View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

PROCEEDINGS AND DOCUMENTS OF THE

United Nations
Monetary and Financial
Conference
,

BRETTON WOODS NEW HAMPSHIRE

,

JULY 1-22 1944

Vol. II

UNITED

STATES

GOVERNMENT




PRINTING

OFFICE,

WASHINGTON

I

1948

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Publication 2866
International Organization and
Conference Series I, 3

DIVISION OF PUBLICATIONS
OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C. — Price $2.25




Contents
Page

Appendix I. Miscellaneous Conference Documents . . . .

1129

1. Pre-Conference D ocu m en ts....................................

1129

2. Press Releases...........................................................

1147

3. List of Correspondents...........................................

1245

4. Translations of Certain Documents Into French
and Spanish...........................................................

1248

Appendix II. List of Documents Issued at the Conference

1520

Appendix III. Key to Symbols Used on Documents . . .

1535

Appendix IV. Related P a p e r s ...........................................

1536

1. Preliminary Draft Outline of Proposal for a United
and Associated Nations Stabilization Fund . .

1536

2. International Clearing U n i o n ................................

1548

3.

Letter From Secretary Morgenthau to the Min­
isters of Finance of Thirty-Seven Countries . .

1573

4. Tentative Draft Proposals of Canadian Experts for
an International Exchange U n i o n ....................

1575

5. Preliminary Draft Outline of a Proposal for an In­
ternational Stabilization Fund of the United and
Associated N ations...............................................

1597

6.

Preliminary Draft Outline of a Proposal for a Bank
for Reconstruction and Development of the
United and Associated N ations............................

1616

7. Joint Statement by Experts on the Establishment
of an International Monetary Fund of the United
and Associated N ations.......................................

1629

Index

.......................................................................................




iii

1637




Volume II
APPENDIXES




Appendix I

Miscellaneous Conference Documents
1. Pre-Conference Documents
Document 1
UNITED

N ATIO NS MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE
Mounf Washington Hotel, Bretton Woods, New Hampshire

General Information
Bretton Woods.
Bretton Woods, New Hampshire consists solely of the Mount
Washington Hotel and its appendages. The hotel community is
surrounded by the scenic White Mountain National Forest, which
covers nearly one million acres and is dominated by Mount Wash­
ington, highest peak of the Presidential Range.
Hotel Rates.
By special arrangement with the Mount Washington Hotel,
persons participating in the Conference in any official capacity
will be charged a flat rate of $11.00 per day, American plan (meals
included). Persons assigned to superior accommodations will be
obliged to pay a surcharge. The eleven-dollar rate applies to
double-occupancy rooms with bath or single rooms without bath.
Persons occupying single rooms with bath will be charged fifteen
dollars or eighteen dollars per day, in accordance with the nature
of the accommodations. Ten percent of the daily charge will be
added by the hotel to cover gratuities to hotel personnel.
The hotel will compute its daily charges on the basis of four
six-hour quarters, calculating from the beginning of that quarter
of the day during which the individual enters upon residence at
the hotel. For example, a guest arriving after 6:00 a.m., but
before noon, will be charged three-fourths of the daily rate for
the day of arrival.
Offices.
Space limitations require that the number of rooms devoted
to offices be strictly limited. A flat rate of ten dollars per day
will be charged for all rooms furnished as offices situated on the
first, second, third, and fourth floors where, it is anticipated,




1129

1130

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

the offices of the delegations will be concentrated. Offices will be
furnished with executive desks, stenographic desks or tables, and
appropriate chairs.
Recreation.
Participants in the Conference will be permitted the gratuitous
use of the tennis courts, swimming pool, and motion picture
theater. Other facilities, such as the golf course, riding horses,
et cetera, will be available at customary rates.
Religious Services.
An Episcopal Church is located on the hotel grounds, within easy
walking distance of the hotel. A Roman Catholic Church is located
at Fabyan, a distance of approximately one mile.
Special Transportation to Bretton Woods.
Separate notices are being issued with regard to special
arrangements for transportation to the seat of the Conference.

Document 1y2
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Delegation of the
United States of America
Delegates
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury, Chairman.
Fred M. Vinson, Director, Office of Economic Stabilization, Vice
Chairman.
Dean Acheson, Assistant Secretary of State.
Edward E. Brown, President, First National Bank of Chicago.
Leo T. Crowley, Administrator, Foreign Economic Administra­
tion.
Marriner S. Eccles, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal
Reserve System.
Mabel Newcomer, Professor of Economics, Vassar College.
Brent Spence, House of Representatives, Chairman, Committee
on Banking and Currency.
Charles W. Tobey, United States Senate, Member, Committee on
Banking and Currency.
Robert F. Wagner, United States Senate, Chairman, Committee
on Banking and Currency.
Harry D. White, Assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury.




APPENDIX I

1131

Jesse P. Wolcott, House of Representatives, Member, Committee
on Banking and Currency.
(P. 2)
Technical Advisers
James W. Angell, Foreign Economic Administration.
E. M. Bernstein, Treasury Department, Executive Secretary of
the Delegation.
Malcolm Bryan, Vice President, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
E. G. Collado, Department of State.
Henry Edmiston, Vice President, Federal Reserve Bank of St.
Louis.
Walter Gardner, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System.
E. A. Goldenweiser, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System.
A. H. Hansen, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System.
Frederick Livesey, Department of State.
Walter Louchheim, Jr., Securities and Exchange Commission.
August Maffry, Department of Commerce.
Norman T. Ness, Treasury Department.
Leo S. Pasvolsky, Department of State.
Warren Pierson, Export-Import Bank.
Chauncey W. Reed, House of Representatives, Member, Commit­
tee on Coinage, Weights and Measures.
Andrew L. Somers, House of Representatives, Chairman, Com­
mittee on Coinage, Weights and Measures.
M. S. Szymczak, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System.
(P . 3 )

Legal Advisers
Ansel F. Luxford, Treasury Department, Chief Legal Adviser.
Ben Cohen, Stabilization Board.
Oscar Cox, Foreign Economic Administration.
J. P. Dreibelbis, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System.
E. B. Stroud, Vice President, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
Secretary-General of the Delegation
Charles S. Bell, Treasury Department.
Assistants to the Chairman
Henrietta S. Klotz, Treasury Department.
Margaret McHugh, Treasury Department.
Frederick Smith, Treasury Department.
Arthur Sweetser, Office of War Information.
Technical Secretaries
Mordecai Ezekiel, Department of Agriculture.




1132

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

John Fuqua, Department of State.
I. Lubin, Department of Labor.
George Luthringer, Department of State.
D. F. Richardson, Treasury Department.
G. Silvermaster, Department of Agriculture.
Arthur Smithies, Budget Bureau.
William L. Ullmann, Treasury Department.

Document 2 %
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Officers of the Conference
Temporary President
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury and Chairman
of the United States Delegation.
Secretary General of the Conference
Warren Kelchner, Chief, Division of International Conferences,
Department of State.
Technical Secretary General
V. Frank Coe, Assistant Administrator, Foreign Economic Ad­
ministration.
Assistant Secretary General
Philip C. Jessup, Acting Director, School of Military Government
and Administration, Columbia University.
Secretaries and Assistant Secretaries o f Technical Commissions and Committees

Elting Arnold, Treasury Department;
J. H. Bitterman, Treasury Department;
Karl Bopp, Federal Reserve Board;
Alice Bourneuf, Federal Reserve Board;
R. B. Brenner, Treasury Department;
W. A. Brown, Department of State;
(p. 2) Lauren Casaday, Treasury Department;
Eleanor L. Dulles, Department of State;
Charles H. Dyson, Colonel, United States Army, War Department;
Raymond Mikesell, Treasury Department;
E. E. Minskoff, Treasury Department;
Ruth Russell, Department of State;
Orvis Schmidt, Treasury Department;
Leroy Stinebower, Department of State;
J. Sundelson, Treasury Department;




APPENDIX I

1133

Arthur Upgren, Federal Reserve Bank;
J. P. Young, Department of State.
Chief Press Relations Officer

Michael J. McDermott, Special Assistant to the Secretary of State.
Assistant Press Relations Officers

Harold R. Beckley, Superintendent, Senate Press Gallery;
George H. Coffelt, Treasury Department;
(p. 3) John C. Pool, Department of State.
Executive Secretary

Clarke L. Willard, Assistant Chief, Division of International Con­
ferences, Department of State.
Liaison Secretaries

Elbridge Durbrow, Foreign Service Officer, Department of State;
James H. Wright, Foreign Service Officer, Department of State.
Special Assistant to the Secretary General

Edward G. Miller, Jr., Adviser, Liberated Areas Division, Depart­
ment of State.
Administrative Secretary

Lyle L. Schmitter, Department of State.
Assistant Administrative Secretary

P. Henry Mueller, Department of State.
Chief o f the Interpreting and Translating Bureau

Guillermo Suro, Acting Chief, Central Translating Division, De­
partment of State.
Secretary for Transportation and Special Services

M. Hamilton Osborne, Department of State.
(P- 4 )
Editor o f the “ Journal”

Frances Armbruster, Department of State.
The Permanent President and the Vice Presidents of the Conference,
as well as the Chairmen, Vice Chairmen and Rapporteurs of Technical
Commissions and Committees, will be elected by the Conference.

N o te :

Document 3
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Memorandum on Participation, Organization and the
Functions of Conference Officers and Units
The Conference will be an autonomous organization and will
be operated on the procedure outlined in the regulations formu­




1134

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

lated by the host government until the Conference itself adopts
the definitive regulations. (A copy of the regulations is attached
herewith.)
P a r t ic ip a n t s

Officially accredited delegations from the governments of the
United Nations and those nations associated with them in this
war invited by the Government of the United States will be en­
titled to have full membership in the Conference and each such
delegation shall have the right of one vote. (List attached.) Under
the proposed regulations the voting will be done in alphabetical
order of the countries listed in the English language.
This Government has extended the following additional invita­
tions for the opening plenary session and succeeding sessions
pending determination by the Conference itself of the prerequi­
sites for attendance at the business meetings :
(1) To the following international organizations to send one
observer each:
Economic, Financial and Transit Department of the League of
Nations
International Labor Office
United Nations Interim Commission on Food and Agriculture
United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration
(2) To the Danish Minister to attend in his personal capacity.
(At the previous United Nations conferences held in this
country the Minister has been permitted to attend in this
capacity all meetings except those of standing or special com­
mittees but without the right to vote.)
The Minister and the observers would not have the right to vote
under the invitation extended by this Government.
O r g a n iz a t io n

Officers
In accordance with the generally accepted international prac­
tice, the host government designates the Temporary President and
furnishes the secretariat of (p. 2) the Conference. The Presi­
dent of the United States has designated Secretary Morgenthau as
Temporary President of the Conference, Warren Kelchner as the
Secretary General, V. Frank Coe as the Technical Secretary Gen­
eral and Philip Jessup as the Assistant Secretary General.
The Temporary President will serve until the Permanent Presi­
dent has been elected by the Conference after recommendation
by the Committee on Nominations. This election will probably
take place at the second plenary session on July 3 at which time
the Vice Presidents will be elected in like manner.




APPENDIX I

1135

The Secretary General will be the executive head of the Con­
ference Secretariat and will serve also as the principal adviser to
the President of the Conference, the Vice Presidents and the
officers of the Commissions and Committees on Conference proce­
dure, precedent, organization and protocol. The Technical Secre­
tary General who will have primary responsibility for the coordi­
nation of the substantial technical work of the Commissions and
their Committees and for the planning and supervision of the
work of the Secretaries of such Committees. In addition there will
be an Assistant Secretary General who will aid both the Secretary
General and the Technical Secretary General.
The titles and functions of other officers of the Conference are
included later in this memorandum in the chapters on their respec­
tive units.
Sessions
The Conference will operate through:
Plenary

s e s s io n s

Inaugural plenary session
Business sessions
(Executive sessions if needed)
Closing plenary session.
C o m m is s io n s

Commission I — International Monetary Fund
Commission II — Bank for Reconstruction and Development
Commission III— Other Means of International Financial Co­
operation
C o m m it t e e s

The Commissions will be divided into Committees where most
of the detailed substantial work of the Conference will be done.
The Committee structure will be determined by the Conference.
The United States will make appropriate recommendations in
this regard.
(P . 3 )

Commission and Committee Officials
Each Commission and each Committee will elect a Chairman,
one or more vice-chairmen, and a rapporteur or reporter dele­
gate. The Committee rapporteurs will make the final reports to
the respective Commissions and the Commission rapporteurs will
report to the full Conference on behalf of their respective groups.
The Commission and Committee Secretaries occupy very im­
portant positions in the Conference organization. As indicated
above, the real substantial detailed work of the Conference is
accomplished in Committee sessions. The responsibility therefore




1136

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

devolves upon the Commission and Committee Secretaries to guide
their respective groups along the most logical and fruitful lines,
to maintain a high degree of efficient operation and to assure the
equilibrium and goodwill of the group. The Commission and Com­
mittee Secretaries, like all other officers of the Conference, are
on this occasion international officials and for all practical pur­
poses temporarily lose not only their national identity but their
allegiance to the organizations, governmental or otherwise, with
which they are affiliated. They must operate without partiality or
favor keeping in mind that the national delegations, including,
the delegation of their own country, are of equal standing before
the Conference. The success of the Conference will depend in
large measure upon the effectiveness of the day-by-day work of
the Commission and Committee Secretaries and this will be in­
fluenced very largely by the maintenance of a cordial and friendly
personal relationship with all the members of their respective
committees, especially the foreign participants. The duties in
addition to the foregoing will include the following:
1. Keeping a list of the members of the committee, together
with alternates and advisers;
2. Informing Secretary General and Editor of the Daily Bul­
letin of the names of committee members;
3. Recording the attendance at committee meetings;
4. Notifying Officer in Charge of the Order of the Day (pref­
erably before 6 p.m. of each day) of the time of the next
meeting and arranging with him as to place, seating ar­
rangement and any particular supplies or equipment
needed;
5. Preparing the agenda for the meetings of the Committees;
6. Preparing suggestions for the chairman on the conduct of
the meetings and the procedure to be followed;
7. Responsible for the preparation or coordination of Com­
mittee documents in accordance with the general form and
directives of the Secretary General and Technical Secretary
General ;
8. Drafting documents as directed by the Committee;
9. Recording resolutions presented to the Committee;
10. Recording studies and reports presented by members of
the committee and, when necessary and (p. 4) desirable,
arranging for their duplication and distribution to mem­
bers of the committee and any other interested parties;
11. Counting and recording the votes during committee ses­
sion ;




APPENDIX I

1137

12. Preparation of the minutes;
13. Preparing a brief resume of the subject discussed in each
day's session, for publication in the Daily Bulletin;
14. Conferring with Press officer on nature and extent of in­
formation to be given out to the Press or arranging for
various members of the Committee to give a press confer­
ence; and,
15. Preparing any special announcements concerning the com­
mittee for publication in the Daily Bulletin or for posting
on the Bulletin Board.
Minutes
It is anticipated that, as at previous United Nations Confer­
ences held in this country, verbatim minutes will be kept at only
the plenary sessions. Under this formula the minutes of Com­
mission and Committee meetings will be recorded in resume.
It is suggested that the Commission and Committee secretaries,
with the aid of their respective stenographers or of reporters
detailed from the stenographic pool, maintain a set of minutes
in rough draft containing the record of attendance, the principal
subjects discussed, notations on the remarks of the participants
in the discussions (including the name and country of the speak­
ers) a listing by number and title of the Conference documents
discussed, and the conclusions reached. These minutes should be
kept in suitable form for ready reference and at the conclusion
of the Conference should be deposited in the official archives of
the Conference.
Immediately following each session of a Commission or a Com­
mittee, the Secretary should prepare a brief abstract of the pro­
ceedings containing the above-indicated material. This resume
should be confined to approximately one typed page, single spaced.
In addition, a statement of not more than one short paragraph
should be drafted containing the mention of the pertinent points
above and listing Conference documents considered.
The foregoing two resumes should be completed, approved by
the chairman of the respective Commissions or Committees and
deposited with the Technical Secretary General or the Assistant
Secretary General (whichever is agreed upon) by 9 p.m. in order
to meet the dead line for the daily “ Journal” . (Please see sep­
arate memorandum on minutes.)
(P. 5)
Press Relations
The Chief Press Relations Officer will have the responsibility




1138

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

for the conduct, on behalf of the Conference, of all relationships
with the representatives of the press, radio, and news photo­
graphic agencies. He will be assisted by several press relations
officers. The representatives of the above services will receive
special press passes countersigned by the President of the Standing
Committee of Correspondents. Admission to the hotel for purposes
related to press, radio and photographic services will be restricted
to the holders of these special passes.
The Chief Press Relations Officer will handle publicity on behalf
of the Conference organization and in addition will arrange, when
desired, for press interviews or press releases by the national
delegations.
Liaison Secretaries
The Liaison Secretaries operating under the supervision of
the Secretary General, will keep in constant communication with
the delegations from the world areas in which they respectively
are specialists with a view to furnishing to those delegations any
assistance which may be required either in connection with the
technical work or general problems. Conversely the Liaison Sec­
retaries will be available to aid the officers of the Conference with
any questions which may arise with regard to relationships with
any delegation or member thereof.
Documentation
The issuance of Conference documentation will be controlled
by a documents classification and numbering system adminis­
tered by the Conference Archivist. In general, documentation
will include the following principal categories:
1. Proposals submitted by the delegations for the considera­
tion of the Conference. .
2. Reports or memoranda prepared by the national delega­
tions or by the Secretariat.
3. Reports, resolutions and recommendations of the Technical
Commissions.
4. Reports, resolutions and recommendations of the Technical
Committees.
5. Minutes.
6. General statements by the national delegations.
7. Press releases:
8. Bulletins and announcements issued by the Secretariat.
9. The daily “ Journal” .
10. The Final Act. (Incorporating the conclusions of the Cpnference.)




APPE NDI X I

1139

Please see separate memorandum on documentation and the op­
erations of the classification procedure.
(P . 6 )
R e s p o n s i b il i t i e s
and

and

U n it s

F u n c t io n s
of t h e

of

O t h e r O f f ic e r s

Conference

The responsibility for these activities fall to the following officers
of the Conference or units of the Secretariat:
Executive Secretary
General Administration and coordination.
Administrative Secretary
In charge of administrative services, including registration;
information; personnel management and records; coordination of
recording, duplicating and distribution services; acquisition and
distribution of supplies and equipment; et cetera.
Assistant Administrative Secretary
Special Assistant to the Secretary General
Drafting, interviews, liaison and general assignments.
Chief of the Interpreting and Translating Bureau
Although it is planned to have English as the official language,
there may be need for some interpretation or translation. Pro­
vision has been made therefore for a small staff of interpreters
and translators.
Secretary for Transportation and Special Services
In charge of transportation, protection, the issuance of passes,
and miscellaneous special services for the Secretariat and the
participating delegations.
Editor
Edits the daily “ Journal” and general Conference documenta­
tion.
Archivist
Document classification and registration, archives.
Administrative Assistant in Charge of the t(Order of the Day”
Responsible for the preparation of the daily calendar of events,
in consultation with the Secretary General, (p. 7) the Technical
Secretary General, and the Secretaries of Commissions and Com­
mittees.
Administrative Services (Under the supervision of the Adminis­
trative Secretary)
Stenographic Service.
Court reporting, stenciling, et cetera.
Duplicating Service.
Mimeographing, repair and maintenance of equipment,
795841 — 48— 2




1140

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Assembly and Distribution Services.
Supplies and Equipment.
Registration.
Information.
Personnel Relationships and Records.
Messenger Service.
Conference Secretariat, Division of International Conferences, Department of State, June 26,
1944

Document 4
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Minutes and Resumes
One of the principal duties of each Committee secretary is to
prepare minutes of the sessions and to keep a record of all docu­
ments considered or prepared by the Committee. The records of
Committee sessions are of four types: a brief summary for pub­
lication in the Conference Journal; a second is a more comprehen­
sive summary or official minutes of the meeting (for Conference
distribution); a third is the stenographic report (not verbatim)
of the meeting (not verbatim and not for distribution); and a
fourth for release to the press in case such is decided upon.
The Journal Resumes
Immediately upon return from a Committee meeting, the Secre­
tary, with the aid of the Assistant Secretary, should dictate a
brief statement for the Journal which is based upon their own
notes and the running account of the discussion recorded by their
stenographer. This account shall include the subject or documents
discussed, a complete list of Committee documentation, and the
decisions reached or actions taken. It should not include reference
to particular individuals, the position taken by any one country or
group of countries except possibly to indicate that consideration
had been given to a proposal advanced by country-------------on such
and such a problem. The account should he brief, ordinarily not to
exceed one paragraph unless the discussion covered a number of
different subjects of especial interest. It should cover the conclu­
sions reached with little or no mention of the negotiations by
which they were arrived at.
The purpose of the Journal account of committee sessions is to




APPENDIX I

1141

enable each person at the Conference to get a brief, running ac­
count of the progress of the business sessions and to list all min­
utes, reports, resolutions, et cetera for those who wish to follow
some but not all the work of the various Commissions and Commit­
tees. These brief but inclusive resumes should be of particular
value to the smaller delegations which do not have enough per­
sonnel to follow all the work of each Committee. It will also in­
crease the historical value of the Journal by listing in one brief
document of only a few pages all references to the rather volumi­
nous records which usually flow from a conference of this size.
The resume should first be submitted to the Chairman of the
Committee for his comment and approval. After it has been ini­
tialed by the Chairman, it should be submitted to the Assistant
Secretary General or the Technical Secretary General, or to some
one person designated by them. This person, who may be a Com­
mission Secretary, will review the report primarily with respect
to its relation to other Committee reports and in order to insure a
uniform tone and pattern and to facilitate their eventual consoli­
dation into a joint report of all the Committees (p. 2) in one
Commission and those of the Commissions into a final report of the
Conference.
The report, as finally approved by the office of the Assistant
Secretary General, or Technical Secretary General, shall be regis­
tered as a Conference document with the Archivist (Room 9). The
resume of morning sessions should be submitted before 9 :00 p.m.
of the same day so that they may be edited, stenciled, duplicated,
assembled and ready for distribution by breakfast time of the fol­
lowing morning.
The last line of the notice should carry, if possible, a reference
to the time of the next meeting. For example:
Time of next meeting: 10 a.m., Friday, July 7
or
No meeting scheduled for Saturday or Sunday
or
Drafting Committee to meet on Saturday. The time of the
next meeting will be announced.
The Committee Minutes
The official minutes of the meeting should contain a fairly com­
prehensive summary of all the important points discussed and will
ordinarily follow the order of the Agenda. It is important to keep
in mind, however, that the minutes are a summary of proceedings
and not a record of debates. Summaries of speeches should be as




1142

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

concise as possible. The Secretary may make use of running notes
taken by his stenographer, during the course of the meeting, but
these should not ordinarily be verbatim. The Secretary may also
make use of notes handed in by speakers for the purpose of mak­
ing their summaries, but speakers who ask for their speeches to
be recorded more or less in full should be told that this is not
possible, having regard to the nature of the minutes and the char­
acter of the meeting.
In summarizing speeches, useless formulas, cliches, et cetera
should be avoided. It is also desirable to avoid unnecessary under­
linings, variations in type, et cetera. Discussions concerning pro­
cedure should be summarized very briefly, when they do not affect
the substance of the proceedings. In many cases it may be suffi­
cient to state “ after an exchange of views on such and such a
point of procedure, the Committee decided that.. . . ” . It is impor­
tant that the minutes should constitute, in so far as possible, a
clear and self-explanatory record of the proceedings. An exact
reference should be given to any text discussed, but these need not
be reproduced. The texts of amendments to Conference documents
which are agreed upon should be quoted in full together with their
reference number.
(p. 3) The result of action taken on resolutions, amendments,
et cetera, should in general be noted as approved or rejected with­
out a recording of the votes. In case a record vote is required, the
following sample form should be used:
Vote on amendment 1: 40— 3. Adopted
Vote on resolution 8: 13— 30. Rejected
All decisions should be underlined, with a view to facilitating
ready reference to the minutes.
The minutes will not be approved by the Committee as a whole,
but should be cleared by the Committee Chairman. They will also
be approved by the Secretary of the Commission and by the Assist­
ant Secretary General or the Technical Secretary General. They
will be considered as approved unless correction or objection is
made within twenty-four hours after the mimeographed docu­
ments are distributed. Corrections to . minutes, unless specially
urgent and important, need not be duplicated for separate dis­
tribution, but should be reserved until several can be grouped to­
gether and given in an appendix to the minutes of a later sitting.
Any corrections in the minutes should be signed by the Chairman
and the person within the Technical Secretariat responsible for
the coordination of Committee reports. (Minutes or reports which




APPENDIX I

1143

cannot be limited to a few pages should, if possible, be dictated in
sections to stenographers relieving each other, so that the tran­
scriptions may be completed as soon as possible.)
After approval by the Chairman of the Committee or Commis­
sion and by the Office of the Secretariat, the minutes will be trans­
mitted to the Archivist for classification and registration after
which they will be submitted to the Editor (Room 59), who will
review the document from the standpoint of style and form. The
minutes, like all other Conference documents, must be registered
with the Archivist (room 9) before they can be accepted by the
stenographic pool for stenciling, duplication and distribution. (See
memorandum on Documents.)
Stenographic Report or Notes
The Secretaries of the Committees and Commissions undoubt­
edly will wish to arrange for a stenographer to be present at the
meetings to take notes (not a verbatim record) on the proceed­
ings of principal interest. The stenographic notes should be of
assistance in drafting the reports referred to above and moreover
should be useful to the Technical Secretary in refreshing his mem­
ory on details not sufficiently important to warrant incorporation
in the resumes. These stenographic notes should be preserved and
at the conclusion of the Conference should be transmitted to the
Secretary General for incorporation in the archives.
(p. 4)
Statements for the Press
The Chief Press Relations Officer will prescribe the nature and
form of the material which he will require in preparing press re­
leases. These specifications will be communicated later.
In past conferences it has often been found advisable for the
Committee Secretary to have on hand a supply of the minutes of
the previous meeting since many of the delegates forget to bring
their own copies.
Conference Secretariat, Division of International Conferences, Department of State, June 26,
1944.

Document 5
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Documents
Numbering Procedure
The Archivist will place a symbol in the upper right hand comer




1144

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

of the first page, indicating the series of the particular document
and its consecutive number in that series. For example, the symbol
I/2/M3 indicates the minutes of the third meeting of Committee 2
of Commission I. This simple symbol may, of course, be added by
the Committee secretary but will be checked by the Archivist who
will also add a consecutive document number at the bottom of the
page. The figure 283 in the lower left hand corner of the first page
of the above document, for instance, would indicate that this is
the 283rd consecutive document duplicated for Conference pur­
poses. A re-run of the document should bear exactly the same num­
ber and symbol. If document 283 is the second revision of an
earlier report, the number in the lower corner would be given as
283 (219) (147) and so on.
Classification
In general, documentation will be classified under the following
principal categories or series:
M — Minutes
R —Resolutions
RP— Reports
GD— General Documents
A —Agenda

PR— Press Releases
DP—Delegation proposals
SM— Secretariat Staff Memo
SN— Secretariat notices

(A new symbol series will be added if new categories present them­
selves.)
The Chief of Stenographic Services has orders not to cut sten­
cils for any report until a document number has been assigned and
a record made by the Archivist. All documentation intended for
distribution to members of the Conference must be cleared through
the office of the Archivist (Room 9).
For example, the Agenda of each committee, resolutions pro­
posed and reports prepared, etc., shall all be assigned both series
and consecutive numbers. A resolution of Committee 4 of Com­
mission II would be numbered II/4/R1 while an agenda would be
II/4/A2. The classification of documents is the responsibility of
the Archivist and no one shall start a new series without the con­
firmation of that office. In case of doubt, the latter will consult the
Office of the Secretary General or the Technical Secretary Gen­
eral.
Members of the country delegations who wish to have reports
of reasonable length duplicated may do so through the Committee
secretaries. However, the question of priorities and whether the
subject matter is of sufficient interest to other members of the
Conference, shall if necessary, be referred to the Assistant Secre­
tary General or the Technical Secretary General for decision.




APPENDIX I

1145

(p. 2) Reports of general interest and other requests for dupli­
cated material which the country delegate may not wish to handle
through any one Committee secretary may be taken directly to
the Archivist who, in case of doubt, may refer the matter to the
Secretary General, the Technical Secretary General, or the Assist­
ant Secretary General.
Originals of Conference Documents
All originals are considered Conference documents and will be
returned to the Archivist from the Stenographic Pool after the
stencil has been cut. They may be charged out by the Committee
secretaries but must be returned before the Conference ends.
Instruction Form
There is attached a copy of a standard form indicating priority,
number of copies desired, et cetera, which should be executed and
stapled as the cover for each set of minutes. A reference to the
time of the next meeting should be included, if possible at the end
of the minutes of each Committee meeting, preferably in the form
suggested for the Committee Notice.
Conference Secretariat, Division of International Conferences, Department of State, June 26, 1944
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Document Registration and Order Form

Date-------------------Routine
Urgent
Deliver by-----------S u b je c t

op

S u b m it t e d

D o c u m e n t ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------by

:

Commission I, Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (Circle Committee No.)
Commission II, Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (Circle Committee No.)
Commission III
Other---------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------Name---------------------------------------------------- of Official transmitting documents:
To B e D i s t r i b u t e d t o :
1. All Delegations
Full Distribution
2. Committee Secretary, Room-----------No. of Copies-------------------3. Members of the Secretariat
No. of Copies-------------------4. O ther:----------------------------------------No. of Copies-------------------TIME RECORD
(To be filled in by respective units)
In

Document registration
Stenographic pool
Duplicating Section
Assembly unit
Document distribution

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Out

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

This order form must not be detached from accompanying document




1146

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE
Document 5 1 2
/

UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Mounf Washington Hotel
Bretfon Woods, New Hampshire

Regulations and Special Arrangements Covering
International Cable, Radio, and Telephone
Communication Facilities
For the convenience of the delegations and in order to facili­
tate and expedite as much as possible their international com­
munications, certain special arrangements have been made by the
Secretariat. These arrangements will extend privileges to desig­
nated official communications in accordance with the procedure
outlined below. Personal messages will be accepted by the com­
munications company in the usual manner, and it is understood,
of course, that such personal communications will be subject to
the usual wartime regulations. In the case of personal telephone
calls, it is suggested that the delegates take care to identify them­
selves clearly to the operators.
Messages en clair which relate to the official business of the
delegations are permitted in the native language of the respective
countries or in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish. The
delegations may also use secret cipher or code in communicating
with their respective governments, on the explicit understanding
that such messages will be confined to the business of the Con­
ference and will be despatched under certain safeguards designed
adequately to protect the interests and security of all concerned.
All official messages sent by the delegations will be signed by
one member of the delegation only, whose specimen signature is on
file with the Secretariat. It will be incumbent upon each Chief of
Mission or principal representative accredited to the Government
of the United States in Washington to designate one person to sign
outgoing official messages for the delegation of his country. This
person may be either a member of the staff of the Mission in
Washington who is already authorized to sign outgoing messages
in secret cipher and code as a designee of the Chief of Mission
or principal representative under the already existing censorship
regulations or, alternatively, may be the chairman of the delega­
tion or a senior delegate, provided such chairman or senior dele­
gate is specifically designated to the Secretary General for this
particular purpose. Specimen signatures of the delegation member
authorized to sign outgoing messages in secret cipher or code will




APPE NDIX I

1147

be obtained by the Conference Secretariat at the time identification
cards are issued to the members of the delegations.
The authenticity of signatures appearing on outgoing official
messages will be certified by the Secretary for Transportation and
Special Services of the Secretariat; messages should be presented
at his office in the headquarters hotel for counter-signature. Mes­
sages properly counter-signed will be accepted by the communica­
tions company branch located in the headquarters hotel and will
be accorded privileged and expedited transmission.
(p. 2) With regard to official international telephone calls of
the delegations to their respective governments from the premises
of the headquarters Hotel, such communications should be made in
English, French, Portuguese or Spanish and, in case privileged
treatment is desired, only by a person specifically designated to
the Conference Secretariat for this purpose. Unless otherwise indi­
cated, it will be assumed that this person is identical with the one
designated to sign cables.
While it is the desire of the authorities that every courtesy be
extended, the delegations are reminded that no information of use
to the enemy should be transmitted in any communication which
the enemy may successfully intercept. It is absolutely essential to
the security of the United Nations and the nations associated with
them in this war that the utmost caution be exercised in interna­
tional communications at this time, and the Government of the
United States is confident that the necessity for extreme care is
fully appreciated by the governments and authorities represented
at the Conference.
Conference Secretariat, Division of International Conferences, Department of State, June 26,
1944.

2. Press Releases
Document 9
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 1, 1944
N o . 11

This Conference is the culmination of two years of consultation
and conference between technical experts of over two-score Allied
1 Press Release 2 (Doc. 10) of July 1, 1944, has been omitted here because
its contents (a message from President Franklin D. Roosevelt) appear in
Doc. 40, vol. I, p. 70.




1148

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

Nations to organize a vital phase of post-war peace and economic
stability. During the next two or three weeks we hope to prepare
a plan and text for the consideration of the governments and
peoples of the world which will contribute solidly to world trade
and prosperity.
The Conference is the third general gathering of all forty-five of
the United Nations and Associated Nations. The first on Food and
Agriculture at Hot Springs, Virginia set out to improve the
world’s food supply and nutritional standards; the second on
Relief and Rehabilitation at Atlantic City, New Jersey, provided
cooperative assistance in meeting the immediate post-war prob­
lems of relief. We are here seeking to organize various phases
of the peace even as the fighting is going on, in order to be ready for
the earliest possible reconstruction of the world's shattered econ­
omy immediately after we have secured unconditional surrender.
The United States is proud to be host to the Conference, which
has brought together sixteen Ministers of Finance, many Directors
of Central Banks, and numerous other world authorities. The
Treasury is particularly happy to have this part in the general
plans for the organization of world peace and security which are
being so wisely and so progressively laid down by Secretary of
State Cordell Hull.
The purpose of the Conference is very simple wholly within
the American tradition, and completely outside political considera­
tions. The United States wants, after this war, full utilization of
its industries, its factories and its farms; full and steady employ­
ment for its citizens, particularly its ex-servicemen; and full
prosperity and peace. It can have them only in a world with a
vigorous trade. But it can have such trade only if currencies are
stable, if money keeps its value, and if people can buy and sell
with the certainty that the money they receive on due date will
have the value contracted for—hence the first proposal, the Sta­
bilization Fund. With values secured and held stable, it is next
desirable to promote world-wide reconstruction, revive normal
trade, and make funds available for sound enterprises, all of
which will in turn call for American products— hence the second
proposal for the Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
We are here to find the answers to these problems and to recon­
cile the reasonable differences which are always present in matters
of such complexity. I am sure we will do so.




APPENDIX I

1149

Document 12
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

July 1, 1944

For the Press

No.31

Program for the Inaugural Plenary Session
Assembly Hall, 8:00 p.m., July 1, 1944

1. Convening of the Conference by the Secretary General.
2. Message from the President of the United States.
3. Responses on behalf of the visiting delegations by the fol­
lowing :
Address by the Chairman of the Delegation of China, the
Honorable Hsiang-Hsi Kung.
Address by the Chairman of the Delegation of Czechoslo­
vakia, the Honorable Ladislav Feierabend.
4. Appointment by the Temporary President of the Members of
the following committees:
Committee on Credentials
Committee on Rules and Regulations
Committee on Nominations
5. Address by the Chairman of the Delegation of Mexico, the
Honorable Eduardo Suarez
6. Address by the Chairman of the Delegation of Brazil, the
Honorable Arthur de Souza Costa
7. Address by the Chairman of the Delegation of Canada, the
Honorable J. L. Ilsley
8. Address by the Chairman of the Delegation of the Union of
Soviet Socialist Republics, the Honorable M. S. Stepanov.
9. Election of the Permanent President of the Conference.
10. Address by the Permanent President.
11. Adjournment.
12. “ The Star-Spangled Banner” .
1 Press Releases 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 (Docs. 16, 15, 17, 18, 19, and 24) of
July 1, 1944, have been omitted here because their contents appear in Doc.
40, vol. I, as follows:
Response to President Roosevelt’s message, by Hsiang-Hsi Kung, of China,
p. 71; response to the Presidents message, by Ladislav Feierabend, of Czecho­
slovakia, p. 73; address by Eduardo Suarez, of Mexico, p. 75; address by
Arthur de Souza Costa, of Brazil, p. 76; address by J. L. Ilsley, of Canada,
p. 77; and address by M. S. Stepanov, of the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics, p. 78.




1150

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE
Document 29

UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

July 2, 1944
No. 70

For the Press

Message from Secretary of State Cordell Hull to the Honorable
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Chairman of the United States Dele­
gation :
June 29, 19UU
My

dear

Henry :

I am very glad that the President has selected you as Chairman
of the delegation of this Government to the United Nations Mon­
etary and Financial Conference, to be held at Bretton Woods,
New Hampshire, beginning July 1, 1944.
Your position in national and world affairs as well as your
conscientious and diligent efforts in preparation for this meeting
make you the natural choice to head our delegation.
This forthcoming Conference will be one of the most important
and historic international meetings and the successful accomplish­
ment of your mission will have far-reaching effect upon the future
reconstruction and rehabilitation of the world. You can rest
assured that my colleagues and I will be most happy to extend
to you and the other members of the delegation every possible
assistance.
I wish you the greatest success in this difficult and responsible
undertaking.
Sincerely yours,
C ordell H u ll

Document 37
UNI TED

S T AT E S

[NATIONS]

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 2, 1944

No.111

Statement by Senator Robert F. Wagner,
Delegate of the United States
I have a message of hope and promise for the peace loving
nations.
1 Press Release 12 (Doc. 44) of July 2, 1944, has been omitted here because
its contents (an address by U. S. Senator Charles W. Tobey) appears in
Doc. 63, vol. I, p. 109.




APPENDIX I

1151

I am speaking from Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, where
several hundred able, hard-working men and women from fortyfive countries have gathered together to make plans for the future
of the free world. At the invitation of the President of the United
States these representatives have come by air and by sea from
the far corners of the globe. They have brought with them a
spirit of goodwill and cooperation. They are determined to create
a prosperous and orderly postwar economy in which everyone
will have an opportunity to earn for himself the necessary com­
forts of life. And they are determined that the ties we have
made in this war will continue through the peace.
In recent months the United Nations have given the greatest
demonstration of unified military cooperation ever attempted in
history. They have sent military forces to battlefields all around
the world wherever the enemy could be hunted out. Now they are
showing the same kind of unity in bringing in to a single center
the leaders necessary to reconstruct the world after the present
crisis and give it some hope of continued prosperity and employ­
ment.
Here in Bretton Woods the mass and power of forty-five nations
are concentrating to meet the colossal financial and monetary prob­
lems that will follow this war. They are seeking to make it possible
for factories and farms to convert immediately from war to
peace effort, to keep their present output at a high level, to provide
employment for the millions of men returning home and to as­
semble the means for reconstructing the ravages of war.
The Bretton Woods Conference has only begun, but the tech­
nicians of these forty-five nations are in substantial agreement on
basic plans for monetary stabilization. They all recognize the
great need for international cooperation on economic and mon­
etary problems, because they know this cooperation is vital to
the expansion of world trade; and they know that the cooperative
expansion of world trade is necessary if we are to have prosperity
and full employment.
I have talked to many of the delegates from many of the nations.
I can say with confidence that we are going to succeed in our
purpose here at Bretton Woods. And when we do, we will have
demonstrated (p. 2) once again how very wrong the Axis na­
tions are, how false is the Fascist doctrine that world order can
come out of any system based on aggression and military regi­




1152

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

mentation. The plain fact is that only mutual cooperation such
as we are demonstrating in this Conference of forty-five nations
can create and maintain the kind of order that we mean to have
for our children to enjoy.

Document 48
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

July 3, 1944
No. 7 3

For the Press

At the First Session of Commission II— Bank for Reconstruction
and Development— there was appointed an “ Agenda Committee
for Commission II” with the following members:
United Kingdom, Chairman Czechoslovakia
Brazil
France
Canada
India
China
Union of Soviet Socialist
Cuba
Republics
United States
At the First Session of Commission III— Other Means of Inter­
national Financial Cooperation—there was appointed an “ Agenda
Committee for Commission III” with the following members:
Poland, Chairman
Netherlands, Reporter
Uruguay
Chile
Ethiopia

Document 49
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 3, 1944
No. 14

Remarks by the Honorable Eduardo Suarez, Chairman
of Commission III, at First Session.
a n d M e m b e r s of C o m m is s io n I I I :
As I call this meeting to order, I feel that I should take this

F e llo w D elegates




APPENDIX I

1153

opportunity to say a few words about the importance and scope
of the work of this Commission.
As we know, we have come together at this Conference to con­
sider two definite proposals for dealing with some of our most
fundamental problems. The first is the proposal for the establish­
ment of an International Monetary Fund which has as one of its
primary objectives the assurance of a pattern of stable and orderly
exchange rates that will make possible the expansion of Inter­
national Trade and the maintenance of a high level of employ­
ment and business activity. The second is the proposal for the
Bank of Reconstruction and Development for the purpose of
encouraging sound international investment, thus contributing
to economic reconstruction and development. Commissions I and
II, respectively, have been established for dealing with these
two specific proposals. This Commission will consider and make
recommendations relative to “ Other means of international mone­
tary and financial cooperation.”
I assume that it is not necessary for me to stress to the mem­
bers of this group the importance of the cooperative and united
approach to the important international financial problems with
which we are confronted. As members of the United Nations, we
accept as a basic premise the desirability of working together to
solve our common problems.
Unlike the other Commissions, Commission III is not dealing
with specific proposals which have been the subject of extended
joint consultations and study by the technical representatives of
various nations. Although at this early stage we cannot foresee
the character and disposition of our recommendations, it is not
impossible that some of them may influence the recommendations
approved by the other Commissions.
Without seeming to place undue limitations upon the range of
subjects to be considered, I feel that our time will be most profit­
ably employed if we restrict ourselves to problems predominantly
financial and monetary, and international in scope. For instance,
it has been suggested that there should be some international
agreement with respect to the status of earmarked gold. Some
delegations have privately expressed their concern over the fluc­
tuations in international price levels to the extent that they are
important to international exchange stability. Concern has also
been expressed about the international monetary functions of
silver, for it is felt that the habits and needs of the peoples who
continue to use it have not been thoroughly considered and
appraised.




1154

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CO NF E REN CE

(p* 2) I am not sure that there has been ample opportunity for
members to bring before this group their suggestions as to prob­
lems which might profitably be considered. It may hence be de­
sirable before appointing committees to consider any specific
problems to make arrangements for the purpose of receiving sug­
gestions which may be appropriately considered in the Co; imission.

Document 65
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 4, 1944
N o . 15

Statement by Dr. H. H. Kung, Chairman of
the Delegation of China
China’s resistance to Japan’s drive for world domination started
seven years ago. China fought single-handed for more than four
years before the Allied Nations joined the war against Japan.
China had to devote to the common effort all the resources that
it had accumulated and could produce. As the war extended, the
enemy occupied many of China’s richest provinces and centers
of production— destroying and looting as they went. As a result
of the suffering and sacrifice for the common cause, China today
faces difficulties which are greater than many can imagine.
Destruction and looting by the enemy, together with the block­
ade which has been tightened more and more since outbreak of
the Pacific War, have progressively reduced the supply of essen­
tial goods. Also, internal transport has continually deteriorated,
both from shortage of transport equipment and gasoline and from
enemy occupation of important railroads, rivers and roads.
In wartime no country can avoid inflation. Considering that
the seventh year of the war is now drawing to a close, this
deterioration has not been as great as most of us have feared.
It has not gone as rapidly as the currency de erioration in some
of the European countries twenty-five years ago at the time of
the First World War. The sacrifice of the currency has been only
one of the sacrifices which China has had to make. Inflation can
best be combatted by large import of goods.
China has been doing its best to maintain taxation, and I am
somewhat surprised that the extent of taxation in China is not




APPE NDI X I

1155

more fully realized abroad. The 1944 budget estimates figure the
return from current tax revenue at 52 percent of total expendi­
tures. It is uncertain whether this can be realized, especially be­
cause recent military operations have materially cut into revenue
—for example, in Honan Province, recent military operations have
cut revenue from tobacco production by 200 million Yuan monthly.
Taking account of the value of the land tax collected in kind, the
tax revenue in 1943 exceeded 40 percent of expenditures, which
compares favorably with that in other allied countries. The diffi­
culty, however, is that with leading producing areas occupied,
and in view of the small surplus available to the average person
in China, it has not been practical to sell war bonds directly to the
public to as great an extent as the Government would have
wished. Consequently the Government inevitably had to rely
largely on borrowing from banking institutions, which made un­
avoidable the increase of purchasing power and contributed to
the rise of prices.
(p. 2) The presenjt price movement in China is uneven. Im­
ported articles are much higher than native products; and within
the country prices of rice and other necessities vary considerably
because goods that are plentiful in some regions cannot be moved
readily to centers of consumption. Recent telegraphic reports
state that the crop situation in West China is excellent, and-that
prices have shoWn some reaction after the recent rapid increase.
In the last three" or four years it has been normal for prices to
rise more rapidly than usual in the Spring of the year, especially
because surplus ‘crops cannot be adequately distributed in the
period of short supply prior to the new harvest.
With regard to exchange, it is recognized that wartime con­
ditions are abnormal and true values are hard to determine for
any currency. The Chinese Government has considered it neces­
sary to maintain the official value of its currency, as part of the
program of sustaining the war effort. A change under present
conditions would 'hurt confidence and undoubtedly aggravate the
price rise. The eventual adjustment cannot now be forecast. The
Chinese Government realizes the difficulties entailed for foreign­
ers in view of risftg prices, and has been giving them an exchange
supplement.
^
In order to sustain the currency as far as conditions permitted,
the Chinese Government has always attached importance to main­
taining proper currency reserves. The credits given by the Ameri­
can and British Governments, and particularly the large credits
granted following, the outbreak of the Pacific War, have been
795841— 48— 8




1156

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCf e

very helpful for that purpose. China already has paid off some of
the wartime credits, including the 1938 wood-oil credit of $25,000,000 and the 1941 American and British stabilization credits of
$50,000,000 and £5,000,000 respectively.
Notwithstanding the further strain which will have to be faced,
China as one of the victorious powers will emerge from the war
with a much better prospect of restoring its monetary system
than was the case after the inflations in Europe twenty-five years
ago.
As to China’s interest in silver, the Chinese Government intends
to follow along with the other United Nations with regard to
monetary standards. China has had a managed currency since
1935, which was exceptionally stable until dislocated as a result
of Japanese aggression. The Chinese Government intends, in the
reconstruction of its currency system, to make use of silver
together with nickel and copper for subsidiary coins.
China is looking forward to a period of great economic develop­
ment and expansion after the war. This includes a large-scale
program of industrialization, besides the development and mod­
ernization of agriculture. It is my firm conviction that an economi­
cally strong China is an indispensable condition to the maintenance
of peace and the improvement of well-being of the world. The
China market has long been a dream which, I believe, will come
true after the war when the purchasing power of “ 400 million
customers” is increased.
(p. 3) After the first World War, Dr. Sun Yat-Sen proposed a
plan for what he termed “ the international development of China” .
He emphasized the principle of cooperation with friendly nations
and the utilization of foreign capital for the development of
China’s resources. Dr. Sun's teachings constitute the basis of
China’s national policy.
America and others of the United Nations, I hope, will take an
active part in aiding in the post-war development of China. China
will give protection to foreign investments. As to American par­
ticipation, China looks forward to a long period of happy asso­
ciation and mutual assistance between the two sister republics
across the Pacific. China will welcome American tools and ma­
chines, American capital, American engineering and technical
services.
I am confident that the delegates to the International Monetary
and Financial Conference will reach agreement. That is why we
have come here. Clearly it is in everybody’s interest to make the
Conference a success.




APPE NDI X I

1157

Document 135
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 5, 1944
No. 16

Statement by the Delegation of Mexico
The Mexican Delegation has already submitted to the Interna­
tional Monetary and Financial Conference one of the proposals
it has prepared in connection with the international monetary use
of silver.
If that proposal were adopted by the Conference, it would mean
that silver hoarding member countries would have additional
credit facilities from the Fund, so that those countries would not
need to melt their silver coins and sell their silver as bullion each
time their balance of payments becomes unfavorable and they need
additional foreign exchange to support the parity of their curren­
cies.
It is a well-known fact that the silver-hoarding peoples of the
world absorb large quantities of costly silver coins when their
national income is increasing, and return them to the Central
Bank when they have to draw on their hoardings in bad times.
This monetary phenomenon simply means that the Central Bank
has to invest heavily in silver during the upward swing when
that metal is normally higher in price, and it is compelled to cash
it in the foreign markets during the downward swing, when silver
is depreciated. Thus, the Central Bank of those countries loses
not only the difference between the buying and selling price, but
also the recurrent minting and melting costs.
The Mexican Delegation sponsors this proposal on the ground
that silver-hoarding countries must have two monetary reserves:
one in gold and gold-convertible currencies sufficient to maintain
the parity of their currencies, and lan additional one to satisfy
the heavy hoarding requirements of their nationals. Of course,
other countries are not in this disadvantageous position, for they
use silver only as token money in proportionately very small
quantities, as compared to the total of their respective currencies.
The Mexican Delegation feels certain that the Conference will
accord this proposal due consideration.




1158

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE
Document 136

UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 5, 1944
No. 77

Statement by the Delegation of Uruguay
The United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference con­
stitutes a decisive step toward the achievement through inter­
national cooperation of certain basic objectives of economic secur­
ity for which the free nations of the world fight today,
To attain a stable world economy during the post war period,
with high and increasing levels of real income and employment,
a free and substantial interchange of goods, services, and capital
are essential.
Among the purposes of this Conference is the establishment
of conditions which will make this possible. It is inconceivable—
and the experience of the thirties proves it—that these objectives
could be reached without a stable and flexible monetary standard.
Stability implies avoidance of certain devaluations and dis­
criminatory treatment in foreign exchange, carried out without
rhyme or reason to the prejudice of all countries. Flexibility im­
plies recuperation and equilibrium, for both short and long term,
of the balances in current account without too drastic readjust­
ments in domestic price structures. It likewise implies that an
effort will be made so that conditions of booms and depressions
in the various countries will not lead them to bidding against
each other for export markets and to limiting their imports of
commodities.
The proposals submitted to the consideration of the repre­
sentatives of the 45 United and Associated Nations have the
above-mentioned requirements in mind and at the same time take
into account the arrangements necessary for the transition
period.
There is no doubt that this will necessitate a gradual elimina­
tion of controls of all kinds, specially in the monetary field, which
controls it was found necessary to establish during the thirties
and for which the need became acute as a result of the war.
Our country has always adhered to the principles upon which
these considerations are based.
In signing a trade agreement with the United States in 1942
the Government of Uruguay ratified the policy of seeking a sound
multilateral interchange among nations and of eliminating as far




APPENDIX I

1159

as possible discriminatory treatment in the monetary as well as
in all other fields.
This is the spirit which animates the Delegation of Uruguay
to this Conference. It is confident that an agreement will be
reached which will facilitate the stability of the various currencies,
increase trade and bring about an equilibrium in the balance of
payments without drastic readjustments which may reduce in­
come and employment. The
(p. 2) Delegation hopes that by
means of such an agreement as well as to the one relating to the
re-establishment of international long term credit and other
supplementary measures of international cooperation, Uruguay
will be able to maintain its economy free from those violent
fluctuations which characterize the economy of a young country
easily affected by variations in its foreign trade as well as by the
movement of capital.
It likewise hopes that through a wide market for its exports
it will be able to develop and diversify its economic structure
and thus make a contribution to the new international organiza­
tion, for which the United and Associated Nations are fighting,
as a solid basis for a stable peace.

Document 185
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

July 7, 1944
No. 19

For the Press

Bond Wagon Tour
New Hampshire’s Invasion Bond Wagon, which has been tour­
ing the State selling Fifth War Loan bonds, will pay a visit to the
United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference Saturday
morning, July 8. The party will arrive about 9 a.m.
The caravan of Army vehicles carrying war front exhibits
is in the Bretton Woods area, and New Hampshire War Finance
Committee officials thought the delegates to the conference might
be interested in a demonstration of one of the methods being
used in the United States to raise funds to finance the prosecution
of the war. There will be no solicitation of subscriptions at the
Conference.
Navy Chief Petty Officer William Leary is in charge of the
Bond Wagon. Sergeant Armand Deaudoin, injured veteran of the




1160

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

North African campaign, has been the principal bond salesman
of the tour, speaking at numerous bond rallies throughout the
State. Sergeant Deaudoin has been decorated by the United States
and by the Free French for heroic rescue work in an ammunition
explosion disaster in which he received severe injuries.
New Hampshire has as its goal sale of enough E bonds to
finance construction of a destroyer to be named the U.S.S. Frank
Knox, after the late Secretary of the Navy, whose home was
Manchester. The State has voluntarily boosted its goal for E bond
sales to $10,000,000, from an original $8,000,000 allotment. The
State’s total goal for Fifth War Loan bond sales is $40,000,000,
which officials expect to be exceeded. R. A. Soderlund of Man­
chester is State chairman.
Among the exhibits accompanying the Bond Wagon is a float
from a Japanese Zero shot down in the Pacific area. .

Document 188
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 7, 1944
No. 20

Statement by Dr. J. E. Holloway, Delegate of
The Union of South Africa
I must crave the indulgence of this Committee, composed as it
is of experts to whom the matters to which I am going to devote
myself are matters of common knowledge, for dealing with facts
well known to its members. My sole object is to bring into the
focus of consciousness the background against the problem of the
machinery through which the Fund will operate.
It is the more necessary to sketch this background, even to such
a distinguished company of experts, because the Monetary Fund
approach to the problem, which we are trying to solve, is the
only one which offers a hope for an orderly change of the relation­
ship between gold and currencies in the future. I would remind
you of the experience we went through when the last phase of the
breakdown of the gold standard set in in 1931. We were so accus­
tomed to the traditional stability of the relationship between
gold and currency that many of us hesitated for a lengthy period




APPE NDI X I

1161

before we could bring ourselves to discard that precious possession
—to recapture part of which we are now devoting much thought
in this Conference. I refer not only to my own country. I refer
to the United States of America. I refer to the gold bloc in
Europe. It took us five years to accomplish that change, for the
orderly accomplishment of which, if the need should again arise,
we are now trying to fashion machinery. Those five years were
years of trial and error, of overshooting the mark here, of under­
estimating our troubles there. It ushered in that period of com­
petitive exchange depreciation, that beggar-my-neighbor policy,
which cost the world so dear. We hope to do better next time.
I believe, Mr. Chairman, that we are entering into a period in
which we cannot, even when we have achieved a measure of ex­
change stability, hope to have that continue for such a lengthy
period, as the period which ended in the early thirties.
I would remind you that during that period the economic system
possessed a high measure of flexibility. It was possible on that
account to adjust prices downward, and therefore to maintain a
rigid measure of value.
I do not want to sidetrack myself into a consideration of the
question whether the world would not be better served by a restora­
tion of that flexibility of the economic system. Those of our gen­
eration were nurtured in the schools of economics of Europe and
America in the belief that that flexibility served mankind well.
As a realist I recognize that we must face a world which has
moved into an era of greater rigidity of economic structure.
No longer can population by the million displaced from em­
ployment in Europe, obtain easy access decade after decade
to this great republic. That element of mobility and adjustment
which helped so materially to ease the unemployment problems of
Europe in the 19th century has lost most of its value.
(p. 2) We have, secondly, to reckon with a more rigid wage
structure. Wage legislation and industrial organization have lent
a greater fixity to the remuneration of labour than the worker of
the 19th century enjoyed. It is no longer possible to adjust wage
costs to a fixed standard of value.
In the third place the great integration of capital in the in­
dustrial structure—the investment of millions and even hundreds
of millions in integrated industrial plants—has further reduced
the capacity of the economic system to adjust its costs downwards
to fit into a fixed measure of value.
Yet some flexibility there must be. In a world of change we
cannot work an ossified economic system.




1162

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

It is for these reasons that it would appear essential to have
machinery by which we can adjust the measure of value from
time to time. I would go further and say that unless the world
can achieve this measure of flexibility, its forward march into the
future will proceed from crisis to crisis.
This Fund which we are trying to create will, for the first time
in history, make available the exact data by which such adjust­
ments can be accurately determined. The Fund will after it has
been running for a few years, collect together a body of data and
experience for this purpose.
The Fund’s own series of statistics for its gold holding will give
from month to month, from year to year, a chart of the physical
condition of the economic system. If those data show that the
gold holdings tend towards the upper limit, it will be prima facie
evidence that not much is wrong, and that the relationship be­
tween gold and commodities is reasonably satisfactory. If, on the
other hand, the gold tends regularly to flow away from the Fund,
it will be a pointer to the possibility that some change in its
value in relation to all currencies may have to be considered. The
Fund will have exact statistical data for all the world of a similar
kind to that which the Bank of England had for the United King­
dom in 1931 when the British Government had to make its fateful
decision.
I would also in passing point out that as long as South Africa
continues to play the role which it now does as gold producer, the
Fund will have at its disposal further data bearing on the relation­
ship in value between gold and commodities. It is true that the
Government of South Africa can by its policies influence that re­
lationship, but the influence which it can exert is a comparatively
small one in comparison with natural factors.
The circumstance I allude to is that gold mining in South Africa
has been reduced to a purely industrial basis, similar in very many
ways to factory production. The gold is scattered very thinly
through large bodies of rock and the amount that can be extracted
depends largely on cost of production. The discovery of rich new
fields has receded in importance. If, however, more gold is re­
quired, a rise in price brings within the margin of payability large
bodies of low grade ore. It will perhaps assist to illustrate how
closely (p. 3) the production follows the price if I point out
that Johannesburg is 5700 feet above sea level, that a large number
of mines are working well below sea-level and that the amount of
gold extracted from one ton of ore brought up from the bowels of
the earth to Johannesburg and finely crushed, is appreciably less




APPENDIX I

1163

than the weight of an American quarter-dollar, and yet it pays.
The mining industry on the Rand therefore gives a further in­
dex to the correctnesss of the relationship between gold and com­
modities. A disturbance of the relationship in favour of commodi­
ties immediately depresses below the level of payability millions
of tons of the world's gold-bearing ore.
With these indices to guide it as to the proper relationship be­
tween gold and the currencies of the world, with the need to have
greater flexibility in the measure of value to make up for the
greater rigidity in the economic structure, the Fund will be in a
position to measure the strains and stresses, much as an engineer
does, when it comes to consider a general and orderly change in
parities.
As the representative of the United States of America (Mr.
Brown) has said, such a change should not be lightly made. Strong
sanctions are therefore necessary to ensure that there is general
agreement, based on accurate evaluation of the information which
for the first time in the history of the world, will become
available when the Fund is properly under weigh. On the other
hand, as I have tried to indicate, the Fund should not hesitate to
make a change when the diagnosis which it can make on its avail­
able data, shows that such a change is necessary for the economic
health of the world.

Document 190(184)
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 7, 1944
No. 18

Address by Dr. H. H. Kung, Chairman of the
Delegation of China
I am deeply touched by the presence of the representatives of
the United Nations at this meeting to cbmmemorate the begin­
ning of the eighth year of China’s resistance against Japanese
aggression. I wish to express our appreciation to the Secretariat
of the Conference for calling this meeting which I regard as a
further expression of the solidarity of the United Nations.
Although the first shots of war were fired at the Marco Polo
Bridge on July 7, 1937, this global conflict actually began as far
back as thirteen years ago, in 1931, when Japan invaded




1164

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Manchuria with impunity. The breakdown of collective security
encouraged the aggressors and brought about this world-wide
conflict. It is well known today that Japan’s blueprint for world
conquest sets forth the scheme for the conquest of China as the
prelude to the conquest of the world and it sets forth the specific
steps for the occupation of the South Seas and war against the
United States and the British Empire. This scheme was carried
out step by step in the early months of the Pacific War. Thus
the fall of Manchuria led to the attack at Marco Polo Bridge
which, in turn, prepared the way for the outrageous attacks on
Pearl Harbor and Singapore.
Thus, the events of the past seven years have fully borne out
the insatiability of the Axis greedinesss which has spread havoc,
death and devastation to all corners of the earth. Awakened to
this common peril, the progressive forces of the world, under
the brilliant and sagacious leadership of such statesmen as Presi­
dent Roosevelt, Premier Churchill, Marshal Stalin, and General­
issimo Chiang Kai-shek, have arrayed themselves together in a
supreme effort to stem the tide of aggression. Thanks to their
concerted effort, the days of the arch disturbers of peace are
numbered and final victory for the cause of freedom and justice
is assured.
With the advent of the eighth year in her record of war, China
has fought the longest in this titanic struggle. We have undergone
innumerable hardships and sustained tremendous sacrifices. But
the events of the past seven years show that we have not sacrificed
in vain. Despite inferior equipment and lack of preparedness,
our gallant soldiers have succeeded in bogging down vast numbers
of Japanese forces in various battle fronts in China. Thus we
have been able to prevent the Japanese from launching large-scale
operations against Australia, India and elsewhere. If the large
Japanese forces stationed in China were allowed, then, to run
amuck elsewhere, it would be difficult to imagine how the fortunes
of the war would have turned.
(p. 2) China’s strategic position in this global conflict should
not be underestimated, because China constitutes a most impor­
tant base from which to launch effective attacks against Japan.
I am sure you all recall with pride the bombings of Japan by the
Superfortresses, and you must be enthusiastic and happy over the
bombings of Sasebo and Yawata, which was just announced to­
day. These giant American bombers took off from airfields con­
structed by hundreds of thousands of patriotic Chinese laborers,
men and women, who worked with the simplest implements. This




APPE NDI X I

1165

is the reason why the Japanese are concentrating large forces
in China today and desperately fighting to secure a stronger hold
on China, and to destroy the air bases along the Canton-Hankow
and Hunan-Kwangsi railways. The courage, determination and
fighting ability of the Chinese troops have been proved time and
again in the fields of battle. It was recently demonstrated in the
jungles of Burma, where they shared hardship and glory with
American and British comrades. Our greatest handicap has been
the shortage of equipment. Once the Chinese army is equipped
with the proper weapons, its effectiveness will greatly be increased,
and together with its Allies, it will be able to launch a mighty on­
slaught against Japan. Then the Mikado’s war machine will crum­
ble just as Nazi’s much boasted fortress is crumbling and East
Asia, in cooperation with our Allies will be ready to establish
lasting peace and prosperity.
After seven years of fighting, we naturally hope that more
military supplies from our Allies, will be made available and that
we shall defeat Japan at the earliest possible moment. The suc­
cessful opening of the second front has certainly sealed the doom
of the Nazi forces. It is bound to hasten the conclusion of the war
in Europe and indirectly expedite the launching of an overwhelm­
ing offensive that will completely liquidate our enemy in the Pa­
cific. The mighty arms of the United States forces are already
reaching the enemy’s homewaters. Meanwhile the Chinese forces,
together with American and British comrades are making sub­
stantial gains in the struggle to reopen that vital link of communi­
cation, the Burma road. The quicker we can get supplies to China,
the sooner we shall achieve final victory.
Once victorious and peace again reigns, China will be able to
devote her national energies to economic reconstruction. We hope,
to carry out a vast program of industrialization, besides the de­
velopment and modernization of agriculture. Thus, through the
development of our resources along modern and scientific lines,
we plan to lay the economic foundations of a modern China not
in order to compete with other industrial countries of the world
but for the purpose of raising the standard of living of our people.
Higher standard of living means greater opportunities for trade.
In this gigantic task for the development of China, we welcome
modern equipment and technical assistance as well as capital in­
vestment from friendly countries. I wish to take this opportunity
to assure you that China will offer her foreign friends opportunity
for investment and provide protection for such investment. We
believe that in this way China will not only contribute to world




M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

1166

prosperity through the opening of new opportunities for trade but
she will also play an important part in helping to stabilize con­
ditions in the Far East and the world.
(p. 3) The precondition for all this, however, is enduring
peace. We all have paid heavily for this war against aggressors.
What price victory if it does not bring about an enduring peace?
For the purpose of establishing an enduring peace, we must
set up organizations of international collaboration to deal with
various international problems. This is the best way to remove
causes of international conflict. I have always believed that world
collaboration is the basis of world security. The more we can
work together for the settlement of our common problems, the
less danger there is for us to disagree.
It is from this bigger viewpoint of world security that I am so
anxious for this Conference and similar conferences to succeed.
Ladies and Gentlemen, in order not to disappoint the soldiers,
sailors and fliers at the front and the countless war workers in
the rear whose sacrifices have made it possible for us to prepare
for peace, we must not fail. I, therefore, wish to take this oppor­
tunity to emphasize the importance of our responsibility. Because
we cannot afford to fail, we dare not fail. I am confident that we
will succeed.

Document 252
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 10, 19 44
N o . 21

Proposals by the Norwegian Delegation
Proposal concerning the liquidation of the Bank for Interna­
tional Settlements, submitted by the Norwegian Delegation:
Be i t R e s o l v e d that the United Nations Monetary and Fi­
nancial Conference recommends the liquidation of the Bank for
International Settlement at Basel. It is suggested that the liqui­
dation shall begin at the earliest possible date, and that the Gov­
ernments of the United Nations now at war with Germany, ap­
point a Commission of Investigation, in order to examine the
management and transactions of the bank during the present war.
Proposal concerning the use of members’ gold contribution to
the Fund as coverage for.note issuance, submitted by the Nor­
wegian Delegation:




APPENDIX I

1167

Member States whose note issue, according to their monetary
legislation, bears some relation to the holdings of gold and/or gold
convertible exchange of their central bank or some other institu­
tion, are advised to allow their gold contribution to the Fund to
be regarded as part of the gold coverage of the note issue.
Member States possessing rules limiting their note issue, are
advised to regard notes held by the Fund as additional fiduciary
money, which should not be included in the amount of notes
bearing any required relation to prescribed legal coverage.
Proposal concerning a political prerequisite for admission of
Germany and Japan to membership of the Fund or Bank, sub­
mitted by the Norwegian Delegation:
Be it R e s o l v e d that the United Nations Monetary and Finan­
cial Conference is of the opinion that neither Germany nor Japan
should be admitted to membership of the United and Associated
Nations Monetary Fund or Bank for Reconstruction and Develop­
ment until the country in question has been admitted to the planned
Political World Organization.

Document 254
U N ! i ED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 10 1944
N o. 23

Proposal of the Bolivian Delegation to Commission III
W h e r e a s the full and efficient development of all countries is the
prerequisite of an expanding economy;
W h e r e a s a vastly increased purchasing power in the economic
areas over which the produce of the industrialized powers must
find its outlet is one of the fundamental elements of future pros­
perity and well-being;
W h e r e a s such an increased purchasing power can only be ob­
tained if the raw materials of countries importing finished products
can be sold abroad under conditions and at prices capable of
maintaining a high level of domestic productivity;
W h e r e a s the success and stability of such international mech­
anisms of economic cooperation, such as the Monetary Fund, will




1168

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

be further insured if supported by policies of international co­
operation in other fields of economic activity.
B e i t R e s o l v e d that the United Nations Monetary and Financial
Conference recommends the adoption by its members of the fol­
lowing principles in their international trade policies:
1.— Whenever contracts have been entered into covering the
purchase and delivery of certain materials supporting the economy
of the supplying country, the expiration of said contracts should
be a matter of mutual concern, and policies should be devised
to arrange for the orderly and gradual termination of those con­
tracts in a manner designed to avoid serious disruptions in the
economy of the supplying country;
2.— The development and use of synthetic products and of sub­
stitute materials should not be encouraged by the granting of
subsidies, or of any other protective fiscal policy such as high
import duties, et cetera. However, if materials of this type have
already been developed and are in use, all conditions being equal,
the natural product should always be preferred.
3.— Cooperation in the organization and implementation of In­
ternational Commodity Agreements designed to maintain fair and
stable prices, and provision for the orderly distribution of raw
materials throughout the world, whether or not a member country
is a party to any such Agreement.
4.— Abstention from— except under abnormal political, social
or economic circumstances— any form of trade barriers or dis­
criminatory practices, such as import or export quotas, high
tariffs, subsidies, et cetera.

Document 257
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

Fot the Press

July 10, 1944
No. 22

Statement on Behalf of the United States Delegation at
Meeting of Commission I
We are all cognizant of the importance of the problem of war­
time indebtedness so ably presented by the delegate of India. We
are confident that the problem can best be settled directly by the
countries concerned, however, and we doubt the advisability of
attempting this through the International Monetary Fund.




APPENDIX I

1169

We must be sure that the work of the Fund is not made more
difficult by burdening it with tasks which it cannot successfully
undertake. Recognition of this fundamental principle led the
technical experts to recommend that the International Monetary
Fund should not be used for purposes of relief or reconstruction
or for meeting indebtedness arising out of the war. The Fund
can contribute most effectively to the solution of international
monetary problems if it confines its work to the specialized tasks
for which it is designed.
While the International Monetary Fund cannot deal directly
with indebtedness arising out of the war, we are confident its
operations will facilitate the development of an environment of
orderly and stable exchanges free from restrictions that hamper
world trade— an environment in which the problem of wartime
indebtedness can be amicably settled by the countries directly con­
cerned.
The Fund can contribute a good deal in this way to the ultimate
solution of the problem of wartime indebtedness. It is all that
the Fund can be sure of doing. To ask more is to impose on the
Fund the danger of failing to perform the other and more specific
tasks for which it is intended and for which it is suited.
The United States Delegation expresses its sympathetic under­
standing of the importance of this problem to India. The United
States Delegation hopes that the alternatives proposed by the
Delegate of India will not be pressed. We are confident that the
problem of wartime indebtedness can best be settled directly by
the countries concerned in a spirit of mutual understanding.

Document 258
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 10, 1944
No. 24

Statement by Lord Keynes on Behalf of the Delegation of
the United Kingdom at Meeting of Commission I
Since the United Kingdom is the only country here represented
which has incurred large-scale war debts to her Allies and Associ­
ates also here present, these alternative amendments must be
assumed, as Mr. Shroff had indeed made clear, to relate primarily
to her.




1170

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

The various members of this alliance have suffered in mind,
body and estate from the effort and exhaustion of war in ways
differing in kind and in degree. These sacrifices cannot be weighed
one against the other. Those of us who were most directly threat­
ened and were nevertheless able to remain in the fight, such as
the U.S.S.R. and the United Kingdom, have fought this war on
the principle of unlimited liability and with a more reckless dis­
regard to economic consequences than others who were more
fortunately placed. We do not plead guilty to imprudence; for
in the larger field of human affairs nothing could have been less
prudent than hesitation or a careful counting of the cost.
But as a result there has been inevitably no equality of financial
sacrifice. In respect of overseas assets the end of the war will
find the United Kingdom greatly impoverished and others of the
United Nations considerably enriched at our expense. We make
no complaint of this provided that the resulting situation is ac­
cepted for what it is. On the contrary, we are grateful to those
Allies, particularly to our Indian friends, who put their resources
at our disposal without stint and themselves sulfered from priva­
tion as a result. Our effort would have been gravely, perhaps
critically, embarrassed if they had held back from helping us so
wholeheartedly and on so great a scale. We appreciate the mod­
erate, friendly and realistic statement of the problem which
Mr. Shroff has put before you today. Nevertheless the settlement
of these debts must be, in our clear and settled judgment, a matter
between those directly concerned. When the end is reached and we
can see our way into the daylight we shall take it up without any
delay, to settle honourably what was honourably and generously
given.
But we do not intend to ask assistance in this matter from the
International Monetary Fund— beyond the fact, as the American
Delegation has pointed out, that the existence of the Fund and
the general assistance it will give to the stability and expansion
of trade may be expected to improve indirectly our ability to meet
other obligations. We concur entirely in the view which has just
been expressed by the American Delegation that the Fund is not
intended to deal directly with war indebtedness.
Since we do not intend either to ask for, or to avail ourselves
of, any special treatment from the Fund, it appears to the United
Kingdom Delegation that this amendment could be of no practical
effect; and is therefore better discarded if misunderstanding is
to be avoided about the role which the Fund can expect to play.




APPENDIX I

1171

Document 259
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 10, 1944
No. 25

Statement by Mr. A. D. Shroff, Member of Indian
Delegation, at Meeting of the Commission I
Mr. Chairman, at the outset I should like to have your ruling
on one matter which would probably facilitate discussion and dis­
posal of this item. In Committee I of Commission I, we discussed
on two separate occasions Alternatives G and H. As the result
of these discussions, the Indian Delegation has tabled Alternative
K, which has not yet been discussed by Committee I. I suggest,
Sir, for your consideration that Alternative G, Alternative H and
Alternative K may all be discussed together.
I will now place before Commission I Alternative K tabled by
our Delegation which reads as follows: To facilitate the multi­
lateral settlement of a reasonable portion of the foreign credit
balances accumulated amongst the member countries during the
war so as to promote the purposes referred to in Sub-division 2,
without placing undue strain on the resources of the Fund.
At the time we discussed Alternatives G and H in Committee I,
two principal objections were raised. The delegate from the United
States opposed both of these alternatives on the ground that the
inclusion of this item will overload the Fund. From the very start
when we placed our alternative for consideration before this
Conference, we were absolutely clear in our minds and when I
spoke at one of the meetings of Committee I, I endeavored to clear
up that misunderstanding that we never intended the Interna­
tional Monetary Fund, when it was set up, to take over straight
away in one lump sum the entire accumulated credit balances dur­
ing the war. In explaining particularly the situation of India,
I also made it clear that considering the very close commercial
ties between the two countries, it is more than likely that a very
large proportion of the sterling balances we have accumulated in
London over a period of years will be used in buying goods of both
categories— consumer and capital goods from the United Kingdom.
At the same time, I pointed out that if we are going to be realists,
we must consider the actual situation in the United Kingdom
today and in the postwar period. I refer, for instance, to the un­
fortunate loss of valuable foreign investments by the United
795841— 48— 4




1172

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Kingdom and, I may add, the necessity today rehabilitation of
some of the industries of the United Kingdom and the necessity
of reducing at least some of the tremendous privations which
are being borne by the population of the United Kingdom during
the last four and a half years. All these factors will tend to reduce
the capacity of the United Kingdom to give us the goods which
we badly need. That being so, our position is this: Considering
the primary objective of the International Monetary Fund, namely,
the facilitation and expansion of international trade and, secondly,
a high level of employment and real income— we attach very great
importance to the definition of the primary objective— and taking
into consideration the inability of the United Kingdom at least
for a fairly long period from now onwards to meet the require­
ments of our capital (p. 2) goods, I submit to this Conference
that if a country situated as we are is to be enthusiastic for in­
ternational collaboration, then some means has to be devised by
which multilateral convertibility would be given at least to a cer­
tain proportion of the large balances we have accumulated in
London. I fail to understand the argument of the United States
delegate that the International Monetary Fund would be over­
loaded if this item was included among the purposes of the Fund.
We are here met at the instance of the sponsors of this Conference
to tackle a very big problem. I ask, are we realistic enough in
tackling this problem without adequate resources in the Fund?
There are billions of accumulated balances abroad,, As I said
in Committee I, are we not simultaneously with the establishment
of the Fund creating a sort of rival to the Fund? And I ask
whether it would be advisable to ignore the existence of these
balances? My answer to the delegation of the United States is
that you will not unduly overload the fund if you create machinery
for multilateral convertibility for a reasonable portion of these
accumulated balances. The resources available to the Fund for
tackling the problem are in my judgment inadequate and look
rather like sending a jellyfish to tackle a whale. What I ask for
is a multilateral settlement of a portion of our balances. If the
Conference is prepared to accept the principle of our amendment,
then I see no difficulty at all in evolving a concrete formula
by which the two purposes set out in our amendment can be
met. The purpose set out in our amendment are tw o: To secure
multilateral convertibility for a reasonable portion of our bal­
ances and, secondly, to devise a formula so as not to place undue
strain on the resources of the Fund. I think, Sir, talking among
friends, it may be as well to speak frankly about this question.




APPENDIX I

1173

We have not disguised from the Conference the very strong
feeling in our country on this question. I am sure that the sponsors
of this Conference are seeking collaboration from all countries
of the world known as the United and Associated Nations. It may
be that unfortunately situated as we are politically perhaps the
“ big guns” in the Conference may not attach great importance
to a country like India. But I am bound to point out this, if you
are prepared to ignore a country of the size of India, with four
hundred million population and with natural resources though not
fully developed, yet not incomparable to the natural resources of
some of the biggest powers on this earth, we cannot be expected
to make our full contribution to the strengthening of the resources
of the Fund. Suppose you don't accept our position, you are placing
us in a situation which I may compare to the position of a man
with a million dollar balance in the bank but not sufficient cash
to pay his taxi fare. That is the position you put us in. You want
to facilitate the expansion and balanced growth of international
trade. You incidentally want to build up a high level of employ­
ment and real income throughout the world as a whole. Mr. Morgenthau in his very fine opening address said “ Poverty is a menace
wherever it is found.” Do you expect to fulfil the main objectives
of this Fund if you allow large countries to be festered with this
sort of poverty? I would like this Commission to face this ques­
tion in a very realistic spirit. I am sure everybody here needs the
collaboration of everybody else but if that collaboration has to be
obtained realistically, you will make it possible for all countries
in the world to be associated with you. I beg of you, Commission,
to deal very dispassionately and sympathetically with the problem
I put before you. Thank you very much.

Document 260
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 10, 1944

No. 26

Statement by Mr. Istel, French Delegate, at
Meeting of Commission I
While the French Delegation sympathizes with India’s diffi­
culties, it entirely supports the position taken by the United States




M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

1174

and the United Kingdom. Although France and other occupied
countries have accumulated huge war balances against Germany,
they do not request that the Fund should be concerned with these
because it is clear that the Fund should be concerned only with
current account movements. The very argument given by India’s
Delegate as to the time which it will take for India to obtain goods
against blocked currencies, shows that the transactions contem­
plated are not of a current account nature and, therefore, are not
in conformity with the purposes of the Fund. We consider that the
question raised by India should not be addressed to the Fund but
to some other organization.

Document 262
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

July 10, 1944
No. 27

For fhe Press

Norwegian Proposal to Commission III
The United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference recom­
mends that the books of the International Monetary Fund and
the Bank for Reconstruction and Development shall be kept in a
special international bookkeeping monetary unit called (say)
Demos, being defined as the equivalent of a certain gold weight.
The Conference has no objection to the earlier American proposal
to make the monetary unit equal in value to 137-1/7 grains of fine
gold, or the equivalent of ten dollars in the present gold value of
the United States currency.

Document 283
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 11, 1944
No. 28

Statement by the Delegation of Panama
The Republic of Panama, aware of the urgency, importance




APPE NDI X I

1175

and transcendence of routing the postwar world policies towards
the achievement of true lasting peace, fully realizes that it is
imperative that agreement on fundamental issues—which will
justify calling the world of tomorrow a better world—be reached.
Thus, it is in a spirit of sincere international understanding
and with a firm resolution that military victory will not be followed
in the world by economic anarchy and chaos, that Panama is
being represented in this Monetary and Financial Conference.
Bearing in mind its exceptional geographical position as cross­
roads of the world’s commercial routes, Panama is interested in
international monetary stability, for this is the true basis upon
which world trade can reach its maximum development.
The Government of Panama recognizes the necessity of putting
an end to the burdensome machinery now set up, which prevents
the smooth flow and natural growth of international commerce by
means of discriminatory methods, unilateral exchange controls,
compensation and barter agreements, restrictions to imports and
exports, quotas, interference with free movement of capitals, etc.
It is to be noted that until Panama declared war on the Axis
Powers, none of the above mentioned measures had been con­
sidered necessary to the country, and that the Government’s
general policy was and continues to be opposed to their adoption.
The Delegation of Panama is confident that this Conference will
find the formula to harmonize the interest of each nation with that
of the world as a whole and will so achieve its main objectives,
thus providing the world with the adequate machinery to set its
economic house in order, without which permanent peace cannot
become a reality.

Document 306
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 12, 1944
No. 29

Statement by Delegation of Mexico at Meeting
of Commission II, July 11, 1944
M r . C h a ir m a n , F e l l o w D e l e g a t e s :

On behalf of the Mexican Delegation, may I be allowed to make




1176

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

a brief explanatory statement on the alternative provision sub­
mitted by us which is now before you.
It may appear to some of you that our proposal would rather
hamper the Bank's reconstruction operations during the first few
years. But I wish to assure you, gentlemen, that it is very far
from our purpose to place obstacles in the way of reconstruction.
We are fully aware of the damage that the war has done to the
productive capacity of our Allies in Europe and in Asia, and we
realize also that, once liberated, the territories now occupied by
our enemies will require a great deal of capital in order to be set
afoot again. We are no less aware of the direct sacrifices under­
gone by all those nations. Therefore, it is not with a spirit of deny­
ing them a substantial measure, of the Bank's resources that we
have introduced this— to our mind— important amendment.
Our reasons for asking you to provide that “ reconstruction”
and “ development” be put on the same footing are threefold:
First, we believe that the agreement we are to reach here is to
be embodied in a permanent, and not in a provisional, inter­
national instrument. Therefore, it seems to us inappropriate that
the document should not contain an equal emphasis on the two
great purposes of the Bank, namely, to facilitate reconstruction
and development. In the very short run, perhaps reconstruction
will be more urgent for the world as a whole, but in the long run,
Mr. Chairman— before we are all too dead, if I may say so—
development must prevail if we are to sustain and increase real
income everywhere. Without denying the initial importance of
reconstruction, we ask you not to relegate or postpone
development.
Secondly, we believe that we and other nations not actually in
need of funds for reconstruction, can greatly assist in the recon­
struction of those who do necessitate it, provided our economies
be developed more fully at the same time as the rehabilitation of
the war torn nations takes place. We have resources which are
still untapped. A large part of our population has not yet attained
an adequate standard of living. And yet we have not hesitated to
throw in our lot with our Allies, disregarding temporarily our
own wide domestic problems. If we tackle these— and for that we
require sums of capital we do not dispose of at home—we will
undoubtedly benefit not only ourselves but the world as a whole,
and particularly the industrial nations, in that we shall provide




APPENDIX I

1177

better markets for them and better customers. We submit, there­
fore, that capital for development purposes in our countries is as
important for the world as is capital for reconstruction purposes.
(p. 2) Third and last— and we again wish to emphasize that
it is with no unfriendly spirit that we make this reference— we
should like to call your attention to an important provision of the
draft (Article II, Section 5-A), which states that payments in
gold shall be graduated according to a schedule that shall take into
account the adequacy of the gold and free foreign exchange hold­
ings of each member country. We believe that, having in mind
the position in which the war devastated countries are, this is only
fair; and we have no intention whatever of grudging one ounce
of our contribution in gold. But since we happen to have unprece­
dented holdings of gold and foreign exchange— we speak for the
great majority of Latin American nations— and since we feel that
we have before us an opportunity of devoting part of our holdings
to the import of capital goods for our development, it is our con­
sidered opinion that in contributing part of them, ungrudgingly,
to the Bank, for the benefit of all the nations constituting it, we
should desire at least the assurance that our requests for capital
for development purposes shall, in the words of our amendment,
be given equal consideration as is given to reconstruction projects,
and, further, the assurance that the resources and facilities of the
Bank shall always be made available to the same extent for either
kind of project.
We do wish to make it perfectly clear, however, Mr. Chairman,
that we do not desire to impose on the Bank a rigid fifty-fifty rule.
We believe some discretion on the Bank's part should be provided
for. Furthermore, what we ask is only that the Bank's resources
and facilities be made available. Thus, in the event that countries
requesting loans for development purposes do not use up the
resources and facilities made available to them, countries requir­
ing loans for reconstruction projects could have a claim on the
unused funds.
In conclusion, may we emphasize that we do not contemplate a
rigid interpretation of the phrase “ to the same extent", but that
we do think it is a principle which should be embodied in the
instrument we are endeavoring to draw up. We are perfectly
willing to accept a better wording of our proposed amendment,
so long as the same principle is preserved in it.




1178

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFE RENCE
Document 353

M O N E T A R Y

U N I T E D
N A T I O N S
A N D
F I N A N C I A L
C O N F E R E N C E
Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 14, 1944

No. 30

Statement by Antonio Espinosa de los Monteros, Mexican
Delegate, before Commission I, July 14, on Changing the
Gold Parities of Currencies
M r . C h a ir m a n , F e l l o w D e leg ates :

On behalf of the Mexican Delegation, I wish to make a state­
ment regarding the point now under consideration.
It should be evident to all the Delegates that in this case we
are dealing with one of the fundamental sovereign rights of
nations. We must, therefore, be extremely cautious in relinquish­
ing rights which all our Governments have sworn to uphold.
It is obvious, of course, that international cooperation would be
impossible unless we surrender some degree of our sovereign
rights. But the question now before this Commission is not
whether we shall ask our countries to surrender some measure
of a sovereign right, in order to make our cooperation possible
and fruitful. Rather, the question is how much of that right need
our countries surrender.
Mexico is strongly opposed to the original formula (Alterna­
tive A ) , according to which a uniform change in the gold parities
of all currencies can be effected by the decision of the three major
powers alone.
We are opposed to it, firstly, because should it be approved, the
smaller nations would thereby surrender a maximum of their
monetary sovereignty to the three largest countries. This, in the
opinion of the Mexican Delegation, is entirely uncalled-for and
unjustifiable. What reasons are there to submit small countries
to the absolute will of the larger ones? How can we help coopera­
tion by the blind submission of small nations?
Secondly, we are opposed to that formula also because we do not
believe it can ever be accepted by a community of self-respecting
nations. For no one here can seriously believe that small countries
would be willing to have the gold parities of their currencies
changed at will by the largest nations. Certainly, not a single one
of the major powers would be willing to relinquish to a foreign
agency the right of fixing the value of its currency. This is,
indeed, one of the attributes of sovereignty which they are prone




APPENDIX I

1179

to guard most jealously. How, then, can we expect small countries
to accept this formula when we submit it to them? What possible
reason would they have for doing so?
Thirdly, the Mexican Delegation is against the formula because
it is wholly unnecessary. We know, of course, that no country
would be ready to submit once more to the rigidity of the gold
standard. All of us want a great degree of flexibility. But why
should we, in order to attain such flexibility, set aside the sover­
eignty of small countries while respecting that of the largest
ones? We hold this is entirely unnecessary. For in any case, the
major powers will be able, (p. 2) under the proposed Agreement,
to change the gold parities of their own currencies all at once, if
they so decide, in as much as they have the majority of the aggre­
gate votes. By so doing, they would naturally change the inter­
national price of gold. Almost all small countries would probably
follow suit of their own free will, as they have always done in the
past. Thus, are we not already sufficiently insured against rigid­
ity? Why should we ask small countries to participate in decisions
which probably will be made, as they have always been made in
the past, without their consent? Why should they give up in vain
such large measure of their sovereignty?
Lastly, the Mexican Delegation will vote against the original
formula because it shows a great disregard for the problems of
the smaller nations. Indeed, it assumes that these countries would
have no problems at all when a uniform change is decreed by
the largest ones. It presupposes that small countries will change
their laws and perhaps even their Constitutions at a minute’s
notice, regardless of political, social or economic difficulties. It
takes for granted that those countries can brush aside, if they
so desire, the gold clause which they might have subscribed in
international contracts. But are all these suppositions truly valid?
Are we not taking too much for granted?
The Mexican Delegation wants to thank some Delegations for
their efforts towards a reconciliation between our point of view
and that of Alternative A. We regret to say, however, that in mat­
ters of principle a compromise is hardly possible.
The essential difference between Alternative B and Alternative
C is that, whereas under the former a majority of countries is
required to approve a uniform change, under the latter a vote
of only one-third of member countries would be necessary.
I must not tire this Commission with the enumeration of the
reasons on which we base our opposition to Alternative C. Basi­
cally, they are the same as those I have presented before. Suffice it




1180

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF E RENCE

to say, nevertheless, that while Mexico would agree to submit to
the decision taken in this important matter by a majority of
countries, she does not consider it necessary to accept the dictum
of a small minority, as proposed by South Africa.
Certainly, Mr. Chairman, the implications of this whole question
are very serious. It is because Mexico believes sincerely in not
doing unto others what she would not wish to have done unto her,
that we insist that this Commission approve a formula whereby
due respect be paid to the sovereign rights of small and large
nations alike.

Document 383

M O N E T A R Y

U N I T E D
N A T I O N S
A N D
F I N A N C I A L
C O N F E R E N C E
Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 14, 1944
N o . 31

Statement by Sir Shanmukham Chetty, Indian Delegate,
before Commission I
At the meeting of Commission I of the Monetary Conference
on July 14, the India Delegation moved an amendment to the
effect that Subdivision 2 of Article I relating to the purposes and
policies of the monetary fund must include specific reference to
the needs of economically backward countries.
In moving the amendment, Sir Shanmukham Chetty said that
the object of the amendment was to make more complete the
statement of the primary objectives of economic policy so as to be
applicable to the whole world and not merely to highly industrial­
ized countries. He observed “ We are in full accord with the
general aim of the expansion and balanced growth of interna­
tional trade. But the term 'balanced growth' is generally under­
stood as an increase in the volume of trade which is about equal
in respect of exports and imports so as to avoid disequilibrium
in the international balance of payments. Though this is an im­
portant aspect of balanced growth relating to the volume of im­
ports and exports, we attach great importance also to the
balanced character and composition of international trade. A
predominant flow of raw materials and food stuffs in one direc­
tion and highly manufactured goods in the other direction is not
a really balanced international trade from this latter point of




A P P E N D IX I

1181

view. It is only by greater attention to the industrial needs of
countries like India that you can achieve a real and rational
balance. It is for this reason that the India Delegation wants
to mention specifically the needs of economically backward coun­
tries, in the description of objectives of economic policy, which
the fund cannot directly assist but may indirectly facilitate."
“ Our experience in the past," he continued, “ has shown that
international organizations have tended to approach all problems
from the point of view of the advanced countries of the West. We
want to insure that the new organization which we are trying to
create will avoid this narrow outlook and give due consideration
to the economic problems of countries like India."

Document 386
DP/25

Statement of Sir Shanmukham Chetty, Indian Delegate
before Commission I.
For the Press

At the meeting of Commission I of the Monetary Conference
on the 14th July forenoon the India Delegation moved an Amend­
ment to the effect that subdivision 2 of Article I relating to the
purposes and policies of the Monetary Fund must include specific
reference to the needs of economically backward countries.
In moving the Amendment, Sir Shanmukham Chetty said that
the object of the Amendment was to make more complete the
statement of the primary objectives of economic policy so as to
be applicable to the whole world and not merely to highly
industrialised countries. He observed “ We are in full accord with
the general aim of the expansion and balanced growth of inter­
national trade. But the term 'balanced growth’ is generally
understood as an increase in the volume of trade which is about
equal in respect of exports and imports so as to avoid disequilib­
rium in the international balance of payments. Though this is
an important aspect of balanced growth relating to the volume
of imports and exports, we attach great importance also to the
balanced character and composition of international trade. A
predominant flow of raw material and foodstuffs in one direction
and highly manufactured goods in the other direction is not a
really balanced international trade from this latter point of view.
It is only by greater attention to the industrial needs of countries




1182

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CO NFEREN CE

like India that you achieve a real and rational balance. It is for
this reason that the India Delegation wants to mention specifically
the needs of economically backward countries, in the description
of objectives of economic policy, which the Fund cannot directly
assist but may indirectly facilitate.”
“ Our experience in the past,” he continued, “ has shown that
international organisations have tended to approach all problems
from the point of view of the advanced countries of the West. We
want to ensure that the new organisation which we are trying
to create will avoid this narrow outlook and give due considera­
tion to the economic problems of countries like India.”

Document 432
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 17, 1944
N o . 32

Remarks Made by Mexican Delegation on Veto Power of
Lending Countries Before Commission II, July 16, 1944
M r . C h a ir m a n :

I should like to refer to paragraph A of Section 2 of Article I V :
The issue involved is that the approval of a country is to be
required in order to spend in that country a loan made by the
Bank out of its subscribed capital. We feel certain doubts about
the interpretation of this provision. Apparently, two interpre­
tations may arise:
1. That in the transition period after the war there may not be
enough capital goods to satisfy the demand of all countries in
need of them, so that many countries will have to continue
exercising control over the exports of capital goods. If this is the
correct interpretation, we have nothing further to say except
that perhaps it would be advisable to state it clearly.
2. But a second interpretation is possible, namely, that a coun­
try is entitled permanently to refuse to export capital goods
at certain times. This would appear to be the case, as was ex­
plained at one of the meetings of Committee II, when a condition
of full employment were reached and further expansion of
exports was considered undesirable from the general economic
and monetary point of view of the country in which the loan is
to be spent. If this interpretation is the correct one, it seems




A P P E N D IX I

1183

to us that it would have been desirable to state that when ap­
proval is not given by a country, the Bank should be satisfied
that the general economic conditions and the balance of payments
situation of that country are such that the expenditure of the loan
would be undesirable from that point of view, in which case
the Bank would have full authority to request the borrower to
spend the loan elsewhere. I am quite sure, Mr. t hairman, that if a
C
refusal by a country were endorsed by the Bank in the light of
this type of considerations, no country would have any doubts
as to the motives involved, and, consequently, would find the
Bank's decision quite acceptable.
We attach importance to this view because we feel that the
provision, as it is before us now, will undoubtedly be difficult
to explain to countries which have during the last three or four
years been experiencing the consequences of dealing with what we
may call a “ restricted purchasing area” , that is, one in which
money cannot be spent. We shall certainly have to allay the fears
of those who might interpret this provision as being one which
gives a country the power to discriminate in its exports of capital
goods, or the power to refuse them on non-economic grounds. It
often occurs that in the purchase of capital goods there is no
second choice with respect to the country in which it is desired
to purchase them. Thus, there is the possibility that a country
may have to postpone its development for quite some time.
(p. 2) But there is another aspect of the question. A country
may wish to place its orders in a particular country, and the
latter, under this provision, may refuse, thus forcing the bor­
rower to buy capital goods in a more expensive or less suitable
market. We fear that the refusal could be based on other than
economic considerations, and it seems to us that this further
application of the “ restricted purchasing area” view is apt to lead
very quickly to bilateral trade and political relationships. At any
rate, the present language of the provision does not preclude this
possibility.
We have two other remarks to add, Mr. Chairman. We believe
that this provision is inconsistent with other operations of the
Bank. For example, in the case of guarantees given by the Bank,
a country can presumably go directly to a financial market, ob­
tain a loan and have it guaranteed by the Bank; and no one,
we may assume, will deny the right of the borrower to spend
the loan in the country of the lender. If the principle sustained
in the present provision is to be a more consistent one, should




1184

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFE REN CE

not all countries have to impose a strict control on their capital
markets ?
Finally, we should like to refer to one of the most important
principles embodied in this document, namely, that no condition
should be imposed upon a loan as to the particular country in
which it may be spent (Article III, Section 6). It is our belief,
Mr. Chairman, that this overriding principle is largely nullified
if any particular country can deny the borrower’s right to spend
the money where he thinks fit.
We hope, Mr. Chairman, that it will be possible to state clearly
in this Commission the proper interpretation to be given to the
provision we have referred to.
We move that it be said that, if approval is not given by a
country, the Bank shall give its opinion that the general economic
conditions and the balance of payments situation justify the coun­
try’s decision.

Document 433
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

Ju ly 17, 1944
N o . 33

The President of the Conference today reviewed the status of
the work with the Steering Committee of the Conference. It was
the unanimous opinion of the heads of the Delegations consulted
that agreement on all matters of substance would be reached by
Wednesday, the date originally set for adjournment, but that the
technical and drafting work will require several more days.
It was decided that a closing Plenary Session of the Conference
will be held on Saturday, and that the Delegations will leave
Bretton Woods on Sunday.

Document 436
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 17, 1944

N o. 34

Promptly after granting the Government’s request for the use
of the hotel facilities until Sunday, July 23, Mr. David Stoneman,




A P P E N D IX I

1185

President of the Bretton Woods Company, sent the following
telegram to all guests who had reservations at the Mount Wash­
ington Hotel on July 20 to 28:
“The Secretary of the Treasury has informed us that the work
of the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference cannot
be completed until Sunday, July 23.
“ At the urgent request of the Government, we have agreed that
the hotel will be available to the Conference until the above date.
Accordingly, we are obliged to ask our guests to postpone their
arrival at Mount Washington until Monday, July 24. We are
prompted to do this by patriotic motives and we are sure that
all our guests will feel likewise and will cooperate with us by
postponing or even sacrificing a few days of their vacation to
help promote the war effort and the most important work of the
forty-four nations composing this (Conference.
“ We have been assured by the Government that every effort
will be made, compatible with the conduct of the war, to facili­
tate transportation to Bretton Woods for those guests who will
be obliged to give up transportation reservations.
“ Our representative will be in personal communication with
you, later in the week, to make definite transportation arrange­
ments for you, if you will require it.”

Document
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

451

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 18, 1944
N o. 3 5

Statement by Dr. Carlos Lleras Restrepo, Chairman of the
Delegation of Colombia, Before Commission I
The formula proposed by the special committee for paragraph
b, Article 1, of the Monetary Plan is in my opinion a wise
solution to the problem that has arisen regarding the purposes
of the International Stabilization Fund. The formula harmonizes
the technical orientation of the Fund, the resources of which are
to be used solely to provide foreign exchange for current trans­
actions, with the desire of the Delegation from India to include
among the ultimate purposes of the new facilities for the growth
of international trade the development of the means of produc­
tion of the member countries. An agreement having been reached




1186

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CO NFEREN CE

on this question, one of the few questions still pending with rela­
tion to the Fund has been settled, after a discussion which
certainly has not been futile since it has brought to light the
economic problems of the future, as a whole, and the functions
that for their solution correspond to the various instrumentalities
for international cooperation which the United and Associated
Nations are creating or must create in the future. Moreover, it
seems to me that the very wording of this formula implies the
recognition of the characteristics that the future economic policy
must have, if we take for granted that it must not be opposed
to the right of new nations whose resources are not sufficiently
developed to move forward on the road which they have already
started to travel toward a more complex economy, toward a
growing industrialization which may alter, and probably will
alter, the volume of international trade in many commodities, but
which at the same time will open markets with a greater purchas­
ing power for the more advanced forms of the manufacturing
industries. The balanced expansion and growth of international
trade, which is set forth by this formula as one of the principal
purposes of the Fund, to my mind implies also the fact that
consideration must be given in future agreements on commercial
policy to the need for enlarging the consuming markets for food­
stuffs and raw materials, the prices of which, before the war,
were notoriously far out of proportion to the prices of manu­
factured articles that countries such as mine arq obliged to buy
from the great industrial nations. With reference to those future
agreements on commercial policy, mention must be made of the
fact that they must not be conceived in such a way that they will
become obstacles to the necessary protection which must be given
in the new countries to their infant industries, as was given at
one time by today’s industrial countries to their own industries
during their first steps in industrial development. It is necessary
that the Conference understand that our (p. 2) assent to a policy
of greater trade and greater freedom of exchange for current
transactions is given in a spirit of broad concept of international
cooperation, which could never be based on the idea that this
broadening process could be contrary to the development of our
own domestic production and to the integration of our economy
through a steady access to new industrial techniques.
In requesting that the Commission give its affirmative vote
to the formula presented by the special committee, I also wish to
state a few ideas connected with the spirit of our collaboration
in the organization of the Fund, and in general with the whole




A P P E N D IX I

1187

policy of regulating post-war economy within systems of interna­
tional organization.
We do not believe that Colombia, and the Latin American
countries in general, may have to appeal in the very near future
to the Fund for Monetary Stabilization in order to meet their
needs for foreign exchange. Nor does the expectation to appeal
to the Fund constitute the reason for our action. In fact, we
realize that no matter what the amount of the direct aid given
by the Fund to a country may be, it is less than the general
benefits that may revert to all from the introduction of this new
and broad factor of cooperation into the international economic
life, in the face of strong forces of competition. We understand
further that out of the international economic solidarity there
also arise certain duties, and that therefore cooperation becomes
not only a solution imposed by general convenience, but also a
higher principle of conduct which must be acknowledged before
we can hope for a rise to higher and richer levels of universal
progress. In addition, if this cooperative effort happens to be
associated, as is the case now, with the solution of overwhelming
economic problems in the countries that have suffered the most
in the defense of justice, peace, and liberty in the world, our
conviction on the desirability of the policy of international coop­
eration is of course strengthened by the cordial admiration that
we feel for those countries and their heroic effort. In the degree
that its resources permit, Colombia is taking a part in the com­
mon task of economic rehabilitation, doing so without any feeling
of selfishness, but with the sincere conviction that she is doing her
international duty within the principles of cooperation which
have found in our continent the deepest and most widespread
acceptance.

Document 459
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 79, 1944

No. 36

Address by the Honorable Eduardo Suarez, Mexican
Minister of Finance, Before Commission III
M is t e r C h a ir m a n , F e l l o w D e l e g a t e s :

The Mexican Delegation wishes to make this statement to put
795841— 48— 5




1188

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C I A L CO NFEREN CE

on record its position regarding Mexico’s approval of the report
submitted by Committee I.
The Mexican Delegation realizes that it is difficult to find a
definite solution to the silver problem in this Conference. But it
considers that a great step has been taken in recognizing the
importance that silver has for some countries as a monetary
metal. The Mexican Delegation expresses the hope that in the
near future countries interested in silver either as producers or
consumers, shall find after unbiased and technical consideration
of the problem, a way to stabilize the value of silver.
Upon creating an International Monetary Fund, the United
Nations are tacitly invited to recognize that the fair and just
price for gold is thirty-five dollars an ounce. Henceforth, each
of them will accept an ounce of gold whenever they have a
right to receive thirty-five dollars, or the equivalent, from another
nation.
As for Mexico, her position is clear and definite. During the
past few years of tribulations, Mexico has, of her own accord,
accepted, in unlimited amounts, an ounce of gold for every thirtyfive dollars due her. She has done so in spite of the hardships
of inflation, and even realizing to the fullest extent the risk in­
volved in these transactions, inasmuch as no nation has ever
committed itself to buy that gold from Mexico at the same price
she has paid for it. Throughout this most difficult period she
has also issued Mexican currency at a fixed rate of 4.85 pesos to
the U.S. Dollar, or about 169.75 pesos for each ounce of gold, al­
though she has had no assurance or guarantee that other nations
will give her in commodities and services a fair equivalent to her
investment in gold. Mexico has done all this mainly because of her
full unselfish devotion to a higher cause: helping her Allies to
win this war.
Mexico and other silver-using countries are entitled to expect
in return for their cooperation to maintain the present price of
gold the assistance of other countries to stabilize the price of
silver at a just and fair level.
The history of the past seventy years, according to those who
oppose silver, should contradict Mexico’s expectation. They claim
that silver has no place in the monetary structure of the world.
(p. 2) As if to spite those that like to say the last word on an
intricate subject such as silver, humanity insists not to behave
according to pure theoretical reasoning. It takes an emergency
or a catastrophe such as we are living today, to realize the im­




A P P E N D IX I

1189

portance of silver as a monetary metal. Is it not true, for instance,
that in this hour of anxiety the Mexican masses have found in
silver what they believe to be the best, most secure value as
against all the uncertainties that the future may hold? Is it not
also true that many other Latin American countries have tried
to buy silver in order to allay the fears of their own populations?
Who can deny that the Allied armies have found more willing
traders in the East and Near East, when the soldiers were
provided with silver coins instead of an up-to-date, fully guaran­
teed, gold note? Would it be absurd, besides, to anticipate that
in the aftermath of this diabolic nightmare, the peoples of many
invaded countries will find hoarding silver is better than many
other forms of saving, as it has been proved in the past?
The answers are obvious to all but the prejudiced. Humanity—
that is, the larger and poorer part of humanity— continues to be­
lieve in silver, even if only because it is not their lot to believe
in gold or in any of the so-called higher forms of wealth.
If this plain truth be accepted, then it must be evident that any
monetary scheme designed to meet the needs of all the peoples
of the world is incomplete unless it takes into account silver as
one of the component factors of the whole picture.
A nation whose monetary system will henceforth operate in
accordance with the plan we will submit to our Government, will
accept gold at the proposed world price of thirty-five dollars an
ounce, only because she has the assurance that the other member
countries of the system will likewise accept gold at the same
price, when the former becomes a debtor to them. But that par­
ticular nation might well be a silver-minded country whose people
want neither bills nor bank deposits backed with gold reserves,
but prefer and demand plain silver coins from their monetary
authorities. In the latter case, that country would naturally
be forced to invest part or all of its gold reserve in silver, in
order to meet the demand of its people. When that same nation
becomes a debtor, because, for instance, of a serious depreciation
of her exports in the world markets, how can she turn the silver
coins into gold, in order to meet an unfavorable balance? The
only way, of course, will be to sell her silver stocks in a forced
market, at whatever price the buyers want to pay for them.
We hold and we shall strive in the future to look upon, as a
solution of this problem, a relative stabilization of the interna­
tional price of silver. We feel that this solution is feasible. Just




1190

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFE REN CE

as the United States Government decided that gold was worth
thirty-five dollars an ounce, and was thereafter able to establish
that price in the world markets, so did that same Government
decide to maintain silver at a fixed price in the outside world
markets and has been able to do so for a long time. The pegging
of both metals in terms of the dollar has brought about as far
as it is possible to find out, none of the calamities with which
the traditional enemies of silver like to scare credulous people.
If a single nation has been able to do so much both for gold
and silver without disrupting its monetary equilibrium, internal
or external, why should it not be possible through international
cooperation to undertake the same task, without depending
entirely on the willingness of one nation to carry forever the
whole weight of the stabilization of both metals?
(p. 3) The Mexican Delegation is aware of another argument
against recognizing silver as a component part of the monetary
pattern of the world. Nobody who is anybody, it is said, should
give a thought to the silver problem, since it only affects a few
of the so-called backward peoples of the earth, whose interna­
tional trade added together is but a minor, negligible fraction of
the world trade. If this same or a similar attitude were to be
applied to all the problems of the postwar world, it is difficult to
see how that world could be happy. For how can we brush aside so
lightly the economic habits of millions upon millions of humble
people, just because they are poor and cannot thus “ belong”
amongst the economic “ elite” of this earth?
In closing, it is most fitting that the Mexican Delegation should
quote the wise words which His Excellency* the President of the
United States, said to Congress in a Special Message on January
15, 1934:
“The other principal precious metal — silver — has also
been used from time immemorial as a metallic base for curren­
cies as well as for actual currency itself. It is used as such by
probably half of the population of the world. It constitutes a
very important part of our own monetary structure. It is such
a crucial factor in much of the world's international trade that
it cannot be neglected.”
Mexico feels certain that a monetary problem, small in eco­
nomic dimensions but large in human implications, will receive due
consideration in the future, as envisaged by the report we have
just approved.




A P P E N D IX I

1191

Document 462
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 19, 1944

No. 3 7

The following draft resolution was approved by Committee 2
on Enemy Assets, Looted Property, and Related Matters, and
recommended to Commission III for adoption:
R e s o l v e d t h a t : Commission III recommends to Commission I
that an appropriate provision be included in the Articles of
Agreement of the International Monetary Fund to the effect that
the government of no country shall be eligible for membership
in the International Monetary Fund as long as the Central Bank
of that country has not taken the necessary steps to foster the
liquidation of the Bank of International Settlements.

Document 463
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 19, 1944

No. 38

The following draft resolution was considered by Committee
2 on “ Enemy Assets, Looted Property, and Related Matters".
The iCommittee decided to recommend to Commission III its
adoption in principle and reference to a Drafting Committee
to make certain technical changes.
W

hereas

:

1.
In anticipation of their impending defeat, enemy leaders*
enemy nationals, and their associates and collaborators are trans­
ferring assets through clandestine channels to and through neu­
tral countries to be concealed and held at their future disposal.
Success on the part of such persons in secreting and preserving
under their control substantial amounts of assets in and through
neutral countries will perpetuate their influence, power, and abil­
ity to plan anew future aggrandizement and world domination.
The efforts of the United Nations to establish and permanently




1192

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

maintain peaceful international relations after the conclusion of
the present war would thereby be jeopardized.
2. Throughout the past four years enemy countries and their
nationals have taken the property of occupied countries and their
nationals. Enemy methods have ranged from open loot and plun-^
der of currency, gold, securities, and other movable property,
to subtle and complex devices, including the establishment of pup­
pet governments in occupied territories, designed to give the cloak
of legality to their robbery and to secure for themselves owner­
ship and control of important financial and economic enterprises
in the postwar period despite the impending defeat of their armed
forces. To ensure their success and to frustrate the efforts of
postliberation governments to undo their work, they have, through
sales and other methods of transfer, run the chain of their
ownership and control through foreign countries, both occupied
and neutral, thus making the problem of disclosure and dis­
entanglement one of international character.
3. Throughout the past four years as the enemy has occupied
additional countries, the residents, under duress, have been forced
to turn over to him their assets. The United Nations have de­
clared their intention to do their utmost to defeat the methods
of dispossession practised by the enemy and have reserved their
rights to declare invalid any transfers of property belonging to
persons within occupied territory. They have adopted special
controls and other measures not only to protect and safeguard
property, within their respective jurisdictions, owned by occupied
countries and their nationals, but also to prevent looted property
from being disposed of in United Nations markets or acquired
by persons subject to their jurisdiction.
T h erefore :

It is resolved that, in recognition of those considerations, the
United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference:
1.
Calls upon the neutral countries to take immediate (p. 2)
measures to prevent any disposition or transfer within territories
subject to their jurisdiction of any
(a) assets belonging to the government or any individuals
or institutions within those United Nations occupied by the
enemy; and
(b) looted gold, currency, art objects, securities, other evi­
dences of ownership in financial or business enterprises, and
of other assets looted by the enemy;




A P P E N D IX I

1193

as well as to uncover, segregate and hold at the disposition of
the postliberation authorities in the appropriate country any such
assets within territory subject to their jurisdiction.
2. Calls upon the neutral countries to take immediate measures
to prevent the concealment by fraudulent means or otherwise
within countries subject to their jurisdiction of any
(a) assets belonging to, or alleged to belong to, the govern­
ment or any individuals or institutions within countries with
which we are at war;
(b) assets belonging to, or alleged to belong to, enemy
leaders, their associates and collaborators, and
to facilitate their ultimate delivery to the postarmistice au­
thorities.
3. Recommends the establishment by the United Nations of
appropriate machinery to assist the nations of the world in
(a) uncovering, segregating, controlling, and making appro­
priate disposition of assets to which this declaration is appli­
cable ;
(b) locating and tracing ownership and control of looted
property and taking appropriate measures to make restoration
to its lawful owners.

Document 483

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

July 20, 1944
N o. 39

Statement by Mahmoud Saleh el Falaki,
Delegate of Egypt
Is there or is there not, conflict between the interests of highly
industrialized countries, and the recent tendency in certain raw
material producing countries to industrialize?
This tendency could be discerned even before this war. Many
countries producing raw materials were changing their economies,
and started to produce more and more manufactured commodities.
This movement had been considerably encouraged during this war.




1194

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C I A L CO NFEREN CE

This is particularly true of Egypt and some other Middle East
countries.
The international division of labor would tend to be based
mainly on differences in human skill and efficiency and not mainly
as has been the case in the past, on natural resources which were
the result of planning by nature.
If this is so, there will be a new division of labour between highly
industrialized countries and those mainly producing raw mate­
rials. Foreign trade will readjust itself accordingly. The former
countries shall in this case produce goods that require specialized
ability, goods that undergo refined processes of manufacture, while
the latter would produce only goods of simple manufacture and
simple design. I am inclined to believe that this tendency is in the
right direction because it will raise appreciably the standard of
living in agricultural countries and by so doing, ultimately increase
their ability to buy from industrial countries. There is therefore
no conflict. It is true shiftings and adjustments will have to be
made in the export trade of old industrial countries until a new
equilibrium is reached—but there is no need for those countries
to retain the production of goods of simple manufacture, the largescale production of which requires only a handful of technicians
and skilled workers.
Any attempt after this war to oppose this tendency must have as
a consequence the maintenance of low standards of living in raw
material producing countries, and with that a low buying capacity
on the part of those countries for the products of highly indus­
trialized ones.

Document 485

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 2 0 ,1 9 4 4
N o. 40

Statement by the Honorable L. S. St. Laurent on Behalf
of the Canadian Delegation at Meeting
of Commission III
The resolution, which is now before this Conference, brings
together a number of resolutions put forward by different coun­
tries, The reduction of barriers to trade, the mitigation of fluctua­




APPENDIX I

1195

tions in the prices of staple primary products and the promotion
of high levels of employment are subjects which are highly relevant
to the work of this Monetary and Financial Conference. Time
forbids that we should here embark on the work of drafting plans
through which our countries might cooperate in effective action to
achieve these ends. Yet it is of the highest importance to the wel­
fare of the world that such work should be pushed forward as early
as possible. On behalf of the Canadian Delegation I welcome the
resolution which is before us and the opportunity which it gives
to stress the urgent need for action.
In the work of the past few weeks an important beginning has
been made in the broad scheme for meeting the international eco­
nomic problems which will confront the world at the end of the
war. Nevertheless it is only a beginning. If plans of international
monetary organization and international investment are to be fully
successful, other problems— by no means less difficult or less im­
portant— will also have to be faced and solved by joint internal
tional action. It would indeed be unwise to attach too much impor­
tance to what has been planned here, if thereby we were led to
neglect other problems or to rest on a misguided faith that with
new forms of international monetary and investment organiza­
tions, the other problems would solve themselves. The problems of
commercial policy, the instability of primary product prices, the
coordination of national employment policies, must be attacked
frontally and on the same wide international basis. No such mone­
tary and investment organizations, however perfect in form, can
be expected to long survive the economic distortions of high tariffs,
restrictive trading arrangements or enormous fluctuations in food
and raw material prices such as marked the years between the
wars.
In presenting in the Canadian House of Commons the Joint
Statement of Experts on the Establishment of an International
Monetary Fund, and after expressing sympathy with the par­
ticular objects to which that statement was directed, the Prime
Minister said that the Canadian Government “ is equally anxious
that common views should be reached on other parts also of a
general plan of international economic cooperation, particularly
on the reduction in the barriers to trade expansion, a reduction
vital to Canada’s welfare and necessary if conditions favourable to
stable monetary arrangements are to be achieved.”
(p. 2)
The other parts of such a general plan of international economic




1196

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

organization are perhaps less intricate than those on which so
much effective work has been done here, but they present problems
even more stubborn than those which this Conference has been
facing. Approached in the same spirit, with the same ingenuity,
the same sense of urgency and the same willingness to work
together, which have been witnessed here, these problems can be
solved.
It is because we believe in the possibility of solving them through
international collaboration and because we believe in the urgent
need for action that the Canadian Delegation support this resolu­
tion.

Commission III recommended the adoption by the full Confer­
ence of the following resolution:
W

in Article I of the Articles of Agreement of the Inter­
national Monetary Fund it is stated that one of the principal
purposes of the Fund is to facilitate the expansion and balanced
growth of international trade, and to contribute thereby to the
promotion and maintenance of high levels of employment and
real income in the territories of all members as primary objec­
tives o f economic policy;
hereas

it is recognized that the complete attainment of this and
other purposes and objectives stated in the Agreement cannot
be achieved through the instrumentality of the Fund alone;
T h e r e f o r e the United Nations Monetary, and Financial Confer­
ence recommends to the participating Governments that, in ad­
dition to implementing the specific monetary and financial meas­
ures which were the subject of this Conference, they seek, with
a view to creating in the field of international economic relation*
conditions necessary for the attainment of the purposes of the
Fund and of the broader primary objectives of economic policy,
to reach agreement as soon as possible on ways and means
whereby they may best:
W

hereas

(1) reduce obstacles to international trade and in other ways
promote mutually advantageous international commercial
relations;
(2) bring about the orderly marketing of staple commodities
at prices fair to the producer and consumer alike;
(3) deal with the special problems of international concern
which will arise from the cessation of production for war
purposes; and




APPENDIX I

1197

(4) facilitate by cooperative effort the harmonization of na­
tional policies of member states designed to promote and
maintain high levels of employment and progressively rising
standards of living.

Document 487

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For fhe Press

July 2 0 ,1 9 4 4
N o. 41

Statement by Lord Keynes at the Executive Plenary
Session, July 20, 1944
I am sure that I shall be voicing the sentiments of all here pres­
ent if following our President I express our appreciation of the
illuminating and valuable record of our work and the explanation
of the merits and advantages of the Plan which our reporting dele­
gate, Mr. Rasminsky, has given us, and associate the whole Con­
ference with the more than well-deserved tribute which he paid
to the invaluable work and the admirable determination of Dr.
White and to his conduct of our business in the Chair.
May I, however, return to the list of reservations which he
began by reading us.
I venture to wonder whether there is not a possibility of some
misunderstanding in the minds of the Delegates who wish to make
reservations on particular points. So far as the U.K. Delegation
is concerned we, in common with all other Delegations, reserve the
opinion of our Government on the document as a whole and on
every part of it. The whole of our proceedings is ad referendum to
our Governments who are at the present stage in no way committed
to anything: We have been gathered here to put our heads together
to produce the most generally acceptable document we could frame.
We do not even recommend our Governments to adopt the result.
We merely submit it for what it is worth to the attention of the
Governments and legislators concerned.
Now I suggest to those Delegations who are proposing to make .
reservations that this procedure will suggest that there is some
difference in commitment in respect of the points specially reserved
compared with the rest of the document; and, therefore, that the
rest of the document is in some sense accepted.




1198

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Is it not better that we all of us make clear the entire absence
of commitment on the part of our Governments and that the par­
ticular points of reservation be merged in the general reservation
and be not particularly recorded? Only in this way can misappre­
hension be avoided. Otherwise the position of those of us who are
making no particular reservations may not be understood.
I would therefore urge this course on the Delegations interested
in the particular matters which the reporting delegate has brought
to our attention; and I propose to them that these reservations, by
general agreement and in the light of the above be retained in the
minutes of the Commission where they are already recorded but
are not made part of the Final Act.

Document 488

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 20, 1944
N o. 42

Statement by Mr. Kyriakos Varvaressos, Chairman of
the Greek Delegation, at the Executive Plenary
Session, July 20, 1944
M

r

. P r e s id e n t :

It is my first duty and my privilege on behalf of the Greek Dele­
gation to express our sincere thanks for the words which Judge
Vinson has found to manifest the sympathy and appreciation of
the American people for the peoples of my country who contributed
all they had in this hard struggle and are at this moment suffering
and still fighting with the same spirit, the common enemy. I wish
further to declare on behalf of the Greek Delegation that, in the
light of what has been said by Lord Keynes and Judge Vinson, we
withdraw the only reservation which we had made with regard to
our quota.
We do so, first, because we want to emphasize the spirit which
has prevailed throughout this Conference, a spirit of collaboration,
mutual understanding, and a high degree of discipline; second,
because we are convinced that the Constitution and the function­
ing of the Fund is much more worthy to our countries than the
specific interest which we have in obtaining a relatively larger




APPENDIX I

1199

quota; and third, because we wish to declare that we contemplate
with confidence and assurance the future collaboration of our
countries with the Fund. When we examine the provisions of the
Fund as a whole, we are persuaded that any country which has a
just cause to present to the Fund will not do so in vain.

Document 489

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

A ND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

July 20, 1944
N o. 43

Statement by Vladimir Rybar, Chairman of the
Delegation of Yugoslavia, at the Executive
Plenary Session, July 20, 1944
M

r

. P r e s id

ent

:

In responding to the appeal of Lord Keynes and thanking Mr.
Vinson for the kind words he has had for my country, in the name
of the Yugoslavia Delegation, I withdraw my reservation concern­
ing the quota. By doing so I would like to associate myself with
the speech of my colleague from Greece and add that my people
who are now suffering for years from the enemy and fighting to
regain their freedom, these people will see in the unanimity of the
United Nations who are not only united on the battlefields but are
working for a better peace, for a peace that will last for centuries.

Document 490

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 20, 1944
N o. 44

Statement by Dr. H. H. Kung, Chairman of the
Delegation of China, at the Executive
Plenary Session, July 20, 1944
M

r

. P r e s id

en t

:

After listening to the excellent statement by Lord Keynes, and
the eloquent speech of Judge Vinson— especially the touching senti­




1200

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

ment which he expressed with reference to China— I am happy to
state that the Chinese Delegation is ready to withdraw its reserva­
tion. After fighting seven years of war, I need not tell you that the
needs of China are very great. We made the reservation because
we are facing real difficulties but after the Chairman of the Quota
Committee explained to us the problems they are facing we wired
to our government explaining the difficulties confronting the Con­
ference. China is ready to make further sacrifices and to cooperate
with the friendly nations 100 percent in order to make this Confer­
ence a complete success. Therefore, Mr. President, I am happy
to be able to tell you that we withdraw our reservation and I hope
the other countries who have made reservations may also be able
to see their way clear to withdraw them so that we can have a
record of complete accord and show to the world that we can whole­
heartedly cooperate for the common good.

Document 491

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

Ju ly 20, 1944
N o. 45

Statement by M. Pierre Mendes-France, Chairman
of French Delegation, at Executive Plenary
Session, July 20
M

r

. P r e s id e n t :

France has always been among the nations which have partici­
pated without reservation in matters of international solidarity.
She will do so more than ever after this war which has proven once
again the fundamental need of cooperation between all nations of
good will. We believe firmly that the world would know a period
of terrible disorder if the countries should not decide to collaborate
closely toward the reconstruction of the world, social progress and
maintenance of peace.
This task inevitably requires that substantial concessions be
made by all of the nations, and, I venture to say that each one will
in the future respect to a larger extent than before the legitimate
interests of other nations.
I also venture to say that each country will consent to some




APPENDIX I

1201

restrictions and limitations of its sovereignty and also of its full
freedom of action.
Such revisions in international relations will, however, be ad­
hered to only if all the peoples of the world are convinced that they
are entering into organizations conceived in a fair manner where
all will find sufficient guarantees for the recognition and the exer­
cise of their rights, the development of their natural resources and
the furtherance of their intellectual and spiritual faculties.
I shall not read to you here my letter to the President in which I
state in greater detail France's position. In this letter I offer some
remarks regarding the situation of the liberated countries, the
allocation of quotas, with particular reference to Europe and
France, the definition of “ current transactions", the flexibility of
the machinery for the purchase of foreign currencies, etc.
We have expressed some reservations during the proceedings,
but if all countries represented here withdraw all of their reserva­
tions with the understanding that some sort of general reservation
covering the entirety of the text and asserting the total liberty
of the governments, be maintained, the French Delegation shall
adhere to this procedure. The French Delegation also takes note
that in accordance with what was said by Lord Keynes, the text
of its reservations shall remain recorded in the minutes of the
Commission.
The French Government, and with it the French people, soon to
be liberated by the armies of the United Nations and through the
sacrifices of its own sons, shall participate tomorrow as yesterday
in any effort tending to improve the texts which we arrived at and
which we consider a first approximation.
(p. 2)
Neither the Government nor the people of France will forget
how very much indebted they are to the intelligent and courageous
initiative taken by the President of this great American republic,
to the constructive will and tenacity of the President of this Con­
ference, to the creative spirit, the technical competence, and the
tireless devotion of the experts of all delegations and, in particular,
to the Chairman of Commission I, to whom his Commission last
night has paid tribute by unanimous applause.
I wish to assure them that, faithful to her tradition, France will
bring her entire devotion toward these new institutions aiming to
build for the future sounder currencies, a more stable economy, a
more just community, a humanity which will be better protected
against misery and war.




1202

M O N E T A R Y AN D F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE
Document 493

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 20, 1944
N o. 46

Statement by the Honorable Fred M. Vinson, ViceChairman of the Delegation of the United States,
at the Executive Plenary Session, July 20, 1944
M r . P r e s id e n t :

Gentlemen here assembled, today we approach a new milestone
in the path of history. Ofttimes when we are nearby, close to his­
tory in the making, we fail to recognize the significance of our
meeting. I join with the Delegate from the United Kingdom in
respect of the particular consideration that should be given to
reservations. There is no doubt in my mind that special reserva­
tion weakens the general reservation that is provided in the invi­
tation under which we meet. It not only makes it difficult in the
particular country making the reservation, it makes it difficult to
those countries where no reservations are made. But I would
speak to you particularly in respect of a somewhat unhappy frame
of mind that may exist amidst the Delegates from a few countries
with reference to their quotas. I know the position in which repre­
sentatives of nations find themselves but I also know that they do
not want to make the task of friends more difficult.
Among our Delegates were representatives of the House and
Senate. Conference after conference was held in respect of quotas
and particularly in regard to the limit to which our country could
go without danger of destroying our efforts. As you know the
original maximum was $8,000,000,000 (eight billion dollars). That
maximum was increased to $8,800,000,000 (eight billion eight
hundred million dollars). We were advised that if that limit were
exceeded danger would lie ahead. Certainly no Delegate present
can possibly think that the country in which the genesis of this
Conference took place fails to recognize the condition of a wartorn world; that the United States fails to know the misery today
that exists in the occupied countries of the world. Gentlemen, the
heart of America goes out to the peoples of the earth who suffer
from the attack of those countries whose philosophy runs counter
to yours and ours.
Tell me that the United States is unmindful of the historic




APPENDIX I

1203

friendship that has existed throughout the years between China
and our country; tell me that the United States does not recognize
the glorious courageous effort that China has made and will make
against the treacherous Jap; tell me that the peoples of my country
are not appreciative of China barring the way to world empire in
the Pacific and probably elsewhere, barring the door to a long
dream of the treacherous Japs. We recognized the desires and
needs of China as well as every other devastated country on the
globe.
Tell me that the people of my country can ever forget the France
that was, the France that is and the France that will be. We have
been taught in our schools; we learned it at our mother’s knees
that France came to us years ago when we were in need. 1917
when millions of our sons joined common cause with France and
others of her kind a historic statement was made by an American
(p. 2)
when he stood before the tomb of Lafayette, saluted and said,
“ Lafayette we are here". Tell me that my people will ever forget
the debt we awe France; that we will forget France's suffering,
France’s misery under the iron heel of the Nazis whose philosophy
was in common with that of the Jap and who would have rid this
world of civilization as you and I know it.
Gentlemen, my country is not unmindful of the sufferings that
is rampant throughout the world; my country desires to go to the
extent— to the very limit of its powers in respect of the Fund, in
respect of the Bank, in other instrumentalities in order that we
may have the kind of world in which to live that we need. I men­
tioned a moment ago that we stretched the maximum to the very
limit and it is with regret we find our friends not only China,
France, India, Greece, Yugoslavia, and possibly others, feeling
so deeply that they would make reservation today on the question
of quotas. We trust, we pray that real consideration, reconsidera­
tion perhaps, will be given to that item.
Gentlemen, we had in our midst the Delegate from New Zealand.
He left the Conference last evening. He was unable to say his
adieus, so from New York he writes what I think to be a very sweet
letter to our distinguished citizen, Harry White. I will read it in
part: “ Harry White, Monetary and Financial Conference, Bretton
Woods, New Hampshire. Owing to urgency to make a train last
night it was not possible to say goodbye before leaving for New
Zealand. In congratulating you and those working with you on
the foundation work in connection with the Fund and the Bank
795841 — 48— 6




1204

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C I A L CONFEREN CE

I affirm that it can easily be the greatest step in world history with
possibilities of removing one of the major causes of war, if not
the major cause. Signed, Walter Nash.”
Greatest step in history: the possibility to destroy the major
cause of war— A stabilized economy, restoration and development
that will flow from the construction of the Bank may be a great
step toward removing the causes of war. A poet said that yester­
day is but a dream and tomorrow is only a vision but today welllived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and every to­
morrow a vision of hope. We are here today. In my judgment the
action that will be taken here and now will have momentous effect
in the future of our world. We have prided ourselves in being
coped with unity. Today will be the day in which unity or non­
unity may be seen. Ofttimes men fail because of the fear of the
unknown. Miles intervene between your countries and Bretton
Woods. Today makes every tomorrow a vision of hope. I trust that
doubts that may arise in your heart will be resolved and the great
objective, the hope, the whole being greater than any of its parts.
You will show us little disunity as your hearts may dictate. Mr.
President, I second the motion made by Lord Keynes.

D'ocument 500

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 47

Remarks of the Honorable Fred M. Vinson, Vice-Chair­
man, Delegation of the United States, Towards the Close
of the Executive Plenary Session, July 20, 1944
I feel that a word should be expressed concerning the very effec­
tive and cooperative assistance that has been rendered in the
production of this work by many, many foreign technicians. Not
only has a real contribution been made by them in Washington,
Atlantic City and elsewhere, but having had some opportunity to
witness their unselfish labors, their effective and competent work
and complete objectiveness, I would add a word of tribute to them.




APPENDIX I

1205

Document 501

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

July 21, 1944
N o. 48

Remarks by Mr. Manuel B. Llosa, Delegate from Peru,
Before Commission III on the Creation, in the Field
of International Economic Relations, of Condi­
tions Necessary for the Attainment of the Purposes
of the Fund and the Bank, and Other Broader
Primary Objectives of Economic Policy.
As it has been stated, the Delegation from Peru recognizes that
the draft resolution which has been read covers and reproduces the
issues of the original Peruvian proposal with regard to the enu­
meration of purposes that must be pursued to assure the attain­
ment of the objectives sought by the International Monetary Fund
and the Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the broader
primary objectives of economic policy. However, said draft resolu­
tion fails to mention a practical means to achieve those purposes,
whereas the Peruvian proposal does not.
We continue in our belief that a conference of the united and
associated nations on commercial policy may be one of such practi­
cal means. If it could not be held soon, a start might be made with
one or more regional conferences on related subjects. For instance,
a Pan American conference which might deal with the special
problems which will arise for many American countries from the
cessation of production for war purposes, endeavoring to adopt
resolutions for an orderly return to peace conditions, as a neces­
sary counteract of the economic mobilization of America for the
defense of the Continent, which was enacted in the Third Meeting
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs, held in Rio de Janeiro, after
Pearl Harbor.
We are not going to specify the Agenda that might be assigned
to such an International Commercial Conference already outlined
in the Peruvian proposal, but we would like to mention now, as
an example of the subjects to be tackled by it, the items which
should aim at the elimination of discriminatory practices in the
field of international trade.
A great many practices of the kind, which particularly arise in
the relations of small countries with powerful international “ car­
tels” or other world wide organizations, will not be taken into




1206

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

consideration outside a conference, because they belong to the
jurisdiction of moral rather than positive law; namely, the dump­
ing and underselling to destroy legitimate activities of similar in­
dustries, the discriminatory rates in transportation and communi­
cations, and other disloyal practices which impede the normal de­
velopment of commerce and the economic progress of countries.
The Conference on Commercial Policy seems to be the most able
institution to take care of these practices, by drafting a code of
fair commercial relations, which would be submitted for the ap­
proval of the nations represented and in which code the universal
principles of sound commercial behaviour that should be adopted,
and the unfair practices that should be condemned, should be
clearly defined.
(P . 2 )

It may be taken for granted that the existence of such a code,
if it happens to be approved, will not eradicate those undesirable
practices, but it is hoped that it will constitute a curb for the com­
mercial enterprises inclined to employ that sort of means, and a
yardstick to estimate the high moral standing of those who do not
employ them, helping the new countries in that way to attain
higher levels of employment and better standards of living.
That is why we place our confidence in the fact that, although
not specifically mentioned in the draft resolution, among the means
with which the resolution will be implemented, there will figure
one or more international conferences, as has been suggested by
the Peruvian Delegation.
Mr. Chairman, I would like my words to be on the record of the
proceedings.

Document 502

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

July 21, 1944
N o. 49

Motion of Mr. Manuel B. Llosa, Delegate from Peru,
on the Subject of Silver, Before Commission III
M r. C h a ir m a n :

As one of the four greatest producers of silver in the world,
Peru is much interested in the lot of this metal.
The historical background of the use of silver as a monetary




APPENDIX I

1207

metal cannot be forgotten and must not be underestimated. The
psychological prestige of silver cannot be denied, nor its popu­
larity among the less favoured classes throughout the world.
Several countries, including Peru, use silver as a part of their
legal monetary reserves.
Outstanding representatives of the silver-minded opinion have
formally claimed that unless a place is assigned to silver in mone­
tary stabilization there would be an insufficiency of media for the
settlement of international balances, and the use of silver as money
will be undermined.
Backed with enough expert opinion to be realistic, it has been
recently suggested, too, as a platform for the mining industry, a
general support of hard money philosophy, a policy that Peruvian
miners are willing to adopt.
On account of these considerations, the Peruvian Delegation
supports the report submitted by the Committee I of this Com­
mission III, stating that the matters of value of silver and of the
monetary uses of this metal deserve further study by all the inter­
ested nations, and moves the report be accepted.

Document 504

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

A ND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 50

Statement by Mr. M. S. Stepanov, Chairman, Delegation
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, at the
Executive Plenary Session, July 20, 1944
M r . P r e s id e n t , D e l e g a t e s :

Among postwar international economic problems of particular
importance are problems connected with international payment
arrangements, and stabilization of currencies. A successful solu­
tion of these problems would facilitate the general development of
international trade. Well-balanced trade relations between coun­
tries constitute a sound basis for their prosperity. Therefore, our
Conference will have great importance in the postwar organization
of the world.
Representatives of various states interested in the development
of world trade have gathered at this Conference. The Soviet Union




1208

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

whose foreign trade is conducted by the State will assume its
proper place in the solution of these problems.
Occupation by the Hitlerites and transformation of many demo­
cratic countries into battlefields has brought disaster to them.
Among these countries the Soviet Union occupies a special posi­
tion. The Hitlerite barbarians were especially ferocious in looting
and plundering the temporarily occupied Soviet territories. Con­
sequently industry and agriculture have been ruined over a con­
siderable part of the USSR, and hundreds of cities and thousands
of other populated places destroyed. The Hitlerite Huns have also
caused very great damage to other countries. However, interna­
tional economic collaboration between the freedom-loving peoples
will help the liberated countries to restore and rebuild their
economic structure.
Like other forms of international collaboration, economic col­
laboration and particularly collaboration in monetary and financial
spheres, requires mutual understanding, mutual respect for the
interests of the participating nations and the sovereign rights of
their states. The International Monetary Fund should in all its
activity be guided by the above principles. The Conference has
prepared such provisions for the Fund which would meet these
sound requirements for effective international collaboration.
The Conference has carried out a great and useful work in
elaborating the Draft Agreement on the Fund. High tribute should
be paid in this connection to Dr. White and his colleagues. We wish
to pay a special tribute to Mr. Morgenthau and to Mr. Vinson
whose efforts greatly facilitated the success of the Conference. We
are happy to observe that all Delegations have worked in a friendly
spirit and cooperated closely in achieving mutual agreement.
The work of the Conference has been successfully accomplished
although we had to deal with many questions of a difficult nature.
This Conference will be regarded as one of the important efforts of
the United Nations to solve the postwar economic problems of the
world.
(p- 2)
The Delegation of the USSR has made some reservations re­
garding the Draft Agreement on the Fund which were mentioned
by the Reporting Delegate. I have to state, of course, that the ap­
proval of the Draft Agreement at this Conference, as had been
indicated in the invitation of the Government of the United States
to this Conference, should not be regarded as approval of the
Draft in whole or in any of its parts on behalf of the USSR Gov­
ernment. The USSR Delegation deems it its duty to submit the




APPENDIX I

1209

Draft Agreement on the Fund prepared by this Conference for the
consideration of the USSR Government, reserving the full right
of the USSR Government to make a free and independent study
of the Draft and to decide all questions connected therewith.
Our Conference, which aims to secure postwar international
collaboration among freedom-loving peoples in monetary and fi­
nancial spheres, is a new contribution to the mutual efforts of the
United and Associated Nations which are destined to achieve our
mutual goal— everlasting peace and world prosperity.
I agree to include all our reservations into the Final Minutes
of Commission I. Therefore, these reservations may not be entered
into the Final Act.

Document 508

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

July 21, 1944
No. 51

International Monetary Fund
(Purposes, Methods, Consequences)
Much confusion about the International Monetary Fund would
be avoided if it were clearly understood that there are three sepa­
rate aspects in the proposed plan: one, the Fund's purpose; two,
the methods proposed for achieving this purpose, and, three, the
consequences that may flow from its achievement.
The purpose of the Fund is the restoration of world trade and
its continuing expansion. While the agreement proposing the
Fund deals for the most part with matters relating to foreign
exchange and the maintenance of its stability, that after all is
not an end in itself but merely one of the means towards achiev­
ing better trade conditions. Similarly, while the Fund may be
expected, through improving trade conditions, to contribute to the
maintenance of high levels of employment and real income as well
as to the restoration of disrupted economies and the development
of the productive resources of all members, these matters are in
the nature of hoped for consequences of the successful operation
of the Fund rather than its immediate purpose.
A brief discussion of the three phases of the matter is pre­
sented in the following paragraphs. No attempt is made to de­
scribe the Fund’s operation or to cover all the matters with which




1210

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

the proposal deals. In these respects, the document speaks for
itself. This is merely an attempt to draw a sharp distinction
between the Fund's purposes, its methods, and the possible conse­
quences of its operation.
P u rpo se

No country is completely free from the influence of foreign
trade. Raw material producing countries need foreign trade in
order to find markets for their output. These countries need
the proceeds of the sale of their products abroad for the purpose
of buying goods for consumption as well as for the development
of their country. Industrial countries usually require foreign
trade both for the acquisition of raw materials which they use
in manufacturing and for the disposal of their products. There
are great differences between countries in the extent to which
they depend on foreign trade. In some countries foreign commerce
constitutes a very large proportion of total national income. In
other countries the percentage of national income that is produced
by foreign trade is small. But even in the latter countries it is
often the case that the marginal percentage involved in foreign
trade may spell the difference between prosperity and depression.
For these reasons, a restored world economy cannot be imagined
without the establishment of world trade on the largest possible
scale and with the least possible obstructions. This need not be
(p. 2)
elaborated; suffice it to recall the innumerable difficulties and fric­
tions which developed in the two decades after the last war as a
result of increasing obstructions to world trade. If the Monetary
Fund can make a substantial contribution to its restoration in the
maximum possible volume it will not have been in vain that the
representatives of 44 nations spent much time and effort in pro­
moting and fashioning the plan.
M

ethod

The greater part of the proposed agreement deals with the
methods devised for the purpose of encouraging world trade. The
principal method is the restoration of exchange stability. Assur­
ance to producers and traders throughout the world that they can
count on a reasonably stable level of exchange rates would make
it very much easier for them to engage in their business. They
would have the assurance that their profits will not be exposed
to the unpredictable risk of great fluctuations in the value of the
currencies for which they propose to sell their product or in which
they propose to pay for their imports. Exchange stability affects




APPENDIX I

1211

directly not only those who are engaged in international trade but
also all those who produce goods a considerable part of which
finds its way into world markets. It is, therefore, not a matter
that concerns merely a relatively small proportion of some coun­
tries’ population but one that directly concerns the great majority
of all people. In fact, no prosperous world trade and no pros­
perous economies can persist in the face of violent fluctuations
in exchange. It is for this reason, and as a result of painful ex­
perience, that the necessity for developing an International Mone­
tary Fund was recognized.
More specifically, the Fund proposes to limit the right of mem­
ber countries to change their exchange rates without going through
a certain procedure. The countries that join the Fund undertake
not to propose such changes unless they consider them appropriate
to the correction of a fundamental disequilibrium.
While the Fund looks to exchange stability as the principal
means for the restoration of world trade, it recognizes limitations
on stability that are necessary in order to meet the internal con­
ditions of different countries. It provides that during the period
of transition, in view of the extreme uncertainties that must
prevail after the war comes to an end, many adjustments will
be necessary, and it is proposed that the Fund in deciding on ite
attitude to any proposals for changes in exchange rates pre­
sented by members shall give the member country the benefit of
any reasonable doubt. It is indeed impossible to conceive of a Fund
possessed of such wisdom as to provide immediately after the war
rates of exchange that will in all cases continue to be appro­
priate as the process of reconstruction proceeds. There is, there­
fore, an indication that the Fund will have an open mind in this
matter and will proceed with due consideration for the needs
of applying countries.
The Fund also has other provisions that add flexibility to the
system it hopes to establish. It authorizes a country to make
a ten percent change in its currency without obtaining the con­
currence of the Fund. However, even in that case the country
is required to consult with the Fund and to act in accordance
with its purposes, so that if the agreement is carried out in good
faith such changes will not be arbitrary or competitive devalua­
tion. Furthermore, the proposal provides that a country which
after having made a ten percent change finds itself under the
necessity of making another change without delay may request
the Fund’s concurrence in such a change and a reply must be
given within 72 hours, Other changes can be obtained with the




1212

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

Fund's concurrence and there are no prescribed limitations on
such authorized changes.
(P. 3)
It may be contended that these provisions go a long way toward
diminishing the hoped for stability of exchanges. Careful con­
sideration, however, would indicate that the opposite is the case.
Stability does not mean rigidity, and rigidity in the past has re­
sulted in extreme instability. A country which finds that its
domestic economy is suffering greatly from inability to sell abroad,
because of an inappropriate rate of exchange and also finds it
impossible to make other adjustments to correct the situation, has
no alternative but to change the rate. If it does not change it
soon enough but persists in maintaining it after it has become
untenable, there are likely to be serious consequences both at home
and abroad. Ultimately the rate will be changed and probably by
a larger amount than would have been necessary if the country
had acted promptly. Illustrations of such cases are too common
to need mention.
Therefore, the provision for orderly changes in consultation with
an International Fund and with its concurrence, so long as they
are in accordance with the general objectives of the Fund, is a
contribution to stability rather than an impingement upon it.
In order to protect the economies of the country from any un­
toward influences resulting from excessive rigidity of the rate,
there is an explicit provision that the Fund shall not reject a
requested change that is necessary to restore equilibrium, on the
ground that it does not approve of the domestic social or political
policies of the member country proposing the change. These pro­
visions are not a substantive limitation on what the Fund is ex­
pected to do, but a reassurance to the countries that these vital
matters were kept in mind by the framers of the proposal, and
that the member countries’ autonomy in domestic affairs is not
threatened.
In pursuance of its aim to restore world trade through exchange
stability the Fund provides a method of affording countries an
opportunity in effect to borrow foreign currencies from the Fund,
in exchange for their own. This enables countries that are tem­
porarily short of means for making payments abroad to make
such payments out of the Fund’s resources. The countries are
thus protected from feeling immediately the pressures arising out
of an unfavorable trade balance in a way that leads to disruption,
measures of restrictions, blocked accounts, limitations of trade, etc.
There are many safeguards provided in the Fund to protect its




APPENDIX I

1213

resources from uses that are excessive in amount or in duration.
The Fund is expected to be a revolving fund which affords to the
countries a breathing spell during which they can undertake such
measures as may be necessary to restore their economy to a con­
dition of equilibrium without in the meantime disrupting their for­
eign trade or their domestic economies. No safeguard provided
for the Fund is more important than the provision that the
countries’ request for foreign currencies must indicate that the
uses to which these currencies will be put are consistent with the
purposes of the Fund. This means that countries which conduct
their affairs in good faith in accordance with the undertaking to
act in conformity with the purposes of the Fund will not in any
circumstances divert the resources of the Fund to inappropriate
uses. In international agreements between sovereign States no
method of enforcement can be as important as reliance on the
good faith of the participants. The Fund's operations are gen­
erally limited to current transactions. With reasonable exceptions,
the Fund is not supposed to be used for the transfer of capital or
for purposes of relief or for rehabilitating a country's productive
plant. Such operations must be handled through other.channels.
(P. 4)
An important incidental provision in this connection is the
power of the Fund to warn a member country, even though that
country may not be using the Fund's resources, that the conduct
of its affairs is not consistent with the purposes of the Fund.
Such a warning might point out to the country that its conduct
not only constitutes a failure to perform an obligation undertaken
by joining the Fund but also may be prejudicial to the country if
in future it should wish to have recourse to the Fund.
To summarize, the Fund attempts to provide the greatest degree
of exchange stability that is consistent with the economic neces­
sities of the members. It introduces stability without rigidity and
elasticity without looseness.
Conseq

uences

In drafting the proposal it has been the intention not only to
indicate the purpose and the methods of the Fund but also briefly
to mention the consequences that it may have on world prosperity.
As a means of assuring the member countries that join the Fund
that it is not conceived in the narrow spirit of protecting the
financial interests of traders and their backers but in the spirit
of far-sighted concern about the general well-being, it is indicated
that the Fund proposes to contribute to the promotion and main­
tenance of high levels of employment and real income and to the




1214

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

development of the productive resources of all member countries
as primary objectives of economic policy.
The Fund does not propose to be a universal panacea for all
human ills but only a mechanism for the performance of a clearly
defined specific purpose. At the same time it is one of the means
which, in conjunction with many others, offers hope for the re­
establishment of a prosperous and, consequently, a peaceful world.

Document 513

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 52

Remarks of Andre Istel, Delegate of France, at the
Executive Plenary Session, July 21, 1944
M

r

. P r e s id e n t ,

It is the conviction of the French Delegation that in cooperating
wholeheartedly toward the establishment of the Bank for Recon­
struction and Development, we have participated in a historic event.
We feel certain that in our efforts toward new financial conceptions,
we shall have the full support of French public opinion.
The French people are keenly aware of the lack of vision and of
sense of destiny which was prevailing during the intermediate
period between the two wars; they are looking towards new hori­
zons ; they feel that in this modern world of ours, methods of dis­
tribution and financing have not yet been adapted to the revolu­
tionary changes which have already taken place in the fields of
production and transportation.
We are today facing destructions such as the world has never
known. The French people know that by enduring these devasta­
tions, they are making an effective contribution toward a better
world of the future. They also know that they have what might be
called the “tragic luck” of having to start from the very scratch
in the task of reconstruction.
Modern wars are more destructive than wars of the past. But
owing to new techniques, to new equipment and to mass production,
the amount of new wealth produced each year is today and shall be
tomorrow much greater than it used to be only a few years ago in
proportion to the amount of existing wealth. We may, therefore,




APPENDIX I

1215

readily assume that war damage can be repaired in a relatively
reasonable period of time provided sound political, economic and
financial measures are adopted.
The plan conceived by the American and British experts is
audacious, while at the same time realistic—o f course there is not
human work, without weak points; a further study with less pres­
sure of time than at Bretton Woods might still improve the plan.
The purposes of the Bank, as shown by Lord Keynes in a very
enlightening way, are twofold: to provide resources and to provide
guarantees. As guarantees can be furnished by all countries, even
by those which have at present no resources, all of the United
Nations can participate in the Bank. If resources only had been
involved, objections might have been raised against including ini­
tially countries unable to supply resources for an extended period
of time. (The situation of the Fund is different since any country
may temporarily become creditor on current account.) It is prob­
ably more important to provide guarantees than to provide re­
sources—for the world does not lack capital, it lacks safety.
The French Delegation considers it not only the duty, but the
interest of all the 45 nations (I have not forgotten Denmark) as­
sembled at Bretton Woods to participate in the Bank with the same
enthusiasm, (I did not say: with the same amount) with which
they participated in the Fund. I am certain that we all feel that
(p. 2)

way and, even if some may have had a few moments of hesitation,
they have not been able to withhold very long their true feelings.
However, the French Delegation considers it necessary to re­
iterate its deep disappointment over what it considers an inadequate
recognition of the particular hardships suffered by the countries
devastated by war and by enemy occupation in general—by Europe
and France in particular. No recognition of this situation had been
accorded in the Fund; as regards the Bank I prefer not to mention
the figures involved. Just the same, France remains undaunted in
her spirit and determination of complete and sincere cooperation.
France has not confined her action to the defense of her interests,
but she has always been ready to assume the entirety of her obliga­
tions.
The Chairman of the French Delegation has already expressed
his thanks and appreciation to the President of the United States,
to the Secretary of the Treasury and to the Chairman of Commis­
sion I, for his magnificent work. May we be permitted to add our
expression of admiration and gratitude to Lord Keynes, who as one
of the originators of both plans and as Chairman of Commission II,




1216

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

has rendered to this Conference, and to the world, a service of the
highest order.
There is something in the mind of Lord Keynes, a mixture of
deepness of thought and of quickness of action which I believe is
unique.
I should also like to express the profound appreciation of the
French Delegation for the splendid work which was done by Judge
Vinson. He showed a sense of diplomacy, a patient and smiling
tenacity which command the respect of all. As Chairman of the
Quota Committee of the Fund he had first experienced the difficulty
of shaking the Delegations out of their shyness in order to have
them express their demands, and then in the Bank, he experienced
the difficulty of holding back the many prospective subscribers who
seemed always to be wanting to subscribe more.
Let us raise our minds to the standard of a new world situation,
let us not fall again in the rut of the 1930’s when over-production
was blamed for depressions while at the same time, consumers
lacked essential goods; when labour was unemployed while so much
necessary work was left undone; when capital was idle, while sev­
eral countries could obtain no capital to finance their development.
Let us hope that after having solved technical problems of produc­
tion and overcome so many natural obstacles, nations will find a
way of solving a problem of organization which involves none but
human obstacles.

Document 514

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FIN ANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 53

Remarks by Lord Keynes at Executive Plenary Session
July 21, 1944.
Mr. President, I need add very little to the eloquent report of
our Reporting Delegate, the Delegate of Belgium, Mr. Theunis.
Perhaps I may be excused the mention of a personal memory which
is not irrelevant to this memorable occasion. A quarter of a cen­
tury ago, at the end. of October, 1918, a few days before the
Armistice, Mr. Theunis and I traveled together through Belgium
behind the retreating German armies to form an immediate per­
sonal impression of the needs of reconstruction in his country
after that war.




A P P E N D IX 1

1217

No such bank as that which we now hope to create was in pros­
pect. Today, after a quarter of a century, Mr. Theunis and I find
ourselves brought closely together again and engaged in making
better preparation for a similar event. Perhaps Mr. Theunis and
I are the only members of this Conference— I am not sure— who
were closely concerned with that early experience in the economic
field.
After the last war the most dreadful mistakes were made. It is
with some emotion that I find myself today collaborating with my
old friend to bring to birth an institution which may play a
unique part in restoring the devastation of a second war and in
bringing back to a life of peace and abundant fruitfulness those
great European and Asiatic parents of civilization to which all the
world owes so much of what is honorable and grand in the heritage
of mankind.

Document 516

UNI TED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
F or the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 54

Remarks of Georges Theunis, Delegate of Belgium,
at the Executive Plenary Session, July 21, 1944
M r . C h a ir m a n , Ge n t l e m e n :

I have the honor to report to the Conference on the work of
Commission II, which was set up by the Conference at its Plenary
Session of July 3 to study the proposals for the creation of a Bank
for Reconstruction and Development.
The first meeting of Commission II was also held on July 3 and
was mainly of a formal character, with the exception of an in­
spiring address by Lord Keynes and the appointment of an Agenda
Committee which, slightly enlarged, was to become the hard­
working Drafting Committee. The Commission met again on
July 11. Its Chairman, Lord Keynes, proposed a method of work
by which the best advantage could be taken of the accomplishment
of Commission I while speedy progress was made on the more
delicate points with which the members of Commission II were
confronted.
As in Commission I, the work was divided between four Com­
mittees, dealing respectively with purposes, policies and capital of
the Bank; operations; organization and management; form and




1218

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

status. At the same time, several ad hoc subcommittees were
created for the purpose of examining points which evidently called
for special study and discussion. To these subcommittees the fol­
lowing questions were referred: membership; subscription; rates
of capital employable; flat rate of commission; relationship of in­
ternational agencies; management; suspension and withdrawals;
taxation.
Subcommittees—and amongst them the Subscription Committee
and the Special Committee on Unsettled Problems—were entrusted
with the task of solving the knottier problems. Most of these suband ad hoc committees were created directly by the Commission,
in agreement with the chairmen of the committees, and all of them
were allowed to report directly to the Commission if it were
thought advantageous. This change of procedure was instrumental
in cutting down unnecessary delays. The Commission met nine
times and the various committees and subcommittees held numer­
ous meetings.
This afternoon, the Commission adopted the Articles of Agree­
ment of the Bank for Reconstruction and Development which are
attached to the present report and which the Commission re­
quested me to refer for approval to the Plenary Assembly of the
Conference.
I must call your attention to the fact that the work of Commis­
sion II was simpler in some respects and more complicated in
others than the work of Commission I. It was simpler because
many of the questions relating to general organization, having
already been very carefully studied in Commission I, it sufficed,
in most cases, either to accept them as they were, or to adapt them
to the particular nature of the problems submitted to Commis­
sion II. The work was more complicated because, unlike tne Fund,
the Bank had not been for a long time past under the scrutiny of
international research. Years ago, the questions involving ex­
change stability were already widely discussed both in Europe and
in America. Various solutions had been recommended, and proce­
dures of a somewhat primitive and inadequate character had
indeed been in operation between the two wars.
(p. 2)
The creation of the Bank was an entirely new venture. Never,
during the numerous international meetings which over a period
of twenty-five years have studied all sorts of economic problems,
was any thought given to an organization so considerable in its
scope and so novel in its conception as that which has been the sub­
ject of your deliberations. So novel was it, that no adequate name




APPENDIX I

1219

could be found for it. In so far as we can talk of capital subscrip­
tions, loans, guarantees, issue of bonds, the new financial institution
may have some apparent claim to the name of Bank. But the type
of shareholders, the nature of subscriptions, the exclusion of all
deposits and of short-term loans, the non-profit basis, are quite
foreign to the accepted nature of a Bank. However it was acci­
dentally born with the name Bank, and Bank it remains, mainly
because no satisfactory name could be found in the dictionary for
this unprecedented institution.
Here is another example of our difficulties: The International
Monetary Fund offered obvious advantages to its members in ex­
change for their subscriptions. But, to some people, the advantages
offered by the Bank were not so obvious at first sight. Having re­
gard to their economic structure, certain countries might justifiably
feel that the Bank could not be of assistance to them and that they
would not have to resort to such a source of credit. But here an
idea comes into play, an idea which I do not need to emphasize to
you, Gentlemen, who have long been convinced of its real greatness,
but which should be impressed on the mass of the people whom you
represent. This idea is the idea of human solidarity.
All those who have given thought to the problems which arise
every day in connection with the economic life of a country are
aware of the economic interdependence of nations. This inter­
dependence may not be immediately apparent. It is unquestionable,
however, that a loan granted to one country from the resources
or with the guarantee of the Bank will not be advantageous to that
country alone. The loan will enable it to reconstruct its economy,
destroyed by war, or inadequately developed. As a result, activity is
fostered, needs and requirements are satisfied, purchasing power
is increased, new markets are born, and, indirectly, by means of the
general flow of international trade, all countries finally benefit by
the improvement brought about in the particular country which
has obtained a loan through the Bank. In this way, capital which
is now in excess in certain countries will again be put to productive
use and will find its reward not only in the rate of interest on re­
munerative investments, but also, indirectly, in the promotion of
world prosperity which rich countries themselves need in order to
maintain and develop their own well-being.
As I said before, some of the problems met with in drafting the
regulations of the future Bank were of an entirely new character
—much more so than for the Fund, the studies of which were
started two years ago.
This is not meant to detract from the merit of our colleagues
795841— 48— 7




1220

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

who concentrated their attention especially on the Monetary Fund
and who, I repeat, have greatly facilitated our work. My only inten(p. 3)
tion is to underline the considerable credit due to Commission II,
its committees and subcommittees, which, within a limited period
of time, have succeeded in overcoming the difficulties involved and
in reaching an agreement on the principles which are to govern the
activity of the Bank. This achievement would have been impossible
without two distinct elements: the first is the brilliant chairman­
ship of Lord Keynes. Not only has he greatly contributed to the
ideas contained in the articles of Agreement of the Bank, but he
also has kept the proceedings at a brisk pace which the Delegates
sportingly emulated. The other is the untiring and admirable work
performed by the Secretariat under the orders of Dr. Kelchner,
and by the secretaries of this Commission: Mr. Upgren, Mr.
Smithies, and Miss Russell. A considerable number of reports,
amendments, and other documents were drawn up, copied and dis­
tributed with sufficient promptitude to permit the work to proceed
uninterruptedly.
I should now like to call your attention to a few remarks relating
more directly to the Bank. As for the purpose of the Bank, it should
be noted that the Bank is established both for the reconstruction
and for the development of the member countries, and these two
objectives are to be pursued on a footing of equality.
On the other hand, the Bank aims at covering a field distinct from
the Fund. As Mr. Rasminsky pointed out in his report to Commis­
sion I, “ the Fund is not regarded and should not be regarded as an
institution for the provision of long-term capital requirements” .
The Fund has been created to provide members with an “ opportun­
ity to correct maladjustments in their balance of payments” and “ to
shorten the duration and lessen the degree” of such maladjust­
ments.
On the contrary, when the Bank promotes or supplements private
investments either by means of guarantees and participations in
private loans or by providing funds out of its own resources, the
aim is to provide capital on a long-term or medium-term basis.
Precautionary measures, as you know, appear in various provisions
of the Agreement to prevent such movements of capital from ham­
pering the economy of the countries concerned.
Next, I turn to the prospective size of the actual subscription.
The capital of the Bank is a huge sum and far exceeds anything
the world has ever known in this field. The greater part, however,
is in the form of a guarantee fund which cannot be called up except




APPE NDIX I

1221

over a period of years and the full amount of which we are entitled
to hope will never be called up. Careful recommendations have
been worked out regarding the operation of the Bank with a view
to protecting its resources and its credit. The first payments pro­
vided for, though ample for the initial operations, are moderate
enough and are within the capacity of all the subscribers.
In spite of the difficulties encountered, I have found at the Con­
ference ground for comfort.
In 1927,1 was taking part in an important economic conference
in Geneva. A year of preparatory work and several weeks devoted
to discussions were needed before it was possible to recommend to
the 51 governments represented the economic policy which in the
(p. 4)
opinion of the Conference was indispensable to restore prosperity.
Alas, those recommendations were never implemented! But during
the seventeen years that have elapsed since 1927, these ideas on
economic policy have made good progress and now find a better
response. Indeed, at Bretton Woods we have passed the stage of
making recommendations of a more or less general nature; we are
recommending action. This is evidenced by the important amounts
which various countries are contemplating to subscribe and which
bear witness to the frame of mind of the delegates at the end of our
deliberations.
But don't let us stop with contemplation of the two milestones
we have reached on the arduous road which humanity has to cover
before reaching the peaceful prosperity to which we all aspire.
Even if the Bank and the Fund succeed in their purposes to the full
extent of the most favorable expectations, they cannot be sufficient
to restore a prosperous world economy. I would go further and say
that they could not be successful in a world whose economy re­
mained chaotic in other respects. But they can be and should be the
starting point of this restoration.
Before ending my remarks, I should like to pay tribute to Presi­
dent Roosevelt, to his right-hand man in financial matters, Mr.
Morgenthau, and to the Government and the people of the United
States of America, for the initiative taken by this country in
launching, with farsighted vision, the far-reaching plan which
inspired the Articles of Agreement of the Bank. A great deal of our
appreciation should also go to Mr. Harry White, who was instru­
mental in giving shape to the plan.
In promoting the ideas of the Bank and of the Fund, and in
calling this Monetary Conference, the Government of the U.S.A.
has, on the common peace front of the United Nations, made a
contribution which timely complements that of the glorious Ameri­




1222

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

can armies on the war front. Allies on the battlefield, we must also
do our part together in preparing a better world.
I have stressed the importance of the Fund and of the Bank in
the material organization of tomorrow, but the moral element
which would be expressed in the success of both organizations would
be of paramount value. It would mean that before the war is over,
men of good will, men coming from all parts of the world, men of
different races and creeds, whose countries have different political
systems, have agreed and have succeeded in collaborating in here­
tofore undreamed-of efforts at insuring a better and more secure
future for the whole world. The repercussions of such an achieve­
ment will be tremendous.
The plans set up at Bretton Woods are not perfect. Even if they
were, their forbidding technicalities and the novelty of their
thought might be enough to arouse misapprehension. For many
years, I have noticed that economic questions, and especially finan­
cial matters, are not properly understood by the masses. When you
leave Bretton Woods, Gentlemen, your task will not be over. You
who can bear witness to the sincerity of purpose which has pre­
vailed at Bretton Woods can also dissipate false alarms, clear up
possible misunderstandings, explain the necessary compromises
that were made, and, by so doing, act in your respective countries
as pioneers of a just and promising international cooperation.

Document 517

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 55

Remarks by Mr. Dean Acheson in Executive Plenary
Session, July 21, 1944
Mr. President, before you put the vote to adopt the report of
Commission II, may I add a word of tribute to those which have
already been spoken. You have referred, Mr. President, to the
brilliant leadership under which Commission II has gone for­
ward. May I say a word about those who with me have been
laborers in the vineyard. Under that brilliant leadership, we
have felt from time to time as Mr. Theunis has mentioned that
perhaps we were traveling with the speed of light, but then we
knew that it was a great light which illuminated all our work.




APPENDIX I

1223

Commission II, Mr. President, was started much later than Com­
mission I. We could not have finished it, had it not had the col­
laborative work of literally scores of delegates or technicians in
this Conference. There is not a delegation here which has not con­
tributed to and left the impression of its contribution upon the
work of Commission II. Commission II has been in a very true
sense a symbol of international collaboration. Far into the night
these delegates and these technicians guided by the chairmen of
the committees have worked to finish and have finished their work.
May I say also, Mr. President, that Commission II is indeed fortu­
nate in its reporting delegate. You are aware that we finished the
work of Commission II only a few minutes ago and yet you saw
that the reporting delegate in these few minutes was able to put
into a continuous and philosophic exposition the work of that
entire Commission.

Document 520

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

For the Press

July 21, 1944
N o. 56

Remarks by the President of the Conference, Secretary
Morgenthau, Before the Executive Plenary Session,
July 21, and the Reply of the Mexican Delegate,
Senor Eduardo Suarez
I would like now to call on my very good friend, Mr. Eduardo
Suarez. Before doing so, I would like to say that over a period of
many years I have felt very fortunate that in our sister republic
to the south, that Mexico has had as its Finance Minister for so
many years a very able citizen in Mr. Suarez. Mr. Suarez and I are
sort of old hands at being Ministers of Finance and we have had
many, many problems in common not only financial, smuggling
across the border, the very difficult question of narcotics, and in
every case we in the United States feel that Mr. Suarez and his de­
partment have always cooperated fully with us to the end that to­
day Mexico enjoys one of the finest financial reputati<wis of any
republic in the world. It is with great pleasure that I call upon my
very old friend, Mr. Suarez.
In seconding the motion to approve the report of the Reporting




1224

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

Delegate for the Third Commission, I would very warmly thank
the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, Mr. Henry
Morgenthau, who has been, during all the time that I have been
Minister of Finance of Mexico, a great help, collaborating with my
country in all the difficult problems that we have faced during these
long years. I would like also to thank you gentlemen for the ap­
plause that you have given in mentioning of my name.

Document 521

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o. 57

Concluding Remarks by the President of the Confer­
ence, Henry Morgenthau, at Executive Plenary Session,
July 21, 1944
While this is not a moment for an address, I do want to con­
gratulate each one of you, including the technicians, on your very
able assistance and the unusually fine work which has been accom­
plished here. It seems to me that the spirit during these last three
weeks—all of us working side by side almost twenty-four hours a
day— is a spirit which must go on in peace as well as in war. I
know, talking for myself, I will rest well tonight. Each and all of
you have earned an equally good night’s rest and I hope you will
enjoy it.

Document 522

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 21, 1944
N o . 58

Address of the Honorable Henry Morgenthau, President
of the Conference, at the Closing Plenary Session of
the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference,
Saturday, July 22, 1944 at 10:45 p.m., E.W.T.
I am gratified to announce that the Conference at Bretton Woods
has successfully completed the task before it.




APPENDIX I

1225

It was, as we knew when we began, a difficult task, involving
complicated technical problems. We came here to work out methods
which would do away with the economic evils—the competitive cur­
rency devaluation and destructive impediments to trade—which
preceded the present war. We have succeeded in that effort.
The actual details of an international monetary and financial
agreement may seem mysterious to the general public. Yet at the
heart of it lie the most elementary bread and butter realities of
daily life. What we have done here in Bretton Woods is to devise
machinery by which men and women everywhere can freely ex­
change, on a fair and stable basis, the goods which they produce
through their labor. And we have taken the initial steps through
which the nations of the world will be able to help one another in
economic development to their mutual advantage and for the en­
richment of all.
The representatives of the 44 nations faced differences of opinion
frankly, and reached an agreement which is rooted in genuine un­
derstanding. None of the nations represented here has altogether
had its own way. We have had to yield to one another not in respect
to principles or essentials but in respect to methods and procedural
details. The fact that we have done so, and that we have done it in
a continuing spirit of good will and mutual trust, is, I believe, one
of the hopeful and heartening portents of our times. Here is a sign
blazoned upon the horizon, written large upon the threshold of
the future— a sign for men in battle, for men at work in mines and
mills, and in the fields, and a sign for women whose hearts have been
burdened and anxious lest the cancer of war assail yet another
generation—a sign that the peoples of the earth are learning how
to join hands and work in unity.
There is a curious notion that the protection of national interests
and the development of international cooperation are conflicting
philosophies—that somehow or other men of different nations can­
not work together without sacrificing the interests of their particu­
lar nations. There has been talk of this sort—and from people who
ought to know better— concerning the international cooperative
nature of the undertaking just completed at Bretton Woods. I am
perfectly certain that no delegation to this Conference has lost sight
(P. 2)
for a moment of the particular national interests it was sent here
to represent. The American Delegation which I have had the honor
of leading, has at all times been conscious of its primary obligation
—the protection of American interests. And the other representa­
tives here have been no less loyal or devoted to the welfare of their
own people.




1226

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

Yet none of us has found any incompatability between devotion
to our own countries and joint action. Indeed, we have found on the
contrary that the only genuine safeguard for our national interests
lies in international cooperation. We have come to recognize that
the wisest and most effective way to protect our national interests
is through international cooperation—that is to say, through
united effort for the attainment of common goals. This has been
the great lesson taught by the war and is, I think, the great lesson
of contemporary life— that the peoples of the earth are inseparably
linked to one another by a deep, underlying community of purpose.
This community of purpose is no less real and vital in peace than
in war, and cooperation is no less essential to its fulfillment.
To seek the achievement of our aims separately through the
planless, senseless rivalry that divided us in the past, or through
the outright economic aggression which turned neighbors into
enemies, would be to invite ruin again upon us all. Worse, it would
be once more to start our steps irretraceably down the steep, disas­
trous road to war. That sort of extreme nationalism belongs to an
era that is dead. Today the only enlightened form of national selfinterest lies in international accord. At Bretton Woods we have
taken practical steps toward putting this lesson into practice in the
monetary and economic field.
I take it as an axiom that after this war is ended no people— and
therefore no government of the people—will again tolerate pro­
longed and widespread unemployment. A revival of international
trade is indispensable if full employment is to be achieved in a
peaceful world and with standards of living which will permit the
realization of men’s reasonable hopes.
What are the fundamental conditions under which commerce
among the nations can once more flourish ?
First, there must be a reasonably stable standard of international
exchange to which all countries can adhere without sacrificing the
freedom of action necessary to meet their internal economic prob­
lems.
This is the alternative to the desperate tactics of the past— com­
petitive currency depreciation, excessive tariff barriers, uneconomic
barter deals, multiple currency practices and unnecessary exchange
restrictions— by which governments vainly sought to maintain em­
ployment and uphold living standards. In the final analysis, these
tactics only succeeded in contributing to world-wide depression and
even war. The International Fund agreed upon at Bretton Woods
will help remedy this situation.
Second, long-term financial aid must be made available at reason­
able rates to those countries whose industry and agriculture have




APPENDIX I

1227

(P. 3)
been destroyed by the ruthless torch of an invader or by the heroic
scorched-earth policy of their defenders.
Long-term funds must be made available also to promote sound
industry and increase industrial and agricultural production in na­
tions whose economic potentialities have not yet been developed.
It is essential to us all that these nations play their full part in the
exchange of goods throughout the world.
They must be enabled to produce and to sell if they are to be able
to purchase and consume. The Bank for International Reconstruc­
tion and Development is designed to meet this need.
Objections to this Bank have been raised by some bankers and a
few economists. The institutions proposed by the Bretton Woods
Conference would indeed limit the control which certain private
bankers have in the past exercised over international finance. It
would by no means restrict the investment sphere in which bankers
could engage. On the contrary, it would greatly expand this sphere
by enlarging the volume of international investment and would act
as an enormously effective stabilizer and guarantor of loans which
they might make. The chief purpose of the Bank for International
Reconstruction and Development is to guarantee private loans made
through the usual investment channels. It would make loans only
when these could not be floated through the normal channels at rea­
sonable rates. The effect would be to provide capital for those who
need it at lower interest rates than in the past and to drive only
the usurious money lenders from the temple of international fi­
nance. For my own part, I cannot look upon this outcome with any
sense of dismay.
Capital, like any other commodity, should be free from monopoly
control, and available upon reasonable terms to those who will put
it to use for the general welfare.
The Delegates and Technical Staffs at Bretton Woods have com­
pleted their portion of the job. They sat down together, talked as
friends and perfected plans to cope with the international monetary
and financial problems which all their countries face. These pro­
posals now must be submitted to the Legislatures and the peoples
of the participating nations. They will pass on what has been ac­
complished here.
The result will be of vital importance to every one in every coun­
try. In the last analysis, it will help determine whether or not
people have jobs and the amount of money they are to find in their
weekly pay envelopes. More important still, it concerns the kind of
world in which our children are to grow to maturity. It concerns
the opportunities which will await millions of young men when at




1228

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CO NFEREN CE

last they can take off their uniforms and come home and roll up
their sleeves and go to work.
This monetary agreement is but one step, of course, in the broad
program of international action necessary for the shaping of a
free future. But it is an indispensable step and a vital test of our
intentions. We are at a crossroads, and we must go one way or the
other. The Conference at Bretton Woods has erected a signpost—
a signpost pointing down a highway broad enough for all men to
walk in step and side by side. If they will set out together, there is
nothing on earth that need stop them.

Document 532

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FIN AN CIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For fhe Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o . 59

Comment by the Honorable Edward E. Brown, Delegate
of the U.S.A., on the Announcement by the Secretary of
State of the Forthcoming Conversations on the General
Subject of International Security Organization
Secretary Hull’s announcement regarding the opening of dis­
cussions on a proposed world security organization is good news to
all of us at Bretton Woods. Our deliberations here will result, I
believe, in adding another foundation stone to the edifice of inter­
national cooperation. The conferences which preceded this one—
the meetings at Hot Springs, at Atlantic City and at Philadelphia—
also helped to build the structure in which the world must live, if
it is to live in peace and prosperity.
As a banker and businessman, I am strongly in favor of some
world security organization. Our experience in this and in the last
war has proven to me, as I believe it has to most thinking Ameri­
cans, that a major war cannot be localized, and that it is practically
impossible for the United States to remain out of one. The na­
tional interests of my country demand that we participate in estab­
lishing and in maintaining some machinery which will make further
wars impossible.
Here at Bretton Woods I have seen clearly that it definitely is
possible to construct machinery of international cooperation. I
have worked with men whose opinions on major financial and mone­




APPENDIX I

1229

tary questions differ sharply from mine; and I have seen differ­
ences reconciled all up and down the line—because we all wanted
to see them reconciled.
We met here to accomplish a major objective and I think that by
the time we adjourn we will have succeeded in our work of prepar­
ing a plan for submission to the governments of the United Nations.
What has been done at Bretton Woods gives me confidence that the
still larger job— the task of building functional machinery for the
future peace and security of all nations— can be accomplished.

Document 533

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For fhe Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o. 60

Statement by the Honorable Charles W. Tobey, Delegate
of the U.S.A., on the Announcement by the Secretary
of State of the Forthcoming Conversations on the
General Subject of International Security Organization
The talks which are to be held in Washington next month are
another important step along the road which the United Nations
have been traveling now for many productive months. They will
form, I believe, part of the same great structure of international
cooperation toward which this Monetary and Financial Conference
at Bretton Woods is also making a significant contribution.
This Conference—and those which preceded it— and the discus­
sions of the proposed world security organization— are, all of them,
preliminaries to a just and enduring global peace. In my opinion,
such a peace may not have to await the drawing up of formal docu­
ments around some peace-table after total Allied victory has been
won. Because, in truth, vital elements in the machinery of peace
have already been drafted—indeed, some elements like the United
Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration are already in
operation. Such facts must be sources of encouragement to all
men of good will who are waging this war against evil in the deter­
mination never again to permit the development of conditions which
would make possible another armed conflict among nations.
This is the vision which, in my opinion, has inspired the dele­
gates of the 44 United and Associated Nations who have been
working here at Bretton Woods since the first day of July—and for
months before that date. We feel it imperative that out of our




1230

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

deliberations should come additional machinery for peace— this
time, peace in the field of international trade and investment. With­
out such economic machinery—without the International Monetary
Fund and the World Bank of Reconstruction and Development upon
which we are reaching agreement here— I would fear for the per­
manence of any agreement among nations in the political field. I
am convinced that agreement will be reached, and that when rati­
fied, it will work effectively.
On that premise, I look forward to the discussions which will
open in Washington next month on the proposed world security
organization, as a significant continuation and expansion of our
efforts here at Bretton Woods in New Hampshire.

Document 534

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o . 61

Comment by the Honorable Fred M. Vinson, ViceChairman of the Delegation of the U.S.A., on the
Announcement by the Secretary of State of the Forth­
coming Conversations on the General Subject of Inter­
national Security Organization
The announcement by Secretary of State Cordell Hull that con­
versations concerning international security will begin in Washing­
ton within thirty days is one of the historic events of our time.
To realize its significance we must remember that in prosecuting
the war everywhere in the world, the United Nations have pooled
their resources, all their economic strength and all the power of
their wills and minds.
This strength has been brought to bear against the enemies of
mankind. In the field of economics we have learned how to wage
war with earnestness and effectiveness. We have learned that you
cannot pool specific weapons, or foodstuffs or oil, or airplanes or
tanks without first pooling a great human desire to win.
That great driving force is the hallmark of what distinguishes
the truly United Nations from the crudely hand-forged "partner­
ship” of our enemies.
We who are meeting in Bretton Woods, are here because the
peoples of forty-four nations have decided to turn this power




APPENDIX I

1231

toward the creation of new ways of peaceful living. We are meet­
ing to turn our careful attention to very specific plans for meeting
very specific problems. We are in the position of draftsmen, now
concentrating on the details of one section of a plan for living.
As these plans take shape, and while more than forty million
Allied men in arms push the war forward on every front—we pro­
ceed in calm determination to put more detail into this plan—to
assure the peoples of the world that our common desire for a better
life will not be a vague dream but a practical reality.
In the past fourteen months members of the United Nations have
drafted plans for best utilizing the food supplies of the world; for
meeting emergency problems of relief and rehabilitation; for as­
suring a legitimate and practical place in the sun for the men and
women whose labors build peace—and now, here, to see that finan­
cial and monetary anarchy and madness is replaced by economic
security.
(p. 2)
In the light of these accomplishments, we face with confidence
the vast problem of world security. We are confident because we
are not alone— we are strong in our unity— strong in our tested and
proved capacity to work together.
We fight together on sodden battlefields, we fight together on
the majestic seas, we fight together in the ethereal sky. We must
work together on the paths of peace.

Document 535

UNI TED N A T I O N S
For the Press

MONETARY AND F IN A N CI A L
Bretton Woods

CONFERENCE
Ju ly 22, 1944
N o. 62

Address by the Honorable Arthur De Souza Costa,
Chairman of the Brazilian Delegation, a ; the Closing
Plenary Session, July 22, 1944, 9:45 p.m.
M r . P r e s id e n t ,

The two institutions which will result from our labors at Bretton
Woods are the expression of a success attained by concerted effort,
inspired by a single ideal—that happiness be distributed through­
out the face of the earth.
Through the International Monetary Fund, resources will be
granted to take care of temporary crises, by the use of equally
transitory balances which may be available in other countries.




1232

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

Through the Bank, long range cooperation will be provided.
Countries having larger resources at their disposal will collaborate
and assist the others, thus increasing the wealth of all.
The Fund ensures conditions of stability, making possible the
circulation of capital; the Bank stimulates such circulation, re­
pairing the enormous damages resulting from the war.
As the knowledge of these results becomes more widespread, a
corresponding increase will take place in the number of those who,
realizing the greatness of the objectives sought, will wish to be
counted among the supporters of this undertaking.
There is an aspect, however, of the Bretton Woods Conference
to which a material form has not been given, but which must be
pointed out because of its importance. It is the aspect of its signifi­
cance as evidence that human solidarity is not a result of racial
unity, that it does not depend on the language one speaks but
rather on a community of feeling. We who are assembled here
represent countries from all the corners of the earth, but the
thought that has guided us has been but one—our trust in the
results of cooperation within a moral atmosphere which enables
each nation to live in accord with its sovereign will, in harmony with
its traditions, its culture and the dictates of its heart.
Against the Nazi claim that a supposed racial superiority gives
the right to rule the world, Bretton Woods offers a way for the
guidance of human destinies through the development of human
brotherhood.
The Nations of the world represented here have responded to
President Roosevelt’s appeal and demonstrated that they are able
to cooperate in peace as they are cooperating in war.
To the great inspirer of this meeting, President Franklin Delano
Roosevelt, and to the distinguished President of the Conference,
(P. 2)
Secretary Henry Morgenthau, Jr., who has so ably directed our
work, the world owes a debt of gratitude.
It is, therefore, an honor for me, as representative of Brazil, to
submit to this assembly the following motion:
The United Nations Monetary, and Financial Conference
R eso lves:

1. To express its gratitude to the President of the United States,
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, for his initiative in conven­
ing the present Conference and for its preparation;
2. To express to its President, the Honorable Henry Morgen­
thau, Jr., its deep appreciation for the admirable manner in which
he has guided the Conference;




APPENDIX I

1233

3.
To express to the Officers and Staff of the Secretariat its ap­
preciation for their untiring services and their diligent efforts in
contributing to the attainment of the objectives of the Conference.

Document 537

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o. 64

Statement by Dr. Ludwik Grosfeld, Minister of Finance
of the Republic of Poland
At the end of the Conference, the results of which have been
summed up in such a clear and enlightening way by the Honorable
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury of the United
States, I wish to make a few comments, emphasizing the importance
of the agreements reached at Bretton Woods, to a country, which—
underdeveloped before the war— has been ravaged and ruined in the
course of hostilities.
During the short twenty-year period of Poland’s independence,
we have developed our economic possibilities to a certain extent,
largely with our own resources, yet we have felt acutely the lack of
international institutions, which might assist us in our endeavors.
After the present war, which not only obliterated and destroyed the
achievements of the inter-war years, but also inflicted upon our
country very serious wounds in all the branches of economic life,
we would feel this lack even more acutely. We are well awr
are of the
fact that our basic cure will have to be carried out with our own
resources, with our own labor, with our own persevering efforts.
However, we could never hope to overcome successfully the mount­
ing tide of difficulties, if we could not look forward to the help of
the highly developed industrial countries of the world. We never
doubted that this help would be forthcoming. The adoption at the
Bretton Woods Conference of the projects of the International
Monetary Fund and of the International Bank for Reconstruction
and Development, constitutes a concrete promise of that coopera­
tion, which the nations— ruined by the war—so greatly need and
so confidently expect.
The Conference has devoted a great deal of attention to the size
pf the quotas in the Fund and the ceiling on the credit operations




1234

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

of the Bank. It is very difficult at this time to make an exact esti­
mate of the extent of postwar needs and to relate them to the
scope of operations which our agreements provide for the Fund and
for the Bank. These institutions are beyond any doubt, the mani­
festation of a new spirit in international relations. They establish
an effective machinery for the international economic collaboration
of nations; they serve the public interest of each national com­
munity, as well as that of the whole family of the United Nations.
(P. 2 )

The realization of projects, born from that spirit, is the hope
of the populations of war-torn countries. The fighting and suffer­
ing masses in the occupied countries have the right to expect that
the approaching moment of their liberation will mark the begin­
ning of a new era in human relations—an era of freedom, peace
and prosperity. These hopes will be kept high by the news about
the great results of the Conference.

Document 538

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FIN AN CIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
F or the Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o . 65

A Message from the President of the United States to
the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference
at Bretton Woods
Was Read to the Assembled Delegates at the Closing Plenary
Session of the Conference by the Honorable Henry Morgenthau,
Jr., President of the Conference.
The text follows:
“July 22,19 U

“ Honorable H e n r y M o r g e n t h a u , Jr.,
“ Bretton Woods, New Hampshire.
“ As President of the United Nations Monetary and Financial
Conference at Bretton Woods, please convey to the representatives
of the forty-four nations gathered there my heartiest congratula­
tions on the successful completion of their difficult task. They have
prepared two further foundation stones for the structure of lasting
peace and security. They have shown that the people of the United
Nations can work together to plan the peace as well as fight the war.




APPE NDI X I

1235

As the delegates and technicians depart for their various countries,
express to them my appreciation for the efforts they have made in
coming here.
“ F r a n k l in D . R oosevelt”

Document 539

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

July 22, 1944
N o. 66

Address by Mr. Pierre Mendes-France, Chairman of the
French Delegation at the Closing Plenary Session, July
22, 1944, 9:45 p.m.
This is not the first time that nations have decided to sit around
one table attempting to adjust their interests and to build together
some international organization for the purpose of facilitating their
collaboration in the economic field.
The Conference of Bretton Woods, however, may be proud of
having inaugurated a new era in the history of these conferences.
While the battle is still raging it bears witness to the constructive
will and determination of the United Nations. Without waiting for
the end of this gigantic fight which continues all over the globe
between the forces of progress and the forces of destruction, the
United Nations have decided to prepare in advance the machinery
which will permit the entire world to resume the work of peace and
production of speculation of ideas with more efficiency and more
reason for hope, once the cannon has ceased to fire.
When this moment comes, instead of reconstructing their econo­
mies according to individualistic and sometimes selfish methods,
the United Nations will endeavor to make their national program
part of a large collective conception.
Nothing would be more dangerous than to permit the different
countries to try to regain their stability and their economic pros­
perity separately just as they have tried in times of the past to
insure their security separately.
They would fail tomorrow as they have failed yesterday. Be­
cause, as it is impossible in the modern world to circumscribe wars,
it will be impossible to avoid the spread of unemployment, economic
stagnation, excessive economic fluctuations from one country to
another with all their train of miseries and sufferings.
795841— 48— 8




1236

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFE RENCE

This, the people realize already. But perhaps they do not yet see
that concrete steps must be taken urgently before the effective
work of reconstruction can be started. If tomorrow the different
Governments are called upon to perform the heavy task which
awaits them, each one in his country, without being able to lean
(p. 2)
on an international program that will have to be established in
advance, they shall once more succumb to local and individualistic
influences and to traditional temptations of the past. Special inter­
ests will succeed again in crystallizing positions which we might
have believed to be out of date.
And when then finally a program will have been established it
would meet with such resistance as would render its execution very
much more difficult and perhaps painful.
The entire merit belongs to the President of this great American
Republic for having taken audaciously the initiative and having
invited the United Nations to this Conference in order to study to­
gether today— not tomorrow—these most delicate matters; namely,
those concerning the monetary and financial soundness of the post­
war world. The Conference under the high authority of its most
eminent and hospitable President, the Presidents of its Commis­
sions, and thanks to the devotion and tenacity of the experts of the
different delegations, has largely cleared the ground which was as­
signed to it as its field of activity. To the difficulties of international
transactions, it offers as solution the ingenious machinery of the
International Stabilization Fund. To the problems of reconstruc­
tion of the war-ravaged countries and of development of the young
economies it offers the flexible solution of the International Bank.
No doubt, as original and audacious as these plans may be, they
do not offer a complete and definite answer to all the questions
which have been addressed to us by the anxious peoples of the
world who wish to know their future and to see their economic
security insured. But now that our work has come to an end, we
have the right to say that great steps forward have been made and
that solid foundations have been laid upon which tomorrow the
other international organizatins and bodies destined to organize
an economic postwar world, will be built.
France for her part shall endeavor to accomplish her rehabilita­
tion by utilizing measures which, far from isolating herself from
the other nations of the world, will develop even her solidarity, her
intimacy and her collaboration with them. Opposed to autarchy
and to discriminatory restrictions, opposed to all techniques con­
sistent with the preparation, the continuation or the liquidation




APPENDIX I

1237

of a war but inconceivable in a world guided by fraternal coopera­
tion of all people of good will, France is glad to have participated
in this International Conference at Bretton Woods, glad to have
witnessed its success and the birth of two great international bodies
which for the battered peoples constitute a promise of greater
security, of more productive work, a guarantee of a better insured
peace, and of a better life.

Document 540

UNI TED N A T I O N S
For fhe Press

MONETARY AND F IN A N C IA L
Bretton Woods

CONFERENCE
Ju ly 22, 1944
N o. 67

Address by the Honorable J. L. Ilsley, Chairman of the
Canadian Delegation, at the Closing Plenary Session,
July 22, 1944, 9:45 p. m.
M

r

. P r e s id e n t :

I rise to support the motion so eloquently presented by the distin­
guished delegate of the United Kingdom. In this Monetary and
Financial Conference assembled at the invitation of the Govern­
ment of the United States of America, all of us, I am sure, find it
wholly fitting that the motion to accept the Final Act should be
presented by the delegate of a country which has played so great
and honorable a part in the world's monetary and financial history.
We find a happy fitness also in that delegate being Lord Keynes.
Throughout the Conference, as indeed throughout his life, he has
showered his ideas upon us and has occasionally nourished some of
ours. His sudden insights, his revealing phrases, and, if I may say
so, his passionate striving for what is reasonable and emancipating
in human affairs, have contributed greatly to the progress and wis­
dom of our deliberations.
In supporting the motion I am glad to be associated with the
delegate of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Military events
rushing toward the climax of victory are evidence of the power of
our collaboration, a collaboration which can yield results as far
reaching and productive in achieving our common purpose in the
years of peace as it is now yielding in war.
May I, Mr. President, anticipate the words of the delegate of
France, and say that it is a peculiar pleasure to a representative of
Canada to be associated also with France to whose resurgence we
look forward with hope and confidence.




1238

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

The Final Act records the results of our deliberations. It is pro­
posed that the Conference accept it as a document suitable in the
common view for the consideration of governments. It is for them
and for legislatures to consider, in the light of circumstances, which
are beyond the competence of this Conference, its suitability as a
monetary and financial charter for the world of the future. Even
at this stage, however, we can and do hail it as a great and even
historic achievement. In this document, the Conference offers to
governments plans by which they may recognize, as matters of
(p. 2)
common concern and common interest, exchange rates, the free
convertibility of the proceeds of exports and other current sources
of foreign exchange, assured provisions for financing temporary
unbalance in international accounts, and the regular flow of interna­
tional investment from those countries which have a surplus of
capital to those which are deficient. It offers plans by which they
may be able in a practical and orderly way, to make them matters
of general and beneficent arrangement, rather than of conflict. The
Final Act is evidence of what can be achieved when men forsake
the conflict of creeds, and endeavor in the phrase of a great Ameri­
can, to think things, not words.
In that achievement, we all gratefully recognize what has been
accomplished by the delegate of the United States, Dr. Harry
White. With his associates, under your encouragement and guid­
ance, Mr. President, he has contributed technical competence, basic
ideas, beyond these a great and genuine goodwill and above all an
admirable and undaunted persistence. Without these, we should
not now have this motion before us.
Mr. President, the Canadian delegation supports the motion.

Document 541

UNI TED N A T I O N S
For the Press

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL
Bre+to/i Woods

CONFERENCE
Ju ly 22, 1944
N o. 68

Address by Mr. Eduardo I. Montoulieu, Chairman of
the Cuban Delegation, at the Closing Plenary Session,
July 22, 1944, 9:45 p.m.
M r . P resident :

As Chairman of the Cuban Delegation, and on its behalf, I beg




APPENDIX I

1239

to second the motion of the distinguished Chairman of the Brazilian
Delegation.
The Cuban Delegation feels highly honored for the privilege and
honor granted it, to raise its voice on this memorable occasion in
which all the delegations here present join in a motion to express
our gratefulness and appreciation to the President of the United
States for the invitation tendered us to attend this Monetary and
Financial Conference of the United Nations in which forty-four
countries, through their delegates and technicians, have devoted
the best part of this month to discuss and formulate the articles of
agreement on the monetary and banking regulations which will
guide us in the very difficult and uncertain days that lie ahead in
the period of the postwar, and later in normal peacetimes.
Only the voice of the President of the United States could have
performed the miracle inspiring confidence to the governments and
peoples of the countries participating in the realization of the dream
which we are about to see converted into reality.
Great as the historical significance of this Conference is, and
important as the results of its application to the welfare of our
respective peoples will be, we believe, and I venture to presume that
such is the conviction of all the Delegations here present, that the
brilliant accomplishments of this Conference constitute the first
practical and effective step to insure the promotion and maintenance
of high levels of employment and real income, and the development
of the productive resources of the different countries of the world,
a condition which to be fully attained will require other interna­
tional conferences to be convened for the realization of these pur­
poses.
The Cuban Delegation wishes to second the motion, I might add,
because thanks and gratefulness are unstintingly due to the man
who, unmindful of the crushing burden of financing the war for
this militant nation, has so willingly and generously given all of
his time, his knowledge, and his rare tact and ability to further
(P. 2)

and make possible the success of this Conference, which, under his
firm hand and high statesmanship, will soon be an accomplished
fact. I refer, gentlemen, to the President of this Conference, the
Secretary of the Treasury of the United States of America, the
Honorable Henry Morgenthau, Jr.
May not I say, besides, Mr. President, that the Cuban Delegation
seconds the motion presented by the Minister of Finance of the
Republic of Brazil, because no matter how much we hoped to accom­
plish of the tasks we came here to do; no matter how able our
advisers, technicians and assistants might have been; irrespective




1240

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

of the carefully laid plans, the detailed schedules and the elaborate
agenda prepared during fully two years of untiring labor and con­
sultation, our labors had never been so successfully coordinated, so
precisely ordained, or so efficiently accomplished, without the valu­
able assistance and intelligent support of the men and women who
day and night have labored in the Secretariat, technical and clerical,
of this Conference.
Mr. President, as Chairman of the Cuban Delegation, and on its
behalf, I beg to second the motion of the Chairman of the Brazilian
Delegation.

Document 542

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For fhe Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o. 69

Address by Lord Keynes, Chairman of the Delegation
of the United Kingdom, at the Closing Plenary Session,
July 22, 9:45 p.m.
M

r

. P r e s id

ent

:

I feel it a signal honor that I am asked to move the acceptance
of the Final Act at this memorable Conference.
We, the Delegates of this Conference, Mr. President, have been
trying to accomplish something very difficult to accomplish. We
have not been trying, each one to please himself, and to find the
solution most acceptable in* our own particular situation. That
would have been easy. It has been our task to find a common meas­
ure, a common standard, a common rule applicable to each and not
irksome to any. We have been operating, moreover, in a field of
great intellectual and technical difficulty. We have had to perform
at one and the same time the tasks appropriate to the economist,
to the financier, to the politician, to the journalist, to the propa­
gandist, to the lawyer, to the statesman— even, I think, to the
prophet and to the soothsayer. Nor has the magic of the micro­
phone been able, silently and swiftly perambulent at the hands of
our attendant sprites, the faithful Scouts, Puck coming to the aid
of Bottom, to undo all the mischief first wrought in the Tower of
Babel.
And I make bold to say, Mr. President, that under your wise and
kindly guidance we have been successful. International conferences
have not a good record. I am certain that no similar conference




APPENDIX I

1241

within memory has achieved such a bulk of lucid, solid construc­
tion. We owe this not least to the indomitable will and energy,
always governed by good temper and humor of Harry White. But
this has been as far removed as can be imagined from a one-man
or two-man or three-man conference. It has been teamwork, team­
work such as I have seldom experienced. And for my own part, I
should like to pay a particular tribute to our lawyers. All the more
so because I have to confess that, generally speaking, I do not like
lawyers. I have been known to complain that, to judge from re­
sults in this lawyer-ridden land, the Mayflower, when she sailed
from Plymouth, must have been entirely filled with lawyers. When
I first visited Mr. Morgenthau in Washington some three years ago
accompanied only by my secretary, the boys in your Treasury
curiously inquired of him—where is your lawyer? When it was
explained that I had none— “Who then does your thinking for
you?” was the rejoinder. That is not my idea of a lawyer. I want
him to tell me how to do what I think sensible, and, above all, to
(p. 2)
devise means by which it will be lawful for me to go on being sen­
sible in unforeseen conditions some years hence. Too often lawyers
busy themselves to make commonsense illegal. Too often lawyers
are men who turn poetry into prose and prose into jargon. Not so
our lawyers here in Bretton Woods. On the contrary they have
turned our jargon into prose and our prose into poetry. And only
too often they have had to do our thinking for us. We owe a great
debt of gratitude to Dean Acheson, Oscar Cox, Luxford, Brenner,
Collado, Arnold, Chang, Broches and our own Beckett of the British
Delegation. I have only one complaint against them which I ven­
tured to voice yesterday in Commission II. I wish that they had not
covered so large a part of our birth certificate with such very de­
tailed provisions for our burial service, hymns and lessons and all.
Mr. President, we have reached this evening a decisive point.
But it is only a beginning. We have to go out from here as mis­
sionaries, inspired by zeal and faith. We have sold all this to our­
selves. But the world at large still needs to be persuaded.
I am greatly encouraged, I confess, by the critical, sceptical and
even carping spirit in which our proceedings have been watched
and welcomed in the outside world. How much better that our
projects should begin in disillusion than that they should end in it!
We perhaps are too near to our own work to see its outlines clearly.
But I am hopeful that when the critics and the sceptics look more
closely, the plans will turn out to be so much better than they ex­
pected, that the very criticism and scepticism which we have suf­
fered will turn things in our favor.




1242

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Finally, we have perhaps accomplished here in Bretton Woods
something more significant than what is embodied in this Final Act.
We have shown that a concourse of 44 nations are actually able to
work together at a constructive task in amity and unbroken con­
cord. Few believed it possible. If we can continue in a larger task
as we have begun in this limited task, there is hope for the world.
At any rate we sh^ll now disperse to our several homes with new
friendships sealed and new intimacies formed. We have been learn­
ing to work together. If we can so continue, this nightmare, in
which most of us here present have spent too much of our lives,
will be over. The brotherhood of man will have become more than a
phrase.
Mr. President, I move to accept the Final Act.

Document 542 (536)
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o . 63

At the Dinner given by the Honorable Henry Morgenthau, Jr., President of the
Conference, in honor of the Delegates to the United Nations Monetary and
Financial Conference at 8:00 o’clock, Saturday, July 22, at the Mount
Washington Hotel, Bretton Woods, the Chairman of the Chinese Delega­
tion, Dr. Hsiang-Hsi K’ung, Vice President of Executive Yuan and con­
currently Minister of Finance; Governor of the Central Bank of China,
addressed the gathered as the Spokesman for all the Delegations and pro­
posed a Toast to President Roosevelt and the American people

Following is the text of Dr. K’ung’s remarks:
O u r H o n o r e d H o s t , F e l l o w D e l e g a t e s , L a d ie s

and

Gentlem en :

First of all, I think we all wish to thank our host, Secretary Mor­
genthau for this delightful dinner. Evidently he thought we have
not done badly and wishes to reward us.
I think we have reason to feel gratified that three full weeks of
hard labor have come to a fruitful conclusion. The very fact that
hundreds of delegates and technical experts from 44 Nations gath­
ered together and produced two blue prints of such detail and
quality testifies to the advances we have made in international eco­
nomic cooperation.
The agreements and resolutions embodied in the Final Act truly
represent the collective mind and effort of the financial leaders and
experts of the nations which participated in the Conference. Now




APPENDIX I

1243

that we have reached agreement, I believe it is the wish of all of
us here that the results of the Conference will soon receive the ap­
proval of our respective governments so that the two important
institutions of international financial cooperation can be set up at
an early date.
In every international conference there must be differences of
opinion on some subjects. What is remarkable about this confer­
ence is not that there were differences of views but that many dele­
gations could sacrifice their own special viewpoint in the common
interest and reach agreement. We all realized that it is necessary
sometimes to pay a price for international cooperation. But this
kind of sacrifice is an investment which brings high dividends.
(p. 2)
I am certain you all remember the words of President Roosevelt
at the opening of the Conference. He said: “ This Conference will
test our capacity to cooperate in peace as we have in war.” I am
glad we will be able to tell him we have passed the test.
Ladies and Gentlemen! May I ask you to join me in a toast to
President Roosevelt and his associates, thanks to whose initiative
and effort our Conference was able to meet and to achieve results
which mark a long step forward in international cooperation.
Here’s to President Roosevelt and the American People!

Document 544

UNI TED N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods
For fhe Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
No. 70

Statement by the President of the Conference, the
Honorable Henry Morgenthau, Jr., at the Opening of
the Final Plenary Session, July 22
I have just received word that the Soviet Union has decided to
increase its subscription to the International Bank for Reconstruc­
tion and Development from the nine hundred million dollars origi­
nally agreed upon to the amount of one billion two hundred million
dollars. By this step the Soviet Union has carried even further its
collaboration toward the success of this Conference and toward
assuring international collaboration in solving the postwar prob­
lems of the world. The solution of these future problems will have
the inestimable support of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.




1244

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFE RENCE

Gentlemen, the announcement which you have heard tonight is in
my estimation one which is fraught with more significance and
more hopeful meaning to the future of the world than any which
those of us here have heard so far.

Document 545

U NI TE D N A T I O N S

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bre+ton Woods
For the Press

Ju ly 22, 1944
N o . 71

Statement of the Chairman of the USSR Delegation,
Mr. Michael Stepanov, at the closing Plenary Session
July 22, 1944
M

r

. P r e s id e n t ,

The Final Act is being presented to the attention of the Closing
Session of the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference.
We, the representatives of 44 Democratic Nations, have elabo­
rated this Act in a friendly atmosphere. The questions which we
deliberated upon at Bretton Woods were very difficult and complex,
they gave rise to the prolonged discussions inevitable in a meeting
of this nature. Nor could it be otherwise at a Conference of the
representatives of democratic countries who freely express their
opinions.
However of great weight and value is the fact that although on
separate questions some of us maintained own points of view, the
Conference has nevertheless successfully worked out Draft Agree­
ments for the establishment of the Fund and the Bank which are
not submitted for the consideration of the Governments of the coun­
tries represented here.
As regards the amount of the USSR subscription to the capital
of the Bank, as you have already heard from Mr. Morgenthau, the
USSR willing to meet the wishes of some other delegations at the
Conference and in particular the wishes of Mr. Morgenthau, has
decided to determine the amount of the USSR subscription to the
capital of the Bank at 1,200 million dollars.
The stabilization of the currencies of the various countries, the
expansion of world trade, the balancing of international payments,
long-term capital investments intended for the reconstruction and
development of the democratic nations and especially for the resto­
ration of economy of those countries who suffered severely from




APPE NDIX I

1245

enemy occupation and hostilities— all these aspirations will have
exceptional importance for the postwar organization of the World
and for the maintenance and strengthening of peace and security.
This Conference has sat during the course of very significant
days— our Allied forces in Northern France and Italy achieve
notable successes in their struggle against the Hitlerite armed
forces while the Red Army in the East with terrific speed smashes
the Wehrmacht back along hundreds of miles of battle front.
(p. 2)
The Red Army closely approached the prewar borders of Ger­
many— East Prussia. And not far off is the day when all the occu­
pied countries will be completely liberated from the Fascist yoke.
The peoples of these countries will then remember the efforts of
the United Nations leading to the maintenance of peace and secu­
rity after the war.
Among these efforts a place of honor is occupied by the work of
this Conference. As declared in the Final Act, the Conference has
recommended that in carrying out the policies of the International
Monetary Fund and the International Bank for Reconstruction and
Development, special consideration should be given to the needs of
countries which have suffered from enemy occupation and hostili­
ties.
Taking this opportunity I wish to express my gratitude to the
President of this Conference, the Honorable Henry Morgenthau,
for his brilliant leadership of the Conference which has ensured its
successful accomplishment.
I second the motion of Lord Keynes, the Chairman of the U.K.
Delegation and appeal to the Conference to accept the Final Act
and to submit it to the respective Governments for consideration.

3. List of Correspondents
Document 64
UNITED

NATIONS

MONETARY

AND

FINANCIAL

CONFERENCE

Bretton Woods

July 2, 1944
Pass
No,

76
22

Name

Adelson, Dorothy
Andevrsky, Ralph
Arne, Sigrid




Association

Pan American Magazine
Office of War Information
Associated Press

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFE RENCE

Name

2

21
22
15
23
75

6
77
24
25
26
27
28
80
85
29
13
30
31
32
33

11
84
7
35
34
5
9
36
37
38
39
18
82

12
40

Benedict, A1
Blackburn, C. R.
Bosshard, Walter
Bratter, Herbert
Bryant, George B.
Colby, Jack
Comargo, Mario
Goolidge, Philip
Cosgrove, Helen
Clarke, Philip
Crawford, Arthur W.
Crider, John H.
Crowther, Rodney
Crowther, Samuel
Crowther, Mary Owens
Cross, Austin F.
Daley, Hartwell
Eisenstadt, Alfred
Engelke, Charles B.
Ferenczi, Imre
Fertig, Lawrence
Fleming, Harold
Fliegers, Serge
Fleigers, Mrs. F.
Foley, Paul
Fox, Abe
Fuller, Clement
Furlong, Thomas
Geiskop, Ludvic
Girolami, Louis
Gottfried, Manfred
Gregory, Nicholas P.
Hagenbuch, Thomas D.
Harr, Dr. Luther
Heath, Charles
Hernandez, Manuel A.
Houston, George
Jeffers, Wellington
Kovacic, Don




Association

Paramount Pictures
Canadian Press
Neue Zurcher Zeitung
Banking
Wall Street Journal
Littleton Courier
Coordinator of Inter-American
Affairs
Paramount Pictures
Manchester Union Leader
La Prensa Asociada
Nation's Business
New York Times
Baltimore Sun
Hearst Newspapers
Hearst Newspapers
Ottawa Citizen
Radio Station WLAW
Life Magazine
United Press
Journal de Geneve
New York World Telegram
Christian Science Monitor
Reuters
Novoye Russkoye Slovo
Office of War Information
Associated Press Fotos
British Broadcasting Co.
Chicago Tribune
Hearst NEWS OF THE DAY,
MGM
Fox Movietone News
Time Magazine
Philadelphia Inquirer
Associated Press
Philadelphia Record
Universal News
Instituto de Estudios Ec. y Soc.
Office of War Information
Globe and Mail (Toronto)
Associated Press

APPENDIX I
Pass
No.

41
42
43
8
44
46
45

Name

Kuhns, William R.
Lahey, Edwin A.
Lam, Mildred
Larsen, Carl
Leaf, Earl H.
Lewis, Thurber
Lewis, Sir Willmott

(P. 2)
48
Lohman, Philip
47
Lu, David
81
Lyons, Louis M.
49
MacDermott, Frank
Mann, Donald
50
McCardle, Carl W.
10
Morris, Leavitt
51
Mowrer, Edgar Ansel
79
Perry, Ruth
52
Player, William 0.
Porter, Russell
53
54
Porter, Sylvia
Radetski, Ralph
78
Ramsey, Mary E.
56
Rankine, Paul Scott
3
Rose, James
Rukeyser, Merryle
16
Rukeyser, Berenice
17
57
Saint Jean, Robert de
86
Schwartz, J.
19
Sears, Richard
Seligmann, Herbert J.
58
Silverman, Stanley
Smith, Denys H. H.
59
Tang, T. C.
60
Tastrom, Edward
61
Tiltman, Hessell
62
Travers, Thomas M.
87
83
63
64

Troob, Lester
Twitty, Tom
Utley, Freda




1247

Association

Banking
Chicago Daily News
Journal of Commerce
Fox Movietone News
Shanghai Evening Post & Mercury
TASS Agency
London Times
Time Magazine
Central News Agency of China
Boston Globe
London Sunday Times
CIAA
Philadelphia Evening Bulletin
Christian Science Monitor
Press Alliance Inc.
Hearst Newspapers
New York Post
New York Times
New York Post
OWI
Hearst Newspapers
Reuters
Paramount, electrician
INS
INS
France Afrique
N. Y. Daily News (circulation)
Universal, cameraman
Overseas News Agency
OWI
London Daily Telegraph
Central News Agency of China
Journal of Commerce
London Sketch
Boston Herald Traveler (Circula­
tion)
OWI
New York Herald Tribune
Norte Magazine

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

1248

Pass
No.
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
4
74
14

Name
Vanderbilt, Neil
Vas Dias, Arnold
Visson, Andre
Waithman, Robert
Walzer, Elmer C.
Webb, Arthur
Wilcox, U. V.
Wilson, Kenneth
Wolf, Franz B.
Woodruff, George
Wyckoff, Cecelia G.
Wylie, Jeff

Association
New York Post
Aneta News Agency
Reader’s Digest
News Chronicle of London
United Press
London Daily Herald
American Banker
Financial Post (Toronto)
Research Institute
INS Fotos
Magazine of Wall Street
Life Magazine

4. Translations o f Certain Documents into French
and Spanish
Document 62

Sp anish Translation
C O N F E R E N C I A M O N E T A R I A Y F I N A N C I E R A DE LAS N A C I O N E S

UNIDAS

Reglamento
( Traduction)

Capitulo I
Representation

Art. 1. La representaci6n en la Conferencia se limitara a las
delegaciones acreditadas por los gobiernos o autoridades de las
Naciones Unidas y las naciones asociadas con ellas en esta guerra,
en respuesta a la invitaci6n del Presidente de los Estados Unidos de
America a tomar parte en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera
de las Naciones Unidas.
Capitulo II
Funcionarios de la Conferencia

Art. 2.

S e c c io n I
El Presidente Provisional
El Presidente de los Estados Unidos de America




APPENDIX I

1249

designara el Presidente provisional de la Conferencia, que presidira en la sesion inaugural y seguira ejerciendo sus funciones
hasta que la Conferencia elija el Presidente permanente.
Art. 3. En la primera sesi6n plenaria de la Conferencia el
Presidente provisional nombrara los siguientes comites:
(a) Comite de Credenciales,
(b) Comite de Reglamento, y
(c) Comite de Nominaciones.
(P-2)
S eccion II
El Presidente Permanente
Art. 4. El Presidente permanente de la Conferencia se elegira
por el voto de la mayoria absoluta de las delegaciones de los
Estados representados en la Conferencia.
Art. 5. Seran atribuciones del Presidente permanente:
Primero. Presidir las sesiones de la Conferencia y someter a
consideration las materias en el orden en que esten inscritas en
la orden del dia.
Segundo. Conceder el uso de la palabra a los delegados, en el
orden en que lo hayan solicitado.
Tercero. Decidir las cuestiones de orden que occuran en el
curso de las discusiones de la Conferencia. No obstante, si algun
delegado lo solicitare, la decision del Presidente se sometera a la
Conferencia para que la decida el voto de la mayoria de las
delegaciones.
Cuarto. Llamar a votaciones y anunciar a la Conferencia el
resultado de las mismas.
Quinto. Transmitir a los delegados por conducto del Secretario General, antes de cada sesi6n plenaria, la respectiva orden
del dia.
Sexto. Dictar todas las medidas necesarias para el mantenimiento del orden y la estricta observaiicia del reglamento.
S e ccio n III
Los Vicepresidentes
Art. 6. Se elegiran cuatro Vicepresidentes por el voto de la
mayoria absoluta de las delegaciones de los Estados representados
en la Conferencia. En caso de ausencia del Presidente permanente,
(p. 3) presidira uno de los Vicepresidentes en las sesiones
plenarias de la Conferencia. Cuando un Vicepresidente actue como
Presidente, tendra las mismas funciones y los mismos deberes
que este.




1250

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

SECCION IV
El Secretario General
Art. 7. El Presidente de los Estados Unidos de America
designara el Secretario General de la Conferencia.
Seran atribuciones del Secretario General:
Prim ero. Organizar, dirigir y coordinar el trabajo de los
secretarios, secretarios auxiliares, secretarios de los comites,
interpretes, escribientes y cualesquiera otros empleados que el
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America asigne al servicio de
la Secretaria de la Conferencia, asi como ayudar a las diferentes
Comisiones Tecnicas de la Conferencia en sus labores, y coordinar
su trabajo.
Segundo. Servir como asesor principal del Presidente de la
Conferencia en cuestiones parlamentarias, de procedimiento y de
protocolo.
Tercero. Recibir, distribuir y contestar la correspondencia
oficial de la Conferencia de acuerdo con las resoluciones que ella
adopte.
Cwarto. Preparar o hacer preparar bajo su direction las actas
de las sesiones de la Conferencia, los Comites y las Comisiones
Tecnicas, de acuerdo con las notas que le suministren los secre­
tarios.
Quinto. Distribuir entre los Comites y las Comisiones Tecnicas
los asuntos sobre los cuales deban rendir informes, y poner a
disposition de los Comites todo lo necesario para el desempeno de
sus funciones.
Sexto. Preparar la orden del dia, de acuerdo con las instrucciones del Presidente.
(p. 4) S4ptimo. Servir de intermediario entre las delegaciones o entre los miembros respectivos de estas, en asuntos
relacionados con la Conferencia, y entre los delegados y las autoridades del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America.
Octavo. Desempenar cualesquiera otras funciones que le asignen el reglamento, la Conferencia o el Presidente.
S eccion V
El Secretario General Tecnico
Art. 8. Se hara el nombramiento del Secretario General Tec­
nico de la Conferencia con la aprobacion del Presidente de los
Estados Unidos de America.
Seran atribuciones del Secretario General Tecnico de la Con­
ferencia:




APPENDIX I

1251

Primero. Coordinar el trabajo de las Comisiones Tecnicas y
de sus Comites.
Segundo. Planear y dirigir el trabajo de los secretarios de las
Comisiones Tecnicas y de sus Comites.
Tercero. Cooperar con el Secretario General dirigiendo la
preparacion de los informes y actas de las Comisiones Tecnicas
y sus Comites.
Cuarto. Asesorar a las delegaciones en cuestiones relacionadas
con el trabajo tecnico de la Conferencia.
Quinto. Consultar con el Secretario General en cuanto a la
preparacion del Acta Final y las actas de la Conferencia.
S e c c io n VI
Participantes
Art. 9. La participation en la Conferencia se limitara a las
siguientes personas:
(p. 5) (a) Los delegados acreditados de los gobiernos y autoridades a que se ha extendido invitation a nombre del Presidente
de los Estados Unidos de America. Los delegados acreditados de
los gobiernos y autoridades invitados tendran el privilegio de
asistir a todas las sesiones plenarias y a todas las reuniones de
las Comisiones Tecnicas de la Conferencia; tendran el privilegio
de hacer uso de la palabra en las sesiones plenarias y en las
reuniones de las Comisiones Tecnicas y sus Comites, sujetos
solamente a las reglas que se describen mas adelante; tendran el
privilegio de votar en todas las sesiones plenarias o sesiones generales y en todas las reuniones de las Comisiones Tecnicas y los
Comites, sujetos a las restricciones que se especifican mas ade­
lante sobre el voto de las delegaciones.
(b) Las asesores tecnicos y otros miembros de las delegaciones
de los gobiernos y autoridades invitados podran asistir con sus
delegados a las sesiones plenarias o de los Comites y a las re­
uniones de las Comisiones Tecnicas, pero no tendran derecho
a votar excepto segun se dispone mas adelante.
(c) Podran asistir cualesquiera otras personas que determine
el Comite de Iniciativas de la Conferencia.
C a p itu lo

III

Comites Generates de la Conferencia

Art. 10. Se constituiran los siguientes Comites Generales:
(a)
Comite de Nominaciones, compuesto de cinco miembros
nombrados por el Presidente provisional. El Comite de Nomina­
ciones propondra candidatos para los siguientes cargos: cuatro
795841 — 48— 9




1252

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Vicepresidentes de la Conferencia; Presidentes, Vicepresidentes
y Relatores de las Comisiones; Presidentes y Relatores de los
Comites de las Comisiones I y I I ; y (p. 6) miembros del Co­
mite de Iniciativas.
(b) Comite de Iniciativas, compuesto del Presidente de la Con­
ferencia, que lo presidira, y otros diez miembros electos por la
Conferencia de acuerdo con las recomendaciones del Comite
de Nominaciones.
(c) Comite de Credenciales, compuesto de cinco miembros que
nombrara el Presidente provisional.
(d) Comite de Reglamento, compuesto de cinco miembros que
nombrara el Presidente provisional.
(e) Comite de Coordinacion, compuesto de siete miembros nombrados por el Comite de Iniciativas.
Art. 11. Antes de la primera sesion plenaria se celebrar&
una reunion de los Presidentes de las delegaciones, eri la que se
discutira la organizacion de la Conferencia y se formularan reco­
mendaciones que se someteran a la Conferencia en la primera
sesion plenaria.
Capitulo IV
Art. 12. La Conferencia se dividira en las tres Comisiones
Tecnicas y los Comites que se expresan a continuacion, y en los
comites que determinen las Comisiones respectivas:
C o m i s i o n I. Fondo Monetario Internacional.
Comite 1. Fines, normas y obligaciones del Fondo.
Comite 2. Operaciones del Fondo.
Comite 3. Organizacion y Administracion.
Comite 4. Forma y Status del Fondo.
C o m i s i o n II. Banca de Reconstruction y Fomento.
(p. 7) Comite 1. Fines, normas, capital y subscripciones
del Banco.
Comite 2. Operaciones del Banco.
Comite 3. Organizacion y Administracion.
Comite 4. Forma y Status del Banco.
C o m i s i o n III. Otras formas de Cooperacion Financiera Inter­
nacional.
Art. 13. Despues que el Comite de Coordinacion hay a revisado
las conclusiones a que hayan llegado las Comisiones Tecnicas, los
Relatores de las Comisiones las someteran a una sesion plenaria
de la Conferencia.
Art. 14. El representante de una delegaci6n a quien se elija
Presidente o Secretario de un Comite de una Comision Tecnica




APPENDIX I

1253

sera el Presidente de la delegation, o cualquiera otro miembro
de ella que designe su presidente.
Art. 15. Cada delegation tendra derecho a estar representada
por uno o mas de sus miembros en cada una de las Comisiones
Tecnicas. Cada delegation sometera al Secretario General los
nombres de dichos miembros a la mayor brevedad posible, y en
todo caso antes de la primera reunion regular de cada Comision.
Capitulo V
Idioma de la Conferencia

Art. 16.

El ingles sera el idioma oficial de la Conferencia.
Capitulo VI
Las Delegaciones

Art. 17. Una delegaci6n que no este presente en una sesi6n
en que se tome un voto podra depositar o transmitir su voto por
escrito al (p. 8) Secretario; dicho voto se contara siempre que
se haya depositado o transmitido antes de declararse cerrada la
votacion. En este caso se considerara presente la delegation y se
contara su voto.
Art. 18. Cada delegation tendra derecho a un voto, que se
depositara por conducto de su presidente o del miembro que se
designe para actuar en nombre de la delegation en cuestiones que
se traten en las reuniones de las Comisiones Tecnicas y de los
Comites, o en las sesiones plenarias de la Conferencia. Las dele­
gaciones podran designar representantes substitutos para determinadas reuniones, segun se dispone en el articulo 26.
Capitulo VII
Reuniones de la Conferencia, de los Comites de la Conferencia
y de las Comisiones Tecnicas

Art. 19. La sesi6n inaugural de la Conferencia se celebrar&
en el lugar y en la fecha que designe el Gobierno de los Estados
Unidos de America, y las sesiones subsiguientes se celebrar&n
en las fechas que determine la Conferencia.
Art. 20. El quorum en las sesiones plenarias lo constituted
la mayoria de las naciones que tomen parte en la Conferencia.
De igual modo, constituira el quorum en las reuniones de las
Comisiones Tecnicas la mayoria de las delegaciones que tomen
parte en ellas, y en las reuniones de los Comites Generales, la
misma proportion de miembros.
Art. 21. En las deliberaciones de las sesiones plenarias, asi
como en las de los Comites y las Comisiones Tecnicas, la dele-




1254

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

gaci6n de cada Estado representado en la Conferencia tendra un
solo voto, y los votos se emitiran por separado, en orden alfabetico
segun el idioma ingles, y se haran constar en las actas de las
respectivas sesiones.
Art. 22. Por regia general las votaciones se haran de viva voz
a menos que algun delegado pida que se hagan por escrito. En
este caso cada (p. 9) delegado depositara en una urna una
cedula en que se exprese el nombre de la nacion por el representada y el sentido en que vote. El secretario leera estas cedulas en
alta voz, contara los votos, y anotara el resultado de la votacion.
Art. 23. La Conferencia no procedera a votar sobre ningun
informe, proyecto o proposicion que verse sobre cualquiera de
los asuntos incluidos en el programa a menos que esten representadas por uno o mas delegados dos terceras partes por lo menos
de las naciones que toman parte en la Conferencia. La misma
proporci6n de las delegaciones que tomen parte en las Comisiones
Tecnicas debera estar presente antes que se proceda a votar en
las reuniones de las Comisiones. De la misma manera, los Comites
Generales solo votaran cuando esten presentes por lo menos dos
terceras partes de sus miembros respectivos. En caso de que la
votacion se haga por escrito en cualquier sesi6n o reunion, se contaran los votos depositados por escrito segun se dispone en los
Articulos 21 y 22 y, para los fines de la votacion solamente, se
considerara presentes a los delegados ausentes que hayan sometido
sus votos de la manera indicada.
Art. 24. Excepto en los casos que expresamente se indican en
este Reglamento, las proposiciones, los informes y los proyectos
ante la consideraci6n de la Conferencia o de cualquiera de los
Comites o Comisiones Tecnicas se consideraran aprobados cuando
obtengan el voto afirmativo de la mayoria absoluta de las dele­
gaciones representadas por uno o mas de sus miembros en la
reunion en que se haga la votacion. Se considerara presente en la
reunion cualquier delegacion que haya depositado su voto en la
forma prescrita en el Articulo 17.
Art. 25. Las siguientes personas podran asistir a las sesiones
de la Conferencia y a las reuniones de las Comisiones Tecnicas y
de sus (p. 10) Comites: los delegados, sus asesores tecnicos y
otros miembros de sus delegaciones; los miembros de la Secretaria
de la Conferencia; y cualesquiera otras personas a quienes el
Comite de Iniciativas de la Conferencia conceda este privilegio.
Art. 26. Si le fuere imposible a un delegado asistir a una sesi6n
plenaria o a uria reunion de una Comisi6n Tecnica o un Comite,
su delegacion podra designar a un miembro que le substituya.




APPE NDI X I

1255

En este caso, la persona asi designada tendra derecho de voz y
voto a nombre de su delegacion. Debera notificarse por anticipado
de dicho nombranyento al Secretario General, al Secretario del
Comite, o al Secretario de la Comision Tecnica, segun sea el caso.
Art. 27. Las sesiones de apertura y de clausura de la Con­
ferencia seran publicas. Se celebraran otras sesiones publicas
cuando de antemano asi lo acuerde y lo ordene una mayoria de
votos de los miembros del Comite de Iniciativas. Las reuniones de
las Comisiones Tecnicas y de sus Comites seran privadas a menos
que las delegaciones dispongan lo contrario por mayoria de votos.
Las reuniones de los Comites Generales seran privadas.
Art. 28. Todo nuevo proyecto o propuesta que una delegacion
desee presentar a la Conferencia se entregara al Secretario
General a la mayor brevedad posible, pero no mas de una semana
despues de la sesion plenaria inaugural de la Conferencia. No se
considerara ningun proyecto o proposicion hasta que el Secretario
General haya distribuido copias del mismo entre las delegaciones
participantes. No se incluira en el programa ninguna propuesta o
tema adicional sin el consentimiento de las dos terceras partes de
los miembros del Comite de Iniciativas.
Capitulo VIII
Actas de las Sesiones y Publicaciones de la Reunion

Art. 29. El Secretario General hara que se lleven textualmente
actas de las sesiones plenarias publicas de la Conferencia, y
preparara un (p. 11) resumen breve de las deliberaciones de
las sesiones plenarias privadas, que se conservara en los archivos
de la Conferencia.
Art. 30. El Secretario de cada Comision Tecnica y de cada
Comite preparara actas breves de cada sesion, que aprobaran los
Presidentes respectivos antes que se presenten al Secretario Gen­
eral para que se distribuyan a las delegaciones. Estas actas
contendran un record de las conclusiones a que llegue cada Comision
o Comite.
Art. 31. Las actas de todas las reuniones privadas, sean de la
Conferencia, de las Comisiones Tecnicas, o de los Comites, estaran
a la disposition de los gobiernos y autoridades participantes, pero
se consideraran confidenciales.
Art. 32. Las conclusiones a que llegue la Conferencia se
incorporaran en un Acta Final que firmaran los delegados en la
sesion de clausura.
Art. 33. El Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America
publicara las actas de las sesiones plenarias publicas y el Acta




1256

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Final y acto seguido transmitira copias certificadas a los gobiernos
que tomen parte en la Conferencia y a los delegados que asistan
a las sesiones.
Art. 34. Las actas originales y el original del Acta Final se
conservaran en los archivos del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos
de America, a donde los enviara el Secretario General.
Capitulo IX
Aprobacion del Reglamento y Enmiendas al Mismo

Art. 35. Despues de aprobado por una mayorla absoluta de las
delegaciones reunidas en sesion plenaria, este reglamento podra
enmendarse unicamente cuando lo recomiende el voto de dos
terceras partes de los miembros del Comite de Iniciativas y el
voto de dos terceras partes de la Conferencia reunida en sesifin
plenaria.

Document 66

Spanish Translation
C O N F E R E N C I A M O N E T A R I A Y F I N A N C I E R A DE L A S N A C I O N E S

UNIDAS

Agenda
I. Fondo monetario international
A. Fines, normas y cuotas del Fondo
(Fines y normas del Fondo, obligaciones de los paises mi­
embros, arreglos transitorios para el perlodo durante el cual
el Fondo y los paises miembros adopten las normas que se
acuerden, relacion del Fondo con el publico y con los paises
no miembros, y relacion de los paises miembros con los paises
no miembros, consideration de la cuota de los paises miembros,
base para la revision futura de las cuotas, y pago de las suscripciones en oro y en moneda nacional.)
B. Operaciones del Fondo
(Operaciones del Fondo, incluso la venta de cambio, adquisicion de oro por el Fondo, contratacion de emprestitos por el
Fondo, Ids cargos impuestos por el Fondo, determinaci6n de
paridades y cambios en paridades, garantla del valor del
activo del Fondo, regulation de las transacciones de capital,
prorrateo de las monedas que esten escasas, y disposiciones
sobre reservas y disminucion de beneficios.




APPENDIX I

C.

D.

1257

Organization y administration
(Establecimiento de juntas directivas, bases para la votacion, seleccion de funcionarios, designation de comites, ubicacion de las oficinas y los depositarios, disposiciones sobre estatutos y reglamentos, publication de informes por el Fondo,
informaci6n a ser suministrada al Fondo por los paises miembros, suspension de calidad de miembro, liquidation de
obligaciones reclprocas al cesar de ser miembro, y liquidation
general del Fondo.)
Forma y status del Fondo.
(Naturaleza del acuerdo que establece el Fondo, posici6n
legal del Fondo en los paises miembros, inmunidades del
Fondo y de sus bienes, enmiendas al acuerdo sobre el Fondo
y relation del Fondo con otros organismos internacionales.)

II. Banco de Reconstruction y Fomento
A. Fines, normas, capital y suscripcion del Banco
(Fines y normas del Banco, relaci6n del Banco con el pu­
blico y con los paises no miembros, y relation de los paises
miembros con los paises no miembros; capital del Banco, sus­
cripcion de los paises miembros, proportion de suscripciones
que deben pagarse, pago en oro y en monedas nacionales,
nuevas demandas de pago de las suscripciones, y reserva de
parte del capital no pagado como fondo de seguridad.)
(P. 2)

B.

C.

Operaciones del Banco
(Condiciones en que puede el Banco garantizar, participar
en prestamos, o hacerlos, manera en que ayudara y estimulara las inversiones en acciones, medidas para salvaguardar
los fondos prestados por el Banco, garantla del valor de los
bienes del Banco en moneda nacional, medidas para hacer
pagos de capital e interes, contratacion de emprestitos por
el Banco, limitation del pasivo directo y contingente del Banco,
comisiones que puede cargar el Banco, reservas y distribu­
tion de beneficios, transacciones en valores y en moneda extranjera que podra emprender el Banco, y otras operaciones
del Banco.)
Organization y administracidn
(Establecimiento de juntas directivas, bases para votacidn,
seleccion de funcionarios, nombramiento de comites, ubicacion de oficinas y depositarios, disposiciones respecto a los
estatutos y reglamentos, publication de informes por el Banco,
retiro o suspension de calidad de miembro, pasivo contingente
de ex miembros, y liquidation general del Banco.)




1258

D.

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Forma y status del Banco
(Naturaleza del acuerdo que establece el Banco, position legal
del Banco en paises miembros, inmunidades del Banco y de
sus bienes, enmiendas al acuerdo sobre el Banco y relaciones
del Banco con otros organismos internacionales.)

Ill, Otras formas de cooperation financiera international

Document 123

Sp anish Translation

(Traduccion)

Mensaje del Excmo. Senor Franklin D. Roosevelt, Presi­
dente de los Estados Unidos de America, a la Conferencia
Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
1° de julio de 1944
SENORES MIEMBROS DE LA CONFERENCIA:

Os doy la bienvenida, lleno de confianza y de esperanza, a este
apacible lugar de reunion. Agradezcoos el que hayals hecho tan
larga jornada para venir hasta aqui, y agradezco a vuestros gobiernos la prontitud con que aceptaron mi invitation de tomar
parte en esta reunion. Nada mas natural que, aun cuando la guerra
de liberation se encuentra en su punto culminante, se reunan los
representantes de los pueblos libres para consultarse respecto a
la estructura del futuro que hemos de ganar.
La guerra nos ha impuesto el habito saludable de reunirnos en
conferencia cuando tenemos problemas comunes que discutir y
solucionar. As! lo hemos hecho con buen exito respecto a los
diversos aspectos militares y de production de la guerra, y tambien respecto a las medidas que deben adoptarse inmediatamente
despues que se gane la guerra, tales como el auxilio y la rehabilitaci6n y la distribution de las existencias de alimentos del mundo.
Han sido estas esencialmente cuestiones de emergencia. En Bret­
ton Woods vosotros, que venis de muchos paises, os reunis por
primera vez para discutir propuestas para un programa durable
de futura cooperation economica y progreso pacifico.
El programa que habeis de discutir constituye, por supuesto,
solo una fase de los arreglos que deben hacerse entre las naciones
para asegurar un mundo ordenado en que reine la armonia. Pero




APPENDIX I

1259

es una fase vital que afecta a hombres y mujeres en todas partes,
porque tiene que ver con los principios segun los cuales habra de
efectuarse el intercambio de las riquezas naturales de la tierra
y los productos de su propia industria e ingenio. El comercio
es la sangre que da vida a las comunidades libres. Debemos asegurarnos de que las arterias por que circula esa sangre no se
vean obstaculizadas otra vez, como ha sucedido en el pasado, por
barreras artificiales creadas por rivalidades economicas insensatas.
Las enfermedades de indole economica son transmisibles en
alto grado. Es logico, por lo tanto, que la salud economica de cada
pais concierna a todos sus vecinos, tanto los cercanos como los
distantes. Solo mediante una economia mundial dinamica que
crezca de manera firme podran elevarse las normas de vida de las
naciones a niveles que permitan la plena realization de nuestras
esperanzas para el futuro.
El espiritu que anime vuestras deliberaciones establecera la
pauta para las futuras consultas amistosas que por su propio
interes celebren las naciones. En Bretton Woods se hara mas
evidente aun que los hombres de diversas nacionalidades han
aprendido a ajustar sus posibles diferencias y a colaborar como
amigos. La labor que necesitamos realizar, y que hay que realizar,
solo puede llevarse a cabo en concierto. Esta conferencia pondra
a prueba nuestra capacidad para colaborar en la paz segun lo
hemos hecho en la guerra. Se que todos acometereis la tarea con
un alto sentido de responsabilidad para con aquellos que tanto han
sacrificado con la esperanza de hacer posible un mundo mejor.

Document 158

Spanish Translation

(Traduccion)

Declaracion Conjunta de los Peritos sobre el Establecimiento de un Fondo Monetario Internacional
Las discusiones del aspecto tecnico de los problemas de coopera­
tion monetaria internacional han llegado ya a tal punto que se
justifica una declaracion de principios. La opinifin de los peritos de
las Naciones Unidas y Asociadas que han participado en las
discusiones es que el metodo mas practico de asegurar la coopera­
tion monetaria internacional es el establecimiento de un Fondo
Monetario Internacional. Los principios que a continuacion




1260

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

se detallan tienen por objeto constituir las bases para este
Fondo. No se pide a los Gobiernos que den su aprobacion final
a estos principios hasta que los delegados de las Naciones Unidas
y Asociadas, reunidos en conferencia formal, los presenten en
forma de proposiciones definitivas.
I. Propositos y normas del Fondo Monetario International

El Fondo se inspirara en todas sus decisiones por los propositos
y las normas siguientes:
1. Promover la cooperation monetaria internacional a traves
de una institution permanente que proporcione el mecanismo para
consultas sobre problemas monetarios internacionales.
2. Facilitar la expansion y el desarrollo equilibrado del comercio
internacional y contribuir de esa manera al mantenimiento de un
alto nivel de empleo y de ingresos reales, lo cual debe ser objetivo
fundamental de la polltica economica.
3. Inspirar confianza a los paises miembros, poniendo a su dis­
position los recursos del Fondo bajo garantlas adecuadas, y de ese
inodo darles tiempo para corregir desajustes en sus balanzas de
pago sin recurrir a medidas que destruyan la prosperidad nacional
o internacional.
4. Fomentar la estabilidad del cambio, mantener arreglos uni­
formes sobre cambio entre los paises miembros, y evitar depreciaciones del cambio con fines de competencia.
5. Ayudar a establecer facilidades de pagos multilateros en
transacciones normales entre los paises miembros, y a eliminar
las restricciones del cambio exterior que impidan el desarrollo del
comercio mundial.
6. Acortar los perlodos y disminuir el grado de desequilibrio en
las balanzas de pago internacionales de los paises miembros.
II. Subscription al Fondo
1. Los paises miembros subscribiran en oro y en fondos locales
las cantidades (cuotas) que se convengan, que sumaran en conjunto unos 8 mil millones de dolares si se adhieren al Fondo todas
las Naciones Unidas y Asociadas (corresponderlan al mundo en
conjunto alrededor de 10 mil millones de dolares).
2. Las cuotas podran revisarse de tiempo en tiempo, pero los
cambios requeriran cuatro quintas partes de los votos, y no podra
cambiarse la cuota de un pals miembro sin su consentimiento.
(p. 2) 3. La subscription obligatoria en oro de cada pals mi­
embro se fijara en la menor de las dos cantidades siguientes: el 25




APPE NDI X I

1261

por ciento de su subscription (cuota) o el 10 por ciento de sus
recursos en oro y cambio exterior convertible en oro.
III. Transacciones con el Fondo
1. Los palses miembros trataran con el Fondo solo a traves de
su Tesoreria, su Banco Central, su Fondo de Estabilizacion u otras
agencias fiscales. La cuenta que tenga el Fondo en moneda de un
pais miembro se conservara en el Banco Central de dicho pais.
2. Un pais miembro tendra derecho a comprar del Fondo la mo­
neda de otro pais miembro a cambio de la suya propia en las condiciones siguientes:
(a) Que el pais miembro manifieste que tiene necesidad
urgente de la moneda que solicita para hacer con ella
pagos compatibles con los fines del Fondo.
(b) Que el Fondo no haya notificado que sus existencias de
la moneda solicitada escasean, pues de ser asi regiran
las disposiciones de la Section VI.
(c) Que el total de las existencias en poder del Fondo de la
moneda ofrecida (despues de haberlas restituido al 75
por ciento de la cuota del pals miembro si hubiera bajado
de esa cantidad) no haya aumentado en mas del 25 por
ciento de la cuota del pais miembro en el curso de los
doce meses anteriores y no exceda del 200 por ciento de
la cuota.
(d) Que el Fondo no haya notificado formalmente que se ha
suspendido al pais miembro el derecho de usarlos recursos
del Fondo debido a que los usa en forma contraria a los
fines y las normas del Fondo; pero el Fondo no hara
tal notification sin antes presentar al pais miembro un
informe en que exponga sus puntos de vista y concederle
tiempo suficiente para que conteste.
A su discretion, y en terminos que garanticen sus intereses, el
Fondo podra desistir de cualquiera de las antedichas condiciones.
3. Las operaciones en la cuenta del Fondo se limitaran a transac­
ciones que tengan por fin proporcionar a un pals miembro, a iniciativa suya y a cambio de su propia moneda o de oro, la moneda
de otro pals miembro. Las transacciones previstas en los parrafos
4 y 7, que siguen, no estan sujetas a esta limitation.
4. Para evitar que escasee la moneda de un pals miembro, el
Fondo podra tomar, a su discretion, las siguientes medidas:
(a) Tomar a prestamo la moneda del pals miembro;
(b) Ofrecer oro a un pals miembro a cambio de su moneda.
5. En tanto que un pals miembro tenga derecho a comprar del




1262

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Fondo la moneda de otro pals miembro a cambio de su propia moneda, debe estar preparado asimismo para comprar su propia mo­
neda de dicho pais miembro (p. 3) con la moneda de este o con
oro. Esto no se aplicara a la moneda sujeta a restricciones de
acuerdo con el parrafo 2 de la Seccion IX, o a las existencias de
moneda acumuladas como resultado de transacciones de la clase de
euenta corriente realizadas antes que el pals miembro elimine las
restricciones sobre liquidation multilatera, mantenidas o impuestas segun el parrafo 2 de la Seccion X.
6. Se presume que el pals miembro que desee obtener, directa o
indirectamente, la moneda de otro pals miembro a cambio de oro,
adquiera dicha moneda vendiendole oro al Fondo, siempre que el
hacerlo no resulte en desventaja suya. Esto no impedira que un
pais productor de oro venda en cualquier mercado oro recien
extraldo de sus minas.
7. El Fondo tambien podra adquirir oro de los palses miembros
de acuerdo con las siguientes disposiciones:
(a) Un pals miembro podra recomprar del Fondo, con oro,
cualquier cantidad de las existencias que tenga el Fondo
de su moneda.
(b) Mientras las existencias de oro y de divisas convertibles
en oro de un pals miembro excedan de su cuota, el Fondo,
al venderle divisas extranjeras, exigira de dicho pais
miembro que le pague en oro la mitad de las ventas netas
de dichas divisas durante el ano fiscal del Fondo.
(c) Si al finalizar el ano fiscal del Fondo han aumentado las
existencias de oro y de divisas convertibles en oro de
un pals miembro, el Fondo podra exigir que hasta un
50 por ciento del aumento se utilice para recomprar parte
de las existencias del Fondo de moneda de dicho pals,
siempre que esto no reduzca las existencias del Fondo
de la moneda de un pals mas alia del 75 por ciento de su
cuota, o las existencias de oro y de divisas convertibles
en oro del pals miembro mas alia de su cuota.
IV. Paridad de las monedas de los paises miembros
1.
La paridad de la moneda de un pals miembro se convendra
con el Fondo cuando se admita al pals como miembro, y se expresara en terminos de oro. Todas las transacciones entre el Fondo
y los palses miembros se efectuaran a la par, sujetas a un cargo
fijo que pagara al Fondo el pals miembro solicitante, y todas las
transacciones en moneda de los palses miembros se efectuaran
dentro de un margen de paridad convenido.




APPE NDI X I

1263

2. Salvo lo que se establece en el parrafo 5 mas adelante, el
Fondo no podra hacer cambio alguno en la paridad de la moneda
de un pais miembro sin su aprobacion. Los pais miembros convienen en no proponer cambios en la paridad de sus monedas a
menos que lo consideren apropiado para corregir un desequilibrio
fundamental. Los cambios se haran solamente con la aprobacion
del Fondo, y sujetos a las disposiciones que siguen.
3. El Fondo aprobara los cambios que se soliciten en la paridad
de la moneda de un pais miembro si estos son esenciales para
corregir un desequilibrio fundamental. En particular, el Fondo
no rechazara una solicitud de cambio que se necesite para restablecer el equilibrio, (p. 4) tomando en cuenta las normas sociales o pollticas internas del pais que solicite el cambio. Al considerar una solicitud de cambio, el Fondo tomara en consideration
la gran incertidumbre que prevalecla cuando se convinieron originalmente las paridades de las monedas de los paises miembros.
4. Despues de consultar con el Fondo, un pais miembro podra
cambiar la paridad establecida de su moneda siempre que el cam­
bio propuesto, incluso cualquier cambio anterior desde el establecimiento del Fondo, no exceda del 10 por ciento. En el caso de
una solicitud para un nuevo cambio no previsto por lo antedicho
y que no exceda del 10 por ciento, el Fondo decidira dentro de
los dos dlas siguientes al recibo de la solicitud, si el solicitante
asi lo pide.
5. Se podra convenir en un cambio uniforme del valor oro de
la moneda de los paises miembros siempre que lo aprueben todos
los paises miembros que tengan, cada uno, un 10 por ciento o mas
de la totalidad de las cuotas.
V. Transaceiones de capital
1. Los paises miembros no usaran los recursos del Fondo para
hacer frente a una salida considerable o sostenida de capital, y
el Fondo podra exigir de un pals miembro que adopte medidas de
control para evitar que los recursos del Fondo se usen con tal fin.
Con esta medida no se pretende evitar el uso de los recursos del
Fondo para transacciones de capital, en cantidades razonables,
que se necesiten para la expansion de las exportaciones o en el
curso ordinario del comercio, la banca o cualquier otro negocio.
Tampoco se pretende impedir los movimientos de capital que se
cubran con los recursos en oro y divisas extranjeras del propio
pais miembro, siempre que dichos movimientos de capital respondan a los propositos del Fondo.
2. Salvo lo que se dispone en la Section VI, un pais miembro




1264

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

no usara el control que ejeree sobre los movimientos de capital para
restringir los pagos por transacciones corrientes o para demorar
indebidamente la transferencia de fondos para la liquidation de
obligaciones.
VI. Distribution de moneda escasa
1. Cuando el Fondo tenga la certeza de que la demanda de mo­
neda de un pais miembro puede agotar pronto las existencias de
esa moneda en poder del Fondo, lo informara as! a los paises
miembros y propondra un metodo equitativo para distribuir la
moneda escasa. Cuando se declare escasa una moneda en esa forma,
el Fondo expedira un informe en que se expongan las causas de
la escasez y se formulen recomendaciones encaminadas a ponerle
fin.
2. La decision del Fondo de distribuir una moneda escasa sera
en efecto una autorizacion a un pais miembro para que, previa
consulta con el Fondo, restrinja temporalmente la libertad en las
operaciones de cambio en la moneda en cuesti6n; y el pais miembro
‘ tendra plena jurisdiction para determinar la manera en que ha de
restringir la demanda y racionar las escasas existencias entre
sus nacionales.
VII. Administration
1. Administraran el Fondo una junta, en la que estard representado (p. 5) cada pais miembro, y un comite ejecutivo. El
comite ejecutivo se compondra de nueve miembros por lo menos,
entre los que habra representantes de las cinco naciones que tengan
las cuotas mayores.
2. La distribution del poder de voto en la junta y en el comite
ejecutivo estara en intima relacion con las cuotas.
3. Salvo lo establecido en el parrafo 2 de la Seccion II y en el
parrafo 5 de la Seccion IV, todos los asuntos se decidiran por
mayoria de votos.
4. El Fondo publicara a intervalos cortos un balance de su po­
sition que exprese el monto de las existencias en su poder de
moneda de los paises miembros y de oro, y sus transacciones
en oro.
VIII. Separation de un pais miembro
1. Un pais miembro podra retirarse del Fondo si lo notifica por
escrito.
2. Las obligaciones reciprocas del Fondo y el pais miembro se
liquidaran en un plazo razonable0
3. Despues que un pais miembro notifique por escrito que se
retira del Fondo, el Fondo no podra disponer de las existencias




APPENDIX

I

1265

que tenga de moneda de dicho pais excepto de acuerdo con los
arreglos que se hagan conforme al parrafo 2 anterior. Despues
que un pais notifique que se retira, el uso que haga de los recursos
del Fondo estara sujeto a la aprobacion de este.
IX. Obligaciones de los paises miembros
1. No compraran oro a un precio que exceda de la paridad convenida para su moneda en mas de un margen establecido, y no
venderan oro a un precio inferior a la paridad convenida en mas
de un margen establecido.
2. No permitiran en sus mercados transacciones de cambios en
monedas de otros paises miembros a tipos que sobrepasen un
margen establecido, basado en las paridades acordadas.
3. No impondran restricciones en los pagos por transacciones
internacionales corrientes con otros paises. miembros (excepto
aquellas que impliquen transferencias de capital o de acuerdo con
la Seccion VI anterior) ni entraran en arreglos monetarios discriminatorios ni en practicas monetarias multiples sin la apro­
bacion del Fondo.
X. Disposiciones transitorias
Como el Fondo no tiene por objeto proveer facilidades de auxilio
o reconstruccion ni ocuparse en las deudas internacionales originadas por la guerra, la aceptacion por un pais miembro de las disposiciones del parrafo 5 de la Seccion III y el parrafo 3 de la
Seccion IX no entrara en vigor hasta que el pais miembro tenga
la certeza de que los arreglos que ha hecho para facilitar la liqui­
dation de las diferencias del balance de pagos durante el periodo
de transicion que seguira a la guerra, por medios que no graven
indebidamente las facilidades que le brinde el Fondo.
(p. 6) 2. Durante este periodo de transicion, los paises mi­
embros podran mantener reglas sobre cambios semej antes a las
que han estado en vigor durante la guerra, y adaptarlas a las
circunstancias del momento, pero deberan eliminar lo mas pronto
posible, en etapas progresivas, cualesquier restricciones que impidan las liquidaciones multilateras en cuenta corriente. En su politica de cambio tendran siempre presente los principios y fines del
Fondo; y tomaran todas las medidas posibles para desarrollar,
con otros paises miembros, relaciones comerciales y financieras
que faciliten los pagos internacionales y el mantenimiento de la
estabilidad de los cambios.
3.
El Fondo podra sugerir a cualquier pais miembro que las
condiciones son favorables para la elimination de restricciones
especiales o para el abandono total de las restricciones que sean




1266

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

ineompatibles con lo estipulado en el parrafo 3 de la Secci6n IX.
A mas tardar 3 anos despues de la fecha en que empiece a operar
el Fondo, cualquier pals miembro que mantenga aun restricciones
incompatibles con el parrafo 3 de la Seccion IX debera consultar
con el Fondo respecto a mantenerlas por mas tiempo.
4.
En sus relaciones con los paises miembros, el Fondo reconocera que el perlodo de transicion es uno de cambios y ajustes, y al
considerar cualquier solicitud presentada por los paises miembros
decidira a favor del pals miembro en caso de cualquier duda razonable.

Document 197

Esbozo Preliminar de un Proyecto de Banco de Reconstruccion y Fomento de las Naciones Unidas y Asociadas
Preambulo

1. El suministro de capital extranjero sera uno de los problemas internacionales economicos y financieros de importancia en
ia postguerra. Muchos paises necesitaran capital para reconstruir
sus economlas, para convertir sus industrias a la satisfaction de
necesidades de tiempos de paz, y para desarrollar sus recursos
productivos. Otros hallaran que las inversiones en el exterior
proporcionan a sus productos un mercado mayor. Las buenas inver­
siones internacionales seran de provecho inmenso tanto para los
paises prestamistas como para los prestatarios.
2. Es de esperarse que aun en los primeros anos de la post­
guerra los conductos particulares de inversion proporcionaran
una gran parte del capital que se invierta en el extranjero. Sin
embargo, es indudable que sera preciso estimular las inversiones
particulares asumiendo algunos de los riesgos, que seran especialmente grandes en el perlodo inmediato de postguerra, y reforzarlas
con el capital que suministre la cooperation internacional. Se pro­
pone el Banco de Reconstruccion y Fomento de las Naciones Unidas
y Asociadas como institution permanente que fomente y facilite las
inversiones internacionales para fines sanos y productivos.
3. El Banco tiene por objeto cooperar con organismos finan­
cieros particulares para proveer capital a largo plazo para fines de
reconstruccion y fomento, y completar el capital cuando los orga­
nismos particulares no puedan suministrar todo el que verdaderamente se necesite para fines productivos. El Banco no haria prestamos o inversiones que pudieran obtenerse de inversionistas




APPENDIX I

1267

particulares en condiciones razonables. Su funcion principal seria
garantizar prestamos concedidos por organismos particulares de
inversion, y participar en ellos, y prestar directamente de sus
propios recursos cuando se necesite capital adicional. El Banco
solo prestarla su apoyo a proyectos gubernamentales o particulares
que estuvieran garantizados por los gobiernos nacionales. Basando
sus operaciones en estos principios, el Banco seria un factor
poderoso para estimular el suministro de capital particular para
inversiones en el extranjero.
4.
Al asegurarse de que hay capital disponible para su uso
productivo en condiciones razonables, el Banco puede hacer una
aportacion importante al mantenimiento de la paz y la prosperidad.
Con capital adecuado, los paises afectados por las guerra pueden
progresar firmemente hacia la reconstruccion, y los paises mas
nuevos pueden emprender el desarrollo economico de que son
capaces. Las inversiones internacionales con estos fines pueden
constituir un factor importante para la expansion del comercio y
para ayudar a mantener un alto nivel de actividad economica en
todo el mundo.
(p. 2)
I. Fines del Banco
1. Ayudar en la reconstruccion y el fomento de los paises
miembros, cooperando con los organismos financieros particulares
en el suministro de capital para inversiones internacionales sanas
y constructivas.
2. Suminstrar capital para reconstruccion y fomento en con­
diciones que protejan plenamente los fondos del Banco, cuando los
organismos financieros particulares no puedan proporcionar el
capital que se necesite para dichos fines en condiciones razonables
compatibles con las normas prestatarias de los paises miembros.
3. Facilitar una transicion rapida y uniforme de una economla
de guerra a una de paz, aumentando la corriente de inversiones
internacionales, y ayudar as! a evitar graves trastornos en la vida
economica de los paises miembros.
4. Ayudar a aumentar la productividad de los paises miembros
mediante el suministro, en colaboracion internacional, de capital
a largo plazo para el fomento sano de los recursos productivos.
5. Fomentar el crecimiento equilibrado de largo alcance del
comercio internacional de los paises miembros.
II. Capital del Banco
1. El capital autorizado sera de unos 10,000 millones de
795841 — 48— 10




1268

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L C O N F E R E N C E

dolares, divididos en acciones de un valor nominal de 100,000
dolares cada una.
2. Las acciones del Banco no seran transferibles ni estaran
sujetas a contribuciones o impuestos. La responsabilidad de los
accionistas por sus acciones se limitara a la parte no exhibida del
precio de subscription.
3. Los gobiernos de los paises miembros del Fondo Inter­
national de Estabilizacion subscribiran una cantidad minima de
acciones que se determinara mediante una formula convenida. La
formula tomara en cuenta datos pertin'entes tales como el ingreso
nacional y el comercio exterior del pais miembro. De acuerdo con
ella los Estados Unidos subscribirlan aproximadamente la tercera
parte del total de acciones.
4. El importe de las acciones subscritas se cubrira de la
manera siguiente:
a. Cada pais miembro hara un pago inicial igual al 20 por
ciento de su subscription, una parte (que no exceda del
20 por ciento) en oro y el resto en moneda nacional. La
proportion en que se haya de pagar en oro o en moneda
nacional se graduara de acuerdo con un plan convenido,
que tomara en cuenta las existencias de oro y divisa libre
en cada pais miembro.
(p. 3)
b. Los paises miembros haran el pago inicial dentro de un plazo
de 60 dlas a partir de la fecha establecida para el comienzo
de las operaciones del Banco, y cubriran el resto del importe
de sus subscripciones en las cantidades y en las fechas que
fije la Junta Directiva; pero no se pedira en ningun aho
mas del 20 por ciento de la subscription.
c. Cuando se soliciten nuevos pagos sobre las subscripciones,
se hara en igual proportion para todas las acciones, pero
estas solicitudes solo se haran si el Banco necesita fondos
para sus operaciones. La proportion de los pagos posteriores
que hayan de hacerse en oro se determinara segun el plan
expuesto en el inciso 4a del Artlculo II, segun se aplique
a cada pals miembro en el momento de solicitarse los pagos.
5. Se apartara una parte substancial del capital subscrito
del Banco en forma de acciones no exhibidas, para constituir un
fondo de garantla de las obligaciones garantizadas o emitidas por
el Banco.
6. Cuando los recursos de caja del Banco excedan considerablemente de las necesidades previstas, a la Junta podra reintegrar
una proportion uniforme de las cantidades subscritas, sin perjuicio




APPENDIX I

1269

de volver a solicitarlas. CuandG las existencias del Banco de moneda
nacional excedan del 20 por ciento de la subscription de cualquier
pais miembro, la Junta podra hacer arreglos para comprar con
moneda nacional algunas de las acciones en poder de dicho pais.
7. Cada pais miembro conviene en recomprar del Banco cada
ano, a cambio de oro, parte de su moneda nacional en poder del
Banco que no exceda del 2 por ciento de su subscription exhibida;
disponiendose, sin embargo, que:
a. Este requisito podra suspenderse en cualquier ano de un
modo general si lo aprueban tres cuartas partes de los
miembros de la Junta.
b. No se exigira a ningun pais que recompre su moneda nacio­
nal en ningun ano determinado, en exceso del 50 por ciento
del aumento de sus existencias ofiiciales de oro ocurrido en
el ano anterior.
c. La obligation de un pais miembro de recomprar su moneda
nacional se limitara a la cantidad de moneda nacional
pagada sobre su subscription.
8. Todos los paises miembros convienen en que la totalidad de
las existencias de moneda nacional y otros bienes del Banco
situados en sus territorios estaran libres de toda restriction
especial en cuanto a su uso, salvo las restricciones que acepte el
Banco, y sujeto a lo dispuesto en el inciso 13 del Articulo IV.
9. Los recursos y las facilidades del Banco se emplearan
exclusivamente en beneficio de los paises miembros.
(p . 4 )

III. La JJnidad Monetaria Inter nacional
1. La unidad monetaria del Banco sera la unidad del Fondo
International de Estabilizacion (137 1/7 granos de oro fino, equivalentes a 10 dolares en moneda de los Estados Unidos).
2. Las cuentas del Banco se llevaran en esta moneda. Las
disponibilidades del Banco en moneda nacional se garantizaran
contra depreciation en terminos de oro.
IV. Facultades y Operaciones
1.
Para lograr los fines expuestos en el Articulo I, el Banco
podra garantizar prestamos, participar en ellos o hacerlos, a cual­
quier pais miembro y, a traves del gobierno de dicho pais, a cualquiera de las subdivisiones politicas del mismo, o a firmas o
empresas industriales situadas en su territorio, de acuerdo con
las condiciones siguientes:
a. Que el gobierno del pais garantice plenamente el pago de
intereses y del capital.




1270

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

b. Que el prestatario no haya po’dido obtener credito de otras
instituciones, aun con la garantia de su gobierno, en condiciones que el Banco juzgue razonables.
c. Que una comision competente haya estudiado cuidadosamente los meritos del proyecto o programa y haya dictaminado por escrito que el prestamo servira directa o indirectamente para aumentar la productividad del pais prestatario
y que la perspectiva de que se pague el servicio del prestamo
es favorable. La mayor parte de los miembros de 1 . comision
a
que haga el informe consistira en miembros del personal
tecnico del Banco. En la comision habra un perito seleccionado por el pais que solicite el prestamo, que puede o no
ser miembro del personal tecnico del Banco.
d. Que el Banco haga lo necesario para asegurar que el importe
de cualquier prestamo que garantice o haga, o en que participe, se usara para los fines para los cuales se aprobo dicho
prestamo.
e. Que el Banco garantice, otorgue, o participe en prestamos
solo a tasas de interes razonables, con una tabla de amortiza­
tion adecuada a la naturaleza del proyecto y a la balanza de
pagos prevista del pais prestatario.
2. De acuerdo con lo dispuesto en el inciso 1 del Artlculo IV,
el Banco podra garantizar total o parcialmente prestamos hechos
por inversionistas particulares; disponiendose ademas que:
a. La tasa de interes y otras condiciones del prestamo seran
razonables.
b. Se compensara al Banco por el riesgo que le supone el garan­
tizar el prestamo.
(P. 5)

3. El Banco podra participar en prestamos colocados a traves
de los conductos normales de inversi6n, siempre que se satisfagan
todos los requisitos del incisio 1 del Articulo IV, salvo que la tasa
de interes podra ser mas elevada que si el Banco garantizara los
prestamos.
4. El Banco podra fomentar y facilitar la inversion inter­
national en acciones comunes, obteniendo de los gobiernos la garan­
tia de que podran convertirse a moneda extranjera los reditos de
dichas inversiones extranjeras. Al promover este objetivo, el Banco
podra tambien participar en dichas inversiones, pero su participa­
tion total en las antedichas acciones comunes no excedera del 10
por ciento de su capital pagado.




APPENDIX I

1271

5. El Banco podra ofrecer publicamente cualesquiera valores
que haya adquiri&o previamente. Para facilitar la venta de dichos
valores el Banco podra, a discretion, garantizarlos.
6. El Banco no hara prestamos, o inversiones que puedan colocarse en condiciones razonables a traves de los conductos de in­
version particulares. El Banco reglamentara sus operaciones de
tal manera que se asegure la aplicacion de este principio.
7. El Banco no impondra a un prestamo la condition de que su
producto se gaste en determinado pais miembro; disponiendose,
sin embargo, que el producto de un prestamo no se gastara en un
pais no miembro sin el consentimiento del Banco.
8. A1 hacer prestamos el Banco estipulara que:
a. Las divisas en relacion con el proyecto o programa aprobados las suministrara el Banco en la moneda de los paises
en que hayan de gastarse los productos del prestamo y s61o
con el consentimiento de dichos paises.
b. La moneda national que se necesite para el proyecto se obtendra en gran medida en la localidad sin ayuda del Banco.
c. En circumstancias especiales, cuando el Banco estime que
la parte national de cualquier proyecto no puede financiarse
en la localidad excepto en condiciones muy onerosas, podra
prestar esa parte al prestatario en moneda nacional.
d. Cuando el proyecto de desarrollo origine mayor necesidad de
divisas para fines que no se necesiten directamente para
dicho proyecto, pero que sean consecuencia de el, el Banco
proporcionara una parte adecuada del prestamo en oro o en
la moneda extranjera que se desee.
9. Cuando el Banco haga un prestamo abonara el importe a la
cuenta del prestatario. Los pagos para liquidar giros respecto de
gastos autorizados se haran con cargo a esta cuenta.
10.
Los prestamos en que participe el banco o que haga el Banco
contendran las siguientes estipulaciones de pago:
a. El interes sobre los prestamos se pagara en moneda que el
Banco considere aceptaable, o en oro. Solo se pagaran
intereses sobre las sumas giradas.
b. Los pagos amortization del capital del prestamo se haran
en moneda que el Banco considere aceptable, o en oro. Si al
concertarse un prestamo el Banco y el prestatario convienen
en ello, la amortization del capital podra hacerse en oro o,
a election del prestatario, en la moneda en que se hizo
efectivo el prestamo.




1272

M ON E TA R Y AND F INA NCI AL CONFERENCE

(P . 6 )

c. En caso de escasez aguda de divisas, el Banco podra aceptar
moneda nacional en pago de intereses y capital por perlodos
de no mas de tres anos. El Banco hara arreglos con el pals
prestatario para la recompra de dicha moneda nacional en
el curso de varios anos en condiciones apropiadas que salvaguarden el valor de las existencias de la misma en poder del
Banco.
d. Los pagos de intereses y capital, ya se hagan en moneda
nacional o en oro, deberan equivaler al valor oro del prestamo y del interes estipulado sobre el.
11. El Banco podra cobrar una comision al prestatario por sus
gastos de investigacion en relacion con cualquier prestamo colocado o garantizado por el, en que haya participado, o que haya
otorgado total o parcialmente.
12. El Banco podra garantizar o participar en prestamos a
organismos oficiales internacionales, u otorgarselos a dichos or­
ganismos, para fines compatibles con los propositos del Banco,
siempre que la mitad por lo menos de los participantes de los
organismos internacionales sean miembros del Banco.
13. Al considerar una solicitud de garantla, participacion u
otorgamiento de un prestamo a un pals miembro, el Banco tendra
en cuenta el efecto que pueda tener dicho prestamo en la situacion
economica y financiera del pals en que haya de gastarse el prestamo
y por consiguiente obtendra el consentimiento del pals afectado.
14. A solicitud de los paises en que se gaste parte del prestamo,
el Banco recomprara a cambio de oro o divisas que se necesiten
una parte del importe del prestamo en moneda nacional que haya
gastado el prestatario en esos paises.
15. Con la aprobacion de los representantes de los gobiernos de
los paises miembros interesados, el Banco podra realizar las si­
guientes operaciones:
a. Emitir, comprar o vender, dar en prenda o descontar sus
propios valores y obligaciones o los que tenga en su cartera,
o valores que haya garantizado.
b. Pedir prestado a gobiernos miembros, agencias fiscales, bancos centrales, fondos de estabilizacion, instituciones financieras particulares de los paises miembros o a organismos
financieros internacionales.
c. Comprar o vender divisas previa consulta con el Fondo In­
ternacional de Estabilizacion cuando estas operaciones sean
necesarias en relacion con las suyas propias.




APPENDIX I

1273

16. El Banco podra actuar como agente o corresponsal de los
gobiernos de los paises miembros, sus bancos centrales, fondos de
estabilizacion y agencias fiscales, asi como de instituciones financieras internacionales.
El Banco podra acutar como fiduciario, agente o encargado del
registro, en relation con prestamos por el garantizados, otorgados
o colocados, (p. 7) o en que haya participado.
17. Salvo indication en contrario, el Banco solo tratara con los
siguientes, o a traves de ellos:
a. Los gobiernos de los paises miembros, los bancos centrales,
fondos de estabilizacion y agencias fiscales.
b. El Fondo Internacional de Estabilizacion y cualesquiera
otros organismos financieros internacionales cuyo capital
este subscrito predominantemente por gobieros de paises
miembros.
Sin embargo, con la aprobacion del representante en la Junta
del gobierno del pals interesado el Banco podra negociar sus
propios valores, o los que haya garantizado, con el publico o con
instituciones de los paises miembros.
18. Si el Banco declarare en suspenso a un pais miembro, los
gobiernos miembros y sus organismos convienen en no prestar
apoyo financiero a ese pais sin la aprobacion del Banco hasta que
se le devuelva su status de pais miembro.
19. El Banco y sus funcionarios evitaran escrupulosamente inmiscuirse en los asuntos politicos de los paises miembros. Sin
embargo, esta disposition no limitara el derecho de un funcionario
del Banco a participar en la vida politica de su pais.
A1 resolver las solicitudes de prestamo, el Banco no se dejara
influir de la naturaleza politica del gobierno del pals que solicite
el prestamo.
V. Administracion
1. La administracion del Banco se confiara a una Junta Directiva integrada por un director propietario y uno suplente designados por cada pals miembro en la forma en que este lo
determine.
El director y su suplente desempenaran su cargo durante tres
anos mientras lo considere conveniente su gobierno, y podran
ser reelectos.
2. La votacion en la Junta se efectuara de la manera siguiente:
a. El director de cada pals miembro o su suplente tendran
derecho a 1,000 votos mas un voto por cada action en su
poder. De ese modo un gobierno que posea una action




1274

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF ERENCE

emitira 1,001 votos, y uno que posea 1,000 acciones emitira
2,000 votos.
b. Ningun pals emitira mas del 25 por ciento del total de votos.
c. Excepto cuando se estipule lo contrario, las decisiones de la
Junta Directiva se tomaran por simple mayor la de votos, y
cada miembro de la Junta emitira los votos adjudicados a su
gobierno. Cunado se juzgue que mejor eonvenga al Banco,
las decisiones de la Junta podran tomarse sin celebrar
reunion, sometiendo asuntos concretos a la votacion de los
directores en la forma que determine la Junta.
3. La Junta Directiva elegira un presidente del Banco, que
sera jefe del personal del Banco y miembro ex oficio de la Junta,
y uno o (p. 8) mas vicepresidentes. El presidente y los vicepresidentes del Banco desempenaran su cargo durante cuatro
anos, podran ser reelectos, y podran ser separados de su cargo por
la Junta en cualquiero momento por causa justificada. El personal
del Banco se seleccionara de acuerdo con el reglamento que fije
la Junta Directiva
4. La Junta Directiva designara de entre sus miembros un
Comite Ejecutivo integrado por no mas de nueve personas. El
presidente del Banco sera miembro ex oficio de este Comite.
El Comite Ejecutivo residira permanentemente en el lugar en
que se encuentren las oficinas principales del Banco y ejercera
la autoridad que le delegue la Junta. En caso de ausencia de cual­
quier miembro del Comite Ejecutivo su suplente en la Junta tomara su puesto. Los miembros del Comite Ejecutivo recibiran una
remuneration apropiada.
5. La Junta Directiva seleccionara un Consejo Consultivo in­
tegrado por siete miembros, que asesorara a la Junta y a los
funcionarios del Banco sobre asuntos de polltica general. El Con­
sejo Consultivo se reunira una vez al ano, y cuantas veces lo
solicite la Junta.
Los miembros del Consejo Consultivo se seleccionaran de entre
individuos de reconocida capacidad, pero no se seleccionara mas
de un miembro de cada pals. Los miembros desempenaran su
cargo por dos anos, y su designation podra renovarse. Se le pagaran sus gastos y un sueldo que fije la Junta.
6. La Junta Directiva podra nombrar los comites que considere
necesarios para el funcionamiento del Banco, y comites consultivos
jntegrados total o parcialmente por personas que no pertenezcan
al personal de planta del Banco.
7. La Junta Directiva podra autorizar a cualquier funcionario
o comite del Banco para ejercer determinadas facultades de la




APPE NDI X I

1275

Junta, excepto las de garantizar u otorgar prestamos o participar
en ellos. Las faeultades delegadas se ejerceran de un modo com­
patible con la polltica y practicas generales de la Junta.
La Junta, por una mayoria de tres cuartas partes de los votos,
podra delegar al Comite Ejecutivo la facultad de garantizar,
otorgar o participar en prestamos por las cantidades que ella
senale. Al considerar las solicitudes de prestamos el Comite Eje­
cutivo actuara conforme a los requisites estipulados para cada
clase de prestamos.
8. Podra declararse en mora al pais miembro que no cumpla
sus obligaciones con el Banco, y podra suspendersele mientras lo
este si as! lo decide una mayoria de los paises miembros.
Mientras dure su suspension se negaran al pais los privilegios
que como miembro le corresponden, pero seguira sujeto a sus obli­
gaciones como tal. Al cabo de un ano el pais dejara de pertenecer
al Banco automaticamente a menos que una mayoria de los paises
miembros lo reintegre a su position.
Si un pals miembro decide separarse del Banco, o es separado de
el, el Banco recomprara sus acciones al precio original de compra
si posee un excedente. Si los libros del Banco indican perdidas, el
pals participara proporcionalmente en ellas. El Banco tendra un
plazo de (p. 9) cinco anos para liquidar sus obligaciones para
con un pals miembro que se separe del Banco o sea separado
de el.
Cualquier pals miembro que se separe del Fondo Internacional
de Estabilizacion o sea separado de el dejara de pertenecer al Banco
a menos que una mayoria de tres cuartas partes de los miembros
vote a favor de que continue perteneciendo a el.
9. Las utilidades llquidadas anuales se repartiran de la manera
siguiente:
a. Todas las utilidades se distribuiran en proportion al numero
de acciones en poder de cada miembro, excepto que el 25
por ciento de las utilidades ira a las reservas hasta que
estas sean el 20 por ciento del capital subscrito.
b. Las utilidades se pagaran en la moneda nacional del pals,
o en oro, a election del Banco.
10. El Banco reunira y pondra a la disposition de los paises
miembros y del Fondo Internacional de Estabilizacion la informaci6n financiera y economica y los informes que se relacionen con
las operaciones del Banco.
Los paises miembros proporcionaran al Banco toda la informa­
tion y los datos que faciliten sus operaciones.




1276

M O N E TA R Y AND FI NA NC IA L CONFERENCE
Document 230

French Translation
CONFERENCE

M O N E T AIRE

ET

FINANCIERE

DES

NATIONS

UNIES

Reglement
Chapitre I
Representation

Art. 1. La representation a la Conference sera limitee aux
delegations accreditees par les gouvernements ou autorites des
Nations Unies et des nations a elles associees dans cette guerre, en
reponse a Tinvitation du President des fitats-Unis d’Amerique a
participer a la Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations
Unies.
Chapitre II
Personnel de la Conference

Section I
President temporaire
Art. 2. Le President des Etats-Unis d’Amerique designera le
President provisoire de la Conference, lequel presidera la seance
d’ouverture et continuera a assumer la presidence jusqu’a ce que
la Conference ait elu un President permanent.
Art. 3. A la seance pleniere d’ouverture de la Conference, le
President provisoire nommera les comites suivants:
(a) Comite des Pouvoirs,
(b) Comite du Reglement, et
(c) Comite des Nominations.
Section II
President permanent
Art. 4. Le President permanent de la Conference sera elu a
la majorite absolue des delegations des Etats representes a la
Conference.
Art. 5. Les attributions du President seront les suivantes:
Preincrement. Presider les seances de la Conference et soumettre a l’examen, dans Tordre ou ils sont inscrits, les sujets
portes a Tordre du jour.
Deuxiemement. Donner la parole aux delegues dans Tordre ou
ils Fauront sollicitee.
Troisiemement. Decider de toute question d'ordre soulevee au
cours des discussions de la Conference. Toutefois, si un des dele­
gues en fait (p. 2) la demande, la decision du President sera
soumise a la Conference pour etre decidee par un vote de majorite
des delegations.




APPENDIX I

1277

Quatriemement. Mettre les questions aux voix et annoncer les
resultats du vote a la Conference.
Cinquiemement. Transmettre a l’avance aux delegues, par Tintermediaire du Secretaire General, l’ordre du jour de chacune des
seances plenieres.
Sixiemement. Prescrire toutes mesures necessaires au maintien
de l’ordre et de la stricte observation du Reglement.
S e c t io n

III

Vice-Presidents
Art. 6. Quatre Vice-Presidents seront elus a la majorite absolue des delegations des Stats representes a la Conference. En
Tabsence du President permanent, un des Vice-Presidents presidera les seances plenieres de la Conference. Un Vice-President
faisant fonction de President aura les memes prerogatives et les
memes attributions que le President.
S e c t io n

IV

Secretaire General
Art. 7. Le Secretaire General de la Conference sera nomme
par le President des fitats-Unis d’Amerique.
Les attributions du Secretaire General seront les suivantes:
Premierement. Organiser, diriger et coordonner les travaux
des secretaires, secretaires ad joints, secretaires des comites, interpretes et autres employes nommes par le Gouvernement des
fitats-Unis d’Amerique au Secretariat de la Conference. II aidera
egalement les differentes Commissions techniques et coordonnera
leurs travaux.
Deuxiemement. Faire fonction de conseiller principal du Presi­
dent de la Conference relativement aux questions d’ordre dans
Tassemblee, de procedure et de protocole.
Troisiemement. Recevoir et distribuer la correspondance officielle de la Conference et y repondre, conformement aux resolutions
de cette assemblee.
Quatriemement. Preparer ou faire preparer sous sa direction
les proces-verbaux des seances de la Conference, des Comites et
des Commissions techniques, conformement aux notes que lui
fourniront les secretaires.
Cinquiemement. Distribuer aux Comites et aux Commissions
techniques les sujets sur lesquels ils sont appeles a presenter des
rapports, et mettre a la disposition des Comites tout ce qui pourra
leur etre necessaire pour Texecution de leurs travaux.




1278

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

(P . 3)
Sixiemement. Preparer Tordre du jour conformement
aux instructions du President.
Septiemement. Servir d’intermediaire entre les delegations ou
entre leurs membres respectifs dans les questions du. ressort de
la Conference, et entre les delegues et les autorites du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d'Amerique.
Huitiemement. Remplir toutes autres fonctions qui pourraient
lui etre assignees par le Reglement, la Conference ou le President.
S e c t io n V

Secretaire General Technique
Art. 8. Le Secretaire General Technique de la Conference sera
nomme avec Tapprobation du President des Etats-Unis d’Amerique.
Les attributions du Secretaire General Technique seront les
suivantes:
Premierement. Coordonner les travaux des Commissions tech­
niques et de leurs Comites.
Deuxiemement. fitablir un programme des travaux des Secre­
taires des Commissions techniques et de leurs Comites et surveiller
ces travaux.
Troisiemement. Collaborer avec le Secretaire General en veillant
a la preparation des rapports et des proces-verbaux des Com­
missions techniques et de leurs Comites.
Quatriemement. Conseiller les delegations relativement aux
questions se rattachant aux travaux techniques de la Conference.
Cinquiemement. Proceder a des consultations avec le Secretaire
General lors de la preparation de l’Acte Final et des comptes
rendus de la Conference.
S e c t i o n VI
Participation
Art. 9. La participation a la Conference sera limitee aux
personnes suivantes:
(a)
Les delegues accredites par les gouvernements et autorites
auxquels une invitation a ete adressee au nom du President des
fitats-Unis d’Amerique. Les delegues accredites par les gouverne­
ments et autorites ainsi invites auront le privilege d’assister a
toutes les seances plenieres et a toutes les seances des Commissions
techniques de la Conference; ils auront le privilege de prendre la
parole aux seances plenieres et aux seances des Commissions tech­
niques et de leurs Comites, et ce conformement aux reglements
decrits ci-apres; ils auront le privilege de voter a toutes les seances
plenieres ou generales et a toutes les seances des Commissions




APPENDIX I

1279

techniques et des Comites sous reserve des restrictions ci-apres
specifiees, relativement au vote des delegations.

(p. 4) (b) Les conseillers techniques et autres membres des
delegations des gouvernements et autorites invites a participer a
la Conference pourront assister avec leurs delegues aux seances
plenieres et aux seances des Comites et des Commissions tech­
niques, mais ils n’auront pas le droit de voter excepte dans les
conditions prevues ci-dessous.
(c)
Pourront assister toutes autres personnes autorisees par le
Comite directeur.
Chapitre III
Comites Generaux de la Conference

Art. 10. Seront constitues les Comites generaux suivants:
(a) Comite des Nominations, compose de cinq membres nommes
par le President provisoire. Le Comite des Nominations proposera
des candidats aux postes suivants: Quatre Vice-Presidents de la
Conference; Presidents, Vice-Presidents et Delegues-Rapporteurs
des Commissions; Presidents et Delegues-Rapporteurs des Co­
mites des Commissions I et I I ; et les membres du Comite directeur.
(b) Comite directeur, compose du President de la Conference
comme President et de dix autres membres elus par la Conference
a la suite de la reception des recommandations du Comite des
Nominations.
(c) Comite des Pouvoirs, compose de cinq membres nommes
par le President provisoire.
(d) Comite du Reglement, compose de cinq membres nommes
par le President provisoire.
(e) Comite de Coordination, compose de sept membres; ce co­
mite devant etre constitue par le Comite directeur.
Art. 11. Anterieurement a la premiere seance pleniere, les
Presidents des delegations se reuniront pour examiner Torganisation de la Conference et formuler des recommandations qui seront
soumises a la Conference a la premiere seance pleniere.
Chapitre IV
Art. ,12. La Conference sera divisee en trois Commissions
techniques dont seront issus les Comites suivants, et tous autres
Comites que les Commissions respectives jugeront utile d’instituer.
C o m m i s s i o n I. Fonds monetaire international
Comite 1. Buts, principes d’action et obligations du Fonds.
Comite 2. Operations du Fonds.
Comite 3. Organisation et administration.
Comite 4. Forme et statut du Fonds.




1280

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

(P. 5)
Co m m issio n II.

Banque de reconstruction et de developpement.

Comite 1.

Buts, principes d’action, capital et souscription
de la Banque.
Comite 2. Operations de la Banque.
Comite 3. Organisations et administration de la Banque.
Comite 4. Forme et statut de la Banque.
Co m m issio n III. Autres formes de cooperation financi&re internationale.
Art. 13. Lorsque les conclusions auxquelles auront abouti les
Commissions techniques auront ete revues par le Comite de Co­
ordination, elles seront presentees a une seance pleniere de la
Conference par le Delegue-Rapporteur de chaque Commission.
Art. 14. Le representant d’une delegation elu President ou
Secretaire-Rapporteur d’un Comite d’une Commission technique
sera le President de ladite Delegation, ou tout autre membre de
cette Delegation que le President pourrait nommer.
Art. 15. Chaque delegation aura le droit de se faire repre­
senter par un ou plusieurs de ses membres dans chacune des Com­
missions techniques. Les noms de ces membres seront communiques
au Secretaire General par chaque delegation aussitot que possible,
et en tout cas avant la premiere seance reguliere de chaque Com­
mission.
Chapitre V
Langue de la Conference

Art. 16.

L’anglais sera la langue officielle de la Conference.
Chapitre VI
Les Delegations

Art. 17. Une delegation non presente a la seance au cours de
iaquelle il est procede a un vote peut deposer ou transmettre son
vote par ecrit au Secretaire, et ce vote sera compte a condition qu’il
soit transmis ou depose avant que le vote ne soit declare ferme.
Dans ce cas, la delegation sera consideree comme ayant ete pre­
sente et son vote sera compte.
Art. 18. Chaque delegation aura droit a un vote qui sera ex­
prime par Tintermediaire soit de son President soit d’un membre
nomme par la delegation pour agir en son nom relativement aux
questions examinees au cours des seances des Commissions tech­
niques et des Comites ou aux seances plenieres de la Conference.
Les delegations pourront nommer des remplagants pour des
seances determinees conformement aux dispositions de PArticle 26.




APPE NDI X I

1281

(P. 6)
Chapitre VII
Seances de la Conference, des Comites de la Conference et des
Commissions Techniques

Art. 19. La premiere seance de la Conference aura lieu a Tendroit et a la date fixes par le Gouvernement des Eltats-Unis
d’Amerique, et les seances subsequentes aux jours qu’aura fixes
la Conference.
Art. 20. Le quorum aux seances plenieres sera constitue par
la presence d’une majorite des Nations participant a la Conference.
De meme, la presence de la majorite des delegations participant aux
Commissions techniques constituera un quorum aux seances des
Commissions respectives, et la presence de la meme proportion
des membres des Comites generaux constituera un quorum.
Art. 21. Aux deliberations des seances plenieres, ainsi qu’a
celles des Comites et des Commissions techniques, la delegation
de chaque Etat represente a la Conference n’aura qu’un seul vote,
et les votes seront recueillis separement, par ordre alphabetique
et en langue anglaise, et ils seront enregistres dans les comptes
rendus des seances respectives.
Art. 22. En regie generale, les votes seront pris oralement,
moins qu’un delegue demande qu’ils soient pris par ecrit; dans ce
cas, chaque delegue deposera dans une urne un bulletin de vote
indiquant le nom de la Nation qu’il represente et le sens dans lequel
le vote aura ete fait. Le Secretaire lira ces bulletins a haute voix,
comptera les votes, et enregistrera les resultats.
Art. 23. La Conference ne procedera a un vote relativement a
un rapport, pro jet ou proposition relatifs a Tun quelconque des
sujets inclus dans Tordre du jour que si deux tiers au moins des
Nations participant a la Conference sont representees par un ou
plusieurs delegues. La meme proportion des delegations participant
aux Commissions techniques devra etre presente avant qu’il puisse
etre procede a un vote aux seances des Commissions. Les Comites
generaux egalement ne procederont a un vote que si deux tiers au
moins de leurs membres sont presents. En cas de vote par ecrit,
a toute seance pleniere ou autre, le compte sera fait des votes
deposes par ecrit comme il est prevu aux Articles 21 et 22, les
delegues absents etant consideres presents, aux fins du vote seulement, lorsqu’ils auront soumis leur vote de la maniere indiquee.
Art. 24. Sauf dans les cas expressement indiques dans ce
Reglement, les propositions, rapports et pro jets mis a Tetude par
la Conference ou Tun quelconque des Comites ou des Commissions
techniques seront consideres comme approuves lorsqu'ils auront




1282

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

obtenu un vote affirmatif a la majorite absolue des delegations
representees par un ou plusieurs de leurs membres a la seance
au cours de laquelle il aura ete procede au vote. Toute delegation
ayant depose son vote de la maniere prescrite a rArticle 17 sera
consideree comme presente a 1 seance.
a
Art. 25. Peuvent assister aux seances de la Conference et aux
reunions des Commissions techniques et de leurs Comites: les
delegues, leurs conseillers techniques et autres membres de leurs
(p. 7) delegations; les membres du Secretariat de la Confer­
ence et toutes autres personnes auxquelles le Comite directeur
pourra accorder ce privilege.
Art. 26. Lorsqu’un delegue se trouvera dans Timpossibilite
d’assister a une seance pleniere ou a une seance d'une Commission
technique ou d’un Comite, la delegation pourra designer un membre
pour prendre sa place. Dans ce cas, la personne ainsi designee
aura le droit de prendre la parole et de voter au nom de sa
delegation. Notification de cette designation sera faite au prealable
au Secretaire General, au Secretaire du Comite ou au Secretaire
de la Commission technique, selon le cas.
Art. 27. Les seances d’ouverture et de cloture de la Con­
ference seront publiques; d’autres seances publiques pourront
avoir lieu s’il en a ete ainsi decide par un vote de majorite du
Comite directeur. Les seances des Commissions techniques et de
leurs Comites auront lieu a huis clos a moins qu’il n’en soit
decide autrement par un vote de majorite des delegations. Les
seances des Comites generaux auront lieu a huis clos.
Art. 28. Tout nouveau projet ou proposition qu’une delegation
desirerait presenter a la Conference sera remis au Secretaire
General aussitot que possible, mais une semaine au plus apres
la seance pleniere d’ouverture de la Conference. Aucun pro jet ou
proposition ne sera examine jusqu’a ce que des exemplaires dudit
projet ou de ladite proposition aient ete distribues par le Secretaire
General aux delegations participantes. Aucune proposition d'un
sujet constituant une addition a Tordre du jour n’y sera portee
si elle n’a pas obtenu Tassentiment des deux tiers du Comite
directeur.
Chapitre VIII
Proces-Verbaux des Seances et Publications

Art. 29. Les comptes rendus verbatim des seances plenieres
publiques de la Conference seront dresses par les soins du Secre­
taire General. Le Secretaire General preparera un resume des
travaux des seances plenieres tenues a huis clos, qui sera conserve
dans les archives de la Conference.




APPENDIX I

1283

Art. 30. Le Secretaire de chaque Commission technique et de
chaque Comite preparera un resume des proces-verbaux de chaque
seance qui sera approuve par les Presidents respectifs avant d'etre
presente au Secretaire General pour etre distribue aux delega­
tions. Ce resume contiendra les conclusions auxquelles auront
abouti la Commission ou le Comite.
Art. 31. Les proces-verbaux de chacune des seances tenues a
huis clos, soit de la Conference, soit des Commissions techniques
ou des Comites seront mis a la disposition des gouvernements et
autorites participants, mais ils devront etre consideres comme
confidentiels.
Art. 32. Toutes les conclusions auxquelles la Conference pourra
aboutir seront incorporees dans l’Acte Final, qui sera signe par les
(p. 8) delegues a la seance de cloture.
Art. 33. Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique publiera les proces-verbaux des seances plenieres publiques et l’Acte
Final, et en transmettra sans delai des copies certifiees aux
gouvernements participant a la Conference et aux delegues
presents aux seances.
Art. 34. L’original des proces-verbaux et Toriginal de TActe
Final seront conserves dans les archives du Gouvernement des
fitats-Unis d’Amerique ou ils saront envoyes par le Secretaire
General.
Chapitre IX
Approbation et Modification du Reglement

Art. 35. Une fois approuve par une majorite absolue des
delegations reunies en seance pleniere, ce Reglement ne pourra
etre modifie par la suite que sur la recommandation d’un vote des
deux tiers du Comite directeur et par un vote des deux tiers de
la Conference reunie en seance pleniere.

Document 261

(Traduction)
French translation
CONFERENCE

MONETAIRE

ET

FINANCIERE

DES

NATIONS

UNIES

Programme des travaux
I. Fonds Monetaire International
1. Buts, politique et quotes-parts du Fonds
(Buts et politique du Fonds, obligations des pays membres,
arrangements transitoires pour la periode durant laquelle le
795841— 48— 11




1284

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

Fonds et les pays membres adoptent la politique convenue,
rapports du Fonds avec le public et les pays non membres, et
rapports des pays membres avec les pays non membres, examen
de la quote-part des pays membres, des bases pour la revision
des quotes-parts a Tavenir et du paiement des souscriptions en
or et en monnaie nationale.) 2. Operations du Fonds
(Operations du Fonds y compris la vente de devises, acquisition
de Tor par le Fonds, emprunts par le Fonds, frais pergus par
le Fonds, fixation des parites et changements dans les parites,
garantie de la valeur des avoirs du Fonds, controle des opera­
tions portant sur les capitaux, repartition des devises rares,
et dispositions relatives aux reserves et a la distribution des
benefices.)
3. Organisation et administration
(Etablissement des conseils d’administration, bases de votation,
selection des fonctionnaires, nomination des comites, siege des
bureaux et des depots, dispositions relatives aux statuts et
reglements, publication de rapports par le Fonds, renseignements devant etre fournis au Fonds par les pays membres,
suspension de la qualite de membre, liquidation des obligations
reciproques a la cessation de la qualite de membre, el liquida­
tion generale du Fonds.)
4. Forme et statut du Fonds
(Caractere de Taccord etablissant le Fonds, statut legal du
Fonds dans les pays membres, immunites du Fonds et de ses
avoirs, revision de Taccord relatif au Fonds et rapports du
Fonds avec d’autres organisations internationales.)
II. Banque pour la Reconstruction et le Developpement
1. Buts, politique, capital et souscription de la Banque.
(Buts et politique de la Banque, rapports de la Banque avec
le public et avec les pays non membres, et rapports des pays
membres avec les pays non membres, capital de la Banque,
souscription des pays membres, proportion des souscriptions
devant etre versees, paiement en or et en monnaie nationale,
appels de fonds additionnels et mise en reserve d’une partie du
capital non verse comme fonds de garantie.)
(P. 2)
2. Operations de la Banque
(Conditions auxquelles la Banque peut garantir des emprunts,
en consentir et y participer, la maniere dont elle aidera et
encouragera les placements en titres, mesures destinees a




APPENDIX I

1285

sauvegarder les fonds pretes par la Banque, garantie de la
valeur des avoirs en monnaie nationale de la Banque, disposi­
tions relatives au remboursement en principal et interets, emprunts par la Banque, limitation des engagements directs et
eventuels de la Banque, frais pouvant etre pergus par la
Banque, dispositions relatives a la constitution de reserves et
a la distribution des benefices, operations sur titres et opera­
tions de change que la Banque peut entreprendre, et autres
operations de la Banque.)
3. Organisation et administration.
(Constitution des conseils d’administration, bases de votation,
selection des fonctionaires, nomination des comites, siege des
bureaux et des depots, dispositions relatives aux statuts et
reglements, publication de rapports par la Banque, retrait ou
suspension de la qualite de membre, engagements eventuels
des anciens membres, et liquidation generate de la Banque.)
4. Forme et statut de la Banque.
(Caractere de l’accord etablissant la Banque, statut legal de
la Banque dans les pays membres, immunites de la Banque et
de ses avoirs, revision de Paccord relatif a la Banque et rapports
de la Banque avec d’autres organisations internationales.)
III. Autres mesures visant la cooperation internationale dans le
domaine financier.
Document 308

(Traduccion)

Discurso Pronunciado por el Senor Henry A. Morgenthau,
Jr., Secretario de Hacienda de los Estados Unidos de
America, al Aceptar la Presidencia de la Conferencia
Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas, en la
Sesion Plenaria Inaugural del 1° de Julio de 1944
SENORES DELEGADOS Y MIEMBROS DE LA CONFERENCIA:

Me brindais una oportunidad que me honra. Acepto la presiden­
cia de esta Conferencia agradecido por la confianza que en ml
habeis depositado. La acepto tambien con humildad profunda,
pues se que lo que aqul hagamos moldeara en alto grado la clase de
mundo en que habremos de vivir nosotros, y en que habran de
desarrollar sus vidas y de luchar por el logro de sus esperanzas los
hombres y mujeres de las generaciones nuevas. Se que todos com­
pares este sentido de responsabilidad.




1286

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONF E RENCE

La obra que ante nosotros tenemos tendra mas probabilidades
de exito si la proyectamos con miras al porvenir. A pesar de que
nuestro programa se limita al campo monetario y de las inver­
siones, debe considerarse parte de un programa mas amplio de
action convenida entre naciones que tiene por fin lograr la expan­
sion de la production, de las oportunidades de empleo y del
comercio que persiguen la Carta del Atlantico y el Artlculo VII de
los acuerdos de ayuda mutua celebrados entre los Estados Unidos
de America ymuchas de las Naciones Unidas. Cuanto aqul hagamos
deberan completarlo y afianzarlo otras medidas que tengan por
finalidad el mismo objetivo.
El Presidente Roosevelt ha expuesto claramente que no se nos
pide que hagamos acuerdos definitivos que obliguen a nation
alguna, sino que las propuestas que aqul se formulen se referiran
a nuestros gobiernos respectivos para que las aprueben o las
rechacen. Nuestra tarea, pues, es conferenciar y ponernos de
acuerdo sobre ciertas medidas basicas que deben recomendarse a
nuestros gobiernos para el establecimiento de relaciones econo­
micas sanas y perdurables entre nosotros.
Esta tarea s61o podremos realizarla si la abordamos no como
competidores, sino como asociados, no como rivales, sino como
hombres que reconocen que su bienestar comun depend e, tanto en
la paz como en la guerra, de la mutua confianza y del esfuerzo
unido. No es facil nuestra tarea, pero creo que si animados de ese
espiritu nos consagramos a ella con devotion y sinceridad, lo que
aqul logremos tendra la mas grande signification historica. La
humanidad entera interpretara esta Conferencia como una senal
de que la unidad que entre nosotros ha logrado la guerra perdurara
cuando reine la paz.
Mediante la colaboracion estamos ya venciendo la amenaza mas
formidable y mas temible que jamas haya surgido contra nuestra
libertad y nuestra seguridad. A su debido tiempo, y con la gracia
de Dios, nos libertaremos del azote de la guerra, pero estaremos
enganandomos si consideramos la victoria como sinonimo de liber­
tad y seguridad. La victoria en esta guerra tan solo nos dara la
oportunidad de moldear, mediante nuestro esfuerzo comun, un
mundo que sea verdaderamente libre y seguro.
(p. 2) Vamos a considerar aqul medidas esenciales para la
creation de una economla mundial dinamica, en la que el pueblo de
cada nation pueda hacer uso de sus potencialidades en tiempo de
paz, y mediante su laboriosidad, su imagination creadora y sus
habitos de economla pueda mejorar sus propias normas de vida y
disfrutar cada vez mas del progreso material en un mundo infini-




APPE NDI X I

1287

tamente favorecido con riquezas naturales. He ahl el fundamento
indispensable de la libertad y la seguridad. Sobre el debe construirse todo lo demas, pues la libertad de oportunidades es la
base de las otras libertades.
Espero que esta conferencia concentre su atencion sobre dos
axiomas economicos elementales. El primero de ellos es que la
prosperidad no tiene limites fijos. No es una substancia finita que
al compartirse disminuye; antes por el contrario, cuanto mas
disfruten de ella otras naciones, tanto mas tendra cada nation para
si. La creencia de que una nation se expone a perder sus parroquianos si promueve entre ellos una mayor production y mas altos
niveles de vida es una falacia tragica. Los buenos parroquianos
son los parroquianos prosperos. Ejemplo de ello es la experiencia
de mi propio pais en el comercio exterior. Durante la decada que
precedio a la guerra actual, cerca del 20 por ciento de nuestras
exportaciones se destino a los 47 millones de habitantes del Reino
Unido, que es region sumamente industrializada, mientras que
a los 450 millones de habitantes de la China solo se destino menos
del tres por ciento.
El segundo axioma es corolario del primero. La prosperidad,
como la paz, es indivisible. No podemos repartirla aqui y alia entre
los afortunados, ni disfrutarla a expensas de otros. Dondequiera
que exista la pobreza, nos amenaza a todos y mina el bienestar de
todos. Al igual que la guerra, es algo que no puede circunscribirse,
sino que se extiende y consume el vigor economico de las regiones
mas favorecidas de la tierra. Hoy nos consta que la vida economica
de cada nation esta unida por vmculos inseparables a la estructura
economica del mundo. Aflojese uno solo de esos vmculos, y se
debilitara la estructura entera; ninguna nation, por grande y
fuerte que sea podra quedar inmune.
Todos hemos contemplado la gran tragedia economica denuestra
era. Presenciamos la depresion mundial de la decada que comenzo en
1930. Vimos desarrollarse y extenderse de pais en pals la desorganizacion monetaria que destruyo las bases del comercio internatio­
nal y de las inversiones internacionales, y hasta la confianza inter­
national. Como secuela, vimos despues desempleo y miseria, herramientas de trabajo ociosas, riquezas desperdiciadas. Vimos a algunas de sus vlctimas caer en las garras de los demagogos y los
dictadores, y vimos como la confusion y la amargura propiciaron
el advenimiento del fascismo y, fmalmente, de la guerra.
Muchas naciones pusieron en vigor medidas de control y
restricciones sin tomar en cuenta su posible efecto sobre las demas
naciones; y algunas, en un esfuerzo desesperado por obtener parte




1288

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

del volumen cada vez menor del comercio internacional, agravaron
la situation al depreciar su moneda en competencia con otras
naciones. (p. 3) Gran parte de nuestra habilidad economica
se empleo en la creation de metodos que obstaculizaran y limitaran
el libre intercambio de mercaderias. Esos metodos se convirtieron
en armas economicas que esgrimieron los dictadores fascistas
durante la primera fase del conflicto actual. Habia una inevitabilidad ironica en esta sucesi6n de hechos. La agresion economica no
puede engendrar otra cosa que la guerra, y por lo tanto es tan
peligrosa como inutil.
Ahora sabemos que cuando las naciones tratan de resolver por
separado males economicos que son de alcance internacional,
necesariamente surgen conflictos economicos. Los problemas del
cambio y las inversiones internacionales son algo que no puede
resolver una sola naci6n, ni dos o tres naciones. Son problemas
multilateros que solo la cooperation multilatera ha de resolver.
Son problemas fijos y permanentes, y no meras consideraciones
transitorias del periodo de reconstruction de la postguerra. Son
problemas que no solo interesan a banqueros y a negociantes en
cambio extranjero, sino que son factores vitales en el intercam­
bio de materias primas y productos elaborados, en el mantenimiento de altos niveles de production y de consumo, y en el
establecimiento de normas de vida satisfactorias para los habitantes todos de todos los paises de la tierra.
Durante toda la decada pasada el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos
procurd de muchas maneras promover la action conjunta eritre las
naciones del mundo. En el campo de los problemas monetarios y
financieros, ya desde 1936 este Gobierno habia decidido facilitar
el mantenimiento del cambio sobre bases normales, suscribiendo
el Convenio Tripartito con Inglaterra y Francia, mediante el cual
los signatarios, a los que mas tarde se unieron Belgica, Holanda y
Suiza, convinieron en consultarse respecto a cuestiones de cambio
extranjero antes de dar cualquier paso importante. Esa politica
de consultas se hizo mas amplia a partir de 1937, cuando iniciamos
los arreglos bilaterales sobre el cambio con nuestros vecinos del
continente americano.
En 1941 comenzamos a estudiar la posibilidad de lograr la
cooperation internacional sobre una base multilatera, como medio
de establecer un sistema estable y ordenado de intercambio monetario internacional y restaurar las inversiones internacionales.
Nuestro personal tecnico, al que pronto se unieron peritos de otras
naciones, emprendio la preparation de propuestas practicas




APPENDIX I

1289

encaminadas a estructurar la cooperaci6n internacional monetaria
y financiera. La opinion de esos tecnicos, segun aparece en la
declaration conjunta por ellos publicada, revela la creencia
unanime de que puede evitarse la dislocation de los cambios extranjeros, de que puede evitarse el colapso de los sistemas monetarios, y de que puede establecerse una base monetaria sana para
el desarrollo equilibrado del comercio internacional, si somos tan
prudentes que hacemos los planes con anticipaci6n, y los hacemos
juntos. Opinan estos peritos que el problema lo resolveria un
organismo permanente de consulta y cooperaci6n sobre problemas
internacionales monetarios, financieros y economicos. Uno de los
apartados de nuestro programa sugiere la propuesta definitiva
de un Fondo de Estabilizaci6n de las Naciones Unidas y Asociadas.
(p. 4) Sin embargo, no basta la estabilizacion monetaria para
satisfacer la necesidad de rehabilitar las economias desquiciadas
por la guerra. No es ese, ciertamente, el proposito del Fondo. Se
propone mas bien como un organismo permanente que fomente la
estabilidad del cambio. Aun para desempenar esa funci6n con eficacia necesitara que se le refuerce con otras muchas medidas que
libren de obstaculos al comercio mundial.
Si ha de lograrse una rehabilitation de largo alcanse, es impera­
tive que haya prestamos internacionales en gran escala. Con esto
nos referimos a una necesidad enteramente distinta al problema
de ayuda inmediata que desarrolla la Administration de Socorros
y Rehabilitation de las Naciones Unidas. La necesidad que queremos remediar mediante la segunda propuesta de nuestro programa
es la de prestamos que provean capital para la reconstruction
economica; prestamos para los cuales haya protection adecuada y
que provean la oportunidad de invertir capital de muchos paises
con las debidas garantlas. Los peritos han preparado el esbozo
de un plan para el establecimiento de un Banco Internacional de
Reconstruction de la postguerra que investigue las oportunidades
para prestamos de esta naturale'za, los recomiende y los fiscalice
y, si convienen, de a los inversionistas garantias de pago.
No tratare de discutir aqui los pormenores de esas propuestas.
Esa es precisamente la tarea de esta Conferencia. Es una tarea que
exige sabidurla, habilidad de estadista y, mas que nada, buena
voluntad.
El hecho transcendental de la vida contemporanea es que el
mundo es una comunidad. En los campos de batalla de todo el
mundo la juventud de todos nuestros paises unidos esta muriendo
unida, ofrendando su vida por una causa comun. No es, pues,




1290

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

empeno superior a nuestras fuerzas el lograr que la juventud de
todos nuestros paises viva unida, que dedique sus energlas, sus
habilidades y sus aspiraciones al logro del enriquecimiento mutuo
y del progreso paclfico. A esa juventud hemos de rendir cuentas.
Nuestra labor en esta conferencia se juzgara por el grado de
prosperidad o de miseria que alcance esa juventud en el futuro.
La oportunidad que se nos brinda se ha comprado a precio de
sangre. Afrontemosla, pues, con confianza los unos en los otros,
y con fe en nuestro futuro comun, por cuya libertad luchan hoy
esos hombres.

Document 309

(Traduccion)
SA/3

Sp anish translation

Proyecto Preliminar de Proposiciones para Establecer
un Banco de Reconstruccion y Fomento
A continuation se insertan, con caracter de proyectos preliminares, las proposiciones que han sido referidas a la Secretaria.
Se inserta en primer termino, como Altemativa A, la dispo­
sition pertinente de la “ Proposici6n para un Banco de Recon­
struccion y Fomento” (Doc. SA/2, # 1 6 9 ). Inmediatamente
despues se insertan los textos alternativos y suplementarios referidos a la Secretaria (Habitation # 14 7 ). Se espera que habra
sugestiones adicionales, las cuales se iran distribuyendo para que
se incluyan en este proyecto segun se presenten estas a la
Secretaria.
La Secretaria ha tenido cuid&do de poner juntas las diversas
proposiciones a fin de facilitar la consideration de las disposiciones alternativas sugeridas. El orden en que aparecen aqul estas
disposiciones en forma alguna indica que sea esa la position apropiada en que apareceran en el documento final que se apruebe.
A pesar del cuidado que se tomo al prepararlo, la Secretaria
admite la posibilidad de que el proyecto que se acompana contenga
errores y omisiones. Suplica, por lo tanto, indulgencia de parte
de cualquier delegacion en caso de que sus proposiciones se
hubieren omitido parcial o totalmente, o hubiere defecto en la




APPENDIX I

1291

presentation. La Secretarla hara con gusto la correeci6n que sea
de lugar en cuanto se le indique cualquier error u omision.
( P .D
T itulo

Alternativa A

Acuerdo para Establecer un Banco de Reconstruccion y Fomento.
Alternativa B
Sugierese que el titulo sea: “ Corporation Internacional de
Reconstruccion y Fomento” (The International Corporation for
Reconstruction and Development), o cualquiera otro titulo en el
que se omita la palabra “ Banco” .

(p. la )
T itulo

Alternativa C

Sugierese que el titulo sea “ Asociacion Internacional de
Garantia e Inversiones” (The International Guarantee and
Investment Association), o “ Asociacion Internacional de Inver­
siones y Garantia (The International [Investment] and Guarantee
Association).
(P. 2)
A r tic u lo I

Fines del Banco
Alternativa A

El banco se inspirara, para todas sus decisiones, en los prop6sitos siguientes:
1. Contribuir a la obra de reconstruccion y fomento en los
paises participantes, facilitandoles los medios de obtener, por
conducto de agencias financieras particulares, capital de inversion
a largo plazo con fines de production, garantizando los prestamos
otorgados por inversionistas particulares, y participando en los
mismos;
2. Reforzar la action de las agencias financieras particulares
proporcionando, de sus propios recursos, capital con fines productivos en condiciones que garanticen plenamente sus fondos, cuando
no hubiere capital particular disponible en condiciones razonables;
3. Promover en el comercio internacional un incremento equilibrado de largo alcance, estimulando las inversiones internacio­
nales destinadas al desarrollo de las fuentes productoras de los
paises participantes;




1292

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

4. Coordinar los prestamos que otorgue o garantice el Banco
con los prestamos internacionales tramitados por otros conductos,
a fin de que se atiendan primero los proyectos mas utiles y mas
urgentes; y
5. Manejar sus operaciones con atencion debida al efecto que
puedan tener las inversiones internacionales sobre la situation
del comercio en los paises participantes; y, en los anos subsiguientes al cese de las hostilidades, contribuir a que la transicion,
de una economia de guerra a una economia de paz, se logre sin
contratiempo.
Alternativa B
(a) Con respecto a la subdivision 2, proponese substituir la
frase “ en condiciones que garanticen plenamente sus fondos” con
las palabras: “ en condiciones satisfactorias” .
(p. 2a)

(b) Substituir lo siguiente en lugar de la subdivision 3:
3. Ayudar a elevar la productividad, el nivel de
vida y las condiciones de trabajo en los paises
participantes, contribuyendo de este modo a
proporcionar, mediante la colaboraci6n inter­
nacional, capital a largo plazo para el desarrollo
de la production y de los recursos sobre base
firme.
4. Hacer posible un incremento equilibrado, de
largo alcance, en el comercio internacional entre
los paises participantes.
(Haganse los cambios debidos en la numeration
de las demas subdivisiones.)
Alternativa C

1. Contribuir a la reconstruction y a la rehabilitation de la
economia destruida por las hostilidades, y al desarrollo de paises
participantes proporcionandoles los medios de obtener, por conducto de agencias financieras particulares, capital de inversion a
largo plazo con fines de production, garantizando los prestamos
otorgados por inversionistas particulares, y participando en los
mismos.
2. Reforzar la action de las agencias financieras particulares,
proporcionando, de sus propios recursos, capital destinado a la
reconstruction y rehabilitation de la economia destruida por las
hostilidades y al fomento con fines productivos, en condiciones que
garanticen plenamente su fondo, cuando no hubiere capital par­
ticular disponible en condiciones razonables;




AP P E N D I X I

1293

(p. 2b)
A r tic u lo I

Alternativa D

Por la presente se establece un Banco Internacional para la Re­
construction y Fomento de los Paises Participantes (International
Bank for the Reconstruction and Development of the Member
Countries) con los siguientes fines:
(1) Ayudar a la rehabilitation o desarrollo de las fuentes productoras de los paises participantes, y en especial de aquellos
cuya economla se hubiere dislocado con motivo de la guerra
o se hubiere desarrollado deficientemente, proporcionando
o facilitando el suministro de capital de inversi6n a largo
plazo;
(2) Ayudar al desarrollo de un incremento equilibrado en el
comercio internacional mediante estlmulo a las inversiones
internacionales; y
(3) En los anos subsiguientes al cese de las hostilidades, con­
tribute a que la transition de una economla de guerra a
una economla de paz se logre sin contratiempo.
Alternativa E
La siguiente Section ha sido sugerida como alternativa a la
Section 2:
(2) Reforzar la action de las agencias financier as particulares
proporcionando, de sus propios recursos, capital para fines
productivos que ofrezcan buenas perspectivas, cuando no
hubiere capital particular disponible en condiciones razon­
ables.
(p. 2c)
A r tic u lo I

Alternativa F

El Parrafo 1 deberla estar redactado en los siguientes terminos:
1. Contribute a la obra de reconstruction y fomento en los paises
participantes, facilitandoles los medios de obtener, por conducto
de agencias financieras particulares, capital destinado a inver­
siones internacionales de cardcter constructivo, garantizando los
prestamos otorgados por inversionistas particulares, y participando en los mismos.
El Parrafo 5 deberla estar redactado en los terminos siguientes :
5. Facilitar la transition rapida y sin contratiempo de una eco­
nomla de guerra a una economla de paz mediante el incremento
de las inversiones internacionales, contribuyendo as! a restablecer




1294

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

el funcionamiento normal de la economia y a evitar un grave
desbarajuste en la vida economica de los paises participantes.
(P. 2d)
A r tic u lo I

Alternativa G

Los fines del Banco seran los siguientes:
1. Estimular constantemente el desarrollo economico de los
paises participantes.
2. Ayudar, durante los primeros anos de la postguerra, a la
reconstruccion de paises participantes y en la transition de
una economia de guerra a una economia de paz.
3. Coordinar sus operaciones financieras con las de otras
agendas financieras internacionales y nacionales,,
4. Cooperar con todos los organismos que las Naciones Unidas
y Asociadas hubieren establecido o establecieren en lo futuro.
Para lograr estos fines, el Banco facilitara el suministro de
capital con fines de production, a largo plazo, ya sea garantizando
los prestamos que otorguen inversionistas particulares y participando en los mismos, o proporcionando capital de sus propios
recursos cuando no hubiere capital particular disponible en condiciones razonables.
(p. 2e)
A r tic u lo I

Alternativa H

Proponese substituir lo siguiente en lugar de la subdivision 4
de la Alternativa A :
4. Coordinar los prestamos que otorgue o garantice el Banco
con los prestamos internacionales tramitados por otros conductos, a fin de que se atiendan primero los proyectos mas
utiles y urgentes, tomando en cuenta las necesidades fundamentales de todos y cada uno de los paises participantes que
soliciten prestamos destinados por igual a la reconstruccion
y al fomento.
Alternativa I
Presentase lo siguiente como enmienda al Articulo I (3) :
Promover un incremento equilibrado de largo alcance en el
comercio internacional, mediante estlmulo a las inversiones
internacionales destinadas al fomento de las fuentes productoras de los paises participantes, y contribuir por este
medio al fomento y mantenimiento de altos niveles de ocupa-




A P P E N D IX I

1295

cion e ingresos efectivoe como fin primordial de la politica
econ6mica.
(p. 2f)
A r tic u lo

I

Fines del Banco
Alternativa J

El Banco se inspirara en los prop6sitos siguientes:
1. Contribuir a la obra de reconstruccion y fomento en los
paises participantes, facilitandoles los medios de obtener capital
de inversion con fines de production, inclusive la rehabilitation
de las economias dislocadas por la guerra y el restablecimiento de
los medios de production para satisfacer sus necesidades en tiempos de paz.
2. Fomentar las inversiones de caracter particular en el extranjero, garantizando prestamos y otras inversiones de inversionistas particulares, o participando en los mismos; y, cuando
no hubiere capital particular disponible en condiciones razonables,
reforzar la action de las agencias financieras particulares proporcionando, de sus propios recursos, capital con fines productivos
en condiciones satisfactorias.
3. Promover en el comercio internacional un incremento equilibrado de largo alcance, estimulando las inversiones interna­
cionales destinadas al desarrollo de las fuentes productoras de los
paises participantes.
4. Coordinar los prestamos que otorgue o garantice el Banco
con los prestamos internacionales tramitados por otros conductos,
a fin de que se atiendan primero los proyectos mas utiles y mas
urgentes.
5. Manejar sus operaciones con atencion debida al efecto que
puedan tener las inversiones internacionales sobre la situation
del comercio en los paises participantes; y, en los anos subsiguientes al cese de las hostilidades, contribuir a que la transition,
de una economia de guerra a una economia de paz, se logre sin
contratiempo.
(P. 3)
A r tic u lo

II

Miembros del Banco y Capital del Mismo
Alternativa A

Paises que podran participar
Seran miembros del Banco los miembros del Fondo Monetario
Internacional que acepten participar en el.
Seccion 1.




1296
(P .

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

4)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A

Capital Autorizado
El capital autorizado del Banco sera de Diez Mil Millones de
Dolares ($10,000,000) del peso y la ley vigentes e n ---------------- .
El capital subscrito se dividira en 100,000 acciones, con un valor
nominal de 100,000 dolares cada una, las que s61o podran subscribir los paises participantes.
Podra aumentarse el capital por acciones cuando el Banco lo
estime conveniente, mediante el voto afirmativo de cuatro quintas
partes de los miembros del mismo.
S e c c i o n 2.

Alternativa B

Prop6nese que el segundo parrafo de esta Secci6n quede redactado en los terminos siguientes:
Podra aumentarse el capital por acciones cuando el Banco lo
estime conveniente. Empero, ningun miembro estara obligado a
aumentar su subscription pro rata si no es su deseo hacerlo.
(P. 5)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A

Subscription de Acciones
Cada miembro subscribira un numero de acciones. Los paises
representados en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las
Naciones Unidas subscribiran, como minimo, el numero de ac­
ciones que se estipula en el Cuadro A (Este cuadro se insertara
mas tarde). El Banco determinara el minimo de acciones que
deberansubscribir los demas paises que ingresen como miembros de
la institution.
Cualquier miembro podra subscribir acciones adicionales de
acuerdo con las reglas que establecera el Banco, mas este reservara
una parte del capital autorizado para las subscripciones mlnimas
de paises que no esten representados en la Conferencia Monetaria
y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas.
S e c c i o n 3.

(P. 6)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A
4. Disponibilidad del Capital Subscrito
La subscripci6n de cada pals participante se dividira en dos
partes, a saber:
S e c c io n




A P P E N D IX I

1297

(a) El veinte por ciento (20% ), que podra exigir el Banco
cuando lo necesite para cualquiera de sus operaciones.
(b) El ochenta por ciento (80%) restante que podra exigir el
Banco solo cuando sea necesario para dar cumplimiento a las
obligaciones del mismo creadas por virtud de los incisos (b) y
(c), Parrafo 1, Articulo IV de este instrumento.
Todo requerimiento en los casos de subscripciones pendientes
de pago se aplicara en proportion igual a todas las acciones.
(p. 6a)
A r t ic u l o II

Alternativa B
Substituir lo siguiente en lugar de la Subdivision (a), Alterna­
tiva A :

(a) El veinte por ciento (20%) sera exigible por el Banco en
la forma siguiente:
(i) el dos por ciento (2% ) en oro, o moneda convertible
en oro, dentro de 60 dlas contados a partir de la
fecha fijada para el comienzo de las operaciones del
Banco;
(ii) el dieciocho por ciento (18%) en cantidades maximas
del cinco por ciento (5 % ), en cualquier trimestre,
segun lo necesite para cualquiera de sus operaciones;
disponiendose, sin embargo, que dentro de un ano a partir
de la fecha en que el Banco deba iniciar sus operaciones se
exigira un total de no menos del diez por ciento (10% ).
Y agregar a la oration final de la Seccion:
Si uno o mas accionistas dejaren de satisfacer una demanda
de pago en todo o en parte, se repetira el requerimiento una
o mas veces hasta que se haga efectiva la suma total exigible,
sujeto en todo momento a lo previsto en la Seccion 7 del
presente Articulo.
(P. 7)
A r t ic u l o II

Alternativa A
Seccion 5.

Pago de Subscripciones.
(a) Los pagos que se efectuen de acuerdo con el inciso (a),
Seccion 4, seran parte en oro y parte en moneda local,
excepto que los pagos exigidos para cumplir con las obli­
gaciones del Banco creadas por virtud de los incisos (b)
y ( c ) , Seccion 1, del Articulo IV, se haran en la manera




1298

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CON FEREN CE

prevista en las subdivisi6n que sigue a la presente. Las
proporciones que habran de hacerse efectivas en oro y en
moneda local se calcularan de acuerdo con un cuadro que
tomara en consideration la suficiencia de las existencias
de oro y de divisas extranjeras disponibles en poder de
cada pais participante. La parte pagadera en oro no excedera, en caso alguno, del veinte por ciento (20% ) del
total exigible.
(Insertar el Cuadro)

(b) Los pagos que se hicieren de acuerdo con inciso (b)
de la Secci6n 4 ser&n, a option del pais participante, en
oro o en la moneda requerida para dar cuplimiento a las
obligaciones que motiven la solicitud de pago.
(c) El pago inicial que se hiciere en el caso de cada action
emitida sera de una suma igual al monto total por acci6n ya exigido respecto a las acciones por pagar, ajustado
con arreglo a la diferencia entre el valor de emision y el
valor nominal de la action.
(p. 7a)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa B

Sugierese que en lugar de la ultima oration del inciso (a),
Seccion 5, se substituya lo siguiente:
“ Ningun pais participante se considerara obligado a contribuir en oro mas del veinte por ciento (20% ) del monto
de su subscription exigible de acuerdo con el inciso (a ), Sec­
cion 4, y todo pals participante debera contribuir no menos
del diez por ciento (1 0 % ), salvo que pruebe, a satisfaction
del Banco, que en su caso particular serla adecuada una ’cuota
proporcional mas baja.”
Alternativa C

Agregar lo siguiente a la Secci6n 5:
A cualquiera de los palses representados en la Conferencia Mone­
taria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas, que en su territorio
nacional hubiere sufrido a consecuencia de la ocupacion enemiga
y de las hostilidades durante la presente guerra, se le concedera
el derecho de postergar, hasta el final de su perlodo de reconstruc­
tion, el pago de su contribution en oro hasta una suma del veinticinco (25% ) al cincuenta por ciento (50% ), dependiendo de los
danos que hubieren causado la ocupacion enemiga y las hostilidades.




A P P E N D IX I

1299

(P. 8)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A

Precio de Emision de las Acciones.
Las acciones incluidas en la subscription inicial de un miembro
representado en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las
Naciones Unidas seran emitidas a la par si se recibe la subscripci6n, a mas tardar, dentro de un ano contado a partir de la fecha
en que el Banco deba iniciar sus operaciones. Se emitiran otras
acciones a la par o del valor que se fije por el voto afirmativo de
tres cuartas partes de los miembros del Banco.
S e c c io n

6.

(p. 8a)
II
B
Proponese que la ultima oration de la Alternativa A quede
enmendada de la forma siguiente:
A r tic u lo

A lternativa

Se emitiran otras acciones de un valor igual al monto total
del activo neto que arroje el ultimo balance, dividido por el
numero de acciones existentes en la fecha de dicho balance,
de cualquier otro valor que se fijare por el voto afirmativo
de tres cuartas partes de los participantes.
(P. 9)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A

Limitation de la Responsabilidad
La responsabilidad respecto a las acciones estara limitada a la
parte del valor de emision de las acciones que estuviere pendiente
de pago.
S eccion 7.

(P. 10)
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A

Limitase le Enajenacion de las Acciones.
Las acciones no podran ser pignoradas ni gravadas en forma
alguna, y solo podran traspasarse al propio Banco.
S e c c io n

8.

(P. ID
A r tic u lo

II

Alternativa A

Devolution de Subscripciones
Cuando las disponibilidades llquidas fueren substancialmente

S eccion 9.

795841 — 48— 12




1300

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

mas de las necesarias para satisfacer las necesidades previstas del
Banco, este podra devolver, sujeto a reintegro, una suma propor­
tional uniforme por cada acci6n emitida.
(p. 11a)
II
B
Sugierese la siguiente adicion a la Alternativa A :
, disponiendose que las sumas devueltas no deberan afectar
las cantidades de moneda y/u oro que se mantendran disponibles de acuerdo con lo prescrito en la Section 3, Articulo III,
Alternativa B.
A r tic u lo

A lternativa

Document 355

French translation

(Traduction)

Discours prononce le ler Juillet 1944 par M. Henry A.
Morgenthau, Jr. Secretaire du tresor des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique, a l’Occasion de la Seance d’Ouverture de
la Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations
Unies, a Bretton Woods, New Hampshire.
M e s s ie u r s

l e s d e l e g u e s e t m e m b r e s de l a

Conference,

Je ressens vivement Thonneur qui m’a ete fait. Je vous suis
reconnaissant de la confiance que vous m’avez temoignee.. J’accepte
la Presidence de cette Conference non seulement avec gratitude,
mais aussi avec une humilite profonde. Car je sais que ce que
nous allons accomplir ici determinera en grande partie ce que sera
le monde dans lequel nous aurons a vivre, dans lequel les genera­
tions qui suivent la notre devront vivre et chercher a realiser leurs
aspirations. Vous partagez tous, je le sais, le sentiment de cette
responsabilite.
II nous sera plus facile de mener a bien la tache qui nous incombe si nous Texaminons en perspective. Le programme de nos
travaux traite specifiquement des questions monetaires et des
questions d’investissement. II devrait cependant etre considere
comme faisant partie d’un programme plus large d'action con-




A P P E N D IX I

1301

certee entre nations dont le but est de realiser Texpansion de la
production, du commerce et des possibility d’emploi de la maind'oeuvre, qui est envisagee dans la Charte de TAtlantique et^dans
FArticle VII des accords d’aide mutuelle conclus entre les EtatsUnis et plusieurs des Nations Unies. Ce que nous accomplirons ici
devra etre complete et consolide par d'autres mesures visant le
meme but.
Le President Roosevelt a precise qu’on ne nous demandait pas
de conclure des accords definitifs constituant un engagement pour
aucune nation, mais que les propositions formulees ici devraient
etre soumises a Papprobation de nos gouvernements respectifs.
Notre tache, par consequent, est de conferer et de nous entendre
sur certaines mesures de base qui seront recommandees a nos
gouvernements en vue de Tetablissement, sur une base solide,
de relations economiques entre les pays que nous representons.
Pour accomplir cette tache, il nous faut Taborder non pas en
marchandeurs mais en associes, non pas en rivaux mais en hom­
ines qui reconnaissent que leur interet commun depend, en temps
de paix comme en temps de guerre, de la confiance mutuelle et de
Teffort commun. La tache qui nous incombe n’est pas une tache
aisee, mais si nous nous y consacrons avec application et sincerite,
je crois que ce que nous accomplirons ici sera d’une grande portee
historique. Partout, les hommes rechercheront dans cette reunion
Tindication que notre union solidifi.ee par la guerre continuera
dans la paix.
Grace a la cooperation, nous surmontons aujourd’hui la plus
effroyable, la plus formidable menace qui se soit jamais elevee
contre notre securite et contre notre liberte. Avec le temps, et
avec la grace de Dieu, nous serons delivres du fleau de la guerre,
mais ce serait nous leurrer delusions que de considerer que la
victoire est synonyme de liberte et de securite. La victoire, dans
cette guerre, nous offrira simplement Toccasion de fa§onner en
commun un monde ou reigneront vraiment la securite et la
liberte.
(p. 2) Nous avons a nous preoccuper ici des mesures indispensables a la creation d’une economie mondiale dynamique qui
permettra au peuple de chaque nation de realiser ses potentialites
dans la paix, et, par son travail, son imagination et son economie,
d’elever son propre niveau de vie et de jouir toujours davantage
des fruits du progres materiel sur une terre comblee par la nature.
Ceci constitue le principe fondamental de la liberte et de la




1302

M O N E T A R Y AN D F I N A N C I A L CONFEREN CE

securite sur lequel tout le reste devra etre erige, car ce principe
est a la base de toutes les autres libertes.
J'espere que cette |Conference dirigera tout particulierement son
attention sur deux axiomes economiques elementaires. Le premier
est que la prosperity n’a pas de limites fixes. Ce n’est pas une
substance finie qu’on peut diminuer par la division. Au eontraire,
plus les autres nations en jouiront, plus chaque nation en aura
pour elle-meme. C'est une tragique erreur que de croire qu’un pays
risque de perdre ses clients s’il encourage le developpement de leur
production et ^amelioration de leur niveau de vie. Un bon client
est un client prospere. Ceci peut etre demontre tres simplement
par l’experience en matiere de commerce exterieur de mon propre
pays. Durant les dix annees qui ont precede la guerre actuelle,
environ 20 pour cent de nos exportations etaient destinees aux 47
millions d'une nation fortement industrialist— le Royaume-Uni;
moins de 3 pour cent de nos exportations etaient dirigees vers les
450 millions d’habitants de la Chine.
Le deuxieme axiome decoule du premier. La prosperity, tout
comme la paix, est indivisible. Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de Teparpiller parmi les privilegies ou d’en jouir aux depens
des autres. Ou qu’elle soit, la pauvrete menace Thumanite entiere
et tend a detruire le bien-etre individuel. Pas plus que la guerre,
il n’est possible de la localiser: au eontraire, elle ne peut que se
propager et saper la puissance economique des regions favorisees
du monde. Nous savons aujourd'hui que la vie economique de
chaque nation constitue en quelque sorte la trame de Feconomie
mondiale. Qu’un fil menace de se briser, et l’etoffe tout entiere
perd de sa resistance. Chacune des nations du globe, si grande
et si forte qu’elle soit, est soumise a cette loi.
Nous avons tous ete temoins de la grande tragedie economique
de notre temps. Nous avons vecu la crise des annees 30. Nous
avons vu s’elever et s’etendre d'un pays a Tautre des desordres
monetaires qui ont detruit les bases sur lesquelles reposent les
echanges internationaux, les investissements internationaux, la
confiance internationale elle-meme, et qui ont eu pour consequen­
ces le chomage et la misere: les outils ont ete delaisses, les richesses sont restees inutilisees. Nous avons vu, dans certains cas, les
victimes de ces desordres devenir la proie de demagogues et de
dictateurs. Nous avons vu le desarroi et l’amertume donner naissance au fascisme, puis a la guerre.
Sans tenir compte de Teffet qu’ils pourraient avoir sur les
autres nations, beaucoup de nations ont mis en vigueur certains




A P P E N D IX I

1303

moyens de controle, certaines restrictions. Certains pays, faisant
un effort desespere pour obtenir une part du commerce mondial
toujours decroissant, ont aggrave la situation en depreciant leur
monnaie dans un but de concurrence. Nous avons consacre une
grande partie de nos efforts dans ce domaine a la creation d’expedients destines a entraver et a limiter le libre mouvement des
marchandises. Aux mains des dictateurs, ces expedients sont
devenus des armes economiques dont ils ont fait usage durant la
phase initiale de (p. 3) la guerre actuelle. II y avait dans cette
succession de faits une inevitability ironique: aussi dangereuse
que futile, Tagression economique engendre ineluctablement la
guerre.
Nous savons maintenant que, lorsque les nations essaient, separement de porter remede a des maux economiques qui sont
d’ordre international un conflit economique doit necessairement
s’ensuivre. Seul, un pays est incapable de faire face aux problemes
des changes et des placements internationaux: meme pour deux,
pour trois nations, c’est une tache impossible. Ce sont des prob­
lemes multilateres que seule peut resoudre une cooperation multilatere. Ce sont des problemes definis et permanents, et non pas
des questions d'importance passagere ne se rapportant qu’aux
annees qui suivront immediatement la fin de la guerre. Loin
d'etre des problemes qui ne presentent d'interet que pour les
courtiers de change et les banquiers, ce sont des problemes qui
jouent un role fondamental dans le mouvement des matieres
premieres et des objets manufactures, dans le maintien, a un
niveau eleve, de la production et de la consommation, de meme
que dans Tetablissement pour tous les habitants de tous les pays
d’un standard de vie satisfaisant.
Au cours des dix dernieres annees, le Gouvernement des EtatsUnis, s'est efforce par de nombreux moyens d’encourager Taction
en commun de toutes les nations du monde. Dans le domaine des
problemes monetaires et financiers, des 1936, ce Gouvernement a
entrepris de faciliter le maintien d'operations de change en souscrivant TAccord Tri-partite avec la Grande-Bretagne et la France,
aux termes duquel les signataires, et plus tard la Belgique, les
Pays-Bas et la Suisse, convinrent que les questions relatives au
change seraient examinees en commun avant que des mesures
importantes ne soient prises. Cette politique de consultation a re§u
une application plus large encore dans les dispositions bilaterales
relatives au change que nous avons prises, a partir de 1937, avec
nos voisins du continent americain.




1304

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

En 1941, nous avons commence une enquete pour savoir si la
cooperation internationale sur une base multilatere pouvait favoriser Tetablissement (Tun systeme solide et ordonne de rapports
permanents dans le domaine du change international et rendre
leur essor aux investissements internationaux. Notre personnel de
techniciens, auquel les experts d’autres nations de sont bientot
joints, a entrepris d’elaborer des recommandations pratiques destinees a rendre effective la cooperation internationale dans le do­
maine monetaire et financier. Les conclusions de ces experts, telles
qu’elles ont ete rapportees dans une declaration conjointe qui a ete
publiee, montrent bien qu’ils sont d’accord sur les points suivants:
il est possible d’empecher la dislocation des changes; il est
possible d’eviter Tecroulement des systemes monetaires; il est
possible d’etablir une base monetaire solide pour Fexpansion
equilibree du commerce international, si nous sommes assez
prevoyants pour elaborer a Tavance les plans necessaires et pour les
elaborer en commun. Ces techniciens sont unanimes a declarer que
la solution du probleme consiste en la creation (Tun organisme
permanent de consultation et de cooperation ou seront discutes
les problemes internationaux d’ordre monetaire, financier et
economique. L’elaboration d’une recommandation definitive pour
Tetablissement d’un Fonds de Stabilisation des Nations Unies et
Associees est une des questions a Tordre du jour.
A elle seule, la stabilisation monetaire ne suffira pas a retablir
des regimes economiques detruits par la guerre. Tel nJ
est pas
d’ailleurs le but du Fonds, qui est plutot un mecanisme permanent
destine a favoriser (p. 4) la stabilite des changes. Pour qu’il soit
a meme de remplir efficacement cette fonction, il doit etre soutenu
par de nombreuses autres mesures propres a eliminer les entraves
qui genent le commerce mondial.
Pour resoudre les problemes relatifs a la reconstruction a long
terme, des emprunts internationaux sur une grande echelle seront
indispensables. Nous songeons ici a un besoin qui n’a aucun
rapport avec le probleme de Taide immediate dont s'occupe aujourd'hui TAdministration des Nations Unies pour l’Aide et le
Relevement. Le besoin que nous esperons satisfaire au moyeri de la
deuxieme recommandation a Tordre du jour se rapporte a la
question de prets destines a fournir les capitaux necessaires a la
reconstruction economique, prets pour lesquels des garanties
adequates seront foumies et qui offriront aux capitaux de nombreux pays, dans des conditions favorables de securite, des




A P P E N D IX I

1305

possibility de placement. Les techniciens ont prepare l’ebauche
d’un plan pour Tetablissement d’une Banque internationale de
reconstruction d’apres-guerre qui recherchera les moyens de favoriser des prets de ce genre, recommandera et surveillera ces
prets, et, si elle le juge a propos, fournira aux investisseurs des
garanties de remboursement.
Je n’essaierai pas ici de discuter ces propositions en detail.
C’est la tache de la Conference, tache dont l’accomplissement
demande de la sagesse des connaissances politiques profondes et,
avant tout, de la bonne volunte.
Le fait transcendant de la vie contemporaine est celui-ci: le
monde est une communaute. Sur tous les champs de bataille, les
jeunes hommes de toutes les Nations Unies meurent ensemble, et
pour une cause commune. II n’est pas hors de notre pouvoir de
fournir aux jeunes hommes de nos pays les moyens de vivre
ensemble, de consacrer, dans la paix, leurs efforts, leurs talents,
leurs aspirations, au bien et au progres de l’humanite. C'est envers
eux que nous sommes en dernier lieu responsables. Selon qu’ils
prospereront ou periront, ce que nous accomplirons ici sera juge.
L’occasion qui nous est offerte a ete payee de sang. Profitons-en
done dans un esprit de confiance mutuelle, surs de Tavenir pour la
liberte duquel ces hommes ont combattu.

Document 379

French Translation

(Traduction)

Message de M. Franklin D. Roosevelt, President des
Etats-Unis d’Amerique, Adresse le ler Juillet 1944 aux
Membres de la Conference Monetaire et Financiere
des Nations Unies.
M

e s s ie u r s ,

iC’est plein de confiance et d’espoir que je vous souhaite la
bienvenue ici, dans cet endroit paisible ou vous etes assembles. Je
vous suis reconnaissant d'avoir fait ce long voyage, je suis reconnaissant a vos gouvernements de Tempressement avec lequel ils
ont accepte mon invitation. II est logique, alors que se livrent les
batailles decisives de la guerre de liberation, que les representants




1306

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

de peuples libres s’assemblent pour se consulter sur la forme que
prendra 1
’avenir, cet avenir que nous devons vaincre.
La guerre nous a conduits a prendre la bonne habitude de nous
reunir en conference lorsque nous avons des problemes communs
a discuter et a resoudre. C’est ce que nous avons fait, et avec
succes, pour examiner certains aspects militaires et industriels
de la guerre, ainsi que pour etudier les mesures qui devront etre
prises des que la guerre aura ete gagnee, par exemple celles qui
se rapportent a la question des secours et du relevement et a la
distribution des ressources alimentaires du monde. Ces mesures
etaient essentiellement des mesures d’urgence. A Bretton Woods,
vous qui representez de si nombreux pays, vous vous reunissez
pour la premiere fois afin de discuter les bases d’un programme
durable de cooperation economique et de progres pacifique.
Le programme que vous etes sur le point d’etudier ne repre­
sente, cela va sans dire, qu’un aspect des arrangements qui devront
etre faits entre nations pour assurer l’entente et l’ordre dans le
monde de demain. Mais c’est un aspect supremement important,
qui touche de pres l’humanite tout entiere, car il se rapporte aux
principes grace auxquels les hommes pourront echanger les res­
sources naturelles du globe et les produits de leur propre travail
et de leur ingeniosite. Le commerce est la source de vie d’une
societe libre. Nous devons veiller a ce qu’il ne soit plus gene,
comme il 1 ete dans le passe, par des barrieres artificielles
’a
elevees par des rivalites economiques aveugles.
Les maux d’ordre economique se propagent faeilement. II
s’ensuit done que la sante economique d’une nation interesse
directement tous ses voisins, ses voisins immediats aussi bien que
ses voisins eloignes. Seule, une economie mondiale dynamique,
logique, permettra aux niveaux de vie de chaque nation de se
developper d’une maniere telle que nos espoirs seront realises.
L’esprit qui anime nos deliberations servira de modele aux con­
sultations amicales a venir auxquelles, dans l’interet commun,
prendront part les differentes nations. A Bretton Woods, une fois
de plus, un fait sera prouve: des hommes de nationalites diffe­
rentes ont appris a regler les differends qui peuvent s’el ever entre
eux, et a collaborer en amis. La tache que nous avons a accomplir—
la tache qui doit etre accomplie—ne peut l’etre que par un effort
concerte. Cette Conference nous montrera jusqu’a quel point,
apres avoir collabore en temps de guerre, nous pouvons collaborer
en temps de paix. Je suis sur que vous aborderez votre tache
avec un vif sentiment de responsabilite envers ceux qui ont tant
sacrifie dans l’espoir de creer un monde meilleur.




A P P E N D IX I

1307

Documents 444 and 445
SA /4 and SA/4/1

Spanish translation

(TRADUCCION PRELIMINAR)

Proyecto de Proposiciones para el Establecimiento
de un Banco de Reconstruccion y Fomento
La presente es la ultima edition revisada del SA/3. En ella se
incluyen los textos de los Artlculos I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII,
VIII, IX y X, aprobados por la Comision, por el Comite de
Redaction, o por ambos organismos.
T itulo

La cuestion del tltulo se ha referido al Comite de Subscrip­
tion s.
(P. 2)
Articulo I
Fines del Banco

Los fines del Banco son:
1. Contribuir a la obra de reconstruccion y fomento en los
paises participantes, facilitando la inversion de capital con fines
de production que incluyan la rehabilitacio de las economlas
destruidas o dislocadas por la guerra, la reconversion de los
medios de production a fin de satisfacer las necesidades de la
paz, y estlmulo al fomento de los medios y fuentes de production
en los paises de escaso desarrollo.
2. Fomentar las inversiones particulares en el extranjero med­
iante garantias y mediante participation en prestamos y en otras
inversiones que hicieron inversionistas particulares; y, cuando no
hubiere capital particular disponible en condiciones razonables,
reforzar las operaciones particulares de financiamiento, propor­
cionando, de sus propios recursos, capital con fines productivos en
condiciones satisfactorias.
3. Promover un incremento equilibrado de largo alcance en el
comercio internacional y el mantenimiento de balanzas de pago
niveladas, estimulando las inversiones internacionales destinadas
a] desarrollo de las fuentes productoras de los paises participan­
tes, a fin de contribuir al aumento de la capacidad productiva, a
elevar el “ standard” de vida y a mejorar las condiciones de trabajo en dichos paises.
4. Coordinar los prestamos que haga o garantice el Banco con




1308

M O N E T A R Y AN D F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

los prestamos internacionales tramitados por otros conductos, a
fin de que se atiendan primero los proyectos, grandes y pequenos,
que sean mas utiles y de mayor urgencia.
5.
Manejar sus operaciones con atencion debida al efecto que
puedan tener las inversiones internacionales sobre la situation de
los negocios en los paises participantes; y, en los anos subsiguientes al cese de las hostilidades, contribuir a que la transition,
de una economia de guerra a una economia de paz, se logre sin
contratiempo.
El Banco se inspirara, para todas sus decisiones, en los propositos que arriba
se expresan. (Aprobado por el Comite de Redaccion, Doc. #340)
(Aprobado por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944)

(P. 3)
Articulo II
Miembros del Banco y Capital del Mismo
1. Paises que podrdn ser miembros del Banco
Seran miembros del Banco los miembros del Fondo Monetario
Internacional que acepten participar en el en tal capacidad.
S e c c i6 n

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #389)

(P. 4)
Articulo II
2.
Capital Autorizado
El capital por acciones del Banco sera de Diez Mil Millones
en dolares de los Estados Unidos ($10,000,000,000) del peso y la
ley vigentes en---------------- . Este capital se dividira en 100,000
acciones, con un valor nominal de 100,000 dolares cada una, que
solo podran subscribir los paises participantes.
Cuando el Banco lo estime conveniente, podra aumentarse el
capital por acciones previo el voto afirmativo de tres cuartas
partes del numero total de miembros.
S e c c io n

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #389)

(P. 5)
Articulo II
3. Subscripcion de Acciones
Cada miembro subscribira un numero de acciones. Los paises
representados en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las
Naciones Unidas subscribiran, como mmimo, el numero de ac­
ciones que se estipula en el ,Cuadro “ A ” (Este cuadro se insertara
mas tarde). El Banco determinara el mmimo de acciones que
deberan subscribir los demas paises que ingresen como miembros
de la institution.
S e c c io n




A P P E N D IX I

1309

Cualquier miembro podra subscribir acciones adicionales de
acuerdo con las reglas que establecera el Banco, mas este reservara una parte del capital autorizado para las subscripciones
mlnimas de paises que no esten representados en la Conferencia
Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas.
Si se aumentare el total de capital por acciones, se aumentara
asimismo la participation prorrata de cada pais participante, pero
ningun pals estara obliagdo a aumentar el monto de su subscrip­
tion si no lo desea.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #389)

(p. 6)
Articulo II
Division y Exigibilidad del Capital Subscrito
La subscription de cada pals participante se dividira en dos
partes, a saber:
SECCION 4.

(a) veinte por ciento (20% ), que podra exigir el Banco cuando
lo necesitare para sus operaciones; y
(b) el ochenta por ciento (80%) restante que podra exigir el
Banco solo cuando sea necesario para dar cumplimiento a
las obligaciones del mismo creadas por virtud de los incisos
(b) y (c), parrafo 1 del Articulo IV de este Acuerdo.
Todo requerinuento de pago en los casos de subscripciones exigibles se aplicara en proportion igual a todas las acciones.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #391)

(P- 7)
Articulo II
SECCION 5. Pag os del Capital Subscrito
(a) Pagos que deberan hacerse en oro y en moneda local:
(i) De las cantidades a pagar de acuerdo con el inciso (a),
Seccion 4, Articulo II, el veinte por ciento (20% ) se
pagara en oro, pero si el Banco se convenciere de que
una proportion mas baja serla adecuada en considera­
tion a la situation de un pals participante, la propor­
tion en oro podrla ser menos del veinte por ciento
(20%) ; disponiendose, sin embargo, que en ningun caso
la proportion sera menor del diez por ciento (10J ). La
%
diferencia podra pagarla el pals participante en su
moneda corriente.
(ii) Los pagos que se hicieren de acuerdo con el inciso (b),
Seccion 4, Artlcula II, haran, a option del pals partici­
pante, en oro o en la moneda requerida para dar cum-




1310

M O N E T A R Y AN D F IN A N C I A L CONFERENCE

plimiento a las obligaciones que motiven el requerimiento de pago.
(b) Fecha de pago.
Con respecto a las cantidades exigibles de acuerdo con el inciso
(a ), Section 4, Articulo II;
(i) el dos por ciento (2% ) de su subscription lo pagara
cada pais participante en oro, o en dolares de los Esta­
dos Unidos de America, dentro de 60 dias contados a
partir de la fecha fijada para el comienzo de las opera­
ciones del Banco;
(ii) el diez y ocho por ciento (18%) restante lo pagara en
cantidades maximas del cinco por ciento (5 % ), en cual­
quier trimestre, segun lo necesitare para cualquiera de
sus operaciones; disponiendose que no se le exigira
menos de un total del diez por ciento (10% en un ano.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaction— Doc. #391)

(P. 8)
Articulo II
Valor de Envision de las Acciones
Las acciones incluidas en la subscription initial de un miembro
del Banco representado en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera
de las Naciones Unidas seran emitidas a la par si se recibe la
subscription, a mas tardar, dentro de un ano contado a partir de
la fecha en que el Banco deba iniciar sus operaciones. Se emitiran
otras acciones a la par o si mediaren circunstancias especiales,
en los terminos que fije el Banco por mayoria de votos.
SECCION 6.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaction— Doc. #391)

(P. 9)
Articulo II
Limitation de Responsabilidad
La responsabilidad respecto a las acciones se limitara a la parte
del valor de emision de las mismas que estuviere pendiente de
pago.
S e c c io n

7.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaction—Doc. #340)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 7 de julio de 1944)

(P. 10)
Articulo II
Enajenacionde Acciones Limitada
Las acciones no podran ser pignoradas ni gravadas en forma
alguna, y solo podran traspasarse al propio Banco.
S e c c io n

8.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaction— Doc. #340)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 julio de 1944)




A P P E N D IX I

1311

(P . I D

Articulo II
Devolution de Subscripciones
Cuando las disponibilidades liquidas fueren substancialmente
mas de las necesarias para satisfacer las necesidades previstas del
Banco, este podra devolver, sujeta a nuevo requerimiento, una
suma proporcional uniforme por cada action emitida; disponiendose que las sumas devueltas no deberan afectar las cantidades
de moneda y/u oro que se mantendran disponibles de acuerdo con
lo prescrito en la Seccion 8 del Articulo III.
S e c c io n

9.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #389)
(P . 1 2 )

Articulo III
S e c c i o n 1.
JJso de Disponibilidades
Los recursos y las facilidades del Banco se usaran exclusivamente en beneficio de los paises participantes, prestandose atencion equitativa, por igual, a los proyectos de fomento y a los de
reconstruction.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #340)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944)
(P . 1 3 )

Articulo III
Organismos que Tratardn con el Banco
Salvo lo que se indique en contrario en este Acuerdo, el Banco
solo negociara con, o a traves de, los gohiernos de los paises
participantes, sus bancos centrales, fondos de estabilizacion y
otros organismos fiscales similares, el Fondo Monetario Interna­
cional, y otros organismos internacionales en los que participen
principalmente miembros del Banco.
S e c c io n

2.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #389)
(P . 1 4 )
S e c c io n

3.

Articulo III
Limitation de Prestamos y Garantias
(En el Comite 2)

(p . 1 5 )

Articulo III
Condiciones en las cuales el Banco podra Garantizar
o hacer Prestamos
El Banco podra garantizar u otorgar prestamos, o participar en
los que se hicieren, al gobierno de cualquier pais participante, a
SECCION 4.




1312

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C I A L CONFEREN CE

cualesquiera subdivisiones pollticas del mismo, y a empresas
comerciales, industriales y agricolas ubicadas en su territorio,
sujeto a las condiciones siguientes:
1. Que el gobierno del pais participante donde estuviere situado
el proyecto, o el banco central u otro organismo comparable del
mismo que fuere aceptable para el Banco, garantice plenamente
el pago de intereses y otros cargos sobre el prestamo, as! como el
pago del principal.
2. Que se establezca a satisfaction del Banco que, en las condi­
ciones del mercado, el prestatario no podrla obtener los fondos por
otros medios, en condiciones que el Banco estimarla razonables
para dicho prestatario.
3. Que una comision competente, despues de considerar detenidamente los meritos de la proposition, recomiende el proyecto
en dictamen sometido por escrito.
4. Que el tipo de interes y demas cargos sean razonables en
opinion del Banco, y que dicho tipo de interes, los cargos y la
tabla prescrita para la amortization del principal, sean adecuados
para el proyecto.
5. Que, 1 hacer o garantizar un prestamo, el Banco tenga muy
en cuenta las perspectivas de que el prestatario estara en condi­
ciones de cumplir con las obligaciones impuestas por el prestamo;
y que el Banco actue con prudencia en interes tanto del presta­
tario como de los paises paritcipantes que garanticen el prestamo.
6. Que el Banco reciba compensation por el riesgo que corra al
garantizar un prestamo que hicieren otros inversionistas.
7. Los prestamos que haga o garantice el Banco se destinaran,
salvo en circunstancias especiales, a proyectos especlficos de re­
construccion o fomento.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)
(P . 1 6 )

S e c c io n 5.

Articulo III
(Incorporada al Articulo IV, Section 3.)

(P . 1 7 )

Articulo III
S e c c io n 6. Uso de Prestamos que el Banco Garantice, Otorgue
o en los cuales tenga Participation
(a) El Banco no impondra condition alguna respecto al pais
participante en el cual hayan de invertirse los fondos procedentes
de un prestamo.
(b) El Banco hara arreglos a fin de asegurar que los fondos




A P P E N D IX I

1313

procedentes de un prestamo se dediquen exclusivamente a los
propositos para los cuales fue otorgado, prestando debida atencion
a los factores de economia y eficiencia y haciendo caso omiso de
influencias o consideraciones pollticas u otras que no sean de
Indole economica.
(c)
Ademas de cualquiera otra action que tomare para asegurar el debido cumplimiento de las disposiciones del inciso (b)
anterior con relation a los prestamos que hiciere, el Banco acreditara el monto del prestamo en la cuenta del prestatario y efectuara pagos con cargo a esta cuenta unicamente con el objeto de
cubrir gastos a medida que se incurra en ellos.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #389)
(P . IB )

Articulo IV
Operaciones
1. Medios de Facilitar los Prestamos
El Banco podra facilitar el otorgamiento de prestamos que
satisfagan las estipulaciones generales del Articulo III en cual­
quiera de las formas siguientes:
S e c c io n

(a) Mediante prestamos directos hechos del propio capital
del Banco ingresado de acuerdo con el inciso (a), Seccion 4
del Articulo II.
(b) Mediante prestamos directos hechos de fondos obtenidos
por el Banco en el mercado de valores de un pals participante.
(c) Garantizando total o parcialmente los prestamos que
hicieren inversionistas particulares por los conductos usuales
de inversion.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #389)

(p. 19)
Articulo IV
Prestamos del Capital Subscrito y de Fondos
Tornados a Prestamo, y Garantias de Prestamos
(a) No se haran gastos de los prestamos que hiciere el Banco
conforme al inciso (a), Seccion 1 del presente Articulo, en moneda
subscrita segun lo dispuesto en el inciso (a ), Seccion 4 del Articulo
II, sin la previa aprobacion, en cada caso, del pals participante
cuya moneda hubiere de prestarse.
(b) El Banco podra tomar a prestamo, de acuerdo con el inciso
(b), Seccion 1 del presente Articulo, o garantizar prestamos de
acuerdo con el inciso (c), Seccion 1 del mismo, solo previa apro­
bacion del pals participante en cuyo mercado de valores se huS e c c io n

2.




1314

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFEREN CE

bieren levantado los fondos, y unicamente si dicho pais conviniere
en que el producto de los prestamos podrian traspasarse a cual­
quier pals participante como divisa extranjera.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #421)

(P. 20)
Articulo IV
Suministro de Monedas para Prestamos Directos
Las disposiciones siguientes se aplicaran a los prestamos direc­
tos a que se refieren los incisos (a) y (b) de la Section 1 de este
Articulo:
SECCION 3.

(a) El Banco suministrara al prestatario aquellas monedas
de los otros paises participantes que el prestatario necesitare
para invertir en dichos paises en relation con el prestamo. Si no
contare el Banco con la totalidad o parte de dichas monedas
en los fondos adquiridos de acuerdo con los incisos (a) y (b)
de la Section 1 de este Articulo, podra suministrarlas en alguna
otra forma que el mismo determinare de conformidad con la
Section 8 de este Articulo.
(b) En circunstancias excepcionales, cuando la moneda corriente local necesaria a los fines del prestamo no pudiere
obtenerse en condiciones razonables en la propia moneda corriente del prestatario, el Banco podra suministrar una cantidad
adecuada del prestamo en esa moneda.
(c) Si el proyecto o programa aumentare indirectamente la
necesidad de que el pais prestatario obtuviere divisa extran­
jera, el Banco podra, en circunstancias excepcionales, suministrarle, como parte del prestamo, una cantidad adecuada de oro
o de divisa extranjera que no exceda del monto de los gastos
locles del prestatario en conexion con los fines del Banco.
(d) El Banco podra, en casos excepcionales, a solicitud de un
pais participante en donde se empleare parte del prestamo,
comprar de nuevo, con oro o con divisa extranjera, una parte
de la moneda corriente de dicho pais que se hubiere empleado,
pero esa parte en ningun caso excedera de la cantidad equivalente al aumento en la necesidad de divisa extranjera ocasionado por la inversion del prestamo en dicho pais.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)

(P. 21)
Articulo IV
Disposition para el Pago de Prestamos Directos
Los prestamos que hiciere directamente el Banco conforme a

SECCION 4.




A P P E N D IX I

1315

los incisos (a) o (b ), Seccion 1, del presente Articulo, deberan
contener las siguientes condiciones de pago:
(a)
Los terminos y condiciones relativos a interes, amorti­
zation, vencimiento y fechas de pago de cada prestamos los
determinara el Banco.
Este determinara, asimismo el tipo y cualesquiera otros terminos
y condiciones de la comision que hubiere de cobrarse en relation
con dicho prestamo. En los casos de prestamos que se hicieren
conforme al inciso (b ), Seccion 1, durante los primeros diez anos
de las operaciones del Banco, este tipo no sera menos del uno ni
mas del uno y medio por ciento anual, y se cargara a aquella parte
del prestamo respectivo que no estuviere ya cubierta por los pagos
destinados a amortization o al fondo de amortization. Pasados
diez anos el Banco podra reducir el tipo de comision sobre dichos
prestamos en lo que respecta a la parte aun pendiente de pago de
los mismos, si el propio Banco juzgare que hay suficientes reservas acumuladas como producto de comisiones y otros ingresos. Por
lo que respecta a prestamos futuros, el tipo de comision lo deter­
minara el Banco.
(b) En estudio por el Comite 2.
(c) En estudio por el Comite 2.
(d) En estudio por el Comite 2.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #421)
(P . 2 2 )

Articulo IV
Participation
El Banco podra particular en prestamos usando sus disponibilidades, excepto las subscripta's conforme al inciso (a), Seccion 4
del Articulo II. Los prestamos en que participare el Banco se
tramitaran por los conductos usuales de inversion.
Secci6n 5.

(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944)
(P . 2 3 )

Articulo IV
Garantias
Al garantizar un prestamo colocado a traves de los conductos
usuales de inversion, el Banco cobrara una comision por dicha
garantia sobre la parte del prestamo aun pendiente de pago. El
tipo de la comision de garantia lo determinara el banco. Durante
los primeros diez anos de funcionamiento del Banco, dicho tipo
no sera menos del uno ni mas del uno y medio por ciento (1 y%\%)
anual, y se cargara a aquella parte de cualquier prestamo garanSeccion 6.

795841 — 48— 13




1316

M O N E T A R Y AN D F I N A N C I A L CO NFEREN CE

tizado que no estuviere ya cubierta por los pagos destinados a
amortizacion o al fondo de amortization. Pasados diez anos, el
Banco podra reducir el tipo de comision en lo que respecta a las
partes de prestamos tanto anteriores como futuros aun pendientes
de pago si el Banco considerare que las reservas acumuladas por
concepto de comisiones y otros ingresos son suficientes para justificar la reduction propuesta. En el caso de prestamos futuros, el
Banco tambien tendra discretion para aumentar la comision a un
tipo que exceda el limite antes mencionado, si la experiencia
demostrare que tal cosa es aconsejable.
El prestatario pagara directamente al Banco las comisiones
por concepto de garantias. El Banco determinara cualesquiera
otros terminos y condiciones de la garantia.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #421)

(P. 24)
Articulo IV
S e c c i 6 n 7.

Orden para el Pago de Obligaciones.
(En estudio por el Comite 2)

(p. 25)
Articulo IV
Operaciones Misceldneas
Ademas de las otras operaciones prescritas en este Acuerdo, el
Banco tendra poder:
S ec ci 6 n 8.

(1) Para emitir, comprar y vender (i) sus propios valores,
incluso valores que tuvieren como garantia colateral prestamos
o inversiones que hubiere hecho, (ii) valores que hubiere garantizado, y (iii) valores en los que hubiere hecho inversion;
disponiendose, que el Banco debera obtener la aprobacion del
pais participante en donde hubieren de emitirse, comprarse o
venderse tales valores, y, cuando el Banco comprare valores de
los que hubiere emitido, debera asimismo obtener la aprobacion
del pais participante con cuya moneda se hubieren de pagar
dichos valores.
(2) Para garantizar valores en los que hubiere hecho inver­
sion con el objeto de facilitar la venta de los mismos.
(3) Para tomar a prestamo la moneda corriente de cualquier
pais participante, previa aprobacion de dicho pais; y
(4) Para comprar y vender oro y las monedas corrientes
de paises participantes, previa consulta con el Fondo Monetario
Internacional, cada vez que dichas transacciones fueren necesarias en relacion con las operaciones del Banco; disponiendose




APPENDIX I

1317

que, en lo relativo a cada transaction, salvo la que tenga por
(p. 25a) objeto pagar a acreedores, el Banco debera obtener la
aprobacion del pals participante en donde se efectuare la
transacion, y la del pals participante cuya moneda empleare.
Al ejercer los poderes conferidos por esta Seccion, el Banco
podra tratar con culaquiera persona, sociedad mercantil, asociacion, sociedad anonima, u otra entidad jurldica en cualquier pais
participante.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #340)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944)
(P . 2 6 )

Articulo IV
Advertencia que se Fijard en los Titulos de Valores
Todo valor que garantice o emita el Banco debera contener
impresa en lugar conspicuo la advertencia de que no es una
obligation del gobierno de pals alguno, excepto segun se indique
expresamente en cada uno de dichos valores.
SECCION 9.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #344)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944)

(p. 27)
Articulo IV
Prohibition de Actividades Politicas
Tanto el Banco como sus funcionarios se abstendran de intervenir en los asuntos politicos de cualquier pals participantes, y no
permitiran que la clase de gobierno del pals, o paises partici­
pantes interesados sea factor que influya en sus decisiones. Para
llegar a estas, solo tendran en cuenta consideraciones de caracter
economico, consideraciones que deberan aquilatar con imparcialidad al objeto de lograr los fines expuestos en el Articulo I.
SECCION 10.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #340)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944)

(p. 28)
Articulo V
Administration

Organization Administrativa del Banco
El Banco tendra una Junta de Gobemadores, Directores Ejecutivos, un Presidente y un cuerpo de empleados.
S e c c io n

1.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)




1318

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(P. 2 9 )

Articulo V
S e c c io n 2.

Junta de Gobemadores (Antes Seccion 1)
(a) Todos los poderes del Banco radicaran en la Junta de
Gobernadores la cual constara de un Gobemador y un Suplente
nombrados por cada uno de los paises participantes en la forma
que se determinare. Los Gobemadores y Suplentes serviran cinco
anos en sus cargos, sujeto cada uno de ellos a la voluntad del pals
participante que lo nombrare, y podran ser nombrados para un
nuevo perlodo. Los Suplentes votaran solo cuando estuvieren
ausentes los Gobernadores a quienes substituyan. La Junta elegira
como su Presidente a un Gobernador o al Presidente del Banco.
(b) La Junta de Gobernadores podra delegar en el Director
Ejecutivo autoridad para ejercer cualesquiera facultades de la
Junta, excepto las siguientes:
(1) Admitir nuevos miembros y determinar las condiciones de
su admision;
(2) Aumentar o rebajar el capital por acciones;
(3) Exigir el retiro de un miembro;
(4) Decidir apelaciones sobre interpretaciones del Acuerdo que
dieren los Directores Ejecutivos a solicitud de un miembro;
(5) Concertar acuerdos para cooperar con otros organismos
internacionales, que no fueren arreglos de caracter tem­
poral y administrativo;
(6) Decidir la liquidation del Banco; y
(7) Determinar la distribution de los ingresos netos del Banco.
(c) La Junta de Gobernadores se reunira una vez al ano y
tantas otras veces como lo disponga la misma Junta o como la
convoquen los Directores Ejecutivos. Las reuniones de la Junta
las convocaran los Directores Ejecutivos cuando lo solicitaren
cinco miembros o miembros que tuvieren una cuarta parte del
conjunto total de votos.
(p. 29a) (d) El quorum para toda reunion de la Junta de
Gobernadores lo constituira una mayorla que represente por lo
menos la mitad del conjunto de votos de los Gobemadores.
(e) La Junta podra establecer por reglamento un procedimiento por el cual los Directores Ejecutivos, cuando creyeren
que dicha action habrla de resultar en el mejor interes del
Banco, podran obtener un voto de los Gobernadores en una
cuestion determinada en vez de convocar a reunion de la Junta.
(f) La Junta de Gobernadores, y los Directores Ejecutivos
hasta el grado en que fueren autorizados, podran adoptar las




APPENDIX I

1319

reglas y reglamentaciones que fueren necesarias o adecuadas para
dirigir el Banco.
(g) Los Gobernadores y Suplentes serviran sus cargos sin que
el Banco les pague compensation por sus servicios, pero este
les reembolsara los gastos razonables en que incurrieren cuando
asistan a las reuniones.
(h) La Junta de Gobernadores determinara la remuneration
que se pagara a los Directores Ejecutivos y el salario y los
terminos del contrato de servicios del Presidente.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaction— Doc. #421)
(P . 3 0 )

Articulo V
Seccion 3.

Votaciones. (Anteriormente la Seccion 2)
(En estudio por el Comite 3)

(P . 3 1 )

Articulo V
Directores Ejecutivos (Antes Seccion 3) ( a ) -(h)
inclusive, y (m) : en el Comite 3.
(i) Los Directores Ejecutivos designaran un Presidente, el que
no podra ser ni un Gobernador ni un Director Ejecutivo. El
Presidente sera asimismo Presidente de los Directores Ejecutivos,
pero no votara excepto para decidir en un caso de empate. Podra
paritcipar en las reuniones de la Junta de Gobernadores, mas sin
derecho a votar en ellas. Podra, sin embargo, ser electo Presidente
de la Junta de Gobernadores. El Presidente cesara en su cargo
cuando tal sea la voluntad expresa de los Directores Ejecutivos.
(j) El Presidente sera el jefe del personal administrativo del
Banco, y tendra a su cargo, bajo la direction de los Directores
Ejecutivos, las operaciones ordinarias del mismo. Sera responsable, sujeto al control general de los Directores Ejecutivos, de
la organization, nombramiento y destitution de los miembros del
personal.
(k) En el desempeno de sus cargos, el Presidente y el personal
del Banco deberan, fidelidad exclusiva al Banco y no acataran
otra autoridad. Cada pals miembro del Banco respetara el
caracter international de tal fidelidad, y se abstendra de influir
con miembro alguno del personal en forma que pudiera dificultar
el desempeno de sus funciones.
(1) Al designar los miembros del personal, y salvo la necesidad
primordial de asegurar el mas alto nivel de efeciencia y de
competencia tecnica, el Presidente tomara debida cuenta de la
Seccion 4.




MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

1320

importancia de obtener la representation mas variada posible
desde el punto de vista geografico.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)

(P. 32)
Articulo V
S ecci6n 5. Consejo Consultivo (Antes Section 4)

Habra un iConsejo Consultivo de no menos de siete personas,
designadas por la Junta de Gobemadores de entre ciudadanos
prominentes de los paises participantes, incluso representantes
de intereses bancarios, comerciales, industriales, obreros y agri­
colas, con la representation mas variada posible de ciudadanos
de los distintos paises. En aquellos campos en que existan or­
ganismos internacionales especializados, los miembros correspondientes del Consejo se designaran mediante acuerdo con dichos
organismos. El Consejo asesorara al Banco en materia de politica
general. El Consejo se reunira una vez al ano, y en otras ocasiones
especiales cuando lo solicite el Banco.
Los Consejeros ejerceran sus cargos por unperiodo de dos
anos, y podran ser designados para nuevo periodo. Recibiran
compensation por los gastos razonables que eroguen por cuenta
del Banco.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)

(p. 33)
Articulo V
Comisiones de Prestamos (Antes Seccion 5)
Las comisiones que deberan dictaminar respecto a prestamos
conforme a lo dispuesto en la Seccion 4, del Articulo III, seran
designadas por el Banco, mas cada una de tales comisiones
contara entre sus miembros a un perito designado por el Gobernador que represente al pals participante donde estuviere situado
el proyecto en cuestion. En la Comision habra, ademas, uno o mas
miembros del personal tecnico del Banco.
S ecci6n 6.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)

(p. 34)
Articulo V
Seccion 7.

Relation con otros Organismos Internationales.
(Anteriormente Seccion 6)
(En el Comite de Redaccion)

S eccion 8.

Ubicacion de Oficinas. (Anteriormente Seccion 7)




(En estudio por el Comite 3)

APPENDIX I

1321

Depositaries. (Anteriormente Section 8)

S ecci 6 n 9.

(En estudio por el Comite 3)
(P. 35)

Articulo V
Una forma de tenencia de moneda corriente
En substitution de la parte de moneda corriente de un pais
participante que no necesite el Banco para sus operaciones, este
aceptara letras u otras obligaciones similares que emita el
Gobierno de dicho pais o el depositario que el mismo pais designare, y tales letras u obligaciones no seran negociables ni devengaran interes, y seran pagaderas a su presentation, por su valor
nominal, mediante credito a la cuenta del Banco en el territorio
de dicho pals participante. Esta disposition se aplicara no solo
a la moneda corriente pagada por concepto de subscripciones, sino
tambien a cualquier moneda corriente que el Banco adquiriere
por otros medios.
SECCION 10.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Documento #340)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 13 de julio de 1944).

(p. 36)
Articulo V
Protection del Activo del Banco (Anteriormente
Section 10)

SECCION 11.

(En estudio por el Comite 3)
(P. 37)

Articulo V
Publication de Informes y Servicio de Information
(Antes Secci6n 11)
Elo Banco publicara un informe anual que contenga un estado
de cuentas certificado por auditores, y a intervalos de cada tres
meses o menos, emitira un estado breve de su situation financiera
y un estado de ganancias y perididas que demuestre el resultado
de sus operaciones.
El Banco podra publicar los demas informes que considere
favorables a la realization de sus fines y de su polltica.
A los paises participantes se les distribuiran con regularidad
copias de todos los informes, estados y publicaciones que se
hicieren a tenor con esta Section,
SECCION 12.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #421)




1322

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(P. 3 8 )

Articulo V
Distribution de Ingresos (Antes Seccion 12)
La Junta de Gobernadores determinara cada ano que parte de
los ingresos netos del Banco quedara en reserva, y que parte, si
alguna, habra de distribuirse.
Si se distribuye parte alguna, se pagara a cada pals partici­
pante el dos por ciento no acumulativo, como primer cargo a la
distribution de un ano cualquiera, basado en el monto en que, al
fin del ano economico, la cantidad pagada sobre el valor nominal
de sus acciones excediere la cantidad de moneda de dicho pals en
poder del Banco; y el saldo a todos los palses participantes en
proportion a sus acciones. Los pagos que se hagan a cada pals
participante seran en moneda del propio pals.
S eccion 13.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)

(p. 39)
Articulo V
A n tig u a Seccion 13.

Eliminada

(p. 40)
Articulo VI
Rptiro y Suspension de Miembros y Liquidation

Derecho de los Miembros a Retirarse
Cualquier pals participante puede dejar de ser miembro del
Banco en cualquier tiempo avisado a este por escrito a su oficina
central. El retiro de un miembro sera efectivo en la fecha en que
se recibiere dicho aviso.
Seccion 1.

(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #421)

(p. 41)
Articulo VI
Suspension de Miembros
Un pals participante que dejare de cumplir con alguna de sus
obligaciones contraldas con el Banco podra ser suspendido como
miembro del mismo por decision de la mayoria de los Goberna­
dores, que debera comprender una mayoria del conjunto total de
votos. Un ano despues de la fecha de suspension, dicho pals
cesara automaticamente de ser miembro del Banco, a menos que
la mayoria de los palses participantes, siguiendo en la votacion
el mismo procedimiento empleado para la suspension, restituyere
al pals como miembro con plenos derechos.
Mientras estuviere suspendido, a un pals se le rehusaran todos
Secci 6 n 2.




APPENDIX I

1323

los privilegios reservados para los miembros excepto el derecho de
renunciar, mas quedara sujeto a todas las obligaciones correspondientes.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #421)
(P. 42)
Seccion

Articulo VI
3. Negativa de Ayuda Financiera.
(Rechazada por la Comision, 16 de julio de 1944)

(p. 43)

Articulo VI
Seccion 3. Cese de Participation en el Fondo Monetario (Antes
Seccion 4.)

Un pais participante que dejare de ser miembro del Fondo
Monetario Internacional cesara como miembro del Banco una vez
transcurridos--------- meses, salvo que el Banco, por un 75% de la
totalidad de sus votos, consienta en que dicho pals continue en su
calidad de miembro.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion en cuanto a forma— Doc. #421)
(El numero de meses lo insertara la Comision 3a)

(p. 44)
Articulo VI
Liquidation de Cuentas con Paises que Dejen de Ser
Miembros. (Antes Seccion 5)

SECCI6N 4.

(En estudio por el Comite 3)
SECCION 5.

Contribuciones para Cubrir Perdidas
(Antes Seccion 6)
(En estudio por el Comite 3)

Seccion 6.

Liquidation (Antes Seccion 7)
(En estudio por el Comite 3)

(p. 45)
Articulo VII
Status9 Immunidades y Privilegios del Banco

Fines del Articulo
Para facilitar al Banco el desempeno de las funciones que le
han sido encomendadas, se le otorgaran, en los territorios de cada
pais participante, las atribuciones, inmunidades y privilegios que
se expresan en el presente Articulo.
Seccion 1.

Status del Banco
El Banco tendra personalidad jundica plena, incluso la facultad

S eccion 2.




1324

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

de tomar la action que fuere necesaria o apropiada para dar
cumplimiento a las disposiciones de este Acuerdo, y, en particular,
facultad para:
(a) contratar;
(b) adquirir y enajenar bienes raices y muebles; y
(c) entablar acciones judiciales.
8. Demandas contra el Banco
El Banco podra ser demandado solo ante un tribunal de juris­
diction competente en un pais participante donde el Banco tuviere
oficina, hubiere designado un Apoderado con el objeto de aceptar
emplazamiento o notification de demanda judicial, o hubiere
emitido o garantizado valores; y solo por litigantes que no sean
paises participantes, que representen a estos o deriven reclamaciones de ellos. El Banco y los bienes de su activo, sea cual fuere
la naturaleza de estos, dondequiera que estuvieren ubicados y
quienquiera que los poseyere, estaran exentos e inmunes de secuestro, embargo y ejecucion mientras no se dicte una sentencia
definitiva contra el Banco.
S e c c i6 n

(p. 45a)
Articulo VII
4. Inmunidad con respecto a otras acciones
Los bienes y el activo del Banco, dondequiera que estuvieren
ubicados y quienquiera que los poseyere, estaran inmunes de
registro, requisition, confiscation, expropriacion o cualquiera otra
forma de embargo por action legislativa o ejecutiva, sea mediante
legislation u otro procedimiento cualquiera.
Los archivos del Banco seran inviolables.
S e c c io n

5.
Activo libre de restricciones
Los bienes y el activo del Banco estaran libres de restricciones,
reglamentaciones, controles y moratorias de toda clase, hasta el
grado que sea necesario para llevar a cabo las operaciones
prescritas por este Acuerdo y sujeto a las disposiciones del mismo.
S e c c i6 n

6. Inmunidad de funcionarios y empleados contra
demeandas
Los Gobernadores, Directores Ejecutivos, Suplentes, Funciona­
rios y Empleados del Banco gozaran de inmunidad respecto a
acciones judiciales por actos que realizaren en su capacidad
oficial, salvo que el Banco renunciare a dicha inmunidad.
S e c c io n

7. Inmunidad de funcionarios y empleados respecto a
restricciones
Cada pais participante otorgara a los Gobemadores, Directores

S e c c i6 n




APPENDIX I

1325

Ejecutivos, Suplentes, Funcionarios y Empleados del Banco que
no fueren nacionales de dicho pais, las mismas inmunidades
respecto a restricciones de inmigracion, requisitos para el registro
de extranjeros y obligaciones de servicio nacional, y las mismas
facilidades en lo relativo a restricciones sobre el cambio, que tal
pais otorgare a los representantes, funcionarios, y empleados de
rango comparable de otros paises participantes.
(p. 45b)
Articulo VII
8. Privilegios para las Comunicaciones
Cada pais participante otorgara a las comunicaciones oficiales
del Banco el mismo tratamiento que otorgare a las comunicaciones
oficiales de los demas paises participantes.
S e c c i6 n

Privilegios de los Funcionarios y Empleados en
materia de Viajes
Cada pais participante otorgara a los Gobernadores, Directores
Ejecutivos, Suplentes, Funcionarios y Empleados del Banco, en lo
relativo a facilidades de viaje, el mismo tratamiento que otorgare
a los representantes, funcionarios y empleados de otros pais
participantes que ostentaren rango comparable al de aquellos.
S e c c io n

9.

10. Inmunidad del Pago de Impuentos
Se otorgaran las siguientes inmunidades en materia de impuestos:

S e c c io n

(a) (Esta Seccion no ha sido aprobada aun, en forma
definitiva, por el Comite de Redaction.) El Banco, su activo,
sus bienes e ingresos, y las operaciones y transacciones que le
autoriza el presente Acuerdo, estaran exentos e inmunes del
pago de toda clase de impuestos y derechos de aduana. El Banco
estara asimismo exento e inmune de responsabilidad por cobro
o pago de cualquier contribution o impuesto.
(b) No se establecera impuesto alguno sobre sueldos y
emolumentos pagados por el Banco a los Directores Ejecutivos,
Suplentes, Funcionarios o Empleados del Banco que no sean
ciudadanos, subditos u otros nacionales del pais respectivo, ni
en relation con tales sueldos y emolumentos.
(p. 45c)
Articulo VII
(c) Inguna obligation o titulo que emitiere el Banco (incluso
cualquier dividendo o interes) quienquiera que fuere su tenedor,
se gravara con impuesto alguno—




MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

1326

(i) si esta discriminare contra tal obligation o titulo por el
solo hecho de haberlo emitido el Banco; o
(ii) si la jurisdiction para establecer dicho impuesto tuviere
como unico fundamento el lugar o la moneda en que se
emitiere, fuere pagadero o se pagare el titulo u obliga­
tion, o la ubicacion de cualquier oficinao centro de
operaciones que mantuviere el Banco.
Aplicacion del Articulo
,Cada pais participante tomara, dentro de sus propios terri­
tories, la action que estime necessaria para dar efecto, en los
terminos de su propia legislation, a los principios expuestos en el
presente Articulo. Cada pais participante informara detalladamente al Banco respecto a la action que hubiere tornado para
otorgarle e status, las inmunidades y los privilegios estipulados en
el presente Articulo.
S e c t i o n 11.

(Las Secciones 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 y 11, aprobadas por la Comision, 16 de julio de
1944; las Secciones 2 y 4, con enmiendas subsiguientes del Comite de
Redaccion)
(El Articulo VII, excepto el Inciso (a) de la Seccion 10, aprobado por el
Comite de Redaccion— Documentos #360 y #421)

(P. 46)
Articulo VIII
Enmiendas

(a) Toda proposition que tuviere por objeto enmendar el
presente Acuerdo, ya procediere de un pais participante, de un
Gobernador, o de los Directores Ejecutivos, se le comunicara al
Presidente de la Junta de Gobernadores, quien la llevara a la
consideration de la Junta. Si la junta aprobare por una mayoria
del numero total de votos a enmienda propuesta, el Banco se
dirigira por escrito, en carta circular a todos los paises partici­
pantes, preguntandoles si aceptan la enmienda. Cuando tres quin­
tas partes de los paises participantes que tuvieren en conjunto
cuatro quintas partes de la totalidad de los votos aceptaren la
enmienda propuesta, el Banco certificara el resultado de la vota­
cion mediante comunicacion oficial dirigida a todos los miembros.
(b) No obstante lo dispuesto en el inciso (a) precedente, sera
necesaria la aceptacion de todos los miembros en el caso de cual­
quier enmienda que modificare (1) el derecho a retirarse del
Banco; . . .
(Otros casos estan por determinarse)

(c) Las enmiendas entraran en vigor, para todos los paises
participantes, a los tres meses siguientes a la fecha de la com-




APPENDIX I

1327

municacion oficial, salvo que se fijare un perlodo mas corto en la
carta circular.
(Aprobada por la Comision, 16 de julio de 1944)
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #360)

(p. 47)
Articulo IX
Interpretation del Acuerdo

Interpretation
(a) Las cuestiones de interpretation de las disposiciones de
este Acuerdo que surgieren entre cualquier pais participante y el
Banco, o entre miembros del Banco, se referira para su decision
a los Directores Ejectivos de este. Si la cuestion afectare en parti­
cular a un miembro que no estuviere representado por un Director
Ejecutivo nombrado, se aplicaran al caso las disposiciones de la
Section 3 del Articulo V.
(b) En el caso en que los Directores Ejecutivos hubieren
rendido una decision de acuerdo con el inciso (a) precedente,
cualquier miembro podra exigir que la cuestion se refiera a la
Junta de Gobernadores cuya decision sera final. En tanto la Junta
de Gobernadores decide el caso, el Banco podra actuar a base de
la decision de los Directores Ejecutivos hasta donde lo juzgue
pertinente.
(c) Siempre que hubiere un desacuerdo entre el Banco y un
pals que hubiere cesado como miembro, o entre el Banco y cual­
quier miembro durante la liquidation del Banco, dicho desacuerdo
se sometera para arbitraje a un tribunal de tres arbitros, uno
nombrado por el Banco, otro por el pals interesado, y el tercero
que, salvo que las partes acuerden en contrario, nombrara el Pres­
idente del Tribunal Permanente de Justicia Internacional. Este
tercer miembro tendra plenos poderes para resolver todas las
cuestions de procedimiento en cualquier caso donde las partes
estuvieren en desacuerdo sobre las mismas.
SECCION 1.

(Aprobada por la Comision, 16 de julio de 1944)
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion—Doc. #360)

(p. 48)
Articulo IX
SECCION 2.

Definiciones
(Se suministraran mas tarde)

(p. 49)
Articulo IX
SECCION 3. Considerase Otorgada la Aprobacion
Cuando sea requisite la aprobacion de un pais participante para




1328

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

que el Banco pueda realizar un acto, se considerara otorgada tal
aprobacion salvo que el pals en cuestion presente objecion dentro
de un plazo razonable que el Banco fijara al notificar a dicho pais
del acto en proyecto.
(Aprobada por el Comite de Redaccion— Doc. #360)
(Aprobada por la Comision, 16 de julio de 1944)

(p. 50)
Articulo X
(Disposiciones Finales)
(Se suministraran mas tarde)

Document 461

(TRADUCCION PRELIMINAR)
Spanish translation

Acuerdo Sobre el Fondo Monetario Internacional
(Segun se aprobd en la Sesidn Pleanria de la Conferencia celebrada el 20
de julio de 1944)

Los Gobiernos en cuyo nombre se subscribe el presente Acuerdo
convienen en lo siguiente:
Articulo Preliminar

El Fondo Monetario Internacional se establece y funcionara de
acuerdo con las disposiciones siguientes:
Articulo I
Fines

Los fines del Fondo Monetario Internacional son:
(i) Promover la cooperation monetaria internacional me­
diante una institution permanente que proporcion un mecanismo para consultas y colaboracion sobre problemas
monetarios internacionales.
(ii) Facilitar la expansion y el desarrollo equilibrado del
comercio internacional, y contribuir de ese modo el fomento y al mantenimiento de altos niveles de empleo y
de ingres&s reales, y al desarrollo de las fuentes productivas de todos los paises participantes como objectivos
fundamentals de la politica economica.
(iii) Promover la estabilidad del cambio, mantener acuerdos
uniformes respecto al cambio entre los participantes, y




APPENDIX I

1329

evitar depreciaciones en los cambios con fines de competencia.
(iv) Ayudar a establecer un sistema de pagos multilateros
respecto a las transacciones corrientes entre los palses
participantes, y a eliminar restricciones del cambio sobre
el exterior que obstaculicen el desarrollo del comercio
mundial.
(P. 2)
(v) Inspirar confianza a los palses participantes poniendo a
su disposition los recursos del Fondo bajo garantlas
adecuadas, y de ese modo darles oportunidad de corregir
desajustes en su balanza de pago sin recurrir a medidas
que destruyan la prosperidad nacional o international.
(vi) De acuerdo con lo antes expuesto, acortar la duration y
disminuir el grado del desequilibrio en las balanzas de
pago internacionales de los palses participantes.
El Fondo se inspirara en todas sus decisiones en los fines expuestos en este Articulo.
Articulo II
Participacion
SECTION 1.

Participantes originates,
Los participantes originales del Fondo seran los paises repre­
sentados en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas cuyos gobiernos acepten participar en el Fondo
en calidad de miembros antes de la fecha estipulada en la Seccion
2(e) del Articulo XX.
Otros participantes.
Los gobiernos de otros palses podran ingresar en las feches y
de acuerdo con las condiciones que prescriba el Fondo.
S e c c io n 2.

Articulo III
Quotas y Subscripciones
S e c c io n 1.

Cuotas.
Se asignara una cuota a cada participante. La cuota de los par­
ticipantes representados en la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera
de las Naciones Unidas que antes de la fecha estipulada en la
Seccion 2(e) del Articulo XX acepten el participar en el Fondo
sera la que se estipula en el Cuadro A. El Fondo determinara
la cuota de los otros participantes.
Ajuste de cuotas.
A intervalos de cinco anos el Fondo revisara las cuotas de los

S e c c io n 2.




1330

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL CONFERENCE

(p. 3) participantes y, si lo estima conveniente, propondra ajustes
en las mismas. Tambien podra considerar en cualquier otro tiempo, si lo juzga conveniente, el ajuste de cualquier cuota determinada, a solicitud del participante interesado. Se necesitara una
mayorla de las cuatro quintas partes del total de los votos para
hacer cualquier cambio en las cuotas, y no se cambiara ninguna
cuota sin el consentimiento del participante interesado.
Subscripciones: lugar, fecha y forma de pago.
(a) La subscription de cada participante sera igual a su cuota
y se abonara al Fondo en su totalidad en el depositario apropriado
antes de la fecha en que el participante adquiera el derecho a
comprar moneda del Fondo, de acuerdo con los parrafos (c) o
(d) de las Seccion 4 del Articulo XX, o en dicha fecha.
(b) Cada participante pagara en oro, como mlnimo, la menor
de las cantidades siguientes:
S e c c io n 3.

(i) el 25 por ciento de su cuota, o
(ii) el 10 por ciento de las disponibilidades netas oficiales
en oro y dolares de los Estados Unidos de America que
tenga en la fecha en que el Fondo, de acuerdo con la
Seccion 4(a) del Articulo XX, notifique a los partici­
pantes que estara en breve en condiciones de iniciar
transacciones de cambio.
Cada participante suministrara al Fondo los datos necesarios
para determinar sus disponibilidades netas oficiales en oro y en
dolares de los Estados Unidos.
(c) ( ada participante pagara el balance de su cuota en su
C
propria moneda.
(d) Si en la fecha mencionada en el parrafo (b) (ii) anterior
no es posible determinar las disponibilidades netas oficiales de
algun participante en oro y en dolares de los Estados Unidos
de America por (p. 4) haber estado sus territorios ocupados
por el enemigo, el Fondo fijara una fecha alternativa apropriada
para la determination de dichas disponibilidades. Si la fecha es
posterior a la en que el pals empieza a participar del derecho a
comprarle moneda al Fondo, segun se dispone en la Seccion 4 (c)
o (d) del Articulo XX, el Fondo y el participante convendran en
un pago provisional en oro, que se hara de acuerdo con el parrafo.
(b) anterior, y el balance de la subscription del participante se
pagara en su propia moneda, sujeto a ajustes apropriados entre
el participante y el Fondo cuando se determinen las disponibili­
dades netas oficiales.




APPENDIX I

1331

Pagos en caso de cambio en las cuotas.
(a) Cada participante que acepte un aumento en su cuota
pagara al Fondo, dentro de trienta dlas a partir de la fecha en
que de su consentimiento, el 25 por ciento del aumento en oro y
el balance en su propia moneda. Sin embargo, si en la fecha
en que el participante acepta un aumento sus reservas monetarias
son menos que su nuevo cuota, el Fondo podra reducir la propor­
tion del aumento que hay a de pagarse en oro.
(b) Si un participante consiente en que se reduzca su cuota,
el Fondo, dentro de treinta dlas despues de la fecha en que el
participante consienta, le pagara a este una cantidad igual* a la
reduction. El pago se hara en la moneda del participante y en
la cantidad en oro que se necesite para evitar que se reduzcan las
disponibilidades del Fondo en dicha moneda mas alia del 75 por
ciento de la nueva cuota.
S eccio n 4.

S eccion 5. Substitution de valores por moneda.

El Fondo aceptera de cualquier participante, en vez de cual­
quier parte de la moneda de dicho participante que a juicio del
Fondo no se necesite para las operaciones de este, notas u obligaciones similares emitidas por el participante o por el depositario
designado por dicho participante de conformidad con la Seccion 2
del Articulo XIII, que no seran negociables ni devengaran interes,
y se pagaran a la par a su (p. 5) presentation acreditandolas a la
cuenta del Fondo en el depositario designado. Esta Seccion se
aplicara no solo a la moneda subscrita por los participantes sino
tambien a cualquier moneda que de cualquier otro modo se adeude
al Fondo o adquiera este.
Articulo IV
Valor a la Par de las Monedas

Expresion de valor a la par.
(a) El valor a la par de la moneda de cada participante se
expresara en terminos de oro como denominador comun, o en
terminos del dolar de los Estados Unidos de America del peso y
ley vigentes el 1° de julio de 1944.
(b) Todos los calculos relativos a las monedas de los partici­
pantes a los efectos de aplicar las dosposiciones de este Acuerdo
se haran a base de su valor a la par.
S eccio n 1.

Compras de oro basadas en valores a la par.
El Fondo prescribira un margen sobre el valor a la par, y bajo
el, para las transacciones en oro que efectuen los participantes, y
ningun miembro comprara oro a un precio sobre el valor a la par
S eccio n 2.

795841 — 48— 14




1332

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N CIA L CONFERENCE

mas el margen prescrito, ni lo vendera a un precio bajo el valor
a la par menos el margen prescrito.
3. Transacciones en cambio sobre el exterior basadas
en paridad.
Las tasas maxima y minima de las transacciones en cambio
que se efectuen entre monedas de participantes dentro de sus
proprios territories no diferiran de la paridad.
S e c c i6 n

(i) en casos de transacciones corrientes (spot exchange trans­
actions), en mas del 1 por ciento, y
(ii) en casos de otras transacciones, en un margen que exceda
del margen para transacciones corrientes en mas de lo
que el Fondo considere razonable.
(p. 6)
4. Compromisos respecto a la estabilidad del cambio.
(a) Los participantes convienen en colaborar con el Fondo
para promover, la estabilidad del cambio, mantener acuerdos
uniformes respecto al cambio con otros participantes, y evitar
modificaciones en el cambio con lines de competencia.
(b) Cada participante se compromete, mediante medidas apropriadas compatibles con este Acuerdo, a permitir transacciones
de cambio en sus territorios, entre su moneda y la de otros par­
ticipantes, unicamente dentro de los Kmites prescritos en la
Seccion 3 de este Articulo. Se considerara que cumple con este
compromiso cualquier participante cuyas autoridades monetarias,
con el fin de liquidar transacciones internacionale, de hecho compren y vendan oro libremente dentro de los limites prescritos por
el Fondo en la Seccion 2 de este Articulo.
S e c c i6 n

5. Modificaciones del valor a la par.
(a) Los participantes no propondran cambios en el valor a la
par de su moneda excepto para corregir desequilibrios fundamentales.
(b) Solo podran hacerse cambios en el valor a la par de la
moneda de un participante a propuesta de este, y s61o previa
consulta con el Fonda.
(c) Cuando se proponga un cambio, el Fondo primero tomara
en cuenta cualesquier cambios que ya se hayan efectuado en el
valor a la par inicial de la moneda del participante, segun se
haya determinado este de conformidad con la Seccion 4 del Arti­
culo XX. Si el cambio propuesto, junto con todos los cambios
anteriores, sean estos aumentos o disminuciones.
S e c c io n

(i) no excede del 10 por ciento del valor a la par inicial, el
Fondo no se opondra;




APPEN D IX I

1333

(ii) no excede en un 10 por ciento adicional del valor a la par
inicial, el Fondo podra aprobarlo u oponerse, pero hara
saver su actitud dentro de 72 horas (p. 7) si lo solicita el
participante;
(iii) no esta comprendido en los incisos (i) o (ii) antedichos,
el Fondo podra aprobarlo u openerse, pero tendra derecho
a un plazo mayor para hacer saber su actitud.
(d) Los cambios uniformes en los valores a la par que se hagan
de acuerdo con la Seccion 7 de este Articulo no se tomaran en
cuente para determinar si un cambio propuesto cae dentro de los
incisos (i), (ii), o (iii) del parrafo (c) anterior.
(e) Un participante podra modificar el valor a la par de su
moneda sin la aprobacion del Fondo si tal modification no afecta
las transacciones internacionales de los participantes en el Fondo.
(f) El Fondo convendra en un modification propuesta que
este en armonia con los terminos de los incisos (ii) o (iii) del
parrafo (c) anterior, si le consta que dicho cambio es necesario
para corregir un desequilibrio de caracter fundamental. En par­
ticular, siempre que as! le conste, no se opondra a una modifica­
tion propuesta por razon de normas sociales o pollticas del par­
ticipante que la proponga.
Efecto de modificaciones no autorizados.
Si un participante modifica el valor a la par de su moneda no
obstante la objecion del Fondo, en casos en que el Fondo tenga
derecho a objetar, el participante quedara descalificado para usar
los recursos del Fondo a menos que este determine lo contrario;
y si despues de la expiration de un plazo razonable continua la
diferencia entre el participante y el Fondo, el asunto quedara
sujeto a las disposiciones de la Seccion 2 (b ) del Articulo XV.
S e c c io n 6.

S e c c io n 7.

Modificaciones uniformes en el valor a la par.
No obstante las disposiciones de la Seccion 5 (b ) de este
Articulo, el Fondo, por una mayorla de la totalidad de los votos,
podra efectuar modificaciones proporcionales uniformes en el
valor a la par de las (p. 8) monedas de todos los participantes,
siempre que todos los participantes que tengan el 10 por ciento o
mas del total de las cuotas aprueben cada una de dichas modi­
ficaciones. Sin embargo, de conformidad con esta disposition, no
se modificara el valor a la par de la moneda de un participante
si, dentro de las 72 horas siguientes a la action que haya tornado
el Fondo, el participante informa a este que no desea que como
resultado de tal action se altere el valor a la par de su moneda.




1334

MONETARY AND FIN A N C IAL CONFERENCE

8. Mantenimiento del valor en oro del activo del Fondo.
(a) El valor en oro del activo del Fondo se mantendra a pesar
de las alteraciones en el valor a la par o en el valor cambio sobre
el exterior de la moneda de cualquier participante.
(b) Cuando (i) se reduzca el valor a la par de la moneda de un
participante, o (ii) a juicio del Fondo el valor del cambio sobre
el exterior de la moneda de un participante haya depreciado
considerablemente dentro de los territorios del participante, este
pagara al Fondo, dentro de un plazo razonable, una cantidad de
su propria moneda igual a la reduction del valor en oro de su
moneda que este en poder del Fondo.
(c) Cuando se aumente el valor a la par de la moneda de un
participante el Fondo devolvera, en un plazo razonable, una
cantidad en la moneda de dicho participante igual al aumento del
valor en oro de su moneda que este en poder del Fondo.
(d) Las disposiciones de esta Seccion se aplicaran a cualquier
modification proporcional uniforme en el valor a la par de la
moneda de todos los participantes, a menos que cuando se proponga tal modification el Fondo decida lo contrario.
S e c c io n

Monedas distintas dentro de los territorios de un
participante.
Cuando un participante proponga una modification en el valor
a la par de su moneda se considerara, a menos que declare lo
contrario, que propone una modification correspondiente en el
valor a la par de las distintas monedas de todos los territorios
respecto a los cuales ha (p. 9) aceptado este Acuerdo, de conformidad con la Seccion 2 (g ) del Articulo X X . Sin embargo,
quedara a discretion del participante declarar que su propuesta
se refiere solo a la moneda metropolitana, o solo a una o mas
monedas determinadas, o a la moneda metropolitana y a una o
mas monedas distintas que se especifiquen.
SECCION 9.

Articulo V
Transacciones con el Fondo
1. Organismos que podran negociar con el Fondo.
Cada participante negociara con el Fondo solamente por intermedio de su Tesorerla, su banco central, su fondo de establizacion
u otro organismo fiscal similar, y el Fondo solo negociara con
tales organismos, o por intermedio de ellos.
S e c c io n

2. Limitation de las operaciones del Fondo.
Salvo lo que se dispone en contrario en este Acuerdo, las
operaciones que se hagan por cuenta del Fondo se limitaran a
S e c c io n




APPENDIX I

1335

transacciones que tengan por objeto suministrar a un partici­
pante, a solicitud de este, la moneda de otro participante a cambio
de oro o de la moneda del participante que desee efectuar la
operation.
3. Condiciones que regulan el uso de los recursos del
Fondo.
(a) Un participante tendra derecho a comprar del Fondo la
moneda de otro participante, a cambio de la suya propia, en las
condiciones siguientes:
S e c c io n

(i) Que el participante que desee comprar la moneda manifieste que esta se necesita con urgencia para hacer con ella
pagos compatibles con las disposiciones de este Acuerdo;
(ii) Que el Fondo no haya notificado, conforme a la Seccion 3
del Articulo VII, que escasean sus disponibilidades de la
moneda que se jnteresa;
(p. 10)
(iii) Que la compra propuesta no haga que las disponibilidades
del Fondo en moneda del participante aumenten durante
el perlodo de doce meses que termine en la fecha de la
compra en mas del 25 por ciento. de la cuota del parti­
cipante, ni excedan del 200 por ciento de la cuota del
participante, pero la limitation del 25 por ciento solo se
aplicara hasta el grado en que las disponibilidades del
Fondo en moneda del participante se hayan aumentado
mas alia del 75 por ciento de su cuota, si hablan bajado
de esa cantidad.
(iv) Que el Fondo no haya declarado previamente, segun la
Seccion 5 de este Articulo, la Seccion 6 del Articulo IV,
la Seccion 1 del Articulo VI, o la Seccion 2 (a ) del Artlculo XV, que el participante que desea hacer la compra
esta descalificado para usar los recursos del Fondo.
(b) Los participantes no tendran derecho a usar los recursos
del Fondo sin permiso de este para adquirir moneda que hayan
de retener para cubrir transacciones de cambio futuro.
4. Renuncia de condiciones.
A su discretion, y en terminos que garanticen sus intereses, el
Fondo podra renunciar a cualquiera de las condiciones prescritas
en la Seccion 3 (a ) de este Articulo, especialmente en caso de
participantes cuyo record indique que han evitado hacer gran uso
continuo de los recursos del Fondo. Al renunciar a cualquier
condition tomara en consideration necesidades periodicas o excepcionales del participante que solicite la renuncia. El Fondo tomara
S e c c io n




M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

1336

en cuenta tambien el deseo de un participante de ofrecer como
garantia subsidiaria oro, plata, valores, u otros bienes aceptables
que tengan suficiente valor en la opinion del Fondo para proteger
sus intereses, y podra exigir dicha garantia subsidiaria como con­
dition para su renuncia.
(P . 11)
S e c c io n

5. Perdida del derecho a usar los recursos del Fondo.
En cualquier ocasion en que el Fondo determine que cualquier
participante este usando los recursos del Fondo en forma contraria a los propositos del Fondo, este sometera a dicho partici­
pante un informe en que exponga la opinion del Fondo y senale
un plazo adecuado para que conteste. Despues que el Fondo
someta un informe de esta naturaleza a un participante, podra
limitar el uso que el participante haga de sus recursos. Si no se
recibe contestation del participante al informe dentro del plazo
senalado, o si no es satisfactoria la contestation, el Fondo podra
seguir limitando el uso que de sus recursos haga el participante o,
despues de notificarselo con anticipation razonable, podra retirarle
el derecho a usar los recursos del Fondo.
6 . Compras de moneda al Fondo a cambio de oro.
(a) Cualquier participante que desee obtener directa o indirectamente la moneda de otro participante a cambio de oro la adquirira, siempre que pued hacerlo con igual ventaja, mediante la
venta de oro al Fondo.
(b) Nada de lo expuesto en esta Seccion se interpretara en el
sentido de que impide que un participante venda en cualquier
mercado oro recien extraido de minas situadas dentro de sus
territorios.
S e c c io n

7.
Recompra por un participante de su moneda en
posesion del Fondo.
(a) Un participante podra recomprar del Fondo y el Fondo le
vendera, a cambio de oro, cualquier parte de las disponibilidades
del Fondo en la moneda del participante en exceso de la cuota de
este.
(b) Al finalizar cada ano economico del Fondo los participantes
recompraran del Fondo con oro o monedas convertibles, segun se
determine de acuerdo con el Cuadro B, parte de las disponibili­
dades del Fondo en las monedas respectivas de los participantes
en las condiciones siguientes:

S e c c i6 n

(i) Cada participante usara para recomprar su propia mo­
neda del Fondo una cantidad de sus reservas monetarias




A PPEND IX I

1337

igual (p. 12) en valor a la mitad de cualquier aumento
que se haya efectuado durante el ano en las disponibili­
dades del Fondo en su moneda, mas la mitad de cualquier
aumento, o menos la mitad de cualquier reduction, que
haya ocurrido durante el ano en las reservas monetarias
del participante. Esta regia no se aplicara cuando las
reservas monetarias de un participante hayan disminuldo
durante el ano en mas de lo que hayan aumentado las
disponibilidades del Fondo de su moneda.
(ii) Si despues que se efectue la recompra descrita en el inciso
(i) anterior (si esta es necesaria) se halla que las dis­
ponibilidades de un participante en moneda de otro par­
ticipante (o en oro adquirido de dicho participante) han
aumentado a causa de transacciones con otros participan­
tes o con personas en sus territorios, en terminos de dicha
moneda, el participante cuyas disponibilidades en dicha
moneda (o en oro) hayan as! aumentado usara el aumento
para recomprar del Fondo su propia moneda.
(c)
Ninguno de los ajustes descritos en el parrafo (b) anterior
se llevara al punto en que
(i) las reservas monetarias del participante sean menos que
su cuota, o
(ii) las disponibilidades del Fondo en su moneda sean menos
del 75 por ciento de su cuota, o
(iii) las disponibilidades del Fondo en cualquier moneda que
sea necesario. usar sean mas del 75 por ciento de la cuota
del participante interesado.
Cargos.
(a) Cualquier participante que compre del Fondo la moneda
de otro participante a cambio de la suya propia pagara un cargo
por servicios, (p. 13) que sera uniforme para todos los partici­
pantes, de % por ciento ademas del precio de paridad. A su
discretion el Fondo podra aumentar este cargo a no mas de 1 por
ciento o reducirlo a no menos de
por ciento.
(b) El Fondo podra imponer un cargo razonable por servicios
a cualquier participante que le compre o le venda oro al Fondo.
(c) El Fondo impondra cargos uniformes para todos los par­
ticipantes, que pagara cualquier participante sobre los balances
promedios diarios de su moneda en poder del Fondo en exceso
de su cuota. Dichos cargos seran conformes a las tasas siguientes:
S e c c io n 8.

(i) Sobre cantidades de no mas del 25 por ciento en exceso
de la cuota: libre de cargos por los tres primeros meses;




1338

MON ET A RY AND FINA NC IAL CONFERENCE

i/2 por ciento anual por los proximos nueve meses; y de
ahi en adelante un aumento en el cargo de V2 vor ciento
por cada ano subsiguiente.
(ii) Sobre cantidades de mas del 25 por ciento, pero no mas
del 50 por ciento en exceso de la cuota: y% por ciento
adicional por el primer ano; y y% Por ciento adicional por
cada ano subsiguiente.
(iii) Sobre cada grupo adicional del 25 por ciento en exceso
de la cuota: y% por ciento adicional por el primer ano;
y y% por ciento adicional por cada ano subsiguiente.
(d)
En cualquier momento en que las disponibilidades del
Fondo en moneda de un participante sean tales que el cargo
aplicable a cualquier grupo por cualquier perlodo haya llegado
al tipo de 4 por ciento anual, el Fondo y el participante estudiaran
los medios por los cuales puedan reducirse las disponibilidades de
la moneda en poder del Fondo. Despues de eso los cargos aumentaran de acuerdo con las disposiciones del parrafo (c) anterior
hasta que lleguen a 5 por ciento, y si no se llegare a un acuerdo,
el Fondo podra imponer los cargos que juzgue apropiados.
(p. 14) (e) Las tasas mencionadas en los parrafos (c) y (d)
anteriores podran cambiarse por una mayoria de tres cuartas
partes de la totalidad de los votos.
(f)
Todos los cargos se pagaran en oro. Sin embargo, si las
reservas monetarias del participante son menos de la mitad de su
cuota, pagara en oro unicamente la proportion de los cargos
adeudados que dichas reservas guarden a la .mitad de su cuota, y
pagara el balance en su propia moneda.
Articulo VI
Transferences de Capital
S e c c io n 1.

Uso de los recursos del Fondo para transferencias de
capital.
(a) Ningun participante hara uso neto de los recursos del
Fondo para hacer frente a una salida considerable 0 sostenida de
capital, y el Fondo podra exigir de un participante que adopte
medidas de control para evitar que los recursos del Fondo se usen
con tal fin. Si despues de recibir una solicitud a este efecto un
participante dejare de adoptar las medidas de control adecuadas,
el Fondo podra retirar a dicho participante el derecho a usar los
recursos del Fondo.
(b) Nada de lo expuesto en esta Seccion se interpretara en el
sentido de que




APPEN D IX I

1339

(i) impide el uso de los recursos del Fondo para transac­
ciones de capital en cantidades razonables que se necesiten
para la expansion de las exportaciones o en el curso
ordinario del comercio, la banca, u otros negocios, o
(ii) afecta los movimientos de capital que se cubran con los
recursos en oro y cambios sobre el exterior del propio
participante, pero los participantes se comprometen a ver
que dichos movimientos de capital respondan a los fines
del Fondo.
Disposiciones especiales para las transferences de
capital.
Si las disponibilidades del Fondo en moneda de un participante
han permanecido bajo el 75 por ciento de su cuota por un perlodo
inmediatamente (p. 15) anterior de no menos de 6 meses, el
participante, si no ha perdido el derecho a usar los recursos del
Fondo de acuerdo con la Seccion 1 de este Articulo, la Seccion 6
del Articulo IV, la Seccion 5 del Articulo V o la Seccion 2(a) del
Articulo XV, tendra derecho a comprar del Fondo la moneda de
otro participante a cambio de la suyo propia para cualquier fin,
incluso transferencias de capital, a pesar de las disposiciones de la
Seccion 1(a) de este Articulo. Sin embargo, no se permitiran las
compras para transferencias de capital de acuerdo con esta Sec­
cion si aumentan las disponibilidades del Fondo en moneda del
participante que desee comprar, mas alia del 75 por ciento de su
cuota, o reducen las disponibilidades del Fondo de la moneda que
se desee comprar, mas alia del 75 por ciento de la cuota del par­
ticipante cuya moneda se interese.
S e c c io n 2.

S e c c io n 3.

Control de las transferencias de capital.
Los participantes podran adoptar las medidas de control que
sean necesarias para regular los movimientos de capital inter­
nacionales, pero ningun participante podra adoptar tales medidas
en forme que limite los pagos por transacciones normales o que
indebidamente retrase transferencias de fondos como liquidation
de obligaciones, excepto lo que se dispone en la Seccion 3 (b )
del Articulo VII y en la Seccion 2 del Articulo XIV.
Articulo VII
Monedas Escasas
S e c c io n 1.

Escasez general de moneda.
Si el Fondo se entera de que esta desarrollandose una escasez
general de una moneda determinada podra informarlo asla los
participantes y expedir un informe en que se expongan las causas




1340

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

de la escasez y se formulen recomendaciones encaminadas a
ponerle fin. En la preparacion de dicho informe participara un
representante del participante de cuya moneda se trate.
2 . Medidas para reporter las disponibilidades del Fondo
de monedas escasas.
Si el Fondo juzga apropiada dicha action para reponer sus
disponibilidades de la moneda de cualquier participante, podra
adoptar las siguientes medidas o cualquiera de ellas:
S e c c io n

(p. 16)
(i) Proponer al participante que, en los terminos y las con­
diciones que entre el y el Fondo se acuerden, preste su
moneda al Fondo, o que, con la aprobacion del partici­
pante, el Fondo tome prestada dicha moneda de alguna
otra fuente, ya dentro de los territorios del participante
o fuera de ellos, pero ningun participante estara obligado
a hacer prestamos de esa naturaleza al Fondo ni a aprobar el que el Fondo tome prestada su moneda de ninguna
otra fuente.
(ii) Exigir que el participante le venda su moneda a cambio
de oro.
3. Escasez de las disponibilidades del Fondo.
(a) Si el Fondo llega al convencimiento de que la demanda de
moneda de un participante pone en peligro la capacidad del
Fondo de suplir dicha moneda, el Fondo, haya emitido o no un in­
forme de acuerdo con la Seccion 1 de este Articulo, declarara
formalmente que dicha moneda escasea y en adelante distribuira
sus existencias actuales y cumulativas de la moneda escasa con la
debida consideration a las necesidades relativas de los partici­
pantes, a la situation economica internacional general, y a cualesquiera otras circunstancias pertinentes. El Fondo publicara tambien un informe respecto a las medidas que adopte.
(b) Una declaration formal de acuerdo con el parrafo (a)
anterior servira de automation a cualquier participante para que,
previa consulta con el Fondo, imponga limitaciones temporalmente a la libertad en las operaciones sobre el cambio de la
moneda escasa. Sujeto a las disposiciones de las Secciones 3 y 4
del Articulo IV, el participante tendra plena jurisdiction para
determinar la naturaleza de dichas limitaciones, pero estas no
seran mas restrictivas de lo que sea necesario para limitar la
demanda de la moneda escasa a las existencias en poder del par­
ticipante en cuestion, o que a el le correspondan; y se aflojaran y
se eliminaran tan rapidamente como lo permitan las condiciones.
S e c c io n




APPENDIX I

1341

(c)
La autorizacion mencionada en el parrafo (b) anterior
expirara en cuantas ocasiones el Fondo declare formalmente que
no escasea ya la moneda en cuestion.
(P . 1 7 )
S e c c io n

4. Administration de las restricciones.
Cualquier participante que imponga restricciones respecto a la
moneda de otro participante de conformidad con las disposiciones
de la Seccion 3 (b ) de este Articulo prestara la debida considera­
tion favorable a cualquier representation que haga el otro partici­
pante respecto a la administration de dichas restricciones.
5. Efecto de otros acuerdos internacionales sobre las
restricciones.
Los participantes convienen en no invocar las obligaciones de
ningun compromiso que hubieren formalizado con otros partici­
pantes con anterioridad a este Acuerdo en forma tal que impida
la ejecucion de las disposiciones de este Articulo.
S e c c io n

Articulo VIII
Obligaciones Generales de los Participantes
1. Introduction.
Ademas de las obligaciones asumidas de conformidad con otros
artlculos de este Acuerdo, cada participante se compromete a
asumir las obligaciones expuestas en este Articulo.
S e c c i6 n

2. Abstention en las restricciones sobre pagos
corrientes.
(a) Sujeto a las disposiciones de la Seccion 3 (b ) del Articulo
VII y de la Seccion 2 del Articulo XIV, ningun participante,
sin la aprobacion del Fondo, impondra restricciones sobre pagos y
transferencias por transacciones internacionales corrientes.
(b) Los contratos sobre cambio que impliquen la moneda de
cualquier participante y que sean contrarios a las regulaciones
del control de cambio de dicho participante mantenidas o impuestas de manera compatible con este Acuerdo, no podran ponerse en
vigor en los territorios de ningun participante. Ademas los par­
ticipantes, por mutuo acuerdo, podran cooperar en la adoption de
medidas que tengan por fin hacer mas eficaces las regulaciones
de control de cambio de cualquiera de los participantes, siempre
que dichas medidas y regulaciones sean compatibles con este
Acuerdo.
S e c c io n

(P . 1 8 )
S e c c io n

3. Abstention en las prdcticas monetarias injustas.
Ningun participante entrara en ningun arreglo monetario




1342

M O N E TAR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

injusto ni en practicas monetarias multiples, ni permitira que
entre on ellos ninguno de sus organismos fiscales mencionados en
la Seccion 1 del Articulo V, excepto segun lo autorice este Acuerdo
o lo apruebe el Fondo. Si existen arreglos y praticas de esa
naturaleza en la fecha en que entre en vigor este Acuerdo, el
participante interesado consultara con el Fondo respecto a la
forma de eliminarlos progresivamente, a menos que se mantengan
o se impongan de acuerdo con la Seccion 2 del Articulo XIV,
en cuyo caso seran aplicables las disposiciones de la Seccion 4 de
dicho Articulo.
Conversion de balances retenidos en el extranjero .
(a) Cada participante comprara balances de su moneda reteni­
dos por otros participantes si estos, al solicitar la compra, declaran
S e cc io n 4.

(i) que los balances que han de comprarse han sido adquiridos
recientemente como resultado de transacciones corrientes,
o
(ii) que se necesita su conversion para hacer pagos por trans­
acciones corrientes.
Quedara a option del participante comprador el pagar en la moneda
del participante que haga la solicitud o en oro.
(b) La obligation que se menciona en el parrafo (a) anterior
no sera aplicable
(i) cuando la conversion de los balances se haya limitado
de manera compatible con la Seccion 3 del Articulo VI
o la Seccion 2 del Articulo VIII;
(ii) cuando los balances se hayan acumulado como resultado
de transacciones efectuadas antes que el participante
eliminase las restricciones mantenidas o impuestas de
acuerdo con la Seccion 2 del Articulo XIV ;
(p. 19)
(iii) cuando los balances se hayan adquirido en forma contraria a las regulaciones sobre el cambio impuestas por
el participante a quien se le pide que las compre;
(iv) cuando de acuerdo con la Seccion 3(a) del Articulo VII
se haya declarado escasa la moneda del participante que
solicite la compra; o
(v) cuando el participante a quien se pida que haga la compra
no tenga derecho, por cualquier motivo, a comprarle al
Fondo monedas de otros participantes a cambio de la
suya propia.




A PPEND IX I

1343

5. Suministro de information.
(a)
El Fondo podra exigir que los miembros le suministren los
datos que juzgue necesarios para sus operaciones, y estos deberan
incluir, como mlnimo para el cumplimiento efectivo de las fun­
ciones del Fondo, datos sobre asuntos nacionales sobre lo
siguiente:
S e c c io n

(i) Disponibilidades oficiales dentro de su territorio y en el
extranjero de (1) oro y (2) cambio extranjero.
(ii) Disponibilidades dentro de su territorio y en el extran­
jero, de organismos bancarios y financieros que no sean
organismos oficiales, de (1) oro y (2) cambio extran­
jero.
(iii) Production de oro.
(iv) Exportaciones e importaciones de oro segun los palses
de destino y de origen.
(v) Exportaciones e importaciones to tales de mercaderlas,
en terminos de su valor en moneda nacional, segun los
palses de destino y de origen.
(vi) Balance de pago internacional que incluya (1) comercio
en productos y servicios, (2) transacciones en oro, (3)
transacciones de capital conocidas, y (4) otras partidas.
(P. 20)

(vii) Position de las inversiones internacionales, es decir, inversiones dentro de los territorios del participante cuyos
duenos esten en el extranjero e inversiones en el extran­
jero que pertenezcan a personas en sus territorios, en
cuanto sea posible suministrar esta information.
(viii) Ingreso nacional.
(ix) Indices de precios, es decir, indices de precios de los
artlculos de consumo en los mercados al por mayor y al
por menor y de los precios de exportation y de impor­
tation.
(x) Tipos de compra y de venta de las monedas extranjeras.
(xi) Medidas de control de cambio, es decir, un informe
comprensivo de las medidas de control de cambio en
vigor en el momento de entrar a participar en el Fondo,
y detalles de cambios subsiguientes a medida que ocurran.
(xii) Donde existan arreglos oficiales para liquidaciones,. de­
talles de las cantidades pendientes de liquidation respecto
a transacciones comerciales y financieras, y del espacio




1344

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

de tiempo durante el cual han estado pendientes estos
atrasos.
(b)
Al solicitar information el Fondo tendra en cuenta la
capacidad respectiva de cada participante para suministrar los
datos que se le pidan. Los participantes no estaran obligados a
suministrar information de manera tan detallada que se revelen
los asuntos de individuos o corporaciones. Sin embargo, se comprometen a suministrar la information deseada de manera tan
detallada y tan exacta como sea posible, y en lo posible a evitar
lo que sea mero calculo.
(p. 21) (c) El Fondo podra hacer arreglos para obtener in­
formation adicional mediante acuerdos con los participantes.
Servira de centro para la compilation y el cambio de information
sobre problemas monetarios y financieros y facilitara de ese modo
la preparation de estudios que tengan por fin ayudar a los partici­
pantes a desarrollar normas que fomenten los fines del Fondo.
6. Consultas entre los participantes respecto a acuerdos
internacionales existentes.
En los casos en que de conformidad con este Acuerdo se auto­
rice a un participante en las circunstancias especiales o temporales que se especifican en el Acuerdo para mantener o establecer
restricciones sobre transacciones de cambio, y existan otros compromisos entre participantes, contraldos con anterioridad a este
Acuerdo, que esten en conflicto con la aplicacion de dichas restric­
ciones, las partes en dichos compromisos se consultaran con miras
a efectuar los ajustes mutuamente aceptables que sean necesarios.
Las disposiciones de este Articulo no seran en detrimento de las
operaciones de la Seccion 5 del Articulo VII.
S e c c i6 n

Articulo IX
Status, Inmunidades y Privilegios

1. Fines de este Articulo.
A fin de posibilitar al Fondo para cumplir con las funciones que
se le encomienden, se le otorgaran en los territorios de cada
participante el status, las inmunidades y los privilegios que se
mencionan en este Articulo.
S e c c io n

2. Status del Fondo.
El Fondo tendra plena personalidad juridica y, en particular,
poder para:

S e c c i6 n

(i) hacer contratos;
(ii) adquirir y disponer de bienes muebles e inmuebles;
(iii) instituir procedimientos legales.




AP PE N DIX I

1345

(p. 22)
3. Inmunidad contra procesos judiciales.
El Fondo, sus bienes y activo, no importa donde esten situados
y en poder de quien esten, gozaran de inmunidad contra toda
forma de procesos judiciales, excepto hasta el limite en que expresamente renuncie a su inmunidad para los efectos de cualquier
proceso o de acuerdo con los terminos de cualquier contrato.
S e c c io n

4.
Inmunidad contra otras acciones.
Los bienes y el activo del Fondo, no importa donde esten situa­
dos y en poder de quien esten, seran inmunes a registros, embargos, confiscaciones, expropiaciones y cualquiera otra forma de
comiso por action ejecutiva o legislativa.
S e c c io n

5. Inmunidad de los archivos.
Los archivos del Fondo seran inviolables.

S e c c io n

6. Libertad de restricciones del activo.
Hasta el limite necesario para llevar a cabo las operaciones que
provee este Acuerdo, todas las propriedades y el activo del Fondo
estaran libres de toda clase de restricciones, regulaciones, control
y moratoria.
S e c c io n

Privilegio para las comunicaciones.
Los participantes otorgaran a las comunicaciones oficiales del
Fondo el mismo tratamiento que a las comunicaciones oficiales
de otros participantes.
SECCION 7.

8. Inmunidades y privilegios de functionarios y
empleados.
Todos los gobernadores, directores ejecutivos, suplentes,
funcionarios y empleados del Fondo

S e c c io n

(i) tendran inmunidad contra procesos legales respecto a sus
actos realizados en su capacidad oficial, excepto cuando el
Fondo renuncie a esta inmunidad.
(P . 2 3 )

(ii) cuando no sean nacionales del participante disfrutaran
de las mismas inmunidades contra restricciones de immi­
gration, requisitos de registro de extranjeros y obliga­
ciones respecto al servicio nacional, y las mismas facilidades respecto a las restricciones sobre el cambio, que
otorgan los participantes a los representantes, funcion­
arios, y empleados de rango comparable de otros partici­
pantes.
(iii) recibiran el mismo tratamiento respecto a facilidades de




1346

M O N E T A R Y AND F lN A N G IA L CONFERENCE

viaje que otorgan los participantes a representantes,
funcionarios y empleados de rango comparable de otros
participantes.
9. Inmunidades contra impuestos.
(a) El Fondo, sus bienes, propiedades, ingresos, y operaciones
y transacciones autorizadas por este Acuerdo, seran inmunes a
toda forma de impuestos y de derechos de aduanas. El Fondo
tambien estara libre de responsabilidad por el cobro o el pago de
cualquier impuesto o derecho.
(b) No se impondra impuesto alguno sobre salarios y emolumentos, o respecto a salarios y emolumentos, pagados por el
Fondo a directores ejecutivos, suplentes, funcionarios o emplea­
dos del Fondo que no sean ciudadanos o subditos o nacionales de
otra categorla del participante.
(c) No se impondra impuesto de ninguna clase sobre ninguna
obligation o valor emitido por el Fondo, incluso cualquier dividendo o interes devengado por los mismos, no importa quien los
posea,
S e c c io n

(i) si el impuesto discrimina contra dicha obligation o valor
unicamente debido a su origen; o
(ii) si la unica base jurisdictional de dicho impuesto es el
lugar o la moneda en que se emite, se hace pagadero o
se paga, o la ubicacion de cualquier oficina o agencia
mantenida por el Fondo.
10. Aplicacion del Articulo.
Cada participante adoptara las medidas necesarias en sus propios territorios con el fin de hacer efectivos en terminos de sus
propias leyes los principios establecidos en este Articulo, e informara al Fondo detalladamente sobre las medidas que haya adoptado.
S e c c io n

(P . 2 4 )

Articulo X
Relaciones con Otros Organismos Internacionales

El Fondo, dentro de los terminos de este Acuerdo, cooperara
con cualquier organismo internacional general y con cualesquier
organismos publicos internacionales que tengan responsabilidades
especializadas en campos conexos. Cualesquier arreglos para
efectuar dicha cooperation que impliquen modification de cualquier
disposition de este Acuerdo solo podran efectuarse despues que
se enmiende este Acuerdo de conformidad con el Articulo XVII.




APPEN DIX I

1347

Articulo XI
Relaciones con Paises no Participantes
1.
Compromisos respecto a relaciones con paises no
participantes

S e c c io n

Cada participante se compromete:
(i) A no entrar en transacciones de ninguna clase, ni permitir
que ninguno de sus organismos fiscales mencionados en la
Seccion 1 del Articulo V entre en ellas, con ningun no
participante, ni con personas en territorios de no partici­
pantes, que sean contrarias a las disposiciones de este
Acuerdo o a los fines del Fondo;
(ii) A no cooperar con ningun no participante ni con personas
en los territorios de no participantes en practicas que
sean contrarias a las disposiciones de este Acuerdo o a
los fines del Fondo; y
(iii) A cooperar con el Fondo con el fin de que se apliquen en
sus territorios medidas apropiadas para impedir transac­
ciones con no participantes o con personas en territorios
de estos que sean contrarias a las disposiciones de este
Acuerdo o a los fines del Fondo.
2.
Restricciones en las transacciones con paises no
participantes
Nada en este Acuerdo afectara el derecho de ningun partici­
pante a imponer restricciones en las transacciones sobre cambio
con no participantes (p. 25) o con personas en los territorios de
los mismos a menos que el Fondo halle que dichas restricciones
perjudican los intereses de los participantes y son contrarias a
los fines del Fondo.
Articulo XII
S e c c io n

Organizacion y Administracion
1. Estructura del Fondo
El Fondo tendra una Junta de Gobernadores, Directores Ejecutivos, un Director Administrador y el personal correspondiente.
S e c c io n

2. La Junta de Gobernadores
(a)
Todos los poderes del Fondo se confiaran en la Junta de
Gobernadores, compuesta de un gobemador y un suplente nombrados por cada participante en la forma que este determine. Los
gobernadores y los suplentes desempenaran su cargo durante
cinco anos, sujetos a la voluntad del participante que los nombre,
y podran ser nombrados de nuevo. Los suplentes solo votaran en
S e c c io n

795841— 48— 16




1348

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

la ausencia de sus respectivos gobemadores. La Junta seleccionara
como presidente a uno de los gobemadores.
(b) La Junta de Gobernadores podra delegar en los Directores
Ejecutivos la autoridad para ejercer cualesquier funciones de la
Junta, excepto la de:
(i) Admitir nuevos participantes y determinar las condiciones
en que hayan de admitirse.
(ii) Aprobar una revision de cuotas.
(iii) Aprobar un cambio uniforme en el valor a la par de la
moneda de todos los participantes.
(iv) Hacer arreglos para cooperar con otros organismos in­
ternacionales (excepto arreglos no oficiales de caracter
temporal o administrativo).
(v) Determinar la distribution de los ingresos netos del
Fondo.
(P . 2 6 )

(vi) Exigir a un participante que se retira del Fondo.
(vii) Decidir la liquidation del Fondo.
(viii) Decidir apelaciones en casos de interpretaciones de este
Acuerdo hechas por los Directores Ejecutivos.
(c) La Junta de Gobernadores celebrara una reunion anual y
tantas otras reuniones como disponga la Junta o convoquen los
Directores Ejecutivos. Los Directores Ejecutivos convocaran a la
Junta a reunion siempre que lo pidan cinco participantes o los
participantes que tengan la cuarta parte de la totalidad de los
votos.
(d) Constituira el quorum en cualquier reunion de la Junta
de Gobernadores una mayoria de los gobernadores que tengan no
menos de dos terceras partes de la totalidad de los votos.
(e) Cada gobemador tendra derecho a emitir el numero de
votos que se le asignan en la Seccion 5 de este Articulo al
participante que le nombre.
(f) La Junta de Gobernadores podra establecer, por reglamento, un metodo mediante el cual los Directores Ejecutivos,
cuando en su opinion esta action convenga al Fondo, puedan
obtener el voto de los gobernadores sobre cualquier asunto determinado sin convocar a una reunion de la Junta.
(g) La Junta de Gobernadores, y los Directores Ejecutivos
hasta el limite en que esten autorizados, podran adoptar los reglamentos necesarios o adecuados para conducir los negocios del
Fondo.
(h) Los gobemadores y los suplentes desempenaran su cargo




AP PE N DIX I

1349

sin compensation del Fondo, pero este les reembolsara por los
gastos razonables en que incurran para asistir a las reuniones.
(i) La Junta de Gobernadores determinara la remuneration
que deba pagarse a los Directores Ejecutivos y el salario y los
terminos del contrato de servicios del Director Administrador.
(P . 2 7 )

Los Directores Ejecutivos.
(a) Los Directores Ejecutivos seran responsables de la direc­
tion de las operaciones generales del Fondo, y a ese efecto
ejerceran todos los poderes que en ellos delegue la Junta de
Gobernadores.
(b) Habra no menos de 12 directores, que no tienen que ser
gobernadores, de los cuales
(i) cinco seran nombrados por los cinco participantes que
tengan las cuotas mayores;
(ii) no mas de dos seran nombrados cuando sean aplicables
las disposiciones del parrafo (c) que sigue;
(iii) cinco los elegiran los participantes que no tengan derecho
a nombrar directores, con exclusion de las Republicas
americanas; y
(iv) dos los elegiran las Republicas americanas que no tengan
derecho a nombrar directores.
Para los efectos de este parrafo participantes significa los gobiernos de aquellos paises cuyos nombres aparecen en el Cuadro A, ya
adquieran su calidad de participantes de acuerdo con el Articulo
X X o de acuerdo con la Seccion 2 del Articulo II. Cuando los
gobiernos de otros paises adquieran calidad de participantes, la
Junta de Gobernadores podra aumentar el numero de directores
que hayan de elegirse por mayoria de cuatro quintas partes de
la totalidad de los votos.
(c) Si en la segunda election regular de directores, y en
adelante, los participantes con derecho a nombrar directores de
acuerdo con el parrafo (b) (i) anterior no incluyen a los dos
participantes de cuyas monedas las disponibilidades del Fondo
se hayan reducido como promedio por los dos anos precedentes
mas alia de sus cuotas en las mayores cantidades absolutas en
terminos de oro como comun denominador, ambos participantes o
cualquiera de ellos, segun sea el caso, tendran derecho a nombrar
un director. Cuando la Junta de Gobernadores aumente el numero
de directores que hayan de elegirse de acuerdo con el parrafo (b)
anterior, dictara reglamentos mediante los cuales se efectuaran
los cambios necesarios en la proportion de votos que se requiere
para elegir directores segun las disposiciones del Cuadro C.
S eccio n 3.




1350

M O N E T AR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(d) Sujeto a la Seccion 3(b) del Articulo X X , las elecciones
de los directores electivos se conduciran a intervalos de dos anos
de acuerdo con las disposiciones del Cuadro C completadas con
cualesquier reglamentos que el Fondo juzgue apropiados.
(e) iCada director nombrara un suplente que tendra plenos
poderes para actuar en su nombre durante su ausencia. Cuando
esten presentes los directores que los hayan nombrado, sus
suplentes podran participar en las reuniones, pero no votaran.
(p. 28) (f) Los directores seguiran desempenando su cargo
hasta que se nombren o se elijan sus sucesores. Si vaca el puesto
de un director electo mas de 90 dlas antes de la expiration de
su termino, los participantes que eligieron al director anterior
elegiran otro director por el resto del termino. Se necesitara una
mayoria de los votos emitidos para elegirle. Mientras este vacante
el puesto, el suplente del director anterior ejercera sus funciones,
excepto la de nombrar un suplente.
(g) Los Directores Ejecutivos ejecutaran sus funciones en
sesion continua en la oficina principal del Fondo, y se reuniran
tan a menudo como lo requieran los negocios del Fondo.
(h) Constituira el quorum en cualquier reunion de los Direc­
tores Ejecutivos una mayoria de los directores que represente no
menos de la mitad de los votos.
(i) Cada uno de los directores nombrados tendra derecho a
emitir el numero de votos asignados en la Seccion 5 de este
Articulo al participante que le nombre. Cada director electo
tendra derecho a emitir el numero de votos que recibio al ser
electo. Cuando sean aplicables las disposiciones de la Seccion 5(b)
de este Articulo, los votos que de otro modo tendrla derecho un
director a emitir se aumentaran o disminuiran como corresponda.
Cada director emitira como una unidad todos los votos que tenga
derecho a emitir.
(j) La Junta de Gobernadores adoptara reglamentos segun los
cuales un participante que no tenga derecho a nombrar un direc­
tor de acuerdo con el parrafo (b) anterior pueda enviar un
representante que asista a cualquier reunion de los Directores
Ejecutivos erl que se considere una solicitud hecha por dicho
participante o una cuestion que le afecte en particular.
(p. 29) (k) Los Directores Ejecutivos podran nombrar los
comites que consideren convenientes. La participation en dichos
comites no se limitara a los gobernadores y los directores o sus
suplentes.




APPENDIX I

1351

El Director Administrador y el personal.
(a) Los Directores Ejecutivos seleccionaran un Director Ad­
ministrador que no sera ni gobernador ni director ejecutivo. El
Director Administrador sera presidente de los Directores Ejecu­
tivos, pero no tendra voto excepto para decidir la votacion en caso
de empate. Podra participar en las reuniones de la Junta de
Gobernadores, pero no votara en ellas. El Director Administrador
cesara en sus funciones cuando as! lo decidan los Directores
Ejecutivos.
(b) El Director Administrador sera jefe del personal del
Fondo y, bajo la direction de los Directores Ejecutivos, conducira los negocios ordinarios del Fondo. Sujeto al control general
de los Directores Ejecutivos, sera responsable de la organization,
el nombramiento y la suspension del personal del Fondo.
(c) En el desempeno de sus funciones el Director Administra­
dor y el personal del Fondo deberan acatamiento al Fondo enteramente y no a ninguna otra autoridad. Los participantes en el
Fondo respetaran el caracter internacional de esta obligation y
se abstendran de cualquier intento de influir sobre cualquier
miembro del personal en el desempeno de sus deberes.
(d) Al nombrar el personal el Director Administrador, sujeto
a la importancia suprema de obtener el mas alto nivel de eficiencia y de competencia tecnica, prestara la debida atencion a la
importancia de seleccionar personal a base de la mayor extension
geografica posible.
(p. 30)
S e c c i o n 5. Las votaciones
(a) Cada participante tendra 250 votos mas un voto adicional
por cada parte de su cuota equivalente a 100 mil dolares de los
Estados Unidos, del peso y ley en vigencia el l ero de julio de
1944.
(b) Siempre que se requiera un voto de conformidad con las
Secciones 4 o 5 del Articulo V, cada participante tendra el
numero de votos a que tiene derecho de acuerdo con el parrafo (a)
anterior, ajustado de la manera siguiente:
SECCION 4.

(i) mediante la adicion de un voto por el equivalente de cada
400 mil dolares de los Estados Unidos de las ventas netas
de su moneda hasta la fecha en que se efectue la votacion,
o
(ii) mediante la substraccion de un voto por el equivalente
de cada 400 mil dolares de los Estados Unidos de sus
compras netas de monedas de otros paises participantes
hasta la fecha en que se efectue la votacion,




1352

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

disponiendose, que en ningun momento se considerara que las
compras netas o las ventas netas exceden de una cantidad igual a
la cuota del participante interesado.
(c) A los efectos de todos los calculos en esta Seccion, se
considerara que los dolares de los Estados Unidos son del peso
y la ley vigentes el l ero de julio de 1944, ajustados segun cualquier
cambio uniforme que se efectue conforme a la Seccion 7 del
Articulo IV, si se hace una renuncia conforme a la Seccion 8 (d)
de dicho Articulo.
(d) Salvo lo que se provee en contrario de manera especifica,
todas las decisiones del Fondo se haran por mayoria de los votos
emitidos.
(p. 31)
S e c cio n 6. Distribution de los ingresos netos.
(a) La Junta de Gobernadores determinara anualmente la
porte de los ingresos netos del Fondo que deba colocarse en
reserva y la parte, si la hubiere, que deba distribuirse.
(b) Si se hace una distribution cualquiera, se distribuira
primero entre los participantes un pago de 2 por ciento no
cumulativo de la cantidad por la cual durante el ano el 75 por
ciento de su cuota haya excedido del promedio de las disponibili­
dades del Fondo en su moneda. El balance se les pagara a todos
los participantes en proportion a su cuota. Los pagos se haran
a cada participante en su propia moneda.
S e c ci 6 n 7.

Publication de informes.
(a) El Fondo publicara un informe anual que contenga un
estado de cuenta revisado, y a intervalos de tres meses o menos
publicara un informe breve de sus transacciones y de sus disponi­
bilidades en oro ye en moneda de los participantes.
(b) El Fondo publicara cualesquiera otros informes que juzgue
deseables para realizar sus fines.
Comunicacion con los participantes.
El Fondo tendra derecho en todo momento a comunicar su
opinion a cualquier participante, de manera no oficial, respecto a
cualquier asunto que surja segun este Acuerdo. Si lo aprueba una
mayoria de dos terceras partes de la totalidad de los votos, el
Fondo podra decidirse a publicar un informe dirigido a un par­
ticipante respecto a las condiciones monetarias o economicas, y a
sucesos que tiendan directamente a producir dislocaciones graves
en la balanza de pago internacional de los participantes. Si el
participante no tiene derecho a nombrar un director ejecutivo,
tendra derecho a representation de acuerdo con la Seccion 3 (j )
de este Articulo. El Fondo no publicara informes que impliquen
S e c cio n 8.




APPE N D IX I

1353

cambios en la estructura fundamental de la organizacion econo­
mica de los participantes.
(P. 32)
Articulo XIII
Oficinas y Depositarios

Ubicacion de las oficinas.
La oficina principal del Fondo estara en el territorio del parti­
cipante que tenga la cuota mayor, y podran establecerse agencias o
sucursales en los territorios de otros participantes.
S eccion 1.

SECCI6N 2.

Depositarios.
(a) Cada pals participante designara a su banco central como
depositario de todas las disponibilidades del Fondo en moneda
suya, y si no tiene banco central designara a cualquiera otra
institution que sea grata al Fondo.
(b) El Fondo podra mantener otros bienes, incluso oro, en los
depositarios que designen los cinco participantes que tengan las
cuotas mayores y en otros depositarios designados que seleccione
el Fondo. Al principio, por lo menos la mitad de las disponibili­
dades del Fondo se mantendran en el depositario designado por
el participante en cuyos territorios tenga el Fondo su oficina
principal, y por lo menos 40 por ciento se mantendran en los
depositarios que designen los otros cuatro participantes antes
mencionados. Sin embargo, todas las transferencias de oro que
haga el Fondo se haran con la debida consideration a los gastos
de transporte y los posibles requisites del Fondo. En caso de
emergencia los Directores Ejecutivos podran transferir todas las
disponibilidades de oro del Fondo o cualquier parte de las mismas
a cualquier lugar donde puedan estar protegidas de manera
adecuada.
S ecci 6 n 3.

Garantia de los bienes del Fondo.
Cada participante garantiza todos los bienes del Fondo contra
perdidas que resulten de quiebras o desfalcos de parte del deposi­
tario designado por dicho participante.
(P. 33)
Articulo XIV
Periodo de Transicion

Introduction.
El Fondo no tiene por objeto pro veer facilidades de auxilio o
reconstruction ni ocuparse en deudas internacionales originadas
por la guerra.
S ecci 6 n 1.




1354

M O N E TAR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

S ec ci 6 n 2.

Restricciones sobre el cambio.
En el perlodo de transition de la postguerra los participantes,
no obstante las disposiciones de cualesquiera otros articulos de
este Acuerdo, podran mantener y adaptar a circunstancias var­
iables (y en el caso de participantes cuyos territorios hayan sido
ocupados por el enemigo, introducirlas donde sea necesario
(restricciones en pagos y transferencias por transacciones inter­
nacionales corrientes. Sin embargo, en su. polltica sobre el cambio
extranjero los participantes tendran siempre presentes los fines
del Fondo, y tan pronto como lo permitan las condiciones, adoptaran cuantas medidas sean posibles para desarrollar con otros
participantes arreglos comerciales y financieros que faciliten los
pagos internacionales y el mantenimiento de la estabilidad de los
cambios. En particular los participantes eliminaran las restric­
ciones mantenidas o impuestas segun esta Seccion tan pronto
como tengan la certeza de que, eliminando dichas restricciones,
podran liquidar su balanza de pago en forma que no les impida
indebidamente el hacer uso de los recursos del Fondo.
S e c c io n 3.

Notification al Fondo.
Cada participante notificara al Fondo, antes de llegar a tener
derecho a comprar moneda del Fondo de acuerdo con las Secciones
4 (c ) o (d) del Articulo X X , si tiene intenciones de valerse de los
arreglos transitorios de la Seccion 2 de este Articulo, o si esta
preparado para aceptar las obligaciones de las Secciones 2, 3 y 4
del Articulo VIII. Tan pronto como un participante que se valga
de los arreglos transitorios (p. 34) este preparado para aceptar
las obligaciones antedichas se lo notificara al Fondo.
S e c cio n 4.

A ction del Fondo respecto a restricciones.
A mas tardar tres anos despues de la fecha en que el Fondo
empiece sus operaciones, y cada ano subsiguiente, el Fondo informara sobre las restricciones que aun esten en vigor de acuerdo
con la Seccion 2 de este Articulo. Cinco anos despues de la fecha
en que el Fondo empiece sus operaciones, ye en cada ano sub­
siguiente, cualquier participante que aun mantenga cualesquiera
restricciones incompatibles con las Secciones 2, 3 o 4 del Articulo
VIII consultara con el Fondo respecto a mantenerlas por mas
tiempo. Si el Fondo juzga necesaria dicha action, podra en cir­
cunstancias excepcionales hacer representaciones a cualquier par­
ticipante al efecto de que las condiciones son favorables para la
elimination de cualquier restriction determinada o para abandonar
todas las restricciones que sean incompatibles con las disposi­
ciones de cualesguiera otros articulos de este Acuerdo. Se dara al
participante un plazo adecuado para contestar a dicha represen-




APPE N D IX I

1355

tacion. Si el Fondo descubre que el participante persiste en
mantener restricciones incompatibles con los fines del Fondo,
dicho participante estara sujeto a la Seccion 2 (a) del Articulo
XV.
SECCION 5. Naturaleza del periodo de transition.

En sus relaciones con los participantes el Fondo reconocera que
el periodo de transition de la postguerra sera uno de cambios y
ajustes, y en sus decisiones sobre solicitudes ocasionadas por los
mismos que presente cualquier participante, decidira a favor de
dicho participante en caso de cualquier duda razonable.
Articulo XV
Separation de los Participantes

Derecho de los participantes a retirarse.
Cualquier participante podra retirarse del Fondo en cualquier
(p. 35) momento si transmite una notification escrita al Fondo
en su ofieina principal. La separation sera efectiva en la fecha
en que se reciba dicha notification.

S ec cio n 1.

Separation obligatoria.
(a) Si un participante dejare de cumplir cualquiera de sus
obligaciones incurridas de conformidad con este Acuerdo, el
Fondo podra retirarle el derecho a usar los recursos del Fondo.
No se interpretara nada en esta Seccion en el sentido de que
limita las disposiciones de la Seccion 6 del Articulo IV, de la
Seccion 5 del Articulo V, o de la Seccion 1 del Articulo VI.
(b) Si despues de la expiration de un perlodo razonable el
participante persiste en no cumplir con cualquiera de las obliga­
ciones contraldas en este Acuerdo, o continua una diferencia
entre el participante y el Fondo segun la Seccion 6 del Articulo
IV, podra exigirse a dicho participante que se retire del Fondo
por decision de la Junta de Gobernadores autorizada por la
mayorla de los gobernadores que representen una mayorla del
total de los votos.
(c) Se adoptaran reglas que garanticen que antes que se tomen
medidas contra cualquier participante de acuerdo con los parrafos
(a) y (b) anteriores se notificara al participante con anticipa­
tion razonable de la queja que contra el hubiere, y se le dara
oportunidad adecuada para exponer su caso, tanto oralmente
como por escrito.
S ec cio n 2.

Liquidation de cuentas con participantes que se
retiren.
Cuando un participante se retire del Fondo cesaran las transac-

S eccio n 3.




1356

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

ciones normales del Fondo en la moneda de dicho participante, y
se hara una liquidation de todas las cuentas entre el y el Fondo
con la prontitud posible, mediante arreglos entre el participante
y el Fondo. Si no se llega a un arreglo prontamente, las dispo­
siciones del Cuadro D seran aplicables a la liquidation de las
cuentas.
(p. 36)
Articulo XVI
Disposiciones de Emergencia

Suspension temporal.
(a) En caso de emergencia o del desarrollo de circunstancias
imprevistas que amenacen las operaciones del Fondo los Direc­
tores Ejecutivos, por votacion unanime, podran suspender por un
periodo de no mas de 120 dlas las operaciones de cualquiera de
las disposiciones siguientes:

S e c c io n 1.

(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)

Las Secciones 3 y 4 (b ) del Articulo IV
Las Secciones 2, 3, 7, y 8 (a) y ( f ) del Articulo V
La Seccion 2 del Articulo VI
La Seccion 1 del Articulo X I

(b) Simultaneamente con cualquier decision de suspender las
operaciones de cualquiera de las disposiciones anteriores, los Di­
rectores Ejecutivos convocaran una reuni6n de la Junta de Go­
bernadores para la fecha mas proxima posible.
(c) Los Directores Ejecutivos no podran prolongar ninguna
suspension mas alia de 120 dlas. Sin embargo, dicha suspension
podra prolongarse por un periodo adicional de no mas de 240 dlas
si la Junta de Gobernadores as! lo decide por una mayoria de
4 /5 partes de la totalidad de los votos, pero no podra prolongarse
mas excepto por enmienda a este Acuerdo de conformidad con el
Articulo XVII.
(d) Los Directores Ejecutivos, por una mayoria de la totalidad
de los votos, podran terminar dicha suspension en cualquier
momento.
Liquidation del Fondo.
(a)
No podra liquidarse el Fondo excepto por decision de la
Junta de Gobernadores. En caso de emergencia, si los Directores
Ejecutivos deciden que es necesaria la liquidation del Fondo,
podran suspender todas las transacciones temporalmente en lo que
la Junta decide.
(p. 37) (b) Si la Junta de Gobernadores decide liquidar el
Fondo, este cesara inmediatamente de participar en toda clase de
S ec cio n 2.




A PPEN D IX I

1357

actividades excepto las incidentales al cobro y la liquidation
metodicos de sus bienes y a la liquidation de sus responsabilidades, y cesaran todas las obligaciones de los participantes de
conformidad con este Acuerdo excepto las que se detallan en este
Articulo, en el parrafo 7 del Cuadro D, y en el parrafo (c) del
Articulo XVIII.
(c) La liquidation se administrara de conformidad con las
disposiciones del Cuadro E.
Articulo XVII
Enmiendas

(a) Cualquier propuesta para introducir modificaciones a este
Acuerdo, ya emane de un participante, de un gobernador o de los
Directores Ejecutivos, se comunicara al presidente de la Junta de
Gobernadores, quien presentara la propuesta ante la Junta. Si la
Junta aprueba la enmienda propuesta, el Fondo preguntara a
todos los participantes, por carta circular o telegrama, si aceptan
la enmienda propuesta. Cuando tres quintas partes de los par­
ticipantes, cuyos votos sumen cuatro quintas partes de la totalidad
de votos, hayan aceptado la enmienda propuesta, el Fondo certificara el hecho mediante una comunicacion oficial dirigida a
todos los participantes.
(b) No obstante el parrafo (a) anterior, sera necesaria la
aceptacion de todos los participantes en caso de cualquier en­
mienda que modifique
(i) el derecho a retirarse del Fondo (Seccion 1 del Articulo
X V );
(ii) la disposition de que no se efectuara cambio alguno en la
cuota de un participante sin su consentimiento (Seccion 2
del Articulo I I I ) ; y
(P. 38)
(iii) la disposition de que no se hara cambio alguno en el
valor a la par de la moneda de un participante excepto
a solicitud de dicho participante (Seccion 5 (b ) del A r­
ticulo IV ).
(c) Las enmiendas entraran en vigor para todos los partici­
pantes tres meses despues de la fecha de la comunicacion oficial
a menos que en la carta circular o el telegrama se estipule un
perlodo mas corto.
Articulo XVIII
Interpretation

(a) Cualquier cuestion de interpretation de las disposiciones




1358

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

de este Acuerdo que surja entre cualquier participante y el Fondo
o entre cualesquier participantes en el Fondo se sometera a la
decision de los Directores Ejecutivos. Si la cuestion afecta en
particular a un participante que no tenga derecho a nombrar un
director ejecutivo, este tendra derecho a representation de acuer­
do con la Seccion 3 (j) del Articulo XII.
(b) En cualquier caso en que los Directores Ejecutivos hayan
dado una decision de acuerdo con el parrafo (a) antedicho, cual­
quier participante podra exigir que la cuestion se someta a la
Junta de Gobemadores, cuya decision sera final. Mientras la
Junta de Gobernadores resuelve el caso a ella referido, el Fondo
podra actuar, hasta donde lo juzgue necesario, basandose en la
decision de los Directores Ejecutivos.
(c) Siempre que surja algun desacuerdo entre el Fondo y un
pais que haya dejado de ser participante, o entre el Fondo y
cualquier participante durante la liquidation del Fondo, el de­
sacuerdo se sometera al arbitraje de un tribunal compuesto de
tres arbitros, uno nombrado por el Fondo, otro por el participante
o el participante que se retira, y un tercero en discordia que, a
menos que las partes acuerden lo contrario, sera nombrado por el
presidente del Tribunal Permanente de Justicia Internacional o
cualquiera otra autoridad que prescriban los reglamentos adoptados por el Fondo. El tercero en discordia tendra plenos poderes
para resolver todas las cuestiones de procedimiento en cualquier
caso en que las partes esten en desacuerdo respecto a las mismas.
(P. 39)
Articulo XIX
Explication de los Terminos

Al interpretar las disposiciones de este Acuerdo el Fondo y sus
participantes se guiaran por lo siguiente:
(a) Reservas monetarias de un participante significa sus dis­
ponibilidades netas oficiales en oro, monedas convertibles de otros
participantes, y monedas de equellos no participantes que el Fondo
especifique.
(b) Disponibilidades oficiales de un participante significa dis­
ponibilidades centrales (es decir, las disponibilidades de su tesorerla, su banco central, Su fondo de estabilizacion u otro organismo
fiscal similar).
(c) En cualquier caso particular el Fondo, previa consulta con
el participante, podra considerar las disponibilidades de otras
instituciones oficiales u otros bancos dentro de sus territorios,
disponibilidades oficiales hasta el punto en que excedan substan-




APPE N D IX I

1359

cialmente de los balances efectivos; disponiendose, que a los
efectos de determinar si en un caso particular las disponibili­
dades exceden de los balances efectivos, se deduciran de dichas
disponibilidades las cantidades de moneda que se adeuden a otras
instituciones oficiales y a otros bancos en los territorios de otros
palses.
(d) Disponibilidades de un participante en monedas convert­
ibles significa sus disponibilidades en monedas de otros partici­
pantes que no esten valiendose de los arreglos transitorios con­
forme al Articulo XIV, mas sus disponibilidades en monedas de
aquellos no participantes que el Fondo especifique de tiempo en
tiempo. A estos efectos el termina moneda incluye sin limitation
monedas, papel moneda, balances en banco, aceptaciones bancarias y obligaciones gubernamentales emitidas con un vencimiento que no exceda de 12 meses.
(e) Las reservas monetayias de un participante se calcularan
deduciendo de dichas disponibilidades centrales el pasivo en
moneda en (p. 40) Tesorerlas, bancos centrales, fondos de estabilizacion u otros organismos fiscales similares de otros partici­
pantes o no participantes especificados en el parrafo (d) anterior,
junto con pasivos similares en otras instituciones oficiales y en
otros bancos en los territorios de participantes. A estas disponi­
bilidades netas se anadiran las surnas que se consideren disponi­
bilidades oficiales de otras instituciones oficiales y de otros bancos
conforme al parrafo (c) anterior.
(f) Las disponibilidades del Fondo en moneda de un partici­
pante incluiran cualesquier valores que el Fondo acepte con­
forme a la Seccion 5 del Articulo III.
(g) A los efectos de calcular las reservas monetarias, el Fondo,
previa consulta con un participante que este valiendose de los
arreglos transitorios de la Seccion 2 del Articulo XIV, podra
considerar las disponibilidades en la moneda de dicho partici­
pante que conlleve derechos estipulados de conversion a otra
moneda o a oro, disponibilidades de moneda convertible.
(h) A los efectos de calcular subscripciones en oro conforme a
las Secciones 8 y 4 del Articulo III, las disponibilidades netas
oficiales de un participante en oro y en dolares de los Estados
Unidos consistiran en sus disponibilidades oficiales en oro y en
moneda de los Estados Unidos despues de deducir las disponi­
bilidades centrales de su moneda en otros palses y las disponi­
bilidades de su moneda en otras instituciones oficiales y otros
bancos, si dichas disponibilidades conllevan derechos estipulados
de conversion a oro o a moneda de los Estados Unidos.




1360

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

(i)
Pagos por transacciones corrientes significa pagos que no
se hacen con el fin de transferir capital, y estos incluyen, sin limi­
tation :
(1) Todos los pagos que se adeuden en relation con el comercio
exterior, otros negocios corrientes, incluso servicio, y
facilidades normales bancarias y de credito a corto plazo;
(p. 41)
(2) Pagos que se adeuden como intereses sobre prestamos y
como ingresos netos por otras inversiones;
(3) Pagos en cantidad moderada por amortization de presta­
mos o por depreciation de inversiones directas;
(4) Remesas moderadas para gastos de subsistencia de familias.
El Fondo, previa consulta con los participantes interesados, podra
determinar si han de considerarse ciertas transacciones especificas
como transacciones corrientes o transacciones de capital
Articulo XX
Disposiciones Finales
S e c c io n 1.

Vigencia.
Este Acuerdo entrara en vigor cuando haya sido subscrito a
nombre de gobiernos que tengan 65 por ciento del total de las
cuotas estipuladas en el Cuadro A y cuando los instrumentos a
que se refiere la Seccion 2 (a ) de este Articulo se hayan depositado en su nombre, pero en ningun caso entrara en vigor este
Acuerdo antes del 1° de mayo de 1945.
Firrna del Acuerdo.
(a)
Cada gobierno a cuyo nombre se firme el presente Acuerdo,
depositara con el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America un
instrumento en el que declare que ha aceptado este Acuerdo
conforme a sus proias leyes y que ha tornado todas las medidas
necesarias que le permitiran cumplir con todas las obligaciones
contraldas de acuerdo con las disposiciones del mismo.
(p. 42) (b) Cada gobierno sera participante en el Fondo a
partir de la fecha en que se haga, a nombre suyo, el deposito del
instrumento mencionado en el parrafo (a) anterior, mas ningun
gobierno podra tener tal calidad de participante antes que el
presente Acuerdo entre en vigor de conformidad con la Seccion 1
de este Articulo.
(c)
El Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America notificara
a los gobiernos de todos los paises cuyos nombres aparecen
en el Cuadro A, y a todos los gobiernos cuyo ingreso en calidad
S e c c io n 2.




A PPE N D IX I

1361

de miembro haya sido aprobado de acuerdo con la Seccion 2 del
Articulo II, respecto a todos los casos en que se subscriba el pre­
sente Acuerdo y al deposito de todos los instrumentos mencionados en el parrafo (a) anterior.
(d)
En la ocasion en que se firme este Acuerdo a nombre
de cada gobierno, este remitira al Gobierno de los Estados Unidos
de America la centesima parte del uno por ciento de su subscrip­
tion total, en oro o en dolares de los Estados Unidos de America,
para sufragar los gastos administrativos del Fondo. El Gobierno
de los Estados Unidos de America conservara dichos fondos en
cuenta especial de deposito, y los trasladara a la Junta de Gobernadores del Fondo una vez que se convoque a la primera reunion
segun lo dispone la Seccion 3 del presente Articulo. Si este
Acuerdo no hubiere entrado en vigor para el 31 de diciembre de
1945, el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America devolvera
los fondos de referencia a los gobiernos que los hubieren remitido.
(p. 43) (e) El presente Acuerdo estara en Washington, abierto
a la firma de los gobiernos de los paises mencionados en el Cuadro
A, hasta el 31 de diciembre de 1945.
(f) Con posterioridad al 31 de diciembre de 1945, el presente
Acuerdo quedara abierto a la firma del gobierno de cualquier pals
cuyo ingreso, en calidad de participante, haya sido aprobado
conforme a la Seccion 2 del Articulo II.
( g ) A l su bscribir el presente A cu erdo, todos los gobiernos lo
aceptan tanto a nom bre p rop io com o en lo que respecta a todas
sus colonias, territorios de Ultramar, territorios b a jo su p rotectorado, soberanla o autoridad, y todos los territorios sobre los
cuales ejercen mandato.

(h) En los casos de gobiernos cuyos territorios metropolitanos estuvieren ocupados por el enemigo, el deposito del instrumento a que se hace referencia en el parrafo (a) de esta Seccion
podra retrasarse hasta un plazo de ciento ochenta dlas contados a
partir de la fecha en que tales territorios fueren liberados. Si,
en cambio, no fuere depositado por cualquiera de dichos gobiernos
antes de veneer el plazo de referencia, la firma que se hubiere
puesto a nombre del respectivo gobierno sera nula, y la parte de la
subscription que hubiere pagado conforme al parrafo (d) antes,
citado le sera devuelta.
(i) Los parrafos (d) y (h) entraran en vigor con respecto
a cada gobierno signatario a partir de la fecha en que firme el
Acuerdo.
Inauguration del Fondo.
(a) Inmediatamente despues de entrar en vigor el presente

S eccio n 3.




1362

M O N E TAR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Acuerdo conforme a la Seccion 1 de este Articulo, cada partici­
pante designara un gobernador, y el pals participante que hubiere
contribuldo la cuota mas alta convocara a la primera reunion
de la Junta de Gobernadores.
(b) En la primera reunion de la Junta de Gobernadores se.
haran arreglos para la designation de directores ejecutivos provisionales. (p. 44) Los gobiernos de los cinco paises que deban
aportar las cuotas mas elevadas de acuerdo con el Cuadro A,
nombraran directores ejecutivos interinos. Si uno o mas de dichos
gobiernos no hubieren ingresado en calidad de participantes, los
cargos de directores ejecutivos que les corresponda llenar permaneceran vacantes hasta la fecha de su ingreso, o hasta el 1°
de enero de 1946, la que sea anterior. Se elegiran siete directores
ejecutivos provisionales de acuerdo con las disposiciones del
Cuadro B y estos desempenaran sus deberes hasta que se celebre
la primera election regular de directores ejecutivos, la cual
tendra lugar lo antes posible a contar del 1° de enero de 1946.
(c) La Junta de Gobernadores podra delegar a los directores
ejecutivos provisionales cualesquiera poderes, excepto aquellos
que no deban delegarse a los Directores Ejecutivos en propiedad.
Determination initial del valor a la par.
(a)
Cuando el Fondo sea de opinion que dentro de breve
perlodo de tiempo estara en condiciones de iniciar transacciones
en cambio sobre el exterior, lo comunicara a los participantes y
solicitara de cada uno de estos que le comunique el valor a la par
de su moneda, basado en los tipos de cambio que se coticen
sesenta dlas antes de entrar en vigor el presente Acuerdo. A
ningun participante cuyo territorio metropolitano este ocupado
por el enemigo se le exigira que envle dicha comunicacion mientras el territorio de referencia sea teatro de hostilidades en
grande escala, o por el perlodo posterior que determine el Fondo.
Las disposiciones del parrafo (d) de esta Seccion se aplicaran
cuando dicho participante comunique el valor a la par de su
moneda.
(p. 45) (b) El valor a la par que comunique un participante
cuyo territorio metropolitano no ha sido ocupado por el enemigo
sera el valor a la par de la moneda de dicho participante a los
fines de este Acuerdo, a menos que dentro de los noventa dlas
despues de recibida la solicitud a que se refiere el parrafo (a) de
esta Seccion, (i) el participante notifique al Fondo que considera
que el valor a la par no es satisfactorio, o (ii) el Fondo notifique
al participante que, en su opinion, el valor a la par no puede
mantenerse sin que necesiten dicho participante u otros particiS e c cio n 4.




APPEND IX I

1363

pantes recurrir al Fondo en forma tal que resulte perjudicial al
Fondo y a los participantes. Cuando se notifique de conformidad
con los incisos (i) o (ii) precedentes, tanto el Fondo como el
participante deberan, dentro de un plazo que determinara el
Fondo a tenor con todas las circunstancias que fueren pertinentes,
acordar un valor a la par que sea apropiado para dicha moneda.
Si el Fondo y el participante no llegaren a un acuerdo dentro del
plazo estipulado, el participante se tendra por retirado del Banco
a partir de la fecha en que expire dicho plazo.
(c) Cuando se haya establecido el valor a la par de la moneda
de un participante conforme al parrafo (b) anterior, bien porque
haya expirado el plazo de noventa dlas sin que haya habido
notification, bien por acuerdo despues de la notification, el par­
ticipante podra comprar del Fondo las monedas de otros par­
ticipantes hasta la cantidad maxima que permita este Acuerdo,
siempre que el Fondo haya empezado a hacer transacciones de
cambio.
(d) En el caso de un participante cuyo territorio metropolitano
haya sido ocupado por el enemigo, se aplicaran las disposiciones
del parrafo (b) anterior, sujetas a las modificaciones siguientes:
(i) El perlodo de noventa dlas debera extenderse para que
termine en una fecha que se fijara mediante acuerdo
entre el Fondo y el participante.
(ii) Si el Fondo ha empezado a hacer transacciones de cambio,
el participante podra, dentro del perlodo extendido, com­
prar del Fondo con su moneda las monedas de otros
participantes, pero solo bajo las condiciones y en las
cantidades que prescriba el Fondo.
(P . 4 6 )

(iii) En cualquier tiempo anterior a la fecha fijada de con­
formidad con el inciso (i) anterior, se podran hacer cambios mediante acuerdo con el Fondo en el valor a la par
comunicado de acuerdo con el parrafo (a) de este
Articulo.
(e) Si un participante cuyo territorio metropolitano ha sido
ocupado por el enemigo adopta una nueva unidad monetaria antes
de la fecha que se fije segun el inciso (i) del parrafo (d) de esta
Seccion, el valor a la par fijado por dicho participante para la
nueva unidad se le comunicara al Fondo y se aplicaran las dis­
posiciones del parrafo (d) precedente.
(f) Las modificaciones en los valores a la par acordados con
el Fondo de conformidad con esta Seccion no se tendran en cuenta
795841 — 48— 16




1364

M O N E T A R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

para determinar si una modification propuesta esta comprendida
en los incisos (i), (ii) o (iii) de la Seccion 5 (c) del Articulo IV.
(g) Cuando un participante comunique al Fondo el valor a la
par para la moneda de su territorio metropolitano debera comunicar simultaneamente el valor, en terminos de dicha moneda, para
cada moneda distinta;' cuando estas existan, en los territorios con
respecto a los cuales acepto este Acuerdo de conformidad con la
Seccion 2 (g ) de este Articulo, pero no se le exigira a ningun
participante que haga una comunicacion para la moneda partic­
ular de un territorio que haya estado ocupado por el enemigo en
tanto dicho territorio sea teatro de hostilidades en grande escala,
o por el perlodo adicional que el Fondo determine. A base del
valor a la par comunicado de la manera que se indica, el Fondo
computara el valor a la par de cada moneda distinta. Se entendera
que una comunicacion o notification dirigida al Fondo de con­
formidad con los parrafos (a ), (b) o (d) de esta Seccion, con
respecto al valor a la par de una moneda, es tambien una comuni­
cacion o notification respecto al valor a la par de todas las
distintas monedas mencionadas, a menos que se exprese lo contrario. Sin embargo, cualquier miembro podra dirigir (p. 47) una
comunicacion o notification respecto solamente a la moneda metro­
p o lita n o a cualquiera de las distintas monedas de los territorios.
Si as! lo hace el participante, las disposiciones de los parrafos
precedentes, incluso el parrafo (d ), si ha sido ocupado por el
enemigo un territorio donde exista una moneda distinta, se
aplicaran por separado a cada una de dichas monedas.
(h) El Fondo empezara sus transacciones de cambio en la
fecha que determine despues que los participantes que tengan 65
por ciento del total de las cuotas que se indican en el Cuadro A
hayan llegado a ser elegibles, de acuerdo con los parrafos pre­
cedentes de esta Seccion, para comprar las monedas de otros
participantes, pero en ningun caso hasta tanto terminen las hos­
tilidades principales en Europa.
(i) El Fondo podra posponer transacciones de cambio con un
participante si las circunstancias de las mismas son tales que
en opinion del Fondo ellas conducirlan a usar los recursos del
Fondo en forma contraria a los propositos de este Acuerdo o per ju­
dicial al Fondo o a los participantes.
(j) El valor a la par de las monedas de los gobiernos que indiquen su deseo de ser miembros del Fondo despues del 31 de
diciembre de 1945, se determinara de acuerdo con las disposi­
ciones de la Seccion 2 del Articulo II.
D ado en W ashington, en un origin al que perm anecera deposi-




A PPE N D IX I

1365

tado en los archivos del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de
America, quien transmitira copias certificadas a todos los gobier­
nos cuyos nombres se indican en el Cuadro A, y a todos los gobier­
nos aceptados en calidad de participantes de conformidad con la
Seccion 2 del Articulo II.
(p. 48)
C U A D R O

A

Cuotas
(Participantes, en
orden
alfab&tico
segtin el idioma
ingles)

(En millones de
dolares de los E s­
tados Unidos de
America)

Australia
Belgica
Bolivia
Brasil
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Checoeslovaquia
Dinamarca
Republica Dominicana
Ecuador
Egipto
El Salvador
Etiopia
Francia
Grecia
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
Islandia

200
225
10
150
300
50
550
50
5
50
125
*
5
5
45
2.5
6
450
40
5
5
2.5
1

(Participantes, en
orden
alfabetico
segun el idioma
ingles)

(En millones de
dolares de los E s­
tados Unidos de
America)

400
India
Iran
25
8
Iraq
.5
Liberia
10
Luxemburgo
90
Mexico
275
Holanda
50
Nueva Zelandia
2
Nicaragua
50
Noruega
.5
Panama
2
Paraguay
25
Peru
15
Filipinas
125
Polonia
100
Union Sudafricana
Union de Republicas Socialistas
1200
Sovieticas
1300
Reino Unido
2750
Estados Unidos de America
Uruguay
15
15
Venezuela
60
Yugoeslavia

*E1 Fondo determinard la cuota de Dinamarca despu6s que el Gobierno dan£s
haya declarado que estd dispuesto a subscribir este Acuerdo, pero antes que se
efecttie la firma,

(p. 49)
C U A D R O

B

Disposiciones con respecto a la recompra por un participante
de su propia moneda

1.
Al determinar el grado hasta donde, conforme a la Secci
7 (b) del Articulo V, se hara la recompra al Fondo de la mone
de un participante con cada tipo de reserva monetaria, es de<
con oro y con cada moneda convertible, se aplicara la siguie
regia sujeta al parrafo 2 que sigue:
(a) Si las reservas monetarias del participante no han




1366

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N CIA L CONFERENCE

mentado durante el ano, la cantidad que deba pagarse al
Fondo se distribuira entre todos los tipos de reservas en
proportion a las disponibilidades del participante de los
mismos al fin del ano.
(b) Si las reservas monetarias del participante han aumentado
durante el ano se distribuira, entre los tipos de reservas
que hayan aumentado, una parte de la cantidad que deba
pagarse a;l Fondo igual a la mitad del aumento, en pro­
portion a la cantidad por la que cada uno de ellos haya
aumentado. El resto de la suma que deba pagarse al Fondo
se distribuira entre todos los tipos de reservas en propor­
tion al resto de las disponibilidades de los mismos en poder
del participante.
(c) Si despues de hechas todas las recompras que requiere la
Seccion 7 (b) del Articulo V el resultado excediere de
cualquiera de los llmites especificados en la Seccion 7 (c)
del Articulo V, el Fondo exigira que los participantes
hagan dichas recompras proporcionadamente, en forma tal
que no se excedan los limites.
2. El Fondo no adquirira la moneda de ningun no participante
amparandose en la Seccion 7 (b) y (c) del Articulo V.
3. Al calcular las reservas monetarias y el aumento en las
reservas monetarias durante cualquier ano a los efectos de la
Seccion 7 (b) y (c) del Articulo V, no se tomara en cuenta ningun
aumento en dichas reservas monetarias que se deba a moneda
que, siendo inconvertible anteriormente, se haya hecho convertible
durante el ano, a menos que el participante haya deducido dichas
disponibilidades de otro m odo; o que se deba a disponibilidades
que sean reditos por prestamos a largo plazo o a mediano plazo
contratados durante el ano; o a disponibilidades que hayan sido
transferidas o apartadas para pagar un prestamo durante el ano
subsiguiente.
4. En el caso de participantes cuyo territorio metropolitano
haya sido ocupado por el enemigo, no se incluira en los caiculos
de sus reservas monetarias, o de los aumentos en sus reservas
monetarias, el oro recien extraldo de minas situadas dentro de su
territorio metropolitano durante el periodo de cinco anos despues
que entre en vigor este Acuerdo.
(P. 5 0 )
C U A D R O

C

E lection de Directores Ejecutivos

1. La election de los directores ejecutivos se hara por votacion




APPE N D IX I

1367

de los gobernadores que tengan derecho a votar de acuerdo con
las disposiciones de los incisos (iii) y (iv) del parrafo (b) de la
Seccion 3 del Articulo XII.
2. En la votacion para los cinco directores que deberan elegirse
conforme al inciso (iii) del parrafo (b) de la Seccion 3 del
Articulo XII, cada gobernador con derecho a votar emitira a
favor de una sola persona todos los votos que le reconoce el
parrafo (a) de la Seccion 5 del Articulo XII. Seran directores
las cinco personas que reciban el mayor numero de votos, disponiendose que no se considerara electa ninguna persona que
reciba menos del diecinueve por ciento del numero total de votos
que puedan emitirse (votos calificados).
3. Si no se eligieren cinco personas en la primera votacion, se
procedera a efectuar otra en la que no podra ser candidato la
persona que recibio el numero menor de votos, y en la que votaran
unicamente (a) los gobernadores que hayan favorecido en la
primera votacion a una persona que no resulto electa, y (b) los
gobernadores cuyos votos a favor de una persona se juzgue que,
conforme a lo previsto en el parrafo 4 subsiguiente, han acumulado a favor de dicha persona un numera de votos que exceda del
veinte por ciento del total de votos calificados.
4. Al determinar si ha de considerarse que los votos emitidos
por un gobernador han aumentado el total emitido a favor de una
persona hasta mas del veinte por ciento de los votos calificados,
se considerara que ese veinte por ciento incluye, primero, los
votos del gobernador que haya emitido el mayor numero de votos
a favor de dicha persona, luego los votos del gobernador que le
siga en cuanto al numero de votos emitidos, y asi sucesivamente
hasta completar el veinte por ciento.
5. Se considerara que cualquier gobernador de cuyos votos haya
que tomar en cuenta una parte para aumentar el total emitido a
favor de una persona hasta mas del diecinueve por ciento, ha
emitido todos sus votos a favor de dicha persona, aun cuando
debido a ello el total de votos a favor de dicha persona sobrepase
el veinte por ciento.
6. Si despues de la segunda votacion no resultaren electas cinco
personas, se procedera a efectuar nuevas votaciones de acuerdo
con los mismos principios hasta que se elijan las cinco; disponiendose, que una vez electas cuatro personas, la quinta podra
elegirse por simple mayoria de los votos restantes, y se conside­
rara que ha sido electa por la totalidad de dichos votos.
7. Los directores que han de elegir las Republicas americanas
de acuerdo con las disposiciones del inciso (iv) del parrafo (b)




1368

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CO NFERENCE

de la Seccion 3 del Articulo XII, se designaran en la forma
siguiente:
(a) Se elegira cada director por separado.
(p. 50a)
(b) Al elegir al primer director, cada gobemador que repre­
sente a una Republica americana calificada para participar
en la election emitira todos los votos que le correspondan
a favor de una sola persona. La persona que reciba el
numero mayor de votos se declarara electa, siempre que
haya recibido no menos del cuarenta y cinco por ciento de
la totalidad de los votos.
(c) Si no resultare electa persona alguna en la primera votacion, se efectuaran otras, en las que se eliminara a la
persona que en cada una reciba el numero menor de votos,
hasta que una persona reciba un numero de votos que sea
isuficiente para elegirle conforme a lo dispuesto en el
parrafo (b) anterior.
(d) Los gobernadores cuyos votos hay an contribuldo a la
election del primer director no tomaran parte en la elec­
tion del segundo.
(e) Las personas que no resulten electas en la primera elec­
tion podran ser candidatas en la election del segundo
director.
(f) Para la election del segundo director sera necesaria una
mayorla de los votos que puedan emitirse. Si nadie recibe
una mayorla se procedera a efectuar nuevas votaciones,
y en cada una se eliminara a la persona que reciba el
numero menor de votos, hasta que alguien obtenga una
mayorla.
(g) Se considerara que el segundo director ha sido electo por
la totalidad de los votos que podlan emitirse en la votacion
que determino su election.
Cp. 51)
C U A D R 0

D

Liquidation de Cuentas a Participantes que se Retiran

1.
El Fondo estara obligado a pagar a un participante que se
retira una cantidad igual a su cuota mas cualesquiera otras canti­
dades que se le deban del Fondo, menos cualesquiera cantidades
que adeude al Fondo en su moneda, incluso cargos acumulados
despues de la fecha de su retiro; 'no se le hara, sin embargo, pago
alguno hasta seis meses despues de la fecha de retiro. Los pagos
se haran en la moneda del participante que se retira.




APPE N D IX I

1369

2. Si las disponibilidades del Fondo en moneda del partici­
pante que se retira no son suficientes para pagar la cantidad neta
que tuviere que pagar el Fondo, se pagara el balance en oro o en
aquella otra forma que se acuerde. Si el Fondo y el participante
que se retira no llegan a un acuerdo dentro de los seis meses a
partir de la fecha del retiro, la moneda en cuestion retenida por
el Fondo se pagard inmediatamente al participante que se retira.
Cualquiera que sea el balance de la cuenta, se pagara en diez
plazos semestrales en el curso de los cinco anos siguientes. Cada
uno de estos plazos se pagara, a option del Fondo, bien en la
moneda del participante que se retira, adquirida despues del
retiro de este, o bien en oro.
3. Si el Fondo deja de pagar cualquiera de los plazos a que
esta obligado de acuerdo con los parrafos precedentes, el partici­
pante que se retira tendra derecho a exigir del Fondo que le
pague el plazo en cualquier moneda con que cuente el Fondo, a
exception de la moneda que se haya declarado escasa segun la
Seccion 3 del Articulo VII.
4. Si las disponibilidades del Fondo en la moneda de un par­
ticipante que se retira sobrepasan la cantidad que se le adeuda
a este, y si dentro de seis meses a partir de la fecha del retiro, no
se hubiere llegado a un acuerdo en cuanto al metodo de liquidar las
cuentas, dicho participante estara obligado a liquidar en oro este
exceso de moneda o, si lo prefiriere, en las monedas de participan­
tes que a la fecha de liquidation sean convertibles de acuerdo con
la Seccion 4 del Articulo VIII. La liquidation se hara a la paridad
existente a la fecha del retiro del Fondo. El participante que se
retira completara la operation de liquidation, dentro de cinco anos
a partir de la fecha de su retiro o, dentro de aquel periodo mas
largo que pueda haber fijado el Fondo, pero no se le exigira que
liquide, en periodo semestral alguno, mas de la decima parte del
exceso disponible del Fondo en moneda de este participante a la
fecha del retiro, mas las adquisiciones adicionales de dicha moneda
que hubiere habido durante dicho periodo semestral. Si el partici­
pante que se retira no cumple con esta obligation, el Fondo podra
liquidar en forma ordenada, en cualquier mercado, la cantidad de
moneda que debio liquidarse.
5. Todo participante que deseare obtener la moneda de un
participante que se haya retirado, la adquirira comprandola al
Fondo, sujeto a las disposiciones que regulan el acceso de los
participantes a los recursos del Fondo, y a que dicha moneda
este disponible de conformidad con el parrafo 4 precedente.
(p. 52) 6. El participante que se retira garantiza el uso sin




1370

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

restricciones, en todo tiempo, de la moneda de que se dispusiere
conforme a los parrafos 4 y 5 anteriores para la compra de
productos o para el pago de cantidades que se le adeuden a el o a
personas dentro de sus territorios. El participante que se retira
compensara al Fondo por cualquier perdida que resulte de la
diferencia entre el valor a la par de su moneda en la fecha de
retiro y el valor que logre el Fondo al disponer de ella de acuerdo
con los parrafos 4 y 5 precedentes.
7.
En caso de que el Fondo empiece a liquidarse de acuerdo con
la Seccion 2 del Articulo XVI dentro de seis meses a partir de la
fecha en que se retira un participante, la cuenta entre el Fondo
y el gobierno de dicho participante se liquidara de acuerdo con el
Articulo XVI.
CUADRO

E

Administration de la Liquidation

1. En caso de liquidation tendran prioridad en la distribution
del pasivo del Fondo las obligaciones del Fondo, con exclusion
de la devolution de subscripciones. Al hacer frente a cada una
de dichas obligaciones el Fondo usara su activo en el orden
siguiente:
(a) la moneda en que sea pagadera la obligation
(b) oro
(c) cualesquier otras monedas en proportion, tanto como sea
posible, a las cuotas de los participantes.
2. Despues que se salden las obligaciones del Fondo de acuerdo
con 'el parrafo 1 anterior, el balance del activo del Fondo se
distribuira y prorrateara de la manera siguiente:
(a) El Fondo distribuira sus disponibilidades en oro entre los
participantes de cuyas monedas tenga el Fondo cantidades
menores que su cuota. Estos participantes compartiran el
oro asi distribuido en proporciones de las cantidades por
las cuales sus cuotas excedan de las disponibilidades del
Fondo en sus monedas.
(b) El Fondo distribuira a cada participante la mitad de las
disponibilidades del Fondo en su propia moneda, pero
dicha distribution no excedera del 50 por ciento de su
cuota.
(c) El Fondo prorrateara el resto de sus disponibilidades en
cada moneda entre todos los participantes en proportion
con las cantidades que se adeuden a cada uno de ellos
despues que se efectuen las distribuciones estipuladas en
los incisos (a) y (b) anteriores.




APPE N D IX I

1371

(p. 53) 3. Cada participante amortizara las disponibilidades
de su moneda asignadas a otros participantes conforme al parrafo
2 (c) anterior, y convendra con el Fondo respecto a un procedimiento ordenado para dicha amortization dentro de tres meses
despues que se haya decidido la liquidation.
4. Si un participante no ha llegado a un acuerdo con el Fondo
dentro del perlodo de tres meses mencionado en el parrafo 3
anterior, el Fondo usara las monedas de otros participantes asig­
nadas a dicho participante conforme al parrafo 2 (c) anterior
para amortizar la moneda de dicho participante que se haya
asignado a otros participantes. Cada moneda asignada a un par­
ticipante que no haya llegado a un acuerdo se usara, siempre
que sea posible, para amortizar su moneda asignada a los par­
ticipantes que hayan llegado a un acuerdo con el Fondo conforme
al parrafo 3 anterior.
5. Si el participante ha llegado a un acuerdo con el Fondo
conforme al parrafo 3 anterior, el Fondo usara las monedas de
otros participantes asignadas a dicho participante conforme al
parrafo 2 (c) anterior para amortizar la moneda de dicho par­
ticipante que se haya asignado a otros participantes que hayan
hecho arreglos con el Fondo de acuerdo con el parrafo 3 anterior.
Cada cantidad as! amortizada lo sera en la moneda del partici­
pante a quien se hubiere asignado.
6. Despues de cumplir con los parrafos anteriores el Fondo
pagara a cada participante el resto de las monedas retenidas en
su cuenta.
7. Cada participante cuya moneda haya sido distribuida a otros
participantes conforme al parrafo 6 anterior, amortizara dicha
moneda en oro o, a su discretion, de la moneda del participante
que solicite la amortization, o en cualquier otra forma en que
ambos convengan. Si los participantes interesados no convienen
en lo contrario, el participante que deba efectuar la amortization
la completara dentro de cinco anos de la fecha de la distribution,
pero no se le exigira que amortice en ningun perlodo semianual
mas de 1 decimo de la cantidad distribuida a cada uno de los
participantes. Si el participante dejare de cumplir con esta
obligation, la cantidad de moneda que debio amortizarse podra
liquidarse de manera ordenada en cualquier mercado.
8. Cada participante cuya moneda se haya distribuldo a otros
participantes conforme al parrafo 6 anterior garantiza el uso sin
restricciones de dicha moneda en todo momento para la compra
de productos o para pagos que se adeuden a el o a personas dentro




1372

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

de sus territorios. Cada participante que asi se comprometa
conviene en compensar a otros participantes por cualquier perdida
que resulte de la diferencia entre el valor a la par de su moneda
en la fecha en que se decida liquidar el Fondo y el valor que
logren dichos participantes al disponer de su moneda.

Document 518

Traduccion del Acta Final de la Conferencia Monetaria y
Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
22 de julio de 1944
S en or D elegado:

Debido a lo limitado del personal, y a que no fue posible obtener el texto
oficial ingles hasta ultima hora, es de esperarse que se encuentren errores en
esta traduccion preliminar de los documentos que componen el Acta Final de
la Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas. Agradeceremos cualesquier comentarios y sugerencias que tenga a bien hacernos para la
revisi6n del texto y le recordamos que tendremos gusto en enviarle ejemplares
adicionales si los solicita a nuestra oficina en Washington.
Sirvase dirigir las comunicaciones a:
Guillermo A. Suro, Jefe Interino,
Oficina Central de Traducciones,
Secretaria de Estado,
Washington, D. C.
(T rad u ccio n Prelim inar)

Spanish translation

A c t a F in a l d e l a C o n f e r e n c ia M o n e t a r ia y F in a n c ie r a
d e l a s N a c io n e s U n id a s
celebrada en Bretton Woods, New Hampshire
Del 1° al 22 de julio de 1944

Acta Final
Los Gobiernos de Australia Belgica, Bolivia, Brasil, Canada,
Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Checoeslovaquia, la
Republica Dominicana, Ecuador, Egipto, El Salvador, Etiopia;
la Delegacion Francesa; los Gobiernos de Grecia, Guatemala, Haiti,
Honduras, Islandia, India, Iran, Iraq, Liberia, Luxemburgo, Mex­
ico, Holanda, Nueva Zelandia, Nicaragua, Noruega, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru, las Filipinas, Polonia, la Union Sudafricana, la
Union de Republicas Socialistas Sovieticas, el Reino Unido, los
Estados Unidos de America, Uruguay, Venezuela y Yugoeslavia;
Habiendo aceptado la invitation que les extendiera el Gobierno
de los Estados Unidos de America para que se hicieran representar




APPE N D IX I

1373

en una Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones
Unidas;
Nombraron sus delegados respectivos, cuyos nombres se enumeran a continuacion, en orden alfabetico por paises segun el
idioma ingles:
AUSTRALIA
Leslie G. Melville, Asesor Economico del Commonwealth Bank of Australia;
Presidente de la Delegacion

James B. Brigden, Consejero Financiero de la Legacion de Australia en
Washington
Frederick H. Wheeler, de la Secretarla de Hacienda
Arthur H. Tange, de la Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores
BELGICA
Camille Gutt, Ministro de Hacienda y Asuntos Economicos; Presidente de la
Delegacion

Georges Theunis, Ministro de Estado; Embajador en mision especial en los
Estados Unidos; Gobernador del Banco Nacional de Belgica
Baron Herve de Gruben, Consejero de la Embajada de Belgica en Wash­
ington
Baron Rene Boel, Consejero del Gobierno de Belgica
BOLIVIA
Rene Ballivian, Consejero Comercial de la Embajada de Bolivia en Washing­
ton; Presidente de la Delegacion
BRASIL
Arthur de Souza Costa, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegacion
Francisco Alves dos Santos-Filho, Director del Cambio Extranjero del
Banco del Brasil

(p. 2 )
Valentim Bougas, Miembro de la Comision de Control de los Acuerdos de
Washington y miembro del Consejo Economico y Financiero
Eugenio Gudin, Miembro del Consejo Economico y Financiero y de la
Comision de Estudios Economicos
Octavio Bulhoes, Jefe de la Division de Estudios Economicos y Financieros
del Ministerio de Hacienda
Victor Azevedo Bastian, Director del Banco de la Provincia de Rio Grande
do Sul
CANADA
J. L. Ilsley, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegacion
L. S. St. Laurent, Ministro de Justicia
D. C. Abbott, Ayudante Parlamentario del Ministro de Hacienda
Lionel Chevrier, Ayudante Parlamentario del Ministra de Pertrechos y
Abastecimientos
J. A. Blanchette, Miembro del Parlamento
W. A. Tucker, Miembro del Parlamento
W. C. Clark, Viceministro de Hacienda
G. F. Towers, Gobernador del Banco del Canada
W. A. Mackintosh, Ayudante Especial del Viceministro de Hacienda




1374

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

L. Rasminsky, Presidente (suplente) de la Junta de Control de Cambio
Extranjero
A. F. W. Plumptre, Agregado Financiero de la Embajada del Canadd en
Washington
J. J. Deutsch, Ayudante Especial del Subsecretario de Estado de Relaciones
Exteriores
CHILE
Luis Alamos Barros, Director del Banco Central de Chile; Presidente de la
Deleg acidn

German Riesco, Representante General de la Companla Sudamericana de
Vapores (Chilean Line) en Nueva York
Arturo Maschke Tornero, Administrador General del Banco Central de Chile
Fernando Mardones Restat, Subgerente de la Corporacion de Ventas de
Salitre y Yodo de Chile
CHINA
Hsiang-Hsi K’ung, Vicepresidente del Yuan Ejecutivo y Ministro de Ha­
cienda; Gobernador del Banco Central de la China; Presidente de la Dele­
gacion

Tingfu F. Tsiang, Primer Secretario Politico del Yuan Ejecutivo; Ex Embajador de la China en la Union de Republicas Socialistas Sovieticas
Ping-Wen Kuo, Viceministro de Hacienda
Victor Hoo, Viceministro Administrativo de Relaciones Exteriores
Yee-Chun Koo, Viceministro de Hacienda
Kuo-Ching Li, Asesor del Ministro de Hacienda
Te-Mou Hsi, Representante del Ministerio de Hacienda en Washington; Di­
rector del Banco Central de la China y del Banco de la China
Tsu-Yee Pei, Director del Banco de la China
Ts-Liang Soong, Administrador General del Manufacturers Bank de la
China; Director del Banco Central de la China, del Banco de la China y del
Banco de Comunicaciones

(P. 3)
COLOMBIA
Carlos Lleras Restrepo, Ex Ministro de Hacienda y Contralor General;
Presidente de la Delegacion

Miguel Lopez Pumarejo, Ex Embajador de Colombia en los Estados Unidos;
Administrador de la Caja de Credito Agrario, Industrial y Minero
Victor Dugand, Banquero
COSTA RICA
Francisco de P. Gutierrez Ross, Embajador de Costa Rica en los Estados
Unidos; Ex Ministro de Hacienda y Comercio; Presidente de la Delegacion
Luis Demetrio Tinoco Castro, Decano de la Facultad de Ciencias Economicas
de la Universidad de Costa Rica; Ex Ministro de Hacienda y Comercio;
Ex Ministro de Instruccion Publica
Fernando Madrigal A., Miembro de la Junta de Directores de la Camara de
Comercio de Costa Rica
CUBA
E. I. Montoulieu, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegacion
CHECOESLOVAQUIA
Ladislav Feierabend, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegacidn




A PPE N D IX I

1375

Jan Mladek, del Ministerio de Hacienda; Vicepresidente de la Delegacidn
Antonin Basch, Miembro de la Facultad de Economia Politica de la Universidad de Colombia
Josef Hanc, Director del Servicio Economico Checoeslovaco en los Estados
Unidos de America
Ervin Hexner, Profesor de Economia Politica y Ciencia Politica de la Universidad de la Carolina del Norte
REPUBLICA DOMINICANA
Anselmo Copello, Embajador de la Republica Dominicana en los Estados
Unidos; Presidente de la Delegacidn
J. R. Rodriguez, Ministro Consejero de la Embajada de la Republica Domini­
cana en Washington
ECUADOR
Esteban F. Carbo, Consejero Financiero de la Embajada del Ecuador en
Washington; Presidente de la Delegacidn
Sixto E. Duran Ballen, Ministro Consejero de la Embajada del Ecuador en
Washington
EGIPTO
Sany Lackany Bey; Presidente de la Delegacidn
Mahmoud Saleh El Falaky
Ahmed Selim

(P- 4)
EL SALVADOR
Agustin Alfaro Moran; Presidente de la Delegacion
Raul Gamero
Victor Manuel Valdes
ETIOPIA
Blatta Ephrem Tewelde Medhen, Ministro de Etiopia en los Estados Unidos;
Presidente de la Delegacidn

George A. Blowers, Gobernador del Banco del Estado de Etiopia
DELEGACION FRANCES A
Pierre Mendes-France, Comisionado de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delega­
cidn

Andre Istel, Consejero Tecnico del Departamento de Hacienda
Deleg ados Auxiliares

Jean de Largentaye, Inspector de Finanzas
Robert Mosse, Profesor de Economia Politica
Raoul Aglion, Consejero Legal
Andre Paul Maury
GRECIA
Kyriakos Varvaressos, Gobernador del Banco de Grecia; Embajador Extraordinario en Asuntos Economicos y Financieros; Presidente de la Delega­
cidn

Alexander Argyropoulos, Ministro Residente; Director de la Division Eco­
nomica y Comercial del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores
Athanase Sbarounis, Director General del Ministerio de Hacienda
GUATEMALA
Manuel Noriega Morales, Estudiante Graduado de la Facultad de Ciencias
Economicas de la Universidad de Harvard; Presidente de la Delegacidn




1376

M O N E T AR Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

H A IT f
Andre Liautaud, Embajador de Haiti en los Estados Unidos; Presidente de
la Delegation

Pierre Chauvet, Subsecretario de Estado de Hacienda
HONDURAS
Julian R. Caceres, Embajador de Honduras en los Estados Unidos; Presi­
dente de la Delegacidn

ISLANDIA
Magnus Sigurdsson, Gerente del Banco Nacional de Islandia; Presidente de
\ Delegation
la

Asgeir Asgeirsson, Gerente del Banco de Pesquerlas de Islandia
Svanbjorn Frimannsson, Presidente de la Junta de Comercio del Estado
(p . 5 )

INDIA
Sir Jeremy Raisman, Representante Financero del Gobierno de la India;
Presidente de la Delegation

Sir Theodore Gregory, Consejero Economico del Gobierno de la India
Sir Chintaman D. Deshmukh, Gobernador del Banco de la Reserva de la
India
Sir Shanmukham Chetty
A. D. Shroff, Director de la casa Tata Sons, Ltd.
IRAN
Abol Hassan Ebtehaj, Gobernador del Banco Nacional de Iran; Presidente
de la Delegation

R. A. Daftary, Consejero de la Legacion de Iran en Washington
Hossein Navab, Consul General de Iran en Nueva York
Taghi Nassr, Comisionado Economico de Iran en los Estados Unidos
IRAQ
Ibrahim Kamal, Senador y Ex Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Dele­
gation

Lionel M. Swan, Asesor del Ministerio de Hacienda
Ibrahim Al-Kabir, Contador General del Ministerio de Hacienda
Claude E. Loombe, Contralor del Cambio
LIBERIA
William E. Dennis, Secretario de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegation
James F. Cooper, Ex Secretario de Hacienda
Walter F. Walker, Consul General en Nueva York
LUXEMBURGO
Hugues Le Gallais, Ministro de Luxemburgo en los Estados Unidos; Presi­
dente de la Delegation

MEXICO
Eduardo Suarez, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegation
Antonio Espinosa de los Monteros, Presidente Ejecutivo de la Nacional
Financiera; Director del Banco de Mexico
Rodrigo G6mez, Gerente del Banco de Mexico
Daniel Cosio Villegas, Jefe del Departamento de Estudios Economicas del
Banco de Mexico




APPE N D IX I

1377

HOLANDA
J. W. Beyen, Asesor Financiero del Gobierno de Holanda; Presidente de la
Delegation

D. Crena de Iongh, Presidente de la Junta de las Indias Holandesas, Surinam
y Curasao en los Estados Unidos
H. Riemens, Agregado Financiero de la Embajada Holandeso en Washing­
ton; Miembro de la Mision Economica Financiera y Maritima en los
Estados Unidos
A. H. Philipse, Miembro de la Mision Economica Financiera y Maritima en
los Estados Unidos
NUEVA ZELANDIA
Walter Nash, Ministro de Hacienda; Ministro de Nueva Zelandia en los
Estados Unidos; Presidente de la Delegation
Bernard Carl Ashwin, Secretario del Tesoro
(P. 6 )
Edward C. Fussell, Vicegobernador del Banco de la Reserva de Nueva
Zelandia
Alan G. B. Fisher, Consejero de la Legation de Nueva Zelandia en Wash­
ington
NICARAGUA
Guillermo Sevilla Sacasa, Embajador de Nicaragua en los Estados Unidos;
Presidente de la Delegation

Leon DeBayle, Ex Embajador de Nicaragua en los Estados Unidos
J. Jesus Sanchez Roig, Ex Ministro de Hacienda; Vicepresidente de la Junta
de Directores del Banco Nacional de Nicaragua
NORUEGA
Wilhelm Keilhau, Director del Banco de Noruega, provisionalmente en
Londres; Presidente de la Delegation
Ole Colbjornsen, Consejero Financiero de la Embajada de Noruega en Wash­
ington
Arne Skaug, Consejero Comercial de la Embajada de Noruega en Washing­
ton
PANAM A
Guillermo Arango, Presidente del Servicio de Inversiones Panameno; Presi­
dente de la Delegation

Narciso E. Garay, Primer Secretario de la Embajada de Panama en Wash­
ington
PARAGUAY
Celso R. Velazquez, Embajador del Paraguay en los Estados Unidos; Presi­
dente de la Delegation

Nestor M. Campos Ros, Primer Secretario de la Embajada del Paraguay en
los Estados Unidos
PERU
Pedro Beltran, Embajador del Peru en los Estados Unidos; Presidente de la
Delegation

Manuel B. Llosa, Segundo Vicepresidente de la Camara de Diputados;
Diputado por Cerro de Pasco




1378

M O N E TAR Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Andres F. Dasso, Senador por Lima
Alberto Alvarez Calderon, Senador por Lima
Juvenal Monge, Diputado por Cuzco
Juan Chavez, Ministro y Consejero Comercial de la Embajada del Peru en
Washington
FILIPINAS
Coronel Andres Soriano, Secretario de Hacienda de las Filipinas; Presi­
dente de la Delegation

Jaime Hernandez, Auditor General de las Filipinas
Joseph H. Foley, Gerente de la Sucursal de Nueva York del Banco Nacional
de las Filipinas
POLONIA
Ludwik Grosfeld, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la DelegaciSn
Leon Baranski, Director General del Banco de Polonia
Zygmunt Karpinski, Director del Banco de Polonia

(P. 7)
Stanislaw Kirkor, Director del Ministerio de Hacienda
Janusz Zoltowski, Consejero Financiero de la Embajada de Polonia en
Washington
UNION SUDAFRICANA
S. F. N. Gie, Ministro de la Union Sudafricana en los Estados Unidos; Presir
dente de la Delegation

J. E. Holloway, Secretario de Hacienda; Codeleg ado
M. H. de Kock, Vicegobernador del Banco Sudafricano; Codelegado
UNION DE REPUBLICAS SOCIALISTAS SOVIETICAS
M. S. Stepanov, Vicecomisario del Pueblo de Comercio Exterior; Presidente
de la Delegacidn

P. A. Maletin, Vicecomisario del Pueblo de Hacienda
N. F. Chechulin, Vicepresidente del Banco del Estado
I. D. Zlobin, Jefe de la Division Monetaria de la Comisaria del Pueblo de
Hacienda
A. A. Arutiunian, Catedratico; Doctor en Economla Polltica; Consultante
de la Comisaria del Pueblo de Relaciones Exteriores
A. P. Morozov, Miembro del Collegium; Jefe de la Division Monetaria de la
Comisaria del Pueblo de Comercio Exterior
REINO UNIDO
Lord Keynes; Presidente de la Delegation
Robert H. Brand, Representante del Tesoro del Reino Unido en Washington
Sir W ilfrid Eady, del Tesoro del Reino Unido
Nigel Bruce Ronald, del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores
Dennis H. Robertson, del Tesoro del Reino Unido
Lionel Robbins, de la Oficina del Gabinete de Guerra
Redvers Opie, Consejero de la Embajada de la Gran Bretana en Washington
ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AM ERICA
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Secretario de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegation
Fred M. Vinson, Director de la Oficina de Estabilizacion Economica; Vice­
presidente de la Delegation




APPE N D IX I

1379

Dean Aeheson, Subsecretario Auxiliar de Estado
Edward E. Brown, Presidente del Primer Banco Nacional de Chicago
Leo T. Crowley, Administrador de la Oficina de Economia Extranjera
Marriner S. Eccles, Presidente de la Junta de Gobernadores del Sistema de
Reserva Federal
Mabel Newcomer, Catedratica de Economia Politica en Vassar College
Brent Spence, Miembro de la Camara de Representantes; Presidente del
Comite de Banca y Moneda de la Camara
Charles W. Tobey, Miembro del Senado; Miembro del Comite de Banca y
Moneda del Senado
Robert F. Wagner, Miembro del Senado; Presidente del Comite de Banca y
Moneda del Senado
Harry D. White, Ayudante del Secretario de Hacienda
Jesse P. Wolcott, Miembro de la Camara de Representantes; Miembro del
Comite de Banca y Moneda de la Camara
URUGUAY
Mario La Gamma Acevedo, Perito del Ministerio de Hacienda; Presidente de
la Delegacion

Hugo Garcia, Agregado Financiero de la Embajada del Uruguay en
(P. 8 )
VENEZUELA
Rodolfo Rojas, Ministro de Hacienda; Presidente de la Delegacion
Alfonso Espinosa, Presidente del Comite Permanente de Hacienda de la
Camara de Diputados
Cristobal L. Mendoza, Ex Ministro de Hacienda; Asesor Legal del Banco
• Central de Venezuela
Jose Joaquin Gonzalez Gorrondona, Presidente de la Oficina de Control de
Importaciones; Director del Banco Central de Venezuela.
YUGOESLAVIA
Vladimir Rybar, Consejero de la Embajada de Yugoeslavia en Washington;
Presidente de la Delegacion

Quienes se reunieron en Bretton Woods, N. H., el 1° de julio
de 1944, bajo la presidencia provisional del Excmo. senor Henry
Morgenthau, Jr., presidente de la Delegacion de los Estados Unidos
de America.
El Excmo. senor Henrik de Kauffmann, Ministro de Dinamarca
en Washington, asistio a la Sesion Plenaria Inaugural, aceptando
la invitation del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos para que asistiese
en capacidad particular. La Conferencia, a propuesta de su Comite
de Credenciales, le extendio una invitation similar para el resto de
las sesiones de la Conferencia.
El Departamento Economico, Financiero y de Transito de la
Sociedad de las Naciones, la Oficina Internacional del Trabajo, la
Comision Interina sobre Alimentation y Agricultura de las Na­
ciones Unidas, y la Administracion de Auxilio y Rehabilitation de
las Naciones Unidas estuvieron representadas por un observador
795841 — 48— 17




1380

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

cada una en la Sesion Plenaria Inaugural. Dicha representacidn
obedecio a una invitation del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, y los
observadores o sus suplentes asistieron a las sesiones subsiguientes
de conformidad con una resolution presentada por el Comite de
Credenciales y adoptada por la Conferencia. Asistieron los
siguientes observadores y suplentes:
DEPARTAMENTO ECONOMICO, FINANCIERO Y DE TRANSITO DE
LA SOCIEDAD DE LAS NACIONES
Alexander Loveday, Director
Ragnar Nurkse; Suplente
OFICINA INTERNACIONAL DEL TRABAJO
Edward J. Phelan, Director Interino
C. Wilfred Jenks, Consejero Legal; y
E. J. Riches, Jefe Interino de la Seccion Economica y Estadlstica; Suplentes
COMISION INTERINA SOBRE A LIM E N TA Cl6N Y AGRICULTURA DE
LAS NACIONES UNIDAS
Edward Twentyman, Delegado del Reino Unido
ADMINISTRACION DE AUXILIO Y REHABILITACION DE LAS NA­
CIONES UNIDAS
A. H. Feller, Consejero General; o
Mieczyslaw Sokolowski, Asesor Financiero

(p. 9)
Con la aprobacion del Presidente de los Estados Unidos, se
nombr6 Secretario General de la Conferencia al Sr. Warren
Kelchner, Jefe de la Division de Conferencias Internationales de
la Secretaria de Estado de los Estados Unidos; y se designo Secre­
tario General Tecnico y Secretario General Auxiliar al senor Frank
Coe, Administrador Auxiliar de la Administration de Relaciones
Economicas Extranjeras de los Estados Unidos, y al senor Philip
C. Jessup, Catedratico de Derecho Internacional de la Universidad
de Columbia, en Nueva York, respectivamente.
En la sesion plenaria inaugural celebrada el 1° de julio de 1944,
se eligio Presidente permanente de la Conferencia al Excmo. senor
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Presidente de la Delegacion de los Estados
Unidos de America.
Los senores M. S. Stepanov, Presidente de la Delegacion de la
Union de Republicas Socialistas Sovieticas, Arthur de Souza,
Presidente de la Delegaci6n del Brasil, Camille Gutt, Presidente
de la Delegacion de Belgica, y Leslie G. Melville, Presidente de la
Delegation de Australia, fueron electos vicepresidentes de la Con­
ferencia.
El Presidente provisional nombro los siguientes miembros de los
Comites Generales constituidos por la Conferencia:




APPE N D IX I

1381

COMITE' DE CREDENCIALES
E. I. Montoulieu (Cuba), Presidente
J. W. Beyen (Holanda)
S. F. N. Gie (Union Sudafricana)
William E. Dennis (Liberia)
Wilhelm Keilhau (Noruega)
COMITE DE REGLAMENTO
Hsiang-Hsi K’ung (China) Presidente
Guillermo Sevilla Sacasa (Nicaragua)
Ludwik Grosfeld (Polonia)
Leslie G. Melville (Australia)
Ibrahim Kamal (Iraq)
COMITE DE NOMINACIONES
Walter Nash (Nueva Zelandia), Presidente
Hugues Le Gallais (Luxemburgo)
Julian R. Caceres (Honduras)
Magnus Sigurdsson (Islandia)
Pedro Beltran (Peru)

De acuerdo con el reglamento adoptado en la segunda Sesi6n
Plenaria celebrada el 3 de julio de 1944 la Conferencia eligio un
Comite de Iniciativas, que integraron los siguientes Presidentes
de Delegaciones:
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., (E.U. de A .), Presidente
Camille Gutt (Belgica)
Arthur de Souza Costa (Brasil)
J. L. Ilsley (Canada)
Hsiang-Hsi K’ung (China)
Carlos Lleras Restrepo (Colombia)
Pierre Mendes-France (Delgacion Francesa)
Abol Hassan Ebtehaj (Iran)
Eduardo Suarez (Mexico)
M. S. Stepanov (U.R.S.S.)
Lord Keynes (Reino Uni do)
(p . 10 )

El 21 de julio de 1944 se constituyo el Comite de Coordinacion
con los miembros siguientes:
Fred M. Vinson (E.U. de A .), Presidente
Arthur de Souza Costa (Brasil)
Ping-Wen Kuo (China)
Robert Mosse (Delegation Francesa)
Eduardo Suarez (Mexico)
A. A. Arutiunian (U.R.S.S.)
Lionel Robbins (Reino Unido)

La Conferencia se dividio en tres Comisiones Tecnicas. Los
funcionarios de estas Comisiones y de sus respectivos Comites,
segun los eligio la Conferencia, aparecen a continuation:




1382

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

COMISION I
F ondo M

o n e t a r io

I n t e r n a c io n a l

Presidente : Harry D. White (E.U. de A.)
Vicepresidente : Rodolfo Rojas (Venezuela)
Relator: L. Rasminsky (Canada)
Secretario : Leroy D. Stinebower
Secretaria A uxiliar : Eleanor Lansing Dulles
C o m ite

1— Fines, normas y cuotas del Fondo

Presidente : Tingfu F. Tsiang (China)
Relator : Kyriakos Varvaressos (Grecia)
Secretario : William Adams Brown, Jr.
C o m ite

2— Operaciones del Fondo

Presidente : P. A. Maletin (U.R.S.S.)
Vicepresidente: W. A. Mackintosh (Canada)
Relator: Robert Mosse (Delegation Francesa)
Secretario: Karl Bopp
Secretaria Auxiliar: Alice Bourneuf
C o m ite

3— Organization y administration

Presidente : Arthur de Souza Costa (Brasil)
Relator: Ervin Hexner ( Checoeslovaquia)
Secretario: Malcolm Bryan
Secretario Auxiliar: H. J. Bittermann
C o m i t e 4 — Forma y

status del Fondo

Presidente: Manuel B. Llosa (Peru)
Relator: Wilhelm Keilhau (Noruega)
Secretario: Coronel Charles H. Dyson
Secretario Auxiliar: Lauren Casaday

(p . i d

COMISION II
B anco

de

R e c o n s t r u c c i6 n

y

F om ento

Presidente: Lord Keynes (Reino Unido)
Vicepresidente: Luis Alamos Barros (Chile)
Relator: Georges Theunis (Belgica)
Secretario: Arthur Upgren
Secretario: Arthur Smithies
Secretaria Auxiliar: Ruth Russell
C o m ite

1— Fines, normas y capital del Banco

Presidente: J. W. Beyen (Holanda)
Relator: J. Rafael Oreamuno (Costa Rica)
Secretario: J. P. Young
Secretaria Auxiliar: Janet Sundelson
C o m it £

2— Operaciones del Banco

Presidente: E. I. Montoulieu (Cuba)
R elator : James B. Brigden (Australia)
Secretario: H. J. Bittermann
Secretario Auxiliar: Ruth Russell




APPE N D IX I

1383

Comite 3— Organization y Administracion
Presidente : Miguel Lopez Pumarejo (Colombia)
Relator : M. H. de Kock (Union Sudafricana)
Secretario : Mordecai Exekiel
Secretario Auxiliar: Capitan William L. Ullmann
C o m it e 4 — Forma y

status d e l Banco

Presidente: Sir Chintaman D. Deshmukh (India)
R elator: Leon Baranski (Polonia)
Secretario: Henry Edmiston
Secretario A uxiliar : Coronel Charles H. Dyson

C O M IS IO N
Otras F orm as

de

III

C o o p e r a c io n F in a n c i e r a I n t e r n a c io n a l

Presidente : Eduardo Suarez (Mexico)
Vicepresidente: Mahmoud Saleh El Falaky (Egipto)
Relator : Alan G. B. Fisher (Nueva Zelandia)
Secretario: Orvis Schmidt

La Sesion Plenaria de Clausura se celebro el 22 de julio de
1944. Como resultado de las deliberaciones, segun consta en las
Actas y los Informes de las respectivas Comisiones y sus Comites
y de las sesiones plenarias, se redactaron los siguientes instrumen­
ts:
(P .

12)

FONDO MONETARIO INTERNACIONAL
Acuerdo sobre el Fondo Monetario Internacional, que se incluye
como Anexo A,
y
BANCO INTERNACIONAL DE RECONSTRUCCION Y FOMENTO
Acuerdo sobre el Banco Internacional de Reconstruction y
Fomento, que se incluye como Anexo B,
Se adoptaron las resoluciones, declaraciones y recomendaciones
siguientes
I
PREPARACION DEL ACTA FINAL

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
R esuelve:

Que se autorice a la Secretaria a prepara el Acta Final de confor­
midad con las sugestiones propuestas por el Secretario General en
el numero 19 del Journal de fecha 19 de julio de 1944;
Que el Acta Final contenga los textos definitivos de las conelusiones aprobadas por la Conferencia en sesion plenaria, y que na
se hagan cambios en los mismos en la Sesion Plenaria de clausura;
que el Comite de Iniciativas revise el texto y, si lo aprueba, lo
someta a la Sesion Plenaria de Clausura.




1384

M O N E TAR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

II
PUBLICACION DE LOS DOCUMENTOS

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
R esuelve:

Que se autorice al Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America a
publicar el Acta Final de esta Conferencia; los Informes de las
Comisiones; y las Actas de las Sesiones Plenarias publicas; y a
facilitar, para publication, los documentos adicionales relativos a
los trabajos de esta Conferencia que a su juicio puedan considerarse de interes publico.
(P. 13)
HI
NOTIFICACION DE FIRMAS Y CUSTODIA DE DEPOSITOS

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
R esu elve:

Solicitar del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America
(1) Que en su capacidad de depositario del Acuerdo sobre el
Fondo Monetario Internacional, informe a los Gobiernos de todos
los paises cuyos nombres aparecen en el Cuadro A del Acuerdo
sobre el Fondo Monetario Internacional, y a todos los Gobiernos
cuya participation en calidad de miembros se apruebe de conformidad con la Seccion 2 del Articulo II, de todas las firmas a dicho
Acuerdo; y
(2) Que reciba y guarde en deposito, en una cuenta especial, el
oro o los dolares de los Estados Unidos que se le transmitan de
conformidad con la Seccion 2 (d) del Articulo X X del Acuerdo
sobre el Fondo Monetario Internacional, y que transmita dichos
Fondos a la Junta de Gobernadores del Fondo cuando se convoque
a la reuni6n inicial.
IV
DECLARACION RESPECTO A LA PLATA

Los problemas que confrontan algunas naciones como resultado
de la fluctuation considerable en el valor de la plata fueron tema
de serias discusiones en la Comision III. Debido a la brevedad del
tiempo disponible, a la magnitud de los demas problemas que
deblan discutirse y a limitaciones de diversa Indole, fue imposible
%
prestar a este problema, en la presente ocasion, atencion suficiente
que permitiera formular recomendaciones definitivas. Sin em­
bargo, en la opinion de la Comision III el tema merece ser objeto
de futuros estudios por las naciones interesadas.




APPENDI X I

1385

V
LIQUIDACION DEL BANCO DE ARREGLOS INTERNACIONALES

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
R e c o m ie n d a :

La liquidation del Banco de Arreglos Internacionales a la mayor
brevedad posible.
VI
BIENES DEL ENEMIGO Y BIENES SAQUEADOS

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
C o n s id e r a n d o :

Que ante la inminencia de su derrota los lideres y otros natio­
n a ls de paises enemigos, as! como sus colaboradores, estan valiendose de los paises neutrales a fin de ocultar bienes y de esta manera
(p. 14)
perpetuar su influencia, poder y habilidad para planear su futuro
engrandecimiento y la domination del mundo, comprometiendo asi
los esfuerzos que realizan las Naciones Unidas para establecer y
mantener permanentemente relaciones internacionales de paz;
Que los paises enemigos y sus nacionales se han apoderado de los
bienes de paises ocupados y de los de sus nacionales mediante el
pillaje y el saqueo y mediante transferencias logradas por la
coaccion, asi como por ardides artificiosos realizados a menudo por
conducto de sus gobiernos titeres con el fin de dar visos de legalidad
a sus robos y asegurarse de que poseeran y controlaran ciertas
empresas en el perlodo de la postguerra;
Que los paises enemigos y sus nacionales, mediante ventas y
otros medios de transferencia, tambien han hecho £asar sus titulos
de propiedad y control por los paises ocupados y neutrales, siendo
por lo tanto de caracter internacional el problema de descubrir y
deslindar esos titulos;
Que las Naciones Unidas han declarado su intention de hacer
cuanto este en su poder para contrarrestar los metodos de desposeimiento practicados por el enemigo, se han reservado el derecho de
declarar nulas cualesquiera transferencias de bienes de personas
que se encuentren en territorios ocupados, y han tornado medidas
para proteger y salvaguardar dentro de sus jurisdicciones respectivas los bienes de paises ocupados y de sus nacionales, as! como para
evitar la venta de bienes saqueados en los mercados de las Naciones
Unidas;
POR LO TAN TO:

1.
Nota y apoya plenamente las medidas adoptadas por las
Naciones Unidas con el fin de:




1386

MONETARY AND F INANCI AL CONFERENCE

(a) descubrir, segregar, controlar y disponer de manera
adecuada de los bienes del enemigo;
(b) impedir la liquidation de bienes saqueados por el ene­
migo, localizar y deslindar dichos bienes saqueados, y
adoptar las medidas adecuadas con miras a devolverlos
a sus legltimos duenos; y
2. R e c o m ie n d a :

Que todos los Gobiernos de los paises representados en esta Con­
ferencia tomen medidas compatibles con sus relaciones con los
paises que estan en guerra para solicitar de los Gobiernos de los
paises neutrales
(a) que tomen medidas inmediatas para impedir cualquier
venta o transferencia dentro de territorios sujetos a su
jurisdiction, de
(1) bienes pertenecientes al Gobierno o a cualesquier individuos o instituciones que se encuentren en aquellas
Naciones Unidas que esten ocupadas por el enemigo; y
(2) oro, moneda, objetos de arte y valores saqueados, otros
tltulos de propiedad en empresas financieras o comerciales, y de otros bienes saqueados por el enemigo;
as! como para descubrir, segregar y poner a la dis­
position de las autoridades de los paises correspondientes, despues de la liberation, cualquiera de dichos
bienes que se encuentren dentro de territorios sujetos
a su jurisdiccion;
(p. 15)
(b) que adopten medidas inmediatas para impedir que por
medios fraudulentos o de otro modo se oculten en paises
sujetos a su jurisdiccion
(1) bienes que pertenezcan, o que se alegue que pertenecen, al Gobierno de paises enemigos o a individuos
o instituciones de dichos paises;
(2) bienes que pertenezcan, o que se alegue que pertenecen, a llderes enemigos, sus asociados y colaboradores; y
que faciliten al fin su entrega a las autoridades apropiadas despues del armisticio.
VII
PROBLEMAS ECONOMICOS INTERNACIONALES

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
C o n s id e r a n d o :

Que en el Articulo I del Acuerdo sobre el Fondo Monetario Inter-




APPENDI X I

1387

nacional se declara que uno de los fines principales del Fondo es
facilitar la expansion y el desarrollo equilibrado del comercia
internacional y contribuir de ese modo al fomento y al mantenimiento de altos niveles de empleo y de ingresos reales, y al desa­
rrollo de las fuentes productivas de todos los paises participantes
como objetivos fundamentales de la politica economica;
Que se reconoce que el logro completo de este y otros fines y
propositos expuestos en el Acuerdo no puede realizarse a traves
del Fondo solamente;
R e c o m ie n d a :

Que los Gobiernos participantes, ademas de poner en practica
las medidas monetarias y financieras que constituyeron el tema de
esta Conferencia, y con el fin de crear en el campo de las relaciones
economicas internacionales las condiciones necesarias para el
logro de los fines del Fondo y de los objetivos primordiales mas
trasendentales de la politica economica, traten de llegar a un
acuerdo lo mas pronto posible respecto a los medios en que mejor
puedan:
(1) reducir las barreras al comercio internacional y de otros
modos promover relaciones comerciales internacionales que sean
mutuamente ventajosas;
(2) hacer posible la venta ordenada de productos de consumo
corriente a previos que sean equitativos tanto para el productor
como para el consumidor;
(3) afrontar los problemas especiales de inter es internacional
que surgiran cuando cese la production para fines de guerra; y
(4) facilitar, mediante esfuerzos cooperatives, la armonizacion
de la politica nacional de los paises participantes, a fin de promover
y mantener altos niveles de empleo y elevar las normas de vida
de menera progresiva.
(P. 16 )

VIII

La Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
R esuelve:

1. Expresar su gratitud al Presidente de los Estados Unidos,
Franklin D. Roosevelt, por su iniciativa al convocar la presente
Conferencia y por su preparation;
2. Expresar asu Presidente, el Excmo. senor Henry Morgenthau Jr., su profundo reconocimiento por la forma admirable en
que oriento a la Conferencia;
3. Expresar a los Funcionarios y al Personal de la Secretarla su




1388

MONET A RY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

agradecimiento por sus infatigables servicios y esfuerzos diligentes
por contribuir al logro de los objetivos de la Conferencia.
En f e DE LO CUAL, los siguientes delegados firman la presente
Acta Final.
S u b s c r it a en Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, a veintidos de
julio de mil novecientos cuarenta y cuatro en el idioma ingles. El
original se depositara en los archivos de la Secretaria de Estado
de los Estados Unidos de America, y el Gobierno de los Estados
Unidos de America suministrara copias certificadas del mismo a
cada uno de los Gobiernos y Autoridades representados en la
Conferencia.
(Siguen las fir mas)
(T rad u ccio n Prelim inar)

ANEXO

B

A c u e r d o So b r e e l B a n c o I n t e r n a c io n a l d e
R e c o n s t r u c c io n y F o m e n t o

Los Gobiernos en cuyo nombre se subscribe el presente Acuerdo
convienen en lo siguiente:
Articulo Preliminar

El Banco Internacional de Reconstruccion y Fomento se establece conforme a las disposiciones siguientes, y funcionara de
acuerdo con las mismas:
Articulo I
Fines

Los fines del Banco son:
(i) Contribuir a la obra de reconstruccion y fomento en terri­
torios de palses participantes, facilitando la inversion de
capital con fines de production que incluyan la rehabili­
tation de las economlas destruldas o dislocadas por la
guerra, la reconversion de los medios de production a fin
de satisfacer las necesidades de la paz, y estlmulo al
fomento de los medios y fuentes de production en los
palses de escaso desarrollo.
(ii) Fomentar las inversiones particulares en el extranjero
mediante garantlas y mediante participation en prestamos
y en otras inversiones que hicieren inversionistas particu­
lares; y, cuando hubiere capital particular disponible en
condiciones razonables, reforzar la inversion particular
proporcionando de su propio capital, de los fondos que
hubiere levantado, y de los demas recursos que tuviere,




APPENDI X I

1389

financiamiento en condiciones satisfactorias para fines
productivos.
(iii) Promover un incremento equilibrado de largo alcance en
el comercio internacional y el mantenimiento del equilibrio
en las balanzas de pago, estimulando las inversiones in(p. 2)
ternacionales destinadas al desarrollo de las fuentes productoras de los paises participantes, a fin de contribuir
al aumento de la capacidad productiva, a elevar las normas
de vida, y a mejorar las condiciones de trabajo en sus
territorios.
(iv) Arreglar los prestamos que haga o garantice en relacion
con los prestamos internacionales tramitados por otros
conductos, a fin de que se atiendan primero los proyectos,
grandes y pequenos, que sea mas utiles y de mayor
urgencia.
(v) Manejar sus operaciones con atencion debida al efecto
que puedan tener las inversiones internacionales sobre la
situation de los negocios en los territorios de los paises
participantes; y, en los anos subsiguientes al cese de las
hostilidades, contribuir a que la transition, de una eco­
nomia de guerra a una economia de paz, se logre sin contratiempo.
El Banco se inspirara, para todas sus decisiones, en los fines
expuestos en el presente Articulo.
Articulo II
Miembros del Banco y Capital del Mismo

Miembros.
(a) Seran miembros fundadores del Banco los miembros del
Fonda Monetario Internacional que acepten participar en el con
anterioridad a la fecha estipulada en el parrafo (e), Seccion 2 del
Articulo XI.
(b) Los demas paises participantes en el Fondo podran ingresar
en el Banco en las fechas, y conforme a las condiciones que este
prescriba.

S eccio n 1.

(p. 3)
S eccio n 2.

Capital Autorizado.

(a)
El capital por acciones autorizado del Banco sera de diez
mil millones en dolares de los Estados Unidos de America
($10,000,000,000 del peso y la ley vigentes el 1.° de julio de 1944.
Este capital se dividira en 100,000 acciones, con valor nominal de




1390

MONET ARY AND F I NANCI AL CONFERENCE

100,000 dolares cada una, que solo podran subscribir los paises
participantes.
(b)
Cuando el Banco lo estime conveniente, podra aumentarse
el capital por acciones previo el voto afirmativo de tres cuartas
partes del numero total de votos.
Subscription de acciones.
(a) Cada miembro subscribira un numero de acciones del capi­
tal por acciones del Banco. El rmnimo de acciones que subscribiran
los miembros fundadores sera el que se estipula en el Cuadro A. El
minimo de acciones que deberan subscribir los demas paises que
ingresen como miembros lo determinara el Banco, que reservara
una parte de su capital por acciones suficiente para las subscrip­
t io n s que hicieren dichos miembros.
(b) El Banco prescribira reglas estableciendo condiciones de
acuerdo con las cuales los miembros puedan subscribir acciones
del capital por acciones autorizado del Banco ademas de las sub­
scrip tion s minimas.
(c) Si se aumentare el capital por acciones autorizado, cada
miembro tendra una oportunidad razonable para subscribir, de
acuerdo con las condiciones que decida el Banco, una proportion del
aumento de acciones equivalente a la proportion que sus acciones
hasta entonces subscritas guarden con el capital por acciones del
Banco, pero no se obligara a ningun miembro a subscribir parte
alguna del capital aumentado.
S e c ci 6 n 3.

(P . 4 )

Valor de emision de las acciones.
Las acciones incluidas en las subscripciones minimas de los
miembros fundadores seran emitidas a la par. Tambien se emitiran a la par otras acciones, salvo que el Banco decida emitirlas
con otro valor, en circunstancias especiales, por mayoria del
numero total de votos.

S e c cio n 4.

Division y exigibilidad del capital subscrito.
La subscription de cada pais participante se dividira en dos
partes, a saber:
S ec cio n 5.

(i) El veinte por ciento se pagara o sera exigible conforme al
inciso (i), Seccion 7 del presente Articulo, segun lo necesitare el Banco para sus operaciones; y
(ii) el ochenta por ciento restante sera exigible por el Banco
solo cuando sea necesario para dar cumplimiento a las
obligaciones que hubiere contraido conforme a los incisos
(ii) y (iii), parrafo (a), Seccion 1 del Articulo IV.




APPENDI X I

1391

Los requerimientos de pago en los casos de subscripciones exigibles
afectaran de modo uniforme a todas las acciones.
Limitation de responsabilidad.
La responsabilidad respecto a las acciones se limitara a la parte
del valor de emision de las mismas que estuviere pendiente de pago.

S e c c io n 6.

(P. 5)
S e c c io n 7.

Plan para el pago de subscripciones de acciones.
El pago de subscripciones de las acciones se hara en oro o en
dolares de los Estados Unidos de America, y en las monedas de los
paises participantes, conforme al siguiente plan:
(i) de acuerdo con las disposiciones del inciso (i), Seccion 5
de este Articulo, el dos por ciento del valor de cada action
sera pagadero en oro o en dolares de los Estados Unidos
de America, y cuando se hicieren requerimientos de pago,
el dieciocho por ciento restante se pagara en la moneda del
pais participante respectivo;
(ii) cuando se exija el pago de acuerdo con el inciso (ii),
Seccion 5 del presente Articulo, tal pago se hara, a option
del pals participante, en oro, en dolares de los Estados
Unidos de America o en la moneda requerida para el cumplimiento de las obligaciones del Banco que hubieren motivado el requerimiento de pago;
(iii) cuando un pals participante pagare en cualquier moneda
conforme a los incisos (i) y (ii) anteriores, tales pagos se
haran en cantidades de un valor igual al de la responsa­
bilidad de dicho pals bajo el requerimiento de pago. Esta
responsabilidad constituira una parte proporcional del
capital subscrito por acciones del Banco, segun se autoriza
y define en la Seccion 2 del presente Articulo.
(P. 6 )
S e c c io n 8.

Fecha de pago de la subscripciones.
(a)
El dos por ciento exigible sobre cada action en oro o en
dolares de los Estados Unidos de America, conforme al inciso (i),
Seccion 7 de este Articulo, se pagara dentro de sesenta dlas contados a partir de la fecha en que el Banco comience sus opera­
ciones; disponiendose que (i) a cualquier miembro fundador del
Banco, cuyo territorio metropolitano hubiere sufrido como consecuencia de ocupacion enemiga u hostilidades en el curso de la
presente guerra, se le concedera el derecho de posponer el pago
de un medio por ciento hasta cinco anos despues de dicha fecha;
(ii) que un miembro fundador que no pudiere efectuar tal pago
por razon de no haber recuperado posesion de sus reservas de




1392

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

oro confiscadas o inmovilizadas aun como resultado de la guerra,
podra posponer todo pago hasta una fecha que decidira el Banco.
(b)
El saldo del valor de cada action exigible conforme a lo
dispuesto en el inciso (i), Seccion 7 del presente Articulo, se
pagara en la forma y fecha que lo exija el Banco; disponiendose
que
(i) el Banco requerira el pago, dentro de un ano a partir del
comienzo de sus operaciones, de no menos del ocho por
ciento del valor de la action ademas del pago del dos por
ciento a que se hace referencia en el parrafo (a) anterior;
(ii) no se exigira el pago de mas del cinco por ciento del valor
de la action en un trimestre cualquiera.
SECCION 9. Mantenimiento del valor de determinadds disponibili­
dades en moneda del Banco.
(a) Siempre que (i) el valor a la par de la moneda de un pais
participante se redujere, o que (ii) el valor de la moneda de un
pais participante haya experimentado, en opinion del Banco, una
depreciation considerable en el cambio sobre el exterior dentro de
los territorios de dicho participante, este pagara al Banco, dentro
de un plazo razonable, una cantidad adicional de su propia moneda
que sea suficiente para mantener, en el mismo valor que tenia a la
(p. 7)
fecha de la subscription original, la cantidad de moneda de dicho
pals en poder del Banco y derivada de la moneda con que contribuyo originalmente al Banco el pais participante de acuerdo con el
inciso (i), Seccion 7, del Articulo II, de la moneda a que se refiere
el parrafo (b), Seccion 2, del Articulo IV, o de cualquier otra
moneda adicional suministrada conforme a las disposiciones del
presente parrafo, y que dicho pals no haya recomprado por oro o
por una moneda aceptable para el Banco de cualquier otro partici­
pante.
(b) Siempre que se aumentare el valor a la par de la moneda de
un pals participante, el Banco devolvera a este, dentro de un plazo
razonable, una cantidad de moneda de dicho participante que sea
igual al aumento en el valor de la cantidad de dicha moneda descrita
en el parrafo (a) precedente.
(c) El Banco puede renunciar a las disposiciones de los parrafos
precedentes si el Fondo Monetario Internacional hiciere una modi­
fication uniforme y proporcionada en el valor a la par de las
monedas de todos sus miembros.
S ec cio n 10. Retriccion de la enajenacion de acciones.
Las acciones no podran ser pignoradas ni gravadas en forma
alguna, y solo podran traspasarse al propio Banco.




APPENDI X I

1393

Articulo III
Disposiciones Generates Respecto a Prestamos y Garantias

Uso de disponibilidades.
(a) Los recursos y las facilidades del Banco se usaran exclusivamente en beneficio de los paises participantes, prestandose
atencion equitativa, por igual, a los proyectos de fomento y a los
de reconstruction.
(p. 8)
(b) Para los efectos de facilitar la rehabilitation y recon­
struction de la economia de los paises participantes cuyos territo­
rios metropolitanos hubieren sufrido ruina considerable por causa
de ocupacion enemiga u hostilidades, al determinar las condiciones
y terminos del prestamo el Banco tendra especialmente en cuenta
la necesidad de aligerar la carga financiera y completar a la brevedad posible esa rehabilitation y esa reconstruction.
S e c cio n 1.

Negocios entre los paises participantes y el Banco.
Cada pais participante negociara con el Banco solo por intermedio de la Tesoreria, banco central, fondo de estabilizacion u otro
organismo fiscal semejante de dicho pais, y el Banco negociara con
sus miembros solamente por intermedio de los mismos organismos.

SECCION 2.

Limitaciones sobre garantias del Banco y fondos que
tome a prestamo.
El monto total de las garantias pendientes, de las participa­
t io n s en prestamos, y de los prestamos directos que hiciere el
Banco no podra aumentarse en ningun momento, si con motivo de
tal aumento el monto total excederia en un ciento por ciento el
capital subscrito libre de todo gravamen, las reservas y el superavit
del Banco.
S eccio n 3.

Condiciones en las cuales podra el Banco garantizar o
Ifiacer prestamos.
El Banco podra garantizar prestamos, participar en los que se
hicieren, o conceder prestamos a cualquier pais participante o sub­
division politica del mismo, y a cualquier empresa comercial, indus­
trial y agricola en los territorios de un pais participante, sujeto a
las condiciones siguientes:
S e c cio n 4.

(i) Cuando el pais participante en cuyos territorios estuviere
situado el proyecto no sea el prestatario, que dicho pais, su
banco central o un organismo comparable del mismo que
el Banco considere aceptable, garantice plenamente el pago
del principal, de los intereses y de los demas cargos sobre
el prestamo.




1394

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

(p. 9).
(ii) Que se establezca a satisfaction del Banco que, en las
condiciones del mercado, el prestatario no podria obtener
el prestamo por otros medios y en condiciones que el Banco
estimara razonables para dicho prestatario.
(iii) Que una comision competente, segun lo dispuesto en la
Seccion 7 del Articulo V, despues de considerar detenidamente los meritos de la proposition, recomiende el proyecto
en dictamen sometido por escrito.
(iv) Que el tipo de interes y demas cargos sean razonables en
opinion del Banco, y que dicho tipo de interes, los cargos
y la tabla prescrita para la amortization del principal, sean
adecuados para el proyecto.
(v) Que, al hacer o garantizar un prestamo, el Banco tenga en
cuenta las perspectivas de que el prestatario, y si el presta­
tario no fuere un pais participante, el fiador, estara en
condiciones de cumplir con las obligaciones impuestas por
el prestamo; y que el Banco actue con prudencia en
interes tanto del pals donde estuviere ubicado el proyecto,
como de los paises participantes en general.
(vi) Que el Banco reciba compensation adecuada por el riesgo
que corra al garantizar un prestamo que hicieren otros
inversionistas.
(vii) Los prestamos que haga o garantice el Banco se destinaran, salvo en circunstancias especiales, a proyectos especificos de reconstruccion o fomento.
Uso de prestamos que el banco garantice, otorgue o
en los cuales tenga participation.
(a) El Banco no impondra condition alguna que obligue a invertir el producto de un prestamo en los territorios de uno o mas
paises participantes.
S e ccio n 5.

(P. 10)

(b) El Banco hara arreglos a fin de asegurar que el producto
de un prestamo se dedique exclusivamente a los propositos para
los cuales fue otorgado, prestando debida atencion a los factores de
economia y eficiencia y haciendo caso omiso de influencias o consi­
derations pollticas u otras que no sean de indole econimica.
(c) En el caso de prestamos otorgados por el Banco, este abrira
una cuenta a nombre del prestatario y la cantidad del prestamo
otogado por el Banco se acreditara en dicha cuenta en .la moneda
o monedas en que se hiciere el prestamo. El Banco le permitira
al prestatario girar contra esta cuenta solo para cubrir gastos en
conexion con el proyecto a medida que se incurra en ellos.




APPENDI X I

A rticu lo

1395

IV

Operaciones
S e c c io n 1.

Metodos para hacer o facilitar prestamos.
(a) El Banco podra hacer o facilitar prestamos que llenen las
condiciones generales del Articulo III, en cualquiera de las formas
siguientes:
(i) Haciendo, o participando en, prestamos directos utilizando
fondos propios correspondientes al capital pagado y libre
de compromiso y al superavit y, conforme a la Seccion 6
de este Articulo, a sus reservas.
(ii) Haciendo, o participando en, prestamos directos utilizando
fondos obtenidos en el mercado de un pais participante o
recibidos a prestamo de otro modo por el Banco.
(iii) Garantizando total o parcialmente los prestamos que
hicieren inversionistas particulares por los conductos
usales de inversion.
(P. 1 1)

(b) El Banco podra tomar a prestamo, de acuerdo con el inciso
(ii) del parrafo (a) anterior, o garantizar prestamos conforme
a lo dispuesto en el inciso (iii) del mismo parrafo, solo previa
aprobacion del pais participante en cuyo mercado se levantaren los
fondos y de aquel en cuya moneda se hicieren los prestamos; y
unicamente si dichos paises convinieren en que el producto de
dichos prestamos podrla canjearse sin restriction alguna por la
moneda de cualquier otro pais participante.
S e c c io n 2.

Disponibiiidad y transferibilidad de monedas.
(a) Las monedas ingresadas en el Banco de acuerdo con el inciso
(i), Seccion 7, del Articulo II, se prestaran unicamente con la
aprobacion en cada caso del pals participante de cuya moneda se
tratare; disponiendose, sin embargo, que si fuere necesario despues
de haber pedido todo el capital subscrito del Banco, dichas monedas
se usaran o canjearan, sin restriction por parte de los participantes
cuyas monedas se ofrecen, por las monedas que se necesitaren para
afrontar pagos contractuales de intereses, otros cargos, o amortiza­
tion sobre los prestamos tornados por el mismo Banco, o para hacer
frente a las responsabilidades del Banco con respecto a dichos
pagos contractuales sobre prestamos garantizados por el Banco.
(b) Las monedas que el Banco recibiere de prestatarios o fiadores en pago a cuenta del principal de prestamos directos hechos con
las monedas a que se refiere el parrafo (a) anterior, se canjearan
por las monedas de otros participantes, o se volveran a prestar,
unicamente con la aprobacion, en cada caso, de los participantes
795841 — 48— 18




1396

MONET ARY AND F INANCIAL CONFERENCE

de cuyas monedas se tratare; disponiendose, sin embargo, que si
fuera necesario despues de haber pedido todo el capital subscrito
del Banco, dichas monedas se usaran o canjearan, sin restriction
por parte de los participantes cuyas monedas se ofrecen, por las
monedas que se necesitaren para afrontar pagos contractuales de
interesses, otros cargos, o amortization sobre los prestamos toma
dos por el mismo Banco, o para hacer frente a las responsabilidades del Banco con respecto a dichos pagos contractuales sobre
prestamos garantizados por el Banco.
(P. 12)
(c) Las monedas que recibiere el Banco de prestatarios o fiadores en pago a cuento del principal de prestamos directos hechos
por el Banco de acuerdo con el inciso (ii), parrafo (a), de la
Seccion 1 del presente Articulo, se retendran y usaran, sin re­
striction por parte de los participantes, para hacer pagos de amor­
tization, o para anticipar pagos de una parte o de todas las obli­
gaciones mismas del Banco, o la recompra de una parte o de todas
dichas obligaciones.
(d) Todas las demas monedas asequibles para el Banco, incluso
las levantadas en el mercado, o de otro modo tomadas a prestamo
de acuerdo con el inciso (ii), parrafo (a) de la Seccion 1 de este
Articulo, las obtenidas por la venta de oro, las recibidas en pago
de intereses y otros cargos sobre prestamos directos hechos de conformidad con los incisos (i) y (ii), parrafo (a) de la Seccion 1,
y las recibidas en pago de comisiones y otros cargos conforme al
inciso (iii), parrafo (a) de la Seccion 1, se usaran o canjearan
por otras monedas o por oro adquiridos en las operaciones del
Banco, sin restriction, por parte de los participantes cuyas mone­
das se ofrecen.
(e) Las monedas que los prestatarios levantaren en los mercados de los paises participantes sobre prestamos garantizados por
el Banco de conformidad con el inciso (iii), parrafo (a) de la
Seccion 1 del presente Articulo, tambien se usaran o canjearan por
otras monedas, sin restriction por parte de dichos participantes.
Suministro de Monedas para prestamos directos .
Las disposiciones siguientes se aplicaran a los prestamos direc­
tos a que se refieren los incisos (i) y (ii), parrafo (a), Seccion 1
de este Articulo:
S e ccio n 3.

(a)
El Banco suministrar a al prestatario monedas de otros
paises participantes, que no sea aquel donde estuviere ubicado el
proyecto, a medida que las necesite para invertirlas en los terri­
torios de dichos paises para los fines del prestamo.




APPENDI X I

1397

(b) En circunstancias excepcionales, cuando el prestatario no
pudiere obtener la moneda local necesaria a los fines del prestamo
en condiciones razonables, el Banco podra suministrar una cantidad adecuada de esa moneda como parte del prestamo.
(p. 13)
(c) Si el proyecto aumentare indirectamente la necesidad de
divisa extranjera por parte del pais donde estuviere ubicado el
proyecto, el Banco podra, en circunstancias excepcionales, sumi­
nistrar al prestatario, como parte del prestamo, una cantidad ade­
cuada de oro o de divisa extranjera que no exceda del monto de los
gastos locales del prestatario en conexion con los fines del pres­
tamo.
(d) El Banco podra, en casos excepcionales, a solicitud de un
pais participante en cuyos territorios se empleare parte del presta­
mo, comprar de nuevo, con oro o con divisa extranjera, una parte
de la moneda de dicho pais que se hubiere invertido, pero la parte
recomprada en ningun caso excedera de la cantidad equivalente
al aumento en la necesidad de divisa extranjera ocasionado por
la inversion del prestamo en dichos territorios.
Disposiciones para el Pago de Prestamos Directos
Los contratos de prestamos que se hicieren conforme a los incisos
(i) o (ii), parrafo (a), Seccion 1 del presente Articulo, deberan
regirse por las siguientes condiciones de pago:
(a) El Banco determinara los terminos y condiciones relativos
a interes y pagos de amortization, vencimiento y fechas de pago
de cada prestamo. El Banco determinara, asimismo, el tipo y
cualesquiera otros terminos y condiciones de la comision que
hubiere de cobrarse en relacion con dicho prestamo.
En los casos de prestamos que se hicieren conforme al inciso
(ii), parrafo (a) de la Seccion 1, durante los primeros diez anos
de las operaciones del Banco, este tipo no sera menos del uno ni
mas del uno y medio por ciento anual, y se cargara a aquella parte
del prestamo respectivo aun pendiente de pago. Pasado este
periodo de diez anos, el Banco podra reducir el tipo de comision
en lo que respecta a la parte aun pendiente de pago de prestamos
ya colocados y a futuros prestamos, si el Banco juzgare que las
reservas acumuladas de acuerdo con la Seccion 6 de este Articulo
(p. 14)
y como producto de otros ingresos son suficientes para justificar
dicha reduction. Por lo que respecta a prestamos futuros, el Banco
tambien tendra discretion para aumentar el tipo de comision sobre
el limite antes expresado si la experiencia asi lo aconseja.
(b) Todos los contratos de prestamo deberan estipular la
Se c cio n 4.




1398

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

moneda o monedas en que hayan de hacerse los pagos al Banco
segun cada contrato. Sin embargo, a option del prestatario, tales
pagos podran hacerse en oro o, si el Banco esta de acuerdo, en la
moneda de un pais participante distinto del que se especifique en
el contrato.
*
(i) En los casos de prestamos que se hicieren conforme a lo
dispuesto en el inciso (i), parrafo (a), Seccion 1 del
presente Articulo, los contratos de prestamo dispondran
que los pagos que se hagan al Banco por concepto de intereses, otros cargos y amortization, seran en la misma
moneda prestada, salvo que el pais participante cuya
moneda se haya prestado conviniere en que tales pagos se
hagan en otra moneda o monedas que se especifiquen.
Sujeto a las disposiciones del parrafo (c), Seccion 9 del
Articulo II, estos pagos seran equivalentes al valor de los
pagos prescritos por el contrato, en la fecha en que se
extendieron los prestamos, calculado en terminos de una
moneda que al efecto especifique el Banco por mayoria de
tres cuartas partes del numero total de votos.
(ii) En los casos de prestamos que se hicieren conforme al
inciso (ii), parrafo (a), Seccion 1 del presente Articulo,
(p. 15)
el monto total pendiente y pagadero al Banco en una
moneda cualquiera no exedera jamas del monto total de
los fondos tornados a prestamo por el propio Banco de
acuerdo con el inciso (ii), parrafo (a), Seccion 1, y pagaderos en la misma moneda.
(c)
Si un pals participante sufriere de escasez aguda de divisas
que le prive de cumplir en la forma estipulada con el servicio de
un prestamo cualquiera contratado por dicho pais, o garantizado
por una de sus agencias, dicho pals podra solicitar del Banco que
se moderen las condiciones de pago. Si el Banco se convenciere de
que tal action convendrla a los intereses del pals respectivo, a las
operaciones del Banco y a los intereses de los participantes en
general, podra proceder de acuerdo con cualquiera, o ambos,
de los parrafos siguientes, en lo que respecta a la totalidad o parte
del servicio anual:
(i) El Banco podra, a discretion, hacer arreglos con el par­
ticipante interesado para aceptar pagos sobre el servicio
del prestamo en la moneda de dicho pals durante perlodos
que no excederan de tres anos, sujeto a condiciones apropiadas en lo relativo al uso de dicha moneda y al manteni-




APPENDI X I

1399

miento de su valor en el mercado de cambio sobre el exte­
rior, asi como para readquirir la misma, por compra, en
condiciones adecuadas.
(ii) El Banco podra modificar los terminos convenidos respecto
a amortization, aplazar el vencimiento del prestamo, o
tomar ambas medidas.
(p. 16)
S e c c io n 5.

Garantias
(a) Al garantizar un prestamo colocado a traves de los conductos usuales de inversion, el Banco cobrara una comision por
dicha garantia pagadera periodicamente sobre la parte del presta­
mo aun pendiente de pago. El tipo de la comision de garantia lo
determinara el banco. Durante los primeros diez anos de funcionamiento del Banca, dicho tipo no sera menos del uno ni mas del uno
y medio por ciento anual. Pasado este periodo de diez anos, el Banco
podra reducir el tipo de comision en lo que respecta tanto a las
partes de prestamos ya garantizados y aun pendientes de pago
como a prestamos futuros si el Banco considerare que las reservas
acumuladas de acuerdo con la Seccion 6 de este Articulo y de otros
ingresos son suficientes para justificar una reduction. En el caso
de prestamos futuros, el Banco tambien tendra discretion para
aumentar la comision a un tipo que exceda el limite en esta
Seccion estipulado, si la experiencia demostrare que el aumento es
aconsejable.
(b) El prestatario pagara directamente al Banco las comisiones
por concepto de garantias.
(c) Las garantias del Banco estipularan que el Banco podra
dar por terminada su responsabilidad con respecto a intereses si,
al faltar al pago el prestatario y el liador, si existe, el Banco ofreciere comprar los bonos u otras obligaciones garantizadas, a la
par mas los intereses acumulados hasta la fecha fijada en la oferta.
(d) El Banco tendra facultad para determinar cualesquiera
otros terminos y condiciones de la garantia.
(P. 17)
Reserva especial
La cantidad que por concepto de comisiones reciba el Banco de
conformidad con las Secciones 4 y 5 del presente Articulo, se pondran aparte como una reserva especial que se mantendra disponible
para hacer frente a responsabilidades del Banco segun la Seccion 7
de este Articulo. Dicha reserva especial se conservara en la forma
liquida que permita este Acuerdo y que decidieren los Directores
E]jecutivos.
S e c c io n 6.




1400

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Medios de hacer frente a las responsabilidades del
Banco en casos de falta de pago
En caso de falta de pago de prestamos otorgados o garantizados
por el Banco, o en los que hubiere participado:
(a) El Banco hara los arreglos que fueren factibles para ajustar
las obligaciones que resultaren, incluso arreglos de conformidad
con el parrafo (c) de la Seccion 4 de este Articulo, o arreglos
analogos.
(b) Los pagos que se hicieren para cancelar responsabilidades
contraidas por el Banco por concepto de prestamos o garantias,
de acuerdo con los incisos (ii) y (iii), del parrafo (a) de la
Seccion 1 del presente Articulo, se cargaran:
S e c cio n 7.

(i) primero, a la reserva especial que establece la Seccion 6
de este Articulo;
(ii) despues, hasta el grado necesario y a discretion del Banco,
a las otras reservas, superavits y capital a disposition del
mismo.
(c) Siempre que fuere necesario para hacer frente a pagos
contractuales de intereses, de otros cargos o de amortization sobre
fondos tornados a prestamo por el Banco, o para hacer frente a
(p. 18)
responsabilidades contraidas por el Banco con respecto a pagos
similares sobre prestamos garantizados por el mismo, este podra
exigir, de conformidad con las Secciones 5 y 7 del Articulo II, el
pago de una cantidad adecuada de las subscripciones aun por
pagar de los participantes. Ademas, si creyere que la falta de
pago ha de prolongarse por mucho tiempo, el Branco podra exigir
el pago de una cantidad adicional de las subscripciones aun pendientes, que no exceda, en un ano cualquiera, del uno por ciento
del total de subscripciones de los participantes, con los fines
siguientes:
(i) Para pagar antes de su vencimiento, o de otro modo cance­
lar su responsabilidad, respecto a la totalidad o parte del
principal pendiente de pago de cualquier prestamo garantizado por el y que el deudor no hubiere pagado.
(ii) Para recomprar, o de otro modo cancelar su responsabili­
dad, respecto a la totalidad o parte de las cantidades tomadas a prestamo por el Banco y aun pendientes de pago.
Operaciones misceldneas
Ademas de las otras operaciones prescritas en este Acuerdo, el
Banco tendra facultad:

S e c cio n 8.




APPENDI X I

1401

(i) Para comprar y vender valores que hubiere emitido, y comprar y vender valores que hubiere garantizado o en los
cuales hubiere invertido, disponiendose que el Banco debera obtener la aprobacion del pais participante en cuyos
territorios hubieren de comprarse o venderse tales valores.
(ii) Para garantizar valores en los que hubiere hecho inversion
con el objeto de facilitar la venta de los mismos.
(P. 19)

(iii) Para tomar a prestamo la moneda de cualquier pais par­
ticipante, previa aprobacion de dicho pais; y
(iv) Para comprar y vender cualesquiera otros valores que
los Directores, por mayoria de tres cuartas partes del
numero total de votos, juzguen idoneos para la inversi6n
de la totalidad o parte de la reserva especial, conforme a
la Seccion 6 del presente Articulo.
Al ejercer los poderes conferidos por esta Seccion, el Banco podra
tratar con cualquiera persona, sociedad mercantil, asociacion,
sociedad anonima, u otra entidad juridica en los territorios de
cualquier pais participante.
Advertencia que se fijard en los valores
Todo valor que garantice o emita el Banco debera contener impresen lugar conspicuo una advertencia al efecto de que no es una
obligacion de gobierno alguno, salvo que se indique expresamente
en el propio titulo.

S ec cio n 9.

Prohibition de actividades politicos
Tanto el Banco como sus funcionarios se abstendran de intervenir en los asuntos politicos de cualquier pais participante, y no
permitiran que la clase de gobierno del pais o paises participantes
interesados sea factor que influya en sus decisiones. Para llegar
a estas, solo consideraciones de caracter economico seran pertinentes consideraciones que deberan aquilatarse con imparcialidad
con miras a lograr los fines consignados en el Articulo I.
SECCION 10.

Articulo V
Organization y Administration

Organization administrativa del Banco
El Banco tendra una Junta de Gobernadores, Directores Ejecu­
tivos, un Presidente y demas functionarios y miembros del per­
sonal para desempenar las funciones que el Banco determine.

S ec cio n 1.

(P. 20)
S ec cio n 2.

Junta de Gobernadores
(a) Todos los poderes del Banco radicaran en la Junta de Go-




1402

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

bernadores, la cual constara de un gobernador y un suplente nombrados por cada uno de los paises participantes en la forma que
el mismo determine. Cada gobernador y cada suplente serviran
cinco anos en su cargo, sujetos la voluntad del pais participante
que lo nombre, y podra designarseles para un nuevo periodo.
Ningun suplente podra votar salvo durante la ausencia del respectivo gobernador en propiedad. La Junta elegira a uno de los gobernadores para el cargo de Presidente.
(b) La Junta de Gobernadores podra delegar en los Directores
Ejecutivos autoridad para ejercer cualesquiera facultades de la
Junta, excepto las siguientes:
(i) Admitir nuevos participantes y determinar las condiciones
necesarias para su admision;
(ii) Aumentar o disminuir el capital por acciones;
(iii) Suspender a un pais participante.
(iv) Decidir apelaciones sobre interpretaciones del presente
Acuerdo que emitieren los Directores Ejecutivos;
(v) Concertar arreglos para cooperar con otros organismos
internacionales (que no fueren arreglos de caracter tem­
poral y administrativo) ;
(vi) Decidir la suspension definitiva de las operaciones del
Banco y distribuir su activo; y
(vii) Determinar la distribution de los ingresos netos del Banco.
(c) La Junta de Gobernadores se reunira una vez al ano, y
tantas otras veces como lo disponga la misma Junta o como la
convoquen los directores ejecutivos. Las reuni ones de la Junta las
convocaran los directores cuando lo solicitaren cinco paises par­
ticipantes o aquellos que tuvieren una cuarta parte del con junto
total de votos.
(P. 21)
(d) El quorum para toda reunion de la Junta de Gobernadores
lo constituira una mayoria de ellos que represente por lo menos dos
terceras partes del con junto total de votos.
(e) La Junta de Gobernadores podra establecer, por reglamento,
un procedimiento por el cual los Directores Ejecutivos, cuando creyeren que dicha action habria de redundar en beneficio del Banco,
podran logar que los Gobernadores voten sobre una cuestion determinada sin necesidad de convocar a reunion de la Junta.
(f) La Junta de Gobernadores y los Directores Ejecutivos
podran adoptar, dentro del limite de sus atribuciones, las reglas
y reglamentos que fueren necesarios o adecuados para administrar
los negocios del Banco.
(g) Los gobernadores y suplentes desempenaran sus respectivos




APPENDI X I

1403

cargos sin remuneration de parte del Banco, pero este les reembolsara los gastos razonables en que incurrieren cuando asistan a las
reuniones.
(h)
La Junta de Gobernadores determinara la remuneration
que se pagara a los Directores Ejecutivos, el sueldo del Presidente
y los terminos del contrato de servicios de este.
Votaciones
(a) Cada pais participante tendra
mas un voto adicional por cada action
(b) Salvo lo que especificamente
todas las cuestiones que se sometan
mayoria de los votos emitidos.
S eccio n 3.

doscientos cincuenta votos,
que posea.
se disponga en contrario,
al Banco se decidiran por

Directores Ejecutivos
(a) Los Directores Ejecutivos seran responsables de la direc­
tion de las operaciones generales del Banco, y a ese efecto ejerceran
todos los poderes que en ellos delegue la Junta de Gobernadores.
(p. 22)
(b) Habra doce Directores Ejecutivos, que no tienen que ser
gobernadores, y de los cuales
S eccio n 4.

(i) cinco seran nombrados por los cinco participantes que
tengan el mayor numero de acciones;
(ii) siete seran electos de acuerdo con el Cuadro B por todos
los Gobernadores, excepto los nombrados por los cinco
participantes a que se refiere el inciso (i) precedente.
Para los efectos de este parrafo “ participantes” significa los go­
biernos de aquellos paises cuyos nombres aparecen en el Cuadro A,
ya fueren miembros fundadores o llegaren a miembros de acuerdo
con el parrafo (b), de la Seccion 1 del Articulo II. Cuando los
gobiernos de otros paises adquieran calidad de participantes, la
Junta de Gobernadores podra aumentar el numero total de direc­
tores aumentando el numero de Directores que hayan de elegirse
por mayoria de cuatro quintas partes de la totalidad de votos.
Los Directores Ejecutivos seran nombrados o electos cada dos
anos.
(c) Cada director ejecutivo nombrara un suplente que tendra
plenos poderes para actuar en su nombre durante su ausencia.
Cuando esten presentes los directores ejecutivos que los hayan
nombrado, los suplentes podran participar en las reuniones, pero
no votaran.
(d) Los directores seguiran desempenando su cargo hasta que
se nombren o se elijan sus sucesores. Si vaca el puesto de un di­
rector electo mas de noventa dias antes de la expiration de su




1404

M O N E TAR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

termino, los Gobernadores que eligieron al director anterior elegiran otro director por el resto del termino., Se necesitara una
mayoria de los votos emitidos para elegirle. Mientras este vacante
el puesto, el suplente del director anterior ejercera los poderes
inherentes al cargo, excepto el de nombrar un suplente.
(P. 23)
(e) Los Directores Ejecutivos estaran en functiones en sesi6n
continua en la oficina principal del Banco, y se reuniran tan a
menudo como lo requieran los negocios del Banco.
( f ) Constituira el quorum en cualquier reunion de los Directores
Ejecutivos una mayoria de los mismos que represente no menos de
la mitad del total de los votos.
(g) Cada uno de los directores nombrados tendra derecho a
emitir el numero de votos asignados en la Seccion 3 de este Articulo
al participante que le nombre. Cada director electo tendra derecho
a emitir el numero de votos que recibio al ser electo. Cada director
emitira como una unidad todos los votos que tenga derecho a emitir.
(h) La Junta de Gobernadores adoptara reglamentos segun los
cuales un participante que no tenga derecho a nombrar un director
de acuerdo con el parrafo (b) anterior pueda enviar un representante que asista a cualquier reunion de los Directores Ejecutivos
en que se considere una solicitud hecha por dicho participante o una
cuestion que le afecte en particular.
(i) Los Directores Ejecutivos podran nombrar los comites que
consideren convenientes. La participation en dichos comites no se
limitara a los gobernadores y los directores o sus suplentes.
Del Presidente y el personal
(a) Los Directores Ejecutivos designaran un Presidente, que
no podra ser un gobernador o un director ejecutivo, ni el suplente
de uno u otro. El Presidente sera asimismo Presidente de los Di­
rectores Ejecutivos, pero no votara excepto para decidir en un
caso de empate. Podra participar en las reuniones de la Junta de
Gobernadores, mas sin derecho a votar en ellas. El Presidente
cesara en su cargo cuando tal sea la voluntad expresa de los Di­
rectores Ejecutivos.
(P. 24)
(b) El Presidente sera el jefe del personal administrativo del
Banco, y tendra a su cargo, bajo la direction de los Directores
Ejecutivos, los negocios ordinarios del mismo. Sera responsable,
sujeto al control general de los Directores Ejecutivos, de la orga­
nization, nombramiento y destitution de los funcionarios y de los
miembros del personal.
(c) En el desempeno de sus cargos, el Presidente y el personal
S e c cio n 5.




APPENDI X I

1405

del Banco deberan fidelidad exclusiva al Banco y no acataran otra
autoridad. Cada pais miembro del Banco respetara el caracter
internacional de tal fidelidad, y se abstendra de influir con miembro
alguno del personal en el desempeno de sus funciones.
(d)
Al designar los funcionarios y los miembros del personal,
y salvo la necesidad primordial de asegurar el mas alto nivel de
eficiencia y de competencia tecnica, el Presidente tomara debida
cuenta de la importancia de obtener la representation mas variada
posible desde el punto de vista geografico.
Cornejo Consultivo.
(a) Habra un Consejo Consultivo de no menos de siete personas,
designadas por la Junta de Gobernadores, que comprendera representantes de intereses bancarios, comerciales, industrials, obreros
y agricolas, con la representation mas variada posible de ciudadanos de los distintos paises. En aquellos campos en que existan
organismos internacionales especializados, se designaran los
miembros correspondientes del Consejo de acuerdo con dichos
organismos. El Consejo asesorara al Banco en materia de politica
general. El Consejo se reunira una vez al ano, y en otras ocasiones
especiales cuando lo solicite el Banco.
(b) Los Consejeros ejerceran sus cargos por un periodo de dos
aiios, y podran ser designados para nuevo periodo. Se les reembolsaran los gastos razonables que eroguen por cuenta del Banco.
S e c c io n 6.

(P. 25)
S ec cio n 7.

Comisiones de Prestamos.
El Banco designara las comisiones que deberan dictaminar
respecto a prestamos conforme a lo dispuesto en la Secci6n 4 del
Articulo III. Cada una de tales comisiones contara entre sus
miembros a un perito designado por el Gobernador que represente
al pals participante en cuyos territorios estuviere situado el
proyecto en cuestion, y uno o mas miembros del personal tecnico
del Banco.
Relaciones con otros organismos internacionales.
(a) El Banco, conforme a los terminos de este Acuerdo, cooperara con cualquier organismo internacional de caracter general,
y con organismos publicos internacionales que tengan responsabilidades especializadas en campos relacionados con el suyo.
Cualesquier arreglos que tengan por objeto establecer esa coope­
ration, y que impliquen modification de cualquier disposition de
este Acuerdo, solo podran efectuarse despues que se enmiende este
Acuerdo de conformidad con el Articulo VIII.
(b) Al decidir respecto a solicitudes de prestamos o garantias
S e c cio n 8.




1406

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

relacionados con asuntos bajo la jurisdiction de algun organismo
internacional de los tipos que se expresan en el parrafo anterior,
y en los que figuren principalmente paises miembros del Banco,
este dara consideration a los puntos de vista y recomendaciones de
tales organismos.
Ubicacion de las oficinas.
(a) La oficina principal del Banco estara situada en el territorio del participante que posea el numero mayor de acciones.
(b) El Banco podra establecer agencias o sucursales en los
territorios de cualquier pais miembro del mismo.

S ec cio n 9.

S ec cio n 10.

Oficinas y consejos regionales.
(a) El Banco podra establecer oficinas regionales y determinar
la ubicacion de cada una de ellas y las regiones en las cuales tendran
jurisdiction.
(p. % )
(b) Cada oficina regional estara asesorada por un consejo que
representara a toda la region, y que sera designado en la forma
que decida el Banco.
S ec cio n 11.

Despositarios.
(a) Cada pais participante designara a su banco central como
depositario de todas las disponibilidades del Banco en moneda suya
y, si no tuviere banco central, designara a cualquiera otra institu­
tion que sea aceptable para el Banco.
(b) El Banco podra mantener otro activo, incluso oro, en los
depositarios que designen los cinco paises participantes que posean
el numero mayor de acciones y en cualesquiera otros depositarios
que designe el Banco. Al principio, cuando menos la mitad de las
disponibilidades en oro del Banco se colocaran con el depositario
designado por el pais participante en cuyos territorios tenga el
Banco su oficina principal, y por lo menos 40 por ciento se colo­
caran con los depositarios que designen los otros cuatro partici­
pantes antes mencionados, conservando cada uno de estos deposi­
tarios, para comenzar, no menos de la cantidad de oro pagado con
cuenta a las acciones del pais participante que lo hubiere designado.
Sin embargo, respecto a todas las transferencias de oro que haga
el Banco se prestara consideration debida a los gastos de trans­
p o s e y a las posibles necesidades del Banco. En caso de emergencia, los Directores Ejecutivos podran trasladar todas las dispo­
nibilidades de oro del Banco, o cualquier parte de las mismas, a
algun lugar donde tengan protection adecuada.
S e c cio n 12.

Tipo de disponibilidades.
En substitution de la parte de moneda de un pais participante




A PPENDI X I

1407

pagada al Banco conforme al inciso (i), Seccion 7 del Articulo II,
o para hacer pagos de amortization sobre prestamos hechos en
dicha moneda y que no necesite el Banco para sus operaciones,
este aceptara letras u otras obligaciones similares que emita el
Gobierno de dicho pals o el depositario que el mismo pals designare,
y tales letras u obligaciones no seran negociables ni devengaran
interes, y seran pagaderas a su presentation, por su valor nominal,
(P. 27)
mediante credito abierto a la cuenta del Banco en el depositario
que se especifique.
Publication de informes y servicio de information.
(a) El Banco publicara un informe anual que contenga un
estado de cuentas certificado por auditores, y a intervalos de cada
tres meses o menos, expedira un resumen de su situation financiera
y un estado de ganancias y perdidas que muestre el resultado de
sus operaciones.
(b) El Banco podra publicar los demas informes que considere
convenientes para la realization de sus fines.
(c) A los paises participantes se les distribuiran copias de
todos los informes, estados y publicaciones que se hicieren a tenor
con esta Seccion.

Seccio n IB.

Distribution de ingresos netos.
(a) La Junta de Gobernadores determinara cada ano que parte
de los ingresos netos del Banco, despues de proveer lo necesario
respecto a la reserva, se destinara al superavit, y si hubiere sobrante, que parte se distribuira.
(b) Si se distribuyere alguna parte, se pagara a cada pals
hasta el dos por ciento no cumulativo como primer cargo a la distri­
bution correspondiente a un ano cualquiera, basado sobre la canti­
dad media de los prestamos pendientes de pago durante el ano, en
moneda perteneciente a la subscription que hubiere hecho el pals
conforme al inciso (i), parrafo (a), Seccion 1 del Articulo IV.
Si se pagare el dos por ciento como primer cargo, el saldo que
quedare para distribuir se pagara a todos los paises participantes
en proportion al numero de acciones que tuvieren. Los pagos se
haran a cada participante en moneda del pals respectivo, mas si
esta no fuere obtenible, se haran en otra moneda que el pals parti­
cipante juzgue aceptable. Si se hicieren dichos pagos en moneda
que no sea la del participante, el que la reciba podra, una vez
pagada, usar o traspasar la moneda sin restriction alguna por
parte de los demas paises participantes.

Seccio n 14.




1408

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(P. 28)
Articulo VI
Retiro y Suspension de Participantes:
Suspension de Operaciones

Derecho de los participantes a retirarse del Banco.
Cualquier pais participante puede dejar de ser miembro del
Banco en cualquier tiempo avisando a este por escrito a su oficina
central. El retiro de un miembro sera efectivo en la fecha en que
se reciba dicho aviso.

S e c cio n 1.

S e c cio n 2. Suspension de participantes.

Un pais participante que dejare de cumplir con alguna de sus
obligaciones contraldas con el Banco podra ser suspendido como
miembro del mismo por decision de una mayoria de los Goberna­
dores, en ejercicio de una mayoria del numero total de votos. Un
ano despues de la fecha de suspension, dicho pals cesara automaticamente de ser miembro del Banco, a menos que una mayoria igual
a la que se prescribe para la suspension, restituya al pals su con­
dition de miembro a todos los efectos.
Mientras dure la suspension de un participante, este no tendra
derecho a ejercitar ninguno de los derechos conferidos por el
presente Acuerdo, excepto el de renunciar, mas quedara sujeto a
todas las obligaciones correspondientes.
Cese de participation en el fondo monetario.
Un pais participante que dejare de ser miembro del Fondo
Monetario Internacional cesara automaticamente como miembro
del Banco una vez transcurridos tres meses, salvo que el Banco, por
las tres cuartas partes del numero de votos, consienta en que dicho
pals continue en su calidad de miembro.
S e c cio n 3.

Liquidation de cuentas con gobiernos participantes
que se retiren.
(a) Cuando un gobierno deje de ser miembro del Banco, seguira
siendo responsable de sus obligaciones directas con el y de sus
responsabilidades contingentes mientras este pendiente cualquiera
(p. 29)
parte de los prestamos o guarantlas contraldos antes de cesar como
participante; pero dejara de incurrir en responsabilidad con respecto a los prestamos y garantlas que haga en adelante el Banco,
y dejara de participar tanto de los ingresos como de los gastos
del Banco.
(b) Cuando un gobierno dejare de ser miembro del Banco, 6ste
hara arreglos para recomprar sus acciones como parte de la liqui­
dation de cuentas con dicho gobierno de conformidad con las

S e c cio n 4.




A PPENDI X I

1409

disposiciones de los parrafos (c) y (d) siguientes. A los fines de
dicha recompra, el valor de la acciones sera el que indiquen los
libros del Banco el dia que el gobierno deja de ser participante.
(c)
El pago de las acciones recompradas por el Banco de acuerdo
con esta Seccion se regira por las condiciones siguientes:
(i) Toda cantidad que adeude al gobierno por sus acciones la
retendra mientras el gobierno, su banco central, o cual­
quiera de sus organismos continue siendo deudor al Banco,
bien como prestatario o como fiador, y dicha cantidad
podra aplicarse, a discretion del Banco, a cualquiera de
dichas deudas, a su vencimiento. No se retendra ninguna
cantidad debido a la responsabilidad de dicho gobierno
como consecuencia de su subscription por acciones a tenor
con el inciso (ii), Seccion 5, del Articulo II. De todos
modos, ninguna cantidad que se adeude a un participante
por sus acciones se pagara antes de transcurridos seis
meses de la fecha en que el gobierno dejare de ser parti­
cipante.
(ii) Los pagos por acciones se podran hacer de tiempo en
tiempo, a medida que las entrega el gobierno, si es que la
cantidad adeudada por concepto de la recompra de conformidad con el parrafo (b) precedente excede la totalidad
de la deuda en prestamos y garantias de acuerdo con el
inciso (i), parrafo (c) anterior hasta que el participante
retirado haya recibido el valor completo de la recompra.
(p. 30)
(iii) Los pagos se haran en la moneda del pais que lo reciba o,
a option del Banco, en oro.
(iv) Si el Banco sufriere alguna perdida en alguna garantia,
participation en un prestamo, o en algun prestamo que
hubiere estado pendiente en la fecha en que el gobierno
dejo de ser participante, y dicha perdida excede, en la
fecha en que dicho gobierno dejo de ser participante la
reserva prevista contra perdidas, dicho gobierno tendra la
obligation de pagar, cuando se le solicite, la cantidad por
la cual el precio de recompra de sus acciones hubiera sido
reducido si se hubiera tornado en cuenta la perdida cuando
se determino el precio de recompra. Ademas, el gobierno
participante retirado seguira siendo deudor de cualquier
cantidad exigible por subscripciones pendientes de pago
de acuerdo con el inciso (ii), Seccion 5, del Articulo II,
hasta el mismo grado en que estaria obligado a responder
de haber ocurrido el deterioro de capital, y el requeri-




1410

MO NE TA R Y AND FI NA NC IA L CONFERENCE

miento de pago se hubiere hecho a la fecha en que se determino el precio de recompra de sus acciones.
(d)
Si de acuerdo con el parrafo ( b ) , Seccion 5, de este Articulo,
el Banco suspende sus operaciones permanentemente dentro de seis
meses a partir de la fecha en que un gobierno cualquiera dejare de
ser participante, todos los derechos de dicho gobierno se determinaran por las disposiciones de la Seccion 5 del presente Articulo.
(P. 31)
S e c cio n 5.

Suspension de operaciones y liquidacion de obligacio­
nes.
(a) En caso de emergencia, los Directores Ejecutivos podran
suspender temporalmente las operaciones en lo relativo a nuevos
prestamos y garantias en lo que la Junta de Gobernadores examina
la situation y decide.
(b) El Banco podra suspender permanentemente sus opera­
ciones en lo relativo a nuevos pretamos y garantias mediante el
voto de una mayoria de los Gobernadores que representen una
mayoria del numero total de votos. Seguido de la suspension de
operaciones, el Banco cesara inmediatamente de participar en
actividad alguna, excepto las incidentales a la verification, con­
servation, y resguardo metodicos de su activo, y a la liquidacion
de sus obligaciones.
(c) La responsabilidad de todos los participantes en lo relativo
a las subscripciones al capital por acciones del Banco exigibles y
aun pendientes de pago, y con respecto a la depreciation de sus
propias monedas, continuara hasta tanto todas las reclamaciones
de acreedores, incluso las reclamaciones contingentes, hayan sido
saldadas.
(d) A todos los acreedores que tuvieren reclamaciones directas
contra el Banco se les pagara del activo 'de este, y luego, de los
pagos que reciba el Banco de subscripciones exigibles que estuvieren pendientes Antes de hacer pago alguno a los acreedores que
tuvieren reclamaciones directas contra el Banco, los Directores
Ejecutivos haran los arreglos que sean a su juicio necesarios para
asegurar una distribution, a los tenedores de reclamaciones con­
tingentes, a prorrata con los acreedores que tuvieren reclamaciones
directas.
(e) No se hara distribution alguna a los participantes a cuenta
de sus subscripciones al capital por acciones del Banco hasta tanto
(i) se hayan saldado todas las deudas a los acreedores, o
dispuesto lo necesario para atenderlas, y
(ii) una mayoria de los Gobernadores que poseyeren una




APPENDI X I

1411

mayoria del numero total de votos haya decidido hacer
una distribution.
(P. 3 2 )

(f) Despues de tomada la decision de hacer una distribution,
de acuerdo con el parrafo (e) precedente, los Directores Ejecutivos
podran hacer, mediante dos terceras partes de los votos, distribuciones sucesivas del activo del Banco a los participantes hasta
distribuir todo el activo. Dicha distribution estara sujeta a la
liquidation previa de todas las reclamaciones que tuviere pendientes el Banco contra cada uno de los participantes.
(g) Antes de hacer distribution alguna del activo, los Directores
Ejecutivos fijaran la cuota proporcional de cada participante a
base de la proportion entre su tenencia de acciones y el total de
acciones emitidas por el Banco.
(h) Los Directores Ejecutivos valoraran el activo que vaya a
distribuirse conforme al valor que tuviere a la fecha de la distribu­
tion, y procederan en^onces a distribuirlo de la manera siguiente:
(i) Se pagara a cada participante una cantidad cuyo valor
sea equivalente a su participation proporcional en la can­
tidad total a distribuir, pago que se le hara en sus propias
obligaciones, o en las de sus agencias oficiales o entidades
juridicas dentro de sus territorios, siempre que estuvieren
disponibles para distribution.
(ii) Todo saldo que se adeudare a un participante despues de
efectuado el pago segun el inciso (i) anterior se pagara
a dicho participante en su propia moneda, siempre que el
Banco tenga de ella, hasta una cantidad equivalente al
valor de dicho saldo.
(iii) Todo saldo que se adeudare a un participante despues de
efectuado el pago segun los incisos (i) y (ii) precedentes,
se pagara a dicho participante en oro o en divisa aceptable
para el participante, siempre que el Banco tuviere existen­
cias, hasta una cantidad equivalente al valor de dicho saldo.
(P. 3 3 )

(iv) Todo el activo que quedare en poder del Banco despues
de efectuados los pagos a participantes conforme a los
incisos (i), (ii) y (iii) precedentes, se distribuira a
prorrata entre los participantes.
(i) Todo participante que recibiere activo distribuido por el
Banco de acuerdo con el parrafo (h) anterior, disfrutara de los
mismos derechos con respecto a dicho activo que disfrutara el
Banco antes de su distribution.
795841 — 48— 19




1412

M O N E TA R Y AND FI NA NCI AL CONFERENCE

Articulo VII
Status9 Inmunidades y Privilegios

Fines del Articulo.
Para facilitar al Banco el desempeno de las functiones que le han
sido encomendadas, se otorgaran a dicho Banco, en los territorios
de cada pais participante, el status, las inmunidades y los pri­
vilegios que se consignan en el presente Articulo.

S ec cio n 1.

S ec cio n 2.

Status del Banco.
El Banco tendra personalidad juridica plena, y en particular,
facultad para:
(i) contratar;
(ii) adquirir y enajenar bienes raices y muebles;
(iii) entablar acciones judiciales.

Situation del Banco en materia de procedimiento
judicial.
El Banco podra ser demandado solo ante un tribunal de juris­
diction competente en los territorios de un pais participante donde
el Banco tuviere oficina, hubiere designado un apoderado con el
objeto de aceptar emplazamiento o notification de demanda judicial,
o hubiere emitido o garantizado valores. Sin embargo, no instituiran demandas los paises participantes, ni personas que los
representen o que deriven de ellos sus reclamaciones. El Banco y
los bienes de su activo, dondequiera que estuvieren ubicados y
quienquiera que los poseyere, gozaran de inmunidad respecto a
secuestro, embargo y ejecucion mientras no se dicte sentencia
definitiva contra el Banco.
S ec cio n 3.

(p. 34)
SECCION 4.

Inmunidad del activo contra embargo.
Los bienes y el activo del Banco, dondequiera que
ubicados y quienquiera que los poseyere, tendran
respecto a requisition, confiscation, expropiacion o
otra forma de embargo mediante action ejecutiva o

estuvieren
inmunidad
cualquiera
legislativa.

Inmunidad de los archivos.
Los archivos del Banco seran inviolables.

S e c cio n 5.

Activo libre de restricciones.
Los bienes y el activo del Banco estaran libres de restricciones,
reglamentaciones, controles y moratorias de toda clase, hasta el
grado que sea necesario para llevar a cabo las operaciones prescritas por este Acuerdo y sujeto a las disposiciones del mismo.
S e c cio n 6.




APPENDI X I

1413

S eccio n 7. Privilegios para las comunicaciones.

Cada pais participante otorgara a las comunicaciones oficiales
del Banco el mismo tratamiento que otorgare a las comunicaciones
oficiales de los demas paises participantes.
S eccio n 8.

Inmunidades y privilegios de funcionarios y em-

pleados.
Todos los gobernadores, directores ejecutivos, suplentes, funcio­
narios y empleados del Banco
(i) gozaran de inmunidad respecto a acciones judiciales por
actos que cometieren en su capacidad oficial, salvo que el
Banco renunciare a dicha inmunidad;
(ii) que no sean nacionales del pais, gozaran de las mismas
inmunidades en materia de restricciones de inmigracion,
requisites para el registro de extranjeros y obligaciones
de servicio nacional, as! como las mismas facilidades en lo
relativo a restricciones sobre cambio exterior, que otorguen
los paises participantes a los representantes, funcionarios
y empleados de otros paises participantes que tengan rango
comparable al de aquellos;
(p. 35)
(iii) recibiran el mismo trato, con respecto a facilidades de
viaje, que den los paises participantes a los representantes,
funcionarios y empleados de los demas, que tengan rango
comparable al de aquellos.
Inmunidad del pago de impuestos.
(a) El Banco, su activo, bienes, ingresos, y sus operaciones y
transacciones autorizadas por el presente Acuerdo, gozaran de in­
munidad respecto al pago de toda clase de impuestos y derechos de
aduana. El Banco tendra, asimismo, inmunidad respecto a respon­
sabilidad por el cobro o pago de cualquiera contribution o impuesto.
(b) No se gravaran con impuesto alguno los sueldos y emolumentos pagados por el Banco a los directores ejecutivos, suplentes,
funcionarios o empleados del propio Banco que no sean ciudadanos,
subditos u otros nacionales del pals respectivo, ni se establecera
impuesto alguno con relation a tales sueldos y emolumentos.
(c) No se gravaran con impuesto de Indole alguna las obliga­
ciones o valores que el Banco emita (incluso dividendos e intereses
sobre los mismos), quienquiera que los posea,
SECCION 9.

(i) si tal impuesto discrimina contra dichas obligaciones o
valores por el solo hecho de haberlos emitido el Banco;
(ii) si la base unica de la jurisdiccion para el establecimiento




1414

M ON E TA R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

del referido impuesto la constituye el lugar o la moneda en
que se emita, sea pagadero o se pague la obligation o titulo,
o la ubicacion de cualquier oficina o centro de operaciones
que mantenga el Banco.
(d)
No se gravaran con impuesto de indole alguna las obligacio­
nes o valores que garantice el Banco (incluso dividendos e intereses
sobre los mismos), quienquiera que los posea,
(i) si tal impuesto discrimina contra tales obligaciones o
valores por el solo hecho de haberlos garantizado el Banco;
(ii) si la ubicacion de cualquiera oficina o centro de operaciones
que mantenga el Banco constituye la base unica de la juris­
diction para el establecimiento de dicho impuesto.
(p. 36)
Aplicacion del Articulo.
Cada pais participante tomara, dentro de sus propios territorios,
la action que juzgue necesaria para dar efecto, en los terminos de
sus propias leyes, a los principios consignados en el presente
Articulo, e informara detalladamente al Banco respecto a la action
que hubiere tornado.

S ec cio n 10.

Articulo VIII
Enmiendas

(a) Toda proposition que tuviere por objeto enmendar el pre­
sente Acuerdo, ya proceda de un pais participante, de un Gober­
nador, o de los Directores Ejecutivos, se le comunicara al Presidente
de la Junta de Gobernadores, quien la lievara a la consideracidn de
la Junta. Si la Junta aprobare la enmienda propuesta, el Banco se
dirigira por escrito, en carta o telegramma circular, a todos los
paises participantes, preguntandoles si aceptan la enmienda.
Cuando tres quintas partes de los paises participantes que tuvieren
en con junto cuatro quintas partes del numero total de votos aceptaren le enmienda propuesta, el Banco certificara el resultado de
la votacion mediante comunicacion oficial dirigida a todos los
miembros.
(b) No obstante lo dispuesto en el inciso (a) precedente, sera
necesaria la aceptacion de todos los paises participantes en el caso
. de cualquier enmienda que modifique
(i) el derecho a retirarse del Banco segun la Seccion 1 del
Articulo V I ;
(ii) el derecho estipulado por el Articulo II en su Seccion 3,
parrafo ( c ) ;




APPENDI X I

1415

(iii) la limitation de responsabilidad prescrita en la Section 6
del Articulo II.
(c)
Las enmiendas entaran en vigor, para todos los paises par­
ticipantes, a los tres meses siguientes a la fecha de la comunicacion
oficial, salvo que se fijare un perlodo mas corto en la carta o tele­
grama circular.
(P. 37)
Articulo IX
Interpretation

(a) Las cuestiones de interpretation de las disposiciones de est
Acuerdo que surgieren entre cualquier pais participante y el Banco,
o entre tniembros del Banco, se referiran para su decisi6n a los
Directores Ejecutivos. Si la cuestion afectare en particular a un
participante que no tuviere facultad para nombrar a un Director
Ejecutivo, tendra derecho a representation de acuerdo con el
parrafo (h ), Seccion 4, del Articulo V.
(b) En el caso en que los Directores Ejecutivos hubieron rendido una decision de acuerdo con el parrafo (a) precedente, cual­
quier miembro podra exigir que la cuestion se refiera a la Junta de
Gobernadores cuya decision sera final. En tanto la Junta de Gober­
nadores decide el caso, el Banco podra actuar a base de la decision
de los Directores Ejecutivos, si lo juzgare pertinente.
(c) Si hubiere desacuerdo entre el Banco y un pais que haya
cesado como miembro, o entre el Banco y cualquier miembro du­
rante la suspension permanente del Banco, dicho desacuerdo se
sometera para arbitraje a un tribunal de tres arbitros, uno nombrado por el Banco, otro por el pais interesado, y un tercero que,
salvo que las partes acuerden en contrario, nombrara el Presi­
dente del Tribunal Permanente de Justicia Internacional o cual­
quiera otra autoridad de igual caracter que el Banco hubiere prescrito por reglamento. Este tercer arbitro tendra facultad plena
para resolver todas las cuestions de procedimiento en cualquier
caso en que las partes estuvieren en desacuerdo sobre las mismas.
Articulo X
Considerase Otorgada la Aprobacion

Cuando sea requisito la aprobacion previa de un pais partici­
pante para que el Banco pueda realizar un acto, salvo lo que dispone
el Articulo VIII, se considerara otorgada tal aprobacion salvo que
el pals en cuestion presente objecion dentro de un plazo razonable
que el Banco fijara al notificar a dicho pals del acto en proyecto.




1416

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

(P. 38)
Articulo XI
Disposiciones Finales
1.
Vigencia.
Este Acuerdo entrara en vigor cuando haya sido subscrito en
representation de gobiernos que tengan no menos del 65 por ciento
del total de las subscripciones estipuladas en el Cuadro A y cuando
los instrumentos a que se refiere la Seccion 2 (a ) de este Articulo
se hubieren depositado a nombre de ellos, pero en ningun caso
entrara en vigor este Acuerdo antes del 1.° de mayo de 1945.

S e c c io n

Firma del Acuerdo.
(a) Cada gobierno en cuya representation se firme el •
presente
Acuerdo, depositara con el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de
America un instrumento en el que declare que ha aceptado esit
Acuerdo conforme a sus propias leyes y que ha tornado todas las
medidas necesarias que le permitiran cumplir con todas las obliga­
ciones contraidas de acuerdo con las disposiciones del mismo.
(b) Cada gobierno sera miembro participante del Banco &
partir de la fecha en que se haga, a nombre suyo, el deposito del
instrumento mencionado en el parrafo (a) anterior, mas ningun
gobierno podra tener tal calidad de participante antes de que el
presente Acuerdo entre en vigor de conformidad con la Seccion 1
de este Articulo.
(c) El Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America notificara
a los gobiernos de todos los paises cuyos nombres aparecen en el
Cuadro A, y a todos los gobiernos cuyo ingreso en calidad de miem­
bro haya sido aprobado de acuerdo con el parrafo ( b ) , Seccion 1
del Articulo II, respecto a todos los casos en que se subscriba el
presente Acuerdo y al deposito de todos los instrumentos mencionados en el parrafo (a) anterior.
(d) En la ocasion en que se firme este Acuerdo a nombre de
cada gobierno, este remitira al Gobierno de los Estados Unidos
de America la centesima parte del uno por ciento del valor de cada
action, en oro o en dolares de los Estados Unidos de America, para
sufragar los gastos administrativos del Banco. Este pago se aereditara a cuenta del pago que debe hacerse de acuerdo con el
(P. 39)
parrafo (a ), Seccion 8 del Articulo II. El Gobierno de los Estados
Unidos de America conservara dichos fondos en una cuenta espe­
cial de deposito, y los trasladara a la Junta de Gobernadores del
Banco una vez que se convoque a la primera reunion segun lo dis­
pone la Seccion 8 del presente Articulo. Si este Acuerdo no hubiere
S e c c i o n 2.




APPENDI X I

1417

entrado en vigor para el 31 de dieiembre de 1945, el Gobierno de
los Estados Unidos de America devolvera los fondos de referenda
a los gobiernos que los hubieren remitido.
(e) El presente Acuerdo quedara en Washington, abierto a la
firma de los gobiernos de los paises mencionados en el Cuadro A,
hasta el 31 de dieiembre de 1945.
(f) Con posterioridad al 31 de dieiembre de 1945, el presente
Acuerdo quedara abierto a la firma del gobierno de cualquier pals
cuyo ingreso, en calidad de participante, haya sido aprobado con­
forme al parrafo (b ), Seccion 2 del Articulo II.
(g) Al subscribir el presente Acuerdo, todos los gobiernos lo
aceptan tanto a nombre propio como en lo que respecta a todas sus
colonias, a territorios de Ultramar, a territorios bajo su protectorado, soberanla o autoridad, y a todos los territorios sobre los
cuales ejercen mandato.
(h) En los casos de gobiernos cuyos territorios metropolitanos
estuvieren ocupados por el enemigo, el deposito del instrumento a
que se hace referencia en el parrafo (a) de esta Seccion podra
postergarse hasta un plazo de ciento ochenta dlas contados a partir
de la fecha en que tales territorios fueren liberados. Si, en cambio,
cualquiera de dichos gobiernos no depositare el instrumento antes
de veneer el plazo de referencia, la firma que se hubiere puesto a
nombre del respectivo gobierno sera nula, y le sera devuelta la
parte de la subscription que hubiere pagado conforme al parrafo
(d) antes citado.
(i) parrafos (d) y (h) entraran en vigor con respecto a
cada gobierno signatario a partir de la fecha en que firme el
Acuerdo.
(P. 40)
3. Inauguration del Banco
(a) Inmediatamente despues de entrar en vigor el presente
Acuerdo conforme a la Seccion 1 de este Articulo, cada pals parti­
cipante designara un gobernador, y el pals participante a quien se
le hubiere asignado el mayor numero de acciones en el Cuadro A
convocara a la primera reunion de la Junta de Gobernadores.
(b) En la primera reunion de la Junta de Gobernadores se
haran arreglos para la designation de directores ejecutivos provisionales. Los gobiernos de los cinco paises a quienes se les asigne
el mayor numero de acciones en el Cuadro A, nombraran directo­
res ejecutivos provisionales. Si uno o mas de dichos gobiernos no
gozare de la condition de participantes, los cargos de directores
ejecutivos que les habrla correspondido llenar permaneceran vacantes hasta la fecha de su ingreso, o hasta el 1.° de enero de 1946,
S e c c io n




1418

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

cualquiera de las dos fechas que venga primero. Se elegiran siete
directores ejecutivos provisionales de acuerdo con las disposiciones
del Cuadro B, que desempenaran sus funciones hasta que se celebre
la primera election regular de directores ejecutivos, la cual tendra
lugar lo antes posible a contar del 1.° de enero de 1946.
(c) La Junta de Gobernadores podra delegar a los directores
ejecutivos provisionales cualesquiera poderes, excepto aquellos
que no deban delegarse a los Directores Ejecutivos en propiedad.
(d) El Banco notificara a los paises participantes la fecha en
que estara listo para empezar a funcionar.
H e c h o en Washington, en copia original que quedara depositada
en los archivos del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de America, el
cual transmitira copias certificadas a todos los gobiernos cuyos
nombres se consignan en el Cuadro A, y a todas los gobiernos aceptados en calidad de participantes conforme al parrafo (b ), Seccion
1 del Articulo II.

(P. 41)
CUADRO

A

Subscripciones
(millones de dolares)

(millones de dolares)

Australia _________
____ 200
B elgica____________
____ 225
Bolivia ____________
____
7
B ra sil_________________ 105
Canada____________
____ 325
C h ile______________
____
35
China _________________ 600
Colombia .......................... 35
Costa Rica ____________
2
C u b a__________________
35
Checoeslovaquia _______ 125
Dinamarca ______ ______
*
2
Republica Dominicana __
3.2
E cuador______________
40
Egipto _______________
El Salvador___________
1
E tiop la _______________
3
Francia _______________ 450
Grecia____
25
2
Guatemala
2
H a iti_____
1
Honduras...
1
Islandia __
In d ia_____
400

Iran
Iraq .

_____

24

____

6

_____
Liberia _________________
Luxemburgo __________
Mexico _________________
Holanda________________
Nueva Zelandia________
Nicaragua______________
Noruega________________
Panama ________________
Paraguay_______________
Peru ___________________
Filipinas _____________
Polonia_________________
Union Sudafricana ____
Union de Republicas Socialistas Sovieticas___
Reino Unido___________
Estados Unidos de
America ____________
Uruguay _______________
Venezuela ______________
Yugoeslavia ......................

.5
10
65
275
50
.8
50
.2
.8
17.5
15
125
100
1200
1300
3175
10.5
10.5
40.

Total ........................9100.
*E1 Banco determinara la cuota de Dinamarca despues que acepte participar en el Banco
en calidad de miembro de conformidad con este Acuerdo.




A PPENDI X I

1419

(P. 42)
CUADRO

B

Election de Directores Ejecutivos

1. La election de los directores ejecutivos se hara por votacion
de los gobernadores que tengan derecho a votar de acuerdo con las
disposiciones del parrafo (b ), Seccion 4 del Articulo V.
2. En la votacion para directores ejecutivos electivos, cada
gobernador con derecho a votar emitira a favor de una sola persona
todos los votos que reconoce a su mandatario la Seccion 3 del
Articulo V. Seran directores ejecutivos las siete personas que
reciban el mayor numero de votos, mas no se considerara electa
ninguna persona que reciba menos del catorce por ciento del
numero total de votos que puedan emitirse (votos calificados).
3. Si no se eligieren siete personas en la primera votacion, se
procedera a efectuar otra en la que no podra ser candidato la per­
sona que recibio el numero menor de votos, y en la que votaran
unicamente (a) los gobernadores que hubieren favorecido en la
primera votacion a una persona que no resulto electa, y (b) los
gobernadores cuyos votos a favor de una persona se juzgue que,
conforme a lo previsto en el parrafo 4 subsiguiente, han acumulado
a favor de dicha persona un numero de votos que exceda del quince
por ciento del total de votos calificados.
4. Al determinar si ha de considerarse que los votos emitidoa
por un gobernador han aumentado el total emitido a favor de una
persona hasta mas del quince por ciento de los votos calificados, se
considerara que ese quince por ciento incluye, primero, los votos
del gobernador que hubiere emitido el mayor numero de votos a
favor de dicha persona, luego los votos del gobernador que le
siga en cuanto al numero de votos emitidos, y as! sucesivamente
hasta completar el quince por ciento.
5. Se considerara que cualquier gobernador, parte de cuyos votos
hayan de tomarse en cuenta en el aumento del total de votos emi­
tidos a favor de una persona a mas del quince por ciento, ha hado
a dicha persona todos sus votos, aun cuando debido a ello el total
de votos a favor de dicha persona subrepase el quince por ciento.
6. Si despues de la segunda votacion no resultaren electas siete
personas, se procedera a efectuar nuevas votaciones de acuerdo
con los mismos principios hasta que se elijan las siete; disponiendose, que una vez electas seis personas, la septima podra elegirse
por simple mayoria de los votos restantes, y se considerara que ha
sido electa por la totalidad de dichos votos.




1420

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N C I A L CO NFERENCE

(P. 43)
ANEXO

C

RESUMEN DE LOS ACUERDOS DE LA CONFERENCIA
de

B retton W

oo ds

La Conferencia de Bretton Woods, donde estan representados
casi todos los pueblos del mundo, ha considerado cuestiones monetarias y financieras internacionales que revisten gran importancia
para la paz y la prosperidad. La Conferencia ha tornado acuerdos
respecto a los problemas que exigen atencion, las medidas que
deben adoptarse para resolverlos, y las formas de cooperation u
organization internacional necesarias. El acuerdo a que se ha
llegado en materias de tan vasto alcance. y tan complejas como
estas no tiene precedente en la historia de las relaciones economicas
mundiales.
I. Fondo Monetario Internacional
Como el comercio exterior afecta las normas de vida de todo
pueblo, todos los paises tienen vital interes en el sistema de cambio
de las monedas nacionales y en las reglas y condiciones que rigen
su funcionamiento. Estas transacciones monetarias son cambios
internacionales y, por lo tanto, para que el sistema funcione como
es debido, precisa que las naciones se pongan de acuerdo respecto
a las reglas fundamentales que los rigen. Cuando no sucede asi,
y por el contrario naciones individuales, o pequenos grupos de
naciones, tratan de obtener ventajas en el comercio por medio de
regulaciones especiales y diferentes del cambio sobre el exterior,
los resultados son la inestabilidad, la reduction en el volumen del
comercio exterior y el deterioro de las economias nacionales. Actitud semej ante es natural que conduzca a la guerra economica y
que ponga en peligro la paz del mundo.
La Conferencia, por lo tanto, ha llegado a la conclusion de que
es necesaria la mas amplia action internacional posible a fin de
mantener un sistema monetario internacional que fomente el
comercio exterior. Las naciones deben consultarse entre si y llegar
a acuerdos respecto a cambios monetarios internacionales que
afectan a unas y a otras. Deben proscribir las practicas aceptadas
como perjudiciales a la prosperidad mundial, y ayudarse mutuamente para veneer las dificultades de corta duration en materia de
cambios.
La Conferencia ha convenido en que las naciones aqui representadas -deben establecer, para los fines senalados, un organismo
internacional permanente, e1 Fondo Monetario Internacional, con
poderes y recursos adecuaios para llevar a feliz termino las tareas
que se le han oncomer^ado. Se ha llegado a acuerdos respecto a




APPENDI X I

1421

esos poderes y a esos recursos, as! como en lo concerniente a las
obligaciones adicionales que los paises participantes deben aceptar,
y se ha redactado un proyecto de Acuerdo que abarca todos esos
puntos.
II. Banco Internacional de Reconstruction y Fomento
Interesa a todas las naciones que la reconstruction en la postguerra sea rapida. Del mismo modo, el desarrollo de los recursos
de regiones determinadas es de interes general desde el punto de
vista economico. Los programas de reconstruction y fomento
aceleraran el progreso economico en todas partes, contribuiran a la
estabilidad politica, y fomentaran la paz.
(p. 44)
La Conferencia ha convenido en que la expansion de las inversiones internacionales es esencial como medio de proveer parte del
capital necesario para la reconstruction y el fomento.
La Conferencia ha convenido ademas en que las naciones, para
lograr estos fines, deben cooperar para acrecentar el volumen de
inversiones que, con tales propositos, se hacen en el extranjero a
traves de los conductos normales del comercio. Como los beneficios
han de ser generales, es de especial importancia que las naciones
cooperen para compartir los riesgos que implican tales inversiones.
La Conferencia ha convenido en que las naciones deben establecer un organismo internacional permanente para el desempeno de
estas funciones, organismo que ha de llamarse Banco Internacional
de Reconstruction y Fomento. Se ha acordado que el Banco debera
ayudar a proveer capital por conductos normales, a tipos de interes
razonables y a largo plazo, para obras que aumenten la productividad del pais prestatario. Se ha convenido en que el Banco debera
garantizar prestamos que hagan otros, y que mediante subscrip­
ciones de capital, todos los paises deberan compartir con el pals
prestatario la garantla de dichos prestamos. La Conferencia ha
llegado a un acuerdo respecto a los poderes y recursos que debe
tener el Banco, as! como respecto a las obligaciones que deben
asumir los paises participantes, y a tal efecto ha redactado un
proyecto de Acuerdo.
La Conferencia ha recomendado que, al poner en practica la
politica de los organismos que aqul se proponen, se preste especial
atencion a las necesidades de los paises que han sufrido a causa
de ocupacion enemiga y de las hostilidades.
Los proyectos formulados en la Conferencia para el establecimiento del Fondo y del Banco se someten ahora, de conformidad
con los terminos de la invitation, a la consideration de los Gobier­
nos y de los pueblos de los paises en ella representados.




1422

M O N E T A R Y AN D F I N A N C I A L CO NFERENCE
Document 548

(Traduction preliminaire)
CONFERENCE

French translation

M O N E T A IR E

ET

F IN A N C IE R E

DES

N A T IO N S

U N IE S

Bretton Woods, New Hampshire

Du l er juillet au 22 juillet 1944

TEXTE DE L’ACTE FINAL
Annexe A— Fonds Monetaire International
Annexe B— Banque Internationale pour la Reconstruction et le Developpement
Annexe C— Resume des Accords de la Conference de Bretton Woods

Acte Final
Les Gouvernements de TAustralie, de la Belgique, de la Bolivie,
du Bresil, du Canada, du Chili, de la Chine, de la Colombie, de
Costa-Rica, de Cuba, de la Tchecoslovaquie, de la Republique
Dominicaine, de l’Equateur, de l’Egypte, du Salvador, de TEthiopie;
la Delegation Fran§aise; les Gouvernements de la Grece, du Guate­
mala, d’Haiti, du Honduras, de l’lslande, de Tlnde, de Tlran, de
Tlrak, du Liberia, du Luxembourg, du Mexique, des Pays-Bas, de
la Nouvelle-Zelande, du Nicaragua, de la Norvege, de Panama, du
Paraguay, du Perou, du Commonwealth des Philippines, de la
Pologne, de l’Union Sud-Africaine, de TUnion des Republiques
Socialistes Sovietiques, du Royaume-Uni, des Etats-Unis d’Amerique, de TUruquay, du Venezuela et de la Yougoslavie;
Ayant accepte Tinvitation qui leur a ete faite par le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique de se faire representer a une
Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies;
Ont nomme leurs delegues respectifs qui figurent sur la liste
ci-dessous par ordre de preseance alphabetique * des pays qu’ils
representent:
AUSTRALIE
Leslie G. Melville, Conseiller Economique de la “ Commonwealth Bank of
Australia” ; Chef de la Delegation

(P- 2)
James B. Brigden, Conseiller Financier, Legation d’Australie a Washington
Frederick H. Wheeler, Departement de la Tresorerie du Commonwealth
dA.ustralie
Arthur H. Tange, Departement des Affaires Exterieures du Commonwealth
d’Australie
BELGIQUE
Camille Gutt, Ministre des Finances et des Affaires Economiques; Chef
de la Delegation

Georges Theunis, Ministre dJ
Etat; Ambassadeur sans attribution de poste
en mission speciale aux Etats-Unis; Gouverneur de la Banque Nationale
de Belgique
* En langue anglaise.




APPENDI X I

1423

Baron Herve de Gruben, Conseiller, Ambassade de Belgique a Washington
Baron Rene Boel, Conseiller du Gouvernement beige
BOLIVIE
Rene Ballivian, Conseiller Financier, Ambassade de Bolivie a Washington;
Chef de la Delegation

BRESIL
Arthur de Souza Costa, Ministre des Finances; Chef de la Delegation
Francisco Alves dos Santos-Filho, Directeur des Changes de la Banque
du Bresil
Valentim Bou§as, Commission de Controle pour les Accords de Washington
et Conseil Economique et Financier
Eugenio Gudin, Conseil Economique et Financier et Comite pour le Pro­
gramme Economique
Octavio Bulhoes, Chef de la Division des Etudes economiques et financieres
du Ministere des Finances
Victor Azevedo Bastian, Directeur, “ Banco da Provincia do Rio Grande
do Sul”
CANADA
J. L. Ilsley, Ministre des Finances; Chef de la Delegation
L. S. St. Laurent, Ministre de la Justice
D. C. Abbott, Adjoint parlementaire au Ministre des Finances
Lionel Chevrier, Adjoint parlementaire au Ministre des Munitions et du
Ravitaillement
J. A. Blanchette, Membre du Parlement
W. A. Tucker, Membre du Parlement

(p. 3)
W. C. Clark, Sous-Ministre des Finances
G. F. Towers, Gouverneur de la Banque du Canada
W. A. Macintosh, Adjoint special au Sous-Ministre des Finances
L. Rasminsky, President (suppleant) du Conseil pour le Controle des
Changes
A. F. W. Plumptre, Attache Financier, Ambassade du Canada a Washington
J. J. Deutsch, Adjoint special au Sous-Secretaire d’Etat pour les Affaires
Exterieures
CHILI
Luis Alamos Barros, Directeur de la Banque Centrale du Chili; Chef de
la Delegation

German Riesco, Representant General de la Ligne de Navigation chilienne
a New-York
Arturo Maschke Tornero, Administrateur general de la Banque Centrale
du Chili
Fernando Mardones Restat, Administrateur general adjoint, Societe de
Yente chilienne de Nitrate et d’lode
}HINE
Hsiang-Hsi K’ung, Vice-President du Yuan Executif et concurremment
Ministre des Finances; Gouverneur de la Banque Centrale de Chine;
Chef de la Delegation

Tingfu F. Tsiang, Secretaire Politique principal du Yuan Executif; ancien
Ambassadeur de Chine aupres de TUnion des Republiques Socialistes
Sovietiques




MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

1424

Ping-Wen Kuo, Vice-Ministre des Finances
Victor Hoo, Vice-Ministre administratif des Affaires Etrangeres
Yee-Chun Koo, Vice-Ministre des Finances
Kuo-Ching Li, Conseiller du Ministere des Finances
Te-Mou Hsi, Representant du Ministere des Finances a Washington;
Directeur de la Banque Centrale de Chine et de la Banque de Chine
Tsu-Yee Pei, Directeur de la Banque de Chine
Ts-Liang Soong, Administrateur general de la “ Manufacturers Bank of
China” ; Directeur de la Banque Centrale de Chine, de la Banque de
Chine et de la Banque des Communications
COLOMBIE
Carlos Lleras Restrepo, ancien Ministre des Finances et Controleur general;
Chef de la Delegation

Miguel Lopez Pumarejo, ancien Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis, Administra­
teur de la “ Caja de Credito Agrario, Industrial y Minero”
Victor Dugand, Banquier
(P - 4 )

COSTA-RICA
Francisco de P. Gutierrez Ross, Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis; ancien
Ministre des Finances et du Commerce; Chef de la Delegation
Luis Demetrio Tinoco Castro, Doyen de la Faculte des Sciences Economiques
de TUniversite de Costa-Rica; ancien Ministre des Finances et du Com­
merce; ancien Ministre de PInstruction Publique
Fernando Madrigal A., Membre du Conseil d’Administration de la Chambre
de Commerce de Costa-Rica
CUBA
E. I. Montoulieu, Ministre des Finances; Chef de la Delegation
TCHECOSLOVAQUIE
Ladislav Feierabend, Ministre des Finances; Chef de la Delegation
Jan Mladek, Ministre des Finances; Vice-President de la Delegation
Antonin Basch, ‘‘Department of Economics, Columbia University”
Joseph Hanc, Directeur du Service Economique tchecoslovaque aux EtatsUnis d'Amerique
Ervin Hexner, Professeur d'Economie Politique et de Sciences Politiques h
.
TUniversite de la Caroline du Nord
REPUBLIQUE DOMINICAINE
Anselmo Copello, Ambassadeur aux fitats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation
J. R. Rodriguez, Ministre-Conseiller, Ambassade de la Republique Dominir
:aine a Washington
EQUATEUR
Esteban F. Carbo, Conseiller Financier, Ambassade de l’Equateur a
Washington; Chef de la Delegation
Sixto E. Duran Ballen, Ministre-Conseiller, Ambassade de. TEquateur
a Washington
EGYPTE
Sany Lackany Bey; Chef de la Delegation
Mahmoud Saleh El Falaky
Ahmed Selim




APPENDI X I

1425

(p. 5)
SALVADOR
Agustin Alfaro Moran; Chef de la Delegation
Raul Gamero
Victor Manuel Valdes
ETHIOPIE
Blatta Ephrem Tewelde Medhen, Ministre aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la
Delegation

George A. Blowers, Gouverneur de la Banque d’Etat d’Ethioftie
DELEGATION FRANQAISE
Pierre Mendes-F ranee, Commissaire aux Finances; Chef de la Delegation
Andre Istel, Conseiller technique du Departement des Finances
Delegues adjoints

Jean de Largentaye, Inspecteur des Finances
Robert Mosse, Professeur d'Economie Politique
Raoul Aglion, Conseiller juridique
Andre Paul Maury
GRECE
Kyriakos Varvaressos, Gouverneur de la Banque de Grece; Ambassadeur
extraordinaire pour les Questions Economiques et Financieres; Chef
de la Delegation

Alexander Argyropoulos, Ministre-Resident; Directeur de la Division
Economique et Commerciale du Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres
Athanase Sbarounis, Administrateur general du Ministere des Finances
GUATEMALA
Manuel Noriega Morales, Etudiant diplome poursuivant des etudes superieures de Sciences Economiques a 1’Universite de Harvard; Chef de la
Delegation

HAITI
Andre Liautaud, Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation
Pierre Chauvet, Sous-Secretaire d’Etat aux Finances
HONDURAS
Julian R. Caceres, Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation

(P. 6)
ISLANDE
Magnus Sigurdsson, Administrateur de la Banque Nationale d’Islande;
Chef de la Delegation

Asgeir Asgeirsson, Administrateur Banque des Pecheries de 1’Islande
Svanbjorn Frlmannsson, President de.l’Office d’Etat pour le Commerce
INDE
Sir Jeremy Raisman, Membre charge des questions financieres, Gouvernement de l’Inde; Chef de la Delegation
Sir Theodore Gregory, Conseiller Economique du Gouvernement de PInde
Sir Chintaman D. Deshmukh, Gouverneur de la “ Reserve Bank of India”
Sir Shanmukham Chetty
A. D. Shroff, Directeur de “ Tata Sons, Ltd.”
IRAN
Abol Hassan Ebtehaj, Gouverneur de la Banque Nationale de Tlran; Chef
de la Delegation




1426

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

A. A. Daftary, Conseiller de la Legation Iranienne a Washington
Hossein Navab, Consul General a New-York
Taghi Nassr, Commissaire iranien pour le Commerce et les Questions
Economiques
IRAK
Ibrahim Kamal, Senateur et ancien Ministre des Finances; Chef de la
Delegation

Lionel M. Swan, Conseiller du Ministere des Finances
Ibrahim Al-Kabir, Comptable general, Ministere des Finances
Claude E.' Loombe, Controleur des Changes et Fonctionnaire charge du
controle de la Monnaie
LIBERIA
William E. Dennis, Secretaire de la Tresorerie; Chef de la Delegation
James F. Cooper, ancien Secretaire de la Tresorerie
Walter R Walker, Consul General a New-York
LUXEMBOURG
Hughes Le Gallais, Ministre aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation

(P. 7)
MEXIQUE
Eduardo Suarez, Ministre des Finances; Chef de la Delegation
Antonio Espinosa de los Monteros, President Executif, “ Nacional Financiera” ; Directeur du “ Banco de Mexico”
Rodrigo Gomez, Gerant du “ Banco de Mexico”
Daniel Coslo Villegas, Chef du Departement des Etudes Economiques du
“ Banco de Mexico”
PAYS-BAS
J. W. Beyen, Conseiller Financier du Gouvernement des Pays-Bas; Chef
de la Delegation

D. Crena de Iongh, President de l’Office des Indes Neerlandaises, de Surinam
et de Curasao aux Etats-Unis
H. Riemens, Attache Financier, Ambassade des Pays-Bas a Washington;
Membre Financier de la Mission Economique, Financiere et Maritime
des Pays-Bas aux Etats-Unis
A. H. Philipse, Membre de la Mission Economique, Financiere et Maritime
aux Etats-Unis
NOUVELLE-ZELANDE
Walter Nash, Ministre des Finances; Ministre aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la
Delegation

Bernard Carl Ashwin, Secretaire de la Tresorerie
Edward C. Fussell, Sous-Gouverneur, “ Reserve Bank of New Zealand”
Alan G. B. Fisher, Conseiller de la Legation de Nouvelle-Zelande a Wash­
ington
NICARAGUA
Guillermo Sevilla Sacasa, Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delega­
tion

Leon DeBayle, ancien Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis
J. Jesus Sanchez Roig, ancien Ministre des Finances; Vice-President du
Conseil d*Administration de la Banque Nationale du Nicaragua




APPENDI X I

1427

NORVEGE
Wilhelm Keilhau, Directeur interimaire de la Banque de Norvege a
Londres; Chef de la Delegation
Ole Colbjornsen, Conseiller Financier de PAmbassade de Norvege a Wash­
ington
Arne Skaug, Conseiller Commercial de PAmbassade de Norvege a Wash­
ington
(P. 8 )
PANAMA
Guillermo Arango, President de la Societe enregistree pour le Service des
Investissements de Panama; Chef de la Delegation
Narciso E. Garay, Premier Secretaire de PAmbassade de Panama a Wash­
ington
PARAGUAY
Celso R. Velazquez, Ambassadeur aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation
Nestor M. Campos Ros, Premier Secretaire de PAmbassade du Paraguay
a Washington
PEROU
Pedro Beltran, Ambassadeur designe aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation
Manuel B. Llosa, Deuxieme, Vice-President de la Chambres de Deputes;
Depute du Cerro de Pasco
Andres F. Dasso, Senateur de Lima
Alberto Alvarez Calderon, Senateur de Lima
Juvenal Monge, Depute de Cuzco
Juan Chavez, Ministre, Conseiller Commercial de PAmbassade du Perou a
Washington
COMMONWEALTH DES PHILIPPINES
Colonel Andres Soriano, Secretaire des Finances du Commonwealth des
Philippines; Chef de la Delegation
Jaime Herandez, Verificateur general des Comptes du Commonwealth des
Philippines
Joseph H. Foley, Directeur de la Banque Nationale des Philippines, Agence
de New-York, Commonwealth des Philippines
POLOGNE
Ludwik Grosfeld, Ministre des Finances; Chef de la Delegation
Leon Baranski, Directeur general de la Banque de Pologne
Zygmunt Karpinski, Directeur de la Banque de Pologne
Stanislaw Kirkor, Directeur au Ministere des Finances
Janusz Zoltowski, Conseiller Financier de PAmbassade de Pologne a Wash­
ington
UNION SUD-AFRICAINE
S. F. N. Gie, Ministre aux Etats-Unis; Chef de la Delegation
J. E. Holloway, Secretaire des Finances; CodeleguS
M. H. de Kock, Sous-Gouverneur de la Banque Sud-Africaine; CodeUgue

(p. 9)
UNION DES REPUBLIQUES SOCIALISTES
SOVIETIQUES
M. S. Stepanov, Sous-Commissaire du Peuple pour le Commerce Exterieur;
Chef de la Delegation
795841 — 48— 20




MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

1428

P. A. Maletin, Sous-Commissaire du Peuple pour les Finances
N. F. Chechulin, President adjoint de la Banque d’Etat
I. D. Zlobin, Chef de la Division Monetaire du Commissariat du Peuple
pour les Finances
A. A. Arutiunian, Professeur; Docteur-es-Sciences Economiques; Expert
conseil du Commissariat du Peuple pour les Affaires Etrangeres
A. P. Morozov, Membre du Collegium; Chef de la Division Monetaire du
Commissariat du Peuple pour le Commerce Exterieur
ROYAUME-UNI
Lord Keynes; Chef de la Delegation
Robert H. Brand, Representant de la Tresorerie du Royaume-Uni a
Washington
Sir W ilfrid Eady, Tresorerie du Royaume-Uni
Nigel Bruce Ronald, Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres
Dennis H. Robertson, Tresorerie du Royaume-Uni
Lionel Robbins, Bureaux du Cabinet de Guerre
Redvers Opie, Conseiller de l’Ambassade de Grande-Bretagne a Washington
ETATS-UNIS D’AMERIQUE
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Secretaire de la Tresorerie; Chef de la Delegation
Fred M. Vinson, Directeur de l’Office pour la Stabilisation Economique;
Sous-Chef de la Delegation

Dean Acheson, Sous-Secretaire d’Etat aux Affaires Etrangeres
Edward E. Brown, President de la ‘‘First National Bank of Chicago”
Leo T. Crowley, Administrateur, Administration des Affaires Economiques
Exterieures
Marriner S. Eccles, President du Conseil des Gouverneurs du “ Federal Re­
serve System”
Mabel Newcomer, Professeur des Sciences Economiques au College de Vassar
Brent Spence, Chambre des Representants; President du Comite pour les
Questions Bancaires et Monetaires
Charles W. Tobey, Senat des Etats-Unis; Membre du Comite pour les
Questions Bancaires et Monetaires
Robert F. Wagner, Senat des Etats-Unis; President du Comite pour les
Questions Bancaires et Monetaires
Harry D. White, Adjoint au Secretaire de la Tresorerie
Jesse P. Wolcott, Chambre des Representants; Membre du Comite pour les
Questions Bancaires et Monetaires
ip .

io)

URUGUAY
Mario La Gamma Acevedo, Expert, Ministere des Finances; Chef de la
D iligation

Hugo Garcia, Attache Financier a l’Ambassade d’Uruguay a Washington
VENEZUELA
Rodolfo Rojas, Ministre de la Tresorerie; Chef de la Delegation
Alfonso Espinosa, President du Comite Permanent des Finances de la
Chambre des Deputes
Cristobal L. Mendoza, ancien Ministre de la Tresorerie; Conseiller juridique
de la Banque Centrale du Venezuela
Jose Joaquin Gonzalez Gorrondona, President de l’Office pour le Controle
des Importations; Directeur de la Banque Centrale du Venezuela




APPENDI X I

1429

YOUGOSLAVIE
Vladimir Rybar, Consejero de la Embajada de Yugoeslavia en Washington;
Chef de la Delegation

Qui se sont reunis a Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, le l er juillet
1944 sous la presidence temporaire de PHonorable Henry Morgen-

thau, Jr., Chef de la Delegation des Etats-Unis d’Amerique.
L/Honorable Henrik de Kauffmann, Ministre Danois a Wash­
ington, a assiste a la Seance Pleniere Inaugurate a la suite de
Tinvitation qui lue avait ete adressee par le Gouvernement des
Etats-Unis pour qu’il y assiste en sa eapacite personnelle. Sur la
proposition de son Comite de Verification des Pouvoirs la Con­
ference lui a adresse une invitation similaire pour les seances
ulterieures de la Conference.
Le Departement des Questions Economiques, Financieres et de
Transit de la Societe des Nations, le Bureau International du
Travail, la Commission Interimaire sur 1
’Alimentation et l’Agriculture des Nations Unies, et (p. 11) r Administration des Nations
Unis pour TAide et le Relevement ont ete individuellement repre­
sen ts par un observateur a la Seance Pleniere Inaugurate. Les dits
organismes repondaient a Tinvitation qui leur avait ete adressee
par le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis, et les observateurs ou leurs
suppleants ont assiste aux seances subsequentes conformement a
la resolution soumise par le Comite de Verification des Pouvoirs
et adoptee par la Conference. Les observateurs et leurs suppleants
figurent sur la liste ci-dessous:
DEPARTEMENT DES QUESTIONS ECONOMIQUES, FINANCIERES
ET DE TRANSIT DE LA SOCIETE DES NATIONS
Alexander Loveday, Directeur
Ragnar Nurkse; Suppleant
BUREAU INTERNATIONAL DU TRAVAIL
Edward J. Phelan, Directeur interimaire
C. Wilfred Jenks, Conseiller juridique; et
E. J. Riches, Chef interimaire de la Section des Affaires Economiques et des
Statistiques; Suppleants •
COMMISSION INTERIMAIRE SUR L’ALIMENTATION ET L’AGRICULTURE DES NATIONS UNIES
Edward Twentyman, Delegue du Royaume-Uni
ADMINISTRATION DES NATIONS UNIES POUR L’AIDE
RELEVEMENT
A. H. Feller, Conseiller juridique; ou
Mieczyslaw Sokolowski, Conseiller financier

ET LE

Avec Tagrement du President des Etats-Unis, Monsieur Warren
Kelchner, Chef de la Division des Conferences Internationales du
Departement d’Etat des Etats-Unis a ete nomme Secretaire Gene­




1430

M ON E TA R Y AND F IN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

ral de la Conference; Monsieur Frank Coe, Administrateur adjoint
de FAdministration des Affaires Economiques Exterieures des
Etats-Unis, a ete nomme Secretaire General adjoint pour les ques­
tions techniques, et Monsieur Philip C. Jessup, Professeur de Droit
International a (p. 12) l’Universite de Columbia, a New York,
N. Y., a ete nomme Secretaire General adjoint.
L’Honorable Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Chef de la Delegation des
Etats-Unis d’Amerique, a ete elu President permanent de la Con­
ference a la Seance Pleniere Inaugurale tenue le l er juillet 1944.
MM. M. S. Stepanov, Chef de la Delegation de FUnion des Re­
publiques Socialistes Sovietiques; Arthur de Souza Costa, Chef de
la Delegation du Bresil; Camille Gutt, Chef de la Delegation de la
Belgique, et Leslie G. Melville, Chef de la Delegation de FAustralie,
ont ete elus Vice-Presidents de la Conference.
Le President temporaire a nomme membres des Comites generaux crees par la Conference les personnes suivantes:
COMITE DE VERIFICATION DES POUVOIRS
E. I. Montoulieu (Cuba), President
J. W. Beyen (Pays-Bas)
S. F. N. Gie (Union Sud-Africaine)
William E. Dennis (Liberia)
Wilhelm Keilhau (Norvege)
COMITE DES STATUTS ET REGLEMENTS
Hsiang-Hsi K^ung (Chine), President
Guillermo Sevilla Sacasa (Nicaragua)
Ludwik Grosfeld (Pologne)
Leslie G. Melville (Australie)
Ibrahim Kamal (Irak)
COMITE DES NOMINATIONS
Walter Nash (Nouvelle-Zelande), President
Hugues Le Gallais (Luxembourg)
Julian R. Caceres (Honduras)
Magnus Sigurdsson (Islande)
Pedro Beltran (Perou)

Conformement au reglement adopte a la Deuxieme Seance Ple­
niere tenue le 3 juillet 1944, la Conference a elu un (p. 13) Comite
de Direction des Travaux compose des Chefs de Delegation suivants:
Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (Etats-Unis d’Amerique), President
Camille Gutt (Belgique)
Arthur de Souza Costa (Bresil)
J. L. Ilsley (Canada)
Hsiang-Hsi K'ung (Chine)
Carlos Lleras Restrepo (Colombie)




APPENDI X I

1431

Pierre Mendes-France (Delegation Frangaise)
Abol Hassan Ebtehaj (Iran)
Eduardo Suarez (Mexique)
M. S. Stepanov (URSS)
Lord Keynes (R.-U.)

Le 21 juillet 1944, le Comite de Coordination a ete constitue
avec les membres suivants:
Fred M. Vinson (Etats-Unis d’Amerique), President
Arthur de Souza Costa (Bresil)
Ping-Wen Kuo (Chine)
Robert Mosse (Delegation Frangaise)
Eduardo Suarez (Mexique)
A. A. Arutiunian (URSS)
Lionel Robbins (R.-U.)

La Conference a ete divisee en trois Commissions Techniques.
Les fonctionnaires des dites Commissions et de leurs Comites respectifs, tels qu’ils ont ete elus par la Conference, figurent sur la
liste ci-dessous:
C O M M IS S IO N

I

F o n d s M o n e t a ir e I n t e r n a t io n a l
President: Harry D. White (Etats-Unis d’Amerique)
Vice-President: Rodolfo Rojas (Venezuela)
Delegue Rapporteur: L. Rasminsky (Canada)
Secretaire: Leroy D. Stinebower
SecrStaire adjointe: Eleanor Lansing Dulles

COMiTfi 1— Buts, Politique et Quotes-Parts du Fonds
President: Tingfu F. Tsiang (Chine)
Delegue Rapporteur: Kyriakos Varvaressos (Grece)
SecrStaire: William Adams Brown, Jr.
(P . 1 4 )

Comit£ 2— Operations du Fonds
President: P. A. Maletin (URSS)
Vice-President: W. A. Mackintosh (Canada)
DelSguS Rapporteur: Robert Mosse (Delegation Frangaise)
SecrStaire: Karl Bopp
Secretaire adjointe: Alice Bourneuf
ComitIs 3— Organisation et Administration
President: Arthur de Souza Costa (Bresil)
DeleguS Rapporteur: Ervin Hexner (Tchecoslovaquie)
Secretaire: Malcolm Bryan
Secretaire adjoint: H. J. Bittermann
ComitiS 4— Forme et Statut du Fonds
President: Manuel B. Llosa (Perou)
DSlSguS Rapporteur: Wilhelm Keilhau (Norvege)
Secretaire: Colonel Charles H. Dyson
* SecrStaire adjoint: Lauren Cassaday




1432

M ON E TA R Y AND FINA NCI AL CONFERENCE

COMMISSION II
B a n q u e P our

la

R e c o n s t r u c t io n

et le

D eveloppem ent

President : Lord Keynes (R.-U.)
Vice-President: Luis Alamos Barros (Chili)
Delegue Rapporteur : Georges Theunis (Belgique)
Secretaire: Arthur Upgren
Secretaire: Arthur Smithies
Secretaire adjointe: Ruth Russell
C o m it e 1— Buts, Politique et Capital de la Banque

President: J. W . Beyen (Pays-Bas)
Delegue Rapporteur: J. Rafael Oreamuno (Costa-Rica)
Secretaire: J. P. Young
Secretaire adjointe: Janet Sundelson
C o m i t S 2— Operations de la Banque

President: E. I. Montoulieu (Cuba)
Dilegue Rapporteur: James B. Brigden (Australie)
. Secretaire: H. J. Bittermann
Secretaire adjointe: Ruth Russell
C o m it i S 3— Organisation et Administration

President: Miguel Lopez Pumarejo (Colombie)
Delegue Rapporteur: M. H. de Kock (Union Sud-Africaine)
Secretaire: Mordecai Ezekiel
Secretaire adjoint: Captain William L. Ullmann
C o m i t Is 4— Forme et Statut de la Banque

President: Sir Chintaman D. Deshmukh (Inde)
Delegue Rapporteur: Leon Baranski (Pologne)
Secretaire: Henry Edmiston
Secretaire adjoint: Colonel Charles H. Dyson

(P. 15)
C O M M IS S IO N
A

utres

M oyens

de

III

C o o p e r a t io n F i n a n c i e r e I n t e r n a t i o n a l e

President: Eduardo Suarez (Mexique)
Vice-President: Mahmoud Saleh El Falaky (Egypte)
Deligue Rapporteur: Alan G. B. Fisher (Nouvelle-Zelande)
Secretaire: Orvis Schmidt

La Seance Pleniere de Cloture a eu lieu le 22 juillet 1944. Comme
consequence des deliberations, telles qu’elles ont ete rapportees
dans le proces-verbal et dans les rapports des Commissions respectives et de leurs Comites ainsi que dans ceux des Seances
Plenieres, les instruments suivants ont ete rediges:
FONDS MONETAIRE INTERNATIONAL
Statuts du Fonds Monetaire International constituant l’Annexe
A du present Acte Final.




APPENDI X I

1433

BANQUE INTERNATIONALE POUR LA RECONSTRUCTION
ET LE DEVELOPPEMENT
Statuts de la Banque Internationale pour la Reconstruction et
le Developpement constituant PAnnexe B du present Acte
Final.
Resume des Accords enonces dans les Annexes A et B, le dit
resume constituant PAnnexe C du present Acte Final.
Ont ete adoptees les resolutions, les declarations et les recom­
mendations qui suivent:
I
PREPARATION DE L’ACTE FINAL

La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
adopte une resolution autorisant
(a) la preparation de PActe Final par le Secretariat conformement aux suggestions faites par le Secretaire General dans le
Journal (Numero 19) du 19 juillet 1944; prescrivant
(P. 16)
(b) Tincorporation dans PActe Final des textes definitifs des
conclusions approuvees par la Conference reunie en seance pl§niere et stipulant
(a) qu’aucuns changements n’y soient apportes a la Seance
Pleniere de Cloture;
(b) que le Comite de Coordination revoie le texte et qu’il le
soumette, s’il est approuve, a la Seance Pleniere Finale.
II
PUBLICATION DES DOCUMENTS

La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
adopte une resolution autorisant le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique a publier PActe Final de la presente Conference, les
rapports des Commissions et les proces-verbaux des Seances Ple­
nieres Publiques et Pautorisant a rendre disponibles, en vue de leur
publication, tels autres documents relatifs aux travaux de la Con­
ference dont la publication serait, a Pavis du dit Gouvernment,
dans Pinteret public.
III
NOTIFICATION DES SIGNATURES ET GARDE DES DEPOTS

La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
D ec id e :

De demander au Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique,
(1)
en tant que depositaire des Statuts du Fonds, d’informer
les gouvernements de tous les pays dont les noms figurent au Sup­
plement A des Statuts du Fonds Monetaire International, ainsi
que tous les gouvernements dont la participation comme membres




1434

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

est approuvee conformement a 1
’Article II, Section 2, de toutes les
signatures apposees aux Statuts; et
(p. 17)
(2) de recevoir et de detenir, dans un compte special
de depots, les fonds en or ou en dollars des Etats-Unis qui lui
sont transmis aux termes de 1
’Article X X , Section 2 (d ) des Sta­
tuts du Fond Monetaire International, ainsi que de transmettre
les dits fonds au Conseil des Gouverneurs du Fonds lorsque la
reunion initiate aura ete convoquee.
IV
DECLARATION CONCERNANT L’ARGENT

Les problemes qui se posent pour certaines nations du fait des
grandes variations dans la valeur de Targent ont occasionne une
discussion serieuse au sein de la Commission III. A cause du
manque de temps, de Timportance des autres problemes figurant
au programme et d’autres facteurs limitatifs, il n’a pas ete possible
d’accorder a ce probleme Tattention qu’il faudrait pour que des
recommendations definitives soient emises. Cependant, la Com­
mission III a ete d’avis que la question meriterait d’etre etudiee
de nouveau par les nations interessees.

v
LIQUIDATION DE LA BANQUE DES REGLEMENTS
IN TE R N A TIO NA U X

La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
Recom m ande :

La liquidation de la Banque des Reglements Internationaux, dans
le plus court delai possible.
(P.

18)
VI
AVOIRS ENNEMIS ET BIENS PILLES

A ttendu Que :

Les dirigeants et chefs ennemis, les nationaux ennemis et leurs
collaborateurs se servent des pays neutres pour transferer et dissimuler des avoirs. Ceci dans le but de perpetuer leur influence,
leur puissance et la possibility pour eux de dresser plus tard des
plans d’agrandissement et de domination mondiale, compromettant
ainsi les efforts faits par les Nations Unies pour etablir et pre­
server des relations Internationales pacifiques;
A ttendu Qu e :

Les pays ennemis et leurs nationaux se sont empares des biens
des pays occupes et de ceux des nationaux des dits pays par le
pillage, les transferts forces ainsi qu’au moyen de procedes subtils
et compliques, souvent appliques par l’entremise de gouvernments




APPENDIX I

1435

asservis a Tennemi, dans le but de donner a leurs vols Tapparence
de la legalite et d’obtenir la propriete et le controle de certaines
entreprises dans la periode d’apres-guerre;
A tt e n d u Q u e :

Les pays ennemis et leurs nationaux ont egalement rSussi, au
moyen de ventes et d’autres procedes de transfert, a etendre leurs
droits de propriete et de controle dans les pays occupes et dans les
pays neutres, faisant ainsi du travail de divulgation et de demelage
un probleme d’ordre international;
(p. 19)
A tte n d u Q u e :

Les Nations Unies ont declare qu’elles ont l’intention de
faire tout leur possible pour rendre ineffectives les methodes
d'expropriation pratiquees par Tennemi, qu’elles se sont reserve
le droit de declarer nul et non avenu tout transfert de biens apartenant a des personnes qui se trouvent en territoire occupe; qu’elles
ont pris des mesures pour proteger et sauvegarder la propriete
et les biens des pays occupes et de leurs nationaux se trouvant sur
les territoires soumis a la juridiction des Nations Unies, ainsi que
pour empecher la vente des biens pilles sur les marches des Na­
tions Unies;
La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
1.
Prend acte de certaines mesures prises par les Nations Unies
et les appuie sans reserve. Les dites mesures ont pour but:
(a) de decouvrir les avoirs ennemis, de les mettre a part,
de les controler et d’en disposer d’une maniere appropriee;
(b) d’empecher la liquidation des biens pilles par l’ennemi,
d’etablir et de retracer jusqu’a la source la propriete et le con­
trole des dits biens, ainsi que de prendre des mesures appropriees
en vue de leur restitution aux personnes qui en sont legalement
proprietaires, et la Conference.
2. R e c o m m a n d e :

Que tous les
ence prennent
relations avec
gouvernements

gouvernements des pays representes a la Confer­
toutes dispositions qui seraient conformes a leurs
les pays belligerants en vue de demander aux
des pays neutres

(P. 20)

(a)
de prendre, sans delai, des mesures ayant pour objet
d’empecher, dans les territoires soumis a leur juridiction, la dispo­
sition ou le transfert
(1)
de tous avoirs appartenant au gouvernement, a des particuliers ou a des institutions quelconques se trouvent sur les




1436

MO N E T A R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

territoires des dites Nations Unies qui sont occupes par l'ennemi;
(2)
de monnaie, de valeurs, d’or et d’objets d’art pilles,
d’autres preuves de propriete dans des entreprises financieres
et commerciales, et d’autres avoirs pilles par Tennemi;
et de decouvrir, de mettre a part et de garder a la disposition des
autorites des pays interesses, apres la liberation, tous les avoirs
pilles, quels qu’ils soient, se trouvant a Tinterieur de territoires
soumis a la jurisdiction des dits gouvernements neutres;
(b)
de prendre, sans delai, des mesures en vue d’empecher la
dissimulation, par des moyens frauduleux ou autres, a Tinterieur
des pays soumis a leur juridiction
(1) de tous avoirs qui sont la propriete ou que Ton pretend
etre la propriete du gouvernement de pays ennemis ainsi que de
particuliers ou destitutions se trouvant a Finterieur de pays
ennemis;
(2) de tous avoirs qui sont la propriete ou que Ton pretend
etre la propriete de dirigeants et de chefs ennemis, de leurs
associes et de leurs collaborateurs; et
de prendre des mesures pour faciliter la remise, en dernier lieu,
des dits avoirs aux autorites qui exerceront leurs fonctions apres
Tarmistice!
(P. 21)
V II
PR O BLE M E S ECON OM IQ U ES IN T E R N A T IO N A U X

A tte n d u QU’il est declare a 1'Article I des Statuts du Fonds

Monetaire International qu’un des buts principaux du Fonds est
de faciliter l’expansion et Taccroissement harmonieux du com­
merce international, et de contribuer par ce moyen a Tetablissement et au maintien de niveaux eleves dans le domaine de Temploi
de la main-d’oeuvre et celui du revenu reel ainsi qu’au developpement des moyens de production de tous les membres, comme objectifs primordiaux de politique economique;
A tte nd u Qu’ il est reconnu que la realisation complete de ce qui
precede ainsi que des autres buts et objectifs enonces dans les
Statuts ne pourra etre obtenue par le Fonds a lui seul;
La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
R ecom m ande :

Aux Gouvernements participants qu’ils essaient, en dehors des
dispositions prises en vue de donner suite aux mesures specifiques
d’ordre monetaire et financier qui ont ete traitees par la Confer­
ence, de s’entendre entre eux, dans le plus court delai possible,




APPENDIX I

1437

quant aux voies et moyens par lesquels ils pourront plus facilement:
(1) reduire les obstacles qui entravent le commerce international
et promouvoir, par d’autres moyens, des relations mutuellement
profitables dans le domaine du commerce international;
(2) procurer Fecoulement regulier des produits principaux a
des prix qui seront equitables tant pour le producteur que pour le
consommateur;
(P. 22)
(3) traiter des problemes speciaux ayant une importance internationale qui se poseront comme consequence de Farret de la pro­
duction de guerre;
(4) faciliter par un effort de cooperation la conciliation de la
politique nationale des Etats-membres en vue de favoriser et de
maintenir des niveaux eleves dans le domaine de Femploi de la
main-d’oeuvre ainsi qu’un standard de vie progressivement plus
favorable.
VIII

La Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
D ec id e :

1. D’exprimer sa gratitude au President des Etats-Unis, Frank­
lin D. Roosevelt, pour Finitiative qu’il a prise en convoquant la
presente Conference ainsi que pour le travail fait en vue de sa
preparation;
2. D'exprimer au President de la Conference, FHonorable Henry
Morgenthau, Jr., sa grande appreciation pour la fa^on admirable
dont il a dirige la Conference;
3. D’exprimer aux fonctionnaires et au personnel du Secretariat
Fappreciation de la Conference pour leurs services assidus et leurs
efforts diligents, lesquels ont contribue a la realisation des buts de
la Conference.
En fo i de q u o i , les delegues don les noms suivent ont signe le
present Acte Final.
F a i t a Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, le vingt-deux juillet mil
neuf cent quarante-quatre, dans la langue anglaise. Le texte
original du present Acte Final sera depose dans les archives du
Departement d’Etat des Etats-Unis des copies certifiees conformes
(P. 23)
seront fournies par le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique a
chaque Gouvernement et a chaque Autorite represente a la Con­
ference.




(Les signatures suivent)

1438

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

A N N E X E

A

a

l

’ ACTE

FIN A L

St a t u t s d u F o n d s M o n e t a ir e I n t e r n a t io n a l

Liste des Articles et des Sections
Page
Article preliminaire............................................................................................
I. B u ts.......................................................................................................
II. Quality de m em bre.............................................................................
Section 1. Membres originaires ....................................................
2. Autres membres ...........................................................
III. Quotes-Parts et Souscriptions..........................................................
Section 1. Quotes-parts...................................................................
2. Revision des quotes-parts ...........................................
3. Souscription: Epoque, lieu et forme du paiement....
4. Paiment en cas de modification des quotes-parts.....
5. Remplacement de la monnaie par des va leu rs........
IV. Pair des monnaies...............................................................................
Section 1. Definition du p a ir ..........................................................
2. Achats d’or au p a ir ......................................................
3. Operations de change h la p a rite...............................
4. Obligations relatives a la stabilite des changes......
5. Modifications du p a ir....................................................
6. Consequences des modifications non autorisees ......
7. Modifications uniformes du p a i r ...............................
8. Maintien de la valeur-or des avoirs du F on d s..........
9. Pluralite monetaire dans les territoires d’un Etatm em bre................................................... ........................
V. Transactions avec le Fonds .............................................................
Section 1. Organismes traitant avec le Fonds ..........................
2. Limitation des operations du Fonds ........................
3. Conditions regissant l’emploi des ressources du
F on d s....................................................... .......................
4. Dispense..........................................................................
5. Non recevabilite a recourir aux ressources du Fonds
6. Achats de monnaies au Fonds contre de T o r ............
7. Rachat par les Etats-members des avoirs en leur
monnaie detenus par le F o n d s ...................................
8. Commissions........................................... .......................
VI. Transfert de capitaux.......................................................................
Section 1. Emploi des ressources du Fonds a des transferts
de ca p ita u x....................................................................
2. Dispositions speciales pour le transfert de capitaux
3. Mesures de controle appliquees aux transferts de
capitaux .........................................................................
VII. Monnaies ra re s........................................................... ........................
Section 1. Rarete generale d’une monnaie .................................
2. Mesures a prendre pour reconstituer les avoirs du
Fonds en monnaie r a r e ...............................................
3. Rarete des avoirs du Fonds ......................................
4. Application des restrictions........................................
5. Effet des autres accords internationaux sur les
restrictions......................................................................




1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
8
8
8
9
10
10
10
10
11
12
12
12
14
16
16
17
17
18
18
18
18
19
19

APPENDIX I

VIII.

IX.

X.
XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIV.

Obligations generales des mem bres................................................
Section 1. Introduction...................................................................
2. Eviter les restrictions relatives aux paiements
courants ............................................ .............................
3. Eviter les pratiques de discrimination monetaire....
4. Assurer la convertibility des avoirs detenus par
l’etranger.......................................................................
5. Communiquer des informations .................................
6. Consultations entre membres au sujet d'accords
internationaux existants .............................................
Statut, immunites et privileges.......................................................
Section 1. Objets du present Article .........................................
2. Statut du Fonds ...........................................................
3. Immunite de juridiction .............................................
4. Autres immunites de meme nature.............................
5. Immunite des Archives ..............................................
6. Immunite des avoirs par rapport a toutes restric­
tions ................................................................................
7. Privileges en matiere de communication.................
8. Immunites et privileges des fonctionnaires et em­
ployes ..............................................................................
9. Exemption de charges fiscales....................................
10. Application du present A r ticle ..................................
Rapports avec les autres organisations internationales.............
Relations avec les Etats non-membres ...........................................
Section 1. Engagements des Etats-membres en ce qui concerne
leurs relations avec les Etats non-membres............
2. Restrictions sur les transactions avec des Etatsnon-membres ..................................................................
Organisation et administration.......................................................
Section 1. Composition du Fonds..................................................
2. Conseil des Gouverneurs.............................................
3. Administrateurs ...........................................................
4. L’Administrateur-delegue et le Secretariat.............
5. Le v o t e ...........................................................................
6. Repartition du revenue net ........................................
7. Publication de ra pports...............................................
8. Communications d’opinion aux membres.................
Bureaux et depots..............................................................................
Section 1. Situation des bureaux ................................................
2. D epots.............................................................................
3. Garantie de Tactif du F o n d s......................................
Periode de transition................................................. .......................
Section 1. Introduction........................................... .......................
2. Restrictions de change..................................................
3. Notification au Fonds ................................................
4. Mesures prises par le Fonds relativement aux
restrictions.....................................................................
5. Nature de la periode de transition...........................




1439

Page
20
20
20
20
21
22
24
25
25
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
27
28
28
28
28
29
29
29
29
31
34
35
36
37
37
37
37
38
38
39
39
39
39
40
41

M O N E T A R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

1440

Page

XV.

R etrait..................................................................................................
Section 1. Droit de retrait des Etats-membres..........................
2. Retrait obligatoire ........................................................
3. Reglement des comptes avec les membres qui se
retirent............................................................................
XVI. Mesures pour cas exceptionnels........................................................
Section 1. Suspension tem poraire.................................................
2. Liquidation du F onds....................................................
XVII. Amendements......................................................................................
XVIII. Interpretation.....................................................................................
XIX. Explication des term es......................................................................
XX. Dispositions finales ..........................................................................
Section 1. Entree en vigueur ........................................................
2. Signature.................... .......................... ........................
3. Inauguration du Fonds ...............................................
4. Determination initiale du pair .................................

41
41
41
42
42
42
43
44
45
46
49
49
49
51
52

Supplements
Supplement A.
Supplement B.

Quotes-Parts .......................................................................
Dispositions relatives au rachat par un membre de sa
monnaie detenue par le Fonds ..........................................
Supplement C. Election des Administrateurs ..........................................
Supplement D. Reglement des comptes avec les membres qui se re­
tirent .....................................................................................
Supplement E. Administration de la liquidation....................................
Statuts

du

F

onds

M

o n e t a ir e

I

56
57
59
62
64

n t e r n a t io n a l

Les Gouvernemerits aux noms desquels le present Accord est
signe conviennent de ce qui suit:
Article Preliminaire

Le Fonds Monetaire International est etabli et fonctionnera
conformement aux dispositions suivantes:
Article I
Buts

Le Fonds Monetaire International a pour buts:
(i) d’encourager la cooperation monetaire internationale
grace a un organisme permanent fournissant un cadre
pour la consultation et la collaboration en matiere de
problemes monetaires internationaux;
(ii) de faciliter Texpansion et l’accroissement harmonieux du
commerce international, et de contribuer ainsi au developpement et au maintien d’un niveau eleve de Pemploi
et du revenu reel, et au developpement des ressources
productives de tous les Etats-membres, comme objectifs
primordiaux de la politique economique;




APPENDIX I

1441

(iii) de favoriser la stabilite des changes, de maintenir entre les
Etats-membres des accords de changes reguliers et d’eviter
la course a la depreciation des changes;
(iv) d’aider a l’etablissement d’un systeme multilateral de paiements en ce qui concerne les operations courantes entre
(p. 2)
les membres, et a Telimination de restrictions de change
qui entravent le developpement du commerce mondial;
(v) d’inspirer confiance aux membres, en pla§ant les ressources
du Fonds a leur disposition, moyennant des garanties convenables, et de permettre ainsi aux dits Etats-membres de
remedier aux desequilibres de leur balance des comptes
sans recourir a des mesures compromettant la prosperity
nationale ou internationale;
(vi) conformement a ce qui precede, d’abreger la duree et de
diminuer l’intensite des desequilibres de la balance des
comptes des membres.
Dans toutes ses decisions, le Fonds s’inspirera des buts enonces
dans le present Article.
Article II
Qualite de Membre

Membres originaires
Seront membres originaires du Fonds les Etats representes a la
Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies dont les
gouvernements auront accepte d’etre membres du Fonds avant la
date specifiee a 1
’Article XX, Section 2 ( e ) .
S e c t io n

1.

2. Autres membres.
La qualite de membre pourra etre acquise par les gouvernements
des autres pays aux dates et conformement aux conditions qui
pouront etre prescrites par le Fonds.
S e c t io n

(P. 3)
Article III
Quotes-Parts et Souscriptions

1. Quotes-parts
Une quote-part sera assignee a chaque Etat-membre. Les quotesparts des Etats-membres representes a la Conference Monetaire
et Financiere des Nations Unies et acceptant de faire partie du
Fonds avant la date specifiee a 1
’Article X X, Section 2 (e), sont
fixees dans le Supplement A. Les quotes-parts des autres membres
seront determinees par le Fonds.
S e c t io n




1442

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

Revision des quotes-parts
Le Fonds reexaminera les quotes-parts des Etats-membres tous
les cinq ans et, s’il le juge necessaire, proposera leur revision. S’il
le juge opportun, il peut aussi, a tout moment, envisager la revi­
sion de la quote-part d’un Etat-membre, sur la demande de l’Etat
interesse. Un vote a la majorite des quatre cinquiemes de la totalite
des voix sera exige pour tout changement des quotes-parts, et
aucune quote-part ne sera modifiee sans le consentement de l’Etatmembre interesse.
S e c tio n 2.

Souscription: Epoque, lieu et forme du paiement
(a) La souscription de chaque Etat-membre est egale a sa quotepart et doit etre versee en entier au depositaire appropriS, au plus
tard a la date a partir de laquelle le membre aura droit, aux termes
de 1
’Article X X , Section 4 (c) ou (d ), d’acheter des devises au
Fonds.
(b) Chaque Etat-membre paiera en or, au minimum la moins
elevee des sommes suivantes:
S e ctio n 3.

(i) vingt-cinq pour cent de sa quote-part; ou
(ii) dix pour cent de ses avoirs officials nets en or et en dollars
des Etats-Unis d’Amerique, tels qu’ils existeront a la date
ou le Fonds notifiera aux Etats-membres, en vertu de
1
’Article X X , Section 4 (a ), qu’il est sur le point de commencer des operations de change.
(p. 4)
Chaque Etat-membre fournira au Fonds les donnees necessaires
pour la determination des susdits avoirs en or et en dollars des
Etats-Unis.
(c) Chaque Etat-membre paiera le reliquat de sa quote-part en
monnaie nationale.
(d) Si, en raison de l’occupation ennemie, les dits avoirs-or ne
peuvent etre etablis a la date mentionnee cidessus, (b) (ii), le
Fonds fixera une nouvelle date pour la determination de ces avoirs.
Si cette derniere date est posterieure a celle a laquelle le membre
aura le droit, aux termes de 1
’Article X X , Section 4 (c) ou (d ),
d’acheter de la monnaie au Fonds, le Fonds et le membre conviendront d’un paiement provisoire en or a effectuer selon (b)
ci-dessus, et le reliquat sera paye en monnaie nationale, sous re­
serve d’un reglement de comptes ulterieur lorsque les avoirs officiels
auront ete determines.
Paiement en cas de modification des quotes-parts
(a)
Tout membre qui consent a une augmentation de sa quotepart devra dans les trente jours payer, en or, vingt-cinq pour cent
S e c tio n 4.




APPENDIX I

1443

du montant de 1
’augmentation et, en monnaie nationale, soixantequinze pour cent du meme montant. Cependant, si a la date du
consentement, les reserves monetaires de TEtat-membre sont inferieures a sa nouvelle quote-part, le Fonds pourra reduire le
versement or.
(b)
En cas de reduction de la quote-part, le Fonds devra, dans
les trente jours, rembourser a l’Etat-membre interesse une somme
egale a la reduction. Le paiement sera fait en monnaie nationale,
et en or dans la proportion ou cela sera necessaire pour eviter que
les avoirs du Fonds en la dite monnaie nationale ne tombent audessous de soixante-quinze pour cent de la nouvelle quote-part.
(p. 5)
5. Remplacement de la monnaie par des valeurs
Dans la mesure ou, de l’avis du Fonds, la monnaie d’un Etatmembre n’est pas necessaire aux operations du Fonds, ce dernier
sera tenu d’accepter, en remplacement de la dite monnaie, des bons
ou obligations similaires, emis par le dit Etat-membre ou par
le depositaire designe par ce dernier conformement a 1
’Article XIII,
Section 2. Ces bons ou obligations ne seront pas negociables, ils ne
porteront pas interet et seronts payables a vue a leur valeur nominale par une inscription au credit, sur le compte du Fonds tenu
chez le depositaire designe. Cette Section est applicable non seulement a la souscription mais aussi a toute somme dont le Fonds est
crediteur.
Article IV
S e c t io n

Pair des Monnaies
1. Definition du pair
(a) Le pair de la monnaie de chaque Etat-membre sera exprime
en or pris comme commun denominateur, ou en dollars des EtatsUnis d’Amerique du poids et du titre en vigueur au l er juillet 1944.
(b) Tous calculs relatifs aux monnaies des Etats-membres en
vue de l’application des dispositions du present Accord seront
operes sur la base du pair.
S e c t io n

2. Achats d!or au pair
Pour les operations en or effectuees par les Etats-membres, le
Fonds determinera une marge. Aucun Etat-membre ne pourra
acheter de Tor a un cours depassant le pair d’un montant superieur
a la dite marge. II ne pourra vendre de Tor a un cours inferieur
au pair, diminue de la dite marge.
S e c t io n

(P . 6 )
3.
Operations de change a la parite
Les cours maximum et minimum pour les operations de change

S e c t io n

795 84 1 — 48— 21




1444

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

entre les monnaies des membres ayant lieu sur leurs territoires
ne devront pas s’ecarter de la parite
(i) pour les operations de change au comptant, de plus d’un
pour cent; et
(ii) pour les autres operations de change, de la dite marge plus
telle marge additionnelle que le Fonds jugera raisonnable.
Obligations relatives a la stabilite des changes
(a) Tout Etat-membre s’engage a collaborer avec le Fonds en
vue de favoriser la stabilite des changes, d’entretenir avec les
autres membres des accords de change reguliers et d’eviter la
course a la modification du change.
(b) Par des mesures appropriees conformes au present Accord,
tout Etat-membre s’engage a ne permettre, sur ses territoires, que
des operations de change, entre sa monnaie et les monnaies des
autres Etats-membres, a des cours compris dans les limites prevues
a la Section 3 du present Article. Tout membre dont les autorites
monetaires, pour le reglement des transactions internationales,
achetent et vendent de Tor sans restriction, dans les limites des
cours prescrits par le Fonds a la Section 2 du present Article sera
considere comme se conformant a cet engagement.

SECTION 4.

Modifications du pair
(a) Un membre ne proposera pas de modification du pair de sa
monnaie si ce n’est en vue de remedier a un desequilibre fondamental.
(b) Une modification du pair de la monnaie d’un membre ne
(p. 7)
pourra etre faite que sur la proposition de l’Etat-membre interesse
et seulement apres consultation avec le Fonds.
(c) Lorsqu’une modification est proposee, le Fonds doit d’abord,
s’il y a lieu, prendre en consideration les changements qu’a deja
subis le pair initial, determine conformement a la Section 4 de
1
’Article XX. Si la modification proposee, jointe au total des modi­
fications anterieures (ce total etant obtenu en additionnant les
augmentations et les diminutions),
S e c tio n 5.

(i) ne depasse pas dix pour cent du pair initial, le Fonds ne
pourra pas soulever d’objection;
(ii) si elle ne depasse pas un montant additionnel de dix pour
cent du pair initial, le Fonds pourra soit donner son appro­
bation, si le membre le demande, soit exprimer son opposi­
tion, mais il devra faire connaitre sa decision dans un delai
de soixante-douze heures;
(iii) si la modification ne rentre pas dans Tune des deux cate­




APPENDIX I

1445

gories ci-dessus, le Fonds peut soit donner son approbation,
soit exprimer son opposition, mais il aura une plus longue
periode pour faire connaitre sa decision.
(d) Pour determiner si une modification proposee tombe sous
l’application de (i), (ii) ou (iii) de (c) ci-dessus, il ne sera pas
tenu compte des modifications uniformes du pair prevues a la Sec­
tion 7 du present Article.
(e) Un membre pourra modifier le pair de sa monnaie sans
l’assentiment du Fonds si la modification n’affecte pas le trans­
actions internationales des membres du Fonds.
(f) Le Fonds devra donner son assentiment a une modification
proposee qui tombe sous Tapplication de (c) (ii) ou de (c) (iii)
(p. 8)
ci-dessus, s’il s’est assure que la modification est necessaire pour
remedier a un desequilibre fondamental. En particulier, sous la
meme condition, il ne pourra pas s’opposer a une modification pro­
posee, en raison de la politique sociale ou generale interieure de
l’Etat-membre qui propose la modification.
6.
Consequences des modifications non autorisees
Dans les cas ou le Fonds a le droit de faire opposition, si un
Etat-membre modifie le pair de sa monnaie malgre Popposition du
Fonds, le dit membre cessera d'etre admis a utiliser les ressources
du Fonds, a moins que ce dernier n’en decide autrement. Si, a
l’expiration d’un delai raisonnable, le differend persiste, les disposi­
tions de la Section 2 (b) de 1
’Article XV deviendront applicables.
S e c t io n

7. Modifications uniformes du pair
Nonobstant les dispositions de la Section 5 (b) du present
Article, le Fonds pourra, a la majorite de toutes les voix, apporter
des modifications proportionnellement uniformes au pair des
monnaies de tous les membres, pourvu que chacune de ces modifi­
cations soit approuvee par tout membre ayant dix pour cent ou
plus du total des quotes-parts. Cependant, le pair de la monnaie
d’un Etat-membre ne sera pas modifie si, dans un delai de soixantedouze heures, le dit Etat-membre notifie au Fonds qu’il ne desire
pas que le pair de sa monnaie soit modifie.
S E C T IO N

8. Maintien de la valeur-or des avoirs du Fonds
(a) La valeur-or des avoirs du Fonds sera maintenue en depit
des modifications du pair ou du cours du change de la monnaie
de tout Etat-membre.
(P. 9)
(b) Au cas ou (i) le pair de la monnaie d’un Etat-membre est
abaisse, ou au cas ou (ii) le cours du change de la monnaie d’un
S e c t io n




1446

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

membre a, de Tavis du Fonds, subi une depreciation notable dans
les territoires du dit membre, celui-ci devra, dans un delai raisonnable, verser au Fonds en sa propre monnaie le montant necessaire pour compenser la reduction en valeur-or de la monnaie du
membre detenue par le Fonds.
(c) Si le pair de la monnaie d’un membre est augmente, le
Fonds, dans un delai raisonnable, restituera au dit membre, en
monnaie nationale, un montant equivalent a l’augmentation en
valeur-or de la monnaie de ce membre detenue par le Fonds.
(d) Les dispositions de la presente Section seront applicables
a une modification proportionnellement uniforme du pair des
monnaies de tous les membres, sauf si, au moment ou une telle
modification est proposee, le Fonds en decide autrement.
Pluralite monetaire dans le territoires
d’un Etat-membre
Un membre proposant une modification du pair de sa monnaie
sera considere, a moins qu’il ne declare autrement, comme visant
egalement les diverses monnaies ayant cours sur tous les territoires
pour lesquels il a accepte le present Accord aux termes de la Sec­
tion 2 (g) de TArticle XX. 1 sera cependant loisible a ce membre
1
de declarer que sa proposition se rapporte soit seulement a la
monnaie de la metropole, soit seulement a une ou plusieurs
monnaies specifiees, soit a la fois a la monnaie de la metropole et
a une ou plusieurs monnaies distinctes.

S ectio n 9.

(P. 10)

Article V
Transactions avec le Fonds

Organismes traitant avec le Fonds
Tout membre traitera avec le Fonds exclusivement par Tintermediaire de sa Tresorerie, banque centrale, fonds de stabilisation
ou autres etablissements financiers similaires. De son cote, le
Fonds traitera seulement avec les memes organismes ou par leur
intermediaire.
S ectio n 1.

Limitation des operations du Fonds
Sauf dispositions contraires du present Accord, le Fonds limitera
ses operations aux transactions ayant pour objet de fournir a un
membre, sur Tinitiative de celui-ci, la monnaie d’un autre membre,
en echange soit d’or, soit de la monnaie de l’Etat acheteur.
S e ctio n 3. Conditions regissant Vemploi des ressources du Fonds
(a)
Un Etat-membre aura le droit d’acheter au Fonds la
monnaie d’un autre membre contre sa propre monnaie aux condi­
tions suivantes:
S e ctio n 2.




APPENDIX I

1447

(i) L’Etat-membre desirant acheter une monnaie declare que
cette monnaie est actuellement necessaire pour effectuer
des paiements compatibles avec les dispositions du present
A ccord;
(ii) le Fonds n’a pas notifie, en application de la Section 3 de
TArticle VII, la rarete de la monnaie desiree;
(iii) l’achat envisage ne doit pas avoir pour resultat d’augmenter les avoirs du Fonds en monnaie du membre acheteur de plus de vingt-cinq pour cent de sa quote-part,
(p. 11)
pendant la periode de douze mois se terminant a la date de
Pachat, ou de depasser deux cent pour cent de sa quotepart. Toutefois, la limitation de vingt-cinq pour cent s’appliquera seulement a la portion des avoirs depassant
soixante-quinze pour cent de la quote-part.
(iv) le Fonds n’a pas anterieurement declare, conformement a
la Section 5 du present Article, a la Section 6 de 1
’Article
IV, a la Section 1 de 1
’Article VI, ou a la Section 2 (a)
de PArticle XV que le membre desirant acheter est irrecevable.
(b)
Un membre n’aura pas le droit, sans la permission du
Fonds, d’avoir recours aux ressources du Fonds dans le but d’obtenir des devises destinees a etre conservees pour couvrir des
operations de changes a terme.
4. Dispense
Pourvu qu’il le fasse de maniere a sauvegarder ses interets, le
Fonds peut, discretionnairement, accorder des dispenses aux con­
ditions prescrites a la Section 3 (a) du present Article, en particulier lorsqu’il s’agit d’Etat-membres ayant evite les frequents
et substantiels appels aux ressources du Fonds. Dans l’octroi
de la dispense, il sera tenu compte des besoins periodiques ou
exceptionnels du membre qui Pa sollicitee. Le Fonds prendra
egalement en consideration Toffre de donner en gage, a titre de
surete, de Tor, de l’argent, des titres ou autres actifs suffisants, de
I’avis du Fonds, a la sauvegarde de ses interets. Le Fonds peut,
(P. 12)
dans ce cas, subordonner la dispense a la constitution d’un tel
gage.
S e c t io n

5. Non recevabilite a recourir aux ressources du Fonds
Si le Fonds estime qu’un membre emploie les ressources du
Fonds d’une maniere eontraire aux objectifs de ce dernier, il
adressera a ce membre un rapport exposant ses vues et impartisS e c t io n




1448

MO N E TA R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

sant un delai de reponse. Apres envoi du rapport, le Fonds pourra
restriendre l’emploi des ressources du Fonds par le dit membre.
S’il n’est pas repondu au rapport dans le delai imparti, ou si la
reponse n’est pas satisfaisante, le Fonds pourra soit maintenir la
susdite restriction sur l’emploi des ressources du Fonds, soit, apres
un preavis raisonnable adresse au membre interesse, le declarer
irrecevable a utiliser les ressources du Fonds.
Achats de monnaies au Fonds contre de Vor
(a) Tout membre desireux d’obtenir, directement ou indirectement, la monnaie d’un autre membre contre de Tor devra effectuer
l’operation par l’intermediaire du Fonds, si cela est possible aux
memes conditions.
(b) Nonobstant le paragraphe (a) ci-dessus, tout membre est
libre de vendre sur un marche quelconque de Tor nouvellement
extrait de mines se trouvant sur ses territoires.
S ec tio n 6.

Rachat par les Etats-membres des avoirs en leur
monnaie detenus par le Fonds
(a) Tout membre pourra racheter au Fonds (et celui-ci devra
vendre), en payant en or, une partie quelconque des avoirs du
Fonds dans la monnaie du dit membre, qui serait en excedent de
sa quote-part.

S e ctio n 7.

(P. 13)

(b) A la fin de chaque exercice financier du Fonds, tout membre
devra racheter au Fonds contre de Tor ou contre monnaies con­
vertibles, de la maniere fixee au Supplement B et aux conditions
ci-dessous, une partie des avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie du
dit membre:
(i) chaque membre emploiera au rachat de sa propre monnaie
au Fonds un montant tire de ses reserves monetaires, egal
en valeur a la moitie de toute augmentation survenue au
cours de l’annee dans les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie
du membre; ce montant sera majore de la moitie de toute
augmentation ou minore de la moitie de toute diminution
survenue au cours de l’annee dans les reserves monetaires
du dit membre. Cette regie ne s’appliquera pas lorsque
les reserves monetaires d’un membre auront diminue au
cours de l’annee d’un montant superieur a l’augmentation
survenue dans les avoirs en monnaie du membre detenus
par le Fonds;
(ii) si, apres les rachats decrits dans (i) ci-dessus, les avoirs
d’un Etat-membre dans la monnaie d’un autre Etatmembre (ou en or obtenu de ce dernier) ont augmente en




APPENDIX I

1449

raison <Toperations effectuees dans cette monnaie avec des
Etats tiers ou avec des personnes se trouvant sur les terri­
toires des Etats tiers, le membre dont les avoirs dans la
monnaie en question (ou en or) ont ainsi subi une aug­
mentation se servira de Taugmentation pour effectuer le
(P. 14)

rachat de sa propre monnaie au Fonds.
(c)
Aucun des ajustements decrits dans (b) ci-dessus ne seront
poursuivis jusqu’au point ou
(i) les reserves monetaires de TEtat-membre sont inferieures
a sa quote-part, ou
(ii) les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie du membre sont in­
ferieures a soixante-quinze pour cent de sa quote-part, ou
(iii) les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie a reverser au Fonds
sont superieurs a soixante-quinze pour cent de la quotepart de TEtat-membre interesse.
S e c t i o n 8.

Commissions

(a) Tout membre achetant au Fonds la monnaie d’un autre
membre en echange de la sienne propre devra payer une commis­
sion de soixante-quinze centiemes pour cent en sus de la parite.
A sa discretion, le Fonds pourra elever le taux de cette commission
jusqu’a un pour cent ou la reduire a cinquante centiemes pour cent.
(b) Le Fonds pourra prelever une commission raisonnable de
manipulation sur tout Etat-membre achetant ou vendant de Tor
au Fonds.
(c) Le Fonds devra prelever des commissions, uniformes pour
tous les membres, qui seront payables pour tout membre sur la
base du solde quotidien moyen en monnaie du dit membre detenu
par le Fonds en sus de sa quote-part. Ces commissions seront
etablies aux taux ci-apres:
(i) sur les sommes ne depassant pas la quote-part de plus de
vingt-cinq pour cent: aucune commission ne sera imposee
(P. 15)

pendant les trois premiers mois; une commission de
cinquante centiemes pour cent par an pour les neuf mois
suivants; ensuite, une augmentation du taux de la com­
mission de cinquante centiemes pour cent pour chaque
annee subsequente;
(ii) sur les sommes depassant la quote-part de plus de vingtcinq pour cent mats de moins de cinquante pour cent: un
taux additionnel de cinquante centiemes pour la premiere




1450

M ON E TA R Y AND FIN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

annee et de cinquante centiemes de plus pour chaque annee
subsequente;
(iii) sur chaque tranche additionnelle de vingt-cinq pour cent
en sus de la quote-part: un taux additionnel de cinquante
centiemes pour cent pour la premiere annee, et augmente
ensuite de cinquante centiemes pour cent pour chaque
annee subsequente.
(d) Lorsque le taux de la commission atteint quatre pour cent
par an, le Fonds et l’Etat-membre examineront ensemble les
moyens de reduire les avoirs du Fonds dans la dite monnaie. Par
la suite, les commissions augmenteront conformement aux disposi­
tions de (c) ci-dessus jusqu’a cinq pour cent et, dans le cas de
disaccord, le Fonds pourra imposer tel taux qu’il jugera adequat.
(e) Les taux mentionnes dans (c) et (d) ci-dessus pourront
etre changes par une decision prise a la majoritee des trois-quarts
de la totalite des voix.
(f) Toutes commissions seront payees en or; toutefois, si les
reserves monetaires d’un Etat-membre sont inferieures a la moitie
de sa quote-part, il paiera en or seulement une partie de la com(p. 16)
mission proportionnelle au rapport entre ses reserves et la moitie
de sa quote-part, le reste etant paye dans sa propre monnaie.
Article VI
Transfert de Capitaux

Emploi des ressources du Fonds a des transferts
de capitaux
(a) Aucun membre ne pourra faire un emploi net des ressources
du Fonds pour faire face a une sortie importante ou prolongee de
capitaux et le Fonds pourra demander a tout membre d’appliquer
des moyens de controle en vue d’empecher un tel emploi des
ressources du Fonds. Si, apres avoir ete saisi d’une telle demande,
un membre n’applique pas les mesures de controle appropriees, le
Fonds pourra declarer le dit membre irrecevable a l’emploi des
ressources du Fonds.
(b) Rien dans cette Section ne sera consider e comme ay ant
1
’effet:
S e c t io n 1.

(i) d’empecher l’emploi des ressources du Fonds pour des
transferts de capitaux d’un montant raisonnable, necessaire a l’expansion des exportations ou necessaire dans le
cours normal des operations du commerce, des operations
de banque ou d’autres affaires;




APPENDIX I

1451

(ii) ou encore d’affecter les mouvements de capitaux qui sont
finances au moyen des ressources d’un Etat-membre en
or ou en devises etrangeres; toutefois, les Etats-membres
s’engagent a ce que les dits mouvements de capitaux soient
conformes aux buts du Fonds.
(P. 17)
S ection 2. Dispositions speciales pour le transfert de capitaux
Si les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie d’un membre sont restes

inferieurs a soixante-quinze pour cent de sa quote-part pendant
une periode immediatement anterieure d’au moins six mois, le dit
membre, s’il n’a pas ete prive du droit de se servir des ressources
du Fonds aux termes du present Article, de 1
’Article IV, Section 6,
de PArticle V, Section 5, ou de l’Article XV, Section 2 ( a ) , aura
le droit, nonobstant les dispositions de la Section 1 (a) du present
Article, d’acheter au Fonds, en echange de sa propre monnaie, la
monnaie d’un autre membre pour n’importe quel but, y compris
celui d’effecteur des transferts de capitaux. Cependant, les achats
faits pour effectuer des transferts de capitaux aux termes de la
presente Section ne seront pas permis, s’ils ont pour effet de porter
les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie du membre desireux d’effectuer des achats a plus de soixante-quinze pour cent de sa quotepart, ou s’ils ont pour effet de reduire les avoirs du Fonds dans la
monnaie desiree a moins de soixante-quinze pour cent de la quotepart du membre dont la monnaie est desiree.
Mesures de control appliquees aux transferts
de capitaux
Les membres pourront appliquer les mesures de controle neces­
saires pour reglementer les mouvements internationaux de capi­
taux, mais aucun membre ne pourra appliquer les dites mesures
de control de fagon a limiter les paiements se rapportant aux opera­
tions courantes, ou a retarder outre mesure les transferts de fonds
effectues en reglement d’obligations, a l’exception de ce qui est
prevu a l’Article VII, Section 3 ( b ) , et a l’Article XIV, Section 2.
S ection 3.

(P. 18)

Article VII
Monnaies Rares

Rarete generale dJ
une monnaie
Si le Fonds constate qu’une monnaie particuliere tend a devenir
generalement rare, il pourra en aviser les membres; il pourra
egalement publier un rapport exposant les causes de la rarete et
contenant des recommandations destinees a y mettre fin. Un repre-

S ection 1.




1452

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A NC IA L CONFERENCE

sentant du membre dont la monnaie est en cause participera a la
preparation du rapport.
Mesures a prendre pour reconstituer les avoirs
du Fonds en monnaie rare
S’il le juge utile pour la reconstitution de ses avoirs dans la
monnaie d’un Etat-membre quelconque, le Fonds pourra prendre
Tune ou Tautre des mesures suivantes ou les deux a la fo is :
S ec tio n 2.

(i) proposer a l’Etat-membre interesse de consentir un emprunt au Fonds en la dite monnaie, suivant les termes
et conditions convenus entre lui et le Fonds, ou bien
d’autoriser le Fonds a emprunter cette monnaie a une
autre source, soit a Tinterieur, .soit en dehors des terri­
toires du dit Etat-membre, mais aucun membre ne sera
tenu d’accorder les dits emprunts au Fonds ou d’autoriser
le Fonds a emprunter la dite monnaie a aucune autre
source.
(ii) Exiger que TEtat-membre interesse vende sa monnaie
au Fonds contre de Tor.
Rarete des avoirs du Fonds
(a) Si le Fonds constate que la demande d’une monnaie menace
sSrieusement de reduire Taptitude du Fonds a fournir la dite
(p. 19)
monnaie, le Fonds devra, qu’il ait ou non publie un rapport aux
termes de la Section 1 du present Article, proclamer ofHciellement
la rarete de la dite monnaie et devra, a partir de ce moment, repartir les avoirs existants et a venir, en tenant dument compte
des besoins relatifs des Etats-membres, de la situation economique
internationale et de toutes autres considerations pertinentes. Le
Fonds publiera aussi un rapport sur sa politique.
(b) Une proclamation officielle aux termes de (a) ci-dessus
constituera une autorisation pour tout membre d’imposer temporairement, apres consultation avec le Fonds, des limitations a la
liberte des operations de change portant sur la monnaie rare.
Sous reserve des dispositions de TArticle IV, Section 3 et 4, chaque
Etat-membre est seul competent pour determiner la nature de ces
limitations, mais celles-ci ne devront pas etre plus restrictives
qu’il n’est necessaire pour adapter la demande de monnaie rare
h Toffre actuelle et a venir. Ces limitations devront etre assouplies
puis retirees aussi rapidement que les circonstances le permettront.
(c) L’autorisation visee dans (b) ci-dessus expirera aussitot
S e c tio n 3.




APPENDIX I

1453

que le Fonds declarera officiellement que la dite monnaie n'est
plus rare.
Application des restrictions
Tout membre imposant, conformement aux dispositions de la
Section 3 (b) du present Article, des restrictions sur la monnaie
de tout autre membre, devra accueillir avec sympathie les repre­
sentations faites par Tautre membre au sujet de Tapplication des
dites restrictions.
S ection 4.

Effet des autres accords internationaux sur
les restrictions
Les membres conviennent de ne pas invoquer les engagements
(p. 20)
contractes avec d’autres membres anterieurement au present Ac­
cord pour faire obstacle a Texecution des dispositions du present
Article.
Article VIII
S ection 5.

Obligations Generates des Membres

Introduction
En sus des obligations assumees conformement aux autres
articles du present Accord, chaque membre s’engage a assumer
les obligations enoncees dans le present Article.

S ection 1.

Eviter les restrictions relatives aux paiements
courants
(a) Conformement aux dispositions de la Section 3 (b) de
1
’Article VII, et de la Section 2 de TArticle XIV, aucun membre
n’imposera, sans l’approbation du Fonds, des restrictions aux
paiements et aux transferts relatifs aux transactions internationales courantes.
(b) Les contrats de change qui impliquent la monnaie d’un
Etat-membre et qui sont contraires aux reglementations de change
du dit Etat-membre, appliquees ou etablies conformement aux
termes du present Accord, ne seront pas executoires sur les terri­
toires des autres Etats-membres. En outre, les Etats-membres
peuvent, par accord mutuel, prendre en commun des mesures ayant
pour but de rendre plus efficaces les reglementations de change
de Tun et Tautre membre, a condition que ces mesures et regle­
mentations soient compatibles avec le present Accord.
S ection 2.

Eviter les pratiques de discrimination monetaire
Aucun membre ne pourra etre partie a des arrangements monetaires discriminatoires, ou recourir a des pratiques monetaires
(p. 21)
multiples, sauf autorisation prevue dans le present Accord ou
S ec tio n 3.




1454

M ON E TA R Y AND FI NA NCI AL CONFERENCE

autorisation par le Fonds; de meme, aucun membre ne permettra
a ses etablissements financiers mentionnes dans la Section 1 de
FArticle V de devenir partie a de tels arrangements ou de se
livrer a de telles pratiques. Si de tels arrangements ou de telles
pratiques existent a Tentree en vigueur du present Accord, l’Etatmembre interesse entrera en consultation avec le Fonds au sujet
de leur suppression progressive, a moins qu’ils ne soient maintenus
ou imposes conformement a la Section 2 de 1
’Article XIV, auquel
cas les dispositions de la Section 4 du dit Article seront applicables.
S ectio n 4.

Assurer la convertibilite des avoirs detenus par
Vetranger.
(a) Tout Etat-membre devra acheter ses propres devises de­
tenues par un autre membre, si celui-ci, en demandant cet achat,
declare:
(i) que les dites devises ont ete acquises recemment par suite
d’operations courantes; ou
(ii) que leur conversion est necessaire pour effectuer les paiements d’operations courantes.
Le membre acheteur aura la faculte de payer soit dans la monnaie
du membre faisant la demande, soit en or.
(b) L’obligation visee a (a) ci-dessus ne s’appliquera pas:
(i) lorsque la convertibilite des devises a ete limitee con­
formement a la Section 2 du present Article, ou a la Sec­
tion 3 de PArticle V I ; ou
(ii) lorsque les devises se sont accumulees par suite de trans(p. 22)
actions effectuees avant la levee des restrictions prevues a
la Section 2 de 1
’Article X I V ; ou
(iii) lorsque les devises ont ete acquises contrairement aux
reglementations de change du membre a qui il est demande
d’eff ectuer Tachat; ou
(iv) lorsque la monnaie du membre demandant Pachat a ete
declaree rare en vertu de la Section 3 (a) de 1
’Article V I I ;
ou
(v) lorsque le membre a qui il est demande d'effectuer Pachat
n’a pas le droit, pour une raison quelconque, d’acheter
au Fonds des monnaies d'autres membres en echange de
sa propre monnaie.
Communiquer des informations
(a)
Le Fonds peut demander aux Etats-membres de lui fournir
telles informations qu’il estime necessaires a la conduite de ses
S ec tio n 5.




A PPENDI X I

1455

operations, y compris, comme constituant le minimum necessaire
a l’exercice des fonctions du Fonds, les donnees nationales sur les
points suivants:
(i) avoirs officiels a l’interieur et a l’etranger (1) en or, (2)
en devises etrangeres;
(ii) avoirs a l’interieur et a l’etranger, des organismes bancaires et financiers non officiels (1) en or, (2) en devises
etrangeres;
(iii) production de Tor;
(iv) exportations et importations d’or, par pays de destina­
tion et d’origine;
(P. 23)
(v) valeurs des exportations et importations totales de marchandises en monnaie nationale, par pays de destination
et d’origine;
(vi) balance internationale des paiements, y compris (1) le
commerce de marchandises et services; (2) les mouvements d’or; (3) les mouvements de capitaux connus;
(4) les autres elements;
(vii) etat des investissements internationaux, c’est-a-dire les
investissements etrangers sur les territoires de l’Etatmembre et les investissements a Tetranger des residents
du dit Etat, dans la mesure ou il est possible de fournir
ces informations;
(viii) revenu national;
(ix) indices des prix, c’est-a-dire indices des prix des mar­
chandises, en gros et en detail, ainsi que les prix d’exportation et d’importation;
(x) cours d’achat et de vente des devises etrangeres;
(xi) reglementation des changes, c’est-a-dire un expose complet des regies en vigueur au moment de l’entree au
Fonds, ainsi que des modifications ulterieures a mesure
qu’elles se produisent;
(xii) la ou existent des accords officiels de clearing, indication
detaillee des montants non encore compenses se rapportant aux operations commerciales et financieres, avec
(p. 24)
indication de la duree pendant laquelle ces arrieres sont
restes en suspens.
(b)
En demandant ces renseignements, le Fonds prendra en
consideration l’aptitude variable des Etats-membres a fournir les
donnees demandees. Les Etats-membres ne seront pas tenus d’entrer dans des details les obligeant a divulguer les affaires de par-




1456

MO N E T A R Y AND FI N A N C I A L CONFERENCE

ticuliers ou de societes. Les Etats-membres, cependant, conviennent de fournir les renseignements desires d’une maniere aussi
detaillee et precise que possible et, dans les limites ou ils le
pourront, d’eviter les simples estimations.
(c)
Le Fonds pourra obtenir des renseignements supplementaires par accord avec les Etats-membres. II servira de centre
pour la reunion et l’echange de renseignements relatifs aux ques­
tions monetaires et financieres, et facilitera ainsi la preparation
d’etudes destinees a aider les Etats-membres a developper une
politique de nature a favoriser la realisation des buts du Fonds.
Consultations entre membres au sujet d’accords
internationaux existants
Lorsque, dans les circonstances speciales ou temporaires spe­
cifie s dans le present Accord, un membre est autorise a maintenir
ou a etablir des restrictions sur les operations de change, et
lorsqu'il existe d'autres engagements entre certains Etats-membres, sus anterieurement au present Accord, qui sont incompa­
tibles avec l’application de telles restrictions, les membres
interesses se consulteront en vue d’effectuer les adaptations necessaires mutuellement acceptables. Les dispositions du present
Article seront sans prejudice de Tapplication de la Section 5
de r Article VII.
S e ctio n 6.

(P. 25 )

Article IX
Statut, Immunites et Privileges
S ectio n 1.

Ob jets du present Article
En vue de permettre au Fonds de remplir les fonctions qui lui
sont confiees, le statut, les immunites et les privileges definis au
present Article seront accordes au Fonds dans les territoires de
tous les membres.
Statut du Fonds
Le Fonds jouira de la pleine personnalite juridique et, en particulier, de la capacite:
S e ctio n 2.

(i) de passer des contrats;
(ii) d’acquerir des biens mobiliers et immobiliers et d’en dis­
poser ;
(iii) d’ester en justice.
Immunite de juridiction
Le Fonds, ses biens et ses avoirs, ou qu’ils se trouvent et quels
qu’en soient les detenteurs, juiront de Timmunite de juridiction
S ectio n 3.




APPENDIX I

1457

sous tous ses aspects, sauf dans la mesure ou il y renoncera expressement en vue d’une certaine procedure ou bien par contrat.
Autres immunites de meme nature
Les biens et les avoirs du Fonds, ou qu’ils se trouvent et quels
qu’en soient les detenteurs, ne pourront faire Fobjet de perquisi­
tions, de requisitions, de confiscations, d*expropriations ou de
toutes autres formes de saisies ordonnees par le pouvoir executif
ou par le pouvoir legislatif.

S ectio n 4.

Immunite des Archives
Les archives du Fonds seront inviolables.

S ection 5.

(p. 26)
S ection 6.

Immunite des avoirs par rapport a toutes restrictions
Dans la mesure requise pour effectuer les operations prevues
dans le present Accord, tous les biens et avoirs du Fonds seront
exempts de restrictions, reglementations, controles et moratoires
de toute nature.
Privileges en matiere de communication
Les communications officielles du Fonds seront traitees par
chaque Etat-membre de la meme maniere que les communications
officielles des autres Etats-membres.
S ectio n 7.

Immunites et privileges des fonctionnaires et em­
ployes
Tous les gouverneurs, administrateurs, leurs suppleants, et les
fonctionnaires et employes du Fonds:

S ectio n 8.

(i) seront a Fabri de toutes poursuites, en ce qui concerne
les actes accomplis dans Fexercice de leurs fonctions, sauf
au cas ou le Fonds renoncerait a cette immunite;
(ii) lorsqu’ils ne seront pas des nationaux des pays ou ils se
trouvent, ils benefieieront des memes immunites, h Ffigard
des restrictions relatives a Fimmigration, a Fenregistrement des etrangers et au services militaire, ainsi que des
memes avantages que ceux que les Etats-membres accordent aux representants, fonctionnaires et employes des
autres Etats-membres, possedant un statut equivalent;
(iii) ils benefieieront du meme traitement, en ce qui concerne
les facilites de voyage, que celui que les Etats-membres
(p. 27)

accordent aux representants, fonctionnaires et employes
des autres Etats-membres, possedant un statut equivalent.
Exemption de charges fiscales
(a) Le Fonds, ses avoirs, ses biens, ses revenus, ainsi que ses

S ec tio n 9.




1458

M ON E TA R Y AND FI NA NCI AL CONFERENCE

operations et transactions autorisees par le present Accord, seront
exempts de tous impots et de tous droits de douane. Le Fonds sera
aussi exempt de toute obligation, en ce qui concerne la perception
ou le paiement d’un impot ou d’un droit quelconque.
(b) Aucun impot ne sera per$u sur les traitements et emolu­
ments verses par le Fonds aux administrateurs, a leurs suppleants,
aux fonctionnaires et aux employes du Fonds qui ne sont pas des
nationaux, sujets ou autres ressortissants du pays ou ils resident.
(c) Aucun impot, de quelque nature que ce soit, ne sera pergu
sur une obligation ou une action quelconque emise par le Fonds,
y compris tout dividende ou interet de cette action ou de cette
obligation, quels qu’en soient les detenteurs, si cet impot
(i) constitue une mesure de discrimination contre une telle
action ou obligation du seul fait qu’elle est emise par le
► Fonds; ou
(ii) si le seul fondement juridique d’un tel impot est le lieu
ou la devise dans laquelle Faction ou l’obligation est emise,
rendue payable ou payee, ou l’emplacement de tout bureau
ou centre de transactions que le Fonds fait fonctionner.
(p. 28)
Application du present Article
Chaque membre prendra toutes dispositions utiles, sur ses propres territoires, en vue d’incorporer a ses propres lois et d’appliquer effectivement les principes enonces dans le present A rticle;
il devra informer le Fonds du detail des mesures qu’il aura prises.
S e ctio n 10.

Article X
Rapports avec les Autres Organisations Internationales

Aux termes du present Accord, le Fonds collaborera avec toute
organisation internationale generate et avec les organismes internationaux publics ayant des fonctions specialises dans les domaines
connexes. Toutes dispositions relatives a cette collaboration qui
entraineraient la modification d’une clause quelconque du present
Accord ne pourront etre effectuees qu’a la suite d’un amendement
au dit Accord, conformement a 1
’Article XVII.
Article XI
Relations avec les Etats Non-Membres

Engagements des Etats-members en ce qui concerne
leurs relations avec les Etats non-membres
Chaque Etat-membre s’engage:

SECTION 1.

(i) a ne pas effectuer (par lui-meme ou par l’intermediaire
de ses etablissements financiers mentionnes dans 1
’Article




A P PE NDI X I

1459

V, Section 1) de transactions contraires aux dispositions
du present Accord ou aux buts du Fonds, avec un Etat nonmembre ou avec des personnes residant sur les territoires
d’un Etat non-membre;
(P . 2 9 )

(ii) a ne pas cooperer avec un Etat non-membre, ou avec des
personnes residant sur les territoires d’un Etat non-membre, a des operations contraires aux dispositions du present
Accord ou aux buts du Fonds; et
(iii) a cooperer avec le Fonds en vue de l’application, sur ses
territoires, de mesures destinees a empecher des trans­
actions contraires aux dispositions du present Accord ou
aux buts du Fonds, avec des Etats non-membres ou avec
des personnes residant sur leurs territoires.
2. Restrictions sur les transactions avec des
Etats non-membres
Aucune disposition du present Accord n’affectera le droit de
tout membre d’imposer des restrictions aux operations de change
avec des Etats non-membres ou avec des personnes sur leurs ter­
ritoires, a moins que le Fonds ne juge que de telles restrictions
portent prejudice aux interets des membres et sont contraires aux
buts du Fonds.
Article XII

S e c t io n

Organisation et Administration

Composition du Fonds
Le Fonds comprendra un Conseil des Gouverneurs, des Administrateurs, un Administrateur-delegue et un secretariat.
S e c t io n

1.

2.
Conseil des Gouverneurs
(a) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs sera investi de tous les pouvoirs
du Fonds; il comprendra un gouverneur et un suppleant designes
par chaque membre de la maniere que le Fonds determinera.
(p. 30)
Chaque gouverneur et chaque suppleant restera en fonctions pen­
dant cinq ans, au gre du membre qui l’aura nomme, et pourra etre
renomme. Aucun suppleant ne pourra voter, sauf en l’absence
du gouverneur qu’il remplace. Le Conseil elira President un des
gouverneurs.
(b) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs pourra deleguer aux Administrateurs l’autorite necessaire pour exercer tous les pouvoirs du
Conseil, excepte le pouvoir qui lui permet:

S e c t io n

(i) d’admettre de nouveaux membres et de fixer les condi­
tions regissant leur admission;
795841 — 48— 22




1460

MO N E T A R Y AND F I NA N C I AL CONFERENCE

(ii) d’approuver une revision des quotes-parts;
(iii) d’approuver un changement uniforme dans le pair des
monnaies de tous les membres;
(iv) de faire des arrangements (autres que des arangements
officieux de caractere temporaire ou admistratif) en vue
de collaborer avec d'autres organisations internationales;
(v) de determiner la repartition du revenu net du Fonds;
(vi) d’exiger le retrait d’un membre;
(vii) de decider la liquidation du Fonds;
(viii) de rendre un arret lorsqu’il sera fait appel des interpre­
tations donnees au present Accord- par les Administrateurs.
(c) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs tiendra une reunion annuelle
et tout autre reunion prevue par le Conseil ou convoquee par les
Administrateurs. Les reunions du Conseil seront convoquees par
les Administrateurs toutes les fois que la demande en sera faite
par cinq membres ou par des membres detenant un quart de la
totalite des voix.
(p. 31)
(d) Le quorum pour toute reunion du Conseil des Gouverneurs
sera une majorite des Gouverneurs disposant des deux tiers au
moins de la totalite des voix.
(e) Tout gouverneur aura droit au nombre de voix qui est
accorde, conformement a la Section 5 du present Article, a TEtatmembre qui Ta nomme.
(f) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs pourra regler une procedure
par laquelle les Administrateurs, lorsqu’ils seront persuades de
servir ainsi les meilleurs interets du Fonds pouront obtenir un
vote des Gouverneurs sur une question donnee, sans convoquer une
reunion du Conseil.
(g) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs, ainsi que les Administrateurs
dans la mesure ou ils y sont autorises, pourront adopter tous
reglements necessaires ou appropries a la gestion du Fonds.
(h) Les gouverneurs et les suppleants rempliront leurs fonctions sans recevoir de compensation du Fonds, mais le Fonds leur
remboursera les frais encourus normalement, lorsqu’ils se rendront
aux reunions.
(i) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs determinera la remuneration
des Administrateurs ainsi que les appointements de TAdministrateur-delegue et les conditions de son contrat de service.
Administrateurs
(a)
Aux Administrateurs incombera la responsabilite pour la
conduite des operations generates du Fonds, et, a cette fin, ils
S e c tio n 3.




APPENDIX I

1461

exerceront tous les pouvoirs qui leur seront delegues par le Conseil
des Gouverneurs.
(b) Les administrateurs, qui ne seront pas necessairement des
gouverneurs, seront au nombre de douze au moins, et choisis comme
(p. 32)
suit:
(i) cinq seront nommes par les cinq membres ayant les quotesparts les plus elevees;
(ii) deux au plus seront nommes quand les dispositions de (c)
ci-dessous seront applicables;
(iii) cinq seront elus par les Etats-membres autres que les Republiques Americaines qui ne peuvent pas hommer d’administrateurs.
(iv) deux seront elus par les Republiques Americaines qui ne
peuvent pas nommer d’administrateurs.
Au sens du present paragraphe, le mot “ membres” signifie les
gouvernements des pays dont les noms apparaissent au Supple­
ment A, qu’ils deviennent membres conformement a 1
’Article X X
ou a la Section 2 de 1
’Article II. Lorsque les gouvernements
d’autres pays deviendront membres, le Conseil des Gouverneurs,
par une majorite des quatre cinquiemes du total des voix, pourra
augmenter le nombre des administrateurs a elire.
(c) Si, lors de la seconde election reguliere d’administrateurs
et dans les elections qui suivront, parmi les membres ayant le
droit de nommer des administrateurs en vertu de (b) (i) ci-dessus,
ne se trouvent pas les deux membres dont les avoirs aupres du
Fonds ont subi, au cours des deux annees precedentes, la plus
forte reduction au-dessous de leur quote-part, en valeur absolue
et en termes d’or, soit un de ces membres, soit les deux, selon le
cas, auront le droit de nommer un administrateur.
(d) Sous reserve de la Section 3 (b) de 1
’Article XX, l’election
des administrateurs a elire aura lieu a intervalles de deux ans
conformement aux dispositions du Supplement C, completees par
(P. 33)
les reglements que le Fonds jugera appropries. Chaque fois que
le Conseil des Gouverneurs augmente Ie nombre des admini­
strateurs devant etre elus conformement a (b) ci-dessus, il etablira un reglement effectuant les changements appropries dans la
proportion des votes exiges pour elire des administrateurs con­
formement aux dispositions du Supplement C.
(e) Chaque administrateur nommera un suppleant qui aura, en
son absence, pleins pouvoirs pour agir en son nom. Lorsque les




1462

M O N E T A R Y AND F I N A N CI A L CONFERENCE

administrateurs qui les auront nommes seront presents, les suppleants pourront prendre part aux debats, mais ils ne voteront pas.
(f) Les administrateurs resteront en fonctions jusqu’a ce que
leurs successeurs aient ete nommes ou elus. Si un poste d’administrateur devient vacant plus de quantre-vingt-dix jours avant
que le mandat ne soit acheve, un autre administrateur sera elu
pour la periode a courir par les membres qui ont elu l’ancien ad­
ministrateur. La majorite des voix donnees sera requise pour
qu’une election ait lieu. Tant que le poste restera vacant, le suppleant de l’ancien administrateur exercera les pouvoirs de ce
dernier, sauf celui de nommer un suppleant.
(g) Les Administrateurs rempliront leurs fonctions sans inter­
ruption au siege principal du Fonds et se reuniront aussi souvent
que les affaires du Fonds l’exigeront.
(h) Dans une reunion quelconque des Administrateurs, le
quorum necessaire sera une majorite des administrateurs disposant de la moitie au moins de la totalite des voix.
(i) Chaque administrateur nomme disposera du nombre de
voix attribue, aux termes de la Section 5 du present Article, au
(p. 34)
membre qui l’aura nomme. Chaque administrateur elu disposera
du nombre de voix qui auront compte dans son election. Quand
les dispositions de la Section 5 (b) du present Article sont applicables, le nombre de voix des Administrateurs sera augmente ou
diminue en proportion. Toutes les voix dont disposera l’administrateur seront donnees en bloc.
(j) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs adoptera des reglements d’apres
lesquels un membre qui ne jouit pas du droit de nommer un
administrateur aux termes de (b) ci-dessus pourra envoyer un
representant assister a toute reunion des Administrateurs
lorsqu’une demande faite par le dit membre ou lorsqu’une ques­
tion le concernant particulierement sera a l’etude.
(k) Les Administrateurs pourront nommer tels comites qu’ils
jugeront utiles. La composition des dits comites ne sera pas
necessairement limitee aux gouverneurs, aux administrateurs, ou
a leurs suppleants.
S e c t io n 4.

UAdministrateur-delegue et le Secretariat
(a)
Les Administrateurs choisiront un Administrateur-delegue
qui ne sera ni un gouverneur ni un administrateur. L’Admini­
strateur-delegue presidera les reunions des Administrateurs, mais
il n’aura pas le droit de vote, sauf en cas d’un partage egal, auquel
cas sa voix sera preponderante. II pourra participer aux re­
unions du Conseil des Gouverneurs, mais n’y votera pas. L’Admi-




APPENDI X I

1463

nistrateur-delegue restera en fonctions jusqu’a ce que les Administrateurs en decident autrement.
(b) L’Administrateur-delegue sera le chef du personnel administratif du Fonds, et dirigera, sous le controle des Admini(p. 35)
strateurs, les affaires courantes du Fonds. Sous reserve d’un con­
trole d’ordre general exerce par les Administrateurs, il sera responsable de Porganisation, ainsi que de la nomination et du
congediement du personnel du Fonds.
(c) L’Administrateur-delegue et le personnel du Fonds, dans
Pexercice de leurs fonctions, n’auront de devoirs qu’envers le
Fonds a Pexclusion de toute autre autorite. Chaque membre du
Fonds respectera le caractere international de ces devoirs et
s’abstiendra de toute initiative tendant a influencer les dites personnes dans Pexercice de leurs fonctions.
(d) Lorsqu’il nommera le personnel, PAdministrateur-delegue,
sous reserve de la necessite primordiale d’obtenir le plus haut
degre de capacite et de competence technique, tiendra dument
compte de Pimportance qu’il y aurait a recruter le personnel du
Fonds sur la base d’une distribution geographique aussi large
que possible.
S e c t i o n 5.

Le vote

(a) Chaque membre disposera de deux cent cinquante voix,
avec une voix additionnelle pour toute partie de sa quote-part
equivalent a cent mille dollars des Etats-Unis d’Amerique.
(b) Chaque fois qu’un vote est requis conformement a la Section
4 ou 5 de l’Article V, tout membre disposera du nombre de voix
auquel il a droit conformement a (a) ci-dessus, modifier
(i) par l’addition d’une voix pour l’equivalent de chaque
tranche de quatre cent mille dollars des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique de ventes nettes de sa monnaie jusqu’a la
(P. 3 6 )

date ou le vote est effectue; ou
(ii) par la soustraction d’une voix pour l’equivalent de chaque
tranche de quatre cent mille dollars des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique de ses achats nets des monnaies d’autres mem­
bres jusqu’a la date ou le vote est effectue,
pourvu que ni les achats nets ni les ventes nettes ne soient consideres a un moment quelconque comme depassant le montant de
la quote-part du membre interesse.
(c) En vue de tous calculs relatifs a la presente Section, les
dollars des Etats-Unis d’Amerique seront consideres comme etant
du poids et du titre en vigueur au l er juillet 1944, ajustes vis-a-vis




1464

M O N E TA R Y AND FI N A N CI A L CONFERENCE

de tout changement uniforme conformement a PArticle IV, Sec­
tion 7, si un desistement est fait conformement a la Section 8 (d)
du dit Article.
(d)
Toutes les questions soumises a la consideration du Fonds
seront decidees a la majorite des voix exprimees, s’il n’en est
specifie autrement.
Repartition du revenu net
(a) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs determinera annuellement
quelle portion du revenu net du Fonds sera placee en reserve, et
eventuellement quelle portion sera repiartie.
(b) Si une repartition est faite, un premier paiement preferentiel non-cumulatif de deux pour cent sera effectue a chaque
membre, sur le montant par lequel soixante-quinze pour cent de sa
quote-part a depasse les avoirs moyens du Fonds dans sa monnaie
au cours de Pannee. Le solde sera paye a tous les membres en
proportion de leurs quotes-parts. Les paiements seront faits a
chaque membre dans sa propre monnaie.
S e c t io n 6.

(P. 37)
S e c t io n 7.

Publication de rapports
(a) Le Fonds publiera un rapport annuel contenant un releve
verifie de ses comptes et publiera, a intervalles de trois mois au
plus, un resume de ses operations et de ses avoirs en or et en
monnaie des membres.
(b) Le Fonds publiera tels autres rapports qu’il jugera utiles
h ^execution de ses pro jets.
Communications dy
opinion aux membres
Le Fonds aura le droit, a tout moment, de communiquer officieusement k tout membre ses opinions au sujet de toute question
soulevee par le present Accord. Le Fonds pourra a la majorite
des deux tiers de la totalite des voix, decider de publier un rapport
adresse a un membre, au sujet de la situation monetaire et eco­
nomique et au sujet des developpements qui tendent directement
a produire un desequilbre grave dans la balance internationale des
comptes des Etats-membres. Si le membre n’a pas le droit de
nommer un administrateur, il aura celui d’etre represente aux
termes de la Section 3 (j) du present Article. Le Fonds ne pub­
liera pas de rapport comportant des modifications dans la structure
fondamentale de Porganisation economique des Etats-membres.
S e c t io n 8.

Article XIII
Bureaux et Depots

Sitwation des bureaux
Le siege social du Fonds sera situe sur le territoire de PEtat-

S e c t io n 1.




AP PE N D I X I

1465

membre ayant la plus grande quote-part, et certaines agences ou
(P. 38)
succursales pourront etre etablies sur les territoires des autres
membres.
Depots
(a) Chaque Etat-membre designera sa banque centrale comme
depot de tous les avoirs du Ponds dans sa propre monnaie; au cas
ou il n’aurait pas de banque centrale, il designera un autre etablissement qui devra etre approuve par le Fonds.
(b) Le Fonds pourra conserver d’autres avoirs, y compris de
Tor, dans des depots designes par les cinq membres ayant les plus
grandes quotes-parts et dans tels autres depots que le Fonds
designera a son choix. Au debut, la moitie au moins des avoirs
du Fonds sera conservee dans le depot designe par 1
’Etat-membre
sur le territoire duquel se trouve le siege social du Fonds; quarante
pour cent au moins de ces avoirs seront conserves dans les depots
designes par les quatre autres Etats-membres vises ci-dessus.
Toutefois, tous transferts d’avoirs-or effectues par le Fonds seront
faits en tenant dument compte des frais de transport et des besoins
prevus pour le Fonds. En cas de necessite, les Administrateurs
pourront transferer la totalite ou une portion quelconque des
avoirs-or du Fonds en un point quelconque ou ils pourront etre
convenablement proteges.
S ection 2.

Garantie de Vactif du Fonds
Chaque membre garantit tous les avoirs du Fonds contre des
pertes resultant de la faillite ou du manquement du depot designe
par lui.
S e ctio n 3.

(p. 39)
Article XIV
Periode de Transition

Introduction
Le Fonds n’a pas pour objet de fournir des facilites pour les
secours et la reconstruction, ni de contribuer au reglement des
dettes internationales resultant de la guerre.
S ection 1.

Restrictions de change
Dans la periode de transition qui suivra la fin de la guerre, les
membres pourront, nonobstant les dispositions de tous autres
articles du present Accord, maintenir (et, dans le cas de membres
dont les territoires ont ete occupes par Tennemi, instituer si
necessaire) des restrictions aux paiements et transferts relatifs
aux transactions internationales courantes, et adapter ces restricS ectio n 2.




1466

MONETARY AND F INANCI AL CONFERENCE

tions aux circonstances. Toutefois, dans leur politique concernant
les changes, les membres devront toujours prendre les objectifs
du Fonds en consideration; et, aussitot que les conditions le permettront, ils prendront toutes les mesures possibles pour etablir
avec d’autres membres tous arrangements commerciaux et finan­
ciers susceptibles de faciliter les paiements internationaux et le
maintien de la stabilite des changes. En particulier, les membres
supprimeront les restrictions maintenues ou imposees en vertu de
la presente Section, aussitot qu’ils seront surs de pouvoir, en
1
’absence de telles restrictions, regler leur balance des comptes d’une
maniere qui ne genera pas indument leur acces aux ressources
du Fonds.
Notification au Fonds
Chaque membre, avant qu’il n’obtienne le droit, en vertu de

SECTION 3.
(P . 4 0 )

1
’Article X X, Section 4 (c) ou (d ), d’acheter de la monnaie au
Fonds, notifiera a ce dernier s’il a l’intention de se prevaloir des
arrangements transitionnels vises a la Section 2 du present Article,
ou s’il est pret a accepter les obligations decoulant de 1
’Article
VIII, Sections 2, 3 et 4. Tout membre se prevalent des arrange­
ments transitionnels avisera le Fonds par la suite, aussitot qu’il
sera en mesure d’accepter les obligations susmentionnees.
4. Mesures prises par le Fonds relativement aux
restrictions
Trois ans au plus tard apres la date a laquelle le Fonds aura
commence ses operations, et chaque annee par la suite, le Fonds
presentera un rapport sur les restrictions qui sont encore en
vigueur en vertu de la Section 2 du present Article. Cinq ans
apres la date a laquelle le Fonds aura commence ses operations,
et chaque annee par la suite, tout membre qui maintiendrait
encore des restrictions incompatibles avec l’Article VIII, Sections
2, 3 ou 4, consultera le Fonds au sujet de leur maintien ulteriur.
Le Fonds pourra, s’il le juge necessaire du fait de circonstances
exceptionnelles, faire a tout membre des representations rappelant
que les conditions sont favorables au retrait d’une restriction
particuliere, ou a l’abandon general des restrictions incompatibles
avec les dispositions de tous autres articles du present Accord.
Un delai suffisant sera accorde a l’Etat-membre interesse pour
repondre a ces representations. Si le Fonds estime que le membre
persiste dans le maintien de restrictions incompatibles avec les
objectifs du Fonds, ce membre sera soumis aux effets de 1
’Article
XV, Section 2 (a ).

S e c t io n




APPENDI X I

1467

(p . 4 1 )

Nature de la periode de transition
Dans ses rapports avec les membres, le Fonds reconnaitra que
la periode de transition qui suivra la fin de la guerre sera une
periode de changement et d’ajustement, et lorsque des demandes
resultant de cet etat de choses seront presentees par un Etatmembre, le Fonds donnera a ce membre, autant que possible, le
benefice du doute.
S e c t i o n 5.

Article XV
Retrait
1. Droit de retrait des Etats-membres
Tout Etat-membre aura la faculte de se retirer du Fonds, a
n’importe quel moment en faisant parvenir un avis ecrit au siege
social du Fonds. La demission prendra effet a la date de la recep­
tion du dit avis.
S e c t io n

Retrait obligatoire
(a) Au cas ou un membre ne remplirait pas Tune quelconque
des obligations qui lui incombent aux termes du present Accord,
le Fonds pourra declarer ce membre dechu de son droit d’utiliser
les ressources du Fonds. Rien dans la presente Section ne sera
considere comme limitant les dispositions de TArticle IV, Sec­
tion 6, de l’Article V, Section 5, ou de FArticle VI, Section 1.
(b) Si, apres expiration d’un delai raisonnable, ce membre con­
tinue a ne pas remplir Tune quelconque des obligations qui lui
incombent aux termes du present Accord, ou bien si un differend
persiste entre un membre et le Fonds aux termes de 1
’Article IV,
Section 6, le dit membre pourra etre mis en demeure de se retirer
du Fonds par une decision du Conseil des Gouverneurs prise a la
majorite par les gouverneurs representant la majorite du total
des voix.
S e c t i o n 2.

(p . 4 2 )

(c)D es reglements seront etablis en vue d’assurer qu’avant
qu’aucune mesure ne soit prise contre un membre quelconque en
vertu de (a) ou (b) ci-dessus, le membre sera informe dans des
delais raisonnables des griefs souleves contre lui et il lui sera
accorde toutes possibilites de presenter son cas, tant oralement
que par ecrit.
Reglement des comptes avec les membres qui se
retirent
Lorsqu’un membre se retirera du Fonds, les operations normales du Fonds dans sa monnaie cesseront, et le reglement de

S e c t i o n 3.




1468

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

tous les comptes entre lui et le Fonds se fera avec toute la celerite
raisonnable par accord entre lui et le Fonds. Si un accord n’intervient pas rapidement, les dispositions du Supplement D s’appliqueront au reglement des comptes.
Article XVI
Mesures Pour cas Exceptionnels

Suspension temporaire
(a) En cas de necessite ou si des circonstances imprevues
venaient a menacer les operations du Fonds, les Administrateurs
pourront, a Tunanimite des voix, suspendre durant une periode
de cent vingt jours au plus Fapplication de Tune quelconque des
dispositions suivantes:
S e c t i o n 1.

(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)

Article IV, Sections 3 et 4 (b)
Article V, Sections 2,3, 7, 8 (a) et ( f )
Article VI, Section 2
Article XI, Section 1

(b) Des que sera prise toute decision de suspendre Fapplication
de l’une quelconque des dispositions ci-dessus, les Administrateurs
convoqueront le Conseil des Gouverneurs dans le plus bref delai
(p. 43)
possible.
(c) Les Administrateurs ne pourront proroger aucune suspen­
sion au-dela d’une periode de cent vingt jours. Toutefois, une sus­
pension de cette nature pourra etre prorogee pour une periode
additionnelle de deux cent quarante jours au plus par une decision
du Conseil des Gouverneurs prise a la majorite des quatre
cinquiemes du total des voix, mais cette suspension ne pourra a
son tour etre prorogee, sauf par amendement au present Accord
conformement a PArticle XVII.
(d) Par une decision prise a la majorite du total des voix, les
Administrateurs pourront, a quelque moment que ce soit, mettre
fin a une suspension de cette nature.
Liquidation du Fonds
(a) Le Fonds ne pourra etre liquide sauf par decision du Con­
seil des Gouverneurs. En cas d’urgence, si les Administrateurs
estiment que la liquidation du Fonds est susceptible de s’imposer,
ils pourront suspendre temporairement toutes transactions, en
attendant que le Conseil se soit prononce.
(b) Si le Conseil des Gouverneurs decide de liquider le Fonds,
celui-ci cessera immediatement toutes ses activites, sauf celles
que comporteront le recouvrement et la liquidation de ses avoirs

S e c t io n 2.




APPENDI X I

1469

et le reglement de son passif, et toutes les obligations assumees
par les membres en vertu du present Accord cesseront, a l’exception de celles qui sont enoncees au present Article, a 1
’Article
XVIII, paragraphe (c ), au Supplement D, paragraphe 7, et au
Supplement E.
(c)
La liquidation se fera selon les modalites prevues au Sup­
plement E.
(P . 4 4 )

Article XVII
Amendements

(a) Toute proposition tendant a introduire des modifications
dans le present Accord, qu’elle emane d’un des Etats-membres,
d’un gouverneur ou des Administrateurs, devra etre communiquee
au president du Conseil des Gouverneurs qui la soumettra au Con­
seil. Si l’amendement propose est approuve par le Conseil, le
Fonds, par lettre circulaire, ou par telegramme, demandera a tous
les Etats-membres s’ils acceptent l’amendement propose. Lorsque
le pro jet d’amendement aura ete accepte par trois cinquiemes des
membres disposant des quatre cinquiemes du total des voix, le
Fonds en confirmera l’acceptation par une communication officielle
adressee a tous les Etats-membres.
(b) Par derogation aux prescriptions contenues au paragraph
(a) ci-dessus, l’acceptation par tous les Etats-membres sera requise dans le cas ou il s’agit d’un amendement quelconque modifiant
(i) le droit de se retirer du Fonds
(Article XV, Section 1) ;
(ii) la disposition en vertu de laquelle il ne sera apporte aucune
modification a la quote-part d’un membre sans le consentement de celui-ci (Article III, Section 2) ;
(iii) la disposition en vertu de laquelle il ne sera apporte
aucune modification au pair de la monnaie d’un membre,
a moins que cette modification ne soit proposee par le dit
membre (Article IV, Section 5 ( b ) .
(c) Les amendements entreront 6n vigueur pour tous les mem­
bres trois mois apres la date de la communication officielle, a moins
(P. 45)
qu’un delai plus court ne soit specifie dans la circulaire ou dans
le telegramme.
Article XVIII
Interpretation

(a)
Toute question relative a Interpretation des dispositions
du present Accord qui se poserait entre un Etat-membre et le




1470

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

Fonds, ou entre plusieurs Etats-membres, sera soumise aux Administrateurs pour decision. Si la question affecte particulierement un Etat-membre qui n’est pas habilite a nommer un admi­
nistrateur, le dit Etat-membre aura le droit d’etre represente en
vertu de 1
’Article XII, Section 3 (j) .
(b) Dans tous les cas ou les Administrateurs auront pris une
decision en vertu du paragraphe (a) ci-dessus, tout Etat-membre
pourra demander que la question soit renvoyee au Conseil des
Gouverneurs, dont la decision sera definitive. En attendant le resultat de cet appel au Conseil, le Fonds pourra, dans la mesure
ou il le jugera necessaire, agir en prenant pour base la decision
des Administrateurs.
(c) Au cas ou un differend s’eleverait entre le Fonds d’une part,
et un Etat-membre qui s’est retire d’autre part, ou entre le Fonds
d’une part et un Etat-membre quelconque, durant la liquidation
du Fonds, un tel differend sera soumis a l’arbitrage d’un tribunal
de trois arbitres; deux arbitres, designes, Tun par le Fonds, l’autre
par le membre interesse ou le membre qui se retire, et un surarbitre
qui, a moins que les parties n’adoptent d’un commun accord une
autre solution, sera nomme par le President de la Cour permanente
de Justice internationale ou toute autre autorite qui aura ete
prevue dans un reglement adopte par le Fonds. Le surarbitre aura
plein pouvoir pour regler toute question de procedure dans tous
(P . 4 6 )

les cas ou les parties seraient en disaccord a ce sujet.
Article XIX
Explication des Termes

Dans leur interpretation du present Accord, le Fonds et ses
membres se baseront sur les definitions suivantes:
(a) Par reserves monetaires d’un membre, il faut entendre ses
avoirs nets officiels en or, en monnaies convertibles des autres
membres, et en monnaies de tels pays non-membres que le Fonds
pourra designer.
(b) Par avoirs officiels d’un membre il faut entendre ses avoirs
centraux (c’est-a-dire, les avoirs de sa Tresorerie, de sa banque
centrale, de son fonds de stabilisation, ou de ses autres etablissements financiers du meme ordre).
(c) Les avoirs d’autres etablissements officiels ou d’autres
banques se trouvant sur ses territoires pourront, dans tout cas
particulier, etre consideres par le Fonds, apres consultation avec
le membre interesse, comme des avoirs officiels dans la mesure ou
ils excederont d’une maniere appreciable les disponibilites cou-




APPENDI X I

1471

rantes; pourvu qu’aux fins de determiner si, dans un cas particulier, les avoirs excedent les disponibilites courantes, on deduise des
dits avoirs les sommes de monnaie dues a d’autres etablissements
officiels et a d’autres banques se trouvant sur les territoires d’autres
Etats-membres ou sur ceux des Etats non-membres qui sont vises
a l’alinea (d) ci-dessous.
(d) Par avoirs d’un membre en monnaies convertibles, il faut
entendre ses avoirs en monnaies d’autres membres qui ne se pre(P . 4 7 )

valent pas des arrangements transitionnels prevus a YArticle XIV,
Section 2, ainsi que ses avoirs en monnaies de tels Etats nonmembres que le Fonds pourra designer periodiquement. Le terme
“ monnaie” comprendra done ici sans restriction le numeraire, le
papier monnaie, les balances bancaires les acceptations bancaires
et les obligations gouvernementales dont l’echeance n’exceds pas
douze mois.
(e) Les reserves monetaires d’un membre seront calculees en
deduisant des avoirs centraux le passif de monnaie du aux Tresoreries, aux banques centrales, aux fonds de stabilisation, ou aux
organismes financiers publics du meme ordre des autres Etatsmembres ou des Etats non-membres vises a (d) ci-dessus, ainsi
que toutes obligations similaires envers d’autres etablissements
officiels et envers d’autres banques se trouvant sur les territoires
des Etats-membres, ou sur coux des Etats non-membres vises a
(d) ci-dessus. Aux dits avoirs seront ajoutees les sommes considerees comme etant des avoirs officiels d’autres etablissements
officiels et d’autres banques aux termes de (c) ci-dessus.
( f ) Les avoirs du Fonds en monnaie d’un membre comprendront
toutes valeurs acceptees par le Fonds, conformement a l’Article
III,'Section 5.
(g) Le Fonds, apres consultation avec un membre qui se prevaut
des arrangements transitionnels prevus a 1
’Article XIV, Section 2,
pourra considerer que les avoirs en monnaie de ce membre, specifiquement convertibles en monnaie d’un autre membre ou en or,
sont des avoirs en monnaie convertible entrant en ligne de compte
dans le calcul des reserves monetaires.
(h) Aux fins de calculer les souscriptions en or prevues a
l’Article III, Section 3, les avoirs nets officiels d’un membre, en or
(P . 4 8 )

et en dollars des Etats-Unis, comprendront ses avoirs officiels en or
et en monnaie des Etats-Unis, deduction faite des avoirs centraux
en sa monnaie possedes par d’autres pays et des avoirs en sa
monnaie possedes par d’autres etablissements officiels et d’autres




1472

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

banques, si ces avoirs sont specifiquement convertibles en or ou
en monnaie des Etats-Unis.
(i) Par paiements pour les operations courantes, il faut enten­
dre des paiements qui ne sont pas faits en vue de transferer des
capitaux et comprenant, sans restriction:
(1) tous les paiements dus au titre du commerce exterieur,
d’autres affaires courantes, comprenant les services, les
operations de banque et les facilites de credit normales et
a court terme;
(2) des paiements dus a titre d’interet sur les prets et a titre
de revenu net provenant d’autres placements;
(3) des paiements de montants moderes pour l’amortissement
de prets et pour la depreciation de placements directs;
(4) des envois moderes de fonds a titre de subsistance familiale.
Le Fonds pourra, apres consultation avec les membres interesses,
determiner si une transaction particuliere devra etre consideree
comme une operation courante ou comme une operation portant sur
les capitaux.
(P. 49)

Article XX
Dispositions Finales
S e c tio n

1.

Entree en vigueur

Le present Accord entrera en vigueur lorsqu’il aura ete signe
au nom d’un nombre de gouvernments dont les quotes-parts repre­
sented soixante-cinq pour cent du total specifie au Supplement A
et lorsque les instruments mentionnes a la Section 2 (a) du present
Article auront ete deposes en leur nom ; en aucun cas, le present
Accord n’entrera en vigueur avant le l er mai 1945.
Signature
(a) Chaque gouvernement au nom duquel le present Accord est
signe remettra au Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique un
instrument declarant qu’il a accepte le present Accord conforme­
ment a ses lois propres, et qu’il a pris toutes mesures utiles pour
lui permettre d’executer toutes les obligations contractees aux
termes du present Accord.
(b) Chaque gouvernement deviendra membre du Fonds a
compter de la date ou l’instrument vise a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus
aura ete depose en son nom; toutefois, aucun gouvernement ne
deviendra membre avant que le present Accord n’entre en vigueur
dans les conditions prevues a la Section 1 du present Article.
(c) Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique informera les

S e c tio n 2.




A P P E N D IX I

1473

gouvernements de tous les pays dont les noms figurent au Suplement A, et tous les gouvernements qui seront admis a devenir
membres conformement k 1
’Article II, Section 2, de toutes les
signatures apposees au present Accord et du depot de tous les
instruments vises a 1
’alinea (a) ci-dessus.
(P.50)
(d) Au moment ou le present Accord sera signe en son nom,
chaque gouvernement transmettra au Gouvernement des EtatsUnis d’Amerique un centieme de un pour cent de sa souscription
totale en or ou en dollars des Etats-Unis en vue de faire face aux
frais administratifs du Fonds. Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique conservera ces fonds dans un compte de depots special
et les transmettra au Conseil des Gouverneurs du Fonds lors de
la convocation, conformement a la Section 3 du present Article, de
la premiere reunion. Si le present Accord n’est pas encore entre
en vigueur au 31 decembre 1945, le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique restituera les dits fonds aux gouvernements qui les
lui auront fait parvenir.
(e) Les gouvernements des pays dont les noms figurent au
Supplement A pourront avoir acces a 1
’Accord, pour signature en
leur nom, a Washington, jusqu’au 31 decembre 1945.
(f) A compter du 31 decembre 1945, le gouvernement de tout
pays qui aura ete admis comme membre aux termes de 1
’Article II,
Section 2, pourra avoir acces a l’Accord, pour signature.
(g) En apposant leur signature au present Accord, tous les
gouvernements y souscriront en leur propre nom et au nom de
toutes leurs colonies, de tous leurs territoires d’outremer, de tous
territoires sous leur protectorat, suzerainete ou autorite, et de tous
territoires sur lesquels ils exercent un mandat.
(h) En ce qui concerne les gouvernement dont le territoire
metropolitain a ete occupe par l’ ennemi, le depot de l’instrument
vise a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus pourra etre remis jusqu’a ce qu’un
delai de cent quatre-vingt jours se soit ecoule a compter de la
liberation du dit territoire metropolitain. Toutefois, si le docu(P. 51)
ment n’a pas ete depose par l’un de ces gouvernements avant
l’expiration de la dite periode, la signature apposee au nom de
ce gouvernement deviendra nulle et la fraction de sa souscription
versee aux termes de l’alinea (d) ci-dessus lui sera restituee.
(i) Les alineas (d) et (h) entreront en vigueur en ce qui con­
cerne chaque gouvernement signataire a compter de la date de
sa signature.




1474

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

Inauguration du Fonds
(a) Aussitot que le present Accord entrera en vigueur, aux
termes de la Section 1 du present Article, chaque Etat-membre
nommera un gouverneur, et le membre ayant la plus grande quotepart convoquera la premiere reunion du Conseil des Gouverneurs.
(b) A la premiere reunion du Conseil des Gouverneurs, toutes
dispositions seront prises en vue de designer des administrateurs
temporaires. Les gouvernements des cinq pays auxquels les plus
grandes quotes-parts sont attributes au Supplement A nommeront
des administrateurs temporaires. Si un ou plusieurs de ces gou­
vernements ne sont pas encore devenus membres, les postes d’administrateurs qu’ils auraient le droit de remplir resteront sans titulaires jusqu’au moment ou les dits gouvernements deviendront
membres, ou jusqu’au l er janvier 1946, le choix devant porter sur
la plus rapprochee de ces deux dates. Sept administrateurs tempo­
raires seront elus conformement aux prescriptions du Supplement
C et resteront en fonctions jusqu’a la date de la premiere election
normale d’administrateurs, laquelle aura lieu dans les plus brefs
delais possibles a compter du l er janvier 1946.
(c) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs aura la faculte de deleguer aux
(P. 52)
administrateurs temporaires tous les pouvoirs autres que ceux
qui ne peuvent pas etre delegues aux Administrateurs.
SECTION 3 .

4. Determination initiale du pair
(a) Lorsque le Fonds jugera qu’il sera bientot en mesure de
commencer des operations de change, il en avisera les membres
et demandera a chacun d’eux de lui faire connaitre dans les trente
jours le pair de sa monnaie, base sur les taux de change en cours
le soixantieme jour qui precede l’entree en vigueur du present*
Accord. II ne sera demande a aucun membre dont le territoire
metropolitain a ete occupe par Tennemi de faire la susdite com­
munication tant que ce territoire sera un theatre important d’hostilites ou dufant telle periode subsequente que le Fonds pourra
determiner. Lorsqu’un tel membre fera connaitre le pair de sa
monnaie, les dispositions de (d) ci-dessous deviendront applicables.
(b) Le pair communique par un membre dont le territoire
metropolitain n’a pas ete occupe par l’ennemi sera considere comme
le pair de la monnaie de ce membre pour Tapplication du present
Accord, a moins que dans un delai de quatre-vingt-dix jours apres
que la demande visee a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus aura ete regue, (i)
le membre notifie au Fonds qu’il ne considere pas le pair satisfaisant, ou bien (ii) que le Fonds notifie au membre qu’a son avis le
S e c t io n




APP ENDI X I

1475

pair ne peut etre maintenu sans que ce membre ou (Tautres mem­
bres n’aient recours au Fonds dans des proportions prejudiciables
au Fonds et a ses membres. Lorsque notification sera donnee, selon
(i) ou (ii) ci-dessus, le Fonds et le membre interesse, dans un
delai fixe par le Fonds a la lumiere de toutes les circonstances
(P . 5 3 )

attenantes, conviendront d’un pair approprie pour cette monnaie.
Si le Fonds et le membre ne tombent pas d’accord dans le delai
ainsi fixe, le membre sera considere comme s’etant retire du Fonds
a la date d’expiration de ce delai.
(c) Lorsque le pair de la monnaie d’un membre aura ete etabli
aux termes de (b) ci-dessus, soit par l’expiration des quatre-vingtdix jours sans notification, soit par accord apres notification, le
membre sera admis a acheter au Fonds les monnaies des autres
membres dans toute la mesure permise par le present Accord, a
condition que le Fonds ait commence ses operations de change.
(d) En ce qui concerne un membre dont le territoire metropolitain a ete occupe par l’ennemi, les dispositions de (b) ci-dessus
seront applicables, reserve faite des modifications suivantes:
(i) La periode de quatre-vingt-dix jours sera prolongee
jusqu’a une date qui sera fixee par accord entre le Fonds
et ce membre.
(ii) Au cours de la periode prorogee le membre pourra, si le
Fonds a commence des operations de change, acheter au
Fonds avec sa monnaie les monnaies d’autres membres,
mais seulement dans les conditions et jusqu’a concurrence
des sommes qui pourront etre prescrites par le Fonds.
(iii) A n’importe quel moment avant la date fixee aux termes
de (i) ci dessus, des modifications pourront, d’accord avec
le Fonds, etre apportees au pair communique conforme­
ment a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus.
(P . 5 4 )

(e) Si un membre dont le territoire metropolitain a ete occupe
par l’ennemi adopte une nouvelle unite monetaire avant la date
a fixer aux termes de (d) (i) ci-dessus, le pair fixe par ce membre
pour la nouvelle unite sera communique au Fonds et les dispositions
de (d) ci-dessus deviendront applicables.
(f) II ne sera pas tenu compte des modifications du pair
effectuees d’accord avec le Fonds, en vertu de la presente Section,
en determinant si une modification proposee rentre dans (i), (ii)
ou (iii) de 1
’Article IV, Section 5 ( c ) .
(g ) Un membre faisant connaltre au Fonds le pair de la mon795841 — 48— 23




1476

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

naie de son territoire metropolitain fera connaitre simultanement
la valeur, exprimee en cette monnaie, de chaque monnaie distincte,
la ou il en existe, des territoires pour lesquels il a accepte le present
Accord, aux termes de la Section 2 (g) du present Article; mais
il ne sera demande a aucun membre de faire une communication
concernant la monnaie d’un territoire qui aura ete occupe par
I’ennemi, tant que ce territoire sera un theatre important d’hostilites ou pour telle periode subsequente que pourrait determiner
le Fonds. Sur la base du pair ainsi communique, le Fonds computera le pair de chaque monnaie distincte. Une communication
ou une notification adressee au Fonds aux termes de (a ), (b) ou
(d) ci-dessus concernant le pair d’une monnaie, sera aussi, sauf
declaration contraire, tenue pour une communication ou pour une
notification concernant le pair de toutes les monnaies distinctes
ci-dessus mentionnees. Tout membre pourra, toutefois, adresser
une communication ou une notification relative a la seule monnaie
metropolitaine ou a Tune seule des monnaies distinctes. Si le
(p. 55)
membre prend une telle initiative, les dispositions des paragraphes
precedents (y compris (d) ci-dessus, si un territoire oil existe une
monnaie distincte a ete occupe par 1
’ennemi) s’appliqueront a
chacune de ces monnaies separement.
(h) Le Fonds commencera les operations de change a la date
qu’il fixera apres que les membres ayant soixante-quinze pour cent
du total des quotes-parts enumerees au Supplement A auront
qualite, en conformity avec les paragraphes precedents de la pre­
sente section, pour acheter la monnaie des autres membres mais
il ne les commencera en aucun cas avant la fin, en Europe, des
operations militaires importantes.
(i) Le Fonds pourra differer les operations de change avec tout
membre dont la situation pourrait, a Pavis du Fonds, entramer
Femploi des ressources du Fonds a des fins contraires a celles du
present Accord ou prejudiciables au Fonds ou a ses membres.
(j) Le pair des monnaies des gouvernements qui feraient con­
naitre qu’ils desirent devenir membres apres le 31 decembre 1945,
sera determine conformement aux dispositions de 1 Article II,
’
Section 2.
F a i t a Washington, en un seul exemplaire qui sera depose dans
les archives du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis.d’Amerique, lequel
en fera parvenir des copies certifiees conformes a tous les gou­
vernements dont les noms figurent au Supplement A et a tous les
gouvernements qui seront admis comme membres aux termes des
dispositions contenues a 1
’Article II, Section 2.




APPENDI X I

1477

(P . 5 6 )
s u p p l e m e n t

a

Quotes-Parts
(En millions de dollars des
Etats-Unis d’Amerique)

Australie..........................................
Belgique ............................ ......
Bolivie ............................... ......
Bresil .........................................
Canada .................................... ........
C hile..................................
Chine ................................
Colombie ...........................
Costa-Rica ........................
C uba..................................
Tchecoslovaquie ...............
Danemark*
..........
Republique Dominicaine
Equateur...........................
E gyp te...............................
Salvador ...........................
Ethiopie ...........................
France ...............................
Grece .................................
Guatemala ........................
H a iti..................................
Honduras .........................
Islande...............................

200
225
10
150
300
50
550

50
5
50
125
*

5
5
45
2.5
6
450
40

5
5
2.5
1

(En millions de dollars des
Etats-Unis d’ Am£rique)

Indes ..................................
Ira n ....................................
Ir a k ....................................
Liberia .............................
Luxembourg .........................
Mexique.............................
Pays-Bas...........................
Nouvelle-Zelande.............
Nicaragua.........................
N orvege.............................
Panam a.............................
Paraguay ..........................
Perou ................................
Philippines ......................
Pologne .............................
Union Sud-Africaine . ..
Union des Republiques
Socialistes Sovietiques
Royaume-Uni ..................
Etats-Unis d’Amerique ....
Uruguay ...........................
Venezuela.........................
Yougoslavie...........................

400
25
8

.1
10
90
275
50

2
50
i

2
25
15
125
100
1200
1300
2750

15
15
60

* La quote-part du Danemark sera determin6e par le Fonds apres que le Gouvernement
danois aura declare qu’il est pret a signer le present Accord, mais avant que le dit Gouverne­
ment n ’appose sa signature au dit Accord.

(p. 57)
SUPPLEMENT

B

Dispositions Relatives au Rachat par un Membre de sa Monnaie
Detenue par le Fonds

1.
Lorsqu’il s’agira de determiner la mesure dans laquelle le
rachat au Fonds de la monnaie d’un membre devra etre effectue
avec chaque categorie de reserve monetaire, conformement a
l’Article V, Section 7 (b ), c’est-a-dire avec de Yor et avec chaque
monnaie convertible, la regie suivante sera appliquee sous reserve
de 2 ci-dessous:
(a) Si les reserves monetaires du membre n’ont pas augmente
au cours de l’annee, le montant a payer au Fonds sera
reparti entre toutes les categories de reserves, proportionnellement aux avoirs du membre en or et en chaque monnaie
convertible, a la fin de Tannee.




1478

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

(b) Si les reserves monetaires du membre ont augmente au
cours de 1
‘annee, une partie du montant a payer au Fonds,
egale a la moitie de l’aumentation, sera repartie entre les
dites categories de reserves qui ont subi une augmentation
dans la proportion ou chaque categorie a augmente. Le
solde du montant a payer au Fonds sera reparti entre toutes
les categories de reserves proportionnellement aux avoirs
restants du membre dans ces reserves.
(c) Si le resultat, apres que tous les rachats requis d’apres
(p. 58)
TArticle V, Section 7 (b) ont ete effectues, devait depasser
le cadre specifie a 1
’Article V, Section 7 ( c ) , le Fonds exigera
que les dits rachats soient effectues proportionnellement par
les membres, de fagon a ce que ce cadre ne soit pas depasse.
2. Le Fonds n’achetera pas la monaie d’un Etat non membre
aux termes de YArticle V, Section 7 (b) et ( c ) .
3. Lorsqu’il s’agira d’evaluer les reserves monetaires et l’augmentation des reserves monetaires pendant une annee quelconque,
pour l’application de 1
’Article V, Section 7 (b) et ( c ) , il ne sera
pas tenu compte, a moins que des deductions portant sur ses avoirs
n’aient ete faites autrement par le membre, d’une augmentation
quelconque dans les dites reserves monetaires due au fait qu’une
monnaie auparavant inconvertible est devenue convertible au cours
de l’annee, au occasionnee par les avoirs qui sont le produit ‘d’un
emprunt a long ou a moyen terme contracts au cours de l’annee,
ou par les avoirs qui ont ete transferes ou mis en reserve pour le
remboursement d’un emprunt au cours de l’annee suivante.
4. En ce qui concerne les mebres dont le territoire metropoli­
tain a ete occupe par l’ennemi, l’or nouvellement extrait, pendant
les cinq annees qui suivront l’entree en vigueur du present Accord,
de mines so trouvant sur leur territoire metropolitain ne sera pas
compris dans le calcul de leurs reserves monetaires ou celui des
augmentations de leurs reserves monetaires.
(P. 59)
SUPPLEMENT

C

Election des Administrateurs

1. L’election des administrateurs a elire se fera au scrutin des
gouverneurs ayant le droit de vote aux termes des prescriptions
contenues a l’Article XII, Section 3 (b) (iii) et (iv ).
2. Lors du scrutin pour l’election des cinq administrateurs devant etre elus en vertu de 1
’Article XII, Section 3 (b) (iii), chaque
gouverneur en droit de voter reunira sur un seul nom toutes les




APPENDI X I

1479

voix auxquelles il a droit aux termes de l’Article XII, Section
5 (a ). Les cinq personnes recevant le plus grand nombre de voix
seront administrateurs, a la condition toutefois d’avoir reuni au
moins dix-neuf pour cent du total des voix pouvant etre exprimees
(voix admissibles).
3. Si moins de cinq personnes sont elues au premier scrutin, il
sera procede a un deuxieme scrutin, auquel ne pourra pas etre
presentee de nouveau la candidature de la personne qui a re§u le
nombre de voix le plus faible; seuls voteront a ce scrutin: (a) les
gouverneurs qui ont vote au premier scrutin pour une personne
qui n’a pas ete elue et (b) les gouverneurs dont les voix pour une
personne elue seront considerees, aux termes de Talinea 4 ci-dessous, comme ayant porte le nombre de voix allant a cette personne
a plus de vingt pour cent des voix admissibles.
4. En determinant si les voix donnees par un gouverneur doivent
etre considerees comme ayant porte le total des voix acquises a une
seule personne a plus de vingt pour cent des voix admissibles, les
dits vingt pour cent seront consideres comme comprenant: pre(P. 6 0 )

mierement, les voix du gouverneur apportant le plus grand nombre
de voix a la dite personne; deuxiemement les voix du gouverneur
apportant le total le plus fort apres celui-ci, et ainsi de suite,
jusqu’a ce que Ton arrive a vingt pour cent.
5. Tout gouverneur dont certaines voix devront etre conside­
rees comme ayant porte a plus de dix-neuf pour cent le total des
voix regues par cette personne, sera considere comme ayant fait
beneficier la dite personne de toutes les voix dont il desposait,
meme si le nombre total des voix allant a la dite personne excede
de ce fait vingt pour cent.
6. Si, a la suite du deuxieme scrutin, moins de cinq personnes
ont ete elues, il sera procede a d’autres scrutins selon la meme
regie jusqu’a ce que cinq personnes aient ete elues; toutefois,
lorsque quatre personnes auront te elues, la cinquieme pourra etre
elue a la simple majorite des voix restantes, et devra etre consideree comme ayant ete elue par toutes ces voix.
7. Les administrateurs devant etre elus par les Republiques
americaines en vertu de 1
’Article XII,
S e c t io n 3 ( b )

( i v ) s e ro n t elus com m e s u it:

(a) Chaque administrateur sera elu separement.
(b) Lors de Telection du premier administrateur, chaque gouv­
erneur representant une Republique americaine qui a le
droit de prendre part a l’election reunira sur un seul nom
toutes les voix dont il dispose. La personne qui recevra le




MONET A RY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

1480

plus grand nombre de voix sera elue, a condition qu’elle
ait re£u au moins quarante-cinq pour cent de toutes les
voix.
(c) Si personne n’est elu au premier scrutin, il sera procede
a d’autres scrutins et, dans chaque cas, la personne qui
(P. 61)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

regoit le plus petit nombre de voix sera eliminee jusqu’a
ce qu’une personne recueille un nombre de voix suffisant
pour Telire aux termes de (b) ci-dessus.
Le gouverneurs dont les voix ont contribue a Pelection du
premier administrateur ne participeront pas a Pelection du
deuxieme administrateur.
Les personnes qui ne sont pas elues au cours de Pelection
initiale ne seront pas ineligibles pour le poste de deuxieme
administrateur.
La majorite des voix pouvant etre exprimees sera necessaire pour Pelection du deuxieme administrateur. Si per­
sonne ne reunit la majorite des voix au premier scrutin, il
sera procede a d’autres scrutins et, dans chaque cas, la
personne qui regoit, le plus petit nombre de voix sera
eliminee, jusqu’a ce qu’une personne soit elue a la majorite
des voix.
Le deuxieme administrateur sera considere comme ayant
ete elu par toutes les voix qui auraient pu etre donnees au
tour de scrutin par lequel il a ete elu.

(p. 62)
SUPPLEMENT

D

Reglement des Comptes avec les Membres qui se Retirent

1. Le Fonds sera tenu de payer a un membre qui se retire une
somme egale a sa quote-part, plus toutes autres sommes en sa
monnaie qui lui sont dues par le Fonds, moins toutes sommes qu’il
doit au Fonds, y compris les obligations echeant ulterieurement a
la date de son retrait. Cependant, aucun paiement ne sera effectue
avant l’expiration d’un delai de six mois a compter de la date du
retrait. Les paiements seront effectues dans la monnaie du membre
qui se retire.
2. Si les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie du membre qui se
retire ne suffisent pas pour payer le montant net du par le Fonds,
le solde sera paye en or ou bien de la maniere dont il pourra etre
convenu. Si le Fonds et le membre qui se retire n’arrivent pas h
un accord dans les six mois qui suivent le retrait du membre, la
monnaie du dit membre detenue par le Fonds sera immediatement
versee au membre qui se retire. Tout solde du sera paye au moyen




APPENDI X I

1481

de dix versements partiels, faits tous les six mois pendant les cinq
annees qui suivent. Chaque versement partiel sera fait, au choix
du Fonds, soit dans la monnaie du membre qui se retire, acquise
apres le retrait de celui-ci, soit par une remise d’or.
3. Si le Fonds manque d’effectuer un versement partiel qui est
du aux termes des paragraphes precedents, le membre qui se retire
aura le droit d’exiger que le Fonds effectue ce versement dans
n’importe quelle monnaie detenue par le Fonds, a l’exception de
toute monnaie declaree rare aux termes de 1
’Article VII, Section 3.
(p. 63)
4. Si les avoirs du Fonds dans la monnaie d’un membre qui se
retire sont superieurs au montant du a ce membre, et si le Fonds
et le membre interesse ne conviennent pas des modalites relatives
au reglement des comptes dans un delai de six mois a compter de
la date du retrait du dit membre, l’ancien membre sera tenu de
racheter la monnaie en excedent avec de Tor ou, a son choix, avec
les monnaies des membres, qui sont convertibles au moment ou le
rachat est effectue. Le rachat sera effectue au pair en cours au
moment ou le membre s’est retire du Fonds. Le rachat sera effec­
tue par le membre qui se retire dans les cinq annees qui suivront la
date de son retrait, ou dans un delai plus long que pourra prescrire
le Fonds, mais il ne sera pas exige du dit membre qu’il rachete,
au cours d’une periode semi-annuelle quelconque, plus d’un dixieme
des avoirs du Fonds dans sa monnaie en excedent a la date de son
retrait, plus toutes acquisitions ulterieures en sa monnaie faites
au cours de la dite periode semi-annuelle. Si le membre qui se
retire ne satisfait pas cette obligation, le Fonds pourra liquider
selon une procedure reguliere, sur n’importe quel marche, le mon­
tant de la monnaie qui aurait du etre rachete.
5. Tout membre desireux d’obtenir la monnaie d’un membre
qui s’est retire devra se procurer cette monnaie en l’achetant au
Fonds dans la mesure ou le membre acheteur aura acces aux
ressources du Fonds, et ou la dite monnaie sera disponible en
vertu de 4 ci-dessus.
(p. 64)
6. Le membre qui se retire guarantit la libre utilisation, a tout
moment, de la moinnaie disponible en vertu de 4 et 5 ci-dessus, pour
Fachat de marchandises ou pour le paiement de sommes dues a
lui ou a des personnes residant sur ses territoires. Le dit membre
indemnisera le Fonds pour toute perte resultant de la difference
entre le pair de sa monnaie a la date de son retrait et la valeur
obtenue par le Fonds lorsqu’il s’en est defait en vertu de 4 et 5
ci-dessus.




1482

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

7.
Au cas ou le Fonds viendrait a etre liquide, en vertu de
1
’Article XVI, Section 2, dans les six mois qui suivent la date ou
le membre se retire, les comptes entre le Fonds et le gouvernement
interesse seront regies conformement a TArticle XVI, Section 2,
t au Supplement E.
s u p p l e m e n t e

Administration de la Liquidation

1. En cas de liquidation, les obligations du Fonds autres que le
remboursement des souscriptions auront la priorite dans la dis­
tribution des avoirs du Fonds. Lorsqu’il satisfera chacune des dites
obligations, le Fonds se servira de ses actifs dans l’ordre suivant:
(a) la monnaie dans laquelle l’obligation doit etre payee;
(b) Tor;
(c) toutes les autres monnaies, proportionnellement, dans la
mesure du possible, aux quotes-parts des membres.
2. Apres que les obligations du Fonds auront ete acquittees
conformement a 1 ci-dessus, le solde des actifs du Fonds sera
distribue et attribue comme suit:
(P. 65)
(a) Le Fonds distribuera ses avoirs en or entre les membres
dont les quotes-parts sont superieures aux avoirs du Fonds
dans leurs monnaies. Les dits membres se partageront Tor
ainsi distribue au prorata de l’excedent de leurs quotesparts sur les avoirs flu Fonds dans leurs monnaies respectives.
(b) Le Fonds distribuera a chaque membre la moitie des avoirs
du Fonds dans sa monnaie, mais le montant distribue ne
sera pas superieur a cinquante pour cent de sa quote-part.
(c) Le Fonds attribuera le solde de ses avoirs dans chaque
monnaie entre tous les membres, proportionnellement aux
sommes dues a chacun d’eux apres que les repartitions
visees aux paragraphes (a) et (b) auront eu lieu.
3. Chaque membre rachetera les avoirs dans sa monnaie qui
ont ete attribues aux autres membres conformement a 2 (c) cidessus et, dans les trois mois qui suivront la decision de liauider,
il s’entendra avec le Fonds quant a la procedure a suivre nnnr
effectuer le dit rachat.
4. Si un membre ne s’est pas mis d’accord avec le Fonds avant
Texpiration du delai de trois mois mentionne au paragraphe 3
ci-dessus, le Fonds se servira des monnaies d’autres membres
attributes a ce membre aux termes du paragraphe 2 (c) ci-dessus
pour racheter la monnaie du dit membre attribute a d’autres




APPENDI X I

1483

membres. Chaque monnaie attribute a un membre qui ne s’est pas
mis d’accord avec le Fonds sera employee, autant que possible,
au rachat de la monnaie du dit membre attribute aux membres qui
(p. 66)
se sont mis d’accord avec le Fonds aux termes du paragraphe 3
ci-dessus.
5. Si un accord est intervenu entre un membre et le Fonds aux
termes du paragraphe 3 ci-dessus le Fonds se servira des monnaies
d’autres membres attributes a ce membre aux termes du para­
graphe 2 (c) ci-dessus pour racheter la monnaie du dit membre
attribute a d’autres membres qui se sont mis d’accord avec le
Fonds aux termes du paragraphe 3 ci-dessus. Chaque somme ainsi
rachetee sera rachetee dans la monnaie du membre auquel la dite
somme a ete attribute.
6. Apres avoir donne suite aux prescriptions contenues aux
paragraphes precedents, le Fonds versera a chaque membre le
reliquat des monnaies detenues pour son compte.
7. Chaque membre dont la monnaie aura ete distribute a
d’autres membres aux termes du paragraphe 6 ci-dessus rachetera
la dite monnaie avec de Tor ou, a son choix, avec la monnaie du
membre qui demande le rachat, ou bien de toute autre maniere
dont ils auront convenu entre eux. Si les membres inttressts n’en
conviennent pas autrement, le membre qui doit effectuer le rachat
devra compltter cette optration dans les cinq anntes qui suivront
la date a laquelle la distribution aura ete effectute, mais le dit
membre ne sera pas tenu de racheter, au cours d’une ptriode semiannuelle quelconque, plus d’un dixieme de la somme distribute a
chacun des autres membres. Si le membre ne remplit pas cette
obligation, le montant de la monnaie qui aurait du etre rachete
pourra etre liquide, selon une proctdure rtguliere, sur n’importe
quel marche.
8. Chaque membre dont la monnaie a tte distribute a d’autres
membres aux termes du paragraphe 6 ci-dessus garantit la libre
(p. 67)
utilisation de la dite monnaie, a tout moment, pour l’achat de
marchandises ou pour le paiement de sommes dues a lui ou a des
personnes residant sur ses territoires. Chaque membre pour lequel
cette obligation existe convient d’indemniser les autres membres
de toute perte qui rtsulterait de la difference entre le pair de sa
monnaie a la date a laquelle il est dtcide de liquider le Fonds et
la valeur obtenue par les dits membres lorsqu’ils se sont defaits
de sa monnaie.




1484

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE
A N N E X E

B

a

l

’ A CT E

F I N A L

STATUTS DE LA BANQUE INTERNATIONALE POUR LA
R e c o n s t r u c t io n e t l e D e y e lo p p e m e n t

Liste des Articles et des Sections
Article preliminaire.................................................. ........... .............................
I. B u ts..........................................................................................................
II. Participation de la Banque et capital de la B anque......................
Section 1. Qualite de mem bre...........................................................
2. Capital autorise ...............................................................
3. Souscription des actions .................................................
4. Prix demission des actions ............................................
5. Division et appels de capital souscrit............................
6. Limitation d'obligation ..................................................
7. Methode de paiement des souscriptions aux actions ....
8. Epoque du paiement des souscriptions ........................
9. Mairitien de la valeur de certains avoirs en devises
de la Banque.....................................................................
10. Restriction affectant la disposition des actions..........
III. Dispositions d’ordre general relatives aux prets et aux garanties
Section 1. Emploi des ressources
2. Transactions entre les Etats-membres et la Banque....
3. Limitations aux garanties et aux emprunts de la
B anque...............................................................................
4. Conditions auxquelles la Banque pourra garantir
ou faire des prets ...........................................................
5. Utilisation des prets garantis par la Banque et de
ceux auxquels elle a participe ou qu’elle a effectues....
IV. Operations
Section 1. Methodes a suivre lorsqu’il s’agit d’effectuer ou de
faciliter des prets ...........................................................
2. Disponibilite et possibility de transfert des monnaies
3. Fourniture de devises pour des prets d irects..............
4. Dispositions relatives an paiement de prets directs ....
5. Garanties.................................................. ........................
6. Reserve speciale...............................................................
7. Methodes pour faire face aux obligations de la
Banque dans le cas de manquements............................
8. Operations diverses..........................................................
9. Avertissement que doivent porter les titres.................
10. Les activites d’or dr e politique sont interdites.............
V. Organisation et adminstration...........................................................
Section 1. Composition de la Banque .............................................
2. Conseil des Gouverneurs.................................................
3. Le v o te ...............................................................................
4. Administrateurs ...............................................................
5. Le President et son personnel ......................................
6. Conseil Consultatif ..........................................................
7. Comites des p re ts .............................................................
8. Rapports avec les autres organisations internation a les........................................................... .......................




Page
1
1
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
8
8
8
9
9
10
11
11
12
14
15
18
19
19
20
21
21
22
22
22
24
24
26
27
28
28

APPENDI X I

9. Situation des bureaux ....................................................
10. Bureaux et conseils regionaux......................................
11. D ep ots...............................................................................
12. Forme des avoirs en monnaie.........................................
13. Publication de rapports et diffusion de renseignements
14. Repartition du revenu n e t...............................................
VI. Retrait et suspension de la participation des Etats-membres—
Suspension des operations ..............................................................
Section 1. Droit de retrait des Etats-membres ...........................
2. Suspension de la participation......................................
3. Cessation de la participation des Etats-membres au
Fonds Monetaire International ....................................
4. Reglement des comptes avec les gouvernements qui
cessent d’etre membres ................................................
5. Suspension des operations et reglement des obli­
gations ..............................................................................
VII. Statut, Immunites et privileges .........................................................
Section 1. Objets du present Article .............................................
2. Statut de la Banque.......................................................
3. Position de la Banque en ce qui concerne les poursuites judiciaires ............................................................
4. Insaisissabilite des avoirs .............................................
5. Immunite des archives....................................................
6. Les avoirs seront a Tabri de toutes mesures restrictives ...................................................................................
7. Privileges en matiere de communications..................
8. Immunites et privileges des fonctionnaires et em­
ployes .................................................................................
9. Exemption de charges fiscales ......................................
10. Application du present A rticle......................................
VIII. Amendements ........................................................................................
IX. Interpretation .......................................................................................
X. Approbation consideree comme accordee .........................................
XI. Dispositions finales ...............................................................................
Section 1. Entree en v ig u eu r...........................................................
2. Signature ..........................................................................
3. Inauguration de la Banque .........................................

1485

Page
29
29
29
30
30
31
32
32
32
32
33
35
38
38
38
39
39
39
39
40
40
41
42
42
43
44
44
44
45
47

Supplements
Supplement A.
Supplement B.

Souscriptions......................................................................
Election des Administrateurs .........................................

49
50

B a n q u e I n t e r n a t i o n a l e P o u r l a R e c o n s t r u c t io n
et le

D eveloppem ent

L es G ou v ern em en ts a u x n om s desquels le p re se n t A c c o r d

est

sig n e co n v ie n n e n t de ce qui s u i t :

Article Preliminaire
L a B a n q u e In te rn a tio n a le p o u r la R e co n s tru ctio n et le D evelop p em en t est eta b lie et fo n c tio n n e r a co n fo r m e m e n t a u x d isp o si­
tio n s s u iv a n te s :




1486

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

Article I
Buts

La Banque a pour buts:
(i) d'aider a la reconstruction et au developpement des
territoires des Etats-membres en facilitant Tinvestissement des capitaux pour des buts de production tels que:
la restauration des economies detruites ou disloquees
par la guerre, la transformation des moyens de pro­
duction pour qu’ils puissent satisfaire aux besoins du
temps de paix, ainsi que Tapplication de mesures propres a encourager le developpement des moyens de pro­
duction et des ressources dans les pays moins developpes;
(ii) d’encourager Tinvestissement prive a Tetranger au
moyen de garanties ou de participations aux emprunts
et autres investissements faits par des capitalistes
prives; en outre, lorsque les capitaux prives ne sont pas
disponibles a des conditions raisonnables, de fournir,
(p. 2)
a des conditions appropriees et pour des buts de pro­
duction, des fonds preleves sur son propre capital ou
obtenus par son intermediate ou tires de ses autres
ressources;
(iii) d’encourager Texpansion equilibree, a long terme, du
commerce international et le maintien de Tequilibre
dans la balance des comptes, en encourageant l’investissement international pour le developpement des
ressources productives des Etats-membres et, par ce
moyen, d’aider a augmenter la productivity ainsi que
d’elever le niveau de vie et d’ameliorer les conditions
de travail dans les territoires des membres;
(iv) de coordonner les prets ainsi consentis ou garantis par
elle avec les autres prets internationaux, de fagon a
entreprendre en premier lieu les pro jets les plus utiles
et les plus urgents, de quelque envergure qu’ils soient;
(v) de conduire ses operations en tenant compte de l’influence de l’investissement international sur les condi­
tions economiques dans les territoires des Etats-membres; et de faciliter, pendant les premieres annees
d’apres-guerre, une transition sans heurt de l’economie
de guerre a Teconomie de paix.
Dans toutes ses decisions, la Banque s’inspirera des buts enonces ci-dessus.




A P P E N D IX I

1487

(P. 3)
Article II
Participation de la Banque et Capital de la Banque

1. Qualite de membre
(a) Les membres originaires de la Banque seront les membres
du Fonds Monetaire International qui auront aecepte d’etre mem­
bres de la Banque avant la date specifiee a 1
’Article XI, Section
2 (e).
(b) La qualite de membre pourra etre acquise par les autres
membres du Fonds aux dates et conformement aux conditions qui
pourront etre prescrites par la Banque.
S e c t i o n 2.
Capital autorise
(a) Le montant du capital autorise de la Banque sera fixe a
$10,000,000,000 (dollars des Etats Unis d’Amerique) du poids et
titre en vigueur au l e juillet 1944. Le capital sera divise en
r
100.000 actions, ayant chacune une valeur au pair de $100,000, qui
ne pourront etre souscrites que par les membres.
(b) Le capital pourra etre augmente par une decision de la
Banque approuvee par trois cinquiemes de la totalite des voix.
S e c t i o n 3.
Souscription des actions
(a) Chaque membre devra souscrire aux actions de la Banque.
Le nombre minimum d’actions devant etre souscrites par les mem­
bres originaires est indique au Supplement A. Le nombre mini­
mum d’actions devant etre souscrites par les autres membres sera
fixe par la Banque, qui mettra en reserve une part suffisante de
son capital en portefeuille pour etre souscrite par les dits membres.
IP. 4)
(b) La Banque fixera les conditions auxquelles les membres
pourront, en plus de leurs souscriptions minima, souscrire les
actions de son capital autorise en portefeuille.
(c) Si son capital autorise est augmente, la Banque accordera a
chaque membre une possibility raisonnable de souscrire, aux con­
ditions qu’elle fixera, a une part de l’augmentation de capital; cette
part etant proportionnelle au rapport entre le montant des actions
deja souscrites par ce membre et le montant total du capital de la
Banque; toutefois, aucun membre ne sera tenu de souscrire a une
part quelconque de l’augmentation de capital.
S e c t i o n 4. Prix d!emission des actions
Les actions comprises dans les souscriptions minima des mem­
bres originaires seront emises au pair. Les autres actions seront
emises au pair, a moins que, dans des cas speciaux, la Banque
ne decide, a la majorite de toutes les voix, de les emettre a d’autres
conditions.
S e c t io n




1488

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

5.
Division et appels de capital souscrit
La souscription de chaque membre sera divisee en deux tranches
comme suit:
S e c t io n

(i) vingt pour cent de las souscription seront verses ou sujets
a appel, aux termes de la Section 7 (i) du present Article,
a mesure que la Banque en aura besoin pour ses opera­
tions ;
(ii) le solde de quatre-vingts pour cent ne sera sujet a appel
par la Banque que lorsqu’il sera requis pour faire face aux
obligations de la Banque creees aux termes de 1
’Article IV,
Section 1 (a) (ii) et (iii).
(p. 5)
Les appels de souscriptions non versees seront uniformes pour
toutes les actions.
Limitation d’obligation
L’obligation en ce qui concerne les actions sera limitee a la part
non versee du prix d’emission des actions.

S e c t i o n 6.

Methode de paiement des souscriptions aux actions
Le paiement des souscriptions aux actions sera effectue en or
ou en dollars des Etats-Unis et dans les monnaies des membres
comme suit:
S e c t i o n 7.

(i) aux termes de la Section 5 (i) du present Article, deux
pour cent du prix de chaque action seront payables en or
ou en dollars des Etats-Unis, et, lorsque des appels auront
lieu, le solde de dix-huit pour cent sera paye dans la
monnaie du membre;
(ii) lorsqu’un appel aura lieu aux termes de la Section 5 (ii)
du present Article, le paiement pourra etre fait au choix
du membre soit en or, en dollars des Etats-Unis, ou dans
la monnaie requise pour acquitter les obligations de la
Banque relatives aux buts vises par l’appel;
(iii) lorsqu’un membre effectuera des paiements dans une
monnaie quelconque, aux termes de (i) et de (ii) ci-dessus,
le montant des dits paiements sera egal a celui de l’obligation du membre aux termes de rappel. Cette obligation
sera proportionnelle a la part souscrite du capital de la
(p. 6)
Banque, tel qu’il est defini a la Section 2 du present Article.
Epoque du paiement des souscriptions
(a)
Les deux pour cent a payer sur chaque action, en or ou
en dollars des Etats-Unis, aux termes de la Section 7 (i) du pre­
S e c t i o n 8.




APPENDI X I

1489

sent Article, seront payes dans les soixante jours a compter de la
date ou la Banque commencera ses operations; toutefois,
(i) tout membre originaire de la Banque, dont le territoire.
metropolitain a souffert du fait de Toccupation par Tennemi ou des hostilites durant la presente guerre, aura le
droit de differer le paiement d’un demi pour cent pendant
une periode de cinq ans apres cette date;
(ii) tout membre originaire qui ne peut pas effectuer le dit
paiement faute d’avoir repris possession de ses reserves
d’or encore detenues ou immobilisees du fait de la guerre
pourra differer tout paiement jusqu’a une date fixee par
la Banque.
(b)
Le solde du prix de chaque action, payable aux termes de
la Section 7 (i) du present Article, sera paye dans la forme et a
la date fixees par la Banque, sous reserve que:
(i) la Banque devra faire appel, dans le delai d’un an a partir
du jour ou elle commencera ses operations, a au moins
huit pour cent du prix de Taction, en plus du paiement des
deux pour cent dont il est question au paragraphe (a)
ci-dessus;
(P. 7)
(ii) le montant appele dans une periode quelconque de trois
mois ne devra pas depasser cinq pour cent du prix de
Taction.
Maintien de la valeur de certains avoirs en devises
de la Banque
(a) Toutes les fois

S e c tio n 9.

(i) qu’un Etat-membre abaisse la valeur au pair de sa monnaie
ou
(ii) que la valeur d’echange international de sa monnaie sur
son territoire a diminue d’une maniere que la Banque juge
appreciable, cet Etat-membre devra verser a la Banque,
dans un delai raisonnable, une quantite additionnelle de sa
propre monnaie, suffisante pour maintenir a sa valeur
initiale le depot de devises qu’il a fait a la Banque soit a
Torigine, aux termes de TArticle II, Section 7 (i) ou de
TArticle IV, Section 2 ( b ) , soit ulterieurement conforme­
ment aux dispositions du present paragraphe, lorsque ces
devises n’ont pas ete rachetees par TEtat-membre considere en echange d’or ou de devises d’un autre membre
considerees acceptables par la Banque.




1490

MONET A RY AND F I NANCI AL CONFERENCE

(b) Toutes les fois que la valeur au pair de la monnaie d’un
Etat-membre sera augmentee, la Banque lui remettra, dans un
delai raisonnable, une quantite des devises de cet Etat-membre
egale a Taugmentation de la valeur du depot mentionne au para­
graphe (a) ci-dessus.
(c) La Banque pourra renoncer aux dispositions des paragraphes precedents, lorsqu’une modification proportionnelle uni(P- 8)
forme dans les valeurs au pair des monnaies de tous ses membres
sera effectuee par le Fonds Monetaire International.
Restriction affectant la disposition des actions
Les actions ne seront pas donnees en nantissement ou grevees
de charges quelconques et ne pourront etre transferees qu’a la
Banque.
Article III
S e c t i o n 10.

Dispositions d’Ordre General Relatives aux Prets et aux Garanties
1.
Emploi des ressources
(a) Les ressources et les facilites fournies par la Banque seront
employees exclusivement au profit des Etats-membres, la meme
consideration etant accordee aux pro jets de developpement et aux
pro jets de reconstruction.
(b) Dans le dessein de faciliter la restauration et la recon­
struction de l’economie des Etats-membres dont les territoires
metropolitans ont ete considerablement devastes du fait de r occu­
pation-ennemie ou des hostilites, la Banque, lorsqu’elle fixera les
modalites des prets accordes aux dits membres, mettra un soin
tout particulier a alleger les charges financieres qu’entraineraient
la restauration et la reconstruction en question, afin d’en hater
l’achevement.
S e c t io n

Transactions entre les Etats-membres et la Banque
Chaque Etat-membre traitera avec la Banque exclusivement par
l’intermediaire de sa Tresorerie, banque centrale, fonds de stabili­
sation ou d’etablissements financiers similaires et la Banque
traitera avec les membres exclusivement par Tintermediaire des
dits organismes.
(p. 9)
S e c t i o n 3.
Limitations aux garanties et aux emprunts de la
Banque
Le montant total des garanties, des participations aux prets et
des prets directs consultes par la Banque ne devra pas depasser
cent pour cent du capital, des reserves et du surplus non diminues
de la Banque.
S e c t i o n 2.




APPENDI X I

1491

4.
Conditions auxquelles la Banque pourra garantir ou
faire des prets
La Banque pourra garantir des prets accordes a tout Etatmembre, a toute administration relevant de celui-ci et a toute
entreprise commerciale, industrielle et agricole se trouvant sur
les territoires d’un Etat-membre, participer aux dits prets ou les
accorder aux conditions suivantes:
S e c tio n

(i) Lorsque FEtat-membre dans le territoire duquel Pentreprise projetee sera situee ne sera pas lui-meme l’emprunteur, FEtat-membre, sa banque centrale ou un organisme
similaire de cet Etat-membre, agree par la Banque, devra
garantir sans reserve le remboursement du principal et
le paiement des interets et autres frais afferents au pret.
(ii) La Banque devra s’assurer que, etant donne l’etat 'du
marche, Femprunteur ne pourrait obtenir le pret autrement, a des conditions qui, selon l’avis de la Banque seraient raisonnables pour Femprunteur.
(iii) Un comite competent, etabli conformement aux disposi­
tions de FArticle V, Section 7, devra avoir soumis un
(p. 10)
rapport ecrit recommandant le pro jet, apres l’etr.e dument
assure du bienfonde de la proposition.
(iv) Le taux de l’interet et les autres charges, ainsi que le
programme de remboursement, devront paraitre raison­
nables a la Banque et convenir au pro jet.
(v) La Banque, en effectuant ou garantissant un pret, devra
tenir compte des possibilites de Femprunteur, et, si celui-ci
n’est pas membre, de sa caution, de faire face aux obliga­
tions qui leur incombent du fait du pret; en outre, la
Banque devra agir avec prudence afin de proteger a la
fois les interets de FEtat-membre interesse et ceux de
Fensemble des Etats-membres.
(vi) En garantissant un pret fait par d’autres preteurs, la
Banque devra recevoir une remuneration raisonnable eu
egard aux risques courus.
(vii) Les prets effectues ou garantis par la Banque seront, sauf
cas speciaux, destines a la realisation de pro jets specifiques de reconstruction ou de developpement.
Utilisation des prets garantis par la Banque et de
ceux auxquels elle a participe ou qu’ elle a effectues
(a)
La Banque n’imposera pas la condition que les sommes
provenant d’un pret devront etre depensees dans les territoires
d’un membre ou de plusieurs membres designes.
S e c t i o n 5.

795841— 48—24




1492

M O N E T A R Y AN D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

(b) La Banque prendra des dispositions pour que les sommes
provenant de tout pret soient utilisees uniquement aux fins pour
(P. 11)
lesquelles le pr&t a ete accorde, compte tenu des facteurs d’economie et de rendement, et sans prendre en consideration des influ­
ences ou des facteurs politiques ou non economiques.
(c) Dans le cas de prets faits par la Banque, celle-ci ouvrira un
compte au nom de l’emprunteur et le montant du pret sera porte
au credit de ce compte dans la monnaie ou les monnaies utilisees
pour le pret. La Banque ne permettra a l’emprunteur de tirer sur
ce compte que pour faire face aux frais entraines par le pro jet,
au fur et a mesure qu’ils s’imposeront.
Article IV
Operations

Methodes a suivre lorsqu’il s’agit d’ effectuer ou de
faeiliter des prets
(a) La Banque pourra faire ou faeiliter des prets repondant
aux conditions generates de TArticle III, selon Tune des manieres
indiquees ci-dessous:
S e c tio n 1.

(i) en faisant des prets directs ou en y participant au moyen
de ses propres fonds correspondant a son capital verse
non diminue, a ses surplus et, compte tenu des disposi­
tions de la Section 6 du present Article, a ses reserves;
(ii) en faisant des prets directs ou en y participant, au moyen
de fonds obtenus sur le marche d’un Etat-membre ou empruntes autrement par la Banque;
(iii) en garantissant, en tout ou en partie, les prets faits par
des capitalistes prives par les voies usuelles de placement.
(p. 12)
(b) La Banque ne pourra emprunter des fonds au titre de
(a) (ii) ci-dessus ou garantir des prets au titre de (a) (iii)
ci-dessus qu’apres avoir obtenu, dans chaque cas, le consentement
du membre sur les marches duquel les fonds sont obtenus, ainsi
que celui du membre dans la monnaie duquel le pret est fait, et
seulement dans le cas ou les dits membres conviennent que le
produit en pourra etre echange contre la monnaie de tout membre
sans restriction.
Disponibilite et possibility de transfert des monnaies
(a)
Les devises versees a la Banque, au titre de TArticle II,
Section 7 (i), ne seront pretees qu’avec le consentement, obtenu
dans chaque cas, du membre de la monnaie duquel il s’agit; cepenSECTION 2.




A PPENDI X I

1493

dant, si necessaire, et apres appel du montant total du capital
souscrit de la Banque, la Banque pourra, sans restriction par les
membres dont les monnaies seront offertes, les employer ou les
echanger contre d’autres devises necessaires pour faire face aux
paiements contractuels d’interets, aux autres frais, ou a l’amortissement des emprunts contractes par la Banque ellememe, ainsi
que pour repondre aux obligations de la Banque touchant les
paiements contractuels sur des prets garantis par celle-ci.
(b) Les devises versees a la Banque par des emprunteurs ou
des cautions, en paiement du principal des prets directs effectues
a Paide des devises mentionnees au paragraphe (a) ci-dessus, ne
seront echangees contre les devises des autres Etats-membres ou
pretees a nouveau qu’avec Papprobation, dans chaque cas, des
Etats-membres dont les devises serviront a ces transactions; toutefois, en cas de necessite, et apres appel du montant total du
(P. 13)
capital souscrit de la Banque, les dites devises seront, sans restric­
tion par les Etats-membres dont les monnaies seront aussi offertes,
utilisees ou echangees contre d’autres devises pour faire face aux
paiements contractuels des interets, aux autres frais, ou a Pamortissement des emprunts contractes par la Banque elle-meme, ainsi
que pour repondre aux obligations de la Banque touchant les
paiements contractuels sur les prets garantis par celle-ci.
(c) Les devises versees a la Banque par des emprunteurs ou
des cautions, en paiement du principal des prets directs faits par
la Banque, au titre de la Section 1 (a) (ii) du present Article,
seront detenues et utilisees, sans restrictions par les Etats-mem­
bres, en vue d’effectuer des paiements d’amortissement ou de payer
d’avance ou de racheter en tout ou en partie les obligations de la
Banque elle-meme.
(d) Toutes les autres devises dont la Banque pourra disposer,
y compris celles obtenues sur le marche ou empruntees autrement,
au titre de la Section 1 (a) (ii) du present Article, celles obtenues
par la vente de Por et celles regues comme paiements d’interets et
d’autres frais, au titre des Sections 1 (a) (i) et (ii), ainsi que
celles regues en paiement de commissions et d’autres frais, au titre
de la Section 1 (a) (iii), seront employees ou echangees contre
d’autres devises ou contre de Por requis pour les operations de la
Banque, sans restriction par les Etats-membres dont les monnaies
sont offertes.
(e) Les devises obtenues sur les marches des Etats-membres
par des emprunteurs au moyen de prets garantis par la Banque,
au titre de la Section 1 (a) (iii) du present Article, seront aussi




1494

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

(P. 14)
utilisees ou echangees contre cTautres devises, sans restriction par
les dits membres.

Fourniture de devises pour des prets directs
Les dispositions suivantes devront s’appliquer aux prets directs,
effectues en vertu des Sections 1 (a) (i) et (ii) du present A rticle:
SECTION 3.

(a) La Banque fournira a Temprunteur, a Texception de la
monnaie de TEtat-membre sur les territoires duquel auraient lieu
les travaux projetes, celles des monnaies des Etats-membres qui
sont necessaires a Temprunteur pour effectuer, sur les territoires
des autres membres, les depenses a faire dans le but d'atteindre
les objectifs vises par le pret.
(b) Dans des circonstances exceptionnelles ou la monnaie natio­
nale requise pour la realisation des objectifs du pret ne pourra
etre obtenu par l’emprunteur a des conditions raisonnables, la
Banque pourra fournir a Temprunteur, a titre de fraction du pret,
une quantite appropriee de cette monnaie.
(c) Si le programme de travaux en question augmente indirectement les besoins de change etranger de TEtat-membre sur les ter­
ritoires duquel le programme de travaux est mis en execution, la
Banque pourra, a titre exceptionnel, fournir a Temprunteur,
comme fraction du pret, une quantite appropriee en or ou en
change etranger ne depassant pas les sommes depensees par Temprunteur sur ses territoires afin d’atteindre les objectifs vises par
le pret.
(d) La Banque pourra, dans des circonstances exceptionnelles
et a la demande de l’Etat-membre dans les territoires duquel une
part du pret est depensee, racheter contre de Tor ou du change
(P. 15)
etranger une partie de la monnaie du dit membre ainsi depensee,
mais, en aucun cas, la partie ainsi rachetee ne depassera le montant
des besoins augmentes de change etranger occasionnes du fait de
la depense, dans les dits territoires, des sommes provenant du pret.
Dispositions relatives au paiement de prets directs
Les contrats relatifs aux prets vises a la Section 1 (a) (i) ou (ii)
du present Article seront etablis en conformite avec les disposi­
tions suivantes concernant les paiements.
(a)
Les modalites des paiements a titre d’interets et d’amortissement, l’echeance et les dates de paiement de chaque pret seront
fixees par la Banque. La Banque fixera aussi le taux et les autres
modalites de la commission devant etre pergue du fait du dit pret.
Dans le cas de prets faits au titre de la Section (1) (a) (ii) du
S ectio n 4.




APPENDI X I

1495

present Article, au cours des dix premieres annees des operations
de la Banque, le taux de la commission ne sera ni inferieur a un
pour cent par an ni superieur a un et demi pour cent par an,
et sera impute a la partie non payee du dit pret. A la fin de la
dite periode de dix annees, le taux de la commission pourra etre
reduit par la Banque, tant a regard de la partie non payee des
prets deja faits qu’a Regard de prets futurs, si les reserves accumulees par la Banque, aux termes de la Section 6 du present Article
et du fait d’autres recettes, sont suffisantes, selon l’avis de la
Banque, pour justifier une reduction. Dans le cas de prets futurs,
la Banque pourra aussi, si elle le juge a propos, porter le taux de
la commission au-dela de la limite prescrite ci-dessus, au cas ou
(P. 16)
Texperience en demontrerait l’utilite.
(b) Tous les contrats relatifs aux prets stipuleront en quelle
monnaie (ou quelles monnaies) les paiements a effectuer aux
termes du contrat seront faits a la Banque. Cependant, les dits
paiements pourront etre faits, au choix de l’emprunteur, en or ou,
avec le consentement de la Banque, dans la monnaie d’un membre
autre que celle stipulee dans le contrat.
(i) Dans le cas de prets effectues aux termes de la Section 1
(a) (i) du present Article, les contrats relatifs aux prets
prescriront que les paiements devant etre faits a la Banque
a titre d’interets, d’autres frais et d’amortissement seront
effectues dans la monnaie pretee, a moins que le membre
dont la monnaie est utilisee pour le pret ne consente k
ce que les dits paiements soient faits dans une autre mon­
naie ou dans d’autres monnaies specifiees. Sous reserve
des dispositions de TArticle II, Section 9 (c ), les dits
paiements seront equivalents, dans une monnaie specifiee
a cette fin par la Banque a la majorite des trois quarts du
total des voix, a la valeur effective des dits paiements contractuels a la date ou les prets ont ete faits.
(ii) Dans le cas de prets faits au titre de la Section 1 (a) (ii)
du present Article, le montant total non paye et dont le
paiement doit etre fait a la Banque dans une monnaie
(P. 17)
quelconque ne depassera a aucun moment le montant total
des emprunts non rembourses contractes par la Banque au
titre de la Section 1 (a) (ii) et payables dans la meme
monnaie.
(c) Si un Etat-membre est particulierement gene du fait d’un
manque presque total de change, au point ou le service de tout




1496

MONETARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

pret contracts ou gar anti par lui ou par un desses organismes ne
peut etre assure de la maniere prescrite, TEtat-membre en ques­
tion pourra s’adresser a la Banque pour demander un adoucissement des conditions de paiement. Si la Banque est convaincue
qu’un certain adoucissement s’impose dans l’interet du membre
interesse, des operations de la Banque et de 1
’ensemble de ses
membres, elle pourra agir au titre de Tun ou de l’autre des paragraphes suivants ou des deux a la fois, en ce qui concerne tout ou
partie du service annuel:
(i) La Banque pourra, si elle le juge utile, se mettre d’accord
avec TEtat-membre interesse pour accepter des paiements
pour le service du pret dans la monnaie du membre, pour
des periodes n’excedant pas trois ans, a des conditions
voulues touchant Temploi de la dite monnaie et le maintien
de sa valeur en change etranger, et pour le rachat de la
dite monnaie a des conditions appropriees.
(ii) La Banque pourra modifier les conditions de Tamortissement ou reculer Techeance du pret; elle pourra aussi pro(p. 18)
ceder a Tapplication simultanee de ces deux mesures.
Garanties
(a) Lorsqu’elle garantira un pret negocie par les voies usuelles
de placement, la Banque percevra une commission de garantie
payable periodiquement sur le montant du pret qui reste du au
taux fixe par la Banque. Pendant les dix premieres annees des
operations de la Banque, le dit taux ne sera ni inferieur a un pour
cent par an, ni superieur a un et demi pour cent par an. A la fin
de la dite periode de dix ans, le taux de la commission pourra etre
reduit par la Banque, tant a Tegard des fractions non payees des
prets deja garantis qu’a Tegard de prets futurs, si les reserves
accumulees par la Banque, au titre de la Section 6 du present
Article et du fait d’autres recettes sont suffisantes a son avis, pour
justifier une reduction. Dans le cas de prets futurs et lorsque
Texperience en demontre l’utilite, la Banque pourra aussi, si elle
le juge utile, porter le taux de la commission au-dela de la limite
indiquee ci-dessus.
(b) Les commissions de garantie seront payees directement par
Temprunteur a la Banque.
(c) Les garanties donnees par la Banque stipuleront que la
Banque pourra se degager de sa responsabilite en ce qui concerne
les interets si, a Toccasion d’un manquement de Temprunteur et de
sa caution, s’il s’en produit, 1$ Banque offre d’acheter, au pair et

S e c tio n 5.




APPENDI X I

1497

avec les interets echus a la date indiquee dans Toffre, les bons ou
autres obligations qui sont garantis.
(d)
La Banque aura le pouvoir de fixer toutes autres modalites
en ce qui concerne la garantie.
(P. 19)
Reserve speciale
Le montant des commissions regues par la Banque, aux termes
des Sections 4 et 5 du present Article, sera mis de cote comme
reserve speciale, laquelle sera maintenue disponible pour faire
face aux obligations de la Banque conformement a la Section 7 du
present Article. La reserve speciale sera maintenue liquide, sous
telle forme, permise aux termes du present Accord, que prescriront
les Administrateurs.
S ection 6.

S ection 7.

Methodes pour faire face aux obligations de la
Banque dans le cas de manquements
Dans les cas de manquements en ce qui concerne les prets faits
ou garantis par la Banque ou ceux auxquels elle participera:

(a) La Banque prendra toutes les mesures possibles afin
d’ajuster les obligations qui decoulent du pret, y compris des
mesures conformes aux dispositions de la Section 4 (c) du present
Article ou qui leur soient analogues.
(b) Les paiements effectues en vue de l’acquittement des obliga­
tions ou garanties qui decoulent des Sections 1 (a) (ii) et (iii)
du present Article seront imputes:
(i) en premier lieu, a la reserve speciale prevue a la Section 6
du present Article;
(ii) en second lieu, dans la proportion necessaire et aux choix
de la Banque, aux autres reserves, au surplus et au capital
dont la Banque dispose.
(c) La Banque pourra appeler, en conformite avec 1
’Article II,Sections 5 et 7, une fraction convenable des souscriptions impayees
des membres, toutes les fois que cette mesure sera necessaire pour
faire face aux paiements contractuels d’interets, d’autres frais ou
(p. 20)
de l’amortissement au titre des emprunts contractes par la Banque
elle-meme, ou bien pour faire face aux obligations de la Banque
touchant des paiements du meme ordre au titre de prets garantis
par elle. En outre, si elle est d’avis qu’un manquement est sus­
ceptible de se prolonger, la Banque pourra appeler une fraction
additionnelle des dites souscriptions impayees, dont le montant ne
depassera pas, pour une annee quelconque, un pour cent des sou­
scriptions totales des membres, et dont l’objet sera:




1498

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

(i) de racheter avant la date de l’echeance, ou d’acquitter
autrement ses obligations a cet egard, la totalite ou une
fraction du principal impaye de tout pret garanti par la
Banque et vis-a-vis duquel il y a manquement de la part
du debiteur;
(ii) de racheter, ou d’acquitter autrement des obligations a cet
egard, la totalite ou une fraction des emprunts contractes
par elle.
Operations diverses
En plus des operations specifiees ailleurs dans le present Accord,
la Banque aura le pouvoir:
S ection 8.

(i) d’acheter et de vendre les titres qu’elle aura emis, et
d’acheter et de vendre les titres qu’elle aura garantis ou
auxquels elle aura souscrit, a condition que la Banque
obtienne le consentement de l’Etat-membre dans les terri­
toires duquel les titres doivent etre achetes ou vendus;
(p. 21)
(ii) de garantir les titres auxquels elle aura souscrit afin d’en
faeiliter la vente;
(iii) d’emprunter la monnaie de tout Etat-membre avec l’approbation du dit Etat-membre;
(iv) d’acheter et de vendre tels autres titres que les Admi­
nistrateurs approuveront a la majorite des trois quarts
du total des voix comme etant acceptables pour l’investissement de la totalite ou d’une fraction de la reserve speciale,
aux termes de la Section 6 du present Article.
Lorsqu’elle fera usage des pouvoirs conferes au titre de la presente
Section, la Banque pourra traiter avec n’importe quelle personne,
association, societe anonyme, ou autre entite legale se trouvant sur
les territoires d’un membre quelconque.
Avertissement que doivent porter les titres
Chaque titre garanti ou emis par la Banque portera au recto,
bien en vue, une declaration indiquant que le dit titre n’est pas une
obligation d’un gouvernement quelconque, sauf indication expresse
du contraire sur le dit titre.
SECTION 9.

Les activites d'ordre politique sont interdites
La Banque et ses fonctionnaires n’interviendront pas dans les
affaires politiques d’un membre quelconque, et ils ne se laisseront
pas influencer dans leurs decisions par le caractere politique de
l’Etat-membre ou des Etats-membres interesses. Dans leurs deci­
sions, la Banque et ses fonctionnaires ne tiendront compte que des
SECTION 10.




A PPENDI X I

1499

facteurs economiques et ceux-ci seront -evalues impartialement afin
d’atteindre les buts enonces a 1
’Article 1.
(P. 22)

Article V
Organisation et Administration

Composition de la Banque
La Banque comprendra un Conseil des Gouverneurs, des Administrateurs, un President et tous les fonctionnaires et le personnel
voulus pour remplir les fonctions qui seront fixees par la Banque.
S ection 1.

Conseil des Gouverneurs
(a) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs sera investi de tous les pouvoirs
de la Banque; il comprendra un gouverneur et un suppleant designes par chaque membre de la maniere que la Banque determinera. Chaque gouverneur et chaque suppleant restera en fonctions
pendant cinq ans, au gre du membre qui l’aura nomme, et pourra
etre renomme. Aucun suppleant ne pourra voter, sauf en Tabsence du gouverneur qu’il remplace. Le Conseil elira President un
des gouverneurs.
(b) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs pourra deleguer aux Administrateurs Tautorite necessaire pour exercer tous les pouvoirs du
Conseil, excepte le pouvoir qui lui permet:
S ection 2.

(i) d’admettre de nouveaux membres et de fixer les conditions
regissant leur admission;
(ii) d’augmenter ou de reduire le capital en portefeuille;
(iii) de suspendre un membre;
(iv) de rendre un arret lorsqu’il sera fait appel des interpreta­
tions donnees au present Accord par les Administrateurs;
(v) de faire des arrangements (autres que des arrangements
(p. 23)

officieux d’ordre temporaire ou administratif) en vue de
collaborer avec d’autres organisations internationales;
(vi) de decider de suspendre d’une fa^on permanente les ope­
rations de la Banque et de distribuer ses avoirs;
(vii) de determiner la distribution du revenu net de la Banque.
(c) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs tiendra une reunion annuelle
et toutes reunions prevues par le Conseil ou convoquees par les
Administrateurs. Les reunions du Conseil seront convoquees par
les Administrateurs toutes les fois que la demande en sera faite
par cinq membres ou par des membres detenant un quart de la
totalite des voix.
(d) Le quorum pour toute reunion du Conseil des Gouverneurs




1500

MONET ARY AND F I NANCI AL CONFERENCE

sera une majorite des Gouverneurs disposant des deux tiers au
moins de la totalite des voix.
(e) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs pourra regler une procedure
par laquelle les Administrateurs, lorsqu’ils seront persuades de
servir ainsi les meilleurs interets de la Banque, pourront obtenir
un vote des Gouverneurs sur une question precise, sans convoquer
une reunion du Conseil.
( f ) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs, ainsi que les Administrateurs
dans la mesure ou ils y seront autorises, pourront adopter tous
reglements necessaires ou appropries a la conduite des affaires de
la Banque.
(g) Les Gouverneurs et les suppleants rempliront leurs fonc­
tions sans recevoir de compensation de la Banque, mais la Banque
leur remboursera les frais encourus normalement lorsqu’ils se
rendront aux reunions.
(P. 24 )

(h) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs determinera la remuneration
que devront recevoir les Administrateurs, ainsi que les appointements du President et les conditions de Son contrat de service.
L ev ote
(a) Chaque membre disposera de deux cent cinquante voix,
avec une voix additionnelle pour chaque action detenue par lui.
(b) Toutes les questions soumises a la consideration de la
Banque seront decidees a la majorite des voix donnees, s’il n’en
est specifie autrement.
S e c tio n 3.

Administrateurs
(a) Aux Administrateurs incomber a la responsabilite pour la
conduite des operations generates de la Banque et, a cette fin, ils
exerceront tous les pouvoirs qui leur seront delegues par le Conseil
des Gouverneurs.
(b) Les Administrateurs, qui ne seront pas necessairement des
gouverneurs, seront au nombre de douze, et choisis comme suit:
S e c tio n 4.

(i) cinq seront nommes a raison d’un pour chacun des cinq
membres ayant le plus grand nombre d’actions;
(ii) sept seront elus, aux termes du Supplement B, par tous
les Gouverneurs, a Texception de ceux nommes par les cinq
membres dont il est question a Talinea (i) ci-dessus.
Au sens du present paragraphe, le mot “ membres” signifie les
gouvernements des pays dont les noms sont indiques au Supple­
ment A, qu’ils soient membres originaires ou qu’ils deviennent
(p. 25)
membres aux termes de 1
’Article II, Section 1 ( b ) . Lorsque les




APP ENDI X I

1501

gouvernements d’autres pays deviendront membres, le Conseil des
Gouverneurs pourra, par une majorite des quatre cinqui&mes du
total des voix, augmenter le nombre total des administrateurs en
augmentant celui des administrateurs a elire.
Les administrateurs seront nommes ou elus tous les deux ans.
(c) Chaque administrateur nommera un suppleant qui aura en
son absence pleins pouvoirs pour agir en son nom. Lorsque les
Administrateurs qui les auront nommes seront presents, les suppleants pourront prendre part aux debats, mais ils ne voteront pas.
(d) Les Administrateurs resteront en fonctions jusqu’a ce que
leurs successeurs aient ete nommes ou elus. Si un poste d’administrateur elu devient vacant plus de quatre-vingt-dix jours avant
que le mandat ne soit acheve, un autre administrateur sera elu pour
la periode a courir par les gouverneurs qui ont elu Fancien admi­
nistrateur. Une majorite des voix donnees sera requise pour qu’une
election ait lieu. Tant que le poste restera vacant, le suppleant de
Fancien administrateur exercera les pouvoirs de ce dernier, sauf
celui de nommer un suppleant.
(e) Les Administrateurs rempliront leurs fonctions sans inter­
ruption au siege principal de la Banque et se reuniront aussi souvent que Fexigeront les affaires de la Banque.
(f) Dans une reunion quelconque des Administrateurs, le
quorum necessaire sera une majorite des Administrateurs disposant de la moitie au moins de la totalite des voix.
(g) Chaque administrateur nomme disposers du nombre de
(P. 26)

voix attributes, conformement a la Section 3 du present Article, au
membre qui Faura nomme. Chaque administrateur elu disposera
du nombre de voix qui auront compte dans son election. Toutes
les voix dont disposera Fadministrateur seront donnees en bloc.
(h) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs adoptera des reglements
d’apres lesquels un membre qui ne jouit pas du droit de nommer
un administrateur, aux termes de l’alinea (b) ci-dessus, pourra
envoyer un representant assister a toute reunion des Administra­
teurs, lorsqu’une demande faite par le dit membre ou une question
le concernant particulierement sera a Petude.
(i), Les Administrateurs pourront nommer tels comites qu’ils
jugeront utiles. La composition des dits comites ne sera pas necessairement limitee aux gouverneurs, aux administrateurs, ou a
leurs suppleants.
Le President et son personnel
(a)
Les Administrateurs choisiront un President qui ne sera ni
gouverneur, ni administrateur, ni suppleant de gouverneur ou
S e c tio n 5.




1502

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

d’administrateur. Le President de la Banque sera aussi President
des Administrateurs, mais il n’aura pas le droit de vote, sauf en
cas d’un partage egal des voix, auquel cas sa voix sera preponderante. II pourra participer aux reunions du Conseil des Gou­
verneurs, mais n’y votera pas. Le President cessera de remplir
ses fonctions lorsque les Administrateurs le decideront.
(b) Le President sera le chef du personnel administratif de la
Banque et dirigera, sous le controle des Administrateurs, les
affaires ordinaires de la Banque. Sous reserve d’un controle
(P. 2 7 )

d’ordre general exerce par les Administrateurs, il sera responsable
de l’organisation, ainsi que de la nomination et du congediement
des fonctionnaires et du personnel.
(c) Le President, les fonctionnaires et le personnel de la Banque,
dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions, n’auront de devoirs qu’envers la
Banque a l’exclusion de toute autre autorite. Chaque membre de
la Banque respectera le caractere international de ces devoirs et
s’abstiendra de toute initiative tendant a influencer les dites personnes dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions.
(d) Lorsqu’il nommera les fonctionnaires et le personnel, le
President, sous reserve de la necessite primordiale d’obtenir le plus
haut degre de capacite et de competence technique, tiendra dument
compte de 1
’importance qu’il y aurait a recruter le dit personnel
sur la base d’une distribution geographique aussi large que possible.
Conseil Consultatif
(a) II sera cree un Conseil Consultatif d’au moins 7 personnes,
designees par le Conseil des Gouverneurs, comprenant des representants de la Finance, du Commerce, de l’lndustrie, du Travail et
de l’Agriculture, et constituant une representation nationale aussi
large que possible. Pour les activites ou il existe des organisations
internationales specialises, les membres du Conseil representant
ces activites seront choisis en accord avec les dites organisations.
Le Conseil donnera des avis a la Banque sur les questions touchant
sa politique generale. Le Conseil se reunira annuellement et
chaque fois que la Banque en fera la demande.
(b) Les Conseillers resteront en fonctions pendant deux ans;

S e c t io n 6.

(P . 2 8 )

ils pourront etre designes a nouveau. Les depenses qui, dans des
limites raisonnables, leur incomberont du fait de la Banque leur
seront remboursees.
Comites des prets
La Banque designera les membres des comites qui doivent faire
des rapports sur les prets aux termes de l’Article III, Section 4.

S e c t io n 7.




APPENDI X I

1503

Chacun de ces comites cottlprenflra un expert designe par le gou­
verneur qui represente l’Etat-membre dans les territoires duquel
les travaux projetes seront eilterpris, et un ou plusieurs membres
du personnel technique de la Banque.
Rapports avec les autres organisations
internationales
(a) Dans 1# mesure ou les dispositions du present Accord le lui
permettront, la Banque collaboreraf avec toute organisation inter­
national generate et avec les organismes internationaux publics
ayant des fonctions specialisees dans les domaines connexes. Tous
arrangements relatifs a cette collaboration qui entraineraient une
modification d’une clause quelconque du present Accord ne pour­
ront etre effectues qu’a la suite d’un amendement au dit Accord,
conformement a l’Article VIII.
(b) Lorsqu’elle prendra des decisions sur des demandes de
prets ou de garanties relatives a des questions relevant directement de la competence de 1
’une des organisations internationales
appartenant a l’une des categories specifiees au paragraphe cidessus, organisation a laquelle les membres de la Banque participeraient au premier chef, la Banque prendra en consideration le
point de vue et les recommandations de la dite organisation.

S ection 8.

(p. 29)
Situation des bureaux
(a) Le siege social de la Banque sera situe sur le territoire de
l’Etat-membre possedant le plus grand nombre d’actions.
(b) La Banque aura la faculte de creer des agences ou des
succursales sur les territoires d’un membre quelconque de la
Banque.

S ectio n 9.

Bureaux et vonseils regionaux
(a) La Banque aura la faculte de creer des bureaux regionaux
et de determiner l’emplacement et les zones de competence de
chaque bureau regional.
(b) Chaque bureau regional recevra l’avis du Conseil regional
representant la region toute entiere, lequel sera choisi suivant
des modalites que la Banque aura la faculte d’adopter.

S e ctio n 10.

Depots
(a) Chaque Etat-membre designera sa banque centrale comme
depot pour tous les avoirs de la Banque dans sa propre monnaie;
au cas ou il n’aurait pas de banque centrale, il designera un autre
etablissement qui devra etre approuve par la Banque.
(b) La Banque pourra conserver d’autres avoirs, y compris de
Tor, dans des depots designes par les cinq membres possedant le

S ectio n 11.




1504

M O N E T A R Y AN D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

plus grand nombre d’actions et dans tels autres depots choisis par
la Banque. Au debut, la moitie au moins des avoirs-or de la Banque
sera conservee dans le depot designe par l’Etat-membre sur le
territoire duquel se trouve le siege social la Banque; quarante
pour cent au moins de ces avoirs seront conserves dans les depots
designes par les quatre autres Etats-membres mentionnes ci-dessus,
(p. 30)
chacun de ces depots conservant, au debut, au moins Tequivalent
de la quantite d’or versee pour les actions du membre qui le designe.
Toutefois, tous les transferts d’avoirsor effectues par la Banque
seront faits en tenant dument compte des frais de transport et des
besoins prevus pour la Banque. En cas de necessite, les Admi­
nistrateurs pourront transferer la totalite ou une portion quel­
conque des avoirs-or de la Banque en un point quelconque ou ils
pourront etre convenablement proteges.
SECTION 12.

Forme des avoirs en monnaie
La Banque acceptera de tout Etat-membre, en remplacement
d'une fraction quelconque de la monnaie du dit Etat-membre,
versee a la Banque aux termes de YArticle II, Section 7 (i), ou
pour faire faee a des paiements d’amortissement sur des prets
effectues avec la dite monnaie, et dont la Banque n’a pas besoin
pour ses operations, des traites ou certificats similaires emis par
le Gouvernement de l’Etat-membre ou le depot designe par un tel
Etat-membre, effets qui ne seront pas negociables, qui ne donneront pas lieu a des interets et qui seront payables a leur valeur
nominale sur demande, le montant etant credite au compte de la
Banque dans le depot designe.
S e c t io n 13.

Publication de rapports et diffusion de
renseignements
(a) La Banque publiera un rapport annuel contenant un releve
verifie de ses comptes et fera parvenir periodiquement a ses mem­
bres, a des intervalles de trois mois au plus, un releve sommaire
de sa situation financiere et un bilan des profits et pertes faisant
(P. 31)
apparaitre les resultats de ses operations.
(b) La Banque aura la faculte de publier tous autres rapports
qu’elle jugera utiles a l’execution de son objet.
(c) Des exemplaires de tous les rapports, releves et publications
faits conformement a la presente section seront adresses aux
Etats-membres.
S e c t io n 14.

Repartition du revenu net
(a) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs determinera chaque annee la




APPENDI X I

1505

partie du revenu net de la Banque qui, la part des reserves faite,
sera affectee a l’excedent, et quelle partie sera distribute, au cas
ou il y aurait lieu d’en faire la distribution.
(b)
Si tme partie quelconque est distribute, jusqu’a deux pour
cent de dividendes non cumulatifs seront payes a chaque membre,
avec la monnaie correspondant a sa souscription, au titre du
premier versement de la distribution pour une annee, sur la base
de la moyenne des prets non rembourses de l’annee qui auront
ete effectues aux termes de l’Article IV, Section 1 (a) ( i ) . Si deux
pour cent sont payes au titre du premier versement, tout solde
a distribuer sera paye aux membres suivant leur pourcentage
d’actions. Les paiements a chaque Etat-membre seront effectues
dans la monnaie du dit Etat-membre ou, si celle-ci n’est pas
disponible, dans une autre monnaie agreee par le dit Etat-membre.
Si les dits paiements sont effectues dans une monnaie autre que
celle de FEtat-membre interesse, le transfert de la dite somme et
son utilisation, a la suite du paiement, par l’Etat-membre beneficiaire ne pourront pas faire l’objet de reserves de la part des autres
membres.
(P . 3 2 )

Article VI
Retrait et Suspension de la Participation des Etats-Membres—
Suspension des Operations
1. Droit de retrait des Etats-membres
Tout Etat-membre aura la faculte de se retirer de la Banque, a
n’importe quel moment, en faisant parvenir un avis ecrit au siege
social de la Banque. La demission prendra effet a la date de la
reception du dit avis.
S e c t io n

Suspension de la participation
Au cas ou un membre ne remplirait pas Tune quelconque de ses
obligations envers la Banque, celle-ci aura la faculte de le suspendre,
a la suite d’une decision prise a la majorite par les Gouverneurs
detenant la majorite de la totalite des voix. L’Etat-membre ainsi
suspendu cessera automatiquement d’etre membre de la Banque
dans un delai d’un an a compter de la date de la suspension, a
moins toutefois que la decision ne soit prise, a la meme majorite,
de rendre au dit Etat-membre son statut anterieur.
Au cours de cette periode de suspension, TEtat-membre inte­
resse n’aura la faculte d’exercer aucun des droits prevus dans le
present Accord, sauf le droit de retrait, mais continuera a assumer
toutes les obligations prevues.
S e c t io n 2.




1506

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

Cessation de la participation des Etats-membres au
Fonds Monetaire International
Tout Etat-membre qui cessera de participer au Fonds Monetaire
International cessera automatiquement d’etre membre de la
Banque dans un delai de trois mois, a moins qu’a la majorite des
trois quarts de la totalite des voix, la Banque ne l’autorise a conserver sa qualite de membre.
SECTION 3.

(P. 33)
SECTION 4.

Reglement des comptes avec les gouvernements qui
cessent d'etre membres
(a) Lorsqu’un gouvernement cessera d’etre membre, le dit gou­
vernement conservera ses obligations directes et eventuelles vis-avis de la Banque, aussi longtemps que restera a rembourser une
partie quelconque des prets ou garanties souscrits avant qu’il n’ait
cesse d’etre membre; mais il cessera de contracter de nouvelles
obligations en ce qui concerne les prets ou garanties accordes par
la Banque a une date posterieure a sa demission; il cessera egalement de participer aux revenus ou aux depenses de la Banque.
(b) Au moment ou un gouvernement cessera d’etre membre, la
Banque prendra toutes dispositions pour le rachat de ses actions
a titre de reglement partiel des comptes du dit gouvernement, en
accord avec les prescriptions contenues aux paragraphes (c) et (d)
ci-dessous. A cet effet, le prix de remboursement des actions sera
la valeur apparaissant sur les livres de la Banque, le jour ou le
gouvernement cessera d’etre membre.
(c) Le paiement pour les actions rachetees par la Banque, au
titre de la presente section, se fera conformement aux modalites
suivantes:
(i) Le paiement de toute somme due au gouvernement pour
ses actions sera suspendu aussi longtemps que le dit gou­
vernement, sa banque centrale ou l’un quelconque de ses
organismes restera debiteur envers la Banque, comme emprunteur ou comme caution; une telle somme peut, au
choix de la Banque, servir a couvrir toute obligation de ce
genre au moment ou elle se produit. Aucune somme ne
sera retenue pour couvrir des engagements quelconques
(P. 34)

du gouvernement resultant de sa souscription a des actions,
au titre de l’Article II, Section 5 (ii). En aucun cas, une
somme due a un membre pour ses actions ne sera versee
avant l’expiration d’un delai de 6 mois, a compter de la
date a laquelle le gouvernement cessera d’etre membre.




APPENDI X I

1507

(ii) Les paiements pour des actions pourront etre effectues
periodiquement, au moment ou ces actions seront remises
au dit gouvernement, dans la mesure ou la somme due
comme indemnite de rachat (en vertu de l’alinea (b) cidessus) depassera le total des obligations sur des prets
ou des garanties (definis a l’alinea (c) (i) ci-dessus)
jusqu’a ce que l’ancien Etat-membre ait re$u dans son
integrite le montant du remboursement des actions.
(iii) Les paiements seront effectues au choix de la Banque, soit
dans la monnaie du pays qui regoit le paiement, soit en or.
(iv) Si du fait de garanties, de participations a des prets ou de
prets qui n’etaient pas payes a la date ou le gouvernement
a cesse d'etre membre, des pertes sont subies par la
Banque, et si le montant de ces pertes depasse celui de la
reserve fournie, en prevision de pertes, a la date ou le
gouvernement cesse d’etre membre, le dit gouvernement
sera contraint de reverser, a la demande de la Banque, le
(p. 35)
montant qui aurait ete retranche du prix de rachat de ces
actions, si les pertes avaient ete prises en consideration au
moment ou le prix de rachat a ete determine. En outre,
le gouvernement anciennement membre restera sujet a
toute demande de fonds pour des souscriptions non versees
aux termes de 1
’Article II, Section 5 ( i i ) , dans la mesure ou
il aurait ete tenu d’effectuer ces memes versements si la
reduction de capital et la demande de fonds avaient ete
faites au moment ou le prix de rachat des actions a ete
determine.
(d)
Au cas ou la Banque suspendrait ses operations a titre
permanent, en vertu de la Section 5 (b) du present Article, dans
un delai de six mois a compter du moment ou un gouvernement
quelconque cesse d’etre membre, tous les droits d’un tel gouverne­
ment seront determines par les prescriptions contenues a la Sec­
tion 5 du present Article.
Suspension des operations et reglement des
obligations
(a) Les Administrateurs auront, dans un cas exceptionnel, la
faculte de suspendre les operations a titre temporaire en ce qui
concerne des garanties ou prets nouveaux, en attendant l’occasion
de soumettre la question au Conseil des Gouverneurs afin que
celui-ci puisse prendre une decision.
(b) La Banque aura la faculte de suspendre ses operations a
S ection 5.

795841— 48—2b




1508

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

titre permanent en ce qui concerne des garanties et prets nouveaux
par une decision prise a la majorite par les Gouverneurs detenant
la majorite de la totalite des voix. A la suite d’une telle suspension
(p. 36)
de ses operations, la Banque mettra sur le champ un terme k ses
activites, a 1
’exception de celles qui ont trait a la realisation normale, a la conservation et a la preservation de ses avoirs ou au
reglement de ses obligations.
(c) Les obligations de tous les membres en ce qui concerne les
souscriptions non appelees au capital de la Banque, et celles rela­
tives a la depreciation de leurs propres monnaies, continueront
a exister jusqu’a ce que les creanciers aient ete desinter esses de
leurs creances et de toutes creances eventuelles.
(d) Tous les creanciers titulaires de creances directes seront
desinteresses avec des avoirs de la Banque, et ensuite, avec des
paiements effectues a la Banque sur appels pour des souscriptions
non versees. Avant d’effectuer des versements a des creanciers
titulaires de creances directes, les Administrateurs prendront
toutes dispositions qui leur paraitront utiles en vue d’assurer des
paiements aux titulaires de creances eventuelles au prorata de ceux
effectues aux titulaires de creances directes.
(e) Aucun versement ne sera effectue aux membres, en raison
de leurs souscriptions au capital en portefeuille de la Banque,
avant que:
(i) toutes obligations vis-a-vis des creanciers ne soient satisfaites ou reglees;
(ii) et qu’une majorite des Gouverneurs detenant la majorite
du total des voix n'aient decide d’effectuer une telle dis­
tribution.
(f) Lorsque la decision d’effectuer une distribution aura ete
prise aux termes de l’alinea (e) ci-dessus, les Administrateurs
(P. 37)
auront la faculty de decider, k une majorite des deux tiers, les
distributions successives des avoirs de la Banque aux membres,
jusqu’a ce que tous les avoirs aient ete distribues. Cette distribu­
tion se fera sous reserve du reglement prealable de toutes les
obligations non satisfaites des divers membres envers la Banque.
(g) Avant toutes distributions d’avoirs, les Administrateurs
determineront la part de chaque Etat-membre, calculee au prorata
de sa part d’actions par rapport a toutes les actions non remboursees de la Banque.
(h) Les Administrateurs determineront la valeur des avoirs a




A P P E N D IX I

1509

distribuer a la date meme de la distribution; ensuite, ils procederont a la distribution selon les modalites suivantes:
(i) Le montant de la part proportionnelle de chaque Etatmembre dans les biens a distribuer lui sera paye sous la
forme de ses propres obligations ou de celles de ses organismes ofiiciels ou de personnes juridiques de son terri­
toire, dans la mesure ou des obligations sont disponibles
pour cette distribution.
(ii) Tout solde du a un Etat-membre, une fois que le paiement
a ete effectue dans les conditions precisees a Talinea (i)
ci-dessus, sera verse dans* sa propre monnaie, dans la
mesure ou la Banque en detient, jusqu’a concurrence de
Tequivalent de la valeur du dit solde.
(iii) Tout solde du a un Etat-membre, a la suite des paiements
effectues dans les conditions precisees aux alineas (i) et
(P . 3 8 )

(ii) ci-dessus, sera verse en or ou dans des monnaies convenant a TEtat-membre, dans la mesure ou la Banque en
detient, jusqu’a concurrence d’un montant equivalent au
dit solde.
(iv) Tous avoirs encore detenus par la Banque, une fois les
paiements effectues dans les conditions prtvues aux alineas
(i), (ii) et (iii) ci-dessus, seront distribues aux Etatsmembres au prorata.
(i) Tout Etat-membre recevant des avoirs distribues par la
Banque dans les conditions prevues a Talinea (h) ci-dessus jouira
des memes droits, en ce qui concerne les dits avoirs, que ceux dont
la Banque jouissait avant leur distribution.
Article VII
Statut9 Immunites et Privileges

Objets du present Article
En vue de permettre a la Banque de remplir les fonctions qui
lui sont confiees, le statut, les immunites et les privileges definis
au present Article seront accordes a la Banque dans les territoires
de tous les membres.
S e c t io n 1.

Statut de la Banque
La Banque aura les attributs de la personnalite juridique; elle
aura en particulier la capacite:
S e c t io n 2.

(i) de passer des contrats;
(ii) d’acquerir des biens mobiliers et immobiliers et d’en
disposer;
(iii) d’ester en justice.




1510

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

(p. 39)
Position de la Banque en ce qui concerne les
poursuites judiciaires
La Banque ne peut etre poursuivie que devant un tribunal ayant
juridiction sur les territoires d’un Etat-membre ou la Banque
possede une succursale, ou elle a nomme un agent en vue d’accepter
des sommations ou avis de sommation, ou bien ou elle a emis ou
garanti des actions. Aucune poursuite ne pourra etre intentee par
des Etats-membres ou des personnes representant les dits Etatsmembres ou tenant d’eux des droits de reclamation. Les biens et
les avoirs de la Banque, ou qu’ils se trouvent et quels qu’en soient
les detenteurs, seront a l’abri de toute forme de saisie, d’opposition
ou d’execution, avant que le jugement final contre la Banque n’ait
ete rendu.
S e c t io n 3.

Insaisissabilite des avoirs
Les biens et les avoirs de la Banque, ou qu’ils se trouvent et
quels qu’en soient les detenteurs, seront exempts de perquisitions,
de requisitions, de confiscations, d’expropriations et de toutes
autres formes de saisies ordonnees par le pouvoir executif ou par
le pouvoir legislatif.
S e c t io n 4.

Immunite des archives
Les archives de la Banque seront inviolables.

S e c t io n 5.

Les avoirs seront a Vdbri de toutes mesures
restrictives
Dans la mesure requise pour effectuer les operations prevues
dans le present Accord, et sous reserve des dispositions du dit
Accord, tous les biens et avoirs de la Banque seront exempts de
restrictions, reglementations, controles et moratoires de toute
nature.
S e c t io n 6.

(P . 4 0 )
S e c t io n 7.

Privileges en matiere de communications
Les communications officielles de la Banque seront traitees par
chaque Etat-membre de la meme maniere que les communications
officielles des autres Etats-membres.
Immunites et privileges des fonctionnaires et
employes
Tous les gouverneurs, administrateurs, suppleants, fonction­
naires et employes de la Banque
S e c t io n 8.

(i) seront a Pabri de toutes poursuites, en ce qui concerne les
actes accomplis dans Texercice de leurs fonctions, sauf au
cas ou la Banque renoncerait a cette immunite;




A P P E N D IX I

1511

(ii) lorsqu’ils ne seront pas des nationaux du pays ou ils se
trouveront, ils beneficieront des memes immunites, a
Fegard des restrictions relatives a l’immigration, a l’enregistrement des etrangers et au service militaire, ainsi que
des memes avantages, en ce qui concerne les restrictions
sur les changes, que ceux que les Etats-membres accordent
aux representants, fonctionnaires et employes des autres
Etats-membres, possedant un statut equivalent;
(iii) ils beneficieront du meme traitement, en ce qui concerne
les facilites de voyage, que celui que les Etats-membres
accordent aux representants, fonctionnaires et employes
des autres Etats-membres, possedant un statut equivalent.
(p. 41)
S e c t i o n 9.

Exemption de charges fiscales

(a) La Banque, ses avoirs, ses biens, ses revenus, ainsi que les
operations et transactions auxquelles elle est autorisee par le
present Accord, seront exempts de tous impots et de tous droits de
douane. La Banque sera aussi exempte de toute obligation
en ce qui concerne la perception ou le paiement d’un impot ou d’un
droit quelconque.
(b) Aucun impot ne sera per^u sur les traitements et emolu­
ments verses par la Banque aux administrateurs, a leurs suppleants, aux fonctionnaires et aux employes de la Banque qui ne
sont pas des nationaux, sujets ou autres ressortissants du pays
ou ils resident.
(c) Aucun impot, de quelque nature que ce soit, ne sera pergu
sur une obligation ou une action quelconque emise par la Banque
(y compris tout dividende ou interet de cette action ou de cette
obligation), quels qu’en soient les detenteurs, si cet impot:
(i) constitue une mesure de discrimination contre une telle
action ou obligation du seul fait qu’elle est emise par la
Banque;
(ii) ou si le seul fondement juridique d’un tel impot est le lieu
ou la devise dans laquelle l’action ou l’obligation est emise,
rendue payable ou payee, ou l’emplacement de tout bureau
ou centre de transactions que la Banque fait fonctionner.
(d) Aucun impot, de quelque nature que ce soit, ne sera per$u
sur une obligation ou une action quelconque garantie par la Banque
(y compris tout dividende ou interet de cette action ou de cette
obligation) quels qu’en soient les detenteurs, si cet impot
(p. 42)
(i) constitue une mesure de discrimination contre une telle




1512

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

action ou obligation du seul fait qu’elle est garantie par la
Banque;
(ii) ou si le seul fondement juridique d’un tel impot est l’emplacement d’un bureau ou d’un centre de transactions que
la Banque fait fonctionner.
S ection 10.

Application du present Article
Chaque membre prendra toutes dispositions utiles, sur ses propres territoires, en vue d’incorporer a ses propres lois et d’appliquer effectivement les principes enonces au present Article; il
devra informer la Banque du detail des mesures qu’il aura prises.
Article VIII
Amendements

(a) Toute proposition tendant a introduire des modifications
dans le present Accord, qu’elle emane d’un Etat-membre, d’un
gouverneur ou des Administrateurs, sera communiquee au Pre­
sident du Conseil des Gouverneurs, qui soumettra la dite proposi­
tion au Conseil. Si l’amendement propose est approuve par le
Conseil, la Banque, par lettre circulaire, ou par telegramme, demandera a tous les Etats-membres s’ils acceptent l’amendement
propose. Lorsque le pro jet d’amendement aura ete accepte par les
trois cinquiemes des membres disposant des quatre cinquiemes du
total des voix, la Banque en certifiera l’acceptation par une com­
munication officielle adressee a tous les Etats-membres.
(b) Par derogation aux prescriptions contenues a l’alinea (a)
(p. 43)
ci-dessus, l’acceptation par tous les Etats-membres est requise
dans le cas ou il s’agit d’un amendement modifiant:
(i) le droit de se retirer de la Banque, prevu a 1
’Article VI,
Section 1;
(ii) le droit prevu a l’Article II, Section 3 (c) ;
(iii) la limitation des responsabilites prevue a 1
’Article II, Sec­
tion 6.
(c) Les amendements entreront en vigueur pour tous les mem­
bres a la suite de l’expiration d’un d61ai de trois mois a compter de
la date de la communication officielle, a moins qu’un delai plus
court ne soit specifie dans la circulaire ou dans le telegramme.
Article IX
Interpretation

(a)
Toute question relative a l’interpretation des dispositions
contenues dans le present Accord, et qui se poserait entre un Etatmembre et la Banque, ou entre plusieurs Etats-membres, sera




APPENDI X I

1513

soumise aux Administrateurs pour decision. Si la question affecte
particulierement un Etat-membre qui n’est pas habilite a nommer
un administrateur, le dit Etat-membre aura la faculte d’etre repre­
sente conformement aux prescriptions contenues a 1
’Article V,
Section 4 ( h ) .
(b) Dans tous les cas ou les Administrateurs auront pris une
decision en vertu de l’alinea (a) ci-dessus, tout Etat-membre
pourra demander que la question soit renvoyee au Conseil des
Gouverneurs, dont la decision sera definitive. En attendant le resultat de cet appel au Conseil des Gouverneurs, la Banque pourra,
dans la mesure ou elle le jugera necessaire, agir en prenant pour
base la decision des Administrateurs.
(P. 44)
(c) Au cas ou un differend surgirait entre la Banque, d’une part,
et un pays qui a cesse d’etre membre, d’autre part, ou entre la
Banque, d’une part, et un Etat-membre quelconque, au cours d’une
suspension permanente de la Banque, un tel differend sera soumis
a l’arbitrage d’un tribunal de trois arbitres: deux arbitres designes, l’un par la Banque* l’autre par le pays interesse, et un
surarbitre, qui, a moins que les parties n’adoptent d’un commun
accord une autre solution, sera nomme par le President de la Cour
permanente de Justice internationale ou par toute autre autorite
qui aura ete prevue dans un reglement adopte par la Banque. Le
surarbitre aura pleins pouvoirs pour regler toute question de pro­
cedure, dans tous les cas ou les parties seraient en disaccord k ce
sujet.
Article X
Approbation Consideree Comme Accordee

Dans tous les cas ou l’approbation d’un membre quelconque est
necessaire avant qu’une initiative puisse etre prise par la Banque,
sauf en ce qui concerne les dispositions prevues a 1 Article VIII,
*
l’approbation sera consideree comme ayant ete accordee, a moins
que l’Etat-membre interesse ne presente une objection, dans un
delai raisonnable que la Banque determinera en adressant une noti­
fication a PEtat-membre interess6 par la dite initiative.
Article XI
Dispositions Finales
S e c tio n

1.

Entree en vigueur

Le present Accord entrera en vigueur, lorsqu’il aura ete signe
au nom d’un nombre de gouvernements dont les souscriptions
(P. 45)
minima representent au moins soixante-cinq pour cent du total des




1514

M O N E T A R Y A N D F IN A N C IA L C O N F E R E N C E

souscriptions figurant au Supplement A, et lorsque les instruments
mentionnes a la Section 2 (a) du present Article auront ete de­
poses en leur nom; en aucun cas, le present Accord n’entrera en
vigueur avant le l er mai 1945.
Signature
(a) Chaque gouvernement au nom duquel le present Accord est
signe deposera entre les mains du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique un instrument declarant qu’il a accepte le present
Accord conformement a ses lois propres, et qu’il a pris toutes
mesures utiles pour lui permettre d’executer toutes les obligations
contractees aux termes du present Accord.
(b) Chaque gouvernement deviendra membre de la Banque a
compter de la date ou l’instrument vise a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus
aura ete depose en son nom; toutefois, aucun gouvernement ne
deviendra membre avant que le present Accord n’entre en vigueur
dans les conditions prevues a la Section 1 du present Article.
(c) Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique informera
les gouvernements de tous les pays dont les noms figurent au Sup­
plement A, et tous les gouvernements qui seront admis a devenir
membres conformement a 1
’Article II, Section 1 ( b ) , de toutes les
signatures apposees au present Accord et du depot de tous les
instruments vises a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus.
(d) Au moment ou le present Accord sera signe en son nom,
chaque gouvernement interesse transmettra au Gouvernement des
Etats-Unis d’Amerique un centieme de un pour cent du prix de
(p. 46)
chaque action en or ou en dollars des Etats-Unis en vue de faire
face aux frais administratifs de la Banque. Ce versement sera
credite au compte du paiement a effectuer aux termes de l’Article
II, Section 8 (a). Le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique
conservera ces fonds dans un compte de depots special et les trans­
mettra au Conseil des Gouverneurs de la Banque lors de la con­
vocation, conformement a la Section 3 du present Article, de la
premiere reunion. Si le present Accord n’est pas encore entre en
vigueur au 31 decembre 1945, le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis
d’Amerique restituera les dits fonds aux gouvernements qui les
lui auront fait parvenir.
(e) Les gouvernements des pays dont les noms figurent au Sup­
plement A pourront avoir acces a 1
’Accord, pour signature en leur
nom, a Washington, jusqu’au 31 decembre 1945.
(f) A compter du 31 decembre 1945, le gouvernement de tout
Etat qui aura ete admis comme membre aux termes de 1
’Article II,
Section 1 (b) pourra avoir acces a l’Accord, pour signature.

S e c t io n 2.




APPENDI X I

1515

(g) En apposant leur signature au present Accord, tous les gou­
vernements y souscriront en leur propre nom et au nom de toutes
leurs colonies, de tous leurs territoires d’outre-mer, de tous terri­
toires places sous leur protectorat, suzerainete ou autorite, et de
tous territoires sur lesquels ils excercent un mandat.
(h) Dans le cas de gouvernements dont le territoire metro­
politain aura ete occupe par l’ennemi, le depot du document vise
a l’alinea (a) ci-dessus pourra etre remis jusqu’a ce qu’un delai de
cent quatre-vingts jours se soit ecoule a compter de la liberation
(P. 4 7 )

du dit territoire metropolitain. Si, toutefois, le document n’a pas
ete depose par Tun de ces gouvernements, avant Texpiration de la
dite periode, la signature apposee au nom de ce gouvernement deviendra nulle et la fraction de sa souscription versee aux termes
de l’alinea (d) ci-dessus lui sera restitute.
(i) Les alineas (d) et (h) entreront en vigueur en ce qui con­
cerne chaque gouvernement signataire a compter de la date de sa
signature.
S e c t i o n 3.

Inauguration de la Banque

(a) Aussitot que le present Accord entrera en vigueur, aux
termes de la Section 1 du present Article, chaque Etat-membre
nommera un gouverneur, et l’Etat-membre detenant le plus grand
nombre d’actions d’apres la repartition indiquee au Supplement A
convoquera la premiere reunion du Conseil des Gouverneurs.
(b) A la premiere reunion du Conseil des Gouverneurs, toutes
dispositions seront prises en vue de designer des administrateurs
temporaires. Les gouvernements des cinq pays auxquels le plus
grand nombre d’actions sont attributes au Supplement A nommeront des administrateurs temporaires. Si Tun ou plusieurs des
dits gouvernements ne sont pas devenus membres, les postes d’administrateurs qu’ils auraient le droit de remplir resteront sans titu­
laires jusqu’au moment ou les dits gouvernements deviendront
membres, ou jusqu’au l er janvier 1946, quelle que soit celle de
ces conditions qui se trouve realisee la premiere. Sept administra­
teurs temporaires seront elus conformement aux prescriptions du
Supplement B et resteront en fonctions jusqu’a la date de la pre­
miere election normale d’administrateurs, laquelle aura lieu dans
(p . 4 8 )

les plus brefs delais possibles a compter du l er janvier 1946.
(c) Le Conseil des Gouverneurs aura la faculte de deleguer aux
administrateurs temporaires tous les pouvoirs autres que ceux qui
ne peuvent etre delegues aux Administrateurs.




MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

1516

(d)
La Banque informera les Etats-membres lorsqu’elle sera
prete a commencer ses operations.
F a i t a Washington, en un seul exemplaire qui sera depose dans
les archives du Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amerique, lequel
en fera parvenir des copies certifiees conformes a tous les gou­
vernements dont les noms flgurent au Supplement A et a tous les
gouvernements qui seront admis comme membres aux termes des
dispositions contenues a 1 Article II, Section 1 ( b ) .
*

(P. 49)
SUPPLEMENT

A

Souscriptions
Millions de dollars

A u stra lie..................................
Belgique ..................................
Bolivie ......................................
Bresil ........................................
Canada ....................................
Chili ..........................................
Chine ........................................
Colombie ................. :...............
Costa-Rica ..............................
Cuba ..........................................
Tchecoslovaquie ....................
* D anem ark................................
Republique Dominicaine
Equateur ................................
E g y p te ......................................
Salvador ..................................
E thiopie....................................
France ......................................
Grece ........................................
Guatemala ..............................
H a i t i..........................................
Honduras ................................
Islande ....................................
In d e s..........................................
* La

quote-part

du Danemark

200
225
7
105
325
35
600
35
2
35
125
2
3.2
40
1
3
450
25
2
2
1
1
400

Millions de dollars

24
I r a n ..........................................
6
I r a k ..........................................
.5
Liberia ..................................
10
Luxembourg ........................
65
Mexique ................................
275
Pays-Bas ..............................
50
Nouvelle-Zelande................
.8
Nicaragua ............................
50
N orvege..................................
.2
P a n a m a ..................................
.8
Paraguay ..............................
17.5
Perou ......................................
15
Philippines............................
125
Pologne ...................................
100
Union Sud-Africaine.......
Union des Republiques
Socialistes Sovietiques..... 1200
Royaume-Une ...................... 1300
Etats-Unis d’Amerique .... 3175
10.5
Uruguay ................................
10.5
V en ezu ela...............................
40
Yougoslavie ...........................

determinee par

Total
la

.....................................

Banque,

lorsque

le

9100

Danemark

aura

accepts de devenir membre aux termes des Statuts du present Accord.

(P. 50)
SUPPLEMENT

B

Election des Administrateurs

1. L’election des administrateurs a elire se fera au scrutin des
gouverneurs ayant le droit de vote aux termes des prescriptions
contenues a l’Article V, Section 4 ( b ) .
2. Lors du scrutin pour l’election des administrateurs a elire,
chaque gouverneur en droit de voter reunira sur un seul nom toutes




APP ENDI X I

1517

les voix auxquelles l’Etat-membre qui l’a designe a droit aux
termes de la Section 3 de 1
’Article V. Les sept personnes recevant
le plus grand nombre de voix seront administrateurs, a la condi­
tion toutefois d’avoir reuni au moins quatorze pour cent du total
des voix pouvant etre exprimees (voix admissibles).
3. Si moins de sept personnes sont elues au premier scrutin, un
second scrutin aura lieu, auquel ne pourra pas etre presentee de
nouveau la candidature de la personne qui a re§u le nombre de
voix le plus faible; seuls voteront a ce scrutin: (a) les gouverneurs qui ont vote au premier scrutin pour une personne qui
n’a pas ete elue, et (b) les gouverneurs dont les voix pour une
personne elue sont considerees, aux termes de l’alinea (4) cidessous, comme ayant porte le nombre de voix allant a cette per­
sonne a plus de quinze pour cent des voix admissibles.
4. En determinant si les voix donnees par un gouverneur sont
considerees comme ayant porte le total des voix acquises a une
seule personne a plus de quinze pour cent, les dits quinze pour
cent seront consideres comme comprenant: premierement, les voix
du gouverneur apportant le plus grand nombre de voix a la dite
personne; deuxiemement, les voix du gouverneur apportant le
(p. 51)
total le plus fort apres celui-ci, et ainsi de suite, jusqu’a ce que Ton
arrive a quinze pour cent.
5. Tout gouverneur, dont certaines voix devront etre con­
siderees comme ayant porte a plus de quatorze pour cent le total
des voix regues par cette personne, sera considere comme ayant
fait beneficier la dite personne de toutes les voix dont il disposait,
meme si le nombre total de voix allant a la dite personne excede
de ce fait quinze pour cent.
Si, a la suite du second scrutin, moins de sept personnes ont ete
elues, d’autres scrutins auront lieu selon la meme regie jusqu’a ce
que sept personnes aient ete elues: toutefois, lorsque six personnes
auront ete elues, la septieme pourra etre elue a la simple majorite
des voix restantes, et devra etre consideree comme ayant ete elue
par toutes ces voix.
ANNEXE
R e su m e

des

A ccords

C

de l a

a

l ’ ACTE

Conference

FINAL
de

B r e t t o n W oods

La Conference de Bretton Woods, ou sont representees presque
toutes les nations du globe, a etudie les questions monetaires et
financieres considerees comme importantes pour la paix et la
prosperity du monde. La Conference s’est mise d’accord sur les
problemes a etudier, les mesures a prendre, et les formes de




1518

MONET A RY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

cooperation ou cPorganisation internationales qui sont indispensables. L’accord auquel on a abouti sur ces questions graves et com­
plexes est sans precedent dans l’histoire des relations economiques
internationales.
I.

Fonds Monetaire International
Le commerce exterieur affectant le niveau de vie de tous les
peuples, ceux-ci sont directement interesses par le systeme des
changes des monnaies nationales et par les reglements et les
conditions qui president a son fonctionnement. Les transactions
monetaires constituant des echanges internationaux, les nations
doivent se mettre d’accord sur les regies fondamentales qui regissent ces echanges si Ton desire que le systeme fonctionne harmonieusement. Lorsque ces nations ne sont pas d’accord, et que
certains pays isoles, ou bien de petits groupes de nations, tentent
de s’assurer des avantages commerciaux en instaurant des reglementations speciales et differentes des taux de changes, il en resulte de l’instabilite, une reduction du commerce exterieur et des
inconvenients pour les economies nationales de tous. Cette poli(p. 2)
tique peut finalement provoquer des conflits economiques susceptibles de mettre en peril la paix du monde.
En consequence, la Conference a convenu que des initiatives
internationales d’une grande envergure etaient necessaires pour
faire fonctionner un systeme monetaire international qui encou­
rage le commerce exterieur. Les nations devront pratiquer des
echanges de vues et se mettre d’accord sur les modifications mone­
taires internationales qui les affectent respectivement. Elies
devront egalement proscrire toutes pratiques qui, de l’aveu de tous,
sont funestes a la prosperity mondiale, et elles devront se preter
assistance pour surmonter des difficultes temporaires en mati&re
de changes.
La Conference a convenu que les pays representes ici devraient
etablir a ces fins un organisme international permanent, le Fonds
Monetaire International, avec des attributions et des ressources
lui permettant d’executer les taches qui lui seront confiees. Les
divers pays se sont mis d’accord au sujet de ces attributions et de
ces ressources, ainsi que sur les obligations supplementaires que
les Etats-membres devraient assumer. Des pro jets de Statuts
relatifs a ces questions ont ete prepares.
IL

Banque Internationale pour la Reconstruction
et le Developpement
II est de l’interet de tous les pays que la reconstruction de




APPENDI X I

1519

Fapres-guerre soit rapide. De meme, le developpement des res­
sources de diverses regions du monde coincide avec Finteret
economique general. Les programmes de reconstruction et de
(P . 3 )

developpement accelereront partout les progres economiques,
faciliteront la stabilite politique et favoriseront la paix.
La Conference a convenu qu’un accroissement des investisse­
ments internationaux de capitaux etait essentiel, en vue de fournir
une fraction des capitaux necessaires a la reconstruction et au
developpement.
La Conference a convenu en outre que les nations devraient
collaborer en vue d’augmenter le volume des placements etrangers
destines a ces fins et effectues par les voies commerciales. II est
particulierement important que les divers pays collaborent pour
partager les risques de ces placements a Fetranger, dont les avantages sont communs a tous.
La Conference a convenu que les diverses nations devraient
etablir un organisme international permanent, destine a remplir
ces fonctions, qui sera designe sous le nom de Banque Internatio­
nale pour la Reconstruction et le Developpement. II a ete convenu
que la Banque devrait contribuer a fournir des capitaux par des
voies normales, a des taux d’interet moderes et durant de longues
periodes, pour des pro jets ayant pour but d’augmenter la capacite
de production du pays emprunteur. La Banque garantira les prets
consentis par d’autres pays et, grace a leurs souscriptions de capi­
tal, tous les pays s’associeront ainsi au pays debiteur pour garantir
de tels prets. La Conference a convenu des attributions et res­
sources que devra avoir la Banque, ainsi que des obligations que
devront assumer les Etats-membres, et elle a prepare des pro jets
(P . 4 )

de Statuts dans ce sens.
La Conference a recommande qu’en appliquant la politique
generate des organismes proposes par le present document, les
besoins des pays eprouves par les hostilites et par l’occupation
ennemie soient etudies avec une attention particuliere.
Les propositions formulees a la Conference, en ce qui concerne
Fetablissement du Fonds et de la Banque, sont maintenant soumises, conformement aux termes de Finvitation, a la consideration
des gouvernements et des peuples des pays representes.




Appendix II

List o f Documents Issued at the Conference
Title

Doc. No.

1
1)4

2
2l
A

3
4
5
5y2

6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

16

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

25

General Information
Delegation of the United States of America
Provisional List of Members of the Delegations and Officers of
the Conference (not printed)
Officers of the Conference
Memorandum on Participation, Organization and Functions of
Conference Officers and Units
Minutes and R6sum£s
Documents
Regulations and Special Arrangements Covering Informational
Cable, Radio, and Telephone Communication Facilities
Journal No. 1
Agenda
Inaugural Plenary Session (Agenda)
Press Release No. 1. Statement by Henry Morgenthau, Jr.
Press Release No. 2. Message from President Roosevelt to the
Conference (not printed)
Inaugural Plenary Session (Agenda)
Press Release No. 3. Program for the Inaugural Plenary Session
Draft Regulations of the Conference
Regulations of the Conference
Press Release No. 5. Response to President Roosevelt’s Message
by Ladislav Feierabend, Chairman of the Delegation of Czecho­
slovakia (not printed)
Press Release No. 4. Response to President Roosevelt’s Message
by Hsiang-Hsi Kung, Chairman of the Delegation of China
(not printed)
Press Release No. 6. Address by Eduardo Suarez, Chairman of
the Delegation of Mexico (not printed)
Press Release No. 7. Address by Arthur de Souza Costa, Chair­
man of the Delegation of Brazil (not printed)
Press Release No. 8. Address by J. L. Ilsley, Chairman of the
Delegation of Canada (not printed)
Provisional Telephone Directory (not printed)
Notice of Meeting of Committee on Rules and Regulations
Notice of Meeting of Committee on Nominations
Notice of Meeting of Committee on Credentials
Press Release No. 9. Address by M . S. Stepanov, Chairman of
the Delegation of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (not
printed)
Document Registration and Order Form (not printed)




1520

APPENDI X II
26 (21)
27
28
29

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67

Notice of Meeting of Committee on Rules and Regulations
Order of the Day, July 2 (not printed)
Journal No. 2
Press Release No. 10. Message from Secretary of State Cordell
Hull to Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Chairman of the United States
Delegation
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Preliminary Draft of Suggested Articles of Agreement for Estab­
lishment of an International Monetary Fund
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Regulations of the Conference
Room Directory of the Chinese Delegation (not printed)
Committee on Nominations
Press Release No. 11. Statement by Senator Robert F. Wagner,
Delegate of the United States
Order of the Day, July 3 (not printed)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Inaugural Plenary Session (Verbatim Minutes)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Provisional Telephone Directory (not printed)
Journal No. 3
Press Release No. 12. Address of Senator Charles W . Tobey,
Delegate of the United States (not printed)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Notice to Chinese Delegation (not printed)
Opening Remarks of Lord Keynes at First Meeting of the Second
Commission on the Bank for Reconstruction and Development
Press Release No. 13. Addenda Committees for Commissions II
and III
Press Release No. 14. Remarks by Eduardo Suarez, Chairman of
Commission III, at First Session
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Commission I, Committee Assignments
Report of the Committee on Rules and Regulations
Minutes of the Committee on Rules and Regulations
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Journal No. 4
Proposal on Voting Changes in Rates of Member Currencies
Order of the Day, July 4 (not printed)
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 3
Opening Remarks of Harry D. White at First Meeting of the
Commission of the International Monetary Fund
Minutes of Meeting of Commission II, July 3
Minutes of Meeting of Commission III, July 3
Conferencia Monetaria y Financiera de las Naciones Unidas
Reglamento
Verbatim Minutes of Second Plenary Session
List of Correspondents
Press Release No. 15. Statement by Hsiang-Hsi Kung, Chairman
of the Delegation of China
Agenda of the Conference (Spanish translation)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)




1521

MONET ARY AND FI NANCI AL CONFERENCE

69
70-

100
101

102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109

110
111

112
113
114
115
116
117

118
119

120

121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140

Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Report of Committee on Credentials
0numbers not used)

Order of the Day, July 5 (not printed)
Journal No. 5
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 1, July 4
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 3, July 4
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 2, July 4
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 4, July 4
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Alternative E (SA /1/1)
Alternative B (SA /1/2)
Alternative H (SA /1/3)
Alternative E (SA /1/4)
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 1, July 4
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 2, July 4
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, Committee 3; July 4
Directory of the Conference (not printed)
News Bulletin No. 1 (not printed)
Proposal on Silver (Mexican Delegation)
Memorandum Submitted by the Egyptian Delegation Requesting
Certain Additions to Joint Statement I “Purposes and Policies
of the Fund”
Proposal on Voting a Uniform Change in the Gold Value of Mem­
ber Currencies (Mexican Delegation)
News Bulletin No. 2 (not printed)
Joint Statement (SA /1/5)
Joint Statement (SA /1/6)
Report of Drafting Committee of Committee 1, Commission I,
on Matters Referred to it at Meeting of Committee 1 on July 4
Mensaje del Excmo. Senor Franklin D. Roosevelt, Presidente de
los Estados Unidos de America, a la Conferencia
Joint Statement, VIII, 2 and 3 (SA /1/7)
Report of Committee 1 on Purposes, Policies and Quotas of the
Fund to Commission I
Report of Committee 3 on Organization and Management of the
Fund to Commission I
Report of Committee 4 on Form and Status of the Fund to Com­
mission I
Report of Committee 2 on Operations of the Fund to Commission I
Report of Special Committee on Furnishing Information of the
Pre-Conference Agenda Committee
News Bulletin No. 3 (not printed)
Agenda of the Conference (corrected copy)
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 5
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Press Release No. 16. Statement by the Delegation of Mexico
Press Release No. 17. Statement by the Delegation of Uruguay
Journal No. 6
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 1 of Commission I, July 5
Order of the Day, July 6 (not printed)
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 2 of Commission I, July 5




A P P E N D I X II

141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152

153
154
155
156
157

158
159
160 (25)
161
162
163
164
165
166
167

168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184

Minutes of Meeting of Committee 3 of Commission I, July 5
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 4 of Commission I, July 5
Joint Statement (SA/1/8)
Alternative B (SA/1/9)
Alternative C (SA/l/10)
Alternative D (SA/1/11)
Alternative F (SA/1/12)
Alternative F (SA/1/13)
Alternative B (SA/1/14)
Alternative D (SA/1/15)
Alternative C (SA/1/16)
Combined Alternatives A and B for Joint Statement VII, 1, 2,
and 3, and Additional Material on Page 27 of Document SA/1
(32)
Memorandum to be Submitted to Commission I, Committee 2
(Egyptian Delegation)
News Bulletin No. 4 (not printed)
Secretariat Chart (not printed)
Representation of Delegations on Commissions and Committees
Address Delivered Before Committee 2 of Commission I, by
Antonio Espinosa de los Monteros, Mexican Delegate, in Sup­
port of Mexico’s Proposal on Silver
Declaration Conjunta de los Peritos sobre el Establecimiento de
un Fondo Monetario Internacional
Biographic Data (not distributed) (not printed)
Document Registration and Order Form (not printed)
Alternative I (SA/1/18)
Revised Amendment to Joint Statement I, Subdivision 2, pro­
posed by Indian Delegation
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Alternative C (SA/1/19)
News Bulletin No. 5 (not printed)
Joint Statement IV, 1 (SA/1/20)
Statement by Mahmoud Saleh el Falaki. Delegate for Egypt, in
Support of Alternative H, Article I, “ Purposes and Policies
of the Fund” , Made Before Committee 1, Commission I
Journal No. 7
Proposal for a Bank for Reconstruction and Development
Order of the Day, July 7 (not printed)
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 2, Commission I, July 6
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 1, Commission I, July 6
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 3, Commission I, July 6
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 4, Commission I, July 6
Procedural Decisions of the Steering Committee
News Bulletin No. 6 (not printed)
Alternative B (SA/1/21)
Alternative C (SA/1/22)
Alternative D (SA/1/23)
Alternative B (S A /1/24)
Alternative D (S A /1/25)
Alternative C (S A /1/26)
Alternative B (SA/1/27)
{canceled)

795841— 48— 26




1523

1524

M ON ETARY AND F IN A N C IAL CONFERENCE

Press Release No. 19. Bond Wagon Tour
Status of Business Before Committee 3, Commission I
Agreement on Earmarked Gold (Mexican Delegation)
Press Release No. 20. Statement by J. E. Holloway, Delegate of
the Union of South Africa
Mexico’s Proposal on Silver
189
190 (184) Press Release No. 18. Address by H. H. Kung, Chairman of the
Delegation of China
191
Alternative A (SA/1/29)
192
Second Report of Drafting Committee of Committee 1, Commis­
sion I
News Bulletin No. 7 (not printed)
193
194
Alternative B (SA/1/28)
195
Alternative J (SA/1/30)
196
Alternative C (SA/1/31)
Esbozo Preliminar de un Proyecto de Banco de Reconstruccion y
197
Fomento de las Naciones Unidas y Asociadas
198
Report of the Subcommittee (Committee 4, Commission I) to
Consider Article IX, Section 7; Report of the Asterisk Com­
mittee
199
Journal No. 8
200
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 3, Commission I, July 7
201 (156) Representation of Delegations on Commissions and Committees
202
Commission I, Status of Committee Assignments
203
Alternative D (SA/1/32)
204
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 4, Commission I, July 7
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 2, Commission I, July 7
205
206
Order of the Day, July 8 (not printed)
207
Substitute Alternative A (SA/1/33)
208
Alternative A (SA/1/34)
Joint Statement (SA/1/35)
209
210
Joint Statement (SA/1/36)
211
Joint Statement (SA/1/37)
212
Final Alternative Submitted by the Special Subcommittee Ap­
pointed to Consider All Proposals Relative to the Executive
Directors
213
News Bulletin No. 8 (not printed)
214
Alternative E (SA/1/38)
Proposed Amendment to Article IX, Section 2, Gold Purchases
215
Based on Parity Prices
216
Alternative K (SA/1/39)
217
Alternative C (SA/1/40)
218
Draft Resolution Submitted by Australian Representatives
219
Alternative D (SA/1/41)
220
Alternative C (SA/1/42)
221
Report Submitted to Committee 3, Commission I, by the Special
Subcommittee Appointed to Consider the Various Proposals
Relative to the Organization, Election and Powers of the Execu­
tive Directors
222
News Bulletin No. 9 (not printed)
223
Journal No. 9
224
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 1, Commission I, July 8
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 2, Commission I, July 8
225
185
186
187
188




A P P E N D I X II

226
227
228
229
230
231

Minutes of Meeting of Committee 3, Commission I, July 8
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 4, Commission I, July 8
Order of the Day, July 9 (not printed)
News Bulletin No. 10 (canceled)
Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies Reglement
Officers of the Conference, Members of the Delegations, Officers
of the Secretariat
232
Secretariat Form (not printed)
233
Second Report of Committee 4, Commission I
234
Second Report of Committee 2 on Operations of the Fund to
Commission I
235
Report Submitted to Commission III by the Agenda Committee
Appointed to Receive and Consider Proposals Submitted for
Consideration in Commission
236
Alternative B (SA/1/43)
237
Alternative G (SA/1/44)
238
Report of the Reporting Delegate of Committee 1, Commission I,
on Purposes, Policies, and Quotas of the Fund
239
Report of Committee 3, Commission I, on Organization and
Management of the Fund
240 (202) Commission I, Status of Committee Assignments
241
Alternative B (SA/1/45)
242
Alternative C to Article VIII, Section 3 (SA/1/46)
243
Report of Subcommittee of Committee 3, Commission I, on
Liquidation and Withdrawal
244
Journal No. 10
245
Preliminary Draft of Proposals for the Establishment of a Bank
for Reconstruction and Development (SA/3)
246
Order of the Day, July 10 (not printed)
247 (201) Representation of Delegations on Commissions and Committees
248
News Bulletin No. 10 (not printed)
249
Report of ad hoc Committee of Commission I on Voting Arrange­
ments and Executive Directors
250
United Kingdom Delegation Memorandum to Commission I
251
Speech of A. D. Shroff, Delegate for India, Before Committee 1,
Commission I, on July 6, Supporting the Egyptian Amendment
to Article I, Purposes and Policies of the Fund
252
Press Release No. 21. Proposals by the Norwegian Delegation
253
(canceled)
254
Press Release No. 23. Proposal of the Bolivian Delegation to
Commission III
255 (233) Second Report of Committee 4, Commission I
256
Report Submitted to Commission III by the Agenda Committee
Appointed to Receive and Consider Proposals Submitted for
Consideration in Commission III
257
Press Release No. 22. Statement on Behalf of the United States
Delegation at Meeting of Commission I
258
Press Release No. 24. Statement by Lord Keynes on Behalf of the
Delegation of the United Kingdom at Meeting of Commission I
259
Press Release No. 25. Statement by A. D. Shroff, Member of the
Indian Delegation, at Meeting of Commission I
260
Press Release No. 26. Statement by Mr. Istel, French Delegate,
at Meeting of Commission I




1525

1526

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Conference Monetaire et Financiere des Nations Unies
Press Release No. 27. Norwegian Proposal to Commission III
News Bulletin No. 11 (not printed)
Statement by the Cuban Delegation on Article III, Section 2 (c)
Proposal of the Bolivian Delegation to Commission III
Alternative C (SA/1/47)
Minutes of Third Meeting of Commission I, July 10
Journal No. 11
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
Order of the Day, July 11 (not printed)
Alternative J (SA/3/1)
Alternative C (SA/3/2)
Alternative E (SA/3/3)
Alternative C (SA/3/4)
Alternative B (SA/3/5)
Combined Alternatives A and B (SA/1/48)
Section 5. Fixing Initial Par Values (SA/1/49)
Minutes of Meeting of Commission III, July 10
Text of Provisions Recommended by Committees (Working Paper
for Drafting Committee of Commission I)
Use of Currencies Held by the Fund (Memorandum to Com­
281
mittee 2)
News Bulletin No. 12 (not printed)
282
Press Release No. 28. Statement by the Delegation of Panama
283
284
Alternative D (SA/1 /50)
Minimum Percentage Charges Payable by a Country on Fund’s
285
Holdings of its Currency in Excess of its Quota
Memorandum Submitted to Commission II by United Nations
286
Interim Commission on Food and Agriculture
Proposal for a Conference to Promote Stability in the Prices of
287
Primary International Commodities
Draft Resolution Submitted to Commission III by Cuban Repre­
288
sentatives
289
Draft Resolution Submitted to Commission III by Chilean Rep­
resentatives
290
Proposed Amendment to Draft, Commission II (Mexican Delega­
tion)
291
News Bulletin No. 13 (not printed)
292 (114) Revised Directory of the Conference (not printed)
293
Alternative G (SA/3/6)
294
Alternative A (SA/1/52)
295
Revised Wording of Article II, Section 5, Suggested by the Draft­
ing Committee of Commission I and Submitted to Committee 1
296
Proposals Put Before Committee 2, Commission I, July 11
297
Alternative H (SA/3/7)
298
Commission II, Schedule of Work Assignments to Committees
and Subcommittees of Bank Commission
299
Journal No. 12
300
Minutes of Meeting of Commission II, July 11
301
Order of the Day, July 12 (not printed)
302
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 2, Commission I, July 11
303
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 3, Commission I, July 11

261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280




A P P E N D IX II

304
305
306
307
308

309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337

338
339
340
341

Alternative A (SA/1/53)
News Bulletin No. 14 (not printed)
Press Release No. 29. Statement by Delegation of Mexico at
Meeting of Commission II, July 11
Third Report of Drafting Committee of Committee 1, Commis­
sion I
Discurso Pronunciado por el Senor Henry A. Morgenthau, Jr.,
Secretario de Hacienda de los Estados Unidos de America, al
Aceptar la Presidencia de la Conferencia en la Sesi6n Plenaria
Inaugural del 1° de Julio
Proyecto Preliminar de Proposiciones Para Establecer un Banco
de Reconstruction y Fomento
Alternative J (SA/1 /54)
Ad Hoc Committee of Commission I on Relations with NonMember Countries
News Bulletin No. 15 (not printed)
Alternative J (SA/3/8)
Alternative C (SA/3/9)
Alternative E (SA/1/55)
Joint Statement (SA/1/56)
Amendment to Article VII, I, of Joint Statement (Egyptian
Delegation)
Third Report of Committee 3 to Commission I
Journal No. 13
Report of Drafting Committee of Commission I—Annex 1
Report of Drafting Committee of Commission I—Annex II
Order of the Day, July 13 (not printed)
Alternative A (SA/1/57)
Alternative B (SA /3/10)
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 2, Commission I, July 12
Minutes of Meeting of Committee 1, Commission I, July 12
Alternative C (SA/3/11)
Alternative K (SA/1/58)
Report of ad hoc Committee of Commission I
Report of Subcommittee la, Committee 1 of Commission II
Report of Subcommittee lb, Committee 1 of Commission II
Alternative B (SA/3/12)
Report of Committee 2 to Commission I Concerning Meetings of
July 11 and 12
Report of ad hoc Committee of Committee 3 on Executive Di­
rectors and Voting Arrangements to Commission I
Report of ad hoc Subcommittee A of Committee 4, Commis­
sion II
Report of Subcommittees A and B of Committee 2, on Operations
of the Bank, to Commission II
Text of Provisions Recommended by Committee 2A and Com­
mittee 2B (Working Paper for Drafting Committee of Com­
mission II)
Report of ad hoc Committee 3C of Commission II
News Bulletin No. 16 (not printed)
Report of Drafting Committee, Commission II
Article XVI—Amendments (Addition Proposed by U.K. Delega­
tion)




1527

1528

M O N E T AR Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

342
343

First Report of Drafting Committee of Commission I
Third Report of Reporting Delegate of Committee 1, Com­
mission I
344
Article XVI—Amendments (Addition Proposed by U.K. Delega­
tion)
345
Addition to Alternative C (SA/1/59)
346
Alternative L (SA/1/60)
347 (278) Alternative B (SA/1/61)
348
Alternative D (SA/3/13)
349
Memorandum from Delegation of El Salvador to Assistant
Secretary General and Technical Secretary General
350 (314) Alternative C (SA/3/14)
351
Initial Par Values (Addition to Article X IX , Section 4, of Docu­
ment 321)
352
Report of ad hoc Committee 3b to Commission II
353
Press Release No. 30. Statement by Antonio Espinosa de los
Monteros, Mexican Delegate, Before Commission I, July 14,
on Changing the Gold Parities of Currencies
354
Report to Commission II on Actions by ad hoc Committee 3a
355
Address by Henry Morgenthau, Jr., at Opening Plenary Session
(French translation)
356
News Bulletin No. 17 (not printed)
357
Article VIII—Amendments (Recommended by Drafting Com­
mittee)
358
Article IX, Interpretation of the Agreement (S A /3/16)
359
Article VII, Status, Immunities and Privileges of the Bank
(SA/3/17)
360
Commission II, Second Report of Drafting Committee
361
Journal No. 14
362
Statement by the Polish Minister in Commission II Meeting
363
Article I; Substitute for Alternatives A to G (SA/3/17)
364
Article III (1); Substitute for Alternatives A, B, and C (SA/3/18)
365
Article IV (8); Substitute for Alternative A (SA/3/19)
366
Article IV (9); Substitute for Alternative A (SA/3/20)
367
Article IV (10); Substitute for Alternative A (SA/3/21)
368
Article V (9); Substitute for Alternative A (SA/3/22)
369
Order of the Day, July 14 (not printed)
370
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 13
371
Text of Provisions Recommended by ad hoc Committee 3c of
Commission II (Working Paper for Drafting Committee of
Commission II)
372
Text of Provisions Recommended by ad hoc Committee 3b of
Commission II (Working Paper for Drafting Committee of
Commission II)
373
(canceled)
374
Report of Special Committee of Commission I
375
News Bulletin No. 18 (not printed)
376
Alternative D (SA/1/63)
377
Article I; Substitute for Alternatives A to G (SA/3/23)
378
Alternative B (SA/3/24)
379
Message de M. Franklin D. Roosevelt, President des fitats—
Unis d’ AmSrique, Addresse le 1 er Juillet 1944 aux Membres
de la Conference




A P P E N D I X II

380
381
382
383
384

385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423

Supplemental Report of ad hoc Subcommittee A of Committee
4, Commission II
Minutes of Meeting of Commission II, July 13
News Bulletin No. 19 (not printed)
Press Release No. 31. Statement by Sir Shanmukham Chetty,
Indian Delegate, Before Commission I
Text of Provisions Recommended by ad hoc Committee 3b of
Commission II (Working Paper for Drafting Committee of
Commission II)
Report of Committee 3b, Commission II
Statement of Sir Shanmukham Chetty, Indian Delegate, Before
Commission I
Commission II—Status Report
Journal No. 15
Third Report of Drafting Committee, Commission II
Order of the Day, July 15 (not printed)
Commission II—Fourth Report of Drafting Committee
(canceled)

Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 14
Report of ad hoc Committee II, Commission II
Report of Quota Committee of Commission I
News Bulletin No. 20 (not printed)
International Monetary Fund (Purposes, Methods, Consequences)
Commission II, Documents to be Considered at Meeting
Report of Meeting of ad hoc Committee 2, Commission II
Article VI: Alternative D (SA/3/25)
Minutes and Report of Reporter, Subcommittee 3C, Commis­
sion II
(canceled)

Alternative E (SA/1/65)
News Bulletin No. 21 (not printed)
Alternative C (SA/1/66)
Order of the Day, July 16 (not printed)
Tentative Suggestion From Special Subcommittee to ad hoc
Committee 3b (Committee 3, Commission II)
Journal No. 16
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 15
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 15
News Bulletin No. 22 (not printed)
Alternative G (SA/1/67)
Working Draft—Fund Agreement
Report of Special Committee on Unsettled Problems of Commis­
sion I, July 15
Report of Special Committee on Unsettled Problems of Commis­
sion I, July 16
Article I, Alternative L (SA/1/68)
Alternative A (SA/1/69)
News Bulletin No. 23 (not printed)
Report of ad hoc Committee 2 (Commission II) July 16, 1944
Journal No. 17
Commission II, Fifth Report of Drafting Committee
Order of the Day, July 17 (not printed)
Minutes of Meeting of Commission II, July 16




1529

1530

M ON ETARY AND F IN A N CIA L CONFERENCE

424
425

Commission II, Report of ad hoc Committee 3b
Report Submitted to Commission III by Committee 1 on Use of
Silver for International Monetary Purposes
426
Draft Proposals for Establishment of a Bank for Reconstruction
and Development
427
News Bulletin No. 24 (not printed)
428
Report Submitted to Commission III by Committee 3 on Recom­
mendations on Economic and Financial Policy, the Exchange
of Information, and Other Means of Financial Cooperation
429
Proposal of the Czechoslovakia Delegation to Commission III
430 (389, Commission II, Addenda to Third and Fourth Reports of Drafting
391)
Committee
431 (410) Commission I, Addendum to Minutes of Meeting of July 15
432
Press Release No. 32. Remarks Made by Mexican Delegation
on Veto Power of Lending Countries Before Commission II
433
Press Release No. 33. Date of Adjournment of Conference
434
Draft Proposals for the Establishment of a Bank for Reconstruc­
tion and Development
435
Statement of the Delegation From Peru on Definite Economic
Action Required to Create Conditions Necessary to Make
Possible Attainment of the Specific Purposes of the Fund and
of the Bank
436
Press Release No. 34. Telegram From President of Bretton
Woods Company
437
Report of Subcommittee 3C of Commission II
438
News Bulletin No. 25 (not printed)
439
Order of the Day, July 18 (not printed)
440
Journal No. 18
441
News Bulletin No. 26 (not printed)
442
News Bulletin No. 27 (not printed)
443
Final Act (Draft Text)
444-445
Proyecto de Proposiciones para el Establecimiento de un Banco
de Reconstruccion y Fomento
446
News Bulletin No. 28 (not printed)
447
Report of Special Committee of Commission I
448
Second Report of Drafting Committee of Commission I—Annex I
449
Commission II, Report of ad hoc Committee 3b
450
Journal No. 19
451
Press Release No. 35. Statement by Carlos Lleras Restrepo,
Chairman of Delegation of Colombia, Before Commission I
452
Report of Committee 2, Commission II
453
Order of the Day, July 19 (not printed)
454
Report of Subcommittee 3C of Commission II
455
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 18
456
Commission II, Documents to be Considered at Meeting, July 19
457
News Bulletin No. 29 (not printed)
458
(canceled)
459
Press Release No. 36. Address by Eduardo Suarez, Mexican
Minister of Finance, Before Commission III
460
Report of Committee 2, Commission II
461
Acuerdo Sobre el Fondo Monetario Internacional (Traducci6n
Preliminar)




A P P E N D I X II

462
463

464
465
466
467

468
469
470
471
472

473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480 (468)
(426)
481 (470)
482
483
484
485
486
487
488

489

490

491

492

Press Release No. 37. Draft Resolution Approved by Committee
2 and Recommended to Commission III for Adoption
Press Release No. 38. Draft Resolution Considered by Committee
2 and Recommended to Commission III for Adoption in Prin­
ciple and Reference to a Drafting Committee to Make Certain
Technical Changes
News Bulletin No. 30 (not printed)
Journal No. 20
Report No. 6 of the Special Committee of Commission I
Statement by the Australian Delegation on Report of Committee
3 to Commission III and on Australian Resolution on Em­
ployment Agreement
Report of Drafting Committee of Commission II—Annex I
Minutes of Meetings of Commission II, July 19, 1944
Report Submitted to Commission III by Committee 2 on Enemy
Assets, Looted Property, and Related Matters
Order of the Day, July 20 (not printed)
Report of Commission I (International Monetary Fund) to the
Executive Plenary Session, July 20—Louis Rasminsky, Canada,
Reporting Delegate
Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 19
{omitted)

News Bulletin No. 31 (not printed)
(canceled)
Statement by the Netherlands Delegation to Commission III
Additional Material Approved by Committee 2, Commission II
Resolution to Be Introduced at Executive Plenary Session, July 20
Commission II, Amendments to Document 468 Proposed by
U.S.S.R. Delegation
Report Submitted to Commission III by Committee 2
Report of the Steering Committee
Press Release No. 39. Statement by Mahmoud Saleh el Falaki,
Delegate of Egypt
Supplemental Report of Drafting Committee of Commission II
Press Release No. 40. Statement by L. S. St. Laurent on Behalf
of the Canadian Delegation at Meeting of Commission III
News Bulletin No. 32 (not printed)
Press Release No. 41. Statement by Lord Keynes at Executive
Plenary Session, July 20
Press Release No. 42. Statement by Kyriakos Varvaressos,
Chairman of the Greek Delegation, at Executive Plenary
Session, July 20
Press Release No. 43. Statement by Vladimir Rybar, Chairman
of the Delegation of Yugoslavia, at Executive Plenary Session,
July 20
Press Release No. 44. Statement by H. H. Kung, Chairman
of the Delegation fo China, at Executive Plenary Session,
July 20
Press Release No. 45. Statement by Pierre Mendes-France,
Chairman of the French Delegation, at Executive Plenary
Session, July 20
Final Act




1531

1532

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Press Release No. 46. Statement by Fred M. Vinson, ViceChairman of the Delegation of the United States, at Executive
Plenary Session, July 20
v
494
Order of the Day, July 21 (not printed)
495
Final Report of All Committees to Commission II
Minutes of Meeting of Commission III, July 20
496
Journal No. 21
497
Minutes of Executive Plenary Session {not distributed) (not
498
printed)
499
News Bulletin No. 33 (not printed)
500
Press Release No. 47. Remarks of Fred M. Vinson, Vice-Chairman
of the Delegation of the United States, toward the close of the
Executive Plenary Session, July 20
501
Press Release No. 48. Remarks by Manuel B. Llosa, Delegate
from Peru, Before Commission III on the Creation, in the
Field of International Economic Relations, of Conditions Nec­
essary for the Attainment of the Purposes of the Fund and the
Bank, and Other Broader Primary Objectives of Economic
Policy
502
Press Release No. 49. Motion of Manuel B. Llosa, Delegate From
Peru, on the Subject of Silver, Before Commission III
503
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
504
Press Release No. 50. Statement by M. S. Stepanov, Chairman,
Delegation, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, at Executive
Plenary Session, July 20
505 (495) Report of Commission II to the Executive Plenary Session—
Annex I
506
Articles de 1
’Accord du Fonds Monetaire International (not
printed)
507
Minutes of Meeting of Commission II, July 20
508
Press Release No. 51. Memorandum on the International Mone­
tary Fund
509
Report of the Coordinating Committee
510
Resolution, Recommendations, and Statement Submitted to the
Conference by Commission III
511
Commission II, Report of Subscriptions Committee
512
News Bulletin No. 34 (not printed)
513
Press Release No. 52. Remarks of Andre Istel, Delegate of
France, at Executive Plenary Session, July 21
514
Press Release No. 53. Remarks of Lord Keynes at Executive
Plenary Session, July 20
515
Order of the Day, July 22 (not printed)
516
Press Release No. 54. Remarks of Georges Theunis, Delegate of
Belgium, at Executive Plenary Session, July 21
517
Press Release No. 55. Remarks by Dean Acheson in Executive
Plenary Session, July 21
518
Acta Final (Traducci6n Preliminar)
519 (473) Corrected Minutes of Meeting of Commission I, July 19
520
Press Release No. 56. Remarks by the President of the Con­
ference, Secretary Morgenthau, Before Executive Plenary
Session, July 21, and the Reply of the Mexican Delegate,
Eduardo Suarez
493




A P P E N D I X II

521

Press Release No. 57. Concluding Remarks by the President of
the Conference, Henry Morgenthau, at Executive Plenary
Session, July 21
522
Press Release No. 58. Address of Henry Morgenthau, Presi­
dent of the Conference, at Closing Plenary Session, July 22
523
Journal No. 22
524
Report of Commission III to the Executive Plenary Session,
July 21
525
Minutes of Meetings of Commission II, July 21
526
Verbatim Report of Executive Plenary Session (not distributed)
(not printed)
527
Report of Commission II (International Bank for Reconstruction
and Development) to the Executive Plenary Session, July 21
528
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
529
Secretariat Notice (not printed)
530
News Bulletin No. 35 (not printed)
531
Closing Plenary Session (Agenda)
532
Press Release No. 59. Comment by Edward E. Brown (United
States) on Announcement by the Secretary of State of the
Forthcoming Conversations on the General Subject of Inter­
national Security Organization
533
Press Release No. 60. Statement by Charles W. Tobey (United
States) on Announcement by the Secretary of State of the
Forthcoming Conversations on the General Subject of Inter­
national Security Organization
534
Press Release No. 61. Comments by Fred M. Vinson on An­
nouncement by the Secretary of State of the Forthcoming
Conversations on the General Subject of International Security
Organization
535
Press Release No. 62. Address by Arthur de Souza Costa, Chair­
man of the Brazilian Delegation, at the Closing Plenary Session,
July 22
536
(withdrawn)
537
Press Release No. 64. Statement by Ludwik Grosfeld, Minister
of Finance of Poland
538
Press Release No. 65. Message From the President of the United
States to the Conference at the Closing Plenary Session, July 22
539
Press Release No. 66. Address by Pierre Mendes-France, Chair­
man of the French Delegation, at the Closing Plenary Session,
July 22
540
Press Release No. 67. Address by J. L. Ilsley, Chairman of the
Canadian Delegation, at the Closing Plenary Session, July 22
541
Press Release No. 68. Address by Edwardo I. Montoulieu,
Chairman of the Cuban Delegation, at Closing Plenary Session,
July 22
542
Press Release No. 69. Address by Lord Keynes, Chairman of the
Delegation of the United Kingdom, at Closing Plenary Session,
July 22
542 (536) Press Release No. 63. Remarks of H. H. Kung, Chairman of
Delegation of China, at Dinner Given by Henry Morgenthau,
Jr., July 22, 1944
543
(withdrawn)




1533

1534

544

545

546
547
548

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Press Release No. 70. Statement by the President of the Confer­
ence, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., at Opening of the Final Plenary
Session, July 22
Press Release No. 71. Statement of the Chairman of U.S.S.R.
Delegation, Michael Stepanov, at the Closing Plenary Session,
July 22
Journal No. 23
Verbatim Minutes of Closing Plenary Session, July 22
Texte de l’Acte Final (Traduction Pr61iminaire)




Appendix IU

Key to Symbols Used on Documents
The principal symbols used to differentiate the various series
of documents issued at the Conference are as follow s:
COMMISSIONS

COMMITTEES

Cl — Commission I
CII — Commission II
CIII— Commission III

C/CO— Coordinating Committee
C/CR— Credentials Committee
C/N — Nominating Committee
C/RR— Rules and Regulations
Committee
C/S — Steering Committee
C /SP— Special Committee

Committees of Commissions

1,2,3,4— Committees 1, 2, 3, and 4
A — Agenda Committee
AH— Ad Hoc Committee
DC— Drafting Committee
QC— Quota Committee
S — Sub-committee
SC (or S P )— Special Committee

The following symbols were used to differentiate documents
within the above categories:
B — Status of Business
M — Minutes
MC— Miscellaneous Documents

R P — Reports
R — Remarks, recommendations

Exam ples:

CI/1/RP1 — Report of Committee 1 to Commission I: Document 125
CII/M C/1 — Memorandum submitted to Commission II by the United Nations’
Interim Commission on Food and Agriculture: Document 286
C/CO/RP1— Report of Coordinating Committee: Document 509

The following symbols were used for other types of documents:
DP— Delegation Proposal
FD— Foreign Delegation
GD— General Document
PC— Pre-Conference Document

SA — Secretariat Agenda
(alternatives to draft articles of
agreement for the Fund and Bank
drawn up at a preliminary meeting
at Atlantic City, N. J., June 1944,
and contained in the Joint State­
ment)
SN— Secretariat Notices

E xam ples :

GD/2— Inaugural Plenary Session: Document 11
DP/1— Proposal submitted by the Mexican Delegation: Document 56




1535

Appendix IV

Related Papers
1. Preliminary Draft Outline of Proposal for a United
and Associated Nations Stabilization Fund 1
I. Purposes o f the Fund
1. To stabilize the foreign exchange rates of the currencies of
the United Nations and nations associated with them.
2. To shorten the periods and lessen the degree of disequilibrium
in the international balance of payments of member countries.
3. To help create conditions under which the smooth flow of for­
eign trade and of productive capital among the member coun­
tries will be fostered.
4. To facilitate the effective utilization of the abnormal foreign
balances accumulating in some countries as a consequence of
the war situation.
5. To reduce the use of foreign exchange controls that interfere
with world trade and the international flow of productive
capital.
6. To help eliminate bilateral exchange clearing arrangements,
multiple currency devices, and discriminatory foreign ex­
change practices.
II. Composition of the Fund
1. The Fund shall consist of gold, currencies of member coun­
tries, and securities of member governments.
2. Each of the member countries shall subscribe a specified
amount which will be called its quota. The aggregate of quotas
of the member countries shall be the equivalent of at least
$5 billion.
The quota for each member country shall be determined by
an agreed upon formula. The formula should give due weight
1 Issued by the U. S. Treasury Department.




1536

A P P E N D I X IV

3.

(p.
4.

5.

6.

1537

to the important factors relevant to the determination of
quotas, e.g., a country’s holdings of gold and foreign exchange,
the magnitude of the fluctuations in its balance of interna­
tional payments, and its national income.
Each member country shall provide the Fund with 50 percent
of its quota on or before the date set by the Board of Directors
of the Fund on which the Fund’s operations are to begin.
2)
The initial payment of each member country (consisting of
50 percent of its quota) shall be 12.5 percent of its quota in
gold, 12.5 percent in local currency, and 25 percent in its own
(i.e., government) securities. However, any country having
less than $300 million in gold need provide initially only 7.5
percent of its quota in gold, and any country having less than
$100 million in gold need provide initially only 5 percent of
its quota in gold, the contributions of local currency being
increased correspondingly. A country may, at its option, sub­
stitute gold for its local currency or securities in meeting its
quota requirement.
The member countries of the Fund may be called upon to
make further provision toward meeting their quotas pro rata
at such times, in such amounts, and in such form as the Board
of Directors of the Fund may determine, provided that the
proportion of gold called for shall not exceed the proportions
indicated in II-4 above, and provided that a four-fifths vote
of the Board shall be required for subsequent calls to meet
quotas.
Any changes in the quotas of member countries shall be made
only with the approval of a four-fifths vote of the Board.

III. Powers and Operations
The Fund shall have the following powers:
1. To buy, sell, and hold gold, currencies, bills of exchange, and
government securities of member countries; to accept deposits
and to earmark gold; to issue its own obligations, and to dis­
count or offer them for sale in member countries; and to act
as a clearing house for the settling of international movements
of balances, bills of exchange, and gold.
All member countries agree that all of the local currency
holdings shall be free from any restrictions as to their use.
This provision does not apply to abnormal war balances ac­
quired in accordance with the provisions of III-9, below.




1538

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

2. To fix the rates at which it will buy and sell one member’s
currency for another, and the rates in local currencies at
which it will buy and sell gold. The guiding principle in the
fixing of such rates shall be stability in exchange relation­
ships. Changes in these rates shall be considered only when
essential to correction of a fundamental disequilibrium and
(p. 3)
be permitted only with the approval of four-fifths of member
votes.
3. To sell to the Treasury of any member country (or stabiliza­
tion fund or central bank acting as its agent) at a rate of ex­
change determined by the Fund, currency of any member
country which the Fund holds, provided that:
a. The foreign exchange demanded from the Fund is re­
quired to meet an adverse balance of payments on current
account with the country whose currency is being de­
manded.
b. The Fund’s holdings of the currency of any member coun­
try shall not exceed during the first year of the operation
of the Fund, the quota of that country; it shall not exceed
during the first two years 150 percent of such quota; and
thereafter it shall not exceed 200 percent of such quota;
except that upon approval by four-fifths of the member
votes, the Fund may purchase any local currency in
excess of these limits, provided that at least one of the
following two conditions is m et:
i. The country whose currency is being acquired by the
Fund agrees to adopt and carry out measures recom­
mended by the Fund designed to correct the dis­
equilibrium in the country’s balance of payments, or
ii. It is believed that the balance of payments of the coun­
try whose currency is being acquired by the Fund
will be such as to warrant the expectation that the
excess currency holdings of the Fund can be disposed
of within a reasonable time.
c. When the Fund’s net holdings of any local currency ex­
ceed the quota for that country, the country shall deposit
with the Fund a special reserve in accordance with regu­
lations prescribed by the Board of Directors. This provi­
sion does not apply to currencies acquired under III-9
below.




APPENDIX IV

1539

d. When a member country is exhausting its quota more
rapidly than is warranted in the judgment of the Board
of Directors, the Board may place such conditions upon
additional sales of foreign exchange to that country as it
deems to be in the general interest of the Fund.
(p. 4)
e. A charge at the rate of 1 percent per annum, payable in
gold, shall be levied against any member country on the
amount of its currency held by the Fund in excess of the
quota of that country. Abnormal war balances acquired
by the Fund (in accordance with III-9 below) shall not be
included in the computed balance of local currency used as
a basis for this charge.
f . When the Fund’s holdings of the local currency of a mem­
ber country exceed the quota of that country, upon request
by the member country, the Fund shall resell to the mem­
ber country the Fund’s excess holdings of the currency
of that country for gold or acceptable foreign exchange.
4. The right of a member country to purchase foreign exchange
from the Fund with its local currency for the purpose of meet­
ing an adverse balance of payments on current account is
recognized only to the extent of its quota, subject to the limita­
tion in III-3 above and III-7 below.
5. With the approval of four-fifths of the member votes, the Fund
in exceptional circumstances may sell foreign exchange to a
member country to facilitate transfer of capital, or repayment
or adjustment of foreign debts, when in the judgment of the
Board such a transfer is desirable from the point of view of
the general international economic situation.
6. When the Fund’s holdings of any particular currency drop
below 15 percent of the quota of that country, and after the
Fund has used for additional purchases of that currency,
(a) Gold in an amount equal to the country’s contribution
of gold to the Fund, and
(b) The country’s obligations originally contributed,
the Fund has the authority and the duty to render to the
country a report embodying an analysis of the causes of the
depletion of its holdings of that currency, a forecast of the
prospective balance of payments in the absence of special
measures, and finally, recommendations designed to increase
the Fund’s holdings of that currency. The Board member of
795841— 48— 27




1540

M ONETARY AND FIN A N C IAL CONFERENCE

the country in question should be a member of the Fund com­
mittee appointed to draft the report. This report should be
sent to all member countries and, if deemed desirable, made
public.
(p. 5)
Member countries agree that they will give immediate and
careful attention to recommendations made by the Fund.
7. Whenever it becomes evident to the Board of Directors that
the anticipated demand for any particular currency may soon
exhaust the Fund’s holdings of that currency, the Board of
Directors of the Fund shall inform the member countries of
the probable supply of this currency and of a proposed method
for its equitable distribution, together with suggestions for
helping to equate the anticipated demand and supply for the
currency.
The Fund shall make every effort to increase the supply of
the scarce currency by acquiring that currency from the for­
eign balances of member countries. The Fund may make spe­
cial arrangements with any member country for the purpose
of providing an emergency supply under appropriate condi­
tions which are acceptable to both the Fund and the member
country.
The privilege of any country to acquire an amount of other
currencies equal to or in excess of its quota shall be limited
by the necessity of assuring an appropriate distribution
among the various members of any currency the supply of
which is being exhausted. The Fund shall apportion its sales
of such scarce currency. In such apportionment, it shall be
guided by the principle of satisfying the most urgent needs
from the point of view of the general international economic
situation. It shall also consider the special needs and resources
of the particular countries making the request for the scarce'
currency.
8. In order to promote the most effective use of the available
and accumulating supply of foreign exchange resources of
member countries, each member country agrees that it will
offer to sell to the Fund, for its local currency or for foreign
currencies which it needs, all foreign exchange and gold it
acquires in excess of the amount it possessed immediately
after joining the Fund. For the purpose of this provision, in­
cluding computations, only free foreign exchange and gold are
considered. The Fund may accept or reject the offer.




A P P E N D I X IV

1541

To help achieve this objective each member country agrees
to discourage the unnecessary accumulation of foreign bal­
ances by its nationals. The Fund shall inform any member
country when, in its opinion, any further growth of privatelyheld foreign balances appears unwarranted.
(P . 6 )

To buy from the governments of member countries, abnormal
war balances held in other countries, provided all the follow­
ing conditions are m et:
a. The abnormal war balances are in member countries and
are reported as such (for the purpose of this provision) by
the member government on date of its becoming a member.
b. The country selling the abnormal war balances to the Fund
agrees to transfer these balances to the Fund and to re­
purchase from the Fund 40 percent of them (-at the same
price) with gold or such free currencies as the Fund may
wish to accept, at the rate of 2 percent of the transferred
balances each year for 20 years beginning not later than
3 years after the date of transfer.
c. The country in which the abnormal war balances are held
agrees to the transfer to the Fund of the balances described
in (b) above, and to repurchase from the Fund 40 percent
of them (at the same price) with gold or such currencies
as the Fund may wish to accept, at the rate of 2 percent
of the transferred balances each year for 20 years be­
ginning not later than 3 years after the date of transfer.
d. A charge of 1 percent, payable in gold, shall be levied
against the country selling its abnormal war balances and
against the country in which the balances are held. In
addition a charge of 1 percent, payable in gold,* shall be
levied annually against them on the amount of such bal­
ances remaining to be repurchased by each country.
e. If the country selling abnormal war balances to the Fund
asks for foreign exchange rather than local currency, the
request will not be granted unless the country needs the
foreign exchange for the purpose of meeting an adverse
balance of payments not arising from the acquisition of
gold,, the accumulation of foreign balances, or other capital
transactions.
f. Either country may, at its option, increase the amount it
repurchases annually. But, in the case of the country sell­
ing abnormal war balances to the Fund, not more than




1542

M ON ETARY AND F INA NC IAL CONFERENCE

2 percent per annum of the original sum taken over by the
Fund shall become free, and only after 3 years shall have
elapsed since the sale of the balances to the Fund.
(P. 7)
g. The Fund has the privilege of disposing of any of its hold­
ings of abnormal war balances as free funds after the
23 year period is passed, or sooner under the following
conditions:
i. its holdings of the free funds of the country in which
the balances are held fall below 15 percent of its quota;
or
ii. the approval is obtained of the country in which the
balances are held.
h. The, country in which the abnormal war balances are held
agrees not to impose any restrictions on the use of the in­
stallments of the 40 percent portion gradually repurchased
by the country which sold the balances to the Fund.
i. The Fund agrees not to sell the abnormal war balances
acquired under the above authority, except with the per­
mission or at the request of the country in which the bal­
ances are being held. The Fund may invest these balances
in ordinary or special government securities of that coun­
try. The Fund shall be free to sell such securities in any
country provided that the approval of the issuing govern­
ment is first obtained.
j. The Fund shall determine from time to time what shall be
the maximum proportion of the abnormal war balances
it will purchase under this provision.
Abnormal war balances acquired under this provision shall
not be included in computing the amount of foreign ex­
change available to member countries under their quotas.
10. To buy and sell currencies of non-member countries, but shall
not be authorized to hold such currencies beyond sixty days
after date of purchase, except with the approval of four-fifths
of the member votes.
11. To borrow the currency of any member country, provided
four-fifths of the member votes approve the terms of such bor­
rowing.
12. To sell member-country obligations owned by the Fund pro­
vided that the Board representative of the country in which
the securities are to be sold approves.




A P P E N D I X IV

1543

(p . 8 )

13.

14.

15.

16.

To use its holdings to obtain rediscounts or advances from
the central bank of any country whose currency the Fund
requires.
To invest any of its currency holdings in government securi­
ties and prime commercial paper of the country of that cur­
rency provided four-fifths of the member votes approve, and
provided further that the Board representative of the country
in which the investment is to be made approves.
To lend to any member country its local currency from the
Fund for one year or less up to 75 percent of the currency of
that country held by the Fund, provided such loan is ap­
proved by four-fifths of the member votes.
To levy upon member countries a pro rata share of the ex­
penses of operating the Fund, payable in local currency, not
to exceed y10 percent per annum of the quota of each country.
The levy may be made only to the extent that the earnings of
the Fund are inadequate to meet its current expenses, and only
with the approval of four-fifths of the member votes.
The Fund shall make a service charge of y4 percent or more on
all exchange and gold transactions.
The Fund shall deal only with or through
a. The treasuries, stabilization funds, or fiscal agents of
member governments;
b. The central banks, only with the consent of the member of
the Board representing the country in question; and
c. Any international banks owned predominantly by member
governments.
The Fund may, nevertheless, with the approval of the member
of the Board representing the government of the country con­
cerned, sell its own securities, or securities it holds, directly
to the public or to institutions of member countries.

IV. Monetary Unit of the Fund
1. The monetary unit of the Fund shall be the Unitas (UN)
consisting of 137% grains of fine gold (equivalent to $10 U. S .).
The accounts of the Fund shall be kept and published in terms
of Unitas.
(p. 9)
2. The value of the currency of each member country shall be
fixed by the Fund in terms of gold or Unitas and may not be
altered by any member country without the approval of fourfifths of the member votes.




1544

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

3. Deposits in terms of Unitas may be accepted by the Fund
from member countries upon the delivery of gold to the Fund
and shall be transferable and redeemable in gold or in the
currency of any member country at the rate established by
the Fund. The Fund shall maintain a 100 percent reserve in
gold against all Unitas deposits.
4. No change in the value of the currencies of member countries
shall be permitted to alter the value in gold or Unitas of the
assets of the Fund. Thus if the Fund approves a reduction
in the value of the currency of a member country (in terms of
gold or Unitas) or if, in the opinion of the Board, the cur­
rency of a member country has depreciated to a significant
extent, that country must deliver to the Fund when requested
an amount of its local currency equal to the decreased value of
that currency held by the Fund. Likewise, if the currency
of a particular country should appreciate, the Fund must
return to that country an amount (in the currency of that
country) equal to the resulting increase in the gold or Unitas
value of the Fund’s holdings. The same provisions shall also
apply to the government securities of member countries held
by the Fund. However, this provision shall not apply to cur­
rencies acquired under III-9 (abnormal war balances).
V. Management
1. The administration of the Fund shall be vested in a Bbard of
Directors. Each government shall appoint a director and an
alternate, in a manner determined by it, who shall serve for
a period of three years subject to the pleasure of their govern­
ment. Directors and alternates may be reappointed.
In all voting by the Board, the director or alternate of each
member country shall be entitled to cast an agreed upon num­
ber of votes. The distribution of voting power shall be closely
related to the quotas of member countries, although not in
precise proportion to the quotas. An appropriate distribu­
tion of voting power would seem to be the following: Each
country shall have 100 votes plus 1 vote for the equivalent of
each 100,000 Unitas ($1 million) of its quota.
(p. 10)
Notwithstanding the approved formula for distributing
voting power, no country shall be entitled to cast more than
one-fourth of the aggregate votes regardless of its quota. All
decisions, except where specifically provided otherwise, shall
be made by a majority of the member votes.




A PPENDIX IV

1545

2. The Board of Directors shall select a Managing Director of
the Fund and one or more assistants. The Managing Director
shall become an ex officio member of the Board and shall be
chief of the operating staff of the Fund. The Managing
Director and the assistants shall hold office for two years,
shall be eligible for reelection, and may be removed for cause
at any time by the Board.
The Managing Director of the Fund shall select the operat­
ing staff in accordance with regulations established by the
Board of Directors. Members of the staff may be made
available, upon request of member countries, for consultation
in connection with international economic problems and
policies.
3. The Board of Directors shall appoint from among its members
an Executive Committee to consist of not less than eleven
members. The Chairman of the Board shall be Chairman
of the Executive Committee, and the Managing Director of
the Fund shall be an ex officio member of the Executive
Committee.
The Executive Committee shall be continuously available
at the head office of the Fund and shall exercise the authority
delegated to it by the Board. In the absence of any member
of the Executive Committee, his alternate shall act in his
place. Members of the Executive Committee shall receive
appropriate remuneration.
4. The Board of Directors may appoint such other committees
as it finds necessary for the work of the Fund. It may also
appoint advisory committees chosen wholly or partially from
persons not employed by the Fund.
5. The Board of Directors may at any meeting, by a four-fifths
vote, authorize any officers or committees of the Fund to
exercise any specified powers of the Board. The Board may
not delegate, except to the Executive Committee, any authority
which can be exercised only by a four-fifths vote.
(p. 11)
Delegated powers shall be exercised only until the next
meeting of the Board, and in a manner consistent with the
general policies and practices of the Board.
6. The Board of Directors may establish procedural regulations
.governing the operations of the Fund. The officers and com­
mittees of the Fund shall be bound by such regulations.
7. The Board of Directors shall hold an annual meeting and such
other meetings as it may be desirable to convene. On request




1546

MONETARY AND FINA NC IAL CONFERENCE

of member countries casting one-fourth of the votes, the
chairman shall call a meeting of the Board for the purpose of
considering any matters placed before it.
8. A country failing to meet its obligations to the Fund may be
suspended provided a majority of the member votes so de­
cides. While under suspension, the country shall be denied
the privileges of membership but shall be subject to the same
obligations as any other member of the Fund. At the end of
two years the country shall be automatically dropped from
membership unless it has been restored to good standing by
a majority of the member votes.
Any country may withdraw from the Fund by giving notice,
and its withdrawal will take effect two years from the date
of such notice. During the interval between notice of with­
drawal and the taking effect of the notice, such country shall
be subject to the same obligations as any other member of
the Fund.
A country which is dropped or which withdraws from mem­
bership shall have returned to it an amount in its own currency
equal to its contributed quota, plus other obligations of the
Fund to the country, and minus any sum owed by that country
to the Fund. Any losses of the Fund may be deducted pro
rata from the contributed quota to be returned to the country
that has been dropped or has withdrawn from membership.
The Fund shall have five years in which to liquidate its obli­
gation to such a country. When any country is dropped or
withdraws from the Fund, the rights of the Fund shall be
fully safeguarded.
(P. 12)
9. Net profits earned by the Fund shall be distributed in the
following manner:
a. 50 percent to reserves until the reserves are equal to 10
percent of the aggregate quotas of the Fund.
b. 50 percent to be divided each year among the members in
proportion to their quotas. Dividends distributed to each
country shall be paid in its own currency or in Unitas at
the discretion of the Fund.
VI. Policies of Member Countries
Each member country of the Fund undertakes the follow ing:
1. To maintain by appropriate action exchange rates established
by the Fund on the currencies of other countries, and not to
alter exchange rates except with the consent of the Fund and




APPENDIX IV

1547

only to the extent and in the direction approved by the Fund.
Exchange rates of member countries may be permitted to
fluctuate within a specified range fixed by the Fund.
2. To abandon, as soon as the member country decides that con­
ditions permit, all restrictions and controls over foreign ex­
change transactions (other than those involving capital trans­
fers) with other member countries, and not to impose any
additional restrictions without the approval of the Fund.
The Fund may make representations to member countries
that conditions are favorable for the abandonment of restric­
tions and controls over foreign exchange transactions, and
each member country shall give consideration to such repre­
sentations.
3. To cooperate effectively with other member countries when
such countries, with the approval of the Fund, adopt or con­
tinue controls for the purpose of regulating international
movements of capital. Cooperation shall include, upon recom­
mendation by the Fund, measures that can appropriately be
taken:
a. Not to accept or permit acquisition of deposits, securities,
or investments by nationals of any member country impos­
ing restrictions on the export of capital except with the
permission of the Government of that country and the
Fund;
(P. 13)

b. To make available to the Fund or to the Government of any
member country full information on all property in the
form of deposits, securities and investments of the nationals
of that member country; and
c. Such other measures as the Fund shall recommend.
4. Not to enter upon any new bilateral foreign exchange clearing
arrangements, nor engage in multiple currency practices,
except with the approval of the Fund.
5. To give consideration to the views of the Fund on any existing
or proposed monetary or economic policy, the effect of which
would be to bring about sooner or later a serious disequi­
librium in the balance of payments of other countries.
6. To furnish the Fund with all information it needs for its
operations and to furnish such reports as it may require in
the form and at the times requested by the Fund.
7. To adopt appropriate legislation or decrees to carry out its
undertakings to the Fund and to facilitate the activities of
the Fund.




1548

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

2. International Clearing Union
T ext o r

a

P a p e r C o n t a in in g P ro posals b y B r itish E x p e r t s
I n t e r n a t io n a l C l e a r in g U n io n 1

fo r a n

April 8, 194-3

In Parliament on February 2nd, the Chancellor of the Exchequer men­
tioned the need, after the war, of “ an international monetary mechanism
which will serve the requirements of international trade and avoid any need
for unilateral action in competitive exchange depreciation . . . a system in
which blocked balances and unilateral clearances would be unnecessary . . .
an orderly and agreed method of determining the value of national currency
units . . . we want to free the international monetary system from those
arbitrary, unpredictable and undesirable influences which have operated in
the past as a result of large scale speculative movements of short-term
capital.”
On the directions o f H. M. Government, this problem has been under close
examination by the Treasury in consultation with other Departments. The
present paper has been prepared, and the Government has decided that it
should be published, as a preliminary contribution to the solution of one of
the problems of international economic co-operation after the war.
H. M. Government is not committed to the principles or details of the scheme.
Any proposals for a satisfactory international monetary mechanism after
the war can only be framed after full consideration of all aspects of a very
difficult problem. It is hoped that these proposals will afford a basis for
discussion, criticism and constructive amendment, together with similar plans
having similar objectives which may be prepared by experts of other
Governments.
On these terms it has been presented for technical examination by experts
of the U. S. Government. On these terms also it has been discussed in an
informal and exploratory manner with officials of the Governments of the
Dominions and of India. These discussions were on the expert plane, and
did not commit the Governments concerned in any way. It has also been
discussed with representatives of the European Allies, and has been com­
municated to representatives of the other United Nations.
(p . 3 )

Proposals for an International Clearing Union
PREFACE

Immediately after the war, all countries which have been en­
gaged will be concerned with the pressure of relief and urgent
reconstruction. The transition out of this into the normal world
of the future cannot be wisely effected unless we know into what
we are moving. It is therefore not too soon to consider what is
to come after. In the field of national activity occupied by pro­
duction, trade and finance, both the nature of the problem and the
experience of the period between wars suggest four main lines of
approach.
1 Published by the British Information Services, an agency of the British
Government.




APPENDIX IV

1549

1. The mechanism of currency and exchange.
2. The framework of a commercial policy regulating conditions
for exchange of goods, tariffs, preferences, subsidies, import regu­
lations and the like.
3. Orderly conduct of production, distribution and price of pri­
mary products so as to protect both producers and consumers from
the loss and risk for which extravagant fluctuations of market
conditions have been responsible in recent times.
4. Investment aid, both medium and long term, for countries
whose economic development needs assistance from outside.
If the principles of these measures and the form of institutions
to give effect to them can be settled in advance, in order that they
may be in operation when need arises, it is possible that taken
together they may help the world to control the ebb and flow of the
tides of economic activity which have, in the past, destroyed secu­
rity of livelihood and endangered international peace.
All these matters will need to be handled in due course. The
proposal that follows relates only to the mechanism of currency
and exchange in international trading. It appears on the whole
convenient to give it priority, because some general conclusions
have to be reached under this head before much progress can be
made with other topics.
In preparing these proposals care has been taken to regard
certain conditions, which the groundwork of an international eco­
nomic system to be set up after the war should satisfy if it is to
prove durable.
(1) There should be the least possible interference with inter­
nal national policies, and the plan should not wander from the
international terrain. Since such policies may have important
repercussions on international relations they cannot be left out of
account. Nevertheless, in the realm of internal policy, the author­
ity of the governing board of the proposed institution should be
limited to recommendations, or, at most, to imposing conditions for
more extended enjoyment of the facilities which the institution
offers.
(2) The technique of the plan must be capable of application
irrespective of the type and principle of government and the eco­
nomic policy existing in the prospective member States.
(3) Management of the institution must be genuinely interna­
tional, without preponderant power of veto or enforcement lying
with any country or group. And the rights and privileges of
smaller countries must be safeguarded.




1550

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(P. 4)
(4) Some qualification of the right to act at pleasure is required
by any agreement or treaty between Nations. But in order that
such arrangements may be fully voluntary so long as they last and
terminable when they have become irksome, provision must be
made for voiding the obligation at due notice. If many member
States were to take advantage of this, the plan would have broken
down, but if they are free to escape from its provisions if necessary,
they may be more willing to go on accepting them.
(5) The plan must operate not only to the general advantage
but also to the individual advantage of each of the participants,
and must not require a special economic or financial sacrifice from
certain countries. No participant must be asked to do or offer
anything which is not to his own true long-term interest.
It must be emphasized that it is not for the Clearing Union to
assume the burden of long term lending which is the proper task of
some other institution. It is also necessary for it to have the means
of restraining improvident borrowers. But the Clearing Union
must also seek to discourage creditor countries from having unused
large liquid balances which ought to be devoted to some positive
purpose. For excessive credit balances necessarily create exces­
sive debit balances for some other party. In recognising that the
creditor as well as the debtor may be responsible for a want of
balance, the proposed institution would be breaking new ground.
(P. 5)
I.— TH E OBJECTS OF TH E P L A N

About the primary objects of an improved system of Interna­
tional Currency there is, to-day, a wide measurement of agree­
ment :—
(a) We need an instrument of international currency having
general acceptability between nations, so that blocked bal­
ances and bilateral clearings are unnecessary; that is to
say, an instrument of currency used by each nation in its
transactions with other nations, operating through what­
ever national organ, such as a Treasury or a Central Bank,
is most appropriate, private individuals, businesses and
banks other than Central Banks, each continuing to use
their own national currency as heretofore.
(b) We need an orderly and agreed method of determining the
relative exchange values of national currency units, so that
unilateral action and competitive exchange depreciations
are prevented.




A P P E N D I X IV

1551

(c) We need a quantum of international currency, which is
neither determined in an unpredictable and irrelevant man­
ner as, for example, by the technical progress of the gold
industry, nor subject to large variations depending on the
gold reserve policies of individual countries; but is governed
by the actual current requirements of world commerce, and
is also capable of deliberate expansion and contraction
to offset deflationary and inflationary tendencies in effective
world demand.
(d) We need a system possessed of an internal stabilising mech­
anism, by which pressure is exercised on any country
whose balance of payments with the rest of the world is
departing from equilibrium in either direction, so as to
prevent movements which must create for its neighbours
an equal but opposite want of balance.
(e) We need an agreed plan for starting off every country after
the war with a stock of reserves appropriate to its impor­
tance in world commerce, so that without due anxiety it
can set its house in order during the transitional period
to full peace-time conditions.
(f) We need a central institution, of a purely technical and
non-political character, to aid and support other interna­
tional institutions concerned with the planning and regula­
tion of the world’s economic life.
(g) More generally, we need a means of reassurance to a
troubled world, by which any country whose own affairs are
conducted with due prudence is relieved of anxiety, for
causes which are not of its own making, concerning its
ability to meet its international liabilities; and which will,
therefore, make unnecessary those methods of restriction
and discrimination which countries have adopted hitherto,
not on their merits, but as measures of self-protection from
disruptive outside forces.
2.
There is also a growing measurement of agreement about the
general character of any solution of the problem likely to be suc­
cessful. The particular proposals set forth below lay no claim to
originality. They are an attempt to reduce to practical shape cer(p. 6)
tain general ideas belonging to the contemporary climate of eco­
nomic opinion, which have been given publicity in recent months by
writers of several different nationalities. It is difficult to see how
any plan can be successful which does not use these general ideas,
which are born of the spirit of the age. The actual details put for­




1552

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

ward below are offered, with no dogmatic intention, as the basis
of discussion for criticism and improvement. For we cannot make
progress without embodying the general underlying idea in a frame
of actual working, which will bring out the practical and political
difficulties to be faced and met if the breath of life is to inform it.
3. In one respect this particular plan will be found to be more
ambitious and yet, at the same time, perhaps more workable than
some of the variant versions of the same basic idea, in that it is fully
international, being based on one general agreement and not on a
multiplicity of bilateral arrangements. Doubtless proposals might
be made by which bilateral arrangements could be fitted together
so as to obtain some of the advantages of a multilateral scheme.
But there will be many difficulties attendant on such adjustments.
It may be doubted whether a comprehensive scheme will ever in
fact be worked out, unless it can come into existence through a
single act of creation made possible by the unity of purpose and
energy of hope for better things to come, springing from the vic­
tory of the United Nations, when they have attained it, over imme­
diate evil. That these proposals are ambitious is claimed, there­
fore to be not a drawback but an advantage.
4. The proposal is to establish a Currency Union, here desig­
nated an International Clearing Union, based on international
bank-money, called (let us say) bancor, fixed (but not unalterably)
in terms of gold and accepted as the equivalent of gold by the
British Commonwealth and the United States and all the other
members of the Union for the purpose of settling international
balances. The Central Banks of all member States (and also of
non-members) would keep accounts with the International Clear­
ing Union through which they would be entitled to settle their
exchange balances with one another at their par value as defined
in terms of bancor. Countries having a favourable balance of
payments with the rest of the world as a whole would find them­
selves in possession of a credit account with the Clearing Union,
and those having an unfavourable balance would have a debit
account. Measures would be necessary (see below) to prevent the
piling up of credit and debit balances without limit, and the system
would have failed in the long run if it did not possess sufficient
capacity for self-equilibrium to secure this.
5. The idea underlying such a Union is simple, namely, to gen­
eralise the essential.principle of banking as it is exhibited within
any closed system. This principle is the necessary equality of
credits and debits. If no credits can be removed outside the clear­
ing system, but only transferred within it, the Union can never be




A P P E N D I X IV

1553

in any difficulty as regards the honouring of cheques drawn upon
it. It can make what advances it wishes to any of its members with
the assurance that the proceeds can only be transferred to the
clearing account of another member. Its sole task is to see to it
that its members keep the rules and that the advances made to
each of them are prudent and advisable for the Union as a whole.
(P. 7)
II.— TH E PRO VISIO N S OF THE PLAN .

6.
The provisions proposed (the particular proportions and other
details suggested being tentative as a basis of discussion) are the
following:—
(1) All the United Nations will be invited to become original
members of the International Clearing Union. Other States may
be invited to join subsequently. If ex-enemy States are invited to
join, special conditions may be applied to them.
(2) The Governing Board of the Clearing Union shall be ap­
pointed by the Governments of the several member States, as
provided in (12) below; the daily business with the Union and the
technical arrangements being carried out through their Central
Banks or other appropriate authorities.
(3) The member States will agree between themselves the initial
values of their own currencies in terms of bancor. A member
State may not subsequently alter the value of its currency in terms
# f bancor without the permission of the Governing Board except
under the conditions stated below; but during the first five years
after the inception of the system the Governing Board shall give
special consideration to appeals for an adjustment in the exchange
value of a national currency unit on the ground of unforeseen
circumstances.
(4) The value of bancor in terms of gold shall be fixed by the
Governing Board. Member States shall not purchase or acquire
gold, directly or indirectly, at a price in terms of their national
currencies in excess of the parity which corresponds to the value
of their currency in terms of bancor and to the value of bancor in
terms of gold. Their sales and purchases of gold shall not be
otherwise restricted.
(5) Each member State shall have assigned to it a quota, which
shall determine the measure of its responsibility in the manage­
ment of the Union and of its right to enjoy the credit facilities
provided by the Union. The initial quotas might be fixed by refer­
ence to the sum of each country’s exports and imports on the aver­
age of (say) the three pre-war years, and might be (say) 75 per




1554

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

cent, of this amount, a special assessment being substituted in
cases (o f which there might be several) where this formula would
be, for any reason, inappropriate. Subsequently, after the elapse
of the transitional period, the quotas should be revised annually in
accordance with the running average of each country’s actual
volume of trade in the three preceding years, rising to a five-year
average when figures for five post-war years are available. The
determination of a country’s quota primarily by reference to the
value of its foreign trade seems to offer the criterion most relevant
to a plan which is chiefly concerned with the regulation of the
foreign exchanges and of a country’s international trade balance.
It is, however, a matter for discussion whether the formula for
fixing quotas should also take account of other factors.
(6) Member States shall agree to accept payment of currency
balances, due to them from other members, by a transfer of bancor
to their credit in the books of the Clearing Union. They shall be
entitled, subject to the conditions set forth below, to make transfers
of bancor to other members which have the effect of overdrawing
their own accounts with the Union, provided that the maximum
(p. 8)
debit balances thus created do not exceed their quota. The Clear­
ing Union may, at its discretion, charge a small commission or
transfer fee in respect of transactions in its books for the purpose
of meeting its current expenses or any other outgoings approved
by the Governing Board.
•
(7) A member State shall pay to the Reserve Fund of the
Clearing Union a charge of 1 per cent, per annum on the amount
of its average balance in bancor, whether it is a credit or a debit
balance, in excess of a quarter of its quota; and a further charge
of 1 per cent, on its average balance, whether credit or debit, in
excess of a half of its quota. Thus, only a country which keeps as
nearly as possible in a state of international balance on the average
of the year will escape this contribution. These charges are not
absolutely essential to the scheme. But if they are found accept­
able, they would be valuable and important inducements towards
keeping a level balance, and a significant indication that the system
looks on excessive credit balances with as critical an eye as on
excessive debit balances, each being, indeed, the inevitable con­
comitant of the other. Any member State in debit may, after
consultation with the Governing Board, borrow bancor from the
balances of any member State in credit on such terms as may be
mutually agreed, by which means each would avoid these contri­
butions. The Governing Board may, at its discretion, remit the




A P P E N D I X IV

1555

charges on credit balances, and increase correspondingly those on
debit balances, if in its opinion unduly expansionist conditions are
impending in the world economy.
(8)
— (a) A member State may not increase its debit balance by
more than a quarter of its quota within a year without the per­
mission of the Governing Board. If its debit balance has exceeded
a quarter of its quota on the average of at least two years, it shall
be entitled to reduce the value of its currency in terms of bancor
provided that the reduction shall not exceed 5 per cent, without
the consent of the Governing Board; but it shall not be entitled
to repeat this procedure unless the Board is satisfied that this
procedure is appropriate.
(b) The Governing Board may require from a member State
having a debit balance reaching a half of its quota the deposit of
suitable collateral against its debit balance. Such collateral shall,
at the discretion of the Governing Board, take the form of gold,
ioreign or domestic currency or Government bonds, within the
capacity of the member State. As a condition of allowing a mem­
ber State to increase its debit balance to a figure in excess of a half
of its quota, the Governing Board may require all or any of the
following measures:—
(i) a stated reduction in the value of the member’s currency,
if it deems that to be the suitable remedy;
(ii) the control of outward capital transactions if not already
in force; and
(iii) the outright surrender of a suitable proportion of any
separate gold or other liquid reserve in reduction of its
debit balance.
Furthermore, the Governing Board may recommend to the Govern­
ment of the member State any internal measures affecting its
(p. 9)
domestic economy which may appear to be appropriate to restore
the equilibrium of its international balance.
(c) If a member State’s debit balance has exceeded threequarters of its quota on the average of at least a year and is exces­
sive in the opinion of the Governing Board in relation to the total
debit balances outstanding on the books of the Clearing Union, or
is increasing at an excessive rate, it may, in addition, be asked by
the Governing Board to take measures to improve its position, and,
in the event of its failing to reduce its debit balance accordingly
within two years, the Governing Board may declare that it is in
default and no longer entitled to draw against its account except
with the permission of the Governing Board.
795841 — 48— 28




1556

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(d)
Each member State, on joining the system, shall agree to
pay to the Clearing Union any payments due from it to a country
in default towards the discharge of the latter’s debit balance and
to accept this arrangement in the event of falling into default
itself. A member State which resigns from the Clearing Union
without making approved arrangements for the discharge of any
debit balance shall also be treated as in default.
(9) A member State whose credit balance has exceeded half of
its quota on the average of at least a year shall discuss with the
Governing Board (but shall retain the ultimate decision in its own
hands) what measures would be appropriate to restore the equi­
librium of its international balances, including—
(a) Measures for the expansion of domestic credit and domestic
demand.
(b) The appreciation of its local currency in terms of bancor,
or, alternatively, the encouragement of an increase in money
rates of earnings.
(c) The reduction of tariffs and other discouragements against
imports.
(d) International development loans.
(10) A member State shall be entitled to obtain a credit balance
in terms of bancor by paying in gold to the Clearing Union for the
credit of its clearing account. But no one is entitled to demand
gold from the Union against a balance of bancor, since such bal­
ance is available only for transfer to another clearing account.
The Governing Board of the Union shall, however, have the discre­
tion to distribute any gold in the possession of the Union between
the members possessing credit balances in excess of a specified
proportion of their quotas, proportionately to such balances, in
reduction of their amount in excess of that proportion.
(11) The monetary reserves of a member State, viz., the Central
Bank or other bank or Treasury deposits in excess of a working
balance, shall not be held in another country except with the
approval of the monetary authorities of that country.
(12) The Governing Board shall be appointed by the Govern­
ments of the member States, those with the larger quotas being
entitled to appoint a member individually, and those with smaller
quotas appointing in convenient political or geographical groups,
so that the members would not exceed (say) 12 or 15 in number.
Each representative on the Governing Board shall have a vote in
proportion to the quotas of the State (or States) appointing him,
(P. 10)
except that on a proposal to increase a particular quota, a repre­




A P P E N D I X IV

1557

sentative’s voting power shall be measured by the quotas of the
member States appointing him, increased by their credit balance
or decreased by their debit balance, averaged in each case over the
past two years. Each member State, which is not individually
represented on the Governing Board, shall be entitled to appoint a
permanent delegate to the Union to maintain contact with the
Board and to act as liaison for daily business and for the exchange
c f information with the Executive of the Union. Such delegate
shall be entitled to be present at the Governing Board when any
matter is under consideration which specially concerns the State
he represents, and to take part in the discussion.
(13) The Governing Board shall be entitled to reduce the quotas
of members, all in the same specified proportion, if it seems neces­
sary to correct in this manner an excess of world purchasing
power. In that event, the provisions of 6 (8) shall be held to apply
to the quotas as so reduced, provided that no member shall be
required to reduce his actual overdraft at the date of the change,
or be entitled by reason of this reduction to alter the value of his
currency under 6 (8) (a ), except after the expiry of two years.
If the Governing Board subsequently desires to correct a potential
deficiency of world purchasing power, it shall be entitled to restore
the general level of quotas towards the original level.
(14) The Governing Board shall be entitled to ask and receive
from each member State any relevant statistical or other informa­
tion, including a full disclosure of gold, external credit and debit
balances and other external assets and liabilities, both public and
private. So far as circumstances permit, it will be desirable that
the member States shall consult with the Governing Board on im­
portant matters of policy likely to affect substantially their bancor
balances or their financial relations with other members.
(15) The executive offices of the Union shall be situated in
London and New York, with the Governing Board meeting alter­
nately in London and Washington.
(16) Members shall be entitled to withdraw from the Union on
a year’s notice, subject to their making satisfactory arrangements
to discharge any debit balance. They would not, of course, be
able to employ any credit balance except by making transfers from
it, either before or after their withdrawal, to the Clearing Accounts
of other Central Banks. Similarly, it should be within the power
of the Governing Board to require the withdrawal of a member,
subject to the same notice, if the latter is in breach of agreements
relating to the Clearing Union.
(17) The Central Banks of non-member States would be allowed




1558

M ON E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

to keep credit clearing accounts with the Union; and, indeed, it
would be advisable for them to do so for the conduct of their trade
with member States. But they would have no right to overdrafts
and no say in the management.
(18)
The Governing Board shall make an annual Report and
shall convene an annual Assembly at which every member State
shall be entitled to be represented individually and to move pro­
posals. The principles and governing rules of the Union shall be
the subject of reconsideration after five years’ experience, if a
majority of the Assembly desire it.
(P. ID
III.— W H A T L IA B IL IT IE S OUGHT TH E P L A N TO P L A C E ON
CR E D ITO R CO U N T R IE S?

7. It is not contemplated that either the debit or the credit bal­
ance of an individual country ought to exceed a certain maximum—
let us say, its quota. In the case of debit balances this maximum
has been made a rigid one, and, indeed, counter-measures are called
for long before the maximum is reached. In the case of credit
balances no rigid maximum has been proposed. For the appro­
priate provision might be to require the eventual cancellation or
compulsory investment of persistent bancor credit balances accu­
mulating in excess of a member’s quota; and, however desirable
this may be in principle, it might be felt to impose on creditor
countries a heavier burden than they can be asked to accept before
having had experience of the benefit to them of the working of the
plan as a whole. If, on the other hand, the limitation were to take
the form of the creditor country not being required to accept bancor
in excess of a prescribed figure, this might impair the general
acceptability of bancor, whilst at the same time conferring no real
benefit on the creditor country itself. For, if it chose to avail
itself of the limitation, it must either restrict its exports or be
driven back on some form of bilateral payments agreements outside
the Clearing Union, thus substituting a less acceptable asset for
bancor balances which are based on the collective credit of all the
member States and are available for payments to any of them, or
attempt the probably temporary expedient of refusing to trade
except on a gold basis.
8. The absence of a rigid maximum to credit balances does not
impose on any member State, as might be supposed at first sight,
an unlimited liability outside its own control. The liability of an
individual member is determined, not by the quotas of the other
members, but by its own policy in controlling its favourable balance
of payments. The existence of the Clearing Union does not deprive




A P P E N D I X IV

1559

a member State of any of the facilities which it now possesses for
receiving payment for its exports. In the absence of the Clearing
Union a creditor country can employ the proceeds of its exports to
buy goods or to buy investments, or to make temporary advances
and to hold temporary overseas balances, or to buy gold in the
market. All these facilities will remain at its disposal. The dif­
ference is that in the absence of the Clearing Union, more or less
automatic factors come into play to restrict the volume of its
exports after the above means of receiving payment for them have
been exhausted. Certain countries become unable to buy and, in
addition to this, there is an automatic tendency towards a general
slump in international trade and, as a result, a reduction in the
exports of the creditor country. Thus, the effect of the Clearing
Union is to give the creditor country a choice between voluntarily
curtailing its exports to the same extent that they would have been
involuntarily curtailed in the absence of the Clearing Union, or,
alternatively, of allowing its exports to continue and accumulating
the excess receipts in the form of bancor balances for the time
being. Unless the removal of a factor causing the involuntary
(P. 12)
reduction of exports is reckoned a disadvantage, a creditor country
incurs no burden but is, on the contrary, relieved, by being offered
the additional option of receiving payment for its exports through
the accumulation of a bancor balance.
9. If, therefore, a member State asks what governs the maxi­
mum liability which it incurs by entering the system, the answer
is that this lies entirely within its own control. No more is asked
of it than that it should hold in bancor such surplus of its favour­
able balance of payments as it does not itself choose to employ in
any other way, and only for so long as it does not so choose.
IV .— SOME A D V A N T A G E S OF THE P LA N .

10. The plan aims at the substitution of an expansionist, in place
of a contractionist, pressure on world trade.
11. It effects this by allowing to each member State overdraft
facilities of a defined amount. Thus each country is allowed a
certain margin of resources and a certain interval of time within
which to effect a balance in its economic relations with the rest of
the world. These facilities are made possible by the constitution
of the system itself and do not involve particular indebtedness
between one member State and another. A country is in credit or
debit with the Clearing Union as a whole. This means that the
overdraft facilities, whilst a relief to some, are not a real burden
to others. For the accumulation of a credit balance with the Clear­




1560

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

ing Union would resemble the importation of gold in signifying
that the country holding it is abstaining voluntarily from the imme­
diate use of purchasing power. But it would not involve, as would
the importation of gold, the withdrawal of this purchasing power
from circulation or the exercise of a deflationary and contractionist
pressure on the whole world, including in the end the creditor
country itself. Under the proposed plan, therefore, no country
suffers injury (but on the contrary) by the fact that the command
over resources, which it does not itself choose to employ for the
time being, is not withdrawn from use. The accumulation of ban­
cor credit does not curtail in the least its capacity or inducement
either to produce or to consume.
12. In short, the analogy with a national banking system is com­
plete. No depositor in a local bank suffers because the balances,
which he leaves idle, are employed to finance the business of some­
one else. Just as the development of national banking systems
served to offset a deflationary pressure which would have prevented
otherwise the development of modern industry, so by extending the
same principle into the international field we may hope to offset
the contractionist pressure which might otherwise overwhelm in
social disorder and disappointment the good hopes of our modern
world. The substitution of a credit mechanism in place of hoard­
ing would have repeated in the international field the same miracle,
already performed in the domestic field, of turning a stone into
bread.
13. There might be other ways of effecting the same objects tem­
porarily or in part. For example, the United States might redis­
tribute her gold. Or there might be a number of bilateral arrange­
ments having the effect of providing international overdrafts,
(P. 13)
as, for example, an agreement by the Federal Reserve Board to
accumulate, if necessary, a large sterling balance at the Bank of
England, accompanied by a great number of similar bilateral
arrangements, amounting to some hundreds altogether, between
these and all the other banks in the world. The objection to par­
ticular arrangements of this kind, in addition to their greater com­
plexity, is that they are likely to be influenced by extraneous,
political reasons; that they put individual countries in a position of
particular obligation towards others; and that the distribution of
the assistance between different countries may not correspond to
need and to the real requirements, which are extremely difficult to
foresee.
14. It should be much easier, and surely more satisfactory for




A P P E N D I X IV

1561

all of us, to enter into a general and collective responsibility, apply­
ing to all countries alike, that a country finding itself in a creditor
position against the rest of the world as a whole should enter into
an arrangement not to allow this credit balance to exercise a contractionist pressure against world economy and, by repercussion,
against the economy of the creditor country itself. This would
give everyone the great assistance of multilateral clearing, whereby
(for example) Great Britain could offset favourable balances aris­
ing out of her exports to Europe against unfavourable balances due
to the United States or South America or elsewhere. How, indeed,
can any country hope to start up trade with Europe during the
relief and reconstruction period on any other terms ?
15. The facilities offered will be of particular importance in the
transitional period after the war, as soon as the initial shortages
of supply have been overcome. Many countries will find a diffi­
culty in paying for their imports, and will need time and resources
before they can establish a readjustment. The efforts of each of
these debtor countries to preserve its own equilibrium, by forcing
its exports and by cutting off all imports which are not strictly
necessary, will aggravate the problems of all the others. On the
other hand, if each feels free from undue pressure, the volume of
international exchange will be increased and everyone will find it
easier to re-establish equilibrium without injury to the standard
of life anywhere. The creditor countries will benefit, hardly less
than the debtors, by being given an interval of time in which to
adjust their economies, during which they can safely move at their
own pace without the result of exercising deflationary pressure on
the rest of the world, and, by repercussion, on themselves.
16. It must, however, be emphasized that the provision by which
the members of the Clearing Union start with substantial overdraft
facilities in hand will be mainly useful, just as the possession of
any kind of reserve is useful, to allow time and method for neces­
sary adjustments and a comfortable safeguard behind which the
unforeseen and the unexpected can be faced with equanimity.
Obviously, it does not by itself provide any long-term solution
against a continuing disequilibrium, for in due course the more
improvident and the more impecunious, left to themselves, would
have run through their resources. But, if the purpose of the over­
draft facilities is mainly to give time for adjustments, we have to
make sure, so far as possible, that they ivill be made. We must
have, therefore, some rules and some machinery to secure that
equilibrium is restored. A tentative attempt to provide for this
has been made above. Perhaps it might be strengthened and
improved.




1562

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(p. 14)
17. The provisions suggested differ in one important respect
from the pre-war system because they aim at putting some part of
the responsibility for adjustment on the creditor country as well as
on the debtor. This is an attempt to recover one of the advantages
which were enjoyed in the nineteenth century, when a flow of gold
due to a favourable balance in favour of London and Paris, which
were then the main creditor centres, immediately produced an
expansionist pressure and increased foreign lending in those mar­
kets, but which has been lost since New York succeeded to the
position of main creditor, as a result of gold movements failing
in their effect, of the breakdown of international borrowing and
of the frequent flight of loose funds from one depository to another.
The object is that the creditor should not be allowed to remain
entirely passive. For if he is, an intolerably heavy task may be
laid on the debtor country, which is already for that very reason
in the weaker position.
18. If, indeed, a country lacks the productive capacity to main­
tain its standard of life, then a reduction in this standard is not
avoidable. If its wage and price levels in terms of money are out
of line with those elsewhere, a change in the rate of its foreign
exchange is inevitable. But if, possessing the productive capacity,
it lacks markets because of restrictive policies throughout the
world, then the remedy lies in expanding its opportunities for
export by removal of the restrictive pressure. We are too ready
to-day to assume the inevitability of unbalanced trade positions,
thus making the opposite error to those who assumed the tendency
of exports and imports to equality. It used to be supposed, with­
out sufficient reason, that effective demand is always properly
adjusted throughout the world; we now tend to assume, equally
without sufficient reason, that it never can be. On the contrary,
there is great force in the contention that, if active employment'
and ample purchasing power can be sustained in the main centres
of the world trade, the problem of surpluses and unwanted exports
will largely disappear, even though, under the most prosperous
conditions, there may remain some disturbances of trade and
unforeseen situations requiring special remedies.
V.— TH E D A IL Y M A N A G E M E N T OF TH E E X C H A N G E S U N D E R
TH E P L A N .

19. The Clearing Union restores unfettered multilateral clear­
ing between its members. Compare this with the difficulties and
complications of a large number of bilateral agreements. Com­
pare, above all, the provisions by which a country, taking improper




A P P E N D I X IV

1563

advantage of a payments agreement (for the system is, in fact, a
generalized payments agreement), as Germany did before the
war, is dealt with not by a single country (which may not be strong
enough to act effectively in isolation or cannot afford to incur the
diplomatic odium of isolated action), but by the system as a whole.
If the argument is used that the Clearing Union may have difficulty
in disciplining a misbehaving country and in avoiding consequen­
tial loss, with what much greater force can we urge this objection
against a multiplicity of separate bilateral payments agreements.
(P. 15)
20. Thus we should not only obtain the advantages, without the
disadvantages, of an international gold currency, but we might
enjoy these advantages more widely than was ever possible in
practice with the old system under which at any given time only a
minority of countries were actually working with free exchanges.
In conditions of multilateral clearing, exchange dealings would be
carried on as freely as in the best days of the gold standard, with­
out its being necessary to ask anyone to accept special or onerous
conditions.
21. The principles governing transactions are: first, that the
Clearing Union is set up, not for the transaction of daily business
between individual traders or banks, but for the clearing and settle­
ment of the ultimate outstanding balances between Central Banks
(and certain other super-national Institutions), such as would
have been settled under the old gold standard by the shipment or
the earmarking of gold, and should not trespass unnecessarily
beyond this field; and, second, that its purpose is to increase free­
dom in international commerce and not to multiply interferences
or compulsions.
22. Many Central Banks have found great advantage in central­
ising with themselves or with an Exchange Control the supply and
demand of all foreign exchange, thus dispensing with an outside
exchange market, though continuing to accommodate individuals
through the existing banks and not directly. The further exten­
sion of such arrangements would be consonant with the general
purposes of the Clearing Union, inasmuch as they would promote
order and discipline in international exchange transactions in
detail as well as in general. The same is true of the control of
capital movements, further described below, which many States
are likely to wish to impose on their own nationals. But the struc­
ture of the proposed Clearing Union does not require such meas­
ures of centralisation or of control on the part of a member State.
It is, for example, consistent alike with the type of Exchange




1564

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

Control now established in the United Kingdom or with the system
now operating in the United States. The Union does not prevent
private holdings of foreign currency or private dealings in ex­
change or international capital movements, if these have been
approved or allowed by the member States concerned. Central
Banks can deal direct with one another as heretofore. No trans­
action in bancor will take place except when a member State or
its Central Bank is exercising the right to pay in it. In no case
is there any direct control on capital movements by the Union, even
in the case of 6 (8) (&) (ii) above, but only by the member States
themselves through their own institutions. Thus the fabric of
international banking organisation, built up by long experience to
satisfy practical needs, would be left as undisturbed as possible.
23. It is not necessary to interfere with the discretion of coun­
tries which desire to maintain a special intimacy within a par­
ticular group of countries associated by geographical or political
ties, such as the existing sterling area, or groups, like the Latin
Union of former days, which may come into existence covering,
for example, the countries of North America or those of South
America, or of the groups now active under discussion, including
Poland and Czechoslovakia or certain of the Balkan States. There
(P. 16)
is no reason why such countries should not be allowed a double
position, both as members o f the Clearing Union in their own right
with their proper quota, and also as making use of another finan­
cial centre along traditional lines, as, for example, Australia and
India with London, or certain American countries with New York.
In this case, their accounts with the Clearing Union would be in
exactly the same position as the independent gold reserves which
they now maintain, and they would have no occasion to modify in
any way their present practices in the conduct of daily business.
24. There might be other cases, however, in which a dependency
or a member of a federal union would merge its currency identity
in that of a mother country, with a quota appropriately adjusted to
the merged currency area as a whole, and not enjoy a separate
individual membership of the Clearing Union, as, for example, the
States of a Federal Union, the French colonies or the British Crown
Colonies.
25. At the same time countries, which do not belong to a special
geographic or political group, would be expected to keep their
reserve balances with the Clearing Union and not with one another.
It has, therefore, been laid down that balances may not be held in
another country except with the approval of the monetary author­




A P P E N D I X IV

1565

ities of that country; and, in order that sterling and dollars might
not appear to compete with bancor for the purpose of reserve
balances, the United Kingdom and the United States might agree
together that they would not accept the reserve balances of other
countries in excess of normal working balances except in the case
01 oanks definitely belonging to a Sterling Area or Dollar Area
group.
VI.— TH E PO SITIO N OF GOLD U N D ER TH E PLAN .

26. Gold still possesses great psychological value which is not
being diminished by current events; and the desire to possess a
gold reserve against unforeseen contingencies is likely to remain.
Gold also has the merit of providing in point of form (whatever
the underlying realities may be) an uncontroversial standard of
value for international purposes, for which it would not yet be
easy to find a serviceable substitute. Moreover, by supplying an
automatic means for settling some part of the favourable balances
of the creditor countries, the current gold production of the
world and the remnant of gold reserves held outside the United
States may still have a useful part to play. Nor is it reasonable to
ask the United States to de-monetise the stock of gold which is the
basis of its impregnable liquidity. What, in the long run, the world
may decide to do with gold is another matter. The purpose of the
Clearing Union is to supplant gold as a governing factor, but not
to dispense with it.
27. The international balik-money which we have designated
bancor is defined in terms of a weight of gold. Since the national
currencies of the member States are given a defined exchange value
in terms of bancor, it follows that they would each have a defined
gold content which would be their official buying price for gold,
above which they must not pay. The fact that a member State is
entitled to obtain a credit in terms of bancor by paying actual gold
to the credit of its clearing account, secures a steady and ascer­
tained purchaser for the output of the gold-producing countries,
(P. 17)
and for countries holding a large reserve of gold. Thus the position
of producers and holders of gold is not affected adversely, and is,
indeed, improved.
28. Central Banks would be entitled to retain their separate gold
reserves and ship gold to one another, provided they did not pay
a price above parity; they could coin gold and put it into circula­
tion, and, generaly speaking, do what they liked with it.
29. One limitation only would be, for obvious reasons, essential.
No member State would be entitled to demand gold from the Clear­




1566

M O N E TA R Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

ing Union against its balance of bancor; for bancor is available
only for transfer to another clearing account. Thus between gold
and bancor itself there would be a one-way convertibility, such as
ruled frequently before the war with national currencies which
were on what was called a “ gold exchange standard.” This need
not mean that the Clearing Union would only receive gold and
never pay it out. It has been provided above that, if the Clearing
Union finds itself in possession of a stock of gold, the Governing
Board shall have discretion to distribute the surplus between those
possessing credit balances in bancor, proportionately to such bal­
ances, in reduction of their amount.
30. The question has been raised whether these arrangements
are compatible with the retention by individual member States of
a full gold standard with two-way convertibility, so that, for ex­
ample, any foreign central bank acquiring dollars could use them
to obtain gold for export. It is not evident that a good purpose
would be served by this. But it need not be prohibited, and if any
member State should prefer to maintain full convertibility for
internal purposes it could protect itself from any abuse of the
system or inconvenient consequences by providing that gold could
only be exported under licence.
31. The value of bancor in terms of gold is fixed but not un­
alterably. The power to vary its value might have to be exercised
if the stocks of gold tendered to the Union were to be excessive.
No object would be served by attempting further to peer into the
future or to prophesy the ultimate outcome.
V II.— TH E CO N TROL OF C A P IT A L M O V E M E N TS

32. There is no country which can, in future, safely allow the
flight of funds for political reasons or to evade domestic taxation
or in anticipation of the owner turning refugee. Equally, there is
no country that can safely receive fugitive funds, which constitute
an unwanted import of capital, yet cannot safely be used for fixed
investment.
33. For these reasons it is widely held that control of capital
movements, both inward and outward, should be a permanent
feature of the post-war system. It is an objection to this that con­
trol, if it is to be effective, probably requires the machinery of:
exchange control for all transactions, even though a general per­
mission is given to all remittances in respect of current trade.
Thus those countries which have for the time being no reason to
fear, and may indeed welcome, outward capital movements, may
be reluctant to impose this machinery, even though a general per­
mission for capital, as well as current transactions reduces it to




APPENDIX IV

1567

(P. 18)
being no more than a machinery of record. On the other hand,
such control will be more difficult to work by unilateral action on
the part of those countries which cannot afford to dispense with it,
especially in the absence of a postal censorship, if movements of
capital cannot be controlled at both ends. It would, therefore, be
of great advantage if the United States, as well as other members
of the Clearing Union, would adopt machinery similar to that
which the British Exchange Control has now gone a long way
towards perfecting. Nevertheless, the universal establishment of
a control of capital movements cannot be regarded as essential
to the operation of the Clearing Union; and the method and
degree of such control should therefore be left to the decision of
each member State. Some less drastic way might be found by
which countries, not themselves controlling outward capital move­
ments can deter inward movements not approved by the countries
from which they originate.
34. The position of abnormal balances in overseas ownership
held in various countries at the end of the war presents a problem
of considerable importance and special difficulty. A country in
which a large volume of such balances is held could not, unless it is
in a creditor position, afford the risk of having to redeem them in
bancor on a substantial scale, if this would have the effect of de­
pleting its bancor resources at the outset. At the same time, it is
very desirable that the countries owning these balances should
be able to regard them as liquid, at any rate over and above the
amounts which they can afford to lock up under an agreed pro­
gramme of funding or long-term expenditure. Perhaps there
should be some special over-riding provision for dealing with the
transitional period only by which, through the aid of the Clearing
Union, such balances would remain liquid and convertible into
bancor by the creditor country whilst there would be no corre­
sponding strain on the bancor resources of the debtor country, or,
at any rate, the resulting strain would be spread over a period.
35. The advocacy of a control of capital movements must not be
taken to mean that the era of international investment should be
brought to an end. On the contrary, the system contemplated
should greatly facilitate the restoration of international loans and
credits for legitimate purposes in ways to be discussed below.
The object, and it is a vital object, is to have a means—
(a) of distinguishing long-term loans by creditor countries,
which help to maintain equilibrium and develop the world’s




1568

MONETARY AND FIN A N C IAL CONFERENCE

resources, from movements of funds out of debtor countries
which lack the means to finance them; and
(b) of controlling short-term speculative movements or flights
of currency whether out of debtor countries or from one
creditor country to another.
36. It should be emphasized that the purpose of the overdrafts
of bancor permitted by the Clearing Union is, not to facilitate
long-term, or even medium-term, credits to be made by debtor
countries which cannot afford them, but to allow time and a breath­
ing space for adjustments and for averaging one period with an­
other to all member States alike, whether in the long run they are
well-placed to develop a forward international loan policy or
whether their prospects of profitable new development in excess
(P . 19)
of their own resources justifies them in long-term borrowing. The
machinery and organisation of international medium-term and
long-term lending is another aspect of post-war economic policy,
not less important than the purposes which the Clearing Union
seeks to serve, but requiring another, complementary institution.
V III.— R E L A T IO N OF TH E C LE A R IN G U N IO N TO CO M M ER CIA L
PO LIC Y

37. The special protective expedients which were developed be­
tween the two wars were sometimes due to political, social or
industrial reasons. But frequently they were nothing more than
forced and undesired dodges to protect an unbalanced position of a
country’s overseas payments. The new system, by helping to pro­
vide a register of the size and whereabouts of the aggregate debtor
and creditor positions respectively, and an indication whether it is
reasonable for a particular country to adopt special expedients as
a temporary measure to assist in regaining equilibrium in its bal­
ance of payments, would make it possible to establish a general rule
not to adopt them, subject to the indicated exceptions.
38. The existence of the Clearing Union would make it possible
for member States contracting commercial agreements to use their
respective debit and credit positions with the Clearing Union as a
test, though this test by itself would not be complete. Thus, the
contracting parties, whilst agreeing to clauses in a commercial
agreement forbidding, in general, the use of certain measures or
expedients in their mutual trade relations, might make this agree­
ment subject to special relaxations if the state of their respective
clearing accounts satisfied an agreed criterion. For example, an
agreement might provide that, in the event of one of the contract­




APPENDIX IV

1569

ing States having a debit balance with the Clearing Union ex­
ceeding a specified proportion of its quota on the average of a
period, it should be free to resort to import regulation to barter
trade agreements or to higher import duties of a type which was
restricted under the agreement in normal circumstances. Pro­
tected by the possibility of such temporary indulgences, the mem­
bers of the Clearing Union should feel much more confidence in
moving towards the withdrawal of other and more dislocating
forms of protection and discrimination and in accepting the pro­
hibition of the worst of them from the outset. In any case, it
should be laid down that members of the Union would not allow or
suffer among themselves any restrictions on the disposal of re­
ceipts arising out of current trade or “ invisible” income.
IX .— THE USE OF TH E C LE ARIN G UNION FO R OTH ER
IN T E R N A T IO N A L PU RPOSES.

39.
The Clearing Union might become the instrument and the
support of international policies in addition to those which it is its
primary purpose to promote. This deserves the greatest possible
emphasis. The Union might become the pivot of the future eco­
nomic government of the world. Without it, other more desirable
developments will find themselves impeded and unsupported. With
it, they will fall into their place as parts of an ordered scheme,
(p. 20)
No one of the following suggestions is a necessary part of the plan.
But they are illustrations of the additional purposes of high im­
portance and value which the Union, once established, might be
able to serve:—
(1)
The Union might set up a clearing account in favour of
international bodies charged with post-war relief, rehabilitation
and reconstruction. But it could go much further than this. For
it might supplement contributions received from other sources by
granting preliminary overdraft facilities in favour of these bodies,
the overdraft being discharged over a period of years out of the
Reserve Fund of the Union, or, if necessary, out of a levy on sur­
plus credit balances. So far as this method is adopted it would be
possible to avoid asking any country to assume a burdensome com­
mitment for relief and reconstruction, since the resources would
be provided in the first instance by those countries having credit
clearing accounts for which they have no immediate use and are
voluntarily leaving idle, and in the long run by those countries
which have a chronic international surplus for which they have
no beneficial employment.




1570

M O N E T A R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

(2) The Union might set up an account in favour of any super­
national policing body which may be charged with the duty of pre­
serving the peace and maintaining international order. If any
country were to infringe its properly authorised orders, the polic­
ing body might be entitled to request the Governors of the Clearing
Union to hold the clearing account of the delinquent country to its
order and permit no further transactions on the account except by
its authority. This would provide an excellent machinery for en­
forcing a financial blockade.
(3) The Union might set up an account in favour of interna­
tional bodies charged with the management of a Commodity Con­
trol, and might finance stocks of commodities held by such bodies,
allowing them overdraft facilities on their accounts up to an agreed
maximum. By this means the financial problem of buffer stocks
and “ ever-normal granaries” could be effectively attacked.
(4) The Union might be linked up with a Board for Interna­
tional Investment. It might act on behalf of such a Board and
collect for them the annual service of their loans by automatically
debiting the clearing account of the country concerned. The sta­
tistics of the clearing acounts of the member States would give a
reliable indication as to which countries were in a position to
finance the Investment Board, with the advantage of shifting the
whole system of clearing credits and debits nearer to equilibrium.
(5) There are various methods by which the Clearing Union
could use its influence and its powers to maintain stability of prices
and to control the Trade Cycle. If an International Economic
Board is established, this Board and the Clearing Union might be
expected to work in close collaboration to their mutual advantage.
If an International Investment or Development Corporation is
also set up together with a scheme of Commodity Controls for the
control of stocks of the staple primary products, we might come
to possess in these three Institutions a powerful means of combat­
ing the evils of the Trade Cycle, by exercising contractionist or
expansionist influence on the system as a whole or on particular
sections. This is a large and important question which cannot be
(p. 21)
discussed adequately in this paper; and need not be examined at
length in this place because it does not raise any important issues
affecting the fundamental constitution of the proposed Union. It
is mentioned here to complete the picture of the wider purposes
which the foundation of the Clearing Union might be made to
serve.




APPENDIX IV

1571

40. The facility of applying the Clearing Union plan to these
several purposes arises out of a fundamental characteristic which
is worth pointing out, since it distinguishes the plan from those
proposals which try to develop the same basic principle along
bilateral lines and is one of the grounds on which the Plan can
claim superior merit. This might be described as its “ anonymous”
or “ impersonal” quality. No particular member States have* to
engage their own resources as such to the support of other par­
ticular States or of any of the international projects or policies
adopted. They have only to agree in general that, if they find
themselves with surplus resources which for the time being they
do not themselves wish to employ, these resources may go into the
general pool and be put to work on approved purposes. This costs
the surplus country nothing because it is not asked to part perma­
nently, or even for any specified period, with such resources,
which it remains free to expend and employ for its own purposes
whenever it chooses; in which case the burden of finance is passed
on to the next recipient, again for only so long as the recipient has
no use for the money. As pointed out above, this merely amounts
to extending to the international sphere the methods of any domes­
tic banking system, which are in the same sense “ impersonal”
inasmuch as there is no call on the particular depositor either to
support as such the purposes for which his banker makes ad­
vances or to forego permanently the use of his deposit. There is no
countervailing objection except that which applies equally to the
technique of domestic banking, namely that it is capable of the
abuse of creating excessive purchasing power and hence an infla­
tion of prices. In our efforts to avoid the opposite evil, we must
not lose sight of this risk, to which there is an allusion in 39 (5)
above. But it is no more reason for refusing the advantages of
international banking than the similar risk in the domestic field
is a reason to return to the practices of the seventeenth century
goldsmiths (which are what we are still following in the interna­
tional field) and to forego the vast expansion of production which
banking principles have made possible. Where financial contribu­
tions are required for some purpose of general advantage it is a
great facility not to have to ask for specific contributions from any
named country, but to depend rather on the anonymous and im­
personal aid of the system as a whole. We have here a genuine
organ of truly international government.
X .— TH E T R A N S IT IO N A L A R R A N G E M E N TS

41. It would be of great advantage to agree the general prin795841— 48— 29




1572

M O N E TAR Y AND FIN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

ciples of the Clearing Union before the end of the war, with a view
to bringing it into operation at an early date after the termination
of hostilities. Major plans will be more easily brought to birth in
(P. 22)
the first energy of victory and whilst the active spirit of united
action still persists, than in the days of exhaustion and reaction
frofn so much effort which may well follow a little later. Such a
proposal presents, however, something of a dilemma. On the one
hand, many countries will be in particular need of reserves of
overseas resources in the period immediately after the war. On
the other hand, goods will be in short supply and the prevention
o f inflationary international conditions of much more importance
for the time being than the opposite. The expansionist tendency
of the plan, which is a leading recommendation of it as soon as
peace-time output is restored and the productive capacity of the
world is in running order, might be a danger in the early days of a
sellers’ market and an excess of demand over supply.
42. A reconciliation of these divergent purposes is not easily
found until we know more than is known at present about the
means to be adopted to finance post-war relief and reconstruction.
If the intention is to provide resources on liberal and comprehen­
sive lines outside the resources made available by the Clearing
Union and additional to them, it might be better for such specific
aid to take the place of the proposed overdrafts during the “ relief”
period of (say) two years. In this case credit clearing balances
would be limited to the amount of gold delivered to the Union, and
the overdraft facilities created by the Union in favour of the Relief
Council, the International Investment Board or the Commodity
Controls. Nevertheless, the immediate establishment of the Clear­
ing Union would not be incompatible with provisional arrange­
ments, which could take alternative forms according to the char­
acter of the other “ relief” arrangements, qualifying and limiting
the overdraft quotas. Overdraft quotas might be allowed on a
reduced scale during the transitional period. Or it might be proper
to provide that countries in receipt of relief or Lend-Lease assist­
ance should not have access at the same time to overdraft facilities,
and that the latter should only become available when the former
had come to an end. If, on the other hand, relief from outside
sources looks like being inadequate from the outset, the overdraft
quotas may be even more necessary at the outset than later on.
43. We must not be over-cautious. A rapid economic restoration
may lighten the tasks of the diplomatists and the politicians in the
resettlement of the world and the restoration of social order. For




APPENDIX IV

1573

Great Britain and other countries outside the “ relief” areas the
possibility of exports sufficient to sustain their standard of life is
bound up with good and expanding markets. We cannot afford
to wait too long for this, and we must not allow excessive caution
to condemn us to perdition. Unless the Union is a going concern,
the problem of proper “ timing” will be nearly insoluble. It is suffi­
cient at this stage to point out that the problem of timing must not
be overlooked, but that the Union is capable of being used so as to
aid rather than impede its solution.
(P. 23)
X I.— CONCLUSION

44. It has been suggested that so ambitious a proposal is open to
criticism on the ground that it requires from the members of the
Union a greater surrender of their sovereign rights than they will
readily concede. But no greater surrender is required than in a
commercial treaty. The obligations will be entered into voluntarily
and can be terminated on certain conditions by giving notice.
45. A greater readiness to accept super-national arrangements
must be required in the post-war world. If the arrangements pro­
posed can be described as a measure of financial disarmament,
there is nothing here which we need be reluctant to accept our­
selves or to ask of others. It is an advantage, and not a disad­
vantage, of the scheme that it invites the member States to aban­
don that licence to promote indiscipline, disorder and bad-neigh^
bourliness which, to the general disadvantage, they have been free
to exercise hitherto.
46. The plan makes a beginning at the future economic order­
ing of the world between nations and “ the winning of the peace.”
It might help to create the conditions and the atmosphere in which
much else would be made easier.

3. Letter From Secretary Morgenthau to the Ministers
of Finance of Thirty-Seven Countries
My

dear

M r . M in is t e r :

I am sending for your examination a preliminary draft of a Pro­
posal for an International Stabilization Fund of the United and
Associated Nations. This draft was prepared by the technical staff
of the United States Treasury in consultation with the technical
experts of other departments of this Government.




1574

M O N E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

The document is sent to you not as an expression of the official
views of this Government but rather as an indication of the views
widely held by the technical experts of this Government. I hope
you will examine the draft and submit it for critical study by the
technical experts of your Ministry and your Government. After
you and your experts have had opportunity to study it, you may
wish to send one or more of your technical experts to Washington
to give me your preliminary reaction to the draft proposal, and to
discuss with our technical experts the feasibility of international
monetary cooperation along the lines suggested therein, or along
any other lines you may wish to suggest. We are informed that
the technical experts of the British Government have also been
studying the question and will doubtless make their views available.
It seems to me that the enclosed draft proposal points the way
to an effective means of facilitating through cooperative action the
(P. 2)
maintenance of international monetary stability and the restora­
tion and balanced growth of international trade. It is my hope
that as a result of unofficial discussions involving no commitments,
we may find a sufficient area of agreement to warrant proceeding
on a more formal basis.
Very truly yours,
H e n r y M o r g e n t h a u , Jr.
Secretary of the Treasury.
The countries to whose Finance Ministers the letters were ad­
dressed are the follow ing:
Australia
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
China
Costa Rica
Cuba
Czechoslovakia
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Ethiopia
Great Britain
Greece
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
India
Iraq
Luxembourg




M exico
Netherlands
New Zealand
N icaragua
N orway
Panama
Poland
South A frica, Union o f
Union o f Soviet
Socialist Republics
Yugoslavia
Bolivia
Colombia
Chile
Ecuador
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela

APPENDIX IV

1575

4. Tentative Draft Proposals of Canadian Experts for
an International Exchange U nion1
(p. 3)
CONTENTS
Page

1. General Observations of Canadian Experts on Plans fo r Post-W ar
Monetary Organization ....................................................................................
2. Tentative D raft Proposals o f Canadian Experts fo r an International
Exchange Union* .............................................................................................

5
10

(p. 5)
Ottaw a,
G e n e r a l O b s e r v a t io n s
P o st- W

ar

of

M

C a n a d ia n E x p e r ts

onetary

June 9,1943.

on

P lans

for

O r g a n iz a t io n

1.
Officials of the Canadian Government have had an oppor­
tunity of examining the United States Treasury Department Pre­
liminary Draft Outline of a Proposal for a United and Associated
Nations Stabilization Fund, and have received explanations of this
proposal from American officials. A similar procedure was fol­
lowed in connection with the paper containing proposals by British
experts for an International Clearing Union. The discussions with
both British and American officials have been entirely exploratory
and the Canadian Government has not been committed to any
course of action as a result of these conversations. The American
and British experts, for their part, have laid stress on the fact that
their proposals are tentative in character, and have made it clear
to representatives of the Canadian Government (as well as to
those of other governments) that they would welcome critical com­
ment and constructive suggestions. Canadian experts who have
been studying the British and the American proposals are, there­
fore, led to make certain observations of a general character and
to submit an alternative plan. Like the British and the American
plans, the proposals of the Canadian experts are provisional and
tentative in character; they incorporate important features of both
the American and the British plans and add to them certain new
elements.
1 Canadian publication distributed in the United States through
Canadian W artime Inform ation Board, Washington, D. C.

the

* It might be preferable to refer to the proposed organization as the Inter­
national Exchange Fund. However, to avoid any possible misunderstanding
which might arise through the use o f the term Fund to describe both the asso­
ciation o f members and the resources of the institution, the term Union has
been used throughout this document to describe the organization itself.
[Footnote in the original.]




1576

M ON ETARY AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

2. The main objectives of the American and the British pro­
posals appear to be identical, namely, the establishment of an
international monetary mechanism which will aid in the restora­
tion and development of healthy international trade after the war,
which will achieve a high degree of exchange stability, and which
will not conflict with the desire of countries to carry out such
policies as they may think appropriate to achieve, so far as pos­
sible, economic stability at a high level of employment and in­
comes. To aid in the achievement of these objectives, the British
and American experts have proposed the establishment of a new
international monetary institution. Their proposals are large in
conception, but no larger than the problem itself. There is every
reason to improve the structure and operation of the monetary
mechanism on the basis of experience. But there is no reason why
proposals should be based exclusively on the limited, and on the
whole, bad experience of the past two decades. Unless dependable
exchange and credit relations between countries can be achieved
before the stresses and strains of the post-war period begin, there
is little likelihood that irreparable damage can be avoided.
3. If plans for international monetary organization are to be
successful, other problems— by no means less difficult or less im­
portant— will also have to be faced and solved by joint interna­
tional action. It would, indeed, be dangerous to attach too much
importance to monetary organization of and by itself, if this re­
sulted in neglect of other problems which may be even more im­
portant and difficult, or in a misguided faith that with a new form
of monetary organization the other problems would solve Qiemselves. In the international field alone (to say nothing of the in­
numerable domestic problems involved in the profound changes in
the structure of production and employment which have taken
place in all belligerent and many non-belligerent countries due to
the exigencies of the war) it will be necessary to attack frontally
such problems as commercial policy, international investment, the
(P. 6)
instability of primary product prices— to name but a few. No
international monetary organization, however perfect in form,
could long survive economic distortions resulting from bilateralist
trade practices, continued refusal of creditor countries to accept
imports in payment of the service on their foreign investment or
to invest their current account surplus abroad, or enormous fluc­
tuations in food and raw material prices sueh as characterized
the years between the two wars. But the fact that there are many
problems to be faced cannot be used as an excuse for facing none.




A PPENDIX IV

1577

A start must be made somewhere, and for the reasons given in
paragraph 5, the problem of international monetary organiza­
tion is a logical and fruitful starting-place.
4. The establishment of an international monetary organization
is no substitute for the measures of international relief and re­
habilitation which will be required as the war draws to its con­
clusion and afterwards; and in the view of the Canadian experts
any monetary organization which is set up should not be called
upon to finance transactions of this nature. Some continuing and
stable arrangements regarding international long-term investment
are also clearly essential if equilibrium is to be achieved and main­
tained. Nor should it be thought that the proposed international
monetary institution is merely an instrument of the transition
period from war to peace. True, it has special importance in this
period, but it should be designed as a permanent institution and
not as a stop-gap to function during a relatively short period of
time.
5. An important, perhaps the most important, feature of the
British and the American proposals is the provision in both plans
for the extension of credit between countries. The two plans differ
as regards the precise techniques to be used in extending credit and
as regards the amounts which may be involved; but both plans
provide that foreign credits are to be available under certain con­
ditions to countries having need of them, and that they shall be
made available through an international monetary organization
rather than through bilateral arrangements between pairs of
countries. The provision for credit extension is nothing more nor
less than a straightforward and realistic recognition of the fact
that at the end of the war a large number of countries, whose
import requirements will be considerable, will not have imme­
diately available a sufficient reserve of foreign assets to enable
them to expose themselves to the risk of participation in a world
economic system. An interval will be needed to give time for ad­
justment and re-organization. If the penury in foreign means of
payment of certain important countries is to be allowed to fix the
pattern of post-war trading and domestic policies, then all can
look forward to penury— no country, rich or poor, will escape the
impoverishment resulting from the throttling of international
trade which will result.
6. It is useful to consider what would happen if no action were
taken to set up international machinery of the general character
suggested by the experts of the United States and the United King­
dom. Theoretically, one alternative would be immediate cash




1578

M ON E TA R Y AND F IN A N C IA L CONFERENCE

settlement for all international transactions. But how can cash
be produced for purchases abroad? Only by selling goods or
services abroad, or by disposing of acceptable foreign assets such
as securities and gold. The facts regarding the distribution of the
world’s monetary gold reserves and the changes which have taken
place in the course of the war in various countries’ holdings of for­
eign securities are too well known to require elaboration. Broadly
speaking, and allowing for certain exceptions and time-lags, a cash
basis for the settlement of international transactions would mean
that any country’s capacity to export would be limited to the
amount of its own currency it made available to foreign countries
through its imports and other current payments abroad— in other
words, trade would in effect be reduced to barter. In point of fact,
(P. 7)
however, there is no possibility that countries would for long allow
themselves to be confined in such a strait-jacket. Faced with the
problem of an unsalable surplus of export goods and with conse­
quent domestic unemployment, they would refuse to accept the
penalty of disorganization of export trade if that penalty could be
avoided, even temporarily, by the extension of credit. Countries
would embark on bilateral credit arrangements, no doubt linked
with deals relating to the purchase and sale of goods; and as soon
as certain countries began to adopt this course others would find
that they had to follow suit to protect their trade interests. It is
difficult to imagine a more fruitful source of international dissen­
sion than a competitive trade and credit extension program of this
character.
The Canadian experts believe it to be true, therefore, that the
Stabilization Fund or Clearing Union plans do not involve a deci­
sion as to whether foreign credits shall be extended or withheld.
In some form or other, credit will in fact be extended; and the
decision which has to be taken relates primarily to the method
employed. For the reasons given above, international arrange­
ments are greatly to be preferred to bilateral deals.
7.
This leads to the question, how much credit should be made
available through the international monetary mechanism? A
vital feature of any plan of this sort is the provision it makes for
the borrowing power of each participant and for the contribution
to the resources of the organization by the participating countries
through the provision of capital, the accumulation of balances or
through loans. Some concern has been expressed in regard to the
size of the commitment which may be assumed by prospective
creditors. It