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TR EASU R Y DEPARTM ENT

REPORT
OF

NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY
LOAN COMMITTEE




FOR THE

FIRST A N D SECO N D
L IB E R T Y L O A N CA M PA IG N S

19! 7

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

!9!8

t




!NDEX.

TART I.
Afembers National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee..........................................
Introduction..................................................................................................................
Organization of National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee...............................
Federal reserve chairmen, second Liberty loan campaign.....................................
State chairmen, second Liberty loan campaign................. .....................................
Advisorycouncil..........................................................................................................
Organization..................................................................................................................
Map of Federal reserve district?.................................................................................
Organizationchart........................................................................................................

5
7
H
8
8
9
12
13
17

pARTlt.
Report of first Liberty loan campaign.......................................................................
Two important Liberty loan conferences..................................................................
Report of second Liberty loan campaign..................................................................
National committee activities.....................................................................................
Publicitychairm an......................................................................................................
Introduction to financial report.................................................................................
Financial report, second Liberty loan campaign.....................................................
Financial returns, averaged................................................................ - ......................
Subscriptions, advisory council, second Liberty loan............................................
Cooperation with Government departments.............................................................
Treasurer'sreport..........................................................................................................
Budgetforms..................................................................................................................
Special features, second Liberty loan campaign......................................................

IS
20
22
22
23
24
25
27
27
28
29
30
31

PAHTl il.
OfKfers and subcommittee chairmcn.........................................................................
National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee............................................................
Federal reserve chairmen, third Liberty loan campaign........................................
State chairmen, third Liberty loan campaign.........................................................
Recommendations to State chairmen........................................................................
Warsavings....................................................................................................................
Franking privilege........................................................................................................




3

36
36
36
36
37
42
42




MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

Mrs. WiLLiAM G. McADOO, C a rm a n .
Mrs. ANTOINETTE F u x x , tlce
Afrs. GEORGE B A ss, &?cr^Hry.

Airs. FRANK A. VANDERLiF, Treasurer.
Mrs. A. S. BALDWIN.
M rs. CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT.*
M rs. GUILFORD D U D L EY.
M rs. KELLOGG FAIR BA N K .
M rs.

GEORGE TtlACHER GUERNSEY.

M r s . F . L . H iG G iN s o N .

Mrs. J O. MiLLER.
M iss M A R Y SY N O N .
A ir s . E L LA F L A G G Y O U N G .
t Mrs. Catt resigned on N ovem ber 15, due to the h e a v y dem ands o f her other w ork.




5

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Mrs. A. S. BALDWIN,
Mrs.

GEORGE BASS,

M r s . G U IL F O R D D U D L E Y ,

Mrs.

KRLLOGG FAIRI3AXK,

Mrs.

A N T O IN E T T E F u X K ,

Mrs.

GEORGE TH ACH ER G U ER N SEY,

Airs. F. L.

H lG G IN S O N ,

Mrs. J .O .

M IL L E R ,

Miss MARY SYNON,
Airs.

FRANK

A.

V A N D E R L IP ,

M rs. ELLA FLAGG Y O U N G .

REPORT OF NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

PART I.
!N TRO D U CT!O N .

When war comes to a nation, the first essentia! for the prosecution
of that war is money. It is necessary for arming and equipping an
army and a navy; it is essential for food, for ships, for dependent
families of soldiers, for everything that makes for efficient prosecu­
tion of war; and the total cost is so stupendous as to make any former
outlay of the Government of the United States seem trifling. It is
estimated that in the neighborhood of $14,000,000,000 will be spent
by this country alone in the Erst year that we are at war.
There are two ways to raise this enormous sum of money—by
taxation and by the sale of Government bonds. The Government
could take our money as it has taken our men. It could levy taxes
so heavy that the burden would be well-nigh unbearable. But it
has seen fit not to do this, and Congress has authorized issues of
Government bonds, to be known as Liberty bonds, to help finance
the war, thus offering to the people of the United States the oppor­
tunity to put their money into the safest and the most glorious in­
vestment in the world.
To borrow billions of dollars is an undertaking so important that
the Government must fail in it unless it has the whole-hearted sup­
port of every one of its loyal citizens, women as well as men. It was
in recognition of this fact that the Secretary of the Treasury created
a National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee to help Soat the
Liberty bonds to be put out during the war. In his informal address
to the women he summoned to Washington to serve upon this com­
mittee, he stated that he felt certain no democratic appeal could be
made to the country without the support of women citizens, and in
submitting the foUowing report, the National Woman's Liberty Loan
Committee hopes that in addition to the concrete achievement here
recorded, the reader wili bear in mind the tremendous effect upon the
sale of bonds undoubtedly made by the enthusiastic and patriotic
support of the women of the United States.




8

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN's LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.
ORGANIZATION

OF THE NATIONAL W OM AN'S LIBE RTY LOAN
COMMITTEE.

On May 7, 1917, the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States
called to Washington for a conference in regard to the formation of
a National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee the following women:
Mrs. George Baas, of Illinois; Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catty of New York;
Mrs. Guilford Dudley, of Tennessee; Mrs. Antoinette Funk, of Illi­
nois; Mrs. Kellogg Fairbank, of Illinois; Mrs. George Thacher Guern­
sey, of Kansas; and Mrs. J. O. Miller, of Pennsylvania.
A t this meeting it was decided that a woman's organization for
the sale of bonds be instituted throughout the country, under the
direction of an executive committee in Washington. Mrs. William
G. McAdoo was made chairman of this committee. Rooms in the
Treasury Building were put at the disposal of the new organization,
and a clerical force installed.
A publicity bureau was immediately opened, in charge of Miss
Mary Synon, to work in cooperation with the publicity bureau of the
United States Treasury Department. It was decided to add the
following members to the executive committee— they were appointed
by the Secretary of the Treasury in May, 1917: Mrs. F. L. Higginson, of Massachusetts, and Mrs. Frank A. Vanderlip, of New
York; and later, Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, of Illinois; Miss Mary Synon,
of Illinois; and Mrs. A. S. Baldwin, of California.
On May 9 the first meeting of the National Woman's Liberty Loan
Committee was held in the Treasury Building, and a plan of organiza­
tion was determined upon.
FEDERAL RESERVE D IST R IC T CHAIRMEN, SECOND LIBERTY LOAN.
First district, Mrs. Frank L. Higginson, Boston.
Second district, Mrs. John Pratt, New York.
Third district, Miss Clara Middleton, Philadelphia.
Fourth district, Mrs. Roger G. Perkins, Cleveland.
Fifth district, Mrs. Egbert Leigh, Richmond.
Sixth district, Mrs. P. J. McGovern, Atlanta.
Seventh district, Miss Grace Dixon, Chicago.
Eighth district, Miss Florence J. Wade, St. Louis.
Ninth district, Mrs. C. A. Severance, St. Paul.
Tenth district, Mrs. G. W. Fuller, Kansas City.
Eleventh district, Mrs. E. B. Reppert, Dallas.
Twelfth district, Mrs. A. S. Baldwin.
STATE CHAIRMEN, SECOND LIBERTY LOAN CAM PAIGN .
Alaska, Mrs. T. J. Donohoe, Valdez.
Alabama, Mrs. Solon Jacobs, Birmingham.
Arizona, Miss Alice M. Birdsall, Phoenix.
Arkansas, Mrs. C. H. Brough, Little Rock.
California, Mrs. E. R. Brainerd, Los Angeles.
Connecticut, Mrs. Morgan S. Bulkeiey (Mrs. R. M. Bissel, vice chairman), Hartford.




REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M

9

Colorado, Mrs. E. S. Kassler, Denver.
Delaware, Mrs. W. R. Orr, Lewes.
Florida, Mrs. W. 8. Jennings, Jacksonville.
Georgia, Mrs. William R. Leaken, Savannah.
Idaho, Mrs. Teresa M. Graham, Coeur d'Alene.
Illinois, Mrs. Howard T. Willson, Yirden.
Indiana, Mrs. Frederick II. McCulloch, Fort Wayne.
Iowa, Mrs. Wilbur W. Marsh, Waterloo.
Kansas, Mrs. J. M. McCown, Emporia.
Kentucky, Mrs. Donald McDonald, Louisville.
Louisiana, Mrs. Lawrence Williams, New Orleans.
Maine, Mrs. John F. Hill, Augusta.
Maryland, Mrs. Robert Garrett, Baltimore.
Massachusetts, Mrs. Barrett Wendell, Boston.
Michigan, Mrs. Delphine D. Ashbaugh, Detroit.
Minnesota, Mrs. Francis Chamberlain, Minneapolis.
Mississippi, Mrs. R. L. McLaurin, Vicksburg.
Missouri, Airs. Philip N. Moore, St. Louis.
Montana, Mrs. W. W. McDowcll, Butte.
Nebraska, Mrs. A. G. Peterson, Aurora.
Nevada, Mrs. Samuel H. Belford, Reno.
New Hampshire, Mrs. Wm. II. SchoReld, Peterboro.
New Jersey, Mrs. H. O. Wittpcn, Hoboken.
New Mexico, Airs. J. J. Shuler, Raton.
New York, Mrs. Courtlandt D. Barnes, Manhassett, L. I.
North Carolina, Mrs. R. J. Reynolds, Winston-Salem.
North Dakota, Miss Minnie J. Nielson, Valley City.
Ohio, Mrs. Frank Mulhauser, Cleveland.
Oregon, Mrs. Sarah Evans, Portland.
Pennsylvania, Mrs. J. 0 . Miller, Pittsburgh.
Rhode Island, Mrs. Walter A. Teck (Mrs. Livingstone Beekman, honorary chair­
man), Providence.
South Carolina, Mrs. F. S. Munsell, Columbia.
South Dakota, Mrs. Ellwood Perisho, Brookings.
Tennessee, Mrs. Guilford Dudley, Nashville.
Texas, Mrs. D. E. Waggoner, Dallas.
Utah, Mrs. W. Mont Ferry, Salt Lake City.
Vermont, Mrs. E. C. Smith, St. Albans.
Virginia, Mrs. John L. Hagan, Danville.
Washington, Mrs. Overton G. Ellis, Tacoma.
West Virginia, Mrs. Beulah Boyd Ritchie, Fairmont.
Wisconsin, Mrs. John W. Mariner, Milwaukee.
Wyoming, Mrs. T. S. Taliaferro, jr., Rock Springs.
A D V IS O R Y COUNCIL OF TH E NATIONAL W O M AN 'S LIB E R TY LOAN
COM M ITTEE.
[N am e of organization, representative, and address.]

American Fund for French Wounded, Mrs. Bfthelbert Nevin, president, New York City.
American Home Economics Association, Miss Catharine J. Mac Kay, president, Ames,
Iowa.
American Pen Women, League of, Mrs. Isaac Pearson, president, Washington, D. C.
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Mrs. Alfred Wagstaff,
New York City.

40209°—18---- 2



10

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

Ancient Order of Hibernians, Mrs. Mary F. McWhortcr, president, Chicago., 111.
Ancient Order of Hibernians, Ladies' Auxiliary, Mrs. II. A. Gallagher, State presi­
dent, Pennsylvania.
Arlington Confederate Monument Association, Mrs. Wm. OBcar Roome, Washington,
D. C.
Army Nurses of the Civil War, Mrs. Alice C. Rislev, Jefferson City, Mo.
Catholic Benevolent Association, Ladies, Miss Kate Mahoney, supreme president,
Troy, X. Y.
Catholic Ladies of Columbia, Miss Ellen Fryberger, supreme secretary, Canton, Ohio.
Catholic Order of Foresters, Woman's, Mrs. Rose D. Rittman, president, Chicago, 111.
Catholic W'omen's Benevolent Legion, Mrs. Ellen L. Louglilin, supreme president,
New York City.
Catholic Women of United States, Mrs. Francis Burrall Hoffman, New York City.
Child Welfare League (International), Mrs. Isabella Charles Davis, Westfield, N. J.
Christian Endeavor, United Society of, Rev. F. E. Clark, president, Boston, Mass.
Civic Federation, National, Miss Maude Wetmore, chairman, New York City.
College Women, National Federation of, Mrs. Myra Fingman Miller, president,
Long Beach, Cal.
Collegiate Alumnae, Association of, Mrs. Lois Kimball Mathews, president, University
of Wisconsin, Madison, Wig.
Colonial Dames, X V II Century, Mrs. Stella Pickett Hardy, Batesvillc, Ark.
Colonial Dames of America, National Society of, Mrs. Joseph R. Lamar, president,
Washington, D. C.
Colonial Dames, State of New York, Mrs. Hamilton R. Fairfax, president, New
York City.
Companions of the Forest of America, Supreme Circle, Mrs. Annie E. Poth, supreme
financial secretary, New York City.
Congress of States Societies, Mrs. Thomas J. Vivian, president, New York City.
Daughters of America, National Council of, Mrs. Annie X . Ellis, national councilor,
Fredericksburg, Va.
Daughters of the American Revolution, Mrs. George Thacher Guernsey, Washington,
D. C.
Daughters of the G. A. R., Mrs. Carrie P. Boggs, commander in chief, Detroit, Mich.
Daughters of Isabella, Mrs. Genevieve H. Walsh, supreme regent, Utica, N. Y .
Daughters of the Union, Mrs. Charles H. Masury, president general, Danvers, Mass.
Daughters of the Revolution, Mrs. Everett Menzies Raynor, president general, New
York City.
Daughters of 1812, United States Society of, Mrs. Robert Hall Wiles, president,
Chicago, 111.
Degree of Honor, Miss Elizabeth E. Allbum, superior recorder, Sioux City, Iowa.
Eastern Star, Order of the, Mrs. Emma C. Ocobock, grand worthy matron, Hartford,
Mich.
Education Association, National, Mias Sarah Louise Arnold, Boston, Maas.
Farm and Garden Association, Woman's National, Mrs. Francis King, president,
Alma, Mich.
Federation of Settlements, National, Miss de G. Trenholm, New York City.
Federal Suffrage Association, Mrs. Olympia Brown, president, Racine, Wis.
First Aid Association, National, Mrs. J. Sewall Reed, president, Arlington, Mass.
First Families of Virginia, Mm. Henry L. book, president, Milwaukee, Wis.
Rafental Brotherhood, Mrs. Emma R. Neidig, supreme past president, Los Angeles,
Cal.
Girls Friendly Society, Miss Frances W . Sibley, president, Detroit, Mich.
Girls Honor Guard, National, Miss Theodora Booth, president, New York City.
Grange, National, Mrs. E. S. McDowell, treasurer, Wellesley, Mass.




REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN's LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

11

Homeopathy, American Institute of, Mrs. Sarah M. Hobson, Chicago, III.
H ousew ives League, National, Mrs. Julian Ilea th , president, Now Y o rk C ity .

Illinois Women in New York City, Society oi, Mrs. Thomas Slack, president, New
York City.
Independent Order of True Sisters, Mrs. Emma Schlesinger, president, New York
City.
Industrial Education, National Society for Promotion of, Mr. Alvin E. Dodd, sec­
retary; May Allison, assistant secretary, New York City.
International Peoples' Aid Association, Mrs. Kate Davis, president, Cleveland, Ohio.
International Typographical Union, Woman's International Auxiliary, Mrs. J. W.
Armistead, president, Atlanta, Ga.
Jewish Women, Council of, Airs. X. E. Harris, president, Bradford, Pa.
Kindergarten Union, International, Stella Louise Wood, president, Minneapolis.
Kings Daughters and Sons, Mrs. A. H. Evans, president, New York City.
Ladies of the G. A. R., Mrs. Virginia C. McClure, national president, Peoria, 111.
Maccabees, Ladies of the, Mrs. Frances E. Bums, president, St. Louis, Mich.
Maccabees, Woman's Benefit Association, Miss Bina M. West, supreme commander,
Port Huron, Mich.
Mayiiower Descendants, Airs. A. Howard Clark, Washington, D. C.
Aiethodist Home Missionary Society, Airs. W. P. Thirkeild, president, Alarshheld
Center.
Alount Vernon Ladies' Association of the Union, Airs. Harriet Clayton Comcgys,
regent, Dover, Del.
Musical Clubs, National Federation, Airs. A. J. Ochan or, president, Chicago, 111.
Na\y League, Women's Section, Airs. George Dewey, president, Washington, D. C.
National Security League, Miss Atabel Choate, Stockbridgc, Aiass.
National Council of Women, Airs. Philip North Aloore, president, St. Louis, Aio.
New York State Women, Society of, Airs. Gerard Bancker, president, New York City.
Ohio Women, National Society, Mrs. George M. Clyde, president, Brooklyn, N. Y .
Opposed to Woman Suffrage, National Society, Airs. Alice H. Wadsworth, president.
Washington, D. C.
Patriotic Order of Americans, Airs. AI. Elizabeth Strunk, national president, Phila­
delphia, Pa.
Patriotic Women of America, National Society of, Mrs. Wm, R. Stewart, president,
New York City.
Presbyterian Woman's Board of Home Alissions, Airs. F. S. Bennett, president, New
York City.
Private School Afanagers' Association, National, Aliss Nettie Huff, Kansas City, Mo.
Signers of Decimation of Independence, Descendants of, Mrs. €has. C. Harrison,
St. Davids, Pa.
Slovak Ladies Union, First Catholic, Airs. Anna Ondrey, president, Cleveland, Ohio.
Social Work, National Conference of, Airs. John M. Glenn, New York City.
Southern Association of College Women, Aliss Elizabeth Avery Colton, president,
Raleigh, N. C.
Southern Memorial Association, Confederate, Mis. W. J. Behan, president general,
New Orleans, La.
Southern Women, Conference of, Mrs. Nellie Peters Black, president, Atlanta, Ga.
Special Aid Society, National, Mrs. William Alexander, president, New York City.
Surgical Dressings Commission, National, Airs. Mary Hatch Willard, chairman, New
York City.
Temple Sisterhoods, National Association, Mrs. Abraham Simon, Washington, D. C.
United Daughters of the Confederacy, Miss Mary B. Poppenheim, president general,
Charleston,S.C.




12

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M

Unitarian and Other Liberal Christian Women, Miss Lucy Lowell, president, Boston,

M
ass.
Woman's Auxiliary Recruiting and Relief Work, Mrs. Margaret M. Crumpacker,
commandant, New York City.
Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Miss Anna Gordon, president, Evanston, III.
Women Lawyers' Association, Miss Sara Stephenson, president, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Woman's National Rivers and Harbors Congress, Mrs. Joseph M. Strout, president,
Portland, Me.
Woman's Relief Corps, Mrs. Ida K. Martin, national president, Minneapolis, Minn.
Women's Trade Union, League of America, National, Mrs. Raymond Robins, presi­
dent,Chicago, 111.
Woman's Suffrage Association, National American, Airs. Carrie Chapman Catt, Xew
York City.
Women Voters, National Council of, Mrs. Emma Smith Devoe, president, Tacoma,
Wash.
Women of Woodcraft, Mrs. Carrie C. Van Orsdall, grand guardian, Portland, Oreg.
Women Workers, National League of, Mrs. Henry Ollesheimer, president, New York
City.
Woodmen Circle, Supreme Forest, Mrs. Emma B. Manchester, supreme guardian,
Omaha, Nebr.
World's Purity Federation, Mrs. B. S. Stcadwell, La Crosse, Wis.
Young Women's Hebrew Association, Mrs. Israel Unterberg, president, New York
City.
Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association, Mrs. Martha II. Tingey, general
president, Salt Lake City.
Young Woman's Christian Association, Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president, New York
City.

ORGANIZATION.
!. Federat Reserve District Chairmen.

As the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee is a committee
of the Treasury Department of the United States, it was decided to
organize along governmental financial lines, and the Rrst appoint­
ments made by the National Committee were the twelve women
chairmen of the Federal reserve bank districts of the United States.
For purposes of organization the National Woman's Liberty Loan
Committee has made the State the unit, and has appointed a chair­
man of every State and Territory.
The Federal reserve chairman has supervision over the State
chairmen in her district; she directs their activities, and is held
responsible by the National Committee for carrying out its sugges­
tions in the States in her charge.
The Federal reserve chairman also serves as a member of the
executive committee of the Liberty loan committee of the Federal
reserve bank board of her district.
She has power to call women's Liberty loan conventions in the
States in her charge, and to call together for conference the State
chairmen serving under her.




REPORT
NATIONAL
W O M A N 's
LIBERTY
LOAN
C O M M IT T E E ,




Map of the United States Showing Federa! Reserve Bank Districts.

14

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M
H. STATE CHAIRMEN.

State chairmen in those States that arc divided between two
Federal reserve districts are requested to appoint a vice chairman to
organize the smaller area of the State, who shall report to the reserve
chairman in whose district her territory lies, at the same time coordi­
nating her work with that of the State chairman under whom she
serves.
It is the duty of each State chairman of the National Woman's
Liberty Loan Committee to appoint a chairman for every county
in her State, and for every town with a population of over 50,000.
When these chairmen are appointed, the State chairman has the
entire responsibility for them. She must maintain constant touch
with them, in order to see that the recommendations of the National
Committee are carried out, and that a satisfactory amount of bonds
is being sold.
The State chainnan must also consult with the heads of all im­
portant organizations of women in her State as to the better method
of reaching their memberships with an appeal to buy bonds. She
must see that speakers appear before all conventions meeting in her
State during a loan campaign, and she must arrange for meetings in
the parts of her State where the sale of bonds proves patriotic en­
thusiasm to be lacking.
A fortunate arrangement has been made with the woman's com­
mittee of the Council of National Defense, which insures cooperation
between these two important woman's committees. When the
National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee appoints its State
chairman for the Liberty loan, her name is presented by Dr. Anna
Howard Shaw, chairman of the woman's committee of the Council of
National Defense, to the woman's committee of the State council of
defense in her State, for membership on that body. This enables
the chairman representing the National Woman's Liberty Loan
Committee to use the existing State defense organization for Liberty
loan campaigns, and for aid in organizing her own committee for
the sale of Liberty bonds.
Congreastona! District and Zone Chairmen*

In some States a chairman was appointed for each congressional
district, having supervision, under the State chairman, of those
counties that lie in the geographical division made by the congres­
sional district lines. In other States, where the area is large and the
congressional districts few, the territory to be covered has been
arbitrarily divided into zones, with a chairman having supervision
of such counties or townships as may lie within her zone. This
method of organization, while not generally used, has been found
successful, as it divides the responsibility of supervision and enables



REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M

15

the State chairman to have a more intimate knowledge of the counties
working under her.
C ou n ty Chairm en.

The county chairman has the task of appointing chairmen of all
towns with a population under 50,000, of all townships and villages,
and in some States, of school districts. It is her duty to see that
every person in her county is reached by an appeal to buy bonds;
she must exact daily reports from the women working under her,
and in her turn send a daily report to her State chairman of the
work done in her county. She must arrange for patriotic meetings
in her county if the sale of bonds is sluggish, and she must make
sure that the rural districts in her charge are being covered. She
should call frequent meetings of village and township chairmen serv­
ing under her to discuss methods of campaign.
Township and ViHage Chairmen*

The township or village chairman is instructed to appoint a gen­
eral committee, consisting of leading women in every activity of her
community, to plan the organization of her unit. The National
Committee urges that the township be so organized that a house-tohouse canvass for the sale of bonds be conducted, and recommends
a trolley or automobile house-to-house appeal to reach the districts
lying between villages.
City Chairmen.

The city chairman has a different problem, as she must organize
her community so that she may reach all the people in it. The
National Committee strongly urges a ward organization that will
include a house-to-house canvass for bond selling: In the past
campaign it was demonstrated that this was the only way to be
certain that the ground was covered. In addition to this, the city
chairman should appoint a Rying squadron of bond saleswomen, and
should send them out on daily drives for large subscriptions. They
should maintain booths in banks, hotels, department stores, street
comers, etc., and should see that all stores and factories where labor
is employed are covered.

Publicity is an important part of the duty of a city chairman; she
must keep the papers in her community constantly fed with news
stories in regard to the work women are doing in the Liberty loan
campaign, and she must see that posters and special street-car adver­
tising of a kind to appeal to women are widely distributed.
She must arrange for women Liberty loan speakers at all patriotic
meetings, and at all places where women are employed; and she must
see that every woman's club or organization meeting during the time
of the campaign is addressed by them. She must also make an




16

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M

effort to persuade women's institutions and organizations to invest
endowment funds in Liberty bonds. This has been attempted with
great success in some cities.
A t the Liberty loan conference recently called by the Secretary
of the Treasury it was recommended that the city chairman appointed
in the various districts by the Federal reserve banks for the sale of
Liberty bonds should include on his executive committee the woman
appointed as Liberty loan chairman of that city, and other women
as he may decide, and that he should appoint a woman to such
subcommittees as the women members of the executive committee
may suggest. This merging of the two forces for bond selling enables
each to have the benefit of the other's organization and insures a
more comprehensive campaign.
H !. AD VISO RY COUNC!L.

One of the first oRicial acts of the National Woman's Liberty Loan
Committee was to provide for an advisory council, and to appoint
as members the heads of the great national organizations of women.
In this way the support and cooperation of these important groups
was assured. In the past two Liberty loans these Nation-wide
memberships were of inestimable aid to the campaigns in the various
States, and in many cases the societies made national contributions
of great sums to the Liberty loan. The high sense of patriotism of
the organized women of the United States was proved beyond all
question.




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-CHART OF ORGANtZATtON

PART I I .
W ORK OF NATIONAL W OM AN'S LIBERTY LOAN
COMMITTEE.

FIRST L!BERTY LOAN CAMPAtON.
(May 15 to June 15, 1917.)

The following report is compiled from the letter files in the office
of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee. Undoubtedly
there were many subscriptions made by and through women which
were not recorded here. As there were no distinctive women's blanks
used in the first campaign it is impossible to arrive at any correct
estimate of the results of the work done by women; it was, however,
of sufficient value to encourage the National Committee to believe
that the women of the United States might be relied upon to take a
substantial share of the responsibility of disposing of succeeding bond
issues.
Mrs. Frank L. Higginson, chairman of the first Federal reserve
district, appointed her State chairmen and put in operation the most
complete piece of organization in the Brst campaign. The women of
New England called together the heads of all women's organizations
and put them to work selling bonds. They instituted house to house
canvasses in many places, held street meetings, and sold bonds in
department stores. It is estimated that well over 82 ,000,000 was
subscribed through the women's committees of the first district.
Airs. Frank A. Vandcrlip, of New York, reported that Miss Virginia
Furman, chairman of the woman's Liberty loan executive committee
in the second Federal reserve district, brought together the heads of
80 organizations of women to work for the Liberty loan. One organ­
ization alone, the Woman's Motion Picture Industry, subscribed
§1,000,000 worth of bonds. The New York State Woman's Suffrage
Party secured $4 ,700,000 worth of subscriptions; $8 ,300,000 was
reported as the woman's total for the second district.
Mrs. J. O. Miller, State chairman of Pennsylvania, reported that
in Allegheny County the bankers' statements show that 34 per cent

of the bonds sold were taken by women. Her estimate of subscrip­
tions taken through her committees is $12,000,000.
Mis. George Bass, of Illinois, made two Chautauqua trips, of a
fortnight each, speaking every day. Her itinerary covered all towns
in northern Kentucky and in southern and northern Indiana.
18




REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

19

Mrs Antoinette Funk and Mrs. Kellogg Fairbank, of Illinois, and
Mrs. Guilford Dudley, of Tennessee, reported publicity campaigns,
frequent speaking, and personal solicitation for bond subscriptions to
a considerable amount.
In the State of California 7 out of 10 bonds were taken by women.
In Tennessee the subscriptions through women amounted to
$1,000,000.
The following is a statement of the national associations of women
which subscribed through the National Woman's Liberty Loan Com­
mittee to the Erst issue of Liberty bonds:
AD V ISO R Y COUNCIL.

Daughters of the American Revolution. (It is estimated by Mrs. Guernsey, presi­
dent, that $2,428,000 was subscribed through the members of this organization.)
Society of Mayflower Descendants, $120,000.
Catholic Women's Benevolent Legion, $20,000.
Daughters of the Union, $28,000.
Woman's Benefit Association of the Maccabees, $100,000.
Ladies of the Maccabees, $25,000.
Women's Catholic Order of Foresters, $10,000.
National Society of Colonial Dames of America.
Order of the Eastern Star.
United Daughters of the Confederacy.
Association of Collegiate Alumme.
United Societies of Christian Endeavor.
Daughters of 1812.
Young Woman's Christian Association.
Council of Jewish Women.
Women's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Church.
Women's Christian Temperance Union.
Mount Vernon Ladies' Association of the Union.
Woodman Circle.
Companions of the Forest.
Congress of States Societies.
Catholic Ladies of Columbia.
Army and Navy League.
Publicity Campaign.

Under the direction of the Woman's Liberty Loan Committee the
church bells of hundreds of towns throughout the United States were
rung in the week preceding the close of the first Liberty loan, calling
attention to the number of days left for subscriptions. A scattered
but effective telephone canvass by women was also utilized to instruct
and interest communities in the loan.
In cooperation with the Treasury Department Liberty loan pub­
licity bureau, the committee's bureau issued daily bulletins to all news
service organizations of the United States relative to the work of
women in the first Liberty loan. The bureau also issued to the mem­
bership of the Daughters of the American Revolution 96,000 copies
of a letter written by Mrs. George Thacher Guernsey.



20

REPORT NATIONAL W OM AN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.
TWO IM PORTANT LIBERTY LOAN CONFERENCES.
W O M A N 'S L IB E R T Y L O A N

CONFERENCE.

On September 27 and 28 , 1917, the National Woman's Liberty
Loan Committee called a confcrcnce 111 Washington of all chairmen
working in the woman's Liberty loan organization throughout the
country and the members of the advisory council. Through the kind­
ness of Mr. John Barrett, director, the beautiful building used by
the Bureau of Pan-American Republics was given over to the use of
the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee, and all meetings were
held in the large assembly room there.
Over three hundred women attended this conference from all
parts of the country. Mrs. William G. McAdoo, chairman, presided.
A message of welcome was read by Assistant Director Dr. Francisco
J. Yanes, of the Bureau of Pan-American Republics. Addresses
were made by Secretary of the Treasury, William Gibbs McAdoo;
Secretary of War, Newton D. Baker; Senators Reed Smoot, and
Peter Gerry, representing the Senate Finance Committee; Rep­
resentative Rainey, of IllRnois, representing the Finance Committee
of the House; Mr. Bainbridgo Colby, of the United States Shipping
Board; Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, chairman of the woman's committee
of the Council of National Defense; Mrs. Antoinette Funk, vice
chairman of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee; and
Mrs. George Bass. Mrs. Kellogg Fairbank presented the scheme of
organization of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee and
outlined the chart prepared by it. There were informal accounts of
work done in various States, and general discussion of the better
method of organization.
The delegates to the conference were received at the White House
by the President of the United States. They were also entertained
at luncheon at Suffrage House, where the ladies of the Cabinet were
asked to meet them, and at a reception at the home of the chairman
of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee, Mrs. WiHiam G.
McAdoo.
The great advantage of the advisory committee of heads of women's
organizations throughout the country was emphasized at this con­
ference. Millions of women were represented there, and much of the
success of the second Liberty loan campaign may be attributed to
their enthusiastic cooperation.
W AR

LOAN

CONFERENCE.

The Secretary of the Treasury invited to a Liberty loan conference
at the Treasury Department in Washington the governors of the
Federal reserve banks, representative executives from the central




REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

21

Liberty loan committees of the Federal reserve districts, and the
members of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee and
their chairmen of Federal reserve districts. This conference was held
in Washington during three days, December 10, 11, and 12, 1917, and
was attended by about 125 delegates.
The purpose of the conference was to exchange ideas and experiences
resulting from the first two Liberty loan campaigns and, after a de­
tailed discussion of organization plans, methods, etc., to make to the
Secretary of the T r e a s u ry suggestions as to organizing and con­
ducting forthcoming campaigns for selling United States Government
bonds. The chairman of the conference was Mr. Lewis B. Franklin,
director of war loan organization, who was also chairman of the group
on organization and sales management. The other groups and chair­
men were: Publicity, Mr. Oscar A. Price; speakers, Mr. Charles F.
Horner; accounting, Mr. J. A. Broderick.
Each group met separately, and after a general consideration of
the group program, divided into subcommittees for consideration of
speciRc topics, and reported to the main group. Women represent­
ing the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee were in every
case members of these subcommittees.
The conference was addressed by the Secretary of the Treasuiy on
the subject of the Liberty loan and taxation. His was the only
formal speech made; the rest of the time was devoted to plans for
organization and sales management.
Mention has already been made of the recommendation of the con­
ference that the city chairman appointed through the National
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee be made a member of the men's
executive Liberty loan committee of her city, and that a woman
appointed by her should represent women's interests on every sub­
committee working on loan organization in the city. The National
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee hopes that this recommendation
will be generally carried out, as the last campaign proved beyond
question the value of cooperation between the two agencies for the
sale of Liberty bonds.
Reports were made on the work done through the women's com­
mittees in the schools of the country, and some of our successful
organizations of teachers and pupils were favorably commented on,
and recommended.
The following quotation is from the of&cial report of that conference,
issued by the Treasury Department:
A most valuable part oi the conference was the attendance from the various FedenJ
reserve districts of the district Liberty loan chairmen, and the presence of the of5ciais of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee.
The extremely important work done by the organization of women throughout the
country was apparent to all those familiar with the facts. In those districts where
there waa sufficient time to properly coordinate the work of the organizations oi women




22

REPORT NATIONAL W O M AN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

with the Liberty loan organizations, the results produced were remarkable. For
instance, in one State the organizations of women alone sold more than $41,000,000
of the second Liberty loan bonds.
The above is illustrative of what may be accomplished where there is proper coop­
eration. It is therefore recommended that all Liberty loan executives make a. special
point of assisting in coordinating all Liberty loan activities within their respective
jurisdiction. It is suggested that (1) the district chairman of the woman's organiza­
tion be made a member of the central Liberty loan committee of the district, (2) that
the State chairman of the woman's organization be made a member of the State
Liberty loan committee, and (3) that the local chairman of the woman's organization
be made a member of the local committee.

(Copies of the above report may be procured by writing to Mrs.
George Bass, secretary National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee,
Treasury, Washington.)
SECOND LIBERTY LOAN CAM PAIGN.
(October 1 to 28, 1917.)
N A T IO N A L

C O M M IT T E E .

The National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee is a strongly
centralized body, with the responsibility and direction firmly located
in Washington. The fact that the committee is & committee of
the Treasury Department necessitates this; the chairmen all over
the country are not only chairmen of their own particular unit, they
are also representatives of the Treasury Department of the United
States, and as such must be closely united to it.
Under these conditions it will readily be seen that the management
of the oHice in the Treasury Building at Washington is a most im­
portant part of the work of the committee.
Mrs. Antoinette Funk, vice chairman of the National Woman's
Liberty Loan Committee, undertook this arduous duty, and all
through the hot summer months she stayed at her post in Washing­
ton, building up a skeleton of machinery and conducting the volumin­
ous correspondence that preceded the campaign. Mrs. McAdoo and
Mrs. Funk conducted the ofSce end of the sccond campaign, with
the assistance of Miss Mary Synon, who directed publicity and
distribution.
Mrs. George Bass devoted her entire time before and during the
second Liberty loan campaign to speaking to large audiences at
Chautauquas in the Western States on the subjcct of Liberty bonds.
During August she spoke daily, reaching almost every county in
Nebraska and Kansas. In September she joined the Secretary of
the Treasury and his party in San Francisco, and spent a fortnight
in California, speaking at meetings arranged for Secretary McAdoo.
In October she spoke in many towns of Colorado, Wyoming, and
Utah, at Spokane and Seattle, Washington, at Portland, Oreg.,
at Helena, Mont., and at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. She returned to



REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 's LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

23

California at the end of the month, and was in San Francisco for
the Liberty Day celebration there. The results of her appeal to
the women of the West are apparent in the totals shown in the finan­
cial report from State chairmen, and in close relationships estab­
lished by her between the National Committee and its representa­
tives in the States she covered.
Mrs. Kellogg Fairbank spent the weeks preceding and during the
campaign in Washington, assisting in organization work, and in
the Middle West, working with local chairmen in the seventh Federal
reserve district, endeavoring to give the work of women for the
loan greater publicity. She spoke in Indiana, Wisconsin, and
Illinois, and particularly in Chicago, where, for the last 10 days of
the campaign she made several loan speeches a day.
Mrs. F. L. Higginson was fully occupied with her work as chairman
of the first Federal Reserve District. She visited each State in her
district, spoke at frequent meetings, and stimulated the work of
her State chairmen.
Mrs. Guilford Dudley, as State chairman of Tennessee, demon­
strated her great ability as an organizer of women. Her State was
thoroughly covered, and $2 , 650,000 was credited to the efforts of
the women.
Mrs. J. O. Miller, State chairman of Pennsylvania, devoted her
time to the organization of her State, with the amazing result of a
total subscription from women of over $29,000 ,000, at a total ex­
penditure of $50— the best example of volunteer work in the National
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee records.
The following is the report of the publicity chairman:
During the months of August, September, and October, the publicity bureau of
the committee furnished articles concerning the Liberty loan to 22 magazines, with
a total circulation of 17,557,321, and including all the more important publications
for women in the United States. Material for editorial use was also furnished to 46
periodicals for women. During the month of October, the committee bureau dis­
tributed weekly copy concerning woman's share in the loan to farm journals, news­
paper syndicates, religious weeklies, miscellaneous and foreign weeklies, and to
mail-order journals. The bureau also, during the last 10 days of the drive, distributed
daily publicity to 3,000 local women chairmen in the United States.
Through cooperation with the Treasury publicity bureau the committee sent out
daily bulletins to all news service associations in the country and weekly information
to all newspapers during the Liberty loan campaign.
Seven million dodgers for distribution to workers in factories were sent by the
committee to those States of particular industrial activity where the local oiRcers
stationed workers at the entrances to factories to give out these Aiers on Liberty Day.
A special appeal to farm women was made by cooperation with the Treasury pub­
licity bureau in the insertion of copy in the letter which was distributed to users
of rural free delivery routes by the Post OfRce Department of the United States.
Through the cooperation of the States Relations Service of the United States De­
partment of Agriculture, hundreds of trained lecturers and demonstrators in farm
work enlisted the interest of the farm women of the country in the Liberty loan.




24

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

Two million dodgers of Appeal to the farm women of the United States were sent
out by the mail-order houses of Montgomery Ward & Co., and Sears, Roebuck & Co.,
of Chicago, through an arrangement made with these houses by Mrs. Kellogg Fairbank.
From the Washington headquarters the Woman's Liberty Loam Committee sent
out 3,000,000 special application blanks for women subscribers to State chairmen
for redistribution among their local ofEcers, and to members of the advisory counsel
for distribution among their organizations. The committee also sent out 100,000
organization charts, 110,000 source books, 500,000 primers, and 600,000 special posters
to the State organizations during the second Liberty loan campaign. The committee
also issued 98,500 circular letters, in several different forms, to members of organiza­
tions throughout the United States.
Among these were 25,000 letter to clergymen of various religions requesting their
cooperation in promoting the sucess of Liberty loan Sunday. These letters contained
excerpts from exhortations prepared for the committee by leading clergymen of the
various religions, appealing for patriotic interest in the Liberty loan.
The committee placed through the enthusiastic cooperation of the librarians of
the country 4,500,000 Liberty loan reminder cards in as many public library books
in 1,500 libraries.
Mrs. Katherine Russell Eckstorm, who directed the ofHce staff for the distribution
of the 17,000,000 pieces of copy sent out by the committee, reported that the last
run of material cleared the United States Treasury on October 22,1917. The director
of publicity and distribution wishes to call attention to the fact that the clearing of
this great volume of material was made possible only by the self-sacriRcing labors of
Mrs. Eckstorm and her women coworkers in the task.
MART SYNON.
IN T R O D U C T IO N T O F IN A N C I A L

RECORD.

W O M E N 'S BL A N K S.

In the second campaign, in response to the request of the National
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee, an especial subscription blank
for use of women was printed by the Treasury Department. The
distinguishing feature was simply that these blanks were printed in
Hue ink, with the idea that, at the close of the campaign, when
" the tumult and the shouting" died, the bankers of the country
could at their leisure separate the blue blanks from the black and
determine the amount of money taken in through the woman's
committee. Two causes contributed to the failure of this plan.
One was that a banker has apparently no leisure; from every State
dismayed protests came from them when requested to add the burden
of this work to the splendid service they had already contributed to
the work of the Liberty loan campaign; and the other was that, in
any event, the record would have been inaccurate, as, due to unavoid­
able delay in the printing and distributing of the woman's blanks,
in many States the campaign was well under way before they came
into the hands of the women.
The Rnancial record of the chairmen of the National Woman's
Liberty Loan Committee is therefore impossible to compute accur­
ately. In the following report, when the words " actual account"
are used, it indicates that the State chairman has claimed only



REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M

25

those subscriptions actually taken through her committee, making
no allowance for money subscribed directly to the banks in the
blue blanks given out through her committee. No State has com*
plete returns from every county, and the actual account takes into
consideration only those counties where a deRnite record was kept.
The "estimated totals" represent this amount, added to what the
bankers of the State announce to be their estimate of money sub­
scribed through them, on woman's blanks.
REPORT CARD SYSTEM .

In the coming campaign there will be no attempt made to differ­
entiate the woman's blanks; in place of that, a system of reporting
subscriptions taken has been worked out, and report cards are to
be mailed daily by each county chairman to her State chairman,
and weekly by each State chairman to the National Committee and
to her Federal reserve chairman. These cards will shortly be dis­
tributed.
Financiai Record of Federa! Reserve Chairmen in Second Liberty Loan.
[Compiled from actual accounts of State chairmen.]
Chairman.

District.

First district........

Amount.

Remarks.
Actual account; no report from Rhode
Island and Vermont.
Actual account.
Actual account; this represents the
women's subscriptions trom western
Pennsylvania only: there was no re­
port from the district as a whole.
Actual account.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Actual account; no report from Kansas
and Wyoming: Denver's report only
one from Colorado.
Actual account.
Actual account; no report from Wash­
ington and California because no
separate record could be kept.

Mrs. F. L. Higgmson............

$22,887,960

Second district......... Mrs. John Pratt.....................
Third district_
_
Miss Clara Middleton............

41,274.845
29,800

Fourth district..

Fifth district_
_
Sixth district__
Seventh district.
Eighth district..
Ninth district...
Tenth d istrict...

Mrs. R. G. Perkins................
Mrs. Egbert Leigh.................
Mrs. P. J. McGovern.............
Miss Grace Dixon..................
Miss Florence Wade..............
Mrs. C. A. Severance.............
Mrs. G. W . Fuller..................

4,000,000
13,183,509
4,972,800
26,414,683
24. $58,700
% 777,601
3,686,500

Eleventh distrh-t.
Twelfth d istrict..

Mrs. E. B. Reppcrt...............
Mrs. A. S. Baldwin...............

13,000,000
10,110,310

Financia! Record of State Chairmen in Second Liberty Loan Campaign.
State.

Chairman.

Amount.

Mrs. Solon Jacobs.........

California^.!

Colorado....
Connecticut
Delaware...
Florida........

$400,000

Miss Alice M. Birdsall..
Mrs. C. II. Brough.......
Mrs. E.R.Brainerd—

1,049,910
2,161,800

Mrs. E. S. Kassler, chairman;
Mrs. Ella Mullen Weckbaugh, vice chairman.
Mrs. Motgan G. Buikeley..

1,399,700

M W R. O
rs. .
rr..........
M W S.Jen in
rs. .
n gs......
M W . R Leakin.....
rs. m .
M .T MG
w eresa . raham
..




Remarks.
Actual account: over $1,000,000 due to
women's efforts.
Actual account; not complete.
Do.
Women cooperated with local banks;
no separate account kept.
Returns from Denver only.

16,184,860

Approximate; men's committee credit
women with 23 per cent total amount
raised in State.

331,900

ActuS^acoount; not complete.
Do.
Actual account; 8 counties; bankers es­
timate women responsible for
tMrdStatea

3,564,700

909,000

R EPOR T N A T IO N A L W O M A N 's L IB E R T Y L O A N C O M M IT T E E .

26

.FtM RaZ Record q /
aiM

CAci/*?n,o?z

Zoan

—Continued.

Amount.

State.
Mrs. Howard T. Willson..

Illinois.

Indiana......................
Iowa........................... ;
Kansas.......................
Kentucky.................. ;

Hrs.Frederiek IT. McCuHoch.
Mrs. W. W. Marsh..................
MrsJ.M. McCoim................
Mrs. Donald McDonald.........

!

21,429,400

5,966,900
2,422,390
1,927,450

Louisiana...................' Mrs. Lawrence Wiliiams..

1,800,000

Maine......................... } Mrs. John F. Hill..........
Marvlond................... - Mrs. Robert Garrett...
Massachusetts........... Mrs. Barrett Wendeii..

2, 111,000

660,000
1,374,706

Michigan..
Minnesota.
Missouri...

Mrs. R. H. Ashbaugh.........
Mrs. Francis Chamberlain.
Mrs. PhiiipN. Moore.........

Mississippi.

Mrs. R. L. McLaurin...

859,950

Montana.. .

M rsW .W . McDowell.

1,379,675

Nebraska..
Nevada....

Mrs. A. G. Peterson..
Mrs.S.H.Belford...

1,344,700
250,000

New Hampshire..
New Jersey...........
New Mexico.........
New York............

Mrs. W m . H. Schofield.. . .
Mrs. H. O. Wittpen.............
Mrs.J.J. Shuler...................
Mrs. Courtlandt D. Bames.

3,932,100
9,284,075

North Carolina.
North Dakota..
Ohio..................

Mrs. R . J. Reynolds. . . .
Miss Minnie L Nielson.
Mrs. Frank Mulhauser.

Oregon............
Pennsylvania.

Mrs. Sarah Evans..
Mrs. J. O. Miller...

8,400,000
29,124,800

Rhode Island...
South Carolina.

Mrs. W . A. Peck...
Mrs. F. S. MunscM.

3,000,000

South Dakota.

Mrs. Guilford Dudley.
Mrs. D. E. Waggoner..
Mrs. W . Mont Perry. .

31,632,393
5.000.000
1,020,000
3.000.000

Mrs. Ellwood Perisho.

Tennessee.
Texts........
Utah.........

8,526,510
6.480,376
17,250,000

Vermont.................... Mrs. E. C. Smith
Virginia......................! Mrs. John L.

2,650,000

10, 000,000
110,600

1,067,750

Washington............... Mrs. Overton G. Ellis.

West Virginia.

Mrs. Beulah Boyd Ritchie.

Wisconsin........

Mrs. John W. Mariner.........

Wyoming.............
Mrs. T . S. Taliaferro.
District of Columbia *

6,334,930

943,100

Actual account; $6,372,250, amount re*
ported by Chicago chairman repre­
sents only subscriptions taken in at
W . L. L. headquarters; estimated
three times that amount subscribed
through banks on woman's blanks;
estimated total, $40,000,000.
Actual account; not complete.
Do.
No financial report.
Actual account; not including city of
Lexington, where sale was large.
Actual account; bankers state much
larger amount influenced by women's
work.
Actnal account; not complete.
Do.
Actnal account; report of only 40 out of
140 towns.
Actual account; not complete.
Do.
Actual account; only one-half counties
in State reporting.
Chairman appointed after campaign
had commenced.
Actual account; only one-half counties
reporting.
Actual account; not complete.
Report from 1 county only; impossible
to segregate amounts secured through
women from total amount.
Actual account; not complete.
Do.
No report.
Actual account; estimated by bankers
much larger subscription on women's
blanks not counted.
Actual account; not complete.
Do.
Actual account; estimated by bankers
about 25 per cent of number and 18
per cent of amount of subscriptions
taken by women; amount credited
to women's work by bankers approx­
imately $50,000,000.
Approximate.
Actual account; not complete; 31 out
of 67 counties.
No financial report.
Amount credited to women's work by
bankers; W . L. L. chairman ap­
pointed late In campaign.
No report; chairman out of State
during campaign.
Actual account; not complete.

Approximate.

Actual account; estimated by bankers
20 per cent of number and 4 per cent
of amount total subscriptions taken
by women.
No financial report.
Actuai account; chairman appointed
after campaign commenced.
No report: men and women worked in
sucn close cooperation that no
separate records were kept; bankers
state women's help sold 50 per cent
of loan.
No report; chairman appointed late in
campaign.
Actual account; propaganda work
done by women was of great value,
and added enormously to total sale
of bonds.
Actual aoconnt; not complete.

i Mrs. Emest Thompson Seton, of Connecticut, chairman, It was found impossible to secure a resident
_________________
chairman for the District of Columbia. The woman's committee of the Council of National Defense, under
**
**
*
.
Mrs. Archibald Hopkms, gave valuable cooperation, and Mrs. Antoinette Funk gave much time to direct*
h g th e campaign andspeaking for the Liberty loan. Mrs. Setonreports that tRe amount per capita sub*
^{bed^gwomMinWashingtonexceeded that of any other city. Aetna! account, $2,670,103% estimated^




27

REPORT NATIONAL W O M A X 'a LIBERTY LOA^ COMMITTEE.

(In every case State chairmen reported an especially large sale
of bonds of smalt denominations among women, bought as a general
rule upon the installment plan.)
Financiai Returns from States, Averaged.
Total amount subscribed by and through women, ''actual account"
(36 States).................................................................................................
$214,214,077
Average amount p e r State..........................................................................
5,950, 391
Total amount for United States directly credited to women s work,
based on average per State.....................................................................
2S5, 618, 768
On basis that amounts reported on woman's blanks represent only onefourth of amount actually subscribed by and through women, total
amount due to women's work in United States.................................... * 1,142,475,072
Total subscription to second Liberty loan, United States..................... 4, 617,532, 300
On basis that one-fourth total subscription was due to women's work
(in States where bankers estimated results due to women's work,
one-fourth to one-third is average percentage credited in this w ay;.. *1, 151, 383,075
-

Subscriptions Made by Advisory Council Organizations.
Amounts subscribed through funds of national organizations;
Army and Navy League....................................- .........................................
Catholic Ladies of Columbia........................................................................
Congress of States Societies..........................................................................
Daughters of the Revolution........................................................................
Daughters of the Union...............................................................................
Eastern Star....................................................................................................
First Catholic Slovak Ladies Union............................................................

§1, 500
5,000
50
1,500
253,000
70,000
100^000

(This organization, composed almost altogether of fnrei?n-born women, pledged their
society to the subscription of a similar amount in each sutveeding loan, and is a
notable instance of understanding loyalty.)

Methodist Home Missions Society.............................................................
1,000
* Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union.....................................
10. 000
Woodman Circle...........................................................................................
100,000
Woman's Benefit Association of the Maccabees......................................
-00, 0 0
0
Amounts subscribed through membership oi'organizations:
Companions of the Forest............................................................................
2^7,000
MayRower Descendants............................................................................... $1,300,000

The above is not in the least a complete report of the amounts
subscribed through the organizations represented on the National
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee's Advisory Council. It is simply
a publication of the oSice record of such as reported to headquarters.
The majority turned their subscriptions in to the chairmen of the
various States, or directly into banks on the woman's subscription
blanks distributed through their organizations. In New York City
alone, women's organizations reported over $10,000,000 subscribed.
i It jg interesting to note that the estimates made by the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee
of total amounts due to women's work in the entire United States, and the bankers' estimates in those
States where such an estimate was made, arrive at approximately the same Sguie Rr the estimated total

oi woman's work in the United States.




28

REPORT NATIONAL W OM AN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.
C ooperation w ith Governm ent D epartm ents.

Under the chairmanship of Mrs. Cart F. KeUerman, each depart­
ment of the Government was organized for the sale of Liberty bonds
to women employees. A Liberty loan chairman was appointed in
each department, committees were formed, and the departments were
thoroughly canvassed. During the last two weeks of the campaign,
Mrs. William G. McAdoo and Mi's. Antoinette Funk spoke at noon
meetings to large groups of the women employees of the Govern­
ment. The amounts obtained from the various departments were
as follows:
Department of State (Mies Ethel E. Lawrence, chairman)................................ ?14,100
O
Treasury Department (Miss Clara Grcaccn, chairman)............................. ......... 407, B O
War Department (Miss Estelle Helman, chairman)............................................
80, 850
Post OfHce Department (Miss A. B. Sanger, chairman).....................................
23, 550
Department of Justice (Miss Maude II. Yates, chairman).................................
j. 150
Navy Department (Miss Nannie Barney, chairman)..........................................
15, 550
Department of the Interior (Miss Margaret Sammons, chairman).....................
92, 950
Department of Agriculture (Miss Olive Wadlin, chairman)...............................
70, 550
Department of Commerce (Miss Beatrice Bulla).................................................. 20, 250
Department of Labor (Mrs. Grace Porter Hopkins, chairman)..........................
S, 500
Bureau of Engraving and Printing (Miss Gertrude M. McNally, chairman)...
30, 850
Government Printing OlHce (Miss Nannie Daniels, chairman).........................
15, 550
Civil Service Commission (Miss Elizabeth Raymond, chairman).....................
3. 300
Interstate Commerce Commission (Miss Alice McLean, chairman)..................
3, 250
Food and Fuel Administration (Miss Moore and Miss Braddock, chairmen).. 146, C O
O
7, ()50
Smithsonian Institution, (Miss Margaret Moody, chairman).............................
5, 000
Export License Bureau (Mrs. Gertrude Zaneis, chairman)................................
Shipping Board and Emergency Fleet (Miss Eckhart, chairman)....................
3, 250
Federal Trade Commission (Miss Marion Davies, chairman).............................
3, 200
United States D epartm ent o f Agricutture.

Miss Florence E. Ward, in charge of the extension work among
women conducted by the Department of Agriculture, rendered
efficient aid to the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee.
The demonstration agents of her department, North and West,
were instructed to carry with them into the homes of the country
people literature and subscription blanks from the National Woman's
Liberty Loan Committee. Undoubtedly many women subscribed
through this agency.
Miss Ward also sent letters to the agricultural colleges in all States
asking their cooperation and the help of their agents in the Reid.
Owing to unavoidable delays in Washington, this work was taken
up so late in the campaign that there was not time to reach great
numbers of people. In the third drive for the sale of Liberty bonds,
the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee is assured of con­
tinued cooperation with the Extension Work Division of the United
States Department of Agriculture, and anticipates a large sale of
bonds through this channel.



R E P O R T N A T I O N A L W O M A N 'S L I B E R T Y L O A N C O M M I T T E E .

29

REPORT OF TREASURER.

During the first two Liberty loan campaigns, the expenses of the
women's committees, Federal reserve. State, and city, were donated
by women, or were paid through the generosity of the men's com­
mittees. The total expense submitted directly to the Treasury
Department was $3,712.16, and the National Woman's Liberty Loan
Committee is able to state that the amount of money contributed
from the other sources was small. It is a generous estimate to
announce that $50,000 would cover the entire expenses for State
campaigns for the whole country in the second issue.

In preparation for the more intensive organization of the women
for the third loan, it has seemed advisable to prepare a budget of
expenses for each committee. These are based on the results of the
women's work and on the expenditures necessary in the earlier loans.
Below are copies of our budget forms. All budgets have been
approved by the finance committee and by a Treasury ofRcial
before the money was put to the credit of the Federal reserve chair­
men. When it seemed advisable, the committee has raised or low­
ered the total amount. To the budgets have been added possible
traveling expenses for chairmen of Federal reserve districts, States,
and counties, in order to insure large attendance at local or State
conferences. It is recommended that whenever possible, chairmen
donate their traveling expenses. Careful reports of all money spent
in selling the loans, whether donated or paid by the Treasury, are to
be kept by all chairmen. The tendency of women to be too saving
for cfliciencv has been illustrated in some of the budgets received.
For their encouragement and for the restraint of the extravagant, the
following card has been sent out:
DON'T WASTE MONEY.
There is available, through Concessional action, for the selling expenses of
the loan about 1 mill in every dollar of Liberty loan bonds sold.
That means that you ought to consider that every dollar spent should result in
the sale of at least a thousand dollars' worth of bonds.
Spend your money to sell bonds
Don't waste the Go: TrmneH; money.
J.?? o/* H
S
arg ?&
€
is O /: 7/to^fy.
M

Respectfully submitted,




N A R C IS S A

Cox

JVationaZ Woman's Zi&% y
r%

Y A X D E R L IP ,

30

REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.
19tS

TREASURY DEPARTMENT
W O M A N 'S

L IB E R T Y

LOAN

C O M M IT T E E

...................... F E D E R A L R E S E R V E
(N um ber)

D IS T R IC T

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN BUDGET
.......................... ............................ Chairman..........................
(N am e)

Federal Reserve District

(N u m ber)

(T ost oiEce)

E x p e n d i t u r e s in
..................Federal
R eserve District
for Second L iberty
Loan Campaign.

i

ZM/arg

[

Tdcgr&iQS And t^lcphono calls !
'

'

Fost&gc

'

^

O ^ c o rent

'
^

DotJarg

: C/#. <

Do^tirg

<%.

t

*

Stcnogr&ptMrs
Aud

.................. Federal
Reserve
D istrict
for T h ird L iberty
Loan Campaign.

!

Stationery

A ppropriations ior T h ird
L ib erty Loan Campaign.
(T h e Chairm an should
n o t ftll this colu m n . T h e
Federal R eserve B ank of
t h e ..................D istrict wit!
f)!l it u p o n advice from
Treasury D epartm en t.)

*
'

!

!

'

i

i
i

'

j

i

)

!

:

T o ta l......................................

i

<

D IS T R I B U T IO N O F T H IS B U D G E T :
N ot later than January 15,1918, there should he three copies in oRice o f W om an's L ib erty L oon Comm ittee, Treasury Departm ent, W ashington, I). C. T w o copies in Federal Reserve Hank o f the D istrict.
These copies should have "E x p e n d it u r e s " and " E s t im a te s " colum ns RUed.
W ashington, D ecem ber 20,1917.
F orm A




Signed: ............................................................................................. ..
rrt(MKrt!r,
LJbfrty Z ocn C o m m i t .

31

REPORT XATIOXAL WOMAK^S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.
1918

TREASURY DEPARTMENT
W O M A N 'S

L IB E R T Y

LOAN

C O M M IT T E E

.................. F E D E R A L R E S E R V E
N um ber.

D IS T R IC T .

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN BUDGET
f State of
........................................... Chairman, j County of
[Congressional District
(D raw iine th rou gh term s n o t needed.)

(P ost office)

E xpenditnres
for Second L iberty
Loan Campaign

DoHars

Stationery

j Cf n's
i
t *

Telegram s and telephone calls

Appropriations O r T h ird
L i herty Loan Campaign.
(T h e chairm an m aking
out th is bu d get should
not Alt this colu m n ; it w in
be iii!ed an d returned to
her later.)

Estim ates for T h ird
L i b e r t y Loan
Campaign

DoHors
!
j

: Cfnts
'

*

*

Dollars
t
.................................

"

................ i...... !.............................. i........... i........................................

Postage

!

O fS w ren t
Stenographers
Clerks and messengers

!

'

!

'

............................. i...........!.............................. ............ t...........................................
i
!
i
:

T o ta l...................................... ............................. ............ i.............................. ............ i........................................
i t
i
;

.

.

D IS T R I B U T IO N O F T H IS B U D G E T :
N ot later than January 3,191 &, there should be three copir.s in the ofUm of the State C hairm an,and such
other copies elsewhere as she m ay direet.

Washington, D. C., Deecmbcr 30,1917
F orm B

Signed:............................................. ...................................
TrfOMiMf, H om aa'3 Liberty Loaa

SPEC!AL FEATURES OF SECOND LIBERTY LOAN CAMPA!GN.

Tlie problem of perfecting any organization that shall Rt the
whole United States is a difficult one. The situations in different
States are completely dissimilar; as, for example, in Delaware, the
State chairman can reach her county chairman by telephone at small
expense, or get to them comfortably in an hour or two, while a
chairman in Montana reports that: "Our counties are as large as
many good-sized Eastern States. In my county but six towns can
be reached by rail. The roads are so bad that last week a doctor
nearly lost his life in a 50-mile trip, yet we must reach people at
these magniBcent distances, and undertake frequent 50 to 70 mile
trips. Mail is unsatisfactory, for it takes from two to three weeks
to secure answers from some localities-." It has been found impos­
sible to hold rigidly to the scheme of organization outlined in this



32

REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 's LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

report. Some of the departures from it that proved successful
locally are submitted here.
Florida used the ready-made organizations of the State because of
the late appointment of the State chairman. Connecticut worked on
a town-unit basis instead of the county. Georgia worked through
district, rather than county, chairmen. Minnesota organized
through three important cities, Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Duluth;
the woman's Liberty loan committee there depended upon the
county chairmen of the woman's committee of State defense for the
small towns and 83 counties of the State. In Oregon, counties being
large and distances to travel being great, the county units were found
impossible, the State was divided into districts making certain towns
the center.
Some of the features introduced locally in certain parts of the
country are of sufficient importance to be commented upon in this
report.
S C H O O L C H IL D R E N .

In Michigan, Mrs. Delphine Dodge Ashbaugh, the woman's Liberty
loan committee chairman, called a conference of the teachers of the
English classes in the high schools in Detroit, and as a result the
following plan was developed: During the Liberty loan campaign,
the children in the English classes were allowed to devote their time
to Liberty loan work. They wrote themes, planned speeches, made
posters, etc., all of which were put to practical use. The boys and
girls spoke before the different rooms. As a result of the enthusiasm
aroused in this way, they sold over $1,500,000 worth of bonds.
In Illinois, Mrs. Howard Willson, the woman's Liberty loan com­
mittee chairman, secured the aid of the school children of the State
in the following manner: She appealed to the State superintendent
of public instruction to divide the schools of the State into three
groups. He then wrote a letter to the county and city superin­
tendents of schools, asking their cooperation in putting before the
children the plan for the campaign in the State. Gov. Lowden
consented to give three flags, one to each school in which the greatest
number of bonds was sold per capita according to the enrollment. A
letter was sent by the State Liberty loan chairman to county and
city teachers asking their aid, and a special appeal to the children
themselves was issued on cards printed in red and blue. As a result
the school children secured, in Chicago alone, subscriptions for
$2, 130,350 worth of Liberty bonds.
A M IL E O F N I C K L E S .

In Washington, D. C., Mrs. Ernest Thompson Seton developed an
interesting scheme with a double appeal. A day was set apart as
children's day with the slogan " A Mile of Nickles," and children



REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

33

from ail public and private schools, orphan asylums, and all children
of members of patriotic societies, were invited to attend in a body
at different hours of the day and bring their nickels, which they
deposited in a bank in the form of a large Liberty bell. Their names
were then inscribed on a roll of honor. The money was used to
purchase Liberty bonds to be contributed to the fatherless children
of France. An authorized custodian of this association was present
during the day. Special features of children in costume, both
military and historical, were announced through the press at specified
times. Speakers for the Liberty loan addressed large crowds about
the booth.
PARAD ES.

Children's parades were held* in various parts of the country with
tableau "Qoats" representing important events in American history.
Two of these parades which were notably successful were Lincoln,
111., and in Puyallup, Wash.
In Minneapolis, in a Liberty Day parade, there was a special
division of wives and mothers of soldiers, each woman carrying
her service flag. Their banner read, "W e have given our men.
They are more precious than dollars."
"H O T

D O G S ."

In Reno, Nev., the girls of Reno College sold "h ot dogs" in street
booths in order to raise money to buy Liberty bonds as an endow­
ment fund for the college.
EXEM PTED

M EN.

In Illinois an appeal was made to all exempted men. The Federal
exemption oiRcers furnished the names and addresses of about
150.000. The card sent to them seemed to the bankers such valuable
material that it was asked for and recommended by them to all
States in the 8th district.
SPEAK ER S.

In Rhode Island, the woman's Liberty loan committee interested
a number of young women in the speaking end of the campaign, and
prepared with them four-minute addresses.
A t the State defense headquarters in Chicago two classes in
public speaking on patriotic subjects have been conducted by Prof.
Nelson of the University of Chicago.
CLU BS.

In Washington, D. C., the Twentieth Century Club was divided
into sections of 20 women each, and one woman was appointed to
present the Liberty loan appeal to every woman in her section.



34

REPORT NATIONAL W O M AN'S LIBERTY LOAN CO M M ITIEE.
ACTORS'

B E N E F IT .

A t an actors' benefit in the opera house in Providence, R. I., whero
acts from every theater were given and speeches made for the Lib­
erty loan, the entire proceeds of the entertainment were invested in
Liberty bonds and given to the actors' benefit fund.
M OTH ERS' A P P E A L .

In Milwaukee, Wis., Mrs. John W. Mariner, the woman's Liberty
loan chairman, had two large signs hung across the principal street:
"Mothers who have given their sons to end this war beg you to buy
a Liberty bond."
L IB E R T Y D A Y .

Liberty Day was suggested to Secretary McAdoo by a member of
the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee. He chose October
24 as the date, and instructed the committees working for the loan
all over the country to make this day the climax of their drive.
The President of the United States announced a general holiday, and
in every city and town of importance, and in almost every county,
speeches were made, and on the evening before. Liberty bonfires
were lighted, this feature also being suggested by a member of the
National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee.
W A S H IN G T O N

B O N F IR E .

In Washington, a monster Liberty fire was lighted near the base
of the Washington Monument on Liberty Eve. Wood had been sent
from places of historical interest in practically every State in the
Union; there were pieces from the boyhood home of the President
in Georgia, Lincoln's home in IHinois, Cleveland's birthplace in New
Jersey, Custer's headquarters in North Dakota, the Aztec House, near
Roosevelt Dam in Arizona, Grant's home in Missouri, the Consti­
tutional Elm at Corydon, Ind., the old Blue Lick battleBeld of K en ­
tucky, the homes of Presidents Jackson, Johnson, and Polk, from
Tennessee, etc. The fire was lighted by Mrs. McAdoo, and at the
same moment the signal was given to start the fires that crowned
the Virginia hills on the opposite side of the river. Enormous crowds
witnessed this ceremony, and papers all over the country printed
accounts of it.
R E A C H IN G T H E R U R A L D IS T R IC T S .

The agricultural population in the various States was reached by
the following means: Rest rooms in county courthouse; advertising;
speaking; country newspapers; house-to-house canvassing; circulari­
zation, and personal letters; personal visits; distribution of literature;
patriotic meetings at schoolhouses; market days in town; churches;
country stores; rural letter carriers; telephone solicitation.



REPORT NATIONAL W O M AN 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

35

Meetings were held generally at school houses, churches, granges,
fairs, fraternal meetings, and all other gatherings.
There was much interesting publicity in the newspapers in each
State. The copy given below is possibly the most important single
instance of women's appeal in paid advertising in the press:
W OM EN— F o n THE N E X T F O U R D A Y S .

Tut aside any work that interferes with your doing your utmost to show how much
you care whether or not this country wins this war.
Doing your bit is not enough. Doing our best and then bettering it is what we
must do right now.
When the colonial soldiers ran short of bullets in their struggle for independence
their "women folks'' melted lead, ran bullets, and carried them to the fighters "behind
each fence and farmyard wall.'' Ammunition for this fight for freedom is not going
to be home-made, but the mothers of the fighting men must provide their share of
it just the same.
If you ever wondered whether you could have been a heroine of the Revolution,
now is your chance to find out. Whether history puts the women oi 1917 alongside of
the women of '76 depends on what we all do in the next four days.
There is nothing dramatic about buying U B E R T Y BO N D S, and it may take more
courage than running off leaden buHets.
If the front-line trenches were just over in Detroit, we would volunteer all our
resources. Because the line is a little farther away, are we to let our soldiers think
that from Michigan to France, by way of Texas, is too far for our loyalty to go? It is
unbelievable that our help for them should be more remote than their sacrifices for us.
Somewhere in that gigantic fighting unit is the man who makes this war "m y war''
for each one of us. We must match his gift of all with our gift of all and, like him, 1*c
ready to pay on demand.
That demand has come. For the first time in our remembrance women are asked
to come into BIG BUSINESS as partners. For the most part women have been ciphers
when it came to large finance. Now we have a chance to prove that the only difference
between a million and a billion is a few ciphers at the right side of the line. That is
our side.
If we wake up to the chance of the next four days and do it now, we shall have a
share in victory. If we wake up next week, we shall miss our chance and help the
enemy. Let us do something more than talk and knit and patch up mistakes. When
it comes to food and shoes and munitions, fifty dollars* worth of Liberty bonds is more
persuasive than the tongue of an angel.
If every woman buys or makes someone else buy one Liberty bond to-day, the
success of the loan is assured.
Are those men out there in the cold and hardships to think o f us as just reserves,
B a fely back of the line?
Or are they to know that we are side by side at the very
front, the army of support and the army of action, standing shoulder to shoulder?
We know the answer. Right there is the place where we should be, and there is
where we will be. So, altogether, with all our strength and courage and love for the
men who are lighting for us, let us go "over the to p ," and may God help us!
(Name of donor of space and writer of message appeared here.)




PART I I I .

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN.
OFFICERS AND SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIRMEN FOR THE T H IRD LIBERTY
LOAN CAA1PAIGN*
Mrs. WiLLiAM G. McAD00,
Mrs. ANTOINETTE Ft'XK,
Mrs. GEORGE BASS,
Mrs. FRANK A. YAXDERLiP,
o/*
Mrs. KELLOGG FAiRBAXK,
Miss MARY Syxox, C^a?'rmGn.
Airs. ELLA FLAGG YouxG, Chairman. ^ScAoo^ 7'e^c^frg^
Miss ViRciLA STEPHENS,
Dfw^or.
FEDERAL RESERVE D IST R IC T CHAIRMEN FOR THE TH IR D LIBERTY
LOAN CAMPAIGN.
First district, Mrs. F. L. Higginson, Boston.
Second district, Mrs. John Pratt, New York.
Third district, Mrs. James Starr, jr., Philadelphia.
Fourth district,
Fifth district, Mrs. George J. Seay, Richmond.
Sixth district, Mrs. Haynes McFadden, Atlanta.
Seventh district, Miss Grace Dixon, Chicago.
Eighth district, Miss Florence J. Wade, St. Louis.
Ninth district, Mrs. C. A. Severance, St. Paul.
Tenth district, Mrs. George W. Fuller, Kansas'City.
Eleventh district, Mrs. E. B. Rep pert, Dallas.
Twelfth district, Mrs. A. S. Baldwin, San Francisco.
STATE CHAIRMEN FOR THE TH IRD LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN.
Alabama, Mrs. Solon Jacobs, Altamont Road, Birmingham.
Alaska, Mrs. T. J. Donohoe, Valdez.
Arizona, Miss Alice M. Birdsall, 421 Fleming Building, Phoenix.
Arkansas, Mrs. C. II. Brough, 2107 Arch Street, Little Rock.
California, Mrs. E. R. Brainerd, Alexandria Hotel, Los Angeles.
Colorado, Mrs. Helen Ring Robinsou, 1222 Gaylord Street, Denver.
Connecticut, Mrs. Morgan B. Bulkeley, 100 Washington Street, Hartford.
Delaware, Mrs. Henry Ridgely, Dover.
Florida, Mrs. W. S. Jennings, 1845 Main Street, Jacksonville.
Georgia, Mrs. Wm. R . Leaken, 1401 Savannah Trust Co., Savannah.
Idaho, Mrs. Teresa M. Graham, Villa Glendalough, Coeurd'Alene.
Illinois, Mrs. Howard T. Willson, Virden.
Indiana, Mrs. Frederick H. McCulloch, 2423 Fairfield Avenue, Fort Wayne.
Iowa, Mrs. Wilbur W. Marsh, 408 South Street, Waterloo.

36



REPORT NATIONAL W O M AN 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

37

Kansas, Mrs. Henry Ware Allen, 3420 Country Club Place, Wichita.
Kentucky, Mrs. Donald McDonald, 1440 St. James Court, Louisville.
Louisiana, Mrs. Lawrence Williams, 4 Everett Place, New Orleans.
Maine, Mrs. John F. Hill, 136 State Street, Augusta.
Maryland, Mrs. Sydney M. Cone, 2326 Eutaw Place, Baltimore.
Massachusetts, Mrs. Barrett Wendell, 358 Marlboro Street, Boston.
Michigan, Mrs. Delphine D. Ashbaugh, 110 Fort Street, Detroit.
Minnesota, Mrs. Francis Chamberlain, 2312 Blaisdell Avenue, Minneapolis.
Missouri, Mrs. Theodore Benoist, 4632 Berlin Avenue, St. Louis.
Mississippi, Mrs. R. L. McLaurin, Vicksburg.
Montana, Mrs. W. W. McDowell, 180 Excelsior Avenue, Butte.
Nebraska, Mrs. A. 0 . Peterson, 1217 Ninth Street, Aurora.
Nevada, Mrs. S. H. Belford, 719 Humboldt, Reno.
New Hampshire, Mrs. Wm. H. Schofield, Peterborough.
New Jersey, Mrs. II. 0 . Wittpen, Castle Point, Hoboken.
New Mexico, Mrs. Howard Huey, care of Toltec Oil Co., Santa Fe.
New York, Mrs. John Pratt, 120 Broadway, New York City.
North Carolina, Mrs. R. H. Latham, Winston-Salem.
North Dakota, Miss Minnie Nielson, Valley City.
Ohio, Mrs. Frank Mulhauser, 1560 Mistletoe Drive, Cleveland.
Oregon, Mrs. Sarah Evans, Keeler Apartments, Portland.
Oklahoma, Dr. Leila E. Andrews, 405 Colcord Building, Oklahoma City.
Pennsylvania, Mrs. J. O. Miller, 7109 Jenkins Arcade, Pittsburgh.
Rhode Island, Mrs. Walter A. Peck, 113 Waterman Street, Providence.
South Carolina, Mrs. F. S. Munsell, 1824 Green Street, Columbia.
South Dakota, Mrs. Ellwood Perisho, State College, Brookings.
Tennessee, Mrs. Guilford Dudley, Nashville.
Texas, Mrs. Minnie Fisher Cunningham, Galveston.
Utah, Mrs. W. Mont Ferry, 164 East South Temple Street, Salt Lake City.
Vermont, Mrs. E. C. Smith, St. Albans.
Virginia, Mrs. John L. Hagan, 234 Jefferson Street, Danville.
Washington, Mrs. Overton G. Ellis, 811 North G Street, Tacoma.
West Virginia, Mrs. George Poffenbarger, 1507 Lee Street, Charleston.
Wisconsin, Mrs. John W. Mariner, 428 Milwaukee Street, Milwaukee.
Wyoming, Mrs. T. S. Taliaferro, 106 Cedar Street, Rock Springs.
RECOMMENDATIONS TO STATE CHAtRMEN FOR THIRD UBER TY
LOAN CAMPAtGN.
C O O P E R A T IO N

W IT H O R G A N I Z A T IO N S .

AU State organizations of women should he utilized. The State
chairman may eifect this cooperation by —
(1) Letter to State representatives asking their cooperation.
(2) Calling a conference of ail State organizations to form a work­
ing committee.
(3) Asking State representatives to appoint members in counties,
cities, villages, and townships to work with local Liberty loan
chairman.
(4) Circularizing State organizations for the loan.
(5) Asking for volunteer workers from each organization to join
Hying squadrons of bond saleswomen during campaign.




38

REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

(6) Making arrangements for Liberty loan speakers at State and
local meetings of organizations.
(7) Communicating with Mrs. Kellogg Fairbank, chairman, ad­
visory council committee. Treasury Building, Washington, D. C.
C O O P E R A T IO N W IT H

CLERGY.

The State chairman should make full use of the churches and
religious organizations in conducting her campaign.
(1) An appeal should be sent to ministers of all denominations to
emphasize from the pulpit the necessity of buying Liberty bonds.
(2) Special attention should bo paid to the churches in rural dis­
tricts, as this is often the only agency through which residents of
remote country districts can be reached.
(3) If agreeable to the minister, arrangements should be made for
speakers to appear in churches at evening services.
(4) The ladies' aid societies, guilds, and other women's auxiliaries,
should bo enlisted in the bond-selling campaign.
C O O P E R A T IO N

W IT H

SCH O O LS.

It is hoped that each State chairman will devote considerable
attention to cooperation with the public and private schools in the
coming campaign, as where this was practiced in the previous drives
the results secured were invaluable, not so much in the amount of
bonds actually sold, although this was worth while in itself, as in
the carrying back into the home of each child the ideal of patriotic
service through buying a Liberty bond.
For special organizing of school activities, see section "Special
Features of the Second Liberty Loan Campaign/' Further informa­
tion may be secured by communicating with Mrs. Ella Flagg Young,
chairman, school teachers' activities.
C O O P E R A T IO N

W IT H

CO LLEGES.

Where the opportunity was given them, it was found that students
in all institutions of higher education were keenly alive to the signiRcance of the Liberty loan campaign, and were eager to assist in every
way possible. The following suggestions for a college campaign are
made:
(1) The State chairman should write a letter to the dean of women
in every college in her State, asking her to form a Liberty loan unit
m the college.
(2) Student committees should then be appointed to canvass each
university. All records made b y such committees should be given
the widest possible publicity.
(3) Colleges should be recruited for women speakers, and oratorical
departments in colleges should be stimulated to develop them. A
special course in patriotic speaking would be of great value.



R E P O R T N A T I O N A L W O M A N 'S L I B E R T Y L O A N C O M M I T T E E .

39

SPEAK ERS.

Without exception, every State chairman reported that in the last
campaign she had too much printed matter and too few speakers.
Therefore the amount of literature sent out in the succeeding cam­
paign will be greatly reduced. Experience has proved in every sec­
tion of the country that the spoken word is the most effective method
of reaching the people. In one State, for example, the chairman
reported that only 35 per cent of the population knows how to read;
if bonds are to be sold under such conditions, speakers must reach
every community in the State. Women employed in industrial
plants have little time to read the daily papers; they should be
appealed to at noon meetings by speakers accompanied by some one
who will take subscriptions after a short talk on Liberty bonds.
At all meetings of the rural population a Liberty loan speaker
should present her appeal, and all clubs, federated and unfederated,
should be appealed to at all meetings held while a Liberty loan cam­
paign is in progress. Meetings should be held in rest rooms of de­
partment stores, on street comers, everywhere that the public may
be reached.
This program means that great effort must be made to list and
develop local speakers in every part of the State, and State chairmen
are urged to investigate all possibilities. Many women, without
previous experience in speaking, developed into effective speakers
duriiig the campaign. If there is an existing speakers' bureau in
connection with the banking committee, the State defense com­
mittee, or any patriotic, fraternal, professional, or business associa­
tion, the State chairman should endeavor to have a representative
on this committee and to see that all speakers are available for
Liberty loan work during the campaign.
If there is no such speakers' bureau in her State, the Liberty loan
chairman should appoint a committee to form a Liberty loan speak­
ers' bureau, with instructions to canvass all colleges, associations of
professional women, social service workers, club women, etc., in
search of speakers; to list these women, enroll them for service during
the campaign, and see that so far as possible all parts of the State
are covered by them.
For important meetings in large centers, State chairmen will be
able to secure speakers of national importance by applying to their
Federal reserve chairman, provided they comply with the ruling of
the Director of the Speakers' Bureau of the Treasury Department.
Statement of Charles F. Horner, Director of Treasury Speakers* Bureau*

" I f any chairman of a Federal reserve district, serving on the
woman's Liberty loan committee, will submit an itinerary of not less
than six towns in her district, the speakers' bureau in Washington




40

REPORT NATIONAL W O M A N 's LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

will be glad to send a speaker to cover the meetings, at the expense
of the Treasury Department. When the request comes, the chair­
man of the speakers' bureau will endeavor to send a woman speaker,
but if one can not be secured a man will be sent. It is assumed that
a demand will be made only for meetings of considerable size, and
that the request will be made at least a week in advance of the first
meeting/'
N E W S P A P E R P U B L IC IT Y .

It should be borne in mind that the success of the bond issue is
largely dependent upon advertising. People will not buy bonds
unless they know they are on sale. While the actual contact with
the editors of newspapers is largely in the hands of city or town
chairmen, the State chairman is urged to meet the principal editors
of her State and to discuss with them the matter of publicity before
the next campaign opens. She should also instruct the county
chairmen to call upon the editors of the papers in their counties and
to arrange to give them stories of the local woman's committee work.
A chairman of publicity should be appointed by each State chairman,
whose duties should include a supervision of the woman's Liberty
loan publicity in the papers of her State.
The newspapers have given splendid service to the country in the
two past campaigns for the sale of Liberty bonds. The editors in
the United States have proved that they are willing to do their part,
but the Liberty loan chairman must keep in mind that it is not
reasonable to expect them to print material unless it is of timely
interest; it is a part of such chairman's duty to develop novel and
unique schemes which will attract attention and compel space in the
papers because they will be news.
CHANGES

IN O R G A N IZ A T IO N .

If any change is made in organization within the State as outlined
by the national committee, the State chairman is requested to consult
with the National Committee at Washington in regard to it. Recom­
mendations for organization have been made after a careful study of
the reports of all State chairmen, and while the National Committee
does not wish to be unreasonably rigid in regard to such matters, it
does wish to have definite reasons submitted for any proposed changes
in the official plan of organization.




REPORT NATIONAL W O M AN 'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

41

REPO RTS.

The report forms given below will be printed on franked post cards
and are intended for the use of State, county, and city chairmen:
WEEKLY REPORT OF STATE CHAMMAN

TO NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

6 M M ......................,
7 & P
S tate.......................................................... Chairman.............................................
Number counties reporting..................... Number meetings h e ld .................
Number women's organizations canvassed..........
D enom ination
o f bonds.

N um ber of
subscribers.

A m ou n t.

$50.....................................
100.........................................................
500.....................................

........................................ $
.............................................................$
........................................$

1,000............................

................................. $

Total number...................
Total amount................ $
Complaints or questions:
(Duplicate report should be sent to Federal reserve chairman.)

NATIONAL W OM AN'S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.
DAILY REPORT OF COUNTY, CTTY, AND TOWNSHIP CHAIRMEN.

......................, 7973.
State........................................................ County......................................................
C ity ......................................................... Township..................................................
Chairman................................................ Address.....................................................
Women represented by the above group have secured subscriptions for the
Liberty loan on this date as follows:
D enom ination
of bonds.

$50 .

.

.

.

X u m b e ro f
subscribers.

.

.

100..............................
500.....................................

A m ou n t.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . $

............................... $
........................................ $

1,000.............................

...................................$

Total number...................
Complaints or questions:

Total amount................ $

The county and city chairmen are asked to Rll out a daily report
of bonds sold through their organization and to mail it to their State
chairman. The State chairman then compiles a weekly report of the
number and amount of bonds sold through her State organization
and mails it to both her Federal reserve chairman and the National
Committee.
In this way an accurate account of the bonds sold through the
National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee may be kept, and in the



42

REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN ' S LIBERTY LOAN COMMITTEE.

next report of this committee there will he no necessity for estimating
returns.
W A R S A V tN G S .

The National War Savings Committee has asked for the cooperation
of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee in the work of
selling war savings certificates and thrift stamps. Mrs. George Bass,
secretary of the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee, is a
member of the National War Savings Committee and represents the
Liberty loan organization there. In every case the State chairman
for the National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee has been made
a member of the State executive committee for war savings, and
locally many of our chairmen are giving their time between Liberty
loan campaigns to the work of the War Savings Committee. When
a Liberty loan drive is announced all women enrolled to work for the
sale of Liberty bonds are released for that prior responsibility.
F R A N K IN G

P R IV IL E G E .

USE OF FRANKED OR PENALTY ENVELOPES.

The franking privilege has been extended to the National Woman's
Liberty Loan Committee under the following provisions:
yts
— The members of the National
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee, all of whom act on behalf of
the Secretary of the Treasury, will have the use of penalty envelopes
in conducting oiRcial business.
— Federal reserve and
State chairmen, whose oBices will be located in their respective
districts or States, are like the members of the National Committee,
appointees of the Secretary of the Treasury. In the performance
of their duties by virtue of such appointment they will carry on
correspondence relating exclusively to the business of the Govern­
ment of the United States, and in such correspondence they are
entitled to the use of penalty envelopes.
^ Tls
cAairmm.— The franking privilege has been
made available to the executive chairman of the regular Liberty loan
organization in each city or county. Individuals in each city or
county who will have the right to use the frank will be designated
by the executive committee of that Federal reserve district, and will
be furnished with a printed authorization making him a Treasury
representative. Subordinate committees may have the right to use
the frank under his direction, provided all literature contains the
signature of this executive committee chairman, either printed or
written. For example, if a subordinate committee of the Woman's
Liberty Loan Organization wishes to send out a communication under




REPORT NATIONAL WOMAN'S LIBERTY LOAN COM ITTEE.
M

43

frank, it would contain the signature of the executive chairman who
is the Treasury representative, and the additional signature of the
Woman's Liberty Loan Committee.
POSTAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS.

Any department or oihcer authorized to use the penalty envelopes may inclose
them with return address to any person or persons from whom or through whom
oRicial information is desired, the same to be used only to cover such ofRcial
information, and indorsements relating thereto.

The National Woman's Liberty Loan Committee is advised that
distribution of pamphlets, ctc., in many instances is not to be made
from the oiRces of State chairmen, ^as originally contemplated,
but rather through ofliccs of county or city chairmen. Under
those circumstances, the State chairman would be justified in sending
to county and city chairmen only such number of penalty envelopes
as would be actually required for distribution of particular pieces
of literature from time to time. Great caution should be exercised
by Federal and State chairmen to see that penalty envelopes are
not furnished to county or city chairmen except when needed in
individual or particular instances and never in excess of the actual
quantity needed for a particular distribution. This obligation is
moral in character, both bccausc of our relations with the Treasury
Department, which has made such a generous extension of the
franking privilege to us, and because of the fact that we should not
make it easy for any person to misuse penalty envelopes.
Mrs. WiLHAM G. McAuoo,
Mrs. ANTOINETTE FUNK,




M rs. GEORGE BASS,

Mrs. FRANK A. VANDERLiP,
Mrs. A . S. BALDWIN.
Mrs. CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT.
Mrs. GUILFORD DUDLEY.
Mrs. K E L L O G G F A I R B A X K .
Mrs. GEORGE THACIIER GUERNSEY.
Mrs. F. L. HiGGiNsoN.
Mrs. J. 0 . MlLLER.
Miss MARY SYNOX.
M rs. E L L A FLA G G Y O U X G .

o