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Occupational Wage Survey

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
November 1951

Bulletin No.

1 0 6 7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU

Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary

Ewan Clague - C o m m is s io n e r




OF

LABOR

STATISTICS




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION .............................. ...................................................

1

THE MEMPHIS METROPOLITAN A R E A ..............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ............................... , ................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ..............................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ..................... '
.................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ......................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ............................

3
6
7
®

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis# B-40
Railroads ........................................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ..............................................................

10
10

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
BuiJding construction ..........................................................
C-205 Bakeries .........................................................................
C-27
Printing .........................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees .............................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ................................................

H
11
11
H
H

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ......................................

12

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions .....................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ............................................ ,...........
E-3
Paid holidays ........................................................
E-4
Paid vacations .......................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave .....................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ..........................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ...............................................

12
13
13
14
15
17
17

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ............................................................

18

I N D E X ........................................................................... .............

20

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for auto repair shops
(June 1951)
and power laundries
(June 1951)«

For s l by the Superintendent o Documents, U. S Government Printing O f c , Washington 2 , D. C. - Price 15 cents
ae
f
.
fie
5

March 28, 1952

Introduction 1 /
The Memphis area is one of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor S ta tistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys® Occupations com on to a variety of
m
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis® Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus u tilized In compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) o ffice; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping® In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A -l through A-A) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions®
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the 'community survey® 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables®
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices®
Data were also collected and summarized on s h ift op­
erations and d iffere n tia ls, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid h oli­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans®

The Memphis Metropolitan Area
The to ta l population in 1950 of the Memphis Metropol­
itan Area, (Shelby County, Tenn® was about 480,000 persons® Of
)
these, more than fou r-fifth s resided within the c ity lim its of
Memphis•
S trategically located in the middle southern United
States, Memphis serves a large trade area having 17 railroad
lines of 9 trunk systems, 6 operating a irlin e s, 5 Mississippi
River barge lin es, and an extensive network of highways® The
area has the advantages of low u t i lit y rates and large warehous­
ing and storage facilities® Memphis is the worldfs largest cot­
ton and inland hardwood market, the largest producer of cotton1/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in Atlanta, Ga®
,
by Bruce Woytych under the direction of Harry H Hall, Regional
®
W
age and Industrial Relations Analyst® The planning and central
direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau^ Division
of Wages and Industrial Relations in Washington, D C.
®
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.



seed products, and has increased in industrial importance since
World W II®
hr
The Bureau fs estimate of the annual budget for a M ­
em
phis c ity workerfs family was $3,784, the tenth highest among
the 34 large c itie s surveyed in the United States during October
1950® The budget is described as providing a w
modest but adequateMle v e l of livin g for an urban worker^ family of four per­
sons - an employed father, a housewife not gainfully employed,
and two children under 15 years of age® Between December 1950
and December 1951, consumers1 prices in Memphis increased ap­
proximately 5 percent®
Nonagricultural wage and salary workers in the Memphis
Metropolitan Area totaled over 168,000 during November 1951 *2/
Almost 42,000 persons were employed in the wide variety of manu­
facturing plants located in the area® Total manufacturing em
­
ployment was evenly divided between durable and nondurable goods
industries, the dominant industries including food products,
employing 7,000 workers; lumber with 5,650 employees; and m
a­
chinery, 4,200 workers®
As the center of an extensive trade area, three-fourths
of a l l Memphis employment in November 1951 was concentrated in
nonmanufacturing industries, with about 51,000 persons working
in wholesale and r e ta il trade establishments. The various serv­
ice industries employed over 22,000 persons and approximately
20,500 were working for agencies of the lo ca l, State, and Fed­
eral governments® More than 15,000 employees were on the pay­
ro lls of transportation, communication, and other public u t il­
itie s companies; 9,000 were engaged in construction a c tiv itie s ;
and almost 8,000 in finance, insurance, and real estate®
Unionization in Memphis manufacturing plants was a l­
most wholly confined to nonoffice workers. About two-thirds of
the manufacturing establishments, employing over 70 percent of
nonoffice employees in the establishment-size groups studied,
had written agreements with labor unions at the time of the sur­
vey. Nonoffice workers in the transportation, communication,
and other public u t ilit ie s group were largely unionized with 95
percent of the workers in over fou r-fifth s of the plants work­
ing under terms of labor-management agreements. About 30 per­
cent of the office workers in approximately one-seventh of these
firms were also covered by such agreements® Two of every five
nonoffice employees in wholesale trade establishments were em
­
ployed under the terms of collective-bargaining agreements® The
degree of unionization in the re ta il, finance, and service groups
was negligible for both plant and office workers®

2 / Source: Tennessee Department of Qnployment Security in
cooperation with the U S Department of Labor, Bureau of labor
® ®
S ta tis tic s , The labor Market in Memphis®November 1951#

2

Occupational Wage Structure
Extensive wage adjustments were made by Memphis estab­
lishments during the period between January 1950, the base per­
iod for the W
age Stabilization Board*s 10 percent "catch-up"
wage formula, and the time of the survey*
These adjustments
were much more numerous after the outbreak of h o s tilitie s in
Korea than during the preceding 6-month period* More than fourfifth s of the manufacturing plant workers and an equal propor­
tion of nonoffice workers in public u t ilit ie s industries were
empiqyed in establishments granting general wage changes during
the period* About tw o-fifths of the plant workers in other non­
manufacturing establishments received at least one general wage
increase*
Although the majority of the plant workers in the
Memphis area received cents-per-hour advances, percentage in­
creases also were commonly reported* Formal wage increases for
office workers also were extensive - particularly in the manu­
facturing and public u t ilit ie s group of industries*
Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers were a part of the formalized rate structures of
virtually all Memphis firms within scope of the survey* Approx­
imately half the employees worked In establishments with minimum
entrance rates varying from 75 to 85 cents an hour, whereas
about a tenth were employed in firms with minimum rates varying
from 86 cents to $1 an hour* No rates below 75 cents an hour
were reported in manufacturing or wholesale trade, but about
two-thirds of the retail trade and 90 percent of the service
workers were employed by firms reporting minimum entrance rates
below 75 cents an hour*




Wages and salaries of workers for most jobs were high­
er in manufacturing industries than in nonmanufacturing* Where
job comparisons were possible,average hourly earnings for plant
occupations were higher in manufacturing companies than in non­
manufacturing for 19 of the 21 occupations* Weekly office sala­
ries showed the same tendency with 16 of the 22 comparable jobs
showing higher rates in manufacturing firms*
Approximately 1A percent of the plant workers in manu­
facturing plants were employed on second shifts and 6 percent
on third shifts* About 9 out of 10 second- and third-shift work­
ers were paid shift differentials, expressed either in centsper-hour or as a percentage of day rates* The most common dif­
ferential paid to second-shift workers was 5 cents*

The scheduled workweek was AO hours for approximately
three-fourths of the women office workers and five-eighths of
the plant workers in a l l Memphis industries* The AO-hour work­
week was com on for both plant and o ffice workers in a l l indus­
m
try groups with the exception of service companies, where a A&hour workweek for plant workers prevailed*
Almost a l l office workers and 90 percent of the plant
workers in the Memphis area received paid holidays* Five holi­
days were usual, being granted to more than one-third of the
employees* As a group, finance, insurance, and real estate com­
panies granted more paid holidays than other industry d iv i­
sions, about 3 out of 5 office employees receiving 11 or 12 hol­
idays a year*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l: O fy ic* O cCU fuU lO H d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Tenn., ly industry division, November 1951)
a

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
«• Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-li

O ffic e

O c c u p a tio n *

-

G o n tU u n d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Term., by industry division, November 1951)

See footnotes at end of table.
a
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5
.

O ffic e O ccu p aU o tU

Table A-it

-

C o n tin u e d

(Average s tr a ig h t- tim e w eekly hours and ea rn in g s }J f o r a e le o te d o ccu p a tio n s stu d ie d on an area
b a s is in Memphis, T enn ., by in d u stry d iv is i o n , November 1 9 5 1 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and in d u stry d iv is i o n

Number
of

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Weekly Under 2 7 . 5 0 3 0 .0 0 . 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .o o 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0 9 5 .0 0
Weekly
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) %

2 7 . 5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 40.00 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 . 0 0

over

Women - Continued
L,262

$
a .00
4 1 .5
"■ T r.y ~ 4 4 ' ^ c r

C le r k s, g e n e r a l .........................
M anufacturing .......................
Nonmanufaoturing .................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * . . . .
W holesale tra d e .............
R e t a il tra d e ...................
Finance * * .......................
S e r v ic e s ...........................

.,0 1 9
92
2 96
373
107
M9

41.5
41.0
42.0
41.5
40.0
42.0

C le r k s, order .............................
M anufacturing .......................

79

41.0

~W ~

-t

it

40.50

4 7 .5 0

43.50
3 6 .0 0
4 9 .5 0
3 5 .0 0

77
77
2 /6 5
12

94
23
71
8
50
2
9
2

49
8
41
2
14
17
6
2

94
32
62
2
18
19
21
2

30
20
10
2
_
8

21
2
19
7
6
2
4

51
3
48
33
15

17
2
15
15

3
2
2

28
7
21
5

_

1
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
•

_

10
6

_
_

_
1

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

8
6

_

_

_

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

1

_

_

15
15

12
12

5
2

10
7

5
-

10
3

3
3

2
2

8
8

1
1

_

-

_
_
“

2
2
1
.
1
-

2
1
1
1
-

2
2
1
1
-

H
5
9
3
2
4

'0
6
4
3
1

13
6
7
1
_
3
2

25
10
15
4
5
6
-

24
11
13
4
3
2
3

19
13
6
2

7
2
5
-

H
8
6
2

6
6
_
_

?
1
4
2

6
6
_
_

2
2
_
_

5
4
1
1

2
2
_
_

3
1

2
2

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

3
1

5
_

4

-

1

, -

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_
- -

1
1

1
1

3

9
3
6

3
3

_
-

11
10
1

3
2
1

_
. -

3
_
3
-

2
2
"

-

21
12
9
9

5
4
1
-

16
8
8
4

12
_
12
5

8

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

6
4
4

5
5
1

11

25

3
2

3
3

_

2
2

_
-

4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 2 .0

4 5 .0 0
4 4 .5 0
4 5 .0 0

“

4 6 .5 0
4630“
4 6 .5 0
4 9 .5 0

_
_
“

O ffic e g i r l s ................................
Nbnm anufacturing..................
Finance * *

57
45
18

4b. 5
4 0 .0

3 5 .0 0
2
3 5 .b o ' ~ T ~
3 3 .5 0
-

S e c r e t a r ie s ..................................
M anufacturing ........................
N onm anufaoturing..................
W holesale tra d e ..............
R e t a il tra d e .....................
Finanoe « * .........................
S e r v ic e s .......................

395
108
287
83
46
64
40

4 1 .0
4 0 .5
4 1 .0
4 1 .5
4 1 .5
4 0 .0
4 1 .0

5 3 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
4 7 .0 0
5 0 .0 0
5 0 .5 0

_
-

S tenographers, g e n e r a l ............
M a n u fa c tu r in g .........................
Nonm anufaoturing...................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .........
W holesale tra d e ...............
R e t a il tra d e .....................
Finanoe * * .........................
S e r v ic e s .............................

817
499
29
235
50
144
a

4 1 .0
4 i.b
4 1 .0
4 4 .0
4 1 .5
4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 1 .5

4 5 .5 0
4 7 .0 0
4 4 .5 0
4 4 .0 0
4 7 .5 0
4 2 .0 0
4 2 .5 0
4 1 .0 0

_
_
_
-

Switchboard op era to rs ...............
N onm anufaoturing...........
R e t a il tra d e .....................
S e r v ic e s .............................

130
1 25
18
56

4 3 .5
4 3 .5
4 0 .0
4 7 .5

3 6 .0 0
3 5 .0 0
3 8 .5 0
2 9 .5 0

22
22
L/22

_
-

3
7
2
5

-

_

1

2

p

-

1

2

5

7
7
"

8
6
2
2

16
8
8
8

12
8
8
4

37
2
35
7
6
5
4

62
3
59
23
3
21
-

60
2
58
26
12
8

13
6

30
4
26
5
1
6
-

17
8
9
5
_
-

11
6
5
_
_
5
-

20

7
1
1
1
2

41
16
25
4
3
2
13

16
4
_
1
1
2

13
11
2
_
1
_
1

8
3
5
5
-_
_

7
7
_
_
_

3
3
_
_
_

1
_
1
1
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

76
15
61
5
29
8
10
9

60
32
28
2
18
5
3

34

48

4

2
2
_

7
6
1

12
6
6

_
_
.

_
_

4

6
5
1

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

12

27

4

1

_

1

6

-

_

_

_

6
6
4

_

_

5

7

_
-

1
1
1
-

8
1
7
4
1
2

1
1
1

25
12
13
3
3
7

8
29
3
10
14
-

6

19
_
19
2
5
1
9
2

55
11
44
18
7
10
9

65
21
44
1
10
10
21
2

94
34
60
1
21
11
19
8

194
119
75
8
23
3
31
10

24
111
9
60
4
38
-

4

16
16
2
4

22
22
3
-

12
12
4
1

8
8

6
6

8

!

i
>

6

-

6
1
1
3
1

8
8
2
6

21
21
2
19

-

i

n r~

T

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




p

_

39
15
24

*18

1 38
30
1 08
16
33
30
14
15

“

D uplicating-m achine opera to rs
M a n u fa c tu r in g ........................
Nonmanufaoturing ..................,

40.0

123
27
96
2
34
36
12
12

-

4 3 .5
4 4 .5
4 0 .0
4 3 .0

117
4 1 .0
57“ ■ 40 : 0”
60
41.5
40
41.0

113
U
99
12
32
36
4
15

-

77
21
U
28
11

Key-punch o p erators ..................
M anufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
W holesale tra d e ..............

161
4l
120
11
44
39
26

-

4 7 .5 0
5b .6 (5"
4 5 .0 0
4 9 .0 0
4 1 .5 0
4 5 .5 0
4 0 .5 0

42.5

2
48
2
32

150
29
121
6
34
54
3
24

_

161

84.

86
2

.84

4 6 .0 0
4 5 .5 0

C lerk s, p a y r o ll .........................
M anufacturing ........................,
Nonmanufacturing .................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
W holesale t r a d e ..............
R e t a il trad e ....................,
S e r v ic e s ...........................

U .5
4 6 .5

24
24
15
2
7

4
1
2

37

-

2

_

8

22
12

21
27

6,

O ^ ic e O c c u p a tio n *. - C o n tin u e d

Table A
-l:

(Average s tr a ig h t- tim e w eekly hours and ea rn in g s 1 / fo r s e le c t e d o ccu p a tio n s stu d ie d on an area
b a s is in Memphis, Term., by in d u stry d i v is i o n , November 1 9 5 1 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occu p ation , and in d u s tr y d i v is i o n

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly
earnings Under 2 7 .5 0 30.00 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 40.00 4 2 .5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 62.50 65.00 7 0 . 0 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 85.00 9 0 . 0 0 9 5 . 0 0
hours
(Standard) (Standard)
and
? 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 35»OQ 3 7 *5 0 A 0.00 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.QO 5 7 .5 0 6QxQQ_6 2 ,5 0 . 6 5 ,0 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 5 . 0 0 ■8Q..QQ ,8 5 .0 0 [3 0 .0 0 | 9 5 .0 0 tvmof

Number
of
workers

$

$

$

$

$

Women - Continued
Switchboard o p e r a to r - r e c e p tio n is ts .............

$

4 4 .5
/Q O
41*5

nAi Aj i

T ranscribing-m achine o p e r a to r s , g e n e r a l ••
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40.0
38
— 25— " W

4 3 .5 0
4 5 .5 0 '

-

T y p is ts , c la s s A ..................... ............................
M anufacturing ..................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................
W holesale t r a d e ......................................
R e t a il trad e ..................................... • • • •
Finance * * .......... . • • * • • • ................
S erv io « s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

261
4 0 .5
“ ■ "77..... " " 4K 0

4 2 .5 0
'4 5 7 5 0 “”

_
_
-

17

4 4 .0

T y p is ts , c la s s B ................................... ..............
M a n u fa c tu r in g ............................................. ....
Nonmanufacturing ......................................... ..
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ............................. ..
W holesale trad e
R e t a il trad e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finance * *

426
- S I 3 45
18
40

40.0
40.0
40.0

fj
*

**

34

24
14

g
32

41.0

35
27

4 0 .5
4 1 .5

40.0

4 0 .5
4 1 .5

40.0
40.0

-

-

-

41.00

4 8 .5 0
4 0 .5 0

5
5
-

_
_

_

_

40.00
36.00

5
1

3 6 .5 0
3 9 .0 0

-

36.00
41.00

1

3 7 .5 0
3 7 .0 0
3 5 .0 0

27
27

?9
9
50
g

1
26

34

3
:

3

16

16
_

_

9

4
4
38
3
35
5

_

8
2

-

-

2
2

2

5

2
1

-

1 ___ i _
1
5

_

_

2
2

1
1

8
8

1
1

3
3

1

-

2
2

7

10

-

3
3

_

-

“

5

23

14
“ T 1
13
5
4

_

8

-

-

1
1

-

_

_

-

■

-

_

-

-

“

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

1

1

27
_
27

_

-

2
2

1
1

6
1

16

2
2

56
18
38

1
1

-

“

7

17

3

3

16

11

3
12
7
5

9

51
“ “1 7 “
34

28

15

21
•5
10

46
2

4

4
4

1

7

2

21
2
2

3

2

■

_

-

_

_

-

13
4
9
9

_

1
1

_

_

-

2

_
_

_

2
2

_

_

_

_

_
~

16

26
4

16

2

22
6

15

4

107

114

2
3

15
99

3
10

27
3
24

42
4
38

?
4
5

24
18

85

1

1

2

69

13
46

1
21

6
2
1

A

3

3

3

22

5

2

17

5

A

1
8

1

5

4
4

2
2

_
1

5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

“
”

Hours r e f l e c t th e workweek f o r which em ployees r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s tr a ig h t- tim e s a la r i e s and th e ea rn in g s correspond to th e s e w eekly hours.
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s : 2 a t $ 2 2 .5 0 t o $ 2 5 .0 0 ; 7 a t $ 2 5 .0 0 t o $ 2 7 . 5 0 .
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s : 1 2 a t $ 2 0 .0 0 t o $ 2 2 .5 0 ; 26 a t $ 22.50 t o $ 2 5 .0 0 ; 2 7 a t $ 2 5 .0 0 t o $ 27 . 50 .
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s : 5 a t $ 22.50 t o $ 2 5 .0 0 ; 1 7 a t $ 2 5 .0 0 t o $ 27 . 50 .
T ran sp ortatio n (e x c lu d in g r a il r o a d s ) , comm unication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in an ce, in su r a n c e, and r e a l e s t a t e .

P ^ £ d 4 iO H o l G *id

Table A-2:

*1 • o lu U c o l O c C K f u U d O H d

(Average s tr a ig h t- tim e weekly hours and ea rn in g s 3 / f o r s e le c t e d occu p a tio n s stu d ie d on an area
b a s is in Memphis, Tenn., by in d u s tr y d i v is i o n , November 1 9 5 1 )

Avebage
S ex, o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d i v is i o n

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$

$
Weekly ? 7 .5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 .5 0
Weekly
earnings and
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$ 3 5
Men

$

$

$

$

$

t
$
s
$
8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9

$

45.00 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0
P ,
8 8

l/
2/
2/

184

213

55
9

1

3 9 .0 0

26
— n —

20

24

5 3 .5 0
5 5 .5 0

1
3

41.00

Tabulating-m achine o p era to rs .........................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................

100

6
1
5

_
“

a . 50

4 0 .5
'"TOJ

55
/Q
*¥7

_

_
“

42.0 ' 4 1 . 5 0
41.0
4 4 .5 0

. 181
51"

4 2 , 5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0

18

4 4 .5

125
95

4 5 .0
4 5 ,0

6 5 .5 0
6 8 .0 0

-

D raftsm en, ju n io r • • • • • • • • • • • • • ............... ..
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..................... ......................

23
23

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 0 .0 0
“ 5105—
5

3
3

31

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

5 7 .5 0
5 7 .0 0

_

_

_

“

-

~

5

9 0 . 0 00 9 5 . 0 0 L
. 0

$
9 5 .0 0

Draftsm en ......................................... ....................
M anufacturing • • • • • • • • ........... ....................

8

D raftsm en, c h ie f ..................................................

$

5 1 . 0 0 00
O

O

3
-

-

5
2

_

_

_

_

9
-1
1
1

4
4

9

6

-

_

_

-

-

6
6

5
4

24
21

24
23

-

1
1

_

2
2

5
5

16
16

„

_

7

$

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

“

24

2

4

-

-

_

-

_

7

Women
N u rses, i n d u s t r ia l (r e g is t e r e d ) .................
M anufacturing ................... ............................
1/

—

_

4
4

9

_
|

1
1

2
2

2
2

2
2

1
-

_

_
-

-

Hours r e f l e c t th e workweek f o r which em ployees r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s tr a ig h t- tim e s a la r i e s and th e ea rn in g s correspond t o t h e s e w eekly hours.




. 0

0

0
2

8
6
-

. 0

O ccup ational Wage Survey, Memphis, T enn ., November 1 9 5 1
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

8

7,

Table a- 3 :

M a in t e n a n c e

an d

Pow ak

P la n t

O c c n p a t io n l

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Tenn., ty industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv is i o n

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ - $
$
$
$
$
$
Average
$
$ , $
hourly Ohdex 0 . 8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1.60 1 .6 5 1 . 7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2.1C 2.2C 2 . 3 0
earnings $
and
0 .8 0
.8 5 .9 0 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1.50 1 .5 5 1.60 1 .6 5 1.7C 1 .7 5 1.8C 1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.2C 2.3C over
$
1 .7 1
T .6 4
1 .7 9
5 .1 0

-

1

1

1

1

1

-

1.20

1

-

1

1

149
131
18

1 .8 3
1 .9 0
1 .3 2

«.
“

_
-

4

-

E n g in e e r s, s t a t i o n a r y ..................................................... ..
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
S e r v ic e s ..............................................................................

113
75
38

1 .7 6
1 .8 1

_
_
-

Firem en, s ta tio n a r y b o i le r .....................................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
N on m anufacturing......................................... ..........................

152

1.11

119
33

1 .1 3 '....
1 .0 3

H elp e r s, tr a d e s , m aintenance .................................................
M anufacturing .........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
S e r v ic e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

280

C arpenters, m aintenance ..................................... ..............
M a n u fa c tu r in g ................... .................................. ....................
N on m anu facturing....................................... ............................

130

S e r v ic e s ..............................................................................

11

E l e c t r i c i a n s . m aintenance .......................................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
N on m anu facturing....................................... ............................

1

7
7
-

4

4

4

8
1

-

4

-

_
-

4
4

..
-

_
-

1

-

_
-

2

4

_
-

2

1

4

3

3

2

4

3
3

3
3

2
2

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
“

5

4
4

_
-

7
7

21
21

11

11

5
4

6

14
14
-

10

-

19
19
-

8

6
5

1.08
1.10

3

11

10

4

17
77

24

3
3

4
4
-

21

1 .0 8
1 .0 6

_
-

M a c h in ists, m aintenance ...........................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..................................................................

139
~ 1 33

1 .8 0
“1 7 8 5

-

-

-

-

-

M aintenance men, g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ........................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
S e r v ic e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

260
U?
1 13
18

1 .4 2
1 . 4 8 ....
1 .3 4
1 .0 3

-

16

1

9
9

14
5
9

M echanics, autom otive (m aintenance) .............
N on m anu facturing......................................... ..........................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .........................................................
R e t a il trad e ............................................... ......................
.............. ..

227

11

1 .3 2
1 .3 4 “
1 .3 9
1 .1 4

-

-

1.52

5
5
5

M echanics, m aintenance ..............................................................
fug «», »i i »»»»T», T--TT»-Ti TTtf-t--TTtrt»-

457

221

1 .6 7
1 .5 4

M illw r ig h ts ....................................... ............................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................................

178
176

1 .9 3
1 .9 3

O ile r s ............................................. ................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ....................... ..................................................

83
79

1 .4 3
1748

P a in t e r s , m aintenance ........................................... ..
_ ............. . _ .............................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
A1
. . .

85
47
38
16
14

1 .5 4
1 .6 1
1 .4 5
1 .9 0

34

1 .9 5

6

2
2

1
1

2
1
1

1

S h eet-m eta l workers, m aintenance .........................................

2/
2/
*

28

76
204

1%

89
19

-

1.68
1 .3 9

.97

-

16
3

6
~T ~
-

-

6
2

-

1
1
-

-

n
%

2

-

5

3

1

-

6

8
-

-

5
5

-

12
12
-

2

42
4
38

24

3

2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

_
-

14

7

14
13

15
1

1

-

-

1

1
1

6

1
1

4

1
3

-

1

-

12
2

9

2
5

1

25

12

13

3

1
2

3
3

57
43
3
-

3

6

26

18
9

6

16

4

'

2
6
2 " T

5
5

_

-

2
2

_

2

2

_

4

1

-

2

2

-

4

1

2

2

4.

1

8

_

_

4

-

3
3
3

6

26

6
6

2
2

3

-

10
10

2
2

_
-

1
1

4

_

_

13

4

_

_

-

2

6

8
5

3
2

4

2
2

3

-

_
-

-

2
2

—r 1
-

1
2

_
_
-

1

4

1
1

4
4

7
7
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6
2

5
-

34
18
16

rr

4

10
3
7

-

-

2

4

4
2
2

3
3

15
15

-

17

4
2
2

n

12
5

2
31
31
31
-

5
1

3
3

1
1
1

5

1
1
1
-

-

12
12
2
2

1

_
-

1
1

2

-

4

5
5

34
33

1

16
1

_
_
-

12
11
1

1
1

4

3

?

10
10

3
-

3
3

-

4
4
-

1

_
-

_
-

_
-

4
4
-

6

_

4

6

-

5

_

_

1
1

16
16

4

4

4

4

4
2

26
26

35
34

2

59

-

1

-

1

-

12
47

1

_
_

13
5
_

21 103
21 3 7

4
3

1
-

2

1

21
16
15

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

6
6

6
6

37
37

8
-

4

33
33

2
2

7
7
-

20
20

4

_
_
_

2

-

6
2

2
2
-

•4
4
4
_.

IP

2

9

6

1

1

$

1
1

12
12

22
22

-

4

1
1

10
10

1

_

_

-

-

4

4

_

3
3

8
8

_

_

_

_

2

-

10
10
8
2 2/10
2
1

8

1
1

4

16
15

-

4

5
5

5

_

«.
_

-

5
5

1

_
_

-

_

28

2

-

-

_

16
16
-

7
5

1

-

4

29

2
2
2

_

30
30

6
6

-

1
17

1
1

1

10
7

-

2

39

12
27
27

1
1

2

4

18
13
5

3
3

30

-

3

2
1

“

2

-

4

2
2

5

2

-

5

2

3
3
-

-

3

_

8
8

5
3

-

3

4,

2
2

-

-

22
22

5

7
7
-

2

2

5
5
-

2

Excludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work.
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s f o llo w s i 6 a t $ 2 * 3 0 t o $ 2 * 4 0 ; 1 a t $ 2 . 5 0 t o $ 2 .6 0 ; 3 a t $ 2 . 6 0 t o $ 2 . 7 0 .
T ran sp ortatio n (ex clu d in g r a il r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




9

3
3
-

4

74
56
34-

12

7

7

2

4

2

8 ‘ 57
3 M
15
15

-

—:
_
_

_
„
_

_

_

-

_
_
_

3 112
•a

2

5
_

_

2

_

_
_

20
20

84

-

-

_

_

4

_

_

-

-

-

4

-

2
2

6
8

16

_

19
19

1
1
1

8

64

36
36

3
11
11

_

19

2

O ccupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn*, November 1951
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

-

1
_

1
X

Table A-4i

C

u

s t o d ia l,

W

Q A eJiO u A U U fa C U td

S U

iffU

H

if

O oC M

flc U u U U

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Term., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccupation and in d u stry d i v is i o n

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$ , $
$
$
$
$
Tnder 6 . 4 5 6 . 5 0 0 .5 5 6 .6 0 0 .6 5 0 . 7 0 8 .7 5 0 . 8 0 0 .8 5 0 . 9 0 0 .9 5 1.00 1.05 i .10 i . 1 5 1.20 1 . 2 5 i .30 1 . 3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 6 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 8 0 1.90

%
.5 0

p .45

Crane o p e r a to r s. e l e c t r i c b rid g e (under 2 0 t o n s ) . . . . .

a
132
117
15
15

1 ,5 8 9
621

.86
1.01

W holesale tra d e ............................................. ..................
R e t a il t r a d e ............................................. ....................

187
447
107
133

.8 7
.7 4
.6 7

!62

3 /3 9

748

.4 3

.6 5

.7 0

.7 5

.8 0

1 .4 5
1 .4 9
1 .1 8

J a n ito r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s (men) ....................... ..
M a n u fa c tu r in g ........................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................................................................

.6 0

.8 5

.9 0

and
.9 5 1.00 1 . 0 5 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.20 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1 . 4 0 1 .4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 6 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 over

1*38

Guards ..............................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................

.5 5

S e r v ic e s ............................................................................ ..
J a n ito r s . D o r te r s, and c le a n e r s (women) ...........................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
W holesale tra d e ................................................................
R e t a il t r a d e ....................................... ..............................
S a^vl a m
i i i
Order f i l l e r s ................................................................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................... .................................. ..
Uhnl m m I a trod a . Tr. TTt t t t t T. TT. t Tr. TTr. . . ____ _

968

2
2

.7 6

13
185
348

.7 5
.4 8
•3 0

726
195
5 31
429

45
-

25

51

61

70

85

-

-

-

25

51

46

61

70

-

6 15

31

59

60
6

79

10

.
48
3

15

2

4

6

5 17

14

26

36

3

517

14

26

36

3

-

-

U 04

12
2

21
5

35

3

-

-

85

232
201

5^33

1 .0 4

1.01

1 .0 7
1 .0 8

-

-

-

-

-

201

2
2

1

•
-

1

-

66

Shipping c le r k s ............................................................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
W holesale tra d e ................................................................
Ratjil'l I.miila
1
--i i i
-- -- t

274
132
142
116
19

21

93
54
39
13
4

1

233
78 ‘ 167
66
171
15
78
78
17
3 13
21
9

23
21
2

-

1

“

3
3

1 .3 2
1 .4 1
1 .2 5
1 .2 9
1 .0 7

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1
1

-

-

-

2

1

_
4
4,

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1
-

1

_

2

65
46
19
19
-

1

35
4
31
30

1

4

4

23

25
24

3

57
31
26

4

-

-

-

-

6
6

2
2

15
14

20
20

4

23
19
4

1

1

14
5
9

28

10
10

28
28

2
2

-

54
50
4

~
-

-

-

4

•
-

28

_
3

1

-

8
1

4
_

1

1

25

_

-

_

■ 4
•

_
_

_

_
_

2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

4
2
2

3

-

.
3

?
3

2
2

-

2

3

12

33

19
19

60

50
14
36
36

-

-

_

_

-

33

31
18
13

6

12
9
3

33

13

_

_

_
_
_

1

15
15
-

22
6

-

15

38
38
»

1
1

9
9
_

8
2
6
6

-

41 1 1 3
11 2 7
30
86
28

2

69
17

-

20

49

29

10
6

37

13

4
3

-

15

5

17
3
14

4

39
29

12

10
10

22

5

13
-

4

4

6

_

3
3

4

4

3
7

_

1

2 17
2 13

-

30
5

6

30
36
35

2
-

2
2

28

13

66

1
1

2

13

2

64
48
40
g

1

54
16
38

14
13

_ 10 _

14

69
44
25
18

7

112

1

-

113
74
39

9

13

1.01
1 .3 3
1 .5 9
1 .0 9
1 .1 4

59
197
27
58
54
37

16 1 3 4

31

98
103

256 2 4 9

16 121
16 1 15
6

1.05

R eceiv in g c le r k s ..........................................................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
Uhnl * m 1a tmrlA T. T. T........ t . _ _ . t . _ TTr......................




46

-

45

-

1 .0 7
1 .1 4
1 .0 5
1 .0 4

448
216

8
8

1 18

86 —
662
.3 8

102
Packers .............................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
W holesale tra d e ................................................................
R e t a il tra d e ......................................................................

17

13
5
8

3

1
1
2
2
-

16
8

1?
4

11
10

16

35

47
1
46
39

23
12
10
2

16

1

-

6
6

-

1 11
1 g
2
1

39
38

14

2
12
12

1
_

-

60
60

1

-

46
46

19

1 11

1
1

39

-

20
18

2

_

2
14

2
12

6

11

4
2
2

6
5
5

17
5

12
8

50

6

10
10

50
50

6

7
4
3

12

3
5

7
5

_

32
13
19
19

9
6
3
3

7
2
5
5

14
14
_
_

17
17
_
_

5
5
-

5
5
_

8

19
13
6
5
1

17
7

4

11
2
9
g

16
4
12
5

7

5

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

3

«

6
6

6

6
6

_

5

_

_

44
32
12
12

14

1

_
_

_

9
,

Table k-U i

C u s t o d ia l,

W a t e lt o u lU u f r a n d

S k ip p in g

O c c u p a t io n * - C o n t in u e d

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Term., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and in d u stry d i v is io n

ShiD D in g-and -receivins c le r k s ...............................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................................
N onm anu facturing.................................................................. ..

Number
of

255
" "T a j

130
43

han d lers and tru ck er s, h a n d .......................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................... ........................

3 ,7 9 1
1 ,6 6 9

2,122
674
744

R e t a il t r a d e ......................................................................

6 89

Truck d r iv e r s , l i g h t (under lir to n s ) .........................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................. ............................ ..
U irtTcoal a froH a
V
TT
i r i ........
r
R e t a il trad e ......................................................................

291
163
1 88
82
77

Truck d r iv e r s , medium (l^- to and in c lu d in g 4- to n s ) . . .
M a n u fa c tu r in g ......................... ................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................... ..........................................
PnKHf* rrH U +Ioo *
, i r • t • tt r - - - - t t

1,038

R e t a il t r a d e ......................................................................

192

252
776

300

2 79

Truck d r iv e r s , heavy (o v e r 4- to n s , t r a i l e r ty p e ) .........
M anufacturing ......................................... ........................
N onm anu facturing................... ................................................
PnWM » ,,+n i H o o *

T ruckers, power ( f o r k - l i f t ) ........................................... ..
M a n u fa c tu r in g ........... .................................. ..........................
Mrtnmoniifar*+_Trr^n^v ( . . . . ( | i | f i r T T f _. , , | l l t I TT- T- 1 | T
r

Watchmen............................. .................... .............................. ..
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
4 j n+4 1 4 +4 on K
*
R e t a il tra d e ................. .....................................................
oao
( (j
i i r ■ ' i | r | | | r ■ r t~ i i i

1/
2/
2/

y
y
*

.9 5
1 .0 4

.88

-

24

8

24

8

36
36

24

-

8

4

1

4

301
365
18

27

1

4

145

_

8

76
9
67
30

-

.9 9

.34
.8 2

-

-

_

.9 0

1.00
.84
.8 5
.8 4

.9 7
'0 2 “
.9 5
1 .1 9
.8 3
I 76

202

102

--- 102 “




92

38
54
10 ■ 29

-

-

1

-

8

-

-

-

-

1

-

8

21

11

20

_
-

-

-

24
24

18
18

36
36

1 70
19
151

167

-

74
36
38

-

-

-

-

24

18

36

12
155

69 1 5 4
1

82

5

32

23
13

10
2
8

30
19

11

572

46

32

22 103

233

2

414
373

13

130

3

47
47
-

26

29

36
-

38
44

10 1 4
6
25

5
8

8 28
2 27
6 1
1

2

3

-

-

-

15
15
-

12 12
- 10

10
6

4

3

4

- i
_
_
_

4

- j
-

.
-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

9
9
-

-

17
17
-

-

-

-

-

-

"

2
2

49
49

4
4
-

10
10

-

5
5

12
12
1
1

2
2

-

-

9
9

16

9

9

-

97

54
45
9

6

33

6

25

-

8

33
7

26

“ ----5-

1

3
3

_

_

2

1

3

1

6

-

-

1

6

1

_
6

5
5

16

1

_

4

95
30
65
41

14
3

1

16

3

12

8

16

-

11

64
42
22

9

3

66
31

30

17
14
3

4
3

20
2
2

“

3

-

43
34
9

-

8 33
8 27
6
6
30
30

5

2
2

1 80
180
-

%

$

$

1.60 1 .7 0 1.80 1 . 9 0

and
1 . 7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 over
5
5
-

18

_
-

-

-

-

7

_
-

-

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

16
16

4

141
141
1 41

1

1

-

1
8
8

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 27
2 37

12
12

-

12
12

1 72
1 72

18
18

-

7
7

“

-

10
10

-

24
34

6
6

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

2

18
17

14

10

1

12

1
2

7
7

1

1

9

3

1

-

-

3
3
-

3

2

3

1

2

7

1

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

2

2

-

2

-

15

-

-

2
2

3

2

8_
8

10

10

13

_

10
10

_
-

27
27
-

120
120

-

-

2
2

-

283

9

18

299

12
1 287

5

-

105

1

3

6

1 .3 5
1 .3 5 '

1“

8

16

10

_
-

13

-

20 3 2
2
4

25

$

23

19

25

10

1.11

158 17

11 12

33

1

11

82

93

1

33
33

-

-

10
10

8
20

E xcludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work.
Study lim it e d to men workers e x c ep t where o th e rw ise in d ic a te d .
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s f o llo w s : 3 a t 3 0 to 35 c e n ts; 32 a t 35 to 4.0 c e n ts; 4 a t 4-0 to 4.5 c e n ts .
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s : 25 a t 3 0 to 35 c e n ts ; 1 2 a t 35 to 4-0 c e n ts ; 6 7 a t 4-0 t o 4.5 c e n ts .
Workers were d is tr ib u t e d a s f o llo w s : 3 33 under 3 0 c e n ts .
T ran sp ortation (e x c lu d in g r a il r o a d s ) , communication, and oth er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

9 9 7 5 8 2 0 - 52 - 2

24
24

-

1 .3 9
1 .5 6 “
.90

.88
3 12
--- 153 “ — 7^5
.80
1 49
/q
.77
20
.8 6
.9 2
41
.6 6
34

350 170
3 50 “522" 71
7 79 1 28
99
101
67
42
3 71
33
66
3 07
19

-

1 .0 9
5 5 “ ' 1 .1 5
3 12
1.08
1 .1 8
**i1
.86
76
433
354
79

666 1 1 2 9

1

1

-

368
—

12

T ruckers, power (o th e r than f o r k - l i f t ) ....................... ..
M a n u fa c tu r in g ........................... .............................. ................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly
0.60 0 .6 5 0 .7 0 0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0.90 0 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 . 5 0
earnings Under 0 .4 5 0 .5 0 0 . 5 5
$
0 .4 5 .5 0 .5 5 .60 . 6 5 .7 0 .7 5 .8 0 .8 5 .9 0 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1.60
$
1.20
8
2 13 11
1 6 15
46
7
29
19
12 24 1 9
2 13
8
2 12
12
11 1 .2 3
33
9
7
1.18
8
16 15
6
8 7
1 15
3
44
\
1
20
15
7
8
14
13
g
3
7
5
7 10
1,06

10,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-40s

R cU Ia jo o c U

1
/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
h o u rly
ea rn in g s

Number
of
workers

O ccupation 2 /

y

*
1 .4 0

#
1 .4 5

%

%

*
1 .6 5

$
1 .7 0

%

1 .5 5

*
1 .6 0

%

1 .5 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

$
1 .8 5

*
1 .9 0

$
1 .9 5

1 .4 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2
-

*
1 .3 5
and
under
1 .4 0

-

-

45
-

2 43
1
-

1
-

-

-

32
-

13
-

11
32
115
16

33
6
14
5

%
89
38
289
142
1 29
21

C arpenters, m aintenance ........................................................
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m aintenance ..................... ..............................
H elp e r s, t r a d e s , m aintenance ..............................................
J a n ito r s and c l e a n e r s ............................................................
M a c h in ists, m aintenance ........................................................
P ipe f i t t e r s , m aintenance ....................................................

1 .9 1
1 .9 3
1 .6 2
1 .3 6
1 .9 3
1 .9 4

139
-

1/ The stu d y covered r a ilr o a d s (Group 4 0 ) w ith more than 2 0 w orkers, a s d e fin e d in th e Standard I n d u s t r ia l C l a s s if ic a t io n Manual (1 9 4 9 e d i t i o n ) prepared by th e Bureau o f
th e B udget. Data r e la t e t o a December 1 9 5 1 p a y r o ll p e r io d .
2 / Data l im it e d t o men workers.
2 / E xcludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work.

T able B-63*

O ccupation and sex

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS
Average 2 /
$
$
$
$
s
%
$
$
$
7 .5
Weekly 1 a m 0 l o .o o I 2.50 S 5 .0 0 1 7 . 5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under
30.00 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 .5 0 40.00 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 62.50 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0

OF—

$
$
$
&
$
$
$
6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 90.00
and
70.00 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0 over

Men

%
U nderw riters ....................................... . ................

13

4 0 .0

6 8 .5 0

-

25
20
18
10
39
74

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

a . 50
3 1 .5 0
4 1 .5 0
4 2 .0 0
3 8 .0 0
3 5 .0 0

-

-

-

3
8

3

-

3

-

1

-

-

1

2

-

_

4

3

_

1

_
2
8
1

3

3
3
3
1

3

1
1

-

-

-

2
1
4
1
1
1

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

3

_

_

_

_

_

Women
C le r k s :
Accounting ........................................................
F i l e , c la s s B ..................................................
Premium a c c ep to r s ...............................................
S e c tio n heads ........................................................
S ten ograp h ers, g en era l .....................................
T y p is t s , c la s s B ..................................................

1/
2/

8
_
_
11

..
4
14

7

1

2

2
10
19

4
2
10
17

4
_
_

5

_
2
4.

_

_

The stu d y covered in su ran ce c a r r ie r s (Group 6 3 ) w ith more th ar 2 0 w orkers, as d e fin e d in th e Standard I n d u s tr ia l C l a s s if ic a t io n Manual (1 9 4 9 e d it io n ) prepared by th e Bureau o f th e Budget.
Hours r e f l e c t th e workweek f o r which em ployees r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s tr a ig h t- tim e s a la r i e s and th e earnin gs correspond t o t h e se weekly h ou rs.




O ccupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Term., November 1 9 5 1
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

11.

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C -15: B u lid U t C f G O + U t> lU c ti0 + l

Table C -2 0 5 : R o J z e S lie d

January 2 , 1952
C l a s s if ic a t io n
B r ic k la y e r s .............................................................
C arpenters ................................................................
E l e c t r ic ia n s ......................... ..................................
P a in te r s ....................................................................
P la s te r e r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plumbers ....................................................................
B u ild in g la b o r e r s .................................................

Table C-27: P / U n iiH f - G o t U iM M o d

- G (m t i*U t e d

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1
Rate
per
hour
$ 3,000
2 .1 2 5

2.600
2 .0 6 3

2.813
2.650
1.000

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1
Rate
per
hour

C l a s s if ic a t io n

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
Bench h e lp e r s , machine h e lp e r s ,
and wrapping-machine h e lp e r s ...........
R^nd
T- TTT. . . . . T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H e lp e r s:
F i r s t 3 m o n th s ........ ..............................
L to 9 months .........................................
A fte r 9 months ........................................

Hours
per
week

$ 0,920

40
40

.8 2 0

40
40
40

.860

.860
.920

Rate
per
hour

C la s s if ic a t io n
Newspapers: - Continued
P ressm en-in-charge:
Day work ............................................. ..
Ni ght vr»i*lr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S te r e o ty p e r s :
Dny urvpk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ni ght work ................................... ..

Hours
per
week

$ 2 ,6 6 0
2 .8 1 3

37*
37*

2 .3 8 7

2.520

37*
37*

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Table C-41: j H o c a l
Table C-205:

Bah& U ed

Table C-27:

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1

O p & ia t U U f

P A 4 4 ttU U p

October 1 , 1 9 5 1

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1
C la s s if ic a t io n
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread:
Foremen ...................................................
M ixers, ovenmen, and leadmen .........
D iv id er o p e r a to r s, bun-machine
op e r a to r s .........................................
Molder o p e r a to r s, bench hands,
and oven h e lp e r s ...........................
Bread ra ck ers ........................................
H elp e r s:
F i r s t 3 months ...............................
4 t o 9 m o n th s .........! ......................
A fte r 9 months ...............................
Cake:
Foremen ....................................................
Leadmen ....................................................
M ixers ......................................................
Ovenmen ....................................................
Doughnut-machine o p e r a to r s .............
In g r e d ie n t s c a le r s .............................
Scaling-m achine o p e r a to r s ,
benchmen ......................... ..................
Checkers ..................................................
Leadwomen............................. ..
Icing-m achine o p era to rs ...................
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s .............
Female h e lp e r s :
F i r s t 3 months ...............................
4 t o 9 months .................................
A fte r 9 months ...............................
Agreement B:
M ixers, ovenmen (bread) .........................
Ovenmen (cake) ..................... ......................
Dividerm en, roll-m achine
op e r a to r s ................................................
Bench hands ..................................................
M olderm en......................................... ............
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s ...................




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$ 1 ,7 5 0
1 .4 7 0

40
40

1 .3 6 0

40

1 .3 1 0
1 .1 7 0

40
40

.9 6 0
1 .0 1 0
1 .0 6 0

40
40
40

1 .5 9 0
1 .4 7 0
1 .4 5 0
1 .3 9 0
1 .3 7 0
1 .2 7 0

40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .2 4 0
1 .2 2 0
1 .1 7 0
1 .1 0 0

1.040

40
40
40
40
40

.8 8 0
.9 3 0
.9 8 0

40
40
40

1 .2 9 5
1 .2 1 0
1 .1 9 0
1 .1 5 5
1 .1 5 5
1 .1 2 0

40
40
40
40
40
40

C las s i f i c a t i o n
Book and jo b shops:
Bindery women ......................................................
Bookbinders ..........................................................
C om positors, hand ..............................................
E le c tr o ty p e r s ............................. ........................
Machine o p e r a to r s ............................. ................
Photoengravers ......................................... ..
P ress a s s is t a n t s and fe e d e r s :
C ylinder fe e d e r s .........................................
P la te n fe e d e r s , men ...................................
P la te n f e e d e r s , women ...............................
Pressm en, c y l i n d e r ...........................................
2 - c o lo r , over 25 x 38 in c h e s .................
O ffs e t p r e s se s :
1 7 x 2 2 in c h e s and up to 2 2 x 3 4 . .
2 2 x 3 4 in c h e s .......................................
Over 2 2 x 3 4 in c h e s .............................
2 - c o lo r ......................................................
Pressm en, p la te n ...............................................
Newspapers:
C om positors, hand:
Day w o r k .........................................................
N ight work ......................................................
Machine o p e r a to r s:
Day work ..........................................................
N ight w o r k ....................... ..............................
Machine ten d e rs (m a c h in is ts ):
Day work ....................... ................................ ..
N ight work ......................................................
M a ile r s :
Day work ..........................................................
N ight work ......................................................
P h o toengravers:
Day work ..........................................................
Night work ......................................................
Pressm en, web p r e s se s :
N ight work ......................................................

Rate
per
hour

$ 0 ,9 9 3
1 .9 8 5
2 .1 5 0

40
40
40
37*
40
37*

C l a s s if ic a t io n

Hours
per
week

1-man ca r 3 and b u sses:
F i r s t year ........................................................

2.400
2 .1 5 0
2 .5 6 0
1 .4 0 0
.9 7 5
2 .0 2 5
2 .0 7 5
2 .0 0 0
2 .0 5 0
2 .0 7 5
2 .1 2 5
1 .7 2 0

40
40
40
40
40

2 .5 0 0
2 .6 3 3

37*
37*

2 .5 0 0
2 .6 3 3

37*
37*

2 .5 0 0
2 .6 3 3

37*
37*

2 .1 4 0
2 .2 6 0

37*
37*

2 .7 0 0
2 .9 2 7

37*
37*

2 .4 0 7
2 .5 4 0

37*
37*

1.460
1.510

Table C-42 : M o t o S lP u ic J z

48
48
48

jb > U v e S ld

J f e lp & U

40
40
40
40
40

1.130

$ 1 ,4 1 0

A fter 2 y e a r s .................

J u ly 1 , 1 95 1
C l a s s if ic a t io n
Bakery:
Agreement A .....................................................
Agreement B ............................. ........................
Brewery d r iv e r s ...................................................
F i r s t h e lp e rs .................................................
F u r n itu r e :
D r iv e r s , oth er than c i t y ...........................
D r iv e r s , c i t y .................................................
H elpers
G eneral - F r e ig h t:
S outheastern area:
Turn a r o u n d ...............................................
Peddle runs ................................................
Southw estern area:
Turn around ................................................
Peddle runs ................................................
Grocery - W holesale:
A fte r 6 months ...............................................
Pick-up and d e liv e r y firm s:
Under 3 months ...............................................
Over 3 months ..................................................
Railway e x p r e ss ....................................................
j/

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$ 1 ,1 5 5
1 .2 2 0
.8 3 8
.8 3 8

60
48
40
40

.9 3 0
.9 8 0

40
40
40

1 .4 1 0
1 .3 3 0

OQ
£/)

1.460
1 .4 6 0

u /)
0/)

.7 8 0

40

•1.13 0
1 .1 8 0
1 .6 3 2

50
50
40

.900

Inform ation n ot a v a ila b le .

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LAB®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12,

D:
T
able D i
-:

M s U t i m u m

Minimum rate ( n c n s
i et)

All e tablishments .........
s

Entrance Rates

C s t b u M G e

P a t & l

P l a t U

W & J i & l A ,

1
/

Percent o plant w rkers i e t blishments with spe i i d
f
o
n sa
cfe
minimum r t s ±tr ae
Manufacturing e t blishments
sa
indu t i s
sre
with Pbi
ulc
2/
0 r utilities* Wholesale Retail Services
21-100 101-500 5 1 o
tae
rd
tae
rd
workers workers wmore
o
rkers
100.0

40 and under..............

6.7
25
.

45 ....................
Over 45 a t n e 50........
nd i d r
50....................
Over 5 a under 5 ........
0 nd
5
55....................
Over 5 and under 60 ........
5
6 0 ....................
Over 60 a d under 6 ........
n
5
6 ....................
5
70....................
7 ....................
5
Over 7 and under 80 ........
5
80....................
Over 80 a under 8 ........
nd
5
85....................
Over 8 a under 90 ........
5 nd
90....................
Over 90 and under 95 .........
95 ....................
Over 95 a under 1 .......
nd
00
100....................
Over 100 a t n e 1 5 .......
nd i d r 0
Over 105 a under 110 .......
nd
Over 1 and t n e 115 .......
10
idr
115 ....................
Over 1 5 a t n e 120.......
1 nd i d r
120 a d over ..............
n

1
.3
51
.
1
.2
25
.
.
5
.
4
.
5
.
8
.
3
28.7
34
.4.
-2
55
.
70
.
16
.
1
.0
1.9
1.4
3.4
11
.
19
.
.
8
.
2
.
3
23
.
6
.9

.U

1
00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

_
—
_

_

-

-

_

_
_
_
-

_

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
24.4
50
.
75
.

_

_
_
_
35.8
52
.
6.7
6.7
8
.6
11.1
75
.
8
.7
31
.
6.6

_
42.8
58
.
6.8
1
3.3
59
.
4.4
50
.
4.0
51
.
4.0
2.9

_

E tablishments with n
s
o
e tablished minimum .......
s

(2/)

-

-

Information not available .....

6.2

-

-

1/
2/
2/
*

foi

100.0
_
_
_
_
-

-

3.8
2.8
2.7
3.8
.
9
.
8
56
.
3
.4

_

_

06
.
2.
50
10.0
15.3
19.4
-

_
61.6
6
.9
7
.7
-

_

48.7
1 .5
2
4
.1
20.0

_

Table E l
-:

S U U t

Shift differential

56
.
_
_
_
4
.7
.
1.8
—
2.6
—
-

_
32
.
7
.9
24.2

.
14.4
39
.
55
.
2.7
31
.
_

27.8

.
1

-

-

-

-

-

P A M U i a H > i

Percent o pla t
f n
workers e
mployed
on each shi t
f
in All
manufacturing
i d st i s
nu re
3 o
d r
2d
o her
t
s ift
h
shi t
f

Percent of workers on extra s i t ,
hfs
all establishments .............

14.2

Receiving shift differentials .....

02.7

54
.

Uniform c n s ( e h u ) ......
et pr or
I n « * opns -T
T d T 5 .it .rtrltT.... T.
5 c nts ................
e
Over 5 and under 10 cen s ...
t
10 c n s ......... ......
et
Over 10 cen s ............
t

10.0
2.9
59
.
.
3
.
9

4.5
2.8
.
5
(/
1)
1
.2

Uniform percentage ..........
Over 5 a under 10 percent . .
nd
..
10 percent....... t .......

2.7
.
1
2.6

.
9
_
.
9

1
.5

.
7

61
.

-

_
_

Receiving n differential .......
o
1/ L s than . 5 o 1 p r e t
es
0 f ecn.

L w rates formally e tablished for hiring either men or women plant workers other t an w t h e ,
o est
s
h acmn
Excludes data for f n n e i s r n e a real e t t .
i a c , n u a c , nd
sae
L s than . 5 o 1 p r e t
es
0 f ecn.
Transportation (ex l d n rail o d ) commun c t o , and other p
cuig
ras,
iain
ublic u i i i s
tlte.




Supplementary Wage Practices

100.0

12.0
6.8
61
.
15.8
54
.
9
.2
25
.
1
.9
23
.
35
.
1.0
13.7
12
.
1.9
33
.
7.4
_
_
6.0
_

_

_

100.0

E:

Occupational Wage S r e , Memphis, Tenn., November 1 5
uvy
91
U S DEPARTMENT OF L B R
..
AO
Bureau of L b r S
a o tatistics

13,

Table E-2:

S

c

h

e

d

u

le

d

W

s

e

e

k

ly

J lo

u

M

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS. ^EMPLOYED I
N—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Weekly hou s
r
Al
l
idsre
nutis
All establishments............. .

Under 3 hours.............. .
5
3 hours........ .......... .
5
Over 3 and under 3$ hours.......
5
73 $ hours....................
7Over 3 $ and under 40 hours.......
740 hours........ ......... .
Over 40 and under 44 hours.......
44 hours.....................
Over 44 and under 48 hours.......
48 hours.*...... .......... .
Over 48 a d u
n nder 5 hours....... .
0
5 hours••••.................
0
Over 5 hours................
0

.100*0
0.2
_
2.7
1.2
74.0
33
.
11.1
51
.
13
.
. 9

Mn f c u i g
auatrn

100.0

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

W oeae
hlsl
tae
rd

100.0

IPQ.o

_
.
29.4
46.4
_
4.2
1.
53
4.7

-

86.0
4.9
16
.
43
.
-

32
.

.
2

-

-

Fnne*
iao*

. J Q t ___ -AQQtQ
.LOS

0.9
3.6
5.
11
3.4
34.4
6.6

-

.

Rti tae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

^

_
_

_
2.4
9
7.6
.
_
-

_
64.4
1.0
1 .5
3
5.1
12.5

_

_
7 .9
6
6.8
11.4
4.5
.
4
-

.

J.QQ,P.
.

2.5

1.0

a uatrn
idsre 2/ M n f c u i g
nutis

100.0
02
.
6.1
1
.1
.
1
62.1
25
.
63
.
6.4
9.7
.
2
4.6

100.0
_
12.0
2.1

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

.1QQ.0

_

W o eae
h l sl
tae
rd

100.0
_

7.
56
_
3.6
4.7
2.0

49.6
_
1.2
6
.3
20.1

0.9
5 .1
9
4.7
1.
56
75
.
12.2

_

22.8

_

_

S nes
ede

100.0

100.0
2.6

_
_

_

Rti tae
eal rd

_
_

.7

5.
75
93
.
4.8
6
.3
1.
12
o
82
.
18
.

11.8
„
23.1
16.0
36.8
6.2
3
.5

Data rel t t women w r e s
ae o
okr.
2/ I c u e data f r I d s r e other than those sho n s p r t l .
nlds
o nutis
w eaaey
* Transportation ( x l d n r i r a s , communication,and oth r p
ecuig alod)
e ublic u i i i s
tlte.
** F n n e I s r n e and real e t t .
iac, nuac,
sae

\J

Table E 3
-:

P & i d

d t o lidcufi

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

Number of paid h
olidays

All establishments........... .
Establishments providing paid
holidays .......... ........
Under 3 days ..............
3 days ..................
4 d ys ............... .....
a
5 days ....................
5$ days.......... .......
6 days ....................
7 days ..................
8d
ays ......... ...........
9d
ays ....................
11 days ...................
12 days...................
14 days.......... ........
Establishments providing no paid
holidays .....••..............

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Mnfc u i g
aua t r n

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

-1QP,0

100.0

ISP
Qt,

99.7

99.3

100.0
-

.
5
1.2
5.4
37.5
1.3
28.5
12.5

1.6

-

3.0
5.5
18.6

~
43.1

24.8
4.3

. 2

-

. 3

1.4
35.3

-

49.1
14.2

“

W o eae
h l sl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I
N—
Fnn e *
ia c *

.. .100*0___

.

100.0

-100*0

100.0

100.0
-

97.9
2.5
3.4
26.4
54.4

100.0
1.2

.
5

-

.7
9.6
32.9
6.3
33.5
12.7

90.2

22
.

-

-

-

9.3

-

9.6

21.7

6.8
-

. 7

. 2
7.4

3.4

Srie
evcs

.9

. 11
.
41.8
19.0
-

11.2
-

2.1

Al
l
aua t r n
idsre 1/ Mnf c u i g
nutis
100.0
89.3
4.1
5.5
5.6
34.7
.4
31.4
5 . 5

2.1
-

10.7

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

_100
_Q.

100.0

90.2
-

95.0

10.4
4.7
16.4

-

47.6 .
7.9
3.2

_
_
-

32.7

_

57.5
4.8

-

_
_
-

9.8

5.0

W oeae
h lsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

100*0 , „ _ 1 0 0
_0.
96.8

Srie
evcs
_ 100.0

6.9

93.3
15.3

58.2
1.2

3.6
51.7
4.0

75.0

2.3
30.7
22.9

14.8

3.0

_

10.3
5 . 5

_
_
_
-

3.2

_
_

_
.
_

_

1.1
_
_

_

6.7

41.8

'
1/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

14.

Table e- *
4

P a i d

V t G c a t U u U

(f y o b m a l

P

& U U

a q

m

A )

PERCENT or OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N

Vacation policy

All e tablishments ..............
s

Al
l
idsre
nutis

100.0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

W o eae
h l sl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

100,0 .. 100.0
..
..

100.0

100.0

.J f e .
flQ

100.0

M nf~uig
» u-trn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Fnn e *
iac *

Srie
evcs

A
H
idsre
nutis

Mn f c u i g
auatrn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

100.0

...
. 100*0

100.0

W oeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

, 1Q0*0 . 100*0 ,
—
.

100.0

1 vear of s r i e
evc
Establishments with paid vacations ...

9
8.3

99.2

100.0

93.4

9 .8
9

100.0

100.0

92.9

9 .5
3

94.2

91.5

95.0

82.7

1 week....... ....... .....
2 weeks ...................
O 3 weeks............... .
ver

44.1
5.
38
.
4

78.8
2.
03
.
9

45.2
46.5
17
.

64.0

35.8
-

38
.
96.2

33.4
66.6
-

79.8
12.9
.
2

89.5
4.0
-

81.2
13.0
-

66.4
23.6
1.5

63.7
31.3
-

79.7
3.0
-

Establishments with no paid vacations .
.

1.7

47.2
52.0
.
8

-

6.6

.
2

-

71
.

65
.

58
.

85
.

5.0

17.3

Establishments with paid vacations • • .
••

98.3

99.2

100.0

93.4

9
9.8

100.0

94.7

95.6

9 .3
9

91.5

95.0

87.3

1 week....................
O er 1 and under 2 weeks .......
v
2 weeks ...................
3 weeks ................... .
Over 3 weeks......... ......

2 .7
1
.
1
7 .7
4
1.4
.
4

3 .9
9
5.
92
.
9

30.9
5 .4
4
6.4
1.7

6
2.3

-

33.5
1.0
15
.

25.1
6
9.9
-

71.1
35
.
12.7
-

-

6.6

-

-

53
.

4.4

38.4
6.
09
.
7

55.5

31.9
.
1
.
1

82.3
1.
33
-

1.7

10.2
89.6
.
2

27.2
1.7
7
1.1
-

Establishments with no paid vacations .
•

29.7
69.5
•“
.
8

85
.

5.0

1 .7
2

Establishments with paid vacations . . .
..

98.3

99.2

100.0

93.4

99.8

100.0

9 .7
4

95.6

9.
93

9
1.5

95.0

8
7.3

1 week...... ..............
2 weeks........... ....... .
O 2 and under 3 weeks..... .
ver
3 weeks............ ...... .
O er 3 weeks............. .
v

4.3
91.3
.
4
1.9
.
4

31
.
96.0
.
9

12
.
8 .1
4
6.4
1.7

12.2
80.8
1
.6
.
1

4.8
90.8
-

_

9.
93
-

1.6
87.4
1.0
15
.

18.3
69.9
_
68
.
-

64.0
2
3.3
_
-

1
.7

-

66
.

1
0.2
87.7
.
6
13
.
.
2

2.
65
7.
35
-

Establishments with no paid vacations .
.

.
3
97.6
13
.
.
8

-

53
.

4-4

.
7

85
.

50
.

12.7

Establishments with paid vacations . • •
.•

9 .3
8

99.2

100.0

93.4

99.8

100.0

9 .7
4

95.6

9 .3
9

9 .5
1

95.0

87.3

1 week.... .............. .
2 weeks.................. .
O er 2 and under 3 weeks....... .
v
3 weeks ...................
Over 3 weeks....... .

4.3
5.
91
2.6
3.
18

.
3
64.8

31
.
3 .8
9

1.2
5.
43

2.
65
7.
35

11.6
5.
23

3.7
57.0

«.

5 .4
8

1.6
6
3.1

18.3
44.7

64.0
23.3

•

-

-

_

_

34.1
-

5.
62
.
9

36.2
1.7

10.2
46.6
.
6
42.0
.
4

30.1
.
7

34.9
-

40.9

2 .3
5
15
.

2.
95
25
.

_

Establishments with no paid vacations .
.

1
.7

6
.6

.
2

53
.

4.4

.
7

8
.5

50
.

L
~

2 vears o serv c
f
ie
100.0
_
100.0

.3

Ijoari o _
f agvj,oe
100.0
«
.
98.6
1.4
“
-

1 y a s ,f a r l e
? e y ,o e v q .

.5

.
8

I o v . s data f r Industries oth r t an those s o n s p r t l .
nlde
o
e h
hw eaaey
* Transportation (e c u i g r
x l d n ailroads), com u i a i n and other p
mncto,
ublic u i i i s
tlte.
* Fn
* i ance, i s r n e and real e t t .
nuac,
sae

ij




100.0
-

74.2
14.2

11.6
-

-

-

12.7

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1 5 ,

Table E-5:

P a id S ic J l

(Q o b m o l P sU M U itH tf)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Mnfcuig
auatrn

Pb i
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
t ae
rd

Rt i t a e
ea l r d

Fnne*
iac*

Sr i e
ev c s

100.0

100.0

ipo,o

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

16.5

5.6

19.9

4.5

55.6

2.5

18.9

Under 5 days ..................
5 days .......................
6 days .......................
7 days ................. .....
10 days ............ .........
12 days ................ .....
15 days ......................
20 days ......................

1.6
1.3
2.9
1.0
1.5
1.1
6.9
.2

5.2
-

2.1
14.2
3.6

1.1
-

-

-

.4
“

-

-

~

~

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

83.5

94.4

80.1

26.3

10.6

21.7

3 days .......................
4 days .......................
5 days .......................
6 days .......................
7 days .......................
10 days ......................
12 days......................
15 days ......................
20 days ......................
Over 20 days ..................

.6
1.5
7.0
2.5
1.0
2.4
1.2
6.9
1.0
2.2

1.6
4.9
1.8
2.3

2.1
14.2
5.4
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

73.7

89.4

All establishments ................

Al
l
.
idsre 1 M n f c u i g
nutis / a u a t r n

Pbi'
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rt i t a e
ea l r d

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.8

4.4

5.9

“

39.2

6.7

2.2
1.2
3.1

4.4
4.8
1.1
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
—

1.4
14.0
_
11.5
12.3
~

5.6
_
1.1
_
_
“

Sr i e
evcs

6 months of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

-

-

-

13.3

-

-

5.8
36.5

1.4
1.1

17.8
~

.1
2.5
2.7
—

_
_
_
—

95.5

44.4

97.5

81.1

88.2

95.6

94.1

100.0

60.8

93.3

32.9

55.6

15.0

20.7

14.8

5.0

9.0

16.6

39.2

16.7

7.0
17.9
4.6
_
3.4

12.9
6.2
36.5
~

3.3
1.4
5.5
4.8

17.8
.
.
~

.8
.6
4.4
2.8
_
.4
3.1
2.6
.1

1.5
_
3.5
_
_
_
_

_
4.8
_
3.8
.4
_
-

5.8
9.3
_
_
_
_
_
_
1.5

_
1.4
11.5
_
_
14.0
12.3
_

•
12.2
3.4
_
1.1
_
_
“

67.1

44.4

85.0

79.3

85.2

95.0

91.0

83.4

60.8

83.3

4.5

-

-

-

1 vear of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave.......... .

-

78.3

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

_
1.9
1.0

_
"

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

T

a

b

l e

P a i d
E

- S 5l & : k

J l & a a e

( f y o k m a l

P

a o u

I U

I)

o h

-C

o n t i n u e d

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ................

Al
l
idsre
nutis

M nfcuig
a uatrn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

100.0

100.0

100.0

26.4

10.6

22.9

_

3.3

W o eae
h l sl
tae
rd

100.0 ■

Rti tae
eal rd

100.0

Fnn e *
iac *

100.0.

Srie
evcs

Al - , a u a t r n
l
idsre 4/ Mn f c u i g
nutis

1D0.0

100.0

20.7

15.9

1.9

1.4
4.0

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

W oeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

5.0 .

21.8

16.6

39.2

16.7

.
6

12.7

9.3

1.4

3.4

5.8

1.2
10.3
11.5

1.1

100.0

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............
3 days.......................
5 days .......................
6 days.......................
7 or 8 days .................
10 days ......................
12 days......................
20 days....................
22 days ....................
24 days ....................
Over 24 days .................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............

.3
3.6
.9
2.4
7.8
1.1

1.6
.9
.
1

4.9

1.6
1.8
2.3

-

7.7

32.9

55.6

15.0

_

_

_

7.6

2.2
-

3.3

-

1.0
-

10.7
5.8

1.4

17.8

.
4

4.8

“

-

11.6

19.6

10.3

~

'3.4

36.5,

5.5
-

2.8

“

8.6
.
5
•

1.0
.5
3.1
2.5

-

•
6

3.5
.9

_
-

-

12.2
-

1.5

2.5
12.3

~

-

73.6

89.4

77.1

67.1

44.4

85.0

79.3

84.1

95.0

78.2

83.4

60.8

83.3

26.4

10.6

22.9

32.9

55.6

15.0

20.7

15.9

5.0

21.8

16.6

39.2

16.7

2.1
1.2

7.6

1.9

1.0
•

1.4
1.2

12.2
3.4

4.6
8.1
7.0

_
4.7

17.8

15 vears of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............
Under 3 days .................
5 days .....................
6 days.....................
7 days .....................
10 days ....................
12 days ....................
18 days ....................
20 or 21 days..... ............
Over 2 1days ..................

2.6
2.0

-

.8
11.1

2.3
“

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

73.6

89.4

i/
*
**

.
2
3.1
.9

_

4.9

1.0

1.6
-

_
-

4.7

1.8

5.4

_
-

_

_

.3
4.6

1.0
1.0

.
6
3.5
.9

.

_

12.7

3.5

.
-

-

_

3.9

-

5.8
5.8

_

_

_

11.5
10.3

_

1.1 '

5.8
10.7

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

14.2

5.6

36.9

1.1
9.2

-

3.8

-

5.2

1.5

14.8

-

77.1

67.1

44.4

85.0

79.3

84.1

95.0

78.2

83.4

60.8

83.3

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), oaamunioation, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




- .
2.2
-

3.0
2 . 2

_

17,

Table E-6t

M

O

H

jb
l

O

c L

u

U

iO

H

B

o

*

U

U

&

l

1/ I c u e data f r indus r e other than tho e sh w s p r t l .
nlds
o
tis
s on eaaey
7j T n u l c t d t t l
Jdpiae oa.
* T ansportation ( x l d n rai r a s , c m u i a i n and other p
r
ecuig lod) omncto,
ublic u i i i s
tlte.
* F n n e i s r n e and real e t t .
* iac, nuac,
sae

Table E 7
-*

OdiAdtna*toe a n d P-etUion PAanl

p 5RCENT OF O F C WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
i
FIE
N

T p o plan
ye f

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Mnfcuig
auatrn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

100.0

100.0

100.0

E tablishments with i surance o
s
n
r
pension plans 2/......... ....

8.
53

7.
85

Life i s rance ..............
nu
Health i surance ............ .
n
Hospitalisation ..............
Retirement pension ............

74.0
49.6
5.
78
3.
29

14.7

A l e tablishments ........... ..
l s

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Fnne*
iao*

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.JLQ9»o

9.
73

92.3

86.2

98.6

36.7

7 .8
4

7 .5
5

96.8

78.2

76.1

3.
97

68.6
5.
88
5.
59
40.1

6
5.8
73.1
35.8
33.2

7.
52
46.2
5 .4
8
31.0

82.2
68.0
66.0
41.2

9 .8
0
1 .3
4
7 .0
6
24.4

3 .1
4
33.4
21.2
7.9

63.9
46.4
43.0
2.
88

6
8.9
44.0
44.7
3 .6
7

6.
99
7
8.7
3 .5
4
30.6

5.
60
3 .1
6
49.1
2.
23

64.5
50.4
49.6
20.6

3.
25
32.4
1 .8
8
4.5

2.
15

27
.

77
.

13.8

1.4

6.
33

2
5.2

2.
45

3.2

2.
18

23.9

6.
03

I c u e data for i d
nlds
n ustries o h r than t o e s own s p r t l .
te
hs h
eaaey
Ieulctd t t l
fdpiae oa.
Transportation (exc u i g r ilroads), c m u i a i n and o
ldn a
omncto,
ther public uti i i s
lte.
F n n e i s r n e and real e t t .
iac, nuac,
sae




PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N
Al . auatrn
l
idsre 1/ Mnfcuig
nutis

Rti tae
eal rd

Establishments with no insurance o
r

1/
2/
*
*
*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Srie
evcs

Rti tae
eal rd

Snes
ede

,
100,0.. .i 0 ,
.00

Occupational Wage S r e , M
u v y emphis, T n . November 1
en,
951
US DPR
. . E A TMENT O LABOR
F
Bureau o Labor S a i
f
t t stics

18.

Appendix - Scope ar

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used) these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations t (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial,warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered Industry groupings a r e : manufac­
turing) transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities) wholesale trade) retail trade) finanoe,
insurance, and real estate) and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the Industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry offioe and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data b y industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Monproduetion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported aa for offioe olerioal, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid) average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest $0 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Bata are shown far only full-time
workers, i.e., thoee hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage praotioos refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offioes
(or plant departments) that observe the practice In
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table sumnarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vaoation and
sick-leave plans is limited to formal arrangaments. It excludes
informal pliuos whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

19

ESTABLISH EN A D W R E S IN M JO IN U
M TS N O K R
A R D STRY DIVISIONS A D IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN M PH TEN . l/ ,
N
EM IS,
N
A D N M E STU IED BY T E B R A O LA O STATISTICS, N V M E 1951
N U BR
D
H UEU F B R
OE BR

Item

Minimm number
u
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Num of
ber
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ................................................................
Manufacturing....... ....................... .........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................................... .........
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
u t i l i t i e s ........... ................................ .............
Wholesale trade . . ................................................
Retail trade ........................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ................
Services 2/ ..........................................................

21
21
21

873
2a
632

191
53
138

88,700
39,500
A.9,200

48,110
22,070
26,040

7,270
1,870
5,400

21
21
21
21
21

63
192
227
65
85

22
32
40
20
24

8,000
11,600
18,400
4,100
7,100

5,900
3,320
9,810
2,540
4,470

890
840
1,650
1,620
400

21
21

5
26

5
13

1,880
1,287

1,880
680

263

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis U
Railroads .......................................................................
Insurance carriers .......................................................

_

1/ Memphis Metropolitan Area (Shelby County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
y
Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.




20,

Index
Page
num
ber

Page
num
ber
Bench hand (bakeries) ............... ............................. ............
II
Biller* machine . . . . .................. ...........................• •.••••••••
3
11
Bookbinder (printing) ............... ••••.........................•••••••
Bookkeeper* hand.............................................. . . . . . . .........
3* A
Bookkeeping-machine operator ..••••••••••••.......... •••••••••
3* A
Bricklayer (building construction) ...................... .......... .
11
Calculating-machine operator............••••......... ..................
A
Carpenter (building construction)................... .
11
Carpenter* maintenance .......... .........................................
7
............••••••••.
10
Carpenter* maintenance (railroads)
Cleaner......................... .................... ................... <••••••••
8
Cleaner (railroads) ....................................
10
Clerk* accounting......................................
3* A
Clerk* accounting (insurance carriers) ......................
10
Clerk* file ............................................................................
A
••••••••••
10
Clerk* file (insurance carriers) ..............
Clerk* general.................. ••••••••............................
3* 3
Clerk* order............................ ...................... ............ .........
3* $
Clerk* payroll....... ........................ •••••••••••......... .........
3* 3
Compositor* hand (printing) ..............................................
11
Crane operator* electric bridge..................
•••••••
8
••••••••••
6
Draftsman ....................................
Duplicating-machine operator ••••••••....... ............... ..........
3
11
Electrician (building construction) ••••••..........................
Electrician* maintenance .............
7
Electrician* maintenance (railroads)
10
•••••••••
7
Engineer* stationary ..............
Fireman* stationary boiler .................................. •••••••••••
7
Guard .........
8
Helper (bakeries).......•••••........................... ••••••••••••••
11
Helper* motortruck driver ••••••••.................. ••••••••........
11
Helper* trades* maintenance •••••••............. ••••........... ••••
7
Helper* trades* maintenance (railroads) «.••••....................
10
Janitor ••••............... ••••••••............................... ............ .
8
Janitor (railroads) •••••.............
••••••••.
10
Key-punch operator
..................................•••••........
3
Laborer (building construction)........ •••••••••••••........... .
11
Machine operator (printing) ..• • • ........................................
11
Machine tender (printing)
.......••••••••••........... .
11
Machinist* maintenance ....................................••••.••........«
7
Machinist* maintenance (railroads) ..............
10
Mailer (printing) ...................
H
Maintenance m general u tility
an*
7
Mechanic* automotive (maintenance) ................................................ 7




Mechanic* maintenance ....................... ..................................
Millwright.......... .....................................•••••.....................
Mixer (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••••••••«••..••..........

Molder (bakeries) ......................... ••••.................................
Motortruck driver ............................................................... .
Nurse* industrial (registered) .....................
Office boy..................................
Office g i r l ............................................................................
O iler.......... ..................................
Operator (local transit) ...........................•••••••••••.........
Order fille r ••••••••••...........
O an (bakeries) ••••••....... •••••••........•••••••••........... .
venm
Packer ••••••••••••••........ ...•• •• ••......... •••••.........
Painter (building construction).•••••••••••••••••••..........
Painter* maintenance.......•••••................... ....................
Photoengraver (printing) .......... ............ .......... ............. .
Pipe fitter* maintenance (railroads) ••••••••••••..•••«••••
Plasterer (building construction).........•••••••••........... .
Plumber (building construction) •••••.......••••••..................
Porter •••••.........•••••••••••...... ................. ••••.................
Prem acceptor (insurance carriers) ..•••••••••••••........
ium
Press assistant (printing) .......................................
Press feeder (printing) .................... •••••••.................••••
Pressman (printing)
............... •••••••..............................
Receiving clerk ••«•••••..................
Secretary ••••.......... .................. ............ ••••••........... .........
Section head (insurance carriers) .......... .......... ............ .
Sheet-metal worker* maintenance....... ............................. ••••
Shipping c le r k .............••••••••••.........................................
Shipping-and-receiving clerk .......................................
Stenographer ..........................
Stenographer (insurance carriers) •••••..............................
Stereotyper (printing) .................... ................... ...............
Stock handler...........
Switchboard operator .................•••••••••••••.......................
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••••••............................
Tabulating-machine operator............................ .......... ••••••
Transcrib ing-machine operator.....................
Truck d river.................•••••••......... .........•••••••......... .
Trucker* hand.............................••.••••••.........
•••••••••••••••••.
Trucker* power ................................
Typist.............
Underwriter (insurance carriers) .............
•••••••••
Watchman...........................

7
7
H

11
U
6
3
5
7
11
8
11
8
11
7
11
10
11
11
8
10
11
11
11
8
3
10
7
8
9
3
10
11
9
3
6
3* 6
6
9
9
9
6
10
9

U S GOVERNMENT P I TING OFF C :
..
RN
I E O— 1952




This report was prepared in the Bureau’s Southern Regional Office.
Communications may be addressed to;
Brunswick A. Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 6 6 k
50 Seventh Street, N. E.
Atlanta 5 , Georgia
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The Southern Region includes the following States:
Alabama
North Carolina
Arkansas
Oklahoma
Florida
South Carolina
Georgia
Tennessee
Texas
Louisiana
Maryland
Virginia
Mississippi
West Virginia
District of Columbia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102