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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES \
BUREAU OF LABOR STA TISTICS/ • • • •
WHOLESALE

PRICES

J lO e

A CO
**0 0

SERIES

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS
OF WHOLESALE PRICES




1923 TO JULY, 1927

SEPTEMBER, 1927

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON
1927




CONTENTS
Page

Introduction_________________________________________ _____ _______________
1
Table 1. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, by groups of com­
modities, January, 1923, to July, 1927______________________________ ___
2-7
Table 2. Index numbers of wholesale prices and purchasing power of the
dollar, January, 1923, to July, 1927____________________________________
8
Table 3. Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index
numbers of wholesale prices, by groups of commodities________________
9-19
Table 4. Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and
July, 1927_______________________________________________________________20-31




hi




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
NO. 453

WASHINGTON

SEPTEMBER, 1927

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES,
1923 TO JULY, 1927
INTRODUCTION
There are presented herewith the results of a recently completed
revision of the index numbers of wholesale prices constructed by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. This revision consists of (1) the addition
of a number of important articles to the list of commodities included
in the index, (2) a shift of the price base to the last completed year,
1926, and (3) the substitution of more recentw eights” for those
heretofore employed. In addition, there has been a slight rearrange­
ment of commodities in certain groups, while the former group of
“ clothing materials” has been superseded by two groups— “ hides
and leather products” and “ textile products.”
The number of commodities or price series .has been increased from
404 to 550, some of these being composites jpciade by combining three
or more quotations into one. A complete list of the commodities in
the new index, together with the 1926 base prices and the quantities
used as weights, will be found on pages 9 to 19 of this bulletin.
Additions to the list formerly used include, among others, such im­
portant items as agricultural machinery and plows, automobiles and
tires, prepared fertilizers, by-product coke, manufactured gas, gloves,
traveling bags and suit cases, rayon, sewing machines, stoves, box
board, and mechanical wood pulp. Several articles no longer im­
portant, as clay worsted suiting, New York State hops, and Bessemer
steel billets and rails, have been dropped.
The shift in the price base from 1913 to 1926 has been made in
order that the latest and most reliable information may be utilized
as the standard for measuring price changes. Also, it has become
increasingly apparent that the year 1913 is now too remote to furnish
a satisfactory base for comparing price levels in recent years.
For much the same reasons data for the years 1923 to 1925 have
been substituted for the 1919 figures used in weighting the prices
included in the index numbers. Where trustworthy information for
the three years 1923, 1924, and 1925 could be procured, as in the
case of agricultural products, the average for these years was used
as the weight. For manufactured products the biennial census
reports of 1923 and 1925 were used. In all cases the most recent
and dependable information obtainable has been employed in con­
structing the weighted index numbers for the various groups of
commodities. It is the purpose of the bureau to extend the revision
of its index numbers further into past years as the exigencies of the
work will permit, and additional results will be announced as fast as
the computations are completed.




1

2

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 1. — Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, by groups of commodities,

January, 1928, to July,
11926=100]
Farm products
Year and month
Grains

Foods

Livestock Other All farm Butter,
and
farm
cheese,
poultry products products and milk

Meats

Other
foods

All foods

1923
Average for year-----January________
February_______
March_________
April....................
M ay----------------June___________
July........... .........
August_________
September______
October________
November ------December............

88.0
87.8
90.0
89.4
92.7
91.5
87.8
83.6
84.3
87.2
92.9
85.3
82.4

77.7
78.9
78.7
78.8
75.7
77.8
75.1
78.1
82.0
84.2
78.0
71.8
72.7

116.7
118.0
118.3
118.8
116.2
111.6
113.4
108.6
109.2
115.5
118.9
128.2
127.1

98.6
99.6
100.0
100.2
98.5
96.7
96.0
94.0
95.8
100.0
100.6
101.8
101.0

103.4
110.9
107.4
106.0
102.4
94.3
92.5
94.3
100.1
105.9
108.4
110.5
109.0

76.2
80.3
76.0
74.6
74.5
74.6
75.5
76.1
77.2
81.9
79.6
74.1
71.6

99.6
92.9
94.9
99.3
102.3
103.3
102.0
98.5
94.2
97.2
101.7
103.1
100.7

92.7
92.3
91.2
92.6
93.3
92.3
91.7
90.5
89.9
94.0
95.8
95.1
92.9

100.6
85.3
87.5
85.9
85.2
86.0
90.4
104.4
109.1
109.2
114.2
116.9
129.9

79.3
74.0
74.0
77.7
79.7
77.7
74.4
77.5
84.2
84.3
86.0
78.8
82.6

114.2
125.9
120.0
111.5
113.7
110.3
109.5
111.2
111.9
108.6
111.5
116.2
118.6

100.0
101.4
98.8
95.7
97.3
95.1
94.3
98.6
102.0
100.4
103.2
103.6
108.3

94.5
105.1
102.8
99.6
90.8
85.4
87.1
87.5
91.1
93.7
91.6
98.8
101.1

75.7
71.4
70.1
70.4
71.4
73.3
76.2
74.7
78.3
80.1
80.8
80.6
82.0

100.0
99.3
99.9
97.5
95.2
93.1
93.0
95.7
97.9
100.8
105.4
107.4
110.0

91.0
91.4
90.8
89.2
86.7
85.3
86.5
87.4
90.3
92.8
94.9
97.1
99.3

118.3
139.7
136.9
124.5
116.3
123.8
121.5
114.8
115.9
107.5
104.3
106.8
110.0

98.9
87.8
91.7
104.8
100.0
96.8
100.9
106.7
105.5
105.1
97.9
93.8
93.9

114.5
122.9
118.1
114.2
109.9
108.8
110.9
115.0
114.3
114.4
114.4
118.4
111.8

109.8
113.8
112.4
112.8
107.6
107.3
109.3
112.1
111.6
110.0
107.0
108.1
105.4

101.1
99.5
100.0
103.5
100.0
96.3
94.4
97.6
100.8
103.9
106.2
106.0
104.6

93.3
82.3
81.8
88.8
91.6
88.8
89.3
94.3
97.4
98.5
104.6
104.2
99.0

104.5
111.2
107.2
104.1
99.8
101.8
104.6
103.2
103.5
102.4
102.2
107.6
103.9

100.2
99.7
97.7
99.1
97.3
96.7
97.8
99.4
101.2
101.6
103.8
106.2
102.4

100.0
112.6
108.2
101.8
102.9
100.3
97.6
100.7
95.7
95.3
97.4
93.6
96.9

100.0
98.8
100.4
99.8
98.6
103.8
106.7
102.2
98.3
103.7
102.2
93.3
93.5

100.0
111.6
107.3
103.0
105.6
102.2
98.0
95.3
97.1
97.7
95.1
96.2
95.2

100.0
107.4
105.1
101.7
102.8
102.4
100.9
98.6
97.2
99.3
97.9
94.7
94.9

100.0
102.3
101.6
99.5
97.2
96.0
95.4
95.5
97.3
101.1
102.9
104.5
107.4

100.0
100.3
97.8
98.0
99.3
100.2
102.3
101.4
99.9
101.6
101.3
99.0
98.4

100.0
104.2
101.9
99.7
102.5
101.7
101.3
98.2
95.9
98.0
99.7
99.9
99.6

100.0
102.6
100.5
99.1
100.4
100.1
100.5
98.8
97.5
99.8
100.8
100.5
100.7

95.9
95.3
93.0
93.2
104.3
109.7
107.0

98.5
99.4
100.6
101.2
93.9
90.6
95.3

95.4
92.6
90.2
89.8
95.1
95.9
95.9

96.5
95.4
94.2
94.3
102.1
100.2
101.2

105.4
107.1
106.1
105.2
98.9
97.7
97.9

89.4
89.6
89.9
90.9
89.8
88.6
90.5

98.8
95.7
93.0
93.0
95.7
97.1
94.7

96.9
95.9
94.5
94.6
94.4
94.4
93.9

1924
Average for year____
January._______
February_______
March_________
April___________
M ay----------------June___________
July-----------------August_________
September______
October________
November______
December______
1925
Average for year____
January________
February_______
March.................
April___________
M ay___________
June___________
July............. ........
August_________
September______
October_________
November______
December.......... .
1926
Average for year____
January________
February........—
March_________
April___________
M ay___________
June.....................
July____________
August............... .
September______
October............ .
November______
December.______
1927
January.___________
February___________
March........................
April_______________
M ay----------------------June_______________
July....................... .




3

•REVISED INDEX NUMBEKS OF WHOLESALE PEICES

T a b l e 1 .— Revised index numbers of wholesale 'prices, by groups of commodities,

— Continued

January, 1928, to July,
[1926=100]
Hides and leather products

Year and month

Textile products

All
Other
Other
Boots leather hides Cotton Silk Woolen textile
Hides
and
and
and
and Leather and
prod­ leather goods rayon worsted prod­
. skins
shoes
prod­
goods
ucts
ucts
ucts

All
textile
prod­
ucts

1923
Average for year___
January.............
February...........
March................
April..................
M ay................. .
June..................
July....................
August...............
September.........
October----------November.........
December........ .

117.6
130.9
135.5
137.2
137.1
135.4
121.8
110.8
107.3
102.0
100.8
91.2
99.1

104.1
107.0
107.1
107.8
107.8
107.0
104.6
104.9
102.9
102.4
101.7
100.0
98.4

99.1
98.9
98.9
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
98.9
98.9
98.9
98.9

103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8

104.2
107.6
108.6
109.4
109.3
108.8
105.5
103.3
102.1
100.7
100.3
97.9
99.2

116.9
116.9
118.9
121.0
120.3
117.3
115.0
111.8
110.3
113.5
115.5
120.3
124.1

129.5
127.8
129.5
132.0
135.3
135.1
128.9
123.3
122.1
134.0
135.1
126.3
124.7

107.5
104.4
106.0
107.6
110.1
110.4
109.2
108.2
107.3
107.2
106.8
106.4
106.3

77.4
79.5
79.7
78.9
78.9
77.1
76.6
76.5
75.4
75.9
76.2
76; 5
77.0

111.3
110.2
111.8
113.4
114.4
113.0
110.5
107.9
106.7
110.2
111.1
111.4
112.7

1924
Average for year___
January.............
February...........
March................
April..................
M ay...................
June...................
July...................
August...............
September.........
October............ .
November.........
December..........

110.2
103.9
115.8
112.5
106.5
103.1
102.7
103.3
109.0
108.9
112.3
116.5
126.2

99.8
98.5
99.7
100.1
100.1
99.7
95.9
95.7
99.3
99.4
100.5
103.1
106.2

98.4
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.7
98.6
98.6
98.6
97.7
97.6
98.0
98.7
99.1

103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9

101.4
100.1
102.9
102.3
101.0
100.2
99.2
99.3
100.8
100.7
101.9
103.7
106.6

114.7
121.6
118.2
114.8
113.5
114.8
114.8
114.2
115.3
112.9
112.4
112.3
112.2

103.1
125.4
115.5
109.4
102.3
97.9
92.9
94.7
100.4
99.6
97.7
100.8
101.2

106.8
105.6
105.6
106.1
106.2
106.0
105.2
104.7
104.9
105.9
108.9
110.6
111.5

87.1
82.1
81.7
81.9
82.5
82.1
82.8
83.9
86.8
87.7
96.9
98.5
97.7

106.7
112.3
109.1
106.8
105.0
104.7
103.6
103.7
105.6
104.9
106.4
107.7
107.8

1925
Average for year___
January.............
February______
March................
April.................
M ay...................
June...................
July....................
August...............
September....... .
October..............
November_____
December-.........

118.7
136.3
138.7
129.9
120.0
114.6
110.4
114.6
114.8
112.5
110.0
110.0
112.8

104.8
109.1
110.6
110.6
108.2
103.1
103.5
103.1
101.9
101.9
101.9
102.1
101.8

100.5
100.2
100.4
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7

104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0

105.4
109.9
110.9
109.1
106.5
104.3
103.5
104.3
104.1
103.6
103.1
103.1
183.6

110.0
111.1
111.0
112.0
111.5
110.3
108.8
108.8
109.3
109.8
110.3
108.7
107.4

104.5
101.8
102.9
100.5
101.1
102.4
102.9
103.9
106.1
107.9
108.5
107.8
108.1

110.2
113.3
114.2
114.1
113.1
111.1
110.6
109.8
108.2
107.0
106.8
107.3
107.0

104.1
104.1
103.6
105.5
102.5
101.7
100.9
102.2
103.5
104.2
107.0
107.6
106.8

108.3
108.8
109.2
109.4
108.6
107.7
106.9
107.1
107.4
107.6
108.3
107.7
107.0

1926
Average for year----January.............
February...........
March......... ......
April..................
M ay.................
June.................
July..................
August............September.----October....... —
November.........
December........ .

100.0
112.8
104.1
98.0
91.6
94.8
94.6
97.5
100.5
95.8
106.2
103.2
103.3

100.0
101.8
101.8
101.8
101.4
99.6
99.2
98.6
98.7
99.1
99.2
99.4
99.4

100.0
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.4
100.4
100.3
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
103.3
101.4
100.1
98.7
98.9
98.8
99.0
99.7
98.8
101.0
100.4
100.4

100.0
105.8
104.8
103.5
102.3
100.5
99.1
98.6
99.5
100.0
97.3
95.4
93.3

100.0
108.2
107.6
104.0
100.5
100.1
100.3
98.0
97.6
99.0
97.6
94.7
92.4

100.0
106.7
105.3
103.1
101.4
100.5
100.3
99.3
98.7
98.4
98.3
98.5
98.4

100.0
106.2
104.9
101.7
101.0
99.3
98.3
*98.4
97.7
98.5
99.2
98.1
99.7

100.0
106.3
105.2
103.0
101.3
100.1
99.4
98.5
98.5
98.9
97.7
96.3
95.2

1927
January....................
February.............. .
March......................
April.........................
M ay.........................
June..........................
July..........................

105.5
101.5
102.3
108.2
114.2
123.8
133.5

99.6
99.7
100.2
100.2
103.3
107.6
113.5

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.9
101.0
103.0

101.2
101.2
101.2
101.2
101.2
101.2
101.6

101.0
100.2
100.5
101.7
103.7
107.3
111.7

92.1
92.6
92.7
92.5
93.8
95.1
96.1

90.1
90.9
90.6
91.8
90.7
90.3
87.4

98.2
98.9
98.8
98.7
97.4
97.1
97.2

99.9
97.9
93.5
94.5
92.5
93.0
93.9

94.3
94.6
94.0
94.2
93.9
94.3
94.3




4

BEVISED INDEX NUMISEKS OF WHOLESALE PEICES

T a b l e 1,— Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, by groups of commodities,

January, 1923, to July, 1007— Continued
[1926=100]
Fuel and lighting
Year and month

Anthracite Bituminous
coal
coal

Coke

Manufac­
tured gas

Petroleum
products

All fuel
and
lighting

1923
Average for year.......................
January..............................
February-..........................
March................................
April..................................
M ay............ ......................
June------ ------ ---------------July_____ ____________
August........ ......... .............
September______________
October,-..........................
November.........................
December...........................

100.8
101.4
101.1
100.7
97.0
97.5
98.1
99.2
100.4
102.9
103.6
103.8
104.0

113.4
136.9
129.9
122.1
115.4
112.6
110.1
107.9
106.8
107.1
105.7
103.8
103.0

118.8
134.6
130.7
131.6
130.5
123.3
119.5
114.3
113.1
113.3
108.8
103.0
101.9

104.8
106.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
104.8
104.8
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9

82.6
88.7
101.4
103.7
98.5
87.5
86.0
79.1
75.0
71.3
69.6
64.7
65.5

97.3
108.4
111.8
110.6
105.6
99.3
97.6
93.6
91.4
90.0
88.6
85.5
85.6

98.6
101.4
100.8
99.8
95.7
96.0
96.8
97.7
98.4
98.9
99.3
99.2
99.3

99.7
104.0
103.5
101.6
99.7
99.1
99.1
97.4
96.7
98.1
99.0
98.7
99.1

97.2
101.9
102.6
102.6
99.3
98.0
96.6
94.6
93.5
94.2
93.5
93.5
96.1

102.9
101.9
101.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
101.9

83.5
83.3
94.7
94.0
92.9
89.1
83.0
81.2
76.7
76.6
73.2
75.7
80.2

92.0
93.8
98.9
98.0
96.2
94.2
91.4
90.0
87.7
88.2
86.9
88.0
90.3

99.7
98.3
98.1
97.0
93.0
92.7
93.3
94.1
95.7
99.9
108.6
112.9
112.9

96.5
98.3
96.5
95.5
94.3
94.3
93.8
93.8
94.7
97.7
98.2
100.5
100.7

97.7
97.4
96.9
95.6
94.3
93.3
92.5
92.6
93.4
94.9
105.8
111.0
105.9

101.9
101.9
101.9
101.9
102.9
101.9
102.9
102.9
102.9
101.9
101.9
101.9
101.0

95.0
83.5
104.2
99.9
94.3
96.4
104.2
102.3
95.4
89.3
87.4
89.4
91.7

96.5
91.5
100.6
98.1
94.6
95.5
99.0
98.2
95.5
94.1
95.1
97.6
98.3

100.0
113.7
102.0
101.2
98.1
97.6
97.3
97.4
98.1
98.4
98.4
98.8
98.8

100.0
98.9
99.0
97.2
95.0
95.2
95.2
95.4
96.6
98.2
104.3
116.8
107.9

100.0
114.0
115.3
102.2
93.6
92.6
94.0
93.8
94.3
95.3
96.3
106.2
103.3

100.0
101.9
101.0
101.9
101.9
101.0
101.0
101.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
98.1

100.0
92.3
96.3
96.9
99.4
106.3
106.6
103.3
104.6
105.4
100.9
94.1
93.7

100.0
98.7
99.1
98.1
97.7
100.8
101.0
99.5
100.6
101.5
101.3
102.5
99.4

99.1
98.9
96.8
93.8
93.6
94.8
95.2

103.9
101.5
100.1
99.9
99.8
100.3
100.0

97.4
96.1
96.0
95.4
94.0
94.2
93.7

99.0
99.0
98.1
98.1
99.0
99.0
99.6

93.0
90.9
80.0
70.0
68.0
68.0
68.1

97.7
95.8
90.0
84.9
83.9
84.2
84.2

1924
Average for year.......................
January..............................
February. .........................
March................................
April...................................
M ay...................... ............
June...................................
July................................. .
August................................
September...................... .
October................. ............
November..........................
December.........................
1925
Average for year______ ____
January..............................
February. ........................
March...................... .........
April..............................._.
M ay...................................
June...................................
July..................... ..............
August..............................
September............ ............
October..............................
November..........................
December..........................
1926
Average for year.'.....................
January..............................
February. ...................... .
March................... ............
April...................................
M ay...................................
June...................................
July....................................
August............... ................
September..........................
O ctober..:.........................
November..........................
December..........................
1927
January...................................
February..................................
March.................................. .
April.........................................
M ay.........................................




5

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 1*— Revised index numbers of wholesale pricesy by groups of commodities,

January, 1923, to July, 1927— Continued
(1926=100)
Metals and metal products

Year and month

Iron
and
steel

Agri­
Noncul­
ferrous tural
metals imple­
ments

Building materials

Auto­
mo­
biles

Other
metal
prod­
ucts

All
metals
and
metal
prod­
ucts

Lum­
ber

Brick

Port­ Struc­
land
tural
cement steel

1923
Average for year----January.............
February...........
March................
April..................
May*_.................
June...................
July....................
August...............
September_____
October..............
November.........
December..........

117.3
106.6
110.6
117.1
122.9
122.8
120.6
119.5
119.1
118.7
117.6
116.9
117.2

95.3
95.0
99.4
107.4106.8
100.4
95.8
92.3
91.2
90.6
87.4
88.4
90.5

98.8
98.5
98.5
98.5
98.6
98.6
98.8
98.9
98.9
98.9
98.9
98.9
98.9

108.7
107.9
107.9
107.9
107.9
107.9
108.0
114.3
111.8
112.0
105.3
105.2
105.2

103.3
104.2
104.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2

109.3
105.0
107.1
110.8
112.8
111.7
110.3
111.8
110.5
110.3
106.7
106.5
107.0

111.8
114.1
116.8
120.7
123.4
120.0
114.2
110.9
107.6
103.9
104.7
104.2
101.2

103.6
102.2
102.7
103.3
104.3
102.8
104.9
105.3
104.3
103.2
103.3
103.3
104.2

107.9
105.2
108.5
108.5
108.5
108.5
108.5
109.4
109.6
109.6
108.6
105.7
104.2

123.7
102.1
107.2
112.3
132.8
134.0
130.2
127.7
127.7
127.7
127.7
127.7
127.7

1924
Average for year----January.............
February...........
March................
April..................
M ay...................
Ju ne.................
Ju ly.„................
August...............
September.........
October..............
November.........
December..........

109.4
117.5
117.6
116.9
113.2
110.8
109.1
107.5
105.8
103.9
102.9
103.0
105.6

93.0
91.1
94.0
97.7
93.4
88.9
86.8
87.0
93.1
92.4
92.8
97.3
101.4

105.7
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.6

107.5
107.0
107.0
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
109.1
109.3
109.1
109.1
107.8

101.7
101.5
101.5
102.1
102.1
102.1
102.1
101. 5
101.5
101.5
101.5
101.5
101.5

106.3
108.0
108.5
108.9
106.8
105.2
104.3
103.7
104.9
104.2
103.8
104.5
105.6

99.3
103.8
104.6
103.7
103.5
102.6
96.6
93.8
94.1
95.9
96.3
97.5
99.5

103.4
104.3
104.2
104.2
104.2
104.1
104.3
103.7
103.5
103.0
103.0
102.0
100.8

105.7
104.8
105.2
105.6
105.7
106.1
106.1
106.1
106.1
106.1
106.1
106.1
104.5

114.2
127.7
127.7
127.7
125.1
121.3
116.2
112.3
109.8
104.7
99.6
97.0
100.8

1925
Average for year----January.............
February...........
March................
April..................
M ay...................
June...................
July...................
August..............
September.........
October..............
November_____
December..........

102.2
107.3
107.2
106.5
103.1
101.5
100.6
100.0
99.4
99.2
99.6
100.9
101.4

101.4
105.8
103.3
99.5
95.1
95.7
96.7
99.1
103.2
103.7
104.9
106.5
103.9

100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.3
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.3
100.3

105.3
107.2
107.2
107.6
107.6
107.6
107.6
107.6
103.3
101.5
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.5
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.9
100.9
100.9

103.2
106.5
106.1
105.4
103.5
103.0
102.8
102.9
101.7
100.9
100.7
101.4
101.2

100.6
103.2
106.7
103.3
99.5
100.8
96.9
96.8
99.4
99.0
99.7
100.5
102.2

100.1
100.5
100.6
100.4
100.8
100.9
99.9
99.7
99.5
99.5
99.4
100.0
100.1

102.6
103.1
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
101.7
100.4
100.4

102.2
107.2
104.7
107.2
104.7
102.1
102.1
102.1
98.3
99.6
99.6
99.6
99.6

1926
Average for year----January.............
February...........
March................
April..................
M ay...................
June...................
July....................
August...............
September_____
October..............
November_____
December..........

100.0
100.0
101.3 . 102.7
100.7
102.6
100.7
100.6
100.3
98.5
99.4
97.3
98.9
97.8
99.5
100.2
99.4
102.2
99.8
102.2
99.9
100.5
100.2
98.8
100.0
96.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
97.3
97.3
97.3
97.4
97.4
99.7
102.1
102.3
102.3
102.3
102.3
102.3

100.0
101.1
101.1
100.4
100.4
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.4
99.4
99.4

100.0
99.9
99.6
99.3
98.8
98.3
99.1
100.7
101.0
101.2
101.0
100.8
100.4

100.0
103.3
103.0
102.5
100.9
99.9
99.2
98.4
98.1
98.5
98.2
100.2
98.9

100.0
101.0
101.7
101.7
101.6
101.6
101.4
101.4
99.5
97.7
97.7
97.5
97.5

100.0
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
99.9
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4

100.0
99.6
99.6
99.6
99.6
99.6
94.5
99.6
99.6
102.1
102.1
102.1
102.1

1927
January....................
February..................
March......................
April.........................
May.........................
June..........................
July.........................

99.2
97.7
97.4
97.2
96.8
96.1
95.5

99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4

99.9
99.9
99.8
99.8
102.9
102.9
102.6

99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
100.6
100.6

98.8
98.0
98.2
97.8
98.6
98.2
97.7

96.7
96.0
95.0
95.0
95.2
94.9
93.9

98.3
96.0
93.6
93.5
93.5
93.4
93.3

98.3
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5

102.1
99.6
97.0
97.0
97.0
94.5
90.7

61577°— 27-------2




94.8
93.6
95.1
93.2
91.0
90.0
89.3

6

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 1.— Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, by groups of commodities,

January, 1928, to July, 1927— Continued
[1926=100]
Building materials—
Continued
Year and month

1923
Average for year...
January...........
February.........
March.............
April...............
M ay................
June................
July................
August............
September___
October...........
November
December.......

Other
Paint build­
ing
mate­
rials mate­
rials

All
AU
Drugs
All
build­ Chem­ and Ferti­ Mixed chem­
Fur­ houseing
phar­ lizer ferti­ icals Furni­ nish­ furicals maceu­ mate­ lizers
ture
mate­
and
ings nishing
rials
ticals rials
drugs
goods

101.3
103.0
105.4
109.1
113.1
107.5
104.1
99.1
97.2
95.9
98.1
95.5
95.0

105.5
100.8
102.3
104.3
106.5
109.6
107.9
106.7
106.2
106.1
105.4
105.2
105.3

108.7
107.1
109.4
112.2
115.5
114.3
111.1
108.9
107.1
105.4
105.7
104.9
103.6

100.6
100.1
100.5
102.1
103.3
101.8
99.3
98.5
97.9
98.7
100.1
102.9
103.0

95.7
95.1
95.7
97.1
97.0
96.5
95.9
94.8
94.4
95.9
95.5
95.3
94.9

102.5
105.9
108.1
110.8
110.1
105.0
100.9
99.9
98.8
98.7
99.5
96.9
95.9

107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4

1924
Average for year... 99.7
January______ 97.4
February......... 99.0
March............. 99.3
April............... 97.6
M ay................ 97.6
June_________ 96.1
July................ 96.1
August............ 99.2
September___
99.8
October........... 101.7
November
104.9
December....... 106.3

104.0
105.9
106.2
106.8
106.2
105.4
103.1
102.3
103.1
102.1
101.3
101.8
103.2

102.3
105.1
105.7
105.5
105.0
104.3
100.8
99.2
99.7
99.9
99.8
100.5
101.8

102.2
103.7
103.3
102.3
101.2
99.2
97.7
98.9
102.3
102.4
103.5
105.5
105.5

95.8
95.5
95.5
95.3
95.5
95.0
94.2
94.2
95.6
96.3
96.8
97.5
97.3

92.6
95.0
92.6
91.7
92.1
91.5
91.7
89.6
92.2
91.9
92.3
94.2
96.2

1925
Average for year...
January...........
February........
March.............
April________
M ay................
June____ ____
July.................
August______
September___
October...........
November
December

109.3
111.7
111.6
108.6
105.6
107.6
106.1
103.6
106.7
112.8
113.7
113.5
100.6

100.4
102.2
102.7
101.5
100.5
99.1
99.3
99.5
99.9
100.0
99.9
99.8
100.2

101.7
103.8
105.2
103.3
101.1
101.4
99.6
99.3
100.6
101.1
101.3
101.5
101.9

104.1
105.8
103.6
103.4
102.4
102.3
102.2
102.7
104.1
105.6
106.0
106.2
104.6

97.7
97.5
97.5
97.5
97.9
97.3
97.2
97.1
97.1
96.9
97.1
99.8
100.1

1926
Average for year...
January...........
February........
March.............
April...............
M ay................
June................
July.................
August............
September___
October______
November
December.......

100.0
107.7
103.4
99.0
95.4
91.5
96.3
101.1
103.7
102.7
101.1
100.5
97.6

100.0
100.3
100.4
100.2
99.8
99.5
99.3
99.5
99.8
99.8
100.8
100.6
100.1

100.0
102.3
101.8
101.1
100.0
99.1
98.9
99.4
99.5
99.5
99.5
100.1
99.2

100.0
102.2
100.5
99.3
99.4
100.2
101.7
101.1
100.3
101.0
99.3
97.9
97.7

1927
January.................
February...............
March....................
April......................
M ay.......................
June.......................
July........................

96.0
94.5
92.5
91.0
93.9
92.7
91.5

97.7
96.6
96.4
95.9
95.2
94.5
94.0

97.5
96.2
95.3
95.0
95.1
94.6
93.7

98.0
98.2
97.4
99.1
99.8
99.9
100.0




House-furnishing
goods

Chemicals and drugs

101.1 116.7
101.3 118.7
102.0 118.7
103.6 118.7
104.1 119.1
102.3 119.1
100.1 119.4
99.4 119.6
98.8 115.9
99.4 115.9
100.3 115.9
101.4 109.8
101.2 109.8

104.8
108.9
104.0
109.4
104.3
109.6
104.3
109.6
105.«4 110.4
105.5
110.5
105.5
110.6
104.7
110.2
104.7 ' 108.8
104.6
108.8
104.8
108.9
105.1
106.8
105.7
107.2

95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9
95.9

98.9
100.1
99.4
98.7
98.2
96.9
95.9
96.2
98.8
98.9
99.6
101.2
101.5

107.9
109.2
109.2
108.2
108.2
108.2
107.9
107.3
107,3
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.3

103.4
105.2
105.3
105.5
105.4
103.0
102.4
101.7
101.9
102.1
102.0
102.9
103.3

104.9
106.7
106.7
106.5
106.4
104.9
104.4
103.8
103.9
104.0
104.0
104.6
104.8

98.8
98.7
99.5
99.8
99.3
98.7
96.4
95.9
96.8
98.9
100.3
100.7
101.1

100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
101.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4

101.8
102.7
101.6
101.5
100.9
100.7
100.2
100.4
101.4
102.6
103.0
103.6
102.8

104.6
108.1
108.1
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.4
105.4
103.9
103.7
102.3
102.3

102.2
102.5
102.4
102.5
102.9
102.8
102.1
101.5
101.5
101.6
102.4
102.0
102.0

103.1
104.5
104.5
103.7
103.9
103.9
103.4
.102.9
102.9
102.4
102.9
102.1
102.1

100.0
99.6
99.2
98.0
97.6
98.5
100.2
101.6
101.1
101.1
101.1
101.0
101.2

100.0
102.9
104.0
105.0
103.6
101.6
99.4
97.4
96.7
97.0
95.8
98.0
99.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
101.6
100.8
100.2
99.9
100.2
100.9
100.4
99.8
100.2
99.1
98.6
98.8

100.0
101.8
101.3
101.0
100.7
100.1
100.0
99.9
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5

100.0
101.2
100.9
100.9
100.8
100.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.4
99.3
98.9
98.4

100.0
101.4
101.0
100.9
100.8
100.2
100.0
99.9
99.8
99.5
99.4
99.1
98.8

91.3
90.2
88.7
88.2
88.0
87.7
86.9

99.1
99.6
100.1
99.3
98.0
98.3
93.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
82.1
84.8
86.6

97.6
97.6
97.1
97.8
95.4
95.8
95.3

97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8

98.8
98.9
98.8
98.8
98.8
99.0
99.1

97.9
97.9
97.8
97.8
97.8
98.0
98.0

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

7

T a b l e 1*— Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, by groups of commodities,

January, 1928, £o

— Continued

[1926=100]
Miscellaneous
Year and month

Cattle
feed

Paper
and
pulp

Other
Rubber, Automo­ miscel­
bile tires laneous
crude

All
miscel­
laneous

All com­
modities

1923
118.5
124.8
127.4
126.2
120.0
122.3
106.3
104.1
111.7
119.6
122.5
120.3
116.9

102.8
104.0
103.7
102.8
103.8
103.9
103.6
102.9
103.0
103.0
101.9
100.6
99.5

61.3
64.5
71.6
71.8
67.5
62.7
53.9
57.7
61.2
59.1
53.4
57.1
55.2

102.0
100.3
104.2
107.3
107.4
104.5
102.9
101.5
100.0
98.9
99.0
99.1
99.6

98.8
99.8
102.7
103.4
102.4
100.8
97.0
96.7
97.5
97.4
96.3
96.3
95.5

100.6
102.2
103.5
104.6
104.0
102.0
100.4
98.6
97.9
99.7
99.6
98.6
98.3

110.2
117.1
110.5
104.8
99.0
92.4
93.3
110.3
114.8
112.7
118.0
117.5
127.9

100.7
98.8
98.6
98.5
99.5
99.5
99.6
98.0
99.5
101.6
101.2
101.8
111.7

54.3
52.9
52.6
46.0
47.1
39.9
37.5
45.8
54.2
57.6
66.9
70.4
80.5

100.8
106.5
104.0
104.0
104.5
103.1
100.6
97.9
96.1
96.4
97.4
98.3
100.6

95.5
97.4
95.7
93.9
94.2
91.8
90.5
92.0
93.8
95.1
97.4
98.5
105.9

98.1
99.8
100.0
98.7
97.6
96.1
95.1
95.9
97.4
97.5
98.6
99.6
102.1

112.7
129.7
110.4
107.1
107.4
117.7
118.3
111.3
114.3
111.3
104.7
111.4
110.0

105.2
101.9
98.9
98.8
112.0
109.6
107.7
108.2
108.9
109.8
103.8
103.9
100.3

149.9
75.2
73.6
84.7
90.2
117.7
158.8
215.3
167.5
180.0
205.8
217.0
206.2

99.6
101.5
102.7
101.8
99.9
98.9
100.2
99.8
98.1
97.5
98.2
97.8
99.0

113.9
101.7
99.0
100.3
105.5
110.0
117.1
126.5
118.0
120.0
121.9
124.4
121.5

103.5
103.5
104.5
104.8
102.4
102.1
103.4
104.6
104.2
103.7
103.6
104.5
103.4.

Average for year.........................
January................................
February..............................
March............................ ......
A pril.......................... .........
M ay............................... ......
June............................ .........
July.......................................
August....................... .........
September............................
October................................
November............................
December.............................

100.0
111.1
101.1
98.0
104.8
99.1
96.2
100.3
99.3
95.6
93.5
97.6
105.3

100.0
106.5
109.4
105.8
102.6
101.6
100.7
100.3
99.5
95.7
92.1
92.1
93.7

100.0
164.1
128.3
120.9
105.2
99.7
89.2
85.6
80.7
85.1
87.7
82.0
78.1

100.0
123.3
110.8
108.8
108.3
108.3
108.3
97.2
92.8
91.4
91.4
83.6
78.6

100.0
99.9
99.5
99.7
99.9
99.8
100.8
100.4
100.3
100.0
99.8
99.6
99.7

100.0
116.8
109.0
106.3
103.9
102.5
101.0
97.5
95.4
94.2
93.4
90.8
89.9

100.0
103.6
102.1
100.4
100.1
100.5
100.5
99.5
99.0
99.7
99.4
98.4
97.9

1927
January.......................................
February.....................................
March.........................................
April...........................................
M ay............................................
June.............................................
July.............................................

110.0
115.8
110.9
113.2
117.7
117.8
115.4

93.0
92.9
92.8
93.4
92.2
92.0
92.0

80.7
78.3
84.1
83.8
84.1
76.1
72.0

78.6
78.7
78.7
78.7
78.7
78.3
77.9

99.6
100.3
100.0
100.2
100.3
100.6
100.0

90.3
90.6
90.9
91.3
91.3
90.2
89.3

96.6
95.9
94.5
93.7
93.7
93.8
94.1

January ________________
February________________
March
_____________
June
August
September ______________
October
______________
November ______________
December,
__
1924
Average for year ____________
January ,,
February________________
March___________________
April __________________
M a y ____________________
June
-- - _____________
July_____________________
____
August_________ ____ •
September
____________
October__ _______________
November_______________
December________________
1925
Average for year ____________
January_________________
February....................... ......
March
_______________
April____________________
May________________ ____
June
__________ _______
July......................................
August..................................
September............................
October......... .............. ........
November_______________
December_______________
1926




8

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

The following table furnishes a comparison of the bureau’s old
and revised general index numbers reduced to the same base, viz,
1926 equals 100, together with the purchasing power of the dollar
as measured by each series, for the period from January, 1923, to
July, 1927.
T a b l e 2. — Index numbers of wholesale prices and purchasing power of the dollar,

January, 1923, to July, 1927
[1926=100]
Old series

Year and month

New series

Pur­
Pur­
chas­
chas­
ing
ing
Index power Index
power
of
of
dollar
dollar

1923
Average for year.
January____
February___
March..........
April_______
May........ —
June.............
July..............
August-------September....
October____
November...
December___

101.8
103.2
103.8
105.0
105.1
103.4
101.7
99.7
99.4
101.8
101.4
100.7
100.0

Cents
98.2
96.9
96.3
95.2
95.1
96.7
98.3
100.3
100.6
98.2
98.6
99.3
100.0

99.1
100.1
100.5
99.3
98.3
97.3
95.8
97.4
99.1
98.5
100.6
101.1
104.0

100.9
99.9
99.5
100.7
101.7
102.8
104.4
102.7
100.9
101.5
99.4
98.9
96.2

Cents
99.4
97.8
96.6
95.6
96.2
98.0
99.6
101.4
102.1
100.3
100.4
101.4
101.7

98.1
99.8
100.0
98.7
97.6
96.1
95.1
95.9
97.4
97.5
98.6
99.6
102.1

101.9
100.2
100.0
101.3
102.5
104.1
105.2
104.3
102.7
102.6
101.4
100.4
97.9

1925
Average for year.
January____
February----March..........

105.1
106.0
106.4
106.6

95.1
94.3
94.0
93.8

Year and month
Index

New series

Pur­
Pur­
chas­
chas­
ing Index ing
power
power
of
of
dollar
dollar

1925
100.6
102.2
103.5
104.6
104.0
102.0
100.4
98.6
97.9
99.7
99.6
98.6
98.3

1924
Average for year.
January.......
February----March..........
April............
May........... .
June........ —
July............
August.........
September...
October....... .
November...
December—

Old series

103.5
103.5
104.5
104.8

96.6
96.6
95.7
95.4

Averageforyear-Con.
April....... ...........
May— ..............
June....................
July....................
August................
September..........
O ctober............
November_____
December...........

Cents

Cents

103.4
102.8
104.2
105.9
106.2
105.8
104.4
104.4
103.4

96.7
97.3
96.0
94.4
94.2
94.5
95.8
95.8
96.7

102.4
102.1
103.4
104.6
104.2
103.7
103.6
104.5
103.4

97.7
97.9
96.7
95.6
96.0
96.4
96.5
95.7
96.7

100.0
103.3
102.6
100.3
100.1
100.5
100.9
99.8
98.8
99.7
99.1
98.1
97.5

100.0
96.8
97.5
99.7
99.9
99.5
99.1
100.2
101.2
100.3
100.9
101.9
102.6

100.0
103.6
102.1
100.4
100.1
100.5
100.5
99.5
99.0
99.7
99.4
98.4
97.9

100.0
96.5
97.9
99.6
99.9
99.5
99.5
100.5
101.0
100.3
100.6
101.6
102.1

97.3
97.0
96.2
95.5
95.4
95.2
95.8

102.8
103.1
104.0
104.7
104.8
105.0
104.4

96.6
95.9
94.5
93.7
93.7
93.8
94.1

103.5
104.3
105.8
106.7
106.7
106.6
106.3

1926
Average for year . . .
January.............
February_______
March..... ...........
April....... ...........
M ay....................
June...................
July____ _______
August________
September....... .
October________
November..........
December...........
1927
January.............
February............
March.................
April...................
May....................
June............. .
July.....................

The quantities of the various commodities used as weights in
computing the revised index numbers, also the 1926 base prices, are
shown in Table 3. As previously explained, the weights represent
averages for the years 1923, 1924, and 1925, or where satisfactory
information for 1924 was lacking, averages for 1923 and 1925.




REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

9

T a b l e 3 .— Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP I.—FARM PRODUCTS
(a) Grains:
Barley, malting, Chicago................................. .................. Bushel............
Corn, Chicago—
Contract grades................. ......... .................................. ____ do_______
No. 3, mixed - - __ _____ .
_
.......... .
.........- ....... do_______
Oats, No. 2, white, Chicago
___ ____________________ ____ do_______
Rye, No. 2, Chicago_______ ______ ______________ _____ ____ do_______
Wheat—
No. 2, red winter, Chicago________________________ ____do_______
No. 2, hard, Kansas City......... .............................. ...... ....... do_______
No. 1, northern spring, Minneapolis........................... ....... do.............
No. 2, dark northern spring, Minneapolis.................... ....... do_______
No. 1, hard, white, Portland, Oreg
- ____do.............
No. 2, red winter, St, Tennis
___ ....... do_______
(6) Livestock and poultry:
Cattle, Chicago—
Calves, good to choice, vealers____ ________________ 100 pounds----Cows—
Fair to good_____ ______
_______ _______ ....... do.............
Good to choice................ ............ —.............. ......... ....... do_______
Steers—
____ d o ______
Fair to good_______ _____ ______ _________
Good to choice
____________________________ ____ do_______
Hogs, C hicagoFair to choice, heavy butchers_____________________ ____ do_______
Fan* to choice, light butchers______________________ ____ do_______
Sheep, Chicago—
Ewes, native, all grades, fair to best________________ ____do_______
Lambs, western, fair to good
___________________ ____do_______
Wethers, fed, poor to best_________________________ ____ do_______
Poultry, live fowls—
Chicago
__
__
. ____________ Pound_______
New York_______________________________________ ____ do_______
(c) Other farm products:
Beans, medium, New York............, .................................... 100 pounds___
Cotton, middling—
Galveston
............................ ............ ................... . Pound_______
New Orleans _________ ______ ____________________ ____do.............
New York ________ ________ . _ _______________ ....... d o .......... .
Eggs, fresh—
Western, Boston _ ______________________________ Dozen_______
Firsts, Chicago___________ _______________________ ____ do_______
Extra firsts, Cincinnati______ __________________ ____ do_______
Candled, New Orleans __________________________ - ....... do.............
Firsts, New York_________________________________ ____ do_______
Extra firsts, Philadelphia____ _____________________ ____ d o ______
No. 1, extras, San Francisco_______________________ ____ do_______
Fruit—
Apples, fresh—
Baldwins—
Chicago_______________________ ____ ______ Barrel_______
New York............ ................... ...................... . ____ do_______
Winesaps, medium grade, Portland, Oreg_______ Box................
Lemons, choice or fancy, California, Chicago.............. ____do.............
Oranges, choice, California, Chicago ............................. ....... do.............
Hay—
Alfalfa, TTansas City .................................................... T o n ...............
Clover mixed, No. 1, Cincinnati_________ __________ ....... do.............
Timothy, No. 1, Chicago__________________________ ....... do........ .
Hops, prime t© choice, Pacifics, Portland, Oreg................ Pound............
Milk, fluid—
100 pounds___
Chicago___________ ______ ____________ _________
New Y o r k _________________________________ _____ ____do.............
San Francisco...................... .......................................... ....... do.............
Peanuts, Norfolk................................................................. Pound_______
Seeds—
Alfalfa, Kansas City............... ...................................... 100 pounds—
Clover, Chicago__________________________________ ....... do_______
Flaxseed, Minneapolis______ ______________________ Bushel______
Timothy, Chicago.......................................................... 100 pounds___
Tobacco, leaf, average warehouse sales, Kentucky.............




70,506

$0.694

212,978
319,466
375,450
39,168

.759
.736
.430
.954

121,164
164,436
47,389
142,167
62,871
90,684

1. 542
1.496
1.549
1.555
1.436
1.555

15,511

12.135

22.366
44.732

5.764
6.489

22.366
44.732

8.763
9.529

30,852
92,453

12.336
13.115

2,547
8,916
1,274

6.592
13.701
8.181

413,241
413,242

.252
.298

8,291

5.442

4,640,487
1,325,853
662,927

.170
. 168
.175

136,122
345,255
40,836
39,599
499,939
118,797
56,924

.356
.335
.356
.339
.356
.395
.298

7,203
11,295
67,280
7,291
34,423

4.102
4.032
2.133
5.571
5.957

8,003
3,473
3,624
25,901

21.034
22.212
23.481
.241

113,601
227,721
37,954
515,059

2.940
3.581
3.130
.050

499
514
41,110
653
14,324

16.475
31.817
2.328
6.111
8.472

10

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 3.— Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Unit

Commodity

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP I —FARM PRODUCTS-Continued
(c) Other farm products—Continued.
Vegetables, fresh—
Onions, Chicago............................... ............... ............ 100 pounds___
Potatoes, white—
Boston..................... ................................... ............. ____ do_______
Chicago._______ __ ___ _ __________ _______ ____do_______
New Y o r k ___________________________________ ____do_______
Portland, Oreg. _____________________________ ____ do_______
Potatoes, sweet, Philadelphia ____________________ ^-bushel.........
Wool, Boston—
Ohio, grease basis—
Fine clothing............................................................ Pound_______
Fine delaine..................... ...................................... ____ do_______
Half blood.................... ...... ..................................... ....... do..............
Medium grades....................................................... ____ do..............
Territory, scoured—
Staple, fine and fine medium.................................. ____do_______
Half blood................................................................. ____ do_______
F oreignArgentine crossbreds, quarter blood, grease basis. _ ____do..............
Australian, Qeelong 56’s, scoured basis.......... ........ ....... do..............
Montevideo, one-fourth blood, 50’s, grease basis. „ ....... do..............

6,062

$2,447

27,176
47,207
21,905
20,850
28,533

3.525
3.013
3.776
2.873
1.531

43,485
16,307
21,743
27,178

.402
.467
.462
.457

36.077
36.077

1.152
1.047

126,984
52,482
66,577

.283
.678
.369

Pound.
___ do..
___ do..

44,180
154,629
22,090

$0,439
.421
.391

-do..
.do..
-do.
,-do.

120,630
422,205
60,315
59,547

.429
.414
.390
.395

-do..
.d o.

17,288
40,338

.476
.458

,.do..
.do..
.d o.

123,703
432,961
61,852

.443
.420
.388

..do.
..do.
.d o.
..do.

35,728
125,048
17,864
115,251

.455
.443
.407
.440

..do.
..d o.

20,169
47,061

.436
.418

___ do.
....d o .
----- do.
C ase...
----- do.

397,501
143,078
36,346
9,841
28,229

.217
.227
.229
5.857
4.393

Pound............
.— .d o ............
Barrels (200
pounds)
Pound............
___ do.............

2,314,664
4,629,327
406

.164
.171
23.491

393,395
196,425

.262
.144

___ d o.............
..— do............
Barrels (200
pounds)
Pound............
.......do.............

623,847
623,847
5,878

.304
.308
37.447

587,817
587,817

.201
.198

GROUP H.—FOODS
(a) Butter, cheese, and milk:
Butter, creamery—
B oston Extra...... ...............................
Firsts.....................................
Seconds-................................
Chicago—
Extra......................................
Extra firsts............................
Firsts.....................................
Cincinnati, as to score............... .
New OrleansFancy................................... .
C h oice.--............................. .
New York—
Extra...... ..............................
Firsts.. ................................ .
Seconds--.............................
PhiladelphiaExtra.....................................
Extra firsts...........................
Firsts...................................
St. Louis, extra...........................
San FranciscoExtra...... ................ ............
F irs ts ..................................
Cheese, whole milk—
C h icag o.-..................................
New York...................................
San Francisco.............................
Milk, condensed____ _______ _____
Milk, evaporated..............................
Milk, fluid. (See Farm products.)
(&) Meats:
Beef, fresh, carcass, steers—
Chicago.-....................................
New York..... .............................
Beef, cured, family, New York____
Lamb, fresh, Chicago.......................
Mutton, fresh, dressed, New York..
Pork, cured—
Bacon, Chicago..........................
Hams, Chicago...........................
Mess, New Y ork.......................
Sides, clear, Chicago...
Sides, rough, Chicago..




REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

11

T a b l e 3 . — Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP H.—FOODS—Continued
(6) Meats—Continued.
Pork, fresh, dressed hogs, Chicago_____________________ Pound_______
Poultry, dressed—
Chicago_____________________________
_ ________ ....... do..... ........
New York___________________________
______ ....... do_______
Veal, fresh, good, Chicago____________ : _______________ ....... do.............
_
(c) Other foods:
Beans. (See Farm products.)
Bread, loaf (per pound before baking)—
Chicago____________________________ ____ _________ ____ do_______
CiTininnati
_
_ ___
....... do—_........
" T. Orleans _ _
Npw
....... do—.........
New York................................................ ....................... ....... do_______
San Francisno
_____ ___ __ __ ...
....... ____do_______
Cocoa beans, Arriba, New York_______________________ ____ do_______
Coffee, Brazilian grades, New York—
Rio No. 7.......................................... .............................. ____ do_______
Santos, No. 4
.............
____ do_______
Copra, South Sea, New York___________ ______________ ....... do.............
Crackers, soda, New York............... ................................. ....... d o „ _ ........
Eggs. (See Farm products.)
Fish—
Cod, pickled, cured, Gloucester, Mass......................... 100 pounds___
Herring, pickled, New Y ork._____________ ______ Pound_______
Mackerel, salt, New York_________________________ ....... do_______
Salmon, canned, Alaska, red, factory.- ____________ Dozen cans__
Salmon, smoked, Alaska, New York_______________ Pound_______
Flour, rye, white, Minneapolis........................................... Barrel_______
Flour, w h ea tStandard patents, hard, winter, Buffalo........ .............. ....... do_______
First clears, Buffalo....................................................... ____do_______
Short patents, winter, Kansas City.............................. ____do_______
Straights, winter, Kansas City......................... ........... ____do_______
Standard patents, Minneapolis__________ __________ ....... do—.........
Second patents, Minneapolis________________ ____ ....... d o .— ........
Patents, Portland, Oreg................................................. ....... do.............
Short patents, soft, winter, St. L ou is.-........................ ____do—.........
Straights, soft, winter, St. Louis___________________ ____do__ ........
Standard patents, soft, winter, Toledo______________ ____ do_______
Fruit, canned, New York—
Peaches, 2 ^ s............... ........................................... .... Case_______ _
Pineapple, 2%s__________________ _______ _________ ____ do_______
Fruit, dried, New York—
Apples, evaporated_______________________________ Pound_______
Currants, cleaned_________________________________ ___ _do..... ........
Prunes, California, 60-7Qs............................................. ____ do_______
Raisins, coast, seeded_____________________________ ....... do_______
Fruit, fresh—
Apples. (See Farm products.)
Bananas, Jamaicas, New York...... ............................... Bunch_______
Lemons. (See Farm products.)
Oranges. (See Farm products.)
Glucose, 42° mixing, New York________________________ 100 pounds___
Hominy grits, white, mill..................... ............................. ....... do.............
Lard, prime, contract, New York............. ........... ............ . Pound............
Meal, corn—
White, mill
100 pounds___
Yellow, fancy, Philadelphia........................................ . ....... do..............
Molasses, New Orleans, fancy, New York__............ ......... Gallon. ..........
Oatmeal, in 90-pound sacks, New York.............................. 100 pounds___
Oleomargarine, standard, uncolored, Chicago.................... Pound............
Oleo oil, extra, Chicago______________________________ ....... do..............
Pepper, black, New York________________ _______ _____ ....... do..............
Rice, head, clean, New Orleans—
Blue Rose, medium to good___ _____ _______ _______ ....... do.__.........
Honduras, medium to choice...................... .................. ____do_______
Salt, Chicago—
American, medium............................. .......................... B a r r e l (280
pounds).
Granulated................................ ..................................... Ton_________
Sugar, New Y o r k Granulated______________________________________ Pound_______
Raw, 96° ........................................ ................................ ....... do..............
Tallow, edible, Chicago............................................... ........ ....... do.............
Tea, Formosa, fine, New York...................... .......... .......... ....... do..............




6,405,181

$0.250

253,457
506,913
937,661

.271
.314
.187

2,980,983
445,556
424,340
6,195, 352
562, 249
391,504

.075
.071
.072
.070
.077
.180

342,885
1,028,655
329,375
1,156,431

.182
.223
.058
.140

574
51,491
15,085
24,900
6,699
1,598

7.258
.132
.100
3.326
.383
5.600

8,582
2,861
25,405
8,468
36,219
12,073
8,125
5,321
1,774
5,607

8.690
8.374
8.035
7.252
8.426
8.148
7.984
7.832
7.108
7.626

17,566
14,624

1.950
2.150

20,329
16,313
324,625
464,276

.118
.090
.078
.092

48,941

2.451

11,547
2,963
1,792,994

3.439
1.558
.150

10.320
10.320
42,052
9,137
228,788
152,106
30,394

1.558
2.663
.528
3.073
.228
.120
.256

855,859
213,965

.062
.073

25,704

2.195

3,599

7.509

11,505,726
10,360,669
51,605
99,604

.055
.043
.095
.355

12

REVISED INDEX NUMBEBS OF WHOLESALE PBICES

T a b l e 3 .— Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

tvholesale prices^ by group of commodities—
^Continued

Unit

Commodity

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP n .—FOODS—Continued
(c) Other foods—Continued.
Vegetables, canned—
String beans, New York.......... ....................................
............................................ .....................
Corn, factory
Peas, New Y ork... __ __
_
________
Tomatoes, New York....................... . ....................
Vegetables, fresh—
Onions. (See Farm products.)
Potatoes. (See Farm products.)
Vegetable oil—
Coconut, New York _ _
_
. ________
Corn, New Y o rk ._ _______ _______________ ____ _
Cottonseed, New York......................... .......................
Olive, New York_______________ ______ ______ ____
Peanut, mill.................. ...............................................
Soya bean, New Y ork ...........................................^___
Vinegar, cider, New York_______ . . _ . . . ___________

Dozen.............
____ do_______
....... do..............
....... do..............

13,775
33,705
34,128
33,528

$0.893
.901
1.316
1.433

Pound.............
____ do..............
....... do..............
G allon ...........
Pound............
____ do..............
Gallon............

424,837
110,854
1,086,705
10,560
13,233
21,737
77,453

. 106
.120
.118
1.911
. 113
.126
.186

Pound.

443.410

$0,097

.do..
.do..

443.410
443.410

.140
.134

..d o ............
....... do............
..d o ............
. .do............

138,570
83,634
69,285
38,554

.173
.733
.155
2.168

Square foot...
___ do............
Pound______
Square foot...

170,680
184,550
23,020
213,104

.453
.675
.437
.253

Pound.
.....d o ..
___ do—

72.341
72.341
108,514

.353
.438
.429

6,365
15.905
15.905
21,178

1.330
1.473
1.568
1.663

-do..
_do_.
.d o „
_do~
-d o -do..
.do..
.do..
.do..
-do..
-do..

6.464
11.312
6.464
11.312
11.312
6.464
6.464
6.464
6.464
6.464
11.312

4.924
6.400
3.199
6.000
1.723
3.350
4.600
3.600
4.924
3.375
2.050

_do_.
-d o .do..
.do..
_do..
-do_.

14.160
14.160
35,399
14.160
14.160
14.160

4.074
3.600
2.000
2.850
4.150
3.600

434
795
3.100
3.100

33.840
21.150
44.975
7.903
6.513

GROUP i n .—HIDES AND LEATHEI1 PRODUCTS
(a) Hides and skins:
Hides, C hicagoCountry cows.................................................................
Packers’—
Heavy native steers...... ..........................................
Heavy Texas steers.................................................
Skins—
Calf, No. 1, country, Chicago.......................................
Goat, Brazil, first selection, New York.......................
Kip, No. 1, country, Chicago...................................... .
Sheep, packers’, Chicago...............................................
(&) Leather:
Chrome calf, B grade, Boston............................................ .
Glazed kid, top grade, Boston...........................................
Harness, California oak, general market........................... .
Side, black, chrome, tanned, B grade, Boston.................. .
Sole, oak, Boston—
Insides.......................................................................... .
Scoured backs.............................................................. .
Sole, union backs, steers, New York...................................
(c) Boots and shoes, factory:
Children’s—
Child’s gun metal. __....................................................
Little boy’s, tan calf, blucher......................................
Misses’ , gun m etal.......................................................
Youths’, tan calf, blucher.............................................
Men’s—
Black, calf, bal..............................................................
Black, calf, blucher.......................................................
Black, dress, welt, side leather....................................
Black, vici kid...............................................................
Chocolate, elk, blucher.............. ......................... ........
Dress........................................ ................... .................
Gun metal, blucher....................... ..............................
Mahogany, chrome, bal...............................................
Tan, dress, welt, calf.................................. .................
Tan, dress, welt, side leather.....................................
Work............. ...............................................................
Women’s—
Black, kid, dress..........................................................
Black, kid, M cKay sewed............................................
Medium grade..............................................................
Better grade.................................................. ...............
Colored calf.. ...............................................................
Patent leather pump.......................................... .........
( cl) Other leather products:
Gloves—
Men’s................«............................................ ..............
Women’s........................................................................
Harness (composite price)...................................................
Suitcases (composite price) ........................................ ........
Traveling bags (composite price).......................................




Pair...............
....... do............
- d o ...........
..d o ...........

Dozen pairs.
.......d o.........
Set...............
Each_______
.......do..........

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

13

T a b l e 3 .— Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP IV.—TEXTILE PRODUCTS
(a) Cotton goods:
Blankets, colored, Boston
..... ............... ...... ......
Denims, M^sanhusetts, 28-inp.hmill_
_
Drillings, brown—
Massachusetts, 30-inch, mill..........................................
Pepperell, 29-ineh, mill _
__ _____
Duck— *
Eight-dunce, army, mill.................................................
Wide, 36-inch, mill.........................................................
FlannelColored, 27-inch, mill_____________________________
Unbleached, 33-inch, mill^
_______ _
Gingham—
Amoskeag, 27-inch, mill.................................................
Security, 32-i neb, mill
....
_
Hosiery—
Men’s, combed yam, mill_________________________
Women’s, sillr mercerized, millT .......... ........ ..
Muslin, bleached—
Fruit of the Tiftom, m ill.
....... . ,
"Lonsdale, mill
TJongh Rider, mill . _
Nainsook, Wamsutta, mill...........................................
Pftrralft, Snouts, 38^-infth, mill _T
Print cloth—
Twenty-seven inch, mill__________________________
Thirty-eight and one-half inch, mill_______ _________
Sheeting, bleached—
10/4, Pepperell, mill_______________________________
10/4, Wamsutta, mill____ _________________________
Sheeting, brown—
Indian Head, 36-inch, mill.............................................
4/4 Pepperell, mill________________________________
4/4 Trion, mill____________________________________
Thread, 6-cord, 100 yards, mill___________________________
Ticking, Amoskeag, 32-inch, mill________________________
Underwear—
Men’s, shirts and drawers, mill_____ 1_______________

Pair_________
Yard...............

20,153
270,755

$1,235
.169

....... do..............
____ do_______

176.862
176.862

.132
.127

____ do..............
____ do..............

150,553
29,656

.197
.418

____ do.............
____ do_______

180.454
180.454

.126
.176

____ do..............
____ do..............

278.443
278.443

.090
.123

Dozen pairs.__
____ do_______

22,349
31.662

1.624
2.329

Yard...............
____ do_______
....... do..............
....... do..............
....... do.............

86.662
86,662
86,662
86,662
352,461

.167
.151
.143
.228
.129

....... do..............
___ do_______

343,071
1,029,214

.052
.075

__ do_______
__ ;_do_^______

166.685
166.685

.416
1.140

____ do..............
____ do_______
____ do..............
Spool________
Yard...............

277.808
277.808
277.808
2,907,744
50,931

.123
.123
.093
.036
.205

D ozen gar­
ments.
Women’s, union suits, mill__ ____ ____________ ___ _ D o z e n .........
Yam Carded, white, northern, 10-1 cones, mill___________ _ -Pound_______
Carded, white, northern, 22-1 cones, mill................. — ____ do..............
Carded, single warp, 40/ls, southern spinning, mill_ ____ do..............
_
Twisted, 20/2, carded, weaving, mill............................. ____ do..............
Twisted, 40/2, carded, weaving, mill_________________ ____ do..............
(6) Silk and rayon:
Rayon, New Y o r k 150 A denier_____________________________________ _ ____ do_______
150 B denier_________________ ____ ________________ ____ do_______
300 A denier________ _____________________________ ____ do..............
300 B denier____________________________________ . . ___ do_______
Silk, raw, New York—
China, steam filature, third category_______________ ____ do..............
Canton, double extra A-crack______________________ ..... d o _______
Japan, double extra cracks_________________________ ___ do_______
Japan, 13-15____ _________________________________ ____ do..............
Silk, spun, New York—
Domestic, 60/1.............................. ............................. ....... do..............
Domestic, 60/2............................................................... . ____ do_______
Imported, 200/2, first quality_______________________ ____ do_______
Hosiery—
Women’s, pure sillr, mill
_
.................
Dozen pairs...
Women’s, artificial silk, mill.......................................... ....... do..............
Men’s, silk, mercerized top, heel, and toe.................... ____ do.............
(c) Woolen and worsted goods:
Blankets, all wool, 4 to 5 pounds per pair, mill__________ Pound_______
Flannel, No. 6400, 54-inch, mill__________________________ Yard...............
Overcoating, mill—
H eavy__________________________________________ ..... d o _______
Light____________________________________________ ____ do_______

5,232

6.837

7,373

9.875

105.826
105.826
141.102
141.102
141.102

.324
.358
.508
.324
.472

12,086
12,086
12,086
12,086

1.810
1.692
1.603
1.508

* 8,127
2,709
32,507
10,836

6.348
4.655
6.044
6.194

1.744
1.744
1,340

4.693
5.966
5.784

15,221
7,266
9,316

12.168
2.792
4.795

7,404
1,708

1.349
1.678

32.523
32.523

3.042
4.542

6 1 5 7 7 ° — 27-------- 3




14
T

able

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF 'WHOLESALE PRICES
3. — Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of
*wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP IV.—TEXTILE PRODUCTS—Continued
(c) Woolen and worsted goods—Continued.
Suiting—
Serge, 116 M. B. m ill_ __ ............................................
Serge, 11-ounce, 56-68 inch, mill.....................................
Uniform serge, fine grade, 12-ounce, mill......................
Uniform serge, medium grade, 12-ounce, mill..............
Unfinished worsted, 13-ounce, mill................................
Trousering, 2,900 range, cotton warp, 11-onnr>p., mill..
Underwear, men’s—
Shirts and drawers, mill_________ ______ __________
Union suits, mill______________ ______ ____________
Women’s dress goods—
Broadcloth, 9^-ounce, mill........................................ .
Flannel, 12-ounce, mill...................................................
Flannel, WFD, 54-inch, mill.........................................
French serge, 39-inch, mill.............................................
Serge, 36-inch, mill.........................................................
Sicilian cloth, 54-inch, mill_________________________
Yams—
2/32s, crossbred stock, white, mill______ ___________
2/40s, half-blood, weaving, mill.......................... ...........
2/50s, fine, weaving, mill___________________________
(ft) Other textile products:
Binder twine, standard, mill ________________________
Burlap, 10^-ounce, 40-inch, mill_______________________
Hemp, Manila, New York____________________________
Jute, raw, medium grades, New York__________________
Linen shoe thread, 10s, Barbour, New Y o rk .................. .
Rope, pure Manila, ^-inch and larger, New York_______
Sisal, Mexican, New Y o rk ____________________________

Yard...............
....... do..............
....... do..............
....... do..............
....... do..............
____do..............

21,682
21,682
21,682
21,682
21,682
25,766

$3.818
2.168
2.752
1.997
2.005
1.527

D ozen gar­
ments.
Dozen_______

710

30.000

972

30.380

Yard...............
....... do..............
....... do..............
____ do..............
____d o ............
____ do_______

21,682
32.523
21,682
32.523
42,927
28,618

2.360
1.944
1.451
1.034
.458
.792

Pound_______
____do..............
____ d o.............

47.862
47.862
47.862

1.435
1.854
2.106

50 lb. b a le ___
Yard________
Pound_______
____ do_______
____ do_______
____ do_______
____ do_______

49,978
879,229
193,274
145,432
3,440
96,636
261,661

6.531
.092
.148
.090
1.946
.251
.091

Gross ton____
____ do_______
____ do_______

31,475
13,022
25,138

$13.767
13.290
10.652

____ do_______
____ do_______

248,122
173,685
74,437

4.314
4.794
3.422

____ do_______
____ do.............

2,019
11,441

5.555
4.106

____ do_______
........do_______
1,000 cubic feet

9,298
27,892
357,978

5.728
10.622
1.034

____ do_______
____ do_______

300,168
470,534
40,563

1.092
1.884
3.501

____ do_______
Gallon_______

210,250
5,298,312

1.295
.064

____ do_______
____ do_______
___ .d o .............
____ do.............
____ do_______

2,027,271
1,720,390
3,106,002
2,445,744
951,662

.113
.104
.128
.103
.089

____ do_______
____ do_______

1.230.318
1.230.318

.086
.104

GROUP V.—FUEL AND LIGHTING
(a) Anthracite coal (composite price):
Chestnut____________________________________________
Egg_________________________________________________
Pea _______________________________________________
(5) Bituminous coal (composite price):
Mine run ___________________________________________
Prepared sizes________________________________________
Screenings___________________________________________
•(e) Coke:
Beehive—
Alabama_________________________________________
Connellsville_________________________________ ___
By-product—
Alabama_________________________________________
New Jersey______ _______________________________
(<?) Manufactured gas (composite price)_____________________
(e) Petroleum products:
Petroleum, crude, wells—
California________________________________________
TCaims-Okiahoma.
Pennsylvania____________________________________
Fuel oil, refinery—
Oklahoma
___
Pennsylvania __________________________________
Gasoline, refinery—
California
__________________________________
Oklahoma ______________________________________
Pennsylvania __________________________________
North Texas
__________________________________
Natural, Oklahoma. _____________________________
KeroseneStandard white, New York
Water white, refinery ___________________________




15

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 3 . — Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued
Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Commodity

price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP VI.—METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS
(a) Iron and steel:
Iron ore, Mesabi, lower lake ports—
Non-Bessemer_______________________________
Pig iron—
Basic, furnace.______________________________
Bessemer, Pittsburgh------------------------------------Foundry, No. 2, northern, Pittsburgh_________
Foundry, No. 2, southern, Birmingham............ .
Ferromanganese, furnace--------- ---------------------Spiegeleisen, furnace_________________________
Bar iron—
Best refined, Philadelphia-----------------------------Common, refined, Pittsburgh_________________
Bars, concrete reinforcing, %-inch and larger, mill—.
Nails, wire, Pittsburgh---------------------------------------Pipe, cast iron, 6-inch, New York_________________
Pipe, black steel, Pittsburgh-------------------------------Skelp, grooved, Pittsburgh------ ---------------------------Steel billets, open-hearth, Pittsburgh-------------------Steel merchant bars, Pittsburgh__________________
Steel plates, tank, Pittsburgh_____________________
Steel rails, open-hearth, mill______________________
Steel scrap______________________________________
Steel sheets, No 27. box annealed, m ill-----------------Steel, structural, mill____________________________
Teme plate, No. 8 ,1. C. package, mill-----------------Tin plate, domestic, standard, coke, Pittsburgh____
Wire, fence—
Barbed, galvanized, mill-------------------------------Galvanized, No. 9, Pittsburgh________________
Plain, annealed, Pittsburgh__________________
Woven, Pittsburgh__________________________
<& Nonferrous metals:
)
Aluminum, New Y ork---------------------------------------Antimony, New York___________________________
Brass, sheets, mill----------------------------------------------Copper, ingot, electrolytic, refinery----------------------Copper, sheet, hot rolled, New York______________
Copper wire, bare, mills--------------------------------------Lead, pig, desilverized, New York________________
Lead pipe, New York___________________________
Nickel, ingot, New York_________________________
Quicksilver, New York__________________________
Silver, bar, fine, New York_______________________
Tin, pig, straits, New York---------------------------------Zinc, sheet, La Salle, 111-............................................
Zinc, pig, slab, New York.......................................... .
<c) Agricultural implements, factory:
Binder, grain............................................................... .
Cultivator.....................................................................
Drill, grain.................................................................. .
Engine, 3-horsepower...................................................
Harrow—
Spike, peg tooth.....................................................
Spring tooth.......................................................... .
Loader, hay................................................................. .
Mower, hay..................................................................
Picker, corn.................................................................
Planter, corn............ ...................................................
Plow, tractor....................................................... _.......
•
Plow, walking—
1-horse (composite price).......................................
2-horse (composite price).......................................
R akeSelf dump...............................................................
Side delivery..........................................................
Separator, cream..........................................................
Sheller, corn..................................................................
Spreader, manure.........................................................
Tractor-................................... . ........................... .......
Wagon, 2-horse.............................................................




Gross ton.
___ d o . . . .

25,601
42,667

$4,400
4.250

.d o.
___ do____
___ do____
___ do____
___ do____
____ do____

2,255
595
2.657
2.657
312
118

18.548
21.318
20.616
21.154
94.827
33.769

Pound_____
___ do______
100 pounds...
.do.
Net ton___
100 feet_____
100 pounds..
Gross t o n .._
100 pounds—
Pound_____
Gross ton___
.do.
Pound_____
100 pounds...
200 pounds—.
100 pounds—.

350.274
350.274
14,169
16,564
1,946
18,067
11,946
4,899
107,683
8,915,498
2,802
1,574
5,854,650
76,019
1,050
33,198

.029
.030
1.992
2.750
51.340
4.261
1.900
35.000
1.996
.019
43.000
13.481
.032
1.958
11.700
5.500

___ do______
___ d o _____
___ d o .........
100 rods-------

5,078
4,682
16,315
2,049

.3.400
3.100
2.650
20.030

233,429
21,314
342,517
2,206,325
149,066
465,658
1,413,985
1,032
32,052
2,091
69,745
170,632
1,270
1,038,381

.270
.159
.190
.138
.216
.162
.084
9.916
.350
1.226
.624
.653
10.589
.077

Each...
___ do.
___ do.
___ do.

35
131
28

121

156.750
44.170
91.670
76.000

_do.
_do_
_do.
..do.
..do.
_do_
_do.

195
106
19
94
5
39
54

16.720
22.040
85.260
59.140
325.000
57.710
104.500

-do_.
.do..

168
185

7.283
16.095

-do.

42
16
157
3
46
23
109

32.060
78.370
59.370
26.600
114.000
680.000
103.070

Pound. .
___ do__
___ d o ..
___ do­
d o.
.do.
do100 pounds..
Pound____
___ d o........ .
Ounce_____
Pound____
100 pounds.
Pound....... .

.do..
.do..
.do..
-do.
-do-

16

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OP WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 3 . — Weights and base 'prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP VI.—METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS—Continued
(< ) Automobiles, factory (composite price):
Z
Buick...................................................................................
Cadillac.......................... _........................
Chevrolet_________________________ __________________
Dodge_______________________________ __________ ____
Ford......................................................................................
Packard „ ...
.......................................................... .
(e) Other metal products:
Sewing machines (composite price)—
Electric_______________________________ _________
Treadle__________________________________________
Stoves, cooking (composite price)—
Coal....... ................................................
Gas................. .........................................

Each..... ..........
....... do.............
____ do_______
....... do_______
....... do_______
____ do_______
____ do_______
____ do ____

2491
2490

77.550
49.120

..... d o ._ .......

21,022
21,397
21,153

62.869
62.924
62.274

d o . ........
___
on............................................................ .......do___ _
GROUP

TO.—
BUILDING MATERIALS

(a) Lumber:
Cypress, shop, St. Louis
_ __________
1,000 feet_____
Douglas fir, null—
No. 1............................................................................... ....... do_______
No. 2............................................................................... ....... do .........
Gum, plain, sap, St. Louis................................................... ..... d o . ........
Hemlock, northern, No. 1, Chicago......................... ....... do__ .......
Maple, hard, No. 1, Chicago.................................. ....... do_ ...........
Oak, plain, white, No. 1, Cincinnati.............................. . ____ do_______
Pine, white, No. 2, Buffalo.................................................. ....... do.............
Pine, yellow, flooring, mill................................... ......... _ _ ..... d o _ . ......
__
Pine, yellow, timbers, mill_______________________ ___ ____ do______
Poplar, No. 1, Cincinnati—_______ _______ _
_ ....... do _ _
Spruce, eastern, Boston_________ __________ ....... do.............
Lath—
Douglas fir, No. 1, Chicago________________________ M _........ ......
Pine, yellow, No. 1 mill__________________________ M ....................
,
Shingles—
Cypress, mill_____________________________________ M ..............
Cedar, red, mill.
______
,
T .......
M ..............
(6) Brick:
Common, building, plant (composite price)________ M ....................
Brick, front, New York_______________________________ M ....................
Brick, sand lime, plant_______________________________ M ....................
Paving blocks, 33^-ineh, St. Louis___________________ _ M .................
(c) Cement, Portland, plant (composite price)............................ Barrel_______
(d) Structural steel. (See Metals and metal products.)
(e) Paint materials:
Barytes, western, New York____ ________________ ____ _ Ton.................
Bone black, powdered, New York_____________________ Pound_______
Copal gum, mamla, mill______________________________ ____ do_______
Lampblack, velvet, New Y ork________________________ ____ do_______
Linseed oil, raw, New York____ ___________ ____ ______ ....... do..............
Litharge, commercial, New York................................... . ....... do__.........
Lithopone, domestic, New York................................ ........ ....... do__.........
Putty, commercial, New York______ ___________ ____ do_______
Red lead, dry, New York ................................................... ....... do__.........
Rosin, B grade, New York________ _____ __ ______ Barrel_______
_
Shellac, T. N., New York ___ _ _ ___________ Pound ____
_ _ _
Turpentine, Southern, New Y ork ______________ Gallon. _ _
White lead, in oil, New York _________ _ ______ Pound_______
_
Zinc oxide, leaded grades, New York ____ ___________ ____ do............
(/) Other building materials:
Asphalt, bulk, refinery_______________________________ T o n ..............
Crushed stone, 1^-inch, New York.___________ ________ Cubic yard___
Glass, plate, New York—
3 to 5 square feet............................................................. Square foot___
5 to 10 square feet________________ ____ ___________ ____ do_______
Glass, window, works—
Single A _______________________ __________________ 50 square feet _
Single B................. ........... .............................................. ____ do..............
i Based on sales of all makes of passenger cars in 1926.
i Production in 1925.




1374 $1,467.896
125 3,730.765
1805
613.646
1366
884.453
425. 792
11,935
129 3,599.462

861

$48.750

6,132
2,047
1,058
2,006
882
2,078
1,547
4,910
8,182
364
755

16.483
33.468
55.346
34.115
55.673
66. 019
50.039
45.109
27.835
55.404
33.014

1.999
2.999

7.589
4.959

924
9,038

5.825
2.724

7,424
2,203
272
494
149,560

13. 913
48. 904
11.539
42.500
1.744

236
57,583
29,131
12,644
703,082
154,165
245,231
96,113
76, 546
3,446
42,489
28,636
291,080
324,462

34.000
.055
.104
.120
.112
.112
.055
.040
.117
12.416
.343
.930
.152
.074

3,405
45,549

12.000
1.773

52.965
52.965

.398
.478

5.387
5.387

3.900
3.110

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OP WHOLESALE PRICES

17

T a b l e 3 . — Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP v n .—BUILDING MATERIALS—Continued
( / ) Other building materials—Continued.
Gravel, building, plar\t (nompnsitft p ricft)_____
u _ T o n ________
___
_______ ________ _ _ Block..............
Hollow tile, building, Chicago.
Lim e, building, plant (composite price)................_ _ _ Ton_________

57,827
456,745
1,210
1,069
42,261
501

$0,941
.078
8.984
9.984
.635
14.000

Pound_______
....... do_______
____ do__....... .
____ do_______
....... do.............
....... do.............
____ do._______
....... do.............
....... do.............

60,660
16,738
54,909
307,539
48,617
56,907
4,632
21,121
9,071,760

$0,033
.089
.060
.009
.064
.093
.342
.163
.007

G a llo n ..____
____do_______
100 pounds___
Pound_______
____d o .............
Gallon_______
100 pounds___
P ou n d.._____
....... do.............
Ton ..........
Pound_______

69,687
5,714
5,601
27,673
13,913
20,145
2,542
103,061
14,225
142
11,557

.367
.634
1.400
.131
.164
.242
2.000
.049
.073
21.000
.071

____do_______
____do_______
____do..............
____do_______
____do.............
Ton.................

18,550
22,817
32,920
12,802
37,948
62

.344
.212
.140
.456
.047
12.423

Gallon_______
Pound_______
100 pounds___
Pound_______
100 pounds___
T o n ________
100 pounds___
Pound_______
____do.............
100 pounds___
Gross ton____
Pound_______
Gallon_______
Pound_______

115,687
21,093
1,437
60,931
1,360
144
26,286
268,820
977,718
7,266
1,739
387,557
3,890
45,603

.141
.097
3.279
.055
1.012
20.000
2.290
.019
.038
.779
18.212
.087
.350
.035

....... do_______
____ do__-____

133,837
27,095

.080
.100

Lime, hydrated, plant (composite price)............................ ....... do.............
Sand, building, plant (composite price)............................. ....... do.............
Slate, roofing, sea green, quarry_____ ______ ___________ 100 square feet_
Copper, sheet. (See Metals and metal products.)
Copper, wire. (See Metals and metal products.)
Nails, wire. (See Metals and metal products.)
Pipe, cast-iron. (See Metals and metal products.)
Pipe, lead. (See Metals and metal products.)
Pipe, black-steel. (See Metals and metal products.)
Reinforcing bars. (See Metals and metal products.)
Terneplate. (See Metals and metal products.)
Zinc, sheet. (See Metals and metal products.)
GROUP v m . — CHEMICALS AND DRUGS
(o) Chemicals:
Acid, New Y o r k Acetic, 28 per cent________________________________
Boric____________________________________________
Carbonic________________________________________
Muriatic, 20° , works______________________________
Nitric, 42°__ _______ ______________________________
Oleic, distilled_________ _____ ____________________
Salicylic, U. S. P., New York.....................................
Stearic, triple-pressed_____________ ____ __ _____ ___
Sulphuric, 66°____________________________________
Alcohol, New Y o r k Denatured
.
_ _ _ ^ _ _ _ ____
____
Wood, refined____________________________________
Alnminnm sulphate, commercial, New Y ork___________
Ammonia, anhydrous, New York_____________________
Anglin oil, New York________________________________
Benzine, pure, works_________________________________
Bleaching powder, works__________________ __________
Borax, crystals, New York____________________________
Calcium arsenate, New York__________________________
Calcium chloride, 73-75 per cent, New York____________
Caustic potash, 88-92 per cent, New Y ork______________
Coal-tar colors, New Y o r k Black, direct_____________________________________
Brown, sulphur__________________________________
Indigo, paste_____________________________________
Jet, nigrosine__________________________ __________
Copper sulphate, New Yorlr
................... . ...
Copperas, w orks_________________ ____________ . _____
Copra. (See Foods.)
Creosote oil, grade 1, works___________________________
Formaldehyde, New York____________________________
Lime, acetate, New York_____________________________
Naphthalene flake, New York_________________________
Sal soda, New York________ , ________________________
Salt cake, ground, works______________ - ______________
Soda ash, light, 58 per cent, New York___ _____________
Soda, bicarbonate, works_____________________________
Soda, caustic, New York_____________________________
Sodium silicate, 40°, works...... ................... ........... ............
Sulphur, crude, mines________________________________
Tallow, packers’ prime, Chicago_______________________
Toluene, pure, works_________________________________
White arsenic, powdered, New York___________________
Vegetable oils—
Coconut. (See Foods.)
Corn. (See Foods.)
Palm, niger. New York______ ____________________
Palm kernel, crude, New York____________________
Soya bean. (See Foods.)




18

BEVISED INDEX NUMBERS OP WHOLESALE PBICES

T a b l e 3 . — Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP v m .—CHEMICALS AND DRUGS-Continued
(&) Drugs and pharmaceuticals:
Acid, New York—
Citric, domestic, crystals...............................................
Tartaric, crystals............................................................
Alcohol, gram, New Y ork__________ _ „
„. _ „ .
Camphor, Japanese, refined, slabs, New Y ork..................
Castor oil, medicinal, New York
....................
Cream of tartar, powdered, New York______ _________
Epsom salts, U. S. P., New York.................. ...................
Glycerine, chemically pure, New York______ ____ _____ _
Menthol, imported, New York________________________
Opium, T . S. P., N p.w York
T
Peroxide of hydrogen, U. S. P., New York_____________

Pound_______
____ do.............
Gallon_______
Pound_______
____ do.. ____
....... do..............
100 pounds___
Pound_______
....... d o ______
....... do
........
Gross 4-ounce
bottles.
Phenol, U. S. P., New York................................................ Pound_______
Quinine, snlphat.fi, domestic, New York
__ .
Ounce_______
Soda phosphate, commercial, New York_______________ Pound_______
Zinc chloride, granular, New York........... ................ - ........ ....... do_______
(c) Fertilizer materials:
Acid phosphate, Baltimore ............................ „........ ..... Ton.................
Bones, ground, Chicago...... ........................ ........................ ....... do_______
Kainit, 12.4 per cent, New York.................... _................... ....... do_______
Manure salts, 20 per cent, New York............................ . ____ do_______
Muriate of potash, 80-85 per cent, New York.................... ....... do_______
Nitrate of soda, 95 per cent, New York.............................. 100 pounds___
Phosphate rock, Florida land pebble, mines...................... Ton...............
Sulphate of ammonia, New York______________________ 100 pounds___
Sulphate of potash, 90-95 per cent, New York.................... Ton_________
Tankage, Chicago_____________ _____ _____ ___________ ____ do_______
(d) Fertilizers, mixed (composite price):
New England_______________________________________ ____ do_______
Middle West......................................................................... ____ do_______
South Central and Southwest .................. ....................... ....... d o . . . ........
Middle Atlantic. ............ ..................................................... ____ do_______
South Atlantic, 8-3-3.......... ............................................. ____ do_______
South Atlantic, other. - ........................................................ ____ do_______

7,167
8,639
11,146
6,551
41,896
7,304
554
85,519
244
107
918

$0,447
.293
4.855
.740
.126
.214
2.474
.275
5.101
12.000
7.712

6,676
4,050
119,087
62,781

.197
.431
.033
.065

2,626
163
196
366
210
22,444
3,639
9,805
74
127

9.592
26.519
8.293
11.782
35.121
2.550
3.140
2.628
46.058
34.608

154
386
588
927
1,402
934

38. 771
27.817
27.922
32.497
23.200
29.915

Each............ .
____ do_______
....... do_______
....... do_______

1,071
1,189
2,382
1,041

$31,039
6.208
40.693
7.068

....... do_______
Set of six_____
Each...............

782
992
825

36.912
48.561
31.341

....... do_______
Dozen_______
Each________
____ do_______

493
298
3,392
741

39.667
16.667
17.000
6.500

....... do.............
____ do_______
____ do_______

2,126
655
3,652

40.708
64.823
19.000

Yard...............
....... do_______
....... do_______

34,240
11,170
14,280

$3,120
3.064
5.072

Pair.................
Gross________
....... do.............

953
288
110

1.350
12.500
21.903

GROUP IX.—HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS
(a) Furniture, factory (composite price):
Bed room—
Beds................................................................................
Chairs_______________________ __________ ____ ____
Dressers....... ........... ................... ............................ ......
Rockers__________________________ _____________ _
Dining room—
Buffets............................................................................
Chairs.................... ............... ........................................
Tables___________________________________________
Kitchen—
Cabinets. .......................................................................
Chairs____________________________ __________ ___
Refrigerators__________________________ ___________
Tables______________________ _____ _______________
Living room—
Chairs___________________________________________
Davenports.....................................................................
Tables................................................................ ............
(6) Furnishings:
Blankets—
Cotton. (See Textile products.)
Wool. (See Textile products.)
Carpets, factory—
Axminster________ _______________ _______________
Brussels............ ............................. ........... .....................
Wilton______ ____________________________________
Cutlery, factory—
Carvers.................. ................................. .....................
Knives and forks............................................................
Pails, galvanized iron, factory________ _________________
Sheeting, 10/4—
Pepperell. (See Textile products.)
Wamsutta. (See Textile products.)




19

REVISED INDEX NUMBEBS OF WHOLESALE PBICES

T a b l e 3 . — Weights and base prices used in constructing revised index numbers of

wholesale prices, by group of commodities— Continued

Commodity

Unit

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted)

Base
price
(average
for 1926)

GROUP IX.—HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS—Continued
(6) Furnishings—Continued.
Tableware, factory—
Dinner set, 100-piece, semivitreous_________________
Dinner set, 104-piece, vitreous................................ ......
Nappies, glass, 4-inch, common____________________
Pitchers, glass, ^ gallon, common__________________
Tumblers, pint, common_______________________
Plates, white granite
_
___ ______
Tea cups and saucers, white granite________________
Ticking, Amoskeag. (See Textile products) . __________
Tubs, galvanized iron, factory_________________________
Sewing machines, factory. (See Metals and metal
products.)
Stoves, cooking—
Coal. (See Metals and metal products.)
Gas. (See Metals and metal products.)
Oil. (See Metals and metal products).

528
528
18,616
18,616
45,777
4,400
4,383

$19,860
45.700
.200
2.142
.183
.980
1.260

662

6.550

Ton.................
____ do_______
____do_______
____do_______

2,271
1,808
636
2,271

$23,084
28.542
47.731
23.430

____do_______
____do_______
____do_______

1.029
1.029
1.029

39.008
48.916
61.298

100 pounds___
Pound_______

57,417
2,534,670

3.450
.110

Ton.......... ......
100 pounds___

602
38,257

30.817
2.865

Pound_______
____do_______

37,036
703,689

.380
.487

Each________
....... do_______
____do_______

20.842
20.842
10,421

18.289
14.016
8.796

Gallon_______
____do_______

313.453
313.453

.180
.264

....... do.............
....... do.............

313.453
313.453

.129
.280

100 cakes_____
___ d o _______
Pound_______

14.614
14.614
878,552

4.469
4.851
.058

____do........ ....
Gross 1-ounce
bags.

116,095
26,816

.696
8.320

Set..................
....... do_______
Dozen_______
....... do_______
....... do.... ........
____ do_______
....... do_______
....... do_______
....... do_______

GROUP X.—MISCELLANEOUS
(a) Cattle feed:
Bran, Minneapolis____ _______________________________
Cottonseed meal, prime, Memphis_____________________
Linseed meal, New York_____________________________
Middlings, standard, Minneapolis_____________________
(6) Paper and pulp:
Box board, mill—
C h ip ..............................................................................
Manila-lined chip________________________________
85-pound test liner________________________________
Paper—
Newsprint, rolls, contract, mills___________________
Wrapping, manila, No. 1, jute, New Y o r k _________
Wood pulp—
Mechanical, No. 1, domestic, mill______ _____ ______
Sulphite, domestic, unbleached, news grade, New
York.
(c) Rubber, crude, New York:
Para, island, fine_____________________________________
Plantation, ribbed, smoked sheets_____________________
(d) Automobile tires, factory (composite price):
Balloon_____________________________________________
Cord__ _____________________________________________
Fabric_______________________________________________
(e) Other miscellaneous:
Cylinder oil, refinery—
Oklahoma_______________________________________
Pennsylvania____________________________________
Neutral oil, refinery—
Gulf Coast______________ _____ ___________________
Pennsylvania____________________________________
Soap, laundry—
Cincinnati_______________ _______ ____ ___________
Philadelphia___ _____________ _____ _____ _____ ___
Starch, laundry, New York..............................................
Tobacco, New York—
Plug.................................................................................
Smoking_________________________________________

Table 4, which follows, contains prices for each of the 550 commodi­
ties for the months of July, 1926, and June and July, 1927. Corre­
sponding index numbers for the various commodity groups are
contained in Table 1.




20

BEVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

T a b l e 4. — Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and July, 1927

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Average prices
Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

$0.722

$0,916

$0.786

104.0

132.0

113.3

.804
.786
.417
1.040

1.003
.980
.503
1.146

1.021
.999
.477
1.096

132.1
133.2
116.8
120.2

134.6
135.8
110.9
114. &

1.440
1.373
1.693
1.701
1.445
1.433

1.448
1.487
1.456
1.494
1.510
1.511

1.428
1.401
1.440
1.486
1.378
1.455

93.4
91.7
109.3
109.4
100.7
92.1

93.9
99.4
94.0
96.1
105.2
97.2

92.6
93.6
93.0
95.6
96.0
93.6

12.750
5.525
6.263
8.719
9.419

11.844
7.113
7.988
10.613
11.831

13.031
7.013
8.038
10.825
12.300

105.1
95.9
96.5
99.5

97.6
123.4
123.1

107.4

12.981
13.900

9.075

8.975
9.969

105.2
106.0

5.875
14.263
7.313

5.156
13.250
7.500

5.313
14.219
6.500

78.2
96.7
91.7

80.6
103.8
79.4

.248
.270

.206
.243

.215
.248

82.0
81.4

85.5
83.1

5.056

6.400

6.531

92.9

117.6

120.0

.180
.182
.187

.165
.164
.168

.179
.177
.180

105.6
108.4
106.4

96.9
97.5
95.7

.293
.274
.280
.318
.293
.322
.265

.228
.219
.231
.173
.231
.250

.248
.232
.260
.183
.248
.275
.223

82.1
82.0
78.7
93.7
82.3
81.5
89.0

64.0
65.4
65.0
50.9
65.1
63.3
67.2

0)
5.725
1.406

4.500
4.875
0

0)
0)
0)

6.188
5.906

6.313
6.406

8.469
7.156

18.250
19.875
23.750

15.750
18.125
19.625

15.550
14.750
18.000

July,
1927

FARM PRC>DUCTS
(a) Grains:
Barley, malting, per bushel, Chicago..............
Corn, per bushel, Chicago—
Contract grades..........................................
No. 3, mixed...............................................
Oats, per bushel, No. 2, white, Chicago.........
Rye, No. 2, per bushel, Chicago.................. .
Wheat, per bushel—
No. 2, red winter, Chicago........................
No. 2, hard, Kansas C ity. ........................
No. 1, northern spring, Minneapolis........
No. 2, dark, northern spring, Minneapolis. .
No. 1, hard, white, Portland, Oreg...............
No. 2, red winter, St. Louis...........................
(&) Livestock and poultry:
Cattle, per 100 pounds, Chicago—
Calves, good to choice, vealers.......................
Cows, fair to good...........................................
Cows, good to choice......................................
Steers, fair to good. ........................................
Steers, good to choice....................................
Hogs, per 100 pounds, Chicago—
Fair to choice, heavy butchers. ............ .......
Fair to choice, light butchers.........................
Sheep, per 100 pounds, Chicago—
Ewes, native, all grades, fair to best..........
Lambs, western, fair to good.........................
Wethers, fed, poor to best..............................
Poultry, live fowls, per pound—
Chicago...........................................................
New York.......................................................
(c) Other farm products:
Beans, medium, per 100 pounds, New York.......
Cotton, middling, per pound—
Galveston........................................................
New Orleans...................................................
New York. ................................................ .
Eggs, fresh, per dozen—
Western, Boston.............................................
Firsts, Chicago. .....................................
Extra firsts, Cincinnati................................
Candled, New Orleans...................................
Firsts, New York...........................................
Extra firsts, Philadelphia.............................
No. 1, extras, San Francisco..........................
Apples, fresh, per barrel—
Baldwins, Chicago........................................ .
Baldwins, New York.....................................
Winesaps, medium grade, Portland, Oreg....
Lemons, choice or fancy, California, per box,
Chicago..............................................................
Oranges, choice, California, per box, Chicago____
Hay, per ton—
Alfalfa, Kansas City..................................... .
Clover mixed, No. 1, Cincinnati...................
Timothy, No. 1, Chicago............................. .
Hops, prime to choice, Pacifics, per pound,
Portland, Oreg...................................................
Milk, fluid, per 100 pounds—
Chicago......................................................... .
New York..................................................... .
San Francisco............................................... .
Peanuts, per pound, Norfolk..............................
Seeds—
Alfalfa, Kansas City, per 100 pounds............
Clover, Chicago, per 100 pounds................. .
Flaxseed, Minneapolis, per bushel-............ .
Timothy. Chicago, per 100 pounds.............. .
Tobacco, leaf, warehouse sales, per 100 pounds,
Kentucky..........................................................
1 N o quotation.




.200

121.1

124.2

121.7

123.9
123.5
129.1
72.8
76.0

142.0
65.9

.255

.223

.199

105.9

2.863
3.517
3.084
.055

2.878
3.517
3.140
.053

2.994
3.517
3.140
.059

97.4
98.2
98.5

111.1

19.000
27.654
2.446
6.361

0)
34.615
2.233
4.289

0)
30.620
2.215
4.440

115.3
86.9
105.1
104.1

108.8
95.9
70.2

96.2
95.1
72.7

6.265

7.633

8.786

74.0

90.1

103.7

100.3
120.0

21

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
T a b l e 4. — Wholesale prices of commodities, July,

1926, and June and July,

1927— Continued
Index numbers
(1926=100)

Average prices
Commodity
July,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

$5.078

$4,632

112.4

207.5

189.3

3.400
3.694
2.750
4.406
0)

1.635
2.138
2.017
3.406
0)

69.6
67.6
57.0
70.7

96.5
122.6
72.8
153.4

46.4
70.9
53.4
118.6

.370
.450
.440
.430

.390
.460
.450
.440

94.6
96.4
95.3
94.2

92.1
96.4
95.3
94.2

97.1
98.6
97.5
96.3

1.075
.988

1.095
1.006

96.4
94.6

93.3
94.3

95.1
96.1

.280
.660

.292
.660

96.3
94.3

98.8
97.3

103.0
97.3

.355

.361

94.9

96.3

97.9

$0.405
.385
.358

$0.423
.400
.367

$0,416
.396
.367

92.3
91.4
91.5

96.4
94.8
93.7

94.8
93.9
93.8

.384
.377
.358
.360

.403
.394
.371
.383

.399
.386
.368
.370

89.6
90.9
91.7
91.2

94.0
95.1
95.0
96.9

93.0
93.0
94.2
93.7

.440
.420

.453
.413

.449
.410

92.5
91.6

95.1
90.0

94.3
89.5

.405
.384
.354

.425
.395
.367

.416
.394
.369

91.4
91.6
91.2

95.8
94.2
94.6

93.8
94.0
95.3

.415
.403
.373
.395

.434
.423
.388
.423

.426
.411
.381
.413

91.3
91.0
91.6
89.7

95.4
95.4
95.3
96.0

93.7
92.8
93.7
93.7

.407
.390

.418
.402

.418
.399

93.4
93.3

95.9
96.2

95.8
95.4

.198
.218
.203
5.869
4.325

.226
.218
.200
5.900
4.600

.223
.243
.204
5.825
4.581

91.3
96.0
88.7
100.2
98.4

104.3
96.2
87.4
100.7
104.7

102.9
107.2
89.1
99.5
104.3

.162
.165

.170
.188

.182
.200

98.7
96.7

103.5
109.8

110.8
117.2

22.100
.284
.150

19.625
.300
.144

19.500
.294
.156

94.1
108.6
104.0

83.5
114.7
99.7

83.0
112.4
108.4

July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

FARM PRODUCTS—Continued
(c) Other farm products—Continued.
Vegetables, fresh—
Onions, Chicago, per 100 pounds................... $2.750
Potatoes, white, per 100 pounds—
Boston.............................. ...................... . 2.452
Chicago..................................................... 2.038
New York........................... .................... 2.153
Portland, Oreg......................................... 2.031
Potatoes, sweet, per %-bushel, Philadelphia.
0)
Wool, per pound, Boston—
Ohio, grease basis—
Fine clothing............................................
.380
.450
Fine delaine— ...................................... .
Half blood.................................................
.440
Medium grades...................... .................
.430
Territory, scoured—
Staple, fine and fine medium................._ 1.110
.990
Half blood.................................................
Foreign—
Argentine crossbreds, quarter blood,
.273
grease basis...........................................
Australian, Geelong 66’s, scoured basis...
.640
Montevideo, one-fourth blood, 50’s,
grease basis.... ..................... .................
.350
FOODS
(а) Butter, cheese, and milk:
Butter, creamery, per pound—
B ostonExtra.................................................. ......
Firsts......................................... ..............
Seconds_____________________________
C hicagoExtra.........................................................
Extra firsts........ ...................... ......... ......
Firsts___________ _______ _____ _______
Cincinnati, as to score................................ —
New Orleans—
Fancy..................... ................................
Choice......................................................
New York—
Extra........................................................
Firsts_________ _____________________
Seconds.................................. .................
PhiladelphiaExtra................. : .............. .......... ..........
Extra firsts..... ..........................................
Firsts___________ ____ _____ __________
St. Louis, extra...............................................
San FranciscoExtra____________ ___________ _______
Firsts........................................................
Cheese, whole milk, per pound—
Chicago............ .............................................
New York................... ..................................
San Francisco..................................................
Milk, condensed, per case, New York............... .
Milk, evaporated, per case, New York................
Milk, fluid. (See Farm products.)
(б) Meats:
Beef, fresh, steers, per pound—
Chicago....... ...................................................
New York............ ..........................................
Beef, cured, family, per barrel (200 pounds),
New York...........................................................
Lamb, fresh, per pound, Chicago....................... .
Mutton, fresh, dressed, per pound, New York__

1No quotation.




22

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICBS

T a b l e 4t,— Wholesale 'prices of commodities, July, 1926,

and June and July,

1927— Continued
Index numbers
(1926=100)

Average prices
Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

$0.331
.351
40.375
.224
.224
.250

$0,280
.246
33.250
.186
.184
.183

$0.270
.243
33.000
.172
.168
.183

108.9
113.9
107.8

.275
.295
.184

.195
.268
.178

.075
.071
.070
.070
.078
.179

June,
1927

July,
1927

FOODS—Continued
(6) Meats—Continued.
Pork, cured—
Bacon, per pound, Chicago.......................
Hams, per pound. Chicago.................... ........
Mess, per barrel (200 pounds), New Y o rk ...
Sides, clear, per pound, Chicago...................
Sides, rough, per pound, Chicago..................
Pork, fresh, dressed hogs, per pound, Chicago...
Poultry, dressed, per pound—
Chicago............................................................
New Y ork.......................................................
Veal, fresh, good, per pound, Chicago.................
(c) Other foods:
Beans. (See Farm products.)
Bread, loaf, per pound (before baking)—
Chicago...........................................................
Cincinnati.......................................................
New Orleans.................................................. .
New Y o r k .....................................................
San Francisco__________ _____ ____ ______ _
Cocoa beans, Arriba, per pound. New York___
Coffee, Brazil grades, per pound, New York—
Rio No. 7....................................................... .
Santos No. 4...................................................
Copra, South Sea, per pound, New York.......... .
Crackers, soda, per pound, New York............... .
Eggs. (See Farm products.)
Fish—
Cod, pickled, cured, per 100 pounds, Glouces­
ter. Mass................ ................................... .
Herring, pickled, per pound, New York___
Mackerel, salt, per pound, New York..........
Salmon, canned, Alaska red, per dozen cans,
factory.-...................- ................................
Salmon, smoked, Alaska, per pound, New
York....................... ...................................
Flour, rye, white, per barrel, Minneapolis.........
Flour, wheat, per barrel—
Hard winter, standards, Buffalo..................
Clears, firsts, Buffalo....................................
Patents, short, winter, Kansas City............
Straights, short, winter, Kansas City..........
Standard patents, Minneapolis....................
Second patents, Minneapolis.......................
Patents, Portland, Oreg...............................
Patents, short, soft, winter, St. Louis.........
Straights, soft, winter, St. Louis..................
Patents, soft, winter, Toledo.......................
Fruit, canned, per oase, New York—
Peaches, 2^ s.................................................
Pineapple, 2Ms..............................................
Fruit, dried, per pound, New York—
Apples, evaporated.......................................
Currants, cleaned, Amalias..........................
Prunes, California, 60-70s.............................
Raisins, coast, seeded...................................
Fruit, fresh—
Apples. (See Farm products.)
Bananas, Jamaicas, per bunch, New Y o rk ...
Lemons. (See Farm products.)
Oranges. (See Farm products.)
Glucose, 42° mixing, per 100 pounds, New York.
Hominy grits, white, per 100 pounds, f. o. b. mill-.
Lard, prime, contract, per pound, New York___
Meal, corn, per 100 pounds—
White, f. o. b. mill.....................................
Yellow, fancy, Philadelphia.........................
Molasses, New Orleans, fancy, per gallon, New
York....................................................................
Oatmeal, in 90-pound sacks, per 100pounds, New
York....................................................................
Oleomargarine, standard, uncolored, per pound,
Chicago........................................................




88.8
79.0

113.1
100.2

92.1
80.0
88.8
92.9
92.9
73.1

.218
.260
.195

101.7
94.0
98.3

72.1
83.7
94.9

80.4
82.9
104.2

.075
.071
.066
.070
.069
.204

.075
.069
.070
.070
.069
.203

100.0
100.3
97.8
100.0
100.9
99.2

100.0

100.3
91.6
100.0
89.8
113.2

100.0
97.6
97.8
100.0
89.8
112.8

.198
.228
.060
.140

.148
.169
.052
.140

.142
.169
.052
.140

108.7
102.2

103.4
100.0

81.5
75.8
89.0
100.0

78.1
75.7
90.2
100.0

7.250
.135
.100

6.500
.153
.110

6.500
.145
.090

99.9
102.2
100.0

89.6
115.4
110.0

89.6
109.8
90.0

3.575

2.675

2.694

107.5

80.4

81.0

.400
6.263

.430
6.238

.420
5.950

104.4
111.8

112.2
111.4

109.6
106.2

8.250
7.885
7.355
6.805
8.975
8.669
8.090
7.540
6.860
7.300

6.844
7.813
7.063
7.913
7.625
8.060
7.213
6.381
6.938

8.030
6.990
7.585
6.920
7.813
7. 556
8.012
6.940
6.295
6.575

94.9
94.2
91.5
93.8
106.5
106.4
101.3
96.3
96.5
95.7

96.2
81.7
97.2
97.4
93.9
93.6
100.9
92.1
89.8
91.0

92.4
83.5
94.4
95.4
92.7
92.7
100.3

1.900
2.150

1.775
2.250

1.775
2.250

97.4
100.0

91.0
104.7

91.0
104.7

.103
.115
.069
.069

.111
.111
.068
.069

102.7
97.1

101.0

106.4

87.0
127.6
89.0
75.1

94.2
123.5
86.5
75.1

1.631

116.8

68.8

66.5

.121

.088
.079

2.863

111.6

88.1

85.7
84.7
73.1

3.435
1.663
.165

3.160
2.068
.131

3.160
2.145
.132

99.9
106.7
109.7

91.9
132.7
86.9

91.9
137.7
87.8

1.663
2.580

2.068
3.075

2.145
3.210

106.7
96.9

132.7
115.5

137.7
120.5

.520

.650

.650

98.5

123.1

123.1

3.014

3.681

3.597

98.1

119.8

117.1

.225

.215

.215

98.6

94.2

94.2

Re

v is e d

In

d e x

n u m b e r s

o f

w h o l e sa l e

23

p r ic e s

T a b l e 4*— Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and July,

1927— Continued

Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

$0.134
.245

$0.132
.320

$0,134
.358

111.5
95.7

109.6
124.9

111.3
139.7

.063
.073

.044
.063

.041
.061

102.4
98.9

71.1
85.3

67.0
83.6

2.195
7.600

2.195
6.600

2.195
6.600

100.0
101.2

100.0
87.9

100.0
87.9

.056
.042
.106
.355

.060
.046
.084
.345

.059
.'045
.082
.345

101.3
95.6
111.4
100.1

110.2
106.7
88.2
97.3

107.3
104.4
85.8
97.3

.841
.875
1.363
1.400

1.150
.975
1.225
1.500

1.150
.975
1.225
1.500

94.1
97.2
103.5
97.7

128.8
108.3
93.1
104.7

128.8
108.3
93.1
104.7

.111
.140
.151
1.850
.133
.125
.185

.097
.110
.092
2.150
.125
.120
.185

.096
.110
.095
2.150
.125
.120
.190

104.6
116.3
127.8
96.8
118.1
99.2
99.6

91.3
91.4
77.5
112.5
111.0
95.2
99.6

90.8
91.4
80.5
112.5
111.0
95.2
102.3

$0.151
.195
.181

$0.173
.219
.199

96.8
101.1
96.5

156.5
139.0
135.2

179.4
156.4
148.9

.201
.753
.196
2.275

.226
.759
.221
2.250

99.1
93.8
99.1
98.0

115.9
102.8
126.3
104.9

130.5
103.6
142.6
103.8

.480
.675

.510
.675

99.3
100.0

105.9
100.0

112.5
100.0

.440

.478

100.9

100.8

109.5

.320

.370

98.7

126.3

146.1

.380
.490
.464

.390
.510
.490

99.1
93.5
96.3

107.6
111.8
108.3

110.4
116.4
114.4

1.330
1.473
1.568
1.663

1.330
1.473
1.568
1.663

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4.902
6.400
3.185
6.000
1.880
3.450
4.600
3.600

5.000
6.400
3.250
6.000
1.967
3.550
4.750
3.650

98.5
100.0
98.5
100.0
99.8
100.0
100.0
100.0

98.5
100.0
98.5
100.0
109.1
103.0
100.0
100.0

101.6
100.0
101.6
100.0
114.1
106.0
103.3
101.4

July,
1926

July,
1927

FOODS—Continued
(c) Other foods—Continued.
Oleo oil, extra, per pound, Chicago....................
Pepper, black, per pound, New York------ -----Rice, head, clean, per pound, New OrleansBlue Rose, medium to good.........................
Honduras, medium to choice.........................
Salt—
American, medium, per barrel (280 pounds),
Chicago...................- ................................
Granulated, per ton, Chicago......................
Sugar, per pound, New Y o r k Granulated.-................................................
Raw, 96°..........................................................
Tallow, edible, per pound, Chicago. .................
Tea, Formosa, fine, per pound, New York........
Vegetables, canned, per dozen—
String beans, New Y o r k ............................. .
Corn, f. o. b. factory. ................................... .
Peas, New York............................................
Tomatoes, New York...................................
Vegetables, fresh—
Onions. (See Farm products.)
Potatoes. (See Farm products.)
Vegetable oils—
Coconut, per pound, New York...................
Corn, per pound, New York........................
Cottonseed, per pound, New York..............
Olive, per gallon, New Y ork........................
Peanut, per pound, f. o. b. mill.....................
Soya bean, per pound, New York________ _
Vinegar, cider, per gallon, New York.................

HIDES AND LEATHER PRODUCTS
(а) Hides and skins:
Hides, per pound, C hicagoCountry cows................................................. $0,093
Packers’ , heavy native steers........................
.142
Packers’, heavy Texas steers........................
.129
Skins, per pound—
Calf, No. 1, country, Chicago......................
.172
Goat, Brazil, first selection, New York....... .
.688
Kip, No. 1, country, Chicago........... ..........
.154
Sheep, packers’, Chicago.............................. . 2.125
(б) Leather:
Chrome calf, B grade, per square foot, Boston..
.450
Glazed kid, top grade, per square foot, Boston—
.675
Harness, California oak, per pound, general
market............................................................... .
.441
Side, black, chrome, tanned, B grade, per square
foot, Boston....................................................... .
.250
Sole, per pound—
Oak, m sides, Boston........................ .......... .
.350
Oak, scoured backs, Boston......................... .
.410
Union backs, steers, New Y o r k ................. .
.413
(c) Boots and shoes—
Children’s, per pair, factory—
Child's, gun metal.................................. . 1.330
Little boy’s, tan calf blucher................. . 1.473
Misses’, gun metal............ .................... . 1.568
Youths’, tan calf blucher......................... 1.663
Men’s, per pair, factory—
Black calf, bal......................................... . 4.850
Black calf, blucher................................... 6.400
Dress welt, black, side leather................
3.150
Black, vici kid.........................................
6.000
Chocolate, elk, blucher........................... . 1.719
Dress........................................................ 3.350
Gun metal, blucher.................................
4.600
Mahogany, chrome, baL.......................... 3.600




24
T

able

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
4 .—

Wholesale 'prices of commodities, July, 1926 , and June and July ,
1927— Continued
Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,

June,
1927

July,
1927

HIDES AND LEATHER PRODTJCTS-Continued
(c) Boots and shoes—Continued.
Men’s, per pair, factory—Continued.
Dress welt, tan, c a ll................................
Dress welt, tan side leather.............. ......
Work........................................................
Women’s, per pair, factory—
Black kid, dress........................................
Black kid, McKay sewed____ _________
Medium grade....... .................................
Better grade....................._.................... .
Colored calf..............................................
Patent leather pump................................
(d) Other leather products:
Gloves—
Men’s, per dozen pairs...................................
Women’s, per dozen pairs..............................
Harness, per set (composite price).......................
Suitcases, each (composite price)....................... .
Traveling bags, each (composite price)...............

$4,850
3.350
2.050

$4,902
3.367
2.150

$5,000
3.400
2.250

98.5
99.3
100.0

98.5
99.3
104.9

101.6
100.8
109.8

4.000
3.600
2.000
2.850
4.150
3. 600

4.000
3.600
2.100
2.950
4.150
3.600

4.000
3.650
2.200
3.050
4.250
3.750

98.2
100.0
100.0
100.0

98.2
100.0
105.0
103.5

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

98.2
101.4
110.0
107.0
102.4
104.2

33.840
21.150
44.975
7.903

33.840
22.560
44.975
8.070

22.560
45.585

6.513

6.597

33.840
8.070
6. 597

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
106.7

100.0

100.0
106.7

102.1
101.3

101.4
102.1
101.3

100.0
96.9

82.6
92.8

83.7
97.0

100.4
96.3

91.6
85.8

92.9
89.4

98.7
96.9

92.7
93.3

94.7
91.5

99.3
99.5

87.2
93.5

87.4
93.8

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

101.1
100.0

98.5
98.8

95.4
97.7

95.4
97.7

99.5
98.2
97.1
100.7
96.7

96.6
90.8
106.1
98.8
98.3

96.6
91.0
107.6
98.8
98.3

95.8
95.0

104.8
96.8

106.9
98.5

98.0
100.0

88.5
100.0

89.2
100.0

102.0
97.9
95.3
100.0
97.8

87.8
91.4
90.2
100.0
100.2

89.5
96.9
93.8
100.0
101.3

101.4
101.3

88.3
86.1

88.3
86.1

97.1
96.0
98.4
94.2
97.0

90.7
96.7
92.4
92.9
96.3

94.2
98.7
94.7
96.8
96.5

91.2
88.6
93.6
92.9

82.9
85.7
81.1
84.9

82.9
85.7
81.1
84.9

TEXTILE PRODUCTS
(а) Cotton goods:
$1.235 $1.020 $1,034
Blankets, cotton, per pair, Boston.................
.164
Denims, Massachusetts, 28-inch, per yard, mill.
.164
.157
Drillings, per yard, mill—
.132
.121
.123
Brown, Massachusetts, 30-inch.__________
.114
Brown, Pepperell, 29-inch. ............... ..........
.109
.123
Duck, per yard, mill—
8-ounce- Army................... ...... .....................
.187
.195
.183
.382
Wide, 36-inch......... .......................................
.406
.390
Flannel, per yard, mill—
Colored, 27-inch................. ...........................
.110
.125
.110
Unbleached, 33-inch......................................
.175
.164
.165
Gingham, per yard, mill—
Amoskeag, 27-inch--------- ------------- ---------.091
.090
.099
Security, 32-inch............ ..............................
.123
.123
.123
Hosiery, per dozen pairs, mill—
Men’s, combed yarn....................................
1.550
1.600
1.550
Women’s silk mercerized..............................
2.275
2.302
2.275
Muslin, bleached, per yard, mill—
.162
Fruit of the Loom..........................................
.166
.162
Lonsdale.........................................................
.137
.148
.137
.154
Rough Rider..................................................
.152
.139
Nainsook, Wamsutta, per yard, mill. .........
.225
.229
.225
Percale, Scouts, 38^-nach, per yard, mill______
.127
.125
.127
Print cloth, per yard, mill—
27-inch............................................................
.056
.055
.050
38^-inch.........................................................
.075
.072
.073
Sheeting, bleached, per yard, mill—
10/4, Pepperell................................................
.371
.408
.369
10/4, Wamsutta.............................................
1.140
1.140
1.140
Sheeting, brown, per yard, mill—
.110
Indian Head, 36-inch.....................................
.125
.108
.112
.119
4/4 Pepperell..................................................
.120
.084
.087
4/4 Tnon.........................................................
.089
.036
.036
.036
Thread, 6-cord, 100 yards, per spool, mill______
.207
Ticking, Amoskeag, 32-inch, per yard, mill-----.200
.205
Underwear, mill—
Men’s shirts and drawers, per dozen gar­
ments.......................................................
6.039
6.930
6.039
8.500
Women’s union suits, per dozen................... 10.000
8.500
Yarn, per pound, mill—
.294
.305
Carded, white, northern, 10/1 cones.............
.315
.354
.344
Carded, white, northern, 22/1 cones..............
.346
.481
Carded, single warp, 40/ls, southern spinning.
.500
.470
Twisted, 20/2, carded for weaving.................
.305
.301
.313
.454 . .456
.458
Twisted, 40/2, carded for weaving.................
(б) Silk and rayon:
Rayon, per pound, New York—
1.500
1.500
150 A denier..................................................... 1. 650
150 B denier..................................................... 1.500
1.450
1.450
1.300
300 A denier......................... ........................... 1. 500
1.300
1.280
1.280
300 B denier..................................................... 1. 400




25

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
T able

4.— Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and July,
1927— Continued

Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
June,
1927

July,
1926

July,
1927

•July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

TEXTILE PRODUCTS—Continued
(6) Silk and rayon—Continued.
Silk, raw, per pound, New York—
China, steam filature, third category_______
Canton, doublft e*tra A-crack-_______ _____
Japan, double extra cracks________________
Japan, 13-1
Silk, spun, per pound, New Y o r k Domestic, 60/1___________________________
Domestic, 60/2___________________________
Imported, 200/2, first quality______________
Hosiery, per dozen pairs, mill—
Women’s, pure silk___________i __________
Women’s, artificial silk___________________
Men’s, silk, mercerized top, heel, and toe__
(c) Woolen and worsted goods:
Blankets, all wool, 4 to 5 pounds per pair, per
pound, mill_______________________________
Flannel, No. 6400,64-inch,per yard, mill________
Overcoating, per yard, mill—
Heavy__________________________________
L i g h t __ _________________
Suiting, per yard, mill—
Serge, 116 M . B __________________________
Serge, 11-ounce, 66-58 inch___________________
Uniform serge, fine grade, 12-ounce________
Uniform serge, medium grade, 12-ounce____
Unfinished worsted, 13-ounce____________
Trousering, 2900 range, cotton warp, 11-ounce,
per yard, m i ll ____________________________
Underwear, men’s, mill—
Shirts and drawers, per dozen garments ..
Union suits, per dozen___________________
Women’s dress goods, per yard, mill—
Broadcloth, 9H>-ounce____________________
Flannel, 12-ounce________________________
Flannel, W FD, 64-inch___________________
French serge, 39-inch_____________________
Serge, 36-inch____________________________
Sicilian cloth, 64-inch_____________________
Yarns, per pound, mill—
2/32s, crossbred stock, white_______________
2/40s, half-blood, weaving_________________
2/60s. fine, weaving_______________________
(d) Other textile products:
Binder twine, standard, per bale (60 pounds),
m ill___________________________ ._________________
Burlap, Iftl^-nnncft, 40-inch, per yard, mill _____

Hemp, manila, per pound, New Y ork.................
Jute, raw, medium grades, per pound, New York.
Linen shoe thread, 10s Barbour, per pound, New
York__________________________ _____ _____
Rope, pure manila, % inch and larger, per
pound, New Y ork_________________________
Sisal, Mexican, per pound, New York................

$6,235
4.836
5.959
6.076

$5.775
4.100
5.688
5.488

$5,418
3.989
5.442
5.292

98.2
103.9
98.6
98.1

90.9
88.1
94.1
88.6

85.3
85.7
90.0
85.4

4.606
5.880
5.640

4.214
5.096
5.047

4.077
4.978
4.978

98.2
98.6
97.5

89.8
85.4
87.3

86.9
83.4
86.1

12.250
2.750
4.500

11.270
2.300
4.000

10.780
2.450
4.000

100.7
98.5
93.8

92.6
82.4
83.4

88.6
87.8
83.4

1.367
1.642

1.313
1.715

1.313
1.715

101.3
97.8

97.3
102.2

97.3
102.2

3.000
4.500

3.000
4.350

3.000
4.350

98.6
99.1

98.6
95.8

98.6
95.8

3.848
2.073
2.734
2.070
1.913

3.848
2.048
2.678
1.935
1.913

3.848
2.048
2.678
1.935
1.913

100.8
95.6
99.3
103.6
95.5

100.8
94.5
97.3
96.9
95.4

100.8
94.5
97.3
96.9
95.4

1.521

1.500

1.500

99.6

98.2

98.2

30.000
30.380

28.000
27.440

28.000
27.440

100.0
100.0

93.3
90.3

93.3
90.3

2.255
1.925
1.475
1.050
.450
.800

2.255
1.900
1.325
.975
.510
.775

2.255
1.900
1.325
.975
.510
.775

95.6
99.0
101. 6
101. 5
98.2
101.1

95.6
97. 7
91.3
94.3
111.3
97.8

95.6
97.7
91.3
94.3
111.3
97.8

1.400
1.788
2.025

1.325
1.738
2.038

1.350
1.750
2.025

97.5
96.4
96.1

92.3
93.7
96.7

94.1
94.4
96.1

6.531
.088
.133
.083

6.056
.090
.064

6.056
.093
.144
.069

100.0
96.0
89.8
92.1

92.7
97.6
95.3
71.4

92.7
101.5
97.7
77.0

1.946

1.946

1.946

100.0

100.0

100.0

.240
.093

.245
.076

.245
.076

95.5
102.1

97.5
83.4

97.5
83.4

99.1
99.3
98.6

94.8
94.3
100.0

95.5
95.3
99.6

94.8
95.2
99.0

99.0
99.2
109.6

98.5
98.9
109.6

.141

FUEL AND LIGHTING
(a) Anthracite coal:
Composite spot price, per gross ton—
Chestnut........................................................ $13.643 $13,057 $13.148
Egg.................................................................. 13.194 12.535 12.665
Pea................................................................... 10.505 10.648 10.614
(6) Bituminous coal:
Composite spot price, per net ton—
Mine run......................................................... 4.090
4.251
4.272
Prepared sizes................................................. 4.563
4.755
4.741
Screenings.................................................... 3.388
3.752
3.748




REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES

26
T

able

4 .—

Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and July ,

1P#7—Continued

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Average prices
Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

FUEL AND LIGHTING—Continued
(c) Coke:
Beehive, Alabama, per net ton.......... .
Beehive, Connellsville, per net ton_
_
By-product, Alabama, per net to n .. .
By-product, New Jersey, per net ton..
(d) Manufactured gas, per 1,000 cubic feet..
(e) Petroleum products:
Petroleum, crude, per barrel, wells—
California...................................... .
Kansas-Oklahoma........................ .
Pennsylvania...................... ..........
Fuel oil, refinery—
Oklahoma, per barrel................... .
Pennsylvania, per gallon...............
Gasoline, per gallon, refinery—
California........................................
Oklahoma.......................................
Pennsylvania................................ .
North Texas..................................
Natural, Oklahoma...................... .
Kerosene, refined, per gallonstandard white, New Y o rk ........ .
Water white, refinery....................

$5,563
2.944
5.750
10.180
1.039

$6,000
3.169
5.563
10.180
1.022

$6,000
3.044
5.500
10.180
1.026

100.1
71.7
100.4
95.8
100.4

108.0
77.2
97.1
95.8
98.8

108.0
74.1
96.0
95.8
99.2

1.100
2.050
3.463

.850
1.155
2.900

.850
1.155
2.900

100.8
108.8
98.9

77.9
61.3
82.8

77.9
61.3
82.8

1.231
.063

.906
.047

.900
.047

95.1
97.5

70.0
73.2

69.5
73.6

.125
.112
.131
.109
.082

.078
.066
.089
.065
.048

.079
.070
.088
.066
.044

110.4
107.8
102.8
106.4
91.3

68.5
63.7
70.0
63.4
53.5

69.6
67.9
68.5
64.8
49.0

.086
.099

.063
.072

.064
.070

99.7
95.6

72.8
69.1

74.6
67.0

METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS
(a) Iron and steel:
Iron ore, per gross ton, lower Lake ports—
Mesabi Bessemer............................................
Mesabi non-Bessemer....................................
Pig iron, per gross ton—
Basic, furnace..................................................
Bessemer, Pittsburgh.....................................
Foundry, No. 2, northern, Pittsburgh..........
Foundry, No. 2, southern, Birmingham.......
Ferromanganese, furnace................................
Spiegeleisen, furnace.......................................
Bar iron, per pound—
Best refined, Philadelphia.............................
Common, Pittsburgh....................................
Bars, concrete reinforcing, % inch and larger, per
100 pounds, mill.................................................
Nails, wire, per 100 pounds, Pittsburgh..............
Pipe, cast-iron, 6-inch, per net ton, New Y ork ..
Pipe, black steel, per 100 feet, Pittsburgh...........
Skelp, grooved, per 100 pounds, Pittsburgh.......
Steel billets, open-hearth, per gross ton, Pitts­
burgh..................................................................
Steel merchant bars, per 100 pounds, Pittsburgh.
Steel plates, tank, per pound, Pittsburgh______
Steel rails, open-hearth, per gross ton, mill....... .
Steel, scrap, per gross ton.....................................
Steel sheets, No. 27, box annealed, per pound,
mill.................................................................... .
Steel, structural, per 100 pounds, mill.................
Terne plate, No. 8,1. C . package, per200 pounds,
mill....... .............................................................
Tin plate, domestic, standard coke, per 100
pounds, Pittsburgh.......................................... .
Wire, per 100 pounds—
Barbed, galvanized, mill.............................. .
Galvanized, No. 9, Pittsburgh......................
Plain, annealed, Pittsburgh......................... .
Woven, fencing, per 100 rods, Pittsburgh_
_
(b) Nonferrous metals:
Aluminum, per pound, New Y ork......................
Antimony, per pound, New York...................... .
Brass, sheets, per pound, mill..............................
Copper, ingots, electrolytic, per pound, refinery.
Copper, sheet, not rolled, per pound, New York.
Copper wire, bare, per pound, mills....................
Lead, pig, desilverized, per pound, New York__




$4.400
4.250

$4,400
4.250

$4,400
4.250

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

17. 625
20.385
19. 448
21.000
88.000
33.000

17.875 17.500
20. 635 20.260
19.890 19.760
18.000 17.438
90.000 90.000
35.875 33.750

95.0
95.6
94.3
99.3
92.8
97.7

96.4
96.8
96.5
85.1
94.9
106.2

94.3
95.0
95.8
82.4
94.9
99.9

.029
.030

.028
.028

.028
.028

100.0
100.0

96.6
91.7

96.6
91.7

1.950
2.750
51.600
4.261
1.900

1.900
2.600
45.425
4.261
1.800

1.825
2.625
43.750
4.261
1.800

97.9
100.0
100.5
100.0
100.0

95.4
94.5
88.5
100.0
94.7

91.6
95.5
85.2
100.0
94.7

35.000
2.000
.019
43.000
14.188

33.000
1.813
.018
43.000
12.000

33.000
1.800
.018
43.000
12.063

100.0
100.2
101.1
100.0
105.2

94.3
90.8
95.7
100.0
88.9

94.3
90.2
95.7
100.0
89.5

.031
1.950

.032
1.850

.032
1.775

96.8
99.6

99.4
94.5

99.4
90.6

11.700

11.700

11.475

100.0

100.0

98.1

5.500

5.500

5.500

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.400
3.100
2.650
20.030

3.250
3.000
2.513
20.030

3.275
3.000
2.550
20.030

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

95.6
96.8
94.8
100. C

96.3
96.8
96.2
100.0

.270
.140
.189
.139
.215
.162
.086

.254
.123
.177
.124
.204
.147
.064

.254
.120
.177
.125
.203
.147
.063

100.1
88.0
99.6
100.8
99.5
99.9
101.4

94.1
77.4
92.9
89.7
94.5
90.6
76.3

94.1
75.0
92.9
90.4
94.0
90.6
74.7

27

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
T able

4 . — Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and July,

1927— Continued

Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
.1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS—Continued
(5) Nonferrous metals—Continued.
100. 7
Lead pipe, per 100 pounds. New York_________ $9,990 $7,840 $7,735
.350
100.0
Nickel, ingot, per pound. New Y ork__________
.350
.350
Quicksilver, p«r pound, Naw York. _
___
1.203
1.617
98.1
1.570
Silver, bar, firm, per ounce, Npw York r r . . . . . . .
.651
.571
.567
104.3
.639
96.5
Tin, pig, straits, per pound, New York________
.630
.673
Zinc, sheet, per 100 pounds. La Salle, 111_______ 10.407
8.793
8.793
98.3
.078
Zinc, pig, slab, per pound, New York_________
.066
.066
100.8
(c) Agricultural implements, factory:
156.750 156.750 156.750
100.0
100.0
Cultivator, each_____________________________ 44.170 42.270 42.270
100.0
Drill, grain, each____________________________ 91.670 90.720 90. 720
76.000 76.000 76.000
100.0
Harrow, each-^Spike, peg tooth_________________________ 16.720 15.670 15.670
100.0
100.0
22.040 19.470 19.470
100.0
Loader, hay, e a ch .._____ __________________ 85.260 84,310 84,310
100.0
Mower, hay, each_________ __________________ 59.140 59.140 59.140
325.000 325.000 325.000
100.0
Planter, corn, ea ch ... ^ ...
....... . 57.710 57.710 57.710
100.0
Plow, each—
Tractor_________________________________ 104.500 104.500 104.500
100.0
"Walking, 1-horse (composite price) ___
7.299
100.4
7.315
7.315
Walking, 2-horse (composite price)............... 16.294 16.174 16.174
101.2
100.0
Rake, self dump, each_______________________ 32.060 30.400 30.400
Rake, side delivery, each_____________________ 78.370 77.420 77.420
100.0
Separator, cream, each.._____________________ 59.370 61.270 61.270
100.0
Sheller, corn, each.__________________________ 26.600 26.600 26.600
100.0
100.0
Spreader, manure, each______________________ 114.000 114.000 114.000
100.0
Tractor, each______________________________ _ 680.000 680.000 680.000
Wagon, 2-horse, each_______ _________________ 103.070 103.070 103.070
100.0
(d) Automobiles (composite price), f. o. b. factory:
Buick, each_________________________________ 1,448.125 1,492.500 1,492.500 98.7
Cadillac, each_______________________________ 3,876.071 3,566.000 3,566.000 108.9
Chevrolet, each__ _________________ __________ 616.250 627.500 627.500 100.4
99.9
Dodge, each, ___________ ________
_______ 883.636 890.000 895.417
Ford, each. _________________________________ 453.000 453.000 453.000 106.4
Packard, each_______________________________ 3 610000 3,547.188 3.263.421 100.3
(e) Other machinery and tools:
Sewing machines, each (composite price)—
100.0
Electric____ _______________ _____________ 77.550 82.080 82.080
Treadle_________________________________ 49.120 50.840 50.840
100.0
Stove, each, factory (composite price)—
98.5
Coal____________________________________ 61.943 61.616 61.616
Gas............... - .............. .......... - ____ ______ 62.924 63.409 63.409
100.0
100.4
Oil...................................................... ............. 62.510 61.565 61. 565

79.1
100.0
128.1
91.4
103.0
83.0
85.5

78.0
100.0
131.9
90.8
97.8
83.0
85.1

100.0
95.7
99.0
100.0

100.0
95.7
99.0
100.0

93.7
88.3
98.9
100.0
100.0
100.0

93.7
88.3
98.9
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.4
100.5
94.8
98.8
103.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.2
100.5
94.8
98.8
103.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

101.7
92.0
102.3
100.6
106.4
98.5

101.7
92.0
102.3
101.2
106.4
90.7

105.8
103.5

105.8
103.5

98.0
100.8
98.9

98.0
100.8
98.9

BUILDING MATERIALS
(a) Lumber:
Cypress, shop, per 1,000 feet, St. Louis_________ $48.750
Douglas fir, per 1,000 feet, mill—
No. 1................................................................ 16.970
No. 2................................................................ 33.220
Gum, plain sap, per 1,000 feet, St. Louis............. 53.000
Hemlock, northern, No. 1, per 1,000 feet, Chicago. 34.000
Maple, hard, No. 1, per 1,000 feet, Chicago......... 55.000
Oak, plain, white, No. 1, per 1,000 feet, Cincin­
nati______________________________________ 67.000
Pine, white, No. 2, per 1,000 feet, Buffalo______ 50.000
Pine, yellow, per 1,000 feet, mill—
Flooring________________________________ 43.170
Timbers_________________________________ 26.730
Poplar, No. 1, per 1,000 feet, Cincinnati________ 55.000
Spruce, eastern, per 1,000 feet, Boston_________ 33.000
Lath, No. 1, per 1,000—
Douglas fir, Chicago_____________________
7.600
Pine, yellow, *nni________________________ 4.840
Shingles, per 1,000, mill—
Cypress_________________________________ 6.000
Rea cedar...... ........................................ ........ 2.620




$43,750 $43,750

100.0

89.7

89.7

16.340 16. 510
30.080 29.990
66.000 62.000
34.000 34.000
51.500 51.500

103.0
99.3
95.8
99.7
98.8

99.1
89.9
119.2
99.7
92.5

100.2
89.6
112.0
99.7
92.5

67.000
47.000

65.000
47.000

101.5
99.9

101.5
93.9

98.5
93.9

38.960
26.420
55.000
33.250

38.310
26.500
53.000
32.750

95.7
96.0
99.3
100.0

86.4
94.9
99.3
100.7

84.9
95.2
95.7
99.2

6.600
3.280

6.600
3.280

100.2
97.6

87.0
66.1

87.0
66.1

5.750
2.470

5.750
2.470

103.0
96.2

98.7
90.7

98.7
90.7

28
T

able

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
4. — Wholesale prices of commodities, July , 1926 and June and July,
1927— Continued

Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

$13.880 $14,029 $13.988
60.600 41.500 41.500
11.600 11.000 11.000
42.500 42.600 42.500

99.8
103.3
99.7
100.0

84.9
95.3

100.5
84.9
95.3

June,
1927

July,
1927

BUILDING MATERIALS—Continued
(6) Brick:
Common, building, per 1,000, plant (composite
price)....... .......................... ..............................
Brick, front, per 1,000, New York__________ _
Brick, sand lime, per 1,000, plant— ___________
Paving blocks, 33^-inch, per 1,000, St. Louis____
(c) Cement, Portland, per barrel, plant (composite
price)................................................ ..................
id) Structural steel. (See Metals and metal products.)
(e) Paint materials:
Barytes, western, per ton, New York..................
Bone black, powdered, per pound, New York___
Copal gum, manila, per pound, mill....................
Lampblack, velvet, per pound, New York.........
Linseed oil, raw, per pound, New York..............
Litharge, commercial, per pound, New York___
Lithopone, domestic, per pound. New York___
Putty, commercial, per pound, New York.........
Red lead, dry, per pound, New York__..............
Rosin, B grade, per barrel, New York.................
Shellac, T . N ., per pound, New York.................
Turpentine, southern, per gallon, New York......
White lead, in oil, per pound, New York............
Zinc oxide, leaded grades, per pound, New York_
(f) Other building materials:
Asphalt, bulk, per ton, refinery...........................
Crushed stone, lK-inch, per cubic yard, New
York______________________________________
Glass, plate, per square foot, New York—
3 to 5 square feet.............................................
5 to 10 square feet............................................
Glass, window, per 50 square feet, works—
Single A_ .........................................................
Single B ... .......................................................
Gravel, building, per ton, plant (composite price).
Hollow tile, building, per block, Chicago.......... .
Lime, building, per ton, plant (composite price) .
Lime, hydrated, per ton, plant (composite price).
Sand, building, per ton, plant (composite price).
Slate, roofing, sea green, per 100 square feet,
quarry............................................................... .
Copper, sheet. (See Metals and metal prod­
ucts.)
Copper wire. (See Metals and metal prod­
ucts.)
Nails, wire. (See Metals and metal products.)
Pipe, cast iron. (See Metals and metal prod­
ucts.)
Pipe, lead. (See Metals and metal products.)
Pipe, black steel. (See Metals and metal prod­
ucts.)
Reinforcing bars. (See Metals and metal prod­
ucts.)
Terneplate. (See Metals and metal products.)
Zinc, sheet. (See Metals and metal products.)

100.8

100.0

100.0

1.750

1.683

1.683

100.4

96.5

96.5

34.000
.055

34.000
.055
.100
.120

100.0
100.0
96.3

100.0
100.0
96.3

100.0

100.0

.055
.040
.117
13.350
.270
.882
.153
.071

.090
.053
.060
.100
9.925
.493
.570
.141
.066

31.900
.055
.100
.120
.106
.089
.053
.060
.099
9.738
.572
.559
.138
.066

97.0

100.4
80.1
95.8
150.0
85.3
79.9
143.5
61.3
92.8
90.2

93.8
100.0
96.3
100.0
95.4
79.3
95.8
150.0
84.4
78.4
166.7
60.1
90.3
90.2

12.000

12.000

12.000

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.840

98.7

103.8

103.8

100.4
100.4

80.3
83.6

80.3
83.6

.100
.120

.119
.112

.112

1.750
.400
.480

.320
.400

.320
.400

3.900
3.072
.936
.075
8.967
9.955
.623

3.600
3.135
.907
.076
8.754
9.753
.586

3.600
3.135
.907
.076
8.764
9. 743
.595

14.000

14.000

106.5
99.7
100.4
100.0

99.7
107.5
78.7
94.8
100.2

100.0

92.3

98.8
99.6
95.8
99.7
99.7
98.1

92.3
100.8
96.5
97.1
97.4
97.7
92.2

14.000

100.0

100.0

100.0

$0,034
.083
.060
.010
.065
.088
.400
.133
.008

99.7
101.6
100.0
102.2
101.4
97.1
87.6
101.4
102.7

103.7
93.1
100.0
102.2
101.4
94.4
116.9
81.4
102.7

103.7
93.1
100.0
108.6
101.4
94.4
116.9
81.4
102.7

100.8

96.5
97.1
97.6
97.6
93.7

CHEMICALS AND DRUGS
(a) Chemicals:
Acids, per pound—
Acetic, 28 per cent, New York....................... $0,033
.090
Boric, New York.............................................
.060
Carbonic, New York.......................................
.010
Muriatic, 20°, works.......................................
.065
Nitric, 42°, New York....................................
.090
Oleic, distilled. New Y o r k -..........................
.300
Salicylic, U. S. P., per pound, New York.—
.165
Stearic, triple pressed, New York.............
.008
Sulphuric, 66°, New York.........................




$0,034
.083
.060
.010
.065
.088
.400
.133
.008

29

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
T a b le

4 .—

Wholesale prices of commodities, July, 1926, and June and July,
1927— Continued

Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
July,
1926

July,
1927

June,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

CHEMICALS AND DRUGS—Continued
(a) Chemicals—Continued.
Alcohol, per gallon, New Y o r k Denatured........................................................
Wood, refined............ .....................................
Aluminum sulphate, commercial, per 100
pounds. New York.............................................
Ammonia, anhydrous, per pound, New Y o rk ...
Analin oil, per pound, New York........................
Benzene, pure, per gallon, works.........................
Bleaching powder, per 100 pounds, works...........
Borax, crystals, per pound, New York................
Calcium arsenate, per pound, New York............
Calcium chloride, 73-75 per cent, per ton, New
York....................................................................
Caustic potash, 88-92 per cent, per pound, New
York....................................................................
Coal-tar colors, per pound, New Y o r k Black, direct....................................................
Brown, sulphur...............................................
Indigo, paste....................................................
Jet, nigrosine.
Copperas, per ton, works.
Copper sulphate, per pound, New York..
.
x
See " ’
Copra. (S e eFoods.)
Creosote oil, grade 1, per gallon, works..............
Formaldehyde, per pound, New York...............
Lime, acetate, per 100 pounds, New York......... .
Naphthalene, flake, per pound. New York.......
Sal soda, per 100 pounds, New York..................
Salt cake, ground, per ton, works.......................
Soda ash, light, 58 per cent, per 100 pounds, New
York..................................................................
Soda, bicarbonate, per pound, works.................
Soda, caustic, per pound, New York.................
Sodium silicate, 40°, per 100 pounds, works.......
Sulphur, crude, per ton, mines........................... .
Tallow, packer’s prime, per pound, Chicago-----Toluene, pure, per gallon, works
Vegetable oils—
Coconut. (See Foods.)
Com. (See Foods.)
Palm, niger, per pound, New York...............
Palm kernel, crude, per pound, .New York—
Soya bean. (See Foods.)
White arsenic, powdered, per pound, New York.
(6) Drugs and pharmaceuticals:
Acid, citric, domestic, crystals, per pound, New
York..................................................................
Acid, tartaric, crystals, per pound, New Y ork...
Alcohol, grain, per gallon, New York..................
Camphor, Japanese, refined, slabs, per pound,
New York.... ............................................... .....
Castor oil, medicinal, per pound, New York----Cream of tartar, powdered, per pound, New York
Epsom salts, U. S. P., per 100 pounds, New York.
Glycerine, chemically pure, per pound, New
York................................................................. .
Menthol, imported, per pound, New York.........
Opium, U. S. P., per pound, New York.............
Peroxide of hydrogen, U. S. P., per gross 4 oz.
bottles, New York.............................................
Phenol, U. S. P., per pound, New York.............
Quinine, sulphate, domestic, per ounce, New
York...................................................................
Soda phosphate, commercial, per pound, New

$0,339
.562

$0,500
.660

$0.512
.660

92.3
88.6

136.2
104.1

139.5
104.1

1.400
.130
.160
.250
2.000
.050
.075

1.400
.113
.150
.230
2.000
.043
.075

1.400
.115
.150
.230
2.000
.043
.075

100.0
99.0
97.4
103.3
100.0
102.9
102.6

100.0
85.7
91.4
95.1
100.0
87.4
102.6

100.0
87.6
91.4
95.1
100.0
87.4
102.6

21.000

26.000

26.000

100.0

123.8

123.8

.071

.075

.075

100.0

105.2

105.2

.340
.200
.140
.460
12.000
.049

.400
.240
.140
.400
13.000
.049

.400
.240
.140
.400
13.000
.049

98.8
94.2
100.0
100.9
96.6
103.6

116.2
113.0
100.0
87.8
104.6
104.3

116.2
113.0
100.0
87.8
104.6
105.1

.140
.090
3.250
.054
1.020
20.000

.160
.099
3.500
.045
.900
18.000

.160
.095
3.500
.045
.900
18.000

99.4
93.2
99.1
97.3
100.8
100.0

113.6
102.9
106. 7
81.8
89.0
90.0

113.6
98.3
106.7
81.8
89.0
90.0

2.290
.019
.038
.800
19.000
.086
.350

2.290
.019
.038
.750
18.000
.079
.350

2.290
.019
.038
.750
18.000
.078
.350

100.0
100.0
100.0
102.6
104.3
98.4
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
96.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
96.2

90.6
100.0

89.4
100.0

.083
.104

.069
.089

.068
.089

103.0
104.2

86.3
89.3

85.3
89.5

.035

.038

.038

100.0

107.1

107.1

.445
.295
4.855

.445
.360
3.750

.445
.370
3.750

99.5
100.6
100.0

99.5
122.8
77.2

99.5
126.2
77.2

.726
.123
.210
2.500

.643
.130
.270
2.350

.644
.126
.278
2.250

98.1
97.4
* 98.3
101.1

86.8
102.9
126.3
95.0

87.0
99.7
129.9
90.9

.304
4.540
12.000

.253
4.250
12.000

.242
4.320
12.000

110.4
89.0
100.0

91.7
83.3
100.0

87.9
84.7
100.0

7.750
.190

7.750
.160

7.750
.160

100.5
96.5

100.5
81.3

100.5
81.3

.400

.400

.400

92.9

92.9

92.9

.033
.064

.033
.064

.033
.064

100.0
98.6

100.0
98.6

100.0
98.6

100.8
106.3
99.5
100.6

86.0
105.6
108.5
105.2

88.6
105.6
108.5
105.2

99.4

103.6

103.6

Zinc chloride, granular, per pound, New York___
(c) Fertilizer materials:
Acid phosphate, per ton, Baltimore...................
9.600 8.250
8.500
Bones, ground, per ton, Chicago...... .................. 28.200 28.000 28.000
Kainit, 12.4 per cent, per ton, New York..........
8.250
9.000
9.000
Manure salts, 20 per cent, per ton, New York___ 11.850 12.400 12.400
Muriate of potash, 80-85 per cent, per ton, New
York.................................................................. . 34.900 36.400 36.400




98.8

98.8

30
T

able

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
4.— Wholesale prices of commodities, July , 1926, and June and July,

1927— Continued
Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

CHEMICALS AND DRUGS—Continued
(c) Fertilizer materials—Continued.
Nitrate of soda, 95 per cent, per 100 pounds, New
York.................................................................. . $2.390
Phosphate rock, Florida land pebble, per ton,
mines................................................................ . 3.150
Sulphate of ammonia, per 100 pounds, New York. 2.520
Sulphate of potash, 90-95 per cent, per ton, New
45.850
Tankage, per ton, Chicago................................... 38.900
(d) Fertilizers, mixed, per ton (composite price):
New England..................................................... . 38. 771
Middle W est.................................. .................... 27.817
South Central and Southwest___ ______ ______ 27.922
32. 497
Middle Atlantic............ ......... .........................
South Atlantic, 8-3-3....... .......................... ......... 23.200
South Atlantic, other____________ __________ _ 29.915

$2.713

$2,390

93.7

106.4

93.7

3.000
2.300

3.000
2.300

100.3
95.9

95.5
87.5

95.5
87.5

47.300
35.750

47.300
36.650

99.5
112.4

102.7
103.3

102.7
105.9

35.592
25. 738
20. 498
27. 980
20.400
24. 510

35.698
25.28720. 372
29.105
21.400
24. 510

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

91.8
92.5
73.4
86.1
87.9
81.9

92.1
90.9
73.0
89.6
92.2
81.9

100.0

100.0
97.2
94.6

100.0
97.2
94.6

HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS
(а) Furniture:2
Bedroom, average price, factory—
Bed, each............................................... .....
Chairs, each................................................
Dresser, etc., each............................ ..........
Rocker, each................................... __........
Dining room, average price, factory—
Buffet, each................................. ..............
Chairs, set of six...... ..................................
Table, e a c h ...___________ ____________
Kitchen, average price, factory—
Cabinet, each.............................................
Chairs, per dozen.... .................................
Refrigerator, each.......................... ...........
Table, e a c h ................................... ...........
Living room, average price, factory—
Chair, ea ch ................ ...................... ........
Davenport, each ........................... .............
Table, each..................................... ..........
(б) Furnishings:
Blankets, cotton. (See Textile products.)
Blankets, wool. (See Textile products.)
Carpets, per yard, factory—
Axminster...................................................
Brussels.......................................................
Wilton.........................................................
Cutlery, factory—
Carvers, per pair........................................
Knives and forks, per gross................. .
Pails, galvanized iron, per gross, factory________
Sheeting, Pepperell, 10/4. (See Textile prod­
ucts.)
Sheeting, Wamsutta, 10/4. (See Textile prod­
ucts.)
Tableware, factory—
Dinner sets, per set—
100 piece, semivitreous........................... .
104-p^ece, vitreous...................................
Nappies, glass, 4-inch, common, per dozen___
Pitchers, glass, 3^-gallon, common, per dozen.
Tumblers, } i pint, common, per dozen..........
Plates, white granite, per dozen....................
Tea cups and saucers, white granite, per
dozen............................................................
Ticking, Amoskeag. (See Textile products.)
Tubs, galvanized iron, per dozen, factory.......... .
Sewing machines, factory. (See Metals and
metal products.)
Stoves, factory—
Coal. (See Metals and metal products.)
Gas. (See Metals and metal products.)
Oil. (See Metals and metal products.)

$3.120
3.072
5.088

$3.120
2.976
4800

$3.120
2.976
4.800

1.350
12.500
20.700

1.350
12.500
21.050

1.350
12.500
21.050

19.860
45.700

19.860
45.700

.200

.200

19.860
45.700
.200
2.100
.160

100.0
100.0
100.0

2.250

100.0

100.0
94.5

100.0
100.0
96.1

100.0

100.0

100.0
96.1

105.1
98.2
100.0

100.0
98.1
87.3
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
98.1
87.3
100.0
100.0

100.0

1.260

1.260

1.260

.100.0

100.0

6.375

6.475

6.475

97.3

98.9

3 No comparable month to month prices for individual items.




2.100
.160

100.3
100.3

31

REVISED INDEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES
T a b l e 4 .— Wholesale prices of commodities, July,

1926, and June and July,

1927— Continued

Average prices

Index numbers
(1926=100)

Commodity
July,
1926

June,
1927

July,
1927

July,
1926

June,
1927

95.7
109.5
96.4
98.3

113.4
128.8
97.9
123.5

107.8
114.7
97.8
134.4

92.9
94.3
93.7

105.6
104.4
105.0

105.6
104.4
105.0

100.0

94.2

94.2

103.2

83.9

83.3

July,
1927

MISCELLANEOUS
(a) Cattle feed:
Bran, per ton, Minneapolis............................... $22,094 $26,188 $24,875
Cottonseed meal, prime, per ton, Memphis----- 31.250 36.750 32.750
Linseed meal, per ton, New York...................... 46.000 46.750 46.700
Middlings, standard, per ton, Minneapolis....... 23.031 28.938 31.500
(& Paper and pulp:
)
Box board, per ton, mill—
Chip............................................................... 36.234 41.184 41.184
Manila lined chip.......................................... 46,134 51.084 51.084
85-pound test liner......................................... 57.420 64.350 64.350
Paper—
Newsprint, rolls, contract, per 100 pounds,
3.450
3.250
3.250
Wrapping, manila, No. 1, jute, per 100
.114
.093
.093
pounds, New York.------ -----------------------Wood pulp—
Mechanical, No. 1, domestic, per ton, mill. 30.875 28.500 28.500
Sulphite, domestic, unbleached, news
2.950
2.600
2.600
grade, per 100 pounds, New Y o rk --.........
(c) Rubber, crude, per pound, New York:
.278
.335
.255
Para Island, fine............... - ----- ------------ a_____
.416
.371
.352
Plantation, ribbed, smoked sheets.... ................
(< ) Automobile tires, factory (composite price):
2
Balloon........................................................... 17.630 14.045 14.045
Cord............................................................... 13.554 10.948 10.948
7.199
6.815
8.610
Fabric............................................................
(e) Other miscellaneous:
Cylinder oil, per gallon, refinery—
.170
.180
Oklahoma- ....................................................
.170
.253
.250
Pennsylvania.................................................
0)
Neutral oil, per gallon, refinery—
.130
.115
.109
Gulf Coast.. ..................................................
.285
.344
.340
Pennsylvania.................................................
Soap, laundry, per 100 cakes—
4.180
4.583
4.180
Cincinnati.............. ......................................
4.851
4.851
Philadelphia................................ .................
4.851
.058
.058
.058
Starch, laundry, per pound, New Y ork -............
Tobacco—
.696
.696
.696
Plug, per pound, New Y o r k ................ ........
8.320
8.320
Smoking, per gross 1-ounce bags, New York. 8.320




100.2

92.5

92.5

103.0

90.7

90.7

88.2
85.5

73.0
76.2

67.1
72.2

96.4
96.7
97.9

76.8
78.2
81.8

76.8
78.2
77.9

100.0

94.4
95.6

94.4
94.6

101.1
101.9

89.4
122.9

84.6
121.5

102.6
100.0
98.6

93.5
100.0
98.6

93.5
100.0
98.6

180.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list o f all bulletins o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case o f bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list o f the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulle­
tins published since that date, will be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus (*)
are out o f print.
Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
*No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York. [1913.]
♦No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its inquiry into industrial
agreements. [1913.]
♦No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City. [1914.]
No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of New York City.
[1914.]
♦No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry. [1916.]
♦No. 198. Collective agreements in the men's clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc. [1921.]
No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
No. 419. Trade agreements, 1925.
Cooperation.
No. 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricultural).
Employment and Unemployment.
♦No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the United States. [1913.]
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
♦No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries. [1915.]
♦No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
No. 196. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis, Minn., January,
1916.
♦No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association, Boston, Mass., held
May 10,1916.
No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
♦No. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3,
1917.
No. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
♦No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
No. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May 9-11,1918.
No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes. [1922.]
No. 409. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.
Foreign Labor Laws.
♦No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European countries. [1914.]
Housing.
♦No. 158.
No. 263.
No. 295.
No. 368.
No. 424.
No. 449.

Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign countries.
Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in 11921 to] 1923.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States [1924 and] 1925.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in 1926. (In press.)

[1914.]

Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.
♦No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain-enameled sanitary ware factories.
[1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection. [1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.j
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
♦No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead in the painting
of buildings. [1916.]
♦No. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation-insurance cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. [1916.]
♦No. 207. Causes of death by occupation. [1917.1
♦No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives. [1917.]
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts). [1918.]




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Industrial Accidents and Hygiene—Continued.
No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
♦No. 236. Effect of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Munition Workers
Committee. [1919.]
*No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial-accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates. [1921.]
No. 291. Carbon-monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910 to 1919.
No. 306. Occupational hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be looked for in
hazardous occupations. [1922.]
No. 339. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States. [1923.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and the preparation of phosphorus.
[1926.]
No. 425. Record of industrial accidents in the United States to 1925.
No. 426. Deaths from lead poisoning. [1926.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the “
Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at Washington, D . C.,
July 14-16,1926.
Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.
No. 237. Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
No. 340. Chinese migration, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
No. 349. Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.J
No. 361. Labor relations in the Fairmount (W . Va.) bituminous coal field. [1921.
No. 380. Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
No. 383. Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
No. 384. Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920 to 1924.
No. 399. Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States.

[1925.]

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).
No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
No. 229. Wage-payment legislation in the United States. [1917.]
No. 285. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States. [1921.1
No. 321. Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
No. 322. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
No. 343. Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
No. 370. Laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto. [1925.]
No. 408. Labor laws relating to the payment of wages. [1926.]
No. 434. Labor legislation of 1926.
No. 444. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1926. (In press.)
Proceedings o f Annual Conventions of the Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the
United States and Canada.
No. 266. Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
No. 307. Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6,1921.
♦No. 323. Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., M ay 22-26, 1922.
No. 352. Tenth, Richmond, Va., M ay 1-4,1923.
No. 889. Eleventh, Chicago, 111., M ay 19-23,1924.
No. 411. Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
No. 429. Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
Proceedings of Annual Meetings of International Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.
No. 210. Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28,1916.
No. 248. Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25,1917.
No. 264. Fifth, Madison, Wis., September 24-27,1918.
♦No. 273. Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26,1919.
No. 281. Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
No. 304. Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
No. 333. Ninth, Baltimore, M d., October 9-13,1922.
No. 359. Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26, 1923.
No. 385. Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28,1924.
No. 395. Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
No. 406. Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
No. 432. Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Proceedings of Annual Meetings of International Association of Public Employment Services.
No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20,1913; Second, Indianapolis, September 24 and 25,1914;
Third, Detroit, July 1 and 2,1915.
No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y ., July 20 and 21,1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y ., September 7-9,1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, HI., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y ., September 15-17, 1925.
Productivity of Labor.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1924.]
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
[1925.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.] (In press.)




(I I )

Retail Prices and Cost of Living.
*No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
No. 357. Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
No. 369. The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.
No. 445. Retail prices, 1890 to 1926. (In press.)
Safety Codes.
No. 331. Code of lighting factories, mills, and other work places.
No. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
No. 350. Specifications of laboratory tests for approval of electric headlighting devices for motor
vehicles.
No. 351. Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
No. 364. Safety code for the mechanical power-transmission apparatus.
No. 375. Safety code for laundry machinery and operation.
No. 378. Safety code for woodworking plants.
No. 382. Code of lighting school buildings.
No. 410. Safety code f©r paper and pulp mills.
No. 430. Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433. Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
No. 436. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
No. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders. (In press.)
No. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping. (In press.)
Vocational and Workers9 Education.
♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment. [1915.]
♦No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1916.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States. [1920.]
Wages and Hours of Labor.
♦No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in the dress and
waist industry of New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry. [1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam-railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
♦No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907 to 1914.
No. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1915.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
No. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
No. 348. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile industry, 1922.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1924.]
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 374. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1924.
No. 376. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industry, 1907 to 1924.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor cost of production, and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
[1925.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 413. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and 1924.
No. 421. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry, 1925.
No. 422. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1925.
No. 431. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15,1926.
No. 435. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1926.
No. 438. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1925.
No. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1925.
No. 443. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
No. 446. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
No. 450. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1926. (In press.)
No. 452. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1926. (In press.)
Welfare Work.
♦No. 123. Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United States. [1919.]
Wholesale Prices.
No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign countries. [1921.]
No. 440. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1926.
Women and Children in Industry.
No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in selected industries
in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
*No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile establishments and
garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries. T1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of woman and child wage earners in the United States.
[1915.]
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]




(I ll)

W om en an d Children in Industry—Continued.
*No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women. [1915.]
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of Boston, Mass.
[1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
*No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of industrial employ­
ment of women and children. [1918.]
No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war. [1917.]
No. 253. Women in lead industries. [1919.]
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).
*No. 101. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
*No. 102. British national insurance act. [1911.]
*No. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland. [1912.]
No. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
*No. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
No. 212. Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Washington, D. C., December 5-9,1916.
No. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign countries, 1917 and 1918.
No. 301. Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration. [1922.]
No. 312. National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1920.
No. 379. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of January 1,1925.
No. 423. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada. [1926.]
Miscellaneous Series.
"“
No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to
May 1,1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees m Washington, D. C. [1921.]
No. 299. Personnel research agencies: A guide to organized research in employment management,
industrial relations, training, and working conditions. [1921. ]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization. [1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
[1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and problems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. The cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 420. Handbook of American trade-unions. [1926.]
No. 439. Handbook of labor statistics, 1924-1926.
No. 448. Trade agreements, 1926.




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