14
67
10
9
22
29
22
37
67
24
10
32
37

1
3
14
6
Y
1

9
12
8
37
6
1
15
6
13

23
2
2
1
3

7
8

11

12
28

20
24
3

3
1

10
4
14
15
5
10
21
5
4
45

__
72
22
4
50

6

2
10 ” 46’
9

__

1
1
5
7
1

11

27
23

_
_

19"
10

5
13
1
181
1
45
12
33
16
31
85
8
17

1
19
14
1
13
7
4
2
7
2
2
16
6
29
8
24

45
7
5

6

7
18
22
80
20

5

6
3

13
1
2

6
55
10
6
9
29
21
35
59

8
22
10
8

2

6 Amputation resulting.
7 Nuisance value,
w At $2.50 per day.

12

•
7

.....

3

.....

3
34
17

12

1

27

3

27
28
28
4

1
1

7
1
10

8

13

1

2
1
9
1
44

11
1
40

37

22

83

APPE N D IX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Days
Days
Possible recovery un­
for
Amount actually paid as—
from
der compensation act which
in­
compen­
jury
Main­
Main­
Other
Compared sation
to
Total
was
te­
compen­ Amount with actual com ­
settle­ Wages
te­
settle­
nance ment
nance
recovery
ment
sation
puted

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Main­
Wa­
te­
ges nance Wages

P E R S O N A L A G B E E M E N T -C on tin n e d
i
3
14
1
1
2

20
IS
48
37
14
1

$1.58
6.25
22.17
3.67
2.08
4.33

$40.00
26.00
96.00
74.00
28.00
2.00

7
10
30
27
7
267

$1.58
6.25
22.17
3.67
2.08
4.33

23

15
9
13

47.92

30.00
18.00
26.00

20
37
16

47.92

3
34
37
24
15

3.33
4.17
1.40
8.33

6.00
68.00
74.00
48.00
30.00

13
87
21
17
12
41
61
14
12
38
12
6

2
2
1
4
11
3
1
1
1

26.58
27
12
28
29

1

(4
0)

1
1
1

10

1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
9
19
44
15
1
30
1
27
3
10
9

....
9
5
14

1

1
1
3
7
10
3

1
1
2
3
1
3
1
3

1

(40)

15
28
7
5
14
21
2
34
23
2
21
26
6
34
13
9
181
25
45
12
33
61
31
92
13
17

54.00
6.25
24.00
2.08
56.00
2.08
0
2.08 1 72.50
(40)
4.50
2.08
4.50
2.42
~ 3. 67"
2.08
2.67
2.00
2.08
2.08
10.33
5.67
34.50
39.58
242.00

20.00

(40)

30.00
2 60.00
7
2 24.50
10.00
28.00
42.00
4.00
68.00
2 80.50
4.00
2 73.50
52.00
2 21.00

2119.00

"31.25" 26.00
2.83
18.00
62.50 362.00
2.00
58.50
4.50
55.00
21.75

50.00
90.00
2 42.00
66.00
2
213.50
62.00
2
322.00
26.00
34.00

2.17"
18.75
12.08
7
70.00 "2
~24."50"
5.83
63.00
18
22
2 77.00
80 " "2.08" 160.00
2.42
40.00
20
12.50 2 21.00
6
55
10
6

9

29
21
35
59
22
10
30

14.58
86.67
6.50
1.58
1.83
3.67
6.00
2.17
5.50
2.17
6.50
2.25

iio.oo
2 35.00
12.00
18.00
58.00
42.00
70.00
118.00
44.00
20.00
60.00

3.33
4.17
1.40
8.33

$40.00
20.00
96.00
70.00
28.00
30.00
15.00
25.00

52.00
50.00
100.00
30.00

75.00
50.00

50.00
2.00
1
58.50
90.00
72
77
35
4750" ” 66:55"
55.00 2
213.50
85
21.75
62.00
40
123
14 " "2."l7" " 26.-66"
4.17
35.00
18
12.08
26
14
70.00
15.00
5.83
63.00
18
99
2 77.00
92
2.08
37
2.42 "lo.'oo"
14
12.50 2 21.00
14.58
86.67
6.50
1.58
1.83
3.67
6.00
2.17
5.50
2.17
6.50
2.25

5.00

50.00
25.00

20.00
2.08
10
4.50
25
2.42
30.00
22
2 60.00
7
13
175 ""§."67"
10.00
2.08
7
2.67
20.00
9
30.00
2.00
5
2.08
28
68.00
2.08
8
10.33
36
5.67
49
34.50
86
39.58
52.00
12
129 242.00
2119.00
105
2.08
40
21
2.83
62.50 139.58
64

69
16
9
22
29
22
37
67
24
10
32
37

7.00
30.00

36.57
65.00
40.00
48.00
30.00

26.58
6.25
2.08
2.08
2.08
4.50

$69.00

100.00
2 35.00
12.00
18.00
58.00
35.00
70.00
118.00
44.00
15.00
60.00

36.00
24.50

10.00
7.00
84.00
75.00
75.00
12.59
225.00
11.00
200.00
7 115.00

7.50
165.00
9.00
529.50
38.00
300.00
4.00
50.00
36.16
11.00
260.00
20.00
4.00
13.38
8.00
22.00
2.39

55766"
23.25
11.00
40.00
15.00

$41.58
26.25
187.17
73.67
37.08
34.33

$82.24
62.97
215.75
220.77
63.16
6.33

35.00
62.92
25.00

71.21
87.19
56.72

+36.21
+24.27
+31.72

15

39.90
69.17
41.40
108.33
30.00
76.58
50.00
31.25
102.08
32.08
77.08
54.50

30.20
171.41
146.18
110.68
00. 50
57.57
168. 79
58.60
30.43
124.24
140.74
63.64

-9 .7 0
+102.24
+104.78
+2.35
+30. 50
-19.01
+118.79
+27.35
-7 1.6 5
+92.16
+63.66
+ 9.14

10
42
37
23
15
12
55
12
12
28
28
23

22.08
40.50
32.42
60.00
28.17
12.08
22.67
32.00
12.08
77.08
94.33
80.67
109.50
104.17
467:00
130.00
202.08
117.83
202.08

43.35
48.21
68.58
124.60
52.02
23.89
66.38
92.45
20.26
148.05
182.82
141.10
181.83
110.48
541.57
319.00
78.52
46.54
1, 705.17

+21.27
+7.71
+36.16
+64.60
+23.85
+11.81
+43.71
+60.45
+8.18
+70.97
+88.49
+60.43
+72.33
+6.31
+74.57
+189.00
-123.56
-7 1 .2 9
+1,503.09

17
14
28
7
5
13
21
6
33
27
46
21
8
78
56
9
9
6 542

52.00
156.00
165.00
79.50
798.00
121.75
300.00
32.17
39.17
62.08
85.00
104,99
88.00
262.08
62.42
37.50

107.37
257.27
106.29
133.81
629.21
163.82
650.57
59.59
74.02
30.16
94.50
129.54
155.57
377.10
91.49
72.79

+55.37
+101.27
—58.71
+54.31
-168.79
+42.07
+350.57
+27.42
+34.85
—31.92
+9.50
+24.55
+67.57
+115.02
+29.07
+35.29

24
45
18
32
101
31
92
13
9
7

114.58
135.05
26.50
41.58
62.22
38.67
131.00
143.42
60.50
17.17
106.50
17.25

266.35
121.67
33.00
62.27
121.39
89.64
154.44
279.70
95.67
43.92
136.60
91.27

+151.77
-1 3 .3 8
+ 6.50
+20.69
+59.17
+50.97
+23.44
+136.28
+35.17
+26.75
+30.10
+74.02

60

+$40.66
20
+36.72
13
+28.58
48
+147.10
42
+26.08
14
-2 8 .0 0 ............

9

13

9

17
22
91
19
11

6
21
28
20
34
66
21
9
29
63

2 A t $15 per week.
7
Employed on harbor craft 6 days per week—in practice not given allowance for maintenance. Wages
allow for subsistence ashore,




84

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

N o.
of

Occupation

Age

rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
Days ment received Days
of
of
contotal
disa­ On In­ Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d
$50.00
72.50

765
766

Cook..
Oiler..

767
770
771
772

____d o....................
Fireman--------A ble seaman- .
____d o......... .........
Pantrym an. - .
A ble seaman. .

70.00
60.00
62.50
80.00
60.00
62.50

773
774
775
776
777
778
779
780
781
782
783
784

Oiler........ ............
Chief stew ard...
Cook’s mate_____
Able seam an..
First engineer___
Oiler___________
____ do......... .......
Junior engineer .
Able seaman----Steward.............Cook’s mate-----Boatswain_____

67.50
135.00
40.00
62.50
170.00
72.50
65.00
90.00
62.50
70.00
40.00
65.00

785 Second engineer._
786 Assistant steward
787 Able seaman____
788 Oiler_______ _____
789 ____ d o ..................
790 Third engineer.

160.00
45.00
55.00
C5.C0
C5.00
120.00

A ble seam an..
____d o___________
Second assistant
engineer.
Quartermaster. _.

55.00
55.00
135.00

Assistant steward
C ook......................
Ordinary seaman
Able seaman........
Pantrym an..........
Assistant steward
Cook’s m ate—
Chief mate........
Butcher.............
Assistant steward
Cook’s m ate. _
Storekeeper...
W iper.......
Cook................
Able seam an..
Oiler.................
Cook...........
Butcher...........
Fireman..........
Cook’s m a t e ..
....... do....................
Stewardess___
Able seam an..

45.00
45.00
40.00
55.00
60.00
45.00
85.00
165.00
65.00
55.00
40.00
65.00
50.00
75.00
55.00
65 00
85.00
85.00
60.00
40.00
40.00
45.00
45.00

791
792
793
794
795
796
797
798
799
800
801
802
803
804
805
806
807
810
811
812
813
814
815
816
817

60.00

55.00
65.00
80.00
75.00
67.50
65.00

818 ____d o ..............
819 Oiler.................
820 Butcher...........
821 C o o k ...............
822 Oiler.................
____d o......... .
825
826
827

Engineer________
O i l e r . ... ...
Second engineer..;
W iper....................




42
20
31
28

180.00
65.00
165.00
57.50

28
Biuise, left side....................... .. .......... .
5 63
Dismemberment, infection, first and
second fingers6 right hand.
5
Laceration, fingers right hand______
186
Fracture, knee......................................
43
Bruise, left hip__................................. .
48
Bruise, right groin............................ ..
37
Hernia, groin..................... ...............
32
Abrasion, infection, first finger right
hand.
23
Laceration, hand..................................
50
Hernia, groin....................................... .
8
Sprain, little finger right hand..........
36
Bruise, left leg.......... .......................... .
13
Sprain, left knee...................................
16
Laceration, left hand......................... .
50
Fracture, thumb left h a n d ......... ......
46
Hernia, abdom en.................................
18
Fracture, left toe__...............................
35
Puncture, infection, right foot......... .
13
Puncture, left foot................................
124
Puncture, infection, thumb left
hand.
61
Fracture, second finger left hand___
22
Laceration,infection,(finger right hand.1
Fracture, left ankle....................... .'
57
14
Laceration, fourth finger right hand.
41
Fracture, first finger left hand...........
Dismemberment, second finger left
hand.
25
Hernia, abdomen.................................
Laceiation, finger_ _____ _________
_
25
Death from injury, nature not re­
ported.
Bruise and sprain, ribs and first fin­
55
ger right hand.
Sprain, thumb right hand..................
18
Burn, left ankle....................................
12
Sprain, left wrist..................................
47
Concussion of brain.............................
13
111
Fracture, second finger left hand........
Sprain, left ankle..................................
15
Hernia, abdom en. ...............................
37
Bruise, right knee.................................
30
Laceration, finger...............................
Hernia, abdom en. ...............................
23
16
Hydrocele, right testicle.....................
Puncture, infection right hand.........
20
Bruise, great toe. - ...............................
6
78
Foreign bod y in eye.............................
64
Abrasion and bruise, legs.................. .
Laceration, third finger right hand—
32
Bruise, right heel..................................
30
39
Abrasion, left leg...... - ...........................
Burn, left arm and face.......................
15
7
Bruise, thum b.......................................
Bruise, wrist..........................................
05
Fracture, left arm.................................
Dismemberment,
second
finger
*60
r.ght hand.
39
Bruise, fourth finger left hand______
14
Abrasion, second finger right hand - .
52
Laceration, thum b and third finger.
32
Scald, f o o t ................. ...................... .
33
Fracture, thum b................................. .
55
Laceration, second and third fingers
right hand.
20
Burn, irfection, forearm.................... .
49
Laceration and fracture, fingers____
365
Laceration, chest, arms, and sides.*.
91
Fracture and laceration, first, sec­
ond, and third fingers right hand.

i N ot reported.
* A t $3.50 per day.
? Partial disability for life,

35
‘ 135*

16
44

19

51
4
20

25

19
8

8 Amputation resulting,
7 Nuisance value,

(18)

23
28

85

APPEND IX B . — GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
D a y s en ­
titled to­

w

ges

M ain ­
a
­
W ages
te­
nance

D ays
for
w h ich
com pen­
sation
C om pa red
w as
w ith actual
com ­
re covery
p u ted

P ossible reco v e ry u n ­
der com pen sation act

A m o u n t en­
titled to as—

D ays
A m o u n t actu ally pa id as—
from
in ­
ju r y
O ther
M a in ­
M a in ­
T o ta l
to
com pen ­
te­
settle­
settle­ W ages
te­
sation
m ent
nance m ent
nance

A m oun t

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T - -C o n tin u e d
18
13

11
35

$30.00
31.42

$22.00
70.00

28
39

$30.00
31.42

$22.00
70.00

$28.00
1,201.00

4
7
2
1
14
1

5
135
42
42

9.33
14.00
4.17
2.67
28.00
2.08

10.00
270.00
84.00
84.00

5
99
43
48
37
32

9.33
14.00
4.17
2.67
28.00
2.08

10.00
270.00
84.00
65.00

8.00
55.00
128.00

1
1
4
14
3
1
14
25
1
12
10
24

22
6
5
22

2.25
4.50
5.33
29.17
17.00
2.42
30.33
75.00
2.08
28.00
13.33
52.00

44.00
2 21.00
10.00
44.00

2.25
4. CO
5.33
29.17
17.00
2.42
30.33
75.00
2.03
28.00
13. 33
52.00

36.00
2 21.00
10.00
44.00

202.00

23
50
8
36
13
13
50
46
18
35
13
124

32

13
50
19
101

64.00

32.00
100.00
38.00

75.00
67.75

32.00
100.00
38.00

46
15
30
14
41

85.33 W115.00
12.00
30 00
25.67
60.00
2.17
28.00
26.00
82.00
56.00

61
22
57
14
41
14

85.33
12.00
25.67
2.17
23.00
56.00

117.00
30.00
60.00
28.00
82.00

22
6

3
20

40.33
11.00

6.00
40.00

25
25
4

40.33
11.00

20

36

40.00

72.00

55

40.00

9
6
17
7
12
1
7
2
9
5
3
5
1
14
13
20
17
25
6
7

9
6
31
13
111
15
6
28

13.50
9.00
22.67
12.83
24.00
1.50
19.83
11 00
19.50
9.17
4.00
10.83
1.67
35 00
23.83
43.33
48 17
70.83
12.00
9.33

18.00
12.00
62.00
26.00
222.00
30.00
12.00
2 98.00

13.50
9.00
22.67
12.83
24.00
1.50
19.83
11.00
19.50
9.17
4.00
10.83
1.67
5.00
23.83
43.33
48.17
70.83
12.00
9.33

3
2

39
60

4.50
3.00

78.00
120.00

18
12
47
13
111
15
37
30
0)
26
16
20
6
0)
64
32
30
39
185
7
0)
65
60

9
1
1
12
2
54

31
14
51
21
32
54

16.50
2.17
2.67
30 00
4.50
117.00

62.00
28.00
102.00
42.00
64.00
108.00

39
14
52
32
33
55

16.50
2.17
2.67
30.00
4.50
117.00

1
1

20
48
170
59

6.00 2 70.00
2.17
96.00
561 00 2 595.00
1.92 118.00

20
49
730
560

6.00
2.17
5.50
1.92

102

1

26.00
16.00
12.00
98.00
102.00
24.00
23.00
30.00
20.00

4.50
3.00

1 A t $2.50 per day.
0
1 A m p u ta tion of distal phalange.
2




45.00
37.00
55.67

50.00

16
8
14
1
12
14

13
8
6
49
51
12
13
15
10

114.00
40.00
36.00
248.91
23.00
25.00

$80.00 !
$72.87
1,302.42 | 1,475.50
27.33
339.00
214.17
67.67
103.00
69.83

i

38.25
139.50
55. 33
109.17
285.91
57.42
155.33
75.00
47.08
103.00
69.00
102. 00

1

!
I
|
!
|
!
1
i
I
1
'
|
j

'
j
[

—$7.13
+ 173.08

10
6 532

21.86
696.98
185.05
215.79
81.06
139.33

- 5 .4 7
+ 357.98
- 2 9 .1 2
+ 148.12
- 2 1 .9 4
+ 6 9 . 50

1
179
41
47
23
31

100.65
200.50
22.80
125.15
52.71
73.16
217.35
137.31
42.25
124.12
18.94
495.71

+ 6 2 .4 0
+ 6 1 .0 0
- 3 2 . 53
+ 1 5 .9 8
—213. 20
+ 1 5 .7 4
+ 6 2 .0 2
+ 62. 31
- 4 .8 3
+ 2 1 .1 2
—50.06
+393. 71

22
49
4
22
10
15
36
21
17
23
3
100
45
14
43
13
29
12 105

6.00
25.33
17.00
44.17
100.00

202.33
43.00
111. 00
47.17
152.17
156.00

361.04
69.70
180. 21
61.49
178.10
431.00

+158.71
+ 2 1 .7 0
+ 09. 21
+ 1 4 .3 2
+ 2 5 .9 3
+ 275.00

6.00
40.00

269.00
35.00
22.50

315.33
86.00
22.50

52.93
92.77
7,500.00

-2 6 2 .4 0
+ 6 .7 7
+ 7 ,4 7 7 .5 0

72.00

28.00

140.00

192.75

+ 5 2 .7 5

63.50
59.00
62.67 !
91.83
201.80 i
47.70
94.83
159.50
84.50
84.17
144.00
60.83
36.67
155.00
233.83
103.33
98.17
170.83
112.00
79.33
7 25.00
192. G
O
1-iO.OO

49.31
32.87
140.73
52.02
474.41
59.20
117.54
209.00
19.50
55.34
54.29
63.09
24.11
301.78
237.96
96.34
111. 31
140.83
52.76
9.33
205.17
538.50

91.50
52.17
122. G7
150.00
79.50
154.33

144.46
61.59
244.77
124 74
145.16
227.42

32.00
18.00
38.00
12.00
40.00
53.00
26.00
177.80
30.00 '" '" 1 6 .2 0 '
12.00
63.00
2 98.00
50.50
65.00
75.00
114.00
26 00
34.00
16 00
12 00
23.00
150.00
102 00
138.00
41.00
24.00
2100
26.00
70.00
30.00
100.00
70.00
7 25.00
138.10
120.00
17.00
62.00
28.00
42.00
64.00
37.33
2 70.00
96.00

13.00
22 00
120.00
78.00

11.00
13.46
5.52
1,150.50
167.80

89.46
103.69
1,156.00
169.72

143.86
214.19
2,095.29
322.68

( 5

3
19
3

35

9
-1 4 .1 9
6
- 2 6 .1 3
30
+ 7 8 .0 6
6
- 3 9 .8 1
99
+272.61
14
+ 1 1 .5 0
30
+ 2 2 .7 1
28
+ 4 9 .5 0
—65.00
—28 83 ...........21
-8 9 .7 1
13
15
+ 2 .2 6
- 1 2 .5 6
5
64
+ 1 4 6 78
51
- 2 5 .8 7
12
-1 1 .9 9
13
+ 1 3 .1 4
14
- 3 0 .0 0
9
- 5 9 .2 4
—70.00
—25.00
62
+ 12.57
6 210
+ 398.50
+ 5 2 .9 6
+ 9 .4 2
+ 122.10
* - 2 5 .2 6
+ 6 5 .6 6
+ 7 3 .0 9

30
13
51
20
31

+ 5 4 .4 0
+ 110.50
+ 939.29
+ 152.96

19
48
263
90

1 N o record o f further disability.
8
» D epen den t w ife 38 years o f age.

1

)

86

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United, Stales

N o.
of

Occupation

Wage
rate
Age per
month

Nature of injury and part of b od y
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

P E R S O N A L A G R E E M E N T -C o n tin u e d
828 Fireman................
829 ........do....................
830 Chief engineer___
831 M essman..............

23
42
31
56

$67.50
67.50
260.00
50.00

832

D eck engineer___

58

80.00

833
834

Fireman................ 12
A ble seaman........ 45

65.00
62.50

835
836
837

Chief cook............ 47
Chief mate............ 41
Engineer............... 42

100.00
180.00
175.00

838
839

Fireman................ 38
Chief cook............ 28

67.50
90.00

840
841
842
843

Able seaman........ 20
Oiler...................... 22
Firem an.............. 19
Second machinist 40

62.50
72.50
62.50
135.00

844
845
846

A ble seaman........ 26
Master.................. 62
A ble seaman......... 22

60.00
205.00
60.00

847
848
849
850

Second engineer. _
Third engineer. _
Pum p m an______
W iper....... ............

34
31
55
24

165.00
150.00
SO 00
.
57.50

851
852
853
854

Cook’s mate........ 39
D eck h a n d 4 ....
0
0)
A ble seaman........ 39
Oiler...................... 0)

40.00
130.00
65.00
70.00

855 D eck hand........... 56
0
856 ........ do.4 . ............... 20
857 ____ d o ................... 21
858 F irem a n .............. 23
859 ____ d o _ _ ................ 33
860 A ble seaman........ 49
861 First engineer----- 31

85.00
121.33
85.00
75.00
90.00
62.50
185.00

862
863
864
865
866

Able seaman........
Coal passer______!
Second engineer __
Boatswain............
Scullery man........

49
41
27
38
32

62.50
60.00
165.00
75.00
50.00

867

Third engineer.

34

150.00

868
869

Assistant steward
A ble seaman ...

39
32

50.00
72.00

870
871
872
873
874

Floatman « -------First cook.............
Third baker.........
Boatswain______
C o o k -.......... „ ____

24
43
32
35
29

129.48
90.00
65.00
75.00
60.00

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
5 Partial disability for life.
« Amputation resulting.
7 Nuisance value.
m A t $2.50 per day.
1 A t $3 per day.
1
1 Amputation of distal phalange.
2




Hernia, abdom en. ............................. .
Burn, infection, left arm.....................
Death resulting from fractured skull.
Bruise, chest; fracture, twelfth rib
left side.
Sprain and laceration, ankle; frac­
ture right fibula.
Bruise, infection, leg............................
Death resulting from internal in­
juries.
Hernia, groin.........................................
Fracture, right leg................................
Dismemberment, great toe, right
foot.
Bruise, infection, right hand .............
Laceration, first and second fingers
left hand; fracture, third finger.
Fracture, right arm.............................
Fracture, fourth finger6 left h a n d ...
Burn, infection, face, neck, and hands
Burn, head, face,, neck, arms, and
hands.
Sprain, a n k le --.....................................
Death from drowning........ .................
Fracture, twelfth dorsal and first
lumbar vertebrae; laceration, in­
fection, right leg; bruise, head.
Fracture, right arm .......................... —
Fracture, fourth finger left hand----Bruise and burn; infection, right leg.
Bruise, hand; fracture, infection, fore­
arm.
Sprain, left knee__...............................
Fracture, left leg...................................
Rupture of drum, right ear.............
Dismemberment, first and third

12

54
35

121
79
143
247
* 150
58

(46)

125
*40
34
49

33

( 46 )

1
1

27
132

44
124

24

15

28
Life."
91
81
59
162

Life.
34

131
70
«15
5 45

Laceration, thum b left h and........ .
15
Laceration, right leg; sprain, ankle.
14
Abrasion, laceration, left hand..........I
24
Burn, and scald, face, nose, and eye.
11
Strain, back...........................................
19
Foreign matter in right e y e 60...........
12
Death resulting from concussion of
brain.
153
Fracture, left leg and right foot........ .
132
Fracture, right wrist.......................... .
89
Fracture and puncture, left h a n d ...
82
Laceration, perineum.........................
4 97
2
Fracture of skull, abscess of lungs,
death resulting.
Bruise and laceration, great toe left
26
foot.
45
Varicose veins, leg; sprain, knee— .
6394
Puncture, infection, index finger
right hand.
Dismemberment, right foot............. . «107
20
Bruise, s i d e . ........................................
Laceration, perineum......................... .
18
36
Bruise, left knee................................. .
63
Hernia, left groin..................................

25

126

25

39

« Employed on harbor craft 6 days per week—
in practice not given allowance for maintenance.
Wages allow for subsistence ashore.
4 Before death.
2
4 N o tim e lost.
«
M Dependent mother 56 years of age.
5 Dependent wife 24 years of age, 1 child 2 years
5
of age.

87

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Wa-

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
to
settle­
te­
nance ment

Maintenance

Amount actually paid a s i
M ain­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

Total
compen­
sation

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
Compared sation
was
Amount with actual com ­
recovery
puted

PERSONAL AGREEMENT—Continued
$24.00

1
121

10.00

$69.75

31

30.00
34

11

322.67

68.00

286.67
54.00 2 210.00
70.00 *462.00
20.25

12.00

22.92
58.00
2.08
4.50

"5 :6 ’
46

2.00

27

295 '

1.67

$136.96
2.14
1,881.60
25.92

$136.96
71.89
1,881.60
27.59

$187.21
89.64
5.577.00
65.48

+$50.25
+17.75
+3,695.40
+37.89

$69.75

12.00

32.00

5.33

225.50

230.83

390.67

23.83

142.22
3,008.91

166.05
3,008.91

188.20
7.500.00

+22.15
+4,491.09

243
163

3.33
54.00 *$210.00
70.00 485.00

302.23
1,097.88
750.00

305.56
1,361.88
1,305.00

468.34
1.114.00
1,242.71

+162.78
-247.88
—62.29

11

33
(40)
15
25

55.25
7 50.00

153.42

+98.17
-5 0 .0 0

49

164
93
34
49

22.92
58.00
2.08
4.50

232.05
327.88
61.86
97.78

254.97
385.88
63.94
102.28

292.29
361.20
80.05
229.93

+37.32
-2 4 .6 8
+16.11
+127.65

114
6 105

224

2.00

49.76
51.76
1,832.04 1,832.04
13,581.12 13,583.12

76.29
7.500.00
7.502.00

+24.53
+5,667.96
-6,081.12

61

+327.59
+402.54
+122.08
+71.71

(40)

24

11

19

C
1
)

5.50
5.00

131
70
15
45

13.33
5.00
2.17
2.33

15
14
24

2.83
4.67
2.83
2.50
3.00
25.00

2.83
4.67
2.83
2.50
3.00
25.00

(40)
48.00
22.00
38.00

193.34
166.67
150.00
310.75

198.84
171.67
150.00
314.58

526.43
574.21
272.08

66.00

384.00
230.00

30.00
50.00

10.00

463.33
235.00
42.17
1,602.33

305.43
202.14
384.11
1,908.36

72.83
120.43
52.83
67.50
38.00
75.00
2,959.26

42.83
39.32
116.54
50.87
94.41
25.00
7,500.00

-3 0 .0 0
-8 1.1 1
+63.71
-1 6 .6 3
+56.41
-5 0 .0 0
+4,540.74

477.24
477.08
564.24
431.00
572.00
297.00
173.61
228.11
4,311.55 623,945.30

+ . 16
+133.24
+275.00
+54.50
-366.25

152
118
77
81
6 80
2

961
162

11
19
66

6
25

2.08
28.00
2.50
28.33

12.00

5.00

2 87.50

11.67
(64)
( 4°)

11
6

2

19

116.00
264.00

66.00 “ 231.00

136.00

( 4°)
27.00
6.50
12.50
4.00
22.00 io 47.50

2 .0
20
1 .0
20

95
139
89
155
25

5.00

62

20
18

27.00
6.50

58

10.00
22.00

0)

2 87.50

22.00

12.00

46.00
25.00

5 Dependent wife 51 years of age.
6
«7 Complete transverse myelitis of the lower dorsal
region.
5 40 per cent loss of hearing in the right ear.
8
*9 43 per cent loss of use of hand.
60 Resulting in loss of false teeth overboard; given
$50 for new ones.
6 Dependent wife 31 years of age, 1 child 6 years
1




43.00

359.00
139.00
171.11
4,308.22

90
80
59
160

121

-157.90
69
-3 2.8 6
+341.94 » 145*
+306.03 5 734tsV
5
14
13
23

10
18
(61)

5.50

98.00

181.79

+83.79

25

64.79
181.29

11.67
(64)

63

2.00

eo 50.00
2,959.26

2.08 116.00
28.00 264.00
66.00 “ 231.00
2.50
3.33

86

1,550.00

70.00
115.76
48.00
22.00
35.00

881
58
132
77

57
238

1 19
29

35.00
7 50.00

5.50 2199.50
5.00 2283.50
110.00
22.00
66.00
(40)
30.00
50.00

(«)

20.25

0) ""i'oo'
582

13.33
5.00
2.17
2.33

17

43
40

2.00
57
81
55

4

(64)

+159.84

275
219

23.83

60
132

106
91
144
212

76.46
181.29

90.98
395.45

+14.52
+214.16

38
63 94

2,600.00

2,600.00
49.00
18.50
56.00
47.00

4,083.60
81.64
54.76
98.25
189.47

+1,483.60
+32.64
+36.26
+42.25
+142.47

1,435

11

15
31
52

6 Dependent wife 33 years of age, children 12, 10,
2
7, and 3 years of age. Includes $166.97 compensation
for 80 days’ temporary total disability before death;
50 per cent of compensation payable, nonresident
alien beneficiary.
6 5 per cent partial disability for 138 days.
3
6 N ot including $505.68 wages earned during 138
4
days of partial disability.

88

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidcnta to stamen of the United States

No.
of

rate
per
month

Occupation

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

NO CLAIM FILED
1 Wireless operator.
2 Second engineer..
3 Carpenter.............
4 Purser...................
5 Ordinary seaman.
6 Fireman................
7 Oiler.....................
8 Master...................
9 A ble seaman........
10 Messman..............
11 Able seaman........
12 Ordinary seaman.
13 Second cook.........
14 Able seaman........
15 Second baker____
16 Donkey man____
17 Coal passer...........
18 A ble seaman. . . . .
19 Mess b o y ..............
20 A ble seaman........
21 ........ d o ....................
22 First engineer___

27 $110.00
53 135.00
43
80.00
22 100.00
23
47.50
42
67.50
72.50
(0
46 285.00
62.50
40
20
42.00
19
62.50
21
47.50
35
80.00
18
62.50
19
80.00
40
65.00
25
50.00
62.50
0)
64
42.00
20
40.00
27
62.50
30 185.00

23 A ble seaman.. .... 40
24 ____ do.................... 39
25 E nd m an . ........... 22

55.00
62.50
40.00

Fracture, left leg..............................
Laceration, second finger6.............
Fracture, leg.....................................
Osteomyelitis, right shin...............
Laceration, hand.............................
Dismemberment, left arm.............
Strain, left lumbar region. ............
Strain, §roin..................... ...............
Laceration, infection, right shin__
Laceration, left knee.......................
Fracture, lower femur and radius___
Bruise, left knee....................................
Bruise, left shoulder.............................
Bruise, infection, second finger........
Laceration, second finger left hand.
Laceration, wrist and shoulder........
Laceration, infection, hand......... ......
Foreign matter in eye...................... .
Abrasion, infection, leg and shin—
Abrasion, infection, left h ip ..............
Strain, back_________ _________
Dismemberment, second finger,
right hand.
Sprain, ankle.................. ....................
Abrasion, infection, left foot.............
Bruise, infection, foot........................

47
i»9
75
127
8
«112
20
62
57
27
116
31
8
11
13
55
82
15
22
20
38

9
(18)
74
83
7 1
102 ;

(18)
39

"15
57
20
114
22

AGREEMENT BT ATTORNEY

42
25
29
(l)
26

62.50
67.50
80.00
55.00
62.50

8 Mess b oy________ 22
9 Firem an. ............. 23
10 Carpenter............. 43
11 Second cook......... 31
12 Water tender____ 0)
13 W iper.................... 24
14 Water tender____ 21
15 Able seaman........ 20
16 Junior engineer-- 38
17 Able seaman........ 36
18 Wiper.................... 18
19 Able seaman........ 31
20 ____ d o .................... 33
21 W iper.................... 21
22 Oiler....................... 55
23 Able seaman........ (0
24 Coal passer______ 27
25 Chief mate............ 41

35.00
50.00
70.00
70.00
65.00
50.00
65.00
62.50
115.00
50.00
50.00
55.00
47.50
57.50
72.50
62.50
60.00
180.00

26

Deck b o y .............. 24

25.00

27
28

Able seaman____
Second cook.........

21
0)

62.50
85.00

29

Able seaman____

28

62.50

Fracture, left arm.................................
Sprain, wrist; abrasion, bruise, fore­
head.
Bruise, right ankle...............................
Strain, left leg.......................................
Bruise, left fo o t .................................. .
Strain and bruise, arms and back. _ _
Abrasion, bruise, and laceration, left
hand and ear .«•
Fracture and strain, right ankle 4 _ .
4
Laceration, right knee c a p . . . ............
Fracture, right shoulder.....................
Fracture, vertebra...............................
Strain, g r o in .....................................
Sprain, right ankle...............................
Bruise, groin.........................................
Foreign matter in eye..........................
Fracture, right hand. ..........................
Bruise, infection, arm ..........................
Fracture, left f o o t . . . ............................
Foreign matter in eye .........................
Bruise, left hand...................................
Bruise right leg; hernia, right groin..
Fracture, jaw; bruise left e y e 6 .........
8
Burn, knees.......................................... .
Bruise, laceration, left hand............. .
Bruise, laceration, first« and second
fingers right hand.
Foreign matter in right eye, infec­
tion.
Hernia, groin..... ...................................
Abrasion, infection, first finger right
hand.
Fracture, puncture, infection, right

30 ........ d o .................... 23
31 ........ d o . . ................ 29

55.00
62.50

Laceration, infection, right leg.
Laceration, right ea r..................

1
2

W iper................
19
Ordinary seaman. 26

3 A ble seaman........
4 Fireman................
5 Assistant cook___
6 A ble seaman........
7 ........ d o ....................

$57.50
47.50

1 N ot reported.
2 At $3.50 per day.
« Partial disability for life.
•Amputation resulting.




48

123
6 69
5
5 12
5 276
96
90
665
62
27
83
62
70
24
55
32
15
42
«61
579
97
5 53

55
449
25
23

30

10

50

20

5 202

166

" '1 9

30
36
11

7 Nuisance value.
• Alleged further disability could not be verified.
1 N o record of further disability.
8

89

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Possible recovery un­ Days
Amount actually paid as—
Days
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
M ain­
to
Main­
Other
Total
Compared sation
was
te­
te­
settle­ Wages
settle­
compen­ Am ount with actual com*
recovery
ment
nance
sation
nance ment
puted

Am ount en­
titled to as—

[Main­
Wa- i te­
nance

NO CLAIM FILED
$95.33
40.50
2.67
330.00
9.50
65.25

$44.00

25

$3.67
40.50
2.67
20.00
1.58
2.25

$3.67
40.50
2.67
20.00
1.58
2 25

128.00

2 08
2.80
2.08
7.92
2.67
2.08
2.67
17.33
13.33

2.08
2.80
2.08
7.92
2 67
2.08
2.67
17.33
13.33

2 21.00

9.33
2.03
6.16

9.33
2.08
6.16

1.83
6.25
1.33

1.25

78.00
40 00
2150.50

118.75
37.80
2.08
33.25
2.67
2.08
2.67
17.33
13.33
30.80
12 00
2.08
141.83
11.00
27.08
1.33

12.00
4.00
20.00
12.00

12.00

$210.88
790.50
205.96
497.24
13.57
5-, 465.97
91.66
371.93
118.75
49 80
277.81
53.58
21 90
45.71
47.64
130.94
295.78
35.44
30.80
32.55
89.51
912.83

+$207.21
+750.00
+203.29
+477.24
+11.99
+5,463.72
+91.66
+371.93
+116.67
+47.00
+275.73
+45.66
+19.23
+43.63
+44.97
+113.61
+282.45
+35.44
+30.80
+23.22
+87.43
+906.67

21
3« 210
74
28
2
6 2,184
20

23.00
31.81
77.94

+21.17
+25.56
+76.61

2
41

115
10
7
10
12
47
74

io

'" “ l i
37
6 210

AGREEMENT BY ATTORNEY
$900.00

$903.83
45.17

$163.87
126.16

-$739.96
+80.99

45
30

58.33
6.75
48.00
11.00
2.08

72.92
400.00
150.00
7 225.00
2,000.00

131.25
406.75
198.00
236.00
2,002.08

58.33
303.49
258.10
11.00
852.00

-7 2.9 2
-103.26
+G0.10
-225.00
-1,150.08

120
51

7.00
15.00
2.33
266.00
21.67
6.67
52.00
22.92
130.33
8.33
35.00
3.67
25.00
1.92
26.58
12.50
18.00

2,000.00
500.00
400.00
2,404.00
100.00
75.00
200.00
125.00
175.00
50.00
125.00
250.00
30.00
125.00
200.00
200.00
125.00
500.00

2.007.00
515.00
402.33
3.570.00
121.67
81.67
252.00
147.92
305.33
58.33
160.00
253.67
55.00
126.92
226.58
212.50
143.00
650.50

729.77
370.58
363.50
2,558.46
197.36
91.00
262.35
237.36
375.90
47.99
119.96
125.97
41.00
94.29
2,991.38
1,450.42
397.03
1,300.50

-1,277.23
-144.42
-3 8.8 3
-1,011.54
+75.69
+9.33
+10.35
+89.44
+70.57
-1 0.3 4
-4 0.0 4
-127.70
-1 4 .0 0
-3 2.6 3
+2,764.80
+1,237.92
+254.03
+650.00

225.00

225.00
178.14

+118.14
-7 5 .0 0

50

7 75.00

60.00
7 75.00

$34.50
3.17

6 35
5
12

10
114
10
27
49
47
34
5
21
12
15
1
11

87
69
450
25
23
37
52
34

$28.00
62.00

34

$3.83
3.17

58.33
6.75
48.00
11.00
25.00

70.00

104
155
229
787
50

280
7.00
15.00 174.00 1,284
365
23.33 138.00
287
266.00 900.00
21.67
190
50.00
75
45.00
46.00
148
106.17
74.00
276
97.92 104.00
489
130.33 2119.00
8.33
49
35.00
679
14.00
297
22.00
60.00
25.00
16.00 1*229
134
1.92
26.58
72."oo" 133
12.50
826
84.00
18.00 176.00
211
4
U50.50
186.00

900.00

2150.50

143

60.00

$42.00

76
101

60.00

"66350
«7 411
87
80
551
52
34
15
36
19
34
20
41
681.120
573
88
6322

+104.09

72.00
8

12

16.67

230

5.000.00

5,000.00

-3,340.16

6 672
9

24.00

296
12

7 75.00
31.00

7 75.00
71.67

-7 5 .0 0
-5 .0 1

‘ " " 'i i

16.67

24.00

8 Amputation of tw o phalanges.
8
4 25 per cent loss of use.
4
M N o record of events from time he left the ship
until admission to hospital (16 days).




w Loss of hearing in 1 ear.
6 25 per cent permanent total disability.
7
Loss of sight in 1 eye.
6» 33H per cent loss of use.

90

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Age

rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In­ Outbility ship pa­
tient tFent

Days
con­
vales­
cence

A G R E E M E N T B Y A T T O R N E Y —Continued
Mess m a n ............ 38
W iper....................
Second cook.........
Mess man..............
Second engineer,.
Ordinary seaman.
Messman..... ........
A ble seaman........
Quartermaster...
A ble seaman........
Fireman...............
W a ite r ................
Fireman...............
A ble seaman........

$45.00
57.50
75.00
50.00
140.00
40.00
45.00
62.50
70.00
55.00
57.50
45.00
70.00
62.50

Messman____
W iper_______
A ble seaman .
Chief cook—
Messman-----A ble seaman.
____do.............
Oiler...............
Fireman........
Dishwasher..
Messman____
A ble seaman.
____d o.............
____ d o.............

47.50
57.50
62.50
90.00
42.00
62.50
62.50
72.50
67.50
42.00
55.00
62.50
62.50
60.00

........ do.................. .

60.00

........ d o ------M essm an..
C ook ..,___

62.50
42.00
85.00

Water tender___
Fireman..............
Second engineer.
A ble seaman----........ do..................

65.00
57.50
130.00
62.50
55.00

Fireman..............

67.50

Oiler.....................
Boatswain..........
Second engineer.
Oiler....................

65.00
65.00
140.00
72.50

Able seaman____
Carpenter........... .
Ordinary seaman.
Storekeeper........ .
Fireman..............

65.00
70.00
47.50
70.00
65.00

Third engineer..
Second mate—

150.00
145.00

1 N ot reported.
3 A t $3.50 per day.
* Permanent loss of use.
* Partial disability for life.
7 Nuisance value.




Burn, back.....................................
Scald, chest, back, head, arm s...
Dislocation, right shoulder_____
Laceration, right hand.................
Death from explosion...................
Fracture, n o s e .. ...........................
Laceration, thumb * right hand.
Sprain, back...................................
Laceration, left hand....................
Laceration, fracture, ankle..........
Hernia, left inguinal......................
do..
Rupture, ear drum.............................
Fracture rib right side, heel; bruise,
left hip, chest, chin.
Hernia, groin.......................................
Fracture, clavicle................................
Bruise and laceration, arms..............
Burn, left hand...................................
Strain, groin.........................................
Bruise, laceration, heel.....................
Bruise, laceration, left forehead-----Scald, right leg....................................
Bums, abscess, infection, h a n d s...
Hernia, right side...............................
Bruise, right eye; laceration, scalp..
Bruise and sprain, b od y......................
Bruise, laceration, right shin..............
Fracture right tibia; bruise, right
hip.
Laceration, hand; crushed astragalus,
ankle.
Fracture, pelvis.....................................
Puncture, left e y e 68..............................
Puncture, infection, first finger left
hand.
Burn, right arm and neck...................
Hernia, right groin...............................
Hernia, abdom en..................................
Puncture, infection, eye......................
Fracture, left ankle; laceration, eye­
brow.
Bruise, infection, second finger right
hand.
Bruise, foot............................................
Bruise and sprain, back....................
Bruise, infection, right leg.................
Bruise, laceration, fracture, third
finger left hand.
Bruise, head..........................................
Dislocation, right shoulder.................
Foreign body in eye; infection.........
Sprain, ankle.........................................
Fracture, left wrist; laceration, ankle;
bruise, forehead.
Fracture, skull; bruise, shoulder—
Fracture, back, seventh rib left side.

11

11
27

27
113
*49
119
26

21
21
152

93
»48
136
75
28
67
38
108
118
15
«8
34
71
38
14
72
59

W

"'9 3 '
14
14
(»)

"~5

"~28

30

30
” ’ ii*

......
185

90

152
*42

17

12

(9
)

68
(9
)
30

152'
’ ~60’

71
92
97
31

"l86*
44
56
(IS)
91
25

*332

88
96
57
141
151

3
40
49

23

48

24
I f
3 ’"'82’
8

3
91
69
125
132
57

• Alleged further disability could not be verified.
1 A t $2.50 per day.
0
1 A t $3 per day.
1
is N o record of further disability.
« A t $12.50 per week.

7
14

81
94
21

21
62

91

A PPE N D IX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to­

wa­
ges

Amount en­
titled to as—

Main­
te­
nance Wages

Possible recovery un­ Days
Amount actually paid as—
Days
der compensation act
for
from
which
in­
compen­
jury
to
M ain­
Other
Compared sation
Total
Main­
was
settle­ Wages
compen­ Amount with actual
te­
settle­
te­
com ­
nance ment
sation
recovery
ment
nance
puted
A G R E E M E N T B Y A T T O R N E Y —Continued

$16.50
13.42
70.00
1.67
40
70
21
338
44
56
1840
107

$22.00
54.00
40.00
40.00

10.67
13.50
70.83
11.67
51.33
3.83
25.50
30.33
4.17

6.00
80.00
H210.00
2 37.50
8
676.00
10110.00
2
*100.00

80.00
214.00

84 $16.50
41
13.42
70.00
719
1.67
100
171
10.67
113
620
13.50
231.
22.92
37
11.67
674
51.33
3.83
386
117
25.50
152
30.33
4.17
136

$75.00
164.50
25.00
40.00
4.500.00
134.66
175.00
250.00
50.00
1.250.00
105.00
125.00
250.00

$91.50
231.92
95.00
41.67
4,500.00
151.33
188.50
272.92
61.67
1,301.33
108.83
150.50
280.33
187.17

$87.96
175.56
199.66
81.33
4,761.41
212.87
1,132.25
481.67
102.24
1, 53f>. 40
296.31
275.87
198.78
534.79

-$ 3 .5 4
-5 6 .3 6
+104.66
+39.66
+261.41
+61.54
+943.75
+208.75
+40.57
+235.07
+187.48
+125.37
-8 1 .5 5
+347.62

2.08
2.00

146.00
7 50.00
1
350.00
40.00
150.00
425.00
75.00
7 125.00
100.00
74.00
100.00
50.00
75.00
1,000.00

146.00
51.92
362.50
43.00
155.60
427.08
77.08
144.33
111. 25
141.40
116.50
50.00
77.08
1,002.00

152.46
116.75
278.63
186.78
390.54
366.53
63.16
19.33
82.96
201.30
69.67
61.08
161.78
139.81

+ 6.46
+64.83
-8 3 .8 7
+143.78
+234.94
-6 0 .5 5
-1 3 .9 2
-125.00
-2 8 .2 9
+59.90
-4 6 .8 3
+11.08
+84.70
-862.19

$54.00

6.00

183.00

25
48
34
19
(7
°)
105
* 525
85
21
368
81
76
35
134

"'14
1
2

77.08
2.00

28.00
2.00
4.00

110
28
169
348
259
225
44
136
133
59
124
123
73
188

241

2.00

482.00

150

2.00

4.500.00

4.502.00

3,602.51

-899.49

82

2.08
58.80

323
61
179

2.08
1.40

1.100.00
2,000.00
35.00

1,102.08
2,001.40
35.00

522.87
2,201.20
38.86

-579.21
+199.80
+3.86

151
8 1,120
8

2.17
11.50

250.00
7 50.00
250.00
40.00

252.17
61.50
169.33
250.00
171.00

348.46
11.50
340.57
537.16
449.79

+96.29
-5 0.0 0
+171.24
+287.16
+278.79

....... 15
141
145

33

1.92
12.50
3.00
5.60
2.08
2.08
19.33
11.25
1.40
69.67

54.00
122.00
74.00
186.00
88.00
28.00
66.00

164.00
16.00

30
102

2.17 136.00
11.50
182.00 2105755'
204.00
120.00
” 11765
"

31
37
295

1.92
12.50
3.00
5.60
2.08
2.08
19.33
11.25
1.40
16.50

11.00

66.00

120.00

75
27
61
37
104
117
14
........29
70
........14
35
58
(72)

87

70.00

317.57

+247.57

120
203
134
72

2.17
2.17
9.33
9.67

250.00
250.00
635.00
100.00

252.17
252.17
644.33
109.67

139.60
300.37
646.12
95.41

-112.57
+48.20
+ 1.79
-1 4 .2 6

37
76
95
27

176.00
28.00
188.00
42.00

84
, 136
75
36
118

23.33
12.67
60.67
8.67

188.00
42.00

7 30.00
125.00
50.00
12.00
158.00

7 30.00
148.33
62.67
260.67
208.67

6.50
404.03
164.67
498.86
360.06

-2 3 .5 0
+255.70
+102.00
+238.19
+151.39

81
61
99
128

5.00
42.00
62.83 2217.00

146
51

5.00
62.83 2217.00

7 292.18
3
144.34

™297.18
424.17

247.00
469.12

-5 0 .1 8
+44.95

56
53

142.00
2.17
48.00
34.67
82.00
9.33 2297.50
9.67
16.00
6.50
23.33
12.67
60.67
8.67

70.00

6 Loss of sight in 1 eye.
8
7 Dependent father 61 years of age, sister 30 years of age.
0
7 N et amount.
1
7 20 per cent permanent total disability.
3
7 Settlement, $302.18. The sum of $10 earned wages unclaimed b y the seamen deducted.
1




92

SETTLEMENT POE ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Age

Occupation

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

a c t io n

Chief thate___ * . 49 $250.00
Ofdinafy seaMa: . 30
47.50
25
67.50
Fireman. ^..........
Mess b o y ---_
Mfesstftan-----A ble seaman.
____do_______
Carpenter-----

22
22
36
. 29
30

42.00
42.00
55.00
55.00
70.00

23
35

72.50
110.00

23
21
36
. 25
. 21
. 24

72.50
62.50
57.50
40.00
40.00
40.00

Oiler...........
Chief cook.
Oiler...............
A ble seaman.
W iper.............
........ do.......

Quartermaster __ .
Able seam an...
Boatswain........ .
Able seam an...
Fireman...........
Able seaman...
_
Fireman.

24
21
46
0)
25
31
42
24

60.00
55.00
65.00
62.50
65.00
62.50
165.00
65.00

Oiler_____
Mess b o y .

48
22

65.00
42.00

Fireman........
Able seaman.
Fireman........
W iper.............
Oiler...............

33
25
37
23
23

65.00
55.00
o7.50
50.00
65.00

Second engineer... 40
Mess b o y —
0)
23
Able seaman

135.00
37.50
47.50

Ordinary seaman..
.
.
J
A ble seaman.
W iper.............
Messman____
A ble seaman.

(*).............

23
19
20
45
42
(l)
20
38
41

40.00
25.00
47.50
120.00
62.50
45.00
40.00
85.00
55.00

W iper.........
Ordinary see
Fisherman.
____d o .........
Oiler............

30
20
49
31
27

57.50
47.50
350.00
350.00
72.50

Mess b o y . . .
Coal passer .
Mess b o y . . .

23
17
33
28

42.00
60.00
42.00
57.50

l

D
T

c o m p r o m is e d

fracture, infection, ieg 7 and afm__.
4
Nervous shock, abdomen. ........... .
Fracture, fourth, fifth, and sixth
fibs left side.
Pneumonia, pleurisy8
.........................
Fracture, left foot............................... .
Sprain, left wrist; strain, a bd om en ..
Fracture, left leig...................................
Bruise, laceration, infection, frac­
ture, dismemberment, left lower
leg and foot.6
Dismemberment, thumb right hand
Opening of old wound in leg; infec­
tion.
Bruise, thumb right hand...................
Crushed, left hand...............................
Hernia, side............................................
Fracture, right wrist........ ..................Sprain, strain, bruise, right foot........
Abrasion over right eye;7 sprain,
®
wrist; bruise, knee.
Rupture, right side..............................
Laceration, left leg...............................
Foreign matter in eye; infection........
Bruise, arm ............................................
Bruise, great toe, left foot..................
Burn, face, chest, and hands.............
Foreign matter in right eye 2 ............
3
Bruise and laceration, first finger
left hand.
Sprain, both ankles.............................
Bruise, infection, first finger right
hand.
Fracture, rib right side........................
Bruise, left leg, hip, heel.....................
Sprain and strain, right hand...........
Laceration, second finger right hand..
Bruise, fracture, second finger7 left
4
hand.
Sprain, bruise, infection, left leg.......
B um , face..............................................
Contusion, fourth finger • right
hand.
Laceration, ear......................................
Fracture, bruise, toe right foot..........
Thrombosis, leg; hernia, groin...........
Compound fracture, left knee c a p ...
Fracture, left foot.................................
Dislodgment, kidney..........................
Fracture, right elbow ........ .................
Fracture skull, death resulting.........
Bruise, infection, second finger right
hand.
Fracture, knee cap ...............................
Laceration, right forearm.................. .
Drowned in collision...........................
........d o .................................................... .
Fracture, third metacarpal right
hand.
Bruise, right knee; sprain, left ankle
Scald, face and eye...............................
Sprain, strain, left side.......................
Bruise; endarteritis obliterans; in­
fection all extremities.

i N ot reported.
8 A t $3.50 per day.
* Partial disability for life.
6 Amputation resulting.
* Nuisance value.
8 Occupational disease.
* Alleged further disability could not be verified.




D ays of treat­
ment received
Days
of
con­
total
disa­ On In- Out- vales­
cence
bility ship
tl

*63
90
162

15
21

209
64
92
159
5 492

47
31
C
O
0)
162

#65
22
10
55
136
221
73
<62

186
61
17

116
195
153
3
89
83
*73

6
‘ lb
'Th

' 57'

35

46
7 42
6

94

19

31
44
54
* 44

3
40

106
16
8 151
27
13
265
91
Q4
is 358
56

24 (
‘ i§5"

47

50

(18)5

55
63

31

28

30

30

10
22
119
Life.

9
17
34
65
28 1463

98
3

5
20
2
39 8 870

12 Amputation of distal phalange.
w N o record of further dsability.
2 90 per cent loss of vision.
3
8 Voucher for this amount still unclaimed.
8
53 Dependent wife 38 years of age.
7 50 per cent loss of use.
4

93

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE
merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Wa-

Amount en­
titled to as—

MainWages
tenarice

Days
from
in­
jury
to
M ain­
settle­
te­
nance ment

Am ount actually paid as—

M ain­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

Total
compen­
sation

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
sation
Compared
was
Amount with actual com ­
recovery
puted

ACTION COMPROMISED

15
27
1
2
44
119

0)
162

1,202
89
157

$83.33
104.50
137.25

37.80
1.40
3.67
80.67
277.67

801
290
463
471
<9
324.00 1,142

2.80
1.40
3.67
1.83
28.00

80.67

51

130.00 1.149
20.00
31

40.33

$425.00
104.50
153.00

$30.00
44.00
94.00
62.00

12.00 1.149
495
256
455
122.00
607
34.00 1,044

9.67
2.08
17.25
24.00
1.33
4.00

60.00
122
68.00
68
62.33
85
108.33 290.00
155
6.25
459
“"75* 32.50 150.00
1,125
41.67
695
264.00 2 213.50
13.00 140.00
395

38.00
62.33
108.33
2.08
32.50
41.67
264.00
13.00

124
109
375
352
276
847
656

144
63
136.00 1,315

30

145

92.00

19.50
28.00

20.00
18.00

175.50
22.00
9.58
56.67
2.17

80.00
80.00

47

58.50 78211.50

68

72.83

56

20.00

36.00
5.83
49.08
16.00
2.08
1.50
2.67
1. £
187.83
1.58

520
4.00 2,054
2 7.00
80
486
18.00
323
112.00
57
764
126.00
670
196.00
6.00

2.42
5
20
! 909

141
218
491
491
474

7.00
231
2.00
10.00
51
54.60
40.00
277
126.50 1,818.00 1,736

36.00
5.83
49.08
16.00
2.08
1.50
2.67




808.00
100.67

150.00
300.00

171.67
302.08
117.25
324.00
151.33
2.504.00

37.17
237.40
495.36
775.32
257.87
2,732.67

-134.50
6
-6 4 .6 8
53
+378.11
127
+451.32
203
+106.54
72
+228.67 7«1,400

1.250.00
439.50
171.17
75.00
300.00
3.500.00
432.00
500.00

1.288.00
501.83
569.50
77.08
332.50
3,541.67
696.00
513.00

317.19
416.30
647.30
6.25
361.37
190.53
4,477.50
363.29

-970.81
82
-8 5.5 3
161
+77.80
103
-70.83
+28.87
74
-3,351.14
63
+3,781.50 231,120
-149.71
87

519.50
96.40

256.53
189.55

-262.97
+93.15

60
74

100.00

275.50
1,022.00
209.58
201.67
300.00

212.84
63.77
177.44
178.41
255.97

-6 2.6 6
—958.23
-3 2.1 4

8
19
39
20
74105

300.00

358.50
223.66

602.14
20.00
615.40

+243.64

222.08

100.00

290.00

100.00
100.00

7.00
18.00

1.83
a 1.92
1.58
2.42
2.00
47.60
24.92

7 Total deafness.
8
7« Expense of United States consul.
A t $4.50 per day.
Dependent children 17,15,13, and 7 years of age.
8 Dependent wife 26 years of age, one child 5
0
years of age.

105676°—28----- 7

150.00
115.33

1,000.00
200.00
200.00
300.00

12.00

+302.14
182
-317.49
63
-300.00
-8,418.32
115
-10,122.61 *1,703

500.00
95.00

58.50
20.00
1.58

108.00
192.00
372.00

479.94
183.91
3.67
333.51
4,905.39

300.00
150.00
2.500.00

175.50
22.00
9.58
1.67

9.67
4.17
17.25
24.00
1.33
82.67

-$58.33 741,008
24
+53.96
34
-4,856.17

150.00
75.00

19.50
1.40

54
96
186
61
17

>4,000.00 $4,083.33 $4,025.00
129.33
183.29
5,"o66.’ 66‘ 5,137.25
281.08
177.80
175.00
501.40
500.00
7300.00
303.67
8.750.00 8,751.83
15,000.00 15,028.00

$24.83

120.00

+658.00
-1 4 .6 6

-

93

100.00

+391.74

6200""

100.00

136.00
36.00
255.83
15.06
299.08
528.77
854.00
333.71
1,452.08
221.83
252.65
725.85
102. 67
215.57
3,000.00 537.500.00
201.83
264.14

-240.77
+229.69
-520.29
-1,230. 25
+473.20
+112.90
+4,500.00
+62.31

386.08
350.00
351.92
68.57
300.00
301.58
10.500.00 10.500.00 794.910.50
12.500.00 12.500.00 807.500.00
60.00
62.42
77.32

+34.16
-233.01
-5,589. 50
-5,000.00
+14.90

829

16.56
111.20
60.45
34.00
247.63
197.60
774.92 839.444.50

-9 4 .6 4
+26.45
+50. oz
+8,669.58

5
21
80
( 63)

250.00
250.00
831.00
1.450.00
233.15
100.00
3,000.00

200.00

» 111. 20
32.00
150.00
750.00

-

234
87
93
357
54
(53)
1
30

Settlement, $150. The sum of $38.80, earned
wages refused b y the seaman upon leaving the
ship, was deducted.
82 T o date. 8 Permanent total disability. Compensation
3
not to exceed $7,500.

94

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

N o.
of
case

Wage
Age rate
per
month

Occupation

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Outbility ship pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

A C T IO N COMPROMISED—Continued
Deck b o y ___
Able seaman.
Oiler.................
Able seaman._
Water tender..
Fireman_____
Second mate 8
4
Able seam an..

-

19
(0
0)

Fireman............... .
Assistant stewarcI
Carpenter’s mate..
Wiper______
Fireman____
Able seaman
U tility man..
Coal passer..
■
Able seaman
Oiler............. .

50
32
29
30
0)
42
(9
22
0)
59
26
33
60
33
(0
24
27

Third engineer—..
Fireman...............
.
W iper.............
A ble seaman.
Chief mate—

21
51
34
33
27
29

Able seaman.

34

Messman____
A ble seaman-

35
- 0
. 21
40
26

Oiler..........
Messman.
A ble seaman..

-

46

Boatswain._

. 58
. 34
. 24
28
. 23
26
39
- (1
)
. 20
50

Dishwasher.

21

Scullery m an..

25

Able seaman..
101

____d o ______

24
. 32
. 73
. 20

102

Storekeeper..
B oatswain...

23
35

Able seaman.

24
- 24

____d o .
____do_
Able seaman .
W iper________
Water tender..
Chief cook___

99

100 ____d o ----------

103
104
105
106

Fireman................ 45

$25.00
02. 50
47.50

Fracture, skull......................................
Sprain, ankle.......................................
Incomplete fracture, second lumbar
vertebra and right ilium.
72.50 Abrasion, right leg; bruise, left arm ..
55.00 Bruise and laceration, l e g . . . .............
72.50 Bruise, left leg................. ....................
57.50 Fracture, two ribs, right side.............
165.00 Bruise, knee.........................................
55.00 Strain,neuritis, right sacro iliac joint.
70.00 Bruise, back, right side____________
65.00 Amputation, third finger right hand..
40.00 Ringworm ,8 hand; eczema,8 b o d y ....
60.00 Fracture, left wrist, ........................
57.50 Laceration, n ose..............................
65.00 Fracture, spine______ ______ _____
62.50 Laceration, second finger right hand..
47.50 Laceration, first finger left hand—
50.00 Burn, foot.............. ............................
55.00
Bruise, infection, left leg.....................
72.50 Laceration and fracture, third and
fourth fingers left hand.8
5
150.00 Laceration of head, death resulting..
65.00 Traumatic neurosis, right eye...........
65.00 Burn, side; bruise, back.................... .
57.50 Burn, ear...............................................
62.50 Abrasion and fracture, fa ce............. .
4
160.00 Dislocation, right arm;7 fracture,
elbow, cheek bone.
55.00 Fracture and neurosis, ribs and left
hip.
42.00 Laceration, infection, elbow...............
62.50 Abrasion head, concussion of brain.62.50 Bruise and sprain, back and legs___
72.50 Laceration, first finger left hand.......
35.00 Fracture, dismemberment, first and
second toes 1 left foot.
2
62.50 Abrasion, bruise, right arm; rope
burns, hands.
62.50 Fracture, right leg....... ........................
62.50 Fracture, third finger right hand —
8
57.50 Fracture, legs;8 bruise, face..............
62.50 Fracture and sprain, leg.....................
47.50 Bruise, back; hernia, groin................
50.00 Abrasion, left leg and eye...................
65.00 Abrasion, back.....................................
85.00 Bruise, left hand................................. .
40.00 Bruise, left side........ ............ ............. .
95.00 Fracture, skull, left arm, and leg,
death resulting.
50.00 Dismemberment, infection, third
finger 6 right hand.
50.00 Puncture, infection, knee; bruise,
right foot.
62.50 Sprain, thighs.......................................
62.50 Strain, right groin........................... .
62.50 Bruise, right testicle.............................
62.50 Abrasion and bruise, back, left foot
and arm.
70.00 Burn, legs; laceration, head...............
70.00 Fracture, left arm, heel, lumbar
vertebra.
62.50 Sprain, left elbow .................................
Fracture, left hip; displacement,
45.00
femur.
65.00 Laceration, left h e e l...........................

1 Not reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
5 Partial disability for life.
•Amputation resulting.
7 Nuisance value.
« Occupational disease.




95
19
40
18
30
70
91
172
83
24
»55
148
42
123
is 61
76
»5
56
110
6 67

36

33
12
34
104
26

12
44

'( 19) "

w
14

42 52
7
13
48

4
14
239

22

458
77
167
79
19
5 47

229
56
127

18
17

45

29
92
164
500
77
96
101
60
130
146

0)

0)

122

®70

25
56
92
304

28

10

34
114
4
235
317

32
73
271

12

140
218

9 Alleged further disability could not be verified.
A t $2.50 per day.
1 Amputation of distal phalange.
2
1 N o record of further disability,
8
w Amputation of tw o phalanges.

79

95

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

m an m , b individual cases— Continued
erch t arine y
Days en­
titled to—

Am ount en­
titled to as—

W a- Main- Wages
tenance

Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
to
settle­
te­
nance ment

Am ount actually paid as—

M ain­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

Total
compen­
sation

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

D ays
for
which
compen­
Compared sation
was
Amount with actual com ­
recovery
puted

A C T IO N C O M P R O M IS E D —Continued

32

170
47

12

55
104
26
101

30
" ’ 57
49
5
13
48
14
248

64.00

758
813
28

12.08
10.00
55.00
7.25
23.00 138.00
(84)
3595.00
11.00
94.00
28.00
24.00
2.17 110.00
208.00
32.~00" 52.00
42.17 202.00
49.83
18.00
35.42 120.00
7.92
43.33
75.00
44.00
159.50 114.00

978
1,450
993
364
462
1,305
401
82
1,204
932
459
194
259
1,214
1,173
208
130

$25.83
39.58
63.33

$16.00

2171.50 1,700
162
10.00
268
26.00
275
96.00
787
28.00
45.83
153
122.67 2868.00

$0.83
2.08
63.33

$64.00

$5,000.00 $5,000.83
102.08
379.00
506.33

100.00

100.00

12.08

$140.30 -$4,860.53
39.58
-6 2 .5 0
127.33
-379.00

450.00
7.500.00
400.00
7 225.00
75.00
4.000.00
750.00

112.08
22.00
82.25
226.92
800.00
100.00
103.00
252.17
75.00
132.00
492.17
7.549.83
435.42
232.92
118.33
4.044.00
752.42

55.66
55.00
180.30
338.98
1,205.71
274.29
82.33
323.67
484.55
143.99
471.71
159.68
294.83
7.92
180.94
233.08
1.155.80

-5 6 .4 2
+33.00
+98.05
+112.06
+405.71
+174.29
-2 0.6 7
+71.50
+409.55
+11.99
-2 0.4 6
-7,390.15
-140.59
-225.00
+62.61
-3,810.92
+403.38

45.83
122.67 2868.00

1.000.00
25.00
150.00
75.00
1,000.00
5,859.33

1,000.00
29.33
150.00
75.00
1.045.83
6.850.00

7,671. 50
26.42
57.42
204.14
73.83
5.122.81

(86)
+6,671.50
-2 .9 1
5
-9 2 .5 8
13
+129.14
48
-972.00
-1,727.19 7
*1,157

458.00

3,586.65

4.048.32

1,464.22

-2,584.10

456

100.00
1.175.00
250.00
7 200.00
1,000.00

129.40
1,237.56
289.58
245.92
1,003.50

221.34
424.17
301.35
45.92
387.20

+91.94
-813.39
+11.77

3
144
60

22.00
7.25
1.92

75.00
225.00
800.00
100.00
75.00
250.00
75.00

28.00
2.17

100.00

32.00
42.17
49.83
35.42
7.92
43.33
44.00
2.42
4.33

458

3.67

0)
292
36.00
380
120.00
458
1,261

29.40
47.92
39.58
45.92
3.50

58.00

168

2.08

500.00

502.08

126.24

48.00

455
493
943
314
80
26
42
1,463
1,062
2,384

2.08
22.92

1.800.00
300.00
1.750.00
2.750.00
8.75

1,802.08
322.92
1.750.00
2.750.00
176.58
36.67
119.33
375.00
1.032.00
1,000.00

265.10
384.44
7.500.00
169.73
245.08
355.86
193.01
370.53
503.97
7.500.00

229

3.67

458.00

56
18

103.60
47.92
39.58
45.92
54.83

112.00

2.08

122

2.08
22.92
(84)
120.83
91.83
11.67
69.33
107.67
32.00

244.00

28

53.33

56.00

8

3.33

6

41.67
116.67
16.67
72.92

4.00
76.00
148.00
56.00

64

91.83
11.67
69.33

14.64

76.00
25.00
50.00

375.00
1,000.00
1,000.00

32.00

-

13
” 67"”
79
171
77

12

«8 7 H
148
26

101
38
59
30

86

85341^

200.00

-616.30

a 189
s

-375.84

28

-1,536.98
91
+61.52
153
+5,750.00 8 3,329&
8
-2,580.27
19
+68.50
38
+319.19
94
+73.68
28
- 4 .4 7
92
-528.03
122
(89)
+6,500.00

814

1.67

400.00

401.67

503.80

+102.13

6 189

16.00 1,296

3.33

3,000.00

3.003.33

194.65

-2,808.68

84

116
64.00 1,062
843
146.00
542.00
336

41.67
4.17
16.67
16.67

150.00
150.00
50.00
750.00

191.67
154.17
66.67
766.67

65.48
180.67
361.15
1,250.53

-126.19
+26.50
+294.48
+483.86

84
269

748
115

2.33
2.33

250.00
750.00

252.33
752.33

111.33
287.90

-141.00
-464.43

113

140

8.33
63.00

737
280.00 1,744

8.33
1.50

7 150.00
750.00

158.33
751.50

8.33
724.86

-150.00
-2 6 .6 4

79

43.33

158.00

301

43.33

2.842.00

3.043.33

919.22

-2,124.11

32
73
271
16

12.00

79.33
2.33

32.00

158.00

4 Before death.
2
7 50 per cent loss of use.
4
8 Injured while returning as a work-a-way at
4
$0.01 per month.
8 20 per cent loss of use.
5




5

297

8 Dependent mother 38 years of age.
6
8 Am putation of right leg at hip; 70 per cent loss
8
of use of left leg.
8 Dependent wife 50 years of age; one child 10
9
years of age.

96

SETTLEMENT FOB ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Occupation

Wage
Age rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In­ Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

A C T IO N C O M P R O M IS E D —Continued
107
108
109

A ble seaman.
Fireman.........
A ble seaman.

110
113
114
115

____do _ _ ................
Fireman______
A ble seaman. .
Mess b oy........
Fireman______
Boatswain------

116

A ble seaman.

117

Oiler...............

118
119

123
124

Mess b o y ..............
Boatswain............
A ble seaman____
Ordinary seaman.
A ble seaman.......
Oiler......................
Third m ate.........

125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
334
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150

Oiler.................
Able seaman. .
___ do..............
____d o— ...............
Oiler...........
Waiter.............
Fireman..........
Oiler_________
Able seam an..
____do.... ...............
Waiter.............
Seaman...........
W iper..............
____d o ....................
Oiler.................
Fireman..........
Water tender..
Ordinary seaman.
Able seaman „
____d o ...................
____d o ..............
Fireman..........
Able seaman. .
Oiler.................
W iper..............
First engineer___

111

112

120
121
122

151

Carpenter........

152
153
154

Ordinary seaman.
Able seaman........
Scullion. ...............

155
156
157
158
159
160
161

Able seaman........
F ire m a n .............
Ordinary seaman.
Firem an...............
Cook.................... .
Fireman...............
Electrician...........
Deck engineer___

Hernia, groin.......................................
Double hernia, groin. ........................
Fracture, infection, spine, wrists;
internal injuries.
62.50 Abrasion,infection,fingers right hand.
57.50 Fracture, right foot_________ ______
62.50 Laceration, mouth, loss of 4 te e th ...
50.00 Hernia, groin........................................
65.00 Sprain, great toe right fo o t ................
75.00 Fracture, hip and pelvis; and paraly­
sis, left leg.
67.50 Abrasion, forehead; fracture, right
arm, hand; bruise, left leg,right hip.
60.00 Laceration infection, third finger left
hand.
42.50 Abrasion and bruise, side...................
65.00 Laceration, right hand........................
62.50 Bruise and sprain, thum b, left hand.
35.00 Dislocation, h ip ._______ ________
55.00 Bruise, first toe right foot_______
72.50 Laceration, third finger1 right hand.
2
150.00 Laceration, second and third fin­
gers 4 right hand; dismemberment,
fourth finger.6
65.00 Burn, right leg......................................
62.50 Sprain, a n k l e ................................ «...
67.50 Fracture, right leg................................
55.00 Second finger right h a n d ...............
65.00 Bruise, first finger right hand.......... .
Bruise, infection, arm______________
5 0.0 0
65.00 Burn, face, neck, right forearm.........
72.50 Laceration, right arm ........................ .
55.00 Fracture, arm .......................................
62.50 Fracture, left le g 26. . ...........................
40.00 Fracture, j a w . . ....................................
52.50 Laceration, forehead.... ........................
55.00 Burn, face, head, ears, and arms 2 _._
8
7
50.00 Laceration, over right eye 6 ...............
72.50 Bruise, left groin and h ip ..................
55.00 Foreign matter in eyes.........................
65.00 Aggravated varicose veins 8___...........
47.50 Foreign matter in e y e s 6 .....................
8
55.00 Bruise, scalp; laceration, neck..........
55.00 Rupture, intestines........................... .
72.50 Bruise, infection, hand........................
75.00 Fracture, ankle 94..................................
52.50 Sprain, right ankle...............................
72.50 Laceration, right arm .........................
57.50 Dismemberment, first finger left hand
185.00 Scald and burn, head, neck, back,
and arms.
80.00 Fracture, rib; laceration, skull; bruise,
head and right shoulder.
40.00 Iritis, eyes.............................................
35.00 Laceration, head; fracture, leg......... 50.00 Fracture, bruise, first and second
finger, right hand; laceration,
third finger.
60.00 Fracture, right thumb................ ........
67.50 Fracture, left cheek bone.....................
47.50 Fracture, left l e g . ...........................
67.50 Aggravation of ear trouble..................
110.00 Hernia, right groin...............................
65.00 Fracture, right ankle—........................
90.00 Bruise and laceration...........................
90.00 Laceration and puncture, second
finger, right hand.
$55.00
57.50
55.00

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
* Permanent loss of use.
* Partial disability for life.
6 Amputation resulting.




300
98
365
92
76
67
61
Life.

100
43
145
0

0

10

39
40

14
27

21

15

24

21 I
60 !

63
252

173

19

11
10
11

87
(0
117
8
5 168
0
99
43
84
5 95
38
131
117
5 393
58
24
5 119
30

0

(9
)

26

25
29
91
15
1
35
14

94
365
215

72

31
4
124

20

2

428
15
52

7 Nuisance value.
8 Occupational disease.
9 Alleged further disability could not be verified,
1 Amputation of distal phalange.
2
2 50 per cent loss of use of right arm.
9

365

30

97

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marinej by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

W a-

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Am ount actually paid a s Days
from
in­
jury
Other
M ain­
Total
M ain­
to
compen­
settle­
te­
settle­ Wages
te­
sation
nance
ment
ment
nance

Maintenance

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
Compared sation
was
Amount with actual com­
recovery
puted

A C T IO N C O M P R O M IS E D — Continued
162
43
206

$3.83
1.83

0)

62.50

$324.00
86.00
412.00

620
341
642
70.00 1,377
80.00
853

20.00

121

30.33
2.50
108.00

42.00

193

2.08
3.83
30.33
2.50

24

63
19
4
10
1
1
0)
6
1
2

15
173

0)
20
7

131.25
74.25

815
608
764
48.00

30.00
346.00

41.17
6.67
21.67
2.42
1.83
0)

22.00
0)
40.00
14.00

8.00
1.75
3.67

21.75
3.17
1.83
1.83
149.83
9 90.00
4
56.00
2.42

i85.’66'

86.00

57
492
1,363
58
297
1,094
1,235
1,031
1,013
1,184
264
143
1.332
55
730
0)
469
1.333
1,202
199
860
941
1,787

84.00
58.00
188.00 2,200
354
54.00
2.00
32
70.00 1,078
249.00 1,192

$500.00
84.00
2,088.00

$970.38
306.10
1,214.11
209.00
190.54

350.00

8.50
39.00
6.25
29.17
18.33
29.00
5.00

48.00

352.25

7 100.00

2.25

578
8.50
39.00
6.25
29.17
18.33
29.00
270.00

$500.00
87.83
2,501.83

200.00
202.08
500.00
503.83
7 400.00
7 400.00
100.00
100.00
125.00
155.33
18,000.00 18,002.50

$3.83
1.83 $412.00

0)

10

48

392

108.50
189.00
206.25
529.17
218.33
332.25
1,655.00

7 250.00
71.67
2.25
41.17
6.67
21.67
2.42
1.83
0)

0)

8.00

1.75
3.67

21.75
3.17
1.83
1.83
2.42
25.00
56.00
2.42

2.00

6.17

300
96
364

+ 6.92
-313.29
-400.00
209.84
+109.84
223.93
+68.60
7,502.50 -10,500.00

62
74

7 100.00

100.00
150.00
7200.00
7 500.00
200.00
255.25
1,650 00

+$470.38
+218.27
-1,287.72

7,000.00
7 150.00
50.00
100 00
200.00
150.00
2,000.00
1,250.00
250.00
75.00
7,500.00
650.00
7 100.00
150.00
100.00
3,000.00
46.00
200.00
75.00
287.50
300.00
148.00
450.00
300.00

150.00

67*
47
Life*

-202.25
—100.00

35.42
39.00
6.25
29.17
18.33
308.17
1,284.29

7 250.00
71.67
161.25
961.81
7,002.25
7 150.00
91.17
41.17
21.28
106.67
221.67
21.67
152.42
50.25
190.91
2,001.83
1,250.00
714.53
258.00
255.41
76.75
30.75
7, 503.67 2,404.51
650.00 1,875.00
21.75
121.75
180.54
150.00
203.04
100.00
3,003.17 2,279.97
83.18
47.83
371.64
201.83
349.89
77.42
312.50 9*3,278.00
356.00
165.71
152.42
63.83
450.00
432.71
306.17
234.00

-7 3 .0 8
-150.00
-200.00
-500.00
-200.00
-2 4 .0 8
-370.71

14

1 85
2
9 284
2

—250.00
+89.58
-6,040.44
219
-150.00
-5 0 .0 0
-8 5 .3 9
7
-200.00
-102.17
10
-1,810.92
86
6
-535.47 3 302%
-2 .5 9
111
-4 6 .0 0
7
-5,099.16 201,092
+1,225.00 6? Life.
-100.00
+30.54
43
+103.04
84
-723.20 681,120
+35.35
37
+169.81
130
+272.47
55
+2,965.50 95 Life.
-190.29
26
-8 8 .5 9
23
-1 7 .2 9 1 161
2
-7 2 .1 7

93.33

10.00

93

93.33

10.00

192.00

295.33

265.41

-2 9 .9 2

1.33
1.17
26.67

728.00
144.00
58.00

288
497
442

1.33
1.17
1.67

728.00

472.00
1,600.00
400.00

1,201.33
1,601.17
401.67

1,409.49
521.50
111.80

+208.16
-1,079.67
-289.87

364
214
13*

62.00
2.25
14.25
4.50

364
72
29

40.00

274
590
384
463
743
928
,243
574

25.00
150.00
1,500.00
7 50.00
7 25.00
900.00
50.00
250.00

25.00
152.25
1,514.25
54.50
7 25.00
949.83
50.00
319.00

133.52
15.67
288.03
4.50

+108.52
-136.58
-1,226.22
-5 0 .0 0
-2 5 .0 0
+978.94
-5 .4 9
-103.95

31
3
115

6.00

365
23

6
49.83 9 900.00

"30

69.00

60.66"

2.25
14.25
4.50
49.83
19.00

8615 per cent loss of use.
6 25 per cent permanent total disability.
7
6 Loss of sight in one eye.
8
“ Am putation resulting; permanent loss of use.
93 Nature of injury not reported.




1,928.77
44.51
215.05

59

405
15
29

9 N ot including $63.32 earned wages collected
4
and used b y United States consul to send man
home, for which he was not reimbursed.
9 40 per cent permanent total disability.
5
w A t $75 per month.

98

SETTLEMENT FOR ACCIDENTS TO AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

N o.
of
case

Occupation

Age

Wage
rate
per
month

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Out­
bility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence

A C T IO N C O M P R O M IS E D — Continued
163
164
165
166

Oiler.............. . . . (!)
Ordinary seaman.
Second cook_____ (0
Seaman_________ 20

$55.00
50.00
80.00
62.50

167 Able seaman____
168 ____ d o___________
169 Fireman________
170 Able seaman____
171 Oiler____________
17? Assistant steward
173 End m an_______
174 Able seaman____
175 ____ do....................

0)
23
(i)
(0
22
30
58
26

72.50
60.00
57.50
62.50
72.50
45.00
40.00
55.00
62.50

176
177
178
179
180

Ordinary seaman.
Able seaman........
Assistant steward
Water tender____
Coal passer______

26
44
45
26
46

47.50
47.50
50.00
72.50
50.00

181

Pantrym an_____

42

100.00

182

Oiler...................... 31

72.50

Fracture, left hand...............................
Burn, eyes_____________ ____ ______
Scald, right arm and shoulder..........
Fracture, left a rm ;7 sprain, back;
4
bruise, left foot.
Bruise, chest.........................................
Sprain, right ankle__ ______ _______
____ d o .................. ....................................
Eye 9 .............................................. ........
3
Hernia, groin ,_ _
Laceration, s c a l p ______ __________
Abrasion, left thigh^ _____ ________
Strain; fracture, right wrist________
Bruise, face, body; fracture, nose,
ribs, left shoulder.
Fracture, third and fourth fingers.
7
Dislocation, hip; fracture, leg 9 .........
Bruise, infection, little toe, left foot 98
_
Abrasion, left le g ........................ .........
Death resulting from eczema and
exposure.
Dismemberment, left thum b;6 abra­
sion, second and third fingers.
Burn; death resulting from explo­
sion.

48
68

4
” 35’
36

558
15
36
24
(46)
56

1

27
91
120

11
2
9

44
32
22

14
12
24

22

2

42

9
62

1

11
75

1

56
16
80
7

13
1
« 215
140
5 338 ” 45' 293

(5
)

JU D G E O R J U R Y
1
2
3
4

Steward _ ___
Able seaman........
Oiler......................
Ordinary seaman.

(i) $105.00
24
55.00
65.00
31
47.50
18

5 ____ do___________ 26
a A ble seaman____ 27
8
9

____ do.................... 257
Second cook_____ 57
Able seaman____ 19

10

Oiler......................

11
12
13
14

Able seaman____
Coal passer_____
Fireman _
Able seaman.

15
16
17

Fireman________ 0)End man _ __ _ 35
A ble seaman........ 40

47.50
55.00
62.50
70.00
62.50

27

72.50

0)
30
31
46

55.00
60.00
65.00
62.50
65.00
40.00
55.00

Laceration, infection, right heel____
66
Hypertrophy of left knee jo in t 4........ 14120
Scald, right ear 1 __________________
5
16
4
Fracture, collar bone; crushed head,
5 805
arm,4 side,
foot; 17 dislocated
shoulder.
Bruise, legs....... .....................................
21
Dismemberment, right leg;6 bruise, 51,239
laceration left leg, head, body.
Fracture, sacrum..................................
75
Bruise of intestines resulting in death
5 135
Abrasion, bruise, laceration, fracture,
second,1 third,i3 fou rth 6 fingers,
2
left hand.
Amputation, th ird 1 finger left hand; 5 102
2
laceration, first2 and second fingers.
3
Puncture, right e y e 26______________
533
64
Abrasion, chest
________________
11
Burn, right arm, shoulder..................
106
Infection, left hand; hernia, right
groin.
11
Burn, arms and face
____________
Burn, left foot __________ ________
36
Fracture, first finger4 right hand___
5 18

5

62
120
(18)
75

14

7
1,239
25

4
(1 )
8
(18$

23

$
730

27

135
32

70

15
51
3
18

8
8

11
5
18

10
5
8

88
14

17

1 N ot reported.
2 A t $3.50 per day.
3 Including attorney’s fee of $2,500 and $594.94 additional collected b y the attorney as “ expenses” said to
have been incurred in the prosecution of the case.
4 Permanent loss of use.
s Partial disability for life.
« Amputation resulting.
7 Nuisance value,
w A t $2.50 per day.
“ Dependent wife 31 years of age; 50 per cent of compensation payable nonresident alien beneficiary.
Amputation of distal phalange,
u Partial disability for life; no record of further disability,
is Loss of hearing in 1 ear; partial disability for life.
i« Loss of hearing in 1 ear.
is N o record of further disability.
i« Voucher for this amount still unclaimed.




99

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE

merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to­

w a­
ges

Amount en­
titled to as—

Amount actually paid as—
Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
Other
to
M ain­
Total
settle­ Wages
te­
settle­
compen­
te­
ment
nance ment
nance
sation

Main­
Wages
te­
nance

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
sation
Compared
was
Amount with actual com ­
recovery
puted

A C T IO N C O M P R O M IS E D — Continued
27
1

44
33

1

22
24

1
1

21
1
10

9
104

1
1
32

12
75

$7.33
1.67

2.08

$88.00 1,494
66.00 1,438
845
44.00 1,001

2.42
2.00
1.92

1,555
48.00
0)
952

1 2.42
2 00
1.92

0)
613
315
234
618

28.00
1.83
20.83

$49.50
1.67

28.00
1.83
18.00
20.83 10260.00
1.58
1.58
53.33

24.00
8
150.00 1,162
1,214
880
1,347

21
-$73.66
-394.16
67
-5 0 .0 0
+124.24 741,092

$250.00
600.00
7 50.00
2,500.00

571
539

22.50
24.00

52.42
77.00
301.92
7 50.00
115.00
7 75.00
203.00
451.83
943 33

‘ 38.58
130.75
53.74

16.00
5.000.00
1.000.00
7 150.00
500.00

41.5$
5,001.58
1,053.33
7150.00
500.00

49.97
1,790.88
3,286.31

750.00

1.58
1.58
53.33

$48.66

50.00
27.00
300.00
7 50.00
115.00
7 75.00
175.00
450.00
900.00

750.00

836.63

+86.63

35,000.00 35,000.00 003,750.00

2.08

$257.33
601.67
7 50.00
2,502.08

-1,250.00

$183.67
207.51
2,626.32"

144.64"
39.21
217.70
540.74

-13.84
+53.75
-248.18
-5 0.0 0
+29.64
-7 5.0 0
-163.79
-234.13
-402.59

14
35
23
56
90
110

12
+8.39
7
-3,210.70 9 806&
+2,232.98 w 1,549
-1 5 0 00
(W)
5,762.76" +5,262.76
«262M
(“ )

JU D G E O R J U R Y
1
6
5

4
(18)
181
730

-$277.69
65
$225.81
4,432- 32 -10,267.68 4% 016
-718.16 1 364
6
894.84
0
7,857.19 -26,150.73 2 3,143

520
1,181

23.75
148.50

* 23.75
1
5,000.00

33.25
6,689.25

21 +77.75
+1,689.25 e2,"016’ “

203
1,303
0)

2.08
7.00
2.08

687.50
689.58
1,200.00 1,207.00
10,161.15 10,163.23

256.25
5.373.61
1,036.46

-433.33
+4.166.61
-9,126.77

(22)
2 436
4

779

33.25
148.50

21
81

$503. 50
$500.00
14.700.00 14. 700.00
13.00
1,600.00 1.613.00
19 7.92 ............. 34.000.00 34,007.92

82.17

2
«409H

$3.50 ?$14.00 1,116
565
13.00
2.00
584
7.92 1,460.00
400

(«)
4,851.50

50

156.25
7.00
6.25

3.143.87

1,139.85

-2.004.02

33
64
4
9

10
5
8

60.50
128.00
8.67
18.75

20.00
10.00
16.00

728
981
675
1,179

27.50 ............. 12.250.00 12.277.50
44.00
1,000.00 1,044.00
8.67
8.67
18.75
2,000.00 2, 018.75

2, 542.90
138.00
41.59
247.95

«1,120
- 9 , 734.60 2
-906.00
7
+32.92
97
-1,770.80

11
6
18

17

23.83
8.00
33.00

34.00

1,608
571
798

23.83
8.00
33.00

75
3
3
34

100.00

$3.50

82.17

3,061.70

300.00
475.00

23.83
308.00
508.00

23.83
98.06
740.94

-209.94
+232.94

30
4 322

2 Amputation of greater and 1 lesser toe right foot; permanent loss of use of right arm.
0
$68.25 court costs assessed plaintiff.
i2 Dependent wife, 57 years of age.
2 Amputation of 2 phalanges.
3
** Amputation of distal phalange second finger, 2 phalanges of third finger, and the entire fourth finger.
2 Amputation of 2 phalanges of first and second fingers and of distal phalange of third finger.
5
2 Loss of sight in 1 eye.
6
4 No time lost.
6
7 50 per cent loss of use.
4
9 50 per cent of compensation payable, nonresident alien beneficiary.
0
9 Nature of injury not reported.
3
9 40 per cent loss of use of leg.
7
9 Resulting in amputation of foot.
8
9 Dependent wife 46 years of age.
9




100

SETTLEMENT FOB ACCIDENTS TO

AMERICAN SEAMEN

Accidents to seamen of the United States

No.
of

Wage
rate
per
month

Occupation

Nature of injury and part of body
affected

Days of treat­
ment received
Days
of
total
disa­ On In- Outbility ship pa­ pa­
tient tient

Days
of
con­
vales­
cence;

J U D G E O R J U R Y —Continued
........ do.................... 23

$62.50

Ordinary seaman.
Able seaman........
M e ssm a n ...........
Boatswain............
Ordinary seaman.
Third m ate..........
Able seaman____
.. — do— ...............
Oiler......................
Assistant c o o k ...
Fireman...............

21
23
37
59
42
21
42

35.00
150.00
62.50
62.50
65.00
110.00
65.00

Second butcher..
F irem an..............
Able seaman.......

38
39
24

75.00
90.00
62.50

Second cook.........
34

23
40.00
62.50
(0
(l) . 40.00
52
80.00

24

80.00

Ordinary seaman.

55

40.00




Laceration, upper lip; puncture, fore­
13
head and tongue.
Puncture, forehead...............................
13
18
Laceration, second finger, right hand.
Fracture, little t o e 6 right foot........... 5 113
7
Fracture, right leg; abrasion, ribs; 2 386
bruise and sprain, hips.
Strain, b a c k ..........................................
40
Laceration, infection, ankle________
309
Hernia, groin.........................................
47
Strain, back; fracture, 2 r ib s ............
Life
Laceration, right forearm..................
89
Dislocation and fracture, right knee3 5195
0
Fracture, right femur; bruise, arm
173
and back.
Fracture, right tibia and fibula.........
110
Hernia; appendicitis______________ _
134
Fracture, abrasion, bruise and lacer­
162
ation, head, limbs, and body.
Osteitis and cellulitis, first finger,
56
right hand.
Fracture, fifth cervical vertebra____
219

1 N ot reported.
J A t $3.50 per day.

e Partial disability for life.
• Amputation resulting.

14
4

28
’ 59’

10
82
73
7
189

1

29

101

APPENDIX B .— GENERAL TABLE
merchant marine, by individual cases— Continued
Days en­
titled to—

Am ount en­
titled to as—

Days
from
in­
jury
M ain­
to
settle­
te­
nance ment

Wa- Maintenance

Amount actually paid as—

M ain­
te­
nance

Other
settle­
ment

Total
compen­
sation

Possible recovery un­
der compensation act

Days
for
which
compen­
Compared sation
was
Amount with actual com­
recovery
puted

J U D G E O R J U R Y —Continued
13

27.08

329

27.08

777.08

27.08

-750.00

13
4
4
79

17.33
8.33
5.33
210.67

329
755
0)
511

17.33
1,000.00 1,017.33
8.33
158.33
150.00
5.33
5.33
2.67 ............... 10,000.00 10,002.67

17.33
69.41
329.12
3,960.67

-1,000.00
-8 8.9 2
+323.79
-6,042.00

14
169
2 Life.
7

+52.76
+528.57
+171.05
-1,624.60
+333.13
-6,126.24
-7,615.67

30
239
47
Life.
89
3 4O3K
0
159

+136.35
+540.83
-8,348.40

101
127
130

10
70

14
4

50
28

"'"49"
59
"’ "15’
9
7
32

10
82
73

1

30

28.00
8.00

11.67
1,541
11.67
774 350.00
350.00 * 175.00
2 60.00
8
123
102.08
83.33
1,810
118.00
0)
55.00
854
55.00
30.33
421 14
30.33
22.50
21.00
66.67

7

20.00
101
164.00 1,929
146.00 1,294
14.00

1.33

317

20.00

1.33

3 50 per cent permanent total disability.
7
2 A t $15 per week.
8




7,555.00
8,030.33

64.43
1.378.57
171.05
7,602.08
333.13
1,428.76
414.66

130.00
8,866.16

172.50
21.00
8,868.24

308.85
561.83
519.84
167.84

22.50
21.00
2.08

9,143.35

11.67
850.00
(29)
9,226.68

7,500.00
8,000.00

(29)

+167.84

56

2,500.00

2,501.33

468.68

-2,032.65

218

500.00

566

60.00

750.00

» Offer of $60 refused prior to litigation,
so 20 per cent loss of use of leg.




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1921, as well as the bulle­
tins published since that date, will be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus
(*) are out of print.
Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
♦No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater N ew York. [1913.]
*No. 133. R eport of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade in its inquiry into industrial
agreements. [1913.]
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
N o. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of N ew York City. [1914.]
N o. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of N ew York
City. [1914.]
No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry. [1916.]
No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
N o. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor Board: H istory of its formation, activities, etc. [1921.]
No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of N ew York C ity. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining b y actors. [1926.]
No. 448. Trade agreements, 1926.

Cooperation.
No. 313. Consumers* cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
N o. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movem ent in the United States in 1925 (other than agricultural).

Employment and Unemployment.
*No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of em ploym ent offices in the United States.
[1913.]
No. 172. Unemployment in N ew York C ity, N . Y . [1915.]
•No. 183. Regularity of em ploym ent in the wom en’s ready-to-wear garment industries. [1915.]
•No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
N o. 196. Proceedings of the Em ploym ent Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis, M inn., Janu­
ary 19 and 20, 1916.
•No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Em ploym ent Managers’ Association of B oston, Mass.,
held M a y 10,1916.
No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
•No. 227. Proceedings of the Em ploym ent Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3,
1917.
N o. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
•No. 241. Public em ploym ent offices in the United States. [1918.]
No. 247. Proceedings of Em ploym ent Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N . Y ., M a y 9-11, 1918.
No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes. [1922.]
N o. 409. Unem ploym ent in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.

Foreign Labor Laws.
*No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European countries.

[1914.].

Housing.
♦No.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.

158.
263.
295.
368.
424.
449.

Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign countries.
Housing b y employers in the United States. [1920.]
Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1921 to] 1923.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1924 and] 1925.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1925 and] 1926.




(I)

[1914].

Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.
*No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories.
[1912.]
N o. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection. [1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.]
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
♦No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
N o. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead in the painting
of buildings. [1916.]
♦No. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation-insurance cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. [1916.]
♦No. 207. Causes of death, b y occupation. [1917.]
♦No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
♦No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives. [1917.]
N o. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
N o. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. M ortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts). [1918.]
♦No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
N o. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
N o. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of M unition Workers*
Committee. [1919.]
•No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
N o. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
N o. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
N o. 276. Standardization of industrial-accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates. [1921.]
N o. 291. Carbon monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
N o. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
N o. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910 to 1919.
N o. 306. Occupational hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be looked for in
hazardous occupations. [1922.]
N o. 339. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States. [1923.]
N o. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
N o. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and in the preparation of phosphorus.
[1926.]
N o. 425. Record of industrial accidents in the United States to 1925.
N o. 426. Deaths from lead poisoning. [1927.]
N o. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
N o. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at Washington, D . C .,
July 14-16, 1926.
N o. 460. A new test for industrial lead poisoning. [1928.]

Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.
No.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.

237.
340.
349.
361.
380.
383.
384.
399.

Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
Chinese migration with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
Labor relations in the Fairmont (W . Va.) bituminous-coal field. [1924.]
Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920 to 1924.
Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States.

[1925.]

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.
No.
N o.
N o.
N o.
N o.

211.
229.
285.
321.
322.
343.
408.
434.
444.

Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
Wage-payment legislation in the United States. [1917.]
Minimum-wage laws of the United States: Construction and operation.
Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
Labor legislation of 1926.
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor. [1926.]




(II)

[1921.]

Proceedings of Annual Conventions of the Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the United
States and Canada.
*No.
No.
N o.
N o.
♦No.
♦No.
N o.
No.

266.
307.
323.
352.
389.
411.
429.
455.

Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
Eighth, New Orleans, La., M a y 2-6,1921.
N inth, Harrisburg, Pa., M a y 22-26, 1922.
Tenth, Richm ond, Va., M a y 1-4, 1923.
Eleventh, Chicago, 111., M a y 19-23,1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
Fourteenth, Paterson, N . J., M a y 31-June 3, 1927.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions.
No. 210.
No. 248.
No. 264.
*No. 273.
No. 281.
No. 304.
N o. 333.
IS o. 359.
i
No. 385.
]\o. 395.
No. 406.
No. 432.
]Sio. 456.

Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25,1917
Fifth, Madison, W is., September 24-27, 1918.
Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
Ninth, Baltimore, M d ., October 9-13,1922.
Tenth, St. Paul, M inn., September 24-26, 1923.
Eleventh, Halifax, N ova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake C ity, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Fourteenth, Atlanta, Ga., September 27-29, 1927.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of International Association of Public Employment Services.
No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20,1913; Second, Indianapolis, September 24 and 25,1914;;
Third, Detroit, July 1 and 2,1915.
Iso. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y ., July 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. N inth, Buffalo, N. Y ., September 7-9,1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., M a y 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N . Y ., September 15-17, 1925.

Productivity of Labor.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1923.]
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
11926.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1025.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]

Retail Prices and Cost of Living.
*No.
*No.
*No.
No.
No.
No.
N o.
N o.

121.
130.
164.
170.
357.
369.
445.
464.

Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
Foreign food prices as affected b y the war. [1915.]
Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. 11925.]
Retail prices, 1890 to 1926.
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1927. (In press.)

Safety Codes.
No. 331. Code of lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
N o. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
N o. 350. Specifications of laboratory tests for approval of electric headlighting devices for motor
vehicles.
N o. 351. Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
N o. 364. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus.
N o. 375. Safety code for laundry machinery and operation.
N o. 378. Safety code for woodworking plants.
N o. 382. Code of lighting school buildings.
N o. 410. Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
N o. 430. Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
N o. 433. Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
N o. 436. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.




(I ll)

Safety Codes— Continued.
N o. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
N o. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
N o. 463. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus—first revision.

Vocational and Workers* Education.
♦No.
♦No.
N o.
N o.
N o.

159.
162.
199.
271.
549.

Short-unit courses for wage earners and a factory school experiment. [1915.]
Vocational education survey of Richm ond, Va. [1915.]
Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, M inn. [1917.]
Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States. [1920.]
Apprenticeship in building construction. [*1928.]

Wages and Hours of Labor.
♦No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in the dress and
waist industry of N ew York City. [1914.]
♦No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry. [1914.]
N o. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
N o. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam-railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
♦No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907 to 1914.
N o. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
N o. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1915.
♦No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
N o. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
N o. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
N o. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
N o. 360. Tim e and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1923.]
N o. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
N o. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
N o. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
[1926.]
N o. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
N o. 413. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1925.
N o. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and 1924.
N o. 421. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry, 1925.
N o. 422. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1925.
N o. 435. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1926.
N o. 438. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1925.
No. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1926.
N o. 443. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
N o. 446. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
N o. 450. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1926.
N o. 452. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1926.
N o. 454. Hours and earnings in bituminous-coal mining in 1922, 1924, and 1926.
N o. 457. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, M a y 15,1927.

Welfare Work.
♦No.
N o.
♦No.
N o.

123.
222.
250.
458.

Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
Welfare work in British munition factories. [1917.]
Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United States.
Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments, 1928.

[1919.]

Wholesale Prices.
N o. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign countries.
N o. 440. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1926.
N o. 453. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.

[1921.]

Women and Children in Industry.
N o. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in selected industries
in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
N o. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile establishments
and garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries. [1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of woman and child wage earners in the United States.
[1915.]




IV

W omen and Children In Industry—Continued.
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
*No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women. [1915.]
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of Boston, Mass.
[1916.]
N o. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
N o. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
♦No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of industrial em ploy­
ment of women and children. [1918.]
No. 223. Em ploym ent of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war. [1917.]
N o. 253. W omen in the lead industries. [1919.]
W orkm en’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).
♦No.
♦No.
♦No.
Efo.
♦No.
N o.

101.
102.
108.
107.
155.
212.

♦No. 243.
No.
No.
No.
No.

301.
312.
379.
243.

Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
British national insurance act, 1911.
Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland. [1912.]
Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called b y the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Washington, D . C., December 5 -9 ,1916#
W orkm en’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign countries, 1917 and
1918.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration. [1922.]
National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of January 1, 1925.
W orkm en’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada as of July 1, 1926.

Miscellaneous Series.
♦No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to
M ay 1,1915.
N o. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
N o. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
N o. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
N o. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. M utual relief associations among Government employees in W ashington, D . C. [1921.]
No. 299. Personnel research agencies: A guide to organized research in em ploym ent management,
industrial relations, training, and working conditions. [1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization. [1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics. [1923.]
N o. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and problems. [1923.]
N o. 346. Hum anity in government. [1923.]
N o. 372. C o n v ic t labor in 1923.

N o 386.
N o. 398.
N o. 401.
No. 420.
N o. 439.
N o. 458.
N o. 461.
N o. 462.
No. 465.

Cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
Handbook of American trade-unions. [1926.]
Handbook of labor statistics, 1924 to 1926.
Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments.
Labor organizations in Chile. [1928.]
Park recreation areas in the United States. [1928.]
Beneficial activities of American trade-unions. [1928.]




V

[1928.]




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