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Retail Prices of Food
1946 and 1947

Bulletin No. 938
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
L. B. Schwellenbach, Secretary
B U R EAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent o f Docum ents, U . S. Governm ent Printing O ffice, W ashington 25, D . C .
Price 15 cents







Letter o f Transmittal
U nited States D epartment of L abor ,
B ureau of L abor Statistics,
Washington, D . C ., M a y 31, 1948.
The Secretary of L abor :
I have the honor to transmit herewith the bulletin on retail prices and indexes
of retail prices of foods for the years 1946 and 1947.
In 1946, the first full postwar year, a number of major developments occurred
in the food price situation. Government programs in effect during the war were
being terminated, while new programs were being instituted to facilitate exports
of food to war-torn countries. In 1947, the first full year of uncontrolled food
prices, a year of rising incomes, unusually adverse weather, and urgent need for
European famine relief, food prices reached successive record highs. This report
describes the impact of the various developments on food prices at retail.
Part I covers changes in retail food prices during 1946 and Part I I during 1947*
The two parts were intended originally for publication as separate documents,
but have been combined for purposes of economy and promptness.
A mimeographed report on retail prices of food, giving index numbers by groups
and subgroups of commodities and average prices for individual foods in each of
56 cities will continue to be issued monthly and will be available on request as
heretofore.
Part I of this report was prepared by Lillian Leikind and Part II by Willard
Fazar of the Food Section of the Bureau’s Branch of Consumers’ Prices.

E wan C lague, Commissioner.
Hon. L. B . SCHWELLENBACH,
Secretary of Labor.




(in)




Contents
Part I.—Retail Prices of Food 1946
Pago
Summary_______________________________________________________________________
Food prices during 1946_______________________________________________________
Retail food price controls in 1946_____________________________________________
Retail food price controls during World War I I _____________________________
Food subsidy programs________________________________________________________
Other factors affecting retail prices of food in 1946__________________________
Changes in food prices by cities----------------------------------------------------------------------Trend of prices for major food groups________________________________________
Retail prices of individual foods in 1946____________________________________
Revision of the Retail Food Price Index in February 1946_________________

1
1
2
5
6
8
9
12
18
34

TABLES
Table 1.— Comparison between retail price increases for selected foods
from June to July and December 1946, and the estimated
subsidy rate at retail (including mark-ups) in June 1946_____
Table 2.— Indexes of retail prices of food, by cities and months, 1946____
Table 3.— Average retail prices of principal foods in large cities combined,
by months, 1946_________________________________________________
Table 4.— Annual average retail prices of principal foods, by cities, 1946. _

7
10
19
22

Part II.—Retail Prices of Food 1947
Summary_______________________________________________________________________
Food prices during 1947_______________________________________________________
Changes in food prices by cities_______________________________________________
Trend of prices for major food groups________________________________________
Retail prices of individual foods in 1947_____________________________________
Revision of the Retail Food Price Index in August 1947___________________

36
36
38
40
46
58

TABLES
Table 1.— Indexes of retail prices of food in large cities combined, by
years, 1913 to 1947, and by months, January 1945 to De­
cember 1947______________________________________________________
Table 2.— Indexes of retail prices of food, by cities and months, 1947____
Table 3.— Indexes of retail prices of food in large cities combined, by com­
modity groups, by years, 1923 to 1947, and by months,
January 1946 to December 1947________________________________
Table 4.— Average retail prices of principal foods in large cities com­
bined, by months, 1947_________________________________________
Table 5.— Annual average retail prices of principal foods, by cities, 1947_>




(V)

37
39

42
47
50




B ulletin 7^o. 938 o f the
U nited States Bureau o f Labor Statistics

Part I.—Retail Prices of Food, 1946
Sum m ary

The year 1946 was marked by one of the most rapid advances in
food prices in this Nation’s history. Within 15 months after VJ-day,
retail food prices had increased by nearly one-third; almost all of the
rise occurred after June 1946, the final month of extensive Govern­
ment regulation. By November, the first month of “ free markets,”
the Bureau’s Retail Food Price Index had climbed to an all-time high
of 187.7 percent of the prewar (1935-39) average, exceeding the pre­
vious postwar peak of June 1920 by 1.5 percent. The steady advance,
which had persisted for nine consecutive months, was broken at the
end of the year as prices declined slightly. The net price rise among
foods over the year amounted to 31.5 percent, in sharp contrast to
the moderate annual gains, ranging from 0.2 to 3.3 percent, of the
peak war years.
Table 1 in Part II of this report and the accompanying chart
present the trend in retail prices of all foods combined from 1913
through 1947. Annual average retail food prices in 1946 were 15
percent above 1945, and almost 68 percent above 1939. The average
rise for 1946 was somewhat smaller than the 17.4 percent advance
that occurred between 1941 and 1942, the first year after the entry of
the United States into the war.
Food P rices D uring 1946

A net decline of 1.3 percent in retail food prices between December
1945 and February 1946, caused primarily by a seasonal drop in egg
prices, was soon offset by the steady advances occurring among all
other foods, and by June 1946 food prices were 3 percent higher on the
average than at the beginning of the year. Since the majority of
foods were under price control, these increases were made possible
through upward ceiling adjustments to cover higher wage costs
(meats), to encourage production (dairy products), to compensate
for subsidy withdrawals (butter, peanut butter, cheese), to cover legal
parity requirements (grain products) or to meet foreign competition
(sugar).



(l)

2
Following the lapse of OPA price controls and subsidies on June 30,
1946, retail food prices climbed 13.8 percent, led by advances for the
heretofore scarce meats and dairy products which were up 30 and 21
percent, respectively. On July 25, ceilings as of June 30 levels were
restored to a limited list of foods; namely, cereal and bakery products,
fruits and vegetables, imported foods, and sugar and sweets. The
ceiling prices for these commodities were subsequently increased to
cover higher costs and compensate for subsidy terminations.
With the majority of foods still free of regulations and higher ceil­
ings in effect for the remainder, the retail price rise for foods continued
on into August at about one-fourth the rate of the previous month.
On August 21 price controls for livestock, livestock products, cotton­
seed and soybeans and their edible products were resumed and subsidy
payments for the meat industry were reinstated at previous rates.
Additional foods, primarily fruits and vegetables, were automatically
removed from control on September 1 with the issuance by the
Secretary of Agriculture of the list of foods in short supply.
Most foods other than meats continued to rise in September and
October. Because of an extreme scarcity of meats in retail stores
after the restoration of ceilings, the Bureau was unable to secure a
sufficient number of quotations to measure the price movement of
meats satisfactorily. Pressure for the elimination of regulations
grew and on October 15 the President removed ceilings from livestock
and livestock products. Coffee and edible fats and oils were freed
from price control on October 17, and on October 24 all remaining
foods were decontrolled with the exception of sugar, sirups, and rice,
which remained under control because of world-wide scarcity. Ra­
tioning of sugar was continued but almost all other restrictions on
distribution, use, and import of foods, and set-aside orders for Govern­
ment purchase, were terminated by the end of the year.
Food prices rose to an all-time high in November, up 34 percent
from a year earlier as prices of the decontrolled fats and oils and
meats skyrocketed and many record high prices were reported for
other foods. Growing consumer resistance to high prices and ample
supplies brought about a decline of 1 percent in retail food prices in
mid-December, but the family food bill averaged 31.5 percent above
December 1945, with all major commodity groups sharing in the
increase with the exception of fresh fruits and vegetables. Between
mid-December 1945 and mid-December 1946, the Bureau’s Retail
Food Price Index advanced from 141.4 to 185.9 (1935-39=100).
Retail F ood P rice Controls in 1946

The food price picture in 1946 was dominated by developments in
price control, the same as during the entire war period. Within the



3
first 6 months, when most foods were retailing at ceiling, prices rose
almost 3 percent, reflecting upward adjustments in legal maximums
allowed by OPA. In addition, controls were suspended during these
6 months for a number of foods—fresh fish and foods considered un­
important in the cost of living, such as highly seasonal fruits and
specialty foods.
On July 1, all price controls lapsed after the President had vetoed
a bill to continue controls with extensive modifications. Food prices
advanced at the greatest rate on record between June 30 and July 25
when the Price Control Extension Act was signed. This act restored
controls at the June 30 levels on foods representing approximately 37
percent of an average family’s food budget— cereals and bakery
products, most fruits and vegetables, imported foods, and sugar and
sweets.' About 55 percent of the food budget was left free of controls
until August 20—livestock, meats, dairy products, grains, cottonseed,
soybeans, poultry, eggs and their products. Recontrol of these
articles was made dependent on action by a Decontrol Board. The
rest of the budget, free of price controls on June 30, remained uncon­
trolled— fresh fish, some fruits and vegetables, and specialty foods.
In effect, the new bill provided for selective price controls and
divided authority, with (1) sharply curtailed OPA discretion, (2)
control over farm commodities vested in the Secretary of Agriculture,
and (3) a Decontrol Board having final jurisdiction over all price
controls. The Decontrol Board’s first task was to decide whether to
restore controls over those foods specifically exempted until August
20. Of the foods for which controls could be reinstated, the price
Decontrol Board ordered restoration of controls for livestock, meats,
cottonseed, and soybeans and their edible products. Dairy products,
grains, poultry, and eggs, which were also left to the discretion of
the Board, were not put under ceiling controls again. An additional
group of commodities, primarily fruits and vegetables, were removed
from control when they were omitted from the list of foods in short
supply which was issued by the Secretary of Agriculture on September
1, in compliance with provisions of the new Price Control Act.
Pressure for complete decontrol mounted and finally, on October
15, ceilings on livestock and livestock products were terminated by
Presidential proclamation. Within 10 days all remaining price con­
trols on foods were ended, except for sugar, sirups, and rice. Prices
soared immediately and many new highs were established for individ­
ual foods. On the average, retail food prices in mid-November were
more than 13 percent higher than in mid-July, when prices were tem­
porarily decontrolled. This trend was reversed in December with a
decline of 1 percent attributable to increasing supplies and strong
consumer resistance.
791528—49----- 2







RETAIL m

m

IF F i n

11 LARGE CI TI ES COMI I HEI

1935- 39-100
INOEX

220

INOEX

220

5
The uncertain price control situation caused considerable trade
confusion throughout the year and prices varied widely among foods
and for individual foods among sellers. There were many reports in
the trade and general press that supplies were being withheld from
sale in anticipation of decontrol. Shortages developed, particularly
for meats and butter, that were more severe than at any time during
the war; and reports of black marketing became widespread in the
spring and again in the fall following the reinstatement of ceilings on
meats, and fats and oils.
Rationing was not resumed for any foods during 1946 although it
was maintained on sugar throughout the year. Pent-up demand for
foods that had been scarce or rationed during the war frequently
caused scarcities among relatively abundant foods.
Retail F ood P rice Controls D uring W orld W a r I I

The year 1946 marked the termination of 4 years of Government
control of retail prices of food. The first major control issued for
retail prices was the General Maximum Price Regulation (GM PR)
effective M ay 18, 1942, which froze the prices of approximately 60
percent of the average family’s food budget at the level of their re­
spective March 1942 peaks. Immediately following the passage on
October 2, 1942, of the Stabilization Act, which altered some of the
limitations of the Emergency Price Control Act, price ceilings were
imposed on an additional 30 percent of the average food budget. Dur­
ing the 6 months prior to GM PR, retail food prices had advanced
7.5 percent. Between May and October 1942 the monthly rate of
increase was 1.3 percent and from October to the end of the year, 1.2
percent. Thus, dining the first year of price regulation the rate of
increase was retarded.
The general upward trend in retail prices of food, unbroken since
November 1940, continued into 1943, reaching a peak in May, hav­
ing increased more than 26 percent in the 18 months after the attack
on Pearl Harbor. This steady advance led to the President’s “ holdthe-line” order in April 1943, and the inauguration by the OPA in
June of that year of a program for a 10-percent roll-back in retail
food prices, beginning with butter and meats. The roll-back was to
be accomplished by the reduction of ceiling prices and the payment
of subsidies to processors in order to maintain the high level of producer
prices and production. This program caused the first break in the
rise, and food prices dropped 1 percent in June and 2 percent in July.
During 1943 the control program was extended to cover almost all
remaining commodities, with “ freeze-type” ceilings generally replaced
by ceiling prices based upon fixed mark-ups over cost or specific
dollar-and-cent maximums. During the following 2 years, controls



6
were generally improved and the high price level reached in May
1943 was not exceeded until 10 months after the end of the war.
Food supplies available for consumers increased noticeably after
VJ-day, as a direct result of reductions in military buying and termi­
nation of set-asides for Government purchase for lend-lease. A
slight recession was expected during the period of reconversion and,
consequently, the Government announced a policy of price decontrol
and subsidy termination. The subsidy withdrawals, beginning with
butter and peanut butter on November 1, 1945, followed by cheddar
cheese on February 1, 1946, were accompanied by compensating
ceiling price increases and were scheduled to coincide with price de­
clines among other foods in order to prevent rises in the cost of living.
Early in 1946 a recession had not occurred and the Government plan­
ned to extend controls and subsidies beyond June 30, the expiration
date of the Price Control Act. With the war ended, however, pres­
sure toward decontrol mounted. The Price Control Extension Act
passed by the Congress to become effective after June 30, relaxed the
price control provisions. This act was vetoed by the President and
for 25 days, all price control and subsidy payments provided under
the earlier act lapsed.
The new Price Control Act that went into effect on July 25, 1946,
differed considerably from that in effect prior to June 30. Instead of
general control over all items, it restored controls for selected foods and
established a Price Decontrol Board with jurisdiction over the control
and decontrol of other foods. The meat shortage that developed
upon the Board’s reinstatement of price ceilings and the ineffectiveness
of controls over a limited list of items when a majority were free of
regulation, brought general decontrol in late October over all remain­
ing foods except sugar, sirups, and rice. Immediately following the
abandonment of price controls, retail food prices reached an all-time
high, having advanced 29 percent since June. During the second
month of “ free markets,” however, prices declined slightly, the net
rise over the year reaching 31.5 percent. The yearly percents of
increase in retail food prices from 1940 through 1946 were:
December
December
December
December
December
December

1940-Decem ber
1941-Decem ber
1942-Decem ber
1943-Decem ber
1944-Decem ber
1945-Decem ber

1941______________16.
1942______________17.
1943____________
3.
1944____________
.
1945____________
2.
1946______________31.

2
3
3
2
9
5

Food Subsidy Program s

The sharp price advances during the second half of 1946 also re­
flected in part the elimination of the large Federal subsidy program,



7
inaugurated during the war to limit the rise in the cost of living and at
the same time encourage production through increased returns to
producers. Foods representing about three-fifths of the average
family’s food expenditures were included in the subsidy programs
that were suddenly terminated on June 30 with the temporary lapse in
price controls. None of the payments were resumed later except
those for the meat-packing industry with the reinstatement of price
controls in September and October. Payments to the sugar industry
applicable under the Sugar Act continued throughout the year. The
entire subsidy program during its existence had cost the Government
over 4 billion dollars with expenditures for the major programs aver­
aging annually 700 million dollars for meats, 500 million dollars for
dairy products and 200 million dollars for flour; but it was estimated
that savings to consumers surpassed these totals.
Approximately three-fourths of the 13.8 percent food price rise in
July and about one-third of the 31.5 percent gain over the year may
be attributed to the termination of these subsidies. The retail food
price increases from June to July and December and the estimated
rate of subsidy payments in June as translated to retail levels (includ­
ing mark-ups) are presented in table 1 for a selected list of foods.
Table 1.— Comparison between retail price increases for selected foods from June to
July and December 1946, and the estimated subsidy rate at retail (including mark-ups)
in June 19461
Price increase

Commodity

Flour, wheat_______________________________
Bread, white_______________________ ____ ___
Soda crackers______________ _______ _______
Round steak___________________ ____ _______
Rib roast__________________________________
Chuck roast________________________________
Veal cutlets________________________________
Pork chops________ ________________________
Bacon, sliced_______________________________
Ham, whole_____ ____ ______________________
Salt pork__________________________________
Lamb chops, rib____________________ _______
Butter_____________________________ _______
Cheese, Cheddar..... .......................................... .
Milk:
Fresh, grocery__________________________
E vaporated..... .............. .............. ..............
Tomatoes, canned__________________________
Peas, canned........................................................
Corn, canned...... .................................................
Prunes, dried____________ _________
______
Beans, dried_____ ____ ______________ _______
Coffee_____________________________ ______
Sugar______________________________________

Unit

5-pounds............ .
Pound...................

do
do
do
do
d o_____
do
do
do _
do
do
do
do

Quart__________
14H-otmce can___
No. 2 can______

do
do
Pound
do
_ do___
do

Estimated
subsidy
rate
From June From June (including
to July
to Decem­ mark-ups)
1946
ber 1946 June 19461
Cents
3.1
.1
.1
19.4
16.0
14.4
19.2
13.7
19.4
12.3
7.3
11.0
19.5
9.9

Cents
9.2
.9
5.8
22.6
21.2
17.3
24.5
20.2
33.4
29.1
27.5
19.1
30.5
24.5

2.4
1.2
.2
.3
.1
.4
.2
.2
.1

3.9
3.6
9.6
2.1
3.1
8.1
8.6
13.4
2.1

Cents

4.9
1.0
1.1
11.7
10.3
7.8
6.0
6.0
6.8
5.9
3.7
7.2
13.2
7.5
1.8
1.9
2.0
2.2
.9
4.2
.7
4.5
.8

1 From unpublished records of the Office of Price Administration, Historical Research and Service
Division.




8
Other Factors A ffecting Retail P rices o f Food in 1946

Export demand for foodstuffs lent support to the rising prices.
After the end of World War II, food became the major feature of the
rehabilitation program for war devastated countries. The United
States, having the largest exportable surpluses, became the chief
supplier of foods for famine relief. During 1946 a record volume of
foodstuffs, approximating 18 million long tons valued at more than
2 billion dollars, was exported, principally to countries suffering from
food shortages. The heaviest shipments occurred in early 1946
when exports were at the rate of 16 percent of the total available food
supply, compared with 6 to 8 percent in the war years, 1942-44, and
about 3 percent in prewar years. The major component of these
shipments was the bread grains, mainly wheat, whereas for lend-lease
during the war, it had been livestock products. From the 1945-46
crop almost 400 million bushels of wheat and flour (in terms of grain
equivalent) left this country, or more than 40 percent of all of the wheat
distributed as food. This was nearly double the original commitment
for famine relief and was made possible through a program of grain
conservation involving weight reduction of loa ves of bread, extraction
of more flour from wheat, restricted distribution of grains and flour,
controls over inventories and exports, and prohibition of use of wheat
and limitations on use of other grains for alcohol and beer. These
restrictions, imposed during March aud April brought about relative
scarcity of cereal products, particularly flour and bread. The
situation was relieved somewhat the following month with shipments
from the new bumper wheat crop. The controls were gradually
relaxed and finally removed during the last quarter of the year.
Other food products shipped abroad in sizable quantities were corn,
oats, rye, rice, lard, dry beans and peas, dried fruit, sugar, meats, eggs,
and dairy products.
Despite the high level of exports, greatly reduced military require­
ments and record food production made more food available for
civilian consumption than ever before. Per capita consumption of all
foods, up 4.5 percent from 1945, was 18 percent greater than in prewar
years. During 1935-39 about 97 percent of each year's food supply
was consumed domestically and 3 percent exported. The proportion
available to civilians during the war period declined to about 80 per­
cent with from 12 to 14 percent used by the armed forces and the
remainder exported, principally under lend-lease. From the begin­
ning of 1945 to YJ-day the military takings amounted to almost
one-fifth of the total food supply and other Government purchases
were large. Cut-backs were immediate at the war's end altering the
entire food supply situation. In 1946 the civilian share had risen to



9
90 percent and the expansion in total food production brought per
capita consumption to a record rate.
However, at various times during the year shortages of specific
foods occurred that were more severe than any during the war period,
attributed in some quarters to the withholding of supplies at various
levels of distribution when decontrol was anticipated. Other factors
in the shortage picture were the large export program and unfavorable
ceiling price relationships among related commodities. In addition,
the freight-car shortage aggravated by priorities granted famine
relief foods, brought some maldistribution of supplies.
The large price increases of 1946 may be primarily attributed to the
rapid termination of Government controls in the face of strong demand
for supplies that were already near capacity and could not be readily
expanded. This exceptional demand for foods stemmed not only
from the general high level of business activity and a substantial
foreign market but also from pent-up demands of a population recover­
ing from wartime shortages. Unemployment had remained unusually
low during the shift from war to peacetime production and the total
civilian labor force swelled to new high levels, exceeding by as many
as 4 million the number of workers employed in early 1945 when the
manufacture of war goods was at its height. Personal incomes reached
177 billion dollars, up 3.3 percent from the year before and almost one
and a half times that of 1939. Agricultural incomes made even greater
gains as prices received by farmers for livestock and the major crops
were well above parity levels.
Changes in Food Prices b y Cities

The trend in retail food prices during the year 1946 was strikingly
similar throughout the country, with the slow upward movement of
the first 6 months greatly accelerated after the temporary lapse of
OPA on June 30. In 46 of the 56 cities surveyed, peaks were reached
in November, with slight declines in December. The net rise over
the year, which averaged 31.5 percent for all cities combined, varied
from 25.3 percent in Newark to 37.9 percent in Knoxville. As in the
previous 4 years cities in the South were among those with the largest
price increases. Of the 7 cities having advances of more than 35 per­
cent over the year, 37.9 percent was recorded in Knoxville, 37.2
percent in Winston-Salem, 36.6 percent in Birmingham, 36.1 percent
in Dallas, 36 percent in Manchester and Omaha, and 35.7 percent in
Memphis.
In four cities the level of food prices in December 1946 was more than
double their relatively low prewar (1935-39) averages: Memphis, up
106 percent; Savannah, 105.8 percent; San Francisco, 104.6 percent;




10
and New Orleans, 102.4 percent. All of the cities on the West Coast
reported increases over the prewar period of more than 95 percent,
while Columbus, Ohio, had the least rise, 74 percent, and the New
England cities had relatively small advances ranging from 77.2 percent
in Fall River to 86.7 percent in Manchester.
The indexes of average retail food prices by cities for the year 1946
are presented in table 2. (Annual average prices of individual foods
by cities are shown in table 4.)
Table 2.— Indexes of retail prices of food by cities 1 and months, 1946
[1935-39=100]

Region and city

Aver­
age
for
the Jan.
year
15

1946
Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug.
15 2
15
15
15
15
15
15

Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
15 3 15 4
15
15

United States......... 159.6 141.0 139.0 140.1 141.7 142.6 145.6 165.7 171.2 174.1 180.0 187.7 185.9
New England
Boston....................
Bridgeport..............
Fall River..............Manchester...........New Haven............
Portland, M aine..Providence.............

153.1
153.9
152.8
156.6
153.8
153.3
159.7

135.1
135.1
134.6
136.7
135.9
134.2
140 4

133.3
135.6
132.1
135.8
135. 2
133.7
139.1

134.1
136.9
133.8
136.4
137.0
134.8
139.9

135.9 135.1
135.2 136.9
133.7 134.5
137.8 139.2
136.8 136.9
135.4 135.4
141.8 U41.2

138.0
139.1
138.1
144.4
140.4
138.4
144.9

161.9
158.7
158.2
161.5
160.6
160.8
165.3

165.2
164.3
164.7
168.7
163.7
166.5
173.4

168.0
168.9
168.4
170.0
166.8
167.0
175.9

174.4
175.9
175.6
176.9
173.9
173.5
184.1

177.8
179.5
182.6
185.6
179.0
178.9
186.7

178.1
180.7
177.2
186.7
179.1
180.5
184.0

152.7
159.2
162.3
156.8
160.8
153.8
159.9

136.9
144.4
143.5
138.9
141.0
136.6
140.2

136.1
141.7
141.8
137.6
140.4
134.4
138.8

136.4
140.8
142.3
139.0
141.4
135.9
141.8

138.8
143.1
144.5
139.6
142.5
138.6
143.3

139.0
144.6
145.9
141.0
142.8
139.5
143.8

140.2
147.9
149.2
143.5
147.1
142.5
144.0

157.9
164.9
168.9
160.8
167.6
160.6
168.4

162.8
170.0
171.0
169.2
174.0
165.5
171.2

164.8
170.9
178.8
172.6
176.9
165.7
174.0

168.4
179.5
186.7
176.2
179.3
172.5
182.5

175.4
181.7
188.6
181.6
188.5
176.9
185.6

175.8
180.4
186.1
181.8
187.7
176.8
185.2

160.1
156.0
163.9
H9.8
156.4
156.5
156.5
165.5
165.0

139.2
138.2
144.2
132.5
137.8
138.0
137.5
146.5
145.8

138.6
136.1
142.7
131.1
136.7
135.6
136.3
144.6
143.9

138.7
136.9
142.7
131.2
137.0
136.0
136.5
143.9
144.1

141.9 141.9
137.9 139.1
144.5 146.7
133.3 133.2
140.1 141.6
137.7 138.6
138.3 140.8
146.8 5148.1
145.8 147.3

142.8
141.4
149.3
136.4
145.4
141.5
144.3
151.3
150.1

168.4
161.6
171.3
153.1
166.9
159.9
167.4
172.2
174.1

174.0
168.6
178.6
160.3
168.5
170.8
168.3
183.5
181.1

176.2
169.3
179.3
161.9
168.4
172.4
170.3
183.8
179.8

183.4
171.3
183.1
171.6
173.9
175.9
174.8
188.9
181.7

189.4
187.0
193.1
178.4
181.6
187.3
184.1
190.3
194.9

187.0
184.0
191.4
174.0
179.2
184.3
179.7
186.2
191.6

163.8
150.7
153.0
154.5
162.4
151.4
169.1

143.0
134.5
134.3
133.6
144.3
132.9
150.4

141.8
132.6
132.5
131.8
142.3
131.0
147.6

144.1
133.6
131.8
132.5
142.6
131.1
148.0

144.9
134.0
133.0
134.6
143.4
131.9
149.4

148.1
134.9
134.9
136.8
144.5
133.6
151.7

148.2
134.8
137.5
139.5
147.4
137.3
154.4

171.8
154.4
160.9
161.4
169.7
159.0
174.8

174.6
164.3
163.3
167.8
175.5
161.6
183.2

180.0
165.3
167.9
171.0
174.5
164.6
186.6

184.8
166.6
177.6
178.2
183.6
176.2
189.2

192.1
178.0
181.7
184.1
191.8
180.1
198.5

192.7
175.4
180.2
182.9
189.3
177.7
195.5

159.0
166.1
157.1
166.5
164.6
155.1
175.0
159.8
163.0

141.5
147.7
138.7
149.9
146.5
138.7
153.8
143.0
143.1

139.4
145.6
138.4
145.8
145.4
137.5
155.6
141.0
140.3

137.7
147.1
138.3
146.5
144.5
136.5
154.7
141.3
141.5

140.8 5140.5
149.4 149.3
138.9 139.6
148.0 147.3
147.2 146.4
136.7 137.3
155.7 5155.8
142.2 141.1
141.7 5143.1

141.0
152.4
140.8
150.8
146.0
138.4
158.5
145.5
145.3

161.5
170.5
161.9
170.6
164.5
154.0
180.1
164.8
164.6

174.1
178.0
173.2
181.5
176.6
164.1
187.2
169.9
177.4

173.4
180.1
170.4
180.7
177.4
167.4
190.9
174.7
179.2

177.5
186.1
173.0
182.5
189.3
175.9
192.2
180.6
184.3

192.0
195.1
188.2
199.1
197.0
188.2
209.4
186.8
200.0

188.7
192.3
184.2
194.8
195.0
186.5
205.8
186.1
195.3

Middle Atlantic
Buffalo........... ........
Newark...................
New York________
Philadelphia...........
Pittsburgh..........
Rochester________
Scranton_________
East North Central
Chicago__________
Cincinnati.............
Cleveland________
Columbus, O hio..Detroit................ .
Indianapolis..........
Milwaukee----------Peoria____________
Springfield, 111----West North Central
Cedar Rapids6. .....
Kansas City...........
Minneapolis...........
Omaha....................
St. Louis.................
St. Paul..................
W ichita6
.................
South Atlantic
Atlanta...................
Baltimore...............
Charleston, S. C ...
Jacksonville............
Norfolk__________
Richmond..............
Savannah................
Washington, D. C.
Winston-Salem •
_

See footnotes at end of table.




11
Table 2.— Indexes of retail prices of food by cities 1 and months, 1946— Continued
[1935-39=100]

Region and city

Aver­
age
for
the Jan.
year
15

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug.
15 2
15
15
15
15
15
15

Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
15 3 15*
15
15

164.4
169.2
183.5
151.3
171.3
164.5

144.6
149.2
160.5
134.2
151.2
147.9

142.9
146.6
158.1
132.7
149.2
147.9

142.8
146.6
159.1
132.9
148.8
147.7

142.3
145.2
159.7
133.8
149.8
148.6

144.0
145.7
162.4
133.2
151.7
148.3

147.7
150.6
165.6
135.6
153.6
149.8

166.6
169.1
186.4
155.2
174.6
163.8

180.8
188.0
103.7
163.1
187.5
175.5

176.6
189.0
197.8
163.7
185.3
176.4

183.0
195.8
201.5
167.4
191.0
182.8

203.5
203.4
226.5
184.9
207.3
193.8

198.4
200.8
220.4
178.6
206.0
191.0

157.7
158.3
156.5
173.8

138.5
140.8
140.8
152.7

137.8
139.3
138.1
151.1

138.3
139.3
137.9
151.5

138.2
139.7
141.2
153.6

139.5
139.7
141.6
153.8

142.4
144.0
139.1
157.6

162.7
160.4
159.3
180.6

168.6
168.8
167.8
188.8

173.0
173.5
168.6
190.7

177.0
174.7
172.3
196.0

188.7
190.0
186.3
207.4

187.1
189.9
184.8
202.4

1946

East South Central
Birmingham...........
Jackson6
.................
Knoxville6........ .
Louisville..............
Memphis................
Mobile------- --------West South Central
Dallas....................
Houston______ ___
Little Rock---------New Orleans—. ___
Mountain
Butte...................... 153.6 136.2 135.2 135.7 135.9 136.3 139.7 154.4 163.6 170.0 175.6 180.8 180.2
Denver................... 158.3 139.8 139.5 139.9 140.5 141.7 145.3 161.8 166.3 170.1 171.4 192.7 190.6
Salt Lake City....... 162.0 142.2 141.7 142.5 143.5 145.8 151.7 166.4 171.8 175.4 180.6 191.9 190.6
Pacific
Los Angeles............
Portland, Oreg.......
San Francisco------Seattle___________

166.6
169.0
170.1
164.3

148.6
149.1
149.5
146.0

148.4
148.7
147.7
146.1

148.9
149.9
148.3
145.6

149.0
151.5
149.3
146.3

150.7
153.2
150.4
147.1

154.8
158.4
155.5
151.6

171.2
175.8
172.1
167.1

175.1
182.1
180.6
170.0

176.5
184.5
186.5
175.6

182.8
183.7
191.4
186.1

198.1
194.8
205.2
194.6

195.1
196.0
204.6
195.9

1 Aggregate costs of 61 foods in each city, weighted to represent total purchases by families of wage earners
and lower-salaried workers, have been combined for the United States with the use of population weights.
* Meat prices for June index carried as last reported in April or May. (See technical note.)
3Average prices for beef veal, and pork items held at August level in all cities; for leg of lamb in 45 citi es;
for lamb rib chops in 47 cities. (See technical note.)
* Prices for meats were held at August levels as follows: pork, all cities; round steak, 28 cities; rib roast,
-33 cities; chuck roast, 32 cities; beef liver, 38 cities; hamburger, 30 cities; veal cutlets, 44 cities; leg of lamb,
*3 cities; lamb chops, 33 cities. (See technical note.)
5
* Average prices for meats held at April level for computations of May index. (See technical note.)
6 June 1940=100.
T e c h n i c a l N o t e .— Because of the acute meat shortage during some
months of the year the Bureau was unable to secure a sufficient number
of quotations for meats to determine price trends. For those cities
where this occurred the prices collected during the preceding month were
used in the index for the following month. Thus for the M ay index
meat prices were considered as unchanged from April levels in five
cities. In the June index meat prices were considered as unchanged
from April or M ay levels in 23 cities. The July index, based on the
usual number of quotations for meats, reflects the correct level of prices
.and the full price change that occurred between April and July.
The severity of the meat shortage was at its height in September and
October and again the Bureau was unable to secure an adequate number
o f quotations. Prices collected in August for all meats in all cities
(except lamb in a few cities) were used in the September index. In
mid-October sufficient price quotations were obtained for beef and veal
in many cities, but pork remained so scarce in all cities, and lamb in all
but a few cities, that a reliable sample of prices could not be obtained.
Where October prices were secured in adequate numbers they were
used in the index for October, and compared directly with prices in
August, the last preceding month in which a sufficient number of quota•791528—49---- 3




12
tions was secured for all meats. Prices of the scarce meats where
reliable averages could not be determined in October, were again held
unchanged at August levels. The November index, based on the usual
number of quotations for meats, reflected the correct level of prices and
the full price change that occurred since August.

Trend o f Prices fo r M a jor Food Groups

Cereals and bakery 'products.— In contrast to the slow but generally
steady price advance since 1939, cereals and bakery products, as a
group, increased almost 30 percent during 1946, up 52 percent from
August 1939. In a year retail prices of flour rose 29 percent, corn
meal 38 percent, white bread 31 percent, and rye bread 35 percent.
The Government's export commitments to meet famine relief
requirements was a major factor in the sharp price rise among these
normally stable foods. Early in February with our export shipments
behind schedule because of transportation difficulties and the inade­
quate volume of grain being marketed, the President promulgated a
program to conserve wheat in the United States and to speed up
deliveries. A Famine Emergency Committee was appointed to pro­
pose voluntary means of conservation. Limitations were imposed on
all users of wheat and grains. The wheat flour extraction rate was
raised to 80 percent beginning March 1 and the production of this
“ emergency flour" continued until September 1. (The usual rate of
extraction for white flour is approximately 72 percent.) Bakers
were requested to reduce the weights of loaves of bread by 10 percent*
On a voluntary basis at first, loaf weight reduction was made com­
pulsory in June and terminated in October shortly before the decontrol
of bread prices. In April the production of flour for domestic consump­
tion was limited to 75 percent of the output of the previous year,
increased to 85 percent in July in view of the record proportions of
the new crop and finally terminated in December more than 1 month
after the majority of other grain use restrictions were relaxed or
removed. To speed up the marketing of wheat, the Government
announced a certificate plan in April, whereby farmers could elect
to receive any market price prevailing on or before March 31, 1947,
for wheat delivered immediately. Three weeks later a bonus of 30
cents a bushel above the market price level was offered for both wheat
and corn currently marketed. On May 25 the Government began
requisitioning 25 percent of the wheat stored in elevators. Ceiling
prices for grains and grain products were raised in March and again
in M ay to reflect parity to farmers and stimulate both marketing and
production. This purchase program practically halted all domestic
cash sales in wheat and corn. Future trading was suspended at
various boards of trade in mid-June. Large numbers of flour mills
shut down and bread production declined considerably* Toward the



13
end of May bread and flour shortages became acute and in mid-June
bakers were granted a 10 percent ceiling price rise to compensate for
the cost increase created by the cut in production.
During the first 6 months of the year, retail prices of cereals and
bakery products increased 12 percent, but the Government success­
fully met its high export goal for this period of 225 million bushels of
wheat and flour (in terms of grain equivalent). During July a further
price increase of 3.3 percent was recorded, reflecting in part the ceiling
increases allowed cereal manufacturers and bakers in June, and in
part the lapse of the subsidy payments to flour millers which had
served since November 1943 to prevent undue price rises at retail.
The restoration of ceilings on July 25, with grain prices free of controls
and the flour subsidy not reinstated, brought further retail price
increases as ceilings were raised to compensate for higher costs.
Maximum prices for flour were adjusted upward twice in August and
once in September. By December housewives were paying more than
41 cents for a 5-pound sack of all-purpose family flour and 11.5 cents
for a 16-ounce loaf of white bread as compared with 32 cents and 9
cents spent for these products early in the year.
Meats.— The relative stability of meat prices at retail, that had
existed after the 10-percent roll-back for meats in July 1943, ended in
April 1946 when prices increased 1.1 percent, moving up to the new
maximums granted by OPA to cover wage increases in meat-packing
establishments. Ceilings on beef and veal cuts were increased an
average of one-third cent a pound; lamb, one-half cent; and pork,
three-fourths cent. Supplies in retail channels, that had been large
during the winter of 1945-46, dwindled in the spring as procurement
for export was expanded, production declined seasonally, livestock
was withheld on farms, and black marketing spread because of the
possible end of price controls. The number of animals marketed
through legitimate channels and processed under Federal inspection
fell off considerably, while meat production in nonfederally inspected
plants reached record proportions. In an effort to correct this undue
diversion, wartime slaughter controls were reimposed on April 28 but
the meat shortage grew. By late June, the American Meat Institute
reported that at least half of the Nation’s retail meat butchers had
shut down because of inability to get supplies. During this period,
the Bureau found it very difficult to secure the usual number of quota­
tions on meats and it was necessary in a number of cities in May and
June to estimate prices on the basis of the previous months’ reports.
(See technical notes on tables 2 and 4.)
With the lapse of OPA control in July, meat prices jumped 30
percent. Part of this increase offset the suspension of subsidy pay­
ments to meat packers, which accompanied the lapse in price controls.
In August an additional advance of 7.4 percent occurred, and although



14
consumer resistance began to temper the rate of meat price increases,
prices for beef, veal, lamb, and pork, particularly the scarce cured
pork products, continued to rise markedly. Between June and Au­
gust, meat prices advanced more than 39 percent, with increases
among individual items ranging from 26.4 cents for sliced ham to
12 cents for hamburger. Meat supplies became very large in June
and July, with production at a rate sufficient to provide the average
consumer with 4 pounds per week, equivalent to a per capita rate of
200 pounds annually, compared with the record high in 1944 of 153
pounds.
The reimposition of retail ceilings in September, accompanied by a
renewal of the subsidy program and slaughter restrictions, brought a
drastic reduction in livestock marketing and one of the severest
shortages of meats in retail stores in the Nation’s history. The Gov­
ernment halted all purchases for export because of the scarcity. In
September and October the Bureau again was unable to secure an
adequate number of quotations on meats to determine the price trend
accurately. Following decontrol on October 15, prices for red meats
again rose sharply, reaching a level in November that was 9 percent
higher than in mid-August. Meat supplies increased rapidly and
prices declined 4 percent in December as consumer reaction toward
high prices developed. Prices in December were lower than in
November for all meat items, particularly pork, which dropped 7
percent in price. At the end of the year meat prices averaged more
than 61 percent above December 1945, despite greater supplies, with
part of the advance due to the termination of the subsidy program.
Prices of poultry, the major meat substitute, in general fluctuated
in opposition to meat supplies. During the meat shortages in the
spring and fall, prices for poultry rose, and then declined when meats
appeared in volume. Retail prices of poultry were highest in October,
the height of the meat shortage, up 48 percent from a year earlier. A
month later prices dropped more than 16 percent, as meats became
available, but made a slight recovery at the end of the year. Fresh
fish prices were also maintained at high levels because of the meat
situation and in the last quarter of the year averaged more than 13
percent higher than in January. Because supplies of poultry and
fresh fish were ample during the entire year, ceilings were not restored
for poultry after they lapsed on June 30, or for fresh fish, for which
controls were first temporarily suspended in late May. The canned
fish pack was extremely short, however. Supplies of canned salmon
were the smallest since 1922 and a set-aside for Government purchase
cut deeply into civilian stocks. Ceilings on canned fish were main­
tained until October 24, after which prices climbed 38 percent to the
end of the year.
Dairy 'products.—Retail prices of dairy products climbed 47.5 per­
cent during the year, continuing the upward movement begun in




15
November 1945 with the termination of the direct subsidy of 5
cents per pound to butter manufacturers. The subsidy to cheddar
cheese processors ceased in February 1946 and prices rose gradually
to the new ceilings which offset this withdrawn payment of 3% cents
per pound. During the war period beginning with the 10-percent
roll-back in retail prices of butter in June 1943, the Government's
subsidy program had stabilized retail prices of dairy products at a
level approximately 33 percent above the prewar (1935-39) average.
Butter production declined during the winter of 1945-46 as butterfat was diverted to more remunerative channels, dropping to one-third
of the corresponding output of the previous year, despite the continued
high level of milk production. An extreme shortage developed by
spring which led to an increase in the dairy feed payments to farmers
in May and sizable upward ceiling price adjustments for dairy prod­
ucts in June. From October 1945 to June 1946 prices of butter at
retail had advanced 23 percent with about half of the rise occurring
between M ay and June, the season of the year when prices of all dairy
products are usually at their lowest. Increases in June in the other
dairy products ranged from 5 percent for fluid and evaporated milk
to 3 percent for cheddar cheese. With the lapse of controls in July
prices of dairy products shot upward more than 21 percent. Butter
prices in many parts of the country were quoted as high as $1 a pound
retail and greater supplies were again available for sale. Reaction
to these high prices soon lowered butter quotations and by August
butter was down more than 5 percent, while prices of the other dairy
products made additional gains and continued to increase slowly
throughout the rest of the year, except for a 5-percent decline in the
price of cheese in December. Retail prices of butter, however,
fluctuated thereafter, a peak of 96.3 cents per pound being reached
in October, which compared with the average of 50 cents a year earlier
and 31 cents in August 1939. During the last 3 months of the year
fluid milk was being sold in retail stores for 19 cents a quart on the
average, 4 cents more than in May.
Ceilings and subsidies were not reinstated after they lapsed on
June 30, as the Decontrol Board judged that prices had not risen
“ unreasonably.” With high prices, production of butter increased
but fluid milk consumption decreased somewhat. Nevertheless,
supplies of butter, because of the depleted condition of storage stocks,
did not reach the levels of the previous year. Per capita consump­
tion of 1946 reached a low of 10.3 pounds below the consumption
during the war years and 6.4 pounds less than in the 5 years 1935-39.
Eggs.— Retail prices of eggs fell rapidly early in 1946 reflecting
unusually large supplies resulting from heavy seasonal production.
By February the United States Department of Agriculture began
supporting the market by procuring eggs for drying and freezing,
most of which were later exported. From December to April egg




16
prices had dropped almost 30 percent. This was the only food having
a sizable price decline during that time. The shortage of meats and
seasonally declining production soon gave additional support and
beginning in May the price trend reversed. Between April and
October prices of eggs advanced steadily, 56 percent, more than offset­
ting the declines of the earlier months. Following the decontrol of
meats and the subsequent heavy meat production, prices dropped 6
percent. At the end of the year retail prices of eggs were only 4
percent higher than in December 1945.
Fruits and vegetables.— Price fluctuations for fresh fruits and vege­
tables during 1946 paralleled the usual seasonal pattern more closely
than those for other foods, irrespective of general price control develop­
ments, and because of record supplies of most items. Ceilings on the
majority of products were automatically withdrawn September 1
because of their absence from the list of foods in short supply, pre­
pared by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the new
Price Control Act. Ceilings remained on bananas and oranges until
October 24. At the year’s end, fresh fruits and vegetables were the
only foods selling below (4.1 percent) the levels of December 1945.
Retail prices of potatoes, not under control after September 1945,
generally moved upward in the spring with the marketing of good
quality new crop potatoes that are normally higher in price than the
fall crop of late potatoes. Prices reached a seasonal low in November
when potatoes were retailing for 61 cents a peck and then increased
slightly the following month. For the third time in 4 years, a potato
crop of more than 400 million bushels had been produced and supplies
were so plentiful that the Government made substantial purchases to
maintain support levels. Prices of onions advanced to a seasonal
high of 10 cents per pound in April as weather damage cut shipments
from the Texas crop, but declined about 50 percent from April to the
end of the year, as supplies from other areas appeared in ample
quantities. Retail prices for sweetpotatoes were slightly higher than
during 1945 despite a slight improvement in supplies. The truck
crops, particularly lettuce and spinach were of record size and prices
were generally below those of the previous year.
Because the citrus crop was of record proportions for the fifth
consecutive year, ceilings had been suspended in November 1945 but
the rapid price increases that followed brought the reinstatement of
controls in early January. Oranges remained under price control
until October 24, except for the brief period in July. Early in the
year prices of oranges rose less than seasonally due to the preponder­
ance of small-sized fruit and declined after July because of the large
intermediate and late crops. Prices for apples, particularly for the
extremely scarce eastern varieties, were high in the late winter and
spring, declining somewhat in the fall with shipments from the new



17
crop. The wartime shortage of bananas continued in 1946 although
it was not so severe as in earlier years. Prices of bananas were kept
fairly stable by controls until October 24, and increased sharply
thereafter. By the end of the year housewives were paying nearly
15 cents a pound as compared with 10.5 cents in December 1945.
Prices of canned fruits and vegetables generally began to weaken
in March as the approach of the new canning season brought promise
of record packs at a time when existing supplies were ample, in con­
trast to the shortages of the war period. By June, prices were more
than 2 percent lower than in January. The OPA holiday offset the
decline and prices rose steadily through the end of the year, an increase
of 35 percent from June levels. In addition to the removal of ceilings
in September and October, the rise was augmented by the withdrawal
of subsidy payments after June 30 to processors of the major canned
vegetables. The increase was also a reflection of the higher ceilings
granted to processors for the new packs to cover the rise in costs of
production. Ceiling prices on canned beans were suspended on March
1. For canned peas they were terminated September 1 by omission
from the Secretary of Agriculture’s list of items in short supply.
Canned peaches and corn were similarly decontrolled on October 1,
and ceilings on canned pineapple and tomatoes were terminated
October 24.
Dried fruits and vegetables were in inadequate supply throughout
the year and prices climbed almost 60 percent during the year. Export
demand for these products was heavy and the packs of dried fruit
and crop of dry beans were inadequate to meet all requirements.
Some of the price rise compensated for the loss of subsidies withdrawn
June 30 and controls on prune prices were removed in mid-August
{retroactive to July 28) and on October 24 on dry beans.
Beverages.— Retail prices of beverages, fairly stable during the
first 6 months of the year, advanced steadily thereafter, up 41 per­
cent during the 12 months. Between November 1945 and June 1946,
coffee importers had been subsidized at the rate of 3 cents a pound in
order to permit them to meet world competition without subsequent
retail price increases. Ceilings on coffee were increased in late June
as South American countries asked higher prices. A further increase
in August was designed to offset the loss of subsidy payments. It
became increasingly difficult to obtain supplies, and ceilings were
finally removed October 17. Between June and December retail
coffee prices increased an average of 13 cents a pound. Retail prices
for tea were fairly stable throughout the year despite the return by
the Government of the importing function to private interests in the
spring and the withdrawal of ceilings on October 24.
Fats and oils.— The world-wide scarcity of fats and oils continued
in 1946 to support the price level while domestic production lagged



18
with the sporadic marketing of livestock during the year and an inade­
quate cottonseed and flaxseed supply. During the first 6 months of
the year the short stocks were generally retailing at the level of OPA
maximums. Freedom from controls in July and August resulted in a
sharp increase of 43 percent for those months. The reinstatement of
ceilings, which were higher than those of June, brought a decline of
16 percent in the following month, lard prices alone dropping more
than one-fourth. Following the complete abandonment of controls
between October 15 and 29, prices began to soar. By November prices
of lard at retail had more than doubled, selling at an average of 53
cents a pound, as compared with 19 cents in June and 10 cents in
August 1939. Shortenings also increased rapidly, up 66 to 85 percent;
oleomargarine advanced 56 percent; and cooking and salad oils were
up 45 percent. The United States Department of Agriculture at the
same time terminated all inventory, use, and distribution controls
over the fats and oils. By December prices for fats and oils had
dropped 15 percent from the high levels of November, led by a
decrease of one-third in the price of lard, as consumer resistance de­
veloped and supplies increased. At the close of the year prices of
fats and oils were more than 65 percent above the levels of a year
earlier, the largest annual increase among the major food groups.
Sugar and sweets.— Retail prices of sugar also advanced consider­
ably during the year—38.5 percent—in marked contrast to the stability
that existed during the four war years. Because the world-wide and
domestic shortage continued in 1946, price ceilings were retained
throughout the year even though most foods were decontrolled. Part
of the price rise occurred early in the year when ceilings were adjusted
upward; in February, to cover increased wage costs and in late June,
to compensate for a subsidy reduction. Following an agreement with
Cuba in July, which geared increased payments to Cuba to the move­
ments of the Bureau's Consumers' Price or Food Indexes, ceilings
were moved upward three times. Sugar was the only commodity
that was rationed in 1946. In 1941 the average American consumed
104 pounds of refined sugar, or 2 pounds a week; in 1946 he had less
than 1.5 pounds a week or 73 pounds a year. Price controls were also
maintained throughout the year on com sirup, because of its compet­
itive position with sugar. Retail prices of corn sirup rose more than
23 percent during 1946 with ceiling price adjustments granted to
offset the rising cost of production.
Retail P rices o f Individual Foods in 1946

Average retail prices of individual foods for large cities combined
are presented in table 3 for each month in 1946. Annual average
retail prices of individual foods in each of 56 cities, for 1946, are
shown in table 4.



Table 3 .— Average retail prices o f principal food s in large cities com bined, b y months, 1946
791528—49-

1946

Article

Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat.......................... _____5 pounds..
Macaroni........... ............. ......... ............ pound..
Wheat cereal *______________ ____28 ounces..
Corn flakes........ ..................... ____ 11 ounces..
Corn meal--------------------------- ............ pound..
Rice i......... ......................... ...... ............... do___
Rolled oats........ ....................... ....... ........d o.—
Flour pancake 1........................ ....... 20 ounces..
Bakery products:
Bread:
White................................. ..............pound..
Whole wheat............... ...... ............... do___
R ye............... .....................___ ____ .do___
Vanilla cookies................... ...... ............... do___
Soda crackers............................
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Beef:
Round steak.............................
Rib roast - ............................... ............... do___
Chuck roast--......................... ............... do—
Stew m eatl. ..................... ........ ...............d o___
Liver........................................ ....... ........do___
Hamburger...............................................d o ___
Veal:
Cutlets______________ ______ ............ ..d o .—
Roast, boned and rolled 1.........................do—
Pork:
C h op s--..................- ................ ................. do___
Bacon, sliced............................. ................do—
Ham:
Sliced................... -’.............................. do___
Whole......... - .....................
Salt p o rk .................................. ................. do—
Liver L ...................... ..............____ ____ do___
Sausage1..... ............................................... do—
Bologna, b ig 1....... .................................... do—
See footnotes at end of table.




Average
for the Jan. 15
year

Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 M ay 15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15

Cents
31.9
15.6
23.4
9.3
6.5
12.9
10.5
12.4

Cents
32.0
15.6
23.4
9.3
6.5
12.9
10.4
12.4

Cents
31.9
15.6
23.2
9.3
6.5
12.9
10.4
12.4

9.7
9.9
28.4
18.6

8.8

8.9
9.7
9.9
28.6
18.6

8.9
9.7
9.9
29.6
18.6

10.5
30.0
18.6

44.4
34.1

40.6
33.4
28.4
29.8
37.4
27.3

40.8
33.3
28.5
29.8
37.4
27.2

40.8
33.3
28.3
29.9
37.4
27.2

55.9
43.1

44.6
36.0

44.6
34.7

48.5
53.3

37.1
40.9

64.0
47.8
32.9
2 25.8
44.9
237.7

50.5
35.7

Cents
35.4
16.7
223.4
10.4
7.5
14.0
10.5
3 12.6
10.4
11.3

12.0

31.9
20.3
52.1
43.1
36.6

234.4

22.0
22.2

38.8
34.0

Cents
31.9
15.7
23.1
9.3
6.5
13.0
10.4
12.4

Cents
31.7
15.6
23.0
9.3

Cents
31.9
15.6
23.0
9.3

13.1
10.4
12.4

13.2
10.5
12.4

9.3

9.5
10.3

10.0

6.6

6.8

10.6

Cents
35.0
16.0
23.5
10.5
7.8
13.8
10.5
12.7
10.7
11.7

11.6
12.6

(3
)

11.6

9.0
16.3
10.7
(3
)

12.0

61.1
50.0
43.4
41.8
47.1
41.0

63.1
52.1
43.8
43.9
51.2
40.0

(5
)
(5
)
(5
)
(5
)
(5
)
(5
)

(8
)
(s)
(5
)
(3
)
(s)
(8
)

65.6
55.9
47.1
(3
)
53.5
43.1

64.3
55.2
46.3
(3
)
52.7
41.4

45.2
35.7

64.4
48.9

49.6

66.6

(5
)
(5
)

(5
)
(8
)

70.3
53.2

69.7
52.3

37.5
41.7

37.5
41.8

51.2
51.2

61.0
63.1

(5
)
(8
)

(5
)
(8
)

66.5
76.1

57.7
75.2

50.1
36.1

50.8
36.2

64.9
48.5
30.1
29.1
46.2
42.6

77.2
58.8
42.4
34.3
48.9
46.0

(5
)
(«)
(5
)

(8
)
(8
)

84.8
67.3
52.8

83.7
65.3
50.3

41.7
34.0
29.0
30.1
38.8
28.0

44.6
35.8

45.1
35.6

45.2
36.2

37.0
41.0

37.0
40.9

37.4
41.5

50.3
35.7

50.8
35.9

50.4
36.0

22.4
38.9
34.2

13.2

10.6

9.0
16.4
10.7
(3
)

11.8

13.4
(*)
24.5

41.6
33.8
28.9
30.0
38.6
28.0

22.4
38.6
33.9

11.6

10.6

8.6

14.8

Cents
41.1
19.0
(3
)

11.5
12.4
13.2
37.2
24.2

41.2
33.6
28.9
30.1
37.8
27.7

22.3
38.8
33.9

12.8

11.6

8.4
14.1

Cents
40.7
18.7
(3
)

12.5
13.4
33.7

30.9
18.8

22.6

14 4
10.5

Cents
40.3
18.6
(»)
11.7

13.2
34.0

28.9
18.7

22.2

11.2
8.0

Cents
38.6
18.0
24.4

12.4
13.1
33.9

11.7
12.5
29.7
18.7

22.2

Cents
38.2
16.7
23.6

12.1

22.8

22.4
39.2
34.4

22.8

22.4
39.3
34.6

12.6

20.6

21.6

22.2

(5)

(8)
(3)

(5
)
(8
)

(8
)
(3
)

(3)

57.4
(3
)

11.5

12.6

(3)

55.0
(3
)

CD

Table 3.— Average retail prices o f principal food s in large cities com bined, b y m on th s, 1946— Continued
1946
Article

Meats, poultry, and fish—Continued
Lamb:
Leg......................................................... pound..
Rib chops..................................................do___
Poultry: Roasting chickens............................do____
Fish:®
Salmon:
Pink....................................... 16-ounce can..
Red i . .................................................. d o ....
Dairy products:
Butter............ ...............................................pound..
Cheese.............................................................. do—
Milk:
Fresh (delivered) .....................................quart..
Fresh (grocery)......................................... do----Evaporated...............................14}4-ounce can..
Eggs: Fresh......... ................................................. dozen..
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples..................................................... poundBananas.................................................... -do—
Oranges...................................... ..........- -dozen..
Grapefruit1
............................................... each..
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green........................................... pound..
Cabbage.................................................... do—
Carrots.................................................... bunch. _
Lettuce......................................................head—
Onions....................................................pound. _
Potatoes............................................16 pounds..
Spinach................................................... pound..
Sweetpotatoes........................................... do—
Beets 1..................................................... bunch..
Canned fruits:
Peaches.......................................... No. 2H can..
Pineapple.................................................. do----Grapefruit juice................................No. 2 can..
Canned vegetables:
Beans, green..............................................do----Corn...........................................................do----Peas........................................................... do-----




Average
for the
year

Jan. 15

Cents
48.7
54.4
52.6

Cents
40.3
45.7
46.3

Cents
40.4
46.0
45.8

Cents
40.4
45.9
45.5

Cents
40.7
46.3
48.3

Cents
40.8
46.6
48.9

Cents
40.9
46.5
49.3

Cents
50.5
57.5
53.8

Cents
58.7
62.4
52.9

Cents
(5
)
(5
)
58.2

26.0
45.0

24.7
43.2

24.8
42.9

24.9
43.3

24.8
43.9

24.7
43.5

24.5
43.1

25.4
43.7

25.5
43.2

71.0
50.1

54.7
36.5

54.7
37.3

54.8
38.1

55.0
38.4

55.1
40.0

61.0
41.3

80.5
51.2

17.6
16.7
11.5
58.6

15.4
14.5
9.9
59.9

15.4
14.5
9.9
50.1

15.4
14.5
9.9
48.3

15.4
14.6
9.9
47.8

15.6
14.7
9.9
48.7

16.4
15.5
10.4
51.0

13.4
11.6
49.9
9.3

14.4
11.0
46.0
8.6

14.5
10.9
44.9
8.3

14.5
10.9
44.8
8.3

14.8
10.9
45.0
8.6

14.9
10.9
48.4
8.8

19.6
5.9
9.0
11.6
6.9
70.2
11.3
10.9
2 9.2

25.0
5.7
9.0
10.6
8.1
70.0
12.6
10.1
9.4

21.1
6.3
8.7
11.0
8.4
72.2
12.7
10.4
9.4

20.2
7.6
8.6
11.9
8.8
74.6
10.9
10.9
9.5

20.5
8.0
8.8
11.4
9.6
77.8
10.2
11.4
10.2

29.3
27.8
14.4

28.1
28.0
14.1

28.1
27.5
14.1

28.1
26.4
14.1

14.3
15.5
14.3

13.6
14.7
13.8

13.6
14.8
13.8

13.6
14.8
13.6

Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 M ay 15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15

68.0

Cents
62.3
66.6
57.0

24.0
41.7

24.1
43.2

31.1
52.1

76.4
57.4

82.9
60.3

96.3
65.3

88.6
69.6

18.9
17.9
11.6
55.8

19.3
18.1
12.6
60.2

19.3
18.2
12.7
67.0

20.0
19.0
13.2
74.4

20.0
19.2
13.9
69.9

14.7
10.9
50.9
9.5

14.0
11.9
57.7
10.0

12.1
11.3
55.4
10.6

11.2
11.0
57.4
11.7

11.4
11.0
57.4
10.0

12.0
13.7
48.9
8.9

18.5
7.1
9.0
10.6
8.3
81.1
9.8
11.9
10.3

16.7
5.5
9.1
11.7
8.4
75.2
9.7
12.4
9.6

18.3
4.8
9.2
11.6
7.0
76.4
12.0
13.4
7.7

16.3
5.3
8.7
11.5
5.2
67.6
13.1
12.0
7.9

17.4
5.4
8.9
12.2
4.7
63.7
11.9
9.5
8.4

18.1
5.1
9.5
11.5
4.7
61.0
10.8
9.1
(3
)

22.7
5.1
9.5
13.2
4.5
61.0
10.6
9.4
(3
)

28.0
26.4
14.0

27.9
26.0
14.1

27.7
25.6
14.4

29.5
26.8
14.8

29.0
26.6
15.0

30.1
28.5
15.3

30.8
28.9
15.2

31.8
31.1
14.8

13.6
14.8
13.6

13.6
14.8
13.1

13.7
14.8
13.7

14.0
14.9
14.0

14.3
14.9
14.5

14.6
15.4
14.8

15.0
16.2
15.2

15.7
17.3
15.6

Cents

fl
f
(*)

Cents
59.4
65.6
57.2
(4)
91. 5
65. 8

20.3
19. 4
no

6J.8

12.4
14.5
42.6

8.1

20.0

5.4
9.6
12.6
4.8
61.4
11.6
10.0
(3
)
32.1
(4)

13.2

15.8
17.9
15.8

to
o

Tomatoes.................................................. do----Soup, vegetable1______________11-ounce can..
Dried fruits: Prunes.................................... pound..
Dried vegetables:
Navy beans...............................................do-----Soup, dehydrated, chicken noodle1
-----ounce..
Beverages:
.............pound..
Coffee...................................
.........H pound..
Tea........................................
.........H pound. .
C ocoa1..................................
Fats and oils:
.............. pound—
Lard............... - ....................
Shortening other than lard:
................. do___
In cartons......................
................ d o ....
In other containers.......
................. pint..
Salad dressing......................
.............pound..
Oleomargarine.....................
................do___
Peanut butter......................
................. pint—
Oil, cooking or salad1.........
Sugar and sweets:
.............. pound..
Sugar....................................
........ 24 ounces. .
Corn sirup............................
16 fluid ounces..
Molasses1.............................
.........16 ounces—
Apple butter *......................
i Not included in the index,
a Not priced after September; average of 9 months.
* Pricing discontinued.
* Inadequate reports.




15.0
13.5
19.1

12.9
13.3
17.7

14.0
2 3.9

11.7
3.9

34.4
24.1
10.8

30.4
24.0
10.5

26.3

18.7

24.4
28.8
30.5
28.3
33.9
34.0

20.2
24.8
28.1
2 24.1
32.2
30.8

7.7
17.1
20.5
2 15.3

6.7
15.7
20.3
15.0

12.9
13.3
17.6

12.8
13.3
17.6

12.6
13.3
17.7

12.5
13.4
17.5

12.7
13.4
17.9

15.3
13.4
18.1

16.7
13.4
18.4

17.6
13.7
20.0

20.0
14.1
23.8

21.1
14.3
25.6

11.7
3.9

11.9
3.9

12.2
3.9

12.5
3.9

12.7
3.9

13.8
4.0

13.9
4.0

14.6
(3
)

20.2
(3
)

21.1
(3
)

30.4
24.0
10.4

30.4
24.0
10.4

30.7
24.0
10.4

30.7
24.1
10.4

30.9
24.1
10.5

31.0
24.1
10.4

40.4
24.3
10.5

41.6
24.3
10.9

41.9
24.1
12.1

44.1
24.1
12.5

18.6

18.7

18.8

18.8

23.5

38.4

28.2

25.8

52.6

35.1

20.1
24.8
28.2
24.1
33.2
30.6

20.2
24.8
28.3
24.2
33.3
30.4

20.2
24.8
27.9
24.3
33.6
30.7

20.2
24.7
28.2
24.1
33.8
30.4

20.9
25.2
28.7
25.2
34.1
31.4

26.7
28.9
31.2
30.4
34.2
33.6

22.9
26.3
29.7
26.5
34.6
32.1

22.3
27.0
30.2
27.2
34.9
32.1

41.3
44.9
38.3
42.5
35.2
46.6

(4
)
44.3
39.3
42.5
35.4
48.3

7.1
15.6
20.3
14.9

7.2
15.6
20.3
15.1

7.3
15.8
20.3
14.9

7.3
15.7
20.4
15.6

7.4
16.0
20.4
15.8

7.5
17.4
20.5
15.6

7.5
18.6
20.6
15.8

9.0
19.2
20.8
<)
3

9.1
19.8
20.8
(3
)

9.4
19.4
21.0
<)
3

5 Average prices not available in a number of cities due to the meat shortage.
« Costs of fresh and/or frozen fish are included in the index, but average prices are not
computed.
* Revised.




to

Table 4 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1946
New England
Article

United
States

Cereals and bakery products:
Cents
Cereals:
35.4
Flour, wheat____ _____________ _______5 pounds..
16.7
Macaroni_____________________ _________pound..
23.4
Wheat cereal12_______________ ______ 28 ounces..
10.4
Cora flakes______ ___________ ______ 11 ounces..
7.5
Corn meal___________________ _________ pound..
14.0
Rice 1_______ ___ ____ _________ .............. do___
10.5
Rolled oats_________ __________
12.6
Flour, pancake 12_____________ ______ 20 ounces..
Bakery products:
Bread:
10.4
White____________________ ________ pound._
11.3
Whole wheat--------------------- ___________ d o .—
12.0
R y e________ ____ _________ ___________ do___
31.9
Vanilla cookies. _ _____________ ___________ do___
20.3
Soda crackers___ _____________
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Beef:
52.1
Round steak__________________ .....................do___
43.1
Rib roast________ ________ ____ .............. ...... do—
36.6
Chuck roast.............. .................................... ..d o ___
34.4
Stew m eat12________ ____ ____ ..... ........... ..d o ___
44.4
Liver_______________ ____ _____ .............. ...... do___
Hamburger___ _____ __________.................... do___
34.1
Veal:
55.9
Cutlets________________ _______ ................— do—
43.1
Roast, boned and rolled 1______ -------- --------do___
Pork:
48.5
Chops________________________ ___________ do___
53.3
Bacon, sliced_____________________________ do___
Ham:
64.0
Sliced------------------- ------------ ___________ do___
47.8
Whole____ ___________ ____ .................... do—
32.9
Salt pork-------------------------------- .....................do___
25.8
Liver 1 2 ____________ _______ ____ _____ .d o —
44.9
Sausage1----------------- ---------------.....................d o .—
37.7
Bologna, big 12------------------------ .....................d o ....




Boston Bridge­ Fall
port
River

Middle Atlantic

Port­
Man­
New
land,
chester Haven Maine

Provi­ Buffalo New­
dence
ark

New
York

Phila­ Pitts­
delphia burgh

Roch­
ester

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

Cents

36.0
16.9
23.3
10.7
7.3
(3
)
10.4
13.1

35.8
18.0
23.7
10.4
7.3
(3
)
10.6
13.0

36.5
17.5
23.1
10.3
7.3
(3
)
10.7
13.0

35.8
17.8
23.8
10.5
7.2
(3
)
10.6
12.2

36.3
16.6
25.1
10.2
7.1
(3)
10.5
13.0

35.6
17.6
22.9
10.2
7.1
(3
)
10.4
12.3

36.0
15.6
22.4
10.2
7.3
(3
)
10.4
12.7

34.2
16.4
22.2
10.0
7.2
(3
)
10.2
12.0

36.5
17.4
24.9
10.0
7.7
14.8
10.7
12.3

37.0
17.2
23.9
10.7
7.7
14.5
10.4
13.2

34.9
17.5
23.9
10.3
7.2
14.6
10.2
12.1

35.2
17.1
23.1
10.3
7.0
(3
)
10.3
11.9

35.9
16.6
23.0
10.6
6.6
13.7
10.4
12.2

9.7
10.6
11.2
(3
)
21.2

9.7
10.6
11.1
<27.2
20.5

10.2
10.7
10.8
(3
)
20.9

10.3
11.4
12.1
(3
)
20.9

9.7
10.8
11.2
(3
)
20.7

10.1
11.2
11.7
(3)
20.7

10.2
11.6
12.1
(3)
21.1

9.9
11.9
11.7
(3
)
21.3

10.8
11.7
12.0
<28.2
20.8

11.2
11.9
12.4
29.0
20.7

10.9
12.2
12.5
<29.4
20.5

10.6
12.4
11.7
(3
)
20.9

9.8
10.5
10.8
(3
)
20.2

556.6
544.1
(3
)
(3
)
546.0
536.1

«55.5
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

6 53.8
*41.5
«37.6
8 37.9
(3
)
(3
)

« 55.0
641.6
836.8
(3
)
6 40.8
836.0

6 57.0
6 45.6
(3
)
6 41.3
8 46.2
(3
)

655.2
640.8
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
636.1

754.8
(3
)
940.2
(3
)
(3
)
736.3

850.9
841.4
6 36.3
(3
)
«41.6
6 34.6

554.9
544.8
« 38. 2
(3
)
546.4
536.9

5 54.7
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
834.8

«54.9
6 44.0
637.1
839.2
(3
)
834.8

6 51.5
842.7
836.4
8 29.1
6 43.3
834.0

« 55.2
6 44.0
638.3
840.3
6 45.1
835.1

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

« 55.8
(3
)

560.9
(3
)

5 60.1
(3
)

6 59.5
6 46.8

6 55.4
6 44.3

6 59.0
(3
)

549.5
552.5

549.8
5 52.8

«50.4
6 52.7

6 48.9
« 52.0

6 50.0
6 53.5

6 49.2
6 52.6

7 50.1
7 52.2

6 50.2
6 52.2

5 48.8
5 52.8

549.9
«53. 6

6 48.9
« 53.4

« 47. 6
6 51.3

6 51.1
«53.8

562.2
547.0
526.6
(3
)
549.5
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
5 27.6
(3
)
545.0
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
« 26.4
(3)
6 51.0
«37.8

(3
)
(3
)
« 26.6
(3
)
8 45.8
837.7

(3
)
(3
)
6 28.6
(3
)
« 47.0
840.2

(3
)
(3
)
« 28. 2
(3
)
646.0
38.0

(3
)
(3
)
7 26.9
(3
)
7 50.2
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
643.4
838.1

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
545.3
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

6 65.4
6 48.4
(3)
(3
)
6 46.8
839.6

)
((3)
3
( 3)

6 67.0
6 49.2
633.6
(3
)
6 43.2
837.9

(3
)
6 44.3
836.8

Cents

Lamb:
Leg..................................................................... do—
48.7 850.4
Rib chops.....................................................
do_
54.4 «55.0
Poultry: Roasting chickens...............................
do_
52.6 » 52.7
F ish:»
Salmon:
Pink.............................................. 16-ounce can.
26.0
(3
)
R ed1
_________________________
do_______ (3
45.0
)
Dairy products:
Butter_________________________ ___________ pound71.0
69.9
Cheese...........................................................
do 50.1
51.2
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)..................
quart.
17.6
18.2
Fresh (grocery)_____ ______
d o ...
16.7
17.2
Evaporated............................... ...... 14H-ounce can.
11.5
11.9
Eggs: Fresh................................................................. dozen..
58.6
60.6
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples............................................................pound.
13.4
13.9
Bananas............................................................ do___
11.6 8 12.4
Oranges........................................................... dozen..
49.9
47.0
Grapefruit1..................................................... .each.
9.3
9.7
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green..................................................pound.
19.6
20.9
Cabbage............................................................do___
5.9
6.3
Carrots...........................................................bunch..
9.0
10.0
Lettuce............................................................. head..
11.6
12.6
Onions_____________________
pound..
6.9
7.4
Potatoes____________________________ 15 pounds..
70.2
64.9
Spinach..........................................................pound..
11.3
11.2
Sweetpotatoes...................................................d o ....
10.9
11.0
Beets 12-._ .....................................................bunch..
9.2
10.3
Canned fruits:
Peaches................................................ No. 2H can..
29.3
Pineapple..........................................................do___
27.8
8
Grapefruit juice....................................... No. 2 can..
14.4
14.8
Canned vegetables:
Beans, green..... ................................................do___
14.3
16.5
Corn.........................
d o ....
15.5
16.1
Peas............................................................
do_______
14.3
16.2
Tomatoes.....................................................
do_
15.0
(3
)
Soup, vegetable 1................................ 11-ounce can..
13.5
13.6
Dried fruits: Prunes...........................................pound..
19.1
18.7
Dried vegetables:
Navy beans__________________________
do_______
14.0
15.7
Soup, dehydrated, chicken noodle 13...........ounce..
3.9
3.9
Beverages:
Coffee.................................................................. .pound..
34.4
36.6
T ea.................................................................................Upound..
24.1
23.5
Cocoa 1............................................................................Hpound..
10.8
11.1
See footn otes at end o f table.




5 50.3
(3
)
ii 53.0
(3
)
(3
)
71.1
50.8
18.1
17.1
12.0
60.4
14.5
12.1
47.8
10.1
22.0
5.9
10.2
13.8
7.0
64.5
10.9
11.9
10.0

8
15.1
(3
)
16.1

( 3)

(3
)
13.6
21.1
14.4
4.0
35.8
23.4
10.7

•48.7
#55.6
52.9

»46.2
852.4
(3
)

(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

4 27.2
(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

72.0
50.5

(3
)

70.7
(3
)

70.5
49.4

70.3
50.4

18.5
17.2
11.7
60.2

17.6
16.8
11.4
58.2

19.5
18.3
11.6
62.1

19.5
17.2
11.7
62.9

17.2
16.5
11.7
60.8

17.5
17.6
11.4
58.7

17.8
16.9
11.6
58.4

14.3
(3
)

11.4
47.8
9.2
19.8
5.4
9.0
12.1
6.8
63.8
10.3
10.7
8.3

12.7

11.9
49.0
9.7
18.7
5.8
9.9
12.5
7.0
71.3
10.8
11.0
8.6

13.1

13.7
(3
)

11.3
48.6
9.5
20.1
6.4
9.9
13.2
7.1
70.9
11.4
11.5
8.7
30.2
(3
)
14.0
14.2
15.9
14.2
(3
)
13.4
19.6
4 14.2
4.1
33.5
23.4
10.9

13.5

11.4
48.8
8.7
19.7
5.9
9.2
12.1
7.0
66.4
11.4
12.0
9.1

13.1

12.6
(3
)

6 50.2
6 56.0
52.9

6 48.6
6 52.6
52.8

12 53.0

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

70.2

71.2
50.7

69.9
(3
)

70.4
53.6

69.7

(3
)

17.8
17.9
11.7
58.0

18.1
17.2
11.8
60.7

17.6
18.0
11.8
59.8

14.0
12.2

11.9
47.2
9.8
19.6
5.6
9.2
12.2
7.4
60.0

13.8

14.4
12.5

50.7
9.8
(3
)

6.1
9.9
12.7
7.3
59.1
(3
)
11.2
10.0
(3
)
(3
)

15.5
15.7
15.9
15.6
(3
)
13.3
18.5
(3
)

3.9
34.1
22.8
11.5

49.0
10.0
21.6
6.0
10.0
12.4
6.9
65.3
11.7
11.7
9.6
(3
)
(3
)

15.0
15.4
15.9
16.3
(3
)
13.7
20.2
13.3
3.8
35.7
23.4
10.7

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)

15.4
14.1
15.6
15.2
(3
)
13.8
18.8

47.2
10.0
19.6
6.2
10.1
13.5
7.2
64.0
11.0
11.0
10.4
29.9
(3
)
15.4
15.2
15.8
15.8
15.6
13.2
18.2

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

10.8

(3
)
(3
)

4.1
34.8
23.3
10.6

« 47.2
#55.6
52.6

«49.5
5 54.4
ii 53.2

1 48.0
0
io 52.1
52.2

3.9
35.6
23.5

11.1

6 46.4
«48.7
6 54.2
553. 4
51.8 ii 53. 2

(3
)

h
14.5
15.2
15.3
14.2
(3
)
13.3
418.2
11.5
3.7
32.3
23.2
10.4




(3
)

(3
)

00
14.6
14.3
16.2
15.2
(3
)
13.7
419.4
(3
)

4.1
35.5
23.6
10.8

72.6

51.2
9.9
19.5
6.1
10.1
12.5
7.0
72.5
12.0
12.0
9.0

(3
)
(3
)

14.8
14.9
16.2
16.0
(3
)
13.5
19.5
14.6
4.2
35.4
23.4
11.0

(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

15.0
14.1
15.6
14.7
15.0
13.5
19.0
13.4
3.9
34.6
23.3
10.3

(3
)
(3
)

51.5
9.6
21.1
5.4
8.9
12.7
6.5
59.3
10.8
10.9

(3
)

29.8
15.0
15.0
15.0
14.7
(3
)
13.2
19.3
12.6
3.9
33.1
23.5
10.8
(3
)

Table 4 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1946 —Continued
New England
Article

Fats and oils:
Lard................ ............................... .....................pound..
Shortening other than lard:
In cartons................................. ...................... -d o .—
In other containers................. ........................ d o „ „
Salad dressing............................... _____________ pint..
Oleomargarine................................ .....................pound..
Peanut butter................................ ........................ d o .—
.................... ........................ pint..
Oil, cooking or salad 1
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar.............................................. ...................p o u n d ..
Corn sirup...................................... ......... ...... 24 ounces..
Molasses1 ................. .................... ____16 fluid ounces..
Apple butter n .............................. ________ 16 ounces..




United
States

Fall
Boston Bridge­ River
port

Middle Atlantic

Man­
New
chester Haven

Port­
land,
Maine

Provi­ Buffalo New­
dence
ark

New
York

Phila­ Pitts­
delphia burgh

Roch­
ester

Cents
26.3

Cents
27.8

Cents
26.0

Cents
28.4

Cents
26.8

Cents
27A

Cents
27.7

Cents
28.3

Cents
25.2

Cents
25.8

Cents
(3
)

Cents
25.1

Cents
26.2

Cents
26.6

24.4
28.8
30.5
28.3
33.9
34.0

(3
)
29.4
434.2
29.4
33.7
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
28.1
33.1
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
32.3
28.4
33.6
(3
)

(3
)
29.1
30.3
28.3
33.4
(3
)

(3
)
29.6
31.5
28.8
33.8
(3
)

(3
)
28.9
33.7
28.1
34.8
(3
)

(3
)
28.5
(3
)
28.0
34.5
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
28.1
27.2
32.9
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
29.3
35.0
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
34.2
(3
)
35.0
(3
)

(3
)
28.6
30.8
(3
)
32.5
(3
)

(3
)
28.8
30.1
27.0
33.0
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
28.4
29.0
34.6
(3
)

7.7
17.1
20.5
15.3

7.6
19.1
20.2
(3
)

7.7
(3
)
20.6
15.6

7.8
19.0
20.4
(3
)

7.8
18.4
20.7
(3
)

7.8
19.7
20.2
14.8

7.9
(3
)
19.9
(3
)

7.6
18.5
20.1
(3
)

7.6
17.3
20.4
(3
)

7.6
(3
)
20.2
14.8

7.8
18.2
21.2
14.7

7.4
18.1
20.0
(3
)

7.7
17.3
20.1
13.9

7.7
(3
)
20.7
14.1

Article

Middle
Atlan­
tic—
Continued
Scran­
ton

Cereals and bakery products:
Cents
Cereals:
Flour, wheat............................... ............ 5 pounds..
34.0
Macaroni..... ..................... .......... ............... pound..
15.8
Wheat cereal 12.................. ........ ______ 28 ounces..
22.7
Corn flakes....... .......................... ............11 ounces..
9.7
Corn meal.................... .............. .................pound..
7.0
R ice 1........................................... ...................do___
16.3
Rolled oats......... ......................... ........ .......... do___
10.2
Flour, pancake12....................... ............20 ounces..
11.4
Bakery products:
Bread:
White.......................................... ........... pound..
10.3
Whole wheat......................... ....................do___
12.1
R ye............ ................................................do___
12.4
Vanilla cookies.................................................do___
(3
)
17.9
Soda crackers............................. .....................do___
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Beef:
Round steak............................... .....................do___ 553.5
Rib roast..... .....................................................d o .—
(3
)
Chuck roast......................................................d o .—
«37.8
Stew meat l2._................................................. do___
(3
)
Liver..... ........ ............................. ..................... do___ 1142.8
Hamburger....................................................... do___ ®34.8
Veal:
Cutlets______________ ________ _.................. .do___ 556.8
Roast, boned and rolled1
.............................. -do___ 544.0
Pork:
Chops.......... .................................
(3
)
Bacon, sliced............................... ..................... do___ 552.7
Ham:
S lic e d --............................... ..................... do___
(3
)
Whole......................................................... do___
(3
)
Salt pork—................ ................. ..................... do___
(3
)
L iver12............................................................. do___
(3
)
Sausage1
......................................
«47.5
Bologna, b ig 12................................................. do—
(3
)

See footnotes at end of table.




West North Central

East North Central

Spring- Cedar Kansas Minne­
Cin­
Cleve­ Colum­ Detroit Indian­ Mil­
Chica­
cinnati land
apolis waukee Peoria field Rapids City
bus
apolis Omaha
go

Cents
33.3
14.6
22.3
10.1
7.4
13.1
10.1
12.3

Cents
34.2
17.1
23.5
10.3
7.3
13.4
10.3
13.3

Cents
35.3
15.6
22.6
10.5
7.3
13.6
10.3
11.0

Cents
34.4
18.3
21.9
10.6
7.2
413. 7
10.4
12.6

Cents
34.0
17.2
22.7
10.4
7.6
12.6
10.1
12.0

Cents
34.9
16.5
23.9
10.2
7.0
(3
)
10.1
11.9

Cents
34.7
14.3
22.7
410.3
6.6
(3
)
10.4
12.2

Cents
35.6
15.5
21.7
10.2
7.7
(3
)
10.3
11.6

Cents
35.2
15.4
23.5
10.4
7.9
(3
)
10.6
12.7

Cents
35.5
19.5
23.8
10.7
7.3
413. 5
10.8
13.1

Cents
32.5
19.2
22.8
10.3
7.6
13.2
10.5
13.2

Cents
34.9
16.3
23.9
10.4
7.3
13.4
10.6
12.7

Cents
32.7
19.0
23.7
10.4
6.7
413.3
10.6
12.8

9.7
11.0
11.4
(3
)
19.8

9.8
12.4
12.6
(3
)
19.2

10.2
11.8
11.7
(3
>
20.6

9.8
12.0
12.7
(3
)
19.6

9.9
12.3
11.7
(3
)
20.2

9.8
11.2
11.4
(3
)
19.4

9.8
11.1
10.9
(3
)
19.9

10.5
11.3
11.4
(3
)
20.1

10.9
11.4
11.6
(3
)
21.0

10.2
10.3
12.8
(3
)
20.3

10.5
10.7
11.4
34.7
20.6

10.3
12.7
12.7
(3
)
20.1

10.2
11.6
12.0
(3)
19.6

5 50.8
844.2
536.6
(3
)
543.6
533.0

M9.4
840.4
834.6
830.9
840.1
833.1

849.6
941.8
836.3
835.7
842.6
833.4

•50.5
•42.2
•35.7
(3
)
•40.9
•34.7

1 49.3
4
540.9
535.4
1 35.0
4
542.8
534.0

551.0
541.2
«36.0
(3
)
541.4
533.9

850.1
840.8
835.6
832.4
«39.6
833.6

7 52.7
(3
)
737.1
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

8 50.3
839.2
834.8
8 29.3
•42.9
•33.9

550.6
(3
)
*34.7
(3
)
543.0
533.3

1 49.8
4
1 41.0
4
1 34.1
4
(3
)
542.2
1 31. 5
4

•52.2
•42.4
•36.7
836.9
•41.5
•34.7

•51.6
•40.4
•35.1
834.9
•43.0
•32.9

5 52.2
(3)

853.8
644.8

•58.3
(3
)

•52.6
•43.2

«53.1
(3
)

«54.0
(3)

850.8
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

•50.7
(3
)

(3
)
(3)

(3
)
(3
)

•55.5
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

547.2
5 51.5

847. 2
•52.3

•48.7
•52.1

•47.4
•51.7

548.1
553.2

547.6
553.2

•46.1
•51.5

746.8
7 53.1

•48.2
•53.7

546.4
5 52.3

646.6
5 52.5

•49.4
•54.5

•45.8
•53.4

(3
)
(3
)
533.2
(3
)
544.6
(3
)

•61.3
•44.4
•31.4
825.2
•41.5
834.5

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
•44.0
837.9

•61.8
•45.0
•30.2
825.2
•44.1
834.9

(3
)
(3
)
«32.1
(3
)
543.0
1 37.3
4

564.8
(3)
(3
)
(3)
41.3
(3
)

•60.5
•45.2
•31.5
(3
)
•44.8
837.9

(3
)
(3)
(3
)
(3
)
7 42.6
<)
3

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
•43.2
836.9

562.1
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
541.1
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
«32. 2
(3
)
« 42.8
(3
)

•65.6
•47.1
•33.0
824.7
•40.3
«37.2

•62.9
•46.4
•31.5
(3
)
•41.5
(3
)

Table 4 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1946 —Continued

Article

Middle
Atlantie—
Continued
Scranton

Meats, poultry, and fish—Continued
Cents
Lamb:
Leg............................................... ..................pound.. s 48.0
Rib chops____________________ __ _________ do___ 5 55.3
Poultry: Roasting chickens. ........... .................._.do___ ii 52.2
Fish: »
Salmon:
Pink...................................... ....... 16-ounce can..
(3
)
Red i..................................... .....................do___
(3
)
Dairy products:
69.4
Butter................................................. .................pound..
48.9
Cheese___________________________ ................... .d o___
Milk:
17.3
Fresh (delivered)................. ...... ................... quart..
17.3
Fresh (grocery)_______________ ................ ...d o ___
11.3
Evaporated................................. ...1 4 b o u n ce can..
..................d ozen ..
57.1
Eggs: Fresh..............................................
Fruits and vetetables:
Fresh fruits:
12.8
Apples......................................... ..................pound..
11.2
Bananas_____________________ .....................do___
48.2
Oranges....................................... .................... dozen..
8.8
Grapefruit1................................. ..................... each..
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green. .............................. ..................pound..
19.7
4.8
Cabbage_____________________ .....................d o ....
Carrots......................................... ..................bunch..
9.6
12.6
Lettuce........................................ .....................head..
6.3
Onions......................................... ..................pound..
56.6
Potatoes....................................... ............16 pounds. _
11.3
Spinach........................................ ..................pound..
11.5
Sweetpotatoes............................. ..................... do___
9.0
Beets i *........................................ ..................bunch..
Canned fruits:
30.0
Peaches....................................... ......... No. 2)4 can..
Pineapple____________________ .....................do___
(3
)
14.5
Grapefruit juice.......................... ............N o. 2 can..




west North Central

East North Central

CinCleve­ Colum­ Detroit Indian­ Mil­
Chicaapolis waukee Peoria
bus
cinnati land
go

Spring- Cedar Kansas Minne­ Omaha
apolis
field Rapids City

Cents
647.2
6 53.7
43.5

Cenes
6 47.0
6 55.0
(3
)

Cents
545.6
H 52.8
u 50.8

Cents
1 45.8
4
1 53.6
4
(3
)

Cents
46.0
50.8
49.4

Cents
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

Cents
(3)
(3
)
(3
)

Cents
M4.5
t3
)
u 44.4

Cents
ii 43.8
(3
)
(3
)

Cents
845.5
853.3
49.5

25.7
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3)
(3
)

69.2
48.9

69.3
49.8

69.7
49.6

70.5
48.3

70.4
48.8

70.2
49.4

68.8
47.9

70.5
51.2

68.9
49.4

69.3
48.9

70.8
49.4

69.2
48.9

18.6
17.3
11.1
57.1

16.7
15.5
11.4
53.6

17.1
16.1
11.4
59.2

16.0
15.5
11.5
55.3

16.7
16.0
11.1
56.8

15.8
15.2
11.2
52.7

15.1
14.8
11.2
53.3

17.1
16.1
11.3
47.4

16.5
16.2
11.6
45.5

13.9
13.7
11.8
43.8

16.8
15.9
11.2
53.1

15.2
14.2
11.7
52.4

15.5
14.9
11.3
46.3

13.2
11.2
51.4
8.7

13.1
11.2
47.9
9.0

13.3
10.6
50.2
8.7

12.8
11.3
51.7
9.3

12.9
10.7
54.9
9.6

12.9
10.9
50,4
9.8

13.2
11.3
54.7
9.5

13.7
(3
)
54.7
9.8

13.2
(3
)
53.5
9.0

12.2
4 11.6
4 53.8
8.9

13.6
11.5
51.3
8.6

14.0
11.5
52.0
8.7

13.8
11.0
54.0
9.7

19.6
5.7
8.4
10.8
6.2
75.0
11.2
10.9
7.3

18.6
5.3
9.2
12.2
6.6
75.1
11.5
10.7
8.5

19.6
6.4
9.4
12.7
6.7
73.3
11.4
11.8
9.3

19.4
5.8
9.7
12.8
7.0
70.6
12.5
11.4
8.1

20.3
6.1
9.2
12.2
6.7
67.6
4 12.2
11.1
10.7

18.5
5.8
9.5
12.5
7.0
72.0
12.7
10.9
8.2

21.2
4.8
8.2
11.3
6.4
61.1
11.6
11.2
7.8

19.9
6.1
9.4
12.6
7.0
72.1
(3
)
11.4
(3
)

<18.9
5.9
9.5
12.1
7.1
69.4
(3
)
10.8
(3
)

(3
)
7.1
6.1
12.1
7.1
66.8
(3
)
10.7
(3
)

19.3
5.2
9.0
11.7
7.0
68.4
(3
)
11.0
7,1

21.4
5.7
8.9
11.9
6.8
70.5
12.5
11.1
8.6

4 21.5
5.8
9.1
12.5
6.7
64.8
11.2
11.3
7.9

28.6
(3
)
14.1

28.9
(3
)
14.3

29.1
(3
)
15.0

30.0
(3
)
14.6

28.8
(3
)
14.8

29.2
(3
)
14.2

30.4
(3
)
14.7

(3
)
(3
)
14.8

30.7
(3
)
14.7

30.0
(3
)
15.8

29.3
(3
)
14.4

31.4
(3
)
15.1

29.8
(3
)
15.0

Cents
46.9
54.2
(3
)

Cents
847.0
854.9
52.3

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
42.8

70.0
47.9

Cents
547.3
553.5
ii 50. 6

(3
)
(*)

Canned vegetables:
Beans, green.................................................... do___
13.6
C om ........................................................ .........do___
15.8
Peas...._.............................................................do___
14.2
Tomatoes.........................................................do___
(3
)
Soup, vegetable,1.................................U-ounce can..
13.3
Dried fruits: Prunes............................................pound._
19.5
Dried vegetables:
Navy beans......................................................do___
(3
)
Soup, dehydrated, chicken noodle 12........... ounce..
3.6
Beverages:
Coffee................................................................... pound..
31.8
Tea.................................................................................. Upound..
22.6
C ocoa1..............................................................Yi pound. .
9.7
Fats and oils:
Lard_____ _____ _________ _____ ____________ pound..
27.1
Shortening other than lard:
In cartons......................................................... do___
(3
)
In other containers........................................d o ___
(3
)
Salad dressing........................................................ .pint..
30.1
Oleomargarine......................................................pound. _
26.2
Peanut butter.........................................................do___
33.0
Oil, cooking or salad1............................................pint..
(3
)
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar................................................................... .pound..
7.6
Corn sirup....................................................... 24 ounces. .
17.4
Molasses 1
__________________________ 16 fluid ounces..
19.7
Apple butter12................................................ 16 ounces..
13.7

See footnotes at end of table.




14.2
14.5
13.5
15.0
13.2
. 19.2

13.6
14.5
14.3
15.2
13.6
18.6

13.9
14.9
14.2
(3
)
13.3
19.8

13.7
4.1

12.5
3.5

13.0
4.0

33.3
23.4
10.4

33.7
25.2
11.4

33.4
22.9
10.6

25.2

25.6

26.0

(3
)
(3
)
29.0
28.2
33.1
(3
)

(3
)
28.5
30.6
27.6
34.5
33.7

(3
)
28.8
29.1
25.9
32.3
(3
)

7.9
15.1
20.8
15.6

7.7
16.1
20.7
15.6

7.8
16.8
20.2
14.7

13.4
14.8
14.1
15.0
13.8
(3
)

13.9
14.7
13.4
(3
)
13.4
18.3

13.5
15.0
13.5
14.5
13.3
4 19.2

13.8
15.4
13.2
(3
)
13.2
4 20.0

13.6
15.3
13.6
(3
)
13.6
18.3

13.8
15.4
14.3
15.3
14.0
18.1

14.0
14.5
13.9
15.2
14.1
4 19. 5

13.1
14.9
13.3
14.1
13.5
4 18.8

14.0
14.7
13.4
16.3
13.8
19.7

12.8
14.7
13.5
15.0
13.6
19.5

12.3
3.5

12.7
4.0

13.1
4.1

14.0
3.5

(3
)
4.0

14.6
3.8

14.7
3.7

12.6
3.9

13.3
3.6

12.0
3.7

33.3
25.2
11.2

33.9
24.4
9.9

34.4
26.0
10.9

33.9
«26.0
10.9

33.7
25.4
11.0

32.9
26.1
11.7

35.4
26.0
11.2

34.1
25.3
10.6

35.3
26.7
11.6

35.0
26.5
11.5

26.6

26.0

25.0

25.8

25.6

26.1

27.0

25.8

26.0

24.7

(3
)
28.5
31.3
26.9
33.1
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
27.7
27.1
33.7
(3
)

(3
)
4 28. 5
30.8
29.2
33.2
(3
)

(3
)
27.6
30.9
(3
)
36.6
32.8

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
29.8
36.3
(3
)

(3
)
29.0
(3
)
30.7
35.2
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
31.3
36.0
4 39.3
(3
)

(3
)
28.6
29.5
27.0
32.0
(3
)

(3
)
30.0
4 33.7
30.5
35.7
35.4

(3
)
28.3
33.7
29.0
35.0
34.8

7.9
16.7
20.4
15.7

7.7
16.9
18.6
14.6

7.9
15.8
21.5
(3
)

7.9
15.8
20.0
15.6

7.8
7.8
15.3
16.0
22.4 • 22.0
(3
)
(3
)

7.9
416.9
23.8
16.6

8.0
16.1
22.4
14.4

7.9
16.2
20.2
17.2

7.6
16.5
21.7
14.9




Table 4 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1946 —Continued
West 1
'forth Central—
C
Continued

East South
Central

South Atlantic

Article
Balti­ Charles­ Jack­
ton,
son­
more
S. C.
ville

Nor­
folk

Rich­
mond

Cents
37.3
18.9
23.5
10.4
6.6
12.5
10.5
12.7

Cents
35.7
17.0
23.0
10.5
7.4
4 14.5
10.6
12.4

Cents
39.1
19.1
(3
)
10.5
7.6
(3
)
10.8
13.8

Cents
36.3
17.1
0
10.1
9.9
14.1
10.3
11.4

Cents
35.9
18.0
23.2
10 5
7.6
0
10.5
11.7

Cents
34.1
18.2
22.2
10 7
7.1
12.0
10.1
11.7

Cents
37.9
18.4
23.4
10 4
7.2
414.2
10.6
12.6

10.8
10.4
11.3
(3
)
20.4

10.9
11.2
14.7
(3
)
19.4

10.2
12.1
12.6

11.5
11.7
12.3
(3
)
19.6

11.3
12.6
13.2
0
19.5

10.6
11.0
12.1
0
20.6

10.3
11.8
11.9
0
19.6

«50.7
8 41.9
8 35.9
831.1
8 41.2
« 33.8

848.0
(3
)
832.5
828.6
840.0
830.1

9 51.0
941.2
®35.8
(3
)
»44.1
«34.5

«53.9
«44.1
8 36.6
833.8
#45.2
6 36.0

4 49. 6
4
(3
)
4 35.1
4
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

,450.2
0
4 36. 4
4
0
4 44. 5
4
1 31.7
4

6 53.8
0
6 37.1
0
« 44.3
634.6

4 52. 0
4
4 44.0
4
4 35.9
4
4 31.0
4
0
4 34. 2
4

« 52.4
(3
)

8 50.2
(3
)

« 49.4
(3
)

« 52.3
(3
)

8 58.1
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

0
0

« 55.4
0

4 53.6
4
0

0
0

6 56.6
0

0
0

« 46.7
• 52.4

« 48.4
« 53.6

«47.2
«54.8

M7.9
7 53.2

« 49.0
« 53.1

(3
)
«53.8

5 48.1
5 53.2

« 47.6
« 53. 6

5 47.5
«52.8

0
0

« 47.9
«53.1

0
0

* 63.9
•46. 5
•31.3
8 25.5
«42.5
837.2

« 65.9
«46.7
#32.8
(8
)
« 43.2
836.2

«66.8
«47.4
(3
)
« 25.4
«42.4
8 37.5

0
(3
)
7 33.1
0
7 43.3
(3
)

6 62.8
« 48.0
«31.9
0
«44.9
841.2

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
0
«46.0
0

5 64.1
0
0
0
545.9
0

0
6 47.0
« 34. 6
0
« 44.1
837.2

0
0
5 32.2
0
«41 6
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
« 43.6
839.8

St.
Louis
Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat.............................................5 pounds.
Macaroni........ ...............................................pound.
Wheat cereal42........................................ 28 ounces.
Corn flakes....................................... ........ 11 ounces.
Corn meal____ _________________________ pound.
..........
do...
Rice 1
Rolled oats....... ...................
d o...
Flour, pancake 12.................................... 20 ounces.
Bakery products:
Bread:
W hite...................................................... pound
do
Whole wheat..................................
Rye......... ....................................................d o...
Vanilla cookies....... ...............
do...
Soda crackers..... ...............
do...
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Beef:
do_.
Round steak...................
Rib roast........................................................... do...
Chuck roast........................................... .........d o...
Stew m eat12..........................................
do...
Liver............................................................... ..d o...
Hamburger.................................................... do...
Veal:
do...
Cutlets.....................
Roast, boned and rolled1............................ d o .
Pork:
Chops— .......................................................... do...
Bacon, sliced..................................................... do ..
Ham:
Sliced.......................................................... d o...
Whole..........................................................do...
Salt pork............................................................do...
L iver12.....................................
d o...
Sausage4
...........
d o...
Bologna, big 12..................................................do...




St.
Paul

Cents
34.2
17.1
24.0
10.3
7. 5
13.7
10.2
10.5

Cents
35.2
16.3
24.9
10.5
7.2
14.0
11.0
13.3

Cents
32.1
20.0
25.0
10.8
7.7
13.9
10.8
13.6

10.4
11.0
11.3
0
19.8

10.5
12.8
12.5
(3
)
20.3

8 50.5
8 40.6
835.5
833.2
842.1
833.5

Wichi­ Atlan­
ta
ta

(3 A
)
20.9

Wash­
Savan­ ington,
nah
D. C.

Win­
stonSalem

Bir­
ming­
ham

Jackson

Cents
36.1
17.2
23.6
10.5
7.3
0
10.5
12.2

Cents
38.9
19 0
23.7
10.6
4 7.2
(»)
10.7
12.3

Cents
38.9
17 3
22.6
10.5
6.8
0
10.3
12.2

Cents
39.2
20 9
0
11.2
7.8
(3
)
10.8
13.8

11.2
12.0
12.5
0
19.6

10.0
10.7
11.9
0
19.7

11.5
4 11.8
0
0
20.7

11.2
11.3
0
0
19.7

11.2
10.2
0
27.9
20.0

»50.9
942.0
936.2
0
0
0

6 54.5
« 45.2
6 37.2
8 31.1
0
« 35.9

9 51. 7
0
9 37.6
0
0
0

8 49.9
841.3
835.0
8 25.8
8 42.5
834.6

« 51.3
(3
)
0
0
0
833.2

0
0
0
0
2 45.2
0

0

0
0

« 47.8
« 53.5

4 55.2
4

«63.2
0
•33.8
0
•42.8
835.0

0
0
0
0
4 44.0
4
4 34.9
s

0

to

00

Lamb:
Leg...... ............................................................. do___ 845.3
Rib chops..........................................................do._.
8 53.0
Poultry: Roasting chickens.................................. do___
(3
)
F ish:«
Salmon:
Pink.......................................... .... 16-ounce can..
(3
)
Red i.......................................................... do___
(3
)
Dairy products:
Butter...................................................................pound..
69.7
Cheese......................................................................d o ....
48 6
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)............................................quart..
17.5
d o ....
Fresh (grocery)...............................
17.3
Evaporated................ .................... 14^-ounce can..
11.1
Eggs: fresh.................................................................. dozen..
52.6
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
A pples........................................................... pound.
12.8
Bananas.............................................................d o ...
11.3
Oranges.......................................................... dozen.
50.0
Grapefruit i_..................................................... each..
8.4
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green..................................................pound..
20.0
Cabbage........................................................... do___
5.7
Carrots............................................................bunch..
9.3
11.9
Lettuce_______________
head.
Onions............................................................pound..
7.0
Potatoes.................................................. 15 pounds..
73.2
Spinach.......................................................... pound..
10.1
Sweetpotatoes.................................................. do___
10.0
Beets 12.......................................................... bunch..
7.3
Canned fruits:
Peaches.................................................No.
can..
28.9
Pineapple.........................................................do___
(3
)
Grapefruit juice....................................... No. 2 can..
14.2
Canned vegetables:
Beans, green. ................................................... do___
13.8
14.9
C orn.................................................................do___
Peas........ ..........................................................do___
14.0
Tomatoes..........................................................do___ 415.4
Soup, vegetable i................................. 11-ounce can..
13.6
Dried fruits: Prunes............................................pound..
19.2
Dried vegetables:
Navy beans......................................................do___
13.5
3.9
Soup, dehydrated, chicken noodle i K..........ounce..
Beverages:
Coffee.................................................................... pound..
32.3
Tea...................................................................................Hpound..
25.7
11.2
Cocoai................................................
Hpound..

See footnotes at end of table.




•48.1
•55 4

45.8
53.1
(3
)

846.0
8 54.9
52.4

12 54.1

28.4
51.6

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

71.0
50 2

70.2
49 3

72.0
48 5

15.1
14.2
11.9
51.6

16.4
16.3
11.6
47.3

18.8
19.1
11.6
56.1

14.2
11.5
53.1
8.8

14.0
11.7
54.7
9.4

13.1
10.6
444.7
8.5

21.0
5.6
9.0
12.4
7.1
66.1
11.8
11.3
8.0

20.0
6.2
9.4
13.5
7.7
71.8
(3
)
11.0
9.7

17.5
5.5
9.3
12.2
7.2
70.8
(3
)
10.2
(3
)

30.8
(3
)
15.6

29.3
(3
)
15.2

28.6
(3
)
14.4

14.4
15.0
13.4
17.4
14.7
19.6

13.6
14.7
14.6
14.8
13.7
19.0

13.3
15.5
14.3
14.9
13.1
418.5

13.2
3.4

14.4
4.1

(3
)
3.7

36.7
27.7
11.8

37.2
27.8
11.8

35.7
25.4
10.5

9 47.0
9 55.6
51.8

4 50.3
4
(3
)
4 57.6 14 55.2
4
4 56.4 411 51.2
4

6 47.5
9 54.2
(3
)

4 48.1
4
1 54.3
4
4 49.5
4

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

4 46.8
9
9 54.9
51.2

0
0
0

0
0
55.3

0
0
57.5

(3
)
0

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

0
0

0
0

0
0

72.1
0

(3
)
(3
)

71.7
49.6

70.7
(3
)

71.4
51.0

71.9
49.4

72.0
0

73.4
0

73.3
48.6

74 0
0

16.5
16.5
11.8
58.1

18.6
18.7
11.9
57.2

20.6
20.0
11.1
57.3

20.1
20.2
11.6
56.6

17.6
17.8
11.3
57.0

19.8
19.9
11.7
55.3

17.2
15.9
11.8
58.6

18.6
18.6
12.0
56.7

18.8
18.2
11.8
54.3

17.1
17.1
12.0
56.8

12.9
11.4
44.7
9.3

14.0
11.0
46.9
9.1

14.2
9.7
42.0
7.9

13.5
(3
)
45.6
9.0

12.9
(3
)
45.3
8.8

13.8
10.4
43.4
8.1

12.8
0
47.5
9.2

11.5
0
43.6
8.4

13.8
11.0
44.3
4 9.6

15.1
0
53.0
11.4

19.0
6.1
10.0
12.6
7.4
73.4
11.9
11.3
9.8

18.9
5.8
10.3
14.0
8.2
75.0
(3
)
9.6
(3
)

17.5
5.0
9.5
12.0
7.3
68.4
(3
)
10.8
(3
)

17.5
5.3
9.8
12.2
7.1
64.7
11.7
10.7
10.3

17.3
5.2
9.4
13.0
7.3
64.2
12.0
10.7
10.8

17.6
5.2
9.4
12.4
7.3
70.4
(3
)
9.9
(3
)

18.6
5.6
9.6
4 14.2
6.8
65.3
11.3
11.2
9.6

16.8
5.2
10.2
12.4
7.9
73.3
0
9.9
0

19.1
5.5
9.1
12.0
7.6
70.9
12.7
8.8
0

20.6
6.1
10.0
13.5
8.5
86.3
0
9.7
10.3

30.8
(3
)
14.9

29.8
(3
)
14.6

28.0
(3
)
13.4

29.4
(3
)
14.8

28.3
(3
)
14.0

29.8
(3
)
14.2

30.1
0
14.4

30.6
0
15.3

30.0
0
14.4

0
0
14.6

13.7
15.2
14.7
415.7
13.7
(3
)

14.4
16.4
16.4
15.7
13.9
(3
)

13.8
15.6
13.3
14.8
13.4
18.0

14.1
14.9
14.8
14.6
13.2
18.7

13.3
14.7
13.7
14.0
13.2
17.7

13.5
16.6
14.2
15.2
13.5
4 18.6

13.3
15.2
13.9
0
13.4
18.8

14.2
15.2
14.7
15.6
13.8
4 20.0

13.4
16.1
14.4
14.9
13.5
4 19.4

13.5
15.6
14.5
16.1
13.9
21.6

14.8
3.7

13.8
3.8

(3
)
3.9

(3
)
3.6

11.5
3.6

(3
)
3.8

414.6
3.7

0
4.0

0
3.9

35.0
24.4
10.6

38.5
27.0
11.7

35.5
24.2
10.4

30.4
25.1
10.5

34.0
23.9
10.4

35.2
25.4
10.5

32.4
26.1
11.1

34.6
25.4
9.7

31.6
24.2
9.3




0

4.0

38.9
27.6
11.6

Table 4 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1946 —Continued
West North CentralContinued

East South
Central

South Atlantic

Article
Balti­ Charles­ Jack­
ton,
son­
more
S. C.
ville

St.
Louis
Fats and oils:
Lard........ .......................................
Shortening other than lard:
In cartons....... ........ ................
In other containers....... ......... .............. ...........do___
Salad dressing_________________ ----------------------pint..
Oleomargarine.......................................... ........... pound..
Peanut butter................................ ......................... do___
Oil, cooking or salad i.................. ....... ............. ...p in t-Sugar and sweets:
Sugar............... ...... ............................................. pound..
Corn sirup.................. ................... ..... ...........24 ounces..
Molasses»....................................... ____ 16 fluid ounces..
Apple butter12............................................... 16 ounces..




St.
Paul

Wichh
ta

Atlan­
ta

Cents
24.6

Cents
26.8

Cents
27.0

Cents
26.0

Cents
26.2

Cents
(3
)

(3
)
27.7
27.0
27.7
31.3
33.4

(3
)
30.0
30.5
31.6
37.1
37.0

(3
)
29.3
28.4
30.4
33.2
(3
)

23.9
(3
)
(3
)
28.6
33.5
(3
)

(3
)
4 30.3
28.2
29.0
33.8
33.4

7.8
15.4
22.6
15.0

8.0
16.9
20.1
16.2

7.8
(3
)
22.9
16.1

7.5
17.1
4 19.5
14.7

7.6
4 18.1
21.1
14.0

Wash­
Savan­ ington,
nah
D. C.

Win­
stonSalem

Bir­
ming­
ham

Jackson

Cents
26.0

Cents
26.9

Cents
(3
)

Cents
25.7

Cents
29.5

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
27.8
31.2
(3
)

24.7
28.6
30.3
28.9
32.0
32.8

(3
)
28.0
30.9
29.2
32.0
33.5

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
4 29.4
35.5
(3
)

24.5
(3
)
30.6
28.3
31.9
32.7

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
30.0
35.1
(3
)

7.6
(3
)
19.2
14.3

7.6
(3
)
22.1
15.6

7.5
16.9
19.7
13.7

7.8
(3
)
4 22.8
(3
)

7.5
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

7.8
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

Nor­
folk

Rich­
mond

Cents
25.3

Cents
25.6

Cents
26.0

26.0
(3
)
34.1
29.6
34.3
33.0

24.5
(3
)
29.5
27.9
31.6
(3
)

424.4
28.5
(3
)
26.4
31.8
432.6

7.7
18.6
22.5
13.9

7.4
(3
)
20.0
15.2

7.6
(3
)
(3
)
14.9

East South Central—Continued

Article
Knox­
ville
Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Cents
30.0
Flour, wheat..................... .........5 pounds—
Macaroni......................... _______pound..
18.5
Wheat cereal 4 2_.............. .........28 ounces..
25.3
Com flakes....................... .........11 ounces..
11.2
Com meal..................... ............. pound..
7.0
Rice 4............... .............. . ......... . — d o .—
(3
)
Rolled oats....................... .................do___
11.1
Flour, pancake1 2............ .........20 ounces. _
14.1
Bakery products:
Bread:
11.2
W hite______________............. pound..
10.3
Whole wheat...............................do—
R ye......... ...................................d o —
13.0
Vanilla cookies.................................. do—
31.0
Soda crackers................... ._________ do----20.9
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Beef:
Round steak.................... .................do— . «51.6
Rib roast......................... ..................do___
(3
)
Chuck roast..................... .................. do___
(3
)
Stew m eat12.................... ................. do___
(3
)
L iver.-............................. .................. do—
(3
)
834.5
Hamburger...................... ................ .d o .—
Veal*
Cutlets.............. ......... ..... ................. do___
(3
)
Roast, boned and rolled4 .................do___
.
(3
)
Pork:
Chops......... ....................................... do___ 8 48.6
Bacon, sliced...................................... do___ 8 52.8
Ham:
Sliced.— ...................
« 64.5
W hole............................. ........... do___
(3
)
Salt pork.......................... ..................do___
(3
)
Liver 12. ......................... ..................do___
(3
)
Sausage1_______________ .................do___ 8 45.5
833.5
Bologna, big 42................ ..................do—
Lamb:
Leg....... ....................................... ...... do___
(3
)
Rib c h o p s ...................... .................. do___
(3
)

See footnotes at end of table.




Mountain

West South Central

Pacific

Louis­
ville

Mem­
phis .

M o­
bile

Dallas

Hous­
ton

Little
Rock

New
Or­
leans

Butte

Den­
ver

Salt
Lake
City

Los
An­
geles

Port­
land,
Oreg.

San
Fran­
cisco

Seattle

Cents
35.8
15.5
23.5
10.2
6.7
(3
)
10.4
11.5

Cents
42.6
14.6
24.9
KlO.9
(3
)
(3
)
410.8
12.8

Cents
36.7
19.4
(3
)
10.3
7.0
13.6
10.4
12.6

Cents
35.0
18.5
23.1
10.1
7.6
16.2
10.2
12.4

Cents
34.9
18.2
23.3
10.4
7.8
12.6
10.4
13.5

Cents
37.9
20.4
25.3
10.7
7.5
13.0
10.6
14 2

Cents
37.0
11.8
(3
)
10.9
8.0
(3
)
10.7
13.7

Cents
32.1
19 4
(8)
10.8
8.2
4 15.5
11.5
15.0

Cents
31.9
17.2
24.0
10.6
7.8
(8)
10.5
13.4

Cents
33.0
17.3
23.9
10.3
9.6
13.2
11.3
14.1

Cents
36.9
16.0
24.3
10.4
9.4
14.1
11.4
13.5

Cents
33.7
16.8
24.0
10.5
9.5
13.8
11.7
14.0

Cents
37.7
18.9
24.2
10.7
9.9
(8)
12.1
13.7

Cents
34.7
16.2
24.5
10.7
9.2
(8)
11.7
13.8

9.8
11.9
10.9
424.8
20.6

10.0
10.5
(3
)
(3
)
20.1

12.3
11.4
12.5
27.5
19.7

10.2
10.6
11.1
4 28.3
20.4

9.0
9.8
11.0
(3
)
20.4

10.2
10.2
10.7
28.3
20.2

11.6
11.4
413.2
33.4
20.4

10.8
10.9
11.5
(3
)
20.0

10.1
10.1
12.0
(3
)
20.2

10.1
10.2
12.1
27.2
19.8

10.4
10.4
12.4
27.4
20.0

10.9
11.1
12.5
(8)
20.6

11.5
11.6
14.0
29.4
20.4

10.9
10.9
12.8
(3
)
20.2

850.0
8 39.9
835.2
8 26.9
841.2
833.5

8‘49.5
# 39.3
8 35.5
8 26.9
#42.6
832.6

»47.8
(3
)
8 32.7
4 22.9
4
#44.2
832.7

849.1
#38.4
8 32.4
8 22.3
8 41.5
8 30.0

847.8
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

« 48.9
838.5
833.2
826.9
#37.4
8 29.6

«53.4
543.4
5 35.1
4 26.2
4
(3
)
535.4

5 47.5
6 38.3
5 33.0
(8)
538.2
6 31.9

p48.6
841.1
834.4
33.9
841.1
831.1

847.1
839.0
833.4
8 29.9
840.1
8 31.3

8'52.4
845.0
#36.2
837.2
845.3
8 33.9

849.0
840.3
834.8
838.4
841.4
833.5

(3
)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(8)
(5
)

8 55.0
(3
)

8 51.6
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

*50.2
(3
)

848.9
(3
)

8 52.4
(3
)

« 54.5
(3
)

(8)
(3
)

849.6
(8)

(3
)
(8)

857.0
(8)

8 53.1
(8)

(8)
(3
)

(8)
(8
)

•48.6
8 52.9

« 46.9
6 52.5

547.2
#51.9

«47.1
« 53.9

« 47.9
« 52.6

#45.8
« 52.8

« 49.2
5 54.1

(8)
6 53.4

#48.1
« 54.9

«48.1
#55.5

8 52.8
#57.1

8 51.5
«57.1

(8)
(3
)

5 51.5
«57.3

«61.6
#45.2
(3
)
(3
)
8 42.5
s 35.9

«61.5
(3
)
« 33.6
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

«59.8
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
5 45.1
(3
)

«62.8
« 47.9
« 33.6
(3
)
•43.1
•34.7

866.4
(3
)
« 33.2
(3
)
#43.2
834.1

(8
)
(3
)
(3
)
824.9
«41.6
#32.6

535.6

(3
)
(8)

(8)
«45.8
4 37.2
4

(8)
(3
)
(8)
(8)
(3
)
(8)

« 64.2
« 47.6
«33.0
(8)
« 44.5
#35.7

(8)
« 48.7
#32.8
(8)
#39.9
8 35.1

(8)
(8)
(8)
5 27.5
#44.7
837.5

#70.7
#49.2
(8)
8 27.2
8 40.8
836.2

(3
)
(8)
(8)
(3
)
(8)
C)
3

(3
)
5 50.3
(8)
4 28.8
4
5 45.6
4 38.1
4

#49.3
« 58.2

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

#44.8 4« 45.8
« 52.2 4« 51.0

46.0
53.2

5 49.1
«54.8

(8)
(8)

45.5
52.3

44.7
50.9

49.6
55.5

46.2
52.3

(8)
(8)

4 46. 0
4
4 52.6
4

551.8
543.8
5 36.0
4 37.8
4
5 45.0
«35.2

Table 4 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, by cities, 1946 —Continued
Article

ats. Doultrv. and fish—Continued
Poultry: Roasting chickens.. ..............pound..
Fish: is
Salmon:
Pink........................... ..16-ounce can..
Red i..........................
iry products:
Butter..................................... .............. pound..
Cheese.................................... ..................do___
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)............ ................quart..
Fresh (grocery)................ ..................d o ....
Evaporated...................... .14^-ounce can..
is: Fresh................................... .............. dozen...
fits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples..... ......................... .............. pound..
Bananas.......................... ..................d o ....
Oranges. ______ ________ ................dozen. _
Grapefruit *...................... ................. each..
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green..................... .............. pound..
Cabbage...................... . .................d o ....
C arrots............ .............. .............bu nch...
L ettuce........................... ................-bead_.
Onions..... ........................ .............. pound..
Potatoes.......................... ..........15 pounds..
Spinach:.............. ........... .............. pound..
Sweetpotatoes.................. ..................do___
Beets i 2............................ .............. bunch..
Canned fruits:
Peaches___ ____________ ___ No. 2J-6 can..
Pineapple......... .............. ......... ........ do_.__
Grapefruit juice.............. ......... No. 2 can..
Canned vegetables:
Beans, green___________ ..................d o___
Corn ________________ ..................d o—
P e a s ._________________ ..................d o ..r.
Tomatoes............... - ........
Soup, vegetable1............. ...1 1 -ounce can..




Pacific

Mountain

West South Central

East South Central—Continued
Knox­
ville

Louis­
ville

Mem­
phis

Mo­
bile

Dallas

Hous­
ton

Little
Rock

New
Or­
leans

Butte

Den­
ver

Salt
Lake
City

Los
An­
geles

Port­
land,
Oreg.

San
Fran­
cisco

Seattle

Cents
(3
)

Cents
(3
)

Cents
47.9

Cents
(3
)

Cents
51.9

Cents
54.0

Cents
52.9

Cents
(3
)

Cents
(3
)

Cents
49.6

Cents
52.0

Cents
54.1

Cents
49.2

Cents
(3
)

Cents
4 ii 51.7

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

4 25.4
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

4 25.4
48.6

(3
)
(3
)

26.5
44.4

(3
)
(3
)

73.1
50.4

69.9
48.8

72.3
51.0

70.6
49.9

70.8
51.2

69.9
(3
)

70.7
48.8

72.1
51.2

68.8
48.1

71.0
(3
)

71.1
48.6

72.8
52.7

70.5
50.8

74.1
53. 5

72.4
50.6

16.8
16.8
12.3
53.7

18.1
17.4
11.5
55.3

15.4
15.3
11.9
57.8

19.7
19.6
11.1
54.9

16.9
16.2
11.5
55.0

17.8
16.7
11.4
55.9

16.9
16.9
11.6
55.2

17.8
17.5
11.7
55.6

15.2
15.2
12.4
59.4

15.5
14.5
11.3
57.9

14.8
13.9
11.4
58.9

16.2
15.2
11.3
62.4

15.8
15. 5
11.4
59.9

17.1
16.2
11.7
63.8

16.1
15.5
11.6
63.2

13.6
411.3
46.4
9.7

13.1
11.1
46.9
9.4

14.5
(3
)
53.3
10.4

14.6
10.3
47.0
9.1

14.0
10.5
49.6
8.5

14.8
11.5
51.0
9.1

13.7
(3
)
52.1
8.5

14.6
9.5
46.7
9.4

13.1
(3
)
51.9
11.1

14.2
11.1
55.0
9.9

13.4
12.8
49.7
11.0

14.2
14.1
46.7
8.3

11.7
13.1
52.8
11.1

12.9
13.2
48.6
8.8

12.6
(3
)
55.0
11.5

19.3
6.1
10.4
13.4
8.9
76.8
(3
)
11.3
(3
)

18.3
5.6
9.2
11.8
6.7
69.8
11.7
10.8
9.3

19.4
5.6
9.1
12.6
7.9
83.6
12.3
11.0
9.5

19.0
5.9
9.1
12.1
7.4
81.1
(3
)
8.5
10.2

18.3
5.3
7.7
10.9
6.2
81.8
(3
)
9.9
8.9

20.2
6.0
9.0
11.9
7.3
93.4
14.0
10.0
10.8

419.6
5.4
8.8
li.8
6.8
66.2
(3
)
9.5
8.9

19.0
5.1
9.2
12.3
7.1
73.0
11.6
8.8
9.6

t3
)
6.9
8.9
14.5
7.7
58.9
(3
)
12.3
(3
)

(3
)
5.7
7.3
12.1
6.0
63.3
<11.1
11.2
8.5

4 19.1
5.9
7.6
11.2
6.2
59.9
(3
)
11.2
9.3

19.8
6.8
7.7
8.8
6.5
77.1
410.2
12.8
8.3

(3
)
6.8
8.1
12.5
6.1
68.7
4 11.4
12.6
9.4

(3
)
6.1
7.4
8.0
6.8
74.7
(3
)
12.6
(3
)

(3
)
7.3
8.4
11.9
6.4
67.3
410.8
12.6
(3
)

29.5
(3
)
15.7

29.0
(3
)
14.2

30.7
(3
)
14.9

29.2
(3
)
13.9

29.3
(3
)
13.6

28.6
(3
)
13.2

29.2
(3
)
14.4

30.1
(3
)
14.2

30.0
(3
)
15.9

29.2
(3
)
14.4

28.4
(3
)
15.0

26.1
(3
)
14.9

29.0
(3
)
15.0

27.1
(3
)
15.5

28.2
(3
)
15.0

14.0
16.5
14.4
15.1
14.6

13.7
15.0
14.6
13.9
13.4

13.9
16.3
414.9
15.2
13.8

13.2
15.1
13.4
15.0
13.4

13.4
16.1
14.2
14.1
14.1

13.4
16.2
14.5
13.3
14.2

13.1
15.7
14.7
14.5
13.1

14.0
16.2
14.7
15.7
13.7

15.2
16.8
14.7
(3
)
14.3

13.6
15.1
14.2
414.8
13.9

13.5
15.8
13.4
is 17.2
13.7

13.9
16.6
13.6
(3
)
13.6

13.9
16.2
13.8
(3
)
14.0

14.6
17.2
414.3
1518.8
13.6

14.1
16.8
14.0
(3
)
14.0

25.3
(3
)

CO

10

Dried fruits: Prunes............. ................pound—
Dried vegetables:
N avy beans.................... ................... do___
Soup, dehydrated, chicken noodle 1 1ounce..
2
*
Beverages:
Coffee.................................... ................pound—
Tea......................................... ...........H pound. _
Cocoa 1................................... ........... Yi pound..
Pats and oils:
Lard....................................... ................pound..
Shortening other than lard:
In cartons....................... ................... do—
In other containers........ ................... do___
Salad dressing....................... ................... pint..
Oleomargarine....................... ................pound—
Peanut butter....................... ................... do___
Oil, cooking Or salad 1.......... ................... pint—
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar......................................
Com simp..... .......................
Molasses 1...... ....................... ..16 fluid ounces..
Apple butter 1 2......................

(8
)

19.2

(8
)

18.0

18.1

19.3

20.0

(8
>

(8
)

(8
)

19.4

17.2

18.2

417.7

(8
)

4.1

11.2
3.7

13.4

15.6
3.9

14.5
3.8

(8
)

3.9

16.6
4.0

12.0
4.2

12.7
3.8

13.0
3.8

17.2
3.9

(8
)

(8
)

(8
)

13.2
3.9

3.8

414.4
3.9

33.0
27.2
11.8

35.6
26.4
10.4

34.6
28.2
12.1

36.3
26.2
10.6

35.0
24.3
10.7

33.2
26.2
11.3

35.7
25.8
11.8

32.6
27.4
11.2

36.6
27.2
11.5

37.8
27.2
11.7

36.7
25.6
11.2

35.5
26.2
11.2

35.5
26.1
11.4

37.3
27.0
11.3

35.6
27.0
11.7

27.4

25.8

26.0

24.5

27.9

26.8

26.1

26.3

29.3

25.9

27.3

27.9

28.3

(8
)

27.1

(8
)

24.3

24.1

24.8
28.7
24.6
27.9
33.1
33.3

24.5
28.7
25.0
28.8
31.6
32.5

25.3
28.4
32.6
29.6
34.6
34.2

24.8
28.8
32.7
29.2
32.7
34.3

(8
)
(8
)
(8
)
(8
)

(8)

24.8

36.6

25.8
28.5
32.7
29.7
40.0

30.6
28.1
35.6

25.5
28.4
29.7
29.0
34.9

(8
)
(8
)

(8
)

7.8
17.2
22.3
16.7

7.5
17.2
18.8
16.4

7.9
17.2

7.5
17.5
21.6

8.5
4 17.8
4 20.4

CD

(8
)
(8
)

(8
)

30.7
30.3
35.5
(8
)

8.2
(8
)

23.0

(8
)

28.6
28.8
29.5
32.8
33.5
7.8
15.6
(8
)

15.3

(8
)

(8
)

(8
)

34.7

30.4
28.9
30.7

(8
)

(8
)

29.2

7.7
(8
)
(8
)
(8
)

7.4
17.1
(8
)

16.4

1 Not included jn the index.

2 Not priced after September; average of 9 months.

2 Not available; insufficient number of reports secured during year.
4 Insufficient number of reports secured in December; average of 11 months.
* Included estimates monthly averages for June, September, and October carried as
unchanged from preceding month.
•Includes estimated monthly averages for September and October carried as un­
changed from preceding month.
2Includes estimated monthly averages for May, June, September, and October carried
as unchanged from preceding month.
8 Includes estimated monthly average for September carried as unchanged from pre­
ceding month.




(8
)

(8
)

3.7

(8
)

(8
)

28.0
31.2
34.1
37.7
33.4

(8
)

(8
)

25.5
28.5
32.0
29.9
38.0
33.0

8.0
16.7
19.3
17.0

8.1
16.8
22.4
17.7

7.6
17.1
20.3
16.9

7.7
17.7
21.3
17.2

7.5
17.2
21.6
18.1

28.6
(8
)

29.0

35.6

(8
)

7.7
17. (
18.1

9 Includes estimated monthly averages for May, June, and September carried as un­
changed from preceding month.
Includes estimated monthly average for October carried as unchanged from preceding
month.
1 Includes estimated monthly average for June carried as unchanged from preceding
1
month.
12 Includes estimated monthly averages for May and June carried as unchanged from
preceding month.
i* Costs of fresh and/or frozen fish are included in the index, but average prices are not
computed.
14Includes estimated monthly averages for June and September carried as unchanged
8
*
from preceding month.
1* Price per No. 2H can.

34
T e c h n i c a l N o t e .— See Technical Note on computation of indexes,
table 4, Indexes of Retail Prices of Food, by Cities and Months, 1946.
Where an insufficient number of quotations was secured for the various
meat items because of the extreme shortage in M ay, June, September
and/or October, prices collected, during the preceeding month were used
without change in the index for the following month. These estimated
prices are also included in the annual averages.
The price collection for eight foods (wheat cereal, pancake flour,
stew meat, pork liver, bologna, beets, dehydrated soup, and apple
butter) not used for index purposes was discontinued in October 1946.
The averages for these items, as published above, contain prices for 9
months only.
N o annual average price has been computed for foods other than meats
where shortages in five or more months made impossible the collection of
a sufficient number of quotations to determine monthly average prices.

Revision o f the Retail Food P rice In dex in February 1 946 1

In order to take account of the changes in food consumption that
occurred since the revision in March 1943 2 and to assure continued
1
accuracy in the representation of price movements, the Bureau’s
Retail Food Price Index was revised in February 1946. Changes
were made in food weights; in treatment of sales taxes; in the list of
foods priced; in weighting factors used to combine quotations secured
from individual retail stores; in the samples of reporting stores in
each city; and in the technical procedures used for editing reports.
The quantity-weighting factors used in combining prices for in­
dividual foods to compute the index were adjusted to eliminate the
wartime consumption patterns and as in prewar years represented
the purchases by moderate income families as determined by ex­
penditure surveys in 1934-36. These weight adjustments reduced
the importance of cereals and bakery products, pork, chickens, milk,
eggs, corn sirup, fats and oils, and some fresh fruits and vegetables,
while increases were made for beef, lamb, butter, coffee, fish, sugar,
processed fruits and vegetables and some fresh fruits and vegetables.
Since the usual method of sales tax collection is on a total purchase
rather than the price of an individual food, beginning in February
1946, State and local sales taxes were no longer included in the average
prices published by the Bureau. The indexes, however, continued
to reflect any changes in taxes of this type.
Weighting factors used to combine prices reported by individual
stores were revised on the basis of new sales volume information.
1 For a more complete discussion, see “ Store Samples for Retail Food Prices,” Monthly Labor Review
January 1947, p. 90.
2 For a description of the revision in March 1943, see “ Bureau of Labor Statistics Cost of Living in War­
time,” Monthly Labor Review, July 1943, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics press release, “ The Cost of
Living and Retail Costs of Food, March 15,1943,” issued May 19,1943.




35
This is in accordance with regular Bureau procedure for the periodic
examination of these weights. No change was made at the time in the
population weighting factors used to compute average prices for 56
cities combined.
The net effect of all of these changes was minor in character and
the revisions were introduced into the index using the linking method
thereby maintaining the comparability of indexes before and after the
revision. The average prices for January 1946 published in this
bulletin have been computed in accordance with the new methods.3
* For comparisons between prices in January 1946 and earlier periods, use prices published in the Bureau
of Labor Statistics press release, “ Retail Food Prices by Cities, January 15,1946.” The February 12,1946
issue of this report contains revised prices for January to be used for comparisons with prices for subsequent
periods.




Part II.—Retail Prices of Food, 1947
Sum m ary

Retail food prices advanced 11 percent during 1947, the first full
postwar year of uncontrolled prices,1 and reached a record-high level
by the end of the year. Lower food prices in the early months of
the year gave rise to speculation over whether the postwar peak had
been reached. From the middle of the year on, however, food prices
rose sharply and persistently to a December level, more than 10 per­
cent above May, despite near-record total crop and livestock produc­
tion during the year. Several factors, evident in the spring of 1947,
which stimulated successions of food price increases were (1) unusually
adverse planting and growing weather for many late crops, notably
corn, (2) European crop failures, accelerating Government purchases
and allocations for foreign relief, and (3) the rising national income
accompanied by increasing domestic demand and record or near­
record per capita consumption of many foods.
By December, the Bureau’s Retail Food Price Index had climbed
to 206.9 percent of the 1935-39 average, 42 percent higher than in
June 1946 and 12 percent above June 1920, the peak after World
War I. Price advances over the year were recorded for each of the
56 cities surveyed monthly by the Bureau. In the same period,
prices advanced for every major food group, ranging from 0.4 percent
for fats and oils to 20 percent for cereals and bakery products.
Food Prices D uring 1947

Wheat and corn played a significant role in the food price move­
ments of 1947. Forecasts in the spring of a record wheat crop and
a near-record corn crop were followed by unusually inclement weather
which resulted in monthly reductions in corn crop forecasts and a
final crop of only 2,401 million bushels, 26 percent below the record
1946 crop. This small corn crop set off a chain reaction which in­
cluded (1) accelerated demands for the record wheat crop, (2) higher
feed prices, (3) reduced incentive to feed livestock, (4) prospects for
inadequate supplies of wheat, meat, poultry, and lard, and (5) higher
primary market and retail prices for these and other foods.
1Except, for sugar, rice, and corn sirup.




(36)

37
The rapid advance in food prices after June 1946 was reversed in
December of that year and the downward movement continued into
January and February 1947. During these 3 months, consumers'
prices of food declined 3 percent, leading many experts to believe the
food price peak had been reached.
In March, however, food prices rose to a new record-high, with re­
ports of urgent need for foreign relief and continued scarcity of some
foods. Retail food price movements in the second quarter of 1947
repeated their behavior of the first quarter by declining slightly in
April and M ay only to rise to new highs in June. It was during
June that most of the factors which spurred food prices upward in
the following months were crystallized. Grain prices started advanc­
ing in May, when the President ordered the immediate exportation
of wheat to end food strikes in Germany, and continued upward in
June as unfavorable Corn Belt weather marred prospects for the corn
crop. The rising national income was accompanied by strong
consumer demand which pushed retail meat prices sharply upward.
The last half of 1947 was marked by consecutively higher retail
food prices in each month except one, culminating in a net advance
of more than 8 percent between June and December. In mid-1947,
considerable apprehension arose regarding (1) our ability to feed
famine-stricken Europe and (2) our future supplies and prices of
Table 1.— Indexes o f retail prices oj food in large cities combined, by yea rs, 1913 to 19479
and by months, January 1945 to December 1947
[1935-39=100]
Year and month

All-foods
index

Year and month

All-foods
index

Year and month

All-foods
index

B Y YEARS

1913
__
1914
1915............................
1916________________
1917............... .......... .
1918_________ ______
1919
_________
1920________________
1921............................
1922 _
1923.............................
1924................... ........

79.9
81.8
80.9
90.8
116.9
134.4
149.8
168.8
128.3
119.9
124.0
122.8

1925....................
1926......... .............. .
1927.................... ......
1928_______________
1929_______________
1930_______ _____ _
1931.._____________
1932_______________
1933_______________
1934.._____ _______
1935...____ ________
1936...........................

132.9
137.4
132.3
130.8
132.5
126.0
103.9
86.5
84.1
93.7
100.4
101.3

1937_______________
1938_________ _____
1939. .................... .
1940_______________
1941................. .........
1942__________ ____
1943__________ ____
1944_______________
1945............ ..........
1946_______________
1947........ .................

105.3
97.8
95.2
96.6
105.5
123.9
138.0
136.1
139.1
159.6
193.8

141.0
139.6
140.1
141.7
142.6
145.6
165.7
171.2
174.1
180.0
187.7
185.9

1947
January....................
February_____ ____
March____________
April....................... .
M a y ................... .....
June..........................
July..........................
August................... .
September________
October....................
November_________
December_________

183.8
182.3
189.5
188.0
187.6
190.5
193.1
196.5
203.5
201.6
202.7
206.9

B Y M ONTHS

ms
January.................. .
February...................
March__ _ . . ___
April..........................
M ay_______________
June...........................
July.............. .............
August.................... .
September_________
October......................
November_________
■December .




137.3
136.5
135.9
136.6
138.8
141.1
141.7
140.9
139.4
139.3
140.1
141.4

1946
January....................
February..................
M arch.. _.
April........ ................
M ay........................
June................. ........
July........... .
August.....................
September..
October....................
November_________
December _

38
grains and livestock as well as the foods and byproducts derived from
them. With attention focused on the grain exchanges, demand for
speculation curbs led the Government to increase margin require­
ments for future trading to one-third of the selling price, effective
October 7. In September, the President appointed the Citizens Food
Committee which invoked voluntary conservation measures, includ­
ing meatless Tuesdays, poultryless and eggless Thursdays, and a 60day grain-holiday for distilleries, in order to reduce human and
animal consumption of grain, to feed Europe, and to restrain further
price rises. Early in the fall, congressional committees held local
hearings to account for the high cost of living; people were urged to
adjust their diets to conserve food, and consumers* organizations urged
resistance to high prices, particularly of meat.
In December 1947, 28 months after the close of World War II,
retail prices were 12 percent above those of June 1920, with no as­
surance that they had reached their postwar peak. After World
War I retail food prices reached the postwar peak of 185 percent of
the 1935-39 average in June 1920, 19 months after the armistice.
Table 1 and the accompanying chart present the trend in retail prices
of all foods combined from 1913 through 1947.
Changes in Food Prices b y Cities

Retail food price increases during 1947 varied considerably among
the 56 cities surveyed by the Bureau. The rise over the year, which
averaged 11.3 percent for all cities combined, ranged from 5.4 percent
in San Francisco to 20.4 percent in Peoria. Food price movements
in most cities followed the national pattern rather closely, with a net
rise of from 9 to 14 percent in 43 of the 56 cities. In December,
consumers in 53 of the 56 cities paid the highest food prices on
record.
Except for far western cities, there was little uniformity in the
extent of price advances for cities in given regions. In six of the
seven far western cities, food price increases were less than the average
for all cities combined.
At the end of 1947, food prices in most of the 56 cities had more
than doubled their prewar (1935-39) averages. The largest increases
over this longer period occurred in cities of the Southern and Pacific
Coast regions and the smallest in New England, where December
prices were still less than double their 1935-39 averages.
Indexes of average retail food prices by cities during 1947 are pre­
sented in table 2. Annual average prices of individual foods by cities
are shown in table 5.




39
Table 2 .— Indexes o f retail prices o f food , by cities 1 and m onths, 1947
(1935-39=100)
1947

Region and city

Aver­
age
for Jan.
15
the
year

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15

United States_____ 193.8 183.8 182.3 189.5 188.0 187.6 190.5 193.1 196.5 203.5 201.6 202.7 206.9
New England,
Boston....................
Bridgeport..............
Fall River...............
Manchester............
New Haven---------Portland, M aine...
Providence.............

184.0
188.2
188.4
191.6
186.6
186.3
195.9

177.6
180.0
180.9
183.6
177.3
179.8
183.8

172.7
178.5
178.2
177.5
174.1
174.3
180.5

180.0
184.6
186.8
186.8
181.4
184.8
189.8

176.3
180.4
183.1
184.0
178.5
181.4
185.5

175.6
180.8
181.7
185.1
180.5
180.2
186.1

179.6
186.9
186.3
190.3
186.4
185.3
194.2

183.5
187.7
188.7
192.6
187.8
188.4
199.3

187.9
191.3
190.0
196.8
191.2
191.0
200.6

195.3
196.8
195.8
201.3
196.1
193.6
208.2

191.8
195.6
195.6
198.0
193.8
190.9
206.5

192.4
196.5
195.0
199.0
193.4
190.7
206.1

195.7
199.0
199.0
204.7
198.9
195.2
210.5

187.0
187.8
193.1
189.3
197.9
186.5
194.9

175.9
178.5
183.5
179.7
185.2
177.4
180.9

173.3
176.5
182.1
177.2
185.6
174.3
182.6

179.7
185.3
189.5
185.8
192.0
180.3
188.9

179.2
183.3
187.3
181.9
189/9
178.4
188.0

182.5
181.1
184.8
183.4
192.4
180.5
189.2

187.0
184.1
187.9
187.1
196.9
185.2
194.9

188.7
186.1
191.7
188.9
199.9
187.4
196.1

192.4
190.0
194.3
191.7
202.0
192.2
199.5

196.5
196.8
203.0
199.8
209.8
195.5
206.6

193.3
194.6
200.6
196.2
206.1
192.3
199.1

194.8
197.4
203.9
197.5
205.2
194.9
202.8

200.3
199.4
206.1
201.8
209.6
200.1
210.0

197.5
195.5
200.1
181.7
189.2
193.1
191.8
204.1
206.1

184.5
182.4
189.1
171.6
176.5
180.0
178.0
187.1
193.4

183.2
182.8
186.9
170.0
175.1
179.9
180.1
183.9
194.5

190.8
191.3
195.1
177.0
183.0
187.8
186.9
197.2
202.3

188.6
18S.9
195.0
176.2
182.7
187.9
185.4
198.3
201.7

190.6
187.9
194.3
176.6
182.7
185.1
186.6
195.1
200.2

193.9
191.1
198.3
178.4
188.5
188.7
190.8
201.7
203.5

198.4
194.3
199.7
179.3
191.4
191.7
193.4
205.5
205.9

203.1
198.3
204.3
184.9
195.5
195.5
196.8
211.4
211.0

211.0
206.7
211.0
190.0
197.4
203.0
200.1
212.9
217.1

207.1
206.9
208.7
192.0
199.0
204.5
197.6
212.3
213.6

207.8
204.2
206.1
190.1
196.7
204.3
200.7
220.3
213.2

210.5
211.6
212.3
194.4
202.0
208.8
204.6
224.1
217.3

201.9
185.1
185.5
188.9
201.4
182.4
203.1

188.6
175.4
174.0
178.2
187.4
173.1
193.3

190.0
176.6
174.6
178.3
188.4
172.3
190.1

195.6
182.3
181.3
183.2
198.9
179.1
199.6

197.3
182.7
179.6
183.2
195.2
176.6
198.7

197.3
180.7
179.0
183.8
193.4
176.8
195.3

203.2
180.0
182.6
187.4
196.8
178.5
197.3

203.7
181.3
182.5
187.2
200.9
179.3
199.8

204.4
183.5
187.4
191.1
205.0
193.4
201.8

212.0
193.5
197.2
197.9
215.9
192.1
213.8

208.7
193.5
194.6
195.6
209.4
191.0
213.8

209.1
194.2
193.7
198.1
209. e
191.2
215.1

213.0
197.3
199.3
202.6
215.2
195.9
221.6

198.7
203.7
191.4
202.6
202.9
192.8
212.3
193.7
199.3

187.5
191.4
180.5
190.3
191.3
181.5
203.8
183.7
192.6

187.5 .199.6
189.7 199.3
181.5 189.2
189.3 198.8
191.6 199.8
182.1 188.8
203.1 213.1
181.3 190.3
189.6 192.2

194.6
197.7
188.0
199.7
200.5
188.3
208.9
189.4
197.2

190.3
198.5
187.0
196.0
198.8
186.3
208.2
187.8
191.8

193.0
202.0
188.3
199.1
198.0
185.8
209.4
190.9
194.4

194.5
204.6
190.6
201.8
199.5
188.4
207.4
190.2
195.0

198.9
206.9
189.8
205.0
203.2
194.3
215.1
197.1
199.0

209.4
212.8
198.0
209.1
210.7
203.8
220.3
202.9
205.8

211.1
211.5
201.4
214.7
214.3
205.1
219.2
200.9
208.4

206.9
211.8
198.9
211.0
210. e
201.0
217.1
202.0
207.1

211.1
217.8
203.1
216.6
216.1
207.6
222.2
207.4
211.3

203.5
207.3
226.8
187.6
211.7
200.2

196.0
199.1
216.4
177.7
200.2
189.2

193.5
199.0
213.9
176.6
198.6
188.7

202.9
203.3
225.2
183.9
205.1
199.6

198.8
206.0
223.4
183.6
204.6
201.6

195.8
201.7
216.8
J80.0
201.6
197.0

197.3
202.7
223.0
183.4
205.1
196.9

201.8
205.6
225.3
185.4
210.1
198.6

204.8
209.5
225.9
189.7
213.5
200.8

210.9
212.0
235.9
198.2
220.5
206.8

210.7
212.6
236.9
196.2
223.6
209.3

212.7
213.1
235.6
195.8
226.2
206.8

217.0
223.2
243.5
198.9
229.7
216.3

195.4
201.2
195.0
209.0

186.3
192.5
182.4
199.7

186.5
190.6
182.9
199.1

191.4
196.3
190.8
204.3

193.9
199.2
193.0
204.0

192.5
197.1
188.1
201.1

191.4
196.2,
189.8
203.7

192.8
198.7
193.6
207.2

195.5
200.8
195.1!
211.0

200.3
206.4
201.3
216.8

201.6
208.7
200.4
219.5!

204.4
210.2
200.4
220.2

208.2
218.1
211.8
222.1

Middle Atlantic
Buffalo....................
Newark..............
New York..............
Philadelphia..........
Pittsburgh..........
Rochester.......... .
Scranton.................
East North Central
Chicago.................
Cincinnati......... .
Cleveland________
Columbus, O h io...
Detroit...... .......... .
Indianapolis______
Milwaukee.............
Peoria........... ..........
Springfield, 111-----West North Central
Cedar Rapids2___
Kansas City______
Minneapolis..........
Omaha____ ______
St. Louis_________
St. Paul__________
Wichita 2
........ ........
South Atlantic
Atlanta....... ..........
Baltimore________
Charleston, S. C . . .
Jacksonville______
Norfolk_____ _____
Richmond........ .
Savannah________
Washington, D. C._
Winston-Salem 2_. _
East South Central
Birmingham...........
Jackson2
.................
Knoxville2_______
Louisville....... ........
Memphis................
Mobile.......... ..........
West South Central
Dallas......................
Houston.............. .
Little Rock............
New Orleans....... .
See

footnotes at end of table.




40
Table 2 .— Indexes o f retail prices o f food, by cities 1 and months, 1947 — Continued
(1935-39=100)
1947
Region and city

Aver­
age
for Jan.
the
15
year

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug.
15
15
15
15
15
15
15

Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
15
15
15
15

Mountain
Butte....... ..............
Denver...............
Salt Lake City.......

187.7 174.9 175.1 184.5 183.4 184.7 185.9 188.9 193.8 195.7 195.0 194.2 195.8
194.0 185.7 185.7 191.4 192.4 191.9 191.9 191.6 195.8 199.0 197.2 201.0 205.6
194.0 183.9 184.1 186.8 189.2 189.3 192.6 192.2 197.6 200.7 199.4 202.6 209.7

Pacific
Los Angeles______
Portland, Oreg.......
San Francisco_____
Seattle------ -----------

198.6
203.6
202.8
198.7

194.3
192.8
200.6
189.6

194.1
191.2
195.4
187.4

195 5
198.1
199.5
194.3

195.7
201.4
201.7
196.4

196.7
200.8
199.9
193.9

193.8
199.7
190.9
193.3

193.8
202.7
200.4
197.1

195.4
205.0
200.4
200.3

204.2
209.9
210.4
206.0

201.9
208.7
208.8
205.4

206.7
214.2
214.4
207.6

211.1
219.0
215.7
213.4

1 Aggregate costs of foods in each city, weighted to represent total purchases by families of wage earners
and lower-salaried workers, have been combined for the United States with the use of population weights.
2 June 1940=100.

Trend o f Prices F or M a jor Food Groups

Retail prices for all major food groups advanced during 1947.
Advances varied considerably among groups, ranging from 0.4 percent
for fats and oils to more than 20 percent for cereals and bakery prod­
ucts. Compared with the prewar period 1935-39, prices in December
1947 had risen most for eggs (136 percent) and meats, poultry, and
fish (127 percent) while prices had advanced least for cereals and
bakery products (70 percent) and sugar and sweets (84 percent).
Table 3 presents indexes of retail food prices by groups for the years
1923 through 1947 and for each month in 1946 and 1947. The ac­
companying chart shows the trend of retail food prices by groups
for 1929 through 1947.




41

RETAIL PRICES FO G UPS O FOO
R RO F O
AVERAGE FOR LARGE C IT IE S
1 9 35 — 3 9 * 1 0 0

inoex

250

F R U I T S A ,ND V E G ; e

t

index

250

> BL ES
\

200

150
\

I

100

\

r

v \J

200

i

i

150

100

V A L L FOODS

50

____ 1
____ 1
____

50

250
C E F *EA L S

ANC)

BA uKEIR Y

250

f/ r

P R C )DU<C T S

200

h

150
- A L L FO O O S

l l.
V

s

100

50

200

150

i
100

50

300
NAEA*r s ,

PO U L T R Y,

300

A h ID F: IS F i

250

250

r
200

f

150

200

V

150

I L L FC >oos

i

I
100

___ L

50

i
'

1
D/\ ! R ' < PFROD

o
3

300

100
1

__

50
300

rs

250

250

200

200

4
150

un
r. !

*3=

L L F C :0 0 S

i
SO0

1




100
:

*1

1923 5930

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF l AS OR S TA TIS TIC S

150

!

50
S935

1940

1945

Tal

retail prices o f food , in large cities com binedf by com m odity groups, b y years, 1923 to 1947, and b y months, January 1946 to
December 1947
[ 1935- 39= 100]

All
foods

Cereals Meats,
and
bakery poultry,
and
prod­
fish
Total
ucts

Meats
Beef
and
veal

Fruits and vegetables

Pork

Lamb

Chick­
ens

Fish

Dairy
prod­
ucts

Eggs
Total

Fresh Canned Dried

169.5
159.5
185.1
210.8
183.8
161.4
169.0
177.5
125.7
103.5
113.8
119.1
99.7
104.8
107. 9
93.2
94.5
96.5
103. 2
130.8
168.8
168.2
177.1
182.4
199.4

173.6
162.7
193.5
226.2
194.4
166.5
173. 5
185.7
128.7
105.9
118.9
122.3
98.8
106.2
108.6
92.1
95.1
97.3
104.2
132.8
178.0
177.2
188.2
190.7
201.5

Bever­
ages

Fats
and
oils

Sugar
and
sweets

B Y Y EA R S, 1923 T O 1947 2
1923.
1924.
1925.
1928.
1927.
1928
1929.
1930.
1931
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945
1946.
1947.

124.0
122.8
132.9
137.4
132.3
130.8
132. 5
126.0
103.9
86.5
84.1
93.7
100.4
101.3
105.3
97.8
95.2
96.6
105.5
123.9
138.0
136.1
139.1
159.6
193.8

105.5
107.2
118.0
115.7
113.3
110.1
107.6
104.3
91.4
82.6
84. 7
98.3
101.8
100.7
103.3
99.8
94.5
96.8
97.9
105.1
107.6
108.4
109.0
125.0
155.4

101.2
102.4
111.3
117.8
116.0
123.1
127.1
119.1
101.1
79.3
68. 9
78.9
99.9
98.9
105.8
98.9
96.6
95.8
107.5
126.0
133.8
129.9
131.2
161.3
217.1

100. 7
98.6
106.4
97.8
96.6
94.4
106.5
122.5
124.2
117.9
118.0
150.8
214.7

98.9
94.7
106. 5
98.7
101.1
102.8
110.8
123.6
124.7
118.7
118.4
150.5
213.6

104.7
103. 4
106.6
96.3
88.9
81.1
100.1
120.4
119.9
112.2
112.6
148.2
215.9

96.3
101.1
105. 2
97.9
99.5
99.7
106.6
124.1
136.9
134.5
136.0
163.9
220.1

95. 5
101.1
104.9
104.6
93.8
94.8
102.1
122.6
146.1
151.0
154.4
174.0
183.2

98.2
98.5
101.0
101.3
101.0
110.6
124. 5
163.0
206.5
207.6
217.1
236.2
271.4

129.4
124.1
128.1
127.4
130.7
131.4
131.0
121.0
102.8
84.9
82.8
90.9
97.5
101.6
105.4
99.6
95.9
101.4
112.0
125.4
134.6
133.6
133.9
165.1
186.2

136.1
139.0
151.2
141.7
133.2
137.3
143.8
121.4
95.6
82.3
77.9
88.6
104. 2
103.3
101.2
100.3
91.0
93.8
112.2
136. 5
161.9
153.9
164.4
168.8
200.8

175.4
159.1
124.6

124.8
128.2
132.3
122.9
120.8
120.6
124.3
118.6
103.3
91.1
87.9
103.9
106.2
100.9
103.2
97.4
92.3
92.4
97.9
121.6
130.6
129.5
130.2
140.8
166.2

175.4
159.6
159.0
152.4
145.9
153.9
171.0
158. 7
118.7
91.2
88.4
101.1
100.8
96.6
116.0
93.3
93.3
100.6
106.7
136.3
158.9
164.5
168.2
190.4
263.5

131.5
147.6
170.3
170.4
163.3
165.2
164.8
143.4
124.6
112.6
102.4
107.6
104.0
99.4
103.6
97.7
95.5
92.5
101.5
122.1
124.8
124.3
124.7
139.6
186.8

126.2
134.1
149.1
145.0
132.8
128.3
127.2
119.2
96.0
71.1
66.4
76.4
110.3
102.8
105.8
93.5
87.7
82.2
94.0
119.6
126.1
123.3
124.0
152.1
197.5

97.9
100.6
96.8
106.4
126.5
127.1
126.5
126.5
143.9
180.0

130.5
130.9
129.6
128.7
127.8
127.5

169.0
169.8
168.9
169.5
171.9
172.5

124.9
124.9
124.9
125.1
125.4
125.4

125.5
125.4
125.9
126.1
126.1
126.4

126.5
126.9
132.4
135.3
135.9
136.2

120.0

127.2
123.1
114.3
107.4
99.1
89.6
94.3
97.9
100.7
99.6
101.2

B Y PRICE R E PO RT IN G PERIODS, 1946 AND 1947
Jan.
Feb.
Mar
Apr.




141.0
139.6
140.1
141.7
142.6
145.6

109. 4
109. 8
110. 3
113. 3
115. 2
122. 1

131.4
131.3
131.3
132.8
133.5
134.0

118.0
118.1
118.1
119.4
120.1
120.4

118.2
118.3
118.3
119.8
120.9
121.2

112.6
112.6
112.8
113.7
114.0
114.3

136.4
136.9
137.0
138.1
138.7
139.0

152.7
151.2
150.2
159.3
161.5
162.8

227.3
226.9
227.7
221.3
218.3
219.7

136.4
136.6
137.0
137.4
138.6
147.8

172.4
144.2
139.0
137.7
140.3
147.1

180.8
181.1
183.4
185.9
185.7
183.5

192.7
193.0
196.3
199.8
199.6
196.7

(4
^
fc
O

July 15.............................
Aug. 15_..........................
Sept. 15...........................
Oct. 15............ ................
Nov. 15...........................
Dec. 15.......................... .

165.7
171.2
174.1
180.0
187.7
185.9

126.1
135.4
137.3
138.5
140.6
141.7

173.7
186.6
188.5
190.7
203.6
197.8

165.6
181.7
181.4
178.4
197.9
190.5

175.2
180.3
180.3
174.6
191.0
187.6

150.3
182.4
182.4
182.4
207.1
193.3

171.6
189.5
187.6
187.7
205.4
198.8

178.2
175.2
192.8
225.3
188.9
189.4

235.2
237.6
237.8
249.7
265.0
267.6

179.1
180.1
186.6
202.4
198.5
200.9

161.0
173.6
193.3
214.6
201.6
201.1

188.4
178.3
176.4
176.5
184.5
185.0

202.1
185.8
181.1
178.8
182.3
180.6

130.9
140.7
148.7
154.6
167.7
172.6

175.9
183.0
185.6
198.7
251.6
268.0

126.0
126.6
162.0
166.5
167.8
176.2

137.9
180.3
151.4
147.9
244.4
207.3

138.5
140.3
141.5
167.5
170.5
175.3

1947
Jan. 15.............................
Feb. 15............................
Mar. 15............................
Apr. 15............................
M ay 15...........................
June 15............................

183.8
182.3
189.5
188.0
187.6
190.5

143.4
144.1
148.1
153.4
154.2
154.6

199.0
196.7
207.6
202.6
203.9
216.9

192.1
191.7
204.1
198.7
200.6
216.1

190.9
190.0
195.1
194.6
197.1
216.4

190.8
191.6
217.2
203.5
204.2
213.6

205.3
204.3
209.7
206.5
209.6
226.7

185.8
176.5
178.3
177.1
179.6
182.3

271.3
258.7
266.0
261.0
255.1
254.7

190.1
183.2
187.5
178.9
171.5
171.5

181.7
169.9
174.7
176.3
178.9
183.0

187.9
191.7
199.6
200.4
207.0
205.0

184.1
189.3
199.4
200.7
209.5
208.0

173.6
172.6
172.9
172.6
172.3
169.7

269.2
269.9
271.3
269.7
268.1
262.6

178.3
182.8
186.9
189.5
188.9
181.3

201.9
201.3
219.1
227.8
200.5
188.3

176.2
178.1
178.6
179.3
179.3
179.7

July 15.............................
Aug. 15_ ..........................
Sept. 15...........................
Oct. 1 5 -....... ...... ...........
Nov. 15............................
Dec. 15............................

193.1
196.5
203.5
201.6
202.7
206.9

155.0
155.7
157.8
160.3
167.9
170.5

220.2
228.4
240.6
235.5
227.0
227.3

219.7
229.8
241.9
234.9
223.6
223.2

220.8
230.5
239.7
233.6
226.3
227.6

216.4
229.3
245.9
240.9
219.7
218.2

228.6
232.1
244.0
226.2
227.1
221.5

181.9
180.5
191.4
189.5
184.6
190.7

260.6
263.4
275.7
286.5
302.4
302.3

178.8
183.8
195.2
190.1
198.4
204.9

203.0
212.3
235.9
232.7
224.7
236.1

202.0
199.8
198.2
196.6
199.6
205.3

204.2
202.1
202.4
201.1
205.0
212.1

168.5
165.7
157.3
155.2
156.5
157.3

263.6
263.4
261.2
255.6
251.7
255.4

180.8
181.7
187.0
190.8
194.7
198.5

182.0
178.5
176.6
190.0
196.4
208.2

179.7
179.8
181.8
181.8
183.2
183.7

1 Aggregate costs in each city weighted to represent total purchases of families of wage earners and lower-salaried workers, have been combined with the use of population weights.
2 Comparable indexes for the years 1923-34 have been computed by converting indexes from the 1923-25 base to the 1935-39 base.




CO

44
Cereals and bakery products.— Continuing the sharp advances made
during 1946, retail prices for cereals and bakery products climbed 20
percent during 1947, the largest increase recorded over the year for
any of the major food groups. Despite 2 years of steady gains, how­
ever, prices for this group of foods had risen only 70 percent, or less
than any other group since the period 1935-39.
Over the year, prices of com flakes increased 34 percent, flour 32 per­
cent, rice 28 percent, rolled oats 25 percent and corn meal 24 percent.
Bread prices moved upward less rapidly— 18 percent from December
1946 to December 1947. These advances were closely associated with
the record high prices established in the grain markets during 1947.
Retail bread prices remained relatively stable until late in October,
when rising wholesale prices for flour and other ingredients led to
Nation-wide price increases of 1 to 2 cents a loaf. In December, city
housewives paid an average of 54 cents for 5 pounds of flour and 13K
cents for a loaf of bread as compared with 41 and 11% cents a year
earlier.
Meats.— Prices for meats, poultry, and fish, as a group, advanced 15
percent between December 1946 and December 1947, with meats 17
percent higher, fish 13 percent higher, and poultry less than 1 percent
higher. Meat prices declined slightly between January and Febru­
ary but rose 6^ percent in March when fresh and cured pork prices
advanced 13 percent. After a further decline in April meat prices
jumped about 22 percent between April and September, reaching a
record high and a peak for the year. Between April and June, the
usual sequence of short-run price-setting factors, from producer to
processor to consumer, reversed itself. Unusually strong consumer
demand together with unseasonably cool weather caused retail prices
to increase 8 percent in June alone, and served to sustain and increase
prices in primary markets. Additional factors contributing to rising
meat prices included higher feed prices, anticipation of lower pork
supplies from the relatively small fall pig crop of 1946, and the small
volume of lambs available for shipment. In the fall, the public was
being urged to eat less meat and to resist high prices; farmers liqui­
dated livestock because of rising feed costs; and meatless Tuesdays and
poultryless Thursdays, combined with more liberal supplies lowered
meat prices at all levels of distribution. Nevertheless, many house­
wives who could remember paying 36 cents a pound for round steak,
30 cents for bacon, and 15 cents for salt pork in 1939, paid an average
of 80, 87, and 58 cents for these same meats in December 1947.
Dairy prod,nets.— Despite sharper than usual fluctuations during the
year, prices of dairy products moved up only 2 percent. A decline of
about 15 percent in the first half of the year was followed by a 19
percent rise in the last half. Significantly lower fluid milk and cream
consumption in the first half of the year diverted considerable quanti­



45
ties to processors of butter, evaporated milk, and cheese. This di­
version, with the approach of the flush milk production season, resulted
in sharply lower prices for all items between March and June. After
June, prices advanced much more than seasonally, with production
declines resulting from prolonged drought and hot weather in major
dairy producing areas.
Butter prices fluctuated irregularly between June and December,
when steady but moderate seasonal advances were to be expected.
In September and December, many retailers sold butter for more than
$1 a pound. Despite low butter production and unusually light stor­
age stocks, slow consumer demand and substitution of oleomargarine
forced sharp price reductions in October and again at the end of
December. Production of oleomargarine increased toward the end of
the year when it exceeded butter production by 10 to 15 percent. In
December, consumers paid an average of 42 cents a pound for oleo­
margarine and 95 cents a pound for butter. Prices of evaporated milk
and cheese declined 4% and 6 percent over the year while fresh milk
advanced nearly 3 percent.
Eggs.-—Egg prices climbed more than 17 percent over the year.
After seasonal declines in January and February active Government
support-buying and reduction of storage-holdings to less than half
those of 1946 sent prices upward more than seasonally for seven
successive months. The average retail price of eggs advanced from
59 cents a dozen in February to 82 cents in September. Consumer
demand was well sustained throughout the year, as eggs replaced
meat more frequently in the family diet.
Fruits and vegetables.—Retail prices of fruits and vegetables as a
group climbed 11 percent during 1947. A 17K percent rise for fresh
items more than offset a 9 percent decline for canned and a 5 percent
decline for dried fruits and vegetables.
In most months of 1947, fresh produce prices advanced more than
seasonally or declined less than seasonally, resulting in increasingly
higher price levels compared with 1946. Unfavorable weather during
planting and growing seasons and moderate acreage reductions low­
ered the 1947 fruit crop by 4 percent and the vegetable crop by 12
percent from the record production of 1946. Many spring vegetable
crops fell 25 percent below those of a year earlier. A large potato crop
(384 million bushels) required Government support-buying at prices
higher than in 1946, to meet the increase in parity as required by law.
Greatest price increases were recorded for onions (up 125 percent),
carrots (up 74 percent), and cabbage (up 68 percent). Prices of
oranges dropped 11 percent, and apples and sweetpotatoes, 6% percent.
Retail prices of canned fruits and vegetables declined for seven
consecutive months in 1947 when reduced packs were more than offset
by large inventories. Prices of dried fruits and vegetables declined



46
about 5 percent over the year, mainly because of surplus stocks of
prunes and raisins.
Beverages.—Beverage prices rose nearly 13 percent during 1947.
The price of coffee advanced in 9 of the 12 months. Coffee prices
declined in June and July with reduced summer demand and hesitant
buying by importers and roasters. Thereafter, roasters enlarged
inventories to meet cool-weather demand and retail prices continued
upward through December. The average retail price of coffee was
50 cents a pound in December 1947, compared with 31 cents in June
1946 and 21 cents during most of 1940.
Fats and oils.'—Although prices of fats and oils fluctuated widely
and erratically during 1947, their net gain was only 0.4 percent.
Between December 1946 and April 1947, prices jumped 10 percent
but then dropped nearly 22 percent by September. Chiefly respon­
sible for these fluctuations were swift changes in the price of lard.
The average price of lard fell from 39 cents a pound in April to 25
cents in August. The marketing of unusually heavy hogs brought the
lard yield per hog to near-record levels in this period, but by the yearend much of the price decline was recovered and lard sold for an aver­
age of 36 cents a pound or a gain of 4 percent over the year. Prices
for other fats and oils moved less erratically. Hydrogenated shorten­
ing prices advanced 3 percent while those for salad dressing declined
6 percent, and oleomargarine 2 percent.
Sugar and sweets.—Retail prices of sugar and sweets gained about
5 percent in 1947. Sugar prices moved slowly and steadily upward
throughout the year for a total increase of 5.3 percent. The removal
of sugar from price controls on October 31 was not accompanied by
any severe price increase, for stocks were adequate and the outlook
for abundant future supplies was good.
Retail Prices o f Individual Foods in 1947

Average retail prices of individual foods for large cities combined
are presented in table 4 for each month in 1947. Annual average
retail prices of individual foods in each of 56 cities, for 1947, are shown
in table 5.




Table 4 .— Average retail prices of principal foods in large cities combined, b y months, 1947
1947
Article

Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat_ ......... ............ . ....... 5 pounds..
Macaroni_____________ ______
Corn flakes____ _____________ ___ 11 ounces..
Corn meal___ ____ __________ _____ pound..
R ice2______________ _________ _______ do___
Rolled oats---------------------------- ___20 ounces. _
Bakery products:
Bread:
White___________________ ______ pound..
Whole wheat____________ ________ do___
R ye-------------------------------- ________ d o ....
Vanilla cookies_______________________ d o ....
Soda crackers________________ _______ .do___
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak_____________ ...............d o ....
Rib roast____ ____ _____ ________ do___
Chuck roast..................... ________ do— .
Liver____________________ ............... do___
Hamburger-....................................... do___
Veal:
Cutlets__________________ ............... do___
Roast, boned and rolled 3..................do___
Pork:
Chops_______ _______ ____ ...............d o ....
Bacon, sliced..... .............................. - d o —
Ham:
Sliced............................................ d o ....
W h o le -........................ ............... do___
Salt pork............................. ............ ..d o ___
Sausage3............................. ________ do—
Lamb:
Leg_______________ ______ ...............d o___
Rib chops_______________ ________ do___
Poultry: Roasting chickens. .......... ___ ____ do___
See footn otes a t end o f table.




m
Average 'U
for the fJan. 15
year

Feb. 15 >Mar. 15 Apr. 15 M ay 15 June 15

July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15

Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15

Cents
48.2
0
13.5
9.8
18.4
14.6

Cents
41.7
19.1
12.1
9.1
16.9
13.4

Cents
42.5
19.2
12.1
9.0
17.0
13.4

Cents
44.5
19.2
12.3
9.0
17.0
13.5

Cents
48.5
19.4
12.3
9.1
16.9
13.7

Cents
49.6
19.6
12.6
9.0
17.2
13.9

Cents
49.1
19.6
12.8
9.1
17.3
14.1

Cents
48.5
19.7
13.3
9.3
17.9
14.1

Cents
48.3
0)
13.7
9.9
19.0
14.4

Cents
48.9
0
14.3
10.5
19.9
14.9

Cents
50.1
0)
14.9
10.9
20.3
15.8

Cents
52.9
0
15.5
11.2
20.8
16.6

Cents
54.1
0)
16.0
11.2
20.8
16.8

12.5
0
0
40.1
0

11.6
12.6
13.4
38.8
24.6

11.7
12.6
13.5
38.6
24.6

12.1
13.1
14.1
39.0
24.7

12.5
13.5
14.6
39.8
24.7

12.4
13.6
14.7
39.7
24.7

12.5
13.8
14.7
40.0
24.7

12.5
13.8
14.7
40.4
24.6

12.5
0
0)
40.4
0

12.6
(0
0
40.7
0

12.7
0)
0)
40.7
0)

13.4
0)
0
41.3
0

13.6
0)
0)
41.6
0

75.6
62.0
51.5
0
43.9

66.0
55.9
46.6
53.2
41.1

65.8
55.4
45.1
53.6
40.2

68.2
56.5
46.4
55.3
40.3

68.4
56.3
45.6
56.7
40.1

69.3
56.8
45.9
58.4
40.4

78.0
62.1
50.6
62.2
43.9

80.0
63.4
52.3
63.5
44.9

83.7
66.7
55.8
0
46.8

86.7
69.6
58.1
0)
48.2

82.4
68.2
58.4
0)
47.7

79.2
66.2
56.9
0
46.5

79.9
66.7
56.4
0)
46.8

81.6
0

72.7
54.2

75.2
56.0

77.8
58.2

77.3
55.9

78.5
56.6

84.2
59.8

83.7
0

84.5
(4
)

88.8
(4
)

86.8
(4
)

84.5
0

0

72.1
77.7

60.0
71.5

63.2
68.9

72.1
77.0

66.6
72.4

70.6
69.0

74.2
72.3

74.6
74.5

78.8
79.4

85.0
85.6

82.0
87.8

70.7
86.7

0
67.5
45.1
0

83.1
63.2
42.4
52.4

83.6
61.7
38.7
50.0

92.9
70.9
44.2
53.6

90.2
66.1
44.2
52.5

89.6
63.9
40.2
51.7

93.1
66.9
39.6
51.9

94.8
67.9
39.3
(4
)

0
72.1
40.7
(4
)

0)
75.5
47.5
(4
)

0
71.8
50.9
0

0
64.1
55.5
0

0

64.2
0
55.3

61.6
67.4
56.1

60.8
67.6
53.3

62.0
69.9
53.8

60.6
69.4
53.5

61.2
70.8
54.2

66.3
76.4
55.0

66.1
78.0
54.9

66.9
0
54.5

70.3
0
57.7

65.2
0)
57.2

65.4
0
55.7

63.8
0)
57.5

85.0
68.0
87.2
65.6
57.5

0

Table 4 .— Average retail prices o f principal foods in large cities combined, b y months, 1947 —Continued
1947
Article

Meats, poultry, and fish—Continued
F ish:»
Salmon:
P ink................................... . .16-ounce can..
Red a.................................. .......... ...... do___
Dairy products:
Butter............................................ ..............pound..
Cheese....... .....................................
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)................... ............... quart..
Fresh (grocery)....................... .................. do___
Evaporated............................. ..14^-ounce can..
Eggs: F resh .......................................... .............. dozen..
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples....... .............................. ...............pound..
B ananas................................ ._________ do___
Oranges . ................ ......... . ___ ____ dozen..
____________ ____ ................. each..
Grapefruit3
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green........................... ._______ pound..
Cabbage............................... .
Carrots .............. .................... .------------bunch..
L ettuce................................... .............. .head..
Onions..... ..............................................pound..
Potatoes..... ........... ................. ------ 15 pounds..
Spinach.................................. .----------- pound..
Sweetpotatoes. ........................ ............... -do—
Canned fruits:
Peaches. .................................. — No.
can..
Pineapplo................................. ............— do—
Grapefruit juice.................................No. 2 c a n ..
Canned vegetables:
Beans, green............................................ -d o—
Corn....... ..................................
Peas...........................................
Tomatoes....... .......................... -------------- do___
Soup, vegetable 3__................. —11-ounce can..
Dried fruits: Primes. .............. .................. .pound..
Dried vegetables: Navy beans___ ..................do-----




Average
for the Jan. 15
year

Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 M ay 15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15

Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15

Cents
42.4
(4
)

Cents
35.1
59.0

Cents
36.6
58.8

Cents
37.9
59.2

Cents
39.4
*60.5

Cents
40.4
61.8

Cents
41.1
63.3

Cents
41.6
(4
)

Cents
42.4
C)
4

Cents
44.9
(4
)

Cents
48.0
(4
)

Cents
50.7
<)
4

Cents
51.3
(4
)

80.5
59.0

79.5
63.5

76.2
61.4

82.9
61.1

73.6
61.3

69.5
55.9

70.7
55.2

76.6
56.3

80.9
56.1

91.6
57.5

81.0
58.8

88.2
60.1

95.4
61.4

19.6
18.7
13.1
69.6

20.1
19.3
14.0
63.0

19.4
18.6
13.9
58.9

19.3
18.3
13.8
60.6

19.0
18.1
13.3
61.1

18.6
17.7
12.9
62.0

18.5
17.6
12.6
63.4

19.0
18.0
12.5
70.4

19.3
18.4
12.5
73.6

19.8
18.9
12.5
81.8

20.4
19.4
12.6
80.6

20.8
19.8
13.0
77.9

20.8
19.9
13.3
81.8

12.8
15.1
43.4
(4
)

12.5
14.7
37.8
7.9

12.9
14.8
37.9
7.6

13.5
14.9
43.4
7.6

14.5
15.0
44.1
7.7

14.9
15.2
43.5
7.7

15.5
15.1
42.8
8.9

13.6
14.9
42.9
(4
)

11.0
14.9
51.2
(4
)

11.5
15.2
49.2
(4
)

11.3
15.4
48.7
(4
)

11.2
15.5
41.8
(4
)

11.6
15.6
37.7
(4
)

20.6
7.3
10.8
13.6
7.4
75.4
12.5
10.4

18.7
6.3
10.6
13.6
4.9
63.8
14.0
10.4

25.3
6.6
9.0
15.4
5.0
64.0
13.7
10.4

(«>
6.6
9.2
12.7
5.2
67.9
14.9
10.2

28.5
6.4
8.4
11.6
6.5
74.4
12.6
10.2

20.9
9.2
9.2
14.9
7.5
78.8
11.2
10.2

17.8
7.8
9.1
11.5
7.4
87.7
10.9
11.4

15.0
6.4
9.7
12.0
7.6
90.5
12.0
11.6

13.3
8.9
9.6
14.2
7.9
77.1
12.5
12.2

17.1
6.5
11.1
15.6
7.8
72.8
(0
10.4

23.5
6.3
13.0
12.5
8.0
72.4
12.4
9.0

25.8
7.3
14.0
14.1
9.5
75.8
11.1
9.0

20.3
9.0
16.7
14.8
10.8
79.9
12.0
9.5

32.0
(«)
0)

32.2
32.2
11.8

32.2
32.1
11.2

32.3
(«)
11.0

32.3
(•)
10.9

32.1
(«)
10.7

32.4
(#
)
10.7

32.4
(6
)
10.6

32.4
(6
)
0)

31.6
(«)
0)

31.3
33.7
0)

31.3
34.4
(0

31.2
34.8
0)

(0
18.4
15.7
19.3
<«)
24.7
21.3

15.8
18.1
15.8
21.3
14.3
25.7
21.2

16.0
18.1
15.9
21.1
14.3
26.1
21.0

16.5
18.1
16.1
21.0
14.3
26.3
21.0

16.6
18.1
16.2
20.8
14.3
26.2
20.9

16.7
18.1
16.1
20.8
14.2
25.8
20.9

16.6
18.1
15.7
20.3
14.1
24.9
20.9

16.6
18.3
15.5
19.9
(*)
25.0
21.0

(0
18.3
15.5
19.2
(4
)
25.0
21.0

0)
18.2
15.4
17.2
(4
)
24.1
21.6

(0
18.6
15.4
16.5
(4
)
23.3
21.5

0)
18.9
15.4
16.7
(4
)
22.3
21.8

(0
19.3
15.4
16.7
(4
)
22.3
22.5

Beverages:
Coffee........................................
T e a . . . ......................................
Cocoa*.......................................
Fats and oils:
L a rd .......... - ............................
Shortening other than lard:
In cartons..... ......................
In other containers 1
7_........ ...................... do___
*
4
3
2
Salad dressing-.......................... ...................... pint..
Oleomargarine.......................... ................... pound..
Peanut butter.......................... ...................... d o . „ .
Oil, cooking or salad *_ ............
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar.........................................
Corn sirup.................................
Molasses*—. ............................. -----16 fluid ounces..

(0
(0

46.9

44.7
24.1
12.9

45.9
24.1
13.4

47.0
24.0
13.5

47.6
24.1
13.8

31.5

32.5

32.4

38.7

38.8

(*)

36.9
44.3
39.5
42.3
35.5
48.7

37.1
44.3
39.3
41.9
35.4
48.3

39.8
46.0
40.3
43.9
35.5
49.3

42.2
51.2
42.0
45.7
36.0
51.9

9.5
18.8
20.9

9.6
18.6
21.0

9.7
18.3
21.0

9.7
18.4
21.0

34.3
38.5
40.8

(*)
(4)

9.7

0)

(«)

1 Discontinued pricing August 1947.
2Reintroduced mto index in August 1947.
3 Not included in the index.
4 Discontinued pricing July 1947.
* Costs of fresh and/or frozen fish are included in the index, but average prices are not computed.
•Inadequate reports.
7 Published as “ hydrogenated shortening” since August 1947.




47.5
24.2
14.1

45.5
24.3
14.1

45.3
24.3

45.6

46.9

47.9

48.8

0)

0)

(4)

0)

(4)

(0

(4)

(4)

(4)

24.9

27.0

32.2

(0

0

28.8

27.1

25.6

37.0
49.0
41.9
41.3
36.3
49.5

34.4
45.4
38.4
40.3
36.4
45.7

33.3
44.0
37.3
39.9
36.3

(0

(4)

(4)

9.7
18.4
20.8

9.7
18.4
20.9

9.7
18.9

0)

(4)

(4)

(0

42.2
36.8
39.9

9.7




39.6
36.4
36.1

)
(4)
0

(0

0)

(0

(4
)

(4)

39.7
36.3
38.1

9.8
0)
(4)

34.1

)

9.8
)
(4)

0

41.0
36.4
39.1

49.8
(')
(4
)

36.2
0)

45.6
36.9
41.7

0)
(4
)

9.9

9.9

0)

(0

(4
)

(4
)

C
O

Table 5 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1947
Middle Atlantic

New England
Article

United
States

Cereals and bakery products:
Cents
Cereals:
48.2
Flour, wheat_________________________ 5 pounds._
13.5
Corn flakes__________________________ 11 ounces. .
9.8
Corn meal_______
pound..
18.4
do___
Rice__________________
Rolled oats___________________________________ 20ounces..
14.6
Bakery products:
12.5
Bread, white___________________________ pound..
40.1
Vanilla cookies____________
do----Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
75.6
Round steak__________________________ do_
_
62.0
Rib roast---------do----51.5
Chuck roast___________________
...d o ----43.9
Hamburger.._________________________ do----81.6
Veal: Cutlets_______________
do----Pork:
72.1
Chops________________________________ do---77.7
Bacon, sliced__________________________ do---67.5
Ham, whole---------------------------------------- do... .
45.1
Salt pork_____________________________ do_
_
64.2
Lamb: Leg_______________________________ do_
_
55.3
Poultry: Roasting chickens____________________do___
42.4
F ish :2 Salmon, pink__________________ 16-ounce can..
Dairy products:
80.5
Butter_____________________________________ pound..
Cheese_______________________________________ do_
_
59.0
Milk:
19.6
Fresh (delivered)________________________ quart..
18.7
Fresh (grocery)___________________________ do---13.1
Evaporated____________________ 14^-ounce can..
69.6
Eggs: Fresh_______________________ ______ ______ dozen. _




Fall
Boston Bridge­ River
port

Man­
New
chester Haven

Port­
land,
Maine

Provi­
dence

Buffalo Newark

13.9

11.7
35.6

13.1

G
)

13.8
35.7

13.6
37.2

G
)

73.5
60.0
51.0
43.6
83.0

81.2
63.4
54.8
51.1
88.3

80.9
67.3
55.6
48.6
90.0

80.6
64.6
51.9
44.1
89.8

77.1
62.2
52.4
46.4
83.1

77.5
61.9
53.4
43.5
86.4

75.6
72.1
66.0
0)
61.9
54.5

72.9
78.4
68.0

72.8
80.2
68.8

G
)

G
)

73.4
79.7
68.5
49.6
63.9
53.1

75.0
76.6
66.5
44.0
63.6

Cents
50.1
13.8
9.3

Cents
49.7
13.4
9.9

Cents
50.0
13.5
9.7

Cents
48.1
13.2
9.7

Cents
47.3
12.5
9.5

G
)

G
)

G
)

G
)

G
)

G
)

G
)

G
)

12.0

11.5

12.7

12.2

G
)

G
)

G
)

G
)

11.6
35.8

12.1
39.8

12.1
38.6

84.1
61.4
54.9
47.2

82.9
62.0
57.1
50.2
84.9

79.0
59.4
53.8
49.9

85.0
63.1
57.2
48.0
88.2

77.5
57.1
51.6
46.1

81.4
60.4
52.9
47.2

G
)

81.7
57.0
51.9
48.4
83.1

G
)

G
)

75.1
77.8
69.2
34.9
67.7
57.4
44.1

74.0
77.0
(l)
33.5
65.8
54.7
44.9

74.3
77.8
67.6
37.4
66.7
56.3
44.4

73.0
76.0
65.6
38.2
65.1
54.2

G
)

74.4
77.8
68.1
32.8
66.6
56.1
44.5

G
)

74.9
76.5
67.5
34.2
68.4
56.5
41.8

79.2
54.9

79.3
0)

79.6
58.6

78.0
59.0

79.5
65.2

78.4
59.4

20.2
19.2
13.5
72.6

20.3
19.3
13.4
74.5

20.6
20.4
13.4
72.1

20.4
20.5
13.5
71.4

20.2
19.4
13.4
73.6

19.7
20.1
13.5
72.6

G
)
73.7
76.7
67.8
35.6
65.7
53.6

14.5

14.6

14.4

14.1

Cents
49.5
13.1
9.1
18.0
14.5

Cents
47.3
13.4
10.0
19.0
14.0

Cents
48.4
13.4
9.7
14.5

Roch­
ester

Cents
47.8
14.0
10.2
18.9
14.6

Cents
48.9
13.2
10.2
14.8

Phila­ Pitts­
delphia burgh

Cents
46.5
12.9
9.9
19.0
14.3

Cents
48.6
13.4
9.6
14.5

New
York

Cents
49.1
13.7
10.1
19.1
14.5
12.2

11.8

G
)

G
)

G
)

62.5
55.0
44.5

G
)

G
)
G
)

78.0
74.5
68.4
52.6
63.1
57.4
42.2

G
)

78.1
56.9

81.2
59.6

81.3
64.0

80.8
58.0

80.8
56.7

78.2
60.8

20.6
19.2
12.8
71.2

19.4
18.0
12.8
69.3

21.5
20.2
13.3
74.9

21.2
18.8
13.3
76.2

19.2
18.8
13.2
73.2

19.8
19.8
13.3
70.3

20.2
19.3
13.3
70.6

80.3

61.6
53.6

Crc

O

Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples...........................................................pound._
Bananas............... - ..........................................do___
Oranges.......................................................... dozen. _
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green...................
..pound..
Cabbage_____ _____ ______________________do___
Carrots.________________________ ____ __ .bunch. _
Lettuce______________ ____ ______________ head..
Onions____________
pound..
Potatoes.............. ........... ........................15 pounds. .
Spinach________ ____________ _____ _____ pound..
S weetpotatoes________________________ do___
Canned fruits:
Peaches........................... ..................... No. 2H can..
Pineapple.............. ................ .......... .............. do----Canned vegetables:
Corn___________________ _____ _______ No. 2 can..
Peas____ ________________________________ do___
Tomatoes_______________________________ do___
Dried fruits: Prunes----- ------------------------------ pound._
Dried vegetables: Navy beans------------------------do____
Beverages: Coffee_______________________________ do—
Fats and oils:
Lard______________ ____ _____________________do___
Shortening other than lard: Hydrogenated 3____ do____
Salad dressing______________ ___________ _____ pint..
Oleomargarine____________ ____ _______ _____ pound..
Sugar and sweets: Sugar_________________________ do____
See footnotes at end of table.




1 2 .8
15.1
4 3 .4

1 2 .6
0)
4 3 .1

1 2 .7
1 5 .6
4 7 .2

1 3 .6
1 5 .4
4 5 .4

2 0 .6
7 .3
10 .8
1 3 .6
7 .4
7 5 .4
1 2 .5
1 0 .4

2 0 .9
7 .4
1 2 .0
15.1
7 .9
7 0 .0
1 2 .4
0)

2 2 .9
7 .3
1 2 .5
1 5 .5
7 .4
6 7 .8
1 1 .7
1 0 .8

0)
7 .7
1 2 .4
1 6 .0
8 .0
6 4 .4
0)
1 0 .4

3 2 .0
0)

3 3 .8
0)

3 3 .9
0)

3 3 .7
3 4 .8

1 8 .4
1 5 .7
19.3
2 4 .7
2 1 .3
4 6 .9

1 9 .2
18 .1
2 1 .4
2 4 .5
2 3 .3
4 9 .5

19 .1
1 7 .2
2 0 .7
2 4 .8
2 3 .0
4 8 .1

1 9 .0
1 7 .4
1 9 .0
0)
2 4 .2
4 8 .3

3 1 .5
4 4 .3
3 8 .5
4 0 .8
9 .7

3 1 .5
4 4 .5
4 2 .6
4 0 .4
9 .4

3 0 .5
4 5 .1
4 2 .4
4 0 .7
9 .8

3 1 .2
4 6 .0
4 1 .9
4 0 .7
9 .7

11.6
14.9
43.4

11.4
14.4
47.5

11.9
15.3
42.9

12.6
14.6
43.4

13.0
14.9
38.8

11.4
14.5
45.3

11.8
14.4
43.8

13.1
15.1
45.7

12.7
14.9
41.7

11.7
15.3
42.3

(9
6.9
11.6
14.7
7.9
66.2
(9

h

24.7
7.3
12.4
15.0
7.3
69.4
12.3
11.0

(9
6.4
10.3
15.7
7.7
62.7
(9
(9

20.6
6.9
12.2
16.1
7.4
66.5
12.0
10.0

24.3
7.0
10.4
13.6
7.2
65.6
(9
11.3

18.3
7.2
12.5
15.4
7.4
75.3
(9
10.5

21.7
7.8
12.7
15.4
7.6
76.6
12.8
10.7

22.1
7.6
12.4
14.7
7.6
75.0
12.2
10.4

20.9
7.4
11.3
13.8
7.8
73.1
13.8
11.1

6.9
10.2
14.8
7.1
59.3
(9
10.4

32.7
0)

33.6
35.4

34.8
(9

32.3
(9

32.0
(9

33.2
(9

33.6
(9

31.0
(9

34.8
(9

34.0
(9

19.3
17.4
20.1
24.3
21.8
46.9

19.1
17.9
20.4
(9
21.4
47.8

19.2
18.1
20.9
26.2
24.0
48.4

18.3
17.7
19.9
23.9
22.8
47.1

17.6
15.6
21.2
25.1
19.8
45.6

19.1
16.0
20.9
2C7
21.3
47.0

19.7
17.2
21.5
(9
22.4
47.3

18.9
15.9
18.5
24.0
20.9
46.2

19.0
16.1
21.0
(9
20.7
47.7

17.5
17.2
(9
24.9
20.2
45.8

30.8
44.9
43.0
40.1
9.8

31.2
45.1
41.2
41.0
9.8

31.4
44.9
41.9
41.7
9.8

31.5
44.3
40.8
40.0
9.5

30.0
43.5
34.8
39.3
9.7

31.7
44.8
41.7
41.6
9.6

32.6
45.3
42.4
40.4
9.6

31.5
43.8
36.6
(9
9.4

32.4
44.3
39.9
40.7
10.0

31.1
44.9
35.6
40.7
9.7




(9

Table 5 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, by cities, 1947 —Continued
Article

Middle
Atlantic
—Con.

East North Central

West North Central

Scran­ Chicago Cincin­ Cleve­ Colum­
Mil­
Detroit Indian­ waukee Peoria
ton
nati
land
bus
apolis
Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat...........- ................ ............. 5 pounds..
Corn flakes________ _______ . . . ---------- 11 ounces.
Corn meal____ _____ ____ ____ ................. pound..
Rice------------------------- ------------ ......... ........... do—
Rolled oats...................... ........... _______20 ounces..
Bakery products:
Bread, white............................. ---------------pound..
Vanilla cookies_............. ........... .............. ...... do___
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak..................... . . .....................d o ....
Rib roast..... ........... ............ .....................do___
Chuck roast.......................... .....................do___
Hamburger.......... ................. ___________ do___
Veal: Cutlets.............................. ___________ d o ...
Pork:
Chops______ ____ ________ ___________ do___
Bacon, sliced. ....................... ___________ do___
Ham, whole......................... ____ _____ do___
Salt pork. . . ...................... ___________ do___
Lamb: Leg____________ ______ ............ ........do___
Poultry: Roasting chickens............. ___________ do___
Fish: 2 Salmon, pink........................ ....... 16-ounce c a n ..
Dairy products:
B utter....................... ....................... _________ pound..
Cheese...................................... ........ ___________ do___
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)........................ ............ ...... quart..
Fresh (grocery)____ __________ ___________ do—
Evaporated............................. ...14^-ounce can..
Eggs: Fresh__________ ___________ ______________ dozen..
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples....... ......................... ........ .............. ..p ou n d..
Bananas.................... ........ ......... .....................do—
Oranges....................................... ....................dozen..




Spring- Cedar Kansas Minne­
field Rapids City
apolis Omaha

Cents
45.2
13.6
9.3
19.6
14.0

Cents
47.2
13.4
10.4
17.6
14.1

Cents
47.2
13.4
9.7
17.4
14.4

Cents
48.8
14.2
10.2
18.7
14.4

Cents
47.0
13.2
9.4
18.0
14.6

Cents
46.6
13.4
10.2
0)
14.4

Cents
50.7
13.3
9.9
18.4
14.5

Cents
46.4
13.4
9.3
(9
14.1

Cents
46.2
12.8
10.9
(0
14.2

Cents
46.3
13.3
10.4
(0
14.7

Cents
49.5
14.0
10.3
19.3
14.9

Cents
47.6
13.6
10.7
(0
14.4

Cents
48.3
13.8
10.1
17.6
14.6

Cents
46.6
13.4
9.2
17.4
14.4

12.8
35.6

12.0
49.9

11.9
(9

11.9
38.0

11.7
(9

11.5
45.3

11.2
0)

11.6
(0

13.1
(0

15.3
(0

11.8
(0

12.1
49.9

11.8
<9

11.7
(9

78.2
60.4
52.6
44.4
80.8

73.7
62.6
52.2
42.1
77.4

73.5
58.9
50.3
42.8
80.5

72.5
62.2
53.3
43.1
82.7

73.4
60.5
52.6
44.0
77.0

71.4
55.9
49.6
43.0
78.7

73.9
59.2
50.4
42.3
78.1

71.9
58.4
51.7
44.1
72.0

72.7
(0
51.7
43.7
72.4

72.8
54.9
49.3
43.1
73.2

70.5
51.3
46.8
42.3
(0

72.9
60.5
48.7
43.0
74.0

71.3
59.1
50.9
43.2
78.1

72.7
58.0
47.3
40.8
(9

75.1
78.5
65.7
51.3
64.8
53.1
0)

71.2
76.5
64.7
47.5
63.1
52.5
43.3

73.3
79.0
66.8
45.4
68.3
58.7
40.4

72.8
77.3
67.0
50.4
64.2
54.8
(9

72.3
76.3
66.6
44.2
66.8
63.8
(0

72.6
77.0
67.4
44.6
63.1
53.0
(9

70.2
75.8
65.9
(9
(9
(9
45.2

69.1
77. 8
66.0
44.7
64.7
52.1
(0

66.6
74.0
64.5
42.3
(0

68.7
77.2
66.4
(0
(0
(0
(0

67.3
76.0
63.9
45.5
(0
46.0
46.9

69.4
77.4
63.9
45.0
64.9
57.8
44.4

71.4
79.2
66.6
47.1
60.8
51.4
43.5

66.4
77.3
65.6
43.6
61.2
45.6
44.9

78.3
57.7

79.3
57.1

78.3
55.6

79.0
56.9

78.2
53.1

79.6
54.6

80.4
55.4

80.4
56.3

76.8
56.2

78.6
55.8

76.8
58.7

78.5
54.3

79.7
56.8

78.7
54.4

19.6
19.6
12.9
70.2

20.1
19.1
13.0
66.3

19.2
18.0
13.0
62.9

17.7
16.9
13.3
70.6

17.4
17.1
13.3
63.3

18.4
17.8
12.7
67.2

17.8
17.6
12.8
61.4

16.8
16.4
12.7
62.8

19.8
19.1
13.1
55.0

18.8
18.4
13.2
53.3

15.8
15.7
13.8
51.7

18.0
17.2
13.1
61.3

18.2
16.6
13.6
59.4

17.5
17.0
13.0
53.2

11.3
14.4
41.9

13.2
15.4
45.2

12.2
15.9
37.2

12.6
14.3
45.5

11.6
15.2
42.4

12.9
14.1
46.4

11.8
14.9
40.9

13.0
15.1
47.3

13.0
14.9
45.0

11.6
17.0
43.7

13.3
(0
(0

12.9
16.9
43.3

14.1
15.1
46.2

13.0
15.2
47.7

(0
(0

Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green. ...................................... ......... pound..
Cabbage__________ ________ ____ __________ d o ....
Carrots............................................
Lettuce........................ ...... ........... -------------- head..
Onions..................... .............. ........
Potatoes..................... ....................
Spinach......... ................................ ..... ......... pound..
Sweetpotatoes........................ ........___ ______ do— .
Canned fruits:
Peaches..................... ...................___ No. 2H can..
Pineapple......... ............................. __________ do___
Canned vegetables:
Corn......... .................. ........ .....................No. 2 can..
Peas................................................__________ do___
Tomatoes________________________________ do___
Dried fruits: Prunes............................________ pound..
Dried vegetables: Navy beans........... __________ d o ....
Beverages: Coffee........... ........................... ___ ______ d o ....
Fats and oils:
L a r d ..................... ......... ................ .
Shortening other than lard: Hydrogenated ’ ____do___
Salad dressing...................................__ __________ pint..
Oleomargarine..... ................................ ............... pound..
Sugar and sweets: Sugar._____ ___________________ d o .—

See footnotes at end of table.




20.4
6.7
11.6
14.6
6.9
58.8
11.7
10.0

21.4
7.0
10.5
13.1
6.9
84.5
14.2
10.4

17.3
6.7
11.5
14.1
7.4
83.7
14.8
10.3

23. 7
7. 5
10. 7
14. 3
7. 4
76. 4
14. 3
11. 6

31.8

31.4
33.6

30.7
33.5

0)

18.7
14.9

17.5
14.7
20.2
0)
20.2
44.9

17.6
15.6

18. 6
14. 5

18.8
(l)
0)
45.5

18.4
24.4
19.7
47.2

19.
27. 0
20. 5
45. 7

31.0
43.5
39.2
39.8
9.7

30.5
43.9
36.4
41.6
9.9

31.7
43.6
38.2
41.2
10.0

33. 9
44. 1
35. 3
39. 0
9. 9

(0

33. 4

2

1 8 .9
7 .4
1 1 .3
1 4 .3
7 .4
7 2 .6
0)
11 .1

2 3 .7
7 .1
1 0 .8
1 4 .0
7 .2
7 5 .4
0)
1 1 .5

1 7 .6
7 .2
1 1 .2
1 4 .6
7 .5
7 9 .8
1 4 .3
1 0 .7

2 4 .2
6 .5
9 .6
1 3 .2
6 .5
7 1 .7
0)
0)

0)
7 .0
1 1 .2
1 3 .9
7 .1
7 5 .9
0)
1 1 .3

(0
7 .4
1 1 .3
1 3 .6
7 .7
7 6 .9
0)
1 0 .9

0)
1 1 .0

2 0 .6
6 .9
1 1 .1
1 4 .0
7 .4
7 9 .7
0)
1 0 .8

0)
6 .8
1 0 .2
1 3 .7
7 .0
7 2 .4
(0
(0

7 .0
1 0 .6
1 4 .0
6 .8
7 3 .4
0)
1 1 .0

3 2 .0
0)

3 2 .2
0)

3 2 .8
0)

3 2 .4
(0

3 2 .4
(0

3 2 .8
0)

3 3 .4
0)

3 2 .9
3 5 .8

3 3 .3
0)

3 2 .4
3 6 .2

1 6 .6
16.1
1 8 .3
0)
1 8 .6
4 6 .3

1 7 .8
1 4 .5
1 8 .9
2 5 .8
2 0 .1
4 5 .8

1 8 .6
1 5 .0
1 8 .4
2 5 .2
1 9 .3
4 6 .5

1 8 .9
1 4 .6
2 0 .4
2 5 .2
2 0 .2
4 5 .9

1 9 .4
1 5 .0
19 .1
(l)
1 8 .9
4 5 .2

1 8 .0
1 5 .3
1 8 .9
0)
1 9 .1
4 7 .6

1 7 .2
1 6 .0
0)
0)
1 8 .9
4 6 .5

1 8 .0
1 3 .8
1 6 .6
0)
1 6 .3
4 7 .4

1 7 .0
1 4 .3
2 0 .0
2 5 .5
1 9 .5
4 7 .4

1 6 .9
1 4 .2
1 8 .3
2 4 .6
1 6 .5
4 7 .1

3 1 .0
4 4 .6
3 7 .5
3 9 .3
1 0 .0

3 1 .2
4 3 .6
3 4 .8
4 0 .2
10 .1

3 1 .2
4 2 .8
4 1 .2
4 1 .6
1 0 .2

3 0 .4
4 3 .8
3 8 .2
0)
1 0 .1

3 2 .5
4 5 .8
3 9 .3
4 0 .4
1 0 .0

3 0 .2
4 6 .1
4 4 .7
4 1 .4
1 0 .2

3 2 .4
4 5 .9
4 0 .0
4 7 .0
1 0 .2

3 0 .8
4 4 .8
3 8 .2
4 1 .9
1 0 .1

3 0 .9
4 4 .3
3 7 .4
4 3 .4
10 .3

3 0 .4
4 2 .9
3 8 .5
4 0 .9
9 .9




0)
7 .5
1 0 .9
0)
7 .9
7 3 .1

(*)

03

Table 5 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, b y cities, 1947 —Continued
West North CentralContinued
Article
St.
Louis
Cereals and bakery products:
Cents
Cereals:
46.4
Flour, wheat_________ _____ _________ 5 pounds..
_________11 ounces—
13.0
Corn flakes___________ - ........
10.6
Corn meal__________________ ___________ pound—
_____________ d o ....
17.1
Rice----------------------------------14.1
Rolled oats......... ........... .......... ________ 20 ounces..
Bakery products:
12.1
Bread, white_______________ __________ pound—
Vanilla cookies_____________
0)
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
74.6
Round steak - - ------ -------- _____ ________ do—
57.3
Rib roast.------- -------------- _____________ do___
49.5
Chuck roast____________
44.7
H a m bu rger___________ _____________ do----77.5
Veal cutlets------ ------------------ _____________ do___
Pork:
68.5
Chops__________________
76.0
Bacon, sliced___________
_____________ do----65.1
Ham, whole____________
45.6
Salt pork_______________ _____________ do—
_____________ do—
60.6
Lamb: Leg_________________
Poultry: Roasting chickens......... _____________ do—
0)
43.5
Fisa:2 Salmon, pink____________ ______ 16-ounce can—
Dairy products:
80.4
Butter_____ ___________________ .....................pound..
53.4
Cheese__________________ ______ ........................ do—
Milk:
20.3
Fresh (delivered)....................
20.2
Fresh (grocery)_____________
12.4
Evaporated________________ ....... 14^-ounce can..
...................... dozen..
60.7
Eggs: Fresh_____________________
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
12.2
A p p l e s . ------ --------------------- ____________pound..
15.9
Bananas___________________ ___________ „ d o —
45.3
Oranges— ------ ------------------- ............ ..........dozen..




East South
Central

South Atlantic
Wash­
Savan­ ington,
nah
D. C.

Wins­
tonSalem

Bir­
ming­
ham

Jackson

Cents
50.9
14.0
9.2
18.2
14.5

Cents
47.6
13.4
9.7
(9
14.6

Cents
51.4
14.2
8.0
(9
15.1

Cents
49.3
14.0
8.6
(9
13.7

Cents
52.2
15.0
8.9
0)
15.3

12.0
(9

12.6
41.5

11.8
39.6

13.6
(9

13.4
(0

13.8
40.4

77.0
62.2
49.3
43.9
83.5

76.8
63.5
48.3
43.6
82.1

73.5
63.0
50.5
41.8
75.5

77.6
62.6
49.7
45.6
82.5

72.2
58.8
50.1
43.5
76.2

74.3
58.5
48.4
44.7
71.9

77.3
(9
48.4
40.6
(9

67.2
76.3
67.2
44.1
67.9
(0
43.4

68.2
77.0
65.9
45.1
64.9
0)
(0

69.6
77.6
66.7
44.6
65.9
48.0
(9

67.2
76.8
65.6
44.2
69.6
62.2
(9

71.2
75.5
66.8
43.7
63.2
52.0
(9

66.2
78.6
67.9
43.1
70.1
(9
(9

66.2
76.5
65.0
45.1
64.5
57.9
43.8

66.3
79.9
67.2
47.8
(9
58.3
(0

83.9
57.0

80.6
55.2

82.3
55.8

83.0
56.6

82.2
55.9

82.7
60.7

85.9
57.7

85.7
54.1

82.9
57.6

19.0
18.9
13.2
70.4

20.3
20.8
13.7
65.4

22.5
22.5
12.5
69.2

22.0
22.2
13.3
68.2

19.5
20.4
13.2
67.6

23.0
23.0
13.0
65.6

19.8
19.0
13.8
70.4

20.5
20.6
13.9
66.7

22.1
21.2
13.1
64.0

20.5
20.6
13.4
64.4

12.9
15.0
39.4

14.9
14.2
36.2

14.0
12.2
30.4

13.6
14.6
36.2

12.7
14.5
37.0

14.3
13.5
32.5

12.4
15.0
40.2

11.1
14.2
36.0

14.2
14.0
37.8

15.2
0)
41.3

St.
Paul

Wich­
ita

At­
lanta

Balti­
more

Charl­ Jack­
eston, sonville
S. C.

Nor­
folk

Rich­
mond

Cents
47.0
14.4
9.8
17.0
15.0

Cents
45.7
14.4
11.5
17.8
14.9

Cents
52.0
13.8
7.8
16.4
14.6

Cents
47.4
14.0
10.0
0)
14.3

Cents
50.8
14.4
10.8
16.3
15.0

Cents
48.9
13.2
11.9
(0
13.8

Cents
50.1
13.8
9.7
(0
14.6

Cents
48.1
14.1
8.2
(0
14.2

12.0
0)

13.3
55.0

13.0
35.3

12.6
0)

12.8
34.8

12.6
53.3

12.5
(9

68.1
56.4
48.7
41.8
67.3

69.2
(M
43.6
37.8
69.8

76.2
61.3
52.1
43.9
76.1

78.6
61.5
50.4
47.5
87.4

69.9
0)
49.1
39.3
75.5

72.1
64.4
50.1
36.8
73.8

70.4
78.2
65.9
47.1
61.1
52.3
43.9

67.8
78.6
64.5
46.7
68.4
54.0
47.4

69.1
76.9
67.1
45.5
72.5
58.0
45.0

71.8
79.7
67.8
42.9
63.6
51.1
0)

68.1
76.7
67.6
45.7
(0
58.9
45.5

80.7
57.4

79.5
53.9

85.5
55.4

83.5
60.8

17.3
16.4
13.8
58.3

17.5
16.9
13.1
54.8

22.0
22.5
13.1
65.7

14.2
15.1
47.1

14.4
0)
51.6

12.9
13.6
36.8

OI

Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green....................................................pound.
Cabbage...................................................d o —
Carrots.......... ................................................ bunch—
Lettuce....... ..................................................... head—
Onions............................................................pound—
Potatoes. ............................... ............ .15 pounds..
Spinach.........................................................pound..
Sweetpotatoes................................................... do—
Canned fruits:
Peaches................................................. No.
can..
Pineapple.........................................................do----Canned vegetables:
Cora..........................................................No. 2 can..
Peas..................................................................do—
Tomatoes........................................................ -do—
Dried fruits: Prunes............. .........................__.pound—
Dried vegetables: Navy beans........... ................. do—
Beverages: Coffee........................................................... -do-Fats and oils:
L ard........................................................................ do—
Shortening other than lard: Hydrogenated3____do___
Salad dressing.......................................................... pint—
Oleomargarine..................................................... pound..
Sugar and sweets: Sugar.............................................. do—

See footnotes at end of table.




19.8 .
7.4
11.2
13.3
7.4
80.1
13.1
9.3

0)
6.9
10.4
13.8
7.2
72.6
12.9
0)

0)
7.8
10.7
16.1
7.3
81.0
(0
11.3

19.0
7.2
10.8
13.2
7.5
75.8
(0
9.2

31.2
(l)

32.9
C
O

32.9
(0

32.6
(0

18.0
15.0
0)
26.2
19.7
45.4

17.7
14.5
20.8
24.5
19.6
48.8

18.5
15.7
18.3
25.2
18.1
47.5

18.5
14.9
18.3
25.1
20.1
47.7

29.7
43.0
35.8
40.5
9.9

30.6
44.4
37.6
43.0
10.4

29.8
44.0
34.8
41.7
10.2

31.6
44.4
37.2
41.6
9.6

20.2
7.8
12.4
15.3
7.7
76.7
13.1
10.0

22.0
6.8
12.0
15.3
8.0
78.0
(9
8.9

19.8
6.3
10.5
13.1
7.3
72.2
(9
9.9

20.0
6.9
12.0
13.3
7.4
69.9
(9
9.1

17.8
6.5
11.7
14.8
7.4
68.5
(9
9.3

20.7
6.5
11.1
13.7
7.7
74.1
(9
9.0

19.4
7.1
11.8
15.7
7.3
69.1
(9
9.9

17.4
6.6
12.1
14.3
8.4
77.6
(9
9.3

22.1
6.8
10.7
13.3
7.4
77.9
(9
8.7

21.6
7.5
10.5
14.3
8.6
95.5
(9
9.9

32.5
(9

33.3
(9

30.2
0)

31.6
(9

29.6
(9

33.5
(9

32.5
(9

34.3
(9

34.1
(9

35.7
(9

18.2
16.6
(9
0)
21.1
47.4

19.0
19.3
18.6
25.3
(9
52.7

18.3
13.6
16.1
(9
(9
47.3

17.1
16.7
17.8
26.0
21.8
42.8

17.6
14.2
17.7
24.9
(9
47.5

19.5
16.4
17.6
25.5
21.7
47.9

18.4
14.8
0)
23.5
0)
45.9

18.8
17.1
18.9
(9
21.4
50.2

18.9
15.3
16.5
24.0
(9
45.0

20.4
15.7
18.7
27.9
21.5
50.6

31.1
44.5
38.6
42.3
9.7

33.7
46.3
38.7
41.2
9.9

30.7
43.8
38.1
39.9
9.4

32.2
45.0
37.1
41.4
9.7

31.9
44.7
37.8
41.6
9.6

31.7
44.3
39.5
40.1
9.5

32.4
43.0
40.3
42.1
9.5

32.7
47.3
39.1
(9
10.1

31.1
41.9
40.7
40.3
9.5

32.6
44.5
42.1
41.7
9.9




O
x
Ox

Table 5 .— Annual average retail prices o f principal food s, by cities, 1947 —Continued
Article

Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat_________ ______ 5 pounds..
Corn flakes___________ --------- 11 ounces..
Corn meal...................... ________ pound..
R i c e _________________ ____ ____ _.do___
Rolled oats___________ _____20 ounces-Bakery products:
Bread, white__________ ____ ____ pound..
Vanilla cookies ______ ......... ..........d o .—
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak........... ...................do___
Rib roast_________ __________ do___
Chuck roast_______ ----------------do----Hamburger_______ ...................do___
Veal: Cutlets..... ........ . __________ do___
Pork:
Chops____________ ----------------do—
Bacon, sliced______ __________ do___
Ham, whole_______ ----------------do—
Salt pork__________ ----------------do----Lamb: Leg___________ ...................do___
Poultry: Roasting chickens. __________ do----Fish: 2 Salmon, p in k .......... ___ 16-ounce can..
Dairy products:
Butter____ ____________ ________ pound..
Cheese___________ ________ - ....... ........do— .
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)......... ............ ...q u art.Fresh (grocery)________ __________ d o .—
Evaporated.
.................14^-ounce can..




Mountain

West South Central

East South Central—Continued

Pacific

Mem­ Mobile Dallas
phis

Hous­
ton

Little
Rock

New
Or­
leans

Butte

Denver

Salt
Lake
City

Los
An­
geles

Port­
land,
Oreg.

San
Fran­
cisco

Seattle

Cents
51.4
14.2
0)
16.0
14.7

Cents
49.2
13.1
8.8
18.8
14.2

Cents
46.5
13.0
11.0
(0
14.2

Cents
47.1
13.0
10.8
16.9
14.6

Cents
50.4
15.1
10.8
16.2
15.0

Cents
49.0
13.8
10.9
17.9
14.8

Cents
49.9
14.1
10.3
19.0
16.2

Cents
44.7
14.3
10.6
0)
15.3

Cents
47.7
13.1
12.0
16.6
15.5

Cents
49.1
13.1
11.3
18.9
15.3

Cents
48.6
13.2
11.6
17.4
15.5

Cents
50.9
13.7
11.8
0)
16.5

Cents
48.7
13.5
11.4
(0
15.9

11.5
0)

13.3
0)

14.6
37.6

13.0
42.2

11.5
41.6

11.8
40.8

13.7
45.7

12.6
0)

12.1
48.1

11.4
0)

13.0
38.4

12.9
39.0

13.6
38.4

12.3
(0

71.8
60.3
49.2
43.7
73.2

72.1
57.2
48.6
42.4
79.8

73.9
59.1
50.2
42.4
70.8

69.8
58.6
49.1
41.1
72.8

73.4
57.8
46.4
39.8
73.4

76.2
65.8
52.4
44.0
70.5

73.0
60.6
48.3
39.0
72.6

79.8
65.6
48.9
42.7
78.7

67.0
53.7
44.2
40.0
66.9

71.3
61.2
50.5
41.3
70.6

68.1
56.1
46.2
39.9
70.1

70.9
63.3
46.2
39.7
78.4

68.6
58.1
48.4
39.8
70.4

(0
0)
0)
0)
0)

73.3
61.7
49.9
43.3
0)

66.5
77.0
66.2
46.4
(0
0)

(})

70.3
75.4
61.5
0)
66.5
55.7
44.2

69.4
76.9
66.1
44.4
0)
(0
(0

65.3
73.0
66.7
46.8
66.3
60.0
0)

67.0
77.3
66.8
44.4
64.5
54.9
0)

68.7
75.3
65.7
47.3
69.4
58.3
0)

65.3
76.6
65.0
45.1
68.5
54.4
0)

70.6
77.4
70.4
44.8
67.1
50.4
42.3

70.4
81.2
69.1
46.1
60.1
(0
0)

70.8
81.6
64.7
46.0
62.2
0)
0)

71.7
83.4
67.8
47.3
60.8
53.7
40.0

81.0
82.8
71.9
51.0
65.6
(0
(0

73.8
80.2
69.4
50.8
63.4
0)
0)

0)
0)
0)
0)
(0
0)
0)

74.8
81.7
70.4
49.5
60.1
0)
<0

81.9
57.0

79.3
56.0

83.1
56.8

81.6
56.7

81.2
57.2

80.2
60.5

79.9
53.3

81.5
57.6

79.3
55.0

80.1
57.1

81.0
53.0

82.9
65.7

79.9
60.2

85.3
65.6

80.9
56.9

19.1
19.4
14.4

19.8
19.2
13.1

17.6
17.6
13.5

22.0
22.0
12.7

19.2
18.6
13.1

21.2
20.0
13.2

19.5
19.5
12.8

20.5
20.0
12.9

17.0
17.0
14.4

18.2
17.3
12.9

17.1
16.3
12.6

18.3
17.4
12.6

17.8
17.4
12.7

18.7
17.7
13.3

19.3
18.6
13.0

Knox­
ville

Louis­
ville

Cents
54.0
14.6
7.7
0)
15.4

Cents
48.4
13.4
9.0
(0
14.6

13.5
44.3

Eggs: Fresh................. ................................. dozen..
62.5
Fruits and vegetables:
Fresh fruits:
Apples__________ ______ ________ pound..
12.7
14.3
Bananas....... ................ ...................d o ___
O ran ges____________ _________ dozen..
36.8
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green........................
pound—
19.7
Cabbage............ .....................
do_ 7.3
Carrots___________________ _____ bunch..
12.0
14.4
Lettuce..................... ............ .......... head..
Onions_____ _____
pound..
8.8
Potatoes____________________ 15 pounds. .
81.8
pound.
Spinach.............................
0)
10.6
Sweetpotatoes____________________ do_
_
Canned fruits:
33.4
Peaches..................... ...........N o , 2H can..
Pineapple............................
do_
0)
Canned vegetables:
20.3
C om ............. ..............................No. 2 can..
16.0
do_
Peas___________________
19.3
Tomatoes___ _________ ___________do—
Dried fruits: Prunes________________ pound..
25.0
Dried vegetables: Navy beans................do---19.5
Beverages: Coffee............ ......................
do_ 45.3
Fats and oils:
Lard___________________
34.2do_
Shortening other than lard: Hydrogenated *
pound— 46.7
Salad dressing........................................... pint— 40.7
Oleomargarine.............................
pound.
43.3
Sugar and sweets: Sugar..........................
do_
10.4

62.9

67.1

63.6

63.2

64.8

12.5
15.4
38.9

(*)
16.4
42.8

14.6
11.7
36.6

14.4
13.9
42.7

15.9
15.1
42.8

19.1
7.4
11.0
14.0
7.6
74.3
14.2 .
10.9

22.5
6.7
10.0
14.2
8.2
88.5
0)
11.1

20.9
6.7
9.2
13.1
7.0
87.0
0)
8.0

20.3
6.2
8.1
12.5
6.8
89.1
(0
0)

21.9
7.0
9.4
13.4
7.7
100.1
0)
9.7

0)
0)

33.6
0)

29.5
0)

32.1
(})

30.8
0)

18.3
14.6
17.2
0)
18.3
47.8

17.5
0)
17.2
0)
21.3
46.9

18.2
15.2
17.4
24.1
21.2
48.1

19.0
15.2
15.0
27.5
23.3
47.6

17.9
16.5
15.7
25.0
21.7
47.5

30.9

32.0

30.7

0)

32.6

45.5
36.5
_
42.0
10.1

0)
36.7
39.8
9.8

42.3
40.0
41.1
9.3

41.9
33.3
40.0
9.7

43.5
33.9
41.2
9.5

1 Not available. Insufficient number of reports secured during year.
2 Costs of fresh and/or frozen fish are included in the index, but average prices are not computed,
2 Published as “ in other containers” prior to August 1947,
4 No. 2} i can,




64.4

64.7

69.9

66.6

69.4

75.5

68.1

75.3

72.2

14.3
14.7
48.4

13.6
10.1
36.5

12.7
(9
48.8

13.5
15.4
50.2

12.6
16.9
40.3

13.5
18.0
39.2

12.0
17.3
43.6

11.1
17.6
41.9

13.3
16.8
50.6

20.9
6.7
9.8
13.7
7.2
78.2
(9
10.2

21.6
6.2
9.2
13.1
6.7
77.4
13.2
8.2

(9
8.1
9.7
15.4
7.5
68.2
'9
(9

(9
6.7
8.5
13.0
6.1
71.5
(9
10.4

(9
6.8
7.9
11.8
6.3
69.4
(9
(9

21.8
7.9
8.7
10.7
6.8
77.4
(9
14.2

(9
7.7
8.4
12.7
6.6
74.9
(9
(9

(9
7.1
8.8
9.2
7.2
82.6
(9
14.0

(9
8.3
9.4
11.4
6.9
73.7
(9
(9

33.1
(9

33.7
(9

33.6
(9

31.8
(9

31.3
(9

29.2
(9

32.7
(9

29.4
(9

30.5
(9

19.2
17.6
16.3
25.1
20.9
46.6

19.1
14.8
17.5
25.1
20.5
49.6

19.6
16.8
(9
(9
17.6
50.3

17.0
15.8
18.9
(9
18.1
49.3

17.2
15.8
421.3
24.6
20.0
48.5

19.0
15.4
4 26.8
(9
25.0
47:4

17.9
16.1
431.8
24.1
24.9
48.1

19.4
15.8
(9
22.6
25.2
49.0

18.6
16.0
427.1
(9
(9
48.6

32.9

31.2

34.9

30.7

32.7

33.5

34.3

36.2

34.9

43.7
38.3
41.2
9.7

43.4
39.9
41.0
9.3

50.8
40.1
(9
10.9

42.4
40.3
41.2
10.1

44.9
38.5
45.6
10.4

44.0
38.6
40.5
9.5

45.1
39.4
39.9
9.8

45.9
39.8
41.8
9.5

45.0
37.9
43.3
9.8




58
Revision o f the Retail Food P rice Index in A u gu st 1 947

In August 1947, the Bureau of Labor Statistics introduced into its
Retail Food Price Index the results of a reappraisal of the list of foods
included, and the number of price quotations obtained for each food.
This is in line with the Bureau’s policy of continuous review and coin­
cided with a reduction in the appropriation for food price work for
the fiscal year 1948.
On the basis of this examination the list of foods included in the
index was reduced from 62 to 50. Pricing of the following foods was
discontinued and they were eliminated from the index: Macaroni,
whole wheat bread, rye bread, soda crackers, liver, sliced ham, lamb
rib chops, canned grapefruit juice, canned green beans, tea, standard
shortening, peanut butter, and corn sirup. At the same time, rice
was reintroduced into the index for the first time since August 1939.
The number of price quotations for individual food items remained
unchanged for meats and fresh fruits and vegetables, for which
variation in price from store to store is greater than for the dry
groceries and staples. The number of quotations for dry groceries
and staples was cut so that standard errors for these foods were in line
with those for meats and produce. This cut resulted in a 20-percent
reduction in the sample of quotations from independent food stores.
Tests made by the Bureau showed that the effects of these changes
on the statistics of average prices and indexes were negligible. The
Bureau is continuing to use prices obtained in 56 cities monthly in
computing the Retail Food Price Index. Indexes for groups and sub­
groups of foods are being continued unchanged except for the addition
of a subgroup for meats (<
excluding poultry and fish).




U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O FFIC E : 1949


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102