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U. S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABO R
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU

OF LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S

ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES
B U R E A U OF L A B O R STATISTICS } • • ■ • I N o . 2 9 9
MISCELLANEOUS

PERSONNEL

SERIES

RESEARCH

A G E N C IE S

A GUIDE TO

ORGANIZED RESEARCH IN EMPLOYMENT
MANAGEMENT, INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
TRAINING, AND WORKING CONDITIONS




By J. DAVID THOMPSON

NOVEMBER, 1921

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1921




CONTENTS.
Page.

Introduction_________________________________________________________________ ____
5, 6
List of personnel research agencies classified according to principal
activities______________________________________________________________________
7 -1 7
I. Federal agencies:
( a ) In the Department of Labor_______________________________________ UL-25
( b) In other executive departments,boards, and commissions________25—
43
II. State and municipal agencies:
{ a) States, alphabetically_______________________________________________44-64
( b) Cities, alphabetically------------------------------------------------------------------------- 64-66
III. Nonofficial agencies:
( a) Associations, societies, foundations, research bureaus and insti­
tutions, alphabetically by name________________________________ 67-165
(5 ) Universities and colleges_________________________________________165-199
In d e x _________________________________________
201-207
3







B U L L E TIN O F T H E

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
n o . 299.

WASHINGTON.

No v e m b e r , 19 2 1

PERSONNEL RESEARCH AGENCIES.
INTRODUCTION.

This bulletin has been prepared in response to the request contained
in the following resolution adopted by a preliminary conference on
personnel research, held in Washington, D. C., November 12, 1920,
under the auspices of Engineering Foundation and National Research
Council:
R e so lv e d , That in order to provide the information about existing agencies in
the field of personnel research, which is prerequisite to coordination of their
work, the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics be requested to undertake
a survey of such agencies and to issue a bulletin describing their scope, methods,
and present activities.

The purpose of this preliminary conference, which was attended
by 40 representatives o f organizations o f labor, manufacturers, em­
ployment managers, engineers, physicians, educators, economists,
and social workers, was to consider the practicability o f bringing
about cooperation among the many bodies conducting research relat­
ing to persons employed in industry and commerce. As a result o f
its deliberations the Personnel Research Federation was organized
in March, 1921.
Personnel research has been construed to include within its scope
studies and investigations of all kinds concerned with any of the
problems o f (a) employment management and industrial relations
(such as selection and placement o f employees, job analyses and speci­
fications, rating and grading, lines o f promotion, labor turnover,
absenteeism, wage and other incentives, joint control, etc) ; (6) vo­
cational psychology, including the development and standardization
of intelligence and trade tests; ( c) training o f managers, foremen,
and workmen, either in schools and colleges, in the factory, or under
schemes o f cooperation between educational institutions and industrial
establishments; (d) working conditions in relation to output, includ­
ing hours o f labor, fatigue, lighting, ventilation, food; ( e) health
hazards and occupational diseases; ( / ) safety codes and appliances;
also the special problems connected with the employment o f women
and young persons, foreign born workers and colored workers, the
handicapped or disabled, and the mentally deficient or unstable.




5

6

IN T R O D U C T IO N .

The agencies whose activities are described herein are arranged in
the following main divisions:
(1) Official agencies: { a ) Federal, ( b ) State, ( c ) Municipal.
(2) Nonofficial agencies: ( a ) Associations, foundations, research
bureaus, and institutions; ( b ) Universities and colleges.
In each group the entries are arranged alphabetically.
To facilitate reference to agencies concerned with a particular
branch o f personnel research a classified list arranged according to
the following scheme is prefixed:
Employment management.
Intelligence tests, trade tests, etc.
Psychopathic and mentally deficient employees.
Placement. Unemployment.
Industrial relations (incentives, adjustment, joint control, etc.).
Cost o f living. Budgets.
Employment of women.
Child labor. Vocational guidance. Juvenile placement.
Foreign-born workers.
Colored workers.
Handicapped and disabled workers.
Training. Vocational education.
Working conditions. Hours o f labor. Fatigue and efficiency.
Industrial hygiene and occupational diseases.
Industrial morbidity and mortality statistics.
Safety. Accident prevention.
Public employment (civil-service examinations, classification and
salaries, efficiency ratings, retirement).




AGENCIES CLASSIFIED ACCORDING T O PRIN CIPAL
ACTIVITIES.
EMPLOYMENT MANAGEMENT.
f e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :

Page-

F ederal B o ard fo r

V o c a t io n a l E d u c a t i o n ,..__ ..._____________________________

F ed era l R eserve B o a rd .

G o v e r n o r s ’ c o n fe re n c e .

so n n e l ________
U n it e d
--------

S ta te s .

32

C o m m itte e on p e r ­
35

B ureau

o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s ______________________________ -

19

S h ip p in g B o a r d ___________ ___________________________________________________

41

S o c ie tie s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m e r ic a n A c a d e m y o f P o litic a l a n d S o c ia l S c ie n c e _______________________

67

A m e r ic a n E le c t r ic R a i l w a y T r a n s p o r t a t io n a n d T ra ffic A s s o c ia t io n __

71

A s s o c ia tio n

85

of

C o lle g ia te

S c h o o ls o f B u s in e s s _____________________________

B o s t o n C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .

R e t a il T r a d e B o a r d ______________________

86

B ureau

o f I n d u s t r ia l R e s e a r c h _________________________________________________

87

B ureau

o f P e r s o n n e l A d m in is t r a t i o n __________________________________________

D e t r o it

B oard

of

89

C o m m e r c e ____________________________________________________

100

E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , B o s t o n _________________________________

101

I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia t io n o f A m e r ic a ________________________________

105

M e t r o p o lit a n L i f e I n s u r a n c e C o _________________________________________________

118

N a t io n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f C o r p o r a tio n T r a i n i n g ______________________________

118

N a t io n a l C o m m itte e o n P r is o n s a n d P r is o n L a b o r __________________________

123

P a c ific C o a s t B u r e a u o f E m p lo y m e n t R e s e a r c h _____________________________

142

P erson n el R esea rch

F e d e r a tio n _________________________________________________

143

R e t a il R e s e a r c h A s s o c ia t io n ______ __________ ____________________________________

146

S c o tt

150

Com pany

L a b o r a t o r y _______________________________________________________

U n iv e r s it i e s a n d c o lle g e s ;
C o lle g e o f B u s in e s s A d m in is t r a t i o n ________________

B o s to n U n iv e r s ity .
B r y n M a w r C o lle g e .
S o c ia l E c o n o m y

C a r o la W o e r is h o ff e r G r a d u a t e

and

S o c ia l R e s e a r c h ______________________________________

C a r n e g ie I n s tit u te o f T e c h n o lo g y .

166

D e p a r tm e n t o f
166

B u r e a u o f P e r s o n n e l R e s e a r c h ___

169

P s y c h o lo g y ______________________________________________

171

S c h o o l o f O o m m e r c e a n d A d m in is t r a t i o n ___

172

C o lu m b ia U n iv e r s ity .

D e p a r tm e n t o f E x te n s io n T e a c h in g _____________

1 75

D a rtm ou th

A m os

--------

D e p a r tm e n t

of

U n iv e r s it y o f C h ic a g o .
C o lle g e .

T uck

S chool

of

A d m in is tr a tio n

and

F in a n c e ___________________________________________________________________

1 77

H a r v a r d U n iv e r s ity .

G r a d u a t e S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s A d m in is t r a t i o n __

I n d ia n a U n iv e r s ity .

D e p a r t m e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ____________________________

U n iv e r s ity o f M ic h ig a n .
U n iv e r s ity o f M in n e s o ta .

D e p a r tm e n t

of

179
1 82

E c o n o m ic s _______________________

186

S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s ______________________________

187

N e w S c h o o l f o r S o c ia l R e s e a r c h _________________________________________________

187

N e w Y o r k S c h o o l o f S o c ia l W o r k -------------------------------------------------------------------------

187




7

AGENCIES CLASSIFIED AS TO PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES.

8

U n iv e r s it i e s a n d c o lle g e s — C o n c lu d e d .
N e w Y o r k U n iv e r s ity .

Page.

S c h o o l o f C o m m e rc e , A c c o u n ts , a n d F in a n c e __

N o r t h w e s te r n U n iv e r s ity .

S c h o o l o f C o m m e r c e ____________________________

U n iv e r s ity o f P e n n s y lv a n ia .

W h a rto n

D e p a r tm e n t o f I n d u s t r ia l R e s e a r c h ___________________________________

U n iv e r s ity o f P itts b u r g h .

188

S c h o o l o f F in a n c e a n d C o m ­

m e r c e _________________________________________________________________________________
--------

188

191
191

S c h o o l o f E c o n o m ic s ____________________________

1 92

P rin c e S c h o o l o f E d u c a tio n f o r S to r e S e r v ic e ________________________________

1 92

U n iv e r s ity o f S o u th e r n C a lif o r n ia .

C o lle g e o f C o m m e rc e a n d B u s i ­

n e s s A d m in is t r a t i o n ______________________________________________________________

195

S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s A d m in is t r a t i o n -------------------------

195

S y r a c u s e U n iv e r s ity .

W a s h in g t o n U n iv e r s ity .
U n iv e r s ity

of

S c h o o l o f C o m m e r c e a n d F in a n c e ______________

W is c o n s in .

B ureau

of

C o m m e r c ia l

and

R e la t io n s ______________________________________________________________________________
-------

D e p a r tm e n t

of

E c o n o m ic s ________________________________________________

IN T E L L IG E N C E

195

I n d u s t r ia l
195
19G

TESTS, TR AD E TESTS, ETC.

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
U n it e d S ta te s .

W a r D e p a r tm e n t.

G e n e r a l S t a f f __________________________

42

S ta te a g e n c i e s :
B o s to n P s y c h o p a th ic H o s p i t a l ____________________________________________________

51

M in n e s o ta

52

S c h o o l f o r F e e b le -m in d e d __________________________________________

N e w Jersey.

D e p a r tm e n t o f I n s tit u tio n s a n d A g e n c ie s __________________

53

M u n ic ip a l a g e n c i e s :
N ew Y ork

(C ity ).

se a r c h , a n d

B o a r d o f E d u c a tio n .

B u r e a u o f R e fe r e n c e , R e ­

S t a t is t ic s ___________________________________________________________

65

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m e r ic a n E le c t r ic R a i lw a y T r a n s p o r t a t io n a n d T a r i f f A s s o c ia t io n __

71

A m e r ic a n P s y c h o lo g ic a l A s s o c ia t io n ___________________________________________

77

A m e r ic a n R a ilw a y A s s o c ia t io n __________________________________________________

79

B u s in e s s S ta n d a r d s A s s o c ia t io n _________________________________________________

91

J u d g e B a k e r F o u n d a t io n ___________________________________________________________

114

M c L e a n H o s p i t a l _______________________________________________________________________

116

N a t io n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f D ir e c to r s o f E d u c a tio n a l R e s e a r c h _____________
N a t io n a l R e s e a r c h C o u n c il.
S c o tt C o m p a n y

120

D iv is io n o f A n th r o p o lo g y a n d P s y c h o lo g y _

131

L a b o r a t o r y __________________________________________________ -____

150

S o c ie ty f o r th e P r o m o tio n o f E n g in e e r in g E d u c a tio n .

C o m m itte e on

in te llig e n c e t e s t s ______________________________________1 ___________________________
T r a in in g S c h o o l a t V in e la n d , N . J.

153

D e p a r tm e n t o f R e s e a r c h ___________

158

T r a v e lin g E n g in e e r s ’ A s s o c ia t io n ________________________________________________

1 59

U n iv e r s it i e s a n d c o ll e g e s :
B r o w n U n iv e r s ity .

S c h o o l o f E d u c a tio n ________________________________________

C a r n e g ie I n s t it u t e o f T e c h n o lo g y .
U n iv e r s it y o f C in c in n a ti.
C la r k U n iv e r s ity .

171

C o lle g e o f E n g in e e r in g a n d C o m m e r c e _____

173

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y _________________________________

C le v e la n d S c h o o l o f E d u c a tio n .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ________________

C o lo r a d o S ta t e T e a c h e r s ’ C o lle g e .
C o lu m b ia U n iv e r s ity .
--------

D a r t m o u t h C o lle g e .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y _________

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ___________________________

T e a c h e r s ’ C o lle g e .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y _____________________

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y _________________________

G e o r g e P e a b o d y C o lle g e f o r T e a c h e r s .
H a rva rd

U n iv e r s ity .




166

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y __________

P s y c h o lo g ic a l

P s y c h o lo g ic a l L a b o r a t o r y _____
L a b o r a t o r y ____________________________

174
175
175
175
177
177
178
179

INTELLIGENCE TESTS, TRADE TESTS,

9

ETC.

U n iv e r s it i e s an d c o lle g e s — C o n c lu d e d .
U n iv e r s ity o f Illin o is .
I n d ia n a U n iv e r s ity .

Page.

B u r e a u o f E d u c a tio n a l R e s e a r c h ________________
D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ____________________________

S ta t e U n iv e r s ity o f I o w a .

1 82

D e p a r tm e n t o f P h ilo s o p h y a n d P s y c h o lo g y -

183

P s y c h o lo g ic a l L a b o r a t o r y _____________________

184

J o h n s H o p k in s U n iv e r s ity .

L e la n d S ta n fo r d U n iv e r s ity .
U n iv e r s it y o f M ic h ig a n .

182

D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a t i o n ________________

1 85

B u rea u o f M en ta l T e sts and M e a su re m e n ts-

186

D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a tio n a l P s y c h o lo g y ___

186

--------

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ________________________________________________

187

O h io

S ta t e U n iv e r s ity .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ______________________

189

U n iv e r s it y o f M in n e s o ta .

P r in c e to n

U n iv e r s ity .

S im m o n s C o lle g e .
U n iv e r s ity

P s y c h o lo g ic a l L a b o r a t o r y _________________________

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ______________________________

o f T exas.

U n iv e r s it y

--------

195
195

o f W is c o n s i n .

of

E d u c a t i o n ___________________

196

P s y c h o lo g ic a l L a b o r a t o r y ________________________________________________

197

U n iv e r s ity o f W y o m in g .
Y a le

P s y c h o lo g y _______________________

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y ________________

D e p a r tm e n t

U n iv e r s ity o f W a s h in g t o n .
--------

193
193

U n iv e r s ity .

D e p a r tm e n t o f

D e p a r tm e n t o f P h ilo s o p h y a n d P s y c h o lo g y -

D e p a r tm e n t

of

E d u c a t i o n ______________________________

P s y c h o lo g ic a l L a b o r a t o r y _____________________________________

P S Y C H O P A T H IC A N D M E N T A L L Y D E F IC IE N T

197
Y97
198

EM PLOYEES.

State a g en cie s:
C o n n e c tic u t C o m m is s io n on C h ild W e l f a r e .
B o s to n

P s y c h o p a th ic

M a s s a c h u s e t ts

C o m m itte e on d e f e c t i v e s .

H o s p i t a l __________________________________________________

50

th e F e e b le -m in d e d -J ____________________________

52

S c h o o l f o r F e e b le -m in d e d __________________________________________

M in n e s o ta

School fo r

45

52

A ssocia tio n s and in s titu tio n s :
A m e r ic a n

I n s tit u te

of

M in in g

and

M e t a llu r g ic a l

E n g in e e r s .

Com ­

m itte e on in d u s tr ia l r e la t io n s _________________________________________________

76

E n g in e e r in g F o u n d a t io n _____________________________________________________________

102

M a s s a c h u s e t ts S o c ie ty f o r M e n t a l H y g ie n e ____________________________________

117

N a t io n a l C o m m itte e f o r M e n t a l H y g ie n e ________________________________________
N a t io n a l C o m m itte e o n P r is o n s a n d P r is o n L a b o r _________________________
S ta t e C h a r it ie s A id A s s o c ia tio n o f N e w Y o r k .

122
123

C o m m itte e on m e n ta l

h y g i e n e ______________________________________________________________________________

155

C o lle g e s:
S m ith C o lle g e .

T r a in in g

S c h o o l f o r S o c ia l W o r k _______________________

194

PLACEMENT— UNEMPLOYMENT.
F ederal a g en cie s:
U n ite d S ta te s .
--------

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s _________________________________

E m p lo y m e n t

S e r v ic e -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

19
24

State ag e n cie s:
N ew Y ork (S ta te ).

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r .

B u r e a u o f S t a t is t ic s a n d

I n f o r m a t i o n ________________________________________________________________________

57

A ssocia tio n s and in s titu tio n s :
A m e r ic a n

L e g is la t io n _____ _________________________

69

C o o r d in a tin g C o m m itt e e o n E m p lo y m e n t A c t iv it ie s in N e w Y o r k C i t y .

A s s o c ia tio n

98

I n t e r n a t io n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f P u b lic E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e s -----------------------

112

O h io C o u n c il on W o m e n a n d C h ild r e n in I n d u s t r y --------------------------------------

142

R u s s e ll S a g e F o u n d a t io n —

148




fo r

Labor

----------

10

A G E N C IE S

C L A S S IF IE D A S

TO

P R IN C IP A L

A C T IV IT IE S .

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
{Incentives, adjustment, joint control, etc.)
F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
U n it e d

S ta te s .

Page.
B ureau

of Labor

S t a t is t ic s ________________________________

10

--------

N a v y D e p a r tm e n t__ - _______________________________,_______________________

36

--------

R a ilr o a d L a b o r B o a r d _____________________________________________________

40

--------

S h ip p in g B o a r d ______________________________________________________________

41

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m a lg a m a t e d C lo th in g W o r k e r s o f A m e r ic a _________________________________

67

A m e r ic a n A c a d e m y o f P o litic a l a n d S o c ia l S c ie n c e _______________________

67

A m e r ic a n F e d e r a tio n o f L a b o r .

R a ilw a y E m p lo y e e s ’ D e p a r t m e n t _____

75

S o c ie ty o f M e c h a n ic a l E n g in e e r s ___ ._____________________________

81

B a lt im o r e F e d e r a tio n o f C lo t h in g M a n u f a c t u r e r s _________________________

86

A m e r ic a n
B ureau

o f A p p lie d

E c o n o m ic s ___________________________________________________

87

B u r e a u o f I n d u s tr ia l R e s e a r c h _________________________________________________

87

B u r e a u o f P e r so n n e l A d m in is t r a t i o n __________________________________________

83

C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e o f th e U n ite d S ta t e s o f A m e r ic a ________________

93

C le v e la n d C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e ______________________________________________
I n d u s tr ia l

I n fo r m a tio n

I n te r n a tio n a l

94

S e r v ic e _________________________________________________

A s s o c ia tio n

of

G arm en t

M a n u fa c t u r e r s .

B ureau

104

of

F a c to r y P r a c tic e a n d I n d u s tr ia l R e la t io n s ________________________________

111

I n te r n a tio n a l L a d ie s ’ G a r m e n t W o r k e r s ’ U n io n ____________________________

113

L a b o r B u r e a u , I n c __________________________________________________________________

115

M e r c h a n t s ’ A s s o c ia tio n o f N e w Y o r k _______________ *
__________________________

1 17

N a tio n a l C iv ic F e d e r a t i o n -_______________________________________________________

121

N a tio n a l E le c t r ic L ig h t A s s o c ia t io n ___________________________________________

126

N a tio n a l I n d u s tr ia l C o n fe r e n c e B o a r d _________________________________________

128

N a tio n a l R e t a il D r y G o o d s A s s o c i a t i o n -,_____________________________________

133

N e w J e r se y S ta t e C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e ________________________________ „ _
_

1 40

P h ila d e lp h ia

C ham ber

of

C o m m e rc e .

In d u s tr ia l

r e la tio n s

com ­

m itte e _______________________________________________________________________________
R o c h e s te r C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
R u s s e ll S a g e F o u n d a tio n .

146

D e p a r tm e n t o f I n d u s t r ia l S t u d ie s ___ - ____

148

U n ite d T y p o th eta ? o f A m e r ic a .
W estern

E fficie n cy

144

I n d u s tr ia l m a n a g e m e n t c o u n c il__

D e p a r tm e n t o f I n d u s t r ia l R e la t i o n s -

161

S o c ie t y -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

163

COST

OF

L IV IN G — B U D G E T S .

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
U n it e d S ta te s .

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s _________________________________

F e d e ra l R eserv e B o ard .

19

D iv is io n o f A n a ly s is a n d R e s e a r c h ___________

35

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
O h io .

I n d u s t r ia l

S ta t is tic s

C o m m is s io n .

D e p a r tm e n t

of

I n v e s tig a tio n

and

__________________________________________ _ _______________ ._____________
_

59

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
B u r e a u o f A p p lie d E c o n o m i c s ___________________________________________________
B u r e a u o f M u n ic ip a l R e s e a r c h , N e w Y o r k ___________________________________

87
.

89

B u r e a u o f M u n ic ip a l R e s e a r c h , P h ila d e lp h ia ________________________________

89

I o w a S ta te F e d e r a tio n o f L a b o r _________________________________________________

113

L a b o r B u r e a u , I n c __________________________________________________________________

115

N a t io n a l I n d u s tr ia l C o n fe r e n c e B o a r d _________________________________________

128

N e w Y o r k A s s o c ia tio n f o r I m p r o v in g th e C o n d it io n o f th e P o o r ______

141

R o c h e s te r C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e .

I n d u s tr ia l m a n a g e m e n t c o u n c il—

146

S e t tle m e n t ______________________________________________

173

U n iv e r s it y o f C h ic a g o




C H IL D LABOR— V O C A T IO N A L G U ID A N C E — J U V E N IL E P L A C E M E N T .
EM PLOYM ENT

OF

W OM EN.

F e d e ra l a g e n c ie s ;

Page.

U n ite d S t a t e s .
--------

11

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s _________________________________

W o m e n ’s B u r e a u _____________________________________________________________

19
23

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
C a lifo r n ia .

I n d u s t r ia l W e l f a r e C o m m is s io n ________________________________

C o n n e c tic u t.

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r a n d F a c t o r y I n s p e c t io n ____________

D is t r ic t o f C o lu m b ia .
K an sas.

45
46

M in im u m W a g e B o a r d ______________________________

46

C o u r t o f I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s _______________________________________

48

M a s s a c h u s e t ts .

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r a n d

In d u s tr ie s .

D iv is io n o f

in d u s tr ia l s a f e t y --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------—

49

------------------D iv is io n o f m in im u m w a g e ____________________________________________

50

M in n e s o ta .

52

N ew

Y ork

B u r e a u o f W o m e n a n d C h ild r e n ________________________________
(S ta te ).

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r .

B ureau

of W om en

in

I n d u s t r y ____________________________________________________________________________
O re g o n .
T exas.

I n d u s t r ia l W e l f a r e

59

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ________________________________ ___________

62

W a s h in g t o n .
fa r e

57

C o m m is s io n ____________________________________

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r a n d I n d u s tr ie s .

I n d u s tr ia l W e l ­

C o m m itt e e ____________________________________________________________________

W is c o n s i n .

I n d u s tr ia l C o m m issio n .

W o m e n ’ s D e p a r tm e n t____________

62
63

M u n ic ip a l a g e n c i e s :
C le v e la n d .

S t a t e -C it y F r e e E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e .

W o m e n ’s d i v i s i o n -

64

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s ;
A m e r ic a n C o u n c il on E d u c a t i o n _________________________________________________

71

B u r e a u o f V o c a tio n a l I n f o r m a t io n _____________________________________________

90

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f C i n c i n n a t i -_____________________________________________

96

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f C o n n e c tic u t______________________________________________

96

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f E a s t e r n P e n n s y lv a n ia ________________________________

97

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f N e w J e r s e y _____________________________________________

97

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f N e w Y o r k _____________________

97

N a t io n a l C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e _____________________________________________________

124

O h io C o u n c il on W o m e n a n d C h ild r e n in I n d u s t r y _______________________

142

R u s s e ll S a g e F o u n d a t io n -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

147

W o m e n ’ s E d u c a t i o n a l a n d I n d u s t r ia l U n io n _________________________________

163

W o m a n ’ s O c c u p a tio n a l B u r e a u __________________________________________________

16S

Y . W . C. A .

165

N e w Y o r k C it y , c e n tr a l b r a n c h _________________________________

C o lle g e s :
B r y n M a w r C o lle g e .

C a r o la W o e r is h o ife r G r a d u a t e D e p a r tm e n t o f

S o c ia l E c o n o m y a n d S o c ia l R e s e a r c h _________ - ____________________________
S im m o n s C o lle g e .

S c h o o l o f S o c i a l W o r k - .__________________________________

166
193

C H IL D L A B O R — V O C A T IO N A L G U ID A N C E — J U V E N IL E P L A C E M E N T .
F e d e ra l a g e n c ie s :
B u r e a u o f E d u c a t i o n __________________________________________

26

--------

U n it e d S ta t e s .

C h ild r e n ’ s B u r e a u ___________________________________________________________

22

--------

E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e .

--------

P u b lic H e a lt h

J u n io r d iv is io n _________________________________

S e r v ic e ____________________

24
38

S ta t e a g e n c i e s :
C a lif o r n ia .

B u r e a u o f J u v e n i le R e s e a r c h -___________________________________

44

C o m m is s io n o n C h ild W e l f a r e _____________________________

45

C o n n e c tic u t.
P e n n s y lv a n ia .




D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r a n d I n d u s t r y _______________________

60

AGENCIES CLASSIFIED AS TO PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES.

12

M u n ic ip a l a g e n c ie s :

Page.

C in c in n a ti P u b lic S c h o o ls.
D e s M o in e s
N ew

Y ork

se a r c h ,
O a k la n d

(Io w a )

S c h o o l B o a r d ______________________________________________

(C ity ).
and

V o c a tio n B u r e a u --------------------------------------------------

B oard

o f E d u c a tio n .

B ureau

o f r e fe r e n c e , re­

s t a t is t ic s ___________________________________________________________

( C a l i f .)

P u b lic S c h o o ls.

64
65

B u r e a u o f re s e a r c h a n d g u id a n c e -

65
66

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
o f E d u c a tio n a l E x p e r im e n t s __________________________________________

87

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f C o n n e c tic u t_____________________________________________

B ureau

96

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f E a s t e r n P e n n s y lv a n i a ________________________________

97

N a tio n a l C h ild L a b o r C o m m itt e e ________________________________________________

120

N a t io n a l V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e A s s o c ia t io n ___________________________________

138

T o le d o C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e ________________________________________________________

158

V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e a n d E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e f o r J u n io r s _____________

162

U n iv e r s itie s :
B o s to n U n iv e r s it y ____________________________________________________________________

166

H a r v a r d U n iv e r s ity .

1 78

B u r e a u o f V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e ___________________

F O R E IG N -B O R N

W ORKERS.

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
C a lif o r n ia .
I llin o is .

C o m m is s io n on I m m ig r a t io n a n d H o u s in g __________________

I m m ig r a n t s ’

M a s s a c h u s e t ts .

C o m m is s io n ________________________________________________

D e p a r tm e n t

of

E d u c a tio n .

D iv is io n

of

44
47

u n iv e r s ity

e x te n s io n _______________________________________________________________________________
N ew

Y ork

(S ta te ).

D e p a r tm e n t

of

L ab or.

B ureau

of

48

I n d u s tr ie s

a n d I m m ig r a t io n __________________________________________________________________

56

A s s o c ia tio n s an d in s titu tio n s :
A s s o c ia te d I n d u s tr ie s o f M a s s a c h u s e t t s __________________________________________
C a r n e g ie C o r p o r a tio n o f N e w Y o r k .
I n t e r -R a c ia l

C o u n c i l -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------COLORED

83

A m e r ic a n iz a t io n s t u d y ______________

92
113

W ORKERS.

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
U n ite d S ta te s .

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r -----------------------------------------------------------------

24

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
C h ic a g o C o m m is s io n on R a c e R e la t io n s __________________________________________

46

S ta t e -C ity F r e e E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e , C le v e la n d _______________________________

64

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f E a s t e r n P e n n s y lv a n i a ___________________________________

97

C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f N e w Y o r k ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

98

G e o r g e P e a b o d y C o lle g e f o r T e a c h e r s ----------------------------------------------------------------H A N D IC A P P E D

AND

D IS A B L E D

178

W ORKERS.

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
F e d e r a l B o a r d f o r V o c a tio n a l E d u c a t i o n _________________________________________

35

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
I llin o is .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P u b lic W e l f a r e _________________________________________

M a s s a c h u s e t ts .

D e p a r tm e n t

of

I n d u s t r ia l

A c c id e n ts .

47

V o c a tio n a l

t r a in in g d iv is io n _____________________________________________________________________
M in n e s o ta .
O h io .

D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a tio n .

I n d u s t r ia l

C o m m is s io n .

D iv is io n o f r e -e d u c a tio n _____

D e p a r tm e n t

of

I n v e s tig a tio n

S t a t is t ic s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




48
52

and
59

T R A I N I N G ------V O C A T IO N A L

E D U C A T IO N .

13

S ta te a g e n c ie s — C o n c lu d e d .
P e n n s y lv a n ia .

Page.

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r a n d I n d u s tr y .

B ureau of R e­

h a b ilit a t io n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W is c o n s i n .

I n d u s tr ia l

C o m m is s io n .

E m p lo y m e n t

O ffices

61

D e p a rt­

m e n t _____________________________________________________________________________________

63

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m e r ic a n A c a d e m y o f P o litic a l a n d S o c ia l S c ie n c e _______________________

67

A s s o c ia tio n f o r tlie P re v e n tio n a n d R e li e f o f H e a r t D is e a s e ___________

84

D o u b le D u t y F in g e r G u ild ________________________________________________________

100

I n s tit u te fo r C r ip p le d a n d D is a b le d M e n ______________________________________

108

R e d C r o s s I n s t it u t e fo r th e B l i n d ______________________________________________

145

T R A IN IN G — V O C A T IO N A L

E D U C A T IO N .

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
F e d e r a l B o a r d f o r V o c a tio n a l E d u c a tio n _______________________________________
U n ite d

S ta te s .

B ureau

32

o f E d u c a t i o n _________________________________________

B u r e a u o f F o r e ig n a n d D o m e s tic

--------

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s ______________________________________________

19

--------

Navy

o f N a v ig a t i o n _________________________

36

--------

W a r D e p a r tm e n t.

G e n e r a l S t a f f _______________________________________

41

V o c a tio n a l D iv is io n _____

48

D e p a r tm e n t.

B ureau

C o m m e r c e _______________________

26

--------

20

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
M a s s a c h u s e t ts .
N ew

Y ork

D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a tio n .

(S ta te ).

tio n a l a n d
W is c o n s in .

D e p a r tm e n t o f

e x te n s io n

E d u c a tio n .

D iv is io n

of

voca­

e d u c a tio n _________________________________________________

I n d u s tr ia l C o m m is s io n .

A p p r e n tic e s h ip D e p a r tm e n t___

55
63

A s s o c ia t io n s an d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m e r ic a n

A s s o c ia tio n

o f E n g in e e r s ______________________________________________

A m e r ic a n C h e m ic a l S o c ie ty .
u n iv e r s itie s

and

69

C o m m itte e on c o o p e r a tio n b e tw e e n th e

th e in d u s t r ie s _________________________________________________

70

A m e r ic a n C o u n c il o n E d u c a t i o n ____________________________________________________

70

A m e r ic a n E le c t r ic R a i lw a y T r a n s p o r t a t io n a n d T ra ffic A s s o c ia tio n __

71

A m e r ic a n S o c ie ty o f M e c h a n ic a l E n g in e e r s ____________________________________

81

B u s in e s s T r a in in g C o r p o r a tio n _____________________________________________________
C a r n e g ie F o u n d a tio n f o r th e A d v a n c e m e n t o f T e a c h in g ________________

91
93

C o u n c il o f M a n a g e m e n t E d u c a tio n ________________________________________________

99

E n g in e e r in g F o u n d a t io n _____________________________________________________________

102

N a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f C o r p o r a tio n T r a in in g _________________________________

118

N a tio n a l E le c t r ic L ig h t A s s o c ia t io n _______________________________________________

126

N a t io n a l M e t a l

130

T rades

A s s o c ia t io n _____________________________________________

N a tio n a l R e t a il D r y G o o d s A s s o c ia t io n _________________________________________

133

N a t io n a l S o c ie ty f o r V o c a t io n a l E d u c a tio n ____________________________________

135

S o c ie ty f o r th e P r o m o tio n o f E n g in e e r in g E d u c a t i o n _____________________

152

S o c ie ty o f I n d u s t r ia l E n g in e e r s ________________________________

15

T e c h n ic a l A s s o c ia tio n o f th e P u lp a n d P a p e r I n d u s t r y __________________
U n ite d T y p o th e tse o f A m e r ic a .

157

C o m m itte e on e d u c a tio n _______________

161

V o c a tio n a l E d u c a tio n A s s o c ia tio n o f th e M id d le W e s t ___________________

162

U n iv e r s it i e s an d c o ll e g e s :
M u n ic ip a l U n iv e r s ity o f A k r o n _____________________________________________________

165

U n iv e r s ity o f C a lif o r n ia .

168

C a r n e g ie

I n s t it u t e

of

D iv is io n o f v o c a tio n a l e d u c a tio n ______________

T e c h n o lo g y .

R esearch

B ureau

fo r

R e t a il

T r a i n i n g ______________________________________________________________________________
U n iv e r s ity o f C in c in n a ti.

C o lle g e o f E n g in e e r in g a n d C o m m e r c e --------

M a s s a c h u s e t ts I n s t it u t e o f T e c h n o lo g y ----------------------------------------------------------------




171
173
186

14

A G E N C IE S

C L A S S I F IE D

AS TO

P R IN C IP A L A C T IV IT IE S .

U n iv e r s it i e s a n d c o lle g e s — C o n c lu d e d .
U n iv e r s it y o f M ic h ig a n .
N e w Y o r k U n iv e r s ity .

Page.

D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a tio n ________________________

186

T r a in in g S c h o o l f o r T e a c h e r s o f R e t a il S e l l i n g -

188

S c h o o l o f E n g in e e r in g __________________________

192

P r in c e S c h o o l o f E d u c a tio n f o r S to r e S e r v ic e ________________________________

192

U n iv e r s ity o f P itts b u r g h .

W O R K IN G

C O N D I T I O N S — -H O U R S

OF

L A B O R — F A T IG U E

AND

E F F IC IE N C Y .
F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
U n ite d

S ta te s .

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s _________________________________

--------

P o s t Office D e p a r tm e n t.

--------

P u b lic H e a lt h

19

W e l f a r e D e p a r tm e n t______________________

87

S e r v ic e ________________________________________________ ______

37

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m e r ic a n A s s o c ia tio n f o r L a b o r L e g is la t io n ________________________________

68

A s s o c ia tio n o f G o v e r n m e n ta l L a b o r O ffic ia ls o f th e U n it e d S ta t e s a n d
C a n a d a ____________________________________ , ________________________________________
_
C a b o t F u n d ____________________________________________________________________________
F e d e r a te d A m e r ic a n E n g in e e r in g

S o c i e t ie s _____ ____________________________

85
91
103

N a t io n a l C iv ic F e d e r a t io n _____ ^ _________________________________________________

121

N a t io n a l

B o a r d _______________________________________

128

N u t r it io n L a b o r a to r y , B o s t o n ____________________________________________________

141

S o c ie ty o f I n d u s t r ia l E n g in e e r s _________________________________________________

153

I n d u s t r ia l

C o n fe r e n c e

S tr u c tu r a l S e r v ic e B u r e a u ________________________________________________________

155

T a y lo r S o c i e t y ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

155

U n iv e r s itie s :
C o lu m b ia U n iv e r s ity .
m ent

of

C o lle g e o f P h y s ic ia n s a n d S u rg e o n s .

D e p a r t­

P h y s io lo g y ______________________

J o h n s H o p k in s U n iv e r s ity .

School o f

176
H y g ie n e a n d

P u b lic

H e a lth .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P h y s io lo g y ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------L e la n d S t a n fo r d U n iv e r s ity .

S c h o o l o f M e c h a n ic a l E n g in e e r in g ___________

P u r d u e U n iv e r s ity .
IN D U S T R IA L

D e p a r tm e n t o f P h y s io lo g y _________________

H Y G IE N E

AND

O C C U P A T IO N A L

184
185
193

D IS E A S E S .

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s ___________________________________

19

——

U n it e d S ta t e s .

B u r e a u o f M in e s _____________________________________________________________

29

--------

P u b lic H e a lt h

37

S e r v ic e ______________________________________________ _______

S ta te a g e n c ie s :
M a s s a c h u s e t ts .
in d u s tr ia l

D e p a r tm e n t

o f L a b o r a n d I n d u s tr ie s .

D iv is io n

of

s a f e t y -----------------------------------

N e w J e r se y .

49

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r .

B u r e a u o f H y g ie n e

a n d S a n i­

t a t io n ______________________________________________________________________________ ,__
N ew Y ork
--------

C o m m is s io n on V e n t ila t io n __________________________

D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r .

d u s t r ia l
O h io .

(S ta te ).

B u r e a u o f In s p e c tio n .

D iv is io n o f in ­

h y g ie n e __________________________________________________________________

I n d u s t r ia l

C o m m is s io n .

D e p a r tm e n t

of

I n v e s tig a tio n

S ta t e D e p a r tm e n t o f H e a lt h .

P e n n s y lv a n ia .

D e p a r tm e n t

of

D iv is io n o f I n d u s t r ia l H y g ie n e __

Labor

and

I n d u s tr y .

D iv is io n

56

and

S t a t is t ic s ____________________________________________________________________________
--------

53
54

59
58

of

H y g ie n e a n d E n g in e e r in g _____________________________ ___________ _________ ____

61

M u n ic ip a l a g e n c i e s :
N ew

Y ork

(C ity ).

D e p a r tm e n t o f H e a lt h .

D iv is io n o f I n d u s t r ia l

H y g ie n e _____________________ ________________________________________________________ ,




65

15

IN D U S T R IA L M O R B ID IT Y A N D M O R T A L IT Y S T A T IS T IC S .
A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :

Page.

A m e r ic a n A s s o c ia tio n o f I n d u s t r ia l P h y s ic ia n s a n d S u r g e o n s ___________
A m e r ic a n C h e m ic a l S o c ie ty .

th e c h e m ic a l t r a d e s ______________________________________________________________
A m e r ic a n

M e d ic a l A s s o c ia t io n __________________________________________________

A m e r ic a n

P o s tu r e

L e a g u e ________________________________________________________

A m e r ic a n P u b lic H e a lt h A s s o c ia tio n .
--------

69

C o m m itte e o n o c c u p a tio n a l d is e a s e s in
70
76
77

S e c tio n o n in d u s tr ia l h y g ie n e —

78

L a b o r a to r y s e c tio n ______________________________________________ - _________

79

A m e r ic a n

S o c ie ty o f H e a t in g a n d V e n t ila tin g E n g in e e r s .

R esea rch

L a b o r a t o r y _________________ ________________________________________________________
C le v e la n d

H o s p it a l C o u n c il.

H o s p it a l a n d h e a lth

su r v e y

la n d __________________________________________________________________________________
C o lle g e o f P h y s ic ia n s , P h ila d e lp h ia .

80

o f C le v e ­
94

S e c tio n on in d u s tr ia l m e d ic in e

a n d p u b lic h e a lt h _________________________________________________________________

95

C o n fe r e n c e B o a r d o f P h y s ic ia n s in I n d u s t r y _________________________________

95

H o u g h to n R e s e a r c h S t a f f ________________________________________________________

104

I llu m i n a t i n g E n g in e e r in g S o c ie t y ___ :___________________________________________

104

J o in t B o a r d o f S a n it a r y C o n tr o l in th e C lo a k , S u it, andr S k i r t a n d
D ress and W a is t

I n d u s t r ie s _____________________________ ______________________

114

L i f e E x te n s io n I n s t it u t e ___________________________________________________________

110

M a s s a c h u s e t ts G e n e r a l H o s p it a l.

116

I n d u s t r ia l C linic_______________________

M e t r o p o lit a n L i f e I n s u r a n c e C o __________

118

N a t io n a l T u b e r c u lo s is A s s o c ia t io n ______________________________________________

136

N e la R e s e a r c h L a b o r a t o r y _______________________________________________________

139

S c o v ill M a n u f a c t u r in g C o .

151

D e p a r tm e n t o f I n d u s t r ia l H y g ie n e ________

W i ll i a m H . S in g e r M e m o r ia l R e s e a r c h L a b o r a t o r y _________________________

152

T a n n e r s ’ C o u n c il o f th e U n it e d S ta t e s o f A m e r ic a __________________________

155

E d w a r d L . T r u d e a u F o u n d a t io n ________________________________________________

159

W o r k e r s ’ H e a lt h B u r e a u ___________________________________________________________

164

U n iv e r s itie s :
B r y n M a w r C o lle g e .

P s y c h o lo g ic a l L a b o r a t o r y ____________________________

U n iv e r s ity o f C a lifo r n ia .
U n iv e r s it y o f C h ic a g o .

167

D e p a r tm e n t o f H y g ie n e ________________________

168

O th o S. A . S p r a g u e M e m o r ia l I n s t i t u t e -.______

173

H a r v a r d M e d ic a l S c h o o l.

D iv is io n o f I n d u s t r ia l H y g i e n e _____________

1 80

S ta te U n iv e r s it y o f I o w a .

S c h o o l o f M e d ic in e _____________ _______________

184

Johns

H o p k in s U n iv e r s ity .

S c h o o l o f H y g ie n e

a n d P u b lic H e a lth .

D e p a r tm e n t o f P h y s io lo g y --------------------------------------------O h io S ta t e U n iv e r s ity .

U n iv e r s ity o f P e n n s y lv a n ia .
--------

184

D e p a r tm e n t o f P u b lic H e a lt h a n d S a n it a t i o n S c h o o l o f P u b lic H y g ie n e __________________

H e n r y P h ip p s I n s t it u t e f o r th e S tu d y , T r e a t m e n t , a n d P r e v e n ­

tio n o f T u b e r c u lo s i s -___ - ____
Y a l e U n iv e r s ity .
--------

189
189
191

L a b o r a t o r y o f A p p lie d P h y s io lo g y ______________________

S c h o o l o f M e d ic in e .

IN D U S T R IA L

D e p a r tm e n t o f P u b lic H e a l t h ________________

M O R B ID IT Y

AND

M O R T A L IT Y

197
198

S T A T IS T IC S .

F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s :
U n it e d S ta t e s .
--------

B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s __________________

P u b lic H e a lt h S e r v ic e .

19

S ta t is tic a l O ffice_______________________ * ____

39

A s s o c ia t io n s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s :
A m e r ic a n

P u b lic

C o m m itt e e

on

H e a lt h

A s s o c ia tio n .

m o r b id ity

r e p o r ts

and

S e c tio n

on

m o r t a lit y

V ita l

S ta tis tic s .

s ta tis t ic s

in

in ­

d u s t r y ________________________________________________________________________________




78

16

AGENCIES CLASSIFIED AS TO PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES.

Associations and institutions— Concluded.
Page.
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions.
Committee on Statistics and Compensation Insurance
C o s t----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Metropolitan Life Insurance Co---------------------------------------------------------------Pennsylvania State Chamber of Commerce. Research Bureau-----------Prudential Insurance Co. of America------------------------------------------------------Workmen’s Circle-------------------------------------------S A F E T Y — A C C ID E N T

P R E V E N T IO N .

Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Chemistry----------------------------------------------------------- Bureau of Labor Statistics----------------------------------------------------------------- Bureau of M in e s---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bureau o f Standards_____________________________________________
Interstate Commerce Commission. Bureau of Locomotive Inspec­
tion_______________________________________________________________________
gtate agencies:
California. Industrial Accident Commission. Department of SafetyMassachusetts. Department of Labor and Industries. Division of
industrial sa fety -_________________________________________'--------------------New Jersey. Department o f Labor. Bureau of electrical and me­
chanical equipment______________________________________________________
--------------- Bureau of explosives-----------------------------------------------------------------: ’ New York (S ta te). Department of Labor. Bureau of industrial
cod e_________________________________________________________________________
------- Bureau of Statistics andInformation____________________________
Pennsylvania.
Department of Labor and Industry.
Industrial
b oa rd _______________________________________________________________________
Wisconsin. Industrial Commission. Safety and sanitation depart­
ment_________________________________________________________________________
Associations and institutions:
American Dyes Institute_________________________________________________
American Engineering Standards C om m ittee__________________________
American Gas Association________________________________________________
American Railway Association__________________________________________
American Society of Mechanical Engineers_____________________________
American Society o f Refrigerating Engineers__________________________
American Society of Safety Engineers___________________________________
Bureau of Safety__________________________________________________________
Conference Board on Safety and Sanitation___________________________
Electrical Safety Conference_____________________________________________
Grinding W heel Manufacturers’ Association of the United States
and C an ada______________________________________________________________
Illuminating Engineering Society_________________________________________
Institute of Makers of Explosives_________________________________________
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness__________________
National Electric Light Association_____________________________________
National Fire Protection Association____________________________________
National Founders’ Association__________________________________________
National Machine Tool Builders’ Association__________________________




112
118
143
144
165

26
19
29
80
86
44
49
53
53
56
57
60
63
71
72
75
79
81
82
82
90
95
100
103
104
110
111
123
124
126
127
130

PUBLIC EM PLO YM EN T.
Associations and institutions— Concluded.
National Safety C ouncil_________________________________________________
National Workmen’s Compensation Service Bureau___________________
Portland Cement Association____________________________________________
Safety Institute of America______________________________________________
Southern Pine Association_______________________________________________
Travelers’ Insurance Company___________________________________________
Underwriters’ Laboratories_______________________________________________

17
Page.
133
138
144
149
154
158
159

PUBLIC E M P L O Y M E N T .
(Civil-seryice examinations, classifications and salaries, efficiency rating, retirement.)
Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Efficiency______________ 2.____________________
------- Bureau of Labor Statistics_______________________________________
------- Civil Service Com m ission_________________________________________
------- Navy Department. Departmental W age Board of Review____
------- Wom en’s B u reau ___________________________________________________
Associations and institutions:
American Association of Engineers______________________________________
Assembly of Civil Service Commissions_________________________________
Bureau of Municipal Research___________________________________________
Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America_____________1
Engineering Council______________________________________________________
Institute for Government R esearch_____________________________________
New Jersey State Chamber of Commerce_______________________________
70723°— Bull. 299— 21------: 2




27
22
32
36
23

69
83
89
93
103
110
140




I. FEDERAL AGENCIES
(a) IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
B U R E A U O F L A B O R STATISTICS.

1712 G Street NW., Washington, D. C. Ethelbert Stewart, com­
r
missioner.
Organized January 1, 1885, under act of Congress approved June
27, 1884, as the Bureau of Labor in the Department of the Interior,
it w given independent status as the Department of Labor (without
ras
Cabinet representation) in 1888. It again became the Bureau of
Labor in 1903 under the Department o f Commerce and Labor, from
which it was transferred, with change of name to Bureau o f Labor
Statistics, to the present Department of Labor upon its establishment
in 1912.
The function of the bureau as stated in the law creating it is to
“ collect information upon the subject of labor, its relation to capital,
the hours o f labor and the earnings of laboring men and women, and
the means of promoting their material, social, intellectual and moral
prosperity.”
Prior to July, 1912, the publications o f the bureau consisted of
annual and special reports and a bimonthly bulletin containing mis­
cellaneous articles on labor and related topics. Since that time bulle­
tins have been issued at irregular intervals, each number devoted to a
special subject in one o f the following groups, under which they are
classified in recent printed lists, v iz : Wholesale prices, Detail prices
and cost o f living, Wages and hours of labor, Employment and unem­
ployment, Women in industry, Workmen’s insurance and compensa­
tion, Industrial accidents and hygiene, Conciliation and arbitration,
Labor laws o f the United States, Foreign labor laws, Vocational
education, Labor as affected by the war, Miscellaneous series. They
include also the Proceedings of the International Association of Pub­
lic Employment Service (see p. 112), International Association of In ­
dustrial Accident Boards and Commissions (see p. I l l ) , and Associa­
tion o f Governmental Labor Officials (see p. 85), and o f various
employment managers’ conferences (Nos. 196, 202, 227, 247).
The studies on wages and hours of labor cover the following indus­
tries : Anthracite and bituminous coal mining (No. 279) ; boot and
shoe industry (Nos. 134, 154, 178, 232, 260, 278) ; clothing and cigars
(Nos. 135, 161, 187) ; cotton goods (Nos. 128, 150, 190, 239, 262, 288) ;
hosiery and underwear (Nos. 134, 154, 177) ; iron and steel (Nos. 151,
168, 218) ; lumber, millwork, and furniture (Nos. 129, 153, 235) ;
men’s clothing (No. 187) ; silk (Nos. 128, 150, 190) ; slaughtering
and meat packing (Nos. 252, 294); building and repairing o f steam




19

I.

20

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

railroad cars (Nos. 137, 163) ; street railway employment (No. 204);
woolen and worsted goods (Nos. 128, 150, 190, 238, 261, 289) ; petro­
leum industry (No. 297, in press). They include also a special study
of the dress and waist industry of New York City (No. 146) and the
preliminary report o f an industrial survey in selected industries,
1919 (No. 265).
Results o f other special investigations are included in the series of
bulletins as follows:
( a ) E m p l o y m e n t an d U n e m p l o y m e n t :

No. 172. Unemployment in New York City. 1915. 24 p.
No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores
of Boston. 1916. 72 p.
No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment
industries. 1916. 155 p.
No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. 1916. 115 p.
No. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association, by P. F.
Brissenden. 1918. 58 p.
No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States, by J. G. Herndon.
1918. 100 p.
(&) W o m e n in I n d u s t r y :

No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women
in selected industries in the District of Columbia, by M. L. Obenauer. 1913.
68 p.
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin, by M. L.
Obenauer. 1913. 54 p.
No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee, by M. L.
Obenauer. 1913. 92 p.
No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mer­
cantile establishments and garment factories, by M. L. Obenauer and F. W .
Valentine. 1914, 198 p.
No. 176. Effect of minimum wage determinations in Oregon, by M. L. Obe­
nauer and B. von der Nienburg. 1915. 108 p.
No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for
women. 1915. 109 p.
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts, by M. Allinson.
1916. 180 p.
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. 1917.
275 p.
No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity
of industrial employment of women and children, by M. K. Conyngton. 1917.
170 p.
No. 285. Minimum wage laws of the United States, by L. D. Clark. 1921.
345 p.
( c)

In d u stria l A c c id e n ts and H y g i e n e :

No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sani­
tary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton. 1912. 95 p.
No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton. 1913. 68 p.
No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes and methods of protection,
by W . C. Hanson. 1913. 22 p.
No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead, by Alice Ham il­
ton. 1914. 97 p.
No. 157. Industrial accident statistics, by F. L. Hoffman. 1915. 210 p.
No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries, by Alice
Hamilton. 1915. 38 p.
No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry, by Alice Hamilton.
1915. 64 p.
No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades, by Alice Hamilton and C. H . Verrill.
1917. 118 p.
No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives,
by Alice Hamilton. 1917. 141 p.
No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts),
by F. L. Hoffman. 1918. 458 p.
No. 234. The safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917, by
L. W.. Chaney and H . S. Hanna. 1918. 299 p.




IK THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

21

No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. 1918. 147 p.
No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton manufacturing industry, by A. R.
Perry. 1919. 534 p.
No. 253. Women in the lead industries, by Alice Hamilton. 1919. 38 p.
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. Revision o f
No. 216, by L. W . Chaney. 1920. 123 p.
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease, by J. B. Andrews. 1920. 186 p.
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates,
by Alice Hamilton. 1921. 87 p.
No. 291. Carbon monoxide poisoning, by Alice Hamilton. 1921 (in press).
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite stone industry, by F. L.
Hoffman. 1921 (in press).
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, bjr
L. W . Chaney. 1921 (in press).
( d ) V o c a tio n a l E d u c a t i o n :

No. 147. W ages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry, with plans for apprenticeship for cutters and the education of work­
ers in the industry. 1914. 197 p.
No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners and a factory school experiment.
1915. 93 p.
No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. 1916. 333 p.
No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis. 1917. 592 p,
( e ) M is c e l la n e o u s :

No. 123. Employers’ welfare work, by E. L. Otey. 1913. 80 p.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States, by B. Emmet. 1917. 188 p.
No. 250. W elfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the
United States. 1919. 139 p.
No. 263. Housing by employers in the United States, by L. Magnusson. 1920.
283 p.
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in W ash ­
ington, D. C., by V. B. Turner. 1921. 38 p.
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, by W . E.
Llotchkiss and H. R. Seager. 1921. 107 p.
No. 299. Personnel research agencies: a guide to organized research in employ­
ment management, industrial relations, training, and working conditions, by
J. D. Thompson. 1921.

The following special publications have been issued without serial
numbering:
Tentative quantity and cost budget necessary to maintain a family of five in
Washington, D. C., at a level of health and decency. 1919. 75 p.
W ages and hours of labor in the coal-mining industry in 1919. 1919. 20 p.
Minimum quantity budget necessary to maintain a worker’s family of five at
a level of health and decency. 1920. 20 p.
Descriptions of occupations, prepared for the United States Employment
Service, 19 18 -1 9: Boots and shoes, harness and saddlery, and tanning; Canesugar refining and flour m illin g; Coal and water gas, paint and varnish, paper,
printing trades, and rubber goods; Electrical manufacturing, distribution, and
maintenance; Logging camps and saw m ills; Medicinal manufacturing; Metal
working, building and general construction, railroad transportation, and ship­
building ; Mines and m ining; Office employees; Slaughtering and meat packing;
Street railw ays; Textiles and clothing; W ater transportation.

Since July, 1915, the bureau has published the Monthly Labor lieview, which contains special articles on important phases o f the
labor question, summary reports o f investigations by the bureau,
and current labor news and information, e. g., prices and cost o f
living, wages and hours of labor, minimum wage, labor organizations
and agreements, awards, and decisions, employment and unemploy­
ment, women in industry, housing, industrial hygiene, accidents,
workmen’s compensation, labor laws and court decisions, strikes and
lockouts, and what State labor bureaus are doing.
Analyses o f the data collected in the cost-of-living survey con­
ducted by the bureau during the fall and winter of 1918-19 were




22

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

published in articles by Royal Meeker, W. F. Ogburn, and others in
the Monthly Labor Review, July-December, 1919, and July, 1920.
Studies o f labor turnover by P. F. Brissenden and E. Frankel were
printed in the issues of January-May, November, December, 1919,
and June, 1920. Other special articles on the following personnel
topics appeared in the numbers indicated: Disability among wage
earners* by Boris Emmet (November, 1919; March, 1920) ; Shop com­
mittees, by A. L. Whitney (November, 1919) ; A rest day in con­
tinuous-operation industry, by F. C. Croxton (February, 1920) ; A
Federal personnel policy, by W. E. Mosher (July, 1920) ; Separations
from the Government service, by M. Conyngton (December, 1920) ;
Tonnage output per pick miner per day in bituminous coal fields,
by Ethelbert Stewart (February, 1921) ; Industrial absenteeism, by
R. S. Quinby (October, 1921). Recent papers dealing with industrial
hygiene and occupational diseases include: Opportunities for the
study o f industrial medicine in the United States, by A. Shuford
(May, 1920) ; Cost o f occupational diseases under workmen’s com­
pensation acts in the United States, by C. Hookstadt (February,
1921) ; Occupational poisoning, by W. H. Rand (February, 1921).
C H ILD R E N ’S B U R E A U.

Twentieth and D Streets NW., Washington, D. C. Miss Grace
Abbott, chief.
Established by act o f Congress approved April 9, 1912, the Chil­
dren’s Bureau is directed “ to investigate and report * * * upon
all matters pertaining to the welfare o f children and child life,” in­
cluding “ dangerous occupations, accidents and diseases o f children,
employment.”
In its series o f Publications, besides a compilation of child-labor
laws (No. 10) and reports on their administration dealing with the
employment certificate system of Connecticut (No. 12), New York
(No. IT), Maryland (No. 41), Wisconsin (No. 85), and the adminis­
tration o f the first Federal child-labor law (No. 78), the bureau has
published the following special studies :
No. 74. Industrial instability of child workers. A study o f employment cer­
tificate records in Connecticut, by R. M. Woodbury. 1920. 86 p.
No. 79. Physical standards for working children. Preliminary report of the
committee appointed by the Children’s Bureau to formulate standards of
normal development and sound health for the use of physicians in examining
children entering employment and children at work. 1921. 24 p.

A summary of a study o f the working children of Boston by Helen
Sumner Woodbury, dealing with the character, conditions, and
effects o f employment o f children under 16 3
^ears o f age, was pub­
lished in the Monthly Labor Review, U. S. Bureau o f Labor Sta­
tistics, v. 12, No. 1, January, 1921, p. 45-59.
The bureau has in progress studies of (1) occupations open to
minors, their educational requirements for entrance, and the oppor­
tunities which they offer for advancement; (2) methods o f juvenile
guidance and placement. Under the latter, a field survey o f methods
o f vocational guidance, juvenile placement, and supervision o f work­
ing children in 15 or 20 typical cities is to be undertaken by the bu­
reau in the fall of 1921 in cooperation with the Junior division of the
United States Employment Service. The trustees o f the National




I jT
S

the

departm ent

of

labor.

23

Vocational Guidance Association are serving as an advisory com­
mittee in connection with this project.
Investigations planned for the near future cover: (1) The rela­
tion between occupation and physical development and health of
working boys and girls of different ages in selected employments;
(2) the accident risk of different occupations with special reference
to age.
W O M E N ’ BUREAU.
S

Twentieth and D Streets NW., Washington, D. C. Miss Mary
Anderson, director.
Organized as the “ Woman in Industry Service” in July, 1918,
during the war emergency, to serve as a policy forming and advisory
body; established as a permanent bureau by act o f Congress ap­
proved June 5, 1920, 4 to formulate standards and policies which
4
shall promote the welfare o f wage-earning women, improve their
working conditions, increase their efficiency, and advance their op­
portunities for profitable employment,” and 4 to investigate and re­
4
port upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of women in in­
dustry.”
The publications which have been issued by the bureau consist o f
annual reports o f the director, a series o f Bulletins (Nos. 1 to 17,
1919-1921), and charts of labor legislation affecting woman workers,
The bulletins include, besides studies of labor laws (Nos. 2, 5, 6, 7,
16) and standards for employment o f women in industry (No. 3),
the following reports of special investigations:
No. 1. Proposed employment of women during the war in the industries of
Niagara Falls. 1918. 16 p. (From Monthly Labor Review, U. S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics, June, 1919.)
No. 4. W ages of candy makers in Philadelphia in 1919. 1919. 46 p.
No. 8. Women in the Government service, by Bertha M. Nienburg.
1919.
37 p. (Analysis of examinations open to women, appointments, and salaries of
women as compared with men.)
No. 9. Home work in Bridgeport, Conn. 1919. 35 p.
(Deals with .corset
and garter making.)
No. 10. Hours and conditions of work for women in industry in Virginia.
1920. 32 p. (Survey made at the request of the governor.)
No. 11. Women street-car conductors and ticket agents. 1920. 86 p. (Sur­
vey in Detroit, Kansas City (M o .), Boston, and Chicago; women’s hours and
conditions of work compared with men’s.)
No. 12. New position of women in American industry. 1920. 158 p.
(Sur­
vey made under the war-work council of the Y. W . C. A .)
No. 13. Industrial opportunities and training for women and girls. 1920.
48 p. (Covers 100 schools in 20 States.)
No. 14. A physiological basis for the shorter working day for women, by
George W . Webster. 1921. 20 p.
No. 15. Some effects of legislation limiting hours of work for women. 1921.
26 p. (A comparison of the effect of the Massachusetts 48 hours with the New
Jersey 60 hours.)
No. 17. Wom en’s wages in Kansas. 1921. 104 p. (Survey of hours, wages,
and conditions of work of women in selected industries in 31 cities made in
cooperation with the Kansas Industrial W elfare Commission.)
Preliminary report of a survey of wages, hours, and conditions of work of
women in industry in Georgia. 1921. 63 p.

Similar local investigations of women in industry undertaken
by the bureau are in progress in Ohio (hours and working condi­
tions), Minnesota (wages and hours), Khode Island (wages and
hours), Manchester, N. H. (dependency of 500 families on woman




24

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

workers, stability o f women employees, continuity of employment
and unemployment).
A survey o f Negro women in industry was made by this bureau
December, 1918, to June, 1919, and a summary of the data secured
is included in the second report o f the Division of Negro Economies
(see v. infra).
UN I T E D STATES E M P L O Y M E N T SERVICE.

Twentieth and C Streets NW., Washington, D. C. Francis I.
Jones, director general.
A public employment service was organized in a limited way in
the Bureau of Immigration in 1907, under the direction o f its Division
o f Information. This was developed from 1914 to 1917 under the
present name and in December, 1917, was separated from the Bureau
o f Immigration and made a service in the office o f the Secretary of
Labor.
A plan for classifying adults, registered with the Service, by the
use of a modification o f the army trade tests was tried out experi­
mentally in the New York office, 1184 Broadway, during the first
three months of 1919; but reduction of the appropriations for con­
ducting the Service made it necessary to discontinue the work.
J u n i o r D i v i s i o n .—Miss Mary StewT
art, director. This division
deals with the youth o f the country, both sexes, between legal work­
ing age and twenty-one. Its purpose is (a) to aid the schools of the
country in assisting their charges to select and to prepare for some
definite occupational responsibility in which they may be efficient,
productive, and constructive workers; (b) to do everything possible to
secure for them the type of position in which they may utilize their
abilities to the best possible advantage; (c) to afford the type o f em­
ployment supervision which will encourage efficiency, fuil develop­
ment o f abilities, adaptability, and stability. The work is carried on
in cooperation with local educational authorities, the national office
furnishing leadership and advice in analyzing local demands and in
perfecting an organization best fitted to local needs. Further infor­
mation is given in “ Policies, development plans, and analysis o f
positions,” a mimeographed bulletin issued January, 1921.
With the assistance o f special experts, the division has prepared,
and issued in mimeographed form, April, 1921, “ An information
course in vocational guidance and placement for normal schools and
colleges ” (15 p.).
W A R SERVICES (now discontinued).
D i v i s i o n o f N egro E c o n o m i c s .— This division was formed by the
Secretary of Labor in May, 1918, to advise the department on matters
relating to Negro wage earners and to outline and promote plans for
greater cooperation between Negro wage earners, white employers,
and white workers in agriculture and industry, particularly during
the war emergency. It was discontinued as a separate division July,
1921. Two publications giving the results of its investigations have
been issued, viz.:
Negro migration in 1916-17. 1919. 158 p.
The Negro at work during the W orld W a r and during reconstruction;
statistics, problems, and policies relating to the greater inclusion of Negro
wage earners in American industry and agriculture. 1921. 144 p. (Contains;
the results of comparative studies o f white and colored workers.)




25

IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

T r a i n i n g S e r v i c e .— During 1919 this service under the Office o f
the Secretary issued a series of Training Bulletins, as follows:
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
24 p.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
23 p.
No.
No.
No.

1. How to start a training department in a factory. 24 p.
2. A successful apprentice toolmaker’s school. 8 p.
3. British methods of training workers in war industries. 68 p.
4. Training employees for better production. 29 p.
5. Training labor for peace time. 12 p.
6. Labor turnover and industrial training. 7 p.
7. Industrial training and foreign trade. 12 p.
8. Some advantages of industrial training. 12 p.
9. Seven million candidates for training. 15 p.
10. A business man’s experience with industrial training. 12 p.
11. Efficient training in a large plant. 13 p.
12. How training departments have bettered production— a symposium,
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.

Training in representative industries. 15 p.
Training in industrial plants. 30 p.
Training in the paper box industry. 75 p.
Training in men’s suit and overcoat industry. 83 p.
Training workers in the women’s cloak and skirt industry. 83 p. Industrial training in the overall industry. 57 p.
Training for shirt makers. 59 p.
Training in the rubber industry. 75 p.
Training in the leather shoe industry. 61 p.
Course of instruction in piano-making. 65 p.
Outline courses for instruction in lithography and photolithography.

24. Industrial training for foundry workers. 68 p.
25. A course of instruction for workers in the cotton mills.
26. The foreman. 79 p.

64 p

W o r k i n g C o n d i t i o n s S e r v i c e .—This service was organized in
three divisions: (1) Industrial hygiene and medicine, consisting o f
personnel detailed from the U. S. Public Health Service, (2) Labor
administration, (3) Safety engineering. The scope, functions, and
activities o f this service are described in its report for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1919 (35 p .), and a pamphlet entitled “ Treatment
o f industrial problems by constructive methods” (15 p.) ; also in the
House hearings on the sundry civil appropriation bill for 1920 (p.
1527-1551). It was discontinued July 1, 1919, through failure o f
appropriations. The results o f two special studies were published
as follows:
Investigation into dermatic effect and infective character of a lubricating
compound, by F. E. Deeds. 1919. 8 p.
Safeguarding workers in the tanning industry, by It. S. Bonsib. 1919. 121 p.

(b) IN OTHER E XEC U TIV E DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND
COMMISSIONS.
B U R E A U OF CHEMISTRY.

United States Department o f Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
D. J. Price, engineer in charge of grain-dust explosion investi­
gations.
Since 1913 the Bureau o f Chemistry has been making studies o f
the causes o f dust explosions in grain elevators, feed, cereal and
flour mills, starch factories, sugar refineries, and other industrial
plants which handle grain, and has developed and tested effective
preventive methods. Field investigations o f mill, elevator, and
thrashing-machine explosions have been made. An experimental




m

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

attrition mill was erected at Pennsylvania State College in 1915 and
experiments on grain-dust explosions have been conducted there
under a cooperative agreement between the Department o f Agricul­
ture and the college. Large scale tests have been made at the test­
ing station o f the Bureau of Mines at Bruceton, Pa., in the large steel
gallery used for experiments on the inflammability of coal dusts.
An extensive educational campaign for the prevention of graindust explosions was inaugurated in the fall of 1917 by the United
States Department of Agriculture and the United States Food A d­
ministration. The United States Grain Corporation assumed finan­
cial control o f this campaign in July, 1919.
A preliminary report on the explosibility o f grain dusts, by
D. J. Price and H. H. Brown, containing the results of the first
investigation made in cooperation with the United States Bureau o f
Mines and the millers’ committee of Buffalo, N. Y., was published by
that committee in 1914 (now out o f print). The later work is de­
scribed in the following publications:
Price, D. J., and McCormick, E. B. Dust explosions and fires in grain sepa­
rators in the Pacific Northwest. 1916. (U . S. Department of Agriculture, Bul­
letin 879.)
Declrich, B. W ., Fehr, R. B>, and Price, D. J. Grain-dust explosions; investi­
gation in the experimental attrition mill at Pennsylvania State College. 1918.
(U . S. Department of Agriculture, Bulletin 681.)
Roethe, H. E., and Bates. E. N. The installation of dust-collecting fans on
thrashing machines for the prevention of explosions and fires and for grain
cleaning. 1920.
(Department Circular 98.)
United States Grain Corporation.
Grain-dust explosion prevention.
New
York, 1920.
------- Proceedings of conference of men engaged in grain-dust explosion and
fire-prevention campaign, New York, April 22-24, 1920. New York, 1920.
Circulars, posters, etc., for use in educational campaign.

The Bureau o f Chemistry has also made investigations o f cofcton-

f in fires and has found the main cause of ignition is static electricity.
t has prepared a circular describing methods for preventing such
fires (Department Circular 28).
BUREAU

O F E D U C A T IO N .

Pension Building, Washington, D. C. John James Tigert,
commissioner.
Special studies on educational subjects by its own staff and other
specialists are published by this bureau in its series of bulletins.
These have included local studies o f industrial education in the
United States, e. g., at Columbus, Ga. (1913, No. 25), Worcester,
Mass. (1913, No. 17: A trade school for girls), Cleveland, Ohio
(1913, No. 39), and Wilmington, Del. (1918, No. 2 5 ); reports on
vocational and higher technical education in foreign countries (1913,
No. 54; 1914, No. 23; 1915, No. 33; 1917, No. 11); papers on voca­
tional secondary education (1916, No. 21) and vocational guidance
(1914, No. 14; 1918, Nos. 19, 24) in the public-school systems; teach­
ing English to the foreign born (1919, No. 80) and training teachers
for Americanization (1920, No. 1 2 ); and the following issues dealing
with various systems of training and with education for particular
Occupations:
1908, No. 6. The apprenticeship system in its relation to industrial educa­
tion, by Carroll D. Wright.




IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

27

1913, No. 50. The Fitchburg plan of cooperative industrial education, by M. R .
McCann.
1916, No. 34. Service instruction of American corporations, by L. F. Fuld.
1916, No. 37. Cooperative system of education, by C. W . Park.
1909, No. 10. Education for efficiency in railroad service, by J. S. Eaton.
1917, No. 9. Department-store education, by Helen R. Norton.

Some o f the effects of a system o f industrial espionage, discovered
in the course o f an investigation of the problem of adult education in
Passaic, N. J., by Mrs. A. B. Fernandez, are described in her report
published as Bulletin 1920, No. 4.
During 1919-20, six numbers of a series of Industrial education
circulars were issued:
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Lessons from the war and their application in the training of teachers.
The cooperative school.
Industrial art a national asset.
The Army trade tests.
Progress in the preparation of industrial teachers.
Examples of good teaching in industrial education.

Nos. 1 and 5 are reports of conferences of men from institutions
in the Mississippi Valley engaged in training teachers of the manual
arts and industrial education, December, 1918, and December, 1919;
and Nos. 4 and 6 are reports of conferences of specialists in indus­
trial education, February, 1919, and February, 1920. The confer­
ences were called by the United States Commissioner of Education.
Bibliographies of industrial, vocational, and trade education have
been issued as Bulletin 1913, No. 22, and Library Leaflet No. 7.
Current titles are included in the “ Monthly record of educational
publications ” which is published in the bulletin series.
B U R E A U OF E F F IC IE N C Y .

Winder Building, Seventeenth and F Streets, Washington, D. C.
Herbert D. Brown, chief.
Established as a division of the Civil Service Commission by au­
thority of the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act
approved March 4, 1913 (37 Stat. 750) ; made an independent estab­
lishment under present name by the urgent deficiency appropria­
tion act approved February 28, 1916 (39 Stat. 15).
The duties of the Bureau o f Efficiency are to establish and maintain
a system o f efficiency ratings for the executive departments in the
District o f Columbia; to investigate the needs o f the several execu­
tive departments and independent establishments with respect to
personnel; and to investigate duplication of statistical and other
work and methods o f business in the various branches of the Gov­
ernment Service.
The first personnel work undertaken by the bureau was the estab­
lishment of a system of efficiency rating in the Division of Dead Let­
ters of the Post Office Department. This system, developed and
extended so as to be applicable to other classes o f work, was estab­
lished experimentally throughout the entire Post Office Department
in December, 1914, and formally promulgated by Executive order of
June 23, 1915. A description of the procedure followed in rating
efficiency, the text o f this order and the forms used are printed in
the report o f the bureau for the period from March 25, 1913, to
October 13, 1916. During this period informal ratings were made in




28

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

the office o f the Treasurer o f the United States, the National Bank
Redemption Agency, the State Department, Bureau of Supplies and
Accounts o f the Navy Department. In 1919 an efficiency record sec­
tion was created in the Division of Loans and Currency of the Treas­
ury Department, and two systems for obtaining ratings were sub­
sequently developed so as to include all employees o f that office, one
applying to work susceptible o f precise measurement and the other
to work not measurable in quantitative units. In 1920 the system was
also put into operation in the office o f the Register of the Treasury.
By Executive order o f October 24, 1921, the bureau was directed by
the President to prescribe a system of rating the efficiency of em­
ployees throughout the classified service.
The bureau operated a training school for correspondence clerks
in the Bureau o f W ar Risk Insurance during 1918 and assisted with
the establishment o f a school for training revenue collectors in the
Bureau o f Internal Revenue. In June, 1919, an investigation o f the
desirability o f establishing a training school for Federal employees
in the District o f Columbia was undertaken. A report on this sub­
ject and recommendations with respect to the conduct o f such a
school were transmitted to the Senate March 3, 1920, and printed as
Senate Document No. 246 o f the Sixty-sixth Congress, second session.
> An investigation o f the methods and procedure of the Civil Service
Commission, authorized by the legislative, executive, and judicial
appropriation act o f March 3, 1917 (39 Stat. 1080), has recently
been completed and a report is to be submitted to Congress in the
hear future discussing all phases o f the work o f the commission, in­
cluding methods o f recruiting candidates, examinations, ratings, and
certifications, with recommendations for changes in policy and prac­
tice which, in the opinion o f the bureau, would enable the commis­
sion to perform more efficiently its primary function, that o f an
employment department for the Government service.
By the same act o f Congress the bureau was directed to make an
investigation o f the classification, salaries, and efficiency o f Federal
employees in the District of Columbia and a comparison of the rates
o f pay o f employees of the Federal Government with those of State
and municipal governments and commercial institutions performing
similar services. This work, suspended during the war and again
during the life o f the Joint Commission on Reclassification o f Sal­
aries,1 was resumed at the beginning of 1920 at the direction o f mem­
bers o f the House Committee on Appropriations. A brief classifi­
cation o f Government positions has been made and ranges o f pay
have been suggested for each class.2
Prior to the passage o f the retirement act o f 1920 the bureau col­
lected elaborate statistics on the personnel of the Government service
and from these made actuarial calculations for the Senate Committee
on Civil Service and Retrenchment as to the cost o f retiring civil
employees o f the Government under the various plans proposed.
1 The report of this Joint Commission, created Mar. 1, 1919, by section 9 of the legis­
lative, executive, and judicial appropriation act for 1 9 1 9 -2 0 , submitting a classification of
positions on the basis of duties and qualifications, and schedules of compensation for the
respective classes (197, 884 p.)„ was printed as House Doc. 686, 66th Cong., 2d ses.
2 Incorporated in one of the pending reclassification bills, viz : H. R. 2921, 67th Con­
gress. A different plan, the Lehlbach-Sterling bill (H . R. 8 9 2 8 ), was, however, reported
by the House Committee on Reform in the Civil Service, Nov. 3, 1921.




IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

29

BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE.

Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C. Philip B. Ken­
nedy, director.
This bureau has cooperated with the Federal Board for Vocational
Education in the preparation and publication of texts and educa­
tional guides on training in foreign commerce and shipping, which
have been issued in its Miscellaneous Series, as follow s:
No.
No.
No.
No.

81.
85.
97.
98.

Selling in foreign markets. 1919. 638 p.
Paper work in export trade. 1920. 152 p.
Training for foreign trade. 1919. 195 p.
Training for the steamship business. 1920.

BUREAU OF MINES.

49 p.

Department of the Interior, Washington, D. C. H. Foster Bain,
director.
Established by act of Congress, approved May 16, 1910 (37 Stat.
681), this bureau is authorized to conduct investigations designed to
improve health and safety in the mineral industry, and to promote
efficient development and utilization o f mineral resources. Its work
is organized under (a) the investigations branch, consisting of the
technical divisions of mining, mineral technology, fuels, metallurgy r
petroleum and natural gas, and the division o f mining experiment
stations; (&) the operations branch, including the divisions o f office
administration, education and information, mine-rescue cars and
stations, explosives, and the Government fuel yard. The principal
experiment station and central laboratories are at Pittsburgh, P a .;
other experiment stations are located at Bartlesville, Okla. (petro­
leum) ; Berkeley, Calif.; Columbus, Ohio (ceramics); Fairbanks,,
Alaska; Golden, C olo.; Minneapolis, M inn.; Salt Lake City, U tah;
Seattle, W ash.; Tucson, A riz.; IJrbana, 111.; and appropriations have
been made for two new mining experiment stations, which will serve
the Birmingham (Ala.) and St. Louis (Mo.) districts. The bureau
has an experimental mine at Bruceton, Pa., for explosion tests, etc.
Investigations are also carried on under cooperative agreements with
various State universities, mining schools, bureaus and commissions,
and other agencies. Each annual report of the director contains a,
record o f investigations completed or in progress.
For purposes o f safety work the country is divided into nine safety
districts, each with a district engineer in charge; and the bureau
maintains in them 10 mine-rescue cars and 9 safety stations, which
render aid at mine disasters, and at which about 10,000 miners each
year are trained in first-aid and mine-rescue methods.
The publications of the bureau are the Bulletins and the Technical
Papers (containing the results o f investigations), the Miners’ Cir­
culars (written in nontechnical English and dealing with accident
prevention, rescue and first-aid methods, the safeguarding of health,
and other topics that directly concern the workers in mines, mills,
and metallurgical plants), the annual reports o f the director, and
miscellaneous handbooks on special subjects, posters, charts, and
schedules. A printed list o f them may be obtained on application.
A mimeographed series o f brief reports, presenting results of minor
investigations on special phases o f major investigations, is also issued
and distributed to the technical press and to Government organiza­
tions, companies, or individuals interested.




30

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

Among the studies which have been published as Bulletins or Tech­
nical Papers are many dealing with mine hazards, rescue and firstaid training for miners, health and safety conditions in mines, quar­
ries, and metallurgical plants, explosives and equipment used in
mines and quarries, and related subjects, viz:
Coal dust, explosion tests, etc. (Bulletins Nos. 20, 50, 50, 102, 141, 167).
Mine gases, explosibility, etc. (Bulletins Nos. 42, 72, 195; Technical Papers
Nos. 89, 43, 119, 121, 134, 150, 190) ; ignition by incandescent lamps (Bulletin
No. 5 2 ; Technical Papers Nos. 23, 28 ).
Prevention of explosions (Technical Papers Nos. 21, 56, 8 4 ).
Safety of mine electrical equipment (Bulletin Nos. 46, 6 8 ; Technical Papers
Nos. 19, 44, 75, 101, 138) ; of other equipment and operations (Bulletins Nos.
57, 7 4 ; Technical Papers Nos. 103, 228, 237).
Accident prevention in metal mines (Technical Papers Nos. 30, 229) ; use of
stenches as warnings (Technical Paper No. 244).
Safety in stone quarrying (Technical Paper No. 111).
Mine rescue and first aid, gas masks, etc. (Bulletin No. 6 2 ; Technical Papers
Nos. 82, 248) ; carbon monoxide detection and effects (Technical Papers Nos.
11, 62, 122) ; Report of the committee on resuscitation from mine gases (Tech­
nical Paper No. 7 7 ). S e e a l s o Yale University, laboratory of applied physiology
(p. 197).
Occupational diseases: Miner’s nystagmus (Bulletin No. 9 3 ) ; pulmonary
diseases due to rock dust in metal mines (Bulletin No. 132; Technical Papers
Nos. 105, 260) ; control of hookworm infection (Bulletin No. 139).
Blast furnaces, hazards, and accident prevention (Bulletins Nos, 130, 140;
Technical Paper No. 136) ; asphyxiation by blast-furnace gas (Technical Paper
No. 106).
Steel plants, health conservation (Technical Paper No. 102) ; dust hazards
(Technical Paper No. 153) ; carbon monoxide poisoning (Technical Paper No.
156).
Explosibility of acetylene (Technical Paper No. 112) ; inflammability of
alum inum dust (Technical Paper No. 152) ; gasoline hazards (Technical Papers
Nos. 115, 127).
Also accident statistics for coal mines, coke ovens, metal mines, quarries, and
metallurgical works.

As the result of 13 years’ experience in testing and in assisting
manufacturers to develop explosives which offer the minimum
hazard, when properly used, in gaseous and dusty mines, the bureau
has prepared standard specifications for the testing and iise o f per­
missible explosives for use in mines (schedule 17), which have
recently been submitted to the American Engineering Standards
Committee for approval as “ tentative American standard.”
BUREAU

OF

STAN DARD S.

Washington, D. C. S. W. Stratton, director.
In 1913, under authorization o f Congress, this bureau began the
study o f the hazards of electrical practice, and from the start has
had the active cooperation of all the interests concerned. This has
involved not only the study o f existing requirements on electrical
construction embodied in State statutes, commission orders, city ordi­
nances, company specifications, technical association reports, and
regulations in force in foreign countries, and o f current electrical
practice, but also a series o f investigations covering such matters as
strength o f splices in wires, strength o f poles, weather conditions in
different parts of the country, shielding effect o f wires upon others
mounted on the same line, methods of making ground connections,
resistances of various types of ground in various soils, preservative
treatment o f wood and its effect upon conductivity, etc.




IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

31

Two tentative editions of the National Electrical Safety Code
issued in 1914 and 1916 as Circular No. 49 and Circular No. 54 were
superseded in 1921 by the third edition published as Handbook
Series No. 3. This has been submitted to the American Engineer­
ing Standards Committee for approval, the Bureau o f Standards
having been assigned the sponsorship for the electrical safety code
in the safety program o f that committee. (See p. 73.) It consists
o f parts 1 to 3, dealing respectively with installation and main­
tenance o f (1) electrical supply stations and substations, (2) over­
head and underground supply and signal lines, (3) utilization equip­
ment; part 4, rules for the operation of equipment and lines; and
supplementary sections which include rules for protective grounding
o f equipment and circuits. The discussion o f the rules which ac­
companied them in the second edition has been omitted and is to
appear considerably amplified in a separate publication, Handbook
Series No. 4, now in press. Circular No. 72. (1918), entitled “ Scope
and application o f the national electrical safety code,9 gives further
’
details o f its preparation, describes typical accidents, suggests pro­
cedure o f inspections, and summarizes the rules. The researches on
ground connections for electrical systems were published as Tech­
nologic Paper No. 108.
In 1918 the bureau cooperated with the safety engineers o f the
War and Navy Departments in the preparation o f a set of safety
standards to be applied in the Government establishments. Among
these standards was one for head and eye protection, which was
further developed through study and experimental work at the
bureau and conferences with other parties who had had experience in
eye protection, and then revised in 1920 by an advisory committee
organized for the purpose. It has now been published under the
title “ National safety code for the protection o f the heads and eyes
o f industrial workers,” as Handbook Series No. 2 (1921) ; and having
been developed by an organization and procedure substantially in
conformity with the rules of the American Engineering Standards
Committee, it has been approved as u recommended American prac­
tice ” by that committee, which had previously recognized the bureau
as sponsor for this safety code.
The bureau is also sponsor for the safety code for logging and
sawmill operations and has organized the sectional committee repre­
senting the different interests concerned and prepared the first draft.
It is joint sponsor for several other codes in preparation under the
auspices and rules o f procedure of the American Engineering Stand­
ards Committee (see p. 74), viz, the gas safety code, for which it
has made a number o f investigations relating to the use o f illumi­
nating gas; the safety code on aeronautics; the code for lightning
protection, on which subject it had previously published investiga­
tions in Technologic Paper No. 56. It is a member o f the Electrical
Safety Conference (see p. 100), wdiich is sponsor for the safety code
on electrical powder control and engaged in the development o f other
safety standards also.
In connection with the elevator code recently compiled by the
American Society o f Mechanical Engineers (see p. 81) the bureau
made a survey o f field conditions with respect to elevator interlocks
and has prepared a report on the subject which it expects to publish.




32

I,

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

It is cooperating with several State commissions in the preparation
o f safety rules and has representatives on the sectional committees
developing safety codes for which various technical associations are
sponsors.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.

1724 F Street NW., Washington, D. C. John T. Doyle, secre­
tary; Herbert A. Filer, chief examiner.
The chief examiner’s office has recently given special attention to
modification o f the examination for departmental clerk, so as to re­
duce the time occupied by the examiners in handling and rating the
papers and thus the cost o f the examination without interfering with
its efficiency as a test of fitness for the clerical service. This has been
accomplished partly by mechanical adjustment (i. e., size of papers*
methods o f handling, etc.) and partly by changing the character o f
some o f the tests, e. g., .arithmetic. ' In regard to the technical ex­
aminations, the consultant expert retained by the commission for this
investigation has advised against the use of trade tests under present
conditions.
During 1918-19 the Army alpha psychological test was given to 105
o f the commission’s employees and the results compared, in charts
and tables, with the grades attained by these employees in the com­
mission’s examinations and with the efficiency ratings of these per­
sons as reported by their chiefs o f division. Facing a large reduction
o f its staff July 1, 1921, due to a cut of $60,000 in the appropriation
for the fiscal year 1921-22, the commission used the graphic rating
scale, devised by the Scott Co., as an aid to eliminating the least
efficient o f its employees at that time.
The thirty-seventh annual report for the fiscal year ended June
30, 1920, includes a survey o f employment conditions in the Federal
civil service (p. xx-xxvii) and an account of the special method
adopted in applying the merit principle to the selection o f post­
masters (p. x x x iii-x x x v ).
FEDERAL BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.

Washington, D. C. Lewis II. Carris, administrative head.
Created by the act o f Congress, approved February 23, 1917, which
provided Federal aid for vocational schools and classes and teacher
training carried on under the direct supervision or control o f State
boards o f vocational education, in accordance with plans approved by
the Federal board. Its primary function is the administration o f this
act. In addition, it is charged with the promotion of vocational
rehabilitation o f persons disabled in industry under the act o f Con­
gress, approved June 2, 1920. B y each of these acts the board is
authorized to make studies, investigations, and reports.
The duty o f directing the vocational rehabilitation and return to
civil employment o f disabled soldiers, sailors, and marines, imposed
by the act o f June 27, 1918, was transferred to the Veterans’ Bureau
by the act of Congress creating that bureau, approved August 9,
1921.
The first studies issued by the board in its bulletin series dealt
with emergency war training courses as follows :
Bulletin No. 2. Training conscripted men for service as radio and buzzer
operators (international code) in the United States Arm y. 1917. 14 p.




IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

33

Bulletin No. 3. Emergency training in shipbuilding— evening and part-time
classes for shipyard workers. 1918. 72 p. (Contains job analyses for shipyard
occupations and comparisons with kindred trades.)
Bulletin No. 4. Mechanical and technical training for conscripted men (Air
Division, U. S. Signal Corps.) 1918. 47 p.
Bulletin No. 7. Emergency war training for motor-truck drivers and chauf­
feurs. 1918. 75 p.
Bulletin No. 8. Emergency war training for machine-shop occupations, blacksmithing, sheet-metal working, and pipe fitting. 1918. 48 p.
Bulletin No. 9. Emergency war training for electricians, telephone repairmen,
linemen, and cable splicers. 1918. 31 p.
Bulletin No. 10. Emergency war training for gas-engine, motor-car, and
motor-cycle repairmen. 1918. 79 p.
Bulletin No. 11. Emergency war training for oxyacetylene welders.
1918.
86 p.
Bulletin No. 16. Emergency war training for radio mechanics and radio
operators. 1918. 75 p.

During the war a number of Government agencies combined to
carry on the training of employment managers under the immediate
direction of the War Industries Board. When the latter was discon­
tinued December 31,1918, provision was made by the President, from
the appropriation for national security and defense, for the continua­
tion o f this work under the auspices of the Federal Board for Voca­
tional Education until July 1, 1919. Subsequently, nine bulletins
dealing with certain phases of employment management were pub­
lished, forming the following series:
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g em en t S eries.

No. 1. Employment management: its rise and scope. The organization of an
employment department. By Boyd Fisher and Edward D. Jones. 1920. 34 p.
(Bulletin No. 50.)
No. 2. The selection and placement of employees. B y Philip J. Reilly. 1919.
84 p. (Bulletin No. 49.)
No. 3. Job specifications. By Franklyn Meine. 1919. 64 p.
(Bulletin No.
45.)
No. 4. Employment management and industrial training. By Roy W . Kelly.
1919. 107 p. (Bulletin No. 48.)
No. 5. The wage-setting process. B y Alfred B. Rich. 1919. 32 p. (Bulletin
No. 44.)
No. 6. The turnover of labor. B y Boris Emmet. 1919. 60 p.
(Bulletin
No. 46.)
No. 7. Industrial accidents and their prevention. By R. R. Ray. 1919. 66
p. (Bulletin No. 47.)
No. 8. The labor audit: a method of industrial investigation. By Ordway
Tead. 1920. 48 p. (Bulletin No. 43.)
No. 9. Bibliography of employment management. By Edward D. Jones. 1920.
119 p. (Bulletin No. 51.)

The results of the research work undertaken to promote the effi­
ciency o f trade and industrial education are made available to the
States through regional conferences held annually with representa­
tives of State boards and through the publication of bulletins. The
special types o f service to State boards, as described in the fourth
annual report, 1920 (p. 28-40), includes studies of training of trade
and industrial teachers, and development of methods of educational
trade analysis, effective programs for foremen’s conferences, and
methods o f conducting local surveys. Short training courses on
these subjects have been given at the regional conferences. The bul­
letins containing results of studies in this field constitute the follow­
ing subseries.
70723°— Bull. 299— 21-------3




34

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

T r a d e and I n d u s t r i a l S e r ie s .

No. 1. Trade and industrial education— organization and administration.
1918. 125 p.
(Bulletin No. 17.)
No. 2. Evening industrial schools. 1918. 55 p. (Bulletin No. 18.)
No. 3. Part-time trade and industrial education.
1918.
52 p.
(Bulletin
No. 19.)
No. 4. Buildings and equipment for schools and classes in trade and indus­
trial subjects. 1918. 77 p. (Bulletin No. 20.)
No. 5. Evening and part-time schools in the textile industry in the Southern
States. 1919. 106 p.
(Bulletin No. 30.)
Contains job analyses of textile
occupations.
No. 6. Training courses in safety and hygiene in the building trades. 1919,
128 p. (Bulletin No. 31.)
No. 7. Foreman training courses, Parts I and II. 1919. 2 v. (Bulletin No.
36.)
Based on an experiment in foreman training conducted in cooperation
with an industrial plant.
No. 8. General mining. 1919. 169 p. (Bulletin No. 38.) Includes analyses
of mining occupations, routes for promotions, mining schools, outlines of courses,
etc.
No. 9. Coal-mine gases. 1919. 36 p. (Bulletin No. 39.)
No. 10. Coal-mine timbering. 1919. 103 p. (Bulletin No. 40.)
No. 11. Coal-mine ventilation. 1919. 63 p. (Bulletin No. 41.)
No. 12. Safety lamps, including flames, safety lamps, and approved electric
lamps. 1919. 72 p. (Bulletin No. 42.)
No. 13. Theory and practice. Outlines of instruction in related subjects for
the machinist’s trade, including general trade subjects for certain other occu­
pations. 1919. 127 p. (Bulletin No. 52.) Includes analysis of machinist’s trade
(p. 15-47.)
No. 14. Compulsory part-time school attendance laws. 1920. 95 p.
(Bulle­
tin No. 55.)
No. 15. Trade and industrial education for girls and women. 1920. 106 p.
(Bulletin No. 58.)
No. 16. Foremanship courses vs. instructor-training courses.
1921.
15 p.
(Bulletin No. 60.)
No. 17. Improving forem anship: trade extension courses for foremen. 1921.
42 p. (Bulletin No. 61.)
No. 18. Instructor training, instructor-training courses for trade teachers and
for foremen having an instructional responsibility. 1921. 43 p. (Bulletin No.
62.)
No. 19. Bibliography on vocational guidance: A selected list o f vocational
guidance references for teachers. 1921. 35 p. (Bulletin No. 66.)
No. 20. A survey and analysis of the pottery industry. 1921. 88 p. (Bulletin
No. 67.)
No. 21. An analysis of the railway boilermaker’s trade. 1921. 24 p. (Bulle­
tin No. 69.)

In the field o f training for mercantile occupations some of the
studies made have been issued in the following subseries of bulletins:
C o m m e r c ia l E d u c a tio n S e r ie s .

No. 1. Retail selling. By Mrs. L. W . Prince. Rev. ed. 1919. 103 p. (Bulletin
No. 22.)
No 2. Vocational education for foreign trade and shipping.
1918.
85 p.
(Bulletin No. 24.)
No. 3. Commercial education— organization and administration. 1919. 67 p.
(Bulletin No. 34.)
No. 4. Survey of junior commercial occupations. 1920. 77 p. (Bulletin No.
54.) Contains job analyses of 26 occupations, promotional lines, etc.

A revised edition o f Bulletin No. 24
trade/’ a bulletin on 6 Training for the
4
text for use in teaching,4 Paper work in
4
the Federal Board, have been published




on 4 Training for foreign
4
steamship business/’ and a
export trade/’ prepared by
by the Bureau o f Foreign

IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

35

and Domestic Commerce as Nos. 97, 98, and 85, respectively, of its
miscellaneous series.
During 1918-1920 the board issued three series of studies in con­
nection with the vocational rehabilitation o f disabled soldiers,
sailors, and marines, viz r
Reeducation Series, Nos. 1 -8 (Bulletins Nos. 5, 6, 15, 25, 29, 32, 33, 59 ), of
which the last four deal with tuberculous cases and were prepared with the
assistance of the National Tuberculosis Association (see p. 137).
Rehabilitation Monographs, Joint Series, Nos. 1-67, consisting of unit courses
of instruction in various school and trade subjects, issued in cooperation with
the Surgeon General’s Office, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (Navy De­
partm ent), and the Bureau o f W a r Risk Insurance.
Opportunity Monographs, Vocational Rehabilitation Series, Nos. 1-44, con­
taining descriptions o f occupations to aid disabled soldiers, sailors, and marines
in choosing a vocation.

The industrial rehabilitation division has thus far been concerned
primarily with administration, general policy 2 and problems arising
in connection with the establishment o f rehabilitation work for per­
sons disabled in industry in the several States. It has issued three
bulletins up to October, 1921, v iz :
Industrial Rehabilitation Series: No. 1, A Statement of Policies (Bulletin
No. 57) ; No. 2, General Administration and Case Procedure (Bulletin No. 64) ;
No. 3, Services of Advisement and Cooperation (Bulletin No. 70).
FED ER AL RESERVE BOARD.

D ivision of A nalysis and R esearch, 511 Philosophy Hall, One
hundred and sixteenth Street, New York, N. Y .— H. Parker Willis,
chief. In order to obtain data for ascertaining changes in the cost o f
living o f bank employees, with a view to affording a basis for adjust­
ing salaries according^, a questionnaire was prepared by this divi­
sion and distributed to all employees of Federal reserve banks re­
ceiving" salaries of less than $5,000 per annum, requesting certain in­
formation relative to either family or individual expenditures for the
year 1919. The purpose was to determine the percentage o f the total
expenditures going toward food, rent, clothing, etc., of a typical
family or individual in each salary group, in order to give proper
weighting to the price changes reported by the United States Bureau
of Labor Statistics at intervals of six months. Five thousand one
hundred and twenty returns from 12 Federal reserve districts have
been tabulated; the figures for the Federal Reserve Bank o f New
York are published in an article on the investigation in the Federal
Reserve Bulletin for December, 1920 (p. 1293-1295).
G overnors’ C onference, C ommittee on P ersonnel.—T his com­
mittee, appointed at the governors’ conference with the Federal Re­
serve Board held at Washington, D. C., April 7 to 10,1920, has under­
taken a survey of the whole field of personnel activities in all of the
Federal reserve banks, and also in representative industrial and com­
mercial concerns. Under date of July 15, 1920, it sent out to the
banks and through them to a few other concerns in each district a
comprehensive questionnaire in the form o f a printed pamphlet o f
45 pages quarto, in which the questions are classified according to a
decimal system in nine groups, with subdivisions. 'T o facilitate com­
parison o f information relating to the same subject from all the banks
the instructions provided that the several questions should be an­
swered on separate sheets of standard size, marked with the respective
classification numbers. The investigation is being conducted under




36

I.

FEDERAL

A G E N C IE S .

the immediate direction of H. A. H opf, organization counsel, Federal
Reserve Bank of New York, room 2524,15 Nassau Street, New York,
N. Y. A report on the material received is to be submitted to the
governors’ conference, showing the present status of personnel activi­
ties in the Federal reserve banks and in other institutions and making
constructive recommendations,
IN T E R S T A T E C O M M E R C E C O M M IS S IO N .

Eighteenth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.
L o c o m o t iv e I n s p e c t i o n .— A. G. Pack, chief inspector.
This bureau administers the act of February 17, 1911, as amended
March 4, 1915, which empowers the commission to inspect and pre­
scribe standards of safety for all parts and appurtenances of the loco­
motive and tender, including the boiler. Its annual reports contain
statistical and other data on accidents and casualties resulting from
failures o f locomotives and tenders and their appurtenances and on
defects found by the inspectors.
As it has been found that fire-box failures, due to crown sheets
being overheated, are among the most prolific sources of fatal acci­
dents, and that such failures are frequently due to dependence on
gauge cocks to give a correct indication of the height o f water, when
in fact the true level was much lower, the bureau during the fiscal
year 1919-20 made an extensive series of tests for the purpose o f de­
termining the action o f water in the boiler on the water-indicating
appliances, with respect to their correct registration. The results of
the experiments made on a number o f locomotives of different classes
on 14 railroads in various sections of the country are given in the
ninth annual report of the bureau, 1920 (p. 8-30).
B

u r e a u of

N A V Y DEPARTM ENT.

Washington, D. C.
o f N a v i g a t i o n .— L . D . Alderman, educational adviser.
This bureau has planned and organized on the ships o f the Navy an
education system intended (1) to assist enlisted men in raising their
ratings in the Navy, and (2) to increase the efficiency of enlisted men,
whether for naval or civil life. It is carried on according to the selfinstruction plan, each subject being taught through a series of lessons.
The system has been started by selecting from the courses already
prepared by various correspondence schools and university extension
divisions those which present the subjects in the most simple and
direct manner; and the bureau is now having courses prepared by
naval officers and others especially adapted to meet naval needs. The
subjects are offered in six courses, v iz : Steam engineering, electrical
engineering, gas engineering, navigation, ordnance and gunnery, yeo­
manry. A description o f the courses and subjects is published m a
pamphlet entitled “ United States Navy education system: Announce­
ment o f courses” (rev. ed., Jan. 1921).
D e p a r t m e n t a l W a g e B o ar d o f R e v ie w ". —It is provided by law
that the rate o f wages of the employees in the navy yards shall con­
form, as nearly as is consistent with the public interest, with those
o f private establishments in the immediate vicinity of the respective
yards, to be determined by the commandants thereof, subject to the
approval and revision of the Secretary of the Navy, who appoints a
board o f review to advise him. The present board (John K. Robi­
son, captain, United States Navy, senior member; W. D. Bergman,

B

ureau




IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS.

37

chief, appointment division, recorder) on August 31, 1921, issued its
“ report on the question of wages for civilian employees of naval
establishments within continental limits of the United States ” based
on the recommendations of local wage boards, public hearings, and
investigations by its members. An abstract of the report and the
schedules o f rates of pay, which were approved by the Secretary o f
the Navy and became effective September 16, are printed in the
Monthly Labor Review for October, 1921 (pp. 116-127).
P O S T O F F IC E D E P A R T M E N T .

Eleventh Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.
elfare
D e p a r t m e n t .— Dr. Lee K. Frankel, welfare director.
During the summer of 1921 a national welfare council, composed
o f representatives elected by the postal employees, was organized to
consider matters affecting working conditions, health, and general
welfare o f employees in post offices, mail trains, steamships, and other
divisions of the Postal Service. A model plan for constitution o f
local welfare councils, to be organized in all cities of sufficient size
for the discussion o f matters of local interest, has been adopted by
the national welfare council and the welfare department and sent
out from the office o f the Postmaster General, October 26, 1921. It
is planned to appoint committees from the permanent councils to
study questions of sanitation, lighting, rest rooms, first aid, medical
and nursing service, recreation, etc.
The welfare department has recently sent out questionnaires to
about 3,000 post offices to obtain preliminary data as to existing work­
ing conditions, and about 100 of them have been personally investi­
gated. These questionnaires have been placed in the hands of the
post-office inspectors to> study the conditions reported and submit
recommendations thereon to this department.
W

U N IT E D

S T A T E S P U B L IC H E A L T H

Washington, D. C.

S E R V IC E .

Hugh S. Gumming, surgeon general.
D i v i s i o n o f S c i e n t i f i c R e s e a r c h .—Asst. Surg. Gen. J. W . Schereschewsky in charge. Investigations of occupational diseases and in­
dustrial hygiene have since 1914 constituted part of the work o f this
division. They are carried on under the office o f industrial hygiene
and sanitation either by the regular personnel o f the service or by
the part-time personnel in connection with certain university medical
schools. Statistical studies in connection with these investigations
are made by the statistical office of the division and laboratory work
is done by the Hygienic Laboratory.
The general policy which has been formulated is that the funds
allotted are to be expended in such manner as to make known the
hazards o f those industries where present information is inadequate;
the prevalence o f specific hazards from known poisonous elements or
compounds; the causative factors o f prevalent occupational dis­
eases and in each instance the preventive measures and routine
treatment to meet abnormal conditions whenever and wherever
found. The general plan o f work, which is being followed as far as
circumstances permit, is to undertake each year the study o f the
health hazards o f one industry, the hazard distribution o f one occu­
pational poison, and the causation, treatment, and prophylaxis o f one
occupational disease. Investigations are also undertaken in coopera-




38

I.

federal

a g e n c ie s ,

tion with State and local authorities to provide data on which to base
the administration o f State labor laws and for the improvement o f
the sanitation o f industrial communities.
O f f ic e of I n d u s t r i a l H y g i e n e a n d S a n i t a t i o n .3— The results of
some o f the principal investigations conducted under the direction of
this office have been published in the series o f Public Health Bulletins
as follows:
No. 71. Studies in vocational diseases: I. The health of garment workers,
by J. W . Schereschewsky. II. The hygienic conditions of illumination in work­
shops of the women’s garment industry, by J. W . Schereschewsky and D. H.
Tack. 1915. 224 p. [See also No. 81.]
No. 73. Tuberculosis among industrial w orkers: Report o f an investigation
made in Cincinnati, with special reference to predisposing causes, by D. E.
Robinson and J. G. W ilson. 1916. 143 p.
No. 78. Influence of occupation on health during adolescence: Report of a
physical examination of 679 male minors under 18 in the cotton industries of
Massachusetts, by M. V. Safford. 1916. 52 p.
No. 81. Studies in vocational diseases. The effect of gas-heated appliances
upon the air of workshops, by C. Weisman. 1917. 84 p. [Part of the garment
industry investigation.]
No. 85. Miners’ consumption: A study of 433 cases of the disease among
zinc miners in southwestern Missouri, by A. J. L a n za ; with a chapter on
roentgen ray findings in miners’ consumption, by S. B. Childs. 1917. 40 p.
No. 92. Color blindness: Its relation to other ocular conditions, and the
bearing on public health of tests for color sense acuity, by G. L. Collins. 1918.
29 p. [One of a series of illumination and vision studies in Government depart­
ments made in 1915-1918.]
No. 99. Studies o f the medical and surgical care of industrial workers, by
O. D. Selby. 1919. 115 p.
No. 106. Studies in industrial physiology: Fatigue in relation to working
capacity.
I.- Comparison of an 8-hour plant and a 10-hour p la n t: Report
by Josephine Goldmark and M. D. Hopkins on an investigation by P. S.
Florence and associates, under the general direction of Frederic S. Lee.
1920. 213 p.

The following is a partial list o f the investigations undertaken,
with references to the annual reports of the Surgeon General, where
they are briefly described, and to the reprints from the Public Health
Keports, in which some o f the results are published:
(1) Surveys of health hazards of particular industries, v iz : Steel plants
(annual report, 1914, p. 5 2 ; 1915, p, 5 2 ; 1916, pp. 46, 4 8 ; s e e also United
States Bureau of Mines, Technologic Paper No. 102) ; chemical industry (an­
nual report, 1917, p. 3 8 ; 1918, p. 40) ; textile industry (annual report, 1917,
p. 3 9 ; 1918, p. 4 0 ) ; illuminating gas manufacture and distribution (annual
report, 1917, p. 3 8 ; 1918, p. 40) ; munition plants ( annual report, 1918, p. 33) ;
electrochemical and abrasive plants (annual report, 1919, p. 38) ; pottery in­
dustry (annual report, 1919, p. 3 9 ; 1920, p. 34) ; foundry trades (annual re­
port, 1920, p. 33) ; mining industry, in cooperation with United States Bureau
of Mines (annual report, 1914-1920) ; glass industry (in progress, 1921) ; dye
industry (planned for 1921 -2 2).
(2 ) Studies of specific health hazards, occupational diseases and poisons,
v iz : Heat hazard in industries (Reprint No. 4 4 1 ; projected for 1921-22) ; ef­
fect of pneumatic hammers on hands of stone cutters (annual report, 1918, p.
4 7 ; Reprint No. 460) ; dust hazards and air conditioning (annual report, 1919,
p. 4 0 ; 1920, p. 3 3 ; in progress, 1921; Reprint Nos. 509, 530, 585, 61 6), under the di­
rection of O.-E. A. Winslow, Yale Medical School (see p. 198) ; plumbism (among
pottery workers, annual report, 1919, p. 3 9 ; 1920, p. 3 4 ; glass workers, in prog­
ress, 1921; in sundry other trades, e. g., smelting and refining, white-lead works,
storage batteries, planned for 1921-22) ; cutting oil dermatoses among machin­
ists ( annual report, 1920, p. 3 5 ; in progress, 1921) ; ink dermatosis among plate
3 From October, 1918, to June 30, 1919, the personnel was detailed to constitute the
division of industrial hygiene and medicine of the Working Conditions Service of the
Department of Labor (dissolved after the latter date).




IN

O T H E R D E P A R T M E N T S , BOARD S, A N D

C O M M IS S IO N S .

39

and press printers (annual report, 1920, p. 36) ; tellurium poisoning (annual
report, 1920, p. 3 6 ; Reprint No. 590).
(3) Studies in industrial fatigue, including field investigations in 8-hour and
10-hour plants, muscle tests, laboratory studies of the chemical phenomena of
fatigue, etc. (annual report, 1918, p. 3 7 ; 1919, p. 4 1 ; 1920, p. 3 7 ; in progress
1921; Reprints Nos. 448, 458, 465, 482, 513, 543, 605; Public Health Bulletin
No. 16, v. supra: Public Health Reports, 1919, p. 1682; 1920, p. 2445) begun in
1917 in cooperation with the divisional committee on industrial fatigue, Council
o f National Defense, and continued since the war under the direction of
Frederic S. Lee, Columbia University (see p. 176).
(4 ) Local studies relating to women in industry, v iz : Sanitary survey of
Indiana industries employing woman labor (Supplement No. 17 to Public Health
reports) ; health conditions surrounding employment of women in Wisconsin
(annual report, 1916, p. 4 4 ; 1917, p. 36 ).
S t a t i s t i c a l O f f i c e .— Edgar Sydenstricker, statistician, in charge.
Organized in the winter o f 1918-19 to provide a central plant, with
experienced personnel and necessary mechanical equipment, for the
tabulation o f material collected in the field and epidemiological
studies carried on by the Public Health Service, to furnish the tech­
nical advice required in planning the statistical work and in analyz­
ing the results o f such studies and to conduct independently certain
statistical studies bearing thereon. Its activities have included com­
pilation and analysis of the morbidity and mortality statistics col­
lected in field investigations o f influenza, studies of morbidity reports
in cooperation with the Division o f Sanitary Reports and Statistics
and State and municipal health departments, statistical studies o f pul­
monary tuberculosis, venereal diseases, and child hygiene, and the or­
ganization o f industrial morbidity statistics.
The purposes of its work in the field of industrial morbidity
statistics are (1) to secure current reports of disease prevalence among
wage earners in different plants, industries, and occupations, and (2)
to collect data relating to the incidence o f disease according to diag­
nosis among wage earners of different sexes, ages, races, and occupa­
tions for the study o f the influence o f occupational and other condi­
tions. It is believed that when a sufficiently large number o f indus­
trial establishments and employees’ sick benefit associations cooperate
with the Public Health Service in furnishing regular reports o f dis­
ease prevalence a better basis will be laid by the study o f industrial
hygiene and for more definitely direct preventive measures. A t the
present time 45 sick benefit organizations are sending monthly reports
and 10 are seiiding annual or special reports to this office, applying in
the aggregate to 158,000 employees.
In addition to statistical studies in its other lines of work, the pub­
lications from this office include the following papers dealing with in­
dustrial morbidity, which have appeared in the issues of the Public
Health Reports indicated by date:
Sickness records for industrial establishments (N ov. 14, 1919; Reprint No.
573).
Prepared in cooperation with the committee on industrial morbidity
statistics of the section on vital statistics, American Public Health Association
(see p. 78 ).
Keeping tab on sickness in the plant (Apr. 9, 1920, Reprint No. 589).
Sickness and absenteeism during 1919 in a large industrial establishment
(Sept. 10, 1920).
Sickness frequency among industrial employees, 1920-21 (Dec. 3, 1920; Mar. 4,
July 1, 1921; Reprints No. 624).
Diseases prevalent among steel workers in a Pennsylvania city i.Dec. 3 1 ,1 9 2 0 ).




40

I.

FEDERAL AGENCIES.

Also a series of studies of disabling sickness and pellagra incidence in cottonmill villages of South Carolina (Nov. 22, 1918; Mar. 19, July 9 and 16, Nov. 12,
1920).
H y g i e n i c L a b o r a t o r y , Twenty-fifth and E Streets W . , Washing­
ton, D. C.— Surg. G. W. McCoy, director. The divisions o f chemis­
try and pharmacology o f this laboratory conduct laboratory research
required in connection with some o f the industrial hygiene investiga­
tions undertaken by the United States Public Health Service. This
includes (1) chemical and bacteriological analyses o f samples col­
lected in the field, (2) research into simple tests to be used in field
sampling, (3) determinations of dosage injurious to workers
handling poisonous elements and compounds found in trade processes,
and (4) physiological changes of the body due to abnormal condi­
tions arising from or inherent in industrial activities. Thus in con­
nection with the investigation o f trinitrotoluene poisoning the divi­
sion o f chemistry developed the analytical procedures for the detec­
tion o f T. N. T. in the atmosphere (later applied to other nitro com­
pounds) , and studied the chemistry of T. N. T., its manufacture and
impurities, and the vapor pressure and volatility o f T. N. T. as influ­
enced by temperature and humidity; and the division o f pharma­
cology dealt with the toxicological and pharmacological aspects o f
the problem, such as the discovery o f diagnostic tests for the early
recognition o f poisoning, the study o f absorption o f the poison, and
the discovery o f preventive measures. The principal findings were
published in Reprint No. 534 from the Public Health Reports, June
13, 1919, and also with studies o f the poisonous properties o f parazol
and the action of mercury fulminate on the skin, as Hygienic Labora­
tory Bulletin No. 120.
In connection with the administration of the act o f Congress levy­
ing a prohibitive tax on white phosphorus matches, the division of
chemistry, during 1914-15, examined samples o f matches and match
materials for the Commissioner o f Internal Revenue and developed
a new method for the detection of white or yellow phosphorus in the
presence o f other permissible forms (published as the fourth article
in Hygienic Laboratory Bulletin No. 96).
From 1914 to 1917 this division carried on, in cooperation with the
New York State Commission on Ventilation (see p. 54), studies o f
heat dissipation from the human body and devised various types o f
instrument, called the comfortimeter, intended to record the actual
characteristics of the atmosphere— temperature, humidity, and veloc­
ity o f air movement—in terms o f physical comfort.
It also made a study o f the volatility o f lead and other metals from
molten type metal, under conditions existing in the Government
Printing Office in 1916, and analyzed samples of dust and glazes in
connection with the pottery investigation by the Office o f Industrial
Hygiene and Sanitation in 1919.
R A IL R O A D L A B O R B O A R D .

5 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. R. M. Barton, chairman.
This board was created by section 304 of the transportation act,
1920 (41 Stat., 470), to hear and decide disputes involving grievances,
rules, or working conditions not settled by the railroad boards o f
labor adjustment (provided for in sec. 302) and disputes involving
wages or salaries not settled by conferences o f representatives o f the




IN

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C O M M IS S IO N S .

41

carriers and their employees or subordinate officials directly inter­
ested therein (sec. 301).
The following studies have been published by the board as Wage
Series, Reports Nos. 1 and 2:
No. 1. Average daily and monthly wage rates of railroad employees on class 1
carriers; in effect under private control (December, 1917) ; under the United
States Railroad Administration (January, 1920) ; and under Decision No. 2
(July 20, 1920), United States Railroad Labor Board. August, 1920. 12 p.,
fold, tables.
No. 2. Rules for reporting information on railroad employees, together with
a classification and index of steam railroad occupations. May, 1921. 320 p.
(Prepared by the board and approved by the Interstate Commerce Commission,
to be used by carriers in reporting wage and compensation data to either
body.)

In decision No. 119, April 14,1921, providing for abrogation o f the
national agreement entered into during the period of Federal control,
the board laid down 16 principles for the settlement of disputes as to
rules and working conditions by local conferences between the car­
riers and their employees, and a number of interpretations and ad­
denda have been issued since the date of the original decision.
Decision No. 222, effective August 16,1921, has determined the con­
ditions under which overtime is to be paid to the employees comprised
in the six shop crafts on about 100 railroads submitting this question
to the board. The machinists, boiler makers, blacksmiths, sheet
metal workers, electrical workers, and carmen and their apprentices
and helpers are affected.
U N IT E D S T A T E S S H IP P IN G B O A R D .

1319 F Street, NW., Washington, D. C.
o f I n d u s t r ia l
R e l a t i o n s .— In 1921 this division pub­
lished a “ Codification of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board 4
awards, decisions, and authorizations” (341 p.).
During 1918-19 the Industrial Service Section, Industrial Rela­
tions Group, Emergency Fleet Corporation, Philadelphia, prepared
and issued the following publications:
D

iv is io n

Handbook on employment management in the shipyard: Bulletin I, Organiz­
ing the employment department. 1918. Bulletin 2, The employment building.
1918. Bulletin 3, Selection and placement of the worker. 1919. Special Bul­
letin, Labor loss. 1918.
Aids to employment managers and interviewers on shipyard occupations
with descriptions o f such occupations. 1918.
Opportunities in shipbuilding for the physically handicapped. 1919.
The physical examination in the employment department. 1919.
W A R DEPARTM ENT— GENERAL STAFF.

State, War, and Navy Building, Washington, D. C.
a n d T r a in in g D iv is io n
(G 3).—Under the reorganiza­
tion o f the present year the advisory board and the training and
instruction branch of this division now have charge of the training
work of the Army previously carried on by the education and
recreation branch of the War Plans Division (now abolished), to
which the duties of the Committee on Education and Special TrainO

p e r a t io n s

4 The history of this hoard from its organization in August, 1917, to its dissolution
Mar. 31, 1919, written by W. E. Hotchkiss, supervising examiner for the board, and
H. R. Seager, its secretary, was published in 1921 as Bulletin of the United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics No. 283.




42

I.

FE D ER A L . A G E N C I E S .

ing (organized February, 1918) were transferred in September,
1919. The advisory board, consisting of civilians (CL IT Maim,
chairman), formulates the plans for training to be carried out by
the training and instruction branch.
The method adopted by the board has been outlined in a mimeo­
graphed memorandum “ The technique o f army training” (8 pp»).
It involves (1) the preparation by the Army authorities o f minimum
specifications o f the personal characteristics, skill, and knowledge
needed to meet the requirements of each of the many grades and
ratings o f the A rm y; (2) the preparation o f standardized tests for
selecting and assigning men; (3) the analysis o f the required skill
and knowledge into unit operations and information topics which
make good instruction units, and the combination of these into a
practical school program; (4) the preparation o f students’ manuals
and instructors’ guides; (5) the determination o f the average time
required for men to qualify for each grade or rating.
The personnel o f the Division o f Testing and Grading (D. Edgar
Rice, director) o f the research and development service, recently located
at Camp Grant, 111., has since the reorganization been transferred to
[Washington, D. C., to continue its work under the advisory board.
The activities o f this division started in the summer o f 1920, and its
force o f about 19 men was engaged throughout the fall and early win­
ter in administering tests for selection and assignment o f men in the
various Army camps and posts. Up to May, 1921, about 58,000 men
had been tested and classified, on the basis o f the .Army intelligence
tests and several elementary educational and vocational tests. The
following is a brief statement of the tests used and the research and
development work which the division has undertaken:
A r m y in telligen ce te s t — A lph a ,— This test of intelligence for literates used
during the war has been continued in use during the past year, because it was
thoroughly standardized and an ample supply o f copies was already on hand in
the W a r Department. It is not found to be entirely satisfactory for use with
Army men, as it gives too much weight to results o f formal training and the
division is engaged upon a revision of this test with a view to adapting it more
accurately to the Arm y needs.
A r m y in telligen ce test — B e t a .— This test, used during the war to measure
the intelligence o f men o f a low degree o f reading ability, has during the past
year been used chiefly in the testing o f illiterates in the recruit educational
centers. A revision of it has been undertaken with a view to eliminating the
difficulty in administering it, due to the necessity fo r using a demonstration
blackboard.
M in in m m in telligen ce t e s t .— As the W a r Department has felt the need of a
very simple test o f intelligence that may he administered by recruiting parties
and will serve to segregate men of low intelligence from those who will make
satisfactory soldiers, the division is engaged upon the development o f a test
of this sort. It will differ from the alpha, beta, and individual tests such as
the Stanford-Binet, in that it will not accurately classify men as to mental
age or degree o f intelligence, but is intended simply to reject the unsatisfactory
by the use of a single critical score.
M in im u m litera cy tes t ,— Developed over a year ago, this test has served satis­
factorily in segregating those men who are o f such low degree of literacy
ability as to require special instruction in the recruit educational centers.
Classification litera cy t e s t .— T h e purpose o f this additional test, developed by
the division, is to classify the men in order to determine at which point their
training should start.
T est fa r disch arge fr o m recru it educational c e n te r .— This test is sim ilar in
character to the other literacy tests, but is based to some extent on the course o f
instruction.




IN

O T H E R D E P A R T M E N T S , BOARD S, A N D

C O M M IS S IO N S .

43

The tests above described have reference either to the measurement
of intelligence for general purposes or to the specific activities of the
recruit educational centers. In direct connection with the work of
the Army schools, the following simple tests of formal training and
mechanical aptitude have been developed to assist in properly assign­
ing men to courses o f training:
A rith m etic test, used in determining whether the student is prepared, with
respect to ability in the fundamental operations of arithmetic, to enter various
vocational courses; also to indicate the point at which his instruction in
mathematics should begin.
R eadin g fe s t , used to determine whether the student has sufficient under­
standing of language to enter courses in which the instruction is largely in
printed form.
M echanical-interest test, used to determine, in a general way, the mechanical
aptitude of applicants for vocational courses. This is based on the assumption
that if men have an interest in mechanical work they will, without special
training, pick up a fund of information about the more common mechanical
tools and operations.
G eneral-trade te s t , used to measure the specific information o f applicants for
vocational courses with reference to the more common trades taught in the
Army schools.

Investigations are in progress to select from a variety of tests a
small number that will be most significant of business ability, and to
develop tests of proficiency in ( a ) stenography and typewriting, ( b )
certain vocational courses, viz, machine work, automotive work, and
drafting, and (c) general education subjects, such as spelling, vocab­
ulary, mathematics, etc.
The tests that have been used during the past year have been
printed or mimeographed; their publication is controlled by the
Adjutant General’s Office, War Department.
This division has also developed during the past year a standard
system o f rating students and a standard system o f certification,
which are now being published by the Adjutant General’s Office
for the use o f the service.




II.

ST A T E

A N D

M U N IC IP A L

A G E N C IE S .

STATE AGENCIES.

C A L IF O R N IA .

B U R E A U O F J U V E N IL E R E SE A R C H .

Whittier, Calif. J. Harold Whittier, director.
Established by acts o f the State legislature, 1915 and 1917, this
bureau has charge o f intelligence tests and related investigations in
the three State schools of California, viz, Whittier State School,
W hittier; California School for Girls, Ventura; Preston School of
Industry, Waterman. A staff of seven persons is engaged in this
work, which, is divided into two main divisions, psychological and
sociological. Numerous studies made in the field of delinquency
have been published in the Journal of Delinquency, issued bimonthly
by Whittier State School, and its supplementary monographs. O f
these the two following titles deal with vocational adaptability:
The intelligence o f the delinquent boy, by T. Harold W illiam s, Jan., 1919'.
198 p. (Journal of Delinquency. Monograph No. 1.)
A statistical study of intelligence as a factor in vocational progress, by K arl
M. Cowdery. (Journal of Delinquency, v. 4, No. 6, Nov., 1919, p. 221-240.)
C A L IF O R N IA .

C O M M IS S IO N O N IM M IG R A T IO N A N D H O U S IN G .

525 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. Simon J. Lubin,
president.
Created by act o f June 12, 1913, and empowered to make investi­
gations into the condition, welfare, and industrial opportunities o f
immigrants in the State, including inspection of labor camps, em­
ployment agencies, etc. It administers the division o f immigration
and housing of the Department of Labor and Industrial Delations
created by chapter 604, Laws of 1921, in effect July 30.
The results of the commission’s studies o f the problems of migra­
tory labor and sanitation of labor camps are summarized in its an­
nual reports. It has issued several editions o f an “ Advisory pam­
phlet on camp sanitation and housing ” (79 p.).
C A L IF O R N IA .

IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID E N T C O M M IS S IO N .

525 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. W. J. French, chair­
man.
This commission, organized January 1, 1914, administers the divi­
sion o f workmen’s compensation insurance and safety o f the De­
partment o f Labor and Industrial Eelations created by chapter 604,
Laws of 1921, in effect July 30.
D e p a r t m e n t o f S a f e t y .—H. M. Wolflin, superintendent. Surveys
o f the special hazards of various industries have been made by this
department and safety codes to cover them have been prepared by
44




STATE AGENCIES.

45

committees o f employers, employees, and others interested in safety
work, in cooperation with the commission. Public hearings were
held to discuss the tentative drafts as completed by the committees,
and after final revision the following have been adopted by the
commission and made effective from the dates indicated:
1916: Jail. 1— mine safety rules, general safety rules; Aug. 1— woodworking
safety orders, engine safety orders, laundry safety orders; Oct. 1— elevator
safety orders.
1917: Jan. 1— electrical utilization safety orders, air-pressure tank safety
orders, window-cleaning safety orders, trench construction safety orders; Mar.
15— logging and sawmill safety orders.
1918: Jan. 1— quarry safety rules; Jan. 15— general construction safety
orders; Dec. 1— electrical station safety orders.
1919: Jan. 1— safety rules for gold dredges; Dec. 1— tunnel safety rules,
general lighting safety orders.
1920: June 1— steam-shovel and locomotive-crane safety orders.
1921: Jan. 1— mine safety orders; Apr. 1— petroleum safety orders, shipbuild­
ing safety orders.
In course of preparation (1921) : X -ray safety orders, gas welding and cut­
ting safety orders.

Further information is given in a paper on “ The safety move­
ment in California,” by H. M. Wolflin, in Proceedings o f the Inter­
national Association o f Industrial Accident Boards and Commis­
sions, 1920 (published as U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin
No. 281).
C A L IF O R N IA .

IN D U S T R IA L W E L F A R E C O M M IS S IO N .

870 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. A. B. C. Dohrman,
chairman.
Created by act of the legislature approved May 26, 1913 (Laws,
1913, c. 324), to regulate working conditions and establish minimum
wages in occupations, trades, and industries in which women and
minors are employed, this commission administers the division of
industrial welfare of the Department o f Labor and Industrial Rela­
tions created by chapter 604, Laws of 1921, in effect July 30.
The publications o f the commission contain results of investiga­
tions as follow s:
Report on the regulation of wages, hours, and working conditions of women
and minors in the fruit and vegetable canning industry of California. 1917,
176 p. (Bulletin No. 1.)
Seating of women and minors in the fruit and vegetable canning industry
of California. 1919. 14 p. (Bulletin No. 2a.)
Resume of a study of the cost of living of women workers in California,
made in 1914. (In second biennial report, 1915-1916, p. 19-57.)
Outline o f a policy concerning “ learners ” in industry, by Meyer Bloomfield.
(In second biennial report, 1915-1916, p. 69-76.)
Report on effects of the mercantile order. ( In third biennial report, 1917-1918,
p. 80 -4 8.)
Effects of the laundry order. (In third biennial report, 1917-1918, p. 58-91.)
C O N N E C T IC U T .

C O M M IS S IO N O N C H IL D W E L F A R E .

Hartford, Conn.
C o m m i t t e e o n D e f e c t i v e s .—Dr. Arnold Gesell, Yale University,
chairman. The report of this committee on 4 Handicapped children
6
in school and court,” published in volume 2, part 4, of the commis­
sion’s report to the governor, 1921, recommends (p. 33-36) voca­
tional probation for defective youth. The subject is also treated in
an article by Dr. Gesell in Mental Hygiene (v. 5, No. 2, Apr., 1921,
p. 321-326). The results of a study made by Elizabeth B. Bigelow,




II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL* AGENCIES.

46

under Dr. Gesell’s direction in connection with the commission’s
work, are given in an article entitled “ Experiment to determine the
possibilities o f subnormal girls in factory work,” published in Men­
tal Hygiene (v. 5, No. 2, Apr., 1921, p. 302-320).
C O N N E C T IC U T .
T IO N .

D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R A N D F A C T O R Y IN S P E C ­

Hartford, Conn. Miss Charlotte Molyneux Holloway, industrial
investigator.
Chapter 233, Laws o f 1913, authorized the commissioner o f labor
and factory inspection to appoint a woman investigator to study
the conditions of wage-earning women and girls. Since then sep­
arate biennial reports of the results o f these investigations have been
transmitted to the legislature and published. The 1917-18 and
1919-20 issues are designated “ Reports on the conditions o f wageearners in the State ” without limitation to women and girls. One
thousand family budgets were secured in 1919-20.
D IS T R IC T O F C O L U M B IA .

M IN IM U M W A G E B O A R D .

Washington, D. C. Miss Elizabeth Brandeis, secretary.
Created by act o f Congress, approved September 19,1918, to estab­
lish minimum wages for women on the recommendation o f con­
ferences composed o f representatives o f employers, employees, and
the public.
An investigation by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
furnished the data for Bulletin No. 1, published by the board in
January, 1919, on “ The cost of living o f wage-earning women in the
District of Columbia.”
The following wage surveys have been made by the board and
results summarized in its annual reports: (1) Printing, publishing,
and allied industries; (2) mercantile establishments (Bulletin No.
2) ; (3) hotels, restaurants, apartment houses, clubs, and hospitals
(Bulletin No. 3 ); (4) laundries and dry-cleaning establishments;
(5) manufacturing establishments; (6) car cleaners, and cleaners,
maids, and elevator operators in office buildings and theaters
(Monthly Labor Review, U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Novem­
ber, 1920, v. 11, p. 976-982). The annual reports also include sum­
maries o f the proceedings o f the conferences, the budgets submitted
to them, report of a hearing on minimum-wage rates for minors in
the mercantile industry (second annual report, p. 33-50), data on
applicants for learners’ certificates, etc.
C H IC A G O

C O M M IS S IO N O N R A C E R E L A T IO N S .

414 to 415 Oxford Building, 118 North La Salle Street, Chicago,
111. Graham Romeyn Taylor, executive secretary.
Appointed by Gov. Lowden, of Illinois, following the riots of July,
1919, to study and report upon the broad question o f the relations be­
tween the white and colored races. The commission is composed o f
12 members—6 from each race. This work is organized under six
committees, as follows: Racial clashes; Housing; Industry; Crime
and police administration; Racial contacts; Public opinion.
The scope o f the work o f the committee on industry is defined as
follow s:
To study the industries employing Negroes; expansion o f opportunities in
industry; relative locations of work places and hom es; w ages; attitude of em-




STATE AGENCIES.

47

ployers and fellow employees toward Negro workmen; efficiency of Negroes;
opportunities for advancement; organized labor in relation to the Negro.

Since February 1,1921, a thorough and comprehensive inquiry into
the relations of the races has been undertaken with the assistance of
a staff o f trained investigators, both white and colored, and the co­
operation o f many educational, governmental, and volunteer agencies.
Throughout this study the emphasis has been placed upon the social
and psychological aspects of the relations o f the white and Negro
groups.
The report is now in process o f final editorial revision and will
be ready shortly.
IL L IN O IS .

D E P A R T M E N T O F P U B L IC W E L F A R E .

Springfield, 111. C. H. Jenkins, director o f public welfare.
By act of the legislature approved June 28, 1919 (Laws, 1919, p.
534), this department was made responsible for the rehabilitation of
physically handicapped persons residing in the State of Illinois.
By section 2 (n) it is directed—
^
to conduct investigations and surveys of the several industries located in the
State to ascertain the occupations within each industry in which physically
handicapped persons can enter upon remunerative employment under favorable
conditions and work with normal effectiveness and to determine what practicable
changes and adjustments in industrial operations and practices may facilitate
such employment.

Results o f a survey relating to the rehabilitation o f physically
handicapped persons in Illinois are given in the official report (150
p.) published by the department in 1921, part of which was sum­
marized in an article on “ Physical restoration in the rehabilitation
o f disabled persons,’7 by William T. Cross, survey officer, in Modern
Medicine (v. 3, No. 3, March, 1921, p. 143-148). Analyses were made
o f 92 different jobs in 23 representative industries, showing that 9
per cent of the employees in these plants were engaged at work that
might be performed by disabled persons. (Appendix F - l of the- re­
port. )
IL L IN O IS .

IM M IG R A N T S ’ C O M M IS S IO N .

Department of Registration and Education, Springfield, 111.
Created in the Department of Registration and Education of the
State of Illinois by an amendment to the civil administrative code
approved June 10, 1919 (Laws, 1919, p. 8), and directed to investi­
gate the conditions of employment and standards o f housing and liv­
ing, social organizations, and educational needs o f the foreign bom
in the State. The results of its investigations completed thus far,
under the direction of Miss Grace Abbott, have been published in two
Bulletins:
No. 1. The educational needs of immigrants in Illinois. . 1920. 37 p.
No. 2. The immigrant and coal-mining communities o f Illinois. 1920.

43 p.

The work o f the commission was suspended June 30, 1921, when
Gov. Small vetoed its appropriations for the ensuing fiscal year. The
office in Chicago has been closed and the records have been transferred
to the department in Springfield, 111. The data obtained in an inves­
tigation o f Mexicans in labor camps, practically completed, was
turned over to the Immigrants’ Protective League, Chicago, which
may prepare the material for publication. This league had supple-




48

II.

STATE AND M U N ICIPAL AGENCIES.

mented the State appropriations by approximately an equal amfrom its own funds in order to extend the work of the commission
KANSAS.

C O U R T O F IN D U S T R IA L R E L A T IO N S .

Topeka, Kans.
A tribunal o f three judges created by act of the special sessio;
the legislature in January, 1920, to regulate industrial relations in
all employments and industries concerned with the production and
distribution o f food, clothing, and fuel and in all public utilities.
Decisions in cases heard before this court to date have dealt with
wage scales, train crews, and hours of labor on interurban railways,
cessation or limitation of work in flour mills, u one man one job ”
policy in a case of seasonal employment, etc.
By act of March 16, 1921, the Industrial Welfare Commission and
the Department o f Labor were consolidated with this court.
The women’s division of the Industrial Welfare Commission (Miss
Linna E. Bresette, director of women’s work) is making a survey
o f the cost o f living of the women of the State, to include the 31
towns in which the United States Women’s Bureau made its study
o f hours and wages in 1920. (See p. 23.) The plan o f procedure is
described briefly in Monthly Labor Review o f the United States
Bureau o f Labor Statistics, August, 1921 (p. 206).
M ASSACH U SETTS.

DEPARTM ENT

O F E D U C A T IO N .

State House, Boston, Mass.
D ivision of U niversity E xtension.— James A. Moyer, director.
This division has given special attention to problems of immigrant
education in the industries and two recent numbers of the Bulletin
of the Department o f Education have been devoted to this subject,
v iz :
Volume 5, No. 6 (whole No. 32) : Proceedings of the State conference on im­
migrant education in Massachusetts industries, Plymouth, Mass., Sept. 16-18,
1920. (Under the joint auspices of the department and the Associated Indus­
tries of Massachusetts.) 124 p.
Volume 6, No. 4 (whole No. 36) : Adult immigrant education in Massachusetts,
1920-21. 19 p.

V ocational D ivision.— T his division has recently inaugurated a
program for the training of foremen. Representatives from a num­
ber o f different industries are being trained in various industrial
cities for conference leaders. They will take charge o f conferences
and classes for foremen on returning to their respective plants.
M ASSACH U SETTS.

DEPARTM ENT

O F IN D U S T R IA L

A C C ID E N T S .

Room 272, State House, Boston, Mass.
V ocational T raining D ivision.—E rnest L. Locke, director.
Created under the Industrial Accident Board (now Department of
Industrial Accidents) by act o f May 28, 1918, for the rehabilitation
o f industrial cripples, this division has made several surveys of in­
dustries, involving analyses of physical requirements for particular
jobs, to ascertain the opportunities for handicapped persons. These
investigations have covered storage battery making and repairing,
decorative plastering, sign painting, etc. The results have not been
published but are available in the files o f the division.5
5
Additional information on rehabilitation work in Massachusetts is given in the. Amer­
ican Labor Legislation Review, Mar., 1919 (v. 9, No. 1, p. 1 2 6 -1 2 9 ) , and in Proceedings of
International Association o f Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions* 1920.
(U . S.
Bureau o f Labor Statistics, Bulletin No. 281, p. 1 2 3 -1 2 8 .)




STATE AGENCIES.
M ASSACH U SETTS.

D EPAR TM EN T OF

LABOR AND

49
IN D U S T R IE S .

State House, Boston, Mass. E. Leroy Sweetser, Commissioner
of Labor and Industries.
The Department of Labor and Industries is one of the 20 adminis­
trative divisions ipto which the hundred or more boards, depart­
ments, and commissions of the Commonwealth have been consolidated
by the reorganization act of 1919 (General acts, 1919, ch. 350). It
supersedes the Board of Labor and Industries; the Board o f Con­
ciliation and Arbitration; the Minimum Wage Commission; the
divisions of labor statistics, manufactures statistics, and free em­
ployment offices of the Bureau of Statistics, and the offices of the
Commissioner of Standards and the Surveyor General of Lumber;
and by act o f May 25, 1920, the Commission on Foreign and Domes­
tic Commerce was placed under it. Its work is organized under
divisions of Industrial Safety, Statistics, Minimum Wage, and
Standards and the Board o f Conciliation and Arbitration. The Bul­
letin o f Current Activities (v. 1, No. 1, June, 1920) describes the
work o f the department and its several divisions and explains how
the functions of the former boards and commissions included in the
department are carried on under the reorganization.
D i v i s i o n o f I n d u s t r i a l S a f e t y .— John P. Meade, director. This
division continues the factory inspection work of the Board of
Labor and Industries which, prior to the reorganization in 1919, had
prepared and published in the series of Industrial Bulletins sugges­
tions, rules, and regulations on the following subjects; Protection of
eyes and prevention of accidents (No. 5) ; prevention o f anthrax
(No. 6) ; compressed-air work (No. 7) ; safety and machinery stand­
ards (No. 9) ; working conditions in foundries and the employment
o f women in core rooms (No. 10) ; safety in the manufacture of ben­
zene derivatives and explosives (No. 11) ; prevention o f accidents in
building operations (No. 12) ; painting business (No. 13) ; require­
ments for the care of employees injured or taken ill in industrial
establishments (No. 14).
The present division has added Industrial Bulletins Nos. 15 and 16:
No. 15. Conserving children in the industries of Massachusetts. 1920. 20 p.
(For the teaching of safety to working children in the continuation schools.)
No. 16. Rules and regulations for safeguarding woodworking machinery.
1920.

Studies dealing with industrial health recently made by this divi­
sion include an investigation o f tobacco factories, with special refer­
ence to the effect of the work upon women and children, and an
investigation of the health hazards of the granite-cutting industry*
(Annual report, 1920, pp. 38-40.) The field work of a study o f
the employment o f women in laundries, with special reference to
the effect o f the work upon health, has recently been completed. The
inspection force is engaged at present in acquiring information rela­
tive to accidents occurring on the power punch press, with a view to
securing better guarding on a type of machine that is productive o f
more permanent disabling injuries than any other in the industries
o f the State. An investigation of the type and character o f first-aid
treatment rendered injured persons in the industries is to commence
shortly.
70723°— Bull. 299— 21------4




50

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES.

As the outcome of an investigation in 1920 a safety council has
been organized with the object of reducing accidents to street railway
and steam rail-way employees.
D ivision of M inimum W age.—E thel M. Johnson, assistant com­
missioner, in charge. The Minimum Wage Commission, whose
powers are now exercised by three associate commissioners of the
department, was created in 1912 and has published the results o f
its investigations of the wages of women in a series of 23 Bulletins
dealing with the following industries: Brush factories (Nos. 1, 3, 7 );
corset factories (Nos. 2, 2 1 ); candy factories (Nos. 4, 18); laun­
dries (No, 5) ; retail stores (Nos, 6, i2 ) ; paper-box industry (Nos. 8,
22) ; women’s clothing factories (Nos. 9, 14) ; hosiery and knit goods
factories (No. 10) ; men’s clothing and raincoat factories (Nos. 13,
15) ; office and other building cleaners (No. 16) ; hotels and restau­
rants (No. 17) ; canning and preserving establishments (No. 19);
millinery industry (No. 20) ; manufacture o f minor lines o f confec­
tionery and food preparations (No. 23).
During 1920 this division made investigations of the wages o f
women employed by firms manufacturing druggists’ preparations,
compounds, and proprietary medicines, and in establishments manu­
facturing stationery goods and envelopes. (Annual report, 1920,
pp. 67-69.) It is planning a study of the public housekeeping occu­
pation, to include hotels and restaurants, institutions such as hos­
pitals and homes, apartment houses, and similar establishments.
A handbook of information for wage board members entitled
“ Wage Boards and Their W o rk ” (11 p.) was published in 1920,
D ivision of Statistics.—R oswell F. Phelps, director. This divi­
sion continues the annual reports issued by its predecessor, the Bu­
reau o f Statistics,6 on statistics of labor (issued in parts as labor
bulletins), statistics o f manufactures, and public employment o f­
fices; and since March, 1920, has published quarterly the Massachu­
setts Industrial Review, superseding the “ Quarterly report on em­
ployment in Massachusetts.” It finished and published in 1920, as
Labor Bulletin No. 132, the results of a special survey o f “ Wages
and hours o f labor in the metal trades in Massachusetts, 1914-1919 ”
(72 p .), which includes a chapter giving classification and descrip­
tion of occupations.
M ASSACH U SETTS.

B O S T O N P S Y C H O P A T H IC H O S P IT A L ,

74 Fenwood Road, Boston, Mass. C. Macfie Campbell, M. D.,
director.
This institution was the Psychopathic Department o f Boston State
Hospital from 1912 to 1916, when it became a separate establishment
under the Commission (now Department) o f Mental Diseases, cre­
ated in that year.
The scientific papers of the staff, reprinted from various journals,
have been issued in collected form as “ Boston State Hospital—
Collected contributions,” 1913-1915 (three volumes), continued by
the quarterly Bulletin o f the Commission (now Department) of
Mental Diseases (v. 1-4, 1917-1920).
6
See the M assachusetts Bureau of Statistics, 1 8 6 9 -1 9 1 5 : a sketch of its history, or­
ganization, and functions, together with, a list o f publications and illustrative charts,
by C. F. Gettemy. 1915. 115 p.




STATE AGENCIES.

51

The psychiatric problems of industry have been of special interest
to this institution from the beginning. Shortly after it was opened
cases were referred to it for mental tests and examinations as to
mental disease from the Industrial Accident Board o f Massachu­
setts; and many problems concerning damages, allowances, and com­
pensation had to be looked into with, the tests devised by its psy­
chologists. Another group of cases that have been investigated is
that of the occupation-neuroses. Through the iSocial Service of the
hospital studies have been made of the psychopathic employee and
the relation between unemployment and mental diseases. The pub­
lished results of these researches include the following:
Adler, H. M. Unemployment and personality: a study of psychopathic cases..
(Mental Hygiene, v 1, No. 1, Jan.. 1917, p. 16-24.)
Jarrett, Mary C. The psychopathic employee: a problem of industry. (M edi­
cine and Surgery. Sept., 1917, p. 727-741.)
------- Shell-shock analogues : neuroses in civil life having a sudden or critical
origin. (Medicine and Surgery, v. 2, No. 2, Mar., 1918.)
Briggs, L. Vernon.
Occupational and industrial therapy.
How can this
important branch of treatment of mentally ill be extended and improved?
(Amer. Jour, of Insanity, v. 74, No. 3, Jan., 1918.)
Southard, E. E. Discussion on illness in industry— its cost and prevention,
(Trans. Amer. Inst. Mining Eng., 1918, v. 59, p. 678-684.)

During 1919-20 further investigations in the mental hygiene o f
industry were undertaken by the late director, Dr. E. E. Southard,
under a grant from Engineering Foundation (see p. 102), which pub­
lished three papers completed by him, as Nos. 1 to 3 of its reprint
series. A report of progress o f this work was published by Miss
Mary C. Jarrett, who collaborated with him, in Mental IXygiene
(v. 4, No. 4, Oct., 1920).
In the past two years an industrial research worker (Miss Clara
W . Butler) has devoted her time in the Social Service to this prob­
lem and the results of the study are now being analyzed. It covers
(1) intensive social case work on a few men, with special attention
to employment adjustment, (2) industrial histories covering details
o f jobs held by patients for five years before admission to the Psycho­
pathic H ospital-details obtained from both employers and patients,
(3 ) a brief survey of the industrial asx>ects of the out-patient service
o f the hospital, (4) a bibliography of the a human element in indus­
try,” from the psychiatric point of view.
Several papers in the above collection deal with psychiatric social
service, its functions and the preparation required for it; and in
order to provide a supply of trained workers in this field the Boston
Psychopathic Hospital staff in 1918 cooperated in the establishment
of a training school of psychiatric social work at Smith College.
(See p. 104.)
P s y c h o l o g i c a l L a b o r a t o r y .— F . L . Wells, chief.
The YerkesBridges point scale was devised in this laboratory, while Dr. Yerkes
was here as psychologist. The following papers, dealing with this
scale and its application and other similar researches, have been pub­
lished, in addition to studies dealing specially with criminals and
the insane:
Yerkes, Robert M., and Bridges, J. W . The point scale: a new method for
measuring mental capacity.
(Boston Med. and Surg. Jour., v. 171, No. 23,
Dee. 3, 1914.)




52

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES.

Yerkes, R. M., and Anderson, Helen M. The importance of social status as
indicated by the results of the point scale method of measuring mental capacity.
(Jour. Educ. Psychol., Mar., 1915.)
Yerkes, R. M., and Wood, Louise. Methods of expressing results of measure­
ments of intelligence: coefficient of intelligence.
(Jour. Educ. Psychol., Dec.,
1916, y. 7, No. 10, p. 593-606.)
Rossey, C. S. The Yerkes-Bridges point scale: as applied to candidates for
employment at the Psychopathic Hospital.
(Boston Med. and Surg. Jour., Dec.
7, 1916, v. 175, No. 23, p. 822-824.)
Yerkes, R. M., and Rossey, C. S. A point scale for the measurement o f
intelligence in adolescent and adult individuals.
(Boston Med. and Surg. Jour.,
Apr. 19, 1917, v. 176, No. 16, p. 546-573.)
Foster, Josephine C., and Taylor, Grace A. The applicability of mental tests
to persons over 50 years o f age.
(Jour. App. Psychol., v. 4, No. 1, Mar., 1920,
p. 39 -5 8.)
M A S S A C H U S E T T S S C H O O L F O R T H E F E E B L E -M IN D E D .

Waverley, Mass. Walter E, Fernald, M. D,, superintendent.
This institution has made a survey of the subsequent careers of its
discharged patients, including men employed in 39 different occupa­
tions. A summary of the results was published in its seventy-second
annual report for the year ending November 30, 1919, and also issued
separately under the caption “ After-care study of the patients dis­
charged from Waverley for a period of 25 years,5 by W. E. Fer­
5
nald (9 p . ) .
M IN N E S O T A .

D E P A R T M E N T O F E D U C A T IO N .

St. Paul, Minn.
D ivision of R eeducation.— Oscar M. Sullivan, director. This
division by its research work has added materially to the list of
occupations open to different types of handicapped men. Studies
have been made by members of the staff in typical plants, and the
various processes analyzed, with a view to discovering new oppor­
tunities for such persons.
M IN N E S O T A .

IN D U S T R IA L

C O M M IS S IO N .

St. Paul, Minn.
B ureau of W omen and C hildren.—L ouis E. Schutz, superintend­
ent. During 1918 this bureau, in conjunction with the Women in
Industry Committee, Council of National Defense, carried on field
investigations on the industrial employment of women in the State.
The report written by Dr. Carol Aronovici and entitled “ Women in
industry in Minnesota in 1918 5 was published by the bureau in 1920
5
(3 6 p .) .
M IN N E S O T A S C H O O L F O R F E E B L E -M IN D E D .

Faribault, Minn.
D epartment of R esearch.— F. Kuhlmann, director. A number o f
studies o f feeble-minded and tests of intelligence o f children have
been published from this department, principally in the Journal o f
Psycho-Asthenics, 1911-1916.
A revision o f the Binet-Simon system by Dr. F. Kuhlmann, was
issued as a monograph supplement to the 1912 volume o f this journal;
and a further extension and revision by the same author was printed
by the institution in 1917. These are to be superseded shortly by
the following work:
Kulhmann, F. A handbook of mental te sts; a further extension and revision
of the Binet-Simon scale. Baltimore, Warwick and York, 1921.
(In press.)




STATE AGENCIES.

53

A paper on 4 Results of mental reexaminations of 600 feeble-minded
4
over a period of 10 years.” by Dr. Kulilmann, presented before the
American Association for the Study of Feeble-minded in 1920 is to
appear in its proceedings.
NEW

JERSEY.

DEPARTM ENT

OF IN S T IT U T IO N S A N D

A G E N C IE S .

State Hospital, Trenton, N. J.
D ivision of Classification and E ducation.—E dgar A. Doll,
director. Since February 1919, this division has been making psycho­
logical examinations of the prisoners in New Jersey State prison by
the Army group test alpha supplemented by individual psychiatric
and psychological examinations. Its report is included in the annual
report o f New Jersey State prison; papers on the criminological re­
sults entitled uA study of multiple criminal factors ” and 4 The com­
4
parative intelligence of prisoners,” by E. A. Doll, were published in
the Journal o f Criminal Law and Criminology for May and July
!92°.
A program of research in the application of psychological tests for
the purposes o f vocational education and industrial placement in the
prison, outlined in the annual report for 1919 (p. 70, 74-77), is
being carried out. Surveys have been made o f the prison industries
and are to be followed by detailed analyses of the work processes
from the psychological point of view. This phase of the division’s
work is discussed in an article on 4 Intelligence and industrial tests
4
in institutional administration,” by E. A. Doll, in the Journal of
Delinquency (v. 5, No. 6, Nov., 1920).
NEW

JERSEY.

DEPARTM ENT

OF LABOR.

Trenton, N. J. Lewis T. Bryant, commisioner.
B ureau of E lectrical and Mechanical E quipment.—R owland
H. Leveridge, chief. This bureau has prepared and published the
following safety codes and regulations:
General rules for the construction and installation of fire-alarm signal
systems for factories, mills, and other work places. 1919. 38 p.
Code of lighting for factories, mills, and other work places. 1918. 42 p.
Safety standards for transmission machinery and all mechanically driven
equipment. 1918. 13 p. (Also in ann. rep., 1919, p. 39 -4 9.)
Safety standards relating to the use and care of abrasive wheels. 1919.
23 p. (Also in ann. rep., 1919, p. 21-38.)

B ureau of E xplosives.— Charles H. Weeks, chief. Organized in
1917, because o f the great increase in the manufacture o f explosives
in New Jersey during the war, this bureau prepared and issued:
Laws and safety standards for the manufacture and storage of explosives.
1918. 44 p.

B ureau of H ygiene and Sanitation .—J ohn Roach, chief. This
bureau carries on investigations for the purpose o f establishing sani­
tary and safety standards and has issued the following bulletins:
Sanitary standards for the felt hatting industry. 1915. 94 p.
Sanitary and engineering industrial standards. 1916. 36 p. (Mainly speci­
fications and regulations for the removal of dust, fumes, etc.)
Sanitary industrial standards. 1917. 4 p.
Safety standards for lead corroders and lead oxidizers, paint grinders, dry
color manufacture. 1917. 28 p.
Instructions for the inspection of plants where anilin is produced or handled.
1917. 6 p.
(Also in ann. rep., 1916, p. 53-55.)
Safety standards for the manufacture of nitro and amido compounds. 1919.
18 p.




54

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES.

Eecent annual reports o f the Department of Labor include sum­
maries of special investigations, text o f regulations, etc., made by
this bureau in various industries, viz:
1915: Summaries of special investigations in potteries, porcelain plants, flint
mills, lithographing plants, and the manufacture of pearl buttons (p. 3 6 -4 9 ).
1916: Investigation of munitions hazards (p„ 4 2 -4 3 ) ; survey of the iron
foundries in the State (p. 45-52) ; summary on chemical trades with test ques­
tions for inspectors (p. 53-81) ; paint and dry color trades (p. 8 1 -8 6 ).
1917: Investigation of the lunch problem in various industries (p. 3 0 -3 3) ;
sanitary standards for power laundries (p. 33 -4 6) ; tannery investigation and
anthrax hazard (p. 5 4 -5 6 ).
1919: First-aid and hospital equipment in New Jersey industrial plants (p.
5 9 -7 8) ; schedule of a sanitary survey of the pottery industry, made by the
United States Public Health Service in cooperation with the bureau, to deter­
mine the risk to health in this industry resulting from the use of lead glaze
(p. 79 -8 6) ; standards for brass and bronze foundries and metal-finishing
processes (p. 9 2 -1 1 0 ).
N E W Y O R K (S T A T E ) .

C O M M IS S IO N O N V E N T I L A T I O N .

Prof. C.-E. A. Winslow, Yale University, chairman.
Nominated by the New York Association for Improving the Con­
dition of the Poor and appointed by the governor of New7 York State
in June, 1913, this commission was endowed w
rith $50,000 by Mrs.
Elizabeth Milbank Anderson to be devoted to the study of the fun­
damental problems of ventilation, with a view7 to determining what
atmospheric conditions are most favorable for human health and
efficiency, and how they may most certainly and economically be
maintained, as part of "the original program of the department o f
social welfare of the A. I. C. P. (see p. 141). An additional sum of
$25,000 was provided by Mrs. Anderson in 1915.
The complete report of the work of the commission has not yet
been published; but progress reports are found in the A. I. C. P. year­
books for 1913, 1914, and 1915, Journal of Industrial and Engineer­
ing Chemistry (v. 6, No. 3, March, 1914), Journal of the American
Medical Association, November 7, 1914 (v. 63, p. 1620-1628), Ameri­
can Journal of Public Health (v. 5, No. 2, 1915), papers read at the
annual meetings of the American Society of Heating and Ventilating
Engineers in 1915 and 1916 by D. D. Kimball (engineer member of
the commission) and George T. Palmer (chief o f investigating staff),
and articles in Science by C.-E. A. Winslow (n. s., v. 41, p. 625-636)
and Frederic S. Lee (n. s., v. 44, p. 183-190).
An experiment chamber was fitted up at the College of the City
o f New York for studies of the effect o f accurately controlled air
conditions. Experiments were also made in Neiv York City school­
rooms; and by cooperative w
rork in Springfield, Mass, (at the Inter­
national Y. M. C. A. College gymnasium), and the Minneapolis
schools the use of recirculated air, w ashed and conditioned as to tem­
T
perature, was investigated. The commission also cooperated in spe­
cial investigations with the Safety Institute o f America (see p. 149)
and the Framingham community health and tuberculosis demonstra­
tion o f the National Tuberculosis Association (see p. 136) and in
other researches.




STATE AGENCIES.

55

The scientific contributions by the commission’s investigators are
published in various journals, including:
(1) Papers on methods and apparatus:
Lee, Frederic S. The experimental methods of the New York State Commis­
sion of Ventilation. (Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol, and Med., 1915, v. 12, p. 113-114.)
Palmer, George T. A new sampling apparatus for the determination of
aerial dust. (Amer. Jour. Publ. Health, v. 6, No. 1, p. 54-55.)
----- A study of methods for determining air dustiness. (Amer. Jour. Puhi.
Health, v. 6, No. 10.)
Winslow, C.-E. A. The katathermometer as a measure of the effect of atmos­
pheric conditions upon bodily comfort. (Science, n. s., v. 43, p. 710-719.)
(2) Papers on physiological effects o f air conditions on appetite,
muscular work, the blood, etc.:
Winslow, C.-E, A., and Palmer, G. T. The effect unon the appetite of the
chemical constituents of the air of occupied rooms. (Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol,
and Med., 1915, v. 12, p. 141-144.)
Lee, Frederic S., and Scott. Ernes! L. The action of temperature and liuiiudity on the working power of muscles and on the sugar of the blood. (Amer.
Jour. Physiol., v. 40, No. 3, May, 1916.)
Winslow, C.-E. A., Miller, J. A., and Noble, W. C. The effect of moderately
high atmospheric temperatures upon the formation of hemolysins. (Proc.
Soc. Exper. Biol, and Med., 1916, v. 13, No. 5, p. 93-98.)
(3) Special studies of the effects of temperature and humidity
upon the mucous membrane of the nose and throat to shed light
on the question of susceptibility to common colds and health hazards
o f laundry workers:
Miller, James A., and Cocks, G. H. The effect of changes in atmospheric
conditions upon the upper respiratory tract. (Trans. Amer. Climat. and Clin.
Assoc., 1915.)
Cocks, Gerald P Experimental studies of the effect of various atmospheric
I.
conditions upon the upper respiratory tract. (Laryngoscope, 1915, v. 25, p.
603-651, awarded the gold medal of the American Laryngologieal, Rhbiological,
and Gtological Society for meritorious research.)
Miller, James A., and Noble, W. C. The effect of exposure to cold upon ex­
perimental infection of the respiratory tract. (Jour. Exper. Med., v. 24, No. 3,
p. 223-232, Sept. 1, 1916.)
Miller, James A. Some physiological effects of various atmospheric condi­
tions. (Amer. Jour. Med, Sci., v. 153, No. 3, p. 412, Mar., 1917.)
(4) A bacteriological survey o f the atmosphere:
Winslow7 C.-E. A., and Browne, W. W. The mierobic eontent of indoor and
,
outdoor air. (Monthly Weather Review, v. 42, p. 452-453.)
(5) Psychological tests to show capacity o f the subjects for mental
w ork:
Thorndike, E. L., McColl, W. A., and Chapman, J. C. Ventilation in relation
to mental v7
ork. 1916. 83 p. (Teachers’ College, Columbia University. Con­
tributions to Education, No. 78.)
Stecher, Lorle Ida. The effect of humidity on nervousness and on general
efficiency. (Archives of Psychology, No. 38, Dec., 1916.)
NEW

YORK

(S T A T E ).

DEPARTM ENT

O F E D U C A T IO N .

Albany, N. Y.
D ivision of V ocational and E xtension E ducation.—L. A. W il­
son, director. This division is engaged in making general industrial
surveys and in establishing summer courses for the training o f men
to conduct foremen training conferences in industrial plants. It is
not, however, carrying on foremen training work directly.




56
NEW

II.
YORK

STATE AND M U N ICIPAL AGENCIES.

(S T A T E ).

DEPARTM ENT

OF LABOR.

124 East Twenty-eighth Street, New Yrork, N. Y. Henry D.
Sayer5 industrial commissioner.
This department is now under the administration of the industrial
commissioner, an office created by chapter 50, Laws, 1921, abolishing
the State Industrial Commission, which had administered the labor
laws since 1915.7
B u r e a u o f I n d u s t r i a l C o d e , 124 East Twenty-eighth Street, New
York City .— This bureau is concerned with rules for safety and sani­
tation in industrial and mercantile establishments and is charged
with the revision and enlargement of the New York State Industrial
Code (latest edition, 1920) which has been compiled in the course of
seven years in accordance with powers conferred on the State Indus­
trial Board and its successor, the State Industrial Commission, and
has the force and effect of law. The bureau also conducts the indus­
trial safety congress o f New York State, and the safety exhibits in
connection therewith, which has been held in various cities (fifth, at
Syracuse, N. Y., December 6 to 9, 1920; proceedings published in
1921).
B u r e a u o f I n d u s t r i e s a n d I m m i g r a t i o n , 125 East Twenty-seventh
Street, New York City.— Mrs. Marian K. Clark, chief investigator.
Complaints by alien employees in New York industries are investi­
gated by this bureau, including wage claims, exploitation by employ­
ment agencies, and the like. It has also made community surveys o f
immigrant living and labor conditions in a large number of the towns
o f the State and studies of the relationship between alien illiteracy
and mental defect and industrial accidents. In 1917 it issued a
pamphlet on “ The English for safety campaign.”
B ureau
of
I n s p e c t i o n . —The Division of Industrial Hygiene
(John H 0 Yogt, director), created in 1913,8 has prepared the follow ­
ing issues in the series of Special Bulletins:
N o . 79. A n t h r a x .
1916.
2 2 p.
N o . 8 2. H o o d s f o r r e m o v in g d u s t, fu m e s , a n d g a s e s . 1 9 1 7 . 2 3 p.
N o . 8 3 . D a n g e r s in m a n u fa c tu r e o f P a r is g re e n a n d S c h e e le ’ s g re en .
1917.
17. p.
N o . 8 6. D a n g e r s in th e m a n u fa c tu r e a n d in d u s tr ia l u s e s o f w o o d a lc o h o l.
1917.
1 7 p.
N o . 8 9 . H e a l t h h a z a r d s o f th e c lo th -s p o n g in g in d u s tr y .
1918.
2 4 p.
N o . 9 0 . A sim p le a n d in e x p e n s iv e re s p ir a to r f o r d u s t p ro te c tio n .
1918.
1 0 p.
N o . 9 6 . H e a lt h h a z a r d s o f th e c h e m ic a l in d u s tr y .
1 9 1 9 . 6 9 p.
N o . 1 0 1 . A s p h y x ia t io n in g a r a g e s an d o th e r a u to m o b ile a c c id e n ts . 1 9 2 0 . 2 3 p .
N o . 1 02 . D e v ic e s f o r s a n i t a r y co n tr o l o f m a te r ia l d is e n g a g e d in in d u s tr ia l
p ro c e sse s.
1921.
3 1 p.

7 T h e Now York S ta te F a c to ry In v e stig a tin g Com m ission, created in 1911, p resen ted
fo u r extensive re p o rts (11 vols.) to th e leg islatu re, 1912-1915, including, in ad d itio n to
th e testim o n y a t public h earin g s, appendices co n tain in g th e re s u lts of special in v e stig a ­
tions, e. g., sa n ita tio n fo r facto ries, fire h azard , w orking co nditions in b ak eries an d th e
chem ical, tobacco, p rin tin g , an d can n in g in d u stries, em ploym ent of wom en an d children
in fa c to rie s an d m ercan tile estab lish m en ts, n ig h t w ork fo r wom en, lead an d a rse n ic
poisoning, wood alcohol, d an g ers to w o rk ers in th e m a n u fa c tu re an d use of com m ercial
acids, w ages in th e confectionery,, paper-box, sh irt, b u tto n , a n d m illin e ry in d u strie s,
m inim um -w age problem , v ocational tra in in g , co st o f living.
8 P rio r to th is d a te special in v estig atio n s in occu p atio n al diseases and in d u s tria l hygiene
w ere m ade by th e M edical In sp e c to r of F a c to rie s and published in th e a n n u a l re p o rts of
h is office (in clu d ed in th e a n n u a l re p o rts of th e D e p a rtm e n t), a s fo llo w s: 1908— v e n tila ­
tio n of fa c to rie s ; 1909— calico p r in t in d u stry , b ak eries in M a n h a tta n borough, p o tte r ie s ;
1910— p h o sp h o ru s m atches, p earl b u tto n s, r e s u lts o f a i r a n aly ses in c e rta in f a c to r ie s ;
1911— fe lt-h a t in d u stry , cloak an d s u it in d u stry in New York City, r e s u lts of a ir a n aly ses
in th ese in d u strie s, v e n tila tio n of a d e p a rtm e n t store.




57

STATE AGENCIES.

B ureau of M ediation and A rbitration.—A study of “ plant disa­
bility funds” (16 p.) by Charles M. Mills, industrial counselor for
this bureau, was published April, 1921, as Special Bulletin No. 105.
B ureau of Statistics and I nformation, Capitol, Albany, N. Y .—
E. B. Patten, chief statistician. This bureau has published, in the
series of Special Bulletins, various issues dealing with statistics of
unemployment, trade-unions, wages and hours, strikes and lockouts,
and industrial accidents; compilations of New York labor laws;
court decisions on workmen’s compensation, labor laws and indus­
trial disputes; No. 76, European regulations for prevention of occu­
pational diseases (77 p .), and the results of special investigations, as
follow s:
N o . 77. I n d u s t r ia l a c c id e n t p re v e n tio n . 1 9 1 6 . 5 4 p.
N o . 9 1 . A p la n fo r sh op s a f e t y , s a n ita t io n , a n d h e a lth o r g a n iz a tio n .
1919.
3 2 p.
N o . 9 2. W e e k ly e a r n in g s o f w o m e n in five in d u s tr ie s (p a p e r b o x e s , s h ir ts a n d
c o lla r s , c o n fe c tio n e r y , c ig a r s a n d to b a c co , a n d m e r c a n tile e s t a b li s h m e n t s ).
1 9 1 9 . 2 1 p.
N o . 1 0 8 . S ic k n e ss ^ r n o n g N e w Y o r k S ta t e f a c t o r y w o r k e r s in 1 9 1 9 .
1921.
2 9 p.
( B a s e d on d a ta c o lle c te d a n d tu r n e d o v e r to th e b u r e a u b y th e A s s o c ia te d
I n d u s tr ie s o f N e w Y o r k S t a t e .)

It also publishes monthly The Labor Market Bulletin, giving cur­
rent information about the extent o f employment in factories and
building work, average earnings, and food prices, labor supply and
demand at State employment offices.
B ureau of W omen in I ndustry, 124 East Twenty-eighth Street,
New York City.—Miss Nelle Swartz, chief. Results of special inves­
tigations relating to women in industry made by this bureau have
been published in the following Special Bulletins:
N o . 9 3 . T h e in d u s tr ia l re p la c e m e n t o f m e n b y w o m e n .
1919.
6 9 p.
N o . 1 0 0 . T h e te le p h o n e in d u s tr y .
1920.
9 5 p.
( A n in v e s t ig a tio n o f th e con ­
d itio n s o f e m p lo y m e n t fo r w o m e n in th e te le p h o n e e x c h a n g e s th r o u g h o u t th e
S ta t e , w ith esp e cia l r e fe r e n c e to w a g e s , h o u rs, s a n ita t io n , an d la b o r tu r n o v e r
a n d it s c a u se s, m a d e a t th e r e q u e st o f th e g o v e r n o r .)
N o . 1 0 4 . I n d u s tr ia l p o stu r e a n d s e a tin g .
1 9 2 1 . 5 6 p.

Unpublished reports which have been completed deal with: (1)
The paper-box industry in New York State; (2) the candy industry;
(3) the employment of women ih canneries; (4) employment of
women at grinding and polishing; (5) employment of women in
transportation; and (6) work accidents among women. O f these,
(3 ), (4 ), and (5) were prepared to assist the Industrial Commission
in framing rules and regulations covering employment in the occu­
pations to which they relate; some o f the results of (6) were pub­
lished in The Bulletin, issued by the industrial commission (v. 6, No.
3, December, 1920, p . 56-57.) An investigation of wages, hours, and
length of service of women employed in five-and-ten-cent stores is in
progress.
NORTH

DAKOTA.

W O R K M E N ’S C O M P E N S A T IO N

BUREAU.

Bismarck, N. Dak.
M inimum W age D epartment.— H azel Farkasch, secretary. Or­
ganized in 1919 to take charge of the administration o f the minimum
wage law enacted in that year, this department has made investiga­
tions o f the hours of labor, working conditions and wages of women




58

II.

STATE AND M U N IC IPAL AGENCIES.

in hotels and restaurants, retail stores, laundries, telephone exchanges,
and factories in the State. A summary o f the results of these inves­
tigations and the recommendations of the conferences, including
rates o f pay, terms o f apprenticeship, work time, etc., are given in its
first annual report for the year ending June 30, 1920 (48 p.).
O H IO .

STATE

DEPARTM ENT

OF

HEALTH.

Columbus, Ohio.
D i v i s i o n o f I n d u s t r i a l H y g i e n e .— Dr. Emery R. Hayhurst, Ohio
State University, consultant. Organized in 1915 following the sur­
vey o f occupational diseases made by the State Board of Health in
pursuance o f a joint resolution adopted by the State legislature in
February, 1913 (Laws, 1913, v. 103, p. 975), and the results of which
were published in a report entitled:
E.

A s u r v e y o f in d u s tr ia l h e a lth h a z a r d s a n d o c c u p a tio n a l d is e a s e s in O h io , b y
It. H a y h u r s t .
1915.
4 3 8 p.

Most o f the research work of the division has consisted o f investi­
gations in industrial plants similar to those made in the original
survey. One of the principal studies undertaken concerned the
healthfulness of the coal-mining industry o f the State, the results
o f which are published in the following articles:
H a y h u rst, E . R .
H e a lt h o f O h io c o a l m in e rs.
{ O h i o P u b lic H e a lt h J o u r.,
v . 10, N o s . 2 - 5 , F e b - M a y , 1 9 1 9 .)
-------- T h e h e a lth h a z a r d s a n d m o r ta lity s t a t is t ic s o f s o ft-c o a l m in in g in
I llin o is an d O h io .
(J o u r . I n d u s t. H yg\, v. 1, N o . 7, N o v ., 1 9 1 9 , p. 3 6 0 - 3 6 7 .)
S ta r r , E . B . E x c e s s iv e m o r ta lity f r o m in flu e n z a -p n e u m o n ia a m o n g b itu m in o u s
c o a l m in e r s o t O h io in 1 9 1 8 .
( A m e r . J o u r. P u b . H e a lt h , v. 10, N o . 4 , A p r ., 1 9 2 0 ,
p . 3 4 8 - 3 5 1 .)

In 1918 a survey o f the munitions industry was begun and labora­
tory studies of the infections from oil-cutting compounds and lubri­
cants were made and published as follow s:
A lb a u g h , R . P .
C a u s e a n d p r e v e n tio n o f fu r u n c u lo s is a n d w o u n d in fe c tio n s
a m o n g m a c h in is ts .
( O h io P u b . H e a lt h J o u r ., v. 9 , N o . 4, A p r ., 1 9 1 8 , p. 1 4 5 - 1 5 2 .)

A number o f different trade processes involving dangers to health
have been investigated from time to tim e; clinical studies o f occupa­
tional diseases have usually been concerned with individual cases,
in which disease or death was alleged to be due to occupational causes.
The following is a partial list o f miscellaneous contributions since
1915:
H a y h u rst, E . R .
T h e p r e v a le n c e o f o c c u p a tio n a l f a c t o r s in d is e a s e a n d s u g ­
g e s tio n s f o r th e ir e lim in a tio n .
( A m e r . J o u r. P u b . H e a lt h , v . 5 , N o . 6 , J u n e ,
1 9 1 5 , p. 5 3 8 -5 5 0 .)
-------T h e c la s s ific a tio n o f h a z a r d o u s o c c u p a tio n s .
( A m e r . J o u r. P u b . H e a lt h ,
V . 6, N o . 5, M a y , 1 9 1 6 , p. 4 6 9 - 4 6 9 .)
A lb a u g h , R . P . T h e d a n g e r s c o n n e c te d w ith th e s p ra y m e th o d o f fin is h in g a n d
d e c o r a tin g .
( J o u r . A m e r . M e d . A s s o c ., J u ly 1 4 , 1 9 1 7 , v. 69, p. 1 4 2 ; O h io P u b .
H e a lt h J o u r., v . 6, N o . 5 , N o v ., 1 9 1 5 , p. 5 1 2 -5 1 4 .)
-------G a s o lin e e n g in e e x h a u s t g a s p o iso n in g .
( A m e r . J o u r. P u b . H e a lt h ,
V . 7, N o . 8 , A u g ., 1 9 1 7 , p. 6 6 4 - 6 6 6 .)
S ta r r , E . B .
L e a d p o is o n in g a s a f a c t o r in < h r o n ic d is a b ilit y .
c
(O h io P u b.
H e a l t h J o u r ., v . 10, N o . 1 0 , O c t., 1 9 1 9 , p. 3 8 4 - 3 8 6 .)

Close cooperation exists between this division and the Department
o f Public Health and Sanitation o f Ohio State University. (See
p. 189.)




STATE

O H IO .

IN D U S T R IA L

A G E N C IE S .

59

C O M M IS S IO N .

Columbus, Ohio.
Established in 1913, when seven State departments were merged
and placed under it, namely, the departments of commissioner o f
labor statistics, chief inspector of mines, chief inspector of work­
shops and factories, chief examiner of steam engineers, board of
boiler rules, State board of arbitration and conciliation, and State
liability board of awards. Since 1915 its annual report has been pub­
lished in “ Ohio general statistics,” issued by the Secretary of State.
D e p a r t m e n t o f I n v e s t i g a t i o n a n d S t a t i s t i c s .— George F. Miles,
chief statistician. This department has prepared and issued a series
o f reports, Nos, 1 to 39, latterly also numbered as Bulletins of the
Industrial Commission, consisting mainly of statistics of wages and
employment, accidents and workmen's compensation, mines and quar­
ries, and reports on the inspection of workshops and factories and
the work of the free labor exchanges. The series also includes the
following reports of special investigations by the department:
N o . 1 4. C o s t o f liv in g o f w o r k in g w o m e n in O h io . 1 9 1 5 . 2 5 5 p.
N o . 18. P h y s ic a l e x a m in a t io n o f w a g e e a r n e r s in O h io in 1 9 1 4 .
1915.
2 9 p.
( B u lle t in , v. 2 , N o . 6 .)
N o . 24, Job se llin g in in d u s tr ia l e s ta b lis h m e n ts in O h io . 1 9 1 8 . 3 8 p .
( B u l le ­
tin , v . 3 , N o . 5 .)
N o . 2 9 . I n fe c t io n s fo llo w in g in d u s tr ia l a c c id e n ts in O h io . 1 9 1 7 . 1 2 p.
( B u l le ­
tin , v . 4, N o , 8 ,)
N o . 32. P r e lim in a r y s u r v e y o f la b o r c a m p s in O h io .
1 9 1 8 . 2 2 p.
( B u lle t in ,
V. 4 , N o . 1 1 .)

During the year 1916-17 this department made an inquiry into the
industrial futures of 269 workmen awarded compensation for perma­
nent partial injury during the period January 1, 1914, to June 30,
1915, for the purpose of ascertaining in what measure their handi­
caps had affected their subsequent employment as to rate of wages,
loss o f time, change of trade or employer and cause of unemployment
if found not at work. The. report of this study has not yet been
published.
OREGON.

IN D U S T R IA L W E L F A R E C O M M IS S IO N .

Portland, Oreg, W. L. Brewster, chairman.'
This commission created in 1913 to establish minimum wages and
maximum hours of labor for women and minors published in 1914
a report o f an investigation of power laundries in Portland (52 p.).
Its latest biennial report for 1919-20 contains (p. 13-19) a summary
o f studies on the length and wage of the apprenticeship period in
the mercantile, factory, and laundry industries.
P E N N S Y L V A N IA .

D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R A N D IN D U S T R Y .

Harrisburg, Pa. Clifford B. Connelley, commissioner.
Created by act of the legislature approved June 2, 1913 (P. L. 396),
the department organization now includes: Industrial Board, W ork­
men’s Compensation Board, Bureau of Inspection, Division of
Hygiene and Engineering, Bureau of Mediation and Arbitration,
Bureau o f Employment, Bureau of Workmen’s Compensation, and
Bureau o f Rehabilitation. The recent reports of these boards and
bureaus have been published as Bulletins o f the department.




60

II.

STATE

AND

M U N IC IP A L

A G E N C IE S .

The department held four annual welfare and efficiency confer­
ences up to November, 1916 (proceedings of the fourth in Monthly
Bulletin, v. 4, Nos. 2-3, February-March, 1917). These were dis­
continued during the war and resumed as the annual safety congress
in March, 1920 (proceedings issued as Bulletin, v. 7, No. 4).
In February, 1920, a conference of superintendents and employ­
ment managers was held at Harrisburg to discuss employment prob­
lems, and an “ Employment Advisory Group ” of the Pennsylvania
Department of Labor and Industry was organized. A digest of the
proceedings forms Bulletin, volume 7 (series o f 1920), No. 3.
An Industrial Belations Conference is to be held at Harrisburg,
October 24-27, 1921. The subjects for the different sessions are:
Industrial waste, Women and children in industry, Industrial co­
operation, Industrial education, Present industrial situation, In­
dustrial publicity, and Medical supervision in industry.
I n d u s t r i a l B o a r d . — Fred J. Hartman, secretary.
This board con­
sists of the commissioner, who is chairman, and four additional mem­
bers appointed by the governor, v iz : An employer of labor, a wage
earner, a woman, and a representative of the public, for a term o f
four }uars, retiring in rotation. Its functions are (1) to investigate
matters relating to employment and effect of labor laws; (2) to make
rules and regulations under the various labor laws, e. g., safety7
standards, dangerous or injurious occupations in which minors may
not be employed, modifications o f provisions o f the act relating to
employment o f women.
The work is organized in four divisions, one being assigned to
each associate member, v iz :
(1) Women and children in industry—the rulings o f the board
pertaining to these workers have been published in two pamphlets.
(2) Industrial relations— the activities under this division include
the establishment o f the Bureau o f Employment, investigation o f
various strikes, campaigns in behalf o-f organizing for safety and
Americanization; in the fall of 1920 studies o f immigrant prob­
lems, preparatory to an investigation of labor camps, and of systems
o f apprenticeship in various States were begun.
(3) Industrial surveys, industrial education, publications, etc.
Under this division are the surveys of working conditions, health
hazards, etc., made by the Division o f Hygiene and Engineering and
cooperative surveys, such as the study o f fire prevention in indus­
trial plants provided for by Bryn Mawr College alumnae in 1916
(in second annual report, 1915-16, p. 29-74), and the survey of
industrial home work in Pennsylvania, made with the Consumers’
League o f Eastern Pennsylvania (see p. 97) and the Carola Woerishoffer Department at Bryn Mawr College (see p. 166) in 1917-18.
A supplementary survey was made in October, 1920, to check up the
latter for publication.
(4) Safety standards and safety appliances. The safety standards
committee initiates the formulation o f safety standards by repre­
sentative committees, submits tentative drafts for public hearings,
and prepares final drafts for adoption by the board; the approvals
committee, consisting o f a member o f the board, the chief of the
Bureau o f Inspection, the chief of the Division o f Hygiene and
Engineering, and the secretary o f the board is concerned with offi­
cial approval o f satisfactory safety devices.



STATE AGENCIES.

61

The following completed “ Safety standards of the Industrial
Board ” have been published and a revision of them is in progress:
P o w e r t r a n s m i s s io n ; r a ilin g s , to e -b o a rd s, p la t f o r m s , a n d r u n w a y S ^ r e v . e d .) ;
s ta tio n a r y e n g in e s (r e v . e d .) ; m a c h in e to o ls (r e v . e d .) ; fo r g in g a n d s ta m p ­
in g ; p o lis h in g an d g r i n d i n g ; c o m p re sse d a ir ; w o o d w o r k in g m a c h in e r y ; b a k e r ie s
(r e v . e d .) ; fire p r e v e n tio n ; c a n n e r ie s ( r e v . e d ) ; b o i l e r s ; f o u n d r i e s ; l a d d e r s ;
c e re a l m i l l s ; li g h t i n g ; e le v a t o r s ; e x p lo s iv e s ; c r a n e s ; e le c tric c o d e ; le a d c o r r o d ­
in g a n d o x i d i z i n g ; p a in t g r i n d i n g ; d ry c o l o r s ; n itr o a n d a m id o c o m p o u n d s ;
b r e w in g a n d b o t t li n g ; m o tio n -p ic tu r e m a c h in e o p e r a t io n ; s c a ff o ld in g ; p la n t r a il­
w a y s ; sh op c lo th in g f o r w o m e n ; p r in t in g a n d a llie d in d u s tr ie s .

New standards recently completed and not yet published include
industrial sanitation, industrial ladders, and head and eye pro­
tection. Data are being gathered on quarries, the galvanizing indus­
try, tunnels, and mines, other than coal mines.
A report of the activities of the Industrial Board to December 31,
1919, have been issued as Bulletin (series of 1920), volume 7, No. 6;
“ What Pennsylvania is doing for safety and safety work,” as volume
7, No. 7. A monthly Bulletin of Information is issued by the board
giving its current activities.
D ivision of H ygiene and E ngineering.—D r. Francis D. Patterson,
chief. This division consists of the chief medical inspector and engi­
neering experts in the Bureau of Inspection, under the immediate
charge o f the commissioner. It makes special inspection of factories
and mercantile establishments and conducts special investigations
relative to industrial processes and conditions, e. g .:
P h y s ic a l s ta n d a r d s a n d q u a lific a tio n s a p p lie d to c h ild re n re q u e s tin g e m p lo y ­
m e n t c e rtific a te s, 1 9 1 5 .
( B a s e d on p h y s ic a l e x a m in a t io n o f ch ild re n b e tw e e n
1 4 a n d 1 6 a p p ly in g fo r su ch c e rtific a te s in P h ila d e lp h ia , J u n e -A u g u s t , 1 9 1 4 .)
R e p o r ts on th e p h y s ic a l c o n d itio n o f a g ro u p o f t e x t ile m ill o p e r a tiv e s in
P e n n s y lv a n ia a n d o f in d iv id u a ls liv in g u n d e r th e s a m e c o n d itio n s a s t e x t ile
m ill o p e r a tiv e s b u t n o t e n g a g e d in th a t w o rk .
( I n an n . re p ., 1 9 1 5 , p t. 2 , p .
1 1 6 - 2 4 1 .)
R e p o r t on th e m e th o d s e m p lo y e d in th e w h ite le a d a n d le a d o x id e in d u s tr ie s
in P e n n s y lv a n ia to s a fe g u a r d th e h e a lth o f th e w o r k m e n .
( B u lle t in , v. 2 , N o .
1 1 , N o v ., 1 9 1 5 .)
I n v e s tig a tio n o f h e a lth o f 4 0 0 to b a c c o w o r k e r s .
( B u lle t in , v . 4, N o . 6 , J u n e ,
1 9 1 7 ).

This division has held a number o f conferences of industrial physi­
cians and surgeons. The first four formed part of the annual welfare
and efficiency conferences of the department; the fifth to ninth in­
clusive were held separately and the proceedings were printed in the
Pennsylvania Medical Journal (March, 1918-January, 1920) and
issued as separates; the tenth constituted a section o f the annual
safety congress of 1920.
B ureau of R ehabilitation.— S. S. Riddle, chief. Established by
act of the legislature approved July 18, 1919, for the rendering of
physically handicapped persons fit to engage in a remunerative occu­
pation. By section 5 (k) the chief is empowered—
T o c o n d u c t in v e s tig a tio n s a n d su r v e y s o f th e s e v e r a l in d u s tr ie s lo c a te d in th e
C o m m o n w e a lth to a s c e r ta in th e o c c u p a tio n s w ith in e ach in d u s tr y in w h ic h
p h y s ic a lly h a n d ic a p p e d p e r so n s ca n e n te r u p o n r e m u n e r a tiv e e m p lo y m e n t u n d e r
fa v o r a b le c o n d itio n s, a n d w o r k w ith n o r m a l e ffe c tiv e n e s s , a n d to d e te r m in e w h a t
p r a c tic a b le c h a n g e s a n d a d ju s tm e n t s in in d u s tr ia l o p e r a tio n s a n d p r a c tic e s
m a y f a c ilit a t e su c h e m p lo y m e n t.

The report o f activities to January 1,1921, published as the depart­
ment’s Bulletin, volume 8 (series o f 1921), No; 2, does not show any
surveys o f the kind contemplated in this provision. But prior to



62

II.

STATE AND M U N IC IPAL AGENCIES.

the establishment o f this bureau the Department of Labor and Indus­
try, in January, 1918, sent out a questionnaire to Pennsylvania em­
ployers to ascertain opportunities in their establishments for employ­
ment of^erson s handicapped by various types of disability and to
obtain data on crippled workers actually employed. The returns,
showing more than 50,000 employment opportunities, were analyzed
and tabulated by the Bureau of Employment and the results pub­
lished as Bulletin, volume 5 (series of 1918), No. 2.
TEXAS.

BUREAU

OF LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S .

Austin, Tex.
W o m a n ’ s D i v i s i o n .— Mrs. Lena Gardner, chief.
In 1920 this
division made a survey o f woman workers in Fort Worth, Tex., and
issued a mimeographed report containing the results (summarized
in Monthly Labor Review of the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,
January, 1921, p. 157-158). A child labor survey in Austin and
Corpus Christi and an industrial survey of El Paso are in progress.
W A S H IN G T O N .

D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R A N D IN D U S T R IE S .

Olympia, Wash.
Created by act o f February 9, 1921, which reorganized the adminis­
trative departments of the State and brought together under a single
director various offices, boards, and commissions dealing with labor.
It comprises three divisions, (1) industrial insurance, (2) safety,
(8) industrial relations.
I n d u s t r i a l W e l f a r e C o m m i t t e e .— This committee, consisting of
the director o f labor and industries, the supervisor o f industrial
insurance, the supervisor o f industrial relations, and the supervisor
o f women in industry, exercises the powers and performs the duties
formerly devolving upon the Industrial Welfare Commission.
Created by act of March 24, 1913, and authorized to fix minimum
wages and standard conditions of labor for women and minors, this
commission made a preliminary investigation and published a 4 Re­
4
port on the wages, conditions o f work, and cost and standards of
living o f women wage earners in Washington” (111 p.) in March,
1914 (reprinted as Appendix A in first biennial report, 1918-1914).
Its first and second biennial reports contain other data on cost of
living, summaries o f occupational surveys and o f the proceedings
o f wage conferences, a survey made to ascertain the effects o f mini­
mum wage, fruit cannery investigations, etc.
W IS C O N S IN .

IN D U S T R IA L C O M M I S S IO N .

State Capitol, Madison, Wis. Fred M. Wilcox, chairman.
This commission, created in 1911, is organized in seven depart­
ments, v iz : Safety and sanitation, Workmen’s compensation, Woman
and child labor, Employment offices, Mediation and arbitration,
Apprenticeship, Statistics. It undertakes investigations only for
the purpose of obtaining data on which to base rules and regula­
tions or for other administrative purposes,9 e. g., during 1914-15,
9
In 1915 th e commission,, to o b tain d a ta upon w hich th e h o u rs of em ploym ent fo r
wom en m ig h t be fixed u n d er th e S ta te law p roviding th a t such w orking h o u rs “ sh a ll n o t
be p reju d icial to th e ir h ealth , safety, o r w elfare,” req u ested th e cooperation of th e TJ. S.
P u b lic H e a lth Service, w hich d etailed Dr. R o b ert Oleson to d ire c t a survey o f th e womenem ploying in d u strie s of th e S tate. T he in v e s tig a tio n w as carrie d on fro m November,
1915, to O ctober, 1916, an d included special in te n siv e stu d ie s of fa tig u e a n d hourly
p ro d u ctio n in its re la tio n to th e le n g th of th e w ork-day a n d to shop equipm ent. B rief
•re p o rts w ere p u b lished in th e a n n u a l re p o rts of th e U. S. P ublic H e a lth Service fo r
1916 (p. 4 4 -4 6 ) a n d 1917 (p. 3 6 -3 7 ).




STATE AGENCIES.

63

sanitation and safety for women and children in paper mills, health
hazards in the rubber industry. As a rule, the results of these
investigations are not published.
S afety and S anitation D epartment.— Shortly after its estab­
lishment the commission organized a committee on safety and sani­
tation to formulate for it a series o f general orders on safety and
sanitation which after approval were promulgated as Bulletins of the
Industrial Commission (v. 1, 2, 1912-13). The series of bulletins
includes shop bulletins on accident prevention, designed for the use
o f superintendents and foremen; also “ Results of investigations on
permanent partial disabilities ” (v. 2, No. 6). In 1915 the commission
published “ General orders on zinc mines,” drafted with the assist­
ance o f a committee of mining engineers appointed at a conference
o f the zinc mining companies. This is now in process of revision.
This department has prepared and published three safety codes, of
which the latest editions are as follow s:
C o d e o f b o ile r ru le s. 1 9 2 0 . 52 p.
E le v a t o r code. 1 9 2 0 .
2 2 p.
I n d u s tr ia l lig h t in g code f o r fa c to r ie s , m ills ,
3 d ed. rev . 1 9 2 1 .
51 p.

offices, find o th e r w o r k p la c e s.

W omen’ s D epartment, 809 Manufacturers’ Home Building, M il­
waukee.—Miss Maud Swett, director. This Milwaukee office of the
Woman and Child Labor Department was organized in April,
1916. One report containing the results of a special investigation
has been published, viz, “ Cost o f living o f women workers in W is­
consin,” 1916 (29 p .). In the summer of 1917 the department made
a study of metal trades establishments in Milwaukee to ascertain
the new operations women were actually performing and the proc­
esses which they might perform. In 19i8 it conducted an investiga­
tion on the employment o f women on street-car lines and made a
study o f the proper length of the meal period for women employees.
During the past few months it has been making surveys in several
Wisconsin cities to furnish data on cost o f living of working women
for the use o f the advisory board in connection with minimum-wage
determinations, hut £his material has not been published. A study
of the employment of women and girls on power sewing machines is
in progress, and an investigation on the question of prohibiting
women from working at buffing and polishing machines and at
plating is to be undertaken shortly.
E mployment O ffices D epartment.—I n January, 1918, the com­
mission undertook a survey o f the large manufacturing industries
o f the State to determine wdiat trades or processes were open to men
with certain permanent handicaps, and in the following August a
division for handicapped persons was organized wuthin the employ­
ment service as part o f the Milwaukee public employment office. An
analysis o f placements o f the first five months is given in “ Indus­
trial experience of handicapped workmen in Wisconsin,” by George
P. Hambrecht. (Amer. Labor Legisl. Rev., v. 9, No. 1, Mar., 1919,
p. 117-125.)
A pprenticeship D epartment.-—W. J. Simon, supervisor o f ap­
prenticeship. This department is charged with the enforcement of
the apprenticeship law (Statutes, sec. 2377), which regulates the con­
tent of indentures and the instruction to be provided.




64

II.

STATE

AND

M U N IC IP A L

A G E N C IE S .

In 1915 a State committee representing the interests o f the em­
ployers, the employees, and the continuation schools, was called to­
gether in Milwaukee by the Industrial Commission. From this com­
mittee was created a State Apprenticeship Board to consider some o f
the important details of administration and to advise the super­
visor o f apprenticeship. Upon its advice a standard form of appren­
ticeship indenture was prepared. The details of the processes to be
taught and the length of time to be devoted to each have been worked
out by other advisory committees composed of practical men actually
engaged in that particular trade, employers and employees being
represented equally.
To date the following trades have been classified and advisory com­
mittees organized to standardize the terms of apprenticeship inden­
tures : A ll the metal trades, bakers, bricklayers, engravers, plasterers,
printers, painters and decorators, tailors, electricians, carpenters,
and plumbers. Definite schedules have been determined for the
following trades: Blacksmith, draftsman, electrician, baker, shoe­
maker, custom tailor, milliner, jeweler, watchmaker, printer, com­
positor, lithographing transferer, sheet metal worker, auto mechanic,
boiler maker, wire weaver, ship fitter, photo-engraver, commercial
artist, tinsmith, wood engraver, photographer, stone metal artist,
knitting machine adjuster, dressmaker, templet maker, copper etcher,
paper ruler, painter, meat cutter, and artificial-limb maker. These
are printed in “ Apprenticeship in Wisconsin—third report, 1919.”
The department cooperates with the State Board of Vocational
Education in planning courses of study for apprentices and issues
pamphlets describing the subject matter of various trades with which
an apprentice should be familiar (e. g. Standard requirements for
bricklayers, 1918; Apprenticeship for plumbing in Wisconsin, 1919)
and a periodical entitled “ The Wisconsin Apprentice ” (v. 1-4,
1918-21).
M UNICIPAL AGENCIESC IN C IN N A T I P U B L IC

S C H O O L S — V oca tio n B u rea u .

Denton Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Helen T. Woolley,
director.
The Psychological Laboratory o f this Vocation Bureau has estab­
lished norms o f mental and physical measurements which are ap­
plicable to industrial workers between the ages of 14 and 18 years.
A brief account o f the first two years of the tests and a statement as
to what tests were included, is given in an article entitled “ A new
scale of mental and physical measurements for adolescents, and some
o f its uses,” by Helen T. W oolley in Journal o f Educational Psy­
chology (November, 191‘5 ). The later results are not yet ready for
publication.
S T A T E -C I T Y F R E E

EM PLOYM ENT

S E R V IC E .

City Hall, Cleveland, Ohio.
W o m e n ’ s D i v i s i o n .— Miss Margaretta Williamson, director.
This
division is the successor of the Cooperative Employment Bureau for
Girls which published in 1915 the volume entitled “ Commercial
work and training for girls,” by Jeannette Eaton and Bertha M.
Stevens.




MUNICIPAL AGENCIES.

65

Since that time it has made a number of studies o f vocational
opportunities for women in Cleveland, viz: Report on women em­
ployed in iron and steel industries in Cleveland, by Elizabeth Arnold
(published in Appendix A o f “ A report on the problem of the sub­
stitution of woman for man power in industry ” issued by the Cleve­
land Chamber o f Commerce in 1918) ; Opportunities for women in
the printing trades (December, 1917) ; and Negro women in indus­
try (June, 1918), unpublished studies by Elizabeth Arnold; “ Op­
portunities in Cleveland for women trained in domestic science and
home economics ” by Margaret Church, and “ Opportunities for
trained women in Cleveland factories,” studies made for the Bureau
of Occupations for Trained Women (108 City Hall, Cleveland);
articles on opportunities for women by Elizabeth Arnold, published
in newspapers September, 1920, and January, 1921.
D E S M O IN E S
D irecto rs.

(IO W A ).

IN D E P E N D E N T

S C H O O L D I S T R I C T — B o ard o f

Garfield School, Des Moines, Iowa. Raymond Franzen, direc­
tor of research.
An investigation is in progress in the high schools to determine
which o f the various group intelligence tests will give the best pre­
diction of success in academic studies and also to discover some tests
among them with prognostic value in vocational pursuits.
NEW

YORK

(C IT Y ).

B O A R D O F E D U C A T IO N .

B ureau of R eference, R esearch, and Statistics.— 500 Park Ave­
nue, New York, N. Y. E. A. Nifenecker, director. Investigations of
intelligence tests are being made by Mr. John L. Stenquist of this
bureau. One such investigation was made during 1920, in which
the comparative results obtained in using five or six well-known
intelligence tests were shown. Studies of tests of mechanical ability
and some tests of educational achievement are in progress.
NEW

Y O R K (C IT Y ).

D EPARTM EN T OF H EALTH .

New York, N. Y.
D ivision of I ndustrial H ygiene.— S. Dana Hubbard, M. D., su­
perintendent. Established in 1915 under the Bureau of Preventable
Diseases; reorganized in 1918 and transferred to the Bureau of Pub­
lic Health Education.
In addition to carrying on the inspection of industrial establish­
ments and enforcement of the sanitary code and its educational pro­
gram by means of lectures and group talks on industrial hygiene,
distribution of posters on sanitation, hazards, etc., the division has
made several industrial hygiene surveys, the results of which have
been published as follows:
A c lin ic a l a n d s a n ita r y s tu d y o f th e fu r a n d h a t t e r s ’ f u r tr a d e , b y L . I.
H a rris.
1915.
5 5 p.
( M o n o g r a p h se rie s, N o . 1 2 ; a ls o in M o n th ly B u lle t in , v.
5, N o . 10, p. 2 6 7 -2 9 8 , O c t., 1 9 1 5 .)
T h e h e a lth o f fo o d h a n d l e r s ; a c o o p e r a tiv e s tu d y b y th e D e p a r tm e n t o f
H e a lt h , M e t r o p o lit a n L i f e I n s u r a n c e C o ., a n d A m e r ic a n M u s e u m o f S a f e t y . B y
L . I. H a r r i s a n d L . I. D u b lin . 1 9 1 7 . 2 4 p .
(M o n o g r a p h se rie s , N o . 1 7 .)
C o s t o f c le a n c lo th e s in te r m s o f h e a l t h ; a s tu d y o f la u n d r ie s a n d la u n d r y
w o r k e r s in N e w Y o r k C ity .
B y L . I . H a r r i s a n d N e llie S w a r tz .
1916.
96 p.
( I n v e s t ig a t io n m a d e jo in t ly b y th e d iv is io n a n d th e C o n s u m e r s ’ L e a g u e o f th e
C it y o f N e w Y o r k .)
7 0 7 2 3 ° — B u ll. 2 9 9 — 2 1 -------- 5




II.

66

STATE AND M U N IC IPAL AGENCIES.

Clinical study of tlie frequency of lead, turpentine, and benzine poisoning in
400 painters, by L. I. Harris. (Reprint No. 71. Aug., 1918.)
Health of workers in garages; a preliminary study, by L. I. Harris. (Monthly
Bulletin, v. 8, No. 11, Nov., 1918.)
Conditions affecting health in the millinery industry, by S. D. Hubbard and
Christine R. Kefauver. 1920. 39 p.
(Monograph series, No. 2 2 ; also con­
densed in Monthly Bulletin, v. 10, No. 4, p. 81-97, Apr., 1920.)
Investigation of 34 cases of human anthrax occurring in New York City
during 1919 and 1920, by S. D. Hubbard and W . Jaeobsohn.
(Monthly Bulle­
tin, v. 10, No. 11, p. 249-266, Nov., 1920; see also Jour. Amer. Med. Assoc.,
Dec. 18, 1920, v. 75, No. 25, p. 1687.)

A paper on “ Mercurial poisoning in the manufacture o f clinical
thermometers/’ by W. Jaeobsohn, was published in the Journal of
Industrial Hygiene, September, 1920 (v. 2, No. 5, p. 193-196).
The research work in progress is concerned with poisoning in the
dye and other chemical industries and by illuminating gas and car­
bon monoxide, and with the detection of lead fumes in printing and
linotype establishments.
An effort o f the division to associate labor unions with it for im­
proving general health conditions in the factories o f the city by
means of the Labor Sanitation Conference is described m the
Monthly Bulletin of the department for June, 1917.
Physical examinations o f industrial workers, which are voluntary
and strictly confidential, are performed by the staff o f industrial
medical inspectors.
In addition to the above publications, Nos. 62, 75, 83, 86, and 91
o f the reprint series of the department (consisting o f papers by
members of the staff reprinted from various journals) deal with
industrial hygiene subjects; also Keep-well leaflet, No. 19—First aid
to the industrial worker (43 p.).
OAKLAND

(C A L I F .) P U B L IC SC H O O LS.

B ureau of R esearch and G uidance, Room llOfi, City Hall, Oak­
land, Calif.-—Virgil E. Dickinson, director. This bureau includes de­
partments o f research, vocational guidance, placement, industrial
welfare, and mental testing. It is engaged in a constant study of all
o f the factors pertaining to individuals in the public schools who need
either adjustment in school, placement in industry, or vocational
guidance. A vocational counselor is provided in every elementary
school o f any considerable size and in every high school. A pro­
gram o f work is outlined in a mimeographed “ Bulletin for vocational
counselors,” issued April, 1921. The reports of the bureau are pub­
lished in the superintendent’s annual reports and also issued as re­
prints.




III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES
(a) ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, RESEARCH
BUREAUS, AND INSTITUTIONS.
A M A L G A M A T E D C L O T H IN G W O R K E R S OF A M E R IC A .

Suite 701-715, 81 Union Square, New York, N. Y.
D e p a r t m e n t .— Established July, 1920, partly as an out­
growth o f the economic research work done in connection with an in­
junction suit against the union at Rochester, N. Y., April~May, 1920
(Michael Stern v. Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America).
The department collects data on industrial and economic conditions
with particular reference to (1) the men’s clothing and related in­
dustries, (2) the cost of living, (8) wages and employment condi­
tions; digests the decisions made by the impartial chairmen pro­
vided for under the agreements between the manufacturers and the
union in the various' clothing manufacturing centers in the United
States and Canada ; prepares the economic briefs submitted by the
union in wage arbitration cases and makes the necessary investiga­
tions upon which the union briefs and arguments are based. It is
frequently called upon bv the officers of the union and the other
departments (e. g., the organization, editorial and publicity depart­
ments) to furnish information in connection with their activities and
to make investigations on wages, production standards, week-work
and piecework systems, and other similar problems relating to work­
ing conditions in the industry.
R

esearch

A M E R IC A N A C A D E M Y O F P O L IT IC A L A N D S O C IA L S C IE N C E .

Thirty-ninth Street and Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.
Clyde L. King, editor.

Organized in December, 1889, to provide a national forum for the
discussion of political and social questions. The academy does not
take sides upon controverted questions, but seeks to secure and present
reliable information to assist the p-Hblic in forming an intelligent and
accurate opinion. The annual membership fee is $5, The academy
publishes annually six issues of The Armais dealing with the most
prominent current social and political questions, each issue contain­
ing from 20 to 25 papers upon the same general subject, largely
solicited by the editorial office or presented at meetings of the acad­
emy. The following recent numbers deal with personnel questions:
v. 65, May, 1906 (No. 154) : Personnel and employment problems. 326 p.
------- . Suppl. to May, 1916. Steadying employment, with a section devoted to
some facts on unemployment in Philadelphia. By Joseph H. W illits. 104 p.
67




68

III. NONOFFICIAL, AGENCIES.

v. 69, Jan., 1917 (No. 158) : The present labor situation; compulsory investi­
gation and arbitration. 302 p.
v. 71, May, 1917 (No. 160) : Stabilizing industrial employment. 246 p.
v. 80, Nov., 1918 (No. 169) : Rehabilitation of the wounded. 164 p.
(Indus­
trial opportunities for disabled, p. 62-110.)
v. 81, Jan., 1919 (No. 170) : A reconstruction labor policy. 211 p. (Industrial
placement, p. 1 9 -7 9 ; Standards for replaced labor, p. 86-186.)
v. 85, Sept., 1919 (No. 174) ; Modern manufacturing; partnership of idealism
and common sense. 324 p. (The personnel, p. 110-219.)
v. 90, July, 1920 (No. 179) : Industrial stability. 177 p.
v. 91, Sept., 1920 (No. 180) : Labor, management, and production. 173 p.

Other articles can be found by consulting the “ Twenty-fifth anni­
versary index” (July, 1890, to January, 1916) and the “ Thirtieth
anniversary index (March, 1916, to July, 1921), issued as supple­
ments to The Annals.
A M E R IC A N A S S O C IA T IO N F O R L A B O R L E G IS L A T IO N .

131 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. John B. An­
drews, secretary.
Organized in 1906 to serve as the American branch o f the Inter­
national Association for Labor Legislation, the object o f the asso­
ciation is to investigate conditions underlying labor legislation and to
collect and disseminate information leading to the enactment and
efficient enforcement of laws for the promotion of the comfort, health,
and safety o f employees. In 1920 there were 3,124 members (mini­
mum annual dues, $3). The annual meeting is held in the last week
o f December in conjunction with one or more of the American
Economic, Sociological, Statistical, and Political Science Associa­
tions.
Investigations and studies have been made and conferences held by
the association for the purpose o f determining standards for legis­
lation and furnishing data for the drafting of bills introduced in
Congress and the State legislatures and for briefs in support of them
on the following subjects: Workmen’s compensation (including
Federal employees, longshoremen, and seamen) , vocational rehabili­
tation for industrial cripples, occupational diseases, health insur­
ance, maternity protection, hours of labor in continuous industries,
one day rest in seven, women in industry, national public employ­
ment service, unemployment insurance, administration of labor laws.
Publications Nos. 1-11 (1908-1910) and the American Labor Leg­
islation Revieiv, issued quarterly since 1911, contain the proceedings
o f the annual meetings, annual reviews o f labor legislation, com­
parative digests, results o f investigations and other papers, and also
the proceedings of special conferences called by the association, v iz :
First national conference on industrial diseases, Chicago, June, 1910
(Publication No. 10) ; Chicago conference on prevention and report­
ing of industrial accidents, September, 1911 (v. 1, No. 4) ; second
national conference on industrial diseases (jointly with American
Medical Association), Atlantic City, June, 1912 (v. 2, No. 2 ); first
national conference on social insurance, Washington, June, 1913
(v. 3, No. 2) ; first and second national conferences on unemploy­
ment, February and December, 1914 (v. 4, No. 2, and v. 5, No. 2) ;
second national conference o f health insurance commissioners, 1918
(v. 8, No. 2). A summary of association activities, 1906-1914, forms
volume 4, No. 4.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

69

The American section of the International Association on Unem­
ployment was first organized in 1911 as a special committee of this
association, and has since worked in close affiliation with it. Under
its auspices a report on “ The relation o f irregular employment to the
living wage for women” (in v. 5, No. 2, p. 287-418), was prepared
for the New York State Factory Investigating Commission, and an
unemployment survey was made, 1914r-15, (v. 5, No. 8).
The results of an unemployment survey, 1920-21, made by the
association are published in the September, 1921, issue of the Ameri­
can Labor Legislation Review (v. 11, No. 3, p. 189-219).
A M E R IC A N

A S S O C IA T IO N O F E N G IN E E R S .

63 East Adams Street, Chicago, 111. C. E. Drayer, Secretary.
Incorporated under the laws o f Illinois in 1915, this association
now has about 25,000 members (entrance fee, $10; annual dues, $15),
with 188 chapters and 75 clubs. It is devoted to the nontechnical in­
terests o f engineers, such as the standards of professional ethics, en­
actment o f engineers’ license laws, participation of engineers in public
affairs, engineering education, adequate professional remuneration,
employment opportunities. It conducts the Engineering Service
Bureau, a cooperative employment service for its members.
On November 12, 1920, the Employment Council of the association
held at Chicago a conference on employment and education, at­
tended by educators, engineers, and employment managers, at which
personnel work was one of the principal subjects of discussion. A
partial report o f its proceedings has been published in pamphlet
form.
The Federal Department of the association in 1921 prepared a
report on engineers’ salaries in the Government service, which was
presented at the hearing before the Senate Committee on Civil Serv­
ice on the pending reclassification bills. A progress report o f the
Committee on Fees and Services of Practicing Engineers was sub­
mitted to the association in March, 1921, and published. Other con­
tributions to the study o f the remuneration of engineers have ap­
peared in Professional Engineer, published monthly as the official
organ of the association.
A M E R IC A N
A S S O C IA T IO N
SURGEONS.

OF

IN D U S T R IA L

P H Y S IC IA N S

AND

Post office box 4061, West Philadelphia Station, Philadelphia,
Pa. Francis D. Patterson, M. D., secretary-treasurer.
Organized at Detroit, Mich., in 1915 to foster the study and dis­
cussion of the problems peculiar to the practice of industrial medi­
cine and surgery; to develop methods adapted to the conservation
o f health among workers in the industries; to promote a more gen­
eral understanding o f the purposes and results of the medical care
o f employees; and to unite into one organization members of the
medical profession specializing in industrial medicine and surgery
for their mutual advancement in the practice of their profession.
There are 565 members (annual dues, $5). Meetings are held an­
nually.
The official organ of the association, in which its proceedings are
published, is The Nation's Health (prior to May, 1921, called Modern




70

III.

NONOEFICIAL AGENCIES.

M edicine), issued monthly since May, 1919 (M odem Hospital Pub­
lishing Co., 22 East Ontario Street, Chicago, 111., $3 a year). This
Journal has a department a Medicine and industry ” (edited by Otto
P. Geier, M. D .) in each issue.
A M E R IC A N C H E M IC A L S O C IE T Y .

Committee on O ccupational D iseases in the C hemical T rades.—
Prof. Charles Baskerville, College o f the City o f New York, chair­
man. The original committee was appointed by the New York sec­
tion o f the American Chemical Society in February, 1912, and in
the following year the parent society appointed the present com­
mittee to better conditions o f labor in chemical industry through
(1) developing the interest of the manufacturers, (2) cooperation
on obtaining uniform legislation in the different States and munici­
palities, and (3) bringing about a limited degree o f publicity mainly
among chemists. The committee has cooperated with boards of
health and bureaus o f labor in their investigations and has aided in
formulating uniform legislation, especially in connection with the use
o f wood alcohol.
A symposium on occupational diseases in the chemical trades by
the committee was published in the Journal of Industrial and Engi­
neering Chemistry (v. 8, No. 11, November, 1916, p. 1054-1067).
Its annual reports for 1920 and 1921 have appeared in the same
journal (v. 12, No. 5, May, 1920, p. 439-440; v. 13, No. 6, June, 1921,
p. 568-569).
Papers by the chairman o f the committee describing its activities
have been published in Medicine and Surgery (Sept., 1917), and
Modern Medicine (v. 2, No. 5, May, 1920, p . 863—
364).
R ubber C hemistry D ivision, C ommittee on O rganic A cceler­
ators.— A report o f this committee calling the attention o f manu­
facturers to the poisonous properties o f certain organic accelerators
used in the vulcanizing o f rubber goods and recommending precau­
tions to be taken for the protection o f workers was printed in Jour­
nal o f Industrial and Engineering Chemistry for October, 1918
(v. 10, No. 10, p . 865).
C ommittee on C ooperation between the U niversities and the
I ndustries.— Prof. W. A. Noyes, University of Illinois, chairman. A
report of this committee relating to the training of chemists for in­
dustrial work, cooperative investigations, and fellowships for re­
search bearing on the problems of chemical industry was published
in the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry for May,
1919 (v. 11, No. 5, p. 417). A brief report was recently submitted
to the president of the society and will probably be published in the
same journal during 1921.
A M E R IC A N C O U N C IL O N E D U C A T I O N .

818 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D. C. Samuel P. Capeir
director.
Organized in 1918 to take action on matters whieh are of common
interest to the educational associations and institutions represented
in it. The constituent or voting membership consists of 14 educa­
tional associations which are national in scope (annual dues, $100).




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

71

1 1 addition, it has as associate members 12 other learned societies
1
having educational relations (annual dues, $10). There is also a class
o f institutional members, which consists o f 133 universities and cob
leges, contributing from $100 to $500 a year, according to the size of
the institution.
The council has a standing Committee on Cooperation with Indus­
tries (Dean F. L. Bishop, University of Pittsburgh, chairman), which
is to undertake, in conjunction with the Council of Management Edu­
cation (see p. 99), to specify methods o f training for college students
who later intend to enter industrial enterprises.
Its standing Committee on Training of Women for Professional
Service recently sent out a questionnaire to employment and voca­
tional bureaus for women, requesting information as to scope of work,
standards required, classification used, relation to organized per­
sonnel departments in industry, commerce, etc., personnel specifica­
tions prepared, use of general intelligence and special vocational tests,
and other data. A preliminary report on the returns has been pre­
pared by Miss Elizabeth Kemper Adams for publication in the
January, 1922, issue of the Educaiional Record (published quarterly
by the council since January, 1920).
A M E R IC A N B Y E S IN S T IT U T E .

130 West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. W. R. Corwine,
secretary.
This institution is the association of dyestuff manufacturers in the
United States.
C ommittee on Sanitation and Safety.—T his committee was
formed to prepare a safety code on nitro and amido compounds at
the request of the American Engineering Standards Committee, laid
‘ before the institute by Dr. F. D. Patterson, chief of the Division o f
Hygiene and Engineering, Pennsylvania Department o f Labor and
Industry. A tentative draft was submitted, but was not considered
entirely satisfactory. A t the July, 1921, meeting o f the institute the
committee was reorganized and strengthened and instructed to per­
fect the safety code as soon as possible.
A M E R IC A N E L E C T R IC R A I L W A Y T R A N S P O R T A T IO N A N D T R A F F IC
A S S O C IA T IO N .

8 West Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. James W. Welsh,
secretary.
Organized in 1908 as one of the affiliated associations of the Ameri­
can Electric Railway Association,1 for the consideration o f general
0
operating methods in detail, rules, freight and express time-tables,
the hiring and training of employees, block signals, multiple-unit
operation, and other matters relative to traffic and transportation.
Committee on P ersonnel and T raining of T ransportation D e ­
partment E mployees.—J ames P. Barnes, chairman. The report of
this committee presented at the annual convention, October 3 to 7,
1921, deals with the application blank, preliminary testing, medical
examination, instruction, “ breaking in,” and written and oral exami­
nations for new employees, and has been printed in pamphlet form.
10
This, organization changed its name from American Street and Interurban Railway
Association to American Electric Railway Association in 1910, and a corresponding change
took place in the names of all of its affiliated associations.




72

III.

NONOFFICXAL AGENCIES.

Earlier reports may be found in the volumes of proceedings (e. g.,
1912, p. 331-364; 1915, p. 285-301).
Standard employment, reference, and physical examination blanks
adopted at the 1909 convention are furnished at cost by the American
Electric Railway Association to member companies. A pamphlet
containing samples of all o f these forms may be obtained from the
office.
A M E R IC A N E N G IN E E R IN G C O U N C IL .

See Federated American Engineering Societies (p. 102).
A M E R IC A N E N G IN E E R IN G S T A N D A R D S C O M M IT T E E .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. P. (1. Agnew,
secretary.
Organized as the result of the work of a joint committee of the
American Society of Civil Engineers, American Institute of Mining
and Metallurgical Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engi­
neers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and American So­
ciety for Testing Materials, appointed December, 1916, to consider
the formation of a central national body to serve as a clearing house
for standards, the American Engineering Standards Committee held
its first meeting in October, 1918. Originally it consisted o f three
representatives of each of the five societies above named; but in 1919
representatives of three Government departments— Navy, War, and
Commerce— were added, and the constitution was revised to make
provision for representation of other bodies of national scope in­
terested in standardization, which may be either single organizations
or groups of organizations. During 1920 the following bodies be­
came represented upon i t : United States Department of Agricul­
ture ; United States Department of the Interior; American Electrical
Railway Association; National Safety Council; Society o f Auto-*
motive Engineers; Electrical Manufacturers Council (representing
Associated Manufacturers of Electrical Supplies, Electrical Manu­
facturers Club, Electric Power Club) ; electric light and power group
(including Association o f Edison Illuminating Companies, National
Electric Light Association) ; fire-protection group (including Asso­
ciated Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, National Board of
Fire Underwriters, National Fire Protection Association, Under­
writers’ Laboratories) ; gas group (including American Gas Associa­
tion, Compressed Gas Manufacturers Association, International
Acetylene Association).
The American Engineering Standards Committee itself, usually
referred to as the main committee, is thus composed at present of 47
members, representing 17 bodies or groups of bodies, including 6 na­
tional engineering societies, 5 Government departments, and 13 na­
tional industrial associations. Its work is supported at present by
the dues of the member bodies, $500 for each representative on the
main committee (except in the case of Government departments,
pending the enactment of legislation by Congress to enable them to
contribute their share of the expenses).
The main committee is solely an administrative and policy-forming
committee, and does not concern itself with technical details of any
particular standard. It has formulated rules of procedure for the




ASSOCIATIONS. SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS. ETC.

73

development o f standards to be approved by it, which, briefly sum­
marized, are as follows: (a) A standard (or code) is assigned by the
main committee to a 6 sponsor 5 which is any organization, whether
6
5
represented on the main committee or not, considered capable of
carrying out the work; (b) the sponsor organizes a thoroughly rep­
resentative “ sectional committee,” subject to approval by the main
committee; (c) the sectional committee prepares the standard (or
code) and submits it to the sponsor, which after approving the final
draft submits the standard to the main committee; ( d) it is then pub­
lished by the sponsor and, on approval by the main committee, is
labeled “ American standard,” “ Tentative American standard,” or
“ Recommended American practice,” according to circumstances and
the nature of the standard. Provision is also made for the approval
of standards adopted or in process prior to 1920, if they have been
developed substantially in the same way or have, in actual practice,
proven their right to become standards.
Besides the standardization o f specifications and tests of engi­
neering materials, equipment, parts of machinery, etc., a compre­
hensive program of industrial safety codes forms an important
part of the committee’s work. This was the outcome o f conferences
of organizations interested in the subject held by the United States
Bureau o f Standards on January 15 and December 8, 1919, to ar­
range for general cooperation in the work of developing safety
codes and for the coordination of the work done by different
agencies. The second conference, acting on the result of a mail
vote, decided that the preparation of safety codes should be car­
ried out under the auspices and rules of procedure o f the American
Engineering Standards Committee and requested this committee
to invite the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions, the Bureau of Standards, and the National Safety
Council to appoint a safety codes committee, which should suggest
a list of safety codes, priority o f consideration, and sponsors for
them. The organization and work of this National Safety Codes
Committee was described in a paper by E. B. Rosa read before
the 1920 meeting o f the International Association of Industrial A c­
cident Boards and Commissions (U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Bulletin No. 281, p. 20-24).
Two safety codes in this program have now been formally ap­
proved by the main committee, v iz :
U. S. Bureau of Standards. National safety code for the protection of the
heads and eyes of industrial workers. 1st ed., Dec., 1920.
(Bureau of Stand­
ards Handbook Series, No. 2.)
Approved Jan. 20, 1921, as “ Recommended
American practice.”
National Fire Protection Association. National electrical [fire] code. Regu­
lations of the National Board of Fire Underwriters for electric wiring and
apparatus. Edition of 1920. Approved Apr. 19, 1921, as “ American standard.”

Twenty-three other safety codes have been definitely assigned to
sponsors, and the majority of these have reached (July, 1921) fur­
ther stages in the process as indicated in the following table.




74

m . HOSTOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Code.

Sponsor.

Sectional committee.

Drafts prepared.

[Bureau of Standards..............
Aviation.................... Society of Automotive EnginFirst draft.
l eers.
Compressed air mach­ American Society of Safety
inery.
Engineers.
Construction.............. National Safety Council......... Formed and approved
Electric safety........... Bureau of Standards..............
Final draft (submitted).
Electric power con­ Electrical Safety Conference..
trol.
Floor openings, rail­ National Association of Mutual Formed.
ings, and toe-boards.
Casualty Companies.
{National Founders Associa­
tion.
Foundries
Formed and approved. Final draft (prepared).
Gas.
Grinding wheels.
Ladders.............
Lighting........... .
Lightning..........
Logging..........
Machine tools...

Power transmission...
Paper and pulp.........
Power presses............
Refrigeration.............
Stairways..................
Sanitation-..................
Textiles..................
Ventilation...............
Woodworking............

American Foundrymen’s As­
sociation.
fBureau of Standards..............
\American Gas Association......
( Grinding Wheel Manufactur­
ers Association.
International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.
American Society of Safety
Engineers.
Illuminating Engineering So­
ciety.
{Bureau of Standards..............
American Institute of Electri­
cal Engineers.
Bureau of Standards............. .
National Machine Tool Build­
ers Association.
National Workmen’s Compen­
sation Service Bureau.
American Society of Mechan­
ical Engineers.
International Association of In­
dustrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.
National Workmen’s Compen­
sation Service Bureau.
National Safety Council___...
.......do......................................
American Society of Refrigera­
ting Engineers.
National Fire Protection As­
sociation.
U. S. Public Health Service..
National Association of Mutual
( Casualty Companies.

Formed and submit­ j-Pirst draft.
ted.
Formed and approved.

Do.

Formed and submit­
ted.
Formed and approved.

Do.

Formed and approved.

Do.

Formed and submitted

DO.

Formed and approved.
_ do.........................
_
Formed and submit­
ted.

DO.

Do.

Formed,

National Safety Council........
American Society of Heating Formed and submit­
and Ventilating Engineers.
ted.
I nternational Association of In­
dustrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.

Sponsors for Tationai Workmen’s Compen­ have been recommended by the
the following codes
National Safety sation Service Bureau.
Codes Committee and approved by the main com­
mittee but definite assignments have not yet been made for the
reasons indicated:
( a ) Not yet accepted by proposed sponsors: Steam boilers (American So­
ciety of Mechanical Engineers) ; explosives (Institute of Makers of Explo­
sives) ; nonfired pressure vessels (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ;
tanneries (Tanners’ Council) ; blast furnaces (National Safety Council, con­
ditional on mining) ; blooming and rolling mills (National Safety Council, con­
ditional on m ining).
(&) Accepted by sponsors but manufacturers objected: A combined electric
fire and safety code under the joint sponsorship of National Fire Protection
Association and Bureau of Standards.
(c) Declined by proposed sponsor: Industrial power control (Electrical
Safety Conference).




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

75

The main committee has not yet approved the following recom­
mendations for sponsorships made by the National Safety Codes
Committee:
Cranes (Association of Iron and Steel Electrical Engineers) ; elevators and
escalators, locomotive boilers (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ;
boiler-room equipment and operation, conveyors and conveying machinery,
internal-combustion engines, engine-room equipment and operation, steam
engines and turbines (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, condition­
ally) ; nitro and amido compounds (American Dyes Institute) ; electricity in
mines, storage-battery locomotives for use in gaseous mines, portable electric
mine lamps (U. S. Bureau of M ines).

A four-page circular o f “ Suggestions on form and arrangement
of safety codes,” issued by the main committee, shows also the
method of selecting the personnel of the sectional committees which
formulate the codes.
A M E R IC A N F E D E R A T IO N O F L A B O R — Railway Em ployees’ Department.

4750 Broadway, Chicago, 111.
B ureau of R esearch.—L eland Olds, director. Established in the
spring o f 1920 to carry on the research necessary to supply informa­
tion to officers of the department and to the locals, and to furnish
data for hearings before the Railroad Labor Board, Interstate Com­
merce Commission, legislative committees, etc., on matters in which
the railway shop employees’ unions affiliated with the American
Federation of Labor are interested.
The bureau has made job analyses of the work o f car men to show
the amount of skill required and has prepared material for other
exhibits presented to the Railroad Labor Board in the hearings
during the spring of 1921, e. g., those dealing with punitive over­
time, seniority rules of the national agreement, the sanction of the
eight-hour day, the recognition of human standards in industry,
occupation hazard of railway shopmen, history of collective bar­
gaining, and a study of cost of living and actual quantity food and
rent budgets of a considerable number of railroad shop employees.
It is also making a study of labor turnover and unemployment on
a number o f railroad systems.
A weekly digest of labor news is issued by the bureau to union
officials of affiliated unions and to railroad lodges.
A M E R IC A N G A S A S S O C IA T IO N .

130 East Fifteenth Street, New York, N. Y.
Formed June 6, 1918, by the union o f the American Gas Institute
(founded 1906) and the National Commercial Gas Association
(founded 1905) ; incorporated 1919.
The association is joint sponsor with the United States Bureau o f
Standards for the gas safety code in preparation under the auspices
and rules of procedure of the American Engineering Standards
Committee. (See p. 74.) The first draft has been made.
A ccident P revention C ommittee.—Charles B. Scott, Bureau o f
Safety, 72 West Adams Street, Chicago, 111., chairman. The func­
tions o f the committee are: To investigate preventable causes of
accidental casualties and damage in the gas industry and to recom­
mend methods, safe practices, and safety appliances for avoidance;
to devise and promulgate plans for interesting and educating em­
ployees and the public in accident prevention; to be helpful to the




76

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L A G E N C IE S .

members o f the association in their individual accident problems.
The reports o f the committee (1914-1920), containing analyses o f
accidents reported to it, and rules and precautionary measures rec­
ommended, are included in the Proceedings o f the association (and
o f the American Gas Institute) and also issued separately.
A M E R IC A N
NEERS.

IN S T IT U T E

O F M IN IN G

AND

M E T A L L U R G IC A L

E N G I­

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y.
Organized in 1871 as the American Institute of Mining Engineers
and incorporated 1905. The American Institute o f Metals became
the Institute of Metals Division o f this organization July, 1918, and
the name was changed to the present form February, 1919. The
number o f members (1921) is 9,345. The annual meeting is held
in New York on the third Tuesday in February.
C o m m i t t e e o n I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .—T. T. Read, United States
Bureau o f Mines, Washington, D. C., secretary. This committee,
created for the purpose o f keeping the institute in touch with de­
velopments in the field o f industrial relations, has organized eight
subcommittees dealing with the following subjects: Americaniza­
tion, cripples in industry, prevention o f illness, safety, education,
mental factors in industry, housing, employment. Reports are pre­
sented at the annual meetings and have been printed for 1919-1921
in the Transactions (v. 60, p. 810-814), and in the institute’s monthly
publication, Mining and Metallurgy for August, 1920 (p. 8-11) and
A pril, 1921 (p. 11-17). The subcommittee on mental factors in in­
dustry is the only one which has promoted any original research, viz,
the investigation in its field provided for by Engineering Foundation
(see p. 102).
Sessions devoted to personnel problems have been held at each
annual meeting, 1918 to date. The papers and discussions at these
sessions in 1918 and 1919 appear in the Transactions (v. 59, p. 590662, and v, 60, p. 748-818).
A M E R IC A N M E D IC A L A S S O C IA T IO N .

535 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. Alexander R. Craig,
secretary.
The Scientific Assembly of the American Medical Association
does not provide a special section on industrial medicine and sur­
gery, but papers on subjects in this field are presented at each annual
meeting in the different sections of the Scientific Assembly, e. g.,
medical topics in the Section on Practice of Medicine, surgical topics
in the various sections dealing with surgery, public health, and
medico-sociological questions in the Section on Preventive Medi­
cine and Public Health.
Occasionally special sessions have been devoted to industrial medi­
cine and surgery, e. g., the second national conference on industrial
diseases was held jointly with the American Association for Labor
Legislation at Atlantic City, June, 1912; in the annual meeting o f
1915 the Section on Preventive Medicine and Public Health had a
symposium on industrial sanitation; in 1918 the Orthopedic Section
held a symposium on industrial surgery; two meetings of the Sec­
tion on Miscellaneous Topics for the 1919 annual session were de­
voted to the presentation of a program on industrial medicine and
surgery. Scientific contributions in this field are published from



A S S O C I A T IO N S ,

S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T IO N S , E T C .

77

time to time in the Journal of the American Medical Association
(weekly).
In 1913-14 a Committee on Conservation of Vision appointed by
the association prepared and published “ Conservation o f vision
series, Pamphlets 1-20,” of which No. 14 is “ Visual requirements of
transportation employees,” by J. J. Carroll (14 p.).
The report o f the Committee on the Ultraviolet and Visible Trans­
mission of Eye-Protective Glasses, appointed by the Section on
Opthalmology, was presented in 1920 and printed in the section’s
transactions.
A M E R IC A N M U S E U M O F S A F E T Y .

See Safety Institute of America (p. 149).
A M E R IC A N P O S T U R E L E A G U E .

1 Madison Avenue (Metropolitan Tower), New York, N. Y.
Henry Ling Taylor, M. D., secretary.
A national health organization organized in 1913 and incorporated
the following year to do scientific and educational work in the
standardization and improvement of conditions affecting the posture
o f the human body.
While the principal activities of this organization have been in
the field of personal, public, and school hygiene, its technical com­
mittee on seating has made anatomical studies for the improvement
o f the design o f chairs, stools, etc., for industrial establishments and
offices, so as to promote correct posture and help to eliminate fatigue.
An article by the secretary on “ Seating of industrial employees ”
in a recent issue of Modern Medicine (v. 3, No. 3, Mar., 1921, p. 164).
gives the results o f the league’s studies on this subject. An account
of its other activities appears in the December, 1920, number of the
same periodical (p. 7 7 7 -7 7 9 ).
Lists o f reprints of articles on posture, wall charts, lantern slides,
and other educational material issued by the league may be ob­
tained on application.
A M E R IC A N

P S Y C H O L O G IC A L A S S O C IA T IO N .

Edwin G. Boring, Clark University, Worcester, Mass., secretary.
Organized in 1892 for the advancement of the interests o f psy­
chology as a science. Meetings are held annually in the last week o f
December. The proceedings, with abstracts of papers read, are pub­
lished in an association number o f the Psychological Bulletin every
year.
At each annual meeting recently a considerable number o f papers
have been presented relating to intelligence tests and other subjects
in the field o f personnel research, e. g., at the Chicago meeting 1920
a joint session with the Section o f Psychology and Section of Edu­
cation o f the American Association for the Advancement of Science,
devoted to intelligence tests, was held December 29 (Psychol. Bull.,
v. 18, No. 2, February, 1921).
In 1906 a Committee on the Standardizing o f Procedure in E x­
perimental Tests, under the chairmanship o f Prof. James R. Angell,
was appointed to act as a general control committee on the subject
o f measurements. Its work is represented by the following reports:
R eport o f the com m ittee . . .
on the standardizing o f procedure in ex­
perim ental tests. 1910. 107 p.
(P sy ch ol. M onographs, v. 13, No. 1, whole
No. 53.)




.78

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L A G E N C IE S .

A ssociation tests, by R . S. W ood w orth and F . L . W e lls .
chol. M onographs, v. 13, N o. 5, w hole No. 5 7.)

1911.

85 p.

(P s y ­

In December, 1916, a Committee on the Academic Status o f Psy­
chology published as its report:
B ald w in , B . T . A survey o f psychological investigations w ith reference to
differentiation betw een psychological experim ents and m ental tests.
Sw arthrnore, 1916.

The work o f the association and its committees during the war,
in connection with the establishment of the Army psychological serv­
ice for intelligence testing and the study of special psychological
problems relating to various military activities, is described in
Robert M. Yerkes’ presidential address, December, 1917, “ Psychol­
ogy in relation to the w a r” (Psychol. Rev., v. 25, No. 2, March, 1918,
p. 85-115) and in his u Report o f the Psychology Committee o f the
National Research Council” (its Reprint and circular series. No. 2;
from Psychol. Rev., v. 26, No. 2, March, 1919, p. 83-149). The re­
port o f the Committee on Reeducation Research (S. I. Franz, Gov­
ernment Hospital for Insane, chairman) was published in December,
1917 (Psychol. Bulk, v. 14, No. 12, p. 416 ff.).
At the December, 1920, meeting a standing Committee on Certifi­
cation o f Consulting Psychologists was created, following the presen­
tation o f a printed report of a special committee previously ap­
pointed to investigate the question.
A M E R IC A N P U B L IC H E A L T H A S S O C IA T IO N .

Penn Terminal Building, Seventh Avenue and Thirty-first
Street, New York, N. Y. A. W. Hedrich, secretary.
Organized in 1872, for the advancement of sanitary science and
promotion o f organizations and measures for the practical applica­
tion of public hygiene. There are now seven sections: Laboratory,
Vital statistics, Public health administration, Sociological, Sanitary
engineering, Industrial hygiene, Food and drugs. Meetings are held
annually at time and place determined by the board of directors.
The fiftieth annual meeting will be held in New York City, Novem­
ber 14-18, 1921, and it is proposed to have a health institute in con­
nection with it.
The American Journal of Public Health is the official monthly
publication of the association, in which its proceedings and papers
presented before its sections are published. This periodical has a
department on industrial hygiene and occupational diseases, consist­
ing of abstracts of current literature, conducted by E. R. Hay hurst,
and E. B. Starr. The A. P. H. A. News Letter, issued the 8th o f
each month, contains personal notes, public health news, etc. The
issue for May, 1921, contains a complete list of the committees of
the association giving their personnel, scope, activities, and plans.
S e c t i o n o n I n d u s t r i a l . H y g i e n e .-— Dr. W. A. Sawyer, 343 State
Street, Rochester, N. Y., secretary. This section was organized in
1914 and now has about 100 members. A sketch o f the develop­
ment of industrial hygiene and protective legislation is being pre­
pared by Dr. George M. Kober to form part of a special volume o f
papers to commemorate the fiftieth aniversary of the foundation of
the association.
S e c t i o n o n V i t a l , S t a t i s t i c s . —At the 1917 meeting this section
appointed a special Committee on Industrial Morbidity Statistics,



A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C I E T I E S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

79

consisting o f representatives of the United States Public Health
Service, statisticians interested in industrial morbidity, employment
and welfare managers in industry, and organized labor, which formu­
lated a standard plan for recording and reporting sickness among
employees and recommendations for tabulation and analysis by the
United States Public Health Service. Its reports at the annual meet­
ings in 1918 and 1919 were published as Reprints No. 484 and 564
from the Public Health Reports { v. 33, No. 35, p. 1429-1434; v. 34, No.
42, p. 2289-2294), and the details of the plan were presented to in­
dustrial establishments and sick benefit associations by the United
States Public Health Service in Reprint No. 573 from the Public
Health Reports (v. 34, No. 46, November 14, 1919, p. 2593-2604),
entitled “ Sickness records for industrial establishments.” The com­
mittee has been continued by the section as the standing Committee
on Morbidity Reports and Mortality Statistics in Industry (Louis
I. Dublin, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., New York, chairman, to
cooperate with the United States Public Health Service,
L a b o r a t o r y S e c t i o n .— The Committee on Standard Methods for
the Examination of A ir, appointed by this section, made four re­
ports on methods for use in ventilation studies, which have been pub­
lished as follows: First (preliminary), 1909, Amer. Jour. Pub. Hyg.
v. 20, p. 346; second (preliminary), 1912, Amer. Jour. Pub. Health,
v. 3, p. 78; third (final), 1916, idem, v. 7, p. 54; fourth (supplemen­
tary), 1919, idem, v. 10, p. 450. It is now merged in the Committee
on Standard Methods (Roger G. Perkins, Western Reserve Medical
School, Cleveland, chairman), which has been substituted for the
separate committees on particular standards.
A M E R IC A N R A IL W A Y

A S S O C IA T IO N .

30 Vesey Street, New York, N. Y. J. E. Fairbanks, secretary.
The object o f this association is the discussion and recommenda­
tion o f methods for the management and operation of American rail­
ways. Its membership consists o f common carriers which operate
American steam railways.
C o m m i t t e e o n T r a n s p o r t a t i o n .— This standing committee ex­
amines into and reports upon questions affecting transportation, such
as train rules, rules for the operation of interlocking and block
signals, etc.
C o m m it t e e o n t h e S a f e T r a n s p o r t a t io n
O t h e r D a n g e r o u s A r t i c l e s .— This committee

of

E

x p l o s iv e s

and

has formulated rules
on the subject indicated in its title. The Bureau of Explosives,
maintained by the association at its headquarters, receives reports
of accidents due to explosives and investigates them.
The rules above noted are printed in the “ Rule book ” of the asso­
ciation, which includes also u Code o f rules governing the determina­
tion of physical and educational qualifications for employees— Oper­
ating department,” adopted April. 1906 (edition of March, 1917,
p. 391-410).
A M E R IC A N S O C IE T Y O F H E A T IN G A N D V E N T IL A T IN G E N G IN E E R S .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street* New York, N. Y.
Organized in 1894 for the promotion o f the arts and sciences
connected with heating and ventilating in all branches, the society
now has local chapters in Illinois, Kansas City, Massachusetts,



80

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Western New York, Ohio, Eastern
Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. The annual meeting is
held in New York, beginning the fourth Tuesday in January; semi­
annual professional sessions are held at time and place determined
by the council. Annual dues, $10; initiation fee, for members and
associates, $15; for junior members, $10.
The society is sponsor for the ventilation code to be prepared under
the auspices and rules of procedure of the American Engineering
Standards Committee (see p. 72).
R e s e a r c h L a b o r a t o r y at United States Bureau of Mines Experi­
ment Station, Pittsburgh, Pa.—L. A. Scipio, director o f research.
Established under an agreement for cooperation in certain investi­
gations between the United States Bureau of Mines and the society,
executed in July, 1919, by which the bureau furnishes at its Pitts­
burgh plant the neceasary office and laboratory space, light, power,
heat, water, and other general facilities, and the services of certain
engineering assistants, and the society provides the salaries o f the
director of research, assistant director, and such other assistants
as may be required, expending not less than $15,000 in each year.
The work is under the supervision of a standing Research Committee
with a subcommittee of five, the Subjects Committee, to determine
the subjects on which research shall be undertaken. Official reports
o f the Research Laboratory are published in the Journal of the
society (monthly, except February, June, and August) and papers
containing the results of the investigations are presented at research
sessions o f the society’s meetings.
The program o f work in progress includes two series of investiga­
tions in the field o f industrial hygiene: (1) Standardization of dust
measurements, and (2) temperature, humidity, and air motion ef­
fects on health. In the first-mentioned series three papers have been
published in the Journal, v iz : Theory of dust action, by O. W. Armspach (in v. 26, No. 9, December, 1920, p. 819-829) ; Efficiency of
the Palmer apparatus (in v. 26, No. 8, November, 1920, p. 687), and
of the sugar tube (v. 27, No. 2, March, 1921, p. 119-123) for deter­
mining dust in air. In the second group, a study of the relation
o f wet-bulb temperature to health, by O. W. Armspach, was pub­
lished in the Journal for May, 1920. An investigation of the effect
of humidity and temperature on the human system undertaken by
Prof. F. B. Rowley at the University of Minnesota, forms part of a
program of cooperative research between universities and colleges
and the Research Laboratory, which is an important feature of the
plan of the Research Committee. Similarly a study o f certain ven­
tilation problems is being made in cooperation with the Minneapolis
school board.
A M E R IC A N S O C IE T Y O F M E C H A N IC A L E N G IN E E R S .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Calvin W. Rice,
secretary.
Organized in April, 1880, for the promotion of the arts and sciences
connected with engineering and mechanical construction. There are
now local sections in 42 cities and 11 professional sections, viz, Aero­
nautics, Cement, Fuel, Gas power, Machine shop, Materials han­
dling, Management, Ordnance, Power, Railroads, Textiles.




A S S O C I A T IO N S ,

S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

81

A session on industrial relations was held at the Detroit meeting,
June, 1919; the papers (Nos. 1692, 1693) and discussion thereon are
found in the Transactions of the society (v. 41, p. 145-208). A num­
ber o f other papers on personnel matters have been presented before
the society from time to time and published in its Transactions or in
Mechanical Engineering. Some of these are available in pamphlet
form, e. g., on labor turnover (Nos. 1624-1648), woman workers, Nos.
1627, 1628), labor dilution (No. 1671), industrial organization (No.
1672), industrial unrest (No. 1721a), mutual control of industry
(No. 1721b), profit sharing (No. 1721c), wage payment (No. I721d).
A session at the annual meeting in 1918 was devoted to discussion o f
the crippled soldier problem (Jour. Amer. Soc. Mech. Eng., v. 40,
p. 51-61).
A number of papers on industrial safety and accident prevention
have been published in the Transactions, some of which are available
in pamphlet form (e. g., Nos. 1510-1513, 1523, 1572, 1597, 1598, 1625,
1631).
On the invitation o f the American Society o f Mechanical Engi­
neers, delegates of a number of engineering societies met in New
York, May 6, 1921, to discuss plans for a congress of engineers allied
to the mechanical engineers to consider education in industry, em­
bracing (1) education of engineers and higher executives, (2) educa­
tion o f foremen and department heads, (3) education o f workers,
(4) the modification of college courses to cover the requirements o f
industry, and (5) revision of textbooks. It was decided to hold an
engineers’ congress on industrial education along the lines suggested,
the program and arrangements being left to an executive committee
(W . Herman Greul, Engineers’ Club, 32 West Fortieth Street, New
York, secretary). The meeting will probably take place in the spring
of 1922.
M a n a g e m e n t D i v i s i o n . — Organized as the Management Section
October 15, 1920, this division now has an enrollment of approxi­
mately 1,000 members and holds sessions; at the spring and annual
meetings o f the society devoted to management topics. It has taken
the initiative in the establishment of a joint Committee on Manage­
ment Terminology, including, besides its own, representatives from
the Society of Industrial Engineers, Industrial Relations Associa­
tion o f America, National Association of Cost Accountants, Taylor
Society, and American Institute of Accountants.
S a f e t y C o d e C o m m i t t e e .— C . B . LePage, secretary.
For some
time the society has been engaged in the development of safety codes
by representative committees. An elevator safety code has recently
been completed and is to be issued shortly. The society is joint
sponsor for the safety code for mechanical transmission of power
being prepared under the auspices of the American Engineering
Standards Committee (see p. 72) and is represented on the follow­
ing sectional committees which are drafting safety codes: Floor open­
ings, railings, and toe boards; Grinding machinery; Industrial light­
ing code; Ladders; Logging and sawmill machinery; Machine tools;
Paper and pulp m ills; Power presses. It has also been nominated as
sponsor for various other codes but has not yet accepted these spon­
sorships.
7 0 7 2 3 °— B ull. 299— 21------ 6




III.

82

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

This committee, now being organized to take the place of the Com­
mittee on Protection o f Industrial Workers, is to be a standing com­
mittee o f five men who will direct the safety-code activity o f the so­
ciety in the future, acting in an advisory capacity to the council on
such matters and taking charge o f the organization o f all new sec­
tional committees on safety codes for which the society may accept
sponsorship or joint sponsorship.
B o i l e r C o d e C o m m i t t e e .— C. W. Obert, secretary.
In 1914 the
committee prepared and issued the A. S. M. E. boiler code and a re­
vised edition was published in 1918 (147 p.). It contains standard
specifications for the construction, equipment, and use o f steam boil­
ers and has been adopted officially by many States as well as by many
boiler-insurance companies, boiler manufacturers, and consulting en­
gineers. The committee meets monthly and formulates “ Interpreta­
tions of the boiler code, 1918 edition,” which are published in data
sheet form with index.
A M E R IC A N

S O C IE T Y

O F R E F R IG E R A T IN G

E N G IN E E R S .

154 Nassau Street, New York, N. Y.
R e f r i g e r a t i o n R e g u l a t i o n C o m m i t t e e .— -William H. Ross, chair­
man. This committee, charged with the preparation of the mechani­
cal refrigeration code for which the society is sponsor under the aus­
pices o f the American Engineering Standards Committee, has re­
cently sent out to members o f the society and others interested an
advance proof of the proposed safety code for suggestions for its
improvement. The code is not to be published until it has been
approved by the council and members of the American Society of
Refrigerating Engineers and by the American Engineering Stand­
ards Sommittee,
b

A M E R IC A N S O C IE T Y

O F S A F E T Y E N G IN E E R S .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y.
Organized in May, 1911, as the United Association o f Casualty
Inspectors; reorganized and incorporated under present name in
1915, so as to admit to membership any person actively engaged in
safety work, whether in manufacturing plants, insurance companies,
State labor departments or rating boards.
The constitution of the society provides for a Research Committee,
a Standards Committee, and a Codes and Legislative Committee. O f
these the Research Committee has not been appointed for the current
year. The Standards Committee, which is concerned with the for­
mulation and revision o f safety standards, is at present investigating
certain rules for safety in building construction referred to the
society by the New York State Department of Labor. The Codesand
Legislative Committee seeks to have the results of the Standards
Committee’s work incorporated in codes and legislation to which they
are pertinent. These two committees jointly are interested m a
national safety code on ladders now being prepared by a sectional
committee formed by the society which is sponsor for it under the
auspices o f the American Engineering Standards Committee. (See
p. 74.) In September, 1921, the society was also designated as
sponsor for the safety code on compressed-air machinery.
In 1919 Safety Engineering (published monthly by the Safety
Press, 80 Maiden Lane, New York City) was adopted as the official




A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C I E T I E S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

83

organ of the society, and papers and proceedings of the meetings are
published in this magazine.
ASSEM BLY

O F C IV IL S E R V IC E

C O M M IS S IO N S .

R. P. Van Hook, city civil service commission, Colorado Springs,
secretary.
Organized 1906 to promote acquaintance among administrators
of civil-service laws, to exchange information and views concerning
the principles and methods of public employment, and to increase
public knowledge of procedure tending to improve and perfect the
merit system. The assembly met biennially 1906 to 1910; since then
it has held annual meetings in June of each year at various places.
The published volumes of the reports of proceedings include in
recent years papers and discussions on the following subjects:
(1915) Elimination of applicants on preliminary requirements;
(1917) efficiency records, standard forms of examinations; (1918)
promotion examinations, psychological tests, methods of removal,
oral tests, physical examination, service record systems; (1919)
examination for occupation of clerk, trade tests, examinations for
probation officer, weight given to experience, methods of rating
personal qualifications, training and experience, appeals o f candi­
dates from ratings, preference to veterans, woman’s place in civil
service; (1920) classification of public employment. Many of these
are comparative studies of the methods and practices of the various
civil-service commissions throughout the country.
Various problems have been studied by special committees whose
reports appear in the proceedings of the annual meetings. In 1916
the following committee reports were published separately:
D r a f t o f a sta n d a r d c iv il-s e r v ic e la w e m b o d y in g th e e s s e n tia l p r in c ip le s o f a
p r a c tic a l m e r it s y s t e m o f p u b lic e m p lo y m e n t. 1 8 p.
R e p o r t o f c o m m itte e on c o o p e r a tio n a m o n g c o m m is s io n s on e x a m in a t io n
s ta n d a r d s .
8 1 p.
F i r s t re p o rt o f th e c o m m itte e on efficiency re co rd s y s te m s . 5 6 p.

The final report of the last-named committee is printed in the
1917 volume of proceedings, which contains also the report of the
Committee on Advancement in the Public Service. In 1919 the report
of a Committee on Cooperation of Appointing Officers was submitted.
A t the 1920 meeting a plan for a new personnel research agency was
outlined in the report of the Committee on the Establishment o f a
National Service Bureau of Civil Service Standards. The functions
o f this proposed bureau would b e :
T o co n d u ct in v e s t ig a tio n s in o r d e r to d e te r m in e th e tr u e e s s e n tia ls o f e x a m ­
in a tio n t e s t s ; to d e te r m in e h o w b e st to d isc o v e r, th r o u g h a p p r o p r ia te te s ts ,
th e a b ilitie s , c a p a c itie s, a n d a p titu d e re q u isite f o r th e p e r fo r m a n c e o f specific
p u b lic s e r v i c e ; to h a v e s u p e r v is o r y d ir e c tio n o v e r re s e a r c h w o r k in sp ec ia l
p r o b le m s r e la t in g to civ il se rv ic e , w h ic h m a y b e c a r r ie d on b y u n iv e r s itie s ,
o r g a n iz a tio n s , or in d iv id u a ls in te r e ste d in su ch p r o b le m s o f g o v e r n m e n ta l
a c t i v i t i e s ; in sh o r t, to a c t a s a c le a r in g h o u se f o r c iv il-s e r v ic e e x a m in a t io n
p r a c tic e a n d p ro c e d u re .

A S S O C IA T E D

IN D U S T R IE S O F M A S S A C H U S E T T S .

1034 Kimball Building, 18 Tremont Street, Boston 9, Mass.
A manufacturers’ association embracing in its membership 1,045
manufacturers in all lines of industry having plants in Massachu­
setts organized to solve their common problems.




84

III.

N O H O F F IC IA L . A G E N C I E S .

I n d u s t r i a l S e r v i c e D e p a r t m e n t .— H. O . Stetson, secretary.
Staff
experts in industrial relations, employment management and safety
are employed for full-time service to members. Two secretaries are
devoting full time to the promotion o f Americanization activities
within the factories. In cooperation with the Bureau o f Vocational
Guidance at Harvard University the preparation o f a series of special
texts for teaching English to aliens employed in industries was under­
taken in 1919-20. Each text consists o f loose-leaf lessons dealing
with the processes o f a particular industry, into which safety pre­
cautions are also introduced. An account of this investigation is
given in an article entitled, “ Preparing industrial English lessons,”
by George F. Quimby and Charles H. Pauli, in Industrial Manage­
ment, March, 1920. The following have been completed and pub­
lished :
Q u im b y , G e o r g e F ., a n d P a u li, C h a r le s H .
E n g lis h o f le a th e r m a k i n g ; in ­
d u s tr ia l le s s o n s fo r a d u lt E n g lis h c la s s e s o f ta n n e r y w o r k e r s .
1919.
2 4 p.
P a u li, C h a r le s H .
E n g lis h o f p a p e r m a k i n g ; le s s o n s fo r a d u lt E n g lis h c la s s e s .
1920.
2 8 p.

The first Massachusetts accident prevention congress was held at
Worcester in’ 1920 under the joint auspices of this organization and
locals o f the National Safety Council. Its proceedings have been
published.
A S S O C IA T IO N
D IS E A S E .

FOR

THE

P R E V E N T IO N

AND

R E L IE F

OF

HEART

325 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. Miss M. L.
Woughter, executive secretary.
Incorporated December 18, 1915, to coordinate the agencies already
dealing separately with the various phases o f relief for patients
suffering from heart disease, and to provide an organization to
initiate measures of prevention.
The association considers that the vocational training of children
in suitable trades, and the adjustment of the adult heart cripple to
some form of labor which is within his physical limitations are
among the most important of relief measures, from both a medical
and an economic standpoint. It has accordingly made a study of the
kinds o f work which are suited to the limited capacities o f those
suffering from heart disease and has published a folder on “ Occupa­
tions for cardiacs” for popular distribution. The placement work
which it started is now continued through the special bureau for
cardiacs established by the Bureau for the Handicapped of the Hos­
pital Social Service Association of New York City.
A fund has recently been given for the purpose of making a survey
o f all the cardiacs for w hom occupations have been secured. The
T
following questions are to be investigated: (1) Ability o f the in­
dividual to continue at w
rork in the job secured; (2) whether the
work presents features unexpectedly taxing; (3) whether the cardiac
keeps in touch with his own physician or one o f the cardiac clinics;
(4) present state of health; (5) the need for occasional rest, either at
home or in an institution, to prevent a breakdown.
A Committee on Research and Scientific W ork and a Committee
on Vocational Guidance and Occupation are included among those
recently organized. Further information as to the association’s




85

A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C I E T I E S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

activities is given in its first report for the period December 18, 1915,
to January 1, 1921.
The work has been supported by annual dues of members and dona­
tions, particularly from the Burke foundation. In the spring of 1920,
when the Trade School for Cardiac Convalescents (founded 1912)
was dissolved, its endowment fund of $7,000 was transferred to the
association.
A S S O C IA T IO N

O F C O L L E G IA T E S C H O O L S O F B U S IN E S S .

Dean L. C. Marshall, School of Commerce, University of Chicago, president.
Organized in 1918 for the promotion and improvement of higher
business education in North America, this association is composed of
institutions giving collegiate business training of a certain grade and
type. It has at present 19 members (annual dues, $25). Institutions
may be admitted, on recommendation of the executive committee, by
a two-thirds vote of the members represented and voting at an annual
meeting (generally held in M ay).
Several o f the papers presented at the meetings have been pub­
lished in the Journal of Political Economy issued by the University
of Chicago. At the third general meeting, held May 5 to 7, 1921,
at the University of Pittsburgh, a separate session was devoted to
“ Courses in the labor field.” O f the two papers presented at this
session, “ The problem of graduate training in personnel administra­
tion,” by Ordway Tead, appears in the Journal of Political Economy
for May, 1921 (p. 353-367), and “ Undergraduate instruction in
labor problems,” by Joseph H. Willits, is announced among forth­
coming articles.
The association has a Committee on Coordination with Corpora­
tion Training Schools.
A S S O C IA T IO N O F G O V E R N M E N T A L
U N IT E D S T A T E S A N D C A N A D A .

LABOR

O F F IC IA L S

OF

THE

Miss Linna E. Bresette, Industrial Welfare Commission, Topeka,
Kansas, secretary-treasurer.
Formed at Nashville, Tenn., in June, 1914, by amalgamation of the
International Association of Factory Inspectors (organized 1887)
and the Association of Chiefs and Officials of Bureaus of Labor (or­
ganized 1883), which had held joint conventions from 1910. The
membership of this association consists of employees of Federal, State,
provincial, county, or municipal departments having to do with the
enforcement and supervision of labor laws. The annual dues of de­
partments are determined upon the following basis: When the de­
partment staff consists of 1 to 5 persons, $5; 6 to 25 persons, $10; 26
to 75 persons, $15; and where the staff exceeds 75 persons, $20. Meet­
ings are held annually, the place being decided upon at the preceding
convention and the time fixed by the executive committee.
The Proceedings of the annual conventions contain papers and dis­
cussions on labor topics (e. g., in 1920, apprenticeship, child labor and
vocational education, women in industry, safety, and compensation).
Since 1918 they have been published by the United States Depart­
ment of Labor; the Proceedings of the seventh annual convention,
July 12-15, 1920, were issued as Bulletin No. 266 of the United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics.




III.

86

B A L T IM O R E

N O N O F E IC L U L . A G E N C I E S .

F E D E R A T IO N

OF

C L O T H IN G

M ANUFACTURERS.

Room 503, 5 Hopkins Place, Baltimore, Md.
The principal aim o f this federation is unified action on questions
o f wages, hours o f labor, and general working conditions. The labor
managers, comprising the Board o f Labor Managers o f the Balti­
more Market, meet regularly three times a week for the purpose
o f interchanging information on labor problems confronting them,
to work out common labor policies, and to secure unified action in
labor matters. The federation also aims to establish standards o f
production and is studying the factors contributing to efficient pro­
duction, among which are: (1) Industrial relations, (2) planning
o f work, (3) proper lay-out o f factories, (4) suitable appliances
for the workers in their various tasks, etc. It is also studying the
general situation in the men’s clothing industry with a view to
obviating as far as practicable the seasonal character of the industry
and periodical unemployment.
R e s e a r c h B u r e a u .— This bureau, formerly known as the Clothiers’
Research Bureau, is now a part of the federation an< is under the
1
direction o f the secretary. It conducts such investigation^ and
compiles such information as may be necessary for the general im­
provement and standardization of working conditions in the Balti­
more Market. It keeps on file a complete list o f current piece and
week rates, with a description o f each operation as performed in
each house, which is used constantly by members in setting piece
rates and in settling disputes over prices. It collects regularly
records o f the earnings o f the workers, which serve as a basis for
discussions by the employers and the union; they show actual earn­
ings by occupation groups for given pay-roll weeks, and are com­
parable with earning figures from other markets, earnings in other
industries, and cost-of-living figures. Several extensive wage studies
were prepared for presentation before boards of arbitration during
the past year.
A manual or handbook o f tailoring, containing a detailed analysis
o f the operations and processes used in the manufacture o f clothing,
has been completed recently. The purpose of this work is to lay
the basis for standardized manufacturing processes for the industry
as a whole, to afford a framework upon which any factory can base its
own system o f standardization, to train nontechnical men to be cloth­
ing executives, to furnish a standard nomenclature and basis for
fixing piece rates and to set up a standard by which industrial dis­
putes o f a technical nature may be settled.
This office prepares and sends out regularly to members Labor
News Bulletins containing digests of important decisions, piece rates,
and labor news from other markets, etc. It also maintains a library
and classified files o f clippings on subjects o f interest to the clothing
industry.
B O S T O N C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E — R e ta il T ra d e B o ard .

1T7 Milk Street, Boston 9, Mass. Arthur James Kelly, secretary.
The Retail Trade Board, which is the merchants’ section o f the
Boston Chamber o f Commerce, has a Personnel Group composed o f
the personnel managers o f some of the larger stores in the city. A
subcommittee of this group recently made an investigation of ab­
senteeism and tardiness by questionnaire to its members and sub­
mitted a brief report December 3, 1920,




87

A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C I E T I E S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

B U R E A U O F A P P L IE D E C O N O M IC S .

Southern Building, Washington, D. C. Hugh S. Hanna, director.
Organized 1914 by W. Jett Lauck and incorporated 1919 under
the laws of Virginia, this bureau is a private organization estab­
lished for the purpose of doing research and statistical work in the
field o f industrial, commercial and general economic activities. Its
labor research work has included compilations of data regarding
prices, cost of living, w ages, and other statistical information (e. g.,
T
for use in labor cases before wage boards, etc.), original investiga­
tions o f industrial and commercial conditions, plant and industrial
surveys, memoranda on industrial and labor legislation.
The following bulletins are the latest issues of its printed com­
pilations :
C h a n g e s in co st o f liv in g a n d p ric e s, 1 9 1 4 to 1 9 2 0 . 2 4 p.
W a g e s in v a r io u s in d u s tr ie s a n d o c c u p a t io n s : a s u m m a r y
m e n ts, 1 9 1 4 to 1 9 2 0 . 6 5 p.
S t a n d a r d s o f l i v i n g : a c o m p ila tio n o f b u d g e ta r y s tu d ie s .
1 5 6 p.

of

w age

R ev.

ed.

m ove­
1920.

The bureau has prepared a limited number o f mimeographed
copies o f a “ Handbook of industrial relations and conditions ”
(722 p .), containing digests o f the more important lawT programs,
s,
and experiences in the field of industrial relations. It has also
brought together all of the awards, actions, and pronouncements of
the National War Labor Board, using printed copies where avail­
able and reproducing the others in typewritten form from the orig­
inal docket o f the board, in a compilation “ National War Labor
Board D ocket” (5 vols.). A price list may be obtained on appli­
cation.
B U R E A U O F E D U C A T IO N A L E X P E R IM E N T S .

16 West Eighth Street, New York, N. Y. Jean Lee Hunt, in
charge of department o f information.
The only work done by this bureau related to the field of personnel
research is the testing o f undernourished children with a view to
discovering whether any correlation could be established between the
condition of malnutrition and mental ability. An interim report on
the investigation appeared in the Pedagogical Seminary for March,
1920, in an article by David Mitchell and Plarriet Forbes entitled,
“ Malnutrition and health education.” A more extensive report on
the later work is to appear in “ The nutrition class and health educa­
tion,” a publication o f the bureau now in press. The results of this
study are quite negative.
The bureau has issued the following reference list as its Bulletin 9:
M itc h e ll, D a v id , a n d H u g e r , G . J.
b ib lio g r a p h y .
1918.
1 1 6 p.

BUREAU

P s y c h o lo g ic a l t e s t s : re v is e d a n d cla s s ifie d

O F IN D U S T R IA L R E SE A R C H .

289 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Robert W. Bruere, di­
rector.
An incorporated voluntary association without profit organized in
February, 1918, to promote sound human relationships in industry
by consultation, fact studies, education, and publicity. It is main­
tained by fees received for professional services and by private con­
tributions in support of its research program. The policy o f the




88

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

bureau at the present time is increasingly to limit its research activi­
ties to work designed for the information of the public.
The following studies have been made by members o f the staff and
published by the bureau:
H o w th e G o v e r n m e n t h a n d le d it s la b o r p r o b le m s d u r in g th e w a r ; h a n d b o o k
o f th e o r g a n iz a tio n s a s s o c ia te d w ith th e n a tio n a l la b o r a d m in is tr a tio n ; w ith
n o te s on th e ir p e r so n n e l, fu n c tio n s , a n d p o lic ie s. 1 9 1 9 . 4 8 p.
A m e r ic a n c o m p a n y sh op c o m m itte e p l a n s ; a d ig e s t o f 2 0 p la n s f o r e m p lo y e e s ’
r e p r e s e n ta tio n .
1919.
3 8 p.
W o r k e r s ’ e d u c a t i o n : A m e r ic a n a n d fo r e ig n e x p e r im e n ts .
B y A r t h u r G le a s o n .
1921.
62 p.
B u ild in g g u ild s in G r e a t B r it a i n .
B y O rdw ay Tead.
1921.
(R e p r in t o f
s tu d y p u b lish e d in J o u r n a l o f A m e r ic a n I n s t it u t e o f A r c h ite c ts , F e b ., 1 9 2 1 .)
N a tio n a l c o u n c ils in th e p r in t in g tr a d e s.
B y C h a r le s R . W a l k e r , j r .
1921.
3 0 p.
(R e p r in te d f r o m M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w , U . S . B u r e a u o f L a b o r S ta t is tic s ,
F e b ., 1 9 2 1 .)
T h e o p e n -sh o p d riv e .
W h o is b e h in d it a n d w h e r e i s it g o in g ?
B y Savel
Z im a n d .
1921.
61 p .

A study of production standards in their relations to shop admin­
istration and wage payment plans is in preparation.
The bureau has made a labor survey o f the tanning industry, cover­
ing 70 plants, for the Tanners5 Council of the United States of
America (see p. 155), personnel surveys o f seven plants for the Busi­
ness Problems Group of the Social Order Committee, Philadelphia
yearly meeting o f Friends, and other similar studies, and it has co­
operated on a professional basis with industrial concerns in the devel­
opment o f their personnel organizations.
In 1919, members of the bureau’s staff were retained by the Inter­
church W orld Movement to organize the research plans of its
Industrial Relations Department and to give technical assistance to
the Commission of Inquiry into the steel strike. The following re­
ports of this commission were prepared:
T h e I n te r c h u r c h W o r l d M o v e m e n t re p o rt on th e ste e l s tr ik e o f 1 9 1 9 .
N ew
Y ork , H a rco u rt, B race & H o w e.
1920.
2 7 7 p.
P u b lic o p in io n a n d th e ste e l s t r i k e : s u p p le m e n ta r y r e p o r ts o f th e S te e l S tr ik e
C o m m is s io n o f I n q u ir y o f th e I n te r c h u r c h W o r l d M o v e m e n t.
N ew York, H a r­
c o u rt, B r a c e & C o.
1921.
3 4 6 p.

At the present time the bureau is conducting an extensive inquiry
into the economics and administrative organization o f the coal in­
dustry and has projected similar studies of other basic industries.
During 1918-1920 the bureau conducted courses in employment
administration in cooperation with the New School of Social Re­
search and the Training School for Public Service of the Bureau o f
Municipal Research. Owing to the growth of these courses, involv­
ing costs in excess of the bureau’s resources, they have been discon­
tinued as bureau activities, but members of the bureau have con­
tinued educational work in the field of personnel administration
under other auspices.1
1
The industrial research library of the bureau is freely put at the
service of the public.
11
M r. L eo n ard O u th w aite a t C olum bia U n iv ersity (see p. 175), Mr. O rdw ay Tead a t th e
New Y ork School of Social W ork (see p. 187) an d th e New School of Social R esearch
(see p. 187) ; M r. H. C. M etcalf a t th e B u reau of P erso n n el A d m in istratio n (see p. 89 ).
M essrs. T ead a n d M etcalf published in 1920 (M cG raw -H ill Book Co., New Y ork) a com­
p rehensive stu d y of personnel problem s under th e title “ P ersonnel a d m in istra tio n : its
p rin cip les a n d p r a c t i c e ” (538 p .).




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

89

B U R E A U O F M U N IC IP A L R E SE A R C H .

261 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
Incorporated in 1907 to promote efficient and economical govern­
ment and the adoption of scientific methods in the transaction of
public business.
The following studies relating to public employment and munici­
pal salary standardization have been published in the series Munici­
pal Research, issued by this bureau and the Training School for Pub­
lic Service attached to i t :
N o . 67, N o v ., 1 9 1 5 : T h e s ta n d a r d iz a tio n o f p u b lic e m p lo y m e n ts .
P art I, A n
in te r p r e ta tio n .
1 21 p.
N o . 6 8 , D e c ., 1 9 1 5 : T r a in in g fo r m u n ic ip a l se rv ic e .
5 1 p.
N o . 76, A u g ., 1 9 1 6 : T h e s ta n d a r d iz a t io n o f 'p u b lic e m p lo y m e n ts .
P art II,
A p p lic a tio n .
1 2 8 p.
N o . 95, 1 9 2 1 : Q u a n tity a n d co st b u d g e ts f o r c le ric a l w o r k e r s in N e w Y o r k
C ity , A p r ., 1 9 2 1 , b y W . E . M o sh e r .
3 0 p.

The bureau prepared a report for the Municipal Civil Service
Commission of the City of New York on which was based the
a Standards for physical examinations ” published by the commission
in 1916 (60 p.).
BUREAU

OF M U N IC IP A L R E SE A R C H

O F P H IL A D E L P H IA .

805 Franklin Bank Building, Philadelphia, Pa. *
Organized experimentally in November, 1908, with the aid of a
staff detailed from the New York bureau; incorporated as a separate
institution in the fall of 1909. It is “ an agency of 2,000 citizens co­
operating in the effective discharge of civic duties, equipped to in­
terpret and solve technical problems of government.”
Among its recent activities is a field investigation of living
standards and living costs of workingmen’s families in all the more
important industrial sections of the city, made during the period
from August, 1917, to May, 1918. A report based on 260 schedules
was published in 1919 (New York, Macmillan Co.) under the title
u Workingmen’s standard of living in Philadelphia” (x, 125 p.).
Supplements to this, bringing the cost-of-living figures down to
December, 1919, August, 1920, and March, 1921, respectively, were
published as Nos. 3.93, 433 and 463, of Citizens? Business (issued
weekly by the bureau).
BUREAU

O F P E R S O N N E L A D M IN IS T R A T IO N .

17 West Forty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. Henry C.
Metcalf, director.
The Educational Division offers four types of training: An eightw^eeks’ intensive course for industrial, commercial, and governmental
employees; a year’s cooperative course for qualified college graduates;
a six weeks’ summer course for teachers of industrial and commercial
subjects, placement secretaries, and vocational advisers; and a series
of evening lectures and discussions for professional men and women.
Details are given in its Bulletin of Information, 1921-22.
The Division of Labor Analysis makes labor audits of industrial
and mercantile establishments; and studies the problems involved in
the employment of labor, health, safety, and working conditions,
instruction and training, wages and other incentives, employees’
relations, administrative policy," and executive organization. It has




III. iSONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.
T

90

carried on research resulting in articles on the following subjects
which have appeared in various issues of the Industrial Information
Service (Boston, Mass.) : Personnel work and vacation policies in
retail stores; joint councils on industrial relations; personnel admin­
istration in the National City Bank (New York) ; employees’ training
in a large corporation; safety— 24 hours in the d a y; real wages—the
cost o f living: 4 family week” ; strike insurance, etc. A paper on
4
4 Control of absenteeism,” by P. S. Florence, was published in A d ­
4
ministration (v. 1, No. 5, May, 1921, p. 634-646).
The bureau also conducts a placement service for supplying per­
sonnel directors, employment managers, industrial physicians and
nurses, safety engineers, training directors, editors of employee maga­
zines, job analysts and recreation directors to industrial and mercan­
tile establishments.
B U R EAU OF PER SO N N EL RESEARCH .

See Carnegie Institute of Technology (p. 169).
BUREAU

OF SAFETY.

Edison Building, 72 West Adams Street, Chicago, 111. Charles
B. Scott, director.
This bureau was incorporated March 2, 1915, and is supported by
contracts which it has with its several public-utility company clients,
particularly the Inter-Company Insurance Trusteeship of the Middle
West Utilities Co. These contracts provide that the Bureau o f
Safety shall direct and supervise the accident prevention work of the
several clients, which include light and power, street car, gas, ice
and water companies.
Its service includes inspection (survey, analysis, and report of
operating conditions, recommendations regarding operating hazards
and accident hazards caused by physical condition of the plant,
regular reinspection) ; organization of safety committees; statistics
o f accidents (compilation, analysis, charts) ; instructional and edu­
cational work (to committees and to employees, by lectures, shop bul­
letins for posting, safety bulletins for each employee).
The bureau makes studies of the effect of safety rules tentatively
adopted and of contrivances devised by men working in the plants
for their individual protection. It is also engaged in an investiga­
tion o f psychological tests for motormen.
Its director is chairman o f the accident prevention committees of
the National Electric Light Association and the American Gas Asso­
ciation.
B U R E A U O F V O C A T IO N A L G U ID A N C E .

See Harvard University (p. 178).
B U R E A U O F V O C A T IO N A L IN F O R M A T IO N .

2 West Forty-third Street, New York, N. Y. Miss Emma P.
Hirth, director.
An educational and research organization established in April,
1919, to serve as a definite connecting link between the education o f
women and their vocational activities and to bring about, wherever
possible, a closer correlation o f the two. It is the successor to the
Department of Information of the Intercollegiate Bureau o f Occu­
pations in New York, whose information files it inherited when the




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

91

United States Employment Service first took over and then aban­
doned the Intercollegiate Bureau.
The bureau is making investigations of vocations and professions
for women so as to secure for each field of work definite and authori­
tative information regarding (a) training necessary and desirable—
schools and institutions where it may be taken, with specific facts
about each; (h) personal qualifications required; (c) best methods
o f entering the field; ( d) kinds of positions and duties involved; (e)
conditions o f work; ( / ) salary ranges; (g) ultimate opportunities
to which definite beginning positions may lead.
The following studies in occupations have been published by the
bureau:
N o . 1. V o c a tio n s f o r b u s in e s s a n d p ro fe s s io n a l w o m e n .
1919.
4 8 p.
2 0 c.
P u b lis h e d in c o o p e r a tio n w ith th e N a tio n a l B o a r d o f th e Y o u n g W o m e n ’s C h r is ­
tia n A s s o c ia tio n .
N o . 2. W o m e n in s t a t is t ic a l w o rk .
192 1 .
N o . 3. W o m e n in th e l a w : a n a n a ly s is o f tr a in in g , p ra c tic e , a n d s a la r ie d
p o s itio n s . 1 9 2 0 .
1 3 8 p.
N o . 4 .- T h e w o m a n c h e m is t . 1 9 2 1 .
N o . 5. P o s it io n s o f r e s p o n s ib ility in d e p a r tm e n t s to r e s a n d o th e r r e ta il s e llin g
o r g a n iz a tio n s : a s tu d y o f o p p o r tu n itie s f o r w o m e n .
1 9 2 1 . 1 2 6 p.

In addition to furnishing vocational information to inquirers
and cooperating with college appointment bureaus, it has acted as
editor and publisher of the Bulletin of the National Committee of
Bureaus o f Occupations.
B U S IN E S S S T A N D A R D S A S S O C IA T IO N .

189 West Madison Street, Chicago, 111. 299 Broadway, New
York, N. Y. Sherwin Cody, managing director.
Founded and incorporated under the laws of Illinois in 1913 as
the National Associated Schools of Scientific Business. Its object is
the improvement of commercial education and especially the relation
between employers o f office help and the schools which train ap­
plicants.
The special work of this organization has been the development o f
the national business ability tests, a full account of which is given in :
C o d y , S h e r w in .
W o r l d B o o k C o .,

C o m m e r c ia l te s ts a n d h o w to u s e th e m .
1919.
v ii, 2 1 6 p.

Y o n k e r s , N . Y .,

B U S IN E S S T R A IN IN G C O R P O R A T IO N .

185 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 440 South Dearborn
Street, Chicago, 111.
This corporation conducts a course in modern production methods,
planned by Mr. John Calder, in charge of industrial relations for
Swift & Co., Chicago, for the training of foremen. An outline o f
the subject matter and method o f procedure is given in a pamphlet
entitled “ A plan for group training for making better foremen,
adopted by 300 leading concerns,” which may be obtained on ap­
plication.
CABOT FUND.

Philip Cabot, 111 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass., trustee.
A trust fund o f $50,000 under the will of the late Charles M. Cabot
of Boston, to be applied to such charitable uses as a board of three
managers may determine. As illustrating the objects to which the
fund may be devoted the testator suggested “ the investigation and




92

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

study of industrial conditions in this country and the publication
o f the results of such investigation and study to the end that in­
dustrial abuses and hardships o f industrial laborers may be known
and remedied.” The whole fund is to be expended and the trust
terminated within 40 years after the death of the testator or within
20 years after the death of his last surviving child, whichever date
shall fall first. Paul U. Kellogg, Edward T. Devine, and Philip
Cabot are designated as the first members o f the board of managers.
Appropriations w ere made in 1920 for an investigation o f indus­
T
trial espionage under the Department o f Social Ethics o f Harvard
University, which was made by Sidney Howard and Robert Dunn,
and the results published in The New Republic, February 16-March
30, 1921, in seven articles on “ The labor sp y ” (also reprinted as a
booklet) ; investigations of the present condition of the steel and iron
industry with reference to the 8-hour day in Great Britain by W hit­
ing Williams and the 12-hour day and the 7-day week in the United
States, by John A. Fitch, the reports of which were published in a
special number of The Survey, March 5, 1921, “ Three shifts in steel:
the long day and the way out ” ; the preparation of a report on the
experience o f 20 plants in the United States which have introduced
the three-shift system, by Horace B. Drury, presented at a joint
meeting o f the Taylor Society, the Metropolitan and Management
Sections o f the American Society o f Mechanical Engineers, and the
New York Section of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers,
December 3,1920, and published, with discussion thereon, in Bulletin
o f the Ta}dor Society (v. 6, No. 1, Feb., 1921).
C A R N E G I E C O R P O R A T I O N O F N E W Y O R K — A m erica n iz a to n S tu d y .

522 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Allen T. Burns, director.
Early in 1918 the Carnegie Corporation of New York provided
for a study of methods of Americanization and the survey was or­
ganized in 10 divisions, each in charge o f a specialist in the field
assigned to it. The results of the investigation are now in course of
publication by Harper & Bros., New York, in a series of “ Americani­
zation studies” in 11 volumes, one from each division, with a sum­
mary by the director.
D ivision of I ndttstkial and E conomic A malgamation.—W . M.
Ueiserson, chief. The work o f this division included personnel studies
o f immigrant employees in industrial establishments. Two sched­
ules were used b}^ interviewers: (a) For securing data about indi­
vidual immigrants such as their personal and occupational histories,
earnings, training, conditions of employment, knowledge o f English,
membership in labor unions and benefit societies, experience in strikes
and with employment agencies, attitude toward employers, etc.; (b)
applicable to industrial concerns, for obtaining information with re­
gard to the methods and policies of employers in dealing with immi­
grants, and including inquiries as to labor turnover, hiring and firing,
transfers, promotions and lay-offs, wages and earnings, system of
wage payment, hours of labor, overtime, vacations, safety and com­
pensation, health, hygiene and sanitation, training and education,
and other industrial service work, with special reference to foreignborn workers in each case. The report of this division is announced
for publication under the title, “ Adjusting immigrant and industry.”




A S S O C I A T IO N S ,

S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

93

D i v i s i o n o f H e a l t h S t a n d a r d s a n d C a r e .— Michael M. Davis, jr.,
chief. A study o f the special medical, sanitary, and health problems
due to immigrant employees and the organization of industrial medi­
cal services has been made b}^ this division by questionnaires to indus­
trial physicians, nurses, and employment managers and by field in­
vestigations made in 1918 and 1919. The results are published in
Journal of Industrial Hygiene (v. 2, No. 11, March, 1921, p. 397422), in an article entitled “ Industrial medicine and the immigrant,”
by M. M. Davis and Linda James, and form a chapter in the volume
containing the report of this division’s finding, issued 1921 under the
title “ Immigrant health and the community.”
Other volumes of the series deal incidentally with problems of the
immigrant in industry (e. g., immigrant classes in factories, in
“ School of the immigrant,” by F. V. Thompson, p. 55, 99).

C A R N E G IE F O U N D A T IO N F O R T H E A D V A N C E M E N T O F T E A C H IN G .

522 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Henry S. Pritchett, presi­
dent.
In 1918 this foundation published as its Bulletin No. 11, “ A study
o f engineering education,” by Charles Biborg Mann. This publi­
cation contained the results o f a comprehensive investigation under­
taken at the request of and in close cooperation with the Joint
Committee on Engineering Education of the National Engineering
Societies, which consisted of delegates from the Society for the Pro­
motion o f Engineering Education, the American Society o f Civil
Engineers, the American Society o f Mechanical Engineers, the
American Institute o f Chemical Engineers, and the American Insti­
tute o f Mining Engineers. The report includes a description of
present conditions, analysis of the problems of engineering educa­
tion and suggested solutions. An appendix on objective tests de­
scribes investigations made by Prof. E. L. Thorndike, o f Columbia
University, as an integral part of the study. Their bearings on the
problems o f admission, elimination, and grading are discussed here
and there throughout the report, but especially in Chapters V III
and X I.
C A R N E G IE IN S T IT U T IO N

O F W A S H IN G T O N .

Bee Nutrition Laboratory, Boston (p. 141).
C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E O F T H E U N IT E D

STATES

O F A M E R IC A .

Mills Building, Washington, D. C. Elliot II. Goodwin, resi­
dent vice president.
This body is a national organization of chambers of commerce,
trade, and civic associations. Its activities are threefold: (1) To
serve American business in the study and solution of its national
problems; (2) to interpret to the American business public those acts
o f the National Government which affect business; (3) to present
to the various branches and departments of the National Govern­
ment the opinion o f American business on business and economic
questions. In the formulation of this opinion on any subject it pro­
ceeds by the method of referendum, submitting to a vote o f its
constituent organizations a series of propositions, prepared by a
committee o f the chamber, which are printed on a ballot and ac­
companied by the report of the committee and arguments in the
negative. Propositions approved by a two-thirds vote are adopted




94

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

by the chamber. Three such reports for referenda submitted by com­
mittees after investigations have dealt with personnel problems in
industry and public employment:
R e fe r e n d u m N o . 2 7 on th e r e p o r t o f th e C o m m itte e on I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s
r e g a r d in g p r in c ip le s o f in d u s tr ia l r e la t io n s . A p r . 1 6 , 1 9 1 9 .
R e fe r e n d u m N o . 3 1 on th e r e p o r t o f th e C o m m itt e e oil I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s
r e g a r d in g e m p lo y m e n t r e la tio n s , J u n e 9 , 1 9 2 0 .
R e fe r e n d u m N o . 3 5 o n th e re p o r t o f th e C o m m itt e e o n B u d g e t a n d E fficie n cy
r e g a r d in g G o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y e e s.
A p r. 22, 1921.

The Raw Materials Production, Fabricated Production, and Rail­
road Departments are also concerned with the study o f labor prob­
lems encountered by the employers’ organizations in their respective
fields.
CLEVELAND

CH AM BER OF COM M ERCE.

Cleveland, Ohio.
The Committee on Industrial Welfare, which issued reports on
“ Safety devices and factory organizations for the prevention o f in­
dustrial accidents” (1913), “ Industrial profit-sharing and welfare
work ” (1916), and “ Substitution o f woman for man power in indus­
t r y ” (1918), and the Committee on Labor Disputes, which issued
three reports on “ Violence in labor disputes” (1915, 1916, 1917),
were succeeded in 1918 by the follow ing:
Committee on L abor R elations.—W. B. McAllister, chairman.
In addition to a fourth report on “ Violence in labor disputes ” (1920)
and two other pamphlets (1919), this committee prepared “ Labor
relations in Cleveland, a declaration o f principles establishing a
proper basis therefor,” which was adopted by the Cleveland Cham­
ber of Commerce, April, 1920. It has recently completed and pub­
lished (1921) a report on “ Employees’ incentive plans in Cleveland
industries” (95 p.), which includes detailed information regarding
types of (a) individual incentive plans (wage-payment methods
offering incentives to individual employees based on their accom­
plishment measured by predetermined standards of production),
and (b) group incentive plans (employees’ profit sharing, bonuses,
and stock ownership), which were found in a survey o f nearly 600
firms..
C L E V E L A N D H O S P IT A L C O U N C IL .

308 Anisfield Building, Cleveland, Ohio.
H ospital and H ealth S urvey of C leveland.—H aven Emerson,
M. D., director. This survey, completed September, 1920, was con­
ducted under the supervision o f a committee appointed by the Hos­
pital Council, October 1, 1919 (Malcolm L. McBride, chairman;
Howell Wright, secretary). The expenses were met by appropria­
tions received from the community chest, through the Welfare Fed­
eration, o f which the Hospital Council is a member.
The complete report is in 11 parts, sold by the council at 50 cents
per part. The results of the industrial investigations are contained
in part 8 (p. 517-639), viz: Industrial medical service, by Wade
Wright, M. D., director o f the industrial hygiene survey; Women and
industry, by Marie W right; Children and industry, by Florence V.
Ball, for the Consumers’ League o f Ohio. The method of survey
is described in part 11, which contains also a bibliography of indus­
trial hygiene surveys (p, 1054-1056),




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC,

95

C O L L E G E OF P H Y S IC IA N S .

15 South Twenty-second Street, Philadelphia, Pa. William S.
Higbee, M. D., 1703 South Broad Street, clerk.
Section on I ndustrial M edicine and P ublic H ealth .— T his sec­
tion o f the College of Physicians was organized in 1917. Fort}^-six
fellows of the college have signed the roll of the section; meetings
are held in February, April, October, and December, on the third
Friday. Its proceedings are published in the Transactions of the
College of Physicians, beginning with third series, v. 39, p. 421-489,
1917. The scope and aims of the section are described in a paper
by J. M. Anders in third series, v. 39, p. 461.
C O M M IS S IO N O N R E S U S C IT A T IO N F R O M

E L E C T R IC

SHOCK.

See National Electric Light Association (p. 125).
C O N F E R E N C E B O A R D O F P H Y S I C I A N S IN I N D U S T R Y .

10 East Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Dr. F. L. Lector,
secretary.
Organized in April, 1914, for cooperative effort in introducing into
industrial establishments the most effective measures for the treat­
ment of injuries or ailments of employees; for promoting sanitary
conditions in workshops; and for prevention of industrial diseases.
It also acts as adviser on medical problems in industry to the
National Industrial Conference Board.
Membership is limited to 30, and is confined to the medical di­
rectors o f industrial establishments who are on a full-time basis. It
is financed by contributions from the firms represented by the
members.
The board meets bimonthly, five times a year, the midsummer
meeting being omitted. Questions of administration of industrial
medical departments, the scope and value of medical records, methods
o f treating industrial accidents and illness occurring within the
plant, and related subjects are discussed at these meetings. Sug­
gested methods are tried out by different board members, under
actual conditions, and their experiences discussed at subsequent meet­
ings. Methods of first-aid treatment of industrial injuries, the con­
tents of first-aid outfits, the minimum size and equipment of firstaid rooms, methods of physical examination and classification of
physical findings, and medical terminology used in industrial work
have been promulgated and standardized by this board. These stand­
ardized methods and classifications have been published in Lesearch
Keport No. 34 of the National Industrial Conference Board, which
contains also a list of members. ' During the past year the board
made a study of physical examinations among industrial workers,
the results being published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association o f December 18, 1920.
C O N F E R E N C E B O A R D ON S A F E T Y A N D S A N IT A T IO N .

10 East Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Magnus W.
Alexander, executive secretary.
Organized in March, 1914, with the National Founders Associa­
tion, the National Association of Manufacturers, the National Metal
Trades Association, and the National Electric Light Association as
charter members. Its purpose is organized cooperation between em­
ployers for the prevention o f work accidents and the promotion of




96

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

sanitary conditions in workshops. At present the Conference Board
is composed o f the first three of the above-named associations.
The board has developed a number of protective devices for use
in industrial plants which it recommends to employers for adop­
tion in their plants. Among these devices are safety goggles, arc
welders’ helmets, leggings, shoes, respirators, knuckle guards, lad­
der feet, chip guards, danger signs, first-aid jars, and stretchers.
These devices have been made available for all employers, whether
or not members of the cooperating associations. The board author­
izes its trade-mark, N. A. S. Q., which stands for National Affiliated
Safety Organizations, to be imprinted on all literature and devices
which it has approved.
In 1916 it issued a number of popular safety bulletins under the
general title of “ The spirit o f caution.” Other information about
its activities is given in a pamphlet entitled, “ Conference boards and
their value in industrial cooperation,” by Magnus W. Alexander
(1915, p. 3-11).
C O N SU M E R S’ L E A G U E O F C IN C IN N A T I.

25 East Ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Miss Annette Mann,
executive secretary.
In November, 1916, three investigators of the league were ap­
pointed an advisory board by the Ohio Industrial Commission and
given the necessary credentials for making a systematic study of
the working conditions of women in Cincinnati factories. The re­
port of this investigation was published by the league in August,
1918, v iz :
W o m e n w o r k e r s in f a c t o r i e s : a s tu d y o f w o r k in g c o n d itio n s in 2 7 5 in d u s tr ia l
e s ta b lis h m e n ts in C in c in n a ti a n d a d jo in in g to w n s .
B y A n n e tte M a n n .
1 91 8 .
4 5 p.

In 1920 a study of wages and cost of living was made, covering
the incomes and expenditures of 216 working women in several cities,
and printed (7 p.) for use in the recent minimum wage campaign.
Minor studies are outlined briefly in the reports for 1917-18 and
1919-20.
C O N S U M E R S ’ L E A G U E O F C O N N E C T IC U T .

36 Pearl Street, Hartford, Conn. Mary C. Welles, general
secretary.
Kecent investigations made by the league to furnish data for its
legislative activities include a study o f “ Child laborers in the shadegrown tobacco industry in Connecticut,” made in 1916 and published
as Pamphlet No. 11; an investigation o f 164 “ Women night workers
in Connecticut,” made in four cities in 1918 (summary o f results
printed as Leaflet No. 20) ; and investigations of tenement-house
workers on factory products in five cities (1918), toilet facilities
for employees in stores (1918) and seats for sales girls (1919) in
several cities, the results o f which have not been published.
In 1919-20, in cooperation with the State Board of Education, a
study was made of the earnings of children wdio go to work at 14
years o f age as compared with those who leave school at 18 years, and
of the turnover of child workers o f 14 to 15 years. For 1921 a
study of the health of children from 14 to 18 years of age employed
in factories and stores is planned.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

97

C O N SU M E R S’ L E A G U E OF E A ST E R N P E N N S Y L V A N IA .

814-815 Otis Building, Sixteenth and Sansom Streets, Phila­
delphia, Pa. Miss A. Estelle Lauder, executive secretary.
This organization has recently published a report o f an investiga­
tion o f 4 Colored women as industrial workers in Philadelphia ”
4
(49 p .), made in 1919-20. Its earlier work includes an investigation
o f retail selling carried on in 1913-14 with the cooperation o f the
Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, which published
the results in its monthly bulletin (v. 2, No. 1, January, 1915, p.
15-98) under the title 4 Condition o f women in mercantile estab­
4
lishments in Philadelphia ” ; a study of home work in 1916-17 made
by investigators of the league, students of Bryn Mawr College, and
the Department o f Labor and Industry, which is to appear shortly as
a State publication entitled 4 Industrial home work in Pennsyl­
4
vania.” In 1918 it initiated, and assisted the National Consumers’
League in carrying out, the shoddy study published as 4 Wage­
4
earning women in war time: the textile industry” (Jour. Indust.
Hyg., October, 1919).
Surveys were made by the league in 1913-14 to gather material
for three vocational guides issued as Pamphlets Nos. 1-3, 4 Occupa­
4
tions for Philadelphia girls”—No. 1, Paper-box making (20 p . ) ;
No. 2, Telephone operating (40 p.) ; No. 3, Bookbinding (88 p.). It
has recently done the research work on the industrial section of a
revised pamphlet on 4 Vocational opportunities in Philadelphia and
4
vicinity,” which is about to go to press.
An unpublished study of girls in public messenger service, made
by the league with the assistance o f other interested organizations,
was the basis o f a ruling by the Industrial Board of the Depart­
ment of Labor and Industry in 1919 prohibiting such employment
o f girls under 18 years of age. A recent study of the application o f
civil service to the labor departments of the several States, under­
taken for a civil-service campaign in Pennsylvania, has been circu­
lated in typewritten form. Data on the cost of living of working
girls in the State and the wages paid to them are collected currently.
CO N SU M ER S’ LE AG U E OF N E W JERSEY.

13 Central Avenue, Newark, N. J.
In December, 1920, this organization published a report o n 4 Night4
ivorking mothers in textile mills, Passaic, N. J.,” by Agnes de Lima,
research secretary (20 p .), containing the results of a study made
during the preceding spring and early summer.
CON SU M ERS’ LE AG U E OF N E W

YORK.

289 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Miss Helen Bryan, execu­
tive secretary.
Formed by the consolidation of the Consumers’ League of the City
o f New York and the Consumers’ League of New York State, effected
June 14, 1921.
In 1916 the New York City organization completed and published
the results o f an investigation of the working conditions of woman
employees in New York restaurants, viz:
B e h in d th e scen es in a r e s ta u r a n t, a s tu d y o f 1 ,0 1 7 w o m e n r e s ta u r a n t e m ­
p lo y e e s.
1916.
4 7 p.
7 0 7 2 3 ° — B u ll. 2 9 9 — 2 1 ------- 7




98

in.

ITONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

In 1916 the Division of Industrial Hygiene of the New York City
Department o f Health undertook an investigation of power laundries
and laundry workers in the city. The Consumers’ League o f the City
of New York cooperated in the study by furnishing additional
investigators to portray the social background and relate the work­
ing life to home conditions. The results of this survey were pub­
lished jointly by the league and the Department o f Health under
the title:
T h e c o st o f c le a n c lo th e s in te r m s o f h e a l t h : a s tu d y o f la u n d r ie s a n d la u n d r y
w o r k e r s in N e w Y o r k C it y . B y L o u is I . H a r r i s a n d N e lle S w a r t z . 1 9 1 8 . 9 6 p.

During 1919 the league made a study of conditions o f work in
steam and^ hand laundries, and reported its findings to the State
Industrial Commission.
Early in 1919 a joint committee, consisting o f representatives o f
the Consumers’ League of New York City, Women’s Trade Union
League, Y. W. C. A., New York Urban League, the Division of
Industrial Studies o f the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Com­
mittee on Colored Workers of the Manhattan Trade School, was
formed to study the employment o f colored women in the industries
of New York City. The report of the investigation was issued under
the following title :
A n e w d a y f o r t h e co lo re d w o m a n w o r k e r :
in d u s tr y in N e w Y o r k C it y . 1 9 1 9 . 3 9 p.

a

s tu d y

o f c o lo re d

w om en

in

A study o f hours, wages, and conditions of work o f telephone
operators on private switchboards tvas made by the league in 1920
to supplement the investigation o f the New York Telephone Co. made
by the New York State Bureau of Women in Industry. A summary
of the results is given in the Consumers’ League Bulletin, July, 1920.
C O O R D IN A T IN G C O M M IT T E E
N E W Y O R K C IT Y .

ON

EM PLOYM ENT

A C T IV IT IE S

IN

W. E. Mosher, Bureau of Municipal Research, New York, chair­
man ; G. E. Scott, Brooklyn Chamber o f Commerce, Brooklyn,
secretary.
Organized early in 1921 at a conference consisting of representa­
tives o f the vocational educational activities and the public employ­
ment and other noncommercial employment interests, together with
those representing employers’ and employees’ organizations as fo l­
lows:
E m p lo y e r s ’ a s s o c i a t i o n s :
N e w Y o r k S ta t e C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
M e r c h a n ts A s s o c ia tio n .
B r o o k ly n C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
Q u e e n sb o r o C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
R e t a il D r y G o o d s A s s o c ia tio n .
E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b .
C e n tr a l T r a d e s a n d L a b o r C o u n c il.
N e w Y o r k S ta t e D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r :
P u b lic E m p lo y m e n t B u r e a u .
B u r e a u o f M e d ia t io n a n d A r b it r a tio n .
B u r e a u o f W o m e n in I n d u s tr y .
B u r e a u o f S ta t is tic s .
U n it e d S ta t e s E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e .
N o n c o m m e r c ia l e m p lo y m e n t a g e n c i e s :
K n ig h t s o f C o lu m b u s.
Y o u n g W o m e n ’s C h r is tia n A s s o c ia tio n .
Y o u n g M e n ’s C h r is tia n A s s o c ia tio n .
S o c ia l W o r k e r s ’ E x c h a n g e .




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC,

99

V o c a tio n a l a n d c o n tin u a tio n sch o o l te a c h e r s.
V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e a n d E m p lo y m e n t S e r v ic e f o r J u n io rs .
B u r e a u o f V o c a tio n a l I n fo r m a tio n .
S ta t e D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a tio n ( V o c a t io n a l D i v i s i o n ) .

The purpose o f the committee is to coordinate activities o f these
various groups so as to secure better training, more discriminating
placement, better organization o f the employment market and of
production processes as means o f reducing unemployment, and to
formulate and develop a community employment policy.
Three working committees have been appointed to deal with three
of the most pressing problems:
1. U n e m p lo y m e n t.
C h a ir m a n , W . E . M o s h e r ; su b c o m m itte e ^ on ( 1 ) U n e m ­
p lo y m e n t a n d th e s c h o o ls ; ( 2 ) U n e m p lo y m e n t a n d r e l i e f ; ( 3 ) M e a n s o f r e ­
d u c in g p re se n t u n e m p lo y m e n t; ( 4 ) A c o n str u c tiv e p r o g r a m fo r r e d u c in g u n ­
e m p lo y m e n t a s a n in d u s tr ia l w a s te .
2 . V o c a tio n a l o p p o r tu n itie s.
C h a ir m a n , C h a r le s M . S m i t h ; s u b c o m m itte e s
on ( 1 ) O p p o r tu n itie s f o r j u v e n i l e s ; ( 2 ) O p p o r tu n itie s in th e s k ille d t r a d e s ;
( 3 ) O p p o r tu n itie s f o r h ig h -s c h o o l s t u d e n t s ; ( 4 ) O p p o r tu n itie s in p r o fe s s io n a l
a n d te c h n ic a l c a llin g s.
3. C o n tin u a tio n sc h o o ls.
C h a ir m a n , A . E . K id d , E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b .

The committee is issuing a monthly bulletin (mimeographed)
which is distributed by the Bureau of Women in Industry o f the
New York State Department of Labor and the New York City
Board o f Education. It is to include reports of progress from the
above committees and also the material formerly published in the
“ News Sheet” o f the Bureau of Women in Industry and the V o­
cational Guidance and Employment Service for Juniors.
C O U N C IL O F M A N A G E M E N T E D U C A T IO N .

Drexel Building, Philadelphia, Pa. Plollis Godfrey, chairman.
Organized as the outcome of a conference on cooperation between
the colleges and industries held in connection with the annual meet­
ing o f the Technology Clubs Associated at Philadelphia, March 26-27,
1920, it serves as a clearing house which provides immediate contact
between the supply of college-trained management men and the de­
mands o f industry for these men; “ management ” being defined u to
include all mind workers in industry from president to foreman,
whether concerned with the technical or the nontechnical branches
of management.”
The council is organized in two divisions: the Industrial Division,
composed of representatives of different American industries, viz,
textiles, rubber, cotton and silk finishing, paper, shoes and leather,
machinery and metals, railroads, public utilities, oil and mining; the
Industrial Collegiate Division, composed of men who are or have
been administrative officers in American colleges and have had indus­
trial as well as academic experience. These two cooperate with the
Committee on Cooperation with Industries o f the American Council
o f Education. (See p. 71.)
The work of the council is confined to the field of collegiate edu­
cation for management and is not concerned with the solution o f
technical problems o f industrial processes and supplies. It consists
at present mainly in the preparation of “ joint specifications,” sup­
ported by an “ inventory o f joint resources,” kept constantly up to
date. The specification shows what the management man needs to
fit him for industry and how much o f this the facilities of the college




III.

100

N O N O F F IC IA L A G E N C IE S .

permit being given; and thus it provides a sound basis for effective
education for industrial management. The purpose o f the inventory
is to promote the use by the industries and the colleges, of each other’s
resources reciprocally and to improve their coordination.
D E T R O IT B O A R D

OF COM M ERCE.

Detroit, Mich. Harry B. Warner, secretary.
The Detroit Board of Commerce proposes to revive, in the fall of
1921, the work o f the Executives’ Club, which disbanded when its
staff went into war services in 1917.1
2
D O U B L E D U T Y F IN G E R G U IL D .

Crocker-Wheeler Co., Ampere, 1T J. Ida Hirst-Gifford, super­
S.
intendent.
This department for the blind was founded in 1917 in conjunction
with the plant of the Crocker-Wheeler Co., by Dr. S. S. Wheeler, for
the purpose of ascertaining by trial what operations in the manufac­
ture of electrical apparatus and machinery could be done as efficiently
by blind workers as by their sight competitors, and of providing em­
ployment for them accordingly. It undertakes to cooperate with
institutions, commissions, associations, etc., for the blind by training
blind men and women to become efficient operatives in the electrical
business. An account of the work done is given in a pamphlet en­
titled “ Information about profitable industrial occupations for the
blind ” (Finger Industry News, No. 3, June, 1919) published by the
guild.
E L E C T R IC A L

SAFETY

CONFERENCE.

25 City Hall Place, New York, N. Y. Dana Pierce, secretary.
An association of representatives of national organizations inter­
ested in questions affecting accident hazards arising from the design,
construction, installation and use of electrical appliances. The co­
operating organizations are as follow s: Associated Manufacturers of
Electrical Supplies; Bureau of Standards; The Electric Power Club;
National Workmen’s Compensation Service Bureau; Underwriters’
Laboratories.
The objects of the conference are to promote by cooperative effort
the orderly, consistent and proper development of practice in elec­
trical manufactures and installations with regard to accident haz­
ards; to promote the development and adoption of safety standards
for the construction and test of electrical appliances and for their
application and installation; to promote and make uniform the ap­
plication o f electrical safety codes both in regard to general prin­
ciples and in regard to particular classes of appliances and systems.
12
A t t h a t tim e th e E x ecu tiv es’ Club w as ad v isin g 40 m a n u fa c tu rin g concerns in D etroit,
an d included in its v ario u s stu d y g ro u p s ab o u t 500 fu n c tio n a l executives. P erso n n el re­
s e arc h w as one of th e seven divisions of its w ork a n d th e sta ff included sp e cialists in
em ploym ent m anagem ent, em ployees’ w elfare w ork, p roduction m ethods, an d tim e study.
I t s lib ra ry of in d u s tria l re la tio n s lite r a tu r e a t th e D e tro it B oard o f C om m erce has been
con tin u ed by th e assig n m en t of a lib ra ria n fro m D e tro it P ublic L ib rary .
Two p a p e rs by Boyd F ish er, it s vice p resid en t, “ How to reduce lab o r tu rn o v e r ” and
“ D eterm in in g co st of tu rn o v e r o f lab o r,” w ere published in U. S. B u reau of L abor S ta ­
tis tic s B u lletin No. 227 (p. 29—
47, 6 0-66) and in A nnals of th e A m erican A cadem y of
P o litic al an d Social Science, May, 1917 (v. 71, p. 10l 32, 44— 0 ). T he r e p o rt of a com­
5
m ittee o f p h y sician s an d w elfare w orkers to th e w elfare m an ag ers’ gro u p of th e club en­
title d “ ‘R ecom m ended sta n d a rd p ra c tic e on m edical supervision in D e tro it p la n ts ” a p ­
peared in th e sam e issu e of th e A n n als (p. 9 6 -1 0 6 ). A stu d y of 87 m u tu al benefit or­
g an izatio n s, m ade by one of th e staff, is o u t of p rin t. In a d d itio n to th e above, confi­
d e n tia l re p o rts on special p hases of m anagem ent, in cluding personnel, w ere se n t o ut in
m u ltig ra p h e d fo rm to m em bers of th e club.




ASSOCIATIONS^ SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

101

A committee of the conference has prepared the following publica­
tion, which has been approved and accepted by its cooperating organi­
zations :
S a f e t y s ta n d a r d f o r in d u s tr ia l c o n tr o l e q u ip m e n t 1 9 2 1 .
22 p.
( I n t e n d e d to
b e u se d in c o n ju n c tio n w ith p a r t 3 o f th e n a t io n a l e le c tr ic a l s a f e t y co d e, to
w h ic h it is s u p p le m e n ta r y .)

An additional section of this standard containing detailed rules
for special application to elevators, cranes, printing presses, etc., is
in course of preparation.
The conference is also the sponsor under the American Engineer­
ing Standards Committee of a code on electric power control, but
the results of this work are not yet published.
E M P L O Y M E N T M A N A G E R S ’ A S S O C IA T IO N , B O S T O N .

Room 327, 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Ralph G Wells,
r.
secretary.
This association, the first o f its kind in the country, was organized
in the fall of 1912, informal meetings having been held for some
time previously. It is affiliated with the Industrial Relations Asso­
ciation o f America.
The object of the organization is to study and promote the various
phases o f industrial relations .activities, and problems o f relations
with employees—their selection, training, and management. Sus­
taining memberships (annual dues, $50) are held by firms, which
are entitled to designate as many o f their executives as they desire
to participate in the association’s activities. In addition there are
a few associate members (annual dues, $25), individuals connected
with educational institutions.
Regular meetings are held once a month, except during July and
August; special meetings as interest in some special subject warrants.
In recent years groups interested in particular phases o f industrial
relations work (e. g., employment-office practice, training and educa­
tion, mutual benefit associations, planning and research) have been
formed and hold meetings more or less regularly for the more in­
tensive discussion o f special topics. Occasionally all-day conferences
on special subjects have been held and analyses have been prepared
in advance to focus discussion (e. g., on shop committee plans in
operation, foremen’s meetings).
A file of information regarding industrial relations activities, col­
lected by questionnaires sent to its members, is maintained at the
office o f the association to enable it to answer as fully as possible
inquiries from members. This includes data regarding wage sys­
tems and other financial inducements, employment, training and
education, working conditions, health, special service, employees’
activities, and personal aid.
A report from the Committee on Labor Turnover o f the associa­
tion in 1917 on “ The tabulating of labor turnover ” was published
in United States Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 227 (p.
50-55) and in Annals o f the American Academy o f Political and So­
cial Science, May, 1917 (p. 33-43).




102

III.

N Q N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

E N G IN E E R IN G F O U N D A T IO N .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Alfred D.
Flinn, secretary.
This foundation is based on a trust fund established in 1914 by
United Engineering Society from a gift by Ambrose Swasey, o f
Cleveland, Ohio, and subsequently increased by Mr. Swasey and
other donors (present amount, $500,000). The income from this
endowment is used 4 for the furtherance o f research in science and
6
in engineering, or for the advancement in any other manner of the
profession o f engineering and the good o f mankind.” It is ad­
ministered by the Engineering Foundation Board composed of
members from the American Society of Civil Engineers, American
Institute o f Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, American So­
ciety of Mechanical Engineers, and American Institute of Electrical
Engineers, and members at large. The board is a department of
United Engineering Society and is the joint agency of the Founder
Societies named for the stimulation, direction and support of
research.
Besides researches relating to the physical aspects of engineering,
it has supported a limited study in the mental hygiene o f industry by
Dr. E. E. Southard, terminated by his sudden death in February,
1920. Three papers by Dr. Southard resulting from this study have
been issued by Engineering Foundation in its reprint series:
N o . 1 . T h e m e n ta l h y g ie n e o f i n d u s t r y : A m o v e m e n t t h a t p a r t ic u la r ly c o n ­
c e rn s e m p lo y m e n t m a n a g e r s .
( R e p r . f r o m I n d u s t r ia l M a n a g e m e n t , F e b ., 1 9 2 0 .)
2 4 p.
N o . 2 . T r a d e -u n io n is m a n d te m p e r a m e n t ; th e p s y c h ia tr ic p o in t o f v ie w in
in d u s tr y .
(R e p r . f r o m I n d u s t r ia l M a n a g e m e n t , A p r ., 1 9 2 0 .)
1 8 p.
N o . 3 . T h e m o d e r n s p e c ia lis t in u n r e s t ; a p la c e f o r th e p s y c h i a t r is t in in ­
d u s tr y .
( R e p r . f r o m I n d u s t r ia l M a n a g e m e n t , J u n e , 1 9 2 0 .)
1 8 p.
( T h e s e a r tic le s w e r e a ls o p u b lis h e d in M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 4 , p . 4 3 - 6 4 , 2 8 1 3 0 0 , 5 5 0 -5 6 3 .)

Miss Mary C. Jarrett, who collaborated with Dr. Southard, pre­
sented a report o f progress on the work before the Mental Hygiene
Division o f the National Conference o f Social Work, New Orleans,
April IT, 1920, which appeared under the title 4 The mental hygiene
6
o f industry” in Mental Hygiene (v. 4, No. 4, October, 1920).
Engineering Foundation has also cooperated with National Re­
search Council in a preliminary examination o f the possibilities for
scientific research relating to personnel in industry, resulting in the
organization o f the Personnel Research Federation (see p. 143), and
is considering the need and means for a thorough survey of in­
dustrial education and training, particularly training o f men for
and in industries relating to the various branches of engineering.
FEDERATED

A M E R IC A N

E N G IN E E R IN G S O C IE T IE S .

719 Fifteenth Street, NW., Washington, D. C. D. W. Wallace,
executive secretary.
Organized June, 1920, in Washington, D. C., at a conference of
delegates representing 66 engineering societies, after two years’ pre­
liminary work by development committees and a joint conference
committee o f the Founder Societies (i. e., the mechanical, civil, elec­
trical, and mining engineers). The object o f the organization is:
T o f u r t h e r th e in te r e s ts o f th e p u b lic th r o u g h th e u s e o f te c h n ic a l k n o w le d g e
a n d e n g in e e r in g e x p e r ie n c e , a n d to co n sid e r a n d a c t u p on m a tte r s c o m m o n to
th e e n g in e e r in g a n d a llie d te c h n ic a l p r o fe s s io n s .




103

A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

Its membership consists of national, local, State and regional
engineering, and allied technical organizations and affiliations. The
management is vested in a -body known as the American Engineering
Council1 and its executive board. Each constituent society is en­
3
titled to one representative on the American Engineering Council
for a membership of from 100 to 1,000 engineers, and one additional
representative for every additional 1,000 members or major fraction
thereof. Each national society represented on the council contributes
annually $1.50 per member and each local, State, or regional organiza­
tion $1 per member.
C o m m i t t e e o n E l i m i n a t i o n o f W a s t e i n I n d u s t r y . —E. W . W al­
lace, vice chairman. This committee, appointed January 12, 1921,
has undertaken an “ Assay of waste ” to ascertain primarily the waste
o f human effort in production, and to suggest means of removing the
cause o f such waste. Field studies have been carried on in nine d if­
ferent industries, v iz : Housing and building trades, transportation,
bituminous coal mining, ready-made men’s clothing, printing, shoes,
rubber, metal trades, and textiles, covering about 200 factories; and
at Worcester, Mass., a regional assay covering 40 industries was
made. A schedule of “ Guide questions for field workers,” pre­
pared by J. H. Williams and C. E. Knoeppel, was issued in mime­
ographed form March, 1921, to standardize the collection of data.
Section K (organization) of this questionnaire deals in part with the
following topics: Personnel records, procedure of employment, un­
employment and efforts to overcome seasonal fluctuation, records of
discharges and lay-offs, practice of temporary shut downs, investi­
gation o f quits, labor turnover, determination of wage scale, hours
o f labor, methods of shop representation, labor difficulties due to
strikes, lockouts, and stoppages, accidents, safety, and welfare work.
A summary of the committee’s findings was issued in August and the
completed report on the results of this investigation was published
" in October, 1921 (McGraw-Hill Co.) under the title “ Waste in in­
dustry” (402 p.).
G R IN D IN G
W HEEL
M ANUFACTURERS’
U N IT E D S T A T E S A N D C A N A D A .

A S S O C IA T IO N

OF

THE

Dayton, Ohio. Frank E. Henry, secretary.
This association (formerly Abrasive Wheel Manufacturers) is
joint sponsor for the fourth and revised edition o f the “ Safety code
for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels ” now being pre­
pared under the auspices and rules of procedure of the American
Engineering Standards Committee. The first three editions o f this
code were issued by the association independently. The original issue
was based on the report of a special committee appointed by the Na­
tional Machine Tool Builders Association to consider safety in con­
nection with abrasive wheels and grinding machines and a tentative
13
E n g in e erin g Council, w hich th is new body supersedes, w e n t o u t of existence Dec.
31, 1920. I t w as estab lish ed in, th e sp rin g of 1917 fo r a sim ila r purpose a s a d e p a rtm e n t
of U n ited E n g in e erin g Society a n d consisted of five re p re se n ta tiv e s each from th e four
F o u n d er Societies, fo u r tru s te e s of U nited E ngineering Society, and one re p re se n ta tiv e
each from A m erican Society fo r T estin g M a terials a n d A m erican R ailw ay E n g in e erin g
A ssociation, w hich becam e m em bers F eb ru ary , 1919, and A pril, 1920, respectively. D u r­
in g th e w ar period i t w a s activ ely engaged in o rganizing en gineering ab ility for th e
pro secu tio n of th e w ar. I t s C om m ittee on C lassification and C om pensation of E ngineers,
organized A pril, 1919, conducted an in v estig atio n concerning engineers in F ederal, S tate,
an d m unicip al services an d prep ared a sta n d a rd classification (fo r purposes of com pensa­
tio n ) an d a proposed schedule of sa la rie s for en g in eers in G overnm ent em ploym ent (pub­
lished Ja n u a ry , 1920, in ab b rev iated form by th e F o u n d er S ocieties and th e tech n ical jo u r ­
n als, e. g,, E n g in e erin g News R ecord),




104

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

report of a special committee appointed by the State of Pennsylvania
to draft laws pertaining to grinding and polishing. The third edi­
tion bears the approval of the Safety Committee of the National
Machine Tool Builders’ Association, which cooperated with the
Safety Committee of this association in conducting the tests and com­
piling the tables.
H O U G H TO N RESEAR CH STAFF.

Third, American, and Somerset Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. E. F.
Houghton & Co.
With the aid of outside specialists in bacteriology and dermatology
this staff has recently completed an investigation of the “ Causes of
skin sores and boils among metal workers ” and the results were pub­
lished in 1920 in a pamphlet (51 p .) , obtainable from the above firm.
IL L U M IN A T IN G E N G IN E E R IN G S O C IE T Y .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y.
Organized January 10, 1906, for the advancement and dissemina­
tion o f theoretical and practical knowledge o f the science and art of
illumination. Sections have been organized in Chicago, New Eng­
land, New York, Philadelphia; chapters for Cleveland and San
Francisco Bay cities.
The Transactions, published monthly, include papers on eye fa­
tigue, illumination and eye strain, factory lighting, glare, safety fea­
tures o f industrial lighting, etc. The 1915 volume contains a number
o f reports by a committee on the glare from reflecting surfaces, which
began its work in 1912.
C o m m i t t e e o n L i g h t i n g L e g i s l a t i o n .— This standing committee
was first appointed in 1913. In cooperation with a special commit­
tee on factory lighting it prepared in 1915 the code of lighting fac­
tories, mills, and other work places, printed with explanatory rules
and notes in the society’s Transactions (v. 10, p. 606-641). This code
was essentially a safety code in that it stipulated the minimum re­
quirements for proper illumination o f dangerous places about ma­
chinery, etc. It also contained data and recommendations for in­
stallations designed to avoid glare and undue strain upon the eyes.
It was amended in 1917 and has served as the basis for the industrial
lighting laws, rules and regulations now in force in Pennsyvania,
New Jersey, New York, Wisconsin, Oregon, California, and Ohio.
The code is now being revised under the auspices and rules of pro­
cedure o f the American Engineering Standards Committee, the
sponsorship for the industrial lighting code having been assigned
to the Illuminating Engineering Society, which is represented by
this committee. The revisions thus far proposed are in the nature
o f additions and modifications arising out o f advances in the art and
experience gained in the operation and enforcement of the State codes.
IN D U S T R IA L IN F O R M A T IO N

S E R V IC E ,

Barristers’ Hall, Boston, Mass. W. L. Stoddard, secretary.
Organized in 1920 as “ a clearing house for accurate current infor­
mation about labor in industrial and mercantile establishments,
transportation, agriculture, and clerical and professional service.”
Since March 18, 1920, it has issued to clients (subscribing $25 a
year) loose-leaf weekly reports, entitled “ The industrial information
service,” whifch consist largely of analyses and digests o f published



A S S O C I A T IO N S ,

S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

105

data, but also contain short studies relating to personnel matters
made by the staff or by the Bureau of Personnel Administration
(see p. 89), whose director heads the New York office o f the service
(17 West Forty-seventh Street). A supplementary service letter is
also sent to clients subscribing $100.
Extended investigations are made for clients, subject to appro­
priate charges. In the early part o f 1921 several studies on em­
ployment, unemployment, strikes and lockouts, employee representa­
tion, and methods o f wage payment were made for the Committee
on Elimination of Waste o f the Federated American Engineering
Societies. (See p. 103.)
IN D U S T R IA L R E L A T IO N S A S S O C IA T IO N

O F A M E R IC A .

671 Broad Street, Newark, N. J, E. A. Shay, executive secretary.
Organized as the National Association of Employment Managers
at a convention of employment and other executives held in Rochester.
N. Y., May, 1918; three such conferences having been held prior to
this, in Minneapolis (January, 1916), Boston (May, 1916), and Phila­
delphia (April, 1917).1 Incorporated under the laws of New Jersey
4
in February, 1920; name changed to Industrial Relations Association
o f America, March 1, 1920.
The purpose of the organization is to study and promote the various
phases of industrial relations activities and to encourage the organi­
zation o f and give assistance to local organizations of similar nature
through the maintenance of central administrative offices and by
such other means as the board of directors may determine.
There are at present 34 group members (annual dues: 1 $5 per mem­
5
ber for groups having not more than 75 members, with a minimum
of $100 and a maximum of $300; $4 per member for groups having
76 or more members). These groups are the affiliated local organi­
zations listed below, with a membership representing in the aggre­
gate approximately 2,000 concerns. In addition, there are about 120
business members (concerns so located geographically that they can
not join a local group; dues, $25 a year) and about 120 associate
members (interested persons not directly engaged in industrial re­
lations work; dues, $10 a year).
Annual conventions are held at time and place determined by the
board o f directors (first at Cleveland, Ohio, May 21-23, 1919; second
at Chicago, 111., May 19-21, 1920; third to be held at New York, Nov.
1-4, 1921). The attendance at the 1920 convention was about 2,500.
In addition to the general sessions, there are round-table discussions
o f special topics and sectional meetings of those belonging to particu­
lar groups o f industrial or commercial concerns. Sections have been
organized as follow s: Banks, Chemical industries, Department stores,
Lumber, Metal trades, Packing industries, Public utilities, Railroads,
Steel industries. At the 1920 convention subject meetings were held
on Americanization, apprentice training, benefit, thrift and budget,
cooperative stores, coordination with educational institutions, de­
veloping the industrial relations staff, developing understudies, de­
velopment of plant spirit, employment office methods, group in­
surance, housing, industrial relations department costs, introducing
14 P roceedings of these four conferences w ere published as B u lletin s 196, 202, 227, 247,
of th e U. S. B u reau of L abor S ta tistic s.
15 A proposal to ra ise th e dues to $10 a y ear per m em ber is under consideration.




106

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

the new worker, job specifications and job analysis, mental tests,
periodic rating, personal aid to workers, plant papers, problems o f
industries employing under 500, radicalism, recreation, relations
o f employment office and foremen, restaurants, shop and works com­
mittees, shortage of labor, stock purchase, vacations, wage levels
and women. The Proceedings of the 1919 and 1920 conventions have
been published (two volumes, $5 each).
In October and December, 1919, and February, 1920, three one-day
conferences on special subjects were held, two in New York and one
in Chicago. The minutes o f the first two o f these bimonthly con­
ferences have been published under the titles “ Training the super­
visory fo rce 9 and “ Relationships and adjustments between employ­
5
ers and em ployed9 respectively ($2 per volume). District confer­
9
ences were started early in 1921, the first being held at Springfield,
Mass., on January 7.
Since January, 1919, the association has issued a monthly periodi­
cal, Personnel, devoted entirely to subjects in the various branches
o f industrial relations and containing news notes o f the local asso­
ciations, etc. It is sent to all members.
A number o f special investigations have been made by question­
naires sent out by the association to its members. A digest o f the
material received has been furnished to members either in pam­
phlet form, or in the columns o f Personnel. The subjects covered
(and the issues o f Personnel containing brief summaries o f the re­
sults) are as follows: National employment service (questionnaire
with v. 1, No. 3, March, 1919; results in v. 1, No. 8, August, 1919) ;
Americanization—effects o f illiteracy and inability to understand
English on turnover, earnings, industrial unrest, production, and
accidents (questionnaire with v. 1, No. 7, July, 1919; results in v. 1,
No. 10, October, 1919) ; Training the supervisory force (v. 2, No. 1,
January, 1920) ; Extent and cost o f personnel activities (v. 2, No. 3,
March, 1920) ; Vacations (v. 2, No. 6, June, 1920) ; Supervisory
force salaries; Introducing the new worker; How successful employ­
ment offices are started. A digest o f information regarding person­
nel work in public utility corporations in the United States and
Canada obtained by questionnaire sent out by the Public Utility
Section is published in v. 2, No. 10, October, 1920.
The administrative office staff conducts an information service for
members and reports that it has received and answered nearly
10,000 inquiries on subjects connected with industrial relations dur­
ing the past two years.
Affiliated groups and their secretaries.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ B r a n c h , A t la n t ic C o a s t S h ip b u ild e r s A s s o c ia tio n , P h ila ­
d e lp h ia , P a .
C la r e n c e S a m u e l K in g , A t la n t ic C o a s t S h ip b u ild e r s A s s o c ia tio n , 1 7 0 1 W a l ­
n u t S tr e e t.
B a lt i m o r e C o u n c il, I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , B a lt im o r e , M d .
J . A llis o n M u ir , G e n e r a l E le c t r ic C o.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , B o s to n , M a s s , ( s e e p . 1 0 1 ) .
R a lp h G . W e l l s , ro o m 3 2 7 , 6 B e a c o n S tr e e t.
B r id g e p o r t C o u n c il, I n d u s t r ia l R e la t io n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , B r id g e p o r t,
Conn.
C . S. S m ith , M a n n in g , M a x w e ll & M o o r e ( I n c . ) .
B u f f a lo C o u n c il, I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , B u f fa lo , N . Y .
E . E a r le A x t e ll, M a s o n ic S e r v ic e B u r e a u .




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

107

S ta r k C o u n ty E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ S c h o o l, C a n to n , O h io .
J. H o w a r d R e n s h a w , 1 7 E r v in B lo c k .
C h ic a g o C o u n c il, I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , C h ic a g o , 111.
F . C . W . P a r k e r , C e n tr a l Y . M . C . A ., 1 9 S o u th L a S a l l e S tr e e t.
C in c in n a ti C o u n c il, I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , C in c in n a ti,
O h io .
M a b e l B . W a lla c e , G e o r g e G . S tr ie t m a n n ’s S o n s Co.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s G r o u p , M a n u f a c t u r e r s a n d W h o le s a le M e r c h a n ts B o a r d ,
C le v e la n d C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
S.
R . M a s o n , C le v e la n d C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , D a y to n , O h io .
J. D , D o u g la s , D a y to n M a lle a b le Ir o n C o .
D e t r o it E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , D e tr o it , M ic h .
G e o r g e W . G r a n t , E m p lo y e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , 1 3 1 9 B o o k B u ild in g .
E a s t S id e E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , E a s t S t. L o u is , 111.
R o s s B o w le s , E a s t S id e E m p lo y e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , M u r p h y B u ild in g .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , H a m ilt o n , O h io .
J o sep h M . B u tc h e r , Y . M . C . A .
I n d ia n a p o lis C o u n c il, I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , I n d i a n ­
a p o lis , In d .
Is a b e l N . D r u m m o n d , I n d ia n a p o lis G lo v e C o.
J e r s e y C it y C o u n c il, I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , J e r s e y C it y ,
N.
J.
E . G e o r g e S c h a e fe r , J e r s e y G ity C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
L a n s in g E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , L a n s in g , M ic h .
A r t h u r N . A v e r y , N e w -W a y M o to r C o.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , L o s A n g e le s , C a lif .
C . B e n ja m in B e m is , S o u th e r n C a lif o r n ia T e le p h o n e C o .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , M e r id e n , C o n n .
G . F . C r o a s d a le , C o n n e c tic u t T e le p h o n e & E le c t r ic C o .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ S e c tio n , M a n u f a c t u r in g C lu b o f M in n e a p o lis , M in n e ­
a p o lis , M in n .
A le x i s C a s w e ll, M a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ C lu b .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , T r i -C i t y M a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , M o lin e , 111.
E d g a r R . B la d e l, T r i -C i t y M a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n .
N e w a r k C o u n c il, I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , N e w a r k , N . J.
M . A . C la r k , E . I . d u P o n t d e N e m o u r s & C o . ( I n c . ) , A r lin g t o n , N . J.
T h e E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b o f N e w Y o r k , N e w Y o r k C ity .
O s c a r M . M ille r , S ta n d a r d O il C o ., 2 6 B r o a d w a y .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ G ro u p , C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e , N ia g a r a F a lls , N . Y .
R . D . H o u s e , N ia g a r a F a lls C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
P h ila d e lp h ia A s s o c ia tio n f o r th e D is c u s s io n o f E m p lo y m e n t P r o b le m s , P h ila d e l­
p h ia , P a .
J o se p h H . W i ll i t s , W h a r t o n S c h o o l, U n iv e r s it y o f P e n n s y lv a n ia .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n o f th e E m p lo y e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n o f P it t s ­
b u r g h , P itts b u r g h , P a .
E . B . M o r e la n d , E m p lo y e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , P o n tia c , M ic h .
K . M c V i t t ie , S ta n d a r d P a r ts Co.
O r e g o n C o u n c il, I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , P o r tla n d , G re g .
R a y m o n d T a n V a lin , Y . M . C . A .
I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f B e r k s C o u n ty , R e a d in g , P a .
P . B . W e id n e r , M a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n .
E m p lo y m e n t a n d S e r v ic e G r o u p , I n d u s tr ia l M a n a g e m e n t C o u n c il, R o c h e s t e r
C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
E li o t t F r o s t , R o c h e s te r C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e .
I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f C a lif o r n ia , S a n F r a n c is c o , C a lif .
A d d r e s s : 4 5 1 F lo o d B u ild in g .
S in c e A u g u s t , 1 9 2 1 , th is a s s o c ia tio n h a s
p u b lis h e d a m im e o g r a p h e d m o n th ly , I n d u s t r ia l R e la t io n s E x c h a n g e
( V in i n g T . F is h e r , e d i t o r ) .
S t. L o u is D is t r ic t C o u n c il, I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , S t.
L o u is , M o .
C . H . W e is e r , S o u th w e s te r n B e ll T e le p h o n e S y s te m .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C o u n c il, S t. P a u l A s s o c ia tio n , S t. P a u l, M in n .
T h e o d o r e S a n d e r, j r ., A th le t ic C lu b B u ild in g .
S e a ttle C o u n c il, I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f A m e r ic a , S e a ttle , W a s h .
N in a F . W in n , B e m is B r o s , B a g C o.




108

III.

1 TO S O F F I C I A L
S UT

A G E N C IE S .

E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n o f S t. J o se p h C o m ity , S o u th B e n d , In d .
A . M . T a y lo r , I n d ia n a B e ll T e le p h o n e C o.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , S p rin g fie ld , M a s s .
C h a r le s V . D e r r ic k , A m e r ic a n B o s c h M a g n e to Co.
I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f T o le d o , T o le d o , O h io .
A lla n M . K u r e th , 5 0 1 N a s b y B u ild in g .

Unaffiliatcd y roups and their secretaries.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , A u b u r n , N., Y .
C . W . S to r k e , E m p lo y e r s ' A s s o c ia tio n .
P e r so n n e l M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , B r o o k ly n C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e , B r o o k ly n , N . Y .
G.
E . S c o tt, B r o o k ly n C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e , 3 2 C o u r t S tr e e t.
I n d u s t r i a l.R e la t i o n s A s s o c ia tio n o f E lm i r a D is t r ic t, E lm ir a , N . Y .
J e s s e C . S h e p a rd , S h e p a r d E le c t r ic C r a n e & H o i s t C o ., M o n to u r F a lls , N . Y .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , E r ie , P a .
J . C . D a lz e ll, Y . M . C . A .
E m p lo y m e n t E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b , H a r t f o r d , C o n n .
P h ilip J. S h e r id e n , P r a t t & C a d y C o . ( I n c .) .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C o u n c il, C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e , K a n s a s C ity , M o .
M is s M . E . B r ia n , W e s t e r n U n io n T e le g r a p h C o.
L a w r e n c e I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s C lu b , L a w r e n c e , M a s s .
G . W . F o lk , Y . M . C . A .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r G r o u p , N e w H a m p s h ir e M a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n ,
M a n c h e s te r , N . H .
J a m e s H a it h w a it e , S ta r k M ills .
M ilw a u k e e E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , M ilw a u k e e , W i s .
L.
J. P a r r is h , W is c o n s i n M o to r M a n u f a c t u r in g C o.
M u s k e g o n E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , M u s k e g o n , M ic h .
W . W . P o o le , U n io n N a t io n a l B a n k B u ild in g .,
I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s C o u n c il, N e w H a v e n , C o n n .
R ic h a r d M . T h o m p s o n , U n it e d S ta te s R u b b e r C o .
E m p lo y m e n t E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b o f L o u is ia n a , N e w O r le a n s , L a .
A . S. B o is fo n t a i n e , S o u th e r n P in e A s s o c ia tio n .
P e r s o n n e l W o r k e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , N e w Y o r k C ity .
M is s C h r is tin e M . A y a r s , M c E lw a in , M o r s e & R o g e r s , D u a n e S tr e e t.
B la c k s t o n e V a lle y E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , F a w tu c k e t, R . I.
E . E., W y n n , D . G o ff & S o n s.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , P e o r ia , 111.
H . S. T a e s , P e o r ia , 111.
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n o f B e r k s h ir e C o u n ty , P itts fie ld , M a s s .
M y le s W . I llin g s w o r t h , 7 3 N o r t h S tr e e t.
R h o d e I s la n d I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n , P ro v id e n c e , R . I.
G e o r g e S. W a lla c e , U n iv e r s a l W i n d i n g C o.
P e r so n n e l M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e , B o r o u g h o f Q u e e n s , N . Y .
F r a n k E . B r e y fo g le , C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e , B r id g e P la z a , B o r o u g h o f
Q u e e n s, N., Y .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ C lu b , S a g in a w , M ic h .
E . F . V o g t, S a g in a w P r o d u c ts C o.
E m p lo y m e n t E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b o f th e S t. L o u is D is t r ic t , S t. L o u is , M o .
O.
V . S ly , E m p lo y e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , 3 0 2 S e c u r ity B u ild in g .
E x e c u t i v e s ’ C lu b , S p r in g fie ld B r a n c h , N a t io n a l M e t a l T r a d e s A s s o c ia tio n ,
S p rin g fie ld , M a s s .
x\. R . T u lio c h , N a t io n a l M e t a l T r a d e s A s s o c ia tio n , S p rin g fie ld , M a s s .
E m p lo y m e n t M a n a g e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , S y r a c u s e , N . Y.,
C . L . N ic h o ls o n , P a s s & S e y m o u r ( I n c .) .
I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f T o r o n to , T o r o n to , O n ta r io , C a n a d a .
G . W . A lle n , C o n s u m e r s ’ G a s C o .
I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s A s s o c ia tio n o f W e s t V ir g in ia , W h e e lin g , W . V a .
J o s. A . M e a g h e r , E m p lo y e r s ’ A s s o c ia tio n , 3 0 0 S c h e n k B u ild in g .

I N S T IT U T E F O R C R IP P L E D A N D

D IS A B L E D M E N .

101 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. J. C. Faries,
director.
Established by the American Red Cross in 1917 as the Red Cross
Institute for Crippled and Disabled Men; in November, 1919, turned




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

109

over to a board of trustees to be continued as a private philanthropic
institution and name changed to present form ; incorporated Janu­
ary 13, 1920.
Its purpose is, primarily, to help men who, through the loss of one
or more limbs or the impairment of their use, find difficulty in earn­
ing their living. It does not undertake medical or surgical treatment.
As means appropriate to its aim it maintains a shop for the manu­
facture of artificial limbs and appliances, a training school for giving
instruction in a variety of trades, and an employment bureau for
finding suitable occupations for handicapped men. A report of the
activities of the institute, by the director, entitled “ Three years o f
work for handicapped m en” (96 p.) published July, 1920, covers
these three branches of its work and also contains a list of its publi­
cations.
The results of research undertaken by the institute have been pub­
lished in 25 monographs, forming Publications, Series I, Nos. 1-16;
Series II, Nos. 1-9. O f these, 12 are descriptive of the work done
in foreign countries for the rehabilitation of disabled soldiers; the
rest are mainly studies of the vocational possibilities for the handi­
capped in this country.
Preliminary to starting the work of the institute, an investigation
was made in the summer of 1917 into the experiences of cripples in
civil life in readjusting themselves to industry after injury. The re­
sults are given i n :
S e r ie s I , N o . 2. T h e e co n o m ic co n se q u e n c e s o f p h y s ic a l d i s a b i li t y ; a
s tu d y o f c iv ilia n crip p le s in N e w Y o r k C ity . B y J. C. F a r ie s . 1 9 1 8 . 11 p.

c a se

In the early part of 1918 the Department of Industrial Survey of
the institute undertook a survey of the chief industries of New York
City to locate the jobs in which the work could be performed by
cripples. The first report was issued as:
S e r ie s I , N o . 1 6 .
O p p o r tu n itie s f o r th e e m p lo y m e n t o f d is a b le d m e n ; p re ­
lim in a r y s u r v e y o f th e p ia n o , le a th e r , ru b b e r, p a p e r g o o d s , sh oe , s h e e t-m e ta l
go o d s, c a n d y , d r u g a n d c h e m ic a l, c ig a r , silk , c e llu lo id , o p tic a l go o d s, a n d m o tio n p ic tu r e in d u s tr ie s . 1 9 1 8 . 3 3 p.

A study supplementary to this was prepared for publication in the
American Journal of Care for Cripples, but owing to the suspension
o f that magazine was never printed. A set o f page proofs is on file
in the institute library, which also has typewritten manuscripts of
studies o f the toy industry, woodworking, knit goods, machine trades,
fur industry, photo-engraving, and banjo and drum trades, not in­
cluded in the two foregoing compilations.
In Series I I the institute has published five studies made by the
Bureau of Vocational Guidance, Harvard University, viz:
N o . 4 . E m p lo y m e n t o p p o r tu n itie s fo r h a n d ic a p p e d m e n in th e e o p p e r s m ith in g
tr a d e .
B y B e r t J. M o r r is .
1918.
N o . 6. E m p lo jn n e n t o p p o r tu n itie s fo r h a n d ic a p p e d m en in th e o p tic a l-g o o d s
in d u s tr y . B y B e r t J. M o r r is .
1919.
N o . 7. O p p o r tu n itie s fo r h a n d ic a p p e d m e n in th e b r u s h in d u s tr y . B y C h a r le s
H . P a u li.
1919.
N o . 8. O p p o r tu n itie s f o r h a n d ic a p p e d m e n in th e sh oe in d u s tr y .
B y F red ­
e ric k J. A lle n .
1919.
N o . 9 . O p p o r tu n itie s fo r h a n d ic a p p e d m en in th e ru b b e r in d u s tr y .
B y B . J.
M o r r is a n d C . H . P a u li. 1 9 1 9 .

Placement technique in the employment work of the institute is
the subject o f Series I, No. 9, by Miss 'Gertrude Stein; and the results



110

III. 1T
S ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

o f experimental work on prosthetic appliances are given in Series
XI, No. 2, entitled, “ Principles of design and construction o f arti­
ficial legs,” by Philip Wilson.
The institute has also issued miscellaneous special publications
and reprints and translations of addresses of delegates at the Inter­
national Conference on Rehabilitation o f the Disabled, held March,
1919, in New York City.
IN S T IT U T E F O R G O V E R N M E N T R E SE A R C H .

818 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, D. C. W. F. W il­
loughby, director.
The purpose of this institute, incorporated under the laws of the
District o f Columbia March 16, 1916, is to conduct scientific investi­
gations into the theory and practice of governmental administration,
including the conditions affecting the efficiency and welfare of gov­
ernmental officers and employees, and perform such services as may
tend to the development and application of the principles of efficiency
in governmental administration.
It is publishing the results of its researches in two series of volumes
under the general titles “ Principles of administration ” and “ Studies
in administration,” respectively. The former series attempts to de­
termine and make known the most approved principles of adminis­
tration ; the latter consists of detailed and critical studies of existing
systems in the United States or foreign countries. Personnel admin­
istration is the subject of two contributions, one in each series, which
have been completed and are now in press:
P r in c ip le s o f p u b lic p e r so n n e l a d m in is tr a tio n .
B y A r t h u r W . P r o c te r .
T h e F e d e r a l s e r v i c e : A s tu d y o f th e s y s t e m o f p e r s o n n e l a d m in is tr a tio n o f
th e U n ite d S ta t e s G o v e r n m e n t.
B y L e w is M a y e r s .

The following studies o f special personnel problems have already
been published for the institute by D. Appleton & Co., New Y ork:
P r in c ip le s g o v e r n in g th e r e tir e m e n t o f p u b lic e m p lo y e e s . B y L e w is M e r r ia m .
1918.
4 6 2 p.
T e a c h e r s ’ p e n sio n s y s te m s in th e U n ite d S ta te s .
B y P a u l S tu d e n s L y .
1920.
4 6 0 p.

Information about the work o f the institute in other lines of gov­
ernmental research is given in a pamphlet entitled “ The Institute
for Government Research; its organization, work and publications,”
issued June, 1920.
IN S T IT U T E O F M A K E R S O F E X P L O S IV E S .

103 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. C. Stewart Comeaux, sec­
retary.
A safety code for the manufacture and plant handling of explosives
is in course o f preparation by a special committee. The institute has
been approved as sponsor for the explosives code in the program of
the American Engineering Standards Committee. (See p. 72.)
Members make reports to the institute on explosions occurring in
their plants and on any unusual occurrence or condition which might
have resulted in an explosion or fire. The causes are investigated
and recommendations made with a view to preventing similar oc­
currences. The Committee on Standardization (C. A. Patterson,
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del., chairman) is
concerned with safety problems in the industry, other than those
indicated above.



ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.
IN T E R N A T IO N A L

A S S O C IA T IO N

I ll

OF GARM ENT M ANUFACTURERS.

320 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
An association of 450 firms in the United States and Canada
engaged in the manufacture of men’s or women’s clothing by power
machines.
B u r e a u o f F a c t o r y P r a c t ic e a n d I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .— Arthur
Schwab, director. Established in June, 1919, and maintained by a
group o f about 80 members, each contributing $100 a year, for em­
ploying cooperatively the services of an industrial engineer (at
present on part time) to conduct research and furnish information
regarding manufacturing experience. Membership is not limited to
the association.
To date, the bureau has made ITT special inquiries by questionnaire
and has reported the results in mimeographed form to its members.
These have mainly dealt with matters of factory practice, cost
accounting, etc., but the list includes also the following personnel
topics: No. 103, Foreladies; No. 128, Overtime; No. 135, Method o f
paying learners; No. 149, Vacations to factory workers; No, 152,
Bonus systems for executives; No. 155, Wage reductions; No. 158,
Employee representation plan; No. 166, Average daily output for
cutters—men’s shirts; No. 168, Average daily output for joiners—
men’s shirts; No. ITT (in preparation), Reduction in welfare and
service work.
A more extensive study o f “ Learners in the garment trades,” deal­
ing with the methods of obtaining, instructing, and retaining learners
in the garment trades, was printed as Special Report No. 1, Novem­
ber, 1919 (49 p.).
A series o f charts designated as u Executive’s control charts,” with
mimeographed text to accompany them, was issued June 1, 1921, as
a basis o f educational plans for foremen.
A standardized application blank devised by the bureau for use
in the employment offices of garment factories was issued in blue­
print form February, 1921.
IN T E R N A T IO N A L
A S S O C IA T IO N
B O A R D S A N D C O M M IS S IO N S .

OF

IN D U S T R IA L

A C C ID E N T

Ethelbert Stewart, United States Commissioner o f Labor Sta­
tistics, secretary-treasurer.
Organized as the National Association o f Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions at the first national conference of industrial
accident boards and commissions held at Lansing, Mich., in 1914;
present name adopted in 1916.
This association holds meetings once a year (now usually in Sep­
tember), or oftener, for the purpose of bringing together the officials
charged with the duty o f administering the workmen’s compensa­
tion laws of the United States and Canada to consider, and, so far
as possible, to agree on standardizing (a) ways of cutting down
accidents; (b) medical, surgical, and hospital treatment for injured
workers; (c) means for the reeducation of injured workmen and
their restoration to industry; ( d) methods of computing industrial
accident and sickness insurance costs; (e) practices in administering
compensation laws; (f) extensions and improvements in workmen’s
compensation legislation; and (g) reports and tabulations o f in­
dustrial accidents and illnesses.




112

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

Each State of the United States and each Province of Canada
having a workmen’s compensation law, United States Employees’
Compensation Commission, United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
and the Department o f Labor o f Canada, are entitled to active mem­
bership (annual dues, $50, with certain exceptions). Organizations
and individuals actively interested in any phase o f workmen’s com­
pensation or social insurance may be admitted to associate member­
ship (annual dues, $10).
The proceedings o f the 1914 conference at which the association
was organized were printed in National Compensation Journal (v. 1,
No. 5), May, 1914; those o f a special meeting at Chicago, January,
1915, and the second annual conference at Seattle, October, 1915, were
published by the association. Since then the United States Bureau
o f Labor Statistics has issued the proceedings o f the annual meetings
in its Bulletin series, viz: Third, Columbus, 1916, Bulletin No. 210;
fourth, Boston, 1917, Bulletin No. 248; fifth, Madison, 1918, Bulletin
No. 264; sixth, Toronto, 1919, Bulletin No. 273; seventh, San Fran­
cisco, Bulletin No. 281. Papers and discussions on all o f the sub­
jects indicated in the above statement of the association’s purpose
are contained in these publications.
The Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by
this association and held at Washington, D. C., December 5-9, 1916,
were published as Bulletin No. 212 of the United States Bureau of
Labor Statistics. In addition to papers and discussions on work­
men’s compensation and industrial insurance legislation this volume
contains material on physical examination and medical supervision
o f employees, permanently disabled workers, employees’ benefit as­
sociations, and pension funds.
The association is joint sponsor for the safety codes on grinding
wheels, power transmission, and woodworking, in preparation under
the auspices and rules o f procedure of the American Engineering
Standards Committee. (See p. 74.)
C o m m it t e e

on

S t a t is t ic s

and

C o m p e n s a t io n I

nsurance

C o s t .—

Appointed at the Chicago meeting o f the association in January,
1915, this committee has presented reports annually since that time.
Bulletin No. 276 o f the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics,
entitled “ Standardization of industrial accident statistics” (103 p.),
consists o f a revision and consolidation of the reports o f this com­
mittee, 1915-1919. The sixth report, devoted to methods of com­
paring compensation cost, is printed in the 1920 proceedings of the
association.
M e d i c a l C o m m i t t e e .—The first report of this committee, on eye
injuries, was presented and discussed at the 1920 annual meeting and
is published in its proceedings.
IN T E R N A T IO N A L A S S O C IA T IO N
IC E S .

O F P U B L IC

EM PLOYM ENT

SERV­

B. A. Flinn, 112 West Fifty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y.,
secretary-treasurer.
Organized in Chicago in December, 1913, as the American Associa­
tion o f Public Employment Offices; present name adopted in 1920.
The objects o f the association are (a) to promote a system or systems
o f employment exchanges in the United States and Canada, (b) to
advance the study o f employment problems, and ( c ) to bring into




A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

113

closer association and to coordinate the efforts o f Government officials
and others engaged or interested in questions relating to employ­
ment, unemployment, and the organization o f the labor market.
Persons connected with Federal, State, provincial, or municipal de­
partments operating public employment offices are eligible to mem­
bership ; others may become associate members.
Proceedings of the first to third, and fourth annual meetings
(1913-1916) were issued by United States Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics as its Bulletins Nos. 192 and 220. The report o f the Committee
on Standardization, presented and adopted at the fifth annual meet­
ing, September, 1917, was published in Monthly Labor Review,
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (v. 5, p. 950-961), Novem­
ber, 1917, and a brief account of the seventh annual meeting appeared
in the December, 1919, issue (v. 9, p. 1941-1943). In 1921 the
Canadian Department of Labor published Proceedings of the eighth
annual meeting, Ottawa, September, 1920 (230 p .), which contains
papers presented at sessions on “ Unemployment and organization
o f employment,” “ Employment and education,” “ The placement of
the physically handicapped,” and “ Employment office administra­
tion and technique” (including job analysis and psychological
tests).
Buffalo, N. Y., has been chosen as the place of the 1921 meeting.
IN T E R N A T IO N A L L A D IE S ’ G A R M E N T W O R K E R S ’ U N IO N .

31 Union Square, New York, N. Y.
R ecor ds a n d R e s e a r c h .— Alexander Trachtenberg,
director. This department has made a study of cost of living in
Cleveland in connection with an arbitration in the garment industry
there and is at present collecting data concerning earnings of its mem­
bers preparatory to a study o f seasonal fluctuations of employment
and annual earnings.
D

e p a r t m e n t of

I N T E R -R A C I A L

C O U N C IL .

233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Miss Frances A. Kellor, vice
chairman.
This organization, which now includes in its membership about
1,100 industrial, mercantile, and banking corporations, and commit­
tees representing 32 racial groups, was formed in March, 1919. Its
aims and purposes are:
T o p r o m o te A m e r i c a n i s m ; to im p r o v e th e r e la tio n s h ip s a m o n g ra c e s in
A m e r i c a ; to s ta b iliz e in d u s tr ia l c o n d itio n s ; to d e v e lo p p o lic ie s , s ta n d a r d s , a n d
le g is la tio n u p o n im m ig r a tio n a n d e m i g r a t i o n ; to a p p ly A m e r ic a n b u s in e s s
m e th o d s to th e fo r e ig n la n g u a g e p r e s s b y b u ild in g a n A m e r ic a n a d v e r tis in g
b a s e u n d e r it a n d s e c u r in g su p p lie s a n d c r e d it f o r it.

As part o f its service to industrial members it makes analyses of
racial relations in plants where foreign-born workers are employed,
with special reference to their reactions to methods o f personnel
administration, welfare activities, and community conditions, and
makes recommendations based thereon to the management.
IO W A

S T A T E F E D E R A T IO N OF L A B O R .

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Fred A. Canfield, president.
In February, 1921, this organization conducted a survey o f wages,
cost o f living, and costs of building in Cedar Rapids to secure data
7 0 7 2 3 ° — B u ll. 2 9 9 — 2 1 -------- 8




114

III.

N O N O E F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

for use in connection with cases then pending between the council and
the Master Builders’ Association in Cedar Rapids and other cities
on the question o f wage scales for 1921. The report, which includes
a detailed family budget, has been published under the title 4 Eco­
4
nomic survey as applying to the building trades industry in Cedar
Rapids, Io w a ” (26 p.).
J O IN T B O A R D O F S A N IT A R Y C O N T R O L IN T H E C L O A K , S U IT A N D
S K IR T A N D D R E S S A N D W A IS T IN D U S T R IE S .

131 East Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. George M. Price,
M. D., director.
Organized October 31, 1910, pursuant to the protocol entered into
after the strike in the summer o f that year between the Cloak, Suit
and Skirt Manufacturers’ Protective Association, and the Cloak,
Suit and Skirt locals of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’
Union to establish standards o f sanitary conditions, to which the
manufacturers and the unions shall be committed. In 1913 a pro­
tocol was also established in the dress and waist industry, which then
joined in the work o f the board, and has since been under its juris­
diction. The semiannual inspection in October-November, 1920,
covered 3,866 factories with 63,162 workers. The board consists o f
three representatives of the public, two representatives of each of the
two labor unions, v iz : the joint board o f the Cloak, Skirt and Keefer
Makers’ Unions, and the joint board of the Ladies’ Waist and Dress­
makers’ Union, and two representatives from each of the employers’
organizations. The budget in 1920 was $33,000 contributed by the
unions, employers’ associations and independent manufacturers.
The first annual report includes the results of a special study o f
the ventilation o f cloak and suit shops made for the State Depart­
ment o f Labor in 1911 by Dr. C. T. Graham Rogers, with the aid o f
an assistant appointed by the board. In 1914 the board cooperated
with the United States Public Health Service in its investigations o f
the health o f garment workers, l^gienic conditions o f illumination in
the workshops, and the effect of gas-heated appliances upon the air
of workshops, which were reported in Public Health Bulletin Nos.
71 and 81.
For the purpose o f its educational work among both employers
and employees a number o f special bulletins have been prepared and
published, among which are 4 Manufacturers’ bulletin on fire pro­
4
tection” (1915, No. 2 ), 46Fire hazards in factory buildings” (1915,
No. 8), and 44Light and illumination in garment shops” (1918, No.
2). A summary o f the activities of the board in supervising fire
drills, first-aid work, sanitation and general health education, and a
list o f its publications, together with an account o f the Union Health
Center wdiich has taken over and carries on as a cooperative enter­
prise the health, medical and dental services initiated by the board,
are given in 4 Ten years of industrial sanitary self control: tenth an­
4
nual report o f the Joint Board of Sanitary Control,” 1921.
JU D G E B A K E R F O U N D A T IO N .

40 Court Street (Scollav Square), Boston, Mass. William
Healy, M. D., Augusta F. Bronner, Ph. D., directors.
Established in 1917, this foundation exists primarily for the study
o f the problems of delinquency, and in that connection has to do with




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

115

better educational and vocational adjustments. Other more general
problems are also studied in continuation of the work on psycho­
logical tests previously published by the directors.1 A paper on
6
“ Individual variations in mental equipment,” by Augusta F. Bronner, published in Mental Hygiene (v. 4, No. 3, p. 521-536), July,
1920, is distributed as Reprint No. 90 of the National Committee on
Mental Hygiene.
LABOR BUREAU

( I N C .) .

Rooms 513, 514, 1 Union Square, New York, N. Y. George
Soule, Evans Clark, David J. Saposs, and Alfred L. Bernheim,
directors.
This bureau, established in 1920, furnishes professional services,
solely to labor organizations, in statistics, economic and social re­
search, drafting of legislation, preparation o f arbitration cases, etc.
In April, 1921, branch offices were opened at 14 West Washington
Street, Chicago, and 1700 Arch Street, Philadelphia.
The first year’s work of the bureau included five original investi­
gations to determine what is a living wage. The basis of each o f
these surveys was the “ Minimum health and decency quantity
budget,” prepared by the United States Bureau o f Labor Statistics.
They were made in New York (East Harlem), November, 1920 (re­
sults published in Monthly Labor Review, February, 1921, pp. 6166) and March, 1921; Philadelphia, March 1921; New York (South
B rooklyn), April, 1921; Chicago, April, 1921. During the year an
extensive investigation was made of wages, cost o f living, profits of
the manufacturers, and general working conditions in the Philadel­
phia textile industry. Studies have also been made of wages of fancy
leather goods workers, various groups of city employees. in New
York, workers in the New York book and job printing trade, paint­
ers, decorators, and paper hangers in New York and Philadelphia,
and railroad unskilled labor in New York State; and two reports
were prepared on wages paid to seamen, firemen, cooks, and waiters,
and the cost o f living in seacoast cities, one covering the Atlantic
and Gulf coast, the other the Pacific coast. Other investigations
carried out include continuity of employment in the printing trades,
piece work and week work in the clothing industry, and the extent
and character of joint control by capital and labor in the management
ox industry. The following publication contains the results of one
o f its studies for labor organizations in Philadelphia:
T h e p a in tin g a n d d e c o r a tin g in d u s tr y o f P h i l a d e l p h i a : a r e p o r t o n w a g e s ,
c o st o f liv in g , p ro fits, a n d e c o n o m ic c o n d itio n s, c o m p ile d in b e h a lf o f P h ila ­
d e lp h ia D is t r ic t C o u n c il, N o . 21,* B r o th e r h o o d o f P a in t e r s , D e c o r a to r s , a n d
P a p e r H a n g e r s o f A m e r ic a . 1 9 2 1 . 3 2 p.

The bureau has undertaken the installation of systems o f personnel
records for various labor unions, in such form as to allow at any time
for statistical reports on unemployment, part-time work, labor turn­
over, causes o f lay-offs, etc.
'
i6
T e s t s f o r p r a c t ic a l m e n t a l c la s s ific a t io n , b y W . ile a l y a n d G r a c e M . F e r n a id .
1f ill.
5 3 p.
( P s y c h o lo g ic a l M o n o g r a p h N o . 5 4 .)
P s y c h o lo g y o f s p e c ia l a b ilit ie s a n d d is a
b ilit ie s , b y A u g u s ta F . B r o n n e r .
B oston , 1917.
2 6 9 p.




116

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

L IF E E X T E N S IO N IN S T IT U T E .

25 West Forty-fifth Street, New York, N. Y. Harold A. Ley,
president; Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D t, medical director.
Organized and incorporated in 1914 as a self-sustaining public
service institution with a hygiene reference board of 100 advisers to
control its educational and scientific policy (Prof. Irving Fisher,
Yale University, chairman).
Its purpose is to conserve health and prolong life and to this end
it has organized health services for individual subscribers, for groups
o f employees, and for institutions such as insurance companies which
are interested in prolonging the lives of their members or policy­
holders. These services include a standard physical examination,
laboratory tests, monthly journals and other educational health
literature. It maintains a pathological laboratory at the head office
in New York and has in its service over 7,000 examining physicians
located in the principal cities and towns throughout the country. In
its industrial service the institute examines 1,500 to 2,000 employees
a month.
Analyses of the examinations of typical industrial and commercial
groups have been made, disclosing the extent of prevalence of various
physical impairments. These results are available in reprints of
papers by the medical director.
Recently the institute has developed a plan for a special form of
mutual benefit association combining the health services of the insti­
tute with group health and accident insurance and group life insur­
ance by an insurance company and has organized such associations in
a considerable number of industrial concerns. Pamphlets describing
the details of the scheme may be obtained on application. An ac­
count was also published in the Survey, October 16, 1920 (p. 90-91.)
M c L E A N H O S P IT A L .

Waverley, Mass.
L a b o r a t o r y .—The results o f the studies in voca­
tional psychology made while Dr. Frederic Lyman W ells1 was psy­
7
chologist in this institution (until January 1, 1921) are published in
the following:
P

s y c h o l o g ic a l ,

W e l l s , F . L . T h e a n a ly s is o f a s u c c e s s fu l a g e n t.
( L i f e A s s o c ia tio n N e w s , v.
1 1 , N o . 3 .)
A n a d d r e s s on th e sc ie n tific s e le c tio n o f l i f e in s u r a n c e s a le s m e n a t
th e first a n n u a l m e e tin g o f th e A s s o c ia tio n o f L i f e A g e n c y O fficers, C h ic a g o , O c t.
16, 1 9 1 6 .
--------- A lt e r n a t iv e m e th o d s f o r m e n ta l e x a m in e r s .
(J o u r . A p p . P s y c h o l., J u n e ,
1 9 1 7 , v. 1, p. 1 3 4 - 1 4 3 .)
-------- O n th e p s y c h o m o to r m e c h a n is m s o f ty p e w r itin g .
( A m e r . J o u r. P s y c h o l..
J a n ., 1 9 1 6 , v. 2 7 , p. 4 7 - 7 0 .)
K e lle y , C . M ., a n d W e l l s , F . L . B r ie f e r stu d ie s fr o m th e p s y c h o lo g ic a l la b o r a ­
to r y o f M c L e a n H o s p it a l.
(J o u r . A p p . P s y c h o l., J u n e , 1 9 1 9 , v. 3, p. 1 7 2 - 1 9 3 .)
In c lu d e s th e “ c o a c h p r o o f ” te st, a filin g te st, a n d a b r i e f te s t f o r m e n ta l
accuracy.

M A S S A C H U S E T T S G E N E R A L H O S P IT A L .

Boston, Mass.
I

C l i n i c .—Wade Wright, M. D., secretary, industrial
This clinic was opened in the out-patient department o f

n d u s t r ia l

hygiene.

1
7
Now chief of the psvchological laboratory of Boston
p. 51.)




Psychopathic Hospital.

(See

ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

117

the hospital in March, 1916. A report of its activities was published
in the Monthly Review o f the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, De­
cember, 1917, in two articles, “ The study of occupational diseases in
hospitals,” by David L. Edsall (p. 169-185) and “ An industrial
clinic,” by Wade Wright (p. 185-198). During the war it was
temporarily suspended.
The scope of the activities of the Industrial Clinic is now being
extended and it is closely affiliated with the Division o f Industrial
Hygiene o f Harvard Medical School. (See p. 180.) It is undertak­
ing certain studies of industrial morbidity, based on the records of
the out-patient department of the hospital and analyses of the sick
absentee reports of a large public service corporation, of the effects
of early employment upon the health of adolescents, and of specific
industrial diseases, particularly lead poisoning.
M ASSACH U SETTS

S O C IE T Y

FOR M EN TAL

H Y G IE N E .

1182 Kimball Building, 18 Tremont Street, Boston 9, Mass.
A. W. Stearns, M. D., medical director.
Organized and incorporated in 1918 for the prevention of mental
disease and defect, this society has thus far confined itself to educa­
tional work through public lectures, the preparation and distribution
o f literature, and conferences. Among its publications are the fol­
lowing on personnel subjects:
N o . 3 0 . S o m e c r ite r ia f o r th e e v a lu a tio n o f m e n ta l te s ts a n d te s t se rie s .
By
F lo r e n c e M a te e r .
N o . 3 8 . A p p lic a tio n o f p s y c h ia tr y to in d u s tr ia l h y g ie n e .
B y S ta n le y C o b b .
( R e p r . f r o m J o u r. I n d u s t. H y g ., v . 1 , N o . 7, p . 3 4 3 - 3 4 7 , N o v ., 1 9 1 9 .)

In the future the society’s efforts will be more specialized and
among the selected fields o f activity under special committees is a
section the scope of which is “ the application of knowledge of per­
sonality and temperament, as well as the prevention of disease, in the
industries.” A conference on the subject of “ The human element in
industry ” was held April 7, 1921.
M E R C H A N T S A S S O C IA T IO N O F N E W

YORK.

Woolworth Building, 233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. S. C.
Meade, secretary.
I n d u s t r i a l B u r e a u .—In 1917 this bureau made an investigation
into the extent tb which women were being substituted for men, the
types of work on which they were found satisfactory, and special
problems connected with such employment. The results were pub­
lished in a pamphlet entitled “ Increased employment of women in
industry: a report on the problems of substituting female workers for
male to meet the present labor scarcity,” November, 1917 (23 p .).
It has recently made a study of the turnover of factory labor in
New YY>rk City, the results of which were published in the organ of
the association, Greater New York for October 4, 1920 (also in
Monthly Labor Review, U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, November,
1920, p. 158).
C o m m i t t e e o n I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .— This committee has pre­
pared two reports on “ Industrial relations,” which were adopted and
approved by the board of directors and published in pamphlet form
November 13, 1919, and March 9, 1921, respectively.




118

i n . NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

M E T R O P O L IT A N L IF E IN S U R A N C E CO .

1 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.
This company has financed the Framingham Community Health
and Tuberculosis Demonstration conducted by the National Tubercu­
losis Association (see p. 136).
P e r s o n n e l D i v i s i o n .— The system and methods followed by this
division are described in an article by Lawrence Washington in
Industrial Management, July 1, 1921 (p. 27-32).
P o l i c y h o l d e r s ’ S e r v i c e B u r e a u . — Alexander Fleisher, assistant
secretary. This bureau sends out to group policyholders a monthly
“ Industrial Service Bulletin: Digest o f current literature on per­
sonnel problems” (mimeographed) ; semimonthly letters on special
topics in this field; and occasional special short studies (e. g., on
methods of wage payment, training of foremen, employees’ thrift
and savings plans, employees’ incentive or bonus plans), and
bibliographies.
S t a t i s t i c a l B u r e a u . —Louis I. Dublin, statistician.
The results
o f an analysis of the occupational mortality experience o f the Metro­
politan Life Insurance Co., 1911-1913, prepared by this bureau, were
published in 1917 under the title, 6 Causes of death, by occupation,”
6
as Bulletin No. 207 of United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Among other studies by this bureau available for distribution are the
following pamphlets bearing on occupational hazards and m orbidity:
T h e e ffe c t o f life c o n s e r v a tio n on th e m o r t a lit y o f th e M e t r o p o lit a n L i f e I n ­
s u r a n c e C o . : a s u m m a r y o f th e e x p e r ie n c e , in d u s tr ia l d e p a r tm e n t, 1 9 1 4 , f o r
s u p e r in te n d e n ts , m e d ic a l e x a m in e r s , a n d v i s itin g n u r s e s .
B y L o u is 1. D u b lin ,
1916.
11 p.
T h e h e a lth o f f o o d -h a n d le r s : a c o o p e r a tiv e s tu d y b y th e D e p a r t m e n t o f
H e a lt h , th e M e t r o p o lit a n L i f e I n s u r a n c e C o ., a n d th e A m e r ic a n M u s e u m o f
S a fe ty .
R e p o r t p r e p a re d b y L o u is I . H a r r i s a n d L o u is I . D u b lin . 1 9 1 7 . 2 2 p .
( A l s o is s u e d in M o n o g r a p h s e rie s, N o . 1 7 , o f N e w Y o r k C it y D e p a r tm e n t o f
H e a l t h .)
S ic k n e ss a m o n g co al m in e r s a n d th e ir f a m ilie s . B y L e e K . F r a n k e l a n d L o u is
I . D u b lin .
1 9 1 7 . 1 4 p.
O c c u p a tio n h a z a r d s a n d d ia g n o s tic s i g n s : a g u id e f o r m e d ic a l e x a m in e r s re ­
g a r d in g im p a ir m e n ts to be lo o k e d f o r in h a z a r d o u s o c c u p a tio n s . 1 9 1 8 . 1 5 p.
O c c u p a tio n a l r a tin g s [ r a t e b o o k , i n s e r t !. 2 7 p.

N A T I O N A L A S S O C IA T IO N O F C O R P O R A T IO N T R A IN IN G .

130 East Fifteenth Street, New York, N. Y. F, C. Henderschott,
managing director.
Organized at New York University, January 24/1913, as the Na­
tional Association of Corporation Schools; name changed to present
form August, 1920, and association incorporated under the laws o f
Delaware.
The object o f the association is to aid corporations in the educa­
tion of their employees: (1) By providing a forum for the inter­
change o f ideas; (2) by collecting, and making available, data as to
the successful and unsuccessful plans o f developing the efficiency o f
the individual employee.
There are three classes o f members: Class A, commercial, indus­
trial, transportation, or governmental organizations (admission fee,
$100; annual dues, $100) : class B, employees of class A members
(annual dues, $5) ; class C, interested persons not eligible for mem­
bership in A or B (annual dues, $10). Five local chapters have been
organized, viz, Chicago, southern New England, Pittsburgh, western




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119

New York, New York City. The annual conventions (four days)
are held in different cities, usually in June.
Committees of the association study and investigate various phases
of training and other personnel developments. Their reports are
printed in advance of the annual convention and are included with
discussions thereon in the annual volume of proceedings. For the
current year (1921) there are committees on the following subjects:
A p p lic a tio n o f p s y c h o lo g ic a l te s ts a n d r a tin g sc a le s in in d u s tr y ( 1 9 1 9 ) .
E m p lo y m e n t ( 1 9 1 5 ) .
E x e c u ti v e tr a in in g ( 1 9 1 8 ) .
F o r e m e n tr a in in g .
H e a lt h e d u c a tio n ( 1 9 1 4 ) .
Job a n a ly s is ( 1 9 1 9 ) .
L a b o r tu r n o v e r .
M a r k e tin g ( 1 9 1 4 ) .
O ffice- work tr a in in g (1914).
P r o fit-s h a r in g a n d a llie d t h r i f t p la n s .
P u b lic e d u c a tio n ( 1 9 1 8 ) .
S k ille d a n d s e m is k ille d la b o r ( 1 9 1 8 ) .
T e c h n ic a l tr a in in g ( 1 9 1 8 ) .
T r a d e a p p re n tic e sh ip ( 1 9 1 5 ) .
S e c tio n I — M a n u f a c t u r in g ( 1 9 1 3 ) .
S e c tio n I I — S te e l a n d iron a n d p la n t m a in te n a n c e .
S e c tio n I I I — R a ilr o a d s .
T r a in in g f o r fo r e ig n c o m m e rc e .
U n s k ille d la b o r a n d a m e r ic a n iz a tio n ( 1 9 1 9 ) .
V is u a liz e d tr a in in g .

A list o f the chairmen and outline of the scope o f work of these
committees is printed in a special circular and at the back o f each
number o f the association’s Bulletin. The date given after the
name o f any of the above committees indicates the first volume of
proceedings in which a report o f that committee or its equivalent
appears.
In addition to the above a Committee on Vocational Guidance
made extensive reports in 1915 and 1916 which cover the whole
field o f personnel administration.
Reports of committees on
“ Methods o f instruction ” and “ Corporation continuation schools ”
are printed in the proceedings 1917-1919.
A special and confidential report service is available to class A
members only. Two confidential reports and two special reports are
issued annually.
Confidential reports.— No. 1, An initial survey o f the problem o f
labor turnover. No. 2, The present status o f business correspond­
ence; development of the business letter. No. 3, A survey o f some
o f the industrial-educational problems of reconstruction. No. 4, A
preliminary survey o f the problem of representation in management.
No. 5, Bonus plans and other schemes for insuring satisfactory
punctuality and attendance records. No. 6, Transfers and pro­
motions.
No. 7 (in preparation), Industrial training costs. No. 8 (in
preparation), Personnel organizations.
Special reports.—No. 1, Trade apprenticeship schools. No. 2,
Office-work schools. No. 3, Educational methods. No. 4, Hygiene
and sanitation for the worker. No. 5, Housing plans. No. 6, Group
insurance.
No. 7 (in preparation), Employee stock ownership plans. No. 8
(in preparation), Industrial athletics.




III.

120

N A T IO N A L
SEARCH.

H O N O F F IC IA L A G E N C IE S .

A S S O C IA T IO N

OF

D IR E C T O R S

OF

E D U C A T IO N A L

RE-

E. J. Ashbaugh, University o f Iowa, Iowa City, secretary.
The objects o f this association are (1) the formation of inde­
pendent departments of educational research in all systems o f public
instruction, and (2) the promotion of the practical use o f educational
measurements in all educational research having for its object the
improvement o f the efficiency o f the educational administration,
supervision, or teaching.
In 1918 a committee o f this association prepared for the annual
meeting in that year a report on “ The measurement o f educational
products ” (194 p .) , which was published by the National Society
for the Study of Education, as its Seventeenth Yearbook (pt. 2).
This includes chapters on bureaus o f research in city school systems,
existing tests and standards, statistical methods, and a bibliography.
The official organ of the association is the Journal of Educational
Research (published for the Bureau of Educational Research, Uni­
versity o f Illinois, by the Public School Publishing Co., Blooming­
ton, 111.) in which it conducts a department recording research in
progress.
N A T I O N A L C H IL D

L A B O R C O M M IT T E E .

105 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y. Owen R.
Lovejoy, general secretary.
Organized April 15, 1904, and incorporated by act o f Congress
February 21, 1907, to safeguard American childhood as affected by
industrial and agricultural conditions. The enactment and enforce­
ment o f progressive legislation and the development of enlightened
public opinion are essential features of the committee’s policy. Its
legislative program is chiefly concerned with child labor laws, com­
pulsory education laws, mothers’ pension laws, and so-called chil­
dren’s codes.
The committee has a staff of trained investigators whose services
are placed at the disposal of local agencies desirous of procuring data
for revision and standardization of child welfare laws in their re­
spective States. Child-welfare surveys have been completed and the
results published for Oklahoma (1918), Alabama (1918), North
Carolina (1918), Kentucky (1919), and Tennessee (1921), and one in
West Virginia is in progress. Each of these reports contains a chap­
ter on the operation of the State child-labor lawT
s.
A study o f health defects of working children in Newark, N. J.,
under the direction o f the committee is in progress. A discussion of
the health needs of working children by Dr. H. H. Mitchell, in charge
o f the investigation, entitled “ At what age should children enter in­
dustry?” was published in the May, 1921, issue of The American
Child.
The 300 pamphlets and the child-labor bulletin (v. 1-7,1912-1919),
continued since May, 1919, by the quarterly periodical The American
Child, which the committee has published, contain occasional reports
o f investigations o f the employment of children in various occupa­
tions.




A S S O C I A T IO N S , S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T I O N S , E T C .

N A T IO N A L

121

C IV IC F E D E R A T IO N .

Thirty-third Floor, Metropolitan Tower, New York, N. Y.
Mrs. Gertrude Beeks Easley, secretary, executive council.
An organization of representatives of capital, labor, and the gen­
eral public formed as an outgrowth of conventions held in Chicago
and New York, 1900-1901. Its purpose is “ to organize the best
brains o f the nation in an educational movement seeking the solu­
tion o f some of the great problems related to social and industrial
progress; to provide for study and discussion of questions of national
import; to aid thus in the crystallization o f the most enlightened
public opinion; and when desirable, to promote legislation in accord­
ance therewith.”
The federation is organized in the following departments: Food
and drugs, Immigration, Industrial accident prevention. Industrial
economics, Industrial mediation, Industrial training, Pensions, Profitsharing, Public health education, Regulation o f industrial corpora­
tions, Regulation o f public utilities, Social insurance, Study of revo­
lutionary movements, Welfare, Workmen’s compensation. Woman’s
department, Minimum wage commission, and Committee on national
defense. Their activities are reported in the National Civic Federa­
tion Review, annual meeting addresses, and special publications.
Only those related to the field o f personnel research are noted here, as
follow s:
Industrial Economics Department has made a study o f the divi­
sion o f people’s income, and its conclusions will soon be made public.
Industrial Training Department is interesting employers in fac­
tory industrial training through establishment of vestibule schools.
This is an enlargement of the work conducted by the federation’s
Welfare Department for the Committee on Labor o f the Council of
National Defense, during the war, when there was given a practical
demonstration of the possibility of utilizing such schools, to place,
new employees through proper tests in jobs which they could suc­
cessfully perform, to train new unskilled workers and improve the
efficiency of the skilled, including foremen. Reports^ on this sub­
ject are published in the National Civic Federation Review for April
10, 1919, and May 10, 1920.
Pensions Department published in 1916 “ The problem o f pen­
sions: Federal, State, municipal, and industrial ” (15 p.), to which is
appended a tabular summary o f data on “ Industrial pensions or re­
tirement systems in operation throughout the United States.”
Profit-sharing Department has issued two editions o f a report on
“ Profit sharing by American employers; examples from England,
types in France ” (2d ed., 1920, 423 p.).
Welfare Department, organized to induce employers through edu­
cational means to improve voluntarily working and living conditions
o f employees, is collecting data on welfare work in stores, factories,
mines, on railroads and in public institutions. The scope o f the
inquiry is shown in a printed “ Outline for report on welfare work ”
under the following main headings: Type o f work place, sanitation,
recreation, education, housing, additions to wages, provident funds,
supervision o f welfare work. The National Civic F ederation Review
for July 15, 1913, was devoted to “ Working conditions in New York
stores; a report upon welfare activities in 22 retail concerns.” A




122

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

housing committee is organized under this department to e\olve ways
and means to meet the national housing problem.
Social Insurance Department has been active in opposition to pro­
posed compulsory health insurance legislation. It has issued two
reports o f the committee on foreign inquiry (1914 and 1920), pam­
phlets by its committee on constructive plan, and addresses at annual
meetings. The 1917 annual meeting addresses on compulsory health
insurance include data on existing voluntary agencies instituted by
trade unions and industrial concerns.
Committee upon dangerous and unhealthy industries o f the New
York and New Jersey section (Women’s Welfare Department) pub­
lished in 1912 a report of an investigation on 4 Mercury poisoning in
4
the industries of New York City and vicinity,” by Mrs. Lindon W.
Bates,- its chairman.
N A T IO N A L C O M M IT T E E F O R M E N T A L H Y G IE N E .

Penn Terminal Building, Seventh Avenue and Thirty-first
Street, New York, N. Y . Thomas W. Salmon, M. D., medical
director.
Founded in 1909 and incorporated under the laws o f the State of
New York in 1916 to work for the conservation of mental health; to
help prevent nervous and mental disorders and mental defect; to
help raise the standards o f care and treatment for those suffering
from any o f these disorders or mental defect; to secure and dis­
seminate reliable information on these subjects and also on mental
factors involved in problems related to industry, education, delin­
quency, dependency, and the like; to aid ex-service men disabled in
the war; to cooperate with Federal, State, and local agencies. Affili­
ated societies or committees for mental hygiene have been organized
in 17 States and the District o f Columbia. The necessary funds to
support the work o f the committee have been largely provided by the
Rockefeller Foundation.
Since January, 1917, the committee has published a quarterly
magazine entitled Mental H ygiene, in wdiich 4 nontechnical articles
6
on the practical management o f mental problems in all relations of
life ” appear (subscription $2 a year). A list o f publications con­
sisting o f reprints from this magazine and other medical journals,
special publications, and leaflets available for distribution may be
obtained on application. Among these are included the following
pamphlets dealing with the mental hygiene o f industry:
A d le r , H e r m a n M .
U n e m p lo y m e n t a n d p e r s o n a li t y ; a s tu d y o f p s y c h o p a th ic
c a se s.
( R e p r in t 2 f r o m M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 1, p. 1 0 - 2 4 , J a n ., 1 9 1 7 .)
B a ile y , P e a r c e .
E ffic ie n c y a n d in e fficien c y— a p ro b le m in m e d ic in e .
(R e ­
p r in t 1 2 f r o m M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 1 , p . 1 9 6 -2 1 0 , A p r ., 1 9 1 7 .)
J a r r e t t, M a r y C .
T h e p s y c h o p a th ic e m p lo y e e : a p ro b le m o f in d u s tr y .
(R e ­
p r in t f r o m M e d ic in e a n d S u r g e r y , v . 1 , p . 7 2 7 -7 4 1 , S e p t., 1 9 1 7 .)
R ossy , O. S.
F e e b le -m in d e d n e s s a n d in d u s t r ia l r e la tio n s .
(R e p r in t 19 fro m
M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 2 , p. 3 4 - 5 2 , J a n ., 1 9 1 8 .)
S o u th a r d , E . E .
T h e m o v e m e n t f o r a m e n ta l h y g ie n e o f in d u s tr y .
(R e p r in t
7 4 f r o m M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 4 , p. 4 3 - 6 4 , J a n ., 1 9 2 0 .)
S o u th a r d , E . E .
T r a d e -u n io n is m a n d t e m p e r a m e n t : n o te s u p on th e p s y ­
c h ia tr ic p o in t o f v i e w in in d u s tr y .
( R e p r i n t f r o m M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 4, p.
2 8 1 -3 0 0 , A p r ., 1 9 2 0 .)
S ou th ard , E . E .
T h e m o d e r n s p e c ia lis t in u n r e s t : a p la c e f o r th e p s y c h ia ­
tr is t in in d u s tr y .
( R e p r in t 9 2 f r o m M e n t a l H y g ie n e , v . 4 , p. 5 5 0 - 5 6 3 , J u ly ,
1 9 2 0 .)




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC

123

J a r r e t t, M a r y C .
T h e m e n ta l h y g ie n e o f i n d u s t r y : re p o r t o f p r o g r e s s o f
w o r k u n d e r ta k e n u n d e r th e E n g in e e r in g F o u n d a tio n o f N e w Y o r k .
(R e p r in t
88 f r o m M e n t a l H y g ie n e , y . 4, N o . 4 , O c t., 1 9 2 0 .)

N A T IO N A L C O M M IT T E E F O R T H E P R E V E N T IO N O F B L IN D N E S S ,

130 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y. Mrs. W ini­
fred Hathaway, secretary.
Organized January 1, 1915, by the consolidation of the Committee
for the Prevention of Blindness and the American Association for
the Conservation o f Vision.
In 1916 this committee made a survey o f 70 representative indus­
trial plants in Buffalo, N. Y., to ascertain the local working condi­
tions and the industrial accident hazards which might be productive
o f eye injuries. With this study as a basis, the investigation was
extended to cover the entire field of such hazards in American indus­
tries. The results were issued as No. 12 o f the committee’s publi­
cations :
E y e h a z a r d s in in d u s tr ia l o c c u p a t io n s : a r e p o r t o f t y p ic a l c a s e s a n d c o n ­
d itio n s , w ith r e c o m m e n d a tio n s f o r s a fe p r a c tic e .
B y G o rd o n L . B e r r y a n d
T h o m a s P . B r a d s h a w . N o v ., 1 9 1 7 . 1 4 5 p.

A model plan for saving sight in industry was prepared by the
committee for the hospital and health survey made by the Cleveland
Hospital Council in 1920. {See p. 94.)
The committee has cooperated with the United States Bureau o f
Standards in preparation of the “ National safety code for the pro­
tection o f the heads and eyes of industrial workers.” It has also
prepared a set o f posters on industrial eye accidents for use in safety
and health exhibits, factories, etc.; and miniature reproductions for
general distribution (e. g., in pay envelopes). Recently its publicity
material has included several articles on the dangers of wood alcohol.
N A T I O N A L C O M M IT T E E O N P R IS O N S A N D P R IS O N L A B O R .

Broadway and One hundred and sixteenth Street, New York,
N. Y. E. Stagg Whit in, chairman, executive committee.
Established in August, 1909, for the purpose o f studying the
problem o f labor in prison and with a view to causing the abolition
o f the contract system o f convict labor, this committee has recently
endeavored to secure the introduction of modern methods of per­
sonnel administration into prison industries. Its program for mak­
ing the prisons training schools for life after release and for increas­
ing production in the prison industries, so that penal communities
may become self-sustaining, includes classification of prisoners by
psychiatric examination to determine appropriate treatment, indus­
trial training, placement by trade tests, payment o f wages based on
individual efficiency and other incentives, and a system o f after care
and industrial parole.
Investigations on these subjects were made by the New York
(State) Prison Survey Committee, o f which Mr. Adolph Lewisohn,
president o f the national committee, was chairman, and the results
and recommendations thereon published in its report, 1920 (412 p .),
particularly in Chapters II I, I X , and X I I . The national committee
is at present engaged in a reorganization of the shoe shop at Sing
Sing Prison according to the plan recommended to demonstrate its
practical application. It has already secured the establishment o f a
psychiatric bureau in that institution.




124

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

In 1920 the committee published a report on “ The penal system o f
the District o f Columbia” (32 p., illus., charts), based on a study
which it made at the invitation of the Penal Commission of the
District o f Columbia, submitting recommendations along the lines
above indicated.
The committee is at present cooperating with State authorities in
similar prison surveys in Virginia and Texas.
N A T IO N A L C O N SU M E R S’ L E A G U E .

44 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. Mrs. Florence
Kelley, general secretary; Miss Mary W. Dewson, research
secretary.
Organized May, 1899, to awaken responsibility for conditions under
which goods are made and distributed, through investigation, educa­
tion, and legislation, to mobilize public opinion in behalf of en­
lightened standards for workers and honest products for all. The
principal research work done by the league has been in the prepara­
tion o f briefs in defense o f the constitutionality of labor laws, limit­
ing the hours of labor, prohibiting night work of women, and pro­
viding for the fixing o f minimum wages. In addition to these it has
published results of the following surveys made under its auspices:
W a g e -e a r n in g w o m e n a n d g i r ls in B a lt im o r e — a s tu d y o f th e c o s t o f liv in g
in 1 9 1 8 . B y J o se p h in e A . R o c h e . 1 9 1 8 . 3 6 p.
S u r v e y o f w a g e -e a r n in g g ir ls b e lo w s ix te e n y e a r s o f a g e in W i lk e s -B a r r e , P a .
B y S a r a h H . A th e r t o n . 1 9 1 5 . 6 5 p .
W a g e -e a r n in g w o m e n in w a r tim e — th e te x t ile in d u s tr y .
( W i t h s p e c ia l r e f e r ­
e n ce in P e n n s y lv a n ia a n d N e w J e r s e y to w o o le n a n d w o r s t e d y a r n , a n d in R h o d e
I s la n d to w o r k o f w o m e n a t n ig h t .)
B y F lo r e n c e K e lle y .
(R e p r . fro m J o u rn al
o f I n d u s t r ia l H y g ie n e f o r O c to b e r, 1 9 1 9 .)
2 4 p.

See also Consumers’ Leagues o f Cincinnati, Connecticut, Eastern
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York (p. 96-97), Toledo
(p. 158).
N A T IO N A L

E L E C T R IC

L IG H T A S S O C IA T IO N .

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. M. H. Aylesworth, executive manager.
This association was organized at Chicago in 1885 and its object is
to advance the art and science of production, distribution and use of
electricity for light, heat, and power for public service, in further­
ance of which its activities are largely educational. The association
has four national sections—Accounting, Commercial, Public relations,
Technical— and 13 geographic divisions, under which are grouped
State associations and sections; also company sections and local clubs.
The functions and personnel of its numerous committees, subcom­
mittees, etc., are given in a pamphlet, “ Organization personnel of the
National Electric Light Association,” published annually. Their re­
ports are printed as advance copies for presentation at the annual
conventions of the association, held in May, and subsequently pub­
lished in the volumes of proceedings. Among the subjects which
have been studied through committees are accident prevention, resus­
citation from electric shock, education of employees in the industry,
and wage incentives.
A c c i d e n t P r e v e n t i o n C o m m i t t e e .— Charles B. Scott, Bureau o f
Safety, Chicago, 111., chairman. This committee has presented re­
ports since 1914. It was at first concerned with preparation of ac­
cident-prevention rules relating to operating methods of companies



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125

and workmen, later with the details of operating methods and safety
specifications for tools and appliances, such as safety belts, rubber
gloves, ladders, first-aid kits, etc. In 1920 its scope was extended to
include also health promotion and morbidity statistics, and fire pre­
vention and extinguishment; and its report presented in 1921 in­
cludes detail reports on these subjects in addition to material on
operating methods, organization methods, and apparatus.
As recently reorganized this committee consists of geographic divi­
sion representatives, who are the chairmen of the accident preven­
tion committees of these divisions, and some members at large. Its
work is now carried on in seven subcommittees—Apparatus, Devices
and appliances, Fire prevention, Health promotion, Operating meth­
ods, Organization, Publicity.
During the period 1918-19 it was a subcommittee o f the Safety
Rules and Accident Prevention Committee of the association, and co­
operated with the Bureau of Standards in formulating the operating
rules in part 4 of the National Electrical Safety Code. The main
committee (later a separate Safety Rules Committee) was chiefly
concerned with assisting the Bureau of Standards and various State
commissions in the preparation or revision of safety rules for con­
struction of overhead and underground lines, electrical equipment of
stations, and electrical equipment for utilization of electrical energy,
covered by parts 1 to 3 of the National Electrical Safety Code, and
subcommittees were formed to assist in special researches connected
therewith.
C o m m i s s i o n s o n R e s u s c i t a t i o n f r o m E l e c t r i c S h o c k .— The first
commission, consisting of representatives of the American Medical
Association, National Electric Light Association and General Elec­
tric Co. was organized, on the initiative of this association, in 1911
to consider the problems presented in resuscitation and in the deter­
mination o f the best manual method of artificial respiration that
could instantly be applied by laymen. Its report unqualifiedly rec­
ommended the prone pressure method and rules based on the findings
of the commission were printed and distributed by the National Elec­
tric Light Association in 1912.
The third resuscitation commission,1 composed of 15 physiologists,
8
physicians, surgeons, and engineers, representing medical and techni­
cal societies, institutions o f learning, bureaus, and divisions o f the
Federal Government and the electrical industry, was organized under
the auspices of the Committee on Safety Rules and Accident Pre­
vention of the N. E. L. A. in 1918 to review the work accomplished
and make further recommendations. Besides considering all the
known efficient methods of artificial respiration for emergency use, a
number o f laboratory tests and demonstrations were made by the
commission relative to the value of mechanical devices for inducing
respiration in the apparently dead. Its proceedings and resolutions
are appended (p. 20-32) to the “ Rules for resuscitation from elec­
trical shock by the prone pressure method,” revised April, 1919, by
the subcommittee on accident prevention o f the above-named com­
mittee, on the basis of the commission’s resolutions, and issued by
18
The Second Resuscitation Commission was appointed by the U. S. Bureau of Mines
to deal with cases o f asphyxiation by mine gases and consisted of the five representa­
tives of the American Medical Association on the First Commission. Its report was pub­
lished by the bureau as its Technical Paper No. 77.




126

III, NONOFFIOIAL AGENCIES.

the association. The commission voted to continue its existence,
ready to respond when required. (Dr. Eeid Hunt, Harvard Medical
School, secretary.)
E ducation C ommittee (C ommercial N ational S ection).—F red
E. Jenkins, Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, 111., chairman. A
plan o f educational work for the higher training and improved
efficiency o f the men engaged in the industry was inaugurated by the
committee in November, 1915, with the first edition of the “ Com­
mercial engineering course ” (17 lessons), followed in January, 1917,
by the “ Course in practical electricity ” (10 lessons), both o f which
have been frequently revised and reprinted. They are conducted by
correspondence. A list of the subjects covered by the lessons is given
in the 1921 report o f the committee.
A ccounting E ducation C ommittee (A ccounting N ational Sec­
tion ).— F red E. Jenkins, Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, 111.,
chairman. This committee, appointed in 1916 to select, prepare,
publish, and exploit among members suitable accounting courses for
persons engaged in the industry, has since 1917 conducted two homestudy accounting courses, viz, an elementary accounting course (in
7 lessons) and an advanced course in electric utility accounting, pre­
pared by a number o f specialists (to be completed in 36 lessons by
October, 1921). A list of the subjects covered by the lessons is given
in the committee’s report for 1921.
B onus S ystem C ommittee (A ccounting N ational Section).—
A. H. S. Cantlin, Pennsylvania Power & Light Co., Allentown, Pa.,
chairman. Appointed in 1919 to investigate and report on bonus
systems among central stations, this committee’s work is limited to
the departments, from meter reading to clerical work and collection
o f accounts, and does not include salesmen, power plants, linemen,
etc. It has investigated the extent o f actual use of such systems in
the companies serving cities with populations of 50,000 or more or
having 10,000 kilowatts or more o f generating equipment installed,
and has described and discussed the systems found in the reports
which it presented in 1920 and 1921.
C ompensation of S alesmen C ommittee (C ommercial N ational
S ection.)—L. E. Wallis, Edison Co. o f Boston, chairman. Appoint­
ed to determine some points of relationship which compensation o f
salesmen should bear to the qualifications required in performing
the various classes o f work, to sales opportunities, and to net sales,
the committee has secured data by questionnaires sent to all company
members serving a population o f 100,000 or more, and has analyzed
the answers in its 1921 report.
N A T I O N A L FIRE P R O T E C T I O N ASSOCIATION.

87 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. Franklin H. Wentworth, secre­
tary-treasurer.
Organized in 1895 to promote the science and improve the methods
o f fire protection and prevention, to obtain and circulate information
on these subjects, and to secure the cooperation of its members in
establishing proper safeguards against loss o f life and property by
fire. There are 135 members (annual dues, $60) and about 4,500 as­
sociates (annual dues, $10). The members are national institutes,
societies, and associations (e. g., o f engineers and manufacturers)
having a direct interest in protection o f life and property against




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

127

fire, State associations for reduction of fire waste, insurance boards
and associations; associates are other organizations, corporations,
and individuals. Chapters have been organized in Chicago, New
York, Oregon, San Francisco, Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma.
A three-day convention is held annually, at which reports on the
various standards for protection against fire are presented by com­
mittees o f experts and discussed by the convention before adoption.
The following committees are specially concerned with investigations
o f industrial hazards: Safety to life, Manufacturing risks and spe­
cial hazards, Gases, Hazardous chemicals and explosives, Inflam­
mable. liquids. Other committees are concerned with fire-prevention
apparatus The committee reports are published in the Proceedings
o f the annual meetings (for members only).
The Electrical Committee1 of the association is carrying on the
9
work o f revision of the National Electrical [Fire] Code (regulations
fo r electric wiring and apparatus) originally drafted in 1897 by the
National Conference on Standard Electrical Pules and adopted by
the National Board o f Fire Underwriters. The 1920 revision has
been approved as “ American standard ” by the American Engineer­
ing Standards Committee, the association being sponsor for the elec­
trical fire code in the safety-code program o f that committee. It has
also been selected as sponsor for the safety code on stairways to be
prepared under the same auspices.
A list o f the standard regulations for fire protection and the safe­
guarding of hazards, recommended by the association and adopted
as the official standard of the National Board o f Fire Underwriters,
and other publications available for free distribution or for sale, is
contained in a pamphlet entitled “ The story o f the National Fire
Protection Association, and list of its publications,” obtainable on
application at the executive office.
N A T I O N A L F O U N D E R S ’ ASSOCIATION.

29 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111 J. M. Taylor, secretary.
Organized in January, 1898, the original purpose o f this associa­
tion was to provide machinery for bargaining collectively with the
Iron Holders’ Union. A joint board of conciliation was estab­
lished under the so-called New York agreement, which was in forc8
until 1904, when it was abrogated. Since that time the association
has operated independently of the union and has adopted the openshop policy. In conjunction with the National Metal Trades Asso­
ciation it publishes The Open-Shop Review in advocacy o f this
policy. It is a member association o f the National Industrial Con­
ference Board.
C o m m i t t e e o n S a f e t y a n d S a n i t a t i o n .— Appointed in 1912 under
the chairmanship of Magnus W. Alexander, this committee investi­
gated each specific hazard in the foundry industry and appropriate
means for effective safeguard against it, and issued a bulletin on the
subject. These were combined in 1915 to form a handbook entitled
“ Safety in the foundry,” by M. W. Alexander (202 p.). It has
19
The follow ing associations, form erly m em bers of th e N atio n al Conference, a r e repre­
sen ted on th is c o m m itte e : A m erican E le ctric R ailw ay A ssociation, A m erican I n s titu te
of E le c tric a l E ngineers, A ssociated F acto ry M u tu a l F ire In su ra n c e Com panies, N atio n al
A ssociation of E le ctrical In sp ecto rs, N atio n al B oard of F ire U n d erw rite rs, N atio n al E lec­
tr ic L ig h t Association,, N atio n al E le ctrical C o n tra c to rs’ A ssociation.




128

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

developed a number of safety appliances, such as goggles, foundry
shoes and leggings, ladder feet, respirators, etc. In 1914 this com­
mittee invited similar committees of other associations to meet with
it and as a result of these meetings the Conference Board on Safety
and Sanitation was formed. (See p. 95.)
In 1917 the National Founders’ Association, in conjunction with
the American Foundrymen’s Association, established a foundry code
on safety and sanitation and several States have since used it as the
basis for framing their foundry safety rules and regulations. These
two associations are joint sponsors for future revisions o f the code
under the auspices of the American Engineering Standards Com­
mittee.
N A T I O N A L INDUSTRIAL C O N F E R E N C E BOARD.

10 East Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Magnus W.
Alexander, managing director. (Branch office, Southern
Building, Washington, D. C.)
A cooperative body composed of representatives o f national and
State industrial associations, and o f closely allied engineering socie­
ties o f a national character, organized in May, 1916, to provide a
clearing house o f information, a forum for discussion, and machin­
ery for cooperative action on matters that vitally affect the industrial
development of the Nation. The stated objects o f the board are:
(1 ) To make impartial investigations in the field of industrial economics,
and to cooperate to this end with individuals, institutions, associations, and
agencies of Government.
(2 ) To aid in securing, on the basis of established economic facts underly­
ing and affecting industrial conditions, joint deliberation of manufacturers
and associations of manufacturers in the United States.
(3 ) To secure, analyze, and disseminate information concerning industrial
problems and experience in the United States and other countries.
(4) To promote good understanding and friendly relations between em­
ployees and employers for the benefit of both, and between those engaged in
industry and the public for the general good of the community.
(5) To make the results of its research and collective experiences available
to Governmental agencies when industrial and economic legislation and poli­
cies are being formulated, in an endeavor to secure sympathetic consideration
of its views and opinions, and
(6 ) In general, to encourage and promote the sound development of Am eri­
can industry by all proper and legitimate means.

The affiliated organizations (1921) are:
American Cotton Manufacturers’ Association.
American Electric Railway Association.
American Hardware Manufacturers’ Association.
American Malleable Castings Association.
American Paper and Pulp Association.
American Pig Iron Association.
Electrical Manufacturers’ Club.
Institute of Makers of Explosives.
Manufacturing Chemists’ Association of the United States.,
National Association of Cotton Manufacturers.
National Association of Finishers of Cotton Fabrics.
National Association of Manufacturers.
National Association of W ool Manufacturers.
National Automobile Chamber of Commerce.
National Boot and Shoe Manufacturers’ Association.
National Electric Light Association.
National Erectors’ Association.
National Founders’ Association.
National Implement and Vehicle Association.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

129

National Industrial Council.
Railway Car Manufacturers’Association.
Rubber Association of America ( n . .
Ic)
Silk Association of America.,
Tobacco Merchants’Association of the United States.
United Typothetse of America.
Associated Industries of Massachusetts.
Associated Industries of New York State ( n . .
Ic)
I l n i Manufacturers’ Association.
lios
Manufacturers’Association of Connecticut (In . .
c)

The Conference Board of Physicians in Industry (see p. 95) acts
as advisor on medical problems in industry to the National Industrial
Conference Board.
The publications o f the board consist o f Research Reports, Nos.
1-38; Special Reports, Nos. 1-18; and Industrial News Survey, issued
weekly. These include:
A series of Research Reports on 4 Hours o f work as related to out­
4
put and health o f workers 5 in various industries, v iz : cotton manu­
5
facturing (No. 4), boot and shoe industry (No. 7), wool manufac­
turing (No. 12), silk manufacturing (No. 16), and metal manufactur­
ing industries (No. 18) : 4 The hours of work problem in five major in­
4
dustries” (No. 2 7 ); 4 Practical experience with the work week o f
4
48 hours or less” (No. 32) ; also 4 Analysis of British-war-time re­
4
ports on hours o f work as related to output and fatigue ” (No. 2).
A series o f Research Reports on 4 Changes in the cost of living ”
4
since July, 1914, now issued every four months, i. e., to March, July*
and November (Nos. 9, 14, 17, 19, 25, 28, 30, 33, and 36).
A series o f local studies of 4 The cost of living among wage-earn­
4
e rs ” : Fall River, Mass., October, 1919 (Research Report No. 2 2);
Lawrence, Mass., November, 1919 (Research Report No. 24) ; North
Hudson County, N. J., January, 1920 (Special Report No. 7) ; Green­
ville and Pelzer, S. C., and Charlotte, N. C., January-February, 1920
(Special Report No. 8) ; Cincinnati, Ohio, May, 1920 (Special Re­
port No. 13) ; Worcester, Mass., June, 1920 (Special Report No. 16).
Research reports on the following special subjects: 4 War-time
4
employment o f women in the metal trades ” (No. 8) ; 4 Rest periods
4
for industrial workers” (No. 13) ; 4 Works5 councils in the United
4
States5 (No. 21), and supplement, 4A works5 council in the United
5
4
States 5 (No. 26) ; 4 Practical experience with profit-sharing in in­
5
4
dustrial establishments 5 (No. 2 9 ); 4 Health service in industry 5
5
4
5
(No. 34) ; 4 Wage changes in industry, September, 1914, to Decem­
4
ber, 1920 5 (No. 35) ; 4 Cost of health service in industry 5 (No. 37);
5
4
5
4 Experience with trade-union agreements, clothing industries 5 (No.
4
5
38).
A complete list, with prices, is printed at the end o f the latest re­
search report.
The activities of the Conference Board on Training of Appren­
tices2 were merged with those o f the National Industrial Conference
0
Board in 1920.
20
O rganized M arch, 1915 (M agnus W. A lexander, se c re ta ry ) ; com posed of rep re sen ­
ta tiv e s of N atio n al A ssociation o f M a n u fac tu rers, N atio n al F o u n d ers’ A ssociation,
N atio n al M etal T ra d e s A ssociation, N atio n al M achine Tool B u ild ers’ A ssociation, U nited
T ypothetse an d F ra n k lin Clubs of A m erica, A m erican F o u n d ry m e n ’s A ssociation. P u b li­
ca tio n s : P ra c tic a l ap p ren ticesh ip , a b u lle tin of in fo rm a tio n on th e tra in in g o f in d u stria l
w o rk e rs ; B u lletin No. 1, N ecessity of app ren ticesh ip (1916, 18 p.) ; B u lletin No. 2,
F u n d a m e n ta ls of a p p ren ticesh ip (1917, 30 p .). (P re p a re d by H enry P. P o rte r.)
70723°— Bull. 299— 21-------9




180

H I. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

N A T I O N A L M A C H I N E T O O L BUILDERS’ ASSOCIATION.

818 Provident Bank Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. Ernest F.
DuBrul, general manager.
This association is joint sponsor for the safety code on power drive
o f machine tools which is being prepared under the auspices and
rules o f procedure of the American Engineering Standards Commit­
tee.
A special committee appointed by the association made the pre­
liminary study on which was based the “ Safety code for the use and
care of abrasive wheels” issued by the Grinding Wheel Manufac­
turers’ Association o f the United States and Canada. (See p. 108.)
The Safety Committee o f the association has continued its coopera­
tion in conducting the tests and compiling the tables for later edi­
tions.
N A T I O N A L M E T A L T R A D E S ASSOCIATION.

People’s Gas Building, Chicago, UL Homer D. Sayre, secretary.
An employers’ association organized in 1899 u for national, united
action in handling unjust collective demands o f organized labor and in
treating with the labor question generally.” Its annual convention is
held in April, generally in New York, and a synopsis o f proceedings
is published.- There are about 1,000 members and 28 local branches.
The association is active in the open-shop campaign, and in conjunc­
tion with the National Founders’ Association publishes the Open
Shop Review.
Industrial education has been a matter o f special concern to the
association for many years. One o f its early efforts in this field con­
sisted in securing contributions from its members for equipment and
scholarships at Winona Technical Institute, Indianapolis, and in giv­
ing financial support and other assistance to the institute for the
maintenance and management o f a metal trades department. In 1906
the first steps towards the inauguration of the cooperative course in
engineering at the University o f Cincinnati, under Dean Herman
Schneider, were taken at a conference of the authorities o f the Engi­
neering College wfith the local branch o f the association, whose mem­
bers agreed to open their shops to students; and as a result o f Dean
Schneider’s address on the subject at the 1908 convention the cooper­
ative plan was introduced into the public schools of Fitchburg, Mass.
In the same year the Chicago branch developed a plan o f cooperation
with Lewis Institute. Appropriations were made in 1911, 1914, and
1915 for advancing the work undertaken by the National (Society for
the Promotion o f Industrial Education. (See p. 185.) Reports of
committees on industrial education and apprenticeship were pub­
lished annually in the synopsis o f proceedings up to and including
1917, in which year the Smith-Hughes Act was passed.
C ommittee on I ndustrial. E ducation.—H arold C. Smith, Illinois
Tool Works, Chicago, 111., chairman. The present committee, which
has reported annually since 1919, has established at the national office
o f the association a Department of Industrial Education (Philip C.
Molter, superintendent) and has had an individual survey made o f
the plants o f the members o f the association—about 1,000 in number
(located east o f the Mississippi R iver)— for the purpose o f ascertain­
ing what particular system o f training was adaptable to a particular
plant.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

181

A session on April 21 at the 1921 convention was devoted to reports
and papers on industrial education.
Committee of W orks5C ouncils in the M etal T rades made an in­
vestigation into the question o f employee representation and a session
was devoted to discussion of the subject at the 1920 convention.
N A T I O N A L R E S E A R C H COUNCIL.

1701 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, I>. C. VeFnon Kel­
logg, permanent secretary.
Established in 1916 under the congressional charter of the Na­
tional Academy of Sciences and organized with the cooperation o f
the national scientific and technical societies o f the United States.
During the war the National Research Council acted, in a cooperative
capacity, as the Department of Science and Research o f the Council
o f National Defense; also, as the Science and Research Division of
the United States Signal Corps. In tills connection, during the war,
it received a considerable part o f its support from the Government,
but since its reorganization after the war it derives its support wholly
from private sources. As now organized, the technical work of the
council is distributed among its 18 divisions, 6 of which deal with
the more general aspects and contacts of research (the divisions of
Federal Relations, Foreign Relations, States Relations, Educational
Relations, Research Extension, and the Research Information Serv­
ice) and 7 with particular fields of science and technology (viz,
Physical sciences, Engineering, Chemistry and chemical technology,
Geology and geography, Medical sciences, Biology and agriculture,
Anthropology and psychology). The personnel of these divisions
and numerous committees is given in a pamphlet, “ National Research
Council: organization and members, 1920-21 ” (45 p .).
D ivision oe A nthropology and P sychology.— C. E. Seashore,
chairman (1921-22). This is the successor of the Psychology Com­
mittee formed in April, 1917, to organize and supervise psychological
research and service in the war emergency and o f which various
committees on military personnel problems appointed by the Ameri­
can Psychological Association became subcommittees. Among these
were (1) the committee on the psychological examination o f recruits
which developed the plan of mental testing subsequently applied to
the Army by a division of psychology created in the Office of the
Surgeon General,2 (2) the committee on the selection o f men for
1
tasks requiring special aptitude, from which developed through
the activity of two of its members— E. L„ Thorndike and Walter Dill
Scott— the Committee on Classification of Personnel in the Army.2
2
Other committees studied problems of vision, reeducation, incapacity,
emotional stability, etc.; and psychological service was rendered to
the Committee on Education and Special Training o f the War De­
partment and other military agencies. The report o f the Psychology
Committee, by Robert M. Yerkes, chairman, was published in the
Psychological Review, March, 1919 (v. 26, p. 83-149), and issued

2 T he te s ts used a re given in “A rm y m en tal teats.,” by C. S. Y oakum an d R. M. Yerkes
1
(New York, H. H o lt & Co., 1920) ; t h e official rep o rt, “ P sychological exam ining in th e
U n ited State® A rm y,” co n sistin g of (1 ) h isto ry , o rganizations, and m aterials,. (2)
m ethods, an d (3) resu lts, w as published as Memoir® of th e N atio n al Academy of Sciences
(v. 15).
2 An official a cco u n t of th e w ork o f th is com anittee w as published by th e W ar D e p a rt­
2
m en t u n d e r th e title , “ T h e personnel system of th e U n ited S ta te s A rm y ” (1919. 2 v ols.).




132

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

also as No. 2 o f the reprint and circular series of the National Re­
search Council.
This division acts in an advisory capacity on research projects in
its field. Committees on the following subjects organized under it
deal with various phases of personnel research:
(a) Anthropological and psychological study of the people of the
United States? with a subcommittee dealing with standardization o f
procedures for determining race characters.
(b) Superior attainment o f college students.—This committee is
conducting an organized search for research talent among college
students, through committees organized for the purpose in the various
universities and colleges. For the use o f these committees it has
prepared a printed blank for 4Analyzed rating of fitness for graduate
4
study.” It proposes to issue shortly a series o f bulletins on 4 Re­
4
search opportunities ” (including those in industrial establishments),
eight of which are now ready for the printer.
(c) Prediction of success of students entering higher institutions.—
This committee is concerned with the development of tests o f fitness,
e. g., advising in the investigation of the use of tests for engineering
students being made under the Society for the Promotion of Engi­
neering Education. (See p. 153.) It has prepared and published
two 4 comprehension tests.”
4
( d) National intelligence tests.—This committee, under a grant
from the General Education Board, prepared an adaptation for
school purposes of the group intelligence tests used in the examina­
tion o f recruits in the Army. These tests, with a manual o f direc­
tions, are published by the W orld Book Co., Yonkers, N. Y . An
account o f this work is given in a paper entitled,4 The national intel­
4
ligence tests,” by Guy M. Whipple, in Journal of Educational Re­
search (v. 4, No. 1, p. 16~31), June, 1921 (issued as a reprint by the
committee).
(e) Child welfare research,
(f) Problems o f military psychology, including methods o f rating
in the Army.
R esearch I nformation Service.—R obert M. Yerkes, chairman
and resident director. A clearing house for information about scien­
tific methods and results and their practical applications in engineer­
ing, industry, and education. This service maintains a biographical
file o f scientists who are qualified by training and experience to con­
duct research in the physical or biological sciences or their respective
technologies. Approximately 13,000 persons in the United States
are already listed, and the data about them are being arranged by
means o f the Findex system for ready reference and mechanical sort­
ing to meet the informational demands o f scientific and industrial
agencies.
C ommittee on F ood and N utrition.— J. R. Murlin, University o f
Rochester, chairman. This committee under the Division of Biology
and Agriculture has formulated an extensive and detailed program o f
research for which it is endeavoring to secure support. Among the
projects outlined by the subcommittee on human nutrition are (1) thefood requirements o f children o f different ages, including the effects
o f muscular work upon children; (2) nutrition in relation to the
health and efficiency o f industrial workers.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

133

C o m m i t t e e o n I n d u s t r i a l P e r s o n n e l R e s e a r c h .— Alfred D.
Flinn, Engineering Foundation, New York, secretary. This com­
mittee represented the council in planning and conducting the con­
ferences held in November, 1920, and March, 1921, which resulted in
the formation o f the Personnel Research Federation. (See p. 143.)

N A T I O N A L RETAIL D R Y G O O D S ASSOCIATION.

200 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Organized in 1911 to promote and protect the interests o f retail
dry goods merchants throughout the United States. Annual con­
ventions are held in New York City; there are also spring and fall
meetings which may be held elsewhere. At the present time (March,
1921) the association has 2,234 members.
In addition to subsidiary groups devoted to financial and account­
ing problems, advertising, and transportation and shipping ques­
tions, there is a department o f education under the direction o f Mrs.
Lucinda W. Prince, director o f the Prince School of Education for
Store Service, Boston, which conducts an information service on
matters relating to training for retail selling, and holds special
sessions on educational, employment, and research work in stores
at the annual conventions.
A Committee for the Study o f Wage Problems appointed by the
board o f directors in October, 1919, published a “ Preliminary re­
port o f commission and bonus methods” (51 p.) in May, 1920.
B u r e a u o f R e s e a r c h a n d I n f o r m a t i o n .— W. A. Fitzgerald, man­
ager. This bureau, maintained at the New York office to collect
data on the various problems o f the retail dry goods trade, including
personnel administration, issued to members in February, 1921, a
confidential report on “ Bonus methods for delivery department
employees,” containing a description o f methods used in 15 different
stores.
N A T I O N A L S A F E T Y COUNCIL.

168 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. C. W. Price, general
manager; Sidney J. Williams, secretary and chief engineer.
The first cooperative safety congress was held under the auspices
of the Association o f Iron and Steel Electrical Engineers at M il­
waukee, Wis., September 30 to October 5, 1912, and a committee
appointed at that congress was authorized to prepare plans for a
national society, which was officially organized as the National Coun­
cil for Industrial Safety in September, 1913. As the scope o f its
activities broadened, the name was changed to National Safety Coun­
cil in the following year. This council is an association o f companies
and individuals interested in promoting safety in industrial establish­
ments and also on the streets and in the home. Its field is the pre­
vention o f accidents, with related activities affecting the health, com­
fort, and welfare o f industrial workers.
The present membership includes about 4,000 industrial concerns,
operating more than 7,500 plants and employing more than 6,000,000
workers. To these it renders a safety service, consisting of posters
for the bulletin board, a monthly magazine entitled National Safety
News, “ Safe practices” pamphlets, and consultation. Membership
dues are based on the nature and extent o f the service rendered and
the number o f employees on the pay roll o f the concern.




1 M

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES,

The council also organizes schools for foremen .and safety super­
visors and has published in loose-leaf form outlines o f lectures for
such schools.
For Greater JJew York and the adjacent manufacturing district
o f New Jersey, the Metropolitan Safety Council has been formed by
the National Safety Council and the Safety Institute o f America {see
p. 149) jointly; and in order to unify the work o f the two organiza­
tions and prevent duplication they have entered into an agreement
that all industrial plants in this district, which are members o f either,
shall be entitled to the joint service o f both This local council con­
ducted lecture courses for foremen during 192.0-21 at various places
in its territory.
Safety congresses have been held annually since 1912 in different
cities and the proceedings published. The present organization
o f the congress consists o f Engineering, Public Safety, Education,
Health Service, and Women in Industry sections, and the follow­
ing sections devoted to safety in particular industries, viz: Auto­
motive, Cement, Chemical, Construction, Electric Railway, Metals,
Mining, Packers and Tanners, Paper and Pulp, Public Utilities,
Rubber, Steam Railroad, Textile, Woodworking. Meetings on spe­
cial topics are also held, e. g., at the ninth annual safety congress,
1920, on employees’ benefit associations, and employees’ publications.
The National Safety Council is sponsor for the safety codes on
construction work, paper and pulp mills, and power presses, now in
preparation by sectional committees under the auspices and rules o f
procedure o f the American Engineering Standards Committee (see
p. 72) and is joint sponsor for the textiles safety code and for the
standard color scheme for pipe lines. It has been recommended and
was approved conditionally m June, 1920, as sponsor for the safety
codes on blast furnaces and blooming and rolling mills but has not
yet accepted these sponsorships.
E ngineering D epartment.— Created in 1917, this department
consists of saf ety engineers who have in charge the preparation o f all
the bulletins and “ Safe practices” pamphlets and also serve the
membership of the council by investigating and answering all in­
quiries for technical information.
u Safe practices ” is a series o f pamphlets, in each o f which a
particular hazard is discussed in detail and the safe practices in the
construction and operation o f the particular equipment involved
are described. They represent the results of extensive research
work by the engineers o f the department, with the cooperation o f
a conference committee of safety engineers. The following num­
bers have been issued:
No. 1, Ladders; No. 2, Stairs and stairw ays; No. 3, Boiler room s; No. 4,
C ran es; No. 5, Belt shifters and belt shippers; No. 6, Knots, bends, hitches, and
slings; No. 7, Belts and belt guards; No. 8, Shafting, couplings, pulleys, gearing;
No. 9, Engine guarding and engine stop s; No. 10, Oiling devices and o ile r s;
No. 11, Floors and flooring; No. 12, Scaffolds <for industrial plant use) ; No.
13, Grinding wheels; No. 14, Goggles; No. 15, Freight elevators; No. 16, Safe
clothing; No. 17, Y a rd s; No. 18, Power presses; No. 19, Exits, fire alarms and
fire d r ills; No. 20, Woodworking machinery and equipment; No. 21, Accident
records; No. 22, Shop lighting; No. 23, Gas and electric welding; No. 24, Fire
extinguishment; No. 25, Acids and caustics {industrial p la n ts); No. 26, M a­
nila and wire rope; No. 27, Drinking water,, wash and locker rooms, and toilet
facilities; No. 28, Commercial explosives; No. 29, Electrical equipment in in-




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC*

1&5

dust rial p lan ts; No* 80, Trucks and wheelbarrows; No* 31, Fire causes and
prevention; No. 32, Exhaust system s; No. 33, Hoisting apparatus; No* 34, Indus­
trial explosion hazards; gases, vapors, flammable liquids and dusts; No. 35,
Conveyers; No. 36, Fire brigades; No. 3T, Industrial ventilation; No. 38, Safety
bulletins and bulletin b oard s; No. 39, Machine shop m achinery; No. 40, Sug­
gestion system s; No. 41, Hand too ls; No. 42, Industrial safety organization; No.
43, Passenger elevators; No. 44, Th e prevention of skin troubles from cutting
oils and emulsions; No. 45, Industrial housekeeping.
Sectional: P. and P. 1, Paper and pulp m ills; Me. 1, Cleaning and finishing
rooms in foundries; Me. 2, Blast furnaces; M. 1, Underground mine cars and

haulage.
H e a l t h S e r v ic e S e c t i o n .— This section originated at an indus­
trial hygiene session at the annua! safety conference in 1914 and has
held meetings at each subsequent congress. A t the 1919 congress
it appointed a committee to investigate and report on the best
modes o f preventing and controlling skin diseases in industry and
the best methods o f treatment. The questionnaire sent out by this
committee is given in Modern Medicine (v. 2, No. 2, Feb., 1920,
p. 150).

N A T I O N A L SOCIETY F O R V O C A T I O N A L EDUCATION.

140 West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. Miss Clotilde
Ware, office secretary.
Organized in 1906 as the National Society for the Promotion o f
Industrial Education; present name adopted in 1918, The objects o f
this society are (1) to afford all those who are interested, opportuni­
ties for the presentation and discussion o f the various problems o f
vocational education; (2) to make available the results of the ex­
perience of those working in the various fields o f vocational educa­
tion, both in this country and abroad. A t the present time (1921)
there are 2,200 members, including educators, industrial managers,
manufacturers, labor leaders, social workers, etc.
Annual conventions have been held in various cities, latterly in
February. The proceedings are issued in the society’s series o f Bul­
letins. The 1920 convention at Chicago was a joint convention with
the Vocational Education Association o f the Middle West.
A special feature o f the conventions at Richmond, Va. (1914),
Minneapolis (1916), and Indianapolis (1917) was the holding of ses­
sions devoted to the results o f a vocational education survey o f the
city made in advance o f the convention. In the case o f the first two
cities, the survey was made under the direction o f a general survey
committee o f the society with funds provided locally and in coopera­
tion with a local survey committee. The report o f the Richmond
(V a.), survey was published as Bulletin No. 162 o f United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics; the Minneapolis survey as Bulletin No.
21 o f the society (also in revised form as Bulletin No. 199 of United
States Bureau o f Labor Statistics). The Indianapolis survey for
vocational education was the sixth o f a series o f seven vocational
surveys in Indiana undertaken by the State Board o f Education,
Indiana University, and local education authorities jointly, with the
cooperation o f this society, the reports o f which were published by
State Board of Education as the Survey Series o f its Educational
Bulletins.
An industrial art survey was undertaken by the society in 1920-21.
The work has been completed but is not yet published.




136

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Employment managers’ conferences were held in connection with
the annual conventions at Minneapolis (January, 1916) and Indian­
apolis (February, 1917). The proceedings o f the first o f these, pub­
lished as Bulletin o f the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
No. 196, are appended to the society’s Bulletin No. 22; the proceed­
ings o f the second are included in its Bulletin No. 24 (p. 225-291).
A conference on training for salesmanship in retail stores was the
first session o f the 1914 convention; and beginning with the St. Louis
convention o f 1919, section meetings have been held on commercial
education, devoted largely to the same subject, and on agricultural
education, in addition to those on industrial education, to which the
papers and discussions at the conventions had mainly been confined
in previous years.
The following bulletins are studies made by special committees o f
the society appointed for the purposes indicated by the titles:
No.
1907.
No.
1908.
No.
By C.
No.

4. Industrial training for women. By Florence M. Marshall, October,
59 p.
8. Education of workers in the shoe industry. By Arthur D. Dean. Dec.,
110 p.
19. Selection and training of teachers for State-aided industrial schools.
A . Prosser and W . A. O’Leary. Feb., 1914; rev. ed. Feb., 1917. 64 p.
23. Evening vocational courses for girls and women. Feb., 1917. 73 p.

The proceedings of the 1920 convention (Bulletin No. 32) contain
reports o f special committees on the following subjects: Vestibule
and upgrading schools (p. 86-97); Vocational education in the con­
tinuation schools (p. 136-150); Vocational training for women in
industry (p. 151-158); Vocational education in high schools (p.
159-183).
N A T I O N A L T U B E R CULOSIS ASSOCIATION.

381 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Charles T. Hatfield,
M. D., managing director.
Originally organized as the National Association for the Study and
Prevention o f Tuberculosis; present name adopted in 1918 and asso­
ciation incorporated under the laws of Maine. The following para­
graphs summarize only the special activities o f this association in
the industrial field.
In December, 1916, the Framingham Community Health and T u­
berculosis Demonstration was initiated by the association with a
special fund of $100,000 provided by the Metropolitan L ife Insurance
Co., which continues to finance it, as an intensive experiment to
determine whether it is possible to reduce substantially the mortality
and morbidity of tuberculosis, particularly in industrial communities.
Its executive officer is Donald B. Armstrong, M. D., Community
Health Station, Framingham, Mass.
The results of the experiment are set forth in Framingham Mono­
graphs, Nos. 1-8, subdivided into three series, viz: General series,
Medical series, Sanitary series, o f which No. 6 (Sanitary series I I )
published September, 1919, is devoted to schools and factories. The
section o f this monograph on the factories includes besides a general
sanitary study o f the great majority of the Framingham industries,
(1) a special study o f ventilation in certain typical plants, where




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

1ST

the questions o f dust, fumes, chemicals, and general ventilation were
touched upon, carried out with the cooperation of the New York
State Commission on Ventilation (see p. 54), and (2) a special
study of safety in a number of the Framingham plants, conducted
by the American Museum o f Safety. (See p. 149, Safety Institute o f
America.)
In 1918 the association detailed its field secretary, Dr. H. A. Pattison, to the Federal Board o f Vocational Education to study the prob­
lem o f vocational rehabilitation in the case o f tuberculous soldiers
and sailors, and appointed a committee to direct and assist him. The
results o f this work were published as:
U. S. Federal Board of Vocational Education. Bulletin No. 29 (Reeducation
series No. 5 ). Treatment and training for the tuberculous, with standards by
which to determine proper training and occupations for the tuberculous sol­
dier, sailor, or marine. Mar., 1919, 22 p.

In August, 1921, the association began an investigation o f the
standards o f employment for tuberculous persons, which will take
about three years to complete. The study will involve an analysis
o f the operations or processes of the leading industries to determine
what, if any, are their peculiar health hazards to tuberculous persons,
or persons likely to become tuberculous, and also to ascertain in what
particular departments persons who have had tuberculosis can be
employed.
C o m m it t e e

on

M

o r t a l it y fr o m

T

u b e r c u l o s is i n

D

usty

T

r a d e s .—

Dr. Edward K. Baldwin, Saranac Lake, N. Y., chairman. Appointed
in 1917, this committee has concentrated its efforts upon an investi­
gation o f the marble and granite industries of Vermont and the lime­
stone industry of Indiana. Two preliminary reports were published
in 1919—the first (27 p.) by the Working Conditions Service o f the
United States Department of Labor, the second (24 p.) by the Na­
tional Tuberculosis Association— which are largely correspondence
relating to the plan o f the investigation and preliminary data.
Since then the following parts of the Vermont investigation have
been completed: (1) A statistical survey, by Mr. Sylvester Schattschneider, o f the Prudential Life Insurance Co., of the various fea­
tures o f the industry, and house-to-house visitation o f the granite
cutters, to obtain data on family and personal histories, housing con­
ditions, etc.; (2) a study o f the mortality records of the State o f
Vermont, which was summarized in an informal report to the asso­
ciation in 1920, by Dr. Frederick L. Hoffmann, former chairman o f
the committee. The results o f the medical examinations, about 500
in number, were reported to the executive committee at the meeting
o f the association in June, 1921, and the report is being prepared
for publication as a separate pamphlet.
In conjunction with this investigation some experimental work
has been carried on at the Saranac Laboratory under a Trudeau
Foundation fellowship (see p. 159) by Dr. L. U. Gardner. His first
results were published in the American Keview o f Tuberculosis
(v. 4, No. 10, Dec., 1920, p. 73L-755) under the title “ Studies on the
relation o f mineral dusts to tuberculosis, I. The relatively early
lesions in experimental pneumokoniosis produced by granite inhala­
tion and their influence on pulmonary tuberculosis.”




138

H I. N03STOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

N A T I O N A L V O C A T I O N A L G U I D A N C E ASSOCIATION.

Anne S. Davis, Vocational guidance department, city schools,
Chicago, secretary.
The organization of this association was completed during a series
o f meetings held at Grand Eapids, Mich., October 21-24, 1913.
(Papers presented were published by United States Bureau of Edu­
cation as Bulletin 1914, No. 14.) This was the third national con­
ference on vocational guidance, previous meetings having been held at
Boston in 1910 and New York City in 1912.
There are now about 300 members and eight branch associations,
viz :
Vocational Guidance Association of New York City. Mrs. Marie Holl, 112
W est Forty-sixth Street, secretary.
/ Chicago Vocational Guidance Association. Mary F. Stone, 607 Plymouth
Court, secretary.
Vocational Guidance Association of Minneapolis. Hermione Dealey, Depart­
ment of Educational Psychology, University of Minnesota, secretary.
Cincinnati Vocational Guidance Association. Mrs. Helen T. Woolley, Vocation
Bureau, School Department, secretary.
Vocational Guidance Association of Philadelphia and Vicinity. Elmira A.
Lodor, Kensington High School, secretary.
New England Vocational Guidance Association. Lewis A. Maverick, 1 Law­
rence Hall,, Kirkland Street, Cambridge 38, Mass.
California Vocational Guidance Association. Charles L. Jacobs, School of
Education, University of California, Berkeley.
Kansas City, Kansas, Vocational Guidance Association. C. W . Shelley, 2300
North Tw elfth Street, secretary.

It is planned this year (1921) to have each branch association make
a study o f some phase o f vocational guidance.
N A T I O N A L W O R K M E N ’ C O M P E N S A T I O N SERVICE BUREAU.
S

13 Park Eow, New York, N. Y. Albert W. Whitney, general
manager.
Established in December, 1910, by a group of casualty insurance
companies to classify compensation and liability risks, regulate com­
missions and construct a standard manual; in May, 1911, the Bureau
o f Liability Insurance Statistics (organized 1896) was merged with
it. The original name Workmen’s Compensation Service and In for­
mation Bureau was changed to Workmen’s Compensation Service
Bureau in March, 1913, and the present style was adopted in June,
1916. Membership is open to companies engaged in liability or
workmen’s compensation insurance which are duly authorized to
transact such business in any State o f the Union.
In addition to establishing manual or basic rates for particular
classifications, the bureau has prepared, tested, and published plans
o f (1) 6 schedule rating,” for modifying the manual rates by giving
6
credits or debits for good or bad physical conditions (e. g., in regard
to use and efficiency o f safety appliances) in the individual plant as
revealed by inspection; and (2) “ experience rating,” for a further
modification based on the actual experience of the plant in respect
to casualties, etc. Both o f these exert an important influence in the
direction o f accident prevention because they offer to the employer a
pecuniary inducement for improving his risk and his experience. The
bureau is, therefore, interested in all safety standards, primarily
because of their direct bearing on rating, and has compiled the fo l­
lowing handbooks:




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

139

Universal safety standards: a reference bo ok of rides, drawings, tables,
formulae, data, and suggestion. By Carl M. Hansen. 2d ed. 1914. 312 p.
Safety in woodworking. 1918.

It is represented on the executive committee of the American
Engineering Standards Committee (see p. 72) and is joint sponsor
for three o f the safety codes in process of development under its
auspices and rules of procedure, viz, woodworking, power transmis­
sion, and machine tools. It is also represented on the sectional com­
mittees of a number of other codes.
The library o f the bureau has issued in mimeographed form a
number o f reference lists on special subjects in the field of indus­
trial hygiene and safety, e. g., manufacture o f munitions and ex­
plosives from the standpoint o f safety and health; the dust hazard
in industry; industrial poisons; safety in machine shops and foun­
dries; accident prevention in building construction and contract­
ing; safety in conveying and hoisting; safety in electrical work;
and a weekly bulletin of references arranged under subject headings.
N E L A R E S E A R C H LABORATORY.

National Lamp Works o f General Electric Co., Nela Park,
Cleveland, Ohio. Edward P. Hyde, director of research.
Organized in the autumn of 1908 as the Physical Laboratory o f
the National Electric Lamp Association for the development of those
branches of science with which the art o f lighting is closely associ­
ated (e. g. physics, physiology, and psychology) ; present name
adopted January, 1914, in consequence of a business reorganiza­
tion which did not, however, affect the continuity of the work of the
laboratory.
The results o f the investigations carried out in this laboratory
have been presented before various American scientific and technical
societies and have been published in their proceedings or in scientific
and technical journals. Abstracts of all papers up to January, 1916,
have also been published in the Laboratory’s Abstract-Bulletin (v. 1,
Nos. 1, 2). The studies of physiological and psychological aspects o f
lighting made by the staff include the follow ing:
Ives, Herbert E. A visual acuity test object.
(Elec. World, v. 55, 1910, p.
93 9 ; Abstract No. T.)
Cobb, Percy W . The influence of illumination of the eye on visual acuity.
(Amer. Jour. Physiol., v. 29, 1911, p. 7 6 ; Abstract No. 8.)
Cobb, Percy W ., and Geissler, L. R. The effect on fovea 1 vision of bright
surroundings. (Psychol. Rev., v. 20, 1913, p. 425-447.)
Cobb, Percy W . The effect on foveal vision of bright surroundings II, III,
IV.
(Psychol. Rev., v. 21, 1914, p. 2 3 -3 2 ; Jour. Exper. Psychol., v. 1, No. 5,
Oct., 1916, p. 419-42 5; v. 1, No. 6, Dec., 1916, p. 540-566.)
------- The influence o f . pupillary diameter on visual acuity.
(Amer. Jour.
Physiol., v. 36, 1915, p. 33 5 ; Abstract No. 53.)
----- -- Eye-function and light.
(Cleveland Med. Jour., v. 15, Mar., 1916,
p; 164.)
Luckiesh, M. Monochromatic light and visual acuity. (Elec. W orld, v. 58,
1911, p. 45 0; Abstract No. 9 .)
------- The dependence o f visual acuity on the wave-length of light.
(Elec.
W orld, v. 58, 1911, p. 1252; Abstract No. 10.)
------- Visual acuity in white lights (Elec, W orld, v. 62, 1913, p. 1160; Ab­
stract No. 54.)
------- Radiant energy and the eye. (Elec. World, v. 62, 1913, p. 844; v. 66,
1915, p. 576; Abstract No. 60.)
------- Glasses for protecting the eyes in industrial processes.
(Trans. Ilium.
Eng. Soc., v. 9, 1914, p. 47 2; Abstract No. 62.)




140

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Burge, W . E. The injurious effect of ultra-violet radiation on living tissue.
(Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soc., v. 10, 1915, p. 9 3 2 ; Amer. Jour. Physiol., v. 36, 1914, p.
2 1 ; v. 39, 1916, p. 33 5; Elec. World, v. 65, 1915, p. 91 2 ; Abstract No. 61.)
Johnson, H . M. The influence of the distribution of brightness over the
visual field on the time required for discriminative responses to visual stimuli.
(Psychobiology, v. 1, No. 6, May, 1918, p. 459-494.)
------- The dynamogenic influence of light on tactile discrimination. (Psycho­
biology, v. 2, No. 4, Aug., 1920, p. 351-374.)

N E W JERSEY S T A T E C H A M B E R OF CO M M ERCE.

Clinton Building, Newark, N. J.
B u r e a u o f S t a t e R e s e a r c h .— Paul Studensky, supervisor of staff.
Established in 1915 to make impartial investigations of questions of
public interest on which the State chamber desires data as a basis
for action. Articles and brief reports by its staff are published in
New Jersey, issued monthly by the State chamber, or is the weekly
Legislative Index, issued by the bureau during each legislative ses­
sion; the results o f its more extensive studies appear as consecutive
numbers o f State Research (a supplement section of New Jersey').
Originally its research activities were directed to governmental
problems in the State. Among its published reports on such subjects
is a series in the field o f personnel administration dealing with teach­
ers’, police, firemen’s, and other local employees’ pension systems pre­
pared for the New Jersey Pension and Retirement Fund Commission
in the work o f reorganizing the State and municipal funds on a
sound actuarial basis (published 1917-1919 as State Research, Con­
secutive Nos. 8-13,16).
The experience thus gained was made available for industrial
concerns by the establishment o f a special Department for the A d­
vancement o f Sound Benefit Funds in the bureau to advise employers
and employees regarding the best methods to be followed in the ad­
justments o f benefits and contributions and to perform the technical
work for them. A report entitled “ Broadening the scope of pensions
in private industry,” by Paul Studensky, was published as New Jer­
sey, v. 6, No. 8, May, 1919.
On the subject of housing, a report entitled “ A practical build­
ing program to meet the immediate and permanent needs o f New
Jersey industry,” by Lillian Erskine, was issued as State Research,
Consecutive No. 17, June, 1919.
In December, 1918, January and March, 1919, the State chamber
held three conferences on industrial relations, of which the proceed­
ings were published in New Jersey (v. 6, Nos. 4 -6). As a result o f
these the bureau was directed to collect the various plans and
schemes for organizing employee representation in shop manage­
ment, analyze these systems and prepare a report thereon, which
was subsequently published under the title “ Shop committees and
industrial councils,” parts 1 and 2, as State Research, Consecutive
No. 18, July, 1919 (64 p.). It also formulated a plan for the estab­
lishment of a Joint Industrial Council for New Jersey (in New Jer­
sey, v. 6, No. 10). A fourth conference on industrial relations was
held in September, 1919 (proceedings in New Jersey, v. 6, No. 11),
and the fifth o f the series in November, 1920.
A Committee on Industrial Relations was appointed in December,
1920, to continue consideration of questions in this field, and for this
committee the bureau is making investigations on the “ closed shop ”




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

141

and “ open shop.” An introductory report on “ Closed shop and
open shop terminology” has been issued as New Jersey, v. 8, No. 2.
N E W Y O R K ASSOCIATION F O R IMPROVING T H E CONDITION O F
T H E POOR.

105 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y.
o f S o c i a l W e l f a r e .” John C. Gebhart, director.
Established in April, 1913, by Mrs. Elizabeth Milbank Anderson to
“ foster preventive and constructive social measures for the welfare
o f the poor o f this city, as distinguished from relief measures affect­
ing particular individuals and families.” Its principal work at the
present time is centered in the Bureau of Welfare of School Chil­
dren. It has also a Nutrition Bureau (formerly Bureau of Food
Supplies) which carries on research work in food economics and has
published the following study o f 92 family dietaries (Publication
No. 121 o f the Association) :
D

epartm ent

Sherman, H. C.„ and Gillett, L. H.
city dietaries. 1917. 32 p.

The adequacy and economy of some

Attached to this department is the New York State Commission
on Ventilation (see p. 54), endowed in June, 1913, with a special
fund of $50,000 by Mrs. Elizabeth Milbank Anderson to enable it
to carry out an important part of the original program of the de­
partment as outlined in the letter of gift, i. e., to establish by research
and experimental work adequate scientific and practical standard
methods o f ventilation for home, school, and workshop.
D e p a r t m e n t o f F a m i l y W e l f a r e , — This department has under
its direction the work o f the association which deals more particu­
larly with individual families. The Bureau of Family Rehabilita­
tion and Relief has accumulated considerable data on family budgets
through the requirement that such a record shall be kept by prac­
tically all o f the families receiving allowances sufficient for their
maintenance, which are based on estimates made by the bureau’s
dietitians.
NUTRITION LABORATORY.

Vila Street, Boston, Mass. Francis G. Benedict, director.
This laboratory, erected 1907-8, is one of the research depart­
ments o f the Carnegie Institution of Washington. The investiga­
tions in nutrition, to which it is devoted, originated with the late
Prof. W. O. Atwater, of Wesleyan University, Middletown,
Conn., and during the years 1903 to 1907 grants were made to him
and to the present director. The equipment comprises a variety of
apparatus for observations on metabolism and for related investi­
gations, including respiration calorimeters, appartus for recording
muscular activity and other physiological phenomena, bicycle ergometers and treadmills for muscular work, etc. A psychological
laboratory provides for observations on physical and mental effici­
ency particularly as influenced by various foods, drugs, and fatigue.
The researches undertaken, which are of interest in the field of
industrial physiology and psychology, include observations on the
influence o f various factors upon metabolism, as the ingestion o f
foods, breathing o f oxygen-rich atmospheres, variations in tempera­
ture environment, muscular activity; observations on the effect of
undernutrition on physical and mental well-being; the ingestion o f




142

h i.

sroisroFriciA ii

a g e n c ie s .

alcohol as influencing psychological processes in general and also
skilled muscular performance; (in progress) respiratory exchange
during muscular work and influence of alcohol on fatigue and re­
cuperation. The results of these investigations published thus far
are contained in the following Publications of the Carnegie Institu­
tion of Washington:
N#. 187. Benedict, Francis G-, and Cathcart, E. P. Muscular w o rk : A meta­
bolic study with special reference to the efficiency o f the Unman body as a
machine. 1918. 176 p.
No. 232. Dodge, Raymond, and Benedict, F. G. Psychological effects of
aleohol. An experimental investigation o f the effects of moderate doses of
ethyl alcohol on a related group o f neuro-muscular processes in man. 1915.
281 p.
No. 266. Miles, W alter R. Effect of alcohol on psycho-physiological func­
tions. 1919. 144 p.
No. 280. Benedict, Francis G., and others. . Human vitality and efficiency
under prolonged restricted diet. 1919. xi, 702 p.

O H I O C OUNCIL O N W O M E N A N D C H I L D R E N IN INDUSTRY.

305 Bank o f Commerce Building, Toledo. Miss Amy G. Maher,
chairman.
This council was formed in December, 1919, and consists o f rep­
resentatives of 25 organizations concerned with industrial problems,
besides a number o f interested individuals. Its object is to make
unbiased investigation into conditions calling for proposed legis­
lation, and studies o f its results in places where it is already in
operation, and probable effects, if passed, on various industries and
localities in O hio; and on this basis to develop a legislative program
in the interest of women and children in industry which can be sup­
ported by the united strength of its constituent organizations and a
State-wide public opinion.
It has recently published interim reports o f an investigation under­
taken with a view to securing data bearing on a minimum wage law
for the State o f Ohio. The second section is devoted to a study of
the cost o f living in the case o f women in various occupations all
over the State. A summary o f the reports is given in Monthly
Labor Review, U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, February, 1921
(p. 9 7 -1 0 0 ).

The results of an unemployment survey made by the council in
1921 have been published under the title “ Ohio and unemployment
in 1920-21 ” (40 p.).
PACIFIC C O A S T B U R E A U O F E M P L O Y M E N T RESEARCH.

455 Flood Building, San Francisco, Calif. W ilford E. Talbert,
director.
Organized in the fall o f 1919 (1) to render “ community service ”
and (2) to serve individual corporations in matters affecting the
relations between employer and employee. By “ community serv­
ice ” was meant those activities which woulcl make for better indus­
trial relations in the community as a whole. In June, 1920, its sub­
scribers were organized to form the Personnel Club, which issued
the proceedings o f monthly meetings in its official organ, Person­
nel Club Exchange (mimeographed) to July, 1921. This publica­
tion superseded Employment Problems (v. 1, No. 1, Sept., 1919),
information service bulletins, and the monthly news letters pre­
viously sent to subscribers. In July, 1921, the Personnel Club
merged with the Industrial Relations Association o f California.



ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

143

The bureau has made a study for one of the street railways to
determine whether or not it is possible to select in advance those
motormen who will be least liable to accidents. It is also making,
at the request o f the Chamber of Commerce, a preliminary survey o f
the building industry in San Francisco, with particular reference to
the elements o f personnel administration which are involved. Other
research work done by the bureau applies only to individual corpora­
tions and the results have been considered confidential.
A general intelligence test for business institutions, designed by
Arthur S. Otis, of its staff, has recentlv been published bv the
W orld Book Co., Yonkers, N. Y.
P E N N S Y L V A N I A S TATE C H A M B E R OF C OMMERCE.

Telegraph Building, Harrisburg, Pa.
B u r e a u .—Leonard P. Fox, director.
As part o f its
health insurance investigation in 1919 this bureau made a study of
sickness absenteeism in Pennsylvania from reports furnished by its
members with regard to their establishments. The results are pub­
lished in its “ Special report on health insurance,” 1919 (p. 41-91).
R

esearch

P E R S O N N E L R E S E A R C H FEDERATION.

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Leonard Outhwaite, acting director; Alfred D. Flinn, secretary.
Organized March 15, 1921, at a conference on personnel research
held under the auspices o f the National Research Council and Engi­
neering Foundation, following a preliminary conference held No­
vember 12,1920, under the same auspices to consider the practicability
o f bringing about cooperation among the many bodies conducting
research relating to men and women in industry and commerce, from
management to unskilled labor.
The object o f the federation is defined to be “ the correlation o f
research activities pertaining to personnel in industry, commerce,
education, and government, wherever such researches are conducted
in the spirit and with the methods of science*” T o this end the
federation will—
(a ) Create a clearing house for information pertaining to research agencies
in the field of personnel, the scope and facilities of such agencies, and researches
already completed or in progress.
(5 )
Study whether and to what extent research effort may be harmonized,
duplication minimized, neglected phases of the problem considered, and ad­
vanced work undertaken.
(e) Formulate a comprehensive general plan through which research activi­
ties may be correlated and in accordance with which future work may develop.

The charter member organizations are National Research Council,
Research Information Service (see p. 132); Engineering Foundation
(see p. 102); American Federation of L abor; Bryn Mawr College,
Carola Woerishoffer Department of Social Economy and Social Re­
search (see p. 166); Bureau o f Industrial Research (see p. 87); Car­
negie Institute of Technology, Bureau of Personnel Research (see
p. 169) ; National Committee for Mental Hygiene (see p. 122); Uni­
versity o f Pennsylvania, Department o f Industrial Research (see
P-191)-. .

.

.

.

.

Provision is made in the constitution for four classes o f members
paying annual dues as follow s:




144

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

(1) Voting members (scientific, engineering, labor, management,
employer, educational, and other organizations engaged in personnel
research), $100.
(2) Cooperating members (individuals and organizations con­
tributing results o f research they may conduct) — {a) Government
agencies, no dues for those agencies prevented by legal restrictions
from paying such dues, others $50; ( b) educational institutions, $15;
( c) associations, $50; (d) corporations, $50; (e) individuals, $5.
(3) Sustaining members— (a) individuals, $100; (b) corporations,
$250; (c) associations, $250; (d) patrons (individuals, corporations,
or associations), $500 or more.
The first general meeting is to be held November 21, 1921.
PH I L A D E L P H I A C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E.

Widener Building, Philadelphia, Pa.
e l a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e .— E. T. Trigg, chairman.
In
February, 1921, this committee held a conference at Philadelphia o f
representatives o f the various interests involved in the construction
industries. Its proceedings and those of a national conference held
in Chicago, March 2-3, 1921, by the National Federation of Con­
struction Industries, have been published together under the title :
I n d u s t r ia l R

Proceedings of the Philadelphia and National Conference on the Construction
Industries. Philadelphia. 1921. 254 p., charts. 4°.

Chapter 6 (p. 66-82) is devoted to living costs, wages and hours o f
labor; chapter 8 (p. 129-158) to the viewpoint of union labor on in­
dustrial conditions.
PHIPPS INSTITUTE.

See under University o f Pennsylvania (p. 191).
P O R T L A N D C E M E N T ASSOCIATION.

I l l West Washington Street, Chicago, 111.
This association issues a bimonthly Accident Prevention Bulletin,
which contains papers on health and accident hazards of the cement
industry. It has prepared annually since 1913 a “ Study of accidents ”
occurring in the plants o f member companies, the 1920 report being
published in the July-August, 1921, number o f the Accident Preven­
tion Bulletin (v. 7, No. 4).
P R U D E N T I A L I N S U R A N C E CO. O F AMERICA.

Newark, N. J.
e p a r t m e n t .—Frederick L. Hoffman, third vice
president and statistician. This department has given special atten­
tion to industrial mortality and in the course of the last 25 years has
accumulated a large collection of data on practically every occupa­
tion or industry and the occupational diseases or special mortality
problems related thereto, including material obtained through its
own specialized field investigations. Its studies in this field are made
primarily for occupational rating purposes but many o f the results
have a broader scientific value. Some of this material has been made
available in Bulletins of the United States Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics— No. 157, Industrial accident statistics, 1915; No. 231, Mortaility from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts),
1918; No. 293, The problem o f dust phthisis in the granite stone in-

S t a t i s t i c i a n ’s D




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

145

dustry, 1921 (in press)—prepared by Dr. Hoffman, and in the fol­
lowing publications on industrial hygiene issued by the company:
Industrial accidents and trade diseases in the United States. 1912.
Industrial accidents in the United States and their relative frequency in dif­
ferent occupations. 1914. 28 p.
The mortality from diseases of the lungs in American industry, by F. S
.
Crum. 1916. 31 p.
Menace of dust, gases and fumes in modern industry. 1918.
Occupational diseases and their compensation, with special reference to
anthrax and miners’ lung diseases, by F. L. Hoffman. 1920. 45 p.
The mortality from respiratory diseases in the glass industry. 1920.

Investigations have also been made in connection with the work of
the Committee on Mortality from Tuberculosis in Dusty Trades, Na­
tional Tuberculosis Association (see p. 137), of which Dr. Hoffman
was formerly chairman.
R E D CROSS INSTITUTE F O R CRIPPLED A N D DISABLED MEN.

See Institute for Crippled and Disabled Men (p. 108).
R E D CROSS INSTITUTE F O R T H E BLIND.

Baltimore, Md. Charles F. F. Campbell, director.
Established in 1918 at General Hospital No. 7, Baltimore, Md., for
the purpose of assisting the Medical Department of the Army in the
reeducation and rehabnitation o f the blind of the United States mili­
tary forces.
To determine the best method of doing the work, experimental in­
vestigations were made along various lines for the purpose o f plan­
ning courses of study based upon the findings. A program o f in­
dustrial surveys was worked out in consultation with a number o f
prominent engineers, and the services o f Mr. A. B. Segur, consulting
industrial engineer, were secured to carry it out. The basis o f this
work consisted of a careful classification of the industries from which
typical plants could be chosen for survey, and a standardized ques­
tionnaire outlined and sent to each plant which would serve as a basis
for future analysis and study.
The intention when these surveys were started was to make a gen­
eral analysis of ail jobs in the industries o f this country that could
be done by blind persons after receiving the necessary amount o f
training, away from the job and on the job. However, as the work o f
training the ex-service men continued, those undertaking it gradually
learned that very few o f the men would be willing to accept factory
jobs because of the independence gained through the payment o f in­
surance and compensation made by the Government. It, therefore,
became necessary to alter the policy and provide vocational training
which would fit the men for the operation o f small independent busi­
nesses. The work o f making industrial surveys was accordingly dis­
continued, as it did not meet the immediate requirements. An ex­
tensive report, containing much detailed technical information about
the industrial plants surveyed before the work was abandoned, is on
file at the institute. A great deal of the information obtained is held
as confidential. An article describing some features o f this work,
entitled “ Taking the guesswork out of employment,5 by Alfred
5
Fischer, was published in Factory (v. 23, No. 5, Nov., 1919, p. 10571058).
70723°— Bull. 299— 21------10




146

III. N OH OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

The industrial department provides instruction in automobile re­
pair, tire vulcanizing, and cigar making, to fit the men to work in
shops as employees, and management courses are also given to enable
them to operate unit industries in these lines.
Current information about the work o f the institute is contained in
its monthly publication Evergreen Review ^ issued since January,
1920.
In 1918-19 translations o f papers on the rehabilitation and em­
ployment o f war blind in foreign countries were printed as Publica­
tions of the Red Cross Institute for the Blind, Nos. 1-4.
R E S E A R C H B U R E A U F O R RETAIL TRAINING.

See Carnegie Institute o f Technology (p. 171).
RETAIL R E S E A R C H ASSOCIATION.

225 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.
An organization of large retail establishments (18 firms at present,
only one from any community), for cooperative research covering
the whole range o f department store functions. Contributions to
meet the financial requirements o f its budget are assessed on turn­
over.
P e r s o n n e l a n d O r g a n i z a t i o n D i v i s i o n .—Philip J. Reilly, in
charge. Organized July, 1919, this division has made a personnel
audit o f each member store and recommended to the proprietors
personnel administration plans based thereon. It has held three
semiannual conferences on common problems as follows: First, O c­
tober, 1919, application blanks, service records, rating scales, leaving
slips, etc.; Second, May, 1920, systems o f wage payment and other
financial inducements; Third, October, 1920, comparisons of methods
o f training departments. The next (to be held in 1921) will be
devoted to shop councils, benefit associations, and other employee
activities. Prior to each conference comparative data on the subjects
to be considered are collected by questionnaire and three or four
months’ field work and digested in convenient form as a basis for
the discussions.
A short training course for buyers o f the member stores is con­
ducted at the association’s office in New York.
In 1920 the chief o f the division visited London and prepared a
“ Report on staff administration at Harrods (L td .),” which has been
printed by that firm.
The following are being prepared in cooperation with the person­
nel departments o f the member stores: (1) A standard practice
manual on merchandise for teaching sales people, (2) a basis for
trade tests,-and (3) a loose-leaf manual o f personnel information,
giving a summary o f experience and standard practice.
The results o f the association’s researches are available to mem­
bers only.
R O CHESTER C H A M B E R OF COMMERCE.

Rochester, N. Y.
M a n a g e m e n t C o u n c i l . — E l i o t t F r o s t , director.
Formed in 1916, the purpose o f this council is “ through cooperation,
investigations by paid experts, and systematic interchange of ideas
and information to secure for members the benefits of the best, most
I

n d u s t r ia l




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

147

efficient, and most economical factory methods in use.” It comprises
in its membership 41 of the largest industrial concerns in the city and
its work is supported by assessments levied on the firms participating
which are based on the number of persons they employ. It is organ­
ized in six groups, v iz : Managers, Superintendents, Employment and
service, Production methods, Cost accountants, Tax.
Among the reports prepared by the staff at the request of members
in 1920 was one on bonus systems for foremen executives. It has re­
cently taken over the work o f preparing local cost o f living statistics
every month, which has heretofore been carried on by one of the
industries o f the city over a period o f years. One of the groups o f
the council is at the present time at work upon the standardization
o f a table for accurately figuring turnover.
C o m m e r c i a l a n d I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n C o m m i t t e e —In 1915 this
committee published a report o f its a Survey o f needs in commercial
education ” (18 p .). There was also made a survey o f industrial estab­
lishments which furnished material for Vocations for Rochester
boys and girls: Bulletins Nos. 1-4,” by R. C. Keople, issued by
Rochester (N. Y .) Department o f Public Instruction, 1915, as
follow s:
No. 1, Machine industry, 9 p . ; No. 2, Woodworking industry, 4 p .; No. 3,
Clothing industry for girls, 7 p .; No. 4, Collar factories, 4 p.

RUSS E L L S A G E FOUNDATION.

130 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y. John M.
Glenn, secretary and general director.
Incorporated under the laws of the State o f New York in April,
1907, with an endowment of $10,000,000 given in memory of her hus­
band by Mrs. Russell Sage, to which she added $5,000,000 in 1918, the
purpose o f the foundation, as stated in its charter, is “ the improve­
ment of social and living conditions in the United States of Amer­
ica.” Research and publication are the means to this end which have
been employed.
Its research work has been organized under the following depart­
ments: Charity organization, Child helping, Education, Industrial
studies, Library, Recreation, Remedial loans, Surveys and exhibits.
The publications o f the foundation contain the results o f original
researches carried on under it by members of its staff or by experts
commissioned for special studies, and also o f special investigations
such as the Pittsburgh Survey,2 which the foundation financed but
3
did not direct, and the Cleveland Survey,2 directed by a member of
4
its staff for another foundation. A printed price-list may be obtained
from the Publication Department.
The following industrial studies in the list deal with* child labor,
cost o f living, fatigue and efficiency, hours o f work, industrial acci2 This was planned and conducted by Paul U. Kellogg, editor, and his associates in the
3
p u b licatio n of T he Survey.
2 A su rv ey of th e public schools of C leveland, Ohio, u n d e rta k e n by th e Survey Com­
4
m itte e of th e Cleveland F o u n d atio n an d c arrie d o ut un d er th e d irectio n of Dr. L eonard P.
A y res (th e n d irecto r, division of education, R ussell Sage F o u n d a tio n ), w ho edited th e
findings, p ublished a s T he C leveland S urvey M onographs, in 25 volum es. Am ong these
a re 9 v o catio n al m onographs, descrip tiv e o f o ccupations an d th e tr a in in g required fo r
them , v i z : Boys an d g irls in com m ercial w ork, by B e rth a M. S te v e n s ; D e p a rtm e n t sto re
occupations,, by I ris P. O’L eary ; D ressm aking an d m illinery, by E d n a B r y n e r ; R a ilro ad
an d s tr e e t tra n s p o rta tio n , by R. D. F le m in g ; T he building tra d e s, by F. L. S h a w ; T he
g a rm e n t tra d e s, by E d n a B r y n e r ; T he m etal tra d e s, by R. R. L u tz ; T he p rin tin g tra d e s,
by F . L. S h a w ; W age earn in g and education, by R. R. L utz,




148

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

dents, industrial education, seasonal employment, trade unionism,
unemployment, wages, or women’s work:
Anthony, Katherine S. Mothers who must earn. 1914. 223 p. (Issued with
Cartwright, Otho G. The middle W est Side. 67 p.)
Barnes, Charles B. The longshoremen. 1915. 287 p.
Butler, Elizabeth B. Saleswomen in mercantile stores. 1912. 217 p.
Goldmark, Josephine. Fatigue and efficiency: a study in industry. 1912.
302 p.
Hewes, Am y, and W alter, Henriette R. Munition makers. 1917. 158 p. (Part
I is a study of women as munition makers in Bridgeport, Conn.; Part I I is a
summary of British reports.)
Odencrantz, Louise C. Italian women in in du stry: a study of conditions in
New York City. 1919. 345 p.
Yan Kleeck, Mary. Artificial-flower makers. 1913. 261 p.
------- A seasonal industry: a study of the milinery trade in New York. 1917.
276 p.
------- Women in the bookbinding trade. 1913. 270 p.
------- Working girls in evening schools: a statistical study. 1914. 252 p.
The Pittsburgh Survey (findings in 6 vols. ed. by Paul U. Kellogg) : Women,
and the trades, by Elizabeth B. Butler, 1909, 440 p . ; W ork accidents and the
law, by Crystal Eastman, 1910, 335 p . ; H om estead: the households of a mill
town, by Margaret F. Byington, 1910, 292 p . ; The steel workers, by John A .
Fitch, 1910, 380 p . ; Wage-earning Pittsburgh, by Paul U. Kellogg and others,
1914, 582 p . ; The Pittsburgh district civic frontage (by various investigators),
1914, 554 p.
D e p a r t m e n t o f I n d u s t r i a l S t u d i e s .—Mary Van Kleeck, director.
This department originated as the Committee on Women’s Work,
organized in 1908 by the Alliance Employment Bureau with sup­
port from the Foundation, becoming one o f its departments in the
following year. In 1916 the present name was adopted and it is now
engaged in the study of industrial conditions affecting both men and
women.
The purpose of its present series of investigations is to make an
accurate and impartial record of typical experiences in industry in
the United States in securing for the workers participation in deter­
mining the conditions o f employment, in the belief that an analysis
o f experience will afford a basis for constructive action by employers
and workers in improving industrial relations. Studies of the indus­
trial representation plan o f the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. and the
contract o f the United Mine Workers, the works’ council at Rock
Island Arsenal, and the partnership plan at Dutchess Bleachery*
Wappinger’s Falls, N. Y., have recently been completed or are still
in progress.
D e p a r t m e n t o f S u r v e y s a n d E x h i b i t s .— Shelby M. Harrison,
director. Industrial investigations have been included as integral
S arts of the city surveys made and directed by this department at
pringfieldjTll., Topeka, Kans., and Newburgh, N. Y.
In 1919 this department began a study o f public employment
service— its organization and administration, the technique of the
local service, and its place and function in industrial life. The field
work has been completed and a report o f progress was made in a
paper read at the Ottawa meeting o f the Internationl Association of
Public Employment Services, October, 1920. The complete report is
to be sent to the printer about October, 1921.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

149

SA F E T Y INSTITUTE O F AMERICA.

261 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. Eiley M. Little,
director.
Organized in 1909 as the Museum of Safety and Sanitation; in­
corporated in 1911 by special charter from the New York State
Legislature (Laws, 1911, c. 152) under the name, American Museum
o f Safety; present name adopted January 1,1919. The objects of the
institution are the prevention of accidents, the elimination or lessen­
ing o f occupational diseases, and the promotion of industrial wel­
fare through health, efficiency, and cooperation.
There are three classes o f members—individual (annual dues, $10),
commercial (annual dues, $25), and industrial (annual dues $100).
The dues for commercial members include the special report service
on any phase o f accident prevention or industrial hygiene upon
which the member desires information; and in addition to this, in­
dustrial members are entitled to an illustrated lecture on safety and
industrial hygiene and the free inspection service.
The institute has entered into an agreement with the National
Safety Council (see p. 133) to unify the work o f the two organiza­
tions in the Metropolitan District in order to prevent duplication.
A ll industrial plants in this district which are members o f either,
become entitled to the joint service o f both. The two bodies have
organized the Metropolitan Safety Council for carrying on an active
safety campaign.
The institute maintains at its headquarters a permanent exhibit
o f approved safety and sanitary appliances and a special free refer­
ence library.
Its research work is represented by the consultation service re­
ports, prepared in response to inquiries from members, which are
filed and indexed in the library, and by articles prepared by its staff
for publication in its bulletin Safety, published monthly, December,
1913, to December, 1920 (now temporarily suspended). The results
o f an investigation made by the institute jointly with the New Y ork
State Commission on Ventilation (see p. 54) on “ Determination o f
standards for the atmospheric dust content iii factories and work­
shops,” by H. C. Ward, were published in Safety (v. 4, No. 7, JulyAug., 1916, p. 166-171). In 1917 in connection with the Framing­
ham Community Health and Tuberculosis Demonstration under­
taken by the National Tuberculosis Association (see p. 136) a survey
of the various industrial establishments was conducted by Mr. A. S.
Eegula o f the technical staff of the institute, with a view to indicat­
ing the most important features of the problem of safeguards for
mechanical equipment and developing monthly foremen’s meetings
to educate them in the elementary essentials o f safety devices and
safety practices.
A volume o f lectures given by the institute on alternate Saturday
mornings, February to June, 1919, for the benefit of factory in­
spectors employed by the city of New York, the States of New York
and New Jersey, and insurance companies was published in 1920
under the title “ safety fundamentals ” (228 p.).
The institute awards two gold medals for the encouragement o f
research and invention in its special field, v iz ;




150

I II . NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES,

The Scientific American gold medal,, for the most efficient safety
device indented within a certain number of years and exhibited at
the museum.
The Louis Livingston Seaman gold medal, for progress and
achievement in the,promotion o f hygiene and the mitigation of occu­
pational disease.
SC OTT CO. LABO R A T O R Y .

Drexel Building, Philadelphia, Pa. L. B. Hopkins in charge.
Established in 1919 by the Scott Co. for the purpose o f carrying
on both specific and general research in the field o f industrial per­
sonnel The Scott Co. is an outgrowth o f the Committee on Classifi­
cation o f Personnel in the Army, in the work of which its nine active
members were associated during the war. In June, 1919, they or­
ganized this firm o f consultants and engineers in industrial per­
sonnel, which was incorporated as a personal service corporation
under the laws o f Pennsylvania (Walter D ill Scott, president;
Beardsley Ruml, secretary). As consultants, its service is available
at a consultant’s fee, including a specific research o f long duration
in a particular plant or company. Out of its earnings the general
research work o f the laboratory is supported and the results are
made available for the advancement of scientific knowledge in the
field o f industrial personnel, in the form o f mimeographed bulletins,
as follow s:
Apprentice Manual.
A Plan of Apprentice Training.
Departmental Interview Bulletins, Nos. 1, 2 ; D . I. 1, Departmental inter­
views ; D. I. 2, Measuring the importance of merchandise knowledge among
retail sales people.
Labor Turnover Bulletins, Nos. 1 - 5 : L, 1. The labor turnover daybook; L. 2,
Turnover and mental alertness test scores; L. 3, General intelligence and in­
stability ; L. 4, Relation between age and length of service in common la b o r ;
L. 5, Labor turnover in relation to length o f service.
Mental Alertness Bulletins, Nos. 1 -1 1 : M . A. 1, Description o f the Scott Co.
mental alertness tests (series I ) - M. A. 2, Mental alertness tests as a measure
©f the general value o f office employees; M. A . 3, Comparison of mental alert­
ness scores of men and women office employees; M. A. 4, Differences in mental
alertness scores in different office departm ents; M. A. 5, Mental alertness stand­
ards for various occupation groups; M. A. 6, Mental alertness tests as a basis
for classification in factory schools; M . A. 7, Significance o f relation o f mental
alertness scores of applicants to mental alertness scores of employees; M. A. 8,
Significance of the mental alertness scores of the women office employees in
four companies * M. A. 9, Differences between men and women office em ployees;
M. A. 10, Mental alertness of messenger and office b o y s; M. A. 11, Foremen’s
training and mental alertness.
Qualification Card Bulletins, Nos. 1, 2 : Q. C. 1, The employee’s qualification
card ; Q. C. 2, Construction o f qualification cards.
Rating Beale Guide.
Rating Scale Bulletins, Nos. 1 - 3 : R. S. 1, The graphic rating on w orkers;
R. S. 2, A method of efficiency rating for forem en; R. S. 3, The experimental
development of the graphic rating method.
Service Bulletin No. 1 : S. 1, The development o f a factory library.
Trade T est Guide, Army type.
Trade Test Bulletins, Nos. 1 - 4 : T. T . 1, W h at is a trade test? T . T. 2, The
making o f the Army type of trade te st; T. T. 3, File clerk test standards;
T . T. 4, The file clerk’ s test.
W a ge Bulletins, Nos. 1, 2 ; W . 1, A procedure in wage adjustm ent; W . 2,
Ratings and wage adjustments.

Single copies o f the above are available to anyone whose standing
is a guarantee that these instruments for research will not be mis


ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

151

used. Tests, rating scales, and various forms for recording and ac­
cumulating information about personnel have been devised and are
sold in quantities at cost under the same conditions.
The following contributions by members o f the staff have ap­
peared in psychological journals:
Ruml, B. The need for an examination o f certain hypotheses in mental
tests.
(Jour. Philos. Psychol. & Sci. Methods, v. 17, No, 3, Jan. 29, 1920, p.
57-61.)
Kornhauser, A., and Ruml, B. Recent developments in trade-test theory.
{Psychol. Bull., v. 17, No. 2, Feb,, 1920, p. 79 -8 0.)
Paterson, D. G., and Ruml, B. The extension of rating scale theory and
technique. (Psychol. Bull., v. 17, No. 2, Feb., 1920, p. 80 -8 1.)
Hayes, Mary H. S., and Paterson, D. G. Experimental development of the
graphic rating method. (Psychol. Bull., v. 18, No. 2, Feb., 1921, p. 98-99.)
Tables to facilitate the computation o f coefficients of correlation by the rank
difference method.
(Jour. App. Psychol., v. 4, Nos. 2 -3, June-Sept., 1920, p.
1 1 5-12 5; also issued as a reprint by the Journal.)

SCOVILL M A N U F A C T U R I N G CO.

Waterbury, Conn.
I n d u s t r ia l , H y g i e n e .— A. H. Ryan, M. D., direc­
tor. Established in November, 1919, to conduct research and to
apply present knowledge to the improvement o f working conditions
and the increase o f human efficiency in industry; in the performance
o f these functions the initiative regarding the particular problems
to be undertaken may come from the department itself or the man­
agement. The company agreed to allow academic freedom in the
research undertaken and the use of the results. The departmental
st&ff consists o f the director, two full-time research assistants and
secretary; and the director is one o f the advisory staff of the general
superintendent. The equipment o f the department includes physio­
logical, psychological, and chemical laboratories, an experimental
shop room in which operations are brought near to the laboratories
for the purpose of closer study, and a research library. The services
and equipment o f other departments, including tool and machine and
photographic departments, chemical and electrical research labora­
tories, hospital, etc., may be obtained when required.
Among the problems upon which the advice o f the department
has been sought are the follow ing: Sanitation and ventilation o f the
plant and buildings; standards for selection o f workers for opera­
tions, and methods o f application; physical standards for occupa­
tions ; fatigue in connection with the planning o f operations and
piece-rate setting; accident and illness in relation to occupations—
their determination, causation, and prevention; occupational place­
ment o f handicapped; functional specialization in group work;
methods o f increasing efficiency in the employment o f the special
senses; occupational classification; personnel statistics; absenteeism
and turnover with reference to occupation; first-aid methods and in­
struction.
In view o f the fact that cooperation o f the worker is required in
achieving improvement through hygienic measures, a regular course
in industrial hygiene is given by the department to the apprentices.
During the past year a similar course was also given to foremen.
A paper entitled “ Discussion o f Public Health Bulletin No. 106,
Comparison o f an eight-hour plant and a ten-hour plant,5 by A. H.
5
Ryan, was published in Journal o f Industrial Hygiene (v. 2, p. 466D

e p a r t m e n t of




152

III. ITON OFFICIAL AG EN CIES/

478), April, 1921. An investigation of 6 Spoiled work in relation
4
to hours o f labor and other industrial conditions,” made by A. H.
Byan and P. S. Florence, in conjunction with the United States
Public Health Service, is in press.
Eesearches on the following subjects are in progress (September,
1921) : Physiological analysis of occupation and its practical appli­
cations; the respiratory exchange in fatigue and work; eyestrain;
fatigue; the absorption and elimination o f zinc, cadmium, lead, and
copper in brass foundry workers; the effect of long exposure to small
quantities of carbon monoxide.
Graduate research is provided for in the plan as formulated, in
order to develop properly trained research workers in industrial
physiology, psychology, medicine, etc.; to stimulate interest in the
industrial aspects o f the biological sciences and to encourage re­
search in these lines in the universities; and to keep the department
staff in touch with the scientific spirit.and viewpoint of the uni­
versity laboratories. According to the plan contemplated, a gradu*
ate student in physiology, or psychology, for example, could spend
one year in the factory in research upon his thesis, for which the
university would give him credit. The factory would provide a fel­
lowship stipend for such a student. The plan has been made effective
at Yale University by the appointment of the director o f this depart­
ment as lecturer in industrial physiology; and at Tufts College,
where the director of this department is head of the department of
physiology in the medical school, through the establishment by the
trustees o f a research fellowship of $600 for this purpose.
W I L L I A M H. SINGER M E M O R I A L R E S E A R C H LABORATORY.

Sandusky and Parkway, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. Samuel E. Haythorn, M. D., director.
Founded by Mrs. William H. Singer and construction o f the build­
ing commenced April, 1915. On completion the entire property was
turned over to the board o f trustees o f the Allegheny General Hos­
pital to be used both as a research laboratory for the study of gen­
eral medical and surgical problems and as a means of furnishing the
hospital with a high grade o f routine laboratory work.
The following studies by the director having a bearing on indus­
trial hygiene have been published from this laboratory: 4 The preven­
4
tion ox epidemic influenza, with special reference to vaccine prophy­
laxis” (containing an analysis o f the results on about 50,000 steel
workers and railroad employees), which is included in the studies on
epidemic influenza, published by the University of Pittsburgh School
o f Medicine in 1919; 4 Unresolved pneumonia associated with severe
4
anthracosis ” (in International Association of Medical Museums Bul­
letin No. 7, May, 1918) ; 4 The pathology of trinitrotoluene poison­
4
in g ” (ibid.) ; 44Experimental trinitrotoluene poisoning” (Journal o f
Industrial Hygiene, December, 1920, v. 2, No. 8, p. 298-318).
A description of the equipment of the laboratory is available in
pamphlet form.
SOCIETY F O R T H E P R O M O T I O N O F ENGINEERING EDUCATION.

Dean F. L. Bishop, University of Pittsburgh, secretary.
Organized at the close of the engineering congress held at Chicago
in 1893, as an outgrowth o f section E (engineering education) o f



A S S O C IA T IO N S , S O C IE T IE S , F O U N D A T IO N S , E T C .

153

that congress. There are now over 1,500 members (animal dues, $4).
Annual meetings are held in the last week of June at a center of engi­
neering education and at the invitation of a college or university.
Three local sections have been organized since their authorization in
1919, viz: Pittsburgh, Georgia-Tech., Kansas-Nebraska.
The society publishes a bulletin, Engineering Education, monthly
September to June, and the Proceedings o f the annual meeting (v.
1-28, 1893-1920). ^
In 1907 the society formed with the American Society o f Civil
Engineers, the American Society o f Mechanical Engineers, the
American Institute eff Electrical Engineers, and the American
Chemical Society, a “ Joint Committee on Engineering Education”
which cooperated in a comprehensive investigation o f the subject
undertaken by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of
Teaching at its request. (See p. 93.)
A large part o f the work o f the society is conducted by 24 com­
mittees, half o f this number being devoted to the separate subjects
in the engineering curriculum. Their reports are presented at the
annual meetings and printed in the proceedings.
C o m m i t t e e No. 22 o n I n t e l l i g e n c e T e s t s .— L. L. Thurstone,
Carnegie Institute of Technology, chairman. Appointed June, 1919,
to determine the possible usefulness of intelligence tests and other
objective tests for engineering students, as the result of papers and
discussion on the subject at the Baltimore meeting in that year (P ro­
ceedings, v. 27, p. 113-158). The investigation is being carried on
with the cooperation of 47 colleges, at which 10,000 freshmen were
given six tests in 1920. The first report was published in the Pro­
ceedings o f 1920 (v. 28, p. 3497361) and the committee has been con­
tinued so that the results o f sophomore, junior, and senior scholar­
ships may be used as criteria for determining the predictive value of
the tests.
SOCIETY OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS.

327 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. George C. Dent, busi­
ness manager.
Organized May, 1917, in Chicago at a conference of executives and
engineers called by the Western Efficiency Society to discuss “ the
human factor in industrial preparedness.” The activities of the
society include stimulating original research, both in industrial
plants and at universities; exchanging and coordinating knowledge
of scientific methods of management. It has 345 members consisting
o f : Class 2, professional industrial engineers, whether consultants or
executives; class 3, technical engineers and accountants, retained or
resident; class 4, managing executives of commercial and industrial
activities; class 5, investigators, teachers, writers and lecturers in
engineering, economics, psychology and other subjects associated wfith
management; class 6, juniors and students. Conventions are held
semiannually, in the spring and fall at various places. Sectional
meetings of industrial relations, educational, finance and accounting,
production, and sales groups have been held at recent conventions.
Local chapters in New York, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee,
and in Texas hold monthly meetings.




154

IH . WQNOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Complete reports o f the proceedings of conventions have been pub­
lished as follow s:
1918 (Chicago) : Labor problems under war conditions. (Jointly with W est­
ern Efficiency Society.) 222 p.
1919, spring (New York) : Industrial reconstruction problems. 200 p.
1919, fall (Cleveland) : American and international labor conditions. 160 p.
1920, spring (Philadelphia) : The practical applications of the principles of
industrial engineering. 800 p.
1920, fall (Pittsburgh) : Industrial education. 249fcp. (Includes education
of the professional industrial engineer, training the working force, education
of the citizen in industry.)
1921, spring (M ilwaukee) r Industrial leadership. 1921. 375 p.

The main subject of the fall convention, October, 1921, at Springfield, Mass., was Industrial stability.
The series of Publications includes also addresses at local chapters,
yearbooks and “ A list o f bibliographies of industrial engineering and
management,” prepared by the Committee on Research. The busi­
ness manager’s office issues a monthly bulletin, mainly chapter news.
R e s e a r c h C o m m i t t e e .— Edward J. Kunze, Pennsylvania State
College, vice president in charge o f research. Among the projects o f
this committee (organized 1919) is the promotion of original re­
search, both in the industrial plant and in the university, to establish
elemental standards of basic industrial exertion, such as shoveling,
mixing, grinding, sawing, etc., and arrive i f possible at a closer
determination o f what is a “ fair day’s work,” and to make, arrange,
and collect elemental time studies.
E d u c a t i o n a l C o m m i t t e e .— Dwight T. Farnliam, St. Louis, Mo.,
vice president in charge o f education. This committee was organized
in March, 1920, and has been working on a standard course in indus­
trial engineering and management for colleges.
C o m m it t e e

for

the

E

l im in a t io n

of

U

nn ecessary

F

a t i g u e .—

Frank B. Gilbreth, Montclair, N. J., chairman. The organization
of this committee by the vice president in charge of research was
authorized at the fall meeting, 1919. There are now about 85 mem­
bers not restricted to the society. It has prepared exhibitions o f
devices and equipment designed to eliminate fatigue, and held ses­
sions at the spring and fall conventions o f 1921 on “ Practical
methods o f fatigue elimination ” and “ White paint as a reducer o f
unnecessary fatigue,” respectively.
S O U T H E R N PINE ASSOCIATION.

New Orleans, La.
e p a r t m e n t .— W. Graham Cole, director of safety.
This
department was organized March 15, 1919, to assist the members of
the association in the reduction of accidents among their employees
and to collect and distribute information o f value in this work. It
has prepared and published a series o f safety bulletins designed for
posting and a booklet entitled, “ Safety in the mill and woods ” for
distribution among workmen; also two safeguarding bulletins, safety
suggestions on cards, and the annual report o f its activities entitled,
“ Safeguarding the workman ” have been published for the use o f
superintendents and foremen. The last named contains statistical
charts o f accidents in the Southern lumber industry.
The association is represented on the cooperating committee or­
ganized by the United States Bureau o f Standards in formulating
a National Safety Code for Logging and Sawmilling Operations.

S afety D




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

155

S P R A G U E M E M O R I A L INSTITUTE.

See under University of Chicago (p. 173).
ST ATE CHARITIES AID ASSOCIATION O F N E W YORK.

105 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y.
o n M e n t a l H y g i e n e .— Mrs. Margaret J. Powers, social
service director. Organized in 1910 for the twofold purpose o f con­
serving mental health and o f securing high standards o f care and
treatment for those suffering from mental disorders and defects,
this committee furnishes the psychiatric social service for the De­
partment o f Psychiatry, o f Cornell Clinic, dealing with about 500
mental cases a year. A large number o f these are referred to the
Social Service Department for adjustment in all o f their social
relationships, and it is found that with many o f them employment is
the chief factor in their difficulty. The case records which have ac­
cumulated contain valuable data for research on difficulties in voca­
tional adjustment. Illustrative material is given in a paper on
“ The industrial cost o f the psycopathic employee,” by Mrs. Powers,
read before the Mental Hygiene Division of the National Confer­
ence o f Social Work, April, 1920, and published in Mental Hygiene
(v. 4, No. 4, October, 1920, p. 932-939).
C o m m it t e e

S T R U C T U R A L SERVICE BUREAU.

Estey Building, Philadelphia, Pa.
This bureau has worked out the average number o f days’ employ­
ment which the Philadelphia bricklayer could normally expect in a
year, and the number of days he would probably lose through unem­
ployment, illness, and other causes beyond his control. The results
were published in the Monthly Labor Review of the U. S. Bureau o f
Labor Statistics, v. 12, No. 5, May, 1921, p. 107-110. Similar figures
which it has worked out for all the building trades in Philadelphia
are given in the October, 1921, issue of the Monthly Labor Review
(p. 98-100).
T A N N E R S ’ CO U N C I L O F T H E U N I T E D STATES OF AMERICA.

41 Park Row, New York, N. Y. Edward A. Brand, secretary.
B u r e a u .— This bureau was maintained by the coun­
cil until the early part o f 1921 when it was discontinued (R oy S.
Bonsib, director). During 1919-20 it prepared and issued the fol­
lowing :
I

n d u s t r ia l

W h a t tanners should know about anthrax; a compilation of general in­
formation on anthrax, its treatment, prevention, and elimination. B y R. S.
Bonsib. 1920. 24 p.
Healthgrams, Nos. 1 -4 , July-Nov., 1920 (a series of circulars upon the im­
provement of the health of tannery workers).
Safety grams, Nos. 1-36, Aug., 1919-N o v., 1920 (a series o f circulars on the
prevention of accidents in tanneries).

A labor survey o f the tanning industry, covering 70 plants, was
made by the Bureau of Industrial Research (see p. 88) for the Tan­
ners9 Council, but the report has not been published.
T A Y L O R SOCIETY.

29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y . H. S. Person,
managing director.
Organized in 1911 as the Society to Promote the Science o f Man­
agement ; name changed in 1916 to honor the memory o f Frederick W ,




156

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Taylor, pioneer in the development of science in management, who
had died in 1915. The activities of the society were suspended dur­
ing the war; it was reorganized in 1919, when permanent head­
quarters were established in New York and a managing director
elected.
The object o f the society is to promote the science and the art o f
administration and o f management, for the mutual benefit of the
community, labor, the manager, and the employer, and, among other
things, to secure the gradual elimination o f unnecessary effort and o f
unduly burdensome toil in the accomplishment o f the work o f the
world.
There are now about 450 members, mainly management engineers
and industrial executives, classified in five grades: Honorary, senior
(initiation fee $15, annual dues $15) ; associate (initiation fee $15,
annual dues $15) ; junior, 21 to 30 years of age (initiation fee $5,
annual dues $5) ; sustaining (annual dues $100 to $500). A Sales
Executives’ Section was established in 1920. Not less than two
regular meetings are held each year, the annual meeting in November
or December. The New York Section, organized in 1920, meets
monthly on the third or fourth Thursday.
Papers and discussions at the meetings of the society and other
contributions are published in the society’s Bulletin, as follow s:
Cost of living in relation to wage adjustments, a research made at the Holt
Manufacturing Co., Peoria, 111. (in v. 4, No. 5, p. 2 9 -4 6 ).
Industrial relations symposium, Cambridge meeting October 4, 1919 (in v.
4, No. 6, p. 1 2 -4 8 ).
Proceedings of the New York meeting, December 5, 6, 1919, on managerial
problems (in v. 5, Nos. 1, 2 ) , viz— “ Standards,” by W . K . Hathaway (p. 12-42) ;
“ The foreman,” by S. E. Thompson (p. 4 8 -4 8 ) ; “ Labor turnover, a mathe­
matical discussion,” by C. G. Barth (p. 5 2 -5 8 ) ; “ Mutual rating, a contribu­
tion to the technique of participation,” by H. W . Shelton (p. 59437) ; “ The
need of better management in mining operations,” by H . Archbald (p. 6 8 -7 8 ).
Proceedings of the Rochester meeting, May 6 -8 , 1920 (in v. 5, Nos. 8, 4 ) ,
which included papers on “ The necessity for standards in the relation between
illumination and output,” by W ard Harrison (p. 1 1 8 -1 1 9 ); “ Can industrial
democracy be efficient? The Rochester plan,” by Meyer Jacobstein (p. 15 3 1 5 9 ) ; “ The worker’s reaction to scientific management,” by W . R. Leiserson
(p. 160-177).
“ The three-shift system in the steel industry,” by Horace B. Drury (in v.
6, No. 1 ), the results of an investigation under the Cabot fund (see p. 91) pre­
sented at the New York meeting December 3, 1920, with discussion thereon.
A symposium on “ Stop-watch time stu d y ” (v. 6, No. 3 ) , consisting of papers
and discussion by F. B. and L. M. Gilbreth and others, before the New York
and Philadelphia sections, December, 1920, and April, 1921.
The Cleveland meeting, May 19-21, 1921, included a sales executives’ session
devoted to methods of compensation of salesm en; a personnel administration
session, consisting of papers and discussions on (a ) performance ratings and
bonuses for salaried employees, (&) unemployment scores; an industrial rela­
tions session, at which there was a symposium on joint action of employer and
management in establishing standards, tasks, rates, and other standard con­
ditions.
R e s e a r c h C o m m i t t e e .— Morris L. Cooke, 1109 Finance Building,
Philadelphia, Pa., chairman. This committee was appointed Octo­
ber, 1919, to plan, arrange for, and supervise research in the field o f
administration and management carried on by subcommittees, indi­
viduals, and institutions, and to deliver the results of such research
to the managing director as material for discussion at meetings, for
publication in the Bulletin or as pamphlets or books, or to be filed




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIESf FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

157

in the library of the society and thereby made available to the mem­
bers; and also to coordinate experiments and investigations under­
taken in this field by members and others.
The committee has persuaded the International Labor Office at
Geneva to send out a questionnaire on the three-shift day in the steel
industry; and it has done some work toward developing a method
for measuring or establishing a quantitative method for studying
unemployment.
C o m m it t e e

on

S t a n d a r d s R e l a t in g

to

S c ie n t if ic M

a n a g e m e n t .—

H. K. Hathaway, 1109 Finance Building, Philadelphia, Pa., chair­
man. The purpose o f this committee, appointed at the Rochester
meeting May, 1920, is to formulate standards relating to scientific
management for promulgation by the Taylor Society. The pro­
gram o f work to be undertaken was set forth in a paper by W . O.
Lichtner, read at that meeting and published with discussion thereon
in the Bulletin o f the Taylor Society (v. 5, No. 4, August, 1920, p.
140-152). It includes promulgation of standards as to policy on
bonus payments and policy on base rates and total earnings.
C o m m i t t e e o n S e l e c t i o n a n d T r a i n i n g o f S a l e s m e n .—Appointed
at the request of a conference of sales executives, held under the
auspices o f the society June 25, 1920, has not yet published a report.
TECHNICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY.,
532 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Thomas J. Keenan, sec­
retary.
An association organized for the encouragement o f original investi­
gations and research work in mill engineering and the chemistry o f
paper, cellulose, and paper-making fibers generally; affiliated with
the American Paper and Pulp Association.
V o c a t i o n a l E d u c a t i o n C o m m i t t e e .— R. S. Kellogg, News Print
Service Bureau, New York, secretary. This committee and the corre­
sponding committee of the Technical Section of the Canadian Pulp
and Paper Association have, through their joint executive committee,
raised about $30,000 in the United States and Canada which is being
used in the preparation and publication of a course of instruction for
employees of pulp and paper mills. A survey of several different
typical plants, including an analysis o f the principal pay-roll jobs,
has been made for the joint executive committee by Mr. J. C. Wright,
o f the Federal Board o f Vocational Education, for the purpose o f
determining the jobs or occupations for which specific vocational
training can and should be given, the specific character of the in­
struction appropriate to each, the line of promotion, etc. The fo l­
lowing pamphlet (reprinted from Paper Trade Journal) contains
the results of this survey:
Vocational education in the pulp and paper industry: scope of vocational edu­
cation, analyses of pay-roll jobs and synopsis of the textbooks. By J. O. W right.
New York, 1921. 71 p.

A series o f textbooks for the course on the manufacture of pulp
and paper is in preparation (J. N. Stephenson, editor) to be pub­
lished by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. in five volumes and also
in pamphlet form in sets corresponding to each volume. The first
two volumes, containing preliminary subjects essential to a study o f
the technical matter in volumes 3-5, have been completed.




158

H I. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

TOLEDO CONSUMERS5 LEAGUE.
305 Bank o f Commerce Building, Toledo* Ohio.
The results o f a survey o f u Toledo children who leave school for
work,” undertaken by the league in cooperation with the Toledo
woman’s committee o f the Council of National Defense, was pub­
lished in 1921 as No. 31 o f its series o f pamphlets (31 p.).
TRAINING SCHOOL AT VINELAND, N. J.
Vineland, N. J. E. R. Johnston, director.
An institution devoted to the interests o f those whose minds have
not developed normally (not a State institution, but the State o f New
Jersey sends some o f its pupils here).
D e p a r t m e n t o f R e s e a r c h .— S. D . Porteus, director. Established
in 1906, the general scope o f the work o f this department has been
research on the problems o f (1) the recognition, (2) the causation,
and (3) the prevention o f mental defect. The results o f its studies
are published as monographs in its Publications, Nos. 1-23, or as
papers in The Training School Bulletin, issued monthly by the in­
stitution.
The work on the recognition of mental defect has involved the
standardization o f new tests and the modification and revision of ex­
isting series. The following publications contain material bearing
on industrial competency and stability:
No. 16. Porteus tests— Vineland revision. By S. D. Porteus. 1919. 44 p,
(These tests have a high correlation with industrial ability o f individuals either
just above or below the social efficiency level.)
No. 20. Intelligence and social valuations: a practical method for the diagnosis
of mental deficiency and other forms of social inefficiency. By R. J. A. Berry
and S. D. Porteus. 1920. 100 p.
No. 23. A study of personality of defectives with a social ratings scale. By
S. D. Porteus. 1921. 24 p.

The department has also published translations o f the writings o f
Binet and Simon (Publications, Nos. 11,12) and a “ Condensed guide
to the Binet tests” (Publication No. 19; Training School Bulletin,
v. 17, Nos. 1-2, March-April, 1920).
An industrial capacity scale, briefly noted in Publication No. 17 “ A
standardized information record” (p. 5), is being tried out and the
results will shortly be published. This scale represents an attempt
to give comparative numerical ratings to children engaged iri d if­
ferent industrial occupations, which have been classified according to
manual skill involved, judgment required, special knowledge such as
the handling o f machinery, and responsibility placed upon the
worker to work without supervision and then each has been analyzed
into ten steps o f increasing difficulty, the basis of arrangement taking
into consideration such factors as importance o f the work, value of
the material dealt with, personal risk to the worker, judgment and
skill.
TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.
Hartford, Conn.
E n g i n e e r i n g a n d I n s p e c t i o n D i v i s i o n . — John L. Thompson,
superintendent. One o f the primary duties o f this division is to
make recommendations on safety and accident prevention for all
such risks as are insured by the company under compensation and




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

159

liability policies. It has accordingly prepared and issued the fol­
lowing publications dealing with safety matters:
Industrial standards, Elevators, Accident prevention in paper mills, The
employee and accident prevention, Safety in moving-picture theaters, Accident
prevention on the farm, Accident prevention in brick-making, Safety in build­
ing construction, Safety in the machine shop, Reciprocating engines and steam
turbines, Grinding wheels, Boiler economy, Illumination in paper mills, Fore­
men and accident prevention, Organization of safety work in industrial plants,
Motor vehicles and safety, Coal mining hazards, Boiler safety, Sate foundry
practice, A treatise on safety engineering as applied to scaffolds.

TRAVELING ENGINEERS’ ASSOCIATION.
W. O. Thompson (General offices, New York Central Railroad,
Cleveland, O hio), secretary.
This association has prepared the “ Standard form for examination
for firemen,” (revised edition 1919), which is revised from time to
time by its Committee on Revision of Progressive Examination for
Firemen for Promotion and New Men tor Employment.
EDWARD L. TRUDEAU FOUNDATION.
Saranac Lake, N. Y. Edward R. Baldwin, M. D., director,
Aii endowment inaugurated in December, 1916, as a memorial to
the American pioneer in tuberculosis research whose name it bears
and to continue the scientific investigations to which he had devoted
his life. The fund now amounts to $420,000 and the income is
devoted to the following purposes:
1. To maintain laboratories and carry on research into the nature, causes
and treatment o f tuberculosis.
2. To maintain regular courses of instruction for physicians and others in
the most advanced knowledge of the above subject, under the name o f The
Trudeau School of Tuberculosis.
3. To offer young physicians and others the opportunities for research work,
while undergoing treatment for the disease, through the establishment o f
fellowships.

In addition to researches o f more general application, such as those
on infection (Etiological studies in tuberculosis, by L. Brown, S. A.
Petroffi and G. Pesquera, in Am. Rev. Tuberculosis, v. 3, No. 10,
December, 1919), which have a direct bearing on industrial hygiene,
experimental work in conjunction with the investigations o f the
Committee on Mortality from Tuberculosis in Dusty Trades of the
National Tuberculosis Association has been carried on in the Saranac
Laboratory under a Trudeau Foundation fellowship. The follow ­
ing is the first publication o f results o f these experiments:
Gardner, Leroy U. Studies on the relation of mineral dusts to tuberculosis.
I. The relatively early lesions in experimental pneumokoniosis produced by
granite Inhalation and their influence on pulmonary tuberculosis.
(Am . Rev.
Tuberculosis, v. 4, No. 10, Dec., 1920.)

UNDERWRITERS’ LABORATORIES.
207 East Ohio Street, Chicago, UL W. H. Merrill, president.
Established and maintained by the National Board o f Fire Un­
derwriters, for service—not profit; incorporated under the laws o f
the State o f Illinois in November, 1901. The object o f Underwriters’
Laboratories is to bring to the user the best obtainable opinion on
the merits of appliances, devices, machines, and materials in respect
to life and fire hazards and accident prevention. Branch offices are
located throughout the United States and Canada and in England,




III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

160

The New York office (25 City Hall Place) is equipped for the con­
duct of examinations and tests o f all electrical devices under the
same conditions as those afforded at the principal office and testing
station at Chicago.
Summaries o f the Laboratories’ reports are issued on printed cards
filed according to classifications, and cabinets containing these cards
are maintained at the offices of the principal boards o f underwriters
and inspection bureaus in the United States, at many o f the general
offices o f insurance companies, by some insurance firms, certain Fed­
eral, State and municipal departments, and at the local offices of the
Laboratories in large cities. Much of the information is also freely
distributed by many o f the following lists which are, as a rule, re­
vised semiannually:
List
List
------List
List

of inspected mechanical appliances. July, 1920. 101 p.
of inspected electrical appliances. Apr., 1920. 204 p.
Supplement. Oct., 1920. 16 p.
of appliances inspected for accident hazard. Oct., 1920.
of inspected automotive appliances. Apr., 1920. 20 p.

24 p.

The results o f the work in many classes o f appliances are fur­
nished directly to building owners, architects, users and other per­
sons interested, by means o f the Laboratories’ label service, under
which goods are inspected at factories by Laboratories’ engineers and
stamps or labels attached to such portion of the output as is found
constructed in accordance with standard requirements.
Schedules of fees for examinations and tests and o f charges for
labels, as well as information regarding the three forms o f super­
vision over goods marketed under the approvals, namely, the reex­
amination, inspection, and label services, and a list o f the addresses o f
branch offices, are given in the following pamphlet, obtainable on
application:
The organization,
1917. 45 p.

purpose,

and

methods

of

Underwriters’

Laboratories.

Underwriters’ Laboratories is one o f the cooperating organizations
which constitute the Electrical Safety Conference (see p. 100) and is
represented in the Fire Protection Group of the American Engineer­
ing Standards Committee (see p. 72).
UNITED ENGINEERING SOCIETY.
See Engineering Foundation (p. 102).
UNITED TYPOTHETiE OF AMERICA.
608 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111.
An international association o f master printers organized in two
divisions, v iz : The Closed Shop Branch and the Open Shop Branch,
each having complete autonomy in labor matters and full control o f
its own finances. Each branch appoints three members of its board
o f governors to the Industrial Relations Committee o f the association,
created to enable the Open Shop and Closed Shop branches to co­
operate, if they so desire, in labor matters o f mutual interest.
The Closed Shop Branch joined with two other employers’ organi­
zations, namely, the Printers’ League o f America and the Interna­
tional Association of Employing Stereotypers and Electrotypers, and
the four international unions to establish in April, 1919, “ The Inter-




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

161

national Joint Conference Council” 2 to investigate and legislate
5
upon matters of labor policy in the commercial and periodical
branches of the printing industry.
D e p a r t m e n t o f I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .—F. A. Silcox, director.
Established in 1919 4 to provide within the printing industry cen­
4
tralized investigation, coordination, analysis, interpretation, and dis­
tribution of information on the problem of industrial relations be­
tween employer and employee which will eventually lay the founda­
tion for the formulation of broad, constructive policies leading to
greater uniformity in wages and existing conditions, and to the elimi­
nation o f strikes through voluntary conciliation and arbitration.” Its
annual reports are published in the convention numbers of the Typothetse Bulletin (e. g., December, 1919, October, 1920). Expendi­
tures of the department during the year 1919-20 amounted to ap­
proximately $30,000.
Labor statistics questionnaires sent by this department to all mem­
bers o f the United Typothetae of America have enabled it to make an
analysis of the labor policy followed in the shop of each member,
the number o f employees at work in the mechanical department, and
the number of apprentices employed in relation to total employees.
Data regarding plans for training apprentices, which are being
tried out in different parts of the country, have been collected and
published in a series of four articles by Francis H. Bird, assistant
director, in Typothetae Bulletin, A pril-July, 1920.
A survey of profit-sharing and bonuses in Chicago printing plants
has recently been made by F. E. W olfe, of the research staff of the
department, and the results were published in the Journal o f Politi­
cal Economy, July, 1921 (p. 521~542) ; two reports from this investi­
gation, which covered 138 establishments, have appeared in T y­
pothetae Bulletin, December, 1920 (p. 18-23), and February, 1921 (p.
5-7). A brief report on 4 group life insurance in Chicago printing
4
plants,” by F. E. W olfe, was published in Typothetae Bulletin, Jan­
uary, 1921 (p. 6-7).
In cooperation with the National Industrial Conference Board a
contractual relations survey has been undertaken by questionnaires
sent out to 1,000 members seeking information on their experience
with agreements with labor organizations. Contracts with different
unions in various cities have been analyzed and arranged in compara­
tive form for use of scale committees.
Other material prepared by the department includes articles and
charts on changes in cost of living and printers’ wages (in various
numbers o f Typothetae B ulletin); wage scales (with emergency
bonuses) compiled from reports o f local Typothetae secretaries (pub­
lished monthly as supplements to Typothetae Bulletin) ; a pamphlet
entitled 4 Helpful hints for dealing with the wage problem; ” memo­
4
randa on shop committees and other special topics.
C o m m i t t e e o n E d u c a t i o n .— Henry P. Porter, chairman; Fred­
erick W. Hamilton, education director (office at 2 Park Square,
Boston, Mass.). This committee has made a study of the teaching o f
2
5
An account of the formation and subsequent activities of this council is given in an
article by C. R. W alker, jr., Monthly Labor Review of the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics, v. 12, No. 1, January, 1921, p. 2 3 -4 4 ; also reprinted separately by the Bureau of
Industrial Research, New York.

70723°— Bull. 299— 21- 11



162

III. N OH OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

printing which has been introduced widely in public schools and has
embodied its findings and recommendations in a pamphlet published
in 1919 under the title 4 Instruction in printing in public schools ”
4
(34 p.). This contains also a list o f 64 textbooks in the a T ypo­
graphic technical series for apprentices ” (or U. T. A. Typographic
Library) prepared under the supervision of the committee for use in
vrade classes in courses o f printing instruction, and by individuals;
about half o f these have been published to date.
Standard cost finding, accounting, estimating and salesmanship
courses, for printers, have been in operation by correspondence for
several years.
The United Typothetse o f America School o f Printing, 1500 East
Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Xnd., was established by the associa; tion in 1904.
^ Further information regarding educational activities is given in
reports made to the 1920 convention (Typothetse Bulletin, v. 14, No.
2, Oct., 1920, p. 47-91).
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OF THE MIDDLE WEST.
L. W. Wahlstrom, 1711 Estes Avenue, Chicago, secretary.
Organized in 1914 6 to study problems relating to vocational edu­
4
cation and to bring the results o f this study to public attention for
the purpose o f fostering types o f education that will meet the voca­
tional needs o f youth and the reasonable demands o f industry for
efficient workers, while preserving those elements o f general educa­
tion necessary for good citizenship in a democracy.” Its present
membership is about 650 (annual dues, $1 a year). Meetings are
held annually, in January or February.
The association has published the Proceedings of the second apd
third annual conventions (1916, 1917). In 1916 separate sessions
were devoted to 4 Work for women” and 4 School and employ­
4
4
ment; ” in 1917, to 4 W ork for women” and 4 Vocational education
4
4
from the standpoint o f organized labor.” In 1920 a joint convention
was he]d at Chicago with the National Society for Vocational Edu­
cation (see p. 135) and the proceedings published in its Bulletin
No. 32.
A t the Minneapolis convention, February, 1921, the following
special committees presented reports at sectional meetings: Indus­
trial education (on standards in part-time education) ; Commercial
education; Vocational guidance (on the applications o f psychology
to problems o f vocational guidance). The vocational guidance pro­
grams were carried out in cooperation with the Vocational Guid­
ance Association o f Minneapolis.
VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICE FOR
JUNIORS.
17 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. Mrs. Alice K. Pollitzer,
director.
In connection with the work o f this service psychological tests are
being applied to classes and groups o f students in the New York
City schools. Results o f application of the Otis intelligence test and
the correlations between Regents’ marks, as well as teachers’ ratings,
and I. Q. are available for certain dressmaking and industrial art
classes.




ASSOCIATIONS* SOCIETIES* FOUNDATIONS* ETC.

163

In the fall o f 1920 psychological tests were given by Dr. Ruth
Clark, o f this service, in the West Side Continuation School* which
provides instruction for employed children for four hours a week,
and the results have been used as an aid in arranging their classwork
to fit their individual needs and for the guidance of the placement
secretaries when interviewing applicants for employment.
WESTERN EFFICIENCY SOCIETY.
327 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111.
Organized December, 1912, and incorporated under the laws of
Illinois February, 1913, for the promotion o f efficiency in commer­
cial, financial, public service, and industrial enterprises.
In May, 1917, under the auspices of this society was held a national
conference on “ The human factor in industrial preparedness,9 at
’
which the Society o f Industrial Engineers was organized. The re­
port o f its proceedings (212 p.) consists o f papers on personnel
questions.
In March, 1918, a national conference on “ Labor problems under
war conditions” was held under the joint auspices o f the Society o f
Industrial Engineers and the Western Efficiency Society. The pro­
ceedings of this conference (222 p.) include “ Women in industry,”
by C. E. Knoeppel, based on answers to 1,000 questionnaires (p.
28-72; also issued by the author’ s firm with additional material as a
monograph, 123 p.)
The society is organized in functional management sections, each
o f which meets twice a month or oftener. Papers read at the meet­
ings have been published up to August 30, 1920, in the society’s Bul­
letin (v. 1-4, Nos. 1-76), which has been superseded by Business
Crucible,, published monthly from November, 1920.
P e r s o n n e l a n d E m p l o y m e n t M a n a g e m e n t S e c t i o n .— This group
published in July, 1918, “ A questionnaire digest on methods of wage
payment” (52 p.).
WOMAN’S OCCUPATIONAL BUREAU.
216 Meyers Arcade, Minneapolis, Minn. Margaret A. Smith,
manager.
In 1919 the Vocational Informational Service o f this bureau pub­
lished Occupational Bulletins Nos. 1, 2, v iz :
No. 1. Wom en in banking in the city of Minneapolis. 23 p.
No. 2. W ar-tim e replacement in the city of Minneapolis. 19 p.

The tables in the latter were compiled from data collected in the
Industrial Survey of Women employed outside the home made by
the Women in Industry Committee of the Women’s Division, Minne­
sota Commission o f Public Safety and the Bureau o f Women and
Children, State Department of Labor and Industries with the co­
operation o f this bureau.
The bureau has also published the results o f three short studies on
“ Home economics positions in Minneapolis,” “ The field o f social
service,” and “ Opportunities for women in journalism.”
WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL UNION.
264 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass.
Organized 1877 and incorporated 1880, to promote the educational,
industrial, and social advancement of women.




164

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

D e p a r t m e n t o f R e s e a r c h .—Miss Lucile Eaves, director. The re­
sults o f investigations made by this department and published 19101921, mainly by other agencies, have been issued in a series entitled
“ Studies in economic relations o f women” (v. 1-11). They include
studies o f dressmaking (v. 4 ), millinery (v. 5), and the boot and shoe
industry (v. 6) as trades for women; industrial home work in Massa­
chusetts (v. 7) ; the public schools and women in office service (v. 8 ) ;
industrial experience o f trade-school girls in Massachusetts (v. 9 ) ;
the food o f working women in Boston (v. 10); old-age support or
women teachers (v. 11). O f these, volumes 4, 6, 9, were published
by United States Bureau o f Labor Statistics as its Bulletins Nos.
193, 180, 215 ; volume 7 by Massachusetts Bureau o f Statistics as
Labor Bulletin 101; volume 8 by Boston School Committee; and
volume 10 by Massachusetts Department of Health. “ Women pro­
fessional workers,” a study made for the Union by Elizabeth Kemper
Adams, and published in 1921 by the Macmillan Co., New York,
largely supersedes volume 1 o f the above series, “ Vocations for the
trained woman.”
During 1917-18 a study of the vocational experience of juvenile
employees in Boston was made. A report o f the investigations in re­
tail departments, dry goods and clothing stores was published in 1920
under the title “ Training for store service” (143 p.). A list o f the
unpublished statistical material tabulated by the department while
making this study in retail stores is given on pages 127-132 of the
report. Investigators wishing to compare this unpublished data
with similar data collected in other cities may obtain any o f the
tables in the list by paying the cost of copying and mailing. Simi­
lar studies o f the experiences of young persons in confectionery
works, printing offices, grocery stores, and hotels have been com­
pleted, but are not yet published. Another unpublished study re­
lates to 1,000 cases o f illiterate foreign born (how employed, rela­
tive earnings, and chance o f promotion).
Investigations in progress during the current year deal with the
subject “ Methods by which self-supporting women may provide for
their old age.” The report is to form volume 12 of the above series.
Three fellowships in social-economic research carrying a stipend
o f $500 are awarded annually to women who are college graduates
trained in economics or sociology. They are given a year’s training
in the department on schedules, field work, construction and interpre­
tation o f statistical tables, and the literary presentation o f results and
carry out a cooperative investigation o f the subject selected for the
year’s work. This fulfills the requirements for the degree of M. S. in
research at {Simmons College (see p. 193), with which the department
is affiliated.
WORKERS’ HEALTH BUREAU.
Saint Denis Offices, Broadway and Eleventh Street, New York,
N. Y. Grace M. Burnham, Harriet Silverman, directors.
Incorporated in 1921, this organization is devoted to planning, in­
stalling, and supervising health service for trade-unions. The work
which it is organized to do is defined as follows:
1. T o conduct a scientific industrial study of the health needs of any tradeunion.
2. To recommend a complete health program for that trade-union based on
such a study.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

165

3. To recommend an educational program completely covering the subject
of workers’ health.
4. To establish health departments within trade-union locals, such depart­
ments to specialize in preventive work, including thorough medical and dental
examinations.
5. To train workers’ health committees to carry out the health program
in the workshop.
6. To select with scrupulous care, trained doctors, nurses, and teachers re­
quired in conducting the union health work.

WORKMEN’S CIRCLE.
175 East Broadway, New York, N. Y. George Rubin, statistician.
A fraternal organization with about 82,000 members and 642
branches distributed throughout the United States and Canada.
A statistical review of disability based upon an analysis o f its
records has been completed recently and published in Modern Medi­
cine (v. 2, No. 11, November, 1920, p. 780-733).
YOUNG WOMAN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, NEW YORK CITY,
CENTRAL BRANCH.
610 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y.
In 1919-20 the Employment Department of this branch and the
Industrial Department o f the War Work Council o f the National
Board, YTmng Woman’s Christian Association made a factory sur­
vey o f opportunities for executive and technical women, covering
250 shops in the Greater New York industrial district and the New
Jersey factory belt which employed 200 or more women. The re­
port prepared by Janet R. Huntington, in charge of survey, was
published in 1920 under the title “ Executive and technical women
in factories” (19 p.).
(b) U N IVER SITIES AND COLLEGES.

MUNICIPAL UNIVERSITY OF AKRON.
Akron, Ohio.
C ollege of E ngineering.— F red E. Ayer, dean. Established in
1914, this college has a five-year cooperative engineering course,
patterned after the “ Cincinnati plan,” in which the students are
grouped in two sections, one of which is at work in local engineering
shops (at a minimum wage o f 30 cents per hour) and the other in
attendance at the university, and these sections change places every
two weeks. The shop work and the university work are coordinated
by technically trained men experienced in engineering practice.
A cooperative course in municipal engineering has been arranged
in which the students work half time in the different engineering
departments of the city o f Akron.
Three of the large rubber companies in Akron have united in
establishing about 30 industrial scholarships for the purpose o f
training men by the cooperative plan in manufacturing production.
The company pays the university tuition and fees of the student and
employs him at the rate o f $75 per month during his alternate twoweek periods in the production department of the factory, the work
being carefully arranged so that he- will spend some time in every
department of the plant. The length of this course is four years o f
eleven months each.




166

III. N 0N 0F F IC IA E AGENCIES.

B O S T O N U N IV E R S IT Y .

525 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass.
Vocational guidance 3, one o f the late afternoon courses for teach­
ers and other special students, is a research course in this field con­
ducted by Frederick J. Allen, of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance,
Harvard University. Each member o f the class carries on individual
research into a special problem, such as the study of methods in
establishing a vocational bureau in a community or school system, an
occupational, educational or social survey, or the extended study o f a
particular business or industry.
C o l l e g e o f B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t i o n .— A course on employment
management practice (R-55, 56), two hours each week throughout
the year, is given in the evening division by Mr. Baiph G. Wells,
and special lecturers. It was inaugurated by the Employment Mana­
gers’ Association, Boston.
B R O W N U N IV E R S IT Y .

Providence, R. I.
of E d u c a t i o n .*
—Stephen S. Colvin, director. A series o f
group intelligence tests, designated the Brown University tests, has
been compiled by the director. It includes two completion tests, two
vocabulary tests, two opposite tests, two analogies tests, one factsand-conclusions test, and one arithmetic test. The results obtained
in the administration o f these tests are given in the following articles
by Prof. Colvin:

S chool

Psychological tests at Brown University.
(School and Society, v. 10, No.
236, July 5, 1919, p. 27-30.)
The validity of psychological tests for college entrance.
(Educational Rev.,
v. 60, No. 1, June, 1920, p. 7-17.)
Educational guidance and tests in college.
(Shortly to appear in Journal
of Applied Psychology.)
The use of intelligence tests in Brown University.
(Shortly to appear in
Educational Review .)
BRYN M AW R COLLEGE.

Bryn Mawr, Pa.
C a r o l a W o e r is h o f f e r G r a d u a t e D e p a r t m e n t of S o c i a l E
a n d S o c i a l R e s e a r c h .— Dr. Susan M. Kingsbury, director.

conom y

Estab­
lished in 1915 as a graduate school to prepare students for profes­
sional service dealing with industrial and social relations. In 1918,
with the support and cooperation of the National War Council o f
the Young Women’s Christian Association, courses in industrial
supervision and employment management were introduced to meet
the demands of industry for trained women to fill positions as super­
visors of women’s work, employment managers, etc. This division
has now been made permanent, as the Grace H. Dodge Foundation,
through a fund o f $100,000 recently given to Bryn Mawr College by
Mr. John D. Rockefeller, jr., for the endowment o f instruction in
industrial relations in this department, and additional endowment
is being raised to provide scholarships and fellowships.
The instruction in industrial supervision and personnel administra­
tion is given by Miss Gladys Boone and includes a graduate course
dealing with the problems and technique of personnel administration
and three seminars in labor organization, research in labor prob­
lems, and social economy applied to industrial supervision and per­
sonnel administration, respectively (each two hours a week through


UNIVERSITIES ANI> COLLEGES.

167

out the year). The last-named seminar includes a practicnm o f 7
or 12 hours* field work per week in industrial experience in or near
Philadelphia during the college year, and two months of nonresident
work in an industrial or mercantile establishment during the follow­
ing summer, under the supervision o f the instructor. The firms
which have cooperated in giving experience to students either in the
employment office or in the factory are listed in the announcements
o f the department and the college calendar o f graduate courses 1921,
which also give information regarding scholarships and fellowships
available for students in this group.
The seminar in social and industrial research, offered by the di­
rector, is devoted to training in field investigations and the analysis
and interpretation o f data secured.
Among the subjects o f seminar researches recently made are the
following: Analysis o f labor turnover for some large industrial con­
cerns ; substitution o f women for men on the Pennsylvania railroad;
mothers in industry in Philadelphia; women who manufacture in
their homes for industry (in cooperation with the State Department
of Labor and Industry).
P sychological L aboratory.—P rof. C. E. Ferree, director. The
principal researches o f this laboratory in the field of industrial
psychology have been in special physiological and sensory tests
for vocational selection and in the study of hygienic conditions o f
work, particularly as regards the question o f illumination. Studies
have been made by Prof. Ferree and Dr. Gertrude Band on the effect
o f intensity, distribution, and color of light on ocular functions,
individual differences in speed of discrimination of the eye, power to
sustain clear seeing, and power to see at low illuminations. The light­
ing studies were made under the auspices of the American Medical
Association’s Subcommittee on the Hygiene o f the Eve. The work
on the speed o f changes in accommodation o f the eye for different
distances was used in the selection o f aviators and in checking
up their daily condition both at Mineola and in France; the in­
vestigation on acuity at low illuminations was made in conjunction
with the Navy Medical Service primarily for the use o f the Navy
in the selection of men for lookout service. The results o f these
researches have been published in the following papers:
Ferree, C. E. Tests for the efficiency of the eye under different systems of
mumination and a preliminary study of the causes of discomfort.
(Trans,
Ilium. Eng. Soc., 1913, v. 8, p. 40 -6 0.)
------- The efficiency of the eye under different systems of lighting. ( Intermit.
Cong, on School Hygiene, 4th, Buffalo, 1913, v. 5, p. 35 1-36 4; Ophthalmology,
July, 1914, p. 1 -1 6 ; Mind and Body, 1913, v. 20, p. 280-286, 345-353.)
-------- The problem of lighting in relation to the efficiency o f the eye. ( Science,
July 17, 1914, N. S., v. 15, p. 84 -9 1.)
Ferree, C. E. and Rand, G. The efficiency o f the eye under different condi­
tions o f lighting: the effect o f varying distribution and intensity.
(Trans.
Ilium. Eng. Soc., July, 1915, v. 10, p. 407-447.)
------- Further experiments on the efficiency of the eye under different con­
ditions of lighting. (Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soc., July, 1915, v. 10, p. 449-501.)
------- Some experiments on the eye with inverted reflectors of different
densities.
(Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soc., 1915, v. 10, p. 1097-1138.)
------- A resume of experiments on the problem of lighting in its relation
to the eye. (Jour. Philos. Psychol, and Sci. Methods, 1915, v. 12, p. 657-663.)
------- Some experiments on the eye with pendant reflectors of different
densities.
(Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soe., 1916, v. 11, p. 1111-1137.)
------- Miscellaneous experiments on the efficiency of the eye under different
conditions of lighting. ( Ophthalmology, July, 1916, p. 1-25.)




16 8

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Ferree, C. E., and Rand, G. A resume of experiments on the effect of differ­
ent conditions of lighting on the eye.
(Annals of Ophthalmology, July, 1916,
p. 1-10 .)
------- The power of the eye to sustain clear seeing under different conditions
o f lighting.
(Jour. Educ. Psychol., 1917, v. 8, p. 451-468.)
------- Some experiments on the eye with pendant opaque reflectors differing in
lining, dimensions, and design. (Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soc., 1917, v. 12, p. 464-487.)
------- Some experiments on the eye with different illuminants, parts I - I I .
(Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soc., 1918, v. 13, p. 5 0 -6 0 ; 1919, y. 14, p. 107-132.)
------- Lighting in its relation to the eye. (Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc., 1918, v.
57, No. 5, p. 440-478.)
------- The inertia of adjustment of the eye for clear seeing at different dis­
tances; a study of ocular functions with special reference to aviation.
(Trans.
Amer. Ophthalmological Soc., 1918, v. 16, p. 14 2-16 6; Amer. Jour, of Ophthal­
mology, 1918, v. 1, p. 764-776.)
• ------- The speed of adjustment of the eye for clear seeing at different dis­
tances.
(Amer. Jour. Psychol., 1919, v. 30, p. 40 -6 1.)
------- Lantern and apparatus for testing the light sense and for determining
acuity at low illuminations.
(Amer. Jour, of Ophthalmology, v. 3, No. 5, May,
1920.)
-------- Visual acuity at low illumination and the use of the illumination scale
for the detection of small errors in refraction. (Amer. Jour, of Ophthalmology,
V. 3, No. 6, June, 1920.)
------- An apparatus for testing the light and the color sense. (Amer. Jour, of
Ophthalmology, v. 3, No. 11, Nov., 1920.)
------- The effect of variations in intensity of illumination on functions of im­
portance to the working eye.
(Trans. Ilium. Eng. Soc., Dec., 1920, v. 15, No. 9,
p. 769-801.)

A study o f the ideal reading page as to coloration, finish and type
is being made with the American W riting Paper Co., of Holyoke.
In the seminar and laboratory course in applied psychology in­
telligence testing is taught from the point of view of the application
o f tests in employment and placement and the procedure in devising
tests for such purposes, and research work is done in connection with
vocational guidance bureaus.
U N IV E R S IT Y O F C A L IF O R N IA .

Berkeley, Calif.
D epartment of H ygiene.— R obert T. Legge, M. D., professor o f
hygiene. In this department an investigation is being made by Dr.
John Force into the cause of 4 packer’s itch,” a dermatitis found
6
among packers using infested straw. Another type o f occupational
dermatosis, which is being investigated by Dr. Legge, is that o f a
peculiar infection o f the fingers o f dried fig packers. Problems o f in­
dustrial nursing are being studied by Miss Edith S. Bryan, professor
o f public health nursing.
A syllabus o f the lecture course in industrial hygiene given in this
department for the past six years is published in United States Pub­
lic Health Reports (v. 35, No. 15, April 9, 1920, p. 891-893).
D ivision of V ocational E ducation.—R. J. Leonard, director. Es­
tablished in 1919 for the purpose o f unifying the various activities
in this field carried on in connection with the University at Berkeley
and its southern branch at Los Angeles. Among the special research
projects recently completed or in progress by graduate students in
seminary are the follow ing: Studies in occupational extension; Atti­
tude o f organized labor toward vocational education; Analysis o f the
chemical industries o f the East Bay Region for purposes of voca­
tional education; Study of the garment-making industries in San
Francisco; Mathematical and scientific work related to the machine




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

169

shop trades; How large employers select personnel; The function of
vocational guidance and placement in part-time and evening schools;
Study o f juvenile employment in Long Beach; Industrial education
in the junior high school; Vocational opportunities for girls of high
school age in Oakland.
R esearch and Service Center for P art-time E ducation.— Miss
Emily G. Palmer, director. Established in 1920 under the above
division, it is confining its efforts at present to the analysis of occupa­
tions as a means o f assisting continuation school teachers. It will
take up from time to time those matters which are of greatest im­
portance in furthering the scheme of State aid in vocational educa­
tion. It has issued the follow ing:
Bulletin No. 1. Syllabus of an introductory course on part-time education.
(Out of print.)
Leaflet No. 1. Part-time education series No. 1. A first reading list for ad­
ministrators and teachers in part-time schools.
Leaflet No. 2. Part-time education series No. 2. The work of coordination in
part-time education. (Out of print.)
Bulletin No. 2. Part-time education series No. 3. An analysis of departmentstore occupations for juniors.
Bulletin No. 3. Part-time education series No. 4. Coordination in part-time
education.
Bulletin No. 4. Part-time education series No. 5. An analysis of the work of
juniors in banks.
Part-time news notes: No. 1, Three months of coordination in the Oakland
schools; No. 2, Progress in part-time education in Los A n geles; No. 3, The work
of the director of part-time education; No. 4, The application blank for enroll­
ment in part-time schools: a statistical study, by E. G. P alm er; No. 5, Junior
employees in the retail drug business, by H . A. Campion.
C A R N E G IE IN S T IT U T E O F T E C H N O L O G Y .

Schenley Park, Pittsburgh, Pa.
D ivision of C ooperative R esearch.—W. V. Bingham^ director.
This division was organized in 1921 to encourage research in both
pure and applied science, including the scientific aspects of human
relations in industry, and particularly to place the facilities of the
institute at the disposal of large industrial and commercial concerns,
or associations, desiring to have systematic research carried out on
specific problems. It includes the Bureau of Personnel Research and
the Research Bureau for Retail Training, which were previously
departments of the Division of Applied Psychology (superseded by
this new division). Additional departments are now in process of
organization, v iz : Bureau of Educational Research, under the im­
mediate supervision of Dr. E. K. Strong, jr .; Bureau of Science and
Engineering Research, headed by Prof. A. J. Wurts.
B ureau of P ersonnel R esearch.— C. S. Yoakum, director. This
bureau was organized in May, 1916, as the Bureau of Salesmanship
Research. During the war its officers and research assistants were
taken over by the General Staff to develop and administer the
personnel system of the army.2 After the return of the staff from
6
war, the scope of the bureau was enlarged to include selection and
development o f clerical workers and executives, as well as salesmen,
and the present name was adopted in June, 1919.
The bureau is a joint enterprise maintained by groups o f cooperat­
ing manufacturing and commercial concerns, through which they
2 The Com ittee on Classification of Personnel in the Arm was headed by W
6
m
y
alter
Dill Scott and W V Bingham of the bureau staff.
. .



170

III. NONOEFICIAL AGENCIES.

pool their experience, exchange information, and initiate investiga­
tions o f problems of common interest relating to employment, selec­
tion, training, organization, and supervision of personnel. The in­
stitute maintains the general research staff and laboratories; and
subscriptions are received from cooperating firms in aid o f pure
research in personnel problems. An important portion of the sup­
port of the bureau comes from its applied research on personnel
problems arising in the office, sales, or executive organization of in­
dividual firms, for which a minimum annual fee of $500 is asked. In
addition to this annual retainer, a firm may arrange for special
research, fellowships, or the assignment of an assistant to work on
its problems. Groups o f firms may be organized for special research,
in which case the fees are determined by group agreement. Service
work to business concerns through the bureau’s staff is supported as
a separate function under agreements with the firms for which it is
performed, those now in force ranging in payments from $100 to
$1,000 monthly.
The researches carried on by the Bureau o f Salesmanship Research
during the three years 1916 to 1919 fall into two groups:
(a) Methods o f selecting salesmen, including preparation and issu­
ance of the volume, 4 Aids in selecting salesmen, series of 1916,” con­
4
taining application, interviewer’s and test blanks (28 p.) ; develop­
ment of norms and standards of comparison for use in evaluating
a salesman’s performance in the tests; statistical studies of sources
o f successful salesmen.
(b) Methods o f developing salesmen, including studies o f types
o f sales schools; studies o f sales conventions, summarized in its Bulle­
tin No. 21, issued in 1919, entitled 4 Sales conventions” (26 p.) ;
4
studies o f methods o f supervision, stimulation through house organs
and bulletins, and compensation as affecting the salesman’s pro­
ductivity.
A summary o f the available results o f the previous work of the
bureau was published in 1920 under the title 4 Research in sales per­
4
sonnel” (60 p.) ; and the w ork done during 1919-20 on job specifica­
T
tions relating to clerical personnel was issued as 4 Aids for selection
4
and placement o f clerical personnel ” (130 p.).
In February, 1920, the bureau began sending out a series o f mimeo­
graphed reports covering the topics being studied, as follow s:
Report A , 1920. First-year production as a measure of future success in
selling.
Report B, 1920. A preliminary study of clerical workers.
Report C, 1920. Methods of measuring sales possibilities.
Report D, 1920, Outlines of personnel administration: (1 ) Personnel de­
partment— organization and employment process; (2 ) Cost of living in rela­
tion to wage adjustm ent; (3 ) Use and development of sources of supply;
(4 ) Labor turnover; (5) Education and training; (6 ) Foreman training;
(7 ) Health supervision; (8) Methods of compensation; (9 ) Organization
studies; (10) Follow-up w ork; (11) Recreation, welfare, and social w ork;
(12) Employees’ associations and organization.
Report E, 1920, Building a marketing organization.
Report F, 1920. Questions and answers on supervision o f salesmen*
Report H, 1920. Some uses of job analyses: Pt. 1, The zoning of jobs— an
effective solution of some personnel problems; Pt. 2, The zoning of jobs and
determining a fair wage.
Also special reports, based on data from cooperating firms, dealing with
special topics in selection, training, measures of success, supervision, and
organization.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES..

171

Other papers, and the discussion thereon, are printed in the pro­
ceedings o f the first fall meeting (November 14, 1919) and the fourth
annual meeting (May 27, 1920) of the board of cooperating mem­
bers of the bureau.
R esearch B ureau for R etail T raining.*
—W. W. Charters, direc­
tor. Established in 1917, because certain o f the firms in the origi­
nal Bureau of Salesmanship Research (v. supra) wished to develop
the training and educational work more rapidly, this bureau aims
(1) to provide a limited group of able people with technical train­
ing for leadership in the employment and educational departments
o f general stores; (2) to train teachers for high-school courses
in selling; (3) to conduct research bearing on the human factor in
stores: the selection, placement, and individual development o f
employees; (4) to cooperate with the public schools in( arranging
part-time courses which combine schooling with experience in stores.
The institute contributes the services o f its faculty and provides
rooms, office force and overhead expenses in addition to substantial
support of the training course. Seven Pittsburgh stores in 1918 un­
derwrote $32,000 a year for five years for the support of the bureau.
The bureau has successfully solved many problems in retail selling
and has developed a technique in training that can be applied gener­
ally. Some of the results of its studies are issued in three series of
bulletins, as follows:
Bulletin (general series) : No. 1. Merchandise manual for shoe departments.
By Elizabeth Dyer. 1921. No. 2. The retail-selling course in Pittsburgh high
schools. By J. B. Miner. 1921.
Elementary series: No. 1. Shoes— merchandise information for salespeople.
By Elizabeth Dyer. 1920.
Instruction series : No. 1. Shoes— teaching instructions for training new sales­
people. By Elizabeth Dyer. 1920.

The training course for personnel work in the retail field, covering
department-store administration, training, employment management,
applied psychology (including mental-test technique), and research,
and fellowships offered, are described in a special bulletin of the
Carnegie Institute of Technology.
B ureau of E ducational R esearch.— E. K. Strong, jr., director.
This bureau, established in 1921, will concern itself chiefly with edu­
cational problems arising within the institute, but also has an interest
in problems o f education in industry. Research work in this field
was previously carried on under the direction of Dr. Strong in
connection with the Vocational Education Department. During
1920-21 job analyses of the duties o f executives in the three fields o f
commercial printing, building construction, and the metal-working
industries were made. The information obtained in this survey has
thus far been utilized only for the reorganization o f the courses of
instruction in the College o f Industries o f the institute intended for
training men to become executives in these industries. Certain as­
pects of the work were dealt with in two papers by the director,
nam ely:
Analyzing industrial requirements. (Proceedings o f the Society of Industrial
Engineers, Nov., 1920, p. 75-82.)
Job analysis of the manager in industry.
(School and Society, v. 18, p.
450-462, Apr. 16, 1921.)
D

of
P s y c h o l o g y .-—L. L. Thurstone, professor o f
This department o f the former Division o f Applied

epartm ent

psychology.



172

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Psychology has been transferred to the Division o f General Studies,
but it remains in close affiliation with the Division o f Cooperative
Research. It gives instruction in pure and applied psychology, sta­
tistical methods, personnel administration, etc., and conducts the
group tests given to all students entering the institute.
Tests developed and published by this department include: Pro­
ficiency test for typists; clerical examination; a series of six tests
for college freshmen and high-school seniors prepared for the Society
for the Promotion o f Engineering Education (see p. 153) ; personnel
aids (series of 1918). The following articles on tests have been
published in psychological journals:
Mental tests for prospective telegraphers, a study of the diagnostic value o f
mental tests for predicting ability to learn telegraphy, by L. L. Thurstone.
(Jour. App. Psychol., v. 3, No. 2, June, 1919, p. 110-117.)
A standardized test for office clerks, by L. L. Thurstone. (Jour. App. Psychol.,
v. 3, No. 3, Sept., 1919, p. 248-251.)
U N IV E R S IT Y

O F C H IC A G O .

Chicago, 111.
S chool or C ommerce and A dministration.—L. C. Marshall, dean.
In addition to courses of a more general character, the program o i
work in preparation for personnel administration includes the fo l­
lowing dealing specifically with personnel problems:
Political economy 43: The business manager’s administration o f
labor (Asst. Prof. Paul H. Douglas), dealing'with (1) the factors
making for ineffective work, such as labor turnover, absenteeism,
withheld effort, personal incapacities of health and training, dis­
harmonies o f relationship between management and the workers; (2)
methods o f securing effective effort, such as the proper administration
o f the labor supply and the selection of workers, promotion, demo­
tion, trah&fer, and discharge, regularization of employment, education
and training, safety and health, welfare work, hours of labor, wages
and rewards, joint relations with employees, whether through shop
committees, unions, or industrial councils; (3) the organization and
functions o f a personnel department and its place in a business
organization. Investigations are assigned on special topics and the
student is expected to do field work upon some phase o f employment
problems.
Political economy 44: The education and training o f the worker;
a study o f the various kinds o f ability needed in modern industry
and a consideration o f the training agencies set up (1) outside the
industrial establishment, such as trade schools, supplementary train­
ing courses, cooperative schools and continuation schools; (2) inside
the establishment, such as the training department, vestibule
schools, apprentice schools, “ formanizing ” classes, etc. Provision
will be made for those who wish definite training in trade teaching by
means of supervised field work, etc.
An article by Dean Marshall on “ Incentive and output: a statement
o f the place o f the personnel manager in modern industry ” appeared
in Journal o f Political Economy (v. 28, No. 9, November, 1920, p.
713-734). A guide and bibliography for labor managers, by Prof.
L. S. Lyon, was published in Industrial Management for November,
1920. Prof. Douglas published in 1921 a monograph on “ American
apprenticeship and industrial education” (348 p .), in Columbia
University, Studies in history, economics, and public law (v. 95,



UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

173

No. 2; whole No. 216); and an article on “ Shop committees: a sub­
stitute for or supplement to trade-unions” (Jour. Pol. Econ., Feb.,
1921, p. 89-107). He has in preparation a study of “ The relationship
between turnover and absenteeism.”
OTHO

S. A . S P R A G U E M E M O R IA L IN S T IT U T E .

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. H. Gideon Wells, M. D.,
director of medical research.
Organized January, 1911, under a bequest from Otho S. A. Sprague
for the purpose of the relief of human suffering (present fund,
$1,500,000; annually available, $80,000) and incorporated under the
laws of the State of Illinois; affiliated with the Medical School of the
University o f Chicago by vote of its trustees on November 17, 1916.
The chief emphasis of the work of the institute has been upon the
chemical side of medical problems (e. g., in the study of tuberculosis,
diabetes, etc.), children’s diseases, and the influence o f heredity on
cancer. While at the present time it is doing no work in industrial
diseases, in the past it has. supported a few special investigations in
this field, viz., by Dr. Peter Bassoe on “ The late manifestations o f
compressed-air disease” (American Journal Medical Science, April,
1913) ; by Dr. Emery R. Hayhurst on “ Occupational brass poison­
in g ” (American Journal Medical Science, May, 1913), “ A study o f
lead poisoning in painters” (American Journal Medical Science,
June, 1914), and “ The prevalence of occupational features in disease ”
(Journal American Medical Association, December 12, 1914).
During the war several problems concerning the toxicity of various
explosives or chemicals used in munitions plants were referred to the
institute for investigation. The sudden cessation of munitions work
terminated these investigations, most of them while incomplete. A
synopsis of some of the results w^as published in the Journal of Indus­
trial Hygiene (v. 2, No. 7, November, 1920, p. 247-252),
U N IV E R S IT Y O F C H IC A G O

SETTLEM ENT.

4630 Gross Avenue, Chicago, 111. Miss Mary McDowell, head
resident.
In 1910-1912 a survey of the stockyards district was undertaken by
the Board of the University of Chicago Settlement (John C. Ken­
nedy, in charge) to secure accurate and detailed information regard­
ing the living and working conditions of the people in that neigh­
borhood. The results of these investigations were published in three
parts entitled:
A study of Chicago’s stockyards community: (1 ) Opportunities in school and
industry for children of the stockyards district. By Ernest L. Talbert. 1912.
64 p. (2) The American girl in the stockyards district. By Louise Montgomery.
1913. 70 p.
(3) W ages and family budgets in the Chicago stockyards district,
with wage statistics from other industries employing unskilled labor. By J. C.
Kennedy and others. 1914. 80 p.

A study o f night-working mothers in the packing houses, who had
children under school age, has recently been made at the settlement,
under the supervision o f the head resident, by Miss Annie Konticke,
U N IV E R S IT Y

O F C IN C IN N A T I.

Cincinnati, Ohio.
C ollege of E ngineering and Commerce.— H erman Schneider,
dean. This college operates on what is known as the cooperative



174

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

system. Under this plan the practice o f engineering is taught in a
shop or on a railroad under actual commercial conditions, and the
science underlying the practice is taught in the university. The stu­
dents are divided into two sections, which alternate every two weeks,
i. e., during each biweekly period one-half o f the students are at the
university and one-half are in the factories, and at the end o f the
period the sections are interchanged. The students are paid for their
work in the shops at the same rate as other employees. The coopera­
tive course is o f five years’ duration, eleven months in the year. For
the year 1920-21 there was an enrollment o f 950 students, and the
number o f cooperating firms is now 150, covering a great variety o f
industries not only in Cincinnati but also in other cities in Ohio and
Indiana. An account o f the evolution o f the plan since its inception
in 1906 and a description o f the courses o f instruction in chemical,
civil, electrical, mechanical, and metallurgical engineering and in
commerce for 1921-22 are published as University o f Cincinnati
Becord, January, 1921 (ser. 1, v. 17, No. 1).
Direct correlation o f the work o f the shop with the instruction
given in the university is made by the department o f coordination,
which studies each cooperating firm, devises organization charts
showing the various kinds o f work which a student can most profit­
ably follow and keeps a graphical record for every student, which
shows the various kinds o f work he has done during the five years
o f his course.
The selection o f men for the work for which they are to be trained
being o f special importance under this system, nearly all o f the tests
proposed for this purpose have been tried and the results have been
largely negative. In a paper entitled “ Selecting men for jobs ” (re­
printed from the Engineering Magazine, New York, June, 1916)
Dean Schneider has discussed the methods tried and discarded and
outlined the plan adopted, which is based on the study o f the apti­
tude for different jobs of about 1,000 men who came under close ob­
servation in 10 years.
C L A R K U N IV E R S IT Y .

Worcester, Mass.
of P s y c h o l o g y ,—A report on work done in this
department in testing the intelligence o f office and shop workers,
using Otis group intelligence scale, Forms A and B, and Otis general
intelligence examination, was made at the annual meeting o f the
American Psychological Association in December, 1920, by Dean
James P. Porter, and a brief summary o f some of the results was pub­
lished in its proceedings (Psychol. Bull., v. 18, No. 2, February,
1921). An attempt is to be made to ascertain the relation between
scores obtained by various kinds of tests and to work out correlations
between intelligence scores and (1) tenure o f service, (2) scores in
mechanical skill and trade tests, (3) measures of honesty, reliability,
loyalty and possibly some other moral traits, and also the by­
products o f tests in industry. Dr. Porter spent the summer vaca­
tions o f 1919 and 1920 as an unskilled laborer and as an office em­
ployee in a shipyard and a loom works to come into first-hand con­
tact with personnel problems. A brief account o f his observations is
Siven in Industry, a bulletin issued by the Associated Industries o f

D

epartm ent

Massachusetts, for November 2Q? 1920,




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

175

A psychological practician on mental and physical tests and the
application o f general intelligence scales (one hour a week) and a
course on systematic applied psychology dealing, among other topics,
with personnel analysis and the human element in business and
industry (two hours a week) are given in this department by Dr.
L. R. Geissler.
The Journal of Applied Psychology is published quarterly by
Florence Chandler, Clark University.
CLEVELAND

S C H O O L O F E D U C A T IO N .

Cleveland, Ohio.
D epartment of P sychology.-—Garry C. Myers, head of depart­
ment. The 4 Myers mental measure,’7 by Caroline E. Myers and
4
Garry C. Myers, a group intelligence test consisting wholly o f pic­
tures (published by The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa.) which has been used
in several school surveys, has been adapted by the authors to unskilled
workmen, especially those o f foreign speech.
A study of 4 Problems in skill ” reported before Ohio Academy of
4
Sciences, March 26, 1921. is still in progress.
COLORADO STATE TEACHERS9 COLLEGE.

Greeley, Colo.
D epartment of P sychology.— J. D. Heilman, in charge. A series
o f tests intended to determine a person’s capacity to learn type­
writing has been developed recently in this department.
C O L U M B IA

U N IV E R S IT Y ,

Broadway and One hundred and sixteenth Street, New York,
N. Y.
D epartment of E xtension T eaching,—F our courses on personnel
administration were given in this department in 1920-21 by Mr, L.
Outhwaite: Business <?31~32, Principles of personnel management,
Tuesday afternoons, forming part o f the general training in business
management for students in the School o f Business; Business e!61162, Personnel management, a general course, Tuesday evenings, in­
tended primarily for graduates and persons in executive and per­
sonnel work in industry, dealing with personnel technique in the
winter session and with problems connected with industrial relations
and labor maintenance in the spring session; Business el63, Per­
sonnel methods for office executives, Monday evenings, winter ses­
sion; Business ^164, Personnel methods for institutions, Monday
afternoons, spring session. A course on vocational and industrial
psychology is given by Profs. H. L. Hollingworth and A. T. Poffenberger in the winter session (Psychology <?145&) and repeated in
the spring session (Psychology #146a). In connection with this, spe­
cial conferences are arranged for students with practical and research
problems. Details o f these courses are given in a special circular,
4 Courses in personnel management ” issued by the department.
4
D epartment of P sychology.— H. L. Hollingworth, professor.
The following is a list of the published reports of work done in the
field of personnel research in this department:
Hollingworth, H. L. Vocational psychology. New York, D. Appleton, 1916.
308 p.
Hollingworth, H. L., and Poffenberger, A. T. Applied psychology. New York,
D , Appleton, 1920. 389 p. (1 st ed., 1 917.)




176

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

Hollingworth, H . L. Selection of salesmen.
(Salesmanship Magazine, Dec.,
1916.)
Rogers, H. W . Psychological tests for stenographers and typewriters. (Jour.
App. Psychol., y . 1, No. 3, Sept., 1917, p. 268-274.)
Oschrin, Elsie. Vocational tests for retail saleswomen. (Jour. App. Psychol.,
v. 2, No. 2, June, 1918, p. 148-155.)
Marcus, Lawrence. Vocational selection for specialized task s: a study of
selective tests for Hollerith-machine operatives.
(Jour. App. Psychol., v. 4,
Nos. 2 -3 , June-Sept., 1920, p. 186-201.)
Rogers, H . W . Empirical tests in vocational selection. (Abstract in Psychol.
Bull., Feb., 1921, p. 9 5 ; forthcoming volume of Archives of Psychology.)
Bregman, E. O. Psychological tests in employment. (Forthcoming article in
Jour. App. Psychol.)

Two unpublished master’s essays, “ Vocational selection o f factory
workers” (Lenora Allen) and “ Selection of telephone operators”
(Nead) are on file in the Columbia University Library.
COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.

437 West Fifty-ninth Street, New York.
P h y s i o l o g y .— Frederic S. Lee, professor of physi­
ology. This department carries on research in industrial physiology,
particularly in conjunction with United States Public Health Ser­
vice, to which Prof. Lee is consulting physiologist. The following
papers have been published:
D

e p a r t m e n t of

Lee, Frederic S. Is the eight-hour working day rational?
(Science, N. S.,
v. 44, p. 727-735, Nov., 1916.)
------- The human machine and industrial efficiency. New York, Longman,
Green & Co., 1918. vii, 119 p.
------- The human machine in industry. (Columbia University Quarterly,
v. 20, No. 1, Jan., 1918.)
------- Industrial efficiency: The bearings of physiological science thereon;
a review of recent work.
(Reprint No. 448 from U. S. Public Health Reports,
v. 33, No. 2, Jan. 11, 1918, p. 29 -3 5.)
------- The new science of industrial physiology.
(Reprint No. 513 from
U. S. Public Health Reports, v. 34, No. 15, Apr. 11, 1919, p. 723-728.)
Scott, Ernest L. The present status of our knowledge of fatigue products.
(Reprint No. 465 from U. S. Public Health Reports, v. 33, No. 17, Apr. 26,
1918, p. 605-611.)
Hastings, A. B. An investigation of changes in the blood and urine result­
ing from fatigue.
(U . S. Public Health Reports, 1919, v. 34, p. 1682.)
Scott, E. L., and Hastings, A. B. Some phases o f protein catabolism and
fatigue.
(U. S. Public Health Reports, 1920, v. 35, p. 2445.)

An investigation on “ Physiology of fatigue: physico-chemical
manifestations of fatigue in the blood,” by A. B. Hastings, has been
completed but the results have not yet been published.
During the war, Prof. Lee was executive secretary of the divisional
committee on industrial fatigue, section of sanitation, National Com­
mittee on Welfare Work, under the Council of National Defense and
prepared its preliminary report on “ Industrial fatigue” issued by
the council as Welfare W ork Series, No. 1, January, 1918, and also by
United States Public Health Service under title “ How industrial
fatigue may be reduced ” as its Reprint No. 482. He was also in
charge o f the investigation comparing an 8-hour plant and a 10hour plant in the metal-working industry, reported in Public Health
Bulletin No. 106.
Researches as to the physiological effects o f air conditions were also
made by Prof. Lee for the New York State Commission on Ventila­
tion (see p. 54), of which he is a member.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

177

TEACHERS’ COLLEGE.

Columbia University, New York, N. Y.
P s y c h o l o g y .— E. L. Thorndike, professor o f psy­
chology. This department has developed the Thorndike intelligence
examinations for high-school graduates, suitable for use in the selec­
tion of men for high-grade positions, in which intelligent planning
is required. Sets o f the current and back issues of these examina­
tions may be ordered from the Bureau of Publications, Teachers’
College.
It began also the work on the Stenquist tests of mechanical skill
and mechanical intelligence, which are now being developed in the
Bureau o f Reference and Research o f the New York City schools
(see p. 65) by Mr. J. L. Stenquist.
Prof. Thorndike, in 1914, prepared for the Metropolitan Life In­
surance Co. an entrance examination for general clerical workers,
which has been in force in that company to the present time. He
also prepared tests in connection with the study of engineering edu­
cation by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement o f Teach­
ing. (See p. 93.)
Psychological researches on “ Ventilation in relation o f mental
work,” published in 1916 as Teachers’ College Contributions to Edu­
cation No. 78, were carried out in connection with the New York
State Commission on Ventilation (see p. 54), o f which Prof. Thorn­
dike is a member.
Studies have also been made, especially by F. H.- Knight and R.
Franzen, of the qualities associated with success in the teaching pro­
fession in the elementary schools and also in high schools.
I n s t i t u t e f o r E d u c a t i o n a l R e s e a r c h .— Established at Teachers’
College early in 1921, this institute is to consist of three divisions:
Psychology, School experimentations, Field studies. The Division
o f Psychology will, during 1921 and 1922, study methods for deter­
mining an individual’s promise for general office work, for trade and
factory work, and for advanced study, with the hope o f providing
instruments whereby schools, vocational bureaus, and employers may
guide the early careers of young persons from 15 to 18 years of age.
D

e p a r t m e n t of

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE.

Hanover, N. H.
T u c k S c h o o l o f A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d F i n a n c e .— W . R.
Gray, dean. A course on personnel management (three hours) is
given by Prof. Malcolm Keir in the second semester o f the second
year. As part of the requirements for the degree o f master of com­
mercial science, students are required to make investigations and
present a thesis in the field of business for which they are preparing.
The thesis investigations on personnel management subjects under­
taken during the academic year 1920-21 were: Need for personnel
work in a meter manufacturing company, by T. W. Bradley; W el­
fare work in a paper manufacturing plant, by W. C. Hulbert; Wel­
fare work in a corporation town, by F. T. Marden; Personnel work*
o f a department store, by R. J. Miner.
t
\
D e p a r t m e n t o f P s y c h o l o g y .— A test is given by this department
to each freshman class shortly after the opening o f the fall term. It
has no connection with admission but is an attempt to secure a picture
A

mos

70723°— Bull. 299— 21------- 12




III. NONQFFICIAL AGENCIES.

178

o f each student’s mental equipment. The test is divided into several
parts, used to determine the student’s aptitude for various subjects
which he might pursue while in college. A t the end of each year
instructors are requested to make estimates of their students on the
traits o f intelligence, forcefulness, reliability, and personality, each
o f these points being carefully defined as a guide to the instructor.
Associate Dean R. W. Husband receives the detailed data o f both
kinds for interpretation to the students and as an aid in guiding them
toward appropriate occupations. In determining occupational apti­
tudes the individual’s physical examination, financial and social
status, personal experience (especially in the way of summer jobs),
interest in student activities, and intellectual interests are also taken
into account.
GEORGE PEABODY COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS.

Nashville, Tenn.
L a b o r a t o r y .—Joseph Peterson, professor of psy­
chology. The following studies published from this laboratory may
have relations to industrial psychology, inasmuch as they develop a
kind o f test that may be useful for the detection of special sorts of
abilities as well as o f general intelligence:
P

s y c h o l o g ic a l .

Experiments in rational learning, by Joseph Peterson (Psychol. Rev., 1918,
v. 25, p. 4 4 8-46 9).
Tentative norms in the rational learning test, by Joseph Peterson (Jour.
Applied Psychol., 1920, v. 4, p. 250-25 7).
The rational learning test applied to 81 college students, by Joseph Peterson
(Jour. Educ. Psychol., 1920, v. 11, p. 137-150).
The backward elimination of errors in mental maze learning, by Joseph Peter­
son (Jour. Exper. Psychol., 1920, v. 3, p. 25 7-28 0).

A tentative standardization of the hard opposites test, by Mrs.
Marie Hackl Means, is soon to appear from the press as a Psycho­
logical Monograph.
A study on the best method o f scoring the Pressey cross-out tests,
schedule E, will soon be ready for publication. Tests have been
made on about 2,000 white and ISfegro children to determine race d if­
ferences; the results when completed will have a bearing on the in­
dustrial life o f the Negro in some respects.
HARVARD UNIVERSITY.

Cambridge, Mass.
of
V o c a t i o n a l G u i d a n c e , Lawrence Hall, Kirkland
Street. John M. Brewer, director. This bureau is a department o f
the Graduate School of Education. Formerly the Vocation Bureau
o f Boston, it was transferred to Harvard University in 1917.
During the war the facilities o f the bureau were largely given
over to emergency courses in employment management, under the
direction o f the Ordnance Department o f the United States Army,
and to the preparation of studies on occupational opportunities for
physically handicapped men. During 1919-1920 the bureau co­
operated with the Associated Industries o f Massachusetts (see p. 84)
‘and Ludlow Manufacturing Associates2 in the preparation o f text­
7
book materials for Americanization in the paper industry, the leather
industry, and the jute industry. It also inaugurated discussion

B

ureau

2 Pauli, Charles H.
1
ties. 1919.




English lessons for the lute industry, including community activi­

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

179

classes for foremen in factories and consultation work on foremen
training, but these activities have since been abandoned.
The present services and activities of the bureau include corre­
spondence and conferences on matters relating to vocational guid­
ance, definite help for specific schools and school systems in intro­
ducing classes in occupations, university courses in vocational guid­
ance and vocational education, and promotion o f organizations for
the extension of vocational guidance. The following vocational and
personnel studies have been published:
Allen, Frederick J. The shoe industry.
(Rev. ed.) New York, Henry Holt
and Co., 1921.
------- Advertising as a vocation. New York. Macmillan Co., 1919.
------- A guide to the study of occupations. Cambridge. Harvard University
Press, 1921.
Brewer, John M.
The vocational-guidance movement.
New York.
Mac­
millan Co., 1918.
Brewer, John M., and Kelly, Roy W . A selected critical bibliography of vo­
cational guidance. Cambridge. Harvard University, 1917.
Kelly, Roy W .
Hiring the worker.
New York.
Industrial Management
Library, 1918.
------- Training industrial workers. New York. Ronald Press, 1920.
Kelly, Roy W ., and Allen, Frederick J. The shipbuilding industry. Boston.
Houghton Mifflin Co., 1918.
------- Shipyard employment. U. S. Shipping Board, 1918.

The series o f bulletins describing the opportunities for industrial
cripples and disabled soldiers and sailors, which were prepared by
this bureau, have been published by the Bed Cross Institute for
Crippled and Disabled Men, New York. (See p. 109.) They cover
the coppersmithing, shoe, rubber, optical goods, and brush indus­
tries.
The bureau offers a research course in vocational education and
vocational guidance; and, in the second half-year, courses on educa­
tion in industry (H 2) and vocational guidance in the occupa­
tions (K 2).
G r a d u a t e S c h o o l o f B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t Rx t i o n .— W . B . Donham,
\
dean. The study group in industrial management begins with a
general introductory course (first year, first half), part of which is
devoted to management problems arising from personal or human
relations. This is followed in the second half o f the first year by a
course on labor technique which primarily covers the functions and
underlying technique of employment management and its coordina­
tion with other departments o f the business, particularly with the
general executive. It deals with the technical and administrative
problems arising out o f the relation of employer and employee in
industry, such as selection and placement of the workman, w age set­
T
ting, adjustment and follow-up, training and education, safety, sani­
tation and health, housing and transportation, benefit associations.
In the second year a course on labor problems is given, in which
the point o f view taken is that o f the executive responsible for
labor policies and the work consists largely o f research by the indi­
vidual student on selected problems approved by the instructor where
data may be obtained in the field. During the academic year
1920-21 four studies on labor turnover were made for graduate
theses.
P s y c h o l o g i c a l L a b o r a t o r y .— Herbert S. Langfeld, director. The
work o f the late Prof. Miinsterberg in vocational psychology is



180

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

covered by his own treatise and an article containing additional re­
sults o f his researches edited and published after his death, v iz :
Miinsterberg, Hugo. Psychology and industrial efficiency. Boston, Houghton,
Mifflin & Co., 1913. 321 p.
Burtt, Harold E. Prof. Miinsterberg’s vocational tests.
(Jour. App. Psy­
chol., v. 1, No. 3, Sept., 1917, p. 201-213.)

A t the present time a research to devise tests for the selection of the
clerical force is being conducted at a manufacturing establishment,
by H. L. Harley. In the laboratory the following work is in prog­
ress: Experiments on the social factors in industrial work, by I. C.
Whittemore; methods o f testing personality, by Gordon A llport; a
problem of the selection of telegraphers, by Crawford Goldthwaite;
a series o f tests upon monotony and fatigue in industrial work, by
H. L. Harley.
HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL.

240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Mass. David L. Edsall, M. D.,
dean.
.v
D i v i s i o n of I n d u s t r i a l H y g i e n e .— In 1918 Harvard University
received funds with which to establish facilities for the training of
industrial medical personnel and for laboratory, clinical, and field
research in matters relating to the health of industrial workers. The
funds were largely contributed by New England manufacturing es­
tablishments and interested individuals. They are under the ad­
ministration o f the Governing Committee on Industrial Hygiene
(Wade Wright, M. D., secretary).
The courses offered in 1921-22 include applied physiology, in­
dustrial toxicology, industrial operation, nutrition, industrial psy­
chiatry, health administration, legal aspects o f industrial medical
practice, and methods of air analysis, given at Harvard Medical
School; industrial surgery and rontgenology, given at Boston City
Hospital; vital statistics and industrial sanitation, given at the
School o f Engineering, Harvard University (except the ventilation
portion o f the latter course which is given at Harvard Medical
School) ; industrial medicine, given at the Industrial Clinic, Massa­
chusetts General Hospital (see p. 117) and the office o f the Harvard
Mercantile Health Work (v. infra). They lead to the certificate in
public health in industrial hygiene (C. P. H .) o f the School of
Public Health o f Harvard University and the Massachusetts Insti­
tute o f Technology and to the doctorate in public health in industrial
hygiene (Dr. P. H .) or the Ph. D. in hygiene, conferred by Harvard
University. Detailed description o f the courses, requirements for
admission, etc., are given in a catalogue obtainable from the registrar
o f the division.
The laboratory research work conducted by the division includes
special investigations in industrial poisoning (viz, b}^ manganese,
lead, ether, tetrachlorethane, and trinitrotoluene), effects o f mineral
dusts and development of new apparatus for dust measurement in
the atmosphere, etc.
The occurrence, course, and prevention o f chronic manganese
poisoning were described by Drs. D. L. Edsall, F. P. Wilbur, and
C. K. Drinker in the Journal o f Industrial Hygiene (v. 1, No. 4,
August, 1919); experimental studies on manganese were published
by C. K. Pieman and Annie S'. Minot in Journal of Biological



UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

181

Chemistry (v. 42, No. 2, June, 1920, and, v. 45, No. 1, December,
1920) , and by C. K. Drinker, L. A. Shaw, and C. C. Lund in Journal
o f Experimental Medicine (v. 33, Nos. 1 and 2, January-February,
1921) .
Dr. Alice Hamilton has published in the Journal of Industrial
Hygiene a series of articles on industrial poisoning, v iz : By lead (v.
1, No. 1, May, 1919), inorganic poisons other than lead (v. 1, No. 2,
June, 1919), compounds of the aromatic series (v. 1, No. 4, August,
1919), ether in.the manufacture of smokeless powder (v. 2, No. 2,
June, 1920), trinitrotoluene (v. 3, No. 3, July, 1921) ; and a discus­
sion o f the etiology of so-called anilin tumors of the bladder (v. 3,
No. 1, May, 1921). Other contributions in this field by Dr. Hamil­
ton have been published by the United States Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics (see p. 20).
Other papers on industrial poisoning from the division, published
in the Journal of Industrial Hygiene, are: A study o f 50 workers in
trinitrotoluene, by T. J. Putnam and W. Herman (v. 1, No. 5, Sep­
tember, 1919); Blood examinations of trinitrotoluene workers, by
G. R. Minot (v. 1, No. 6, October, 1919) ; Tetrachlorethane poisoning
and its prevention, by D. C. Parmenter (v. 2, No. 12, April, 1921);
A survey o f carbon monoxide poisoning in American steel works,
metal mines, and coal mines, by II. S. Forbes (v. 3, No. 1, May, 1921).
Two papers on the phagocytosis of solid particles (quartz and
carbon) by W. O. Fenn appeared in the Journal of General Physi­
ology (v. 3, No. 4, March 20, 1921) and a third on the same subject
is in press. The results of the study of the question “ Does the mag­
netic field constitute an industrial hazard?” by C. K. Drinker and
R. M. Thomson, are published in the Journal o f Industrial Hygiene
(v. 3, No. 4, August, 1921). An article on headache as an occupa­
tional complaint, by S. Cobb and D. C. Parmenter, appeared in the
October, 1921, issue o f the same periodical.
A study of oil folliculitis has been made in the bacteriological labo­
ratories by C. G. Page and L. D. Bushnell (Jour. Indust. Hyg., v. 3,
No. 2, June, 1921, p. 6275).
In December, 1919, under a cooperative arrangement between this
division and a group of 25 merchants (19 in Boston, 6 in other cities),
an investigation of health conditions and the problems of health con­
servation in stores was begun. It is known as the H a r v a r d M e r c a n ­
t i l e H e a l t h W o r k (Arthur B. Emmons, 2d, M. D., director; office at
3 Joy Street, Boston, Mass.). Three reports by the director have
been published to date in the Journal o f Industrial Hygiene under
the title of “ Health in mercantile establishments” : I. The general
principles of store medical service (v. 2, No. 7, November, 1920) ; II.
Medical records (v. 2, No. 8, December, 1920) ; III. Common sanitary
defects in stores (v. 3, No. 1, May, 1921). A paper oil “ A work
chair,” by A. B. Emmons and J. E. Goldthwait, arising out of this
investigation, was published in the September, 1921, number o f the
same journal.
A printed list of the publications of the staff of the division, indi­
cating reprints available for distribution, may be obtained from the
secretary. It includes, in addition to the above, a number o f articles
dealing with industrial clinics and the study of occupational diseases
in hospitals and various other general topics in the field of industrial
hygiene.



III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

182

The Jouviml of Industrial Hygiene, under an international board
o f editors, American and ‘British, has been published monthly by this
division since May, 1919. It contains both original contributions in
industrial hygiene and abstracts of articles scattered through vari­
ous technical, trade, and professional journals.
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS.

Urbana, 111.
E d u c a t i o n a l R e s e a r c h .—B. R . Buckingham, director.
Established in July, 1918, to assist in the investigation of educa­
tional questions throughout the State. The work of its Division o f
Educational Tests and Measurements (Walter S. Monroe, assistant
director, in charge) includes (1) publication and purchase o f test
materials; (2) the preparation o f accessory material for the adminis­
tration and scoring of the tests; (3) distribution of these materials to
the schools; (4) derivation of new tests. A few group intelligence
scales are included within the scope of the material it distributes.
(See Bulletin No. 2, its first annual report, p. 67-70.) The report of
this division for 1919-20 forms Bulletin No. 5. It is expected that it
will be necessary in the near future to set up a division of intelligence
tests either within the bureau or in the Department o f Educational
Psychology or by some cooperative arrangement between the two.
“ Mental tests for school use,” by Charles E. Holley (91 p .), pub­
lished in 1920 as Bulletin No. 4, contains a comparison o f six group
scales, v iz : Otis group intelligence scale, Theisen-Fleming classifica­
tion test, W hipple’s group test for grammar grades, Pressey primer
scale, Virginia delta I (H aggerty), and Sentence vocabulary scale
(H olley).
The Journal o f Educational Research, which has been published
for the bureau since January, 1920, by the Public School Publishing
Co., Bloomington, 111., contains articles on intelligence tests and
scales. It is the official organ of the National Association of Direc­
tors of Educational Research.
B

u r e a u of

INDIANA UNIVERSITY.

Bloomington, Ind.
of ^ P s y c h o l o g y .— Harry D .
Kitson, professor of
psychology. The courses in this department relating to the indus­
trial applications o f psychology are as follows :
Psychological problems o f employment management (41A ), deal­
ing with the selection o f employees, measurement o f their efficiency,
devising just methods of promotion, making conditions favorable fo r
production, etc., second semester, two hours a week (Dr. Kitson).
Psychological methods in industry {48), a graduate course giving
particular attention to the measurement o f the productiveness o f em­
ployees, the reduction o f fatigue, efficiency methods, etc., second
semester, three hours a week (Dr. Kitson).
Psychological research in business and industrial psychology, em­
ployment management, personnel (Dr. Kitson).
The following papers dealing with subjects in this field have been
published by Dr. K itson:

D

epartm ent

Psychological tests and vocational guidance.
207-214, Mar., 1916.)
Interest as a criterion in vocational guidance.
Nov., 1916.)




(School Rev., v. 24, No. 3, p.
(Educ. Rev., v. 52, p. 349-356,

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES.

183

Psychological measurements of college students. (School and Society, *v. 0,
p. 307-311, Sept. 15, 1917.)
Comparison between two scales for the estimation of intelligence.
(Jour.
App. Psychol., Dec., 1919, p. 310-316.)
Vocational guidance and the theory of probability. (School Rev., v. 28, No. 2,
p. 143-150, Feb., 1920.)
Economic implications in the psychological doctrine of interest. (Jour. Pol.
Econ., v. 28, No. 4, p. 332-338, Apr., 1920.)
H ow to make employees interested in their jobs.
(Amer. Machinist, v. 52,
p. 483-485, May, 1920.)
Intelligence tests for college students.
(Chicago Schools Jour., v. 3, p. 1 6 7170, Feb., 1921.)
Employment managers as vocational counselors.
(Indust. Manag., v. 61, p.
211, Mar. 1, 1921.)
Scientific method in job analysis. (Jour. Pol. Econ., v. 29, No. 6, p. 508-514,
June, 1921.) [An investigation of certain psychological phases of proofreading,
including measurements of eye movements of good and poor proofreaders.]

Researche's in progress include: The measurements of the output of
hand compositors as affected by a particular form o f bonus; the cor­
relation between turnover and age.
Psychological research in mental and social measurements, under
Dr. S. L. Pressey, is mainly directed to public-school uses. Some o f
the tests devised may also be useful in employment psychology, e. g.,
Pressey X - 0 tests, discussed in the following papers:
Cross-out tests, with suggestions as to a group scale of the emotions, by S. L.
Pressey and L. W . Pressey. (Jour. App. Psychol., v. 3, p. 138-150, 1919.)
First revision of a group scale designed for investigating the emotions, by
S. L. Pressey and O. R. Chambers.
(Jour. App. Psychol., v. 4 r p. 97-104,
Mar., 1920.)
S c h o o l of E d u c a t i o n .-—Henry Lester Smith, dean.
For the past
seven years the School of Education has held annual conferences on
educational measurements (proceedings published as university bul­
letins). It maintains a Bureau of Cooperative Research in this field,
the purposes of which are (a) research, and (b) service, by making
easily accessible educational tests considered valuable to teachers.
D e p a r t m e n t o f V o c a t i o n a l E d u c a t i o n .—Edwin A. Lee, professor
of vocational education. This department offers, as a part of its
teacher-training program under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes
Act, a course in industrial relations. A syllabus of this course, by
DeWitt S. Morgan, o f Arsenal Technical Schools, Indianapolis, has
been published as Indiana University Bulletin (v. 18) No. 12, De­
cember, 1920. In addition to general topics in the economics of in­
dustry and labor legislation, the course covers also factors in indus­
trial efficiency; wages—methods of payment; problems o f employ­
ment—hiring, discharging, promoting,

STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOW A.

Iowa City, Iowa.
o f P h i l o s o p h y a n d P s y c h o l o g y .—This department
is at work on the following tests: (1) A test for the selection of
eighth-grade students possessing stenographic predispositions; (2)
a group test for the selection of clerical workers adapted to the em­
ployment departments which would maintain waiting lists and ex­
amine a large number o f applicants at one time; (3) a group test
for determining relative merit in elementary school teachers for city,
county, and State examinations; (4) preliminary work has been
started on a technique of measuring significant interests and tempera-

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III. N OK OFFICIAL AGENCIES.

mental and emotional aspects of successful business executives in con­
trast to unsuccessful business executives.
Prof. C. E. Seashore has published a number o f papers dealing
with measures o f musical talent and vocational and avocational
guidance in music.
Volume 8 o f the 4 University of Iowa studies in psychology,” now
4
in press (Psychological Monograph series), contains papers dealing
with standard procedures in rating and directing musical talent,
typewriting, and stenography tests, and special measures o f fitness.
C o l l e g e o f M e d i c i n e .— A study of 4 Health hazards in the pearl
4
button industry,” by E. G. Birge and L. C. Havens, made in the
Division o f Hygiene, Preventive Medicine, and Epidemiology, was
published in Journal of Industrial Hygiene (v. 2, No. 3, July, 1920,
p. 81-89). Certain studies in heating, lighting, and ventilating, with
special reference to school buildings, are in progress at the present
time.
An elective course on industrial hygiene (two hours a week) is
given in the second semester. The students are expected to make an
investigation and report on an assigned industrial condition.
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY.

Homewood, Baltimore, Md.
L a b o r a t o r y .— Knight Dunlap, professor o f experi­
mental psychology. Two courses on the methods and technique of
mental measurements and a course on their commercial and indus­
trial applications are given in this department by Prof. Buford J.
Johnson.
During 1919-20 research on problems of the psychological effects
o f tobacco smoking was conducted by Prof. Dunlap and others at the
request o f the American Committee for the Study of the Tobacco
Problem. In furtherance of this investigation it was necessary to
devise new apparatus and new forms of test material, which are
available for research on many other problems. These include the
4 omitted letter test,” 12 forms of which, of equal difficulty, have been
4
completed; and new apparatus for the graphic recording of attention
changes. Dr. L. W. Kline completed an investigation on the effects
o f inhibitions in the learning process.
P

s y c h o l o g ic a l

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY— School of Hygiene and Public Health.

3KU312 West Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. William H.
Welch, M. D., director.
Established June, 1916, with the aid of the Rockefeller Foundation
o f New Y ork; opened for instruction October, 1918. The main
objects o f the school are to establish courses for the training o f
qualified persons for public-health work, to promote investigative
work in hygiene and preventive medicine and provide opportunities
fo r the training of investigators in these subjects, and to develop
adequate means for the dissemination of sound hygienic knowledge.
Occupational diseases and vocational hygiene are included in the
scope o f its work.
D e p a r t m e n t o f P h y s i o l o g y .— The co u rses o f in s tr u c tio n in this
d e p a r t m e n t i n c lu d e :

1. The physiology of work and fatigue in industry (Dr. R. A.
Spaeth), dealing with the theoretical and experimental aspects o f




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES;

185

muscular and mental work and fatigue and practical problems, such
as the limitation of scientific management, length of the industrial
workday, night work, industrial accidents and fatigue, monotony
and incentives, the emotionally unstable, civilian shell-shock ana­
logues, standardization of industrial working conditions, physical
examination of workers, and the physical, physiological, and psy­
chological standardization of industrial workers by trades and proc­
esses (including laboratory training in tests and class visits and
surveys of local industries, with reports and seminar discussion).
2. The physiological action of light and other radiations (Dr.
Janet TI. Clark), including the subject of illumination in relation to
hygienic conditions o f lighting in factories, with investigation of
lighting conditions in local factories.
3. Respiration, ventilation, and climatology (Dr. A. L. Meyer),
including a study of the various types of ventilation employed in
factories, etc., and laboratory work on methods of air analysis and
use o f instruments applicable to the study of air conditions.
Some researches regarding the relation between susceptibility to
toxins and fatigue are in progress.
The following contributions to industrial hygiene have recently
been published:
The problem of fatigue, by R. A. Spaeth.
(Journal of Industrial Hygiene,
v. 1, No. 1, May, 1919, p. 2 2 -5 3 .) Bibliography, p. 42-53.
The prevention of fatigue in manufacturing industries, by R. A. Spaeth.
(Journal of Industrial Hygiene, v. 1, No. 9, Jan., 1920, p. 435-447.)
A method for determining the finer dust particles in air, by A. L. Meyer.
(Journal of Industrial Hygiene, v. 3, No. 2, June, 1921, p. 51-56.)

LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY.

Stanford University, Calif.
o f E d u c a t i o n .— Lewis M. Terman, professor.
The
principal contribution from this department is the “ Stanford re­
vision' ” of the Binet-Simon scale. A guide to its use and a compan­
ion volume o f source material have been issued, v iz :

D

epartm ent

Terman, L. M. The measurement of intelligence. Boston, Houghton, Mifflin,
1916. 362 p.
Terman, L. M., and others.
The Stanford revision and extension of the
Binet-Simon scale for measuring intelligence. Baltimore, W arwick and York,
1917. 179 p. (Educ. Psychol. Monog. No. 18.)

The following articles on intelligence tests have been published in
psychological journals:
Terman, L. M. A trial of mental and pedagogical tests in a civil-service ex­
amination for policemen and firemen. (Jour. App. Psychol., v. 1, No. 1, Mar.,
1917, p. 17-29.)
Terman, L. M., and Chamberlain,- Mary B. Twenty-three serial tests of in­
telligence and their intercorrelation.
(Jour. App. Psychol., v. 2, No. 4, Dec.,
1918, p. 341-354.)
Proctor, W . M. The use of psychological tests in the vocational guidance of
high-school pupils. (Jour. Educ. Research, v.«2, No. 2, Sept., 1920, p. 533-546.)

Prof. Terman conducts courses on intelligence tests and psychol­
ogy of endowment and a seminar on intelligence problems.
D e p a r t m e n t of ’ P h y s i o l o g y .— E. G. Martin, professor of phy­
siology. The following investigations in industrial physiology have
recently been completed in this laboratory:
Strength tests in industry, by E. G. Martin.
1920, Reprint No. 606.)




(U. S. Pub. Health Rep., Aug. 13,

III.

186

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

F a t ig u e a n d e fficien cy o f s m o k e r s in a s tr e n u o u s m e n ta l o c c u p a tio n , b y J. P .
B a u m b e r g e r a n d E . G . M a r t in .
(J o u r . I n d u s t. H y g ., O c t., 1 9 2 0 , v . 2, N o . 6 , p .
2 0 7 -2 1 4 .)
O u tp u t s tu d y o f u s e r s a n d n o n u se r s o f to b a c c o in a s tr e n u o u s p h y s ic a l oc cu ­
p a tio n , b y B a u m b e r g e r , P e r r y , a n d M a r t in .
*(Jour. I n d u s t. H y g ., M a y , 1 9 2 1 , v .
3 , N o . 1, p . 1 - 1 0 . )
F a t ig u e a n d e r r o r in a m e n ta l o c c u p a tio n , b y J. P . B a u m b e r g e r . (J o u r . I n d u s t.
H y g ., S e p t., 1 9 2 1 , v. 3, N o . 5, p. 1 4 9 -1 5 3 .)

Researches are in progress on the following subjects: Fatigue and
working capacity as affected by alternating operations, rest periods,
and pride o f craftsmanship; tolerances in the glass-bottle trade in
relation to Weber’s law and visual judgments of size; output studies
o f shipyard riveters.
M A S S A C H U S E T T S INSTITUTE O F T E C H N O L O G Y .

Cambridge, Mass.
A cooperative course (Y I - A ) in electrical engineering has been
arranged between the institute and the General Electric Co. at West
Lynn, Mass. The course covers a total of five years, the first two be­
ing identical with the regular course in electrical engineering (course
V I) at the institute, the last three being divided between instruction
in theory at the institute and instruction in practice at the Lynn
works. The latter is supervised by a joint committee representing
both the institute and the company. The class is divided into two
sections which exchange places at the end of each period, of approxi­
mately three months, into which the time occupied by the cooperative
training is divided. Further details are given in a special bulletin of
the institute.
,
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.

Ann Arbor, Mich.
o f E c o n o m i c s / —Course 34 on employment manage­
ment and an advanced course 34& following it are given by Asst. Prof.
C. C. Edmonds. The following subjects are being developed by sev­
eral students in seminar during the academic year, 1920-21: Sources
o f supply o f labor; selecting unskilled labor; illiterate and nonEnglish speaking labor; the personnel department and the wage ques­
tion.
D e p a r t m e n t o f E d u c a t i o n . —Under the direction o f the professor
o f industrial education (Geo. E. Myers) courses have been conducted
in Grand Rapids for training o f foremen. A brief outline o f the
course is given in the report of Committee on Foremanship Training
*)f the National Association o f Corporation Training. (See p. 118.)
B u r e a u o f M e n t a l T e s t s a n d M e a s u r e m e n t s .— Guy M. Whipple,
director. The work o f this bureau in the department o f education has
consisted o f studies o f the intelligence o f students who are failing in
their university work. The director is the author o f “ Manual o f
mental and physical tests” (2d eel., Baltimore, 1914-15, 2 vols.).

D

e par tm en t

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA.

Minneapolis, Minn.
D

ep a r tm e n t

of

E

d u c a t io n a l

P

sych olog y

(C

ollege

of

E

d u ca

­

M. E . Haggerty, head o f department and dean o f the college
o f education. A study on the relation o f intelligence to the learning
o f telegraphy by Miss Margaretta Weber is in progress.

t io n

) .—




U N IV E R S IT IE S A N D

D

ep a r tm e n t

or

P

sych o lo g y

{C

187

COLLEGES.

ollege:of

S

c ie n c e

, L

it e r a t u r e

,

an d

M. Elliott, professor. This department has
just been reorganized and now includes for the first time a part-time
instructor in industrial psychology.
S c h o o l o f B u s i n e s s .— A program of two years’ work offering basic
training to (1) prospective heads o f personnel in business establish­
ments, and (2) to persons who expect to participate as trained experts
in the adjustment o f matters pertaining to the employment o f labor,
is outlined in the bulletin o f the university containing the announce­
ment o f the School o f Business. This includes two quarter courses on
industrial relations in the department of economics, by Dr. Z. C.
Dickinson, and a course on employment psychology in the department
o f psychology, by Dr. J. J. B. Morgan. The first quarter’s work in
industrial relations, intended also for students of the liberal arts col­
lege, covers the broader problems of labor policy, from the standpoint
o f management; the second course deals specifically with employment
and personnel management; both include study o f practice in repre­
sentative establishments and written reports thereon. The course in
employment psychology includes standardization of the personal
interview, the principles and development of tests, and personnel
classification; and independent investigations are required of each
student.

t h e

A

r ts

) . — Richard

N E W S C H O O L F O R SOCIAL RESEARCH.

465 West Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y.
Courses in employment administration were given during 19181920 by the Bureau o f Industrial Research (see p. 87) in affiliation
with the New School of Social Research. These were designed to
provide professional training in this field, but were discontinued
in 1920.
During the session 1920-21 a course in “ problems o f industrial rela­
tions ” was given at the New School by Mr. Ordway Tead, devoted to
research and critical analysis into the methods o f administering the
relations between management and men in industry.
An advanced course on problems of American labor, intended to
meet the needs of persons engaged in labor work or carrying on
research in the fie]d, is among those announced to be given by Dr.
Leo Wolman in 1921-22. Wage adjustment, systems o f industrial
relations, workers’ control, and trade-union policy are among the
topics to be dealt with.
In April, 1921, the first national conference on workers’ education
in the United States was held at the school by labor representatives
and teachers in that field; and as a result o f this conference, the W ork­
ers’ Educational Bureau of America was organized, with headquarters
at the school.
N E W Y O R K S C H O O L OF SOCIAL W O R K .

'105 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y.
e p a r t m e n t o f I n d u s t r y .— The objectives of this department are
(1) to provide vocational training for direct service in this field, (2)
to make available such facts and sources o f information concerning
it as should be a part of the equipment of every intelligent social
worker. The courses are conducted by John A. Fitch and Ordway
Tead and include (27) psychology in industry; (121-122) principles
D




188

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

and practice of personnel administration. The latter includes field
work in the employment departments o f factories and stores in the
vicinity. A study o f one o f the building trades-unions in New York
City and a study o f the place where personnel policy is decided upon
in a selected group of corporations have recently been made.
N E W Y O R K UNIVERSITY.

Washington Square, New York, N. Y.
of C o m m er ce, A cco u n ts, a n d
F i n a n c e . —In the Depart­
ment o f Business Management a course on labor and employment
management (37-38) is given by J. D. Hackett, Thursday evenings,
first and second terms, designed especially for the employees of pro­
gressive concerns who wish to learn the methods which have proved
successful in the most advanced plants of the country. In the
seminar on management (101-102) by Prof. Galloway and others,
special investigations by students and faculty .on various manage­
ment problems are discussed. During 1920-21 these included (1)
working out o f a bonus system in a large office, (2) lowering of labor
turnover in factories.
Courses are also given in the principles and methods of training
employees (35-36), industrial lunchroom management (39) and pre­
vention and first aid for the industrial worker (40).
T r a i n i n g S c h o o l f o r T e a c h e r s o f B e t a i l S e l l i n g .— Norris A.
Brisco, director. This school, recently established, prepares college
graduates and others with equivalent general ability, who have passed
satisfactorily a personality test, for positions as teachers of salesman­
ship in high schools or directors of training for department stores
and for other managerial positions in retail stores. The general
policy is determined by a committee o f six merchants, three university
and two public-school representatives. The so-called New York plan
adopted is a two-year course, one-half the day being given to study
and lectures, the other half to practical training in the stores. W ork­
ing fellowships from $700 to $1,000 are provided; and a special
coordinator devotes his time to investigation of store work for the
guidance o f the students. Instruction is given in retail salesmanship,
methods o f training, store organization, employment management,
tests, ratings, and personnel problems, and in textiles, nontextiles,
color and design. Each student prepares a written thesis from his
observations and a study o f some particular activity during his prac­
tical training period.

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chool

N O R T H W E S T E R N UNIVERSITY.

Evanston, 111.

Walter Dill Scott, president.
, 31 Lake Street., Chicago, 111.— Courses o f
instruction for employment managers, educational directors, labor
managers, safety engineers, welfare directors, and others interested
in employment and personnel problems are given in the evenings and
on Saturday afternoons. They include: Employment managenfent
(second semester, Tuesday evenings), by Prof. Dutton and special lec­
turers, dealing with methods and technique; Personnel management
(each semester, Saturday afternoons), by Mrs. Mary H. S. Hayes, in
which the selection and handling o f men is discussed from the basis
o f fundamental theory and emphasis is placed on aims and principles
rather than on technique; Vocational and employment psychology
(each semester, Monday evenings), by Prof. Webb.
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of

C




o m m erce

U N IV E R S IT IE S A N D

COLLEGES.

189

The Bureau of Business Research, which is an integral part of the
school, conducts investigations regarding business principles and
practice and provides research opportunities for graduate students.
It has recently completed a survey of industrial and personnel prob­
lems connected with the book and job printing industry in Chicago:
B abcock, F . M .
A p p r e n tic e s h ip a n d la b o r r e c r u itin g , b o o k a n d jo b p r in t in g
in d u stry * C h ic a g o , 111. 1 9 2 1 .

OHIO S TATE UNIVERSITY.

Columbus, Ohio.
o f P s y c h o l o g y . — Rudolph Pintner, professor of psy­
chology. The following studies in the field of personnel research have
been published by members of this department:

D

epar tm en t

P in tn e r , R ., a n d T o o p s, H . A .
M e n ta l te sts o f u n e m p lo y e d m e n .
(J o u r . A p p .
P s y c h o l., v . 1, N o . 4, D e c ., 1 9 1 7 , p. 3 2 5 - 3 4 1 ; v . 2 , N o . 1 , M a r ., 1 9 1 8 , p . 1 5 - 2 5 .)
T o o p s, H . A ., a n d P in tn e r , R .
V a r ia b ilit y o f th e e d u c a tio n o f u n e m p lo y e d
m en.
(J o u r . A p p . P s y c h o l., v . 2 , N o . 3, S e p t., 1 9 1 8 , p . 2 0 7 - 2 1 8 .)
-------- E d u c a tio n a l d iffe re n c e s a m o n g tr a d e sm e n .
(J o u r . A p p . P s y c h o l., v . 3,
N o . 1, M a r ., 1 9 1 9 , p. 3 3 - 4 9 .)
B u r t t , H a r o ld E .
E m p lo y m e n t p s y c h o lo g y in th e ru b b e r in d u s tr y .
(J o u r .
A p p . P s y c h o l., v. 4 , N o . 1, M a r ., 1 9 2 0 , p. 1 - 1 7 .)

The above studies of unemployed were made among persons regis­
tering in the Ohio free employment offices.
An investigation o f vocational tests for agricultural engineers, by
Dr. H. E. Burtt, is in progress.
Dr. Burtt is giving courses in industrial psychology and is plan­
ning to start a laboratory course in 1921-22 which will take the
students out into the factories and business houses in Columbus in
order to get practical experience in the field.
D e p a r t m e n t o f P u b l i c H e a l t h a n d S a n i t a t i o n .— Dr. Emery R.
Hayhurst, professor of hygiene and head of department. Beginning
with the academic year 1921-22, a special course in industrial medi­
cine is offered under the administration of this department, to pre­
pare recent graduates in medicine,, both men and women, to become
medical directors and supervisors m industrial and mercantile estab­
lishments, and providing an interneship on a part-time basis in in­
dustrial w0rk. For the first year the number of students is limited
T
to five, to assure their satisfactory placements for practical experi­
ence in the industries of Columbus. In addition to hygiene and sani­
tation as applied to industry, the economic placement of physically
or mentally handicapped workers and the industrial rehabilitation
of those suffering from all forms of temporary disablements are spe­
cial features of this course.
P E N N S Y L V A N I A STATE COLLEGE.

State College, Pa.
E x p e r i m e n t S t a t i o n . — Grain-dust explosion experi­
ments have been conducted here in cooperation with the Bureau of
Chemistry, United States Department o f Agriculture. (See p. 25.)
E

n g in e e r in g

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

Philadelphia, Pa.
o f P u b l i c H y g i e n e . —A. C. Abbott, M. D., director.
The
Industrial Hygiene Department of this school has conducted or
collaborated in the following investigations:
(a) Completed and results published:

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190

JH .

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

A survey o f the cigar-making industry in Philadelphia, made in
collaboration with the Clinic for Diseases of Occupation, University
Hospital, for the Pennsylvania State Department of Labor; results
published in—
S m y th , H . F ., a n d M ille r , T . G r ie r .
A h y g ie n ic s u r v e y o f c ig a r m a n u fa c tu r in g
in P h ila d e lp h ia .
(M e d ic in e a n d S u r g e r y , S e p t., 1 9 1 7 , p. 6 9 8 - 7 1 8 .)
M ille r , T . G ., a n d S m y th , H . F .
T h e h e a lth h a z a r d s o f c ig a r m a n u fa c tu r in g .
( P e n n a . M e d . J o u r., M a r ., 1 9 1 8 , v . 2 1 , p. 3 6 0 -3 6 4 .)

Field and laboratory studies of dust conditions in various indus­
tries, in collaboration with the Clinic for Diseases of Occupation,
University Hospital, published in—
S m y th , H . F ., a n d M ille r , T . G .
A p r e lim in a r y r e p o r t on d u s t s tu d ie s in
v a r io u s in d u s tr ie s .
( P e n n a . M e d . J o u r., M a r ., 1 9 1 8 , v . 2 1 , p. 3 6 4 - 3 6 7 .)
M ille r , T . G ., a n d S m y th , H . F .
T h e d u s t h a z a r d in c e r ta in in d u s tr ie s .
(J o u r . A m e r . M e d . A s s o c ., M a r . 2, 1 9 1 8 , v. 7 0, p. 5 9 9 - 6 0 4 .)
S m y th , H . F .
S u g g e s te d m o d ific a tio n s o f th e s ta n d a r d m e th o d f o r th e s tu d y
o f th e d u s t c o n te n t o f a i r .
( A m e r . J o u r. P u b . H e a lt h , O c t., 1 9 1 8 , v . 8, p. 7 6 9 7 7 1 .)
S m y th , H . F ., a n d I s z a r d , M ir ia m S. T h e p ra c tic a l h y g ie n ic e fficien cy o f th e
P a lm e r a p p a r a tu s f o r d e t e r m in in g d u s t in a i r .
( J o u r . I n d u s t. H y g ., v. 3 , N o .
5, S e p t., 1 9 2 1 , p. 1 5 9 - 1 6 7 .)

Field and laboratory investigations on the detection and estima­
tion o f anilin fume in the air o f departments of an anilin and inter­
mediate products plant, published in—
I s z a r d , M ir ia m S .
D e te r m in a t io n o f a n ilin v a p o r s in th e a ir .
( J o u r . I n d u s t.
H y g ., v. 2, N o . 7, N o v ., 1 9 2 0 , p. 2 5 0 - 2 6 6 .)
-------E s t im a t io n o f to x ic w a te r s o lu b le d u s t w it h th e P a lm e r a p p a r a tu s .
( I d e m , v . 2 , N o . 9 , J a n ., 1 9 2 1 , p. 3 4 4 - 3 4 7 .)

A survey and study of the anthrax problem in the horsehair-dress­
ing industry in Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Division of
Hygiene and Engineering, Pennsylvania State Department of L abor;
results published in—
S m y th , H . F .
T h e a n t h r a x p ro b le m
2, N o . 11, M a r ., 1 9 2 1 , p. 4 2 3 -4 3 2 .)

in h o r s e h a ir .

( J o u r . I n d u s t. H y g ., v .

( i ) Completed but results not as yet published:
investigations of COs and CO content of air in various depart­
ments o f a felt-hat factory; survey o f women in industry in Phila­
delphia after the war (master’s thesis) ; inspection of an organic
color mixing plant for the Philadelphia Department of Health.
In collaboration with the Clinic for Diseases o f Occupation^ Uni­
versity H ospital: Investigation of the cause of and prevention o f out­
breaks o f oil grinder’s furunculosis in a steel ball-bearing factory;
physical examinations, sputum examinations, and X-rays o f the
lungs of workers in stove foundries.
(c) In progress:
Study o f the Schattenfroh and other methods of disinfecting hides
for anthrax; laboratory studies on the fate-and effects of various
industrial dusts inhaled by animals.
(d) Planned for the immediate future:
Studies on the relative resistance to tubercular and other affec­
tions o f animals exposed to various industrial dusts.
In collaboration with the Henry Phipps Institute, Philadelphia:
Surveys of industrial hygiene conditions in various industries in
conjunction with physical examinations o f employees.




U N IV E R S IT IE S A N D

COLLEGES.

191

In addition to the above research work, the public health students
make weekly inspection trips during the second semester to various
industrial establishments, during which trips advice and criticism is
often asked for by plant officials and gladly given by the department
representatives.
H E N R Y PHIPPS INSTITUTE F O R T H E STUDY, TREATMENT, A N D
P R E V E N T I O N O F TUBERCULOSIS.

Seventh and Lombard Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. H. K. M.
Landis, M. D., director o f Clinical and Sociological Depart­
ments.
This institute, established in 1903 and supported up to May, 1919,
entirely by funds donated by Mr. Henry Phipps, is said to be the
first organization brought into existence for the express purpose of
eradicating tuberculosis through intensive and scientific research.
Since July 1, 1910, it has been under the supervision o f the board o f
trustees o f the University of Pennsylvania.
Three industrial hygiene studies made under its auspices have been
published, v iz :
F a c t o r s a ffe c tin g th e h e a lth o f g a r m e n t m a k e r s .
B y H . R . M . L a n d is a n d
J a n ic e S. R e e d .
(8 t ji r e p o r t o f t h e H e n r y P h ip p s I n s tit u te .
P h ila d e lp h ia ,
1915.
1 0 4 p .)
A R o n tg e n o lo g ic a l s tu d y o f th e e ffe c ts o f d u s t in h a la tio n u p o n th e lu n g s .
B y H . K . P a n c o a s t , T . G . M ille r , a n d H . R . M . L a n d is .
( A m . J o u r , o f R o e n t­
g e n o lo g y , v. 5 , N o . 3 , M a r ., 1 9 1 8 , p. 1 2 9 -1 3 8 .)
T h e p a th o lo g ic a l a n d c lin ic a l m a n ife s t a t io n s f o llo w in g th e in h a la tio n o f
d u st.
B y H . R . M . L a n d is .
( J o u r . I n d u s t. H y g ., y . 1 , N o . 3 , J u ly , 1 9 1 9 , p .
1 1 7 - 1 3 9 .)

A survey o f policemen and firemen in Philadelphia has recently
been completed, but the data obtained is not yet ready for publica­
tion.
W H A R T O N SCHOOL OF FINANCE A N D COMMERCE.

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.
One o f the three-year courses o f study in this school covers the
field o f labor management (P rof. J. H. Willits, adviser). In the
senior year this includes the following courses (each two hours,
both terms) in the department o f geography and industry: 9, Field
work in industry (inspection o f management problems in manufac­
turing establishments); 10, Industrial relations and employment
management; 11, Research in management (an intensive study o f a
management problem o f a specific industrial plant in the Philadel­
phia d istrict); 12, Industrial policy.
D e p a r t m e n t o f I n d u s t r i a l R e s e a r c h . —Joseph H. Willits, di­
rector. Established at the Wharton School o f Finance and Com­
merce early in 1921, the purpose of this department is to “ apply the
methods o f thorough scientific research to various fundamental prob­
lems in industry, such as industrial relations, so that human well­
being, and especially the more general distribution o f human well­
being, may be increased, and to provide a bureau to which the various
elements o f the industrial community may turn for scientific research
on industrial problems.” The University o f Pennsylvania, American
Academy o f Political and Social Science, Pennsylvania Department
of Labor and Industry, Philadelphia Association for the Discussion
o f Employment Problems, and 15 firms representing the machine,




192

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L A G E N C IE S .

textile, transportation, and publishing industries have agreed to co­
operate in its establishment and support. The Carnegie Corporation
o f New York has granted $50,000 per annum for five years on the
condition, which has been met, that $10,000 is contributed locally.
The funds will be administered by the trustees o f the university.
Eesearch conducted w ill follow the cooperative method, the per­
T
sonnel o f the firms cooperating being available for laboratory pur­
poses. The tentative program o f subjects to be studied covers (a)
industrial education and training (including foremen’s courses, job
analyses from standpoint o f teachable content) ; (b) selection and
guidance (including psychological and trade tests) ; (c) stabiliza­
tion o f work and workers (steadying o f production, unemployment
funds, studies of turnover and absenteeism) ; ( d) physiological prob­
lems (fatigue, results o f medical and health work in terms o f sta­
bility and productivity) ; (e) wages, standards, and cost of living;
( / ) plant relations with the community (public employment bu­
reaus, public schools, State labor department). The installation o f
uniform records to secure comparable information from the cooperat­
ing concerns is to be undertaken immediately and a special evening
training course in personnel work is to be given for employees se­
lected by the cooperating firms.
Three investigations are in progress: (1 )A study in foreman
training, undertaken at the request of the Philadelphia Association
for the Discussion of Employment Problems, to evaluate the results
o f the 20-week course for foremen given by that association, by in­
terviews with a considerable number o f the 700 foremen who took
the course; (2) a study of plant publications; (3) a study o f the
causes o f leaving, being made cooperatively with a group o f con­
cerns which regularly report their “ leaves ” to the department.
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH.

Bigelow Boulevard, Pittsburgh, Pa.
of
E c o n o m i c s .— A course on personnel administration,
two hours each week throughout the year, is given by Mr. B. F.
Ashe, employment manager for the American Zinc & Chemical
Co., Langeloth, Pa.
S c h o o l o f E n g i n e e r i n g .— F. L. Bishop, dean.
The cooperative
plan o f engineering education, which has been in operation in this
school since 1911, is described in a special issue o f the university bul­
letin. The freshman year, the summer term following, the sophomore
year, and the senior year are spent entirely in school; the intervening
terms o f the sophomore and junior years are spent alternately in the
school and in the cooperative work in engineering industries o f the
Pittsburgh district, each class being divided into two sections for
this purpose.
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chool

PRINCE S C H O O L O F E D U C A T I O N F O R STORE SERVICE.

66 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Mrs. Lucinda Wyman Prince,
director.
Established in 1905 as the School o f Salesmanship at the Women’s
Educational and Industrial Union in Boston (see p. 163); in 1918 the
school moved into quarters o f its own and the present name was
adopted. Its original object was to provide training for saleswomen
in department stores. The chief purpose o f the school now is to train




U N IV E R S IT IE S A N D

C OLLEGES.

193

personnel executives— educational directors, employment managers,
superintendents— for stores and, to an increasing extent, for fac­
tories. It is affiliated with Simmons College, and the National Re­
tail Dry Goods Association (see p. 133) and the Boston merchants
have cooperated in its support. A history of this school, together
with an account o f the training methods developed, under the title
“ Department store education,” by Helen Rich Norton has been pub­
lished by United States Bureau o f Education as its Bulletin (1917)
No. 9.
The director o f the school is the author o f Bulletin No. 22 (Com­
mercial Education Series No. 1), “ Retail selling” (103 p .), issued by
the Federal Board for Vocational Education in 1919.
P r i n c e A l u m n a e A s s o c i a t i o n holds its annual meeting at the same
time as the National Retail Dry Goods Association. Sessions are de­
voted to the presentation and discussion of educational, employment
and research work in stores and to the work of teachers of retail
selling in the public schools. Its publication The Prince Alumnm
News contains papers on department store personnel work.
PR I N C E T O N UNIVERSITY.

Princeton, N. J.
L a b o r a t o r y .— H. C. McComas, director.
The con­
tributions from this laboratory include the following monographs
on mental tests:
P

s y c h o l o g ic a l

B r ig h a m , C . C.
T w o stu d ie s in m e n ta l t e s t s : I. V a r ia b le f a c t o r s in th e
B in e t te s ts .
I I . T h e d ia g n o s tic v a lu e o f so m e m e n ta l te s ts .
1917.
2 5 4 p.
( P s y c h o l. M o n o g r a p h s , v. 2 4 , N o . 1, w h o le N o . 1 0 2 .)
D o ll, E . A .
T h e g r o w th o f in te llig e n c e .
1921.
1 3 0 p.
(P s y c h o l. M o n o ­
g r a p h s , v . 2 9 , N o . 2, w h o le N o . 1 3 1 .)

A study in tests of mechanical ingenuity, by S. W. Prince, has been
completed recently but is not yet published.
P U R D U E U N IV E R S IT Y .

Lafayette, Ind.
o f M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g .— George H. Shepard, pro­
fessor of industrial engineering and management, is conducting tests
to obtain quantitative data on the relation between rest periods dur­
ing working hours in industry and production or output. A pre­
liminary report on this year’s tests was presented at the spring meet­
ing, 1921, o f the Society of Industrial Engineers; a final report is
to be published in Industrial Management in the fall of 1921. It is
expected that these tests will be continued from year to year as a
regular feature of the work in industrial management at Purdue
University.

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chool

S I M M O N S COLLEGE.

Boston, Mass.
o f P s y c h o l o g y .— In 1920 Dr. A. A. Roback, special
instructor in psychology, prepared a1 set of 12 tests for a general
intelligence examination of the students of the college, which has
been printed under the title “ Roback mentality tests for superior
adults.” A report on this examination is published in The Simmons
College, Review (v. 3, No. 8, June, 1921, p. 313-318) .
S c h o o l o f S o c i a l W o r k .— During the past year the class in social
inquiry, under the direction of Miss Lucile Eaves, made a study

D

ep a r tm e n t

7 0 7 2 3 ° — B u ll. 2 9 9 — 2 1 ------- 1 3




194

III.

N O N O F F IC IA L

A G E N C IE S .

dealing with the employment of handicapped women. One thousand
case records from the Bureau for the Handicapped, maintained by
the Women’s Educational and Industrial Union, were tabulated.
The results o f the investigation have been published by the Union,
with five other studies made by students in this school under the title
“ Gainful employment for handicapped women” (32 p.).
In the previous year students in this class copied and tabulated the
records o f one thousand industrial accidents to wage-earning chil­
dren 14 and 15 years o f age reported to the Massachusetts Industrial
Accident Board, 1918-19. The results of this study were published
in The American Child (v. 2, No. 3, November, 1920, p. 222-232) and
also as a separate pamphlet by the Women’s Educational and Indus­
trial Union.
SMITH COLLEGE.

Northampton, Mass.
S c h o o l f o r S o c i a l W o r k . —Prof. F. Stuart Chapin,
director. A graduate professional school offering training courses
in psychiatric social work, medical social work, and community serv­
ice. It originated as an emergency training course in psychiatric
social work estab1* 1 1 ’
1
mthorities of Smith College
under the auspices of the
and the Boston
National Commit_____
____
_ 32 (see p. 122) primarily to
_ 8
provide a supply of specially trained social workers to deal with
mental and nervous cases among returned soldiers.
The duration of the course is now 14 months, in three divisions—
a summer session of eight weeks of theoretical instruction, combined
with clinical observation, at Smith College; a training period of
nine months’ practical instruction carried on in cooperation with
hospitals and settlements (during 1920-21 in Boston, Cincinnati^
Minneapolis, New York, and Philadelphia), and a concluding sum­
mer session o f eight weeks of advanced study. In the belief that the
social worker with psychiatric experience will be of particular value
in industrial personnel work, a beginning has been made in adapting
the course to provide special preparation for the industrial field. It
includes courses on social psychology, mental tests, case work, in­
dustrial problems, and social psychiatry. Details are given in Bulle­
tin of Smith College Training School for Social Work, 1921-22.
The second session’s work includes the preparation and writing of
a thesis. The following are among the thesis subjects of the students
completing the course in August, 1921: Two studies o f the results
o f vocational training under the Federal Board for Vocational Edu­
cation (1) in 25 cases o f dementia prsecox (or epilepsy), (2) in 25
cases o f constitutional psychopathic inferiority; the epileptic in
industry— a study of 25 cases from Monson State Hospital and
Boston Psychopathic Hospital out-patient department; a compari­
son of employment of neuro-circulatory asthenia patients before and
after military service; investigation o f all cases in training in Minne­
apolis and St. Paul, classified according to type o f mental disorder,
vocational training, previous training, etc.; the social and economic
problems o f 25 cases o f epilepsy.
T

r a in in g

2 S e e also this committee’s Reprints Nos. 35 and 46 from Mental Hygiene, v. 2. No. 4,
8
p. 582-593, Oct. 1918 ; v. 3, No. 1, p. 59-64, Jan. 1919.




U N IV E R S IT IE S A N D

C O LLEGES.

195

UNIVERSITY O F S O U T H E R N CALIFORNIA.

Thirty-fifth and University Avenues, Los Angeles, Calif.
o f C o m m e r c e a n d B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . —A course
o f lectures and discussions on employment management is given by
Prof. H. J. Stonier with the cooperation of the Employment Man­
agers’ Association of Los Angeles, by which a supervisor of employ­
ment in some large business firm in the city lectures each week before
the class (two units, throughout the year). A mimeographed outline
o f the course is available for distribution. A course on industrial
management (including the efficiency movement, selecting and train­
ing help, and training of future executives) is given by Mr. Clayton
Bogers in the second semester (two units).
C

ollege

S Y R A C U S E UNIVERSITY.

Syracuse, N. Y.
B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . — J. Herman Wharton, dean.
The courses of instruction in this school dealing with personnel mat­
ters are: Psychology of personnel management and Applied psy­
chology: mental and social measurements, by Prof. M. A. May (Busi­
ness psychology 4 and 5, each three hours, first semester) ; Employ­
ment and personnel management, by Dr. H. H. S. Aimes (three hours,
second semester) ; Industrial hygiene, by Dr. F. W. Sears (Business
administration 7, two hours, first semester).
S

ch o o l of

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS.

Austin, Tex.
o f P s y c h o l o g y . —Thomas B. Garth, professor.
Spe­
cial studies have been made in this department on mental fatigue and
racial differences:

D

epar tm en t

G a r th , T h o m a s R .
R a c ia l d iffe re n c e s in m e n ta l fa tig u e .
(J o u r . A p p . P s y c h o l.,
v. 4 , N o s . 2 - 3 , J u n e -S e p t ., 1 9 2 0 , p. 2 3 5 -2 4 4 .)
-------T h e r e s u lts o f so m e te s ts on fu ll a n d m ix e d b lo o d I n d ia n s .
(P s y c h o l.
B u ll., v. 18, N o . 2, F e b ., 1 9 2 1 , p. 9 4 - 9 5 .)

UNIVERSITY O F W A S H I N G T O N .

Seattle, Wash.
e p a r t m e n t o f P s y c h o l o g y . — Stevenson Smith, head of depart­
ment. This department has standardized two sets of general intel­
ligence tests and is at present engaged in testing students of the
university with a new form of group test. This material has not yet
been published.

D

W A S H I N G T O N UNIVERSITY.

St. Louis, Mo.
of
C ommerce an d
F i n a n c e . — Course 60, Employment
problems, given by Prof. G. W. Stephens (three hours a week, second
semester), deals principally with the various wage systems, selection
o f employees, records of employees, welfare and betterment work.

S

chool

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN.

Madison, Wis.
o f C o m m e r c i a l a n d I n d u s t r i a l E e l a t i o n s . —Willis Wisler, chief. This bureau, established 1920 in the University Extension
Division, aims to furnish three types of service:

B

u r eau

1. A c e n tr a l lib r a r y a n d re se a r c h la b o r a to r y to s e rv e a s a p r a c tic a l c le a r in g
h o u se f o r th e b e st p r a c tic e s in th e field o f in d u s tr ia l a n d c o m m e r c ia l r e la tio n s .




196

TI I .

N O N O F F IC IA L A G E N C IE S .

2. A monthly bulletin service on timely and fundamental topics, mechanically
arranged to admit of convenient filing and indexing.
3. A consulting service where other professional services are not available.

From time to time special bulletins will be prepared along lines
indicated by the interest and inquiries of employers and employees.
This service is intended for the entire public affected by industrial
and commercial relations and of necessity must confine itself to
legitimately informational and educational treatments of problems
presented to it for aid or solution. In conjunction with several de­
partments of the university a plan is being worked out for detailing,
by special arrangement, advanced students to special projects in
industrial units, working under the close supervision o f their depart­
ments and of this bureau.
A series o f circulars (mimeographed) has been issued, 1920-21, as
follow s:
No. 1, Explanation of plan (2 p .). No. 2, A labor policy and the labor audit
(13 p .). Special No. 2 -A , A labor audit— specimen report (14 p .). No. 3, The
cycle of employment (10 p .). Nos. 3 -A , 3 -B , Employment forms and routine
(13, 6 p .). No. 3-C , Employment forms and routine for the small plant (5 p .).
No. 4, Job analysis (15 p .). No. 5, Absenteeism (7 p .). No. 5 -A , Absentee;
forms and routine (11 p .). No. 6, Plant organs (7 p .). No. 7, Practical methods
for selecting employees (9 p .). No. 8, Wages, earnings, and incentives (13 p .).
No. 8 -A , Audit of a gain-sharing wage plan (7 p .). No. 10-A , Industrial rep­
resentation plans in open-shop plants (13 p .).
No. 9, Industrial housing, is in preparation.
D e p a r t m e n t o f E c o n o m i c s . — John R. Commons, professor of eco­
nomics. A two-semester course of instruction in labor management
(Economics 149) is given in this department by Mr. Wisler, in which
the actual problems coming into the above bureau are used as labora­
tory material. As far as possible, the theses are prepared for use by
the Bureau o f Commercial and Industrial Relations in its services to
employers or labor unions; and each student is looked to for expert
advice on the topics within the range of his thesis subject. In the
second semester the employment practices of a variety of firms are
analyzed and reported on by members of the class; and each par­
ticular system is tried out in class, the student to whom it is assigned
acting as labor manager, with others impersonating various types of
applicants. A prerequisite course on employment management (E co­
nomics 171) is given by Mr. D. D. Leseohier.
The research course, conducted b^ Prof. Commons with other in­
structors in the department, is divided into four sections: (a) Labor
legislation, ( b) Labor history and industrial government, (c) Un­
employment, causes and remedies, (d) Labor management. Doctoral
dissertations in 1921 included Government in industry (O. F. Carpen­
te r),Collective bargaining in the men’s ready-made clothing indus­
try (Jean Davis), Collective bargaining in the book and job printing
industry (Ethel B. Dietrich), Wage measurement and the manage­
ment of labor (A. P. Haake) ; for 1922, Employee participation in
management of industry (H. H. Smith) and The labor union and
production (Mrs. Glenn Turner) are announced. In 1921 the Mac­
millan Co., New "York, published a volume entitled “ Industrial
government” (425 p .), by Prof. Commons and others in the depart­
ment, containing the results o f field investigations o f 18 experiments
studied July-September, 1919.
D e p a r t m e n t o f E d u c a t i o n . — Y. A. C. Henmon, director. A study

on testing vocational aptitude for typesetting (compositors) by Prof.



U N IV E R S IT IE S - A N D

COLLEGES.

197

M. Y. O’Shea is in progress. Prof. Henmon is cooperating with Mr.
Ruggles of the Wisconsin Civil Service Commission in devising a set
of tests for aptitude as junior clerks. He is also completing the
statistical work on his set of aptitude tests for aviators (published
in Jour. App. Psychol., v. 3, No. 2, June, 1919, p. 103-109). Work
on the problem of a team of tests for measuring physical efficiency
is also in progress.
P s y c h o l o g i c a l L a b o r a t o r y .— Clark L . Hull, director.
W ork on
the following problems in personnel research is in progress is this
laboratory: (1) To determine aptitude for learning lathe work
(steel)— in cooperation with the course in engineering shop prac­
tice; (2) to determine aptitude for learning to operate knitting ma­
chines— in cooperation with a large hosiery company (this will prob­
ably be published in the Journal of Applied Psychology when com­
pleted) ; (3) to determine aptitude for becoming 64maters” of hose,
that is, choosing from stock pairs of hose which match in size and
shade; (4) standardization o f a set o f tests for vocational aptitude in
journalism— in cooperation with Max Freyd o f Carnegie Institute
of Technology; (5) weighting a team of tests to determine skill in
mechanical drawing.
UNIVERSITY OF W Y O M I N G .

Laramie, Wyo.
o f P h i l o s o p h y a n d P s y c h o l o g y .— Dr. June E. Dow­
ney. An extensive report on the Will-Temperament, including di­
rections for giving and scoring both the individual and the group
form of the test is in preparation. The following papers on this
subject have already appeared:

D

epar tm en t

The will-profile.
(Univ. of Wyoming Bull., Dept, of Psychol., No. 3, 1919.)
The adolescent will-profile.
(Jour. Educ. Psychol., Mar., 1920.)
Some volitional patterns revealed by the will-profile.
(Jour. Exp. Psychol.,
Aug., 1920.)

Y A L E UNIVERSITY.

New Haven, Conn.
o f E d u c a t io n
( G r a d u a t e S c h o o l ) . — Dr. J. Crosby
Chapman, associate professor of educational psychology, has recently
issued the following work dealing with the trade tests used in the
United States Army during the war period:

D

e par tm en t

Chapman, James Crosby. Trade tests; the scientific measurement of trade
proficiency. New York. H . H olt & Co., 1921. ix, 435 p.

The Psycho-Clinic (Dr. Arnold Gesell, director) is constantly deal­
ing with personnel problems as represented by adolescents seeking
employment, particularly those with subnormal or unstable constitu­
tions. (See also p . 45.)
P s y c h o l o g i c a l L a b o r a t o r y . —A contribution on 4 Psychological
4
tests for stenographers and typewriters,” by H. W. Rogers, was pub­
lished in Journal of Applied Psychology (1917, v. 1, p. 268-274).
The results of two years’ research with empirical vocational tests
to detect typing ability, and to predict ultimate physiological capa­
city in typing are to be published in the fall of 1921 in the Archives
o f Psychology, Columbia University.
A paper on 4 The analysis o f trade ability,” by E. S. Robinson,
4
appeared in the Journal of Applied Psychology (v. 3, No. 4, p.
352-357, Dec., 1919).



198

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES.

L a b o r a t o r y o f A p p l i e d P h y s i o l o g y .— Park and Oak Streets.
Yandell Henderson, professor of applied physiology. The researches
conducted in this laboratory have been mainly studies in the physi­
ology and toxicology of gases, and the treatment of asphyxia, etc.,
particularly in connection with the United iStates Bureau of Mines, to
which Prof. Henderson is consulting physiologist, and, during the
war, with the Chemical Warfare Service and the Medical Research
Board of the A ir Service. They include experimental studies o f the
various forms of mine-rescue oxygen helmets and their adaptation to
the physiological needs of the wearer (Bureau of Mines Technical
Paper No. 62) ; investigations of resuscitation apparatus, in connec­
tion with the work of the commissions on resuscitation (see p. 125)
of which Prof. Henderson was a member; the development of effi­
cient gas masks for the military service and apparatus and methods
of testing aviators in respect to their ability to withstand altitude,
and of any oxygen inhaler to be used in the treatment of carbon
monoxide asphyxiation. Dr. Henderson’s studies for the Bureau of
Mines on carbon monoxide poisoning and on resuscitation and arti­
ficial respiration were published in the Journal of the American Medi­
cal Association, 1916 (v. 67, p. 1-5, 580-583).
In 1919-20 the staff of the laboratory investigated the physiological
effects of automobile exhaust gas for the commissions o f the States
of New York and New Jersey in charge of the proposed vehicular
tunnel under the Hudson River to establish standards for ventilation.
The results, which are applicable to any tunnel, garage, or factory
where the air is contaminated with the products of combustion and
similar gases and vapors, have appeared in abbreviated form in the
Journal of Industrial Hygiene, July and August, 1921. The full
report is in press as a bulletin of the Bureau of Mines and as part
of the report of the chief engineer of the commissions.
Other papers in this field have been published or completed for
publication in various journals, as follows:
The elimination of carbon monoxide from the blood after a dangerous degree
of asphyxiation, and a therapy for accelerating the elimination, by Y. Henderson
and H. W . Haggard. (J. Pharm. and Exp. Therap., 1920, v. 16, p. 11-20.)
The anesthetic and convulsant effects of gasoline vapor, by H. W . Haggard.
(J. Pharm. and Exp. Therap., 1920, v. 16, p. 401-404.)
Respiration and blood alkali during carbon monoxide asphyxia, by H . W .
Haggard and Y. Henderson. (J. Biol. Chem., 1921, v.'47, p. 421-433.)
The treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning, by Y. Henderson.
(J. Amer.
Med. Assn., 1921, in press.)
Studies in carbon monoxide asphyxia. I. The behavior of the heart. By
H . W . Haggard. (Amer. J. Physiol., 1921, v. 56, p. 390-403.) Two other studies
in this series are ready for publication.
Studies in hydrogen sulphide poisoning, I— I I . By H. W . Haggard. (Ready
I
for publication; I to appear shortly in J. Biol. Chem.)

The series of investigations is being continued for the Bureau of
Mines and several researches are still incomplete.

Y A L E UNIVERSITY— School of Medicine.
D e p a r t m e n t o f P u b l i c H e a l t h .— C.-E . A a Winslow, professor
o f public health. This department carries on research in indus­
trial hygiene, particularly in conjunction with the Office of Indus­
trial Hygiene and Sanitation of the United States Public Health
Service. The latter has employed one or more sanitary experts and




U N IV E R S IT IE S A N D

COLLEGES.

199

the Yale Medical School has provided the laboratory for carrying
on the work. Special attention has been given to the dust hazard
in industry. In addition, extensive factory surveys have been made
and studies of illumination, ventilation, and general sanitary con­
ditions have been conducted in many of the plants in the neighbor­
hood of New Haven. The published results of these researches
are as follows:
Winslow, C.-E. A., Greenburg, L., and Angermyer, H . G. Standards for
measuring the efficiency of exhaust systems in polishing shops.
(U . S. Pub.
Health Rep., Mar. 7, 1919, Reprint No. 509.)
Winslow, C.-E. A., Greenburg, L. and D. The dust hazard in the abrasive
industry. (U. S. Pub. Health Rep., May 30, 1919, Reprint No. 530.)
Winslow, C.-E. A., Greenburg, L., and Reeves, E. H . The efficiency of cer­
tain devices used for the protection of sand blasters against the dust hazard.
(U . S. Pub. Health Rep., Mar. 5, 1920, Reprint No. 585.)
Winslow, C.-E. A., and Greenburg, L. A study of the dust hazard in the
wet and dry grinding shops of an ax factory.
(U. S. Pub. Health Rep., Oct.
8, 1920, Reprint No. 616.)
W inslow C.-E. A., and Greenburg, L. Industrial tuberculosis and the
control of the factory dust problem.
(Jour. Indust., Hyg., Jan.-Feb., 1921,
v. 2, Nos. 9-10, p. 333-343, 378-395.)
Drury, W . H. The incidence of tuberculosis among polishers and grinders
in an ax factory.
(U. S. Pub. Health Rep., Feb. 4, 1921, p. 159-178.)

The following studies have been completed and are in press or
unpublished:
Winslow, C.-E. A., and Hewitt, E. L. The relation between katathermometer and temperature readings under ordinary indoor conditions.
(In press.)
Greenburg, L. Carbonated water as a source of five cases of lead poison­
ing.
( Unpublished.)
Winslow, C.-E. A., and Greenburg, L. A health survey of a small-arms
manufacturing plant.
(Unpublished.)
Group of miscellaneous factory inspection studies.
(Unpublished.)

Extensive studies on the katathermometer (of Prof. Leonard H ill)
are now in course of preparation.

Since 1916 the university has offered courses in industrial hygiene
to students in public health in the graduate school, and students
have been given the opportunity of obtaining their final degrees on
the basis of thesis work undertaken in industrial hazards.







IN D EX
Page.
Brass foundries, health hazards----- 54, 152
Bricklayers :
A b r a s i v e p l a n t s , h e a l t h h a z a r d s ____ 3 8 , 1 9 9
Apprenticeship and tra in in g ----64
(S ee
a lso
G rin d in g
w h e e ls ,
Employment during the year___
155
s a fe t y c o d e s .)
Brickmaking, accident prevention----159
A b s e n t e e i s m _________________________________
22,
Brush factories, women’s wages------50
3 9 , 8 6 , 9 0 ,1 1 7 ,1 4 3 , 1 7 3 ,1 9 2 , 1 9 6
Building trades :
A c c id e n t
p r e v e n t i o n ______________________ 3 3 , 5 7 ,
Employment during the year----155
63,
81, 84, 90, 94, 95, 103, 111, 127,
Personnel management__________
143
1 3 3 - 1 3 5 , 1 3 7 , 1 3 9 , 1 4 9 , 1 5 8 , ,1 5 9
Safety and hygiene----------------------34, 49
( S e e a lso u n d e r p a r t i c u l a r i n ­
A.

P age.

d u s t r ie s .)
A c c id e n t s t a t is t ic s , in d u s t r ia l, s ta n ­
d a r d i z a t i o n o f ____________________________
112
A c c i d e n t s , i n d u s t r i a l ______________________
19,
2 0 ,2 1 , 5 7 , 5 9 , 6 8 , 1 4 5
T o c h i l d r e n ----------------------------------------2 3 , 1 9 4
T o w o m e n ______________________________
57
( S e e a ls o u n d e r p a r t i c u l a r i n ­
d u s tr ie s a n d o c c u p a tio n s .
A c c o u n t i n g e d u c a t i o n _________________ 1 2 6 , 1 6 2
A c e t y l e n e , e x p l o s i b i l i t y o f ______________
30
A c i d s , s a f e h a n d l i n g ______________________
134
A e r o n a u t i c s , s a f e t y c o d e _______________ 3 1 , 7 4
A ir
c o n d i t i o n i n g ___________________________3 8 , 7 9
( S e e a ls o D u s t h a z a r d s ; D u s t
r e m o v a l ; V e n t ila t io n .)
A i r h a m m e r , e f f e c t o f - __________________ 2 1 , 3 8
( S e e a ls o S t o n e c u t t e r s , h e a l t h
h a z a r d s .)
A lc o h o l, e ffe c t o n w o r k in g c a p a c it y 142
A l u m i n u m d u s t , i n f l a m m a b i l i t y o f __
30
A m e r i c a n i z a t i o n ____________________ 2 6 , 1 0 5 , 1 1 9
A n ilin
and
in t e r m e d ia t e
p rod u cts
p l a n t s , h e a l t h h a z a r d s _______ 2 1 , 1 8 1 , 1 9 0
A n i l i n t u m o r s o f t h e b l a d d e r _________
181
A n t h r a x __________ 2 1 , 4 9 , 7 9 , 6 6 , 1 4 5 , 1 5 5 , 1 9 0
A p p l i c a t i o n b l a n k s ------------------- 7 1 , 7 2 , 1 4 6 , 1 7 0
A p p r e n t i c e s c h o o l s _________________________
25
A p p r e n t i c e s h i p ______________________________
21,
26, 58, 59, 60, 6 3 -6 4 , 85, 105,
119, 129, 150, 161, 172, 189
A p t i t u d e t e s t s _______________ 1 3 2 , 1 7 4 , 1 9 6 - 1 9 7
A rm y
t r a i n i n g ---------------------------------------------41
A r s e n i c p o i s o n i n g _________________________
56
A r t i f i c i a l f l o w e r m a k e r s _________________
148
A s p h y x ia t io n :
30
B y b l a s t - f u r n a c e g a s _______________
B y m i n e g a s e s _______________________
30
I n g a r a g e s ______________________________
56
198
T r e a t m e n t o f _________________________
A v i a t i o n , s a f e t y c o d e ____________________ 3 1 , 7 4
A v i a t o r s , t e s t s f o r _______________ 1 6 7 —1 6 8 , 1 9 6
A x f a c t o r y , h e a l t h h a z a r d s ____________
199

Bakeries, working conditions______
56
Bank employees______ 35, 90, 105, 163, 169
Benefit associations_________________
21,
39, 100, 105, 116, 122, 140, 146
Benzene poisoning__________________
66
Blast furnaces, hazards and accident
prevention___________________ 30, 74, 135
Blind, industrial occupations for__100, 145
Boiler-room equipment, safety_____ 75,134
Boilers, safety codes____ 61, 63, 74, 82, 159
(See also Locomotive boilers.)
Bonus systems------------------------94, 111, 119,
126, 133, 147, 156, 157, 161, 183, 188
Bookbinding, employment of women- 97,148
Boot and shoe industry :
Employment of women_______ 20, 164
Hours of labor_______________ 19, 129
Training-------------------------- 25, 136, 179
Wages-------------------------------------19




C.
Candy factories, women’ s wages and
, working conditions-------------------- 23, 50, 57
Canning industries :
Hours of labor and working
conditions---------------------------- 20, 45, 57
61
Safety standards_________________
W om en’s wages__________ 45, 50, 57, 62
19
Car building, wages and hours______
Carbon monoxide detection in m ines30
Carbon monoxide poisoning__________
21,
30, 66, 152, 1 8 1 ,1 9 8
Cement industry :
Accident statistics_______________
144
Safety__________________________
1 3 4 ,1 4 4
Chemical industry :
38,
Health hazards and safety_____
54, 56, 66, 7 0 ,1 2 7 ,1 3 4
Personnel management__________
105
(S e e
a lso
Dye in d u stry; E x­
plosives m anufacture.)
Child labor_________________ 22, 38, 60, 61, 62,
64,
85, 94, 96, 117, 120, 124, 1 3 2 ,1 5 8
Cigar manufacture :
190
Health h a za rd s---------------------------W ages and hours______________ — 19, 57
( S e e a l s o Tobacco industry.)
Civil service__________ 28, 32, 83, 89, 94, 110
Classification of personnel--------- 24, 89, 131
Cleaners, in offices, etc., w ages--------- 46, 50
Clerical workers_____150', 170, 180, 183, 197
Cloak, suit, and skirt industry. ( S e e
Clothing industries.)
Cloth - sponging industry, h e a l t h
h a za r d s______________________________
56
Clothing industries :
Collective bargain ing--------------129, 196
Health and working conditions20,
38, 56, 67, 114, 191
Piecework and week w ork- 67, 86, 115
Personnel management__________
111
Production standards--------- 67, 86, 111
Regularity of employm ent- 20, 2 1 ,1 1 3
Training______ 21, 25, 86, 111, 1 4 7 ,1 6 8
W ages and hours---------------------19,
20, 21, 50, 67, 8 6 ,1 1 3
Coal dust explosion tests----------------30
Coal mining in d u stry :
(S ee
a l s o E xp losio n s; Mine
s a fe ty ; Mine-rescue meth­
ods.)
Accidents!----------------------------------30
Health hazards__________________ 5 8 ,1 1 8
Industrial relations____________ 88, 148
Output___________________________
22
T r a in in g ------------------------------------34
W ages and hours of labor______ 19, 21
Coke-oven accid en ts________________
30
Collective bargaining----------------75, 161, 196
(S ee
a ls o
Labor agreements.)
Color blin d ness_______________________ 38, 77
Colored workers______________ 24, 46, 97, 98
Comfortimeter’ _______________________
40
201

IN D E X ,

202

Page.
Commercial education-------------------------34,
85, 136, 147, 162
Compressed air, safety__ 45, 49, 61, 74, 82
Compressed-air disease____ ^_________
173
Conciliation and arbitration__________ 19, 68
Confectionery manufacture, women’s
wages___________________________________ 50, 56
Construction industries :
144
Industrial relations______________
Safety______________________ 74, 134, 159
Continuous industries__________________ 22, 68
Conveying and hoisting, safety____
75,
135, 139
Cooperative plan of industrial edu­
27,
cation_________________ ,_______________
70, 71, .99, 130, 165, 1 7 3 -1 7 4 , 186, 192
Corporation schools_______ 27, 85, 1 1 8 -1 1 9
Corset industry, women’s wages and
home work____________________________ 23, 50
Cost of living___________ .._____________
19,
21,
35, 45, 48, 56, 59, 62, 63, 75, 87,
89, 96, 97, 113, 115, 124, 129, 147, 156.
Cotton-gin fires__________
26
Cotton m anufacturing:
Accident prevention_______________21, 134
Hours of work as related to
129
output and health_____________
Training------------------------------------------- 25, 34
W ares and hours o f labor______
19
Cranes, safety------------------------ 45, 61, 7 5, 134
Cutting oil dermatoses__________ 38, 58, 135
D.
45
Defectives, employment_______________
Department
stores.
(S e e
Retail
stores.)
D erm atoses_____________________________ 38, 58
( S e e a l s o Skin diseases.)
D ie ta rie s_______________________________141, 164
Disability among wage earners_____2 2 ,1 6 5
Disabled in industry, rehabilitation. 32, 35,
47, 48, 59, 61, 63, 68, 1 0 8 -1 1 0 , 151, 189
Discharges and lay-offs______________ 103, 155
Dress
and
waist industry.
(S ee
Clothing industries.)
D ressm aking_____________________ 20, 147, 164
D ust explosions________________________
25
( S e e a ls o
Coal dust explosion
tests.)
D ust hazards___________ 20, 30, 38, 1 3 7 ,1 8 0 ,
181, 1 9 0 ,1 9 1 , 199
( S e e a l s o Air conditions, Alumi­
num d u s t; Granite industry ;
M etal mines.)
D ust measurements___ 55, 80, 149, 185, 190
Dust phthisis------------------ 21, 30, 38, 144, 159
Dust removal______ :______________ 53, 5 6 ,1 9 9
Dye industry, health hazards_______
21,
38, 66, 7 1 ,1 9 0

E.
Efficiency of human body as a ma­
chine_______________________________i_ 142, 176
Efficiency r a tin g ______ 27, 83, 106, 150, 156
Electrical
equipment
in
mines,
safety--------------------------------------------------- 30, 75
Electrical industries :
Accident prevention______ 9 0 ,1 0 0 ,1 2 4
Training-------------------------------- 33, 126, 186
Electrical
power
control
safety
codes_________________________________ 74, 101
Electrical safety codes_______________
31,
45, 73, 74, 101, 125
Electrochemical
plants,
health
h a za rd s----------------------------------------------38
Elevator safety codes_________________
31,
45, 61, 63, 75, 81, 134
Emotions, psychological tests_______
183
Employee representation_____________
105,
1 1 1 ,119, 148, 196
(S ee
a ls o
Shop
com m ittees;
W orks’ councils.)
E m p loym en t_______________ 19, 20, 21, 57 98
Regularity o f - 20, 21, 24, 67, 68, 86, 115
Stabilization o f___________ 103, 1 5 4 ,1 9 2
Employment certificates---------------------22




Page.
E m p l o y m e n t m a n a g e m e n t ____ 2 0 , 2 1 , 3 3 , 4 1 ,
60, 67, 68, 71, 85, 100, 101, 103, 105
118, 119, 156, 170, 172, 177, 179, 196
C ou rses o f in s tr u c tio n - 88, 89, 166, 171,
175, 177, 178, 179, 182, 183, 186,
187, 188, 191, 192, 193, 195, 196
E m p lo y m e n t m a n a g e r s ’ a s s o c ia tio n s
a n d c o n f e r e n c e s -------------------------------------19,
102 , 1 0 5 -1 0 8 , 136 , 142 , 163
E m p lo y m e n t o ffic e s :
P r i v a t e ___________________________________ 4 4 , 7 1
P u b lic —
20, 2 4 , 5 9 , 1 0 6 , 1 1 2 -1 1 3 , 148
E n g i n e e r i n g e d u c a t i o n ___________________
81,
9 3 . 1 5 2 , 1 6 5 , 1 7 4 ,1 7 7 , 1 8 6 , 1 9 2
E n g i n e e r s ’ s a l a r i e s _______________________ 6 9 , 1 0 3
E n g l i s h t e a c h i n g i n i n d u s t r i e s _______ 8 4 , 1 7 8
E p i l e p t i c s , e m p l o y m e n t o f ______________~
194
E t h e r p o i s o n i n g ------------------------------------------181
E x a m in a tio n s :
C i v i l s e r v i c e -----------------------------------------3 2 , 8 3
, C l e r i c a l w o r k e r s _______________ 3 2 , 8 3 , 1 7 7
F i r e m e n _________________________________
159
71
S t r e e t r a i l w a y e m p l o y e e s _________
( S e e a lso M e n t a l t e s t s . )
E x e c u t i v e a b i l i t y t e s t s --------------------------183
E x e c u tiv e s , t r a in in g o f_ 8 1 ,9 9 ,1 1 9 ,1 5 4 ,1 7 1
E x p lo s ib ilit y o f :
A c e t y l e n e ----------------------------------------------30
C o a l d u s t -----------------------------------------------30
G r a i n d u s t ---------------------------------------------26
M i n e g a s e s ------------------------------------------30
E x p lo s io n s , p r e v e n t io n o f :
G r a i n e l e v a t o r s ---------------------------------26
I n d u s t r i a l p l a n t s ------------------------------135
M i n e s ____________________________________
30
E x p lo s iv e s , m a n u fa c t u r e , e tc . :
H e a l t h h a z a r d s -----------------------------------20
S a f e t y c o d e s a n d r u l e s ____________
49,
53, 61, 74, 110, 127
( S e e a ls o E t h e r p o i s o n i n g ; M u ­
n it io n p l a n t s ; T r in itr o t o lu e n e
p o is o n in g .)
E x p l o s i v e s , p e r m i s s i b l e i n m i n e s ---------2 9 , 3 0
E x p l o s i v e s , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n o f -------------79
E x p o r t t r a d e , t r a i n i n g f o r --------------------29
E y e i n j u r y a n d s t r a i n _________ 1 0 4 , 1 1 2 , 1 5 2
E y e p r o t e c t i o n ----------- 3 1 , 4 9 , 6 1 , 7 7 , 1 2 3 , 1 3 9

F.
F a ctory
s c h o o l s --------------------------------------------2 1 , 1 5 0
F a m i l y b u d g e t s ---------------------------------------------21,
35, 46, 75, 87, 89, 114, 141, 173
F a t i g u e -----------------------------------------------------------38,
39, 62, 129, 148, 152, 154, 176,
180, 182, 184, 185, 186, 192, 195
F e e b le -m in d e d , e m p lo y m e n t o f — 4 6 , 5 2 , 1 2 2
F e lt-h a t
in d u s tr y ,
h e a lth
h azards
a n d s a n i t a t i o n ____________________ 5 3 , 5 6 , 1 9 0
F i l e c l e r k s , t e s t s _________________________ 1 1 6 , 1 5 0
F ir e
p r o t e c t i o n ______________ 5 3 , 5 6 , 6 0 , 6 1 , 7 3 ,
1 1 4 , 1 2 5 , 1 2 6 —1 2 7 , 1 3 4 , 1 3 5
F i r s t - a i d ___________________ 2 9 , 3 0 , 4 9 , 5 4 , 9 5 , 1 8 8
F i v e - a n d - t e n - c e n t s t o r e s -------------------------57
F o o d p r o d u c ts m a n u fa c tu r e :
H e a l t h o f w o r k e r s -------------------------- 6 5 , 1 1 8
W o m e n ’ s w a g e s ________________________
50
F o r e ig n co m m e r c e , t r a in in g f o r . 2 9 , 3 4 ,1 1 9
F o r e m a n t r a in in g - 2 5 , 33, 3 4, 4 8 , 55, 9 1 ,1 0 1 ,
106, 111, 119, 134, 149, 150, 186, 192
F o u n d r ie s :
H e a lt h
h azards
and
w o r k in g
c o n d i t i o n s _________ 3 8 , 4 9 , 5 4 , 1 2 7 , 1 9 0
S a f e t y c o d e s a n d r u l e s ------------------61,
74,
128, 135, 159
T r a i n i n g ________________________________
25
F u r t r a d e , H e a l t h h a z a r d s --------------------65
Fum es :
H e a l t h h a z a r d s _______________________ 2 0 , 4 0
R e m o v a l ---------------------------------------------------5 3 , 5 6
F u r n it u r e m a n u fa c t u r e , W a g e s a n d
h o u r s ________________________________________
19
F u r u n c u l o s i s ------------------------------------------------ 5 8 , 1 9 0

G.
Galvanizing industry, safety standards____

61

203

INDEX,
Page.
Garages, health hazards______________ 56, 66
Garment trades.
( S e e Clothing in­
dustries.)
Gas and electric welding, safety------134
Gas m anufacture:
Accident statistics_______________
76
Accident preven tion--------------------31, 75
Health hazards-------------------------------- 3 8 ,6 6
Gas m asks_____________________________ 30, 198
Gas safety code------------------------------ 31, 74, 75
Gasoline engine exhaust gas, effects
o f ______ ______________________________5 8 ,1 9 8
Gasoline hazards-------------------------------- 3 0 ,1 9 8
Glare from reflecting surfaces-----------104
Glass industry, health hazards------- 38, 145
Government employees :
Classification------- 28, 36, 6 9, 83, 94, 103
Personnel adm inistration— 22, 2 7 ,1 1 0
R etirem ent-----------------------------------116
T ra in in g ------------------------------------------28
W elfare work-------------------------------37
(See a l s o Civil Service.)
Grain-dust explosions-------------------------- 25, 26
Granite industry, health h a z a r d s .^ 2 1 ,
Graphic rating---------------------------------- 1 5 0 ,1 5 1
Grinding and polishing, employment
.of w o m en ------------------------------------------ 5 7 , b S
Grinding wheels, safety codes_ . . - - 53, 61
74, 103, 112, 130, 1 3 4 ,1 5 9
Group insurance------------------------1 1 6 ,1 1 9 ,1 6 1
H.
Handicapped, opportunities f or—
35, 41,
47, 48, 52, 59, 62, 63, 68, 8 4 ,1 0 9 , 179
Handicapped women, gainful employ- ment f o r _________________________________ 194
Head and eye protection, safety
c o d e ________________________________ 31, 61, 73
Headache,
as
occupational
com­
plaint_________________________________
181
Health education
66, 1 1 4 ,1 1 6 ^ 1 1 8 ,
Health hazards___________ 3 7 -3 9 , 40, 5 8 ,1 1 8
(See
a lso
Industrial hygiene;
and under particular indus­
tries and occupations.)
Health in mercantile establishm ents181
Health insurance------------------------- 68,122, 143
Heart
disease,
employees-----handi­
capped b y ------------------------------ -Heat dissipation from human body—
40
Heat hazard in industries-----------------38
Hollerith machine operatives, t e s t s ._____ 176
Home work_______________ 23, 60, 96, 9 7 ,1 6 <
Hookworm infection in mines-----:----30
Horse-hair industry, health hazards.
190
( S e e a l s o Anthrax.)
Hosiery and knit-goods manufacture :
Aptitude t e s t s ----------------------197
Hours' of labor--------------------------- 49
W a g e s _____________________________ 19, 50
Hotels, women’s wages------------------ 46, 50, 58
Hours of work-------------------- 19, 21, 38, 39 92
103, 129, 151, 176
( S e e a l s o under particular in­
dustries and occupations.)
Hours of work for women----------- 23, 62, 124
Housing_________________ 21, 44, 105, 119, 140
Humidity, effects o f------------------------ 40, 55, 80
Hydrogen sulphide poisoning-----198
I.
Im migrants in industry :
Education___________ 26, 47, 48, 84, 93
Personnel problems---------------------44,
47, 56, 60, 92, 106, 113, 164, 186
Incentives_________________ 94, 146, 172, 196
( S e e a l s o Bonus sy ste m ; Profit
sh a rin g ;
Stock ow nership;
W age payment plans.)
Industrial capacity scale-------------------158
Industrial education__________________
26,
27, 34, 81, 102, 130, 154
Industrial espionage---------------------------- 27, 92




Page.
19,
I n d u s t r i a l h y g i e n e -------------------------------------2 0 , 2 1 , 3 7 -4 0 , 5 3 , 56 , 61, 65 , 69,
7 6, 78, 9 3, 9 4, 9 5 , 151, 1 8 0 -1 8 2 , 1 9 0
S t u d y a n d t e a c h i n g _________________
22,
152, 168, 180, 184, 185, 189, 199
I n d u s t r i a l m e d i c a l d e p a r t m e n t s ____ 9 5 , 1 2 9
( S e e a lso M e d i c a l c a r e o f i n d u s ­
t r ia l w o r k e r s .)
I n d u s t r i a l p h y s i o l o g y ____________________
23,
38, 40, 152, 176, 184
( S e e a ls o F a t i g u e ; N u t r i t i o n ;
S tr e n g th t e s t s .)
I n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s _______________________
60,
67, 68, 76, 81, 86, 88, 90, 94,
103 , 1 0 5 -1 0 6 , 117 , 1 2 8 , 140,
148, 153, 156, 161, 183, 187
I n d u s t r i a l s u r v e y s _________ 2 0 , 2 3 , 6 0 , 1 4 5
In fe ctio n s
f o llo w in g in d u s t r ia l a c ­
c i d e n t s ______________________________________
59
I n f l a m m a b l e l i q u i d s __________________________
127
I n f l u e n z a e p i d e m i c __________________________3 9 , 1 5 2
I n f o r m a t i o n s e r v i c e s ____________________ 1 0 4 , 1 3 2
I n k d e r m a t o s i s ______________________________
38
I n t e llig e n c e
te sts.
(S e e
M e n ta l
te s t s .)
I n t e r e s t i n t h e j o b _________________________
183
I n t e r n a l - c o m b u s t i o n e n g in e s ,s a f e t y 75
I n t e r v i e w s _____________________________
I n t r o d u c i n g t h e n e w w o r k e r _______________
106
I r o n a n d ste e l in d u s t r y :
A c c id e n t s a n d a c c id e n t p r e v e n ­
t i o n ------------------------------------ 2 0 , 2 1 , 7 4 , 1 4 8
H e a l t h h a z a r d s _________________ 3 0 , 3 8 , 3 9
_ ___________
105
P erson n el m a n a g em en t_ <
T h r e e - s h i f t d a y _______ 9 2 , 1 5 6 , 1 5 7 , 1 7 6
W a g e s a n d h o u r s _____________________1 9 , 1 4 8

Job analysis---- 106, 119, 145, 170, 183, 196
Chemical industry_____________
168
Clothing industry______________
86
Commercial occupations_______
34
Executives_____________________
171
34
Machinist’s trade______________
Mining occupations____________
34
Paper and pulp industry______
157
34
Pottery industry______________
Railway car men______________
75
Railway boilermaker’s trade___
34
Shipyard occupations__________
33
Textile trades__________________
34
( S e e a ls o Occupations, descrip­
tions of.)
Job selling__________________________
59
Job specification®________ 33, 42, 106, 170
Joint relations---------------------- 156, 161, 187
(See also Employee representation;
Labor agreements.)
Jute industry, English lessons_____
178
Juvenile placement_____ 22, 24, 66, 99, 162
K.
Katathermometer.

5.5, 199
L.

Labor a d ju stm en t--------- 21, 48, 8 7 ,1 0 6 , 187
Labor agreements, awards and de­
cisions-------------------------------------- 21, 129, 161
( S e e a l s o Collective bargaining.)
Labor audit®----------- ----------------------- 33, 89, 196
Labor camps------------------------------ 44, 47, 59, 60
Labor law s-------------------------------- 19, 21, 57, 68
( S e e a l s o Hours of labor for
w om en ;
Minimum
wage;
W orkm en’ s compensation.)
Labor organizations :
Current information about--------- 21, 57
R e co rd s___________________________
115
Research bureaus f o r -----------------67,
75, 113, 1 1 4 ,1 1 5 , 164
( S e e a l s o Trade-union policy.)
Labor s p y -------------------------------- 1------------- 27, 92

150

204

INDEX,
P age.

L a b o r t u r n o v e r _______________________ 2 2 , 2 5 , 3 3 ,
75,
100, 101, 103, 117, 119, 150,
156, 167, 170, 173, 179, 188, 192
W o m e n e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------23
L a d d e r s , s a f e t y c o d e s -------------- 6 1 , 7 4 , 8 2 , 1 3 4
L a k e C a r r i e r s ’ A s s o c i a t i o n ______________
20
L a u n d r ie s :
H e a l t h h a z a r d s ___________________ 4 9 , 5 5 , 6 5
S a f e t y a n d s a n i t a t i o n ______________ 4 5 , 5 4
W o m e n ’s
w ages
and
w o r k in g
c o n d i t i o n s __ 2 0 , 4 5 , 4 6 , 5 0 , 5 8 , 5 9 , 9 8
L e a d c o r r o d in g a n d o x id iz in g , s a fe ty
s t a n d a r d s _________ _________________________ 5 3 , 6 1
L e a d p o i s o n i n g ------------------------------------ 2 0 , 2 1 , 3 8 ,
53, 56, 58, 66, 117, 173, 181, 199
L e a r n e r s ________________________________ 4 5 , 4 6 , 1 1 1
L i g h t i n g ______ 3 8 , 1 0 4 , 1 1 4 , 1 3 9 , 1 5 6 , 1 6 7 , 1 8 5
L i g h t i n g c o d e s ---------------------------------------------45,
53, 61, 63, 74, 104, 134, 159
L i g h t n i n g p r o t e c t i o n ------------------------------------ 3 1 , 7 4
42
L i t e r a c y t e s t s _______________________ 1----------L i t h o g r a p h y , t r a i n i n g ____________________
25
L o c o m o t i v e b o i l e r s , s a f e t y ________________ 3 6 , 7 5
L o c o m o t i v e f i r e m e n ________________________
159
L o g g i n g , s a f e t y c o d e ___________ 3 1 , 4 5 , 7 4 , 1 5 5
L o n g s h o r e m e n ________________________________
148
L u m b e r in d u s tr y :
A c c i d e n t p r e v e n t i o n ____ 3 1 , 4 5 , 7 4 , 1 5 5
W a g e s a n d h o u r s o f l a b o r -------------19
L u n c h r o o m s , e m p l o y e e s ’ _________ 5 4 , 1 0 6 , 1 8 8

M.
M a c h in e b u i l d in g :
A c c i d e n t p r e v e n t i o n ___________________ 2 1 , 6 1
T r a i n i n g _________________________________
34
M a c h in e t o o ls , s a fe t y c o d e — 6 1 ,7 4 ,1 3 0 ,1 3 9
M a c h i n i s t s , o i l d e r m a t o s e s ----------- 3 8 , 5 8 , 1 0 4
M a g n e t ic fie ld a s in d u s t r ia l h a z a r d _
_
181
M a l n u t r i t i o n --------- 1 ------------------------------------ 8 7 , 1 4 1
M a n a g e m e n t t e r m i n o l o g y -----------------------81
M a n g a n e s e p o i s o n i n g --------------------------------180
M e a l p e r i o d ___________________________________
63
M e a t -p a c k in g in d u s t r y :
P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t ____________
105
S a f e t y ----------------------------------------------------134
W a g e s a n d h o u r s -----------------------------1 9 , 1 7 3
M e c h a n i c a l a p t i t u d e t e s t s --------------------43,
65,
M e d ic a l c a r e o f in d u s t r ia l w o r k e r s .
38,
49, 54, 94, 95, 100, 112, 129
M e n ’s c lo t h in g in d u s t r y .
(S e e C lo t h ­
in g in d u s t r y .)
M e n t a l a l e r t n e s s s t a n d a r d s --------------------150
M e n t a l h y g i e n e o f i n d u s t r y ------------------51,
76,
102, 117, 122, 123, 155
M e n t a l t e s t s _______________________ 3 2 , 4 2 , 4 4 , 5 1 ,
52, 53, 64, 65, 7 7 -7 8 , 83, 87, 91,
93, 106, 115, 116, 119, 120, 131,
132, 143, 150, 151, 153, 158, 166,
172, 174, 175, 177, 178, 180, 182,
183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 193, 195
( S e e a ls o A p t i t u d e
te s ts ; M e­
c h a n ic a l a p t it u d e te s ts ; S te n ­
o g r a p h y ; T e le g r a p h e r s ; T e le ­
p h on e o p e ra to rs ; T ra d e tests ;
T y p e w r itin g , e t c .)
M en ta l w o rk :
E f f e c t o f a i r c o n d i t i o n s o n ----------55
E f f e c t o f f a t i g u e o n -------------------------186
E f f e c t o f s m o k i n g o n -----------------------186
M ercu ry
fu lm in a t e , a c t io n
on
th e
s k i n _________________________________________
40
M e r c u r y p o i s o n i n g ----------------------------------- 6 6 , 1 2 2
M e t a l m in e s :
A c c id e n t s a n d a c c id e n t p r e v e n ­
t i o n ________________________________ 3 0 , 4 5 , 6 1
H e a l t h h a z a r d s ---------------------------- 3 0 , 3 8 , 6 3
M e ta l tra d e s :
A p t i t u d e t e s t s -----------------------------------197
C l a s s i f i c a t i o n ----------------------------------------50
E m p l o y m e n t o f w o m e n --------- 6 3 , 6 5 , 1 2 9
H o u r s o f w o r k in r e la t io n t o o u t ­
p u t a n d h e a l t h ____________________
129
P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t ____________
105
T r a i n i n g ____________ 3 3 , 3 4 , 1 3 0 , 1 4 7 , 1 6 9
S a f e t y ________________________________1 3 4 , 1 5 9
W a g e s a n d h o u r s ____________________
50




Page.
M etallurgical works, accident statis­
30
tics------------------------------------------------------- ,
Migratory la b o r _____________________
44
M ilitary personnel problems_______ 131, 132
Milinery industry__ 50, 56, 6 6 ,1 4 7 , 1 4 8 ,1 6 4
Mine gases, explosibility______________
30
Mine-rescue
methods
and
appa­
ratus ------------------------------------------- 29, 30, 198
Mine safety______________ 29, 30, 45, 1 3 4 ,1 3 5
M iner’s consumption_________________38, 145
Miner’s nystagmus_____________________
30
Minimum wage_________________________
20,
21,
45, 46, 50, 56, 57, 59, 62, 124
Morbidity statistics, industrial______
39,
7 8 -7 9 , 117, 125
20,
M ortality statistics, in d u stria l______
39, 118, 144
Mothers in industry_____________ 97, 167, 173
Motormen, psychological tests for__ 9 0 ,1 4 3
Municipal em ployees_________________ 8 9 ,1 4 0
Munition plants :
Employment of w o m en __________
148
Health h a za rd s_________ 38, 54, 58, 173
Muscular work :
Effect of air conditions on______
55
Effect of food on__________________
141
Musical talent, tests__________________
184
Mutual relief associations, Govern­
ment em ployees_____________________
21
N.
National electrical fire code________ 7 3 ,1 2 7
National electrical safety code______ 31, 125
National W ar Labor Board___________
87
36
Navy education system _______________
Negfb w ork ers_______________ 24, 4 6 -4 7 , 178
Negro women in industry_____ 24, 65, 97, 98
Night work for w om en. 56, 96, 97, 124, 173
Nitro and amido compounds, safety
codes,-------------------------------------- 54, 61, 71, 75
Nursing, in d u strial______________________
168
N u tr itio n _____________________________ 1 3 2 , 141
Nystagmus, miner’s_________________ *
30

174, 177, 193
O c c u p a t i o n n e u r o s e s ______________________
O c c u p a t i o n a l d i s e a s e s ____________________ 2 0 ,
22,
30, 3 7 -4 0 , 56, 57, 58, 6 8 ,
76, 117, 144, 145, 150, 173, 181,
( S e e a ls o H e a d a c h e ; P o i s o n s ;
S k in
d is e a s e s ; T u b e r c u lo s is ,
e t c .)
O c c u p a t io n s :
D e s c r i p t i o n s o f _______ 2 1 , 3 5 , 4 1 , 5 0 ,
F o r m in o r s — 2 2 , 9 9 , 1 4 7 , 1 6 4 , 1 6 9 ,
F o r w o m e n ______________________ 2 0 , 2 3 ,
65, 71, 9 0 -9 1 , 97, 162, 163, 164,
O f f ic e
e m p lo y e e s ,
m en ta l
a le rtn e s s
t e s t s a n d s c o r e s _________________________
( S e e a lso C l e r i c a l w o r k e r s ; e x ­
a m in a t io n s .)
O f f i c e - w o r k t r a i n i n g ________________________
O il
f o l l i c u l i t i s ______________________________
O l d a g e , p r o v i s i o n f o r ____________________
O pen
s h o p _______
88 , 127, 130, 141, 160,
O r g a n ic a c c e le r a t o r s , p o i s o n i n g b y _
_
O u t p u t ------------------------------------------------ 1 2 9 , 1 5 6 ,
O v e r a l l i n d u s t r y , t r a i n i n g ______________
O v e r t i m e , r a i l r o a d s h o p s _________________ 4 1 ,

51
21,
69, 70,
190

179
173
64165
150

110
181
164
196
70
186
25
75

P.
P a c k e r ’ s i t c h --------------------------------------------------168
P a in t a n d d r y c o lo r tr a d e s , h e a lth
h a z a r d s a n d s a f e t y s t a n d a r d s ______5 4 , 6 1
P a i n t e r s , h e a l t h h a z a r d s ---------------- 2 0 , 6 6 , 1 7 3
( S e e a lso L e a d p o i s o n i n g . )
P a i n t i n g a n d d e c o r a t i n g i n d u s t r y ____
115
P a p e r a n d p u lp in d u s t r y :
E m p l o y m e n t o f w o m e n ____________
63
S a f e t y --------------------------------- 7 4 , 1 3 4 , 1 3 5 , 1 5 9
T r a i n i n g ---------,------------------------------------1 5 7 , 1 7 8
W e l f a r e w o r k _________________________
177

205

INDEX.
Page.

Paper box industry :

T r a i n i n g ____________
25, 97
W om en ’s
w ages
and,
w o r k in g
c o n d i t i o n s ______________________ 5 0 , 5 6 , 5 7
P a r a z o l , p o i s o n o u s p r o p e r t i e s -------40
P a r t - t i m e e d u c a t i o n ---------------------------- 1 6 2 , 1 6 9
P e a rl-b u tto n
m a n u fa c tu r e ,
h e a lth
h a z a r d s ______________________________ 5 4 , 5 6 , 1 8 4
P e l l a g r a , c o t t o n m i l l v i l l a g e s -------40
P e n s io n s :
I n d u s t r i a l ---------------------------------------- 1 2 1 , 1 4 0
140
P o l i c e m e n ’ s a n d f i r e m e n ’ s _____
T e a c h e r s ’ ---------------------------------------------- 1 1 0 , 1 4 0
P e rso n n e l m a n a g em en t.
(S e e E m ­
p lo y m e n t m a n a g e m e n t.)
P e r s o n n e l r e s e a r c h _____________________
21,
35, 133, 143, 150, 154, 169, 191
P e tr o le u m
in d u s tr y ,
w ages
and
h o u r s -----------------------------------------------------20
P h o s p h o r u s , w h i t e o r y e l l o w _____
40
P h o t o l i t h o g r a p h y , t r a i n i n g ________
25
41,
P h y s i c a l e x a m i n a t i o n ________________
59, 66, 83, 89, 95, 112, 116
P h y s ic a l
sta n d a rd s
fo r
w o r k in g
c h i l d r e n _________________________________ 2 2 , 6 1 , 6 4
P i a n o m a k i n g , t r a i n i n g _______________
25
P l a n t d i s a b i l i t y f u n d s _______________
57
P l a n t p u b l i c a t i o n s ________________________ 1 9 2 , 1 9 6
P lu m b is m .
(S e e L e a d p o is o n in g .)
P n e u m a t i c h a m m e r s , e f f e c t o f ___________ 2 1 , 3 8
P o i s o n s , i n d u s t r i a l ________________________ 2 0 , 2 1 ,
22,
( S e e a ls o A r s e n i c ; C a r b o n m o ­
n o x id e ;
E th er;
H yd rogen
su lp h id e ; L e a d ; M a n g a n e s e ;
M ercu ry;
O r g a n ic
a c c e le r ­
a tors ;
T e llu r iu m ;
T etra c h lo re th a n e ; T r in itr o t o lu e n e ,
e t c .)
P o sta l
e m p lo y e e s ,
w o r k in g
c o n d i­
t i o n s _____________________________________
37
P o s t u r e ________________________________________5 7 , 7 7
P o t t e r y i n d u s t r y , h e a l t h h a z a r d s ---------2 0 , 3 8 ,
54, 56
P o w e r p r e s s , s a f e t y c o d e s _________ 4 9 , 7 4 , 1 3 4
P o w e r t r a n s m i s s i o n , s a f e t y c o d e s ___ 6 1 , 7 4 ,
8 1 ,1 1 2 ,1 3 9
P r i c e s ----------------------------------------------------------------- 1 9 , 2 1
P r in tin g t r a d e s :
A p t i t u d e t e s t s ________________________
196
C o l l e c t i v e b a r g a i n i n g --------------------196
C o n t i n u i t y o f e m p l o y m e n t _______
115
E m p l o y m e n t o f w o m e n ----------------- 4 6 , 6 5
H e a l t h h a z a r d s --------------------- 2 0 , 3 8 - 3 9 , 6 6
O u t p u t ___________________________________
183
S a f e t y s t a n d a r d s ____________________
61
T r a i n i n g _______________
147, 161, 162, 189
W a g e s _______________________________
115, 161
P r i s o n i n d u s t r i e s _________________________ 5 3 , 1 2 3
P r o d u c t i o n s t a n d a r d s ___________________ 8 8 , 1 5 4 ,
1 5 6 ,1 5 7 ,1 8 2
(S e e a lso C l o t h i n g i n d u s t r i e s ;
P r o d u c t io n s t a n d a r d s .)
P r o m o t i o n e x a m i n a t i o n s _________________
83
P r o m o t i o n l i n e s ____________________________
157
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g ------------------------------------------------ 2 1 , 9 4 ,
119, 121, 129. 161, 196
P r o n e p r e s s u r e m e th o d o f r e s u s c it a ­
t i o n --------------------------------------------------------------125
P r o o f r e a d e r s ________________________________
183
P s y c h i a t r i c e x a m i n a t i o n _________ 5 1 , 1 2 2 , 1 2 3
P s y c h i a t r i c s o c i a l w o r k _________5 1 , 1 5 5 , 1 9 4
P s y c h io lo g ic a l
te sts.
(S ee
M e n ta l
P s y c h o l o g i s t s _______________________________ 7 8 , 1 3 2
P s y c h o p a t h ic e m p lo y e e s _
_ 5 1 , 1 2 2 , 1 2 3 ,1 5 5
(S e e
a ls o
D e fe c t iv e s ;
F e e b le ­
m in d e d .)
P u b lic
u t ilit ie s ,
person al
m anage­
m e n t ____________________ 9 0 , 1 0 5 , 1 0 6 , 1 2 4 , 1 3 4

Q.
Q u a l i f i c a t i o n c a r d s -----------------------------------150
Q u a n t i t y b u d g e t s ___________________________2 1 , 8 9
Q u a r r y in g :
A c c id e n t s a n d a c c id e n t p r e v e n ­
t i o n _______________________________ 3 0 , 4 5 , 6 1




Q u a r r y in g — C o n tin u e d .
Page.
H e a l t h h a z a r d s --------------------------------- 2 0 , 1 3 7
( S e e a lso G r a n i t e i n d u s t r y ,
S to n e c u t t e r s .)

It.
R a c e c h a r a c t e r s ------------------------------ 1 3 2 , 1 7 8 , 1 9 5
R a d io
m e c h a n ic s
and
o p e ra tors,
t r a i n i n g ______________________________________ 3 2 , 3 3
R a ilin g s ,
to e -b o a r d s ,
e t c .,
sa fe ty
c o d e s --------------------------------------------------------------- 6 1 , 7 4
R a ilr o a d e m p lo y e e s :
C l a s s i f i c a t i o n ___________________________
41
L a b o r a d j u s t m e n t ___________________
40
P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t __________ 7 9 , 1 0 5
T r a i n i n g ___________________________2 7 , 1 1 9 , 1 4 7
T u r n o v e r a n d u n e m p l o y m e n t ____
75
W a g e s a n d w o r k in g c o n d it io n s - 4 1 , 7 5
R a t i n g s c a l e s -----------------------------------------------83,
1 1 9 ,1 3 2 , 1 4 6 , 1 5 0 , 1 5 1 , 1 5 8
R e f r i g e r a t i o n s a f e t y c o d e -------------------------- 7 4 , 8 2
R e h a b i l i t a t i o n o f d i s a b l e d _______________
32,
35, 47, 48, 61, 63, 68, 1 0 8 -1 1 0
R esea rch
t a l e n t ____________________________
132
R e s p i r a t o r y d i s e a s e s i n i n d u s t r y ______
20,
1 4 4 ,1 4 5
R e s t d a y -------------------------------------------------------------2 1 , 6 8
R e s t p e r i o d s ------------------------------------- 1 2 9 , 1 8 6 , 1 9 3
R esta u ra n ts,
w o m e n ’s
w ages
and
w o r k i n g c o n d i t i o n s ---------------- 4 6 , 5 0 , 5 8 , 9 7
R e s u s c it a t io n :
3 7F r o m 1 8 0e c1 8 i c s h o c k __________ 1 2 5 , 1 9 8
, 40,
el , tr1
F r o m m i n e g a s e s ___________________3 0 , 1 9 8
R e ta il s to re s :
H e a l t h a n d m e d i c a l s e r v i c e ______ 1 8 1
H o u r s a n d w o r k in g c o n d it io n s — 2 0 , 9 7
O p p o r t u n i t i e s f o r w o m e n ----91
P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t _________ 9 0 , 1 0 5 ,
146, 148, 150, 176, 177
T r a i n i n g __________________ 2 7 , 3 4 , 1 3 3 , 1 3 6 ,
1 4 6 , 1 4 7 , 1 6 4 , 1 6 9 , 1 7 1 ,1 8 8 ,
192
20
U n e m p l o y m e n t __________________
W a g e s ______________ 2 0 , 4 6 , 5 0 , 5 7 , 5 8 , 1 3 3
W e l f a r e w o r k -----------------------------121
R i v e t e r s , o u t p u t o f __________________
186
R u b b er in d u s try :
E m p l o y m e n t p s y c h o l o g y i n ______
189
H e a l t h h a z a r d s ___________________ 2 0 , 6 3 , 7 0
S a f e t y ------------------------------------------------------ 134
T r a i n i n g ----------------------------------------------------------- 2 5 , 1 6 5

S.
S a f e c l o t h i n g --------------------------------------------------------- 6 1 , 1 3 4
S a f e t y c o d e s , a n d r u l e s -------------- 4 4 - 4 5 , 4 9 , 5 3 ,
'5 6 , 6 0 , 6 1 , 6 3 , 7 2 - 7 5 , 8 1 , 8 2 , 1 3 9
S a fe ty
d e v i c e s -------------- 9 6 , 1 2 5 , 1 2 8 , 1 3 4 , 1 4 9 ,
150, 159, 160
S a f e t y l a m p s ------------------------------------------- 3 0 , 3 4 , 7 5
S a fe ty
o r g a n i z a t i o n _______ 2 0 , 5 0 , 5 7 , 6 0 , 6 1 ,
85 , 9 0 , 9 4 , 1 3 3 -1 3 5 , 149
S a le s m e n :
I n c e n t i v e s _____________________________1 2 6 , 1 7 0
S e l e c t i n g a n d d e v e l o p i n g ______1 7 0 , 1 7 6
( S e e a ls o R e t a i l s t o r e s . )
S a n i t a t i o n , I n d u s t r i a l ---------------------------- 5 3 , 6 1 ,
74, 114, 134, 151
( S e e a ls o I n d u s t r i a l h y g i e n e . )
S a w m i l l s , s a f e t y c o d e ______________3 1 , 4 5 , 1 5 5
S c a f f o l d i n g , s a f e t y c o d e s _________ 6 1 , 1 3 4 , 1 5 9
S c i e n t i f i c m a n a g e m e n t _______________ 1 5 6 , 1 5 7
S e a m a n _________________________________________ 6 8 , 1 1 5
S e a s o n a l e m p l o y m e n t ------------------------------- 4 8 , 1 4 8
S e a t s f o r w o r k e r s --------------------- 5 7 , 7 7 , 9 6 , 1 8 1
S e le c tio n
and
p la c e m e n t
of
em ­
p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------------------33,
8 3 ,1 5 1 ,1 6 9 ,1 7 6 ,1 8 6 , 1 8 8 ,1 9 6
( S e e a ls o E m p l o y m e n t m a n a g e ­
m e n t ; M e n ta l te s t s .)
S h ip b u ild in g ;
A c c i d e n t p r e v e n t i o n _________________
45
L a b o r a d j u s m e n t ______________________ 2 1 , 4 1
N a v y - y a r d w a g e s ----------------------------------3 6 - 3 7
O c c u p a t i o n s --------------------------------- --— 3 3 , 1 7 9
T r a i n i n g ------------------------------------------- —
33
S h ir t m a k e rs :
P r o d u c t i o n s t a n d a r d s _______ ______
111
T r a i n i n g _________________________
25
W a g e s ______________________________ . . ____ 5 6 , 5 7

206

I^D E X .

Page.
Shop committees-------------------------— 22, 8 8 ,
101, 106, 140, 161, 173
Sickness frequency among industrial
employees--------------------------------- 39, 51, 57
Silk manufacturing:
Hours of work as related to
output and health----------------129
Wages and hours of labor-------19
25,
Skin diseases, occupational------------38, 40, 104, 135, 168
Smelting and refining, health haz­
ards _____________________________ 20, 38
Smokeless p o w d e r manufacture,
health hazards----------------------------181
Spoiled work______________________
152
Spray method of finishing and deco­
rating, health hazards----------------58
Stabilization of employment__ 103, 154, 192
Stairways, safety code----------- 74,127,134
State labor bureaus---------------------- 21, 44-64
Stationery manufacture, Women’s
wages____________________________
50
Steam engines and turbines, safety
codes___________________ 61, 75, 134, 159
Steamship business, training for---- 29, 34
Steel strike of 1919-------------------------88
Steel workers. ( S e e Iron and steel
industry.)
Stenography tests---- 43, 176, 183, 184, 197
Stock ownership by employees-------94,
106, 119
Stone cutters, health hazards__ 20, 38, 137
Stop-watch time study-------------------156
Storage battery manufacture, health.
hazards__________________________ 20, 38
Street and interurban railways :
Employment of women-------- 23, 57, 63
Wages and hours--------------------- 20, 48
Safety________________________ 50,134
Training--------------- --------------------71, 147
Strength tests in industry--------------185'
Strikes and lockouts-----------------------21
Suggestion systems------------------135
T.

T. N. T. poisoning____________ 40,152, 181
Tactile discrimination, influence of
illumination, o n -----------------------140
Tanning industry :
Health hazards and safety-------25,
54, 74, 134, 155
Labor survey------------------------88,155
( S e e a l s o Anthrax.)
Tardiness---------86
Teachers :
„ .^ ^
Pensions — --------------------------- 110,140
Tests_________________________ 177,183
Teachers for Americanization, train­
ing ______________________________
26
27,
Teachers of trades, training-------33, 34, 136, 172
Teachers of retail selling, train­
ing____________________________ 188, 193
Telegraphers, tests----------------- 172, 180, 186
Telephone e x c h a n g e s , women’s
wages, hours, and working condi­
tions_____________________ 57, 58, 97, 98
Telephone operators, selection-----176
Tellurium poisoning-------------------39
Tetrachlorethane poisoning--------181
Textile industries :
Health of workers-------------------- 38, 61
Safety_______________________
74, 134
(S e e
a lso
Cotton manu­
facturing ; Silk manu­
facturing ; Wool manu­
facturing.)
Three-shift system___________ 92, 156, 157
Tile works, health hazards_______
20
Time study______________________
156
Tobacco, effect on working ca­
pacity--------------------------------------- 184, 186
Tobacco industry :
Health hazards_____________ 49, 56, 63
Wages------------------------.____ 2 _
57




Page.
197
Trade ability, analysis of___________
Trade schools for girls_____ 20, 26, 34, 136
Trade test®_________________________
24,
27, 43, 83, 150, 151, 174, 197
Trade-union policy_______________ 187, 196
Trade unionism and temperament__
122
Training___________________ 25, 33-34, 4142, 81, 90, 118-119, 121, 172, 179, 188
( S e e a l s o under particular in­
dustries and Vocational edu­
cation ; Promotion lines.)
Transfers and promotions__________
119
( S e e a l s o Promotion examina­
tions; Promotion lines.)
Transportation employees, visual re­
quirements ______________________
77
Trinitrotoluene poisoning_____ 40, 152,181
Tuberculosis__________________________
20,
30, 38, 136-137, 159, 190, 199
Tuberculous persons, employment
and vocational rehabilitation_35, 137
Turpentine poisoning______________
66
Typewriting tests____________________
43,
116, 172, 175, 176, 184, 197
U.
Ultra-violet radiation, effect of_77, 140
Unemployment__________________19, 20,
21, 51, 57, 67, 6 8 , 69,75, 99,
113, "122, 142, 156, 157, 189
Unskilled labor__________________ 119, 186
V.

Vacations------ ------------------------ 90, 106, 111
Ventilation_________________________
40,
53, 54-55, 56, 79, 80, 114, 136, 177, 185
Ventilation codes______________ 74, 80, 135
Vestibule schools_________________121, 136
Visual acuity------------------ 38, 139, 167, 168
Visual judgments of size___________
186
Vocational education______________
19,
21, 26, 32-35, 64, 135, 147, 162, 168
Vocational guidance_______________
22,
24, 26, 65, 6 6 , 97, 138, 147, 162,
163, 166, 169, 178-179, 182, 185
Vocational psychology___________
175,
179, 187, 188, 189, 195
( S e e a l s o Aptitude tests ; Men­
tal tests; Trade tests.)
W.

Wage levels---------------------------------- 106,170
Wage payment plans---------------------88,
94, 101, 105, 123, 146, 163
( S e e a l s o Incentives.)
Wages__________________________ 19, 21, 33,
36-37, 57, 59, 103, 129, 150, 170
( S e e a l s o under particular in­
dustries and occupations.)
Waste in industry---------------------103
Welfare work_____ 21, 37, 94, 103, 121, 177
Will profile__________________ s _____
197
White-lead works, health hazards__38, 61
Women as street-car conductors and
ticket agents--------------------------- 23, 57, 63
Women in executive and technical
positions_____________________
165
Women in industry_____________
19,
20, 21, 23, 39, 45, 46, 49, 52,
56, 57, 59, 60, 62, 63, 65, 6 8 ,
85, 94, 96,117, 124,
129,
142, 148, 163,164, 167,
190
Dependency on________________ 23,148
Health hazards_____________ 21, 39, 49
Shop clothing--------------------------61
Training______________________ 23, 34
Women in retail stores.
( S e e Re­
tail stores.)
Women in the Government service__23, 83
Women’s garment industries. ( S e e
Clothing industries.)
Wood alcohol, health hazards______ 56, 70

207

INDEX,
Page.
Woodworking, safety codes-------45,
61, 74, 112, 134, 139, 155
Wool manufacturing:
Hours of work as related to out­
put and health----------------129
Wages and hours-----------------------20, 115
Women workers.
Workers’ education____________ 88,187




Page.
19,
Workmen’s compensation___________
20, 21, 22, 57, 59, 68, 111-112, 138
Works’ councils_____________ 129, 131, 148
Z.
Zinc

mines,

health

hazards

and

safety---------------------------------------------------38, 63




SERIES OF BULLETINS PUBLISHED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
[The publication of the annual and special reports and of the bimonthly bulletin was
discontinued in July, 1912, and since that time a bulletin has been published at irregular
intervals. Each number contains matter devoted to one of a series of general subjects. These
bulletins are numbered consecutively, beginning with No. 101, and up to No. 236 they also
carry consecutive numbers under each series. Beginning with No. 237 the serial numbering
has been discontinued. A list of the series is given below. Under each is grouped all the
bulletins which contain material relating to the subject matter of that series. A list of the
reports and bulletin of the Bureau issued prior to July 1, 1912, will be furnished on applica­
tion. The bulletins marked thus * are out of print.]
Wholesale Prices.

* Bui. 114. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 149. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1913.
* Bui. 173. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign
countries.
Bui. 181. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1914.
* Bui. 200. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1915.
Bui. 226. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1916.
Bui. 269. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1919.
BuL 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign coun­
tries. [Revision of Bulletin No. 173.]
Bui. 296. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1920. [In press.]
Retail Prices and Cost of Living.

* Bui. 105. Retail prices, 1890 to 1911: Part I.
Retail prices, 1890 to 1911: Part II— General tables.
* Bui. 106. Retail prices,1890
to
June, 1912 : Part I.
Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1912 : Part II— General tables.
Bui. 108. Retail
prices,1890
to
August, 1912.
Bui. 110. Retail
prices,1890
to
October, 1912.
Bui. 113. Retail
prices,1890
to
December, 1912.
Bui. 115. Retail
prices,1890
to
February, 1913.
* Bui. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer.
Bui. 125. Retail prices, 1890 to April, 1913.
* Bui. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer.
Bui. 132. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1913.
Bui. 136. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1913.
Bui. 138. Retail
prices,1890
to
October, 1913.
* Bui. 140. Retail prices,1890
to
December, 1913.
Bui. 156. Retail
prices,1907
to
December, 1914.
Bui. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer.
Bui. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
Bui. 184. Retail
prices,1907
to
June, 1915.
Bui. 197. Retail
prices,1907
to
December, 1915.
Bui. 228. Retail
prices,1907
to
December, 1916.
Bui. 270. Retail
prices,1913
to
1919.
Wages and Hours of Labor.

Bui. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in
selected industries in the District of Columbia.
* Bui. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons.
Bui. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin.
* Bui. 128. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1890
to 1912.
* Bui. 129. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries,
1890 to 1912.

(i)
70723°— B u ll. 209— 21------ 14




Wages and Hours of Labor— Concluded.
* Bui. 131. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1907 to 1912.
* Bui. 134. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe and hosiery and knit goods
industries, 1890 to 1912.
* Bui. 135. Wages and hours of labor in the cigar and clothing industries, 1911 and
1912.
Bui. 137. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad
cars, 1890 to 1912.
Bui. 143. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1913.
Bui. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates
in the dress and waist industry of New York City.
* Bui. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry.
* Bui. 150. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907
to 1913.
Bui. 151. Wages .and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry in the United
States, 1907 to 19i2.
Bui. 153. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture indus­
tries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 154. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe and hosiery and under­
wear industries, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile
establishments and garment factories.
Bui. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to
1913.
Bui. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad
cars, 1907 to 1913.
Bui. 168. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1918.
Bui. 171. Unionscale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1914.
Bui. 177. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industry, 1907
to 1914.
Bui. 178. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1914.
Bui. 187. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1914.
* Bui. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907
to 1934.
* Bui. 194. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1915.
Bui. 204. Street railway employment in the United States.
Bui. 214. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1916.
Bui. 218. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1915.
Bui. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories.
Bui. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture indus­
tries, 1915.
Bui. 232. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1916.
Bui. 238. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing,
1916.
Bui. 239. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing and finishing,
1916.
Bui. 245. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1917.
* Bui. 252. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry,
1917.
Bui. 259. Unionscale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1918.
Bui. 260. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1918.
Bui. 261. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing,
1918.
Bui. 262. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing and finishing,
1918.
Bui. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919. Pre­
liminary report.
Bui. 274. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1919.
Bui. 278. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907-1920.
Bui. 279. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining.
Bui. 286. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1920.
Bui. 288. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing, 1920.
Bui. 289. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing,
1920.
Bui. 294. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry
in 1921. [In press.]
Bui. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry. [In press.]




on

Employment and Unemployment.

* Bui. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices.
Bui. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in
selected industries in the District of Columbia.
Bui. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y.
Bui. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of
Boston, Mass.
* Bui. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries.
Bui. 192. Proceedings of the American Association of Public Employment Offices.
* Bui. 195. Unemployment in the United States.
Bui. 196. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis,
January, 1916.
Bui. 202. Proceedings of the conference of the Employment Managers’ Association of
Boston, Mass., held May 10, 1916.
Bui. 206. The British system of labor exchanges.
Bui. 220. Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the American Association of
Public Employment Offices, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21, 1916.
Bui. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
* Bui. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa.,
April 2 and 3, 1917.
Bui. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association.
Bui. 241. Public employment offices in the United States.
Bui. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May
9-11, 1918.
Women in Industry*

Bui. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in
selected industries in the District of Columbia.
* Bui. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons.
* Bui. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons.
Bui. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin.
* Bui. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee.
Bui. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile
establishments and garment factories.
* Bui. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
* Bui. 175. Summary of the report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States.
* Bui. 176. Effect of minimum wage determinations in Oregon.
* Bui. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women.
Bui. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of
Boston, Mass.
Bui. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts.
Bui. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts.
Bui. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of
industrial employment of women and children.
Bui. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
Bui. 253. Women in the lead industry.
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).

Bui. 101. Care of tuberculosis wage earners in Germany.
Bui. 102. British National Insurance Act, 1911.
Bui. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland.
Bui. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany.
* Bui. 126. Workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and foreign countries.
* Bui. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States.
* Bui. 185. Compensation legislation of 1914 and 1915.
Bull. 203. Workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and foreign countries.
Bui. 210. Proceedings of the Third Annual Meeting of the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Bui. 212. Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the Inter­
national Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Bui. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of
industrial employment of women and children.
Bui. 240. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States.
Bui. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign
countries.
Bui. 248. Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.




(Ill)

Workmen’ s Insurance and Compensation—Concluded.

3ul. 264. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Meeting1of the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Bui. 272. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada,
1919.
Bui. 273. Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Bui. 275. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and
Canada.
Bui. 281. Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the International Asso­
ciation of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.

Bui. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary
ware factories.
Bui. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade.
* Bui. 127. Dangers to workers from dust and fumes, and methods of protection.
Bui. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead.
* Bui. 157. Industrial accident statistics.
Bui. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries.
* Bui. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry.
Bui. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of
lead in the painting of buildings.
* Bui. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost of the
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commis­
sions. [Limited edition.]
Bui. 205. Anthrax as an occupational disease.
Bui. 207. Causes of death by occupation.
Bui. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades.
* Bui. 216. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building.
Bui. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives.
Bui. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories.
Bui. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories.
Bui. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades.
Bui. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
Bui. 236. Effect of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters.
Bui. 251. Preventable death in the cotton manufacturing industry.
Bui. 253. Women in the lead industries.
Bui. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building.
Revision of
Bui. 216.
Bui. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. (Revised.)
Bui. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics.
Bui. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal tar dyes and dye intermediates.
Bui. 291. Carbon monoxide poisoning. [In press.]
Bui. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite stone industry. [In press.]
Bui. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910
to 1919 [In press.]
Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).

*

* Bui. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York.
Bui. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its
inquiry into industrial agreements.
Bui. 139. Michigan copper district strike.
Bui. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City.
Bui. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of
New York City.
Bui. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry.
Bui. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry.
Bui. 233. Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act of Canada.

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).

* Bui.
Bui.
* Bui.
* Bui.
* Bui.
* Bui.
* Bui.
* Bui.

111.
112.
148.
152.
166.
169.
186.
189.

Labor legislation of 1912.
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1912.
Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto.
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1913.
Labor legislation of 1914.
Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914.
Labor legislation of 1915.
Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1915.




(IV )

Labor Laws of the United States— Concluded.

Bui. 211.
* Bui. 213.
Bui. 224.
Bui. 229.
Bui. 244.
Bui. 246.
Bui. 257.
Bui. 258.
Bui. 277.
Bui. 285.
Bui. 290.
Bui. 292.

Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States.
Labor legislation of 1916.
Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1916.
Wage-payment legislation in the United States.
Labor legislation of 1917.
Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1917.
Labor legislation of 1918.
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1918.
Labor legislation of 1919.
Minimum-wage legislation in the United States.
Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1919—
1920.
Labor legislation of 1920. [In press.]

[In press.]

Foreign Labor Laws.

Bui. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European
countries.
Vocational Education.

Bui. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of
New York City.
* Bui. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry.
Bui. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
Bui. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va.
Bui. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis.
Labor as Affected by the W ar.

Bui.
Bui.
Bui.
Bui.
Bui.
Bui.
Bui.
Bui.

170.
219.
221.
222.
223.
230.
237.
249.

Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives.
Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories.
Welfare work in British munition factories.
Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories.
Industrial unrest in Great Britain.
Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Muni­
tion Workers Committee.
Bui. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain.
Bui. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
Bui. 287. National War Labor Board. [In press.]

Miscellaneous Series.

* Bui.
* Bui.
* Bui.
Bui.

117.
118.
123.
158.

* Bui.
* Bui.
Bui.
Bui.

159.
167.
170.
174.

Bui. 208.
Bui. 222.
Bul. 242.
Bui. 250.
Bul. 254.
Bul. 263.
Bul. 266.
Bul. 268.
Bul. 271.
Bul. 282.
Bul. 295.

Prohibition of night work of young persons.
Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons.
Employers’ welfare work.
Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign
countries.
Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
Foreign food prices as affected by the war.
*
Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics up to May 1, 1915.
Profit sharing in the United States.
Welfare work In British munition factories.
Food situation in Central Europe, 1917.
Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United
States.
International labor legislation and the society of nations.
Housing by employers in the United States.
Proceedings of Seventh Annual Convention of Governmental Labor Officials
of the United States and Canada.
Historical survey of international action affecting labor.
Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States.
Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington,
D. C.
Building operations in representative cities in 1920. [In press.]




(V )

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Descriptions of occupations, prepared for the United States Employment Service, 1918-19.

Boots and shoes, harness and saddlery, and tanning.
Cane-sugar refining and flour milling.
Coal and water gas, paint and varnish, paper, printing trades, and rubber goods.
Electrical manufacturing, distribution, and maintenance.
Glass.
Hotels and restaurants.
Logging camps and sawmills.
Medicinal manufacturing.
Metal working, building and general construction, railroad transportation, and ship­
building.
Mines and mining.
Office employees.
Slaughtering and meat packing.
Street railways.
Textiles and clothing.
Water transportation.




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