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Salaries of White-Collar Workers
in

Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska,
May-June 1963




Professional,
Administrative,
Technical, and
Clerical Occupations
•

Bulletin No. 1392

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

Salaries of White-Collar Workers
in

Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska,
May-June 1963
Professional,
Administrative,
Technical, and
Clerical Occupations
and
Scheduled Weekly Hours
Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations
Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
Cash Bonuses

Bulletin No. 1392
January 1964
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. WiHard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU O F LABOR STATISTICS
Ewon* Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 40 cents






P reface

The results of the Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys of salaries and
supplementary practices relating to white-collar employees in major labor m ar­
kets of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska are summarized in this bulletin.
The
data, obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists, reflect salaries in
effect in May 1963 in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, and in June 1963 in Alaska,
These surveys were conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics upon
request of the Bureau of the Budget and the Civil Service Commission in connec­
tion with their Federal salary responsibilities.

In order to provide a basis for comparing rates of pay in each of the
locations mentioned with the national level, the surveys were patterned from the
Bureau? s annual National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Pay (BLS Bulletin 1387).
The full list of 77 occupation work
levels, as defined for the nationwide survey was used in the study in each area.
(See appendix B. ) The specific job functions and responsibilities determining
classification, and the number of work levels selected for study, vary from occu­
pation to occupation.
The salary data in this report, therefore, relate to em­
ployees meeting the criteria as specified in the survey definitions, and not to all
employees in each field of work.
All data obtained for the occupation work levels studied, unidentified by
establishment, were made available to the Bureau of the Budget and the Civil
Service Commission for administrative use.
Data for some of the work levels
which did not meet publication criteria could be used for comparison with Federal
salaries by combining data for work levels studied that were equivalent to a
specific Classification Act grade, as determined by the Commission.
Such com­
parisons, as well as comparisons with salary levels in other areas of mainland
United States or nationwide, are not included in this report.
This bulletin was prepared by Boyd B. 0*N eal, J r ., under the super­
vision of Louis E. Badenhoop, in the Bureau1s Division of Occupational Pay,
under the general direction of Leonard R. Linsenmayer, Assistant Commissioner
for Wages and Industrial Relations.
Field work for the Alaska and Hawaii studies
was directed by John L. Dana, and for the Puerto Rico study by Louis B.
Woytych, the Bureau* s Assistant Regional Directors for Wages and Industrial
Relations, San Francisco and Atlanta regional*officea, respectively.




Hi




Consents
Page
The Honolulu, Hawaii, survey, May 1963_____________________________________

1

Supplementary wages benefits______________________________________________

5

Charts:
1.
2.

Average monthly salaries in 3 office occupations, urban areas
in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, May 1963, and Alaska, June 1963 --------Office workers1 paid holiday and vacation time, urban areas in
Hawaii and Puerto Rico, May 1963, and Alaska, June 1963 ________

2
2

Tables:
1.

Employment and average salaries for selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in

2.

Percent distribution of employees in selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations by
average monthly sa la r ie s_____________________________________________
Percent distribution of office workers by scheduled

3.
4.
5.
6.

Percent distribution of office workers by number of paid
holidays provided annually____________________________________________
Percent distribution of office workers by vacation pay

7

9

Percent of office workers employed in establishments
providing health, insurance,or pension benefits_____________________
Percent distribution of office workers by type of
supplementary cash bonus payments__________________________________

10

The Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, survey, May 1963 _____
Average s a la r ie s____________________________________________________________

11
11

Supplementary wage benefits____ ___________________________________________

14

7.

10

Tables:
8.
9.
10*
11.
12.
13.
14.

Employment and average salaries for selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in
private industry________________________________________________________
Percent distribution of employees in selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations by
average monthly salaries _____________________________________________
Percent distribution of office workers by scheduled weekly
Percent distribution of office workers by number of paid
holidays provided annually____________________________________________
Percent distribution of office workers by vacation pay
Percent of office workers employed in establishments
providing health, insurance, orpension benefits _____________________
Percent distribution of office workers by type of
supplementary cash bonus payments__________________________________




v

15
16

18

20
20

Contents— Continued
Page
The Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan,
Alaska, survey, June 1963_____________________________________________________
Average salaries______________________________________________
Hours of work_________________________________________________________________
Supplementary wage benefits--------------------------------------------------------------------------

21
21
22
23

Tables:
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.

Employment and average salaries for selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in
private industry____________________________________________________ -___
Percent distribution of employees in selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations by
average monthly salaries______________________________________________
Percent distribution of office workers by scheduled weekly hours____
Percent distribution of office workers by number of paid
holidays provided annually_____________________________________________
Percent distribution of office workers by vacation
pay provisions---------------------------------------Percent of office workers employed in establishments
providing health, insurance,or pension benefits______________________
Percent distribution of office workers by type of
supplementary cash bonus payments__________________________________

24
25
27
27
28
29
29

Appendixes:
A.
B.




Scope and method of survey__________________________________________ __
Occupational definitions_________________________________________________

vi

30
33

Salaries o f While-Collar Workers in Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, and Alaska, May—
June 1963
This bulletin presents, in separate sections, data on salaries and related
supplementary benefits for selected professional, administrative, technical, and
clerical occupations in urban areas of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska. Although
77 occupation work levels were studied in each area, the number of levels for
which salary data are presented varies among the areas. For some occupations
and levels, salaries could not be presented because either (l) employment was
too small to provide enough data to permit, publication, or (2) there was a pos­
sibility of disclosure of individual establishment data.
For those occupations that could be compared, salary levels in Hawaii
were distinctly below those in Alaska, but well above salary levels in Puerto
Rico. This is illustrated by the three representative clerical occupations shown
in chart 1.
The lower salaries in Puerto Rico were offset, at least in part,
by more liberal provisions for paid vacations and paid holidays.
(See chart 2.)

The Honolulu, Hawaii, Survey, May 1963

The survey of salaries for selected white-collar occupations which was
conducted in Hawaii in May 1963 relates to the Honolulu Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area (Honolulu County).
In the I960 census this area had a popu­
lation of about 500,500, which included approximately four-fifths of the popu­
lation of the State. Among the industries studied, establishments with 50 workers
or more employed approximately 56, 300 workers in the period surveyed. Almost
a fourth of these were employed in manufacturing, chiefly in raw sugar process­
ing, pineapple canning, printing and publishing, and apparel manufacturing. Within
nonmanufacturing, the industries with the highest proportion of the 42, 700 total
employment were transportation, communication, and other public utilities as a
group, and retail trade, each with more than a fifth of these workers. The r e ­
maining nonmanufacturing employment was about equally represented in contract
construction, wholesale trade, finance, and service industries.
Employment in
white-collar occupations was distributed somewhat differently than total employ­
ment. Manufacturing and contract construction industries, for example, accounted
for smaller proportions of the white-collar employment, whereas the finance
industries, with a tenth of the total employment, accounted for approximately a
fourth of the white-collar workers.
Employment and salary data are presented in this bulletin for 32 of the
77 selected professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupation work
levels as defined for the study. The 32 work levels accounted for 2,718 employees
representing about 15 percent of the estimated total white-collar employment in
the establishments within scope of the study.




2

Chart 1. A verage Monthly Salaries in 3 O ffice Occupations
Urban Areas in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, May 1963, and Alaska
June 1963
Average Monthly Salaries
0________ $100_______ $ 2 0 0 _______ $300

for Selected Occupations
$400_______ $500_______$ 6 0 0

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU Of LA80R STATISTICS

Chart 2. Office W orkers’ Paid Holiday and Vacation Time
Urban Areas in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, May 1963, and Alaska
June 1963
Average Annual Number of Days

Average Number of Weeks
(For workers with 1 year’s service)

1
5
1
2

9

6

3

0
PAID HOLIDAY TIME
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU Of LABOR STATISTICS




PAID VACATION TIME

3

Although women accounted for about two-thirds of the employment in the
selected occupations, they were nearly all employed in clerical positions. In ad­
dition to accounting for almost all of the professional, administrative, and technical
positions, men accounted for about nine-tenths of the tabulating-machine operators
and also were employed as bookkeeping-machine operators, accounting clerks, and
office boys.
The salaries presented include special differentials paid to employees in
Hawaii by companies with headquarters in mainland States. In four establishments
with headquarters in other States, representing approximately a fifth of all such
establishments studied, the differentials over the mainland salaries paid to e li­
gible employees in the occupations studied ranged from about 10 to 25 percent.
In most instances, these differentials applied to employees transferred to Hawaii
from the mainland, and in 3 of 4 establishments they applied only to employees
in professional, administrative, or technical positions.
Average Salaries
Average (mean) monthly salaries for the 32 occupation work levels pre­
sented in table 1 ranged from $241 for file clerks I to $1,221 for engineers VI.
These levels ranged from clerks performing simple filing to engineers with full
technical responsibility for planning and directing engineering projects of major
scope. 1
For the five levels of accountants defined for survey, salary data are
presented for levels II through V. Average monthly salaries ranged from $515
for accountants H, a level above entry positions for inexperienced accounting
graduates, to $921 for accountants V, who are involved with complex technical
and managerial problems of accounting systems.
Accountants HI, who repre­
sented more than half the accountants in the levels surveyed, averaged $650
a month.
Monthly salaries of engineers ranged from $605 for level I, the pro­
fessional trainee level usually requiring a B. S. degree, to $1,221 for those in
level VI.
Engineers at level VI typically direct a small staff of project en­
gineers and have full technical responsibility for planning and directing a number
of large and important projects or a project of major scope and importance.
Salaries of engineers and chemists could be compared in levels HI and V; en­
gineers averaged $681 and $1,0 3 4 , respectively, and chemists in the correspond­
ing levels averaged $670 and $1,069. Two-thirds of the engineers were employed
in public utilities and construction industries combined, with about equal propor­
tions in each.
Senior draftsmen, those fully experienced, were paid $537 a month on
the average, whereas for the less experienced or junior draftsmen the average
wa s $382.
Among the 17 clerical occupation work levels represented in the survey,
average monthly salaries ranged from $241 for file clerks I, who performed
routine filing, to $513 for tabulating-machine operators HI, who operate a variety
of machines and perform the wiring for long and complex tabulating assignments.
Monthly average salaries between $300 and $400 were recorded for nine of the
work levels.
Accounting clerks and stenographers accounted for approximately
half the clerical workers in the jobs studied. These occupations were well dis­
tributed among various industry divisions within scope of the survey, compared
Classification o f employees in the occupations and work levels surveyed was based on factors detailed in the
definitions in appendix B.




4

to others that were more concentrated in certain industries.
About half the
keypunch and tabulating-machine operators, for example, were employed in
finance industries.
Percent distributions of employees by monthly salaries are shown in
table 2.
Within nearly all occupation work levels, salaries of the highest paid
employees were at least one and one-half times the salaries of the lowest paid
employees in the same work level. These distributions also show marked over­
lapping of salaries between work levels of the same occupation and between occu­
pations with substantially different salary levels.
The ranges in salaries paid
individuals in the same job category reflect salary differences among establish­
ments as well as within establishments.
Salary differences for the same job
category in an establishment may be accounted for by differences in ability,
experience, or performance, as determined informally on an individual basis or
as provided for under formal plans with established salary ranges for each
grade level.
Hours of Work
The length of the workweek on which the regular straight-time salary
was based was obtained for employees in the occupations studied.
As shown
in the following tabulation, the average weekly hours varied somewhat among
occupations and levels.

Average
weekly
hours

Occupation and level

3 8 .0 -------------------------------------------------

Accountants V; chemists V; clerks, file III;
stenographers, senior.

38. 5------------------------------------------------- Clerks, file I and II; keypunch operators II;
stenographers, general.
3 9 .0

----------------------------------------- Accountants III and IV; chief accountants II;
chemists HI; engineers IV; clerks, account­
ing II; tabulating-machine operators HI;
typists I and II.

39. 5------------------------------------------------- Accountants II; engineers II, V, and VI;
bookkeeping-machine operators I; clerks,
accounting I; keypunch operators I; office
boys or girls; switchboard operators; tab­
ulating-machine operators II.
4 0 ,0 ---------------------------------------------— Engineers I and III; draftsmen, junior and
senior; bookkeeping-machine operators II.

These differences in average weekly hours reflect variations in the dis­
tribution of employees among industries in which salaries are based on work­
weeks of fewer than 40 hours.
The number of hours per week which a majority of the full-time nonsupervisory office workers were scheduled to work was obtained (table 3). The
scheduled workweek for office workers was 40 hours in establishments employing
nearly four-fifths of these workers. A majority of the office workers on shorter
workweeks were on 35-hour schedules. More than half the office workers on such
schedules were employed in finance industries.




5

Supplementary Wage Benefits
Information presented on selected supplementary wage benefits relates
to provisions applying to nonsupervisory office workers, although others in higher
level positions may receive the same benefits. Each provision was tabulated as
applying to all nonsupervisory office workers in an establishment if a majority
were eligible or could eventually meet the eligibility requirements.
Paid holidays were provided to nearly all office workers. Although the
number of paid holidays given annually varied widely, a majority of these workers
received 9 days or more (table 4). A fourth of the office workers received 11 or
12 paid holidays, most of whom were employed in banks.
Paid vacations after qualifying periods of service were given to office
workers in establishments employing 97 percent of these workers. The service
requirements were usually 1 year for 2 weeks with pay, and 5 years or less
for 3 weeks, in establishments employing a majority of the office workers (table 5).
Four weeks with pay were given, usually after 20 years of service, in establish­
ments employing more than two-fifths of the office workers. With a few exceptions,
these workers were in banks, insurance companies, and public utilities.
Health, insurance, and pension benefits applying to office workers, pre­
sented in table 6, are provided under plans to which the employers paid at least
part of the cost.
Life, hospitalization, surgical and medical insurance coverage
was available to more than nine-tenths of the office workers.
Nearly the same
proportion of these workers were covered by sick benefit plans, most of which
provided for sick leave at full pay without a waiting period.
Pension plans, providing regular payments for life after retirement (in
addition to legally required coverage), applied in establishments employing nearly
three-fourths of the office workers.
Nonproduction bonus plans providing for cash payments to all or a m a­
jority of the office workers were in effect in establishments with two-fifths of
these workers (table 7).
Bonuses paid under profit-sharing plans were more
prevalent than Christmas or year end bonuses.




6
Table 1

Employment and Average Salaries for Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Occupations in Private Industry,1 Honolulu, Hawaii, May 1963
Monthly s a la r ie s 1
2

Occupation and cla ss
(See definitions in appendix B)

Number
of
em ployees

Annual s a la r ie s 2

M iddle range4
Mean

Median 3

Middle ra n ge4
Mean

M ed ian3

$ 6 , 180
7,8 0 0
9 ,5 6 4
11,052
9,876

$ 6 ,0 6 0
7,7 4 0
9 ,972
11,256
9,768

8,0 4 0
12,828

F irs t
quartile

8,2 5 6
11,928

708
802
731
904
1,086
1,313

7 ,2 6 0
8, 124
8, 172
9,948
12, 408
14,652

T hird
quartile

F irs t
T hird
quartile quartile

Accountants
Accountants II --------------------------------Accountants HI --------------------------------Accountants IV --------------------------------Accountants V _____________________
Chief accountants II_________________

24
64
30
7
31

$515
650
797
921
823

$505
645
831
938
814

$489
593
748

$524
709
866

766

839

13
6

670
1,069

688
994

31
34
103
65
80
21

605
677
681
829
1,034
1, 221

617
621
700
831
1,035
1,228

517
603
623
771
948
1, 192

43
65

382
537

378
538

329
472

425
614

132
72
356
237
72
29
4
122
50
102
197
210
130
87
20
194
87

299
360
311
435
241
275
399
305
364
255
330
384
316
426
513
264
348

292
356
310
426
242
263

270
310
274
391
231
246

331
395
356
493
258
284

297
350
247
331
394
309
430
518
267
330

275
330
218
292
348
279
391
485
236
300

334
393
299
367
427
338
469
567
293
400

$ 5 ,8 6 8
7, 116
8,976

$ 6 ,2 8 8
8,5 0 8
10,392

9,192

10,068

7 ,4 0 4
7,4 5 2
8 ,400
9 ,972
12,420
14,736

6 ,2 0 4
7,2 3 6
7,4 7 6
9 ,252
11,376
14, 304

8 ,4 9 6
9 ,6 2 4
8 ,7 7 2
10,848
13,032
15,756

4, 584
6 ,4 4 4

4 ,536
6 ,4 5 6

3,948
5, 664

5, 100
7, 368

3,588
4, 320
3,732
5,2 2 0
2,892
3,300
4,7 8 8
3, 660
4, 368
3,060
3,960
4,6 0 8
3,792
5, 112
6, 156
3, 168
4, 176

3,504
4, 272
3,720
5, 112
2 ,9 0 4
3, 156

3,240
3,720
3, 288
4,6 9 2
2,772
2, 952

3,972
4,740
4, 272
5 ,916
3,096
3 408
*,

3,5 6 4
4, 200
2, 964
3, 972
4,728
3,708
5, 160
6,216
3 ,204
3, 960

3, 300
3,960
2,616
3,5 0 4
4, 176
3,348
4,6 9 2
5,820
2 ,832
3,600

4 ,008
4,716
3, 588
4, 404
5, 124
4,056
5,628
6 ,8 0 4
3,516
4, 800

Chem ists and Engineers
C hem ists I H _________________________
C hem ists V -----------------------------------------E ngineers
E ngineers
E ngineers
E ngineers
E ngineers
E ngineers

I
— -------II ______ —r----------------------_____ _____
H I-.
IV — — — —
V Tr-,---r—r. — ir
r—
VI
_ — ----------------------

•

Draftsm en
Draftsm en, ju n io r ------------------------------D raftsm en, s e n i o r ___________________

C lerica l
B ookkeeping-m achine op era tors I ___
B ookkeeping-m achine op era tors II —
C lerk s, accounting I ------------------------ C lerk s, accounting I I ----------------------—
C lerk s, file I _________________ _______
C lerk s, file H ________________________
C lerk s, file H I _______________________
Keypunch op era tors I ---------------------—
Keypunch op era tors II---------------------—
O ffice boys o r g irls — — ------------------Stenographers, general -------------- ——
Stenographers, s e n i o r --------- ------------Switchboard o p e r a t o r s ----------------------Tabulating-m achine op era tors I I------Tabulating-m achine op era tors IH ____
Typists I _________________ „-------- . ____
Typists II
------------- — --- ------—
—

1 F or scope o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 Salaries rep orted relate to the standard sala ries that w ere paid fo r standard w ork schedules, i . e . , to the straigh t-tim e
salary correspon din g to the em ployee* s n orm al w ork schedule excluding overtim e h ou rs.
3 Medians are om itted fo r occupations that had few er than 5 em p loyees.
4 The m iddle range (interquartile) used here is the cen tral part o f the a rra y excluding the upper and low er fourths o f
the em ployee distribution. M iddle ranges are om itted fo r occupations that had few er than 15 em p loyees.




Table 2. Percent Distribution of Employees in Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Occupations1 by Average Monthly Salaries, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 1963
" tHhZet"'
account­
ants

Accountants
A verage m onthly sala ries
H

HI

IV

$425 and under $450 — ^ ----$450 and under $475 $475 and under $ 500 ------------

4 5 .8

-

_
-

$ 500
$ 525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 525 _______
$ 550 _______
$575 ---- , -----$ 6 0 0 ________

33. 3
4 .2
4 .2

6. 3
3.1
9 .4
9 .4

$ 600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625 ________
$650 r _
_
$675 -----------$700

$700
$725
$ 750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$ 750 -----$775 -----------$800

4 .2
_

$ 800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 825
$850
$875 -----------$900 ________

$900
$025
$050
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$925 -----------$050
----$075
$ 1, 0 0 0 _____

$ 1, 000
$ 1, 050
$ 1,100
$ 1,150
$ 1, 200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1,100
$ 1,150
$ 1, 200
$ 1, 250

___
__
__
^—
....

$ 1,250 and under $ 1, 3 0 0 ---$ 1, 300 and under $ 1, 350 . . . .
$ 1, 350 and o v e r _____________
Total
Number o f e m p lo y e e s _______
A verage m onthly s a l a r i e s ___

III

H

V

E ngineers
H

I

-

-

_
“

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
15.4
-

_
"

2 9 .0
9 .7
-

12.5
12.5
12.5
7 .8

_
3 .3
3. 3

_
-

_
6 .5
-

7 .7
1 5.4
7 .7
1 5.4

_
-

10. 0
1 0.0
13.3
3 .3

_

3 .2

-

-

-

7 .8
1.6
4 .7
1.6

_
38.5
-

-

_
.
-

1.6
7 .8
1.6

6 .7
6 .7
3 3.3
3. 3

_

6 .7

_

4 .2
4 .2
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

2 5 .8
-

14.3
14. 3
14. 3

2 9 .0
22.6
-

_
2 8.6

3 .2

_
.
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
6 .5

_
16.7

_
16.7
33. 3

IV

m

-

-

-

_
2 .9
11. 8
8 .8

_
5 .8

-

_
-

_
-

9 .7
6 .5
12.9

2 0.6
8 .8
5 .9

2 1 .4
13.6
5 .8
3 .9

4 .6

_
-

_
“

9 .7
16.1
-

8 .8
2 .9
5 .9

2 1 .4
15.5
4 .9
-

7 .7
1.5
13.8
6 .2

_
-

_
-

11.8
2 .9
5 .9
-

4 .9
1.0
1 .0
-

15.4
6 .2
15.4
3. 1

_
3 .8
1. 3

_
-

2 .9
-

1 .0

13.8

10. 0
11. 3
5 .0
-

4 .8
4 .8
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

“

3. 1
6 .2

_

3. 1

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

14. 3

6 .5

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

.

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

3 .2

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

14. 3

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

100.0
24
$515

100.0
64
$650

100.0
30
$797

100.0
7
$921

100.0
31
$823

100. 0

16.7
16.7
-

100. 0

13
6
$670 $1,069

VI

-

-•

_

_

V

_

_

See footnotes at end o f table.




V

C hem ists

-

-

-

_

_

_

2 7 .5
2 3 .8
5 .0
2 .5
6. 3

-

-

-

-

2 .5
1. 3

-

-

-

-

-

_

4 .8
_
_

14. 3
4 2 .9
4 .8
9 .5
1 4.4

100.0

100. 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

31
$605

34
$677

103
$681

65
$829

80
$1,034

21
$1,221

8
Table 2. Percent Distribution of Employees in Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Occupations1 by Average Monthly Salaries, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 1963— Continued

A verage monthly sala ries

D rafts­ D rafts­
men,
men,
junior
senior

$200
$225
$250
$275

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$225$250—
$ 275—
$300-

$300
$325
$350
$375

and
and
and
and

tinder
under
tinder
under

$325$350$375—
$400—

18.6
14.0
11.6
23. 3

1. 5
1. 5

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
tinder
tinder
tinder

$425$450—
$475$500-

4. 7
18.6
2. 3
2 .3

3.1
4. 6
16.9
16.9

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

tinder
under
tinder
under

$525$550—
$575—
$600—

and
and
and
and

tinder
tinder
tinder
tinder

$625—
$650$675$ 700-

C lerks,
accounting

Keypunch
op erators

C lerk s, file

II

4 .6
3. 1
7 .7
3. 1

$600
$625
$650
$675

Bookkeeping machine
op erators

III

0.8
6.6

23. 1

1. 5
8. 3
18.9
31.8

4. 7

Number of em p loy ees-------A verage monthly sala ries -

4
4
3
5

6.1
.8

20.8
11. 1

8 .3
23.6
1 .4
8. 3
1 .4
1 .4

5.
7.
13.
16.

3
0
5
3

12.5
55.6
2 6 .4
5.6

31. 0
4 1 .4
13.8

2. 1

2. 0

18.9
9 .8
4. 1
4 .9

12. 0
34. 0
8. 0
28. 0
8. 0
4. 0
4. 0

20. 2
10. 4
10. 1
7 .9

7 .6
9 .3
9 .3

25. 0

6 .7
2. 0
.6

2 1.5
7. 2
10. 5

2 5.0
50. 0

4.1
4 .9

100.0

100.0

4
$399

$305

11.0

7 .6

6 .9

8.0
5.1
.8

1 0 0 .0

43

65
$537

$382

10 0
0.

100.0

100
0.

132
$299

72
$360

356
$311

O ffice
boys
or
girls

1 0 0 .0

237
$435

100 100
0.
0.
72
$241

Switch­
Stenog­ Stenog­
board
raphers, raphers.
o p e ra ­
general senior
tors

$200
$225
$250
$275

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$225$250$275$300-

34. 3
18. 6
7.8
15.7

0.
13.7
15.7

$300
$325
$350
$375

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$325$350$375$400-

12. 7
8. 8

2 0 .8

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425$450$475$500-

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525$550$575$600-

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

29
$275

Tabulating machine
op era tors
II

$625$650$675$700-

2.0

15. 2
13. 7
10. 7

6. 1

.5

1.0
1. 5

5
1 .4

5 .4
16.9
16. 2
33. 8
8 .5
3.8
.8

6 .9

21.8

5
1
1
3

17. 2

6.2

10. 3
8. 0

10
.

11
.
12.6

50
$364

T ypists

15.
21.
20.
26.

2. 3
10. 3
5 .7
9 .2

21. 0
21.9
2.9
.5

122

100
0.

HI

1.1

7. 1
17.6
16. 2
10. 5

6. 7
6. 7
2. 6

10
.

5. 7
10. 3
23. 0
17. 2
10. 3
3 .4
16 .1

10. 3
3 .4

20. 0

15.0
2 5.0
5 .0
20. 0

5 .0
10. 0

T otal-------------------------

100.0

100
0.

1 0 0 .0

Number o f em p loy ees-------A verage monthly sala ries -

102
$255

197
$330

210
$384

1 F o r scope of study, see table in appendix A.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums o f individual item s may not equal 100.




18.0
27.9

12. 3
1. 5
100.0

T otal—

11.
14.
5.
1.

4. 2
12. 5

100. 0
130
$316

100. 0

100.0

100.0

87
$426

20
6513

194
$264

87
$348

9
Table 5. P e rce n t Distribution o f O ffice
W orkers by V acation P ay P ro v isio n s ,
Honolulu, Hawaii, 1 May 1963

Table 3. P ercen t Distribution of O ffice
W orkers by Scheduled W eekly H ours,
Honolulu, Hawaii, 1 May 1963
P ercen t

W eekly hours
A ll office w orkers -

100

-----------------------

13
1
2
5
(1
2)
78
(2)

35 _________________________________________
O ver 35 and under 37V ________________
2
37Vz ------------------------------------------------------Dv p r 38 and under 40

_

_

_______

O yer 40 n
,.,

1 F or scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 L ess than 0 .5 percen t.
NOTE: B ecause o f rounding,
item s m ay not equal 100.

sums

of

individual

Table 4. P ercen t Distribution of O ffice W orkers by
Number o f Paid Holidays P rov ided Annually,
Honolulu, Hawaii, 1 May 1963
Item
A ll o ffice w orkers

___________________

W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays —------------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid h o lid a y s _____________ —----------

P ercen t
100

(2)

(2)
(2)
<
2)
(?)
(2 )
12
2
(2)
22
2
7
12
3
9
(2)
14
12

Total holiday t im e 3
17 8a y«
11 o r m ore days _______________________
10 o r m ore d a y s --- --------------------------------9V2 o r m ore d a y s------- ----------------------9 o r m ore days
------------------------------8V2 o r m ore days----------------------------------8 o r m ore d a y s - . ------------- ------------------7V o r m ore d a y s --- ----------------------------- -2
7 o r m ore d a y s . ------------------------------------6V2 o r m ore d a y s . . ---------------- ------6 or m o re d a y s ______________________
5 o r m o re d a y s . ------------------------------ -----3 or m ore days
-----------------------------------

12
27
36
39
58
61
82
84
97
97
99
99
99

1 F or s cop e of study, see table in appendix A .
2 L ess than 0 .5 p ercen t.
3 A ll com binations o f full and half days that
add to the sam e amount a re com bined; fo r exam ple, the
p rop ortion o f w orkers receiv in g a total o f 7 days includes
those with 7 full days and no half days, 6 full days and
2 half days, 5 full days and 4 half days, and so on. P r o ­
portions w ere then cumulated.




A ll o ffice w o r k e r s _____________________

P ercen t
100

Method o f paym ent
W orkers in establishm ents
providing paid vacations -----------L e n g th -of-tim e paym ent ________ _
W orkers in establishm ents
providing no paid vacations _______ _

97
97
3

Amount o f vacation p a y 2
A fter 6 months o f s e r v ic e :
1 week ______ ______________________ _
2 weeks -----------------------------------------------

3
1

A fter 1 year o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ___________ _______ _ _______
2 w e e k s _________________ __ _________
3 weeks -----------------------------------------------

14
67
19

A fte r 2 years o f s e rv ice :
1 week ______________________ _—
,
.
2 weeks __________ .. __ —
_____ ____ _
3 weeks -----------------------------------------------

1
79
19

A fter 3 years o f s e rv ice :
1 w eek. .
___
_
___ _____
.—
„_______________
2 weeks __,r--^r
3 weeks -----------------------------------------------

1
62
37

A fter 4 years of s e rv ice :
1 week __________________ ______. . . . . —
2 weeks ______________________________
3 weeks ______________________________

1
62
37

A fter 5 years o f s e rv ice :
1 week ______________________________
2 weeks - _____________ _______________ _
O ver 2 and under 3 weeks ----------3 weeks -----------------------------------------------

1
43
(3)
56

A fter 10 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 UfPplf ,,
......
2 weeks ___________ _________________
3 weeks -----------------------------------------------

1
24
75

A fter 12 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 week ______________________________
2 weeks —________ -__ ___________ — _
3 weeks -----------------------------------------------

1
24
75

A fter 15 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 wftftlr ...
_ . .. . .
__
2 weeks - ________________ ____________ 3 weeks ------- ------------------------------------4 weeks - ____________________________
O ver 4 weeks ________________________

1
14
84
1
(3)

A fte r 20 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 week - ______________ __ ___________ —
2 weeks _____________________________
3 weeks _________________ ________ ____
4 week*
.. ...
O ver 4 weeks ________________________

1
13
49
34
3

A fte r 25 years o f s e rv ice :
1 week -------------- --------------------------2 weeks
3 weeks ______________________________
4 weeks _____________________________
O ver 4 weeks ________________________

1
13
41
42
3

99

Number o f days
3 h o l i d a y s .______________________________
5 h o l i d a y s ._____________________________—
6 h o l i d a y s ._____________________________—
6 holidays plus 1 half day
______
6 holidays plus 2 half d a y s . ----------------7 h o l i d a y s .______________________________
7 holidays plus 1 half day ------------------__
7 holidays plus 2 half days ___________
8 holidays
___________________________
8 holidays plus 1 half day -----------------8 holidays plus 2 half days -------------- —
9 h o l i d a y s .______________________________
9 holidays plus 1 half day _ ___________
10 holidays
---------------------------------10 holidays plus 2 half days ---------------11 holidays ____________________________ _
12 holidays
------------------- -------- — .

Vacation p o licy

1 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A .
2 P eriod s o f s e r v ic e w ere a rb itra rily chosen and do
not n e c e ss a r ily re fle ct the individual p ro v isio n s fo r p r o ­
g re ssio n s. F o r exam ple, the changes in p rop ortions in ­
dicated at 10 y e a rs 1 s e rv ice include changes in p rov ision s
o ccu rrin g between 5 and 10 yea rs. Estim ates are cum u­
lative.
Thus, the p rop ortion re ceiv in g 3 weeks* pay o r
m o re after 5 yea rs includes those who re ce iv e 3 weeks*
pay o r m ore a fter few er years o f s e r v ic e .
3 L ess than 0. 5 p ercen t.

10
Table 6. P ercen t of O ffice W orkers Em ployed in Estab­
lishm ents Providing Health, Insurance, o r Pension
B e n e fits ,1 Honolulu, Hawaii, 2 May 1963
Type o f benefit
A ll office w orkers

, --- ------- ---

P ercen t

A ll o ffice w orkers
93
63
90
5

P ercen t

---------------------------- -

W orkers in establishm ents paying
supplem entary cash bonuses
______
Christm as o r y e a re n d ___________ P ro fit s h a rin g _____________________ _
W orkers in establishm ents paying
no supplem entary cash bonuses _____

100
40
17
23
60

88
2
95
95
95
82
74
(4)

1 Includes those plans fo r which at least part o f the
cost is borne by the em ployer, excepting only legal
requirem ents such as w orkm en’ s com pensation, s o cia l
secu rity, and ra ilroa d retirem ent.
2 F or scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
3 Unduplicated total o f w orkers receiv in g sick leave
o r sickness and accident insurance shown separately below.
Sick leave plans are lim ited to those which definitely
establish at least the m inimum number o f days* pay that
can be expected by each em ployee.
Inform al s ick leave
allow ances determ ined on an individual basis a re excluded.
4 L ess than 0 .5 p ercen t.




Cash bonus plan

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing:
Life in s u ra n c e ^ .------------------------ -----A ccid ental death and d ism em b er­
ment insurance
------------ ------Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave o r b oth 1 __________
3
2
Sickness and accident
insurance
-------------- — ------Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting period) — ---------------------Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting p e r io d ) ________________
H ospitalization in s u ra n c e --- -----------Surgical in s u ra n c e --------------------------M edical insurance --------------------------Catastrophe in s u ra n c e --------------------R etirem ent pension p la n ----------------No health, insurance, o r
pension p lan _______________________

Table 7. P e rce n t D istribution o f O ffice W orkers by
Type o f Supplem entary Cash Bonus P a y m e n ts,1
Honolulu, Hawaii, 2 May 1963

1 Supplem entary nonproduction bonuses paid in cash
to a m a jo rity o f the o ffice w o rk e rs.
2 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A .

The Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, Survey, May 1963

The survey of salaries for selected white-collar occupations, conducted
in Puerto Rico in May 1963, relates to the Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan
metropolitan areas (municipalities of Mayaguez, Ponce, San Juan, Catano, Bayamdn,
and Guaynabo). These areas had a combined population of approximately 818,000
in the I960 census, and included almost 35 percent of the population of the
Commonwealth.
Among the industries surveyed, approximately 81,700 workers
were employed in establishments with 50 workers or more during the period
studied. Approximately two-fifths of the total were employed in manufacturing.
The principal industries, in terms of employment, were apparel; food and related
products; electrical machinery and equipment; furniture and fixtures; and cement,
concrete, and glass products.
Within nonmanufacturing, the industries with the
highest proportions of the 48,900 total employment were contract construction
(30 percent) and transportation, communication, and other public utilities (24 per­
cent). The remaining employment in nonmanufacturing was divided among whole­
sale trade, retail trade, and finance industries, with approximately 13 percent in
each, and service industries with about 8 percent.
Manufacturing and contract
construction industries accounted for smaller proportions of the employment in
white-collar occupations than were indicated for total employment. In contrast,
the finance industries, with less than a tenth of the total employment, accounted
for a fourth of all white-collar employees.
Employment and salary data could be presented for 27 of the 77 selected
professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupation work levels as de­
fined for the study.
The 27 work levels include a total of 2,801 employees, or
approximately 18 percent of the estimated white-collar employment in establish­
ments within scope of the study. San Juan, with four-fifths of the total employ­
ment in the areas surveyed, accounted for almost nine-tenths of the employees
in the selected occupations.
Women, who represented slightly more than half the employment in the
occupations studied, were nearly all employed in clerical positions. Among the
15 clerical levels, women represented more than four-fifths of the employment
in 8 levels and a majority in 2 levels. In addition to constituting almost all of
the professional, administrative, and technical occupations, men represented a
third of the employment in the clerical levels. The five levels in which men rep­
resented a majority were bookkeeping-machine operators II, accounting clerks II,
office boys or girls, and tabulating-machine operators I and II.
Although the study provided for inclusion of data on salary differentials
paid to employees in Puerto Rico by companies with headquarters in mainland
United States, none of the employees in the selected occupations were paid such
differentials by companies represented in the study.
Average Salaries
Average (mean) monthly salaries for the 27 occupation work levels pre­
sented in table 8 ranged from $211 for office boys or girls and switchboard
operators, to $1,208 for engineers VII, a level defined to include engineers re­
sponsible for an engineering program consisting of many large and important
projects.




11

12

Of the five levels of accountants defined for the survey, salary data could
be presented for levels II through IV. Average monthly salaries ranged from
$361 for accountants II, a level above entry positions for inexperienced college
graduates, to $532 for accountants IV who generally work with considerable
independence and are fully competent in solving a variety of difficult accounting
problems.
Salary data for engineers, the largest group of professional employees
studied, are presented in six levels, engineers II through VII.
Level II rep­
resents engineers who have completed their initial on-the-job training and are
performing engineering tasks requiring application of standard procedures. The
highest level presented, engineers VII, typically plans and directs engineering
programs consisting of many large and important projects.
Average monthly
salaries ranged from $469 for engineers II to $1,208 for engineers VII. Almost
half of the engineers were classified as engineers IV; their monthly salaries av­
eraged $705.
In the combined six engineering levels studied, the construction
indust riels accounted for half the employment.
Among the 15 clerical work levels presented, average monthly salaries
ranged from $211 for office boys or girls and switchboard operators, to $298
for bookkeeping-machine operators II. Average monthly salaries were below $250
for 11 of the occupation work levels. The remaining four levels, senior stenog­
raphers, accounting clerks II, tabulating-machine operators II, and bookkeepingmachine operators II, had average monthly salaries between $279 and $298.
The large at groups of employees in the selected clerical occupations were ac­
counting clerks and typists, each representing more than a fifth of the clerical
workers„ For most of the clerical occupations, the finance industries accounted
for a higher proportion of the employment than any of the other industry divisions
represented in the study.
For a limited number of clerical occupations, it was possible to make
comparisons between average salaries in the San Juan area with those in the
Mayaguez and Ponce areas. As indicated earlier, almost nine-tenths of all em­
ployees in the occupations studied were located in the San Juan area. In the fol­
lowing tabulation, average monthly salaries are shown for the five clerical levels
with at least 15 employees in the Mayaguez and Ponce areas combined.

Occupation and level
Bookkeeping-machine operators I ------------------ ---------Clerks, accounting I -------------------------------------Clerks, accounting II-------------------------------------Stenographers, general------------------------------------ .............
Typists I ---------------------------------------------------------

Mayaguez
and Ponce
$219

233

San Juan
$244
245
285
251
218

Among these clerical levels, average salaries were from 6 to 21 per­
cent higher in the San Juan area than in the other areas combined.
It was not
possible, in this comparison, to take into account such factors as differences
in the industrial composition and the relative size of establishments in these
areas, which may influence salary levels.
The percent distribution of employees by monthly salary is presented
in table 9 for each of the 27 occupation levels.
Within most of the levels,
rates of pay for the higher salaried employees were at least one and one-half
times the salaries received by the lowest paid employees in the same level.




13

It is readily apparent that a substantial degree of salary overlapping
occurs between work levels of the same occupation.
Overlapping also occurs
between distinct occupations for which average salaries differ substantially.
To illustrate, accountants II averaged $3,61 a month with 10.9 percent receiving
salaries of less than $325; although senior stenographers averaged $279 ($82
less), 7 .6 percent were paid $325 or more.
The ranges in salaries paid in­
dividuals in the same job category reflect salary differences among establish­
ments as well as within establishments.
Salary differences for the same job
category in an establishment may be ♦
accounted for by differences in ability,
experience, or performance, as determined informally on an individual basis
or as provided for under formal salary plans with established salary ranges
for each grade level.
Hours of Work
The length of the workweek, on which the straight-time salary was based,
was obtained for each employee in the 27 occupation levels for which data are
presented.
These levels were distributed by average weekly hours (rounded to
the nearest half hour) as follows:

Average
weekly
hours

Occupation and level

3 8 .0 ----------------------------------------------- Keypunch operators I.
3 8 .5 .......... - ............................................... Clerks, file I and II.
3 9 .0 ------------------------ ------------------------

Stenographers, general and senior; typists I.

39. 5-------------------------------------------------

Accountants II; chief accountants II; clerks,
accounting II; office boys or girls; switch­
board operators; tabulating-machine
operators I and II.

4 0 .0 ----------------------------------------------- - Chemists IV; engineers II, IV, V, and VI;
draftsmen, senior; bookkeeping-machine
operators I and II; clerks, accounting I;
typists II.
40. 5----------------------------------------------- - Accountants III and IV; engineers III.
4 1 .0 -------------------------------------------------

Engineers VII.

The differences in average workweeks among levels of work reflect
variations in the distribution of employees among industries in which salaries
are based on workweeks of other than 40 hours.
Data on the number of hours per week which a majority of the full-time
nonsupervisory office workers were scheduled to work was also obtained.
The
scheduled workweek was 40 hours in establishments employing 65 percent of these
workers, between 40l/z and 50 hours for 8 percent, and between 3Zl/z and 39 hours
for 27 percent (table 10).
Of the office workers scheduled to work less than
40 hours, most had workweeks of either 35 or 37V hours.
2
The majority of
these workers were employed in banks and insurance companies.




14

Supplementary Wage Benefits
Information presented on selected supplementary wage benefits relates to
provisions applying to nonsupervisory office workers, although others in higher
level positions may receive the same benefits. Each provision was tabulated as
applying to all office workers in an establishment if a majority were eligible or
could eventually meet the eligibility requirements.
Paid holidays were provided to almost all office workers (table 11). The
most common provisions were for either 18 full holidays, or a combination of
18 full and half holidays.
For example, 27 percent of the office workers re­
ceived 18 full days, 17 percent received 8 full plus 10 half days, 13 percent
received 7 full plus 11 half days, and 6 percent received 9 full plus 9 half days.
Most of the office workers receiving 18 full days with pay were employed in
banks and water transportation companies.
Paid vacations after qualifying periods of service were given to office
employees in almost all establishments (table 12). After 1 year of service, at
least 3 weeks with pay were given in establishments employing half of the office
workers.
After 15 years of service, establishments employing one-fifth of the
office workers provided 4 weeks or more with pay; these workers were largely
employed in banks and in insurance and transportation companies.
Health, insurance, and pension benefits applying to office workers,
(table 13), relate to plans in which the employer paid at least part of the
cost. Life, hospitalization, surgical, and medical insurance coverage was availa­
ble to at least four-fifths of the office workers. Approximately seven-tenths of
the office workers were eligible to receive sick benefits in the form of either
paid sick leave or sickness and accident insurance, with sick leave in the form
of full pay without a waiting period being the most common.
Pension plans, providing regular payments for the remainder of the
worker* s life on retirement (in addition to legally required coverage), were pro­
vided in establishments employing 35 percent of the office workers. A majority
of the workers covered by these plans were employed in banks.
Nonproduction bonuses, usually paid at Christmas or year end, were given
by establishments in which three-fourths of the office workers were employed
(table 14).




15
Table 8.

Employment and Average Salaries for Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical
Occupations in Private Industry,1 Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 1963
Monthly s a la r ie s 1
2

Occupation and cla ss
(See definitions in appendix B)

of
em ployees

Annual s a la r ie s 2

Middle ra n g e 4
Mean

Median 3

F irs t
quartile

T hird
quartile

Middle range 4
Mean

Median 3

F irs t
Third
quartile quartile

Accountants
55
96
74
19

$361
454
532
728

$349
451
520
736

—

13

667

575

I I _____ ____________________
III----------------------------------------IV —
—
V .
------V I __________________________
VII ______ — — —------------------

28
70
141
44
10
4

469
593
705
800
978
1,208

32

284
68
250
283
50
65
116
130
280
66
93
26
43
360
101

Accountants II
Accountants III —------------ ---------------------Accountants I V ------------- ----------------------Chief Accountants II
—

$334
420
486
708

$409
496
612
763

468
595
694
788
988

453
548
623
717

491
659
768
888

349

347

330

239
298
243
287
214
232
221
211
249
279
211
229
289
215
244

237
291
233
291 •
214
231
219
221
248
287
213
233
302
218
242

223
262
211
262
202
215
209
205
224
259
201
209
280
206
220

$ 4 , 332
5 ,448
6, 384
8,7 3 6

$ 4 , 188
5,412
6 ,240
8 ,832

$ 4 ,0 0 8
5,040
5,8 3 2
8,496

$ 4 , 908
5,952
7, 344
9, 156

8 ,0 0 4

6,900

5 ,628
7, 116
8,4 6 0
9,600
11,736
14, 496

5,616
7,140
8,328
9,456
11,856

5,436
6,576
7,476
8 ,6 0 4

5,892
7,908
9,216
10,656

380

4, 188

4, 164

3,960

4,560

250
354
274
315
226
247
234
238
271
307
224
262
315
236
269

2,868
3,576
2, 916
3 ,4 4 4
2,568
2 ,7 8 4
2,652
2, 532
2,988
3, 348
2 ,532
2,748
3, 468
2,580
2 ,928

2,8 4 4
3,492
2,796
3,492
2,568
2,772
2,628
2,652
2,976
3 ,444
2,556
2,796
3,624
2,616
2,904

2,676
3, 144
2,532
3, 144
2,4 2 4
2,580
2,508
2,460
2,688
3, 108
2,412
2,508
3, 360
2,472
2,640

3,000
4, 248
3, 288
3,780
2,712
2 ,9 6 4
2,808
2,856
3, 252
3,684
2 ,688
3, 144
3,780
2,832
3,228

Chem ists and Engineers
Chem ists IV
E ngineers
Engine e r s
E ngineers
E ngineers
E ngineers
E ngineers

—

Draftsm en
D raftsm en, senior . . .

C lerica l
B ookkeeping-m achine op era tors I ____
B ookkeeping-m achine op era tors I I ___
C lerk s, accounting I -------------------------C lerk s, accounting II
— C lerk s, file I --------------------------------------C lerk s, file I I _________________________
Keypunch op era tors I ---—
O ffice boys o r g i r l s ______ ___________
S tenographers, general
S tenographers, s e n i o r -----------------------Switchboard o p e r a t o r s -----------------------T abulating-m achine op era tors I --------T abulating-m achine op era tors II_____
T ypists I ______________________________
T ypists II
—
- -----------

1 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A .
2 S alaries rep orted relate to the standard sa la ries that w ere paid fo r standard w ork schedules, i. e . , to the straigh t-tim e
sala ry corresp on din g to the employee* s norm al w ork schedule excluding overtim e h ou rs.
3 Medians are om itted fo r occupations that had few er than 5 em p loy ees.
4 The m iddle range (interquartile) used here is the central part o f the a rra y excluding the upper and low er fourths of
the em ployee distribution.
Middle ranges are om itted fo r occupations that had few er than 15 em p loy ees.




16
Table 9. Percent Distribution of Employees in Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical
Occupations1 by Average Monthly Salaries, Mayag&ez, Ponce, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 1963
'-T E S T '
a ccou n t. Chem ists
ants

Accountants
A verage monthly sala ries
III

II

IV

_

$250 and under $ 275-----------$275 and tinder $300------------

IV

II

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$325-----------$350-----------$375-----------$400------------

10.9
41.8
3 .6
14. 5

3.1
2. 1
1 .0
7. 3

_
1 .4

_
-

_

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425-----------$ 450-----------$ 475-----------$500------------

14.5
1.8
10.9
-

14.6
21.9
12.5
15.6

2 .7
6 .8
10.8
8. 1

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
tinder
tinder
tinder

$ 525-----------$550-----------$ 575-----------$600------------

1.8
_
“

4. 2
11.5
2. 1
-

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

tinder
under
under
under

$625-----------$ 650-----------$ 675-----------$ 700------------

3. 1
_
1. 0
-

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
tinder
under
under

$ 725-----------$ 750-----------$775-----------$ 800------------

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

tinder
under
tinder
under

$ 825-----------$850-----------$ 875-----------$900------------

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

tinder
under
tinder
under

$ 925-----------$950-----------$975-----------$ 1 ,0 0 0 --------

„
_

-

-

_
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

30. 8
-

3 .6
17.9
42. 9
2 1 .4

_

-

2 .9
-

25.7
1 .4
10.8
2.7

5. 3
-

_

_

1 5 .4
7 .7
7 .7

7. 1
3 .6
3 .6

12. 2
14.9
1 .4
-

5. 3
10. 5
-

_
7 .7

1. 4
-

15.8
36.8
10.5
-

_
-

_

_
-

5. 3
5. 3
-

7. 7
-

-

"

_
-

_

_
-

VII

-

_

_

.7
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

17. 1
5. 7
15.7
1 1 .4

.7
6 .4
5 .0

4 .5
-

-

_
_
-

12.9
_
28.6
-

12.8
5. 7
1 6.3
2 .8

4 .5
2 .3
“

.
-

_
-

_

_
-

_
_

_
-

7 .8
2. 1
19.9
3 .5

20. 5
_
15.9
6 .8

_
2 0.0

.
-

5 .7
-

2.1
1 .4
5 .7
-

1 1.4
2 .3
6 .8
2 .3

10. 0
-

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

5. 3

-

-

_

_

_
.
-

_
-

_

_

-

.
0 .7

-

-

23. 1

-

_

_
.
-

_

-

-

VI

-

-

_
-

V

-

_
-

_

$1, 000 and under $ 1 ,0 5 0 ---$1, 050 and under $ 1 ,1 0 0 ---$1, 100 and o v e r ----------------

IV

m

_
-

_
-

II

.

$300
$325
$350
$375

_

Engineers

.7

-

_
-

-

_
_

_

.7

2 .3
6 .8

-

_
_

io. d
-

2.1
2 .8

13. 6

3 0.0

_

_
_

-

1 0.0

_

5 0.0

_
_

2 0.0

5 0.0

T otal----------------------------

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Number of em p loy ees----------A verage monthly sala ries

55
$361

96
$454

74
$532

19
$728

13
$667

28
$469

70
$593

141
$705

44
$800

10
$978

4
$1, 208

See footnotes at end of table.




17
Table 9. Percent Distribution of Employees in Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical
Occupations 1 by Average Monthly Salaries, Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 1963— Continued

A verage m onthly sala ries

D ra fts­
men,
senior

Under $150 ________________
$150 and tinder $ 1 7 5 ______
$175 and under $ 2 0 0 ___—

_

Bookkeeping m achine
operators
I

I

I

II

-

Keypunch
op erators

C lerks,
file

C lerks,
accounting
II

1. 2
2 .8
6. 0

_
0. 7

II

I

2 .0
2 .0
16.0

3. 1

0 .9

5 6 .0
16.0
6 .0
2 .0

3 6.9
4 1 .5
6. 2
12.3

6 6 .4
2 2 .4
9 .5
.9

-

0 .4
-

$225 and under $250 -------$250 and under $ 2 7 5 --------$275 and under $300„______

_
12.5
3. 1

2 7.5
4 7 .9
11.3
7. 7

4 .4
4 .4
3 5.3
10.3

3 4 .4
19.2
12.4
11.6

2 .5
11. 7
21. 2
22. 6

$300
$325
$350
$375

3.
37.
18.
12.

3 .2
.4
1 .8
-

8. 8
8. 8
2 7.9
-

6 .8
3 .2
1. 6
-

2 7.9
6 .4
4 .9
1. 8

_
-

_
-

_
-

.8

.4

_
_

_
-

_
-

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 3 2 5 __
$350 __
$375
$ 4 0 0 ______

$400 and under $425_
$425 and under $450
$450 and ov er
_

1
5
8
5

_

_
.

_
-

_

__

6 .3
6 .3

T o t a l________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100.0

100. 0

100. 0

Number o f em ployees _____
A verage monthly sala ries __

32
$349

284
$239

68
$298

250
$243

283
$287

50
$214

65
$232

116
$221

O ffice
boys or
girls

Stenog­
raphers,
gen eral

Stenog­
raphers,
senior

Switch­
board
operators

____
Under $150 ___
$150 and under $ 1 7 5 ____ _
$175 and under $200

10. 0
.8
6. 2

2. 1
3. 2

-

5 .4
17. 2

15.4
-

-

$200
$225
$250
$275

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 2 2 5 ______
$250
$275
$300

40. 0
3 5 .4
4. 6
2 .3

20. 7
25. 7
27.5
1 0.4

6. 1
15. 2
12. 1
3 6 .4

54. 8
15. 1
7. 5
-

3 0 .8
19.2
26. 9
3 .8

4.
4.
11.
25.

$300
$325
$350
$375

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

__
$325
$ 3 5 0 ______
$ 3 7 5 ______
$ 4 0 0 ______

.8
-

4 .3
2. 1
3. 6

22. 7
7. 6
-

_
_

.4
.

_
_

$400 and under $ 4 2 5 ______
$425 and under $ 4 5 0 ______
$450 and over__ _

_

Tabulating m achine
op era tors
I

Typists

II

_

-

3 .8
-

_

_

_

_

II

I
3. 6
6. 1
2 .8
7
7
6
6

5 1.2
2 .3
_
_

1.0

5 1 .4
31.7
3 .9
.6

29. 7
29. 7
19. 8
12.9

_
-

5 .9
1. 0
-

_
-

_
-

T o t a l________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100.0

100. 0

100.0

100.0

100. 0

Num ber o f e m p lo y e e s __ ___
A verage monthly s a la r ie s ..

130
$211

280
$249

66
$279

93
$211

26
$229

43
$289

360
$215

101
$244

1 F or scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
NOTE: B ecause o f rounding,




sums o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.

18
Table 10. P ercen t Distribution o f O ffice W orkers by
Scheduled Weekly H ours, Mayaguez, P on ce, and
San Juan, P uerto R i c o ,1 May 1963
P ercen t

W eekly hours
A ll o ffice w o r k e r s --------------------------------3 2V z................................................................
3 5 _______________________________________
O ver 35 and under 3 7 % --------------------------

100

O ver 40 and under 44 ---------------------------4 4 _______________________________________

(2)
13
(2)
10
(2)
4
65
1
6

O ver 48 --------------------------------------------------

A

38 — ----------------------------------------------------O ver 38 and under 40 ----------------------------

1 F or scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 L ess than 0 .5 percen t.

Table 11.

P ercen t Distribution o f O ffice W orkers by Number o f Paid H olidays P rovided
Annually, Mayaguez, P on ce, and San Juan, P uerto R i c o ,1 May 1963

Item

P ercen t

Item

100

Num ber o f days 2— Continued

99

A ll o ffic e w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------

18 holidays __ ------------------------------------------- _
18 holidays plus 4 half days _________________

W orkers in establishm ents providing
W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays ---------------------------------------------

P ercen t

(3>

Total holiday tim e 4

1
3
3
(3)
(3)
1
2
5
3
5
13
2
1
17
3
2
6
(3)
2
3
(3)

20 days -------------------------------------------------18 o r m o re d a y s _________________________ _
15 o r m o re d a y s ____________________________
14% o r m o re days --------------------------------------14 o r m o re days ------------ -------------------------13% o r m o re d a y s ____ ; ___________________
_
13 o r m o re d a y s ------------------------------------12% o r m o re days --------------------------------------12 o r m o re days __________________________
11 % o r m o re days __________________________
11 o r m o re days ------------------------------ ------10% o r m o re d a y s __________________________
10 o r m o re days _ ----------------- ----------------9 o r m o re days ---- --------------------------------------8% o r m o re days -----------------------------------------8 o r m o re days
_______ ________ _______
7% o r m o re d a y s ___________________________
7 o r m o re days
__________________________
6 o r m o re days _____________________________
5 o r m o re days ____________________________ _
4 o r m o re d a y s ____________________________
3 o r m ore days --------------------------------------------

27
(3)

N um ber o f d a y s 1
2
3
3
4
4
5
5

h olid a ys-------------------------------------------------------holidays plus 6 and 15 half days —----------------h olid a ys______________________________________
holidays plus 14 half days ----------------------------h olid a ys______________________________________
holidays plus 12, 13, and 14 half days ——---,

6 holidays plus 3 and 12 half days ____________
7 holidays plus 9, 10, and 13 half d a y s ----------7 holidays plus 11 half days ----------------------------8 h olid a ys______________________________________
8 holidays plus 1, 4, and 5 half days ----------8 holidays plus 10 half days ___________________
9 h olid a ys______________________________________
9 holidays plus 3, 8, 10, and 11 half d a y s --9 holidays plus 9 half d a y s -------------------------------10 h o lid a y s --------------------------------------------------------10 holidays plus 1, 2, 8, and 10 half d a y s -----11 holidays plus 4 and 7 half days ------------------12 holidays plus 5 and 6 half days —-----------------

(3)
27
28
32
32
42
59
72
77
78
79
83
84
87
88
90
91
94
96
97
99
99

1 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 Each line containing m ore them a single com bination
o f full and half day holidays is com p osed o f se v e ra l com binations,
each o f which apply to few er than 5 p ercen t o f the em ployees.
3 L ess than 0. 5 p ercen t.
4 A ll com binations o f full and half days that add to the sam e amount a re com bined; fo r exam ple, the p rop ortion o f
w ork ers receiv in g a total o f 7 days includes those with 7
full days and no half days, 6 full days and 2 half days, 5 full days,
and 4 half days, and so on.
P rop ortion s w ere then cumulated.




19
Table 12.

P ercen t Distribution of O ffice W orkers by Vacation Pay P ro v isio n s ,
Mayag&ez, P once, and San Juan, Puerto R i c o , 1 May 1963

V acation p olicy

A ll o ffic e w o r k e r s ------------------------ --- ----------------------

P ercent

Vacation p o licy

100

Amount o f vacation p a y 1 Continued
2—

Method o f payment
W orkers in establishm ents
W orkers in establishm ents
providing no paid v a c a t io n s ---------------------------------

99
99

A fter 5 ye a rs o f s e rv ice :
1 week
______ __ — ________ . . .
_
2 weeks . . . _.
..
____ _______
_
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
____ _____

P ercen t

._

O ver 3 and under 4 weeks — ________________ ____
1

--------------------------------------------------------

1
16
9
61
8
2
4

Amount o f vacation pay 2
After 6 months o f s e r v ic e :
1 week ---------------------— --------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ---------------------------------

A fter 1 yea r o f s e rv ice :
1 w eek.—
.
.
.
.
------- — O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________
2 waaIca
_ ..
Dyer 7. anrl nnrldr ^ wo.Ire
.... ............
Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s --------------------------------4 weeks
_ ...............................................................
_
Hyai* 4 lyaolra
. .

A fter 2 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
| vyAAfr
2 weeks
,................. . . .......... ......
....... .....
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________ —
------3 w eeks --------------------------------------------------------------Huar ^
linear 4 tyaalre
. .
O ver 4 w e e k s -------------------------------------- —-------------

(3)
12
16
4
3
2

2
(3)
34
12
41
4
2
3

A fter 4 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ___________________________________________
2 weeks
__...
------------------- -----rtyar 7 and imHar ^ maalria
............. .
3 weeks
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks —__. ______ __________
4 w e e k s --- --------------------------------- ------------- -------- —

Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s --------------------------------4 wpplts
....... .
Over 4 weeks --------._ __ . ------A fter 12 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
1 week _________________________________________
2 waaka _
_ _
_ _ _______
Ova t 2 anrl linHar 1 waalrs
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s --------------------------------4 weeks ---------------------------- , _____________________
_
Ovar 4 wpplfs ._ .
_
_
_

1
11
8
54
10
12
4

1
11
8
54
10
12
4

A fter 15 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
1
32
13
44
4
2
3

A fter 3 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
2 w e e k s _________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ---- ------------ --------- -----3 w e e k s ____ _______ — -----— -___— ---------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s __ _______ _______ ___
4 weeks
- .
_ _ .
O ver 4 w e e k s -------------- — ----------------------------- ------

A fter 10 ye a rs o f s e rv ice :
1 wfiftk

1
28
12
48
4
2
4

1
26
12
50
4
2
4

2 w e e k s --------------------- ----------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 weeks --------------------------------3 weeks -------------------------------------„-------- -Over 3 and under 4 weeks . . . . . . . . .
Over 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------A fter 20 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
1 WPPlf
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ---------------------— -------3 weeks ______________________________ __________
Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s _____________________
4 weeks --------------------------------„ ,,— ..- ------------Over 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------A fter 25 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
1 week ------------ ------- -------------- ---------------------------2 w e e k s __ _
__ ________
. .
Oupr 2 anrl linrlpr 3 waalca
.... .
.......
Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s _____________________
4 weeks ---------- , ----------------------- ^ _„
______________

1
11
8
53
6
10
10

1
11
8
52
4
12
11

1
11
8
43
4
22
11

1 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A .
2 P eriod s o f s e rv ice w ere a rb itra rily chosen and do not n e ce ss a rily re fle ct the individual p rov ision s fo r p r o g re ss io n s .
F o r exam ple, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 years* s e rv ice include changes in p rov ision s o cc u rrin g between 5 and
10 y e a r s .
E stim ates are cum ulative.
Thus, the proportion receivin g 3 weeks* pay o r m o re after 5 yea rs includes those who
re c e iv e 3 weeks* pay o r m ore after few er yea rs o f s e r v ic e .
3 L ess than 0 .5 p ercen t.




20
Table 13. P ercen t o f O ffice W orkers Em ployed in
Establishm ents Providing Health, Insurance,
o r Pension B e n e fits ,1 Mayaguez, P on ce,
and San Juan, P uerto R ico, 2 May 1963
Type o f benefit
A ll o ffic e w ork ers ----------------------------------

P ercen t

A ll o ffice w orkers
80
46
71
11
66
1
87
86
82
25
35
4

1 Includes those plans fo r which at lea st part o f
the co s t is borne by the em p loyer, excepting only legal
requirem ents such as w orkm en ^ com pensation, s o cia l
secu rity, and ra ilroa d retirem ent.
2 F o r s cop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
3 Unduplicated total o f w orkers receiv in g sick leave
o r sickness and accident insurance shown separately below.
Sick leave plans a re lim ited to those which definitely e s ­
tablish at lea st the minimum number o f days* pay that
can be expected by each em ployee.
Inform al s ick leave
allow ances determ ined on an individual basis a re excluded.




Cash bonus plan

P ercen t

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing:
L ife in su ra n ce________________________
A ccid en ta l death and d ism em b er­
m ent insurance
— -------------------Sickness and accident insurance
o r s ick leave o r b oth1 ----------------3
2
S ickness and accident in s u r a n c e Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting p eriod ) ------------------- —
Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting p eriod ) — -----------------------H ospitalization insurance -----------------S urgical insurance ---------------------------M ed ica l in s u r a n c e ----------------------------Catastrophe in s u ra n c e ----------------------R etirem ent pension p la n ------------------No health, insurance, o r
pension p l a n --------------------------------------

Table 14. P e rce n t Distribution o f O ffice W orkers
by Type o f Supplementary Cash Bonus
P a y m e n ts,1 Mayaguez, P on ce, and
San Juan, P uerto R ic o ,2 May 1963

_______

__________

W orkers in establishm ents paying
supplem entary b o n u s e s _______________
Christm as o r y e a re n d _______
P ro fit s h a rin g _______________________
OtVi*»r
.... ...
W orkers in establishm ents paying
no supplem entary cash bonuses
____

100

75
70
4
(3)
25

1 Supplementary nonproduction bonuses paid in cash
to a m ajority o f the o ffice w ork ers.
2 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A .
2 L ess than 0 .5 percen t.

The Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, A laska, Survey, June 1963

The survey of salaries for selected white-collar occupations, conducted
in June 1963, relates to the cities and contiguous areas of Anchorage, Fairbanks,
Juneau, and Ketchikan, plus a few relatively large establishments located in other
communities. Altogether, there were 97 establishments with 50 workers or more
in the privately operated enterprises within scope of the survey; all were included
in the study. During the period surveyed, these establishments employed approx­
imately 9,100 workers, of which one-fifth were engaged in manufacturing. This
included pulp and lumber m ills, newspapers, fish canneries, and manufacturers
of concrete products.
In terms of employment, the principal nonmanufacturing
industries were defense communications, retail trade, air transportation, and
contract construction.
Together, these industries represented approximately
70 percent of the 7,300 total employment in nonmanufacturing industries.
The
finance industries accounted for less than a tenth of the total nonmanufacturing
employment, but accounted for nearly a fourth of the white-collar employees.
These employment patterns are subject to substantial change during the year
because of the highly seasonal nature of certain industries such as contract con­
struction and fish canning.
Employment and salary data could be presented for 17 of the 77 selected
professional, administrative, technical, and clerical work levels as defined for
the study.
These occupation work levels included a total of 379 employees, or
approximately 14 percent of the estimated white-collar employment within scope
of the study. Nearly three-fifths of the employees in the occupations presented
were located in the Anchorage area.
Data for only a few levels could be pre­
sented, primarily because of the limited number of private companies in Alaska,
and their relative size. Seventy-five of the 97 establishments surveyed em ­
ployed fewer than 100 workers, and only 5 establishments had 250 workers or
more. Less specialization and various combinations of duties and responsibilities
of employees in white-collar positions in smaller establishments frequently pre­
cluded classification according to the specific occupation work levels as defined
for the study.
Women accounted for almost nine-tenths of all employees in the occu­
pations presented, and four-fifths or more of the employees in 11 of the 17 levels.
Men represented a majority in six levels (accountants III and IV, chief account­
ants II, engineers V, tabulating-machine operators II, and office boys or girls).
The salaries presented include special differentials paid to employees in
Alaska by companies with headquarters in other States. Such differentials were
paid to employees in the jobs studied in 17 of approximately 30 establishments
whose headquarters were known to be located outside of Alaska. In some cases,
the salary differentials were specified flat sums and in others they were a speci­
fied percentage of salary. Airlines servicing Alaska, for example, typically paid
specified amounts ranging from $75 to $195 per month. Companies maintaining
defense communications facilities, oil companies, and construction companies
usually paid percentage differentials which varied from 25 to 45 percent above
salaries paid in other States.
Average Salaries
Average (mean) monthly salaries could be presented for three professional
levels of accounting responsibility (table 15). As defined for the study, account­
ants III averaged $806 and accountants IV $953 a month. Level III included those




21

22

primarily responsible for the day-to-day accounting operations requiring the stand­
ardized application of well established accounting principles, whereas level IV
included fully experienced professional accountants handling a wider variety of
difficult accounting problems with considerable independence. Chief accountants
with responsibility for an accounting program of the scope and complexity as de­
fined for level II were paid $1,120 on the average.
Monthly salaries for the 13 clerical levels presented ranged from $355
for file clerks I to $537 for accounting clerks II.
These levels ranged from
clerks performing routine filing to accounting clerks with responsibility for main­
taining one or more sections of a complete set of books.
Within these levels,
monthly salaries ranged from $374 to $387 in four clerical levels and from $405
to $499 in seven levels. Ac counting clerks, bookkeeping-machine operators, and
typists accounted for two-thirds of the clerical workers in the jobs studied. Half
of the bookkeeping-machine operators were employed in banks, whereas the largest
proportion of the accounting clerks and typists were employed in transportation
and other public utilities.
Limited comparisons that could be made of individual rates in Anchorage
with those in Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan did not indicate a consistent
pattern of higher or lower rates.
Percent distributions of employees by monthly salaries are presented
in table 16.
For more than half of the occupation work levels, salaries of
the highest paid employees were at least one and one-half times the salaries
of the lowest paid employees in the same work level. These distributions also
show marked overlapping of salaries between work levels of the same occupation
and between occupations with substantially different salary levels.
The ranges
in salaries paid individuals in the same job category in an establishment may be
accounted for by differences in ability, experience, or performance as deter­
mined informally on an individual basis or as provided for under formal salary
plans with established salary ranges for each grade level.
Hours of Work
The length of the workweek on which the regular straight-time salary
was based was obtained for employees in the occupations studied. As shown
in the following tabulation, the average weekly hours varied somewhat among
occupations and levels.




Average
weekly
hours
39. 5-------------------------------------------------

Occupation and level
Tabulating-machine operators II; typists I.

4 0 .0 ------------------------------------------------- Accountants III and IV; chief accountants
II; clerks, accounting I; clerks, file I
and II; o ffice boys or girls; stenographers,
general and senior; switchboard operators;
typists II.
40. 5-------------------------------------------------

Bookkeeping-machine operators I.

4 1 .0 -------------------------------------------------

Bookkeeping-machine operators II; clerks,
accounting IL

4 6 .0 -------------------------------------------------

Engineers V.

23

These differences in average weekly hours reflect variations in the dis­
tribution of employees among industries in which salaries were based on work­
weeks of other than 40 hours. For example, engineers V, who averaged 46 hours
a week, were largely employed in construction and communications establishments.
The number of hours per week which a majority of the full-time nonsupervisory office workers were scheduled to work during the period studied was
also obtained (table 17).
The scheduled workweek was 40 hours in establish­
ments employing nearly nine-tenths of these workers.
Most of the office em­
ployees scheduled to work 48 hours a week or more were employed in construc­
tion companies and in defense communications outposts.
Supplementary Wage Benefits
Information presented on selected supplementary wage benefits relates
to provisions applying to nonsupervisory office workers, although others in higher
level positions may receive the same benefits. Each provision was tabulated as
applying to all office workers in an establishment if a majority were eligible or
could eventually meet the eligibility requirements.
Paid holidays were provided to nearly all office workers. Two-thirds of
the office workers received 8 days or more annually, and approximately half of
these received as many as 11 days (table 18). All of the workers receiving 11 paid
holidays were employed in banks.
Paid vacations after qualifying periods of service were given to office
employees in almost all establishments. Although service requirements varied
considerably, the most common policy was to give 1 week with pay after 6 months
of service, 2 weeks after a year, and 3 weeks after 10 years (table 19). Paid
vacations of 4 weeks or more were given in establishments employing nearly half
the office workers; usually at least 15 years of service were required to qualify.
Health, insurance, and pension benefits applying to office workers, pre­
sented in table 20, relate to plans to which the employer paid at least part of
the cost. Hospitalization, surgical, and medical insurance coverage was availa­
ble to about nine-tenths of the office workers.
Nearly the same proportion of
these employees were eligible to receive sick leave pay for a specified number
of days, which in most instances was full pay without a waiting period.
Life
insurance was available to approximately three-fourths of the office workers.
Pension plans, providing regular payments for the remainder of the
worker*s life on retirement (in addition to legally required coverage), applied
in establishments employing 45 percent of the office workers.
The policy of paying cash bonuses to all or a majority of the office
workers applied in establishments employing about two-fifths of these workers.
In nearly all instances, these bonuses were Christmas or yearend payments
(table 21).




24
Table 15. Employment and Average Salaries for Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical
Occupations in Private Industry,1 Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, Alaska, June 1963
Annual sala ries 2

Monthly sala ries 1
2
O ccupation and cla ss
(See definitions in appendix B)

Number
of
em ployees

Middle range 4
Mean

Median 3

T hird
quartile

Middle range 4
Mean

Median 3

$ 9 ,6 7 2
11,436
13,440

F irs t
quartile

$ 9 ,8 2 8
11,700

F irs t
T hird
quartile quartile

Accountants
Accountants III ------- .
— .
Accountants I V --- ------------------ ----- --- ----C hief accountants II -------__ —

8
7
4

$806
953
1, 120

$819
975

16

1, 246

1, 275

$1,0 31

$1,4 63

14,952

15, 300

43
17
66
54
15
8
9
14
31
21
7
22
37

374
499
426
537
355
387
377
449
489
405
492
377
440

378
500
424
551
367
408
406
444
500
428
492
388
440

357
469
400
507
350

413
581
460
577
388

470
348

520
443

354
431

421
449

4, 488
5 ,988
5, 112
6 ,4 4 4
4,260
4 ,6 4 4
4 ,5 2 4
5, 388
5,868
4 ,8 6 0
5 ,9 0 4
4 ,5 2 4
5 ,280

4,536
6,000
5,088
6,6 1 2
4 ,4 0 4
4,896
4,8 7 2
5, 328
6,0 0 0
5, 136
5 ,9 0 4
4 ,6 5 6
5 ,2 8 0

Engineers
E n gin eer, V ------------------------------------------

$ 12,372 $17,556

C lerica l
B ookkeeping-m achine op era tors I
B ookkeeping-m achine op era tors II . —
C lerk s, accounting I __
C lerk s, accounting II . — —
C le rk s, file I _________________________
C lerk s, file I I -------------------------------------O ffice boys o r g i r l s ----------------------------S tenographers, g e n e ra l---- —---------------Stenographers, sen ior — ------------ -------Switchboard op era tors — —
Tabulating-m achine op era tors II_____
T ypists I „ t____ t____________i _____-i___
_
Typists II

4, 284
5,628
4,800
6 ,0 8 4
4, 200

4,956
6 ,9 7 2
5,520
6 ,9 2 4
4, 656

5,640
4,176

6 ,240
5, 316

4, 248
5, *72

5 ,052
5,3 8 8

1 F o r scop e of survey, see table in appendix A .
2 S alaries rep orted relate to the standard sala ries that w ere paid fo r standard w ork schedules, i. e . , to the straigh t-tim e
salary corresp on din g to the employee* s norm al w ork schedule excluding overtim e h ou rs.
3 Medians a re om itted fo r occupations that had few er than 5 em p loyees.
4 The m iddle range (interquartile) used here is the cen tral part o f the a rra y excluding the upper and low er fourths of
the em ployee distribution.
M iddle ranges are om itted fo r occupations that had few er than 15 em p loy ees.




25
Table 16.

Percent Distribution of Employees in Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Occupations
by Average Monthly Salaries, Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, Alaska, June 1963
Accountants

A verage m onthly sala ries
III
$ 300
$ 325
$ 350
$ 375

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 325 ________
$ 350
$ 375 .
$ 4 0 0 ________

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425 ________
$450 -----------$475 -----------$500
_

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525 __ _____
$550 ________
$575 ________
$600

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625 -----------$650
$675
$ 7 0 0 ________

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 800
$ 825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
tinder

$ 825
$ 850
$875
$900

$900
$ 925
$950
$ 975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$
$
$
$
$

.
.
-

IV

C hief
account­ Engineers
ants
V

n

.
-

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

_

_

_
-

-

12.5
-

_
-

-

$725
$750 . _
$775 ________
$800

12.5
12.5

-

-

________
________
________
________

2 5 .0

$925
$Q50
$975 _____ __
$ 1, 0 0 0 _____

2 5 .0
12.5
-

14. 3
14.3
1 4.3

_

14. 3

-

14. 3

2 5 .0
2 5 .0

_

_

000
050
100
150

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$

1, 0 5 0 ___
1, 100 _ _
1 ,1 5 0 ___
1, 200 ___

1, 200
1, 250
1, 300
1, 350
1,400

and
and
and
and
and

under $ 1, 250
under $ 1, 300 _ _
under $ 1, 350 ___
under $ 1 ,400
o v e r ____________

Total .
Num ber o f em p loyees
A verage m onthly s a la r ie s ___

•
•
-

-

-

_

-

-

_
„
-

-

I

II

4 .7
11.6
32.6
18.6

2 8.6

_
-

_

_

-

_
-

-

-

I

II

4 .5
3. 0
10.6

_
_

18.6
7 .0
4 .7

11.8
11.8
2 3.5

33. 3
2 1 .2
10.6
9 .1

1.9
3.7
9 .3
3.7

2 .3
-

11.8
11.8
11.8

7 .6

24. 1
7 .4
2 5.9
5 .6

_
-

5 .9
5 .9
-

„
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

I

II

20. 0
6 .7
4 0 .0
2 6 .7

12.5
12.5
6 2 .5

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

9 .3
1.9
7 .4
-

..
_
-

_
_
-

.
.
_
-

.
-

_
_

_
-

_
.

_
_
_

_
-

_
_

-

-

-

-

•
-

_
.
-

_

_
_

-

-

_

_

_

_
_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
_

_

12.5

_

_

_
_

-

-

_

_

-

6 .3
.
12.5

2 5 .0

_
-

_
_
2 5 .0
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
-

6 .3

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

6 .3
37.5

.
-

_
_

18.8

_

12.5

6 .7
-

_
-

C lerk s,
file

_
5 .9
•-

_
-

C le rk s,
accounting

_

-

_
_
-

_

_
«
.

_

-

-

-

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. 0

100.0

8
$806

7
$953

4
$1, 120

16
$ 1 ,2 4 6

43
$374

17
$499

66
$426

54
$537

15
$355

8
$387

See footnotes at end o f table.




_
-

B ookkeepingmachine
operators

26
Table 16. Percent Distribution of Employees in Selected Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Occupations1
by Average Monthly Salaries, Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, Alaska, June 1963— Continued

Average monthly sala ries

O ffice boys
or
girls

Stenog­
raphers,
general

Stenog­
raphers,
senior

Switch­
board
o p era tors

Tabulatingm achine
op era tors
II

T ypists
I

$ 300
$ 325
$ 350
$ 375

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 325
$ 350
$ 375
$400

________
________
---- ------________

11. 1
33. 3
-

p
»
7. 1
7. 1

_
3 .2
-

_
28.6
4 .8

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
tuider
under
under

$425
$450 __ ___
$475 ________
$500 ______ _

4 4 .4
11.1
-

28.6
14. 3
7. 1

3 .2
6. 5
16.1
2 2.6

14. 3
4 2 .9
4 .8
4 .8

28.6
4 2 .9

$ 500
$525
$550
$ 575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 525 -----------$550
$575 _
$600 ________

35.7
_
-

32. 3
3 .2
9 .7
-

-

14. 3
14.3
-

_
-

2 .7
-

$600
$625
$650
$ 675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$ 700

-

$700
$ 725
$750
$ 775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$ 750 ________
$775 _______
$ 800 ________

$ 800
$ 825
$ 850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 825
$ 850
$ 875
$900

________
________
________
_______

-

$900
$925
$950
$ 975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 ________
$950 ________
$975
$ 1,000 _____

_
-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1,
1,
1,
1,

000
050
100
150

1,200
1, 250
1, 300
1, 350
1,400

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

________
________
________
________

$ 1, 050
$ 1 ,1 0 0 ___
$ 1, 1 5 0 ___
$ 1, 200 ----

under $ 1,250 ___
under $ 1, 300 _ _
under $ 1, 350 _ _
under $ 1 ,400 ___
o v er ____________

Total__________
Number o f e m p lo y e e s ___
A verage m onthly s a l a r i e s ___

_
-

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

2 2 .7
2 2.7
13.6

2 .7
2 .7

2 2.7
9 .1
9.1
-

5 .4
6 7 .6
16.2
2 .7

_
_

3 .2
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
“

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
"

_
-

-

_
“

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

.

.

-

_

_
-

-

-

100 0

100.0

100.0

100 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9
$377

14
$449

31
$489

21
$405

7
$492

22
$377

37
$440

1 F or scope o f study see table in appendix A.
NOTE: B ecause o f rounding, sums at individual item s m ay not equal 100.




_

_
-

II

27
Table 17. P ercen t D istribution of O ffice W orkers by
Scheduled Weekly H ours, A nchorage, F airbanks,
Juneau, and Ketchikan, A la s k a ,1 June 1963
W eekly hours

P ercen t

A ll o ffice w orkers ________________
38

42 m i ” _________ i i - i i i i i _______i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i
421 ------------------------------------------------------2
/3
43

4 4 _______________________________________
5 4 _______________________________________

100
5
88
1
(2 )
2
1
1
X
2

1 F or scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 L ess than 0 .5 p ercen t.

Table 18. P ercen t Distribution o f O ffice W orkers by Number o f Paid H olidays P rovided
Annually, A nchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, A la s k a ,1 June 1963
Item
A ll o ffice w orkers -----------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays ------------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays -------------------------------

P ercen t
100

Num ber o f days— Continued

98

10 holidays ____________________________
11 h o lid a y s __________________________________

2

Total holiday tim e 3

(2)
8
22
29
3
1

11 days __________ _________________________ __
10 o r m ore d a y s ____________________________
9V2 or m ore d a y s ___________________________
9 o r m ore days ___________________________
8 o r m o re days _____________________________
7 o r m o re days _____________________________
6 o r m o re days _____________________________
5 o r m o re days _____________________________

N um ber o f days
5
6
7
8
9
9

h o lid a y s __________________
holidays «._________________
h o lid a y s __________________
h o lid a y s __________________
holidays ---------------------------holidays plus 1 half day ,

Item

1 F or scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 L ess than 0 .5 percen t.
3 A ll com binations o f full and half days that add to the sam e amount a re com bined; fo r exam ple, the p rop ortion o f
w orkers receiv in g a total of 7 days includes those with 7 full days and no half days, 6 full days and 2 half days, 5 full days
and 4 half days, and so on.
P rop ortion s w ere then cumulated.




28
Table 19. P ercen t Distribution o f O ffice W orkers by Vacation Pay P rov ision s
A nchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, A la s k a ,1 June 1963
P ercen t

V acation p olicy

100

A ll o ffic e w o r k e r s ----------------- -----------------------------

Method o f payment
W orkers in establishm ents
providing paid v a c a t io n s ---------------------------------L en g th -of-tim e payment ------— ------------------—
F la t-su m p a y m e n t ---- — —------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents
providing no paid v a c a t io n s ____ ______________

99
98
1
1

Amount o f vacation p a y 2
A fter 6 months o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 week
. . . .
1 w e e k -----------, --------------------------- --------- ----------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ______________ ____
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------

(3)
30
5
2

A fter 1 yea r of s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w e e k ------------------------- -------- ---- —— —
1 w e e k -------------------------------------------- —
------------2 w e e k s ------- -------------- ------—---- —
—------— -------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------- --------- ------- —
O ver 4 weeks
. _
— _________

(3)
6
85
6
2

A fter 2 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k -------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ---- — — ------— ----- 2 weeks ______________________________________
O ver ^ and vm
d'®'** ^ uro^irc
._.
3 w e e k s ------------- ------------- ----------------------------—
O ver 4 weeks — — -----------------— — ---------------—

4
(3)
81
12
(3)
2

A fter 3 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k --------- ---- ------— ------------- ----------- — ------7. yyoolr c
n
a
...
M ..... . ... ...
l
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------------- ; -------------

3
80
12
1
2

A fter 4 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k -------------------------------------------- — -------------

3
78
7
4
5
3

7

sintl und°r ^

-_

O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks ------— — ----------- —

Vacation p o licy

P ercen t

Amount o f vacation p a y 1 Continued
2—
A fter 5 ye a rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek ------------------------------------------------------- -------—
2 weeks —_________________________ _______________
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ____ __ _____________ —
3 weeks ----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s --------- ------- --------- — —
Over 4 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------

2
72
6
11
6
3

A fter 10 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 week
— ---- —
2 w e e k s _____ L
,___________________ , ----------------,-------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------------------------- -------3 weeks _______________________ ____________________
Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s ---- —---------------------------4 weeks - r,------ ,^wr---- ------------------ .---------------------------Over 4 w e e k s ____________ ___________________ _____

2
30
3
53
3
4
5

A fter 12 ye a rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek ______ ______ ______ _______________________
2 weeks
—
—
— ---- ------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _____ ________ ____ ___.
3 weeks ------------------------------ — — — ----------------—----O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -------------- ------------ — ----4 w e e k s _______,___________________________________
Over 4 w e e k s ____ ________________________ ______

2
30
3
53
3
4
5

A fter 15 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
1 w eek ____________ —
p
_____________________ ,„,-------2 weeks ---------------------------------------- r._.---------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ------------- ---- ----------------3 weeks ----------------------------------------------------- -------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s ____ ___________________________ __ _____ __
A fter 20 y e a rs o f s e rv ice :
1 week
-----------—
2 weeks
.. .
— ___________
O ver 2 and under 3 weeks -----------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 weeks

_

A fter 25 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
1 w eek ------------------- --- - ------------, - ... —
,r------2 weeks — , ------------------------------ - — ,- -- — ---------

4 weeks

2
27
3
43
3
17
5
2
27
3
39
3
21
5
2
27
3
20
3
40
5

1 F o r scop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
2 Includes fla t-su m paym ents con verted to am equivalent tim e b a s is.
P e rio d s o f s e r v ic e w ere a rb itra rily ch osen and do
not n e c e ss a r ily re fle ct the individual provision s fo r p ro g re ss io n s . F o r exam ple, the changes in p rop ortions indicated at 10 y e a r s '
s e rv ice include changes in provision s o ccu rrin g between 5 and 10 y e a rs .
E stim ates are cum ulative.
Thus, the p r o ­
portion receiv in g 3 w eeks1 pay o r m o re after 5 y e a rs includes those who re c e iv e 3 weeks* pay o r m o re after few er y e a rs o f
s e r v ic e .
3 L ess than 0. 5 p ercen t.




29
Table 20. P ercen t o f O ffice W orkers Em ployed in E stab­
lishm ents Providing Health, Insurance, o r Pension
B e n e fits ,1 A nch orage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and
Ketchikan, A laska, 2 June 1963
P ercen t

Type o f benefit
A ll o ffice w orkers -------- --------

_ __

A ll o ffice w orkers _____________________
76
66
89
28

P ercen t

W orkers in establishm ents paying
supplem entary cash bonuses _______
C hristm as o r yea r end_______________
P ro fit sharing_______________________
O th er____________________ ____________
W orkers in establishm ents paying
no supplem entary cash bonuses --------

100

41
39
(3 )
2
59

80
8
90
90
89
83
45
9

1 Includes those plans fo r which at least part o f
the cost is borne by the em p loyer, excepting only legal
requirem ents such as w orkm en 's com pensation, s o cia l
s e cu rity, and ra ilroa d retirem ent.
2 F or s cop e o f study, see table in appendix A.
3 Unduplicated total o f w orkers receiv in g sick leave
o r sickness and accident insurance shown separately below .
Sick leave plans a re lim ited to those which definitely e s ­
tablish at lea st the m inimum number of d a y s' pay that can
be expected by each em ployee. Inform al sick leave a llow ­
ances determ ined on an individual basis a re excluded.




Cash bonus plan

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing:
L ife insurance ----------------------------------A ccid ental death and d ism em b er­
ment insurance ----------------------------- -Sickness and accident insurance
o r s ick leave o r b oth1 ____________
3
2
Sickness and accident insurance _
Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting p eriod ) ________________
Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting period) --------------------------H ospitalization insurance __________
S urgical insurance
________________
M ed ical insurance _________________
Catastrophe insurance -----------------R etirem ent pension p l a n ____________
No health, insurance, o r
pension p la n ________________________

Table 21. P e rce n t D istribution o f O ffice W orkers by
Type o f Supplem entary Cash Bonus P a y m e n ts,1
A nchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and
Ketchikan, A la s k a ,2 June 1963

1 Supplementary nonproduction bonuses paid in cash
to a m a jo rity o f the o ffice w ork ers.
2 F o r s cop e o f study, see table in appendix A .
3 L ess than 0 .5 p ercen t.

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of Survey
These surveys in Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska relate to establishments within
seven broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; contract construction; transportation, com­
munication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and selected services. Major industry groups excluded from these studies are
government operations and extractive industries.
The study in each area includes establishments with 50 workers or more at the
time of reference of the data used in compiling the universe lists (first quarter of 1962 for
Hawaii and Puerto Rico areas, and highest employment in second or third quarter of 1962
for Alaska areas). The estimated number of establishments and workers within each in­
dustry division during the period studied and the number actually studied in each area are
indicated in the accompanying table. The geographic scope of each study is defined in foot­
notes to the table.
The surveys in Hawaii and Puerto Rico were conducted on a sample basis because
of the cost involved in surveying all establishments. To obtain optimum accuracy at min­
imum cost, a greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied. In
combining the data, however, all establishments were given their appropriate weight. Be­
cause of the relatively small universe of establishments in Alaska, all establishments within
scope as defined for the survey were actually studied. The estimates based on the estab­
lishments studied in each area are presented, therefore, as relating to all establishments
in the industries and areas covered, except for those below the minimum size studied.
Method of Collection
Data were obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists to the establish­
ments selected for study within each area. Employees were classified according to occu­
pation and level, with the assistance of company officials, on the basis of uniform job
definitions. In comparing actual duties and responsibilities of employees with those in the
survey definitions, extensive use was made of company occupational descriptions, organization
charts, and other personal records, usually available in the larger companies. The occu­
pational definitions used in classifying employees appear in appendix B.
Occupational Earnings
Although all occupations and levels defined in appendix Bwere studied in each survey,
earnings data for a number of the occupations and work levels are not presented in the tables
because either (1) employment is too small to provide enough data to permit presentation,
or (2) there is a possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data. The average
salaries reported relate to the standard salaries that were paid for the standard work sched­
ules; i. e . , to the straight-time salary corresponding to the employee^ normal work schedule
excluding overtime hours. Salary differentials over mainland rates, paid by some companies
with employees in the areas studied, were included. Average salaries were rounded to the
nearest dollar.
In the occupations surveyed, both men and women were classified and included in
the occupational employment estimates. Employment of one sex was sufficiently predominant
in each of the occupations to preclude presentation of separate data by sex.
Occupational employment estimates in all areas surveyed relate to the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actually surveyed. Because
of differences in occupational structure among establishments, the estimates of occupational
employment obtained from the sample of establishments,in the Hawaii and Puerto Rico studies
serve only to indicate the relative importance of the jobs as defined for these studies. There
are also variations among the professional and administrative occupations in the proportion
of all employees represented in these fields of work because of differences (1) in the range
of functions and responsibilities encompassed by the definitions for various occupations, as
well as differences (2) in the number of work levels selected for study in each occupation.




30

31
Establishments and Workers Within Scope of Survey1 and Number Studied in Selected
Labor Markets, Hawaii and Puerto R ico, May 1963, and in Alaska, June 1963
Number of establishments
Area and industry division

Within
scope of
study

Workers in establishments
Within scope of study

Studied

Studied
Total 2

Office

Plant

T otal1
2

Honolulu, Hawaii 3
A ll divisions-------------------------------------

327

127

56, 300

9,300

37,800

38,460

Manufacturing---------------------------------Nonmanufacturing----------------------------Contract construction-----------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities4 5
----------Wholesale trade--------------------------Retail tra d e -------------------------------Finance, insurance, and
real estate-------------------------------Services3 ------------------------------------

57
270
57

27
100
18

13,600
42,700
5,900

900
8,400
400

10,300
27,500
4,900

10,600
27,860
2,400

30
38
74

17
13
17

10,000
5,900
8,800

1,400
1,600
700

6,900
3,400
7,000

8,450
3,470
4,750

32
39

16
19

5,600
6,500

3,600
700

700
4,600

4,010
4,780

A ll divisions-------------------------------------

535

179

81,700

8,600

66,100

47, 910

Manufacturing---------------------------------Nonmanufacturing----------------------------Contract construction-----------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities 4 -------Wholesale trade--------------------------Retail tra d e -------------------------------Finance, insurance, and
real estate-------------------- -----------Services 3 ------------------------------------

227
308
90

66
113
32

32,800
48,900
14,400

1,900
6,700
400

28,300
37,800
13,400

16,210
31,700
8,870

48
60
47

23
14
15

11,600
6,200
6,300

1, 100
1,300
500

9,000
4,300
5,300

9,010
2,240
4,050

38
25

15
14

6,400
4,000

3, 100
300

2,500
3, 300

4,140
3,390

A ll divisions--------------------------------------

97

97

9,090

1, 150

6, 320

9,090

Manufacturing — -----------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------Contract construction---- ------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities 4 -------Wholesale trade--------------------------Retail tra d e -------------------------------Finance, insurance, and
real estate-------------------------------Services3 ------------------------------------

12
85
20

12
85
20

1,780
7,310
1,090

160
990
30

1,200
5,120
920

1,780
7,310
1,090

28
6
14

28
6
14

3,390
290
1,180

380
30
120

2, 340
.210
920

3,390
290
1,180

6
11

6
11

550
810

400
30

40
690

550
810

Mayaguez, Ponce, and
San Juan, Puerto R ico 67

Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tuneau,
and Ketchikan, Alaska^

1 The study relates to establishments in the areas and industries listed employing 50 workers or more.
2 Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded from the separate office and plant categories.
3 Honolulu Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (Honolulu County), as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget.
4 Taxicabs were excluded.
5 Selected services: Hotels; personal services, business services; automobile repair shops; motion pictures; nonprofit organizations;
and engineering and architectural services.
* Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (municipalities of Mayaguez, Ponce, San Juan, Catano,
Bayambn, and Guaynabo), as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget.
7 Cities and contiguous areas o f Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan, plus a few relatively large establishments lo ­
cated in other communities in Alaska.




32

Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
♦
Information presented on selected establishment practices and supplementary bene­
fits relates to office workers. The concept "office workers," as used in these studies, in­
cludes working supervisors and nonsupervisory workers performing clerical and related
functions, and excludes administrative, executive, and professional personnel.
Because of rounding, sums of individual items
equal totals.

in these tabulations may not

The scheduled hours (tables 3, 10, and 17) of a majority of the office workers in
a establishment are tabulated as applying to all office workers of that establishment.
m
Paid holidays; paid vacations; health, insurance, and pension plans; and nonproduction
bonuses are treated statistically on the basis that these are applicable to all office workers
if a majority of such workers are eligible or may eventually qualify for the practices listed.
The paid holidays tables (4, 11, and 18) present the number of whole and half holi­
days actually provided, in the first part, and combines whole and half holidays to show total
holiday time in the second part.
The summary of paid vacation plans (tables 5, 12, and 19) is limited to formal
policies, excluding informal arrangements whereby time off with pay was granted at the
discretion of the employer. Separate estimates are provided according to employer practice
in computing vacation payments, such as time payments, percent of annual earnings, or flatsum amounts. However, in the tabulations of vacation allowances by weeks of pay and years
of service, payments not on a time basis were so converted; for example, a payment of 2 per­
cent of annual earnings was considered as the equivalent of 1 week* s pay. The pay amounts
and service period for which data are presented are typical, but do not necessarily reflect
the individual provisions for progressions. For example, the changes in proportions indicated
at 10 years1 service include changes in provisions occurring between 5 and 10 years. Fur­
thermore, estimates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion receiving 3 weeks1 pay or more
after 10 years of service includes those who receive 3 weeks* pay or more after fewer years
of service. Data for intermediate service periods were not tabulated.
Data are presented for all health, insurance, and pension plans (tables 6, 13, and 20)
for which at least a part of the cost was borne by the employer, excepting only legal re­
quirements such as workmen’s compensation, railroad retirement, and social security. Such
plans included those underwritten by a commercial insurance company and those provided
through a union fund or paid directly by the employer out of current operating funds or from
a fund set aside for this purpose. Death benefits were included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance data are limited to that type of insurance under
which predetermined cash payments were made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability. Information is presented for all such plans to
which the employer contributes. Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal
plans which provided full pay or a proportion of the worker’s pay during absence from work
because of illness. Separate tabulations are presented according to (1) plans which provided
full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans which provided either partial pay or a waiting
period. Sick leave plans include only those which definitely established at least the minimum
number of days* pay that could be expected by each employee. Informal sick leave allowances
determined on an individual basis were excluded. In addition to the presentation of the pro­
portions of workers who are provided sickness and accident insurance or paid sick leave,
an unduplicated total is shown of workers who received either or both types of benefit.
Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended medical insurance, in­
cludes those plans which were designed to protect employees in case of sickness and injury
involving expenses beyond the normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical
plans. Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial payment of
doctors* fees. Such plans might be underwritten by commercial insurance companies or
nonprofit organizations or they might be self-insured. Tabulations of retirement plans are
limited to those plans that provided monthly payments for the remainder of the worker’s life.




Appendix B. Occupational Definitions

The primary purpose of preparing job definitions for the
Bureaufs wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into
appropriate occupations, or levels within occupations, workers who
are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work
arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area
to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates rep­
resenting comparable job content. To secure comparability of job
content, some occupations and work levels are defined to include
only those workers meeting specific criteria as to training, job
functions, and responsibilities. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational con­
tent, the Bureau’s occupational definitions may differ significantly
from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared
for other purposes. Also see note referring to the definitions for
the drafting and clerical occupations on page 56.

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS

ACCOUNTANT
Performs accounting work requiring professional knowledge of the theory and prac­
tice of recording, classifying, examining, and analyzing the data and records of financial
transactions. Personally or by supervising others provides accounting service to management
by maintaining the books of account, accumulating cost or other similar data, preparing
reports and statements, and maintaining the accounting system by interpreting, supplementing,
and revising the system as necessary. The work requires a professional knowledge of ac­
counting and a bachelor's degree in accounting or equivalent experience and education com­
bined. (See also chief accountant. )
Accountant I
General characteristics. — At this beginning professional level, position is distin­
guished from nonprofessional positions by the variety of assignments; rate and scope of
development expected of the incumbent; and the existence, implicit or explicit, of a planned
training program designed to give the beginning accountant practical experience in the opera­
tions of an established accounting system. Learns to apply the principles, theories, and
concepts of accounting to a particular accounting system.
Direction received. — Works under close supervision of an experienced accountant.
The guidance and supervision received are directed primarily to the development of the
accountant's professional ability and to the evaluation of his potential for advancement.
Limits of assignments are clearly defined, methods of procedure are specified, kinds of
items to be noted and referred to supervisor are detailed.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Many of the assignments will include duties
some of which may be nonprofessional in nature such as proving arithmetical accuracy;
examining standard accounting documents for completeness, internal accuracy, and con­
formance with specific accounting requirements; tracing and reconciling records of financial
transactions; and preparing detailed statements and schedules for reports. The presence
of such nonprofessional tasks, provided they are part of the training and development pro­
cess, do not prevent the matching of a job if it otherwise meets this definition.
Responsibility for direction of others.— Usually none.




33

84
A C C O U N T A N T — C ontin u ed

Accountant II
General characteristics.— At this continuing developmental level the professional
accountant makes practical applications of technical accounting practices and concepts be­
yond the mere application of detailed rules and instructions.
Assignments are designed
to expand his practical experience and to develop his professional judgment in the application
of basic accounting techniques to simple professional problems. He is expected to be com­
petent in the application of standard procedures and requirements to routine transactions,
and to raise questions about unusual or questionable items and suggest solutions.
Direction received. — Work is reviewed closely to verify its general accuracy and
coverage of unusual problems, to insure conformance with required procedures and special
instructions, and to insure his professional growth. His progress is evaluated in terms
of his ability to apply his professional knowledge to basic' accounting problems in the
day-to-day operations of an established accounting system.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Prepares routine working papers, schedules,
exhibits, and summaries indicating the extent of his examination and developing and sup­
porting his findings and recommendations. This includes the examination of a variety of
accounting documents to verify accuracy of computations and to ascertain that all trans­
actions are properly supported, are in accordance with pertinent regulations, and are
classified and recorded according to acceptable accounting standards.
Responsibility for direction of others.— Usually none, although may supervise a
few clerks.

Accountant III
General characteristics. — Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
requiring the standardized application of well established accounting principles, theories,
concepts, and practices. Receives detailed instructions concerning the overall accounting
system and its objectives, the policies and procedures under which it is operated, and the
nature of changes in the system or its operation.
Direction received. — A professional accountant at higher level normally is available
to furnish advice and assistance as needed. Work is examined for technical accuracy,
adequacy of professional judgment, and compliance with .instructions 'through spot checks,
appraisal of results, subsequent processing, analysis of reports and statements, and other
appropriate means.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — The primary responsibility of most positions
at this level is to insure that the day-to-day operations of the segment or system are
carried out in accordance with accounting principles and the policies and objectives of
the accounting system.
Within limits of delegated responsibility, the accountant makes
the day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treatment of financial transactions.
He is expected to recommend solutions to complex problems and propose changes in the
accounting system, but he has no authority to effectuate these solutions or changes. His
solutions are derived from his own knowledge of the application of well*established prin­
ciples and practices or by referring the problem to his superior for solution.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — In most instances directs the work of
a subordinate nonprofessional staff.




35

A C C O U N T A N T — C on tin u ed

Accountant IV

General characteristics.— Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
which requires the application of well established accounting principles, theories, concepts
and practices to a wide variety of difficult problems.
Receives instructions concerning
the objectives and operations of the overall accounting system. At this level, compared
with level 1H, the technical accounting problems are more difficult and a greater degree
of coordination among more numerous types of accounting records and operations may be
essential.
Direction received, — An accountant at higher level normally is available to furnish
advice and assistance as needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment,
compliance with instructions, and overall accuracy and quality by spot checks and appraisal
of results.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— As at level III, a primary characteristic of
most positions at this level is the responsibility of operating an accounting system or seg­
ment in the intended manner. Makes day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treat­
ment of financial transactions. He is expected to recommend solutions to complex problems
beyond the scope of his responsibility and to propose changes in the accounting system,
but he has no authority to act independently on these problems.

Responsibility for direction of others. — Accounting staff supervised,
include professional accountants.

if any, may

Accountant V

General characteristics. — Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
requiring the application of accounting principles and practices to the solution of very dif­
ficult problems for which no clear precedents exist, or to the development or extension
of theories and practices to problems to which they have not been applied previously. Also
at this level are positions having more than average responsibility because of the nature,
magnitude, or impact of the assigned work.
Is more directly concerned with what the system or segment should be, what
operating accounting policies and procedures should be established or revised, and the
meaning of the data in the reports and statements for which he is responsible.

Direction received. — An accountant at higher level normally is available to furnish
advice and Assistance as needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment,
compliance with instructions, and overall quality.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — In addition to insuring that the system or
segment is operated as intended, is deeply involved in the fundamental and complex tech­
nical and managerial problems.
Responsibility for direction of others. — Accounting staff supervised, if any, includes
profe s sionai accountants.



36
AUDITOR

Audits the financial records of a company or divisions or components of the com­
pany, to appraise systematically and verify the accounting accuracy of the records and
reports.
To the extent determined necessary, examines the transactions entering into
the balance sheet and the transactions entering into income, expense, and cost accounts.
Determines (1) the existence of recorded assets (including the observation of the taking
of physical inventories) and the all inclusiveness of recorded liabilities; (2) the accuracy
of financial statements or reports and the fairness of presentation of facts therein; (3) the
propriety or legality of transactions; and (4) the degree of compliance with established
policies and procedures concerning financial transactions. Evaluates the adequacy of the
accounting system and internal financial control.
Makes appropriate recommendations
for improvement as necessary. (Work typically requires a bachelor* s degree in accounting
or equivalent experience and education combined.)
Excluded from the definition are positions which call for auditing duties which may
require detailed knowledge of the operations of a particular company, but do not require
full professional accounting training. For example, when the primary responsibility of the
position is to check transactions to determine whether or not they conform to prescribed
routines or procedures, it is excluded.

Auditor I
As a trainee auditor at the entering professional level, performs a variety of routine assignments under the close supervision of an experienced auditor.

Auditor II
This is the continuing developmental level for the professional auditor. As a junior
member of an audit team, independently performs assigned portions of the audit examination
which are limited in scope and complexity, such as physically counting to verify inventory
items, checking assigned subsidiary ledger accounts against supporting bills or vouchers,
checking and balancing various subsidiary ledgers against control accounts, or other similar
duties designed to help the team leader check, verify, or prove the accounting entries.
Responsibility extends only to the verification of accuracy of computations and the deter­
mination that all transactions are properly supported. Any technical problems not covered
by instructions are brought to the attention of a superior.

Auditor III1

(1)
As auditor in charge of an audit team or in charge of individual audits, inde
pendently conducts regular recurring audits in accordance with a prescribed audit policy
of the accounts of smaller or less complex companies having gross income up to approxi­
mately $ 3 million per year, or similar size branch or subsidiary organizations of larger
companies. Under minimum supervision, either working alone, or with the assistance of
one or two subordinate auditors, examines transactions and verifies accounts; observes
and evaluates local accounting procedures and internal controls; prepares audit working
papers and submits an audit report in the required pattern containing recommendations
for needed changes or improvements, or (2) as a member of an audit team auditing a
larger and more complex organization (approximately $4 to $25 million gross income per
year), independently performs the audit examination of a major segment of the audit such
as the checking, verification, and balancing of all accounts receivable and accounts payable,
the analysis and verification of assets and reserves, or the inspection and the evaluation
of controls and procedures.



37
AUDITOR— Continued
Auditor IV

(1)
As auditojr in charge of an audit team or of individual audits under minimum
supervision with the assistance of approximately five subordinate auditors, independently
conducts regular recurring audits of a company having gross income of approximately $4 to
$25 million per year or in companies with much larger gross incomes, audits of ac­
counts of branch or subsidiary organizations of those companies each of which have gross
income of $4 to $25 million per year.
Plans and conducts the audit and prepares an
audit report containing recommendations for changes or improvements in accounting prac­
tices, procedures, or policies; or (2) as a member of an audit team auditing the accounts
of a larger and more complex organization (over $30 million gross income per year), is
assigned relatively independent responsibility for a major segment of the audit such as the
checking, verification, and balancing of all accounts receivable and accounts payable, the
analysis and verification of assets and reserves, or the inspection and evaluation of con­
trols and procedures.
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT1
Responsible for directing the accounting program for a company or for an es­
tablishment of a company. The minimum accounting program includes: (1) General ac­
counting (assets, liabilities, income, expense, and capital accounts, including responsibility
for profit and loss and balance sheet statements); and (2) with at least one other major
accounting activity, typically tax accounting, cost accounting, property accounting, or sales
accounting. It may also include such other activities as payroll and timekeeping, .tabulating
machine operation, etc.
(Responsibility for an internal audit program is typically not
included.)
The responsibilities of the chief accountant include all of the following:
(1)

Developing, adapting, or revising an accounting system to meet the needs of
the organization.

(2)

Supervising, either directly or through subordinate supervisors, the operation
of the system with full management responsibility for the quality and quantity
of work performed, training and development of subordinates, work scheduling
and review, coordination with other parts of the organization served, etc.

(3)

Providing advisory services to the top management officials of the organization
served as to:
(a)

The status of financial resources and the financial trends or results of
operations in a manner that is meaningful to management.

(b)

Methods for improving operations as suggested by his expert knowledge
of the financial situation, e .g ., proposals for improving cost control,
property management, credit and collection, tax reduction, or similar
programs.

Definition does not cover positions with responsibility for the accounting program
if they also include (as a major part of the job) responsibility for budgeting; work meas­
urement; organization, methods, or procedures studies, or similar functions. Such work
is typical of positions sometimes titled as comptroller, budget and accounting manager,
financial manager, etc.
Chief accountant jobs which meet the above definition are classified by level of
work in accordance with the following:




C H IE F A C C O U N T A N T — C ontin ued

Clas s

Authority
and
res pons ibility
_________ (!)________

Technical
complexity

(*)

Subordinate staff of professional accountants in
the system for which he is responsible.2

I

AR-1

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant ni job definition.

n

AR-1

TC-2

About 5 to 10 professional accountants, with at
least one or two matching the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-2

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most
of these match the accountant III job definition,
but one or two may match the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-3

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant IV job definition.

AR-1

TC-3

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. At
least one or two match the accountant V job
definition.

AR-2

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant IV job definition,
but some may match the accountant V job
definition.

AR-3

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most
of these match the accountant III job definition,
but one or two may match as high as ac­
countant V.

AR-2

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant V job definition,
but several may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Most
of these match the accountant IV job definition,
but several may match accountant V and one
or two may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant V job definition,
but several may exceed that level.

or

or

in
or

or

IV
or

V

i AR-1-2 and -3 and T C -l-2 and -3 are explained on the following page.
9
2 The number of professional accountants supervised, as shown above, is recognized
to be a relatively crude criterion for distinguishing between the various classes. It is to be
considered as less important in the matching process than the other criteria. In addition to
the staff of professional accountants in the system for which the chief accountant is re­
sponsible, there are clerical, machine operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.



39

C H IE F A C C O U N T A N T — C ontinued

AR-1. Directs the accounting program for an establishment of a company. The
accounting system has been established in considerable detail at higher organizational levels
in the company, i. e. , accounts, procedures, and reports to be used have been prescribed.
The chief accountant has authority, within this prescribed system, to adapt and expand it to
fit the particular needs of the organization served, e.g. , to provide greater detail; to establish
additional accounting controls; to provide special or interim reports and statements needed
by the establishment manager for day-to-day operations, etc.

AR-2. Directs the accounting program for an establishment of a company when the
delegated authority to modify the basic accounting system established at higher organizational
levels within the company clearly exceeds that described in AR-1. The basic accounting
system is prescribed only in broad outlines rather than in specific detail, e .g ., while certain
major financial reports, overall accounts, general policies, etc., are required by the basic
system, the chief accountant has broad latitude to decide what specific methods, procedures,
accounts, reports, etc., are to be used within the organizational segment he serves. He
has authority to evaluate and take final action on recommendations for changes in that portion
of the system for which he is responsible, but he must secure prior approval from higher
organizational levels for any changes which would affect the basic system prescribed by such
higher levels. Accounting reports and statements prepared reflect the events and progress
of the entire organizational segment of the company for which he is responsible, and usually
these reports represent consolidations of accounting data submitted by subordinate segments
of the organization which have accounting responsibilities. (This degree of authority is most
characteristically found at an organizational level in the company which is intermediate
between the company headquarters level (see AR-3) and the plant level (see AR-1). How­
ever, if a similar degree of authority has been delegated to the plant level, the chief ac­
countant at such a place should be matched with this definition.)

AR-3. Directs the accounting program for an entire company with or without sub­
ordinate establishments. Has complete responsibility for establishing and maintaining the
framework for the basic accounting system used in the company, subject only to general
policy guidance and control usually from a company official responsible for general financial
management, frequently an officer of the company. The chief accountant evaluates and takes
final action on recommendations for basic changes in the accounting system, originating from
subordinate units within the system. Accounting reports and statements prepared reflect the
events and progress of the* entire company, and to the extent that subordinate accounting
segments exist, they represent consolidations of accounting data submitted by these segments.
TC-1. The organization which the accounting program serves has relatively few
functions, products, work processes, etc., and these tend to be stable and unchanging. The
accounting system operates in accordance with well-established principles and practices or
those of equivalent difficulty which are typical of that industry.

TC-2. The organization which the accounting program serves has a relatively large
number of functions, products, work processes, etc. , requiring substantial adaptations of
the basic system to meet management needs.

TC-3. The organization which the accounting program serves has functions, prod­
ucts, work processes, etc., which are very numerous, varied, unique, specialized or
which, for similar reasons, puts a heavy demand on the accounting organization for spe­
cialized and extensive adaptations of the basic system to meet management needs. The ac­
counting system, to a considerable degree is developed well beyond the established principles
and practices in order to provide methods for the solution of problems for which no clear
precedents exist or to provide for the development or extension of theories and practices
to problems to which they have not been previously applied.



40

ATTORNEYS

ATTORNEY
Performs work involved in providing consultation and advice to operating officials
of the company with respect to its legal rights, privileges, and obligations. Performs such
duties as anticipating any legal problems or risks involving the company and advising company
officials; preparing and reviewing various legal instruments and documents, such as contracts
for leases, licenses, sales, purchases, real estate, etc.; keeping informed of proposed
legislation which might affect the company and advising the appropriate company officials;
examining and checking for legal implications, public statements or advertising material;
advising company whether to prosecute or defend law suits; acting as agent of the company
in its transactions; and applying for patents, copyrights, or registration of the company's
products, processes, devices, and trademarks. (Patent work which requires training in
a technical field, e.g., engineering in addition to legal training, is excluded. Claims ex­
amining, claims investigating, or similar work are excluded even though the work is per­
formed by persons with a LL.B. degree, unless there is clear evidence that the job actually
requires use of full professional legal training such as that of an attorney who performs
investigative duties as a preliminary phase of his total responsibility for preparing a case
for trial or actually trying a case in court.)
Attorney I
As a trainee (EL.B. with membership in bar), performs routine legal work, such
as preparing briefs or drawing up contracts for review and evaluation by attorneys of higher
grade. Receives immediate supervision in assignments designed to provide training in the
application of established methods and techniques of legal research, drafting of legal in­
struments, etc.
Attorney II
Performs a variety of legal assignments, e.g., (1) drawing up contracts which
require some ingenuity and an ability to evaluate the legal sufficiency of contract terms;
(2) preparing draft opinions on legal questions involved in such areas as claims, grievances,
labor laws, etc., when the legal question can be resolved relatively easily in the light of
well*established facts and clearly applicable precedents. Receives general supervision during
assignments, with most work reviewed by an attorney of higher grade. Responsibility for
final action is usually limited to matters which are covered by instructions and prior approval
of a superior.
Attorney III
Performs a variety of legal assignments, primarily in the study and analysis of
legal questions, problems, or cases. Prepares draft opinions or other kinds of legal work
on legal questions involved in such areas as claims, grievances, labor laws, etc., when
the questions are complicated by the absence of legal precedents clearly and directly appli­
cable to the case, or by the different possible constructions which might be placed on either
the facts or the laws and precedents involved. Typically Specializes in one legal field, e.g.,
labor law, real estate, contracts, etc. Receives general supervision during initial and final
stages of assignments, but is expected to conduct work with relative independence. Respon­
sibility for final action is usually limited to matters covered by legal precedents and in
which little . deviation from standard forms and practices is involved. Any decisions or
actions having a bearing on the company's business are reviewed by a superior. May super­
vise or review the work of a few assistants, normally not attorneys.
Attorney IV
Similar to attorney III but the work is performed under considerably less close
supervision and direction. The attorney is expected to independently investigate the facts,
search out precedents, define the legal and factual issues, draft all necessary documents,
opinions, etc., and present conclusions and recommendations for review. Guidance from
superiors during this process occurs only if the problem is clearly more difficult than normal
for this level. The final product is reviewed carefully, but primarily for overall soundness
of legal reasoning and consistency with company policy, rather than for accuracy of tech­
nical detail.




41

A T T O R N E Y — C ontin ued

Attorney V
Responsible for a broad legal area in which assignments cover a wide range of
difficult and complex legal questions and problems. Primarily serves in an advisory capacity,
making studies and developing opinions which may have an important bearing on the conduct
of the company's business (e.g., recommending action to protect the company's trademarks
and copyrights in foreign countries). Receives a minimum of technical legal supervision.
May supervise a small staff of attorneys.
Attorney VI
Similar to attorney V but the legal questions and problems are of outstanding diffi­
culty and complexity or of crucial importance to the welfare of the company. For example,
(1) complex factual and policy issues which require extensive research, analysis, and ob­
taining and evaluating expert testimony in controversial areas of science, finance, corporate
structure, engineering, etc.; or (2) cases involve very large sums of money (e.g., about
$ 1 million) or, for other reasons, are very vigorously contested.
Attorney VII
Plans, conducts, and supervises legal assignments within one or more broad legal
areas. Supervises a staff of attorneys, and has responsibility for evaluating their perform­
ance and approving recommendations which may have an important bearing on the conduct
of the company's business. Receives guidance as to company policy but no technical super­
vision or assistance except when he might request advice on the most difficult, novel, or
important technical legal questions. Usually reports to the general counsel or chief attorney
of the company or his immediate deputy.
OFFICE SERVICES

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES
Responsible for planning, directing, and controlling of office services, subject only
to the most general policy supervision. Plays an active role in anticipating and planning to
meet office services needs of the operating organization served. Supervises a group of em­
ployees engaged in providing office services of a supporting or "housekeeping'1 nature to the
primary operation of a company, an establishment, or an organizational unit of a company
or establishment. (May personally perform some of the functions.) Office services include:
(a) Receipt, distribution, and dispatch of mail.
(b) Maintenance of central files.
(c) Printing or duplication and distribution of forms, publications, etc. (May be
limited to ordering the printing or duplication of items. Does not necessarily
have charge of a printshop or duplication facilities, especially in large opera­
tions, but coordinates the flow to and from the reproduction units.)
(d) Purchasing office supplies and equipment. (Makes direct purchases of run-ofthe-mill office supplies. May be responsible for direct purchase of other items
from outside suppliers or may requisition through establishment purchasing
departments.)
(e) Records control and disposal.
(f) Communications (telephone switchboard and/or teletype service).
(g) Typing or stenographic pool.
(h) Office equipment maintenance and repair. (May have direct supervision of main­
tenance and repair personnel or may coordinate the ordering of such services
from outside service suppliers or from a central service unit within the
e stablishment.)
(i) Space control over office facilities— layout and arrangement of offices. (Typically
serves as a staff assistant to management officials in performing this function.)




42
M A N A G E R , . O F F IC E S E R V IC E S— C ontinued

Manager, Office Services I
Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing a few (e. g ., four or five)
of the above functions as a service to a small organization (e. g. , 300 to 600 employees,
excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
Manager, Office Services II
A. Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing a few (e. g ., four or
five) of the above functions as a service to a moderately large organization (e. g ., 600 to
1, 500 employees, excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
OR
B. Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing most (e. g. , seven or
eight) of the above functions as a service to a small organization (e. g ., 300 to 600 em­
ployees, excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
Manager, Office Services III
A. Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing a few (e. g ., four or
five) of the functions as a service to a large organization (e. g ., 1, 500 to 3, 000 employees,
excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
OR
B. Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing most (e. g ., seven or
eight) of the above functions as a service to a moderately large organization (e. g ., 600 to
1, 500 employees, excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
Manager, Office Services IV
Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing most (e. g ., seven or eight)
of the above functions as a service to a large organization (e. g ., 1, 500 to 3, 000 employees,
excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

JOB ANALYST
Performs work involved in collecting, analyzing, and developing occupational data
relative to jobs, job qualifications, and worker characteristics as a basis for compensating
employees in a fair, equitable, and uniform manner. Performs such duties as studying and
analyzing jobs and preparing descriptions of duties and responsibilities and of the physical
and mental requirements needed by workers; evaluating jobs and determining appropriate
wage or salary levels in accordance with their difficulty and responsibility; independently
conducting or participating with representatives of other companies in conducting compen­
sation surveys within a locality or labor market area; assisting in administering merit rating
program; reviewing changes in wages and salaries indicated by surveys and recommending
changes in pay scales; and auditing individual jobs to check the propriety of evaluations and
to apply current job classifications.
Job Analyst I
As a trainee, performs work in designated areas and of limited occupational scope.
Receives immediate supervision in assignments designed to provide training in the application
of established methods and techniques of job analysis. Studies the least difficult jobs and
prepares reports for review by a job analyst of higher level.
Job Analyst II
Studies, describes, and evaluates jobs in accordance with established procedures.
Is usually assigned to the simpler kinds of both wage and salaried jobs in the establishment.
Works independently on such assignments but is limited by instructions of his superior and
by defined area of assignment.



43
JO B A N A L Y S T — C ontin ued

Job Analyst III
Analyzes and evaluates a variety of wage and salaried jobs in accordance with
established evaluation systems and procedures. May conduct wage surveys within the locality
or participate in conducting surveys of broad compensation areas. May assist in developing
survey methods and plans. Receives general supervision but responsibility for final action
is limited.
Job Analyst IV
Analyzes and evaluates a variety of jobs in accordance with established evaluation
systems and procedures, and is given assignment which regularly includes responsibility for
the more difficult kinds of jobs. ("More difficult" means jobs which consist of hard-tounderstand work processes; e.g., professional, scientific, administrative, or technical; £r
jobs in new or emerging occupational fields; or jobs which are being established as part of
the creation of new organizations; or where other special considerations of these types apply.)
Receives general supervision, but responsibility for final action is limited. May participate
in the development and installation of evaluation or compensation systems, which may include
those for merit rating programs. May plan survey methods and conduct or direct wage
surveys within a broad compensation area.
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL*
3
2
1
Directs a personnel management program for a company or for a plant or estab­
lishment of a company. For a job to be covered by this definition, the personnel manage­
ment program must include responsibility for all three of the following functions:
(1) Administering a formal job evaluation system; i.e., a system in which there
are established procedures by which jobs are analyzed and evaluated on the
basis of their duties, responsibilities, and qualification requirements in order
to provide a foundation for equitable compensation. Typically, such a system
includes the use of one or more sets of job evaluation factors and the prepa­
ration of formal job descriptions. It may also include such related functions
as wage and salary surveys or merit rating system administration. The job
evaluation system(s) does not necessarily cover all jobs in the organization,
but does cover a substantial portion of the organization.
(2) Employment and placement functions; i.e., recruiting actively for at least some
kinds of workers through a variety of sources (e.g., schools or colleges, em­
ployment agencies, professional societies, etc.); evaluating applicants against
demands of particular jobs by use of such techniques as job analysis to deter­
mine requirements, interviews, written tests of aptitude, knowledge, or skill,
reference checks, experience evaluations, etc.; recommending selections and
job placements to management, etc.
(3) Employee relations and services functions; i.e., functions designed to maintain
employees morale and productivity at a high level (for example, administering
a formal or informal grievance procedure; identifying and recommending solu­
tions for personnel problems such as absenteeism, high turnover, low produc­
tivity, etc.; administration of beneficial suggestions system, retirement, pension,
or insurance plans, merit rating system, etc.; overseeing cafeteria operations,
recreational programs, industrial health or safety programs, etc.).
Employee training and development functions may or may not be part of the per­
sonnel management program for purposes of matching this definition.
Labor relation activities, if any, are confined mainly to the administration, inter­
pretation, and application of labor union contracts and are essentially similar to those de­
scribed under (3) above. If responsibility for actual contract negotiation with labor unions
as the principal company representative is considered a significant one in the job, i.e., the
one which serves as the primary basis for qualification requirements and compensation, the
job is excluded from being matched with this definition. Participation in bargaining of a less
significant nature, e.g., to negotiate detailed settlement of such matters as specific rates,
job classifications, work rules, hiring or layoff procedures, etc., within the broad terms
of a general agreement reached at higher levels, or to supply advice and information on
technical points to the company's principal representative, will not have the effect of ex­
cluding the job from coverage.



44
D IR E C T O R O F P E R S O N N E L — C ontinued

The director of personnel not only directs a personnel management program of the
intensity and scope outlined previously, but (to be a proper match) he is recognized by the top
management officials of the organization he serves as the source of advice and assistance
on personnel management matters and problems generally. For example, he is typically
consulted on the7 personnel implications of planned changes in management policy or pro­
gram, the effects on the organization of economic or market trends, product or production
method changes, etc. ; he represents management in external contacts with other companies,
trade associations, government agencies, etc., when the primary subject matter of the con­
tact is on personnel management matters.
Typically, the director of personnel reports to a company officer or a high manage­
ment official who has responsibility for the operation of a plant or establishment of a com­
pany; or, at company headquarters level, he may report to a company officer in charge of
industrial relations and personnel management activities or a similar official.
Directors of personnel jobs which meet the above definition are classified by level
of work in accordance with the following tabulation:

Personnel program
operations le v e l1

Number o f employees in
work force serviced
250-750 ............................................................ -----1,000-5,000 — ...............................................
6,000-12,000 ----------------------------------------- -----15,000-25,000 ---------------------------------------

.Organization
serviced—
type A 3

I
Ill

Organization
serviced—
type B 4

II
III
IV
V

Personnel program
______ development le v e l2
Organization
serviced—
type A 3

II
III
IV
V

Organization
serviced—
type B 4

III
IV
V
-

* Personnel program operations level— director o f personnel servicing an organizational segment ( e . g . , a plant)
o f a company, where the basic personnel program policies, plans, objectives, e t c ., are established at company head­
quarters or at some other higher level between the plant and the company headquarters level. The personnel di­
rector's responsibility is to put these into operation at the local level, in such a manner as to most effectively serve
the local management needs.
Personnel program development level— director of personnel servicing an entire company (with or without sub­
ordinate establishments) where the personnel director plays an important role in establishment of basic personnel policies,
plans, objectives, e t c ., for the company, subject to policy direction and control from company officers. There may
be instances in which there is such relatively com plete delegation of personnel program planning and development re­
sponsibility below the company level to an intermediate organization, e. g . , a subsidiary or a division, that a job of
personnel director for such an organization should be matched as though it were a company level job.
3 Organization serviced— type A — jobs serviced are (almost exclusively) types which are common in the labor
market generally, and consist o f relatively easy-to-understand work processes, or for similar reasons do not present
particularly difficult recruitment,
job evaluation, or training problems. Work force, organizational structure, and
other organizational characteristics are relatively stable.
4 Organization serviced— type B— jobs serviced include a substantial number of types which are largely peculiar
—
to the organization serviced, consist o f hard-to-understand work processes (e. g . , professional, scientific, administra­
tive, or technical), are jobs in new or emerging occupational fields, are in extremely short supply, have hard-tomatch skill requirements, or for similar reasons present difficult recruitment, job evaluation, or training problems.
Work force, organizational structure, or other organizational characteristics are complicated, unstable, subject to wide
seasonal fluctuations, etc.
NOTE: There are gaps between different degrees o f all three elements used to determine job level matches.
These gaps have been provided purposely to allow room for judgment in getting the best overall job level match for
each job. Thus, a job which services a work force o f 850 employees should be matched with level II if it is a
personnel program operations level job where the nature o f the organization serviced seems to fall slightly below the
definition for the type B degree.
However, the same job should be matched with level I if the nature of the organi­
zation serviced clearly falls well within the definition for the type A degree.




45

CHEMISTS AND ENGINEERS

CHEMIST
Performs research, development, interpretive, and analytical work to determine the
composition, molecular structure, and properties of substances, to develop or investigate
new materials and processes, and to investigate the transformation which substances undergo.
Work typically requires a B.S. degree in chemistry or equivalent in education and ex­
perience combined.
Chemist I
General characteristics.— As the beginning level of professional work in chemistry,
a bachelor's degree with major study in chemistry, or equivalent is required. Typically
receives formal classroom or on-the-job training.
Direction received.— Performs work under close supervision with specific and de­
tailed instructions as to required tasks and results expected.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Assignments are planned to provide experience
in the application of common laboratory techniques and familiarization with methods and
practices in the laboratory. Performs a variety of routine analyses, tests, and operations,
and assists experienced chemists by carrying out detailed steps of experiments.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— None.
Chemist II
General characteristics.— At this continuing developmental level for professional
chemists, work is characterized by selection and application of general and specialized
methods, techniques, and instruments commonly used in the laboratory. May receive advanced
on-the-job training or formal classroom instruction.
Direction received.— Supervisors establish the nature and extent of analysis re­
quired, specify methods and criteria on new types of assignments, and review work for thor­
oughness of application of methods and accuracy of results.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Analyzes a wide variety of samples for which
there are standard or established methods of analysis or for which the adaptation of standard
methods is obvious or determined by others. Conducts specified phases of research projects
as an assistant to an experienced chemist.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise a few technicians or aids.
Chemist III
General characteristics.— Performs work requiring application of knowledge of a
specialized field of chemistry and ingenuity in the independent evaluation, selection, and
adaptation of standard methods and techniques.
Direction received.— On routine work, supervision is very general; unusual problems
are resolved with close collaboration of supervisor. Completed work is reviewed for appli­
cation of sound judgment in choice of methods and adequacy of results.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Develops details of research and development
assignments in accordance with a line of approach suggested by the supervisor and adapts
methods to the specific requirements of assignments. Analyzes samples that require special­
ized training because standard methods are ^inapplicable, because of required interpretive
judgment of quality of substances, or because of required specialized skill in adapting tech­
niques such as microanalysis.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise a few technicians or aids.



46
C H E M IST — C ontin ue d

Chemist IV
General characteristics.— Plans and conducts work in chemistry requiring mastery
of specialized techniques or considerable ingenuity in selecting and evaluating approaches to
unforeseen or novel problems.
Direction received.— Generally works independently of technical supervision but re­
fers proposed plans and unusually important or complex problems to supervisor for guidance.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Conducts research assignments requiring the
evaluation of alternate methods of approach. Undertakes the more complex, and exacting,
or esoteric analytical assignments requiring a specialist in technique or product. Prepares
interpretive reports of results and may provide technical advice on significance of results.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise a small staff of chemists
and technicians.
Chemist V
General characteristics.— Participates in planning research programs on the basis
of specialized knowledge of problems and methods and probable value of results. May serve
as an expert in a narrow specialty making recommendations and conclusions which serve as
the basis for undertaking or rejecting important projects.
Direction received.— Usually discusses important developments -with supervisor.
Supervision received relates largely to work objectives and administrative aspects.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— From broad program objectives, plans, organ­
izes, and supervises or conducts research investigations with responsibility for defining
projects and scope and independently selecting lines of approach.
As individual worker, carries out research project requiring origination of new
scientific techniques and mature background of knowledge of related fields of science.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise a small group of chemists
engaged in varied research projects or a larger group on routine analytical work.
Chemist VI
General characteristics.— Performs work requiring leadership and expert knowledge
in a specialized field of chemistry. Conceives, plans, and directs projects of a pioneering
nature to create new methods and techniques or to resolve problems which have proved
unusually refractory.
Direction received.— Supervision received is essentially administrative with assign­
ments broadly indicated in terms of objectives.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Determines the kinds of projects and data
needed to meet objectives of programs. Maintains liaison with related organizations and
represents the laboratory in important conferences with authority to commit the organiza­
tion. May serve as a consultant to other chemists in the specialty field.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May plan, organize, direct, and evaluate
the work of a group of chemists.
Chemist VII
General characteristics.— Supervisor— provides leadership and scientific guidance
for a broad and diversified program in chemistry and related supporting activities such as
to require several subordinate supervisors responsible for programs typically identified with
level VI. Recommends the facilities, personnel, and funds required to carry out programs
and evaluates accomplishments.



47
C H E M IST— C ontin ued

Individual researcher and consultant—is a nonsupervisory chemist of recognized
leadership status and authoritativeness in his company* in a broad area of specializa­
tion. Is consulted extensively by associates and others with a high degree of reliance
placed on his scientific interpretations and advice.
Direction received.— Under general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Supervisor—is responsible for an important
segment of a chemical program of a company with extensive and diversified scientific re­
quirements or the entire chemical program of a company where the program is limited in
scope. Makes authoritative technical recommendations concerning the scientific objectives
and levels of work which will be most profitable in the light of company requirements and
scientific and industrial trends and developments.
Individual researcher and consultant— selects problems for research and conceives
and plans investigations in which the phenomena and principles are not adequately under­
stood, so that outstanding creativity and mature judgment are required to devise hypoth­
eses and techniques of experimentation and to interpret results. Advises the head of a
large laboratory on complex aspects of extremely broad and important programs with
responsibility for exploring, justifying, and evaluating proposed and current programs
and projects and furnishing advice on unusually complex and novel problems in the spe­
cialty field.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— Supervisor— see "general character­
istics" above.
Chemist VIII
General characteristics.— Supervisor—provides leadership and scientific guidance
for a very broad and highly diversified program in chemistry and related supporting activ­
ities requiring several subordinate supervisors responsible for programs typically identified
with level VII, or a large number of supervisors of lower levels. Recommends the facil­
ities, personnel, and funds required for programs and evaluates accomplishments.
Individual researcher and consultant— serves as a consultant to top-level management
on scientific questions of far-reaching significance. Is sought as a consultant by chem­
ists who are themselves specialists in the field. Is a nationally recognized research
leader and consultant for his company.
Direction received.— Receives general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Supervisor—is responsible for an important
segment of a chemical program of a company with very extensive and highly diversified scien­
tific requirements or the entire chemical program of a company where the program is of
moderate scope. Is responsible for deciding the kind and extent of chemical and related
program needed to accomplish the objectives of the company, for choosing the scientific ap­
proaches, for planning and organizing facilities and programs, and for interpreting results.
Individual researcher and consultant—formulates and guides the attack on exception­
ally difficult and important problems whose solution would represent a major scien­
tific or technological advance.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— Supervisor— see "general character­
istics" above.

This level does not include the chief chemist of a company with a
very extensive and highly diversified program; or the assistant chief
chemist of a company with an unusually extensive and novel chemical
program.




48
ENGINEER
Performs work in research, development, design, testing, analysis, production, con­
struction, maintenance, operation, planning, survey, estimating, application, or standardiza­
tion of engineering facilities, systems, structures, processes, equipment devices, or ma­
terials requiring knowledge of the science and art by which materials, natural resources, and
power are made useful. Work typically requires a B.S. degree in engineering or the
equivalent in experience and education combined. (Safety engineers, industrial engineers,
quality control engineers, and sales engineers are to be excluded.)
Engineer I
General characteristics.— As the beginning level of engineering work, a bachelor's
degree in engineering or equivalent is required. Typically receives formal classroom or
on-the-job training.
Direction received.— Performs work under close supervision with specific and de­
tailed instructions as to required tasks and results expected. Work is checked during prog­
ress, and upon completion is reviewed for accuracy.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Performs simple tasks that are planned to pro­
vide experience and familiarization with methods and practices of the company in the specialty
field and to ascertain the interests and aptitudes of the beginning engineer.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— None.
Engineer II
General characteristics.— At this continuing developmental level, performs routine
engineering work requiring application of standard techniques, procedures, and criteria in
carrying out a sequence of related engineering tasks. Limited exercise of judgment is re­
quired on details of work. May receive advanced on-the-job or classroom instructions.
Direction received.— Supervisor screens assignments to eliminate difficult problems
and selects techniques and procedures to be applied. Receives close supervision on new
aspects of assignments.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Using prescribed methods, performs specific
and limited portions of a broader assignment of an experienced engineer. Applies standard
practices and techniques in specific situations, adjusts and correlates data, recognizes dis­
crepancies in results, and follows operations through a series of related detailed steps or
processes.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise a few aids or technicians.
Engineer III
General characteristics.— Work requires independent evaluation, selection, and ap­
plication of standard engineering techniqueis, procedures, and criteria, using judgment and
ingenuity in making minor adaptations and modifications.
Direction received.— Receives instruction on specific assignment objectives, points
of emphasis, reference and information sources, and possible solutions. Unusual problems
are solved jointly with supervisor, and work is reviewed for application of sound engineering
judgment.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Assignments include equipment design and de­
velopment, test of materials, preparation of specifications, process study, research investigations, report preparation, and other activities of limited scope requiring knowledge of
principles, practices, and techniques commonly employed in the specific narrow area of
assignments. Performs work which involves conventional types of plans, investigations,
surveys, structures, or equipment with relatively few complex features for which there
are precedents.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise the work of draftsmen,
inspectors, and other technicians assigned to assist in the work.



49
EN GIN EE R — C on tin u ed

Engineer IV
General characteristics.— Work requires originality and judgment in the independent
evaluation* selection* and substantial adaptation and modification of standard techniques*
procedures, and criteria. Is recognized as fully competent in all conventional aspects of
the subject-matter or functional area of assignments.
Direction received.— Receives direct supervision and guidance primarily on novel
or controversial problems or questions. Makes independent technical decisions on details
of work covered by precedents.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Plans, schedules, and coordinates detailed
phases of the engineering work in a part of a major project or in a total project of moderate
scope. Devises new approaches to problems encountered. Performs work which involves
conventional engineering practice but includes a variety of complex features such as conflict­
ing design requirements, unsuitability of standard materials, and difficult coordination re­
quirements. Work requires a broad knowledge of precedents in the specialty area and a
good knowledge of principles and practices of related specialties.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— May supervise a few engineers or tech­
nicians on routine work.
Engineer V
General characteristics.— Work requires application of intensive and diversified
knowledge of engineering principles and practices in broad areas of assignments and re­
lated fields. Makes decisions independently on engineering problems and methods, and rep­
resents the organization in conferences to resolve important questions and to plan and co­
ordinate work. Positions may be supervisory or nonsupervisory.
Direction received.— Receives supervision and guidance only in terms of specific
work objectives and critical issues.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Supervisor—plans, develops, coordinates, and
directs a large and important engineering project or a number of small projects with many
complex features.
Nonsupervisory researcher— carries out complex or novel research assignments
requiring the development of new or improved techniques and procedures.
Nonsupervisory staff specialist— develops and evaluates plans and criteria for a
variety of projects and activities to be carried out by others.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— Supervisor— supervises, coordinates, and
reviews the work of a small staff of engineers and technicians. Estimates manpower needs
and schedules and assigns work to meet completion date.
Engineer VI
General characteristics.— Work is characterized by full technical responsibility for
interpreting, organizing, executing, and coordinating assignments. Maintains liaison with
other organizations or companies. Positions may be supervisory or nonsupervisory.
Direction received.— Assignments are received in terms of broad general objectives
and limits. Supervision concerns administrative features of the work.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Conceives and plans engineering projects in­
volving exploration of subject area, definition of scope and selection of problems for inves­
tigation, and development of novel concepts and approaches.
Supervisor—plans, develops, coordinates, and directs a number of large and im­
portant projects or a project of major scope and importance.
Nonsupervisory researcher—plans and conducts research or other work requiring
pioneering in areas in which large blocks of data are controversial or unknown.



50
ENGINEE R — C ontin ued

Nonsupervisory staff specialist— as an expert in a specific field, performs advisory,
consulting, and review work.
Responsibility for direction of others.— Supervisor— directs a staff of project engi­
neers and assistants. Evaluates progress of the staff and results obtained, and recommends
major changes to achieve overall objectives.
Engineer VII
General characteristics.— Work is characterized by decisions and recommendations
which are recognized as authoritative and have an important impact on extensive engineering
activities. Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key engineers and officials of
other organizations and companies; this requires skill in persuasion and negotiations of
critical issues. Positions may be supervisory or nonsupervisory.
Direction received.— Receives general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Demonstrates creativity, foresight, and mature
engineering judgment in anticipating and solving unprecedented engineering problems, de­
termining program objectives and requirements, organizing programs and projects, and de­
veloping standards and guides for diverse engineering activities.
Supervisor—plans, develops, coordinates, and directs an engineering program con­
sisting of many large and important projects.
Nonsupervisory— performs advisory, consulting, and review work as authoritative
specialist or expert in broad program areas.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— Supervisor— directs a large staff of pro­
ject engineers, and engineers and scientists in supporting functions. Several subordinate
supervisors are responsible for projects or activities typically identified with level VI.
Engineer VIII
General characteristics.— Work is characterized by authoritative decisions and rec­
ommendations which have a far-reaching impact on extensive engineering and related ac­
tivities of the company. Negotiates critical and controversial issues with top level en­
gineers and officers of other organizations and companies. Positions may be supervisory
or nonsupervisory.
Direction received.— Receives general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Demonstrates a high degree of creativity, fore­
sight, and mature engineering judgment in planning, organizing, and guiding extensive engi­
neering programs and activities of outstanding novelty and importance.
Supervisor—plans, develops, coordinates, and directs a highly complex and diver­
sified engineering program consisting of many large and important projects and support­
ing activities.
Nonsupervisory—performs advisory and consulting work for his company as a na­
tionally recognized authority for broad program areas of considerable novelty and
importance.
Responsibility for the direction o others.— Directs a very large staff of project
f*
engineers, and engineers and scientists in supporting functions. Several subordinate super­
visors are responsible for programs, projects, or activities typically identified with level VII.

This level does not include positions of chief engineers of companies
with large engineering organization; e.g., those engaged in research
and development on a variety of complex weapons systems with nu­
merous novel components, or of chiefs of primary organizational seg­
ments of companies with very large engineering organizations engaged
in unusually extensive and diversified research and development.



51

ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN
To be covered by these definitions, employees must meet all of the following criteria:
( 1 ) Provides semiprofessional technical support for engineers working in such
areas as research, design, development, testing or manufacturing process
improvement.
(2) Work pertains to electrical, electronic, or mechanical components or equipment.
(3) Required to have some knowledge of science or engineering.
(Excludes production or maintenance workers, quality control testers, craftsmen,
draftsmen, designers, and engineers.)
Engineering Technician I
Performs simple routine tasks under close supervision or from detailed procedures.
Work is checked in process or on completion. Performs at this level, one or a combi­
nation of such typical duties as:
Assembles or installs equipment or parts requiring simple wiring, soldering, or
connecting.
Performs simple or routine tasks or tests such as tensile or hardness tests; op­
erates, and adjusts simple test equipment; records test data.
Gathers and maintains specified records of engineering data such as tests, and draw­
ings; performs computations by substituting numbers in specified formulas; plots
data and draws simple curves and graphs.
Engineering Technician II
Performs standardized or prescribed assignments, involving a sequence of related
operations. Follows standard work methods or explicit instructions; technical adequacy of
routine work is reviewed on completion; nonroutine work may also be reviewed in process.
Performs at this level, one or a combination of such typical duties as:
Assembles or constructs simple or standard equipment or parts.
repair simple instruments or equipment.

May service or

Conducts a variety of standardized tests; may prepare test specimens; sets up and
operates standard test equipment; records test data.
Extracts engineering data from various prescribed sources; processes the data
following well defined methods; presents the data in prescribed form.
Engineering Technician III
Performs assignments that are not completely standardized or prescribed. Selects
or adapts standard procedures or equipment. Receives initial instructions, equipment re­
quirements and advice from supervisor or engineer; technical adequacy of completed work
is checked. Performs at this level, one or a combination of such typical duties as:
Constructs components, subunits or simple models or adapts standard equipment.
May troubleshoot and correct malfunctions.
Conducts various tests or experiments which may require minor modifications in
test setups or procedures; selects, sets up and operates standard test equipment
and records test data.
Extracts and compiles a variety of engineering data; processes or computes data
using specified formulas and procedures. Performs routine analysis to check ap­
plicability, accuracy, and reasonableness of data.




52

E N G IN E E R IN G TECH N ICIAN — C on tin u ed

Engineering .Technician IV
Performs nonroutine assignments of substantial variety and complexity. Receives
objectives and technical advice from supervisor or engineer; work is reviewed for technical
adequacy. May be assisted by lower level technicians. Performs at this level, one or a
combination of such typical duties as:
Works on limited segment of development project; constructs experimental or pro­
totype models to meet engineering requirements; conducts tests or experiments;
records and evaluates data and reports findings.
Conducts tests or experiments requiring selection and adaptation or modification of
test equipment and test procedures; sets up and operates equipment; records data;
analyzes data and prepares test reports.
Compiles and computes a variety of engineering data; may analyze test and design
data; develops or prepares schematics, designs, specifications, parts lists or makes
recommendations regarding these items. May review designs or specifications for
adequacy.
Engineering Technician V
Performs nonroutine and complex assignments involving responsibility for planning
and conducting a complete project of relatively limited scope or a portion of a larger and
more diverse project.
Selects and adapts plans, techniques, designs or layouts. May
coordinate portions of overall assignment; reviews, analyzes and integrates the technical
work of others. Supervisor or professional engineer outlines objectives, requirements and
design approaches; completed work is reviewed for technical adequacy and satisfaction of
requirements. May be assisted by lower level technicians. Performs at this level, one
or a combination of such typical duties as:
Designs, develops and constructs major units, devices or equipment; conducts tests
or experiments; analyzes results and redesigns or modifies equipment to improve
performance; reports results.
Plans or assists in planning tests to evaluate equipment performance. Determines
test requirements, equipment modification and test procedures; conducts tests,
analyzes and evaluates data and prepares reports on findings and recommendations.
Reviews and analyzes a variety of engineering data to determine requirements to
meet engineering objectives; may calculate design data; prepares layouts, detailed
specifications, parts lists, estimates, procedures, etc. May check and analyze
drawings or equipment to determine adequacy of drawings and design.
DRAFTSMEN

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR (Assistant Draftsman)
Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by draftsman or others for
engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. Uses various types of drafting tools
as required. May prepare drawings from simple plans or sketches, or perform other duties
under direction of a draftsman.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes, rough or detailed sketches
for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. Duties involve a combination of
the following: Preparing working plans, detail drawings, maps, cross-sections, etc., to
scale by use of drafting instruments; making engineering computations such as those involved
in strength of materials, beams and trusses; verifying completed work, checking dimensions,
materials to be used, and quantities; writing specifications; and making adjustments or
changes in drawings or specifications. May ink in lines and letters on pencil drawings,
prepare detail units of complete drawings, or trace drawings.
Work is frequently in a
specialized field such as architectural, electrical, mechanical, or structural drafting.



53

TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing tracing cloth or paper
over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil. Uses T-square, compass, and other drafting
tools. May prepare simple drawings and do simple lettering.

CLERICAL

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundstrand, Bur­
roughs, National Cash Register, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of
business transactions.
Bookkeeping-Machine Operator I
Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records usually re­
quiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, customers* accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under biller,
machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
Bookkeeping-Machine Operator II
Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic bookkeeping
principles and familarity with the structure of the particular accounting system used. Deter­
mines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of
the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Clerk, Accounting I
Under supervision, performs one or more routine accounting operations such as
posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher
registers; reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not require a knowledge of
accounting and bookkeeping principles, but is found in offices in which the more routine ac­
counting work is subdivided on a functional basis among several workers.
Clerk, Accounting II
Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant, has responsibility for keeping
one or more sections of a complete set of books or records relating to one phase of ah
establishment^ business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary ledger
or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding invoices
or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; requires judgment and experience in making
proper assignations and allocations. May assist in preparing, adjusting, and closing journal
entries; may direct accounting clerks I.
CLERK, FILE
Clerk, File I
Performs routine filing of material that has already been classified or which is
easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e. g . , alphabetical, chronological,
or numerical). As requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards ma­
terial; may fill out withdrawal charge. Performs simple clerical and manual tasks required
to maintain and service files.




54

CLERK, FILE— Continued
Clerk, File II
Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter) headings
or partly classified material by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and
cross-reference aids. As requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards
material.
May perform related clerical tasks required to maintain and service files.
Clerk, File III
In an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter files,
classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical documents,
etc. May also file this material. May keep records of various types in conjunction with
the files. May lead a small group of lower level file clerks.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Keypunch Operator I
Under close supervision or following specific procedures or instructions, transcribes
data from source documents to punched cards. Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or
combination keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. May verify cards. Working
from various standardized source documents, follows specified sequences which have been
coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of
data to be punched. Problems arising from erroneous items or codes, missing informa­
tion, etc. , are referred to supervisor.
Keypunch Operator II
Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination keypunch machine to tran­
scribe data from various source documents to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs same
tasks as lower level keypunch operator but in addition, work requires application of coding
skills and the making of some determinations, for example, locates on the source document
the items to be punched; extracts information from several documents; searches for and
interprets information on the document to determine information to be punched. May train
inexperienced operators.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands; operating minor office
machines, such as sealers or mailers; opening and distributing mail; and other minor
clerical work.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Primary duty is to take and transcribe dictation from one or more persons either
in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a normal routine vocabulary.
May also type from written copy. May maintain files, keep simple records or perform other
relatively routine clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include
transcribing-machine work.
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Primary duty is to take and transcribe dictation from one or more persons, either
in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or specialized
vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research. May also type from
written copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.
OR
Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and re­
sponsibility than stenographer, general as evidenced by the following: Work requires high
degree of stenographic speed and accuracy; a thorough working knowledge of general



55
S T E N O G R A P H E R , SEN IOR— C ontinued

business and office procedure and of the specific business operations, organization, policies,
procedures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing stenographic duties
and responsible clerical tasks such as maintaining followup files; assembling material for
reports, memorandums, and letters; composing simple letters from general instructions;
reading and routing incoming mail; answering routine questions, etc.
Does not include
transcribing-machine work.
NOTE: This job is distinguished from that of a secretary in that the secretary
normally works in a confidential relationship to only one manager or executive and performs
more responsible and discretionary tasks as described in that job definition.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard. Duties involve han­
dling incoming, outgoing, intraplant, or office calls. May handle routine long-distance calls
and record toll calls. May perform limited information work, for example, giving telephone
extension numbers when a specific name is furnished. May occasionally take telephone orders.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR, SPECIAL
In addition to the work described above for switchboard operator or as a full-time
assignment, serves as a "special" operator who handles the more complex long-distance
calls (e.g. , conference, collect, overseas, or similar calls) or performs full telephone in­
formation service (e. g. , where a knowledge of the work done in different parts of the organ­
ization is required).
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Tabulating-Machine Operator I
Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting machines, such as the sorter,
reproducing punch, collator, etc., with specific instructions. May include the performance
of some simple wiring from diagrams and some filing work. The work typically involves
portions of a work unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive
operations.
Tabulating-Machine Operator II
Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical accounting machines, such as the
tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is
performed under specific instructions and may include the performance of some wiring from
diagrams. The work typically involves, for example, tabulations involving a repetitive ac­
counting exercise, a complete but small tabulating study, or parts of a longer and more
complex report. Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are well established. May also include the training of new employees in the basic
operation of the machine.
Tabulating-Machine Operator HI
Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical accounting machines, typically in­
cluding such machines as the tabulator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others. Per­
forms complete reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs difficult
wiring as required. The complete reporting and tabulating assignments typically involve a
variety of long and complex reports which often are of irregular or nonrecurring type re­
quiring some planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more experienced operator,
is typically involved in training new operators in machine operations, or partially trained
operators in wiring from diagrams and operating sequences of long and complex reports.
Does not include working supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations and day-today supervision of the work and production of a group of tabulating-machine operators.




56

TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various materials or to make out bills after
calculations have been made by another person. May include typing of stencils, mats, or
similar materials for use in duplicating processes. May do clerical work involving little
special training, such as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting
and distributing incoming mail.
Typist I
Performs one or more of the following; Copy typing from rough or clear drafts;
routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc. ; setting up simple standard tabulations,
or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.
Typist II
Performs one or more of the following; Typing material in final form when it in­
volves combining material from several sources 0£ responsibility for correct spelling, syl­
labication, punctuation, etc. , of technical or unusual words or foreign language material;
planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and balance
in spacing. May type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.

NOTE: The definitions for the drafting and clerical occupations shown in this bul­
letin are the same as those used in the Bureau*s program of labor market occupational wage
surveys. The level designations used in this bulletin, however, differ from those used in
the area bulletins. The equivalent level designations for the occupations concerned are
as follows:

Occupation
Bookkeeping-machine
operator______ _
_
Clerk, accounting—
Clerk, file__

— ____ —

Keypunch operator_______ __




Tabulating -machine
operator_________________

National Survey of
Professional, Admini­
strative, Technical, and
Clerical Pay

I
II

B
A
B
A

I
II
III

C
B
A

I
II

B
A

I
n

C
B
A
B
A

I
II

hi

Typist____ ______rr
n
__________
Typist__

Labor Market
Occupational
Wage Surveys

i
ii




Available On Request---The fourth annual report on salaries for accountants, auditors, attorneys, chemists,
engineers, engineering technicians, draftsmen, tracers, job analysts, directors o f
personnel, managers of o ffice services, and clerical employees.
Order as BLS Bulletin 1387, National Survey o f Professional, Administrative, Tech­
nical, and C lerical Pay, February—
March 1963,




40 cents a copy.

* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 19€4 0-719-100




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102