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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FRANCES PERKINS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ISADOR LUBIN, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES 1 ................... XT
C flC
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS /
HO. DJfD
PRISON

LABOR

SERIES

PRISON LABOR
IN THE UNITED STATES
1932
PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF

HERMAN B. BYER

AUGUST 1933

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON s 1933

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C.




Price 15 cents




Contents
Page

Letter of transmittal__________________________________________________
Summary_____________________________________________________________
Federal and State prisons_________________________________________
County and city jails_____________________________________________
Selection of work for prisoners_____________________________________
State and Federal prisons______________________________________________
Proportion of inmates employed at productive labor________________
Employment and production, 1923 and 1932_______________________
Work distribution of prisoners_____________________________________
Hours of labor____________________________________________________
Kind and value of articles produced_______________________________
Sex of prisoners__________________________________________________ _
Employment of prisoners on public works and ways________________
Disposal of goods produced by prisoners___________________________
Contract systems_________________________________________________
Compensation to prisoners________________________________________
State prisons_________________________________________________
Federal prisons_______________________________________________
General table_____________________________________________________
Index of products in State and Federal prisons_____________________
County and city jails__________________ ________________________________
Arguments and opinions for and against prison labor___________________
Arguments presented by Amercian ^Prison Association and Osborne
Association, Inc________________________________________________
Attitude of organized labor________________________________________
Statements of prison officials______________________________________




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Letter of Transmittal
U n it e d S t a t e s D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ,
B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s ,

Washington, July 22, 1983.
have the honor to transmit herewith a re­
port giving the results of a survey of the extent and character of
prison labor in the United States in 1932. This survey was in con­
tinuation of the series of surveys of the subject of prison labor made
by the Bureau at intervals of 9 or 10 years since 1885. The 1932
survey was considerably broader in scope than the earlier ones, city
and county jails being included as well as Federal and State prisons.
The information contained in the current report is of particular
timeliness in view of the added interest in prison labor at the present
time, as a result of the fact that the so-called Hawes-Cooper Act,
which divests prison-made goods of interstate character, becomes
effective in 1934.
Respectfully submitted.
I s a d o r L u b in , Commissioner.
M adam S e c r e ta r y : I

H

on.

F r a n c e s P e r k in s ,




Secretary of Labor.
▼




BULLETIN OF THE

U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR
WASHINGTON

NO. 595

STATISTICS
AUGUST 1933

PRISON LABOR IN THE UNITED STATES, 1932
Summary
Surveys of the extent and character of prison labor in the
United States have been made by the Bureau of Labor Statistics
at intervals of about 9 or 10 years since 1885. The latest survey,
dealing with conditions in the year 1932, was conducted along lines
similar to those of previous surveys, but was extended in scope to
cover not only Federal and State prisons but also city and county
jails. It was found, however, that while the city and county jails
were important as regards numbers of prisoners, they were of minor
importance as producers of commodities. For this reason, the
present report deals primarilv with Federal and State institutions.
The principal findings of the 1932 survey are, briefly, as follows:
Federal and State Prisons
Number of prisons and 'prisoners.— In 1932 there were in the United
States 12 Federal prisons and 114 strictly State prisons. In addition,
1 county prison (the New Castle County Workhouse, Delaware) and
1 city prison (the Detroit House of Correction) have keen included in
this report under State prisons, as, by arrangement with their respec­
tive States, the 2 institutions house State prisoners.
In these 12 Federal and 116 State prisons there were confined
during the year 1932, 158,947 persons, as against 84,761 in 1923.1
This represents an increase of 87 percent during the 9-year period, as
against an increase of only about 12 percent in the general population.
Prisoners employed at productive work.— The number of prisoners
employed at productive work of various kinds increased from 51,799
in 1923 to 82,276 in 1932, but the proportion of total prisoners pro­
ductively employed continued the decline which had begun many
years ago. Thus, while in 1885, 75 percent of all prispners were em­
ployed at productive work, by 1895 this had declined to 72 percent,
by 1923 to 61 percent, and by 1932 to 52 percent, or barely one half
of the prisoners confined.
The fact that such a large proportion of the prisoners were not
engaged in productive labor does not necessarily mean, of course, that
they were not kept at work Most of them (52,986, or 33 percent of the
i The year of the Bureau’s latest previous study (Bui. No, 372). For other reports of the Bureau on
this subject, see Second Annual Report of Commissioner of Labor (1885); Bui. No. 5 of Department of
Labor (1896); Twentieth Annual Beport of Commissioner of Labor (1905); and S.Doc. No. 494,63d Cong.,
2d sess., 1914.




2

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

total in 1932) were engaged in various prison duties. The remainder
were reported as either sick (6,658, or 4 percent of the total) or as
idle (17,027, or 11 percent of the total).
Character of productive work.— The productive work of the prisoners
in the Federal and State prisons is carried on under several systems.
Of particular interest is the distinction between the so-called State-use
system, under which all the products are used in public institutions and
none are sold in the general market, and those other systems in which
prison products are offered for sale and thus come into competition,
more or less, with the products of “ free” industry and labor.
The 1932 survey showed a continued increase in the State-use
system, at the expense of the other systems. Thus, in 1905, only 26
percent of all productive labor in Federal and State prisons was under
the State-use system; in 1914 this percentage had grown to 33 and
in 1923 to 55, while in 1932 it was found that no less than 65 percent
were working under the State-use system.
The lease system, i.e., the system of leasing out convicts to private
employers at so much per head, has apparently disappeared from
practice. No instances of its use were found in either the 1923 or the
1932 survey, although in earlier surveys it was found to be quite
frequent.
Character and value of prison-labor products.— The total value of
the products resulting from the labor oi the 82,276 State and Federal
prisoners employed at productive work was approximately $75,000,000 in 1932, as against $76,000,000 in 1923. This decrease in value
was, however, purely nominal, due to the general decline in wholesale
prices. If allowance is made for this factor, it appears that the actual
output of prison-made products was considerably greater in 1932
than in 1923.
The manufacture of clothing of various kinds gave employment to
the largest number of prisoners— approximately 19,000, or 23 percent
of all prisoners productively employed. More than 22,000,000 shirts,
having a value of over $8,000,000, were thus produced during the
year 1932. Binder twine, with a total value of some $4,000,000 in
1932, was a very important item, and it is also of interest to note that
some 36,000,000 automobile license tags were made in 1932 by prison
labor.
Working conditions of prison laborers.—Of the prisoners employed
at productive labor in 1932, 1.3 percent had nominal working hours of
less than 24 per week, 55.2 percent worked 44 hours or less per week,
while 21.8 percent worked 60 hours or over per week.
Of the 116 State prisons, 66 paid money compensation to all or
part of the inmates, 48 paid no compensation of any kind, and 2 allowed
credit on the sentences for prisoners doing certain classes of work.
Of the 12 Federal institutions, 7 paid wages to prisoners for work
done, and 5 did not. In most of the institutions the pay was nominal,
generally ranging from 2 cents to not more than 15 cents per day,
although in a few prisons the scales were considerably higher.
County and City Jails
The Bureau’s survey of county and city prisons covered all of the 92
cities of more than 100,000 population and 2,721 (or 88.6 percent) of
the 3,072 counties in the United States,




STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

3

In the 2,721 county jails 44,014 prisoners were confined in 1932.
Of this number, 70.4 percent were engaged in ordinary prison duties or
were sick or idle; 18.8 percent were engaged in road work; 5.4 percent
in farm and dairy work; and 5.4 percent in other productive work.
The city jails surveyed housed 11,446 prisoners. Of this number,
68.2 percent were engaged at ordinary prison duties or were sick or
idle; 5.3 percent were on road work; 7.9 percent at farm and dairy
work; and 18.6 percent at other productive work.
The great majority of the county and city jails were either not en­
gaged in manufacturing activities or were producing on a very limited
scale; no effort was made, therefore, to secure detailed data on this
point from all such institutions. In the case of 13 city and county
jails, however, manufacturing was being carried on on such an exten­
sive scale that special inquiry was made regarding the character and
value of the products. The total value of all products made in 12
of these prisons during the year was $567,619, of which 86.7 percent
was to be sold and 13.3 percent to be used by various public institu­
tions. The principal products were brushes, brooms, and wire goods.
Selection of Work for Prisoners
There is general agreement that regular work is beneficial to pris­
oners. There is, however, strong opposition to the sale of prisonmade goods in the open market, on the ground that this practice
constitutes a form of unfair competition. This opposition led, in
1929, to the passage of the so-called Hawes-Cooper Act, which
divests prison-made goods of interstate character and thus enables
a State to prohibit within its borders the sale of prison-made goods
from other States. This act becomes effective in 1934. It was the
general opinion of the prison officials who expressed themselves in the
matter that this act would probably result, in most States, in the
restriction of prison labor exclusively to the State-use system.

State and Federal Prisons
The survey covered 116 State and 12 Federal institutions. Of the
116 State institutions, the data for 74 covered the year ending June
30, 1932; for 10, the year ending September 30, 1932; for 9, the year
ending December 31, 1931; for 9, the year ending December 31, 1932;
for 5, the year ending November 30, 1931; for 5, the year ending May
31, 1932; for 2, the year ending November 30, 1932; for 1, the period
from the opening of the institution on January 4, 1932, to December
22, 1932; and for 1, the year ending January 31, 1933. Of the 12
Federal prisons, data were reported for 11 institutions for the year end­
ing June 30, 1932, and for 1 for the year ending November 30, 1932.
In the main the information was obtained by agents of the Bureau
from the records of the institutions, but as regards goods produced
under the contract and piece-price system data were also obtained
from the records of the contractor manufacturing the goods. Excellent
cooperation was received by the Bureau from the officials of all Federal
and State institutions and representatives of all firms having contracts.
In these 128 Federal and State institutions, 82,276 prisoners were
engaged in productive labor, and the value of their products was
$75,369,471. This number does not include prisoners assigned to




4

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

ordinary prison duties— that is, such duties as cooking and washing
for prisoners, cleaning cells, etc.
The value of goods as reported includes an indefinite amount of
duplication. For example, corn is reported under farm products.
Part of this com is fed to the hogs, and the value of the hogs is also
shown in the tables. Under the accounting system in effect in most
of these institutions it was impossible to prevent this duplication.
All goods in State and Federal institutions were produced under one
or more of the five following systems: Contract, piece-price, Stateaccount, State-use, public works and ways. No prisoners were found
working under the lease system. Following are the definitions of the
several systems.
Contract system.— Under this system an outside contractor contracts
with the institution for the labor of the prisoners at a stipulated
amount per capita per day. The State assumes no risk of loss, as the
contractor furnishes his own raw materials and generally provides his
own foremen, inspectors, machinery, and tools. The institution,
however, houses, feeds, clothes, and guards the prisoners, and some­
times supervises their work.
Piece-price system.— This system is nearly the same as the contract
system, the only' difference being that under the piece-price system
the contractor, mstead of paying a stated amount per day, contracts
with the institution for the labor of the prisoners at an agreed price
per unit of output. The contractor generally furnishes the machinery
and tools, and also provides for the supervision and inspection of the
prisoners while working.
State-account system.—Under this system the institution carries on
the productive enterprise and disposes of the product on the general
market and in competition with the goods produced by free labor.
The institution assumes all the business risks. If the business is one
of manufacturing, the institution buys the raw material and sells the
finished product in the same way as would be done by any manufac­
turing concern, except that it may retain part of the product for use
in the prison. Thus, in the manufacture of shirts, part of the garments
are used by the inmates of the institution and the remainder are sold
in the open market under the State-account plan. The goods may be
sold to individual customers or to a contractor who takes the entire
output. Such a contractor must not be confused, however, with the
contractor who hires work done by the prisoners. The institution
under this system houses, feeds, clothes, and guards the prisoners,
and directs and supervises their work.
In the past the State-account system often has been designated as
the “ public account” system.
State-use system.— Under this system, also, the institution carries on
the business of production; use or sale of the goods produced is, how­
ever, limited to the institution in which they were produced or to other
State or Federal institutions. Such other State institutions may be
under the control of the same or other States or of any of their sub­
divisions. The purpose of this restricted-sale principle is, of course,
to make the prison product available to public institutions while
avoiding direct competition with free-labor products. Under the
State-use plan the institutions also house, feed, clothe, guard, direct,
and supervise the prisoners.




5

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

Public works and ways system.— This system is the same in effect as
the State-use system, the only difference being the character of the
thing produced. The public works and ways system applies not to
consumption goods, but to the construction and repair of prison build­
ings, other public buildings, roads, parks, and bridges, and to the
work of flood control, reforestation, clearing land, etc.
Lease system.— No prisoners were found working under the lease
system in 1923 or in 1932, and it seems to have entirely disappeared
from both State and Federal prisons. Under the lease system the
State enters into a contract with the lessee, who agrees to receive the
prisoners, paying the State a specific amount per man per day; gen­
erally also he feeds, clothes, houses, and guards the prisoners while
employed. The State reserves the right to make rules for the care of
the prisoners and to inspect their quarters and place of work.
Proportion of Inmates Employed at Productive Labor
The Bureau of Labor Statistics previous to the 1932 study had
made surveys of prison labor covering the years 1885, 1895, 1905,
1914, and 1923.
Table 1 shows the percent the prisoners employed at productive
labor formed of all prisoners, and, of the prisoners working at pro­
ductive labor, the percent employed under the different systems in
each specified year.
T able

1.— Percent of prisoners employed at productive labor under different
systems in specified years
System

1885

Prisoners employed at productive labor under—
26
Lease system____________________________ ____ 40
Contract system________________________ ______
Piece-price system_____________ _______________
8
State-account system......................... ..................... 1
State-use system______________________ ____ __ V 126
Public works and ways system______________- __
Total________________________ -_ ____ ____ __
_
Percent of all prisoners_________________ ____ __

100
75

1895

1905

19
34
14
133

f
1

100
72

9
36
8
21

1914

1923

1932

8

4
26
6
31
22
U

0
12
7
26
36
19

0
5
11
19
42
23

100
65

# 100
" (*>

100
61

100
52

i No separation made of State account, State use, and public works and ways system in this year.
1 Not reported.

The table shows the growing use of the State-use system as com­
pared with the contract, piece-price, and State account systems. In
1905 only 26 percent of the prisoners were employed at productive
labor under the two State-use systems (State-use and public works and
ways). The other 74 percent were working under the four State-account
systems (State-account, piece-price, contract, and lease). In the 1914
survey the proportion of prisoners working under the State-use sys­
tems had risen to 33 and in 1923 to 55 percent. In 1932, 65 percent
of all prisoners engaged in productive labor were working under the
State-use systems, as compared with 35 working under the Stateaccount systems.
Goods produced under the State-use and under the public works and
ways systems are both in effect State-use systems, in that such goods
do not enter public competition. Goods produced under the State




6

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

account system, the contract system, the piece-price system, and the
lease system all enter into competition with free labor, and in that
sense all are State-account systems.
There has been a marked decrease in the number of prisoners em­
ployed at productive labor. In 1885, 75 percent of all prisoners
incarcerated in Federal and State institutions were working at
productive labor. By 1932, however, the proportion had fallen to
52 percent.
Employment and Production, 1923 and 1932
Table 2 shows the number of prisoners employed at productive
labor and the value of production in both Federal and State institu­
tions in 1932 as compared with 1923.
Number of prisoners employed and amount and percent of value of
articles produced under specified systems in State and Federal prisons in 1928 and
1932

T a b l e %.—

System

Value of articles produced

Average number
of piisoners em­
ployed at pro­
ductive labor

Amount
1923 1

Percent
1932 2

1923 1

1932 2

State use................. .....................- ......... . 18,850
Public works and ways........................... 9,763
State account____ ___________ ________ 13,526
Piece price................................................ 3,577
6,083
Contract ------ ------ ---------------- ------

34,894
18,697
15,249
9,081
4,355

$13,753,201
15,331,545
16,421,878
12,340,986
18,249,350

$21,260,411
25,159,152
12,367,646
10,522,200
6,060,062

18.1
20.1
21.6
16.2
24.0

28.2
33.4
16.4
14.0
8.0

Total......... ..................................... 51,799

82, 276

76,096,960

75,369,471

100.0

100.0

1923 1 1932 2

1 Year covered ends as follows: State institutions—for 58, June 30,1923; for 12, Nov. 30,1922; for 9, Dec. 31,
1923; for 7, Sept. 30,1922; for 6, June 30,1922; for 4, May 31,1923; for 4, Sept. 30,1923; and for 1, Jan. 31, 1923.
Federal institutions—for 3, June 30, 1923.
2 Year covered ends as follows: State institutions—for 74, June 30,1932; for 10, Sept. 30,1932; for 9, Dec. 31,
1931; for 9, Dec. 31,1932; for 5, Nov. 30,1931; for 5, May 31,1932; for 2, Nov. 30,1932; for 1, Jan. 31,1933; and
for 1, period from Jan. 4, 1932, to Dec. 22, 1932. Federal institutions—for 11, June 30, 1932; and for 1, Nov.
30, 1932.

In 1923, in the 104 State and Federal institutions surveyed, there
were 51,799 prisoners employed at productive labor. The value of
their products was $76,096,960.
In 1932, in the 128 State and Federal institutions in which the study
was made, 82,276 prisoners were employed at productive labor, and
the value of their products was $75,369,471.
It should be borne in mind that the purchasing power of the dollar
was much higher in 1932 than in 1923—in other words, that prices
were much lower in 1932 than in 1923. If, therefore, the 1932 value
were adjusted in accordance with the purchasing power of the dollar
in 1923, as shown by the Bureau of Labor Statistics index number of
wholesale prices, the value of the 1932 product would be $111,169,969.
The value of the goods produced under the State-use system rose
from 18.1 percent o f the total in 1923 to 28.2 percent in 1932. An
increased proportion of the value of the goods produced under the
public works and ways system was also shown in 1932. The pro­
portion produced under the State-account, piece-price, and contract
systems, however, was smaller in 1932 than in 1923.




7

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

Table 3 shows, for State and Federal institutions separately, the
number of prisoners employed at productive labor and the value of
prison production in 1923 and 1932, by groups of commodities.
T a b l e 3 . — Number

of prisoners employed at productive labor and value of goods
produced in State and Federal institutionst 1923 and 1982, by commodity groups

Class of prison and group of commodities produced

Average number of
prisoners employed
at productive labor
1923 1

State prisons:
Agricultural implements.... ........................ ........
Agricultural implements, parts..... .....................
Bakery products, commercial......... .................
Baskets......................... ................... ......... .........
Brooms, brushes, and mops................................
Clay, cement, and stone products.................... .
Clothing....... ......................... .......... „ „,.......... .
Coal mining,_ , , , ___
_________ ________
Collee roasting.................... ........................ ........
C onstruction..................... ..............................
Farm, garden, and dairy............... ....................
Furniture and furnishings____ ______________
Harness, pieces___________________________
Harness, sets.______________________________
Highway markers__________________________
Land development_________________________
Laundry, commercial........................................
Lumber and timber products........................... .
Metal products....................................... ............
Printing and binding___ _____ _______ _______
Repair and shop work_________ ____ _________
Soap and soap powder.............................. .........
Sugar........................................ ...........................
Textiles and textile products.............................
Toys................. ...................................................
Whips......................... ......... ............................. .
Other manufactured products_______________
Miscellaneous labor only____________________
Total........ .............. ..........................................
Federal prisons:
Bakery products, commercial________________
Brooms, brushes, and moDS_________________
Clay, cement, and stone products....................
Clothing________________ ______ ___________
Construction.................. ......... ................... ........
Farm, garden, and dairv____________________
Furniture and furnishings___________________
Land development_________________________
Laundry, commercial .
Lumber and tiraber products____
___
Printing and binding............. ......... .................
Repair and shop work______________________
Textiles and textile products....... ......................
Other manufactured products
Miscellaneous labor only_____________ _______

163.0
4.0
100.0
575.0
2.411.0
10,656.0
1.965.0
2.0
9.077.0
11,858.0
3.208.0
93.0
235.0
54.0
32.0
348.0
1,113.0
521.0
845.0
58.0
4, 793. 0
22.0
83.0
108.0
12.0
48,336.0

1932 2

Value of goods produced

19231

1932 *

147.6
$236,765
25.3
25.7 .......... 15,“454"
36,234
209.6
1,816,189
671.0
5,145.1
1,527,788
19,029.7
28,970,139
1,057.0
4,105,424
6.0
29,040
16,471.4
15,295,076
5,693, 630
17,991.8
3,976.7
3,030,096
51.5
213,210
21.8
316,940
103,460
207.4
999.6
203.1 .......... 27,"567"
914,887
340.1
2,146,230
2,136.1
324,254
957.6
315.4
434,118
61.2
115,601
124.0
6,511.1
8,098,086
146.8
14,069
31.0
63,200
302.2
81,416
101.2
60,000

$485,066
87,600
35,577
57,546
897,948
1,575,222
21,044,782
312,018
59,974
23,583,052
6,475,079
2,784,257
123,918
30,210
267,188
469,616
90,561
231,989
3,006.423
673,435
122,633
135,666
179,566
8,059,910
70,691
43,782
346,318
56,004

77,267.0

71,306,061

73,668,879

28.0

10.0
155.0
134.0
1,039.1
1,034.0
980.0
49.3
192.0
138.0
26.0
82.0
61.0
969.6
50.0
89.0

Total__________ _________________________

3,463.0

5,009.0

2,428,081

4,063,410

Grand total______________________________

51,799.0

82,276.0

76,096,960

75,369,471

6.0
45.0
254.0
762.0
298.0
16.0

33.0
338.0
1,683.0

2,396
9,372
186,436
130,001
137,939
7,932

6,369
204,515
1,718,304
24,817

12,622
283,081
34,252
797,491
1,064,745
306,290
20,274
41,740
113,945
13,230
54,365
16,077
1,201.548
54,306
49,444

* For enumeration of year periods covered, see footnote 1, table 2.
1 For enumeration of year periods covered, see footnote 2, table 2.

The 1923 survey showed that there were 48,336 prisoners engaged
at productive labor in State institutions, and the value of the goods
produced by these prisoners was $73,668,879. The 1932 survey shows
77,267 prisoners producing goods valued at $71,306,061.
In 1923 more prisoners in State institutions were worldng at farm,
garden, and dairy work than any other class of production, although
clothing manufacture was not far behind. These two classes of work




8

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

occupied 11,858 and 10,656 prisoners, respectively, in that year. In
1932 the production of clothing engaged the largest number of pris­
oners— 19,030—while 17,992 were in farm, garden, and dairy work.
In 1923 the value of the clothing manufactured was greater than that
of any other product, while in 1932 construction work held first place
as regards value.
A number of products showed a much higher dollar value in 1932
than in 1923. Among these were agricultural implements, construc­
tion work, farm, garden and dairy products, highway markers, metal
products, and printing and binding. Other products showed a de­
cided decrease in dollar value, comparing 1932 with 1923. Among
the commodities of this class were brooms, brushes, and mops, cloth­
ing, coal mining, furniture and furnishings, and lumber and timber
products.
Federal prisons in 1923 had 3,463 prisoners engaged at produc­
tive labor, and the value of the goods produced for that year was
$2,428,081. In 1932 there were 5,009 prisoners in Federal penal
institutions, producing goods valued at $4,063,410. Textiles and
textile products accounted for the largest dollar valuation of any
class of goods produced in the Federal prisons in both 1923 and 1932.
Large increases in dollar value were shown from 1923 to 1932 in the
production of clothing, construction work, and farm, garden, and
dairy products. Repair and shop work and textiles and textile
products were the only classes of work showing a lower dollar value
m 1932 than in 1923.
Table 4 shows, by States, the number of prisoners and the value of
prison products in 1932, as compared with 1923, in State and Federal
institutions.
T a b l e 4 . — Number

of prisoners and value of prison products in State and Federal
institutions, 1923 and 1932, by States

Average number of
prisoners
Class of prisons, and States
19231
State prisons:
Alabama.........................................
Arizona...........................................
Arkansas.........................................
California........................................
Colorado.........................................
Connecticut....................... ............
Delaware.........................................
District of Columbia......................
Florida........ ...................................
Georgia...........................................
Idaho.............................................
Illinois.............................................
Indiana...........................................
Iow a...............................................
Kansas..... .......................................
Kentucky........................................
Louisiana........................................
Maine.............................................
Maryland........................................
Massachusetts................................
Michigan 3......................................
Minnesota.......................................
Mississippi......................................

2,988
383
1,295
3,841
1,003
916
350
539
1,426
3,822
280
4,450
2,946
1,851
1,225
2,043
1,596
338
1,495
1,964
3,381
1,488
1,572

19321

4,837
591
1,425
7,675
1,369
1,378
527
1,580
2,786
4,197
307
10,453
6,309
2,904
2,731
3,575
2,782
515
2,586
3,586
9,735
2,449
2,104

Average
number
of prisoners em­
ployed at produc­
tive labor
19231

2,553
56
1,053
2,541
795
528
245
220
1,028
3,698
42
2,531
1,369
1,400
881
1,695
1, no
278
1,212
966
2,110
875
1,252

19323

3,763
225
867
4,394
354
738
312
676
1,739
3,328
203
4,577
3,780
1,988
1,326
2,407
1,644
152
1,341
1,781
4,164
1,321
1,370

* For enumeration of year periods covered, see footnote 1, table 2.
* For enumeration of year periods covered, see footnote 2, table 2.
9 Includes the Detroit House of Correction, in existence but not studied in 1923.




Value of articles
produced

19231

$6,153,387
69,573
. 300,623
1,463,332
922,378
2,421,119
431,661
297,479
2,199,796
5,084,188
20,045
1,320,687
1,702, 369
2,051,389
807,453
6,961,220
257,992
454,154
2,771,143
1,161,921
3,637,829
2,664,253
779,571

1932*

$5,525,751
262,116
232,409
2,651,567
137,187
698,804
226,018
712,020
2,205,647
4,962,727
198,613
2,030,032
2,233,989
2,721,769
657,364
3,115,445
979,230
33,435
2,099,867
2,002,267
4,203,736
2,989,332
393, 663

9

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS
T a b l e 4 . — Number

of prisoners and value •/ prison products in State and Federal
institutions, 1923 and 1982, by States— Continued
Average number of
prisoners

Class of prisons, and States
1923
State prisons—Continued
Missouri..........................................
Montana........................................
Nebraska........................................
Nevada.................... *.....................
New Hampshire.............................
New Jersey........................ ..........
New Mexico...................................
New York.......................................
North Carolina...............................
North Dakota................................
Ohio................................................
Oklahoma.......................................
Oregon.............................................
Pennsylvania..................................
Bhode Island..................................
South Carolina...............................
South Dakota.................................
Tennessee........................................
Texas...............................................
Utah................................................
Vermont..........................................
Virginia...........................................
Washington....................................
West Virginia.................................
Wisconsin.......................................
Wyoming........................................

2,828
340
805
147
138
1,850
399
6,512
1,102
220
4,128
2,051
424
4,336
570
537
309
1,691
3,474
188
344
1,439
1,094
1,645
1,188
399

1932

4,981
615
1,212
255
179
3,349
560
11,485
2,877
417
8,941
4,117
851
6,314
657
1,142
524
2,941
5,550
312
430
3,719
1,976
2,642
2,554
420

Average number
of prisoners em­
ployed at produc­
tive labor
1923

1932

Value of articles
produced

1923

1932

1,813
119
627
30
100
503
193
2,395
935
122
1,751
1,271
163
987
329
452
232
1,359
2,749
39
243
857
302
1,281
782
264

2,222
107
830
74
140
1,421
263
4,321
1,834
197
3,886
2,064
352
2,148
421
459
405
2,063
4,462
37
266
2,944
566
1,555
1,502
278

$4,426,097
71,874
677,947
22,769
218,000
409,363
37,175
1,789,397
1,638,233
374,448
1,323,291
1,940,751
129,402
1,148,163
1,458,471
381,302
267, 731
2,120,055
925,291
86,847
615,280
2,303,610
215,604
2,879,329
2,558, 562
1,716,325

$3,103,964
194,853
866,226
71,473
186,577
1,210,588
59,217
3,780,581
805,211
436,967
2,290,190
979,592
265,301
2,492,075
464,788
393,797
528,415
1,609,161
1,371,572
16,573
291,816
3,828,290
368,684
2,592,545
1,565,052
259,565

Total............................................

79,350

145,421

48,336

77,267

73,668,879

71,306,061

Federal prisons:
Georgia (Atlanta)...........................
Kansas (Leavenworth)..................
Washington (McNeil Island)........
9 prisons not covered in 1923_____

2,479
2,454
478

3,526
3,229
943
5,828

2,066
1,270
127

1,626
1,032
285
2,066

1,992, 779
283,943
151,359

1,566,898
932,936
410,351
1,153,225

Total................ ...... .....................

5,411

13,526

3,463

5,009

2,428,081

4,063,410

Grand total....... - ........................

84,761

158,947

51,799

82,276

76,096,960

75,369,471

In 1923 there were 84,761 prisoners incarcerated in State and Federal
institutions, as compared with 158,947 in 1932. From 1923 to 1932,
there was an increase in number of prisoners confined in State and
Federal institutions in every State in the Union. The number engaged
at productive labor, however, showed decreases in Arkansas, Colorado,
Georgia, Maine, Montana, and Utah. New York had the largest
number of prisoners confined in 1932, but Illinois had the largest
number engaged in productive labor. The largest proportion of pris­
oners engaged in productive labor occurred in Texas. In that State
over 80 percent of the prisoners confined in 1932 were engaged in
producing goods.
The dollar value of the goods produced by prison labor in Alabama
during 1932 was greater than the dollar value of goods produced in
the State penal institutions in any other State during that year.
Work Distribution of Prisoners
Table 5 shows the number of prisoners confined in both Federal
and State penal institutions in 1932, the average number employed
at productive labor, engaged in ordinary prison duties, sick, and idle,
during that year, and the number of prisoners at productive labor
under each system, by States.




10

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

T a b l e 5 . — Number

of prisoners and average number employed under various
systems of productive labor in State and Federal prisons in 1982.
Average number of prisoners during
year—

Class of prison, and
State

Em­
En­
ployed gaged
at pro­ in pris­
ductive on du­
labor
ties

Sick

State prisons:
Alabama................. 3,763
837
237
Arizona...................
225
303
25
Arkansas................
867
493
65
California............... 4,394
2,967
227
Colorado.................
354
935
45
Connecticut............
738
554
79
Delaware-..............
312
190
10
District of Colum­
676
823
bia.......................
81
920
Florida.-............... • 1,739
127
661
Georgia................... 3,328
208
203
Idaho......................
87
11
Illinois.................... 4,577
3,905
185
2,054
Indiana................... 3,780
301
Iowa.......................
1,988
739
33
Kansas.................... 1,326
1,083
158
Kentucky............... 2,407
608
109
1,644
1,037
Louisiana...............
101
152
217
9
M aine--.................
374
Maryland............... 1,341
167
1,480
Massachusetts____ 1,781
246
2,430
372
Michigan................ 4,164
1,321
564
Minnesota___
91
651
Mississippi............. 1,370
83
Missouri................. 2,222
1,111
125
107
139
3
Montana.................
830
282
42
Nebraska................
74
Nevada.................
81
4
140
36
0
New Hampshire...
1,421
1,254
72
New Jersey............
218
30
263
New Mexico______
4,914
New York.............. 4,321
332
560
133
1,834
North Carolina___
87
23
197
North Dakota____
3,177
848
Ohio....................... 3,886
2,064
72
1,981
Oklahoma. ............
352
436
38
Oregon....................
2,972
219
Pennsylvania......... 2,148
421
170
39
Rhode Island.........
459
195
185
South Carolina
9
405
78
South Dakota_____
604
225
Tennessee________ 2,063
73
1,015
Texas...................... 4,462
20
Utah.......................
37
79
134
4
266
Vermont.................
109
666
Virginia.................. 2,944
39
566
793
Washington............
388
139
West Virginia......... 1,555
101
581
Wisconsin............... 1,502
278
99
15
Wyoming...............
Total................... 77,267 45,962 5,869
Federal prisons:
304
199
26
California...............
1,385
265
Georgia................... 1,626
2,994
257
Kansas.................... 1,440
134
155
12
New Hampshire...
769
42
666
Ohio.......................
40
104
3
South Carolina____
494
68
458
Virginia..................
597
57
285
Washington............
222
59
161
West Virginia.........
7,024
789
Total____ ______ 5,009
Grand total......... 82,276 52,986 6,658
i Includes 245 assigned to regular school
other than apprentice school.
* Includes 164 attending school.
* Includes 350 in school and 110 in band.
<Includes 215 attending school.




Idle

0
38
0
87
35
7
15

Total

4,837
591
1,425
7,675
1,367
1,378
527

Average number of prisoners at pro­
ductive labor under specified system
State
use

894
110
142
1,850
293
265
56

Public
works State Piece Con­
and account price tract
ways
1,174
74
0
1,401
45
28
38

968
41
725
1,143
16
38
12

727
0
0
0
0
407
206

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
1,580
476
200
0
0
0
2,786
453
263
1,010
13
0
0
4,197
210 3,118
0
0
0
6
307
1
166
33
3
0
11,786
10,453
2,820
1,380
377
0
0
174
6,309
1,110
565
483 1,622
0
144
2,904
754
658
210
366
0
2164
1,041
0
2,731
47
238
0
451
126
1 1,185 1,095
8,575
0
0
2,782
809
0
506
329
0
137
114
515
0
0
0
38
704
22
182
2,586
210
849
78
79
1,440
3,586
188
153
0
0
2,769
1,303
739 2,122
9,735
0
0
372
8 473
2,449
66
883
0
0
0
334
2,104
59
977
0
0
621
‘ 1,523
4,981
288
1,136
177
0
366
85
14
0
615
8
0
142
58
1,212
62
37
583
6
96
64
2
0
255
8
0
3
0
0
0
0
179
140
* 602
1,199
222
0
0
3,349
0
49
560
106
32
125
0
0
2,941
«1,918
11,485
1,380
0
0
0
350
712
429
425
0
2,877
268
110
71
111
0
417
15
0
1,030
8,941
3,623
263
0
0
0
0
371
723
950
20
4,117
0
25
143
179
0
851
30
0
0
975
6,314
955
76
1,117
0
27
1
306
657
71
43
0
303
1,142
162
50
59
0
188
32
12
175
0
218
524
0
2,941
49
0
377
0 1,243
443
0
0
2,186
140 2,136
5,550
0
2
0
176
35
0
0
312
41
26
50
0
175
430
0
187
0
303
477
3,719
1,757
220
24
0
494
? 578
48
1,976
0
0
658
560
131
2,642
629
137
361
43
370
747
142
2,554
209
172
64
5
37
«28
420
0
16,323 145,421 31,190 17,471 15,170 9,081 4,355
0
250
302
0
148
0
0
4
0
704
17,027

109
529
3,526
1,485
1,290
4,993
301
134
202
1,625
14
147
1,020
225
84
943
442
161
13,526 3,704
158,947 34,894

49
141
150
0
464
0
231
201
0
1,226
18,697

51
0
0
0
0
26
2
0
0
79
15,249

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9,081

* Includes 200 attending school.
* Includes 803 attending school and 200
receiving military training.
TIncludes 125 attending school.
1 Includes 17 attending school.

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4,355

11

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

Of the prisoners confined in State and Federal penal institutions,
51.8 percent were employed at productive labor; 33.3 percent were
engaged in prison duties; 4.2 percent were sick; and 10.7 percent were
idle. The percentage employed at productive labor differed greatly
in Federal and State institutions. In the State prisons as a whole,
53.1 percent were employed at productive labor, while in Federal
prisons only 37 percent were so engaged. In contrast, 31.6 percent of
the prisoners in State institutions, as against 51.9 percent of the
Federal prisoners, were employed at ordinary prison duties. The
percentage of idle in State institutions was over twice that in Federal
institutions.
Of the prisoners in Federal and State institutions engaged at pro­
ductive labor, 42.4 percent were working under the State-use system,
22.7 percent under the public works and ways system, 18.5 percent
under the State-account system, 11 percent under the piece-price
system, and 5.3 percent under the contract system.
A number of States, among them California, Illinois, New Jersey,
New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, have no prisoners working under
either of the contract systems. In other States, on the other hand,
Kentucky, Tennessee, Maryland, and Connecticut, the majority of
the work is done under the two contract systems; that is, either pieceprice or per capita contract.
Hours of Labor
Table 6 shows the hours of work of prisoners employed at pro­
ductive labor in 1932.
T a b l e 6 . — Classified

weekly working hours of prisoners employed at productive
labor in State and Federal prisons, 1932
Number of prisoners whose average weekly hours of labor were—

24 32 36 40
Class of prison, and State Un­ and and and and
der un­ un­ un­ un­
24 der der der der
32 36
44
40
State prisons:
Alabama....................
Arizona................. .
Arkansas....................
California...................
Colorado....................
Connecticut...............
Delaware......... .........
District of Columbia.
Florida..................... .
Georgia......................
Idaho.....................
Illinois........................
Indiana......................
Iowa...........................
Kansas......................_
Kentucky..................
Louisiana...................
Maine........................
Maryland..................
Massachusetts...........
Michigan...................
Minnesota.................
Mississippi.................
Missouri....................
Montana....................
Nebraska.................
2574°—33----- 2




0
44

a

835
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
23
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0

0
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
426 1,152 321 1,044
14
0 235
7
0 238
0
0
11
0
0
0
0
0
15 276
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4 177
18
0 4,145
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
61
0
0
0
0
0 144
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 80 621 863
0
0
0 396
0 325
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
96
0
0
0
0
0
0
15
0 815

44

Over
Over
Over
44
54
48
and 48 and 54 and
un­
un­
un­
der
der
der
48
54
60

0
0
0
0
172
0
0
0
0
0
16
0
20
0 581
0
12 36
0
0
500
0
0
0
206
0
0
0
385
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
409
0
0
0
3,780
0
0
0
1,892
0
35
0
30
0 143
739
0
0 2,402
0
0
0
0
0
50
0 75
27
1,145
0
0 60
176
0
0
0
3,274 494
0
0
0 921
0
75
0
0
0
0
392
0 1,720
0
0
0 92
0
0
0
o 0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 1,739
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 270
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Over
60 Total

60

3,763
0
851
15
43
0
95
0
0
3,328
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,644
0
136
41

O
'

0
1,370
0
13
0

0
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
14
0
0

3,763
225
867
4,394
354
738
312
676
1,739
3,328
203
4,577
3,780
1,988
1,326
2,407
1,644
152
1,341
1,781
4,164
1,321
1,370
2,222
107
830

12

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

T able

6.— Classified weekly working hours of prisoners employed at productive
labor in State and Federal prisons, 1982— Continued
Number of prisoners whose average weekly hours of labor were—

24
32 36 40
Class of prison, and State Un­ and and and and
der un­ un­ un­ un­
24 der der der der
32
36
40 44
State prisons—Contd.
Nevada....... ..............
New Hampshire........
New Jersey................
New Mexico________
New York.................
North Carolina.........
North Dakota...........
Ohio...........................
..................
Oregon.......................
Pennsylvania............
Rhode Island............
South Carolina..........
South Dakota............
Tennessee..................
Texas.........................
Utah...........................
Vermont....................
Virginia......................
Washington...............
West Virginia............
Wisconsin..................
Wyoming...................

44

24
3
0 42
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10 385 30 996
0
184
0
0 41
0
553
0 868 406 1,889 460
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 72
0
0
0 3,814
0 Oklahoma 0
0
0
0 1,659
323
6
3
0
0
0
948
0
0 394 140 311
0
0
0
0
0 120
263
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 405
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
32
0
5
178
0
0
0
0 36
21
0
0
0
0
0
198
0
3
0 51 229
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 36
0
0
50
0
0
0
0
0

Over
Over
Over
54
44
48
and 48 and 54 and
un­
un­
un­
der
der
der
54
48
60
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 32
0 73
0 17
1
0
0
0
0 405
0
0
0 355
300
0
0 196
0
0
0 650
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 837
0
30
0
0
3 559
179 49

0
0
140
0
0
0
0
0
0
55
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
114 1,271
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 2,086
0
15
0 1,555
635 269
0
0

Over Total
60

60

0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
17
0
0 1,817
196
0
0
0
0
0
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
17
0 4,462
0
0
52
0
0
0
12
20
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
0
0
0

74
140
1,421
263
4,321
1,834
197
3,886
2,064
352
2,148
421
459
405
2,063
4,462
37
266
2,944
566
1,555
1,502
278

Total...................... 1,099 1,343 6,838 3,870 5,023 22,572 1,969 8,206 1,193 5,181 2,074 17,869
30 77,267
Percent................... 1.4 1.7 8.8 5.0 6.5 29.2 2.5 10.6 1.5 6.7 2.7 23.1 (0 100.0
Federal prisons:
California...............
Georgia......... ............
Kansas.......................
New Hampshire____
Ohio...........................
South Carolina_____
Virginia......................
Washington________
West Virginia----------

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

25
130 31
0
0 1,626
0 1,192
115
134
0
0
0
0 666
0
0
0
0
0 458
218
0
0
0 161
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
40
0
0
0

0
0
133
0
0
0
0
40
0

13
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
27
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
199
0 1,626
0 1,440
0
134
0
666
0
40
0
458
0
285
0
161

Total.......................
Percent...................

0
0

0
0

0
0

264 1,384 3,108
5.3 27.6 62.0

0
0

40
.8

173
3.5

13
.3

27
.5

0
0

0 5,009
0 100.0

Grand total....... . 1,099 1,343 6,838 4,134 6,407 25,680 1,969 8,246 1,366 5,194 2,101 17,869
30 82,276
Percent................... 1.3 1.6 8.3 5.0 7.8 31.2 2.4 10.0 1.7 6.3 2.6 21.7 0) 100.0
* Less than one tenth of 1 percent.

Of the 82,276 prisoners employed at productive labor in State and
Federal institutions, 1.3 percent had nominal working hours of less
than 24 per week, and 55.2 percent, hours of 44 or less per week; while
32.3 percent had working hours in excess of 48 per week. More of the
prisoners working over 48 hours per week were engaged at farm,
garden, and dairy labor, than at any other class of work. It must be
borne in mind tnat these are only nominal working hours; that is,
the number of hours the prisoners spent in the factory workrooms. In
a number of cases, however, there was not enough work to keep
prisoners busy the whole work period.
There is a notable contrast in the hours of labor in the different
States. For example, in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Missis­
sippi, all the prisoners worked 60 hours per week, and in North
Carolina, 1,817 of the 1,834 prisoners worked 60 hours per week. In
contrast, in Illinois, 4,168 of the 4,577 prison inmates worked less
than 36 hours per week. In California, 2,413 of the 4,394 prisoners
worked less than 36 hours per week, and in New York, 3,163 of a total
of 4,321 worked less than 40 hours per week.




STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

13

In Federal institutions no prisoners had nominal working hours of as
much as 60 hours per week and none were reported as working less
than 36 hours per week.
Kind and Value of Articles Produced
Table 7 shows the kind, quantity, and value of articles produced
in State and Federal institutions under each of the systems in practice.
The total value of all goods produced in State penal institutions was
$71,306,061. Of this amount more than $24,000,000 was produced
under the public works and ways system; over $18,000,000 under the
State-use system; over $10,500,000 under the piece-price system;
and over $6,000,000 under the contract system.
New road building accounted for nearly two thirds of the total value
produced under the public works and ways system.
Automobile license tags accounted for the largest valuation of any
class of goods produced under the State-use system. The value of the
more than 36,000,000 automobile license tags produced was nearly
$2,300,000. Miscellaneous farm products produced under this
svstem accounted for a valuation of over $2,000,000. The pants,
shoes, miscellaneous printing, and milk, produced under the Stateuse system, each accounted for a valuation of between $500,000 and
$1,000,000.

Under the State-account system more than 63,000,000 pounds of
binder twine was produced, having a value of over $4,000,000. This
is nearly one third of the total value of all goods produced under the
State-account system. Other commodities produced on a large scale
under this system were over $1,000,000 worth of shirts, nearly
$1,000,000 worth of raw cotton, and over $800,000 worth of pants.
Shirts were the largest item produced under the piece-price system,
accounting for over $5,000,000 of the total of $10,500,000 valuation.
Nearly $2,500,000 worth of pants and nearly $900,000 worth of under­
wear were also produced under this system.
Shirts held first place in value of goods produced under the contract
system, followed in order by pants, chairs, brooms, and hosiery.
More than 22,000,000 shirts, valued at over $8,000,000 were pro­
duced under all systems combined. The valuation of shirts is
higher than that of any other article manufactured. The only work
performed by prisoners having a higher valuation is road building.
In Federal prisons practically all goods produced were under either
the State-use or public works and ways system. Shoes and duck and
canvas were the only classes of goods produced under the State-use
system in Federal institutions having a valuation of over $500,000.
New buildings accounted for nearly $700,000 of the $1,100,000
valuation shown under the public works and ways system. The
values shown under public works and ways system mclude the value
of the material whether or not fabricated by the prisoners; thus, the
total value of a building erected by prisoners is given, even though
bricks and stones were purchased on the outside. In some cases,
road-repair work includes labor only. Only slightly over $55,000
worth of goods were produced under the State-account system in
Federal institutions. These goods were sold either to employees of
the institution, or, in the case of Army and Navy prisons, to officers
and enlisted men of the Service. No goods were produced under
either the piece-price or contract systems.




T a b le 7.— Kind, quantity, and ra/ue 0 articles produced,
/

system under which produced

STATE PRISONS
Number and value of articles produced under each system

Number

Value
$3,974.20
954.00

Number

Value

State account
Number
9,044

0)

Value

Piece price
Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

0)

86,646.00

42,140,000
517,505
3 7,838
57,334

461,084.52
54,257.21
65,010.72
49,436.66

3 76,774
3 31,037
3 621,038
0)

76,023.60
234,780.44
595,048.08
39,580.61

40.236
1,567,440
138,151
2,108,749
859,276.25
<217,439
175,641
142,048
« 5,279,280 * 523,365.40 <6,667,534
963,017
540.00
13.236

12,439.79
440,548.67
428,771.75
883,690.87
21,164.56
8,279.37
40,858.12
681,648.30
636,063.90
87,756.13

739,079
250,106
1,605

116,051.34
26,305.95
313.16

2,360,681

592,101,35

402, 525.57
54,226.91
65,010. 72
49,436.66

6,008,000
505

58,558.95
30.30

17,315.10
234,268.67
263,701.50
10,260.41

« 56,280
3 513
3 86,565

58,708.50
511.77
106,157.21
29,320. 20

12, 410.87

84
29,540
49,962

79,530.40
647,644.15

19
1,050,089

3 207,864

28.92
9,846,67 1,537,540
138,061.60
2,080,540

600

225,189.37

$430,477.00

909,012 484,048.89
312,917.63
17.41
587,178
803,422.67 3,756,057 2,461,312.83 2,021,8621,410,258.74

1,616,689
876,514.33
7,257,380 5,322,638.39

STATES, 1932

768,307.30
88,839.51
40,800.87

60,154.61
62,533.56
40,487.71

I TTN
N
ITED

3,225,071
364,760
157,048

$7,163. 7
-9

23.10
103.44
379,433.75
311.00

87,600.00
35,577.18
57,546.37

34,620

640,014
27

$485,065.75

158,529

34,305.52

,

Value

2826,557

97,223

225.00
290, 710.15
24, 414.62
21 164.56
8, 279.37
40, 835.02
158, 179.46
256, 090.15
87, 445.13

Number
9,095

$481,091.55

35,577.18
16,077.06

(0

Total

LABOR

51
147.6
Agricultural implements...
Agricultural implements,
25.3
parts................................
(9
Bakery products, commer­
25.7 * 826,557
cial...................................
26,686
209.6
Baskets....................... .......
Brooms, brushes, etc.:
125,311
510.5
Brooms........................
114,654
137.4
Brushes______ _______
155,443
23.1
Mops............................
Clay, cement, and stone
products:
Brick and building tile. 1,441.6 36,132,000
517,000
182.8
Concrete blocks...........
3 7,838
25.0
Concrete pipe..............
57,334
81.3
Concrete posts.............
Lime and agricultural
222.5 3 20,494
limestone..................
3 30, 524
379.
Stone, building............
Stone, crushed_______ 2,769.2 3 326,f
Miscellaneous_______
43.1
0)
Clothing:
40,152
32.3
Aprons.........................
360
540.9
Children’s play suits..
88,189
423.6
Coats............................
28,'209
582.7
Dresses........................ .
47.3 <217,439
Gloves and mittens—
175,641
18.7
Handkerchiefs----------142,042
80.4
Hats and caps----------686.9 <1,387,595
Hosiery........................
322,403
710.6
Overalls-------------------13,209
98.0
Overcoats.....................
Pajamas and night­
539.4
120,480
gowns----- -------------429,372
Pants............................ 4,691.9




Public works and
ways

State use

PRISON

Articles produced

Aver­
age
number
of pris­
oners
em­
ployed

49,899.38
316,712.28
966.318.04
160.728.05
384,871.71
322,375.75 .............. ....................
41,336.89
105,420.86

26.5
1,057.0

1,003.20
218,520.47
59,974.10

6.0

0)
151,865
2374,132

3

512.9
5,371.7
25.0
9,205.1
503.6

0)

390,763

5,201.34
93,497.46

(9

4,120.04

0)
74,946
81,074,946
»1,370
3 10
(0

180,740.71
462,758.87
48,139.00
90.00
3,014.00

10,324.58
312,017.93
59,974.10

611.159.72
181 6,685,340.58
140,000.00
•1.50
«1,240.77 15,286.536.41
182,274.24
0)

0)

677,740.61

71,035
88,710
» 26,805
3 11,417
0)
3 1,077
3 1,553
73,761
21,208,200
28,988,500
3 420
828,211
8

55,659.02
3,776.83
826,119.37
126,773.73
18,796.05
126,763.00
18,197.56
37,521.51
30,526.39
36,690.96
1,318.82
17,142.91
12,033.19
156,465.92
7,865.34

0)
5Includes clockwork decoration on 87,204 pairs, market
value $21,801; work done on piece-price basis.
•Miles.

75,981
»1,083,656
•28,175
311,427

0)

31,077
338,008
726,614
222,573,300
*29,174,000
3 40,898
*115,817

0)
0)
0)

677,740.61
236.399.73
466,535.70
874,258.37
126.863.73
21,810.05
126,763.00
466,758.78
416.564.69
623.451.70
213,560.81
128.409.74
63,178.48
426,792.97
2,269,081.28
14,650.13

PRISONS

336,455
448,561.22
722,853
379,043.18
221,365,100 592,925.31
599. 220,185,500
176,869.85
297.
3 40,478
127,090.92
253.
887,606
46,035.57
360.
414,759.78
6,104.
2,113,615.36
8
6,784.79
0)
* Enumeration impracticable.
2Pounds.
* Tons.
<Pairs.

(0

3 242,628
2374,132

0)

$611,159.72
181 6,685,340.58
*1.50
140,000.00
«1,240.77 15,286,536.41
182,274.24
0)
0)

853.1
2,631.
3,737.
586.
66 .
170.

2,139,185 1,420,532.07
4,173,196 1,268,519.40 11,030,621 3,674,841.58 4,597,382 1,533,319.37 20,380,526 6,793,392.63
264,694.35 <159,121
233,870.03
<751,386 1,464,882.42
<196,232
164,164.37
3,436.32
<4,711
<238,615
45,912 392,003.64
351
7,131.93
889,283.00
77
50.50 3,968,304
4,716,145 1,211,709.25
41,336.89
11,051
106,062.31
641.45
0)
0)

A D FEDERAL
N




73,308
647.6
6.498.6
579,327
1.433.6 <396,033
269.5 <233,904
562.7
45,561
990.9
747,764
79.8
11,051
167.9
(0

STATE

Siiirts, dress.................
Shirts, work.................
Shoes, new...................
Shoes repaired..............
Suits..........................
Underwear...................
Uniforms, prison.........
Miscellaneous________
Miscellaneous, labor
on ly...........................
Coal mining........................
Coffee roasting....................
Construction:
Alterations and instal­
lations....... ................
New buildings..............
Railroad track..............
Roads, new...................
Roads, repaired............
New, other than build­
ings and roads______
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................
Corn..............................
Cotton..........................
Cottonseed__________
Farm hands hired out.
Flax industry. .............
Hay...............................
Hogs..............................
M ilk..............................
Potatoes........................
Sugar cane....................
Wheat............. ............
Miscellaneous dairy_
_
Miscellaneous farm___
Miscellaneous livestock

7 Head.
* Bushels.
•Bales.

Of

T a b le 7.— Kind , quantity, and vaZwe o/ articles produced, 6^ system under which produced— Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued

Articles produced

State use
Number

19,765
1,498

128.8
415.9
,646.1
391.7
289.3
141.3
21.3
411.5
258.8
51.5

1, 510
81,931
3,334
3,605
46,331
34,876
16,308

1,'

Number

Value

$163,688.85
4,813.89

900.6
99.0
203.1 21,324,148

64,840.65

31,218
58.0
2
142.1 1 924,435
60.1
1,475
79.9
0)

6,942.59
17.683.42
39,756.94
34.585.43

21.8

207.4

128,275
58,227. 72
,0 0 36,243,928 2,299,430.89
2 .9
371.7 3 5,140,293
134,565.58
134.0
192.3
96,129
104,087.31
552.02
104.2
457
32,590.58
18.0 2, 205, 538
64.6
96,187
26,278.37
50,998.09
165.3
(0

Value

16,571.
9,082.
290,792.

4,674
302
160
58,941

26,558.
1,647.
785.
142,664.
20,600.
38.
1,435.
18,501.

0) 1 9
0
n 35
37,520

$405, 749. 00
63,867.00

Value

Number

* 346, 111
458,996

12, 748
15,040
9,701

$43,104.00
95,071. 00
92,728.00

1,276

5,747.00
25,380.00

0)

22,878
588,580
14, 713

$76,804.05
623,962. 65
181,920. 56

2, 585

8,435. 29
5, 744. 61

.0)

1 74,049 123,317.73
0
1 968 26, 620. 00
1

0)
(0

(0

490,214

1 4,328,227
2

1,490

(0

65.1

288,568
1,113,010
323
134,214
30,576
116

0)

3,943.75
48,983.57
471.25
47,348.00
2,202.05
31.74
4,730.22

28,760,852

0)

Value

$172,313.72
6,454.24

5,040
53, 410.09
40, 796
133, 277.52
871,774 1,298, 511.21
29,078
355, 519.02
8,279
136, 432.06
46,633
180, 868.78
35,036
24, 267.23
79,110
294, 763.71
128, 439.55
0)
i®74,<
123, 918.26
1 1,053
1
30, 210.50
291,279
267, 188.31

21,670, 259

49,938.32
72, 293. 73
79.74
10,708.91

15

Number

21,304
2,873

25,719.94

1 3,403, 792
2

Value

$8,624.87
1,640.35

3,271
3,660
186,223

1
,r~

Number

Total

Contract

Piece price

405,749.00
63,867.00
90,560.59
56,880.91
89,977.15
39,836.68
45,294.34

128,275
58,227.72
36,243,928 2,299,430.89
176,247.60 213,989,713
314,756.93
1,113,010
48,983.57
96,452
104,558.56
134,671
47,900.02
2,236,114
34,792.63
96,303
26,310.11
71,462.95
15,734.64
0)

STATES, 1932

io 850
1 50
1
253,759

Number

1,375

36, 838.90
4, 287.17
288, 684.82
72, 173. 75
109, 873.91
179, 221.16
23, 481. 68
137, 917.39
76, 714.79
562.50
2, 155. 50
248, 687.20

0)

State account

I XJNITED
N

260.8
11.2

Value

Public works and
ways

LABOR




Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Furnituro and furnishings:
Beds__........................
Benches.......................
Bureaus, chiffoniers,
dressers, etc__.........
Chairs, fiber................
Chairs, wood............ .
Davenports, sofas, etc.
Desks..........................
Mattresses,...............
Pillows........................
Tables.........................
Miscellaneous.............
Harness..............................
Highway markers.............
Land development:
Land improvement—
Reforestation..............
Laundry, commercial.......
Lumber and timber prod­
ucts:
Boxes..........................
Lumber.......................
Millwork—.............. .
Miscellaneous..........—
Metal products:
Aluminum ware.........
Auto license tags------Castings— .................
Electric switch boxes.
Galvanized ware------Iron hollow ware.......
Tags, miscellaneous - -.
Tinware.......... - ..........
Miscellaneous..........—

Aver­
age
number
of pris­
oners i
em­
ployed

Printing and binding:
Books, blank and
bound........................
Envelopes___________
Letterheads__________
Miscellaneous..............
Repair and shop work____
Soap and soap powder.......
Sugar..... .............................
Textiles and textile prod­
ucts:

1,073.2
93,667
Binder twine------------- 1,671.9
*25,350
152,158
Blankets--...................
354.0
Cotton yard goods,
light...........................
983.9 * 965,104
Cotton yard goods,
h e a v y .-....................
945.2 2 284,580
Duck and canvas____
5.0 217,692
Flags.............................
37,128
41.2
Pillowcases...................
H op e, tw in e (not
binder), and cordage.
130.4
Sheets...........................
384,525
142.5
Spreads_____________
38,853
12.5
477,183
69.5
Wool yard goods_____
304.0 2 247,262
Yarn, cotton and wool.
409.8 21,253,647
Miscellaneous textiles..
2.2
0)
Miscellaneous textile
products....................
305.9
(*
)
Toys....................................
146.8
149
Whips....... ............... ........
31.0
Other manufactured prod­
ucts..................................
302.2
101.2
Miscellaneous, labor only..

6,931.80
1,863.13
447,130.88

352,187.55
5,463,357
*63,686,325 4,050,123.27
114.20
20

8

Total..........................77,267.0

8

849,997
14,172,495
12,641,382

72.20
89.20
8,855.09
23,073.27
873.30
176,873.67

432,388.59

2189,451
23,947,562

916,207.30

122
134

393.98
35.95

6,851.00
208,971.84
40,162.72
71,941.78
353,705. 56
481,410.68
826.71

■3,556,998
267

311,926.89
254.76

80

26.67

'*8," 653

~i,"655."35

96,748.21
149.00

0)

5,557,024
359,119 35
2
63,711,675 4,051,986.40
447.245.08
152,178

44,716.50

129,814.55
3,586.15
34,701.90
50,609.32

8

22,970, 749
25,506,874

14,622.5ll
70,542.211

21,154,555

23,646,286
384,792
38,853
477,263
2247,262
21,262,300

87,564
256,747.88
42,066.00

8

18,358,763.73

66,650.16
11,891.66

24,052, 667.56_________ 12,312,367.26

I

477.105.09

24,232,142 1,046,021.85
3,586.15
17,692
35,095.88
37,250
260,163
50,645.27

(9
45,338

17,158.61
61,600.15
35,400.53
559,275.63
122,662.53
135,665.75
179,566.43

0)

$22,919.49

0)

10,522,200.35

43,782.00
2,046.25
6,060,062.29

0)
45,487

87,564

8

318,777.89
209,226.60
40,162.72
71,968.45
353,705.56
483,066.03
826.71
111,370.72
70,691.21
43,782.00
346,317.53
56,003.91
71,306,061.19

FEDERAL PRISONS
$248.78

2 411,350

2F

io Pieces.

ii Sets.

i2 Boar

$12,622.05

319,584
486,558
3,056

............. |
_____
to




26,219

1

Bakery products, commer­
cial....................................
10.0 2405,131
$12,373.27
Brooms, brushes, etc.:
319,584
Brooms.........................
54.0
109,723.84
Brushes________ _____
100.0
486,558
172,742.23
Mops....... .....................
614.79
1.0
3,056
i Enumeration impracticable.

109,723.84
172,742.23
614.70

PRISONS

2 15,530
25,424,274

8

21,450
28,200

A D FEDERAL
N

17,158.61
61,527.95
35,311.33
550,420.54
99,589.26
134,792.45
2,692.76

STATE

849,997
60.6 14,151,045
47.3 12,613,182
810.9
315.4
61.2 22,955,219
124.0 282,600

T a b le 7.— Kind , quality, and value of articles produced,

system under which 'produced— Continued

O
O

FEDERAL PRISONS—Continued

Articles produced

State use

Public works and
ways

State account

Piece price

I
Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Total

Contract
Number

Value

Number

Value

2,704,000

$34,252.00

1,055.50
8,923.58
3,677.14
418.07
90.30
1,563.97
17,701.62
14,618.33

3,745
3,615
3,340
*5,841
3,010
7,498
30,218
3,149

1,055.50
8,923.58
3,677.14
418.07
90.30
1,563.97
17,701.62
14,618.33

1,769
2.9
9,169
40.3
4,245
9.0
64,655
85.9
469.0 <240, 280
82.0 <45,482
7,778
108.2
48,144
47.1
1.8
268
5.2
0)

860.75
13,502.68
2,653.20
28,610. 53
582,887.36
28,925.68
36,368.80
12,738.54
413.00
1,519.93

9,1
4,245
64,655
<240,280
*47,732
7,778
48,144
268

1
,7

860.75
13.502.68
2,653.20
28.610.53
582,887.36
31.175.68
36,368.80
12.738.54
413.00
1,519.93

4.3
27.2
12.0
5.0

1.0

5.1
63.5
40.4

29.2

0)

42, 250

3,860.00

34,851.70

0)

233.0
735.0
2.0
4.0

0)

$283,598.51
693,583.45
1,140.00
5,000.00

60.0

(0

81,422.71

13.2

20

60.08

7199

6,357.35

$2,250.00

(0
0)
0)

38,711.70

20

80.08

0)
0)

7199

283,598.51
693,583.45
1,140.00
5,000.00
81,422.71
6,357.35

STATES, 1032

$34,252.00

3,745
3,615
3,340
<5,841
3,010
7,498
30,218
3,149

I UNITED
N

134.0 2,704,000

LABOR




Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Clay, cement, and stone
products:
Brick and building tile.
Clothing:
Aprons______________
Coats_______________
Dresses........................ .
Gloves and mittens_
_
Handkerchiefs............ .
Hats and caps............ .
Overalls........................
Overcoats--.................
Pajamas and night­
gowns........................
Pants— ......................
Shirts, dress.................
Shirts, work......... .......
Shoes, new.................. .
Shoes, repaired........... .
Suits............................ .
Underwear...................
Uniforms, prison.........
Miscellaneous............. .
Miscellaneous, labor
only.......................... .
Construction:
Alterations and instal­
lations...................... .
New buildings.......... .
Roads, new........... .....
Roads, repaired--------New, other than build­
ings and roads..........
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...........................

Aver­
age
number
of pris­
oners
em­
ployed

(*
)

2.3

7 62
480,800

«57,174
8 3,017
7 2,843
2,874,800
297,200
81,464
0)
0)

1,692.47
22,052. 63

8,244.94

0)

507.22

24,243.97
8,939.71
49,900.27
103,750.92
3,286.99
800.81
19,295.33
89,207.72
507.22

0)

.1

10
45
258
85
1,602
157

5.0
7.0

6.0
2.0
7.0

22.2

(9

10

72.00

16
59
13

848.11
1,180.85
840.00

137

810.15
1,733.04
3,383.11
2,503.10
1,930.56
1,285.24

72.00

*1,918.03
3,769.86

61
317
98
1,602
294
(0

1,658.26
2,913.89
4,223.11
2.503.10
3,848.59
5.055.10

*81,439

6,450.73

0)
*1,408,932

41,739.82
113,944.69

0)
41,739.82

107,493.96

14.0 1*471,350
12.0
0)

3,135.13
10,094.52

i* 471,350
0)

3,135.13
10,094.52

1,621.00
891.81
1,497.49
50,355.15
14,277.29

3,242
348,600
776,200

1,621.00
891.81
1,497.49
50,355.15
16,077.29

6.0

2.0
3.2
70.8
61.0

3,242
348,600
776,200

8

15.4
47,098
9
.1
664.0 *4,271,780
21,646
10.5
27,225
42.2
.2
71
6.1 15,682

0)

1,800.00

8

21,270.60
27.00
881,574.96
2,954.22
16,820.37
65.98
1,116.71

180.0 *2,287,164

<
*)

227,208.01

51.1
50.0
89.0

0)

1,106,484.49

5,009.0
* Pounds.

3 Tons.

55,278.40
« Pairs.

e Miles.

50,509.71

8

50.00

227,208.01

0)

54,306.10
49,444.40

0)

21,270.60
27.00
881,574.96
2,954.22
16,82a37
65.98
1,116.71

*2,287,164

50,459.71

8

47,098
9
*4,271,780
21,646
27,225
71
15,682

54,306.10
49,444.40
4,063,409.56

7Head.

8Bushels.

« Board feet.

PRISONS

192.0
138.0 ‘ 1,327,493

i Enumeration impracticable.




24,243.97
8,939.71
48,207.80
81,698.29
3,286,99
800.81
19,295.33
80,962.78

A D FEDERAL
N

T otal..................... -

101.7 857,174
32.4
8 3,017
7 2,781
125.0
214.5 2,394,000
297,200
25.0
2.0 8 1,464
82.0
381.9
h

STATE

C orn.............................
Hay...............................
Hogs....... ......................
M ilk .............................
Potatoes........................
Wheat...........................
Miscellaneous d airy...
Miscellaneous farm___
Miscellaneous
live­
stock..........................
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches........................
Bureaus, chiffoniers,
dressers, etc__...........
Chairs, wood................
Desks........... ................
Mattresses. ..................
Tables...........................
Miscellaneous..............
Land development:
Land improvement___
Laundry, commercial........
Lumber and timber prod­
ucts:
Lumber.............. .........
Miscellaneous..............
Printing and binding:
Books, blank, and
bound................. ......
Envelopes____ _______
Letterheads..................
Miscellaneous..............
Repair and shop work.......
Textiles and textile prod­
ucts:
Bags..............................
Blankets.....................
Duck and canvas_____
Pillow cases..................
Sheets...........................
Spreads-.......................
Towels..........................
Yarn,
cotton and
wool...........................
Miscellaneous textile
products....................
•Other manufactured p rod-.
ucts..................................
Miscellaneous labor only—

20

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

Sex of Prisoners
Table 8 shows the average number of prisoners of each sex em­
ployed at productive labor, by institution.
T a b l e 8 ,—

Average number of prisoners of each sex employed at productive labor,
by institution
STATE PRISONS
Average number of prisoners
Males

Females

State and institution
Total

Alabama:
State prison system................................
Arizona: State prison....................................
Arkansas:
State penitentiary...................................
State farm for women.............................
California:
State prison at San Quentin...................
Folsom State prison...............................
Colorado:
State penitentiary..................................
State reformatory...................................
Connecticut:
State reformatory...................................
State farm for women.............................
State prison...................................... . . . .
Delaware: New Castle County workhouse.
District of Columbia:
District reformatory...............................
District workhouse.................................
Florida: State farm........................................
Georgia: State prison system........................
Idaho: State penitentiary.............................
Illinois:
State farm...............................................
State penitentiary...................................
State reformatory...................................
State reformatory for women................
Women’s prison.....................................
Southern penitentiary............................
Indiana:
State reformatory...................................
State farm...............................................
Women’s prison.....................................
State prison.............................................
Iowa:
Men’s reformatory.................................
State penitentiary..................................
Women’s reformatory............................
State penitentiary........................
State industrial reformatory........
State industrial farm for women..
Kentucky:
State reformatory.........................
State penitentiary........................
Louisiana: State penitentiary............
Maine:
State prison.............................. —
State reformatory for men...........
Women’s reformatory..................
Maryland:
House of correction.......................
State penal farm...........................
State penitentiary........................
Massachusetts:
State prison................................. .
Massachusetts reformatory........ .
Prison camp.................................
State farm.....................................
State prison colony.......................
Women’s reformatory..................




Employed
at
productive
labor

Total

Employ­
ed at
produc­
tive labor

4,652
583

3,619
225

185
8

144
0

1,353
0

845
0

25
47

6
16

4,875
2,679

3,021
1,363

121
0

10
0

1,146
207

257
97

16
0

0
0

433
0
727
496

143
0
500
301

0
218
0
31

0
95
0
11

854
669
2,669
4,024
305

365
296
1,696
3,232
203

0
57
117
173
2

0
15
43
96
0

602
4,623
2,702
0
0
2,310

351
2,282
569
0
0
1,294

0
0
0
115
101
0

0
0
0
58
23
0

2,416
1,213
0
2,496

1,458
937
0
1,311

0
0
184
0

0
0
74
0

1,430
1,374
0

947
980
0

0
0
100

0
0
61

1,838
763
0

984
323
0

0
0
130

0
0
19

2,348
1,156
2,705

1,583
760
1,638

71
0
77

64
0
6

261
140
0

60
75
0

1
0
113

0
0
17

1,191
124
1,184

568
86
638

86
0
1

49
0
0

905
958
104
928
346
0

629
621
41
176
210
0

0
0
0
88
0
257

0
0
0
0
0
104

21

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS
T a b l e 8 .—

Average number of prisoners of each sex employed at productive labor,
by institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued
Average number of prisoners
Males

Females

State and institution
Total

Michigan:
State reformatory...........................................
State prison.....................................................
State house of correction and branch prison.
Detroit house of correction.............................
Minnesota:
State prison.....................................................
State reformatory for men..............................
State reformatory for women.........................
Mississippi: State penitentiary............................
Missouri:
State penitentiary...........................................
State reformatory............................................
Montana: State prison..........................................
Nebraska:
State penitentiary-.........................................
State reformatory for men.............................
State reformatory for women.........................
Nevada: State penitentiary.................................
New Hampshire: State prison..............................
New Jersey:
Annandale farms.............................................
State reformatory......... .................................
State reformatory for women.........................
State prison.....................................................
New Mexico: State penitentiary..........................
New York:
State prison for men....................................... .
Attica State prison..........................................
State prison for women....................................
State hospital...................................................
Clinton prison..................................................
House of refuge__________ ____ ____________
Great Meadow prison.......... ................ ..........
Institution for male defective delinquents_
_
Westfield State farm........................................
State reformatory.............................................
Sing Sing prison.............................................. .
North Carolina:
Industrial farm colony for women................. .
State’s prison............................. . ................... .
North Dakota: State penitentiary........................
Ohio:
State reformatory for women..........................
State penitentiary............................................
London prison farm.........................................
State reformatory.............................................
Oklahoma:
State penitentiary........................................... .
State reformatory.............................................
Oregon: State penitentiary....................................
Pennsylvania:
State industrial home..................................... .
Eastern State penitentiary..............................
Western State penitentiary at Rockview___
Western State penitentiary............................ .
State industrial reformatory............................
Rhode Island:
State prison and Providence County jail-----Reformatory for women................................. .
South Carolina: State penitentiary.......................
South Dakota: State penitentiary........................
State penitentiary.................................................
Brushy Mountain penitentiary.......................... .
Texas: Prison system..................................................
Utah: State prison..................................................... .
Vermont:
State prison and house of correction for women..
State prison and house of correction for men......




Employed
at
productive
labor

Total

Employ­
ed at
produc­
tive labor

1,898
5,712
921
920

1,328
1,946
396
377

0
0
0
284

0
0
0
117

1,355
1,037
0
2,046

958
325
0
1,335

0
0
57
58

0
0
38
35

4,318
578
606

2,027
195
105

85
0
9

0
0
2

787
377
0
252
175

601
205
0
74
140

13
0
35
3
4

9
0
15
0
0

357
863
0
1,896
551

285
307
0
711
263

0
0
233
0
9

0
0
118
0
0

1,816
439
0
773
1,530
582
1,127
922
0
1,558
2,409

786
343
0
37
700
106
478
325
0
305
1,145

0
0
115
0
0
0
0
0
214
0
0

0
0
56
0
0
0
0
0
40
0
0

0
2,725
411

0
1,787
196

43
109
6

17
80
1

0
4,416
1,180
3,021

0
2,124
354
1,336

324
0
0
0

72
0
0
0

3,189
843
823

1,618
405
343

85
0
28

41
0
9,

0
2,827
967
1,070
1,310

0
1,270
337
269
212

140
0
0
0
0

60
0
0
0
0

623
0
1,072
511

409
0
439
404

0
34
70
13

0
12
20
1

1,965
902
5,447
310

1,300
689
4,405
37

74
0
103
2

74
0
57
0

0
881

0
230

49
0

86
0

22

p r i s o n l a b o r i n u n i t e d s t a t e s , 1932

T a b l e 8 . — Average

number of prisoners of each sex employed at productive labor,
by institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued
Average number of prisoners
Males

Females

Btate and institution
Total

Virginia:
State industrial farm for women_____________________
State penitentiary__________________________________
State farm______________________ ____________ _____
Washington:
State penitentiary__________________________________
State reformatory__________________________________
West Virginia: State penitentiary_______________________
Wisconsin:
Industrial home for women.................................. ...........
State prison......... .................................................. .........
State reformatory_______________ _____ _____________
Wyoming:
State industrial institute___________________________
State penitentiary__________________________________
Total..................... .......................................... ............

Employed
at
productive
labor

Employ­
ed at
produc­
tive labor

Total

0
2,780
781

0
2,339
521

77
81
0

21
63
0

1,318
630
2,554

394
169
1,526

28
0
88

3
0
29

0
1,692
759

0
983
483

66
37
0

30
6
0

87
333

50
228

0
0

0
0

140,521

75,344

4,900

1,923

392
137
3,526

118
81
1,626

0
0
0

0
0
0

3,229
1,764
301
1,625
147

1,032
408
134
666
40

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

559
461
943
6

182
276
285
0

0
0
0
442

0
0
0
161

FEDERAL PRISONS
California:
Pacific Branch United States Disciplinary Barracks_
_
United States Naval Prison............................................
Georgia: United States Penitentiary.....................................
Kansas.
United States Penitentiary..............................................
United States Penitentiary Annex.................................
New Hampshire: United States Naval Prison.....................
Ohio: United States Industrial Reformatory....... ................
South Carolina: United States Naval Prison.......................
Virginia:
Federal Correctional Camp.............................................
Federal Reformatory Cam p............................................
Washington: United States Penitentiary.......... .................
West Virginia: Federal Industrial Institution for Women..
Total...............................................................................

13,084

4,848

442

161

Orand total....................................................................

153,605

80,192

5,342

2,084

Of the 145,421 prisoners in State prisons throughout the United
States, 96.6 percent were males and 3.4 percent were females. In the
State prisons 77,267 prisoners were working at productive labor; of
this number 97.5 percent were males and 2.5 percent were females.
There were 13,526 prisoners incarcerated in Federal institutions,
96.7 percent of which were males and 3.3 percent females.
In Federal and State institutions combined, there were 158,947
prisoners, of which 153,605, or 96.6 percent, were men and 5,342, or
3.4 percent, were women. Of the 82,276 prisoners engaged in
productive labor in Federal and State institutions, 80,192, or 97.5 per­
cent, were males and 2,084, or 2.5 percent, were females.
Employment of Prisoners on Public Works and Ways
Table 9 shows the average number of State and Federal prisoners
employed under the public works and ways system, and the value of
the projects, by State.




T a b l e 9 . — Average

number of State and Federal prisoners employed under public works and ways system, and value of projects, by State
STATE PRISONS
Average number of prisoners employed on -

Value of—

Construction
State

Land

7.7

74.0
670.0

45.0

24.0
34.0
92.0

1.0

20.0
10.0

10.0

1.0

1,165.8
276.0
114.0

Louisiana...........
Maryland..........
59.0
Massachusetts..
188.0
Michigan...........
669.5
44.0
Minnesota-.......
62.0
Mississippi.........
29.0
Missouri............
288.0
Montana______
14.0
Nebraska...........
3.0
52.7
Nevada..............
8.0
New Jersey........
37.0
112.0
New Mexico___
32.0
New Y o r k ........
310.0
204.0
North Carolina.
North Dakota__
4.0
2.0
Ohio..............
9.0
190.0
Oklahoma_____
i Work done by prisoners working on new buildings.




19.2
4.0
28.5

140.3
24.8
4.0
34.5

55.2
49.0
16.3
47.0

95.0
7.0
59.7

17.0

2.0

21.5
4.0

575.0

990.0
3,108.0

”4.6

3.1

0)

9.0

8.6

64.0

20.0

54.0

~ 6"
"io.~
506.0

1.380.0
565.0
210.0
47.0
506.0
78.0
188.0
739.0
59.0
288.0
14.0
62.0

3.2

10.0

3.0

335.0

2522.0
429.0

...

1.010.0
1.0

$3,600.00

5,000.00

3.118.0

66.0

lo.'o'
0)

1.174.0
74.0
1.401.0
45.0
28.0
38.0
200.0

Land de­
Altera­
New,
velopment New build­ tions and other than Hoads, new
ings
installa­ buildings and repaired
tions
and roads

8.0

222.0

32.0
1.380.0
429.0
15.0
263.0

20.0

5,000.00
22,140.00
4,780.00

$209,000.00
372.395.00
2,500.00
91.500.00
50,000.00
297.350.00
26,317.13
10.500.00
913.13
876,999.68
145,516.81
374,000.00

1,350.00

87,400.00

325.18 102, 600.00
323.46 23,000.00
800.00 69,060.00
303.41
23,017.67

5,828.00

008.00
300.00

"§,875.6o

6,000.00

25,400.00
79,000.00
9,172.79

1,680.00
10 000.00

,

180,000.00

* Indudes average of 25 men constructing a railroad.

$2,237,363.26 $2, 237,
209, 0 0 0
0 .0
1,920, 195.00
43, 970.00
97, 500.00
51, 0 0 0
0 .0
426, 100.00
1,809,972.51 1,836, 289.64
4,898,569.43 4,
069.43
913.13
56,375.00 1>102, 299.86
217, 1.27
”"i7,"566.'oo' 498, 640.00
54, 303.41
426, 757.44
426,757.'44
100, 630.14
194, 129.00
580, 375.00
206, 600.00
46, 400.00
608, 107.40
83, 500.00
253, 800.00
30, 375.00
217, 337.97
103,172.97
25, 000.00
832, 660.00
3305,480.00
143,233.24
143, 233.24
34, 630.00

0 0 0 $35,000.00 I,"503,‘200.'55'
0 .0
350.00 25,120.00
6 0 .0
,0 0 0
.,0 0 0
0 .0

71,784.47
194.129.00
499.992.00
203.300.00
32.000.00
608,107.40
83.500.00
5,000.00 230.500.00
30.000.00
"l4,"io6.’ oo
99.500.00
25.000.00
"6 ," o.'6 228,000.00
ooo o
60,500.00

Total

8,600.00
225.00

14,"466."00
9,700.00
150.00
565.00

32,580.00 206,600.00
1,550.00

PRISONS

10.0
233.0

1,174.0

8.0

Total

A D FEDERAL
N

Alabama......................
Arizona...................... .
California.—.............. .
Colorado......................
Connecticut_________
Delaware........... .........
District of Columbia..
Florida....................... .
Georgia........................
Idaho...........................
Illinois........................ .
Indiana........................
Iowa_________ _____ _

New,
Altera­
Roads,
New
tions and other
than
buildings installa­ buildings new and
repaired
tions
and roads

STATE

develop­
ment

Construction

00 0
0 .0

9, 172.79
1 Includes $140,000.00 of railroad construction.

CO-

T a b l e 9 . — Average

number of State and Federal prisoners employed under public works and ways system, and value of projects, by State— Con.

to

STATE PRISONS—Continued
Value of—

Average number of prisoners employed on—

Construction

Construction

State

662.1

26.8
61.0

60.0

1
.0

10.0

Total.

28.3
1.3

29.0
1.7

5,371.7

2.0

20.0

512.9

1.0
"1,697.0

31.0

2.0

198.0
6.7

853.1

9,733.7

1 0 .0
30.0 $ ,0 0 0
955.0 222,349.00 $1,035,889.00
43.0
81,000.00
50.0
40.000.00
12.0
364,086.94
140.0
65.000.00
., 757.0
81,060.02
48.0
629.0
68,500.00
142.0 53,867.00
1 0 .0
,0 0 0
600.00
5.0

$70,428.24
36,121,00

$500.00
22.567.00
12.556.00
2, 000.00

24,037.00
9,000.00

$1,250.00
2,"876,"235.”80

37,817.97
41,769. 61
7,500.00

1, 217,856.00
12,345.00

Total

$71,928.24
1,316,926.00
12.556.00
81,000.00
43.250.00
364,086.94
2,979,053.77
81,060.02
1,259,625.61
166,249.00
10.600.00

17,471.0 469, 616.00 6,685,340.58 611,159.72 677,740. 61 15, 608,810. 65 24,052,667.56

FEDERAL PRISONS

Total................................................
Grand total......................................




1.0

5.0

2.0
4.0

27.0
71.0

65.0

102.0

82.0

111.0

17.0

735.0

233.0

60.0

6,106.7

3,576.49

745.9

913.1

6.0
9,739.7

$10,220.00
20,000.00
199,070.90

6,622.06

149,010.07
277,671.53

60,118.91

21,335.05

85,030.45

361,053.18

4,428.36

4,428.36

201.0

20.0

192.0

91,959. 29

270,471.53

17.0

63.0

1,191.6

7,200.00

214.0

30.0

17.0

$1,140.00

149,010.07

150.0
464.0

454.0

$6, 780.00

5,000.00
$100,489.55

141.0

5.0

150.0
10.0

$2,300.00

8.0
31.0 $15,000.00

15,963.33

258,075.10

40,329.15

46,685.60

1,226.0

41,739.82

693,583. 45 283, 598.51

81,422. 71

6,140.00

1,106,484.49

18,697.0 511,355.82 7,378,924.03 894,758.23 759,163.32 15,614,950.65 25,159,152.05

STATES, 1932

Pacific Branch, United States Discipli­
nary Barracks, Alcatraz, Calif.............
United States Naval Prison, Mare Island,
Calif
United States Penitentiary, Atlanta,
Qa
United States Penitentiary, Leaven­
worth Kans
United States industrial Beformatory,
nhillionthp Ohift
Federal Reformatory Camp, Petersburg,
Va
Federal Correctional Camp, Fort Eustis,
Va
United States Penitentiary, McNeil
Island, Wash................ ........... .............

I UNITED
N

140.0
40.0
48.0
76.0

0.2

26.0
43.0

New,
Altera­
Land de­
velopment New build­ tions and other than Boads, new
installa­ buildings and repaired
ings
and roads
tions

LABOR

3.0
205.9

Total

PRISON

Oregon...............
Pennsylvania.—
Bhode Island...
South CarolinaSouth Dakota__
Texas.................
Virginia.............
Washington.......
West Virginia—
Wisconsin..........
Wyoming..........

New,
Land
Altera­
Boads,
other
develop­
tions and
New
than
ment
buildings installa­ building new and
repaired
tions
and road

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

25

The total value of construction under the public works and ways
svstem in Federal and State institutions during the period covered by
tliis study was $25,159,152, and 18,697 prisoners were engaged in this
work. Road work was the largest item under this system, the value
thereof, both new and repairs, being over $15,000,000. The value
of new buildings erected was over $7,000,000, that of alterations and
installations nearly $900,000, and that of other construction nearly
$760,000.
In Georgia, nearly $5,000,000 worth of road work was done by the
prisoners in State institutions. The value of road work done by
prisoners in several other States—Alabama, California, Florida, Vir­
ginia, and West Virginia—reached over $1,000,000.
The value of new buildings erected in Pennsylvania was greater than
in any other State, being over $1,000,000. In Illinois, the next
highest State, the new buildings erected were valued at nearly
$900,000.
Disposal of Goods Produced by Prisoners
Table 10 shows the value of the goods sold inside the State where
produced and of those sold outside the State.




T a b le 10.— Value of goods sold inside and outside of State in which produced, by State and institution
STATE PRISONS
Value of goods sold under—
State account

State and institution

Outside
State

Within
State

Outside
State

Total

$946,292.65
1,148.03
191,818.83

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

Within
State

Outside
State

Total
Total

Within
State

Outside
State

Total

$102,787.00 $1,952,958.00$2,055,745.00 $310,120.90 $2,691,916.75 $3,002,037.65
0
0
1,148.03
0
0
1,148.03
191,818.83
0
0
0
0
191,818.83

0
0

357,590.06
11,190.85

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

357,590.06
11,190.85

0
0

357,590.06
11,190.85

Total..............................

368,780.91

0

368,780.91

0

0

0

0

0

0

368,780.91

0

368,780.91

Colorado:
State penitentiary............
State reformatory.............

3,057. 31
1, 585.12

0
0

3,057.31
1,585.12

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

3,057.31
1,585.12

0
0

3,057.31
1,585.12

0

0

0

4,642.43

0

4,642.43

4,642.43

0

4,642.43

0

0

0

Connecticut:
State reformatory.............
State farm for women___
State prison......................

9,113. 55
1,920.00
0

100.00
0
0

9,213. 55
1,920.00
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
10,786.00

0
0
404,384.00

0
0
415,170.00

9,113.55
1,920.00
10,786.00

100.00
0
404,384.00

9,213.55
1,920.00
415,170.00

10,786.00

404,384.00

415,170.00

21,819.55

404,484.00

426,303.55

144,423.00

144,423.00

5,652.63

144,423.00

150,075.63

Total___ ____________

Total..............................

11,033. 55

100.00

11,133.55

0

0

0

Delaware:
New
Castle
County workhouse..............

5,652.63

0

5,652.63

0

0

0

0

District of Columbia:
District reformatory------District workhouse..........

101.50
18.52

0
0

101.50
18.52

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

Total..............................

120.02

0

120.02

0

0

0

Florida: State farm................
Idaho: State penitentiary-----

5,871.00
2,518.95

0
0

5,871.00
2,518.95

0
0

0
0

0
0




0
114,946.25
59,255.53

0
0
0
114,946.25
121,152.44

0
0
0
229,892.50
180,407.97

101.50
18.52
120.02
120,817.25
61,774.48

0
0
0
114,946.25
121,152.44

101.50
18.52
120.02
235,763. 50
182,926.92

STATES, 1932

357,590.06
11,190.85

I UNITED
N

California:
State prisonat San Quentin.
Folsom State prison_____

LABOR

Alabama: State prison sys­
tem..................................... . $207,333.90 $738,958.75
1,148.03
Arizona: State prison.............
0
0
Arkansas: State penitentiary . 191,818.83

Total

Piece price

PRISON

Within
State

Contract

- H9Z
O

Illinois:
State penitentiary______
_______
State reformatory for
women_______________
Southern penitentiary___

8,133.96
550.68

4,065.49
0

12,199.45
550.58

0
0

0
0

0
0

47.53
19,898.84

0
0

47.53
19,898.84

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

Total..............................

28,630.91

4,065.49

32,696.40

0

0

0

0

Indiana:
State reformatory_______
State farm_____________
Wnmfir) ’< prison........... .
?
State prison____________

53,570.37
16, 233.06
1,285.85
1,322.00

64,396.39
55,317.91
0
3,577.27

117,966. 76
71,550.97
1,285.85
4,899.27

0
0
0
0

0
o
o
o

0
o
o
0

13,658.88
17,092.96
o
51,231.16

81,983.00 1,034,502.77 1,116,485.77

0
0

8,133.96
550.58

4,065.49
0

12,199.45
550.58

o
0

o
0

47.53
19,898.84

o
0

47.53
19,898.84

0

o

28,630.91

4,065.49

32,696.40

67,229.25
33,326.02
1,285.85
52,553.16

669,091.89
136,141.69
o
352,560.76

736,321.14
169,467.71
1,285.85
405,113.92

604,695.50
80,823.78
o
348,983.49

618,354.38
97,916.74
o
400,214.65

123,291.57

195,702.85

0

0

0

34,595.00
52, 645. 62
177.27

1,964.71
268,632.61
0

36,559. 71
321,278.23
177.27

o
0
0

o
0
0

o
o
0

116,406.0
127,011.35
0

746,962. 25
190,517.03
0

Total________________

87,417.89

270,597.32

358,015.21

0

o

0

243,417.35

937,479.28 1,180,896.63

Kansas:
State penitentiary______
State industrial reforma­
tory_________________
State industrial farm for
women_______________

863,368.25
317.528.38
0

154,394.28 1,157,794.34 1,312,188.62
151,001.00
179,656.97
177.27

748,926.96
459,149.64
0

899,927.96
638,806.61
177.27

330,835.24 1,208,076.60 1,538,911.84

0

203,984.13

o

0

0

0

0

0

203,984.13

0

203,984.13

12,067.24

0

12,067.24

o

0

o

0

0

0

12,067.24

0

12,067.24

62.88

o

62.88

o

o

o

0

0

o

62.88

0

62.88

Total________________

216,114.25

o

216,114. 25

o

0

o

0

o

0

216,114. 25

0

216,114.25

Kentucky:
State reformatory_______
State penitentiary______

0
2,025.87

0
o

Total________________

0
119,865.95 1,248,091.43 1,367,957.38 35,743.52
2,025.87 92,575.41 240,998.92 333,574.33 17,650.06

714,870.48
588,335. 63

155,609.47 1,927,218.39 2,082,827.86
811,684.49
112,251.34
923,935.83

2,025.87 212,441.36 1,489,090.35 1,701,531.71 53,393.58 1,249,812. 53 1,303,206.11

267,860.81 2,738,902.88 3,006,763.69

679,126.96
570,685. 57

2,025.87

0

Louisiana: State penitentiary -

255,460.36

0

255,460.36

0

0

0

0

0

0

255,460.36

0

255,460.36

Maine:
State prison____________
State reformatory for men.

3, 559.69
5,460.49

o
0

3,559.69
5,460.49

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

3,559.69
5,460.49

0
0

3,559.69
5,460.49

Total..............................

9,020.18

o

9,020.18

0

0

0

0

0

0

9,020.18

0

9,020.18

4,508.86
858.45

0
1,324.00

4,508.86 19,201.24 364,825.02 384,026.26 12,502.33
o
2,182.45 86,519.65 1,101,479.36 1,187,999. 01

237,544.17
0

250,046.50
0

602,369.19
36,212.43
638,581.62
87,378.10 1,102,803.36 1,190,181.46

5,367.31

1,324.00

6,691.31 105,720.89 1,466,304.38 1,572,025.27 12,502.33

237,544.17

250,046.50

123,590.53 1,705,172.55 1,828,763.08

Maryland:
House of correction_____
State penitentiary______
Total..............................




PRISONS

203,984.13

A D FEDERAL
N

72,411. 28

Iowa:
Men’s reformatory______
State penitentiary______
Women’s reformatory___

STATE

Total.......................... .

o
0
State reformatory
0
0

T able

10.— Value of goods sold inside and outside of State in which produced, by State and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued
Value of goods sold under—

Within
State

Outside
State

Total

Within
State

Outside
State

Total

Within
State

$21,253.95
58.40
1,480.16

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

$20,093.95
58.40
784.95

$1,160.00
0
695.21

$21,253.95
58.40
1,480.16

823.79
78,440.37

0
38,336.69

823.79
116,777.08

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

823.79
78,440.37

0
38,336.69

823.79
116,777.06

100.201.46

40,191.90

140,393.36

0

0

0

0

0

0

100,20L 46

40,191.90

140,393.36

22,538.79
459,433.95

500.20
323,183.69

23,038.99
782,617.64

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

22,538.79
459,433.95

500.20
323,183.69

23,038.99
782,617.64

78,016.85
172,970.15

242,390.28
164,373.43
950,815.53 1,123,785.68

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

78,016.85
172,97a 15

164,373.43
242,39a 28
950,815.53 1,123,785.68

732,959.74 1,438,872.85 2,171,832.59

0

0

0

0

0

0

732,959.74 1,438,872.85 2,171,832.59

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

731.00

0

0

0

0

0

0

731.00

Total.............................. 1,472.876.00

681,418.00 2,154,294.00

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,472,876.00

0

0

0

233,947.24

0

233,947.24

0

233,947.24

0

0

0

Missouri:
12,030.11
State reformatory.........
State penitentiary............ 1,932,323.39

0
0

12,030.11
1,932,323.39

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0
$114,420.00 $147,610.00

Total..................... ........ 1,944,353.50

0

1,944,353.50

0

0

0

114,420.00

147,610.00

1,471,016.00
1,129.00

681,418.00 2,152,434.00
0
1,129.00
0

731.00

681,418.00 2,191,294.00
0

233,947.24

0
12,030.11
$262,030.00 2,046,743.39

12,030.11
0
147,610.00 2,194,353.39

262,030.00 2,058,773.50

147,610.00 2,206,383.50

STATES, 1932

$1,160.00
0
695.21

681,418.00 2,152,434.00
1,129.00
0




Total

$20,093.95
68.40
784.95

Minnesota:
State prison....................... 1,471,016.00
State reformatory for men.
1,129.00
State reformatory for
731.00
women............... ..........

Mississippi: State peniten­
tiary __..................................

Outside
State

I UNITED
N

Total..............................

Total

LABOR

Total________________
Michigan:
Detroit house of correction
State prison......................
House of correction and
branch prison................
State reformatory.............

Outside
State

Total

Piece price

PRISON

Within
State
Massachusetts:
Prison camp____________
State farm............. ..........
Massachusetts reforma­
tory................................
Women's reformatory___
State prison____________

Contract

State account

State and institution

0

6,119.84
3,058.40

5,344.45
0

1,346.10

0

1,346.10

Total............. ................

10,524.34

5,344.45

15,868.79

Nevada: State penitentiary
New Hampshire:
State
prison....................................
New Mexico: State peniten­
tiary.....................................

904.40

0

904.40

0

0

0

18,089.66

0

18,089.66

0

0

New York:
State reformatory_______
State prison for men.........

373.30
126.00

0
0

373.30
126.00

0
0

0

499.30

0

Total________________

499.30

North C a r o lin a : S t a t e ’ s
prison...................................
North Dakota: State peni­
tentiary__________________

86,042.-97

10,042.10

214,240.70

1,795.29

Ohio:
State reformatory_______
State penitentiary______

416.00
155.50

6,873.94

0

11,464.29 $1,693.75
3,058.40
352.50
0

0
0
0
0

2,046.25

0

0

0

0

0

$1,693.75 17,445.04
312.45
352.50
0

0

2,046.25 17,757.49

314,321.80
130,755.95
0
445,077.75

0
331,766.84
131,068.40
0
462,835.24

6,873,94
25,258.63
3,723.35
1,346.10
30,328.08

0
319,666.25
130,755.95
0
450,422.20

6,873.94
344,924.88
134,479.30
1,346.10
480,75a 28

0

0

0

904.40

0

0

0

2,049.45

0

0

0

0

18,089.66

0

18,089.66

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

373.30
126.00

0
0

373.30
126.00

0

0

0

0

0

499.30

0

499.30

2,049.45 $184,527.29

0

0

186,576.74

0
184,527.29

904.40
186,576.74

0

0

311,232.34

10,042.10

321,274.44

0

0

0

0

0

0

214,240.70

1,795.29

216,035.99

0
0

416.00
155.00

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

416.00
155.50

0
0

416.00
155.50

0

571.50

0

0

0

0

0

0

571.50

0

571.50

96,085.07 225,189.37

0

225,189.37

Total____________ ____

571.50

Oklahoma:
State penitentiary______
State reformatory_______

129,570.09
10,823.41

27,500.55
0

157,070.64
10,823.41

0
0

0
0

0
0

59,036.00
0

531,323.00
0

590,359.00
0

188,606.09
10,823.41

558,823.55
0

747,429.64
10,823.41

59,036.00

531,323.00

590,359.00

Total..............................

140,393.50

27,500.55

167,894.05

0

0

0

199,429.50

558,823.55

758,253.05

Oregon: State penitentiary.. .

52,198.57

27,097.00

79,295.57

0

0

0

0

0

0

52,198.57

27,097.00

79,295.57

Pennsylvania:
Eastern State peniten­
tiary...............................
State industrial home___
Western State peniten­
tiary at Rockview_____

5,858.90
58.64

5,858.90
58.64

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

5,858.90
58.64

0
0

101.67

0

101.67

0

0

0

0

0

0

101.67

0

101.67

Total-------------------------

6,019.21

0

6,019.21

0

0

0

0

0

0

6,019.21

0

6,019.21




0
0

5,858.90
58.64

PRISONS

0

216,035.99

A D FEDERAL
N

6,873.94

Nebraska:
State penitentiary______
State reformatory for men.
State reformatory for
women...........................

STATE

Montana: State prison______

T able

09
©

10.— Value of goods sold inside and outside of State in which produced, by State and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued
Value of goods sold under—
State account

State and institution

Outside
State

Total

Within
State

Outside
State

Total

0
0

$870.46
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

T ota l.............................

870.46

0

870.46

0

0

0

16,817.57

0

South Carolina: State peni­
tentiary................................
South Dakota: State peni­
tentiary................................

206,126.63 $169,946.39

16,817. 57 $49,639. 77 $186,740.13 $236,379.90
376,073.02

0

0

0

Total

Within
State

Outside
State

Total

$4,127.50 $387,020.25
4,132.50
0

$391,147.75
4,132.50

$4,997.96
0

$387,020.25
4,132.50

$392,018.21
4,132.50

391,152.75

395, 280.25

4,997.96

391,152.75

396,150.71

4,127.50
0

0

0

66,457.34

186,740.13

253,197.47

0

0

0

206,126.63

169,946.39

376,073.02

193,704.86 1,159,991.34 1,353,696.20

11,183.80

0

11,183.80 182,521.06 1,159,991.34 1, 342,512.40

0

0

0

98,217.07

0

98, 217.07

0

0

0

Total................ ............

109,400.87

0

0

0

0

291,921.93 1,159,991.34 1,451,913.27

Texas: Prison system.............
Utah: State prison..................

397,632.78
446.34

0
270.00

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

397,632.78
446.34

0
270.00

397,632.78
716.34

Vermont:
State prison and house of
correction for men.........
State prison and house of
correction for women. __

2,456.14

420.00

2,876.14

0

0

0

4,153.13

6,609.27

230,136.90

236,746.17

15,689.53

0

15,689.53

0

0

0

0

Total........... —..............

18,145. 67

420.00

18, 565.67

0

0

0

4,153.13

229,716.90

233,870.03

22,298.80

230,136.90

252,435.70

Virginia:
State penitenitary............
State farm.........................

37,862.35
23,581.86

0
0

37,862.35 19,489.45
23,581.86
0

88,489.95
0

107,979.40 13, 235.95
12,346.05
0

251,482.80
234,635. 20

264,718.75
246,981. 25

70,587.75
35,927.91

339,972.75
234,635.20

410,560.50
270,563.11

Total..............................

61,444.21

0

61,444. 21 19,489.45

88,489.95

107,979.40 25,582.00

486,118.00

511,700.00

106,515.66

574,607.95

681,123.61




0

0

0

109,400.87 182,521.06 1,159,991.34 1,342,512.40
387,632.78
716.34

0
0

0
0

229,716.90
0

233,870.03
0

98,217.07

15,689.53

0

0

98,217.07

*5,689.53

STATES, 1932

Tennessee:
State penitentiary............
Brushy Mountain peni­
tentiary______________

I UNITED
N

$870.46
0

Outside
State

LABOR

Rhode Island:
State prison and Provi­
dence County jail.........
Reformatory for women. .

Within
State

PRISON

Within
State

Total

Piece price

Contract

Washington:
State penitentiary.......... _
State reformatory.............

5,233.72
3,609.05

0
0

5,233.72
3,609.05

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

5,233.72
3,609.05

0
0

5,233.72
3,609.05

Total____ ____________

8,842.77

0

8,842.77

0

0

0

0

0

0

8,842.77

0

8,842.77

0

0

0

West Virginia: State peni­
tentiary................................
Wisconsin:
I n d u s t r i a l h o m e for
women.......... ................
State prison......................
State reformatory.............

626.00
402,363. 00
22,518.00

0
59,030.00
1,325.00

78,521.60

177,098.65

255,620.25 57,462.05

626.00
461,393.00
23,843.00

0
9,906.00
0

0
420,295.00
0

0
430, 201.00
0

0
436.00
0

0
21,365.00
0

0
21,801.00
0

626.00
412,705.00
22,518.00

0
500,690.00
1,325.00

626.00
913,395.00
23,843.00

420, 295.00

430, 201.00

436.00

21, 365.00

21,801.00

435,849.00

502,015.00

937,864.00

964,949.05 1,022,411.10

135,983.65 1,142,047.70 1,278,031.35

60,355.00

485,862.00

9,906.00

16,136.44
5,936.00

19,291.71
0

35,428.15
5,936.00

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
167,441.25

0
167,441.25

16,136.44
5,936.00

19,291.71
167,441.25

35,428.15
173,377.25

Total..............................

22,072.44

19,291.71

41,364.15

0

0

0

0

167,441. 25

167,441.25

22,072.44

186,732.96

208,805.40

Total, State prisons___ 7,763,371.07 3,620,882.37 11,384,253.44 887,525.20 5,172,537.09 6,060,062. 29 962,045.21 9,581,956.14 10,544,001.35 9,612,941.48 18,375,375.60 27,988,317.08
FEDERAL PRISONS

$9,626.00

0

22,578.85

T otal-____ ___________

32,204. 85

South
Carolina:
United
States Naval Prison............
Virginia* Federal Correctional
Camp....................................
Total, Federal prisons.
Grand total...................




$9,626.00

0

0

22,578.85

0

0

32,204.85

0

22,374.04

0

22,374.04

0

0

0

0

699. 51

0

699.51

0

0

0

0

55,278. 40

0

55,278.40

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
0

$9,626. 00

0

$9,626.00

22,578.85

0

22, 578.8 5

32, 204.85

0

32,204.85

22,374.04

0

22,374.04

699. 51

0

699.51

55, 278.40

0

55,278.40

PRISONS

California:
United States Naval
Prison............................
Pacific Branch, United
S t a t e s Disciplinary
Barracks--------------------

A D FEDERAL
N

425,507.00

STATE

Total..............................
Wyoming:
State industrial institute.
State penitentiary............

7,818,649.47 $3,620,882.37 11,439,531.84 $887,525.20 $5,172,537.09 $f>f060,062.29 $962,045.21 $9,581,956.14 $10,544,001.35 9,668,219.88 $18,375,375.60 28,043,595.48

1

CO

32

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

Of the $27,988,317 worth of goods manufactured in State prisons
under other systems than State use and public works and ways, 65.7
percent was sold outside the State where produced and 34.3 percent
was sold within the State. Of the goods produced under the Stateaccount system, 68.2 percent was sold within the State and 31.8
percent outside the State, while of those produced under the contract
system, 14.6 percent was sold within the State and 85.4 percent out­
side the State. Only 9.1 percent of the goods produced under the
piece-price system was sold in the State where it was manufactured
and 90.9 percent was sold in other States.
All goods produced under the State-use system was sold in the
State where produced, except for automobile license tags and road
signs, valued at $14,695, made in Indiana for other State governments.
No goods were produced in Federal prisons under the contract or
piece-price systems. The only goods produced under the Stateaccount system were articles sold to guards, Army and Navy officers,
etc., which were all sold in the State where produced.
Contract Systems
Table 11 shows the value and class of articles produced under
contract, together with the amounts paid by the contractor to the
institutions and to the prisoners.
T able

11.— Value and class of articles produced under contract, and amounts paid
institutions and prisoners by contractors, by State and institution

State and institution

Alabama: State prison sys­
tem.
Connecticut State prison
Delaware: New Castle
County workhouse.
Florida: State farm............

Aver­
age
daily
num­
ber of
pris­
oners
work­
ing
under
con­
tract

State prison..

443.0
118.0

len’s reformatory----- 490.0
1.0

1 Not reported.




Article

Shirts, dress........
Underwear..........
Shirts, work____
Pants...................

105,018.00
124,874.50
180,407.97
170,667.08
41,369.70
311,317.60
95,000.00
74,997.25
22,919.49

Underwear..........
Shirts, work........
----- do..................
Pants...................
Shirts, work.............
Children's play suits.
Underwear...............
Shirts, work.............
Other manufactured
products.
288,117.60 Shirts, work.............
112,097.05 . — do.......................

259.0

859,276.25
846.00 Pajamas and night­
gowns.
8,246.00 Miscellaneous cloth­
ing, labor only.
317,528.38 Shirts, work.............

73.0
50.0
10.0
43.0
558.0

183,636.60
123,317.73
26,620.00
61,450.40
526,885. 23

4.0
State penitentiary----Kentucky:
State penitentiary___

Value

474.0 $1,366,480.00
253.0
689,265.00
415,170.00
407.0
144,423.00
206.0

122.0
141.0
Idaho: State penitentiary.. 166.0
Indiana: State Reforma­ 261.0
79.0
tory.
413.0
185.0
104.0
State farm.
19.0

Iowa

Articles produced

Brooms....................
Harness, pieces........
Harness, sets...........
Children’s play suits.
Shirts, work_______

Amount Amount
paid in­
System under
stitution paid to which goods
for labor prisoners
were pro­
by con­
of pris­
duced
tractor
oners

$131,831.58 $3,414.70 Piece price.
57,753.41
Do.
0)
49,064.93 14,260.04
Do.
20.631.92
0
Do.
11.376.92
10,447.77
14,550.83
22,469.46
36,173.66
20,778.89
8,712.50
2,605.68

0
0
1,376.93
0
0
■

8

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

43,796.69
17,118.49

Do.
Do.

74,345.41

Do.
Do.
Do.

45,755.73

Do.

22,831.33
20,572.31

Contract.
Do.
Do.
Piece price.
Do.

79,284.68

33

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS
T a b l e 1 1 ,—

Value and class of articles produced under contract, and amounts paid
institutions and prisoners by contractors, by State and institution— Continued

State and institution

Aver­
age
daily
num­
ber of
pris­
oners
work­
ing
under
con­
tract

Kentucky—Continued
State reformatory____ 322.0
432.0
78.0
268.0
184.0
83.0
179.0
Maryland:
House of correction___ 250.0
49.0
161.0
16.0
State penitentiary..._

8.0
7.0
535.0
14.0
18.8
.2

Missouri: State peniten­
tiary.

29.2
64.2
62.6
3.9
17.1

Nebraska:
State penitentiary____ 128.0
1.0
320.0
1.0

Articles produced

Value

Article

Amount Amount
paid in­
paid to System under
stitution prisoners which goods
for labor by con­
were pro­
of pris­
duced
tractor
oners

$345,089.85 Shirts, work__
444,426.37 ....... do. __................57,709.00 Children’s play suits. *1*70 17R* 0
7
484,048.89 Pajamas and night­
gowns.
312,071.63 ____do_______ _____
196,626.50 Brooms.................... 27,420.06
242,855.62 Chairs, wood........... 48,798.32
361,127.83 Pants........................
32,386. 75 ....... do.......................
217,659.75 Shirts, work.............
15,734.64 Miscellaneous metal
products.
7,163.79 Baskets....................
15,792.60 Castings___ _______
1,049,130.91 Pants........................
52,386. 75 Davenports, sofas,
etc.
70,146.25 Chairs, wood............
542.50 Miscellaneous furni­
ture.
43,104.00 Chairs, fiber.............
95,071.00 Chairs, wood............
92,728.00 Davenports, sofas,
etc.
5,747.00 Tables............ .........
25,380.00 Miscellaneous furni­
ture.
83,799.00
540.00
246, 553.80
874.04

0
0
0
0

Piece price.
Contract.
Piece price.
Contract.

0
0
0

Piece price.
Contract.
Do.

Do.
•84,697.99 $28,666.33 Piece price.
Do.
Contract.
• 6,899.40 2,431.97
Do.
2,044.50 1,410.41
Do.
105,399.11 74,001.13
Do.
Do.
• 8,762.75

►
36,786.00

Shirts, work_______
Overalls----------------—
Pants.................... •
Miscellaneous cloth­ •42,336.43
ing, labor only.
Miscellaneous, labor
only.
Pants....... ...............
Miscellaneous, labor •15,288.02
only.
Chairs, wood............ 20,464.60

4,549.58

Do.
Do.

o
0
0

Piece price.
Do.
Do.

0
0

Do.
Do*

0
0
0
0

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

5.0

1,693.75

State reformatory for
men.

133.0
1.0

131,068.40
352.50

New Hampshire: State
prison.
North Carolina: State's
prison.
Oklahoma: State peniten­
tiary.
Bhode Island:
State prison.................
B e f o r m a t o r y for
women.
South Carolina: State pen­
itentiary.

140.0

186,576.74

157.0
111.0
950.0

140,683.43 Stone, crushed.........
84,505.94 ____do—
____ _______
590,359.00 Pants........................

37,352.33
0
Do.
28,861.60
0
Do.
78,011.06 13,626.00 Piece price.

300.0
6.0

391,147.75 Shirts, work.............
4,132.50 Shirts, dress.............

62,612.16
376.37

Tennessee:
tentiary.

State peni­

Vermont: State prison
and house of correction
for men.

37,013.94 Chairs, fiber.............
90,191.57 Chairs, wood............
101,297.33 Davenports, sofas,
etc.
5.0 * 6,147.92 Tables......................
2.0
1,729.14 Miscellaneous furniniture.
74,955.00 Castings...................
72.0
102.0
85,500.00 ....... do.......................
93,164.40 Hosiery....................
120.0
383.0
466,605.00 Shirts, work.............
566.0
622,288.00 ....... do.......................
175.0
233,870.03 Shoes, new...............

0

Contract.

o
0

Piece price.
Contract.

0

Do.

0
0

29.0
72.0
80.0

62,495.98

7,610.89

Do.
Do.
/Contract.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

29,026.70
0
36,536.25
0
20,295.47
0
52,101.85
0
84,746.05
0
11,136.84
(*>

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Piece price.
f

2 $11,136.84 was paid institution by contractor, but all of it was credited to the accounts of the prisoners
engaged on this work.




34

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

11.— Value and class of articles produced under contract, and amounts paid
institutions and prisoners by contractors, by State and institution— Continued

T a b le

State and institution

Aver­
age
num­
ber of
pris­
oners
work­
ing
under
con­
tract

Articles produced

Value

Amount Amount
paid in­
paid to System under
stitution prisoners which goods
for labor by con­
were pro­
duced
of pris­
tractor
oners

Article

Virginia:
State penitentiary____ 302.0 $264,718.75 Pants_____________ $46,054.15 $1,389.00 Piece price.
80.0 39,790.11 Chairs, fiber_______
/Contract.
34.192.47 Chairs, wood______
Do.
70.0
28.236.48 Davenports, sofas,
Do.
58.0
17,742.90 3,419.84
3,472.97 Miscellaneous furni­
Do.
7.0
ture.
2,287.37 Tables____________
Do.
5.0
State farm__________ 175.0
246.981.25 Pants_____________ 28,206.98
360.00 Piece price.
106.0 Virginia: State peni­
West 211.838.25 Brooms___________ } 22,381.30 9,195.00 /Contract.
tentiary.
\
Do.
31.0
43,782.00 Whips____________
0
634,154.80 Pants............ ........... 54,214.43
391.0
Piece price.
Do.
267.0
0
388,256.30 Shirts, work_______ 48,348.98
Wisconsin: State prison___ 209.0 } 430,201.00 Hosiery___________ / 58,224.00 10,474.00 Contract.
\ 5,087.00 1,090.00 Piece price.
43.0
167.441.25 Shirts, work_______ 12.440.97
Wyoming: State peniten­ 172.0
0
Do.
tiary.

There was a daily average of 13,436 prisoners working under the
contract and piece-price systems, and these prisoners produced goods
valued at $16,582,263.
The 52 contractors paid to the State penal institutions $2,052,292,
which is 12.4 percent of the value of goods produced under these
contracts. Alabama and Kentucky each produced goods having a
valuation of over $2,000,000 and the following States produced goods
valued at between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000: Indiana, Iowa, Mary­
land, Tennessee, and West Virginia.
More contracts were awarded for the making of shirts than for
any other class of goods. Of the 52 contracts awarded, 19 include
the making of shirts and 10 include the making of pants.
Table 12 shows the number of contracts awarded under these
systems in which clothing, food, housing, machinery, etc., were
furnished by the prisons and the number in which such items were
furnished by the contractor.
T a b l e 1 3 . — Number

of contracts under which specified items were furnished by
the prison or by the contractor in institutions producing goods under piece-price or
contract systems

Item

Number of contracts
where specified item
was furnished by—
Prison

Clothing____________________ _____
Food................ ..................................
Foremen. _____ ____________ _______
Guards___ ____ __________ ____ ___
Housing___ _____________________
Machinery_______________________
Power and light___________ ______
Tools.............. ..............................
Workrooms 1
______________________

52
52
3
52
52
5
23
g
48

Contractor

49
47
29
44
2

1 The North Carolina State Prison contracted with 2 firms to do quarrying, which required no work-




STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

35

In the case of all the 52 contracts, clothing, food, guards, and housing
were furnished by the prisons. The contractors paid the foremen in
49 cases, and machinery was furnished by the contractors in 47 cases.
Workrooms were furnished by the prisons in 48 cases, and in 2 cases
no workrooms were required as the contracts were for quarrying.
In the 2 cases where the contractors furnished the workrooms, they
simply paid rent to the prison for the rooms.
Compensation to Prisoners
The Bureau endeavored to obtain information concerning amounts
paid to prisoners in all State and Federal institutions. It was impos­
sible to tabulate the information obtained, as many States made pay­
ments on various bases in the same institution.
Of the 116 State institutions, 66 paid money compensation to all
or part of the inmates, 48 paid no compensation of any kind, and 2
allowed time credit on the sentence for prisoners doing certain classes
of work, this being in addition to time off for good behavior. Seven
of the 12 Federal institutions paid wages to prisoners and 5 did not.
In most of the institutions the pay was merely nominal, generally
ranging from 2 to 15 cents per day.
State Prisons

Alabama.—The State paid all prisoners 15 cents per week. In
addition, prisoners employed in the cotton mills were paid extra*
when they worked overtime, the regular hours of work being 10 per
day. The shirt company which had a contract in this institution
paid the prisoner a bonus of $1 for each task completed over the
daily set task; for example, if a prisoner’s task was 500 dozens per
day, and he completed 1,100 dozens in a day, he received a bonus
o f $ 1 ?°*

California. —At both the State prison at San Quentin and the
Folsom State prison, prisoners working on State highways at the
road camp were paid $2.10 per day. From this amount each paid
his pro-rata share of camp expenses. The net payment, about 40
to 55 cents per day, was paid to the prisoners upon release. In
addition, such prisoners were allowed 3 days’ time against their
sentence for every 2 worked.
Connecticut.— In the State prison all prisoners received a wage of
8, 10, or 12 cents per day, depending on their conduct and industrial
record. At the State farm for women, 14 inmates in the laundry,
serving long terms, were paid approximately $35 per year each.
These were the only inmates who received any wages.
Delaware.— Inmates of the New Castle County workhouse received
15 cents per day for prison duties and farm work. Certain key men,
however, received from $5 to $15 per month, and those employed on
contract work received an average of about $4 per month.
District of Columbia.— All inmates in the District reformatory or
the District workhouse, after 60 days’ confinement, received from 5
to 15 cents per day.
Idaho.— Prisoners in the penitentiary who worked on productive
work in the shirt factory received 22 cents for a week’s quota of shirts.
When the set quota had been reached the prisoner could stop work,
but if he kept on and produced more than the quota he got 25 cents




36

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

for each day’s task over the daily quota. Nonproductive workers
received a flat monthly rate ranging from $1.25 to $6.88. Only
skilled mechanics, markers, and office workers received over $2 per
month.
Indiana.— General operators in the shirt shop in the State reforma­
tory received about $2 per month, those in the pants and underwear
shop about $1.50 per month, and those in the foundry approximately
$2.30 per month. A few other men received more. One class—head
clerks, head cutters, mechanics, etc.— received from $6 to $8 per
month, and another class— assistants in offices and on the floors—
received $4 per month. Apprentices received $1 per month. At
the State farm the wages averaged 25 cents per day for inmates sen­
tenced to prison for desertion of or for failure to support wife or
child, such wages being paid to the dependents of such inmates.
There were about five such cases a year. No other inmates received
wages. In the State prison, prisoners engaged on maintenance and
construction work, on clerical work, and in State shops received from
3 to 5 cents per day, depending upon ability and willingness to
produce. In the piece-price shop inmates were paid on a task basis,
and the rates varied according to the work done. Nonproductive
workers in the piece-price shops received a flat rate, depending on
ability and willingness to work.
Iowa.— In the men’s reformatory, except for a few who received a
flat rate—from $1 to $6 per month— prisoners employed in the pieceprice apron industry received a strictly piece-rate wage, which aver­
aged about $4.40 per month. Those working in the stone quarry
received 10 cents per day, while those in the soap, tag, tailor, printing,
tin, and cheese departments received 2 cents per hour. Prisoners
engaged in farm, construction, and maintenance work were paid
wages. Each girl in the women’s reformatory, after incarceration
for 6 months or longer, received 2 cents per day while working. In
the State penitentiary women engaged in the contract shirt and fur­
niture factories received a piece-price wage which averaged about 25
cents per day, while those in 11 other mdustries— shoes, sweeping
compound, rendering, brooms, brushes, knitting, weaving, hosiery,
furniture assembly, quarry, and potato— received a flat daily wage
of 25 cents. Inmates working as clerks, as maintenance workers, m
power production, in the tailor shop, and doing general farm and
construction work did not receive any wage or bonus.
Kansas.—Each inmate of the State industrial farm for women
received 3 cents per day for the first month and 5 cents per day there­
after. In the State industrial reformatory all convicts were paid 4
cents per day for the time they served regardless of the work done.
In the State prison all prisoners received 4 cents per day from the
State appropriation. Those working in coal mines had a set task
per day, and prisoners producing more than this set task were paid
50 cents for each ton produced over the task.
Louisiana— In the State prison trusty guards, upon being dis­
charged, received $2 for each month they were on guard duty. No
other prisoners were paid.
Maryland.— At the State penal farm all prisoners were paid 25 cents
per day when working. In the State house of correction the State
compensated prisoners as follows: In the shirt shop and the pants
shop 25 cents per task; on construction work, 50 cents per day; and




STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

37

on farm and maintenance work, from $2 to $6 per month, averaging
about $3 per month. No compensation was paid to idle or sick
prisoners. Contractors in this mstitution paid 20 to 25 cents per
task, with a bonus per over-task of 75 cents to $1. In the State
penitentiary prisoners employed in the shoe, printing, and auto-tag
shops received from 25 cents to $1 per day from the State. Prisoners
in the sewing room and on maintenance work received an average
compensation of about $3.25 per month. Idle and sick prisoners
received no compensation. Contractors in this prison paid from 20
to 25 cents per task, with a bonus of 75 cents to $1 per over-task.
Massachusetts.— Prisoners in the State prison received a bonus based
on profits from sales of goods produced by them— 25 percent of such
profits were given to the State and one half of the excess was distributed
among the prisoners. The average paid to each convict in 1932 was
$59.68.
Michigan.— In the State prison wages ranging from 5 to 95 cents
per day were paid to all productive and nonproductive workers. The
average wage of nonproductive or maintenance men was about 15
cents per day and that of productive men about 20 cents per day,
while farm workers received 15 cents per day. In the State house of
correction and branch prison inmates working in the shops were paid
a varying rate per day, depending upon the nature of the work and
their ability and willingness to work. In the sawmill the average rate
per day for 1932 was 15 cents; in the box shop, 10 cents; in the snowfence shop, 25 cents; in the overall shop, 15 cents; and on farm work,
10 cents. All men on maintenance work were compensated at the rate
of 5 cents per day. In the Detroit House of Correction compensation
was paid to all prisoners, the amount depending on length of sentence.
A prisoner sentenced to less than 15 days received 10 cents; to 15 but
less than 30 days, 25 cents; to 30 days, 50 cents; to 60 days, 75 cents;
to 90 days, $1; to over 90 days, 10 cents per day while working. In
the State reformatory all productive and all nonproductive or main­
tenance workers were paid, the wages being based on the nature of
the task and the willingness and ability of the prisoner to produce.
In the shirt and furniture shops inmates received compensation for
production in excess of a set task, but there was no payment for pro­
duction under the set task. Rates varied with the operations.
Earnings ranged from 10 to 25 cents per day in the furniture shop and
from 10 to 40 cents per day in the shirt shop, with the majority earning
about 15 cents per day in the furniture shop and about 20 cents per
day in the shirt shop. Farm and construction men earned 10 cents
per day; clerks, 25 cents per day; unskilled maintenance men, 10
cents per day; skilled maintenance men, power-house electricians,
oilers, and engineers, 25 cents per day; and truck drivers and
mechanics, 25 cents per day.
Minnesota.— In the State prison the scale of wages in the twine
plant, the farm-machinery shop, the printing shop, the tailor shop,
and for farm, garden, and dairy work, ranged from 25 to 90 cents per
day, with the inmates on production in twine, rope, and machinery
on a piecework basis. In the State reformatory for men wages were
paid at the rate of 6 to 15 cents per day according to grade of work
and effort and conduct of the prisoner. In the State reformatory for
women, the wages ranged from 10 to 15 cents per day, depending on
effort and conduct markings, not production.




38

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

Montana.— In the State prison the State pays nothing to inmates.
Employees in the barber shop, the tailor shop, and the laundry doing
work for guards, however, are paid for this work by the guards and
are allowed to keep the money.
Nebraska.—In the State penitentiary each worker in the piece-rate
shirt and pants industries got 20 cents a task, the task set varying
with the operation. The earnings averaged about $2.50 per month.
In the furniture plant, where a strict piece rate by operation was in
effect, the earnings averaged about $5 a month during the year
covered, but would have been much more if the factory had been
busy. A few special artisans could make $15 per month. In con­
struction, a day rate of 25 cents while working was paid, except in
the case of a few artisans who drew 50 cents per day. Farm workers
were allowed 1 cent per bushel for husking corn. In the State re­
formatory for men wages were paid only in the pants factory. The
rate was 15 cents per task, which was a given number of garments,
depending upon the operation. Earnings averaged about $2.50 per
month during the year covered.
Nevada.— Inmates of the State prison who did farm work were
paid 10 cents for each day spent at the farm. Other inmates received
no compensation.
New Hampshire.—In the State prison each inmate received 10 cents
per day for each day worked.
New Jersey.— The State paid each inmate in the State reformatory
approximately 3 cents per day. In the State prison all prisoners
received wages ranging from 5 to 25 cents per day, depending on the
character of the work performed.
New York.—All inmates in the Attica State prison who were as­
signed to farm, grading, or maintenance work received an average of
5 cents per day. In the State prison for women, girls working in
the shops and on maintenance work received 1% cents per day. In
the Clinton Prison all industrial work was placed on a piece basis
wherever possible. Inmates engaged on farm or general maintenance
work received 5 cents per day. Inmates who were idle through no
fault of their own received 2 cents per day, but those idle through
punishment or by reason of their own misconduct received nothing.
Upon discharge, inmates received $20 in cash. In the Great Meadow
Prison wages ranged from 5 to 30 cents per day. All who were sick
or idle because of lack of work received 2 cents per day, but those
idle through their own fault received nothing. At the Westfield
State Farm 1 cent per hour was paid to power-machine operators for
all satisfactory work, and 2 cents to clerical workers and specially
skilled workers in industry. Only those inmates engaged in pro­
ductive work received wages; those employed at maintenance tasks
and those who were idle or sick received nothing. In Sing Sing
Prison prisoners in the printing shop, knitting shop, and maintenance
department received 5 cents per day, but all other industrial depart­
ments were on a piecework basis, and their earnings ranged from 5
to 30 cents per day. Inmates locked up or under punishment re­
ceived nothing. Prisoners idle through no fault of their own received
2 cents per day. The average wage per inmate during 1932 was 21
cents per day. Prisoners in the State prison for men at Auburn were
paid wages according to work performed. Inmates working on
prison industries averaged 20 cents per day; on construction work,




STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

39

farm and dairy work, and repairs and renewals, from 5 to 10 cents
per day; on general maintenance work, 5 cents per day; those idle
because of lack of work, 2 cents per day; those idle because of sickness,
2 cents per day; inmates willfully idle or under discipline were not
paid.
North Dakota.— In the State penitentiary everybody on duty got
25 cents per day and 10 cents per hour for time over 10 hours per
day. The daily wage applied to all maintenance duties as well as
to production.
Ohio.— All inmates of the State reformatory for women who were
engaged in productive or maintenance work received 1 cent per hour,
winch was paid to them in full when they were discharged from the
institution. A few inmates who unloaded railroad coal cars and
loaded the small cars for the boiler room received 3 cents per hour
when unloading and 1 cent per hour when loading coal into the boilerroom cars. In the State penitentiary married men with dependents
received a maximum of 5 cents and unmarried men a maximum of 1
cent per hour for all productive and maintenance work. Ninety per­
cent of the married men's earnings were sent to their dependents
quarterly, the other 10 percent being paid to them upon discharge.
The single men received their earnings upon discharge. At the Lon­
don Prison Farm married men received a maximum of 5 cents per
hour and unmarried men a maximum of 1 cent per hour, the wages
being paid in the same way as in the State penitentiary. In the State
reformatory wages were paid at the same rate and in the same manner
as in the State penitentiary.
Oklahoma.— A bonus was paid by the contractor to prisoners in the
State penitentiary for each unit produced over a set task, the rates
varying with the type of work done. The State also paid a bonus to
prisoners during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1932, amounting to
$9,369.08. The rates paid the prisoners were not stated.
Oregon.— In the State penitentiary an average of 35 cents per day
was paid to prisoners working in the flax industry, the rates varying
from 25 to 50 cents per day.
Pennsylvania.— In the eastern State penitentiary compensation
varying from 10 to 61 cents per day was paid to all prisoners on main­
tenance, farm, and productive work. In the State industrial reforma­
tory inmates working in the maintenance shops, on the farm, and at
ordinary prison duties received from 10 to 20 cents per day, depending
upon the task and the willingness and ability of the inmate to work.
In the furniture and printing shops inmates received 10 cents per
day plus a bonus for production in excess of a set task, the bonus
rate varying with the operation. On an average, furniture-shop
men earned $2.15 and printing-shop men $1.35 per month. In the
western State penitentiary, Pittsburgh, all maintenance men received
10 cents per day. All men employed in the brush, tag, weaving,
and clothing shops received from 25 to 65 cents per day, depending
upon the nature of the work and the skill and application of the
man; the average rate paid was approximately 40 cents per day. At
the Kockview Farms in the western part of the State, all maintenance
men on good behavior received 10 cents per day. All men in the
department which produces for outside sales were paid 50 cents per
day. This department operates the cannery, the vegetable garden,
the nursery, and the hot-house.




40

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

Rhode Island.— The State pays the prisoners in the State prison
working in the shirt factory a bonus for all work performed in excess
of a required amount, the bonus varying with the class of work per­
formed. The total bonus paid to prisoners working on piecework in
the shirt shop during 1932 was $9,198.18. Inmates at floor work,
shipping, etc., were paid $2 per month.
South Carolina.— In the State penitentiary prisoners employed in
the furniture and tag plants were paid on a piecework basis, the rates
varying with the type of work done. In the furniture plant the
average wage was approximately 7 cents per hour and in the tag
plant about 3 cents per hour.
South Dakota.— Prisoners in the State penitentiary received 25
cents per 8-hour day in the twine plant, the auto-tag plant, the
printing shop, the tailor shop, and the quarry. Long-time men on
farm and garden work got 25 cents per day, while short-time men
received 15 cents per day. Prisoners working at crushing stone on the
rock pile got 15 cents per day. Inmates working in the kitchen, dining
rooms, or library, or doing janitor work received 25 cents per day.
Tennessee.— In the Brushy Mountain Penitentiary prisoners work­
ing in the coal mines received 20 cents per ton for coal produced in
excess of a daily set task.
Vermont.— All inmates of the State prison and house of correction
for women who worked either on productive labor or on ordinary
prison duties were paid at least $2 per month and a few received $3
or $4. In addition, at the time of discharge each inmate received a
sum equal to $1 per month for each month served. In the State
prison and house of correction for men each prisoner received on the
day of his discharge compensation at the rate of $1 per month for
each month served, but not to exceed $100. In the shoe shop prison­
ers received in addition a piece rate per 100 dozen, the rate varying
with the operation.
Virginia.— In the State penitentiary prisoners, when working,
received 10 cents per day from the State. In addition, the State paid
prisoners regularly employed in the printing shop, shoe-repairing
shop, woodworking shop, clothing shop, and tag plant from 10 to
25 cents per day according to their ability. The contractor in the
pants shop also paid to some prisoners a bonus ranging from 50 cents
to $9 per month. In the contract furniture shop prisoners were paid,
in addition to the regular pay of 10 cents per day, a bonus when pro­
ducing more than a set task. At the State farm prisoners, when
working, received 10 cents per day from the State. In the pants
factory the State paid in addition a bonus of 75 cents per task over a
set task. The contractor also paid a bonus ranging from 50 cents to
$6 per month to prisoners doing office work and in key positions,
such as inspectors, instructors, cutters, etc.
West Virginia.— The State paid prisoners in the State penitentiary
who were employed in the road camps 10 cents per day. It also paid
a bonus to prisoners employed in the contract pants and shirt fac­
tories for exceeding a certain task, the rate varying with the type of
work done. The contractor in the broom and whip shops paid a
bonus to prisoners for exceeding a set task, the rates differing with
the type of work performed.
Wisconsin.— In the State prison most inmates working for the
contractor in the hosiery shop were paid a piece rate which varied




STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

41

with the type of work, but a few were paid a straight monthly rate
ranging from $3 to $10. Prisoners working in the adjoining country
club grounds were paid by the club 25 cents per day. Those working
on piecework in the twine plant received from 1 to 4 cents per ton of
twine, depending upon the class of work done. Day labor in this
plant was compensated at the rate of 35 cents per day. In the auto­
tag shop prisoners received 25 cents per day.
Wyoming.— In the State penitentiary men on nonproductive work
in the shirt shop received a wage of either $2.50 or $3.75 per month,
depending upon the kind of work done. Men on piecework jobs
were paid 50 cents per task for each task over the standard set, and
earned from a few cents to as high as $15 per month.
Federal Prisons

In the United States Disciplinary Barracks, Pacific Branch,
prisoners working in the furniture shop and on the farm and part of
those working in the tailor and shoe shops were paid $2 per month.
In the United States Penitentiary at Atlanta, Ga., prisoners in the
power house are classified as first-, second-, and third-class workers.
The first-class workers received $15 and the second-class workers $12
per month, while the third-class workers received no compensation.
Prisoners in the spinning mill received 5 cents per hour. First-class
workers in the duck mill received an average of 6 cents per hour;
second-class workers, 5 cents per hour; and third-class workers, 4
cents per hour. In the basket shop first-class workers received an
average of 7 cents per hour; second-class workers, 6 cents per hour;
and third-class workers, 5 cents per hour.
Inmates of the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kans.,
who worked in the shoe shop, broom factory, and brickyard received
compensation as follows: First-grade workers, 6 cents per hour;
second-grade workers, 5 cents per hour; third-grade workers, 4 cents
per hour. A man’s grade might change from day to day, depending
upon his behavior.
In the United States Penitentiary Annex at Leavenworth, Kans.,
men working in the furniture shop and the brush and mat shops were
graded as to efficiency. The first-grade men received 6 cents per
hour; the second-grade men, 5 cents per hour; and the third-grade
men 4 cents per hour. In the laundry, dry-cleaning, and ice plants
there was one rate of pay only—3% cents per hour—which was limited
to 60 laundry men, 18 dry-cleaning men, and 13 ice-plant men. The
other men assigned to these plants were not paid. Eligibility for pay
was based on length of time served in the respective plant. In the
printing plant 7 pressmen, 7 compositors, and 2 rulers received 11
cents per thousand impressions and averaged 6.3 cents per hour.
Twenty-six dayworkers in the printing plant received wages ranging
from 2.5 to 3.7 cents per hour. No other workers in the printing plant
received wages.
All inmates of the United States Naval Prison at Portsmouth, N.H.,
received compensation at the rate of 10 cents per day.
In the United States Naval Prison, S.C., all prisoners were allowed
$3 per month.
Prisoners working in the bakery of the Federal Correctional Camp in
Virginia received 25 cents per day.




42

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

General Table
Table A shows the kind, quantity, and value of articles manu­
factured in each of the 116 State penal institutions and 12 Federal
penal institutions, by system under which produced.
Most articles produced in any quantity are shown separately in
this table. It would be impossible, however, due to lack of space,
to show all classes of articles separately. In cases, therefore, where
small amounts were produced, the articles of different classes are
grouped under the heading “ Miscellaneous.” For example, under
“ Farm, garden, and dairy” products, cattle, corn, hay, hogs, wheat,
etc., are shown separately. Other farm, garden, and dairy products
which are produced in smaller quantities, such as beans, beets, rye,
oats, etc., are grouped under “ Miscellaneous farm” products.
An index of products in State and Federal prisons, showing both
the main heading and the subheading under which articles are included
in the tables is shown on pages 198 to 204.




T a b l e A .—

Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, a n d institution

2574° -

STATE PRISONS
ALABAMA

Institution, articles produced, and
unit

Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

i Enumeration impracticable.




$457.50
687.55
28,142. 67

37,941
12,576
(0

14,551.98
3,942.58
498.95

120,700
1,350

42.245.00
47.439.00

1,422

2,049,720 $1,366,480.00
2,757,060

14,220.00 .......

2,340
296,850
103,969
17,556
21,454
13,584

...............

35.663.01
2,413.95
7.128.66
1,364.20
1,922.49

0)

286,350.19

689,265.00

184.88 $2,237,363.26

63.726.00
1.101.65
20.845.00

0)

$457.50
3,864
687.55
8,644
28,142.67
41,366
2,049,720 1,366,480.00
14,551.98
37,941
2,769,636 693,207.58
498.95
0)
18,488 2,237,363.26

625

$8,750.00

76,"260 ” 29,"570.*76

...........

3,905,083 907,971.89

2,237,363.26

946,292.65

2,055,745.00

.........................

42.245.00
47.439.00
8,750.00
14.220.00
29,570.76
63.726.00
1.101.65
20.845.00

4,009,052
17,556
21,454
13,584
(0

........................... .....................

120,700
1,350
625
1,422
76,250
(0
2,340
296,850

943,634.90
2,413.95
7.128.66
1,364.20
1,922.49
5,525,751.10

PRISONS

Total______________________ 3,763.0

3,864
8,644
41,366

A D FEDERAL
N

STATE PRISON SYSTEM

Clothing:
Aprons______________________
0.3
Hats and caps________________
.4
Pants________________________
17.0
Shirts, dress____________ . ____ 474.0
Shirts, work__________________
9.0
Underwear___________________ 266.0
Miscellaneous________________
.3
Construction: Roads, new ...m iles._ 1,174.0
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn_________ ______ bushels. _ 205.0
Cotton________________ bales _. 232.0
Cottonseed___ __________ tons. 45.0
Hay____________ _______ do___
69.0
Potatoes_________ 100 pounds. _ 144.0
308.0
Miscellaneous farm___________
Highway markers..............................
1.0
Metal products: Auto license tags__
9.0
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods (heavy)
pounds— 810.0
Pillowcases____ — ___ _______
1.0
Sheets______ __ _____ _____ ___
5.0
Towels_______________________
1.0
2.0
Miscellaneous textile products—

STATE

Aver­
age
num­
ber of
State use
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

T able A,— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued
ARIZONA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE PRISON




600

$300.00

600

$300.00

1.0
2.0
1.5
6.0
3.0
1.0
.5
74.0

600
1,800
2.400
4,055
2,175
2.400
<0

1,200.00
3.150.00
1.440.00
14.092.50
2 , 012.12
1.200.00
600.00

600
1,800
2.400
4,055
2,186
2.400
4

1,200.00
3.150.00
1.440.00
14,092.50
2,025.62
1.200.00
600.00
209,000.00

1.9
6.0
68.0
5.0
14.0
38.1

20
430
215
175
3,362
0)

480.00
304.44
2.649.50
3,308.76
1,733.82
13,257.25

20
430
637
223
3,362
0)

480.00
304.44
7.713.50
4,223.86
1,733.82
13,415.18

1.0

550

1.237.50

225.0

46,965.89

11

$13.50

4 $233,030.00

W
422
48
0)

5,064.00
915.10
157.93

550
209,000.00

6,150.52

1.237.50
262,116.42

STATES, 1932

Total______________

2.0

I UNITED
N

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms.
Clothing:
Coats________________________
Pants___ _____ ______________
Shirts, work______ ____________
Shoes, new___ _____ ___ pairs._
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Underwear............................. ....
Miscellaneous, labor only______
Construction: New buildings______
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle__________ ______ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head—
Wheat................. ........bushels..
Miscellaneous farm_____ _____ _
Furniture and furnishings: Mat­
tresses_________________________

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

ARKANSAS
STATE PENITENTIARY

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn............................. bushels..
Cotton________________ bales..
Cottonseed........................tons..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous textile products...........

70.0
641.0
84.0
50.0

6.0

43,000

0)
0)

$17,200.00
6,841 $169,866.90
2,000 21,951.93

43,000
6,841
2,000

$17,200.00
169,866.90
21,951.93
13,140.00

8,387.50

0)
0)

80.00
57.50
835.00

<
9

80.00
57.50
835.00

890.00

<
9

89a0
0

13,140.00

8,387.50

STATE FARM FOR WOMEN

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay....................................tons..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous textile products......... .

1.0
1.0

10.0
4.0

200

0)
0)

5

200

5

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Com............................. bushels..
Cotton..............................bales..
Cottonseed........................tons..
Hay...................................do___
Miscellaneous farm....................
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous textile products_____ _
Total........................................

71.0
641.0
84.0

1.0

60.0

10.0

43,200

<>
*
0)

867.0

17,280.00
57.50
13,975.00

6,841 169,866.90
2,000 21,951.93

43,200
6,841

2,000

0)
(9

9,277.50
40,590.00

5

191,818.83

17.280.00
169,866.90
21,951.93
57.50
13.975.00
9,277.50
232,408.83

CALIFORNIA
STATE PRISON AT SAN QUENTIN

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed......................tons—
Clothing:
Aprons.................................... .
Coats........................................
Dresses....................................
Hats and caps______ _______
>Enumeration impracticable.




128.0

6,250

$7,842.50

6,250

$7,842.50

2.0
11.5
5.0
5.0

1,380
5,729
360
5,903

574.35
14,998.25
720.00
2,045.50

1,380
5,756
360
5,903

574.35
15,563.25
720.00
2,045.50

27

$565.00

T a b l e A . — Kind,

, and institution— Continued

quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State,

^

STATE PRISONS— Continued
CALIFORNIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

STATE PRISONS AT SAN QUENTIN—

continued

2.3
17.1
15.0
88.0

24.0
92.9
4.2
15.0

5,350
168
9,517
13, 201
10,661
13,926
1,631

0)

$3,495.65
134.40
17,728.00
9,296.45
29,942.20
7,622.35
40, 740.00
459.00

7.6

202.0

1.0

82.0
89.4
13.0

2.0

5.0
43.6
10.0

2,300
103

1,332.87
2.845.00
32.50
3.600.00

0)
0)
0)

40.0

2.0
6.0

$706.25

19
44
460
3,874

695.18
440.43
7,595. 27
12,511.32
11,458.51

3,585
118
1,370
1,625
292

17,809.13
4,286. 60
9.590.00
1.625.00
4,310.70
4,654.23

0)
(0

0)

5,350
168
9,576
13, 201
10, 661
16,226
1,734
0)
0)

$3,495.65
134.40
18,434.25
9,296.45
29,942.20
8,955.22
43,585.00
491.50
3,600.00

14 307,395.00
23.70 1,225,600.00

14 $307,395.00
23.70 1,225,600. 00

500.0
478.0

.4

59

15,000.00

0)

0)

21

32,000

19
44
460
3,895

15,000.00

(1
)

66.04
1,250.70

2,250.00

695.18
440.43
7,595.27
12,577.36
12,709.21
559.08

3,585
118
1,370
1,625
292
0)
32,000

17,809.13
4,286. 60
9,590.00
1,625.00
4,310.70
4,654.23
2,250.00

STATES, 1932




10.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Overalls............................. .........
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants..........................................
Shirts, work,...............................
Shoes, new____ ________ pairs..
Shoes, repaired.................do___
Suits......... - ............................ —
Miscellaneous........... .................
Miscellaneous, labor only..........
Construction:
New buildings....................... ...
Hoads, new.....................miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads................. ......................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...............................head..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Miscellaneous livestock..............
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood.............. ................
Desks..........................................
Mattresses...................................
Pillows...........- ............................
Tables....... .......................- ..........
M iscellaneous.......... ..................
Laundry, commercial____ pounds—

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Metal products:
Galvanized ware............ —
Iron hollow ware_............
Tinware.............................
Miscellaneous- . ........... ...
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound.
Letterheads. .....................
Miscellaneous...... .............
Textiles and textile products:
Bags..................................

2,658.35
330.00
444.85
16.00
400.00
750.00
15,200.00
134.40
920.90
228.60
1,121. 20
231.40
6,153. 52
5,204.45

739.7

26,550

13,981.00

859
321
58
2,971
490
1
7,337
432
6,788
3,496
8,723
320

214.75
996.25
23.20
710.35
313.30
.75
9,326.98
181.44
2,715.20
5,544.78
4,367.00
8,000.00
234.10

1, 040.1

380
250,000
0)

400.00
750.00
15, 200.00

959.87
1,440.00

,422,951
109
762
1,219
1,076
(0
0)

342, 919.73
920.90
228.60
1, 121.20
231.40
7, 113.39
6, 644.45

483.00

27,700

14, 464.00

859
326
58
2,971
490
1
7,373
432
6,788
3,496
9,883
363
0)
(0

214.75
1, 108.75
23.20
710.35
313.30
' .75
9, 686.98
181.44
2, 715.20
5, 544.78
5, 527.00
9, 720.00
246.60
197.85

5,422,615 342,785.33

(0

0)

FOLSOM STATE PRISON

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed..................... tons..
Clothing:
Aprons.......................................
Coats.............................. ............
Gloves and mittens....... .pairs..
Hats and caps................... .........
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns..........
Pants.......—_______ __________
Shirts, dress................................
Shirts, work......... ......................
Shoes, new...................... pairs..
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Suits.........................................
Miscellaneous.......................... .
Miscellaneous, labor only..........
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings..... ..................... .
Roads, n ew ..._________ miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle........... ................... head..
Hay.......... ........................ tons..
Hogs— ...... ..................... headM ilk-------------------100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy.................. .
Miscellaneous farm....................
Miscellaneous livestock_______




(2
)

(2
)

0)

...........
__

1,150
5

36

1,160
43

13
2.40

0)
18
94
387
3,835
561

0)
0)

360.00

1,160.00
1,720.00
12.50
197.85

0)
(i)
0)

100.3

112.50

273.50
1,390.04
6,245.52
12,652.36
336.85
4,263.78
34,083.07
376.88

1 Enumeration impracticable.

i

6,000.00
65,000.00
277,600.00

0)

20,000.00

13
240

6, 000.00
65, 000.00
277, 600.00

0)

2
2
310

(0
(l)

h)

34.06
736.62
302.42
1,542.11
8.64
8 Less than one tenth of 1.

20, 000.00

20
94
389
4,145
561
0)
(*)
0)

19.70

293.20
1, 390.04
6, 279.58
13, 388.98
336.85
4, 566.20
35, 625. 18
385.52

PRISONS

7.0

336
109
762
1,219
1,076
0)
(0

(l)

2, 658.35
330.00
444.85
16.00

A D FEDERAL
N

380
250,000

.1

3,623
244
2,027
0)

STATE

Pillowcases-......... ......................
Sheets....................................... .
Towels. .................................. .
.
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

3,623
244
2,027
0)

15.0
2.9

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued
CALIFORNIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
folsom state pbison—continued

6.0
.3
3.0
.2

3.8
2.4
.4

1.6
1.2
2.0
867.7
2.3
15.5
5.0
.1
6.4

1 .0
1

2.3.
43.1
.3
19.7
108.0

0)
0)
17,200

(9

2,073
78
5,019

0)
0)

32,800

2
,

6,050
360
58
8,874
5,840
169
16,854
432
19,989
14,157

$77.00
3,000.00

0)
(0

$2,635.36
67.00
88.94

43.00

1 368.71
,

383.01
136.50
750.85
549.73
4,380.00

21,823.50
789.10
15,994. 50
720.00
23.20
2,755.85
3,808.95
135.15
27,054.
181.44
12,011.65
35,486.98

$3,600.00
2,635.36

0)
<)
*

144.00
3,088.94
43.00
1,868.71

2,073
78
5,019

37,648

(*
>

17,200

$3,600.00

383.01
136.50
750.85
549.73
6,090.15

33,950

22,306.50

2,239
6,082
360
58
8, S74
5*840
169
1$.949
432
19,980
14,1571

789.10
16,672.00
720.00
23.20
2,755.85
3,808.95
135.1 5
28,121.23
181.44
12,011.65
35,486.98

37,648

C
1
)

0)

1,710.15

1,150

483.00

32

677.50

95

1,066.25

C
1
)

STATES, 1932




0)

7.7

I UNITED
N

Land development: Land improve­
ment...............................................
Laundry, commercial........ pounds..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous______ _______________
Metal products: Miscellaneous.......
Printing and binding:
Letterheads................................
Miscellaneous.............. ..............
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets..........................................
Towels.........................................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products.........
ALL INSTITUTIONS
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed____________tons..
Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Coats...........................................
Dresses........................................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs..
Hats and caps.............................
Overalls....... ...... ........................
Pajamas and nightgowns..........
Pants...........................................
Shirts, dress................................
Shirts, work........ ......................
Shoes, new._______ ____ pairs, j

ss, repaired______-__.do.-_.
Suits........................— ____ ___
Miscellaneous..
.
___
Miscellaneous labor only......... .
Construction;
.
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings____
Boads, new_____ ______ miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads........................................
iTarm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............... ............head..
H a y ...___ ____ ______ _„tons_.
Hogs.-...............................headM ilk..........— ...-.100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy———_____
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Furniture and furnishings;
Chairs, wood............................. .
Desks................................ .........
Mattresses.......... ...................... .
Pillows......... ........................... .
Tables...................... ............ ......
Miscellaneous.......................... ..
Land development: Land improve­
ment................... ...................... .
Laundry, commercial _____ pounds _.
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous......................................
Metal products:
Galvanized ware.........................
Iron hollow ware........................
Tinware......................................
Miscellaneous..................... .......
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound...........
Letterheads-...................... .......
Miscellaneous............................ .
Textiles and textile products:

33.0
115.9
4.5
15.4

1.951

(9

8.0

1.4
4.0
8.0
11.3
1.0
1.3
318.0
2.9
82.0
89.4
13.0

2.0

5 .0

43.6

37
138
847
7,709
561

(9
8

3,585
118
1,370
1,625
292

6.0
3.2
34.8

1,040.1
4.0
Pillowcases..................................
3.4
Sheets......................................... .
2.4

2.6
8.1
9.0

Total---------------------------------- i 394.0
1Enumeration impracticable.




4,565.00
45.00
3,797.85

(9

2

34.06
802.66

3,600.00

380
267,200

302.42
2,792.81
8.64

134.40
920.90
611.61
1,257.70
982.25
6,703.25
9,584.45

4,885.36
67.00

400.00
793.00
17,068.71

336

69,648

(9

2,658.35
330.00
444.85
3,016.00

(9
(9

m

2,835
1,297
6,095

8

362,347.67

14,482. 22
53,305.00
738.10
3,797.85

6,0 0 0
0 .0

8,040
561

1,830.47
13,874.85
25,966.34
336.85
4,566.20
48,334.39
944.60

3,585
118
1,370
1,625
292

8
(9

77.00

3,623
244
2,027

(9
(9
(9

19.70

2
331

(9
(9

26,109
2,097

27 372,395.00
26.10 1,503,200.00
35,000.00
(9

17,809.13
4,286.60
9.590.00
1.625.00
4,310.70
4,654.23

16.0
.3

(9
(9

968.68
1,830.47
13,840.79
25,163.68
336.85
4,263.78
45,541.58
935.96

7.7

15.0
2.9
9.0
3.1

146

6,000.00
(9
27.00 372,395.00
26.10 1,503,200.00
35,000.00
(9

670; 0
575.0
140.3

gags............................... ..
Flags............................. .............

Towels....................................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

48,740.00
693.10

17,809.13
4,286.60
9.590.00
1.625.00
4.310.70
4,654.23

69,648

3.600.00
4,885.36

(9
(9

(9
(9

0)

144.00

88.94

2,658.35
330.00
444.85
3,104.94

380
267,200

(9

3,623
244
2,027

400.00
793.00
17,068.71

5,422,951
109
2,835
1,297

342,919.73
920.90
611.61
1.257.70
982.25
7,663.12
12,734.60

<
9

(9

5,422,615 342,785.33

(9
(9
1,920,195.00

959.87
3,150.15
369,024.41

6,1

(9

2,651,567.08

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

Or
O

STATE PRISONS— Continued
COLORADO
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

14.0

18,890

$19,000.00

18,890

$19,000.00

500
500
4,250
3,600
2,400
2,166

1.325.00
175.00
3,902.50
1.620.00
960.00
759.10

21.00

500
500
4,250
3,600
2,400
2,166

1.325.00
175.00
3,902.50
1.620.00
960.00
759.10

21.00

18.3

0)

$15,200.00

0)

15,200.00

24.7

0)

25,000.00

<
9

25.000.00

47
8,968
413
247
(0

766.84
1,614.26
3,695.09
1,690.19
18,649.24

3,000

600.00
2.736.00
1.700.00

4.9
8.0
17.9
3.1
104.1

28
8,968
413
20
0)

505.58
1,614.26
3,695.09
130.00
17,413.38

2.6
2.0
21.0

3,000
<*)
(0

600.00
2.736.00
1.700.00

14
1,314

20.25
35.25
65.70

19
227
(0

$261.26
1,560.19
1,235.86

8

STATE REFORMATORY

Clothing:
Aprons____________________
Coats.......................................
Gloves and mittens--------------




8

.6

66
14
1,314

20.25
35.25
65.70

STATES, 1932

.1
6.0
1.3
11.0
8.0
4.0
6.0

I UNITED
N

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building___________ tons..
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats-----------------------------------Hats and caps________________
Pants________________________
Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs..
Underwear___________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New, other than buildings and
roads______________________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Com ________________ bushels..
Hay....................................tons—
Hogs................................. head—
Miscellaneous farm___________
Textiles and textile products:
Sheets............................................ .
Other manufactured products_____
Miscellaneous, labor only-----------

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

•21

.1
.2
.7
.7
2.0
.6
.1

2521
44
29
1,004
620
2,013
1,039
(0

63.601
55.00
116.00
725.00
445.60
1,368.05
281.70
15.10

.9
1.0

C>

.1

1

1.150.00
2.500.00

120.00

0)
69
524
158
2,985
1,440
581

0)

1.150.00
2.500.00

63.60
55.00
116.00
725.00
445.60
1,368.05
281.70
15.10

0)

2,241.27
5,240.00
1,488.00
9,101.25
720.00
348.80

21
1

210.30
7.20

71

42.40
430.70
259.77
833.15

545
159
1,440
652

0)

2,697.10
355.95

.7
6.0

12,000
(*)

540.00
2,880.00

0)

.5
1.5

12,000
0)

33.00
105.00

0)

0)

W
(0

14.0

18,890

0)
12,000

12,000

46.65
150.70
114.30
75.80
2,890.00

540.00
2.880.00
33.00
105.00

311
265
762

46.65
150.70
114.30
75.80
2,890.00

18,890

19,000.00

126
514
1,314
752
44
29
5,254
4,220
4,413
3,205
<0

41.25
1,360.25
65.70
238.60
55.00
116.00
4,627.50
2,065.60
2,328.05
1,040.80
15.10

0)

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building___________ tons..
Clothing:
Aprons_____________ _________
Coats............................- .............
Gloves and mittens....................
Hats and caps____ _______ ____
Overalls................... ....................
Overcoats.....................................
Pants...................................... .....
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, repaired................ pairs. _
Underwear..................................
Miscellaneous_______ _________




.1
6.0
.6
1.5
.1
.2
11.7
8.7
6.0
6.6
.1

19,000.00

126
41.25
514
1,360.25
1,314
65.70
752
238.60
44
55.00
29
116.00
5,254
4,627.50
4,220
2,065.60
4,413
2,328.05
3,205
1,040.80
15.10
0)
* Enumeration impracticable.

_

* Less than one tenth of 1.

PRISONS

311
265
762

(2
)
(2
)
(a
)
(2
)
3.3

8
0)

120.00

2,241.27
5,450.30
1,495.20
9,101.25
720.00
391.20
430.70
2,956.87
1,189.10

A D FEDERAL
N

6.0
3.0
5.0
6.0
13.6
2.0
.9
30.6
10.5

2521
44
29
1,004
620
2,013
1, f "
0)

STATE

Hats and cap s..____ __________
Overalls______________________
Overcoats. ______ _____________
Pants............................................
Shirts, work................. ...............
Shoes, repaired____ ____ pairs—
Underwear...................................
Miscellaneous.......................... .
Construction:
Alterations and installations
New buildings________________
New, other than buildings and
roads_______________________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Hay....................................tons—
Hogs................................. head—
M ilk....................... 100 pounds—
Potatoes...........................d o ___
Wheat......................... bushels—
Miscellaneous dairy___________
Miscellaneous farm.....................
Miscellaneous livestock..............
Lumber and timber products:
Lumber................... board feet—
Miscellaneous........... ........ .........
Printing and binding:
Letterheads.................................
Miscellaneous.......................... —
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases......... - .......................
Sheets................... * ..................—
_
Towels.... ....................................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Miscellaneous, labor only.................

Ox

“T a b l e A , — Kind,

quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued

fcO

STATE PRISONS— Continued
COLORADO—Continued

Num­
ber

Value

0)

Value

25,120.00

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

$16,350.00
2.500.00

0)

25,120.00

0)

$2,746.85
1,614.26
8,935.09
1,618.00
9,101.25
720.00
348.80

1|
9

8

0)

$261.26

116

21

20,110.48
355.95

210. 30
1,567. 39

958
406
2,985
1,440
652
(0
(0
(0

42.40
430. 70
1,495. 63
833.15

12,000
0)

540.00
2,880.00

0)

12,000
(0

33.00
105.00

0)

311
3,265
762
(0
0)
(0

46.65
750.70
114.30
75.80
2,736.00
4,590.00
88,375.98

12,000

12,000

43,970.00

4,840.83

Value

3,008.11
1,614.26
9.145.39
3.185.39
9,101.25
720.00
391.20
430.70
21,606.11
1,189.10
540.00
2.880.00
33.00
105.00
46.65
750.70
114.30
75.80
2.736.00
4.590.00
137,186.81

STATES, 1932

(1}
(0

Number

$16,350.00
2,500.00

(0
97
8,968
937
178
2,985
1,440
581

State account

I UNITED
N




Public works and
ways

LABOR

all institutions—continued
Construction:
19.2
Alterations and installations...
New buildings............... ............
1.0
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
24.8
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
10.9
8.0
Corn................. ........... bushels-_
Hay___________________ tons
20.9
Hogs................................. head—
8.1
6.0
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do___
13.6
Wheat.......................... bushels—
2.0
Miscellaneous dairy...................
.9
Miscellaneous farm..................... 134.7
Miscellaneous livestock..............
10.5
Lumber and timber products:
.7
Lumber....................board feet—
6.0
Miscellaneous______________
Printing and binding:
.5
Letterheads________________
1.5
Miscellaneous.........................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.............................
(>)
2.6
Sheets.....................................
Towels....................................
(2
)
Miscellaneous textile products— (2
)
2.0
Other manufactured products-------24.3
'Miscellaneous labor only-----------Total......................................... 354.0

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

CONNECTICUT
STATE REFORMATORY

Clothing:
Coats_____ _____ _______ _____
Hats and caps_______________
Overalls................. ............... .
Pants, prison..............................
Shirts, dress.............................. .
Shirts, work...............................
Shoes, repaired................ pairs..
Construction: New buildings........ .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle____________ ____ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay.........— ..................... tons..
Hoes................................. head..
M ilk...................... 100 pounds_
Miscellaneous farm__________
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.............................. ..............
Miscellaneous.............................
Metal products: Auto license tags—
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous............................. ....................
Repair and shop work.............. .......
Other manufactured products_____

1.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
18.0

f>
50

1,000

500
1,500
650
1,000

1,750

.........5 ” "$76,"505.00

1.0
10.2
2.0
11.0
25.5

2
516
230
32
2,973
0)

.5
1.0
32.0

820,834

30.0
2.0
.5

$975.00
150.00
500.00
1.500.00
810.00
747.00
1.050.00

650
1,000
500
1,500
650
1,000
2,314
5

_____
175

3.500.00

615

3,000.00

15

525 00
200.00

774.21

55,416.77 ..........
35,671.54

C
O

2
516
405
32
3,588
C
O

564

C
O

............... ....................
C
O
C
O
(0

800.00
600.00
250.00

$975.00
150.00
500.00
1,500.00
810.00
747.00
1,388.53
76,500.00
100.00
250.00
8,100.00
774. 21
14,875.00
7,193.49

15
C
O
820,834

525.00
200.00
55,416.77
36,471.54
600.00
250.00

(0
C
O
C
O

STATE FARM FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Dresses....................................... .
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Underwear.................................
Miscellaneous............................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle__________ _______ head..
Corn---------------- -------- bushels..
Hay------------------------------tons..
Hogs................................. head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm.................. .
Miscellaneous livestock............ .
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets_______________________




2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
17.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
3.0
25.0
2.0
25.0
1.0
2.0

429
757
362
1,60
C
O

429
757
362
1,609
C
O

103.95
644.98
153.50
570.20
1,575.92

21

21
1,200
150
57
1,832
C
O
(0
C
O
93,600

939.97
480.00
2,400.00
1,652.35
6,430.32
1,465.74
14,443.07
129.02
1,920.00

232
631

69.40
242.25

1,200

150
57
1,832

8

C
O

1,465.74
14,443.07
129.02
93,600

1,920.00

232
631

69.40
242.25
1 Enumeration impracticable.

* Less than one tenth of 1.

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued

Oi

STATE PRISONS— Continued
CONNECTICUT—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account
Number

Value

Piece price
Number

Value

Total

Contract
Number

Value

Number

Value

360

$90.00

225.00
600.00

75
400
1,328,544
1,800

225.00
600.00
415,170.00
900.00

1,328,544

900.00

$415,170.00

15,000.00

$15,000.00
0)

6,000.00

6,000.00

3
2,436
113
93
1,799
2,460
0)

60.00
974.40
1.356.00
1,398.42
6.839.00
2.019.00
4,804.58

3
2,436
113
93
1,799
2,460
(0

60.00
974.40
1.356.00
1,398.42
6.839.00
2.019.00
4,804.58

(0

2.500.00

0)

2.500.00

300.00

0)

300.00

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms................. .........................
Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Coats----------- -----------------------Dresses........................................
Hats and caps................... .........
Overalls........................... ...........
Pajamas and nightgowns...........




4.0
2.0
2.5
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.01

90.00

90.00
429
725
757
1,000

500

103.95
1,200. 00
664.98
150.00
500.00
153.50

429
725
757
1,000

500

103.95
1,200.00
664.98
150.00
500.00
153.50

STATES, 1932

0)

I UNITED
N

$90.00
75
400

LABOR

STATE PRISON

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms.
4.0
Clothing:
Coats, prison............................. .
1.5
Pants, prison...........................
1.5
Shirts, work................................ 407.0
Shoes, repaired..................pair_.
2.0
Construction:
New buildings............................
6.0
New, other than buildings and
roads.......... .............................
4.0
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle........—....................head—
3.0
Corn............................. bushels..
4.0
Hay_________ __________tons.
5.0
Hogs................................. head—
8.0
M ilk____ ________ 100 pounds..
10.0
Potatoes............................do—
4.0
Miscellaneous farm....................
33.0
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous..................................................
3.0
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous textile products______
4.0

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
Value
ployed Number

2.5
i n
408.0
5,0
4.0
17.0

1,900
650
1,000
3,550
1,609

(9

2,100.00
810.00
747.00
1,950.00
570.20
1,575.92

564

24,0

6

4,0
43
60
17.2
12.0
25.0
4.0
3.0
83.5
2.0

26
4,152
493
182
6,604
2,460

(9
(9
(9

820,834

6

6,000.00

(0

1.099.97
1,704.40
8.356.00
3.824.98
25,144.32
2.019.00
1,465.74
26,441.14
129.02

175
615

1.0
2.0
4.0
.5
738.0

(9

3,000.00

182
7,219
2,460

(9
15

93,600

55,416.77

(9
0)

69.40
242.25
300.00
175,000.08

68
6

8

38,171.54
232
631

6,000.00

26
4,152

3, 500. 00

(9
97,500.00

525.00
200.00
1,920.00

•

(9

15

93,600
820,834

800.00
600.00

0)
(9
(9
(9

250.00
11,133. 55

91,500.00

1.099.97
1,704.40
11,856.00
3.824.98
28,144.32
2,019.00
1,465.74
26,441.14
129.02
525.00
200.00
1,920.00
55,416.77
38,971.54
600.00

232
631

69.40
242.25
300.00
250.00
698,803.63

415,170.00

DELAWARE

PRISONS

(9

2,100.00
1,900
650
810.00
1,329,544 415,917.00
4,114
2,288.55
1,609
570.20
1,575.92
(9

91,500.00

(9

33.0
2.0

415,170.00

A D FEDERAL
N

.5
1.0
25.0
32.0

(9

$338. 55

1,328,544

STATE

Pants.......................................
Shirts, dress.............................
Shirts, work......... ...... ........... .
Shoes, repaired................pairs —
Underwear........... ..................... .
Miscellaneous...............—......... .
Construction:
New buildings............................
New, other than buildings and
roads..................... ................. .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________ ________head—
Corn............................. bushels.
Hay----------------- ------------ tons—
Hogs................ ................head—
M ilk...... ................ 100 pounds..
Potatoes.................... do—.........
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm....................
Miscellaneous livestock............ .
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc............... ............................
Miscellaneous- .......................... .
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Metal products: Auto license tags..
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous..................................................
Repair and shop work.............. .......
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets.........................................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products........ .
Total......... ..............................

NEW CASTLE COUNTY WORKHOUSE

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Dresses....... .......................... ......
Overalls.......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants...........................................
Shirts, work.............. .................
Shoes, repaired____ ____ pairs—
i Enumeration impracticable.




0.5

500

$125.00

500

$125.00

.3
3.0
5.0
1.0
206.5
5.0
1.0

68
260
6,000
128
600
6,000
1,054

13.60
260.00
2,400.00
64.00
300.00
2,400.00
527.00

68
260
6,000
128
248,183
6,000
1,054

13.60
260.00
2,400.00
64.00
144,723.00
2,400.00
627.00

247,583

$144,'423.00

Ot

C7f

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

Crc

STATE PRISONS— Continued
DELAW ARE—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

NEW CASTLE COUNTY W O R K H O U SE -

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

continued
0.4
3.3
1.5

180
497

$270.00
248.50
25.00

4.0
34.0

(0
0)

$1,000.00
60,000.00

$270.00
248.60
25.00
1,000.00
60,000.00

0)

162.00
2,280.00
8,849.90
891.60
954.63
8,666.00

324
114
1,373
1,337
926
0

162.00
2,280.00
4,185.10
891.60
416.70
8,656.00

.1

150

300.00

160

300.00

81.60
970.80
280.00
85.00

408
1,618
3,600
(0

81.60
970.80
280.00
535.00

.1
.5
.5
2.3

Total.........................................

312.0

408
1,618
3,500
0)

24,941.90

2,314

”i,’ i9
5

0)
61,000.00

$4,664.80

2,121

537."83

0)

460.00

56 2 3
, 5 .6

$144,423.00

226,017.63

STATES, 1932

324
114
3,687
1,337

3.0
6.0
8.0
4.0
9.0
13.0

Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases................................
Sheets______________________
Towels
•
Miscellaneous textile products _




180
497
0)

I UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Suits......................................... .
Underwear........... ..................... .
Miscellaneous...... ..................... .
Construction:
Alterations and installations—
New buildings..... ..................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay............... ................... tons..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Potatoes_______________ do___
Wheat..........................bushels..
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Furniture and furnishings: Mat*

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
DISTRICT REFORM A TORY

.4
1.3
1.4
7.3
10.0
13.8
2.0

321
2,460
4,052
5,563
10,142
2,174

7,673
1,169
609

0)

16.5
.8
1.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
26.4
.8

365
321
2,460
4,052
5,563
10,142
2,174

1,639; 25

.5
56.0

0)

8

(0

eo,gco.co

0)

0)

192.74

1.0
1.0

317
473
656,629

26,058.37

$101.5C

1.0

(0

22.8
352,986
71.1 1,219,948
.1
(0
1.3
1.3
13.3
.1

138,025
174,360

.4
.8

755
1,560

<*)

768.88

8

500.00
200,600.00
60,800.00

350
91
93
2,343
975
8

795.34
113.91

45.0
36.0

160.40
424.50
465.90
2,276.50
3.142.00
4.571.00
1,639.25

$500. C
O
2C0,6C0. C
O

350
91
93
2,343
975
0)

$2,851.73
710.07
129.50

192.50
1,269.00
3,393.92
3,210.75
487.50
23,751.42
192.74

317
473
0)

5, C O 00
O.

795.34
113.91

0)
656,629

5,000.00
26,058.37

0)

768.88

19,785.99
34,977.71
86.71

352,986
1,219,948
0)

19,785.99
34,977.71
86.71

416.45
361.96
4,156.54
119.70

138,025
174,360

416.45
361.96
4,156.54
119.70

151. C
O
234. C
O

755
1,560

PRISONS




7,673
1, “

A D FEDERAL
N

1 Enumeration impracticable .

18.0
2.4

STATE

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms........................................
Brushes....................- ................ .
Mops......... ..................................
Clothing:
Aprons...... ................................. .
Coats.......................................... .
Hats and caps............................
Overalls......... ..................... .......
Pants........................................ .
Shirts, w o rk ..............................
Shoes, repaired................ pairs..
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings...................... ......
New, other than buildings and
roads........................................
.Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay____________________tons..
Hogs..................................head..
Potatoes_________ 100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Miscellaneous livestock.............
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses___________________
Pillows______________________
Land development:
Land improvement....................
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Lumber and timber products:
Miscellaneous_____ __________
.Metal products:
Auto license tags_____________
Castings_____________pounds..
Miscellaneous_____ ______ ____
■Printing and binding:
Envelopes_______________ ____
Letterheads............................... .
Miscellaneous........................... .
Repair and shop work____________
'Textiles and textile products:
Bags................................ ............
Pillowcases..................... ............

0)

151.00
234.00
Cn

T able

, and institution— Continued

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State,

Cg

STATE PRISONS— Continued
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA—Continued
!

Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

I

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

DISTRICT ROTOHMATORY—COntd.
$654.15
31.30
184.05

(9

8,186

90,920.30
2,000.00

(9

536
168
80
62
132
19
2
13
147

134.00
156.60
8.00
17.25
66.00
6.00
1.00
19.50
37.75
814.50

(9

125.9
3.0

(9

1,878
313

$654.15
31.30
184.05

8,186

90,920.30
2,000.00

536
168
80
62
132
19
2
J3
147

134.00
156.60
8.00
17.25
66.00
6.00
1.00
19.50
37.75
817.50

7

35,850.00
96,750.00

DISTRICT WORKHOUSE
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tQe
thousands—
Miscellaneous________________
Clothing:
Aprons_______________________
Dresses---------------------------------Handkerchiefs________________
Hats and caps________________
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Shirts, dress__________________
Shirts, work__________________
Suits.____ ___________________
Underwear___________________
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings...........................
New, other than buildings and
roads------ ---------- --------------Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Corn............ ............... bushels.




.5
1.1
.1
.1
.5
.1
(2
)
.1
.3
2.1

(9

28.0
36.0

22
705

915.38
390.00

$35,850.00
96.750.00

(9

18.0
1.0
1.6

(9
(9

26.600.00

$3. G
O

(9
(9
(9

26,600.00
22
705

915.38
390.00

STATES, 1932

1,878
313

2.0
.1
.5

I UNITED
N

Textiles and textile products—Con.
Sheets_______________________
Towels_______________________
Miscellaneous textile products—

LABOR

num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
m t
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

PRISON

Aver­
age

Hay....... _.......................... tons..
Hogs.......... —....................head..
Potatoes................. 100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
g
Miscellaneous dairy...... ............
32
Miscellaneous farm___________
1 Furniture and furnishings:
°
Mattresses..................................
Pillows....................................
Textiles and textile products:
Bags............................................
Blankets.................. ............ ......
Pillowcases.............. ...................
Sheets.........................................
Towels.............. .........................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Toys______ ______________ ______ _
Other manufactured products.........

1.5
11.0
3.0
.3
17.0
47.6

120
112
1,870
281
(0
0)

1,560.00
3,798.32
2,470.00
140.50
20,068.66
21,539.88

1.8
.2

71
89

390.50
65.20

15.52

1,560.00
3,798.32
2,470.00
140.50
20,068.66
21,555.40

71
89

0)

120
112
1,870
281
K
(0

390.50
65.20

.5
1.0
2.0
.5
3.9
1.7
.5

15
9
1,797
2,240
450
<
*)
149
0)

1.50
36.00 _____
359.40 _____
1,344.00
65.25
622.30 _____
149.00
40.25

15
9
1,797
2,240
450
0)
149
0)

1.50
36.00
359.40
1,344.00
65.25
622.30
149.00
40.25

18.0
2.4
.6

7,673
1,169
609

2,851.73
710.07
129.50 ____

7,673
1,169
609

2,851.73
710.07
129.50

125.9
3.0

8,186
(*)

8,186
(0

90,920.30
2,000.00

.9
1.3
1.1
.1
1.5
7.3
.5
10.0
.1
13.8
2.0
.1
.3
2.1

901
321
168
80
2,522
4,052
132
5,563
19
10,144
2,174
13
147
(9

901
321
168
80
2,522
4,052
132
5,563
19
10,144
2,174
13
147

294.40
424.50
156.60
8.00
483.15
2,276.50
66.00
3,142.00
6.00
4,572.00
1,639.25
19.50
37.75
817.50

(»)

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms______ _______ _______
Brushes...................................... .
Mops...........................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Miscellaneous.............................
Clothing:
Aprons___ _____ _____________
Coats.................. .................. .....
Handkerchiefs___________ ____
Hats and caps.............................
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants...........................................
Shirts, dress_________________
Shirts, work__________ ______ _
Shoes, repaired____ ____ pairs..
Suits.......................................... .
Underwear__________________ _
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings............................
New, other than buildings and
roads______ ________________




90,920.30 __
2,000.00

i
1

294.40
424.50 ____
156.60 _____
8.00
483.15
2,276.50 ..........
66.00 ..........
3,142.001..........
6.001.........
4,572.00 ..........
1,639.25
19.50 _____
37.75
814.50 ..........

28.5
92.0

(0

34.5

0)

1 Enumeration impracticable.

15

0)

3.00

0)

36.350.00
297,350.00

0)

87.400.00

0)

15

36,350.00
297,350.00
87,400.00

3 Less than one tenth of 1.
Oi
CD

T a b le

and institution— Continued

A.— Kind, quantity,, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State,

g

STATE PRISONS— Continued
D ISTR IC T OF COLUMBIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Piece price

Number

Value

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

all institutions—continued

22
1,055
211
205
4,213
1,256
0)
0)
0)

2.8
1.2

562

45.0
36.0

656,629

1.0

0)

$117.02

22
1,055
211
205
4,213
1,256
0)
0)
0)

$915.38
582.50
2,829.00
7,192. 24
5,680. 75
628.00
20,068.66
45,306.82
192. 74
1,185.84
179.11

26,058.37

0)

$5,000.00

(l)
656,629

5,000.00
26,058.37

0)

C)

22.8
352,986
71.1 1, 219,948
.1
<
l)
1.3
1.3
13.3
.1

770
9

1

19,785.99
34,977.71
86.71

138,025
174,360

138,025
174,360

.5
.5

352,986
, 219,948
C)

416.45
361.96
4,156.54
119.70

8
770
9

152.50
36.00

STATES, 1932




1.0
2.4
2.5
15.0
6.0
1.3
17.0
74.0
.8

I UNITED
N

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................ ..head.
Corn___________ ____ bushels..
Hay................— .............. tons.
Hogs................................. head.
Potatoes................. 100 pounds. _
Wheat..........................bushels. .
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm....................
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses................................. .
Pillows.......................................
Land development: Land improve, ment.............................. ................
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Lumber and timber products:
. Miscellaneous...............................
Metal products:
Auto license ta g s.....................
Castings....................... pounds..
Miscellaneous.............................
Printing and binding:
Envelopes..................................
Letterheads............. ...................
Miscellaneous........... ................ .
Repair and shop work......................
Textiles and textile products:
Bags........................................
B lankets--.-..........................

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Pillowcases................ ...
Sheets..........................
Towels........... .......................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Toys................ ............ ................
Other manufactured products___
Total______ ______________

1.8
40
>6
4.4
1.7
.5

3,35^1
4,118
763
0)
149
0)

676.0

3,357
4,118
763
0)
149
0)

593.40
1,998.15
96.55
806.35
149.00
40.25
285,800.28

712,020.30

120.02

426,100.00

593,40*
1,998.15
96.55
806.35
149.00
40.25

FLORIDA
STATE FARM

$124,874.50

420,072

105,018.00

12 $26,317.13
197.41 1,809,972.51

20.0
990.0
8.0
29.0
11.0
68.0
68.0
187.0

12,133
160
1,340
3,090
0)

1,650.00
6,066.50
2,245.55
14,070.00
12,185.34
38,255.15

15.0
35.0

262,670
506,275

2,117.03
24,486.63

1.0
3.0
19.0

4,200
4,009
0)

662.50
2,066.98
14,533.83
133,593.51

1,739.0

499

(0
1,836,289.64

$1,997.00

3,874.00
5,871.00

1.650.00
6,066.50
2,245.55
14,070.00
14,182.34
38,255.15
2,117.03
24,486.63

4,200
4,009
(0

334,332

662.50
2,066.98
18,407.83

5,882
334,332
4,722
420,072

2,205,646.65

229,892. 50

GEORGIA
STATE PRISON SYSTEM

Clothing:
Overalls............................... .
Pants.................... ...............
Shirts, work........................ .
Uniforms, prison__________
* Enumeration impracticable.




1.0
3.0
2.0
2.0

500
2,000
2,000
600

$320.00
1,280.00
700.00
486.00

500
2,000
2,000

600

$320.00
1,280.00
700.00
486.00

p r is o n s

66
12,133
160
1,340
3,589
0)
262,670
506,275

9,372.00

$5,882.00
124,874.50
9.372.00
105,018.00

12 26,317.13
197.41 1,809,972.51

$5,882.00

4,722

federal

5,882

and

Total_______________ ______

8.0
141.0
14.0
122.0

state

Clothing:
P a n t s . ......................................
Shirts, work........... .....................
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Underwear............ ........ ...........
Construction:
New buildings............................
Roads, n e w ....................miles..
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle................................head..
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay......... ................ - ........tons..
Hogs............. ....................head..
M ilk -.................... 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Lumber and timber products: Lum­
ber. ............................. board feet..
Metal products: Auto license tags.
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases................... .............
Sheets.................................... .....
Other manufactured products_____

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

to

STATE PRISONS— Continued
GEORGIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account
Number

Value

Picce price
Number

Value

Contract
Number

Value

Total
Number

Value

1 $10,500.00
48,587 4,898, 569.43

$570.00
3.250.00
700.00
90.00
2.880.00
2,110.00
2,989.00
11,840.00

19
6,500
20
10
288
132
797
0)

570.00
3.250.00
700.00
90.00
2.880.00
2,110.00
2,989.00
11,840.00

50,000
670,906

500.00
25,158.98

50,000
670,906

500.00
25,158.98

1,600
1,600

224.00
560.00
4,962,727.41

56
24
438,897
384
1

$221.50
60.00
180,407.97
115.20
913.13

1,600
1,600

224.00
560.00
53,657.98.......... 4,909,069.43
IDAHO

STATE PENITENTIARY

Clothing:
Coats_____________________
Pants________ ____________
Shirts, work................. ..........
Shoes repaired____ _____ pairs—
Construction: New buildings___




1.3
.4
166.0
2.0
1.0

56
24
384

$221.50
60.00
438,897

115.20
$913.13

$180,407.97

STATES, 1932

19
6,500
20
10
288
132
797
0)

I UNITED
N

1 $10,500.00
48,587 4,898,569. 43

LABOR

STATE PRISON SYSTEM— C o n t in u e d

Construction:
New buildings...................... ......
10.0
Roads, new......................miles.- 3,108.0
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
4.0
Corn......... ...... .............bushels _
23.0
Cotton..............................bales—
5.0
Cottonseed........................ tons—
1.0
Hay...................................d o ___
20.0
Hogs.................. ............ _hea<
15.0
M ilk..................... .100 pounds—
21.0
Miscellaneous farm....................
81.0
Lumber and timber products: Lum­
ber........... ...................board feet—
4.0
Metal products: Auto license tags__
26.0
Textile and textile products:
1.0
Pillowcases.............................
1.0
Sheets......... ............................
Total.........................................3,328.0

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
Value
ployed Number

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... headHogs.................................. do___
Milk.......................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous dairy.................. .
Miscellaneous farm..................
Miscellaneous livestock............ .
Lumber and timber products: Mis*
cellaneous...... ............................... .
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases................................ .
Sheets_______________________
Towels_____ ________________ _

76
228

224

$1,389.80
(i)
v)
0)

481. 70
647.45

0)
0)

405.00

1.0
.1
.1
.1

2,015.27
1,412.89
1,122.20
2,337.10
6,686. 74
223.99

96
48
550

203.0

96
48
550

101.00

913.13..............

2,518.95,

2,015.27
2,802.69
1,122.20
2,818.80
7,334.19
223.99
405.00

(0

24.00
48.00
14,772.89

76
452
898

24.00
48.00
101.00
198,612.94

180,407.97

ILLINOIS

i Enumeration impracticable.




6.0

143,028

$9,535.20

143,028

$9,535.20

2.3
.3
1.4

2,242
842
1,100

1,180.85
157.80
678.00

2,242
842
1,100

1,180.85
157.80
678.00

35.0
25.0

759
22,920

7,870.29
13,752.00

308

$2,505. 26

1,067
22,920

10,375.55
13,752.00

96.0
351.0

868
54,882

774.60
43,496.03

14.215
5,415

12,363.12
4,893.96

15,083
60,297

13,137.72
48,389.99

.5
24.0
1.5
2.0
66.8
33.5
5.0
2.2
24.3
21.7
31.0
38.3
8.3
L4

1,032
5,254
16,080
3,084
296,532
28,404
421
2,640
9,088
20,508
66,084
2,653
6,528
0)

304.35
21,092.00
1,330. 20
1,752.40
32,933.56
29,407. 50
4,263.30
1,917.08
21.326.70
18.962.70
27,123.93
33,633.15
7,293.75
1,177.00

1,032
5,254

304.35
21,092.00

3,084
296,532
28,404
421
2,640

1,752 40
32,933.56
29,407.50
4,263.30
1,917.08
21.326.70
18.962.70
27,123.93
33,633.15
7,293. 75
1,177.00

16,080

9,088

1,330.20

20,508
66,084
2,653
6,528
0)

PRISONS

products,
commercial
pounds..
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms--------------------------------Brushes..................................... .
Mops.................................... .....
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Concrete posts........................... .
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone.............................. tons..
Stone, crushed..................do___
Clothing:
Aprons................................. .....
Coats............... —................ .......
Handkerchiefs__________ ____ _
Hats and caps............................
Hosiery.......... ................. pairs..
Overalls_____________________
Overcoats. .................................
Pajamas and nightgowns......... .
Pants................................... .....
Shirts, dress................................
Shirts, work............ ........ ...........
Suits........................................... .
Underwear............................. .
Miscellaneous............................

A D FEDERAL
N

SOUTHERN PENITENTIARY

Bakery

STATE

Total______________________

.7
2.9
.8
2.2
22.4
2.0

G>

CO

T a ble A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued

C
&

STATE PRISONS—Continued
ILLINOIS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

SOUTHERN PENITENTIARY—COntd.
0)
5.00
2.50

63.0

0)

$60,500.00
295,200.00
12.500.00

0)

80.200.00

(0

5
2.50

$60,500.00
295,200.00
12.500.00
80.200.00

43
728

876.55
4.488.00
10,544.00
10,500.25
9,540.51
29,231.32
716.70

50
(0

2.172.00
250.00
1.300.00

724.88
1,226.00
1,857.50

18,122
0)
4,295

724.88
1,226. C
O
1,857.50

520.85
1,101.70
1,459.10
617.40
2,369.71
15,064.78

2,352
2,580
8,316

520.85
1.101.70
1,459.10
617.40
2.369.71

1.2
6.0
14.5
8.0
13.8
41.8
1.7

43
11,220
1,021
728
4,698
(0
(0

$876.55
4,488.00
10,544.00
10,500.25
9,540.51
29,112.82
716.70

4.0
.5
2.5

1,086
50
0)

2,172.00
250.00
1,300.00

4.0
5.0
4.6

18,122
0)
4,295

.6
1.3
1.7
1.2
2.7
11.4

2,352
2,580
8,316
(i)
0)
0)

11,220
1,021

0)
0)

0)

(0

18.00

8

(0

15,082.7a

STATES, 1932




64.0
248.0
25.0

I TJNITED
N

Construction:
Alterations and installations.....
New buildings............................
Roads, new........ _........... miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads.........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn................. .......... bushels..
Hay................................... tons
Hogs__________________ head..
M ilk ...................... 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous farm................
Miscellaneous livestock.........
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses-.........— ...............
Tables............... ...... ...............
Miscellaneous.........................
Lumber and timber products:
Lumber................... board feet. Miscellaneous............................
Metal products: Tinware................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases................................
Sheets.........................................
Towels........................ ...............
Miscellaneous textiles...............
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products___

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

i

STATE FARM

9.1
4.3
8.2
44.4
15.0
9.0
42.0
5.0

12
3
9
3,000
500
15,000
(9

6.1

0)

3.00
6.00

6.0

1.9
38.5
15.3

13
2
9
3,000
5
00
15.000

2,463.66
1,229.02
2.250.00
12,000.00
2.500.00
2,405. 7
9

<
9

3

6.00

(9

10.0

(9

6,000.00

5,000.00

867.60
5.250.00
2.090.00
2,837.33
7,524.75
15,370.59
5,000.00

360
5
75
15
6

306.00
431.25
82.50
48.75
1,400.00
192.50
180.00
2,925.03
300.00

STATE REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Dresses........................................
Overalls______ _____ ___ ______
Underwear.............. ..................
Miscellaneous.............................
Construction: New, other than
buildings and roads.......................
Tarm, garden, and dairy:
Com .............. ...... ........bushels..
Hay.................... ..............tons..
Miscellaneous.............................
Other manufactured products_____

9.0
13.0
<
9

360
5
75
15
6

306.00
431.25
82.50
48.75

3.0

(9
<
9

350
2
3

192.50
180.00
2,877.50
300.00

94
976
57,050
<
9
1,662
2,871
22,500

14,917.37
2,555.05
28,566.47
2,620.55
468.80
7,702.77
978.00

1.0

17.0
9.0

•

8

1,400.00

<9

350
(9

47.5

PRISONS

25
15.000
340
307
2,468
(9
(9

867.60
5.250.00
2.090.00
2,837.33
7,524.75
15,370.59

A D FEDERAL
N

25
15,000
340
307
2,468
(9

30,000.00
13,875.00
6,000.00

2,463.66
1,229.02
2.250.00
12,000.00
2.500.00
2,405.79
30,000.00
13,875.00
STATE

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands.
Concrete blocks................do_
_
Concrete posts...........................
Stone, building................. tons..
Stone, crushed..................do___
Miscellaneous...... ..................
Construction:
New buildings........................
Roads, new..................... miles. _
New, other than buildings and
roads.......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn________________ bushels .
Hay................... ............... tons..
Hogs................................. head—
M ilk. .....................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm...................
Land development: Land improve­
ment...............................................

STATE PENITENTIARY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete blocks___ thousands..
Concrete posts.................. .
Stone, crushed_____ ____ tons..
Miscellaneous......... ................
Clothing:
Aprons....................................
Coats, prison...........................
Handkerchiefs.........................
1 Enumeration




impracticable.

124.5
12.1
229.0
3.4
.5
5.0
1.9

1
(9

57.10

94
976
57,050
<
9
1,662
2,871
22,500

14,917.37
2,555.05
28,566.47
2,677.65
468.80
7,702.77
978.00
Cn

T able

A*— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution—Continued

O
o>

STATE PRISONS— Continued
ILLINOIS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY— Continued

1,914
10,898
2,335
9,256
18,858

1,914
10,898
2,335
9,256
18,858

$582.00
8,725.48
4,900.66
6,200.35
7,662.33

1.2
815.8
24.0

<
9

$825.18
522,488. 37
30,000.00

<
9

825.18
522,488.37
30,000.00

23.0

(*>

15,000.00

<>
*

15,000.00

54
10,023
526
952
2,740
(0

1,078.33
3,708.51
4,794.00
15,404.56
1,041.20
57,995.68

336
4,951
17,623
377
492
490
758
0)

3,067.20
12,025.15
31,069.37
2,697.65
7,630.43
2,375.35
5,957.82
2,058.44

2.00
.50

4.4
15.2
19.6
63.2
4.2
236.4

10,023
526
952
2,740
<
*)

57,995.68

15.3
274.2
160.4
68.0
38.9
6.4
36.9
26.9

336
1,476
16, 763
142
492
490
I
<0

29,837.43
1,268.01
7,630.43
2,375.35
4,835.75
1,.........

2
0.50

3,708.51

3,475
860
235
220
0)

$7,869.85
1,231.94
1,429.64
1,122.07
488.85

STATES, 1932




1.2
11.2
3.8
11.3
13.2

E UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Hats and caps_____ __________
Overalls......................................
Pants, prison________________ _
Shirts, work_____ ____ - ...........
Underwear..................................
Construction:
Alterations and installations—
New buildings............................
Hoads, new...................miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________bushels..
Hay.................................. tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
Wheat..........................bushels-.
Miscellaneous........................
Furniture and furnishings:
B e d s ......................................
Chairs, fiber...........................
Chairs, wood................... .......
Davenports, sofas, etc---------Desks.................................. —
Mattresses..---------- ----------Tables.....................................
Miscellaneous---------------------

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Metal products:
Castings _ .............. ...... pounds.
Galvanized ware_____________
Tinware_____________________
Miscellaneous____________. __
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.______________ . . .
Sheets______________________
Towels.............. ...... ..................
Miscellaneous textile products.

12.4
10.1
2.2
.3

116,323
4,187
15,490

6,515.54
6,310.59
1,463.16
252.69

116,323
4,187
15,490

6,515.54
6,310.59
1,463.16
252.69

.9
1.9
1.9
1.2

5,272
7,036
10,778

854.32
2,678.69
1,641.90
1,857.08

5,272
7,036
10,778

854.32
2,678.69
1,641.90
1,857.08

(9

(9

(9

(9

WOMEN’ S PRISON

6,002.88

100,048

6,002.88

(9

93

1,491.30
57.75

93

1,491.30
57.75

28.0
28.6
.4

(9

147
241

6,684.97
6,721.80
148.13

306
1,778
3.800
5,835

57.20
4,368.93
139.55
2,580.01
4,246.57
2,581.48
10,700.09
7,835.37
8,142.25
1,547.10
4,581.68
133.28
1,060.12
29,311.31

(9

STATE REFORMATORY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete blocks___ thousands.
Stone, building_________ tons.
Miscellaneous_______________
Clothing:
Aprons_____________________
Coats__________ ____________
Handkerchiefs_______________
Hats and caps............................
Overalls_____ _______________
Overcoats____ __________ ____
Pants............... .........................
Shirts, work_________ _______
Shoes, new_____________pairs.
Shoes, repaired................. d o ...
Suits...........................................
Underwear__________________
Miscellaneous............................
Construction: New buildings_____
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle.............................. head.
Corn________________ bushelsHay................................... tons.
Hogs----------------------------head_
M ilk____________ 100 pounds .
Miscellaneous farm...................
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds...........................................
Desks___ ____ ______________
Miscellaneous_______________




.2
11.8
.4
7.0
11.3
7.0
30.0
21.3
64.0
12.0
12.4
.4
2.7
60.0
2.4
3.0
2.0
10.1
30.0
54.4
1.9
1.8
L7

146
241

306
1,778
3,800
5,835
6,211
388
6,388
19,592
5,246
5,012
711
108

(9

6,654.67
6,721.80
99.00
57.20
4,368.93
139.55
2,580.01
4,246.57
2,581.48
10,700.09
7,835.37
8,142.25
1,547.10
4,581.68
133.28
1,060.12

(9
(9

30.30
49.13

(9

6,211

388
6,388
19,592
5,246
5,012
711
108

1

(9

29,311.31

65
5,800
199
463
5,524

1,576.70
2,030.00
1,403.00
7,059.51
20,076.91
36,282.56

(9

196
11

238.00
223.52
193.60

0)

1

(9

0)
t Enumeration impracticable.

65
5.800
199
463
5,524
196
11

» 505 blocks.

1,576.70
2.030.00
1.403.00
7,059.31
20,076.91
36,282.56
238.00
223.52
193.60

PRISONS

100,048

2.0
L0

A D FEDERAL
N

20.0

STATE

Laundry, commercial........pounds.
Textiles and textile products:
Flags...........................................
Miscellaneous textile products.

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982,

State,

, and institution— Continued

C
&

STATE PRISONS— Continued
ILLINOIS—Continued
Number and va’ueo articles produced under cach sys s
Publi works and
w s

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Value

Number

Value

$1,470.18

Number

I UNITED
N

Value

Piece price

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Averago
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
S ate us*
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE REFORMATORY—Continued
5,569

$1,470.18

112,950
0)

19.25
2,518.78
6,578.96

1,933
4.7
8.9 1,877,644
3.3 1,114,200
60.1
0)
1,662
.1
2,847
8,135
14,575

8.5
.1
15.2
50.8

6.2
4.9

(9

114,295
0)

19.25
2,548.78
7,020.11

3,647.74
6,832.46
2,565.27
46,748.81
93.24

1,933
1,877,644
1,114,200
0)
1,662

3,647.74
6,832.46
2,565.27
46,748.81
93.24

281.73
2,311.52
1,808.84
246.89

2,847
8,135
14,575
0)

281.73
2,311.52
1,808.84

1,345
0)

$30.00
441.15

ALL INSTITUTIONS
Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms_____ ________________
Brushes..................... .................
Mops............................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Concrete blocks____ ____ do----Concrete posts________________




6.0

143,028

9,535. 20

143,028

9,535.20

2.3
.3
1.4

2,242
842
1,100

1,180.85
157.
678. C
O

2,242
842
1,100

1,180.85
157.80
678.00

44.1
156.8
45.3

882
249
26,896

1,190
250
26,896

12,839.21
22,831.36
18,557.05

10,333.95
22,801.06
18,557.05

308
(3
)

2,505. 26
30.30

STATES, 1932

Highway markers........... ...... ..........
Metal products:
Aluminum ware........................
Castings....................... pounds.
Miscellaneous............................
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound..........
Envelopes........................... ......
Letterheads...............................
Miscellaneous............................
Soap and soap powder___ pounds.
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets.........................................
Towels.......................................
Miscellaneous textile products. .

.................... ............... ....................

830. 1
33,163.
306. C
2,447.'
4.914.4
32,933,
42,810. £
6,844. *
3
1.917.0
36,927. A
18,962.7
41,159. f
8.142.5
1.547.1
38,214. 1
15,171. S
2,285. i
0)

(0

11
9

61,325.18
876,999.68
56,375.00

0)

102,600.00

187
42,393
2,109
2,450
12,690
2,740
0)
0)

4,399.18
35,669.01
19,011.00
35,801.65
37,142.17
1,041.20
141,805.18
716.70

532
4,951
17,623
377
503
1,576
808
(0
5,569

3,305.20
12,025.15
31,069.37
2,697.65
7,853.95
4,547.35
6,207.82
3,552.04
1,470.18

166.03

3.475
860
235

7,869.85
1,231.94
1,429.64

220

1,122.07
488.85

7,8

4.547.3
5,085.7
3.063.1
1.470.1

0)
5,000.00

0)
*

505 blocks.

11
9

PRISONS

102,600.00

3,305. 2
4.155.3 .......... ....................
29,837.4
1,2 " ‘

<
*)

830.35
33,163.70
306.00
2,447.75
4,914.41
32,933.56
42,810.80
6,844.78
1,917.08
36,927.45
18,962.70
41,159.65
8,142.25
1,547.10
38,214.83
15,171.86
2,285.87

0)

0)

1 Enumeration impracticable.

13,137.72
18,721.80
79,456.46
5.231.57

$61,325.18
876,999.68
56,375.00

187
42,393
2,109
2,450
12,690
2,740
0)
0)
532
1,476
16,763
142
503
1,576
i—
o '

4,893.96
106.23

A D FEDERAL
N




3,000
9 ,r "
360
42,380
10,833
296,532
46,088
809
2,640
17,811
20,508
94,932
5,246
5,012
3,364
25,i
(0

12,363.12

5,415
<9

15,083
741
132,347
(*)
3,000
9,903
360
42,380
10,833
296,532
46,088
809
2,640
17,811
20,508
94,932
5,246
5,012
3,364
25,659
0)

14,215

741
126,932
(0

STATE

Lime and agricultural limestone
96.0
tons..
73.0
Stone, building................ do___
Stone, crushed................ do____ 595.0
12.8
Miscellaneous.........................
Clothing:
1.2
Aprons...................................
Coats.................................... .
40.8
9.0
Dresses.............. .......... ...........
3.8
Handkerchiefs.......................
10.2
Hats and caps......................
66.8
Hosiery............................ pairs..
69.0
Overalls______________ ____
12.0
Overcoats................................
2.2
Pajamas and nightgowns___
Pants.......................................
58.1
21.7
Shirts, dress..........................
63.6
Shirts, work__________________
64.0
Shoes, new.......................pairs..
12.0
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Suits........................................
50.7
23.9
Underwear_______ ____ ____
Miscellaneous.........................
5.1
Construction:
55.2.
Alterations and installations___
New buildings........................... 1,165.8.
Hoads, new......................miles.
54.0.
New, other than buildings and
roads......... ............................. .
95.0.
Farm, garden, and dairy:
9.9
Cattle............................... head..
65.7
Corn............................. bushels.
52.4
Hay....................................tons.
87.4
Hogs................................. head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds. _
61.8
4.2
Wheat..........................bushels. _
467.8
Miscellaneous farm....................
Miscellaneous livestock............ .
1.7
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds....................... ....................
17.2
Chairs, fiber............................... 274.2
Chairs, wood............................. .
160.4
Davenports, sofas, etc________
68.0
Desks......................................... .
40.7
Mattresses-............................... .
10.4
Tables.........................................
37.4
Miscellaneous............................ .
31.1
Highway markers.......... .................
8.5
Land development: Land improve­
ment......... .................................... .
10.0.

5,000.00
O
CO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system,

and

institution— C o n tin u e d

o

STATE PRISONS— Continued
ILLINOIS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

Number

Value

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

I UNITED
N

Value

Piece price

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

a l l i n s t i t u t i o n s —-c o n t i n u e d

20.0

100,048

$6,002.88

100,048

$6,002.88

4.0
5.0

18,122
0)

724.88
1,226.00

18,122
(0

724.88
1,226.00

.1
27.6
10.1
6.8
51.1

229,273
4,187
19,785
0)

19.25
9,034.32
6,310.59
3,320.66
6,831.65

230,618
4,187
19,785
0)

19.25
9,064.32
6,310.59
3,320.66
7,272.80

1,
4.7
8.9 1,877,644
3.3 1,114,200
60.1
0)
1,662
.1

3,647.74
6,832.46
2,565.27
46,748.81
93.24

V
1,877,644
1,114,200
0)
1,662

3,647.74
6,832.46
2,565.27
46,748.81
93.24

2.0
2.3
9.4
8.5
1.2
5.5
20.4

1,491.30
1.656.90
6.091.91
4,909.84
617.40
4,531.43
15,364.78

10,471
17,751
33, C "
0)
0)

1,491.30
1.656.90
6.091.91
4,909.84
617.40
4,531.43
15,382.78

Total______________________ 4,577.0




1,345

$30.00

0)

441.15

0)
$1,102,299.86 ..............

18.00
32,696.40

2,030,032.28

STATES, 1932

Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Lumber and timber products:
Lumber................... board feet—
Miscellaneous_____________
Metal products:
Aluminum ware___________
Castings-.....................pounds—
Galvanized ware........ ...........
Tinware___________________
Miscellaneous____ _________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound___
Envelopes_____ ____________
Letterheads----------------------Miscellaneous........................
Soap and soap powder....... pounds—
Textiles and textile products:
Flags........................................
Pillowcases------------------------Sheets-------------------------------Towels_______ _____________
Miscellaneous textiles.................
Miscellaneous textile products—
Other manufactured products___

INDIANA
REFORMATORY

11,172
7,333

$3,824.99
2,236.97

2.0
1.0
47.9

2,500
543
18,209

2,000.00
543.00
14,398.47

.2
413.0
7.0
2.0
2.0
24.0
.8
317.0
83.0
15.0
188.0
.3

831

272.07

49

14.92

197

397. 75

4,
2,938
14,631
224
7,874
6,469
1,892
5,044
0)

4,964.26
881.83
1,546.23
8,033.92
165.60
10,168.78
3,164.01
9,353.79
1,856.37
58.55

119,326 $20,030.60
1,605
313.16
184
37
6,685

85

7

25
420
320
3,648
8,500

40
3
964
1,0
0)

$26,823.46
49,000.00

189.83
21.60
5.022.00
1.321.41
437.11

.5
9.0
2.01

0)
87,066
1,241

95,000.00

8
114
24

362.57
7.00

40
3
1,078
1,090

<
9
(9

9,000.00

255.05
2,815.57

791,172

286.99
311,317.60
5,362.01
881.83
1,546.23
8,095.93
165.60
219,951.08
44,533.71
9,398.25
96,856.37
58.55

25
420
320
3,648
8,500

(9

15.0

170,667.08
41,369. 70

1,098, 776
3,285
4,694
2,938
14,716
224
331,197
140,646
1,:
796,216
0)

<
9

553.63
2.917.00
3.317.40
3.040.00
3.740.00
6,944.96
10,129.13

.6
.1
6.0
2.0
1.3

289,788
134,177

2,166.73
578.90
20,429.76

<
9
64,818
138

3,241.60
101.78

151,884
1,379

26,823.46
49,000.00
553.63
2.917.00
3,317.40
3.040.00
3.740.00
6,944.96
10,129.13
21.60
5,384.57
1,328.41
437.11
9,000.00
255.05
6,057.17
971.58

PRISONS

1.0
2.2
4.0
4.0
2.0
20.0
14.8

2

44.43

$311,317.60

62.01
39,115.22

1,098,776

$23,855.59
2,550.13

2,684
580
24,894

35.90
6,031.29

33,535

(9

48.0
50.0

8,938

A D FEDERAL
N




35.0
5.0

STATE

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms........................................
Mops.......................................... .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural limestone
tons..
Stone, building_________ do___
Stone, crushed____ _____ do___
Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Children’s play suits____ _____
Coats...........................................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs..
Hats and caps.............................
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants........ ........................... ......
Shirts, work................................
■Suits.......................................... .
Underwear.................................
Miscellaneous.............................
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings____ ____ _____ _
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Hay____________ _______ tons..
Hogs.......... ..................... _head_.
Potatoes_________ 100 pounds..
Wheat................... ...... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm____ _______
Furniture and furnishings:
B e d s ........................ .................
Desks. _______ _______________
Mattresses............. ........... .........
Pillows........................................
Miscellaneous. ...........................
Land development: Land improve­
ment......... .....................................
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous. .....................................
Metal products:
Castings............... ........pounds..
Galvanized ware...................... .
i Enumeration impracticable.

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982,

/State, system, and institution— Continued

to

STATE PRISONS— Continued
INDIAN A—Continued

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece prioe

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

reform atory

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
—continued
101.3
3.0
.8
25.0

213
2,679
(0
(0

$222.02
2,043.17
198.00
11,283.72

134,214 $47,348.00
31.74
116
200.00
0)

$47,570.02
2,074.91
398.00

3,249.45

14,533.17

0)

646
1,554

91.26
864.14
278.36
145.00
180.00

108.5
2.4

1,740

574.09
705.00

95,975

31,678.92

103.0

3,814

31,559.08

1,120

STATE FARM

Baskets...........................................
Brooms, brushes, and mops: BroomsClay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone.........- ...............—-tons..
Stone, crushed................-do—
M iscellaneous............. ............
Clothing:
Aprons......................................
Coats........................................
Gloves and mittens......... pairs
Hats and caps..........................
Overalls......... ..........................
Pajamas and nightgowns........




17.0
85.0
6.0

12,085
60,487
0)

7.251.00
36,292.20
1.402.00

.1
1.3
1.0
.1
2.0
.7

312
1,778
19,640
255
4,794
1,448

62.40
1.778.00
1.964.00
38.25
3,595.50
724.00

184
0)

97,715
1,692

32,253.01
705.00

10,437.37

4,934

41,996.45

736.00

12,269
60,487
0)

7.987.00
36,292.20
2.662.00

312
1,778
19,640
255
4,794
1,448

62.40
1.778.00
1.964.00
38.25
3,595.50
724.00

1,260.00

STATES, 1932

91.26
864.14
278.36
145.00
180.00

.5
.6
.5
.2
.4

I UNITED
N

Metal products—Continued
Iron hollow ware........ ...........
Tinware..................................
Miscellaneous..............................
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous printing................ ................. .
Textile and textile products:
Pillowcases_____________ ____ _
Sheets..........................................
Miscellaneous textile products—
Other manufactured products____
Miscellaneous, labor only....... .......

i.0 4 .3

1.0
.2

£52
3,534
(*)

136.081
1,063.501
81.00

242,910

$74,997.25

$1,000.00

1.0
7.0
120
. 20,000
620
748
7,272
(0
194
134
5,665

278.60
413.16
4,140.18

218.0

4,715
1,003
21,143

4,909
1,137
26,808

6,795.11
3,123.70
17,519.87

13,140.00

2.150.80
8,000.00
6,200.00
12,127.92
2.908.80
61,069.21
7,073.71
3,536.86
21,660.05
13,140.00

0)

4,354.84

383.75
1,240.00
217.40

1,535
2,480
2,174
0)

383.75
1,240.00
217.40
22,919.49

1,328
1,423

791.48
451.91

2,878
2,223
14,468
3,057
53,561
3,283
433
2,173
6,554
1,758
1,330,800
17,518
4,450
731
6,483
(0

766.65
7,539.30
1,446.88
883.78
5,253.50
2,164.64
2,835.95
1,594.35
10,121.37
1,763.69
402,777.82
34,397.43
2,247.23
5,160.40
2,756.85
511.45

.2
.8
.4
19.0

1,535
2,480
2,174

3.0
3.0

1,328
1,413

791.48
440.76

1.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
13.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
566.0
45.0
3.0
2.0
7.0
5.0

2,878
2,215
14,468
3,057
53,561
3,280
433
2,173
6,554
1,752
6,777
17,504
4,450
731
6,483
0)

766.65
7,533.30
1,446.88
883.78
5,253.50
2.159.75
2,835.95
1,594.35
10,121.37
1.760.75
2,512.26
34,364.44
2,247.23
5,160.40
2,756.85
511.45

(0

22,919.49

STATE PRISON

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms........................................
Brushes.......................................
Clothing:
Aprons.........................................
Coats.................................. ........
Gloves and mittens_____pairs..
Hats and caps....... .....................
Hosiery........................... .pairs..
Overalls.......................................
Overcoats....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns...........
Pants........ ..................................
Shirts, dress................................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new....................... pairs. .
Shoes, repaired.......... ...... do___
Suits________________________
Underwear..................................
Miscellaneous________________

10

11.15
6.00

4.89

2.94
50.91 1,323,950
32.99

400,214.65

PRISONS

(0

4,354.84

(0
(0

1,000.00
23,000.00

A D FEDERAL
N

10.0

1
(0

2.150.80
8,000.00
6,200.00
12,127.92
2.908.80
61,069.21

40.0
15.0
43.0

ft

23,000.00

75,133.33
1,063.50
81.00

120
20,000
620
748
7,272
0)

0)

4.0
13.0
6.0
10.0
3.0
114.0

243,162|
3,545
(0

STATE

Shirts, work....... .........................
Underwear......... ........ ............._.
Miscellaneous..........................
Construction:
New buildings......................... .
New, other than buildings and
roads.........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Corn............................. bushels..
H ay.—...............................tons—
Hogs.............................. ..h ead..
Wheat................... ...... bushels—
Miscellaneous farm _...................
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood...............................
Davenports, sofas, etc................
Tables.........................................
Land development: Land improve­
ment................................................
Lumber and timber products:
Miscellaneous............................. .
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.......................... ........
Sheets..........................................
Towels______________________
Other manufactured products..........

i Enumeration impracticable.




CO;

T a b l e A . — Kind,

quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State,

, and institution—Continued

M

STATE PRISONS—Continued
INDIANA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PKISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
state prison—continued

.1
26.0
8.0
6.0
20.0
1.0
8.0
74.0
.2
1.
.1
41.4
1.5

8,660
586
210
4,511
784

57.42
1.294.00
76.50
63.333.94

2,620

319.70
132.23

(9
(9

(9

68.9 5,015,941
1.0
328
4.0
79,158
738
1.0
1.6
(9
5.0
.5
17.0

(9

$84.10
2,598.25
5.860.00
1,758.67
3.759.00
373.60
6,567.37
22.802.93

613
306
100,103

$500.00
95,516.81

652
(9
223,264

129,701.69
428.67
2.522.00
469.91
452.41
379.81
7.16
9,074.84

195

$2,145. (

$500.00
95,516.81

586
4C5
4,511
784

8

84.10
2,598.25
5.860.00
3.904.36
3.759.00
373.60
6.567.37
22.802.93

22
613
306
IC , 1C
O 3

(9

2P.19

(9

942.17

(9

118. 75
348.58

10,375

57.42
1.294.00
76.50
63.333.94

2,620

319.70
160.42

3,015,941
328
79,158
738

129,701.69
428.67
2.522.00
469.96
1,394.58

652

379.81
125.91
9,423.42

(9

(9

(9

STATES, 1932




(9

1.0
225.0

I UNITED
N

Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head—
Corn----------------- ------ bushels—
Hay____________ _______ tons
Hogs----------------- -----------head
Potatoes................. 100 pounds
Wheat.......................... bushels _.
Miscellaneous dairy........... ......
Miscellaneous farm...................
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, fiber_________________
Mattresses__________________
Pillows_____ ________________
Highway markers............................
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes.................... ........... ..........
Miscellaneous_______________
Metal products:
Auto license tags........... ...........
Galvanized ware------- ------------Tags, miscellaneous---------------Tinware—................... ...............
Miscellaneous............................
Printing and binding: Books, blank
and bound.....................................
Repair and shop work.....................
Soap and soap powder------pounds—

-oHQZ

Textiles and textile products:
Blankets................................. .
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Flags................. ....................
Pillowcases________________
Sheets___________ _________
Towels........... ..................... ........
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

2.0

689

.814.50

96.0
.2
1.5
2.0
2.0
15.4
7.0

34,276
8
7,203
7,279
18,753
(9
(0

26,349.47
32.34
1,440.60
4,710.11
1,649.03
1,169.12
11,496.63

1.0
1.0
3.0

87
195
1,745

43.50
143.75
432.95

2

3.00

817.50

4,997.08
1,238.71

55
407
212

1,194.51

(9

43.50
143. 75
432.95

(9
17,696

9.50

26,349.47
41.84
1,440.60
4,710.11
1,649.03
2,363.63
11,496.63

87
195
1,745

2

34,276
10
7,203
7,279
18,753
(0
0)

550.00
52.00
159.00
543.14
241.70

WOMEN’ S PRISON

Clothing:
Aprons.

8.0
26.0

17,696
55
407
212

(»)
(l)

550.00
52.00
159.00
496.00
241.70

1,238. 71

47.14

(9

(9
(9

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Lime and agricultural limestone
tons..
Stone, building................ do___
Stone, crushed................. do___
Miscellaneous________________
Clothing:
Aprons..................... ...................
Children’s play suits..................
Coats________________________
Dresses........................................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs,.
Hats and caps________________
Hosiery------------------------ pairs—
Overalls___________ _______
i Enumeration impracticable.




108.5

1,740

574.09

95,975

31,678.92

97,715

32,253.01

40.4
3.0
5.0

14,192
1,413
7,333

5,321.47
440.76
2,236.97

119,326
10
1,605

20,030.60
11.15
313.16

133,518
1,423
8,938

25,352.07
451.91
2,550.13

103.0

3,814

31,559.08

1,120

10,437.37

4,934

41,996.45

19.0
1.0
132.9
6.0

14,585
543
78,696
0)

9,251. 00
543.00
50,690. 67
1,402.00

368
37
6,685
(9

902.73
35.90
6,031.29
1,260.00

14,953
580
85, 381
0)

10,153.73
578.90
56,721.96
2,662.00

2.3
413.0
11.3
1.0
8.0
3.1
13.0
31.0

4,108

4,157
098,776
7,
195
38,802
6,250
53,561
22,793

1,159.54
311,317.60
14,679.31
143.75
4,292.71
2,468.26
5,253.50
13,856.07

7,081
195
38,802
6,250
53,561
22,705

1,144.62
14,275.56
143.75
4,292. 71
2,468.26
5,253. 50
13,789.17 ...—_ ......

49

14.92

205

403. 75

88

66.90

1,098,776

$311,317.60

....... II

PRISONS

Baskets....................... ..........
Brooms, brushes and mops:
Brooms_______________
Brushes_______________

A D FEDERAL
N

8.0
2.0
3.0
7.0
15.0

4,997.08

0)

STATE

Underwear...... ..........................
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm......................... ........
Laundry, commercial____ pounds .
Textiles and textile products:
Blankets__________ ______ ___
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets.......... ........................... .
Miscellaneous textile products.
Other manufactured products.........

<1

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— C o n t in u e d

05

STATE PRISONS— Continued
INDIANA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
all institutions—continued

433
3,845
14,428
1,752
13,498
17,504
4,450
2,623
16,817
0)

$2,835.95
2,483.95
20,290.15
1,760.75
5,812.35
34,364.44
2,247.23
14,514.19
6,109.67
651.00

289,788
33,535 $39,115.22
2.94
6
73
50.91 1,701,037
14
32.99
44.43

791,172

$170,667.08
516, 581.60

95,000.00

433
3,845
337,751
1,758
1,714, r ~
17,518
4,450
2,630
807,989

(9

$2,835.95
2,483.95
230,072.45
1, 763.69
522,444.86
34,397.43
2,247.23
14,558.62
101,109.67
651.00

0)

7.0

$27,323.46
145,516.81

0)

27,323.46
145,516.81

<
9

49.0
276.0

23,000.00

0)

23,000.00

153
28,660
1,626
1,473
8,159
16,556

2,788.53
10,598.25
14,977.00
19,349.68
6,799.00
7,022.40
13,512.33
98,998.35

5.1
39.0
16.2
20.0
24.0
6.0
28.0
210.8

153
28,660
1,626
1,278
8,159
16,556

2,788.53
10,598.25
14,977.00
17,203.99
6,799.00
7,022.40
13,512.33
98,998.35

195

.6
.2
40.0
15.0
.1

40
22
194
134
3

189.83
57.42
278.60
413.16
21.60

4,715
1,003

2,145. (

8
6,795.11
3,123.70

40
22
4,909
1,137
3

189.83
57.42
7,073.71
3,536.86
21.60

STATES, 1932




2.0
3.5
320.0
2.0
753.3
45.0
3.0
17.0
199.0
5.5

I UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Overcoats.............. ....................
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants..........................................
Shirts, dress...............................
Shirts, work....... - .....................
Shoes, new..................... . pairsShoes, repaired................. d o ...
Suits..........................................
Underwear.................................
Miscellaneous............................
Construction:
Alterations and installations...
New buildings...........................
New, other than buildings and
roads.......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle................ .............. head.
Corn________________ bushels .
Hay------- ------------- -------- tons.
Hogs............. ...... .............head.
Potatoes_________ 100 pounds _
Wheat..........................bushels.
Miscellaneous dairy..................
Miscellaneous farm...................
Furniture and furnishings:
B e d s ......................................... .
Chairs, fiber...............................
Chairs, wood..............................
Davenports, sofas, etc------------Desks_______________________

7.8
2.1
43.0
1.3
41.4

1.5
11.3

....................
....................

0)
2,620
0)

652
0)
0)
223,264

0)
17,696

22,140.00
1,238.71

0)

2,620
0)

319.70
4,770.31

3,015,941
151,884
1,707
134,427
79,158
4,533

129,701.69
6,057.17
1.400.25
47,570.02
2,522.00
2,544.82
1.792.58

652

379.81
14,533.17
125.91
9.423.42

3,241.60
101.78
47,348.00

116
0)

31.74
1,142.17

379.81
11,283.72
7.16
9,074.84

0)
0)
10,375

3,249.45
118.75
348.58

2

3.00

744

1,364.50

34,276
8
9,791
11,525
20,927

26,349.47
32.34
1,967.61
6,973.25
1,866.43
1,943.48
11,883.33
180.00
701,032.89

2

0)

217,980.27

<
9

8
233,639
746

9.50

1,241. 65
0)
198,490.24

22,919.49
1,116,485.77

1,367.50

34,276
10
9,791
11,525
20,927
0)
0)
0)

26,349.47
41.84
1,967.61
6.973.25
1.866.43
3,185.13
34,802.82
180.00
2, 233,989.17

PRISONS

10.0

0

1,238.71

64,818
138
134,214

96.0
.2
4.2
6.4
2.4
22.9
41.2
.4

h

6.678.57
1,404.91
21,660.05
437.11
63,33 . 94

28.19

17,696

129,701.69
2,815.57
1,298.47
222.02
2,522.00
2,513.08
650.41

5.0
25.0
.5
17.0

V
1,<
26,808
0)
100,103

22,140.00

319.70
4,742.12

68.9 3,015,941
9.0
87,066
3.0
1,569
101.3
213
4.0
79,158
4.0
4,417
2.4
0)

1 11
14
362,57
24
7.00
21,143 17,519.87

A D FEDERAL
N




6,316.00
1,397.91
4,140.18
437.11
63,333.94

233.0
26.0

Total.........................................3,780.0
, 780.0
1 Enumeration impracticable.

1,577
1,372
5,665
0)
100,103

STATE

Mattresses................................. .
Pillows.............. .........................
Tables........................................ .
Miscellaneous.............................
Highway markers............................
Land development: Land improve­
ment.................................... .........
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes......................................
Miscellaneous.........................
Metal products:
Auto license tags.....................
Castings...................... pounds..
Galvanized ware........................
Iron hollow ware........................
Tags, miscellaneous.................. .
Tinware.....................................
Miscellaneous........................... .
Printing and bindingBooks, blank and bound...........
Miscellaneous.............................
Repair and shop work......................
Soap and soap powder___ pounds..
Textiles and textile products:
Blankets......................................
Cotton yard goods, lightpounds.
Flags............................................
Pillowcases................... ..............
Sheets........................................ .
Towels..................... ................. .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____
Miscellaneous labor only__________

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

^

STATE PRISONS— Continued
IOW A
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

Total

Contract

Piece price

State account

MEN’ S REFORMATORY

8

$1,280.00

4,514
2,509
17,924

3,563.66
13,274.87
13,183.53

479
871
5,080,540
18,120
5,005
12,954
883
1,354
2,488
2,100
4,031
3,768
1,401
2,627
0)
0)

227.95
2,755.25
859,276.25
2, 648.61
2,087.17
12.568.00
6,492. 70
1,018.70
5.725.80
1,571.85
3,289.15
4.144.80
13,382.75
1,678.95
525.20
3,460.00

8.4
18.0
30.7

1,546
2,033
11,162

.3
3.6
490.0
3.5
2.8
16.5
8.5
1.2
7.5
2.0
4.3
4.4
17.5
2.2
.7
4.3

479
871

2,648.61
2,087.17
12,568. 00
6,422.70
172.70
5,677.30
1,554.
3, 289.15
4,144. “
13,086. 50
1,678.95
525.20

$2,335.05
475.87
4,387.77

227.95
2,755.25

18,120
5,005
12,954
878
226
2,478
2,079
4,031
3,768
1,352
2,627
0)

2,968
476
6,762

1,228.61
12, 799.00
8,795.76

14.3
55.0
10.0
11.7

2,080,540

70.00
48.50
17.25
49
0)

$859,276.25

1,128

846.00

296.25
214.00

(0

3,246.00

0)

0)

$31,800.00
277,500.00
17,000.00

C)

31.800.00
277,500.00
17,000.00

0)

20,160.00

0)

20.160.00

0)

STATES, 1932




$1,280.00

4.0

I UNITED
N

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete blocks___ thousands..
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone ______ __________tons..
Stone, building —............ do___
Stone, crushed_________ do—
Clothing:
Aprons................ .......................Coats_____ ______ —.................
Dresses....................................... Gloves and mittens........ pairs..
Hats and caps......... ................. Overalls-------------------------------Overcoats.......................... .........
Pajamas and nightgowns..........
Pants...................................... —
Shirts, dress------ -------------------Shirts, work...............................
Shoes, repaired------------- pairs..
Suits---------------- -------------------Underwear--------- -----------------Miscellaneous.............................
Miscellaneous, labor only--------Construction:
Alterations and installations—
New buildings............................
Roads, repairs.............................
New, other than buildings and
roads----------------------------------

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

6.9
16.1
3.6
5.4
29.3
.3
3.6
24.3
.3

14,989.00
11,239.38
7.246.00
6,749.42
36,331.52
1.040.00
26,626.81
25,440.81

1.0
13.7

472.50
31,319.04

10.0
1.1

176
507
27

745.00

8

2,725.20
67,941.35
1,516.52
5,778.43
854.05
3,062.27

3.2
4,304
8.1 1,131,7f
1.4
198,500
26.3
.6
11.1
433,753

68.02

5,357.27
89.12
125.00

472.50
31,319.04
4,780.00

4.780.00

<
9

38.00

1,576.45
4,005.79

8

1,900
868
3,320

1.1
6.0
.1
3.1
4.4
.6

606
1,571
180
1,435
1,833

514.63
506.33
1,206.17
829.40
8,762.79

(9

(9
5,155

(9
(9

143.60

1,530.18
524.72

20.90
86.05

783.00
3,993
1,604,300
1,383
136,012
1,180

2,725.20
67,941.35
1,516.52
5,778.43
854.05
3,205.87

4,304
1,131,782
198,500

1,576.45
4,005.79
666.38
12,847.49
567.68
39,374.52

(9

(9
(9

438,908
1,900
868
3,320

8

514.63
506.33
1,206.17
850.30
8,848.84

PRISONS

.7
.7
1.6
1.1
4.8

11,317.31
567.68
38,849.80

28,401.61
11,239.38
7.246.00
14,068.97
36,399.54
1.040.00
31,984.08
25,529.93
934.59

A D FEDERAL
N

5.9
3,993
29.9 1,604,300
3.3
1, —
2.5
136,012
1.9
1,180
6.9
(9

7,319.55

0)

(9
(9

13,412.61

STATE

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...............................head..
Corn__________ _____ bushels..
Hay.......... ........................tons..
Hogs................................. head..
M ilk...... ................ 100 pounds..
Wheat______ ________ bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy......... .........
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock_______
F u r n i t u r e and fu r n is h in g s :
Benches. ....................................... .
Highway markers...... .................... .
Land development: Land improve­
ment.............................................. .
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous________ _____________
Metal products:
Aluminum ware........................ .
Auto license tags.....................
Galvanized ware_____________
Tags, miscellaneous.................. .
Tinware. __________ __________
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound___
Envelopes..................................
Letterheads....................... .........
Miscellaneous....................... .....
Repair and shop work......................
Soap and soap powder___ pounds..
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases_____________ ____ _
Sheets______________________ _
Towels....................................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____
WOMEN’ S REFORMATORY

Clothing:
Aprons________________ _____ _
Dresses...................... .................
Hats and ca]
Pajamas an<
Underwear..............................
Miscellaneous-......................
i

(9

268.92
2,214. 23
36.00
1,215.40
973.45
65.10

1,571
180
1,435
1,“ “

(9

268.92
2,214.23
36.00
1,215.40
973.45
65.10

Enumeration impracticable.




*<1
CD

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

00

o

STATE PKISONS— Continued
IOW A—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
women ’ s reformatory—contd.

$793.54
564.00
953.10
5,803.04
1.025.40
6,678.47

4.0
2.0
10.0
.1
.6

2.104.41
3,745. 30
19,258.12
16.80

$73.00
49.62

200.00

54.65

(0

16
47
47
2,974
0)
p>
0)

$793.54
564.00
953.10
5,803.04
1,098.40
6,728.09
200.00

9,752
10,040
17,112
48
0)

2,104.41
3,745.30
19,258.12
16.80
54.65

8,006
5,617
109

3,604.49
2,359.78
27.25

217
13,903

748.97
108.62
9,504.17

STATE PENITENTIARY
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms........................................
Brushes.................. .....................
Mops............................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural limestone
tons..
Stone, building................ do_.
Stone, crushed.................. do----Clothing:
Coats......................................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs..
Hats and caps.............................
Hosiery.............................pairs—




6.0
3.0
.1

7,776
5,515
109

3,491.29
2,312.83
27.25

3.1
.4
38.5

976
217
5,190

731.76
108.62
3,696.01

5.7
2.1
.5
10.0

1,000
22,944
1,000
75,787

4.500.00
2.316.00
400.00
10,989.87

230
102

113.20
46.95

23

17.21

8,713

5,808.16

1,000

22,944
1,000

46.92

76,078

4.500.00
2.316.00
400.00
11,036.79

STATES, 1932

0.5
.4
2.0
4.0
.4
21.6
.1

I UNITED
N

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... headHay....................................tons.
Hogs................................. headM ilk................ ...... 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm.....................
Miscellaneous livestock..............
Textile and textile products:
Flags............................................
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets..........................................
Towels.........................................
Miscellaneous textile products..

3.6
1.9
9.1
263.3
25.2
3.6
3.7
7.8
.2

4,200
195
2,400
6,013
15,456
6,648
387
13,697
0)

2,800.00
1,462.50
7,200.00
3,074.70
48,051.56
6,736.61
2,902. 50
8,638.36
91.52

2.0
59.0

0)
0)

10,183.79
145.00
382
26

0)

911.00
67.50
15.00
555.00

12

0)
0)

789. 66
363.02

28.5
38.2

4,477

12,604.13

29.1
40.3
7.0
.1
2.7

16,659
29,434
11,045
(0
0)

9,600.92
13,324.14
2,298.54
160. 72
3,156.50

6.0
3.0
.1

7,776
5,515
109

3,491.29
2,312.83
27.25

$2,000.00
96,500.00

$317,528.38

0)

48,900.00

1

2,000.00
96,500.00

C)
104
1,612
10
142

0)
(0
(0

7,992.10
403.12
50.00
1,494.98

133. 63
373. 83
33.00

142
284.00
108,014 175,585. 50
4, 620 25,392.40
27,204 78,802.85
5,301.09
0)

48,900.00

518
10,412
345
1,051
5,226
29,072
250
0)

35,361.01
3,803.12
2,260.00
13,921.38
10,194.48
24, 226.33
137. 50
133.63
10,557.62
178.00

(')

0)

142
108,396
4,620
27,230
0)

12

284.00
176,496.50
25,392.40
78,870.35
5,316. 09
555.00

0)
0)

419.07
6,516. 24

(0
(0

40, 741

9,401. 57

40,741
4,477

9,401.57
12,604.13

16,659
29,434
11,045

PRISONS

3.2
6.8

27,368.91
3,400.00
2,210.00
12,426.40
10,194.48
24,226.33
137.50

35.50

835,601

2,800.00
1,462.50
7,200.00
320,603.08
50,495.01
7,221.56
2,902.50
8,673.86
91.52

A D FEDERAL
N

.8
170.9
23.8
75.7
5.5
1.1

0)
414
8,800
335
909
5,226
29,072
250

1

2,443.45
484.95

53
0)

48.0
4.2
3.5
2.1
4.5
8.3
15.5
.1
.1
10.9
.3

910
510

4,200
195
2,400
841,614
16,366
7,158
387
13,750
0)

STATE

Overalls. .....................................
Overcoats...................................
Pants...........................................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new...... ................ pairs..
..Shoes, repaired................. do___
S u its......................... ...............
Underwear...... .......................... .
Miscellaneous.... ....................... .
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings...........................
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn________________ bushels.
Hay---------------------------- ton s...
Hogs...............................head..
M ilk........... ........... 100 pounds _
Potatoes............................do___
Wheat..........................bushelsMiscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm...................
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches.......................................
Chairs, wood..............................
Desks..................... .....................
Tables........................................ .
Miscellaneous........................... .
Harness............................... . .sets..
Lumber and timber products:
Miscellaneous.............................. .
Repair and shop work......................
Textile and textile products:
Bags........................................... .
Blankets......................................
Cotton yard goods:
Light..................... pounds..
Heavy......... ...............do___
Towels.............. .........................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

9,600.92
13,324.14
2,298.54
193.97
3,221.76

33. 25
65.26

0)
0)

0)

0

1,208.73
6,879.26

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms_________ _____ _______
Brushes_____________________
Mops............ ..............................
1 Enumeration impracticable.




2T0
102

113.20
46.95

8,006
5,617
109

3,604.49
2,359.78
27.25

00

T able

A,— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by Stale, system,

and

institution—

C o n tin u e d

00
to

STATE PRISONS— Continued
IOW A—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Number

Total

Contract

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

Piece price

State account

all institutions—continued

2,522
2,250
16,352

1.4
9.3
496.0
5.6
3.4
10.0
20.1
10.4
4.3
16.6
2.0
267.6
25.2
8.0
21.2
14.4
1.5
4.3

1,085
1,871
1,571
41,064
6,185
75,787
17,154
1,073
1,661
4,878
2,079
10,044
15, 456
10,416
1,739
18,157
0)

2,991
476
15,475

1,960.37
12,907.62
12,491.77
496.87
7,255.25
2,214. 23
4,964. 61
2,523.17
10,989.87
15, 368.00
7,885.20
1,388.10
12,877."
1,554.60
6,363.85
48,051.56
10,881.41
15,989.00
11,290.76
681.82

$2,352.26
475. 87
10,195.93

$1,280.00
4,312.63
13,383.49
22,687.70

1,085
1,871
2,082, 111
41,064
6,185
76,078
17,154
1,078
2,789
4,888
2,100
845,645
16,366
10,926
1,788
18,210
0)
0)

496.87
7,255.25
861,490.48
4,964.61
2,523.17
11,036.79
15,368.00
7,955.20
2,234.10
12,925.80
1,571.85
323,892.23
50,495.01
11,366.36
16,285.25
11,326.26
681.82
3,460.00

2,080,540
291

70.00

53
0)

1,128

846.00

835,601

317,528.38

46.92

48.50
17.25
910
510

$859, 276.25

2,443.45
484.95
296.25
35.50
214.00

0)

3,246.00

0)

$33,800.00
374,000.00
17,000.00

0)

33,800.00
374,000.00
17,000.00

(0

69,060.00

(0

69,060,00

16.3
114.0
10.0

(0

59.7

(l)

3

STATES, 1932




8
5,513
2,726
31,827

$1,280.00

4.0
11.5
18.4
69.2

I UNITED
N

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete blocks___ thousands..
Lime and agricultural limestone
tons..
Stone, building_________do___
Stone, crushed_________ do___
Clothing:
Aprons................ ........................
Coats....................... ...................
Dresses........................................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs
Hats and caps........ ....... .............
Hosiery_______________ pairs „
Overalls_____________________
Overcoats.......................... .........
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants............. ............. ...............
Shirts, dress______ ___________
Shirts, work....... .......................
Shoes, new....................... pairs.
Shoes, repaired-------------- do_
_
Suits________________________
Underwear---------------------------Miscellaneous.................. ..........
Miscellaneous, labor only_____
Construction:
Alterations and installations—
New buildings----------------------Roads, repaired......................... .
New, other than buildings and
roads___ - _________________

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value




8

(0

1,064
37,713
1,029
2,052
26,847
29,072
2,330

68.02

5,563.90
512.57
158.00

142
284.00
108,014 175,585.50
4,620 25,392.40
27,204 78,802.85
5,301.09
0)

472.50
911.00
67.50
15.00
555.00
31,319.04
0)

4,780.00
(0

2,725.20
67,941.35
1,516.52
5,778.43
854.05
3,062.27

<0

1,576.45
4,005.79
666.38
11,317.31
930. 70
38,849.80

457.07

1,991.73

143.60

2,725.20
67.941.35
1,516.52
5,778.43
854.05
3,205.87

(9
(0
5,155

40,741
4,477

108.
151. 31
358,015.21.

9,401.57
12,604.13

16,
29,
9,
11,
17,
14, 413

9,401.57

0)
0)
498,640.00

0)
438,908

1,576.45
4,005.79
666.38
12,847.49
7,446.94
39,374.52

600.92
324.14
104.41
259.93
764.45
521. 51
098.92
070.60
2,721,768.91

4,304
1,131,782
.. 198,500

1,530.18
6,516.24
524.72

40,741

12,604.13

64*556.16
15,042.50
10,070.00
28,943.45
52,397.06
24,226.33
1,177.50
33,216.11
42,815.64
1,312.59
756.50
176,496.50
25,392.40
78.870.35
5,316.09
555.00
31,319.04

4,780.00

1,534.66

600.92
324.14
104.41
259.93
764.45
521. 51
990.12
919.29
684,217.07

21,404.71
403.12
50.00
8,814.53

8
1,180,896.63

PRISONS

1 Enumeration impracticable.

1,612
10
649
27

A D FEDERAL
N

8

43,151.
14,639.
10, 020.
20,128.
52,329.
24,226.
1,177.
27,652.
42,303.
1,154.

STATE

Farm, garden, and dairy:
11.6
Cattle............................... head..
19.6
Corn......... ............ ...... bushels..
Hay................................... tons..
6.1
11.9
Hogs............... ..................head41.6
M ilk____ ________ 100 pounds..
15.5
Potatoes.......................-_-do—
.4
Wheat.......................... bushels..
4.1
Miscellaneous dairy..................
56.8
Miscellaneous farm............... .
Miscellaneous livestock_______
.7
Furniture and furnishings:
1.8
Benches......................................
170.9
Chairs, wood________________
23.8
Desks_________ _____________
75.7
Tables.........................................
Miscellaneous......... ...................
5.5
(0
12
Harness.....................................sets..
1.1
36,947
Highway markers............................ .
13.7
Land development: Land improve­
ment................ ............................. .
10.0
Lumber and timber products:
4.3
Miscellaneous............................... .
(0
Metal products:
3,993
5.9
Aluminum ware______________
29.9 1,604,300
Auto license tags....................... .
1,383
3.3
Galvanized ware.................... .
136,012
2.5
Tags, miscellaneous...................
1,180
1.9
Tinware...................... ...............
6.9
Miscellaneous________________
0)
Printing and binding:
4,304
3.2
Books, blank and bound...........
8.1 1,131,782
Envelopes___________________
1.4
198,500
Letterheads.................. ..............
26.3
Miscellaneous____ ___________
7.4
Repair and shop work............... .....
433,753
11.1
Soap and soap powder............... .....
Textiles and textile products:
28.5
Bags........................................... .
4,477
38.2
Blankets................................. .
Cotton yard goods:
16,659
Light..................... pounds..
29.1
29,434
40.3
Heavy......... .............. do___
9,752
4.0
Flags...........................................
11,940
2.7
Pillowcases....... ...... ...................
17,980
Sheets..........................................
10.7
14,413
Towels....................................... .
8.7
1.8
Miscellaneous textile products7.5
Other manufactured products......... .
Total_____ ________________ _ 1,988.0

OO
CO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

82

STATE PRISONS— Continued
KANSAS
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE INDUSTRIAL FARM FOR WOMEN

38
492
221
28:
316

1.0
2.5
.5
2.0
.8
1.5

0)

6.0

0)

38
492
221
28
316

$109.20
241.50
52.70
166.00
79.00
142. 55
2,279.83

0)

$62. i

2,342.71

0)
504
207
372

26.00
41.40
37.20
314.71

42
289
1,068
258
603
438
1,683
3,514
180
1,144
0)

26.00
41.40
37.20
314.71

42.00
91.60
373.80
395.25
180.90
153.30
3.366.00
2,735.85
3.240.00
114.40
128.25

0)

STATE INDUSTRIAL REFORMATORY

Clothing:
Coats...........................................
Hats and caps........................... .
Overalls____ ________ ______ _
Pants............... ...... .....................
Shirts, dress................................
Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, new.......................pairs. _
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Suits...........................................
Underwear................................ .
Miscellaneous_______ ________
Construction: Alterations and in­
stallations......................................




.2
.5
2.0
2.2
1.0
1.0
7.0
6.0
18.3
.6
.7
47.0

42
1,

258
603
438
1,683
3,514
180
1,144
0)

42.00
91.60
373.80
395.25
180.90
153.30
!, 366.00
!, 735.85
!, 240.00
114.40
128.25
0)

$54,303.41

0)

54,303.41

STATES, 1932

504
207
372

.3
.5
.3

0)
0)

$109.20
241.50
52.70
166.00
79.00
142.55

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Coats________________________
Dresses.........................................
Pajamas and nightgowns...........
Suits. ..........................................
Underwear..................................
Miscellaneous.............................
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm.................. ...............
Textiles and textile products:
Bags.............................................
Pillowcases..................................
T ow e ls.......................................
Miscellaneous textile products. .

112
600
310
2,500

8

6,226.15
4.220.00
6,061.12
1.250.00
21,773.70
9,124.25

1
6,000
52
0)
0)
834
0)

56.44
2.100.00
1,691.84
15,741.19
10,485. 73
550.50
471.31

9.85
62.40
183.40
310.60

1,590
0)

17,320.31
134.10
325.92
19.75
862.81
778.62
3,498.62
85.50
4,336.44
3,162.44
10,053.87
3,080.00
895.69
140,105.00

22
6,000
462
0)
0)
834
0)

320.30
2,100.00
4,820.62
15,741.19
11,252.63
550.50
471.31

266
3,202,938
3,703
(1}
0)

88.14
198,377.17
541.44
3,301.64
209.81

STATE PENITENTIARY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands.
Miscellaneous............................
Clothing:
Aprons---------- --------- -----------Coats— ....... ...........................
Gloves and mittens____ pairs.
Hats and caps...................... .
Overalls-------------- --------- ------Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants.................. —...................
Shirts, work...................... ........
Shoes, repaired................ pairs.
Suits------------- ------------ ...........
Underwear.................................
Coal mining.............................tons.
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn.............................bushels.
Hogs................................. head.
Miscellaneous dairy..................
Miscellaneous farm...................
Harness_________ *.............. pieces.
Repair and shop work.....................
Textile and textile products:
Bags............................................
Binder twine........... ..................
Sheets.........................................
Miscellaneous textile products _
Other manufactured products____

i
i

266

88.14

3,703
0)
.0)

541.44
3,301.64
209.81

98

1,447.42

21

(l)

263.86

410

3,128. 78
766.90

3,202,938 198,377.17

PRISONS

325.92
19.75
862.81
778.62
3,498.62
85.50
4.336.44
3.162.44
10,053.87
3.080.00
895.69
140,105.00

7,211.45
5,223.12
7,431. 67
1, 250.00
22,272. 76
16,043.46
1,290.00
12,993. 78
91,970.48

1,735
34
25,517
5,274
7,268
228
7,365
14,802
15,850
308
8,605
69,174

15,872.89
134.10

1,735
34
25,517
5,274
7,268
228
7,365
14,802
15,850
308
8,605
69,174

499.06
6,919. 21
1, 290.00

9.85
62.40
183.40
310.60

1,492
0)

30

150
643
384
2,500
0)
(9
30
25,478
1,226,273
57
208
262
1,653

0)
0)

12,993.78
91,970.48

67
208
262
1,553

985.30
1,002.12
1,370. 55

A D FEDERAL
N

25,478
1,226,273

1
38
143
74

STATE

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle.............................. head.
Hay................................... tons.
Hogs............. ....................head.
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous dairy..................
Miscellaneous farm...................
Harness..................................... sets.
Highway markers............................
Metal products: Auto license tags..
Textiles and textile products:
Bags...........................................
Pillowcases.... ............................
Sheets.........................................
Towels.......................................

i Enumeration impracticable.




00
Of

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, fry Stale, system, and institution— Continued

O
O

STATE PRISONS— Continued
KANSAS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

ALL INSTITUTIONS

1,492
0)

1.0
2.2
2.5
3.0
2.5
13.0
1.5
16.2
1.0
11.0
7.0
13.0
29.3
4.4
2.2
429.0

1,735
114
492
25,517
5,563
8,336
449
7,623
603
15,240
l ,r “
19,364
516
10,065
0)
9,174

$1,447.42

$15,872.89
134.10
325.
170.
241.
862.
870.
3,872.
138.
4,731.
180.
3,315.
3,366.
12,789.
6,486.
1,089.
270.
140,105.

47.0
6.0
26.0
29.0
66.0
10.0

113
6,000
500
362
2,500

$17,320.31
134.10

325.92
1,735
114
170.95
492
241.50
25,517
862.81
870.22
5,563
3,872.42
8,336
138.20
449
4,731.69
7,623
603
180.90
3.315.74
15,240
3.366.00
1 ,'" “
12,789.72
19,364
6.486.00
516
10,065
1,089.09
270.80
0)
69,174 140,105.00
(0

6,282.59
2,100.00
4.220.00
7,752.96
1.250.00

1,590
0)

$54,303.41

0)
1,249.16
143
484

1,003.12
4,499.33

172
6,000
643
846
2,500

54,003.41
7.531.75
2.100.00
5,223.12
12,252.29
1,250.00

STATES, 1932




104.0
1.0

I UNITED
N

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands.
Miscellaneous.........................—
Clothing:
Aprons................ ...................—
Coats..............- .............- ...........
Dresses...................... ................
Gloves and mittens........ pairs.
Hats and cap s..........................
Overalls.....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants........................................ Shirts, dress......... .....................
Shirts, work...............................
Shoes, new....................... pairs.
Shoes, repaired__________ d o ..
Suits..................... ...... ...............
Underwear................... .............
Miscellaneous...........................
Coal mining............................ tons.
Construction: Alterations and in­
stallation....... ........... ....................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn............ - .............. bushels.
Hay........................- ......... tons.
Hogs______ ____________head.
Wheat____ __________bushels.

PRISON

Average
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Total......... - ..........................

29.0
235.0
834
1.0
5.0
10.0
25,478
68.0 1,226,273
1.0
(0
1.5
125.0
.8
3.0
2.3
15.6
1.0

827
415
3,965
1,925
(0
(0

37,514.89
21,889.81
550.50

834
30
25,478
1,226,273
0)

1,290.00

123.1

3,202,938 198,377.17

103.
724.84
347.80
3,616.35
209.81
54,303.41

38,013.95
29,638.80
550.50
1,290.00
12,993.78
91,970.48
471.31

827
3,202,938
415
3,965
1,925
0)
0)

499.06
7,748.

12,993. 78
91,970.48
471.31

386,946.86

1,326. 0

(0
0)

123.99
198,377.17
103.80
724.84
347.80
3,616.35
209.81
657,364.52

216,114.25

STATE PENITENTIARY

Brooms, brushes, and mops:Brooms.
Clothing:
Aprons____________
Children’s play suits.
Coats, prison.............
Hats and caps...........
Pants........................
Pants, prison_______
Shirts, work________
Suits..........................
Underwear
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Hogs.................................head—
Miscellaneous farm............ .....
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses__________________
Pillows_______________ _____ _
Harness............. ....................pieces.
Harness..................................... sets.
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets______________________
Towels......................................
Miscellaneous textile products—
Other manufactured products_____




(2
)
43.0
1.8
.4
2.2
1.7
559.9
3.9
.3
2.0
8.2

$183,636.60

$183,636.60

73.0
437
1,285
4,149
899
3,296
1,013
1,978
124

1,718. 73
2,748.06

(0

.4
(2
)
50.0
10.0

134
74

2,
2.839
5,801
0)

231.48
1,701.11
630.53
91.41

t Enumeration impracticable.

$61,450.40

1, 712,482

526,885.23

1,718.73
2,748.06

134
74
74,049
968

480.14
48.84
123,317.73
26,620.00
231.48
1,701.11
630.53
91.41
2.025.87

0)

480.14
48.84

.2
1.4
.5
(*)
1.0

207,928

41.16
61,450.40
2,252.92
532.82
2,525.47
2,037.00
529,176.33
4.557.87
371.77

2,586
2,839
5,801

2, 252.92
532.82
2,525. 47
2,037.00
2,291.10
4,557.87
371. 77

437
207,928
668
1,285
4,149
899
1,715,778
1,013
1,978
124

$41.16

74,049

(0

123,317.73
26,620.00

8

$2,025.87
* Less than one tenth of 1.

A D FEDERAL PRISONS
N

K EN TU CK Y

STATE

Miscellaneous dairy_________
Miscellaneous farm................. .
............................. pieces
........... ................................ sets
Highway markers......................... .
Metal products: Auto license tags.
Repair and shop work....... ........... .
Textiles and textile products:
Bags............................. ............
Binder tw ine..............pounds
Pillowcases......... .....................
Sheets.......................................
Towels.......................................
Miscellaneous textile products.
Other manufactured products____

OO

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

OJ
J

QO'

STATE PRISONS—Continued
KENTUCKY—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value
labor

Num­
ber

State account

prison

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE REFORMATORY

$79.64

' ‘ 16
3,460
2,977

11.25
2,086.07
1,211.51
2,430.24

6,755
3,904
3,518
1,463
3,092
128
(0

10,125. 75
1,600.98
1,882.13
7,007.97
1,004.90
562.37
18.84

(*)

230,836

$57,709.00

586,050

312,071.63

960,807

345,089.85 1,237,382

909,012

722,800

6L0
.2
.9
.8
.4

1,*
2,062
7,951
0)

862,800 $196,626.50

367
230,836
16
595
3,460
2,977
484,048.89 1,495,062
6,755
3,904
444,426.37 2,201,707
1,463
3,092
128
(0

675.00

0)
238,800

179.0
8.0

$196,626.50

242,855.62

79.64
57,709.00
11.25
2,086.07
1,211. 51
2,430.24
796,120.52
10,125. 75
1,600.98
791,398.35
7,007.97
1,004.90
562.37
18.84
675.00

48.789.00

238,800
722,800

242,855.62
48,789.00

6,321.99
255.82
977.39
865.94
514.00

9,893
1,938
2,062
7,951
0)

6,321.99
255.82
977.39
865.94
514.00

1932

4.0

367

states,

.1
78.0
(*)
1.9
1.1
2.3
452.0
9.3
1.4
755.7
6.4
.9
.5
(»)

u n Ited




862,800

83.0

iisr

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms.
Clothing:
Aprons.........................................
Children's play suits__________
Coats............................ ..............
Coats, prison..............................
Hats and caps................... - ........
Overalls............................... ........
Pajamas and nightgowns--------Pants................................. ..........
Shirts, dress______ _____ ______
Shirts, work____ _____________
Suits________________________
Underwear_____ _____________
Uniforms, prison______________
Miscellaneous..............................
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm...................................
Furniture and furnishings: Chairs,
wood............................... ................
Metal products: Auto license tags..
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Pillowcases........................ ..........
Sheets------ ------------- --------------Towels.........................................
Miscellaneous textile products—

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms 156.0
Clothing:
.1
Aprons.......................... ..............
Children’s play suits__________ 121.0
3.7
Coats...........................................
1.5
Hats and caps______ __________
2.3
Overalls............................. .........
452.0
Pajamas and nightgowns______
13.2
Pants...........................................
1.4
Shirts, dress__________________
Shirts, work__________________ 1,315.6
Suits. _____ __________________
10.3
1.2
Underwear_______ ___________
.5
Uniforms, prison_____________
.1
Miscellaneous ______ _ ____ —
Farm, garden, and dairy:
2.0
Hogs................................. head..
12.2
Miscellaneous farm_________
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood................... ........... 179.0
.4
Mattresses___________________
.1
Pillows______________ _______
50.0
Harness............. ...................pieces..
Harness..................................... sets..
10.0
JMetal products: Auto license ta g s...
8.0
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
61.0
Pillowcases........................ .........
.4
2.3
Sheets..........................................
1.3
Towels.........................................
.4
Miscellaneous textile products..
1.0
Other manufactured products.........
Total.........................................2,407.0




1,691,669
804

120.80

1,279
4,745
2,977

4.350.24
1,744.33
2.430.24

11,803
3,904
6,814
2,476
5,070
128
(0

14,688.22
1,600.98
4,173.23
11,565.84
1,376.67
562.37
18.84

124

380,263.10

134
74

312,071.63

2‘ 673,'289

909,012

871,975.08 1,237,382

124
242,855.62

74,049

(0

Enumeration impracticable

238,800
134
74
74,049
968
722,800

242,855.62
480.14
48.84
123,317.73
26,620.00
48,789.00

9,
4,524
4,901
13,752
0
0)

238,800

6,321.99
487.30
2,678.50
1,496.47
605.41
108,681.20

1,718.73
3,423.06

6,321.99
487.30
2,678.50
1,496.47
605.41
2,025.87

0)

123,317.73
26,620.00

48,789.00

9,893
4,524
4,901
13,752
(0

586,050

480.14
48.84

722,800

119,159.40

380,263.10

Q
fU
120.80
438,764 119,159.40
1,279
4,35a 24
4,745
1,744.33
2,977
2,430.24
484,048.89 1,495,062 796,120.52
11,803
14,688.22
3,904
1,600.98
444,426.37 3,917,485 .320,574.68
11,565.84
2,476
5,070
1,376.67
128
562. ?7
18.84
0)

1,718.73
3,423.06

(0

438,764

1,691,669

$2,025.87
2,025.87

1,303, 206.11
;Less than one tenth of 1.

1,701,531.71

3,115,444.89

T a b l e A . — Kind,

quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, & /State, systemy and institution— Continued
?/

C
O

o

STATE PRISONS— Continued
LOUISIANA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

’

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
emloyed Number
Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

991
4,172

$198.20
3,129.00

240.0
157.0
297.0
184.0
9.0

175,000
400
40,478
0)
9,405

13.0
89.0
19.0
124.0

11,451
420,617
629,518
82,600

3,762.85
9,897.65
37,529. 28

.1
.8
.3

123
744

36.90
558.00
176.40

Total....................................... 1,644.0




991
4,172
83

0)

297,012.43..........

$426,757.44

420
0)

$1,318. 82
43,241. 83

1,804,815

34,026. 0
i

5,424,274 176,873. 0;

$198.20
3.129.00
426,757.44

175,000
400
40,
0)
9,405

70,000.00
4.600.00
128,409.74
61,791.09
18, 791.21

11,451
,225,432
629,518
,506,874

3, 762.85
43,923.69
37,529.28
179,566.43

123
744

70,000.00
4,600.00
127,090.92
18,549.26
18,791.21

83

36.90
558.00
176.40

(0
426,757.44

255,460.36

979,230.23

STATES, 1932

0.3
4.5
506.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Pajamas and nightgowns___
Pants, prison______________
Construction: Roads, new. _. miles..
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn............................. bushels.
H a y ..................................tons.
Sugarcane.--------- -----------do—
Miscellaneous farm...................
Highway markers...........................
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes.........................................
Lumber......... ..........board feet..
Metal products: Auto license tags__
Sugar................ ................. pounds-Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.................................
Sheets................. ......................
Miscellaneous textile products-

-W—oUQZ

MAINE
STATE PRISON

1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
8.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
8.0

300
300
600
1,095
300

$60.00
105.00
240.00
547.50
1,245.00

1,
1,028
(0

222.26
162.48
745.04
3.714.54
1,078.35
2.558.55

9
325
26
1,209
1,028
0

222.26
162.48
745.04
3,714.54
1,078.35
2,558.55

250

1,000.00

250
9
5

1,000.00
38.03
145.00

9
325
26

3.0
.4
1.6

$38.03
145.00

3.0
15.0

740.00
2,636.66

740.00
2,636.66

(0

STATE REFORMATORY FOR MEN

10.0
2.0
1.0
1&0
6.0
4.0
5.0
32.0

72.00
35
125
200
13
392
0)

949.60
60.00
2,000.00
190.35
764.88
736.00
5,094.59

267

155
431
(0

3,652.89

273

402.75

949.60
60.00
2,000.00
754.40
1,605.68
736.00
5,497.34

238
104
790
453

564.05
840.80

3,724.89

35
125
200
168
823
590

53.05
61.80
272.55
428.40
284.09

(0

PRISONS

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Com________________ bushels. _
Hay______________ _____ tons—
Hogs____________ _____ .head—
M ilk ........... .........100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do..
Miscellaneous farm................

A D FEDERAL
N

$60.00
105.00
240.00
547.50
1,245.00

300
600
1,095
300

STATE

Clothing:
Hats and caps____________ ___
Pants, prison___ ____ _______
Shirts, work......... .....................
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs.
Uniforms, prison........ ..............
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle................ ..............head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hogs........ —..................... head—
M ilk......................100 pounds..
Potatoes.............—........... do___
Miscellaneous farm....................
Furniture and furnishings: Mat­
tresses.................................. ......... .
Harness............. ...................pieces._
Harness..................................... sets..
Lumber and timber products:
Miscellaneous_____ ____________
Repair and shop work____________

WOMEN’ S REFORMATORY

Clothing:
Aprons______ ______________
Dresses____________________
Underwear_______ _________
Uniforms, prison___________
Miscellaneous______________

1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
3.0

104
790
453
0)

53.05
61.80
272.55
428.40
284.09

(0

i Enumeration impracticable.




CD

T able

A*— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

O

to

STATE PRISONS—Continued
MAINE—Continued

1.0
1.0

Num­
ber

Value

State account
Number

Value

Piece price
Number

Value

Total

Contract
Number

Value

Number

97
34
3
89

99.10
67.20
1,109.99
154

$34.12
333.33
99.10
67.20
1,109.99

59
154

$34.12

0)

Value

13.40
111.80

0)

13.40
111.80

3,724.89

238
104
300
300
600
1,095
790
753
(*)

53.05
61.80
60.00
105.00
240.00
547.50
272.55
1,673.40
284.09

238
104
300
300
600
1,095
790
753
(*)

53.05
61.80
60.00
105.00
240.00
547.50
272.55
1,673.40
284.09

4.0
3.1
15.6
9.2
8.0
10.1
42.0

44
547
234
42
1,601
1,707
(0

1,171.86
256.60
2,333.33
1,034.49
4,479.42
1,881.55
8,763.13

44
547
234
197
2,032
1,707
0)

1,171.86
256.60
2,333.33
1,598.54
5,320.22
1,881.55
9,165.88

267

72.00

155
431
(0

$3,652.89

564.05
840.80
402.75

STATES, 1932

273

1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
12.0
3.0

10.0

I UNITED
N




0.1
.6
.2
.1
2.0

Public works and
ways

LABOR

WOMEN’S REFORMATORY—COntd.
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn________________bushels..
Hay_______________ - ___ tons..
Hogs_____________ _____ head..
Potatoes....... .........100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm...................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases____________ _____
Sheets_____ _________________
ALL INSTITUTIONS
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile thousands.
Clothing:
Aprons......................................
Dresses.........—..........................
Hats and caps............................
Pants..................... ....................
Shirts, work....... .......................
Shoes, repaired...... ..........pairs.
Underwear......... ............ .........
Uniforms, prison............. ..........
Miscellaneous....................... —
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head.
Com___________ ____ bushels.
Hay___________ ________ tons.
Hogs_________ _________head-.
M ilk...................... 100 pounds.
Potatoes............................do—
Miscellaneous________________

Number and value of articles producod under each system

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Furniture and furnishings: Mat*
tresses................. ...... .....................
Harness______ ____________pieces..
Harness_________ ___________sets..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous............................ ..........
Repair and shop work......................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets_______________________
Total....................................... .

3.0
.41.
1.6|.

1, 000.00

3.0
15.0|.
1.0
1.0|

250
9
5

38.03
145.00
740.00
2,636.66

0)
0)
154

152.0.

740.00
2,636.66

13.40
111.80

154

24,414.97

1,000.00
38.03
145.00

9,020.18

13.40
111. 80
33,435.15

M A RY LA N D

STATE

STATE PENAL FARM

12.0
48.0
1.1
1.0
2.0
.9
6.0
8.0
1.0
6.0

$543.12
600.00
840.00
442.89
2,236.89
3,192.77
625.00
2,461.11

3,500

6

$8,904.17
36,403.12
543.12
600.00
840.00
442.89
2,236.89
3,192.77
625.00
2,461.11

34,620

7,163.79

3,500
588,408
746,262
2,250
11,000

2.625.00
393,514.58
217,659.75
1.125.00
2.200.00

0)

2,625.00

HOUSE OF CORRECTION

Clothing:
Overalls_____________________
Pants. _______ __ ____ _______
Shirts, work....... ...... ................ .
Shoes, repaired................ pairs.
Underwear..................................
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings........................... .
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn________________ bushels..
H ay................................... tons..
Hogs___________ _______ head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
i Enumeration impracticable.




8.0
1.6
299.0
161.0
2.0
1.4

34,620

2,250
11,000

1.125.00
2.200.00

5.0
11.0

0)

3
1,750
207
54
1,513

60.01
700.00
2,484.00
744.82
4,921.55.

14,113.50
35,381.35

(0

2.0
2.0
3.0
12.0
5.0

70,662
746,262

5,828.00

$32,386.75
217,659.75

517,746

$7,163.79
361,127.83

0)

6

(9
10

$252.46

20

358.82

13
1,750
207
74
1,513

PRISONS

16
1,500
70
29
1,276
3,900
1,250
0)

$8,904.17
36,403.12

16
1,500
70
29
1,276
3,900
1,250
0)

(0

A D FEDERAL
N

Construction:
Alterations and installations...
New buildings_______________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn.............................bushels.
Hay____________________tons.
Hogs__________ ____ ___ head.
M ilk_____________100 pounds.
Potatoes_________ ______ do—
Wheat......... ................bushels.
Miscellaneous farm----------------

14,113.50
35,381.35
5,828.00
312.47
700.00
2,484.00
1,103.64
4,921.55

CO
00

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution—Continued

JO

STATE PRISONS— Continued
M ARYLAND—Continued

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

h o u s e o f c o r r e c t io n —

Number and value of articles produced under each system

continued
9.0
3.0
53.0
16.0

1,753

$1,893.30
13,933.17

(0

1,241
0)

1,753
1,241

$714.03
3,183.55
(0

$15,734.64

$1,893.30
714.03
17,116.72
15,734.64

STATE PENITENTIARY




(*)
1.0
p>
537.0
.4
8.0
1.0
.6
18.8
14.0
.3
.1
.2

50
446
295
46
2,209
687
9,387
1,221
2,714

12.50
50
1,003.50
446
29.50
295
46
34.50
1,504,116 1,049,130.91 1,506,325 1,051,892.16
687
412.20
9,387
25.012.75
1,221
713.40
2,714
542.80

12.50
1,003.50
29.50
34.50
2,761.25
412.20
25,012.75
713.40
542.80

6,048
2,587
204
173
(0

70,146.25
52.386.75
336.60
73.53
542.50

377.70

682,632
315,852
3,000

48,186.65
15,792.60
377.70

1,804.75

618,700
1,529,300
0)

3,405.70
4,418.40
43,249.21

6,048
2,587
204
173

73.53
0)

25.9
7.0
.1

48,186.65

2.0
618,700
2.0 1,529,300
19.0
0)

3,405.70
4,418.40
41,444.46

315,852
3,000

<
9

70,146.25
52,386.75
542.50
15,"792."60

STATES, 1932

Clothing:
Aprons................... - ...............
Coats, prison..........................
Hats and caps........... .............
Overalls_____ ______ _____
Pants_______ _____________
Shirts, work---------------- -----Shoes, new............. .........pairs..
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Underwear............................... .
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood.......................... .
Davenports, sofas, etc..............
Mattresses.................................
Pillows_____________________
Miscellaneous.......................... .
Metal products:
Auto license tags...... ................
Castings..................... -pounds.
Tags, miscellaneous..................
Printing and binding:
Envelopes....... ........................ .
Letterheads________ ________ _
Miscellaneous......... ...... .........

I UNITED
N

Farm, garden, and dairy— Contd.
Potatoes................. 100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels—
Miscellaneous farm...............
Metal products: Miscellaneous..

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases......... ..............
Sheets_____ ________ ____

709
877

106.35
350.80

50
446
295
3,546
2,209
687
9,387
3,471
13,714

12.50
1.003.50
29.50
2.659.50
2,761.25
412.20
25,012.75
1,838.4C
2,742.80

709
877

106.35
35a 80

34,620

7.163.79

ALL INSTITUTIONS

8.0
(*)
1.0
(*)
1.6
836.0
161.4
8.0
3.0
2.0
17.0
59.0

5,828.00

0)

10
20
1,241
0)

714.03
3,183. 55
70,146.25
52,386.75

73.53
0)

25.9
7.0
.1
16.0
2.0
618,700
2.0 1,529,300
19.0
(l)

3,405. 70
4,418.40
41,444.46

542.50

48,186. 65

.1
.4

1,000

709
877

0)

315,852

377. 70

"o f

15,792.60
"l5,~734.'64

1,804. 75

106.35
350.80
170,473.52

i Enumeration impracticable.

100,630.14

6,691.31

250,046.50
* Less than one tenth of 1.

1,572,025.27

19,577.83

6,048
2,587
204
173
0)

70,146.25
52.386.75
336.60
73.53
542.50

682,632
315,852
3,000
0)

48,186.65
15,792.60
377.70
15,734.64
3,405.70
4.418.40
43,249.21
106.35
350.80

855.59

1.300.00

prisons

6,048
2,587

3.324.00
1,546.53
7,158.44
5,086.07
1,339.03

618,700
1,529,300
0)

358.82

5.828.00

29
3,250
277
103
2,789
5,653
2,491
0)

252.46

23,017.67
71,784.47

709
877

603.
1,300.
3,324.
1,187.
7,158.
5,086.
625.
16,394.

0)

federal

204
173

50
12.50
446
1,003.5a
295
29.5a
3,546
2,659.5a
410,258.74 2,094,733 1,445,406.74
746,949 218,071.95
9,387
25.012.75
3,471
1.838.40
13,714
2.742.80

$23,017. 67
71,784.47

0)
19
3.250
277
83
2,789
5,653
1.250
(0

$32,386. 75 2,021,862
217,659.75

7,163.79

an
d

18.8
14.0
.3
.1
.2

70,662
746,262

0)

2.0
3.1
4.0
14.0
5.9
29.0
17.0
4.0
59.0

Total......................................... 1,341.0




34,620

State

Baskets.................. ...........................
Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Coats...........................................
Hats and caps............................
Overalls............................. _.......
Pants_______________________
Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Underwear........... ......................
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings....... ....................
New, other than buildings and
roads........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn-------------------------bushels..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs------------------ --------- head..
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes________ _______ do___
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous farm_____ ______
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood............................. .
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Mattresses___________________
Pillows_____ _________________
Miscellaneous________________
Metal products:
Auto license ta g s..................... .
Castings...................... pounds..
Tags, miscellaneous__________ _
Miscellaneous_____ __________
1’rinting and binding:
Envelopes_____ ______________
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous............................ .
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases....... ...... ...................
Sheets......................................... .

2,099,866.74
CD'

O l:

T a b l e A ,—

Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by Staley system,

and

institution—

C o n t in u e d

CD
05

STATE PRISONS— Continued
MASSACHUSETTS
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

STATE PRISON

24,970

$41,162.83

26,284

$43,276.69

23,064
(0

30,068.47
899. 72

23,064
0)

30.068.47
899.72

1.0
26.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
10.0
4.0
18.0
6.0
162.0
69.0
4.0
1.0

467
8,036
1,161
231
1,122
8,521
869
11,280

467
8,036
1,161
231
1,122
8,521
869
11,280

38,631
143 568
0)

280.20
39,051.31
4.644.00
324.63
841.50
14.911.75
6.633.00
27.236.75
7,881.05
94,482.36
62,284.79
5,641.90

102,288
143,568
0)
0)

280.20
39,051.31
4.644.00
324.63
841. 50
14,911. 75
6.633.00
27,236. 75
7,881.05
160,132. 96
62,284.79
5,641.90
302.89

2,325
3,349
3,708
2,786

20,343.75
30,037.80
9,270.00
60,466.68

2,325
3,514
3,708
2,786

20,343.75
31,118.60
9.270.00
60,466.68

2.0
13,167
64.0 1,956,782
78.0 3,683,886
34.0
18,215

9,425.15
153,482.56
86,592.13
18,215.00

13,167
,956,782
!, 606,291
18,400

9,425.15
153,482.56
87,264.28
18.584.47

12.0
16.0
4.0
17.0

2,866

1,314

$2,113.86

2,866

63,657

65,650.60
302.89

0)
165

1,080.80

22,405
186

672.15
369.47

STATES, 1932




28.0
34.0
1.0

I UNITED
N

Brooms, brushes and mops: Brushes.
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete posts________________
Miscellaneous_______ _____ ___
Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Coats....... —.................................
Coats, prison...............................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs —
Hats and caps........................ .
Overalls......... —_____ ______
Overcoats....................... .........
Pants.......................................
Pants, prison..........................
Shoes, new....................... pairs—
Underwear.......... ................ .
Miscellaneous....................... ......
Miscellaneous labor only______
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds.............................................
Mattresses...................................
Pillows______________________
Highway markers..............................
Metal products:
Aluminum ware--------------------Auto license tags.........................
Castings.................. —.pounds. _
Galvanized ware---------------------

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Printing and binding: Miscellaneous
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Miscellaneous textile products..

20.236.78L ____

29.0

(9

14.0
3.0

2.500
<9

581.87
2.443.16

4.0
2.0

1,654
4.500

12.0
17.0
12.0
12.0
11.0
38.0

3,292
183
85
4,107

6.95

<9
189,302
(9

44,643.59
1,936.75

(9

20,243.73

191,802
(0

45,225.46
4,379.91

4.784.00
2.298.00

1,654
4,500

4.784.00
2.298.00

k m

2.139.85
3.706.16
3.167.85
15,482.74
2,415.06
8,762.20

3,292
183
85
4,107
1,365
(9

2.139.85
3,706.16
3.167.85
15,482.74
2,415.06
8,762.20

695
19,459
401
1,283
4,261
<9

13,995.76
70,104.78
8,198.25
38,136.45
40,230.84
12,769.47

19,459
401
1,283
4,885
(9

13,995.75
70,104.78
8,198.25
38.136.45
41.548.45
12,769.47

MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY

11.0
3.0

3.077.00
153.18

8

624

1,317.61

162.55

(9

(9
(9

315.73
3,077.00

37,219

73,815.05

37,219

73,815.05

20.0
180.0
35.0
1.0

40,169
71,742
69,563
(9

15,575.65
105,150.48
27,701.35
209.31

40,169
71,742
69,563
(9

15,575.65
105,150.48
27,701.35
209.31

1.0
6.0
3.0
4.0
25.0
2.0

373
7
748

6,537.00
170.00
2,820.90
12,231.77

28
373
238
3,142

2.511.00
6.537.00
1,353.63
9,179.67
22,437.32
995.00

PRISON CAMP

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle______ ___________head..
Hay______________ _____ tons..
Hogs---------------------------- hea<~
M i l k .....................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm.................
Miscellaneous livestock______

(9

28

2,511.00

231
2,394

1,183.63
6,358.77
10,205.55
995.00

8

8

PRISONS

115.0

A D FEDERAL
N

32.0
13.0
8.0
36.0
34.0

STATE

Clothing:
Shoes, new______ ______ pairs..
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn_____ i __________ bushels..
Hay_____________ ______ tons..
Hogs__________ ________ head..
M ilk____ ________ 100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do___
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.............................................
Chairs, wood..............................
Davenports, sofas, etc...... ........
Desks......... ............. ..................
Tables........................................
Miscellaneous............................
Printing and binding* Miscellane­
ous printing....................................
Repair and shop work____________
Textiles and textile products*
Blankets....................................
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Wool yard goods.............. do___
Yarn, cotton and w o o l...d o _
_
Miscellaneous textiles________

i Enumeration impracticable.




CO

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by Stale, system, and institution— Continued

CO
00

STATE PRISONS— Continued
M ASSACHUSETTS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE FARM

$783.00
10,272.00
23.50
601.20
469.20
11.522.50
3.853.50
13,157.80
3,120.00
1,855. 50

21
937
303
10,324
9,659

1,605. 74
17,945.53
13,054.25
38,920.73
16,903.95
40,882.16

1,044
2,568
1,128
3,006
408
4,190
4,404
5,848
5,200
0)

$783.00
10,272.00
23.50
601.20
469.20
11,522.50
3.853.50
13,157.80
3,120.00
1.855.50

2.0
7.0
2.0
18.0
5.0
61.0

21
937
297
10,324
9,659
(0

1,605.74
17,945.53
13,022.25
38,920.73
16,903.95
40,855.76

2,064

891.25
19.55

2,064

891.25
19.55

4,728
3,972
21,708

1,118.96 —
3,011.40 —
3,346.65 —
58.40 —

4,728
3,972
21,708
0)

1,118.96
3,011.40
3,346.65
58.40

6.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
L0

0)

$32.00
0)

26.40

0)

STATES, 1932




1,044
2,568
1,128
3,006
408
4,190
4,404
5,848
5,200
(0

1.0
15.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
15.0
5.0
9.0
6.0
8.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Aprons.......................................
Coats__________ _____________
Handkerchiefs...........................
Hats and cap s.......................... .
Pajamas and nightgowns......... .
Pants......................................... .
Shirts, work_________________ _
Shoes, new....................... pairs.
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Miscellaneous............................
^Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Hay.................................. tons..
Hogs................................. head.
Milk.......................100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do—
Miscellaneous farm..................
Furniture and furnishings: Mat­
tresses......... .................................. .
•Soap and soap powder........pounds..
'Textile and textile products:
Pillowcases. ______ _________
Sheets...........- ............................ .
Towels.................. - ...................
Miscellaneous textile products..

STATE PRISON COLONY

L0
10.0
1.0

42
114
39

425.00
17,000.00
3,000.00

42
114

425.00
17,000.00
3,000.00

1.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
188.0

45
424
1,082
83

675.00
1,272.00
1,352.00
1,245.00

45
424
1,082

675.00
1.272.00
1.352.00
1.245.00
194,129.00

1.0
2.0

39

150.00
450.00

3 $194,129.00
0)

(0

150.00
45a 00

W OMEN'S REFORMATORY

1,031
187,935
15,848
19,385
<>
*
0)

15.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
9.0

24,970

1.0
10.0
34.0
1.0
1.0

2,542
11,765
231
1,128

384.48
35.95
254. 76

80

42
114
23,064

4.0
43.0
1.0
1.0

120
134
267

26.67

1,314

2,113.86

(0

5,134
35,390
33,287
9,712
64,208
0)

28.0

29.52
17.41
23.00
10.00

23,087.41

42.00

1,031
188,087
15,867
19,408
(0

855.00
26.130.50
23,415.91
24.283.00
18.110.44

0)

23,129.41

5,254
35,524
33,554
9,712
64,288
0)

21,043.31
11,048.39
42.198.51
12.140.00
16,098.67
20.115.45

26,284

43,276.69

42
114
23,064
39
0)

0)

425.00
17,000.00
30,068.47
3,000.00
899.72

2,542
11,765
231
1,128

1,918.20
53,967.31
324.63
23.50

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brushes.........................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands
Concrete, blocks.............. do___
Concrete, posts........................ .
Stone, building_________ tons.
Miscellaneous_______________
Clothing:
Aprons__________ __________
C o a ts.................. .....................
Gloves and mittens_____pairs..
Handkerchiefs_____ ________
1 Enumeration impracticable.




41,162.83

0)
53,967.31

PRISONS

24.0

152
19
23

FEDERAL

Pillowcases_____ _________
Sheets................... ...............
Spreads................................
Towels............................. .
Other manufactured products.

2.0
21.0
6.0
7.0
11.0

AD
N

Clothing:
Aprons—___________- ________
Hosiery.............................pairs..
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Shirts, work................................
Miscellaneous.............................
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm...................................
Textiles and textile products:

STATE

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands.
Concrete, blocks________ do—
Stone, building_________ tons.
Clothing:
Overcoats_________ __________
Pants.........................................
Shoes, repaired ................pairs.
Suits...........................................
Construction: New buildings_____
Furniture and furnishings:
Tables........................... .............
Miscellaneous. _ ............ ...........

CD
CO

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued

O
O

MASSACHUSETTS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

ALL INSTITUTIONS—-continued
4,
187,
8,
16,
18,
23,
46,
10,
143,5
(0

$1,442.70
26,100.98
14,911.75
7.308.00
23,867.70
47,912.30
28,113.50
112,424.16
6.770.00
1.245.00
62,284.79
25,597.84

152

$29.52

19

17.41

23
63,657

23.00
65,650.60

10.00

302.89

$194,129.00

4,128
188,087
8,521
914
16,275
18,760
23,812
109,790
10,782
83
143,568

8

$1,442.70
26.130.50
14.911.75
7.308.00
23,885.11
47,912.30
28.136.50
178,074.76
6 770.00
*
1.245.00
62,284.79
25,607.84
302.89
194,129.00

3.0
12.0
30.0
17.0
34.0
16.0
148.0
2.0

21
3,292
1,493
389
15,179
11,024
(0

1,605.74
2,139.85
28,188.69
16,360.10
57,224.37
19,319.01
84,937.14

12.0

2,325

20.343.75

2,325

20.343.75

19,459
401
1.283

13.995.75
70,104.78
8,198.25
38.136.45

19,459
401
1,283

13.995.76
70,104.78
8,198.25
38,136.45

32.0
13.0
8.0
36.0

28

2,511.00

237
2,394

1,215.
6,358.77
10,273.95
995.00

49
3,292
1,493
626
17,573
11,024

8

4,116.74
2,139.85
28,188.69
17,575.73
63,583.14
19,319.01
95,211.09
995.00

STATES, 1932




4.0
21.0
10.0
5.0
8.0
40.0
12.0
175.0
9.0
3.0
69.0
23.0
1.0
188.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Hats and caps_______________ _
Hosiery________________pairs.
Overalls__________ ___________
Overcoats..____ _____________
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
P a n ts.-_____________________
Shirts, work............ ...................
Shoes, new________ ____ pairs.
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Suits. ________ ___________; __
_
Underwear__________________
Miscellaneous............................
Miscellaneous, labor only........ .
Construction: New buildings_____
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay___________________ tons.
Hogs.................. ...............head..
M ilk____________ 100 pounds.
Potatoes............................do___
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds........................................... .
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc........................................... .
Chairs, wood.............................
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Desks......................................... .

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

4,039
3,708
4,300

13,167
2.0
54.0 1,956,782
78.0 3,583,886
18,215
34.0

9.425.15
153,482.56
86,592.13
18.215.00

40.0
3.0
1.0

2,064
37,219
42,669
5,134
40,118
37,259
9,712
85.916
71, 742
69, f ‘

1,317.61

22,405
185

672.15
369.47

16,157.52
20,658.83
12,131.40
44.955.15
12.140.00
19,418. 65
105,150.48
27,701.35
209.31
2,501.56
20,115.45

l

1,781.0________ 1,667,744.40

6.95
162.55

189,302
120
134
267

44,643.
384.48
35.95
254.76

80

26.67
1,936.75

0)

4,204
3,708
4,924
0)
2,786

32,00C. 85
9.270.00
41.698.45
13.219.47
60,466.68

13,167
1,956,782
3,606,291
18,400

9,425.15
153,482.56
87,264.28
18.584.47

2,064

23,320.73
315.73
19.55

37,219

73.815.05

34.0
15.0
4.0
6.0
1.0
6.0
180.0
35.0
1.0
4.0
9.0

1,080.80

23,313.78
153.18
19.55

115.0

165
624

73,815.05

231,971
5,254
40,252
37,526
9,712
85,996
71,742
69,563
(0

60,801.11
21.043.31
12.167.35
45,209.91
12.140.00
19.445.32
105,150.48
27.701.35
209.31
4,438.31
20.115.45

8
194,129.00

140,393.36

2,002,266.76

PRISONS

M ICHIGAN
STATE PRISON

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms--------------------------------Brushes.......................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone...............................tons..
Miscellaneous________________
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats, prison................ ..............
Gloves and mittens_____ pairs..
Handkerchiefs________________
Hats and caps_______________
Hosiery________________pairs.
t Enumeration impracticable.




9.0
33.0

6,469
9,725

$3,33a 54
3,801.23

348

869.69
31.00

4.0
17.0

0)

.2
4.0
.1
.4
.6
10.0

1,419
2,393
146
38,264
5,206
98,808

376.23
5,546.32
32.01
1,227.51
1,779.72
11,527.40

275
152,525

$253.90
13,525.99

58

151.62
27,182.92

O
')

A D FEDERAL
N

Total.....................................

^2,786

30.929.05
9.270.00
40,380.84
13,219.47
60,466.68

21.0
4.0
35.0
27.0
17.0

STATE

Mattresses................................. .
Pillows.— ......... ..................... .
Tables........................................ .
Miscellaneous________ _____ _
Highway markers........................ .
Metal products:
Aluminum ware_________. . . . . .
Auto license tags______ ____ ...
Castings____ ________ pounds..
Galvanized ware. ..................... .
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous printing.................................. .
Repair and shop work......................
Soap and soap powder----- pounds..
Textiles and textile products:
Blankets................ ................
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds. .
Flags............................................
Pillowcases___________________
Sheets_________ _____________
Spreads-___—______ __________
Towels........... ......... ...................
Wool yard goods_____ pounds—
Yarn, cotton and wool__ do___
Miscellaneous textiles.................
Miscellaneous textile products.^
Other manufactured products_____

6,744
162,250

$3,584.44
17,327.22

406
0)

1,021.31
27,213.92

1,419
2,393
146
38,264
5,206
98,808

376.23
5,546.32
32.01
1,227.51
1,779.72
11,527.40

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISON S— Continued
M ICHIGAN—Continued

p e is o n —

Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

continued
3,416
235
494
10,285
13,170
37,335

(9

(9

16.5
456.5
1.0
2.0
8.0
20.0
40.0
5.0
55.0
196.5
2.0
2.0
.1
19.0
16.8
23.0
2.0

24

279
1,309
706
22,403
2,408

8
200
1,029

(9

5,408

<
9

$12,508.00
347,492.00

2,544.76
117.34
13,541.89
17,533.75
20,673.00
1,444.80
63,052.02
149,314.75

45

1,415.50

145.14

12.508.00
347,492.00

279
1,354
706
22,403
2,408

2,544.76
117.34
13,687.03
17,533.75
20.673.00
1,444.80
63,052.02
171,525.64
2,000.00
2,945.05
60.00
13,746.35
27,040.09
10,000.00

3,416
235
494
lty 285
13,170
37,359

(9

(9

22,210.89

(9
(9

<
9

18.75
60.00
1,108.00
18,464. 31

200
1,035
9
<9.
42,836

(9

15.00

2,000.00
2,926.30
12,638.35
8,575.78

$15.00

$2,829.78
1,240.00
309.37
16,109.76
8,157.59
16,742.29
424.71

<
9

$2,829.78
1,240.00
309.37
16,109. 76
8,157. "
16,727.29
424.71

STATES, 1932

0.9
.4
.2
8.5
3.5
22.2

I tTNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Overalls......................................
Overcoats!............................. . .
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants, prison.............................
Shirts, work....... ......................
Underwear_____ ____ ________
Miscellaneous............................
Construction:
Alterations and installations—.
New buildings...........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle.......................... ...h ead .
Corn................. - ......... bushels .
Hay....... ..........................tons.
Hogs............................ --_head.
Potatoes............... -100 pounds .
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous dairy..................
Miscellaneous farm...................
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches......................................
Mattresses..................................
Tables..................................... .
Miscellaneous............................
Highway markers............................
Land development: Reforestation..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous......................................




Public works and
ways

37,428

(9

LABOR

state

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles pioduced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

10,000.00

(9

(9

1,430. 5
0

2
48
134
2
5

0
12,315
7 3,035,516
0
3
291,777
8
(9

9,160.94
224,624.67
3,646.12
3,917.11

16,671
522,750
861,450

(l)

304 0
50

1,000
10,142

63.00
32,454.20

72 0
36,0
4,0
.3
2.0
1.3

155,383
80,222
16,762
6,706
8,864
27,476

73,127.68
42,142.56
3,352.40
997.86
5,745.73
3,233.64

137.8
.1
145.0
31.4
1.0

345,795
(0

53,618.25
469.73

(9

25.50

(0

12,124,690 763,855.47
3
9.20

1.372.40
1,051.35
511.51
27,311.24

12,125,690
10,145

1,372.40
1,051.35
511.51
27,311.24

9,160.94
224,624.67
48,983,57
5,155.47
6.553.63

16,671
522,750
861,450

(9

12,315
3,035,516
1,113,010
317,621
(0

48,983.57
1,509.35
2,636.52

763,918.47
32,463.40

149
42,479

72.91
8,235.41

155,532
122,701
16,762
6,706
8,864
27,476

73.200.59
50,377.97
3.352.40
997.86
5,745.73
3.233.64

8,653

1,655.35
144.88
70,515.21
17,955.09
1,291.25

354,448

55.273.60
614.61
70,515.21
17,980.59
1,291.25

ri

45,332
0)

<
9

(9

45,332

STATE HOUSE OF CORRECTION AND
BRANCH PRISON




5

19.10

1,146
8
120
697
18,097
212
42

405.70
8.00
480.00
240.20
14,643.82
954.00
42.00

2,768
2,952
120

4,529.40
1,503.25
250.00
317.70

26
75
305
1,755

512.21
750.00
2,705.85
1,641.25
11,696,61
5,736.80

<>
*
(*)

.4

1.0
.3
235.7
2.0
(’)
.5
4.6
3.0
.5
1.4
3.1
4.0
2.0
10.7
12.0
16.3
i

(9

<9

(9
Enumeration impracticable.

5
3

11
120
703
294,324
212
42
665
2,768
2,952
121

17.10

23.10
6
276,227 149,773.15
665

(9

551.95

1

11.25
566.95

19.10
405.70
25.10
480.00
263.30
164,4*6.97
954.00
42.00
551.95
4,529.40
1,503.25
261.25
884.65

(9

26
75
305
1,755

P
9
* Less than one tenth of 1.

512.21
750.00
2,705.85
1,641.25
11,696.61
5,736.80

PRISONS

Baskets--------------------------------------Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats________________________
Coats, prison________________
Hats and caps________________
Overalls___ ____ _____________
Overcoats....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants.......................................... .
Pants, prison.____ ___________
Shirts, work____ _____________
Suits............................................
Miscellaneous______ _________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle......... .....................head..
Hay...................... .............tons..
Hogs-------------- ------------- head..
Potatoes....... ......... 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous, dairy._________
Miscellaneous, farm.__ _______

A D FEDERAL
N

29
12
6
29 0

1,113,010
25,844

STATE

Metal products:
Aluminum ware-.......................
Auto license tags_____________
Electric switch boxes_________
Tags, miscellaneous________ ...
Miscellaneous_______ ________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound...........
Envelopes............................. —
Letterheads..................... ...........
Miscellaneous............................ .
Textile and textile products:
Binder twine................. pounds.
Blankets........... ........................ .
Cotton yard goods:
Light..................... pounds..
Heavy........................ do—
Duck and canvas............. do—
Pillowcases______ _______ ____ _
Sheets............................. ............
Towels.........................................
Yarn, cotton and wool
pounds..
Miscellaneous textile products..
Toys............................................. .....
Other manufactured products_____
Miscellaneous, labor only.................

O
CO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

g

STATE PRISONS— Continued
MICHIGAN—Continue d
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Piece price

Value

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Number

Value

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
STATE HOUSE OF CORRECTION AND
branch prison—continued
$10.85

13

$33.60

.60
197

$22.75
13.25
4.
16.75

2
5
92
197
20

50.45
3,789.25

2,432.54
1,591.83
23.50
7,654.93

(0

458,996
1,598,672
15
(*)

49,938.32
38,257.19
79.74
8,684.28

475,220
1,658,320
20
0)

52,370.86
39,849.02
103.24
16,339.21

55
8
1,
1,535
8,175

16.50
25.00
366.60
1.535.00
1.430.00
155.50
16,998.13

.65

56
8
1,222
1,535
8,175

17.15
25.00
366.60
1.535.00
1.430.00
1,159.05
17,807.88
1,325.56

1.003.55
809.75
1.325.56

-

§

DETROIT HOUSE OF CORRECTION
Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Clothing:
Aprons.....................




6.0

158,378

7,918.90

158,378

7,918.90

.4

576

210.60

576

210.60

STATES, 1932

16,224
59,648
5
(*)

8

20

0)

157.60
96.37

0)

13.25
5.40
16.75
157.60
50.45
3,885.62

I UNITED
N

Furniture and furnishings:
Benches................... ..................
Bureaus, chiffoniers,
etc_____ _____________
Chairs, wood___________
Desks___ ____ __________
Pillows_________________
Tables........................... .
Miscellaneous....................
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes................................. .........
Lumber___________board feet—
Mill work...........................
Miscellaneous..................
Textiles and textile products:
Bags..................................
Blankets_______________
Pillowcases_____________
Sheets............................... .
Towels.............................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____
Miscellaneous, labor only_______

Coats..

Sheets____
Spreads----Towels.
Miscellaneous textile products._
Toys............................................
Other manufactured products_____




12
506
1,863
960
1,760
100
130
1,823
1,817
3,400
2,465

(9

___ ___
____

1,

960
1,760
100
130
1,823
1,817
3,400
2,465

(9

________
34
800
300
220
1,715

12
506

24.00
639.00
201.30
48.00
459.40
150.00
117.00
2,195.50
1.436.75
2,550.00
1.880.75
249.00

(9

2

<
9
<
9

$3,500.00
12,500.00

26
3

32.00

485
838

431.00
2» 514.00

22,593

17,622.54

2,540

148,976

7,826.74

5,707

500

110.00,
1,536.00

60,000
55,000

180.00
137.50
2,510.35
75.00

8

<
9

8
89
484
346
203
5,524

(9
<
9

3.500.00
12.500.00

(9

3,875.00

1.324.00
120.00
2.400.00
3.300.00
3,345.60
19,200.44
82,413.05

780.00

24.00
639.00
201.30
48.00
459.40
150.00
117.00
2,195.50
1.436.75
2.550.00
1.880.75
249.00

3.875.00

60
800
300
223
1,715

2.104.00
120.00

8
<
9

22.25
121.20
342.00
203.00
903.60
1,526.80

M 00.00
i Enumeration impracticable.

50,500.00

2.400.00
3.332.00
3,345.60
19,200.44
82,413.05

8,111.00

23,078
838
2,540

18,053.54
2.514.00
8.111.00

816.91

154,683

<
9

50.500.00
8,643.65

(9

500

60,000
55,000

8

(9

6

484
346
203
5,524

1,215.66
27.00

(,)

(9

<

110.00

1,536.00
180.00
137.50
2.510.35
75.00

S A E A D FEDERAL PRISONS
TT
N

Gloves and mittens_____ pairs..
Handkerchiefs......... ........
Hats and caps................ .
Overalls____ ____ ______
Pajamas and nightgowns.
Pants_____ ____________
Shirts, work___________
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs—
Underwear...
Miscellaneous.
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings................. ...........
New, other than buildings and
roads........................................
Farm, garden and dairy:
Cattle...............................head..
Com________________ bushels..
Hay____________________tons—
Hogs____________ ____ ..h ead ..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous dairy___________
Miscellaneous farm______•
_____
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood_________________
Mattresses___________________
Tables..........................................
Land development: Land improve*
ment.............................................. .
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes_______ ___________
Miscellaneous____ ______
Printing and binding:
Envelopes______________
Letterheads_____________
Miscellaneous___________
Repair and shop work......... .
Textiles and textile products:
Bi

22.25

121.20

342.00
203.00
903.60
2,741.80
27.00
<,400.00

* Less than one tenth of 1.
O
CJt

T a b le

A*— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in Stale and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS—Continued
M I CHIG AN—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE REFORMATORY

Baskets_______________________
Clothing:
Coats, prison______________
Pants, prison_________________
Shirts, work........................ .......
Construction: New buildings-------Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_____ ______ _____ head.
Com________________ bushels.
Hay__________ _________tons.
Hogs--------------- --------- -.head.
Potatoes................. 100 pounds.
Wheat.......................... bushels_
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm---------------Furniture and furnishings:
Benches....... .............................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.......................................—
Chairs, wood................... ..........
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Desks_____ _________________
Tables............... ............. ...........
Miscellaneous............................
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous.......................................

$11.00

2.5
8.0
7.0
865.5
200.0
1.0
5.0
2.7
4.0
8.0
1.0
30.4
34.3

2,808
3,077
15,558

9,828.00
7,692.50
7,678.65

$140,000.00

$2,626.60

3,215,458 989,133.24

2,051.54
500
273
193
3,753
775

200.00

2,730.00
3.360.95
3.127.50
395.25
23,127.31
7.866.96

1,254

$2,637.60

2,808
3,077
3,231.016
1

9,828.00
7,692.50
996,811.89
140,000.00

38
500
273
193
3,753
775

1,248

2,051.54
200.00
2,730.00
3.360.95
3,127.50
395.25
23,127.31
7.866.96

8
1

25.50

144
54,989
357
223
7,786
0)

2,821.84
107,120.00
7,337.15
6,829.50
48,083.95
16,221.70

25.50
2.8
88.0
6.8
7.0
39.0
14.4

123
5,094
357
171
620
0)
0)

2,605.84
20,471.44
7,337.15
5.680.50
12,544.77
7,748.60
654.05

21
49,895

216.00
86,648. 56

52
7,166

1,149.00
35,539.18
8,473.10

(*
5

(0

654.05

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Bakery products, commercial
pounds..




6.0

158,378

7,918.90

158,378

7,918.90

P ISO
R N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

2574°-

B&skots
_____
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms..................................—
Brushes...................................—
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural lime
stone_________________ tons..
Miscellaneous________ ____ —
Clothing:
Aprons_____ ____ ____________
Coats.

Mattresses__________________
Pillows_____________________
Tables______ ______________
Miscellaneous__________ ____
1Enumeration impracticable.




11

30.10

1,248

2,626.60

1,259

2,656.70

6*469
9,725

3,330.54
3,801.23

275
152,525

253.90
13,525.99

6,744
162,250

3,584.44
17,327.22

348

869.69
31.00

58

151.62
27,182.92

406

1,021.31
27,213.92

4.0
17.0
1.0
13.1
2.0
.5
.5
1.6
10.0
236.9
2.4
.5
25.1
875.0
4.9
.5
25.9

0)
3,141
5,341
506
2,009
39,224
7,663
98,808
21,613
447
666
17,953
33,497
3,400
120
39,800

(9

(0

992.53
15,886.32
639.00
233.31
1,275.51
2,479.32
11,527.40 ______
17,623.60
2,194.00 _____
468.37
30,527.16
18,776.24
2,550.00 ______
___
250.00
18,608.04
991.41

21.5
669.5

0)

4.0

<
9
186
1.579
1,957
1,424
1,715
27,911
3,183

7.3
8.0
22.7
30.1
5.0
58.7
6.0
121.1
433.2

8

2.1
2.8
168.0
6.8
7.0
4.0
.3
77.8
37.6

206
123
5.580
357
171
1,867
197
620
<*)

1
0

3

3,141
992.53
5,344
15,903.42
639.00
506
233.31
2,009
39,224
1.275.51
2,502.42
7,669
11.527.40
98,808
297,840 167,396.75
2.194.00
447
468.37
666
31,079.11
18,618
3,248,955 ,007,909.48
2.550.00
3,400
121
261.25
18,623.04
39,824
1,558.36
(0

17.10

6

(0

23.10

276,227 149,773.15
665
551.95
3,215,458 989,133. 24

(0

1
24

11.25
15.00
566.95

16,008.00
499,992.00

(9

16,008.00
499,992.00

3,875.00

(0

3.875.00

26

780.00

45
3

6.432.5
437. r
19,421.1
26,900. £
3.345.6
25,441.7
1,840.0
117,076. r
245,331. £

212
1,579
2,002
1,427
1,715
27,911
3,183
0)
0)

145.14
32.00

0)

22,210.89

22.75
8
229.25
23
72,492 104,275.90
54
6
____ ______

1,165.75
18.75

9,735

43,760.63
13,370.35

(9

_________

7.212.51
437.34
19,567.03
26,932.55
3,345.60
25,441.75
1.840.05
117,076.38
267,542.45

214
146
78,072
357
225
1,873
197
10,355
(0

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Gloves and mittens___________
Handkerchiefs............................
Hats and caps......... .................
Hosiery................. ........... pairs..
Overalls_____ ______________ _
Overcoats................................ .
Pajamas and nightgowns-------Pants........................................ .
Shirts, work............ ................. .
Shoes, repaired................ pairs..
Suits________ ________________
Underwear____ ______________
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings.......................... .
New, other than buildings and
roads......... ........................... Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head_.
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay_____________ ______ tons..
Hogs.......... .......................head..
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes........................ ..d o ___
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy..................
Miscellaneous farm_____ ______
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches.......................................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, etc_______
Chairs, wood..................... .........
Davenports, sofas, etc_________

2.5
9.0
33.0

2,059.10
2,835.09
125,178.94
7,337.15
6,846.25
5.459.05
157.60
56.305.40
33,853.67

O

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

g
00

MICHIGAN—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

VaJue

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

ALL INSTITUTIONS—continued
5,408

37,428 $18,464.31

$8,575.78

21.0
23.0
18.0

148,976

7,826.74

43.2
26.4
.1
22.2

16,724
59,648
5
0)

2,542.54
1,591.83
23.60
11,260.48

12,315
2.0
48.7 3,035,516
134.0
291,777
2.3
5.8
(0

9,160.94
224,624.67

2.9
1.6
1.1
35.1
.1

16,671
582,760
916,460

144
1,000
10,150

38.75
63.00
32,479.20

72.0
36.0
4.0
.9

155,383
80,222
16,762
8,412

73,127.68
42,142.56
3.352.40
1,485.66

42,836

$27,04a 09

5,707

816.91

0)
(0
154,683

50,600.00
10,000.00
8.643.65

458,996
1,598,672
15
0)

49,938.32
38,257.19
79.74
8,699.28

475,720
1,658,320
20
0)

52,480.86
39,849.02
103.24
19,959.76

1,113,010
25,844
(0

48,983.57
1,609.35
2,636.52

12,315
3,035,516
1,113,010
317,621
<
l)

9,160.94
224,624.67
48,983.57
5,155.47
6,553.63

16,671
582,760
916,450

1.372.40
1,231.3
649.01
29,821.59
75.00

.65
12,124,690 763,855.47
9.20
3

145
12,125,690
10,153

39.40
763,918.47
32,488.40

72.91
8,235.41

155,532
122,701
16,762
8,412

73,200.50
50,377.97
3.352.40
1.485.66

1.372.40
1,231.35
649.01
29,821.59
75.00

.1
304.0
5.0

$50,500.00
10,000.00

3,646.12
3,917.11

149
42,479

STATES, 1932




16.8

I XJNITED
N

Highway markers_______________
Land development:
Land improvement__________
Reforestation............................
Laundry, commercial........pounds.
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes........................................ .
Lumber........... ........board feet.
Millwork.................................. .
Miscellaneous_______________
Metal products:
Aluminum ware_____________
Auto license tags____________
Electric switch boxes________
Tags, miscellaneous_________
Miscellaneous_______________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound_____
Envelopes__________________
Letterheads_________________
Miscellaneous_______________
Repair and shop work............ .......
Textiles and textile products:
Bags..........................................
Binder twine________pounds.
Blankets____________________
Cotton yard goods:
Light____________pounds.
Heavy...............—___ do__.
Duck and canvas----------- do__
Pillowcases_________________

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Sheets_______________________
Towels............................I___ I .
Yarn, cotton and wool.pounds.
Miscellaneous textile products. _
Toys...........................................
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous labor only_____
Total_________________

3.01

i6

137.8
38.7
145.1
36.5
5.6

10,745
203
41,175
345,795
0)

7,622.73
203.00
5,567.24
53,618.25
%
152.03
23,423.63

(0

1,216,015.36

4,164.0

8,653
0)
4r

1,655.35
2,363.43
70,542.21
18,764.84
2,616.81

10,745
203
41,175
354,448
0)
45,338
?>
0)

375.00_______ 2,407,345.65

7,622.73
203.00
5,567.24
55,273.60
4,515.46
70,542.21
42,188.47
2,616.81
4,203,736.01

MINNESOTA

.1
3.2
1.0
2.5
3.5
2.2
2.0
.3

457
1,109
1,147
2,507
1,498
2,848
2,190
(0

45.00
1,502.00
478.00
1,168.00
1,621.00
1,011.00
932.00
136.00

L0
1.3
1.4
4.1
1.4
3.5
.1
1.6
22.4

45
2,000
110
220
745
4,796
216
0)
(0

702.00
1,000.00
1,100.00
3,276.00
1,118.00
2,800.00
108.00
1,258.00
17,818.00

.4
.6
20.1

1,071.00
1,553.00
55,667.00

645.7
.3

119
345,000
0)
11,300
1,225

734.00
147.00

26,644,000 1,671,773.00

69.4
2.8
2.2
1.0

10,164
3,427
9,981
(0

1,015.00
1,285.00
1,017.00
466.00

2,624,659 247,547.00

y, u $479,748.00
86,646.00
(*5

9,050 $481,035.00
87,600.00
0)
457
1,109
1,147
2,507
1,498
2,848
2,190
(0

114.00

45.00
1,502.00
478.00
1,168.00
1,621.00
1,011.00
932.00
136.00

54
2,000
110
220
745
4,796
216

816.00
1,000.00
1,100.00
3,276.00
1,118.00
2,800.00
108.00
1,258.00
17,818.00

0)

PRISONS




$1,287.00
954.00

0)

A D FEDERAL
N

1 Enumeration impracticable.

21

138.6
25.3

STATE

STATE PRISON

Agricultural implements__________
Agricultural implements, parts.......
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats_________ ______________
Hats and caps________________
Overalls_______ ______________
Pants________________________
Shirts, work__________________
Underwear____ ______________
Miscellaneous................ .............
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay-------------------- --------- tons..
Hogs------------------ --------- head..
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do___
Wheat______________ bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy........ ...........
Miscellaneous farm___________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound______
Letterheads.................. ..............
Miscellaneous.............................
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine............... pounds..
Pillowcases..................................
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage.....................................
Sheets____ ___________________
Towels........................ ...............
Miscellaneous textile products..

1,071.00
119
1,553.00
345,000
55,667.00
0)
26,655,300 1,672,507.00
147.00
1,225
2,634,823 248,562.00
3,427
1,285.00
1,017.00
9,981
466.00
(0

O
CD

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932,

State, system, and institution—Continued

STATE PEISONS—Continued
MINNESOTA—Continued

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

State account

Piece price

3
H
H

Total

Contract

00

o
Num­
ber

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value
>

w

o

STATE REFORMATORY FOR MEN

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone building...................tons..
Stone, crushed__________do___
Clothing:
Aprons.......................................
Coats_________ ______________
Hats and caps............................
Hosiery______ _________ pairs.
Overalls................. ...... ...........
Overcoats...................................
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants..........................................
Shirts, work...............................
Shoes, new...................... pairs.
Shoes, repaired_________do___
Suits___ _________ ___________
Miscellaneous....................... —
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings...........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Hay................................... tons..
Hogs_____ _______ _____ head—
M ilk...................... 100 pounds—
Potatoes............................do—
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous farm............... .
Miscellaneous livestock_______




w
50.0
4.0

1,456
6,600

.4
15.7
.6
1.1
4.4
4.2
2.0
23.4
1.4
8.1
7.9
13.1
1.3

629
3,407
1,741
5,988
3,884
328
1,577
7,856
2,213
1,847
5,084
r~
(0

318.
12,239.
507.
867.
3,408.
3,041.
1,511.
18,143.
1,107.
3,878.
3,814.
9,025.
—

4.0
62.0
2.8
7.3
7.2
20.4
13.4
.2
26.1
.1

1,456
6,600

$62,160.00
5,500.00
$8.00

81.00
23

828.00
(0

36
3781
262
4,895
10,807
172

1,008.00
2,610.00
2.562.00
7.343.00
4.825.00
86.00
9.362.00
49.00

92.00
120.00

$3,300.00
203,300.00

$62,160.00
5.500.00

629
3,412
1,741
5,988
3,884
336
1, 577
7,879
2,213
1,872
5,084
1,055
0)

318.00
12.247.00
507.00
867.00
3.408.00
3,122 00
1.511.00
18.235.00
1.107.00
3.998.00
3.814.00
9.853.00
1.023.00

0)

6

36
378
262
4,895
10,807
172
T

8

3.300.00
203,300.00
1.008.00
2.610.00
2.562.00
7.343.00
4.825.00
86.00
9.362.00
49.00

d
3

3

a
u
00

I

00
C
O
to

00

4.7
.8
3.5
4.0

1,935
107
C '
>

1,935
107
430

6,637.00
1,160.00
4,947.00
5,591.00

310.00
261.00
3.754.00
5.546.00

58
69,500

310.00
261.00
3,754.00
5,546.00

1,054
1,660
6,816

118.00
863.00
850.00
193.00

78
1,080
18
343
1,549
2,964
1,836
1,140

46.00
674.00
2.00
1,831.00
659.00
1,551.00
1,035.00
500.00
38.00

5
183
18
38
740
120
75

109.00
92.00
167.00
221.00
1,110.00
74.00
37.00
996.00

5
46
61
156

70.00
10.00
30.00
23.00
615.00

9,050

481,035.00
87,600.00

1,456
6,600

62,160.00
5,500.00

6.637.00
1.160.00
4.947.00
5.591.00

.9
.7
10.4
16.0

69,500

.2
1.1
1.1
.5

1,054
1,660
6,816
0)

118.00
863.00
850.00
193.00

.2
2.8
(2
)
7.7
2.8
6.6
4.4
2.1
.2

43
1,080
18
343
1,549
2,964
1,836
1,140
(0

32.00
674.00
2.00
1.831.00
659.00
1.551.00
1.035.00
500.00
38.00

.3
.3
.5
.6
3.2
.2
.1
2.8

1
183
18
9
740
120
75

(9

18.00
92.00
167.00
150.00
1.110.00
74.00
37.00
996.00

8

(9

(9

STATE REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Gloves and mittens......... pairs.
Overcoats...................................
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Shirts, dress...............................
Shirts, work_________________
Underwear____ _____________
Miscellaneous...........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________ ________ head.
Com ________________ bushels.
Hay____________________tons.
Hogs___________ _______ head.
M ilk....................... 100 pounds.
Potatoes......... - ................ d o ...
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous farm...................
Textiles and textile products:
Blankets______ _____________
Pillowcases_________________
Towels....................... .................
Miscellaneous textile products..

(9

.3
(*)

.1
.1
2.6

(9

138.6
25.3

46
61
156

(9

35

14.00

(0
91.00
71.00

0)
70.00

10.00
30.00
23.00
130.00

(9

1.287.00
954.00

(9

485.00

(0

9,029 479,748.00
86,646.00

<
9

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Agricultural implements.......... ......
Agricultural implements, parts___
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building....... ..........tons.
Stone, crushed--------------- do_
_




50.0
4.0

1,456
6,600

62,160.00
5.500.00

i Enumeration impracticable.

* Less than one tenth of 1.

S A E A D FEDERAL PRISONS
TT
N

Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, w ood............................
Davenports, sofas, etc...............
Tables........................................
Miscellaneous............................
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound--------Letterheads...............................
Miscellaneous............................
Repair and shop work....... .............
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases-...............................
Sheets.........................................
Towels.......................................
Miscellaneous textile products.

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

£
60

MINNESOTA—Continued

State use

employed Number

Value

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

a l l in s t it u t io n s — c o n t in u e d

Clothing:
Aprons.
Coats...
Gloves and mittens......... pairs.
Hats and caps...........................
Hosiery______ _________ pairs.
Overalls_________________ ____
Overcoats. ............................. ...
Pajamas and nightgowns-------Pants..........................................
Shirts, dress...............................
Shirts, work..............................
Shoes, new. .....................pairs.
Shoes, repaired............. . d o . . .
Suits__________ _____________
Underwear.................................
Miscellaneous_______ ____ ____
Construction:
Alterations and installations....
New buildings.................... .......
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn............ —........... .bushels..
Hay____________ _______ tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do—
Wheat______________ bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy................ .
Miscellaneous farm.............. —
Miscellaneous livestock-----------




0.7
18.9
2.8
.1
1.6
1.1
6.9
11.9
4.8
26.9
6.6
8.0
8.1
7.9
13.1
4.1
1.8

1,129
4,516
1,080
18
2,888
5,988
6,391
671
3,126
9,354
2,964
6,897
1,847
5,084
986
3,330

(0

82
2,183
506
491
6,380
15,723
463
0)
(l)

1.728.00
1.092.00
3.877.00
5.988.00
9.571.00
7.699.00
231.00
1,258.00
28,176.00
49.00

$14.00
8.00

8

81.00

23

92.00

25

6

120.00

69

(9

4.0
62.0
4.1
1.6
9.2
11.9
25.0
17.1
.4
1.6
51.3
.1

35
5

$395.00
13,741.00
674.00
2.00
985.00
867.00
4.576.00
4.872.00
2.170.00
19,764.00
1.551.00
3.153.00
3.878.00
3.814.00
9.025.00
1.432.00
1.197.00

828.00

1,164
4,521
1,080
18
2,888
5,988
6,391
679
3,126
9,377
2,964
6,897
1,872
5,084
1,055
3,330

$409.00
13,749.00
674.00
2.00
985.00
867.00
4.576.00
4.953.00
2,170.00
19,856.00
1,551.00
3.153.00
3.998.00
3.814.00
9.853.00
1,432.00
1,197.00

6

3,300.00
203,300.00

95
2,183
506
520
6,380
15,723
463
(l)
(i)
0)

1.933.00
1.092.00
3.877.00
6.059.00
9.571.00
7.699.00
231.00
1,258.00
28,176.00
49.00

<
9
(9

$3,300.00
203,300.00
13

205.00

29

71.00

P IS N L B R I tT IT D STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N E

Institution, articles produced, and
unit

Number and value of articles produced under each system

Average
num­
ber of
pris-

4.7
.8
3.5
4.0

1,935
107
430
0)

6.637.00
1.160.00
4.947.00
5.591.00

1,935
107
430
0)

6.637.00
1.160.00
4.947.00
5.591.00

1.3
1.3
30.5
16.0

177
414,500

1.381.00
1.814.00
59,421.00
5.546.00

177
414,500

1.381.00
1.814.00
59,421.00
5.546.00

645.7
.3
.5

11,300
2,325

275.00

69.4
4.0
3.4
4.1

10,164
5,148
16,953
(0

1.015.00
2.178.00
1.890.00
789.00

8

Total................... ..................... 1,321.0

8
26,644,000 1,671,773.00
70.00
5

734.00

2,624,659 247,547.00
0)

295,044.00

485.00

26,655,300 1,672,507.00
70.00
5
2,325
275.00
2,634,823
5,148
16,953
(0

206,600.00..............2,487,688.00

248,562.00
2.178.00
1.890.00
1.274.00
2,989,332.00

MISSISSIPPI
STATE PENITENTIARY

Clay, cement and stone roducts:
Brick and building tile thousands.
15.0
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone_________________ tons—
22.0
Clothing:
Overalls______________________
2.0
Pants._____ __________________
6.0
Shirts, work__________________
1.0
Underwear_____ ______________
3.0
Uniforms, prison.........................
8.0
Construction:
New buildings.............................
29.0
New, other than buildings and
roads.........................................
30.0
Farm, garden and dairy:
Corn________________ bushels. _
87.0
Cotton______ __________ bales— 809.0
Cottonseed____ _________ tons.. 146.0
Hay______ ____________ do___
103.0
Miscellaneous farm.....................
94.0
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous, textile products______
15.0
T o ta l_____________________ 1,370.0
1Enumeration impracticable.




650

$4,875.00

650

1,074
5,408
2,047
5,449
4,016

1,645. 60
6,667.95
1,457.60
3,208.00
9,723.50
1
0)

51,950
2,130
0)
0)

6,426.00
1.645.60
6,667.95
1.457.60
3,208.00
9,723.50
32,000.00

$32,000.00
14,400.00

0)

20,780.00

14,400.00

46,400.00

233,947.24

51,950
6,919
3,027
2,130
0)

20.780.00
192,970.39
34,550.85
24.495.00
22,479.50

0)

6,919 192,970.39
3,027 34,550.86

24,495.00
22,479. 50
17,983.91
113,316.06

$4,875.00

1

$6,426.00

3,213
1,074
5,408
2,047
5,449
4,016

3,213

17,983.91
393,663.30

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood............ .............
Davenports, sofas, e t c . . . ._
_
Tables._______ ____________
Miscellaneous______________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound____
Letterheads.................. ..........
Miscellaneous______________
Repair and shop work__________
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine________ pounds..
Blankets____________________
Pillowcases..................................
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage______________ ____
Sheets_______________________
Towels.......................................
Miscellaneous textile products..

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by Stale, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued
MISSOURI
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

labor

Num­
ber

State account

STATE PENITENTIARY

45,408

$90,860.80

593,868
45,408

$90,860.80
9,838.40

59,950.26

33,333

59,950.26

9,846.67
29,540
49,683 136,628.25
362,991 229,124.70

29,540
50,892
418,767
250
1,049,318
998,394
139,905
7

9,846.67
139,953.00
264,177.19
93. 75
803,842.50
291,198. 25
206,359.88
608,107.40

504
81
958
0)

23.395.56
1,286.01
25,003.92
83.880.56

12,748
15,040
9,701
1,276
0)
20,470

43.104.00
95.071.00
92.728.00
5,747.00
25.380.00
6,215.70

2,304,695 126,758.23

2,304,695

126,758.23

12.130.00
33.147.00

121,300
(0

12.130.00
33.147.00

$9,838.40
33,333

34.0
6.2
74.9
140.9
.1
429.1
245.8
79.0
288.0

1,209
55,776
250
33,708
40,752
9,154

3,324.75
35,052.49
93.75
42.135.00
11.886.00
13,502.15

94.0
5.0
100.0
228.0

504
81
958

23.395.56
1,286.01
25,003.92
83.880.56

29.2
64.2
62.6
3.9
17.1
11.0
37.0
2.0
16.0

(})

20,470

$608,107. 40

1,015,610 761,707.50
957,642 279,312.25
130,751 192,857.73

12,748
15,040
9,701
1,276
(0

6,215.70

121,300
0)

$43,104.00
95.071.00
92.728.00
5,747.00
25.380.00

s ta te s, 1632




56.0
3.0

i united
n

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms................................ .......
Mops.......................................... .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed..................... tons..
Clothing:
Children's play suits_________
C oats-........................................
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants.......................................... .
Shirts, work.............. .................
Shoes, new....................... pairs..
Construction: New buildings..........
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...............................head..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs........................... ...... head..
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, fiber_________________
Chairs, wood..............................
Davenports, sofas, etc................
Tables..........................................
Miscellaneous________________
Highway markers.................. ...........
Textile and textile products:
Binder twine............... pounds..
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage......................pounds. _
Other manufactured products_
_

prison

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE REFORM ATOUT

138
385
326
1,648
1,113
279
1,489
6,800

?89.55

430.00
818.95
6,100.00
521.33 .......... ....................
1,197.20
2,424.00
1,952.34
598.15
16,199.01

9,838.40

0)

551.40
611.04

111.84
553.40
173.64
289.36

45,408

33

492.62

22
2,468
202
153
1.709
(9

1,013.95
1,197.20
2,424.00
2,503.74
598.15
16,810.05
111.84
553.40
173.64
289.36

0)

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms................................ ......
Mops..........................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands.
Stone, crushed.................. tons.
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Children’s play suits..... ...........
Coats............ .............................
Hats and caps......... .................
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants______ ________________
Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, new____ ________ pairs.
Shoes, repaired................. d o ...
Construction: New buildings.........

138

1.1
430.1

593,868
45,408

90,860.80
9,838.40

75
42,032

806.62
69,518.69

138
29,540
51,277
326
420,415
1,—
.,049,597
999,883
139,905
6,800
7

27.60
9,846.67
141,000.30
56.38
265.146.19
483.30
804,272.50
292.017.20
206,359.88
6,100.00
608,107.40

27.60
4,372.05
56.38
36,021.49
483.30
42,565.00
12,704.95
13,502.15
6,100.00

90,860.80

75
806.62
42,032 69,518.69

1,594
326
57,424
1,363
33,987
42,241
9,154
6,800

593,868

29,540 9,846.67
49,683 136,628.25
362,991 229,124.70
1,015,610 761,707.50
957,642 279,312.25
130,751 192,857.73
7

608,107.45

PRISONS

855
1,466
2,557
(0

11

27.60
1,047.30
56.38
969.00
389.55
430.00
818.95
6,100.00

855
1,466
2,557

27.60
1,047.30
56. as
969.00

806.62
9,568.43

A D FEDERAL
N

11
2,468
202
120
1,709
<>
*

S06.62
9,568,43

75
8,699
138
385
326
1,648
1,113
279
1,489
6,800

75
8,699

STATE

Clay, cement and stone products:
Brick and building tilo
thousands.
Stone, crushed__________ tons.
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats_______________________
Hats and caps_______________
Overalls....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants_______ _____ __________
Shirts, work.................... ..........
Shoes, repaired................ pairs.
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn________________ bushels.
Hay______. . . __________ tons.
Hogs______________ ____ head.
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous farm...................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases........... ................ .....
Sheets............ ............................
Towels......... ..............................
Miscellaneous textile products.

i Enumeration impracticable.




Ol

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PBISONS— Continued

£
05

MISSOURI—Continued

a l l in s t it u t io n s —

Public works and
ways
Num-

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

continued

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...............................head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay____________________tons..
Hogs---------------------------- head—
Wheat.............. ........... bushels..
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, fiber....... ...................... .
Chairs, wood................... ..........
Davenports, sofas, etc...... .........
Tables.........................................
Miscellaneous.............................
Highway markers________________
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine............... pounds .
Pillowcases..................................
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage____________pounds..
Sheets_____________________
Towels____ ______ ___________
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products------Total.......................................




Number and value of articles produced under each system

96.0
6.0
17.0
103.0
3.0
301.0
29.2
64.2
62.6
3.9
17.1
1L0

515
2,468
283
1,078
1,709

<
9

$492.62

$23,916.89
1,197.20
3,710.01
26,956.26
598.15
100,079.57

33
(9

551.40

(9

611."04
12,748
15,040
9,701
1,276

20,470

(9

6,215.70

37.0
1.0

855

2.0
1.5
L0
2.5
16.0

1,466
2*557

553.40
173.64
289.36

121,300

<
9

289,473.34

(9
$608,107.40

33,147.00
262,030.00

20,470

43.104.00
95.071.00
92.728.00
5,747.00
25.380.00
6,215.70
126,758.23
111.84

121,300
1,466
2,557

12,130.00

1,944,353.50 ________

12,748
15,040
9,701
1,276

$24,409.51
1,197.20
3,710.01
27,507.66
598.15
100,690.61

2,304,695
855

$43,104.00
95.071.00
92.728.00
5, 747.00
25.380.00

2,304,695 126,758.23

111.84

2, 222.0

2,468
283
1,111
1,709

12.130.00
553.40
173.64
289.36
33.147.00

(9

3,103,96424

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

M ONTANA
STATE PRISON

Total..




99
36
12
1,957
2,278
900
40

$24.95
126.00
2.40
1,868.63
1,368. “
1,350. 00
24.00
$83,500.00

16
840
408
6,047
5,040
924

813.00
8.400.00
6.360.00
14,749. 20
5.040.00
554.40
11,049.45
5,610.17
13.30

99
36
12
1,957
2,278
900
40
0)
1

$360.00

(*)

$24.95
126.00
2.40
1,868.63
1,368.60
1,350.00
24.00
360.00
83,500.00
813.00
8,400.00
6,360.00
14,749.20
5,040. C
O
565.80
11,924.34
6,399.32
13.30
900.00

19

8

11.40
874.89
789.15

7,500

900.00

16
840
408
6,047
5,040
943
0)
(0
0)
7,500

305
<>
*

10.50
268.00

53,333
(0

1,355.53
967.00

53,028
0)

1,345.03
699.00

223,618
20
340

13,137.55
12.00
100.00

223,618
20
340

13,137.55
12.00
100.00

18,000
0)

45.00
4.00

18,000
<9

45.00
4.00

52
12

13.00
12.00
71.00
86.00
1,600.00
30,000.00

52
12
259

13.00
12.00
71.00
86.00
1,600.00
33,660.00

(0 ‘
(l)
0)
107.0

104,478.68

* Enumeration impracticable.

(0
83,500.00

(0

3,660.00

(l)

6,873.94

194,852.62
1 Less than one tenth of 1.

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Clothing:
Aprons______________
Coats _
Hats and caps_______________
Overalls. _____ _______________
Shirts, work__________ _____ ..
Shoes, repaired___ ._____ pairs.
Underwear.................................
Miscellaneous, labor only....... .
Construction: New buildings_____
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle-------------------------- head.
Hay------------------------------tons.
Hogs__............................. head.
M ilk........... ........... 100 pounds.
Potatoes....................... __.do.__
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous dairy...... ...........
Miscellaneous farm...................
Miscellaneous livestock.......... .
Laundry, commercial____ pounds.
Lumber and timber products:
Lumber................... board feet.
Miscellaneous_______________
Metal products:
Auto license tags_____________
Galvanized ware_____________
Tinware_____________________
Printing and binding:
Letterheads.................... ...........
Miscellaneous....................... .....
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases_______ _____ _____
Sheets____ __________________
Towels______________________
Miscellaneous textile products _
Other manufactured products____
Miscellaneous, labor only________

T able

A,— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1988, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

h
0°

NEBRASKA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Total

Contract

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

500

$500.00

0)

3.0

.1
3.3
8.3
11.8
.5
2.2
.3
3.2
3.0

<
9
(9

3.0
43.0

.4
4.0
.9
1.0
4.6
.7
.3
4a i

600
293,928
279,330

26
3,180
60
237
3,618
2,460

8
6
12
20
16
1
29

(0

4

$540.00
246,553.80
83,799.00
874.04

600
293,928
279,330
500

(9

$8,500.00
190,500.00

(,)

9,000.00

(9

513.96
1.272.00
612.00
2,094.35
7.060.00
1.230.00
554.40
29,785.60

4

8

(9

35.95

<
9

5,000.00

185
142
92
17
136
15

$1,212.45
2,904.29
4,143.37
185.50
778.55
141.00
1,239.86

(9
<
9

8.500.00
190,500.00
9.000.00

26
3,180
60
237
3,618
2,460

21.50
74.45
443.62
648.13
11.50
84.40

$540.00
246,553.80
83,799.00
500.00
874.04

6
197
162
108
18
165
15

513.96
1.272.00
612.00
2,094.35
7.060.00
1.230.00
554.40
29,785.60
21.50
1.286.90
3.347.91
4,791.50
197.00
862.95
141.00
1,275.81
5.000.00

STATES, 1932




1.0
320.0
128.0
1.0
L0

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Overalls______________________
Pants________________ _______
Shirts, work.................................
Shoes, repaired................ pairs—
Miscellaneous, labor only..........
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings— ........................
New, other than buildings and
roads.......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head—
Corn________________ bushels.Hay____________ ____ _tons..
Hogs_______ _________head—
M ilk_____________100 pounds__
Wheat..........................bushels__
Miscellaneous dairy........... ........
Miscellaneous farm___________
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches_____ ______ __________
Chairs, fiber............................. ...
Chairs, wood...............................
Davenports, sofas, etc_________
Mattresses..................... .............
Pillows______________________
Tables_______________________
Miscellaneous________________
Land development: Land improvement..................... ..........................

Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous____ ________________ _
Repair and shop work____________
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous............................... .......
Other manufactured products_____
Miscellaneous labor only__________

1.2
1.8
2.3
15.0
5.0

(9
(9
(9
(9

462.85
319.14

8

38.77
409.64

1,027.09
52,489.00

8

61.28
349.58

(9

134.75

501.62
728.78

(9

1,088.37
52,838.58
1,693.75

$1,693.75

STATE REFORMATORY FOR MEN

.3
432
12
313
800

.6
133.0
.3
1.8

302.40
9.60 .......... ----------------- -----------156.50
480.00

.1
9.7 — ........... --------------.2
.5
7.0
.3
2.6
1.5
4.0
.3
34.2
.1
.4
.3
1.3
1.9
.8
.1
.1
2.3
1.3

13
6,271

(9

190
35
2,214
565

(9

15,600
16,000

<
9
427
704

<
9

(9
(9

196.00
2,508.40
94.00
1,971.00
564.52
4,320.00
282.50
12,109.22
42.12
36.00
148.40
50.00

2

<
9
149,114

134.75

432
149,126
313
800

131,068.40.

(9

100.00
40,000.00
700.00

100.00

40,000.00

<
9
(9

(9

6
73
51
106

172.96
36.50
51.00
547.00
1,261.24

840

212.02
29.43

16,000
4,200

302.40
131,078.00
156.50
480.00

700.00

19
6,344

(9

241
141
2,214
565
(0
840

2,544.90
145.00
2.518.00
1,825.76
4.320.00
282.50
12,321.24
29.43

8

137.75
93.50

85.32
45.45
225.60
302.40

427
704

8

427.00
84.48
87.00
1,500.00

31,600
20,200

427.00
84.48
87.00
1,637.75
446.00

36
236
60
127

43.20
9.45
77.20
252.40

9.00
236.00
6.00

(9
<
9

(9

352.50

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Miscellaneous__________________
Clothing:
Overalls_____________________
Pants._____ _________________
Shirts, work__________________
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs..
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings............................
New, other than buildings and
roads. .......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... headCorn............................. bushels..
Farm hands hired o u t .............
Hay............ ............. ..........tons..
Hogs__________ ________ head-.
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels. .
Miscellaneous farm....................
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Printing and binding:
Envelopes...................................
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous____ ___________
Repair and shop work____ ________
Textiles and textile products:
Sheets_____ _________ _________
Towels_____ ________ _________
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products..........
Miscellaneous, labor only.................

8

<
9

STATE REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Gloves and mittens.........pairs..
Pajamas and nightgowns______




0)
(*)

.8
.3

36
236
60
127

9.00
236.00
6.00
112.00

i Enumeration impracticable.

* Less than one tenth of 1.

112.00

CO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

to

o

STATE PRISONS— Continued
NEBRASKA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and

Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

8TATE REFORMATORY FOR W O M EN—

continued
Clothing—Continued
Underwear................ ..............
Miscellaneous..................... ....
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Com________________ bushels. _
Hay______________ _____ tons..
Hogs___________ _______ head—
M ilk______ ______ 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous dairy........... —
Miscellaneous farm...............
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.............. ..............
Sheets.....................................
Miscellaneous textile products—
Other manufactured products—

0.3
.6
1.0
.3
1.5
1.3
4.8
.7
2.3
(*)

.1
.8

(*)

0)

268

8
(0

464.00
180.00
1,260.00
765.26
3,115.98
501.26
1,059.83

48
48

0)

28.00
180.00
1,260.00
88.00
3,115.98
375.00
1,059.28
16.80
48.00
199.10

3
450
105
8
1,597

$140.25
193.50

13
450
105
71
1,597
0)
0)

$140.25
193.50
10

$436.00
677.26
126.26
.55

94.48
11.55

0)
0)

16.80
48.00
293.58
11.55

134.75

(0

134.75

ALI. INSTITUTIONS

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Miscellaneous____ _____________
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Dresses........................................
Gloves and mittens.........pairs.
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants_______ ________________
Shirts, work------------------------Shoes repaired------ -------- pairs..




.3
(*)

.8\

(*)
.3
453.0
128.3
2.8

0)
36
236
60
432
127
12
313
1,300

9.00
236.00
6.00
302.40
112.00

9.60
156.50
980.00

600

$540.00

443,042
279,330

377,622.20
83,799.00

36
236
60
1,032
127
443,054
279,643
1,300

9.00
236.00
6.00
842.40
112.00
377,631.80
83,955.50
980.00

P IS N LA O
R O
B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
Value
ployed Number

0)
0)

3.2
1.9
11.3
.3
5.0
3.8
13.4
1.0
LO
76.6

42
9,901
0)
355
280
7,429
3.025
0)
0)
6j
12
20
16
1

9,700.00

737.96
3,960.40
94.00
3,843.00
2,746.87
14,495.98
1,512.50
929.40
42,954.10

.1
3.3
8.3
11.8
.5
2.2
.3
3.2

$8,600.00
230,500.00

0)

3.1
52.7

0)
0)

840

(0

462.85

0)

.4
.3
1.3
3.7

15,600
16,0 0

42.12
36.00
148.40
369.14

16,000
4,200

(»)

.9
.1
3.2
17.3
6.3

830.0

48
475
704

8

1 Enumeration impracticable.

6
197
162
108
18
165
15

1,212.45
2,904.29
4,143.37
185.50
778.55
141.00
1,239.86

<>
*

38.77

15,868.79

21.50
1.286.90
3.347.91
4.791.50
197.00
862.95
141.00
1,275.81

501.62

«
31,600

43.20
9.45
77.20
662.04

20,200

8

155.76
498.88
93.50
253,800.00

1,346.92
3.996.90
145.00
4.390.00
4,685.37
14,495.98
1.512.50
1,055.66
43,166.67

5,000.00
29.43

29.43

48
475
704

16.80
475.00
84.48
1,313.19
53,989.00
131,675.99

8

5,000.00

1.2

8

9.700.00

58
9,974
<9
406
449
7,429
3,025

126.26
212.57
185
142
92
17
136
15

8,600.00
230,500.00

(0
608.96
36.50
51.00
547.00
1,938.50

0)

35.95

0)

140.25
193.50
874.04

0)

21.50
74.45
443.62
648.13
11.50
84.40

3.0
.1

8

874.04

0)
462,835.24

$2,046.25
2,046.25

8

(9

85.32
45.45
225.60
1,031.18

PRISONS




28
6)

140.251
193.50

0)

A D FEDERAL
N

Total______________________

.3
.6
1.0

STATE

Underwear___________________
Miscellaneous..................... .......
Miscellaneous, labor only_____
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings....... ....................
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn............................. bushels..
Farm hands hired out.............. .
Hay.......... ........................tons..
Hogs.......... .......................head..
M ilk....................... 100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm.____ ______
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches___ _______ __________
Chairs, fiber_________________
Chairs, wood................... ..........
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Mattresses___________________
Pillows______________________
Tables..... ........ .......................... .
Miscellaneous...... ..................... .
Land development: Land improve­
ment......................................... ......
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous_____________________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes___________________
Letterheads___________ ____ _
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shop work.............. .......
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets_____ __________________
Towels....................................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____
Miscellaneous, labor only_________

16.80
475.00
84.48
1,468.95
54,487.88
2,139.75
866,226.27

* Less than one tenth of 1.
bO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

to
to

NEVADA

Public works and
ways

State use

employed Number

Value

Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Value

Number

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building_________ tons..
Stone, crushed__________ do___
Clothing:
Aprons
Hats and c&ps_______________
Pants
Shirts work
Shoes, repaired................ pairs..
Miscellaneous labor only
Construction:
Alterations and installations----New buildings
New, other than buildings and
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle
head
Hay
tons
Hogs
head
Wheat
bushels
Miscellaneous farm
Metal products:
Aiftn IlftA IQ
T A
T T^haIIanAnns
Vi
Repair and shop work------ -----------Other manufactured products_____
Total




22.0
3.0

741
2,967

$8,000.00
3,709.00

741
2,967

$8,000.00
3,709.00

36
225
695
741
400

7.20
15.00
521. 25
296.40
300.00

36
225
695
741
400

7.20
15.00
521.25
296.40
300.00
120.00

1

225.00
30,000.00

57
525
180
450

1,776.80
3,675.00
2,918.26
270.00
7,445.78

78,204

5,083.26
3,500.00
2,500.00
960.00

\/
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0

0)

(5
)
2.0
5.0
2.0
1.0
14.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
74.0

0)
0)

(5
)
8.0

57
525
110
450

0)

150.00

1,776.80
3,675.00
2,290.11
270.00
7,289.53

78,204

1

5,083.26
3.500.00
2.500.00
960.00

0)
0)
0)
0)

40,193.55

(*
)
0)

$120.00

$225.00
30,000.00

i
70

0)

628.15
156.25

(9
0)
0)
0)

30,375.00

904.40

150.00

71,472.95

P ISO
R N L B R I T N B STATES, 1932
AO
N J IT D

Institution, articles produced, and
unit

Number and value of articles produced under each system

Aver­
age
num­
ber of
pris-

NEW HAM PSHIRE
2574°-

STATE PRISON

Furniture and furnishings: Chairs,
wood.............................................. .
Total-

325,120

$186,576.74

325,120 $186,576.74

186,576.74

140.0
140.0

186,576.74

NEW JERSEY

2.0
7.0

500
6,036

$500.00
5,030.75

32
1,900
2,016
69
3,126
2,791
1,408
0)

1,641.
608.
40,320.
1,095.
13,318.
2,870.
704.
12,709.

37.0
16.0

565.00

(0

1,641.91
608.00
40.320.00
1,095.84
13,318.32
2,870.00
704.00
12,709.07

14,100. C
O

0)

0)

14.100.00
1,998.60

6* 000.00

565.00

0)

PRISONS

15.0
6.0
9.0
3.0
8.0
8.0
6.0
49.0

(0

90,000.00

$90,000.00
6,000.00

A D FEDERAL
N

10.0

3
0.50

32
1,900
2,016
69
3,126
2,791
1,408
(*)

3.00
.50

$500.00
5,030.75

(0

104.0
5.0

500
6,036

STATE

ANNANDAIE FARMS

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed......................tons..
Clothing: Shoes, repaired___ pairs..
Construction:
New buildings..... ..................... .
Roads, new..................... miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Com___________ ____ bushels..
Hay....... ........................... tons—
Hogs................................_head—
M ilk.......................100 pounds.
Potatoes............................ do___
Wheat............................bushels.
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Land development: Land improve­
ment.............................................. .
Printing and binding:
Miscel­
laneous............................................
REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Aprons....................................... .
Overalls.............................
Pajamas and nightgowns.
Shirts, work......................
Suits..................................
Underwear.........................
Miscellaneous....................
1 Enumeration impracticable.




.7
12.0
.5
.5
8.0
.5
1.5
5. O
'

455
4,171
320
457
3,807
141

148.75
3,128.25
239.00
182.80
2,474. 55
282.00
347.90

0)
<Labor performed by inmates producing pants and shirts.

455
4,171
320
457
3,807
141
0)
8 Labor performed by inmates charged to new buildings.

148.75
3,128.25
239.00
182.80
2,474.55
282.00
347.90
380.90

to

CO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

to

STATE PRISONS-—Continued
NEW JEESEY—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

State account

Piece price

Contract

Total

1
Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN—COn.
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Corn____ ____________bushels—
Hay___________________ tons—
Hogs____________ ______ head—
M ilk____________ 100 pounds—
Potatoes__________1____ do...
Wheat........... ...............bushels.
Miscellaneous farm................. .
Laundry, commercial....... pounds—
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases-------------- ------------Sheets___________ _____ _____
Towels_______________ ______

2.0
4.0
9.0
2.0
12.0
12.0
1.0
36.0
10.0

10
1,855
188
40
1,:
1,273
180
0)
277,011

.5
.5

.5
12.4
5.0
50.0
2.9

6
348
616
127
690
33
>463
, 207
,037
,331

<)
2
2.0

4
1,090

$348.44
532.00
3,760.00
634.16
8,253.00
1,473.00
89.00
11,342.31
16,620.66

316
387
497

69.52
251.55
124.25

1,608.75
4,312.00
19.05
773.75
462.00
10,135.75
1,544.90
15,766.65
1,233.95

6
348
616
127
690
33
3,463
2,207
5,037
3,331

1.50
1,608.75
4,312.00
19.05
773.75
462.00
10,135.75
1,544.90
15,766.65
1,233.95

96.58
436.00

4
1,090

96.58
436.00

316
387
497

<*)
2.9
5.0

10
1,855
188
40
1,896
1,273
180
9
77,011

$348.44

11,342.31

STATE REFORMATORY
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats............... ................. ........
Coats, prison______ ____ _____
Hats and caps_______________
Overalls_____________ _______
Overcoats-----------------------------Pants_______________________
Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, new_____________pairs.
Underwear---------------------------Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head—
Corn________________ bushels.




P IS N LA O
R O
B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

7.5
1.0
9.0
4.0
.5
40.0
25.0
1.0
49.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
49.8

105
174
3,653
1,539
238

2,350.54
2,885.97
16,550.50
1,764.80
119.00
12,751.97

1,972
237
3,525
179
257

16,372.57
1.422.00
19,484.00
5.100.00
2.222.00
851.35
21,267.95

(9

(9

10,273

105
174
3,653
1,539
238

2,350.54
2,885.97
16,550.50
1,764.80
119.00
12,751.97

1,972
237
3,525
179
257

16,372.57
1,422.00
19,484.00
5,100.00
2,222.00
851.35
21,267.95

(9

.

(9

10,273

1.0

(9

5.0
.3
.5
.2

20,120
137
169

1,145.85
92.75
86.48
51.10

20,120
137
169

1,145.85
92.75
86.48
51.10

9.0 2.230.500
3.0 1.395.500
6.0
(9

11,162.30
4,178.91
9,319.86

2,230,500
1,395,500

11,162.30
4,178.91
9,319.86

372.55
233.75
128.85
917.85
999.80
48.75

900
930
487
1,450
4,739

372.55
233.75
128.85
917.85
999.80
48.75

3.0
1.0
.4
.2
.8

<
9

<
9

900
930
487
1,450
4,739

(0

392.00

(9

<
9
(9

(9

392.00

STATE PRISON

Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete, blocks.__thousands..
Concrete, posts_______________
Clothing:
Coats, prison________________
Hats and caps________________
Overalls_____________________
Overcoats____________________
Pants______ _________________
Pants, prison__________ _____ _
Shoes, new_____________ pairs..




12.0

454,775

15,906.78

464,775

15,906.78

12.0
2.0

146
7,374

13,145.85
811.14

146
7,374

13,145.85
811.14

2.5
4.0
1.0
6.0
7.0
11.0
2.0
49.0

1,618
1,168
1,013
5,898
1,080
7,001
2,451
32,061

2,865.10
6,832.80
415.33
4,855.50
6,804.00
8,224.40
7,720.65
101,667.45

1,618
1,168
1,013
5,898
1,080
7,001
2,451
32,061

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Hay------------------------------tonsHogs------------------ ------ _.head_.
M ilk------------------- 100 pounds..
Potatoes__________ _____ do___
Wheat______________ bushels..
Miscellaneous farm_____ ______
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds________________________
Benches____ _________________
Chairs, wood_________________
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Tables_______ _______________
Miscellaneous________________
Highway markers.............................
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous..................... ................ .
Metal products:
Castings............. ..........pounds..
Galvanized ware_____________
Tinware______ ______________
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes___________________
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous.
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Duck and canvas_______ do___
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets_______________________
Towels.
Miscellaneous textile products..

2,865.10
6,832.80
415.33
4,855.50
6,804.00
8,224.40
7,720.65
101,667.45

i Enumeration impracticable.

* Less than one tenth of 1.

fcO
Oi

T a b l e A . — Kind,

quantity, and value of articles produced in Stale and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

to
o>

NEW JERSEY—Continued

Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account
Number

Value

Piece price
Number

Value

Total

Contract
Number

Value

Number

Value

state prison —continued

C lothing—Continued
Shoes, repaired.................pairs.
Suits...........................................
Miscellaneous............................
Coffee roasting____ ______ poundsConstruction:
New buildings...........................
Roads, new..........—........milesE&rm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle____ ______ ______ head.
Corn___________ ____ bushelsHay................. —.............. tons.
Hogs............. ...... .............head,
M ilk....................... 100 pounds.
Potatoes.............. ............ do—
Miscellaneous farm...................
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers,
etc........ .................
Chairs, wood............
Desks.........................
Tables........................
Miscellaneous...........
Metal products:
Auto license tags------Galvanized ware.......
Tinware....................
Printing and binding:
Envelopes..................
Letterheads................
Miscellaneous...........
Repair and shop work—




21.0
6.0
10.5
2.0

15,463
1,758
0)
134,901

134,901
1
2.37

9,500.00
97,172.97

20
4,118
450
205
10,027
4,703

247.38
1,786.00
7,550.29
4,240.49
45,848.59
5,357.89
55,199.63

(9

1.00
2.37

8.0
58.0

$13,212.86
12,955.50
28,989.07
19,304.83

15,403
1,758

$13,212.86
12,955.50
28,989.07
19,304.83
$9,500.00
97,172.97

8.0
10.0
20.0
12.0
24.0
16.5
167.5

20
4,118
450
205
10,027
4,703
0)

247.38
1,786.00
7,550. 29
4,240.49
45,848.59
5,357.89
55,199. “

14.0
.5
10.0
19.5
6.0

441
40
133
739

9.212.70
80.85
5.534.70
10,651.50
2.454.87

(9

441
40
133
739

9.212.70
80.85
5.534.70
10,651.50
2,454.87

65.0 2,023,941
4,126
4.0
4,289
14.0

203,360.36
4,636.10
8,256.63

2,023,941
4,126
4,289

203,360.36
4,636.10
8,256.63

10.0 1,677,900
10.0 1,893,300
56.0
(9
19.5
0)

11,906.35
7,574.00
53,240.21
4.381.88

1,677,900
1,893,500

11,906.35
7,574. 00
53,240. 21
4,381.88

(0

(9

(9
(9

P ISO
R N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
Value
ployed Number

Other manufactured products........ .
Miscellaneous, labor only_________

5.0
5.5

7,352.15
523.50

7,352.15
523.50

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Bakery

products,
commercial
pounds..
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete, blocks___thousands..
Concrete, posts....... ...................
Stone, crushed.................. tons..
Clothing:
Aprons........................ ...............
Coats...........................................
Dresses....................................
Hats and caps_______________
Overalls......................................
Overcoats....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants...........................................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new.......................pairs..
Shoes, repaired.................pairs..
Suits............................................
Underwear................... ............ .
Miscellaneous.............................
Coffee, roasting..................pounds..
Construction:
New buildings.................... .......
Roads, new................ ..miles..
New other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay................................ ..tons..
Hogs....................... ..........head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Potatoes...........................d o ___
Wheat.......................- _bushels..
Miscellaneous farm products....
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds.......................-.................. .
Benches_____ _______________ _
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc..........- .............. ................ .
Chairs, wood..............................
Davenports, sofas, etc...............
Desks............................... ..........
Tables..... ....................................
Miscellaneous furniture.............
Highway markers.............................
1 Enumeration impracticable.




12.0

454,775

15,906.78

454,775

15,906.78

12.0
2.0
2.0

146
7,374
500

13,145.85
811.14
500.00

146
7,374
500

13,145.85
811.14
500.00

.7
14.4
12.0
1.0
6.5
7.5
.5
25.4
13.0
99.0
28.0
6.5
4.4
15.5
2.0

461
3,750
4,171
1,140
6,908
1,113
457
12,915
6,014
37,098
21,499
1, r ~
4,:
(0
134,901

150.25
15,618.65
3.128.25
434.38
5.868.25
7,266.00
182.80
26,080.80
4,019.45
117,434.10
18,243.61
13,237.50
1,581.85
29,369.97
19,304.83

461
3,750
4,171
1,140
6,908
1,113
457
12,915
6,014
37,098
21,499
1,899
4,269
(0
134,901

150.25
15,618.65
3.128.25
434.38
5.868.25
7,266.00
182.80
26,080.80
4,019.45
117,434.10
18,243.61
13,237.50
1,581.85
29,369.97
19,304.83

4
2.87

99,500.00
103,172.97

66
8,963
2,759
488
18,702
10,306
1,826
(0

2,334.31
3.362.00
53,980.83
8,856.46
83,970.41
11,465.69
912.00
92,002.98

112.0
63.0

4.00
2.87

10.0

0)
2,334.
3,362.
53,980.
8,856.
83,970.
11,465.
912.
92,002.

99,500.00
103,172.97
565.00

0)

00
^
3
B
h>
5
£

w
*1
H
u

H
#

565.00

25.0
22.0
45.5
18.0
53.0
40.5
7.5
292.5

8,963
2,759
488
18,702
10,306
1, ■
(0

25.0
1.0

1,972
237

16,372.57
1.422.00

1,972
237

16,372.57
1.422.00

14.0
49.5
3.0
10.0
22.5
9.0
49.8

441
3,565
179
133
996
(0
10,273

9,212. 70
19,564.85
5.100.00
5,534. 70
12,873.50
3,306.22
21,267.951

441
3,565
179
133
996
0)
10,273

9.212.70
19,564.85
5.100.00
5.534.70
12,873.50
3,306.22
21,267.95

2
S
m

O
2
00

£5
to

T a b le A .—

Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system,

am i

institution— C on tin u ed

STATE PRISONS— Continued
NEW JERSEY—Continued

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

ALL

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PKISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

i n s t it u t i o n s — c o n t i n u e d




1.0

277,011

$16,620. f

0)

$14,100.00

$14,100.00
16,620.66
392.00

0)

392.00

(0

(l)
277,011

203,360.36
1.145.85
4.728.85
8,343.11
51.10

65.0 2,023,941
20,120
5.0
4.3
4,
4,458
14.5
.2
0)

203,360,36
1.145.85
4.728.85
8,343.11
51.10

2,023,941

19.0 3,908,400
13.0 3,289,000
78.0
0)
19.5
0)

23,068.65
11,752.91
64,558.67
4,381.88

3,908,400
3,289,000

23,068.65
11,752.91
64,558.67
4,381.88

900

372.55
233.75
198.37
1,169.40
1,124.05
48.75
7,352.15
523.50

900

372.55
233.75
198.37
1,169.40
1,124.05
48.75
7,352.15
523.50

3.0
1.0
.9
.7
1.1
.1
5.0
5.5

1,837
5,236

1,421.0_________

993,250.19 ______

20,120

4,263
4,458
0)

1,837
5,236

217,337.97

1,210,588.16

STATES, 1932

TotaL.

37.0
10.0

I tTNITED
N

Land development: Land improve­
ment...............................................
Laundry, commercial........pounds—
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous____ _____ _____ _____
Metal products:
Auto license tags.......................
Castings....................-.pounds.
Galvanized ware_____________
Tinware____________________
Miscellaneous____ ____________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes_____ ______________
Letterheads...... .........................
Miscellaneous printing----------Repair and shop work............ ........
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds—
Duck and canvas_______ do___
Pillowcases___________________
Sheets-----------------------------------Towels
mb . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(
Miscellaneous textile products—
Other manufactured products-------Miscellaneous labor only---------------

NEW M EXICO
STATE PENITENTIARY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Construction: New buildings___
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn-------------------------bushels..
Hay------------------------------ tons..
Hogs_____________ „____ head_
Miscellaneous farm_________
Miscellaneous, labor only_______
TotaL

183.6
32.0

369

2.0
4.0
2.4
25.0
14.0

300
40
108

$4,097.08
$25,000.00

<
9

263.0

135.00
600.00
1,848.00
800.00
6,352.50

794 $20,152.04

<
9

42

1,163
5

$24,249.12
25,000.00

300
40
150

135.00
600.00
1,997.00
883.62
6,352.50

149.00
83.62
8 '

13,832.58

25,000.00

20,384.66

9,217.24

NEW YORK
ATTICA STATE PRISON

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle-------------------------- head—
Clay----------------------------- tons—
Potatoes-------------- 100 pounds. .
Wheat______________ bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy___________
Miscellaneous farm___________
Land development: Land improve­
ment.... ...................... .....................

0.1
2.0
10.0
1.6
9.0
10.3

2
400
3,667
1,400
<9

310.0

$85.00
4,000.00
2,650.00
910.00
6,000.00
4,020.00

2
400
3,667
1, ■
“

8
(9

(9

$60,000.00

$85.00
4.000.00
2.650.00
910.00
6.000.00
4.020.00
60,000.00

STATE PRISON FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats________________________
Handkerchiefs___________
Hats and caps___________
Overalls______ __________
Overcoats............... ............
Palamas and nightgowns..
Shirts, work_____________
Underwear______________
Miscellaneous___________




1.6
.4
2.7
.3
(’)
.2
1.5
.2
9.0
.3
.1

3,174
314
543
3,000
58
100
34
125
7,524
226

830.20
211.50
989.50
150.00
13.80
75.00
572.20
73.20
4,399.00
94.50
73.50 ____ _
(9
1 Enumeration impracticable.

3,174
314
543
3,000
58
100
34
125
“
__ ___ _

-

-

(9
1 Less than one tenth of 1.

226

830.20
211.50
989.50
150.00
13.80
75.00
572.20
73.20
4,399.00
94.50
73.50

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, fry State, system, and institution— Continued
O

STATE PRISONS—Continued
NEW Y O E K —Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE PRISON FOR WOMEN—COn.
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches............................. .........
Mattresses......................... .........
Pillows_____________ ________
Repair and shop work................. .
Textiles and textile products:
Bags........................................ .
Pillowcases_____ _____________
Sheets....... .....: _______________
Spreads________ ____ ________
Towels.................................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____
CLINTON PRISON
Brooms, brushes, and mops: Mops.
Clothing:
Aprons...................................... .
Coats......................... ............
Coats, prison................... .........
Handkerchiefs.............. ............
Hats and caps...........................
Overalls............................... .....
Overcoats................................. .
Pants........................................ .
Pants, prison....... .....................
Shirts, dress......... .....................
Shirts, work_____________ ___
Shoes, repaired................ pairs.
Suits................... — ................ .
Underwear.............. ................ .




(2
)
9.1
.6
(*)

10
848
905

10
848
905

0)

$10.00
4,550.08
468.72
22.25

0)

$10.00
4,550.08
468.72
22.25

(2
)
2.5
9.3
(2
)
2.0
16.1
(2
)

40
2,828
5,170
12
6,439
0)
0)

7.45
734.15
4,603.80
18.00
983.20
7,790.68
16.70

40
2,828
5,170
12
6,439
0)
0)

7.45
734.15
4,603.80
18.00
983.20
7,790.68
16.70

6.0

83,414

22,471.06

83,412

22,471.06

1.0
1.0
6.0
1.0
2.0
6.0
16.0
1.0
10.0
1.0
9.0
5.0
48.0
5.0

162
1,054
900
18,852
6,120
6,936
4,416
706
3,300
2,412
27,388
4,500
11,484
17,976

12.
844.
7,425.
855.
2,350.
8,521.
22,080.
494.
13,200.
1,371.
24,394.
3,375.
45,675.
7,770.

144
1,056
900
18,852
6,120
6,936
4,416
706
3,300
2,412
27,388
4,500
11,484
17,976

12.00
844.80
7,425.00
855.50
2,350.56
8,521.60
22,080.00
494.20
13,200.00
1,317.50
24,394.62
3,375.00
45,675.00
7,770.00

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

109.0

5

50.0
1.0
1.0
1.4
3.0
2.0
3.6

78
150
70
150
5,966
(0

2.0

(0

1,515.00

0)

$1,193.20
59.52
700.00
1,200.00
16,761.00
1,865.52

20,000.00

78
150
70
150
5,966
0)

4,800.00

2.0

$81,000.00

0)

1,193.22
59.50
700.00
1,200.00
16,761.00
1,865.52

0)

1,515.00

0)

4,800.00

392.0
3.0
12.0

384,232
72,887
210,256

193,539.06
12,704.84
71,771.00

384,232
72,887
210,256

193,539.06
12,704.84
71,771.00

4.0

485

11,382.2F
i

485

11,382.25

.4
1.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
.6
2.0

292
515
201
7,183
564
704
1,802
650
2,290
208
0)

113.40
2.369.00
100.50
1,357.10
903.00
1.936.00
1,982.20
1.592.50
1.629.50
187.60
420.85

292
515
201
7,183
564
704
1,802
650
2,290
208
0)

113.40
2,369.00
100.50
1,357.10
003.00
1,936.00
1,982.20
1,592.50
1,629.50
187.60
420.85

.2
.1
.1
1.7
3.0
2.9

9
311
6
76
995

145.00
125.00
75.00
1.650.00
3.027.00
2.944.00

9
311
6
70
995

145.00
125.00
75.00
1, 650 00
3,027.00
2,944.00

40

200.00

40

200.00

30,000
0)

75.00
292 48

DANNEMORA STATE HOSPITAL

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building___________ tons..
Clothing:
Aprons_____ _________________
Coats, prison____ _______ _____
Hats and caps________________
Hosiery_____ __________ pairs..
Overalls____ __________ _______
Pants, prison.............................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new...................... pairs ~
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Underwear.............. ...................
Miscellaneous.............. ..............
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay____________________tons..
Hogs.......... .......................head..
M ilk....................... 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm.....................
Furniture and furnishings: MatPrinting and binding:
Letterheads...........
Miscellaneous........




ST T A D FEDEBAL PRISONS
AE N

Construction:
New buildings............... ............
New, other than buildings and
roads........................ ...... .........
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle................ ..........___head_.
Corn_____ ___________bushels. .
Hay_______________ ____ tons..
Hogs____ _______ ______ head—
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Lumber and timber products:
Miscellaneous................. ..............
Printing and binding: Miscella­
neous............................................ .
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Towels.........................................
Yarn, cotton and wooLpounds—

1.C

(0

0)

.4
.6

30,000
75.00
292.48
0)
1Enumeration impracticable.

’ Less than one tenth of 1.

00

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

GO

to

STATE PRISONS—Continued
NEW YORK—-Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

DANNEMORA STATE HOSPITAL—COn.
Textiles and textile products:
Bags...........................................
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets_______________________
Spreads_____________________
Towels......... .............................
Miscellaneous textile products.

0.8
1.0
.9
.1
1.0
2.2

339
1,259
1,190
169
3,725
(*)

$67.05
299.77
1,032.50
149.50
377.57
1,192.80

1,259
1,190
169
3,725
0)

$67.05
299.77
1,032.50
149.50
377.57
1,192.80

40.0

9,934

11,920.50

9,934

11,920.50

3.0
2.0
2.0
15.0
2.0
15.0
3.0
6.0

200
300
360
4,000
1,500
1,104
3,384
360

400.00
3.600.00
1.440.00
4,000.00
525.00
6.624.00
3.384.00
4.320.00

200
300
360
4,000
1,500
1,104
3,384

400.00
3.600.00
1.440.00
4.000.00
525.00
6.624.00
3.384.00
4.320.00

3
1.50
0.19

147.000.00
140.000.00
5.000.00

GREAT MEADOW PRISON
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed____________ tons.
Clothing:
Coats, prison___________ _____
Overcoats___________________
Pants_____ _________________
Pants, prison____ _____________
Shirts, work__________ ______
Shoes, new____________ pairs.
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Suits......................................... .
Construction:
New buildings............ .............. .
Railroad_________ _____ miles.
Roads, new...................... do—
New, other than buildings and
roads..........................- ........... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
H ay._____________ _____ tons..




95.0
25.0
10.0

3.00
1.50
.19

50.0
2.0
1.0
7.0

0
49
105
250

794.31
42.07
2,500.00

$147,000.00
140,000.00
5,000.00
15,600.00

15,600.00

0)
49
105
250

794.31
42.07
2.500.00

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Hogs............. ....................head..
Milk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do___
Miscellaneous, farm__________
Miscellaneous livestock----------Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, wood..............................
Davenports, sofas, etc------------Tables............................... ..........
Miscellaneous furniture----------Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous............. ..........................
Other manufactured products--------

4.0)
12.0
1.0
26.0
2.0

103
5,449
102
0)
0)

2,420.501
16,654.15
101.70
3,695.20
48.40

0)

2,420.50
16,654.15
101.70
3,695.20
48.40

62.0
52.0
2.0
2.0

7,988
1,532
118
0)

46,553.05
38,480.50
1,417.00
1,912.95

7,988
1,532
118
0)

46,553.05
38,480.50
1,417.00
1,912.95

2.0
3.0
32.0

C
>
0)
0)

103.60
1,500.00
10,473.56

0)

103.60
1,500.00
10,473.56

103
5,449
102

0)

Coats________________________
Coats, prison............. - ................
Gloves and mittens_____ pairs..
Handkerchiefs________________
Hats and caps________________
Hosiery________________pairs..
Overalls......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants_____ ________ _________
Pants, prison_________________
Shirts, dress__________________
Shirts, work...............................
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Shoes, repaired-------------- do___
Underwear_______ ___________
Miscellaneous____ _____ ______
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle........... ....................head..
Corn________ _______ -bushels..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs___________ _______ head—
M ilk____ ________ 100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous farm.....................
Furniture and furnishings:
Tables
.......
Miscellaneous furniture........ ....
Highway markers.......................... —
i Enumeration impracticable.




40.5

310

542.35

310

542.35

3.0

1,013

445.75

1,013

445.75

1.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
11.0
1.5
.5
.5
7.0
.5
5.0
32.0
8.0
3.0
1.0

350
240
694
882
5,338
933
6,713
196
209
68
3,573
136
2,187
1,310
5,913
2,728
0)

122.50
347.60
3,123.00
44.10
213.52
606.45
268.52
205.60
188.10
40.80
8,384.50
136.00
1,640.25
3,085.75
2,365.50
806.80
68.40

350
240
694
882
5,338
933
6,713
196
209
68
3,573
136
2,187
1,310
5,913
2,728
0)

122.50
347.60
3,123.00
44.10
213.52
606.45
268.52
205.60
188.10
4a 80
8,384.50
136.00
1,640.25
3,085.75
2,365.50
806.80
68.40

3.0
2.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
26.0

10
471
208
59
2,590
198
<)
>

773.55
260.45
2,496.00
929.25
7,617.82
118.80
8,335.05

10
471
208
59
2,590
198
0)

773.55
260.45
2,496.00
929.25
7,617.82
118.80
8,335.05

.5
36.0
1.01

4

60.00
2,962.90
150.00

4

C)
1

0

60.00
2,962.90
150.00

^

150

150

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

INSTITUTION FOR MALE DEFECTIVE
DELINQUENTS

Baskets___ ______________________
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms________________________
Clothing:

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

^

NEW YO R K —Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

INSTITUTION FOB MALE DEFECTIVE
d e u n q u e n t s — co n tin u e d

4.0
.5
4.0
.5
.5
1.0
17.0

(9
83,500
28,600
0)

(9
2,750
691
879
3,671

(9

$6.00
32,120.84
11,880.09
1,500.00
8. 75
550.00
138.20
437.50
624.07
79.50

(9
83,500
28,600

8

$6.00
32,120.84
11,880.09
1,500.00
a 75

2,750
691
879
3,671

550.00
138.20
437.50
624.07
79.50

235
40
2,370
957
1,422
2,136
1,284
9,867

122.01

(9

HOUSE OF REFUGE

Clothing:
Aprons......................................
Coats........................................ .
Handkerchiefs...........................
Overalls.....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants.........................................
Shirts, work............................. .
Shoes, repaired...... .........pairs
Miscellaneous.......................... .
Miscellaneous, labor only____




.1
.2
2.3
2.1
10.5
1.3
18.1
1.2

235
40
2,370
957
1,422
2,136
1,284
9,867

(9
(0

122.01

50.00
108.24
957.00
1,350.90
4,360. 50
544.05
5,920. 20
740. 70
320.00

(9

(9

50.00
108.24
957.00
1,350.90
4,360.50
544.05
5,920.20
740.70
320.00

STATES, 1932

p ou n ds. _

Pillowcases________________
Sheets._____ _________ _____
Towels.................................... __
Miscellaneous textile products..

.5
42.0
43.0

I UNITED
N

Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous.......................................
Metal products:
Aluminum ware_____________
Galvanized w a r e ..................... .
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous printing.............................. ...
Repair and shop work................. .
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods, light

Construction:
Alterations and
installations.................................. .
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm...................................
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..
Metal products: Tinware.......... .....
Printing and binding:
Envelopes.______ ____________
Letterheads................. ...............
Miscellaneous...................... .....
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets..........................................
Towels........................................
Miscellaneous textile products..

7.0

<9

<9

26,580.00

<
9

1,184.13
5.200.00
2,009.60

6.0
10.0
17.0

<0
52.000
6,291

1,184.13
5.200.00
2,009.60

1.4
1.1
23.5

100,000

400.00
157.50
6.727.00

100,000

63.000

400.00
157.50
6.727.00

.2
1.4
1.0
.5

825
1,127
3,026

148.50
919.10
605.20
212.00

825
1,127
3,026

148.50
919.10
605.20
212.00

646
505
5,124
960
2,383
279
1,027

188.40
490.46
2,332.87
800.00
2,469.11
279.00
255.67
573.32

63.000

(9

(9

52.000
6,291

(9

(9

WESTFIELD STATE FARM

Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats_______________________
Dresses______________________
Overalls______________ ______
Pajamas and nightgowns......... .
Pants..........................................
Underwear.................................
Miscellaneous................... .........
Furniture and furnishings: Mat­
tresses...... .................................. .
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets................. . ..................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..

1.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.5
4.5

646
505
5,124
960
2,383
279
1,027

(9

4.0
3.0
14.0
1.0

188.40
490.46
2,332.87
800.00
2,469.11
279.00
255.67
573.32

(9

333.50
5,584
31,703

<
9

23

333.50

1,172.
25,462.40
71.90

5,584
31,703

1,172.60
25,462.40
71.90

(9

STATE REFORMATORY

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms______________________
Brushes_____________________
Clothing*
Aprons_________________ _____
Coats________ _______ _______
Coats, prison________________
Handkerchiefs__________ ____ _
Hats and caps...........................
Hosiery............................pairs.
Overalls.....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants...........................................
Pants, prison............................. .
1 Enumeration

impracticable.




1.2
.8

2,072
2,506

822.60
506.85

2,072
2,506

822.60
506.85

1.0
9.5
.6
2.2
4.0
2.0
.8
2.6
8.6

800
204
1,247
8,193
2,737
11,322
1, “
401
1,351
2,527

280.00
334.15
5,798.55
491.58
1,807.25
1,132.20
1,549.90
200.50
1,353.00
7,328.30

800
204
1,247
8,193
2,737
11,322
1,409
401
1,351
2,527

u, f vo. oo
491.58
1,807.25
1,132.20
1,549.90
200.50
1,353.00
7,328.30

280.00

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in Stale and Federal prisons, 1932, by Stale, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

CO
C&

NEW YORK—Continued

state r e f o r m a t o r y

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

—continued

Clothing—Continued
Shirts, w o rk _ ___
Shoes, new_____________ pairs..
Miscellaneous________ ________
Coffee, roasting__________ pounds..
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New, other than buildings and
roads________________ _____
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay____________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
Potatoes-------------- 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous d airy...
Miscellaneous farm___
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers, etc.
Chairs, wood..
Desks_____
Mattresses.
Pillows..
Tables---------------Miscellaneous____
____________________
.pieces—
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous.
Metal products:
Aluminum ware.
Galvanized ware--------------




Number and value of articles produced under each system

6.0
15.0
3.1
4.0
2.0

C)

140.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
6.0
10.0
33.5

0)
12
400
200
44
1,927
<>
*
4
52
2
110
126
469

.1
.5
(*)

.1
.1
3.4
1.5
(2
)
1.0
.1
1.5

(*>

16

0)
5,000
437

4,135
1,778
(0
239,231

______

4,135
1,778
(0
239,231

$6,000.00

24
400
200
44
1,927
0)
0)

728.21
260.00
2,400.00
1,243.90
1,524.00
9,395.79
47,775.74

4
52
2
110
126
469

$60.00

80.00 _
157.90
25.00
110.00
63.00
627.50
756.00
12.00

50.00
526.50

120,000.00

0
12

668.21
260.00
2,400.00
1,243.90
1,524.00
9,395.79
47,775.74

709.54

6,000.00

0)

120,000.00

$2,481.00
4,445.00
727.10
40,669.27

80.00
157.90
25.00
110.00
63.00
627.50
756.00
12.00

0)
0)

299.60

16

0)
5,000
437

1,009.14
50.00
526.50

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Tinware-------------------------------Miscellaneous-----------------------Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound--------Envelopes___________________
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous_____ _____ _____
Soap and soap powder___ pounds..
Textiles and textile products:

6.0
.8
2.0
16.2
2.0
.1
.5
1.5
.3
2.7

579

438.10
634.25

2,844
167,345
317,400

(9

(9

346,070
2,061
2,327
494
9,810

579

438.10
634.25

2,174.00
672.75
1,592.50
13,152.85
725.00

2,844
167,345
317,400

2,174.00
672.75
1,592.50
13,152.85
725.00

131.50
447.75
1,293.35
272.52
2,240.70
697.10
193.41

3
2,061
2,327
494
9,810

(9

(9

346,070

(9
(9

131.50
447.75
1,293.35
272.52
2,240.70
697.10
193.41

SING SING PRISON

Baskets..................... ........... ............
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms______________________
Brushes—...................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed____________tons..
Clothing:
Coats________________________
Coats, prison---------- -------------Gloves and mittens....... ............
Hats and caps________ _______
Hosiery________________pairs..
Overcoats....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants, prison.............. ................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Suits.......................... .................
Underwear___________________
Miscellaneous............. ................
Construction:
Roads, new____________miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads.................................. ......
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses___________________
Pillows______________________
Miscellaneous..........................
Metal products:
Galvanized ware.......... ..............
Tags, miscellaneous___________
Miscellaneous________________




.1

129

63.37

129

63.37

63.1
35.9

38,239
52,881

18,224.45
10,383.14

52,881

18,224.45
10,383.14

65.0

25,350

61,000.00

25,350

61,000.00

9.3
8.0
4.0
.4
50.0
2.1
31.2
30.1
3.1
93.0
8.0
5.1
110.0
61.1

495
1,800
7,459
1,200
215,668
200
63,542
16,000
2,596
63,253
10,000
600
199,473
(0

507.24
11,700.00
373.69
600.00
22,617.31
3,000.00
30,562.61
44.000.00
1,932.88
126,256.09
10.000.00
7,500.00
96,414.54
34,049.44

495
1,800
7,459
1,200
215,668
200
63,542
16,000
2,596
63,253
10,000
600
199,473

507.24
11.700.00
373.69
600.00
22,617.31
3,000.00
30,562.61
44.000.00
1,932.88
126,256.09
10.000.00
7,500.00
96,414.54
34,049.44

0.42

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Pillowcases..
Sheets.
Spreads______________________
Towels.................................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

1.0
1.2

53.000.00

73.5
2.4
2.4

13,646
6,786

(9

31,274
480,003

(9

53.000.00.

<
9

95.0
19.4
1.1
1.6

(9

0.42

296.0

51.000.00.

(9

69,716.94
4,014.92
1,228.15

31,274
480,003

55.752.01
1,789.72
1,840.38

(9

55,752.01 . . . .
1.789.72....
1.840.38....

i Enumeration impracticable.

51.000.00

13,646
6,786

69,716.94
4,014.92
1,228.15

(9

1 Less than one tenth of L

CO
■<1

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1983, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

CO
00

NEW Y ORK—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
sing sing prison—continued

11,566
481,774
758,550
0)

$2,635.21
1.294.88
2,230.70
8.474.88

11,566
481,774
758,550
0)

$2,635.21
1.294.88
2,230.70
8.474.88

.5
.6
15.0
1.1
3.9
3.0
14.0

824
25
3,321
40,118
105,528
27, 750
0)

20.04
100. 50
8,167. 65
6,282. 56
23,865. 50
26, 392. 70
12,199.40

824
25
3,321
40,118
105, 528
27,750
0)

20.04
100.50
8,167.65
6,282.56
23,865.50
26,392.70
12,199.40

49.9

24,452

STATE PRISON FOR MEN
Baskets...............................................
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms-------- ------- ------------------Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed-................tons..
Clothing:
Hats and caps.............................
Overcoats...................................
Pants, prison.............. ...............
Shoes, new.......................pairs..
Shoes, repaired..............d o ----Suits................................... ........
Miscellaneous..................... ........




19.2
2.0
3.0
10.0
22.0
6.0
8.0
1.0

14,819.85

24,452

14,819.85

23,125.14

28.0

39,699

23,125.14

2.575.00 .
2,580
300
5,000
3,360
2,650
700
0)

1,290.00*.
2.850.00 .
11.250.00 .
10.505.00 .
2,392.50 _
7,000.00 .
100.00 .

2.575.00
2,580
300
5,000
3,360
2,650
700
0)

1.290.00
2.850.00
11.250.00
10.505.00
2,392.50
7,000.00
100.00

STATES, 1932

6.5
3.2
5.5
20.8

I UNITED
N

Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound...........
Envelopes....................................
Letterheads.................................
Miscellaneous..............................
Textiles and textile products:
Bags.............................................
Blankets......................................
Flags...........................................
Pillowcases........................ .........
Sheets.........................................
Spreads............... ............ .........
Miscellaneoust extile products..

2574°—33---- 10

79.4
111.6

18.52
0)

18.52
0)

$69,815.00
37,665.00

69.815.00
37.665.00

284
321
1,109
221
0)
0)

1,443.96
2.976.00
5,227.79
928.06
132.60
13,018.44
7,871.53
98.933.00
449.50
1.400.00
112.00
5.250.00
1.500.00
30.00
751.26

18
284
321
1,109
221
0)
0)

1,317.96
2,976.00
5,227.79
928.06
132.60
13,018.44
7,871.53

70.0
.5
1.5
.2
3.0
2.0
.1

12,265
31
35
8
3,000
3,000
3
3,954

98,933.00
449.50
1,400.00
112.00
5,250.00
1,500.00
30.00
751.26

12,265
31
35
8
3.000
3.000
3
3,954

.2
0)
91.8 5,141,684

175.00
304,881. 75

5,141,684

175.00
304,881.75

97.0
64.0
90.0
3.0

80,240
122,214
382,016
0)

267,438.50
192,175.38
229,209. 60
1,586.00

80,240
122,214
382,016
(l)

267,438.50
192,175.38
229,209.60
1.586.00

$126.00.

(9

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Enumeration impracticable.




90.5

24,891

15,430.57

24,891

15,430.57

95.3
36.7
6.0

81,023
55,387
83,412

42,617.94
10,889.99
22,471.06

81,023
55,387
83,412

42,617.94
10,889.99
22,471.06

4.0
124.2

485
42,179

11,382. 25
75,495.50

485
42,179

11,382.25
75,495.50

5.6
46.3
5.7
6.0
3.1
8.6
69.0
15.0
24.6
37.8

5,641
8,210
5,667
8,341
37,753
13,829
240,886
11,122
5,250
68,082
40,004!

1,668. 51
33,601. 30
3,322.37
417.79
1,818.84
6,768.56
25, 375.13
13,012.10
32,102.20
34,844. 42

5,641
8,210
5,667
8,341
37,753
13,829
240,886
11,122
5,250
68,082
40,004

1,668.51
33.601.30
3,322.3
417.79
1,818.84
6,768.56
25,375.13
13,012.10
32,102.20
34,844.42
98.066.30

PRISONS

Baskets............................ .................
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms......................................
Brushes.......................................
Mops.......................................... .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building................. tons.
Stone, crushed..................do___
Clothing:
Aprons.......................................
Coats.........................................
Dresses.......................... ...........
Gloves and mittens........ pairs.
Handkerchiefs........................... .
Hats and caps........................ .
Hosiery...................................... .
Overalls..................................... .
Overcoats....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants...........................................

A D FEDERAL
N

.7
3.8
1.0
1.2
.2
6.3

STATE

Construction:
Hoads, new__r.............. miles..
Roads, repaired. _ .....................
Farm, garden, and duiry:
Cattle............................... head.
H ay................................... tons.
Hogs................................. head.
Potatoes................. 100 pounds..
Wheat______________ bushels.
Miscellaneous dairy. ................ .
Miscellaneous farm ...................
Furniture and furnishings:
B eds.......... ............ .................
Chairs, wood......... ....................
Davenports, sofas, etc...............
Desks.........................................
Mattresses.................................
Pillows.......................................
Tables..... ...................................
Highway markers_______ ________
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous...... ...............................
Metal products: Auto license tags.
Textiles and textile products:
Blankets.....................................
Wool yard goods......... pounds.
Yarn, cotton and wool_ do___
_
Other manufactured products........

00
CO

T a ble

A*— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued
NEW YO R K —Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

State account

Piece price

Total

Contract

i
Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

Number

Value

all institutions—continued

2,548
48,416
71,455
38,604
13,144
221,638

2,548
48,416
71,455
38,604
13,144
221,638

0)
239,231

239,231

(9

91

(9

9.0
204.0
25.0
385.4
111.6

8.00
1.50
19.13

(9

$32,580.00
228,000.00
140,000.00
127.815.00
37,665.00

335.0

<9

206.600.00

8.0
5.1
24.3
16.7
22.0
18.2
5.8
25.3
116.9
2.0

(9

178
1,437
1,418
753
15,000
6,805
1,819

(9
(9
<9

(9

_____

$186.00

32,580.00
228,000.00
140,000.00
127,815.00
37,665.00

(9

1

23
______

(9

$1,507.50
37,899.00
152,508.34
29,066.70
64,495.00
105,529.11
36,753.31
320.00
40,669.27

206,600100

8
1.50
19.13

201
1,437
1,418
753
15,000
6,805
1,819
P

(9
(9

5,163.23
747.04
15,147.00
12,671.44
44,059.97
5,203.76
1,161.40
28,414.23
77,691.17
48.40

STATES, 1932




1.5
36.4
180.0
50.1
67.1
120.4
74.0
.8
4.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Shirts, dress_________________
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Suits______ ________________
Underwear_______—____ ___
Miscellaneous........- ................ _
Miscellaneous, labor only..........
Coffee roasting...................pounds—
Construction:
Alterations and installation—
New buildings---------- --------Railroad.......................... miles. _
Roads, new_____ _______ do___
Roads, repaired...........................
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head—
Corn________________ bushels—
Hay__________ _________tons—
Hogs__________________ head—
M ilk.......................100 pounds—
Potatoes______ ____ ____ do----Wheat..........................bushels—
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock--------

LABOR

Num­
ber

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Furniture and furnishings:
Beds------------------------------------Benches_____________________
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc— _____________________
Chairs, wood_________________
Da^nports, sofas, etc_________

12.265
10

98,933.00
10.00

.1
63.0
53.5
.3
36.6
3.8
6.0
41.1
(2
)
1.8

4
8,071
1,567
10
17,667
10,817

4
8,071
1,567
10
17,667
10,817
594

16
4,104

80.00
47,160.45
39,880.50
137.00
80,160.52
6,046.64
2,134.50
6, 860.00
12.00
901.26

80.00
47,160.45
39,880.50
137.00
80,160.52
6,046.64
2,134.50
6,860.00
12.00
901.26

52,000

5,200.00

310.0
10.0
5.7

<
9

16
4,104

(9

52,000

(9

2.509.14

0)

(9

60,000.00

(9

299.60

60,000.00
5,200.00
2,808.74

32,170.84
304,881.75
68,158.60
1,789.72
2.447.70
2.474.63

88,500
5,141,684
60,311
480,003
6,870

32,170.84
304,881.75
68,158.60
1,789.72
2.447.70
2.474.63

14,410
12.5
5.4
749,119
9.0 1,168,950
70.1
.5
2.0
346,070

4,809.21
2.367.63
4.055.70
36,447.21
31.00
725.00

14,410
749,119
1,168,950
346,070

4,809.21
2.367.63
4.055.70
36,447.21
31.00
725.00

1.3
97.6

1,203
80,265

Q. U
d

267,539.00

1,203
80.265

94.54
267,539.00

396.0
15.1
8.8
31.5
3.4
10.7
64.0
102.0
51.6
35.3

3,324
53,366
147,924
28,425
99,558
122,214
592,272
c;
0

194,089.06
8.299.15
9,223.53
57,614.15
26,832.72
17,535.58
192,175.38
300,980.60
22,243.38
12,269.67

3,324
53,366
147,924
28,425
99,558
122,214
592,272

194,089.06
8,299.15
9,223.53
57,614.15
26,832.72
17,535.58
192,175.38
300,980.60
22,243.38
12,269.67

-.2,947,435.46

l Enumeration impracticable.

<
9

<
9

8
832,660.00 —

485.60

3,780,581.06
* Less than one tenth of 1.

PRISONS

42.1
88,500
91.8 5,141,684
118.0
60,311
2.4
480,003
18.0
6,870
(9

Total_______________________4,321.0 —




0)

FEDERAL

Pillowcases-_
_
Sheets________
Spreads____
Towels______________________
W ool yard goods......... pounds..
Yarn, cotton and wool_ do___
_
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

98,933.00
10.00

AD
N

Blankets_____________________
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..

12,265
10

STATE

Mattresses___________________
Pillows______________________
Tables.
Miscellaneous.
_ pieces..
_
Highway markers________________
Land development: Land improve­
ment........................ ......................
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous____ _________________
Metal products:
Aluminum ware______________
Auto license tags_____________
Galvanized ware_____________
Tags, miscellaneous___________
Tinware________ ____________
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound______
Envelopes___________________
Letterheads
Miscellaneous..
Repair and shop work____________
Soap and soap powder____ pounds..
Textiles and textile products:

70.0
(2
)

T able

A*— Kind, quantity, and valu>e of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

to

STATE PRISONS— Continued
NORTH CAROLINA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

INDUSTRIAL FARM COLONY FOR
WOMEN

67
59
50
123

$16. 75
33.04
17.50
26.02

67
59
50
123

$16.75
33.04
17.50
26.02

1.0
2.0
4.0
9.0

194
12
116

194
12
116

0)

97.00
132.00
363.00
807.50

(0

97.00
132.00
363.00
807.50

.2

0)

28.50

0)

28.50

STATE’ S PRISON

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete pipe................... tons..
Stone ,crushed.................... do.
Clothing:
Aprons....................................
Hats and caps...........................
Overalls__________ ___ _____ _
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants.......................... ..............
Shirts, work......... ....................
U nderwear..............................
Miscellaneous.......................... .




25.0
268.0

7,838

.1
.4
5.0
2.0
12.0
7.0
3.0
.2

1,092
10,344
12,120
8, 712
25,512
26,784
22,152
0)

65,010.72
218.40
1,034.40
10,963.00
3.496.00
25, 512.00
15,289.20
7.384.00
308.40

207,864

$225,189.37

7, i
207,864

65,010.72
225,189.37

1,092
10,344
12,120
8,712
25,512
26,784
22,152
(l)

218.40
1,034.40
10.963.00
3.496.00
25.512.00
15,289.20
7.384.00
308.40

STATES, 1932

0.1
.3
.2
.2

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Aprons......................................
Dresses-............................. .......
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Underwear......... .......................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn________________ bushels.
Hay................................... tons.
M ilk ...................... 100 pounds.
Miscellaneous farm.........................
Textiles and textile products: Mis­
cellaneous textile products..........

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PKISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

2.50

47.0
382.0

(9

2.50

15.624.00
127,609.24

12
81,862
1,178
621

$15,624.00
127,609.24

449.98
40.931.00
34,050.53
6,210.00
18.745.05
12.084.06
5,856.79
11,677.63
13,511.70
23,350.65
56,341.62

(9

5.0
1.0
21.0

7,872
7,032
706,750

7,872
7,032
706,750

10.496.00
2.930.00
35,337.50

2.0 1,259,400
1.0 1,051,700
7.0
(9

1,259,400
1,051,700

4,329.02
2,291.20
15,442.26

19,008
9,312
20,400

19,008
9,312
20,400

1.584.00
3.104.00
850.00
6.478.00

7,
207,864

65,010 72
225,189.37

1,159
59
10,344
12,120
8,762
25,512
26,784
22,275

235.15
33.04
1,034.40
10.963.00
3,513.50
25.512.00
15,289.20
7,410.02
308.40

1.0
1.0
.3
3.0

1,178 $34,050.53
621
6,210.00
18,745.05
(9

1,067
403
3,648
11,656
17,799

(9

3,248.20
11,895.75
21,935.54

(9

18,484

(9

(9

1,067
403
3,648
16,545
36,283

(9

(9

(9

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Concrete pipe....................tons.
Stone, crushed..................d o...
Clothing:
Aprons___________ _________
Dresses............ ........................
Hats and caps........................
Overalls....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants. .................................... .
Shirts, work..............................
Underwear................................
Miscellaneous...........................
Construction:
Roads, new__................. miles.
Roads, repaired— ....................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Corn........ ....................bushels.
Cotton..............................bales.
1 Enumeration impracticable.




25.0
268.0
.2
.3
.4
5.0
2.2
12.0
7.0
3.2
.2

207,864
1,159
59
10,344
12,120
8,762
25,512
26,784
22,275
(9

47.0
382.0
2.0
190.0
158.0

(9
150

(9
12
82,056

225,189.37

2.50

15, 624.00

15.624.00
127,609.24

12
82,056
1,178

449.98
41.028.00
34,050.53

(9

127,609. 24

1,178

34,050.53

PRISONS

12
81,862

A D FEDERAL
N

2.0
189.0
158.0
29.0
58.0
56.0
27.0
54.0
63.0
126.0
261.0

STATE

Construction:
Roads, new____________miles.
Roads, repaired.................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head.
Com......... ................... bushels.
Cotton.............................bales.
Cottonseed........................ tons.
Farm hands hired out..............
Hay................................... tons.
Hogs________ _______ ___head.
M ilk_____________100 pounds.
Potatoes............................ d o ...
Wheat...... ....................bushels.
Miscellaneous farm...................
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses.................................
Pillows......................................
Metal products: Auto license tags.
Printing and binding:
Envelopes__________________
Letterheads................ ............
Miscellaneous..................... ......
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases................................
Sheets____ ____ _____________
T ow els.....................................
Miscellaneous textile products.

CO

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued

STATE PRISONS— Continued
N ORTH CAROLINA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

a l l in s t it u t io n s — c o n t in u e d




$6,210.00
18.745.05
12.216.06
5,856.79
12,040.63
13,511.70
23,350.65
57,149.12

10,496.00
2.930.00
35.337.50

7,872
7,032
706,760

10,496.00
2.930.00
35,337.50

4,329.02
2,291.20
15,442.26

i, 259,400
1,051,700
(0

4,329.02
2,291.20
15,442.26

1.584.00
3.104.00
850.00
6,506.50

19,008
9,312
20,400
0)

1.584.00
3.104.00
850.00
6,506.60

1,079
403
3,764
11,656
17,799
0)

5.0
1.0
21.0

7,872
7,1
706.750

2.0 1,259,400
1.0 1,051,700
7.0
0)

4,1
!M 84

$12,216.06
5,856.79
12,040.63
10.263.50
11,454.90
35,213.58

1.0
1.0
.3
3.2
1,834.0

19,008
9,312
20,400
0)

340,703.35

$6,210.00
18,745.05

3,248. 20
11,895. 75
21,935.54

0)

$143,233.24

96,085.07

$225,189.37

805,211.03

STATES, 1932

Total_____________________

621
(0
1,079
403
3,764
16,545
36,283
0)

621

29.0
68.0
58.0
27.0
58.0
63.0
126.0
270.0

I TJN
N
ITED

Farm, garden, and dairy—Contd.
Cottonseed........................ tons.
Farm hands hired out..............
Hay___________________ tons
Hogs____________ ______ head.
M ilk____________ 100 pounds.
Potatoes_______________ d o...
Wheat.......................... bushels.
Miscellaneous farm......... .........
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses__________________
Pillows................... - ____ _____
Metal products: Auto license tags.
Printing and binding:
Envelopes__________________
Letterheads_________________
Miscellaneous_______________
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases_________________
Sheets______________________
Towels.................................... .
Miscellaneous textile products.

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

NORTH DAKOTA
STATE PENITENTIARY

Clothing:
Aprons..
Hats and caps________________
Overalls_______ ______________
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Shirts, work__________________
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs..
Suits________________________
Underwear____ ______________
Miscellaneous labor only______
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings______ ______ __
New other than buildings and
roads__________ ___________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Com____________*_ -bushels..
_
Hay____________________tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
Milk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes_______________ do—
Wheat______________ bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm___________
Harness...................... ...............sets..
Land development: Land improve*
ment_________________ ____ ____
Lumber and timber products:
Lumber___________ board feet..
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shop work____________
Textiles and textile products:
Bags.................... ........................
Binder twine________ pounds-.
Pillowcases_____________ _____
Rope, twine (not binder) and
cordage____________ pounds..
Sheets-----------------------------------




------- -------------- --------- ------------ ---------- -------------- ----------- -------- -

0)
(0

1

$25,400.00
6,000.00

0)

1,550.00

0)

4,842.15
1,468.40
5.712.00
5,978.10
10,293.44
2,512.50
6.00
1.800.00
11,319.03
110.00

4
304
1

38.000

90,087
6,500
562

25.00
25.00

5,871.75
631.63
140.50

1,680.00

(0

78.50
1,255.00
75.00

75.000
541

110.2

106
3,975
664
343
5,275
3,045
12

8

967.00
700.00

8

$120.00
272.21

30

0)
48,350
0)

129
18
24
799
24
921
1,412
32
12
0)

541.00

» Enumeration impracticable.

$51.60
18.00
4.80
559.30
21.60
460.50
2,112.00
115.20
6.00
83.20
25,400.00
6,000.00
1.550.00
4,962.15
3,740.61
5.712.00
6,003.10
10,293.44
2,537.50
6.00
1.800.00
11,319.03
110.00
1,680.00

111.00

967.00
811.00

38.000

<
9

48,350
0)

78.50
1.255.00
75.00

8

90,087
5,871.75
4,160,050 335,972.16
562
14a 50

4,153,550 335,34a 53

1
* Less than one tenth of L

75.000
541

5.250.00
541.00

T able

A .— Kind, quantity and value of articles produced, in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued
N ORTH DAKOTA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

Number

Value

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY— c o n t i n u e d

0.7
.3
4.0
1.0

$244.70
178.00
2,616.00
420.00

Total.......................................

197.0

66,442.90

1,738
0)
(')
(0
$34,630.00

$244.70
178.00
2,616.00
420.00
436,966.64

$335,893.74

REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN

Clothing:
Dresses.........................................
Handkerchiefs................. ...........
Shirts, dress................................
Underwear.....................- ...........
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscella­
neous farm.................. ...................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases...............................—
Sheets..........................................
Spreads........................................
Towels........................ ................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products..........




35.0
2.0
1.0
1.0

11,345
320
677
379

$10,875.60
48.00
364.70
246.35

11,345
320
677
379

$10,875.60
48.00
364.70
246.35

8.0

0)

3,401.23

0)

3,401.23

5.0
5.0
7.0
2.0
3.0
3.0

2,556
5,333
288
1,709
0)
0)

639.00
4,373.00
864.00
205.08
226.50j
264.2411
..........

2,556
5,333
288
1,709
0)
(0

639.00
4,373.00
864.00
205.08
226.50
264.24

STATES, 1932

OHIO

I UNITED
N

Textiles and textile products—Con.
Towels..................... -................
Miscellaneous textile products.
Other manufactured products........
Miscellaneous, labor only....... ........

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

75.00

$34,000.00
80,000.00

237,377.56

1,645
10,035

2,467.76
9,345.56

494
1,459
70,404
48,348
3,492
177,955
27,557
762
7,008
3,783
31,178
38,310
4,991
17,206
1,923
102,583
(0

142.80
8,567.10
7,050.90
2,350.87
1,649.85
19.850.32
19,869.60
6.195.00
4,591.40
11,577.50
16.561.33
22,480.39
13,332.70
6,581.82
19.664.35
45.214.35
574.11
34.000.00
80.000.00

(0

19,504.26
12,340.96

2,801
6,227

12,437.16
747.24

1,470
(0

39,733.44
3.395.00

10,212

4,726.34
193,650.63
765.78
7,810.58
8,057.20
26,458.08
24, 767.69
84,635.62

C)

4,065,481
1,977
520,705
55,349
0)
0)
1,879,576

PRISONS

829

FEDERAL

20,188

$80.50

5,106.53

AD
N




17,472

STATE

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Mops.
17,472
7.0
5,106.53
Olay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands— 650.0
20,188 237,377. i
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone............................... tons..
1,645
24.0
Stone, crushed-................do___
10,035
143.0
•Clothing:
Aprons....................................... .
.1
142.80
Coats.............................. *...........
1,
11.0
8, 567.10
Gloves and mittens.........pairs. _
70,404
7.0
7, 050.90
Handkerchiefs....... ..................
8.0
48,348
2, 350.87
Hats and caps................... ..........
1, 649.85
4.8
3,492
Hosiery............... ............ pairs..
50.0
19, 850.32
177,955
Overalls-................................
30.0
19, 1.60.
27,557
Overcoats____ ____ ________
7.0
762
6, 195.00
Pajamas and nightgowns___
9.0
7,008
4, 591.40
Pants.....................................
13.0
3,770
11, 497.00
Shirts, dress............................
17.0
31,178
16, 561.33
Shirts, work...........................
22, 480.39
23.0
38,310
Shoes, new__...................pairs..
9.0
4,991
13, 332.70
Shoes, repaired_________ d o ...
14.0
17,206
6, 581.82
Suits...................... ...................
19, 589.35
26.0
1,918
Underwear.................................
68.4
102,583 45, 214.35
Miscellaneous............................
1.7
574.11
(0
Construction:
Alterations and installations__
14.0
0)
New buildings. .........................
90.0
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Hogs..................................head—
3.0
829
19,504.26
Miscellaneous farm................
25.0
12,340.96
0)
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses..............................
19.6
2,801
12,437.11
Pillows..................................
747.24
3.0
6,227
Lumber and timber products:
Millwork.................................
60.0
39,733.44
1,470
Miscellaneous................ ........
6.0
3,395.00
0)
Metal products:
Aluminum ware.............. ..........
13.0
10,212
4,726.34
Auto license tags........................ 136.0 4,065,481 193,650.63
Galvanized ware....................
2.0
765.
1,977
Tags, miscellaneous...............
2.0
520,705
7,810.58
Tinware........................ ..............
7.0
8,057.2f
20.
55,349
Miscellaneous..............................
63.0
26,458.0!
Printing and binding: Miscellaneous.
40.0
24,767.69
Soap and soap powder.......pounds—
84,635.62
29.0 1,879,576
1Enumeration impracticable.

Si

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and £ nstitution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

^
00

OHIO—Continued

p e n it e n t ia r y

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

—continued
10,177

$31,942.00

10,177

$31,942.00

225,195
5,:
4,346
13,108
53,306
246,017

67,132.29
854.55
2,449.60
2,034.76
56,379.70
99,110.48
813.80
34,402.90

225,195
5,203
4,346
13,108
53,306
246,017
0)
0)

67,132.29
854.55
2,449.60
2,034.76
56,379.70
99,110.48
813.80
34,402.90

5.0

1,995

214.48

1,995

214.48

5.0
4.0
1.0
5.0
9.0
2.0
10.0
100.0

247
9,379
501
1,764
402
1,218

1,624.50
964.50
147.60
1,135.40
1.253.00
780.50
7.928.00

247
9,379
501
1,764
402
1,218
528
1

1,624.50
964.50
147.60
1,135.40
1,253.00
780.50
7,928.00
100,000.00

6.0
25.0
2.0
6.9

143
20,000
852
358

4,631.43
6,000.00
11,786.23
8,156.35

143
20,000
852
358

4,631.43
6,000.00
11,786.23
8.156.35

8

THE LONDON PRISON FARM

Brooms,
brushes and mops:
Brushes_______________________
Clothing:
Coats, prison............................. .
Qloves and mittens------- pairs..
Hats and caps------ ----------------Overalls--------- ----------------------Pants, prison________________
Shirts, work------ -------------------Uniforms, prison................ .......
Construction: New buildings-------Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ headCom____ ________ __ bushels..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head-




$100,000.00

STATES, 1932

45.0
229.0
1.0
.9
1.0
60.0
135.0
1.5
15.0

I UNITED
N

Textiles and textile products:
Blankets____ ____ _____ _____
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets______ _________________
Towels--------- --------------- --------Wool yard goods_____ pounds..
_
Yam, cotton and w o o l...d o _
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

LABOR

state

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Miscellaneous dairy.

.
.

Miscellaneous livestock..
Harness..................................
Land development: Land improve­
ment.....................................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases_____________
Sheets.
Miscellaneous textile products..

5.0
26.0
124.0
.1
4.0

6,2721
8

36

2,822.401--------60,688.61
94,099.16
206.68 --------1,490.50

9.0 --------------L0
2.0
2.0

250
1,361
<9

56.0
10.0
11.0
48.0
10.0
16.0
120.0
66.0
23.0

2,988
4,670
10,136
12,832
5,076
8,996
44,385
6,918
1,313

6,272
~ — -------------- ------------- ----------------- -------------

: : z z z

10,000.00

(9

1
0)

50.00
1,020.75 --------- ----------------- ----------497.60

------------- -----------------

: z : z z

1,361
0)

2,822.40
50,588.61
94,099.16
206.58
1,490.50
10,000.00
50.00
1,020.75
497.60

STATE REFORMATORY

$154.00
-----------------

15

262.00

------------- : : : : : : : : : : : : :

-----------------

1,313

45,000.00 ------------ -------------- ------------- ----------------- ------------- -----------------

45,000.00
143
11,186
924
636
5,202

8

8
2,631

24,544.50

67
14,126
153
556
965

2,260.00
48,994.75
3,705.00
19,627. 50
20,033.25

-------------- ------------- -----------------

5,837.94
3.355.80
10,194.00
12,806.57
2,340.90
77,080.65
51,135.98

-----------------

2,260.00
48,994.75
3,705.00
19.627.50
20,033.25
9,554.25
31,768.27

8

-----------------

4,802
3,692
<9
(9

24.544.50

67
14,126
153
556
965

8

2,631

--------------- -------------

4,802
3 ,f“
?>

h

PRISONS

143
11,186
924
636
5,202

18,051.88
2,155.16
8,828.62
42,495.29
3,887.78
5.843.80
114,734.96
74,869.47
10,293.92

FEDERAL

10.0
20.0
6.0
37.0
5.0
65.0
85.0

1

25

2,988
4,670
10,136
12,857
5,076
8,996
44,385

AD
N

50.0

.
Miscellaneous dairy___
Miscellaneous farm..
Furniture and furnishings:
99.0
Beds................................. .
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
3.0
etc-----------------------------------Chairs, wood............................. . 315.0
Davenports, sofas, etc________
6.0
Desks______________________
51.0
Tables______________________ .
59.0
Miscellaneous...........................
15.0
L 140.0
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases______________
3.0
Sheets---------- ----------------4.0
2.0
Other manufactured products____
L0
i Enumeration impracticable.




18,051.88
2,155.16 --------- ----------------8,828.62
42,341.29
3,887.78
5,843.80
114,734.96
74,607.47 --------- ----------------10,293.92

STATE

Clothing:
Coats..
Hats and caps.
Overalls______
Pants________
.
Shirts, dress...
Shirts, work____________
.
Shoes, new____ ________ ;
Suits__________________
Uniforms, prison_______ ______
Construction: Alterations and in­
stallations................ ............
farm , garden, and dairy:
.
_______bushels. _
Corn____
__________tons.
Hay_____
.

1,244.68
2,894.13
683.48
360.00

CD

Table A,— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

Cr*
O

OHIO—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account
Number

Value

Piece price
Number

Value

Total

Contract
Number

Value

Number

Value

$214.48
5,106.53

V
17,472

$214.48
5,106.53

650.0

20,188

237,377.56

20,188

237,377.56

24.0
143.0

1,645
10,035

2,467.76
9,345.56

1,645
10,035

2,467.76
9,345.56

.1
72.0
35.0
11.0
10.0
15.8
50.0
46.0
7.0
9.0
70.0
28.0
41.0
129.0
14.0
92.0
69.4
33.0
1.7

494
4, 694
11, 345
79, 783
48, 668
8, 663
177, 955
457
762
7, 008
17, 004
36, 931
48, 524
49, 376
17, 206
8, 836
102, 962
1, 841
0)

142.80
28,243.48
10,875.60
8.015.40
2,398.87
3,952.61
19,850.32
29,833.62
6,195.00
4.591.40
55,091.29
20.813.81
29,104.69
128,067.66
6,581.82
94.196.82
45,460. 70
18,221.92
574.11

494
4,<
11,345
79,783
48,668
8,663
177,955
39,457
762
7,008
17,042
36,931
48,524
49,376
17,206
8,856
102,962
1,841
0)

142.80
28,243.48
10,875.60
8.015.40
2,398.87
3,952.61
19,850.32
29,833.62
6,195.00
4.591.40
55,325.79
20.813.81
29.104.69
128,067.66
6,581.82
94.533.82
45.460.70
18,221.92
574.11

64.0
190.0

38

$234.50

337.00

0)

$79,000. 00
180,000.00

0)

7 9 ,0 00 .00

180,000.00

STATES, 1932

1,995
17,472

I UNITED
N




5.0
7.0

LABOR

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brushes...................................... .
Mops.......................................... .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone................... .......... tons..
Stone, crushed..................do___
Clothing:
Aprons....................................... .
Coats.......................................... .
Dresses....................................... .
Gloves and mittens......... pairs..
Handkerchiefs........................... .
Hats and caps...................... .....
Hosiery.............................pairs..
Overalls.......................................
Overcoats........... ...................... .
Pajamas and nightgowns......... .
Pants...........................................
Shirts, dress................................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new..... ..................pairs..
Shoes, repaired*.................do___
Suits........................................... .
Underwear..................................
Uniforms, prison.... ...................
Miscellaneous............................
Construction:
Alterations and installations—
New buildings------- ---------------

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
Value
ployed Number

16.0
45.0
8.0
46.9
10.0
91.0
242.0
.1

(9
(9
(9

10,469.37
9,355.80
21,980.23
40,467.18
5,163.30
127,669. 26
160,977.33
206.58

2,631

24,544. 50

2,631

24,544.50

3.0
315.0
6.0
51.0
19.6
3.0
59.0
15.0
4.0

67
14,126
153
556
2,801
6,227
965

2,260.00
48,994. 75
3,705.00
19,627. 50
12,437.16
747.24
20,033.25
9,554. 25
1,490.50

67
14,126
153
556
2,801
6,227
965

2,260.00
48,994.75
3,705.00
19,627.50
12,437.16
747.24
20,033.25
9,554.25
1,490. 50

(9

9.0

(9
(9

10,000.00

36

(9

10,000.00
39,733.44
3,395.00

4,726.34
193,650. 63
765.78
7,810. 58
8,057.20
26,458.08

10,212
4,065,481
1,977
520,705
55,349

4,726.34
193,650.63
765.78
7,810.58
8,057.20
26,458.08

180.0
(9
29.0 1,879,576

56,535.96
84,635. 62

(9

1,879,576

56,535.96
84,635.62

45.0

10,177

31,942.00

10,177

31,942.00

229.0
10.0
11.9
7.0
3.0
60.0
135.0
8.5
19.0

225,195
12,811
14,732
288
14,817
53,306
246,017

132. 29
788.23
737.48
864.00
239.84
379.70
110.48
221.38
027.14

225,195
12,811
14,732
288
14,817
53,306
246,017

67,132.29
2,788.23
10.737.48
864.00
2,239.84
56,379. 70
99.110.48
2,221. 38
35,027.14

39,733.44
3,395.00

13.0
10,212
136.0 4,065,481
2.0
1,997
2.0
520,705
7.0
55,349
63.0
(9

(9
(9

_,2,020,618.18

(9

(9

(9
(9

269,000.00

2,290,189.68

PRISONS

1,470

1,470
(9

60.0
6.0

A D FEDERAL
N




8

<9

286
31,186
1,776
1,823
11,474

10,469.37
9,355.80
21,980.23
40,467.18
5,163.30
127,669.26
160,977,33
206.58

99.0

Total......................................... 3,886.0
1 Enumeration impracticable.

31,186
1,776
1,823
11,474

STATE

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...............................head—
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay....................................tons..
Hogs.................. ..............head—
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm._............ ...
Miscellaneous livestock.............
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds............. ........ .......................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.............................................
Chairs, wood..............................
Davenports, sofas, etc................
Desks...........................................
Mattresses_________ _______ —.
Pillows-.................................... .
Tables........................................ .
Miscellaneous.......................—
Harness..................................... sets..
Land development: Land improve­
ment..................... ..........................
Lumber and timber products:
Millwork.....................................
Miscellaneous.............................
Metal products:
Aluminum ware........................ .
Auto license tags........................
Galvanized ware.........................
Tags, miscellaneous....................
Tinware— ................ —..............
Miscellaneous.............................
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous printing............ ......................
Soap and soap powder.......pounds—
Textiles and textile products:
Blankets..................... : ...........
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds.
Pillowcases................................
Sheets.........................................
Spreads ......................................
Towels........................................
Wool yard goods......... pounds.
Yarn, cotton and w ool.—do___
Miscellaneous textile products.
Other manufactured products_____

T able

A#— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

Oi

to

STATE PRISONS— Continued
OKLAHOMA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

Number

Value

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Valuo

I UNITED
N

Value

Piece price

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE PENITENTIARY




15.0

4,476

$845.79

25,380

$4,792.84

29,856

$5,638.63

160.0

371

2,163.71

3,344

19,473.35

3,715

21,637.06

49
4,092
1,012,242
16,040
2,446
1,278

186.97
513.17
591,142.77
35,337.12
3,444.12
9,280.22

1.0
2.0
953.0
36.0
4.0
32.0

49
4,092
198
16,040
2,446
1,278

186.97
513.17
783.77
35,337.12
3,444.12
9,280.22

5,000
167
0)

2,000.00
1,835.43
42,526.21

20.0
4.0
4.0
91.0

0)

!9,172.79

$590,359.00

0)

9,172.79

5,000
167
0)

2,000.00
1,835.43
42,526.21

1,539
1,225

37.0
5.0
68.0
10.0
1.0
4.0
25.0
3.0
14.0

1,012,044

106
1,633
1,377
0)
678,525
9,142
0)

693.12
3,825.67
230.30
955.65
49,908.98
4,919.43
8,081.39

8,624.87
1,333.60

1,539
1,225

8,624.87
1,333.60

3,212

15,603.71

3,318
1,633
1,377
0)
678,525
9,142
(»)

16,296.83
3,825.67
230.30
955.65
49,908.98
4,919.43
8.081.39

STATES, 1932

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms.
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands. _
Clothing:
Coats_____________________
Hats and caps--------------------Pants--- --------- ------------------Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Shoes, repaired__________do----Suits............................ ................
Construction: Alterations and in­
stallations...... ................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn________________ bushels—
Hay....................................tons—
Miscellaneous farm--------------Furniture and furnishings*
Beds..................................... —
Benches—..................................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc________________________
Mattresses---------------------------Pillows-------------------------------Miscellaneous........ —................
Metal products: Auto licenses tags. Highway markers........... ..................
Printing and binding: Miscellaneous.

Repair and shop work............ .........
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine________ pounds..
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage____________ pounds-

22.0

c>

12,058.13

98.0

1,700,402

70,753.70

1,700,402

70,763.70

60.0

677,024

36,488.57

677,024

36,488.57

8,610

7,653.27

8,610

7,653.27

3,080
3,696
1,993
3,385
150

3,850.00
1,293.60
2,798.05
1,692.75
1,312.50

2,130
94
12
33
0)

852.00
3,015.00
155.14
360.00
20,417.96

12,058.13

(*>

-I

STATE REFORMATORY

300.0
3,080
3,696
1,993
3,385
150

3,850.00
1,293.6“
2,798.05 _
1,692.75
1,312.50

3.0
10.0
1.0
2.0
65.0

2,130

852.00

33

360.00
20,417.96

0)

3,015.00
155.14

AD
N

9.0
3.0
6.0
3.0
3.0

STATE

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed____________ tons—
Clothing:
Pants.............
Shirts, work_.
Shoes, new____ ________ pairs—
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Suits.............................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Com________________ bushels—
Cotton________________ bales—
Cottonseed---------------------tons—
Hay_______________ ____ do----Miscellaneous farm products—
ALL INSTITUTIONS

4,476

160.0
300.0

371

1.0
2.0
962.0
3.0
42.0
7.0
35.0

4,092
3,278
3,696
18,033
5,831
1,428

4,792.84

29,856

5,638.63

3,344
8,610

19,473.35
7,653.27

3,715
8,610

21,637.06
7,653.27

49
4,092
1,015,322
3,696
18,033
5,831
1,428

186.97
513.17
594,992.77
1,293.60
38,135.17
5,136.87
10,592.72

186.97 _
513.17 _
4,633.77
1,293.6'
38,135.17 _
5,136.87
10,592.72

7,130

25,380

PRISONS




15.0

FEDERAL

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brooms
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Stone, crushed__________ tons—
Clothing:
Coats-----------Hats and caps—
Pants_________
Shirts, work___
________pairs—
Shoes, new..
Shoes, repaired-------------- do___
Suits....................... ....................
Construction: Alterations and in­
stallations.......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn-_____ __________ bushels. .
Cotton________________ bales.
Cottonseed_____________ tons..
Hay—__________________do__
Miscellaneous farm__________
Furniture and furnishings:
Beds________________________
Benches____________________
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc—...................... ..................
i Enumeration impracticable.

2,852.00

845.79 .
2,163.71

1,012,044

20.0
7.0
10.0
1.0
6.0
156.0

0)

200
(0

3,015.00
155.14

2,195.43
62,944.17

37.0
5.0
68.0

590,359.00

9,172.79

7,130
94
12
200
(0

2.852.00
3.015.00
155.14
2,195.43
62,944.17

1,539
1,225
106

>3.12

8,624.87
1,333.

1,539
1,225

8,624.87
1,333.60

3,212

15,603.71

3,318

16,296.83

Ol
OO

T able

A,— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution—Continued

Cn

STATE PRISONS— Continued
OKLAHOM A—Continued

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

c o n tin u e d

1,633
1,377
0)
9,142
678, 525
0)
0)

$3,825.67
230.30
955.65
4,919.43
49,908.98
8,081. 39
12,058.13

1,633
1,377
(9
9,142
678,525
0)
0)
1, 700, 402

1,700,402 $70,753. 70

98.0

677,024

60.0
212,166.04

2,064.0

$9,172.79

70,753.70

677,024

36,488.57
167,894.05

$3,825.67
230.30
955.65
4,919.43
49,908.98
8,081.39
12,058.13

$590,359. 00

36,488.57
979,591.88

OREGON
STATE PENITENTIARY

Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Clay, cement and stone products:
Lime and agricultural limestone
tons..




0.7

5,226

$261.30

7.0

301

1,429.18

6,226
1,314

$7,138.57

$261.30

1,615

8,567.75

STATES, 1932

Total....................................

10.0
1.0
4.0
3.0
25.0
14.0
22.0

I UNITED
N

Furniture and furnishings—Contd.
Mattresses.................. ................
Pillows_____ _________________
Miscellaneous.......................... ..
Highway markers............................ .
Metal products: Auto license tags..
Printing and binding: Miscellaneous.
Repair and shop work......................
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine...............pounds..
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage..................... pounds..

LABOR

a l l in s t it u t io n s —

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unii
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Clothing:
Aprons____ __________________
Coats.......................................... .
Hats and caps________________
Hosiery.............................pairs..
Overalls.......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants.............................. .........
Shirts, work____ ______ ______ _
Shoes, new_____ _______ pairs..
Shoes, repaired....... ..........do___
Suits........................................... .
Uniforms, prison_____________
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle................... ........... head..
Flax industry....................tons..
Hogs......... ........ ............... head..
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do___
Miscellaneous farm....................
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches_____ ________________
Tables______ ________________
Miscellaneous............................ .
Land development: Land improve­
ment.............................................. .
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous...................................... .
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound______
Envelopes...................................
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous..................... .......
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases___ ____ __________
Sheets.............. ................ ..........
Towels______________________
Total______________________
i Enumeration impracticable.




.3
1.2
.6
11.0
2.6
.1
2.4
7.7
17.0
2.0
13.8
.3
.1

480
584
904
5,971
2,101
48
1,470
4,026
l , r '~
1,820
529
56

168.00
2,995.92
223.20
537.39
2,140.30
21.06
2,795.48
3,423.05
5.348.00
827.84
5.819.00
36.40

51.75

680.00
(0

5?50

480
584
904
5,971
2,101
48
1,479
4,026
1,948
1,820
569
5|
6
0)

168.00
2,995.92
223.20
537.39
2,140.30
21.06
2,847.23
3.423.05
5.348.00
827.84
6.499.00
36.40
5.50

26.8

0)

$70,428.24

0)

70,428.24

.2

0)

500.00

0)

500.00

.5
170.9
4.0
9.5
15.4
48.6
.3
.4
.6

14

298.99

501

7,493.06
7,655.42
2,726.96
10,248.74

4,508
0)
300
300
(0

225.00
300.00
600.00

3.0
.1
.2
.3
.3
3.2
.3
.3
352.0

120
63.000
54.000
0)

1,200
2,000

2,500

360.49
126,763.00
7.493.06
7,655.42
2,726.96
10,248.74
225.00
300.00
600.00

(0
(0

(0

34
1,077
501
3,828
4,508
(0
300
300

20
61.50
1,077 126,763.00

1,000.00

(0

51.75
48.00
160.04
1,207.72

120
63.000
54.000
0)

204.00
1,000.00
325.00

2,000
2,500

101.20

58,672.00

,

1 000.00
51.75

0)

1,200

71,928.24

134,700.32

48.00
160.04
101.20

1,207.72

,

204.00
1 000.00
325.00
265,300.56

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

gj

0

STATE PRISONS— Continued
PENNSYLVANIA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

STATE INDUSTRIAL HOME

1.1
1.5
.1
1.5
1.0
.9
1.5

681
364
139
602
299
521
0)

1.0
1.0
10.0
1.0
1.0
36.0

25
84
3,266
1,056
(l)
0)

.1
.2
.4
1.7

119
65
394
C9

681
364
139
602
299
621

473.17
1,104.37
11,686.11
1,267.20
1,664.50
10,919.31 --------- -----------------

$234.20
455.00
15.10
626.75
224.25
191.00
381.50

25
86
3,266
1,056

$234.20
455.00
15.10
626.78
224.25
191.00
881.60

473.17
1,127.62
11,586.11
1,267.20
1,564.50
10,954.70

(0
2

0)

$23.25

35.39

8
119
65
394

29.75
48.75
66.80
308.25

29.75
48.75
66.80
308.25

720
3,152
468
6,408
3,588
187,600

323.75
6,971.25
103.35
306.90
897.00
19,064.31

0)

EASTERN STATE PENHTENTIARY

Clothing:
Gloves and mittens----------------HanflkArphfefo....
Hats and caps .. .................. .
Hosiery ____
___ pairs—




.2
4.8
.1
.2
.8
41.0

720
3,152
468
6,408
3,588
187,500

323.75
6,971.25
103.35
306.90
897.00
19,064.31

-----------

------------- ----------------- -------------

----------------_________

STATES, 1932

Presses___ ___________________
__ ____
Hats and caps- __
O veralls-_____ —______ - ___
Pajamas and nightgowns--------TTnderwear.. _ __________
Miscellaneous________________
Farm, garden, and dairy
Cattle_________________ head—
TTncw
_
dn
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes_______________ do----Miscellaneous dairy___________
Miscellaneous farm-----------------Textiles and textile products:
PjllA^r^QM
Sheets_______________________
Towels
___ _______________
Miscellaneous textile products—

I TJN
N
ITBD

Clothing:

LABOB

Num­
ber

State account

PBISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

.11
11.9
12.5
104.0
18.0
8.8
24.1
.1

159
16,201
18,998
37,796
6,740
1,609
47,414
0)

145.95
25,112.75
10,271.38
99,925.20
7,095.23
12,868.25
17,010.67
53.40

— —

(9

4.0

477,500
461,000
0)

2,009.27
1,428.55
25,712.34

12.4
26.6
.9
.8
2.7
.9
67.1
8.0

15,626
34,493
18,708
4,224
7,994
7,500

8,426.23
17,819.30
1,194.97
899.80
3,717.64
1,093.75
1,462.70
5,246.39

4*567.00

337.50
984.00
3,340.62
1,597.35
1,169.98
6,206.02

2.6
1.8
33.6
10.0

(0

1,121.00
10 1,012,889.00

0)

222,349.00

----------------- ------------- -----------------

4,567.00

750
62
216
1,192
1,918
0)

----------- -------------- -------------

(9

(0

--------- ------__ ______ __ ____ . . . . .

337.50
984.00
3,340.62
1,597.35
1,169.98
6,206.02
222,349.00

0)
477,500
461,000

(9

(9

8

504.65 -------------

15,626
34,493
18,708
4,224
7,944
7,500

5,354.25

8

2,009.27
1,428.55
25,712.34
504.65
8,426.23
17,819.30
1,194.97
899.80
3,717.64
1,093.75
6,816.95
5,246.39

PRISONS

750
62
216
1,192
1,918
0)

—— -----___ __ ___

FEDERAL

3.2
1.0
3.0
5.0
4.2
13.6
wu: q

$1,121.00
10 1,012,889.00

145.95
25,112.75
10,271.38
99,925.20
7,095.23
12,868.25
17,010.67
53.40

AD
N

(9

1.0
635.1

159
16,201
18,998
37,796
6,740
1,
47,414
0)

STATE

Pajamas and nightgowns______
Pants. ......... .......
Shirts, work____
Shoes, new_____
_pairs_do_.
Shoes, repaired__
Suits..
Underwear..
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings......... ........... .......
New, other than buildings and
roads______________________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Com________________ bushels—
—tons—
H ay_
..head..
Hogs.
Potatoes_________ 100 pounds..
Wheat______________ bushels..
Miscellaneous farm___________
Land development: Land improve­
ments______________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes_______
Letterheads.
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shop work____________
Textiles and textile products:
Cotton yard goods—
Light____________ pounds..
Heavy_____________ do___
Flags________________________
Pillowcases---------------------------Sheets.
Towels______________________
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____
STATE INDUSTRIAL REFORMATORY

Clothing:
Coats, prison-----Pants, prison____
Shirts, work___
Farm, garden, and dairy:
..head.
Cattle------------Corn.. ______________ bushels—
___
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs---------------------------- head-.
M ilk------------------- 100 pounds..
Potatoes----------------------- do----* Enumeration impracticable.




15.3
4.2
6.1

1,383
632
2,984

1.0
4.8
7.1
7.0
12.0
3.0

39
2,148
176
262
6,352
1,316

5,076.52
1,395.45
2,221.52
816.71
-------------- ------------- ----------------- ------------966.60
----------------2,808.00
7,355.04
----------------- -----------22,932.32
M
1,454.19 n __, ___________

1,383
632
2,984
, , _ ,„

5.076.52
1,395.45
2.221.52

2,148
176
262
6,352
1,316

816.71
966.60
2,808.00
7,355.04
22,932.32
1,454.19

3

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by Stale, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

Ol
00

PENNSYLVANIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

8TATE INDUSTRIAL REFORMATORY—

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

continued
1,254
0)

$742. 68
19,560.85

1,254
(l)

$742.68
19,560.85

6.0
17.2
4.2
19.0
23.8
4.3

202
5,783
278
503
1,010
0)

6,596.59
18,794.79
4,463.55
20,585.02
26,204.73
4,761.78

202
5,783
278
503
1,010
<
*)

6,596.59
18,794.79
4,463.55
20,585.02
26,204.73
4,761.78

.5

0)

475.95

0)

475.95
414.39
265.64
8,411.28

1.0
.6
18.4

113,950
55,069
0)

414.39
265.64
8.411.28

113,950
55,069
0)

1.7
4.0
4.1
2.6

2,413
3,019
11,566

<9

579.12
1,630.26
1.358.29
824.68

2,413
3,019
11,566
(0

579.12
1,630.26
1,358.29
824.68

2.0

13,638

% 843.57

13,638

2,843.57

.4
5.0

1,212
3,276

525.00
6,898.22

WESTERN STATE PENITENTIARY

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brushes_______________ _______ _
Clothing:
Aprons___________ ___________
Coats..........................................




1,212

3,276

525.00
6,898.22

STATES, 1932

2.4
41.7

I UNITED
N

Farm, garden, and dairy—Contd.
Wheat..........................bushels..
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc............................................
Chairs, wood................. ............
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Desks______ _______ _________
Tables........................................ .
Miscellaneous.............................
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous......................................
Printing and binding:
Envelopes___________________
Letterheads_______________
Miscellaneous.............................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.... ............................
Sheets........... ...............................
Towels
. ...................
Miscellaneous textile products..

.2

(0
5,329

212.501
814.66
8,069.75
1,788.65
27,078.40
656.60
10,928.82
12,016.86
1,706.25
1,092.48
3,405.47

74.8 3,799,702
683,976
2.3
.1
0)

.6
5.9
1.3
20.0
.5
8.0
8.9
1.4
.8

600
3,822
10,332
2,872
15,905
570
12,846
1,466

2,100

600
3,822
10,332
2,872
15,905
570
12,846
1,465
5,329

212.50
814.66
8,069.75
1,788.65
27,078.40
656.50
10,928.82
12,016.86
1,706.25
1,092.48
3,405.47

322,979.20
10,110.73
360.00

3,799, 702
683,976
0)

322,979.20
10,110.73
36a 00

2,100

0)

292
9,117

514.67
27,351.00

61.4
32.3
1.5
4.8

77,521
36,462
7,—
9,284
10,502
0)

30,810.88
20,865.54
2,012.51
6,489.97
1,267.78
3,024.30

77,521
36,462
7,.—
9,284
10,502
0)

30,810.88
20,865.54
2,012.51
6,489.97
1,267.78
3,024.30

$35,000.00
23.000.00

0)

35,000.00
23,000.00

18.000.00

0)

1.0

2.3

STATE PENITENTIARY AT ROCKVIEW

Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings.................... .......
New, other than buildings and

60.0
27.0

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle____ ____________ head—
Corn________________bushels..
Hay---------- ------------------- tons—
Hogs_____________ _____ head..
M ilk_____________ 100 pounds.
Potatoes___________ ____ do----Wheat____ __________bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy_____ _____
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock_______

3.0
20.0
6.0
9.0
20.3
24.0
8.0
1.7
136.1
.9

0)

22.0
4,659.78
5,788.80
7,712.00
5,292.77
30,223.43
12,558.50
4,054.06
2,495.28
118,477.67
1,156.46

(0

$101.67.

2

18,000.00

99
12,864
482
287
10,460
10,046
6,646
0)
0)
0)

4,659.78
5,788.80
7,712.00
5,292.77
30,223.43
12,568.60
4,064.06
2, "95.28
118,579.34
1,156.46

PRISONS

514.67
27,351.00

FEDERAL

292
9,117

AD
N

.4
42.3

STATE

Oloves and mittens......... pairs..
Hats and caps.....................
Overalls.............................
Pajamas and nightgowns. _
Pants________ ___________
Shirts, dress_____________
Shirts, work_____________
Suits___ ______ __________
Underwear______________
Miscellaneous________________
Highway markers_
_
Metal products:
Auto license tags.
Tags, miscellaneous___________
Miscellaneous________________
Textiles and textile products:
Bags........................................
Blankets__________________
Cotton yard goods:
Light.......................-poun ds..
Heavy____ ________ pounds
Pillowcases__________ ______ _
Sheets______________________
Towels_____ _______ _______
Miscellaneous textile products—

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brushes_______________________
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats-----------------------------------Dresses---------------------------------i Enumeration impracticable.




2.0

13,638

2,843.57

13,638

2,843.57

1.7
25.1
1.5

2,513
7,811
364

1,082.95
18,945.99
456.00

2,513
7,811
364

1,082.95
18,945.99
455.00

<5

CO

T a b l e A , — Kind,

quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

o>
O

PENNSYLVANIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

all institutions—continued

Clothing—Continued
Gloves and mittens_____ pairs—
Handkerchiefs________ _______
Hats and caps________________
Hosiery_______ ________ pairs. _
Overalls....... ..............................
Pajamas and nightgowns...........
Pants______ _________________
Shirts, dress__________________
Shirts, work____ _____________
Shoes, new____ ________ pairs. _
Shoes, repaired__________do___
Suits________________________
Underwear____ ______________
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings.......... ..................
New, other than buildings and
roads............ . ..........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head—
Corn________________ bushels. _
Hay........................... ........tons—
Hogs.................................head—
M ilk____________ 100 pounds—
Potatoes.......................... -do----Wheat................... ...... bushels—
Miscellaneous dairy...... ........ .
Miscellaneous farm......... .......
Miscellaneous livestock_____




0.3
.2
1.5
41.0
7.4
2.4
36.1
.5
26.6
104.0
18.0
17.7
26.4
2.4

1,1
6,408
7,549
187,500
10,834
3,330
32,738
570
34,828
37,796
6,740
3,074
50,035

(9

$315.
306.
1,726.
19,064.
8,596.
2,158.
53,586.
656.
23,421.
99,925.
7,095.
24,885.
18,907.
1,527.

34,
37,
6,
3,
50,

<9
(9

26.0
163
15,762
720
84S
20,078
13,610
9,818

(9
(9
(9

5,949.66
7,092.90
11,504.00
17,092.80
64,741.86
16,877.24
5,966. 72
4,059.78
155,163.85
1,156.46

(9

$36,121.00
1,035,889.00

(9

61.0
662.1

5.0
28.0
13.1
20.0
42.3
33.0
14.6
2.7
227.4
.9

7,
187,
10,
3,

22,567.00

$315.85
306.90
1,726. 76
19,064.31
8,J59f> 50
.
2,158.85
53,586.60
656.50
23,421.72
99,925.20
7,095.23
24,885.11
18,907.92
1,527.38
36.121.00
1,035,889.00
22.567.00

$23.25

(9

137.06

163
i, 762
720
851
1,078
1,610
►
,818

5,949.66
7,092.90
11.504.00
17,116.05
64,741.86
16,877.24
5,966.72
4,059.78
155,300.91
1,156.4ft

P ISO
R N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Blankets_____________________
Cotton yard goods, light
pounds..
Cotton yard goods, heavy
pounds..
Flags________________________
Pillowcases___ __________ _ __
_
Sheets_______________________
Towels______________________
Miscellaneous textile products-.
Other manufactured products_____
TotaL.

6.0
17.2
4.2
19.0
23.8
4.3

202
5,783
278
503
1,010

202
5,783
278
503
1,010

<
9

0)
5,329

5,329

205.9

0)
0)

_

93,147

58.9
.9
4.1
11.7
6.4
73.7
8.0

70,955
18,708
14,624
20,312
29,962
(*)

475.95

591,450
516,069
0)
0)

1,194.97
3,786.62
5,619.93
5,246.39

2,148.0________ 1,169,130.22

0)

5,354.25

514.67
27,351.00
39,237.11

70,955
18,708
14,624
20,312
29,962

39,237.11

2,423.66
1,694.19
34.123.62
504.65

93,147

504.65

322,979.20
10.110.73
360.00

292
9,117

0)

<9

222,349.00

t, 779,702
683,976
0)

292
9,117

63.8

0)

591,450
516,069
(0

.4
42.3

0)

475.95

74.8 3,799,702
2.3
683,976
.1
0)
3.6
2.4
52.0
10.0

222,349.00

6,596.59
18,794.79
4,463.55
20,585.02
26.204.73
4,761.78
3,405.47

38,684.84
1,194.97
3,521.18
11.886.62
3, 786.62
10,974.18
5,246.39

0)
1,316,926.00

6,019.21

2,492,075.43

RHODE ISLAND
STATE PRISON

Clothing:
Aprons................. ...................
Hats and caps____ _________
Overalls......... .........................
Pajamas and nightgowns____
Pants.......................................
Shirts, work____ _____ ______
i Enumeration impracticable.




L0
L0
2.0
1.0
4.0
303.0

104
438
514
17
1,519
1,881

$26.00
131.40
390.50
5.95
3,038.00
1,128.60

992,748

$3§i, 147.75

104
438
514
17
1,519
994,629

$26.00
131.40
390.50
5.95
3,038.00
392,276.35

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers,
etc.................................
Chairs, wood___________
Davenports, sofas, etc___
Desks_________________
Tables.
Miscellaneous________________
Highway markers........... .................
Land development: Land improve­
ment..................... ................. .......
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous....................... ...............
Metal products:
Auto license tags_____________
Tags, miscellaneous___________
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes___________________
Letterheads.
Miscellaneous___________
Repair and shop work_______
Textiles and textile products:

T a b le

A. — Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by Stale, system, and institution

Continued

STATE PRISONS— Continued
RHODE ISLAND—Continued

s t a t e p e is o n —

Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

continued

Clothing—Continued.
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs. _
Uniforms, p rison -.................... .
Construction: New, other than
buildings and roads...................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Com ___________ ____ bushels. _
Hay____________ _______ tons—
M ilk_____________100 pounds—
Potatoes............................do—
Miscellaneous farm....................
Printing and binding: Miscella­
neous..............................................
Textiles and textile products: Pil­
lowcases.............. —.......................

2.0
2.0

1,800
253

43.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
33.0
9.0

1,

$1,080.00
1,138.50
0)

98
208

49.50
4,576.00

2,635
0)

0)

198

$870.46

49.50
4.576.00
870.46
4.392.00
35,005.15

(0

3,46a 13

(0

12,556.00

98
208
198
2,6
0)

$12,556.00

4,392.00
35,005.15

3,460.13
57.60

57.60

1.0

$1,080.00
1,138.50

REFORMATORY FOB WOMEN

Clothing:
Hats and caps________________
Overalls.................................. —
Pajamas and nightgowns......... .
Shirts, dress......... ................. .
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscella­
neous farm......................................
Other manufactured products--------




.2
1.0
.3
7.5
2.0
L0

138
296
78
348

8

34.50
222.00
69.42
313.20
267.55
695.09

16,130

$4,132.50

138
296
78
16,478

8

34.50
222.00

69.42
4,445.70
267.55
605.09

P ISO
E N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Total______________________

L0
1.2

3.0
L3
4.0
7.5
303.0
2.0
2.0

104
576
810
95
1,519
348
1,881
1,800
253

26.00
165.90
612.50
75.37
3.038.00
313.20
1,128.60
1.080.00
1,138.50

98

49.50
4,576.00

43.0

16,130
992,748

3.0
35.0

0)

0.0

<
*)

0)
198

870.46

57.60
695.09

1.0
1.0

2,635

421.0

4,392.00
35,272.70

12,556.00

98
208
198
2,635
(9

3,460.13.

0)

4,132.50
391,147.75

12,556.00

(0

1.0
2.0
1.0

104
26.00
576
165.90
810
612.50
75.37
95
1,519
3.038.00
4,445.70
16,478
994,629 392,276.35
1,800
1.080.00
1,138.50

49.50
4.576.00
870.46
4.392.00
35,272.70

0)

(0

56,081.09

12,556.00

870.46

3,460.13
57.60
695.09

395,280.25

464,787.80

SOUTH CAROLINA
STATE PENITENTIARY

Clothing:
Overalls____ _______________
Pants________ _____________
Shirts, work............................
Construction: New buildings___
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Com_________ ______ bushels—
Cotton------------ ------------ bales..
Cottonseed........................ tons..
Hay................................... do___
Hogs.................................head—
Miscellaneous farm.....................
Furniture and furnishings:
Chairs, fiber................................
Chairs, wood_________________
* Enumeration impracticable.




0.4
1.1
.8
50.0

392
980
980

$392.00
980.00
735.00

9.0

71
12,000

2.500.00
4.800.00

_ __

500
625
0)

6,000.00
9,500.00
16,175.00

1

392
980
980
1
71
12,000
350
140
1,000
625
0)

$81,000.00

350
140
500

$9,246.80
1,570.77
6,000.00

12,294
10,577

$37,013.94
90,191.57

$392.00
980.00
735.00
81,000,00
2,500.00
4,800.00
9,246.80
1,570.77
12,000.00.
9,500.00
16,175.00,

12.294
10.577

37,013.94
90,191.57

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Clothing:
Aprons____________________
Hats and caps______________
Overalls...................................
Pajamas and nightgowns____
P a n ts................................... .
Shirts, dress_______________
Shirts, work_____ __________
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs..
Uniforms, prison........ ..............
Construction: New, other than
buildings and roads................. ......
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn________________ bushels,.
Hay____________ _______ tons..
M ilk____________ 100 pounds—
Potatoes...... ..................... do___
Miscellaneous farm....................
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous.................................................
Textiles and textile products: Pil­
lowcases.............. ............ ..............
Other manufactured products_____

o

CO.

T able

A• Kind, quantity, and vaZue of articles produced in State and Federal prisons,
—

by State, system, and institution—Continued

STATE PRISONS—Continued
SOUTH CAROLINA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY— C o n t in u e d

Furniture and furnishings—Contd.
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Tables______ ____ ___ ___ ___
Miscellaneous_______________
Highway markers............................
Metal products: Auto-license tags.
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets________________ ______
Total_______________ ______

80.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
18.0

292,000

$1, 500.00
14,600.00

1.9

5.710
5.710

9,225
2,034
0)

$101,297.33
6,147.92
1,729.14

704.25
1,713.00

2,000

459.0

59,599.25

9,225 $101,297.33
6,147.92
2,034
1,729.14
0)
1.500.00
2,000
14,600.00
292,000
5.710
5.710

$81,000.00

$16,817.57

704.25
1.713.00
393,796.72

236,379.90

SOUTH DAKOTA
STATE PENITENTIARY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, crushed..................... tons.
Clothing:
Aprons......... —.............- .........
Coats__________________ ____
Dresses.......................................
Gloves and mittens....... .pairs.,
Hats and caps............................
Overalls_____________________




0.5
(*)
(2 ‘
)

3,000

$2,250.00

3,000

$2,250.00

121
210
24
1,632
810
750

47.20
780.00
24.00
163.20
228.00
538.70

121
210
24
1,632
810
750

47.20
780.00
24.00
163.20
228.00
538.70

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

79
260
1,277
3,050
I

<
9

66.80
1.040.00
637.50
2.150.00
351.00
25.00

(9
1.00
0.50

10.0
1.0
1.0
2.6
1.2
4.0
2.0
9.0
.6
.3
17.3
3.0
9.1

79
260
1,277
3,050
864

0)
2,462
4
486

8,386.60
358.00
544.32
9,927.87
4,832.71
13,676.92

4,934
399,326

$532.40
693.85

3,793
14
486
309
4,298
848

2,977.23
132
0)

74.70

8

261.40

4,934
399,326

167.0
.1

3,550
732

247.50
183.00

4.0
1.1
.2
.1
1.0

1,647
3,190

1.647.00
382.80
204.00
2.400.00
61,821.62

40,000.00
1.250.00

2, 000.00
1,517.20
1,093.85
4.860.00
2,977.23
8,386.60
432.70
544.32
10,189.27
4,832.71
13,676.92

65,975
32,370

263.90
113.30
4,036.50
71.00

6,095,050 410,176.17

6,098,600
732

410,423.67
183.00

8,627.32

80,434
1,647
3,190

8,627.32
1.647.00
382.80
204.00
2.400.00

<
9
(9

80,434

8
43,250.00

423,343.07

528,414.69

PRISONS

65,975
32,370

8

(9
1,331
10

263.90
113.30
4*036.50
71.00

.4
.2
4.4
(’)

405.0

1
0.50

2,000.00

984.80
400.00
4,860.00

4,298
716

$40,000.00
1,250.00

66.80
1.040.00
637.50
2.150.00
351.00
25.00

A D FEDERAL
N

Total______________________

<>
*
.7
.4
2.0
.2
<*)

STATE

Pajamas and nightgowns-------------Pants...........................................
Shirts, work____ _______ _____ _
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs..
Underwear__________________ _
Miscellaneous________________
Construction:
New buildings_______________
Boads, new..................... miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn________________ bushels..
Cattle_________________ head..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Wheat.......................... bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm___________
Highway markers_____ __________
Metal products: Auto license tags
Printing and binding:
Envelopes___________________
Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shop work............ .........
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine............... pounds..
Pillowcases................... ............ .
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage_______ ____ pounds..
Sheets______________ _______ _
Towels....................................... .
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products........ .

TENNESSEE
STATE PENITENTIARY

Clothing:
Coats, prison---------------------Hats and caps--------------------Hosiery________________pairs..
Overalls___________________




4.7
2,275 $10,507.80
.3
2,724
650.88
120.0
324
723.00
.3
l Enumeration impracticable.

1,597,104
* Less than one tenth of 1.

2,275 $10,507.80
2,724
650.88
$93,164.40 1,597,104
93,164.40
324
723.00
O
Or

T a b l e A* — Kind,

quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, fry State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued

a>
o

TENNESSEE—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY—Continued
Clothing—Continued
Pants, prison____ ____________
Shirts, work____ _______ _____
Shoes, new....................... pairs. _
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle..............................head..
Hogs..................................do—
Miscellaneous farm...................
Miscellaneous livestock............
Metal products: Castings, .pounds.
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases______ ____________
Sheets______________________
Towels_____ ________________

7.6
950.5
2.2
32.4
36.0
40.2
5.4
174.0

6,324
5,106
4,026

$16,658.70
3,137.76
10,380.24

153

1,797.75
8,000.00
410.90

8 '

.1
.2

1,116
l,f“
3,240

73,419

66,825.47

1,801
145
30
3,261
766
0)
0)
(0

489.50
720.20
1,742.40
462.00
13,917.05
958.05
2,260.60
2,992. 57
13,680.58

$5,743.38
4,643. 75
221. 72
574.95

111
551
160,455.00 8,445,000

133.20
475.20
324.00

164,182

160,322.93

8
1,801
145
30
3,261
766

8,445,000

5,743.38
6,441.50
8,221.72
985.85
160,455.00

1,116
V
3,240

8

133.20
475.20
324.00

615.0

6,324 $16,658.70
3,360,000 $1,088,893.00 3,365,106 1,092,030.76
4,026
10,380.24

489.50
720.20
1,742.40
462.00
13,917.05
958.05
2,260.60
2,992.57
18,400.19

8

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN PENITENTIARY
Coal mining............... .............tons.
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle.................... .........head..
Com _____________ — bushels—
Hay................................... tons
Hogs.......... .......................head—
Milk.....................100 pounds—
Potatoes............................do.
Miscellaneous dairy................
Miscellaneous farm............... .
Other manufactured products___




2.0
3.0
7.0
2.0
9.0
3.0
2.0
11.0
35.0

90,763

0)

93,497.46

4,719.61

8

0)

P IS N LA?O
R O
R I U ITE
N N D STATES, 1932

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Total....................................

2,724

10,507.80
650.88

324
6,324
5,106
4,026
73,419

723.00
16,658.70
3,137.76
10,380.24
66,825.47

8
1,801
145
183
3,261
766

489.50
720.20
1,742.40
2,259.75
13,917.05
958.05
2,260.60
10,992.57
410.90

2,275

1,116
V
3,240
(0

90,763

93,497.46

111

93,164.40

5,743.38

119
1,801
145
581
3,261
766

4,643.75

221.72
574.95

8,445,000

160,455.00 8,445,000
1,116
1,980
3,240

133.20
475.20
324.00
13,680. 58

(9

4,719.61

0)

157,247.85

2,063.0

10,507.80
2,275
650.88
2,724
93,164.40
1,597,104
723.00
324
16,658.70
6,324
3,360,000 1,088,893.00 3,365,106 1,092,030.76
10,380.24
4,026
164,182 160,322.93
1,597,104

109,400.87

6,232.88
720.20
1,742.40
6,903.50
13,917.05
958.05
2,260.60
11,214.29
985.85
160,455.00
133.20
475.20
324.00
18,400.19
1,609,161.12

1,342,512.40

TEXAS
PRISON STSTEM

Agricultural implements_____
Clothing:
Aprons...............................
Coats..................................
Hats and caps___________
Pants..................................
Shirts, work_____________ ___
Shoes, new------------------- pairs. _
Shoes, repaired.................do___
Underwear...............................
Construction: New buildings___
1 Enumeration impracticable.




9.0

30

$2,687.20

1.0
3.0
2.0
15.0
17.0
96.0
3.0
11.0
140.0

861
4,494
10,518
30,873
30,097
29,930
3,703
3Q,616

287.00
1,954.89
1,669.22
10,188.09
11,135.89
61,743.79
2,778.00
7,435.66

15

85
5 $364.086.94

$1,343.55

613.18

45

$4,03a 75

861
4,494
10,518
30,873
30,097
30,015
3,703
30,616
5

287.00
1,954.89
1,669.22
10,188.09
11,135.89
62,356.97
2,778.00
7,435.66
364,086.94

S A E A D FEDERAL PRISONS
TT
N

Clothing:
Coats, prison______________
4.7
Hats and caps......... ..............
.3
Hosiery............... ............ pairs.. 12a 0
Overalls___________________
.3
Pants, prison______________
7.6
950.5
Shirts, work__________ ____
2.2
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Coal mining..........................__tons.. 615.0
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head— 34.4
3.0
Corn-------------------------bushels..
Hay___________________ tons..
7.0
Hogs.................................head..
38.0
9.0
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do.
3.0
Miscellaneous dairy________
2.0
51.2
Miscellaneous farm_________
5.4
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Metal products: Castings.,pounds._ 174.0
Textiles and textile products:
.1
Pillowcases________________
.2
Sheets......................................
.1
Towels...... ..............................
35.0
Other manufactured products___

A*— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by Stale, system, and institution—Continued

168

T a b le

STATE PRISONS— Continued
TE X AS—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system

em
ployed Number

p r is o n s y s t e m —

Public works and
ways

State use

Value

Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

continued

Farm, garden, and dairy:
48.0
Cattle_________________ head—
Corn________________ bushels. _ ,364.0
Cotton________________ bales— ,850.0
Cottonseed____________ tons— 274.0
Hay___________________ do----- 137.0
32.0
Hogs............... ............. head—
275.0
Miscellaneous farm— ...........
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
25.0
ous printing________ ____________
Repair and shop work...................... 151.0
Textiles and textile products:
2.0
Pillowcases________________
4.0
Sheets_____________________
1.0
Towels____________________
2.0
Miscellaneous textile products..
Total__

951
325,000

$27,201.68
162,500.00

(9

4,!
1,560

8

14,624.08
72,330.46

11,822
11,750
14,108
(0

4,462.0

$27,201.68
162,500.00
416,969.75
53,585.04
71,920.00
18.248.30
59.039.30

8

(9

14,624.08
76,863.84

11,822
11,750
14,108
(9

1,027.33
2,402.98
352.70
913.90
530,440.47

951
325,000
11,423
4,992
4,960
1,560

<
9

71,920.00
18.248.30
59.039.30

11,423 $416,969.75
4,992 53,585.04

$364,086.94_______

1,027.33
2,402.98
352.70
913.90
1,371,572.31

477,044.90

UTAH
STATE PRISON

Clothing:
Aprons____________________
Overalls____ _______________
Shirts, work...........................
Shoes, repaired--------------pairs—




(9

4.0
1.0
1.0

36
1,320
372
1,000

$5.40
660.00
130.20
850.00

480

$270.00

36
1,800
372
1,000

$5.40
930.00
130.20
850.00

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
prisunit

1,062.30
----------------- ------------ -----------------------------450.00 ______
------------- ----------------- ------------1,314.00
14
5,317.55
50.00 ------------- --------------------------------308.00
565.90 .......... ----------------------------5,169.08
396.34
(9
18
108

(2
)
(2
)
37.0

13.50
10.80

in

Total______________________

.5
1.
2.0
2.0
1.9
.5
22.4

II!

Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle........- ____ _______ head..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs_____________ _____ head..
M ilk_______ _____ 100 pounds..
Potatoes..................... ...... do___
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm___________
Textiles and textile products:
Sheets_______________________
Towels______________________

32
75
73
1,650
660

(9

1,062.30
450.00
1,314.00
5,367.55
308.00
565.90
5,565.42

15,856.73

13.50
10.80

------------- -----------------

______

16,573.07

148,720

$15,689.53

159,121

233,870.03

29
600
175
3,910
4,800

716.34

18
108

2,495.21
6,000.00
3,096.84
9,535.95
3,200.00
16,532.62

VERM ON T
STATE PEISON AND HOUSE OF COR­
RECTION FOB WOMEN

Laundry, commercial____ pounds..

36.0

148,720 $15,689.53

STATE PRISON AND HOUSE OF
CORRECTION FOR MEN

Clothing: Shoes, new............ pairs..
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ headHay___________________ tons..
Hogs______________ ____ head—
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes........................... do___
Miscellaneous farm.................
Printing and binding: Miscella­
neous printing................................

175.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
10.0
4.0
29.0
3.0

159,121
16
600
151
3,910
4,560

<
9
<
9

$742.75
6,000.00
2,958.84
9,535.95
3,040.00
16,352.50
750.00

13
24

$233,870.03

1,752.46
138.00

<
9

160.00
180.12

(0

645.56

240

<
9
(9

1,395.56

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Clothing: Shoes, new---------- pairs..
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle-------------------------- head..
Hay___________________ tons,.
Hogs__________________ head—
M ilk------------------- 100 pounds..
Potatoes_________ ______ do___
Miscellaneous farm....................
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Printing and binding: Miscel­
laneous printing________________
Total______________________




175.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
10.0
4.0
29.0
3.0
266.0

159,121
16
600
151
3,910
4,560
(0

(9

742.75
6,000.00
2,958.84
9,535.95
3,040.00
16,352.50
750.00
39,380.04

1 Enumeration impracticable.

233,870.03

24

138.00

240

160.00
180.12
15,689.53

<
9

148,720

<
9

233,870.03
2,495.21
6,000.00
3,096.84
9,535.95
3,200.00
16,532.62
15,689.53

(9

148,720

(9

645.56
18,565.67

159,121
29
600
175
3,910
4,800

1,752.46

233,870.03
* Less than one tenth of 1.

1,395,56
291,815.74

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

-----------------

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by Stale, system, and institution—Continued
O

STATE PRISONS— Continued
VIRGINIA

Public works and
ways

State use

Value

Num*
ber

Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

STATE INDUSTRIAL FARM FOR WOMEN

67
350
87
285
600

0.1
.8
.4
.6
1.1
15.0

67
350
87
285
600

163.05

0)
350
405
220
470
(0

163.05

0)

98.00
212.95
110.00
63.45
92.40

$16.75
157.50
66.60
104.25
206.80

350
405
220
470
0)

98.00
212.95
110.00
63.45
92.40

STATE PENITENTIARY

Baskets...............................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural limestone
tons..
Stone crushed....... ...........do___
Clothing:
Aprons..
C oats....,
Hats and ca]
Pajamas an*
Pants.........................................
Shirts, work................. ........... .
is, repaired................ pairs.




.1

44

42.30

38.0
10.0
.1
2.0
.6
.1
309.0
5.0
2.0

42.30

44

34,121 $29,374.20
7,124
7,292.07
240
2,640
4,140
132
14,628
15,794
5,580

80.00
5.940.00
1.035.00
110.00
17,980.25
11,575.40
2,790.00

34,121
7,124

29,374.20
7,292.07

53.10

240
2,640
4,140
132
438,178
15,794
5,657

80.00
5.940.00
1.035.00
110.00
282,699.00
11,575.40
2,843.10

423,550
77

$264,718.75

STATES, 1932

.5
1.1
.6
.3
.5

$16.75
157.50
66.60
104.25
206.80

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Aprons______ ____ __________
Dresses........................ ................
Overalls.......................................
Pajamas and nightgowns______
Underwear..................................
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm........................... ........
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets____ ______ ____________
Spreads........................................
Towels.................................. ......
Miscellaneous textile products. .

LABOR

employed Number

State account

PRISON

Institution, articles produced, and
unit

Number and value of articles produced under each system

Average
num­
ber of
pris-

------------- -----------------

$37,817.97
<
9
163.74 2,876,235.80

(9

37,817.97
163.74 2,876,235.80
46

183.84

151
10,584
10,502
2,901
325
1,428
1,308
948

1,596.13
39,790.11
41,434.85
28,236.48
8,010.59
2,391.90
539.55
6,927.79
6,571.19

1,022,858

40,519.04
639.85

183.84
21

1,382.90

213.23

10,584
8,035
2,901

7,242.38
8,010.59
2,391.90
539.55
4,640.42
3,098.22

$39,790.11
34.192.47
28.236.48

551

2,287.37
3,472.97

(9

2,758.48
40,519.04
374.85

(9
(9

2,758.48

(9

265.00

(9

5,450
24,000
0)

29.00
79.75
556.00

2,149,650
1,127,100

4,592.43
2,032.21
14,218.37
227.60

5,040
6,324
9,696

4,563.43
1,952.46
13,662.37
227.60

1,155.00
3,636.30
848.40

<
9
(9

1,155.00
3,636.30
848.40

STATE IA B M

Clothing:
Pants..
Shirts, work___________ ______
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs.
Construction: New buildings_____
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________ bushels—
Hay------------------------------tons..
Hogs_____—_______ ____ head—
Milk------------------- 100 pounds—
Wheat______________ bushels—
Miscellaneous farm____ _______
Miscellaneous livestock________
Furniture and furnishings:
Mattresses.
Pillows_____________________
t Enumeration impracticable.




1,322
1,277
1,870
________

16.0
107.0
23.0
79.0
2.0
.8
.2

21
9,400
350

8

1,838

1,211.85
847.30
935.00

395,160
1

65,000.00

845.50
4.418.00
4.200.00
169.80
4,165.25 --------- ----------------11,305.62
121.95

8
375
375

628.13 --------- ----------------151.56

50
5,390

593.88
2,532.60

142
5,154
7,069

2,599.71
11,679.88
3,866.80
2,211.89
97.10

8
„ „ l,_
i

246,981.25

396,482 248,193.10
847.30
1,277
935.00
1,870
1 65,000.00
71
14,790
350
150
6,992
7,069

<
9
375
375

1,439.38
6,950.60
4,200.00
2,769.51
15,845.13
3,866.80
13,517.51
219.05
628.13
151.56

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Construction:
20.0
Alterations and installation.
Hoads, new............... ...... m iles.. 1,097.0
Furniture and furnishings:
46
&
Benches..................... .................
3?
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
130
2.3
etc________________________
Chairs, fiber_________________
80.0
2,467
80.0
Chairs, wood................... ..........
58.0
Davenports, sofas, etc________
325
12.0
Desks_______________________
1,428
1.0
Mattresses___________________
1,308
.3
Pillows______________________
397
12.0
Tables_______________________
Miscellaneous_______ _____ ___
<
9
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous_____________________
4.0
<
9
Metal products:
1,022,858
Auto-license tags_____________
Miscellaneous-----------------------(9
Printing and binding:
2,144,200
Envelops____________________
1,103,100
Letterheads----------- ---------------Miscellaneous printing________
Repair and shop work.....................
8
Textile and textile products:
5,040
Pillowcases__________________
6,324
Sheets______
9,696
Towels_________

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued

^

STATE PRISONS— Continued
VIRGINIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system

employed Number

state

farm

Public works and

State use

Value

Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

— continued

Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases___________________
Sheets_______________________
Towels____ __________________

0.2
.7
.1

860
1,575
1 575
*

$195.50
767.63
116.81

850
1.575
1.575

$195.50
767.63
116.81

.1
Baskets........................................ ......
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural limestone
38.0
tons..
10.0
Stone, crushed__________do___
Clothing:
.2
Aprons-------------------------- -------2.0
Coats------------------------------------.8
Dresses______________________
.6
Hats and caps............................
Overalls............................... ........
Pajamas and nightgowns...........
Pants........................................... 485.
6.0
Shirts, work................................
3.0
Shoes, repaired—.............pairs—
1.1
Underwear--------------- -------Construction:
20.0
Alterations and installations___
40.0
New buildings.............................
Roads, new......................miles— 1,697.0
Farm, garden, and dairy:
8.0
Cattle........ .......................head—
Corn________________ bushels— 41.0
Hay___________________ tons— 25.0

44

42.30

44

42.30

34,121
7,124

29,374.20
7,292.07

307
2,640
350
4,140
87
417
834,660
17,071
7,527
600

96.75
5.940.00
157.50
1.035.00
66.60
214.25
630,892.10
12,422.70
3,778.10
206.80

ALL INSTITUTIONS




34,121 $29,374.20
7,124
7,292.07
307
2,640
350
4,140
87
417
15,950
17,071
7,450
600

96.75
5.940.00
157.50
1.035.00
66.60
214.25
19,192.10
12,422. 70
3.725.00
206.80

818,710
77

63.10

37,817.97
65,000.00
(,)
!
163.74 2,876,235.80

$37,817.97
0)
65,000.00
1.00
163.74 2,876,235."
21
9,400
350

845.50
4.418.00
4.200.00

$511,700.00

50
5,390

593.88
2,532.60

71
14,790
350

1,439.38
6,960.60
4.200.00

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
prisunit

Hogs__________________ head—
M ilk____________ 100 pounds..
Wheat........ ..................bushelsMiscellaneous farm----------------Miscellaneous livestock----------Furniture and furnishings:
Benches............................. .........
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,.

46

46

183.84

213.23

151
10,584
10,502
2,901
325
V
1,
948
0)

1,596.13
39,790.11
41,434.85
28,236.48
8,010.59
3,020.03
691.11
6,927.79
6,571.19

130

7,242.38

325
1,803
1, i
—
397
(0

21

1,382.90

2,467

8,010.59
3,020.03
691.11
4.640.42
3,098.22

10,584
8,035
2,901

0)

$39,790.11
34.192.47
28.236.48

2,287.37
3,472.97

2,769.51
15,845.13
3,866.80
13,680.56
219.05

0)

2,758.48

40,519.04
374.85

40,519.04

6.0 2,144,200
3.1 1,103,100
18.8
0)
(0

4.563.43
1,952.46
13,662.37
227.60

4,592.43
2,032.21
14,218.37
227.60

6,240
8,304
220
11,741
(0

1,448.50
4,616.88
110.00
1,028.
92.40

4.0

1.1
3.1
.6
.7
.5

0)

168,112.33

Total________________ ______ 2,944.0

(0

265.00

1,022,858
0)

5,450
24^000

29.00
79.75
556.00

2,149,650
1,127,100

8
6,240
8,304
220
11,741
(0

2,979,053.77 _______

61,444.21

511,700.00

107,979.40___

1,448.50
4,616.88

110.00
92.40
3,828,289.71

WASHINGTON

PRISONS

2,758.48

26.0 1,022,858
1.0
0)

A D FEDERAL
N

Miscellaneous textile products..

183.84

11,468.67
121.95

.2
2.3
80.0
80.0
58.0
12.0
1.8
.5
12.0
11.1

150
6,992
7 ,‘ “

142
5,154
7,i
0)
0)

STATE

Chairs, fiber_________________
Chairs, wood_________________
Davenports, sofas, etc________
Desks_______________________
Mattresses___________________
Pillows______________________
Tables_______________________
Miscellaneous.............................
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous_____________________
Metal products:
Auto license tags_____________
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes----------------------------Letterheads__________________
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shop work------ -----------Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets_______________________
Spreads______________________

9.71
11,679.88
3,-------2,211.89
97.10

169.80]
4,165.25

16.0
107.0
23.0
94.0
2.0

STATE PENITENTIARY

Clothing:
Aprons_________________
Coats---------------------------Coats, prison.....................
Gloves and mittens......... pairs..
Hats and caps___________
Hosiery________________pairs—
Overalls___________________
i Enumeration impracticable.




0.6
.2
.3
9.5
5.0
19.0
29.4

410
82
96
10,780
638
27,120
8,038

$75.01
355.40
432.00
1,061.85
31.90
3,390.00
6,192.98

216
192

$27.00
16a 00

__

________ ___________

$75.01
355.40
432.00
1,061.85
31.90
3,417.00
6,352.98
•<1
CO

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

<1

STATE PRISONS— Continued
W ASHINGTON—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

state penitentiary —continued

842
30
898
2,456
7,408
1,700
467
4,384
74
0)

.2

24

$4,63400
12.60
1,415.16
1,424.08
21,391.75
517.48
5,137.00
2,169.21
38.00
96.95
$81,06a 02

i

41

483

442.70

12.00
3.00
254.25
79.40

1
1
125

12.00
3.00
254.25
79.40

483

81.2

1
1
125
0)

b)

442.70

.7

.1

406.60

(0

1,086.00
2,920.00
2,858.36
6,582.08
1,329.38
1,410.79
1,324.88
8,699.49
64,764.00

373
320
966
2,716
2,113
0)
0)

0)

$451.40
53.35

$4,634.00
12.60
1,415.16
1,424.08
21,843.15
570.83
5,137,00
2,169.21
38.00
96.95
406.60
81,060.02

373
320
966
2,716
2,113
0)
0)

2.8
9.0
1.6
3.3
.7
10.2
71.5

858.00
2, 920.00
2,858.36
6,582.08
1,329.38
1,410.79
1,324.88
8,699.49
60,956.77

ao

150

842
30
898
2,456
7,558
1,789
467
4,384
74

17

228.00
(0

0)

3,807.23

0)

STATES, 1932




3.2
.4
6.4
7.0
30.0
2.0
16.4
8.7
i:o
.5
1.0
48.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing—Continued
Overcoats............................ .......
Pajamas and nightgowns-------Pants_______________________
Shirts, work............................... .
Shoes, new_____________pairs..
Shoes, repaired__________do—
Suits.______________________ _
Underwear___________________
Uniforms, prison_____________
Miscellaneous..................... .......
Miscellaneous, labor only_____
Construction: New buildings_____
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Farm hands hired out.............. .
Hay....................................tons..
Hogs............... - ................ head..
M ilk........... ........... 100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do— .
Wheat......................... .bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy........... .......
Miscellaneous farm............ ...... :
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches.......................................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc............................................
Chairs, wood...........- ................ .
Tables..............~ ................ .......
Miscellaneous............................ .

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PKISON

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

16.0

3,539
423

3,631

0)

317.50
247.12

828,538
581
1,500
1,761
0)

36.80

317.50
247.12

4,072.22

423

92

4,035.42

.3
.4

45,569.65
423.15
57.00
197.72
228.12

0)

46.0
2.4
2.0
1.6
9.0

828,538
581
1,500
1,761
0)

45,569.65
423.15
57.00
197.72
215.28

1.4
1.0
6.6
1.0

935,000
112,000
0)
68,830

8,242.75
443.85
4,490.65
1,394.40

935.000
112.000
0)
68,830

8,242.75
443.85
4,490.65
1,394.40

8
4,959
2,653
2,966
(0
(0

1.20
856.35
1,995.70
425.75
55.90
11,101.04

0)

50.50

8
4,959
2,653
2,966
0)
0)

1.20
856.35
1,995.70
425.75
55.90
11,151.54

668.25

(0

636.30

(’)

.2
.3
.4
.3
10.0

12.84

0)

STATE REFORMATORY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Miscellaneous__________ _______ _
Clothing:
Aprons___ ____ ________ _____ _
Gloves and mittens........ pairs..
Hats and caps...........................
Overalls....................................
Pajamas and nightgowns.........
Pants.......................................... .
Shirts, work__________ _______ _
Shoes repaired__________pairs..
Suits___ _______ _____________
Underwear___________________
Uniforms, prison_____________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
H a y ..._________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
M ilk....................... 100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do___
Miscellaneous dairy................ .
Miscellaneous farm....................
Furniture and furnishings: Mat-




2.0
.1
.5
(a
)
1.5
(2
)
(2
)
1.0
1.0
14.0
.5
2.0
.2
10.0
2.0
12.8
32.1
3.0
68.9
4.0

0)
128
1,360
32
1,276
12
32
1,231
1,600
536
534
603
49
210
132
11,099
12,660

741.30
1,576.88
3,141.96
15,349.88
4,376.30
3,618.26
12,300.53

0)

to
2,449

20.62
94.50
4.80
1.042.25
16.20
64.00
816.30
450.00
6,432.00
546.76
1,567.80
1,029.05
1,576.88
3,141.96
15,349.88
5,376.30
3.618.26
13,800.53

14

287.75

4,000

1,000.00

63
210
132
11,099
16,660

(0

1,500.00

8
2,449

7,907.50,

* Enumeration impracticable.

1,304.55

128
1,360
32
1,276
12
32
1,231
1,600
636
634

20.62
94.50
4.80
1,042.25
16.20
64.00
816.30
450.00
6,432.00
646.76
1,567.80

1 Less than one tenth of 1.

7,907.50

ST T A D FEDEBAL PRISONS
AE N

Highway markers............................ .
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes_________ ______________
Miscellaneous________________
Metal products:
Auto license tags_____________
Galvanized ware_____________
Tags, miscellaneous__________
Tinware_____________________
Miscellaneous______ _________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes.............. ....... ........... .
Letterheads....................... .........
Miscellaneous............................ .
Soap and soap powder___ pounds..
Textiles and textile products:
Bags............................................
Pillowcases__________________
Sheets_______________________
Towels_____________ ________ _
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products........ .

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by Stale, system, and institution—Continued
a>

STATE PRISONS— Continued
W ASHINGTON—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

STATE REFORMATORY—Continued
Printing and binding:
Letterheads............................... .
Miscellaneous............................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases______________ ____
Sheets_________ ____ ________ _
Towels........... .............................
Miscellaneous textiles________

1.0
12.0

171,000
0)
1,

(2
)

.1

(*)

$185.00

0)
______

40
1,255
0)

171,000
(0

$427.50
776.12

1,
40
1,255
0)

$427.50

521.15
52.00
212.45
64.20

ALL INSTITUTIONS
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Miscellaneous_________________
Clothing:
Coats_______________________
Gloves and mittens_____ pairs.
Hats and caps...........................
Hosiery________________pairs. .
Overalls----------------------------Overcoats— ---------------------Pajamas and nightgowns-----Pants------------ ------------------Shirts, work----------------------Shoes, new--------------- — pairs—
Shoes, repaired_________ do----Suits---------------------------------Underwear------------ ------------Uniforms, prison-----------------




2.0
.7
.5
10.0
5.0
19.0
30.9
3.2
.4
6.4
8.0
30.0
3.0
30.4
9.2
3.0

0)
538
178
12,130
670
27,120
9,314
842
42
930
3,687
7,408
3,200
1,003
4,918
677

668.25

636.30

(*)
______
______
______
_
__

2,240.38
21,391.75
967.48
11,569.00
2,715.97
1,605.80

216
192

27.00
160.00

150
89

451.40
53.35

<
*)
538
178
12,130
670
27,336
9,506
842
42
930
3,687
7,558
3,
1,003
4,918
677

1,304.55
95.63
787.40
1,156.35
36.70
3.417.00
7,395.23
4.634.00
28.80
1,479.16
2,240.38
21,843.15
1,020.83
11,569.00
2,715.97
1,605.80

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

$81,060.02

<
9

73

583
452
12,065
15,376
2,113

1,599.30
2,920.00
4,435.24
9,724.04
16,679.26
5,787.09
1,324.88
12,317. 75
73,257.30

<
9
31

96.95
406.60
81,060.02

8

406.60
515.75

(9

104
i

‘ (I)

1,000.00

452
12,065
19,376
2,113

5^307."23

4,000

(9

442.70

(9
(9

4.0
1.2
.1
16.0
.3
.4

1
i
2,448
125

(9

3,539

(9

423

483

12.00

1
1
2,449
125

3.00
7.907.50
254.25
79.40
4,035.42

92

828,538
581
1,500
1,761

1.4
2.0
18.6
1.0

935.000
283.000

8,242.75
871.35
5,081.77
1,394.40

(9

.4
.3
.5
.4
10.0

566.0

6,448
2,693
4,221
0)

(9

(9

(9

278,781.41

Enumeration impracticable.

317.50
247.12
45,569.65
423.15
57.00
197.72
228.12

935.000
283.000

8,242.75
871.35
5,266.77
1,394.40

(9

12.84

(9

185.00

68,830
8
6,448

1.377.50
2,047.70
638.20

4,221

120.10

(9
81,060.02

12.00

3.00
7.907.50
254.25
79.40
4,072.22

828,538
581
1,500
1,761

1.20

11,101.04

442.70

423

(9

45,569.65
423.15
57.00
197. 72
215.28

(9

3,631

317.50
247.12

46.0
2.4
2.0
1.
9.0

(9

(9

6.80

2,115.05
2,920.00
4,435.24
9,724.04
16,679. 26
6,787.09
1,324.88
12,317.75
78.564.53

(9
(9

50.50
8,842.77

1.20
1.377.50
2,047.70
638.20
120.10

11.151.54
368,684.20

’ Less than one tenth of 1.

PRISONS




.4
8.0
12.8
U.0
14.4
35.4
.7
13.2
140.4

96.95

(9

A D FEDERAL
N

Total..

.5
1.0
48.0

STATE

Miscellaneous________________
Miscellaneous, labor only_____
Construction: New buildings______
Farm, garden, and dairy:
C a ttle ............................. head—
Farm hands hired out................
Hay-------------- -------- ------ tons—
Hogs................................. head..
M ilk------------------- 100 pounds..
Potatoes________ _______ do___
Wheat______ ______ -.bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm___________
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches............................... .......
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc...........................................
Chairs, wood_________________
Mattresses___________________
Tables_____ _________________
Miscellaneous__________ ______
Highway markers......................... .
Lumber and timber products:
Boxes...........................................
Miscellaneous________________
Metal products:
Auto license tags______________
Galvanized ware.......... ..............
Tags, miscellaneous___________
Tinware.......................................
Miscellaneous________________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes____ _________ ______
Letterheads................................
Miscellaneous________ ________
Soap and soap powder......................
Textiles and textile products:
Bags_____ ________ __________
Pillowcases___________________
Sheets_______________________
Towels______________________
Miscellaneous.............................
Other manufactured products_____

T a b le

A.—Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— C o n t in u e d
00

STATE PRISONS— Continued
W EST VIRGINIA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State aocount

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

669,012

$211,838.25

669,012 $211,838.25

1.0
35.0

225
3,750

$562.50
7,500.00

225
3,750

562.50
7,500.00

.2
2.8
.8
391.0
5.0
267.0
2.0
1.0
13.0

1,006
982
4,786

% 185.12

137.24

4,175

4,196.39

1,006
982
4,786
874,228
4,175
1,164,769
4,302
1,779
9,272

137.24
2,185.12
478.60
634,154.80
4,196.39
388,256.30
1,169.97
750.41
11,590.00

4,302
1,779
9,272

478.60

1,169.97
750.41
11,59a 00

598.0

65.34 $1,217,856.00

31.0
.5
11.0
2.0
12.5
14.0
23.0
.2
.3
4.5

874,228

$634,154.80

l,"i64’ 769 ~~388,~256.~30

0)

41,769.61

65.34 1,217,856.00
0)

41,769.61

3
7,155
67
226
1,250
(0

150.89
3,577.50
737.00
4,095.74
4,687
7,287.08

3
7,155
67
226
1,250
(0

150.89
3,577.50
737.00
4,095.74
4,687.66
7,287.08

70.000
85.000

175.00
212.50
3,750.00

70.000
85.000
0)

175.00
212.50
3,750.00

(l)

STATES, 1932




106.0

I UNITED
N

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms........... ............................. .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Lime and agricultural lime­
stone_________________ tons_
Stone, building_________ do___
Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats, prison________________
Hats and caps_______________
Pants_______________________
Pants, prison________________
Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, repaired.._______pairs.
Underwear__________________
Coal mining________________tons.
Construction:
Roads, new ..................... miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads.................................... ....
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________ ________ head..
Corn________________ bushels_
Hay------------------------------tons..
Hogs----------------------------head—
Milk.......................100 poundsMiscellaneous farm_________
Printing and binding:
Envelopes_________________
Letterheads________________
Miscellaneous______________

Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases___________________
Sheets_______________________
Towels_______________ _____ __
Miscellaneous textile products. .
Whips.................................................

.2
.8
1.0
.2
31.0

v
1,566
8,710

<
9

Total______________________ 1,555.0

165.13
547.86
775.47
156.24
54,888.30

165.13
547.68
775.47
156.24
43,782.00

1,486
1,566
8,710

87,564
1,259,625.61

1,022,411.10

43,782.00

(9

87,564

2,592,545.26

255,620.25

WISCONSIN
INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR WOMEN

.5
.2
1.0
3.8

(9

216
68
221
50
1,492
454

(9

$115.00
7.00
166.00
38.00
296.00
830.00
93.00

.1
.7
.1
.2
16.1

<
9

7

238.00
15.00
474.00
47.00
3,1 a00
3

42
115
5
150

15.00
115.00
13.00
38.00
1,38a00

$238.00

4

15.00
474.00
11.00
3,130.00

(9

7

(9

.9

.6
.1
4.3

$115.00
7.00
166.00
38.00
296.00
830.00
93.00

36.00

50

(9

42
115
5
150

(9

852.00

(9

STATE PRISON

Bakery products, commercial
pounds.
Brooms, brushes, and mops: Brushes
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tue
thousands—
Stone, crushed__________ tons.
Clothing:
Aprons_____________________
Coats----------------------------------Dresses_________ ___________
Gloves and mittens......... pairs..




1.0
24.0

65,150

12.0
15.0

132
3,926

.1

318

.1
1.0

122
5,412

.7

1,955.00

96,155

10,608.00

65,150
96,155

1,955.00
10,608.00

2
74

84.00
89.00

134
4,000

4.913.00
4.800.00

31

300.00

318
31
122
5,412

43.00
300.00
83.00
321.00

43.00

1 Enumeration impracticable.

PRISONS

216
68
221
50
1,492
454

A D FEDERAL
N

Towels..................... ....................
Miscellaneous textile products..

1.0

<
9

STATE

Clothing:
Aprons____ _________________
Hats and ca]
Pajamas am
Shirts, work.
Underwear.................
Uniforms, prison____
Miscellaneous...........
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_______ ______ ___ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay____________________tons..
Hogs.......... .......................head—
Miscellaneous farm......... .
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases_____________
Sheets_________________

* Less than one tenth of 1.

«<I
co

T a b l e A .—

Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by Stale, system,

and

institution—

C o n t in u e d

STATE PRISONS—Continued

00
O

WISCONSIN—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

state prison—continued

Clothing—Continued
Hosiery________________ pairs..
Overalls_____________________
Overcoats____________________
Pants________ ____ __________
Shirts, work—......... - ................ .
Shoes, new....................... pairs..
Shoes, repaired_________ do___
Suits................ ...........................
Underwear____ ______________
Uniforms, prison_____________
Construction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings................... .......
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hay_______________ ____ tons..
Hogs................................. head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Potatoes............................do—
Miscellaneous dairy---------------Miscellaneous farm----------------Miscellaneous livestock----------Highway markers..................... .......
Land development: Reforestation..
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..




254.0
2.0
2.1
4.2
3.0
20.0
2.0
7.0
1.0
9.0

28,752
2,625
216
l,:
3,932
9,619
6,648
571
3,143
1,764

$2,210.
1,210.
2,160.
2,318.
1,644.
23,691.
6,126.
3,702.
934.
5,037.

29.0
12.0
19.0
7.0
34.0
18.0
44.0
41.0
10.0
71.9
1.0
2.6
76.0
3.0

$47.00
497.00
640

C
>
236
4,:
612
677
9,504
14,219

23,760.00
323.00
3,557.00

89,484

3,132.00

$24,037.00
35,000.00

5.074.00
1.744.00
9.009.00
5.140.00
11,738.00
8.531.00

0)
5,932

2,525.00

0)

32

53,867.00

233.00

21
17
105
4,476

0)

3 3,682,176 3$430,201.00 3,710,928 $432,411.00
2,625
1,210.00
219
2.207.00
1,981
2.815.00
3,932
1.644.00
10,259
26,216.00
6,648
6.126.00
571
3.702.00
3,143
934.00
1,764
5.037.00

309.00
215.00
194.00
2.687.00
2.818.00
288.00

4,360
9,1
18,695

5,932
0)
89,484

24.037.00
35,000.00
5.307.00
1.744.00
9.318.00
5.355.00
11.932.00
11.218.00
2.818.00
24.048.00
323.00
3.557.00
53.867.00
3.132.00

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

52.0 1,461,688
.4
12,407

108,807.00
876.00

3.0
.5
2.5
.1

811,350
331,483
0)
0)

185.0
.1

3,000

187.00

1,568

188.00

4,124
2,253
(9

586.00
801.00
1,767.00

1,629
2,622

315.00

91,054.00
2,622.00

3.0
1.2
4.2
10.0

3.544.00
806.00
4.399.00
82.00
7,461,000 473,089.00
10
32.00
53,581

7,134.00

0)
0)

715.00
5,254.00

1,461,688
14,139

108.807.00
1.191.00

811,350
331,483
0)
0)

1,732

3.544.00
806.00
4*399.00
82.00

',464,000 473.276.00
10
32.00
1,568
188.00
57,705
2,253

8

7.720.00
80L00
2.482.00
5.254.00

STATE REFORMATORY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Stone, building_________ tons..
Stone, crushed___________do—
Clothing:
Children’s play suits________
Coats---------------------------------Overalls.—. ________________
Overcoats__________________
Pants_____________i ________
Shirts, work________________
Suits_______________________
Uniforms, prison____________
Miscellaneous_______________
Construction:
New buildings___
Roads, new____________miles—
New, other than buildings and
roads_____ _____ ___________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Hay------------------------------tons.
Hogs---------------------------- head__
Wheat______ _____ __ bushels..
Miscellaneous farm____________
Repair and shop work............ ..........
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.
Sheets—

360

3
36
11
12

2.0

(0
(l)
1,766
789

1.924.00
9.923.00
3.483.00
102.00
36,956.00
160.00

370.00
11.00

0)

0
66
872
271
213

27.00
39.00
113.00
58.00

19

4.00
.43

1 Enumeration impracticable.




6.439.00
3.032.00
3.249.00
2.559.00
9.940.00
2.022.00
878.00
33.500.00
12.345.00
7,500.00

91.054.00
2,622.00

360
3
8,322
661
4,353
1,013
509
(0

225.00
27.00
6.478.00
3.145.00
3.307.00
2.559.00
10.310.00
2.022.00
889.00

4
0.43

225.00

8,286
650
2,671
4,353
994
509
0)

1,629
2,622

33.500.00
12.345.00

o>
35
165
119

4.077.00
1.369.00
982.00

7.500.00

101
1,037
390
213
0)
(0

6.001.00
11.292.00
4.465.00
102.00
46.414.00
7.499.00

1,766
789
* Includes clock work decorating on 87,204 pairs of hosiery, market value $21,801; work done on piece-price basis.

ST T A D FEDERAL PRISONS
AE N

Metal products:
Auto license tags_____
Tags, miscellaneous—
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound______
Letterheads
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shop work______
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine_________pounds..
Blankets___
Pillowcases___________________
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage____________ pounds..
Sheets_____ _____ ____ ________
Miscellaneous textile products..
Miscellaneous, labor only__________

257.00
466.00

257.00
466.00

8

9.458.00
7.339.00

00

T a b le

A*— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

STATE PRISONS— Continued

OO
to

WISCONSIN—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brushes.........................................
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..
Stone, building_________ tons..
Stone, crushed___________d o...
Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Children’s play suits__________
Coats.
Gloves and mittens_____pairs..
Hats and caps.............................
Hosiery............................pairs..
Overalls.............. ...................... .
Overcoats.......................... .........
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants...........................................
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new....................... pairs..
Shoes, repaired...................do—
Suits..........................- ................
Underwear................................
Uniforms, prison........................
Miscellaneous................ ............




1.0

65,150

$1,955.00

12.0
161.2
19.7

132
1,
6,548
534
360

$1,955.00

96,155

10,608.00

84.00

134
1,629
6,622

4,913.00
91,054.00
7,422.00

4.829.00
91,054.00
7.333.00

1.1
.7
.8
.1
1.0
.1
254.0
22.0
11.8
.5
14.4
11.0
20.0
2.0
38.5
2.0
19.0
3.0

65,150
96,155 $10,608.00

24.0

158.00
225.00

122
5,412
68
28,752
10,911
866
221
4,560
9,619
6,648
1,565
4,635
2,727
0)

83.00
321.00
7.00
2,210.00
7.649.00
5.192.00
166.00
5.567.00
4.241.00
23.691.00
6.126.00
13.642.00
1.230.00
7.889.00
971.00

74

89.00

34

327.00

39.00
160.00
104

2
,”525."00

19
0)

555.00

640

370.00

” ii.’ 6o

534
158.00
360
225.00
34
327.00
122
83.00
5,412
321.00
68
7.00
3,682,176 3$430,201.00 3,710,928 432,411.00
10,947
7,688.00
880
5,352.00
221
166.00
4,664
6,122.00
8,335
4,241.00
10,259
26,216.00
6,648
6,126.00
1,584
14,012.00
4,635
1,230.00
2,727
7,889.00
982.00
0)

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Co nstruction:
Alterations and installations_
_
New buildings.......................... .
Roads, new......................miles..
New, other than buildings and
roads........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle........ .......................head..
Corn......... ....................bushels..
Hay------------------------------tons..
Hogs____ ________ _____ head—
M ilk_____________100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do___
Wheat. ........................ bushels..
Miscellaneous dairy...... ...........
Miscellaneous farm...................
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Highway markers............................
Land development: Reforestation..
Laundry, commercial........pounds.
Metal products:
Auto license tags_____________
Tags, miscellaneous..............
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bound______
Letterheads................................
Miscellaneous________________
Repair and shopwork................. ......
Textiles and textile products:
Binder twine................pounds. .
Blankets............. ................... .
Pillowcases..................................
Rope, twine (not binder) and
cordage......................pounds—
Sheets_____________________
Spreads____ _____ _________
Towels....................................
Miscellaneous textiles_______
Miscellaneous, labor only_______

29.0
28.3
6.7
2.0

0)

32.1
302
7.0
4,410
57.7
1,523
27.4
949
44.0
9,504
41.0
14,219
.1
213
10.0
171.5
1.0
5,932
2.6
76.0
3.0 '"'"§9,‘ 484

8

52.0 1,461,688
.4
12,407

$24,037.00
68.500.00
12.345.00

3,000
3,

* Enumeration impracticable.

4,124
3,157
5
150
0)

7,500.00

0)

1,461,688
14,139

315.00

7,339.00

53,581

166,249.00

h

1.567.00
5.254.00
532,402.00

3,544.00
806.00
4,399.00
7,581.00

7,464,000 473,276.00
10
32.00
3,376
460.00

7,134.00

8

108,807.00
1,191.00

ft

7,461,000 473,089.00
10
32.00

586.00
1.382.00
13.00
38.00
2.295.00

11,546.00
1,759.00
21,084.00
9,867.00
11,932.00
11,218.00
102.00
2,818.00
73,592.00
323.00
3,557.00
53,867.00
3,132.00

811,350
331,483

3.544.00
806.00
4.399.00
242.00

436,200.00

24,037.00
68,500.00
12,345.00

0)
5,932
(*)
89,484
1,732

460.00

3.0
3.3
.1
.2
20.3
10.0

376
4,410
1,799
1,089
9,609
18,695
213
0)

53,867.00

187.00

h

2,818.00
9,746.00

0)

108,807.00
876.00

185.0
.1
1.2

1,678.00
1,233.00
194.00
2,687.00

91

102.00

811,350
331,483

4,548.00

186
140
105
4,476

0)

5
.43

(0
74

63,846.00
323.00
3,557.00
3.132.00

0)

7,500.00

6.998.00
1.759.00
19.406.00
8.634.00
11.738.00
8.531.00

3.0
.5
2.5
61.1

Total......................................... 1,502.0




0)
5.00
.43

57#705
3,157
5
150

C
O
C
O

430,201.00

8Includes clockwork decorating on 87,204 pairs of hosiery, market value $21,801; work done on piece-price basis.

7,720.00
1,382.00
13.00
38.00
3,862.00
5,254.00
1,565,052.00

T a b le

A. — Kind, quantity and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution— Continued
STATE PRISONS— Continued
W YO M IN G
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

STATE PENITENTIARY

Clothing:
Coats--------------------------------Hosiery________________pairs. _
Pants--------------------------------Shirts, work----------------------Shoes, repaired_________ pairs. _
Construction:
Alterations and installations...
New buildings-.........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Hay___________________ tons..
Hogs__________________ head..
M ilk_______ _____ 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Land development: Land improve­
ment---------------------------------------

0.4
1.0
1.6
172.0
1.0

100
800
244

535,812

(9
51
65
105
1,544

(9
(9

2,750.31
520.00
1,166.
6,590.15
6,024.52
446.25

$9,000. 00
1,000.00

$167,441.25

1

9.000.00
1. 000.00

535,812

(9

$5,936.00

(9

51
65
105
1,544

8

<
9

2.0

666

$250.00
80.00
322.00
167,441.25
466.20

800

466.20

1.7
1.3
1.8
1.0
1.2
2.0
40.0
1.0

100
044

$250.00
80.00
322.00

(9

2,750.31
520.00
1,166.88
6,590.15
11,960.52
446.25
600.00

STATE INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE

Clothing: Shoes, repaired— pairs..
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Corn________________ bushels..
Hogs__________________ head—
M ilk................ ...... 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous dairy___________
Miscellaneous farm------ ----------Miscellaneous livestock------------




10

100
11

825.00
529.60
900.00
8,760.00

100

75.00

246
1,329

14,484.33
529.60
1,907.12
8,760.00
936.26
24,273.69
5,498.60

75.00

4.0
2.0
1.0
2.9
1.0
33.9
2.9

1,
45
3,592

<9
(9

9,945.10
300.00

235

13,659.33

157 ' ’ I,"667.12

(9
(9
(9

936.26
14,328.
5,198.50

202

3,592

(9
(9

(9

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Laundry, commercial........pounds—
Miscellaneous, labor only__

1.0

2,400
0)

240.00
267.35

2,400
0)

240.00
267.35

100
800

250.00
80.00
322.00
167,441.25
541.20

ALL INSTITUTIONS

250.00
80.00
322.00

766

541.20

1.7
1.3
5.8
2.0
1.0
2.2
4.9
1.0
73.9
3.9

244

535,812
0)

1,329
65
150
5,136

9, CC0.00
1,000.00
235

9.000.00
1.000.00

13,659.33

297
1,

157

15,969.62
746.25

65
307
5,136
0)
0)

1,007.12
20,264.59
5,198.50

(0

600.00
2.400

d

278.0

535,812
766
(0

3,575.31
529.60
520.00
2,066.88
15,350.15

2.0
1.0
.3

167,441.25

39,951.01

10,600.00

<>
*
2,400

240.00
267.35
41,573.15

0)

167,441.25

17,234.64
529.60
520.00
3,074.00
15,350.15
936.26
36,234.21
5,944.75
600.00
240.00
267.35
259,565.41

FEDERAL PRISONS
CALIFORNIA

A D FEDERAL PRISONS
N

Total______________________

100
800
244

.4
1.0
1.6
172.0
2.0

STATE

Clothing:
Coats------------------------Hosiery_______________ .pairs. _
Pants-----------------------------------Shirts, work_________________
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs .
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings____________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head—
Com------------------------ bushels—
Hay____________________tons—
Hogs__________________ head—
M ilk------------------- 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous dairy___________
Miscellaneous farm____________
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Land development: Land improve­
ment..................... ........... ..............
Laundry, commercial........ pounds—
Miscellaneous, labor only—

PACIFIC BRANCH, U.S. DISCIPLINARY
BARRACKS

Clothing:
Coats, prison_________________
Hats and caps________________
Overcoats____________________
Pants, prison_________________
Shoes repaired__________pairs..
Suits______ ________________
Miscellaneous........ ......... .......
Miscellaneous, labor only___




0.2
.5
1.1
.3
5.0
9.5
(’)
7.9

32
805
55
46
9,155
292
P)
0)

$160.00
402.50
825.00
207.00
7,102.20
7,300.00
73.00
18,196.25

i Enumeration impracticable.

2,250

<
9

32
805
55
46
11,405
292

$2,250.00
3,650.00

h

$160.00
402.50
825.00
207.00
9,352.20
7,300.00'
73.00
21,846.25

*Less than one tenth of 1.
00
Oi

T able

A.— Kind, quantity and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, and institution—Continued
OS

FEDERAL PRISON S— Continued
CALIFORNIA—Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

PACIFIC BRANCH, U .S. DISCIPLINARY
b a r r a c k s —c o n tin u e d

Construction:
Alterations and installations___
Hoads, new____________ miles. _
New, other than buildings and
roads.........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy: Miscel­
laneous farm...................................
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches.......................................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc________ ________________
Chairs, wood....................... ......
Desks..........................................Tables..........................................
Miscellaneous..............................
Laundry, commercial....... pounds. _
Printing and binding:
Letterheads______ ____________
Miscellaneous..............................
Hepair and shop work------------- -—
Textiles and textile products:
Towels
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

0)
0.08

5.0.
18.0

(9

$2,300.00

$2,300.00
1.140.00

0)

1.0
2.0

6.780.00

0)
0.08

.2
3.8
5.0

2,500.00

(0

10

72,00

10

72.00

16
59
13
137

16
59
13
137

0)
75,000

848.11
1.180.85
840.00
1,918.03
3.769.86
6,000.00

848.11
1.180.85
840.00
1,918.03
3.769.86
70,499.46

0)

1,800.00

.1
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
17.2
34.0

6,780.00

0)

$200.00

0)

$2,300.00
1,140.00

775,000

64,499.46

39,500

94.08
2,350.92
1, isa 00

8
200

(’)

.1
1.0

8

1.0
1.0

(0

50.00
7.50

<>
*
850,000
39,500

8

94.08
2,350.92
2,950.00

200
“ (If

50.00

210.00

0)

50.00
57.50
2,123.50

005

506.00
3,77a 00

8

% 123.50

U.S. NAVAL PRISON

Clothing:
Shoes, repaired...... ......... pairs..
Miscellaneous, labor only...........




605

506.00
3,560.00

0)

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

fit—
—88—o f

4.0
(*)
10.0
16.9
27.0
12.0

0
16
381
0)
144,000

ii, 400.00

5,000.00

160.00
1,594.00
649.98

(0

16
2,521
0)

8,948.00
468.00

15, C O 00
O.

160.00
10,542.00
1,117.98

(0
144,000

2,140
0)
(0

5,000.00

(0

15,000.00
14,400.00

3,360.00

(0

3,360.00

0)
0)

431.00
7.50

0)
0)

431.00
7.50

(*)
(2
)
1.0

(0

33.90
49.00
47.00

0)

.2
.5
1.1
.3
6.0
9.5
(2)'
8.9

32
805
55
46
9,760
292
0)
(0

226
114

226
114

33.90
49.00
47.00

32
805
55
46
12,010
292
C)
1
0)

160.00
402.50
825.00
207.00
9,858.20
7,300.00
73.00
25,616.25

ALL INSTITUTIONS




160.00
402.50
825.00
207.00
7,608. 20
7,300.00
73.00
21,756.25

1.0
2.0
4.0

2, 250.00

0 ).

3,860. C
O

.08
0)

2.300.00
1.140.00
5,000.00

0)
0)

2.300.00
1.140.00
5,000.00

0)

6,780.00

0)

6,780.00

0)

5.0
(2
)
10.0
34.9

2,250

16
381
(0

160.00
1,594.00
2,949.98

2,140
(0

0.08

8,948.00
668.00

16
2,521
0)

160.00
10,542.00
3,617.98

.1

10

72.00

10

72.00

1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
17.2

16
59
13
137

848.11
1,180.85
840.00
1,918.03
3,769.86

16
59
13
137

848.11
1.180.85
840.00
1,918.03
3.769.86

0)
994,000

PRISONS

Clothing:
Coats............................................
Hats and caps.............................
Overcoats.....................................
Pants...........................................
Shoes, repaired.................pairs..
Suits. ...........................................
Miscellaneous........... ..................
Miscellaneous, labor only______
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
Roads, new........ ............ miles—
Roads, repaired................ do___
New, other than buildings and
roads.........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Hay....................................tons—
M ilk....................... 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous farm................. —
Furniture and furnishings:
Benches.......................................
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.............................................
Chairs, wood...............................
Desks...........................................
Tables..........................................
Miscellaneous..............................
Land development: Land improve­
ment...............................................
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..

FEDERAL

0)

1.0
(2
)

AD
N

7.0

STATE

•Construction: Roads, repair..............
-Farm, garden, and dairy:
Hay........................... ........tons—
M ilk____________ 100 pounds—
Miscellaneous farm................. .
Land development: Land improve­
ment................................................
Laundry, commercial........pounds..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous........................................
Printing and binding: Miscellaneous__r ...........................................
Repair and shop work.......................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets.........................................
Miscellaneous textile products..

15,000.00
84,899.46

27.0
46.0

(0
919,000

78,899.46

C)

r Enumeration impracticable.

15,000.00

75,000

0)

6,000.00
* Less than one tenth of 1.

00

•1
<

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution—Continued

00

00

FEDERAL PRISONS— Continued
CALIFORNIA—Continued

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Piece price

Value

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

i n s t it u t io n s — c o n t in u e d

Total— ....................................

199.0

0)

.2
4.8
5.0

39,500

$3,360.00

0)
0)

226
114
200

8

(0

33.90
49.00
50.00
54.50
2.123.50
131,639.79

$3,360.00

0)

94.08
2,781.92
1.157.50

(0
$30,220.00

39,500
(0
0)

50.00

94.08
2,781.92
2,957. 50

226
114
200

$1,800.00

33.90
49.00
50.00
104.50
2,123.50

0)
0)

194,064.64

32,204.85

GEORGIA
1
U. S. PENITENTIARY

Brooms, brushes, and mops: Mops__
Clothing:
Aprons_______________________
Coats________________________
Gloves and mittens_____ pairs..
Overalls______________________
Overcoats____________________
Pajamas and nightgowns____




1.0

3,056

$614.79

3,056

$614.79

1.0
8.0
.8
34.0
19.0
1.0

1,364
1,370
2,391
16,297
1,569
505

226.95
2,217.53
66.17
8,439.76
4,586.19
275.63

1,364
1,370
2,391
16,297
1,569
505

226.95
2,217. 53
66.17
8,439.76
4,586.19
275.63

STATES, 1932

(2
)
(2
)
(a
)
1.1
1.0

7.0

I UNITED
N

Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous........................................
Printing and binding:
Letterheads........ ........................
Miscellaneous..............................
Repair and shop work........................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases-.................................
Sheets________________ _______
Towels......... - ..............................
Miscellaneous textile products. _
Other manufactured products.......

LABOR

ALL

Number and value of articles produced under each system

PRISON

I n s t i t u t i o n , a r tic le s p r o d u c e d , a n d
u n it

Aver­
age
num­
ber of
State use
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

2,604
1,513
11,743
13,392
4,146
23,208

(9

(9

65.0
71.0

(9

5.0
1.0
45.0
10.0
63.0
142.0
57.0

2,604
1,513
11,743
13,392
4,146
23,208

1,937.88
665.57
4.640.37
6,696.00
13,293.55
5,144.28
181.40

34,000
2,508
1,110

9,407

(9

3

1,937.88
665.57
4,640.37
6,696.00
13,293.55
5,144.28
181.40

3

91,959.29
100,489. 55

(9
(9

$91,959.29
100,489.55

(9

6,622.06

404.
13,813.
3,009.
18,820.
41,447.
17,696.

6,622.06

8
34,000
2,508
1, no
9,407

404.85
13,813.10
3,009.49
18,820.32
41,447.54
17,696.73

(9

1,602

2,503.10

1,602

2,503.10

2.0
3.0
6.0
17.0

348,600
736,700

891.81
1,403.41
2,399.22
3,968.43

348,600
736,700

891.81
1,403.41
2,399.22
3,968.43

20,858.10
881,574.96
887.02
8,066.98
227,208.01
45,341.
28,545.32

46,166
4,271,780
8,514
15,014
2,287,164

20,858.10
881,574.96
887.02
8,066.98
227,208.01
45,341.96
28,545.32

(9
0)

46,166
14.0
664.0 4,271,780
8,514
4.0
15,014
22.0
180.0 2,287,164
35.2
21.0

8

1,367,826.42

Total......................................... 1,626.0

(9
(9

■

8

1,566,897.32

199,070.90

PRISONS

2.0

A D FEDERAL
N

Printing and binding:
Efivelopes___________________
Letterheads ............................... .
Miscellaneous- .......................... .
Repair and shop work......................
Textiles and textile products:
Bags........................................... .
Duck and canvas____ pounds..
Pillowcases.............. ..................
Sheets..........................................
Yarn, cotton and wooLpounds..
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products_____

8.0
3.0
19.0
24.0
56.0
21.0
1.0

STATE

Pants.................- ....................... .
Shirts, dress__________________
Shirts, work_____ ______ _____ _
Shoes, repaired____ ____ pairs..
Suits........................................... .
Underwear................ - ................
Miscellaneous............................ .
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings........................... .
New, other than building and
roads............................. ...........
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle...... .........................head..
Corn______ ______ ___ bushels..
Hay.................... ...............tons..
Hosrs........ ....................... head..
M ilk.......................100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm_..................
Furniture and furnishings: M at-

KANSAS
U.S. PENITENTIARY

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms........................................ .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands..




54.0
40.0

319,584 $109,723.84
360

319,584 $109,723.84

3,780.00____

i Enumeration impracticable.

360

3,780.00

a Less than one tenth of 1.
00
CD

T a b le

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, & State, system, and institution— Continued
?/

FEDERAL PRISONS— Continued

CO
O

KANSAS-Continued
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways

Value

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

LABOR

Num­
ber

State account

PRISON

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value
u. s. penitentiary—continued
$635.25
492.62
3,988. 71
5,781.60
2,275.35
1,225. 62
2,911. 59
581,303.36
11,061.60

5.0
21.0
7.0
42.0
77.0
96.0

24
7,848
141
i
0)
0)

1,121.35
4,316.40
1,480.50
8,661. 72
15,892. 59
19,703.37

24
7,848
141
526
0)
(0

1.121.35
4,316.40
1,480.50
8.661.72
15,892.59
19,703.37

2.0
11.0
7.0

6,204
7,680
0)

893.90
5,863.04
2,813.38

6,204
7,680
0)

893.90
5,863.04
2,813.38

100.0

486,558

172,742.23

486, 558

172,742.23

3.0
1.0

245
3,010

532.10
90.30

245
3,010

532.10
90.30

150.0

384
3,840
6,678
1,074
1,458
1,560
5,022
240,208
2,232
C)

$149,010.07

(l)

$635.25
492.62
3.988.71
5,781.60
2.275.35
1,225.62
2,911.59
581,303.36
11,061.60
149,010.07

U.S. PENITENTIARY ANNEX
Brooms,
brushes,
and mops:
Brushes.........................................
Clothing:
Coats..........................................
Handkerchiefs...........................




STATES, 1932

384
3,840
6,678
1,074
1,458
1,560
5,022
240,208
2,232

1.0
1.0
9.0
11.0
6.0
3.0
7.0
459.0
23.0

I UNITED
N

Clothing:
Coats.........................................
Hats and caps...........................
Overalls.....................................
Overcoats................ .............. .
Pants............. ............................
Shirts, dress....... ...... ................
Shirts, work_________ _______
Shoes, new....................... pairs.
Suits..........................................
Construction: Alterations and in­
stallations......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle........................ ...... head..
Corn............................. bushels..
Hay....................................tons—
Hogs................................. head—
Miscellaneous dairy...............
Miscellaneous farm...............
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases.............................
Sheets................... .................
Miscellaneous textile products..

1.0
9.0
3.0
7.0
3.0
5.0
10.0
42.0
16.0
1.0
20.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
71.0

2.0
5.0
3.0
28.0

134.50
2,054.65
735.60
1,351.00
748.15
1,040.30
1,584.00
8,563.80
3,780.65
224.49
12,940.45

45
258
85
157

810.15
1,733.04
3,383.11
1,930.56
1,285.24
23,606.05

(9

(9

337,229

6,734.52

<
9
(9

31,931.27
453.45
1,110.00
685.05
23,637.28

319,584
486,558

109,723.84
172,742.23

40.0

360

4.0
1.0
2.0
18.0
14.0
13.0
6.0
12.0
469.0
42.0
39.0
1.0
20.0

629
3,010
5,185
9,591
1,248
2,414
2,711
6,504
240,280
12,234
3,143
1,069

(9

134.50
2,054.65
735.60
1,351.00
748.15
1,040.30
1,584.00
8,563.80
3,780.65
224.49
12,940.45

45
258
85
157

810.15
1,733.04
3,383.11
1,930.56
1,285.24
23,606.05

(9

(9

337,229

(9
(9

6,734.52
31,931.27

3,023
2,220
4,396

453.45
1,110.00
685.05
23,637.28

319,584
486,558

109,723.84
172,742.23

3,780.00

360

3,780.00

1,167.35
90.30
627.12
6,043.36
6,517.20
3,626.35
1,973.77
3,951.89
582,887.36
8.563.80
14,842.25
224.49
12,940.45

629
3,010
5,185
9,591
1,248
2,414
2,711
6,504
240,280
12,234
3,143
1,—

1.167.35
90.30
627.12
6.043.36
6,517.20
3,626.35
1,973.77
3,951.89
582,887.36
8,563.80
14,842.25
224.49
12,940.45

(9

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Brooms, brushes, and mops:
Brooms.......... .............................
Brushes...................................... .
Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile.thousands.
Clothing:
Coats-----------------------------------Handkerchiefs.............................
Hats and caps................... ........
Overalls................. ...................
Overcoats.........................—.......
Pants..............................—.........
Shirts, dress............................... .
Shirts, w ork......... ............ .......
Shoes, new........ —.......... pairs..
Shoes, repaired_________ do—
Suits..________ ______________
Underwear..................................
Miscellaneous, labor only_____
1 Enumeration impracticable.




54.0
100.0

(9

(9

PRISONS

3,023
2,220
4,396

1,345
2,913
174
956
1,151
1,482
72
12,234
911
1,069

A D FEDERAL
N

5. a
49.0

1,345
2,913
174
956
1,151
1,482
72
12,234
911
1,069

STATE

Hats and caps_______ ________
Overalls_____________________
Overcoats____ _______________
Pants..........................................
Shirts, dress............................... .
Shirts, work................................
Shoes, new....................... pairs..
Shoes, repaired................. do___
Suits........................................... .
Underwear................................. .
Miscellaneous, labor only_____
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.................... ...................... .
Chairs, wood......... ............ .......
Desks........................... ..............
Tables..........................................
Miscellaneous........................... .
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous...................................... .
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous................. ............ ..................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets......... ........... .....................
Towels................... —............ —
Other manufactured products........ .

CO

T a b l e A .—

Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1982, by State, system, a n d institution— C o n t in u e d

FEDERAL PRISONS— Continued

CD
fcO

KANSAS—Continued

a l l i n s t it u t io n s —

Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Total

Contract

Number

Value

Number

Value

(9

$149,010.07

c o n tin u e d

Construction: Alterations and in­
stallations.............. ........................
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle.......................... ...h e a d ..
Corn_________ ______ bushels..
Hay.................................. tons..
Hogs__.............................head..
Miscellaneous dairy...................
Miscellaneous farm....... ........... .
Furniture and furnishings:
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
e tc.............. ...................... ......
Chairs, w o o d ...------ --------------Desks........... ............ —...............
Tables................. ........................
Miscellaneous..............................
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..
Lumber and timber products: Mis­
cellaneous______________________
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous.................................. ................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases..................................
Sheets..........................................
Towels................ - .......................
Miscellaneous textile products..
Other manufactured products--------

150.0
5.0
21.0
7.0
42.0
77.0
96.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
71.0
5.0
49.0
4.0
16.0
3.0
7.0
28.0

Total......................................... 1,440.0




Number and value of articles produced under each system

(0
24'
7,848
141
526

(9

(0

(9

45
258
85
157

337,229

(9
(9
9,227
9,900
4,

8

$149,010.07

24
7,848
141
526
0)

$1,121. 35
4,316.40
1,480. 50
8,661.72
15,892. 59
19,703.37

45
258
85
157

810.15
1.733.04
3,383.11
1,930.56
1,285.24
23,606.05

(9

810.15
1.733.04
3,383.11
1,930.56
1,285. 24
23,606.05

(9

337,229

<
9
(9

6,734.52
31.931.27

9,227
9,900
4, r *

1,347.35
6.973.04
685.05
2,813.38
23.637.28
1,087,747.73

1,121.35
4,316.40
1,480.50
8.661.72
15,892.59
19,703.37

8
149,010.07

6,734.52
31.931.27
1,347.35
6.973.04
685.05
2,813.38
23.637.28
1,236,757.80

P IS N L B R I U ITED STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N N

Aver­
age
num­
State use
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

NEW HAM PSHIRE
U.S. NAVAL PRISON

6.0
4.0
1.0
.1
.2
.1
1.0
89.0

150
653
91
190
1,924
1,343
3,711
(0

$75.00
2.592.00
59.25
2.375.00
5,883.20
3,473. 55
2,646.45
130.40
155.00

o:
<:
*

3,242

1.621.00
8,113.92
1,200.00

(9
(9

(9

to

(9

330
117
129

(9

134.0

$75.00
2.592.00
59.25
2.375.00
5,883.20
3,473. 55
2,646.45
130.40
155.00

3, 242

66.00

87.75
45.15
269. 50
49,444.40

(9
(9

330
117
129

78,237.57

1.621.00
8,113.92
1,200.00
66.00

87.75
45.15
269.50
49,444.40
78,237.57

OHIO

Total.........................................
1 Enumeration impracticable.




94.0
454.0

2,344

3.0
8.0
3.0
6.0
18.0
2.0
66.0
2.0

64
4,!
238
425
4,814
1,464

$30,472.00
$270,471.53

(9
(9

2,520.
2,183.
2,856.
6,618.
11,381.
800.
14,671.
420.

64
4,'
238
425
4,814
1,464

(9

10.0

666.0

71,923.72

2,344 $30,472.00
2 270,471.53

7,200.00
277,671. 53

(9
(9
(9

PRISONS

U.S. INDUSTRIAL REFORMATORY

Clay, cement, and stone products:
Brick and building tile
thousands—
Construction: New buildings______
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle_________________ head..
Com________________ bushels. _
Hay____________________tons—
Hogs..................................head—
M ilk....................... 100 pounds. _
Wheat................ .........bushels—
Miscellaneous farm.....................
Miscellaneous livestock..............
Land development: Land improve­
ment.................................. ............

A D FEDERAL
N

Total......... ...........................

0.2
5.3
.1
4.9
12.2
7.3
2.0
.3
.3

STATE

Clothing:
Aprons.........................................
Coats............................_........ .
Hats and caps............................
Overcoats...................................
Pants_____ __________________
Shirts, w ork_________________
Shoes, repaired________pairs..
Miscellaneous________________
Miscellaneous, labor o n ly _____
Printing and binding:
Books, blank and bou nd______
Miscellaneous printing________
Repair and shop work____ ________
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases___________________
Sheets____ _______ ______ _____
Towels........................ .......... .....
Miscellaneous textile products..
Miscellaneous, labor only_______

2.520.00
2,183.99
2.856.00
6,618.12
11,381.29
800.81
14,671.51
420.00
7.200.00
349,595.25
CO
CO

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution— Continued

194

T a b le

FEDERAL PRISONS— Continued
SOUTH CAROLINA
Number and value of articles produced under each system
Public works and
ways
Num­
ber

Value

State account

Number

Value

Piece price

Number

Value

Contract

Number

Value

Total

Number

Value

U.S. NAVAL PRISON

Clothing:
Hats and caps______________
Overalls.....................................
Overcoats........ .........................
Pants........................................ .
Shirts, dress........................... .
Shoes, repaired...............pairs.
Suits................ ........................ .
Uniforms, prison____________
Miscellaneous................... .......
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
Corn............................bushels..
Hay------------------ ---------- tons..
Hogs................................. head..
M ilk..................... .100 pounds. _
Miscellaneous farm......... .......
Total........................ ............

90
260
87
271
21
601
125

(J
)
0.5
1.4
.5
(2
)
1.0
1.7
1.8
(2
)

0 )'

1.0
.7
.3
3.0
16.0
12.0

23
1,910
25
32
214
0)

40.0

$9.00
130.00
314.94
135. 50
13.86
300. 50
375.00
413.00
18.00
1,034.25
657. 50
300.00
549.70
804.20
1,707.60

90
260
87
271
21
601
125
268

$9.00
130.00
314.94
135.50
13.86
300. 50
375.00
413.00
18.00

23
1,910
25
94
2,882
0)

1,034.25
657.50
300.00
2,242.17
13,908.83
9,284.54

0)

2,0
0)

62

6,763.05

$1,692.47
13,104.63
7,576.94
22,374.04

29,137.09

VIRGINIA
FEDERAL CORRECTIONAL CAMP

Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Clothing: Shoes repaired___ pairs—




10.0
2.0

405,131! $12,373.27
1*1041
552.00

6,219

$248.78

411,350
1,104

$12,622.05
552.00

P IS N L B R I T N E STATES, 1932
R O
AO
N T IT D

Aver­
age
num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
unit
pris­
oners
em­
ployed Number
Value

Construction: New buildings_____
Farm, garden, and dairy;
Corn________________ bushelsHay------ ----------------------- tons..
Potatoes____ _____ 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Laundry, commercial____ pounds..
Repair and shop work____________

17.0
17.0
4.0
15.0
58.0
21.0
38.0

1
3,270
21
1,341

<
9
71,264
(9

74
68
115
2,325

I

$4,428.36

1

450. 73

852 13
192.88
1,232.53
2,958.50
5,439.18
7,951.36

18.50
68.00
115.00
1,162.50

6

6,439

3,270
21
1,341

74
68
115
2,325

18.50
68.00
115.00
1,162.50

"

4,428.36

<
9
77,703
(9

1

852.13
192.88
1,232.53
2,958.50
4,988.45
7,951.36

60,118.91

FEDERAL REFORMATORY CAMP

(*)

.2
.3
2.0

82.0

6

(9

30.0
1,316
68
714

<
9

21,335.05

(9

789.45
940.84
1,077.67
2,657.96

21,335.05

1,316
68
714

(9

102.0

(9
(9

3,576.49

789.45
940.84
1,077.67
2,657.96
3,576.49

471,350

3,135.13

471,350

3,135.13

.4

732
61

183.00
12.20
10.00

732
61

183.00
12.20
10.00

411,350

12,622.05

74
68
115
3,429

18.50
68.00
115.00
1,714.50

7

64,547.27

<
9

<>
*

(9

(9

ALL INSTITUTIONS

Bakery products, commercial
pounds..
Clothing:
Aprons___________ __________
Coats............ ..................... .........
Pants................. ..........................
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs. .
Construction:
New buildings.......... .................
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn............ ................ bushels..
Hay_____________ _____ .tons..
Potatoes................. 100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm___________




10.0

(2
)

.2
.3
4.0

405,131

12,373.27

74
68
115
3,429

18.50
68.00
115.00
1,714.50

6, 219

99.0

7

(9

30.0
24.0
12.0,,
24.0
79.011

4,586
89
2,055

(9

1,641. 58
1,133. 72
2,310.20
5,616.46

i Enumeration impracticable.

248.78

64,547.27
21,335.05

(9
4,586
89
2,055

i

(9
* Less than one tenth of 1.

PRISONS

14.0

A D FEDERAL
N

7.0
8.0
9.0
21.0

60,118.91

STATE

Clothing:
Aprons______________________
Coats_______ ____ ___________
Pants...........................................
Shoes, repaired_________ pairs..
Construction:
New buildings........................... .
New, other than buildings and
roads....................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Corn_________ ______ bushels..
Hay............... ....................tons..
Potatoes....... ..........100 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm................... .
Land development: Land improve­
ment.............................................. .
Lumber and timber prodicts: Lum­
ber____ ____ ________ board feet..
Textiles and textile products:
Bags........................................... .
Pillowcases.................................
Miscellaneous textile products-

21,335.05
1,641.58
1,133.72
2,310.20
5,616.46

co
Cn

T able

A.— Kind, quantity, and value of articles produced in State and Federal prisons, 1932, by State, system, and institution—Continued
FEDERAL PRISONS— Continued

CO
a>

VIRGINIA—Continued
Aver-

Number and value of articles produced under each system

71,264

$4,988.45

14.0
38.0

471,350
(0

Number

Value

(9

Value

Number

Value

Total
Number

Value

6,439

$450.73

3,135.13
7,951.36
183.00
12.20
10.00
131,429.69

$166.26
859.82
351.90
272.60
836.40
720.25
1,091.20
1,396.23
441.00

0)
89,458. 81

699. 51

WASH[INGTOIIf
U.S. PENITENTIARY
Clothing:
A p ro n s_____________________
Coats _______ ______________
Gloves and mittens
pairs _
Hats and caps
Overalls __ _ ___ _____ ___
Pants
_____________________
Shirts, work___ ______________
Shoes, repaired
_____ pairs
Underwear
____________
Construction:
Alterations and installations___
New buildings _____________
New, other than buildings and
roads______________________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle
________head_
Hogs_______________
_do_




1.0
3. 5
4. 2
1.8
4.0
3.0
4.5
3. 0
3.0

489
548
3,450
940
1,230
545
1,364
2,355
1,050

$166.26
859.82
351.90
272.60
836.40
720.25
1,091.20
1,396.23
441.00

17.0
111.0

(0

20.0
1.5
8.0

0)
48
566

649.32
11,861. 40

8

$40,329.15
258,075.10

0)

46,685.60

(0

8

40,329.15
258,075.10
46,685.60

48
566

649.32
11,861.40

STATES, 1932

$3,576.49
5,439.18

489
548
3,450
940
1,230
545
1,364
2,355
1,050

0)

0)
77,703

732
61

183.00
12.20
10.00
41,271.37

.4
(2
)
(2
)
458.0

Number

Contract

471,350
0)

$3,576.49

3,135.13
7,951.36

732
61

Value

Piece price

I UNITED
N

102.0
21.0

Num­
ber

State account

LABOR

all institutions—continued
Land development: Land improve­
ment_________________________
T^anndry, finmmfirmal.
pounds
Lumber and timber products:
Lumber____________ board feet__
Repair and shop work____________
Textiles and textile products:
Bags_________________________
Pillowcases___________________
Miscellaneous textile products __
Total................. ......................

Public works and
ways

PRISON

num­
Institution, articles produced, and ber of
State use
pris­
unit
oners
em­ Number
Value
ployed

M ilk....................... 160 pounds..
Miscellaneous farm....................
Land development: Land improve­
ment...............................................
Printing and binding: Miscellane­
ous............................... ..................
Textiles and textile products:
Pillowcases...........- ....................
Sheets_______________________
Towels_____________ ____ ____
Total....................................... .

11.5
23.0

5,890
(0

14,724.15
9,364.90

53.0
7.0
1.4
1.0
2.6
285.0

5,890
(0
0)

0)
1,931
1,140
9,664

0)

15,963.33

0)

15,963.33

5,128.82

14, 724.15
9,364.90

5,128.82

1,931
1,140
9,664

424.82
794.40
214.54
410,351.19

$568.
1,
3,677.
193.
2,252.
585.
877.
15,453.
558.
6,928.
1,117.

1,
315
3,340
387
2,840
1,264
1,250
43,701
72
22,817
(0

$568.79
1,858.88
3,677.14
193.50
2,252.10
585.12
877.50
15,453. 52
558.00
6,928.77
1,117.13

627.58
1,631.40
1,696.54
11,747.11
976.79
3,402.74
9,252.23
87.22

32
3,900
122
3,234
917
(0

627.58
1,631.40
1,696.54
11,747.11
976.79
3,402.74
9,252.23
87.22

229.50
27.00
182.93
849.20
65.98
121.97
1,970.37
66,939.01

200
9
1,357
940
71
1,293
(0

424.82
794.40
214.54
49,298.01

361,053.18

STATE

W EST VIRGINIA
U.S. INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTION FOB
WOMEN

1,'
315
3,340
387
2,840
1,264
1,250
43,701
72
22,817
0

1.7
3.0
3.0
17.0
1.0
5.0
14.0

32
3,900
122
3,234
917

1.0
.1
1.0
3.0
.2
.4
6.8
161.0

0)
0)

200
9
1,357
940
71
1,293
(0

i Enumeration impracticable.

8

* Less than one tenth of 1.

PRISONS




2.0
6.0
12.0
.7
7.0
1.9
3.0
43.1
2.0
22.1
3.7

A D FEDERAL
N

Clothing:
Aprons........................................
Coats........................................ .
Dresses....................................... .
Hats and caps.............................
Overalls....................... ............ .
Pajamas and nightgowns_____
Pants........................................
Shirts, work................... ............
Suits............................................
Underwear............................... .
Miscellaneous_______ ________
Farm, garden, and dairy:
Cattle............................... head..
C orn „______ ________ bushels..
Hogs................................ head..
M ilk................ ...... 100 pounds..
Potatoes............................ do___
Miscellaneous dairy__________
Miscellaneous farm___________
Miscellaneous livestock_______
Textiles and textile products:
Bags........................................... .
Blankets................ ....................
Pillowcases....... ........................ .
Sheets......... ................................
Spreads........................................
Towels_______________ _____ _
Miscellaneous textile products..
Total— ...................................

229.50
27.00
182.93
849.20
65.98
121.97
1,970.37
66,939.01
CO

198

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

Index of Products in State and Federal Prisons
Table 13 is an index of the products in the State and Federal
prisons and shows the heads and subheads under which the articles
are included in the tables presented in this study.
T a b l e 1 3 . — Index

of 'products in State and Federal prisons, 1982 study
Included u n der-

Articles produced or operation
Main heading
Alfalfa, green............. ......................
Alterations and installations...........
Aluminum ware...............................
Apple butter.....................................
Aprons..............................................
Aerator, milk, metal........................
Art work...........................................
Automobiles, repaired and painted.
Automobiles, washed.......................
Awnings...........................................
Bacon................................................
Bags, cloth........................................
Bags, leather....................................
Bakery products, commercial.........
Bandages, track horse..... ................
Banners, cloth (for Olympic games).
Barley..............................................
Bars, clinker, iron............................
Baskets.............................................
Bathrobes.........................................
Batons, police...................................
Beds......................................
Beets.....................................
Belts, cloth and leather........
Benches, other than work__
Benches, work......................
Bin, coffee, metal..................
Binders..................................
Binders, loose leaf................
Binder twine.........................
Blanket binding...................
Blanket ends........................
Blankets................................
Blocks, bed, wood................
Blocks, cinder and concrete.
Blocks, granite...................
Bloomers............................
Blouses, boys’....... ............
Blouses, middy.................
Boiler compound...............
Bolsters..............................
Bookbinding......................
Bookcases...........................
Book ends, metal..............
Books, blank.......... ..........
Books, rebound.................
Booths, voting, wood____
Booties...............................
Bowl cleaners....................
Boxes, iron, galvanized___
Boxes, paper......................
Boxes, w o o d ..____ ______
Bread.................................
Breakfast foods..................
Breakfast sets, toy, wood..
Bricks-.............................
Bridge sets.................................
Bristles, brush, insert..............
Bronze articles, miscellaneous.
Brooder houses, portable.........
Brooms.....................................
Broomcorn.......................... .
Brushes.....................................
Buckets, tin..............................
Buckwheat.-........................... .
Buffets, wood........................... .




Farm, garden, and dairy,..........
Construction...............................
Metal products...........................
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Clothing......................................
Metal products...........................
Other manufactured products...
Repair and shop work................
Miscellaneous, labor only...........
Textiles and textile products___
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Textiles and textile products___
Other manufactured products...
Bakery products, commercial...
Textiles and textile products___
.do.
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Metal products...........................
Baskets........................................
Clothing......................................
Lumber and timber products....
Farm, garden, and dairy..........
Furniture and furnishings..........
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Clothing......................................
Furniture and furnishings_____
.do.
Metal products................ - .........
Agricultural implements............
Printing and binding.................
Textiles and textile products___
.do.
..do..
.do..
Lumber and timber products...
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts,
do.
Clothing.....................................
.......do.........................................
.......do.........................................
Other manufactured products. .
Furniture and furnishings........
Printing and binding................
Furniture and furnishings.........
Metal products..........................
Printing and binding................
.do.
Furniture and furnishings..........
Clothing......................................
Other manufactured products.
Metal products...........................
Other manufactured products...
Lumber and timber products. _.
Bakery products, commercial...
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Toys............................................
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Furniture and furnishings..........
Other manufactured products...
Metal products.............. - ......... .
Other manufactured products...
Brooms, brushes, and mops___
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Brooms, brushes, and mops___
Metal products...........................
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Furniture and furnishings_____

Subheading
Hay.
Alterations and installations.
Aluminum ware.
Miscellaneous farm.
Aprons.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Repair and shop work.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous farm.
Bags.
Other manufactured products.
Bakery products, commercial.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Baskets.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Beds.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Benches.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Agricultural implements.
Miscellaneous.
Binder twine.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Blankets.
Miscellaneous.
Concrete blocks.
Stone, building.
Underwear.
Shirts, dress.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Pillows.
Books, blank and bound.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Books, blank and bound.
Do.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Other manufactured products.
Galvanized ware.
Other manufactured products.
Boxes.
Bakery products, commercial.
Miscellaneous farm.
Toys.
Brick and building tile.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Brooms.
Miscellaneous farm.
Brushes.
Tinware.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.

199

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS
T able

13.— Index of products in State and Federal prisons, 1982 study— Continued
Included u n der-

Articles produced or operation
Main heading
Buildings, new— ....................
Bunk bottoms, repaired..........
Bureaus, wood.........................
Burlap......................................
Butter......................................
Butterfat..................................
Buttermilk...............................
Cabbage...................................
Cabinets, metal.......................
Cabinets, wood........................
Calves......................................
Cans, galvanized.....................
Cans, tin.................. ...............
Canned fruits and vegetables..
Canning labor..........................
Caps, cleaned...............................
Cards and tags, printed...............
Caretaking of State park............
Cases, clock, wood...................... .
Cases, exhibition.........................
Cases, filing................................. .
Cases, samples, leather.............. .
Caskets and rough boxes............ .
Cast-iron articles, miscellaneous..
Castings, metal........................... .
Cattle.......................................... .
Chairs, caned................................
Chairs, fiber.................................
Chairs, metal............................... .
Chairs, repaired............................
Chairs, steel-frame.......................
Chairs, wood................................
Chaises longues........................... .
Chart boards, miscellaneous........
Cheese...........................................
Chests, wood................................
Chiffoniers, wood........................
Cider............................................
Cigars...........................................
Cleaning and pressing suits-----Cleaning canal................. ..........
Cleaning streets...........................
Clerical work-.............................
Cloth, cleaning and polishing.
Cloth finishing............................
Clothes, baby, miscellaneous___
Clothing cleaned and pressed_
_
Clothing, miscellaneous..............
Clothing, miscellaneous labor_
_
Clothing repaired and pressed__
Clothing repairs..........................
Cloths, miscellaneous..................
Cutting out pants.......................
Clover seed..................................
Coal..............................................
Coat hangers, cloth-covered.......
Coats...................... ......................
Coats, women’s...........................
Coffee roasting.............................
Coffins and coffin boxes..............
Coke.................. .........................
Collar and cuff sets.....................
Collars..........................................
Collars, horse...............................
Commodes, metal.......................
Concrete articles, miscellaneous.
Construction, other.....................
Coolers, water..
Copper goods..
Cordage............
Corn...............
Corn, seed___
Corn-fed hogs.
Corn meal___




Subheading

Construction............................
Repair and shop work.............
Furniture and furnishings.......
Textiles and textile products. .
Farm, garden, and dairy.........
.do­
do,
do.
Furniture and furnishings..
.......do__..............................
Farm, garden, and dairy. _.
Metal products...................
-do_
Farm, garden, and dairy..........
Miscellaneous, labor only.........
Clothing.:.................................
___ d o ._ .....................................
Printing and binding................
Land development....................
Furniture and furnishings........
----- do.........................................
___ d o ........................................
Other manufactured products..
Lumber and timber products. .
Metal products.........................
___ do.........................................
J^rm, garden, and dairy..........
Repair and shop work___ ____
Furniture and furnishings........
— .d o.......................... .............
Repair and shop work...............
Furniture and furnishings........
___ d o . . .....................................
___ d o ........................................
Lumber and timber products. .
Farm, garden, and dairy..........
Furniture and furnishings........

New buildings.
Repair and shop work.
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers, etc.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous dairy.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Cattle.
Galvanized ware.
Tinware.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Hats and caps.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous.
Land improvement.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Do.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Castings.
Do.
Cattle.
Repair and shop work.
Chairs, fiber.
Miscellaneous.
Repair and shop work.
Miscellaneous.
Chairs, wood.
Davenports, sofas, etc.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous dairy.
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Cotton yard goods, light.
Miscellaneous textiles.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous farm.
Coal mining.
Other manufactured products.
Coats.
Overcoats.
Coffee roasting.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Harness.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.

-do.
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
Other manufactured products. .
Clothing____________________
Miscellaneous, labor only..........
do.
_do_
Textiles and textile products.
___ do..................................... .
Clothing..................................
d o . . ..................................
.d o .
_do.
_do.
-d o.
Textiles and textile products___
Clothing........................... .........
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Coal mining............................... .
Other manufactured products. ..
Clothing......................................
___ do__..................................... .
Coffee roasting........................... .
Lumber and timber products...
Other manufactured products. _.
Clothing......................................
___ do....... .................................. .
Harness....... ...............................
Other manufactured products...
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Construction............................... New, other than buildings and
roads.
Other manufactured products.. Other manufactured products.
Metal products...... ........... .......
Miscellaneous.
Textiles and textile products... Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage.
Farm, garden, and dairy.
Corn.
. — do..................... .........
Miscellaneous farm.
— d o ..............................
Do.
___ do_.............................
Do.

200

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

T able 13.—Index of products in State and Federal prisons, 1982 study— Continued
Included underArticles produced or operation
Main heading
Costumers, wood.......................
Cots, metal................................
Cotton........................................
Cotton yard goods, heavy.........
Cotton yard goods, light...........
Cottonseed.............................
Covers, furniture..................... .
Covers, mattress. _....................
Covers, miscellaneous...............
Covers, table..............................
Coveralls.............. ...................
Cream and butterfat.................
Cupboards.................................
Cultivators................................
Curtains, auto...........................
Curtains, miscellaneous............
Cushions....................................
Cuspidors...................................
Dairy products, miscellaneous..
Davenports............ ......... ........
Daybeds and couches, fiber___
Dehydration of vegetables........
Desks.........................................
Desk and chair combinations...
Diapers......................................
Dining booths............................
Disinfectants..............................
Dowels, wood............................
Drain-pipe solvent....................
Drawers (underwear)................
Dressers.....................................
Dresses.......................................
Dresses, infants’.........................
Duck and canvas......................
Dyeing.......................................
Ear muffs...................................
E g g s ................... .......... .........
Electricity..................................
Ensilage.....................................
Envelopes..................................
Fancy work...............................
Farm hands hired out------------Farm products, miscellaneous..
Fence, snow...............................
Ferneries, fiber...........................
Fiber articles, miscellaneous___
Finger-print cabinets.................
Finger-print outfits...................
Flags..........................................
Flagstone...................................
Flax fiber........................................
Flaxseed..........................................
Flax tow..........................................
Flour milling..................................
Flowers........................................... .
Fodder............................................ .
Footstools.......................................
Folders, index cards, etc.................
Foundry articles, miscellaneous___
Fruits, fresh....................................
Fruits and vegetables, canned........
Furniture, miscellaneous............... .
Furniture repairs.............................
Galvanized ware..............................
Garments, miscellaneous................
Garters....................... ....................
Glass strips, miscallansous_______
Gleaning cylinders for hay loaders..
Gloves......................................... .
Goats........................................ .......
Gowns, dressing..............................
Grader, potato, metal.....................
Grains, miscellaneous......................
Gravel..............................................
Grease, nonedible.................
Ham, minced, bologna, etc..
Hams, smoked.....................




Subheading

Furniture and furnishings.........
----- do.........................................
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
Textiles and textile products.
.do.
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Textiles and textile products___
___ do............................. .......... .
___ do......................................... .
___ do..........................................
Clothing......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Furniture and furnishings..........
Agricultural implements............
Textiles and textile products___
.do.
Furniture and furnishings..
Metal products...................
Farm, garden, and dairy...
Furniture and furnishings.,
do.
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Furniture and furnishings..........
___ do............................. .......... .
Textiles and textile products—
Furniture and furnishings-------Other manufactured products...
Lumber and timber products.
Other manufactured products...
Clothing......................................
Furniture and furnishings..........
Clothing......................................
----- do......................................... .
Textiles and textile products___
Clothing.....................................
----- do......................................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy....... .
Other manufactured products...
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Printing and binding................ .
Textiles and textile products___
Farm, garden, and dairy.......... .
do.
Other manufactured products..
Furniture and furnishings.........
----- do.........................................
----- do.........................................
Other manufactured products. .
Textiles and textile products...
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
----- do.........................................
----- do.........................................
— do.........................................
___ do.........................................
----- do.........................................
Furniture and furnishings........
Printing and binding................
Metal products.........................
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
.do..
Furniture and furnishings........
Repair and shop work...............
Metal products..........................
Clothing.....................................
___ do.........................................
Other manufactured products..
Agricultural implements, parts.
Clothing......................... ..........
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
Clothing.....................................
Metal products..........................
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Farm, garden, and dairy........
___ do.........................................
----- do.........................................

Miscellaneous.
Beds.
Cotton.
Cotton yard goods, heavy.
Cotton yard goods, light.
Cottonseed.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Overalls.
Miscellaneous dairy.
Miscellaneous.
Agricultural implements.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Pillows.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous dairy.
Davenports, sofas, etc.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Desks.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Underwear.
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers, etc.
Dresses.
Miscellaneous.
Duck and canvas.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous farm.
Envelopes.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Farm hands hired out.
Miscellaneous farm.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Do.
Other manufactured products.
Flags.
Stone, building.
Flax industry.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Do.
Miscellaneous.
Repair and shop work.
Galvanized ware.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Other manufactured products.
Agricultural implements, parts.
Gloves and mittens.
Miscellaneous livestock.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Stone, crushed.
Miscellaneous farm.
Do.
Do.

201

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS
T able

13.—Index of products in State and Federal prisons, 1982 study— Continued
Included under-

Articles produced or operation
Main heading
Hampers.........................................
Handkerch iefs.................... . .........
Handles, brush, broom, and mop..
Harness......................... .................
Harness repaired-..........................
Hats............... ...............................
Hats, cleaned and blocked............
Hay........ ................ ........................
Hides, cured and raw....................
Hides, tanned..... ...........................
Highway markers..........................
Hogs................................................
Honey.............................................
Horses.............................................
Hosiery..........................................
Hospital supplies...........................
Hyblum ware.................................
Ice..
Iron hollow ware.............................
Iron reinforcing: Cutting and bend­
ing.
Ironware, sheet, black.....................
Jackets, bed......................................
Jackets, lumber, cotton. .................
Jackets, overall.................................
Jackets, smoking..............................
Jackets, welding..............................
Janitor work.....................................
Jumpers............................................
Kimonas...........................................
Knickers, boys’ ................................
Knives..............................................
Kraut................................................
Labor, common................................
Lambs.......... ....................................
Land improvement..........................
Lard..................................................
Laths, wood__.................................
Laundry, commercial......................
Lawn products, cement...................
Layettes, infants’ .............................
Leather articles, miscellaneous____
Leggings, ether.™.............................
Legs, hospital, k n it-....................... .
Letterheads..................................... .
L ie, agricultural.......................... .
Lime, ground................................... .
Limestone dust............................... .
Linens, miscellaneous.......................
Lockers.............................................
Lumber............................................ .
Lumber, sawing............................. .
Lumber and timber products, mis­
cellaneous.
Mackinaws........................................
Mail pouches and sacks................. .
Mangels___________ ___________ _
Markers, billboard (small stampings)
Masks, operating...............................
Mats, coir..........................................
Mats, textile......................................
Matting, rubber...............................
Mattresses.........................................
Mattresses, renovated.......................
Metal articles, miscellaneous............
Milk, skim........................................
Milk, sweet...................................... .
Mill headings................................... .
M illwork ...........................................
Mirrors..............................................
Miscellaneous manufactured articles
Mittens..............................................
Molasses........................................... .
Monuments..................................... .
Monuments, labor only.
Mops.............................. .
Mowers...........................
Mules..............................




Subheading

Baskets.....................................
Clothing..................................
Lumber and timber products.
Harness.................. .................
Repair and shop work.............
Clothing...................................
doFarm, garden, and dairy...........
___ do.......................... ..............
Other manufactured products..
Highway markers....... ..............
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
___ do.........................................
----- do---------------------------------Clothing......................... ..........
Other manufactured products. .
Metal products______________
Other manufactured products..
Metal products_______ _______
Miscellaneous labor only..........

Baskets.
Handkerchiefs.
Miscellaneous.
Harness.
Repair and shop work.
Hats and caps.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Hay.
Miscellaneous farm.
Other manufactured products.
Highway markers.
Hogs.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous livestock.
Hosiery.
Other manufactured products.
Aluminum ware.
Other manufactured products.
Iron hollow ware.
Miscellaneous labor only.

Metal products.
Clothing............
___ do.................
do................
.do..
.do..
Miscellaneous, labor only______
Clothing......................................
___ do.
___ do.......... ...............................
Metal products........... ...............
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Miscellaneous, labor only... .......
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Land development......................
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Lumber and timber products.
Laundry, commercial.................
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Clothing......................................
Other manufactured products...
Clothing............ .........................
.do.
Printing and binding........... ......
Clay, cement, and stone products.
___ do...........................................
___ do...........................................
Textiles and textile products___
Furniture and furnishings..........
Lumber and timber products.
Miscellaneous, labor only______
Lumber and timber products___

Miscellaneous.
Do.
Overalls.
Do.
Coats.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Overalls.
Miscellaneous.
Pants.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous livestock.
Land improvement.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Laundry, commercial.
Miscellaneous.

Clothing......................................
Textiles and textile products___
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Metal products.............. .......... .
Textiles and textile products___
Other manufactured products...
Textiles and textile products___
Other manufactured products...
Furniture and furnishings..........
Repair and shop work................
Metal products. .........................
Farm, garden, and dairy............
.do.
Textiles and textile products___
Lumber and timber products...
Furniture and furnishings..........
Other manufactured products...
Clothing......................................
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Miscellaneous, labor only_....... .
Brooms, brushes, and mops___
Agricultural implements...........
Farm, garden, and dairy...........

Overcoats.
Bags.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Other manufactured products.
Mattresses.
Repair and shop work.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous dairy.
Milk.
Miscellaneous textiles.
Millwork.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Gloves and mittens.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.

Do.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Letterheads.
Lime and agricultural limestone.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous.
Lumber.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous.

Miscellaneous, labor only.
Mops.
Agricultural implements.
Miscellaneous livestock.

202

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

T a b l e 13 .— Index of products in State and Federal prisons, 1982 study— Continued

Included u n derArticles produced or operation
Main heading
Napkins.............................................
Neckties.............................................
Needlework....................... ...............
Nightgowns and nightshirts.............
Nightgowns, infants’.........................
Oats...................................................
Ottomans...........................................
Overalls.............................................
Overalls, children’s............................
Overcoats__________ ____ ________
Packing and shipping (includes
materials and labor).
Pads, bed...........................................
Pads, mattress...................................
Pads, silence......................................
Pajamas.............................................
Pamphlets.........................................
Pans, fern..........................................
Pants.............................................. .
Parts, spare, agricultural imple­
ments.
Patterns, cap.....................................
Patterns, wood................................. .
Peanuts.............................................
Pedestals, wood.................................
Pelts, sheep...................................... .
Petticoats...........................................
Pickles.............................................. .
Pigs....................................................
Pillowcases....................................... .
Pillows...............................................
Pillows, renovated........................... .
Pipe cement.....................................
Pipe, galvanized, corrugated .
Plants, vegetable___________
Plugs, bed, wood...................
Polish, floor and furniture—
Posts, concrete........................
Posts, wood, fence.............................
Potatoes, sweet.................................
Potatoes, white..................................
Poultry...............................................
Powder, scouring............. .................
Printing, miscellaneous.-.................
Prospecting for coal...........................
Pups, bloodhound-..........................
Quilting, miscellaneous.....................
Quilts..................................................
Rabbits..............................................
Rags...................................................
Railroad.............................................
Racks, iron, galvanized-..................
Raincapes...........................................
Raincoats.-........................................
Rakes, delivery..................................
Rakes, dump.....................................
Reforestation......................................
Remnants, burlap.............................
Repairing sewing machines........... .
Repair work and miscellaneous shopwork.
Restoring land............... ...................
R ice-..............................—.........
Roads, new_________ ____________
Roads, repaired...............................
Robes, ecclesiastical............... ...........
Rompers, children’s...........................
Rope...................................................
Rugs.......................
Rye.........................
Salvaged products..
Sand.......................
Sandals, bathing.............
Sanitaries______ _______
Scarfs, dresser and table-




Subheading

Textile and textile products.._
Clothing....... ................. .........
Textiles and textile products..
Clothing...................................
_do_.
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Furniture and furnishings..........
Clothing......................................
----- do..........................................
___ do.........................................
Other manufactured products.

Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Pajamas and nightgowns.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Overalls.
Children’s play suits.
Overcoats.
Other manufactured products.

Textiles and textile products___
___ do..........................................
___ do..........................................
Clothing....................... ..............
Printing and binding.................
Metal products...........................
Clothing......................................
Agricultural implements, parts..

Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Do.
Pajamas and nightgowns.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Pants.
Agricultural implements, parts.

Textiles and textile products___
Lumber and timber products.
Farm, garden, and dairy______
Furniture and furnishings..........
Farm, garden, and dairy............
Clothing.....................................
Farm, garden, and dairy............
.do.
Textiles and textile products___
Furniture and furnishings..........
Repairs and shop work............. .
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Metal products--...................... .
Farm, garden, and dairy....... —
Lumber and timber products.
Other manufactured products...
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Lumber and timber products...
Farm, garden, and dairy............
do.
.do..
Soap and soap pow der.........
Printing and binding............
Miscellaneous, labor only-----Farm, garden, and dairy.......
Textiles and textile products,
.do..
Farm, garden, and dairy.......
Textiles and textile products.
Construction..........................
Metal products . ....................
Clothing..................................
.doAgricultural implements........
----- do......................................
Land developments...............
Textiles and textile products.
Miscellaneous, labor only___
Repair and shop work______

Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Underwear.
Miscellaneous farm.
Hogs.
Pillowcases.
Pillows.
Repairs and shop work.
Concrete pipe.

Land development.......... .
Farm, garden, and dairy..
Construction.................... .
do..
Clothing.................................
___ do......................................
Textiles and textile products.

Land improvement.
Miscellaneous farm.
Roads, new.
Roads, repaired.
Miscellaneous clothing.
Do.
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous farm.
Repair and shop work.
Miscellaneous.

-do..
Farm, garden, and dairy...........
Repair and shop work...............
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
Clothing.....................................
Textiles and textile products_
_
___ do.......................................

Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products
Concrete posts.
Miscellaneous?
Potatoes.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Soap and soap powder.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous livestock.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Blankets.
Miscellaneous livestock.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Railroad.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Do.
Agricultural implements.
Do.
Reforestation.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Repair and shop work.

Do.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.

203

STATE AND FEDERAL PRISONS

T a b l e 13. — Index of products in State and Federal prisons, 1932 study— Continued

Included un derArticles produced or operation
Main heading
Scows___________________________
Scrapers__________ _______________
Screens, door and window........ ........
Seats, chair, hooked......................... .
Seats, wood, saddle_______________
Settees___________________ _______
Shades, lamp, cloth............... ...........
Shades, window................ ................
Shaves and haircuts. _ ......................
Sheep....... ................................. ........
Sheet-metal articles, miscellaneous..
Sheets............................. ...................
Sheets, drop, duck.........................
Sheets, rubber_______ ____________
Shelvfis, mftt.al, rnisrAllanp.nns
Shirts, baby.......................................
Shirts, dress_________ ____________
Shirts, work.......................................
Shoes____ _____ __________________
Shoos, repaired......
.......
Shovels, snow____________________
Sideboards_______________________
Signboards_______________________
Signs, metal______________________
Signs, repainting and refinishing___
Skins
Slippers_____________ _____ _______
Slips...................................................
Smocks........................, .....................
Soap____________________________
Sofas__________ ______ ____ _______
Softeners (washing soda, etc.)______
Sorghum cane____________________
Speltz________ __________________
Spreads_______ _________________
Springs, steel, bed________________
Stands, miscellaneous_____________
Steel work_______________________
Stepladders, wood________________
Stone, building___________________

Metal products
. __________
Other manufactured products. . .
Textiles and textile products___
Fiirnitnro arid furnishings
____do___
___________
Tp.Yt.ilft and t.p.Y prndnnts
t.ilfi
Miscellaneous, labor only______
Farm, garden, and dairy ,
Metal products _ __________
Textiles and textile products----____do___ __ ________________
__ do___
_______________
Metal products ______________
Clothing____________________ _
____do_________________ _____ ....... do...........................................
____do________________________
___do________________________
Lumber and timber products . . .
Fiirnit.iirA and furnishings
Lumber and timber products—
Metal products
___________
Repair and shop work
Farm, garden, and dairy______
Clothing
....... do_________ _____ _________
__ do___ __ ________________
Soap and soap powder_________
Furniture and furnishings..........
Other manufactured products.. .
Farm, garden, and dairy______
____do......................................... .
Textiles and textile products___
Furniture and furnishings_____
d o ....................................... .
Metal products_______________
Lumber and timber products. . .
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
....... do...........................................
....... do...........................................
____do________ _____ _________
___ do________________________
Furniture and furnishings______
Metal products_______________
Textiles and textile products___ !
____ do________________________
____do________________________

Subheading
New, other than buildings and
roads.
Miscellaneous.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Miscellaneous.
Davenports, sofas, etc.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Miscellaneous, labor only.
Miscellaneous livestock.
M iscellaneous.
Sheets.
Miscellaneous textile products.
Do.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Shirts, dress.
Shirts, work.
Shoes, new.
Shoes, repaired.
Miscellaneous.
"
Do.
Do.
Do.
Repair and shop work.
Miscellaneous farm products.
Shoes, new.
Underwear.
Aprons.
Soap and soap powder.
Davenports, sofas, etc.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous farm.
Do.
Spreads.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Stone, building.

Stone, cast__________ ___ _________
Do.
Stone, crushed________________ '__
Stone, crushed.
Stone, cut and dressed____________
Stone, building.
Stone products, miscellaneous______
Miscellaneous.
Stools___________________________
Do.
Stoves, iron______________________
Do.
Straitjackets_____________________
Miscellaneous textile products.
Straps, laundry__________________
Do.
Straps, shoulder and suspensories
Do.
(hospital).
Straw___________________________ Farm, garden, and dairy_______l Miscellaneous farm.
Sugar___________________________ Sugar________ _____ _________ > Sugar.
Sugarcane________________________ Farm, garden, and dairy_______ Sugarcane.
Suits____________________________ Clothing_____________________ Suits.
Suits, play_______________________ ____do________________________ Children’s play suits.
Surplices_________________________ ....... do........................................... Miscellaneous.
Suspenders_______________________ ....... do.................................. ........
Do.
Suspensories_____________________ Textiles and textile products___ Miscellaneous textile products.
Swatters, fly__________ _________
Other manufactured products. „ Other manufactured products.
Sweeping compound______________ ____do__________ _______ ______
Do.
Switch boxes, electric_____________ Metal products.____ _________ Electric switch boxes.
Sirup, maple_____________________ Farm, garden, and dairy_______ Miscellaneous farm.
Tablecloths______________________ Textiles and textile products___ Miscellaneous textile products.
Furniture and furnishings........ Tables.
Tables............................................—
Tables, ironing, wood_____________ ....... do.......... ........................ ........ Miscellaneous.
Tags, auto license_________________ Metal products____ __________ Auto license tags.
Tags, miscellaneous_______________ ____do_______ __________ _____ Tags, miscellaneous.
Tailored items, miscellaneous______ Clothing__________ __________ Miscellaneous.
Tallow______________________ ____ Farm, garden, and dairy_______ Miscellaneous farm.
Tankage (hog food)_______________ .......do________ _______________
Do.
Tarpaulins_______________________ Textiles and textile products___ Miscellaneous textile products.
Tents and tent flies
_______________ .......do.......... ........................... ....
Do.
Do.
Textile articles, miscellaneous______ ____do....................................... .
Ticks, bed and pillow_____________ ____do..... .............................. ......
Do.
Ties, cedar.......................................... Lumber and timber products___ Miscellaneous.
2574°—33----- 14




204

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

T a b le 13 .— Index of products in State and Federal prisons, 1932 study— Continued
Included underArticles produced or operation
Tile, building .
Tile, drain....... .............................. .
Tile, roofing, Spanish.............. .........
Tinware..................................... —
Tobacco..........................................
Tobacco, chewing________________
Tobacco, smoking______ ____ _____
Toweling.......................................... .
Towels— ............................... ..........
Toys, miscellaneous...................... .
Trees................... .............. .......... .
Trucks, post-office and laundry,
canvas.
Tracks, tongue..................................
Trucks, transport..............................
Tubing, pillow....... ........................
Tubing, knitted wrist............. ........
Turnips— ......................................
Twine, novelty..................................

Main heading
Clay, cement, and stone prod­
ucts.
----- do­
do............................... .........
Metal products.........................
Farm, garden, and dairy........
Other manufactured products.
___ do--------------------------- -----Textiles and textile products...
..do.......................................
Toys..
Farm, garden, and dairy_____
Other manufactured products.
Agricultural implements____
___ do.................... .................
Textiles and textile products.
Clothing---------------------------Farm, garden, and dairy.......
Textiles and textile products .

Typewriters repaired........................
Underwear, babies’ ...........................
Underwear, men’s, women’s, and
children’s. "
Uniforms, other than prison.............
Uniforms, prison............ ................. .
Unionalls......................................... .
Vanities, wood................................. .
Ventilators, window........................ .
Vests................................................. .
Vinegar............................................. .
Wagons, farm................................... .
Waists, boys’ .....................................
Wagon repairing.............................. .
Wardrobes, wood________________ _

Repair and shop work..
Clothing............... .......
___ do............................

Waste, cotton...........................
Wax, floor.................................
Wheat.......................................
Whips......... —......................
Willows, peeled (for baskets) ~.
Wire products, miscellaneous..
Wood, fuel................................
Wool.........................................
Wool yard goods......................
Wrappers, women’s.................
Yard work, general..................
Yarn, cotton and wool.............

Textiles and textile products. .
Other manufactured products.
Farm, garden, and dairy.........
Whips................................ .......
Lumber and timber products..
Metal products........................
Lumber and timber products..
Farm, garden, and dairy.........
Textiles and textile products...
Clothing...................................
Land development...................
Textiles and textile products. _

-d o ..d o..do..
Furniture and furnishings........
Other manufactured products..
Clothing............ .......................
Farm, garden, and dairy......... .
Agricultural implements.........
Clothing................................... .
Repair and shop work.............
Furniture and furnishings____

Subheading
Brick and building tile.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Tinware.
Miscellaneous farm.
Other manufactured products.
Do.
Cotton yard goods, light.
Towels.
Toys.
Miscellaneous farm.
Other manufactured products.
Agricultural implements.
Do.
Cotton yard goods, light.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Rope, twine (not binder), and
cordage.
Repair and shop work.
Miscellaneous.
Underwear.
Miscellaneous.
Uniforms, prison.
Overalls.
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers, etc.
Other manufactured products.
Miscellaneous.
Miscellaneous farm.
Agricultural implements.
Shirts, dress.
Repair and shop work.
Bureaus, chiffoniers, dressers,
etc.
Miscellaneous textiles.
Other manufactured products.
Wheat.
Whips.
Miscellaneous.
Do.
Do.
Miscellaneous farm.
Wool yard goods.
Miscellaneous.
Land improvement.
Yarn, cotton and wool.

County and City Jails
In October 1932 at about the same time that agents were sent to
Federal and State penal institutions, the Bureau of Labor Statistics
mailed questionnaires to each of the 3,072 counties in the United
States, and to each of the 92 cities having a population of 100,000 or
over, asking for information concerning prison labor in county and
city jails.
Reports were received from 2,721, or 88.6 percent, of the total
number of counties in the United States. The counties reporting
contain 93.2 percent of the total population of the United States.
Replies were received from all counties in the States of California,
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, North
Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Washington, and Wyom­
ing. The questionnaire asked for data as of the time of receipt of
the form. Many counties reported as of October 1932, others for
dates in November and December 1932, and still others for January
or February 1933.




205

COUNTY AND CITY JAILS

Table 14 shows the number of prisoners under sentence in county
jails in the United States, reported as employed, by States and by
type of work performed by the prisoners.
T a b l e 1 4 . — Number

of prisoners under sentence in county jails in the United
States reported as employed, 1932-33, by States and type of work
Counties re­
porting

State

Alabama..............
Arizona...............
Arkansas.............
California............
Colorado.—.........
Connecticut____
Delaware........... .
Florida................
Georgia................
Idaho...................
Illinois.................
Indiana...............
Iowa....................
Kansas.................
Kentucky______
Louisiana............
Maine.................
Maryland______
Massachusetts...
M ichigan...........
Minnesota...........
Mississippi..........
Missouri..............
Montana.............
Nebraska.............
Nevada...............
New Hampshire.
New Jersey.........
New Mexico.......
New York...........
North Carolina..
North Dakota___
Ohio....................
Oklahoma............
Oregon.................
Pennsylvania___
Rhode Island___
South C arolinaSouth Dakota___
Tennessee............
Texas...................
Utah....................
Vermont________
Virginia...............
Washington.........
West Virginia___
Wisconsin............
Wyoming______
Total.........
Percent___

Total
num­
ber of
coun­
ties

67
14
75
58
63
8

3
67
159
44
102
92
99
105
120

64
16
24
14
83
87
82
114
56
93
17
10
21

31
62
100

53

88

77
36
67
5
46
69
95
254
29
14
100

39
55
71
24
3, 072

Per­
Num­ cent of
State
ber
popu­
lation
61
12

53
58
62
8

3
62
108
43

101
70
54
15
23
14
83
77
73
105
55

91.5
87.2
69.6
100.0

99.0
100.0
100.0
94.6
68.3
99.0
97.7
97.9
95.7
95.6
59.3
85.8
98.1
99.4
100.0

100.0

94.0
89.7
96.0
98.2
95.8

100.0

19
28
61
86

53
83
70
36
67
4
33
68

75
205
28
14
80
39
43
70
24
2,721

88.4
97.6
86.0
98.4
87.5

100.0

95.3
92.2
100.0
100.0
93.9
73.4
98.6
82.4
82.2
98.6

100.0

85.4
100.0
80.1
99.2
100.0

93.2

Number of prisoners under sentence
reported as employed at—
Ordi­
nary
prison
duties,
idle,
sick, or
invalid
463
141
232
2,795
202

496
74
380
745
331
1,047
782
683
355
407
464
545
294
945
754
678
334
792
248
394
71
94
950
67
1,662
458
149
1,405
844
275
4,267
83
241
144
670
1,260
69
145
881
442
884
1,212
114
30,968
70.4

Road
work

441
0
62
773
3
0
0
788
2,348
16
0
0
7
153
82
91
0
0
0
0
0
602
0
0
1
0
6
40
0
9
652
0
20
10
12

0
0
945
13
931
32
0
0
3
3
216
1
0
8,260
18.8

Farm,
garden,
and
dairy
work
20
0
41
89
0
72
0
44
111
0
0
0
14
3
2
51
0
0
192
38
4
162

8

0
4
0
111
124
0
266
148
1
0
2
3
455
16
13
15
166
72
0
0
2
0
4
142
0
2,395
5.4

Other
work

26
0
0
53
16
342
0
25
20

0
50
3
2
0
3
0
57
0
230
7
7
3
15
0
13
1
3
47
0
154
1
0
11
4
62
481
143
4
29
84
0
0
0
7
7
0
481
0
2,391
5.4

Total

950
141
335
3,710
221

910
74
1,237
3,224
347
1,097
785
706
511
494
606
602
294
1,367
799
689
1,101
815
248
412
72
214
1,161
67
2,091
1,259
150
1,436
860
352
5.203
242
1.203
201

1,851
1,364
69
145
893
452
1,104
1,836
114
44,014
100.0

It should be borne in mind that the figures shown in the tables
herein refer to prisoners actually sentenced. Persons detained in jail,
awaiting trial or for other reasons, were not included in the present
study.
“ Ordinary prison duties” include cooking, cleaning, and care of
jail buildings and yards and usually provide little more than a nominal
job for the inmates. In this group have also been classified the idle,
sick, and invalid inmates.
The 2,721 reporting counties had a total prison population of 44,014.
Of these prisoners, 30,968, or 70.4 percent, were engaged in ordinary




206

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

prison duties, or were sick or idle; 8,260, or 18.8 percent, were engaged
m road work; 2,395, or 5.4 percent, were engaged in farm, garden, or
dairy work; 2,391, or 5.4 percent, were engaged in other work, con­
sisting for the most part of manufacturing articles either for use in
the prison or for sale.
The type of work performed by the prisoners varies greatly in the
different States. In a number of the Southern States, notably Ala­
bama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina,
and Tennessee, the majority of prisoners were engaged in road work.
Some States employed no prisoners on any work except ordinary
prison duties. This was true in Arizona, Delaware, Maryland, M on­
tana, New Mexico, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming. The States where­
in city and county prisoners engaged extensively in manufacturing
were Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and
Wisconsin.
Table 15 shows the number of prisoners under sentence in city jails
in cities of the United States having a population of 100,000 or over,
by cities and by type of labor performed by the inmates.
T a b le

15.— Number of prisoners under sentence in jails, in cities with population
of 100,000 or over, reported as employed, by cities and type of work
Number of prisoners under sentence
reported as employed at—

C ity 1

Akron______
Atlanta.........
Baltimore___
Birmingham.
Bridgeport...
Camden........
Chattanooga.
Chicago.........
Cincinnati. __
Cleveland___
Columbus_
_
Dallas...........
Dayton.........
Denver..........
Des Moines..
Detroit..........
Duluth.........
Elizabeth___
El Paso_____
Erie...............
Flint.............
Fort Wayne..
Houston____
Jacksonville—
Kansas City,
Kans..........
Kansas City,
M o.............
Long Beach..
Los Angeles..
Louisville___

Ordinary
prison
Farm,
duties Road gar­ Other
or as
Total
den,
sick, idle, work and work
and
dairy
invalid
0
155
0
120
0
0
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
68
0
0
0
0
0

0
25
0
9
6
45
0
0
0
316
0
0
38
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
145

5
0
115
16
39
0
0
0
214
320
0
24
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

7
299
757
176
183
77
32
213
368
765
75
24
165
6
6
27
7
71
87
15
19
40
31
171

13

0

0

0

13

10
35
1,027
182

0
0
32
0

0
0
6
0

0
0
70
0

10
35
1,135
182

2
119
642
31
138
32
12
213
154
129
75
0
127
6
6
27
7
71
19
15
19
40
31
26

Number of prisoners under sentence
reported as employed at—

City

Ordinary
Farm,
prison
duties Road gar­ Other
den,
or as
Total
sick, idle, work and work
dairy
and
invalid
72
0
44
150
5
0
199
0
0
304 1,250 4,714
0
0
147
0
111
10

Miami______
Newark.........
New Orleans.
New York_
_
Norfolk.........
Oakland........
Oklahoma
City...........
Omaha..........
Paterson.......
Portland,
Oreg...........
Richm ond...
Sal t Lake
City______
San Antonio.
San Diecro___
San Francisco
Seattle...........
Spokane........
St. Louis
St. Paul____
Tacoma_____
Toledo..........
Tulsa............
Utica.............
Wichita.........

28
145
199
2,947
147
101

0
0
0
213
0
0

100
28
42

0
0
0

0
0
8

0
0
0

100
28
50

25
44

0
0

0
0

11
0

36
44

9
85
7
13
63
26
340
70
27
35
52
43
22

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0

12
85
7
13
63
26
340
70
27
35
56
43
22

Total. . . .
Percent—

7,806
68.2

608
5.3

907 2,125 11,446
7.9 18.6 100.0

1 Prisoners in the following cities are reported as incarcerated in county jails: Albany, N.Y., Boston,
Mass., Buffalo, N.Y., Cambridge, Mass., Evansville, Ind., Fall River, Mass., Fort Worth, Tex., Gary,
Ind., Grand Rapids, Mich., Hartford, Conn., Indianapolis, Ind., Knoxville, Tenn., Lowell, Mass., Lynn,
Mass., Memphis, Tenn., Milwaukee, Wis., Minneapolis, Minn., Nashville, Tenn., New Bedford, Mass.,
New Haven, Conn., Peoria, 111., Philadelphia, Pa., Pittsburgh, Pa., Providence, R.I., Reading, Pa.,
Rochester, N.Y., Scranton, Pa., Somerville, Mass., South Bend, Ind., Springfield, Mass., Syracuse, N.Y.,
Tampa, Fla., Trenton, N. J., Washington, D.C., Waterbury, Conn., Wilmington, Del., Worcester, Mass.
Yonkers, N .Y., and Youngstown, Ohio.




207

COUNTY AND CITY JAILS

Of the 92 cities having a population of 100,000 or over, 39 (noted in
table 15) have no city jails in which to confine prisoners sentenced for
any crimes. In these cities the jails are used simply as detention
quarters, and the prisoners, after being sentenced, are incarcerated in
the county jail.
In the 53 cities which confine sentenced prisoners in city jails,
11,446 prisoners were confined. Of these prisoners, 7,806, or 68.2 per­
cent, worked at ordinary prison duties or were sick or idle; 608, or 5.3
percent worked at road work; 907, or 7.9 percent, at farm, garden, and
dairy work; and 2,125, or 18.6 percent, at other work, mostly manu­
facturing.
In 31 of these cities prisoners did no work other than ordinary
prison duties; 6 of the cities employed prisoners on road work; 11
employed prisoners in farm, garden, and dairy work; and 14 used
prisoners for manufacturing articles.
Reports from 13 county and city institutions indicated that articles
were being manufactured, on an extensive scale. An additional form
therefore was sent to these institutions asking for detailed information
and replies were received from 12. Table 16 presents these data.
T a b le

16.— Number of prisoners employed, and number and value of articles
manufactured and sold during year in specified city and county jails

State and institution

Articles manufac­
tured

Aver­ Articles produced
age
num­
ber
of in­
mates Number Value
en­
gaged

Value
of
Value of cles arti­
used
articles in State
sold
institu­
tions

CONNECTICUT

Chairs and rockers..
Chairs......................

165
130

Brushes and wire
goods.

140

(2
)

Hampden County jail, Springfield. Chair seats...............
Hampshire County jail, North­ Repairing and reampton.
caning chairs.
Plymouth County house of correc­ Pants....... ...............
tion, Plymouth

57
14

21,455
2,795

1,738.01
2,740.51

3

3 270

742.50

(4
)

742.50

27
1
2
7
1
16

72,041
6,947
356
2,804
260
8,396
4,701
4,571
2,147
402
17
2,512
55
6,893
1,000
* 2,500
40
140

32,206.00
1,405.25
2,492.00
7,828.00
1,300.00
18,925.00
1,863.66
631.33
407.93
389.25
1.70
606.55
10.45
896.09
480.00
250.00
4.00
35.00

(4)
(v
(4)
(4
)
(4
)
<)
4
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)

32,206.00
1,405.25
2,492.00
7,828.00
1,300.00
18,925.00
1,863.66
631.33
407.93
389.25
1.70
606.55
10.45
896.09
480.00
250.00
4.00
35.00

Hartford County jail.................... .
New Haven County jail................

10,700 $40,000.00 $40,000.00
42,168 36,180.00 35,980.00

0)
$200.00

MARYLAND

Baltimore City jail_____________

286,325.00 286,325.00

0)

MASSACHUSETTS

1,738.01
2,740.51

0)
0)

NEW YORK

Reformatory prison, Harts Island. Brooms....................
Brushes....................
Beds.........................
Beds (repaired)........
Suits.........................

Women’s farm colony, Grey Court. Sheets.......................
Pillow cases.............
Pillow ticks..............
Dresses.....................
Aprons.....................
Caps....... .................
Underdrawers(men’s) » 19
Undershirts (men’s)
Shirts.......................
Gloves, men's...........
Scarfs, dresser..........
R ugs..................
*None used.




* Not reported.

8 Pairs.

W
(4
)

(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
<None sold.

208

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

T a b l e 1 6 , — Number

of prisoners employed, and number and value of articles
manufactured and sold during year in specified city and county jails— Contd.
Aver­ Articles produced
age
num­
ber
of in­
mates Number Value
en­
gaged

Articles manufac­
tured

State and institution

Value
of
Value of clesarti­
used
articles in State
sold
institu­
tions

OHIO
OincinP&ti workhonsa

PENNSYLVANIA

_ _ Shirts____________
Sheets____________
Pillowcases________
Underwear________
Towels____________ > 7
Kitchen jackets____
Mattress covers.......
Dresses___________
Coats, men’s______

Lehigh County prison, Allentown. Rag carpet________

(4)
(4)

1,165
1,470
1,007
1,735
5,889
19
87
4
140

$326.20
352.80
70.49
832.80
412.23
7.60
71.21
1.12
504.00

(4)
(4)
(*

*9,323

3,859.52

$3,859.52

0)

5 «140,000

2,100.00

(<)

2,100.00

12

\
i

(•)

$326.20
352.80
70.49
832.80
412.23
7.60
71.21
1.12
504.00

TENNESSEE
Shelby County penal farm, Mem­
phis.
WISCONSIN
House of correction, Milwaukee
County.

Total

Lumber________ __

Chairs, wood______

273

60,748

69.860.00

69.643.00

217.00

Tables, wood...........
Benches, radio, wood
Stools, wood_______
Buffets, wood_____
Wall brackets, etc...

180
8
1
10
2

11,548
2,048
434
285
263

46.192.00
2,048.00
326.00
2,565.00
632.00

46.178.00
2,048.00
184.00
2,565.00
632.00

14.00
0)
142.00
(l)
«

_______ ________

1 None used.

4 None sold.

1,080
* Yards.

567,619.20 491,893.04 75,726.16
• Board feet sawed.

The total value of articles manufactured in these institutions was
$567,619.20, of which $491,893.04, or 86.7 percent, was to be sold
and $75,726.16, or 13.3 percent, was to be used by various State
institutions.
The county and city institutions engaged in manufacturing were
located for the most part in the New England States and New York.
There was 1 institution, however, in Maryland, 1 in Ohio, 1 in Penn­
sylvania, 1 in Tennessee, and 1 in Wisconsin.
There was a daily average of 1,080 prisoners engaged in the making
of the articles enumerated. This is 21.1 percent of the total number
of inmates in these 12 institutions. Brushes, brooms, and wire goods
accounted for the greater proportion of the value of the articles manu­
factured. Chairs accounted for the next greatest value. While the
value of the goods sold accounted for the larger proportion of the
total value of the goods produced, many of the institutions made all
goods either for their institutions or for other institutions in the State.

Arguments and Opinions For and Against Prison Labor
In addition to compiling information concerning prison labor from
the records of the institutions, the Bureau of Labor Statistics ob­
tained from prison wardens and other interested parties statements
of their opinions concerning conditions of employment in the various




ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST PRISON LABOR

209

penal institutions, and also opinions for and against the different
systems now in vogue in both Federal and State penal institutions.
Arguments Presented by American Prison Association and Osborne
Association, Inc.
The following extract from the pamphlet, Fundamental Questions
Concerning Prison Labor, published by the American Prison Associa­
tion and the Osborne Association, Inc., presents arguments for and
against the different systems of prison labor.
What are some of the arguments for and against the lease system?
In favor: (1) It is the easiest way to solve the prison employment problem.
(2) The State is under no expense to house, feed, and clothe its prisoners.
Against: (1) It is peonage; permits the exploitation of the prisoner; is usually
conducted cruelly and does absolutely nothing to reform or
improve the prisoner.
(2) This system has been officially repudiated by all States.
What are some of the arguments for and against the contract labor system?
In favor: (1) It makes possible the steady and efficient employment of the
prisoners without placing any additional burden or risk upon
the State.
(2) It affords some opportunities for vocational training and teaches
the prisoner to work under modern competitive conditions.
(3) In theory, the system presents a method of sound competition,
efficient management, and the highest financial return to the
State and to the prisoner.
Against: (1) The system permits the exploitation of the prisoner for the private
profit of a contractor. Since the contractor is allowed to exact
a “ task” and enforce it, it encourages sweatshop conditions and
has sometimes resulted in brutalities.
(2) Concentrating the efforts of prisoners on 1 or 2 types of work,
largely the kinds which do not require much skill, places the
burden of prison competition on a few industries. The use of
cheap convict labor enables the contractor to dump his output
upon the open market, thus depressing the working conditions,
wages, and standards of free labor and private industry.
What are some of the arguments for and against the public-account system?
In favor: (1) The State keeps all disciplinary problems in its own hands, sets the
daily work task, and there can be no complaint that greedy
private interests use slave-driving methods or that the prisoner
is exploited.
(2) It provides opportunity for vocational training under the guidance
of State officers, makes practical the diversification of the output
of prison industries, and makes possible prison employment
under normal industrial conditions.
Against: (1) It places upon the State most difficult practical problems connected
with the operation of industries. It requires a large amount of
capital and opens the door to possible graft and inefficiency.
(2) Selling the products of the prison industries in the open market is
most difficult and involves tremendous overhead, unless the goods
are dumped on the market at distress prices, thus depressing the
market.
(3) The tendency is to concentrate in 1 or 2 main lines of work.
What axe some of the arguments for and against the State-use system?
In favor: (1) The principal argument in favor of this system is that it eliminates
direct competition of prison-made goods with the products of
free labor, since none of the goods are sold on the open market.
(2) The proponents of State use declare that it forces diversification of
prison industries, thus broadening the opportunities for voca­
tional training.
(3) The welfare of the prisoners remains in the hands of the State
authorities.
(4) It makes possible some return from the labor of the prisoner, over
and above the operation costs.




210

PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

Against: (1) The requirements of the State do not provide a sufficient market for
the labor of prisoners, and idleness and inefficiency result.
(2) Competition under the State-use system is not eliminated; rather it
intensifies and concentrates the competition with certain types
of industries which have specialized in meeting the needs of the
State.
(3) More harm can be done by competing with some of the relatively
small industries which specialize on filling the requirements of
the State than can be done if the prisoners are employed in a
large Nation-wide industry and goods sold in the open market.
(4) The opponents of State use declare that it makes diversification of
industries difficult, reduces the possibility of vocational training,
and results in idleness.
(5) It is difficult to adminster because of the necessity of meeting the
varied needs and standards of State institutions and agencies.
The experience of some of the States indicates that it is imprac­
tical unless the law requires every tax-supported institution and
agency, including the counties and municipalities, to procure
their needs from the prisons.

Attitude of Organized Labor
Organized labor has repeatedly stated that it favors employment
of convicts, but it has always fought the sale of prison-made goods
in the open market because it believes it depresses the wage standards
and working conditions of free labor. The following excerpt from a
letter of Mr. Samuel Gompers, former president of the American
Federation of Labor, on the subject of prison labor, describes the
attitude of organized labor:
* * * The organized labor movement has been in accord with the position
that men, or rather human beings, deprived of their choice of action and of their
liberty must not be kept in absolute idleness. In addition to the fact that it is
natural for a man to work, work is also civilizing and developing and educational.
All persons must have work of some kind. The only question is what kind of
work. The only question that has developed in connection with convicts is
what kind of work shall they do and under what conditions shall that work be
performed in order that the convicts may get the greatest advantage out of the
work and at the same time that there shall be no injury done to free workers
through the products of prison labor.
What the organized labor movement has concerned itself with has been the
nature of the work done by convicts and safeguards to prevent the products of
their labor from coming in competition with the products of free labor and in
that way undermining the standards and conditions of work which the free
workers have established themselves. This position of the American Federation
of Labor has been repeatedly endorsed.

This policy has never been modified by the American Federation
of Labor.
Statements of Prison Officials
Practically all officials of Federal and State penal institutions fur­
nished the bureau with written opinions concerning labor problems
in their institutions. The prison officials and practically all outside
persons and organizations interested have agreed that it is necessary
to keep prisoners employed. One prison official states: “ Idleness
among prisoners is universally acknowledged to be degenerating both
morally and physically. It encourages degeneracy, breeds contempt
for society, and complicates discipline within the prison. Work is an
essential part of the theory of punishment. Work is curative and an
essential factor in the rehabilitation of a prisoner. The maintaining
of a penal institution imposes a heavy burden on the taxpayer, and
work for prisoners reduces this burden.”



211

ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST PRISON LABOR

While practically all authorities have agreed that it is better for
the prisoners to work, there is a vast disagreement as to the kind of
work that the prisoners should do. In fact, there are many reasons
for opposition to prison labor. Among these are the dumping of
prison-made goods on the open market, regardless of the effect upon
normal industry; the exploitation of prison labor for private profit;
and in some institutions the concentration of prison labor on a few
items, with the result that skilled labor has been forced out of employ­
ment in those branches. The competition of prison labor seems to be
felt by manufacturers and free labor mostly in times of business
depression and wide-spread unemployment. At such times the atten­
tion of the public is focused disproportionately on what is labeled
“ unfair competition. ” There is also a general prejudice against the
Federal Government or a State government engaging in any kind of
business.
Mr. Sanford Bates, Director of Bureau of Prisons of the United
States Department of Justice, has in the following letter stated in
brief the attitude of the Federal prison officials towards the subject
of prison labor.
M ay

Mr.

C h a r le s

E.

B a ld w in ,

,

24, 1933.

,,

Acting Commissioner of Labor Statistics U.S. Department of Labor
Washington D.C.
D e a r S i r : Y o u ask in your letter of April 10, 1933, for a statement concerning
the prison labor situation. Broadly speaking, the prisons of the country seem
to me to be no nearer a solution of the employment problem than they were in
1923, when your last monograph on convict labor was published. I think that I
cannot be successfully contradicted when I say that today there is more idleness
in most of the prisons of the country than ever, those private manufacturers
affected are more vociferous and uncompromising in their attitude than hereto­
fore, labor is still unsatisfied, and the public remains uninformed and indifferent.
Anyone who is familiar with the prisons of this country realizes that they are
afflicted with two fundamental evils—overcrowding and idleness. The former
of these can be overcome through the comparatively simple process of building
new institutions but the latter difficulty is the most baffling and perplexing of
almost any social problem with which I am familiar. No one condones idleness
among prisoners because everyone recognizes that its effects are degenerating
both morally and physically. It complicates discipline, encourages degeneracy,
and breeds contempt for society. There are also strong economic arguments
for employing the prisoner, since he should be required to earn the cost of his
maintenance and not be dawdling in prison at the expense of the taxpayer. If
the prisoner is to be rehabilitated it is essential that he be provided with construc­
tive work which is necessary for physical and mental health, for occupational
training, for the development of habits of industry, and to prevent deterioration.
When men have been crowded into an institution with no means of occupying
their hands and minds, depravity, bloodshed, and riots have been the natural
result. The butchery of the guards at Canon City, Colo., the holocaust at
Columbus, Ohio, the fires at Joliet, 111., have all had lack of employment as a
major contributing cause, according to the official statement of those in charge
of these institutions. Where is there a man who will accept responsibility for the
safekeeping of four or five thousand men caged up within the small compass of a
prison with no means of occupying them?
In spite, however, of what to the general public seem to be compelling reasons
for the employment of prisoners, there are still certain groups who bitterly con­
test even the least encroachment upon what they deem to be their domain.
Some of these groups will accept no compromise and will not be satisfied so long
as there is even the remotest competition with their particular industry. It
may as well be frankly admitted that prisoners cannot be employed in any form,
in any manner, or under any system which does not compete directly or indirectly
with private industry and all of those who are familiar with the situation recog­
nize this essential fact. Very few, however, who seek a subsidy for their particular
group through elimination of prison competition will argue that prisoners cannot
be employed and instead of making direct attacks upon prison labor in any form




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they suavely advocate various so-called compromises. One day they say that
they will be satisfied if the contract labor system is eliminated; the next they
ask only that the sale of prison-made goods in the open market be stopped and
then they seek to limit the sale of prison industries to penal, charitable, and cor­
rectional institutions. To an already complicated problem has been added the
difficulties caused by the enactment of the Federal Hawes-Cooper legislation,
the economic crisis, and the changing industrial set-up. The drive against
prison employment is ceaseless and unrelenting.
So far as the Federal Government is concerned we think that our program is
fair to labor, fair to business and protects the public interest. The Federal Govvernment does not lsase or contract out the labor of convicts. It dees not sell a
single dollar’s worth of its products in the open market. It does not intend to
concentrate the labor of its prisoners in any one type of work or in any single
industry. It uses its prisoners on those types of activities which require the
greatest possible amounts of hand labor and adopts primitive production methods
wherever possible. The largest number of Federal prisoners are engaged in agri­
cultural pursuits as more than 2,000 of the total prison population of 12,000 are
working on our farms in the production of foodstuffs for the institutions. An in­
definite number are performing work of various kinds on Government reserva­
tions for which no funds have been appropriated and consequently they do not
compete in even the remotest way with private labor and free industry. As your
survey will show, the total number of Federal prisoners usefully employed in
industrial operations within the walls of our institutions does not exceed 1,700
or 1,800 which is only about 14 percent of our total population. All of the others
are engaged on maintenance tasks or are in idleness.
You see, therefore, that unemployment conditions in our institutions are acute.
This situation subsists in spite of the many compromises made by the Federal
Government to private industry and free labor as indicated above and which have
for their purpose the elimination of direct competition. Another reason for the
existing situation springs from the fact that Congress has not permitted us to go
forward with our diversified work program enjoined upon us by the act approved
May 27, 1930. The present economic crisis, furthermore, has caused us to defer
our industrial program wherever there was any means whatever of employing the
inmates of our institutions in noncompeting lines, at least until business improves.
You ask me what changes, if any, we would advocate in existing conditions.
So far as the employment program of the Federal Government is concerned, I
have only a few minor changes to suggest. One of these would be that an advisory
board be established to assist us in controlling the output of our industries to
accord with the situation prevailing in private industry. In other words, a board
consisting of representatives of labor and the manufacturers, one member repre­
senting the public, and one member representing the penal institutions, would
advise the head of the department as to the kinds of industries which might be
established in the various institutions and lay down certain principles as to the
aggregate output of each industry, thus assisting us generally to coordinate and
diversify our manufacturing operations. I can make no other suggestions as to
improving the Federal prison labor law and hope only that the industrial situa­
tion will improve to such an extent that we can go forward with our program as
now authorized.
The thought has occurred to me that a somewhat similar board might be set
up to control the industrial activities of all Federal, State and county prisons. If
the bills which have been recently introduced in the Congress to control the length
of the work week in private industry are held constitutional and if various other
measures which are being advocated to cure the economic distress of the country
are practicable and feasible for private industry, some similar legislation might
be enacted by the Federal Government to regulate the activities of prisoners.
The so-called Hawes-Cooper Bill does not do this as it merely divests prisonmade goods of their interstate character and permits each State to legislate on
this subject. Instead of the Federal Government washing its hands of this
problem it might be a wise policy for it to recognize its seriousness and attempt
to regulate and control it. If this plan were feasible an agency of the central
Government could allocate to each State a certain number of industries in which
its prisoners could be employed and determine the relative output which the
prison products should bear to the entire output of that particular industry. It
could also regulate the hours of labor and working conditions for each prison
industry, and prepare a plan for disposing of the prison products. All goods made
in prisons which did not comply with the regulations of the board or commission
would be barred from interstate commerce.




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213

I
hope that you will not think that I have gone too far afield in answering
your letter of April 10, 1933, but the prisonlabor problem is of such magnitude
and has so many ramifications that I cannot well comply with your request in a
small compass. If I can be of any further help or assistance, please do not hesitate
to call upon me.
Very truly yours,
(Signed) S a n f o r d B a t e s ,

.

Director

# Some of the comments by State prison officials concerning condi­
tions in their institutions were as follows:
All convicts are assigned to tasks at which they are most skilled. Plans are
now being formed to devise methods of employment of prisoners when the HawesCooper bill goes into effect, January 19, 1934.
The employment of the honor system in prisons or penitentiaries is the best
method of training convicts to be better citizens when they are discharged.
Under this system the convicts have greater ease of mind and upon release, with
few exceptions, do not hold a grudge against the institution and its officials. They
have respect for laws and the law-enforcing officers, rather than holding them in
disdain. Contract and lease work is objectionable as it gives a few manufacturers
an advantage in products made for less than they can be made by free labor,
thus hurting the market of the free-labor-made goods, curtailing its sales, and
spreading unemployment among the free workers. Contract and lease work is
also bad in its effect upon the convicts as it falls practically in the same category
as working under armed guards.
Institutional industry needs the stimulus of outside orders to operate it at any­
thing like full capacity.
I
think there is a grave misunderstanding of the general principles of prison
labor. A pair of shoes made in prison supplants only one pair of shoes made
with free labor, no matter where worn, either in or outside the institution.
Unfortunately it has been found that the market is so restricted under the Stateuse system that the opportunity for employment of prisoners is very much limited.
Work is the salvation of men sentenced to prison. Enforced idleness is a
severe punishment and destroys the very object for which men are sentenced,
namely, reformation.
The employment of all inmates physically able to work is required by the law
creating this institution. It is also necessary for the morale of the inmates that
they have suitable employment. This is a problem that gives us deep concern.
We operate a clothing shop from which goods are shipped to various States, and
feel that the passage of the Hawes-Cooper bill will eventually cause the closing
of this shop, which employs about 250 men.
The industries in this institution have been given years of study and have been
so planned as to interfere as little as possible with legitimate business. While
basic laws pertaining to the disposal of our surplus would have permitted the
sale of our prison-made products on the open market, I am naturally proud that
we have never had to resort to this, in spite of the fact that our recent population
increases have kept all of us exceptionally busy-trying to expand our ways and
means to provide the necessary amount of work to keep all hands engaged without
overrunning the reasonable bounds of our necessarily limited output.
It seems to me that the opportunity to labor is just as necessary and desirous
inside the prison walls as outside. There may be some difference of opinion as to
the nature of that work, the industry that is created, but of this I am certain that
it should be constructive. There is nothing so revolting as to be forced to do
something where nothing is to be gained. One of the biggest factors in making
criminals is the lack of an opportunity to do constructive work that appeals and
interests the individual. The greatest benefit both to society and the individual
himself is that that person can and is given the opportunity or is induced to accept
the opportunity to become interested in and learn to like and appreciate the value
of industry.
We are now employing about 500 men on piece-price working for the---------------shirt company. It is our opinion that when the Hawes-Cooper bill goes into
effect, that these 500 men will be idle. It seems impossible to establish enough
industries under the State-use plan to take care of our prison population.




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The State-use system is good as far as it goes, yet in my judgment the Stateuse system cannot keep the rather large prison population of the various com­
monwealths busy the year round. We are diversifying our industries to the
greatest possible extent, thereby spreading the competition that we furnish over
a number of lines and not concentrating our competition on any 1 or 2 particular
industries. The idea seems to prevail that because we do not pay taxes, salaries
or rent, that we should be able, or are able, to undersell all competitors. In reply
to this I can only say that it has been my experience over a period of years that
we have a difficult time meeting competition ourselves. I account for this in
this way. For the most part the men in our penitentiaries and reformatories
are unskilled and untrained, and in many cases incompetent and indifferent,
and we must take these men, who are the last men employed and the first men
discharged out in the industrial life of the State, and make out of them what we
can in the way of mechanics, train them as best we can to turn out a commodity
that has a real market value and which is on a par with the competition we have
to meet. As business men we are not price cutters. We want to make a reason­
ably good showing industrially as in every other way for our institutions, yet
we find that factories manufacturing similar commodities generally have the
latest improved labor-saving devices and machinery and skilled and trained
workers; men who are interested in their jobs and sometimes stockholders in the
concern that employs them, and as a rule we have an exceedingly difficult time
to meet the competition.
The matter of employment in institutions where women are confined is a matter
of vital importance as a matter of education, as a means of discipline, and of
maintaining order and good conduct in the institution. The object of the
reformatory, to fit them to return to the communities from which they came,
better able to live decently and respectably among their neighbors, and to main­
tain themselves and their families, can only be accomplished by training and
teaching in performance of useful work under efficient women whose character and
personality will be examples for them to follow.
Due to the Hawes-Cooper bill our unemployment has been increasing for the
last 3 years and will continue to do so until the end of the present calendar year,
at which time all contracts will probably have gone out of this institution. We
are now making plans for manufacturing articles for State use, but at the present
time we do not see where we will be able to employ more than 100 men on this
work, out of a population of 1,300. It will be one of our major problems in the
future to find employment for inmates.
We have been able to employ our prisoners with practically no idleness for a
comparatively long time. The going into effect of the so-called Hawes-Cooper
bill and the subsequent legislation under this act will not seriously disturb our
labor situation and I feel that we will have no difficulty in keeping the inmates
employed after 1934 when this change will take place.
A variety of articles are manufactured in every department of our institution.
There is no question, therefore, of the reformatory flooding the market with its
own deluge of sheets, hoisery, shirts, etc. This state of affairs is useful to us also
as a therapeutic service. One of the techniques of social treatment for delin­
quents is, I should say, to give them a variety of educational glimpses of industry.
There is little educational value in learning to run one type of knitting machine,
and that only. If a woman can be trained to run a variety of machines, to use
her hands at sewing, painting, canning, etc., she feels more confident and more
understanding when she presents herself, on release, at her prospective employer’s
door.
We would like to enter an opinion that the employment of inmates in our penal
institutions in shopwork is very important and very necessary to the proper con­
duct of any penal institution. It is essential that this kind of training should be
given the prisoners for their own welfare and the welfare of the communities when
they are released, and we believe it is economical to the State that it should have
the prisoners do all the work that can be found for them to do not only in mainte­
nance work for their own institution but for the maintenance accounts of all
other State institutions. After a great many years’ experience and investigation,
we also believe that working under the State-use system has proven the most
beneficial to the State with the least harm to any outside labor.
It is my firm opinion and belief that the State should acquire a sufficient
quantity of land to establish a farm. The increase in population very clearly




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215

indicates that it will be necessary to find useful employment for the inmates.
Some means should be devised, as stated above, of securing at least 3,000 acres of
land under some irrigation project to give the men useful employment.
In my opinion, prison labor should be carried on a great deal more extensively
than it is at the present time a t--------------- . We have today 250 inmates who
are idle, and, of course, they make a very restless group. Later on, when we get
our woodworking factory going, we will probably be able to put the greater
number of these men to work. I consider the inmates of a penal institution like
young boys in the street. As long as you can keep the boy busy at work or at
play he is going to keep out of mischief, and the same applies to inmates of a
prison. I would like to see the day come when we can pay inmates in a prison
a fair day’s wages, and that money to be applied to the care of their dependents,
who are usually taken care of by charity organizations. The taxpayer has to pay
the bill anyhow, so why not make the convicts earn some of the money which
can go towards their support.
Prison industry from the viewpoint of the warden is not a source of exploitation
of the inmate, but rather an incentive toward his rehabilitation. Too often the
point is raised by the free man that he is being deprived of a certain amount of
work that is being done by those confined. This is not the case when one con­
siders the fact that automatic machines are not used in prison and that the in­
mates’ product is about 5 percent of that of the free men. It must also be borne
in mind that if it were not for the prison industries the men would be idle and
confined to their cells throughout the day which would destroy their morale and
whatever latent ambition they might have.
Idleness in prison has been proved detrimental to the moral, mental, and
physical welfare of the inmates and places discipline and good administration
under a considerable handicap. All men confined to prisons and penitentiaries
should be put to work in the interest of their own welfare as well as that of the
State. The primary purpose of such work is to create habits of industry, to teach
each man that he is expected to perform his given task every working day in
accordance with essentially the same standards employed in that trade or work
outside. All such work should be of a constructive or useful type. Insofar as
possible, prisoners should be employed in a trade or productive line similar to
that which they pursued before entering the institution, so that with modern
machinery production methods and supervision he can continue to perfect himself
in his trade. However, with the flexible arrangement possible in --------------- it
is not necessary for a man to continue in the same line of work during the entire
term of his incarceration, which arrangement is very valuable in enabling men to
make changes from one line of work to another, thereby giving each man an
opportunity to find that class of work in which he is really interested and in which
he can, with reasonable encouragement, develop himself to the point where upon
his release he will find a wholesome field for employment at good compensation.
Imprisonment may punish, it may deter, but unless it has played its part in the
upbuilding of the offender, it is not worth the money spent. I cannot believe
that reformation and rehabilitation are possible without work, hard work if nec­
essary. I cannot think of a better medicine to administer to the wife deserter,
the robber, the stick-up man, the burglar, the forger, and others of like character,
than a good stiff dose of hard work administered daily and over a reasonable
period of time. The question is where to find work? The purely State-use sys­
tem is now being advocated by the opponents of prison labor, but when we get
right down to brass tacks, they oppose even that plan. Two years ago in
--------------- it was proposed to build a State office building. The granite was to
be quarried and cut by inmates of the State reformatory. The leader in the
labor movement in this State approved that plan and was forced to fight it out
to a finish in the national convention of his group. He put up a good fight. He
finally won out, and the building was completed as originally planned. This is
just a single illustration of the attitude of those who see in prison labor nothing
except its interference with their own particular business. It further demon­
strates the fact that if we are to keep our prisoners employed, we must fight for
that right. No matter what we propose, we shall find that it competes with
some group in civil life. It then remains for us, so far as possible, to select those
occupations that constitute the least competition with outside labor. Many
States have partially solved this problem by employing large groups of prisoners
at road work and on farms. And yet I wonder what our Southern States will do
with their cotton after January 1934. I wonder how--------------- will label each
potato raised on its thousands of acres of prison farms, provided any of these




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PRISON LABOR IN UNITED STATES, 1932

potatoes are to enter out-of-State markets. And I want to say it is not at
all impossible that, in the very near future, even the farm operations of our
prisons will be very much limited by legislative action.
The farm at this prison affords considerable work, but farming cannot take
care of all prisoners as there are some that cannot be trusted to be placed on the
farms. The shirt factory under contract affords work for most of the prisoners
at this prison at present, but with the enforcement of the Hawes-Cooper bill this
industry will probably close and these men will be without employment. Due
to the sparse settlement of this State, the establishment of industries to furnish
products to State institutions under the State-use plan only would not be prac­
tical as the initial cost of installing such prison industries would be too great in
the first place and then the amount of goods that the State institutions would
use would employ but a few of the prisoners. With such conditions existing it is
difficult to outline any plan to employ the prisoners at this institution when and
if the shirt factory is discontinued.
The general point of view of the wardens or the heads of penal institutions,
whatever may be their titles, is that it is in itself a crime to restrain men in idle­
ness. Who is committing this crime? Is it the judge who continues to commit
men to institutions already overcrowded and with hundreds in idleness, or is it
the law which is in error? An army of intelligent men is at work seeking to reform
prisoners and yet little has been heard of reforming the legal profession, the
judiciary and the legislators. Undoubtedly some progress is being made, at
least more people are thinking the situation over than formerly. The present
prison population of the United States is so great that those who are able to work
can put out far more than can be used by the total estimated classes of public
charges. There is no coordinated effort to regulate and distribute this output.
My own conclusion in this matter is that the head of each institution is making
no further effort than that which tends to relieve his own particular problem, and
further that the ultimate solution, if one is humanly possible, lies in reducing the
number of prisoners. I believe that about 60 percent of those now confined
throughout the United States can be released without danger to society, the
other 40 percent might just as well never be released because of the positive
certainty that they will soon again be recommitted, and with this last 40 percent,
all humanitarian feeling being considered, it makes little or no difference how
they are employed so long as they are required to labor sufficiently to pay for
their maintenance and upkeep.